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Sample records for cancer cell death

  1. Glutathione in Cancer Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Angel L.; Mena, Salvador; Estrela, Jose M.

    2011-01-01

    Glutathione (L-γ-glutamyl-L-cysteinyl-glycine; GSH) in cancer cells is particularly relevant in the regulation of carcinogenic mechanisms; sensitivity against cytotoxic drugs, ionizing radiations, and some cytokines; DNA synthesis; and cell proliferation and death. The intracellular thiol redox state (controlled by GSH) is one of the endogenous effectors involved in regulating the mitochondrial permeability transition pore complex and, in consequence, thiol oxidation can be a causal factor in the mitochondrion-based mechanism that leads to cell death. Nevertheless GSH depletion is a common feature not only of apoptosis but also of other types of cell death. Indeed rates of GSH synthesis and fluxes regulate its levels in cellular compartments, and potentially influence switches among different mechanisms of death. How changes in gene expression, post-translational modifications of proteins, and signaling cascades are implicated will be discussed. Furthermore, this review will finally analyze whether GSH depletion may facilitate cancer cell death under in vivo conditions, and how this can be applied to cancer therapy. PMID:24212662

  2. How cell death shapes cancer

    PubMed Central

    Labi, V; Erlacher, M

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis has been established as a mechanism of anti-cancer defense. Members of the BCL-2 family are critical mediators of apoptotic cell death in health and disease, often found to be deregulated in cancer and believed to lead to the survival of malignant clones. However, over the years, a number of studies pointed out that a model in which cell death resistance unambiguously acts as a barrier against malignant disease might be too simple. This is based on paradoxical observations made in tumor patients as well as mouse models indicating that apoptosis can indeed drive tumor formation, at least under certain circumstances. One possible explanation for this phenomenon is that apoptosis can promote proliferation critically needed to compensate for cell loss, for example, upon therapy, and to restore tissue homeostasis. However, this, at the same time, can promote tumor development by allowing expansion of selected clones. Usually, tissue resident stem/progenitor cells are a major source for repopulation, some of them potentially carrying (age-, injury- or therapy-induced) genetic aberrations deleterious for the host. Thereby, apoptosis might drive genomic instability by facilitating the emergence of pathologic clones during phases of proliferation and subsequent replication stress-associated DNA damage. Tumorigenesis initiated by repeated cell attrition and repopulation, as confirmed in different genetic models, has parallels in human cancers, exemplified in therapy-induced secondary malignancies and myelodysplastic syndromes in patients with congenital bone marrow failure syndromes. Here, we aim to review evidence in support of the oncogenic role of stress-induced apoptosis. PMID:25741600

  3. Cell Death and Deubiquitinases: Perspectives in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Seemana

    2014-01-01

    The process of cell death has important physiological implications. At the organism level it is mostly involved in maintenance of tissue homeostasis. At the cellular level, the strategies of cell death may be categorized as either suicide or sabotage. The mere fact that many of these processes are programmed and that these are often deregulated in pathological conditions is seed to thought. The various players that are involved in these pathways are highly regulated. One of the modes of regulation is via post-translational modifications such as ubiquitination and deubiquitination. In this review, we have first dealt with the different modes and pathways involved in cell death and then we have focused on the regulation of several proteins in these signaling cascades by the different deubiquitinating enzymes, in the perspective of cancer. The study of deubiquitinases is currently in a rather nascent stage with limited knowledge both in vitro and in vivo, but the emerging roles of the deubiquitinases in various processes and their specificity have implicated them as potential targets from the therapeutic point of view. This review throws light on another aspect of cancer therapeutics by targeting the deubiquitinating enzymes. PMID:25121098

  4. Nonthermal Plasma-Mediated Cancer Cell Death; Targeted Cancer Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Byul-Bora; Choi, Yeon-Sik; Lee, Hae-Jun; Lee, Jae-Koo; Kim, Uk-Kyu; Kim, Gyoo-Cheon

    Non-thermal air plasma can kill cancer cells. However, there is no selectivity between normal and cancer cells. Therefore, cancer specific antibody conjugated gold nanoparticle (GNP) was pretreated before plasma irradiation. Stimulation of antibody conjugated GNP by plasma treatment resulted in a significant decrease in viability of cancer cells. This technology shows the feasibility of using plasma therapy for killing cancer cells selectively.

  5. Danger signalling during cancer cell death: origins, plasticity and regulation

    PubMed Central

    Garg, A D; Martin, S; Golab, J; Agostinis, P

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating data indicates that following anti-cancer treatments, cancer cell death can be perceived as immunogenic or tolerogenic by the immune system. The former is made possible due to the ability of certain anti-cancer modalities to induce immunogenic cell death (ICD) that is associated with the emission of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), which assist in unlocking a sequence of events leading to the development of anti-tumour immunity. In response to ICD inducers, activation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been identified to be indispensable to confer the immunogenic character of cancer cell death, due to its ability to coordinate the danger signalling pathways responsible for the trafficking of vital DAMPs and subsequent anti-cancer immune responses. However, in recent times, certain processes apart from ER stress have emerged (e.g., autophagy and possibly viral response-like signature), which have the ability to influence danger signalling. In this review, we discuss the molecular nature, emerging plasticity in the danger signalling mechanisms and immunological impact of known DAMPs in the context of immunogenic cancer cell death. We also discuss key effector mechanisms modulating the interface between dying cancer cells and the immune cells, which we believe are crucial for the therapeutic relevance of ICD in the context of human cancers, and also discuss the influence of experimental conditions and animal models on these. PMID:23686135

  6. How does metabolism affect cell death in cancer?

    PubMed

    Villa, Elodie; Ricci, Jean-Ehrland

    2016-07-01

    In cancer research, identifying a specificity of tumor cells compared with 'normal' proliferating cells for targeted therapy is often considered the Holy Grail for researchers and clinicians. Although diverse in origin, most cancer cells share characteristics including the ability to escape cell death mechanisms and the utilization of different methods of energy production. In the current paradigm, aerobic glycolysis is considered the central metabolic characteristic of cancer cells (Warburg effect). However, recent data indicate that cancer cells also show significant changes in other metabolic pathways. Indeed, it was recently suggested that Kreb's cycle, pentose phosphate pathway intermediates, and essential and nonessential amino acids have key roles. Renewed interest in the fact that cancer cells have to reprogram their metabolism in order to proliferate or resist treatment must take into consideration the ability of tumor cells to adapt their metabolism to the local microenvironment (low oxygen, low nutrients). This variety of metabolic sources might be either a strength, resulting in infinite possibilities for adaptation and increased ability to resist chemotherapy-induced death, or a weakness that could be targeted to kill cancer cells. Here, we discuss recent insights showing how energetic metabolism may regulate cell death and how this might be relevant for cancer treatment.

  7. Nitric oxide and cell death in liver cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Muntané, Jordi; De la Rosa, Angel J; Marín, Luís M; Padillo, Francisco J

    2013-05-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a lipophillic, highly diffusible, and short-lived physiological messenger which regulates a variety of physiopathological responses. NO may exert its cellular action through cGMP-dependent and cGMP-independent pathways which includes different postranslational modifications. The effect of NO in cancer depends on the activity and localization of NOS isoforms, concentration and duration of NO exposure, cellular sensitivity, and hypoxia/re-oxygenation process. NO regulates critical factors such as the hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) and p53 generally leading to growth arrest, apoptosis or adaptation. NO sensitizes hepatoma cells to chemotherapeutic compounds probably through increased p53 and cell death receptor expressions.

  8. Targeting Cell Survival Proteins for Cancer Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Manoj K.; Prasad, Sahdeo; Tyagi, Amit Kumar; Deb, Lokesh; Huang, Jiamin; Karelia, Deepkamal N.; Amin, Shantu G.; Aggarwal, Bharat B.

    2016-01-01

    Escaping from cell death is one of the adaptations that enable cancer cells to stave off anticancer therapies. The key players in avoiding apoptosis are collectively known as survival proteins. Survival proteins comprise the Bcl-2, inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP), and heat shock protein (HSP) families. The aberrant expression of these proteins is associated with a range of biological activities that promote cancer cell survival, proliferation, and resistance to therapy. Several therapeutic strategies that target survival proteins are based on mimicking BH3 domains or the IAP-binding motif or competing with ATP for the Hsp90 ATP-binding pocket. Alternative strategies, including use of nutraceuticals, transcriptional repression, and antisense oligonucleotides, provide options to target survival proteins. This review focuses on the role of survival proteins in chemoresistance and current therapeutic strategies in preclinical or clinical trials that target survival protein signaling pathways. Recent approaches to target survival proteins-including nutraceuticals, small-molecule inhibitors, peptides, and Bcl-2-specific mimetic are explored. Therapeutic inventions targeting survival proteins are promising strategies to inhibit cancer cell survival and chemoresistance. However, complete eradication of resistance is a distant dream. For a successful clinical outcome, pretreatment with novel survival protein inhibitors alone or in combination with conventional therapies holds great promise. PMID:26927133

  9. Physical modalities inducing immunogenic tumor cell death for cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Adkins, Irena; Fucikova, Jitka; Garg, Abhishek D; Agostinis, Patrizia; Špíšek, Radek

    2015-01-01

    The concept of immunogenic cancer cell death (ICD), as originally observed during the treatment with several chemotherapeutics or ionizing irradiation, has revolutionized the view on the development of new anticancer therapies. ICD is defined by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, emission of danger-associated molecular patterns and induction of antitumor immunity. Here we describe known and emerging cancer cell death-inducing physical modalities, such as ionizing irradiation, ultraviolet C light, Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) with Hypericin, high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) and hyperthermia (HT), which have been shown to elicit effective antitumor immunity. We discuss the evidence of ICD induced by these modalities in cancer patients together with their applicability in immunotherapeutic protocols and anticancer vaccine development. PMID:25964865

  10. The essential role of evasion from cell death in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Gemma; Strasser, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    The link between evasion of apoptosis and the development of cellular hyperplasia and ultimately cancer is implicitly clear if one considers how many cells are produced each day and, hence, how many cells must die to make room for the new ones (reviewed in (Raff, 1996)). Furthermore, cells are frequently experiencing noxious stimuli that can cause lesions in their DNA and faults in DNA replication can occur during cellular proliferation. Such DNA damage needs to be repaired efficiently or cells with irreparable damage must be killed to prevent subsequent division of aberrant cells that may fuel tumorigenesis (reviewed in (Weinberg, 2007)). The detection of genetic lesions in human cancers that activate pro-survival genes or disable pro-apoptotic genes have provided the first evidence that defects in programmed cell death can cause cancer (Tagawa et al., 2005; Tsujimoto et al., 1984; Vaux et al., 1988) and this concept was proven by studies with genetically modified mice (Egle et al., 2004b; Strasser et al., 1990a). It is therefore now widely accepted that evasion of apoptosis is a requirement for both neoplastic transformation and sustained growth of cancer cells (reviewed in (Cory and Adams, 2002; Hanahan and Weinberg, 2000; Weinberg, 2007)). Importantly, apoptosis is also a major contributor to anti-cancer therapy induced killing of tumor cells (reviewed in (Cory and Adams, 2002; Cragg et al., 2009)). Consequently, a detailed understanding of apoptotic cell death will help to better comprehend the complexities of tumorigenesis and should assist with the development of improved targeted therapies for cancer based on the direct activation of the apoptotic machinery (reviewed in (Lessene et al., 2008)). PMID:21704830

  11. Identification of a mitotic death signature in cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Sakurikar, Nandini; Eichhorn, Joshua M; Alford, Sarah E; Chambers, Timothy C

    2014-02-28

    This study examined the molecular mechanism of action of anti-mitotic drugs. The hypothesis was tested that death in mitosis occurs through sustained mitotic arrest with robust Cdk1 signaling causing complete phosphorylation of Mcl-1 and Bcl-xL, and conversely, that mitotic slippage is associated with incomplete phosphorylation of Mcl-1/Bcl-xL. The results, obtained from studying six different cancer cell lines, strongly support the hypothesis and identify for the first time a unique molecular signature for mitotic death. The findings represent an important advance in understanding anti-mitotic drug action and provide insight into cancer cell susceptibility to such drugs which has important clinical implications. PMID:24099917

  12. Identification of a mitotic death signature in cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Sakurikar, Nandini; Eichhorn, Joshua M; Alford, Sarah E; Chambers, Timothy C

    2014-02-28

    This study examined the molecular mechanism of action of anti-mitotic drugs. The hypothesis was tested that death in mitosis occurs through sustained mitotic arrest with robust Cdk1 signaling causing complete phosphorylation of Mcl-1 and Bcl-xL, and conversely, that mitotic slippage is associated with incomplete phosphorylation of Mcl-1/Bcl-xL. The results, obtained from studying six different cancer cell lines, strongly support the hypothesis and identify for the first time a unique molecular signature for mitotic death. The findings represent an important advance in understanding anti-mitotic drug action and provide insight into cancer cell susceptibility to such drugs which has important clinical implications.

  13. Apoptotic Death of Cancer Stem Cells for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    He, Ying-Chun; Zhou, Fang-Liang; Shen, Yi; Liao, Duan-Fang; Cao, Deliang

    2014-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) play crucial roles in tumor progression, chemo- and radiotherapy resistance, and recurrence. Recent studies on CSCs have advanced understanding of molecular oncology and development of novel therapeutic strategies. This review article updates the hypothesis and paradigm of CSCs with a focus on major signaling pathways and effectors that regulate CSC apoptosis. Selective CSC apoptotic inducers are introduced and their therapeutic potentials are discussed. These include synthetic and natural compounds, antibodies and recombinant proteins, and oligonucleotides. PMID:24823879

  14. Functional inactivation of Rb sensitizes cancer cells to TSC2 inactivation induced cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Danos, Arpad M.; Liao, Yang; Li, Xuan; Du, Wei

    2012-01-01

    We showed previously that inactivation of TSC2 induces death in cancer cells lacking the Retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor under stress conditions, suggesting that inactivation of TSC2 can potentially be used as an approach to specifically kill cancers that have lost WT Rb. As Rb is often inactivated in cancers by overexpression of cyclin D1, loss of p16ink4a cdk inhibitor, or expression of viral oncoproteins, it will be interesting to determine if such functional inactivation of Rb would similarly sensitize cancer cells to TSC2 inactivation induced cell death. In addition, many cancers lack functional Pten, resulting in increased PI3K/Akt signaling that has been shown to modulate E2F-induced cell death. Therefore it will be interesting to test whether loss of Pten will affect TSC2 inactivation induced killing of Rb mutant cancer cells. Here, we show that overexpression of Cyclin D1 or the viral oncogene E1a sensitizes cancer cells to TSC2 knockdown induced cell death and growth inhibition. On the other hand, knockdown of p16ink4a sensitizes cancer cells to TSC2 knockdown induced cell death in a manner that is likely dependant on serum induction of Cyclin D1 to inactivate the Rb function. Additionally, we demonstrate that loss of Pten does not interfere with TSC2 knockdown induced cell death in Rb mutant cancer cells. Together, these results suggest that TSC2 is potentially a useful target for a large spectrum of cancer types with an inactivated Rb pathway. PMID:23022476

  15. Low zinc environment induces stress signaling, senescence and mixed cell death modalities in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Rudolf, Emil; Rudolf, Kamil

    2015-12-01

    Currently it is not clear what type of the final cellular response (i.e. cell death modality or senescence) is induced upon chronic intracellular zinc depletion in colon cancer cells. To address this question, isogenic colon cancer lines SW480 and SW620 exposed to low zinc environment were studied over the period of 6 weeks. Low zinc environment reduced total as well as free intracellular zinc content in both cell lines. Decreased intracellular zinc content resulted in changes in cellular proliferation, cell cycle distribution and activation of stress signaling. In addition, colonocytes with low zinc content displayed increased levels of oxidative stress, changes in mitochondrial activity but in the absence of significant DNA damage. Towards the end of treatment (4th-6th week), exposed cells started to change morphologically, and typical markers of senescence as well as cell death appeared. Of two examined colon cancer cell lines, SW480 cells proved to activate predominantly senescent phenotype, with frequent form of demise being necrosis and mixed cell death modality but not apoptosis. Conversely, SW620 cells activated mostly cell death, with relatively equal distribution of apoptosis and mixed types, while senescent phenotypes and necrosis were present only in a small fraction of cell populations. Addition of zinc at the beginning of 4th week of treatment significantly suppressed cell death phenotypes in both cell lines but had no significant effect on senescence. In conclusion, presented results demonstrate variability of responses to chronic zinc depletion in colon cancer as modeled in vitro.

  16. Human colon cancer HT-29 cell death responses to doxorubicin and Morus Alba leaves flavonoid extract.

    PubMed

    Fallah, S; Karimi, A; Panahi, G; Gerayesh Nejad, S; Fadaei, R; Seifi, M

    2016-01-01

    The mechanistic basis for the biological properties of Morus alba flavonoid extract (MFE) and chemotherapy drug of doxorubicin on human colon cancer HT-29 cell line death are unknown. The effect of doxorubicin and flavonoid extract on colon cancer HT-29 cell line death and identification of APC gene expression and PARP concentration of HT-29 cell line were investigated. The results showed that flavonoid extract and doxorubicin induce a dose dependent cell death in HT-29 cell line. MFE and doxorubicin exert a cytotoxic effect on human colon cancer HT-29 cell line by probably promoting or induction of apoptosis. PMID:27064876

  17. Ceramide metabolism regulates autophagy and apoptotic cell death induced by melatonin in liver cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ordoñez, Raquel; Fernández, Anna; Prieto-Domínguez, Néstor; Martínez, Laura; García-Ruiz, Carmen; Fernández-Checa, José C; Mauriz, José L; González-Gallego, Javier

    2015-09-01

    Autophagy is a process that maintains homeostasis during stress, although it also contributes to cell death under specific contexts. Ceramides have emerged as important effectors in the regulation of autophagy, mediating the crosstalk with apoptosis. Melatonin induces apoptosis of cancer cells; however, its role in autophagy and ceramide metabolism has yet to be clearly elucidated. This study was aimed to evaluate the effect of melatonin administration on autophagy and ceramide metabolism and its possible link with melatonin-induced apoptotic cell death in hepatocarcinoma (HCC) cells. Melatonin (2 mm) transiently induced autophagy in HepG2 cells through JNK phosphorylation, characterized by increased Beclin-1 expression, p62 degradation, and LC3II and LAMP-2 colocalization, which translated in decreased cell viability. Moreover, ATG5 silencing sensitized HepG2 cells to melatonin-induced apoptosis, suggesting a dual role of autophagy in cell death. Melatonin enhanced ceramide levels through both de novo synthesis and acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) stimulation. Serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) inhibition with myriocin prevented melatonin-induced autophagy and ASMase inhibition with imipramine-impaired autophagy flux. However, ASMase inhibition partially protected HepG2 cells against melatonin, while SPT inhibition significantly enhanced cell death. Findings suggest a crosstalk between SPT-mediated ceramide generation and autophagy in protecting against melatonin, while specific ASMase-induced ceramide production participates in melatonin-mediated cell death. Thus, dual blocking of SPT and autophagy emerges as a potential strategy to potentiate the apoptotic effects of melatonin in liver cancer cells.

  18. Activation of ERK signaling and induction of colon cancer cell death by piperlongumine.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, H; Kibble, K; Zeng, H; Moyer, M P; Reindl, K M

    2013-09-01

    Piperlongumine (PPLGM) is a bioactive compound isolated from long peppers that shows selective toxicity towards a variety of cancer cell types including colon cancer. The signaling pathways that lead to cancer cell death in response to PPLGM exposure have not been previously identified. Our objective was to identify the intracellular signaling mechanisms by which PPLGM leads to enhanced colon cancer cell death. We found that PPLGM inhibited the growth of colon cancer cells in time- and concentration-dependent manners, but was not toxic toward normal colon mucosal cells at concentrations below 10 μM. Acute (0-60 min) and prolonged (24h) exposure of HT-29 cells to PPLGM resulted in phosphorylation of ERK. To investigate whether ERK signaling was involved in PPLGM-mediated cell death, we treated HT-29 cells with the MEK inhibitor U0126, prior to treating with PPLGM. We found that U0126 attenuated PPLGM-induced activation of ERK and partially protected against PPLGM-induced cell death. These results suggest that PPLGM works, at least in part, through the MEK/ERK pathway to result in colon cancer cell death. A more thorough understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which PPLGM induces colon cancer cell death will be useful in developing therapeutic strategies to treat colon cancer.

  19. Drug insight: cancer therapy strategies based on restoration of endogenous cell death mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Reed, John C

    2006-07-01

    Cell death is a normal facet of human physiology, ensuring tissue homeostasis by offsetting cell production with cell demise. Neoplasms arise in part because of defects in physiological cell death mechanisms, contributing to pathological cell expansion. Defects in normal cell death pathways also contribute to cancer progression by permitting progressively aberrant cell behaviors, while also desensitizing tumor cells to immune-mediated attack, radiation, and chemotherapy. Through basic research, much has been learned about the molecular mechanisms responsible for cell turnover and how tumors escape cell death. By exploiting this knowledge base, several innovative strategies for eradicating malignancies have materialized that are based on restoration of natural pathways for cell autodestruction. Some of these strategies have advanced into human clinical trials. Several of the current strategies based on targeting core components of the cell death machinery for cancer therapy are reviewed here, and a summary of progress toward clinical applications is provided. PMID:16826219

  20. Blocking CD147 induces cell death in cancer cells through impairment of glycolytic energy metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Baba, Miyako Inoue, Masahiro; Itoh, Kazuyuki; Nishizawa, Yasuko

    2008-09-12

    CD147 is a multifunctional transmembrane protein and promotes cancer progression. We found that the anti-human CD147 mouse monoclonal antibody MEM-M6/1 strongly induces necrosis-like cell death in LoVo, HT-29, WiDr, and SW620 colon cancer cells and A2058 melanoma cells, but not in WI-38 and TIG-113 normal fibroblasts. Silencing or overexpression of CD147 in LoVo cells enhanced or decreased the MEM-M6/1 induced cell death, respectively. CD147 is known to form complex with proton-linked monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs), which is critical for lactate transport and intracellular pH (pHi) homeostasis. In LoVo cells, CD147 and MCT-1 co-localized on the cell surface, and MEM-M6/1 inhibited the association of these molecules. MEM-M6/1 inhibited lactate uptake, lactate release, and reduced pHi. Further, the induction of acidification was parallel to the decrease of the glycolytic flux and intracellular ATP levels. These effects were not found in the normal fibroblasts. As cancer cells depend on glycolysis for their energy production, CD147 inhibition might induce cell death specific to cancer cells.

  1. Inhibition of thromboxane synthase induces lung cancer cell death via increasing the nuclear p27

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Kin Chung; Hsin, Michael K.Y.; Chan, Joey S.Y.; Yip, Johnson H.Y.; Li, Mingyue; Leung, Billy C.S.; Mok, Tony S.K.; Warner, Timothy D.; Underwood, Malcolm J.; Chen, George G.

    2009-10-15

    The role of thromboxane in lung carcinogenesis is not clearly known, though thromboxane B2 (TXB{sub 2}) level is increased and antagonists of thromboxane receptors or TXA2 can induce apoptosis of lung cancer cells. p27, an atypical tumor suppressor, is normally sequestered in the nucleus. The increased nuclear p27 may result in apoptosis of tumor cells. We hypothesize that the inhibition of thromboxane synthase (TXS) induces the death of lung cancer cells and that such inhibition is associated with the nuclear p27 level. Our experiment showed that the inhibition of TXS significantly induced the death or apoptosis in lung cancer cells. The activity of TXS was increased in lung cancer. The nuclear p27 was remarkably reduced in lung cancer tissues. The inhibition of TXS caused the cell death and apoptosis of lung cancer cells, likely via the elevation of the nuclear p27 since the TXS inhibition promoted the nuclear p27 level and the inhibition of p27 by its siRNA recovered the cell death induced by TXS inhibition. Collectively, lung cancer cells produce high levels of TXB{sub 2} but their nuclear p27 is markedly reduced. The inhibition of TXS results in the p27-related induction of cell death in lung cancer cells.

  2. Chinese medicines induce cell death: the molecular and cellular mechanisms for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuanbin; Feng, Yibin; Wang, Ning; Cheung, Fan; Tan, Hor Yue; Zhong, Sen; Li, Charlie; Kobayashi, Seiichi

    2014-01-01

    Chinese medicines have long history in treating cancer. With the growing scientific evidence of biomedical researches and clinical trials in cancer therapy, they are increasingly accepted as a complementary and alternative treatment. One of the mechanisms is to induce cancer cell death. Aim. To comprehensively review the publications concerning cancer cell death induced by Chinese medicines in recent years and provide insights on anticancer drug discovery from Chinese medicines. Materials and Methods. Chinese medicines (including Chinese medicinal herbs, animal parts, and minerals) were used in the study. The key words including "cancer", "cell death", "apoptosis", "autophagy," "necrosis," and "Chinese medicine" were used in retrieval of related information from PubMed and other databases. Results. The cell death induced by Chinese medicines is described as apoptotic, autophagic, or necrotic cell death and other types with an emphasis on their mechanisms of anticancer action. The relationship among different types of cell death induced by Chinese medicines is critically reviewed and discussed. Conclusions. This review summarizes that CMs treatment could induce multiple pathways leading to cancer cell death, in which apoptosis is the dominant type. To apply these preclinical researches to clinic application will be a key issue in the future.

  3. Mcl-1 protects prostate cancer cells from cell death mediated by chemotherapy-induced DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Reiner, Teresita; de las Pozas, Alicia; Parrondo, Ricardo; Palenzuela, Deanna; Cayuso, William; Rai, Priyamvada; Perez-Stable, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1 is highly expressed in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), resulting in resistance to apoptosis and association with poor prognosis. Although predominantly localized in the cytoplasm, there is evidence that Mcl-1 exhibits nuclear localization where it is thought to protect against DNA damage-induced cell death. The role of Mcl-1 in mediating resistance to chemotherapy-induced DNA damage in prostate cancer (PCa) is not known. We show in human PCa cell lines and in TRAMP, a transgenic mouse model of PCa, that the combination of the antimitotic agent ENMD-1198 (analog of 2-methoxyestradiol) with betulinic acid (BA, increases proteotoxic stress) targets Mcl-1 by increasing its proteasomal degradation, resulting in increased γH2AX (DNA damage) and apoptotic/necrotic cell death. Knockdown of Mcl-1 in CRPC cells leads to elevated γH2AX, DNA strand breaks, and cell death after treatment with 1198 + BA- or doxorubicin. Additional knockdowns in PC3 cells suggests that cytoplasmic Mcl-1 protects against DNA damage by blocking the mitochondrial release of apoptosis-inducing factor and thereby preventing its nuclear translocation and subsequent interaction with the cyclophilin A endonuclease. Overall, our results suggest that chemotherapeutic agents that target Mcl-1 will promote cell death in response to DNA damage, particularly in CRPC. PMID:26425662

  4. Ceramide metabolism regulates autophagy and apoptotic-cell death induced by melatonin in liver cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Ordoñez, Raquel; Fernández, Ana; Prieto-Domínguez, Néstor; Martínez, Laura; García-Ruiz, Carmen; Fernández-Checa, José C.; Mauriz, José L.; González-Gallego, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a process that maintains homeostasis during stress, although it also contributes to cell death under specific contexts. Ceramides have emerged as important effectors in the regulation of autophagy, mediating the crosstalk with apoptosis. Melatonin induces apoptosis of cancer cells; however, its role in autophagy and ceramide metabolism has yet to be clearly elucidated. This study was aimed to evaluate the effect of melatonin administration on autophagy and ceramide metabolism and its possible link with melatonin-induced apoptotic cell death in hepatocarcinoma (HCC) cells. Melatonin (2 mM) transiently induced autophagy in HepG2 cells through JNK phosphorylation, characterized by increased Beclin1 expression, p62 degradation and LC3II and LAMP2 colocalization, which translated in decreased cell viability. Moreover, ATG5-silencing sensitized HepG2 cells to melatonin induced-apoptosis, suggesting a dual role of autophagy in cell death. Melatonin enhanced ceramide levels through both de novo synthesis and acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) stimulation. Serine palmitoyl transferase (SPT) inhibition with myriocin prevented melatonin induced autophagy and ASMase inhibition with imipramine impaired autophagy flux. However, ASMase inhibition partially protected HepG2 cells against melatonin while SPT inhibition significantly enhanced cell death. Findings suggest a cross-talk between SPT-mediated ceramide generation and autophagy in protecting against melatonin, while specific ASMase-induced ceramide production participates in melatonin-mediated cell death. Thus, dual blocking of SPT and autophagy emerge as a potential strategy to potentiate the apoptotic effects of melatonin in liver cancer cells. PMID:25975536

  5. Targeting cell death signalling in cancer: minimising 'Collateral damage'.

    PubMed

    Fox, Joanna L; MacFarlane, Marion

    2016-06-28

    Targeting apoptosis for the treatment of cancer has become an increasingly attractive strategy, with agents in development to trigger extrinsic apoptosis via TRAIL signalling, or to prevent the anti-apoptotic activity of BCL-2 proteins or inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins. Although the evasion of apoptosis is one of the hallmarks of cancer, many cancers have intact apoptotic signalling pathways, which if unblocked could efficiently kill cancerous cells. However, it is becoming increasing clear that without a detailed understanding of both apoptotic and non-apoptotic signalling, and the key proteins that regulate these pathways, there can be dose-limiting toxicity and adverse effects associated with their modulation. Here we review the main apoptotic pathways directly targeted for anti-cancer therapy and the unforeseen consequences of their modulation. Furthermore, we highlight the importance of an in-depth mechanistic understanding of both the apoptotic and non-apoptotic functions of those proteins under investigation as anti-cancer drug targets and outline some novel approaches to sensitise cancer cells to apoptosis, thereby improving the efficacy of existing therapies when used in combination with novel targeted agents.

  6. Effect of blue light radiation on curcumin-induced cell death of breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, X. B.; Leung, A. W. N.; Xia, X. S.; Yu, H. P.; Bai, D. Q.; Xiang, J. Y.; Jiang, Y.; Xu, C. S.

    2010-06-01

    In the present study, we have successfully set up a novel blue light source with the power density of 9 mW/cm2 and the wavelength of 435.8 nm and then the novel light source was used to investigate the effect of light radiation on curcumin-induced cell death. The cytotoxicity was investigated 24 h after the treatment of curcumin and blue light radiation together using MTT reduction assay. Nuclear chromatin was observed using a fluorescent microscopy with Hoechst33258 staining. The results showed blue light radiation could significantly enhance the cytotoxicity of curcumin on the MCF-7 cells and apoptosis induction. These findings demonstrated that blue light radiation could enhance curcumin-induced cell death of breast cancer cells, suggesting light radiation may be an efficient enhancer of curcumin in the management of breast cancer.

  7. Calprotectin induces cell death in human prostate cancer cell (LNCaP) through survivin protein alteration.

    PubMed

    Sattari, Mina; Pazhang, Yaghub; Imani, Mehdi

    2014-11-01

    Calprotectin (CP), an abundant heterodimeric cytosolic protein of neutrophils, conveys a variety of functions such as tumor cell growth arrest and antimicrobial activity. We investigated CP activity and its possible apoptosis-inducing mechanism of action against an antiandrogen therapy-resistance prostate cancer cell line LNCaP. Cell viability and Annexin V FITC assays were performed in order to investigate its cell death activity and apoptosis, respectively. In order to address cell death inducing mechanism(s), immunocytochemistry and immunobloting analysis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) measurements were performed. The effective concentration of CP against LNCaP promoting LNCaP cell death was 200 µg/mL. ROS and NO levels of cells remarkably were enhanced following treatment with 50 and 100 µg/mL of CP, respectively. Protein expression of anti-apoptotic protein survivin was significantly decreased after administration of tumor cells with CP. Our data indicate that CP regulates the LNCaP cells viability via survivin-mediated pathway and ROS and NO enhancement. Thus, inhibition of survivin expression, enhancement of ROS and NO level by CP or other similar pharmaceutical agents might be effective in lowering the malignant proliferation of human prostate cancer cells. PMID:24942387

  8. Calprotectin induces cell death in human prostate cancer cell (LNCaP) through survivin protein alteration.

    PubMed

    Sattari, Mina; Pazhang, Yaghub; Imani, Mehdi

    2014-11-01

    Calprotectin (CP), an abundant heterodimeric cytosolic protein of neutrophils, conveys a variety of functions such as tumor cell growth arrest and antimicrobial activity. We investigated CP activity and its possible apoptosis-inducing mechanism of action against an antiandrogen therapy-resistance prostate cancer cell line LNCaP. Cell viability and Annexin V FITC assays were performed in order to investigate its cell death activity and apoptosis, respectively. In order to address cell death inducing mechanism(s), immunocytochemistry and immunobloting analysis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) measurements were performed. The effective concentration of CP against LNCaP promoting LNCaP cell death was 200 µg/mL. ROS and NO levels of cells remarkably were enhanced following treatment with 50 and 100 µg/mL of CP, respectively. Protein expression of anti-apoptotic protein survivin was significantly decreased after administration of tumor cells with CP. Our data indicate that CP regulates the LNCaP cells viability via survivin-mediated pathway and ROS and NO enhancement. Thus, inhibition of survivin expression, enhancement of ROS and NO level by CP or other similar pharmaceutical agents might be effective in lowering the malignant proliferation of human prostate cancer cells.

  9. Differential immunomodulatory activity of tumor cell death induced by cancer therapeutic toll-like receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Klein, Johanna C; Wild, Clarissa A; Lang, Stephan; Brandau, Sven

    2016-06-01

    Synthetic toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands stimulate defined immune cell subsets and are currently tested as novel immunotherapeutic agents against cancer with, however, varying clinical efficacy. Recent data showed the expression of TLR receptors also on tumor cells. In this study we investigated immunological events associated with the induction of tumor cell death by poly(I:C) and imiquimod. A human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cell line was exposed to poly(I:C) and imiquimod, which were delivered exogenously via culture medium or via electroporation. Cell death and cell biological consequences thereof were analyzed. For in vivo analyses, a human xenograft and a syngeneic immunocompetent mouse model were used. Poly(I:C) induced cell death only if delivered by electroporation into the cytosol. Cell death induced by poly(I:C) resulted in cytokine release and activation of monocytes in vitro. Monocytes activated by the supernatant of cancer cells previously exposed to poly(I:C) recruited significantly more Th1 cells than monocytes exposed to control supernatants. If delivered exogenously, imiquimod also induced tumor cell death and some release of interleukin-6, but cell death was not associated with release of Th1 cytokines, interferons, monocyte activation and Th1 recruitment. Interestingly, intratumoral injection of poly(I:C) triggered tumor cell death in tumor-bearing mice and reduced tumor growth independent of TLR signaling on host cells. Imiquimod did not affect tumor size. Our data suggest that common cancer therapeutic RNA compounds can induce functionally diverse types of cell death in tumor cells with implications for the use of TLR ligands in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27034235

  10. (-)-Oleocanthal rapidly and selectively induces cancer cell death via lysosomal membrane permeabilization

    PubMed Central

    LeGendre, Onica; Breslin, Paul AS; Foster, David A

    2015-01-01

    (-)-Oleocanthal (OC), a phenolic compound present in extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO), has been implicated in the health benefits associated with diets rich in EVOO. We investigated the effect of OC on human cancer cell lines in culture and found that OC induced cell death in all cancer cells examined as rapidly as 30 minutes after treatment in the absence of serum. OC treatment of non-transformed cells suppressed their proliferation but did not cause cell death. OC induced both primary necrotic and apoptotic cell death via induction of lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP). We provide evidence that OC promotes LMP by inhibiting acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) activity, which destabilizes the interaction between proteins required for lysosomal membrane stability. The data presented here indicate that cancer cells, which tend to have fragile lysosomal membranes compared to non-cancerous cells, are susceptible to cell death induced by lysosomotropic agents. Therefore, targeting lysosomal membrane stability represents a novel approach for the induction of cancer-specific cell death. PMID:26380379

  11. Chinese Medicines Induce Cell Death: The Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuanbin; Tan, Hor Yue; Zhong, Sen

    2014-01-01

    Chinese medicines have long history in treating cancer. With the growing scientific evidence of biomedical researches and clinical trials in cancer therapy, they are increasingly accepted as a complementary and alternative treatment. One of the mechanisms is to induce cancer cell death. Aim. To comprehensively review the publications concerning cancer cell death induced by Chinese medicines in recent years and provide insights on anticancer drug discovery from Chinese medicines. Materials and Methods. Chinese medicines (including Chinese medicinal herbs, animal parts, and minerals) were used in the study. The key words including “cancer”, “cell death”, “apoptosis”, “autophagy,” “necrosis,” and “Chinese medicine” were used in retrieval of related information from PubMed and other databases. Results. The cell death induced by Chinese medicines is described as apoptotic, autophagic, or necrotic cell death and other types with an emphasis on their mechanisms of anticancer action. The relationship among different types of cell death induced by Chinese medicines is critically reviewed and discussed. Conclusions. This review summarizes that CMs treatment could induce multiple pathways leading to cancer cell death, in which apoptosis is the dominant type. To apply these preclinical researches to clinic application will be a key issue in the future. PMID:25379508

  12. Elevated Expression of Programmed Death-1 and Programmed Death Ligand-1 Negatively Regulates Immune Response against Cervical Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhifang; Pang, Nannan; Du, Rong; Zhu, Yuejie; Fan, Lingling; Cai, Donghui

    2016-01-01

    The present study is to measure the expression of programmed death-1 (PD-1) and programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1), as well as its clinical significance in cervical cancer patients. Our results showed that different T cell subsets in patients with cervical cancer had high expression of PD-1, and DCs had high expression of PD-L1. High expression of PD-1 on Treg cells in cervical cancer patients facilitated the production of TGF-β and IL-10 but inhibited the production of IFN-γ. Cervical cancer elevated the expression of PD-1 and PD-L1 in mRNA level. PD-1 expression in peripheral blood of cervical cancer patients was related with tumor differentiation, lymph node metastasis, and invasiveness. PD-1/PD-L1 pathway inhibited lymphocyte proliferation but enhanced the secretion of IL-10 and TGF-β in vitro. In summary, our findings demonstrate that elevated levels of PD-1/PD-L1, TGF-β, and IL-10 in peripheral blood of cervical cancer patients may negatively regulate immune response against cervical cancer cells and contribute to the progression of cervical cancer. Therefore, PD-1/PD-L1 pathway may become an immunotherapy target in the future. PMID:27721577

  13. Apoptotic and autophagic cell death induced by glucolaxogenin in cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sánchez, L; Escobar, M L; Sandoval-Ramírez, J; López-Muñoz, H; Fernández-Herrera, M A; Hernández-Vázquez, J M V; Hilario-Martínez, C; Zenteno, E

    2015-12-01

    The antiproliferative and cytotoxic activity of glucolaxogenin and its ability to induce apoptosis and autophagy in cervical cancer cells are reported. We ascertained that glucolaxogenin exerts an inhibitory effect on the proliferation of HeLa, CaSki and ViBo cells in a dose-dependent manner. Analysis of DNA distribution in the cell-cycle phase of tumor cells treated with glucolaxogenin suggests that the anti-proliferative activity of this steroid is not always dependent on the cell cycle. Cytotoxic activity was evaluated by detection of the lactate dehydrogenase enzyme in supernatants from tumor cell cultures treated with the steroid. Glucolaxogenin exhibited null cytotoxic activity. With respect to the apoptotic activity, the generation of apoptotic bodies, the presence of active caspase-3 and annexin-V, as well as the DNA fragmentation observed in all tumor lines after treatment with glucolaxogenin suggests that this compound does indeed induce cell death by apoptosis. Also, a significantly increased presence of the LC3-II, LC3 and Lamp-1 proteins was evidenced with the ultrastructural existence of autophagic vacuoles in cells treated with this steroidal glycoside, indicating that glucolaxogenin also induces autophagic cell death. It is important to note that this compound showed no cytotoxic effect and did not affect the proliferative capacity of mononuclear cells obtained from normal human peripheral blood activated by phytohaemagglutinin. Thus, glucolaxogenin is a compound with anti-proliferative properties that induces programmed cell death in cancer cell lines, though it is selective with respect to normal lymphocytic cells. These findings indicate that this glycoside could have a selective action on tumor cells and, therefore, be worthy of consideration as a therapeutic candidate with anti-tumor potential.

  14. Apoptotic and autophagic cell death induced by glucolaxogenin in cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sánchez, L; Escobar, M L; Sandoval-Ramírez, J; López-Muñoz, H; Fernández-Herrera, M A; Hernández-Vázquez, J M V; Hilario-Martínez, C; Zenteno, E

    2015-12-01

    The antiproliferative and cytotoxic activity of glucolaxogenin and its ability to induce apoptosis and autophagy in cervical cancer cells are reported. We ascertained that glucolaxogenin exerts an inhibitory effect on the proliferation of HeLa, CaSki and ViBo cells in a dose-dependent manner. Analysis of DNA distribution in the cell-cycle phase of tumor cells treated with glucolaxogenin suggests that the anti-proliferative activity of this steroid is not always dependent on the cell cycle. Cytotoxic activity was evaluated by detection of the lactate dehydrogenase enzyme in supernatants from tumor cell cultures treated with the steroid. Glucolaxogenin exhibited null cytotoxic activity. With respect to the apoptotic activity, the generation of apoptotic bodies, the presence of active caspase-3 and annexin-V, as well as the DNA fragmentation observed in all tumor lines after treatment with glucolaxogenin suggests that this compound does indeed induce cell death by apoptosis. Also, a significantly increased presence of the LC3-II, LC3 and Lamp-1 proteins was evidenced with the ultrastructural existence of autophagic vacuoles in cells treated with this steroidal glycoside, indicating that glucolaxogenin also induces autophagic cell death. It is important to note that this compound showed no cytotoxic effect and did not affect the proliferative capacity of mononuclear cells obtained from normal human peripheral blood activated by phytohaemagglutinin. Thus, glucolaxogenin is a compound with anti-proliferative properties that induces programmed cell death in cancer cell lines, though it is selective with respect to normal lymphocytic cells. These findings indicate that this glycoside could have a selective action on tumor cells and, therefore, be worthy of consideration as a therapeutic candidate with anti-tumor potential. PMID:26437916

  15. Apoptosis Cell Death Effect of Scrophularia Variegata on Breast Cancer Cells via Mitochondrial Intrinsic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Azadmehr, Abbas; Hajiaghaee, Reza; Baradaran, Behzad; Haghdoost-Yazdi, Hashem

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Scrophularia variegata M. Beib. (Scrophulariaceae) is an Iranian medicinal plant which is used for various inflammatory disorders in traditional medicine. In this study we evaluated the anti-cancer and cytotoxic effects of the Scrophularia variegata (S. variegata) ethanolic extract on the human breast cancer cell line. Methods: The cytotoxicity effect of the extract on MCF-7 cells was evaluated by MTT assay. In addition, Caspase activity, DNA ladder and Cell death were evaluated by ELISA, gel electrophoresis and Annexin V-FITC/PI staining, respectively. Results: The S. variegata extract showed significant effect cytotoxicity on MCF-7 human breast cancer cell line. Treatment with the extract induced apoptosis on the breast cancer cells by cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase. The results indicated that cytotoxicity activity was associated with an increase of apoptosis as demonstrated by DNA fragmentation as well as an increase of the amount of caspase 3 and caspase 9. In addition, the phytochemical assay showed that the extract had antioxidant capacity and also flavonoids, phenolic compounds and phenyl propanoids were presented in the extract. Conclusion: Our findings indicated that S. variegata extract induced apoptosis via mitochondrial intrinsic pathway on breast cancer by cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase and an increase of caspase 3 and caspase 9. However future studies are needed. PMID:26504768

  16. Mitochondrial calcium uniporter silencing potentiates caspase-independent cell death in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Curry, Merril C.; Peters, Amelia A.; Kenny, Paraic A.; Roberts-Thomson, Sarah J.; Monteith, Gregory R.

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: •Some clinical breast cancers are associated with MCU overexpression. •MCU silencing did not alter cell death initiated with the Bcl-2 inhibitor ABT-263. •MCU silencing potentiated caspase-independent cell death initiated by ionomycin. •MCU silencing promoted ionomycin-mediated cell death without changes in bulk Ca{sup 2+}. -- Abstract: The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) transports free ionic Ca{sup 2+} into the mitochondrial matrix. We assessed MCU expression in clinical breast cancer samples using microarray analysis and the consequences of MCU silencing in a breast cancer cell line. Our results indicate that estrogen receptor negative and basal-like breast cancers are characterized by elevated levels of MCU. Silencing of MCU expression in the basal-like MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line produced no change in proliferation or cell viability. However, distinct consequences of MCU silencing were seen on cell death pathways. Caspase-dependent cell death initiated by the Bcl-2 inhibitor ABT-263 was not altered by MCU silencing; whereas caspase-independent cell death induced by the calcium ionophore ionomycin was potentiated by MCU silencing. Measurement of cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} levels showed that the promotion of ionomycin-induced cell death by MCU silencing occurs independently of changes in bulk cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} levels. This study demonstrates that MCU overexpression is a feature of some breast cancers and that MCU overexpression may offer a survival advantage against some cell death pathways. MCU inhibitors may be a strategy to increase the effectiveness of therapies that act through the induction of caspase-independent cell death pathways in estrogen receptor negative and basal-like breast cancers.

  17. Ciglitazone enhances ovarian cancer cell death via inhibition of glucose transporter-1.

    PubMed

    Shin, So Jin; Kim, Jin Young; Kwon, Sun Young; Mun, Kyo-Cheol; Cho, Chi Heum; Ha, Eunyoung

    2014-11-15

    Ciglitazone is a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) agonist and improves insulin sensitivity. Apart from antidiabetic activity, ciglitazone elicits inhibitory effects on cancer cell growth. Recent studies indicate that glucose metabolism plays a key role in malignant diseases. Significant increase in glucose consumption is found under malignant conditions. The role of ciglitazone in cancer cell death in relation to glucose metabolism is unclear. Thus we designed this study to determine the effect of ciglitazone on glucose metabolism. First, we found ciglitazone inhibited glucose uptake in ovarian cancer cells but did not affect hexokinase activity. Ciglitazone decreased expression levels of glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1). We also found that ciglitazone and siGLUT-1 treatments induced cell death in ovarian cancer cells. We identified that ciglitazone decreased expressions of specific protein 1 (Sp-1) and β-catenin while increased phosphorylation levels of AMP-activated protein kinase. In vivo study using NOD-scid IL2Rgamma(null) mice confirmed that ciglitazone significantly decreased ovarian cancer mass transplanted onto the back of the mice. Finally, we determined GLUT-1 expressions in patients with serous type ovarian cancer and found that GLUT-1 expression was markedly increased in cancer patients and expression level was proportional to the degree of cancer stages. These results suggest that ciglitazone induces apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells by the inhibition of GLUT-1 and provides a possible therapeutic effect of ciglitazone as an adjuvant drug in the treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:25240713

  18. Mitochondrial calcium uniporter silencing potentiates caspase-independent cell death in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Curry, Merril C; Peters, Amelia A; Kenny, Paraic A; Roberts-Thomson, Sarah J; Monteith, Gregory R

    2013-05-10

    The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) transports free ionic Ca(2+) into the mitochondrial matrix. We assessed MCU expression in clinical breast cancer samples using microarray analysis and the consequences of MCU silencing in a breast cancer cell line. Our results indicate that estrogen receptor negative and basal-like breast cancers are characterized by elevated levels of MCU. Silencing of MCU expression in the basal-like MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line produced no change in proliferation or cell viability. However, distinct consequences of MCU silencing were seen on cell death pathways. Caspase-dependent cell death initiated by the Bcl-2 inhibitor ABT-263 was not altered by MCU silencing; whereas caspase-independent cell death induced by the calcium ionophore ionomycin was potentiated by MCU silencing. Measurement of cytosolic Ca(2+) levels showed that the promotion of ionomycin-induced cell death by MCU silencing occurs independently of changes in bulk cytosolic Ca(2+) levels. This study demonstrates that MCU overexpression is a feature of some breast cancers and that MCU overexpression may offer a survival advantage against some cell death pathways. MCU inhibitors may be a strategy to increase the effectiveness of therapies that act through the induction of caspase-independent cell death pathways in estrogen receptor negative and basal-like breast cancers.

  19. VMP1 related autophagy and apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells: VMP1 regulates cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Qinyi; Zhou, Hao; Chen, Yan; Shen, Chenglong; He, Songbing; Zhao, Hua; Wang, Liang; Wan, Daiwei; Gu, Wen

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •This research confirmed VMP1 as a regulator of autophagy in colorectal cancer cell lines. •We proved the pro-survival role of VMP1-mediated autophagy in colorectal cancer cell lines. •We found the interaction between VMP1 and BECLIN1 also existing in colorectal cancer cell lines. -- Abstract: Vacuole membrane protein 1 (VMP1) is an autophagy-related protein and identified as a key regulator of autophagy in recent years. In pancreatic cell lines, VMP1-dependent autophagy has been linked to positive regulation of apoptosis. However, there are no published reports on the role of VMP1 in autophagy and apoptosis in colorectal cancers. Therefore, to address this gap of knowledge, we decided to interrogate regulation of autophagy and apoptosis by VMP1. We have studied the induction of autophagy by starvation and rapamycin treatment in colorectal cell lines using electron microscopy, immunofluorescence, and immunoblotting. We found that starvation-induced autophagy correlated with an increase in VMP1 expression, that VMP1 interacted with BECLIN1, and that siRNA mediated down-regulation of VMP1-reduced autophagy. Next, we examined the relationship between VMP1-dependent autophagy and apoptosis and found that VMP1 down-regulation sensitizes cells to apoptosis and that agents that induce apoptosis down-regulate VMP1. In conclusion, similar to its reported role in other cell types, VMP1 is an important regulator of autophagy in colorectal cell lines. However, in contrast to its role in pancreatic cell lines, in colorectal cancer cells, VMP1-dependent autophagy appears to be pro-survival rather than pro-cell death.

  20. Novel self-micellizing anticancer lipid nanoparticles induce cell death of colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sundaramoorthy, Pasupathi; Baskaran, Rengarajan; Mishra, Siddhartha Kumar; Jeong, Keun-Yeong; Oh, Seung Hyun; Kyu Yoo, Bong; Kim, Hwan Mook

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, we developed a novel drug-like self-micellizing anticancer lipid (SMAL), and investigated its anticancer activity and effects on cell death pathways in human colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines. Three self-assembled nanoparticles were prepared, namely, SMAL102 (lauramide derivative), SMAL104 (palmitamide derivative), and SMAL108 (stearamide derivative) by a thin-film hydration technique, and were characterized for physicochemical and biological parameters. SMAL102 were nanosized (160.23 ± 8.11 nm) with uniform spherical shape, while SMAL104 and SMAL108 did not form spherical shape but formed large size nanoparticles and irregular in shape. Importantly, SMAL102 showed a cytotoxic effect towards CRC cell lines (HCT116 and HT-29), and less toxicity to a normal colon fibroblast cell line (CCD-18Co). Conversely, SMAL104 and SMAL108 did not have an anti-proliferative effect on CRC cell lines. SMAL102 nanoparticles were actively taken up by CRC cell lines, localized in the cell membrane, and exhibited remarkable cytotoxicity in a concentration-dependent manner. The normal colon cell line showed significantly less cellular uptake and non-cytotoxicity as compared with the CRC cell lines. SMAL102 nanoparticles induced caspase-3, caspase-9, and PARP cleavage in HT-29 cells, indicating the induction of apoptosis; whereas LC3B was activated in HCT116 cells, indicating autophagy-induced cell death. Collectively, these results demonstrate that SMAL102 induced cell death via activation of apoptosis and autophagy in CRC cell lines. The present study could be a pioneer for further preclinical and clinical development of such compounds. PMID:26342325

  1. Pseudolaric acid B activates autophagy in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells to prevent cell death

    PubMed Central

    YU, JINGHUA; CHEN, CHUNHAI; XU, TIANYANG; YAN, MINGHUI; XUE, BIANBIAN; WANG, YING; LIU, CHUNYU; ZHONG, TING; WANG, ZENGYAN; MENG, XIANYING; HU, DONGHUA; YU, XIAOFANG

    2016-01-01

    Pseudolaric acid B (PAB) has been demonstrated to exert antitumor effects in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. The present study aimed to investigate the mechanism of resistance to PAB-induced cell death. Following incubation with 4 µM of PAB for 3 days, the majority of MCF-7 cells became senescent, while some retained the same morphology as control cells, as assessed using a senescence detection kit. Additionally, 36 h of treatment with 4 µM of PAB increased the positive staining of autophagy markers, as shown by monodansylcadaverine and acridine orange staining. Western blot analysis indicated that this treatment also increased expression of the autophagy-related proteins Beclin-1 and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3. Furthermore, treatment with PAB and the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyl adenine significantly decreased the ratio of autophagy, as assessed by flow cytometric analysis of monodansylcadaverine staining density (P<0.001), and increased the ratio of cell death, as assessed by MTT analysis (P<0.001). This indicated that autophagy promotes cell survival as a resistance mechanism to PAB treatment. Additionally, the present study demonstrated that PAB treatment did not affect the mitochondrial membrane potential, which may be related to autophagy. Increased Bcl-2 expression may explain why PAB did not affect the mitochondrial membrane potential. A Bcl-2 binding test demonstrated that PAB treatment inhibits the binding of Bcl-2 and Beclin-1, which may free Beclin-1 to participate in autophagy. Therefore, the present study demonstrated that autophagy may be activated by PAB treatment in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells, contributing to resistance to cell death. PMID:26998069

  2. Spatiotemporal Temperature Distribution and Cancer Cell Death in Response to Extracellular Hyperthermia Induced by Gold Nanorods

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Huang-Chiao; Rege, Kaushal; Heys, Jeffrey J.

    2010-01-01

    Plasmonic nanoparticles have shown promise in hyperthermic cancer therapy, both in vitro and in vivo. Previous reports have described hyperthermic ablation using targeted and non-targeted nanoparticles internalized by cancer cells, but most reports do not describe a theoretical analysis for determining optimal parameters. The focus of the current research was first to evaluate the spatiotemporal temperature distribution and cell death induced by extracellular hyperthermia in which gold nanorods (GNRs) were maintained in the dispersion outside human prostate cancer cells. The nanorod dispersion was irradiated with near infrared (NIR) laser and the spatiotemporal distribution of temperature was determined experimentally. This information was employed to develop and validate theoretical models of spatiotemporal temperature profiles for gold nanorod dispersions undergoing laser irradiation, and the impact of the resulting heat generation on the viability of human prostate cancer cells. A cell injury/death model was then coupled to the heat transfer model to predict spatial and temporal variations in cell death and injury. The model predictions agreed well with experimental measurements of both, temperature and cell death profiles. Finally, the model was extended to examine the impact of selective binding of gold nanorods to cancer cells compared to non-malignant cells, coupled with a small change in cell injury activation energy. The impact of these relatively minor changes results in a dramatic change in the overall cell death rate. Taken together, extracellular hyperthermia using gold nanorods is a promising strategy and tailoring the cellular binding efficacy of nanorods can result in varying therapeutic efficacies using this approach. PMID:20387828

  3. Game theory in the death galaxy: interaction of cancer and stromal cells in tumour microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Wu, Amy; Liao, David; Tlsty, Thea D; Sturm, James C; Austin, Robert H

    2014-08-01

    Preventing relapse is the major challenge to effective therapy in cancer. Within the tumour, stromal (ST) cells play an important role in cancer progression and the emergence of drug resistance. During cancer treatment, the fitness of cancer cells can be enhanced by ST cells because their molecular signalling interaction delays the drug-induced apoptosis of cancer cells. On the other hand, competition among cancer and ST cells for space or resources should not be ignored. We explore the population dynamics of multiple myeloma (MM) versus bone marrow ST cells by using an experimental microecology that we call the death galaxy, with a stable drug gradient and connected microhabitats. Evolutionary game theory is a quantitative way to capture the frequency-dependent nature of interactive populations. Therefore, we use evolutionary game theory to model the populations in the death galaxy with the gradients of pay-offs and successfully predict the future densities of MM and ST cells. We discuss the possible clinical use of such analysis for predicting cancer progression.

  4. Dehydroabietic Acid Derivative QC4 Induces Gastric Cancer Cell Death via Oncosis and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Dongjun; Ni, Qing; Ji, Anlai; Gu, Wen; Wu, Junhua

    2016-01-01

    Aim. QC4 is the derivative of rosin's main components dehydroabietic acid (DHA). We investigated the cytotoxic effect of QC4 on gastric cancer cells and revealed the mechanisms beneath the induction of cell death. Methods. The cytotoxic effect of QC4 on gastric cancer cells was evaluated by CCK-8 assay and flow cytometry. The underlying mechanisms were tested by administration of cell death related inhibitors and detection of apoptotic and oncosis related proteins. Cytomembrane integrity and organelles damage were confirmed by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage assay, mitochondrial function test, and cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration detection. Results. QC4 inhibited cell proliferation dose- and time-dependently and destroyed cell membrane integrity, activated calpain-1 autolysis, and induced apoptotic protein cleavage in gastric cancer cells. The detection of decreased ATP and mitochondrial membrane potential, ROS accumulation, and cytosolic free Ca2+ elevation confirmed organelles damage in QC4-treated gastric cancer cells. Conclusions. DHA derivative QC4 induced the damage of cytomembrane and organelles which finally lead to oncosis and apoptosis in gastric cancer cells. Therefore, as a derivative of plant derived small molecule DHA, QC4 might become a promising agent in gastric cancer therapy. PMID:27057539

  5. Mechanism of neem limonoids-induced cell death in cancer: Role of oxidative phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Neelu; Kumar, Sandeep; Kumar, Rahul; Srivastava, Pragya; Sun, Leimin; Rapali, Peter; Marlowe, Timothy; Schneider, Andrea; Inigo, Joseph R; O'Malley, Jordan; Londonkar, Ramesh; Gogada, Raghu; Chaudhary, Ajay K; Yadava, Nagendra; Chandra, Dhyan

    2016-01-01

    We have previously reported that neem limonoids (neem) induce multiple cancer cell death pathways. Here we dissect the underlying mechanisms of neem-induced apoptotic cell death in cancer. We observed that neem-induced caspase activation does not require Bax/Bak channel-mediated mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization, permeability transition pore, and mitochondrial fragmentation. Neem enhanced mitochondrial DNA and mitochondrial biomass. While oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) Complex-I activity was decreased, the activities of other OXPHOS complexes including Complex-II and -IV were unaltered. Increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were associated with an increase in mitochondrial biomass and apoptosis upon neem exposure. Complex-I deficiency due to the loss of Ndufa1-encoded MWFE protein inhibited neem-induced caspase activation and apoptosis, but cell death induction was enhanced. Complex II-deficiency due to the loss of succinate dehydrogenase complex subunit C (SDHC) robustly decreased caspase activation, apoptosis, and cell death. Additionally, the ablation of Complexes-I, -III, -IV, and -V together did not inhibit caspase activation. Together, we demonstrate that neem limonoids target OXPHOS system to induce cancer cell death, which does not require upregulation or activation of proapoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins.

  6. Death receptor pathways mediate targeted and non-targeted effects of ionizing radiations in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Luce, Audrey; Courtin, Aurélie; Levalois, Céline; Altmeyer-Morel, Sandrine; Romeo, Paul-Henri; Lebeau, Jérôme

    2009-01-01

    Delayed cell death by mitotic catastrophe is a frequent mode of solid tumor cell death after γ-irradiation, a widely used treatment of cancer. Whereas the mechanisms that underlie the early γ-irradiation-induced cell death are well documented, those that drive the delayed cell death are largely unknown. Here we show that the Fas, tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α death receptor pathways mediate the delayed cell death observed after γ-irradiation of breast cancer cells. Early after irradiation, we observe the increased expression of Fas, TRAIL-R and TNF-R that first sensitizes cells to apoptosis. Later, the increased expression of FasL, TRAIL and TNF-α permit the apoptosis engagement linked to mitotic catastrophe. Treatments with TNF-α, TRAIL or anti-Fas antibody, early after radiation exposure, induce apoptosis, whereas the neutralization of the three death receptors pathways impairs the delayed cell death. We also show for the first time that irradiated breast cancer cells excrete soluble forms of the three ligands that can induce the death of sensitive bystander cells. Overall, these results define the molecular basis of the delayed cell death of irradiated cancer cells and identify the death receptors pathways as crucial actors in apoptosis induced by targeted as well as non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation. PMID:19126655

  7. Microscopic analysis of cell death by metabolic stress-induced autophagy in prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Changou, Chun; Cheng, R. Holland; Bold, Richard; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Chuang, Frank Y. S.

    2013-02-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular recycling mechanism that helps cells to survive against environmental stress and nutritional starvation. We have recently shown that prostate cancers undergo metabolic stress and caspase-independent cell death following exposure to arginine deiminase (ADI, an enzyme that degrades arginine in tissue). The aims of our current investigation into the application of ADI as a novel cancer therapy are to identify the components mediating tumor cell death, and to determine the role of autophagy (stimulated by ADI and/or rapamycin) on cell death. Using advanced fluorescence microscopy techniques including 3D deconvolution and superresolution structured-illumination microscopy (SIM), we show that prostate tumor cells that are killed after exposure to ADI for extended periods, exhibit a morphology that is distinct from caspase-dependent apoptosis; and that autophagosomes forming as a result of ADI stimulation contain DAPI-stained nuclear material. Fluorescence imaging (as well as cryo-electron microscopy) show a breakdown of both the inner and outer nuclear membranes at the interface between the cell nucleus and aggregated autophagolysosomes. Finally, the addition of N-acetyl cysteine (or NAC, a scavenger for reactive oxygen species) effectively abolishes the appearance of autophagolysosomes containing nuclear material. We hope to continue this research to understand the processes that govern the survival or death of these tumor cells, in order to develop methods to improve the efficacy of cancer pharmacotherapy.

  8. New derivatives of lupane triterpenoids disturb breast cancer mitochondria and induce cell death.

    PubMed

    Serafim, Teresa L; Carvalho, Filipa S; Bernardo, Telma C; Pereira, Gonçalo C; Perkins, Edward; Holy, Jon; Krasutsky, Dmytro A; Kolomitsyna, Oksana N; Krasutsky, Pavel A; Oliveira, Paulo J

    2014-11-01

    Novel cationic dimethylaminopyridine derivatives of pentacyclic triterpenes were previously described to promote mitochondrial depolarization and cell death in breast and melanoma cell lines. The objective of this work was to further investigate in detail the mechanism of mitochondrial perturbations, correlating those effects with breast cancer cell responses to those same agents. Initially, a panel of tumor and non-tumor cell lines was grown in high-glucose or glucose-free glutamine-containing media, the later forcing cells to synthesize ATP by oxidative phosphorylation only. Cell proliferation, cell cycle, cell death and mitochondrial membrane polarization were evaluated. Inhibition of cell proliferation was observed, accompanied by an arrest in the G1-cell cycle phase, and importantly, by loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. On a later time-point, caspase-9 and 3 activation were observed, resulting in cell death. For the majority of test compounds, we determined that cell toxicity was augmented in the galactose media. To investigate direct evidences on mitochondria isolated rat liver mitochondria were used. The results showed that the compounds were strong inducers of the permeability transition pore. Confirming our previous results, this work shows that the novel DMAP derivatives strongly interact with mitochondria, resulting in pro-apoptotic signaling and cell death.

  9. Raloxifene induces autophagy-dependent cell death in breast cancer cells via the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Eun; Kim, Yunha; Cho, Dong-Hyung; Jeong, Seong-Yun; Kim, Sung-Bae; Suh, Nayoung; Lee, Jung Shin; Choi, Eun Kyung; Koh, Jae-Young; Hwang, Jung Jin; Kim, Choung-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Raloxifene is a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) that binds to the estrogen receptor (ER), and exhibits potent anti-tumor and autophagy-inducing effects in breast cancer cells. However, the mechanism of raloxifene-induced cell death and autophagy is not well-established. So, we analyzed mechanism underlying death and autophagy induced by raloxifene in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Treatment with raloxifene significantly induced death in MCF-7 cells. Raloxifene accumulated GFP-LC3 puncta and increased the level of autophagic marker proteins, such as LC3-II, BECN1, and ATG12-ATG5 conjugates, indicating activated autophagy. Raloxifene also increased autophagic flux indicators, the cleavage of GFP from GFP-LC3 and only red fluorescence-positive puncta in mRFP-GFP-LC3-expressing cells. An autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine (3-MA), suppressed the level of LC3-II and blocked the formation of GFP-LC3 puncta. Moreover, siRNA targeting BECN1 markedly reversed cell death and the level of LC3-II increased by raloxifene. Besides, raloxifene-induced cell death was not related to cleavage of caspases-7, -9, and PARP. These results indicate that raloxifene activates autophagy-dependent cell death but not apoptosis. Interestingly, raloxifene decreased the level of intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and activated the AMPK/ULK1 pathway. However it was not suppressed the AKT/mTOR pathway. Addition of ATP decreased the phosphorylation of AMPK as well as the accumulation of LC3-II, finally attenuating raloxifene-induced cell death. Our current study demonstrates that raloxifene induces autophagy via the activation of AMPK by sensing decreases in ATP, and that the overactivation of autophagy promotes cell death and thereby mediates the anti-cancer effects of raloxifene in breast cancer cells.

  10. Rapid and efficient cancer cell killing mediated by high-affinity death receptor homotrimerizing TRAIL variants

    PubMed Central

    Reis, C R; van der Sloot, A M; Natoni, A; Szegezdi, E; Setroikromo, R; Meijer, M; Sjollema, K; Stricher, F; Cool, R H; Samali, A; Serrano, L; Quax, W J

    2010-01-01

    The tumour necrosis factor family member TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) selectively induces apoptosis in a variety of cancer cells through the activation of death receptors 4 (DR4) and 5 (DR5) and is considered a promising anticancer therapeutic agent. As apoptosis seems to occur primarily via only one of the two death receptors in many cancer cells, the introduction of DR selectivity is thought to create more potent TRAIL agonists with superior therapeutic properties. By use of a computer-aided structure-based design followed by rational combination of mutations, we obtained variants that signal exclusively via DR4. Besides an enhanced selectivity, these TRAIL-DR4 agonists show superior affinity to DR4, and a high apoptosis-inducing activity against several TRAIL-sensitive and -resistant cancer cell lines in vitro. Intriguingly, combined treatment of the DR4-selective variant and a DR5-selective TRAIL variant in cancer cell lines signalling by both death receptors leads to a significant increase in activity when compared with wild-type rhTRAIL or each single rhTRAIL variant. Our results suggest that TRAIL induced apoptosis via high-affinity and rapid-selective homotrimerization of each DR represent an important step towards an efficient cancer treatment. PMID:21368856

  11. Small Molecular TRAIL Inducer ONC201 Induces Death in Lung Cancer Cells: A Preclinical Study.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yuan; Zhou, Jihong; Li, Zhanhua; Jiang, Ying; Zhou, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) selectively targets cancer cells. The present preclinical study investigated the anti-cancer efficiency of ONC201, a first-in-class small molecule TRAIL inducer, in lung cancer cells. We showed that ONC201 was cytotoxic and anti-proliferative in both established (A549 and H460 lines) and primary human lung cancer cells. It was yet non-cytotoxic to normal lung epithelial cells. Further, ONC201 induced exogenous apoptosis activation in lung cancer cells, which was evidenced by TRAIL/death receptor-5 (DR5) induction and caspase-8 activation. The caspase-8 inhibitor or TRAIL/DR5 siRNA knockdown alleviated ONC201's cytotoxicity against lung cancer cells. Molecularly, ONC201 in-activated Akt-S6K1 and Erk signalings in lung cancer cells, causing Foxo3a nuclear translocation. For the in vivo studies, intraperitoneal injection of ONC201 at well-tolerated doses significantly inhibited xenografted A549 tumor growth in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. Further, ONC201 administration induced TRAIL/DR5 expression, yet inactivated Akt-S6K1 and Erk in tumor tissues. These results of the study demonstrates the potent anti-lung cancer activity by ONC201. PMID:27626799

  12. Small Molecular TRAIL Inducer ONC201 Induces Death in Lung Cancer Cells: A Preclinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yuan; Zhou, Jihong; Li, Zhanhua; Jiang, Ying; Zhou, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) selectively targets cancer cells. The present preclinical study investigated the anti-cancer efficiency of ONC201, a first-in-class small molecule TRAIL inducer, in lung cancer cells. We showed that ONC201 was cytotoxic and anti-proliferative in both established (A549 and H460 lines) and primary human lung cancer cells. It was yet non-cytotoxic to normal lung epithelial cells. Further, ONC201 induced exogenous apoptosis activation in lung cancer cells, which was evidenced by TRAIL/death receptor-5 (DR5) induction and caspase-8 activation. The caspase-8 inhibitor or TRAIL/DR5 siRNA knockdown alleviated ONC201’s cytotoxicity against lung cancer cells. Molecularly, ONC201 in-activated Akt-S6K1 and Erk signalings in lung cancer cells, causing Foxo3a nuclear translocation. For the in vivo studies, intraperitoneal injection of ONC201 at well-tolerated doses significantly inhibited xenografted A549 tumor growth in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. Further, ONC201 administration induced TRAIL/DR5 expression, yet inactivated Akt-S6K1 and Erk in tumor tissues. These results of the study demonstrates the potent anti-lung cancer activity by ONC201. PMID:27626799

  13. Quinacrine promotes autophagic cell death and chemosensitivity in ovarian cancer and attenuates tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Susmita; Wen, Xuyang; He, Xiaoping; Dowdy, Sean; Shridhar, Viji

    2015-01-01

    A promising new strategy for cancer therapy is to target the autophagic pathway. In the current study, we demonstrate that the antimalarial drug Quinacrine (QC) reduces cell viability and promotes chemotherapy-induced cell death in an autophagy-dependent manner more extensively in chemoresistant cells compared to their isogenic chemosensitive control cells as quantified by the Chou-Talalay methodology. Our preliminary data, in vitro and in vivo, indicate that QC induces autophagy by downregulating p62/SQSTM1 to sensitize chemoresistant cells to autophagic- and caspase-mediated cell death in a p53-independent manner. QC promotes autophagosome accumulation and enhances autophagic flux by clearance of p62 in chemoresistant ovarain cancer (OvCa) cell lines to a greater extent compared to their chemosensitive controls. Notably, p62 levels were elevated in chemoresistant OvCa cell lines and knockdown of p62 in these cells resulted in a greater response to QC treatment. Bafilomycin A, an autophagy inhibitor, restored p62 levels and reversed QC-mediated cell death and thus chemosensitization. Importantly, our in vivo data shows that QC alone and in combination with carboplatin suppresses tumor growth and ascites in the highly chemoresistant HeyA8MDR OvCa model compared to carboplatin treatment alone. Collectively, our preclinical data suggest that QC in combination with carboplatin can be an effective treatment for patients with chemoresistant OvCa. PMID:26497553

  14. Autophagy-related cell death by pan-histone deacetylase inhibition in liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Di Fazio, Pietro; Waldegger, Petra; Jabari, Samir; Lingelbach, Susanne; Montalbano, Roberta; Ocker, Matthias; Slater, Emily P.; Bartsch, Detlef K.; Illig, Romana; Neureiter, Daniel; Wissniowski, Thaddeus T.

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a homeostatic, catabolic degradation process and cell fate essential regulatory mechanism. Protracted autophagy triggers cell death; its aberrant function is responsible for several malignancies. Panobinostat, a potent pan-deacetylase inhibitor, causes endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced cell death. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of autophagy in deacetylase inhibitor-triggered liver cancer cell death. HepG2 (p53wt) and Hep3B (p53 null) liver cancer cell lines were exposed to panobinostat. RT-qPCR and western blot confirmed autophagic factor modulation. Immuno-fluorescence, -precipitation and -histochemistry as well as transmission electron microscopy verified autophagosome formation. The cytotoxicity of panobinostat and autophagy modulators was detected using a real time cell viability assay. Panobinostat induced autophagy-related factor expression and aggregation. Map1LC3B and Beclin1 were significantly over-expressed in HepG2 xenografts in nude mice treated with panobinostat for 4 weeks. Subcellular distribution of Beclin1 increased with the appearance of autophagosomes-like aggregates. Cytosolic loss of p53, in HepG2, and p73, in Hep3B cells, and a corresponding gain of their nuclear level, together with modulation of DRAM1, were observed. Autophagosome aggregation was visible after 6 h of treatment. Treatment of cells stably expressing GFP-RFPtag Map1LC3B resulted in aggregation and a fluorescence switch, thus confirming autophagosome formation and maturation. Tamoxifen, an inducer of autophagy, caused only a block in cell proliferation; but in combination with panobinostat it resulted in cell death. Autophagy triggers cell demise in liver cancer. Its modulation by the combination of tamoxifen and panobinostat could be a new option for palliative treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:27058414

  15. Hpr6.6 protein mediates cell death from oxidative damage in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hand, Randal A; Craven, Rolf J

    2003-10-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) cause cell death and are associated with a variety of maladies, from trauma and infection to organ degeneration and cancer. Cells mount a complex response to oxidative damage that includes signaling from transmembrane receptors and intracellular kinases. We have analyzed the response to oxidative damage in human breast cancer cells expressing the Hpr6.6 (human membrane progesterone receptor) protein. Although Hpr6.6 is related to a putative progesterone-binding protein, Hpr6.6 is widely expressed in epithelial tissues and shares close homology with a budding yeast damage response protein called Dap1p (damage response protein related to membrane progesterone receptor). We report here that the Hpr6.6 protein regulates the response to oxidative damage in breast cancer cells. Expression of Hpr6.6 in MCF-7 cells sensitized the cells to death following long-term/low dose or short-term/high dose treatment with hydrogen peroxide. Cell death did not occur through a typical apoptotic mechanism and corresponded with hyperphosphorylation of the Akt and IkappaB proteins. However, inhibition of Akt activation and IkappaB degradation had no effect on Hpr6.6-mediated cell death, suggesting that Hpr6.6 regulates cell death through a novel oxidative damage response pathway. Our work indicates a key regulatory function for Hpr6.6 in epithelial tissues exposed to oxidative damage.

