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Sample records for cancer cell death

  1. Programmed Cell Death in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-10-01

    Programmed cell death , or apoptosis, is a genetically regulated process through which a cell is active in bringing about its own death for the sake...delays and inhibits the cell death response, so that the breast cancer cell lines are much less susceptible to thapsigargin-induced apoptosis than...lymphoid cell lines, an observation that parallels the differential susceptibility of breast cancer and lymphomas to chemotherapy-induced cell death in

  2. Programmed Cell Death in Breast Cancer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-10-01

    TITLE: Programmed Cell Death in Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Clark W. Distelhorst, M.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Case Western Reserve...Programmed Cell Death in Breast Cancer DAMD17-94-J-4451 6. AUTHOR(S) Clark W. Distelhorst, M.D. 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8...cell death , apoptosis, in breast cancer cells has been developed. This model is based on induction of apoptosis by the selective endoplasmic reticulum

  3. Metabolic Regulation of Ovarian Cancer Cell Death

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    Following treatment with chemotherapeutic agents, responsive ovarian cancer cells undergo apoptotic cell death . Several groups have shown that the...apoptotic protease, caspase 2 (C2), is an essential activator of cell death in ovarian cancer cells treated with cisplatin and we have found, by knock

  4. Metabolic Regulation of Ovarian Cancer Cell Death

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    2013 4 . TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Metabolic Regulation of Ovarian Cancer cell death 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-10-1...Introduction 3 2. Keywords 3 3. Overall Project Summary 3-6 4 . Key Research Accomplishments 6-7 5. Conclusion 7 6. Publications, Abstracts, and...synthase inhibitors Fig. 4 ). We were slightly delayed in submitting this work for publication as the first author had to finish his PhD thesis and

  5. Cell Death and Deubiquitinases: Perspectives in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Seemana

    2014-01-01

    The process of cell death has important physiological implications. At the organism level it is mostly involved in maintenance of tissue homeostasis. At the cellular level, the strategies of cell death may be categorized as either suicide or sabotage. The mere fact that many of these processes are programmed and that these are often deregulated in pathological conditions is seed to thought. The various players that are involved in these pathways are highly regulated. One of the modes of regulation is via post-translational modifications such as ubiquitination and deubiquitination. In this review, we have first dealt with the different modes and pathways involved in cell death and then we have focused on the regulation of several proteins in these signaling cascades by the different deubiquitinating enzymes, in the perspective of cancer. The study of deubiquitinases is currently in a rather nascent stage with limited knowledge both in vitro and in vivo, but the emerging roles of the deubiquitinases in various processes and their specificity have implicated them as potential targets from the therapeutic point of view. This review throws light on another aspect of cancer therapeutics by targeting the deubiquitinating enzymes. PMID:25121098

  6. Fas Protects Breast Cancer Stem Cells from Death

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0301 TITLE: Fas Protects Breast Cancer Stem Cells from Death PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Paolo Ceppi CONTRACTING...sensitive to Fas-mediated apoptosis, while the BCSCs part is more sensitive to the death induced by the elimination of CD95 (a phenomenon we have recently...identification of novel molecular targets for the treatment of breast cancer. I have in fact observed a significant enhancement of cancer cell death by

  7. Stapled peptide induces cancer cell death.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Jo

    2004-11-01

    Hydrocarbon stapling could enable peptides from the key domains of natural proteins to be used therapeutically. Using the technique on a peptide involved in apoptosis, researchers have succeeded in destroying cancer cells in a mouse model of leukaemia.

  8. Nonthermal Plasma-Mediated Cancer Cell Death; Targeted Cancer Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Byul-Bora; Choi, Yeon-Sik; Lee, Hae-Jun; Lee, Jae-Koo; Kim, Uk-Kyu; Kim, Gyoo-Cheon

    Non-thermal air plasma can kill cancer cells. However, there is no selectivity between normal and cancer cells. Therefore, cancer specific antibody conjugated gold nanoparticle (GNP) was pretreated before plasma irradiation. Stimulation of antibody conjugated GNP by plasma treatment resulted in a significant decrease in viability of cancer cells. This technology shows the feasibility of using plasma therapy for killing cancer cells selectively.

  9. Danger signalling during cancer cell death: origins, plasticity and regulation.

    PubMed

    Garg, A D; Martin, S; Golab, J; Agostinis, P

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating data indicates that following anti-cancer treatments, cancer cell death can be perceived as immunogenic or tolerogenic by the immune system. The former is made possible due to the ability of certain anti-cancer modalities to induce immunogenic cell death (ICD) that is associated with the emission of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), which assist in unlocking a sequence of events leading to the development of anti-tumour immunity. In response to ICD inducers, activation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been identified to be indispensable to confer the immunogenic character of cancer cell death, due to its ability to coordinate the danger signalling pathways responsible for the trafficking of vital DAMPs and subsequent anti-cancer immune responses. However, in recent times, certain processes apart from ER stress have emerged (e.g., autophagy and possibly viral response-like signature), which have the ability to influence danger signalling. In this review, we discuss the molecular nature, emerging plasticity in the danger signalling mechanisms and immunological impact of known DAMPs in the context of immunogenic cancer cell death. We also discuss key effector mechanisms modulating the interface between dying cancer cells and the immune cells, which we believe are crucial for the therapeutic relevance of ICD in the context of human cancers, and also discuss the influence of experimental conditions and animal models on these.

  10. Targeting Cell Survival Proteins for Cancer Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Manoj K.; Prasad, Sahdeo; Tyagi, Amit Kumar; Deb, Lokesh; Huang, Jiamin; Karelia, Deepkamal N.; Amin, Shantu G.; Aggarwal, Bharat B.

    2016-01-01

    Escaping from cell death is one of the adaptations that enable cancer cells to stave off anticancer therapies. The key players in avoiding apoptosis are collectively known as survival proteins. Survival proteins comprise the Bcl-2, inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP), and heat shock protein (HSP) families. The aberrant expression of these proteins is associated with a range of biological activities that promote cancer cell survival, proliferation, and resistance to therapy. Several therapeutic strategies that target survival proteins are based on mimicking BH3 domains or the IAP-binding motif or competing with ATP for the Hsp90 ATP-binding pocket. Alternative strategies, including use of nutraceuticals, transcriptional repression, and antisense oligonucleotides, provide options to target survival proteins. This review focuses on the role of survival proteins in chemoresistance and current therapeutic strategies in preclinical or clinical trials that target survival protein signaling pathways. Recent approaches to target survival proteins-including nutraceuticals, small-molecule inhibitors, peptides, and Bcl-2-specific mimetic are explored. Therapeutic inventions targeting survival proteins are promising strategies to inhibit cancer cell survival and chemoresistance. However, complete eradication of resistance is a distant dream. For a successful clinical outcome, pretreatment with novel survival protein inhibitors alone or in combination with conventional therapies holds great promise. PMID:26927133

  11. Fas Protects Breast Cancer Stem Cells from Death

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    apoptosis and DICE in breast cancer cells, with many potential therapeutical applications. I could also demonstrate the involvement of miRNA in the...process. Moreover, I have developed a novel plasmid-based tool to isolate BCSCS by the activity of miRNAs , and I am going to optimize and test the...relevance of its use in the next reporting period. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Fas, FasL, Cancer, Cancer Stem cells, Apoptosis, miRNA , EMT, cell death. 16

  12. Diverse functions of ceramide in cancer cell death and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Saddoughi, Sahar A; Ogretmen, Besim

    2013-01-01

    Ceramide, a bioactive sphingolipid, is now at the forefront of cancer research. Classically, ceramide is thought to induce death, growth inhibition, and senescence in cancer cells. However, it is now clear that this simple picture of ceramide no longer holds true. Recent studies suggest that there are diverse functions of endogenously generated ceramides, which seem to be context dependent, regulated by subcellular/membrane localization and presence/absence of direct targets of these lipid molecules. For example, different fatty-acid chain lengths of ceramide, such as C(16)-ceramide that can be generated by ceramide synthase 6 (CerS6), have been implicated in cancer cell proliferation, whereas CerS1-generated C(18)-ceramide mediates cell death. The dichotomy of ceramides' function in cancer cells makes some of the metabolic enzymes of ceramide synthesis potential drug targets (such as Cers6) to prevent cancer growth in breast and head and neck cancers. Conversely, activation of CerS1 could be a new therapeutic option for the development of novel strategies against lung and head and neck cancers. This chapter focuses on recent discoveries about the mechanistic details of mainly de novo-generated ceramides and their signaling functions in cancer pathogenesis, and about how these mechanistic information can be translated into clinically relevant therapeutic options for the treatment of cancer.

  13. HSPA5 Regulates Ferroptotic Cell Death in Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shan; Zhang, Qiuhong; Sun, Xiaofan; Zeh, Herbert J; Lotze, Michael T; Kang, Rui; Tang, Daolin

    2017-01-27

    Ferroptosis is a form of regulated cell death driven by oxidative injury promoting lipid peroxidation, although detailed molecular regulators are largely unknown. Here, we show that heatshock 70-kDa protein 5 (HSPA5) negatively regulates ferroptosis in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells. Mechanistically, activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) resulted in the induction of HSPA5, which in turn bound glutathione peroxidase 4 (GPX4) and protected against GPX4 protein degradation and subsequent lipid peroxidation. Importantly, the HSPA5-GPX4 pathway mediated ferroptosis resistance, limiting the anticancer activity of gemcitabine. Genetic or pharmacologic inhibition of the HSPA5-GPX4 pathway enhanced gemcitabine sensitivity by disinhibiting ferroptosis in vitro and in both subcutaneous and orthotopic animal models of PDAC. Collectively, these findings identify a novel role of HSPA5 in ferroptosis and suggest a potential therapeutic strategy for overcoming gemcitabine resistance. Cancer Res; 77(8); 1-14. ©2017 AACR.

  14. Regulation of ferroptotic cancer cell death by GPX4.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wan Seok; SriRamaratnam, Rohitha; Welsch, Matthew E; Shimada, Kenichi; Skouta, Rachid; Viswanathan, Vasanthi S; Cheah, Jaime H; Clemons, Paul A; Shamji, Alykhan F; Clish, Clary B; Brown, Lewis M; Girotti, Albert W; Cornish, Virginia W; Schreiber, Stuart L; Stockwell, Brent R

    2014-01-16

    Ferroptosis is a form of nonapoptotic cell death for which key regulators remain unknown. We sought a common mediator for the lethality of 12 ferroptosis-inducing small molecules. We used targeted metabolomic profiling to discover that depletion of glutathione causes inactivation of glutathione peroxidases (GPXs) in response to one class of compounds and a chemoproteomics strategy to discover that GPX4 is directly inhibited by a second class of compounds. GPX4 overexpression and knockdown modulated the lethality of 12 ferroptosis inducers, but not of 11 compounds with other lethal mechanisms. In addition, two representative ferroptosis inducers prevented tumor growth in xenograft mouse tumor models. Sensitivity profiling in 177 cancer cell lines revealed that diffuse large B cell lymphomas and renal cell carcinomas are particularly susceptible to GPX4-regulated ferroptosis. Thus, GPX4 is an essential regulator of ferroptotic cancer cell death.

  15. Physical modalities inducing immunogenic tumor cell death for cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Adkins, Irena; Fucikova, Jitka; Garg, Abhishek D; Agostinis, Patrizia; Špíšek, Radek

    2015-01-01

    The concept of immunogenic cancer cell death (ICD), as originally observed during the treatment with several chemotherapeutics or ionizing irradiation, has revolutionized the view on the development of new anticancer therapies. ICD is defined by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, emission of danger-associated molecular patterns and induction of antitumor immunity. Here we describe known and emerging cancer cell death-inducing physical modalities, such as ionizing irradiation, ultraviolet C light, Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) with Hypericin, high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) and hyperthermia (HT), which have been shown to elicit effective antitumor immunity. We discuss the evidence of ICD induced by these modalities in cancer patients together with their applicability in immunotherapeutic protocols and anticancer vaccine development. PMID:25964865

  16. The essential role of evasion from cell death in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Gemma; Strasser, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    The link between evasion of apoptosis and the development of cellular hyperplasia and ultimately cancer is implicitly clear if one considers how many cells are produced each day and, hence, how many cells must die to make room for the new ones (reviewed in (Raff, 1996)). Furthermore, cells are frequently experiencing noxious stimuli that can cause lesions in their DNA and faults in DNA replication can occur during cellular proliferation. Such DNA damage needs to be repaired efficiently or cells with irreparable damage must be killed to prevent subsequent division of aberrant cells that may fuel tumorigenesis (reviewed in (Weinberg, 2007)). The detection of genetic lesions in human cancers that activate pro-survival genes or disable pro-apoptotic genes have provided the first evidence that defects in programmed cell death can cause cancer (Tagawa et al., 2005; Tsujimoto et al., 1984; Vaux et al., 1988) and this concept was proven by studies with genetically modified mice (Egle et al., 2004b; Strasser et al., 1990a). It is therefore now widely accepted that evasion of apoptosis is a requirement for both neoplastic transformation and sustained growth of cancer cells (reviewed in (Cory and Adams, 2002; Hanahan and Weinberg, 2000; Weinberg, 2007)). Importantly, apoptosis is also a major contributor to anti-cancer therapy induced killing of tumor cells (reviewed in (Cory and Adams, 2002; Cragg et al., 2009)). Consequently, a detailed understanding of apoptotic cell death will help to better comprehend the complexities of tumorigenesis and should assist with the development of improved targeted therapies for cancer based on the direct activation of the apoptotic machinery (reviewed in (Lessene et al., 2008)). PMID:21704830

  17. Pyrvinium targets autophagy addiction to promote cancer cell death.

    PubMed

    Deng, Longfei; Lei, Yunlong; Liu, Rui; Li, Jingyi; Yuan, Kefei; Li, Yi; Chen, Yi; Liu, Yi; Lu, You; Edwards, Carl K; Huang, Canhua; Wei, Yuquan

    2013-05-02

    Autophagy is a cellular catabolic process by which long-lived proteins and damaged organelles are degradated by lysosomes. Activation of autophagy is an important survival mechanism that protects cancer cells from various stresses, including anticancer agents. Recent studies indicate that pyrvinium pamoate, an FDA-approved antihelminthic drug, exhibits wide-ranging anticancer activity. Here we demonstrate that pyrvinium inhibits autophagy both in vitro and in vivo. We further demonstrate that the inhibition of autophagy is mammalian target of rapamycin independent but depends on the transcriptional inhibition of autophagy genes. Moreover, the combination of pyrvinium with autophagy stimuli improves its toxicity against cancer cells, and pretreatment of cells with 3-MA or siBeclin1 partially protects cells from pyrvinium-induced cell death under glucose starvation, suggesting that targeted autophagy addiction is involved in pyrvinium-mediated cytotoxicity. Finally, in vivo studies show that the combination therapy of pyrvinium with the anticancer and autophagy stimulus agent, 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG), is significantly more effective in inhibiting tumor growth than pyrvinium or 2-DG alone. This study supports a novel cancer therapeutic strategy based on targeting autophagy addiction and implicates using pyrvinium as an autophagy inhibitor in combination with chemotherapeutic agents to improve their therapeutic efficacy.

  18. Pyrvinium targets autophagy addiction to promote cancer cell death

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Longfei; Lei, Yunlong; Liu, Rui; Li, Jingyi; Yuan, Kefei; Li, Yi; Chen, Yi; Liu, Yi; Lu, You; Edwards III, Carl K; Huang, Canhua; Wei, Yuquan

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is a cellular catabolic process by which long-lived proteins and damaged organelles are degradated by lysosomes. Activation of autophagy is an important survival mechanism that protects cancer cells from various stresses, including anticancer agents. Recent studies indicate that pyrvinium pamoate, an FDA-approved antihelminthic drug, exhibits wide-ranging anticancer activity. Here we demonstrate that pyrvinium inhibits autophagy both in vitro and in vivo. We further demonstrate that the inhibition of autophagy is mammalian target of rapamycin independent but depends on the transcriptional inhibition of autophagy genes. Moreover, the combination of pyrvinium with autophagy stimuli improves its toxicity against cancer cells, and pretreatment of cells with 3-MA or siBeclin1 partially protects cells from pyrvinium-induced cell death under glucose starvation, suggesting that targeted autophagy addiction is involved in pyrvinium-mediated cytotoxicity. Finally, in vivo studies show that the combination therapy of pyrvinium with the anticancer and autophagy stimulus agent, 2-deoxy-𝒟-glucose (2-DG), is significantly more effective in inhibiting tumor growth than pyrvinium or 2-DG alone. This study supports a novel cancer therapeutic strategy based on targeting autophagy addiction and implicates using pyrvinium as an autophagy inhibitor in combination with chemotherapeutic agents to improve their therapeutic efficacy. PMID:23640456

  19. Functional inactivation of Rb sensitizes cancer cells to TSC2 inactivation induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Danos, Arpad M; Liao, Yang; Li, Xuan; Du, Wei

    2013-01-01

    We showed previously that inactivation of TSC2 induces death in cancer cells lacking the Retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor under stress conditions, suggesting that inactivation of TSC2 can potentially be used as an approach to specifically kill cancers that have lost WT Rb. As Rb is often inactivated in cancers by overexpression of cyclin D1, loss of p16(ink4a) cdk inhibitor, or expression of viral oncoproteins, it will be interesting to determine if such functional inactivation of Rb would similarly sensitize cancer cells to TSC2 inactivation induced cell death. In addition, many cancers lack functional Pten, resulting in increased PI3K/Akt signaling that has been shown to modulate E2F-induced cell death. Therefore it will be interesting to test whether loss of Pten will affect TSC2 inactivation induced killing of Rb mutant cancer cells. Here, we show that overexpression of Cyclin D1 or the viral oncogene E1a sensitizes cancer cells to TSC2 knockdown induced cell death and growth inhibition. On the other hand, knockdown of p16(ink4a) sensitizes cancer cells to TSC2 knockdown induced cell death in a manner that is likely dependant on serum induction of Cyclin D1 to inactivate the Rb function. Additionally, we demonstrate that loss of Pten does not interfere with TSC2 knockdown induced cell death in Rb mutant cancer cells. Together, these results suggest that TSC2 is potentially a useful target for a large spectrum of cancer types with an inactivated Rb pathway.

  20. Oncolytic virotherapy and immunogenic cancer cell death: sharpening the sword for improved cancer treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Workenhe, Samuel T; Mossman, Karen L

    2014-02-01

    Oncolytic viruses are novel immunotherapeutics with increasingly promising outcomes in cancer patient clinical trials. Preclinical and clinical studies have uncovered the importance of virus-induced activation of antitumor immune responses for optimal therapeutic efficacy. Recently, several classes of chemotherapeutics have been shown to cause immunogenic cancer cell death characterized by the release of immunomodulatory molecules that activate antigen-presenting cells and thus trigger the induction of more potent anticancer adaptive immune responses. In preclinical models, several oncolytic viruses induce immunogenic cell death, which is associated with increased cross-priming of tumor-associated antigens. In this review, we discuss the recent advances in immunogenic cancer cell death as induced by chemotherapeutic treatments, including the roles of relevant danger-associated molecular patterns and signaling pathways, and highlighting the significance of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response. As virtually all viruses modulate both ER stress and cell death responses, we provide perspectives on future research directions that can be explored to optimize oncolytic viruses, alone or in combination with targeted drug therapies, as potent immunogenic cancer cell death-inducing agents. We propose that such optimized virus-drug synergistic strategies will improve the therapeutic outcomes for many currently intractable cancers.

  1. Inhibition of Telomerase Recruitment and Cancer Cell Death*

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Mai; Nandakumar, Jayakrishnan; Sullivan, Kelly D.; Espinosa, Joaquín M.; Cech, Thomas R.

    2013-01-01

    Continued proliferation of human cells requires maintenance of telomere length, usually accomplished by telomerase. Telomerase is recruited to chromosome ends by interaction with a patch of amino acids (the TEL patch, for TPP1 glutamate (E) and leucine (L)-rich patch) on the surface of telomere protein TPP1. In previous studies, interruption of this interaction by mutation prevented telomere extension in HeLa cells, but the cell culture continued to grow. We now show that the telomerase inhibitor BIBR1532 acts together with TEL patch mutations to inhibit the growth of HeLa cell lines and that apoptosis is a prominent mechanism of death of these cells. Survivor cells take over the population beginning around 40 days in culture. These cells no longer express the TEL patch mutant TPP1, apparently because of silencing of the expression cassette, a survival mechanism that would not be available to cancer cells. These results provide hope that inhibiting the binding of telomerase to the TEL patch of TPP1, perhaps together with a modest inhibition of the telomerase enzyme, could comprise an effective anticancer therapy for the ∼90% of human tumors that are telomerase-positive. PMID:24097987

  2. Metabolic Stress Induced by Arginine Deprivation Induces Autophagy Cell Death in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    Arginine deiminase as a novel therapy for prostate cancer induces autophagy and caspase-independent apoptosis. Cancer Research, 69(2):700-708...TITLE: Metabolic stress induced by arginine deprivation induces autophagy cell death in prostate cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Richard Bold, MD...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Metabolic stress induced by arginine deprivation induces autophagy cell 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER death in prostate cancer 5b

  3. Zanthoxylum fruit extract from Japanese pepper promotes autophagic cell death in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Nozaki, Reo; Kono, Toru; Bochimoto, Hiroki; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi; Oketani, Kaori; Sakamaki, Yuichi; Okubo, Naoto; Nakagawa, Koji; Takeda, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Zanthoxylum fruit, obtained from the Japanese pepper plant (Zanthoxylum piperitum De Candolle), and its extract (Zanthoxylum fruit extract, ZFE) have multiple physiological activities (e.g., antiviral activity). However, the potential anticancer activity of ZFE has not been fully examined. In this study, we investigated the ability of ZFE to induce autophagic cell death (ACD). ZFE caused remarkable autophagy-like cytoplasmic vacuolization, inhibited cell proliferation, and ultimately induced cell death in the human cancer cell lines DLD-1, HepG2, and Caco-2, but not in A549, MCF-7, or WiDr cells. ZFE increased the level of LC3-II protein, a marker of autophagy. Knockdown of ATG5 using siRNA inhibited ZFE-induced cytoplasmic vacuolization and cell death. Moreover, in cancer cells that could be induced to undergo cell death by ZFE, the extract increased the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and the JNK inhibitor SP600125 attenuated both vacuolization and cell death. Based on morphology and expression of marker proteins, ZFE-induced cell death was neither apoptosis nor necrosis. Normal intestinal cells were not affected by ZFE. Taken together, our findings show that ZFE induces JNK-dependent ACD, which appears to be the main mechanism underlying its anticancer activity, suggesting a promising starting point for anticancer drug development. PMID:27626481

  4. Human colon cancer HT-29 cell death responses to doxorubicin and Morus Alba leaves flavonoid extract.

    PubMed

    Fallah, S; Karimi, A; Panahi, G; Gerayesh Nejad, S; Fadaei, R; Seifi, M

    2016-03-31

    The mechanistic basis for the biological properties of Morus alba flavonoid extract (MFE) and chemotherapy drug of doxorubicin on human colon cancer HT-29 cell line death are unknown. The effect of doxorubicin and flavonoid extract on colon cancer HT-29 cell line death and identification of APC gene expression and PARP concentration of HT-29 cell line were investigated. The results showed that flavonoid extract and doxorubicin induce a dose dependent cell death in HT-29 cell line. MFE and doxorubicin exert a cytotoxic effect on human colon cancer HT-29 cell line by probably promoting or induction of apoptosis.

  5. Activation of ERK signaling and induction of colon cancer cell death by piperlongumine.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, H; Kibble, K; Zeng, H; Moyer, M P; Reindl, K M

    2013-09-01

    Piperlongumine (PPLGM) is a bioactive compound isolated from long peppers that shows selective toxicity towards a variety of cancer cell types including colon cancer. The signaling pathways that lead to cancer cell death in response to PPLGM exposure have not been previously identified. Our objective was to identify the intracellular signaling mechanisms by which PPLGM leads to enhanced colon cancer cell death. We found that PPLGM inhibited the growth of colon cancer cells in time- and concentration-dependent manners, but was not toxic toward normal colon mucosal cells at concentrations below 10 μM. Acute (0-60 min) and prolonged (24h) exposure of HT-29 cells to PPLGM resulted in phosphorylation of ERK. To investigate whether ERK signaling was involved in PPLGM-mediated cell death, we treated HT-29 cells with the MEK inhibitor U0126, prior to treating with PPLGM. We found that U0126 attenuated PPLGM-induced activation of ERK and partially protected against PPLGM-induced cell death. These results suggest that PPLGM works, at least in part, through the MEK/ERK pathway to result in colon cancer cell death. A more thorough understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which PPLGM induces colon cancer cell death will be useful in developing therapeutic strategies to treat colon cancer.

  6. Ceramide metabolism regulates autophagy and apoptotic cell death induced by melatonin in liver cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ordoñez, Raquel; Fernández, Anna; Prieto-Domínguez, Néstor; Martínez, Laura; García-Ruiz, Carmen; Fernández-Checa, José C; Mauriz, José L; González-Gallego, Javier

    2015-09-01

    Autophagy is a process that maintains homeostasis during stress, although it also contributes to cell death under specific contexts. Ceramides have emerged as important effectors in the regulation of autophagy, mediating the crosstalk with apoptosis. Melatonin induces apoptosis of cancer cells; however, its role in autophagy and ceramide metabolism has yet to be clearly elucidated. This study was aimed to evaluate the effect of melatonin administration on autophagy and ceramide metabolism and its possible link with melatonin-induced apoptotic cell death in hepatocarcinoma (HCC) cells. Melatonin (2 mm) transiently induced autophagy in HepG2 cells through JNK phosphorylation, characterized by increased Beclin-1 expression, p62 degradation, and LC3II and LAMP-2 colocalization, which translated in decreased cell viability. Moreover, ATG5 silencing sensitized HepG2 cells to melatonin-induced apoptosis, suggesting a dual role of autophagy in cell death. Melatonin enhanced ceramide levels through both de novo synthesis and acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) stimulation. Serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) inhibition with myriocin prevented melatonin-induced autophagy and ASMase inhibition with imipramine-impaired autophagy flux. However, ASMase inhibition partially protected HepG2 cells against melatonin, while SPT inhibition significantly enhanced cell death. Findings suggest a crosstalk between SPT-mediated ceramide generation and autophagy in protecting against melatonin, while specific ASMase-induced ceramide production participates in melatonin-mediated cell death. Thus, dual blocking of SPT and autophagy emerges as a potential strategy to potentiate the apoptotic effects of melatonin in liver cancer cells.

  7. Dual agonist Surrobody™ simultaneously activates death receptors DR4 and DR5 to induce cancer cell death

    PubMed Central

    Milutinovic, Snezana; Kashyap, Arun K.; Yanagi, Teruki; Wimer, Carina; Zhou, Sihong; O' Neil, Ryann; Kurtzman, Aaron L.; Faynboym, Alexsandr; Xu, Li; Hannum, Charles H.; Diaz, Paul W.; Matsuzawa, Shu-ichi; Horowitz, Michael; Horowitz, Lawrence; Bhatt, Ramesh R.; Reed, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Death receptors of the Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) family are found on surface of most cancer cells and their activation typically kills cancer cells through the stimulation of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway. The endogenous ligand for death receptors-4 and -5 (DR4 and DR5) is Tumor Necrosis Factor-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand, TRAIL (Apo2L). Since most untransformed cells are not susceptible to TRAIL-induced apoptosis, death receptor activators have emerged as promising cancer therapeutic agents. One strategy to stimulate death receptors in cancer patients is to use soluble human recombinant TRAIL protein, but this agent has limitations of a short half-life and decoy receptor sequestration. Another strategy that attempted to evade decoy receptor sequestration and to provide improved pharmacokinetic properties was to generate DR4 or DR5 agonist antibodies. The resulting monoclonal agonist antibodies overcame the limitations of short half-life and avoided decoy receptor sequestration, but are limited by activating only one of the two death receptors. Here, we describe a DR4 and DR5 dual agonist produced using Surrobody™ technology that activates both DR4 and DR5 to induce apoptotic death of cancer cells in vitro and in vivo and also avoids decoy receptor sequestration. This fully human anti-DR4/DR5 Surrobody displays superior potency to DR4- and DR5-specific antibodies, even when combined with TRAIL-sensitizing pro-apoptotic agents. Moreover, cancer cells were less likely to acquire resistance to Surrobody than either anti-DR4 or anti-DR5 mono-specific antibodies. Taken together, Surrobody shows promising preclinical pro-apoptotic activity against cancer cells, meriting further exploration of its potential as a novel cancer therapeutic agent. PMID:26516157

  8. Activation of ERK signaling and induction of colon cancer cell death by piperlongumine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Piperlongumine (PPLGM) is a bioactive compound isolated from long peppers that shows selective toxicity towards a variety of cancer cell types including colon cancer. The signaling pathways that lead to cancer cell death in response to PPLGM exposure have not been previously identified. Our objectiv...

  9. Relationship Between Pak-Mediated Cell Death and Stress-Activated Kinase Signaling in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-02-01

    part of the cell death execution machinery. Here we show that a correlation exists in breast cancer cells between caspase- dependent cleavage of the...inhibits its activity might allow us to specifically inhibit signaling pathways downstream of Pak and evaluate how the cell death process is affected. In...a biochemical approach screening for substrates and possible mediators of cell death signaling components via Pak kinases we identified a guanine

  10. Sensitizing cancer cells to TRAIL-induced death by micellar delivery of mitoxantrone.

    PubMed

    Grandhi, Taraka Sai Pavan; Potta, Thrimoorthy; Taylor, David J; Tian, Yanqing; Johnson, Roger H; Meldrum, Deirdre R; Rege, Kaushal

    2014-01-01

    TNFα-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) induces death selectively in cancer cells. However, subpopulations of cancer cells are either resistant to or can develop resistance to TRAIL-induced death. As a result, strategies that overcome this resistance are currently under investigation. We have recently identified several US FDA-approved drugs with TRAIL-sensitization activity against prostate, breast and pancreatic cancer cells. Mitoxantrone, a previously unknown TRAIL sensitizer identified in the screen, was successfully encapsulated in methoxy-, amine- and carboxyl-terminated PEG-DSPE micelles in order to facilitate delivery of the drug to cancer cells. All three micelle types were extensively characterized for their physicochemical properties and evaluated for their ability to sensitize cancer cells to TRAIL-induced death. Our results indicate that micelle-encapsulated mitoxantrone can be advantageously employed in synergistic treatments with TRAIL, leading to a biocompatible delivery system and amplified cell killing activity for combination chemotherapeutic cancer treatments.

  11. Killing Breast Cancer Cells With a VEGF-Triggered Cell Death Receptor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    patients. We are pursuing a totally different approach to targeting VEGF: rather than inhibit VEGF our goal is to convert VEGF to act as a cell death factor...cell lines in vitro. These studies suggest that a receptor such as R2Fas which converts VEGF to act as a cell death factor could yield a new and more aggressive approach to targeting overexpressed VEGF in breast cancer....Toward this aim we created a chimeric receptor (R2Fas) composed of domains from VEGF receptor 2 fused to the intracellular domain of the Fas cell

  12. Sulfasalazine induces autophagic cell death in oral cancer cells via Akt and ERK pathways.

    PubMed

    Han, Hye-Yeon; Kim, Hyungwoo; Jeong, Sung-Hee; Lim, Do-Seon; Ryu, Mi Heon

    2014-01-01

    Sulfasalazine (SSZ) is an anti-inflammatory drug that has been used to treat inflammatory bowel disease and rheumatoid arthritis for decades. Recently, some reports have suggested that SSZ also has anti-cancer properties against human tumors. However, little is known about the effects of SSZ on oral cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-cancer effects of SSZ in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells and to elucidate the mechanisms involved. The authors investigated the anti-proliferative effect of SSZ using the MTT method in HSC-4 cells (an OSCC cell line). Cell cycle analysis, acidic vesicular organelle (AVO) staining, monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining and Western blotting were also conducted to investigate the cytotoxic mechanism of SSZ. SSZ significantly inhibited the proliferation of HSC-4 cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, SSZ induced autophagic cell death, increased microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain (MAP1- LC; also known as LC) 3-II levels, as well as induced punctate AVO and MDC staining, resulted in autophagic cell death. Furthermore, these observations were accompanied by the inhibition of the Akt pathway and the activation of ERK pathway. These results suggest that SSZ promotes autophagic cell death via Akt and ERK pathways and has chemotherapeutic potential for the treatment of oral cancer.

  13. Inhibition of thromboxane synthase induces lung cancer cell death via increasing the nuclear p27

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Kin Chung; Hsin, Michael K.Y.; Chan, Joey S.Y.; Yip, Johnson H.Y.; Li, Mingyue; Leung, Billy C.S.; Mok, Tony S.K.; Warner, Timothy D.; Underwood, Malcolm J.; Chen, George G.

    2009-10-15

    The role of thromboxane in lung carcinogenesis is not clearly known, though thromboxane B2 (TXB{sub 2}) level is increased and antagonists of thromboxane receptors or TXA2 can induce apoptosis of lung cancer cells. p27, an atypical tumor suppressor, is normally sequestered in the nucleus. The increased nuclear p27 may result in apoptosis of tumor cells. We hypothesize that the inhibition of thromboxane synthase (TXS) induces the death of lung cancer cells and that such inhibition is associated with the nuclear p27 level. Our experiment showed that the inhibition of TXS significantly induced the death or apoptosis in lung cancer cells. The activity of TXS was increased in lung cancer. The nuclear p27 was remarkably reduced in lung cancer tissues. The inhibition of TXS caused the cell death and apoptosis of lung cancer cells, likely via the elevation of the nuclear p27 since the TXS inhibition promoted the nuclear p27 level and the inhibition of p27 by its siRNA recovered the cell death induced by TXS inhibition. Collectively, lung cancer cells produce high levels of TXB{sub 2} but their nuclear p27 is markedly reduced. The inhibition of TXS results in the p27-related induction of cell death in lung cancer cells.

  14. TARGETING THE MITOCHONDRIA ACTIVATES TWO INDEPENDENT CELL DEATH PATHWAYS IN THE OVARIAN CANCER STEM CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Alvero, Ayesha B.; Montagna, Michele K.; Holmberg, Jennie C.; Craveiro, Vinicius; Brown, David; Mor, Gil

    2013-01-01

    Cancer stem cells are responsible for tumor initiation and chemo-resistance. In ovarian cancer, the CD44+/MyD88+ ovarian cancer stem cells (OCSCs) are also able to repair the tumor and serve as tumor vascular progenitors. Targeting these cells is therefore necessary to improve treatment outcome and patient survival. The previous demonstration that the OCSCs are resistant to apoptotic cell death induced by conventional chemotherapy agents suggests that other forms of targeted therapy should be explored. We show in this study that targeting mitochondrial bioenergetics is a potent stimulus to induce caspase-independent cell death in a panel of OCSCs. Treatment of these cells with the novel isoflavone derivative, NV-128, significantly depressed mitochondrial function exhibited by decrease in ATP, Cox-I, and Cox-IV levels, and increase in mitochondrial superoxide and hydrogen peroxide. This promotes a state of “cellular starvation” that activates two independent pathways: 1) AMPKα1 pathway leading to mTOR inhibition; and 2) mitochondrial MEK/ERK pathway leading to loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. The demonstration that a compound can specifically target the mitochondria to induce cell death in this otherwise chemo-resistant cell population opens a new venue for treating ovarian cancer patients. PMID:21677151

  15. Cell Death Pathways and Phthalocyanine as an Efficient Agent for Photodynamic Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mfouo-Tynga, Ivan; Abrahamse, Heidi

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms of cell death can be predetermined (programmed) or not and categorized into apoptotic, autophagic and necrotic pathways. The process of Hayflick limits completes the execution of death-related mechanisms. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are associated with oxidative stress and subsequent cytodamage by oxidizing and degrading cell components. ROS are also involved in immune responses, where they stabilize and activate both hypoxia-inducible factors and phagocytic effectors. ROS production and presence enhance cytodamage and photodynamic-induced cell death. Photodynamic cancer therapy (PDT) uses non-toxic chemotherapeutic agents, photosensitizer (PS), to initiate a light-dependent and ROS-related cell death. Phthalocyanines (PCs) are third generation and stable PSs with improved photochemical abilities. They are effective inducers of cell death in various neoplastic models. The metallated PCs localize in critical cellular organelles and are better inducers of cell death than other previous generation PSs as they favor mainly apoptotic cell death events. PMID:25955645

  16. Murraya koenigii leaf extract inhibits proteasome activity and induces cell death in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Inhibition of the proteolytic activity of 26S proteasome, the protein-degrading machine, is now considered a novel and promising approach for cancer therapy. Interestingly, proteasome inhibitors have been demonstrated to selectively kill cancer cells and also enhance the sensitivity of tumor cells to chemotherapeutic agents. Recently, polyphenols/flavonoids have been reported to inhibit proteasome activity. Murraya koenigii Spreng, a medicinally important herb of Indian origin, has been used for centuries in the Ayurvedic system of medicine. Here we show that Murraya koenigii leaves (curry leaves), a rich source of polyphenols, inhibit the proteolytic activity of the cancer cell proteasome, and cause cell death. Methods Hydro-methanolic extract of curry leaves (CLE) was prepared and its total phenolic content [TPC] determined by, the Folin-Ciocalteau’s method. Two human breast carcinoma cell lines: MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 and a normal human lung fibroblast cell line, WI-38 were used for the studies. Cytotoxicity of the CLE was assessed by the MTT assay. We studied the effect of CLE on growth kinetics using colony formation assay. Growth arrest was assessed by cell cycle analysis and apoptosis by Annexin-V binding using flow cytometry. Inhibition of the endogenous 26S proteasome was studied in intact cells and cell extracts using substrates specific to 20S proteasomal enzymes. Results CLE decreased cell viability and altered the growth kinetics in both the breast cancer cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. It showed a significant arrest of cells in the S phase albeit in cancer cells only. Annexin V binding data suggests that cell death was via the apoptotic pathway in both the cancer cell lines. CLE treatment significantly decreased the activity of the 26S proteasome in the cancer but not normal cells. Conclusions Our study suggests M. koenigii leaves to be a potent source of proteasome inhibitors that lead to cancer cell death. Therefore, identification

  17. Investigating the cell death mechanisms in primary prostate cancer cells using low-temperature plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, Deborah; Hirst, A. M.; Packer, J. R.; Simms, M. S.; Mann, V. M.; Frame, F. M.; Maitland, N. J.

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasmas have shown considerable promise as a potential cancer therapy. An atmospheric pressure plasma driven with kHz kV excitation, operated with helium and oxygen admixtures is used to investigate the interaction with prostate cancer cells. The cytopathic effect was verified first in two commonly used prostate cancer cell lines (BPH-1 and PC-3 cells) and further extended to examine the effects in paired normal and tumour prostate epithelial cells cultured directly from patient tissues. Through the formation of reactive species in cell culture media, and potentially other plasma components, we observed high levels of DNA damage, together with reduced cell viability and colony-forming ability. We observed differences in response between the prostate cell lines and primary cells, particularly in terms of the mechanism of cell death. The primary cells ultimately undergo necrotic cell death in both the normal and tumour samples, in the complete absence of apoptosis. In addition, we provide the first evidence of an autophagic response in primary cells. This work highlights the importance of studying primary cultures in order to gain a more realistic insight into patient efficacy. EPSRC EP/H003797/1 & EP/K018388/1, Yorkshire Cancer Research: YCR Y257PA.

  18. Rational Design of Regulators of Programmed Cell Death in Human Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-07-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a better understanding of the intricate pathways of cell death and their contributions to breast cancers...basis for a set of molecular interactions that regulate programmed cell death , and allow the design of novel interventional agents that have investigative and therapeutic potential.

  19. Cell death associated with abnormal mitosis observed by confocal imaging in live cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Castiel, Asher; Visochek, Leonid; Mittelman, Leonid; Zilberstein, Yael; Dantzer, Francoise; Izraeli, Shai; Cohen-Armon, Malka

    2013-08-21

    Phenanthrene derivatives acting as potent PARP1 inhibitors prevented the bi-focal clustering of supernumerary centrosomes in multi-centrosomal human cancer cells in mitosis. The phenanthridine PJ-34 was the most potent molecule. Declustering of extra-centrosomes causes mitotic failure and cell death in multi-centrosomal cells. Most solid human cancers have high occurrence of extra-centrosomes. The activity of PJ-34 was documented in real-time by confocal imaging of live human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells transfected with vectors encoding for fluorescent γ-tubulin, which is highly abundant in the centrosomes and for fluorescent histone H2b present in the chromosomes. Aberrant chromosomes arrangements and de-clustered γ-tubulin foci representing declustered centrosomes were detected in the transfected MDA-MB-231 cells after treatment with PJ-34. Un-clustered extra-centrosomes in the two spindle poles preceded their cell death. These results linked for the first time the recently detected exclusive cytotoxic activity of PJ-34 in human cancer cells with extra-centrosomes de-clustering in mitosis, and mitotic failure leading to cell death. According to previous findings observed by confocal imaging of fixed cells, PJ-34 exclusively eradicated cancer cells with multi-centrosomes without impairing normal cells undergoing mitosis with two centrosomes and bi-focal spindles. This cytotoxic activity of PJ-34 was not shared by other potent PARP1 inhibitors, and was observed in PARP1 deficient MEF harboring extracentrosomes, suggesting its independency of PARP1 inhibition. Live confocal imaging offered a useful tool for identifying new molecules eradicating cells during mitosis.

  20. Cell death in cancer therapy of lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zagryazhskaya, Anna; Gyuraszova, Katarina; Zhivotovsky, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the main cause of all cancer-related deaths in the world, with lung adenocarcinoma (ADC) being the most common subtype of this fatal disease. Lung ADC is often diagnosed at advanced stages involving disseminated metastatic tumors. This is particularly important for the successful development of new cancer therapy approaches. The high resistance of lung ADC to conventional radio- and chemotherapies represents a major challenge to treatment effectiveness. Here we discuss recent progress in understanding the mechanisms of ADC's broad resistance to treatment and its possible therapeutic implications. A number of driving oncogenic alterations were identified in a subset of lung ADCs, making them suitable for targeted therapies directed towards specific cancer-associated molecular changes. In addition, we discuss the molecular aberrations common in lung ADC that are currently being exploited or are potentially important for targeted cancer therapy, as well as limitations of this type of therapy. Furthermore, we highlight possible treatment modalities that hold promise for overcoming resistance to targeted therapies as well as alternative treatment options such as immunotherapies that are potentially promising for improving the clinical outcome of lung ADC patients.

  1. Glucose starvation-mediated inhibition of salinomycin induced autophagy amplifies cancer cell specific cell death.

    PubMed

    Jangamreddy, Jaganmohan R; Jain, Mayur V; Hallbeck, Anna-Lotta; Roberg, Karin; Lotfi, Kourosh; Łos, Marek J

    2015-04-30

    Salinomycin has been used as treatment for malignant tumors in a small number of humans, causing far less side effects than standard chemotherapy. Several studies show that Salinomycin targets cancer-initiating cells (cancer stem cells, or CSC) resistant to conventional therapies. Numerous studies show that Salinomycin not only reduces tumor volume, but also decreases tumor recurrence when used as an adjuvant to standard treatments. In this study we show that starvation triggered different stress responses in cancer cells and primary normal cells, which further improved the preferential targeting of cancer cells by Salinomycin. Our in vitro studies further demonstrate that the combined use of 2-Fluoro 2-deoxy D-glucose, or 2-deoxy D-glucose with Salinomycin is lethal in cancer cells while the use of Oxamate does not improve cell death-inducing properties of Salinomycin. Furthermore, we show that treatment of cancer cells with Salinomycin under starvation conditions not only increases the apoptotic caspase activity, but also diminishes the protective autophagy normally triggered by the treatment with Salinomycin alone. Thus, this study underlines the potential use of Salinomycin as a cancer treatment, possibly in combination with short-term starvation or starvation-mimicking pharmacologic intervention.

  2. Calprotectin induces cell death in human prostate cancer cell (LNCaP) through survivin protein alteration.

    PubMed

    Sattari, Mina; Pazhang, Yaghub; Imani, Mehdi

    2014-11-01

    Calprotectin (CP), an abundant heterodimeric cytosolic protein of neutrophils, conveys a variety of functions such as tumor cell growth arrest and antimicrobial activity. We investigated CP activity and its possible apoptosis-inducing mechanism of action against an antiandrogen therapy-resistance prostate cancer cell line LNCaP. Cell viability and Annexin V FITC assays were performed in order to investigate its cell death activity and apoptosis, respectively. In order to address cell death inducing mechanism(s), immunocytochemistry and immunobloting analysis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) measurements were performed. The effective concentration of CP against LNCaP promoting LNCaP cell death was 200 µg/mL. ROS and NO levels of cells remarkably were enhanced following treatment with 50 and 100 µg/mL of CP, respectively. Protein expression of anti-apoptotic protein survivin was significantly decreased after administration of tumor cells with CP. Our data indicate that CP regulates the LNCaP cells viability via survivin-mediated pathway and ROS and NO enhancement. Thus, inhibition of survivin expression, enhancement of ROS and NO level by CP or other similar pharmaceutical agents might be effective in lowering the malignant proliferation of human prostate cancer cells.

  3. URI prevents potassium dichromate-induced oxidative stress and cell death in gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Dongwei; Xu, Zhonghai; Hu, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Fei; Bian, Huiqin; Li, Na; Wang, Qian; Lu, Yaojuan; Zheng, Qiping; Gu, Junxia

    2016-01-01

    Chromium VI can provoke oxidative stress, DNA damage, cytotoxicity, mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. Aberrantly high level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been associated with oxidative stress and subsequent DNA damage. Notably, multiple previous studies have shown the increased level of ROS in chromium (VI) induced oxidative stress, but its effect on cell death and the underlying mechanism remain to be determined. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of URI, an unconventional prefoldin RBP5 interactor, in potassium dichromate induced oxidative stress and cell death through in vitro loss-of-function studies. We have shown that knockdown of URI in human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells by URI siRNA enhanced potassium dichromate-induced production of ROS. The level of rH2AX, a marker of DNA damage, was significantly increased, along with a reduced cell viability in URI siRNA treated cells that were also exposed to potassium dichromate. Comet assay showed that URI knockdown increased the tail moment in potassium dichromate-treated SGC-7901 cells. Accordingly, the cell rates of apoptosis and necrosis were also increased in URI knockdown cells treated with potassium dichromate at different concentrations. Together, these results suggest that URI is preventive for the oxidative stress and cell death induced by potassium dichromate, which potentially leads to cancer cell survival and therapeutic resistance. PMID:28078011

  4. Chinese Medicines Induce Cell Death: The Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuanbin; Tan, Hor Yue; Zhong, Sen

    2014-01-01

    Chinese medicines have long history in treating cancer. With the growing scientific evidence of biomedical researches and clinical trials in cancer therapy, they are increasingly accepted as a complementary and alternative treatment. One of the mechanisms is to induce cancer cell death. Aim. To comprehensively review the publications concerning cancer cell death induced by Chinese medicines in recent years and provide insights on anticancer drug discovery from Chinese medicines. Materials and Methods. Chinese medicines (including Chinese medicinal herbs, animal parts, and minerals) were used in the study. The key words including “cancer”, “cell death”, “apoptosis”, “autophagy,” “necrosis,” and “Chinese medicine” were used in retrieval of related information from PubMed and other databases. Results. The cell death induced by Chinese medicines is described as apoptotic, autophagic, or necrotic cell death and other types with an emphasis on their mechanisms of anticancer action. The relationship among different types of cell death induced by Chinese medicines is critically reviewed and discussed. Conclusions. This review summarizes that CMs treatment could induce multiple pathways leading to cancer cell death, in which apoptosis is the dominant type. To apply these preclinical researches to clinic application will be a key issue in the future. PMID:25379508

  5. Elevated Expression of Programmed Death-1 and Programmed Death Ligand-1 Negatively Regulates Immune Response against Cervical Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhifang; Pang, Nannan; Du, Rong; Zhu, Yuejie; Fan, Lingling; Cai, Donghui

    2016-01-01

    The present study is to measure the expression of programmed death-1 (PD-1) and programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1), as well as its clinical significance in cervical cancer patients. Our results showed that different T cell subsets in patients with cervical cancer had high expression of PD-1, and DCs had high expression of PD-L1. High expression of PD-1 on Treg cells in cervical cancer patients facilitated the production of TGF-β and IL-10 but inhibited the production of IFN-γ. Cervical cancer elevated the expression of PD-1 and PD-L1 in mRNA level. PD-1 expression in peripheral blood of cervical cancer patients was related with tumor differentiation, lymph node metastasis, and invasiveness. PD-1/PD-L1 pathway inhibited lymphocyte proliferation but enhanced the secretion of IL-10 and TGF-β in vitro. In summary, our findings demonstrate that elevated levels of PD-1/PD-L1, TGF-β, and IL-10 in peripheral blood of cervical cancer patients may negatively regulate immune response against cervical cancer cells and contribute to the progression of cervical cancer. Therefore, PD-1/PD-L1 pathway may become an immunotherapy target in the future. PMID:27721577

  6. Resistance to Cell Death and Its Modulation in Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Safa, Ahmad R.

    2017-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that human cancers arise from various tissues of origin that initiate from cancer stem cells (CSCs) or cancer-initiating cells. The extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways are dysregulated in CSCs, and these cells play crucial roles in tumor initiation, progression, cell death resistance, chemo- and radiotherapy resistance, and tumor recurrence. Understanding CSC-specific signaling proteins and pathways is necessary to identify specific therapeutic targets that may lead to the development of more efficient therapies selectively targeting CSCs. Several signaling pathways—including the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK), NOTCH1, and Wnt/β-catenin—and expression of the CSC markers CD133, CD24, CD44, Oct4, Sox2, Nanog, and ALDH1A1 maintain CSC properties. Studying such pathways may help to understand CSC biology and lead to the development of potential therapeutic interventions to render CSCs more sensitive to cell death triggered by chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Moreover, recent demonstrations of dedifferentiation of differentiated cancer cells into CSC-like cells have created significant complexity in the CSCs hypothesis. Therefore, any successful therapeutic agent or combination of drugs for cancer therapy must eliminate not only CSCs but differentiated cancer cells and the entire bulk of tumor cells. This review article expands on the CSC hypothesis and paradigm with respect to major signaling pathways and effectors that regulate CSC apoptosis resistance. Moreover, selective CSC apoptotic modulators and their therapeutic potential for making tumors more responsive to therapy are discussed. The use of novel therapies, including small-molecule inhibitors of specific proteins in signaling pathways that regulate stemness, proliferation and migration of CSCs, immunotherapy, and noncoding microRNAs may provide better means of

  7. Molecular Basis of Autophagic Cell Death in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    cancer, Subcellular Organelle Purification 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 1 8. N U 2 M B E R O F P A G E S 19a...family members and is the only domain retained by BH3-only proteins, further emphasizing the functional significance of this domain (4). In mammals , there...D. T., McKenna ,W. G., Bernhard, E. J., and El-Deiry, W. S. (2004) Cancer Cell 6, 597–609 37. Hamacher-Brady, A., Brady, N. R., Logue, S. E., Sayen

  8. Metabolic Stress Induced by Arginine Deprivation Induces Autophagy Cell Death in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    death. Inhibition of autophagy appears to stimulate the induction of cell death. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Prostate cancer, autophagy, arginine deiminase ... arginine deiminase (ADI). Both of these enzymes shuttle arginine away from the urea cycle and have been demonstrated to reduce intracellular...F.Y.S. Chuang, R.J. Bold, and H-J. Kung. Arginine deiminase as a novel therapy for prostate cancer induces autophagy and caspase-independent

  9. Apoptotic and autophagic cell death induced by glucolaxogenin in cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sánchez, L; Escobar, M L; Sandoval-Ramírez, J; López-Muñoz, H; Fernández-Herrera, M A; Hernández-Vázquez, J M V; Hilario-Martínez, C; Zenteno, E

    2015-12-01

    The antiproliferative and cytotoxic activity of glucolaxogenin and its ability to induce apoptosis and autophagy in cervical cancer cells are reported. We ascertained that glucolaxogenin exerts an inhibitory effect on the proliferation of HeLa, CaSki and ViBo cells in a dose-dependent manner. Analysis of DNA distribution in the cell-cycle phase of tumor cells treated with glucolaxogenin suggests that the anti-proliferative activity of this steroid is not always dependent on the cell cycle. Cytotoxic activity was evaluated by detection of the lactate dehydrogenase enzyme in supernatants from tumor cell cultures treated with the steroid. Glucolaxogenin exhibited null cytotoxic activity. With respect to the apoptotic activity, the generation of apoptotic bodies, the presence of active caspase-3 and annexin-V, as well as the DNA fragmentation observed in all tumor lines after treatment with glucolaxogenin suggests that this compound does indeed induce cell death by apoptosis. Also, a significantly increased presence of the LC3-II, LC3 and Lamp-1 proteins was evidenced with the ultrastructural existence of autophagic vacuoles in cells treated with this steroidal glycoside, indicating that glucolaxogenin also induces autophagic cell death. It is important to note that this compound showed no cytotoxic effect and did not affect the proliferative capacity of mononuclear cells obtained from normal human peripheral blood activated by phytohaemagglutinin. Thus, glucolaxogenin is a compound with anti-proliferative properties that induces programmed cell death in cancer cell lines, though it is selective with respect to normal lymphocytic cells. These findings indicate that this glycoside could have a selective action on tumor cells and, therefore, be worthy of consideration as a therapeutic candidate with anti-tumor potential.