  16. Androgen Receptor (AR) Positive vs Negative Roles in Prostate Cancer Cell Deaths including Apoptosis, Anoikis, Entosis, Necrosis and Autophagic Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Simeng; Niu, Yuanjie; Lee, Soo Ok; Chang, Chawnshang

    2013-01-01

    Androgen/androgen receptor (AR) signaling plays pivotal roles in the prostate development and homeostasis as well as in the progression of prostate cancer (PCa). Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) with anti-androgens remains as the main treatment of PCa, and it has been shown to effectively suppress PCa growth during the first 12–24 months. However, ADT eventually fails and tumors may re-grow and progress into the castration resistant stage. Recent reports revealed that AR might play complicated and even opposite roles in PCa progression that might depend on cell types and tumor stages. Importantly, AR may influence PCa progression via differential modulation of various cell deaths including apoptosis, anoikis, entosis, necrosis, and autophagic cell deaths. Targeting AR may induce PCa cell apoptosis, autophagic cell deaths and programmed necrosis, yet targeting AR may also suppress cell deaths via anoikis and entosis that may potentially lead to increased metastasis. These differential functions of AR in various types of PCa cell death might challenge the current ADT with anti-androgens treatment. Further detailed dissection of molecular mechanisms by which AR modulates different PCa cell deaths will help us to develop a better therapy to battle PCa. PMID:23993415

  17. Deciphering the rules of programmed cell death to improve therapy of cancer and other diseases

    PubMed Central

    Strasser, Andreas; Cory, Suzanne; Adams, Jerry M

    2011-01-01

    Apoptosis, the major form of programmed cell death in metazoan organisms, plays critical roles in normal development, tissue homeostasis and immunity, and its disturbed regulation contributes to many pathological states, including cancer, autoimmunity, infection and degenerative disorders. In vertebrates, it can be triggered either by engagement of ‘death receptors' of the tumour necrosis factor receptor family on the cell surface or by diverse intracellular signals that act upon the Bcl-2 protein family, which controls the integrity of the mitochondrial outer membrane through the complex interactions of family members. Both pathways lead to cellular demolition by dedicated proteases termed caspases. This review discusses the groundbreaking experiments from many laboratories that have clarified cell death regulation and galvanised efforts to translate this knowledge into novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of malignant and perhaps certain autoimmune and infectious diseases. PMID:21863020

  18. Differential Effects of Procaspase-3 Activating Compounds in the Induction of Cancer Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    West, Diana C.; Qin, Yan; Peterson, Quinn P.; Thomas, Diana L; Palchaudhuri, Rahul; Morrison, Karen C.; Lucas, Pamela W.; Palmer, Amy E.; Fan, Timothy M.; Hergenrother, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    The evasion of apoptosis is a key characteristic of cancer, and thus strategies to selectively induce apoptosis in cancer cells hold considerable promise in personalized anticancer therapy. Structurally similar procaspase activating compounds PAC-1 and S-PAC-1 restore procaspase-3 activity through the chelation of inhibitory zinc ions in vitro, induce apoptotic death of cancer cells in culture, and reduce tumor burden in vivo. IP or IV administrations of high doses of PAC-1 are transiently neurotoxic in vivo, while S-PAC-1 is safe even at very high doses and has been evaluated in a Phase I clinical trial of pet dogs with spontaneously occurring lymphoma. Here we show that PAC-1 and S-PAC-1 have similar mechanisms of cell death induction at low concentrations (less than 50 µM), but at high concentrations PAC-1 displays unique cell death induction features. Cells treated with a high concentration of PAC-1 have a distinctive gene expression profile, unusual cellular and mitochondrial morphology, and an altered intracellular Ca2+ concentration, indicative of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced apoptosis. These studies suggest strategies for anticancer clinical development, specifically bolus dosing for PAC-1 and continuous rate infusion for S-PAC-1. PMID:22486564

  19. Autophagic cell death exists

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Peter G.H.; Puyal, Julien

    2012-01-01

    The term autophagic cell death (ACD) initially referred to cell death with greatly enhanced autophagy, but is increasingly used to imply a death-mediating role of autophagy, as shown by a protective effect of autophagy inhibition. In addition, many authors require that autophagic cell death must not involve apoptosis or necrosis. Adopting these new and restrictive criteria, and emphasizing their own failure to protect human osteosarcoma cells by autophagy inhibition, the authors of a recent Editor’s Corner article in this journal argued for the extreme rarity or nonexistence of autophagic cell death. We here maintain that, even with the more stringent recent criteria, autophagic cell death exists in several situations, some of which were ignored by the Editor’s Corner authors. We reject their additional criterion that the autophagy in ACD must be the agent of ultimate cell dismantlement. And we argue that rapidly dividing mammalian cells such as cancer cells are not the most likely situation for finding pure ACD. PMID:22652592

  20. Non-chemotoxic induction of cancer cell death using magnetic nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, Maria F; Sougrat, Rachid; Zaher, Amir; Ravasi, Timothy; Kosel, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we show that magnetic nanowires with weak magnetic fields and low frequencies can induce cell death via a mechanism that does not involve heat production. We incubated colon cancer cells with two concentrations (2.4 and 12 μg/mL) of nickel nanowires that were 35 nm in diameter and exposed the cells and nanowires to an alternating magnetic field (0.5 mT and 1 Hz or 1 kHz) for 10 or 30 minutes. This low-power field exerted a force on the magnetic nanowires, causing a mechanical disturbance to the cells. Transmission electron microscopy images showed that the nanostructures were internalized into the cells within 1 hour of incubation. Cell viability studies showed that the magnetic field and the nanowires separately had minor deleterious effects on the cells; however, when combined, the magnetic field and nanowires caused the cell viability values to drop by up to 39%, depending on the strength of the magnetic field and the concentration of the nanowires. Cell membrane leakage experiments indicated membrane leakage of 20%, suggesting that cell death mechanisms induced by the nanowires and magnetic field involve some cell membrane rupture. Results suggest that magnetic nanowires can kill cancer cells. The proposed process requires simple and low-cost equipment with exposure to only very weak magnetic fields for short time periods. PMID:25834430

  1. Non-chemotoxic induction of cancer cell death using magnetic nanowires.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Maria F; Sougrat, Rachid; Zaher, Amir; Ravasi, Timothy; Kosel, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we show that magnetic nanowires with weak magnetic fields and low frequencies can induce cell death via a mechanism that does not involve heat production. We incubated colon cancer cells with two concentrations (2.4 and 12 μg/mL) of nickel nanowires that were 35 nm in diameter and exposed the cells and nanowires to an alternating magnetic field (0.5 mT and 1 Hz or 1 kHz) for 10 or 30 minutes. This low-power field exerted a force on the magnetic nanowires, causing a mechanical disturbance to the cells. Transmission electron microscopy images showed that the nanostructures were internalized into the cells within 1 hour of incubation. Cell viability studies showed that the magnetic field and the nanowires separately had minor deleterious effects on the cells; however, when combined, the magnetic field and nanowires caused the cell viability values to drop by up to 39%, depending on the strength of the magnetic field and the concentration of the nanowires. Cell membrane leakage experiments indicated membrane leakage of 20%, suggesting that cell death mechanisms induced by the nanowires and magnetic field involve some cell membrane rupture. Results suggest that magnetic nanowires can kill cancer cells. The proposed process requires simple and low-cost equipment with exposure to only very weak magnetic fields for short time periods.

  2. Cytotoxic effects of two organotin compounds and their mode of inflicting cell death on four mammalian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Costanzo, Margaret; Carrasco, Yazmin P.; Pannell, Keith H.; Aguilera, Renato J.

    2011-01-01

    In this report, we have tested the cytotoxicity of two organotin (OT) compounds by flow cytometry on a panel of immortalized cancer cell lines of human and murine origin. Although the OT compounds exhibited varying levels of cytotoxicity, diphenylmethyltin chloride was more toxic than 1,4-bis (diphenylchlorostannyl)p-xylene on all cell lines tested. The OT compounds were found to be highly cytotoxic to lymphoma cell lines with lower toxicity toward the HeLa cervical cancer cell line. In order to discern the mechanism by which cell death was induced, additional experiments were conducted to monitor characteristic changes consistent with apoptosis and/or necrosis. Cell lines treated with the experimental compounds indicated that there was no consistent mode of cell death induction. However, both compounds induced apoptosis in the pro-B lymphocyte cell line, NFS-70. The work presented here also demonstrates that the two OT compounds possess selective cytotoxicity against distinct transformed cell lines. PMID:21069563

  3. Fibroblast growth factor 8 increases breast cancer cell growth by promoting cell cycle progression and by protecting against cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsson, Emeli M.; Brokken, Leon J.S.; Haerkoenen, Pirkko L.

    2010-03-10

    Fibroblast growth factor 8 (FGF-8) is expressed in a large proportion of breast cancers, whereas its level in normal mammary gland epithelium is low. Previous studies have shown that FGF-8b stimulates breast cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. To explore the mechanisms by which FGF-8b promotes growth, we studied its effects on cell cycle regulatory proteins and signalling pathways in mouse S115 and human MCF-7 breast cancer cells. We also studied the effect of FGF-8b on cell survival. FGF-8b induced cell cycle progression and up-regulated particularly cyclin D1 mRNA and protein in S115 cells. Silencing cyclin D1 with siRNA inhibited most but not all FGF-8b-induced proliferation. Inhibition of the FGF-8b-activated ERK/MAPK pathway decreased FGF-8b-stimulated proliferation. Blocking the constitutively active PI3K/Akt and p38 MAPK pathways also lowered FGF-8b-induced cyclin D1 expression and proliferation. Corresponding results were obtained in MCF-7 cells. In S115 and MCF-7 mouse tumours, FGF-8b increased cyclin D1 and Ki67 levels. Moreover, FGF-8b opposed staurosporine-induced S115 cell death which effect was blocked by inhibiting the PI3K/Akt pathway but not the ERK/MAPK pathway. In conclusion, our results suggest that FGF-8b increases breast cancer cell growth both by stimulating cell cycle progression and by protecting against cell death.

  4. A unifying mechanism for cancer cell death through ion channel activation by HAMLET.

    PubMed

    Storm, Petter; Klausen, Thomas Kjaer; Trulsson, Maria; Ho C S, James; Dosnon, Marion; Westergren, Tomas; Chao, Yinxia; Rydström, Anna; Yang, Henry; Pedersen, Stine Falsig; Svanborg, Catharina

    2013-01-01

    Ion channels and ion fluxes control many aspects of tissue homeostasis. During oncogenic transformation, critical ion channel functions may be perturbed but conserved tumor specific ion fluxes remain to be defined. Here we used the tumoricidal protein-lipid complex HAMLET as a probe to identify ion fluxes involved in tumor cell death. We show that HAMLET activates a non-selective cation current, which reached a magnitude of 2.74±0.88 nA within 1.43±0.13 min from HAMLET application. Rapid ion fluxes were essential for HAMLET-induced carcinoma cell death as inhibitors (amiloride, BaCl2), preventing the changes in free cellular Na(+) and K(+) concentrations also prevented essential steps accompanying carcinoma cell death, including changes in morphology, uptake, global transcription, and MAP kinase activation. Through global transcriptional analysis and phosphorylation arrays, a strong ion flux dependent p38 MAPK response was detected and inhibition of p38 signaling delayed HAMLET-induced death. Healthy, differentiated cells were resistant to HAMLET challenge, which was accompanied by innate immunity rather than p38-activation. The results suggest, for the first time, a unifying mechanism for the initiation of HAMLET's broad and rapid lethal effect on tumor cells. These findings are particularly significant in view of HAMLET's documented therapeutic efficacy in human studies and animal models. The results also suggest that HAMLET offers a two-tiered therapeutic approach, killing cancer cells while stimulating an innate immune response in surrounding healthy tissues.

  5. Hernandezine, a novel AMPK activator induces autophagic cell death in drug-resistant cancers

    PubMed Central

    Law, Betty Yuen Kwan; Mok, Simon Wing Fai; Chan, Wai Kit; Xu, Su Wei; Wu, An Guo; Yao, Xiao Jun; Wang, Jing Rong; Liu, Liang; Wong, Vincent Kam Wai

    2016-01-01

    Drug resistance hinder most cancer chemotherapies and leads to disease recurrence and poor survival of patients. Resistance of cancer cells towards apoptosis is the major cause of these symptomatic behaviours. Here, we showed that isoquinoline alkaloids, including liensinine, isoliensinine, dauricine, cepharanthine and hernandezine, putatively induce cytotoxicity against a repertoire of cancer cell lines (HeLa, A549, MCF-7, PC3, HepG2, Hep3B and H1299). Proven by the use of apoptosis-resistant cellular models and autophagic assays, such isoquinoline alkaloid-induced cytotoxic effect involves energy- and autophagy-related gene 7 (Atg7)-dependent autophagy that resulted from direct activation of AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK). Hernandezine possess the highest efficacy in provoking such cell death when compared with other examined compounds. We confirmed that isoquinoline alkaloid is structurally varied from the existing direct AMPK activators. In conclusion, isoquinoline alkaloid is a new class of compound that induce autophagic cell death in drug-resistant fibroblasts or cancers by exhibiting its direct activation on AMPK. PMID:26811496

  6. Xylitol induces cell death in lung cancer A549 cells by autophagy.

    PubMed

    Park, Eunjoo; Park, Mi Hee; Na, Hee Sam; Chung, Jin

    2015-05-01

    Xylitol is a widely used anti-caries agent that has anti-inflammatory effects. We have evaluated the potential of xylitol in cancer treatment. It's effects on cell proliferation and cytotoxicity were measured by MTT assay and LDH assay. Cell morphology and autophagy were examined by immunostaining and immunoblotting. Xylitol inhibited cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner in these cancer cells: A549, Caki, NCI-H23, HCT-15, HL-60, K562, and SK MEL-2. The IC50 of xylitol in human gingival fibroblast cells was higher than in cancer cells, indicating that it is more specific for cancer cells. Moreover, xylitol induced autophagy in A549 cells that was inhibited by 3-methyladenine, an autophagy inhibitor. These results indicate that xylitol has potential in therapy against lung cancer by inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing autophagy of A549 cells.

  7. Induction of ferroptotic cell death for overcoming cisplatin resistance of head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Roh, Jong-Lyel; Kim, Eun Hye; Jang, Hye Jin; Park, Jin Young; Shin, Daiha

    2016-10-10

    Inhibition of key molecules related to ferroptosis, cystine/glutamate antiporter and glutathione peroxidase, may induce eradication of chemotherapy/radiotherapy-resistant cancer cells. The present study investigated whether ferroptosis could overcome head and neck cancer (HNC) resistance to cisplatin treatment. Three cisplatin-resistant HNC cell lines (AMC-HN3R, -HN4R, and -HN9R) and their parental lines were used. The effects of cystine and glutamate alteration and pharmacological and genetic inhibition of cystine/glutamate antiporter were assessed by measuring viability, death, reactive oxygen species production, protein expression, and preclinical mouse tumor xenograft models. Conditioned media with no cystine or glutamine excess induced ferroptosis of both cisplatin-sensitive and -resistant HNC cells without any apparent changes to necrosis and apoptosis markers. The cystine/glutamate antiporter inhibitors erastin and sulfasalazine inhibited HNC cell growth and accumulated lipid reactive oxygen species, thereby inducing ferroptosis. Genetic silencing of cystine/glutamate antiporter with siRNA or shRNA treatment also induced effective ferroptotic cell death of resistant HNC cells and enhanced the cisplatin cytotoxicity of resistant HNC cells. Pharmacological and genetic inhibition of cystine/glutamate antiporter significantly sensitized resistant HNC cells to cisplatin in vitro and in vivo. Pharmacological and genetic inhibition of cystine/glutamate antiporter overcomes the cisplatin resistance of HNC cells by inducing ferroptosis.

  8. The antitumor natural compound falcarindiol promotes cancer cell death by inducing endoplasmic reticulum stress

    PubMed Central

    Jin, H R; Zhao, J; Zhang, Z; Liao, Y; Wang, C-Z; Huang, W-H; Li, S-P; He, T-C; Yuan, C-S; Du, W

    2012-01-01

    Falcarindiol (FAD) is a natural polyyne with various beneficial biological activities. We show here that FAD preferentially kills colon cancer cells but not normal colon epithelial cells. Furthermore, FAD inhibits tumor growth in a xenograft tumor model and exhibits strong synergistic killing of cancer cells with 5-fluorouracil, an approved cancer chemotherapeutic drug. We demonstrate that FAD-induced cell death is mediated by induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). Decreasing the level of ER stress, either by overexpressing the ER chaperone protein glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) or by knockout of components of the UPR pathway, reduces FAD-induced apoptosis. In contrast, increasing the level of ER stress by knocking down GRP78 potentiates FAD-induced apoptosis. Finally, FAD-induced ER stress and apoptosis is correlated with the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins, suggesting that FAD functions at least in part by interfering with proteasome function, leading to the accumulation of unfolded protein and induction of ER stress. Consistent with this, inhibition of protein synthesis by cycloheximide significantly decreases the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins and blocks FAD-induced ER stress and cell death. Taken together, our study shows that FAD is a potential new anticancer agent that exerts its activity through inducing ER stress and apoptosis. PMID:22914324

  9. Melatonin enhances arsenic trioxide-induced cell death via sustained upregulation of Redd1 expression in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yun, Sun-Mi; Woo, Sang Hyeok; Oh, Sang Taek; Hong, Sung-Eun; Choe, Tae-Boo; Ye, Sang-Kyu; Kim, Eun-Kyu; Seong, Min Ki; Kim, Hyun-A; Noh, Woo Chul; Lee, Jin Kyung; Jin, Hyeon-Ok; Lee, Yun-Han; Park, In-Chul

    2016-02-15

    Melatonin is implicated in various physiological functions, including anticancer activity. However, the mechanism(s) of its anticancer activity is not well understood. In the present study, we investigated the combined effects of melatonin and arsenic trioxide (ATO) on cell death in human breast cancer cells. Melatonin enhanced the ATO-induced apoptotic cell death via changes in the protein levels of Survivin, Bcl-2, and Bax, thus affecting cytochrome c release from the mitochondria to the cytosol. Interestingly, we found that the cell death induced by co-treatment with melatonin and ATO was mediated by sustained upregulation of Redd1, which was associated with increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Combined treatment with melatonin and ATO induced the phosphorylation of JNK and p38 MAP kinase downstream from Redd1 expression. Rapamycin and S6K1 siRNA enhanced, while activation of mTORC1 by transfection with TSC2 siRNA suppressed the cell death induced by melatonin and ATO treatment. Taken together, our findings suggest that melatonin enhances ATO-induced apoptotic cell death via sustained upregulation of Redd1 expression and inhibition of mTORC1 upstream of the activation of the p38/JNK pathways in human breast cancer cells. PMID:26607805

  10. Chloroquine inhibits cell growth and induces cell death in A549 lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, Chuandong; Wang, Weiwei; Zhao, Baoxiang; Zhang, Shangli; Miao, Junying

    2006-05-01

    To investigate the effects of chloroquine diphosphate (CQ) on lung cancer cell growth, we treated A549 cells, a lung cancer cell line, with the drug at various concentrations (0.25-128 microM) for 24-72 h. The results showed that, at lower concentrations (from 0.25 to 32 microM), CQ inhibited the growth of A549 cells and, at the same time, it induced vacuolation with increased volume of acidic compartments (VAC). On the other hand, at higher concentrations (64-128 microM), CQ induced apoptosis at 24 h, while its effect of inducing vacuolation declined. The lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay showed that with the treatment of CQ 32-64 microM for 72 h or 128 microM for 48 h, CQ induced necrosis of A549 cells. To understand the possible mechanism by which CQ acts in A549 cells, we further incubated the cells with this drug at the concentrations of 32 or 128 microM in the presence of D609, a specific inhibitor of phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC). The results showed that D609 (50 microM) could inhibit the effects of CQ 32 microM on the viability and VAC, but it could not change the effects of CQ 128 microM on the same. Our data suggested that CQ inhibited A549 lung cancer cell growth at lower concentrations by increasing the volume of lysosomes and that PC-PLC might be involved in this process. The data also indicated that, at higher concentrations, CQ induced apoptosis and necrosis, but at this time its ability to increase the volume of lysosome gradually declined, and PC-PLC might not be implicated in the process. PMID:16413786

  11. Oxidative pentose phosphate pathway inhibition is a key determinant of antimalarial induced cancer cell death.

    PubMed

    Salas, E; Roy, S; Marsh, T; Rubin, B; Debnath, J

    2016-06-01

    Despite immense interest in using antimalarials as autophagy inhibitors to treat cancer, it remains unclear whether these agents act predominantly via autophagy inhibition or whether other pathways direct their anti-cancer properties. By comparing the treatment effects of the antimalarials chloroquine (CQ) and quinacrine (Q) on KRAS mutant lung cancer cells, we demonstrate that inhibition of the oxidative arm of the pentose phosphate pathway (oxPPP) is required for antimalarial induced apoptosis. Despite inhibiting autophagy, neither CQ treatment nor RNAi against autophagy regulators (ATGs) promote cell death. In contrast, Q triggers high levels of apoptosis, both in vitro and in vivo, and this phenotype requires both autophagy inhibition and p53-dependent inhibition of the oxPPP. Simultaneous genetic targeting of the oxPPP and autophagy is sufficient to trigger apoptosis in lung cancer cells, including cells lacking p53. Thus, in addition to reduced autophagy, oxPPP inhibition serves as an important determinant of antimalarial cytotoxicity in cancer cells.

  12. Circadian Rhythms and Breast Cancer: The Role of Per2 in Doxorubicin-Induced Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Megan I; Engelbrecht, Anna-Mart

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian circadian rhythms form an integral physiological system allowing for the synchronisation of all metabolic processes to daily light/dark cycles, thereby optimising their efficacy. Circadian disruptions have been implicated in the onset and progression of various cancers, including those arising in the breast. Several links between the circadian protein Per2 and DNA damage responses exist. Aberrant Per2 expression results in potent downstream effects on both cell cycle and apoptotic targets, suggestive of a tumour suppressive role for Per2. Due to the severe dose limiting side effects associated with current chemotherapeutic strategies, including the use of doxorubicin, a need for more effective adjuvant therapies to increase cancer cell susceptibility has arisen. This study was therefore aimed at characterizing the role of Per2 in normal breast epithelia (MCF-12A) and in ER(-) breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231) and also at determining the role of Per2 in doxorubicin-induced cell death. In both cell lines Per2 protein expression displayed a 24-hour circadian rhythm in both cell lines. Per2 was located predominantly in the cytoplasm, with nuclear localization observed with lower cytoplasmic fluorescent intensities. Our results show that Per2 silencing effectively sensitizes the chemoresistant MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells to the cytotoxic effects of doxorubicin. PMID:26347774

  13. Ruta 6 selectively induces cell death in brain cancer cells but proliferation in normal peripheral blood lymphocytes: A novel treatment for human brain cancer.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Sen; Multani, Asha S; Banerji, Pratip; Banerji, Prasanta

    2003-10-01

    Although conventional chemotherapies are used to treat patients with malignancies, damage to normal cells is problematic. Blood-forming bone marrow cells are the most adversely affected. It is therefore necessary to find alternative agents that can kill cancer cells but have minimal effects on normal cells. We investigated the brain cancer cell-killing activity of a homeopathic medicine, Ruta, isolated from a plant, Ruta graveolens. We treated human brain cancer and HL-60 leukemia cells, normal B-lymphoid cells, and murine melanoma cells in vitro with different concentrations of Ruta in combination with Ca3(PO4)2. Fifteen patients diagnosed with intracranial tumors were treated with Ruta 6 and Ca3(PO4)2. Of these 15 patients, 6 of the 7 glioma patients showed complete regression of tumors. Normal human blood lymphocytes, B-lymphoid cells, and brain cancer cells treated with Ruta in vitro were examined for telomere dynamics, mitotic catastrophe, and apoptosis to understand the possible mechanism of cell-killing, using conventional and molecular cytogenetic techniques. Both in vivo and in vitro results showed induction of survival-signaling pathways in normal lymphocytes and induction of death-signaling pathways in brain cancer cells. Cancer cell death was initiated by telomere erosion and completed through mitotic catastrophe events. We propose that Ruta in combination with Ca3(PO4)2 could be used for effective treatment of brain cancers, particularly glioma.

  14. Targeting Death Receptor TRAIL-R2 by Chalcones for TRAIL-Induced Apoptosis in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Szliszka, Ewelina; Jaworska, Dagmara; Kłósek, Małgorzata; Czuba, Zenon P.; Król, Wojciech

    2012-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) induces apoptosis in cancer cells without toxicity to normal cells. TRAIL binds to death receptors, TRAIL-R1 (DR4) and TRAIL-R2 (DR5) expressed on cancer cell surface and activates apoptotic pathways. Endogenous TRAIL plays an important role in immune surveillance and defense against cancer cells. However, as more tumor cells are reported to be resistant to TRAIL mediated death, it is important to search for and develop new strategies to overcome this resistance. Chalcones can sensitize cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. We examined the cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of TRAIL in combination with four chalcones: chalcone, isobavachalcone, licochalcone A and xanthohumol on HeLa cancer cells. The cytotoxicity was measured by MTT and LDH assays. The apoptosis was detected using annexin V-FITC staining by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Death receptor expression was analyzed using flow cytometry. The decreased expression of death receptors in cancer cells may be the cause of TRAIL-resistance. Chalcones enhance TRAIL-induced apoptosis in HeLa cells through increased expression of TRAIL-R2. Our study has indicated that chalcones augment the antitumor activity of TRAIL and confirm their cancer chemopreventive properties. PMID:23203129

  15. Anticancer Effect of Ginger Extract against Pancreatic Cancer Cells Mainly through Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Autotic Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Akimoto, Miho; Iizuka, Mari; Kanematsu, Rie; Yoshida, Masato; Takenaga, Keizo

    2015-01-01

    The extract of ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) and its major pungent components, [6]-shogaol and [6]-gingerol, have been shown to have an anti-proliferative effect on several tumor cell lines. However, the anticancer activity of the ginger extract in pancreatic cancer is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that the ethanol-extracted materials of ginger suppressed cell cycle progression and consequently induced the death of human pancreatic cancer cell lines, including Panc-1 cells. The underlying mechanism entailed autosis, a recently characterized form of cell death, but not apoptosis or necroptosis. The extract markedly increased the LC3-II/LC3-I ratio, decreased SQSTM1/p62 protein, and enhanced vacuolization of the cytoplasm in Panc-1 cells. It activated AMPK, a positive regulator of autophagy, and inhibited mTOR, a negative autophagic regulator. The autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine and chloroquine partially prevented cell death. Morphologically, however, focal membrane rupture, nuclear shrinkage, focal swelling of the perinuclear space and electron dense mitochondria, which are unique morphological features of autosis, were observed. The extract enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and the antioxidant N-acetylcystein attenuated cell death. Our study revealed that daily intraperitoneal administration of the extract significantly prolonged survival (P = 0.0069) in a peritoneal dissemination model and suppressed tumor growth in an orthotopic model of pancreatic cancer (P < 0.01) without serious adverse effects. Although [6]-shogaol but not [6]-gingerol showed similar effects, chromatographic analyses suggested the presence of other constituent(s) as active substances. Together, these results show that ginger extract has potent anticancer activity against pancreatic cancer cells by inducing ROS-mediated autosis and warrants further investigation in order to develop an efficacious candidate drug.

  16. Anticancer Effect of Ginger Extract against Pancreatic Cancer Cells Mainly through Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Autotic Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Akimoto, Miho; Iizuka, Mari; Kanematsu, Rie; Yoshida, Masato; Takenaga, Keizo

    2015-01-01

    The extract of ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) and its major pungent components, [6]-shogaol and [6]-gingerol, have been shown to have an anti-proliferative effect on several tumor cell lines. However, the anticancer activity of the ginger extract in pancreatic cancer is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that the ethanol-extracted materials of ginger suppressed cell cycle progression and consequently induced the death of human pancreatic cancer cell lines, including Panc-1 cells. The underlying mechanism entailed autosis, a recently characterized form of cell death, but not apoptosis or necroptosis. The extract markedly increased the LC3-II/LC3-I ratio, decreased SQSTM1/p62 protein, and enhanced vacuolization of the cytoplasm in Panc-1 cells. It activated AMPK, a positive regulator of autophagy, and inhibited mTOR, a negative autophagic regulator. The autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine and chloroquine partially prevented cell death. Morphologically, however, focal membrane rupture, nuclear shrinkage, focal swelling of the perinuclear space and electron dense mitochondria, which are unique morphological features of autosis, were observed. The extract enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and the antioxidant N-acetylcystein attenuated cell death. Our study revealed that daily intraperitoneal administration of the extract significantly prolonged survival (P = 0.0069) in a peritoneal dissemination model and suppressed tumor growth in an orthotopic model of pancreatic cancer (P < 0.01) without serious adverse effects. Although [6]-shogaol but not [6]-gingerol showed similar effects, chromatographic analyses suggested the presence of other constituent(s) as active substances. Together, these results show that ginger extract has potent anticancer activity against pancreatic cancer cells by inducing ROS-mediated autosis and warrants further investigation in order to develop an efficacious candidate drug. PMID:25961833

  17. Anticancer Effect of Ginger Extract against Pancreatic Cancer Cells Mainly through Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Autotic Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Akimoto, Miho; Iizuka, Mari; Kanematsu, Rie; Yoshida, Masato; Takenaga, Keizo

    2015-01-01

    The extract of ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) and its major pungent components, [6]-shogaol and [6]-gingerol, have been shown to have an anti-proliferative effect on several tumor cell lines. However, the anticancer activity of the ginger extract in pancreatic cancer is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that the ethanol-extracted materials of ginger suppressed cell cycle progression and consequently induced the death of human pancreatic cancer cell lines, including Panc-1 cells. The underlying mechanism entailed autosis, a recently characterized form of cell death, but not apoptosis or necroptosis. The extract markedly increased the LC3-II/LC3-I ratio, decreased SQSTM1/p62 protein, and enhanced vacuolization of the cytoplasm in Panc-1 cells. It activated AMPK, a positive regulator of autophagy, and inhibited mTOR, a negative autophagic regulator. The autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine and chloroquine partially prevented cell death. Morphologically, however, focal membrane rupture, nuclear shrinkage, focal swelling of the perinuclear space and electron dense mitochondria, which are unique morphological features of autosis, were observed. The extract enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and the antioxidant N-acetylcystein attenuated cell death. Our study revealed that daily intraperitoneal administration of the extract significantly prolonged survival (P = 0.0069) in a peritoneal dissemination model and suppressed tumor growth in an orthotopic model of pancreatic cancer (P < 0.01) without serious adverse effects. Although [6]-shogaol but not [6]-gingerol showed similar effects, chromatographic analyses suggested the presence of other constituent(s) as active substances. Together, these results show that ginger extract has potent anticancer activity against pancreatic cancer cells by inducing ROS-mediated autosis and warrants further investigation in order to develop an efficacious candidate drug. PMID:25961833

  18. Cardiac glycoside-induced cell death and Rho/Rho kinase pathway: Implication of different regulation in cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Özdemir, Aysun; Şimay, Yaprak Dilber; İbişoğlu, Burçin; Yaren, Biljana; Bülbül, Döne; Ark, Mustafa

    2016-05-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that the Rho/ROCK pathway is involved in ouabain-induced apoptosis in HUVEC. In the current work, we investigated whether the Rho/ROCK pathway is functional during cardiac glycosides-induced cytotoxic effects in cancer cell lines, as well as in non-tumor cells. For that purpose, we evaluated the role of ROCK activation in bleb formation and cell migration over upstream and downstream effectors in addition to ROCK cleavage after cardiac glycosides treatment. All three cardiac glycosides (ouabain, digoxin and bufalin) induced cell death in HeLa and HepG2 cells and increased the formation of blebbing in HeLa cells. In contrast to our previous study, ROCK inhibitor Y27632 did not prevent bleb formation. Observation of ROCK II cleavage after ouabain, digoxin and oxaliplatin treatments in HeLa and/or HepG2 cells suggested that cleavage is independent of cell type and cell death induction. While inhibiting cleavage of ROCK II by the caspase inhibitors z-VAD-fmk, z-VDVAD-fmk and z-DEVD-fmk, evaluation of caspase 2 siRNA ineffectiveness on this truncation indicated that caspase-dependent ROCK II cleavage is differentially regulated in cancer cell lines. In HeLa cells, ouabain induced the activation of ROCK, although it did not induce phosphorylation of ERM, an upstream effector. While Y27632 inhibited the migration of HeLa cells, 10nM ouabain had no effect on cell migration. In conclusion, these findings indicate that the Rho/ROCK pathway is regulated differently in cancer cell lines compared to normal cells during cardiac glycosides-induced cell death. PMID:27017918

  19. Selective apoptotic cell death effects of oral cancer cells treated with destruxin B

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent studies have revealed that destruxins (Dtx) have potent cytotoxic activities on individual cancer cells, however, data on oral cancer cells especial human are absent. Methods Destruxin B (DB) was isolated and used to evaluate the selective cytotoxicity with human oral cancer cell lines, GNM (Neck metastasis of gingival carcinoma) and TSCCa (Tongue squamous cell carcinoma) cells, and normal gingival fibroblasts (GF) were also included as controls. Cells were tested with different concentrations of DB for 24, 48, and 72 h by MTT assay. Moreover, the mechanism of cytotoxicity was investigated using caspase-3 Immunofluorescence, annexin V/PI staining, and the expression of caspase-3, Bax, and Bcl-2 by western blotting after treated with different concentrations of DB for 72 h as parameters for apoptosis analyses. Results The results show that DB exhibited significant (p < 0.01) and selective time- and dose-dependent inhibitory effects on GNM and TSCCa cells viability but not on GF cells. The data suggested that DB is capable to induce tumor specific growth inhibition in oral GNM and TSCCa cancer cells via Bax/Bcl-2-mediated intrinsic mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in time- and dose-dependent manners. Conclusions This is the first report on the anti-proliferation effect of DB in oral cancer cells. The results reported here may offer further evidences to the development of DB as a potential complementary chemotherapeutic target for oral cancer complications. PMID:24972848

  20. Functionalized magnetic nanowires for chemical and magneto-mechanical induction of cancer cell death

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Banderas, Aldo Isaac; Aires, Antonio; Teran, Francisco J.; Perez, Jose Efrain; Cadenas, Jael F.; Alsharif, Nouf; Ravasi, Timothy; Cortajarena, Aitziber L.; Kosel, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Exploiting and combining different properties of nanomaterials is considered a potential route for next generation cancer therapies. Magnetic nanowires (NWs) have shown good biocompatibility and a high level of cellular internalization. We induced cancer cell death by combining the chemotherapeutic effect of doxorubicin (DOX)-functionalized iron NWs with the mechanical disturbance under a low frequency alternating magnetic field. (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were separately used for coating NWs allowing further functionalization with DOX. Internalization was assessed for both formulations by confocal reflection microscopy and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. From confocal analysis, BSA formulations demonstrated higher internalization and less agglomeration. The functionalized NWs generated a comparable cytotoxic effect in breast cancer cells in a DOX concentration-dependent manner, (~60% at the highest concentration tested) that was significantly different from the effect produced by free DOX and non-functionalized NWs formulations. A synergistic cytotoxic effect is obtained when a magnetic field (1 mT, 10 Hz) is applied to cells treated with DOX-functionalized BSA or APTES-coated NWs, (~70% at the highest concentration). In summary, a bimodal method for cancer cell destruction was developed by the conjugation of the magneto-mechanical properties of iron NWs with the effect of DOX producing better results than the individual effects. PMID:27775082

  1. Flow cytometry analysis of cancer cell death induced by the extract of Thai plant Ellipeiopsis cherrevensis.

    PubMed

    Yumoto, Ryoko; Kakizoe, Saki; Nagai, Junya; Patanasethanont, Denpong; Sripanidkulchai, Bung-Orn; Takano, Mikihisa

    2013-01-01

      The mechanism of cancer cell death induced by KP018, an ethanol extract of the Thai plant Ellipeiopsis cherrevensis, was examined in paclitaxel-resistant HepG2 (PR-HepG2) and colon-26 cells using flow cytometry. In PR-HepG2 cells, KP018 induced necrosis in a concentration-dependent manner. Necrosis of PR-HepG2 cells induced by KP018 as well as by hydrogen peroxide was suppressed by co-treatment of the cells with N-acetylcysteine. KP018 decreased the viability of colon-26 cells with an IC50 value of 15.1 µg/mL, which was estimated by XTT assay. As observed in PR-HepG2 cells, KP018 induced necrosis and the necrosis was suppressed by N-acetylcysteine in colon-26 cells. In addition, using colon-26 solid tumor-bearing mice, KP018 was found to suppress tumor growth without apparent toxicities under in vivo conditions. These results indicate that KP018 induces necrosis rather than apoptosis in these cancer cells, and reactive oxygen species such as hydrogen peroxide would be involved in KP018-induced necrosis. KP018 may be a useful source to search for a new anticancer drug that can be used for the chemotherapy of multidrug-resistant tumors.

  2. Cytotoxic hydrogen bridged ruthenium quinaldamide complexes showing induced cancer cell death by apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Lord, Rianne M; Allison, Simon J; Rafferty, Karen; Ghandhi, Laura; Pask, Christopher M; McGowan, Patrick C

    2016-08-16

    This report presents the first known p-cymene ruthenium quinaldamide complexes which are stabilised by a hydrogen-bridging atom, [{(p-cym)Ru(II)X(N,N)}{H(+)}{(N,N)XRu(II)(p-cym)}][PF6] (N,N = functionalised quinaldamide and X = Cl or Br). These complexes are formed by a reaction of [p-cymRu(μ-X)2]2 with a functionalised quinaldamide ligand. When filtered over NH4PF6, and under aerobic conditions the equilibrium of NH4PF6 ⇔ NH3 + HPF6 enables incorporation of HPF6 and the stabilisation of two monomeric ruthenium complexes by a bridging H(+), which are counter-balanced by a PF6 counterion. X-ray crystallographic analysis is presented for six new structures with OO distances of 2.420(4)-2.448(15) Å, which is significant for strong hydrogen bonds. Chemosensitivity studies against HCT116, A2780 and cisplatin-resistant A2780cis human cancer cells showed the ruthenium complexes with a bromide ancillary ligand to be more potent than those with a chloride ligand. The 4'-fluoro compounds show a reduction in potency for both chloride and bromide complexes against all cell lines, but an increase in selectivity towards cancer cells compared to non-cancer ARPE-19 cells, with a selectivity index >1. Mechanistic studies showed a clear correlation between IC50 values and induction of cell death by apoptosis. PMID:27417660

  3. Echinacoside induces apoptotic cancer cell death by inhibiting the nucleotide pool sanitizing enzyme MTH1

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Liwei; Wang, Hongge; Niu, Jiajing; Zou, Mingwei; Wu, Nuoting; Yu, Debin; Wang, Ye; Zou, Zhihua

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of the nucleotide pool sanitizing enzyme MTH1 causes extensive oxidative DNA damages and apoptosis in cancer cells and hence may be used as an anticancer strategy. As natural products have been a rich source of medicinal chemicals, in the present study, we used the MTH1-catalyzed enzymatic reaction as a high-throughput in vitro screening assay to search for natural compounds capable of inhibiting MTH1. Echinacoside, a compound derived from the medicinal plants Cistanche and Echinacea, effectively inhibited the catalytic activity of MTH1 in an in vitro assay. Treatment of various human cancer cell lines with Echinacoside resulted in a significant increase in the cellular level of oxidized guanine (8-oxoguanine), while cellular reactive oxygen species level remained unchanged, indicating that Echinacoside also inhibited the activity of cellular MTH1. Consequently, Echinacoside treatment induced an immediate and dramatic increase in DNA damage markers and upregulation of the G1/S-CDK inhibitor p21, which were followed by marked apoptotic cell death and cell cycle arrest in cancer but not in noncancer cells. Taken together, these studies identified a natural compound as an MTH1 inhibitor and suggest that natural products can be an important source of anticancer agents. PMID:26677335

  4. Theracurmin® efficiently inhibits the growth of human prostate and bladder cancer cells via induction of apoptotic cell death and cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Kang, Minyong; Ho, Jin-Nyoung; Kook, Ha Rim; Lee, Sangchul; Oh, Jong Jin; Hong, Sung Kyu; Lee, Sang Eun; Byun, Seok-Soo

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, we aimed to investigate the anticancer properties of Theracurmin®, a novel form of the yellow curry pigment curcumin, as well as explore the molecular mechanisms of the potential anticancer effects of Theracurmin® on human prostate cancer and bladder cancer cells in vitro. The proliferation of cancer cells was examined by using the Cell Counting Kit-8. The clonogenic growth potential was determined by clonogenic assay. Cell cycle distribution was evaluated by flow cytometry using propidium iodide staining. Western blot analysis was applied to explore the expression patterns of molecules associated with apoptotic cell death and cell cycle checkpoint. We noted that Theracurmin® and curcumin exhibited similar anticancer effects in both androgen-dependent and -independent human prostate cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. These agents reduced cell viability and clonogenic growth potential by inducing apoptosis and cell cycle disturbance in human prostate cancer cells. Theracurmin® and curcumin also exerted marked anticancer effects on human bladder cancer cells, even in cisplatin-resistant T24R2 cells, in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Moreover, Theracurmin® and curcumin treatment decreased cell viability and clonogenicity via induction of apoptotic cell death and cell cycle dysregulation in human bladder cancer cells. In conclusion, our study suggests that Theracurmin® has potential as an anticancer agent in complementary and alternative medicine for these urological cancers. PMID:26718024

  5. Niacin alleviates TRAIL-mediated colon cancer cell death via autophagy flux activation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Wook; Lee, Ju-Hee; Moon, Ji-Hong; Nazim, Uddin M.D.; Lee, You-Jin; Seol, Jae-Won; Hur, Jin; Eo, Seong-Kug; Lee, John-Hwa; Park, Sang-Youel

    2016-01-01

    Niacin, also known as vitamin B3 or nicotinamide is a water-soluble vitamin that is present in black beans and rice among other foods. Niacin is well known as an inhibitor of metastasis in human breast carcinoma cells but the effect of niacin treatment on TRAIL-mediated apoptosis is unknown. Here, we show that niacin plays an important role in the regulation of autophagic flux and protects tumor cells against TRAIL-mediated apoptosis. Our results indicated that niacin activated autophagic flux in human colon cancer cells and the autophagic flux activation protected tumor cells from TRAIL-induced dysfunction of mitochondrial membrane potential and tumor cell death. We also demonstrated that ATG5 siRNA and autophagy inhibitor blocked the niacin-mediated inhibition of TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Taken together, our study is the first report demonstrating that niacin inhibits TRAIL-induced apoptosis through activation of autophagic flux in human colon cancer cells. And our results also suggest that autophagy inhibitors including genetic and pharmacological tools may be a successful therapeutics during anticancer therapy using TRAIL. PMID:26517672

  6. Paclitaxel resistance is associated with switch from apoptotic to autophagic cell death in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Ajabnoor, G M A; Crook, T; Coley, H M

    2012-01-01

    Taxanes remain first line chemotherapy in management of metastatic breast cancer and have a key role in epithelial ovarian cancer, with increasingly common use of weekly paclitaxel dosing regimens. However, their clinical utility is limited by the development of chemoresistance. To address this, we modelled in vitro paclitaxel resistance in MCF-7 cells. We show that at clinically relevant drug doses, emerging paclitaxel resistance is associated with profound changes in cell death responses and a switch from apoptosis to autophagy as the principal mechanism of drug-induced cytotoxicity. This was characterised by a complete absence of caspase-mediated apoptotic cell death (using the pan-caspase-inhibitor Z-VAD) in paclitaxel-resistant MCF-7TaxR cells, compared with parent MCF-7 or MDA-MB-231 cell lines on paclitaxel challenge, downregulation of caspase-7, caspase-9 and BCl2-interacting mediator of cell death (BIM) expression. Silencing with small interfering RNA to BIM in MCF-7 parental cells was sufficient to confer paclitaxel resistance, inferring the significance in downregulation of this protein in contributing to the resistant phenotype of the MCF-7TaxR cell line. Conversely, there was an increased autophagic response in the MCF-7TaxR cell line with reduced phospho-mTOR and relative resistance to the mTOR inhibitors rapamycin and RAD001. In conclusion, we show for the first time that paclitaxel resistance is associated with profound changes in cell death response with deletion of multiple apoptotic factors balanced by upregulation of the autophagic pathway and collateral sensitivity to platinum. PMID:22278287

  7. 3-Bromopyruvate induces rapid human prostate cancer cell death by affecting cell energy metabolism, GSH pool and the glyoxalase system.

    PubMed

    Valenti, Daniela; Vacca, Rosa A; de Bari, Lidia

    2015-12-01

    3-bromopyruvate (3-BP) is an anti-tumour drug effective on hepatocellular carcinoma and other tumour cell types, which affects both glycolytic and mitochondrial targets, depleting cellular ATP pool. Here we tested 3-BP on human prostate cancer cells showing, differently from other tumour types, efficient ATP production and functional mitochondrial metabolism. We found that 3-BP rapidly induced cultured androgen-insensitive (PC-3) and androgen-responsive (LNCaP) prostate cancer cell death at low concentrations (IC(50) values of 50 and 70 μM, respectively) with a multimodal mechanism of action. In particular, 3-BP-treated PC-3 cells showed a selective, strong reduction of glyceraldeide 3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity, due to the direct interaction of the drug with the enzyme. Moreover, 3-BP strongly impaired both glutamate/malate- and succinate-dependent mitochondrial respiration, membrane potential generation and ATP synthesis, concomitant with the inhibition of respiratory chain complex I, II and ATP synthase activities. The drastic reduction of cellular ATP levels and depletion of GSH pool, associated with significant increase in cell oxidative stress, were found after 3-BP treatment of PC-3 cells. Interestingly, the activity of both glyoxalase I and II, devoted to the elimination of the cytotoxic methylglyoxal, was strongly inhibited by 3-BP. Both N-acetylcysteine and aminoguanidine, GSH precursor and methylglyoxal scavenger, respectively, prevented 3-BP-induced PC-3 cell death, showing that impaired cell antioxidant and detoxifying capacities are crucial events leading to cell death. The provided information on the multi-target cytotoxic action of 3-BP, finally leading to PC-3 cell necrosis, might be useful for future development of 3-BP as a therapeutic option for prostate cancer treatment. PMID:26530987

  8. Novel 8-hydroxylquinoline analogs induce copper-dependent proteasome inhibition and cell death in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Milacic, Vesna; Jiao, Peifu; Zhang, Bin; Yan, Bing; Dou, Q Ping

    2009-12-01

    An elevated level of copper (Cu), which is necessary for the growth and metastasis of tumor cells, has been found in many types of cancer, including breast, prostate, lung and brain. Although its molecular basis is unclear, this tumor-specific Cu elevation has been proposed to be a novel target for developing selective anti-cancer therapies. We previously reported that 8-hydroxylquinoline (8-OHQ) is able to form a Cu complex that inhibits the proteasome and induces apoptosis in cultured cancer cells. Toward the goal of discovering novel 8-OHQ analogs as potential anti-copper and anti-cancer drugs, in the current study we synthesized several 8-OHQ analogs and their copper complexes and evaluated their biological activities in human breast cancer cells. We report that when substitutions are made on the hydroxyl group of 8-OHQ, their copper mixtures have profound effects on the proteasome-inhibitory and apoptosis-inducing abilities in breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells. In addition, the proteasome-inhibitory and apoptosis-inducing activities of 8-OHQ analog-copper mixtures are determined by both the polarity and position of the substituents. Finally, a synthetic complex of 8-OHQ analog-copper was able to inhibit the proteasome activity, induce cell death and suppress the growth selectively in breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells, but not in normal immortalized human breast MCF-10A cells. Our results support the concept that human cancer cells and tissues, which contain an elevated copper level and are highly dependent on proteasome activity for their survival, should be sensitive to treatment with anti-copper drugs such as the novel 8-OHQ analogs described here.

  9. Breast cancer cells evade paclitaxel-induced cell death by developing resistance to dasatinib

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Yun-Ji; Kang, Jong Soon; Lee, Su In; So, Dong Min; Yun, Jieun; Baek, Ji Young; Kim, Sang Kyum; Lee, Kiho; Park, Song-Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), which does not express the progesterone, estrogen, or HER2/neu receptor, is aggressive and difficult to treat. Paclitaxel, a tubulin stabilizing agent, is one of the most frequently prescribed anticancer agents for breast cancers, including TNBC. Residual disease that occurs due to resistance or partial resistance of cancer cells in a tumor against anticancer agents is the most important issue in oncology. In the present study, when MDA-MB-231 cells, a TNBC cell line, were treated with 30 µM paclitaxel, a slightly higher concentration than its GI50 value, for 6 days, a small number of cells with different morphologies survived. Among the surviving cells, small round cells were isolated, cloned, and named MDA-MB-231-JYJ cells. MDA-MB-231-JYJ cells were observed to be highly proliferative and tumorigenic. In addition, signal transduction molecules involved in proliferation, survival, malignancy, or stemness of cancer cells, such as c-Src, c-Met, Notch 1, c-Myc, Sox2, Oct3/4, Nanog, and E-cadherin were highly expressed or activated. While further study is required, MDA-MB-231-JYJ cells appear to have some of the characteristics of cancer precursor cells. Although MDA-MB-231-JYJ cells were isolated from the cells that survived in the continuous presence of paclitaxel, they were not resistant to paclitaxel but developed resistance to dasatinib, a Bcr-Abl and Src kinase family inhibitor. The activated state of Src and Notch 1, and the expression levels of c-Myc and cyclins in MDA-MB-231-JYJ cells were less affected than MDA-MB-231 cells by the treatment of dasatinib, which may explain the resistance of MDA-MB-231-JYJ cells to dasatinib. These results suggest that cancer cells that become resistant to dasatinib during the process of paclitaxel therapy in patients may appear, and caution is required in the design of clinical trials using these two agents. PMID:27602155

  10. Adult Stromal Cells Derived from Human Adipose Tissue Provoke Pancreatic Cancer Cell Death both In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Cousin, Beatrice; Ravet, Emmanuel; Poglio, Sandrine; De Toni, Fabienne; Bertuzzi, Mélanie; Lulka, Hubert; Touil, Ismahane; André, Mireille; Grolleau, Jean-Louis; Péron, Jean-Marie; Chavoin, Jean-Pierre; Bourin, Philippe; Pénicaud, Luc; Casteilla, Louis; Buscail, Louis; Cordelier, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Background Normal tissue homeostasis is maintained by dynamic interactions between epithelial cells and their microenvironment. Disrupting this homeostasis can induce aberrant cell proliferation, adhesion, function and migration that might promote malignant behavior. Indeed, aberrant stromal-epithelial interactions contribute to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) spread and metastasis, and this raises the possibility that novel stroma-targeted therapies represent additional approaches for combating this malignant disease. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of human stromal cells derived from adipose tissue (ADSC) on pancreatic tumor cell proliferation. Principal Findings Co-culturing pancreatic tumor cells with ADSC and ADSC-conditioned medium sampled from different donors inhibited cancer cell viability and proliferation. ADSC-mediated inhibitory effect was further extended to other epithelial cancer-derived cell lines (liver, colon, prostate). ADSC conditioned medium induced cancer cell necrosis following G1-phase arrest, without evidence of apoptosis. In vivo, a single intra-tumoral injection of ADSC in a model of pancreatic adenocarcinoma induced a strong and long-lasting inhibition of tumor growth. Conclusion These data indicate that ADSC strongly inhibit PDAC proliferation, both in vitro and in vivo and induce tumor cell death by altering cell cycle progression. Therefore, ADSC may constitute a potential cell-based therapeutic alternative for the treatment of PDAC for which no effective cure is available. PMID:19609435

  11. ARP101, a selective MMP-2 inhibitor, induces autophagy-associated cell death in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jo, Yoon Kyung; Park, So Jung; Shin, Ji Hyun; Kim, Yunha; Hwang, Jung Jin; Cho, Dong-Hyung; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2011-01-28

    Autophagy is a catabolic cellular process involving self-digestion and turnover of macromolecules and entire organelles. Autophagy is primarily a protective process in response to cellular stress, but it can be associated with cell death. Genetic evidence also supports autophagy function as a tumor suppressor mechanism. To identify specific regulators to autophagy, we screened the Lopac 1280 and the Prestwick chemical libraries using a cell-based screening system with autophagy marker (green fluorescence protein conjugated LC3 protein (GFP-LC3)). We identified ARP101, a selective matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) inhibitor as one of the most potent inducer of autophagy. ARP101 treatment was highly effective in inducing the formation of autophagosome and conversion of LC3I into LC3II. Moreover, ARP101-induced autophagy was completely blocked in mouse embryo fibroblasts that lacked autophagy related gene 5 (ATG5(-/-) MEF). Interestingly, cell death induced by ARP101 was not inhibited by zVAD, a pan caspase inhibitor, whereas, it was efficiently suppressed by addition of 3-methyladenine, an autophagy inhibitor. These results suggest that the selective MMP-2 inhibitor, ARP101, induces autophagy and autophagy-associated cell death. PMID:21187062

  12. Intravital imaging reveals p53-dependent cancer cell death induced by phototherapy via calcium signaling

    PubMed Central

    Missiroli, Sonia; Poletti, Federica; Ramirez, Fabian Galindo; Morciano, Giampaolo; Morganti, Claudia; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Mammano, Fabio; Pinton, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    One challenge in biology is signal transduction monitoring in a physiological context. Intravital imaging techniques are revolutionizing our understanding of tumor and host cell behaviors in the tumor environment. However, these deep tissue imaging techniques have not yet been adopted to investigate the second messenger calcium (Ca2+). In the present study, we established conditions that allow the in vivo detection of Ca2+ signaling in three-dimensional tumor masses in mouse models. By combining intravital imaging and a skinfold chamber technique, we determined the ability of photodynamic cancer therapy to induce an increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentrations and, consequently, an increase in cell death in a p53-dependent pathway. PMID:25544762

  13. Intravital imaging reveals p53-dependent cancer cell death induced by phototherapy via calcium signaling.

    PubMed

    Giorgi, Carlotta; Bonora, Massimo; Missiroli, Sonia; Poletti, Federica; Ramirez, Fabian Galindo; Morciano, Giampaolo; Morganti, Claudia; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Mammano, Fabio; Pinton, Paolo

    2015-01-30

    One challenge in biology is signal transduction monitoring in a physiological context. Intravital imaging techniques are revolutionizing our understanding of tumor and host cell behaviors in the tumor environment. However, these deep tissue imaging techniques have not yet been adopted to investigate the second messenger calcium (Ca²⁺). In the present study, we established conditions that allow the in vivo detection of Ca²⁺ signaling in three-dimensional tumor masses in mouse models. By combining intravital imaging and a skinfold chamber technique, we determined the ability of photodynamic cancer therapy to induce an increase in intracellular Ca²⁺ concentrations and, consequently, an increase in cell death in a p53-dependent pathway.

  14. 6-Shogaol Inhibits Breast Cancer Cells and Stem Cell-Like Spheroids by Modulation of Notch Signaling Pathway and Induction of Autophagic Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Anasuya; Vasudevan, Smreti; Sengupta, Suparna

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) pose a serious obstacle to cancer therapy as they can be responsible for poor prognosis and tumour relapse. In this study, we have investigated inhibitory activity of the ginger-derived compound 6-shogaol against breast cancer cells both in monolayer and in cancer-stem cell-like spheroid culture. The spheroids were generated from adherent breast cancer cells. 6-shogaol was effective in killing both breast cancer monolayer cells and spheroids at doses that were not toxic to noncancerous cells. The percentages of CD44+CD24-/low cells and the secondary sphere content were reduced drastically upon treatment with 6-shogaol confirming its action on CSCs. Treatment with 6-shogaol caused cytoplasmic vacuole formation and cleavage of microtubule associated protein Light Chain3 (LC3) in both monolayer and spheroid culture indicating that it induced autophagy. Kinetic analysis of the LC3 expression and a combination treatment with chloroquine revealed that the autophagic flux instigated cell death in 6-shogaol treated breast cancer cells in contrast to the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine. Furthermore, 6-shogaol-induced cell death got suppressed in the presence of chloroquine and a very low level of apoptosis was exhibited even after prolonged treatment of the compound, suggesting that autophagy is the major mode of cell death induced by 6-shogaol in breast cancer cells. 6-shogaol reduced the expression levels of Cleaved Notch1 and its target proteins Hes1 and Cyclin D1 in spheroids, and the reduction was further pronounced in the presence of a γ-secretase inhibitor. Secondary sphere formation in the presence of the inhibitor was also further reduced by 6-shogaol. Together, these results indicate that the inhibitory action of 6-shogaol on spheroid growth and sustainability is conferred through γ-secretase mediated down-regulation of Notch signaling. The efficacy of 6-shogaol in monolayer and cancer stem cell-like spheroids raise hope for its

  15. Plumbagin induces cell death through a copper-redox cycle mechanism in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Nazeem, S; Azmi, Asfar S; Hanif, Sarmad; Ahmad, Aamir; Mohammad, Ramzi M; Hadi, S M; Kumar, K Sateesh

    2009-09-01

    Plumbagin, a naphthoquinone derived from the medicinal plant Plumbago zeylanica has been shown to exert anticancer and anti-proliferative activities in cells in culture as well as animal tumor models. In our previous paper, we have reported the cytotoxic action of plumbagin in plasmid pBR322 DNA as well as human peripheral blood lymphocytes through a redox mechanism involving copper. Copper has been shown to be capable of mediating the action of several plant-derived compounds through production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The objective of the present study was to determine whether plumbagin induces apoptosis in human cancer cells through the same mechanism which we proposed earlier. Using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium, inner salt assay, 3-(4,5-B-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay for cell growth inhibition, histone/DNA ELISA, homogeneous caspase-3/7 assay for apoptosis as well as alkaline comet assay for DNA single-strand breaks detection in this report, we confirm that plumbagin causes effective cell growth inhibition, induces apoptosis and generates single-strand breaks in cancer cells. Incubation of cancer cells with scavengers of ROS and neocuproine inhibited the cytotoxic action of plumbagin proving that generation of ROS and Cu(I) are the critical mediators in plumbagin-induced cell growth inhibition. This study is the first to investigate the copper-mediated anticancer mechanism of plumbagin in human cancer cells and these properties of plumbagin could be further explored for the development of anticancer agents with higher therapeutic indices, especially for skin cancer.

  16. miR-203 inhibits cell proliferation and promotes cisplatin induced cell death in tongue squamous cancer.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jiong; Lin, Yao; Fan, Li; Kuang, Wei; Zheng, Liwei; Wu, Jiahua; Shang, Peng; Wang, Qiaofeng; Tan, Jiali

    2016-04-29

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is one of the most common types of the head and neck cancer. Chemo resistance of OSCC has been identified as a substantial therapeutic hurdle. In this study, we analyzed the role of miR-203 in the OSCC and its effects on cisplatin-induced cell death in an OSCC cell line, Tca8113. There was a significant decrease of miR-203 expression in OSCC samples, compared with the adjacent normal, non-cancerous tissue. After 3 days cisplatin treatment, the survived Tca8113 cells had a lower expression of miR-203 than that in the untreated control group. In contrast, PIK3CA showed an inverse expression in cancer and cisplatin survived Tca8113 cells. Transfection of Tca8113 cells with miR-203 mimics greatly reduced PIK3CA expression and Akt activation. Furthermore, miR-203 repressed PIK3CA expression through targeting the 3'UTR. Restoration of miR-203 not only suppressed cell proliferation, but also sensitized cells to cisplatin induced cell apoptosis. This effect was absent in cells that were simultaneously treated with PIK3CA RNAi. In summary, these findings suggest miR-203 plays an important role in cisplatin resistance in OSCC, and furthermore delivery of miR-203 analogs may serve as an adjuvant therapy for OSCC.

  17. Vitamin B₂ Sensitizes Cancer Cells to Vitamin-C-Induced Cell Death via Modulation of Akt and Bad Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ni; Yin, Shutao; Song, Xinhua; Fan, Lihong; Hu, Hongbo

    2015-08-01

    Vitamin C is an essential dietary nutrient that has a variety of biological functions. Recent studies have provided promising evidence for its additional health benefits, including anticancer activity. Vitamin B2, another essential dietary nutrient, often coexists with vitamin C in some fruits, vegetables, or dietary supplements. The objective of the present study is to determine whether the combination of vitamin C and B2 can achieve a synergistic anticancer activity. MDA-MB-231, MCF-7, and A549 cells were employed to evaluate the combinatory effects of vitamin C and B2. We found that the combination of vitamin C and B2 resulted in a synergistic cell death induction in all cell lines tested. Further mechanistic investigations revealed that vitamin B2 sensitized cancer cells to vitamin C through inhibition of Akt and Bad phosphorylation. Our findings identified vitamin B2 as a promising sensitizer for improving the efficacy of vitamin-C-based cancer chemoprevention and chemotherapy. PMID:26165392

  18. Vitamin B₂ Sensitizes Cancer Cells to Vitamin-C-Induced Cell Death via Modulation of Akt and Bad Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ni; Yin, Shutao; Song, Xinhua; Fan, Lihong; Hu, Hongbo

    2015-08-01

    Vitamin C is an essential dietary nutrient that has a variety of biological functions. Recent studies have provided promising evidence for its additional health benefits, including anticancer activity. Vitamin B2, another essential dietary nutrient, often coexists with vitamin C in some fruits, vegetables, or dietary supplements. The objective of the present study is to determine whether the combination of vitamin C and B2 can achieve a synergistic anticancer activity. MDA-MB-231, MCF-7, and A549 cells were employed to evaluate the combinatory effects of vitamin C and B2. We found that the combination of vitamin C and B2 resulted in a synergistic cell death induction in all cell lines tested. Further mechanistic investigations revealed that vitamin B2 sensitized cancer cells to vitamin C through inhibition of Akt and Bad phosphorylation. Our findings identified vitamin B2 as a promising sensitizer for improving the efficacy of vitamin-C-based cancer chemoprevention and chemotherapy.

  19. Macrolides sensitize EGFR-TKI-induced non-apoptotic cell death via blocking autophagy flux in pancreatic cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    MUKAI, SHUNTARO; MORIYA, SHOTA; HIRAMOTO, MASAKI; KAZAMA, HIROMI; KOKUBA, HIROKO; CHE, XIAO-FANG; YOKOYAMA, TOMOHISA; SAKAMOTO, SATOSHI; SUGAWARA, AKIHIRO; SUNAZUKA, TOSHIAKI; ŌMURA, SATOSHI; HANDA, HIROSHI; ITOI, TAKAO; MIYAZAWA, KEISUKE

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most difficult types of cancer to treat because of its high mortality rate due to chemotherapy resistance. We previously reported that combined treatment with gefitinib (GEF) and clarithromycin (CAM) results in enhanced cytotoxicity of GEF along with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress loading in non-small cell lung cancer cell lines. An epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI) such as GEF induces autophagy in a pro-survival role, whereas CAM inhibits autophagy flux in various cell lines. Pronounced GEF-induced cytotoxicity therefore appears to depend on the efficacy of autophagy inhibition. In the present study, we compared the effect on autophagy inhibition among such macrolides as CAM, azithromycin (AZM), and EM900, a novel 12-membered non-antibiotic macrolide. We then assessed the enhanced GEF-induced cytotoxic effect on pancreatic cancer cell lines BxPC-3 and PANC-1. Autophagy flux analysis indicated that AZM is the most effective autophagy inhibitor of the three macrolides. CAM exhibits an inhibitory effect but less than AZM and EM900. Notably, the enhancing effect of GEF-induced cytotoxicity by combining macrolides correlated well with their efficient autophagy inhibition. However, this pronounced cytotoxicity was not due to upregulation of apoptosis induction, but was at least partially mediated through necroptosis. Our data suggest the possibility of using macrolides as ‘chemosensitizers’ for EGFR-TKI therapy in pancreatic cancer patients to enhance non-apoptotic tumor cell death induction. PMID:26718641

  20. JunD-mediated repression of GADD45α and γ regulates escape from cell death in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    de Vasconcellos, Jaíra Ferreira; Czibere, Akos; Wang, Yihong; Paccez, Juliano D; Gu, Xuesong; Zhou, Jin-Rong; Libermann, Towia A

    2011-01-01

    The AP-1 transcription factor complex has been implicated in a variety of biological processes including cell differentiation, proliferation, apoptosis and oncogenic transformation. We previously established that activation of the AP-1 family member JunD contributes to deregulated expression of the anti-apoptotic IL-6 gene in prostate cancer cells. We now show that inhibition of JunD in prostate cancer cells results in GADD45α and γ dependent induction of cell death and inhibition of tumor growth that is mediated at least partially via c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 kinase activation. Apoptosis induction by dominant negative JunD and JNK and p38 kinase activation are impeded upon knock down of GADD45α and γ expression by small interfering RNA, most vividly demonstrating the central role of GADD45α and γ in JunD-mediated escape of prostate cancer cells from programmed cell death. PMID:21734453

  1. Androstane derivatives induce apoptotic death in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jakimov, Dimitar S; Kojić, Vesna V; Aleksić, Lidija D; Bogdanović, Gordana M; Ajduković, Jovana J; Djurendić, Evgenija A; Penov Gaši, Katarina M; Sakač, Marija N; Jovanović-Šanta, Suzana S

    2015-11-15

    Biological investigation was conducted to study in vitro antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic potential of selected 17α-picolyl and 17(E)-picolinylidene androstane derivatives. The antiproliferative impact was examined on six human tumor cell lines, including two types of breast (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231), prostate (PC3), cervical (HeLa), colon (HT 29) and lung cancer (A549), as well as one normal fetal lung fibroblasts cell line (MRC-5). All derivatives selectively decreased proliferation of estrogen receptor negative MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells after 48 h and 72 h treatment and compounds showed time-dependent activity. We used this cell line to investigate cell cycle modulation and apoptotic cell death induction by flow cytometry, expression of apoptotic proteins by Western blot and apoptotic morphology by visual observation. Tested androstane derivatives affected the cell cycle distribution and induced apoptosis and necrosis. Compounds had different and specific mode of action, depending on derivative type and exposure time. Some compounds induced significant apoptosis measured by Annexin V test compared to reference compound formestane. Higher expression of pro-apoptotic BAX, downregulation of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and cleavage of PARP protein were confirmed in almost all treated samples, but the lack of caspase-3 activation suggested the induction of apoptosis in caspase-independent manner. More cells with apoptotic morphology were observed in samples after prolonged treatment. Structure-activity relationship analysis was performed to find correlations between the structure variations of investigated derivatives and observed biological effects. Results of this study showed that some of the investigated androstane derivatives have good biomedical potential and could be candidates for anticancer drug development.

  2. Evaluation of Biofield Treatment Dose and Distance in a Model of Cancer Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Shrikant; Dave, Umang; Alves-dos-Santos, Leonardo; Gon, Kimberly; Arauz, Robert; Rachlin, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective This study assessed the potential influence of biofield treatment on cultured human cancer cells and whether such influence was affected by varying the duration of the treatment (dose) or the distance between the biofield practitioner and the target cells. Design Biofield treatment dosage was assessed from a short distance (0.25 meters) in three independent experiments involving 1, 2, or 5 treatments, along with another set of three independent and comparable mock experiments. Biofield treatment distance was assessed at 0.25, 25, and ∼ 2000 meters involving two treatments in three independent experiments along with another set of three mock experiments. Intervention Biofield treatments were delivered by a highly acclaimed biofield practitioner with the intention of diminishing growth of the cells or inducing cancer-cell death. Outcome measure Cell viability was quantified 20 hours after treatments, using a spectrophotometric assay for live-cell counting. The dependent measure for each experiment was the log ratio of the cell viability values of treated samples (biofield or mock) over the values of untreated control samples. Results A trend of decreasing cell viability with increasing biofield dose was evident in the first set of experiments assessing dose–response; however, no such effect was evident in the second set of experiments evaluating biofield treatment distance. Mock experiments yielded relatively stable viability ratios in both sets of experiments. Linear regression analysis and hypothesis testing of the data taken as a whole did not yield statistical significance at p<0.05. Conclusions These results represent the first indication of a biofield treatment dose–response in a controlled laboratory setting. The data are inconclusive because of the inability of reproduce the cellular response in a replicate experiment. PMID:22732075

  3. Influence of Berry-Polyphenols on Receptor Signaling and Cell-Death Pathways: Implications for Breast Cancer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Aiyer, Harini S; Warri, Anni M; Woode, Denzel R; Hilakivi-Clarke, Leena; Clarke, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among women worldwide. Many women have become more aware of the benefits of increasing fruit consumption, as part of a healthy lifestyle, for the prevention of cancer. The mechanisms by which fruits, including berries, prevent breast cancer can be partially explained by exploring their interactions with pathways known influence cell-proliferation and evasion of cell-death. Two receptor pathways- estrogen receptor (ER) and tyrosine kinase receptors, especially the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family- are drivers of cell-proliferation and play a significant role in the development of both primary and recurrent breast cancer. There is strong evidence to show that several phytochemicals present in berries such as cyanidin, delphinidin, quercetin, kaempferol, ellagic acid, resveratrol and pterostilbene, interact with and alter the effects of these pathways. Further, they also induce cell death (apoptosis and autophagy) via their influence on kinase signaling. In this review, we summarize in vitro data regarding the interaction of berry polyphenols with the specific receptors and the mechanisms by which they induce cell death. Further, we also present in vivo data of primary breast cancer prevention by individual compounds and whole berries. Finally, we present a possible role for berries and berry compounds in the prevention of breast cancer and our perspective on the areas that require further research. PMID:22300613

  4. Photoacoustic spectral analysis to sense programmed erythrocyte cell death (eryptosis) for monitoring cancer response to treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadhel, Muhannad N.; Kibria, Fayruz; Kolios, Michael C.

    2016-03-01

    Many types of cancer therapies target the tumor microenvironment, causing biochemical and morphological changes in tissues. In therapies using ultrasound activated microbubbles, vascular collapse is typically reported. Red blood cells (RBCs) that leak out of the vasculature become exposed to the ceramide that is released from damaged endothelial cells. Ceramide can induce programmed cell death in RBCs (eryptosis), and is characterized by cell shrinkage, membrane blebbing and scrambling. Since the effect of eryptotic cells on generated photoacoustics (PA) signals has not been reported, we investigated the potential PA may have for cancer treatment monitoring by using PA spectral analysis to sense eryptosis. To induce eryptosis, C2-ceramide was added to RBC suspensions and that were incubated for 24 hours at 37°C. A control and ceramide-induced sample was imaged in a vessel phantom using a high frequency PA system (VevoLAZR, 10 - 45 MHz bandwidth) irradiated with multiple wavelengths ranging from 680 to 900 nm. PA spectral parameters were measured and linked to changes in RBCs as it underwent eryptosis. These samples were examined using optical microscopy, a blood gas analyzer and an integrating sphere setup to measure optical properties (wavelengths 600 - 900 nm). The results of the experiment demonstrate how PA spectral analysis can be used to identify eryptosis at a depth of more than 1 cm into the phantom using ultrasound derived the y-intercept and mid bandfit (MBF) parameters at optical wavelengths of 800 - 900 nm. These parameters were correlated to the morphological and biochemical changes that eryptotic RBCs display. The results establish the potential of PA in cancer treatment monitoring through sensing treatment induced eryptosis.

  5. Plasmonic Imaging of Human Oral Cancer Cell Communities During Programmed Cell Death by Nuclear Targeting Silver Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Lauren A.; Kang, Bin; Yen, Chun-Wan; El-Sayed, Mostafa A.

    2016-01-01

    Plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs) have become a useful platform in the biomedical field due to their potential use in disease diagnosis and treatment. Recently, it has been reported that plasmonic NPs conjugated to nuclear-targeting peptides cause DNA damage and apoptotic populations in cancer cells. In the present work, we utilized the plasmonic scattering property and the ability of nuclear-targeted silver nanoparticles (NLS/RGD-AgNPs) to induce programmed cell death in order to image in real-time the behavior of human oral squamous carcinoma (HSC-3) cell communities during and after the induction of apoptosis. Plasmonic live-cell imaging (movie) revealed that HSC-3 cells behave as non-professional phagocytes. The induction of apoptosis in some cells led to the attraction and their subsequent engulfment by the neighboring cells. Attraction to apoptotic cells resulted in clustering of cellular community. The live-cell imaging movies also revealed that as the initial concentration of NLS/RGD-AgNPs increases, the rate of self-killing increases and the degree of attraction and clustering decreases. These results are discussed in terms of the proposed mechanism of cells undergoing programmed cell death. PMID:21981727

  6. Delayed luminescence to monitor programmed cell death induced by berberine on thyroid cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scordino, Agata; Campisi, Agata; Grasso, Rosaria; Bonfanti, Roberta; Gulino, Marisa; Iauk, Liliana; Parenti, Rosalba; Musumeci, Francesco

    2014-11-01

    Correlation between apoptosis and UVA-induced ultraweak photon emission delayed luminescence (DL) from tumor thyroid cell lines was investigated. In particular, the effects of berberine, an alkaloid that has been reported to have anticancer activities, on two cancer cell lines were studied. The FTC-133 and 8305C cell lines, as representative of follicular and anaplastic thyroid human cancer, respectively, were chosen. The results show that berberine is able to arrest cell cycle and activate apoptotic pathway as shown in both cell lines by deoxyribonucleic acid fragmentation, caspase-3 cleavage, p53 and p27 protein overexpression. In parallel, changes in DL spectral components after berberine treatment support the hypothesis that DL from human cells originates mainly from mitochondria, since berberine acts especially at the mitochondrial level. The decrease of DL blue component for both cell lines could be related to the decrease of intra-mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and may be a hallmark of induced apoptosis. In contrast, the response in the red spectral range is different for the two cell lines and may be ascribed to a different iron homeostasis.