  10. Induction of Cancer Cell Death by Isoflavone: The Role of Multiple Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yiwei; Kong, Dejuan; Bao, Bin; Ahmad, Aamir; Sarkar, Fazlul H.

    2011-01-01

    Soy isoflavones have been documented as dietary nutrients broadly classified as “natural agents” which plays important roles in reducing the incidence of hormone-related cancers in Asian countries, and have shown inhibitory effects on cancer development and progression in vitro and in vivo, suggesting the cancer preventive or therapeutic activity of soy isoflavones against cancers. Emerging experimental evidence shows that isoflavones could induce cancer cell death by regulating multiple cellular signaling pathways including Akt, NF-κB, MAPK, Wnt, androgen receptor (AR), p53 and Notch signaling, all of which have been found to be deregulated in cancer cells. Therefore, homeostatic regulation of these important cellular signaling pathways by isoflavones could be useful for the activation of cell death signaling, which could result in the induction of apoptosis of both pre-cancerous and/or cancerous cells without affecting normal cells. In this article, we have attempted to summarize the current state-of-our-knowledge regarding the induction of cancer cell death pathways by isoflavones, which is believed to be mediated through the regulation of multiple cellular signaling pathways. The knowledge gained from this article will provide a comprehensive view on the molecular mechanism(s) by which soy isoflavones may exert their effects on the prevention of tumor progression and/or treatment of human malignancies, which would also aid in stimulating further in-depth mechanistic research and foster the initiation of novel clinical trials. PMID:22200028

  11. Apoptosis Cell Death Effect of Scrophularia Variegata on Breast Cancer Cells via Mitochondrial Intrinsic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Azadmehr, Abbas; Hajiaghaee, Reza; Baradaran, Behzad; Haghdoost-Yazdi, Hashem

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Scrophularia variegata M. Beib. (Scrophulariaceae) is an Iranian medicinal plant which is used for various inflammatory disorders in traditional medicine. In this study we evaluated the anti-cancer and cytotoxic effects of the Scrophularia variegata (S. variegata) ethanolic extract on the human breast cancer cell line. Methods: The cytotoxicity effect of the extract on MCF-7 cells was evaluated by MTT assay. In addition, Caspase activity, DNA ladder and Cell death were evaluated by ELISA, gel electrophoresis and Annexin V-FITC/PI staining, respectively. Results: The S. variegata extract showed significant effect cytotoxicity on MCF-7 human breast cancer cell line. Treatment with the extract induced apoptosis on the breast cancer cells by cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase. The results indicated that cytotoxicity activity was associated with an increase of apoptosis as demonstrated by DNA fragmentation as well as an increase of the amount of caspase 3 and caspase 9. In addition, the phytochemical assay showed that the extract had antioxidant capacity and also flavonoids, phenolic compounds and phenyl propanoids were presented in the extract. Conclusion: Our findings indicated that S. variegata extract induced apoptosis via mitochondrial intrinsic pathway on breast cancer by cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase and an increase of caspase 3 and caspase 9. However future studies are needed. PMID:26504768

  12. Killing Prostate Cancer Cells and Endothelial Cells with a VEGF-Triggered Cell Death Receptor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    The goal of this project was to test a novel chimeric cell death receptor (termed R2Fas) that is triggered by vascular endothelial growth factor...cells that overexpress VEGF activates apoptotic signaling and induces cell death ; (iii) we demonstrated that adenoviral-mediated expression of R2Fas in

  13. Mitochondrial calcium uniporter silencing potentiates caspase-independent cell death in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Curry, Merril C.; Peters, Amelia A.; Kenny, Paraic A.; Roberts-Thomson, Sarah J.; Monteith, Gregory R.

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: •Some clinical breast cancers are associated with MCU overexpression. •MCU silencing did not alter cell death initiated with the Bcl-2 inhibitor ABT-263. •MCU silencing potentiated caspase-independent cell death initiated by ionomycin. •MCU silencing promoted ionomycin-mediated cell death without changes in bulk Ca{sup 2+}. -- Abstract: The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) transports free ionic Ca{sup 2+} into the mitochondrial matrix. We assessed MCU expression in clinical breast cancer samples using microarray analysis and the consequences of MCU silencing in a breast cancer cell line. Our results indicate that estrogen receptor negative and basal-like breast cancers are characterized by elevated levels of MCU. Silencing of MCU expression in the basal-like MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line produced no change in proliferation or cell viability. However, distinct consequences of MCU silencing were seen on cell death pathways. Caspase-dependent cell death initiated by the Bcl-2 inhibitor ABT-263 was not altered by MCU silencing; whereas caspase-independent cell death induced by the calcium ionophore ionomycin was potentiated by MCU silencing. Measurement of cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} levels showed that the promotion of ionomycin-induced cell death by MCU silencing occurs independently of changes in bulk cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} levels. This study demonstrates that MCU overexpression is a feature of some breast cancers and that MCU overexpression may offer a survival advantage against some cell death pathways. MCU inhibitors may be a strategy to increase the effectiveness of therapies that act through the induction of caspase-independent cell death pathways in estrogen receptor negative and basal-like breast cancers.

  14. Andrographolide induces autophagic cell death in human liver cancer cells through cyclophilin D-mediated mitochondrial permeability transition pore.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Feng, Lina; Nie, Hao; Zheng, Xiaodong

    2012-11-01

    Liver cancer is the third leading cause of cancer death worldwide and about half of the patients with liver cancer require adjuvant therapy after surgical resection. Therefore, development of novel agents to eradicate cancer cells may constitute a viable approach to treat patients with liver cancer. Andrographolide, a diterpenoid lactone isolated from Andrographis paniculata, is known to possess potent antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antineoplastic and antiviral properties. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxic effect of andrographolide on human liver cancer cells and explored the cell death mechanism. Andrographolide induced a cell death distinct from apoptosis in multiple human liver cancer cells. The death was characterized by autophagy as evidenced by the accumulation of LC3 II and autophagosomes, and the formation of puncta GFP-LC3. This autophagy as well as cytotoxicity caused by andrographolide could be effectively prevented by 3-methyladenine (a chemical inhibitor of autophagy). Mechanistic study indicated that andrographolide induced autophagic cell death by disruption of mitochondrial transmembrane potential and elevation of reactive oxygen species, which were correlated with mitochondrial permeability transition pore Inhibition of cyclophilin D (a component of MPTP) by cyclosporin A or abrogation of its expression by small interfering RNA significantly suppressed the cytotoxicity of andrographolide, suggesting that cyclophilin D may play an important role in mediating andrographolide-induced cytotoxicity. Taken together, our findings unveil a novel mechanism of drug action by andrographolide in liver cancer cells and suggest that andrographolide may represent a promising novel agent in the treatment of liver cancer.

  15. Mechanisms underlying 3-bromopyruvate-induced cell death in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yiming; Liu, Zhe; Zou, Xue; Lan, Yadong; Sun, Xiaojin; Wang, Xiu; Zhao, Surong; Jiang, Chenchen; Liu, Hao

    2015-08-01

    3-Bromopyruvate (3BP) is an energy-depleting drug that inhibits Hexokinase II activity by alkylation during glycolysis, thereby suppressing the production of ATP and inducing cell death. As such, 3BP can potentially serve as an anti-tumorigenic agent. Our previous research showed that 3BP can induce apoptosis via AKT /protein Kinase B signaling in breast cancer cells. Here we found that 3BP can also induce colon cancer cell death by necroptosis and apoptosis at the same time and concentration in the SW480 and HT29 cell lines; in the latter, autophagy was also found to be a mechanism of cell death. In HT29 cells, combined treatment with 3BP and the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) exacerbated cell death, while viability in 3BP-treated cells was enhanced by concomitant treatment with the caspase inhibitor benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp fluoromethylketone (z-VAD-fmk) and the necroptosis inhibitor necrostatin (Nec)-1. Moreover, 3BP inhibited tumor growth in a SW480 xenograft mouse model. These results indicate that 3BP can suppress tumor growth and induce cell death by multiple mechanisms at the same time and concentration in different types of colon cancer cell by depleting cellular energy stores.

  16. Immunogenic Cell Death: Can It Be Exploited in PhotoDynamic Therapy for Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Panzarini, Elisa; Inguscio, Valentina; Dini, Luciana

    2013-01-01

    Immunogenic Cell Death (ICD) could represent the keystone in cancer management since tumor cell death induction is crucial as well as the control of cancer cells revival after neoplastic treatment. In this context, the immune system plays a fundamental role. The concept of Damage-Associated Molecular Patterns (DAMPs) has been proposed to explain the immunogenic potential of stressed or dying/dead cells. ICD relies on DAMPs released by or exposed on dying cells. Once released, DAMPs are sensed by immune cells, in particular Dendritic Cells (DCs), acting as activators of Antigen-Presenting Cells (APCs), that in turn stimulate both innate and adaptive immunity. On the other hand, by exposing DAMPs, dying cancer cells change their surface composition, recently indicated as vital for the stimulation of the host immune system and the control of residual ill cells. It is well established that PhotoDynamic Therapy (PDT) for cancer treatment ignites the immune system to elicit a specific antitumor immunity, probably linked to its ability in inducing exposure/release of certain DAMPs, as recently suggested. In the present paper, we discuss the DAMPs associated with PDT and their role in the crossroad between cancer cell death and immunogenicity in PDT. PMID:23509727

  17. VMP1 related autophagy and apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells: VMP1 regulates cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Qinyi; Zhou, Hao; Chen, Yan; Shen, Chenglong; He, Songbing; Zhao, Hua; Wang, Liang; Wan, Daiwei; Gu, Wen

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •This research confirmed VMP1 as a regulator of autophagy in colorectal cancer cell lines. •We proved the pro-survival role of VMP1-mediated autophagy in colorectal cancer cell lines. •We found the interaction between VMP1 and BECLIN1 also existing in colorectal cancer cell lines. -- Abstract: Vacuole membrane protein 1 (VMP1) is an autophagy-related protein and identified as a key regulator of autophagy in recent years. In pancreatic cell lines, VMP1-dependent autophagy has been linked to positive regulation of apoptosis. However, there are no published reports on the role of VMP1 in autophagy and apoptosis in colorectal cancers. Therefore, to address this gap of knowledge, we decided to interrogate regulation of autophagy and apoptosis by VMP1. We have studied the induction of autophagy by starvation and rapamycin treatment in colorectal cell lines using electron microscopy, immunofluorescence, and immunoblotting. We found that starvation-induced autophagy correlated with an increase in VMP1 expression, that VMP1 interacted with BECLIN1, and that siRNA mediated down-regulation of VMP1-reduced autophagy. Next, we examined the relationship between VMP1-dependent autophagy and apoptosis and found that VMP1 down-regulation sensitizes cells to apoptosis and that agents that induce apoptosis down-regulate VMP1. In conclusion, similar to its reported role in other cell types, VMP1 is an important regulator of autophagy in colorectal cell lines. However, in contrast to its role in pancreatic cell lines, in colorectal cancer cells, VMP1-dependent autophagy appears to be pro-survival rather than pro-cell death.

  18. Multimodal immunogenic cancer cell death as a consequence of anticancer cytotoxic treatments

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, H; Tani, K

    2014-01-01

    Apoptotic cell death generally characterized by a morphologically homogenous entity has been considered to be essentially non-immunogenic. However, apoptotic cancer cell death, also known as type 1 programmed cell death (PCD), was recently found to be immunogenic after treatment with several chemotherapeutic agents and oncolytic viruses through the emission of various danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). Extensive studies have revealed that two different types of immunogenic cell death (ICD) inducers, recently classified by their distinct actions in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, can reinitiate immune responses suppressed by the tumor microenvironment. Indeed, recent clinical studies have shown that several immunotherapeutic modalities including therapeutic cancer vaccines and oncolytic viruses, but not conventional chemotherapies, culminate in beneficial outcomes, probably because of their different mechanisms of ICD induction. Furthermore, interests in PCD of cancer cells have shifted from its classical form to novel forms involving autophagic cell death (ACD), programmed necrotic cell death (necroptosis), and pyroptosis, some of which entail immunogenicity after anticancer treatments. In this review, we provide a brief outline of the well-characterized DAMPs such as calreticulin (CRT) exposure, high-mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1), and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release, which are induced by the morphologically distinct types of cell death. In the latter part, our review focuses on how emerging oncolytic viruses induce different forms of cell death and the combinations of oncolytic virotherapies with further immunomodulation by cyclophosphamide and other immunotherapeutic modalities foster dendritic cell (DC)-mediated induction of antitumor immunity. Accordingly, it is increasingly important to fully understand how and which ICD inducers cause multimodal ICD, which should aid the design of reasonably multifaceted anticancer modalities to

  19. Ursodeoxycholic Acid Induces Death Receptor-mediated Apoptosis in Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Won Sup; Jung, Ji Hyun; Panchanathan, Radha; Yun, Jeong Won; Kim, Dong Hoon; Kim, Hye Jung; Kim, Gon Sup; Ryu, Chung Ho; Shin, Sung Chul; Hong, Soon Chan; Choi, Yung Hyun; Jung, Jin-Myung

    2017-01-01

    Background Bile acids have anti-cancer properties in a certain types of cancers. We determined anticancer activity and its underlying molecular mechanism of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) in human DU145 prostate cancer cells. Methods Cell viability was measured with an MTT assay. UDCA-induced apoptosis was determined with flow cytometric analysis. The expression levels of apoptosis-related signaling proteins were examined with Western blotting. Results UDCA treatment significantly inhibited cell growth of DU145 in a dose-dependent manner. It induced cellular shrinkage and cytoplasmic blebs and accumulated the cells with sub-G1 DNA contents. Moreover, UDCA activated caspase 8, suggesting that UDCA-induced apoptosis is associated with extrinsic pathway. Consistent to this finding, UDCA increased the expressions of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) receptor, death receptor 4 (DR4) and death receptor 5 (DR5), and TRAIL augmented the UDCA-induced cell death in DU145 cells. In addition, UDCA also increased the expressions of Bax and cytochrome c and decreased the expression of Bcl-xL in DU145 cells. This finding suggests that UDCA-induced apoptosis may be involved in intrinsic pathway. Conclusions UDCA induces apoptosis via extrinsic pathway as well as intrinsic pathway in DU145 prostate cancer cells. UDCA may be a promising anti-cancer agent against prostate cancer. PMID:28382282

  20. Cancer therapy: Death by magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson, Jon

    2012-12-01

    A magnetic on/off switch for cell-death signalling in cancer cells is developed using antibodies conjugated to magnetic nanoparticles. The control of cell death in in vivo systems is demonstrated by a tell-tale morphological change within the zebrafish.

  1. Novel self-micellizing anticancer lipid nanoparticles induce cell death of colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sundaramoorthy, Pasupathi; Baskaran, Rengarajan; Mishra, Siddhartha Kumar; Jeong, Keun-Yeong; Oh, Seung Hyun; Kyu Yoo, Bong; Kim, Hwan Mook

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, we developed a novel drug-like self-micellizing anticancer lipid (SMAL), and investigated its anticancer activity and effects on cell death pathways in human colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines. Three self-assembled nanoparticles were prepared, namely, SMAL102 (lauramide derivative), SMAL104 (palmitamide derivative), and SMAL108 (stearamide derivative) by a thin-film hydration technique, and were characterized for physicochemical and biological parameters. SMAL102 were nanosized (160.23 ± 8.11 nm) with uniform spherical shape, while SMAL104 and SMAL108 did not form spherical shape but formed large size nanoparticles and irregular in shape. Importantly, SMAL102 showed a cytotoxic effect towards CRC cell lines (HCT116 and HT-29), and less toxicity to a normal colon fibroblast cell line (CCD-18Co). Conversely, SMAL104 and SMAL108 did not have an anti-proliferative effect on CRC cell lines. SMAL102 nanoparticles were actively taken up by CRC cell lines, localized in the cell membrane, and exhibited remarkable cytotoxicity in a concentration-dependent manner. The normal colon cell line showed significantly less cellular uptake and non-cytotoxicity as compared with the CRC cell lines. SMAL102 nanoparticles induced caspase-3, caspase-9, and PARP cleavage in HT-29 cells, indicating the induction of apoptosis; whereas LC3B was activated in HCT116 cells, indicating autophagy-induced cell death. Collectively, these results demonstrate that SMAL102 induced cell death via activation of apoptosis and autophagy in CRC cell lines. The present study could be a pioneer for further preclinical and clinical development of such compounds.

  2. Pseudolaric acid B activates autophagy in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells to prevent cell death

    PubMed Central

    YU, JINGHUA; CHEN, CHUNHAI; XU, TIANYANG; YAN, MINGHUI; XUE, BIANBIAN; WANG, YING; LIU, CHUNYU; ZHONG, TING; WANG, ZENGYAN; MENG, XIANYING; HU, DONGHUA; YU, XIAOFANG

    2016-01-01

    Pseudolaric acid B (PAB) has been demonstrated to exert antitumor effects in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. The present study aimed to investigate the mechanism of resistance to PAB-induced cell death. Following incubation with 4 µM of PAB for 3 days, the majority of MCF-7 cells became senescent, while some retained the same morphology as control cells, as assessed using a senescence detection kit. Additionally, 36 h of treatment with 4 µM of PAB increased the positive staining of autophagy markers, as shown by monodansylcadaverine and acridine orange staining. Western blot analysis indicated that this treatment also increased expression of the autophagy-related proteins Beclin-1 and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3. Furthermore, treatment with PAB and the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyl adenine significantly decreased the ratio of autophagy, as assessed by flow cytometric analysis of monodansylcadaverine staining density (P<0.001), and increased the ratio of cell death, as assessed by MTT analysis (P<0.001). This indicated that autophagy promotes cell survival as a resistance mechanism to PAB treatment. Additionally, the present study demonstrated that PAB treatment did not affect the mitochondrial membrane potential, which may be related to autophagy. Increased Bcl-2 expression may explain why PAB did not affect the mitochondrial membrane potential. A Bcl-2 binding test demonstrated that PAB treatment inhibits the binding of Bcl-2 and Beclin-1, which may free Beclin-1 to participate in autophagy. Therefore, the present study demonstrated that autophagy may be activated by PAB treatment in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells, contributing to resistance to cell death. PMID:26998069

  3. Pseudolaric acid B activates autophagy in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells to prevent cell death.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jinghua; Chen, Chunhai; Xu, Tianyang; Yan, Minghui; Xue, Bianbian; Wang, Ying; Liu, Chunyu; Zhong, Ting; Wang, Zengyan; Meng, Xianying; Hu, Donghua; Yu, Xiaofang

    2016-03-01

    Pseudolaric acid B (PAB) has been demonstrated to exert antitumor effects in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. The present study aimed to investigate the mechanism of resistance to PAB-induced cell death. Following incubation with 4 µM of PAB for 3 days, the majority of MCF-7 cells became senescent, while some retained the same morphology as control cells, as assessed using a senescence detection kit. Additionally, 36 h of treatment with 4 µM of PAB increased the positive staining of autophagy markers, as shown by monodansylcadaverine and acridine orange staining. Western blot analysis indicated that this treatment also increased expression of the autophagy-related proteins Beclin-1 and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3. Furthermore, treatment with PAB and the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyl adenine significantly decreased the ratio of autophagy, as assessed by flow cytometric analysis of monodansylcadaverine staining density (P<0.001), and increased the ratio of cell death, as assessed by MTT analysis (P<0.001). This indicated that autophagy promotes cell survival as a resistance mechanism to PAB treatment. Additionally, the present study demonstrated that PAB treatment did not affect the mitochondrial membrane potential, which may be related to autophagy. Increased Bcl-2 expression may explain why PAB did not affect the mitochondrial membrane potential. A Bcl-2 binding test demonstrated that PAB treatment inhibits the binding of Bcl-2 and Beclin-1, which may free Beclin-1 to participate in autophagy. Therefore, the present study demonstrated that autophagy may be activated by PAB treatment in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells, contributing to resistance to cell death.

  4. Role of apoptosis-related miRNAs in resveratrol-induced breast cancer cell death.

    PubMed

    Venkatadri, R; Muni, T; Iyer, A K V; Yakisich, J S; Azad, N

    2016-02-18

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women, and one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Recent evidences indicate that dietary agents such as resveratrol may inhibit cancer progression through modulation of microRNAs (miRNAs). We demonstrate that resveratrol regulates apoptotic and cell cycle machinery in breast cancer cells by modulating key tumor-suppressive miRNAs including miR-125b-5p, miR-200c-3p, miR-409-3p, miR-122-5p and miR-542-3p. Resveratrol-mediated miRNA modulation regulates key anti-apoptotic and cell cycle proteins including Bcl-2, X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein and CDKs, which are critical for its activity. Modulating miRNAs with mimics or inhibitors further validated a key role for miR-542-3p in MCF-7 and miR-122-5p in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell death in response to resveratrol. In conclusion, this study reveals novel miRNAs modulated by resveratrol that have a key role in breast cancer cell death.

  5. Spatiotemporal Temperature Distribution and Cancer Cell Death in Response to Extracellular Hyperthermia Induced by Gold Nanorods

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Huang-Chiao; Rege, Kaushal; Heys, Jeffrey J.

    2010-01-01

    Plasmonic nanoparticles have shown promise in hyperthermic cancer therapy, both in vitro and in vivo. Previous reports have described hyperthermic ablation using targeted and non-targeted nanoparticles internalized by cancer cells, but most reports do not describe a theoretical analysis for determining optimal parameters. The focus of the current research was first to evaluate the spatiotemporal temperature distribution and cell death induced by extracellular hyperthermia in which gold nanorods (GNRs) were maintained in the dispersion outside human prostate cancer cells. The nanorod dispersion was irradiated with near infrared (NIR) laser and the spatiotemporal distribution of temperature was determined experimentally. This information was employed to develop and validate theoretical models of spatiotemporal temperature profiles for gold nanorod dispersions undergoing laser irradiation, and the impact of the resulting heat generation on the viability of human prostate cancer cells. A cell injury/death model was then coupled to the heat transfer model to predict spatial and temporal variations in cell death and injury. The model predictions agreed well with experimental measurements of both, temperature and cell death profiles. Finally, the model was extended to examine the impact of selective binding of gold nanorods to cancer cells compared to non-malignant cells, coupled with a small change in cell injury activation energy. The impact of these relatively minor changes results in a dramatic change in the overall cell death rate. Taken together, extracellular hyperthermia using gold nanorods is a promising strategy and tailoring the cellular binding efficacy of nanorods can result in varying therapeutic efficacies using this approach. PMID:20387828

  6. Cancer-secreted AGR2 induces programmed cell death in normal cells

    PubMed Central

    Vitello, Elizabeth A.; Quek, Sue-Ing; Kincaid, Heather; Fuchs, Thomas; Crichton, Daniel J.; Troisch, Pamela; Liu, Alvin Y.

    2016-01-01

    Anterior Gradient 2 (AGR2) is a protein expressed in many solid tumor types including prostate, pancreatic, breast and lung. AGR2 functions as a protein disulfide isomerase in the endoplasmic reticulum. However, AGR2 is secreted by cancer cells that overexpress this molecule. Secretion of AGR2 was also found in salamander limb regeneration. Due to its ubiquity, tumor secretion of AGR2 must serve an important role in cancer, yet its molecular function is largely unknown. This study examined the effect of cancer-secreted AGR2 on normal cells. Prostate stromal cells were cultured, and tissue digestion media containing AGR2 prepared from prostate primary cancer 10-076 CP and adenocarcinoma LuCaP 70CR xenograft were added. The control were tissue digestion media containing no AGR2 prepared from benign prostate 10-076 NP and small cell carcinoma LuCaP 145.1 xenograft. In the presence of tumor-secreted AGR2, the stromal cells were found to undergo programmed cell death (PCD) characterized by formation of cellular blebs, cell shrinkage, and DNA fragmentation as seen when the stromal cells were UV irradiated or treated by a pro-apoptotic drug. PCD could be prevented with the addition of the monoclonal AGR2-neutralizing antibody P3A5. DNA microarray analysis of LuCaP 70CR media-treated vs. LuCaP 145.1 media-treated cells showed downregulation of the gene SAT1 as a major change in cells exposed to AGR2. RT-PCR analysis confirmed the array result. SAT1 encodes spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase, which maintains intracellular polyamine levels. Abnormal polyamine metabolism as a result of altered SAT1 activity has an adverse effect on cells through the induction of PCD. PMID:27283903

  7. Statins Inhibit the Proliferation and Induce Cell Death of Human Papilloma Virus Positive and Negative Cervical Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Crescencio, María Elena; Rodríguez, Emma; Páez, Araceli; Masso, Felipe A.; Montaño, Luis F.; López-Marure, Rebeca

    2009-01-01

    Statins, competitive inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, have anti-tumoral effects on multiple cancer types; however, little is known about their effect on cervical cancer. We evaluated the effect on proliferation, cell cycle, oxidative stress and cell death of three statins on CaSki, HeLa (HPV+) and ViBo (HPV−) cervical cancer cell lines. Cell proliferation was assayed by crystal violet staining, cell cycle by flow cytometry and cell death by annexin-V staining. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was evaluated by the oxidation of 2,7-dichlorofluorescein diacetate and nitrite concentration (an indirect measure of nitric oxide (NO) production), by the Griess reaction. Inhibition of cell proliferation by atorvastatin, fluvastatin and simvastatin was dose-dependent. ViBo cells were the most responsive. Statins did not affect the cell cycle, instead they induced cell death. The antiproliferative effect in ViBo cells was completely inhibited with mevalonate, farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) treatments. In contrast, cell proliferation of CaSki and HeLa cells was partially (33%) rescued with these intermediates. The three statins increased ROS and nitrite production, mainly in the ViBo cell line. These results suggest that statins exert anti-tumoral effects on cervical cancer through inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of cell death and oxidative stress. Statins could be an aid in the treatment of cervical cancer, especially in HPV− tumors. PMID:23675166

  8. Game theory in the death galaxy: interaction of cancer and stromal cells in tumour microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Wu, Amy; Liao, David; Tlsty, Thea D; Sturm, James C; Austin, Robert H

    2014-08-06

    Preventing relapse is the major challenge to effective therapy in cancer. Within the tumour, stromal (ST) cells play an important role in cancer progression and the emergence of drug resistance. During cancer treatment, the fitness of cancer cells can be enhanced by ST cells because their molecular signalling interaction delays the drug-induced apoptosis of cancer cells. On the other hand, competition among cancer and ST cells for space or resources should not be ignored. We explore the population dynamics of multiple myeloma (MM) versus bone marrow ST cells by using an experimental microecology that we call the death galaxy, with a stable drug gradient and connected microhabitats. Evolutionary game theory is a quantitative way to capture the frequency-dependent nature of interactive populations. Therefore, we use evolutionary game theory to model the populations in the death galaxy with the gradients of pay-offs and successfully predict the future densities of MM and ST cells. We discuss the possible clinical use of such analysis for predicting cancer progression.

  9. Role of mitochondria-associated hexokinase II in cancer cell death induced by 3-bromopyruvate.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhao; Zhang, Hui; Lu, Weiqin; Huang, Peng

    2009-05-01

    It has long been observed that cancer cells rely more on glycolysis to generate ATP and actively use certain glycolytic metabolic intermediates for biosynthesis. Hexokinase II (HKII) is a key glycolytic enzyme that plays a role in the regulation of the mitochondria-initiated apoptotic cell death. As a potent inhibitor of hexokinase, 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA) is known to inhibit cancer cell energy metabolism and trigger cell death, supposedly through depletion of cellular ATP. The current study showed that 3-BrPA caused a covalent modification of HKII protein and directly triggered its dissociation from mitochondria, leading to a specific release of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) from the mitochondria to cytosol and eventual cell death. Co-immunoprecipitation revealed a physical interaction between HKII and AIF. Using a competitive peptide of HKII, we showed that the dissociation of hexokinase II from mitochondria alone could cause apoptotic cell death, especially in the mitochondria-deficient rho(0) cells that highly express HKII. Interestingly, the dissociation of HKII itself did not directly affect the mitochondrial membrane potential, ROS generation, and oxidative phosphorylation. Our study suggests that the physical association between HKII and AIF is important for the normal localization of AIF in the mitochondria, and disruption of this protein complex by 3-BrPA leads to their release from the mitochondria and eventual cell death.

  10. Mechanism of neem limonoids-induced cell death in cancer: Role of oxidative phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Neelu; Kumar, Sandeep; Kumar, Rahul; Srivastava, Pragya; Sun, Leimin; Rapali, Peter; Marlowe, Timothy; Schneider, Andrea; Inigo, Joseph R; O'Malley, Jordan; Londonkar, Ramesh; Gogada, Raghu; Chaudhary, Ajay K; Yadava, Nagendra; Chandra, Dhyan

    2016-01-01

    We have previously reported that neem limonoids (neem) induce multiple cancer cell death pathways. Here we dissect the underlying mechanisms of neem-induced apoptotic cell death in cancer. We observed that neem-induced caspase activation does not require Bax/Bak channel-mediated mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization, permeability transition pore, and mitochondrial fragmentation. Neem enhanced mitochondrial DNA and mitochondrial biomass. While oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) Complex-I activity was decreased, the activities of other OXPHOS complexes including Complex-II and -IV were unaltered. Increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were associated with an increase in mitochondrial biomass and apoptosis upon neem exposure. Complex-I deficiency due to the loss of Ndufa1-encoded MWFE protein inhibited neem-induced caspase activation and apoptosis, but cell death induction was enhanced. Complex II-deficiency due to the loss of succinate dehydrogenase complex subunit C (SDHC) robustly decreased caspase activation, apoptosis, and cell death. Additionally, the ablation of Complexes-I, -III, -IV, and -V together did not inhibit caspase activation. Together, we demonstrate that neem limonoids target OXPHOS system to induce cancer cell death, which does not require upregulation or activation of proapoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins.

  11. Death receptor pathways mediate targeted and non-targeted effects of ionizing radiations in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Luce, Audrey; Courtin, Aurélie; Levalois, Céline; Altmeyer-Morel, Sandrine; Romeo, Paul-Henri; Lebeau, Jérôme

    2009-01-01

    Delayed cell death by mitotic catastrophe is a frequent mode of solid tumor cell death after γ-irradiation, a widely used treatment of cancer. Whereas the mechanisms that underlie the early γ-irradiation-induced cell death are well documented, those that drive the delayed cell death are largely unknown. Here we show that the Fas, tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α death receptor pathways mediate the delayed cell death observed after γ-irradiation of breast cancer cells. Early after irradiation, we observe the increased expression of Fas, TRAIL-R and TNF-R that first sensitizes cells to apoptosis. Later, the increased expression of FasL, TRAIL and TNF-α permit the apoptosis engagement linked to mitotic catastrophe. Treatments with TNF-α, TRAIL or anti-Fas antibody, early after radiation exposure, induce apoptosis, whereas the neutralization of the three death receptors pathways impairs the delayed cell death. We also show for the first time that irradiated breast cancer cells excrete soluble forms of the three ligands that can induce the death of sensitive bystander cells. Overall, these results define the molecular basis of the delayed cell death of irradiated cancer cells and identify the death receptors pathways as crucial actors in apoptosis induced by targeted as well as non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation. PMID:19126655

  12. Position in cell cycle controls the sensitivity of colon cancer cells to nitric oxide-dependent programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Jarry, Anne; Charrier, Laetitia; Bou-Hanna, Chantal; Devilder, Marie-Claire; Crussaire, Véronique; Denis, Marc G; Vallette, Geneviève; Laboisse, Christian L

    2004-06-15

    Mounting evidence suggests that the position in the cell cycle of cells exposed to an oxidative stress could determine their survival or apoptotic cell death. This study aimed at determining whether nitric oxide (NO)-induced cell death in colon cancer cells might depend on their position in the cell cycle, based on a clone of the cancer cell line HT29 exposed to an NO donor, in combination with the manipulation of the cell entry into the cell cycle. We show that PAPA NONOate (pNO), from 10(-4) m to 10(-3) m, exerted early and reversible cytostatic effects through ribonucleotide reductase inhibition, followed by late resumption of cell growth at 5 x 10(-4) m pNO. In contrast, 10(-3) m pNO led to late programmed cell death that was accounted for by the progression of cells into the cell cycle as shown by (a) the accumulation of apoptotic cells in the G(2)-M phase at 10(-3) m pNO treatment; and (b) the prevention of cell death by inhibiting the entry of cells into the cell cycle. The entry of pNO-treated cells into the G(2)-M phase was associated with actin depolymerization and its S-glutathionylation in the same way as in control cells. However, the pNO treatment interfered with the build-up of a high reducing power, associated in control cells with a dramatic increase in reduced glutathione biosynthesis in the G(2)-M phase. This oxidative stress prevented the exit from the G(2)-M phase, which requires a high reducing power for actin deglutathionylation and its repolymerization. Finally, our demonstration that programmed cell death occurred through a caspase-independent pathway is in line with the context of a nitrosative/oxidative stress. In conclusion, this work, which deciphers the connection between the position of colonic cancer cells in the cell cycle and their sensitivity to NO-induced stress and their programmed cell death, could help optimize anticancer protocols based on NO-donating compounds.

  13. Mechanisms of Growth Factor Attenuation of Cell Death in Chemotherapy Treated Breast Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-08-01

    cells treated with chemotherapy or radiation. To this end, we have focused on the survival kinase, Akt and also the kinase which conveys cell death messages...these cells are resistant to the cell death pathway that is typically activated with chemotherapy and radiation treatment. Therefore, we are currently...studying new mechanisms for Akt mediated cell survival. Our work to identify how JNK conveys cell death signals in response to UV or chemotherapy

  14. Microscopic analysis of cell death by metabolic stress-induced autophagy in prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Changou, Chun; Cheng, R. Holland; Bold, Richard; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Chuang, Frank Y. S.

    2013-02-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular recycling mechanism that helps cells to survive against environmental stress and nutritional starvation. We have recently shown that prostate cancers undergo metabolic stress and caspase-independent cell death following exposure to arginine deiminase (ADI, an enzyme that degrades arginine in tissue). The aims of our current investigation into the application of ADI as a novel cancer therapy are to identify the components mediating tumor cell death, and to determine the role of autophagy (stimulated by ADI and/or rapamycin) on cell death. Using advanced fluorescence microscopy techniques including 3D deconvolution and superresolution structured-illumination microscopy (SIM), we show that prostate tumor cells that are killed after exposure to ADI for extended periods, exhibit a morphology that is distinct from caspase-dependent apoptosis; and that autophagosomes forming as a result of ADI stimulation contain DAPI-stained nuclear material. Fluorescence imaging (as well as cryo-electron microscopy) show a breakdown of both the inner and outer nuclear membranes at the interface between the cell nucleus and aggregated autophagolysosomes. Finally, the addition of N-acetyl cysteine (or NAC, a scavenger for reactive oxygen species) effectively abolishes the appearance of autophagolysosomes containing nuclear material. We hope to continue this research to understand the processes that govern the survival or death of these tumor cells, in order to develop methods to improve the efficacy of cancer pharmacotherapy.

  15. Metabolic Stress Induced by Arginine Deprivation Induces Autophagy Cell Death in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    arginine deiminase W81XWH-08-1-0385 1 AUG 2010 - 31 JUL 2011Annual01-08-2011 University of California, Davis Davis, CA 95618 Metabolic Stress Induced...J Coates, T Bowles, J Sutcliffe, R Jung, R Gandour-Edwards, R Bold, HJ Kung. Arginine deiminase : a novel therapy for prostate cancer and a tool to...R Jung, R Gandour-Edwards, R Bold, HJ Kung. Arginine deiminase induces autophagic cell death in human prostate cancer. EMBO Conference: Autophagy

  16. Galangin induces human colon cancer cell death via the mitochondrial dysfunction and caspase-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Ha, Tae Kwun; Kim, Mi Eun; Yoon, Ju Hwa; Bae, Sung Jin; Yeom, Jihye; Lee, Jun Sik

    2013-09-01

    Galangin is a member of flavonols and found in Alpinia officinarum, galangal root, and propolis. Previous studies have demonstrated that galangin has anti-cancer effects on several cancers, including melanoma, hepatoma, and leukaemia cells. However, anti-cancer activity of galangin on human colon cancer has not been established yet. In this study, we investigated the anti-cancer effects of galangin on two types of human colon cancer cells (HCT-15 and HT-29). We found that galangin induced apoptosis and DNA condensation of human colon cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. We also determined that galangin increased the activation of caspase-3 and -9, and release of apoptosis inducing factor from the mitochondria into the cytoplasm by Western blot analysis. In addition, galangin induced human colon cancer cell death through the alteration of mitochondria membrane potential and dysfunction. These results suggest that galangin induces apoptosis of HCT-15 and HT-29 human colon cancer cells and may prove useful in the development of therapeutic agents for human colon cancer.

  17. HSPB1 as a novel regulator of ferroptotic cancer cell death.

    PubMed

    Sun, X; Ou, Z; Xie, M; Kang, R; Fan, Y; Niu, X; Wang, H; Cao, L; Tang, D

    2015-11-05

    Ferroptosis is an iron-dependent form of non-apoptotic cell death, but its molecular mechanism remains largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that heat shock protein beta-1 (HSPB1) is a negative regulator of ferroptotic cancer cell death. Erastin, a specific ferroptosis-inducing compound, stimulates heat shock factor 1 (HSF1)-dependent HSPB1 expression in cancer cells. Knockdown of HSF1 and HSPB1 enhances erastin-induced ferroptosis, whereas heat shock pretreatment and overexpression of HSPB1 inhibits erastin-induced ferroptosis. Protein kinase C-mediated HSPB1 phosphorylation confers protection against ferroptosis by reducing iron-mediated production of lipid reactive oxygen species. Moreover, inhibition of the HSF1-HSPB1 pathway and HSPB1 phosphorylation increases the anticancer activity of erastin in human xenograft mouse tumor models. Our findings reveal an essential role for HSPB1 in iron metabolism with important effects on ferroptosis-mediated cancer therapy.

  18. Raloxifene induces autophagy-dependent cell death in breast cancer cells via the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Eun; Kim, Yunha; Cho, Dong-Hyung; Jeong, Seong-Yun; Kim, Sung-Bae; Suh, Nayoung; Lee, Jung Shin; Choi, Eun Kyung; Koh, Jae-Young; Hwang, Jung Jin; Kim, Choung-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Raloxifene is a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) that binds to the estrogen receptor (ER), and exhibits potent anti-tumor and autophagy-inducing effects in breast cancer cells. However, the mechanism of raloxifene-induced cell death and autophagy is not well-established. So, we analyzed mechanism underlying death and autophagy induced by raloxifene in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Treatment with raloxifene significantly induced death in MCF-7 cells. Raloxifene accumulated GFP-LC3 puncta and increased the level of autophagic marker proteins, such as LC3-II, BECN1, and ATG12-ATG5 conjugates, indicating activated autophagy. Raloxifene also increased autophagic flux indicators, the cleavage of GFP from GFP-LC3 and only red fluorescence-positive puncta in mRFP-GFP-LC3-expressing cells. An autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine (3-MA), suppressed the level of LC3-II and blocked the formation of GFP-LC3 puncta. Moreover, siRNA targeting BECN1 markedly reversed cell death and the level of LC3-II increased by raloxifene. Besides, raloxifene-induced cell death was not related to cleavage of caspases-7, -9, and PARP. These results indicate that raloxifene activates autophagy-dependent cell death but not apoptosis. Interestingly, raloxifene decreased the level of intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and activated the AMPK/ULK1 pathway. However it was not suppressed the AKT/mTOR pathway. Addition of ATP decreased the phosphorylation of AMPK as well as the accumulation of LC3-II, finally attenuating raloxifene-induced cell death. Our current study demonstrates that raloxifene induces autophagy via the activation of AMPK by sensing decreases in ATP, and that the overactivation of autophagy promotes cell death and thereby mediates the anti-cancer effects of raloxifene in breast cancer cells.

  19. MITA modulated autophagy flux promotes cell death in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bhatelia, Khyati; Singh, Kritarth; Prajapati, Paresh; Sripada, Lakshmi; Roy, Milton; Singh, Rajesh

    2017-03-31

    The crosstalk between inflammation and autophagy is an emerging phenomenon observed during tumorigenesis. Activation of NF-κB and IRF3 plays a key role in the regulation of cytokines that are involved in tumor growth and progression. The genes of innate immunity are known to regulate the master transcription factors like NF-κB and IRF3. Innate immunity pathways at the same time regulate the genes of the autophagy pathway which are essential for tumor cell metabolism. In the current study, we studied the role of MITA (Mediator of IRF3 Activation), a regulator of innate immunity, in the regulation of autophagy and its implication in cell death of breast cancer cells. Here, we report that MITA inhibits the fusion of autophagosome with lysosome as evident from different autophagy flux assays. The expression of MITA induces the translocation of p62 and NDP52 to mitochondria which further recruits LC3 for autophagosome formation. The expression of MITA decreased mitochondrial number and enhances mitochondrial ROS by increasing complex-I activity. The enhancement of autophagy flux with rapamycin or TFEB expression normalized MITA induced cell death. The evidences clearly show that MITA regulates autophagy flux and modulates mitochondrial turnover through mitophagy.

  20. Activation of mitochondrial ERK protects cancer cells from death through inhibition of the permeability transition.

    PubMed

    Rasola, Andrea; Sciacovelli, Marco; Chiara, Federica; Pantic, Boris; Brusilow, William S; Bernardi, Paolo

    2010-01-12

    We studied human cancer cell models in which we detected constitutive activation of ERK. A fraction of active ERK was found to be located in mitochondria in RWPE-2 cells, obtained by v-Ki-Ras transformation of the epithelial prostate RWPE-1 cell line; in metastatic prostate cancer DU145 cells; and in osteosarcoma SAOS-2 cells. All these tumor cells displayed marked resistance to death caused by apoptotic stimuli like arachidonic acid and the BH3 mimetic EM20-25, which cause cell death through the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP). PTP desensitization and the ensuing resistance to cell death induced by arachidonic acid or EM20-25 could be ablated by inhibiting ERK with the drug PD98059 or with a selective ERK activation inhibitor peptide. ERK inhibition enhanced glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3)-dependent phosphorylation of the pore regulator cyclophilin D, whereas GSK-3 inhibition protected from PTP opening. Neither active ERK in mitochondria nor pore desensitization was observed in non-transformed RWPE-1 cells. Thus, in tumor cells mitochondrial ERK activation desensitizes the PTP through a signaling axis that involves GSK-3 and cyclophilin D, a finding that provides a mechanistic basis for increased resistance to apoptosis of neoplastic cells.

  1. Autophagy-related cell death by pan-histone deacetylase inhibition in liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Di Fazio, Pietro; Waldegger, Petra; Jabari, Samir; Lingelbach, Susanne; Montalbano, Roberta; Ocker, Matthias; Slater, Emily P; Bartsch, Detlef K; Illig, Romana; Neureiter, Daniel; Wissniowski, Thaddeus T

    2016-05-17

    Autophagy is a homeostatic, catabolic degradation process and cell fate essential regulatory mechanism. Protracted autophagy triggers cell death; its aberrant function is responsible for several malignancies. Panobinostat, a potent pan-deacetylase inhibitor, causes endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced cell death. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of autophagy in deacetylase inhibitor-triggered liver cancer cell death.HepG2 (p53wt) and Hep3B (p53 null) liver cancer cell lines were exposed to panobinostat. RT-qPCR and western blot confirmed autophagic factor modulation. Immuno-fluorescence, -precipitation and -histochemistry as well as transmission electron microscopy verified autophagosome formation. The cytotoxicity of panobinostat and autophagy modulators was detected using a real time cell viability assay.Panobinostat induced autophagy-related factor expression and aggregation. Map1LC3B and Beclin1 were significantly over-expressed in HepG2 xenografts in nude mice treated with panobinostat for 4 weeks. Subcellular distribution of Beclin1 increased with the appearance of autophagosomes-like aggregates. Cytosolic loss of p53, in HepG2, and p73, in Hep3B cells, and a corresponding gain of their nuclear level, together with modulation of DRAM1, were observed. Autophagosome aggregation was visible after 6 h of treatment. Treatment of cells stably expressing GFP-RFPtag Map1LC3B resulted in aggregation and a fluorescence switch, thus confirming autophagosome formation and maturation. Tamoxifen, an inducer of autophagy, caused only a block in cell proliferation; but in combination with panobinostat it resulted in cell death.Autophagy triggers cell demise in liver cancer. Its modulation by the combination of tamoxifen and panobinostat could be a new option for palliative treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  2. Artesunate induces cell death in human cancer cells via enhancing lysosomal function and lysosomal degradation of ferritin.

    PubMed

    Yang, Nai-Di; Tan, Shi-Hao; Ng, Shukie; Shi, Yin; Zhou, Jing; Tan, Kevin Shyong Wei; Wong, Wai-Shiu Fred; Shen, Han-Ming

    2014-11-28

    Artesunate (ART) is an anti-malaria drug that has been shown to exhibit anti-tumor activity, and functional lysosomes are reported to be required for ART-induced cancer cell death, whereas the underlying molecular mechanisms remain largely elusive. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying ART-induced cell death. We first confirmed that ART induces apoptotic cell death in cancer cells. Interestingly, we found that ART preferably accumulates in the lysosomes and is able to activate lysosomal function via promotion of lysosomal V-ATPase assembly. Furthermore, we found that lysosomes function upstream of mitochondria in reactive oxygen species production. Importantly, we provided evidence showing that lysosomal iron is required for the lysosomal activation and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production induced by ART. Finally, we showed that ART-induced cell death is mediated by the release of iron in the lysosomes, which results from the lysosomal degradation of ferritin, an iron storage protein. Meanwhile, overexpression of ferritin heavy chain significantly protected cells from ART-induced cell death. In addition, knockdown of nuclear receptor coactivator 4, the adaptor protein for ferritin degradation, was able to block ART-mediated ferritin degradation and rescue the ART-induced cell death. In summary, our study demonstrates that ART treatment activates lysosomal function and then promotes ferritin degradation, subsequently leading to the increase of lysosomal iron that is utilized by ART for its cytotoxic effect on cancer cells. Thus, our data reveal a new mechanistic action underlying ART-induced cell death in cancer cells.