  7. Anti-cancer effect of bee venom toxin and melittin in ovarian cancer cells through induction of death receptors and inhibition of JAK2/STAT3 pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Jo, Miran; Park, Mi Hee; Kollipara, Pushpa Saranya; An, Byeong Jun; Song, Ho Sueb; Han, Sang Bae; Kim, Jang Heub; Song, Min Jong; Hong, Jin Tae

    2012-01-01

    We investigated whether bee venom and melittin, a major component of bee venom, inhibit cell growth through enhancement of death receptor expressions in the human ovarian cancer cells, SKOV3 and PA-1. Bee venom (1–5 μg/ml) and melittin (0.5–2 μg/ml) inhibited the growth of SKOV3 and PA-1 ovarian cancer cells by the induction of apoptotic cell death in a dose dependent manner. Consistent with apoptotic cell death, expression of death receptor (DR) 3 and DR6 was increased in both cancer cells, but expression of DR4 was increased only in PA-1 cells. Expression of DR downstream pro-apoptotic proteins including caspase-3, 8, and Bax was concomitantly increased, but the phosphorylation of JAK2 and STAT3 and the expression of Bcl-2 were inhibited by treatment with bee venom and melittin in SKOV3 and PA-1 cells. Expression of cleaved caspase-3 was increased in SKOV3, but cleaved caspase-8 was increased in PA-1 cells. Moreover, deletion of DR3, DR4, and DR6 by small interfering RNA significantly reversed bee venom and melittin-induced cell growth inhibitory effect as well as down regulation of STAT3 by bee venom and melittin in SKOV3 and PA-1 ovarian cancer cell. These results suggest that bee venom and melittin induce apoptotic cell death in ovarian cancer cells through enhancement of DR3, DR4, and DR6 expression and inhibition of STAT3 pathway. -- Highlights: ► Some studies have showed that bee venom and/or melittin have anti-cancer effects. ► We found that bee venom and melittin inhibited cell growth in ovarian cancer cells. ► Bee venom and melittin induce apoptosis in SKOV3 and PA-1.

  8. Dr. Josef Steiner Cancer Research Prize Lecture: the role of physiological cell death in neoplastic transformation and in anti-cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Strasser, A

    1999-05-17

    Cell death is a physiological process which is required for normal development and existence of multi-cellular organisms. Physiological cell death, or apoptosis, is controlled by an evolutionarily conserved mechanism. Abnormalities in this process are implicated as a cause or contributing factor in a variety of diseases. Inhibition of apoptosis can promote neoplastic transformation, particularly in combination with dysregulated cell-cycle control, and can influence the response of tumour cells to anti-cancer therapy. Molecular biological and biochemical approaches are used to find missing cell-death regulators and to define signalling cascades, while experiments in genetically modified mice will identify the essential function of these molecules. Discoveries from cell death research should provide clues for designing therapies for a variety of diseases, including degenerative disorders, auto-immunity and cancer.

  9. Dr. Josef Steiner Cancer Research Prize Lecture: the role of physiological cell death in neoplastic transformation and in anti-cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Strasser, A

    1999-05-17

    Cell death is a physiological process which is required for normal development and existence of multi-cellular organisms. Physiological cell death, or apoptosis, is controlled by an evolutionarily conserved mechanism. Abnormalities in this process are implicated as a cause or contributing factor in a variety of diseases. Inhibition of apoptosis can promote neoplastic transformation, particularly in combination with dysregulated cell-cycle control, and can influence the response of tumour cells to anti-cancer therapy. Molecular biological and biochemical approaches are used to find missing cell-death regulators and to define signalling cascades, while experiments in genetically modified mice will identify the essential function of these molecules. Discoveries from cell death research should provide clues for designing therapies for a variety of diseases, including degenerative disorders, auto-immunity and cancer. PMID:10225436

  10. Tumor-targeting novel manganese complex induces ROS-mediated apoptotic and autophagic cancer cell death

    PubMed Central

    LIU, JIA; GUO, WENJIE; LI, JING; LI, XIANG; GENG, JI; CHEN, QIUYUN; GAO, JING

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the antitumor activity of the novel manganese (II) compound, Adpa-Mn {[(Adpa)Mn(Cl)(H2O)] (Adpa=bis(2-pyridylmethyl)amino-2-propionic acid)}, and its possible mechanisms of action were investigated. In vitro, the growth inhibitory effects of Adpa-Mn (with IC50 values lower than 15 μM) on tumor cell lines were examined by MTT assay. We found that this compound was more selective against cancer cells than the popular chemotherapeutic reagent, cisplatin. We then found that Adpa-Mn achieved its selectivity against cancer cells through the transferrin (Tf)-transferrin receptor (TfR) system, which is highly expressed in tumor cells. Furthermore, Adpa-Mn induced both apoptosis and autophagy, as indicated by chromatin condensation, the activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), Annexin V/prop-idium iodide staining, an enhanced fluorescence intensity of monodansylcadaverine (MDC), as well as the elevated expression of the autophagy-related protein, microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3). In addition, Adpa-Mn induced the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and its anticancer effects were significantly reduced following pre-treatment with the antioxidant, N-acetyl cysteine, indicating that ROS triggered cell death. In vivo, the induction of apoptosis and autophagy in tumor tissue was confirmed following treatment with Adpa-Mn, which contributed to its significant antitumor activity against hepatocellular carcinoma (Hep-A cell) xenografts at 10 mg/kg. Taken together, these data suggest the possible use of Adpa-Mn as a novel anticancer drug. PMID:25604962

  11. Synergistic chemopreventive effects of curcumin and berberine on human breast cancer cells through induction of apoptosis and autophagic cell death.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Zhang, Chao; Bao, Jiaolin; Jia, Xuejing; Liang, Yeer; Wang, Xiaotong; Chen, Meiwan; Su, Huanxing; Li, Peng; Wan, Jian-Bo; He, Chengwei

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin (CUR) and berberine (BBR) are renowned natural compounds that exhibit potent anticancer activities through distinct molecular mechanisms. However, the anticancer capacity of either CUR or BBR is limited. This prompted us to investigate the chemopreventive potential of co-treatment of CUR and BBR against breast cancers. The results showed that CUR and BBR in combination synergistically inhibited the growth of both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells than the compounds used alone. Further study confirmed that synergistic anti-breast cancer activities of co-treatment of these two compounds was through inducing more apoptosis and autophagic cell death (ACD). The co-treatment-induced apoptosis was caspase-dependent and through activating ERK pathways. Our data also demonstrated that co-treatment of CUR and BBR strongly up-regulated phosphorylation of JNK and Beclin1, and decreased phosphorylated Bcl-2. Inhibition of JNK by SP600125 markedly decreased LC3-II and Beclin1, restored phosphorylated Bcl-2, and reduced the cytotoxicity induced by the two compounds in combination. These results strongly suggested that JNK/Bcl-2/Beclin1 pathway played a key role in the induction of ACD in breast cancer cells by co-treatment of CUR and BBR. This study provides an insight into the potential application of curcumin and berberine in combination for the chemoprevention and treatment of breast cancers. PMID:27263652

  12. Gedunin inactivates the co-chaperone p23 protein causing cancer cell death by apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Patwardhan, Chaitanya A; Fauq, Abdul; Peterson, Laura B; Miller, Charles; Blagg, Brian S J; Chadli, Ahmed

    2013-03-01

    Pharmacological inhibition of Hsp90 is an exciting option for cancer therapy. The clinical efficacy of Hsp90 inhibitors is, however, less than expected. Binding of the co-chaperone p23 to Hsp90 and induced overexpression of anti-apoptotic proteins Hsp70 and Hsp27 are thought to contribute to this outcome. Herein, we report that the natural product gedunin may provide a new alternative to inactivate the Hsp90 machine. We show that gedunin directly binds to p23 and inactivates it, without overexpression of Hsp27 and relatively modest induction of Hsp70. Using molecular docking and mutational analysis, we mapped the gedunin-binding site on p23. Functional analysis shows that gedunin inhibits the p23 chaperoning activity, blocks its cellular interaction with Hsp90, and interferes with p23-mediated gene regulation. Cell treatment with gedunin leads to cancer cell death by apoptosis through inactivation of p23 and activation of caspase 7, which cleaves p23 at the C terminus. These results provide important insight into the molecular mechanism of action of this promising lead compound. PMID:23355466

  13. Contribution of mitochondria and lysosomes to photodynamic therapy-induced death in cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieminen, Anna-Liisa; Azizuddin, Kashif; Zhang, Ping; Kenney, Malcolm E.; Pediaditakis, Peter; Lemasters, John J.; Oleinick, Nancy L.

    2008-02-01

    In photodynamic therapy (PDT), visible light activates a photosensitizing drug added to a tissue, resulting in singlet oxygen formation and cell death. Employing confocal microscopy, we previously found that the phthalocyanine Pc 4 localized primarily to mitochondrial membranes in various cancer cell lines, resulting in mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, followed by inner membrane permeabilization (mitochondrial permeability transition) with mitochondrial depolarization and swelling, which in turn led to cytochrome c release and apoptotic death. Recently, derivatives of Pc 4 with OH groups added to one of the axial ligands were synthesized. These derivatives appeared to be taken up more avidly by cells and caused more cytotoxicity than the parent compound Pc 4. Using organelle-specific fluorophores, we found that one of these derivatives, Pc 181, accumulated into lysosomes and that PDT with Pc 181 caused rapid disintegration of lysosomes. We hypothesized that chelatable iron released from lysosomes during PDT contributes to mitochondrial damage and subsequent cell death. We monitored cytosolic Fe2+ concentrations after PDT with calcein. Fe2+ binds to calcein causing quenching of calcein fluorescence. After bafilomycin, an inhibitor of the vacuolar proton-translocating ATPase, calcein fluorescence became quenched, an effect prevented by starch desferal s-DFO, an iron chelator that enters cells by endocytosis. After Pc 181-PDT, cytosolic calcein fluorescence also decreased, indicating increased chelatable Fe2+ in the cytosol, and apoptosis occurred. s-DFO decreased Pc 181-PDT-induced apoptosis as measured by a decrease of caspase-3 activation. In isolated mitochondria preparations, Fe2+ induced mitochondrial swelling, which was prevented by Ru360, an inhibitor of the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter. The data support a hypothesis of oxidative injury in which Pc 181-PDT disintegrates lysosomes and releases constituents that synergistically promote

  14. Conserved features of cancer cells define their sensitivity to HAMLET-induced death; c-Myc and glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Storm, P; Aits, S; Puthia, M K; Urbano, A; Northen, T; Powers, S; Bowen, B; Chao, Y; Reindl, W; Lee, D Y; Sullivan, N L; Zhang, J; Trulsson, M; Yang, H; Watson, J D; Svanborg, C

    2011-12-01

    HAMLET is the first member of a new family of tumoricidal protein-lipid complexes that kill cancer cells broadly, while sparing healthy, differentiated cells. Many and diverse tumor cell types are sensitive to the lethal effect, suggesting that HAMLET identifies and activates conserved death pathways in cancer cells. Here, we investigated the molecular basis for the difference in sensitivity between cancer cells and healthy cells. Using a combination of small-hairpin RNA (shRNA) inhibition, proteomic and metabolomic technology, we identified the c-Myc oncogene as one essential determinant of HAMLET sensitivity. Increased c-Myc expression levels promoted sensitivity to HAMLET and shRNA knockdown of c-Myc suppressed the lethal response, suggesting that oncogenic transformation with c-Myc creates a HAMLET-sensitive phenotype. Furthermore, HAMLET sensitivity was modified by the glycolytic state of tumor cells. Glucose deprivation sensitized tumor cells to HAMLET-induced cell death and in the shRNA screen, hexokinase 1 (HK1), 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-biphosphatase 1 and hypoxia-inducible factor 1α modified HAMLET sensitivity. HK1 was shown to bind HAMLET in a protein array containing ∼8000 targets, and HK activity decreased within 15 min of HAMLET treatment, before morphological signs of tumor cell death. In parallel, HAMLET triggered rapid metabolic paralysis in carcinoma cells. Tumor cells were also shown to contain large amounts of oleic acid and its derivatives already after 15 min. The results identify HAMLET as a novel anti-cancer agent that kills tumor cells by exploiting unifying features of cancer cells such as oncogene addiction or the Warburg effect.

  15. The Growing Complexity of Cancer Cell Response to DNA-Damaging Agents: Caspase 3 Mediates Cell Death or Survival?

    PubMed

    Mirzayans, Razmik; Andrais, Bonnie; Kumar, Piyush; Murray, David

    2016-05-11

    It is widely stated that wild-type p53 either mediates the activation of cell cycle checkpoints to facilitate DNA repair and promote cell survival, or orchestrates apoptotic cell death following exposure to cancer therapeutic agents. This reigning paradigm has been challenged by numerous discoveries with different human cell types, including solid tumor-derived cell lines. Thus, activation of the p53 signaling pathway by ionizing radiation and other DNA-damaging agents hinders apoptosis and triggers growth arrest (e.g., through premature senescence) in some genetic backgrounds; such growth arrested cells remain viable, secrete growth-promoting factors, and give rise to progeny with stem cell-like properties. In addition, caspase 3, which is best known for its role in the execution phase of apoptosis, has been recently reported to facilitate (rather than suppress) DNA damage-induced genomic instability and carcinogenesis. This observation is consistent with an earlier report demonstrating that caspase 3 mediates secretion of the pro-survival factor prostaglandin E₂, which in turn promotes enrichment of tumor repopulating cells. In this article, we review these and related discoveries and point out novel cancer therapeutic strategies. One of our objectives is to demonstrate the growing complexity of the DNA damage response beyond the conventional "repair and survive, or die" hypothesis.

  16. The Growing Complexity of Cancer Cell Response to DNA-Damaging Agents: Caspase 3 Mediates Cell Death or Survival?

    PubMed

    Mirzayans, Razmik; Andrais, Bonnie; Kumar, Piyush; Murray, David

    2016-01-01

    It is widely stated that wild-type p53 either mediates the activation of cell cycle checkpoints to facilitate DNA repair and promote cell survival, or orchestrates apoptotic cell death following exposure to cancer therapeutic agents. This reigning paradigm has been challenged by numerous discoveries with different human cell types, including solid tumor-derived cell lines. Thus, activation of the p53 signaling pathway by ionizing radiation and other DNA-damaging agents hinders apoptosis and triggers growth arrest (e.g., through premature senescence) in some genetic backgrounds; such growth arrested cells remain viable, secrete growth-promoting factors, and give rise to progeny with stem cell-like properties. In addition, caspase 3, which is best known for its role in the execution phase of apoptosis, has been recently reported to facilitate (rather than suppress) DNA damage-induced genomic instability and carcinogenesis. This observation is consistent with an earlier report demonstrating that caspase 3 mediates secretion of the pro-survival factor prostaglandin E₂, which in turn promotes enrichment of tumor repopulating cells. In this article, we review these and related discoveries and point out novel cancer therapeutic strategies. One of our objectives is to demonstrate the growing complexity of the DNA damage response beyond the conventional "repair and survive, or die" hypothesis. PMID:27187358

  17. The Growing Complexity of Cancer Cell Response to DNA-Damaging Agents: Caspase 3 Mediates Cell Death or Survival?

    PubMed Central

    Mirzayans, Razmik; Andrais, Bonnie; Kumar, Piyush; Murray, David

    2016-01-01

    It is widely stated that wild-type p53 either mediates the activation of cell cycle checkpoints to facilitate DNA repair and promote cell survival, or orchestrates apoptotic cell death following exposure to cancer therapeutic agents. This reigning paradigm has been challenged by numerous discoveries with different human cell types, including solid tumor-derived cell lines. Thus, activation of the p53 signaling pathway by ionizing radiation and other DNA-damaging agents hinders apoptosis and triggers growth arrest (e.g., through premature senescence) in some genetic backgrounds; such growth arrested cells remain viable, secrete growth-promoting factors, and give rise to progeny with stem cell-like properties. In addition, caspase 3, which is best known for its role in the execution phase of apoptosis, has been recently reported to facilitate (rather than suppress) DNA damage-induced genomic instability and carcinogenesis. This observation is consistent with an earlier report demonstrating that caspase 3 mediates secretion of the pro-survival factor prostaglandin E2, which in turn promotes enrichment of tumor repopulating cells. In this article, we review these and related discoveries and point out novel cancer therapeutic strategies. One of our objectives is to demonstrate the growing complexity of the DNA damage response beyond the conventional “repair and survive, or die” hypothesis. PMID:27187358

  18. Indole diketopiperazines from endophytic Chaetomium sp 88194 induce breast cancer cell apoptotic death.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fu-qian; Tong, Qing-yi; Ma, Hao-ran; Xu, Hong-feng; Hu, Song; Ma, Wei; Xue, Yong-bo; Liu, Jun-jun; Wang, Jian-ping; Song, Hong-ping; Zhang, Jin-wen; Zhang, Geng; Zhang, Yong-hui

    2015-03-19

    Diketopiperazines are important secondary metabolites of the fungi with variety bioactivities. Several species belonging to genus Chaetomium produce compounds of this class, such as chetomin. To identify new antitumor agents, secondary metabolites of fungus Chaetomium sp 88194 were investigated and three new indole diketopiperazines, Chaetocochins G (1), Oidioperazines E (2) and Chetoseminudin E (3), along with two known compounds Chetoseminudins C (4) and N-acetyl-β-oxotryptamine (5), were obtained. Chaetocochins G and Chetoseminudin E were recrystallized in CHCl3 containing a small amount of MeOH, and their structures with absolute configuration were established by spectroscopic data interpretation and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The absolute configuration of Oidioperazines E was defined by comparing of experimental and calculated electronic circular dichroism spectra. These isolates were also evaluated the anticancer activity, and Chaetocochins G displayed more potent cytotoxicity in MCF-7 cells than the common chemotherapeutic agent (5-fluorouracil) associated with G2/M cell cycle arrest. More importantly, Chaetocochins G induced cell apoptotic death via caspase-3 induction and proteolytic cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, concomitantly with increased Bax and decreased Bcl-2 expression. Our findings suggested that indole diketopiperazines from endophytic Chaetomium sp 88194 may be potential resource for developing anti-cancer reagents.

  19. Inhibition of Lon protease by triterpenoids alters mitochondria and is associated to cell death in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gibellini, Lara; Pinti, Marcello; Bartolomeo, Regina; De Biasi, Sara; Cormio, Antonella; Musicco, Clara; Carnevale, Gianluca; Pecorini, Simone; Nasi, Milena; De Pol, Anto; Cossarizza, Andrea

    2015-09-22

    Mitochondrial Lon protease (Lon) regulates several mitochondrial functions, and is inhibited by the anticancer molecule triterpenoid 2-cyano-3, 12-dioxooleana-1,9(11)-dien-28-oic acid (CDDO), or by its C-28 methyl ester derivative (CDDO-Me). To analyze the mechanism of action of triterpenoids, we investigated intramitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential, mitochondrial mass, mitochondrial dynamics and morphology, and Lon proteolytic activity in RKO human colon cancer cells, in HepG2 hepatocarcinoma cells and in MCF7 breast carcinoma cells. We found that CDDO and CDDO-Me are potent stressors for mitochondria in cancer cells, rather than normal non-transformed cells. In particular, they: i) cause depolarization; ii) increase mitochondrial ROS, iii) alter mitochondrial morphology and proteins involved in mitochondrial dynamics; iv) affect the levels of Lon and those of aconitase and human transcription factor A, which are targets of Lon activity; v) increase level of protein carbonyls in mitochondria; vi) lead to intrinsic apoptosis. The overexpression of Lon can rescue cells from cell death, providing an additional evidence on the role of Lon in conditions of excessive stress load.

  20. TMPyP4 promotes cancer cell migration at low doses, but induces cell death at high doses

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiao-Hui; Nie, Xin; Liu, Hai-Ying; Fang, Yi-Ming; Zhao, Yong; Xia, Li-Xin

    2016-01-01

    TMPyP4 is widely considered as a potential photosensitizer in photodynamic therapy and a G-quadruplex stabilizer for telomerase-based cancer therapeutics. However, its biological effects including a possible adverse-effect are poorly understood. In this study, whole genome RNA-seq analysis was used to explore the alteration in gene expression induced by TMPyP4. Unexpectedly, we find that 27.67% of changed genes were functionally related to cell adhesion. Experimental evidences from cell adhesion assay, scratch-wound and transwell assay indicate that TMPyP4 at conventional doses (≤0.5 μM) increases cell-matrix adhesion and promotes the migration of tumor cells. In contrast, a high dose of TMPyP4 (≥2 μM) inhibits cell proliferation and induces cell death. The unintended “side-effect” of TMPyP4 on promoting cell migration suggests that a relative high dose of TMPyP4 is preferred for therapeutic purpose. These findings contribute to better understanding of biological effects induced by TMPyP4 and provide a new insight into the complexity and implication for TMPyP4 based cancer therapy. PMID:27221067

  1. Inhibition of Lon protease by triterpenoids alters mitochondria and is associated to cell death in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gibellini, Lara; Pinti, Marcello; Bartolomeo, Regina; De Biasi, Sara; Cormio, Antonella; Musicco, Clara; Carnevale, Gianluca; Pecorini, Simone; Nasi, Milena; De Pol, Anto; Cossarizza, Andrea

    2015-09-22

    Mitochondrial Lon protease (Lon) regulates several mitochondrial functions, and is inhibited by the anticancer molecule triterpenoid 2-cyano-3, 12-dioxooleana-1,9(11)-dien-28-oic acid (CDDO), or by its C-28 methyl ester derivative (CDDO-Me). To analyze the mechanism of action of triterpenoids, we investigated intramitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential, mitochondrial mass, mitochondrial dynamics and morphology, and Lon proteolytic activity in RKO human colon cancer cells, in HepG2 hepatocarcinoma cells and in MCF7 breast carcinoma cells. We found that CDDO and CDDO-Me are potent stressors for mitochondria in cancer cells, rather than normal non-transformed cells. In particular, they: i) cause depolarization; ii) increase mitochondrial ROS, iii) alter mitochondrial morphology and proteins involved in mitochondrial dynamics; iv) affect the levels of Lon and those of aconitase and human transcription factor A, which are targets of Lon activity; v) increase level of protein carbonyls in mitochondria; vi) lead to intrinsic apoptosis. The overexpression of Lon can rescue cells from cell death, providing an additional evidence on the role of Lon in conditions of excessive stress load. PMID:26314956

  2. Knockdown of TWIST1 enhances arsenic trioxide- and ionizing radiation-induced cell death in lung cancer cells by promoting mitochondrial dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Sung-Keum; Kim, Jae-Hee; Choi, Ha-Na; Choe, Tae-Boo; Hong, Seok-Il; Yi, Jae-Youn; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Lee, Hyun-Gyu; Lee, Yun-Han; Park, In-Chul

    2014-07-11

    Highlights: • Knockdown of TWIST1 enhanced ATO- and IR-induced cell death in NSCLCs. • Intracellular ROS levels were increased in cells treated with TWIST1 siRNA. • TWIST1 siRNA induced MMP loss and mitochondrial fragmentation. • TWIST1 siRNA upregulated the fission-related proteins FIS1 and DRP1. - Abstract: TWIST1 is implicated in the process of epithelial mesenchymal transition, metastasis, stemness, and drug resistance in cancer cells, and therefore is a potential target for cancer therapy. In the present study, we found that knockdown of TWIST1 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) enhanced arsenic trioxide (ATO)- and ionizing radiation (IR)-induced cell death in non-small-cell lung cancer cells. Interestingly, intracellular reactive oxygen species levels were increased in cells treated with TWIST1 siRNA and further increased by co-treatment with ATO or IR. Pretreatment of lung cancer cells with the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine markedly suppressed the cell death induced by combined treatment with TWIST1 siRNA and ATO or IR. Moreover, treatment of cells with TWIST1 siRNA induced mitochondrial membrane depolarization and significantly increased mitochondrial fragmentation (fission) and upregulated the fission-related proteins FIS1 and DRP1. Collectively, our results demonstrate that siRNA-mediated TWIST1 knockdown induces mitochondrial dysfunction and enhances IR- and ATO-induced cell death in lung cancer cells.

  3. A receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Tyrphostin A9 induces cancer cell death through Drp1 dependent mitochondria fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Park, So Jung; Park, Young Jun; Shin, Ji Hyun; Kim, Eun Sung; Hwang, Jung Jin; Jin, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Jin Cheon; Cho, Dong-Hyung

    2011-05-13

    Highlights: {yields} We screened and identified Tyrphostin A9, a receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor as a strong mitochondria fission inducer. {yields} Tyrphostin A9 treatment promotes mitochondria dysfunction and contributes to cytotoxicity in cancer cells. {yields} Tyrphostin A9 induces apoptotic cell death through a Drp1-mediated pathway. {yields} Our studies suggest that Tyrphostin A9 induces mitochondria fragmentation and apoptotic cell death via Drp1 dependently. -- Abstract: Mitochondria dynamics controls not only their morphology but also functions of mitochondria. Therefore, an imbalance of the dynamics eventually leads to mitochondria disruption and cell death. To identify specific regulators of mitochondria dynamics, we screened a bioactive chemical compound library and selected Tyrphostin A9, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, as a potent inducer of mitochondrial fission. Tyrphostin A9 treatment resulted in the formation of fragmented mitochondria filament. In addition, cellular ATP level was decreased and the mitochondrial membrane potential was collapsed in Tyr A9-treated cells. Suppression of Drp1 activity by siRNA or over-expression of a dominant negative mutant of Drp1 inhibited both mitochondrial fragmentation and cell death induced by Tyrpohotin A9. Moreover, treatment of Tyrphostin A9 also evoked mitochondrial fragmentation in other cells including the neuroblastomas. Taken together, these results suggest that Tyrphostin A9 induces Drp1-mediated mitochondrial fission and apoptotic cell death.

  4. The CT20 peptide causes detachment and death of metastatic breast cancer cells by promoting mitochondrial aggregation and cytoskeletal disruption

    PubMed Central

    Lee, M W; Bassiouni, R; Sparrow, N A; Iketani, A; Boohaker, R J; Moskowitz, C; Vishnubhotla, P; Khaled, A S; Oyer, J; Copik, A; Fernandez-Valle, C; Perez, J M; Khaled, A R

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis accounts for most deaths from breast cancer, driving the need for new therapeutics that can impede disease progression. Rationally designed peptides that take advantage of cancer-specific differences in cellular physiology are an emerging technology that offer promise as a treatment for metastatic breast cancer. We developed CT20p, a hydrophobic peptide based on the C terminus of Bax that exhibits similarities with antimicrobial peptides, and previously reported that CT20p has unique cytotoxic actions independent of full-length Bax. In this study, we identified the intracellular actions of CT20p which precede cancer cell-specific detachment and death. Previously, we found that CT20p migrated in the heavy membrane fractions of cancer cell lysates. Here, using MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, we demonstrated that CT20p localizes to the mitochondria, leading to fusion-like aggregation and mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarization. As a result, the distribution and movement of mitochondria in CT20p-treated MDA-MB-231 cells was markedly impaired, particularly in cell protrusions. In contrast, CT20p did not associate with the mitochondria of normal breast epithelial MCF-10A cells, causing little change in the mitochondrial membrane potential, morphology or localization. In MDA-MB-231 cells, CT20p triggered cell detachment that was preceded by decreased levels of α5β1 integrins and reduced F-actin polymerization. Using folate-targeted nanoparticles to encapsulate and deliver CT20p to murine tumors, we achieved significant tumor regression within days of peptide treatment. These results suggest that CT20p has application in the treatment of metastatic disease as a cancer-specific therapeutic peptide that perturbs mitochondrial morphology and movement ultimately culminating in disruption of the actin cytoskeleton, cell detachment, and loss of cell viability. PMID:24853427

  5. FASL -844C polymorphism is associated with increased activation-induced T cell death and risk of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tong; Zhou, Yifeng; Li, Hua; Han, Xiaohong; Shi, Yuankai; Wang, Li; Miao, Xiaoping; Tan, Wen; Zhao, Dan; Zhang, Xuemei; Guo, Yongli; Lin, Dongxin

    2005-10-01

    The FAS receptor-ligand system plays a key role in regulating apoptotic cell death, and corruption of this signaling pathway has been shown to participate in tumor-immune escape and carcinogenesis. We have recently demonstrated (Sun, T., X. Miao, X. Zhang, W. Tan, P. Xiong, and D. Lin. 2004. J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 96:1030-1036; Zhang, X., X. Miao, T. Sun, W. Tan, S. Qu, P. Xiong, Y. Zhou, and D. Lin. 2005. J. Med. Genet. 42:479-484) that functional polymorphisms in FAS and FAS ligand (FASL) are associated with susceptibility to lung cancer and esophageal cancer; however, the mechanisms underlying this association have not been elucidated. We show that the FAS -1377G, FAS -670A, and FASL -844T variants are expressed more highly on ex vivo-stimulated T cells than the FAS -1377A, FAS -670G, and FASL -844C variants. Moreover, activation-induced cell death (AICD) of T cells carrying the FASL -844C allele was increased. We also found a threefold increased risk of cervical cancer among subjects with the FASL -844CC genotype compared with those with the -844TT genotype in a case-control study in Chinese women. Together, these observations suggest that genetic polymorphisms in the FAS-FASL pathway confer host susceptibility to cervical cancers, which might be caused by immune escape of tumor cells because of enhanced AICD of tumor-specific T cells.

  6. Antitumor Effects of a Sirtuin Inhibitor, Tenovin-6, against Gastric Cancer Cells via Death Receptor 5 Up-Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Hirai, Sachiko; Endo, Shinji; Saito, Rie; Hirose, Mitsuaki; Ueno, Takunori; Suzuki, Hideo; Yamato, Kenji; Abei, Masato; Hyodo, Ichinosuke

    2014-01-01

    Up-regulated sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), an NAD+-dependent class III histone deacetylase, deacetylates p53 and inhibits its transcriptional activity, leading to cell survival. SIRT1 overexpression has been reported to predict poor survival in some malignancies, including gastric cancer. However, the antitumor effect of SIRT1 inhibition remains elusive in gastric cancer. Here, we investigated the antitumor mechanisms of a sirtuin inhibitor, tenovin-6, in seven human gastric cancer cell lines (four cell lines with wild-type TP53, two with mutant-type TP53, and one with null TP53). Interestingly, tenovin-6 induced apoptosis in all cell lines, not only those with wild-type TP53, but also mutant-type and null versions, accompanied by up-regulation of death receptor 5 (DR5). In the KatoIII cell line (TP53-null), DR5 silencing markedly attenuated tenovin-6-induced apoptosis, suggesting that the pivotal mechanism behind its antitumor effects is based on activation of the death receptor signal pathway. Although endoplasmic reticulum stress caused by sirtuin inhibitors was reported to induce DR5 up-regulation in other cancer cell lines, we could not find marked activation of its related molecules, such as ATF6, PERK, and CHOP, in gastric cancer cells treated with tenovin-6. Tenovin-6 in combination with docetaxel or SN-38 exerted a slight to moderate synergistic cytotoxicity against gastric cancer cells. In conclusion, tenovin-6 has potent antitumor activity against human gastric cancer cells via DR5 up-regulation. Our results should be helpful for the future clinical development of sirtuin inhibitors. PMID:25033286

  7. Antitumor effects of a sirtuin inhibitor, tenovin-6, against gastric cancer cells via death receptor 5 up-regulation.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Sachiko; Endo, Shinji; Saito, Rie; Hirose, Mitsuaki; Ueno, Takunori; Suzuki, Hideo; Yamato, Kenji; Abei, Masato; Hyodo, Ichinosuke

    2014-01-01

    Up-regulated sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), an NAD+-dependent class III histone deacetylase, deacetylates p53 and inhibits its transcriptional activity, leading to cell survival. SIRT1 overexpression has been reported to predict poor survival in some malignancies, including gastric cancer. However, the antitumor effect of SIRT1 inhibition remains elusive in gastric cancer. Here, we investigated the antitumor mechanisms of a sirtuin inhibitor, tenovin-6, in seven human gastric cancer cell lines (four cell lines with wild-type TP53, two with mutant-type TP53, and one with null TP53). Interestingly, tenovin-6 induced apoptosis in all cell lines, not only those with wild-type TP53, but also mutant-type and null versions, accompanied by up-regulation of death receptor 5 (DR5). In the KatoIII cell line (TP53-null), DR5 silencing markedly attenuated tenovin-6-induced apoptosis, suggesting that the pivotal mechanism behind its antitumor effects is based on activation of the death receptor signal pathway. Although endoplasmic reticulum stress caused by sirtuin inhibitors was reported to induce DR5 up-regulation in other cancer cell lines, we could not find marked activation of its related molecules, such as ATF6, PERK, and CHOP, in gastric cancer cells treated with tenovin-6. Tenovin-6 in combination with docetaxel or SN-38 exerted a slight to moderate synergistic cytotoxicity against gastric cancer cells. In conclusion, tenovin-6 has potent antitumor activity against human gastric cancer cells via DR5 up-regulation. Our results should be helpful for the future clinical development of sirtuin inhibitors. PMID:25033286

  8. Oxidative Stress Facilitates IFN-γ-Induced Mimic Extracellular Trap Cell Death in A549 Lung Epithelial Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chiou-Feng; Chen, Chia-Ling; Chien, Shun-Yi; Tseng, Po-Chun; Wang, Yu-Chih; Tsai, Tsung-Ting

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that IFN-γ induces an autophagy-regulated mimic extracellular trap cell death (ETosis) in A549 human lung cancer cells. Regarding reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in ETosis, this study investigated the role of oxidative stress. After IFN-γ stimulation, a necrosis-like cell death mimic ETosis occurred accompanied by the inhibition of cell growth, aberrant nuclear staining, and nucleosome release. ROS were generated in a time-dependent manner with an increase in NADPH oxidase component protein expression. STAT1-mediated IFN regulatory factor-1 activation was essential for upregulating ROS production. By genetically silencing p47phox, IFN-γ-induced ROS and mimic ETosis were significantly attenuated. This mechanistic study indicated that ROS may mediate DNA damage followed by histone H3 citrullination. Furthermore, ROS promoted IFN-γ-induced mimic ETosis in cooperation with autophagy. These findings further demonstrate that ROS regulates IFN-γ-induced mimic ETosis in lung epithelial malignancy. PMID:27575372

  9. Oxidative Stress Facilitates IFN-γ-Induced Mimic Extracellular Trap Cell Death in A549 Lung Epithelial Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chiou-Feng; Chen, Chia-Ling; Chien, Shun-Yi; Tseng, Po-Chun; Wang, Yu-Chih; Tsai, Tsung-Ting

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that IFN-γ induces an autophagy-regulated mimic extracellular trap cell death (ETosis) in A549 human lung cancer cells. Regarding reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in ETosis, this study investigated the role of oxidative stress. After IFN-γ stimulation, a necrosis-like cell death mimic ETosis occurred accompanied by the inhibition of cell growth, aberrant nuclear staining, and nucleosome release. ROS were generated in a time-dependent manner with an increase in NADPH oxidase component protein expression. STAT1-mediated IFN regulatory factor-1 activation was essential for upregulating ROS production. By genetically silencing p47phox, IFN-γ-induced ROS and mimic ETosis were significantly attenuated. This mechanistic study indicated that ROS may mediate DNA damage followed by histone H3 citrullination. Furthermore, ROS promoted IFN-γ-induced mimic ETosis in cooperation with autophagy. These findings further demonstrate that ROS regulates IFN-γ-induced mimic ETosis in lung epithelial malignancy. PMID:27575372

  10. Activation of surrogate death receptor signaling triggers peroxynitrite-dependent execution of cisplatin-resistant cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Seah, S; Low, I C C; Hirpara, J L; Sachaphibulkij, K; Kroemer, G; Brenner, C; Pervaiz, S

    2015-01-01

    Platinum-based drugs remain as the cornerstone of cancer chemotherapy; however, development of multidrug resistance presents a therapeutic challenge. This study aims at understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying resistance to cisplatin and unraveling surrogate signaling networks that could revert sensitivity to apoptosis stimuli. We made use of three different sets of cell lines, A549 and H2030 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and A2780 ovarian cancer cells and their cisplatin-resistant variants. Here we report that cisplatin-resistant cell lines displayed a multidrug-resistant phenotype. Changes in mitochondrial metabolism and defective mitochondrial signaling were unraveled in the resistant cells. More interestingly, a marked increase in sensitivity of the resistant cells to death receptor-induced apoptosis, in particular TRAIL (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand)-mediated execution, was observed. Although this was not associated with an increase in gene transcription, a significant increase in the localization of TRAIL death receptor, DR4, to the lipid raft subdomains of plasma membrane was detected in the resistant variants. Furthermore, exposure of cisplatin-resistant cells to TRAIL resulted in upregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and increase in nitric oxide (NO) production that triggered the generation of peroxynitrite (ONOO−). Scavenging ONOO− rescued cells from TRAIL-induced apoptosis, thereby suggesting a critical role of ONOO− in TRAIL-induced execution of cisplatin-resistant cells. Notably, preincubation of cells with TRAIL restored sensitivity of resistant cells to cisplatin. These data provide compelling evidence for employing strategies to trigger death receptor signaling as a second-line treatment for cisplatin-resistant cancers. PMID:26492363

  11. Coding polypurine hairpins cause target-induced cell death in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    de Almagro, M Cristina; Mencia, Núria; Noé, Véronique; Ciudad, Carlos J

    2011-04-01

    Polypurine reverse-Hoogsteen hairpins (PPRHs) are double-stranded DNA molecules formed by two polypurine stretches linked by a pentathymidine loop, with intramolecular reverse-Hoogsteen bonds that allow a hairpin structure. PPRHs bind to polypyrimidine targets by Watson-Crick bonds maintaining simultaneously a hairpin structure due to intramolecular Hoogsteen bonds. Previously, we described the ability of Template-PPRHs to decrease mRNA levels because these PPRHs target the template DNA strand interfering with the transcription process. Now, we designed Coding-PPRHs, a new type of PPRHs that directly target the pre-mRNA. The dihydrofolate reductase (dhfr) gene was selected as a target in breast cancer therapy. These PPRHs caused a high degree of cytotoxicity and a decrease in DHFR mRNA and protein levels, but by a different mechanism of action than Template-PPRHs. Coding-PPRHs interfere with the splicing process by competing with U2 auxiliary factor 65 for binding to the polypyrimidine target sequence, leading to a lower amount of mature mRNA. These new PPRHs showed high specificity as no off-target effects were found. The application of these molecules as therapeutic tools was tested in breast cancer cells resistant to methotrexate, obtaining a noticeable cytotoxicity even though the dhfr locus was amplified. Coding-PPRHs can be considered as new molecules to decrease gene expression at the mRNA level and an alternative to other antisense molecules.

  12. Reactive oxygen species-mediated synergistic and preferential induction of cell death and reduction of clonogenic resistance in breast cancer cells by combined cisplatin and FK228.

    PubMed

    Pluchino, Lenora Ann; Choudhary, Shambhunath; Wang, Hwa-Chain Robert

    2016-10-10

    Safe and effective combination chemotherapy regimens against breast cancer are lacking. We used our cellular system, consisting of the non-cancerous human breast epithelial MCF10A cell line and its derived tumorigenic, oncogenic H-Ras-expressing, MCF10A-Ras cell line, to investigate the effectiveness of a combination chemotherapy regimen in treating breast cancer cells using two FDA-approved agents, cisplatin and FK228. Cisplatin and FK228 significantly, synergistically, and preferentially induced death and reduced drug resistance of MCF10A-Ras versus MCF10A cells. The ERK-Nox-ROS pathway played a major role in both synergistic cell death induction and GSH-level reduction, which contributed to the synergistic suppression of drug resistance in cells. Enhancement of the Ras-ERK-Nox pathway by combined cisplatin and FK228 significantly increased ROS levels, leading to induction of death, reduction of drug resistance, and induction of DNA damage and oxidation in cancerous MCF10A-Ras cells. Furthermore, synergistic induction of cell death and reduction of drug resistance by combined cisplatin and FK228 in breast cells is independent of their estrogen receptor status. Our study suggests that combined cisplatin and FK228 should be considered in clinical trials as a new regimen for therapeutic control of breast cancers. PMID:27477899

  13. RIG-I-like helicases induce immunogenic cell death of pancreatic cancer cells and sensitize tumors toward killing by CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Duewell, P; Steger, A; Lohr, H; Bourhis, H; Hoelz, H; Kirchleitner, S V; Stieg, M R; Grassmann, S; Kobold, S; Siveke, J T; Endres, S; Schnurr, M

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is characterized by a microenvironment suppressing immune responses. RIG-I-like helicases (RLH) are immunoreceptors for viral RNA that induce an antiviral response program via the production of type I interferons (IFN) and apoptosis in susceptible cells. We recently identified RLH as therapeutic targets of pancreatic cancer for counteracting immunosuppressive mechanisms and apoptosis induction. Here, we investigated immunogenic consequences of RLH-induced tumor cell death. Treatment of murine pancreatic cancer cell lines with RLH ligands induced production of type I IFN and proinflammatory cytokines. In addition, tumor cells died via intrinsic apoptosis and displayed features of immunogenic cell death, such as release of HMGB1 and translocation of calreticulin to the outer cell membrane. RLH-activated tumor cells led to activation of dendritic cells (DCs), which was mediated by tumor-derived type I IFN, whereas TLR, RAGE or inflammasome signaling was dispensable. Importantly, CD8α+ DCs effectively engulfed apoptotic tumor material and cross-presented tumor-associated antigen to naive CD8+ T cells. In comparison, tumor cell death mediated by oxaliplatin, staurosporine or mechanical disruption failed to induce DC activation and antigen presentation. Tumor cells treated with sublethal doses of RLH ligands upregulated Fas and MHC-I expression and were effectively sensitized towards Fas-mediated apoptosis and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)-mediated lysis. Vaccination of mice with RLH-activated tumor cells induced protective antitumor immunity in vivo. In addition, MDA5-based immunotherapy led to effective tumor control of established pancreatic tumors. In summary, RLH ligands induce a highly immunogenic form of tumor cell death linking innate and adaptive immunity. PMID:25012502

  14. Induction of morphological changes in death-induced cancer cells monitored by holographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    El-Schich, Zahra; Mölder, Anna; Tassidis, Helena; Härkönen, Pirkko; Falck Miniotis, Maria; Gjörloff Wingren, Anette

    2015-03-01

    We are using the label-free technique of holographic microscopy to analyze cellular parameters including cell number, confluence, cellular volume and area directly in the cell culture environment. We show that death-induced cells can be distinguished from untreated counterparts by the use of holographic microscopy, and we demonstrate its capability for cell death assessment. Morphological analysis of two representative cell lines (L929 and DU145) was performed in the culture flasks without any prior cell detachment. The two cell lines were treated with the anti-tumour agent etoposide for 1-3days. Measurements by holographic microscopy showed significant differences in average cell number, confluence, volume and area when comparing etoposide-treated with untreated cells. The cell volume of the treated cell lines was initially increased at early time-points. By time, cells decreased in volume, especially when treated with high doses of etoposide. In conclusion, we have shown that holographic microscopy allows label-free and completely non-invasive morphological measurements of cell growth, viability and death. Future applications could include real-time monitoring of these holographic microscopy parameters in cells in response to clinically relevant compounds.

  15. (−)-Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate Induces Non-Apoptotic Cell Death in Human Cancer Cells via ROS-Mediated Lysosomal Membrane Permeabilization

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yin; Yang, Nai-Di; Zhou, Fan; Shen, Ting; Duan, Ting; Zhou, Jing; Shi, Yin; Zhu, Xin-Qiang; Shen, Han-Ming

    2012-01-01

    (−)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is the most extensive studied tea polyphenol for its anti-cancer function. In this study, we report a novel mechanism of action for EGCG-mediated cell death by identifying the critical role of lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP). First, EGCG-induced cell death in human cancer cells (both HepG2 and HeLa) was found to be caspase-independent and accompanied by evident cytosolic vacuolization, only observable when cells were treated in serum-free medium. The cytosolic vacuolization observed in EGCG-treated cells was most probably caused by lysosomal dilation. Interestingly, EGCG was able to disrupt autophagic flux at the degradation stage by impairment of lysosomal function, and EGCG-induced cell death was independent of Atg5 or autophagy. The key finding of this study is that EGCG is able to trigger LMP, as evidenced by Lyso-Tracker Red staining, cathepsin D cytosolic translocation and cytosolic acidification. Consistently, a lysosomotropic agent, chloroquine, effectively rescues the cell death via suppressing LMP-caused cytosolic acidification. Lastly, we found that EGCG promotes production of intracellular ROS upstream of LMP and cell death, as evidenced by increased level of ROS in cells treated with EGCG and the protective effects of antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) against EGCG-mediated LMP and cell death. Taken together, data from our study reveal a novel mechanism underlying EGCG-induced cell death involving ROS and LMP. Therefore, understanding this lysosome-associated cell death pathway shed new lights on the anti-cancer effects of EGCG. PMID:23056433

  16. Docetaxel induces Bcl-2- and pro-apoptotic caspase-independent death of human prostate cancer DU145 cells

    PubMed Central

    OGURA, TAKEHARU; TANAKA, YOSHIYUKI; TAMAKI, HIROKI; HARADA, MAMORU

    2016-01-01

    Docetaxel is a useful chemotherapeutic agent for the first-line treatment of hormone-refractory prostate cancer. Abnormal expression of Bcl-2 is commonly found in cancer cells, which increases their anti-apoptotic potency and chemo-resistance. We investigated the effects of Bcl-2 expression status on the susceptibility of DU145 cells, an androgen-independent human prostate cancer cell line, to docetaxel and other anticancer agents. A panel of Bcl-2-expressing DU145 cell lines was established. Bcl-2 expression levels were unrelated to the susceptibility of DU145 cells to docetaxel. The sensitivity of DU145 cells to cisplatin fluctuated, and the sensitivity to tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α was decreased by Bcl-2 overexpression. In a xenograft mouse model, overexpression of Bcl-2 drastically decreased the sensitivity of DU145 cells to cisplatin and TNF-α; however, there was no change in the response to docetaxel. Fluorescent microscopy revealed that Bcl-2-overexpression had no effect on the docetaxel-induced death of DU145 cells, but significantly decreased DU145 cell death induced by cisplatin or TNF-α. Interestingly, docetaxel hardly induced caspase-3/7 activation in control or Bcl-2-overexpressing DU145 cells, but did at a low level in LNCaP cells, another prostate cancer cell line. Moreover, in contrast to LNCaP cells, the reduced viabilities of docetaxel-treated control and Bcl-2-overexpressing DU145 cells were not restored by the addition of either a Bid inhibitor or a panel of pro-apoptotic caspase inhibitors. These findings indicate that the antitumor effects of docetaxel on DU145 cells are independent of both Bcl-2 and pro-apoptotic caspases. PMID:27082738

  17. Programmed cell death

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this conference to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on the role programmed cell death plays in normal development and homeostasis of many organisms. This volume contains abstracts of papers in the following areas: invertebrate development; immunology/neurology; bcl-2 family; biochemistry; programmed cell death in viruses; oncogenesis; vertebrate development; and diseases.

  18. Radical Decisions in Cancer: Redox Control of Cell Growth and Death

    PubMed Central

    Sainz, Rosa M.; Lombo, Felipe; Mayo, Juan C.

    2012-01-01

    Free radicals play a key role in many physiological decisions in cells. Since free radicals are toxic to cellular components, it is known that they cause DNA damage, contribute to DNA instability and mutation and thus favor carcinogenesis. However, nowadays it is assumed that free radicals play a further complex role in cancer. Low levels of free radicals and steady state levels of antioxidant enzymes are responsible for the fine tuning of redox status inside cells. A change in redox state is a way to modify the physiological status of the cell, in fact, a more reduced status is found in resting cells while a more oxidative status is associated with proliferative cells. The mechanisms by which redox status can change the proliferative activity of cancer cells are related to transcriptional and posttranscriptional modifications of proteins that play a critical role in cell cycle control. Since cancer cells show higher levels of free radicals compared with their normal counterparts, it is believed that the anti-oxidative stress mechanism is also increased in cancer cells. In fact, the levels of some of the most important antioxidant enzymes are elevated in advanced status of some types of tumors. Anti-cancer treatment is compromised by survival mechanisms in cancer cells and collateral damage in normal non-pathological tissues. Though some resistance mechanisms have been described, they do not yet explain why treatment of cancer fails in several tumors. Given that some antitumoral treatments are based on the generation of free radicals, we will discuss in this review the possible role of antioxidant enzymes in the survival mechanism in cancer cells and then, its participation in the failure of cancer treatments. PMID:24213319

  19. Mislocalization of death receptors correlates with cellular resistance to their cognate ligands in human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Rivera Rosado, Leslie A.; Zhang, Yaqin; Di, Xu; Zhang, Baolin

    2012-01-01

    Multiple clinical trials are ongoing to evaluate the potential antitumor activity of human TNF variants, Fas ligand (FasL), TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) and its agonistic antibodies. These drug products act through the death receptors (DRs) TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1), Fas/CD95, DR4 (TRAIL-R1) and/or DR5 (TRAIL-R2), respectively. Therefore, characterization of the level and localization of DR expression in cancer cells is important for DR-targeted therapy. In this study, we examined the subcellular distribution of the four DRs in a panel of 10 human breast cancer cell lines by western blots and flow cytometry and 50 human breast tumors by immunohistochemistry. Despite their total protein expressions, the DRs were found to be absent on the surface of some cell lines. Consistent with this result, all four DRs were found to be mostly expressed in the cytoplasm and/or the nucleus of primary breast tumors (n=50). We further determined the growth inhibition activity (GI50) of the death ligands, recombinant human TNFα, FasL and TRAIL, and found a correlation with the subcellular localization of the corresponding DRs. These results demonstrate an aberrant expression of the death receptors in breast cancer cells, and suggest that the lack of surface DRs appears to be predictive of tumor resistance to DR-targeted therapies. PMID:22909995

  20. A Review on Novel Breast Cancer Therapies: Photodynamic Therapy and Plant Derived Agent Induced Cell Death Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    George, Blassan Plackal Adimuriyil; Abrahamse, Heidi

    2016-01-01

    This review article presents an extensive examination of risk factors for breast cancer, treatment strategies with special attention to photodynamic therapy and natural product based treatments. Breast cancer remains the most commonly occurring cancer in women worldwide and the detection, treatment, and prevention are prominent concerns in public health. Background information on current developments in treatment helps to update the approach towards risk assessment. Breast cancer risk is linked to many factors such as hereditary, reproductive and lifestyle factors. Minimally invasive Photodynamic therapy (PDT) can be used in the management of various cancers; it uses a light sensitive drug (a photosensitizer, PS) and a light of visible wavelength, to destroy targeted cancer cells. State of the art analyses has been carried out to investigate advancement in the search for the cure and control of cancer progression using natural products. Traditional medicinal plants have been used as lead compounds for drug discovery in modern medicine. Both PDT and plant derived drugs induce cell death via different mechanisms including apoptosis, necrosis, autophagy, cell cycle regulation and even the regulation of various cell signalling pathways. PMID:26499768

  1. MiR-129-5p is required for histone deacetylase inhibitor-induced cell death in thyroid cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Brest, Patrick; Lassalle, Sandra; Hofman, Veronique; Bordone, Olivier; Gavric Tanga, Virginie; Bonnetaud, Christelle; Moreilhon, Chimene; Rios, Geraldine; Santini, José; Barbry, Pascal; Svanborg, Catharina; Mograbi, Baharia; Mari, Bernard; Hofman, Paul

    2011-12-01

    The molecular mechanism responsible for the antitumor activity of histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) remains elusive. As HDACi have been described to alter miRNA expression, the aim of this study was to characterize HDACi-induced miRNAs and to determine their functional importance in the induction of cell death alone or in combination with other cancer drugs. Two HDACi, trichostatin A and vorinostat, induced miR-129-5p overexpression, histone acetylation and cell death in BCPAP, TPC-1, 8505C, and CAL62 cell lines and in primary cultures of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) cells. In addition, miR-129-5p alone was sufficient to induce cell death and knockdown experiments showed that expression of this miRNA was required for HDACi-induced cell death. Moreover, miR-129-5p accentuated the anti-proliferative effects of other cancer drugs such as etoposide or human α-lactalbumin made lethal for tumor cells (HAMLET). Taken together, our data show that miR-129-5p is involved in the antitumor activity of HDACi and highlight a miRNA-driven cell death mechanism.

  2. Targeting of substance P induces cancer cell death and decreases the steady state of EGFR and Her2.

    PubMed

    Mayordomo, Cristina; García-Recio, Susana; Ametller, Elisabet; Fernández-Nogueira, Patricia; Pastor-Arroyo, Eva María; Vinyals, Laia; Casas, Ignasi; Gascón, Pedro; Almendro, Vanessa

    2012-04-01

    NK1 is a tachykinin receptor highly relevant to tumorigenesis and metastasis development in breast cancer and other carcinomas. Despite the substantial efforts done to develop potent NK1 receptor antagonists, none of these antagonists had shown good antitumor activity in clinical trials. Now, we have tested the effect of inhibition of the neuropeptide Substance P (SP), a NK1 ligand, as a potential therapeutic approach in cancer. We found that the inhibition of SP with antibodies strongly inhibit cell growth and induce apoptosis in breast, colon, and prostate cancer cell lines. These effects were accompained by a decrease in the mitogen-activated kinase singaling pathway. Interestingly, in some cell lines SP abrogation decreased the steady state of Her2 and EGFR, suggesting that SP-mediated signaling is important for the basal activity of these ErbB receptors. In consequence, we observed a blockade of the cell cycle progression and the inhibition of several cell cycle-related proteins including mTOR. SP inhibition also induced cell death in cell lines resistant to Lapatinib and Trastuzumab that have increased levels of active Her2, suggesting that this therapeutic approach could be also effective for those cancers resistant to current anti-ErbB therapies. Thus, we propose a new therapeutic strategy for those cancers that express NK1 receptor and/or other tachykinin receptors, based in the immuno-blockade of the neuropeptide SP.

  3. Fisetin induces autophagic cell death through suppression of mTOR signaling pathway in prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Yewseok; Afaq, Farrukh; Khan, Naghma; Johnson, Jeremy J.; Khusro, Fatima H.; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase is an important component of PTEN/PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, which is frequently deregulated in prostate cancer (CaP). Recent studies suggest that targeting PTEN/PI3K/Akt and mTOR signaling pathway could be an effective strategy for the treatment of hormone refractory CaP. Here, we show that the treatment of androgen-independent and PTEN-negative human CaP PC3 cells with fisetin, a dietary flavonoid, resulted in inhibition of mTOR kinase signaling pathway. Treatment of cells with fisetin inhibited mTOR activity and downregulated Raptor, Rictor, PRAS40 and GβL that resulted in loss of mTOR complexes (mTORC)1/2 formation. Fisetin also activated the mTOR repressor TSC2 through inhibition of Akt and activation of AMPK. Fisetin-mediated inhibition of mTOR resulted in hypophosphorylation of 4EBP1 and suppression of Cap-dependent translation. We also found that fisetin treatment leads to induction of autophagic-programmed cell death rather than cytoprotective autophagy as shown by small interfering RNA Beclin1-knockdown and autophagy inhibitor. Taken together, we provide evidence that fisetin functions as a dual inhibitor of mTORC1/2 signaling leading to inhibition of Cap-dependent translation and induction of autophagic cell death in PC3 cells. These results suggest that fisetin could be a useful chemotherapeutic agent in treatment of hormone refractory CaP. PMID:20530556

  4. Heat-Modified Citrus Pectin Induces Apoptosis-Like Cell Death and Autophagy in HepG2 and A549 Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Leclere, Lionel; Fransolet, Maude; Cote, Francois; Cambier, Pierre; Arnould, Thierry; Van Cutsem, Pierre; Michiels, Carine

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is still one of the leading causes of death worldwide, and finding new treatments remains a major challenge. Previous studies showed that modified forms of pectin, a complex polysaccharide present in the primary plant cell wall, possess anticancer properties. Nevertheless, the mechanism of action of modified pectin and the pathways involved are unclear. Here, we show that citrus pectin modified by heat treatment induced cell death in HepG2 and A549 cells. The induced cell death differs from classical apoptosis because no DNA cleavage was observed. In addition, Z-VAD-fmk, a pan-caspase inhibitor, did not influence the observed cell death in HepG2 cells but appeared to be partly protective in A549 cells, indicating that heat-modified citrus pectin might induce caspase-independent cell death. An increase in the abundance of the phosphatidylethanolamine-conjugated Light Chain 3 (LC3) protein and a decrease in p62 protein abundance were observed in both cell types when incubated in the presence of heat-modified citrus pectin. These results indicate the activation of autophagy. To our knowledge, this is the first time that autophagy has been revealed in cells incubated in the presence of a modified form of pectin. This autophagy activation appears to be protective, at least for A549 cells, because its inhibition with 3-methyladenine increased the observed modified pectin-induced cytotoxicity. This study confirms the potential of modified pectin to improve chemotherapeutic cancer treatments. PMID:25794149

  5. Combined treatment with cotylenin A and phenethyl isothiocyanate induces strong antitumor activity mainly through the induction of ferroptotic cell death in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kasukabe, Takashi; Honma, Yoshio; Okabe-Kado, Junko; Higuchi, Yusuke; Kato, Nobuo; Kumakura, Shunichi

    2016-08-01

    The treatment of pancreatic cancer, one of the most aggressive gastrointestinal tract malignancies, with current chemotherapeutic drugs has had limited success due to its chemoresistance and poor prognosis. Therefore, the development of new drugs or effective combination therapies is urgently needed. Cotylenin A (CN-A) (a plant growth regulator) is a potent inducer of differentiation in myeloid leukemia cells and exhibits potent antitumor activities in several cancer cell lines. In the present study, we demonstrated that CN-A and phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), an inducer of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and a dietary anticarcinogenic compound, synergistically inhibited the proliferation of MIAPaCa-2, PANC-1 and gemcitabine-resistant PANC-1 cells. A combined treatment with CN-A and PEITC also effectively inhibited the anchorage-independent growth of these cancer cells. The combined treatment with CN-A and PEITC strongly induced cell death within 1 day at concentrations at which CN-A or PEITC alone did not affect cell viability. A combined treatment with synthetic CN-A derivatives (ISIR-005 and ISIR-042) or fusicoccin J (CN-A-related natural product) and PEITC did not have synergistic effects on cell death. The combined treatment with CN-A and PEITC synergistically induced the generation of ROS. Antioxidants (N-acetylcysteine and trolox), ferroptosis inhibitors (ferrostatin-1 and liproxstatin), and the lysosomal iron chelator deferoxamine canceled the synergistic cell death. Apoptosis inhibitors (Z-VAD-FMK and Q-VD-OPH) and the necrosis inhibitor necrostatin-1s did not inhibit synergistic cell death. Autophagy inhibitors (3-metyladenine and chloroquine) partially prevented cell death. These results show that synergistic cell death induced by the combined treatment with CN-A and PEITC is mainly due to the induction of ferroptosis. Therefore, the combination of CN-A and PEITC has potential as a novel therapeutic strategy against pancreatic cancer.

  6. Combined treatment with cotylenin A and phenethyl isothiocyanate induces strong antitumor activity mainly through the induction of ferroptotic cell death in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kasukabe, Takashi; Honma, Yoshio; Okabe-Kado, Junko; Higuchi, Yusuke; Kato, Nobuo; Kumakura, Shunichi

    2016-08-01

    The treatment of pancreatic cancer, one of the most aggressive gastrointestinal tract malignancies, with current chemotherapeutic drugs has had limited success due to its chemoresistance and poor prognosis. Therefore, the development of new drugs or effective combination therapies is urgently needed. Cotylenin A (CN-A) (a plant growth regulator) is a potent inducer of differentiation in myeloid leukemia cells and exhibits potent antitumor activities in several cancer cell lines. In the present study, we demonstrated that CN-A and phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), an inducer of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and a dietary anticarcinogenic compound, synergistically inhibited the proliferation of MIAPaCa-2, PANC-1 and gemcitabine-resistant PANC-1 cells. A combined treatment with CN-A and PEITC also effectively inhibited the anchorage-independent growth of these cancer cells. The combined treatment with CN-A and PEITC strongly induced cell death within 1 day at concentrations at which CN-A or PEITC alone did not affect cell viability. A combined treatment with synthetic CN-A derivatives (ISIR-005 and ISIR-042) or fusicoccin J (CN-A-related natural product) and PEITC did not have synergistic effects on cell death. The combined treatment with CN-A and PEITC synergistically induced the generation of ROS. Antioxidants (N-acetylcysteine and trolox), ferroptosis inhibitors (ferrostatin-1 and liproxstatin), and the lysosomal iron chelator deferoxamine canceled the synergistic cell death. Apoptosis inhibitors (Z-VAD-FMK and Q-VD-OPH) and the necrosis inhibitor necrostatin-1s did not inhibit synergistic cell death. Autophagy inhibitors (3-metyladenine and chloroquine) partially prevented cell death. These results show that synergistic cell death induced by the combined treatment with CN-A and PEITC is mainly due to the induction of ferroptosis. Therefore, the combination of CN-A and PEITC has potential as a novel therapeutic strategy against pancreatic cancer. PMID:27375275

  7. Fluid Shear Stress Sensitizes Cancer Cells to Receptor-Mediated Apoptosis via Trimeric Death Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer metastasis, the process of cancer cell migration from a primary to distal location, typically leads to a poor patient prognosis. Hematogenous metastasis is initiated by intravasation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) into the bloodstream, which are then believed to adhere to the luminal surface of the endothelium and extravasate into distal locations. Apoptotic agents such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF) apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), whether in soluble ligand form or expressed on the surface of natural killer (NK) cells, have shown promise in treating CTCs to reduce the probability of metastasis. The role of hemodynamic shear forces in altering the cancer cell response to receptor-mediated apoptosis has not been previously investigated. Here, we report that human colon cancer COLO 205 and prostate cancer PC-3 cells exposed to a uniform fluid shear stress in a cone-and-plate viscometer become sensitized to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Shear-induced sensitization directly correlated with the application of fluid shear stress, and TRAIL-induced apoptosis increased in a fluid shear stress force- and time-dependent manner. In contrast, TRAIL-induced necrosis was not affected by the application fluid shear stress. Interestingly, fluid shear stress did not sensitize cancer cells to apoptosis when treated with doxorubicin, which also induces apoptosis in cancer cells. Caspase inhibition experiments revealed that shear stress-induced sensitization to TRAIL occurs via caspase-dependent apoptosis. These results suggest that physiological fluid shear force can modulate receptor-mediated apoptosis of cancer cells in the presence of apoptotic agents. PMID:25110459

  8. In vitro study of cell death with 5-aminolevulinic acid based photodynamic therapy to improve the efficiency of cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firdous, S.; Nawaz, M.; Ikram, M.; Ahmed, M.

    2012-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a kind of photochemo therapeutic treatment that exerts its effect mainly through the induction of cell death. Distinct types of cell death may be elicited by different PDT regimes. In this study, efforts are underway to optimize PDT protocols for improved efficacy and combination of all three PDT mechanisms involved in the different human carcinomas cell narcosis. Our in vitro cell culture experiments with 5-aminolevulanic acid (ALA) a clinically approved photiosensitizer (PS) and 635 nm laser light have yielded promising results, as follow: (1) (human cervical cancer (HeLa) cell line incubated, for 18 h, with 30 μg/ml of 5-ALA, treated with laser light dose of 50 J/cm2 can produce 85% of cell killing (2) human larynx carcinoma (Hep2c) cell line incubated, for 7 h, with 55 μg/ml of 5-ALA, treated with laser light dose of 85 J/cm2 can produce 75% of cell killing (3) human liver cancer (HepG2) cell line incubated, for 22-48 h, with 262 μg/ml of 5-ALA, treated with laser light dose of 120 J/cm2 can produce 95% of cell killing (4) human muscle cancer (RD) cell line incubated, for 47 h, with 250 μg/ml of 5-ALA, treated with laser light dose of 80 J/cm2 can produce 76% of cell killing (5) Human embryonic kidney (HEK293T) cell line incu-bated, for 18 h, with 400 μg/ml of 5-ALA, treated with laser light dose of 40 J/cm2 can produce 82% of cell killing confirming the efficacy of photodynamic therapy.

  9. Podophyllotoxin acetate triggers anticancer effects against non-small cell lung cancer cells by promoting cell death via cell cycle arrest, ER stress and autophagy

    PubMed Central

    CHOI, JAE YEON; HONG, WAN GI; CHO, JEONG HYUN; KIM, EUN MI; KIM, JONGDOO; JUNG, CHAN-HUN; HWANG, SANG-GU; UM, HONG-DUCK; PARK, JONG KUK

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported that podophyllotoxin acetate (PA) radiosensitizes NCI-H460 cells. Here, we confirmed that PA treatment also induces cell death among two other non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines: NCI-H1299 and A549 cells (IC50 values = 7.6 and 16.1 nM, respectively). Our experiments further showed that PA treatment was able to induce cell death via various mechanisms. First, PA dose-dependently induced cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase, as shown by accumulation of the mitosis-related proteins, p21, survivin and Aurora B. This G2/M phase arrest was due to the PA-induced inhibition of microtubule polymerization. Together, the decreased microtubule polymerization and increased cell cycle arrest induced DNA damage (reflected by accumulation of γ-H2AX) and triggered the induction of intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways, as shown by the time-dependent activations of caspase-3, -8 and -9. Second, PA time-dependently activated the pro-apoptotic ER stress pathway, as evidenced by increased expression levels of BiP, CHOP, IRE1-α, phospho-PERK, and phospho-JNK. Third, PA activated autophagy, as reflected by time-dependent increases in the expression levels of beclin-1, Atg3, Atg5 and Atg7, and the cleavage of LC3. Collectively, these results suggest a model wherein PA decreases microtubule polymerization and increases cell cycle arrest, thereby inducing apoptotic cell death via the activation of DNA damage, ER stress and autophagy. PMID:26314270

  10. Zoledronate and Molecular Iodine Cause Synergistic Cell Death in Triple Negative Breast Cancer through Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Ranu; Singh, Preeti; Singh, Aru; Chagtoo, Megha; Khan, Sajid; Tiwari, Swasti; Agarwal, Gaurav; Meeran, Syed Musthapa; Godbole, Madan M

    2016-01-01

    Women consuming molecular iodine (I2) through seaweeds suffer the least from breast cancers. Zoledronate (Zol) is in clinical use for alleviation of bone pain in cancer patients. Triple negative breast cancers exhibit high mortality due to lack of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. I2 and Zol independently cause weak antiproliferative and apoptotic effect. So far, their combined effects have not been tested. We analyzed the effect of combination of I2 with Zol as a potent adjuvant therapeutic agent for triple negative breast cancer cells (MDA-MBA-231) and in the mice model of breast cancer. Cell viability, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling staining, Western blotting, real-time PCR, flow cytometry, and other assays were performed for assessing cell death, calcium levels, and migration potential, respectively, in treated cells. The increased caspase 8, increased [Ca(2+)]c levels, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress resulted in apoptosis. Real time and fluorescence-based analysis demonstrated that the combination treatment targets ER Ca(2+) homeostasis chaperons leading to apoptosis. Combination therapy reduces metalloproteinases 2 and 9, inhibits invasion/migration of cells, and prevents growth of tumor in mice. I2 + Zol combination treatment induces synergistic increase in ER-mediated apoptosis, reduces invasion/migration potential of MDA-MB-231 cells, and exhibits antiproliferative property in vivo demonstrating its potential as combination therapy.

  11. [Cancer treatment and death studies].

    PubMed

    Shimazono, Susumu

    2009-10-01

    In the West, death studies has become a new academic area since around 1970. The driving force is the hospice movement. People now ask questions such as how to care for dying people and their relatives. Because the main clients in hospice and palliative care are cancer patients, cancer treatment and death studies are closely linked to each other. The rise of death studies is connected with the awareness of the limits of modern medicine. Medical staffs are forced to learn how to care for those patients facing death. But modern medicine has put exclusive emphasis on biomedical treatment to cure. Contemporary medicine is becoming more and more aware of the psychological and spiritual needs of the patient. Today medicine and medical education have to incorporate the perspectives from death studies, learning how human beings facing death can live a better life not only in physical terms but also in psychological, social and spiritual terms.

  12. Nano neodymium oxide induces massive vacuolization and autophagic cell death in non-small cell lung cancer NCI-H460 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yong; Yang Lisong; Feng Chao; Wen Longping . E-mail: lpwen@ustc.edu.cn

    2005-11-11

    Neodymium, a rare earth element, was known to exhibit cytotoxic effects and induce apoptosis in certain cancer cells. Here we show that nano-sized neodymium oxide (Nano Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) induced massive vacuolization and cell death in non-small cell lung cancer NCI-H460 cells at micromolar equivalent concentration range. Cell death elicited by Nano Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} was not due to apoptosis and caspases were not involved. Electron microscopy and acridine orange staining revealed extensive autophagy in the cytoplasm of the cells treated by Nano Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Autophagy induced by Nano Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} was accompanied by S-phase cell cycle arrest, mild disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential, and inhibition of proteasome activity. Bafilomycin A1, but not 3-MA, induced apoptosis while inhibiting autophagy. Our results revealed a novel biological function for Nano Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} and may have implications for the therapy of non-small cell lung cancer.

  13. Quantification of Ultrasonic Scattering Properties of In Vivo Tumor Cell Death in Mouse Models of Breast Cancer1

    PubMed Central

    Tadayyon, Hadi; Sannachi, Lakshmanan; Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Al-Mahrouki, Azza; Tran, William T.; Kolios, Michael C.; Czarnota, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Quantitative ultrasound parameters based on form factor models were investigated as potential biomarkers of cell death in breast tumor (MDA-231) xenografts treated with chemotherapy. METHODS: Ultrasound backscatter radiofrequency data were acquired from MDA-231 breast cancer tumor–bearing mice (n = 20) before and after the administration of chemotherapy drugs at two ultrasound frequencies: 7 MHz and 20 MHz. Radiofrequency spectral analysis involved estimating the backscatter coefficient from regions of interest in the center of the tumor, to which form factor models were fitted, resulting in estimates of average scatterer diameter and average acoustic concentration (AAC). RESULTS: The ∆AAC parameter extracted from the spherical Gaussian model was found to be the most effective cell death biomarker (at the lower frequency range, r2 = 0.40). At both frequencies, AAC in the treated tumors increased significantly (P = .026 and .035 at low and high frequencies, respectively) 24 hours after treatment compared with control tumors. Furthermore, stepwise multiple linear regression analysis of the low-frequency data revealed that a multiparameter quantitative ultrasound model was strongly correlated to cell death determined histologically posttreatment (r2 = 0.74). CONCLUSION: The Gaussian form factor model–based scattering parameters can potentially be used to track the extent of cell death at clinically relevant frequencies (7 MHz). The 20-MHz results agreed with previous findings in which parameters related to the backscatter intensity (i.e., AAC) increased with cell death. The findings suggested that, in addition to the backscatter coefficient parameter ∆AAC, biological features including tumor heterogeneity and initial tumor volume were important factors in the prediction of cell death response. PMID:26692527

  14. Classification of cell death

    PubMed Central

    Kroemer, G; Galluzzi, L; Vandenabeele, P; Abrams, J; Alnemri, ES; Baehrecke, EH; Blagosklonny, MV; El-Deiry, WS; Golstein, P; Green, DR; Hengartner, M; Knight, RA; Kumar, S; Lipton, SA; Malorni, W; Nuñez, G; Peter, ME; Tschopp, J; Yuan, J; Piacentini, M; Zhivotovsky, B; Melino, G

    2009-01-01

    Different types of cell death are often defined by morphological criteria, without a clear reference to precise biochemical mechanisms. The Nomenclature Committee on Cell Death (NCCD) proposes unified criteria for the definition of cell death and of its different morphologies, while formulating several caveats against the misuse of words and concepts that slow down progress in the area of cell death research. Authors, reviewers and editors of scientific periodicals are invited to abandon expressions like ‘percentage apoptosis’ and to replace them with more accurate descriptions of the biochemical and cellular parameters that are actually measured. Moreover, at the present stage, it should be accepted that caspase-independent mechanisms can cooperate with (or substitute for) caspases in the execution of lethal signaling pathways and that ‘autophagic cell death’ is a type of cell death occurring together with (but not necessarily by) autophagic vacuolization. This study details the 2009 recommendations of the NCCD on the use of cell death-related terminology including ‘entosis’, ‘mitotic catastrophe’, ‘necrosis’, ‘necroptosis’ and ‘pyroptosis’. PMID:18846107

  15. Thymoquinone induces caspase-independent, autophagic cell death in CPT-11-resistant lovo colon cancer via mitochondrial dysfunction and activation of JNK and p38.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Cheng; Lee, Nien-Hung; Hsu, Hsi-Hsien; Ho, Tsung-Jung; Tu, Chuan-Chou; Hsieh, Dennis Jine-Yuan; Lin, Yueh-Min; Chen, Li-Mien; Kuo, Wei-Wen; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2015-02-11

    Chemotherapy causes unwanted side effects and chemoresistance, limiting its effectiveness. Therefore, phytochemicals are now used as alternative treatments. Thymoquinone (TQ) is used to treat different cancers, including colon cancer. The irinotecan-resistant (CPT-11-R) LoVo colon cancer cell line was previously constructed by stepwise CPT-11 challenges to untreated parental LoVo cells. TQ dose-dependently increased the total cell death index and activated apoptosis at 2 μM, which then diminished at increasing doses. The possibility of autophagic cell death was then investigated. TQ caused mitochondrial outer membrane permeability (MOMP) and activated autophagic cell death. JNK and p38 inhibitors (SP600125 and SB203580, respectively) reversed TQ autophagic cell death. TQ was also found to activate apoptosis before autophagy, and the direction of cell death was switched toward autophagic cell death at initiation of autophagosome formation. Therefore, TQ resulted in caspase-independent, autophagic cell death via MOMP and activation of JNK and p38 in CPT-11-R LoVo colon cancer cells.

  16. Diatom-Derived Polyunsaturated Aldehydes Activate Cell Death in Human Cancer Cell Lines but Not Normal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sansone, Clementina; Braca, Alessandra; Ercolesi, Elena; Romano, Giovanna; Palumbo, Anna; Casotti, Raffaella; Francone, Maria; Ianora, Adrianna

    2014-01-01

    Diatoms are an important class of unicellular algae that produce bioactive polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUAs) that induce abortions or malformations in the offspring of invertebrates exposed to them during gestation. Here we compare the effects of the PUAs 2-trans,4-trans-decadienal (DD), 2-trans,4-trans-octadienal (OD) and 2-trans,4-trans-heptadienal (HD) on the adenocarcinoma cell lines lung A549 and colon COLO 205, and the normal lung/brunch epithelial BEAS-2B cell line. Using the viability MTT/Trypan blue assays, we show that PUAs have a toxic effect on both A549 and COLO 205 tumor cells but not BEAS-2B normal cells. DD was the strongest of the three PUAs tested, at all time-intervals considered, but HD was as strong as DD after 48 h. OD was the least active of the three PUAs. The effect of the three PUAs was somewhat stronger for A549 cells. We therefore studied the death signaling pathway activated in A549 showing that cells treated with DD activated Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor 1 (TNFR1) and Fas Associated Death Domain (FADD) leading to necroptosis via caspase-3 without activating the survival pathway Receptor-Interacting Protein (RIP). The TNFR1/FADD/caspase pathway was also observed with OD, but only after 48 h. This was the only PUA that activated RIP, consistent with the finding that OD causes less damage to the cell compared to DD and HD. In contrast, cells treated with HD activated the Fas/FADD/caspase pathway. This is the first report that PUAs activate an extrinsic apoptotic machinery in contrast to other anticancer drugs that promote an intrinsic death pathway, without affecting the viability of normal cells from the same tissue type. These findings have interesting implications also from the ecological viewpoint considering that HD is one of the most common PUAs produced by diatoms. PMID:24992192

  17. Bortezomib enhances cancer cell death by blocking the autophagic flux through stimulating ERK phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Kao, C; Chao, A; Tsai, C-L; Chuang, W-C; Huang, W-P; Chen, G-C; Lin, C-Y; Wang, T-H; Wang, H-S; Lai, C-H

    2014-01-01

    The antitumor activity of an inhibitor of 26S proteasome bortezomib (Velcade) has been observed in various malignancies, including colon cancer, prostate cancer, breast cancer, and ovarian cancer. Bortezomib has been proposed to stimulate autophagy, but scientific observations did not always support this. Interactions between ERK activity and autophagy are complex and not completely clear. Autophagy proteins have recently been shown to regulate the functions of ERK, and ERK activation has been found to induce autophagy. On the other hand, sustained activation of ERK has also been shown to inhibit the maturation step of the autophagy process. In this study, we sought to identify the mechanism of autophagy regulation in cancer cells treated with bortezomib. Our results indicate that bortezomib blocked the autophagic flux without inhibiting the fusion of the autophagosome and lysosome. In ovarian cancer, as well as endometrial cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma cells, bortezomib inhibited protein degradation in lysosomes by suppressing cathepsins, which requires the participation of ERK phosphorylation, but not JNK or p38. Our findings that ERK phosphorylation reduced cathepsins further explain how ERK phosphorylation inhibits the autophagic flux. In conclusion, bortezomib may induce ERK phosphorylation to suppress cathepsin B and inhibit the catalytic process of autophagy in ovarian cancer and other solid tumors. The inhibition of cisplatin-induced autophagy by bortezomib can enhance chemotherapy efficacy in ovarian cancer. As we also found that bortezomib blocks the autophagic flux in other cancers, the synergistic cytotoxic effect of bortezomib by abolishing chemotherapy-related autophagy may help us develop strategies of combination therapies for multiple cancers.

  18. Highly efficient synthetic iron-dependent nucleases activate both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic death pathways in leukemia cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Horn, Adolfo; Fernandes, Christiane; Parrilha, Gabrieli L; Kanashiro, Milton M; Borges, Franz V; de Melo, Edésio J T; Schenk, Gerhard; Terenzi, Hernán; Pich, Claus T

    2013-11-01

    The nuclease activity and the cytotoxicity toward human leukemia cancer cells of iron complexes, [Fe(HPClNOL)Cl2]NO3 (1), [Cl(HPClNOL)Fe(μ-O)Fe(HPClNOL)Cl]Cl2·2H2O (2), and [(SO4)(HPClNOL)Fe(μ-O)Fe(HPClNOL)(SO4)]·6H2O (3) (HPClNOL=1-(bis-pyridin-2-ylmethyl-amino)-3-chloropropan-2-ol), were investigated. Each complex was able to promote plasmid DNA cleavage and change the supercoiled form of the plasmid to circular and linear ones. Kinetic data revealed that (1), (2) and (3) increase the rate of DNA hydrolysis about 278, 192 and 339 million-fold, respectively. The activity of the complexes was inhibited by distamycin, indicating that they interact with the minor groove of the DNA. The cytotoxic activity of the complexes toward U937, HL-60, Jukart and THP-1 leukemia cancer cells was studied employing 3-(4,5-dimethythiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT), fluorescence and electronic transmission microscopies, flow cytometry and a cytochrome C release assay. Compound (2) has the highest activity toward cancer cells and is the least toxic for normal ones (i.e. peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs)). In contrast, compound (1) is the least active toward cancer cells but displays the highest toxicity toward normal cells. Transmission electronic microscopy indicates that cell death shows features typical of apoptotic cells, which was confirmed using the annexin V-FITC/PI (fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide) assay. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that at an early stage during the treatment with complex (2) mitochondria lose their transmembrane potential, resulting in cytochrome C release. A quantification of caspases 3, 9 (intrinsic apoptosis pathway) and caspase 8 (extrinsic apoptosis pathway) indicated that both the intrinsic (via mitochondria) and extrinsic (via death receptors) pathways are involved in the apoptotic stimuli. PMID:23933562

  19. Programmed cell death 2 protein induces gastric cancer cell growth arrest at the early S phase of the cell cycle and apoptosis in a p53-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Wei, Wei; Jin, Hui-Cheng; Ying, Rong-Chao; Zhu, A-Kao; Zhang, Fang-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Programmed cell death 2 (PDCD2) is a highly conserved nuclear protein, and aberrant PDCD2 expression alters cell apoptosis. The present study aimed to investigate PDCD2 expression in gastric cancer. Tissue specimens from 34 gastric cancer patients were collected for analysis of PDCD2 expression using immunohistochemistry, western blotting and qRT-PCR. Gastric cancer cell lines (a p53-mutated MKN28 line and a wild-type p53 MKN45 line) were used to assess the effects of PDCD2 overexpression. p53-/- nude mice were used to investigate the effect of PDCD2 on ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced skin carcinogenesis. The data showed that PDCD2 expression was reduced in gastric cancer tissue specimens, and loss of PDCD2 expression was associated with the poor survival of patients. PDCD2 expression induced gastric cancer cell growth arrest at the early S phase of the cell cycle and apoptosis. The antitumor effects of PDCD2 expression were dependent on p53 expression in gastric cancer cells. Moreover, PDCD2 expression inhibited activity of the ATM/Chk1/2/p53 signaling pathway. In addition, PDCD2 expression suppressed UVB-induced skin carcinogenesis in p53+/+ nude mice, but not in p53-/- mice. The data from the present study demonstrated that loss of PDCD2 expression could contribute to gastric cancer development and progression and that PDCD2-induced gastric cancer cell growth arrest at the early S phase of the cell cycle and apoptosis are p53-dependent. PMID:25334010

  20. Homozygous mdm2 SNP309 cancer cells with compromised transcriptional elongation at p53 target genes are sensitive to induction of p53-independent cell death.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Melissa; Polotskaia, Alla; Bargonetti, Jill

    2015-10-27

    A single nucleotide polymorphism (T to G) in the mdm2 P2 promoter, mdm2 SNP309, leads to MDM2 overexpression promoting chemotherapy resistant cancers. Two mdm2 G/G SNP309 cancer cell lines, MANCA and A875, have compromised wild-type p53 that co-localizes with MDM2 on chromatin. We hypothesized that MDM2 in these cells inhibited transcription initiation at the p53 target genes p21 and puma. Surprisingly, following etoposide treatment transcription initiation occurred at the compromised target genes in MANCA and A875 cells similar to the T/T ML-1 cell line. In all cell lines tested there was equally robust recruitment of total and initiated RNA polymerase II (Pol II). We found that knockdown of MDM2 in G/G cells moderately increased expression of subsets of p53 target genes without increasing p53 stability. Importantly, etoposide and actinomycin D treatments increased histone H3K36 trimethylation in T/T, but not G/G cells, suggesting a G/G correlated inhibition of transcription elongation. We therefore tested a chemotherapeutic agent (8-amino-adenosine) that induces p53-independent cell death for higher clinically relevant cytotoxicity. We demonstrated that T/T and G/G mdm2 SNP309 cells were equally sensitive to 8-amino-adenosine induced cell death. In conclusion for cancer cells overexpressing MDM2, targeting MDM2 may be less effective than inducing p53-independent cell death.

  1. Thirty years of BCL-2: translating cell death discoveries into novel cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Delbridge, Alex R D; Grabow, Stephanie; Strasser, Andreas; Vaux, David L

    2016-02-01

    The 'hallmarks of cancer' are generally accepted as a set of genetic and epigenetic alterations that a normal cell must accrue to transform into a fully malignant cancer. It follows that therapies designed to counter these alterations might be effective as anti-cancer strategies. Over the past 30 years, research on the BCL-2-regulated apoptotic pathway has led to the development of small-molecule compounds, known as 'BH3-mimetics', that bind to pro-survival BCL-2 proteins to directly activate apoptosis of malignant cells. This Timeline article focuses on the discovery and study of BCL-2, the wider BCL-2 protein family and, specifically, its roles in cancer development and therapy.

  2. Facilitated Anion Transport Induces Hyperpolarization of the Cell Membrane That Triggers Differentiation and Cell Death in Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Soto-Cerrato, Vanessa; Manuel-Manresa, Pilar; Hernando, Elsa; Calabuig-Fariñas, Silvia; Martínez-Romero, Alicia; Fernández-Dueñas, Víctor; Sahlholm, Kristoffer; Knöpfel, Thomas; García-Valverde, María; Rodilla, Ananda M; Jantus-Lewintre, Eloisa; Farràs, Rosa; Ciruela, Francisco; Pérez-Tomás, Ricardo; Quesada, Roberto

    2015-12-23

    Facilitated anion transport potentially represents a powerful tool to modulate various cellular functions. However, research into the biological effects of small molecule anionophores is still at an early stage. Here we have used two potent anionophore molecules inspired in the structure of marine metabolites tambjamines to gain insight into the effect induced by these compounds at the cellular level. We show how active anionophores, capable of facilitating the transmembrane transport of chloride and bicarbonate in model phospholipid liposomes, induce acidification of the cytosol and hyperpolarization of plasma cell membranes. We demonstrate how this combined effect can be used against cancer stem cells (CSCs). Hyperpolarization of cell membrane induces cell differentiation and loss of stemness of CSCs leading to effective elimination of this cancer cell subpopulation.

  3. Targeting cell death signalling in cancer: minimising ‘Collateral damage'

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Joanna L; MacFarlane, Marion

    2016-01-01

    Targeting apoptosis for the treatment of cancer has become an increasingly attractive strategy, with agents in development to trigger extrinsic apoptosis via TRAIL signalling, or to prevent the anti-apoptotic activity of BCL-2 proteins or inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins. Although the evasion of apoptosis is one of the hallmarks of cancer, many cancers have intact apoptotic signalling pathways, which if unblocked could efficiently kill cancerous cells. However, it is becoming increasing clear that without a detailed understanding of both apoptotic and non-apoptotic signalling, and the key proteins that regulate these pathways, there can be dose-limiting toxicity and adverse effects associated with their modulation. Here we review the main apoptotic pathways directly targeted for anti-cancer therapy and the unforeseen consequences of their modulation. Furthermore, we highlight the importance of an in-depth mechanistic understanding of both the apoptotic and non-apoptotic functions of those proteins under investigation as anti-cancer drug targets and outline some novel approaches to sensitise cancer cells to apoptosis, thereby improving the efficacy of existing therapies when used in combination with novel targeted agents. PMID:27140313

  4. Cell Death in Genome Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Xinchen; Hardwick, J. Marie

    2015-01-01

    Inappropriate survival of abnormal cells underlies tumorigenesis. Most discoveries about programmed cell death have come from studying model organisms. Revisiting the experimental contexts that inspired these discoveries helps explain confounding biases that inevitably accompany such discoveries. Amending early biases has added a newcomer to the collection of cell death models. Analysis of gene-dependent death in yeast revealed the surprising influence of single gene mutations on subsequent eukaryotic genome evolution. Similar events may influence the selection for mutations during early tumorigenesis. The possibility that an early random mutation might drive the selection for a cancer driver mutation is conceivable but difficult to demonstrate. This was tested in yeast, revealing that mutation of almost any gene appears to specify the selection for a new second mutation. Some human tumors contain pairs of mutant genes homologous to co-occurring mutant genes in yeast. Here we consider how yeast again provide novel insights into tumorigenesis. PMID:25725369

  5. Seriniquinone, a selective anticancer agent, induces cell death by autophagocytosis, targeting the cancer-protective protein dermcidin.

    PubMed

    Trzoss, Lynnie; Fukuda, Takashi; Costa-Lotufo, Letícia V; Jimenez, Paula; La Clair, James J; Fenical, William

    2014-10-14

    Natural products continue to provide vital treatment options for cancer. Although their translation into chemotherapeutics is complex, collaborative programs continue to deliver productive pipelines for cancer chemotherapy. A new natural product, seriniquinone, isolated from a marine bacterium of the genus Serinicoccus, demonstrated potent activity over a select set of tumor cell lines with particular selectivity toward melanoma cell lines. Upon entering the cell, its journey began by localization into the endoplasmic reticulum. Within 3 h, cells treated with seriniquinone underwent cell death marked by activation of autophagocytosis and gradually terminated through a caspase-9 apoptotic pathway. Using an immunoaffinity approach followed by multipoint validation, we identified the target of seriniquinone as the small protein, dermcidin. Combined, these findings revealed a small molecule motif in parallel with its therapeutic target, whose potential in cancer therapy may be significant. This discovery defines a new pharmacophore that displayed selective activity toward a distinct set of cell lines, predominantly melanoma, within the NCI 60 panel. This selectivity, along with the ease in medicinal chemical modification, provides a key opportunity to design and evaluate new treatments for those cancers that rely on dermcidin activity. Further, the use of dermcidin as a patient preselection biomarker may accelerate the development of more effective personalized treatments.

  6. Cervical cancer: a preventable death.

    PubMed

    Nour, Nawal M

    2009-01-01

    Cervical cancer kills 260,000 women annually, and nearly 85% of these deaths occur in developing nations, where it is the leading cause of cancer deaths in women. Disparities of health and poverty play a large role in this high mortality rate. Whereas routine Papanicolaou and human papillomavirus (HPV) testing has dramatically reduced cervical cancer deaths in Western nations, without proper infrastructure, facilities, and medical training, the rates of cervical cancer in developing nations will remain high. Studies on HPV DNA testing and the low-technology method of "screen and treat" are promising. In addition, reducing the cost and increasing the availability of HPV vaccines in developing nations brings hope and promise to the next generation of women. PMID:20111660

  7. Energy metabolism targeted drugs synergize with photodynamic therapy to potentiate breast cancer cell death.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaolan; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Pan; Liu, Quanhong; Wang, Xiaobing

    2014-12-01

    Malignant cells are highly dependent on aerobic glycolysis, which differs significantly from normal cells (the Warburg effect). Interference of this metabolic process has been considered as an innovative method for developing selective cancer therapy. A recent study demonstrated that the glycolysis inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) can potentiate PDT efficacy, whereas the possible mechanisms have not been carefully investigated. This study firstly proved the general potentiation of PDT efficacy by 2-DG and 3-bromopyruvate (3-BP) in human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells, and carefully elucidated the underlying mechanism in the process. Our results showed that both 2-DG and 3-BP could significantly promote a PDT-induced cell cytotoxic effect when compared with either monotherapy. Synergistic potentiation of mitochondria- and caspase-dependent cell apoptosis was observed, including a mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) drop, Bax translocation, and caspase-3 activation. Besides, ROS generation and the expression of oxidative stress related proteins such as P38 MAPK phosphorylation and JNK phosphorylation were notably increased after the combined treatments. Moreover, when pretreated with the ROS scavenger N-acetylcysteine (NAC), the ROS generation, the MMP drop, cell apoptosis and cytotoxicity were differently inhibited, suggesting that ROS was vertical in the pro-apoptotic process induced by 2-DG/3-BP combined with PDT treatment. These results indicate that the combination of glycolytic antagonists and PDT may be a promising therapeutic strategy to effectively kill cancer cells. PMID:25363473

  8. ATM Inhibition Potentiates Death of Androgen Receptor-inactivated Prostate Cancer Cells with Telomere Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Vidyavathi; Wu, Min; Ciavattone, Nicholas; McKenty, Nathan; Menon, Mani; Barrack, Evelyn R; Reddy, G Prem-Veer; Kim, Sahn-Ho

    2015-10-16

    Androgen receptor (AR) plays a role in maintaining telomere stability in prostate cancer cells, as AR inactivation induces telomere dysfunction within 3 h. Since telomere dysfunction in other systems is known to activate ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated)-mediated DNA damage response (DDR) signaling pathways, we investigated the role of ATM-mediated DDR signaling in AR-inactivated prostate cancer cells. Indeed, the induction of telomere dysfunction in cells treated with AR-antagonists (Casodex or MDV3100) or AR-siRNA was associated with a dramatic increase in phosphorylation (activation) of ATM and its downstream effector Chk2 and the presenceof phosphorylated ATM at telomeres, indicating activation of DDR signaling at telomeres. Moreover, Casodex washout led to the reversal of telomere dysfunction, indicating repair of damaged telomeres. ATM inhibitor blocked ATM phosphorylation, induced PARP cleavage, abrogated cell cycle checkpoint activation and attenuated the formation of γH2AX foci at telomeres in AR-inactivated cells, suggesting that ATM inhibitor induces apoptosis in AR-inactivated cells by blocking the repair of damaged DNA at telomeres. Finally, colony formation assay revealed a dramatic decrease in the survival of cells co-treated with Casodex and ATM inhibitor as compared with those treated with either Casodex or ATM inhibitor alone. These observations indicate that inhibitors of DDR signaling pathways may offer a unique opportunity to enhance the potency of AR-targeted therapies for the treatment of androgen-sensitive as well as castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  9. Novel piperazine core compound induces death in human liver cancer cells: possible pharmacological properties

    PubMed Central

    Samie, Nima; Muniandy, Sekaran; Kanthimathi, M. S.; Haerian, Batoul Sadat; Raja Azudin, Raja Elina

    2016-01-01

    The current study evaluates the cytotoxic mechanism of a novel piperazine derivate designated as PCC against human liver cancer cells. In this context, human liver cancer cell lines, SNU-475 and 243, human monocyte/macrophage cell line, CRL-9855, and human B lymphocyte cell line, CCL-156, were used to determine the IC50 of PCC using the standard MTT assay. PCC displayed a strong suppressive effect on SNU-475 and SNU-423 cells with an IC50 value of 6.98 ± 0.11 μg/ml and 7.76 ± 0.45 μg/ml respectively, after 24 h of treatment. Significant dipping in the mitochondrial membrane potential and elevation in the released of cytochrome c from the mitochondria indicated the induction of the intrinsic apoptosis pathway by PCC. Activation of this pathway was further evidenced by significant activation of caspase 3/7 and 9. PCC was also shown to activate the extrinsic pathways of apoptosis via activation of caspase-8 which is linked to the suppression of NF-ƙB translocation to the nucleus. Cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase was confirmed by flow cytometry and up-regulation of glutathione reductase expression was quantified by qPCR. This study suggests that PCC is a simultaneous inducer of intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of apoptosis in liver cancer cell lines. PMID:27072064

  10. Engineering death receptor ligands for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Wajant, Harald; Gerspach, Jeannette; Pfizenmaier, Klaus

    2013-05-28

    CD95, TNFR1, TRAILR1 and TRAILR2 belong to a subgroup of TNF receptors which is characterized by a conserved cell death-inducing protein domain that connects these receptors to the apoptotic machinery of the cell. Activation of death receptors in malignant cells attracts increasing attention as a principle to fight cancer. Besides agonistic antibodies the major way to stimulate death receptors is the use of their naturally occurring "death ligands" CD95L, TNF and TRAIL. However, dependent from the concept followed to develop a death ligand-based therapy various limiting aspects have to be taken into consideration on the way to a "bedside" usable drug. Problems arise in particular from the cell associated transmembrane nature of the death ligands, the poor serum half life of the soluble fragments derived from the transmembrane ligands, the ubiquitous expression of the death receptors and the existence of additional non-death receptors of the death ligands. Here, we summarize strategies how these limitations can be overcome by genetic engineering.

  11. Redox-Active Selenium Compounds—From Toxicity and Cell Death to Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Sougat; Boylan, Mallory; Selvam, Arun; Spallholz, Julian E.; Björnstedt, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    Selenium is generally known as an antioxidant due to its presence in selenoproteins as selenocysteine, but it is also toxic. The toxic effects of selenium are, however, strictly concentration and chemical species dependent. One class of selenium compounds is a potent inhibitor of cell growth with remarkable tumor specificity. These redox active compounds are pro-oxidative and highly cytotoxic to tumor cells and are promising candidates to be used in chemotherapy against cancer. Herein we elaborate upon the major forms of dietary selenium compounds, their metabolic pathways, and their antioxidant and pro-oxidant potentials with emphasis on cytotoxic mechanisms. Relative cytotoxicity of inorganic selenite and organic selenocystine compounds to different cancer cells are presented as evidence to our perspective. Furthermore, new novel classes of selenium compounds specifically designed to target tumor cells are presented and the potential of selenium in modern oncology is extensively discussed. PMID:25984742

  12. Aerosol delivery of programmed cell death protein 4 using polysorbitol-based gene delivery system for lung cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, You-Kyoung; Xing, Lei; Chen, Bao-An; Xu, Fengguo; Jiang, Hu-Lin; Zhang, Can

    2014-11-01

    The development of a safe and effective gene delivery system is the most challenging obstacle to the broad application of gene therapy in the clinic. In this study, we report the development of a polysorbitol-based gene delivery system as an alternative gene carrier for lung cancer therapy. The copolymer was prepared by a Michael addition reaction between sorbitol diacrylate (SD) and spermine (SPE); the SD-SPE copolymer effectively condenses with DNA on the nanoscale and protects it from nucleases. SD-SPE/DNA complexes showed excellent transfection with low toxicity both in vitro and in vivo, and aerosol delivery of SD-SPE complexes with programmed cell death protein 4 DNA significantly suppressed lung tumorigenesis in K-ras(LA1) lung cancer model mice. These results demonstrate that SD-SPE has great potential as a gene delivery system based on its excellent biocompatibility and high gene delivery efficiency for lung cancer gene therapy. PMID:24983766

  13. Secondary stimulation from Bacillus Calmette-Guérin induced macrophages induce nitric oxide independent cell-death in bladder cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Tomas; Ryk, Charlotta; Chatzakos, Vicky; Hallén Grufman, Katarina; Bavand-Chobot, Nasrin; Flygare, Jenny; Wiklund, N Peter; de Verdier, Petra J

    2014-06-28

    The anti-tumour mechanisms following Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) treatment of bladder-cancer remain largely unknown. Previous studies have shown involvement of nitric-oxide (NO) formation in the BCG-mediated effect. We analyzed the effects of macrophage secreted factors (MSFs) from BCG-stimulated RAW264.7 cells on the bladder-cancer cell line MBT2. Direct treatment with BCG did not induce NO in MBT2-cells whereas supernatant from BCG-stimulated macrophages increased NOS2 mRNA and protein expression, NO concentrations and cell-death. Blocking NO-synthesis with the NOS-inhibitor L-NAME did not affect levels of cell-death suggesting cytotoxic pathways involving other signalling molecules than NO. Several such candidate genes were identified in a microarray.

  14. Paclitaxel disrupts polarized entry of membrane-permeable C6 ceramide into ovarian cancer cells resulting in synchronous induction of cell death

    PubMed Central

    BEST, CHARLES; CALIANESE, DAVID; SZULAK, KEVIN; CAMMARATA, GARRET; BRUM, GABRIELLA; CARBONE, THOMAS; STILL, ERIC; HIGGINS, KATELYN; JI, FANG; DI, WEN; WANEBO, HAROLD; WAN, YINSHENG

    2013-01-01

    Exogenous cell-permeable C6 ceramide has been demonstrated to act synergistically with chemotherapeutic drugs, including paclitaxel, cisplatin, doxorubicin and the histone deacetylase inhibitor, trichostatin A, to induce cell death in a variety of cancer cells. We previously demonstrated that C6 ceramide and paclitaxel function synergistically to induce ovarian cancer cell death via modulation of the PI3/AKT cell survival pathway. In the present study, the entry pattern of C6 ceramide into ovarian cancer cells was investigated using fluorescent short chain C6-NBD sphingomyelin (C6-NBD). Confocal microscopy revealed that C6-NBD enters the cells in a polarized pattern, characterized by marked signals at one cellular end, representing a likely mitosis initiation site. Pretreatment of the cells with filipin, an inhibitor of the lipid raft/caveolae endocytosis pathway, decreases C6-NBD entry into the cells. A pretreatment with the water channel inhibitor, CuSO4, was also found to reduce the entry of C6-NBD. Notably, the pretreatment with paclitaxel was shown to disrupt the polarized entry of C6-NBD into the cells, resulting in an even distribution of C6-NBD in the cytoplasm. In addition, the pretreatment of the cells with paclitaxel destabilized the cytoskeletal proteins, releasing an increased number of short tubulin fragments. The results of the present study indicate that C6 ceramide preferentially enters the cells via a predetermined initiation site of mitosis. In addition to diffusion, short chain C6 ceramide may also enter cells via water channels and caveolae-mediated endocytosis. Paclitaxel disrupts the cell cytoskeleton and induces an even distribution of C6 ceramide in the cytoplasm resulting in synergistic ovarian cancer cell death. PMID:23833655

  15. Investigation of selective induction of breast cancer cells to death with treatment of plasma-activated medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashizume, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Nakamura, Kae; Kano, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Kenji; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Mizuno, Masaaki; Hori, Masaru

    2015-09-01

    The applications of plasma in medicine have much attention. We previously showed that plasma-activated medium (PAM) induced glioblastoma cells to apoptosis. However, it has not been elucidated the selectivity of PAM in detail. In this study, we investigated the selective effect of PAM on the death of human breast normal and cancer cells, MCF10A and MCF7, respectively, and observed the selective death with fluorescent microscopy. For the investigation of cell viability with PAM treatment, we prepared various PAMs according to the strengths, and treated each of cells with PAMs. Week PAM treatment only decreased the viability of MCF7 cells, while strong PAM treatment significantly affected both viabilities of MCF7 and MCF10A cells. For the fluorescent observation, we prepared the mixture of MCF7 and fluorescent-probed MCF10A cells, and seeded them. After the treatment of PAMs, the images showed that only MCF7 cells damaged in the mixture with week PAM treatment. These results suggested that a specific range existed with the selective effect in the strength of PAM. This work was partly supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Innovative Areas ``Plasma Medical Innovation'' Grant No. 24108002 and 24108008 from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan.

  16. Isolation and identification of ingredients inducing cancer cell death from the seeds of Alpinia galanga, a Chinese spice.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qiao-hui; Lu, Chuan-Li; Zhang, Xue-wu; Jiang, Jian-Guo

    2015-02-01

    This study was carried out to isolate ingredients from the seeds of a Chinese spice (Alpinia galangal) and to evaluate their cytotoxic activity on cancer cell lines. Isolation and purification of the phytochemical constituents were conducted using silica gel, Sephadex LH-20 and ODS columns. After extraction using 95% ethanol, the total extracts were re-extracted, resulting in petroleum ether (PE), ethyl acetate (EA) and water fractions, respectively. Activity tests showed that the EA fraction exhibited obvious (p < 0.05) protective effects on H2O2 damaged PC-12 cells at 20 μg mL(-1), and showed much higher (p < 0.05) cytotoxic activity on cancer cell lines than other fractions. Five compounds, 1'-S-1'-acetoxyeugenol acetate (I), 1'-S-1'-acetoxychavicol acetate (II), 2-propenal, 3-[4-(acetyloxy)-3-methoxyphenyl] (III), isocoronarin D (IV) and caryolane-1, 9β-diol (V), were obtained from the EA fraction and identified by HPLC, UV, MS, and NMR spectroscopic analyses. Compounds III and V were isolated from A. galangal for the first time. Moreover, compounds I, II, IV and V were the main active ingredients for inducing death of the tested cancer cells, and their IC50 values ranged from 60 to 90 μg mL(-1), indicating that these compounds possessed a wide anti-cancer capability. Therefore, A. galangal seeds could be a potential source of healthy food for tumor prevention.

  17. Development of hybrid small molecules that induce degradation of estrogen receptor-alpha and necrotic cell death in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Okuhira, Keiichiro; Demizu, Yosuke; Hattori, Takayuki; Ohoka, Nobumichi; Shibata, Norihito; Nishimaki-Mogami, Tomoko; Okuda, Haruhiro; Kurihara, Masaaki; Naito, Mikihiko

    2013-11-01

    Manipulation of protein stability with small molecules has a great potential for both basic research and clinical therapy. Recently, we have developed a series of hybrid small molecules named SNIPER (Specific and Non-genetic IAP-dependent Protein ERaser) that induces degradation of target proteins via ubiquitin-proteasome system. Here we report the activities of SNIPER(ER) that targets estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) for degradation. SNIPER(ER) induced degradation of ERα and inhibited estrogen-dependent expression of pS2 gene in an estrogen-dependent breast cancer cell line MCF-7. A proteasome inhibitor MG132 and siRNA-mediated downregulation of cIAP1 abrogated the SNIPER(ER)-induced ERα degradation, suggesting that the ERα is degraded by proteasome subsequent to cIAP1-mediated ubiquitylation. Intriguingly, after the ERα degradation, the SNIPER(ER)-treated MCF-7 cells undergo rapid cell death. Detailed analysis indicated that SNIPER(ER) caused necrotic cell death accompanied by a release of HMGB1, a marker of necrosis, from the cells. Following the ERα degradation, reactive oxygen species (ROS) was produced in the SNIPER(ER)-treated MCF-7 cells, and an anti-oxidant N-acetylcysteine inhibited the necrotic cell death. These results indicate that SNIPER(ER) induces ERα degradation, ROS production and necrotic cell death, implying a therapeutic potential of SNIPER(ER) as a lead for the treatment of ERα-positive breast cancers.

  18. The bioenergetic signature of isogenic colon cancer cells predicts the cell death response to treatment with 3-bromopyruvate, iodoacetate or 5-fluorouracil

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Metabolic reprogramming resulting in enhanced glycolysis is a phenotypic trait of cancer cells, which is imposed by the tumor microenvironment and is linked to the down-regulation of the catalytic subunit of the mitochondrial H+-ATPase (β-F1-ATPase). The bioenergetic signature is a protein ratio (β-F1-ATPase/GAPDH), which provides an estimate of glucose metabolism in tumors and serves as a prognostic indicator for cancer patients. Targeting energetic metabolism could be a viable alternative to conventional anticancer chemotherapies. Herein, we document that the bioenergetic signature of isogenic colon cancer cells provides a gauge to predict the cell-death response to the metabolic inhibitors, 3-bromopyruvate (3BrP) and iodoacetate (IA), and the anti-metabolite, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Methods The bioenergetic signature of the cells was determined by western blotting. Aerobic glycolysis was determined from lactate production rates. The cell death was analyzed by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Cellular ATP concentrations were determined using bioluminiscence. Pearson's correlation coefficient was applied to assess the relationship between the bioenergetic signature and the cell death response. In vivo tumor regression activities of the compounds were assessed using a xenograft mouse model injected with the highly glycolytic HCT116 colocarcinoma cells. Results We demonstrate that the bioenergetic signature of isogenic HCT116 cancer cells inversely correlates with the potential to execute necrosis in response to 3BrP or IA treatment. Conversely, the bioenergetic signature directly correlates with the potential to execute apoptosis in response to 5-FU treatment in the same cells. However, despite the large differences observed in the in vitro cell-death responses associated with 3BrP, IA and 5-FU, the in vivo tumor regression activities of these agents were comparable. Conclusions Overall, we suggest that the determination of the bioenergetic

  19. Alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) induces a wave of global protein hyperacetylation: Implications in cancer cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Min-Young; Kim, Myoung-Ae; Kim, Hyun-Ju; Bae, Yoe-Sik; Park, Joo-In; Kwak, Jong-Young; Chung, Jay H.; Yun, Jeanho . E-mail: yunj@dau.ac.kr

    2007-08-24

    Protein acetylation modification has been implicated in many cellular processes but the direct evidence for the involvement of protein acetylation in signal transduction is very limited. In the present study, we found that an alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) induces a robust and reversible hyperacetylation of both cytoplasmic and nuclear proteins during the early phase of the cellular response to MMS. Notably, the acetylation level upon MMS treatment was strongly correlated with the susceptibility of cancer cells, and the enhancement of MMS-induced acetylation by histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors was shown to increase the cellular susceptibility. These results suggest protein acetylation is important for the cell death signal transduction pathway and indicate that the use of HDAC inhibitors for the treatment of cancer is relevant.

  20. Network-based survival-associated module biomarker and its crosstalk with cell death genes in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Nana; Wu, Hao; Miao, Zhengqiang; Huang, Yan; Hu, Yongfei; Bi, Xiaoman; Wu, Deng; Qian, Kun; Wang, Liqiang; Wang, Changliang; Wang, Hongwei; Li, Kongning; Li, Xia; Wang, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer remains a dismal disease with diagnosing in the late, metastatic stages, therefore, there is a growing realization of the critical need to develop effective biomarkers for understanding underlying mechanisms. Although existing evidences demonstrate the important role of the single genetic abnormality in pathogenesis, the perturbations of interactors in the complex network are often ignored. Moreover, ovarian cancer diagnosis and treatment still exist a large gap that need to be bridged. In this work, we adopted a network-based survival-associated approach to capture a 12-gene network module based on differential co-expression PPI network in the advanced-stage, high-grade ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma. Then, regulatory genes (protein-coding genes and non-coding genes) direct interacting with the module were found to be significantly overlapped with cell death genes. More importantly, these overlapping genes tightly clustered together pointing to the module, deciphering the crosstalk between network-based survival-associated module and cell death in ovarian cancer. PMID:26099452

  1. Cytotoxicity and cell death mechanisms induced by the polyamine-vectorized anti-cancer drug F14512 targeting topoisomerase II.

    PubMed

    Brel, Viviane; Annereau, Jean-Philippe; Vispé, Stéphane; Kruczynski, Anna; Bailly, Christian; Guilbaud, Nicolas

    2011-12-15

    The polyamines transport system (PTS) is usually enhanced in cancer cells and can be exploited to deliver anticancer drugs. The spermine-conjugated epipodophyllotoxin derivative F14512 is a topoisomerase II poison that exploits the PTS to target preferentially tumor cells. F14512 has been characterized as a potent anticancer drug candidate and is currently in phase 1 clinical trials. Here we have analyzed the mechanisms of cell death induced by F14512, compared to the parent drug etoposide lacking the polyamine tail. F14512 proved to be >30-fold more cytotoxic than etoposide against A549 non-small cell lung cancer cells and triggers less but unrecoverable DNA damages. The cytotoxic action of F14512 is extremely rapid (within 3 h) and does not lead to a marked accumulation in the S-phase of the cell cycle, unlike etoposide. Interestingly, A549 cells treated with F14512 were less prone to undergo apoptosis (neither caspases-dependent nor caspases-independent pathways) or autophagy but preferentially entered into senescence. Drug-induced senescence was characterized qualitatively and quantitatively by an increased β-galactosidase activity, both by cytochemical staining and by flow cytometry. A morphological analysis by electron microscopy revealed the presence of numerous multi-lamellar and vesicular bodies and large electron-lucent (methuosis-like) vacuoles in F14512-treated cell samples. The mechanism of drug-induced cell death is thus distinct for F14512 compared to etoposide, and this difference may account for their distinct pharmacological profiles and the markedly superior activity of F14512 in vivo. This study suggests that senescence markers should be considered as potential pharmacodynamic biomarkers of F14512 antitumor activity. PMID:21924246

  2. Increased expression and activity of p75NTR are crucial events in azacitidine-induced cell death in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Gravina, Giovanni Luca; Marampon, Francesco; Sanità, Patrizia; Mancini, Andrea; Colapietro, Alessandro; Scarsella, Luca; Jitariuc, Ana; Biordi, Leda; Ficorella, Corrado; Festuccia, Claudio

    2016-07-01

    The high affinity nerve growth factor (NGF) NGF receptor, p75NTR, is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor superfamily that shares a conserved intracellular death domain capable of inducing apoptosis and suppressing growth in prostate epithelial cells. Expression of this receptor is lost as prostate cancer progresses and is minimal in established prostate cancer cell lines. We aimed to verify the role of p75NTR in the azacitidine-mediated antitumor effects on 22Rv1 and PC3 androgen-independent prostate cancer cells. In the present study, we reported that the antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic effects of 5-azacytidine (azacitidine) were more marked in the presence of physiological concentrations of NGF and were reduced when a blocking p75NTR antibody or the selective p75NTR inhibitor, Ro 08-2750, were used. Azacitidine increased the expression of p75NTR without interfering with the expression of the low affinity NGF receptor TrkA and induced caspase 9-dependent caspase 3 activity. Taken together, our results suggest that the NGF network could be a candidate for future pharmacological manipulation in aggressive prostate cancer. PMID:27222100

  3. Non-thermal plasma with 2-deoxy-D-glucose synergistically induces cell death by targeting glycolysis in blood cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushik, Neha; Lee, Su Jae; Choi, Tae Gyu; Baik, Ku Youn; Uhm, Han Sup; Kim, Chung Hyeok; Kaushik, Nagendra Kumar; Choi, Eun Ha

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we show the selective and efficient anti-cancer effects of plasma (at a low dose) when cell metabolic modifiers are also included. 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG), a glycolytic inhibitor, was used with effective doses of non-thermal plasma, synergistically attenuating cell metabolic viability and inducing caspase-dependent and independent cell death. The combination treatment decreased the intracellular ATP and lactate production in various types of blood cancer cells in vitro. Taken together, our findings suggest that 2-DG enhances the efficacy and selectivity of plasma and induces the synergistic inhibition of cancer cell growth by targeting glycolysis and apoptosis. Specifically, this treatment strategy demonstrated an enhanced growth inhibitory effect of plasma in the presence of a metabolic modifier that was selective against cancer cells, not non-malignant cells. This is the first study to report the advantage of combining plasma with 2-DG to eradicate blood cancer cells. Finally, we conclude that 2-DG with non-thermal plasma may be used as a combination treatment against blood cancer cells.

  4. Ethanolic extract from Derris scandens Benth mediates radiosensitzation via two distinct modes of cell death in human colon cancer HT-29 cells.

    PubMed

    Hematulin, Arunee; Ingkaninan, Kornkanok; Limpeanchob, Nanteetip; Sagan, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Enhancing of radioresponsiveness of tumors by using radiosensitizers is a promising approach to increase the efficacy of radiation therapy. Recently, the ethanolic extract of the medicinal plant, Derris scandens Benth has been identified as a potent radiosensitizer of human colon cancer HT29 cells. However, cell death mechanisms underlying radiosensitization activity of D scandens extract have not been identified. Here, we show that treatment of HT-29 cells with D scandens extract in combination with gamma irradiation synergistically sensitizes HT-29 cells to cell lethality by apoptosis and mitotic catastrophe. Furthermore, the extract was found to decrease Erk1/2 activation. These findings suggest that D scandens extract mediates radiosensitization via at least two distinct modes of cell death and silences pro-survival signaling in HT-29 cells. PMID:24641423

  5. Induction of apoptosis by tumor suppressor FHIT via death receptor signaling pathway in human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wu-Guo; Nishizaki, Masahiko; Fang, Bingliang; Roth, Jack A; Ji, Lin

    2007-04-20

    FHIT is a novel tumor suppressor gene located at human chromosome 3p14.2. Restoration of wild-type FHIT in 3p14.2-deficient human lung cancer cells inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis. In this study, we analyzed potential upstream/downstream molecular targets of the FHIT protein and found that FHIT specifically targeted and regulated death receptor (DR) genes in human non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Exogenous expression of FHIT by a recombinant adenoviral vector (Ad)-mediated gene transfer upregulated expression of DR genes. Treatment with a recombinant TRAIL protein, a DR-specific ligand, in Ad-FHIT-transduced NSCLC cells considerably enhanced FHIT-induced apoptosis, further demonstrating the involvement of DRs in FHIT-induced apoptosis. Moreover, we also found that FHIT targeted downstream of the DR-mediated signaling pathway. FHIT overexpression disrupted mitochondrial membrane integrity and activated multiple pro-apoptotic proteins in NSCLC cell. These results suggest that FHIT induces apoptosis through a sequential activation of DR-mediated pro-apoptotic signaling pathways in human NSCLC cells. PMID:17328863

  6. The novel carboxamide analog ITR-284 induces caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death in human hepatocellular and colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yu-Ren; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Lai, Kuang-Chi; Yang, Jai-Sing; Kuo, Sheng-Chu; Wen, Yen-Fang; Fushiya, Shinji; Wu, Tian-Shung

    2013-05-01

    We have previously reported that ITR-284, a potent carboxamide-derived anticancer agent, induced apoptosis in leukemia cells. However, there are no reports showing that ITR-284 inhibits human hepatocellular and colorectal cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the antiproliferative effects and apoptotic induction of ITR-284 on various types of human hepatocellular and colorectal cancer cells in vitro. The growth inhibition effect of ITR-284 on cancer cells was evaluated by thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Cell morphology was examined under a phase-contrast microscope. The activities of caspase-3, -8 and -9 were determined by caspase colorimetric assay. ITR-284 reduced the cell viability in human hepatocellular cancer cells (Hep G2, Hep 3B, SK-HEP-1 and J5) and colorectal cancer cells (HT 29, COLO 205, HCT 116 and SW 620). ITR-284 had highly selective effects on Hep 3B and COLO 205 cells. ITR-284 stimulated morphological changes of Hep 3B and COLO 205 cells. The activation of caspase-3, -8 and -9 contributed to ITR-284-induced apoptosis. ITR-284-triggered growth inhibition was significantly attenuated by the inhibitors of caspase-3, -8 and -9 in Hep 3B and COLO 205 cells. ITR-284 induced apoptosis in Hep 3B and COLO 205 cells through the caspase cascade-dependent signaling pathway.

  7. Reovirus-associated reduction of microRNA-let-7d is related to the increased apoptotic death of cancer cells in clinical samples

    PubMed Central

    Nuovo, Gerard J; Garofalo, Michela; Valeri, Nicola; Roulstone, Vicki; Volinia, Stefano; Cohn, David E; Phelps, Mitch; Harrington, Kevin J; Vile, Richard; Melcher, Alan; Galanis, Evanthia; Sehl, Sarah; Adair, Rob; Scott, Karen; Rose, Ailsa; Toogood, Giles; Coffey, Matthew C

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed the in situ molecular correlates of infection from cancer patients treated with reovirus. Melanoma, colorectal, and ovarian cancer samples from such patients showed variable infection of the cancer cells but not the intermingled benign cells. RT in situ PCR showed most cancer cells contained the viral genome with threefold less having productive viral infection as documented by either tubulin or reoviral protein co-expression. Productive infection in the cancer cells was strongly correlated with co-expression of p38 and caspase-3 as well as apoptosis-related death (P<0.001). The cancer cell apoptotic death was due to a marked viral-induced inhibition of microRNA-let-7d that, in turn, upregulated caspase-3 activity. In summary, reovirus shows a striking tropism to cancer cells in clinical samples. A rate-limiting factor of reovirus-induced cancer cell death is productive viral infection that operates via the marked reduction of microRNA-let-7d and concomitant elevated caspase-3 expression. PMID:22699519

  8. Cancer cell death induced by novel small molecules degrading the TACC3 protein via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway.

    PubMed

    Ohoka, N; Nagai, K; Hattori, T; Okuhira, K; Shibata, N; Cho, N; Naito, M

    2014-11-06

    The selective degradation of target proteins with small molecules is a novel approach to the treatment of various diseases, including cancer. We have developed a protein knockdown system with a series of hybrid small compounds that induce the selective degradation of target proteins via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. In this study, we designed and synthesized novel small molecules called SNIPER(TACC3)s, which target the spindle regulatory protein transforming acidic coiled-coil-3 (TACC3). SNIPER(TACC3)s induce poly-ubiquitylation and proteasomal degradation of TACC3 and reduce the TACC3 protein level in cells. Mechanistic analysis indicated that the ubiquitin ligase APC/C(CDH1) mediates the SNIPER(TACC3)-induced degradation of TACC3. Intriguingly, SNIPER(TACC3) selectively induced cell death in cancer cells expressing a larger amount of TACC3 protein than normal cells. These results suggest that protein knockdown of TACC3 by SNIPER(TACC3) is a potential strategy for treating cancers overexpressing the TACC3 protein.

  9. Suppression of the death gene BIK is a critical factor for resistance to tamoxifen in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Viedma-Rodriguez, Rubí; Baiza-Gutman, Luis Arturo; García-Carrancá, Alejandro; Moreno-Fierros, Leticia; Salamanca-Gómez, Fabio; Arenas-Aranda, Diego

    2013-12-01

    Apoptosis is controlled by the BCL-2 family of proteins, which can be divided into three different subclasses based on the conservation of BCL-2 homology domains. BIK is a founding member of the BH3-only pro-apoptotic protein family. BIK is predominantly localized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and induces apoptosis through the mitochondrial pathway by mobilizing calcium from the ER to the mitochondria. In this study, we determined that suppression of the death gene Bik promotes resistance to tamoxifen (TAM) in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. We utilized small interfering (siRNA) to specifically knockdown BIK in MCF-7 cells and studied their response to tamoxifen. The levels of cell apoptosis, the potential mitochondrial membrane (∆Ψ(m)), and the activation of total caspases were analyzed. Western blot analysis was used to determine the expression of some BCL-2 family proteins. Flow cytometry studies revealed an increase in apoptosis level in MCF-7 cells and a 2-fold increase in relative BIK messenger RNA (mRNA) expression at a concentration of 6.0 μM of TAM. BIK silencing, with a specific RNAi, blocked TAM-induced apoptosis in 45 ± 6.78% of cells. Moreover, it decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (Ψm) and total caspase activity, and exhibited low expression of pro-apoptotic proteins BAX, BAK, PUMA and a high expression of BCl-2 and MCL-1. The above suggests resistance to TAM, regulating the intrinsic pathway and indicate that BIK comprises an important factor in the process of apoptosis, which may exert an influence the ER pathway, which regulates mitochondrial integrity. Collectively, our results show that BIK is a central component of the programmed cell death of TAM-induced MCF-7 breast cancer cells. The silencing of BIK gene will be useful for future studies to establish the mechanisms of regulation of resistance to TAM.

  10. Docetaxel induced-JNK2/PHD1 signaling pathway increases degradation of HIF-1α and causes cancer cell death under hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Eun-Taex; Kim, Chan Woo; Kim, Soo Jung; Lee, Jae-Seon; Hong, Soon-Sun; Park, Heon Joo

    2016-01-01

    HIF-1 (hypoxia-inducible factor-1) regulates the expression of more than 70 genes involved in angiogenesis, tumor growth, metastasis, chemoresistance, and radioresistance. Thus, there is growing interest in using HIF-1 inhibitors as anticancer drugs. Docetaxel, a Food and Drug Administration-approved anticancer drug, is reported to enhance HIF-1α degradation. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanism underlying docetaxel-induced HIF-1α degradation and cancer cell death under hypoxic conditions. Docetaxel pretreatment enhanced the polyubiquitination and proteasome-mediated degradation of HIF-1α, and increased cancer cell death under hypoxic conditions. Docetaxel also activated the prolyl hydroxylase, PHD1, in hypoxia, and pharmacological inhibition or siRNA-mediated knockdown of PHD1 prevented docetaxel-induced HIF-1α degradation and cancer cell death. Additionally, siRNA-mediated JNK2 knockdown blocked docetaxel-induced HIF-1α degradation and cancer cell death by inhibiting PHD1 activation. A luciferase reporter assay revealed that inhibition of the JNK2/PHD1 signaling pathway significantly increased the transcriptional activity of HIF-1 in docetaxel-treated cancer cells under hypoxia. Consistent with these results, docetaxel-treated JNK2-knockdown tumors grew much faster than control tumors through inhibition of docetaxel-induced PHD1 activation and degradation of HIF-1α. Our results collectively show that, under hypoxic conditions, docetaxel induces apoptotic cell death through JNK2/PHD1 signaling-mediated HIF-1α degradation. PMID:27263528

  11. A pyrazolopyran derivative preferentially inhibits the activity of human cytosolic serine hydroxymethyltransferase and induces cell death in lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Fiascarelli, Alessio; Macone, Alberto; Gargano, Maurizio; Rinaldo, Serena; Giardina, Giorgio; Pontecorvi, Valentino; Koes, David; McDermott, Lee; Yang, Tianyi; Paiardini, Alessandro; Contestabile, Roberto; Cutruzzolà, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT) is a central enzyme in the metabolic reprogramming of cancer cells, providing activated one-carbon units in the serine-glycine one-carbon metabolism. Previous studies demonstrated that the cytoplasmic isoform of SHMT (SHMT1) plays a relevant role in lung cancer. SHMT1 is overexpressed in lung cancer patients and NSCLC cell lines. Moreover, SHMT1 is required to maintain DNA integrity. Depletion in lung cancer cell lines causes cell cycle arrest and uracil accumulation and ultimately leads to apoptosis. We found that a pyrazolopyran compound, namely 2.12, preferentially inhibits SHMT1 compared to the mitochondrial counterpart SHMT2. Computational and crystallographic approaches suggest binding at the active site of SHMT1 and a competitive inhibition mechanism. A radio isotopic activity assay shows that inhibition of SHMT by 2.12 also occurs in living cells. Moreover, administration of 2.12 in A549 and H1299 lung cancer cell lines causes apoptosis at LD50 34 μM and rescue experiments underlined selectivity towards SHMT1. These data not only further highlight the relevance of the cytoplasmic isoform SHMT1 in lung cancer but, more importantly, demonstrate that, at least in vitro, it is possible to find selective inhibitors against one specific isoform of SHMT, a key target in metabolic reprogramming of many cancer types. PMID:26717037

  12. A pyrazolopyran derivative preferentially inhibits the activity of human cytosolic serine hydroxymethyltransferase and induces cell death in lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Marani, Marina; Paone, Alessio; Fiascarelli, Alessio; Macone, Alberto; Gargano, Maurizio; Rinaldo, Serena; Giardina, Giorgio; Pontecorvi, Valentino; Koes, David; McDermott, Lee; Yang, Tianyi; Paiardini, Alessandro; Contestabile, Roberto; Cutruzzolà, Francesca

    2016-01-26

    Serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT) is a central enzyme in the metabolic reprogramming of cancer cells, providing activated one-carbon units in the serine-glycine one-carbon metabolism. Previous studies demonstrated that the cytoplasmic isoform of SHMT (SHMT1) plays a relevant role in lung cancer. SHMT1 is overexpressed in lung cancer patients and NSCLC cell lines. Moreover, SHMT1 is required to maintain DNA integrity. Depletion in lung cancer cell lines causes cell cycle arrest and uracil accumulation and ultimately leads to apoptosis. We found that a pyrazolopyran compound, namely 2.12, preferentially inhibits SHMT1 compared to the mitochondrial counterpart SHMT2. Computational and crystallographic approaches suggest binding at the active site of SHMT1 and a competitive inhibition mechanism. A radio isotopic activity assay shows that inhibition of SHMT by 2.12 also occurs in living cells. Moreover, administration of 2.12 in A549 and H1299 lung cancer cell lines causes apoptosis at LD50 34 μM and rescue experiments underlined selectivity towards SHMT1. These data not only further highlight the relevance of the cytoplasmic isoform SHMT1 in lung cancer but, more importantly, demonstrate that, at least in vitro, it is possible to find selective inhibitors against one specific isoform of SHMT, a key target in metabolic reprogramming of many cancer types.

  13. Amicoumacin A induces cancer cell death by targeting the eukaryotic ribosome.

    PubMed

    Prokhorova, Irina V; Akulich, Kseniya A; Makeeva, Desislava S; Osterman, Ilya A; Skvortsov, Dmitry A; Sergiev, Petr V; Dontsova, Olga A; Yusupova, Gulnara; Yusupov, Marat M; Dmitriev, Sergey E

    2016-01-01

    Amicoumacin A is an antibiotic that was recently shown to target bacterial ribosomes. It affects translocation and provides an additional contact interface between the ribosomal RNA and mRNA. The binding site of amicoumacin A is formed by universally conserved nucleotides of rRNA. In this work, we showed that amicoumacin A inhibits translation in yeast and mammalian systems by affecting translation elongation. We determined the structure of the amicoumacin A complex with yeast ribosomes at a resolution of 3.1  Å. Toxicity measurement demonstrated that human cancer cell lines are more susceptible to the inhibition by this compound as compared to non-cancerous ones. This might be used as a starting point to develop amicoumacin A derivatives with clinical value. PMID:27296282

  14. Amicoumacin A induces cancer cell death by targeting the eukaryotic ribosome.

    PubMed

    Prokhorova, Irina V; Akulich, Kseniya A; Makeeva, Desislava S; Osterman, Ilya A; Skvortsov, Dmitry A; Sergiev, Petr V; Dontsova, Olga A; Yusupova, Gulnara; Yusupov, Marat M; Dmitriev, Sergey E

    2016-06-14

    Amicoumacin A is an antibiotic that was recently shown to target bacterial ribosomes. It affects translocation and provides an additional contact interface between the ribosomal RNA and mRNA. The binding site of amicoumacin A is formed by universally conserved nucleotides of rRNA. In this work, we showed that amicoumacin A inhibits translation in yeast and mammalian systems by affecting translation elongation. We determined the structure of the amicoumacin A complex with yeast ribosomes at a resolution of 3.1  Å. Toxicity measurement demonstrated that human cancer cell lines are more susceptible to the inhibition by this compound as compared to non-cancerous ones. This might be used as a starting point to develop amicoumacin A derivatives with clinical value.

  15. Amicoumacin A induces cancer cell death by targeting the eukaryotic ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Prokhorova, Irina V.; Akulich, Kseniya A.; Makeeva, Desislava S.; Osterman, Ilya A.; Skvortsov, Dmitry A.; Sergiev, Petr V.; Dontsova, Olga A.; Yusupova, Gulnara; Yusupov, Marat M.; Dmitriev, Sergey E.

    2016-01-01

    Amicoumacin A is an antibiotic that was recently shown to target bacterial ribosomes. It affects translocation and provides an additional contact interface between the ribosomal RNA and mRNA. The binding site of amicoumacin A is formed by universally conserved nucleotides of rRNA. In this work, we showed that amicoumacin A inhibits translation in yeast and mammalian systems by affecting translation elongation. We determined the structure of the amicoumacin A complex with yeast ribosomes at a resolution of 3.1  Å. Toxicity measurement demonstrated that human cancer cell lines are more susceptible to the inhibition by this compound as compared to non-cancerous ones. This might be used as a starting point to develop amicoumacin A derivatives with clinical value. PMID:27296282

  16. Mitotic cell death caused by follistatin-like 1 inhibition is associated with up-regulated Bim by inactivated Erk1/2 in human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bae, Kieun; Park, Kyoung Eun; Han, Jihye; Kim, Jongkwang; Kim, Kyungtae; Yoon, Kyong-Ah

    2016-04-01

    Follistatin-like 1 (FSTL1) was identified as a novel pro-inflammatory protein showing high-level expression in rheumatoid arthritis. The protective effect of FSTL1 via the inhibition of apoptosis was reported in myocardial injury. However, the functional mechanism of FSTL1 in cancer is poorly characterized, and its proliferative effects are ambiguous. Here, we examined the effects of FSTL1 on cellular proliferation and cell cycle checkpoints in lung cancer cells. FSTL1 inhibition induced the cellular portion of G2/M phase in human lung cancer cells via the accumulation of regulators of the transition through the G2/M phase, including the cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1)-cyclin B1 complex. An increase in histone H3 phosphorylation (at Ser10), another hallmark of mitosis, indicated that the knockdown of FSTL1 in lung cancer cells stimulated a mitotic arrest. After that, apoptosis was promoted by the activation of caspase-3 and -9. Protein level of Bim, a BH3 domain-only, pro-apoptotic member and its isoforms, BimL, BimS, and BimEL were up-regulated by FSTL1 inhibition. Degradation of Bim was blocked in FSTL1-knockdown cells by decreased phosphorylation of Bim. Increased BimEL as well as decreased phosphorylated Erk1/2 is essential for cell death by FSTL1 inhibition in NCI-H460 cells. Taken together, our results suggest that the knockdown of FSTL1 induces apoptosis through a mitotic arrest and caspase-dependent cell death. FSTL1 plays the important roles in cellular proliferation and apoptosis in lung cancer cells, and thus can be a new target for lung cancer treatment.

  17. A novel synthetic 1,3-phenyl bis-thiourea compound targets microtubule polymerization to cause cancer cell death.

    PubMed

    Shing, Jennifer C; Choi, Jae Won; Chapman, Robert; Schroeder, Mark A; Sarkaria, Jann N; Fauq, Abdul; Bram, Richard J

    2014-07-01

    Microtubules are essential cytoskeletal components with a central role in mitosis and have been particularly useful as a cancer chemotherapy target. We synthesized a small molecule derivative of a symmetrical 1,3-phenyl bis-thiourea, (1,1'-[1,3-phenylene]bis[3-(3,5-dimethylphenyl)thiourea], named "41J"), and identified a potent effect of the compound on cancer cell survival. 41J is cytotoxic to multiple cancer cell lines at nanomolar concentrations. Cell death occurred by apoptosis and was preceded by mitotic arrest in prometaphase. Prometaphase arrest induced by 41J treatment was accompanied by dissociation of cyclin B1 levels from the apparent mitotic stage and by major spindle abnormalities. Polymerization of purified tubulin in vitro was directly inhibited by 41J, suggesting that the compound works by directly interfering with microtubule function. Compound 41J arrested the growth of glioblastoma multiforme xenografts in nude mice at doses that were well-tolerated, demonstrating a relatively specific antitumor effect. Importantly, 41J overcame drug resistance due to β-tubulin mutation and P-glycoprotein overexpression. Compound 41J may serve as a useful new lead compound for anticancer therapy development. PMID:24755487

  18. Synergistic Tumor-Killing Effect of Radiation and Berberine Combined Treatment in Lung Cancer: The Contribution of Autophagic Cell Death

    SciTech Connect

    Peng Peiling; Kuo, W.-H.; Tseng, H.-C.; Chou, F.-P.

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy is the most efficacious strategies for lung cancer. The radiation-enhancing effects and the underlying mechanisms of berberine were investigated both in vitro and in vivo. Methods and Materials: Clonogenic survival assays were used to evaluate the radio-sensitivity of berberine on non-small-cell lung cancer. Electron microscopic observation of the features of cell death, flow cytometry of acidic vascular organelles formation, mitochondria membrane potential and cell-cycle progression, and Western blotting of caspase 3, PARP, and LC3 were performed to identify the mechanisms underlying the enhancing effects. Lewis lung carcinoma model in mice was conducted to evaluate the possible application of berberine in synergistic treatment with irradiation. Results: Compared with radiation alone (SF2 = 0.423; D{sub 0} = 5.29 Gy), berberine at 5 and 10 {mu}M concentrations in combination with radiation showed significant enhancement on radiation-induced clonogenic inhibition (SF2 = 0.215: D{sub 0} = 2.70 Gy and SF2 = 0.099: D{sub 0} = 1.24 Gy) on A549 cells. The cellular ultrastructure showed the presence of autophagosome and an increased proportion of acridine orange stain-positive cells, demonstrating that berberine enhanced radiosensitivity via autophagy. The process involved LC3 modification and mitochondrial disruption. The animal model verified the synergistic cytotoxic effect of berberine and irradiation resulting in a substantial shrinkage of tumor volume. Conclusion: Supplement of berberine enhanced the cytotoxicity of radiation in both in vivo and in vitro models of lung cancer. The mechanisms underlying this synergistic effect involved the induction of autophagy. It suggests that berberine could be used as adjuvant therapy to treat lung cancer.

  19. Samsoeum, a traditional herbal medicine, elicits apoptotic and autophagic cell death by inhibiting Akt/mTOR and activating the JNK pathway in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Samsoeum (SSE), a traditional herbal formula, has been widely used to treat cough, fever, congestion, and emesis for centuries. Recent studies have demonstrated that SSE retains potent pharmacological efficiency in anti-allergic and anti-inflammatory reactions. However, the anti-cancer activity of SSE and its underlying mechanisms have not been studied. Thus, the present study was designed to determine the effect of SSE on cell death and elucidate its detailed mechanism. Methods Following SSE treatment, cell growth and cell death were measured using an MTT assay and trypan blue exclusion assay, respectively. Cell cycle arrest and YO-PRO-1 uptake were assayed using flow cytometry, and LC3 redistribution was observed using confocal microscope. The mechanisms of anti-cancer effect of SSE were investigated through western blot analysis. Results We initially found that SSE caused dose- and time-dependent cell death in cancer cells but not in normal primary hepatocytes. In addition, during early SSE treatment (6–12 h), cells were arrested in G2/M phase concomitant with up-regulation of p21 and p27 and down-regulation of cyclin D1 and cyclin B1, followed by an increase in apoptotic YO-PRO-1 (+) cells. SSE also induced autophagy via up-regulation of Beclin-1 expression, conversion of microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3) I to LC3-II, and re-distribution of LC3, indicating autophagosome formation. Moreover, the level of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), which is critical for cross-talk between apoptosis and autophagy, was significantly reduced in SSE-treated cells. Phosphorylation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) was increased, followed by suppression of the protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin (Akt/mTOR) pathway, and phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in response to SSE treatment. In particular, among MAPKs inhibitors, only the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)-specific inhibitor SP600125 nearly

  20. Hepatic Carcinoma-Associated Fibroblasts Promote an Adaptative Response in Colorectal Cancer Cells That Inhibit Proliferation and Apoptosis: Nonresistant Cells Die by Nonapoptotic Cell Death1

    PubMed Central

    Berdiel-Acer, Mireia; Bohem, Monika E; López-Doriga, Adriana; Vidal, August; Salazar, Ramon; Martínez-Iniesta, Maria; Santos, Cristina; Sanjuan, Xavier; Villanueva, Alberto; Molleví, David G

    2011-01-01

    Carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are important contributors of microenvironment in determining the tumor's fate. This study aimed to compare the influence of liver microenvironment and primary tumor microenvironment on the behavior of colorectal carcinoma. Conditioned medium (CM) from normal colonic fibroblasts (NCFs), CAFs from primary tumor (CAF-PT) or liver metastasis (CAF-LM) were obtained. We performed functional assays to test the influence of each CM on colorectal cell lines. Microarray and gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) were performed in DLD1 cells cultured in matched CM. In DLD1 cells, CAF-LM CM compared with CAF-PT CM and NCF led to a more aggressive phenotype, induced the features of an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition more efficiently, and stimulated migration and invasion to a greater extent. Sustained stimulation with CAF-LM CM evoked a transient G2/M cell cycle arrest accompanied by a reduction of apoptosis, inhibition of proliferation, and decreased viability of SW1116, SW620, SW480, DLD1, HT-29, and Caco-2 cells and provoked nonapoptotic cell death in those cells carrying KRAS mutations. Cells resistant to CAF-LM CM completely changed their morphology in an extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase-dependent process and depicted an increased stemness capacity alongside the Wnt pathway stimulation. The transcriptomic profile of DLD1 cells treated with CAF-LM CM was associated with Wnt and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways activation in GSEA. Therefore, the liver microenvironment induces more efficiently the aggressiveness of colorectal cancer cells than other matched microenvironments do but secondarily evokes cell death. Resistant cells displayed higher stemness capacity. PMID:22028619

  1. Dietary phytochemicals and cancer prevention: Nrf2 signaling, epigenetics, and cell death mechanisms in blocking cancer initiation and progression

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Hun; Khor, Tin Oo; Shu, Limin; Su, Zheng-Yuan; Fuentes, Francisco; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony

    2013-01-01

    Reactive metabolites from carcinogens and oxidative stress can drive genetic mutations, genomic instability, neoplastic transformation, and ultimately carcinogenesis. Numerous dietary phytochemicals in vegetables/fruits have been shown to possess cancer chemopreventive effects in both preclinical animal models and human epidemiological studies. These phytochemicals could prevent the initiation of carcinogenesis via either direct scavenging of reactive oxygen species/reactive nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) or, more importantly, the induction of cellular defense detoxifying/antioxidant enzymes. These defense enzymes mediated by Nrf2-antioxidative stress and anti-inflammatory signaling pathways can contribute to cellular protection against ROS/RNS and reactive metabolites of carcinogens. In addition, these compounds would kill initiated/transformed cancer cells in vitro and in in vivo xenografts via diverse anti-cancer mechanisms. These mechanisms include the activation of signaling kinases (e.g., JNK), caspases and the mitochondria damage/cytochrome c pathways. Phytochemicals may also have anti-cancer effects by inhibiting the IKK/NF-κB pathway, inhibiting STAT3, and causing cell cycle arrest. In addition, other mechanisms may include epigenetic alterations (e.g., inhibition of HDACs, miRNAs, and the modification of the CpG methylation of cancer-related genes). In this review, we will discuss: the current advances in the study of Nrf2 signaling; Nrf2-deficient tumor mouse models; the epigenetic control of Nrf2 in tumorigenesis and chemoprevention; Nrf2-mediated cancer chemoprevention by naturally occurring dietary phytochemicals; and the mutation or hyper-expression of the Nrf2–Keap1 signaling pathway in advanced tumor cells. The future development of dietary phytochemicals for chemoprevention must integrate in vitro signaling mechanisms, relevant biomarkers of human diseases, and combinations of different phytochemicals and/or non-toxic therapeutic drugs, including

  2. Environmental causes of cancer death

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, E.R.; Meier, F.A.

    1982-12-01

    People increasingly look to the forensic autopsy as a way of determining whether a particular cancer death was environmentally caused. The forensic pathologist must be diligent pursuing evidence that links potential environmental causes to cancer but must also educate the public providing reassurance that most cancers are not due to industrial pollution. Cigarette smoking and various life-style factors appear to account for more cancers than do man-made environmental contaminants. Assessing the possibility that a cancer death is due to a specific environmental agent requires extensive information. First, one must obtain an accurate history of lifetime occupational and environmental exposures. Second, one must analyze this information in view of epidemiologic data on the cancer risks associated with each exposure. Finally, one should seek to document through the autopsy that exposure to a potentially harmful agent actually occurred. The carefully done forensic autopsy can alert the public to dangerous conditions and can provide individuals a basis for recovery in court for damages due to harmful exposures.

  3. Endoplasmic reticulum vacuolation and unfolded protein response leading to paraptosis like cell death in cyclosporine A treated cancer cervix cells is mediated by cyclophilin B inhibition.

    PubMed

    Ram, Babul Moni; Ramakrishna, Gayatri

    2014-11-01

    Cyclosporine A (CsA), a widely used immunosuppressant shows cytotoxic effects by either inducing apoptosis or redirecting the cell towards non-apoptotic cell death. However, there still remains a lacuna in understanding the mechanism of CsA induced non-apoptotic cell death. In the present study we investigated calcineurin dependent or independent cytotoxic effects of CsA, a calcineurin inhibitor, in cervical cancerous SiHa cells. Decreased cell viability and massive cytoplasmic vacuolations were observed in CsA treated SiHa cells, having increased calcineurin activity. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and unfolded protein response (UPR), accompanied by a decrease in cyclophilin B (ER resident PPIase), preceded the formation of the vacuoles. These vacuoles stained positive for many ER resident markers confirming their ER origin; but the absence of autophagosomal marker, LC3II, ruled out autophagy. Extensively vacuolated cells eventually undergo cell death which lacked the typical apoptotic features, but showed significant decrease in AIP (ALG2 interacting protein) as seen in paraptosis. ER-vacuolation was prevented by cycloheximide and salubrinal thereby indicating requirement of active protein synthesis. Inhibiting calcineurin activity by either Tacrolimus (FK506) or by knockdown of calcineurin B subunit did not result in either ER-stress or cellular vacuolation. However, knockdown of cyclophilin B by siRNA resulted in increased expression of Bip and IRE1α, together with cytoplasmic vacuolation. In conclusion, we report that persistent ER stress due to cyclophilin B inhibition in CsA treated cervical cancer cells caused cellular vacuolation which culminated in a non-apoptotic cell death response similar to paraptosis. Additionally, the paraptotic effects of CsA are independent of calcineurin inhibition. PMID:25003316

  4. Rhus coriaria induces senescence and autophagic cell death in breast cancer cells through a mechanism involving p38 and ERK1/2 activation

    PubMed Central

    El Hasasna, Hussain; Athamneh, Khawlah; Al Samri, Halima; Karuvantevida, Noushad; Al Dhaheri, Yusra; Hisaindee, Soleiman; Ramadan, Gaber; Al Tamimi, Nedaa; AbuQamar, Synan; Eid, Ali; Iratni, Rabah

    2015-01-01

    Here, we investigated the anticancer effect of Rhus coriaria on three breast cancer cell lines. We demonstrated that Rhus coriaria ethanolic extract (RCE) inhibits the proliferation of these cell lines in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. RCE induced senescence and cell cycle arrest at G1 phase. These changes were concomitant with upregulation of p21, downregulation of cyclin D1, p27, PCNA, c-myc, phospho-RB and expression of senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity. No proliferative recovery was detected after RCE removal. Annexin V staining and PARP cleavage analysis revealed a minimal induction of apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 cells. Electron microscopy revealed the presence of autophagic vacuoles in RCE-treated cells. Interestingly, blocking autophagy by 3-methyladenine (3-MA) or chloroquine (CQ) reduced RCE-induced cell death and senescence. RCE was also found to activate p38 and ERK1/2 signaling pathways which coincided with induction of autophagy. Furthermore, we found that while both autophagy inhibitors abolished p38 phosphorylation, only CQ led to significant decrease in pERK1/2. Finally, RCE induced DNA damage and reduced mutant p53, two events that preceded autophagy. Our findings provide strong evidence that R. coriaria possesses strong anti-breast cancer activity through induction of senescence and autophagic cell death, making it a promising alternative or adjunct therapeutic candidate against breast cancer. PMID:26263881

  5. Identification of an anabolic selective androgen receptor modulator that actively induces death of androgen-independent prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Azriel; Meissner, Robert S; Gentile, Michael A; Chisamore, Michael J; Opas, Evan E; Scafonas, Angela; Cusick, Tara E; Gambone, Carlo; Pennypacker, Brenda; Hodor, Paul; Perkins, James J; Bai, Chang; Ferraro, Damien; Bettoun, David J; Wilkinson, Hilary A; Alves, Stephen E; Flores, Osvaldo; Ray, William J

    2014-09-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) initially responds to inhibition of androgen receptor (AR) signaling, but inevitably progresses to hormone ablation-resistant disease. Much effort is focused on optimizing this androgen deprivation strategy by improving hormone depletion and AR antagonism. However we found that bicalutamide, a clinically used antiandrogen, actually resembles a selective AR modulator (SARM), as it partially regulates 24% of endogenously 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-responsive genes in AR(+) MDA-MB-453 breast cancer cells. These data suggested that passive blocking of all AR functions is not required for PCa therapy. Hence, we adopted an active strategy that calls for the development of novel SARMs, which induce a unique gene expression profile that is intolerable to PCa cells. Therefore, we screened 3000 SARMs for the ability to arrest the androgen-independent growth of AR(+) 22Rv1 and LNCaP PCa cells but not AR(-) PC3 or DU145 cells. We identified only one such compound; the 4-aza-steroid, MK-4541, a potent and selective SARM. MK-4541 induces caspase-3 activity and cell death in both androgen-independent, AR(+) PCa cell lines but spares AR(-) cells or AR(+) non-PCa cells. This activity correlates with its promoter context- and cell-type dependent transcriptional effects. In rats, MK-4541 inhibits the trophic effects of DHT on the prostate, but not the levator ani muscle, and triggers an anabolic response in the periosteal compartment of bone. Therefore, MK-4541 has the potential to effectively manage prostatic hypertrophic diseases owing to its antitumor SARM-like mechanism, while simultaneously maintaining the anabolic benefits of natural androgens. PMID:24565564

  6. Programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4) mediates the sensitivity of gastric cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis by down-regulation of FLIP expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weiqiang; Zhao, Jingjing; Wang, Hongbin; Sun, Yonggang; Peng, Zhihong; Zhou, Gang; Fan, Lilin; Wang, Xingwei; Yang, Shiming; Wang, Rongquan; Fang, Dianchun

    2010-09-10

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis induced ligand (TRAIL) is an important apoptosis inducer in a variety of tumor cells. In the present study, we determined the underlying molecular mechanisms by which certain gastric cancer cells are resistant to TRAIL. We first detected expression of programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4) in three gastric cancer cell lines and identified its association with the sensitivity of gastric cancer cells to TRAIL. We then stably transfected PDCD4 cDNA or shRNA into these gastric cell lines. Our data showed that restoration of PDCD4 expression induced TRAIL sensitivity, whereas knockdown of PDCD4 expression reduced the sensitivity of these tumor cells to TRAIL treatment. PDCD4 was able to suppress expression of FLICE-inhibiting protein (FLIP), a negative regulator of apoptosis. Knockdown of FLIP expression using FLIP shRNA had similar effects as those of restored PDCD4 expression. Furthermore, the proteasome inhibitor MG132 was able to inhibit expression of FLIP mRNA and protein and upregulate the sensitivity of these cells to TRAIL treatment. Taken together, the results from the current study demonstrated that PDCD4 plays an important role in mediating the sensitivity of gastric cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis through FLIP suppression. Therefore, the proteasome inhibitor MG132 should be further evaluated for combination therapy with TRAIL. PMID:20595005

  7. Cytotoxic macrophage-released tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) as a killing mechanism for cancer cell death after cold plasma activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushik, Nagendra Kumar; Kaushik, Neha; Min, Booki; Choi, Ki Hong; Hong, Young June; Miller, Vandana; Fridman, Alexander; Choi, Eun Ha

    2016-03-01

    The present study aims at studying the anticancer role of cold plasma-activated immune cells. The direct anti-cancer activity of plasma-activated immune cells against human solid cancers has not been described so far. Hence, we assessed the effect of plasma-treated RAW264.7 macrophages on cancer cell growth after co-culture. In particular, flow cytometer analysis revealed that plasma did not induce any cell death in RAW264.7 macrophages. Interestingly, immunofluorescence and western blot analysis confirmed that TNF-α released from plasma-activated macrophages acts as a tumour cell death inducer. In support of these findings, activated macrophages down-regulated the cell growth in solid cancer cell lines and induced cell death in vitro. Together our findings suggest plasma-induced reactive species recruit cytotoxic macrophages to release TNF-α, which blocks cancer cell growth and can have the potential to contribute to reducing tumour growth in vivo in the near future.