  3. JS-K, a nitric oxide-releasing prodrug, induces breast cancer cell death while sparing normal mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    McMurtry, Vanity; Saavedra, Joseph E; Nieves-Alicea, René; Simeone, Ann-Marie; Keefer, Larry K; Tari, Ana M

    2011-04-01

    Targeted therapy with reduced side effects is a major goal in cancer research. We investigated the effects of JS-K, a nitric oxide (NO) prodrug designed to release high levels of NO when suitably activated, on human breast cancer cell lines, on non-transformed human MCF-10A mammary cells, and on normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs). Cell viability assay, flow cytometry, electron microscopy, and Western blot analysis were used to study the effects of JS-K on breast cancer and on mammary epithelial cells. After a 3-day incubation, the IC50s of JS-K against the breast cancer cells ranged from 0.8 to 3 µM. However, JS-K decreased the viability of the MCF-10A cells by only 20% at 10-µM concentration, and HMECs were unaffected by 10 µM JS-K. Flow cytometry indicated that JS-K increased the percentages of breast cancer cells under-going apoptosis. Interestingly, flow cytometry indicated that JS-K increased acidic vesicle organelle formation in breast cancer cells, suggesting that JS-K induced autophagy in breast cancer cells. Electron microscopy confirmed that JS-K-treated breast cancer cells underwent autophagic cell death. Western blot analysis showed that JS-K induced the expression of microtubule light chain 3-II, another autophagy marker, in breast cancer cells. However, JS-K did not induce apoptosis or autophagy in normal human mammary epithelial cells. These data indicate that JS-K selectively induces programmed cell death in breast cancer cells while sparing normal mammary epithelial cells under the same conditions. The selective anti-tumor activity of JS-K warrants its further investigation in breast tumors.

  4. YM155 potently triggers cell death in breast cancer cells through an autophagy-NF-kB network.

    PubMed

    Véquaud, Eloïse; Séveno, Céline; Loussouarn, Delphine; Engelhart, Lucie; Campone, Mario; Juin, Philippe; Barillé-Nion, Sophie

    2015-05-30

    Specific overexpression in cancer cells and evidence of oncogenic functions make Survivin an attractive target in cancer therapy. The small molecule compound YM155 has been described as the first "Survivin suppressant" but molecular mechanisms involved in its biological activity and its clinical potential remain obscure. We herein show that YM155 exerts single agent toxicity on primary breast cancer cells grown in an ex vivo assay preserving tumor microenvironment. In vitro assays indicate that YM155 more efficiently triggers cell death in breast cancer cells (including these with stem-cell like properties) than in non tumorigenic mammary cells. YM155-induced cell death is critically dependent on autophagy and NF-kB but independent of p53 and it coïncides with DNA damage and a DNA damage response in p53-proficient cells. Our results point out a crosstalk between NF-kB and autophagy controlling YM155-induced death in breast cancer cells and argue for the potential use of YM155 as a genotoxic agent in breast cancer therapy.

  5. YM155 potently triggers cell death in breast cancer cells through an autophagy-NF-kB network

    PubMed Central

    Véquaud, Eloïse; Séveno, Céline; Loussouarn, Delphine; Engelhart, Lucie; Campone, Mario; Juin, Philippe; Barillé-Nion, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Specific overexpression in cancer cells and evidence of oncogenic functions make Survivin an attractive target in cancer tharapy. The small molecule compound YM155 has been described as the first “Survivin suppressant” but molecular mechanisms involved in its biological activity and its clinical potential remain obscure. We herein show that YM155 exerts single agent toxicity on primary breast cancer cells grown in an ex vivo assay preserving tumor microenvironment. In vitro assays indicate that YM155 more efficiently triggers cell death in breast cancer cells (including these with stem-cell like properties) than in non tumorigenic mammary cells. YM155-induced cell death is critically dependent on autophagy and NF-kB but independent of p53 and it coïncides with DNA damage an a DNA damage response in p53-proficient cells. Our results point out a crosstalk between NF-KB and autophagy controlling YM155-induced death in breast cancer cells and argue for the potential use of YM155 as a genotoxic agent in breast cancer therapy. PMID:25974963

  6. Combining chemotherapeutic agents and netrin-1 interference potentiates cancer cell death

    PubMed Central

    Paradisi, Andrea; Creveaux, Marion; Gibert, Benjamin; Devailly, Guillaume; Redoulez, Emeline; Neves, David; Cleyssac, Elsa; Treilleux, Isabelle; Klein, Christian; Niederfellner, Gerhard; Cassier, Philippe A; Bernet, Agnès; Mehlen, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    The secreted factor netrin-1 is upregulated in a fraction of human cancers as a mechanism to block apoptosis induced by netrin-1 dependence receptors DCC and UNC5H. Targeted therapies aiming to trigger tumour cell death via netrin-1/receptors interaction interference are under preclinical evaluation. We show here that Doxorubicin, 5-Fluorouracil, Paclitaxel and Cisplatin treatments trigger, in various human cancer cell lines, an increase of netrin-1 expression which is accompanied by netrin-1 receptors increase. This netrin-1 upregulation which appears to be p53-dependent is a survival mechanism as netrin-1 silencing by siRNA is associated with a potentiation of cancer cell death upon Doxorubicin treatment. We show that candidate drugs interfering with netrin-1/netrin-1 receptors interactions potentiate Doxorubicin, Cisplatin or 5-Fluorouracil-induced cancer cell death in vitro. Moreover, in a model of xenografted nude mice, we show that systemic Doxorubicin treatment triggers netrin-1 upregulation in the tumour but not in normal organs, enhancing and prolonging tumour growth inhibiting effect of a netrin-1 interfering drug. Together these data suggest that combining conventional chemotherapies with netrin-1 interference could be a promising therapeutic approach. PMID:24293316

  7. [Ferroptosis, a new form of cell death relevant to the medical treatment of cancer].

    PubMed

    Lachaier, Emma; Louandre, Christophe; Ezzoukhry, Zakaria; Godin, Corinne; Mazière, Jean-Claude; Chauffert, Bruno; Galmiche, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    Ferroptosis is a form of cell death that has recently been reported during exposure to erastin, a chemical compound identified in a screen for molecules able to kill cancer cells carrying an active Ras oncogene. In cells exposed to inducers of ferroptosis, a catastrophic alteration of the cellular redox metabolism occurs, resulting in massive lipid peroxidation in the plasma membrane and loss of cell viability. We present our recent observations suggesting that sorafenib, the only medical treatment with proven efficacy against hepatocellular carcinoma, induces ferroptosis, a new anti-oncogenic mode of action of this drug. The discovery of ferroptosis sheds light on the critical adaptations of the redox metabolism in cancer cells. It might also foster the discovery of new biomarkers and innovative approaches for the treatment of cancer.

  8. killerFLIP: a novel lytic peptide specifically inducing cancer cell death

    PubMed Central

    Pennarun, B; Gaidos, G; Bucur, O; Tinari, A; Rupasinghe, C; Jin, T; Dewar, R; Song, K; Santos, M T; Malorni, W; Mierke, D; Khosravi-Far, R

    2013-01-01

    One of the objectives in the development of effective cancer therapy is induction of tumor-selective cell death. Toward this end, we have identified a small peptide that, when introduced into cells via a TAT cell-delivery system, shows a remarkably potent cytoxicity in a variety of cancer cell lines and inhibits tumor growth in vivo, whereas sparing normal cells and tissues. This fusion peptide was named killerFLIP as its sequence was derived from the C-terminal domain of c-FLIP, an anti-apoptotic protein. Using structure activity analysis, we determined the minimal bioactive core of killerFLIP, namely killerFLIP-E. Structural analysis of cells using electron microscopy demonstrated that killerFLIP-E triggers cell death accompanied by rapid (within minutes) plasma membrane permeabilization. Studies of the structure of the active core of killerFLIP (-E) indicated that it possesses amphiphilic properties and self-assembles into micellar structures in aqueous solution. The biochemical properties of killerFLIP are comparable to those of cationic lytic peptides, which participate in defense against pathogens and have also demonstrated anticancer properties. We show that the pro-cell death effects of killerFLIP are independent of its sequence similarity with c-FLIPL as killerFLIP-induced cell death was largely apoptosis and necroptosis independent. A killerFLIP-E variant containing a scrambled c-FLIPL motif indeed induced similar cell death, suggesting the importance of the c-FLIPL residues but not of their sequence. Thus, we report the discovery of a promising synthetic peptide with novel anticancer activity in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24176852

  9. killerFLIP: a novel lytic peptide specifically inducing cancer cell death.

    PubMed

    Pennarun, B; Gaidos, G; Bucur, O; Tinari, A; Rupasinghe, C; Jin, T; Dewar, R; Song, K; Santos, M T; Malorni, W; Mierke, D; Khosravi-Far, R

    2013-10-31

    One of the objectives in the development of effective cancer therapy is induction of tumor-selective cell death. Toward this end, we have identified a small peptide that, when introduced into cells via a TAT cell-delivery system, shows a remarkably potent cytoxicity in a variety of cancer cell lines and inhibits tumor growth in vivo, whereas sparing normal cells and tissues. This fusion peptide was named killerFLIP as its sequence was derived from the C-terminal domain of c-FLIP, an anti-apoptotic protein. Using structure activity analysis, we determined the minimal bioactive core of killerFLIP, namely killerFLIP-E. Structural analysis of cells using electron microscopy demonstrated that killerFLIP-E triggers cell death accompanied by rapid (within minutes) plasma membrane permeabilization. Studies of the structure of the active core of killerFLIP (-E) indicated that it possesses amphiphilic properties and self-assembles into micellar structures in aqueous solution. The biochemical properties of killerFLIP are comparable to those of cationic lytic peptides, which participate in defense against pathogens and have also demonstrated anticancer properties. We show that the pro-cell death effects of killerFLIP are independent of its sequence similarity with c-FLIPL as killerFLIP-induced cell death was largely apoptosis and necroptosis independent. A killerFLIP-E variant containing a scrambled c-FLIPL motif indeed induced similar cell death, suggesting the importance of the c-FLIPL residues but not of their sequence. Thus, we report the discovery of a promising synthetic peptide with novel anticancer activity in vitro and in vivo.

  10. Ursodeoxycholic acid effectively kills drug-resistant gastric cancer cells through induction of autophagic death.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sung-Chul; Han, Song Iy

    2015-09-01

    Carcinoma cells that have acquired drug resistance often exhibit cross-resistance to various other cytotoxic stimuli. Here, we investigated the effects of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), a gastrointestinal tumor-suppressor, on a cisplatin‑resistant SNU601 gastric cancer subline (SNU601/R). While other anticancer drugs, including L-OHP, etoposide, and death ligand TRAIL, had minimal effects on the viability of these resistant cells, they were sensitive to UDCA. The UDCA‑induced reduction in the viability of the SNU601/R cells was accomplished through autophagy while the primary means of cell death in the parental SNU601 cells (SNU601/WT) was apoptosis. Previously, we demonstrated that the UDCA-triggered apoptosis of gastric cancer cells was regulated by a cell surface death receptor, TRAIL-R2/DR5, which was upregulated and re-distributed on lipid rafts. The UDCA stimulation of TRAIL-R2/DR5 also occurred in the SNU601/R cells despite the lack of apoptosis. In the present study, we found that CD95/Fas, another cell surface death receptor, was also translocated into lipid rafts in response to UDCA although it was not involved in the decrease in cell viability. Specifically, raft relocalization of CD95/Fas was triggered by UDCA in the SNU601/WT cells in which apoptosis occurred, but not in the SNU601/R cells where autophagic death occurred. Notably, UDCA reduced ATG5 levels, an essential component of autophagy, in the SNU601/WT, but not in the SNU601/R cell line. Moreover, in CD95/Fas-silenced SNU601/WT cells, UDCA did not decrease ATG5 levels and induced autophagic cell death rather than apoptosis. These results imply that raft‑distributed CD95/Fas may support UDCA-induced apoptosis via downregulation of ATG5 levels, preventing the autophagic pathway. Taken together, these results suggest that UDCA induces both apoptotic and autophagic cell death depending on the intracellular signaling environment, thereby conferring the advantage to overcome drug resistance

  11. The role of necroptosis, an alternative form of cell death, in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xinfang; Deng, Qipan; Bode, Ann M; Dong, Zigang; Cao, Ya

    2013-07-01

    Programmed cell death plays an important role in animal development, tissue homeostasis and eliminating harmful or virally infected cells. Necroptosis, a novel form of programmed cell death, is caspase independent but RIPK and RIPK3 dependent. Moreover, it is suggested that necroptosis can be specifically inhibited by small molecular inhibitors such as necrostatin-1. Its signaling pathways have something in common with apoptosis, although the molecular mechanisms of necroptosis need to be further elucidated. Previous evidences suggest that necroptosis has significant effects in regulating various physiological processes and disease, such as ischemic brain injury, immune system disorders and cancer. In this review, the molecular mechanism of necroptosis is described and how it could be manipulated in the treatment of cancer is summarized.

  12. Differential Effects of Procaspase-3 Activating Compounds in the Induction of Cancer Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    West, Diana C.; Qin, Yan; Peterson, Quinn P.; Thomas, Diana L; Palchaudhuri, Rahul; Morrison, Karen C.; Lucas, Pamela W.; Palmer, Amy E.; Fan, Timothy M.; Hergenrother, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    The evasion of apoptosis is a key characteristic of cancer, and thus strategies to selectively induce apoptosis in cancer cells hold considerable promise in personalized anticancer therapy. Structurally similar procaspase activating compounds PAC-1 and S-PAC-1 restore procaspase-3 activity through the chelation of inhibitory zinc ions in vitro, induce apoptotic death of cancer cells in culture, and reduce tumor burden in vivo. IP or IV administrations of high doses of PAC-1 are transiently neurotoxic in vivo, while S-PAC-1 is safe even at very high doses and has been evaluated in a Phase I clinical trial of pet dogs with spontaneously occurring lymphoma. Here we show that PAC-1 and S-PAC-1 have similar mechanisms of cell death induction at low concentrations (less than 50 µM), but at high concentrations PAC-1 displays unique cell death induction features. Cells treated with a high concentration of PAC-1 have a distinctive gene expression profile, unusual cellular and mitochondrial morphology, and an altered intracellular Ca2+ concentration, indicative of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced apoptosis. These studies suggest strategies for anticancer clinical development, specifically bolus dosing for PAC-1 and continuous rate infusion for S-PAC-1. PMID:22486564

  13. Antisense bcl-2 treatment increases programmed cell death in non-small cell lung cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Koty, P P; Zhang, H; Levitt, M L

    1999-02-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a genetically regulated pathway that is altered in many cancers. This process is, in part, regulated by the ratio of PCD inducers (Bax) or inhibitors (Bcl-2). An abnormally high ratio of Bcl-2 to Bax prevents PCD, thus contributing to resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, many of which are capable of inducing PCD. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells demonstrate resistance to these PCD-inducing agents. If Bcl-2 prevents NSCLC cells from entering the PCD pathway, then reducing the amount of endogenous Bcl-2 product may allow these cells to spontaneously enter the PCD pathway. Our purpose was to determine the effects of bcl-2 antisense treatment on the levels of programmed cell death in NSCLC cells. First, we determined whether bcl-2 and bax mRNA were expressed in three morphologically distinct NSCLC cell lines: NCI-H226 (squamous), NCI-H358 (adenocarcinoma), and NCI-H596 (adenosquamous). Cells were then exposed to synthetic antisense bcl-2 oligonucleotide treatment, after which programmed cell death was determined, as evidenced by DNA fragmentation. Bcl-2 protein expression was detected immunohistochemically. All three NSCLC cell lines expressed both bcl-2 and bax mRNA and had functional PCD pathways. Synthetic antisense bcl-2 oligonucleotide treatment resulted in decreased Bcl-2 levels, reduced cell proliferation, decreased cell viability, and increased levels of spontaneous PCD. This represents the first evidence that decreasing Bcl-2 in three morphologically distinct NSCLC cell lines allows the cells to spontaneously enter a PCD pathway. It also indicates the potential therapeutic use of antisense bcl-2 in the treatment of NSCLC.

  14. Cytotoxic effects of two organotin compounds and their mode of inflicting cell death on four mammalian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Costanzo, Margaret; Carrasco, Yazmin P.; Pannell, Keith H.; Aguilera, Renato J.

    2011-01-01

    In this report, we have tested the cytotoxicity of two organotin (OT) compounds by flow cytometry on a panel of immortalized cancer cell lines of human and murine origin. Although the OT compounds exhibited varying levels of cytotoxicity, diphenylmethyltin chloride was more toxic than 1,4-bis (diphenylchlorostannyl)p-xylene on all cell lines tested. The OT compounds were found to be highly cytotoxic to lymphoma cell lines with lower toxicity toward the HeLa cervical cancer cell line. In order to discern the mechanism by which cell death was induced, additional experiments were conducted to monitor characteristic changes consistent with apoptosis and/or necrosis. Cell lines treated with the experimental compounds indicated that there was no consistent mode of cell death induction. However, both compounds induced apoptosis in the pro-B lymphocyte cell line, NFS-70. The work presented here also demonstrates that the two OT compounds possess selective cytotoxicity against distinct transformed cell lines. PMID:21069563

  15. Prostate Cancer Cell Telomere Length Variability and Stromal Cell Telomere Length as Prognostic Markers for Metastasis and Death

    PubMed Central

    Heaphy, Christopher M.; Yoon, Ghil Suk; Peskoe, Sarah B.; Joshu, Corinne E.; Lee, Thomas K.; Giovannucci, Edward; Mucci, Lorelei A.; Kenfield, Stacey A.; Stampfer, Meir J.; Hicks, Jessica L.; De Marzo, Angelo M.; Platz, Elizabeth A.; Meeker, Alan K.

    2013-01-01

    Current prognostic indicators are imperfect predictors of outcome in men with clinicallylocalized prostate cancer. Thus, tissue-based markers are urgently needed to improve treatment and surveillance decision-making. Given that shortened telomeres enhance chromosomal instability and such instability is a hallmark of metastatic lesions, we hypothesized that alterations in telomere length in the primary cancer would predict risk of progression to metastasis and prostate cancer death. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a prospective cohort study of 596 surgically treated men who participated in the ongoing Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Men who had the combination of more variable telomere length among prostate cancer cells (cell-to-cell) and shorter telomere length in prostate cancer-associated stromal cells were substantially more likely to progress to metastasis or die of their prostate cancer. These findings point to the translational potential of this telomere biomarker for prognostication and risk stratification for individualized therapeutic and surveillance strategies. PMID:23779129

  16. Fibroblast growth factor 8 increases breast cancer cell growth by promoting cell cycle progression and by protecting against cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsson, Emeli M.; Brokken, Leon J.S.; Haerkoenen, Pirkko L.

    2010-03-10

    Fibroblast growth factor 8 (FGF-8) is expressed in a large proportion of breast cancers, whereas its level in normal mammary gland epithelium is low. Previous studies have shown that FGF-8b stimulates breast cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. To explore the mechanisms by which FGF-8b promotes growth, we studied its effects on cell cycle regulatory proteins and signalling pathways in mouse S115 and human MCF-7 breast cancer cells. We also studied the effect of FGF-8b on cell survival. FGF-8b induced cell cycle progression and up-regulated particularly cyclin D1 mRNA and protein in S115 cells. Silencing cyclin D1 with siRNA inhibited most but not all FGF-8b-induced proliferation. Inhibition of the FGF-8b-activated ERK/MAPK pathway decreased FGF-8b-stimulated proliferation. Blocking the constitutively active PI3K/Akt and p38 MAPK pathways also lowered FGF-8b-induced cyclin D1 expression and proliferation. Corresponding results were obtained in MCF-7 cells. In S115 and MCF-7 mouse tumours, FGF-8b increased cyclin D1 and Ki67 levels. Moreover, FGF-8b opposed staurosporine-induced S115 cell death which effect was blocked by inhibiting the PI3K/Akt pathway but not the ERK/MAPK pathway. In conclusion, our results suggest that FGF-8b increases breast cancer cell growth both by stimulating cell cycle progression and by protecting against cell death.

  17. The alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonist terazosin induces prostate cancer cell death through a p53 and Rb independent pathway.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kexin; Wang, Xianghong; Ling, Patrick M T; Tsao, S W; Wong, Y C

    2003-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in men. Treatment failure in prostate cancer is usually due to the development of androgen independence and resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs at an advanced stage. Recently, it was reported that the alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonist terazosin was able to inhibit prostate cancer cell growth and indicated that it may have an implication in the treatment of prostate cancer. The aim of the present study was to investigate the mechanisms involved in terazosin-induced prostate cancer cell death using two androgen-independent cell lines, PC-3 and DU145. Our results showed that terazosin inhibited not only prostate cancer cell growth but also colony forming ability, which is the main target of chemotherapy. We also found that the sensitivity of these cells to terazosin was not affected by the presence of either functional p53 or Rb, suggesting that the terazosin-induced cell death was independent of p53 and Rb. However, the terazosin-induced cell death was associated with G1 phase cell cycle arrest and up-regulation of p27KIP1. In addition, up-regulation of Bax and down-regulation of Bcl-2 was also observed indicating that these two apoptotic regulators may play important roles in terazosin-mediated cell death pathway. Our results provide evidence for the first time that terazosin may have a therapeutic potential in the treatment of advanced prostate cancer.

  18. Ubenimex inhibits cell proliferation, migration and invasion by inhibiting the expression of APN and inducing autophagic cell death in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoqing; Niu, Zhihong; Jia, Yang; Cui, Meng; Han, Liping; Zhang, Yongfei; Liu, Zheng; Bi, Dongbin; Liu, Shuai

    2016-04-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most frequently diagnosed cancer in males worldwide and is commonly associated with metastasis. Moreover, in prostate cancer, aminopeptidase N (APN) expression is closely correlated with metastasis. Ubenimex, an APN inhibitor, is widely used as an adjunct therapy for cancer, enhancing the function of immunocompetent cells and conferring antitumor effects. However, due to the low expression of APN, it is rarely used to treat prostate cancer. Recently, the induction of autophagy as a molecular mechanism has been strongly connected with tumor cell death. Thus, we investigated whether ubenimex could inhibit cell proliferation, migration and invasion by downregulating APN expression to induce autophagic cell death in prostate cancer cells. The LNCaP and PC-3 cell lines were treated with different doses of ubenimex. Cell viability was measured using growth curve analysis and WST-8 proliferation assay. Autophagic cell death was assessed using fluorescence microscopy and acridine orange/ethidium bromide (AO/EB) staining. Protein expression was assessed by immunofluorescence and western blot analyses. Autophagosomes were evaluated using transmission electron microscopy. Wound-healing migration assays were performed to determine the migratory ability of the PC-3 cells. In addition, nude mice were used in the present study to examine PC-3 cell proliferation in vivo. The results revealed that APN expression differed between the metastatic and non-metastatic prostate cancer cells. In addition, ubenimex inhibited APN expression in the prostate cancer cells. Ubenimex increased prostate cancer cell death, as determined using the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) cytotoxicity assay. This effect was accompanied by increased levels of LC3B. Furthermore, ubenimex inhibited PC-3 cell proliferation in vivo and in vitro. Ubenimex inhibited the cell migration and invasion in prostate cancer cells by downregulating APN expression. Finally, ubenimex induced

  19. A unifying mechanism for cancer cell death through ion channel activation by HAMLET.

    PubMed

    Storm, Petter; Klausen, Thomas Kjaer; Trulsson, Maria; Ho C S, James; Dosnon, Marion; Westergren, Tomas; Chao, Yinxia; Rydström, Anna; Yang, Henry; Pedersen, Stine Falsig; Svanborg, Catharina

    2013-01-01

    Ion channels and ion fluxes control many aspects of tissue homeostasis. During oncogenic transformation, critical ion channel functions may be perturbed but conserved tumor specific ion fluxes remain to be defined. Here we used the tumoricidal protein-lipid complex HAMLET as a probe to identify ion fluxes involved in tumor cell death. We show that HAMLET activates a non-selective cation current, which reached a magnitude of 2.74±0.88 nA within 1.43±0.13 min from HAMLET application. Rapid ion fluxes were essential for HAMLET-induced carcinoma cell death as inhibitors (amiloride, BaCl2), preventing the changes in free cellular Na(+) and K(+) concentrations also prevented essential steps accompanying carcinoma cell death, including changes in morphology, uptake, global transcription, and MAP kinase activation. Through global transcriptional analysis and phosphorylation arrays, a strong ion flux dependent p38 MAPK response was detected and inhibition of p38 signaling delayed HAMLET-induced death. Healthy, differentiated cells were resistant to HAMLET challenge, which was accompanied by innate immunity rather than p38-activation. The results suggest, for the first time, a unifying mechanism for the initiation of HAMLET's broad and rapid lethal effect on tumor cells. These findings are particularly significant in view of HAMLET's documented therapeutic efficacy in human studies and animal models. The results also suggest that HAMLET offers a two-tiered therapeutic approach, killing cancer cells while stimulating an innate immune response in surrounding healthy tissues.

  20. Hernandezine, a novel AMPK activator induces autophagic cell death in drug-resistant cancers

    PubMed Central

    Law, Betty Yuen Kwan; Mok, Simon Wing Fai; Chan, Wai Kit; Xu, Su Wei; Wu, An Guo; Yao, Xiao Jun; Wang, Jing Rong; Liu, Liang; Wong, Vincent Kam Wai

    2016-01-01

    Drug resistance hinder most cancer chemotherapies and leads to disease recurrence and poor survival of patients. Resistance of cancer cells towards apoptosis is the major cause of these symptomatic behaviours. Here, we showed that isoquinoline alkaloids, including liensinine, isoliensinine, dauricine, cepharanthine and hernandezine, putatively induce cytotoxicity against a repertoire of cancer cell lines (HeLa, A549, MCF-7, PC3, HepG2, Hep3B and H1299). Proven by the use of apoptosis-resistant cellular models and autophagic assays, such isoquinoline alkaloid-induced cytotoxic effect involves energy- and autophagy-related gene 7 (Atg7)-dependent autophagy that resulted from direct activation of AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK). Hernandezine possess the highest efficacy in provoking such cell death when compared with other examined compounds. We confirmed that isoquinoline alkaloid is structurally varied from the existing direct AMPK activators. In conclusion, isoquinoline alkaloid is a new class of compound that induce autophagic cell death in drug-resistant fibroblasts or cancers by exhibiting its direct activation on AMPK. PMID:26811496

  1. Therapeutic strategies of drug repositioning targeting autophagy to induce cancer cell death: from pathophysiology to treatment.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Go J

    2017-03-09

    The 2016 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded to the researcher that discovered autophagy, which is an evolutionally conserved catabolic process which degrades cytoplasmic constituents and organelles in the lysosome. Autophagy plays a crucial role in both normal tissue homeostasis and tumor development and is necessary for cancer cells to adapt efficiently to an unfavorable tumor microenvironment characterized by hypo-nutrient conditions. This protein degradation process leads to amino acid recycling, which provides sufficient amino acid substrates for cellular survival and proliferation. Autophagy is constitutively activated in cancer cells due to the deregulation of PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway, which enables them to adapt to hypo-nutrient microenvironment and exhibit the robust proliferation at the pre-metastatic niche. That is why just the activation of autophagy with mTOR inhibitor often fails in vain. In contrast, disturbance of autophagy-lysosome flux leads to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and an unfolded protein response (UPR), which finally leads to increased apoptotic cell death in the tumor tissue. Accumulating evidence suggests that autophagy has a close relationship with programmed cell death, while uncontrolled autophagy itself often induces autophagic cell death in tumor cells. Autophagic cell death was originally defined as cell death accompanied by large-scale autophagic vacuolization of the cytoplasm. However, autophagy is a "double-edged sword" for cancer cells as it can either promote or suppress the survival and proliferation in the tumor microenvironment. Furthermore, several studies of drug re-positioning suggest that "conventional" agents used to treat diseases other than cancer can have antitumor therapeutic effects by activating/suppressing autophagy. Because of ever increasing failure rates and high cost associated with anticancer drug development, this therapeutic development strategy has attracted increasing

  2. Xylitol induces cell death in lung cancer A549 cells by autophagy.

    PubMed

    Park, Eunjoo; Park, Mi Hee; Na, Hee Sam; Chung, Jin

    2015-05-01

    Xylitol is a widely used anti-caries agent that has anti-inflammatory effects. We have evaluated the potential of xylitol in cancer treatment. It's effects on cell proliferation and cytotoxicity were measured by MTT assay and LDH assay. Cell morphology and autophagy were examined by immunostaining and immunoblotting. Xylitol inhibited cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner in these cancer cells: A549, Caki, NCI-H23, HCT-15, HL-60, K562, and SK MEL-2. The IC50 of xylitol in human gingival fibroblast cells was higher than in cancer cells, indicating that it is more specific for cancer cells. Moreover, xylitol induced autophagy in A549 cells that was inhibited by 3-methyladenine, an autophagy inhibitor. These results indicate that xylitol has potential in therapy against lung cancer by inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing autophagy of A549 cells.

  3. Induction of ferroptotic cell death for overcoming cisplatin resistance of head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Roh, Jong-Lyel; Kim, Eun Hye; Jang, Hye Jin; Park, Jin Young; Shin, Daiha

    2016-10-10

    Inhibition of key molecules related to ferroptosis, cystine/glutamate antiporter and glutathione peroxidase, may induce eradication of chemotherapy/radiotherapy-resistant cancer cells. The present study investigated whether ferroptosis could overcome head and neck cancer (HNC) resistance to cisplatin treatment. Three cisplatin-resistant HNC cell lines (AMC-HN3R, -HN4R, and -HN9R) and their parental lines were used. The effects of cystine and glutamate alteration and pharmacological and genetic inhibition of cystine/glutamate antiporter were assessed by measuring viability, death, reactive oxygen species production, protein expression, and preclinical mouse tumor xenograft models. Conditioned media with no cystine or glutamine excess induced ferroptosis of both cisplatin-sensitive and -resistant HNC cells without any apparent changes to necrosis and apoptosis markers. The cystine/glutamate antiporter inhibitors erastin and sulfasalazine inhibited HNC cell growth and accumulated lipid reactive oxygen species, thereby inducing ferroptosis. Genetic silencing of cystine/glutamate antiporter with siRNA or shRNA treatment also induced effective ferroptotic cell death of resistant HNC cells and enhanced the cisplatin cytotoxicity of resistant HNC cells. Pharmacological and genetic inhibition of cystine/glutamate antiporter significantly sensitized resistant HNC cells to cisplatin in vitro and in vivo. Pharmacological and genetic inhibition of cystine/glutamate antiporter overcomes the cisplatin resistance of HNC cells by inducing ferroptosis.

  4. Berberine inhibits cell growth and mediates caspase-independent cell death in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Pinto-Garcia, Lina; Efferth, Thomas; Torres, Amada; Hoheisel, Jörg D; Youns, Mahmoud

    2010-08-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive human malignancies with an increasing incidence worldwide. In addition to the poor survival rates, combinations using gemcitabine as a backbone have failed to show any benefit beyond monotherapy. These facts underscore an urgent need for novel therapeutic options and motivated us to study the effect of berberine on pancreatic cancer cells. Here, we undertook an mRNA-based gene expression profiling study in order to get deeper insight into the molecular targets mediating the growth inhibitory effects of berberine on pancreatic cancer cells compared to normal ones. Twenty-four hours after treatment, berberine showed preferential selectivity toward pancreatic cancer cells compared to normal ones. Moreover, expression profiling and Ingenuity pathway analysis results showed that the cytotoxicity of berberine was accompanied with an activation of BRCA1-mediated DNA damage response, G1/S and G2/M cell cycle checkpoint regulation, and P53 signalling pathways. The activation of these signalling pathways might be explained by the fact that berberine intercalates DNA and induces DNA strand break through inhibition of topoisomerases and induction of DNA lesions.

  5. From nature to bedside: pro-survival and cell death mechanisms as therapeutic targets in cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Cerella, Claudia; Teiten, Marie-Hélène; Radogna, Flavia; Dicato, Mario; Diederich, Marc

    2014-11-01

    Cell death is an important physiological regulator during development, tissue homeostasis and stress response but it is also a protective tumor suppressive mechanism. Tumor cells almost universally acquire the ability to evade cell death pathways that in normal cells act as a protective mechanism to remove damaged cells. As a result, a population of death-resistant cells with accumulating genetic and epigenetic abnormalities contributes to malignant transformation. Any alteration of the homeostatic balance between survival and death is therefore a critical factor in carcinogenesis. Several forms of cell death exist and cross talk among them is emerging; however, we still miss many molecular details. It becomes essential to revisit the role of each type of cell death to understand interconnections existing between different cell death pathways as well as the network of their mediators to eventually develop new effective strategies to kill cancer cells. More specifically, new therapies based on compounds selectively triggering apoptosis, necrosis or autophagy recently became both appealing and challenging. Despite the rather clear classification of the different cell death modalities according to morphological criteria and the attempt to describe them with distinct signaling pathways, the reality reveals a complex interplay between apoptosis, regulated necrosis and autophagy involving a heterogeneous mix of molecular mediators. Nature, presenting an almost endless plenitude of bioactive scaffolds, can efficiently contribute compounds that allow deciphering the intricate pathways of cell death pathways and thus eventually contribute to selectively target cancer-type specific pathways in an attempt to personalize cancer patient treatment depending on cancer death pathway specificities. The aim of this review is to provide first an overview of molecular cell death specificities and to highlight how compounds of natural origins, with or without hemisynthetic

  6. Dichloroacetate potentiates tamoxifen-induced cell death in breast cancer cells via downregulation of the epidermal growth factor receptor

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yoonhwa; Kim, Eun-Kyu; Seong, Min-Ki; Kim, Hyun-Ah; Song, Jie-Young; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Lee, Jin Kyung; Noh, Woo Chul; Park, In-Chul

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic reprogramming in cancer cells has recently been recognized as an essential hallmark of neoplasia. In this context, metabolic alterations represent an attractive therapeutic target, and encouraging results with drugs targeting various metabolic processes have been obtained in preclinical studies. Recently, several studies have suggested that dichloroacetate (DCA), a specific pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase inhibitor, may be a potential anticancer drug in a large number of diverse tumors. However, the precise mechanism is not fully understood, which is important for the use of DCA in cancer treatment. In the present study, we found that DCA sensitized MCF7 breast cancer cells to tamoxifen-induced cell death by decreasing epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression. The downregulation of EGFR was caused by degradation of the protein. Furthermore, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase played an important role in DCA/tamoxifen-induced EGFR degradation. Finally, DCA also promoted comparable tamoxifen-induced cell death in tamoxifen-resistant MCF7 cells, which were established by long-term treatment with tamoxifen. In summary, our results suggest that DCA is an attractive potential drug that sensitizes cells to tamoxifen-induced cell death and overcome tamoxifen resistance via downregulation of EGFR expression in breast cancer cells. PMID:27494858

  7. Melatonin enhances arsenic trioxide-induced cell death via sustained upregulation of Redd1 expression in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yun, Sun-Mi; Woo, Sang Hyeok; Oh, Sang Taek; Hong, Sung-Eun; Choe, Tae-Boo; Ye, Sang-Kyu; Kim, Eun-Kyu; Seong, Min Ki; Kim, Hyun-A; Noh, Woo Chul; Lee, Jin Kyung; Jin, Hyeon-Ok; Lee, Yun-Han; Park, In-Chul

    2016-02-15

    Melatonin is implicated in various physiological functions, including anticancer activity. However, the mechanism(s) of its anticancer activity is not well understood. In the present study, we investigated the combined effects of melatonin and arsenic trioxide (ATO) on cell death in human breast cancer cells. Melatonin enhanced the ATO-induced apoptotic cell death via changes in the protein levels of Survivin, Bcl-2, and Bax, thus affecting cytochrome c release from the mitochondria to the cytosol. Interestingly, we found that the cell death induced by co-treatment with melatonin and ATO was mediated by sustained upregulation of Redd1, which was associated with increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Combined treatment with melatonin and ATO induced the phosphorylation of JNK and p38 MAP kinase downstream from Redd1 expression. Rapamycin and S6K1 siRNA enhanced, while activation of mTORC1 by transfection with TSC2 siRNA suppressed the cell death induced by melatonin and ATO treatment. Taken together, our findings suggest that melatonin enhances ATO-induced apoptotic cell death via sustained upregulation of Redd1 expression and inhibition of mTORC1 upstream of the activation of the p38/JNK pathways in human breast cancer cells.

  8. Rhodiola crenulata induces death and inhibits growth of breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Tu, Yifan; Roberts, Louis; Shetty, Kalidas; Schneider, Sallie Smith

    2008-09-01

    Diverse compounds from many different chemical classes are currently targeted in preclinical analyses for their ability to act as both chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agents. Phenolic phytochemicals from Rhodiola crenulata has such potential. This Rhodiola species is a perennial plant that grows in the Tundra, Siberia, and high-elevation regions of Tibet. The phenolic secondary metabolites isolated from R. crenulata were recently analyzed in a preclinical setting for their ability to treat lymphosarcomas and superficial bladder cancers. However, the effects of R. crenulata have yet to be examined for its implications in breast cancer prevention or for its chemotherapeutic abilities. Therefore this study investigated the effects of R. crenulata on breast cancer both in vivo and in vitro. Experiments using aggressive human-derived MDA-MB-231 and mouse-derived V14 breast cancer cell lines demonstrated that phenolic-enriched R. crenulata extract was capable of inhibiting the proliferation, motility, and invasion of these cells. In addition, the extracts induced autophagic-like vesicles in all cell lines, eventually leading to death of the tumor cell lines but not the immortal or normal human mammary epithelial cells. Finally, an in vivo experiment showed that phenolic-enriched dietary R. crenulata is effective in preventing the initiation of tumors and slowing down the tumor growth in mice bearing tumor grafts, thereby further demonstrating its possible potential for treatment of breast cancer progression and metastasis.

  9. Phenotypic Reversion or Death of Cancer Cells by Altering Signaling Pathways in Three-Dimensional Contexts

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fei; Hansen, Rhonda K.; Radisky, Derek; Yoneda, Toshiyuki; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Petersen, Ole W.; Turley, Eva A.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2010-01-01

    Background We previously used a three-dimensional (3D) reconstituted basement membrane (rBM) assay to demonstrate that tumorigenic HMT-3522 T4–2 human breast cells can be induced to form morphologically normal structures (“reversion”) by treatment with inhibitors of β1 integrin, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), or mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). We have now used this assay to identify reversion and/or death requirements of several more aggressive human breast cancer cell lines. Methods Breast tumor cell lines MCF7, Hs578T, and MDA-MB-231 were cultured in 3D rBM and treated with inhibitors of β1 integrin, MAPK, or phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K). MDA-MB-231 cells, which lack E-cadherin, were transfected with an E-cadherin cDNA. The extent of reversion was assessed by changes in morphology and polarity, growth in 3D rBM or soft agar, level of invasiveness, and tumor formation in nude mice. Results All three cell lines showed partial reversion (MCF7 the greatest and Hs578T the least) of tumorigenic properties treated with a single β1 integrin, MAPK, or PI3K inhibitor. Combined inhibition of β1 integrin and either PI3K or MAPK resulted in nearly complete phenotypic reversion (MDA-MB-231, MCF7) or in cell death (Hs578T). E-cadherin-transfected MDA-MB-231 cells showed partial reversion, but exposure of the transfectants to an inhibitor of β1 integrin, PI3K, or MAPK led to nearly complete reversion. Conclusion The 3D rBM assay can be used to identify signaling pathways that, when manipulated in concert, can lead to the restoration of morphologically normal breast structures or to death of the tumor cells, even highly metastatic cells. This approach may be useful to design therapeutic intervention strategies for aggressive breast cancers. PMID:12359858

  10. Plumbagin sensitizes breast cancer cells to tamoxifen-induced cell death through GRP78 inhibition and Bik upregulation.

    PubMed

    Kawiak, Anna; Domachowska, Anna; Jaworska, Anna; Lojkowska, Ewa

    2017-03-13

    The glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP78) is a major chaperone of the endoplasmic reticulum, and a prosurvival component of the unfolded protein response. GRP78 is upregulated in many types of cancers, including breast cancer. Research has suggested that GRP78 overexpression confers chemoresistance to anti-estrogen agents through a mechanism involving the inhibition of a pro-apoptotic BH3-only protein, Bik. In the present research the role of plumbagin, a naturally occurring naphthoquinone, in GRP78-associated cell death inhibition was examined. The results demonstrated that plumbagin inhibits GRP78 activity and GRP78 inhibition contributes to plumbagin-mediated cell death induction. Furthermore, Bik upregulation was associated with plumbagin-induced cell death and an increase in plumbagin-mediated Bik induction was observed upon GRP78 downregulation. Plumbagin sensitized estrogen-positive breast cancer cells to tamoxifen and the association of GRP78 inhibition and Bik upregulation in plumbagin-mediated cell sensitization was shown. Collectively, the results of this research suggest that plumbagin inhibits the antiapoptotic activity of GRP78 leading to Bik upregulation and apoptosis induction, which contributes to the sensitization of breast cancer cells to tamoxifen.

  11. Plumbagin sensitizes breast cancer cells to tamoxifen-induced cell death through GRP78 inhibition and Bik upregulation

    PubMed Central

    Kawiak, Anna; Domachowska, Anna; Jaworska, Anna; Lojkowska, Ewa

    2017-01-01

    The glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP78) is a major chaperone of the endoplasmic reticulum, and a prosurvival component of the unfolded protein response. GRP78 is upregulated in many types of cancers, including breast cancer. Research has suggested that GRP78 overexpression confers chemoresistance to anti-estrogen agents through a mechanism involving the inhibition of a pro-apoptotic BH3-only protein, Bik. In the present research the role of plumbagin, a naturally occurring naphthoquinone, in GRP78-associated cell death inhibition was examined. The results demonstrated that plumbagin inhibits GRP78 activity and GRP78 inhibition contributes to plumbagin-mediated cell death induction. Furthermore, Bik upregulation was associated with plumbagin-induced cell death and an increase in plumbagin-mediated Bik induction was observed upon GRP78 downregulation. Plumbagin sensitized estrogen-positive breast cancer cells to tamoxifen and the association of GRP78 inhibition and Bik upregulation in plumbagin-mediated cell sensitization was shown. Collectively, the results of this research suggest that plumbagin inhibits the antiapoptotic activity of GRP78 leading to Bik upregulation and apoptosis induction, which contributes to the sensitization of breast cancer cells to tamoxifen. PMID:28287102

  12. Targeting Death Receptor TRAIL-R2 by Chalcones for TRAIL-Induced Apoptosis in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Szliszka, Ewelina; Jaworska, Dagmara; Kłósek, Małgorzata; Czuba, Zenon P.; Król, Wojciech

    2012-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) induces apoptosis in cancer cells without toxicity to normal cells. TRAIL binds to death receptors, TRAIL-R1 (DR4) and TRAIL-R2 (DR5) expressed on cancer cell surface and activates apoptotic pathways. Endogenous TRAIL plays an important role in immune surveillance and defense against cancer cells. However, as more tumor cells are reported to be resistant to TRAIL mediated death, it is important to search for and develop new strategies to overcome this resistance. Chalcones can sensitize cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. We examined the cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of TRAIL in combination with four chalcones: chalcone, isobavachalcone, licochalcone A and xanthohumol on HeLa cancer cells. The cytotoxicity was measured by MTT and LDH assays. The apoptosis was detected using annexin V-FITC staining by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Death receptor expression was analyzed using flow cytometry. The decreased expression of death receptors in cancer cells may be the cause of TRAIL-resistance. Chalcones enhance TRAIL-induced apoptosis in HeLa cells through increased expression of TRAIL-R2. Our study has indicated that chalcones augment the antitumor activity of TRAIL and confirm their cancer chemopreventive properties. PMID:23203129

  13. Dead Cert: Measuring Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Lisa C; Marfell, Brooke J; Scott, Adrian P; Boughaba, Jeanne A; Chojnowski, Grace; Christensen, Melinda E; Waterhouse, Nigel J

    2016-12-01

    Many cells in the body die at specific times to facilitate healthy development or because they have become old, damaged, or infected. Defects in cells that result in their inappropriate survival or untimely death can negatively impact development or contribute to a variety of human pathologies, including cancer, AIDS, autoimmune disorders, and chronic infection. Cell death may also occur following exposure to environmental toxins or cytotoxic chemicals. Although this is often harmful, it can be beneficial in some cases, such as in the treatment of cancer. The ability to objectively measure cell death in a laboratory setting is therefore essential to understanding and investigating the causes and treatments of many human diseases and disorders. Often, it is sufficient to know the extent of cell death in a sample; however, the mechanism of death may also have implications for disease progression, treatment, and the outcomes of experimental investigations. There are a myriad of assays available for measuring the known forms of cell death, including apoptosis, necrosis, autophagy, necroptosis, anoikis, and pyroptosis. Here, we introduce a range of assays for measuring cell death in cultured cells, and we outline basic techniques for distinguishing healthy cells from apoptotic or necrotic cells-the two most common forms of cell death. We also provide personal insight into where these assays may be useful and how they may or may not be used to distinguish apoptotic cell death from other death modalities.

  14. Functionalized magnetic nanowires for chemical and magneto-mechanical induction of cancer cell death

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Banderas, Aldo Isaac; Aires, Antonio; Teran, Francisco J.; Perez, Jose Efrain; Cadenas, Jael F.; Alsharif, Nouf; Ravasi, Timothy; Cortajarena, Aitziber L.; Kosel, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Exploiting and combining different properties of nanomaterials is considered a potential route for next generation cancer therapies. Magnetic nanowires (NWs) have shown good biocompatibility and a high level of cellular internalization. We induced cancer cell death by combining the chemotherapeutic effect of doxorubicin (DOX)-functionalized iron NWs with the mechanical disturbance under a low frequency alternating magnetic field. (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were separately used for coating NWs allowing further functionalization with DOX. Internalization was assessed for both formulations by confocal reflection microscopy and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. From confocal analysis, BSA formulations demonstrated higher internalization and less agglomeration. The functionalized NWs generated a comparable cytotoxic effect in breast cancer cells in a DOX concentration-dependent manner, (~60% at the highest concentration tested) that was significantly different from the effect produced by free DOX and non-functionalized NWs formulations. A synergistic cytotoxic effect is obtained when a magnetic field (1 mT, 10 Hz) is applied to cells treated with DOX-functionalized BSA or APTES-coated NWs, (~70% at the highest concentration). In summary, a bimodal method for cancer cell destruction was developed by the conjugation of the magneto-mechanical properties of iron NWs with the effect of DOX producing better results than the individual effects. PMID:27775082

  15. Functionalized magnetic nanowires for chemical and magneto-mechanical induction of cancer cell death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Banderas, Aldo Isaac; Aires, Antonio; Teran, Francisco J.; Perez, Jose Efrain; Cadenas, Jael F.; Alsharif, Nouf; Ravasi, Timothy; Cortajarena, Aitziber L.; Kosel, Jürgen

    2016-10-01

    Exploiting and combining different properties of nanomaterials is considered a potential route for next generation cancer therapies. Magnetic nanowires (NWs) have shown good biocompatibility and a high level of cellular internalization. We induced cancer cell death by combining the chemotherapeutic effect of doxorubicin (DOX)-functionalized iron NWs with the mechanical disturbance under a low frequency alternating magnetic field. (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were separately used for coating NWs allowing further functionalization with DOX. Internalization was assessed for both formulations by confocal reflection microscopy and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. From confocal analysis, BSA formulations demonstrated higher internalization and less agglomeration. The functionalized NWs generated a comparable cytotoxic effect in breast cancer cells in a DOX concentration-dependent manner, (~60% at the highest concentration tested) that was significantly different from the effect produced by free DOX and non-functionalized NWs formulations. A synergistic cytotoxic effect is obtained when a magnetic field (1 mT, 10 Hz) is applied to cells treated with DOX-functionalized BSA or APTES-coated NWs, (~70% at the highest concentration). In summary, a bimodal method for cancer cell destruction was developed by the conjugation of the magneto-mechanical properties of iron NWs with the effect of DOX producing better results than the individual effects.

  16. The MOC31PE immunotoxin reduces cell migration and induces gene expression and cell death in ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The standard treatment of ovarian cancer with chemotherapy often leads to drug resistance and relapse of the disease, and the need for development of novel therapy alternatives is obvious. The MOC31PE immunotoxin binds to the cell surface antigen EpCAM, which is expressed by the majority of epithelial cancers including ovarian carcinomas, and we studied the cytotoxic effects of MOC31PE in ovarian cancer cells. Methods Investigation of the effects of MOC31PE treatment on protein synthesis, cell viability, proliferation and gene expression of the ovarian cancer cell lines B76 and HOC7. Results MOC31PE treatment for 24 h caused a dose-dependent reduction of protein synthesis with ID50 values of less than 10 ng/ml, followed by reduced cell viability. In a gene expression array monitoring the expression of 84 key genes in cancer pathways, 13 of the genes were differentially expressed by MOC31PE treatment in comparison to untreated cells. By combining MOC31PE and the immune suppressor cyclosporin A (CsA) the MOC31PE effect on protein synthesis inhibition and cell viability increased tenfold. Cell migration was also reduced, both in the individual MOC31PE and CsA treatment, but even more when combining MOC31PE and CsA. In tumor metastasis PCR arrays, 23 of 84 genes were differentially expressed comparing CsA versus MOC31PE + CsA treatment. Increased expression of the tumor suppressor KISS1 and the nuclear receptor NR4A3 was observed, and the differential candidate gene expression was confirmed in complementary qPCR analyses. For NR4A3 this was not accompanied by increased protein expression. However, a subcellular fractionation assay revealed increased mitochondrial NR4A3 in MOC31PE treated cells, suggesting a role for this protein in MOC31PE-induced apoptotic cell death. Conclusion The present study demonstrates that MOC31PE may become a new targeted therapy for ovarian cancer and that the MOC31PE anti-cancer effect is potentiated by CsA. PMID:24528603

  17. Salinomycin induces cell death with autophagy through activation of endoplasmic reticulum stress in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Tianliang; Su, Ling; Zhong, Ning; Hao, Xuexi; Zhong, Diansheng; Singhal, Sunil; Liu, Xiangguo

    2013-07-01

    Salinomycin is perhaps the first promising compound that was discovered through high throughput screening in cancer stem cells. This novel agent can selectively eliminate breast and other cancer stem cells, though the mechanism of action remains unclear. In this study, we found that salinomycin induced autophagy in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that salinomycin stimulated endoplasmic reticulum stress and mediated autophagy via the ATF4-DDIT3/CHOP-TRIB3-AKT1-MTOR axis. Moreover, we found that the autophagy induced by salinomycin played a prosurvival role in human NSCLC cells and attenuated the apoptotic cascade. We also showed that salinomycin triggered more apoptosis and less autophagy in A549 cells in which CDH1 expression was inhibited, suggesting that the inhibition of autophagy might represent a promising strategy to target cancer stem cells. In conclusion, these findings provide evidence that combination treatment with salinomycin and pharmacological autophagy inhibitors will be an effective therapeutic strategy for eliminating cancer cells as well as cancer stem cells.

  18. Chinese medicine formula "Weikang Keli" induces autophagic cell death on human gastric cancer cell line SGC-7901.

    PubMed

    Huo, Jiege; Qin, Fengxia; Cai, Xueting; Ju, Jianming; Hu, Chunping; Wang, Zhigang; Lu, Wuguang; Wang, Xiaoning; Cao, Peng

    2013-01-15

    Weikang Keli (constitutes of Root of Codonopsis pilosula, Rhizoma Atractylodis Macrocephalae, Rhizoma Curcumae Aeruginosae, Rhizoma Pinelliae, Actinidia chinensis Planch, and Rhodiola rosea) is a well known Chinese herbal formula for gastric cancer therapy in clinical treatment. However, the detailed molecular mechanisms involved are still not fully understood. In this study, we found that Weikang Keli could induce patterns of autophagy in SGC-7901 cells, including intracellular vacuole formation, microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) conversion. Hoechst 33258 staining and Western blot analysis of apoptosis-related proteins showed that WK induced SGC-7901 cell death was not through apoptosis. In vivo study also revealed that i.g. administration of Weikang Keli once a day for 25 days could significantly reduce tumor volumes by about 50%. Collectively, the current data indicated that Weikang Keli induced gastric cancer cell death by autophagy effects.

  19. MIR506 induces autophagy-related cell death in pancreatic cancer cells by targeting the STAT3 pathway.

    PubMed

    Sun, Longhao; Hu, Limei; Cogdell, David; Lu, Li; Gao, Chao; Tian, Weijun; Zhang, Zhixiang; Kang, Ya'an; Fleming, Jason B; Zhang, Wei

    2017-04-03

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the most aggressive and lethal cancer. The role of autophagy in the pathobiology of PDAC is intricate, with opposing functions manifested in different cellular contexts. MIR506 functions as a tumor suppressor in many cancer types through the regulation of multiple pathways. In this study, we hypothesized that MIR506 exerted a tumor suppression function in PDAC by inducing autophagy-related cell death. Our results provided evidence that downregulation of MIR506 expression was associated with disease progression in human PDAC. MIR506 triggered autophagic flux in PDAC cells, which led to autophagy-related cell death through direct targeting of the STAT3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3)-BCL2-BECN1 axis. Silencing and inhibiting STAT3 recapitulated the effects of MIR506, whereas forced expression of STAT3 abrogated the effects of MIR506. We propose that the apoptosis-inhibitory protein BCL2, which also inhibits induction of autophagy by blocking BECN1, was inhibited by MIR506 through targeting STAT3, thus augmenting BECN1 and promoting autophagy-related cell death. Silencing BECN1 and overexpression of BCL2 abrogated the effects of MIR506. These findings expand the known mechanisms of MIR506-mediated tumor suppression to activation of autophagy-related cell death and suggest a strategy for using MIR506 as an anti-STAT3 approach to PDAC treatment.

  20. Lipoic acid induces p53-independent cell death in colorectal cancer cells and potentiates the cytotoxicity of 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Dörsam, Bastian; Göder, Anja; Seiwert, Nina; Kaina, Bernd; Fahrer, Jörg

    2015-10-01

    Alpha-lipoic acid (LA), which plays a pivotal role in mitochondrial energy metabolism, is an endogenous dithiol compound with an array of antioxidative functions. It has been shown that LA triggers cell death in tumor cell lines, whereas non-transformed cells are hardly affected. In the present study, we analyzed the cytotoxicity of LA on colorectal cancer (CRC) cells differing in their p53 status and investigated a putative synergistic effect with the anticancer drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). We show that LA induces a dose-dependent decrease in cell viability, which was independent of the p53 status as attested in isogenic p53-proficient and p53-deficient cell lines. This effect was largely attributable to cell death induction as revealed by Annexin-V/PI staining. LA-treated HCT116 cells underwent caspase-dependent and caspase-independent cell death, which was blocked by the pan-caspase inhibitor zVAD and the RIP-kinase inhibitor Necrostatin-1, respectively. In CaCO-2 and HT29 cells, LA induced caspase-dependent cell demise via activation of caspase-9, caspase-3 and caspase-7 with subsequent PARP-1 cleavage as demonstrated by immunoblot analysis, activity assays and pan-caspase inhibition. Interestingly, LA treatment did neither activate p53 nor induced genotoxic effects as shown by lack of DNA strand breaks and phosphorylation of histone 2AX. Finally, we provide evidence that LA increases the cytotoxic effect induced by the anticancer drug 5-FU as revealed by significantly enhanced cell death rates in HCT116 and CaCO-2 cells. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that LA induces CRC cell death independent of their p53 status and potentiates the cytotoxicity of 5-FU without causing DNA damage on its own, which makes it a candidate for tumor therapy.

  1. Theracurmin® efficiently inhibits the growth of human prostate and bladder cancer cells via induction of apoptotic cell death and cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Kang, Minyong; Ho, Jin-Nyoung; Kook, Ha Rim; Lee, Sangchul; Oh, Jong Jin; Hong, Sung Kyu; Lee, Sang Eun; Byun, Seok-Soo

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, we aimed to investigate the anticancer properties of Theracurmin®, a novel form of the yellow curry pigment curcumin, as well as explore the molecular mechanisms of the potential anticancer effects of Theracurmin® on human prostate cancer and bladder cancer cells in vitro. The proliferation of cancer cells was examined by using the Cell Counting Kit-8. The clonogenic growth potential was determined by clonogenic assay. Cell cycle distribution was evaluated by flow cytometry using propidium iodide staining. Western blot analysis was applied to explore the expression patterns of molecules associated with apoptotic cell death and cell cycle checkpoint. We noted that Theracurmin® and curcumin exhibited similar anticancer effects in both androgen-dependent and -independent human prostate cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. These agents reduced cell viability and clonogenic growth potential by inducing apoptosis and cell cycle disturbance in human prostate cancer cells. Theracurmin® and curcumin also exerted marked anticancer effects on human bladder cancer cells, even in cisplatin-resistant T24R2 cells, in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Moreover, Theracurmin® and curcumin treatment decreased cell viability and clonogenicity via induction of apoptotic cell death and cell cycle dysregulation in human bladder cancer cells. In conclusion, our study suggests that Theracurmin® has potential as an anticancer agent in complementary and alternative medicine for these urological cancers.

  2. Huaier Extract Induces Autophagic Cell Death by Inhibiting the mTOR/S6K Pathway in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yaming; Zhang, Ning; Dong, Lun; Sun, Mingjuan; Cun, Jinjing; Zhang, Yan; Lv, Shangge; Yang, Qifeng

    2015-01-01

    Huaier extract is attracting increased attention due to its biological activities, including antitumor, anti-parasite and immunomodulatory effects. Here, we investigated the role of autophagy in Huaier-induced cytotoxicity in MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468 and MCF7 breast cancer cells. Huaier treatment inhibited cell viability in all three cell lines and induced various large membranous vacuoles in the cytoplasm. In addition, electron microscopy, MDC staining, accumulated expression of autophagy markers and flow cytometry revealed that Huaier extract triggered autophagy. Inhibition of autophagy attenuated Huaier-induced cell death. Furthermore, Huaier extract inhibited the mammalian target of the rapamycin (mTOR)/S6K pathway in breast cancer cells. After implanting MDA-MB-231 cells subcutaneously into the right flank of BALB/c nu/nu mice, Huaier extract induced autophagy and effectively inhibited xenograft tumor growth. This study is the first to show that Huaier-induced cytotoxicity is partially mediated through autophagic cell death in breast cancer cells through suppression of the mTOR/S6K pathway. PMID:26134510

  3. Inhibition of never in mitosis A (NIMA)-related kinase-4 reduces survivin expression and sensitizes cancer cells to TRAIL-induced cell death

    PubMed Central

    Park, So Jung; Jo, Doo Sin; Jo, Se-Young; Shin, Dong Woon; Shim, Sangmi; Jo, Yoon Kyung; Shin, Ji Hyun; Ha, Ye Jin; Jeong, Seong-Yun; Hwang, Jung Jin; Kim, Young Sam; Suh, Young-Ah; Chang, Jong Wook; Kim, Jin Cheon; Cho, Dong-Hyung

    2016-01-01

    The tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) preferentially induces apoptosis in cancer cells. However, many tumors are resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis, and resistance mechanisms are not fully understood. To identify novel regulatory molecules of TRAIL resistance, we screened a siRNA library targeting the human kinome, and NEK4 (NIMA-related kinase-4) was identified. Knockdown of NEK4 sensitized TRAIL-resistant cancer cells and in vivo xenografts to cell death. In contrast, over expression of NEK4 suppressed TRAIL-induced cell death in TRAIL-sensitive cancer cells. In addition, loss of NEK4 resulted in decrease of the anti-apoptotic protein survivin, but an increase in apoptotic cell death. Interestingly, NEK4 was highly upregulated in tumor tissues derived from patients with lung cancer and colon cancer. These results suggest that inhibition of NEK4 sensitizes cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis by regulation of survivin expression. PMID:27602754

  4. Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation controls cancer cell's life and death decisions upon exposure to MAPK inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Corazao-Rozas, Paola; Guerreschi, Pierre; André, Fanny; Gabert, Pierre-Elliott; Lancel, Steve; Dekiouk, Salim; Fontaine, Delphine; Tardivel, Meryem; Savina, Ariel; Quesnel, Bruno; Mortier, Laurent; Marchetti, Philippe; Kluza, Jérome

    2016-06-28

    Although MAPK pathway inhibitors are becoming a promising anticancer strategy, they are insufficient to fully eliminate cancer cells and their long-term efficacy is strikingly limited in patients with BRAF-mutant melanomas. It is well established that BRAF inhibitors (BRAFi) hamper glucose uptake before the apparition of cell death. Here, we show that BRAFi induce an extensive restructuring of mitochondria including an increase in mitochondrial activity and biogenesis associated with mitochondrial network remodeling. Furthermore, we report a close interaction between ER and mitochondria in melanoma exposed to BRAFi. This physical connection facilitates mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake after its release from the ER. Interestingly, Mfn2 silencing disrupts the ER-mitochondria interface, intensifies ER stress and exacerbates ER stress-induced apoptosis in cells exposed to BRAFi in vitro and in vivo. This mitochondrial control of ER stress-mediated cell death is similar in both BRAF- and NRAS-mutant melanoma cells exposed to MEK inhibitors. This evidence reinforces the relevance in combining MAPK pathway inhibitors with mitochondriotropic drugs to improve targeted therapies.

  5. Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation controls cancer cell's life and death decisions upon exposure to MAPK inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    André, Fanny; Gabert, Pierre-Elliott; Lancel, Steve; Dekiouk, Salim; Fontaine, Delphine; Tardivel, Meryem; Savina, Ariel; Quesnel, Bruno; Mortier, Laurent; Marchetti, Philippe; Kluza, Jérome

    2016-01-01

    Although MAPK pathway inhibitors are becoming a promising anticancer strategy, they are insufficient to fully eliminate cancer cells and their long-term efficacy is strikingly limited in patients with BRAF-mutant melanomas. It is well established that BRAF inhibitors (BRAFi) hamper glucose uptake before the apparition of cell death. Here, we show that BRAFi induce an extensive restructuring of mitochondria including an increase in mitochondrial activity and biogenesis associated with mitochondrial network remodeling. Furthermore, we report a close interaction between ER and mitochondria in melanoma exposed to BRAFi. This physical connection facilitates mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake after its release from the ER. Interestingly, Mfn2 silencing disrupts the ER–mitochondria interface, intensifies ER stress and exacerbates ER stress-induced apoptosis in cells exposed to BRAFi in vitro and in vivo. This mitochondrial control of ER stress-mediated cell death is similar in both BRAF- and NRAS-mutant melanoma cells exposed to MEK inhibitors. This evidence reinforces the relevance in combining MAPK pathway inhibitors with mitochondriotropic drugs to improve targeted therapies. PMID:27250023

  6. Characterization of Breast Cancer Cell Death Induced by Interferons and Retinoids.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-07-01

    responses in several human tumor cells. In particular this combination induces cell death similar to apoptosis in vitro, which could not be observed with...individual agents. Preliminary studies identified no changes in the levels of known regulators of cell death such as p53, cyclin D and Bc12. Thus it...products that mediate the growth inhibitory/ cell death inducing activities of the combination of IFN and RA in human tumor cells. To directly identify these

  7. Characterization of Breast Cancer Cell Death induced by interferons and Retinoids.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-07-01

    earlier that IFNBeta/RA combination causes cell death of human breast carcinoma cells. Since we could not find a correlation between expression of known...regulators and cell death , we employed the antisense technical knock-out strategy to isolate genes that participate in IFN/RA induced pathways. We...episomal vector pTKO1. Following transfection of these libraries the breast tumor cells were selected for resistance to IFN/RA induced cell death . Using

  8. Niacin alleviates TRAIL-mediated colon cancer cell death via autophagy flux activation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Wook; Lee, Ju-Hee; Moon, Ji-Hong; Nazim, Uddin M.D.; Lee, You-Jin; Seol, Jae-Won; Hur, Jin; Eo, Seong-Kug; Lee, John-Hwa; Park, Sang-Youel

    2016-01-01

    Niacin, also known as vitamin B3 or nicotinamide is a water-soluble vitamin that is present in black beans and rice among other foods. Niacin is well known as an inhibitor of metastasis in human breast carcinoma cells but the effect of niacin treatment on TRAIL-mediated apoptosis is unknown. Here, we show that niacin plays an important role in the regulation of autophagic flux and protects tumor cells against TRAIL-mediated apoptosis. Our results indicated that niacin activated autophagic flux in human colon cancer cells and the autophagic flux activation protected tumor cells from TRAIL-induced dysfunction of mitochondrial membrane potential and tumor cell death. We also demonstrated that ATG5 siRNA and autophagy inhibitor blocked the niacin-mediated inhibition of TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Taken together, our study is the first report demonstrating that niacin inhibits TRAIL-induced apoptosis through activation of autophagic flux in human colon cancer cells. And our results also suggest that autophagy inhibitors including genetic and pharmacological tools may be a successful therapeutics during anticancer therapy using TRAIL. PMID:26517672

  9. 3-Bromopyruvate induces rapid human prostate cancer cell death by affecting cell energy metabolism, GSH pool and the glyoxalase system.

    PubMed

    Valenti, Daniela; Vacca, Rosa A; de Bari, Lidia

    2015-12-01

    3-bromopyruvate (3-BP) is an anti-tumour drug effective on hepatocellular carcinoma and other tumour cell types, which affects both glycolytic and mitochondrial targets, depleting cellular ATP pool. Here we tested 3-BP on human prostate cancer cells showing, differently from other tumour types, efficient ATP production and functional mitochondrial metabolism. We found that 3-BP rapidly induced cultured androgen-insensitive (PC-3) and androgen-responsive (LNCaP) prostate cancer cell death at low concentrations (IC(50) values of 50 and 70 μM, respectively) with a multimodal mechanism of action. In particular, 3-BP-treated PC-3 cells showed a selective, strong reduction of glyceraldeide 3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity, due to the direct interaction of the drug with the enzyme. Moreover, 3-BP strongly impaired both glutamate/malate- and succinate-dependent mitochondrial respiration, membrane potential generation and ATP synthesis, concomitant with the inhibition of respiratory chain complex I, II and ATP synthase activities. The drastic reduction of cellular ATP levels and depletion of GSH pool, associated with significant increase in cell oxidative stress, were found after 3-BP treatment of PC-3 cells. Interestingly, the activity of both glyoxalase I and II, devoted to the elimination of the cytotoxic methylglyoxal, was strongly inhibited by 3-BP. Both N-acetylcysteine and aminoguanidine, GSH precursor and methylglyoxal scavenger, respectively, prevented 3-BP-induced PC-3 cell death, showing that impaired cell antioxidant and detoxifying capacities are crucial events leading to cell death. The provided information on the multi-target cytotoxic action of 3-BP, finally leading to PC-3 cell necrosis, might be useful for future development of 3-BP as a therapeutic option for prostate cancer treatment.

  10. Whole cell vaccination using immunogenic cell death by an oncolytic adenovirus is effective against a colorectal cancer model

    PubMed Central

    Yamano, Tomoki; Kubo, Shuji; Fukumoto, Miki; Yano, Aya; Mawatari-Furukawa, Yuki; Okamura, Haruki; Tomita, Naohiro

    2016-01-01

    Cancer vaccine application is limited to specific cancer types because few cancer-associated antigens are known to induce tumor rejection. Accordingly, we assessed the utility of Ad881, an oncolytic adenovirus in which viral replication was strictly regulated by the cancer-specific midkine promoter, as a cancer vaccine in a murine colorectal cancer model lacking specific cancer-associated antigens. In CT26 and CMT93 cells, Ad881 (multiplicity of infection: 100 or 1,000) showed stronger cytotoxicity and oncolysis in vitro than its equivalent replication-defective adenovirus, Ad884. CT26 cells (1 × 104) infected with Ad881 (multiplicity of infection: 1,000) for 24 hours were suitable as vaccine antigens without tumor formation in our model. Repeated vaccinations, but not single vaccination, induced a greater prophylactic immune response. The percentage of mice that rejected the tumor challenge was 0, 4, and 38% after no vaccination, single vaccination, and repeated vaccinations, respectively. Immunogenic cell death marker high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) and adenosine triphosphate in culture medium were higher after Ad881 infection (24.3 ng/ml and 48.2 nmol/l, respectively) than after Ad884 infection (8.6 ng/ml and 15.4 nmol/l, respectively) or oxaliplatin treatment (3.7 ng/ml and 1.8 nmol/l, respectively). These results indicate that repeated whole cell vaccination using an oncolytic adenovirus may be a potent approach to evoke immunogenic cell death. PMID:28035331

  11. HuR's post-transcriptional regulation of Death Receptor 5 in pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Pineda, Danielle M; Rittenhouse, David W; Valley, Christopher C; Cozzitorto, Joseph A; Burkhart, Richard A; Leiby, Benjamin; Winter, Jordan M; Weber, Matthew C; Londin, Eric R; Rigoutsos, Isidore; Yeo, Charles J; Gorospe, Myriam; Witkiewicz, Agnieska K; Sachs, Jonathan N; Brody, Jonathan R

    2012-08-01

    Apoptosis is one of the core signaling pathways disrupted in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA). Death receptor 5 (DR5) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-receptor superfamily that is expressed in cancer cells. Binding of TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) to DR5 is a potent trigger of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway, and numerous clinical trials are based on DR5-targeted therapies for cancer, including PDA. Human antigen R (HuR), an RNA-binding protein, regulates a select number of transcripts under stress conditions. Here we report that HuR translocates from the nucleus to the cytoplasm of PDA cells upon treatment with a DR5 agonist. High doses of DR5 agonist induce cleavage of both HuR and caspase 8. HuR binds to DR5 mRNA at the 5'-untranslated region (UTR) in PDA cells in response to different cancer-associated stressors and subsequently represses DR5 protein expression; silencing HuR augments DR5 protein production by enabling its translation and thus enhances apoptosis. In PDA specimens (n = 53), negative HuR cytoplasmic expression correlated with elevated DR5 expression (odds ratio 16.1, p < 0.0001). Together, these data demonstrate a feedback mechanism elicited by HuR-mediated repression of the key apoptotic membrane protein DR5.

  12. Breast cancer cells evade paclitaxel-induced cell death by developing resistance to dasatinib

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Yun-Ji; Kang, Jong Soon; Lee, Su In; So, Dong Min; Yun, Jieun; Baek, Ji Young; Kim, Sang Kyum; Lee, Kiho; Park, Song-Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), which does not express the progesterone, estrogen, or HER2/neu receptor, is aggressive and difficult to treat. Paclitaxel, a tubulin stabilizing agent, is one of the most frequently prescribed anticancer agents for breast cancers, including TNBC. Residual disease that occurs due to resistance or partial resistance of cancer cells in a tumor against anticancer agents is the most important issue in oncology. In the present study, when MDA-MB-231 cells, a TNBC cell line, were treated with 30 µM paclitaxel, a slightly higher concentration than its GI50 value, for 6 days, a small number of cells with different morphologies survived. Among the surviving cells, small round cells were isolated, cloned, and named MDA-MB-231-JYJ cells. MDA-MB-231-JYJ cells were observed to be highly proliferative and tumorigenic. In addition, signal transduction molecules involved in proliferation, survival, malignancy, or stemness of cancer cells, such as c-Src, c-Met, Notch 1, c-Myc, Sox2, Oct3/4, Nanog, and E-cadherin were highly expressed or activated. While further study is required, MDA-MB-231-JYJ cells appear to have some of the characteristics of cancer precursor cells. Although MDA-MB-231-JYJ cells were isolated from the cells that survived in the continuous presence of paclitaxel, they were not resistant to paclitaxel but developed resistance to dasatinib, a Bcr-Abl and Src kinase family inhibitor. The activated state of Src and Notch 1, and the expression levels of c-Myc and cyclins in MDA-MB-231-JYJ cells were less affected than MDA-MB-231 cells by the treatment of dasatinib, which may explain the resistance of MDA-MB-231-JYJ cells to dasatinib. These results suggest that cancer cells that become resistant to dasatinib during the process of paclitaxel therapy in patients may appear, and caution is required in the design of clinical trials using these two agents. PMID:27602155

  13. Targeting the Immune System’s Natural Response to Cell Death to Improve Therapeutic Response in Breast Cancers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-13-1-0158 TITLE: Targeting the Immune System’s Natural Response to Cell Death to Improve Therapeutic Response in Breast...Targeting the Immune System’s Natural Response to Cell Death to 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0158 Improve Therapeutic Response in Breast Cancers 5b...Appendix 1, Supplemental Figure S5E) E. Widespread cell death during post-partum involution induces M2 macrophage polarization, but this is blocked by

  14. 6-Shogaol Inhibits Breast Cancer Cells and Stem Cell-Like Spheroids by Modulation of Notch Signaling Pathway and Induction of Autophagic Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Ray, Anasuya; Vasudevan, Smreti; Sengupta, Suparna

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) pose a serious obstacle to cancer therapy as they can be responsible for poor prognosis and tumour relapse. In this study, we have investigated inhibitory activity of the ginger-derived compound 6-shogaol against breast cancer cells both in monolayer and in cancer-stem cell-like spheroid culture. The spheroids were generated from adherent breast cancer cells. 6-shogaol was effective in killing both breast cancer monolayer cells and spheroids at doses that were not toxic to noncancerous cells. The percentages of CD44+CD24-/low cells and the secondary sphere content were reduced drastically upon treatment with 6-shogaol confirming its action on CSCs. Treatment with 6-shogaol caused cytoplasmic vacuole formation and cleavage of microtubule associated protein Light Chain3 (LC3) in both monolayer and spheroid culture indicating that it induced autophagy. Kinetic analysis of the LC3 expression and a combination treatment with chloroquine revealed that the autophagic flux instigated cell death in 6-shogaol treated breast cancer cells in contrast to the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine. Furthermore, 6-shogaol-induced cell death got suppressed in the presence of chloroquine and a very low level of apoptosis was exhibited even after prolonged treatment of the compound, suggesting that autophagy is the major mode of cell death induced by 6-shogaol in breast cancer cells. 6-shogaol reduced the expression levels of Cleaved Notch1 and its target proteins Hes1 and Cyclin D1 in spheroids, and the reduction was further pronounced in the presence of a γ-secretase inhibitor. Secondary sphere formation in the presence of the inhibitor was also further reduced by 6-shogaol. Together, these results indicate that the inhibitory action of 6-shogaol on spheroid growth and sustainability is conferred through γ-secretase mediated down-regulation of Notch signaling. The efficacy of 6-shogaol in monolayer and cancer stem cell-like spheroids raise hope for its

  15. 6-Shogaol Inhibits Breast Cancer Cells and Stem Cell-Like Spheroids by Modulation of Notch Signaling Pathway and Induction of Autophagic Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Anasuya; Vasudevan, Smreti; Sengupta, Suparna

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) pose a serious obstacle to cancer therapy as they can be responsible for poor prognosis and tumour relapse. In this study, we have investigated inhibitory activity of the ginger-derived compound 6-shogaol against breast cancer cells both in monolayer and in cancer-stem cell-like spheroid culture. The spheroids were generated from adherent breast cancer cells. 6-shogaol was effective in killing both breast cancer monolayer cells and spheroids at doses that were not toxic to noncancerous cells. The percentages of CD44+CD24-/low cells and the secondary sphere content were reduced drastically upon treatment with 6-shogaol confirming its action on CSCs. Treatment with 6-shogaol caused cytoplasmic vacuole formation and cleavage of microtubule associated protein Light Chain3 (LC3) in both monolayer and spheroid culture indicating that it induced autophagy. Kinetic analysis of the LC3 expression and a combination treatment with chloroquine revealed that the autophagic flux instigated cell death in 6-shogaol treated breast cancer cells in contrast to the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine. Furthermore, 6-shogaol-induced cell death got suppressed in the presence of chloroquine and a very low level of apoptosis was exhibited even after prolonged treatment of the compound, suggesting that autophagy is the major mode of cell death induced by 6-shogaol in breast cancer cells. 6-shogaol reduced the expression levels of Cleaved Notch1 and its target proteins Hes1 and Cyclin D1 in spheroids, and the reduction was further pronounced in the presence of a γ-secretase inhibitor. Secondary sphere formation in the presence of the inhibitor was also further reduced by 6-shogaol. Together, these results indicate that the inhibitory action of 6-shogaol on spheroid growth and sustainability is conferred through γ-secretase mediated down-regulation of Notch signaling. The efficacy of 6-shogaol in monolayer and cancer stem cell-like spheroids raise hope for its

  16. Tualang Honey Promotes Apoptotic Cell Death Induced by Tamoxifen in Breast Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Yaacob, Nik Soriani; Nengsih, Agustine; Norazmi, Mohd. Nor

    2013-01-01

    Tualang honey (TH) is rich in flavonoids and phenolic acids and has significant anticancer activity against breast cancer cells comparable to the effect of tamoxifen (TAM), in vitro. The current study evaluated the effects of TH when used in combination with TAM on MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. We observed that TH promoted the anticancer activity of TAM in both the estrogen receptor-(ER-)responsive and ER-nonresponsive human breast cancer cell lines. Flow cytometric analyses indicated accelerated apoptosis especially in MDA-MB-231 cells and with the involvement of caspase-3/7, -8 and -9 activation as shown by fluorescence microscopy. Depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane was also increased in both cell lines when TH was used in combination with TAM compared to TAM treatment alone. TH may therefore be a potential adjuvant to be used with TAM for reducing the dose of TAM, hence, reducing TAM-induced adverse effects. PMID:23476711

  17. miR-203 inhibits cell proliferation and promotes cisplatin induced cell death in tongue squamous cancer.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jiong; Lin, Yao; Fan, Li; Kuang, Wei; Zheng, Liwei; Wu, Jiahua; Shang, Peng; Wang, Qiaofeng; Tan, Jiali

    2016-04-29

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is one of the most common types of the head and neck cancer. Chemo resistance of OSCC has been identified as a substantial therapeutic hurdle. In this study, we analyzed the role of miR-203 in the OSCC and its effects on cisplatin-induced cell death in an OSCC cell line, Tca8113. There was a significant decrease of miR-203 expression in OSCC samples, compared with the adjacent normal, non-cancerous tissue. After 3 days cisplatin treatment, the survived Tca8113 cells had a lower expression of miR-203 than that in the untreated control group. In contrast, PIK3CA showed an inverse expression in cancer and cisplatin survived Tca8113 cells. Transfection of Tca8113 cells with miR-203 mimics greatly reduced PIK3CA expression and Akt activation. Furthermore, miR-203 repressed PIK3CA expression through targeting the 3'UTR. Restoration of miR-203 not only suppressed cell proliferation, but also sensitized cells to cisplatin induced cell apoptosis. This effect was absent in cells that were simultaneously treated with PIK3CA RNAi. In summary, these findings suggest miR-203 plays an important role in cisplatin resistance in OSCC, and furthermore delivery of miR-203 analogs may serve as an adjuvant therapy for OSCC.

  18. Nano neodymium oxide induces massive vacuolization and autophagic cell death in non-small cell lung cancer NCI-H460 cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Yang, Lisong; Feng, Chao; Wen, Long-Ping

    2005-11-11

    Neodymium, a rare earth element, was known to exhibit cytotoxic effects and induce apoptosis in certain cancer cells. Here we show that nano-sized neodymium oxide (Nano Nd2O3) induced massive vacuolization and cell death in non-small cell lung cancer NCI-H460 cells at micromolar equivalent concentration range. Cell death elicited by Nano Nd2O3 was not due to apoptosis and caspases were not involved. Electron microscopy and acridine orange staining revealed extensive autophagy in the cytoplasm of the cells treated by Nano Nd2O3. Autophagy induced by Nano Nd2O3 was accompanied by S-phase cell cycle arrest, mild disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential, and inhibition of proteasome activity. Bafilomycin A1, but not 3-MA, induced apoptosis while inhibiting autophagy. Our results revealed a novel biological function for Nano Nd2O3 and may have implications for the therapy of non-small cell lung cancer.

  19. Photoacoustic spectral analysis to sense programmed erythrocyte cell death (eryptosis) for monitoring cancer response to treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadhel, Muhannad N.; Kibria, Fayruz; Kolios, Michael C.

    2016-03-01

    Many types of cancer therapies target the tumor microenvironment, causing biochemical and morphological changes in tissues. In therapies using ultrasound activated microbubbles, vascular collapse is typically reported. Red blood cells (RBCs) that leak out of the vasculature become exposed to the ceramide that is released from damaged endothelial cells. Ceramide can induce programmed cell death in RBCs (eryptosis), and is characterized by cell shrinkage, membrane blebbing and scrambling. Since the effect of eryptotic cells on generated photoacoustics (PA) signals has not been reported, we investigated the potential PA may have for cancer treatment monitoring by using PA spectral analysis to sense eryptosis. To induce eryptosis, C2-ceramide was added to RBC suspensions and that were incubated for 24 hours at 37°C. A control and ceramide-induced sample was imaged in a vessel phantom using a high frequency PA system (VevoLAZR, 10 - 45 MHz bandwidth) irradiated with multiple wavelengths ranging from 680 to 900 nm. PA spectral parameters were measured and linked to changes in RBCs as it underwent eryptosis. These samples were examined using optical microscopy, a blood gas analyzer and an integrating sphere setup to measure optical properties (wavelengths 600 - 900 nm). The results of the experiment demonstrate how PA spectral analysis can be used to identify eryptosis at a depth of more than 1 cm into the phantom using ultrasound derived the y-intercept and mid bandfit (MBF) parameters at optical wavelengths of 800 - 900 nm. These parameters were correlated to the morphological and biochemical changes that eryptotic RBCs display. The results establish the potential of PA in cancer treatment monitoring through sensing treatment induced eryptosis.

  20. A novel cycloartane triterpenoid from Cimicifuga induces apoptotic and autophagic cell death in human colon cancer HT-29 cells.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xiaoli; Liu, Jing; Nian, Yin; Qiu, Ming-Hua; Luo, Ying; Zhang, Jihong

    2017-04-01

    The extract from Cimicifuga, a genus of flowering plants, has been demonstrated to have mainly therapeutic effects on menstrual and menopausal symptoms and also exhibits immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial activity. Moreover, the anticancer effects of Cimicifuga have been reported, but the underlying mechanism causing cancer cell death has been poorly described. The present study was designed to investigate the antitumor effects and underlying molecular mechanisms of cimigenol (KY17), a novel cycloartane triterpenoid from Cimicifuga. KY17-induced autophagy and apoptotic cell death in human colon cancer cells (HT-29) was investigated. KY17 treatment induced growth inhibition and apoptotic cell death in a concentration-dependent manner. The induction of apoptosis was confirmed by a change in cell morphology, and an increase in the G2/M phase, as well as increased protein levels of cleaved-caspase-8 and -3; cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) in the HT-29 cells following KY17 treatment. In addition, autophagy was evaluated by the accumulation of acridine orange, the appearance of green fluorescent protein-light-chain 3 (LC3) punctate structures and increased levels of LC3-II protein expression. Furthermore, combination treatment with the autophagy inhibitor bafilomycin A1 enhanced the induction of apoptosis by KY17. Taken together, the present study provides new insight into the role of KY17 as a potential antitumor compound. Combination of KY17 with an autophagy inhibitor may be a valuable strategy for the chemoprevention or treatment of colon cancer.

  1. Suppression of spindly delays mitotic exit and exacerbates cell death response of cancer cells treated with low doses of paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Silva, Patrícia M A; Ribeiro, Nilza; Lima, Raquel T; Andrade, Cláudia; Diogo, Vânia; Teixeira, Joana; Florindo, Cláudia; Tavares, Álvaro; Vasconcelos, M Helena; Bousbaa, Hassan

    2017-02-27

    Microtubule-targeting agents (MTAs) are used extensively for the treatment of diverse types of cancer. They block cancer cells in mitosis through the activation of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), the surveillance mechanism that ensures accurate chromosome segregation at the onset of anaphase. However, the cytotoxic activity of MTAs is limited by premature mitotic exit (mitotic slippage) due to SAC silencing. Here we have explored the dual role of the protein Spindly in chromosome attachments and SAC silencing to analyze the consequences of its depletion on the viability of tumor cells treated with clinically relevant doses of paclitaxel. As expected, siRNA-mediated Spindly suppression induced chromosome misalignment and accumulation of cells in mitosis. Remarkably, these cells were more sensitive to low-doses of paclitaxel. Sensitization was due to an increase in the length of mitotic arrest and high frequency of multinucleated cells, both correlated with an exacerbated post-mitotic cell death response as determined by cell fate profiling. Thus, by affecting both SAC silencing and chromosome attachment, Spindly targeting offers a double-edged sword that potentiates tumor cell killing by clinically relevant doses of paclitaxel, providing a rationale for combination chemotherapy against cancer.

  2. Anti-cancer effect of bee venom toxin and melittin in ovarian cancer cells through induction of death receptors and inhibition of JAK2/STAT3 pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Jo, Miran; Park, Mi Hee; Kollipara, Pushpa Saranya; An, Byeong Jun; Song, Ho Sueb; Han, Sang Bae; Kim, Jang Heub; Song, Min Jong; Hong, Jin Tae

    2012-01-01

    We investigated whether bee venom and melittin, a major component of bee venom, inhibit cell growth through enhancement of death receptor expressions in the human ovarian cancer cells, SKOV3 and PA-1. Bee venom (1–5 μg/ml) and melittin (0.5–2 μg/ml) inhibited the growth of SKOV3 and PA-1 ovarian cancer cells by the induction of apoptotic cell death in a dose dependent manner. Consistent with apoptotic cell death, expression of death receptor (DR) 3 and DR6 was increased in both cancer cells, but expression of DR4 was increased only in PA-1 cells. Expression of DR downstream pro-apoptotic proteins including caspase-3, 8, and Bax was concomitantly increased, but the phosphorylation of JAK2 and STAT3 and the expression of Bcl-2 were inhibited by treatment with bee venom and melittin in SKOV3 and PA-1 cells. Expression of cleaved caspase-3 was increased in SKOV3, but cleaved caspase-8 was increased in PA-1 cells. Moreover, deletion of DR3, DR4, and DR6 by small interfering RNA significantly reversed bee venom and melittin-induced cell growth inhibitory effect as well as down regulation of STAT3 by bee venom and melittin in SKOV3 and PA-1 ovarian cancer cell. These results suggest that bee venom and melittin induce apoptotic cell death in ovarian cancer cells through enhancement of DR3, DR4, and DR6 expression and inhibition of STAT3 pathway. -- Highlights: ► Some studies have showed that bee venom and/or melittin have anti-cancer effects. ► We found that bee venom and melittin inhibited cell growth in ovarian cancer cells. ► Bee venom and melittin induce apoptosis in SKOV3 and PA-1.

  3. Delayed luminescence to monitor programmed cell death induced by berberine on thyroid cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scordino, Agata; Campisi, Agata; Grasso, Rosaria; Bonfanti, Roberta; Gulino, Marisa; Iauk, Liliana; Parenti, Rosalba; Musumeci, Francesco

    2014-11-01

    Correlation between apoptosis and UVA-induced ultraweak photon emission delayed luminescence (DL) from tumor thyroid cell lines was investigated. In particular, the effects of berberine, an alkaloid that has been reported to have anticancer activities, on two cancer cell lines were studied. The FTC-133 and 8305C cell lines, as representative of follicular and anaplastic thyroid human cancer, respectively, were chosen. The results show that berberine is able to arrest cell cycle and activate apoptotic pathway as shown in both cell lines by deoxyribonucleic acid fragmentation, caspase-3 cleavage, p53 and p27 protein overexpression. In parallel, changes in DL spectral components after berberine treatment support the hypothesis that DL from human cells originates mainly from mitochondria, since berberine acts especially at the mitochondrial level. The decrease of DL blue component for both cell lines could be related to the decrease of intra-mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and may be a hallmark of induced apoptosis. In contrast, the response in the red spectral range is different for the two cell lines and may be ascribed to a different iron homeostasis.

  4. Downregulation of programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4) in tumorigenesis and progression of human digestive tract cancers.

    PubMed

    Ma, Gang; Zhang, Hao; Dong, Ming; Zheng, Xinyu; Ozaki, Iwata; Matsuhashi, Sachiko; Guo, Kejian

    2013-12-01

    Nowadays, digestive tract cancers become the commonest neoplasia and one of the leading causes of cancer deaths worldwide. The development of diagnosis and therapy is urgently required. Programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4), a new tumor suppressor, has been documented to be a potential diagnostic tool and treatment target for neoplasia due to the inhabitation of tumor promotion/progression and metastasis. However, its role in human digestive tract cancers is few available up to now. In this study, we examined the expression of PDCD4 in human digestive tract cancers (61 gastric cancer, 65 colorectal cancer, and 69 pancreatic cancer patients) by Western blot analysis, reverse transcription (RT)-PCR, and immunohistochemistry. Western blot, RT-PCR, and immunohistochemistry examination showed that expressions of PDCD4 were significantly lower in cancers specimens than in noncancerous tissues. Among the different differentiated cancer tissues, PDCD4 expression was significantly lower in moderately or poorly differentiated cancers than in well-differentiated cancers (p < 0.05). Our findings suggested that PDCD4 might be a potentially valuable molecular target in diagnosis and therapy for human digestive tract cancers.

  5. Casticin induced apoptotic cell death and altered associated gene expression in human colon cancer colo 205 cells.

    PubMed

    Shang, Hung-Sheng; Liu, Jia-You; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Chiang, Han-Sun; Lin, Chia-Hain; Chen, Ann; Lin, Yuh-Feng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2016-11-14

    Casticin, a polymethoxyflavone, derived from natural plant Fructus Viticis exhibits biological activities including anti-cancer characteristics. The anti-cancer and alter gene expression of casticin on human colon cancer cells and the underlying mechanisms were investigated. Flow cytometric assay was used to measure viable cell, cell cycle and sub-G1 phase, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Ca(2+) productions, level of mitochondria membrane potential (ΔΨm ) and caspase activity. Western blotting assay was used to detect expression of protein level associated with cell death. Casticin induced cell morphological changes, decreased cell viability and induced G2/M phase arrest in colo 205 cells. Casticin increased ROS production but decreased the levels of ΔΨm , and Ca(2+) , increased caspase-3, -8, and -9 activities. The cDNA microarray indicated that some of the cell cycle associated genes were down-regulated such as cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (CDKN1A) (p21, Cip1) and p21 protein (Cdc42/Rac)-activated kinase 3 (PAK3). TNF receptor-associated protein 1 (TRAP1), CREB1 (cAMP responsive element binding protein 1) and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B (CDKN1B) (p27, Kip1) genes were increased but matrix metallopeptidase 2 (MMP-2), toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), PRKAR2B (protein kinase, cAMP-dependent, regulatory, type II, bet), and CaMK4 (calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV) genes were inhibited. Results suggest that casticin induced cell apoptosis via the activation of the caspase- and/or mitochondria-dependent signaling cascade, the accumulation of ROS and altered associated gene expressions in colo 205 human colon cancer cells.

  6. Ambiguine I Isonitrile from Fischerella ambigua Induces Caspase-Independent Cell Death in MCF-7 Hormone Dependent Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Acuña, Ulyana Muñoz; Zi, Jiachen; Orjala, Jimmy; Carcache de Blanco, Esperanza J.

    2015-01-01

    Ambiguine I isonitrile (AmbI) obtained from the cultured cyanobacterium Fischerella ambigua was identified as a potent NF-κB inhibitor (IC50=30 nM). The cytotoxic effect was evaluated in both HT-29 colon cancer cell line (EC50=4.35 μM) and MCF-7 breast cancer cell line (EC50=1.7 μM) using the SRB assay. In the cells treated with AmbI, an increased population of cells was detected in sub G1-phase. The apoptotic effect was associated with block in G1-phase of the cell cycle in treated cells; however, cell death was induced independently of caspase-7. The NF-κB expression of p50 and p65 units were also examined in treated cells and compared with the positive control, rocaglamide (IC50=75 nM). Moreover, the expression of mediators of the NF-κB pathway such as kinase IKKκ was studied at increasing concentrations of AmbI. The down stream effect of NF-κB inhibition and the effect on the expression of TNF-α induced ICAM-1 was evaluated. Thus, the dose-dependent and time-dependent effect of AmbI on MCF-7 cells was examined in an attempt to investigate its potential mechanism of action on inducing apoptosis. PMID:26753095

  7. Contribution of mitochondria and lysosomes to photodynamic therapy-induced death in cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieminen, Anna-Liisa; Azizuddin, Kashif; Zhang, Ping; Kenney, Malcolm E.; Pediaditakis, Peter; Lemasters, John J.; Oleinick, Nancy L.

    2008-02-01

    In photodynamic therapy (PDT), visible light activates a photosensitizing drug added to a tissue, resulting in singlet oxygen formation and cell death. Employing confocal microscopy, we previously found that the phthalocyanine Pc 4 localized primarily to mitochondrial membranes in various cancer cell lines, resulting in mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, followed by inner membrane permeabilization (mitochondrial permeability transition) with mitochondrial depolarization and swelling, which in turn led to cytochrome c release and apoptotic death. Recently, derivatives of Pc 4 with OH groups added to one of the axial ligands were synthesized. These derivatives appeared to be taken up more avidly by cells and caused more cytotoxicity than the parent compound Pc 4. Using organelle-specific fluorophores, we found that one of these derivatives, Pc 181, accumulated into lysosomes and that PDT with Pc 181 caused rapid disintegration of lysosomes. We hypothesized that chelatable iron released from lysosomes during PDT contributes to mitochondrial damage and subsequent cell death. We monitored cytosolic Fe2+ concentrations after PDT with calcein. Fe2+ binds to calcein causing quenching of calcein fluorescence. After bafilomycin, an inhibitor of the vacuolar proton-translocating ATPase, calcein fluorescence became quenched, an effect prevented by starch desferal s-DFO, an iron chelator that enters cells by endocytosis. After Pc 181-PDT, cytosolic calcein fluorescence also decreased, indicating increased chelatable Fe2+ in the cytosol, and apoptosis occurred. s-DFO decreased Pc 181-PDT-induced apoptosis as measured by a decrease of caspase-3 activation. In isolated mitochondria preparations, Fe2+ induced mitochondrial swelling, which was prevented by Ru360, an inhibitor of the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter. The data support a hypothesis of oxidative injury in which Pc 181-PDT disintegrates lysosomes and releases constituents that synergistically promote

  8. MicroRNA-425-5p regulates chemoresistance in colorectal cancer cells via regulation of Programmed Cell Death 10.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ye; Hu, Xingqian; Miao, Xiaofei; Zhu, Kuiyu; Cui, Songkui; Meng, Qingyang; Sun, Jialin; Wang, Tong

    2016-02-01

    Acquired chemoresistance represents a major obstacle in cancer treatment, the underlying mechanism of which is complex and not well understood. MiR-425-5p has been reported to be implicated tumorigenesis in a few cancer types. However, its role in regulating chemoresistance has not been investigated in colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. Microarray analysis was performed in isogenic chemosensitive and chemoresistant HCT116 cell lines to identify differentially expressed miRNAs. miRNA quantitative real-time PCR was used to detect miR-425-5p expression levels between drug resistant and parental cancer cells. MiR-425-5p mimic and inhibitor were transfected, followed by CellTiter-Glo(®) assay to examine drug sensitivity in these two cell lines. Western Blot and luciferase assay were performed to investigate the direct target of miR-425-5p. Xenograft mouse models were used to examine in vivo function of miR-425-5p. Our data showed that expression of miR-425-5p was significantly up-regulated in HCT116-R compared with parental HCT116 cells. Inhibition of miR-425-5p reversed chemoresistance in HCT116-R cells. Programmed cell death 10 (PDCD10) is the direct target of miR-425-5p which is required for the regulatory role of miR-425-5p in chemoresistance. MiR-425-5p inhibitor sensitized HCT116-R xenografts to chemo drugs in vivo. Our study demonstrated that miR-425-5p regulates chemoresistance of CRC cells by modulating PDCD10 expression level both in vitro and in vivo. MiR-425-5p may represent a new therapeutic target for the intervention of CRC.

  9. Conserved features of cancer cells define their sensitivity to HAMLET-induced death; c-Myc and glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Storm, P; Aits, S; Puthia, M K; Urbano, A; Northen, T; Powers, S; Bowen, B; Chao, Y; Reindl, W; Lee, D Y; Sullivan, N L; Zhang, J; Trulsson, M; Yang, H; Watson, J D; Svanborg, C

    2011-12-01

    HAMLET is the first member of a new family of tumoricidal protein-lipid complexes that kill cancer cells broadly, while sparing healthy, differentiated cells. Many and diverse tumor cell types are sensitive to the lethal effect, suggesting that HAMLET identifies and activates conserved death pathways in cancer cells. Here, we investigated the molecular basis for the difference in sensitivity between cancer cells and healthy cells. Using a combination of small-hairpin RNA (shRNA) inhibition, proteomic and metabolomic technology, we identified the c-Myc oncogene as one essential determinant of HAMLET sensitivity. Increased c-Myc expression levels promoted sensitivity to HAMLET and shRNA knockdown of c-Myc suppressed the lethal response, suggesting that oncogenic transformation with c-Myc creates a HAMLET-sensitive phenotype. Furthermore, HAMLET sensitivity was modified by the glycolytic state of tumor cells. Glucose deprivation sensitized tumor cells to HAMLET-induced cell death and in the shRNA screen, hexokinase 1 (HK1), 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-biphosphatase 1 and hypoxia-inducible factor 1α modified HAMLET sensitivity. HK1 was shown to bind HAMLET in a protein array containing ∼8000 targets, and HK activity decreased within 15 min of HAMLET treatment, before morphological signs of tumor cell death. In parallel, HAMLET triggered rapid metabolic paralysis in carcinoma cells. Tumor cells were also shown to contain large amounts of oleic acid and its derivatives already after 15 min. The results identify HAMLET as a novel anti-cancer agent that kills tumor cells by exploiting unifying features of cancer cells such as oncogene addiction or the Warburg effect.