  8. The synthetic ajoene analog SPA3015 induces apoptotic cell death through crosstalk between NF-κB and PPARγ in multidrug-resistant cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jee Won; Cho, Hyewon; Lee, Jae Yeon; Jeon, Youngsic; Kim, Su-Nam; Lee, Sang Jin; Bae, Gyu-Un; Yoon, Sungpil; Jeon, Raok; Kim, Yong Kee

    2016-10-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) caused by P-glycoprotein (P-gp) overexpression impedes successful cancer chemotherapy. In this study, we investigated the anticancer effects of SPA3015, a synthetic ajoene analog, in P-gp-overexpressing MDR cancer cells (KBV20C and MES-SA/DX5). Treatment with SPA3015 caused a dramatic decrease in the cell viabilities of both KBV20C and MES-SA/DX5 cells. This decrease was accompanied by apoptotic cell death without affecting the expression level or drug efflux function of P-gp. SPA3015 selectively suppressed NF-κB reporter gene activity, which led to decreased expression of NF-κB target genes such as CIAP1, CIAP2, XIAP, and Bcl-XL. Surprisingly, nuclear localization and DNA binding affinity of the p65 subunit were not affected by SPA3015, suggesting that SPA3015 inhibits the transcriptional activity of NF-κB at the nucleus. Indeed, SPA3015 treatment led to an increase in the physical interaction of p65 with PPARγ, which resulted in the inhibition of NF-κB activity. Our findings support the hypothesis that SPA3015 inhibits NF-κB transcriptional activity by facilitating the physical interaction of the p65 subunit and PPARγ, which leads to apoptotic cell death in MDR cancer cells.

  9. Homotypic cell cannibalism, a cell-death process regulated by the nuclear protein 1, opposes to metastasis in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cano, Carla E; Sandí, María José; Hamidi, Tewfik; Calvo, Ezequiel L; Turrini, Olivier; Bartholin, Laurent; Loncle, Céline; Secq, Véronique; Garcia, Stéphane; Lomberk, Gwen; Kroemer, Guido; Urrutia, Raul; Iovanna, Juan L

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an extremely deadly disease for which all treatments available have failed to improve life expectancy significantly. This may be explained by the high metastatic potential of PDAC cells, which results from their dedifferentiation towards a mesenchymal phenotype. Some PDAC present cell-in-cell structures whose origin and significance are currently unknown. We show here that cell-in-cells form after homotypic cell cannibalism (HoCC). We found PDAC patients whose tumours display HoCC develop less metastasis than those without. In vitro, HoCC was promoted by inactivation of the nuclear protein 1 (Nupr1), and was enhanced by treatment with transforming growth factor β. HoCC ends with death of PDAC cells, consistent with a metastasis suppressor role for this phenomenon. Hence, our data indicates a protective role for HoCC in PDAC and identifies Nupr1 as a molecular regulator of this process. PMID:22821859

  10. Araguspongine C Induces Autophagic Death in Breast Cancer Cells through Suppression of c-Met and HER2 Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Akl, Mohamed R.; Ayoub, Nehad M.; Ebrahim, Hassan Y.; Mohyeldin, Mohamed M.; Orabi, Khaled Y.; Foudah, Ahmed I.; El Sayed, Khalid A.

    2015-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases are key regulators of cellular growth and proliferation. Dysregulations of receptor tyrosine kinases in cancer cells may promote tumorigenesis by multiple mechanisms including enhanced cell survival and inhibition of cell death. Araguspongines represent a group of macrocyclic oxaquinolizidine alkaloids isolated from the marine sponge Xestospongia species. This study evaluated the anticancer activity of the known oxaquinolizidine alkaloids araguspongines A, C, K and L, and xestospongin B against breast cancer cells. Araguspongine C inhibited the proliferation of multiple breast cancer cell lines in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, araguspongine C-induced autophagic cell death in HER2-overexpressing BT-474 breast cancer cells was characterized by vacuole formation and upregulation of autophagy markers including LC3A/B, Atg3, Atg7, and Atg16L. Araguspongine C-induced autophagy was associated with suppression of c-Met and HER2 receptor tyrosine kinase activation. Further in-silico docking studies and cell-free Z-LYTE assays indicated the potential of direct interaction between araguspongine C and the receptor tyrosine kinases c-Met and HER2 at their kinase domains. Remarkably, araguspongine C treatment resulted in the suppression of PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling cascade in breast cancer cells undergoing autophagy. Induction of autophagic death in BT-474 cells was also associated with decreased levels of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor upon treatment with effective concentration of araguspongine C. In conclusion, results of this study are the first to reveal the potential of araguspongine C as an inhibitor to receptor tyrosine kinases resulting in the induction of autophagic cell death in breast cancer cells. PMID:25580621

  11. Diallyl disulfide enhances carbon ion beams-induced apoptotic cell death in cervical cancer cells through regulating Tap73 /ΔNp73.

    PubMed

    Di, Cuixia; Sun, Chao; Li, Hongyan; Si, Jing; Zhang, Hong; Han, Lu; Zhao, Qiuyue; Liu, Yang; Liu, Bin; Miao, Guoying; Gan, Lu; Liu, Yuanyuan

    2015-01-01

    Diallyl disulfide (DADS), extracted from crushed garlic by steam-distillation, has been reported to provide the anticancer activity in several cancer types. However, the effect of DADS on high-LET carbon beams - induced cell death remains unknown. Therefore, we used human cervical cancer cells to elucidate the molecular effects of this diallyl sulfide. Radiotherapy remains the mainstay of treatment, especially in advanced cervical cancer and there is still space to improve the radiosensitivity to reduce radiation dosage. In this study, we found that radiation effects evoked by high-LET carbon beam was marked by inhibition of cell viability, cell cycle arrest, significant rise of apoptotic cells, regulation of transcription factor, such as p73, as well as alterations of crucial mediator of the apoptosis pathway. We further demonstrated that pretreatment of 10 µM DADS in HeLa cells exposed to radiation resulted in decrease in cell viability and increased radiosensitivity. Additionally, cells pretreated with DADS obviously inhibited the radiation-induced G2/M phase arrest, but promoted radiation-induced apoptosis. Moreover, combination DADS and the radiation exacerbated the activation of apoptosis pathways through up-regulated ration of pro-apoptotic Tap73 to anti-apoptotic ΔNp73, and its downstream proteins, such as FASLG, and APAF1. Taken together, these results suggest that DADS is a potential candidate as radio sensitive agent for cervical cancer.

  12. Diallyl disulfide enhances carbon ion beams-induced apoptotic cell death in cervical cancer cells through regulating Tap73 /ΔNp73.

    PubMed

    Di, Cuixia; Sun, Chao; Li, Hongyan; Si, Jing; Zhang, Hong; Han, Lu; Zhao, Qiuyue; Liu, Yang; Liu, Bin; Miao, Guoying; Gan, Lu; Liu, Yuanyuan

    2015-01-01

    Diallyl disulfide (DADS), extracted from crushed garlic by steam-distillation, has been reported to provide the anticancer activity in several cancer types. However, the effect of DADS on high-LET carbon beams - induced cell death remains unknown. Therefore, we used human cervical cancer cells to elucidate the molecular effects of this diallyl sulfide. Radiotherapy remains the mainstay of treatment, especially in advanced cervical cancer and there is still space to improve the radiosensitivity to reduce radiation dosage. In this study, we found that radiation effects evoked by high-LET carbon beam was marked by inhibition of cell viability, cell cycle arrest, significant rise of apoptotic cells, regulation of transcription factor, such as p73, as well as alterations of crucial mediator of the apoptosis pathway. We further demonstrated that pretreatment of 10 µM DADS in HeLa cells exposed to radiation resulted in decrease in cell viability and increased radiosensitivity. Additionally, cells pretreated with DADS obviously inhibited the radiation-induced G2/M phase arrest, but promoted radiation-induced apoptosis. Moreover, combination DADS and the radiation exacerbated the activation of apoptosis pathways through up-regulated ration of pro-apoptotic Tap73 to anti-apoptotic ΔNp73, and its downstream proteins, such as FASLG, and APAF1. Taken together, these results suggest that DADS is a potential candidate as radio sensitive agent for cervical cancer. PMID:26505313

  13. Mimulone-induced autophagy through p53-mediated AMPK/mTOR pathway increases caspase-mediated apoptotic cell death in A549 human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    An, Hyun-Kyu; Kim, Kyoung-Sook; Lee, Ji-Won; Park, Mi-Hyun; Moon, Hyung-In; Park, Shin-Ji; Baik, Ji-Sue; Kim, Cheorl-Ho; Lee, Young-Choon

    2014-01-01

    Anticancer properties and mechanisms of mimulone (MML), C-geranylflavonoid isolated from the Paulownia tomentosa fruits, were firstly elucidated in this study. MML prevented cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent way and triggered apoptosis through the extrinsic pathway in A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells. Furthermore, MML-treated cells displayed autophagic features, such as the formation of autophagic vacuoles, a primary morphological feature of autophagy, and the accumulation of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) puncta, another typical maker of autophagy, as determined by FITC-conjugated immunostaining and monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining, respectively. The expression levels of LC3-I and LC3-II, specific markers of autophagy, were also augmented by MML treatment. Autophagy inhibition by 3-methyladenine (3-MA), pharmacological autophagy inhibitor, and shRNA knockdown of Beclin-1 reduced apoptotic cell death induced by MML. Autophagic flux was not significantly affected by MML treatment and lysosomal inhibitor, chloroquine (CQ) suppressed MML-induced autophagy and apoptosis. MML-induced autophagy was promoted by decreases in p53 and p-mTOR levels and increase of p-AMPK. Moreover, inhibition of p53 transactivation by pifithrin-α (PFT-α) and knockdown of p53 enhanced induction of autophagy and finally promoted apoptotic cell death. Overall, the results demonstrate that autophagy contributes to the cytotoxicity of MML in cancer cells harboring wild-type p53. This study strongly suggests that MML is a potential candidate for an anticancer agent targeting both autophagy and apoptotic cell death in human lung cancer. Moreover, co-treatment of MML and p53 inhibitor would be more effective in human lung cancer therapy. PMID:25490748

  14. Mimulone-Induced Autophagy through p53-Mediated AMPK/mTOR Pathway Increases Caspase-Mediated Apoptotic Cell Death in A549 Human Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji-Won; Park, Mi-Hyun; Moon, Hyung-In; Park, Shin-Ji; Baik, Ji-Sue; Kim, Cheorl-Ho; Lee, Young-Choon

    2014-01-01

    Anticancer properties and mechanisms of mimulone (MML), C-geranylflavonoid isolated from the Paulownia tomentosa fruits, were firstly elucidated in this study. MML prevented cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent way and triggered apoptosis through the extrinsic pathway in A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells. Furthermore, MML-treated cells displayed autophagic features, such as the formation of autophagic vacuoles, a primary morphological feature of autophagy, and the accumulation of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) puncta, another typical maker of autophagy, as determined by FITC-conjugated immunostaining and monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining, respectively. The expression levels of LC3-I and LC3-II, specific markers of autophagy, were also augmented by MML treatment. Autophagy inhibition by 3-methyladenine (3-MA), pharmacological autophagy inhibitor, and shRNA knockdown of Beclin-1 reduced apoptotic cell death induced by MML. Autophagic flux was not significantly affected by MML treatment and lysosomal inhibitor, chloroquine (CQ) suppressed MML-induced autophagy and apoptosis. MML-induced autophagy was promoted by decreases in p53 and p-mTOR levels and increase of p-AMPK. Moreover, inhibition of p53 transactivation by pifithrin-α (PFT-α) and knockdown of p53 enhanced induction of autophagy and finally promoted apoptotic cell death. Overall, the results demonstrate that autophagy contributes to the cytotoxicity of MML in cancer cells harboring wild-type p53. This study strongly suggests that MML is a potential candidate for an anticancer agent targeting both autophagy and apoptotic cell death in human lung cancer. Moreover, co-treatment of MML and p53 inhibitor would be more effective in human lung cancer therapy. PMID:25490748

  15. Gedunin Inactivates the Co-chaperone p23 Protein Causing Cancer Cell Death by Apoptosis*♦

    PubMed Central

    Patwardhan, Chaitanya A.; Fauq, Abdul; Peterson, Laura B.; Miller, Charles; Blagg, Brian S. J.; Chadli, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacological inhibition of Hsp90 is an exciting option for cancer therapy. The clinical efficacy of Hsp90 inhibitors is, however, less than expected. Binding of the co-chaperone p23 to Hsp90 and induced overexpression of anti-apoptotic proteins Hsp70 and Hsp27 are thought to contribute to this outcome. Herein, we report that the natural product gedunin may provide a new alternative to inactivate the Hsp90 machine. We show that gedunin directly binds to p23 and inactivates it, without overexpression of Hsp27 and relatively modest induction of Hsp70. Using molecular docking and mutational analysis, we mapped the gedunin-binding site on p23. Functional analysis shows that gedunin inhibits the p23 chaperoning activity, blocks its cellular interaction with Hsp90, and interferes with p23-mediated gene regulation. Cell treatment with gedunin leads to cancer cell death by apoptosis through inactivation of p23 and activation of caspase 7, which cleaves p23 at the C terminus. These results provide important insight into the molecular mechanism of action of this promising lead compound. PMID:23355466

  16. The apoptotic effect of hesperetin on human cervical cancer cells is mediated through cell cycle arrest, death receptor, and mitochondrial pathways.

    PubMed

    Alshatwi, Ali A; Ramesh, E; Periasamy, V S; Subash-Babu, P

    2013-12-01

    Hesperetin, a flavonoid from citrus fruits, has several bioactivities such as anti-inflammatory, antihypertensive, antiatherogenic effects. However, studies elucidating the role and the mechanism(s) of action of hesperetin in cervical cancer are sparse. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of the antiproliferative and apoptotic actions exerted by hesperetin on human cervical cancer SiHa cells. The viability of SiHa cells was evaluated using the MTT assay, apoptosis by acridine orange/ethidium bromide, propidium iodide, TUNEL assay, and Annexin V-Cy3, cell cycle distribution and mitochondrial transmembrane potential using flow cytometry, and apoptotic marker genes using quantitative real-time PCR. The treatment of SiHa cells with hesperetin (IC50, 650 μm) showed a marked concentration- and time-dependent inhibition of proliferation and induced the G2/M phase in a dose-dependent manner after 24 h. There was an attenuation of mitochondrial membrane potential with increased expression of caspase-3, caspase-8, caspase-9, p53, Bax, and Fas death receptor and its adaptor protein Fas-associated death domain-containing protein (FADD), indicating the participation of both death receptor- and mitochondria-related mechanisms. Furthermore, hesperetin-induced apoptosis was confirmed by TUNEL and Annexin V-Cy3. This study shows that hesperetin exhibits a potential anticancer activity against human cervical cancer cell lines in vitro through the reduction in cell viability and the induction of apoptosis. Altogether, these data sustain our contention that hesperetin has anticancer properties and merits further investigation as a potential therapeutic agent.

  17. Citrus limon-derived nanovesicles inhibit cancer cell proliferation and suppress CML xenograft growth by inducing TRAIL-mediated cell death

    PubMed Central

    Raimondo, Stefania; Naselli, Flores; Fontana, Simona; Monteleone, Francesca; Lo Dico, Alessia; Saieva, Laura; Zito, Giovanni; Flugy, Anna; Manno, Mauro; Di Bella, Maria Antonietta; De Leo, Giacomo; Alessandro, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Nanosized vesicles are considered key players in cell to cell communication, thus influencing physiological and pathological processes, including cancer. Nanovesicles have also been found in edible-plants and have shown therapeutic activity in inflammatory bowel diseases; however information on their role in affecting cancer progression is missing. Our study identify for the first time a fraction of vesicles from lemon juice (Citrus limon L.), obtained as a result of different ultracentrifugation, with density ranging from 1,15 to 1,19 g/ml and specific proteomic profile. By using an in vitro approach, we show that isolated nanovesicles inhibit cancer cell proliferation in different tumor cell lines, by activating a TRAIL-mediated apoptotic cell death. Furthermore, we demonstrate that lemon nanovesicles suppress CML tumor growth in vivo by specifically reaching tumor site and by activating TRAIL-mediated apoptotic cell processes. Overall, this study suggests the possible use of plant-edible nanovesicles as a feasible approach in cancer treatment. PMID:26098775

  18. Citrus limon-derived nanovesicles inhibit cancer cell proliferation and suppress CML xenograft growth by inducing TRAIL-mediated cell death.

    PubMed

    Raimondo, Stefania; Naselli, Flores; Fontana, Simona; Monteleone, Francesca; Lo Dico, Alessia; Saieva, Laura; Zito, Giovanni; Flugy, Anna; Manno, Mauro; Di Bella, Maria Antonietta; De Leo, Giacomo; Alessandro, Riccardo

    2015-08-14

    Nanosized vesicles are considered key players in cell to cell communication, thus influencing physiological and pathological processes, including cancer. Nanovesicles have also been found in edible-plants and have shown therapeutic activity in inflammatory bowel diseases; however information on their role in affecting cancer progression is missing.Our study identify for the first time a fraction of vesicles from lemon juice (Citrus limon L.), obtained as a result of different ultracentrifugation, with density ranging from 1,15 to 1,19 g/ml and specific proteomic profile. By using an in vitro approach, we show that isolated nanovesicles inhibit cancer cell proliferation in different tumor cell lines, by activating a TRAIL-mediated apoptotic cell death. Furthermore, we demonstrate that lemon nanovesicles suppress CML tumor growth in vivo by specifically reaching tumor site and by activating TRAIL-mediated apoptotic cell processes. Overall, this study suggests the possible use of plant-edible nanovesicles as a feasible approach in cancer treatment.

  19. Programmed cell death in aging

    PubMed Central

    Tower, John

    2015-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) pathways, including apoptosis and regulated necrosis, are required for normal cell turnover and tissue homeostasis. Mis-regulation of PCD is increasingly implicated in aging and aging-related disease. During aging the cell turnover rate declines for several highly-mitotic tissues. Aging-associated disruptions in systemic and inter-cell signaling combined with cell-autonomous damage and mitochondrial malfunction result in increased PCD in some cell types, and decreased PCD in other cell types. Increased PCD during aging is implicated in immune system decline, skeletal muscle wasting (sarcopenia), loss of cells in the heart, and neurodegenerative disease. In contrast, cancer cells and senescent cells are resistant to PCD, enabling them to increase in abundance during aging. PCD pathways limit life span in fungi, but whether PCD pathways normally limit adult metazoan life span is not yet clear. PCD is regulated by a balance of negative and positive factors, including the mitochondria, which are particularly subject to aging-associated malfunction. PMID:25862945

  20. Triptolide-induced Cell Death in Pancreatic Cancer Is Mediated by O-GlcNAc Modification of Transcription Factor Sp1*

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Sulagna; Sangwan, Veena; McGinn, Olivia; Chugh, Rohit; Dudeja, Vikas; Vickers, Selwyn M.; Saluja, Ashok K.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer, the fourth most prevalent cancer-related cause of death in the United States, is a disease with a dismal survival rate of 5% 5 years after diagnosis. One of the survival proteins responsible for its extraordinary ability to evade cell death is HSP70. A naturally derived compound, triptolide, and its water-soluble prodrug, Minnelide, down-regulate the expression of this protein in pancreatic cancer cells, thereby causing cell death. However, the mechanism of action of triptolide has not been elucidated. Our study shows that triptolide-induced down-regulation of HSP70 expression is associated with a decrease in glycosylation of the transcription factor Sp1. We further show that triptolide inhibits glycosylation of Sp1, inhibiting the hexosamine biosynthesis pathway, particularly the enzyme O-GlcNAc transferase. Inhibition of O-GlcNAc transferase prevents nuclear localization of Sp1 and affects its DNA binding activity. This in turn down-regulates prosurvival pathways like NF-κB, leading to inhibition of HSF1 and HSP70 and eventually to cell death. In this study, we evaluated the mechanism by which triptolide affects glycosylation of Sp1, which in turn affects downstream pathways controlling survival of pancreatic cancer cells. PMID:24129563

  1. Death receptors: Targets for cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, Zafar; Shukla, Yogeshwer

    2010-04-01

    Apoptosis is the cell's intrinsic program to death, which plays an important role in physiologic growth control and homeostasis. Apoptosis can be triggered by death receptors (DRs), without any adverse effects. DRs are the members of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor superfamily, known to be involved in apoptosis signaling, independent of p53 tumor-supressor gene. Selective triggering of DR-mediated apoptosis in cancer cells is a novel approach in cancer therapy. So far, the best characterized DRs are CD95 (Fas/Apo1), TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand receptor (TRAILR) and tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR). Among these, TRAILR is emerging as most promising agent for cancer therapy, because it induces apoptosis in a variety of tumor and transformed cells without any toxicity to normal cells. TRAIL treatment in combination with chemotherapy or radiotherapy enhances TRAIL sensitivity or reverses TRAIL resistance by regulating downstream effectors. This review covers the current knowledge about the DRs, summarizes main signaling in DRs and also summarizes the preclinical approaches of these DRs in cancer therapy.

  2. 8-p-Hdroxybenzoyl Tovarol Induces Paraptosis Like Cell Death and Protective Autophagy in Human Cervical Cancer HeLa Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cui; Jiang, Yingnan; Zhang, Jin; Huang, Jian; Wang, Jinhui

    2015-01-01

    8-p-Hdroxybenzoyl tovarol (TAW) is a germacrane-type sesquiterpenoid that can be isolated from the roots of Ferula dissecta (Ledeb.) Ledeb. In this study, the growth inhibitory effects induced by TAW were screened on some types of tumor cells, and the mechanism was investigated on TAW-induced growth inhibition, including paraptosis and autophagy in human cervical cancer HeLa cells. TAW-induced paraptosis involved extensive cytoplasmic vacuolization in the absence of caspase activation. Additionally, TAW evoked cell paraptotic death mediated by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and unfolded protein response (UPR). Autophagy induced by TAW was found to antagonize paraptosis in HeLa cells. This effect was enhanced by rapamycin and suppressed by the autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine (3MA). Loss of beclin 1 (an autophagic regulator) function led to promote ER stress. Taken together, these results suggest that TAW induces paraptosis like cell death and protective autophagy in HeLa cells, which would provide a new clue for exploiting TAW as a promising agent for the treatment of cervical cancer.

  3. NAMPT inhibition synergizes with NQO1-targeting agents in inducing apoptotic cell death in non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui-Ying; Li, Qing-Ran; Cheng, Xue-Fang; Wang, Guang-Ji; Hao, Hai-Ping

    2016-08-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) catalyzes the first rate-limiting step in converting nicotinamide to NAD(+), essential for a number of enzymes and regulatory proteins involved in a variety of cellular processes, including deacetylation enzyme SIRT1 which modulates several tumor suppressors such as p53 and FOXO. Herein we report that NQO1 substrates Tanshione IIA (TSA) and β-lapachone (β-lap) induced a rapid depletion of NAD(+) pool but adaptively a significant upregulation of NAMPT. NAMPT inhibition by FK866 at a nontoxic dose significantly enhanced NQO1-targeting agent-induced apoptotic cell death. Compared with TSA or β-lap treatment alone, co-treatment with FK866 induced a more dramatic depletion of NAD(+), repression of SIRT1 activity, and thereby the increased accumulation of acetylated FOXO1 and the activation of apoptotic pathway. In conclusion, the results from the present study support that NAMPT inhibition can synergize with NQO1 activation to induce apoptotic cell death, thereby providing a new rationale for the development of combinative therapeutic drugs in combating non-small lung cancer. PMID:27608947

  4. gamma-Tocopherol or combinations of vitamin E forms induce cell death in human prostate cancer cells by interrupting sphingolipid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qing; Wong, Jeffrey; Fyrst, Henrik; Saba, Julie D; Ames, Bruce N

    2004-12-21

    gamma-Tocopherol (gammaT), the predominant form of vitamin E in diets, but not alpha-tocopherol, the major vitamin E form in tissues and supplements, inhibits proliferation of prostate cancer cells (LNCaP and PC-3) and lung cancer cells (A549). In contrast, at similar concentrations, gammaT has no effect on normal prostate epithelial cells. Combinations of some vitamin E forms, such as gammaT and delta-tocopherol, exhibit additive or synergistic inhibitory effects. In this study, gammaT or its combination with delta-tocopherol induced apoptosis in androgen-sensitive prostate LNCaP, but not in androgen-resistant PC-3 cells, by the induction of cytochrome c release, activation of caspase 9 and caspase 3, cleavage of poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP), and involvement of caspase-independent pathways. Myriocin and fumonisin B1, specific inhibitors of key enzymes (serine palmitoyltransferase and dihydroceramide synthase, respectively) in de novo synthesis of sphingolipids, significantly protected cells from gammaT-induced DNA fragmentation, cytochrome c release, PARP cleavage, and the formation of active caspase 3. Compared with vehicle-treated controls, gammaT treatment led to pronounced dihydroceramide and dihydrosphingosine accumulation, which preceded morphological and biochemical manifestations of apoptosis. In contrast, ceramide and shpingosine levels did not increase until day 3, when substantial cell death took place. Our study demonstrates that gammaT and mixed vitamin E forms induce cell death by interrupting the de novo sphingolipid pathway in a prostate cancer cell line. Thus, certain vitamin E forms may be valuable as anticancer agents.

  5. Inactivation of Akt by arsenic trioxide induces cell death via mitochondrial-mediated apoptotic signaling in SGC-7901 human gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yan-Hui; Zhang, Hao-Peng; Yang, Shu-Meng; Yang, Yue; Ma, Yu-Yan; Zhang, Xin-Yu; Yang, Yan-Mei

    2014-04-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) has been recognized as a potential chemotherapeutic agent, yet the details concerning its mechanism of action in solid cancers remain undetermined. The present study assessed the role of Akt in the cell death induced by As2O3. The MTT assay showed that As2O3 suppressed the proliferation of SGC-7901 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Characteristic apoptotic changes were observed in the As2O3‑treated cells by Hoechst 33342 staining, and FACS analysis showed that As2O3 caused dose-dependent apoptotic cell death. As2O3 activated caspase-3 and -9, and PARP cleavage in a dose-dependent manner. Compromised mitochondrial membrane potential and an increased protein level of Bax indicated involvement of mitochondia. As2O3 decreased the levels of p-Akt (Ser473), p-Akt (Thr308) and p-GSK-3β (Ser9), suggesting that As2O3 inactivated Akt kinase. In addition, LY294002 (a PI3 kinase inhibitor) augmented the apoptosis induced by As2O3. These results demonstrated that inhibition of PI3K/Akt signaling was involved in As2O3-induced apoptosis of gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells. PMID:24482137

  6. Emodin induces apoptosis of human cervical cancer hela cells via intrinsic mitochondrial and extrinsic death receptor pathway

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Emodin is a natural anthraquinone derivative isolated from the Rheum palmatum L. Aim: The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of emodin on the apoptosis of the human cervical cancer line HeLa and to identify the mechanisms involved. Methods Relative cell viability was assessed by MTT assay after treatment with emodin. Cell apoptosis was detected with TUNEL, Hoechst 33342 staining and quantified with flow cytometry using annexin FITC-PI staining. Results The percentage of apoptotic cells was 0.8, 8.2, 22.1, and 43.7%, respectively. The mRNA levels of Caspase-9, -8 and −3 detected by Real-time PCR after treatment with emodin were significantly increased. Emodin increased the protein levels of Cytochome c, Apaf-1, Fas, FasL, and FADD but decreased the protein levels of Pro-caspase-9, Pro-caspase-8 and Pro-caspase-3. Conclusion We conclude that the emodin inhibited HeLa proliferation by inducing apoptosis through the intrinsic mitochondrial and extrinsic death receptor pathways. PMID:23866157

  7. Programmed cell death in neurodevelopment.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Yoshifumi; Miura, Masayuki

    2015-02-23

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is an evolutionarily conserved contributor to nervous system development. In the vertebrate peripheral nervous system, PCD is the basis of the neurotrophic theory, whereby cell death results from a surplus of neurons relative to target and competition for neurotrophic factors. In addition to stochastic cell death, PCD can be intrinsically determined by cell lineage or position and timing in both invertebrate and vertebrate central nervous systems. The underlying PCD molecular mechanisms include intrinsic transcription factor cascades and regulators of competence/susceptibility to cell death. Here, we provide a framework for understanding neural PCD from its regulation to its functions.

  8. Anticancer Activity of Buttermilk Against SW480 Colon Cancer Cells is Associated with Caspase-Independent Cell Death and Attenuation of Wnt, Akt, and ERK Signaling.

    PubMed

    Kuchta-Noctor, Anna M; Murray, Brian A; Stanton, Catherine; Devery, Rosaleen; Kelly, Phil M

    2016-10-01

    Buttermilk is a rich source of milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) fragments assembled from bioactive polar lipids and proteins that originate from bovine mammary epithelial cells. The objective of this study was to examine growth-modulatory effects of experimental buttermilks varying in sphingolipid and phospholipid composition on a colon cancer cell line of human origin. Buttermilks were prepared from washed and unwashed cream using gravity or centrifugation. Compositional analysis showed that sphingomyelin (SM) (10.4-29.5%) and lactosylceramide (LacCer) (1.2-44.3%) were the predominant sphingolipids detected. Experimental samples inhibited in vitro growth of SW480 colon cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. Antiproliferative activity was selective toward cancer cells. A fraction enriched in LacCer (44.3%), obtained by microfiltration induced caspase-independent cell death as evident by phosphatidylserine externalization, increased percentage of degraded DNA, and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential in SW480 cells. This fraction downregulated growth-signaling pathways mediated by β-catenin, phosphorylated Akt (serine/threonine-specific protein kinase), ERK1/2 (extracellular signal-regulated kinase), and c-myc. This study is to our knowledge the first to screen buttermilk samples that vary in polar lipid composition for antiproliferative activity in vitro. PMID:27472445

  9. Loss of Bcl-2 in invasive breast cancer is associated with high rates of cell death, but also with increased proliferative activity.

    PubMed Central

    van Slooten, H. J.; van de Vijver, M. J.; van de Velde, C. J.; van Dierendonck, J. H.

    1998-01-01

    Bcl-2 has been demonstrated to inhibit apoptosis in breast cancer cells in vitro, and the ratio between Bcl-2 and its proapoptotic homologue Bax seems to be an important determinant of cellular sensitivity to induction of apoptosis. However, little information is available on the relationship between Bcl-2 and the rate of apoptotic and necrotic cell death in breast tumours. From a series of 441 premenopausal, lymphnode-negative breast cancer patients, a subset of 49 tumours was selected in which immunostaining for the 26-kDa isoform of Bcl-2 was either absent (n = 23) or very high (n = 26). High expression of Bcl-2 was found to be strongly associated with low rates of apoptotic (P < 0.001) and necrotic cell death (P < 0.001). The mean value of the apoptotic index was 2.69%+/-1.40% in Bcl-2-negative tumours and 0.68%+/-1.00% in Bcl-2-positive tumours. Expression of the proapoptotic protein Bax correlated neither with Bcl-2 nor with the frequency of apoptotic cells. Immunostaining for the antiapoptotic Bcl-2 homologue BcI-X(L) correlated with Bcl-2 expression (P < 0.001) but not with apoptosis. High proliferation rate and high tumour grade (Bloom-Richardson) were strongly associated with absence of Bcl-2 expression (P< 0.001). p53 accumulation was associated with absence of Bcl-2 expression and increased apoptotic activity. Loss of Bcl-2 expression was strongly correlated with increased apoptotic and necrotic cell death, high proliferation rate and high tumour grade, supporting a model in which Bcl-2 not only mediates cell death, but also cell division in breast cancer tissue, and in which regulation of cell division and cell death are tightly linked. Images Figure 1 PMID:9514059

  10. Novel Lobophorins Inhibit Oral Cancer Cell Growth and Induce Atf4- and Chop-Dependent Cell Death in Murine Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Patricia G; Fribley, Andrew M; Miller, Justin R; Larsen, Martha J; Schultz, Pamela J; Jacob, Renju T; Tamayo-Castillo, Giselle; Kaufman, Randal J; Sherman, David H

    2015-08-13

    As part of the International Cooperative Biodiversity Groups (ICBG) Program, we were interested in identifying biologically active unfolded protein response (UPR) inducing compounds from marine microorganisms isolated from Costa Rican biota. With this aim in mind we have now generated more than 33,000 unique prefractionated natural product extracts from marine and terrestrial organisms that have been submitted to the Center of Chemical Genomics (CCG) at the University of Michigan for high throughput screening (HTS). An effective complementary cell-based assay to identify novel modulators of UPR signaling was used for screening extracts. Active fractions were iteratively subjected to reverse-phase HPLC chromatographic analysis, and together with lobophorin A, B, E, and F (1-4), three new lobophorin congeners, designated as CR1 (5), CR2 (6), and CR3 (7) were isolated. Herein, we report that secondary assays revealed that the new lobophorins induced UPR-associated gene expression, inhibited oral squamous cell carcinoma cell growth, and led to UPR-dependent cell death in murine embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells. PMID:26288688

  11. Brazilian Red Propolis Induces Apoptosis-Like Cell Death and Decreases Migration Potential in Bladder Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Begnini, Karine Rech; Moura de Leon, Priscila Marques; Thurow, Helena; Schultze, Eduarda; Campos, Vinicius Farias; Borsuk, Sibele; Dellagostin, Odir Antônio; Savegnago, Lucielli; Moura, Sidnei; Padilha, Francine F.; Pêgas Henriques, João Antonio; Seixas, Fabiana Kömmling

    2014-01-01

    Natural products continue to be an invaluable resource of anticancer drug discovery in recent years. Propolis is known for its biological activities such as antimicrobial and antitumor effects. This study assessed the effects of Brazilian red propolis (BRP) on apoptosis and migration potential in human bladder cancer cells. The effect of BRP ethanolic extract (25, 50, and 100 μg/mL) on 5637 cells was determined by MTT, LIVE/DEAD, and migration (scratch assay) assays. Apoptosis induction was investigated through flow cytometry and gene expression profile was investigated by qRT-PCR. Results showed cytotoxicity on MTT and LIVE/DEAD assays, with IC50 values of 95 μg/mL in 24 h of treatment. Cellular migration of 5637 cells was significantly inhibited through lower doses of BRP ethanolic extract (25 and 50 μg/mL). Flow cytometry analyses showed that BRP induced cytotoxicity through apoptosis-like mechanisms in 5637 cells and qRT-PCR revealed increased levels of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, p53, AIF, and antioxidant enzymes genes. Data suggest that BRP may be a potential source of drugs to bladder cancer treatment. PMID:25530785

  12. Brazilian red propolis induces apoptosis-like cell death and decreases migration potential in bladder cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Begnini, Karine Rech; Moura de Leon, Priscila Marques; Thurow, Helena; Schultze, Eduarda; Campos, Vinicius Farias; Martins Rodrigues, Fernanda; Borsuk, Sibele; Dellagostin, Odir Antônio; Savegnago, Lucielli; Roesch-Ely, Mariana; Moura, Sidnei; Padilha, Francine F; Collares, Tiago; Pêgas Henriques, João Antonio; Seixas, Fabiana Kömmling

    2014-01-01

    Natural products continue to be an invaluable resource of anticancer drug discovery in recent years. Propolis is known for its biological activities such as antimicrobial and antitumor effects. This study assessed the effects of Brazilian red propolis (BRP) on apoptosis and migration potential in human bladder cancer cells. The effect of BRP ethanolic extract (25, 50, and 100 μg/mL) on 5637 cells was determined by MTT, LIVE/DEAD, and migration (scratch assay) assays. Apoptosis induction was investigated through flow cytometry and gene expression profile was investigated by qRT-PCR. Results showed cytotoxicity on MTT and LIVE/DEAD assays, with IC50 values of 95 μg/mL in 24 h of treatment. Cellular migration of 5637 cells was significantly inhibited through lower doses of BRP ethanolic extract (25 and 50 μg/mL). Flow cytometry analyses showed that BRP induced cytotoxicity through apoptosis-like mechanisms in 5637 cells and qRT-PCR revealed increased levels of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, p53, AIF, and antioxidant enzymes genes. Data suggest that BRP may be a potential source of drugs to bladder cancer treatment.

  13. Water-Soluble Dinitrosyl Iron Complex (DNIC): a Nitric Oxide Vehicle Triggering Cancer Cell Death via Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shou-Cheng; Lu, Chung-Yen; Chen, Yi-Lin; Lo, Feng-Chun; Wang, Ting-Yin; Chen, Yu-Jen; Yuan, Shyng-Shiou; Liaw, Wen-Feng; Wang, Yun-Ming

    2016-09-19

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important cellular signaling molecule that modulates various physiological activities. Angiogenesis-promoting activities of NO-donor drugs have been explored in both experimental and clinical studies. In this study, a structurally well characterized and water-soluble neutral {Fe(NO)2}(9) DNIC [(S(CH2)2OH)(S(CH2)2NH3)Fe(NO)2] (DNIC 2) was synthesized to serve as a NO-donor species. The antitumor activity of DNIC 2 was determined by MTT assay, confocal imaging, and Annexin-V/PI staining. The IC50 values of DNIC 2 were 18.8, 42.9, and 38.6 μM for PC-3, SKBR-3, and CRL5866 tumor cells, respectively. Moreover, DNIC 2 promoted apoptotic cell death via activation of apoptosis-associated proteins and inhibition of survival associated proteins. In particular, DNIC 2 treatment suppressed PC-3 tumor growth by 2.34- and 19.3-fold at 7 and 21 days, in comparison with the control group. These results indicate that water-soluble DNIC 2 may serve as a promising drug for cancer therapy.

  14. Histone deacetylase inhibitor-induced cell death in bladder cancer is associated with chromatin modification and modifying protein expression: A proteomic approach

    PubMed Central

    LI, QINGDI QUENTIN; HAO, JIAN-JIANG; ZHANG, ZHENG; HSU, IAWEN; LIU, YI; TAO, ZHEN; LEWI, KEIDREN; METWALLI, ADAM R.; AGARWAL, PIYUSH K.

    2016-01-01

    The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project recently identified the importance of mutations in chromatin remodeling genes in human carcinomas. These findings imply that epigenetic modulators might have a therapeutic role in urothelial cancers. To exploit histone deacetylases (HDACs) as targets for cancer therapy, we investigated the HDAC inhibitors (HDACIs) romidepsin, trichostatin A, and vorinostat as potential chemotherapeutic agents for bladder cancer. We demonstrate that the three HDACIs suppressed cell growth and induced cell death in the bladder cancer cell line 5637. To identify potential mechanisms associated with the anti-proliferative and cytotoxic effects of the HDACIs, we used quantitative proteomics to determine the proteins potentially involved in these processes. Our proteome studies identified a total of 6003 unique proteins. Of these, 2472 proteins were upregulated and 2049 proteins were downregulated in response to HDACI exposure compared to the untreated controls (P<0.05). Bioinformatic analysis further revealed that those differentially expressed proteins were involved in multiple biological functions and enzyme-regulated pathways, including cell cycle progression, apoptosis, autophagy, free radical generation and DNA damage repair. HDACIs also altered the acetylation status of histones and non-histone proteins, as well as the levels of chromatin modification proteins, suggesting that HDACIs exert multiple cytotoxic actions in bladder cancer cells by inhibiting HDAC activity or altering the structure of chromatin. We conclude that HDACIs are effective in the inhibition of cell proliferation and the induction of apoptosis in the 5637 bladder cancer cells through multiple cell death-associated pathways. These observations support the notion that HDACIs provide new therapeutic options for bladder cancer treatment and thus warrant further preclinical exploration. PMID:27082124

  15. Phorbol esters induce death in MCF-7 breast cancer cells with altered expression of protein kinase C isoforms. Role for p53-independent induction of gadd-45 in initiating death.

    PubMed Central

    de Vente, J E; Kukoly, C A; Bryant, W O; Posekany, K J; Chen, J; Fletcher, D J; Parker, P J; Pettit, G J; Lozano, G; Cook, P P

    1995-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) modulates growth, differentiation and apoptosis in a cell-specific fashion. Overexpression of PKC-alpha in MCF-7 breast cancer cells (MCF-7-PKC-alpha cell) leads to expression of a more transformed phenotype. The response of MCF-7 and MCF-7-PKC-alpha cells to phorbol esters (TPA) was examined. TPA-treated MCF-7 cells demonstrated a modest cytostatic response associated with a G1 arrest that was accompanied by Cip1 expression and retinoblastoma hypophosphorylation. While p53 was detected in MCF-7 cells, evidence for TPA-induced stimulation of p53 transcriptional activity was not evident. In contrast, TPA treatment induced death of MCF-7-PKC-alpha cells. Bryostatin 1, another PKC activator, exerted modest cytostatic effects on MCF-7 cells while producing a cytotoxic response at low doses in MCF-7-PKC-alpha cells that waned at higher concentrations. TPA-treated MCF-7-PKC-alpha cells accumulated in G2/M, did not express p53, displayed decreased Cip1 expression, and demonstrated a reduction in retinoblastoma hypophosphorylation. TPA-treated MCF-7-PKC-alpha cells expressed gadd-45 which occurred before the onset of apoptosis. Thus, alterations in the PKC pathway can modulate the decision of a breast cancer cell to undergo death or differentiation. In addition, these data show that PKC activation can induce expression of gadd45 in a p53-independent fashion. Images PMID:7560079

  16. Immunological metagene signatures derived from immunogenic cancer cell death associate with improved survival of patients with lung, breast or ovarian malignancies: A large-scale meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Abhishek D.; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Agostinis, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The emerging role of the cancer cell-immune cell interface in shaping tumorigenesis/anticancer immunotherapy has increased the need to identify prognostic biomarkers. Henceforth, our primary aim was to identify the immunogenic cell death (ICD)-derived metagene signatures in breast, lung and ovarian cancer that associate with improved patient survival. To this end, we analyzed the prognostic impact of differential gene-expression of 33 pre-clinically-validated ICD-parameters through a large-scale meta-analysis involving 3,983 patients (‘discovery’ dataset) across lung (1,432), breast (1,115) and ovarian (1,436) malignancies. The main results were also substantiated in ‘validation’ datasets consisting of 818 patients of same cancer-types (i.e. 285 breast/274 lung/259 ovarian). The ICD-associated parameters exhibited a highly-clustered and largely cancer type-specific prognostic impact. Interestingly, we delineated ICD-derived consensus-metagene signatures that exhibited a positive prognostic impact that was either cancer type-independent or specific. Importantly, most of these ICD-derived consensus-metagenes (acted as attractor-metagenes and thereby) ‘attracted’ highly co-expressing sets of genes or convergent-metagenes. These convergent-metagenes also exhibited positive prognostic impact in respective cancer types. Remarkably, we found that the cancer type-independent consensus-metagene acted as an ‘attractor’ for cancer-specific convergent-metagenes. This reaffirms that the immunological prognostic landscape of cancer tends to segregate between cancer-independent and cancer-type specific gene signatures. Moreover, this prognostic landscape was largely dominated by the classical T cell activity/infiltration/function-related biomarkers. Interestingly, each cancer type tended to associate with biomarkers representing a specific T cell activity or function rather than pan-T cell biomarkers. Thus, our analysis confirms that ICD can serve as a

  17. Coherence-controlled holographic microscopy enabled recognition of necrosis as the mechanism of cancer cells death after exposure to cytopathic turbid emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collakova, Jana; Krizova, Aneta; Kollarova, Vera; Dostal, Zbynek; Slaba, Michala; Vesely, Pavel; Chmelik, Radim

    2015-11-01

    Coherence-controlled holographic microscopy (CCHM) in low-coherence mode possesses a pronounced coherence gate effect. This offers an option to investigate the details of cellular events leading to cell death caused by cytopathic turbid emulsions. CCHM capacity was first assessed in model situations that showed clear images obtained with low coherence of illumination but not with high coherence of illumination. Then, the form of death of human cancer cells induced by treatment with biologically active phospholipids (BAPs) preparation was investigated. The observed overall retraction of cell colony was apparently caused by the release of cell-to-substratum contacts. This was followed by the accumulation of granules decorating the nuclear membrane. Then, the occurrence of nuclear membrane indentations signaled the start of damage to the integrity of the cell nucleus. In the final stage, cells shrunk and disintegrated. This indicated that BAPs cause cell death by necrosis and not apoptosis. An intriguing option of checking the fate of cancer cells caused by the anticipated cooperative effect after adding another tested substance sodium dichloroacetate to turbid emulsion is discussed on grounds of pilot experiments. Such observations should reveal the impact and mechanism of action of the interacting drugs on cell behavior and fate that would otherwise remain hidden in turbid milieu.

  18. Autophagic Cell Death by Poncirus trifoliata Rafin., a Traditional Oriental Medicine, in Human Oral Cancer HSC-4 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hye-Yeon; Park, Bong-Soo; Lee, Guem San; Jeong, Seung-Hwa; Kim, Hyungwoo; Ryu, Mi Heon

    2015-01-01

    Poncirus trifoliata Rafin. has long been used as anti-inflammatory and antiallergic agent to treat gastrointestinal disorders and pulmonary diseases such as indigestion, constipation, chest fullness, chest pain, bronchitis, and sputum in Korea. P. trifoliata extract has recently been reported to possess anticancer properties; however, its mechanisms of action remain unclear. In this study, its antiproliferative effects and possible mechanisms were investigated in HSC-4 cells. The methanol extract of P. trifoliata (MEPT) significantly decreased the proliferation of HSC-4 cells (inhibitory concentration (IC)50 = 142.7 μg/mL) in a dose-dependent manner. While there were no significant changes observed upon cell cycle analysis and ANNEXIN V and 7-AAD double staining in the MEPT-treated groups, the intensity of acidic vesicular organelle (AVO) staining and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain (LC) 3-II protein expression increased in response to MEPT treatment. Furthermore, 3-methyladenine (3-MA, autophagy inhibitor) effectively blocked the MEPT-induced cytotoxicity of HSC-4 cells and triggered the activation of p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) proteins. Taken together, our results indicate that MEPT is a potent autophagy agonist in oral cancer cells with antitumor therapeutic potential that acts through the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. PMID:26221173

  19. Targeted Nanomedicine for Suppression of CD44 and Simultaneous Cell Death Induction in Ovarian Cancer: an Optimal Delivery of siRNA and Anticancer Drug

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Vatsal; Taratula, Oleh; Garbuzenko, Olga B.; Taratula, Olena R.; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Lorna; Minko, Tamara

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The proposed project is aimed at enhancing the efficiency of epithelial ovarian cancer treatment and reducing adverse side effects of chemotherapy using nanotechnology. Overexpression of the CD44 membrane receptor results in tumor initiation, growth, tumor stem cells specific behavior, development of drug resistance, and metastases. We hypothesize that a developed cancer targeted delivery system which combines CD44 siRNA with paclitaxel would successfully deliver its payload inside cancer cells, effectively induce cell death, and prevent metastases. Experimental Design: We synthesized, characterized, and tested a nanoscale-based drug delivery system containing a modified Polypropylenimine (PPI) dendrimer as a carrier; anticancer drug paclitaxel as a cell death inducer; a synthetic analog of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) peptide as a tumor targeting moiety, and siRNA targeted to CD44 mRNA. The proposed NDDS was tested in vitro and in vivo using metastatic ovarian cancer cells isolated from patients with malignant ascites. Results: We found that in contrast to cells isolated from primary tumors, CD44 was highly overexpressed in metastatic cancer cells. Treatment with the proposed tumor-targeted nanoscale-based nucleic acid and drug delivery system led to the suppression of CD44 mRNA and protein, efficient induction of cell death, effective tumor shrinkage, and prevention of adverse side effects on healthy organs. Conclusion: We show a high therapeutic potential for combinatorial treatment of ovarian carcinoma with a novel drug delivery system that effectively transports siRNA targeting to CD44 mRNA simultaneously with cytotoxic agents. PMID:24036854

  20. Beclin-1-independent autophagy mediates programmed cancer cell death through interplays with endoplasmic reticulum and/or mitochondria in colbat chloride-induced hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lei; Liu, Ning; Liu, Shan-Shan; Xia, Wu-Yan; Liu, Meng-Yao; Li, Lin-Feng; Gao, Jian-Xin

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy has dual functions in cell survival and death. However, the effects of autophagy on cancer cell survival or death remain controversial. In this study, we show that Autophagy can mediate programmed cell death (PCD) of cancer cells in responding to cobalt chloride (CoCl2)-induced hypoxia in a Beclin-1-independent but autophagy protein 5 (ATG5)-dependent manner. Although ATG5 is not directly induced by CoCl2, its constitutive expression is essential for CoCl2-induced PCD. The ATG5-mediated autophagic PCD requires interplays with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and/or mitochondria. In this process, ATG5 plays a central role in regulating ER stress protein CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) homologous protein (CHOP) and mitochondrial protein second mitochondria derived activator of caspases (Smac). Two pathways for autophagic PCD in cancer cells responding to hypoxia have been identified: ATG5/CHOP/Smac pathway and ATG5/Smac pathway, which are probably dependent on the context of cell lines. The former is more potent than the latter for the induction of PCD at the early stage of hypoxia, although the ultimate efficiency of both pathways is comparable. In addition, both pathways may require ATG5-mediated conversion of LC3-I into LC3-II. Therefore, we have defined two autophagy-mediated pathways for the PCD of cancer cells in hypoxia, which are dependent on ATG5, interplayed with ER and mitochondria and tightly regulated by hypoxic status. The findings provide a new evidence that autophagy may inhibit tumor cell proliferation through trigger of PCD, facilitating the development of novel anti-cancer drugs. PMID:26609472

  1. Targeted polymersome delivery of siRNA induces cell death of breast cancer cells dependent upon Orai3 protein expression.

    PubMed

    Pangburn, Todd O; Georgiou, Katerina; Bates, Frank S; Kokkoli, Efrosini

    2012-09-01

    Polymersomes, polymeric vesicles that self-assemble in aqueous solutions from block copolymers, have been avidly investigated in recent years as potential drug delivery agents. Past work has highlighted peptide-functionalized polymersomes as a highly promising targeted delivery system. However, few reports have investigated the ability of polymersomes to operate as gene delivery agents. In this study, we report on the encapsulation and delivery of siRNA inside of peptide-functionalized polymersomes composed of poly(1,2-butadiene)-b-poly(ethylene oxide). In particular, PR_b peptide-functionalized polymer vesicles are shown to be a promising system for siRNA delivery. PR_b is a fibronectin mimetic peptide targeting specifically the α(5)β(1) integrin. The Orai3 gene was targeted for siRNA knockdown, and PR_b-functionalized polymer vesicles encapsulating siRNA were found to specifically decrease cell viability of T47D breast cancer cells to a certain extent, while preserving viability of noncancerous MCF10A breast cells. siRNA delivery by PR_b-functionalized polymer vesicles was compared to that of a current commercial siRNA transfection agent, and produced less dramatic decreases in cancer cell viability, but compared favorably in regards to the relative toxicity of the delivery systems. Finally, delivery and vesicle release of a fluorescent encapsulate by PR_b-functionalized polymer vesicles was visualized by confocal microscopy, and colocalization with cellular endosomes and lysosomes was assessed by organelle staining. Polymersomes were observed to primarily release their encapsulate in the early endosomal intracellular compartments, and data may suggest some escape to the cytosol. These results represent a promising first generation model system for targeted delivery of siRNA.

  2. Dissociation of E-cadherin/β-catenin complex by MG132 and bortezomib enhances CDDP induced cell death in oral cancer SCC-25 cells.

    PubMed

    Lü, Lanhai; Liu, Xiqiang; Wang, Cheng; Hu, Fengchun; Wang, Jianning; Huang, Hongzhang

    2015-12-01

    E-cadherin/β-catenin complex plays an important role in maintaining the homeostasis of tissues and regulating cell proliferation, survival and apoptosis. To address the relationships between the change of E-cadherin/β-catenin complex and cell apoptosis, human oral squamous carcinoma SCC-25 cells were used to investigate whether the dissociation of the E-cadherin/β-catenin complex was the main reason of MG132- or bortezomib-induced apoptosis. We found that MG132 or bortezomib alone induced remarkable loss of cell integrity and contact, inhibited cell growth, survival, migration and caused cell cycle arrest, intracellular ROS production. Further experiments showed that colony formations were significantly decreased by MG132 and bortezomib alone or plus cis-diaminedichloroplatinum (CDDP). Immunofluorescence staining showed that SCC-25 cells exhibited remarkable accumulations of β-catenin in cytoplasm and few E-cadherin in cell membranes after MG132 or bortezomib treatment. Western blot results showed that MG132 or bortezomib induced high accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins and activation of apoptosis related protein caspase-3. Meanwhile, the combinational use of MG132 or bortezomib with CDDP led to synergistic effects on SCC-25 cells. However, knockdown of β-catenin could decrease MG132 or bortezomib induced cell death. Taken together, our data suggest that the regulation of E-cadherin/β-catenin complex could be a promising therapeutic target to overcome the multidrug resistance of oral cancer.

  3. A novel protoapigenone analog RY10-4 induces breast cancer MCF-7 cell death through autophagy via the Akt/mTOR pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xuenong; Wei, Han; Liu, Ziwei; Yuan, Qianying; Wei, Anhua; Shi, Du; Yang, Xian; Ruan, Jinlan

    2013-07-15

    Protoapigenone is a unique flavonoid and enriched in many ferns, showing potent antitumor activity against a broad spectrum of human cancer cell lines. RY10-4, a modified version of protoapigenone, manifested better anti-proliferation activity in human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. The cytotoxicity of RY10-4 against MCF-7 cells is exhibited in both time- and concentration-dependent manners. Here we investigated a novel effect of RY10-4 mediated autophagy in autophagy defect MCF-7 cells. Employing immunofluorescence assay for microtubule-associated protein light-chain 3 (LC3), monodansylcadaverine staining, Western blotting analyses for LC3 and p62 as well as ultrastructural analysis by transmission electron microscopy, we showed that RY10-4 induced autophagy in MCF-7 cells but protoapigenone did not. Meanwhile, inhibition of autophagy by pharmacological and genetic approaches significantly increased the viability of RY10-4 treated cells, suggesting that the autophagy induced by RY10-4 played as a promotion mechanism for cell death. Further studies revealed that RY10-4 suppressed the activation of mTOR and p70S6K via the Akt/mTOR pathway. Our results provided new insights for the mechanism of RY10-4 induced cell death and the cause of RY10-4 showing better antitumor activity than protoapigenone, and supported further evidences for RY10-4 as a lead to design a promising antitumor agent. - Highlights: • We showed that RY10-4 induced autophagy in MCF-7 cells but protoapigenone did not. • Autophagy induced by RY10-4 played as a promotion mechanism for cell death. • RY10-4 induced autophagy in MCF-7 cell through the Akt/mTOR pathway. • We provided new insights for the mechanism of RY10-4 induced cell death.

  4. TRAIL restores DCA/metformin-mediated cell death in hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sung-Eun; Kim, Chang Soon; An, Sungkwan; Kim, Hyun-Ah; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Song, Jie-Young; Lee, Jin Kyung; Hong, Jungil; Kim, Jong-Il; Noh, Woo Chul; Jin, Hyeon-Ok; Park, In-Chul

    2016-09-23

    Previous studies have shown that hypoxia can reverse DCA/metformin-induced cell death in breast cancer cells. Therefore, targeting hypoxia is necessary for therapies targeting cancer metabolism. In the present study, we found that TRAIL can overcome the effect of hypoxia on the cell death induced by treatment of DCA and metformin in breast cancer cells. Unexpectedly, DR5 is upregulated in the cells treated with DCA/metformin, and sustained under hypoxia. Blocking DR5 by siRNA inhibited DCA/metformin/TRAIL-induced cell death, indicating that DR5 upregulation plays an important role in sensitizing cancer cells to TRAIL-induced cell death. Furthermore, we found that activation of JNK and c-Jun is responsible for upregulation of DR5 induced by DCA/metformin. These findings support the potential application of combining TRAIL and metabolism-targeting drugs in the treatment of cancers under hypoxia. PMID:27569287

  5. Comparative study between the photodynamic ability of gold and silver nanoparticles in mediating cell death in breast and lung cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    El-Hussein, Ahmed; Mfouo-Tynga, Ivan; Abdel-Harith, Mohamed; Abrahamse, Heidi

    2015-12-01

    Cancer is one of the dreadest diseases once diagnosed and has severe impacts on health, social and economic global aspects. Nanomedicine is considered an emerging approach for early cancer diagnosis and treatment. The multifunctional effects of silver and gold nanoparticles (Ag and Au NPs) have rendered them to be potent candidates for biomedical applications. The current work presents a comparative study between Au NPs and Ag NPs as possible potent photosensitizers (PS) in photodynamic therapy (PDT). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to identify and characterize the shape, size, and cellular localization of Au NPs; the absorption properties of Au NPs were determined using ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis) and zeta potential was used to identify surface charge. Inverted light microscopy (LM), Trypan blue exclusion assay, adenosine triphosphate luminescence (ATP), and lactate dehydrogenase membrane integrity assays (LDH) were used for investigating the photodynamic ability of these nanostructures on breast (MCF-7) and lung (A549) cancer cell lines. Flow cytometry using Annexin V and propidium iodide (PI) dyes was used to determine the cell death pathway induced. The average size of the synthesized Au NPs was 50 nm, having an absorption peak at 540 nm with -7.85 mV surface net charge. MCF-7 and A549 cells were able to absorb the Au NPs. The latter, when irradiated with laser light in the phototherapeutic window, promoted cytotoxicity and a significant reduction in cell viability and proliferation were observed. The photodynamic activity that was observed in both cancer cell lines was found to be less eminent than that observed in case of the Ag NPs when compared to Au NPs. The present study is the first that compares the photodynamic ability of two different nanoparticles, silver and gold, as photosensitizers without any further functionalization. This study extends the possibilities of using such nanostructures in PDT within the therapeutic

  6. Comparative study between the photodynamic ability of gold and silver nanoparticles in mediating cell death in breast and lung cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    El-Hussein, Ahmed; Mfouo-Tynga, Ivan; Abdel-Harith, Mohamed; Abrahamse, Heidi

    2015-12-01

    Cancer is one of the dreadest diseases once diagnosed and has severe impacts on health, social and economic global aspects. Nanomedicine is considered an emerging approach for early cancer diagnosis and treatment. The multifunctional effects of silver and gold nanoparticles (Ag and Au NPs) have rendered them to be potent candidates for biomedical applications. The current work presents a comparative study between Au NPs and Ag NPs as possible potent photosensitizers (PS) in photodynamic therapy (PDT). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to identify and characterize the shape, size, and cellular localization of Au NPs; the absorption properties of Au NPs were determined using ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis) and zeta potential was used to identify surface charge. Inverted light microscopy (LM), Trypan blue exclusion assay, adenosine triphosphate luminescence (ATP), and lactate dehydrogenase membrane integrity assays (LDH) were used for investigating the photodynamic ability of these nanostructures on breast (MCF-7) and lung (A549) cancer cell lines. Flow cytometry using Annexin V and propidium iodide (PI) dyes was used to determine the cell death pathway induced. The average size of the synthesized Au NPs was 50 nm, having an absorption peak at 540 nm with -7.85 mV surface net charge. MCF-7 and A549 cells were able to absorb the Au NPs. The latter, when irradiated with laser light in the phototherapeutic window, promoted cytotoxicity and a significant reduction in cell viability and proliferation were observed. The photodynamic activity that was observed in both cancer cell lines was found to be less eminent than that observed in case of the Ag NPs when compared to Au NPs. The present study is the first that compares the photodynamic ability of two different nanoparticles, silver and gold, as photosensitizers without any further functionalization. This study extends the possibilities of using such nanostructures in PDT within the therapeutic

  7. Photosensitizer effect of 9-hydroxypheophorbide α on diode laser-irradiated laryngeal cancer cells: Oxidative stress-directed cell death and migration suppression

    PubMed Central

    He, Peijie; Bo, Shen; Chung, Phil-Sang; Ahn, Jin-Chul; Zhou, Liang

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effect, and elucidate the potential mechanisms, of 9-hydroxypheophorbide α-based photodynamic therapy (9-HPbD-PDT) on apoptosis and necrosis induction, and migration suppression of laryngeal cancer AMC-HN-3 (HN-3) cells. Phototoxicity initiated by 9-HPbD-PDT on HN-3 cells was observed in a photosensitizer dose-dependent pattern. There was an initial increase of apoptotic cells coupled with gradual enhancement of reactive oxygen series (ROS) generation at lower doses of 9-HPbD. By contrast, at a higher dose of 9-HPbD, there was a clear increase of necrotic cells with a gradual decrease of ROS generation. Following PDT, an elevated percentage of apoptotic cells with shrinkage or condensing nuclei was observed using Hoechst 33342/propidium iodide double staining, and an upregulated expression of poly ADP-ribose polymerase was detected through western blotting. A disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential was detected 2 h following PDT. Significant suppression of cell migration and downregulation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression were recorded following PDT. These results indicate that the distribution of photosensitizer leads to differences in the generation of ROS, which subsequently determines the type of cell death. Overall, mitochondrial activation under oxidative stress is important in the 9-HPbD-PDT-induced apoptosis of HN-3 cells. Migration suppression of HN-3 cells following PDT may be associated with the inhibited expression of EGFR, due to oxidative stress. PMID:27588136

  8. Proteomic analysis of novel targets associated with the enhancement of TrkA-induced SK-N-MC cancer cell death caused by NGF

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Eun Joo; Chung, Ky Hyun; Bae, Dong-Won; Kim, Choong Won

    2016-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is known to regulate both cancer cell survival and death signaling, depending on the cellular circumstances, in various cell types. In this study, we showed that NGF strongly upregulated the protein level of tropomyosin-related kinase A (TrkA) in TrkA-inducible SK-N-MC cancer cells, resulting in increases in various TrkA-dependent cellular processes, including the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and caspase-8 cleavage. In addition, NGF enhanced TrkA-induced morphological changes and cell death, and this effect was significantly suppressed by the JNK inhibitor SP600125, but not by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor wortmannin. To investigate novel targets associated with the enhancement of TrkA-induced SK-N-MC cell death caused by NGF, we performed Coomassie Brilliant Blue staining and two-dimensional (2D) proteomic analysis in TrkA-inducible SK-N-MC cells. We identified 31 protein spots that were either greatly upregulated or downregulated by TrkA during NGF treatment using matrix-associated laser desorption/ionization time of flight/time of flight mass spectrometry, and we analyzed the effects of SP600125 and wortmannin on the spots. Interestingly, 11 protein spots, including heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K), lamin B1 and TAR DNA-binding protein (TDP43), were significantly influenced by SP600125, but not by wortmannin. Moreover, the NGF/TrkA-dependent inhibition of cell viability was significantly enhanced by knockdown of hnRNP K using small interfering RNA, demonstrating that hnRNP K is a novel target associated with the regulation of TrkA-dependent SK-N-MC cancer cell death enhanced by NGF. PMID:27229480

  9. SMAC Mimetic Birinapant plus Radiation Eradicates Human Head and Neck Cancers with Genomic Amplifications of Cell Death Genes FADD and BIRC2.

    PubMed

    Eytan, Danielle F; Snow, Grace E; Carlson, Sophie; Derakhshan, Adeeb; Saleh, Anthony; Schiltz, Stephen; Cheng, Hui; Mohan, Suresh; Cornelius, Shaleeka; Coupar, Jamie; Sowers, Anastasia L; Hernandez, Lidia; Mitchell, James B; Annunziata, Christina M; Chen, Zhong; Van Waes, Carter

    2016-09-15

    Comparison of tumors from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) reveals that head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) harbor the most frequent genomic amplifications of Fas-associated death domain (FADD), with or without Baculovirus inhibitor of apoptosis repeat containing BIRC2 (cIAP1), affecting about 30% of patients in association with worse prognosis. Here, we identified HNSCC cell lines harboring FADD/BIRC2 amplifications and overexpression by exome sequencing, RT-PCR, and Western blotting. In vitro, FADD or BIRC2 siRNA knockdown inhibited HNSCC displaying amplification and increased expression of these genes, supporting their functional importance in promoting proliferation. Birinapant, a novel SMAC mimetic, sensitized multiple HNSCC lines to cell death by agonists TNFα or TRAIL and inhibited cIAP1>XIAP>IAP2. Combination of birinapant and TNFα induced sub-G0 DNA fragmentation in sensitive lines and birinapant alone also induced significant G2-M cell-cycle arrest and cell death in UM-SCC-46 cells. Gene transfer and expression of FADD sensitized resistant UM-SCC-38 cells lacking FADD amplification to birinapant and TNFα, supporting a role for FADD in sensitization to IAP inhibitor and death ligands. HNSCC varied in mechanisms of cell death, as indicated by reversal by inhibitors or protein markers of caspase-dependent apoptosis and/or RIPK1/MLKL-mediated necroptosis. In vivo, birinapant inhibited tumor growth and enhanced radiation-induced TNFα, tumor responses, and host survival in UM-SCC-46 and -11B xenograft models displaying amplification and overexpression of FADD+/- BIRC2 These findings suggest that combination of SMAC mimetics such as birinapant plus radiation may be particularly active in HNSCC, which harbor frequent FADD/BIRC2 genomic alterations. Cancer Res; 76(18); 5442-54. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27469115

  10. Immunomodulatory Protein from Ganoderma microsporum Induces Pro-Death Autophagy through Akt-mTOR-p70S6K Pathway Inhibition in Multidrug Resistant Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Ling-Yen; Hu, Ming-E; Yang, Tsung-Ying; Hsin, I-Lun; Ko, Jiunn-Liang; Tsai, Kan-Jen; Sheu, Gwo-Tarng

    2015-01-01

    Chemoresistance in cancer therapy is an unfavorable prognostic factor in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Elevation of intracellular calcium level in multidrug resistant (MDR) sublines leads to sensitization of MDR sublines to cell death. We demonstrated that a fungal protein from Ganoderma microsporum, GMI, elevates the intracellular calcium level and reduces the growth of MDR subline via autophagy and apoptosis, regardless of p-glycoprotein (P-gp) overexpression, in mice xenograft tumors. In addition, we examined the roles of autophagy in the death of MDR A549 lung cancer sublines by GMI, thapsigargin (TG) and tunicamycin (TM) in vitro. Cytotoxicity of TG was inhibited by overexpressed P-gp. However, TM-induced death of MDR sublines was independent of P-gp level. Combinations of TG and TM with either docetaxel or vincristine showed no additional cytotoxic effects on MDR sublines. TG- and TM-mediated apoptosis of MDR sublines was demonstrated on Annexin-V assay and Western blot and repressed by pan-caspase inhibitor (Z-VAD-FMK). Treatment of MDR sublines with TG and TM also augmented autophagy with accumulation of LC3-II proteins, breakdown of p62 and formation of acidic vesicular organelles (AVOs). Inhibition of ATG5 by shRNA silencing significantly reduced autophagy and cell death but not apoptosis following TG or TM treatment. GMI treatment inhibited the phosphorylation of Akt/S473 and p70S6K/T389. Interestingly, the phosphorylation of ERK was not associated with GMI-induced autophagy. We conclude that autophagy plays a pro-death role in acquired MDR and upregulation of autophagy by GMI via Akt/mTOR inhibition provides a potential strategy for overcoming MDR in the treatment of lung cancers.

  11. Recombinant FIP-gat, a Fungal Immunomodulatory Protein from Ganoderma atrum, Induces Growth Inhibition and Cell Death in Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hui; Kong, Ying-Yu; Chen, Xin; Guo, Meng-Yuan; Bai, Xiao-Hui; Lu, Yu-Jia; Li, Wei; Zhou, Xuan-Wei

    2016-04-01

    FIP-gat, an immunomodulatory protein isolated from Ganoderma atrum, is a new member of the FIP family. Little is known, however, about its expressional properties and antitumor activities. It was availably expressed in Escherichia coli with a total yield of 29.75 mg/L. The migration of recombinant FIP-gat (rFIP-gat) on SDS-PAGE corresponded to the predicted molecular mass, and the band was correctly detected by a specific antibody. To characterize the direct effects of rFIP-gat on MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, MDA-MB-231 cells were treated with different concentrations of rFIP-gat in vitro; the results showed that this protein could reduce cell viability dose-dependently with a median inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 9.96 μg/mL and agglutinate the MDA-MB-231 cells at a concentration as low as 5 μg/mL. Furthermore, FIP-gat at a concentration of 10 μg/mL can induce significant growth inhibition and cell death in MDA-MB-231 cells. Notably, FIP-gat treatment triggers significant cell cycle arrest at the G1/S transition and pronounced increase in apoptotic cell population. Molecular assays based on microarray and real-time PCR further revealed the potential mechanisms encompassing growth arrest, apoptosis, and autophagy underlying the phenotypic effects. PMID:26996414

  12. Improved cytotoxicity and preserved level of cell death induced in colon cancer cells by doxorubicin after its conjugation with iron-oxide magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Augustin, Ewa; Czubek, Bartłomiej; Nowicka, Anna M; Kowalczyk, Agata; Stojek, Zbigniew; Mazerska, Zofia

    2016-06-01

    A promising strategy for overcoming the problem of limited efficacy in antitumor drug delivery and in drug release is the use of a nanoparticle-conjugated drug. Doxorubicin (Dox) anticancer chemotherapeutics has been widely studied in this respect, because of severe cardiotoxic side effects. Here, we investigated the cytotoxic effects, the uptake process, the changes in cell cycle progression and the cell death processes in the presence of iron-oxide magnetic nanoparticles (Nps) and doxorubicin conjugates (Dox-Nps) in human colon HT29 cells. The amount of Dox participated in biological action of Dox-Nps was determined by cyclic voltammetry and thermogravimetric measurements. The cytotoxicity of Dox-Nps was shown to be two/three times higher than free Dox, whereas Nps alone did not inhibit cell proliferation. Dox-Nps penetrated cancer cells with higher efficacy than free Dox, what could be a consequence of Dox-Nps aggregation with proteins in culture medium and/or with cell surface. The treatment of HT29 cells with Dox-Nps and Dox at IC50 concentration resulted in G2/M arrest followed by late apoptosis and necrosis. Summing up, the application of iron-oxide magnetic nanoparticles improved Dox-Nps cell penetration compared to free Dox and achieved the cellular response to Dox-Nps conjugates similar to that of Dox alone. PMID:26911730

  13. Characterization of the Interactions between Calmodulin and Death Receptor 5 in Triple-negative and Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer Cells: AN INTEGRATED EXPERIMENTAL AND COMPUTATIONAL STUDY.

    PubMed

    Fancy, Romone M; Wang, Lingyun; Zeng, Qinghua; Wang, Hong; Zhou, Tong; Buchsbaum, Donald J; Song, Yuhua

    2016-06-10

    Activation of death receptor-5 (DR5) leads to the formation of death inducing signaling complex (DISC) for apoptotic signaling. Targeting DR5 to induce breast cancer apoptosis is a promising strategy to circumvent drug resistance and present a target for breast cancer treatment. Calmodulin (CaM) has been shown to regulate DR5-mediated apoptotic signaling, however, its mechanism remains unknown. In this study, we characterized CaM and DR5 interactions in breast cancer cells with integrated experimental and computational approaches. Results show that CaM directly binds to DR5 in a calcium dependent manner in breast cancer cells. The direct interaction of CaM with DR5 is localized at DR5 death domain. We have predicted and verified the CaM-binding site in DR5 being (354)WEPLMRKLGL(363) that is located at the α2 helix and the loop between α2 helix and α3 helix of DR5 DD. The residues of Trp-354, Arg-359, Glu-355, Leu-363, and Glu-367 in DR5 death domain that are important for DR5 recruitment of FADD and caspase-8 for DISC formation to signal apoptosis also play an important role for CaM-DR5 binding. The changed electrostatic potential distribution in the CaM-binding site in DR5 DD by the point mutations of W354A, E355K, R359A, L363N, or E367K in DR5 DD could directly contribute to the experimentally observed decreased CaM-DR5 binding by the point mutations of the key residues in DR5 DD. Results from this study provide a key step for the further investigation of the role of CaM-DR5 binding in DR5-mediated DISC formation for apoptosis in breast cancer cells.

  14. Delivery of carboplatin by carbon-based nanocontainers mediates increased cancer cell death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arlt, M.; Haase, D.; Hampel, S.; Oswald, S.; Bachmatiuk, A.; Klingeler, R.; Schulze, R.; Ritschel, M.; Leonhardt, A.; Fuessel, S.; Büchner, B.; Kraemer, K.; Wirth, M. P.

    2010-08-01

    Since the activity of several conventional anticancer drugs is restricted by resistance mechanisms and dose-limiting side-effects, the design of nanocarriers seems to be an efficient and promising approach for drug delivery. Their chemical and mechanical stability and their possible multifunctionality render tubular nanomaterials, such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and carbon nanofibres (CNFs), promising delivery agents for anticancer drugs. The goal of the present study was to investigate CNTs and CNFs in order to deliver carboplatin in vitro. No significant intrinsic toxicity of unloaded materials was found, confirming their biocompatibility. Carboplatin was loaded onto CNTs and CNFs, revealing a loading yield of 0.20 mg (CNT-CP) and 0.13 mg (CNF-CP) platinum per milligram of material. The platinum release depended on the carrier material. Whereas CNF-CP marginally released the drug, CNT-CP functioned as a drug depot, constantly releasing up to 68% within 14 days. The cytotoxicity of CNT-CP and CNF-CP in urological tumour cell lines was dependent on the drug release. CNT-CP was identified to be more effective than CNF-CP concerning the impairment of proliferation and clonogenic survival of tumour cells. Moreover, carboplatin, which was delivered by CNT-CP, exhibited a higher anticancer activity than free carboplatin.