  10. The Growing Complexity of Cancer Cell Response to DNA-Damaging Agents: Caspase 3 Mediates Cell Death or Survival?

    PubMed Central

    Mirzayans, Razmik; Andrais, Bonnie; Kumar, Piyush; Murray, David

    2016-01-01

    It is widely stated that wild-type p53 either mediates the activation of cell cycle checkpoints to facilitate DNA repair and promote cell survival, or orchestrates apoptotic cell death following exposure to cancer therapeutic agents. This reigning paradigm has been challenged by numerous discoveries with different human cell types, including solid tumor-derived cell lines. Thus, activation of the p53 signaling pathway by ionizing radiation and other DNA-damaging agents hinders apoptosis and triggers growth arrest (e.g., through premature senescence) in some genetic backgrounds; such growth arrested cells remain viable, secrete growth-promoting factors, and give rise to progeny with stem cell-like properties. In addition, caspase 3, which is best known for its role in the execution phase of apoptosis, has been recently reported to facilitate (rather than suppress) DNA damage-induced genomic instability and carcinogenesis. This observation is consistent with an earlier report demonstrating that caspase 3 mediates secretion of the pro-survival factor prostaglandin E2, which in turn promotes enrichment of tumor repopulating cells. In this article, we review these and related discoveries and point out novel cancer therapeutic strategies. One of our objectives is to demonstrate the growing complexity of the DNA damage response beyond the conventional “repair and survive, or die” hypothesis. PMID:27187358

  11. In vitro investigations on the toxicity and cell death induced by tamoxifen on two non-breast cancer cell types

    PubMed Central

    2001-01-01

    Tamoxifen, a potent anticancer agent known to interrupt the enhanced estrogen activity of malignant mammary gland cells, was recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of breast cancer. In this investigation, the toxic effects of tamoxifen were evaluated through cell multiplication, and cytological, surface ultrastructural, and biochemical studies on human cervical carcinoma cells (HeLa) and/or murine erythroleukemic (MEL) cells (BB-88). Tamoxifen treatment demonstrated an inhibitory effect on HeLa cell multiplication at lower concentrations and toxicity at higher concentrations and longer treatment durations. The drug also triggered morphological and biochemical changes as revealed by light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), fluorescence microscopy, Nucleosome ELISA, and the DNA smear pattern. Cytological observations showed nuclear condensation, cell shrinkage, multinucleation, and apoptotic bodies. Surface ultrastructure of tamoxifen treated cells examined under the SEM revealed abnormalities such as membrane blebbing, holes, and cytoplasmic extrusions, all of which are characteristics of programmed cell death (apoptosis). Redistribution of the membrane phospholipid phosphatidylserine (PS) from the protoplasmic surface of the plasma membrane to the cell surface was identified using annexin V-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in tamoxifen treated MEL BB-88 cells, a general feature of cells undergoing apoptosis. Tamoxifen treated cells demonstrated internucleosomal damages of the genomic DNA and DNA fragmentations, evidenced by an increase in free nucleosomes, and distinctive DNA smear patterns on the agarose gel. PMID:12488602

  12. Knockdown of TWIST1 enhances arsenic trioxide- and ionizing radiation-induced cell death in lung cancer cells by promoting mitochondrial dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Sung-Keum; Kim, Jae-Hee; Choi, Ha-Na; Choe, Tae-Boo; Hong, Seok-Il; Yi, Jae-Youn; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Lee, Hyun-Gyu; Lee, Yun-Han; Park, In-Chul

    2014-07-11

    Highlights: • Knockdown of TWIST1 enhanced ATO- and IR-induced cell death in NSCLCs. • Intracellular ROS levels were increased in cells treated with TWIST1 siRNA. • TWIST1 siRNA induced MMP loss and mitochondrial fragmentation. • TWIST1 siRNA upregulated the fission-related proteins FIS1 and DRP1. - Abstract: TWIST1 is implicated in the process of epithelial mesenchymal transition, metastasis, stemness, and drug resistance in cancer cells, and therefore is a potential target for cancer therapy. In the present study, we found that knockdown of TWIST1 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) enhanced arsenic trioxide (ATO)- and ionizing radiation (IR)-induced cell death in non-small-cell lung cancer cells. Interestingly, intracellular reactive oxygen species levels were increased in cells treated with TWIST1 siRNA and further increased by co-treatment with ATO or IR. Pretreatment of lung cancer cells with the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine markedly suppressed the cell death induced by combined treatment with TWIST1 siRNA and ATO or IR. Moreover, treatment of cells with TWIST1 siRNA induced mitochondrial membrane depolarization and significantly increased mitochondrial fragmentation (fission) and upregulated the fission-related proteins FIS1 and DRP1. Collectively, our results demonstrate that siRNA-mediated TWIST1 knockdown induces mitochondrial dysfunction and enhances IR- and ATO-induced cell death in lung cancer cells.

  13. Cancer Cell Growth Inhibitory Effect of Bee Venom via Increase of Death Receptor 3 Expression and Inactivation of NF-kappa B in NSCLC Cells

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyung Eun; Hwang, Chul Ju; Gu, Sun Mi; Park, Mi Hee; Kim, Joo Hwan; Park, Joo Ho; Ahn, Young Jin; Kim, Ji Young; Song, Min Jong; Song, Ho Sueb; Han, Sang-Bae; Hong, Jin Tae

    2014-01-01

    Our previous findings have demonstrated that bee venom (BV) has anti-cancer activity in several cancer cells. However, the effects of BV on lung cancer cell growth have not been reported. Cell viability was determined with trypan blue uptake, soft agar formation as well as DAPI and TUNEL assay. Cell death related protein expression was determined with Western blotting. An EMSA was used for nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB) activity assay. BV (1–5 μg/mL) inhibited growth of lung cancer cells by induction of apoptosis in a dose dependent manner in lung cancer cell lines A549 and NCI-H460. Consistent with apoptotic cell death, expression of DR3 and DR6 was significantly increased. However, deletion of DRs by small interfering RNA significantly reversed BV induced cell growth inhibitory effects. Expression of pro-apoptotic proteins (caspase-3 and Bax) was concomitantly increased, but the NF-κB activity and expression of Bcl-2 were inhibited. A combination treatment of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-like weak inducer of apoptosis, TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand, docetaxel and cisplatin, with BV synergistically inhibited both A549 and NCI-H460 lung cancer cell growth with further down regulation of NF-κB activity. These results show that BV induces apoptotic cell death in lung cancer cells through the enhancement of DR3 expression and inhibition of NF-κB pathway. PMID:25068924

  14. Gypenoside L inhibits autophagic flux and induces cell death in human esophageal cancer cells through endoplasm reticulum stress-mediated Ca2+ release

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Xu, Hong; Kang, Qiangrong; Fan, Long; Hu, Xiaopeng; Jin, Zhe; Zeng, Yong; Kong, Xiaoli; Zhang, Jian; Wu, Xuli; Wu, Haiqiang; Liu, Lizhong; Xiao, Xiaohua; Wang, Yifei; He, Zhendan

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is one of the leading cause of cancer mortality in the world. Due to the increased drug and radiation tolerance, it is urgent to develop novel anticancer agent that triggers nonapoptotic cell death to compensate for apoptosis resistance. In this study, we show that treatment with gypenoside L (Gyp-L), a saponin isolated from Gynostemma pentaphyllum, induced nonapoptotic, lysosome-associated cell death in human esophageal cancer cells. Gyp-L-induced cell death was associated with lysosomal swelling and autophagic flux inhibition. Mechanistic investigations revealed that through increasing the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), Gyp-L triggered protein ubiquitination and endoplasm reticulum (ER) stress response, leading to Ca2+ release from ER inositol trisphosphate receptor (IP3R)-operated stores and finally cell death. Interestingly, there existed a reciprocal positive-regulatory loop between Ca2+ release and ER stress in response to Gyp-L. In addition, protein synthesis was critical for Gyp-L-mediated ER stress and cell death. Taken together, this work suggested a novel therapeutic option by Gyp-L through the induction of an unconventional ROS-ER-Ca2+-mediated cell death in human esophageal cancer. PMID:27329722

  15. A receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Tyrphostin A9 induces cancer cell death through Drp1 dependent mitochondria fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Park, So Jung; Park, Young Jun; Shin, Ji Hyun; Kim, Eun Sung; Hwang, Jung Jin; Jin, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Jin Cheon; Cho, Dong-Hyung

    2011-05-13

    Highlights: {yields} We screened and identified Tyrphostin A9, a receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor as a strong mitochondria fission inducer. {yields} Tyrphostin A9 treatment promotes mitochondria dysfunction and contributes to cytotoxicity in cancer cells. {yields} Tyrphostin A9 induces apoptotic cell death through a Drp1-mediated pathway. {yields} Our studies suggest that Tyrphostin A9 induces mitochondria fragmentation and apoptotic cell death via Drp1 dependently. -- Abstract: Mitochondria dynamics controls not only their morphology but also functions of mitochondria. Therefore, an imbalance of the dynamics eventually leads to mitochondria disruption and cell death. To identify specific regulators of mitochondria dynamics, we screened a bioactive chemical compound library and selected Tyrphostin A9, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, as a potent inducer of mitochondrial fission. Tyrphostin A9 treatment resulted in the formation of fragmented mitochondria filament. In addition, cellular ATP level was decreased and the mitochondrial membrane potential was collapsed in Tyr A9-treated cells. Suppression of Drp1 activity by siRNA or over-expression of a dominant negative mutant of Drp1 inhibited both mitochondrial fragmentation and cell death induced by Tyrpohotin A9. Moreover, treatment of Tyrphostin A9 also evoked mitochondrial fragmentation in other cells including the neuroblastomas. Taken together, these results suggest that Tyrphostin A9 induces Drp1-mediated mitochondrial fission and apoptotic cell death.

  16. The α-tocopherol derivative ESeroS-GS induces cell death and inhibits cell motility of breast cancer cells through the regulation of energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lijing; Zhao, Xingyu; Zhao, Kai; Wei, Peng; Fang, Yi; Zhang, Fenglin; Zhang, Bo; Ogata, Kazumi; Mori, Akitane; Wei, Taotao

    2014-12-15

    Cancer cells are known to exhibit different hallmarks compared with normal cells. Therefore, targeting these features may improve the response to cancer therapy. In this study, we provided direct evidence that the α-tocopherol derivative ESeroS-GS inhibited the viability, migration, and invasion of breast cancer cells. ESeroS-GS induced cell death in different cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner but showed no significant effects on MCF-10A mammary epithelial cells. Although the ESeroS-GS-induced cell death in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells was accompanied with the generation of reactive oxygen species and the down regulation of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), no such effect on reactive oxygen species and MMP was seen in MCF-10A cells. Further studies indicated that ESeroS-GS down-regulated the expression of hexokinase II, SDH B, UQCRC2 and COX II in MDA-MB-231 cells but not in MCF-10A cells. The down-regulation of these enzymes accounts for the decreased oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and glycolysis in MDA-MB-231 cells upon ESeroS-GS treatment. We also found that sub-toxic concentration of ESeroS-GS treatment resulted in the impairment of F-actin cytoskeleton assembly and the consequently decreased migratory and invasive ability of MDA-MB-231 cells, which might be due to the inhibition of cellular energy metabolism. These results indicate that ESeroS-GS shows potential to become a novel anti-cancer agent by targeting the energy metabolism of cancer cells.

  17. The CT20 peptide causes detachment and death of metastatic breast cancer cells by promoting mitochondrial aggregation and cytoskeletal disruption.

    PubMed

    Lee, M W; Bassiouni, R; Sparrow, N A; Iketani, A; Boohaker, R J; Moskowitz, C; Vishnubhotla, P; Khaled, A S; Oyer, J; Copik, A; Fernandez-Valle, C; Perez, J M; Khaled, A R

    2014-05-22

    Metastasis accounts for most deaths from breast cancer, driving the need for new therapeutics that can impede disease progression. Rationally designed peptides that take advantage of cancer-specific differences in cellular physiology are an emerging technology that offer promise as a treatment for metastatic breast cancer. We developed CT20p, a hydrophobic peptide based on the C terminus of Bax that exhibits similarities with antimicrobial peptides, and previously reported that CT20p has unique cytotoxic actions independent of full-length Bax. In this study, we identified the intracellular actions of CT20p which precede cancer cell-specific detachment and death. Previously, we found that CT20p migrated in the heavy membrane fractions of cancer cell lysates. Here, using MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, we demonstrated that CT20p localizes to the mitochondria, leading to fusion-like aggregation and mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarization. As a result, the distribution and movement of mitochondria in CT20p-treated MDA-MB-231 cells was markedly impaired, particularly in cell protrusions. In contrast, CT20p did not associate with the mitochondria of normal breast epithelial MCF-10A cells, causing little change in the mitochondrial membrane potential, morphology or localization. In MDA-MB-231 cells, CT20p triggered cell detachment that was preceded by decreased levels of α5β1 integrins and reduced F-actin polymerization. Using folate-targeted nanoparticles to encapsulate and deliver CT20p to murine tumors, we achieved significant tumor regression within days of peptide treatment. These results suggest that CT20p has application in the treatment of metastatic disease as a cancer-specific therapeutic peptide that perturbs mitochondrial morphology and movement ultimately culminating in disruption of the actin cytoskeleton, cell detachment, and loss of cell viability.

  18. Antitumor effects of a sirtuin inhibitor, tenovin-6, against gastric cancer cells via death receptor 5 up-regulation.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Sachiko; Endo, Shinji; Saito, Rie; Hirose, Mitsuaki; Ueno, Takunori; Suzuki, Hideo; Yamato, Kenji; Abei, Masato; Hyodo, Ichinosuke

    2014-01-01

    Up-regulated sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), an NAD+-dependent class III histone deacetylase, deacetylates p53 and inhibits its transcriptional activity, leading to cell survival. SIRT1 overexpression has been reported to predict poor survival in some malignancies, including gastric cancer. However, the antitumor effect of SIRT1 inhibition remains elusive in gastric cancer. Here, we investigated the antitumor mechanisms of a sirtuin inhibitor, tenovin-6, in seven human gastric cancer cell lines (four cell lines with wild-type TP53, two with mutant-type TP53, and one with null TP53). Interestingly, tenovin-6 induced apoptosis in all cell lines, not only those with wild-type TP53, but also mutant-type and null versions, accompanied by up-regulation of death receptor 5 (DR5). In the KatoIII cell line (TP53-null), DR5 silencing markedly attenuated tenovin-6-induced apoptosis, suggesting that the pivotal mechanism behind its antitumor effects is based on activation of the death receptor signal pathway. Although endoplasmic reticulum stress caused by sirtuin inhibitors was reported to induce DR5 up-regulation in other cancer cell lines, we could not find marked activation of its related molecules, such as ATF6, PERK, and CHOP, in gastric cancer cells treated with tenovin-6. Tenovin-6 in combination with docetaxel or SN-38 exerted a slight to moderate synergistic cytotoxicity against gastric cancer cells. In conclusion, tenovin-6 has potent antitumor activity against human gastric cancer cells via DR5 up-regulation. Our results should be helpful for the future clinical development of sirtuin inhibitors.

  19. Dictyostelium cell death

    PubMed Central

    Levraud, Jean-Pierre; Adam, Myriam; Luciani, Marie-Françoise; de Chastellier, Chantal; Blanton, Richard L.; Golstein, Pierre

    2003-01-01

    Cell death in the stalk of Dictyostelium discoideum, a prototypic vacuolar cell death, can be studied in vitro using cells differentiating as a monolayer. To identify early events, we examined potentially dying cells at a time when the classical signs of Dictyostelium cell death, such as heavy vacuolization and membrane lesions, were not yet apparent. We observed that most cells proceeded through a stereotyped series of differentiation stages, including the emergence of “paddle” cells showing high motility and strikingly marked subcellular compartmentalization with actin segregation. Paddle cell emergence and subsequent demise with paddle-to-round cell transition may be critical to the cell death process, as they were contemporary with irreversibility assessed through time-lapse videos and clonogenicity tests. Paddle cell demise was not related to formation of the cellulose shell because cells where the cellulose-synthase gene had been inactivated underwent death indistinguishable from that of parental cells. A major subcellular alteration at the paddle-to-round cell transition was the disappearance of F-actin. The Dictyostelium vacuolar cell death pathway thus does not require cellulose synthesis and includes early actin rearrangements (F-actin segregation, then depolymerization), contemporary with irreversibility, corresponding to the emergence and demise of highly polarized paddle cells. PMID:12654899

  20. Induction of multiple programmed cell death pathways by IFN-beta in human non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Koty, P P; Mayotte, J; Levitt, M L

    1999-02-25

    Tissue transglutaminase (tTG) and keratinocyte transglutaminase (kTG), as well as the cross-linked envelopes (CLE) that they form, have been associated with squamous differentiation and programmed cell death in epithelial cells. When interferon-beta (IFN-beta) was used to stimulate differentiation and programmed cell death in the human lung cancer cell lines NCI-H596 and NCI-H226, the cells underwent a decrease in cellular density. In NCI-H596 IFN-beta caused an increase in kTG activity and DNA fragmentation in the lower density cells, which were significantly slower growing than control cells. However, in the higher density cells, which were only slightly slower growing than control cells, IFN-beta caused an increase in tTG activity and CLE competence. Dual-parameter flow cytometry demonstrated that IFN-beta-induced squamous differentiation preceded programmed cell death. Treatment of NCI-H596 cells with monodansylcadaverine, a transglutaminase inhibitor, prevented the increase in CLE competence, but did not inhibit DNA fragmentation. These results suggest that IFN-beta can induce NCI-H596 cells to enter multiple cell death pathways and that these pathways are not only differentiation related, but may also be growth driven.

  1. Fluid shear stress sensitizes cancer cells to receptor-mediated apoptosis via trimeric death receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Michael J.; King, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer metastasis, the process of cancer cell migration from a primary to distal location, typically leads to a poor patient prognosis. Hematogenous metastasis is initiated by intravasation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) into the bloodstream, which are then believed to adhere to the luminal surface of the endothelium and extravasate into distal locations. Apoptotic agents such as tumor necrosis factor apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), whether in soluble ligand form or expressed on the surface of natural killer cells, have shown promise in treating CTCs to reduce the probability of metastasis. The role of hemodynamic shear forces in altering the cancer cell response to apoptotic agents has not been previously investigated. Here, we report that human colon cancer COLO 205 and prostate cancer PC-3 cells exposed to a uniform fluid shear stress in a cone-and-plate viscometer become sensitized to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Shear-induced sensitization directly correlates with the application of fluid shear stress, and TRAIL-induced apoptosis increases in a fluid shear stress force- and time-dependent manner. In contrast, TRAIL-induced necrosis is not affected by the application fluid shear stress. Interestingly, fluid shear stress does not sensitize cancer cells to apoptosis when treated with doxorubicin, which also induces apoptosis in cancer cells. Caspase inhibition experiments reveal that shear stress-induced sensitization to TRAIL occurs via caspase-dependent apoptosis. These results suggest that physiological fluid shear forces can modulate receptor-mediated apoptosis of cancer cells in the presence of apoptotic agents.

  2. RIG-I-like helicases induce immunogenic cell death of pancreatic cancer cells and sensitize tumors toward killing by CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Duewell, P; Steger, A; Lohr, H; Bourhis, H; Hoelz, H; Kirchleitner, S V; Stieg, M R; Grassmann, S; Kobold, S; Siveke, J T; Endres, S; Schnurr, M

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is characterized by a microenvironment suppressing immune responses. RIG-I-like helicases (RLH) are immunoreceptors for viral RNA that induce an antiviral response program via the production of type I interferons (IFN) and apoptosis in susceptible cells. We recently identified RLH as therapeutic targets of pancreatic cancer for counteracting immunosuppressive mechanisms and apoptosis induction. Here, we investigated immunogenic consequences of RLH-induced tumor cell death. Treatment of murine pancreatic cancer cell lines with RLH ligands induced production of type I IFN and proinflammatory cytokines. In addition, tumor cells died via intrinsic apoptosis and displayed features of immunogenic cell death, such as release of HMGB1 and translocation of calreticulin to the outer cell membrane. RLH-activated tumor cells led to activation of dendritic cells (DCs), which was mediated by tumor-derived type I IFN, whereas TLR, RAGE or inflammasome signaling was dispensable. Importantly, CD8α+ DCs effectively engulfed apoptotic tumor material and cross-presented tumor-associated antigen to naive CD8+ T cells. In comparison, tumor cell death mediated by oxaliplatin, staurosporine or mechanical disruption failed to induce DC activation and antigen presentation. Tumor cells treated with sublethal doses of RLH ligands upregulated Fas and MHC-I expression and were effectively sensitized towards Fas-mediated apoptosis and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)-mediated lysis. Vaccination of mice with RLH-activated tumor cells induced protective antitumor immunity in vivo. In addition, MDA5-based immunotherapy led to effective tumor control of established pancreatic tumors. In summary, RLH ligands induce a highly immunogenic form of tumor cell death linking innate and adaptive immunity. PMID:25012502

  3. Induction of morphological changes in death-induced cancer cells monitored by holographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    El-Schich, Zahra; Mölder, Anna; Tassidis, Helena; Härkönen, Pirkko; Falck Miniotis, Maria; Gjörloff Wingren, Anette

    2015-03-01

    We are using the label-free technique of holographic microscopy to analyze cellular parameters including cell number, confluence, cellular volume and area directly in the cell culture environment. We show that death-induced cells can be distinguished from untreated counterparts by the use of holographic microscopy, and we demonstrate its capability for cell death assessment. Morphological analysis of two representative cell lines (L929 and DU145) was performed in the culture flasks without any prior cell detachment. The two cell lines were treated with the anti-tumour agent etoposide for 1-3days. Measurements by holographic microscopy showed significant differences in average cell number, confluence, volume and area when comparing etoposide-treated with untreated cells. The cell volume of the treated cell lines was initially increased at early time-points. By time, cells decreased in volume, especially when treated with high doses of etoposide. In conclusion, we have shown that holographic microscopy allows label-free and completely non-invasive morphological measurements of cell growth, viability and death. Future applications could include real-time monitoring of these holographic microscopy parameters in cells in response to clinically relevant compounds.

  4. Programmed cell death

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this conference to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on the role programmed cell death plays in normal development and homeostasis of many organisms. This volume contains abstracts of papers in the following areas: invertebrate development; immunology/neurology; bcl-2 family; biochemistry; programmed cell death in viruses; oncogenesis; vertebrate development; and diseases.

  5. Synthesis of microtubule-interfering halogenated noscapine analogs that perturb mitosis in cancer cells followed by cell death.

    PubMed

    Aneja, Ritu; Vangapandu, Surya N; Lopus, Manu; Viswesarappa, Vijaya G; Dhiman, Neerupma; Verma, Akhilesh; Chandra, Ramesh; Panda, Dulal; Joshi, Harish C

    2006-08-14

    We have previously identified the naturally occurring non-toxic antitussive phthalideisoquinoline alkaloid, noscapine as a tubulin-binding agent that arrests mitosis and induces apoptosis. Here we present high-yield efficient synthetic methods and an evaluation of anticancer activity of halogenated noscapine analogs. Our results show that all analogs display higher tubulin-binding activity than noscapine and inhibit proliferation of human cancer cells (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231 and CEM). Surprisingly, the bromo-analog is approximately 40-fold more potent than noscapine in inhibiting cellular proliferation of MCF-7 cells. The ability of these analogs to inhibit cellular proliferation is mediated by cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase, in that all analogs except 9-iodonoscapine, caused selective mitotic arrest with a higher efficiency than noscapine followed by apoptotic cell death as shown by immunofluorescence and quantitative FACS analyses. Furthermore, our results reveal the appearance of numerous fragmented nuclei as evidenced by DAPI staining. Thus, our data indicate a great potential of these compounds for studying microtubule-mediated processes and as chemotherapeutic agents for the management of human cancers.

  6. Delicaflavone induces autophagic cell death in lung cancer via Akt/mTOR/p70S6K signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Sui, Yuxia; Yao, Hong; Li, Shaoguang; Jin, Long; Shi, Peiying; Li, Zhijun; Wang, Gang; Lin, Shilan; Wu, Youjia; Li, Yuxiang; Huang, Liying; Liu, Qicai; Lin, Xinhua

    2017-03-01

    Searching for potential anticancer agents from natural sources is an effective strategy for developing novel chemotherapeutic agents. In this study, data supporting the in vitro and in vivo anticancer effects of delicaflavone, a rarely occurring biflavonoid from Selaginella doederleinii, were reported. Delicaflavone exhibited favorable anticancer properties, as shown by the MTT assay and xenograft model of human non-small cell lung cancer in male BALB/c nude mice without observable adverse effect. By transmission electron microscopy with acridine orange and Cyto-ID®Autophagy detection dyes, Western blot analysis, and RT-PCR assay, we confirmed that delicaflavone induces autophagic cell death by increasing the ratio of LC3-II to LC3-I, which are autophagy-related proteins, and promoting the generation of acidic vesicular organelles and autolysosomes in the cytoplasm of human lung cancer A549 and PC-9 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Delicaflavone downregulated the expression of phospho-Akt, phospho-mTOR, and phospho-p70S6K in a time- and dose-dependent manner, suggesting that it induced autophagy by inhibiting the Akt/mTOR/p70S6K pathway in A549 and PC-9 cells. Delicaflavone is a potential anticancer agent that can induce autophagic cell death in human non-small cell lung cancer via the Akt/mTOR/p70S6K signaling pathway. Delicaflavone showed anti-lung cancer effects in vitro and in vivo. Delicaflavone induced autophagic cell death via Akt/mTOR/p70S6K signaling pathway. Delicaflavone did not show observable side effects in a xenograft mouse model. Delicaflavone may represent a potential therapeutic agent for lung cancer.

  7. Radical Decisions in Cancer: Redox Control of Cell Growth and Death

    PubMed Central

    Sainz, Rosa M.; Lombo, Felipe; Mayo, Juan C.

    2012-01-01

    Free radicals play a key role in many physiological decisions in cells. Since free radicals are toxic to cellular components, it is known that they cause DNA damage, contribute to DNA instability and mutation and thus favor carcinogenesis. However, nowadays it is assumed that free radicals play a further complex role in cancer. Low levels of free radicals and steady state levels of antioxidant enzymes are responsible for the fine tuning of redox status inside cells. A change in redox state is a way to modify the physiological status of the cell, in fact, a more reduced status is found in resting cells while a more oxidative status is associated with proliferative cells. The mechanisms by which redox status can change the proliferative activity of cancer cells are related to transcriptional and posttranscriptional modifications of proteins that play a critical role in cell cycle control. Since cancer cells show higher levels of free radicals compared with their normal counterparts, it is believed that the anti-oxidative stress mechanism is also increased in cancer cells. In fact, the levels of some of the most important antioxidant enzymes are elevated in advanced status of some types of tumors. Anti-cancer treatment is compromised by survival mechanisms in cancer cells and collateral damage in normal non-pathological tissues. Though some resistance mechanisms have been described, they do not yet explain why treatment of cancer fails in several tumors. Given that some antitumoral treatments are based on the generation of free radicals, we will discuss in this review the possible role of antioxidant enzymes in the survival mechanism in cancer cells and then, its participation in the failure of cancer treatments. PMID:24213319

  8. Inhibition of proteasome activity by various fruits and vegetables is associated with cancer cell death.

    PubMed

    Chen, Marina S; Chen, Di; Dou, Q Ping

    2004-01-01

    There is a large amount of scientific evidence showing that fruits and vegetables lower the risk of cancer. However, the responsible molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Our previous studies have demonstrated that inhibition of proteasomal chymotrypsin-like activity is associated with cancer cell apoptosis, which may also be the major mechanism responsible for the anticancer effects of green tea polyphenols. In the current study, we tested the hypothesis that some fruits and vegetables inhibit tumor cell proteasome activity and that this inhibition contributes to their cancer-preventative activities. We report that the extracts of apple and grape are more potent than onion, tomato and celery in: (i) inhibiting the proteasomal chymotrypsin-like activity in leukemia Jurkat T cell extract; (ii) accumulating the polyubiquitinated proteins in intact Jurkat T cells; (iii) inducing activation of caspase-3/-7 and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase in intact Jurkat T cells; and (iv) inducing the appearance of spherical cells preferentially in prostate cancer PC-3 over the normal NIH 3T3 cell line. We also found that strawberry extract had some effect on Jurkat T cell extract and the prostate PC-3 cell line but not on intact Jurkat T cells. Our findings suggest that the proteasome is a cancer-related molecular target for, at least, the extracts of apple, grape and onion, and that the inhibition of proteasome activity by these fruits or vegetable may contribute to their cancer-preventative effects, although other molecular mechanisms may also be involved.

  9. Involvement of Reactive Oxygen Species in Breast Cancer Cells Development, Maintenance and Death

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-07-01

    3453-7 2. Induction of cell death by pro-oxidant action of Moxa smoke. Hitosugi N, Ohno R, Hatsukari I, Nakamura S, Mizukami S, Nagasaka H, Matsumoto I...Mononuclear Cells." Arch . Environ. Health 1994,49,246-250. 4. Tortora, G., Funke, B.; Case CL (1995) Microbiology (5 th ed) The Benjamin/Cummings

  10. [Pathophysiologic programming of cell death].

    PubMed

    Dobryszycka, W

    1998-01-01

    In multicellular organisms homeostasis depends on a balance between cell proliferation and cell death. In this review principles of the physiology of programmed cell death (apoptosis), i.e. biochemical features, involved genes and proteolytic enzymes, are described. Alterations in apoptosis contribute to the pathogenesis of a number of human diseases, including cancer, viral infections, inflammation, hematopoietic and immunological system defects (e.g. AIDS), neurodegenerative disorders. Specific effect on regulation of apoptosis might lead to new possibilities for treatment. Methods of quantitative determinations of apoptosis are discussed.

  11. A Review on Novel Breast Cancer Therapies: Photodynamic Therapy and Plant Derived Agent Induced Cell Death Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    George, Blassan Plackal Adimuriyil; Abrahamse, Heidi

    2016-01-01

    This review article presents an extensive examination of risk factors for breast cancer, treatment strategies with special attention to photodynamic therapy and natural product based treatments. Breast cancer remains the most commonly occurring cancer in women worldwide and the detection, treatment, and prevention are prominent concerns in public health. Background information on current developments in treatment helps to update the approach towards risk assessment. Breast cancer risk is linked to many factors such as hereditary, reproductive and lifestyle factors. Minimally invasive Photodynamic therapy (PDT) can be used in the management of various cancers; it uses a light sensitive drug (a photosensitizer, PS) and a light of visible wavelength, to destroy targeted cancer cells. State of the art analyses has been carried out to investigate advancement in the search for the cure and control of cancer progression using natural products. Traditional medicinal plants have been used as lead compounds for drug discovery in modern medicine. Both PDT and plant derived drugs induce cell death via different mechanisms including apoptosis, necrosis, autophagy, cell cycle regulation and even the regulation of various cell signalling pathways.

  12. Induction of abscopal anti-tumor immunity and immunogenic tumor cell death by ionizing irradiation - implications for cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Frey, B; Rubner, Y; Wunderlich, R; Weiss, E-M; Pockley, A G; Fietkau, R; Gaipl, U S

    2012-01-01

    Although cancer progression is primarily driven by the expansion of tumor cells, the tumor microenvironment and anti-tumor immunity also play important roles. Herein, we consider how tumors can become established by escaping immune surveillance and also how cancer cells can be rendered visible to the immune system by standard therapies such as radiotherapy or chemotherapy, either alone or in combination with additional immune stimulators. Although local radiotherapy results in DNA damage (targeted effects), it is also capable of inducing immunogenic forms of tumor cell death which are associated with a release of immune activating danger signals (non-targeted effects), such as necrosis. Necrotic tumor cells may result from continued exposure to death stimuli and/or an impaired phosphatidylserine (PS) dependent clearance of the dying tumor cells. In such circumstances, mature dendritic cells take up tumor antigen and mediate the induction of adaptive and innate anti-tumor immunity. Locally-triggered, systemic immune activation can also lead to a spontaneous regression of tumors or metastases that are outside the radiation field - an effect which is termed abscopal. Preclinical studies have demonstrated that combining radiotherapy with immune stimulation can induce anti-tumor immunity. Given that it takes time for immunity to develop following exposure to immunogenic tumor cells, we propose practical combination therapies that should be considered as a basis for future research and clinical practice. It is essential that radiation oncologists become more aware of the importance of the immune system to the success of cancer therapy.

  13. Small Molecule Activation of Procaspase-2 for the Selective Induction of Apoptotic Death in Breast Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-01

    have synthesized a library of compounds based on a previously identified procaspase-2 activator. These compounds were then tested for their ability to...activate procaspase-2 in vitro. The results from these tests indicated that several of the compounds did indeed activate procaspase-2. Testing of...enzyme activation screens. As a result of this discovery, the compounds were not tested for their ability to induce death in breast cancer cell lines

  14. The novel anthraquinone derivative IMP1338 induces death of human cancer cells by p53-independent S and G2/M cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyun Kyung; Ryu, Hwani; Son, A-Rang; Seo, Bitna; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Song, Jie-Young; Ahn, Jiyeon

    2016-04-01

    To identify novel small molecules that induce selective cancer cell death, we screened a chemical library containing 1040 compounds in HT29 colon cancer and CCD18-Co normal colon cells, using a phenotypic cell-based viability assay system with the Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8). We discovered a novel anthraquinone derivative, N-(4-[{(9,10-dioxo-9,10-dihydro-1-anthracenyl)sulfonyl}amino]phenyl)-N-methylacetamide (IMP1338), which was cytotoxic against the human colon cancer cells tested. The MTT cell viability assay showed that treatment with IMP1338 selectively inhibited HCT116, HCT116 p53(-/-), HT29, and A549 cancer cell proliferation compared to that of Beas2B normal epithelial cells. To elucidate the cellular mechanism underlying the cytotoxicity of IMP1338, we examined the effect of IMP1338 on the cell cycle distribution and death of cancer cells. IMP1338 treatment significantly arrested the cell cycle at S and G2/M phases by DNA damage and led to apoptotic cell death, which was determined using FACS analysis with Annexin V/PI double staining. Furthermore, IMP1338 increased caspase-3 cleavage in wild-type p53, p53 knockout HCT116, and HT29 cells as determined using immunoblotting. In addition, IMP1338 markedly induced the phosphorylation of histone H2AX and Chk1 in both cell lines while the combination of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and radiation inhibited the viability of HCT116, HCT116 p53(-/-), and HT29 cells compared to 5-FU or radiation alone. Our findings indicated that IMP1338 induced p53-independent cell death through S and G2/M phase arrest as well as DNA damage. These results provide a basis for future investigations assessing the promising anticancer properties of IMP1338.

  15. Heat-modified citrus pectin induces apoptosis-like cell death and autophagy in HepG2 and A549 cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Leclere, Lionel; Fransolet, Maude; Cote, Francois; Cambier, Pierre; Arnould, Thierry; Van Cutsem, Pierre; Michiels, Carine

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is still one of the leading causes of death worldwide, and finding new treatments remains a major challenge. Previous studies showed that modified forms of pectin, a complex polysaccharide present in the primary plant cell wall, possess anticancer properties. Nevertheless, the mechanism of action of modified pectin and the pathways involved are unclear. Here, we show that citrus pectin modified by heat treatment induced cell death in HepG2 and A549 cells. The induced cell death differs from classical apoptosis because no DNA cleavage was observed. In addition, Z-VAD-fmk, a pan-caspase inhibitor, did not influence the observed cell death in HepG2 cells but appeared to be partly protective in A549 cells, indicating that heat-modified citrus pectin might induce caspase-independent cell death. An increase in the abundance of the phosphatidylethanolamine-conjugated Light Chain 3 (LC3) protein and a decrease in p62 protein abundance were observed in both cell types when incubated in the presence of heat-modified citrus pectin. These results indicate the activation of autophagy. To our knowledge, this is the first time that autophagy has been revealed in cells incubated in the presence of a modified form of pectin. This autophagy activation appears to be protective, at least for A549 cells, because its inhibition with 3-methyladenine increased the observed modified pectin-induced cytotoxicity. This study confirms the potential of modified pectin to improve chemotherapeutic cancer treatments.

  16. Fisetin induces autophagic cell death through suppression of mTOR signaling pathway in prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Yewseok; Afaq, Farrukh; Khan, Naghma; Johnson, Jeremy J.; Khusro, Fatima H.; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase is an important component of PTEN/PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, which is frequently deregulated in prostate cancer (CaP). Recent studies suggest that targeting PTEN/PI3K/Akt and mTOR signaling pathway could be an effective strategy for the treatment of hormone refractory CaP. Here, we show that the treatment of androgen-independent and PTEN-negative human CaP PC3 cells with fisetin, a dietary flavonoid, resulted in inhibition of mTOR kinase signaling pathway. Treatment of cells with fisetin inhibited mTOR activity and downregulated Raptor, Rictor, PRAS40 and GβL that resulted in loss of mTOR complexes (mTORC)1/2 formation. Fisetin also activated the mTOR repressor TSC2 through inhibition of Akt and activation of AMPK. Fisetin-mediated inhibition of mTOR resulted in hypophosphorylation of 4EBP1 and suppression of Cap-dependent translation. We also found that fisetin treatment leads to induction of autophagic-programmed cell death rather than cytoprotective autophagy as shown by small interfering RNA Beclin1-knockdown and autophagy inhibitor. Taken together, we provide evidence that fisetin functions as a dual inhibitor of mTORC1/2 signaling leading to inhibition of Cap-dependent translation and induction of autophagic cell death in PC3 cells. These results suggest that fisetin could be a useful chemotherapeutic agent in treatment of hormone refractory CaP. PMID:20530556

  17. Ophiobolin A, a sesterpenoid fungal phytotoxin, displays different mechanisms of cell death in mammalian cells depending upon the cancer cell origin.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Rachel; Lodge, Tiffany; Evidente, Antonio; Kiss, Robert; Townley, Helen

    2017-03-01

    Herein we have undertaken a systematic analysis of the effects of the fungal derivative ophiobolin A (OphA) on eight cancer cell lines from different tissue types. The LD50 for each cell line was determined and the change in cell size determined. Flow cytometric analysis and western blotting were used to assess the cell death markers for early apoptosis, late apoptosis and necrosis, and the involvement of the caspase signalling pathway. Alterations in calcium levels and reactive oxygen species were assessed due to their integral involvement in intracellular signalling. Subsequently, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondrial responses were investigated more closely. The extent of ER swelling, and the upregulation of proteins involved in the unfolded protein responses (UPR) were seen to vary according to cell line. The mitochondria were also shown to behave differently in response to the OphA in the different cell lines in terms of the change in membrane potential, the total area of mitochondria in the cell and the number of mitochondrial bifurcations. The data obtained in the present study indicate that the cancer cell lines tested are unable to successfully activate the ER stress/UPR responses, and that the mitochondria appear to be a central player in OphA-induced cancer cell death.

  18. Ophiobolin A, a sesterpenoid fungal phytotoxin, displays different mechanisms of cell death in mammalian cells depending upon the cancer cell origin

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Rachel; Lodge, Tiffany; Evidente, Antonio; Kiss, Robert; Townley, Helen

    2017-01-01

    Herein we have undertaken a systematic analysis of the effects of the fungal derivative ophiobolin A (OphA) on eight cancer cell lines from different tissue types. The LD50 for each cell line was determined and the change in cell size determined. Flow cytometric analysis and western blotting were used to assess the cell death markers for early apoptosis, late apoptosis and necrosis, and the involvement of the caspase signalling pathway. Alterations in calcium levels and reactive oxygen species were assessed due to their integral involvement in intracellular signalling. Subsequently, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondrial responses were investigated more closely. The extent of ER swelling, and the upregulation of proteins involved in the unfolded protein responses (UPR) were seen to vary according to cell line. The mitochondria were also shown to behave differently in response to the OphA in the different cell lines in terms of the change in membrane potential, the total area of mitochondria in the cell and the number of mitochondrial bifurcations. The data obtained in the present study indicate that the cancer cell lines tested are unable to successfully activate the ER stress/UPR responses, and that the mitochondria appear to be a central player in OphA-induced cancer cell death. PMID:28112374

  19. In vitro study of cell death with 5-aminolevulinic acid based photodynamic therapy to improve the efficiency of cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firdous, S.; Nawaz, M.; Ikram, M.; Ahmed, M.

    2012-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a kind of photochemo therapeutic treatment that exerts its effect mainly through the induction of cell death. Distinct types of cell death may be elicited by different PDT regimes. In this study, efforts are underway to optimize PDT protocols for improved efficacy and combination of all three PDT mechanisms involved in the different human carcinomas cell narcosis. Our in vitro cell culture experiments with 5-aminolevulanic acid (ALA) a clinically approved photiosensitizer (PS) and 635 nm laser light have yielded promising results, as follow: (1) (human cervical cancer (HeLa) cell line incubated, for 18 h, with 30 μg/ml of 5-ALA, treated with laser light dose of 50 J/cm2 can produce 85% of cell killing (2) human larynx carcinoma (Hep2c) cell line incubated, for 7 h, with 55 μg/ml of 5-ALA, treated with laser light dose of 85 J/cm2 can produce 75% of cell killing (3) human liver cancer (HepG2) cell line incubated, for 22-48 h, with 262 μg/ml of 5-ALA, treated with laser light dose of 120 J/cm2 can produce 95% of cell killing (4) human muscle cancer (RD) cell line incubated, for 47 h, with 250 μg/ml of 5-ALA, treated with laser light dose of 80 J/cm2 can produce 76% of cell killing (5) Human embryonic kidney (HEK293T) cell line incu-bated, for 18 h, with 400 μg/ml of 5-ALA, treated with laser light dose of 40 J/cm2 can produce 82% of cell killing confirming the efficacy of photodynamic therapy.

  20. Nano neodymium oxide induces massive vacuolization and autophagic cell death in non-small cell lung cancer NCI-H460 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yong; Yang Lisong; Feng Chao; Wen Longping . E-mail: lpwen@ustc.edu.cn

    2005-11-11

    Neodymium, a rare earth element, was known to exhibit cytotoxic effects and induce apoptosis in certain cancer cells. Here we show that nano-sized neodymium oxide (Nano Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) induced massive vacuolization and cell death in non-small cell lung cancer NCI-H460 cells at micromolar equivalent concentration range. Cell death elicited by Nano Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} was not due to apoptosis and caspases were not involved. Electron microscopy and acridine orange staining revealed extensive autophagy in the cytoplasm of the cells treated by Nano Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Autophagy induced by Nano Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} was accompanied by S-phase cell cycle arrest, mild disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential, and inhibition of proteasome activity. Bafilomycin A1, but not 3-MA, induced apoptosis while inhibiting autophagy. Our results revealed a novel biological function for Nano Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} and may have implications for the therapy of non-small cell lung cancer.

  1. Quantification of Ultrasonic Scattering Properties of In Vivo Tumor Cell Death in Mouse Models of Breast Cancer1

    PubMed Central

    Tadayyon, Hadi; Sannachi, Lakshmanan; Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Al-Mahrouki, Azza; Tran, William T.; Kolios, Michael C.; Czarnota, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Quantitative ultrasound parameters based on form factor models were investigated as potential biomarkers of cell death in breast tumor (MDA-231) xenografts treated with chemotherapy. METHODS: Ultrasound backscatter radiofrequency data were acquired from MDA-231 breast cancer tumor–bearing mice (n = 20) before and after the administration of chemotherapy drugs at two ultrasound frequencies: 7 MHz and 20 MHz. Radiofrequency spectral analysis involved estimating the backscatter coefficient from regions of interest in the center of the tumor, to which form factor models were fitted, resulting in estimates of average scatterer diameter and average acoustic concentration (AAC). RESULTS: The ∆AAC parameter extracted from the spherical Gaussian model was found to be the most effective cell death biomarker (at the lower frequency range, r2 = 0.40). At both frequencies, AAC in the treated tumors increased significantly (P = .026 and .035 at low and high frequencies, respectively) 24 hours after treatment compared with control tumors. Furthermore, stepwise multiple linear regression analysis of the low-frequency data revealed that a multiparameter quantitative ultrasound model was strongly correlated to cell death determined histologically posttreatment (r2 = 0.74). CONCLUSION: The Gaussian form factor model–based scattering parameters can potentially be used to track the extent of cell death at clinically relevant frequencies (7 MHz). The 20-MHz results agreed with previous findings in which parameters related to the backscatter intensity (i.e., AAC) increased with cell death. The findings suggested that, in addition to the backscatter coefficient parameter ∆AAC, biological features including tumor heterogeneity and initial tumor volume were important factors in the prediction of cell death response. PMID:26692527

  2. Classification of cell death

    PubMed Central

    Kroemer, G; Galluzzi, L; Vandenabeele, P; Abrams, J; Alnemri, ES; Baehrecke, EH; Blagosklonny, MV; El-Deiry, WS; Golstein, P; Green, DR; Hengartner, M; Knight, RA; Kumar, S; Lipton, SA; Malorni, W; Nuñez, G; Peter, ME; Tschopp, J; Yuan, J; Piacentini, M; Zhivotovsky, B; Melino, G

    2009-01-01

    Different types of cell death are often defined by morphological criteria, without a clear reference to precise biochemical mechanisms. The Nomenclature Committee on Cell Death (NCCD) proposes unified criteria for the definition of cell death and of its different morphologies, while formulating several caveats against the misuse of words and concepts that slow down progress in the area of cell death research. Authors, reviewers and editors of scientific periodicals are invited to abandon expressions like ‘percentage apoptosis’ and to replace them with more accurate descriptions of the biochemical and cellular parameters that are actually measured. Moreover, at the present stage, it should be accepted that caspase-independent mechanisms can cooperate with (or substitute for) caspases in the execution of lethal signaling pathways and that ‘autophagic cell death’ is a type of cell death occurring together with (but not necessarily by) autophagic vacuolization. This study details the 2009 recommendations of the NCCD on the use of cell death-related terminology including ‘entosis’, ‘mitotic catastrophe’, ‘necrosis’, ‘necroptosis’ and ‘pyroptosis’. PMID:18846107

  3. Synthetic tambjamine analogues induce mitochondrial swelling and lysosomal dysfunction leading to autophagy blockade and necrotic cell death in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Rodilla, Ananda M; Korrodi-Gregório, Luís; Hernando, Elsa; Manuel-Manresa, Pilar; Quesada, Roberto; Pérez-Tomás, Ricardo; Soto-Cerrato, Vanessa

    2017-02-15

    Current pharmacological treatments for lung cancer show very poor clinical outcomes, therefore, the development of novel anticancer agents with innovative mechanisms of action is urgently needed. Cancer cells have a reversed pH gradient compared to normal cells, which favours cancer progression by promoting proliferation, metabolic adaptation and evasion of apoptosis. In this regard, the use of ionophores to modulate intracellular pH appears as a promising new therapeutic strategy. Indeed, there is a growing body of evidence supporting ionophores as novel antitumour drugs. Despite this, little is known about the implications of pH deregulation and homeostasis imbalance triggered by ionophores at the cellular level. In this work, we deeply analyse for the first time the anticancer effects of tambjamine analogues, a group of highly effective anion selective ionophores, at the cellular and molecular levels. First, their effects on cell viability were determined in several lung cancer cell lines and patient-derived cancer stem cells, demonstrating their potent cytotoxic effects. Then, we have characterized the induced lysosomal deacidification, as well as, the massive cytoplasmic vacuolization observed after treatment with these compounds, which is consistent with mitochondrial swelling. Finally, the activation of several proteins involved in stress response, autophagy and apoptosis was also detected, although they were not significantly responsible for the cell death induced. Altogether, these evidences suggest that tambjamine analogues provoke an imbalance in cellular ion homeostasis that triggers mitochondrial dysfunction and lysosomal deacidification leading to a potent cytotoxic effect through necrosis in lung cancer cell lines and cancer stem cells.

  4. Suppression of death receptor 5 enhances cancer cell invasion and metastasis through activation of caspase-8/TRAF2-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Oh, You-Take; Yue, Ping; Wang, Dongsheng; Tong, Jing-Shan; Chen, Zhuo G; Khuri, Fadlo R; Sun, Shi-Yong

    2015-12-01

    The role of death receptor 5 (DR5), a well-known cell surface pro-apoptotic protein, in the negative regulation of invasion and metastasis of human cancer cells and the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown and were hence the focus of this study. In this report, we have demonstrated that DR5 functions to suppress invasion and metastasis of human cancer cells, as evidenced by enhanced cancer cell invasion and metastasis upon genetic suppression of DR5 either by gene knockdown or knockout. When DR5 is suppressed, FADD and caspase-8 may recruit and stabilize TRAF2 to form a metastasis and invasion signaling complex, resulting in activation of ERK and JNK/AP-1 signaling that mediate the elevation and activation of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP1) and eventual promotion of cancer invasion and metastasis. Our findings thus highlight a novel non-apoptotic function of DR5 as a suppressor of human cancer cell invasion and metastasis and suggest a basic working model elucidating the underlying biology.

  5. Diatom-Derived Polyunsaturated Aldehydes Activate Cell Death in Human Cancer Cell Lines but Not Normal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sansone, Clementina; Braca, Alessandra; Ercolesi, Elena; Romano, Giovanna; Palumbo, Anna; Casotti, Raffaella; Francone, Maria; Ianora, Adrianna

    2014-01-01

    Diatoms are an important class of unicellular algae that produce bioactive polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUAs) that induce abortions or malformations in the offspring of invertebrates exposed to them during gestation. Here we compare the effects of the PUAs 2-trans,4-trans-decadienal (DD), 2-trans,4-trans-octadienal (OD) and 2-trans,4-trans-heptadienal (HD) on the adenocarcinoma cell lines lung A549 and colon COLO 205, and the normal lung/brunch epithelial BEAS-2B cell line. Using the viability MTT/Trypan blue assays, we show that PUAs have a toxic effect on both A549 and COLO 205 tumor cells but not BEAS-2B normal cells. DD was the strongest of the three PUAs tested, at all time-intervals considered, but HD was as strong as DD after 48 h. OD was the least active of the three PUAs. The effect of the three PUAs was somewhat stronger for A549 cells. We therefore studied the death signaling pathway activated in A549 showing that cells treated with DD activated Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor 1 (TNFR1) and Fas Associated Death Domain (FADD) leading to necroptosis via caspase-3 without activating the survival pathway Receptor-Interacting Protein (RIP). The TNFR1/FADD/caspase pathway was also observed with OD, but only after 48 h. This was the only PUA that activated RIP, consistent with the finding that OD causes less damage to the cell compared to DD and HD. In contrast, cells treated with HD activated the Fas/FADD/caspase pathway. This is the first report that PUAs activate an extrinsic apoptotic machinery in contrast to other anticancer drugs that promote an intrinsic death pathway, without affecting the viability of normal cells from the same tissue type. These findings have interesting implications also from the ecological viewpoint considering that HD is one of the most common PUAs produced by diatoms. PMID:24992192

  6. Diatom-derived polyunsaturated aldehydes activate cell death in human cancer cell lines but not normal cells.

    PubMed

    Sansone, Clementina; Braca, Alessandra; Ercolesi, Elena; Romano, Giovanna; Palumbo, Anna; Casotti, Raffaella; Francone, Maria; Ianora, Adrianna

    2014-01-01

    Diatoms are an important class of unicellular algae that produce bioactive polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUAs) that induce abortions or malformations in the offspring of invertebrates exposed to them during gestation. Here we compare the effects of the PUAs 2-trans,4-trans-decadienal (DD), 2-trans,4-trans-octadienal (OD) and 2-trans,4-trans-heptadienal (HD) on the adenocarcinoma cell lines lung A549 and colon COLO 205, and the normal lung/brunch epithelial BEAS-2B cell line. Using the viability MTT/Trypan blue assays, we show that PUAs have a toxic effect on both A549 and COLO 205 tumor cells but not BEAS-2B normal cells. DD was the strongest of the three PUAs tested, at all time-intervals considered, but HD was as strong as DD after 48 h. OD was the least active of the three PUAs. The effect of the three PUAs was somewhat stronger for A549 cells. We therefore studied the death signaling pathway activated in A549 showing that cells treated with DD activated Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor 1 (TNFR1) and Fas Associated Death Domain (FADD) leading to necroptosis via caspase-3 without activating the survival pathway Receptor-Interacting Protein (RIP). The TNFR1/FADD/caspase pathway was also observed with OD, but only after 48 h. This was the only PUA that activated RIP, consistent with the finding that OD causes less damage to the cell compared to DD and HD. In contrast, cells treated with HD activated the Fas/FADD/caspase pathway. This is the first report that PUAs activate an extrinsic apoptotic machinery in contrast to other anticancer drugs that promote an intrinsic death pathway, without affecting the viability of normal cells from the same tissue type. These findings have interesting implications also from the ecological viewpoint considering that HD is one of the most common PUAs produced by diatoms.