  15. HSP90 Inhibition Enhances Antimitotic Drug-Induced Mitotic Arrest and Cell Death in Preclinical Models of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Brenda C.; O'Callaghan, Katie; Tillotson, Bonnie; Douglas, Mark; Hafeez, Nafeeza; West, Kip A.; Stern, Howard; Ali, Janid A.; Changelian, Paul; Fritz, Christian C.; Palombella, Vito J.; McGovern, Karen; Kutok, Jeffery L.

    2014-01-01

    HSP90 inhibitors are currently undergoing clinical evaluation in combination with antimitotic drugs in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), but little is known about the cellular effects of this novel drug combination. Therefore, we investigated the molecular mechanism of action of IPI-504 (retaspimycin HCl), a potent and selective inhibitor of HSP90, in combination with the microtubule targeting agent (MTA) docetaxel, in preclinical models of NSCLC. We identified a subset of NSCLC cell lines in which these drugs act in synergy to enhance cell death. Xenograft models of NSCLC demonstrated tumor growth inhibition, and in some cases, regression in response to combination treatment. Treatment with IPI-504 enhanced the antimitotic effects of docetaxel leading to the hypothesis that the mitotic checkpoint is required for the response to drug combination. Supporting this hypothesis, overriding the checkpoint with an Aurora kinase inhibitor diminished the cell death synergy of IPI-504 and docetaxel. To investigate the molecular basis of synergy, an unbiased stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) proteomic approach was employed. Several mitotic regulators, including components of the ubiquitin ligase, anaphase promoting complex (APC/C), were specifically down-regulated in response to combination treatment. Loss of APC/C by RNAi sensitized cells to docetaxel and enhanced its antimitotic effects. Treatment with a PLK1 inhibitor (BI2536) also sensitized cells to IPI-504, indicating that combination effects may be broadly applicable to other classes of mitotic inhibitors. Our data provide a preclinical rationale for testing the combination of IPI-504 and docetaxel in NSCLC. PMID:25542032

  16. Programmed cell death in protists.

    PubMed

    Deponte, Marcel

    2008-07-01

    Programmed cell death in protists does not seem to make sense at first sight. However, apoptotic markers in unicellular organisms have been observed in all but one of the six/eight major groups of eukaryotes suggesting an ancient evolutionary origin of this regulated process. This review summarizes the available data on apoptotic markers in non-opisthokonts and elucidates potential functions and evolution of programmed cell death. A newly discovered family of caspase-like proteases, the metacaspases, is considered to exert the function of caspases in unicellular organisms. Important results on metacaspases, however, showed that they cannot be always correlated to the measured proteolytic activity during protist cell death. Thus, a major challenge for apoptosis research in a variety of protists remains the identification of the molecular cell death machinery.

  17. Inactivation of BRCA2 in human cancer cells identifies a subset of tumors with enhanced sensitivity towards death receptormediated apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    De Toni, Enrico N.; Ziesch, Andreas; Rizzani, Antonia; Török, Helga-Paula; Hocke, Sandra; Lü, Shuai; Wang, Shao-Chun; Hucl, Tomas; Göke, Burkhard; Bruns, Christiane; Gallmeier, Eike

    2016-01-01

    Purpose DNA repair defects due to detrimental BRCA2-mutations confer increased susceptibility towards DNA interstrand-crosslinking (ICL) agents and define patient subpopulations for individualized genotype-based cancer therapy. However, due to the side effects of these drugs, there is a need to identify additional agents, which could be used alone or in combination with ICL-agents. Therefore, we investigated whether BRCA2-mutations might also increase the sensitivity towards TRAIL-receptors (TRAIL-R)-targeting compounds. Experimental design Two independent model systems were applied: a BRCA2 gene knockout and a BRCA2 gene complementation model. The effects of TRAIL-R-targeting compounds and ICL-agents on cell viability, apoptosis and cell cycle distribution were compared in BRCA2-proficient versus-deficient cancer cells in vitro. In addition, the effects of the TRAIL-R2-targeting antibody LBY135 were assessed in vivo using a murine tumor xenograft model. Results BRCA2-deficient cancer cells displayed an increased sensitivity towards TRAIL-R-targeting agents. These effects exceeded and were mechanistically distinguishable from the well-established effects of ICL-agents. In vitro, ICL-agents expectedly induced an early cell cycle arrest followed by delayed apoptosis, whereas TRAIL-R-targeting compounds caused early apoptosis without prior cell cycle arrest. In vivo, treatment with LBY135 significantly reduced the tumor growth of BRCA2-deficient cancer cells in a xenograft model. Conclusions BRCA2 mutations strongly increase the in vitro- and in vivo-sensitivity of cancer cells towards TRAIL-R-mediated apoptosis. This effect is mechanistically distinguishable from the well-established ICL-hypersensitivity of BRCA2-deficient cells. Our study thus defines a new genetic subpopulation of cancers susceptible towards TRAIL-R-targeting compounds, which could facilitate novel therapeutic approaches for patients with BRCA2-deficient tumors. PMID:26843614

  18. Lung cancer death rates fall, helping drive decrease in overall cancer death rates

    Cancer.gov

    The Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, covering the period 1975–2010, showed death rates for lung cancer, which accounts for more than one in four cancer deaths, dropping at a faster pace than in previous years.

  19. Simulating hypoxia-induced acidic environment in cancer cells facilitates mobilization and redox-cycling of genomic copper by daidzein leading to pro-oxidant cell death: implications for the sensitization of resistant hypoxic cancer cells to therapeutic challenges.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Mohammad F; Ahmad, Aamir; Bhat, Showket H; Khan, Husain Y; Zubair, Haseeb; Sarkar, Fazlul H; Hadi, Sheikh M

    2016-04-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the mechanism of action involved in the anti-cancer activity of daidzein and identification of cancer specific micro-environment as therapeutic target of this secondary metabolite derived from soy. Our data indicated that daidzein induces cellular DNA breakage, anti-proliferative effects and apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. We demonstrated that such a daidzein-induced anti-cancer action involves a copper-dependant pathway in which endogenous copper is mobilized by daidzein and redox-cycled to generate reactive oxygen species which act as an upstream signal leading to pro-oxidant cell death. Further in the context of hypoxia being a resistant factor against standard therapies and that an effect secondary to hypoxia is the intracellular acidification, we show that the anticancer activity of daidzein is modulated positively in acidic pH but copper-specific chelator is still able to inhibit daidzein activity. Moreover, an experimental setup of hypoxia mimic (cobalt chloride) revealed an enhanced sensitivity of cancer cells to the cytotoxic effects of daidzein which was neutralized in the presence of neocuproine. The findings support a paradigm shift from the conventional antioxidant property of dietary isoflavones to molecules capable of initiating a pro-oxidant signaling mediated by reactive oxygen species. Further, the clinical relevance of such an action mechanism in cancer chemoprevention is also proposed. This study identified endogenous copper as a molecular target and acidic pH as a modulating factor for the therapeutic activity of daidzein against cancer. The evidence presented highlights the potential of dietary agents as adjuvants to standard therapeutic regimens. PMID:26872803

  20. Simulating hypoxia-induced acidic environment in cancer cells facilitates mobilization and redox-cycling of genomic copper by daidzein leading to pro-oxidant cell death: implications for the sensitization of resistant hypoxic cancer cells to therapeutic challenges.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Mohammad F; Ahmad, Aamir; Bhat, Showket H; Khan, Husain Y; Zubair, Haseeb; Sarkar, Fazlul H; Hadi, Sheikh M

    2016-04-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the mechanism of action involved in the anti-cancer activity of daidzein and identification of cancer specific micro-environment as therapeutic target of this secondary metabolite derived from soy. Our data indicated that daidzein induces cellular DNA breakage, anti-proliferative effects and apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. We demonstrated that such a daidzein-induced anti-cancer action involves a copper-dependant pathway in which endogenous copper is mobilized by daidzein and redox-cycled to generate reactive oxygen species which act as an upstream signal leading to pro-oxidant cell death. Further in the context of hypoxia being a resistant factor against standard therapies and that an effect secondary to hypoxia is the intracellular acidification, we show that the anticancer activity of daidzein is modulated positively in acidic pH but copper-specific chelator is still able to inhibit daidzein activity. Moreover, an experimental setup of hypoxia mimic (cobalt chloride) revealed an enhanced sensitivity of cancer cells to the cytotoxic effects of daidzein which was neutralized in the presence of neocuproine. The findings support a paradigm shift from the conventional antioxidant property of dietary isoflavones to molecules capable of initiating a pro-oxidant signaling mediated by reactive oxygen species. Further, the clinical relevance of such an action mechanism in cancer chemoprevention is also proposed. This study identified endogenous copper as a molecular target and acidic pH as a modulating factor for the therapeutic activity of daidzein against cancer. The evidence presented highlights the potential of dietary agents as adjuvants to standard therapeutic regimens.

  1. Calix[6]arene bypasses human pancreatic cancer aggressiveness: downregulation of receptor tyrosine kinases and induction of cell death by reticulum stress and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Pelizzaro-Rocha, Karin Juliane; de Jesus, Marcelo Bispo; Ruela-de-Sousa, Roberta Regina; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; Reis, Fabiano Souza; de Fátima, Angelo; Ferreira-Halder, Carmen Veríssima

    2013-12-01

    Pancreatic cancer ranks fourth among cancer-related causes of death in North America. Minimal progress has been made in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with late-stage tumors. Moreover, pancreatic cancer aggressiveness is closely related to high levels of pro-survival mediators, which can ultimately lead to rapid disease progression, resistance and metastasis. The main goal of this study was to define the mechanisms by which calix[6]arene, but not other calixarenes, efficiently decreases the aggressiveness of a drug resistant human pancreas carcinoma cell line (Panc-1). Calix[6]arene was more potent in reducing Panc-1 cell viability than gemcitabine and 5-fluorouracil. In relation to the underlying mechanisms of cytotoxic effects, it led to cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase through downregulation of PIM1, CDK2, CDK4 and retinoblastoma proteins. Importantly, calix[6]arene abolished signal transduction of Mer and AXL tyrosine kinase receptors, both of which are usually overexpressed in pancreatic cancer. Accordingly, inhibition of PI3K and mTOR was also observed, and these proteins are positively modulated by Mer and AXL. Despite decreasing the phosphorylation of AKT at Thr308, calix[6]arene caused an increase in phosphorylation at Ser473. These findings in conjunction with increased BiP and IRE1-α provide a molecular basis explaining the capacity of calix[6]arene to trigger endoplasmic reticulum stress and autophagic cell death. Our findings highlight calix[6]arene as a potential candidate for overcoming pancreatic cancer aggressiveness. Importantly, we provide evidence that calix[6]arene affects a broad array of key targets that are usually dysfunctional in pancreatic cancer, a highly desirable characteristic for chemotherapeutics. PMID:23872419

  2. Calix[6]arene bypasses human pancreatic cancer aggressiveness: downregulation of receptor tyrosine kinases and induction of cell death by reticulum stress and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Pelizzaro-Rocha, Karin Juliane; de Jesus, Marcelo Bispo; Ruela-de-Sousa, Roberta Regina; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; Reis, Fabiano Souza; de Fátima, Angelo; Ferreira-Halder, Carmen Veríssima

    2013-12-01

    Pancreatic cancer ranks fourth among cancer-related causes of death in North America. Minimal progress has been made in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with late-stage tumors. Moreover, pancreatic cancer aggressiveness is closely related to high levels of pro-survival mediators, which can ultimately lead to rapid disease progression, resistance and metastasis. The main goal of this study was to define the mechanisms by which calix[6]arene, but not other calixarenes, efficiently decreases the aggressiveness of a drug resistant human pancreas carcinoma cell line (Panc-1). Calix[6]arene was more potent in reducing Panc-1 cell viability than gemcitabine and 5-fluorouracil. In relation to the underlying mechanisms of cytotoxic effects, it led to cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase through downregulation of PIM1, CDK2, CDK4 and retinoblastoma proteins. Importantly, calix[6]arene abolished signal transduction of Mer and AXL tyrosine kinase receptors, both of which are usually overexpressed in pancreatic cancer. Accordingly, inhibition of PI3K and mTOR was also observed, and these proteins are positively modulated by Mer and AXL. Despite decreasing the phosphorylation of AKT at Thr308, calix[6]arene caused an increase in phosphorylation at Ser473. These findings in conjunction with increased BiP and IRE1-α provide a molecular basis explaining the capacity of calix[6]arene to trigger endoplasmic reticulum stress and autophagic cell death. Our findings highlight calix[6]arene as a potential candidate for overcoming pancreatic cancer aggressiveness. Importantly, we provide evidence that calix[6]arene affects a broad array of key targets that are usually dysfunctional in pancreatic cancer, a highly desirable characteristic for chemotherapeutics.

  3. Programmed cell death ligand-1 (PD-L1) expression by immunohistochemistry: could it be predictive and/or prognostic in non-small cell lung cancer?

    PubMed

    Mino-Kenudson, Mari

    2016-06-01

    Blockade of immune checkpoints has recently emerged as a novel therapeutic strategy in various tumors. In particular, monoclonal antibodies targeting programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) or its ligand (PD-L1) have been most studied in lung cancer, and PD-1 inhibitors are now established agents in the management of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The reports on high-profile clinical trials have shown the association of PD-L1 expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) with higher overall response rates to the PD-1/PD-L1 axis blockade suggesting that PD-L1 expression may serve as a predictive marker. Unfortunately, however, each PD-1 or PD-L1 inhibitor is coupled with a specific PD-L1 antibody, IHC protocol and scoring system for the biomarker assessment, making the head-to-head comparison of the studies difficult. Similarly, multiple clinical series that correlated PD-L1 expression with clinicopathologic and/or molecular variables and/or survival have reported conflicting results. The discrepancy could be explained by the differences in ethnicity and/or histologic types included in the studies, but it appears to be attributed in part to the differences in PD-L1 IHC methods. Thus, orchestrated efforts to standardize the PD-L1 IHC are warranted to establish the IHC as a predictive and/or prognostic biomarker in NSCLC. PMID:27458525

  4. Programmed cell death ligand-1 (PD-L1) expression by immunohistochemistry: could it be predictive and/or prognostic in non-small cell lung cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Mino-Kenudson, Mari

    2016-01-01

    Blockade of immune checkpoints has recently emerged as a novel therapeutic strategy in various tumors. In particular, monoclonal antibodies targeting programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) or its ligand (PD-L1) have been most studied in lung cancer, and PD-1 inhibitors are now established agents in the management of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The reports on high-profile clinical trials have shown the association of PD-L1 expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) with higher overall response rates to the PD-1/PD-L1 axis blockade suggesting that PD-L1 expression may serve as a predictive marker. Unfortunately, however, each PD-1 or PD-L1 inhibitor is coupled with a specific PD-L1 antibody, IHC protocol and scoring system for the biomarker assessment, making the head-to-head comparison of the studies difficult. Similarly, multiple clinical series that correlated PD-L1 expression with clinicopathologic and/or molecular variables and/or survival have reported conflicting results. The discrepancy could be explained by the differences in ethnicity and/or histologic types included in the studies, but it appears to be attributed in part to the differences in PD-L1 IHC methods. Thus, orchestrated efforts to standardize the PD-L1 IHC are warranted to establish the IHC as a predictive and/or prognostic biomarker in NSCLC. PMID:27458525

  5. The miR-27a-calreticulin axis affects drug-induced immunogenic cell death in human colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Colangelo, T; Polcaro, G; Ziccardi, P; Muccillo, L; Galgani, M; Pucci, B; Rita Milone, M; Budillon, A; Santopaolo, M; Mazzoccoli, G; Matarese, G; Sabatino, L; Colantuoni, V

    2016-01-01

    Immunogenic cell death (ICD) evoked by chemotherapeutic agents implies emission of selected damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMP) such as cell surface exposure of calreticulin, secretion of ATP and HMGB1. We sought to verify whether miR-27a is implicated in ICD, having demonstrated that it directly targets calreticulin. To this goal, we exposed colorectal cancer cell lines, genetically modified to express high or low miR-27a levels, to two bona fide ICD inducers (mitoxantrone and oxaliplatin). Low miR-27a-expressing cells displayed more ecto-calreticulin on the cell surface and increased ATP and HMGB1 secretion than high miR-27a-expressing ones in time-course experiments upon drug exposure. A calreticulin target protector counteracted the miR-27a effects while specific siRNAs mimicked them, confirming the results reported. In addition, miR-27a negatively influenced the PERK-mediated route and the late PI3K-dependent secretory step of the unfolded protein response to endoplasmic reticulum stress, suggesting that miR-27a modulates the entire ICD program. Interestingly, upon chemotherapeutic exposure, low miR-27a levels associated with an earlier and stronger induction of apoptosis and with morphological and molecular features of autophagy. Remarkably, in ex vivo setting, under the same chemotherapeutic induction, the conditioned media from high miR-27a-expressing cells impeded dendritic cell maturation while increased the secretion of specific cytokines (interleukin (IL)-4, IL-6, IL-8) and negatively influenced CD4+ T-cell interferon γ production and proliferation, all markers of a tumor immunoevasion strategy. In conclusion, we provide the first evidence that miR-27a impairs the cell response to drug-induced ICD through the regulatory axis with calreticulin. PMID:26913599

  6. The miR-27a-calreticulin axis affects drug-induced immunogenic cell death in human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Colangelo, T; Polcaro, G; Ziccardi, P; Muccillo, L; Galgani, M; Pucci, B; Milone, M Rita; Budillon, A; Santopaolo, M; Mazzoccoli, G; Matarese, G; Sabatino, L; Colantuoni, V

    2016-01-01

    Immunogenic cell death (ICD) evoked by chemotherapeutic agents implies emission of selected damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMP) such as cell surface exposure of calreticulin, secretion of ATP and HMGB1. We sought to verify whether miR-27a is implicated in ICD, having demonstrated that it directly targets calreticulin. To this goal, we exposed colorectal cancer cell lines, genetically modified to express high or low miR-27a levels, to two bona fide ICD inducers (mitoxantrone and oxaliplatin). Low miR-27a-expressing cells displayed more ecto-calreticulin on the cell surface and increased ATP and HMGB1 secretion than high miR-27a-expressing ones in time-course experiments upon drug exposure. A calreticulin target protector counteracted the miR-27a effects while specific siRNAs mimicked them, confirming the results reported. In addition, miR-27a negatively influenced the PERK-mediated route and the late PI3K-dependent secretory step of the unfolded protein response to endoplasmic reticulum stress, suggesting that miR-27a modulates the entire ICD program. Interestingly, upon chemotherapeutic exposure, low miR-27a levels associated with an earlier and stronger induction of apoptosis and with morphological and molecular features of autophagy. Remarkably, in ex vivo setting, under the same chemotherapeutic induction, the conditioned media from high miR-27a-expressing cells impeded dendritic cell maturation while increased the secretion of specific cytokines (interleukin (IL)-4, IL-6, IL-8) and negatively influenced CD4(+) T-cell interferon γ production and proliferation, all markers of a tumor immunoevasion strategy. In conclusion, we provide the first evidence that miR-27a impairs the cell response to drug-induced ICD through the regulatory axis with calreticulin.

  7. Silencing of MicroRNA-21 confers the sensitivity to tamoxifen and fulvestrant by enhancing autophagic cell death through inhibition of the PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xinfeng; Li, Ruilian; Shi, Wenna; Jiang, Tao; Wang, Yufei; Li, Cong; Qu, Xianjun

    2016-02-01

    Tamoxifen (TAM) and fulvestrant (FUL) represent the major adjuvant therapy to estrogen receptor-alpha positive (ER(+)) breast cancer patients. However, endocrine resistance to TAM and FUL is a great impediment for successful treatment. We hypothesized that miR-21 might alter the sensitivity of breast cancer cells to TAM or FUL by regulating cell autophagy. Using the ER(+) breast cancer cells, we knockdown miR-21.by transfection with miR-21 inhibitor, then the cells were exposed to TAM or FUL and the percentages of apoptosis and autophagy were determined. Knockdown of miR-21 significantly increased the TAM or FUL-induced apoptosis in ER(+) breast cancer cells. Further, silencing of miR-21 in MCF-7 cells enhanced cell autophagy at both basal and TAM or FUL-induced level. The increase of autophagy in miR-21-knockdown MCF-7 cells was also indicated by increase of beclin-1, LC3-II and increased GFP-LC3 dots. Importantly, knockdown of miR-21 contributed to autophagic cell death, which is responsible for part of TAM induced cell death in miR-21 inhibitor-transfected cells. Further analysis suggested that miR-21 inhibitor enhance autophagic cell death through inhibition of PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway. MiR-21 coordinated the function of autophagy and apoptosis by targeting Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) through inhibition of PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway. In conclusion, silencing of miR-21 increased the sensitivity of ER(+) breast cancer cells to TAM or FUL by increasing autophagic cell death. Targeting autophagy-related miRNAs is a potential strategy for overcoming endocrine resistance to TAM and FUL.

  8. Expression of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ (PPARγ) in Human Transitional Bladder Cancer and its Role in Inducing Cell Death1

    PubMed Central

    Guan, You-Fei; Zhang, Ya-Hua; Breyer, Richard M; Davis, Linda; Breyer, Matthew D

    1999-01-01

    Abstract The present study examined the expression and role of the thiazolidinedione (TZD)-activated transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), in human bladder cancers. In situ hybridization shows that PPARγ mRNA is highly expressed in all human transitional epithelial cell cancers (TCCa's) studied (n=11). PPARγ was also expressed in five TCCa cell lines as determined by RNase protection assays and immunoblot. Retinoid X receptor α (RXRα), a 9-cis-retinoic acid stimulated (9-cis-RA) heterodimeric partner of PPARγ, was also co-expressed in all TCCa tissues and cell lines. Treatment of the T24 bladder cancer cells with the TZD PPARγ agonist troglitazone, dramatically inhibited 3H-thymidine incorporation and induced cell death. Addition of the RXRα ligands, 9-cis-RA or LG100268, sensitized T24 bladder cancer cells to the lethal effect of troglitazone and two other PPARγ activators, ciglitazone and 15-deoxy-Δ2,14-PGJ2 (15dPGJ2). Troglitazone treatment increased expression of two cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, P21WAF1/CIP1 and p16INK4, and reduced cyclin D1 expression, consistent with G1 arrest. Troglitazone also induced an endogenous PPARγ target gene in T24 cells, adipocyte-type fatty acid binding protein (A-FABP), the expression of which correlates with bladder cancer differentiation. In situ hybridization shows that A-FABP expression is localized to normal uroepithelial cells as well as some TCCa's. Taken together, these results demonstrate that PPARγ is expressed in human TCCa where it may play a role in regulating TCCa differentiation and survival, thereby providing a potential target for therapy of uroepithelial cancers. PMID:10935488

  9. Chemotherapy Induces Programmed Cell Death-Ligand 1 Overexpression via the Nuclear Factor-κB to Foster an Immunosuppressive Tumor Microenvironment in Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jin; Hamanishi, Junzo; Matsumura, Noriomi; Abiko, Kaoru; Murat, Kumuruz; Baba, Tsukasa; Yamaguchi, Ken; Horikawa, Naoki; Hosoe, Yuko; Murphy, Susan K; Konishi, Ikuo; Mandai, Masaki

    2015-12-01

    Emerging evidence has highlighted the host immune system in modulating the patient response to chemotherapy, but the mechanism of this modulation remains unclear. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of chemotherapy on antitumor immunity in the tumor microenvironment of ovarian cancer. Treatment of ovarian cancer cell lines with various chemotherapeutic agents resulted in upregulated expression of MHC class I and programmed cell death 1 ligand 1 (PD-L1) in a NF-κB-dependent manner and suppression of antigen-specific T-cell function in vitro. In a mouse model of ovarian cancer, treatment with paclitaxel increased CD8(+) T-cell infiltration into the tumor site, upregulated PD-L1 expression, and activated NF-κB signaling. In particular, tumor-bearing mice treated with a combination of paclitaxel and a PD-L1/PD-1 signal blockade survived longer than mice treated with paclitaxel alone. In summary, we found that chemotherapy induces local immune suppression in ovarian cancer through NF-κB-mediated PD-L1 upregulation. Thus, a combination of chemotherapy and immunotherapy targeting the PD-L1/PD-1 signaling axis may improve the antitumor response and offers a promising new treatment modality against ovarian cancer.

  10. Antagonizing programmed death-1 and programmed death ligand-1 as a therapeutic approach for gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaojun; Yang, Zhongxia; Latchoumanin, Olivier; Qiao, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Malignant tumor cells are equipped with mechanisms that can help them escape the surveillance by host immune system. Immune checkpoint molecules can transduce coinhibitory signals to immunocompetent cells and exert immunosuppressive roles in antitumor immunity. Programmed death-1 (PD-1) and programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1) are the two important checkpoint molecules with great potential in targeted cancer therapy. Several antibodies targeting PD-1 and PD-L1 have been approved for clinical use. In this review, we focus on the recent development of targeting PD-1 and PD-L1 in gastric cancer (GC) therapy. PMID:27803740

  11. Triggering of death receptor apoptotic signaling by human papillomavirus 16 E2 protein in cervical cancer cell lines is mediated by interaction with c-FLIP.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Fang, Yong; Sima, Ni; Li, Yan; Li, Wei; Li, Li; Han, Linfei; Liao, Shujie; Han, Zhiqiang; Gao, Qinglei; Li, Kezhen; Deng, Dongrui; Meng, Li; Zhou, Jianfeng; Wang, Shixuan; Ma, Ding

    2011-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) E2 gene disruption is one of the key features of HPV-induced cervical malignant transformation. Though it is thought to prevent progression of carcinogenesis, the pro-apoptotic function of E2 protein remains poorly understood. This study shows that expression of HPV16 E2 induces apoptosis both in HPV-positive and -negative cervical cancer cell lines and leads to hyperactivation of caspase-8 and caspase-3. Activation of these signaling factors is responsible for the observed sensitivity to apoptosis upon treatment with anti-Fas antibody or TNF-α. In addition, immunoprecipitation experiments clearly show an interaction between HPV16 E2 and c-FLIP, a key regulator of apoptotic cell death mediated by death receptor signaling. Moreover, c-FLIP and a caspase-8 inhibitor protect cells from HPV16 E2-mediated apoptosis. Overexpression of c-FLIP rescues cervical cancer cells from apoptosis induced by HPV16 E2 protein expression. The data suggest that HPV16 E2 abrogates the apoptosis-inhibitory function of c-FLIP and renders the cell hypersensitive to the Fas/FasL apoptotic signal even below threshold concentration. This suggests a novel mechanism for deregulation of cervical epithelial cell growth upon HPV-induced transformation, which is of great significance in developing therapeutic strategies for intervention of cervical carcinogenesis.

  12. Caspase-independent cell deaths.

    PubMed

    Lockshin, Richard A; Zakeri, Zahra

    2002-12-01

    A very common and the best understood of the mechanisms of physiological cell death is apoptosis, resulting from the activation, through either of two primary pathways, of site-specific proteases called caspases. There are, however, many other routes to cell death, prominently including autophagy and proteasomal degradation of critical constituents of cells. These routes are frequently seen in experimental situations in which initiator or effector caspases are inhibited or blocked through genetic means, but they are also encountered during normal physiological and pathological processes. Most frequently, autophagic or proteasomal degradation is used to eliminate massive cytoplasm of very large cells, especially post-mitotic cells, and these pathways are prominent even though caspase genes, messages, and pro-enzymes are found in the cells. These forms of cell death are fully physiological and not simply a default pathway for a defective cell; and they are distinct from necrosis. We do not yet understand the extent to which the pathways are linked, what mechanisms trigger the caspase-independent deaths, and how the choices are made.

  13. Aberrant expression and function of death receptor-3 and death decoy receptor-3 in human cancer

    PubMed Central

    GE, ZHICHENG; SANDERS, ANDREW J.; YE, LIN; JIANG, WEN G.

    2011-01-01

    Death receptor-3 (DR3) and death decoy receptor-3 (DcR3) are both members of the tumour necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) superfamily. The TNFR superfamily contains eight death domain-containing receptors, including TNFR1 (also called DR1), Fas (also called DR2), DR3, DR4, DR5, DR6, NGFR and EDAR. Upon the binding of these receptors with their corresponding ligands, the death domain recruits various proteins that mediate both the death and proliferation of cells. Receptor function is negatively regulated by decoy receptors (DcR1, DcR2, DcR3 and OPG). DR3/DcR3 are a pair of positive and negative players with which vascular endothelial growth inhibitor (VEGI) interacts. VEGI has been suggested to be a potential tumour suppressor. The inhibitory effects of VEGI on cancer are manifested in three main areas: a direct effect on cancer cells, an anti-angiogenic effect on endothelial cells, and the stimulation of dendritic cell maturation. A recent study indicated that DR3 may be a new receptor for E-selectin, which has been reported to be associated with cancer metastasis. DcR3 is a soluble receptor, highly expressed in various tumours, which lacks an apparent transmembrane segment, prevents cytokine response through ligand binding and neutralization, and is an inhibitor of apoptosis. DcR3 serves as a decoy receptor for FasL, LIGHT and VEGI. The cytokine LIGHT activates various anti-tumour functions and is expected to be a promising candidate for cancer therapy. Certain tumours may escape FasL-dependent immune-cytotoxic attack by expressing DcR3, which blocks FasL function. DR3/DcR3 play profound roles in regulating cell death and proliferation in cancer. The present review briefly discusses DR3/DcR3 and attempts to elucidate the role of these negative and positive players in cancer. PMID:22977485

  14. Regulated cell death in AKI.

    PubMed

    Linkermann, Andreas; Chen, Guochun; Dong, Guie; Kunzendorf, Ulrich; Krautwald, Stefan; Dong, Zheng

    2014-12-01

    AKI is pathologically characterized by sublethal and lethal damage of renal tubules. Under these conditions, renal tubular cell death may occur by regulated necrosis (RN) or apoptosis. In the last two decades, tubular apoptosis has been shown in preclinical models and some clinical samples from patients with AKI. Mechanistically, apoptotic cell death in AKI may result from well described extrinsic and intrinsic pathways as well as ER stress. Central converging nodes of these pathways are mitochondria, which become fragmented and sensitized to membrane permeabilization in response to cellular stress, resulting in the release of cell death-inducing factors. Whereas apoptosis is known to be regulated, tubular necrosis was thought to occur by accident until recent work unveiled several RN subroutines, most prominently receptor-interacting protein kinase-dependent necroptosis and RN induced by mitochondrial permeability transition. Additionally, other cell death pathways, like pyroptosis and ferroptosis, may also be of pathophysiologic relevance in AKI. Combination therapy targeting multiple cell-death pathways may, therefore, provide maximal therapeutic benefits. PMID:24925726

  15. Combination of PTEN and {gamma}-Ionizing Radiation Enhances Cell Death and G{sub 2}/M Arrest Through Regulation of AKT Activity and p21 Induction in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jong Kuk; Jung, Hae-Yun; Park, Seon Ho; Kang, Seung Yi; Yi, Mi-Rang; Um, Hong Duck; Hong, Sung Hee

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: To identify the role of phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) during {gamma}-ionizing radiation ({gamma}-IR) treatment for non-small-cell lung cancer cells. Methods and Materials: Wild-type PTEN or mutant forms of PTEN plasmids were transfected to construct stable transfectants of the NCI-H1299 non-small-cell lung cancer cell line. Combined effects of PTEN expression and IR treatment were tested using immunoblot, clonogenic, and cell-counting assays. Related signaling pathways were studied with immunoblot and kinase assays. Results: At steady state, stable transfectants showed almost the same proliferation rate but had different AKT phosphorylation patterns. When treated with {gamma}-IR, wild-type PTEN transfectants showed higher levels of cell death compared with mock vector or mutant transfectants, and showed increased G{sub 2}/M cell-cycle arrest accompanied by p21 induction and CDK1 inactivation. NCI-H1299 cells were treated with phosphosinositide-3 kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway inhibitor (LY29002), resulting in reduced AKT phosphorylation levels. Treatment of NCI-H1299 cells with LY29002 and {gamma}-IR resulted in increased cell-cycle arrest and p21 induction. Endogenous wild-type PTEN-containing NCI-H460 cells were treated with PTEN-specific siRNA and then irradiated with {gamma}-IR: however reduced PTEN levels did not induce cell-cycle arrest or p21 expression. Conclusions: Taken together, these findings indicate that PTEN may modulate cell death or the cell cycle via AKT inactivation by PTEN and {gamma}-IR treatment. We also propose that a PTEN-PI3K/AKT-p21-CDK1 pathway could regulate cell death and the cell cycle by {gamma}-IR treatment.

  16. Improvement of gemcitabine sensitivity of p53-mutated pancreatic cancer MiaPaCa-2 cells by RUNX2 depletion-mediated augmentation of TAp73-dependent cell death

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, M; Sugimoto, H; Ogata, T; Hiraoka, K; Yoda, H; Sang, M; Sang, M; Zhu, Y; Yu, M; Shimozato, O; Ozaki, T

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer exhibits the worst prognostic outcome among human cancers. Recently, we have described that depletion of RUNX2 enhances gemcitabine (GEM) sensitivity of p53-deficient pancreatic cancer AsPC-1 cells through the activation of TAp63-mediated cell death pathway. These findings raised a question whether RUNX2 silencing could also improve GEM efficacy on pancreatic cancer cells bearing p53 mutation. In the present study, we have extended our study to p53-mutated pancreatic cancer MiaPaCa-2 cells. Based on our current results, MiaPaCa-2 cells were much more resistant to GEM as compared with p53-proficient pancreatic cancer SW1990 cells, and there existed a clear inverse relationship between the expression levels of TAp73 and RUNX2 in response to GEM. Forced expression of TAp73α in MiaPaCa-2 cells significantly promoted cell cycle arrest and/or cell death, indicating that a large amount of TAp73 might induce cell death even in the presence of mutant p53. Consistent with this notion, overexpression of TAp73α stimulated luciferase activity driven by p53/TAp73-target gene promoters in MiaPaCa-2 cells. Similar to AsPC-1 cells, small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of RUNX2 remarkably enhanced GEM sensitivity of MiPaCa-2 cells. Under our experimental conditions, TAp73 further accumulated in RUNX2-depleted MiaPaCa-2 cells exposed to GEM relative to GEM-treated non-silencing control cells. As expected, silencing of p73 reduced GEM sensitivity of MiPaCa-2 cells. Moreover, GEM-mediated Tyr phosphorylation level of TAp73 was much more elevated in RUNX2-depleted MiaPaCa-2 cells. Collectively, our present findings strongly suggest that knockdown of RUNX2 contributes to a prominent enhancement of GEM sensitivity of p53-mutated pancreatic cancer cells through the activation of TAp73-mediated cell death pathway, and also provides a promising strategy for the treatment of patients with pancreatic cancer bearing p53 mutation. PMID:27294865

  17. Galloflavin, a new lactate dehydrogenase inhibitor, induces the death of human breast cancer cells with different glycolytic attitude by affecting distinct signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Farabegoli, F; Vettraino, M; Manerba, M; Fiume, L; Roberti, M; Di Stefano, G

    2012-11-20

    Galloflavin (GF), a recently identified lactate dehydrogenase inhibitor, hinders the proliferation of cancer cells by blocking glycolysis and ATP production. The aim of the present experiments was to study the effect of this compound on breast cancer cell lines reproducing different pathological subtypes of this tumor: MCF-7 (the well differentiated form), MDA-MB-231 (the aggressive triple negative tumor) and MCF-Tam (a sub-line of MCF-7 with acquired tamoxifen resistance). We observed marked differences in the energetic metabolism of these cell lines. Compared to MCF-7 cells, both MDA-MB-231 and MCF-Tam cells exhibited higher LDH levels and glucose uptake and showed lower capacity of oxygen consumption. In spite of these differences, GF exerted similar growth inhibitory effects. This result was explained by the finding of a constitutively activated stress response in MDA-MB-231 and MCF-Tam cells, which reproduce the poor prognosis tumor forms. As a further proof, different signaling pathways were found to be involved in the antiproliferative action of GF. In MCF-7 cells we observed a down regulation of the ERα-mediated signaling needed for cell survival. On the contrary, in MCF-Tam and MDA-MB-231 cells growth inhibition appeared to be contributed by an oxidative stress condition. The prevalent mechanism of cell death was found to be apoptosis induction. Because of the clinical relevance of breast cancer forms having the triple negative and/or chemoresistant phenotype, our results showing comparable effects of GF even on aggressively growing cells encourage further studies to verify the potential of this compound in improving the chemotherapy of breast cancer.

  18. Soluble VEGF receptor 1 (sFLT1) induces non-apoptotic death in ovarian and colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Miyake, Tatsuya; Kumasawa, Keiichi; Sato, Noriko; Takiuchi, Tsuyoshi; Nakamura, Hitomi; Kimura, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    Soluble Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 1 (sVEGFR1/sFLT1) is an angiogenesis inhibitor that competes with angiogenic factors such as VEGF and Placental Growth Factor (PlGF). Imbalances of VEGF and sFLT1 levels can cause pathological conditions such as tumour growth or preeclampsia. We observed direct damage caused by sFLT1 in tumour cells. We exposed several kinds of cells derived from ovarian and colorectal cancers as well as HEK293T cells to sFLT1 in two ways, transfection and exogenous application. The cell morphology and an LDH assay revealed cytotoxicity. Additional experiments were performed to clarify how sFLT1 injured cells. In this study, non-apoptotic cell damage was found to be induced by sFLT1. Moreover, sFLT1 showed an anti-tumour effect in a mouse model of ovarian cancer. Our results suggest that sFLT1 has potential as a cancer therapeutic candidate. PMID:27103202

  19. Pancreatic β Cell Mass Death

    PubMed Central

    Marrif, Husnia I.; Al-Sunousi, Salma I.

    2016-01-01

    Type two diabetes (T2D) is a challenging metabolic disorder for which a cure has not yet been found. Its etiology is associated with several phenomena, including significant loss of insulin-producing, beta cellcell) mass via progressive programmed cell death and disrupted cellular autophagy. In diabetes, the etiology of β cell death and the role of mitochondria are complex and involve several layers of mechanisms. Understanding the dynamics of those mechanisms could permit researchers to develop an intervention for the progressive loss of β cells. Currently, diabetes research has shifted toward rejuvenation and plasticity technology and away from the simplified approach of hormonal compensation. Diabetes research is currently challenged by questions such as how to enhance cell survival, decrease apoptosis and replenish β cell mass in diabetic patients. In this review, we discuss evidence that β cell development and mass formation are guided by specific signaling systems, particularly hormones, transcription factors, and growth factors, all of which could be manipulated to enhance mass growth. There is also strong evidence that β cells are dynamically active cells, which, under specific conditions such as obesity, can increase in size and subsequently increase insulin secretion. In certain cases of aggressive or advanced forms of T2D, β cells become markedly impaired, and the only alternatives for maintaining glucose homeostasis are through partial or complete cell grafting (the Edmonton protocol). In these cases, the harvesting of an enriched population of viable β cells is required for transplantation. This task necessitates a deep understanding of the pharmacological agents that affect β cell survival, mass, and function. The aim of this review is to initiate discussion about the important signals in pancreatic β cell development and mass formation and to highlight the process by which cell death occurs in diabetes. This review also examines the

  20. Analytic considerations and axiomatic approaches to the concept cell death and cell survival functions in biology and cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Gkigkitzis, Ioannis; Haranas, Ioannis; Austerlitz, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    This study contains a discussion on the connection between current mathematical and biological modeling systems in response to the main research need for the development of a new mathematical theory for study of cell survival after medical treatment and cell biological behavior in general. This is a discussion of suggested future research directions and relations with interdisciplinary science. In an effort to establish the foundations for a possible framework that may be adopted to study and analyze the process of cell survival during treatment, we investigate the organic connection among an axiomatic system foundation, a predator-prey rate equation, and information theoretic signal processing. A new set theoretic approach is also introduced through the definition of cell survival units or cell survival units indicating the use of "proper classes" according to the Zermelo-Fraenkel set theory and the axiom of choice, as the mathematics appropriate for the development of biological theory of cell survival.

  1. Regulated Cell Death in AKI

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guochun; Dong, Guie; Kunzendorf, Ulrich; Krautwald, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    AKI is pathologically characterized by sublethal and lethal damage of renal tubules. Under these conditions, renal tubular cell death may occur by regulated necrosis (RN) or apoptosis. In the last two decades, tubular apoptosis has been shown in preclinical models and some clinical samples from patients with AKI. Mechanistically, apoptotic cell death in AKI may result from well described extrinsic and intrinsic pathways as well as ER stress. Central converging nodes of these pathways are mitochondria, which become fragmented and sensitized to membrane permeabilization in response to cellular stress, resulting in the release of cell death–inducing factors. Whereas apoptosis is known to be regulated, tubular necrosis was thought to occur by accident until recent work unveiled several RN subroutines, most prominently receptor-interacting protein kinase–dependent necroptosis and RN induced by mitochondrial permeability transition. Additionally, other cell death pathways, like pyroptosis and ferroptosis, may also be of pathophysiologic relevance in AKI. Combination therapy targeting multiple cell-death pathways may, therefore, provide maximal therapeutic benefits. PMID:24925726

  2. Characterization of HJ-PI01 as a novel Pim-2 inhibitor that induces apoptosis and autophagic cell death in triple-negative human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yu-qian; Yin, Yi-qiong; Liu, Jie; Wang, Gui-hua; Huang, Jian; Zhu, Ling-juan; Wang, Jin-hui

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Pim-2 is a short-lived serine/threonine kinase, which plays a key role in metastasis of breast cancer through persistent activation of STAT3. Although the crystal structure of Pim-2 has been reported, but thus far no specific Pim-2-targeted compounds have been reported. In this study, we identified a novel Pim-2 inhibitor, HJ-PI01, by in silico analysis and experimental validation. Methods: The protein-protein interaction (PPI) network, chemical synthesis, molecular docking, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to design and discover the new Pim-2 inhibitor HJ-PI01. The anti-tumor effects of HJ-PI01 were evaluated in human breast MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468, MDA-MB-436, MCF-7 cells in vitro and in MDA-MB-231 xenograft mice, which were treated with HJ-PI01 (40 mg·kg−1·d−1, ig) with or without lienal polypeptide (50 mg·kg−1·d−1, ip) for 10 d. The apoptosis/autophage-inducing mechanisms of HJ-PI01 were elucidated using Western blots, immunoblots, flow cytometry, transmission electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy. Results: Based on the PrePPI network, the potential partners interacting with Pim-2 in regulating apoptosis (160 protein pairs) and autophagy (47 protein pairs) were identified. Based on the structural characteristics of Pim-2, a total of 15 compounds (HJ-PI01 to HJ-P015) were synthesized, which showed moderate or remarkable anti-proliferative potency in the human breast cancer cell lines tested. The most effective compound HJ-PI01 exerted a robust inhibition on MDA-MB-231 cells compared with chlorpromazine and the pan-Pim inhibitor PI003. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation revealed that HJ-PI01 had a good binding score with Pim-2. Moreover, HJ-PI01 (300 nmol/L) induced death receptor-dependent and mitochondrial apoptosis as well as autophagic death in MDA-MB-231 cells. In MDA-MB-231 xenograft mice, administration of HJ-PI01 remarkably inhibited the tumor growth and induced tumor cell apoptosis in vivo. Co-administration of

  3. Atmospheric pressure gas plasma-induced colorectal cancer cell death is mediated by Nox2-ASK1 apoptosis pathways and oxidative stress is mitigated by Srx-Nrf2 anti-oxidant system.

    PubMed

    Ishaq, Musarat; Evans, Margaret D M; Ostrikov, Kostya Ken

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric pressure gas plasma (AGP) generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) that induce apoptosis in cultured cancer cells. The majority of cancer cells develop a ROS-scavenging anti-oxidant system regulated by Nrf2, which confers resistance to ROS-mediated cancer cell death. Generation of ROS is involved in the AGP-induced cancer cell death of several colorectal cancer cells (Caco2, HCT116 and SW480) by activation of ASK1-mediated apoptosis signaling pathway without affecting control cells (human colonic sub-epithelial myofibroblasts; CO18, human fetal lung fibroblast; MRC5 and fetal human colon; FHC). However, the identity of an oxidase participating in AGP-induced cancer cell death is unknown. Here, we report that AGP up-regulates the expression of Nox2 (NADPH oxidase) to produce ROS. RNA interference designed to target Nox2 effectively inhibits the AGP-induced ROS production and cancer cell death. In some cases both colorectal cancer HT29 and control cells showed resistance to AGP treatment. Compared to AGP-sensitive Caco2 cells, HT29 cells show a higher basal level of the anti-oxidant system transcriptional regulator Nrf2 and its target protein sulfiredoxin (Srx) which are involved in cellular redox homeostasis. Silencing of both Nrf2 and Srx sensitized HT29 cells, leads to ROS overproduction and decreased cell viability. This indicates that in HT29 cells, Nrf2/Srx axis is a protective factor against AGP-induced oxidative stress. The inhibition of Nrf2/Srx signaling should be considered as a central target in drug-resistant colorectal cancer treatments.

  4. In silico analysis of molecular mechanisms of Galanthus nivalis agglutinin-related lectin-induced cancer cell death from carbohydrate-binding motif evolution hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qi-Jia; Li, Zi-Yue; Yao, Shun; Ming, Miao; Wang, Shu-Ya; Liu, Bo; Bao, Jin-Ku

    2011-10-01

    Galanthus nivalis agglutinin-related lectins, a superfamily of strictly mannose-binding-specific lectins widespread amongst monotyledonous plants, have drawn a rising attention for their remarkable anti-proliferative and apoptosis-inducing activities toward various types of cancer cells; however, the precise molecular mechanisms by which they induce tumor cell apoptosis are still only rudimentarily understood. Herein, we found that the three conserved motifs "QXDXNXVXY," the mannose-specific binding sites, could mutate at one or more amino acid sites, which might be a driving force for the sequential evolution and thus ultimately leading to the complete disappearance of the three conserved motifs. In addition, we found that the motif evolution could result in the diversification of sugar-binding types that G. nivalis agglutinin-related lectins could bind from specific mannose receptors to more types of sugar-containing receptors in cancer cells. Subsequently, we indicated that some sugar-containing receptors such as TNFR1, EGFR, Hsp90, and Hsp70 could block downstream anti-apoptotic or survival signaling pathways, which, in turn, resulted in tumor cell apoptosis. Taken together, our hypothesis that carbohydrate-binding motif evolution may impact the G. nivalis agglutinin-related lectin-induced survival or anti-apoptotic pathways would provide a new perspective for further elucidating the intricate relationships between the carbohydrate-binding specificities and complex molecular mechanisms by which G. nivalis agglutinin-related lectins induce cancer cell death.

  5. Arabidopsis ACCELERATED CELL DEATH2 modulates programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Yao, Nan; Greenberg, Jean T

    2006-02-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplast protein ACCELERATED CELL DEATH2 (ACD2) modulates the amount of programmed cell death (PCD) triggered by Pseudomonas syringae and protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) treatment. In vitro, ACD2 can reduce red chlorophyll catabolite, a chlorophyll derivative. We find that ACD2 shields root protoplasts that lack chlorophyll from light- and PPIX-induced PCD. Thus, chlorophyll catabolism is not obligatory for ACD2 anti-PCD function. Upon P. syringae infection, ACD2 levels and localization change in cells undergoing PCD and in their close neighbors. Thus, ACD2 shifts from being largely in chloroplasts to partitioning to chloroplasts, mitochondria, and, to a small extent, cytosol. ACD2 protects cells from PCD that requires the early mitochondrial oxidative burst. Later, the chloroplasts of dying cells generate NO, which only slightly affects cell viability. Finally, the mitochondria in dying cells have dramatically altered movements and cellular distribution. Overproduction of both ACD2 (localized to mitochondria and chloroplasts) and ascorbate peroxidase (localized to chloroplasts) greatly reduces P. syringae-induced PCD, suggesting a pro-PCD role for mitochondrial and chloroplast events. During infection, ACD2 may bind to and/or reduce PCD-inducing porphyrin-related molecules in mitochondria and possibly chloroplasts that generate reactive oxygen species, cause altered organelle behavior, and activate a cascade of PCD-inducing events.

  6. Cellular Stress Responses: Cell Survival and Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Fulda, Simone; Gorman, Adrienne M.; Hori, Osamu; Samali, Afshin

    2010-01-01

    Cells can respond to stress in various ways ranging from the activation of survival pathways to the initiation of cell death that eventually eliminates damaged cells. Whether cells mount a protective or destructive stress response depends to a large extent on the nature and duration of the stress as well as the cell type. Also, there is often the interplay between these responses that ultimately determines the fate of the stressed cell. The mechanism by which a cell dies (i.e., apoptosis, necrosis, pyroptosis, or autophagic cell death) depends on various exogenous factors as well as the cell's ability to handle the stress to which it is exposed. The implications of cellular stress responses to human physiology and diseases are manifold and will be discussed in this review in the context of some major world health issues such as diabetes, Parkinson's disease, myocardial infarction, and cancer. PMID:20182529

  7. Cancer Cell Death-Inducing Radiotherapy: Impact on Local Tumour Control, Tumour Cell Proliferation and Induction of Systemic Anti-tumour Immunity.

    PubMed

    Frey, Benjamin; Derer, Anja; Scheithauer, Heike; Wunderlich, Roland; Fietkau, Rainer; Gaipl, Udo S

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) predominantly is aimed to induce DNA damage in tumour cells that results in reduction of their clonogenicity and finally in tumour cell death. Adaptation of RT with higher single doses has become necessary and led to a more detailed view on what kind of tumour cell death is induced and which immunological consequences result from it. RT is capable of rendering tumour cells immunogenic by modifying the tumour cell phenotype and the microenvironment. Danger signals are released as well as the senescence-associated secretory phenotype. This results in maturation of dendritic cells and priming of cytotoxic T cells as well as in activation of natural killer cells. However, RT on the other hand can also result in immune suppressive events including apoptosis induction and foster tumour cell proliferation. That's why RT is nowadays increasingly combined with selected immunotherapies. PMID:27558821

  8. Distinct CPT-induced deaths in lung cancer cells caused by clathrin-mediated internalization of CP micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu-Sheng; Cheng, Ru-You; Lo, Yu-Lun; Hsu, Chin; Chen, Su-Hwei; Chiu, Chien-Chih; Wang, Li-Fang

    2016-02-01

    We previously synthesized a chondroitin sulfate-graft-poly(ε-caprolactone) copolymer (H-CP) with a high content of poly(ε-caprolactone) (18.7 mol%), which self-assembled in water into a rod-like micelle to encapsulate hydrophobic camptothecin (CPT) in the core (micelle/CPT) for tumor-targeted drug delivery. As a result of the recognition of the micelle by CD44, the micelle/CPT entered CRL-5802 cells efficiently and released CPT efficaciously, resulting in higher tumor suppression than commercial CPT-11. In this study, H1299 cells were found to have a higher CD44 expression than CRL-5802 cells. However, the lower CD44-expressing CRL-5802 cells had a higher percentage of cell death and higher cellular uptake of the micelle/CPT than the higher CD44-expressing H1299 cells. Examination of the internalization pathway of the micelle/CPT in the presence of different endocytic chemical inhibitors showed that the CRL-5802 cells involved clathrin-mediated endocytosis, which was not found in the H1299 cells. Analysis of the cell cycle of the two cell lines exposed to the micelle/CPT revealed that the CRL-5802 cells arrested mainly in the S phase and the H1299 cells arrested mainly in the G2-M phase. A consistent result was also found in the evaluation of γ-H2AX expression, which was about three-fold higher in the CRL-5802 cells than in the H1299 cells. A near-infrared dye, IR780, was encapsulated into the micelle to observe the in vivo biodistribution of the micelle/IR780 in tumor-bearing mice. The CRL-5802 tumor showed a higher fluorescence intensity than the H1299 tumor at any tracing time after 1 h. Thus we tentatively concluded that CRL-5802 cells utilized the clathrin-mediated internalization pathway and arrested in the S phase on exposure to the micelle/CPT; all are possible reasons for the better therapeutic outcome in CRL-5802 cells than in H1299 cells.We previously synthesized a chondroitin sulfate-graft-poly(ε-caprolactone) copolymer (H-CP) with a high content of

  9. Lovastatin enhances adenovirus-mediated TRAIL induced apoptosis by depleting cholesterol of lipid rafts and affecting CAR and death receptor expression of prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Youhong; Chen, Lin; Gong, Zhicheng; Shen, Liangfang; Kao, Chinghai; Hock, Janet M; Sun, Lunquan; Li, Xiong

    2015-02-20

    Oncolytic adenovirus and apoptosis inducer TRAIL are promising cancer therapies. Their antitumor efficacy, when used as single agents, is limited. Oncolytic adenoviruses have low infection activity, and cancer cells develop resistance to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Here, we explored combining prostate-restricted replication competent adenovirus-mediated TRAIL (PRRA-TRAIL) with lovastatin, a commonly used cholesterol-lowering drug, as a potential therapy for advanced prostate cancer (PCa). Lovastatin significantly enhanced the efficacy of PRRA-TRAIL by promoting the in vivo tumor suppression, and the in vitro cell killing and apoptosis induction, via integration of multiple molecular mechanisms. Lovastatin enhanced PRRA replication and virus-delivered transgene expression by increasing the expression levels of CAR and integrins, which are critical for adenovirus 5 binding and internalization. Lovastatin enhanced TRAIL-induced apoptosis by increasing death receptor DR4 expression. These multiple effects of lovastatin on CAR, integrins and DR4 expression were closely associated with cholesterol-depletion in lipid rafts. These studies, for the first time, show correlations between cholesterol/lipid rafts, oncolytic adenovirus infection efficiency and the antitumor efficacy of TRAIL at the cellular level. This work enhances our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that support use of lovastatin, in combination with PRRA-TRAIL, as a candidate strategy to treat human refractory prostate cancer in the future. PMID:25605010

  10. Histone deacetylase inhibitors and cell death

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Zhong, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are a vast family of enzymes involved in chromatin remodeling and have crucial roles in numerous biological processes, largely through their repressive influence on transcription. In addition to modifying histones, HDACs also target many other non-histone protein substrates to regulate gene expression. Recently, HDACs have gained growing attention as HDAC-inhibiting compounds are being developed as promising cancer therapeutics. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) have been shown to induce differentiation, cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, autophagy and necrosis in a variety of transformed cell lines. In this review, we mainly discuss how HDACi may elicit a therapeutic response to human cancers through different cell death pathways, in particular, apoptosis and autophagy. PMID:24898083

  11. A novel antagonist to the inhibitors of apoptosis (IAPs) potentiates cell death in EGFR-overexpressing non-small-cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, S-H; Lee, J-Y; Jung, C L; Bae, I H; Suh, K H; Ahn, Y G; Jin, D-H; Kim, T W; Suh, Y-A; Jang, S J

    2014-10-16

    In the effort to develop an efficient chemotherapy drug for the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), we analyzed the anti-tumorigenic effects of a novel small molecule targeting the inhibitor of apoptosis (IAPs), HM90822B, on NSCLC cells. HM90822B efficiently decreased IAP expression, especially that of XIAP and survivin, in several NSCLC cells. Interestingly, cells overexpressing epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) due to the mutations were more sensitive to HM90822B, undergoing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis when treated. In xenograft experiments, inoculated EGFR-overexpressing NSCLC cells showed tumor regression when treated with the inhibitor, demonstrating the chemotherapeutic potential of this agent. Mechanistically, decreased levels of EGFR, Akt and phospho-MAPKs were observed in inhibitor-treated PC-9 cells on phosphorylation array and western blotting analysis, indicating that the reagent inhibited cell growth by preventing critical cell survival signaling pathways. In addition, gene-specific knockdown studies against XIAP and/or EGFR further uncovered the involvement of Akt and MAPK pathways in HM90822B-mediated downregulation of NSCLC cell growth. Together, these results support that HM90822B is a promising candidate to be developed as lung tumor chemotherapeutics by targeting oncogenic activities of IAP together with inhibiting cell survival signaling pathways.

  12. Effects of a novel carbocyclic analog of pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine nucleoside on pleiotropic induction of cell death in prostate cancer cells with different androgen responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Suh, Hyewon; Choi, Ko-woon; Lee, Jongbok; Ryou, Chongsuk; Rhee, Hakjune; Lee, Chul-Hoon

    2016-02-15

    Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer and is one of the leading causes of male cancer death in the world. Recently, in the course of our screening for a novel anticancer compound, we synthesized carbocyclic analogs of pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine nucleoside; compounds 5, and 6. In the current study, we report the effects of compound 5 on pleiotropic induction of cell death via up-regulation of AR-associated p21(Cip1) protein in prostate cancer cells with different androgen responsiveness, such as LNCaP (androgen-dependent and -sensitive), LNCaP(C4-2) (androgen-independent and -sensitive; androgen-refractory), and DU145 (androgen-independent and -insensitive) cells. The treatment of LNCaP cells with 6 μM compound 5 for 24 h stimulated the androgen receptor (AR) activity and dramatically up-regulated transcription (56-fold) of p21(Cip1), which, in turn, induces typical apoptosis in the cells. However, induction of apoptosis through up-regulation (23-fold) of AR-associated p21(Cip1) achieved in LNCaP(C4-2) cells was possible by intensive cell treatment with compound 5 (9 μM, 48 h), because the cells are less sensitive and independent to androgen than LNCaP cells. Furthermore, 6 μM compound 5-treated DU145 cells, which exhibit extremely low AR activation due to no androgen responsiveness and dependency, showed neither up-regulation of p21(Cip1) nor apoptotic induction. Instead, a different type of cell death, autophagy-like death through the LC3B-associated autophagosome formation, was obviously induced in DU145 cells. Taken together, our results suggest that pleiotropic induction of prostate cancer cell death by compound 5 is determined by how efficiently and how abundantly androgen-dependent activation of the AR occurs, whereas compound 6 shows no induction of apoptosis in LNCaP cells.

  13. Ferroptosis is an autophagic cell death process.

    PubMed

    Gao, Minghui; Monian, Prashant; Pan, Qiuhui; Zhang, Wei; Xiang, Jenny; Jiang, Xuejun

    2016-09-01

    Ferroptosis is an iron-dependent form of regulated necrosis. It is implicated in various human diseases, including ischemic organ damage and cancer. Here, we report the crucial role of autophagy, particularly autophagic degradation of cellular iron storage proteins (a process known as ferritinophagy), in ferroptosis. Using RNAi screening coupled with subsequent genetic analysis, we identified multiple autophagy-related genes as positive regulators of ferroptosis. Ferroptosis induction led to autophagy activation and consequent degradation of ferritin and ferritinophagy cargo receptor NCOA4. Consistently, inhibition of ferritinophagy by blockage of autophagy or knockdown of NCOA4 abrogated the accumulation of ferroptosis-associated cellular labile iron and reactive oxygen species, as well as eventual ferroptotic cell death. Therefore, ferroptosis is an autophagic cell death process, and NCOA4-mediated ferritinophagy supports ferroptosis by controlling cellular iron homeostasis. PMID:27514700

  14. Effect of proton and gamma irradiation on human lung carcinoma cells: Gene expression, cell cycle, cell death, epithelial-mesenchymal transition and cancer-stem cell trait as biological end points.

    PubMed

    Narang, Himanshi; Kumar, Amit; Bhat, Nagesh; Pandey, Badri N; Ghosh, Anu

    2015-10-01

    Proton beam therapy is a cutting edge modality over conventional gamma radiotherapy because of its physical dose deposition advantage. However, not much is known about its biological effects vis-a-vis gamma irradiation. Here we investigated the effect of proton- and gamma- irradiation on cell cycle, death, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and "stemness" in human non-small cell lung carcinoma cells (A549). Proton beam (3MeV) was two times more cytotoxic than gamma radiation and induced higher and longer cell cycle arrest. At equivalent doses, numbers of genes responsive to proton irradiation were ten times higher than those responsive to gamma irradiation. At equitoxic doses, the proton-irradiated cells had reduced cell adhesion and migration ability as compared to the gamma-irradiated cells. It was also more effective in reducing population of Cancer Stem Cell (CSC) like cells as revealed by aldehyde dehydrogenase activity and surface phenotyping by CD44(+), a CSC marker. These results can have significant implications for proton therapy in the context of suppression of molecular and cellular processes that are fundamental to tumor expansion.

  15. Dual Regulation of Cell Death and Cell Survival upon Induction of Cellular Stress by Isopimara-7,15-Dien-19-Oic Acid in Cervical Cancer, HeLa Cells In vitro

    PubMed Central

    Abu, Nadiah; Yeap, Swee K.; Pauzi, Ahmad Z. Mat; Akhtar, M. Nadeem; Zamberi, Nur R.; Ismail, Jamil; Zareen, Seema; Alitheen, Noorjahan B.

    2016-01-01

    The Fritillaria imperialis is an ornamental flower that can be found in various parts of the world including Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, and the Himalayas. The use of this plant as traditional remedy is widely known. This study aims to unveil the anti-cancer potentials of Isopimara-7,15-Dien-19-Oic Acid, extracted from the bulbs of F. imperialis in cervical cancer cell line, HeLa cells. Flow cytometry analysis of cell death, gene expression analysis via cDNA microarray and protein array were performed. Based on the results, Isopimara-7,15-Dien-19-Oic acid simultaneously induced cell death and promoted cell survival. The execution of apoptosis was apparent based on the flow cytometry results and regulation of both pro and anti-apoptotic genes. Additionally, the regulation of anti-oxidant genes were up-regulated especially thioredoxin, glutathione and superoxide dismutase- related genes. Moreover, the treatment also induced the activation of pro-survival heat shock proteins. Collectively, Isopimara-7,15-Dien-19-Oic Acid managed to induce cellular stress in HeLa cells and activate several anti- and pro survival pathways. PMID:27065873

  16. Dual targeting of heat shock proteins 90 and 70 promotes cell death and enhances the anticancer effect of chemotherapeutic agents in bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liang; Sato, Fuminori; Sato, Ryuta; Matsubara, Takanori; Hirai, Kenichi; Yamasaki, Mutsushi; Shin, Toshitaka; Shimada, Tatsuo; Nomura, Takeo; Mori, Kenichi; Sumino, Yasuhiro; Mimata, Hiromitsu

    2014-06-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs), which are molecular chaperones that stabilize numerous vital proteins, may be attractive targets for cancer therapy. The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible anticancer effect of single or dual targeting of HSP90 and HSP70 and the combination treatment with HSP inhibitors and chemotherapeutic agents in bladder cancer cells. The expression of HSP90 and the anticancer effect of the HSP90 inhibitor 17-N-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG) coupled with cisplatin, docetaxel, or gemcitabine were examined using immunohistochemistry, quantitative real-time PCR, cell growth, flow cytometry, immunoblots and caspase-3/7 assays. The expression of HSP70 under HSP90 inhibition and the additive effect of HSP70 inhibitor pifithrin-μ (PFT-μ) were examined by the same assays and transmission electron microscopy. HSP90 was highly expressed in bladder cancer tissues and cell lines. 17-AAG enhanced the antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of each chemotherapeutic agent. 17-AAG also suppressed Akt activity but induced the upregulation of HSP70. PFT-μ enhanced the effect of 17-AAG or chemotherapeutic agents; the triple combination of 17-AAG, PFT-μ and a chemotherapeutic agent showed the most significant anticancer effect on the T24 cell line. The combination of 17-AAG and PFT-μ markedly suppressed Akt and Bad activities. With HSP90 suppression, HSP70 overexpression possibly contributes to the avoidance of cell death and HSP70 may be a key molecule for overcoming resistance to the HSP90 inhibitor. The dual targeting of these two chaperones and the combination with conventional anticancer drugs could be a promising therapeutic option for patients with advanced bladder cancer.

  17. ANOVA like analysis of cancer death age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Areia, Aníbal; Mexia, João T.

    2016-06-01

    We use ANOVA to study the influence of year, sex, country and location on the average cancer death age. The data used was from the World Health Organization (WHO) files for 1999, 2003, 2007 and 2011. The locations considered were: kidney, leukaemia, melanoma of skin and oesophagus and the countries: Portugal, Norway, Greece and Romania.

  18. Inhibition of EZH2 by chemo- and radiotherapy agents and small molecule inhibitors induces cell death in castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Changping; Jin, Xin; Yang, Jing; Yang, Yinhui; He, Yundong; Ding, Liya; Pan, Yunqian; Chen, Shuai; Jiang, Jingting; Huang, Haojie

    2016-01-19

    Androgen deprivation therapy is the mainstay of treatment of advanced prostate cancer (PCa). However, a significant portion of patients experience disease relapse and tumors ultimately evolve into castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), for which there is no cure in the clinic. The Polycomb protein enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) is frequently overexpressed in CRPC. It is unclear whether EZH2 can be a therapeutic target in CRPC. Here, we demonstrated that chemo- and radiotherapy agents such as camptothecin (CPT) and γ irradiation decrease EZH2 expression in various PCa cell lines. We provided evidence that functional p53 and RB proteins are required for CPT- and irradiation-induced downregulation of EZH2 in CRPC cells. We demonstrated that EZH2-specific small molecule inhibitors mitigate CRPC cell growth. We further showed that the EZH2 inhibitor GSK126 inhibits both Polycomb-dependent and -independent functions of EZH2 in PCa cells. Importantly, we found that inhibition of EZH2 by genetic and pharmacological means sensitizes CRPC cells to CPT-induced apoptotic death and growth inhibition in culture and in mice. Our data suggest that concomitant administration of small molecule inhibitors of EZH2 may significantly increase the anti-tumor efficacy of conventional chemo- and radiotherapies in CRPC. PMID:26657505

  19. Phthalocyanine-mediated photodynamic therapy induces cell death and a G /G{sub 1} cell cycle arrest in cervical cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Haywood-Small, S.L. . E-mail: s.l.hankin@sheffield.ac.uk; Vernon, D.I.; Griffiths, J.; Schofield, J.; Brown, S.B.

    2006-01-13

    We have developed a series of novel photosensitizers which have potential for anticancer photodynamic therapy (PDT). Photosensitizers include zinc phthalocyanine tetra-sulphonic acid and a family of derivatives with amino acid substituents of varying alkyl chain length and degree of branching. Subcellular localization of these photosensitizers at the phototoxic IC{sub 5} concentration in human cervical carcinoma cells (SiHa Cells) was similar to that of the lysosomal dye Lucifer Yellow. Subsequent nuclear relocalization was observed following irradiation with 665 nm laser light. The PDT response was characterized using the Sulforhodamine B cytotoxicity assay. Flow cytometry was used for both DNA cell cycle and dual Annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide analysis. Phototoxicity of the derivatives was of the same order of magnitude as for tetrasulphonated phthalocyanine but with an overall trend of increased phototoxicity with increasing amino acid chain length. Our results demonstrate cell death, inhibition of cell growth, and G /G{sub 1} cell cycle arrest during the phthalocyanine PDT-mediated response.

  20. Clinicopathological and prognostic significance of programmed cell death ligand1 (PD-L1) expression in patients with non-small cell lung cancer: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Zhen-Kui; Ye, Feng; Wu, Xuan; An, Han-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Objective Programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and one of its ligands, PD-L1, are key immune checkpoint proteins. Evidences showed PD-L1 is an emerging biomarker for immunotherapy by anti-PD-1 and anti-PD-L1 antibody in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). To investigate the association of PD-L1 protein expression with clinicopathological features and its impact on survival outcome, we conducted a meta-analysis. Methods A comprehensive literature search of electronic databases (up to July 10, 2014) was performed. Correlation between PD-L1 expression and clinicopathological features and overall survival (OS) was analyzed by synthesizing the qualified data. Publication biases were examined. Results A total of 1,550 NSCLC patients from 9 studies were included. The pooled odds ratios (ORs) indicated high PD-L1 expression was associated with poor tumor differentiation [OR =0.53, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.39-0.72, P<0.0001]. Whereas, none of other clinicopathological characteristics [gender, smoking status, histological type, invasive depth of tumor, status of lymph node metastasis and tumor node metastasis (TNM) stage] were correlated with PD-L1 expression in current analysis. The combined hazard ratio (HR) for OS showed high expression of PD-L1 impaired the OS in NSCLC (HRpositive/negative =1.47, 95% CI: 1.19-1.83, P=0.0004). Conclusions Our meta-analysis indicated PD-L1 protein expression in NSCLC was not associated with common clinicopathological characteristics, except tumor differentiation. It was a poor prognostic biomarker for NSCLC. Further research should be performed to investigate the precise clinicopathological and prognostic significance of PD-L1 in NSCLC under uniform testing standard. PMID:25922726

  1. Modulation of programmed cell death by medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Thatte, U; Bagadey, S; Dahanukar, S

    2000-02-01

    Programmed cell death (apoptosis), a form of cell death, described by Kerr and Wyllie some 20 years ago, has generated considerable interest in recent years. The mechanisms by which this mode of cell death (seen both in animal and plant cells), takes place have been examined in detail. Extracellular signals and intracellular events have been elaborated. Of interest to the clinician, is the concentrated effort to study pharmacological modulation of programmed cell death. The attempt to influence the natural phenomenon of programmed cell death stems from the fact that it is reduced (like in cancer) or increased (like in neurodegenerative diseases) in several clinical situations. Thus, chemicals that can modify programmed cell death are likely to be potentially useful drugs. From foxglove, which gave digitalis to the Pacific Yew from which came taxol, plants have been a source of research material for useful drugs. Recently, a variety of plant extracts have been investigated for their ability to influence the apoptotic process. This article discusses some of the interesting data. The ability of plants to influence programmed cell death in cancerous cells in an attempt to arrest their proliferation has been the topic of much research. Various cell-lines like HL60, human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (KIM-1), a cholangiocarcinoma cell-line (KMC-1), B-cell hybridomas, U937 a monocytic cell-line, HeLa cells, human lymphoid leukemia (MOLT-4B) cells and K562 cells have been studied. The agents found to induce programmed cell death (measured either morphologically or flow cytometrically) included extracts of plants like mistletoe and Semicarpus anacardium. Isolated compounds like bryonolic acid (from Trichosanthes kirilowii var. Japonica, crocin (from saffron) and allicin (from Allium sativum) have also been found to induce programmed cell death and therefore arrest proliferation. Even Chinese herbal medicine "Sho-saiko-to" induces programmed cell death in selected

  2. Pancreatic cancer-specific cell death induced in vivo by cytoplasmic-delivered polyinosine-polycytidylic acid

    PubMed Central

    Bhoopathi, Praveen; Quinn, Bridget A.; Gui, Qin; Shen, Xue-Ning; Grossman, Steven R.; Das, Swadesh K.; Sarkar, Devanand; Fisher, Paul B.; Emdad, Luni

    2014-01-01

    Polyinosine-polycytidylic acid (pIC) is a synthetic dsRNA that acts as an immune agonist of TLR3 and RLR to activate dendritic and NK cells that can kill tumor cells. pIC can also trigger apoptosis in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells but its mechanism of action is obscure. In this study, we investigated the potential therapeutic activity of a formulation of pIC with polyethylenimine ([pIC]PEI) in PDAC and investigated its mechanism of action. [pIC]PEI stimulated apoptosis in PDAC cells without affecting normal pancreatic epithelial cells. Mechanistically, [pIC]PEI repressed XIAP and survivin expression and activated an immune response by inducing MDA-5, RIG-I and NOXA. Phosphorylation of AKT was inhibited by [pIC]PEI in PDAC and this event was critical for stimulating apoptosis through XIAP and survivin degradation. In vivo administration of [pIC]PEI inhibited tumor growth via AKT-mediated XIAP degradation in both subcutaneous and quasi-orthotopic-models of PDAC. Taken together, these results offer a preclinical proof-of-concept for the evaluation of [pIC]PEI as an immunochemotherapy to treat pancreatic cancer. PMID:25205107

  3. Biological effects of (125)i seeds radiation on A549 lung cancer cells: G2/M arrest and enhanced cell death.

    PubMed

    Qu, Ang; Wang, Hao; Li, Jinna; Wang, Junjie; Liu, Jingjia; Hou, Yuzhu; Huang, Li; Zhao, Yong

    2014-07-01

    External beam radiation (EBRT) and (125)I seeds continuous low dose rate radiation (CLDR) were used to treat patients with lung cancer. We herein investigated the biological effects of EBRT and CLDR on lung cancer cells. A549 human lung cancer cell line was thus exposed to different doses of EBRT and CLDR. CLDR was more efficient to inhibit cell growth than EBRT. CLDR induced increased DNA damage as evidenced by long-lasting p-H2AX activity. The enhanced inhibitory effects of CLDR on lung cancer cell growth may be, at least in part, due to the increased Bax/Bcl2 ratio and cyclin B1-mediated G2/M arrest.

  4. Cell death in the nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Bredesen, Dale E.; Rao, Rammohan V.; Mehlen, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease trigger neuronal cell death through endogenous suicide pathways. Surprisingly, although the cell death itself may occur relatively late in the course of the degenerative process, the mediators of the underlying cell-death pathways have shown promise as potential therapeutic targets. PMID:17051206

  5. Frankincense essential oil prepared from hydrodistillation of Boswellia sacra gum resins induces human pancreatic cancer cell death in cultures and in a xenograft murine model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    weight compounds, including boswellic acids, in frankincense essential oil fraactions. Human pancreatic cancer cells were sensitive to Fractions III and IV (containing higher molecular weight compounds) treatment with suppressed cell viability and increased cell death. Essential oil activated the caspase-dependent apoptotic pathway, induced a rapid and transient activation of Akt and Erk1/2, and suppressed levels of cyclin D1 cdk4 expression in cultured pancreatic cancer cells. In addition, Boswellia sacra essential oil Fraction IV exhibited anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities against pancreatic tumors in the heterotopic xenograft mouse model. Conclusion All fractions of frankincense essential oil from Boswellia sacra are capable of suppressing viability and inducing apoptosis of a panel of human pancreatic cancer cell lines. Potency of essential oil-suppressed tumor cell viability may be associated with the greater abundance of high molecular weight compounds in Fractions III and IV. Although chemical component(s) responsible for tumor cell cytotoxicity remains undefined, crude essential oil prepared from hydrodistillation of Boswellia sacra gum resins might be a useful alternative therapeutic agent for treating patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma, an aggressive cancer with poor prognosis. PMID:23237355

  6. Modulation of P2X4/P2X7/Pannexin-1 sensitivity to extracellular ATP via Ivermectin induces a non-apoptotic and inflammatory form of cancer cell death

    PubMed Central

    Draganov, Dobrin; Gopalakrishna-Pillai, Sailesh; Chen, Yun-Ru; Zuckerman, Neta; Moeller, Sara; Wang, Carrie; Ann, David; Lee, Peter P.

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression of P2X7 receptors correlates with tumor growth and metastasis. Yet, release of ATP is associated with immunogenic cancer cell death as well as inflammatory responses caused by necrotic cell death at sites of trauma or ischemia-reperfusion injury. Using an FDA-approved anti-parasitic agent Ivermectin as a prototype agent to allosterically modulate P2X4 receptors, we can switch the balance between the dual pro-survival and cytotoxic functions of purinergic signaling in breast cancer cells. This is mediated through augmented opening of the P2X4/P2X7-gated Pannexin-1 channels that drives a mixed apoptotic and necrotic mode of cell death associated with activation of caspase-1 and is consistent with pyroptosis. We show that cancer cell death is dependent on ATP release and death signals downstream of P2X7 receptors that can be reversed by inhibition of NADPH oxidases-generated ROS, Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) or mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP). Ivermectin induces autophagy and release of ATP and HMGB1, key mediators of inflammation. Potentiated P2X4/P2X7 signaling can be further linked to the ATP rich tumor microenvironment providing a mechanistic explanation for the tumor selectivity of purinergic receptors modulation and its potential to be used as a platform for integrated cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26552848

  7. Modulation of P2X4/P2X7/Pannexin-1 sensitivity to extracellular ATP via Ivermectin induces a non-apoptotic and inflammatory form of cancer cell death.

    PubMed

    Draganov, Dobrin; Gopalakrishna-Pillai, Sailesh; Chen, Yun-Ru; Zuckerman, Neta; Moeller, Sara; Wang, Carrie; Ann, David; Lee, Peter P

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression of P2X7 receptors correlates with tumor growth and metastasis. Yet, release of ATP is associated with immunogenic cancer cell death as well as inflammatory responses caused by necrotic cell death at sites of trauma or ischemia-reperfusion injury. Using an FDA-approved anti-parasitic agent Ivermectin as a prototype agent to allosterically modulate P2X4 receptors, we can switch the balance between the dual pro-survival and cytotoxic functions of purinergic signaling in breast cancer cells. This is mediated through augmented opening of the P2X4/P2X7-gated Pannexin-1 channels that drives a mixed apoptotic and necrotic mode of cell death associated with activation of caspase-1 and is consistent with pyroptosis. We show that cancer cell death is dependent on ATP release and death signals downstream of P2X7 receptors that can be reversed by inhibition of NADPH oxidases-generated ROS, Ca(2+)/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) or mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP). Ivermectin induces autophagy and release of ATP and HMGB1, key mediators of inflammation. Potentiated P2X4/P2X7 signaling can be further linked to the ATP rich tumor microenvironment providing a mechanistic explanation for the tumor selectivity of purinergic receptors modulation and its potential to be used as a platform for integrated cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26552848

  8. The novel pterostilbene derivative ANK-199 induces autophagic cell death through regulating PI3 kinase class III/beclin 1/Atg‑related proteins in cisplatin‑resistant CAR human oral cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Min-Tsang; Chen, Hao-Ping; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Chiang, Jo-Hua; Wu, Tian-Shung; Kuo, Daih-Huang; Huang, Li-Jiau; Kuo, Sheng-Chu; Yang, Jai-Sing

    2014-08-01

    Pterostilbene is an effective chemopreventive agent against multiple types of cancer cells. A novel pterostilbene derivative, ANK-199, was designed and synthesized by our group. Its antitumor activity and mechanism in cisplatin-resistant CAR human oral cancer cells were investigated in this study. Our results show that ANK-199 has an extremely low toxicity in normal oral cell lines. The formation of autophagic vacuoles and acidic vesicular organelles (AVOs) was observed in the ANK-199-treated CAR cells by monodansylcadaverine (MDC) and acridine orange (AO) staining, suggesting that ANK-199 is able to induce autophagic cell death in CAR cells. Neither DNA fragmentation nor DNA condensation was observed, which means that ANK-199-induced cell death is not triggered by apoptosis. In accordance with morphological observation, 3-MA, a specific inhibitor of PI3K kinase class III, can inhibit the autophagic vesicle formation induced by ANK-199. In addition, ANK-199 is also able to enhance the protein levels of autophagic proteins, Atg complex, beclin 1, PI3K class III and LC3-II, and mRNA expression of autophagic genes Atg7, Atg12, beclin 1 and LC3-II in the ANK-199-treated CAR cells. A molecular signaling pathway induced by ANK-199 was therefore summarized. Results presented in this study show that ANK-199 may become a novel therapeutic reagent for the treatment of oral cancer in the near future (patent pending).

  9. Sorafenib-induced defective autophagy promotes cell death by necroptosis.

    PubMed

    Kharaziha, Pedram; Chioureas, Dimitris; Baltatzis, George; Fonseca, Pedro; Rodriguez, Patricia; Gogvadze, Vladimir; Lennartsson, Lena; Björklund, Ann-Charlotte; Zhivotovsky, Boris; Grandér, Dan; Egevad, Lars; Nilsson, Sten; Panaretakis, Theocharis

    2015-11-10

    Autophagy is one of the main cytoprotective mechanisms that cancer cells deploy to withstand the cytotoxic stress and survive the lethal damage induced by anti-cancer drugs. However, under specific conditions, autophagy may, directly or indirectly, induce cell death. In our study, treatment of the Atg5-deficient DU145 prostate cancer cells, with the multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitor, sorafenib, induces mitochondrial damage, autophagy and cell death. Molecular inhibition of autophagy by silencing ULK1 and Beclin1 rescues DU145 cells from cell death indicating that, in this setting, autophagy promotes cell death. Re-expression of Atg5 restores the lipidation of LC3 and rescues DU145 and MEF atg5-/- cells from sorafenib-induced cell death. Despite the lack of Atg5 expression and LC3 lipidation, DU145 cells form autophagosomes as demonstrated by transmission and immuno-electron microscopy, and the formation of LC3 positive foci. However, the lack of cellular content in the autophagosomes, the accumulation of long-lived proteins, the presence of GFP-RFP-LC3 positive foci and the accumulated p62 protein levels indicate that these autophagosomes may not be fully functional. DU145 cells treated with sorafenib undergo a caspase-independent cell death that is inhibited by the RIPK1 inhibitor, necrostatin-1. Furthermore, treatment with sorafenib induces the interaction of RIPK1 with p62, as demonstrated by immunoprecipitation and a proximity ligation assay. Silencing of p62 decreases the RIPK1 protein levels and renders necrostatin-1 ineffective in blocking sorafenib-induced cell death. In summary, the formation of Atg5-deficient autophagosomes in response to sorafenib promotes the interaction of p62 with RIPK leading to cell death by necroptosis. PMID:26416459

  10. Sorafenib-induced defective autophagy promotes cell death by necroptosis

    PubMed Central

    Kharaziha, Pedram; Chioureas, Dimitris; Baltatzis, George; Fonseca, Pedro; Rodriguez, Patricia; Gogvadze, Vladimir; Lennartsson, Lena; Björklund, Ann-Charlotte; Zhivotovsky, Boris; Grandér, Dan; Egevad, Lars; Nilsson, Sten; Panaretakis, Theocharis

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is one of the main cytoprotective mechanisms that cancer cells deploy to withstand the cytotoxic stress and survive the lethal damage induced by anti-cancer drugs. However, under specific conditions, autophagy may, directly or indirectly, induce cell death. In our study, treatment of the Atg5-deficient DU145 prostate cancer cells, with the multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitor, sorafenib, induces mitochondrial damage, autophagy and cell death. Molecular inhibition of autophagy by silencing ULK1 and Beclin1 rescues DU145 cells from cell death indicating that, in this setting, autophagy promotes cell death. Re-expression of Atg5 restores the lipidation of LC3 and rescues DU145 and MEF atg5−/− cells from sorafenib-induced cell death. Despite the lack of Atg5 expression and LC3 lipidation, DU145 cells form autophagosomes as demonstrated by transmission and immuno-electron microscopy, and the formation of LC3 positive foci. However, the lack of cellular content in the autophagosomes, the accumulation of long-lived proteins, the presence of GFP-RFP-LC3 positive foci and the accumulated p62 protein levels indicate that these autophagosomes may not be fully functional. DU145 cells treated with sorafenib undergo a caspase-independent cell death that is inhibited by the RIPK1 inhibitor, necrostatin-1. Furthermore, treatment with sorafenib induces the interaction of RIPK1 with p62, as demonstrated by immunoprecipitation and a proximity ligation assay. Silencing of p62 decreases the RIPK1 protein levels and renders necrostatin-1 ineffective in blocking sorafenib-induced cell death. In summary, the formation of Atg5-deficient autophagosomes in response to sorafenib promotes the interaction of p62 with RIPK leading to cell death by necroptosis. PMID:26416459

  11. Inhibition of autophagy potentiates pemetrexed and simvastatin-induced apoptotic cell death in malignant mesothelioma and non-small cell lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jae-Wan; Kwon, Su-Jin; Park, Do-Sim; Cha, Byong-Ki; Oh, Seon-Hee; Yoon, Kwon-Ha; Jeong, Eun-Taik; Kim, Hak-Ryul

    2015-01-01

    Pemetrexed, a multitarget antifolate used to treat malignant mesothelioma and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), has been shown to stimulate autophagy. In this study, we determined whether autophagy could be induced by pemetrexed and simvastatin cotreatment in malignant mesothelioma and NSCLC cells. Furthermore, we determined whether inhibition of autophagy drives apoptosis in malignant mesothelioma and NSCLC cells. Malignant mesothelioma MSTO-211H and A549 NSCLC cells were treated with pemetrexed and simvastatin alone and in combination to evaluate their effect on autophagy and apoptosis. Cotreatment with pemetrexed and simvastatin induced greater caspase-dependent apoptosis and autophagy than either drug alone in malignant mesothelioma and NSCLC cells. 3-Methyladenine (3-MA), ATG5 siRNA, bafilomycin A, and E64D/pepstatin A enhanced the apoptotic potential of pemetrexed and simvastatin, whereas rapamycin and LY294002 attenuated their induction of caspase-dependent apoptosis. Our data indicate that pemetrexed and simvastatin cotreatment augmented apoptosis and autophagy in malignant mesothelioma and NSCLC cells. Inhibition of pemetrexed and simvastatin-induced autophagy was shown to enhance apoptosis, suggesting that this could be a novel therapeutic strategy against malignant mesothelioma and NSCLC. PMID:26334320

  12. Inhibition of autophagy potentiates pemetrexed and simvastatin-induced apoptotic cell death in malignant mesothelioma and non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Ki-Eun; Kim, Young-Suk; Jung, Jae-Wan; Kwon, Su-Jin; Park, Do-Sim; Cha, Byong-Ki; Oh, Seon-Hee; Yoon, Kwon-Ha; Jeong, Eun-Taik; Kim, Hak-Ryul

    2015-10-01

    Pemetrexed, a multitarget antifolate used to treat malignant mesothelioma and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), has been shown to stimulate autophagy. In this study, we determined whether autophagy could be induced by pemetrexed and simvastatin cotreatment in malignant mesothelioma and NSCLC cells. Furthermore, we determined whether inhibition of autophagy drives apoptosis in malignant mesothelioma and NSCLC cells. Malignant mesothelioma MSTO-211H and A549 NSCLC cells were treated with pemetrexed and simvastatin alone and in combination to evaluate their effect on autophagy and apoptosis. Cotreatment with pemetrexed and simvastatin induced greater caspase-dependent apoptosis and autophagy than either drug alone in malignant mesothelioma and NSCLC cells. 3-Methyladenine (3-MA), ATG5 siRNA, bafilomycin A, and E64D/pepstatin A enhanced the apoptotic potential of pemetrexed and simvastatin, whereas rapamycin and LY294002 attenuated their induction of caspase-dependent apoptosis. Our data indicate that pemetrexed and simvastatin cotreatment augmented apoptosis and autophagy in malignant mesothelioma and NSCLC cells. Inhibition of pemetrexed and simvastatin-induced autophagy was shown to enhance apoptosis, suggesting that this could be a novel therapeutic strategy against malignant mesothelioma and NSCLC.

  13. Honokiol exhibits enhanced antitumor effects with chloroquine by inducing cell death and inhibiting autophagy in human non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lv, Xiaoqin; Liu, Fang; Shang, Yue; Chen, Shu-Zhen

    2015-09-01

    Honokiol (HNK), a potential antitumor compound, has been widely studied in recent years. It induces apoptosis and affects autophagy in cancer cells, yet the mechanism of its antitumor efficacy remains obscure. Chloroquine (CQ), an autophagy inhibitor, is often applied to sensitize antitumor drugs in clinical trials. Here, we investigated the antitumor effect of HNK or CQ alone or in combination in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Using an experimental approach, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) or sulforhodamine B (SRB) was used to determine the cytotoxicity of the agents. The expression levels of proteins were detected by western blotting. Apoptosis was examined via Annexin V-FITC and PI staining. H460 cell xenografts in nude mice were used to study the effects of HNK and/or CQ in vivo. Transfection with siRNA was applied to knock down cathepsin D. The results demonstrated the enhanced effects of HNK combined with CQ on the inhibition of proliferation, induction of apoptosis in vitro and the reduction in growth in vivo. It was confirmed that HNK and/or CQ triggered apoptosis via a caspase-dependent manner. Furthermore, HNK significantly increased the expression of p62 and LC3-Ⅱ in the A549 and H460 cells and inhibited autophagy and induced apoptosis in a cathepsin D-involved manner. In conclusion, an enhanced antitumor effect was demonstrated following treatment with HNK combined with CQ by inhibiting autophagy and inducing apoptosis via a caspase-dependent and cathepsin D-involved manner. This combination may be a novel and useful antitumor approach for chemotherapy in NSCLC. PMID:26136140

  14. Death Concerns among Individuals Newly Diagnosed with Lung Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehto, Rebecca; Therrien, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Confronting the reality of death is an important challenge for individuals facing life-threatening illness such as lung cancer, the leading cause of cancer death. Few studies, however, document the nature of death-related concerns in individuals newly diagnosed with lung cancer. The aims of this exploratory study were to examine unsolicited…

  15. Crude Extracts of Marine-derived and Soil Fungi of the Genus Neosartorya Exhibit Selective Anticancer Activity by Inducing Cell Death in Colon, Breast and Skin Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Alice Abreu; Castro-Carvalho, Bruno; Prata-Sena, Maria; Dethoup, Tida; Buttachon, Suradet; Kijjoa, Anake; Rocha, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Background: The crude ethyl acetate extracts of marine-derived fungi Neosartorya tsunodae KUFC 9213 (E1) and N. laciniosa KUFC 7896 (E2), and soil fungus N. fischeri KUFC 6344 (E3) were evaluated for their in vitro anticancer activities on a panel of seven human cancer cell lines. Materials and Methods: The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay was performed, after 48 h treatments with different concentrations of extracts, to determine their concentration of the extract or Dox that inhibits cell viability by 50% for each cell line. The effects of the crude extracts on DNA damage, clonogenic potential and their ability to induce cell death were also assessed. Results: E1 was found to the void of anti-proliferative effects. E2 was shown to decrease the clonogenic potential in human colorectal carcinoma cell line (HCT116), human malignant melanoma cell line (A375), human breast adenocarcinoma cell line (MCF7), and human caucasian colon adenocarcinoma Grade II cell line (HT29) cells, whereas E3 showed such effect only in HCT116 and MCF7 cells. Both extracts were found to increase DNA damage in some cell lines. E2 was found to induce cell death in HT29, HCT116, MCF7, and A375 cells while extract E3 increased cell death in MCF7 and HCT116 cell lines. Conclusion: The results reveal that E2 and E3 possess anticancer activities in human colon carcinoma, breast adenocarcinoma, and melanoma cells, validating the interest for an identification of molecular targets involved in the anticancer activity. SUMMARY The crude ethyl acetate extract of N. tsunodae (E1) did not decrease cell viability in any of the tested cell linesThe crude ethyl acetate extracts of N. laciniosa (E2) and N. fischeri (E3) decreased cell proliferation in some human cancer cell lines tested at both short- and long-termN. laciniosa (E2) induced a significant increase in the number of cell death, in part, due to the induction of DNA damageN. fischeri (E3) induce cell death but in

  16. Pathogen Tactics to Manipulate Plant Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Mukhtar, M Shahid; McCormack, Maggie E; Argueso, Cristiana T; Pajerowska-Mukhtar, Karolina M

    2016-07-11

    Cell death is a vital process for multicellular organisms. Programmed cell death (PCD) functions in a variety of processes including growth, development, and immune responses for homeostasis maintenance. In particular, plants and animals utilize PCD to control pathogen invasion and infected cell populations. Despite some similarity, there are a number of key differences between how these organisms initiate and regulate cell death. In contrast to animals, plants are sessile, lack a circulatory system, and have additional cellular structures, including cell walls and chloroplasts. Plant cells have the autonomous ability to induce localized cell death using conserved eukaryotic pathways as well as unique plant-specific pathways. Thus, in order to successfully infect host cells, pathogens must subvert immune responses and avoid detection to prevent PCD and allow infection. Here we discuss the roles of cell death in plant immune responses and the tactics pathogens utilize to avert cell death. PMID:27404256

  17. Antimicrobial peptide FF/CAP18 induces apoptotic cell death in HCT116 colon cancer cells via changes in the metabolic profile.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Kengo; Fukuda, Tomokazu; Isogai, Hiroshi; Okumura, Kazuhiko; Krstic-Demonacos, Marija; Isogai, Emiko

    2015-04-01

    Metabolic reprogramming is one of the hallmarks of cancer and can be targeted by therapeutic agents. We previously reported that cathelicidin-related or modified antimicrobial peptides, such as FF/CAP18, have antiproliferative effects on the squamous cell carcinoma cell line SAS-H1, and the colon carcinoma cell line HCT116. Although antimicrobial peptides have potential use in the development of new therapeutic strategies, their effects on the metabolism of cancer cells are poorly understood. Here, we investigated changes in the levels of metabolites in HCT116 cells caused by FF/CAP18, via capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry (CE-TOFMS). Analysis of the 177 intracellular metabolites and 113 metabolites in conditioned medium that were detected by CE-TOFMS, revealed dramatic changes in the metabolic profile of HCT116 cells after treatment with FF/CAP18. The metabolic profile showed that the levels of most metabolites in the major metabolic pathways supported the rapid proliferation of cancer cells. Purine metabolism, glycolysis, and the TCA cycle, were altered in FF/CAP18-treated cells in a dose-dependent manner. Our present study provides mechanistic insights into the anticancer effects of antimicrobial peptides that show great potential as new therapies for colon cancer.

  18. Combination of carbon ion beam and gemcitabine causes irreparable DNA damage and death of radioresistant pancreatic cancer stem-like cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sai, Sei; Wakai, Toshifumi; Vares, Guillaume; Yamada, Shigeru; Kamijo, Takehiko; Kamada, Tadashi; Shirai, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    We try to elucidate whether a carbon ion beam alone or in combination with gemcitabine has advantages over X-ray in targeting putative pancreatic cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) in vitro and in vivo. Colony, spheroid formation and tumorigenicity assays confirmed that CD44+/ESA+ cells sorted from PANC1 and PK45 cells have more CSC properties than CD44−/ESA− cells. The number of colonies and spheroids formed from CSCs after carbon ion beam irradiation was significantly reduced compared to after X-ray irradiation, and they were extremely highly suppressed when carbon ion beam combined with gemcitabine. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for the carbon ion beam relative to X-ray at the D10 levels for CSCs were 2.23-2.66. Expressions of multiple cell death-related genes were remarkably highly induced, and large numbers of γH2AX foci in CSCs were formed after carbon ion beam combined with gemcitabine. The highly expressed CSC markers were significantly inhibited after 30 Gy of carbon ion beam and almost lost after 25 Gy carbon ion beam combined with 50 mg/kg gemcitabine. In conclusion, a carbon ion beam combined with gemcitabine has superior potential to kill pancreatic CSCs via irreparable clustered DSB compared to a carbon ion alone or X-rays combined with gemcitabine. PMID:25849939

  19. The potential utility of acetyltanshinone IIA in the treatment of HER2-overexpressed breast cancer: Induction of cancer cell death by targeting apoptotic and metabolic signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Guerram, Mounia; Jiang, Zhen-Zhou; Yousef, Bashir Alsiddig; Hamdi, Aida Mejda; Hassan, Hozeifa Mohamed; Yuan, Zi-Qiao; Luo, Hou-Wei; Zhu, Xiong; Zhang, Lu-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Increased lipogenesis and protein synthesis is a hallmark of cancer cell proliferation, survival, and metastatic progression and is under intense investigation as a potential antineoplastic target. Acetyltanshinone IIA (ATA) is a compound that was obtained from chemical modifications of tanshinone IIA (TIIA), a potent anticancer agent extracted from the dried roots of the Chinese herbal medicine Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge. A previous investigation indicated that ATA is more effective in inhibiting the growth of breast cancer especially cells with HER2 overexpression. However, the molecular mechanism(s) mediating this cytotoxic effect on HER2-positive breast cancer remained undefined. Studies described here report that ATA induced G1/S phase arrest and apoptosis in the HER2-positive MDA-MB-453, SK-BR-3, and BT-474 breast cancer cell lines. Mechanistic investigations revealed that the ATA-induced apoptosis effect is associated with remarkably down-regulation of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) EGFR/HER2 and inhibition of their downstream pro-survival signaling pathways. Interestingly, ATA was found to trigger oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stresses and to activate AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) leading to inactivation of key enzymes involved in lipid and protein biogenesis. Intraperitoneal administration of ATA significantly inhibited the growth of MDA-MB-453 xenografts in athymic mice without causing weight loss and any other side effects. Additionally, transwell migration, invasion, and wound healing assays revealed that ATA could suppress tumor angiogenesis in vitro. Taken together, our data suggest that ATA may have broad utility in the treatment of HER2-overexpressed breast cancers. PMID:26068969

  20. Death receptors as targets for anti-cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Papenfuss, Kerstin; Cordier, Stefanie M; Walczak, Henning

    2008-01-01

    Human tumour cells are characterized by their ability to avoid the normal regulatory mechanisms of cell growth, division and death. The classical chemotherapy aims to kill tumour cells by causing DNA damage-induced apoptosis. However, as many tumour cells posses mutations in intracellular apoptosis-sensing molecules like p53, they are not capable of inducing apoptosis on their own and are therefore resistant to chemotherapy. With the discovery of the death receptors the opportunity arose to directly trigger apoptosis from the outside of tumour cells, thereby circumventing chemotherapeutic resistance. Death receptors belong to the tumour necrosis factor receptor superfamily, with tumour necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-1, CD95 and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand-R1 and -R2 being the most prominent members. This review covers the current knowledge about these four death receptors, summarizes pre-clinical approaches engaging these death receptors in anti-cancer therapy and also gives an overview about their application in clinical trials conducted to date. PMID:19210756

  1. Quinovic acid glycosides purified fraction from Uncaria tomentosa induces cell death by apoptosis in the T24 human bladder cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Fabrícia; Kaiser, Samuel; Rockenbach, Liliana; Figueiró, Fabrício; Bergamin, Letícia Scussel; da Cunha, Fernanda Monte; Morrone, Fernanda Bueno; Ortega, George González; Battastini, Ana Maria Oliveira

    2014-05-01

    Bladder cancer is the second most prevalent malignancy in the genitourinary tract and remains a therapeutic challenge. In the search for new treatments, researchers have attempted to find compounds with low toxicity. With this goal in mind, Uncaria tomentosa is noteworthy because the bark and root of this species are widely used in traditional medicine and in adjuvant therapy for the treatment of numerous diseases. The objective of this study was to investigate the antitumor effect of one purified bioactive fraction of U.tomentosa bark on cell proliferation in two human bladder cancer cell lines, T24 and RT4. Quinovic acid glycosides purified fraction (QAPF) of U.tomentosa decreased the growth and viability of both T24 and RT4 cell lines. In T24 cells, QAPF induced apoptosis by activating caspase-3 and NF-κB. Further study showed that this fraction does not induce cell cycle arrest and does not alter PTEN and ERK levels. In conclusion, we demonstrated that QAPF of U.tomentosa has a potent inhibitory effect on the growth of human bladder cancer cell lines by inducing apoptosis through modulation of NF-κB, and we suggest that QAPF may become a potential therapeutic agent for the prevention and/or treatment of this cancer.

  2. Cell death: a dynamic response concept.

    PubMed

    Loos, Benjamin; Engelbrecht, Anna-Mart

    2009-07-01

    Autophagy, apoptosis and necrosis have previously been described as distinct static processes that induce and execute cell death. Due to an increased use of novel techniques in mapping cellular death-techniques which allow for reporting of real-time data-the existence of "grey zones" between cell death modes and the existence of the "point of no return" within these have been revealed. This revelation demands the integration of new concepts in describing the cellular death process. Furthermore, since the contribution of autophagy in cell death or cell survival is still poorly understood, it is important to accurately describe its function within the dynamic framework of cell death. In this review cell death is viewed as a dynamic and integrative cellular response to ensure the highest likelihood of self-preservation. Suggestions are offered for conceptualizing cell death modes and their morphological features, both individually and in relation to one another. It addresses the need for distinguishing between dying cells and dead cells so as to better locate and control the onset of cell death. Most importantly, the fundamental role of autophagy, autophagic flux, and the effects of the intracellular metabolic environment on the kinetics of the cell death modes are stressed. It also contextualizes the kinetic dimension of cell death as a process and aims to contribute towards a better understanding of autophagy as a key mechanism within this process. Understanding the dynamic nature of the cell death process and autophagy's central role can reveal new insight for therapeutic intervention in preventing cell death.

  3. Adjuvant Cationic Liposomes Presenting MPL and IL-12 Induce Cell Death, Suppress Tumor Growth, and Alter the Cellular Phenotype of Tumors in a Murine Model of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) process and present antigens to T lymphocytes, inducing potent immune responses when encountered in association with activating signals, such as pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Using the 4T1 murine model of breast cancer, cationic liposomes containing monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL) and interleukin (IL)-12 were administered by intratumoral injection. Combination multivalent presentation of the Toll-like receptor-4 ligand MPL and cytotoxic 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trmethylammonium-propane lipids induced cell death, decreased cellular proliferation, and increased serum levels of IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. The addition of recombinant IL-12 further suppressed tumor growth and increased expression of IL-1β, TNF-α, and interferon-γ. IL-12 also increased the percentage of cytolytic T cells, DC, and F4/80+ macrophages in the tumor. While single agent therapy elevated levels of nitric oxide synthase 3-fold above basal levels in the tumor, combination therapy with MPL cationic liposomes and IL-12 stimulated a 7-fold increase, supporting the observed cell cycle arrest (loss of Ki-67 expression) and apoptosis (TUNEL positive). In mice bearing dual tumors, the growth of distal, untreated tumors mirrored that of liposome-treated tumors, supporting the presence of a systemic immune response. PMID:25179345

  4. Tetrandrine induces cell death in SAS human oral cancer cells through caspase activation-dependent apoptosis and LC3-I and LC3-II activation-dependent autophagy.

    PubMed

    Huang, An-Cheng; Lien, Jin-Cherng; Lin, Meng-Wei; Yang, Jai-Sing; Wu, Ping-Ping; Chang, Shu-Jen; Lai, Tung-Yuan

    2013-08-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that autophagy is associated with cancer development. Thus, agents to induce autophagy could be employed in some cases for the treatment of cancer. Our results showed that tetrandrine significantly decreased the viability of SAS cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Tetrandrine induced nuclear condensation, demonstrated by DAPI staining. The early events in apoptosis analysed by Annexin V/PI staining indicated that the percentage of cells staining positive for Annexin V was slightly increased in SAS cells with tetrandrine treatment but was much lower following bafilomycin A1 pre-treatment. Tetrandrine caused AVO and MDC induction in SAS cells in a concentration-dependent manner by fluorescence microscopy. Tetrandrine also caused LC-3 expression in SAS cells in a time-dependent manner. Our results show that tetrandrine treatment induced the levels of cleaved caspase-3 in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Tetrandrine treatment induced the levels of LC-3 II, Atg-5, beclin-1, p-S6, p-ULK, p-mTOR, p-Akt (S473) and raptor. Tetrandrine decreased cell viability, but bafilomycin A1, 3-MA, chloroquine and NAC protected tetrandrine-treated SAS cells against decrease of cell viability. Atg-5, beclin-1 siRNA decreased tetrandrine-induced cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved PARP in SAS cells and protected tetrandrine-treated SAS cells against decrease in cell viability. Chloroquine, NAC and bafilomycin A1 also decreased tetrandrine-induced cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved PARP in SAS cells. Our results indicate the tetrandrine induces apoptosis and autophagy of SAS human cancer cells via caspase-dependent and LC3-I and LC3-II‑dependent pathways.

  5. The convergence of radiation and immunogenic cell death signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Encouse B.; Pellicciotta, Ilenia; Demaria, Sandra; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary H.; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2012-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) triggers programmed cell death in tumor cells through a variety of highly regulated processes. Radiation-induced tumor cell death has been studied extensively in vitro and is widely attributed to multiple distinct mechanisms, including apoptosis, necrosis, mitotic catastrophe (MC), autophagy, and senescence, which may occur concurrently. When considering tumor cell death in the context of an organism, an emerging body of evidence suggests there is a reciprocal relationship in which radiation stimulates the immune system, which in turn contributes to tumor cell kill. As a result, traditional measurements of radiation-induced tumor cell death, in vitro, fail to represent the extent of clinically observed responses, including reductions in loco-regional failure rates and improvements in metastases free and overall survival. Hence, understanding the immunological responses to the type of radiation-induced cell death is critical. In this review, the mechanisms of radiation-induced tumor cell death are described, with particular focus on immunogenic cell death (ICD). Strategies combining radiotherapy with specific chemotherapies or immunotherapies capable of inducing a repertoire of cancer specific immunogens might potentiate tumor control not only by enhancing cell kill but also through the induction of a successful anti-tumor vaccination that improves patient survival. PMID:22891162

  6. 3,3'-Diindolylmethane (DIM) and its ring-substituted halogenated analogs (ring-DIMs) induce differential mechanisms of survival and death in androgen-dependent and -independent prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Alexander A; Draz, Hossam; Montes-Grajales, Diana; Olivero-Verbél, Jesus; Safe, Stephen H; Sanderson, J Thomas

    2015-05-01

    We recently reported that novel ring-substituted analogs of 3,3'-diindolylmethane (ring-DIMs) induce apoptosis and necrosis in androgen-dependent and -independent prostate cancer cells. In this paper, we have focused on the mechanism(s) associated with ring-DIM-mediated cell death, and on identifying the specific intracellular target(s) of these compounds. The 4,4'- and 7,7'-dichloroDIMs and 4,4'- and 7,7'-dibromoDIMs induced the death of LNCaP, C42B and DU145 prostate cancer cells, but not that of immortalized normal human prostate epithelial (RWPE-1) cells. Ring-DIMs caused the early loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and decreased mitochondrial ATP generation in prostate cancer cells. Cyclosporin A, an inhibitor of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, inhibited ring-DIM-mediated cell death, and salubrinal, an inhibitor of ER stress, inhibited cell death mediated only by 4,4'-dihaloDIMs. We found that although salubrinal did not inhibit the onset of ER stress, it prevented 4,4'-dibromoDIM mediated loss of MMP. Salubrinal potentiated cell death in response to 7,7'-dihaloDIMs and DIM, and this effect concurred with increased loss of MMP. Using in silico 3-D docking affinity analysis, we identified Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) as a potential direct target for the most toxic ring-DIM, 4,4'-dibromoDIM. An inhibitor of CaMKII, KN93, but not its inactive analog KN92, abrogated cell death mediated by 4,4'-dibromoDIM. The ring-DIMs induced ER stress and autophagy, but these processes were not necessary for ring-DIM-mediated cell death. Inhibition of autophagy with bafilomycin A1, 3-methyladenine or by LC3B gene silencing sensitized LNCaP and C42B, but not ATG5-deficient DU145 cells to ring-DIM- and DIM-mediated cell death. We propose that autophagy induced by the ring-DIMs and DIM has a cytoprotective function in prostate cancer cells. PMID:26124925

  7. 3,3′-Diindolylmethane (DIM) and its ring-substituted halogenated analogs (ring-DIMs) induce differential mechanisms of survival and death in androgen-dependent and –independent prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Montes-Grajales, Diana; Olivero-Verbél, Jesus; Safe, Stephen H.; Sanderson, J. Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported that novel ring-substituted analogs of 3,3′-diindolylmethane (ring-DIMs) induce apoptosis and necrosis in androgen-dependent and –independent prostate cancer cells. In this paper, we have focused on the mechanism(s) associated with ring-DIM-mediated cell death, and on identifying the specific intracellular target(s) of these compounds. The 4,4′- and 7,7′-dichloroDIMs and 4,4′- and 7,7′-dibromoDIMs induced the death of LNCaP, C42B and DU145 prostate cancer cells, but not that of immortalized normal human prostate epithelial (RWPE-1) cells. Ring-DIMs caused the early loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and decreased mitochondrial ATP generation in prostate cancer cells. Cyclosporin A, an inhibitor of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, inhibited ring-DIM-mediated cell death, and salubrinal, an inhibitor of ER stress, inhibited cell death mediated only by 4,4′-dihaloDIMs. We found that although salubrinal did not inhibit the onset of ER stress, it prevented 4,4′-dibromoDIM mediated loss of MMP. Salubrinal potentiated cell death in response to 7,7′-dihaloDIMs and DIM, and this effect concurred with increased loss of MMP. Using in silico 3-D docking affinity analysis, we identified Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) as a potential direct target for the most toxic ring-DIM, 4,4′-dibromoDIM. An inhibitor of CaMKII, KN93, but not its inactive analog KN92, abrogated cell death mediated by 4,4′-dibromoDIM. The ring-DIMs induced ER stress and autophagy, but these processes were not necessary for ring-DIM-mediated cell death. Inhibition of autophagy with bafilomycin A1, 3-methyladenine or by LC3B gene silencing sensitized LNCaP and C42B, but not ATG5-deficient DU145 cells to ring-DIM- and DIM-mediated cell death. We propose that autophagy induced by the ring-DIMs and DIM has a cytoprotective function in prostate cancer cells. PMID:26124925

  8. Molecular definitions of cell death subroutines: recommendations of the Nomenclature Committee on Cell Death 2012

    PubMed Central

    Galluzzi, L; Vitale, I; Abrams, J M; Alnemri, E S; Baehrecke, E H; Blagosklonny, M V; Dawson, T M; Dawson, V L; El-Deiry, W S; Fulda, S; Gottlieb, E; Green, D R; Hengartner, M O; Kepp, O; Knight, R A; Kumar, S; Lipton, S A; Lu, X; Madeo, F; Malorni, W; Mehlen, P; Nuñez, G; Peter, M E; Piacentini, M; Rubinsztein, D C; Shi, Y; Simon, H-U; Vandenabeele, P; White, E; Yuan, J; Zhivotovsky, B; Melino, G; Kroemer, G

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, the Nomenclature Committee on Cell Death (NCCD) proposed a set of recommendations for the definition of distinct cell death morphologies and for the appropriate use of cell death-related terminology, including ‘apoptosis', ‘necrosis' and ‘mitotic catastrophe'. In view of the substantial progress in the biochemical and genetic exploration of cell death, time has come to switch from morphological to molecular definitions of cell death modalities. Here we propose a functional classification of cell death subroutines that applies to both in vitro and in vivo settings and includes extrinsic apoptosis, caspase-dependent or -independent intrinsic apoptosis, regulated necrosis, autophagic cell death and mitotic catastrophe. Moreover, we discuss the utility of expressions indicating additional cell death modalities. On the basis of the new, revised NCCD classification, cell death subroutines are defined by a series of precise, measurable biochemical features. PMID:21760595

  9. Validation of an RNA cell cycle progression score for predicting death from prostate cancer in a conservatively managed needle biopsy cohort

    PubMed Central

    Cuzick, J; Stone, S; Fisher, G; Yang, Z H; North, B V; Berney, D M; Beltran, L; Greenberg, D; Møller, H; Reid, J E; Gutin, A; Lanchbury, J S; Brawer, M; Scardino, P

    2015-01-01

    Background: The natural history of prostate cancer is highly variable and difficult to predict accurately. Better markers are needed to guide management and avoid unnecessary treatment. In this study, we validate the prognostic value of a cell cycle progression score (CCP score) independently and in a prespecified linear combination with standard clinical variables, that is, a clinical-cell-cycle-risk (CCR) score. Methods: Paraffin sections from 761 men with clinically localized prostate cancer diagnosed by needle biopsy and managed conservatively in the United Kingdom, mostly between 2000 and 2003. The primary end point was prostate cancer death. Clinical variables consisted of centrally reviewed Gleason score, baseline PSA level, age, clinical stage, and extent of disease; these were combined into a single predefined risk assessment (CAPRA) score. Full data were available for 585 men who formed a fully independent validation cohort. Results: In univariate analysis, the CCP score hazard ratio was 2.08 (95% CI (1.76, 2.46), P<10−13) for one unit change of the score. In multivariate analysis including CAPRA, the CCP score hazard ratio was 1.76 (95% CI (1.44, 2.14), P<10−6). The predefined CCR score was highly predictive, hazard ratio 2.17 (95% CI (1.83, 2.57), χ2=89.0, P<10−20) and captured virtually all available prognostic information. Conclusions: The CCP score provides significant pretreatment prognostic information that cannot be provided by clinical variables and is useful for determining which patients can be safely managed conservatively, avoiding radical treatment. PMID:26103570

  10. Regulation of death receptors-Relevance in cancer therapies

    SciTech Connect

    Thonel, A. de; Eriksson, J.E. . E-mail: john.eriksson@btk.fi

    2005-09-01

    Apoptosis is an essential non-inflammatory mechanism for cell removal, which occurs during both physiological and pathological conditions. Apoptosis is characteristically executed by cysteine proteases, termed caspases. The most specific way to activate the caspases machinery is through death receptors (DRs), such as the tumor necrosis factor (TNFR), Fas receptor (FasR), and TRAIL (TRAIL-R). The apoptotic signaling is tightly regulated by the balance of pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic proteins and an imbalance between cell death and proliferation may cause numerous diseases, including cancers. The intensive research during the past decade has delineated the basic mechanisms of apoptosis and outlined many important molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of apoptosis. There is also a better understanding of how the regulation of apoptosis can be disturbed in human cancer cells. The interplay between DRs signaling and anticancer drugs has offered new concepts for the development of highly specific therapeutical agents. Here we review the current understanding of the different molecular mechanisms that regulate DR-mediated apoptosis and the defects in apoptotic signaling discovered in cancer cells. In light of this knowledge, new promising target-based agents for future cancer therapies have been developed.

  11. Programmed Cell Death During Caenorhabditis elegans Development.

    PubMed

    Conradt, Barbara; Wu, Yi-Chun; Xue, Ding

    2016-08-01

    Programmed cell death is an integral component of Caenorhabditis elegans development. Genetic and reverse genetic studies in C. elegans have led to the identification of many genes and conserved cell death pathways that are important for the specification of which cells should live or die, the activation of the suicide program, and the dismantling and removal of dying cells. Molecular, cell biological, and biochemical studies have revealed the underlying mechanisms that control these three phases of programmed cell death. In particular, the interplay of transcriptional regulatory cascades and networks involving multiple transcriptional regulators is crucial in activating the expression of the key death-inducing gene egl-1 and, in some cases, the ced-3 gene in cells destined to die. A protein interaction cascade involving EGL-1, CED-9, CED-4, and CED-3 results in the activation of the key cell death protease CED-3, which is tightly controlled by multiple positive and negative regulators. The activation of the CED-3 caspase then initiates the cell disassembly process by cleaving and activating or inactivating crucial CED-3 substrates; leading to activation of multiple cell death execution events, including nuclear DNA fragmentation, mitochondrial elimination, phosphatidylserine externalization, inactivation of survival signals, and clearance of apoptotic cells. Further studies of programmed cell death in C. elegans will continue to advance our understanding of how programmed cell death is regulated, activated, and executed in general. PMID:27516615

  12. Caspase-independent cell death revealed in human gastric cancer cell lines, MKN45 and KATO III treated with phenoxazine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Kasuga, Teruhiko; Tabuchi, Takafumi; Shirato, Ken; Imaizumi, Kazuhiko; Tomoda, Akio

    2007-02-01

    We examined whether phenoxazine derivatives such as 2-amino-4,4alpha-dihydro-4alpha,7-dimethyl-3H-phenoxazine-3-one (Phx-1) and 2-aminophenoxazine-3-one (Phx-3) may have anticancer effects on the human gastric cancer cell lines, MKN45, MKN74, MKN7 and KATO III in vitro. Phx-1 inhibited the growth of these cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The IC50 was approximately 65, 25, 100 and 70 microM for MKN45, MKN74, MKN7 and KATO III respectively, after 72 h. Phx-3 exerted stronger antiproliferative effects against these cancer cells (IC50: approximately 5, 1, 10 and 10 microM for MKN45, MKN74, MKN7 and KATO III, respectively, after 72 h) than Phx-1. Phx-1 and Phx-3 increased the population of TUNEL-positive cells in MKN45 and KATO III time-dependently from 24 to 72 h, suggesting that Phx-1 and Phx-3 have apoptotic activity against these gastric cancer cells. The activity of effector caspase-3 significantly increased in MKN45 treated with Phx-3 for 24 h, but did not altered in the cells treated with Phx-1 for 24 h. When z-VAD-fmk, a pan-caspase inhibitor, was co-treated for 24 h, Phx-3-stimulated caspase-3 activity in MKN45 was reversed to the levels of normal activity, while the antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of Phx-3 against the cells were maintained. The activity of caspase-3 was not activated in KATO III by 24 h exposure for Phx-1 or Phx-3. In conclusion, both phenoxazines prevent the growth of the human gastric cancer cell lines, MKN45 and KATO III in vitro, and cause the apoptosis of these cell lines via a caspase-independent pathway. Although the intracellular action mechanisms of Phx-1 and Phx-3 are still unclear, these phenoxazines may be useful for the treatment of gastric cancer in the future. PMID:17203181

  13. Heme oxygenase-1 accelerates erastin-induced ferroptotic cell death

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Min-Young; Park, Eunhee

    2015-01-01

    The oncogenic RAS-selective lethal small molecule Erastin triggers a unique iron-dependent form of nonapoptotic cell death termed ferroptosis. Ferroptosis is dependent upon the production of intracellular iron-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS), but not other metals. However, key regulators remain unknown. The heme oxygenase (HO) is a major intracellular source of iron. In this study, the role of heme oxygenase in Erastin-triggered ferroptotic cancer cell death has been investigated. Zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP), a HO-1 inhibitor, prevented Erastin-triggered ferroptotic cancer cell death. Furthermore, Erastin induced the protein and mRNA levels of HO-1 in HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cells. HO-1+/+ and HO-1−/− fibroblast, HO-1 overexpression, and chycloheximide-treated experiments revealed that the expression of HO-1 has a decisive effects in Erastin-triggered cell death. Hemin and CO-releasing molecules (CORM) promote Erastin-induced ferroptotic cell death, not by biliverdin and bilirubin. In addition, hemin and CORM accelerate the HO-1 expression in the presence of Erastin and increase membranous lipid peroxidation. Thus, HO-1 is an essential enzyme for iron-dependent lipid peroxidation during ferroptotic cell death. PMID:26405158

  14. Cell biology. Metabolic control of cell death.

    PubMed

    Green, Douglas R; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kroemer, Guido

    2014-09-19

    Beyond their contribution to basic metabolism, the major cellular organelles, in particular mitochondria, can determine whether cells respond to stress in an adaptive or suicidal manner. Thus, mitochondria can continuously adapt their shape to changing bioenergetic demands as they are subjected to quality control by autophagy, or they can undergo a lethal permeabilization process that initiates apoptosis. Along similar lines, multiple proteins involved in metabolic circuitries, including oxidative phosphorylation and transport of metabolites across membranes, may participate in the regulated or catastrophic dismantling of organelles. Many factors that were initially characterized as cell death regulators are now known to physically or functionally interact with metabolic enzymes. Thus, several metabolic cues regulate the propensity of cells to activate self-destructive programs, in part by acting on nutrient sensors. This suggests the existence of "metabolic checkpoints" that dictate cell fate in response to metabolic fluctuations. Here, we discuss recent insights into the intersection between metabolism and cell death regulation that have major implications for the comprehension and manipulation of unwarranted cell loss.

  15. Radiation-induced Cochlea hair cell death: mechanisms and protection.

    PubMed

    Tan, Pei-Xin; Du, Sha-Sha; Ren, Chen; Yao, Qi-Wei; Yuan, Ya-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Cochlea hair cell death is regarded to be responsible for the radiation-induced sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), which is one of the principal complications of radiotherapy (RT) for head and neck cancers. In this mini- review, we focus on the current progresses trying to unravel mechanisms of radiation-induced hair cell death and find out possible protection. P53, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathways have been proposed as pivotal in the processes leading to radiation hair cell death. Potential protectants, such as amifostine, N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and epicatechin (EC) , are claimed to be effective at reducing radiation- inducedhair cell death. The RT dosage, selection and application of concurrent chemotherapy should be pre- examined in order to minimize the damage to cochlea hair cells.

  16. Toll-Like Receptor 7 Agonist Therapy with Imidazoquinoline Enhances Cancer Cell Death and Increases Lymphocytic Infiltration and Proinflammatory Cytokine Production in Established Tumors of a Renal Cell Carcinoma Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Kauffman, Eric C.; Liu, Huixian; Schwartz, Michael J.; Scherr, Douglas S.

    2012-01-01

    Imidazoquinolines are synthetic toll-like receptor 7 and 8 agonists and potent dendritic cell activators with established anticancer activity. Here we test the hypothesis that imidazoquinoline has in vivo efficacy within established renal cell carcinoma (RCC) tumors. Immunocompetent mice bearing syngeneic RCC xenografts were treated with imidazoquinoline or placebo at two separate time points. Harvested tumors were assayed by TUNEL/caspase-3/Ki67 immunostains to evaluate cell death/apoptosis/proliferation, and CD3/B220/CD45 immunostains to evaluate T-cell lymphocyte/B-cell lymphocyte/pan-leukocyte tumor infiltration. ELISA measurement of tumor and serum levels of proinflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and MCP-1, was performed. A single imidazoquinoline dose significantly decreased RCC tumor growth by 50% and repeat dosing compounded the effect, without observed weight loss or other toxicity. Tumor immunostaining revealed significant increases in cell death and apoptosis without changes in cell proliferation, supporting induction of apoptosis as the primary mechanism of tumor growth suppression. Imidazoquinoline treatment also significantly enhanced peritumoral aggregation and intratumoral infiltration by T-cell lymphocytes, while increasing intratumoral (but not serum) levels of proinflammatory cytokines. In conclusion, imidazoquinoline treatment enhances T-cell lymphocyte infiltration and proinflammatory cytokine production within established mouse RCC tumors, while suppressing tumor growth via induction of cancer cell apoptosis. These findings support a therapeutic role for imidazoquinoline in RCC. PMID:22481916

  17. Achyranthes aspera Root Extracts Induce Human Colon Cancer Cell (COLO-205) Death by Triggering the Mitochondrial Apoptosis Pathway and S Phase Cell Cycle Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Shagun; Tandon, Simran

    2014-01-01

    Achyranthes aspera (AA) has been used traditionally for the cure of various disorders. However, the action of root extracts of AA as anticancer agent and its cellular mechanism remain unclear. The aim was to screen the antitumor effect of ethanolic (EAA) and aqueous (AAA) root extracts on the growth of colon cancer COLO-205 cells by testing their cytotoxicity, followed by their effect on clonogenicity, migration, and induction of apoptosis. Mechanisms leading to apoptosis and cell cycle arrest were also investigated by expression studies of caspase-9, caspase-3, Bax, Bcl-2, p16, p21, and p27 genes, followed by flow cytometric analysis for cell cycle distribution. Cytotoxicity screening of AA extracts indicated greater cytotoxic activity of AAA extract against COLO-205 cells. A series of events marked by apoptosis revealed loss of cell viability, chromatin condensation, and DNA fragmentation in AAA treated cells to a greater extent. The mRNA expression levels of caspase-9, caspase-3, Bax, p16, p21, and p27 were markedly increased in the AAA treated cells, along with decreased Bcl-2 expression. The cell cycle arrest at S phase was detected by flow cytometric analysis after treatment with AAA. Overall the study signifies the aqueous extracts as a promising therapeutic candidate against cancer. PMID:25401123

  18. Microenvironmental Effects of Cell Death in Malignant Disease.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Christopher D; Ford, Catriona A; Voss, Jorine J L P

    2016-01-01

    Although apoptosis is well recognized as a cell death program with clear anticancer roles, accumulating evidence linking apoptosis with tissue repair and regeneration indicates that its relationship with malignant disease is more complex than previously thought. Here we review how the responses of neighboring cells in the microenvironment of apoptotic tumor cells may contribute to the cell birth/cell death disequilibrium that provides the basis for cancerous tissue emergence and growth. We describe the bioactive properties of apoptotic cells and consider, in particular, how apoptosis of tumor cells can engender a range of responses including pro-oncogenic signals having proliferative, angiogenic, reparatory, and immunosuppressive features. Drawing on the parallels between wound healing, tissue regeneration and cancer, we propose the concept of the "onco-regenerative niche," a cell death-driven generic network of tissue repair and regenerative mechanisms that are hijacked in cancer. Finally, we consider how the responses to cell death in tumors can be targeted to provide more effective and long-lasting therapies. PMID:27558817

  19. Combined treatment with SAHA, bortezomib, and clarithromycin for concomitant targeting of aggresome formation and intracellular proteolytic pathways enhances ER stress-mediated cell death in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Seiichiro; Moriya, Shota; Che, Xiao-Fang; Yokoyama, Tomohisa; Kohno, Norio; Miyazawa, Keisuke

    2013-07-19

    The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and the autophagy-lysosome pathway are two major intracellular protein degradation systems. We previously reported that clarithromycin (CAM) blocks autophagy flux, and that combined treatment with CAM and proteasome inhibitor bortezomib (BZ) enhances ER-stress-mediated apoptosis in breast cancer cells, whereas treatment with CAM alone results in almost no cytotoxicity. Since HDAC6 is involved in aggresome formation, which is recognized as a cytoprotective response serving to sequester misfolded proteins and facilitate their clearance by autophagy, we further investigated the combined effect of vorinostat (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA)), which has a potent inhibitory effect for HDAC6, with CAM and BZ in breast cancer cell lines. SAHA exhibited some cytotoxicity along with an increased acetylation level of α-tubulin, a substrate of HDAC6. Combined treatment of SAHA, CAM, and BZ potently enhanced the apoptosis-inducing effect compared with treatment using each reagent alone or a combination of two of the three. Expression levels of ER-stress-related genes, including the pro-apoptotic transcription factor CHOP (GADD153), were maximally induced by the simultaneous combination of three reagents. Like breast cancer cell lines, a wild-type murine embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cell line exhibited enhanced cytotoxicity and maximally up-regulated Chop after combined treatment with SAHA, CAM, and BZ; however, a Chop knockout MEF cell line almost completely canceled this enhanced effect. The specific HDAC6 inhibitor tubacin also exhibited a pronounced cytocidal effect with a combination of CAM plus BZ. These data suggest that simultaneous targeting of intracellular proteolytic pathways and HDAC6 enhances ER-stress-mediated apoptosis in breast cancer cells.

  20. Necrosis, and then stress induced necrosis-like cell death, but not apoptosis, should be the preferred cell death mode for chemotherapy: clearance of a few misconceptions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ju; Lou, Xiaomin; Jin, Longyu; Zhou, Rongjia; Liu, Siqi; Xu, Ningzhi; Liao, D. Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Cell death overarches carcinogenesis and is a center of cancer researches, especially therapy studies. There have been many nomenclatures on cell death, but only three cell death modes are genuine, i.e. apoptosis, necrosis and stress-induced cell death (SICD). Like apoptosis, SICD is programmed. Like necrosis, SICD is a pathological event and may trigger regeneration and scar formation. Therefore, SICD has subtypes of stress-induced apoptosis-like cell death (SIaLCD) and stress-induced necrosis-like cell death (SInLCD). Whereas apoptosis removes redundant but healthy cells, SICD removes useful but ill or damaged cells. Many studies on cell death involve cancer tissues that resemble parasites in the host patients, which is a complicated system as it involves immune clearance of the alien cancer cells by the host. Cancer resembles an evolutionarily lower-level organism having a weaker apoptosis potential and poorer DNA repair mechanisms. Hence, targeting apoptosis for cancer therapy, i.e. killing via SIaLCD, will be less efficacious and more toxic. On the other hand, necrosis of cancer cells releases cellular debris and components to stimulate immune function, thus counteracting therapy-caused immune suppression and making necrosis better than SIaLCD for chemo drug development. PMID:25594039

  1. Necrosis, and then stress induced necrosis-like cell death, but not apoptosis, should be the preferred cell death mode for chemotherapy: clearance of a few misconceptions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ju; Lou, Xiaomin; Jin, Longyu; Zhou, Rongjia; Liu, Siqi; Xu, Ningzhi; Liao, D Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Cell death overarches carcinogenesis and is a center of cancer researches, especially therapy studies. There have been many nomenclatures on cell death, but only three cell death modes are genuine, i.e. apoptosis, necrosis and stress-induced cell death (SICD). Like apoptosis, SICD is programmed. Like necrosis, SICD is a pathological event and may trigger regeneration and scar formation. Therefore, SICD has subtypes of stress-induced apoptosis-like cell death (SIaLCD) and stress-induced necrosis-like cell death (SInLCD). Whereas apoptosis removes redundant but healthy cells, SICD removes useful but ill or damaged cells. Many studies on cell death involve cancer tissues that resemble parasites in the host patients, which is a complicated system as it involves immune clearance of the alien cancer cells by the host. Cancer resembles an evolutionarily lower-level organism having a weaker apoptosis potential and poorer DNA repair mechanisms. Hence, targeting apoptosis for cancer therapy, i.e. killing via SIaLCD, will be less efficacious and more toxic. On the other hand, necrosis of cancer cells releases cellular debris and components to stimulate immune function, thus counteracting therapy-caused immune suppression and making necrosis better than SIaLCD for chemo drug development. PMID:25594039

  2. Modelling predictions of cancer deaths in Northern Ireland

    PubMed Central

    French, D; Catney, D; Gavin, AT

    2006-01-01

    Background An ageing population has service planners concerned about future levels of disease which are age dependent. Predictions of mortality for colorectal, lung and breast cancers, which account for 30% of cancer cases and 40% of cancers deaths, were calculated for 2010 and 2015, based on trends in death rates and the predicted change in the demography of the Northern Ireland population. Methods The US National Cancer Institute's “Joinpoint” program was used to check for structural breaks in the time series of cancer death rates from 1984 to 2004. The prediction models applied to the data allowed variations in trends across age groups to be taken into account. A linear model was used for increasing or constant trends and a log linear model was used where the trend was decreasing. The models assume the number of deaths in each stratum, defined by age-sex and time-period, is Poisson distributed, with the average value determined by a log or linear function. Results Recent trends in rates of cancers studied were downwards except for female lung. Predictions include decreased colorectal cancer deaths in females and lung cancer deaths in males. In females, lung cancer deaths are predicted to more than double by the year 2015 (473 deaths), based on the 1984 level. Colorectal death rates in males are predicted to drop, but the number of deaths will increase by more than 10%, due to demographic change. Numbers of breast cancer deaths are likely to rise slightly, despite falling age standardised death rates, due to an ageing population. Conclusions This work has provided estimates of early future trends, useful to service planners, and highlights the need for tobacco control, to reduce numbers of lung cancer deaths in females. The recently announced control of environmental tobacco legislation is one welcome development which should reduce lung cancer mortality in Northern Ireland. PMID:16755941

  3. Ubiquitin-like (UBX)-domain-containing protein, UBXN2A, promotes cell death by interfering with the p53-Mortalin interactions in colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Sane, S; Abdullah, A; Boudreau, D A; Autenried, R K; Gupta, B K; Wang, X; Wang, H; Schlenker, E H; Zhang, D; Telleria, C; Huang, L; Chauhan, S C; Rezvani, K

    2014-01-01

    Mortalin (mot-2) induces inactivation of the tumor suppressor p53's transcriptional and apoptotic functions by cytoplasmic sequestration of p53 in select cancers. The mot-2-dependent cytoprotective function enables cancer cells to support malignant transformation. Abrogating the p53-mot-2 interaction can control or slow down the growth of cancer cells. In this study, we report the discovery of a ubiquitin-like (UBX)-domain-containing protein, UBXN2A, which binds to mot-2 and consequently inhibits the binding between mot-2 and p53. Genetic analysis showed that UBXN2A binds to mot-2's substrate binding domain, and it partly overlaps p53's binding site indicating UBXN2A and p53 likely bind to mot-2 competitively. By binding to mot-2, UBXN2A releases p53 from cytosolic sequestration, rescuing the tumor suppressor functions of p53. Biochemical analysis and functional assays showed that the overexpression of UBXN2A and the functional consequences of unsequestered p53 trigger p53-dependent apoptosis. Cells expressing shRNA against UBXN2A showed the opposite effect of that seen with UBXN2A overexpression. The expression of UBXN2A and its apoptotic effects were not observed in normal colonic epithelial cells and p53−/− colon cancer cells. Finally, significant reduction in tumor volume in a xenograft mouse model in response to UBXN2A expression was verified in vivo. Our results introduce UBXN2A as a home defense response protein, which can reconstitute inactive p53-dependent apoptotic pathways. Inhibition of mot-2-p53 interaction by UBXN2A is an attractive therapeutic strategy in mot-2-elevated tumors. PMID:24625977

  4. Chemotherapeutic Approaches for Targeting Cell Death Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, M. Stacey; Zong, Wei-Xing

    2011-01-01

    For several decades, apoptosis has taken center stage as the principal mechanism of programmed cell death in mammalian tissues. It also has been increasingly noted that conventional chemotherapeutic agents not only elicit apoptosis but other forms of nonapoptotic death such as necrosis, autophagy, mitotic catastrophe, and senescence. This review presents background on the signaling pathways involved in the different cell death outcomes. A re-examination of what we know about chemotherapy-induced death is vitally important in light of new understanding of nonapoptotic cell death signaling pathways. If we can precisely activate or inhibit molecules that mediate the diversity of cell death outcomes, perhaps we can succeed in more effective and less toxic chemotherapeutic regimens. PMID:16614230

  5. PTEN Overexpression Cooperates With Lithium to Reduce the Malignancy and to Increase Cell Death by Apoptosis via PI3K/Akt Suppression in Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    de Araujo, Wallace Martins; Robbs, Bruno Kaufmann; Bastos, Lilian G; de Souza, Waldemir F; Vidal, Flávia C B; Viola, João P B; Morgado-Diaz, Jose A

    2016-02-01

    Lithium is a well-established non-competitive inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), a kinase that is involved in several cellular processes related to cancer progression. GSK-3β is regulated upstream by PI3K/Akt, which is negatively modulated by PTEN. The role that lithium plays in cancer is controversial because lithium can activate or inhibit survival signaling pathways depending on the cell type. In this study, we analyzed the mechanisms by which lithium can modulate events related to colorectal cancer (CRC) progression and evaluated the role that survival signaling pathways such as PI3K/Akt and PTEN play in this context. We show that the administration of lithium decreased the proliferative potential of CRC cells in a GSK-3β-independent manner but induced the accumulation of cells in G2/M phase. Furthermore, high doses of lithium increased apoptosis, which was accompanied by decreased proteins levels of Akt and PTEN. Then, cells that were induced to overexpress PTEN were treated with lithium; we observed that low doses of lithium strongly increased apoptosis. Additionally, PTEN overexpression reduced proliferation, but this effect was minor compared with that in cells treated with lithium alone. Furthermore, we demonstrated that PTEN overexpression and lithium treatment separately reduced cell migration, colony formation, and invasion, and these effects were enhanced when lithium treatment and PTEN overexpression were combined. In conclusion, our findings indicate that PTEN overexpression and lithium treatment cooperate to reduce the malignancy of CRC cells and highlight lithium and PTEN as potential candidates for studies to identify new therapeutic approaches for CRC treatment.

  6. Capsaicin induces immunogenic cell death in human osteosarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Tao; Wu, Hongyan; Wang, Yanlin; Peng, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Immunogenic cell death (ICD) is characterized by the early surface exposure of calreticulin (CRT). As a specific signaling molecule, CRT on the surface of apoptotic tumor cells mediates the recognition and phagocytosis of tumor cells by antigen presenting cells. To date, only a small quantity of anti-cancer chemicals have been found to induce ICD, therefore it is clinically important to identify novel chemicals that may induce ICD. The purpose of the present study is to explore the function of capsaicin in inducing ICD. In the current study, MTT assays were used to examine the growth inhibiting effects of MG-63 cells when they were treated with capsaicin or cisplatin. Mitochondrial membrane potential and western blot analysis were used to investigate capsaicin- and cisplatin-induced apoptosis. In addition, the effects of capsaicin and cisplatin were evaluated for their abilities in inducing calreticulin membrane translocation and mediating ICD in human osteosarcoma cells (MG-63). The results demonstrated that capsaicin and cisplatin can induce the apoptosis of MG-63 cells. However, only capsaicin induced a rapid translocation of CRT from the intracellular space to the cell surface. Treatment with capsaicin increased phagocytosis of MG-63 cells by dendritic cells (DCs), and these MG-63-loaded DCs could efficiently stimulate the secretion of IFN-γ by lymphocytes. These results identify capsaicin as an anti-cancer agent capable of inducing ICD in human osteosarcoma cells in vitro. PMID:27446273

  7. Cell Death Signaling and Anticancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Vitale, Ilio; Vacchelli, Erika; Kroemer, Guido

    2011-01-01

    For a long time, it was commonly believed that efficient anticancer regimens would either trigger the apoptotic demise of tumor cells or induce a permanent arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle, i.e., senescence. The recent discovery that necrosis can occur in a regulated fashion and the increasingly more precise characterization of the underlying molecular mechanisms have raised great interest, as non-apoptotic pathways might be instrumental to circumvent the resistance of cancer cells to conventional, pro-apoptotic therapeutic regimens. Moreover, it has been shown that some anticancer regimens engage lethal signaling cascades that can ignite multiple oncosuppressive mechanisms, including apoptosis, necrosis, and senescence. Among these signaling pathways is mitotic catastrophe, whose role as a bona fide cell death mechanism has recently been reconsidered. Thus, anticancer regimens get ever more sophisticated, and often distinct strategies are combined to maximize efficacy and minimize side effects. In this review, we will discuss the importance of apoptosis, necrosis, and mitotic catastrophe in the response of tumor cells to the most common clinically employed and experimental anticancer agents. PMID:22655227

  8. Anti-NeuGcGM3 antibodies, actively elicited by idiotypic vaccination in nonsmall cell lung cancer patients, induce tumor cell death by an oncosis-like mechanism.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Ana María; Rodríguez, Nely; González, Jorge E; Reyes, Emma; Rondón, Teresa; Griñán, Tania; Macías, Amparo; Alfonso, Sailyn; Vázquez, Ana María; Pérez, Rolando

    2011-03-15

    1E10 is a murine anti-idiotypic mAb specific for an idiotypic mAb that reacts with NeuGc-containing gangliosides, sulfatides, and Ags expressed in some human tumors. In melanoma, breast, and lung cancer patients, this anti-idiotypic Ab was able to induce a specific Ab response against N-glycosylated gangliosides, attractive targets for cancer immunotherapy as these glycolipids are not naturally expressed in humans. A clinical study with nonsmall cell lung cancer patients showed encouraging clinical benefits. Immunological studies performed in 20 of these patients suggested a correlation between the induction of Abs against NeuGcGM3 and longer survival times. The induced anti-NeuGcGM3 Abs recognized and directly killed tumor cells expressing the Ag, by a mechanism independent of complement activation. In the present work, we show that this cytotoxicity differs from apoptosis because it is temperature independent, no chromatin condensation or caspase 3 induction are detected, and the DNA fragmentation induced has a different pattern than the one characteristic for apoptosis. It is a very quick process and involves cytosqeleton reorganization. The Abs induce cellular swelling and the formation of big membrane lesions that allow the leakage of cytoplasm and the loss of the cell membrane integrity. All of these characteristics resemble a process of oncotic necrosis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the active induction in cancer patients of NeuGcGM3-specific Abs able to induce complement independent oncotic necrosis to tumor cells. These results contribute to reinforcing the therapeutic potential of anti-idiotypic vaccines and the importance of NeuGcGM3 ganglioside as antitumor target. PMID:21300821

  9. Spontaneous cell death in the chorion laeve.

    PubMed

    Parmley, T H

    1990-06-01

    The granulosa cells of the dominant follicle grow, differentiate, and die in a roughly predictable amount of time. Because the simultaneous death of this population of cells results in menstruation, one may say that the life span of this population of cells "times" the menstrual cycle. Metamorphosis in amphibians and morphogenesis in several vertebrates are other examples of developmental milestones that are "timed" by the life span of specific cell populations. In all these examples, cell death is associated with a specific histology, apoptosis. Apoptosis characterizes the cell death that produces the progressive disappearance of the trophoblast in the chorion laeve as term is approached. Therefore, the histology of trophoblastic death in the near-term chorion laeve corresponds to that of populations of cells with life spans that "time" developmental events. The trophoblastic cell population of the chorion laeve is prematurely destroyed by infiltrating maternal leukocytes in cases of chorioamnionitis.

  10. EM23, a natural sesquiterpene lactone, targets thioredoxin reductase to activate JNK and cell death pathways in human cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shao, Fang-Yuan; Wang, Sheng; Li, Hong-Yu; Chen, Wen-Bo; Wang, Guo-Cai; Ma, Dong-Lei; Wong, Nai Sum; Xiao, Hao; Liu, Qiu-Ying; Zhou, Guang-Xiong; Li, Yao-Lan; Li, Man-Mei; Wang, Yi-Fei; Liu, Zhong

    2016-02-01

    Sesquiterpene lactones (SLs) are the active constituents of a variety of medicinal plants and found to have potential anticancer activities. However, the intracellular molecular targets of SLs and the underlying molecular mechanisms have not been well elucidated. In this study, we observed that EM23, a natural SL, exhibited anti-cancer activity in human cervical cancer cell lines by inducing apoptosis as indicated by caspase 3 activation, XIAP downregulation and mitochondrial dysfunction. Mechanistic studies indicated that EM23-induced apoptosis was mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the knockdown of thioredoxin (Trx) or thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) resulted in a reduction in apoptosis. EM23 attenuated TrxR activity by alkylation of C-terminal redox-active site Sec498 of TrxR and inhibited the expression levels of Trx/TrxR to facilitate ROS accumulation. Furthermore, inhibition of Trx/TrxR system resulted in the dissociation of ASK1 from Trx and the downstream activation of JNK. Pretreatment with ASK1/JNK inhibitors partially rescued cells from EM23-induced apoptosis. Additionally, EM23 inhibited Akt/mTOR pathway and induced autophagy, which was observed to be proapoptotic and mediated by ROS. Together, these results reveal a potential molecular mechanism for the apoptotic induction observed with SL compound EM23, and emphasize its putative role as a therapeutic agent for human cervical cancer. PMID:26758418

  11. Joint aging and chondrocyte cell death

    PubMed Central

    Grogan, Shawn P; D’Lima, Darryl D

    2010-01-01

    Articular cartilage extracellular matrix and cell function change with age and are considered to be the most important factors in the development and progression of osteoarthritis. The multifaceted nature of joint disease indicates that the contribution of cell death can be an important factor at early and late stages of osteoarthritis. Therefore, the pharmacologic inhibition of cell death is likely to be clinically valuable at any stage of the disease. In this article, we will discuss the close association between diverse changes in cartilage aging, how altered conditions influence chondrocyte death, and the implications of preventing cell loss to retard osteoarthritis progression and preserve tissue homeostasis. PMID:20671988

  12. Lung cancer - small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC are ...

  13. Targeting Cell Death Pathways for Therapeutic Intervention in Kidney Diseases.

    PubMed

    Garg, Jay P; Vucic, Domagoj

    2016-05-01

    Precise regulation of cell death and survival is essential for proper maintenance of organismal homeostasis, development, and the immune system. Deregulated cell death can lead to developmental defects, neuropathies, infections, and cancer. Kidney diseases, especially acute pathologies linked to ischemia-reperfusion injury, are among illnesses that profoundly are affected by improper regulation or execution of cell death pathways. Attempts to develop medicines for kidney diseases have been impacted by the complexity of these pathologies given the heterogeneous patient population and diverse etiologies. By analyzing cell death pathways activated in kidney diseases, we attempt to differentiate their importance for these pathologies with a goal of identifying those that have more profound impact and the best therapeutic potential. Although classic apoptosis still might be important, regulated necrosis pathways including necroptosis, ferroptosis, parthanatos, and mitochondrial permeability transition-associated cell death play a significantly role in kidney diseases, especially in acute kidney pathologies. Although targeting receptor-interacting protein 1 kinase appears to be the best therapeutic strategy, combination with inhibitors of other cell death pathways is likely to bring superior benefit and possible cure to patients suffering from kidney diseases. PMID:27339381

  14. Autophagy and cell death in model organisms.

    PubMed

    Kourtis, N; Tavernarakis, N

    2009-01-01

    Autophagy evolved in unicellular eukaryotes as a means for surviving nutrient stress. During the course of evolution, as multicellular organisms developed specialized cell types and complex intracellular signalling networks, autophagy has been summoned to serve additional cellular functions. Numerous recent studies indicate that apart from its pro-survival role under nutrient limitation, autophagy also participates in cell death. However, the precise role of this catabolic process in dying cells is not fully understood. Although in certain situations autophagy has a protective function, in other types of cell death it actually contributes to cellular destruction. Simple model organisms ranging from the unicellular Saccharomyces cerevisiae to the soil amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum and the metazoans Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster provide clearly defined cell death paradigms that can be used to dissect the involvement of autophagy in cell death, at the molecular level. In this review, we survey current research in simple organisms, linking autophagy to cell death and discuss the complex interplay between autophagy, cell survival and cell death. PMID:19079286

  15. Deaths in Canada from lung cancer due to involuntary smoking.

    PubMed Central

    Wigle, D T; Collishaw, N E; Kirkbride, J; Mao, Y

    1987-01-01

    Recently published evidence indicates that involuntary smoking causes an increased risk of lung cancer among nonsmokers. Information was compiled on the proportion of people who had never smoked among victims of lung cancer, the risk of lung cancer for nonsmokers married to smokers and the prevalence of such exposure. On the basis of these data we estimate that 50 to 60 of the deaths from lung cancer in Canada in 1985 among people who had never smoked were caused by spousal smoking; about 90% occurred in women. The total number of deaths from lung cancer attributable to exposure to tobacco smoke from spouses and other sources (mainly the workplace) was derived by applying estimated age- and sex-specific rates of death from lung cancer attributable to such exposure to the population of Canadians who have never smoked; about 330 deaths from lung cancer annually are attributable to such exposure. PMID:3567810

  16. Entosis and Related Forms of Cell Death within Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Wang, X-D

    2015-01-01

    By eliminating the unneeded or mutant cells, programmed cell death actively participates in a wide range of biological processes from embryonic development to homeostasis maintenance in adult. Continuing efforts have identified multiple cell death pathways, with apoptosis, necrosis and autophage the mostly studied. Recently a unique cell death pathway called "cell-in-cell death" has been defined. Unlike traditional cell death pathways, cell-in-cell death, characterized by cell death within another cell, is triggered by the invasion of one cell into its neighbor and executed by either lysosome-dependent degradation or caspase-dependent apoptosis. With remarkable progresses on cell-in-cell over past few years, multiple mechanisms, including entosis, cannibalism and emperitosis, are found to be responsible for cell-in-cell death. Some key questions, such as specific biochemical markers to distinguish precisely the properties of different cell-in-cell structures and the physiological and pathological relevance, remain to be addressed. In light of this situation and a surge of interests, leading scientists in this field intend to share with readers current research progresses on cell-in-cell structures from different model systems through this special edition on cell-in-cell. The mechanistic advances will be highlighted while the future researches be speculated. PMID:26511710

  17. Cell death during crisis is mediated by mitotic telomere deprotection.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Makoto T; Cesare, Anthony J; Rivera, Teresa; Karlseder, Jan

    2015-06-25

    Tumour formation is blocked by two barriers: replicative senescence and crisis. Senescence is triggered by short telomeres and is bypassed by disruption of tumour-suppressive pathways. After senescence bypass, cells undergo crisis, during which almost all of the cells in the population die. Cells that escape crisis harbour unstable genomes and other parameters of transformation. The mechanism of cell death during crisis remains unexplained. Here we show that human cells in crisis undergo spontaneous mitotic arrest, resulting in death during mitosis or in the following cell cycle. This phenotype is induced by loss of p53 function, and is suppressed by telomerase overexpression. Telomere fusions triggered mitotic arrest in p53-compromised non-crisis cells, indicating that such fusions are the underlying cause of cell death. Exacerbation of mitotic telomere deprotection by partial TRF2 (also known as TERF2) knockdown increased the ratio of cells that died during mitotic arrest and sensitized cancer cells to mitotic poisons. We propose a crisis pathway wherein chromosome fusions induce mitotic arrest, resulting in mitotic telomere deprotection and cell death, thereby eliminating precancerous cells from the population.