  7. Highly efficient synthetic iron-dependent nucleases activate both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic death pathways in leukemia cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Horn, Adolfo; Fernandes, Christiane; Parrilha, Gabrieli L; Kanashiro, Milton M; Borges, Franz V; de Melo, Edésio J T; Schenk, Gerhard; Terenzi, Hernán; Pich, Claus T

    2013-11-01

    The nuclease activity and the cytotoxicity toward human leukemia cancer cells of iron complexes, [Fe(HPClNOL)Cl2]NO3 (1), [Cl(HPClNOL)Fe(μ-O)Fe(HPClNOL)Cl]Cl2·2H2O (2), and [(SO4)(HPClNOL)Fe(μ-O)Fe(HPClNOL)(SO4)]·6H2O (3) (HPClNOL=1-(bis-pyridin-2-ylmethyl-amino)-3-chloropropan-2-ol), were investigated. Each complex was able to promote plasmid DNA cleavage and change the supercoiled form of the plasmid to circular and linear ones. Kinetic data revealed that (1), (2) and (3) increase the rate of DNA hydrolysis about 278, 192 and 339 million-fold, respectively. The activity of the complexes was inhibited by distamycin, indicating that they interact with the minor groove of the DNA. The cytotoxic activity of the complexes toward U937, HL-60, Jukart and THP-1 leukemia cancer cells was studied employing 3-(4,5-dimethythiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT), fluorescence and electronic transmission microscopies, flow cytometry and a cytochrome C release assay. Compound (2) has the highest activity toward cancer cells and is the least toxic for normal ones (i.e. peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs)). In contrast, compound (1) is the least active toward cancer cells but displays the highest toxicity toward normal cells. Transmission electronic microscopy indicates that cell death shows features typical of apoptotic cells, which was confirmed using the annexin V-FITC/PI (fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide) assay. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that at an early stage during the treatment with complex (2) mitochondria lose their transmembrane potential, resulting in cytochrome C release. A quantification of caspases 3, 9 (intrinsic apoptosis pathway) and caspase 8 (extrinsic apoptosis pathway) indicated that both the intrinsic (via mitochondria) and extrinsic (via death receptors) pathways are involved in the apoptotic stimuli.

  8. Oxidative stress activates the TRPM2-Ca(2+)-CaMKII-ROS signaling loop to induce cell death in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Huang, Lihong; Yue, Jianbo

    2016-12-20

    High intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) cause oxidative stress that results in numerous pathologies, including cell death. Transient potential receptor melastatin-2 (TRPM2), a Ca(2+)-permeable cation channel, is mainly activated by intracellular adenosine diphosphate ribose (ADPR) in response to oxidative stress. Here we studied the role and mechanisms of TRPM2-mediated Ca(2+) influx on oxidative stress-induced cell death in cancer cells. We found that oxidative stress activated the TRPM2-Ca(2+)-CaMKII cascade to inhibit early autophagy induction, which ultimately led to cell death in TRPM2 expressing cancer cells. On the other hand, TRPM2 knockdown switched cells from cell death to autophagy for survival in response to oxidative stress. Moreover, we found that oxidative stress activated the TRPM2-CaMKII cascade to further induce intracellular ROS production, which led to mitochondria fragmentation and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. In summary, our data demonstrated that oxidative stress activates the TRPM2-Ca(2+)-CaMKII-ROS signal loop to inhibit autophagy and induce cell death.

  9. Facilitated Anion Transport Induces Hyperpolarization of the Cell Membrane That Triggers Differentiation and Cell Death in Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Soto-Cerrato, Vanessa; Manuel-Manresa, Pilar; Hernando, Elsa; Calabuig-Fariñas, Silvia; Martínez-Romero, Alicia; Fernández-Dueñas, Víctor; Sahlholm, Kristoffer; Knöpfel, Thomas; García-Valverde, María; Rodilla, Ananda M; Jantus-Lewintre, Eloisa; Farràs, Rosa; Ciruela, Francisco; Pérez-Tomás, Ricardo; Quesada, Roberto

    2015-12-23

    Facilitated anion transport potentially represents a powerful tool to modulate various cellular functions. However, research into the biological effects of small molecule anionophores is still at an early stage. Here we have used two potent anionophore molecules inspired in the structure of marine metabolites tambjamines to gain insight into the effect induced by these compounds at the cellular level. We show how active anionophores, capable of facilitating the transmembrane transport of chloride and bicarbonate in model phospholipid liposomes, induce acidification of the cytosol and hyperpolarization of plasma cell membranes. We demonstrate how this combined effect can be used against cancer stem cells (CSCs). Hyperpolarization of cell membrane induces cell differentiation and loss of stemness of CSCs leading to effective elimination of this cancer cell subpopulation.

  10. Physangulidine A, a withanolide from Physalis angulata, perturbs the cell cycle and induces cell death by apoptosis in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Reyes, E Merit; Jin, Zhuang; Vaisberg, Abraham J; Hammond, Gerald B; Bates, Paula J

    2013-01-25

    Recently, our group reported the discovery of three new withanolides, physangulidines A-C, from Physalis angulata. In this study, the biological effects of physangulidine A (1), which was the most active and abundant of the three new constituents, are described. It was found that 1 significantly reduces survival in clonogenic assays for two hormone-independent prostate cancer cell lines. Flow cytometry and confocal microscopy studies in DU145 human prostate cancer cells indicated that 1 induces cell cycle arrest in the G(2)/M phase and causes defective mitosis. It was determined also that 1 produces programed cell death by apoptosis, as evidenced by biochemical markers and distinct changes in cell morphology. These results imply that the antimitotic and proapoptotic effects of 1 may contribute significantly to the biological activities and potential medicinal properties of its plant of origin.

  11. Lysosome-mediated Cell Death and Autophagy-Dependent Multidrug Resistance in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    with established links (Fig. 3); this result opens the possibility of hypothesis generation. For example, upregulation of NDRG1 in hypoxia [1] may...be tested in both parental cells and in resistant clones and may involve differential regulation by MYC and PTEN [2, 3] while downregulation of NDRG1 ...the hypoxia- inducible protein NDRG1 in pancreatic cancer. Br J Cancer, 2006. 95(3): p. 307-13. 2. Zhang, J., et al., Human differentiation-related

  12. Molecular Mechanisms by Which a Fucus vesiculosus Extract Mediates Cell Cycle Inhibition and Cell Death in Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Geisen, Ulf; Zenthoefer, Marion; Peipp, Matthias; Kerber, Jannik; Plenge, Johannes; Managò, Antonella; Fuhrmann, Markus; Geyer, Roland; Hennig, Steffen; Adam, Dieter; Piker, Levent; Rimbach, Gerald; Kalthoff, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive cancer entities, with an extremely poor 5-year survival rate. Therefore, novel therapeutic agents with specific modes of action are urgently needed. Marine organisms represent a promising source to identify new pharmacologically active substances. Secondary metabolites derived from marine algae are of particular interest. The present work describes cellular and molecular mechanisms induced by an HPLC-fractionated, hydrophilic extract derived from the Baltic brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus (Fv1). Treatment with Fv1 resulted in a strong inhibition of viability in various pancreatic cancer cell lines. This extract inhibited the cell cycle of proliferating cells due to the up-regulation of cell cycle inhibitors, shown on the mRNA (microarray data) and protein level. As a result, cells were dying in a caspase-independent manner. Experiments with non-dividing cells showed that proliferation is a prerequisite for the effectiveness of Fv1. Importantly, Fv1 showed low cytotoxic activity against non-malignant resting T cells and terminally differentiated cells like erythrocytes. Interestingly, accelerated killing effects were observed in combination with inhibitors of autophagy. Our in vitro data suggest that Fv1 may represent a promising new agent that deserves further development towards clinical application. PMID:26204945

  13. Molecular Mechanisms by Which a Fucus vesiculosus Extract Mediates Cell Cycle Inhibition and Cell Death in Pancreatic Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Geisen, Ulf; Zenthoefer, Marion; Peipp, Matthias; Kerber, Jannik; Plenge, Johannes; Managò, Antonella; Fuhrmann, Markus; Geyer, Roland; Hennig, Steffen; Adam, Dieter; Piker, Levent; Rimbach, Gerald; Kalthoff, Holger

    2015-07-20

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive cancer entities, with an extremely poor 5-year survival rate. Therefore, novel therapeutic agents with specific modes of action are urgently needed. Marine organisms represent a promising source to identify new pharmacologically active substances. Secondary metabolites derived from marine algae are of particular interest. The present work describes cellular and molecular mechanisms induced by an HPLC-fractionated, hydrophilic extract derived from the Baltic brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus (Fv1). Treatment with Fv1 resulted in a strong inhibition of viability in various pancreatic cancer cell lines. This extract inhibited the cell cycle of proliferating cells due to the up-regulation of cell cycle inhibitors, shown on the mRNA (microarray data) and protein level. As a result, cells were dying in a caspase-independent manner. Experiments with non-dividing cells showed that proliferation is a prerequisite for the effectiveness of Fv1. Importantly, Fv1 showed low cytotoxic activity against non-malignant resting T cells and terminally differentiated cells like erythrocytes. Interestingly, accelerated killing effects were observed in combination with inhibitors of autophagy. Our in vitro data suggest that Fv1 may represent a promising new agent that deserves further development towards clinical application.

  14. Targeting cell death signalling in cancer: minimising ‘Collateral damage'

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Joanna L; MacFarlane, Marion

    2016-01-01

    Targeting apoptosis for the treatment of cancer has become an increasingly attractive strategy, with agents in development to trigger extrinsic apoptosis via TRAIL signalling, or to prevent the anti-apoptotic activity of BCL-2 proteins or inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins. Although the evasion of apoptosis is one of the hallmarks of cancer, many cancers have intact apoptotic signalling pathways, which if unblocked could efficiently kill cancerous cells. However, it is becoming increasing clear that without a detailed understanding of both apoptotic and non-apoptotic signalling, and the key proteins that regulate these pathways, there can be dose-limiting toxicity and adverse effects associated with their modulation. Here we review the main apoptotic pathways directly targeted for anti-cancer therapy and the unforeseen consequences of their modulation. Furthermore, we highlight the importance of an in-depth mechanistic understanding of both the apoptotic and non-apoptotic functions of those proteins under investigation as anti-cancer drug targets and outline some novel approaches to sensitise cancer cells to apoptosis, thereby improving the efficacy of existing therapies when used in combination with novel targeted agents. PMID:27140313

  15. Low electric field parameters required to induce death of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shawki, Mamdouh M; Farid, Adel

    2014-06-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a novel technique that deals with killing undesirable cells, mainly cancer cells, directly without using any cytotoxic drugs. Commonly in this technique very high electric field up to 1000 V/cm is used but for very short exposure time (nanoseconds). Low electric fields (LEFs) are used before to internalize molecules and drugs inside the cells (electroendocytosis) but mainly not in killing the cells. The aim of this work is to determine the ability of using LEFs to kill cancer cells (Hela cells). The Physics idea is in making LEFs energy equivalent to IRE energy. Four IRE protocols were selected to represent very high, high, moderate and mild voltages IRE, then we make equivalent energy for each of these protocols using different LEFs' parameters of different amplitudes (7, 10, 14 and 20 V), different pulse numbers (40, 80, 160 and 320 pulses), different frequencies from 0.5 to 106.86 Hz and different pulse widths from 9.38 to 2000 ms. Each of the calculated LEF equivalent to IRE was applied on Hela cell line. The results show complete destruction of the cancer cells for all the tested exposure protocols. This damage was not due to thermal effect because the measured temperature was not changed before and after the exposure. The possible effect mechanism is discussed. It was concluded that the lethal effect on the cancer cells can be achieved using LEFs if the same energy equivalent to IRE is used. This work will help in using low-risk drug-free techniques in cancer treatment.

  16. Mn porphyrin in combination with ascorbate acts as a pro-oxidant and mediates caspase-independent cancer cell death.

    PubMed

    Evans, Myron K; Tovmasyan, Artak; Batinic-Haberle, Ines; Devi, Gayathri R

    2014-03-01

    Resistance to therapy-mediated apoptosis in inflammatory breast cancer, an aggressive and distinct subtype of breast cancer, was recently attributed to increased superoxide dismutase (SOD) expression, glutathione (GSH) content, and decreased accumulation of reactive species. In this study, we demonstrate the unique ability of two Mn(III) N-substituted pyridylporphyrin (MnP)-based SOD mimics (MnTE-2-PyP(5+) and MnTnBuOE-2-PyP(5+)) to catalyze oxidation of ascorbate, leading to the production of excessive levels of peroxide, and in turn cell death. The accumulation of peroxide, as a consequence of MnP+ascorbate treatment, was fully reversed by the administration of exogenous catalase, showing that hydrogen peroxide is essential for cell death. Cell death as a consequence of the action of MnP+ascorbate corresponded to decreases in GSH levels, prosurvival signaling (p-NF-κB, p-ERK1/2), and in expression of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein, the most potent caspase inhibitor. Although markers of classical apoptosis were observed, including PARP cleavage and annexin V staining, administration of a pan-caspase inhibitor, Q-VD-OPh, did not reverse the observed cytotoxicity. MnP+ascorbate-treated cells showed nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor, suggesting the possibility of a mechanism of caspase-independent cell death. Pharmacological ascorbate has already shown promise in recently completed phase I clinical trials, in which its oxidation and subsequent peroxide formation was catalyzed by endogenous metalloproteins. The catalysis of ascorbate oxidation by an optimized metal-based catalyst (such as MnP) carries a large therapeutic potential as an anticancer agent by itself or in combination with other modalities such as radio- and chemotherapy.

  17. Cancer: brain-regulated biphasic stress response induces cell growth or cell death to adapt to psychological stressors.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Charles; Bhatia, Shruti

    2014-01-01

    According to Indian Vedic philosophy, a human being contains 3 major bodies: (1) the matter body--brain, organs, and senses; (2) the mental body--mind, individual consciousness, intellect, and ego; and (3) the soul or causal body--universal consciousness. The third, which is located in the heart according to all spiritual traditions and recent scientific literature, can be seen as the information body that contains all memories. The mental body, which can interface with the matter and information bodies, can be seen as a field of immaterial energy that can carry, regulate, and strengthen all information (eg, thoughts or emotions) both positively and negatively. This body of information may store ancestral and/or autobiographical memories: unconscious memories from inner traumas--inner information (Ii) or samskaras in Vedic philosophy--and conscious memories from outer traumas--outer information (Io). These conscious and unconscious memories can be seen as potential psychological stressors. Resonance between Ii and Io may induce active conflicts if resistance occurs in the mental body; this conflict may cause specific metabolic activity in the brain and a stress response in the physical body, which permits adjustment to psychological stressors. The brainregulated stress response may be biphasic: cell death or growth induced by adrenergic molecular pathways during the conflict's unresolved phase and reversion to cell growth or death induced by cholinergic molecular pathways during the conflict's resolved phase. Case studies and data mining from PubMed suggest that this concept complies with the principles of holistic medicine and the scientific literature supporting its benefits. We suggest that the evolution of cancer can be seen as a biphasic stress response regulated by the brain to adapt to psychological stressors, which produce imbalance among the physical, mental, and information bodies.

  18. Engineering death receptor ligands for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Wajant, Harald; Gerspach, Jeannette; Pfizenmaier, Klaus

    2013-05-28

    CD95, TNFR1, TRAILR1 and TRAILR2 belong to a subgroup of TNF receptors which is characterized by a conserved cell death-inducing protein domain that connects these receptors to the apoptotic machinery of the cell. Activation of death receptors in malignant cells attracts increasing attention as a principle to fight cancer. Besides agonistic antibodies the major way to stimulate death receptors is the use of their naturally occurring "death ligands" CD95L, TNF and TRAIL. However, dependent from the concept followed to develop a death ligand-based therapy various limiting aspects have to be taken into consideration on the way to a "bedside" usable drug. Problems arise in particular from the cell associated transmembrane nature of the death ligands, the poor serum half life of the soluble fragments derived from the transmembrane ligands, the ubiquitous expression of the death receptors and the existence of additional non-death receptors of the death ligands. Here, we summarize strategies how these limitations can be overcome by genetic engineering.

  19. Novel piperazine core compound induces death in human liver cancer cells: possible pharmacological properties

    PubMed Central

    Samie, Nima; Muniandy, Sekaran; Kanthimathi, M. S.; Haerian, Batoul Sadat; Raja Azudin, Raja Elina

    2016-01-01

    The current study evaluates the cytotoxic mechanism of a novel piperazine derivate designated as PCC against human liver cancer cells. In this context, human liver cancer cell lines, SNU-475 and 243, human monocyte/macrophage cell line, CRL-9855, and human B lymphocyte cell line, CCL-156, were used to determine the IC50 of PCC using the standard MTT assay. PCC displayed a strong suppressive effect on SNU-475 and SNU-423 cells with an IC50 value of 6.98 ± 0.11 μg/ml and 7.76 ± 0.45 μg/ml respectively, after 24 h of treatment. Significant dipping in the mitochondrial membrane potential and elevation in the released of cytochrome c from the mitochondria indicated the induction of the intrinsic apoptosis pathway by PCC. Activation of this pathway was further evidenced by significant activation of caspase 3/7 and 9. PCC was also shown to activate the extrinsic pathways of apoptosis via activation of caspase-8 which is linked to the suppression of NF-ƙB translocation to the nucleus. Cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase was confirmed by flow cytometry and up-regulation of glutathione reductase expression was quantified by qPCR. This study suggests that PCC is a simultaneous inducer of intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of apoptosis in liver cancer cell lines. PMID:27072064

  20. ATM Inhibition Potentiates Death of Androgen Receptor-inactivated Prostate Cancer Cells with Telomere Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Vidyavathi; Wu, Min; Ciavattone, Nicholas; McKenty, Nathan; Menon, Mani; Barrack, Evelyn R.; Reddy, G. Prem-Veer; Kim, Sahn-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) plays a role in maintaining telomere stability in prostate cancer cells, as AR inactivation induces telomere dysfunction within 3 h. Since telomere dysfunction in other systems is known to activate ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated)-mediated DNA damage response (DDR) signaling pathways, we investigated the role of ATM-mediated DDR signaling in AR-inactivated prostate cancer cells. Indeed, the induction of telomere dysfunction in cells treated with AR-antagonists (Casodex or MDV3100) or AR-siRNA was associated with a dramatic increase in phosphorylation (activation) of ATM and its downstream effector Chk2 and the presenceof phosphorylated ATM at telomeres, indicating activation of DDR signaling at telomeres. Moreover, Casodex washout led to the reversal of telomere dysfunction, indicating repair of damaged telomeres. ATM inhibitor blocked ATM phosphorylation, induced PARP cleavage, abrogated cell cycle checkpoint activation and attenuated the formation of γH2AX foci at telomeres in AR-inactivated cells, suggesting that ATM inhibitor induces apoptosis in AR-inactivated cells by blocking the repair of damaged DNA at telomeres. Finally, colony formation assay revealed a dramatic decrease in the survival of cells co-treated with Casodex and ATM inhibitor as compared with those treated with either Casodex or ATM inhibitor alone. These observations indicate that inhibitors of DDR signaling pathways may offer a unique opportunity to enhance the potency of AR-targeted therapies for the treatment of androgen-sensitive as well as castration-resistant prostate cancer. PMID:26336104

  1. ATM Inhibition Potentiates Death of Androgen Receptor-inactivated Prostate Cancer Cells with Telomere Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Vidyavathi; Wu, Min; Ciavattone, Nicholas; McKenty, Nathan; Menon, Mani; Barrack, Evelyn R; Reddy, G Prem-Veer; Kim, Sahn-Ho

    2015-10-16

    Androgen receptor (AR) plays a role in maintaining telomere stability in prostate cancer cells, as AR inactivation induces telomere dysfunction within 3 h. Since telomere dysfunction in other systems is known to activate ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated)-mediated DNA damage response (DDR) signaling pathways, we investigated the role of ATM-mediated DDR signaling in AR-inactivated prostate cancer cells. Indeed, the induction of telomere dysfunction in cells treated with AR-antagonists (Casodex or MDV3100) or AR-siRNA was associated with a dramatic increase in phosphorylation (activation) of ATM and its downstream effector Chk2 and the presenceof phosphorylated ATM at telomeres, indicating activation of DDR signaling at telomeres. Moreover, Casodex washout led to the reversal of telomere dysfunction, indicating repair of damaged telomeres. ATM inhibitor blocked ATM phosphorylation, induced PARP cleavage, abrogated cell cycle checkpoint activation and attenuated the formation of γH2AX foci at telomeres in AR-inactivated cells, suggesting that ATM inhibitor induces apoptosis in AR-inactivated cells by blocking the repair of damaged DNA at telomeres. Finally, colony formation assay revealed a dramatic decrease in the survival of cells co-treated with Casodex and ATM inhibitor as compared with those treated with either Casodex or ATM inhibitor alone. These observations indicate that inhibitors of DDR signaling pathways may offer a unique opportunity to enhance the potency of AR-targeted therapies for the treatment of androgen-sensitive as well as castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  2. Redox-Active Selenium Compounds—From Toxicity and Cell Death to Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Sougat; Boylan, Mallory; Selvam, Arun; Spallholz, Julian E.; Björnstedt, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    Selenium is generally known as an antioxidant due to its presence in selenoproteins as selenocysteine, but it is also toxic. The toxic effects of selenium are, however, strictly concentration and chemical species dependent. One class of selenium compounds is a potent inhibitor of cell growth with remarkable tumor specificity. These redox active compounds are pro-oxidative and highly cytotoxic to tumor cells and are promising candidates to be used in chemotherapy against cancer. Herein we elaborate upon the major forms of dietary selenium compounds, their metabolic pathways, and their antioxidant and pro-oxidant potentials with emphasis on cytotoxic mechanisms. Relative cytotoxicity of inorganic selenite and organic selenocystine compounds to different cancer cells are presented as evidence to our perspective. Furthermore, new novel classes of selenium compounds specifically designed to target tumor cells are presented and the potential of selenium in modern oncology is extensively discussed. PMID:25984742

  3. ROS-mediated apoptotic cell death in prostate cancer LNCaP cells induced by biosurfactant stabilized CdS quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Singh, Braj R; Singh, Brahma N; Khan, W; Singh, H B; Naqvi, A H

    2012-08-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) quantum dots (QDs) have raised great attention because of their superior optical properties and wide utilization in biological and biomedical studies. However, little is known about the cell death mechanisms of CdS QDs in human cancer cells. This study was designed to investigate the possible mechanisms of apoptosis induced by biosurfactant stabilized CdS QDs (denoted as "bsCdS QDs") in human prostate cancer LNCaP cells. It was also noteworthy that apoptosis correlated with reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, mitochondrial damage, oxidative stress and chromatin condensation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Results also showed involvement of caspases, Bcl-2 family proteins, heat shock protein 70, and a cell-cycle checkpoint protein p53 in apoptosis induction by bsCdS QDs in LNCaP cells. Moreover, pro-apoptotic protein Bax was upregulated and the anti-apoptotic proteins, survivin and NF-κB were downregulated in bsCdS QDs exposed cells. Protection of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) against ROS clearly suggested the implication of ROS in hyper-activation of apoptosis and cell death. It is encouraging to conclude that biologically stabilized CdS QDs bear the potential of its applications in biomedicine, such as tumor therapy specifically by inducing caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death of human prostate cancer LNCaP cells.

  4. Autophagy inhibits cell death induced by the anti-cancer drug morusin

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sang Woo; Na, Wooju; Choi, Minji; Kang, Shin Jung; Lee, Seok-Geun; Choi, Cheol Yong

    2017-01-01

    Autophagy is a cellular process by which damaged organelles and dysfunctional proteins are degraded. Morusin is an anti-cancer drug isolated from the root bark of Morus alba. Morusin induces apoptosis in human prostate cancer cells by reducing STAT3 activity. In this study, we examined whether morusin induces autophagy and also examined the effects of autophagy on the morusin-induced apoptosis. Morusin induces LC3-II accumulation and ULK1 activation in HeLa cells. In addition, we found that induction of ULK1 Ser317 phosphorylation and reduction of ULK1 Ser757 phosphorylation occurred simultaneously during morusin-induced autophagy. Consistently, morusin induces autophagy by activation of AMPK and inhibition of mTOR activity. Next, we investigated the role of autophagy in morusin-induced apoptosis. Inhibition of autophagy by treating cells with the 3-methyladenine (3-MA) autophagic inhibitor induces high levels of morusin-mediated apoptosis, while treatment of cells with morusin alone induces moderate levels of apoptosis. Cell survival was greatly reduced when cells were treated with morusin and 3-MA. Taken together, morusin induces autophagy, which is an impediment for morusin-induced apoptosis, suggesting combined treatment of morusin with an autophagic inhibitor would increase the efficacy of morusin as an anti-cancer drug.

  5. Secondary stimulation from Bacillus Calmette-Guérin induced macrophages induce nitric oxide independent cell-death in bladder cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Tomas; Ryk, Charlotta; Chatzakos, Vicky; Hallén Grufman, Katarina; Bavand-Chobot, Nasrin; Flygare, Jenny; Wiklund, N Peter; de Verdier, Petra J

    2014-06-28

    The anti-tumour mechanisms following Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) treatment of bladder-cancer remain largely unknown. Previous studies have shown involvement of nitric-oxide (NO) formation in the BCG-mediated effect. We analyzed the effects of macrophage secreted factors (MSFs) from BCG-stimulated RAW264.7 cells on the bladder-cancer cell line MBT2. Direct treatment with BCG did not induce NO in MBT2-cells whereas supernatant from BCG-stimulated macrophages increased NOS2 mRNA and protein expression, NO concentrations and cell-death. Blocking NO-synthesis with the NOS-inhibitor L-NAME did not affect levels of cell-death suggesting cytotoxic pathways involving other signalling molecules than NO. Several such candidate genes were identified in a microarray.

  6. Nonthermal-plasma-mediated animal cell death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Wanil; Woo, Kyung-Chul; Kim, Gyoo-Cheon; Kim, Kyong-Tai

    2011-01-01

    Animal cell death comprising necrosis and apoptosis occurred in a well-regulated manner upon specific stimuli. The physiological meanings and detailed molecular mechanisms of cell death have been continuously investigated over several decades. Necrotic cell death has typical morphological changes, such as cell swelling and cell lysis followed by DNA degradation, whereas apoptosis shows blebbing formation and regular DNA fragmentation. Cell death is usually adopted to terminate cancer cells in vivo. The current strategies against tumour are based on the induction of cell death by adopting various methods, including radiotherapy and chemotherapeutics. Among these, radiotherapy is the most frequently used treatment method, but it still has obvious limitations. Recent studies have suggested that the use of nonthermal air plasma can be a prominent method for inducing cancer cell death. Plasma-irradiated cells showed the loss of genomic integrity, mitochondrial dysfunction, plasma membrane damage, etc. Tumour elimination with plasma irradiation is an emerging concept in cancer therapy and can be accelerated by targeting certain tumour-specific proteins with gold nanoparticles. Here, some recent developments are described so that the mechanisms related to plasma-mediated cell death and its perspectives in cancer treatment can be understood.

  7. Isolation and identification of ingredients inducing cancer cell death from the seeds of Alpinia galanga, a Chinese spice.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qiao-hui; Lu, Chuan-Li; Zhang, Xue-wu; Jiang, Jian-Guo

    2015-02-01

    This study was carried out to isolate ingredients from the seeds of a Chinese spice (Alpinia galangal) and to evaluate their cytotoxic activity on cancer cell lines. Isolation and purification of the phytochemical constituents were conducted using silica gel, Sephadex LH-20 and ODS columns. After extraction using 95% ethanol, the total extracts were re-extracted, resulting in petroleum ether (PE), ethyl acetate (EA) and water fractions, respectively. Activity tests showed that the EA fraction exhibited obvious (p < 0.05) protective effects on H2O2 damaged PC-12 cells at 20 μg mL(-1), and showed much higher (p < 0.05) cytotoxic activity on cancer cell lines than other fractions. Five compounds, 1'-S-1'-acetoxyeugenol acetate (I), 1'-S-1'-acetoxychavicol acetate (II), 2-propenal, 3-[4-(acetyloxy)-3-methoxyphenyl] (III), isocoronarin D (IV) and caryolane-1, 9β-diol (V), were obtained from the EA fraction and identified by HPLC, UV, MS, and NMR spectroscopic analyses. Compounds III and V were isolated from A. galangal for the first time. Moreover, compounds I, II, IV and V were the main active ingredients for inducing death of the tested cancer cells, and their IC50 values ranged from 60 to 90 μg mL(-1), indicating that these compounds possessed a wide anti-cancer capability. Therefore, A. galangal seeds could be a potential source of healthy food for tumor prevention.

  8. Development of hybrid small molecules that induce degradation of estrogen receptor-alpha and necrotic cell death in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Okuhira, Keiichiro; Demizu, Yosuke; Hattori, Takayuki; Ohoka, Nobumichi; Shibata, Norihito; Nishimaki-Mogami, Tomoko; Okuda, Haruhiro; Kurihara, Masaaki; Naito, Mikihiko

    2013-11-01

    Manipulation of protein stability with small molecules has a great potential for both basic research and clinical therapy. Recently, we have developed a series of hybrid small molecules named SNIPER (Specific and Non-genetic IAP-dependent Protein ERaser) that induces degradation of target proteins via ubiquitin-proteasome system. Here we report the activities of SNIPER(ER) that targets estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) for degradation. SNIPER(ER) induced degradation of ERα and inhibited estrogen-dependent expression of pS2 gene in an estrogen-dependent breast cancer cell line MCF-7. A proteasome inhibitor MG132 and siRNA-mediated downregulation of cIAP1 abrogated the SNIPER(ER)-induced ERα degradation, suggesting that the ERα is degraded by proteasome subsequent to cIAP1-mediated ubiquitylation. Intriguingly, after the ERα degradation, the SNIPER(ER)-treated MCF-7 cells undergo rapid cell death. Detailed analysis indicated that SNIPER(ER) caused necrotic cell death accompanied by a release of HMGB1, a marker of necrosis, from the cells. Following the ERα degradation, reactive oxygen species (ROS) was produced in the SNIPER(ER)-treated MCF-7 cells, and an anti-oxidant N-acetylcysteine inhibited the necrotic cell death. These results indicate that SNIPER(ER) induces ERα degradation, ROS production and necrotic cell death, implying a therapeutic potential of SNIPER(ER) as a lead for the treatment of ERα-positive breast cancers.

  9. Investigation of selective induction of breast cancer cells to death with treatment of plasma-activated medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashizume, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Nakamura, Kae; Kano, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Kenji; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Mizuno, Masaaki; Hori, Masaru

    2015-09-01

    The applications of plasma in medicine have much attention. We previously showed that plasma-activated medium (PAM) induced glioblastoma cells to apoptosis. However, it has not been elucidated the selectivity of PAM in detail. In this study, we investigated the selective effect of PAM on the death of human breast normal and cancer cells, MCF10A and MCF7, respectively, and observed the selective death with fluorescent microscopy. For the investigation of cell viability with PAM treatment, we prepared various PAMs according to the strengths, and treated each of cells with PAMs. Week PAM treatment only decreased the viability of MCF7 cells, while strong PAM treatment significantly affected both viabilities of MCF7 and MCF10A cells. For the fluorescent observation, we prepared the mixture of MCF7 and fluorescent-probed MCF10A cells, and seeded them. After the treatment of PAMs, the images showed that only MCF7 cells damaged in the mixture with week PAM treatment. These results suggested that a specific range existed with the selective effect in the strength of PAM. This work was partly supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Innovative Areas ``Plasma Medical Innovation'' Grant No. 24108002 and 24108008 from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan.

  10. Lysosomal Membrane Permeabilization is an Early Event in Sigma-2 Receptor Ligand Mediated Cell Death in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Sigma-2 receptor ligands have been studied for treatment of pancreatic cancer because they are preferentially internalized by proliferating cells and induce apoptosis. This mechanism of apoptosis is poorly understood, with varying reports of caspase-3 dependence. We evaluated multiple sigma-2 receptor ligands in this study, each shown to decrease tumor burden in preclinical models of human pancreatic cancer. Results Fluorescently labeled sigma-2 receptor ligands of two classes (derivatives of SW43 and PB282) localize to cell membrane components in Bxpc3 and Aspc1 pancreatic cancer cells and accumulate in lysosomes. We found that interactions in the lysosome are critical for cell death following sigma-2 ligand treatment because selective inhibition of a protective lysosomal membrane glycoprotein, LAMP1, with shRNA greatly reduced the viability of cells following treatment. Sigma-2 ligands induced lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) and protease translocation triggering downstream effectors of apoptosis. Subsequently, cellular oxidative stress was greatly increased following treatment with SW43, and the hydrophilic antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) gave greater protection against this than a lipophilic antioxidant, α-tocopherol (α-toco). Conversely, PB282-mediated cytotoxicity relied less on cellular oxidation, even though α-toco did provide protection from this ligand. In addition, we found that caspase-3 induction was not as significantly inhibited by cathepsin inhibitors as by antioxidants. Both NAC and α-toco protected against caspase-3 induction following PB282 treatment, while only NAC offered protection following SW43 treatment. The caspase-3 inhibitor DEVD-FMK offered significant protection from PB282, but not SW43. Conclusions Sigma-2 ligand SW43 commits pancreatic cancer cells to death by a caspase-independent process involving LMP and oxidative stress which is protected from by NAC. PB282 however undergoes a caspase-dependent death

  11. Combination treatment with arsenic trioxide and phytosphingosine enhances apoptotic cell death in arsenic trioxide-resistant cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Moon-Taek; Kang, Young-Hee; Park, In-Chul; Kim, Chun-Ho; Lee, Yun-Sil; Chung, Hee Yong; Lee, Su-Jae

    2007-01-01

    Resistance to anticancer drugs can sometimes be overcome by combination treatment with other therapeutic drugs. Here, we showed that phytosphingosine treatment in combination with arsenic trioxide (As(2)O(3)) enhanced cell death of naturally As(2)O(3)-resistant human myeloid leukemia cells. The combination treatment induced an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species level, mitochondrial relocalization of Bax, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) activation, and cytochrome c release from the mitochondria. N-acetyl-l-cysteine, a thiol-containing antioxidant, completely blocked Bax relocalization, PARP-1 activation, and cytochrome c release. Pretreatment of 3,4-dihydro-5-[4-(1-piperidinyl)butoxy]-1(2H)-isoquinolinone, a PARP-1 inhibitor, or PARP-1/small interfering RNA partially attenuated cytochrome c release, whereas the same treatment did not affect Bax relocalization. The combination treatment induced selective activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Inhibition of p38 MAPK by treatment of SB203580 or expression of dominant-negative forms of p38 MAPK suppressed the combination treatment-induced Bax relocalization but did not affect PARP-1 activation. In addition, antioxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine completely blocked p38 MAPK activation. These results indicate that phytosphingosine in combination with As(2)O(3) induces synergistic apoptosis in As(2)O(3)-resistant leukemia cells through the p38 MAPK-mediated mitochondrial translocation of Bax and the PARP-1 activation, and that p38 MAPK and PARP-1 activations are reactive oxygen species dependent. The molecular mechanism that we elucidated in this study may provide insight into the design of future combination cancer therapies to cells intrinsically less sensitive to As(2)O(3) treatment.

  12. Characterization of cell death induced by ethacrynic acid in a human colon cancer cell line DLD-1 and suppression by N-acetyl-L-cysteine.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Shu; Ookawa, Keizou; Kudo, Toshihiro; Asano, Junpei; Hayakari, Makoto; Tsuchida, Shigeki

    2003-10-01

    Since ethacrynic acid (EA), an SH modifier as well as glutathione S-transferase (GST) inhibitor, has been suggested to induce apoptosis in some cell lines, its effects on a human colon cancer cell line DLD-1 were examined. EA enhanced cell proliferation at 20-40 microM, while it caused cell death at 60-100 microM. Caspase inhibitors did not block cell death and DNA ladder formation was not detected. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, however, was cleaved into an 82-kDa fragment, different from an 85-kDa fragment that is specific for apoptosisis. The 82-kDa fragment was not recognized by antibody against PARP fragment cleaved by caspase 3. N-Acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) completely inhibited EA-induced cell death, but 3(2)-t-butyl-4-hydroxyanisole or pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate ammonium salt did not. Glutathione (GSH) levels were dose-dependently increased in cells treated with EA and this increase was hardly affected by NAC addition. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) kinase (MEK) 1, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1 and GST P1-1 were increased in cells treated with 25-75 microM EA, while c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) 1 and p38 MAPK were markedly decreased by 100 microM EA. NAC repressed EA-induced alterations in these MAPKs and GST P1-1. p38 MAPK inhibitors, SB203580 and FR167653, dose-dependently enhanced EA-induced cell death. An MEK inhibitor, U0126, did not affect EA-induced cell death. These studies revealed that EA induced cell death concomitantly with a novel PARP fragmentation, but without DNA fragmentation. p38 MAPK was suggested to play an inhibitory role in EA-induced cell death.

  13. Relationship Between Pak-Mediated Cell Death and Stress-Activated Kinase Signaling Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-02-01

    Jurkat: T-lymphoblast cell line; HeLa: human cervical carcinoma; CHO : chinese hamster ovary ; ZR75, MDA23 1, SKBR-3: human breast cancer cell lines 16 RhoA...activation in Jurkat cells . J Immunol 1998 Jan 1; 160(1):7-1 1 12 Genomic Locus of GEF/H1/KIAA0651 GI 11427616: 870353 864048 861008 858631 858224...1: Schematic representation of the genomic locus of GEF-H1i/KIAA0651 as deduced from the working draft sequence of the GI 11427616 contig derived from

  14. Facilitating Cytokine-Mediated Cancer Cell Death by Proteobacterial N-Acylhomoserine Lactones

    PubMed Central

    Kravchenko, Vladimir; Garner, Amanda L.; Mathison, John; Seit-Nebi, Alim; Yu, Jing; Gileva, Irina P.; Ulevitch, Richard; Janda, Kim D.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) preferentially induces apoptosis in cancer cells over normal cells; however, tumor cells may develop TRAIL resistance. Here we demonstrate that this resistance can be overcome in the presence of bacterial acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) or AHL-producing bacteria through the combined effect of TRAIL-induced apoptosis and AHL-mediated inhibition of inflammation regulated by NF-κB signaling. This discovery unveils a previously unrecognized symbiotic link between bacteria and host immunosurveillance. PMID:23517377

  15. Adenovirus vector-mediated FAM176A overexpression induces cell death in human H1299 non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hong; Hu, Jia; Pan, Huan; Lou, Yaxin; Lv, Ping; Chen, Yingyu

    2014-02-01

    FAM176A (family with sequence similarity 176 member A) is a novel molecule related to programmed cell death. A decreased expression of FAM176A has been found in several types of human tumors in including lung cancers. In the present study, we investigated the biological activities of FAM176A on the human non-small cell lung cancer cell line H1299 cells. We constructed a recombinant adenovirus 5-FAM176A vector (Ad5-FAM176A) and evaluated the expression and anti-tumor activities in vitro. Cell viability analysis revealed that the adenovirus-mediated increase of FAM176A inhibited the growth of the tumor cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. This inhibitory effect was mediated by both autophagy and apoptosis that involved caspase activation. In addition, cell cycle analysis suggested that Ad5-FAM176A could induce cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase, all of which suggested that adenovirus-mediated FAM176A gene transfer might present a new therapeutic approach for lung cancer treatment.

  16. Non-thermal plasma with 2-deoxy-D-glucose synergistically induces cell death by targeting glycolysis in blood cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushik, Neha; Lee, Su Jae; Choi, Tae Gyu; Baik, Ku Youn; Uhm, Han Sup; Kim, Chung Hyeok; Kaushik, Nagendra Kumar; Choi, Eun Ha

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we show the selective and efficient anti-cancer effects of plasma (at a low dose) when cell metabolic modifiers are also included. 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG), a glycolytic inhibitor, was used with effective doses of non-thermal plasma, synergistically attenuating cell metabolic viability and inducing caspase-dependent and independent cell death. The combination treatment decreased the intracellular ATP and lactate production in various types of blood cancer cells in vitro. Taken together, our findings suggest that 2-DG enhances the efficacy and selectivity of plasma and induces the synergistic inhibition of cancer cell growth by targeting glycolysis and apoptosis. Specifically, this treatment strategy demonstrated an enhanced growth inhibitory effect of plasma in the presence of a metabolic modifier that was selective against cancer cells, not non-malignant cells. This is the first study to report the advantage of combining plasma with 2-DG to eradicate blood cancer cells. Finally, we conclude that 2-DG with non-thermal plasma may be used as a combination treatment against blood cancer cells.

  17. Synergistic enhancement of breast cancer cell death using ultrasound-microbubbles in combination with cisplatin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jetha, Sheliza; Karshafian, Raffi

    2017-03-01

    Cisplatin (CDDP), an anti-cancer agent, can effectively treat several cancerous tumourstumors such as testicular, bladder, and ovarian cancers. CDDP binds to specific DNA bases causing 1,2-intrastrand cross-links, single strand and double strand breaks inducing apoptosis. However, the effectiveness of CDDP is limited in tumourtumors such as breast cancer due to drug resistance. In this study, the application of ultrasound-microbubble (USMB) in improving the therapeutic effect of CDDP in breast cancer cell line is investigated. Human breast cancer (MDA-MB-231) cells in suspension (2×106 cells/mL concentration and 0.6 mL volume) were treated with CDDP (3 µM, 30 µM and 300 µM) and USMB at 0.5 MHz pulse centered frequency, 60 s insonation time, 16 µs pulse duration, 1 kHz pulse repetition frequency, and 1.7% v/v (volume concentration) of Definity microbubble agent. Following USMB treatment, cells were plated in 96-well plates for 24 and 48-hour incubation, after which cell viability was measured using MTT assay (VMTT). Cell viability decreased significantly with the combined treatment of CDDP and USMB compared to CDDP alone (p<0.001) after both 24 and 48-hour incubation. After 24-hour incubation, the VMMT was 40±2%, 32±1% and 18±1% with the combined treatment compared to 96±3%, 81±3% and 63±3% with CDDP alone at 3 µM, 30 µM and 300 µM, respectively. The combined treatment was additive at both concentrations (3 µM, p=0.9957) and (30 µM, p=0.6018) and synergistic at the highest concentration (300 µM, p=0.0169), based on Bliss Independence model with a 95% confidence interval of p<0.05. Furthermore, after 48-hour incubation, the VMTT was 54±3%, 22±1% and 13±1% with the combined treatment compared to 94±9%, 68±3% and 44±2%with CDDP alone at 3 µM, 30 µM and 300 µM, respectively. The combined treatment was still additive at the lowest concentration (3 µM, p=0.6689) and synergistic at the higher concentrations (30 µM, p=0.0001) and (300 µM, p=0

  18. Cell death and tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jun; Wang, Min-Xia; Murrell, George A C

    2003-10-01

    Apoptosis and necrosis are presently recognized as the two major types of physiological and pathological cell death. Apoptosis is a tightly regulated cell deletion process that differs morphologically and biochemically from necrotic cell death. Tendinopathy is defined as a tendon injury that originates from intrinsic and extrinsic etiological factors. Excessive apoptosis has recently been described in degenerative tendon. The increased number of apoptotic tendon cells in degenerative tendon tissue could affect the rate of collagen synthesis and repair. Impaired or dysfunctional protein synthesis may lead to weaker tendon tissue and eventually increase the risk for tendon rupture. Clearly, there are many details to insert into this pathway, but there is hope that if the fine details of the pathway can be fleshed out, then strategies may be able to be developed to break the cycle at one or more points and prevent or treat tendinopathy more effectively.

  19. Cancer cell death induced by novel small molecules degrading the TACC3 protein via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway.

    PubMed

    Ohoka, N; Nagai, K; Hattori, T; Okuhira, K; Shibata, N; Cho, N; Naito, M

    2014-11-06

    The selective degradation of target proteins with small molecules is a novel approach to the treatment of various diseases, including cancer. We have developed a protein knockdown system with a series of hybrid small compounds that induce the selective degradation of target proteins via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. In this study, we designed and synthesized novel small molecules called SNIPER(TACC3)s, which target the spindle regulatory protein transforming acidic coiled-coil-3 (TACC3). SNIPER(TACC3)s induce poly-ubiquitylation and proteasomal degradation of TACC3 and reduce the TACC3 protein level in cells. Mechanistic analysis indicated that the ubiquitin ligase APC/C(CDH1) mediates the SNIPER(TACC3)-induced degradation of TACC3. Intriguingly, SNIPER(TACC3) selectively induced cell death in cancer cells expressing a larger amount of TACC3 protein than normal cells. These results suggest that protein knockdown of TACC3 by SNIPER(TACC3) is a potential strategy for treating cancers overexpressing the TACC3 protein.

  20. The double benefit of Spalax p53: surviving underground hypoxia while defying lung cancer cells in vitro via autophagy and caspase-dependent cell death

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Martin; Stern, Orly; Ashur-Fabian, Osnat

    2016-01-01

    The blind subterranean mole rat, Spalax ehrenbergi, is a model organism for hypoxia tolerance. This superspecies have adapted to severe environment by altering an array of hypoxia-mediated genes, among which an alteration in the p53 DNA binding domain (corresponding to R174K in humans) that hinders its transcriptional activity towards apoptotic genes. It is well accepted that apoptosis is not the only form of programmed cell death and that mechanisms that depend on autophagy are also involved. In the current work we have extended our research and investigated the possibility that Spalax p53 can activate autophagy. Using two complementary assays, we have established that over-expression of the Spalax p53 in p53-null cells (human lung cancer cells, H1299), potently induces autophagy. As Spalax is considered highly resistant to cancer, we further studied the relative contribution of autophagy on the outcome of H1299 cells, following transfection with Spalax p53. Results indicate that Spalax p53 acts as a tumor suppressor in lung cancer cells, inducing cell death that involves autophagy and caspases and inhibiting cell number, which is exclusively caspase-dependent. To conclude, the Spalax p53 protein was evolutionary adapted to survive severe underground hypoxia while retaining the ability to defy lung cancer. PMID:27557517

  1. Green tea polyphenols induce cell death in breast cancer MCF-7 cells through induction of cell cycle arrest and mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shu-min; Ou, Shi-yi; Huang, Hui-hua

    2017-01-01

    In order to study the molecular mechanisms of green tea polyphenols (GTPs) in treatment or prevention of breast cancer, the cytotoxic effects of GTPs on five human cell lines (MCF-7, A549, Hela, PC3, and HepG2 cells) were determined and the antitumor mechanisms of GTPs in MCF-7 cells were analyzed. The results showed that GTPs exhibited a broad spectrum of inhibition against the detected cancer cell lines, particularly the MCF-7 cells. Studies on the mechanisms revealed that the main modes of cell death induced by GTPs were cell cycle arrest and mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis. Flow cytometric analysis showed that GTPs mediated cell cycle arrest at both G1/M and G2/M transitions. GTP dose dependently led to apoptosis of MCF-7 cells via the mitochondrial pathways, as evidenced by induction of chromatin condensation, reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ m), improvement in the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), induction of DNA fragmentation, and activations of caspase-3 and caspase-9 in the present paper. PMID:28124838

  2. A pyrazolopyran derivative preferentially inhibits the activity of human cytosolic serine hydroxymethyltransferase and induces cell death in lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Fiascarelli, Alessio; Macone, Alberto; Gargano, Maurizio; Rinaldo, Serena; Giardina, Giorgio; Pontecorvi, Valentino; Koes, David; McDermott, Lee; Yang, Tianyi; Paiardini, Alessandro; Contestabile, Roberto; Cutruzzolà, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT) is a central enzyme in the metabolic reprogramming of cancer cells, providing activated one-carbon units in the serine-glycine one-carbon metabolism. Previous studies demonstrated that the cytoplasmic isoform of SHMT (SHMT1) plays a relevant role in lung cancer. SHMT1 is overexpressed in lung cancer patients and NSCLC cell lines. Moreover, SHMT1 is required to maintain DNA integrity. Depletion in lung cancer cell lines causes cell cycle arrest and uracil accumulation and ultimately leads to apoptosis. We found that a pyrazolopyran compound, namely 2.12, preferentially inhibits SHMT1 compared to the mitochondrial counterpart SHMT2. Computational and crystallographic approaches suggest binding at the active site of SHMT1 and a competitive inhibition mechanism. A radio isotopic activity assay shows that inhibition of SHMT by 2.12 also occurs in living cells. Moreover, administration of 2.12 in A549 and H1299 lung cancer cell lines causes apoptosis at LD50 34 μM and rescue experiments underlined selectivity towards SHMT1. These data not only further highlight the relevance of the cytoplasmic isoform SHMT1 in lung cancer but, more importantly, demonstrate that, at least in vitro, it is possible to find selective inhibitors against one specific isoform of SHMT, a key target in metabolic reprogramming of many cancer types. PMID:26717037

  3. Sialomucin expression is associated with erbB-2 oncoprotein overexpression, early recurrence, and cancer death in non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, C J; Shun, C T; Yang, P C; Lee, Y C; Shew, J Y; Kuo, S H; Luh, K T

    1997-04-01

    Mucin production, when heavily sialylated, can promote cancer cell invasion and metastasis, and modulate the immune recognition system of the host. To explore the prognostic implication of sialomucin expression in lung cancer, we studied 116 patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Tumor specimens were stained immunohistochemically with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against mucin glycoprotein (17Q2, HMFG2, SM3), and histochemically with periodic acid-Schiff/alcian blue to differentiate neutral mucin from acid mucin, and with high-iron diamine/alcian blue to differentiate sialomucin from sulfomucin. The expression status of two established molecular prognostic factors, the p53 and erbB-2 oncoproteins, were evaluated immunohistochemically. The staining was performed on two separately archived, paraffin-embedded tumor blocks for each patient, with normal lung as a control. Correlations were subsequently made among stains and various clinicopathologic factors. All analyses were blinded, and included Kaplan-Meier survival estimates with Cox proportional hazards regression modeling. Associations were established among adenocarcinoma histotype and erbB-2 overexpression, sialomucin expression, and 17Q2 and HMFG2 immunohistochemical positivity (p < 0.05). Sialomucin expression was closely linked to erbB-2 overexpression (p = 0.01). Significant univariate predictors (p < 0.05) of recurrence and cancer death were surgical stage, p53 expression, erbB-2 overexpression, and sialomucin expression. These four factors remained as independent predictors of early recurrence (p < 0.05) after multivariate analysis. For cancer death prediction, p53 and sialomucin expression had a marginal effect. We concluded that sialomucin expression is also a poor indicator of prognosis, which is associated with erbB-2 oncoprotein overexpression, early postoperative recurrence, and cancer death in NSCLC.

  4. Mitotic cell death caused by follistatin-like 1 inhibition is associated with up-regulated Bim by inactivated Erk1/2 in human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bae, Kieun; Park, Kyoung Eun; Han, Jihye; Kim, Jongkwang; Kim, Kyungtae; Yoon, Kyong-Ah

    2016-04-05

    Follistatin-like 1 (FSTL1) was identified as a novel pro-inflammatory protein showing high-level expression in rheumatoid arthritis. The protective effect of FSTL1 via the inhibition of apoptosis was reported in myocardial injury. However, the functional mechanism of FSTL1 in cancer is poorly characterized, and its proliferative effects are ambiguous. Here, we examined the effects of FSTL1 on cellular proliferation and cell cycle checkpoints in lung cancer cells. FSTL1 inhibition induced the cellular portion of G2/M phase in human lung cancer cells via the accumulation of regulators of the transition through the G2/M phase, including the cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1)-cyclin B1 complex. An increase in histone H3 phosphorylation (at Ser10), another hallmark of mitosis, indicated that the knockdown of FSTL1 in lung cancer cells stimulated a mitotic arrest. After that, apoptosis was promoted by the activation of caspase-3 and -9. Protein level of Bim, a BH3 domain-only, pro-apoptotic member and its isoforms, BimL, BimS, and BimEL were up-regulated by FSTL1 inhibition. Degradation of Bim was blocked in FSTL1-knockdown cells by decreased phosphorylation of Bim. Increased BimEL as well as decreased phosphorylated Erk1/2 is essential for cell death by FSTL1 inhibition in NCI-H460 cells. Taken together, our results suggest that the knockdown of FSTL1 induces apoptosis through a mitotic arrest and caspase-dependent cell death. FSTL1 plays the important roles in cellular proliferation and apoptosis in lung cancer cells, and thus can be a new target for lung cancer treatment.

  5. Pepsin-digested bovine lactoferrin induces apoptotic cell death with JNK/SAPK activation in oral cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Takayuki; Banno, Yoshiko; Kato, Yukihiro; Nozawa, Yoshinori; Kawaguchi, Mitsuru

    2005-05-01

    Lactoferrin, a member of the transferrin family, is iron-binding and a strongly cationic 76 kDa glycoprotein. In breast milk it is secreted in high concentrations from glandular epithelia and is also present in other exocrine fluids including saliva. In the present study, we examined the biological mechanisms of apoptosis induced by pepsin-digested-lactoferrin peptide (Lfn-p) in the human oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line SAS. We found that treatment with Lfn-p induced cell death with apoptotic nuclear changes, preceded by the cleavage of caspase-3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) in the apoptotic cells. Treatment with Lfn-p induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), a member of the MAP kinase family, at early stages of apoptosis. Another MAP kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase/stress-activated protein kinase (JNK/SAPK), was also phosphorylated by treatment with Lfn-p. Pretreatment of SAS cells with SP600125, a JNK/SAPK inhibitor, diminished Lfn-induced apoptosis, as assessed by determining released lactate dehydrogenase activity. On the other hand, the MEK1 inhibitors PD98059 or U0126 showed no effect on repression of cell death, but rather an increase. These results suggest that JNK/SAPK activation may play an important role in Lfn-p-induced apoptotic cell death of human oral squamous cell carcinoma cells.

  6. Synergistic Tumor-Killing Effect of Radiation and Berberine Combined Treatment in Lung Cancer: The Contribution of Autophagic Cell Death

    SciTech Connect

    Peng Peiling; Kuo, W.-H.; Tseng, H.-C.; Chou, F.-P.

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy is the most efficacious strategies for lung cancer. The radiation-enhancing effects and the underlying mechanisms of berberine were investigated both in vitro and in vivo. Methods and Materials: Clonogenic survival assays were used to evaluate the radio-sensitivity of berberine on non-small-cell lung cancer. Electron microscopic observation of the features of cell death, flow cytometry of acidic vascular organelles formation, mitochondria membrane potential and cell-cycle progression, and Western blotting of caspase 3, PARP, and LC3 were performed to identify the mechanisms underlying the enhancing effects. Lewis lung carcinoma model in mice was conducted to evaluate the possible application of berberine in synergistic treatment with irradiation. Results: Compared with radiation alone (SF2 = 0.423; D{sub 0} = 5.29 Gy), berberine at 5 and 10 {mu}M concentrations in combination with radiation showed significant enhancement on radiation-induced clonogenic inhibition (SF2 = 0.215: D{sub 0} = 2.70 Gy and SF2 = 0.099: D{sub 0} = 1.24 Gy) on A549 cells. The cellular ultrastructure showed the presence of autophagosome and an increased proportion of acridine orange stain-positive cells, demonstrating that berberine enhanced radiosensitivity via autophagy. The process involved LC3 modification and mitochondrial disruption. The animal model verified the synergistic cytotoxic effect of berberine and irradiation resulting in a substantial shrinkage of tumor volume. Conclusion: Supplement of berberine enhanced the cytotoxicity of radiation in both in vivo and in vitro models of lung cancer. The mechanisms underlying this synergistic effect involved the induction of autophagy. It suggests that berberine could be used as adjuvant therapy to treat lung cancer.

  7. Ribosylation of bovine serum albumin induces ROS accumulation and cell death in cancer line (MCF-7).

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohd Shahnawaz; Dwivedi, Sourabh; Priyadarshini, Medha; Tabrez, Shams; Siddiqui, Maqsood Ahmed; Jagirdar, Haseeb; Al-Senaidy, Abdulrahman M; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A; Musarrat, Javed

    2013-12-01

    Formation of advanced glycation end products (AGE) is crucially involved in the several pathophysiologies associated with ageing and diabetes, for example arthritis, atherosclerosis, chronic renal insufficiency, Alzheimer's disease, nephropathy, neuropathy, and cataracts. Because of devastating effects of AGE and the significance of bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a transport protein, this study was designed to investigate glycation-induced structural modifications in BSA and their functional consequences in breast cancer cell line (MCF-7). We incubated D-ribose with BSA and monitored formation of D-ribose-glycated BSA by observing changes in the intensity of fluorescence at 410 nm. NBT (nitro blue tetrazolium) assay was performed to confirm formation of keto-amine during glycation. Absorbance at 540 nm (fructosamine) increased markedly with time. Furthermore, intrinsic protein and 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonate (ANS) fluorescence revealed marked conformational changes in BSA upon ribosylation. In addition, a fluorescence assay with thioflavin T (ThT) revealed a remarkable increase in fluorescence at 485 nm in the presence of glycated BSA. This suggests that glycation with D-ribose induced aggregation of BSA into amyloid-like deposits. Circular dichroism (CD) study of native and ribosylated BSA revealed molten globule formation in the glycation pathway of BSA. Functional consequences of ribosylated BSA on cancer cell line, MCF-7 was studied by MTT assay and ROS estimation. The results revealed cytotoxicity of ribosylated BSA on MCF-7 cells.

  8. Combining oncolytic HSV-1 with immunogenic cell death-inducing drug mitoxantrone breaks cancer immune tolerance and improves therapeutic efficacy.

    PubMed

    Workenhe, Samuel T; Pol, Jonathan G; Lichty, Brian D; Cummings, Derek T; Mossman, Karen L

    2013-11-01

    Although antitumor activity of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) ICP0 null oncolytic vectors has been validated in murine breast cancer models, oncolytic virus treatment alone is insufficient to break immune tolerance. Thus, we investigated enhancing efficacy through combination therapy with the immunogenic cell death-inducing chemotherapeutic drug, mitoxantrone. Despite a lack of enhanced cytotoxicity in vitro, HSV-1 ICP0 null oncolytic virus KM100 with 5 μmol/L mitoxantrone provided significant survival benefit to BALB/c mice bearing Her2/neu TUBO-derived tumors. This protection was mediated by increased intratumoral infiltration of neutrophils and tumor antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells. Depletion studies verified that CD8-, CD4-, and Ly6G-expressing cells are essential for enhanced efficacy of the combination therapy. Moreover, the addition of mitoxantrone to KM100 oncolytic virus treatment broke immune tolerance in BALB-neuT mice bearing TUBO-derived tumors. This study suggests that oncolytic viruses in combination with immunogenic cell death-inducing chemotherapeutics enhance the immunogenicity of the tumor-associated antigens, breaking immunologic tolerance established toward these antigens.

  9. Samsoeum, a traditional herbal medicine, elicits apoptotic and autophagic cell death by inhibiting Akt/mTOR and activating the JNK pathway in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Samsoeum (SSE), a traditional herbal formula, has been widely used to treat cough, fever, congestion, and emesis for centuries. Recent studies have demonstrated that SSE retains potent pharmacological efficiency in anti-allergic and anti-inflammatory reactions. However, the anti-cancer activity of SSE and its underlying mechanisms have not been studied. Thus, the present study was designed to determine the effect of SSE on cell death and elucidate its detailed mechanism. Methods Following SSE treatment, cell growth and cell death were measured using an MTT assay and trypan blue exclusion assay, respectively. Cell cycle arrest and YO-PRO-1 uptake were assayed using flow cytometry, and LC3 redistribution was observed using confocal microscope. The mechanisms of anti-cancer effect of SSE were investigated through western blot analysis. Results We initially found that SSE caused dose- and time-dependent cell death in cancer cells but not in normal primary hepatocytes. In addition, during early SSE treatment (6–12 h), cells were arrested in G2/M phase concomitant with up-regulation of p21 and p27 and down-regulation of cyclin D1 and cyclin B1, followed by an increase in apoptotic YO-PRO-1 (+) cells. SSE also induced autophagy via up-regulation of Beclin-1 expression, conversion of microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3) I to LC3-II, and re-distribution of LC3, indicating autophagosome formation. Moreover, the level of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), which is critical for cross-talk between apoptosis and autophagy, was significantly reduced in SSE-treated cells. Phosphorylation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) was increased, followed by suppression of the protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin (Akt/mTOR) pathway, and phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in response to SSE treatment. In particular, among MAPKs inhibitors, only the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)-specific inhibitor SP600125 nearly

  10. Dietary phytochemicals and cancer prevention: Nrf2 signaling, epigenetics, and cell death mechanisms in blocking cancer initiation and progression

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Hun; Khor, Tin Oo; Shu, Limin; Su, Zheng-Yuan; Fuentes, Francisco; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony

    2013-01-01

    Reactive metabolites from carcinogens and oxidative stress can drive genetic mutations, genomic instability, neoplastic transformation, and ultimately carcinogenesis. Numerous dietary phytochemicals in vegetables/fruits have been shown to possess cancer chemopreventive effects in both preclinical animal models and human epidemiological studies. These phytochemicals could prevent the initiation of carcinogenesis via either direct scavenging of reactive oxygen species/reactive nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) or, more importantly, the induction of cellular defense detoxifying/antioxidant enzymes. These defense enzymes mediated by Nrf2-antioxidative stress and anti-inflammatory signaling pathways can contribute to cellular protection against ROS/RNS and reactive metabolites of carcinogens. In addition, these compounds would kill initiated/transformed cancer cells in vitro and in in vivo xenografts via diverse anti-cancer mechanisms. These mechanisms include the activation of signaling kinases (e.g., JNK), caspases and the mitochondria damage/cytochrome c pathways. Phytochemicals may also have anti-cancer effects by inhibiting the IKK/NF-κB pathway, inhibiting STAT3, and causing cell cycle arrest. In addition, other mechanisms may include epigenetic alterations (e.g., inhibition of HDACs, miRNAs, and the modification of the CpG methylation of cancer-related genes). In this review, we will discuss: the current advances in the study of Nrf2 signaling; Nrf2-deficient tumor mouse models; the epigenetic control of Nrf2 in tumorigenesis and chemoprevention; Nrf2-mediated cancer chemoprevention by naturally occurring dietary phytochemicals; and the mutation or hyper-expression of the Nrf2–Keap1 signaling pathway in advanced tumor cells. The future development of dietary phytochemicals for chemoprevention must integrate in vitro signaling mechanisms, relevant biomarkers of human diseases, and combinations of different phytochemicals and/or non-toxic therapeutic drugs, including

  11. Rhus coriaria induces senescence and autophagic cell death in breast cancer cells through a mechanism involving p38 and ERK1/2 activation

    PubMed Central

    El Hasasna, Hussain; Athamneh, Khawlah; Al Samri, Halima; Karuvantevida, Noushad; Al Dhaheri, Yusra; Hisaindee, Soleiman; Ramadan, Gaber; Al Tamimi, Nedaa; AbuQamar, Synan; Eid, Ali; Iratni, Rabah

    2015-01-01

    Here, we investigated the anticancer effect of Rhus coriaria on three breast cancer cell lines. We demonstrated that Rhus coriaria ethanolic extract (RCE) inhibits the proliferation of these cell lines in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. RCE induced senescence and cell cycle arrest at G1 phase. These changes were concomitant with upregulation of p21, downregulation of cyclin D1, p27, PCNA, c-myc, phospho-RB and expression of senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity. No proliferative recovery was detected after RCE removal. Annexin V staining and PARP cleavage analysis revealed a minimal induction of apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 cells. Electron microscopy revealed the presence of autophagic vacuoles in RCE-treated cells. Interestingly, blocking autophagy by 3-methyladenine (3-MA) or chloroquine (CQ) reduced RCE-induced cell death and senescence. RCE was also found to activate p38 and ERK1/2 signaling pathways which coincided with induction of autophagy. Furthermore, we found that while both autophagy inhibitors abolished p38 phosphorylation, only CQ led to significant decrease in pERK1/2. Finally, RCE induced DNA damage and reduced mutant p53, two events that preceded autophagy. Our findings provide strong evidence that R. coriaria possesses strong anti-breast cancer activity through induction of senescence and autophagic cell death, making it a promising alternative or adjunct therapeutic candidate against breast cancer. PMID:26263881

  12. The Amaryllidaceae isocarbostyril narciclasine induces apoptosis by activation of the death receptor and/or mitochondrial pathways in cancer cells but not in normal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Patrick; Ingrassia, Laurent; Rouzeau, Sébastien; Ribaucour, Fabrice; Thomas, Stéphanie; Roland, Isabelle; Darro, Francis; Lefranc, Florence; Kiss, Robert

    2007-09-01

    Our study has shown that the Amaryllidaceae isocarbostyril narciclasine induces marked apoptosis-mediated cytotoxic effects in human cancer cells but not in normal fibroblasts by triggering the activation of the initiator caspases of the death receptor pathway (caspase-8 and caspase-10) at least in human MCF-7 breast and PC-3 prostate carcinoma cells. The formation of the Fas and death receptor 4 (DR4) death-inducing signaling complex was clearly evidenced in MCF-7 and PC-3 cancer cells. Caspase-8 was found to interact with Fas and DR4 receptors on narciclasine treatment. However, narciclasine-induced downstream apoptotic pathways in MCF-7 cells diverged from those in PC-3 cells, where caspase-8 directly activated effector caspases such as caspase-3 in the absence of any further release of mitochondrial proapoptotic effectors. In contrast, in MCF-7 cells, the apoptotic process was found to require an amplification step that is mitochondria-dependent, with Bid processing, release of cytochrome c, and caspase-9 activation. It is postulated that the high selectivity of narciclasine to cancer cells might be linked, at least in part, to this activation of the death receptor pathway. Normal human fibroblasts appear approximately 250-fold less sensitive to narciclasine, which does not induce apoptosis in these cells probably due to the absence of death receptor pathway activation.

  13. Identification of an anabolic selective androgen receptor modulator that actively induces death of androgen-independent prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Azriel; Meissner, Robert S; Gentile, Michael A; Chisamore, Michael J; Opas, Evan E; Scafonas, Angela; Cusick, Tara E; Gambone, Carlo; Pennypacker, Brenda; Hodor, Paul; Perkins, James J; Bai, Chang; Ferraro, Damien; Bettoun, David J; Wilkinson, Hilary A; Alves, Stephen E; Flores, Osvaldo; Ray, William J

    2014-09-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) initially responds to inhibition of androgen receptor (AR) signaling, but inevitably progresses to hormone ablation-resistant disease. Much effort is focused on optimizing this androgen deprivation strategy by improving hormone depletion and AR antagonism. However we found that bicalutamide, a clinically used antiandrogen, actually resembles a selective AR modulator (SARM), as it partially regulates 24% of endogenously 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-responsive genes in AR(+) MDA-MB-453 breast cancer cells. These data suggested that passive blocking of all AR functions is not required for PCa therapy. Hence, we adopted an active strategy that calls for the development of novel SARMs, which induce a unique gene expression profile that is intolerable to PCa cells. Therefore, we screened 3000 SARMs for the ability to arrest the androgen-independent growth of AR(+) 22Rv1 and LNCaP PCa cells but not AR(-) PC3 or DU145 cells. We identified only one such compound; the 4-aza-steroid, MK-4541, a potent and selective SARM. MK-4541 induces caspase-3 activity and cell death in both androgen-independent, AR(+) PCa cell lines but spares AR(-) cells or AR(+) non-PCa cells. This activity correlates with its promoter context- and cell-type dependent transcriptional effects. In rats, MK-4541 inhibits the trophic effects of DHT on the prostate, but not the levator ani muscle, and triggers an anabolic response in the periosteal compartment of bone. Therefore, MK-4541 has the potential to effectively manage prostatic hypertrophic diseases owing to its antitumor SARM-like mechanism, while simultaneously maintaining the anabolic benefits of natural androgens.

  14. Myeloid zinc finger 1 mediates sulindac sulfide-induced upregulation of death receptor 5 of human colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Horinaka, Mano; Yoshida, Tatsushi; Tomosugi, Mitsuhiro; Yasuda, Shusuke; Sowa, Yoshihiro; Sakai, Toshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    A combined therapy of sulindac sulfide and tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a promising strategy for the treatment of cancer. Sulindac sulfide had been shown to induce the expression of death receptor 5 (DR5), a receptor for TRAIL, and sensitize cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis; however, the molecular mechanism underlying the upregulation of DR5 has not yet been elucidated. We demonstrate here that myeloid zinc finger 1 (MZF1) mediates the induction of DR5 by sulindac sulfide. Sulindac sulfide induced the expression of DR5 at the protein and mRNA levels in colon cancer SW480 cells. Furthermore, sulindac sulfide increased DR5 promoter activity. We showed that sulindac sulfide stimulated DR5 promoter activity via the −301 to −253 region. This region contained a putative MZF1-binding site. Site-directed mutations in the site abrogated the enhancement in DR5 promoter activity by sulindac sulfide. MZF1 directly bound to the putative MZF1-binding site of the DR5 promoter and the binding was increased by sulindac sulfide. The expression of MZF1 was also increased by sulindac sulfide, and MZF1 siRNA attenuated the upregulation of DR5 by sulindac sulfide. These results indicate that sulindac sulfide induces the expression of DR5 by up-regulating MZF1. PMID:25102912

  15. miR-222 attenuates cisplatin-induced cell death by targeting the PPP2R2A/Akt/mTOR Axis in bladder cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Li-Ping; Hu, Zheng-Mao; Li, Kai; Xia, Kun

    2016-03-01

    Increased miR-222 levels are associated with a poor prognosis in patients with bladder cancer. However, the role of miR-222 remains unclear. In the present study, we found that miR-222 enhanced the proliferation of both the T24 and the 5637 bladder cancer cell lines. Overexpression of miR-222 attenuated cisplatin-induced cell death in bladder cancer cells. miR-222 activated the Akt/mTOR pathway and inhibited cisplatin-induced autophagy in bladder cancer cells by directly targeting protein phosphatase 2A subunit B (PPP2R2A). Blocking the activation of Akt with LY294002 or mTOR with rapamycin significantly prevented miR-222-induced proliferation and restored the sensitivity of bladder cancer cells to cisplatin. These findings demonstrate that miR-222 modulates the PPP2R2A/Akt/mTOR axis and thus plays a critical role in regulating proliferation and chemotherapeutic drug resistance. Therefore, miR-222 may be a novel therapeutic target for bladder cancer.

  16. Cytotoxic macrophage-released tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) as a killing mechanism for cancer cell death after cold plasma activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushik, Nagendra Kumar; Kaushik, Neha; Min, Booki; Choi, Ki Hong; Hong, Young June; Miller, Vandana; Fridman, Alexander; Choi, Eun Ha

    2016-03-01

    The present study aims at studying the anticancer role of cold plasma-activated immune cells. The direct anti-cancer activity of plasma-activated immune cells against human solid cancers has not been described so far. Hence, we assessed the effect of plasma-treated RAW264.7 macrophages on cancer cell growth after co-culture. In particular, flow cytometer analysis revealed that plasma did not induce any cell death in RAW264.7 macrophages. Interestingly, immunofluorescence and western blot analysis confirmed that TNF-α released from plasma-activated macrophages acts as a tumour cell death inducer. In support of these findings, activated macrophages down-regulated the cell growth in solid cancer cell lines and induced cell death in vitro. Together our findings suggest plasma-induced reactive species recruit cytotoxic macrophages to release TNF-α, which blocks cancer cell growth and can have the potential to contribute to reducing tumour growth in vivo in the near future.

  17. The synthetic ajoene analog SPA3015 induces apoptotic cell death through crosstalk between NF-κB and PPARγ in multidrug-resistant cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jee Won; Cho, Hyewon; Lee, Jae Yeon; Jeon, Youngsic; Kim, Su-Nam; Lee, Sang Jin; Bae, Gyu-Un; Yoon, Sungpil; Jeon, Raok; Kim, Yong Kee

    2016-10-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) caused by P-glycoprotein (P-gp) overexpression impedes successful cancer chemotherapy. In this study, we investigated the anticancer effects of SPA3015, a synthetic ajoene analog, in P-gp-overexpressing MDR cancer cells (KBV20C and MES-SA/DX5). Treatment with SPA3015 caused a dramatic decrease in the cell viabilities of both KBV20C and MES-SA/DX5 cells. This decrease was accompanied by apoptotic cell death without affecting the expression level or drug efflux function of P-gp. SPA3015 selectively suppressed NF-κB reporter gene activity, which led to decreased expression of NF-κB target genes such as CIAP1, CIAP2, XIAP, and Bcl-XL. Surprisingly, nuclear localization and DNA binding affinity of the p65 subunit were not affected by SPA3015, suggesting that SPA3015 inhibits the transcriptional activity of NF-κB at the nucleus. Indeed, SPA3015 treatment led to an increase in the physical interaction of p65 with PPARγ, which resulted in the inhibition of NF-κB activity. Our findings support the hypothesis that SPA3015 inhibits NF-κB transcriptional activity by facilitating the physical interaction of the p65 subunit and PPARγ, which leads to apoptotic cell death in MDR cancer cells.

  18. Aloe-emodin induces cell death through S-phase arrest and caspase-dependent pathways in human tongue squamous cancer SCC-4 cells.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Tsan-Hung; Lai, Wan-Wen; Hsia, Te-Chun; Yang, Jai-Sing; Lai, Tung-Yuan; Wu, Ping-Ping; Ma, Chia-Yu; Yeh, Chin-Chung; Ho, Chin-Chin; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Wood, W Gibson; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2009-11-01

    Aloe-emodin, one of the anthraquinones, has been shown to have anticancer activity in different kinds of human cancer cell lines. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the anti-cancer effect of aloe-emodin on human tongue squamous carcinoma SCC-4 cells. The results indicated that aloe-emodin induced cell death through S-phase arrest and apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Treatment with 30 microM of aloe-emodin led to S-phase arrest through promoted p53, p21 and p27, but inhibited cyclin A, E, thymidylate synthase and Cdc25A levels. Aloe-emodin promoted the release of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), endonuclease G (Endo G), pro-caspase-9 and cytochrome c from the mitochondria via a loss of the mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsi(m)) which was associated with a increase in the ratio of B-cell lymphoma 2-associated X protein (Bax)/B cell lymphoma/leukemia-2 (Bcl-2) and activation of caspase-9 and -3. The free radical scavenger N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and caspase inhibitors markedly blocked aloe-emodin-induced apoptosis. Aloe-emodin thus induced apoptosis in the SCC-4 cells through the Fas/death-receptor, mitochondria and caspase cascade. Aloe-emodin could be a novel chemotherapeutic drug candidate for the treatment of human tongue squamous cancer in the future.

  19. Selection of Aptamers for CED-9/Bcl-2 Family Cell Death Regulations and Their Application in Study of Apoptosis Regulation and Drug Design for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    Horvitz, H. R. (1992) Nature 356, 494-499. 18 12. Hengartner , M. 0. & Horvitz, H. R. (1994) Cell 76, 665-676. 13. Finnegan, E. J. & Matzke, M. A. (2003... Apoptosis Regulation and Drug Design for Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ding Xue, Ph.D. Chonglin Yang, Ph.D. Nathan Camp CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION...Aptamers for CED-9/Bcl-2 Family Cell Death Regulations and Their Application in Study of Apoptosis Regulation and Drug Design for Breast Cancer 5b. GRANT

  20. Homotypic cell cannibalism, a cell-death process regulated by the nuclear protein 1, opposes to metastasis in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cano, Carla E; Sandí, María José; Hamidi, Tewfik; Calvo, Ezequiel L; Turrini, Olivier; Bartholin, Laurent; Loncle, Céline; Secq, Véronique; Garcia, Stéphane; Lomberk, Gwen; Kroemer, Guido; Urrutia, Raul; Iovanna, Juan L

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an extremely deadly disease for which all treatments available have failed to improve life expectancy significantly. This may be explained by the high metastatic potential of PDAC cells, which results from their dedifferentiation towards a mesenchymal phenotype. Some PDAC present cell-in-cell structures whose origin and significance are currently unknown. We show here that cell-in-cells form after homotypic cell cannibalism (HoCC). We found PDAC patients whose tumours display HoCC develop less metastasis than those without. In vitro, HoCC was promoted by inactivation of the nuclear protein 1 (Nupr1), and was enhanced by treatment with transforming growth factor β. HoCC ends with death of PDAC cells, consistent with a metastasis suppressor role for this phenomenon. Hence, our data indicates a protective role for HoCC in PDAC and identifies Nupr1 as a molecular regulator of this process. PMID:22821859

  1. Modulation of cell death in human colorectal and breast cancer cells through a manganese chelate by involving GSH with intracellular p53 status.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Kaushik; Das, Satyajit; Majumder, Saikat; Majumdar, Subrata; Biswas, Jaydip; Choudhuri, Soumitra Kumar

    2017-03-01

    Chemotherapy is central to current treatment modality especially for advanced and metastatic colorectal and breast cancers. Targeting the key molecular events of the neoplastic cells may open a possibility to treat cancer. Although some improvements in understanding of colorectal and breast cancer treatment have been recorded, the involvement of glutathione (GSH) and dependency of p53 status on the modulation of GSH-mediated treatment efficacy have been largely overlooked. Herein, we tried to decipher the underlying mechanism of the action of Mn-N-(2-hydroxyacetophenone) glycinate (MnNG) against differential p53 status bearing Hct116, MCF-7, and MDA-MB-468 cells on the backdrop of intracellular GSH level and reveal the role of p53 status in modulating GSH-dependant abrogation of MnNG-induced apoptosis in these cancer cells. Present study discloses that MnNG targets specifically wild-type-p53 expressing Hct116 and MCF-7 cells by significantly depleting both cytosolic, mitochondrial GSH, and modulating nuclear GSH through Glutathione reductase and Glutamate-cysteine ligase depletion that may in turn induce p53-mediated intrinsic apoptosis in them. Thus GSH addition abrogates p53-mediated apoptosis in wild-type-p53 expressing cells. GSH addition also overrides MnNG-induced modulation of phase II detoxifying parameters in them. However, GSH addition partially replenishes the down-regulated or modulated GSH pool in cytosol, mitochondria, and nucleus, and relatively abrogates MnNG-induced intrinsic apoptosis in p53-mutated MDA-MB-468 cells. On the contrary, although MnNG induces significant cell death in p53-null Hct116 cells, GSH addition fails to negate MnNG-induced cell death. Thus p53 status with intracellular GSH is critical for the modulation of MnNG-induced apoptosis.

  2. Anti-cancer effect of bee venom on colon cancer cell growth by activation of death receptors and inhibition of nuclear factor kappa B

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jie; Lee, Hye Lim; Ham, Young Wan; Song, Ho Sueb; Song, Min Jong; Hong, Jin Tae

    2015-01-01

    Bee venom (BV) has been used as a traditional medicine to treat arthritis, rheumatism, back pain, cancerous tumors, and skin diseases. However, the effects of BV on the colon cancer and their action mechanisms have not been reported yet. We used cell viability assay and soft agar colony formation assay for testing cell viability, electro mobility shift assay for detecting DNA binding activity of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and Western blotting assay for detection of apoptosis regulatory proteins. We found that BV inhibited growth of colon cancer cells through induction of apoptosis. We also found that the expression of death receptor (DR) 4, DR5, p53, p21, Bax, cleaved caspase-3, cleaved caspase-8, and cleaved caspase-9 was increased by BV treatment in a dose dependent manner (0–5 μg/ml). Consistent with cancer cell growth inhibition, the DNA binding activity of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) was also inhibited by BV treatment. Besides, we found that BV blocked NF-κB activation by directly binding to NF-κB p50 subunit. Moreover, combination treatment with BV and p50 siRNA or NF-κB inhibitor augmented BV-induced cell growth inhibition. However, p50 mutant plasmid (C62S) transfection partially abolished BV-induced cell growth inhibiton. In addition, BV significantly suppressed tumor growth in vivo. Therefore, these results suggested that BV could inhibit colon cancer cell growth, and these anti-proliferative effects may be related to the induction of apoptosis by activation of DR4 and DR5 and inhibition of NF-κB. PMID:26561202

  3. Phytosphingosine in combination with ionizing radiation enhances apoptotic cell death in radiation-resistant cancer cells through ROS-dependent and -independent AIF release.

    PubMed

    Park, Moon-Taek; Kim, Min-Jung; Kang, Young-Hee; Choi, Soon-Young; Lee, Jae-Hoon; Choi, Jung-A; Kang, Chang-Mo; Cho, Chul-Koo; Kang, Seongman; Bae, Sangwoo; Lee, Yun-Sil; Chung, Hee Yong; Lee, Su-Jae

    2005-02-15

    The use of chemical modifiers as radiosensitizers in combination with low-dose irradiation may increase the therapeutic effect on cancer by overcoming a high apoptotic threshold. Here, we showed that phytosphingosine treatment in combination with gamma-radiation enhanced apoptotic cell death of radiation-resistant human T-cell lymphoma in a caspase-independent manner. Combination treatment induced an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level, mitochondrial relocalization of B-cell lymphoma-2(Bcl-2)-associated X protein (Bax), poly-adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribose polymerase 1 (PARP-1) activation, and nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF). siRNA targeting of AIF effectively protected cells from the combination treatment-induced cell death. An antioxidant, N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), inhibited Bax relocalization and AIF translocation but not PARP-1 activation. Moreover, transfection of Bax-siRNA significantly inhibited AIF translocation. Pretreatment of PARP-1 inhibitor, DPQ (3,4-dihydro-5-[4-(1-piperidinyl)-butoxy]-1(2H)-isoquinolinone), or PARP-1-siRNA also partially attenuated AIF translocation, whereas the same treatment did not affect intracellular ROS level and Bax redistribution. Taken together, these results demonstrate that enhancement of cell death of radiation-resistant cancer cells by phytosphingosine treatment in combination with gamma-radiation is mediated by nuclear translocation of AIF, which is in turn mediated both by ROS-dependent Bax relocalization and ROS-independent PARP-1 activation. The molecular signaling pathways that we elucidated in this study may provide potential drug targets for radiation sensitization of cancers refractive to radiation therapy.

  4. Mimulone-induced autophagy through p53-mediated AMPK/mTOR pathway increases caspase-mediated apoptotic cell death in A549 human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    An, Hyun-Kyu; Kim, Kyoung-Sook; Lee, Ji-Won; Park, Mi-Hyun; Moon, Hyung-In; Park, Shin-Ji; Baik, Ji-Sue; Kim, Cheorl-Ho; Lee, Young-Choon

    2014-01-01

    Anticancer properties and mechanisms of mimulone (MML), C-geranylflavonoid isolated from the Paulownia tomentosa fruits, were firstly elucidated in this study. MML prevented cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent way and triggered apoptosis through the extrinsic pathway in A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells. Furthermore, MML-treated cells displayed autophagic features, such as the formation of autophagic vacuoles, a primary morphological feature of autophagy, and the accumulation of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) puncta, another typical maker of autophagy, as determined by FITC-conjugated immunostaining and monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining, respectively. The expression levels of LC3-I and LC3-II, specific markers of autophagy, were also augmented by MML treatment. Autophagy inhibition by 3-methyladenine (3-MA), pharmacological autophagy inhibitor, and shRNA knockdown of Beclin-1 reduced apoptotic cell death induced by MML. Autophagic flux was not significantly affected by MML treatment and lysosomal inhibitor, chloroquine (CQ) suppressed MML-induced autophagy and apoptosis. MML-induced autophagy was promoted by decreases in p53 and p-mTOR levels and increase of p-AMPK. Moreover, inhibition of p53 transactivation by pifithrin-α (PFT-α) and knockdown of p53 enhanced induction of autophagy and finally promoted apoptotic cell death. Overall, the results demonstrate that autophagy contributes to the cytotoxicity of MML in cancer cells harboring wild-type p53. This study strongly suggests that MML is a potential candidate for an anticancer agent targeting both autophagy and apoptotic cell death in human lung cancer. Moreover, co-treatment of MML and p53 inhibitor would be more effective in human lung cancer therapy.

  5. Mimulone-Induced Autophagy through p53-Mediated AMPK/mTOR Pathway Increases Caspase-Mediated Apoptotic Cell Death in A549 Human Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji-Won; Park, Mi-Hyun; Moon, Hyung-In; Park, Shin-Ji; Baik, Ji-Sue; Kim, Cheorl-Ho; Lee, Young-Choon

    2014-01-01

    Anticancer properties and mechanisms of mimulone (MML), C-geranylflavonoid isolated from the Paulownia tomentosa fruits, were firstly elucidated in this study. MML prevented cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent way and triggered apoptosis through the extrinsic pathway in A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells. Furthermore, MML-treated cells displayed autophagic features, such as the formation of autophagic vacuoles, a primary morphological feature of autophagy, and the accumulation of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) puncta, another typical maker of autophagy, as determined by FITC-conjugated immunostaining and monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining, respectively. The expression levels of LC3-I and LC3-II, specific markers of autophagy, were also augmented by MML treatment. Autophagy inhibition by 3-methyladenine (3-MA), pharmacological autophagy inhibitor, and shRNA knockdown of Beclin-1 reduced apoptotic cell death induced by MML. Autophagic flux was not significantly affected by MML treatment and lysosomal inhibitor, chloroquine (CQ) suppressed MML-induced autophagy and apoptosis. MML-induced autophagy was promoted by decreases in p53 and p-mTOR levels and increase of p-AMPK. Moreover, inhibition of p53 transactivation by pifithrin-α (PFT-α) and knockdown of p53 enhanced induction of autophagy and finally promoted apoptotic cell death. Overall, the results demonstrate that autophagy contributes to the cytotoxicity of MML in cancer cells harboring wild-type p53. This study strongly suggests that MML is a potential candidate for an anticancer agent targeting both autophagy and apoptotic cell death in human lung cancer. Moreover, co-treatment of MML and p53 inhibitor would be more effective in human lung cancer therapy. PMID:25490748

  6. Killing Two Cells with One Stone: Pharmacologic BCL-2 Family Targeting for Cancer Cell Death and Immune Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Lindsey M.; Nassin, Michele L.; Hadji, Abbas; LaBelle, James L.

    2016-01-01

    A crucial component of regulating organismal homeostasis is maintaining proper cell number and eliminating damaged or potentially malignant cells. Apoptosis, or programed cell death, is the mechanism responsible for this equilibrium. The intrinsic apoptotic pathway is also especially important in the development and maintenance of the immune system. Apoptosis is essential for proper positive and negative selection during B- and T-cell development and for efficient contraction of expanded lymphocytes following an immune response. Tight regulation of the apoptotic pathway is critical, as excessive cell death can lead to immunodeficiency while apoptotic resistance can lead to aberrant lymphoproliferation and autoimmune disease. Dysregulation of cell death is implicated in a wide range of hematological malignancies, and targeting various components of the apoptotic machinery in these cases is an attractive chemotherapeutic strategy. A wide array of compounds has been developed with the purpose of reactivating the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. These compounds, termed BH3 mimetics are garnering considerable attention as they gain greater clinical oncologic significance. As their use expands, it will be imperative to understand the effects these compounds have on immune homeostasis. Uncovering their potential immunomodulatory activity may allow for administration of BH3 mimetics for direct tumor cell killing as well as novel therapies for a wide range of immune-based directives. This review will summarize the major proteins involved in the intrinsic apoptotic pathway and define their roles in normal immune development and disease. Clinical and preclinical BH3 mimetics are described within the context of what is currently known about their ability to affect immune function. Prospects for future antitumor immune amplification and immune modulation are then proposed. PMID:28066751

  7. Killing Two Cells with One Stone: Pharmacologic BCL-2 Family Targeting for Cancer Cell Death and Immune Modulation.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Lindsey M; Nassin, Michele L; Hadji, Abbas; LaBelle, James L

    2016-01-01

    A crucial component of regulating organismal homeostasis is maintaining proper cell number and eliminating damaged or potentially malignant cells. Apoptosis, or programed cell death, is the mechanism responsible for this equilibrium. The intrinsic apoptotic pathway is also especially important in the development and maintenance of the immune system. Apoptosis is essential for proper positive and negative selection during B- and T-cell development and for efficient contraction of expanded lymphocytes following an immune response. Tight regulation of the apoptotic pathway is critical, as excessive cell death can lead to immunodeficiency while apoptotic resistance can lead to aberrant lymphoproliferation and autoimmune disease. Dysregulation of cell death is implicated in a wide range of hematological malignancies, and targeting various components of the apoptotic machinery in these cases is an attractive chemotherapeutic strategy. A wide array of compounds has been developed with the purpose of reactivating the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. These compounds, termed BH3 mimetics are garnering considerable attention as they gain greater clinical oncologic significance. As their use expands, it will be imperative to understand the effects these compounds have on immune homeostasis. Uncovering their potential immunomodulatory activity may allow for administration of BH3 mimetics for direct tumor cell killing as well as novel therapies for a wide range of immune-based directives. This review will summarize the major proteins involved in the intrinsic apoptotic pathway and define their roles in normal immune development and disease. Clinical and preclinical BH3 mimetics are described within the context of what is currently known about their ability to affect immune function. Prospects for future antitumor immune amplification and immune modulation are then proposed.

  8. Programmed cell death in aging.

    PubMed

    Tower, John

    2015-09-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) pathways, including apoptosis and regulated necrosis, are required for normal cell turnover and tissue homeostasis. Mis-regulation of PCD is increasingly implicated in aging and aging-related disease. During aging the cell turnover rate declines for several highly-mitotic tissues. Aging-associated disruptions in systemic and inter-cell signaling combined with cell-autonomous damage and mitochondrial malfunction result in increased PCD in some cell types, and decreased PCD in other cell types. Increased PCD during aging is implicated in immune system decline, skeletal muscle wasting (sarcopenia), loss of cells in the heart, and neurodegenerative disease. In contrast, cancer cells and senescent cells are resistant to PCD, enabling them to increase in abundance during aging. PCD pathways limit life span in fungi, but whether PCD pathways normally limit adult metazoan life span is not yet clear. PCD is regulated by a balance of negative and positive factors, including the mitochondria, which are particularly subject to aging-associated malfunction.

  9. Cell Proliferation, Cell Death, and Size Regulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-10-01

    Cell Death , and Size Regulation PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Nicholas E. Baker, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva...SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Cell Proliferation, Cell Death , and Size Regulation DAMD17-97-1-7034 6. AUTHOR(S) Nicholas E. Baker, Ph.D. 7. PERFORMING...Contains unpublished data 5 CELL PROLIFERATION, CELL DEATH , AND SIZE REGULATION INTRODUCTION Cell proliferation and cell death come to attention through

  10. Citrus limon-derived nanovesicles inhibit cancer cell proliferation and suppress CML xenograft growth by inducing TRAIL-mediated cell death

    PubMed Central

    Raimondo, Stefania; Naselli, Flores; Fontana, Simona; Monteleone, Francesca; Lo Dico, Alessia; Saieva, Laura; Zito, Giovanni; Flugy, Anna; Manno, Mauro; Di Bella, Maria Antonietta; De Leo, Giacomo; Alessandro, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Nanosized vesicles are considered key players in cell to cell communication, thus influencing physiological and pathological processes, including cancer. Nanovesicles have also been found in edible-plants and have shown therapeutic activity in inflammatory bowel diseases; however information on their role in affecting cancer progression is missing. Our study identify for the first time a fraction of vesicles from lemon juice (Citrus limon L.), obtained as a result of different ultracentrifugation, with density ranging from 1,15 to 1,19 g/ml and specific proteomic profile. By using an in vitro approach, we show that isolated nanovesicles inhibit cancer cell proliferation in different tumor cell lines, by activating a TRAIL-mediated apoptotic cell death. Furthermore, we demonstrate that lemon nanovesicles suppress CML tumor growth in vivo by specifically reaching tumor site and by activating TRAIL-mediated apoptotic cell processes. Overall, this study suggests the possible use of plant-edible nanovesicles as a feasible approach in cancer treatment. PMID:26098775

  11. Citrus limon-derived nanovesicles inhibit cancer cell proliferation and suppress CML xenograft growth by inducing TRAIL-mediated cell death.

    PubMed

    Raimondo, Stefania; Naselli, Flores; Fontana, Simona; Monteleone, Francesca; Lo Dico, Alessia; Saieva, Laura; Zito, Giovanni; Flugy, Anna; Manno, Mauro; Di Bella, Maria Antonietta; De Leo, Giacomo; Alessandro, Riccardo

    2015-08-14

    Nanosized vesicles are considered key players in cell to cell communication, thus influencing physiological and pathological processes, including cancer. Nanovesicles have also been found in edible-plants and have shown therapeutic activity in inflammatory bowel diseases; however information on their role in affecting cancer progression is missing.Our study identify for the first time a fraction of vesicles from lemon juice (Citrus limon L.), obtained as a result of different ultracentrifugation, with density ranging from 1,15 to 1,19 g/ml and specific proteomic profile. By using an in vitro approach, we show that isolated nanovesicles inhibit cancer cell proliferation in different tumor cell lines, by activating a TRAIL-mediated apoptotic cell death. Furthermore, we demonstrate that lemon nanovesicles suppress CML tumor growth in vivo by specifically reaching tumor site and by activating TRAIL-mediated apoptotic cell processes. Overall, this study suggests the possible use of plant-edible nanovesicles as a feasible approach in cancer treatment.

  12. Death receptors: Targets for cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, Zafar; Shukla, Yogeshwer

    2010-04-01

    Apoptosis is the cell's intrinsic program to death, which plays an important role in physiologic growth control and homeostasis. Apoptosis can be triggered by death receptors (DRs), without any adverse effects. DRs are the members of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor superfamily, known to be involved in apoptosis signaling, independent of p53 tumor-supressor gene. Selective triggering of DR-mediated apoptosis in cancer cells is a novel approach in cancer therapy. So far, the best characterized DRs are CD95 (Fas/Apo1), TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand receptor (TRAILR) and tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR). Among these, TRAILR is emerging as most promising agent for cancer therapy, because it induces apoptosis in a variety of tumor and transformed cells without any toxicity to normal cells. TRAIL treatment in combination with chemotherapy or radiotherapy enhances TRAIL sensitivity or reverses TRAIL resistance by regulating downstream effectors. This review covers the current knowledge about the DRs, summarizes main signaling in DRs and also summarizes the preclinical approaches of these DRs in cancer therapy.

  13. miR-181a and miR-630 regulate cisplatin-induced cancer cell death.

    PubMed

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Morselli, Eugenia; Vitale, Ilio; Kepp, Oliver; Senovilla, Laura; Criollo, Alfredo; Servant, Nicolas; Paccard, Caroline; Hupé, Philippe; Robert, Thomas; Ripoche, Hugues; Lazar, Vladimir; Harel-Bellan, Annick; Dessen, Philippe; Barillot, Emmanuel; Kroemer, Guido

    2010-03-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNA) are noncoding RNAs that regulate multiple cellular processes, including proliferation and apoptosis. We used microarray technology to identify miRNAs that were upregulated by non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) A549 cells in response to cisplatin (CDDP). The corresponding synthetic miRNA precursors (pre-miRNAs) per se were not lethal when transfected into A549 cells yet affected cell death induction by CDDP, C2-ceramide, cadmium, etoposide, and mitoxantrone in an inducer-specific fashion. Whereas synthetic miRNA inhibitors (anti-miRNAs) targeting miR-181a and miR-630 failed to modulate the response of A549 to CDDP, pre-miR-181a and pre-miR-630 enhanced and reduced CDDP-triggered cell death, respectively. Pre-miR-181a and pre-miR-630 consistently modulated mitochondrial/postmitochondrial steps of the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis, including Bax oligomerization, mitochondrial transmembrane potential dissipation, and the proteolytic maturation of caspase-9 and caspase-3. In addition, pre-miR-630 blocked early manifestations of the DNA damage response, including the phosphorylation of the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase and of two ATM substrates, histone H2AX and p53. Pharmacologic and genetic inhibition of p53 corroborated the hypothesis that pre-miR-630 (but not pre-miR-181a) blocks the upstream signaling pathways that are ignited by DNA damage and converge on p53 activation. Pre-miR-630 arrested A549 cells in the G0-G1 phase of the cell cycle, correlating with increased levels of the cell cycle inhibitor p27(Kip1) as well as with reduced proliferation rates and resulting in greatly diminished sensitivity of A549 cells to the late S-G2-M cell cycle arrest mediated by CDDP. Altogether, these results identify miR-181a and miR-630 as novel modulators of the CDDP response in NSCLC.

  14. 8-p-Hdroxybenzoyl Tovarol Induces Paraptosis Like Cell Death and Protective Autophagy in Human Cervical Cancer HeLa Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cui; Jiang, Yingnan; Zhang, Jin; Huang, Jian; Wang, Jinhui

    2015-07-02

    8-p-Hdroxybenzoyl tovarol (TAW) is a germacrane-type sesquiterpenoid that can be isolated from the roots of Ferula dissecta (Ledeb.) Ledeb. In this study, the growth inhibitory effects induced by TAW were screened on some types of tumor cells, and the mechanism was investigated on TAW-induced growth inhibition, including paraptosis and autophagy in human cervical cancer HeLa cells. TAW-induced paraptosis involved extensive cytoplasmic vacuolization in the absence of caspase activation. Additionally, TAW evoked cell paraptotic death mediated by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and unfolded protein response (UPR). Autophagy induced by TAW was found to antagonize paraptosis in HeLa cells. This effect was enhanced by rapamycin and suppressed by the autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine (3MA). Loss of beclin 1 (an autophagic regulator) function led to promote ER stress. Taken together, these results suggest that TAW induces paraptosis like cell death and protective autophagy in HeLa cells, which would provide a new clue for exploiting TAW as a promising agent for the treatment of cervical cancer.