  18. Breast Cancer Deaths Continue to Decline in U.S.

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161468.html Breast Cancer Deaths Continue to Decline in U.S. And the ... 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The racial gap for breast cancer deaths is closing, particularly among younger women, U.S. ...

  19. Cell death-stimulated cell proliferation: A tissue regeneration mechanism usurped by tumors during radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Mary A.; Huang, Qian; Li, Fang; Liu, Xinjiang; Li, Chuan-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Summary Death of all the cancer cells in a tumor is the ultimate goal of cancer therapy. Therefore much of the current effort in cancer research is focused on activating cellular machinery that facilitates cell death such as factors involved in causing apoptosis. However, recently a number of studies point to some counter-intuitive roles for apoptotic caspases in radiation therapy as well as in tissue regeneration. It appears that a major function of apoptotic caspases is to facilitate tissue regeneration and tumor cell repopulation during cancer therapy. Because tumor cell repopulation has been shown to be important for local tumor relapse, understanding the molecular mechanisms behind tumor repopulation will be important to enhance cancer radiotherapy. In this review, we discuss our current knowledge of these potentially paradigm-changing phenomena and mechanisms in various organisms and their implications on the development of novel cancer therapeutics and strategies. PMID:24012343

  20. Blazein of a new steroid isolated from Agaricus blazei Murrill (himematsutake) induces cell death and morphological change indicative of apoptotic chromatin condensation in human lung cancer LU99 and stomach cancer KATO III cells.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Hiroko; Ito, Hitoshi; Hibasami, Hiroshige

    2008-12-01

    Blazein was isolated from mushroom (Agaricus blazei Murrill) and identified by Mass and 1H-NMR as blazein. The effect of blazein on the DNA of human various cancer cells was investigated. DNA fragmentations by blazein to oligonucreosomal-sized fragments, a characteristic of apoptosis, were observed in the human lung LU99 and stomach KATO III cancer cells. The DNA fragmentations by blazein were observed from day 2 (KATO III cells) or day 3 (LU99 cells) after the addition of blazein to the culture cells. These findings suggest that growth inhibition by blazein results from the induction of apoptosis by the compound. PMID:19020714

  1. Morphological classification of plant cell deaths

    PubMed Central

    van Doorn, W G; Beers, E P; Dangl, J L; Franklin-Tong, V E; Gallois, P; Hara-Nishimura, I; Jones, A M; Kawai-Yamada, M; Lam, E; Mundy, J; Mur, L A J; Petersen, M; Smertenko, A; Taliansky, M; Van Breusegem, F; Wolpert, T; Woltering, E; Zhivotovsky, B; Bozhkov, P V

    2011-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is an integral part of plant development and of responses to abiotic stress or pathogens. Although the morphology of plant PCD is, in some cases, well characterised and molecular mechanisms controlling plant PCD are beginning to emerge, there is still confusion about the classification of PCD in plants. Here we suggest a classification based on morphological criteria. According to this classification, the use of the term ‘apoptosis' is not justified in plants, but at least two classes of PCD can be distinguished: vacuolar cell death and necrosis. During vacuolar cell death, the cell contents are removed by a combination of autophagy-like process and release of hydrolases from collapsed lytic vacuoles. Necrosis is characterised by early rupture of the plasma membrane, shrinkage of the protoplast and absence of vacuolar cell death features. Vacuolar cell death is common during tissue and organ formation and elimination, whereas necrosis is typically found under abiotic stress. Some examples of plant PCD cannot be ascribed to either major class and are therefore classified as separate modalities. These are PCD associated with the hypersensitive response to biotrophic pathogens, which can express features of both necrosis and vacuolar cell death, PCD in starchy cereal endosperm and during self-incompatibility. The present classification is not static, but will be subject to further revision, especially when specific biochemical pathways are better defined. PMID:21494263

  2. Regulated cell death and adaptive stress responses.

    PubMed

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Bravo-San Pedro, José Manuel; Kepp, Oliver; Kroemer, Guido

    2016-06-01

    Eukaryotic cells react to potentially dangerous perturbations of the intracellular or extracellular microenvironment by activating rapid (transcription-independent) mechanisms that attempt to restore homeostasis. If such perturbations persist, cells may still try to cope with stress by activating delayed and robust (transcription-dependent) adaptive systems, or they may actively engage in cellular suicide. This regulated form of cell death can manifest with various morphological, biochemical and immunological correlates, and constitutes an ultimate attempt of stressed cells to maintain organismal homeostasis. Here, we dissect the general organization of adaptive cellular responses to stress, their intimate connection with regulated cell death, and how the latter operates for the preservation of organismal homeostasis.

  3. Anoikis: a necessary death program for anchorage-dependent cells.

    PubMed

    Chiarugi, Paola; Giannoni, Elisa

    2008-12-01

    Cell to matrix adhesion is a key factor for cellular homeostasis and disruption of such interaction has adverse effects on cell survival. It leads to a specific type of apoptosis known as "anoikis" in most non-transformed cell types. This kind of apoptosis following loss of cell anchorage is important for development, tissue homeostasis and several diseases. Integrins sense mechanical forces arising from the matrix, thereby converting these stimuli to downstream signals modulating cell viability. Anchorage-independent growth is a crucial step during tumorigenesis and in particular during the metastatic spreading of cancer cells. The disruption of the tight control leading an "homeless" cell to death is therefore able to violate the cell defences against transformation. This review analyses the recent investigations into the molecular mechanisms governing anoikis, discussing the different ways in which adhesion can influence this process and addressing the relevance of this unique apoptosis mode in the development of metastatic cancers, as well as in other diseases.

  4. Programmed cell death in cereal aleurone.

    PubMed

    Fath, A; Bethke, P; Lonsdale, J; Meza-Romero, R; Jones, R

    2000-10-01

    Progress in understanding programmed cell death (PCD) in the cereal aleurone is described. Cereal aleurone cells are specialized endosperm cells that function to synthesize and secrete hydrolytic enzymes that break down reserves in the starchy endosperm. Unlike the cells of the starchy endosperm, aleurone cells are viable in mature grain but undergo PCD when germination is triggered or when isolated aleurone layers or protoplasts are incubated in gibberellic acid (GA). Abscisic acid (ABA) slows down the process of aleurone cell death and isolated aleurone protoplasts can be kept alive in media containing ABA for up to 6 months. Cell death in barley aleurone occurs only after cells become highly vacuolated and is manifested in an abrupt loss of plasma membrane integrity. Aleurone cell death does not follow the apoptotic pathway found in many animal cells. The hallmarks of apoptosis, including internucleosomal DNA cleavage, plasma membrane and nuclear blebbing and formation of apoptotic bodies, are not observed in dying aleurone cells. PCD in barley aleurone cells is accompanied by the accumulation of a spectrum of nuclease and protease activities and the loss of organelles as a result of cellular autolysis.

  5. Controlling the unfolded protein response-mediated life and death decisions in cancer.

    PubMed

    Maurel, Marion; McGrath, Eoghan P; Mnich, Katarzyna; Healy, Sandra; Chevet, Eric; Samali, Afshin

    2015-08-01

    Cancer cells are exposed to intrinsic (oncogene) or extrinsic (microenvironmental) challenges, leading to activation of stress response pathways. The unfolded protein response (UPR) is the cellular response to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and plays a pivotal role in tumor development. Depending on ER stress intensity and duration, the UPR is either pro-survival to preserve ER homeostasis or pro-death if the stress cannot be resolved. On one hand, the adaptive arm of the UPR is essential for cancer cells to survive the harsh conditions they are facing, and on the other hand, cancer cells have evolved mechanisms to bypass ER stress-induced cell death, thereby conferring them with a selective advantage for malignant transformation. Therefore, the mechanisms involved in the balance between survival and death outcomes of the UPR may be exploited as therapeutic tools to treat cancer.

  6. High Mannose-Binding Antiviral Lectin PFL from Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 Promotes Cell Death of Gastric Cancer Cell MKN28 via Interaction with α2-Integrin

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Yuichiro; Morimoto, Kinjiro; Kubo, Takanori; Yanagihara, Kazuyoshi; Seyama, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    Novel anti-HIV lectin family which shows a strict binding specificity for high mannose glycans has been found in lower organisms. The bacterial orthologue has been identified in the genome of Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 and the gene coding a putative lectin was cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by one step gel filtration. Glycan array screening of the recombinant lectin, termed PFL, has revealed that PFL preferentially recognizes high mannose glycans with α1-3 Man that was highly exposed at the D2 position. In contrast, masking of this α1-3 Man with α1-2 Man dramatically impaired lectin-carbohydrate interactions. Reducing terminal disaccharide, GlcNAc-GlcNAc of high mannose glycans was also essential for PFL-binding. PFL showed a potent anti-influenza virus activity by inhibiting the virus entry into cells at doses of low nanomolar concentration. At micromolar concentration or higher, PFL showed a cytotoxicity accompanying loss of the cell adhesion against human gastric cancer MKN28 cells. The cell surface molecule to which PFL bound was co-precipitated with biotin-labeled PFL and identified as integrin α2 by peptide mass fingerprinting using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Intriguingly, upon treatment with exogenous PFL, integrin α2 on the cell surface underwent rapid internalization to the cytoplasm and accumulated to perinuclear region, together with the bound PFL. The resulting loss of cell adherence would trigger a signaling pathway that induced anoikis-like cell death. These events were effectively inhibited by pretreatment of PFL with mannnan, indicating the involvement of high mannose glycans on PFL-induced cell death that was triggered by PFL-integrin α2 interactions. PMID:23029318

  7. High mannose-binding antiviral lectin PFL from Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 promotes cell death of gastric cancer cell MKN28 via interaction with α2-integrin.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yuichiro; Morimoto, Kinjiro; Kubo, Takanori; Yanagihara, Kazuyoshi; Seyama, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    Novel anti-HIV lectin family which shows a strict binding specificity for high mannose glycans has been found in lower organisms. The bacterial orthologue has been identified in the genome of Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 and the gene coding a putative lectin was cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by one step gel filtration. Glycan array screening of the recombinant lectin, termed PFL, has revealed that PFL preferentially recognizes high mannose glycans with α1-3 Man that was highly exposed at the D2 position. In contrast, masking of this α1-3 Man with α1-2 Man dramatically impaired lectin-carbohydrate interactions. Reducing terminal disaccharide, GlcNAc-GlcNAc of high mannose glycans was also essential for PFL-binding. PFL showed a potent anti-influenza virus activity by inhibiting the virus entry into cells at doses of low nanomolar concentration. At micromolar concentration or higher, PFL showed a cytotoxicity accompanying loss of the cell adhesion against human gastric cancer MKN28 cells. The cell surface molecule to which PFL bound was co-precipitated with biotin-labeled PFL and identified as integrin α2 by peptide mass fingerprinting using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Intriguingly, upon treatment with exogenous PFL, integrin α2 on the cell surface underwent rapid internalization to the cytoplasm and accumulated to perinuclear region, together with the bound PFL. The resulting loss of cell adherence would trigger a signaling pathway that induced anoikis-like cell death. These events were effectively inhibited by pretreatment of PFL with mannnan, indicating the involvement of high mannose glycans on PFL-induced cell death that was triggered by PFL-integrin α2 interactions.

  8. A matter of life and cell death.

    PubMed

    Evan, G; Littlewood, T

    1998-08-28

    In multicellular organisms, mutations in somatic cells affecting critical genes that regulate cell proliferation and survival cause fatal cancers. Repair of the damage is one obvious option, although the relative inconsequence of individual cells in metazoans means that it is often a "safer" strategy to ablate the offending cell. Not surprisingly, corruption of the machinery that senses or implements DNA damage greatly predisposes to cancer. Nonetheless, even when oncogenic mutations do occur, there exist potent mechanisms that limit the expansion of affected cells by suppressing their proliferation or triggering their suicide. Growing understanding of these innate mechanisms is suggesting novel therapeutic strategies for cancer.

  9. Methanolic extract of white asparagus shoots activates TRAIL apoptotic death pathway in human cancer cells and inhibits colon carcinogenesis in a preclinical model.

    PubMed

    Bousserouel, Souad; Le Grandois, Julie; Gossé, Francine; Werner, Dalal; Barth, Stephan W; Marchioni, Eric; Marescaux, Jacques; Raul, Francis

    2013-08-01

    Shoots of white asparagus are a popular vegetable dish, known to be rich in many bioactive phytochemicals reported to possess antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory and antitumor activities. We evaluated the anticancer mechanisms of a methanolic extract of Asparagus officinalis L. shoots (Asp) on human colon carcinoma cells (SW480) and their derived metastatic cells (SW620), and Asp chemopreventive properties were also assessed in a model of colon carcinogenesis. SW480 and SW620 cell proliferation was inhibited by 80% after exposure to Asp (80 µg/ml). We demonstrated that Asp induced cell death through the activation of TRAIL DR4/DR5 death receptors leading to the activation of caspase-8 and caspase-3 and to cell apoptosis. By specific blocking agents of DR4/DR5 receptors we were able to prevent Asp-triggered cell death confirming the key role of DR4/DR5 receptors. We found also that Asp (80 µg/ml) was able to potentiate the effects of the cytokine TRAIL on cell death even in the TRAIL-resistant metastatic SW620 cells. Colon carcinogenesis was initiated in Wistar rats by intraperitoneal injections of azoxymethane (AOM), once a week for two weeks. One week after (post-initiation) rats received daily Asp (0.01%, 14 mg/kg body weight) in drinking water. After 7 weeks of Asp-treatment the colon of rats exhibited a 50% reduction of the number of preneoplastic lesions (aberrant crypt foci). In addition Asp induced inhibition of several pro-inflammatory mediators, in association with an increased expression of host-defense mediators. In the colonic mucosa of Asp-treated rats we also confirmed the pro-apoptotic effects observed in vitro including the activation of the TRAIL death‑receptor signaling pathway. Taken together, our data highlight the chemopreventive effects of Asp on colon carcinogenesis and its ability to promote normal cellular homeostasis.

  10. Methanolic extract of white asparagus shoots activates TRAIL apoptotic death pathway in human cancer cells and inhibits colon carcinogenesis in a preclinical model.

    PubMed

    Bousserouel, Souad; Le Grandois, Julie; Gossé, Francine; Werner, Dalal; Barth, Stephan W; Marchioni, Eric; Marescaux, Jacques; Raul, Francis

    2013-08-01

    Shoots of white asparagus are a popular vegetable dish, known to be rich in many bioactive phytochemicals reported to possess antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory and antitumor activities. We evaluated the anticancer mechanisms of a methanolic extract of Asparagus officinalis L. shoots (Asp) on human colon carcinoma cells (SW480) and their derived metastatic cells (SW620), and Asp chemopreventive properties were also assessed in a model of colon carcinogenesis. SW480 and SW620 cell proliferation was inhibited by 80% after exposure to Asp (80 µg/ml). We demonstrated that Asp induced cell death through the activation of TRAIL DR4/DR5 death receptors leading to the activation of caspase-8 and caspase-3 and to cell apoptosis. By specific blocking agents of DR4/DR5 receptors we were able to prevent Asp-triggered cell death confirming the key role of DR4/DR5 receptors. We found also that Asp (80 µg/ml) was able to potentiate the effects of the cytokine TRAIL on cell death even in the TRAIL-resistant metastatic SW620 cells. Colon carcinogenesis was initiated in Wistar rats by intraperitoneal injections of azoxymethane (AOM), once a week for two weeks. One week after (post-initiation) rats received daily Asp (0.01%, 14 mg/kg body weight) in drinking water. After 7 weeks of Asp-treatment the colon of rats exhibited a 50% reduction of the number of preneoplastic lesions (aberrant crypt foci). In addition Asp induced inhibition of several pro-inflammatory mediators, in association with an increased expression of host-defense mediators. In the colonic mucosa of Asp-treated rats we also confirmed the pro-apoptotic effects observed in vitro including the activation of the TRAIL death‑receptor signaling pathway. Taken together, our data highlight the chemopreventive effects of Asp on colon carcinogenesis and its ability to promote normal cellular homeostasis. PMID:23754197

  11. Molecular and Translational Classifications of DAMPs in Immunogenic Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Abhishek D.; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Apetoh, Lionel; Baert, Thais; Birge, Raymond B.; Bravo-San Pedro, José Manuel; Breckpot, Karine; Brough, David; Chaurio, Ricardo; Cirone, Mara; Coosemans, An; Coulie, Pierre G.; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Dini, Luciana; de Witte, Peter; Dudek-Peric, Aleksandra M.; Faggioni, Alberto; Fucikova, Jitka; Gaipl, Udo S.; Golab, Jakub; Gougeon, Marie-Lise; Hamblin, Michael R.; Hemminki, Akseli; Herrmann, Martin; Hodge, James W.; Kepp, Oliver; Kroemer, Guido; Krysko, Dmitri V.; Land, Walter G.; Madeo, Frank; Manfredi, Angelo A.; Mattarollo, Stephen R.; Maueroder, Christian; Merendino, Nicolò; Multhoff, Gabriele; Pabst, Thomas; Ricci, Jean-Ehrland; Riganti, Chiara; Romano, Erminia; Rufo, Nicole; Smyth, Mark J.; Sonnemann, Jürgen; Spisek, Radek; Stagg, John; Vacchelli, Erika; Vandenabeele, Peter; Vandenberk, Lien; Van den Eynde, Benoit J.; Van Gool, Stefaan; Velotti, Francesca; Zitvogel, Laurence; Agostinis, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    The immunogenicity of malignant cells has recently been acknowledged as a critical determinant of efficacy in cancer therapy. Thus, besides developing direct immunostimulatory regimens, including dendritic cell-based vaccines, checkpoint-blocking therapies, and adoptive T-cell transfer, researchers have started to focus on the overall immunobiology of neoplastic cells. It is now clear that cancer cells can succumb to some anticancer therapies by undergoing a peculiar form of cell death that is characterized by an increased immunogenic potential, owing to the emission of the so-called “damage-associated molecular patterns” (DAMPs). The emission of DAMPs and other immunostimulatory factors by cells succumbing to immunogenic cell death (ICD) favors the establishment of a productive interface with the immune system. This results in the elicitation of tumor-targeting immune responses associated with the elimination of residual, treatment-resistant cancer cells, as well as with the establishment of immunological memory. Although ICD has been characterized with increased precision since its discovery, several questions remain to be addressed. Here, we summarize and tabulate the main molecular, immunological, preclinical, and clinical aspects of ICD, in an attempt to capture the essence of this phenomenon, and identify future challenges for this rapidly expanding field of investigation. PMID:26635802

  12. Report to the Nation shows cancer death rates dropping

    Cancer.gov

    The Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1975–2009, shows that overall cancer death rates continued to decline in the United States among both men and women, among all major racial and ethnic groups, and for all of the most common cancer s

  13. Fear of death and good death among the young and elderly with terminal cancers in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jaw-Shiun; Wu, Chih-Hsun; Chiu, Tai-Yuan; Hu, Wen-Yu; Chen, Ching-Yu

    2005-04-01

    Fear of death is a common characteristic among palliative care patients. We might think that the elderly display a higher degree of acceptance of the inevitability and less fear in the face of death. This study was aimed at investigating the relationship between the death fear level and the good-death scale in two age groups. The study was conducted in 224 patients with terminal cancers admitted to the Palliative Care Unit in National Taiwan University Hospital during the period of January 1 through October 31, 2001. The mean age was 62.13 +/- 15.47 years. The duration of admission in the elderly group was shorter than that of the younger group (P < 0.05). The severity of death fear decreased gradually in both groups after being admitted to the hospice (P < 0.05). However, the elderly (> or = 65 years of age) displayed higher levels of death fear than the younger group at two days before death (P < 0.05). A significant negative correlation was observed between the degree of death fear and the total good death score in both groups at two days before death (P < 0.05). The comprehensive care in the palliative care unit might relate to the relief of the death fear of terminal cancer patients. There is a need for psychological and spiritual care in elderly patients.

  14. Association Between Air Temperature and Cancer Death Rates in Florida

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Proponents of global warming predict adverse events due to a slight warming of the planet in the last 100 years. This ecological study tests one of the possible arguments that might support the global warming theory – that it may increase cancer death rates. Thus, average daily air temperature is compared to cancer death rates at the county level in a U.S. state, while controlling for variables of smoking, race, and land elevation. The study revealed that lower cancer death rates were associated with warmer temperatures. Further study is indicated to verify these findings. PMID:26674418

  15. Nineteenth century research on cell death.

    PubMed

    Clarke, P G H; Clarke, S

    2012-10-01

    This paper reviews research on cell death in the 19th C. The first report of cell death was by Vogt in 1842, which was remarkably soon after the establishment of the cell theory by Schleiden and Schwann between 1838 and 1842. Initial studies on cell death, including that of Vogt, focused on its occurrence in metamorphosis (Vogt, 1842; Prévost and Lebert, 1844; Weismann, 1863-1866) or in blatant pathology (Virchow, 1858), but as histological techniques improved it was found to be involved in more subtle roles in numerous situations including endochondral ossification (Stieda, 1872), ovarian follicle atresia (Flemming, 1885), cell turnover (Nissen, 1886), the wholesale loss of a population of sensory neurons in fish (Beard, 1889), and the naturally occurring histogenetic death of myocytes (Felix, 1889) and neurons (Collin, 1906). The current categorization of cell death into about three main morphological types has 19th century roots in that apoptosis was well described by Flemming (1885), who called it chromatolysis, and various authors including Noetzel (1895) proposed a threefold classification. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Apoptosis: Four Decades Later". PMID:23069997

  16. Programmed cell death and hybrid incompatibility.

    PubMed

    Frank, S A; Barr, C M

    2003-01-01

    We propose a new theory to explain developmental aberrations in plant hybrids. In our theory, hybrid incompatibilities arise from imbalances in the mechanisms that cause male sterility in hermaphroditic plants. Mitochondria often cause male sterility by killing the tapetal tissue that nurtures pollen mother cells. Recent evidence suggests that mitochondria destroy the tapetum by triggering standard pathways of programmed cell death. Some nuclear genotypes repress mitochondrial male sterility and restore pollen fertility. Normal regulation of tapetal development therefore arises from a delicate balance between the disruptive effects of mitochondria and the defensive countermeasures of the nuclear genes. In hybrids, incompatibilities between male-sterile mitochondria and nuclear restorers may frequently upset the regulatory control of programmed cell death, causing tapetal abnormalities and male sterility. We propose that hybrid misregulation of programmed cell death may also spill over into other tissues, explaining various developmental aberrations observed in hybrids.

  17. Selective Disruption of Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1) Signaling via Phosphoinositide-dependent Kinase-1 Prevents the Protective Effect of IGF-1 on Human Cancer Cell Death*

    PubMed Central

    Alberobello, A. Teresa; D'Esposito, Vittoria; Marasco, Daniela; Doti, Nunzianna; Ruvo, Menotti; Bianco, Roberto; Tortora, Giampaolo; Esposito, Iolanda; Fiory, Francesca; Miele, Claudia; Beguinot, Francesco; Formisano, Pietro

    2010-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) signaling system exerts a broad antiapoptotic function and plays a crucial role in resistance to anticancer therapies. Exposure of MCF-7 breast cancer cells to IGF-1 rapidly and transiently induced tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 (PDK1). This was paralleled by Akt/protein kinase B and protein kinase C-ζ phosphorylation, at Thr308 and Thr410, respectively. IGF-1 treatment also enhanced PDK1 interaction with IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) in intact MCF-7 cells. Pulldown assays revealed that PDK1 bound IGF-1R in vitro and that the region encompassing amino acids 51–359 of PDK1 was necessary for the interaction. Synthetic peptides corresponding to IGF-1R C terminus amino acids 1295–1337 (C43) and to PDK1 amino acids 114–141 reduced in vitro IGF-1R/PDK1 interaction in a concentration-dependent manner. Loading of fluoresceinated-C43 (fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-C43) into MCF-7 cells significantly reduced IGF-1R/PDK1 interaction and phosphorylation of PDK1 substrates. Moreover, FITC-C43 intracellular loading reverted the protective effect of IGF-1 on growth factor deprivation-induced cell death. Finally, the inhibition of IGF-1R/PDK1 interaction and signaling by FITC-C43 was accompanied by 2-fold enhanced killing capacity of cetuximab in human GEO colon adenocarcinoma cells and was sufficient to restore cell death in cetuximab-resistant cell clones. Thus, disruption of PDK1 interaction with IGF-1R reduces IGF-1 survival effects in cancer cells and may enhance cell death by anticancer agents. PMID:20044479

  18. Parvovirus infection-induced cell death and cell cycle arrest

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Aaron Yun; Qiu, Jianming

    2011-01-01

    The cytopathic effects induced during parvovirus infection have been widely documented. Parvovirus infection-induced cell death is often directly associated with disease outcomes (e.g., anemia resulting from loss of erythroid progenitors during parvovirus B19 infection). Apoptosis is the major form of cell death induced by parvovirus infection. However, nonapoptotic cell death, namely necrosis, has also been reported during infection of the minute virus of mice, parvovirus H-1 and bovine parvovirus. Recent studies have revealed multiple mechanisms underlying the cell death during parvovirus infection. These mechanisms vary in different parvoviruses, although the large nonstructural protein (NS)1 and the small NS proteins (e.g., the 11 kDa of parvovirus B19), as well as replication of the viral genome, are responsible for causing infection-induced cell death. Cell cycle arrest is also common, and contributes to the cytopathic effects induced during parvovirus infection. While viral NS proteins have been indicated to induce cell cycle arrest, increasing evidence suggests that a cellular DNA damage response triggered by an invading single-stranded parvoviral genome is the major inducer of cell cycle arrest in parvovirus-infected cells. Apparently, in response to infection, cell death and cell cycle arrest of parvovirus-infected cells are beneficial to the viral cell lifecycle (e.g., viral DNA replication and virus egress). In this article, we will discuss recent advances in the understanding of the mechanisms underlying parvovirus infection-induced cell death and cell cycle arrest. PMID:21331319

  19. Redox cycling of endogenous copper by ferulic acid leads to cellular DNA breakage and consequent cell death: A putative cancer chemotherapy mechanism.

    PubMed

    Sarwar, Tarique; Zafaryab, Md; Husain, Mohammed Amir; Ishqi, Hassan Mubarak; Rehman, Sayeed Ur; Rizvi, M Moshahid Alam; Tabish, Mohammad

    2015-12-01

    Ferulic acid (FA) is a plant polyphenol showing diverse therapeutic effects against cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases. FA is a known antioxidant at lower concentrations, however at higher concentrations or in the presence of metal ions such as copper, it may act as a pro-oxidant. It has been reported that copper levels are significantly raised in different malignancies. Cancer cells are under increased oxidative stress as compared to normal cells. Certain therapeutic substances like polyphenols can further increase this oxidative stress and kill cancer cells without affecting the proliferation of normal cells. Through various in vitro experiments we have shown that the pro-oxidant properties of FA are enhanced in the presence of copper. Comet assay demonstrated the ability of FA to cause oxidative DNA breakage in human peripheral lymphocytes which was ameliorated by specific copper-chelating agent such as neocuproine and scavengers of ROS. This suggested the mobilization of endogenous copper in ROS generation and consequent DNA damage. These results were further validated through cytotoxicity experiments involving different cell lines. Thus, we conclude that such a pro-oxidant mechanism involving endogenous copper better explains the anticancer activities of FA. This would be an alternate non-enzymatic, and copper-mediated pathway for the cytotoxic activities of FA where it can selectively target cancer cells with elevated levels of copper and ROS.

  20. Kisspeptin Effect on Endothelial Monocyte Activating Polypeptide II (EMAP-II)-Associated Lymphocyte Cell Death and Metastases in Colorectal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Stathaki, Martha; Armakolas, Athanasios; Dimakakos, Andreas; Kaklamanis, Loukas; Vlachos, Ioannis; Konstantoulakis, Manoussos M; Zografos, George; Koutsilieris, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Kisspeptin is an antimetastatic agent in some cancers that has also been associated with lymphoid cell apoptosis, a phenomenon favoring metastases. Our aim was to determine the association of kisspeptin with lymphocyte apoptosis and the presence of metastases in colorectal cancer patients. Blood was drawn from 69 colon cancer patients and 20 healthy volunteers. Tissue specimens from healthy and pathological tissue were immunohistochemically analyzed for kisspeptin and endothelial monocyte activating polypeptide II (EMAP-II) expression. Blood EMAP-II and soluble Fas ligand (sFasL) levels were examined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. The kisspeptin and EMAP-II expression and secretion levels in the DLD-1 and HT-29 colon cancer cell lines were examined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, whereas lymphocyte viability was assessed by flow cytometry. The effect of kisspeptin on the viability of colon cancer cells was examined by MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide]. Exogenous, synthetic and naturally produced, kisspeptin induces through the G-protein-coupled receptor 54 (GPR54; also known as the kisspeptin receptor) the EMAP-II expression and secretion in colon cancer cell lines, inducing in vitro lymphocyte apoptosis, as verified by the use of an anti-EMAP-II antibody. These results were reversed with the use of kisspeptin inhibitors and by kisspeptin-silencing experiments. Tumor kisspeptin expression was associated with the tumor EMAP-II expression (p < 0.001). Elevated kisspeptin and EMAP-II expression in colon cancer tissues was associated with lack of metastases (p < 0.001) in colon cancer patients. These data indicate the antimetastatic effect of tumor-elevated kisspeptin in colon cancer patients that may be mediated by the effect of kisspeptin on EMAP-II expression in colon cancer tumors in patients with normal serum EMAP-II levels. These findings

  1. Cell Cycle-Dependent Mechanisms Underlie Vincristine-Induced Death of Primary Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Cells.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Anisha; Hittelman, Walter N; Chambers, Timothy C

    2016-06-15

    Microtubule-targeting agents (MTA), such as the taxanes and vinca alkaloids, are used to treat a variety of cancers due to their ability to perturb microtubule dynamics. In cell culture, MTAs exert their anticancer effects primarily by causing mitotic arrest and cell death. However, accumulating indirect evidence suggests that MTAs may exert their cytotoxicity in human tumors by interfering with interphase microtubules. In this study, we sought to develop and characterize an experimental system in which to test the hypothesis that MTAs induce cell death during interphase. Primary adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells treated with vincristine only weakly exhibited colocalization between mitotic and apoptotic markers and major characteristics of mitotic death, such as an increase in cells with 4N DNA content before the appearance of cells with <2N DNA content, suggesting a mixed response. Therefore, we separated ALL cells into distinct phases of the cell cycle by centrifugal elutriation, labeled cells with 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU), and then treated each population with vincristine. Cells isolated during G1 underwent cell death without evidence of EdU uptake, indicating that the cytotoxic effects of vincristine took place during G1 Conversely, cells isolated during S or G2-M phases underwent death following mitotic arrest. Thus, vincristine induces distinct death programs in primary ALL cells depending on cell-cycle phase, and cells in G1 are particularly susceptible to perturbation of interphase microtubules. Primary ALL cells may therefore provide a powerful model system in which to study the multimodal mechanisms underlying MTA-induced cell death. Cancer Res; 76(12); 3553-61. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197148

  2. Cell Cycle-Dependent Mechanisms Underlie Vincristine-Induced Death of Primary Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Cells.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Anisha; Hittelman, Walter N; Chambers, Timothy C

    2016-06-15

    Microtubule-targeting agents (MTA), such as the taxanes and vinca alkaloids, are used to treat a variety of cancers due to their ability to perturb microtubule dynamics. In cell culture, MTAs exert their anticancer effects primarily by causing mitotic arrest and cell death. However, accumulating indirect evidence suggests that MTAs may exert their cytotoxicity in human tumors by interfering with interphase microtubules. In this study, we sought to develop and characterize an experimental system in which to test the hypothesis that MTAs induce cell death during interphase. Primary adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells treated with vincristine only weakly exhibited colocalization between mitotic and apoptotic markers and major characteristics of mitotic death, such as an increase in cells with 4N DNA content before the appearance of cells with <2N DNA content, suggesting a mixed response. Therefore, we separated ALL cells into distinct phases of the cell cycle by centrifugal elutriation, labeled cells with 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU), and then treated each population with vincristine. Cells isolated during G1 underwent cell death without evidence of EdU uptake, indicating that the cytotoxic effects of vincristine took place during G1 Conversely, cells isolated during S or G2-M phases underwent death following mitotic arrest. Thus, vincristine induces distinct death programs in primary ALL cells depending on cell-cycle phase, and cells in G1 are particularly susceptible to perturbation of interphase microtubules. Primary ALL cells may therefore provide a powerful model system in which to study the multimodal mechanisms underlying MTA-induced cell death. Cancer Res; 76(12); 3553-61. ©2016 AACR.

  3. Chinese families after the death of a child from cancer.

    PubMed

    Martinson, I M; Chang, G Q; Liang, Y H

    1993-12-01

    As part of a major study of the impact of childhood cancer on Chinese families, 17 families agreed to be interviewed after the death of their child from cancer. They convey what happens to the child's body after death and what remembrances the family has kept of their child's belongings. They share how they have adjusted and what they would like other parents who have a child with cancer to know. A picture emerges of what it is like to have a child die from cancer in China.

  4. Insulin withdrawal-induced cell death in adult hippocampal neural stem cells as a model of autophagic cell death.

    PubMed

    Baek, Seung-Hoon; Kim, Eun-Kyoung; Goudreau, John L; Lookingland, Keith J; Kim, Seong Who; Yu, Seong-Woon

    2009-02-01

    The term "autophagic cell death" was coined to describe a form of cell death associated with the massive formation of autophagic vacuoles without signs of apoptosis. However, questions about the actual role of autophagy and its molecular basis in cell death remain to be elucidated. We recently reported that adult hippocampal neural stem (HCN) cells undergo autophagic cell death following insulin withdrawal. Insulin-deprived HCN cells exhibit morphological and biochemical markers of autophagy, including accumulation of Beclin 1 and the type II form of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) without evidence of apoptosis. Suppression of autophagy by knockdown of Atg7 reduces cell death, whereas promotion of autophagy with rapamycin augments cell death in insulin-deficient HCN cells. These data reveal a causative role of autophagy in insulin withdrawal-induced HCN cell death. HCN cells have intact apoptotic capability despite the lack of apoptosis following insulin withdrawal. Our study demonstrates that autophagy is the default cell death mechanism in insulin-deficient HCN cells, and provides a genuine model of autophagic cell death in apoptosis-intact cells. Novel insight into molecular mechanisms of this underappreciated form of programmed cell death should facilitate the development of therapeutic methods to cope with human diseases caused by dysregulated cell death.

  5. Targeting the Checkpoint to Kill Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Benada, Jan; Macurek, Libor

    2015-01-01

    Cancer treatments such as radiotherapy and most of the chemotherapies act by damaging DNA of cancer cells. Upon DNA damage, cells stop proliferation at cell cycle checkpoints, which provides them time for DNA repair. Inhibiting the checkpoint allows entry to mitosis despite the presence of DNA damage and can lead to cell death. Importantly, as cancer cells exhibit increased levels of endogenous DNA damage due to an excessive replication stress, inhibiting the checkpoint kinases alone could act as a directed anti-cancer therapy. Here, we review the current status of inhibitors targeted towards the checkpoint effectors and discuss mechanisms of their actions in killing of cancer cells. PMID:26295265

  6. Targeting the Checkpoint to Kill Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Benada, Jan; Macurek, Libor

    2015-01-01

    Cancer treatments such as radiotherapy and most of the chemotherapies act by damaging DNA of cancer cells. Upon DNA damage, cells stop proliferation at cell cycle checkpoints, which provides them time for DNA repair. Inhibiting the checkpoint allows entry to mitosis despite the presence of DNA damage and can lead to cell death. Importantly, as cancer cells exhibit increased levels of endogenous DNA damage due to an excessive replication stress, inhibiting the checkpoint kinases alone could act as a directed anti-cancer therapy. Here, we review the current status of inhibitors targeted towards the checkpoint effectors and discuss mechanisms of their actions in killing of cancer cells. PMID:26295265

  7. Time-Lapse Imaging of Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Wallberg, Fredrik; Tenev, Tencho; Meier, Pascal

    2016-03-01

    The best approach to distinguish between necrosis and apoptosis is time-lapse video microscopy. This technique enables a biological process to be photographed at regular intervals over a period, which may last from a few hours to several days, and can be applied to cells in culture or in vivo. We have established two time-lapse microscopy methods based on different ways of calculating cell death: semiautomated and automated. In the semiautomated approach, cell death can be visualized by staining with combinations of Alexa Fluor 647-conjugated Annexin V and Sytox Green (SG), or Annexin V(FITC) and Propidium iodide (PI). The automated method is similar except that all cells are labeled with dyes. This allows faster quantification of data. To this end Cell Tracker Green is used to label all cells at time zero in combination with PI and Alexa Fluor 647-conjugated Annexin V. Necrotic cell death is accompanied by either simultaneous labeling with Annexin V and PI or SG (double-positive), or direct PI or SG staining. Additionally, necrotic cells display characteristic morphology, such as cytoplasmic swelling. In contrast to necrosis where membrane permeabilization is an early event, cells that die by apoptosis lose their membrane permeability relatively late. Therefore, the time between Annexin V staining and PI or SG uptake (double-positive) can be used to distinguish necrosis from apoptosis. This protocol describes the analysis of cell death by time-lapse imaging of HT1080 and L929 cells stained with these dyes, but it can be readily adapted to other cell types of interest. PMID:26933245

  8. Programmed Cell Death in Animal Development and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Yaron; Steller, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    Programmed Cell Death (PCD) plays a fundamental role in animal development and tissue homeostasis. Abnormal regulation of this process is associated with a wide variety of human diseases, including immunological and developmental disorders, neuro-degeneration, and cancer. Here, we provide a brief historical overview of the field and reflect on myriad functions carried out by PCD during development and explore how PCD is regulated. We also focus on the function and regulation of apoptotic proteins, including caspases, the key executioners of apoptosis, highlighting the non-lethal functions of these proteins in diverse developmental processes including cell differentiation and tissue remodeling. Finally, we explore a growing body of work about the connections between apoptosis, stem cells and cancer, focusing on how apoptotic cells release a variety of signals to communicate with their cellular environment, including factors that promote cell division, tissue regeneration, and wound healing. PMID:22078876

  9. The apoptosome: signalling platform of cell death.

    PubMed

    Riedl, Stefan J; Salvesen, Guy S

    2007-05-01

    Recent work on the initial switches that trigger cell death has revealed surprising inventions of nature that ensure the ordered suicide of a cell that has been selected for demise. Particularly intriguing is how a signal--the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria--is translated into the activation of the death cascade, which leads to a point of no return. Now there is new understanding of how this crucial process is delicately handled by a cytosolic signalling platform known as the apoptosome. The formation of the apoptosome and the activation of its effector, caspase-9, reveals a sophisticated mechanism that might be more common than was initially thought. PMID:17377525

  10. Acetylsalicylic acid induces programmed cell death in Arabidopsis cell cultures.

    PubMed

    García-Heredia, José M; Hervás, Manuel; De la Rosa, Miguel A; Navarro, José A

    2008-06-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), a derivative from the plant hormone salicylic acid (SA), is a commonly used drug that has a dual role in animal organisms as an anti-inflammatory and anticancer agent. It acts as an inhibitor of cyclooxygenases (COXs), which catalyze prostaglandins production. It is known that ASA serves as an apoptotic agent on cancer cells through the inhibition of the COX-2 enzyme. Here, we provide evidences that ASA also behaves as an agent inducing programmed cell death (PCD) in cell cultures of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, in a similar way than the well-established PCD-inducing agent H(2)O(2), although the induction of PCD by ASA requires much lower inducer concentrations. Moreover, ASA is herein shown to be a more efficient PCD-inducing agent than salicylic acid. ASA treatment of Arabidopsis cells induces typical PCD-linked morphological and biochemical changes, namely cell shrinkage, nuclear DNA degradation, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release from mitochondria and induction of caspase-like activity. However, the ASA effect can be partially reverted by jasmonic acid. Taking together, these results reveal the existence of common features in ASA-induced animal apoptosis and plant PCD, and also suggest that there are similarities between the pathways of synthesis and function of prostanoid-like lipid mediators in animal and plant organisms.

  11. Ayanin diacetate-induced cell death is amplified by TRAIL in human leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Marrero, Maria Teresa; Estevez, Sara; Negrin, Gledy; Quintana, Jose; Leon, Francisco; Estevez, Francisco

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ayanin diacetate as apoptotic inducer in leukemia cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell death was prevented by caspase inhibitors and by the overexpression of Bcl-x{sub L}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The intrinsic and the extrinsic pathways are involved in the mechanism of action. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Death receptors are up-regulated and TRAIL enhances apoptotic cell death. -- Abstract: Here we demonstrate that the semi-synthetic flavonoid ayanin diacetate induces cell death selectively in leukemia cells without affecting the proliferation of normal lymphocytes. Incubation of human leukemia cells with ayanin diacetate induced G{sub 2}-M phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis which was prevented by the non-specific caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk and reduced by the overexpression of Bcl-x{sub L}. Ayanin diacetate-induced cell death was found to be associated with: (i) loss of inner mitochondrial membrane potential, (ii) the release of cytochrome c, (iii) the activation of multiple caspases, (iv) cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and (v) the up-regulation of death receptors for TRAIL, DR4 and DR5. Moreover, the combined treatment with ayanin diacetate and TRAIL amplified cell death, compared to single treatments. These results provide a basis for further exploring the potential applications of this combination for the treatment of cancer.

  12. The metabolism beyond programmed cell death in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Ring, Julia; Sommer, Cornelia; Carmona-Gutierrez, Didac; Ruckenstuhl, Christoph; Eisenberg, Tobias; Madeo, Frank

    2012-01-01

    A cell's reaction to any change in the endogenous or exogenous conditions often involves a complex response that eventually either leads to cell adaptation and survival or to the initiation and execution of (programmed) cell death. The molecular decision whether to live or die, while depending on a cell's genome, is fundamentally influenced by its actual metabolic status. Thus, the collection of all metabolites present in a biological system at a certain time point (the so-called metabolome) defines its physiological, developmental and pathological state and determines its fate during changing and stressful conditions. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a unicellular organism that allows to easily modify and monitor conditions affecting the cell's metabolome, for instance through a simple change of the nutrition source. Such changes can be used to mimic and study (patho)physiological scenarios, including caloric restriction and longevity, the Warburg effect in cancer cells or changes in mitochondrial mass affecting cell death. In addition, disruption of single genes or generation of respiratory deficiency (via abrogation of mitochondrial DNA) assists in revealing connections between metabolism and apoptosis. In this minireview, we discuss recent studies using the potential of the yeast model to provide new insights into the processes of stress defense, cell death and longevity. PMID:22480867

  13. The deaths of a cell: how language and metaphor influence the science of cell death.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Andrew S

    2014-12-01

    Multicellular development and tissue maintenance involve the regular elimination of damaged and healthy cells. The science of this genetically regulated cell death is particularly rich in metaphors: 'programmed cell death' or 'cell suicide' is considered an 'altruistic' act on the part of a cell for the benefit of the organism as a whole. It is also considered a form of 'social control' exerted by the body/organism over its component cells. This paper analyzes the various functions of these metaphors and critical discussion about them within the scientific community. Bodies such as the Nomenclature Committee on Cell Death (NCCD) have been charged with bringing order to the language of cell death to facilitate scientific progress. While the NCCD recommends adopting more objective biochemical terminology to describe the mechanisms of cell death, the metaphors in question retain an important function by highlighting the broader context within which cell death occurs. Scientific metaphors act as conceptual 'tools' which fulfill various roles, from highlighting a phenomenon as of particular interest, situating it in a particular context, or suggesting explanatory causal mechanisms.

  14. Cell death pathways associated with PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessel, David; Reiners, John J., Jr.

    2006-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy leads to both direct and indirect tumor cell death. The latter also involves the consequences of vascular shut-down and immunologic effects. While these factors are a major factor in tumor eradication, there is usually an element of direct cell killing that can reduce the cell population by as much as 2-3 logs. Necrosis was initially believed to represent the predominant PDT death mechanism. An apoptotic response to PDT was first reported by Oleinick in 1991, using a sensitizer that targets the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. Apoptosis leads to fragmentation of DNA and of cells into apoptotic bodies that are removed by phagocytosis. Inflammatory effects are minimized, and the auto- catalytic elements of the process can amplify the death signal. In this study, we examined consequences of Bcl-2 photodamage by a porphycene sensitizer that targets the ER and causes photodamage to the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. Death patterns after Bcl-2 inactivation by a small-molecular antagonist were also assessed. In addition to apoptosis, we also characterized a hitherto undescribed PDT effect, the initiation of autophagy. Autophagy was initially identified as a cell survival pathway, allowing the recycling of components as nutrients become scarce. We propose that autophagy can also represent both a potential survival pathway after PDT damage to cellular organelles, as well as a cell-death pathway. Recent literature reports indicate that autophagy, as well as apoptosis, can be evoked after down-regulation of Bcl-2, a result consistent with results reported here.

  15. Caspase-3-mediated degradation of condensin Cap-H regulates mitotic cell death.

    PubMed

    Lai, S-K; Wong, C-H; Lee, Y-P; Li, H-Y

    2011-06-01

    Mitotic death is a major form of cell death in cancer cells that have been treated with chemotherapeutic drugs. However, the mechanisms underlying this form of cell death is poorly understood. Here, we report that the loss of chromosome integrity is an important determinant of mitotic death. During prolonged mitotic arrest, caspase-3 is activated and it cleaves Cap-H, a subunit of condensin I. The depletion of Cap-H results in the loss of condensin I complex at the chromosomes, thus affecting the integrity of the chromosomes. Consequently, DNA fragmentation by caspase-activated DNase is facilitated, thus driving the cell towards mitotic death. By expressing a caspase-resistant form of Cap-H, mitotic death is abrogated and the cells are able to reenter interphase after a long mitotic delay. Taken together, we provide new insights into the molecular events that occur during mitotic death.

  16. Programmed cell death in seeds of angiosperms.

    PubMed

    López-Fernández, María Paula; Maldonado, Sara

    2015-12-01

    During the diversification of angiosperms, seeds have evolved structural, chemical, molecular and physiologically developing changes that specially affect the nucellus and endosperm. All through seed evolution, programmed cell death (PCD) has played a fundamental role. However, examples of PCD during seed development are limited. The present review examines PCD in integuments, nucellus, suspensor and endosperm in those representative examples of seeds studied to date.

  17. Nanomaterials Toxicity and Cell Death Modalities

    PubMed Central

    De Stefano, Daniela; Carnuccio, Rosa; Maiuri, Maria Chiara

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade, the nanotechnology advancement has developed a plethora of novel and intriguing nanomaterial application in many sectors, including research and medicine. However, many risks have been highlighted in their use, particularly related to their unexpected toxicity in vitro and in vivo experimental models. This paper proposes an overview concerning the cell death modalities induced by the major nanomaterials. PMID:23304518

  18. Lipids and cell death in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Eisenberg, Tobias; Büttner, Sabrina

    2014-01-01

    Understanding lipid-induced malfunction represents a major challenge of today's biomedical research. The connection of lipids to cellular and organ dysfunction, cell death, and disease (often referred to as lipotoxicity) is more complex than the sole lipotoxic effects of excess free fatty acids and requires genetically tractable model systems for mechanistic investigation. We herein summarize recent advances in the field of lipid-induced toxicity that employ the established model system for cell death and aging research of budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Studies in yeast have shed light on various aspects of lipotoxicity, including free fatty acid toxicity, sphingolipid-modulated cell death as well as the involvement of cardiolipin and lipid peroxidation in the mitochondrial pathways of apoptosis. Regimens used range from exogenously applied lipids, genetic modulation of lipolysis and triacylglyceride synthesis, variations in sphingolipid/ceramide metabolism as well as changes in peroxisome function by either genetic or pharmacological means. In future, the yeast model of programmed cell death will further contribute to the clarification of crucial questions of lipid-associated malfunction. PMID:24119111

  19. The Mechanism of Safrole-Induced [Ca²⁺]i Rises and Non-Ca²⁺-Triggered Cell Death in SCM1 Human Gastric Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Hung, Tzu-Yi; Chou, Chiang-Ting; Sun, Te-Kung; Liang, Wei-Zhe; Cheng, Jin-Shiung; Fang, Yi-Chien; Li, Yih-Do; Shieh, Pochuen; Ho, Chin-Man; Kuo, Chun-Chi; Lin, Jia-Rong; Kuo, Daih-Huang; Jan, Chung-Ren

    2015-10-31

    Safrole is a carcinogen found in plants. The effect of safrole on cytosolic free Ca²⁺ concentrations ([Ca²⁺](i)) and viability in SCM1 human gastric cancer cells was explored. The Ca²⁺-sensitive fluorescent dye fura-2 was applied to measure [Ca²⁺](i). Safrole at concentrations of 150-450 μM induced a [Ca²⁺](i) rise in a concentration-dependent manner. The response was reduced by 60% by removing extracellular Ca²⁺. Safrole-evoked Ca²⁺ entry was not altered by nifedipine, econazole, SKF96365, and protein kinase C activator or inhibitor. In Ca²⁺-free medium, treatment with the endoplasmic reticulum Ca²⁺ pump inhibitor thapsigargin or 2,5-di-tert-butylhydroquinone (BHQ) abolished safrole-evoked [Ca²⁺](i) rises. Conversely, treatment with safrole abolished thapsigargin or BHQ-evoked [Ca²⁺](i) rises. Inhibition of phospholipase C (PLC) with U73122 abolished safrole-induced [Ca²⁺](i) rises. At 250-550 μM, safrole decreased cell viability concentration-dependently, which was not reversed by chelating cytosolic Ca²⁺ with 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid/acetoxy methyl (BAPTA/AM). Annexin V/propidium iodide staining data suggest that safrole (350-550 μM) induced apoptosis concentration-dependently. These studies suggest that in SCM1 human gastric cancer cells, safrole induced [Ca²⁺](i) rises by inducing PLC-dependent Ca²⁺ release from the endoplasmic reticulum and Ca²⁺ influx via non-store-operated Ca²⁺ entry pathways. Safrole-induced cell death may involve apoptosis.

  20. The Mechanism of Safrole-Induced [Ca²⁺]i Rises and Non-Ca²⁺-Triggered Cell Death in SCM1 Human Gastric Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Hung, Tzu-Yi; Chou, Chiang-Ting; Sun, Te-Kung; Liang, Wei-Zhe; Cheng, Jin-Shiung; Fang, Yi-Chien; Li, Yih-Do; Shieh, Pochuen; Ho, Chin-Man; Kuo, Chun-Chi; Lin, Jia-Rong; Kuo, Daih-Huang; Jan, Chung-Ren

    2015-10-31

    Safrole is a carcinogen found in plants. The effect of safrole on cytosolic free Ca²⁺ concentrations ([Ca²⁺](i)) and viability in SCM1 human gastric cancer cells was explored. The Ca²⁺-sensitive fluorescent dye fura-2 was applied to measure [Ca²⁺](i). Safrole at concentrations of 150-450 μM induced a [Ca²⁺](i) rise in a concentration-dependent manner. The response was reduced by 60% by removing extracellular Ca²⁺. Safrole-evoked Ca²⁺ entry was not altered by nifedipine, econazole, SKF96365, and protein kinase C activator or inhibitor. In Ca²⁺-free medium, treatment with the endoplasmic reticulum Ca²⁺ pump inhibitor thapsigargin or 2,5-di-tert-butylhydroquinone (BHQ) abolished safrole-evoked [Ca²⁺](i) rises. Conversely, treatment with safrole abolished thapsigargin or BHQ-evoked [Ca²⁺](i) rises. Inhibition of phospholipase C (PLC) with U73122 abolished safrole-induced [Ca²⁺](i) rises. At 250-550 μM, safrole decreased cell viability concentration-dependently, which was not reversed by chelating cytosolic Ca²⁺ with 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid/acetoxy methyl (BAPTA/AM). Annexin V/propidium iodide staining data suggest that safrole (350-550 μM) induced apoptosis concentration-dependently. These studies suggest that in SCM1 human gastric cancer cells, safrole induced [Ca²⁺](i) rises by inducing PLC-dependent Ca²⁺ release from the endoplasmic reticulum and Ca²⁺ influx via non-store-operated Ca²⁺ entry pathways. Safrole-induced cell death may involve apoptosis. PMID:26387654

  1. Combinatorial Strategies for the Induction of Immunogenic Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Bezu, Lucillia; Gomes-da-Silva, Ligia C.; Dewitte, Heleen; Breckpot, Karine; Fucikova, Jitka; Spisek, Radek; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kepp, Oliver; Kroemer, Guido

    2015-01-01

    The term “immunogenic cell death” (ICD) is commonly employed to indicate a peculiar instance of regulated cell death (RCD) that engages the adaptive arm of the immune system. The inoculation of cancer cells undergoing ICD into immunocompetent animals elicits a specific immune response associated with the establishment of immunological memory. Only a few agents are intrinsically endowed with the ability to trigger ICD. These include a few chemotherapeutics that are routinely employed in the clinic, like doxorubicin, mitoxantrone, oxaliplatin, and cyclophosphamide, as well as some agents that have not yet been approved for use in humans. Accumulating clinical data indicate that the activation of adaptive immune responses against dying cancer cells is associated with improved disease outcome in patients affected by various neoplasms. Thus, novel therapeutic regimens that trigger ICD are urgently awaited. Here, we discuss current combinatorial approaches to convert otherwise non-immunogenic instances of RCD into bona fide ICD. PMID:25964783

  2. Contemporary accuracy of death certificates for coding prostate cancer as a cause of death: Is reliance on death certification good enough? A comparison with blinded review by an independent cause of death evaluation committee

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Emma L; Metcalfe, Chris; Donovan, Jenny L; Noble, Sian; Sterne, Jonathan A C; Lane, J Athene; I Walsh, Eleanor; Hill, Elizabeth M; Down, Liz; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Oliver, Steven E; Evans, Simon; Brindle, Peter; Williams, Naomi J; Hughes, Laura J; Davies, Charlotte F; Ng, Siaw Yein; Neal, David E; Hamdy, Freddie C; Albertsen, Peter; Reid, Colette M; Oxley, Jon; McFarlane, John; Robinson, Mary C; Adolfsson, Jan; Zietman, Anthony; Baum, Michael; Koupparis, Anthony; Martin, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    Background: Accurate cause of death assignment is crucial for prostate cancer epidemiology and trials reporting prostate cancer-specific mortality outcomes. Methods: We compared death certificate information with independent cause of death evaluation by an expert committee within a prostate cancer trial (2002–2015). Results: Of 1236 deaths assessed, expert committee evaluation attributed 523 (42%) to prostate cancer, agreeing with death certificate cause of death in 1134 cases (92%, 95% CI: 90%, 93%). The sensitivity of death certificates in identifying prostate cancer deaths as classified by the committee was 91% (95% CI: 89%, 94%); specificity was 92% (95% CI: 90%, 94%). Sensitivity and specificity were lower where death occurred within 1 year of diagnosis, and where there was another primary cancer diagnosis. Conclusions: UK death certificates accurately identify cause of death in men with prostate cancer, supporting their use in routine statistics. Possible differential misattribution by trial arm supports independent evaluation in randomised trials. PMID:27253172

  3. Glycosphingolipids and cell death: One aim, many ways

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Ruiz, Carmen; Morales, Albert; Fernández-Checa, José C.

    2015-01-01

    Glycosphingolipids (GSLs) are a family of bioactive lipids that in addition to their role in the regulation of structural properties of membrane bilayers have emerged as crucial players in many biological processes and signal transduction pathways. Rather than being uniformly distributed within membrane bilayers, GSLs are localized in selective domains called lipid rafts where many signaling platforms operate. One of the most important functions of GSLs, particularly ceramide, is their ability to regulate cell death pathways and hence cell fate. This complex role is accomplished by the ability of GSLs to act in distinct subcellular strategic centers, such as mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) or lysosomes to mediate apoptosis, ER stress, autophagy, lysosomal membrane permeabilization and necroptosis. Hence better understanding the role of GSLs in cell death may be of relevance for a number of pathological processes and diseases, including neurodegeneration, metabolic liver diseases and cancer. PMID:25637183

  4. Hemoglobins, programmed cell death and somatic embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hill, Robert D; Huang, Shuanglong; Stasolla, Claudio

    2013-10-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a universal process in all multicellular organisms. It is a critical component in a diverse number of processes ranging from growth and differentiation to response to stress. Somatic embryogenesis is one such process where PCD is significantly involved. Nitric oxide is increasingly being recognized as playing a significant role in regulating PCD in both mammalian and plant systems. Plant hemoglobins scavenge NO, and evidence is accumulating that events that modify NO levels in plants also affect hemoglobin expression. Here, we review the process of PCD, describing the involvement of NO and plant hemoglobins in the process. NO is an effector of cell death in both plants and vertebrates, triggering the cascade of events leading to targeted cell death that is a part of an organism's response to stress or to tissue differentiation and development. Expression of specific hemoglobins can alter this response in plants by scavenging the NO, thus, interrupting the death process. Somatic embryogenesis is used as a model system to demonstrate how cell-specific expression of different classes of hemoglobins can alter the embryogenic process, affecting hormone synthesis, cell metabolite levels and genes associated with PCD and embryogenic competence. We propose that plant hemoglobins influence somatic embryogenesis and PCD through cell-specific expression of a distinct plant hemoglobin. It is based on the premise that both embryogenic competence and PCD are strongly influenced by cellular NO levels. Increases in cellular NO levels result in elevated Zn(2+) and reactive-oxygen species associated with PCD, but they also result in decreased expression of MYC2, a transcription factor that is a negative effector of indoleacetic acid synthesis, a hormone that positively influences embryogenic competence. Cell-specific hemoglobin expression reduces NO levels as a result of NO scavenging, resulting in cell survival.

  5. Mitochondria, cholesterol and cancer cell metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ribas, Vicent; García-Ruiz, Carmen; Fernández-Checa, José C

    2016-12-01

    Given the role of mitochondria in oxygen consumption, metabolism and cell death regulation, alterations in mitochondrial function or dysregulation of cell death pathways contribute to the genesis and progression of cancer. Cancer cells exhibit an array of metabolic transformations induced by mutations leading to gain-of-function of oncogenes and loss-of-function of tumor suppressor genes that include increased glucose consumption, reduced mitochondrial respiration, increased reactive oxygen species generation and cell death resistance, all of which ensure cancer progression. Cholesterol metabolism is disturbed in cancer cells and supports uncontrolled cell growth. In particular, the accumulation of cholesterol in mitochondria emerges as a molecular component that orchestrates some of these metabolic alterations in cancer cells by impairing mitochondrial function. As a consequence, mitochondrial cholesterol loading in cancer cells may contribute, in part, to the Warburg effect stimulating aerobic glycolysis to meet the energetic demand of proliferating cells, while protecting cancer cells against mitochondrial apoptosis due to changes in mitochondrial membrane dynamics. Further understanding the complexity in the metabolic alterations of cancer cells, mediated largely through alterations in mitochondrial function, may pave the way to identify more efficient strategies for cancer treatment involving the use of small molecules targeting mitochondria, cholesterol homeostasis/trafficking and specific metabolic pathways. PMID:27455839

  6. Scared witless about death--ovarian cancer narratives compared.

    PubMed

    van Duin, Isabella A J; Kaptein, Ad A

    2013-12-01

    Fifty years ago, doctors did not tell their patients they had cancer. Improved patient-physician communication, feminization of the medical profession and increased patient empowerment may have improved matters. However, death is still a subject many doctors find difficult to deal with. We explore this issue in the context of medical humanities. In order to examine the different strategies in coping with illness and death, we compared illness perceptions in a literary text, W;t by Margaret Edson, about a woman who dies of ovarian cancer, with a personal narrative of a patient with ovarian cancer. Although there are many differences between the two patients in historical and cultural background, similarities were found in the way they cope with illness and death anxiety. Insight into illness perceptions and coping strategies of patients with cancer is important for raising awareness in clinicians, leading to improved understanding and better treatment of patients.

  7. Lipid raft involvement in yeast cell growth and death.

    PubMed

    Mollinedo, Faustino

    2012-01-01

    The notion that cellular membranes contain distinct microdomains, acting as scaffolds for signal transduction processes, has gained considerable momentum. In particular, a class of such domains that is rich in sphingolipids and cholesterol, termed as lipid rafts, is thought to compartmentalize the plasma membrane, and to have important roles in survival and cell death signaling in mammalian cells. Likewise, yeast lipid rafts are membrane domains enriched in sphingolipids and ergosterol, the yeast counterpart of mammalian cholesterol. Sterol-rich membrane domains have been identified in several fungal species, including the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe as well as the pathogens Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans. Yeast rafts have been mainly involved in membrane trafficking, but increasing evidence implicates rafts in a wide range of additional cellular processes. Yeast lipid rafts house biologically important proteins involved in the proper function of yeast, such as proteins that control Na(+), K(+), and pH homeostasis, which influence many cellular processes, including cell growth and death. Membrane raft constituents affect drug susceptibility, and drugs interacting with sterols alter raft composition and membrane integrity, leading to yeast cell death. Because of the genetic tractability of yeast, analysis of yeast rafts could be an excellent model to approach unanswered questions of mammalian raft biology, and to understand the role of lipid rafts in the regulation of cell death and survival in human cells. A better insight in raft biology might lead to envisage new raft-mediated approaches to the treatment of human diseases where regulation of cell death and survival is critical, such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases.

  8. Lipid raft involvement in yeast cell growth and death

    PubMed Central

    Mollinedo, Faustino

    2012-01-01

    The notion that cellular membranes contain distinct microdomains, acting as scaffolds for signal transduction processes, has gained considerable momentum. In particular, a class of such domains that is rich in sphingolipids and cholesterol, termed as lipid rafts, is thought to compartmentalize the plasma membrane, and to have important roles in survival and cell death signaling in mammalian cells. Likewise, yeast lipid rafts are membrane domains enriched in sphingolipids and ergosterol, the yeast counterpart of mammalian cholesterol. Sterol-rich membrane domains have been identified in several fungal species, including the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe as well as the pathogens Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans. Yeast rafts have been mainly involved in membrane trafficking, but increasing evidence implicates rafts in a wide range of additional cellular processes. Yeast lipid rafts house biologically important proteins involved in the proper function of yeast, such as proteins that control Na+, K+, and pH homeostasis, which influence many cellular processes, including cell growth and death. Membrane raft constituents affect drug susceptibility, and drugs interacting with sterols alter raft composition and membrane integrity, leading to yeast cell death. Because of the genetic tractability of yeast, analysis of yeast rafts could be an excellent model to approach unanswered questions of mammalian raft biology, and to understand the role of lipid rafts in the regulation of cell death and survival in human cells. A better insight in raft biology might lead to envisage new raft-mediated approaches to the treatment of human diseases where regulation of cell death and survival is critical, such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23087902

  9. Decoding cell death signals in liver inflammation.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Catherine; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kepp, Oliver; Kroemer, Guido

    2013-09-01

    Inflammation can be either beneficial or detrimental to the liver, depending on multiple factors. Mild (i.e., limited in intensity and destined to resolve) inflammatory responses have indeed been shown to exert consistent hepatoprotective effects, contributing to tissue repair and promoting the re-establishment of homeostasis. Conversely, excessive (i.e., disproportionate in intensity and permanent) inflammation may induce a massive loss of hepatocytes and hence exacerbate the severity of various hepatic conditions, including ischemia-reperfusion injury, systemic metabolic alterations (e.g., obesity, diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty liver disorders), alcoholic hepatitis, intoxication by xenobiotics and infection, de facto being associated with irreversible liver damage, fibrosis, and carcinogenesis. Both liver-resident cells (e.g., Kupffer cells, hepatic stellate cells, sinusoidal endothelial cells) and cells that are recruited in response to injury (e.g., monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, natural killer cells) emit pro-inflammatory signals including - but not limited to - cytokines, chemokines, lipid messengers, and reactive oxygen species that contribute to the apoptotic or necrotic demise of hepatocytes. In turn, dying hepatocytes release damage-associated molecular patterns that-upon binding to evolutionary conserved pattern recognition receptors-activate cells of the innate immune system to further stimulate inflammatory responses, hence establishing a highly hepatotoxic feedforward cycle of inflammation and cell death. In this review, we discuss the cellular and molecular mechanisms that account for the most deleterious effect of hepatic inflammation at the cellular level, that is, the initiation of a massive cell death response among hepatocytes.

  10. Autophagic and apoptotic cell death in amniotic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Shen, Z-Y; Li, E-M; Lu, S-Q; Shen, J; Cai, Y-M; Wu, Y-E; Zheng, R-M; Tan, L-J; Xu, L-Y

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to determine if autophagic cell death is associated with apoptosis and whether it participates in the process of term amniotic rupture. Forty pieces of fresh term amnions, including twenty from a position near the margin of the placentas and twenty from the margin of the naturally ruptured part of the placentas in term gestation were collected, respectively. The amnions were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and amniotic epithelial (AE) cells were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Autophagic and apoptotic cell death (PCD) were assayed by laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) or flow cytometry using monodansylcadaverin (MDC) and propidium iodide (PI) stain. BCL(2) and BAX were examined by immunoblotting. Under SEM the amniotic epithelia appeared normal in the position near the placenta. They had an atrophied appearance in the margin of their natural broken parts. In the AE cells PCD was divided into three subtypes by TEM: autophagic cell death with positive stains of MDC and PI; apoptotic cell death; and the mixed type. Quantitative detection showed that there were more death cells, including autophagic and apoptotic, in the AE cells near the ruptured parts than near the placentas. An increased expression of BAX and a decreased expression of BCL(2) protein in the AE cells near the broken margin were observed. Apoptotic and autophagic cell death by the intrinsic pathway are the basic event in the AE cell and they are involved in the cause of membrane rupture of the human amnion in term gestation.

  11. Cell death and autophagy: cytokines, drugs, and nutritional factors.

    PubMed

    Bursch, Wilfried; Karwan, Anneliese; Mayer, Miriam; Dornetshuber, Julia; Fröhwein, Ulrike; Schulte-Hermann, Rolf; Fazi, Barbara; Di Sano, Federica; Piredda, Lucia; Piacentini, Mauro; Petrovski, Goran; Fésüs, László; Gerner, Christopher

    2008-12-30

    Cells may use multiple pathways to commit suicide. In certain contexts, dying cells generate large amounts of autophagic vacuoles and clear large proportions of their cytoplasm, before they finally die, as exemplified by the treatment of human mammary carcinoma cells with the anti-estrogen tamoxifen (TAM, < or = 1 microM). Protein analysis during autophagic cell death revealed distinct proteins of the nuclear fraction including GST-pi and some proteasomal subunit constituents to be affected during autophagic cell death. Depending on the functional status of caspase-3, MCF-7 cells may switch between autophagic and apoptotic features of cell death [Fazi, B., Bursch, W., Fimia, G.M., Nardacci R., Piacentini, M., Di Sano, F., Piredda, L., 2008. Fenretinide induces autophagic cell death in caspase-defective breast cancer cells. Autophagy 4(4), 435-441]. Furthermore, the self-destruction of MCF-7 cells was found to be completed by phagocytosis of cell residues [Petrovski, G., Zahuczky, G., Katona, K., Vereb, G., Martinet, W., Nemes, Z., Bursch, W., Fésüs, L., 2007. Clearance of dying autophagic cells of different origin by professional and non-professional phagocytes. Cell Death Diff. 14 (6), 1117-1128]. Autophagy also constitutes a cell's strategy of defense upon cell damage by eliminating damaged bulk proteins/organelles. This biological condition may be exemplified by the treatment of MCF-7 cells with a necrogenic TAM-dose (10 microM), resulting in the lysis of almost all cells within 24h. However, a transient (1h) challenge of MCF-7 cells with the same dose allowed the recovery of cells involving autophagy. Enrichment of chaperones in the insoluble cytoplasmic protein fraction indicated the formation of aggresomes, a potential trigger for autophagy. In a further experimental model HL60 cells were treated with TAM, causing dose-dependent distinct responses: 1-5 microM TAM, autophagy predominant; 7-9 microM, apoptosis predominant; 15 microM, necrosis. These phenomena

  12. Sickle Cell Trait Not Linked to Early Death in Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Sickle Cell Trait Not Linked to Early Death in Study However, black soldiers with the gene ... cell gene variant, are at risk of premature death. People with the sickle cell gene variant do ...

  13. PDK2-mediated alternative splicing switches Bnip3 from cell death to cell survival.

    PubMed

    Gang, Hongying; Dhingra, Rimpy; Lin, Junjun; Hai, Yan; Aviv, Yaron; Margulets, Victoria; Hamedani, Mohammad; Thanasupawat, Thatchawan; Leygue, Etienne; Klonisch, Thomas; Davie, James R; Kirshenbaum, Lorrie A

    2015-09-28

    Herein we describe a novel survival pathway that operationally links alternative pre-mRNA splicing of the hypoxia-inducible death protein Bcl-2 19-kD interacting protein 3 (Bnip3) to the unique glycolytic phenotype in cancer cells. While a full-length Bnip3 protein (Bnip3FL) encoded by exons 1-6 was expressed as an isoform in normal cells and promoted cell death, a truncated spliced variant of Bnip3 mRNA deleted for exon 3 (Bnip3Δex3) was preferentially expressed in several human adenocarcinomas and promoted survival. Reciprocal inhibition of the Bnip3Δex3/Bnip3FL isoform ratio by inhibiting pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isoform 2 (PDK2) in Panc-1 cells rapidly induced mitochondrial perturbations and cell death. The findings of the present study reveal a novel survival pathway that functionally couples the unique glycolytic phenotype in cancer cells to hypoxia resistance via a PDK2-dependent mechanism that switches Bnip3 from cell death to survival. Discovery of the survival Bnip3Δex3 isoform may fundamentally explain how certain cells resist Bnip3 and avert death during hypoxia.

  14. PDK2-mediated alternative splicing switches Bnip3 from cell death to cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Gang, Hongying; Dhingra, Rimpy; Lin, Junjun; Hai, Yan; Aviv, Yaron; Margulets, Victoria; Hamedani, Mohammad; Thanasupawat, Thatchawan; Leygue, Etienne; Klonisch, Thomas; Davie, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Herein we describe a novel survival pathway that operationally links alternative pre-mRNA splicing of the hypoxia-inducible death protein Bcl-2 19-kD interacting protein 3 (Bnip3) to the unique glycolytic phenotype in cancer cells. While a full-length Bnip3 protein (Bnip3FL) encoded by exons 1–6 was expressed as an isoform in normal cells and promoted cell death, a truncated spliced variant of Bnip3 mRNA deleted for exon 3 (Bnip3Δex3) was preferentially expressed in several human adenocarcinomas and promoted survival. Reciprocal inhibition of the Bnip3Δex3/Bnip3FL isoform ratio by inhibiting pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isoform 2 (PDK2) in Panc-1 cells rapidly induced mitochondrial perturbations and cell death. The findings of the present study reveal a novel survival pathway that functionally couples the unique glycolytic phenotype in cancer cells to hypoxia resistance via a PDK2-dependent mechanism that switches Bnip3 from cell death to survival. Discovery of the survival Bnip3Δex3 isoform may fundamentally explain how certain cells resist Bnip3 and avert death during hypoxia. PMID:26416963

  15. PDK2-mediated alternative splicing switches Bnip3 from cell death to cell survival.

    PubMed

    Gang, Hongying; Dhingra, Rimpy; Lin, Junjun; Hai, Yan; Aviv, Yaron; Margulets, Victoria; Hamedani, Mohammad; Thanasupawat, Thatchawan; Leygue, Etienne; Klonisch, Thomas; Davie, James R; Kirshenbaum, Lorrie A

    2015-09-28

    Herein we describe a novel survival pathway that operationally links alternative pre-mRNA splicing of the hypoxia-inducible death protein Bcl-2 19-kD interacting protein 3 (Bnip3) to the unique glycolytic phenotype in cancer cells. While a full-length Bnip3 protein (Bnip3FL) encoded by exons 1-6 was expressed as an isoform in normal cells and promoted cell death, a truncated spliced variant of Bnip3 mRNA deleted for exon 3 (Bnip3Δex3) was preferentially expressed in several human adenocarcinomas and promoted survival. Reciprocal inhibition of the Bnip3Δex3/Bnip3FL isoform ratio by inhibiting pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isoform 2 (PDK2) in Panc-1 cells rapidly induced mitochondrial perturbations and cell death. The findings of the present study reveal a novel survival pathway that functionally couples the unique glycolytic phenotype in cancer cells to hypoxia resistance via a PDK2-dependent mechanism that switches Bnip3 from cell death to survival. Discovery of the survival Bnip3Δex3 isoform may fundamentally explain how certain cells resist Bnip3 and avert death during hypoxia. PMID:26416963

  16. Thymoquinone causes multiple effects, including cell death, on dividing plant cells.

    PubMed

    Hassanien, Sameh E; Ramadan, Ahmed M; Azeiz, Ahmed Z Abdel; Mohammed, Rasha A; Hassan, Sabah M; Shokry, Ahmed M; Atef, Ahmed; Kamal, Khalid B H; Rabah, Samar; Sabir, Jamal S M; Abuzinadah, Osama A; El-Domyati, Fotouh M; Martin, Gregory B; Bahieldin, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Thymoquinone (TQ) is a major constituent of Nigella sativa oil with reported anti-oxidative activity and anti-inflammatory activity in animal cells. It also inhibits proliferation and induces programmed cell death (apoptosis) in human skin cancer cells. The present study sought to detect the influence of TQ on dividing cells of three plant systems and on expression of Bcl2-associated athanogene-like (BAG-like) genes that might be involved during the process of cell death. BAG genes are known for the regulation of diverse physiological processes in animals, including apoptosis, tumorigenesis, stress responses, and cell division. Synthetic TQ at 0.1mg/mL greatly reduced wheat seed germination rate, whereas 0.2mg/mL completely inhibited germination. An Evans blue assay revealed moderate cell death in the meristematic zone of Glycine max roots after 1h of TQ treatment (0.2mg/mL), with severe cell death occurring in this zone after 2h of treatment. Light microscopy of TQ-treated (0.2mg/mL) onion hairy root tips for 1h revealed anti-mitotic activity and also cell death-associated changes, including nuclear membrane disruption and nuclear fragmentation. Transmission electron microscopy of TQ-treated cells (0.2mg/mL) for 1h revealed shrinkage of the plasma membrane, leakage of cell lysate, degradation of cell