  15. Antitumor effects of deguelin on H460 human lung cancer cells in vitro and in vivo: Roles of apoptotic cell death and H460 tumor xenografts model.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yu-Chieh; Chiang, Jo-Hua; Yu, Chun-Shu; Hsia, Te-Chun; Wu, Rick Sai-Chuen; Lien, Jin-Cherng; Lai, Kuang-Chi; Yu, Fu-Shun; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2017-01-01

    Deguelin, a naturally occurring rotenoid of the flavonoid family, is known to be an Akt inhibitor, to have chemopreventive activities and anti-tumor effect on several cancers. In this study, investigation to elucidate the effect of deguelin on apoptotic pathways in human lung cancer cells and on the anti-tumor effect in lung cancer xenograft nu/nu mice was performed. In vitro studies, found that deguelin induced cell morphological changes, and decreased the percentage of viability through the induction of apoptosis in H460 lung cancer cells. Deguelin triggered apoptosis in H460 cells was also confirmed by DAPI staining, DNA gel electrophoresis, and Annexin V-FITC staining and these effects are dose-dependent manners. It was also found that deguelin promoted the Ca(2+) production and activation of caspase-3 but decreased the level of ΔΨm in H460 cells. Western blots indicated that the protein levels of cytochrome c, AIF, and pro-apoptotic Bax and Bak protein were increased, but the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and Bcl-x were decreased that may have led to apoptosis in H460 cells after exposure to deguelin. It was also confirmed by confocal laser microscope examination that deguelin promoted the release of AIF from mitochondria to cytosol. In vivo studies, found that in immunodeficient nu/nu mice bearing H460 tumor xenografts showed that the deguelin significantly suppressed tumor growth. Deguelin might be a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of lung cancer in the future. This finding might fully support a critical event for deguelin via induction of apoptotic cell death and H460 tumor xenografts model against human lung cancer. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 84-98, 2017.

  16. Palladium(II) saccharinate complexes with bis(2-pyridylmethyl)amine induce cell death by apoptosis in human breast cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ari, Ferda; Ulukaya, Engin; Sarimahmut, Mehmet; Yilmaz, Veysel T

    2013-06-01

    The outcomes of breast cancer patients are still poor although new compounds have recently been introduced into the clinic. Therefore, novel chemical approaches are required. In the present study, palladium(II) and corresponding platinum(II) complexes containing bis(2-pyridylmethyl)amine (bpma) and saccharine were synthesized and tested against human breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, in vitro. Cytotoxicity was first screened by the MTT assay and the results were further confirmed by the ATP assay. The palladium complexes 1 and 3 yielded stronger cytotoxicity than the corresponding platinum complexes 2 and 4 at the same doses. The palladium complex 3 was found to be the most cytotoxic one. Therefore, a more comprehensive study was carried out with this complex only. The mode of cell death was determined morphologically under fluorescent microscope and biochemically with detection of active caspase-3 and PARP cleavage by Western blot. Changes in apoptosis-related gene expressions were measured with qPCR. It was demonstrated that complex 3 caused cell death by apoptosis determined by fluorescence imaging and Western blot. As a sign of apoptosis, PARP was cleaved in both of the cell lines. In addition, caspase-3 was cleaved in MDA-MB-231 cells while this cleavage was not observed in MCF-7. The results show that the complex 3 is a promising anti-cancer compound against breast cancer with an IC50 value of 3.9 μM for MCF-7 and 4.2 μM for MDA-MB-231 cells, which warrants further animal experiments.

  17. Effects of the knockdown of death-associated protein 3 expression on cell adhesion, growth and migration in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wazir, Umar; Sanders, Andrew J; Wazir, Ahmad M A; Ye, Lin; Jiang, Wen G; Ster, Irina C; Sharma, Anup K; Mokbel, Kefah

    2015-05-01

    The death-associated protein 3 (DAP3) is a highly conserved phosphoprotein involved in the regulation of autophagy. A previous clinical study by our group suggested an association between low DAP3 expression and clinicopathological parameters of human breast cancer. In the present study, we intended to determine the role of DAP3 in cancer cell behaviour in the context of human breast cancer. We developed knockdown sub-lines of MCF7 and MDA-MB-231, and performed growth, adhesion, invasion assays and electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) studies of post-wound migration of the cells. In addition, we studied the mRNA expression of caspase 8 and 9, death ligand signal enhancer (DELE), IFN-β promoter stimulator 1 (IPS1), cyclin D1 and p21 in the control and knockdown sub-lines. The knockdown sub-lines of MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 had significantly increased adhesion and decreased growth when compared to the controls. Furthermore, invasion and migration were significantly increased in the MDA-MB-231DAP3kd cells vs. the controls. The expression of caspase 9 and IPS1, known components of the apoptosis pathway, were significantly reduced in the MCF7DAP3kd cells (p=0.05 and p=0.003, respectively). We conclude that DAP3 silencing contributes to breast carcinogenesis by increasing cell adhesion, migration and invasion. It is possible that this may be due to the activity of focal adhesion kinase further downstream of the anoikis pathway. Further research in this direction would be beneficial in increasing our understanding of the mechanisms underlying human breast cancer.

  18. Inhibition of inducible heat shock protein-70 (hsp72) enhances bortezomib-induced cell death in human bladder cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Qi, Wei; White, Matthew C; Choi, Woonyoung; Guo, Charles; Dinney, Colin; McConkey, David J; Siefker-Radtke, Arlene

    2013-01-01

    The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib (Velcade) is a promising new agent for bladder cancer therapy, but inducible cytoprotective mechanisms may limit its potential efficacy. We used whole genome mRNA expression profiling to study the effects of bortezomib on stress-induced gene expression in a panel of human bladder cancer cell lines. Bortezomib induced strong upregulation of the inducible HSP70 isoforms HSPA1A and HSPA1B isoforms of Hsp72 in 253J B-V and SW780 (HSPA1A(high)) cells, but only induced the HSPA1B isoform in UM-UC10 and UM-UC13 (HSPA1A(low)) cells. Bortezomib stimulated the binding of heat shock factor-1 (HSF1) to the HSPA1A promoter in 253JB-V but not in UM-UC13 cells. Methylation-specific PCR revealed that the HSPA1A promoter was methylated in the HSPA1A(low) cell lines (UM-UC10 and UM-UC13), and exposure to the chromatin demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine restored HSPA1A expression. Overexpression of Hsp72 promoted bortezomib resistance in the UM-UC10 and UM-UC13 cells, whereas transient knockdown of HSPA1B further sensitized these cells to bortezomib, and exposure to the chemical HSF1 inhibitor KNK-437 promoted bortezomib sensitivity in the 253J B-V cells. Finally, shRNA-mediated stable knockdown of Hsp72 in 253J B-V promoted sensitivity to bortezomib in vitro and in tumor xenografts in vivo. Together, our results provide proof-of-concept for using Hsp72 inhibitors to promote bortezomib sensitivity in bladder cancers and suggest that selective targeting of HSPA1B could produce synthetic lethality in tumors that display HSPA1A promoter methylation.

  19. Detection of Cancer Cell Death Mediated by a Synthetic Granzyme B-like Peptide Fluorescent Conjugate and the same Peptide Binding in Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lo, Wai Chun Jennifer; Luther, Donald Gene

    2014-03-01

    Granzyme-mediated apoptosis, supported by pore-forming perforin, plays an important role in CD8+ T lymphocytes (CTL)-dependent cellular immunity protection against both cancer and viral infection. Quantitative and qualitative problems with CTL are potential contributing factors to disease progression. The feasibility of developing CTL-independent cellular immunity is desired but must first overcome the barrier of CTL-independent target cell recognition. Granzyme B with its strong pro-apoptotic activity in many different target cells is investigated for use in the CTL-independent cellular immunity approach, and granzyme B or its bioactive peptides without the enzymatic activity are more desirable for use. Native granzyme B with enzymatic activity is usually investigated in cancer cells for its mediation of apoptosis by detection of DNA fragmentation. Detection of cell death mediated by such peptides in cancer cells is needed to demonstrate the potential therapeutic purposes. We show with never-before-seen microscopic images using fluorescence microscopy that a synthetic granzyme B-like peptide fluorescent conjugate (GP1R) can: 1) mediate cell death of different cancer cells via membrane extrusion, 2) bind to constitutively expressed binding targets in different cancer cells and bacteria, and 3) promote bacterial phagocytosis. The putative binding targets may serve as a universal pathologic biomarker detectable by GP1R. Our data taken together demonstrate the potential applications of GP1R for use in CTL-independent target cell recognition and target cell death induction. It may lead to development of rapid targeted detection and new treatment of cancer, viral and bacterial infections. The new treatment may show mutual benefits for two or more diseases.

  20. Regulation of VDAC trafficking modulates cell death

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Ashvini K; Godbole, Ashwini; Mathew, M K

    2016-01-01

    The voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) and mitochondria-associated hexokinase (HxK) have crucial roles in both cell survival and death. Both the individual abundances and their ratio seem to influence the balance of survival and death and are thus critical in scenarios, such as neurodegeneration and cancer. Elevated levels of both VDAC and HxK have been reported in cancerous cells. Physical interaction is surmised and specific residues or regions involved have been identified, but details of the interaction and the mechanism by which it modulates survival are yet to be elucidated. We and others have shown that heterologous expression of VDAC can induce cell death, which can be mitigated by concomitant overexpression of HxK. We have also observed that upon overexpression, fluorescently tagged VDAC is distributed between the cytosol and mitochondria. In this study, we show that cell death ensues only when the protein, which is synthesized on cytoplasmic ribosomes, migrates to the mitochondrion. Further, coexpression of rat HxK II (rHxKII) can delay the translocation of human VDAC1 (hVDAC1) protein to mitochondria and thereby inhibit VDAC-induced cell death. Variation in the level of HxK protein as seen endogenously in different cell lines, or as experimentally manipulated by silencing and overexpression, can lead to differential VDAC translocation kinetics and related cell death. The N-terminal region of HxK and the Glu73 residue of hVDAC1, which have previously been implicated in a physical interaction, are required for cytosolic retention of VDAC. Finally, we show that, in otherwise unperturbed cells in culture, there is a small but significant amount of soluble VDAC in the cytosol present in a complex with HxK. This complex could well determine how a cell is poised with respect to incoming thanatopic signals, thereby tilting the survival/death balance in pharmacologically interesting situations, such as neurodegeneration and cancer. PMID:28028442

  1. Tumour necrosis factor-alpha-induced protein 8 (TNFAIP8) expression associated with cell survival and death in cancer cell lines infected with canine distemper virus.

    PubMed

    Garcia, J A; Ferreira, H L; Vieira, F V; Gameiro, R; Andrade, A L; Eugênio, F R; Flores, E F; Cardoso, T C

    2015-09-16

    Oncolytic virotherapy is a novel strategy for treatment of cancer in humans and companion animals as well. Canine distemper virus (CDV), a paramyxovirus, has proven to be oncolytic through induction of apoptosis in canine-derived tumour cells, yet the mechanism behind this inhibitory action is poorly understood. In this study, three human mammary tumour cell lines and one canine-derived adenofibrosarcoma cell line were tested regarding to their susceptibility to CDV infection, cell proliferation, apoptosis, mitochondrial membrane potential and expression of tumour necrosis factor-alpha-induced protein 8 (TNFAIP8). CDV replication-induced cytopathic effect, decrease of cell proliferation rates, and >45% of infected cells were considered death and/or under late apoptosis/necrosis. TNFAIP8 and CDVM gene expression were positively correlated in all cell lines. In addition, mitochondrial membrane depolarization was associated with increase in virus titres (p < 0.005). Thus, these results strongly suggest that both human and canine mammary tumour cells are potential candidates for studies concerning CDV-induced cancer therapy.

  2. Diallyl disulfide enhances carbon ion beams–induced apoptotic cell death in cervical cancer cells through regulating Tap73 /ΔNp73

    PubMed Central

    Di, Cuixia; Sun, Chao; Li, Hongyan; Si, Jing; Zhang, Hong; Han, Lu; Zhao, Qiuyue; Liu, Yang; Liu, Bin; Miao, Guoying; Gan, Lu; Liu, Yuanyuan

    2015-01-01

    Diallyl disulfide (DADS), extracted from crushed garlic by steam-distillation, has been reported to provide the anticancer activity in several cancer types. However, the effect of DADS on high-LET carbon beams - induced cell death remains unknown. Therefore, we used human cervical cancer cells to elucidate the molecular effects of this dallyl sulfide. Radiotherapy remains the mainstay of treatment, especially in advanced cervical cancer and there is still space to improve the radiosensitivity to reduce radiation dosage. In this study, we found that radiation effects evoked by high-LET carbon beam was marked by inhibition of cell viability, cell cycle arrest, significant rise of apoptotic cells, regulation of transcription factor, such as p73, as well as alterations of crucial mediator of the apoptosis pathway. We further demonstrated that pretreatment of 10 µM DADS in HeLa cells exposed to radiation resulted in decrease in cell viability and increased radiosensitivity. Additionally, cells pretreated with DADS obviously inhibited the radiation-induced G2/M phase arrest, but promoted radiation-induced apoptosis.  Moreover, combination DADS and the radiation exacerbated the activation of apoptosis pathways through up-regulated ration of pro-apoptotic Tap73 to anti-apoptotic ΔNp73, and its downstream proteins, such as FASLG, and APAF1. Taken together, these results suggest that DADS is a potential candidate as radio sensitive agent for cervical cancer. PMID:26505313

  3. Histone deacetylase inhibitor-induced cell death in bladder cancer is associated with chromatin modification and modifying protein expression: A proteomic approach

    PubMed Central

    LI, QINGDI QUENTIN; HAO, JIAN-JIANG; ZHANG, ZHENG; HSU, IAWEN; LIU, YI; TAO, ZHEN; LEWI, KEIDREN; METWALLI, ADAM R.; AGARWAL, PIYUSH K.

    2016-01-01

    The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project recently identified the importance of mutations in chromatin remodeling genes in human carcinomas. These findings imply that epigenetic modulators might have a therapeutic role in urothelial cancers. To exploit histone deacetylases (HDACs) as targets for cancer therapy, we investigated the HDAC inhibitors (HDACIs) romidepsin, trichostatin A, and vorinostat as potential chemotherapeutic agents for bladder cancer. We demonstrate that the three HDACIs suppressed cell growth and induced cell death in the bladder cancer cell line 5637. To identify potential mechanisms associated with the anti-proliferative and cytotoxic effects of the HDACIs, we used quantitative proteomics to determine the proteins potentially involved in these processes. Our proteome studies identified a total of 6003 unique proteins. Of these, 2472 proteins were upregulated and 2049 proteins were downregulated in response to HDACI exposure compared to the untreated controls (P<0.05). Bioinformatic analysis further revealed that those differentially expressed proteins were involved in multiple biological functions and enzyme-regulated pathways, including cell cycle progression, apoptosis, autophagy, free radical generation and DNA damage repair. HDACIs also altered the acetylation status of histones and non-histone proteins, as well as the levels of chromatin modification proteins, suggesting that HDACIs exert multiple cytotoxic actions in bladder cancer cells by inhibiting HDAC activity or altering the structure of chromatin. We conclude that HDACIs are effective in the inhibition of cell proliferation and the induction of apoptosis in the 5637 bladder cancer cells through multiple cell death-associated pathways. These observations support the notion that HDACIs provide new therapeutic options for bladder cancer treatment and thus warrant further preclinical exploration. PMID:27082124

  4. Pharmacoproteomic study of the natural product Ebenfuran III in DU-145 prostate cancer cells: the quantitative and temporal interrogation of chemically induced cell death at the protein level.

    PubMed

    Roumeliotis, Theodoros I; Halabalaki, Maria; Alexi, Xanthippi; Ankrett, Dyan; Giannopoulou, Eugenia G; Skaltsounis, Alexios-Leandros; Sayan, Berna S; Alexis, Michael N; Townsend, Paul A; Garbis, Spiros D

    2013-04-05

    A naturally occurring benzofuran derivative, Ebenfuran III (Eb III), was investigated for its antiproliferative effects using the DU-145 prostate cell line. Eb III was isolated from Onobrychis ebenoides of the Leguminosae family, a plant endemic in Central and Southern Greece. We have previously reported that Eb III exerts significant cytotoxic effects on certain cancer cell lines. This effect is thought to occur via the isoprenyl moiety at the C-5 position of the molecule. The study aim was to gain a deeper understanding of the pharmacological effect of Eb III on DU-145 cell death at the translational level using a relative quantitative and temporal proteomics approach. Proteins extracted from the cell pellets were subjected to solution phase trypsin proteolysis followed by iTRAQ-labeling. The labeled tryptic peptide extracts were then fractionated using strong cation exchange chromatography and the fractions were analyzed by nanoflow reverse phase ultraperformance liquid chromatography-nanoelectrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry analysis using a hybrid QqTOF platform. Using this approach, we compared the expression levels of 1360 proteins analyzed at ≤ 1% global protein false discovery rate (FDR), commonly present in untreated (control, vehicle only) and Eb III-treated cells at the different exposure time points. Through the iterative use of Ingenuity Pathway Analysis with hierarchical clustering of protein expression patterns, followed by bibliographic research, the temporal regulation of the Calpain-1, ERK2, PAR-4, RAB-7, and Bap31 proteins were identified as potential nodes of multipathway convergence to Eb III induced DU-145 cell death. These proteins were further verified with Western blot analysis. This gel-free, quantitative 2DLC-MS/MS proteomics method effectively captured novel modulated proteins in the DU-145 cell line as a response to Eb III treatment. This approach also provided greater insight to the multifocal and combinatorial signaling

  5. The role of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α in radiation-induced autophagic cell death in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Rui; Xu, Huiying; Chen, Ge; Zhao, Gang; Gao, Yan; Liu, Xiaodong; Ma, Shumei; Dong, Lihua

    2015-09-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) is a major effector in cell survival response to hypoxia, while the roles of HIF-1α in radiation-induced autophagy are still unclear in breast cancer cells. Human breast cancer carcinoma MCF-7 cells were stably transfected with pSUPER-shRNA against human HIF-1α or a scrambled sequence with no homology to mammalian genes, named as pSUPER-HIF-1α and pSUPER-SC, respectively. Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay and colony formation assay were used to detect cell viability, Western blot was used to detect protein expression, monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining was used to analyze autophagy, and Hoechts/PI staining was used to assess apoptosis. Ionizing radiation (IR) and cobalt chloride (CoCl2) could induce HIF-1α expression and increase the microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (MAPLC3)-II/MAPLC3-I ratio, especially in radiation + CoCl2 group. After the silencing of HIF-1α, the radiosensitivity of MCF-7 cells increased and the autophagy level decreased in response to DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation, but there was no influence on IR-induced apoptosis. HIF-1α silencing also increased the expression of phospho-Akt, mTOR, and P70S6K and activated the mTOR signals significantly. Hypoxia can induce autophagy and also improve the IR-induced autophagy via the suppression of Akt/mTOR/P70S6K pathway, which consequently lead to radioresistance.

  6. A Novel Combination RNAi toward Warburg Effect by Replacement with miR-145 and Silencing of PTBP1 Induces Apoptotic Cell Death in Bladder Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Takai, Tomoaki; Yoshikawa, Yuki; Inamoto, Teruo; Minami, Koichiro; Taniguchi, Kohei; Sugito, Nobuhiko; Kuranaga, Yuki; Shinohara, Haruka; Kumazaki, Minami; Tsujino, Takuya; Takahara, Kiyoshi; Ito, Yuko; Akao, Yukihiro; Azuma, Haruhito

    2017-01-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the most difficult malignancies to control. We explored the use of a novel RNA-interference method for a driver oncogene regulating cancer specific energy metabolism by the combination treatment with a small interfering RNA (siRNA) and a microRNA. After transfection of T24 and 253JB-V cells with miR-145 and/or siR-PTBP1, we examined the effects of cell growth and gene expression by performing the trypan blue dye exclusion test, Western blot, Hoechst 33342 staining, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and electron microscopy. The anti-cancer effects of xenograft model mice with miR-145 and/or siR-PTBP1 were then assessed. The combination treatment induced the deeper and longer growth inhibition and reduced the levels of both mRNA and protein expression of c-Myc and polypyrimidine tract-binding protein 1 (PTBP1) more than each single treatment. Notably, the combination treatment not only impaired the cancer specific energy metabolism by inhibiting c-Myc/PTBP1/PKMs axis but also inactivated MAPK/ERK and PI3K/AKT pathways examined in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the combination treatment induced apoptosis or autophagy; but, in some cells, apoptotic cell death was accompanied by autophagy, because the condensation of chromatin and many autophagosomes were coexistent. This combination treatment could be a novel RNA-interference strategy through the systemic silencing of the Warburg effect-promoting driver oncogene PTBP1 in bladder cancer cells. PMID:28106737

  7. Immunological metagene signatures derived from immunogenic cancer cell death associate with improved survival of patients with lung, breast or ovarian malignancies: A large-scale meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Abhishek D.; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Agostinis, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The emerging role of the cancer cell-immune cell interface in shaping tumorigenesis/anticancer immunotherapy has increased the need to identify prognostic biomarkers. Henceforth, our primary aim was to identify the immunogenic cell death (ICD)-derived metagene signatures in breast, lung and ovarian cancer that associate with improved patient survival. To this end, we analyzed the prognostic impact of differential gene-expression of 33 pre-clinically-validated ICD-parameters through a large-scale meta-analysis involving 3,983 patients (‘discovery’ dataset) across lung (1,432), breast (1,115) and ovarian (1,436) malignancies. The main results were also substantiated in ‘validation’ datasets consisting of 818 patients of same cancer-types (i.e. 285 breast/274 lung/259 ovarian). The ICD-associated parameters exhibited a highly-clustered and largely cancer type-specific prognostic impact. Interestingly, we delineated ICD-derived consensus-metagene signatures that exhibited a positive prognostic impact that was either cancer type-independent or specific. Importantly, most of these ICD-derived consensus-metagenes (acted as attractor-metagenes and thereby) ‘attracted’ highly co-expressing sets of genes or convergent-metagenes. These convergent-metagenes also exhibited positive prognostic impact in respective cancer types. Remarkably, we found that the cancer type-independent consensus-metagene acted as an ‘attractor’ for cancer-specific convergent-metagenes. This reaffirms that the immunological prognostic landscape of cancer tends to segregate between cancer-independent and cancer-type specific gene signatures. Moreover, this prognostic landscape was largely dominated by the classical T cell activity/infiltration/function-related biomarkers. Interestingly, each cancer type tended to associate with biomarkers representing a specific T cell activity or function rather than pan-T cell biomarkers. Thus, our analysis confirms that ICD can serve as a

  8. Coherence-controlled holographic microscopy enabled recognition of necrosis as the mechanism of cancer cells death after exposure to cytopathic turbid emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collakova, Jana; Krizova, Aneta; Kollarova, Vera; Dostal, Zbynek; Slaba, Michala; Vesely, Pavel; Chmelik, Radim

    2015-11-01

    Coherence-controlled holographic microscopy (CCHM) in low-coherence mode possesses a pronounced coherence gate effect. This offers an option to investigate the details of cellular events leading to cell death caused by cytopathic turbid emulsions. CCHM capacity was first assessed in model situations that showed clear images obtained with low coherence of illumination but not with high coherence of illumination. Then, the form of death of human cancer cells induced by treatment with biologically active phospholipids (BAPs) preparation was investigated. The observed overall retraction of cell colony was apparently caused by the release of cell-to-substratum contacts. This was followed by the accumulation of granules decorating the nuclear membrane. Then, the occurrence of nuclear membrane indentations signaled the start of damage to the integrity of the cell nucleus. In the final stage, cells shrunk and disintegrated. This indicated that BAPs cause cell death by necrosis and not apoptosis. An intriguing option of checking the fate of cancer cells caused by the anticipated cooperative effect after adding another tested substance sodium dichloroacetate to turbid emulsion is discussed on grounds of pilot experiments. Such observations should reveal the impact and mechanism of action of the interacting drugs on cell behavior and fate that would otherwise remain hidden in turbid milieu.

  9. Cell death and cell death responses in liver disease: mechanisms and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Luedde, Tom; Kaplowitz, Neil; Schwabe, Robert F

    2014-10-01

    Hepatocellular death is present in almost all types of human liver disease and is used as a sensitive parameter for the detection of acute and chronic liver disease of viral, toxic, metabolic, or autoimmune origin. Clinical data and animal models suggest that hepatocyte death is the key trigger of liver disease progression, manifested by the subsequent development of inflammation, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Modes of hepatocellular death differ substantially between liver diseases. Different modes of cell death such as apoptosis, necrosis, and necroptosis trigger specific cell death responses and promote progression of liver disease through distinct mechanisms. In this review, we first discuss molecular mechanisms by which different modes of cell death, damage-associated molecular patterns, and specific cell death responses contribute to the development of liver disease. We then review the clinical relevance of cell death, focusing on biomarkers; the contribution of cell death to drug-induced, viral, and fatty liver disease and liver cancer; and evidence for cell death pathways as therapeutic targets.

  10. Targeted Nanomedicine for Suppression of CD44 and Simultaneous Cell Death Induction in Ovarian Cancer: an Optimal Delivery of siRNA and Anticancer Drug

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Vatsal; Taratula, Oleh; Garbuzenko, Olga B.; Taratula, Olena R.; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Lorna; Minko, Tamara

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The proposed project is aimed at enhancing the efficiency of epithelial ovarian cancer treatment and reducing adverse side effects of chemotherapy using nanotechnology. Overexpression of the CD44 membrane receptor results in tumor initiation, growth, tumor stem cells specific behavior, development of drug resistance, and metastases. We hypothesize that a developed cancer targeted delivery system which combines CD44 siRNA with paclitaxel would successfully deliver its payload inside cancer cells, effectively induce cell death, and prevent metastases. Experimental Design: We synthesized, characterized, and tested a nanoscale-based drug delivery system containing a modified Polypropylenimine (PPI) dendrimer as a carrier; anticancer drug paclitaxel as a cell death inducer; a synthetic analog of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) peptide as a tumor targeting moiety, and siRNA targeted to CD44 mRNA. The proposed NDDS was tested in vitro and in vivo using metastatic ovarian cancer cells isolated from patients with malignant ascites. Results: We found that in contrast to cells isolated from primary tumors, CD44 was highly overexpressed in metastatic cancer cells. Treatment with the proposed tumor-targeted nanoscale-based nucleic acid and drug delivery system led to the suppression of CD44 mRNA and protein, efficient induction of cell death, effective tumor shrinkage, and prevention of adverse side effects on healthy organs. Conclusion: We show a high therapeutic potential for combinatorial treatment of ovarian carcinoma with a novel drug delivery system that effectively transports siRNA targeting to CD44 mRNA simultaneously with cytotoxic agents. PMID:24036854

  11. Bleomycin induced sensitivity to TRAIL/Apo-2L-mediated apoptosis in human seminomatous testicular cancer cells is correlated with upregulation of death receptors.

    PubMed

    Timur, Mujgan; Cort, Aysegul; Ozdemir, Evrim; Sarikcioglu, Sureyya Bilmen; Sanlioglu, Salih; Sanlioglu, Ahter Dilsad; Ozben, Tomris

    2015-01-01

    The most common solid tumor is testicular cancer among young men. Bleomycin is an antitumor antibiotic used for the therapy of testicular cancer. TRAIL is a proapoptotic cytokine that qualified as an apoptosis inducer in cancer cells. Killing cancer cells selectively via apoptosis induction is an encouraging therapeutic strategy in clinical settings. Combination of TRAIL with chemotherapeutics has been reported to enhance TRAIL-mediated apoptosis of different kinds of cancer cell lines. The molecular ground for sensitization of tumour cells to TRAIL by chemotherapeutics might involve upregulation of TRAIL-R1 (TR/1, DR4) and/or TRAIL-R2 (TR/2, DR5) receptors or activation of proapoptotic proteins including caspases. The curative potential of TRAIL to eradicate cancer cells selectively in testicular cancer has not been studied before. In this study, we investigated apoptotic effects of bleomycin, TRAIL, and their combined application in NTera-2 and NCCIT testicular cancer cell lines. We measured caspase 3 levels as an apoptosis indicator, and TRAIL receptor expressions using flow cytometry. Both NTera-2 and NCCIT cells were fairly resistant to TRAIL's apoptotic effect. Incubation of bleomycin alone caused a significant increase in caspase 3 activity in NCCIT. Combined incubation with bleomycin and TRAIL lead to elevated caspase 3 activity in Ntera-2. Exposure to 72 h of bleomycin increased TR/1, TR/2, and TR/3 cell-surface expressions in NTera-2. Elevation in TR/1 cell-surface expression was evident only at 24 h of bleomycin application in NCCIT. It can be concluded that TRAIL death receptor expressions in particular are increased in testicular cancer cells via bleomycin treatment, and TRAIL-induced apoptosis is initiated.

  12. A novel protoapigenone analog RY10-4 induces breast cancer MCF-7 cell death through autophagy via the Akt/mTOR pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xuenong; Wei, Han; Liu, Ziwei; Yuan, Qianying; Wei, Anhua; Shi, Du; Yang, Xian; Ruan, Jinlan

    2013-07-15

    Protoapigenone is a unique flavonoid and enriched in many ferns, showing potent antitumor activity against a broad spectrum of human cancer cell lines. RY10-4, a modified version of protoapigenone, manifested better anti-proliferation activity in human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. The cytotoxicity of RY10-4 against MCF-7 cells is exhibited in both time- and concentration-dependent manners. Here we investigated a novel effect of RY10-4 mediated autophagy in autophagy defect MCF-7 cells. Employing immunofluorescence assay for microtubule-associated protein light-chain 3 (LC3), monodansylcadaverine staining, Western blotting analyses for LC3 and p62 as well as ultrastructural analysis by transmission electron microscopy, we showed that RY10-4 induced autophagy in MCF-7 cells but protoapigenone did not. Meanwhile, inhibition of autophagy by pharmacological and genetic approaches significantly increased the viability of RY10-4 treated cells, suggesting that the autophagy induced by RY10-4 played as a promotion mechanism for cell death. Further studies revealed that RY10-4 suppressed the activation of mTOR and p70S6K via the Akt/mTOR pathway. Our results provided new insights for the mechanism of RY10-4 induced cell death and the cause of RY10-4 showing better antitumor activity than protoapigenone, and supported further evidences for RY10-4 as a lead to design a promising antitumor agent. - Highlights: • We showed that RY10-4 induced autophagy in MCF-7 cells but protoapigenone did not. • Autophagy induced by RY10-4 played as a promotion mechanism for cell death. • RY10-4 induced autophagy in MCF-7 cell through the Akt/mTOR pathway. • We provided new insights for the mechanism of RY10-4 induced cell death.

  13. Comparative study between the photodynamic ability of gold and silver nanoparticles in mediating cell death in breast and lung cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    El-Hussein, Ahmed; Mfouo-Tynga, Ivan; Abdel-Harith, Mohamed; Abrahamse, Heidi

    2015-12-01

    Cancer is one of the dreadest diseases once diagnosed and has severe impacts on health, social and economic global aspects. Nanomedicine is considered an emerging approach for early cancer diagnosis and treatment. The multifunctional effects of silver and gold nanoparticles (Ag and Au NPs) have rendered them to be potent candidates for biomedical applications. The current work presents a comparative study between Au NPs and Ag NPs as possible potent photosensitizers (PS) in photodynamic therapy (PDT). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to identify and characterize the shape, size, and cellular localization of Au NPs; the absorption properties of Au NPs were determined using ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis) and zeta potential was used to identify surface charge. Inverted light microscopy (LM), Trypan blue exclusion assay, adenosine triphosphate luminescence (ATP), and lactate dehydrogenase membrane integrity assays (LDH) were used for investigating the photodynamic ability of these nanostructures on breast (MCF-7) and lung (A549) cancer cell lines. Flow cytometry using Annexin V and propidium iodide (PI) dyes was used to determine the cell death pathway induced. The average size of the synthesized Au NPs was 50 nm, having an absorption peak at 540 nm with -7.85 mV surface net charge. MCF-7 and A549 cells were able to absorb the Au NPs. The latter, when irradiated with laser light in the phototherapeutic window, promoted cytotoxicity and a significant reduction in cell viability and proliferation were observed. The photodynamic activity that was observed in both cancer cell lines was found to be less eminent than that observed in case of the Ag NPs when compared to Au NPs. The present study is the first that compares the photodynamic ability of two different nanoparticles, silver and gold, as photosensitizers without any further functionalization. This study extends the possibilities of using such nanostructures in PDT within the therapeutic

  14. Proteomic analysis of novel targets associated with the enhancement of TrkA-induced SK-N-MC cancer cell death caused by NGF.

    PubMed

    Jung, Eun Joo; Chung, Ky Hyun; Bae, Dong-Won; Kim, Choong Won

    2016-05-27

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is known to regulate both cancer cell survival and death signaling, depending on the cellular circumstances, in various cell types. In this study, we showed that NGF strongly upregulated the protein level of tropomyosin-related kinase A (TrkA) in TrkA-inducible SK-N-MC cancer cells, resulting in increases in various TrkA-dependent cellular processes, including the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and caspase-8 cleavage. In addition, NGF enhanced TrkA-induced morphological changes and cell death, and this effect was significantly suppressed by the JNK inhibitor SP600125, but not by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor wortmannin. To investigate novel targets associated with the enhancement of TrkA-induced SK-N-MC cell death caused by NGF, we performed Coomassie Brilliant Blue staining and two-dimensional (2D) proteomic analysis in TrkA-inducible SK-N-MC cells. We identified 31 protein spots that were either greatly upregulated or downregulated by TrkA during NGF treatment using matrix-associated laser desorption/ionization time of flight/time of flight mass spectrometry, and we analyzed the effects of SP600125 and wortmannin on the spots. Interestingly, 11 protein spots, including heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K), lamin B1 and TAR DNA-binding protein (TDP43), were significantly influenced by SP600125, but not by wortmannin. Moreover, the NGF/TrkA-dependent inhibition of cell viability was significantly enhanced by knockdown of hnRNP K using small interfering RNA, demonstrating that hnRNP K is a novel target associated with the regulation of TrkA-dependent SK-N-MC cancer cell death enhanced by NGF.

  15. Glutathione Depletion and Carbon Ion Radiation Potentiate Clustered DNA Lesions, Cell Death and Prevent Chromosomal Changes in Cancer Cells Progeny

    PubMed Central

    Hanot, Maïté; Boivin, Anthony; Malésys, Céline; Beuve, Michaël; Colliaux, Anthony; Foray, Nicolas; Douki, Thierry; Ardail, Dominique; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, Claire

    2012-01-01

    Poor local control and tumor escape are of major concern in head-and-neck cancers treated by conventional radiotherapy or hadrontherapy. Reduced glutathione (GSH) is suspected of playing an important role in mechanisms leading to radioresistance, and its depletion should enable oxidative stress insult, thereby modifying the nature of DNA lesions and the subsequent chromosomal changes that potentially lead to tumor escape. This study aimed to highlight the impact of a GSH-depletion strategy (dimethylfumarate, and l-buthionine sulfoximine association) combined with carbon ion or X-ray irradiation on types of DNA lesions (sparse or clustered) and the subsequent transmission of chromosomal changes to the progeny in a radioresistant cell line (SQ20B) expressing a high endogenous GSH content. Results are compared with those of a radiosensitive cell line (SCC61) displaying a low endogenous GSH level. DNA damage measurements (γH2AX/comet assay) demonstrated that a transient GSH depletion in resistant SQ20B cells potentiated the effects of irradiation by initially increasing sparse DNA breaks and oxidative lesions after X-ray irradiation, while carbon ion irradiation enhanced the complexity of clustered oxidative damage. Moreover, residual DNA double-strand breaks were measured whatever the radiation qualities. The nature of the initial DNA lesions and amount of residual DNA damage were similar to those observed in sensitive SCC61 cells after both types of irradiation. Misrepaired or unrepaired lesions may lead to chromosomal changes, estimated in cell progeny by the cytome assay. Both types of irradiation induced aberrations in nondepleted resistant SQ20B and sensitive SCC61 cells. The GSH-depletion strategy prevented the transmission of aberrations (complex rearrangements and chromosome break or loss) in radioresistant SQ20B only when associated with carbon ion irradiation. A GSH-depleting strategy combined with hadrontherapy may thus have considerable advantage in the

  16. Glutathione depletion and carbon ion radiation potentiate clustered DNA lesions, cell death and prevent chromosomal changes in cancer cells progeny.

    PubMed

    Hanot, Maïté; Boivin, Anthony; Malésys, Céline; Beuve, Michaël; Colliaux, Anthony; Foray, Nicolas; Douki, Thierry; Ardail, Dominique; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, Claire

    2012-01-01

    Poor local control and tumor escape are of major concern in head-and-neck cancers treated by conventional radiotherapy or hadrontherapy. Reduced glutathione (GSH) is suspected of playing an important role in mechanisms leading to radioresistance, and its depletion should enable oxidative stress insult, thereby modifying the nature of DNA lesions and the subsequent chromosomal changes that potentially lead to tumor escape.This study aimed to highlight the impact of a GSH-depletion strategy (dimethylfumarate, and L-buthionine sulfoximine association) combined with carbon ion or X-ray irradiation on types of DNA lesions (sparse or clustered) and the subsequent transmission of chromosomal changes to the progeny in a radioresistant cell line (SQ20B) expressing a high endogenous GSH content. Results are compared with those of a radiosensitive cell line (SCC61) displaying a low endogenous GSH level. DNA damage measurements (γH2AX/comet assay) demonstrated that a transient GSH depletion in resistant SQ20B cells potentiated the effects of irradiation by initially increasing sparse DNA breaks and oxidative lesions after X-ray irradiation, while carbon ion irradiation enhanced the complexity of clustered oxidative damage. Moreover, residual DNA double-strand breaks were measured whatever the radiation qualities. The nature of the initial DNA lesions and amount of residual DNA damage were similar to those observed in sensitive SCC61 cells after both types of irradiation. Misrepaired or unrepaired lesions may lead to chromosomal changes, estimated in cell progeny by the cytome assay. Both types of irradiation induced aberrations in nondepleted resistant SQ20B and sensitive SCC61 cells. The GSH-depletion strategy prevented the transmission of aberrations (complex rearrangements and chromosome break or loss) in radioresistant SQ20B only when associated with carbon ion irradiation. A GSH-depleting strategy combined with hadrontherapy may thus have considerable advantage in the

  17. Silencing of RUNX2 enhances gemcitabine sensitivity of p53-deficient human pancreatic cancer AsPC-1 cells through the stimulation of TAp63-mediated cell death

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, H; Nakamura, M; Yoda, H; Hiraoka, K; Shinohara, K; Sang, M; Fujiwara, K; Shimozato, O; Nagase, H; Ozaki, T

    2015-01-01

    Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) has been considered to be one of master regulators for osteoblast differentiation and bone formation. Recently, we have described that RUNX2 attenuates p53/TAp73-dependent cell death of human osteosarcoma U2OS cells bearing wild-type p53 in response to adriamycin. In this study, we have asked whether RUNX2 silencing could enhance gemcitabine (GEM) sensitivity of p53-deficient human pancreatic cancer AsPC-1 cells. Under our experimental conditions, GEM treatment increased the expression level of p53 family TAp63, whereas RUNX2 was reduced following GEM exposure, indicating that there exists an inverse relationship between the expression level of TAp63 and RUNX2 following GEM exposure. To assess whether TAp63 could be involved in the regulation of GEM sensitivity of AsPC-1 cells, small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of TAp63 was performed. As expected, silencing of TAp63 significantly prohibited GEM-dependent cell death as compared with GEM-treated non-silencing cells. As TAp63 was negatively regulated by RUNX2, we sought to examine whether RUNX2 knockdown could enhance the sensitivity to GEM. Expression analysis demonstrated that depletion of RUNX2 apparently stimulates the expression of TAp63, as well as proteolytic cleavage of poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) after GEM exposure, and further augmented GEM-mediated induction of p53/TAp63-target genes, such as p21WAF1, PUMA and NOXA, relative to GEM-treated control-transfected cells, implying that RUNX2 has a critical role in the regulation of GEM resistance through the downregulation of TAp63. Notably, ablation of TAp63 gave a decrease in number of γH2AX-positive cells in response to GEM relative to control-transfected cells following GEM exposure. Consistently, GEM-dependent phosphorylation of ataxia telangiectasia-mutated protein was remarkably impaired in TAp63 knockdown cells. Collectively, our present findings strongly suggest that RUNX2-mediated repression of

  18. Improved cytotoxicity and preserved level of cell death induced in colon cancer cells by doxorubicin after its conjugation with iron-oxide magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Augustin, Ewa; Czubek, Bartłomiej; Nowicka, Anna M; Kowalczyk, Agata; Stojek, Zbigniew; Mazerska, Zofia

    2016-06-01

    A promising strategy for overcoming the problem of limited efficacy in antitumor drug delivery and in drug release is the use of a nanoparticle-conjugated drug. Doxorubicin (Dox) anticancer chemotherapeutics has been widely studied in this respect, because of severe cardiotoxic side effects. Here, we investigated the cytotoxic effects, the uptake process, the changes in cell cycle progression and the cell death processes in the presence of iron-oxide magnetic nanoparticles (Nps) and doxorubicin conjugates (Dox-Nps) in human colon HT29 cells. The amount of Dox participated in biological action of Dox-Nps was determined by cyclic voltammetry and thermogravimetric measurements. The cytotoxicity of Dox-Nps was shown to be two/three times higher than free Dox, whereas Nps alone did not inhibit cell proliferation. Dox-Nps penetrated cancer cells with higher efficacy than free Dox, what could be a consequence of Dox-Nps aggregation with proteins in culture medium and/or with cell surface. The treatment of HT29 cells with Dox-Nps and Dox at IC50 concentration resulted in G2/M arrest followed by late apoptosis and necrosis. Summing up, the application of iron-oxide magnetic nanoparticles improved Dox-Nps cell penetration compared to free Dox and achieved the cellular response to Dox-Nps conjugates similar to that of Dox alone.

  19. Erastin Disrupts Mitochondrial Permeability Transition Pore (mPTP) and Induces Apoptotic Death of Colorectal Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Haizhong; Zhou, Zhiyuan; Qin, Jian; Liu, Wenyong; Wang, Bing; Gu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    We here evaluated the potential anti-colorectal cancer activity by erastin, a voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC)-binding compound. Our in vitro studies showed that erastin exerted potent cytotoxic effects against multiple human colorectal cancer cell lines, possibly via inducing oxidative stress and caspase-9 dependent cell apoptosis. Further, mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening was observed in erastin-treated cancer cells, which was evidenced by VDAC-1 and cyclophilin-D (Cyp-D) association, mitochondrial depolarization, and cytochrome C release. Caspase inhibitors, the ROS scavenger MnTBAP, and mPTP blockers (sanglifehrin A, cyclosporin A and bongkrekic acid), as well as shRNA-mediated knockdown of VDAC-1, all significantly attenuated erastin-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells. On the other hand, over-expression of VDAC-1 augmented erastin-induced ROS production, mPTP opening, and colorectal cancer cell apoptosis. In vivo studies showed that intraperitoneal injection of erastin at well-tolerated doses dramatically inhibited HT-29 xenograft growth in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. Together, these results demonstrate that erastin is cytotoxic and pro-apoptotic to colorectal cancer cells. Erastin may be further investigated as a novel anti-colorectal cancer agent. PMID:27171435

  20. Delivery of carboplatin by carbon-based nanocontainers mediates increased cancer cell death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arlt, M.; Haase, D.; Hampel, S.; Oswald, S.; Bachmatiuk, A.; Klingeler, R.; Schulze, R.; Ritschel, M.; Leonhardt, A.; Fuessel, S.; Büchner, B.; Kraemer, K.; Wirth, M. P.

    2010-08-01

    Since the activity of several conventional anticancer drugs is restricted by resistance mechanisms and dose-limiting side-effects, the design of nanocarriers seems to be an efficient and promising approach for drug delivery. Their chemical and mechanical stability and their possible multifunctionality render tubular nanomaterials, such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and carbon nanofibres (CNFs), promising delivery agents for anticancer drugs. The goal of the present study was to investigate CNTs and CNFs in order to deliver carboplatin in vitro. No significant intrinsic toxicity of unloaded materials was found, confirming their biocompatibility. Carboplatin was loaded onto CNTs and CNFs, revealing a loading yield of 0.20 mg (CNT-CP) and 0.13 mg (CNF-CP) platinum per milligram of material. The platinum release depended on the carrier material. Whereas CNF-CP marginally released the drug, CNT-CP functioned as a drug depot, constantly releasing up to 68% within 14 days. The cytotoxicity of CNT-CP and CNF-CP in urological tumour cell lines was dependent on the drug release. CNT-CP was identified to be more effective than CNF-CP concerning the impairment of proliferation and clonogenic survival of tumour cells. Moreover, carboplatin, which was delivered by CNT-CP, exhibited a higher anticancer activity than free carboplatin.

  1. Comprehensive identification of genes driven by ERV9-LTRs reveals TNFRSF10B as a re-activatable mediator of testicular cancer cell death.

    PubMed

    Beyer, U; Krönung, S K; Leha, A; Walter, L; Dobbelstein, M

    2016-01-01

    The long terminal repeat (LTR) of human endogenous retrovirus type 9 (ERV9) acts as a germline-specific promoter that induces the expression of a proapoptotic isoform of the tumor suppressor homologue p63, GTAp63, in male germline cells. Testicular cancer cells silence this promoter, but inhibitors of histone deacetylases (HDACs) restore GTAp63 expression and give rise to apoptosis. We show here that numerous additional transcripts throughout the genome are driven by related ERV9-LTRs. 3' Rapid amplification of cDNA ends (3'RACE) was combined with next-generation sequencing to establish a large set of such mRNAs. HDAC inhibitors induce these ERV9-LTR-driven genes but not the LTRs from other ERVs. In particular, a transcript encoding the death receptor DR5 originates from an ERV9-LTR inserted upstream of the protein coding regions of the TNFRSF10B gene, and it shows an expression pattern similar to GTAp63. When treating testicular cancer cells with HDAC inhibitors as well as the death ligand TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), rapid cell death was observed, which depended on TNFRSF10B expression. HDAC inhibitors also cooperate with cisplatin (cDDP) to promote apoptosis in testicular cancer cells. ERV9-LTRs not only drive a large set of human transcripts, but a subset of them acts in a proapoptotic manner. We propose that this avoids the survival of damaged germ cells. HDAC inhibition represents a strategy of restoring the expression of a class of ERV9-LTR-mediated genes in testicular cancer cells, thereby re-enabling tumor suppression.

  2. Comprehensive identification of genes driven by ERV9-LTRs reveals TNFRSF10B as a re-activatable mediator of testicular cancer cell death

    PubMed Central

    Beyer, U; Krönung, S K; Leha, A; Walter, L; Dobbelstein, M

    2016-01-01

    The long terminal repeat (LTR) of human endogenous retrovirus type 9 (ERV9) acts as a germline-specific promoter that induces the expression of a proapoptotic isoform of the tumor suppressor homologue p63, GTAp63, in male germline cells. Testicular cancer cells silence this promoter, but inhibitors of histone deacetylases (HDACs) restore GTAp63 expression and give rise to apoptosis. We show here that numerous additional transcripts throughout the genome are driven by related ERV9-LTRs. 3' Rapid amplification of cDNA ends (3'RACE) was combined with next-generation sequencing to establish a large set of such mRNAs. HDAC inhibitors induce these ERV9-LTR-driven genes but not the LTRs from other ERVs. In particular, a transcript encoding the death receptor DR5 originates from an ERV9-LTR inserted upstream of the protein coding regions of the TNFRSF10B gene, and it shows an expression pattern similar to GTAp63. When treating testicular cancer cells with HDAC inhibitors as well as the death ligand TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), rapid cell death was observed, which depended on TNFRSF10B expression. HDAC inhibitors also cooperate with cisplatin (cDDP) to promote apoptosis in testicular cancer cells. ERV9-LTRs not only drive a large set of human transcripts, but a subset of them acts in a proapoptotic manner. We propose that this avoids the survival of damaged germ cells. HDAC inhibition represents a strategy of restoring the expression of a class of ERV9-LTR-mediated genes in testicular cancer cells, thereby re-enabling tumor suppression. PMID:26024393

  3. Curcumin Induces Downregulation of E2F4 Expression and Apoptotic Cell Death in HCT116 Human Colon Cancer Cells; Involvement of Reactive Oxygen Species.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-Chan; Lee, Chuhee

    2010-12-01

    E2F transcription factors and their target genes have been known to play an important role in cell growth control. We found that curcumin, a polyphenolic phytochemical isolated from the plant Curcuma longa, markedly suppressed E2F4 expression in HCT116 colon cancer cells. Hydrogen peroxide was also found to decrease E2F4 protein level, indicating the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in curucmin-induced downregulation of E2F4 expression. Involvement of ROS in E2F4 downregulation in response to curcumin was confirmed by the result that pretreatment of cells with N-acetylcystein (NAC) before exposure of curcumin almost completely blocked the reduction of E2F4 expression at the protein as well as mRNA level. Anti-proliferative effect of curcumin was also suppressed by NAC which is consistent to previous reports showing curcumin-superoxide production and induction of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage as well as apoptosis. Expression of several genes, cyclin A, p21, and p27, which has been shown to be regulated in E2F4-dependent manner and involved in the cell cycle progression was also affected by curcumin. Moreover, decreased (cyclin A) and increased (p21 and p27) expression of these E2F4 downstream genes by curcumin was restored by pretreatment of cells with NAC and E2F4 overexpression which is induced by doxycycline. In addition, E2F4 overexpression was observed to partially ameliorate curcumin-induced growth inhibition by cell viability assay. Taken together, we found curcumin-induced ROS down-regulation of E2F4 expression and modulation of E2F4 target genes which finally lead to the apoptotic cell death in HCT116 colon cancer cells, suggesting that E2F4 appears to be a novel determinant of curcumin-induced cytotoxicity.

  4. Ultrastructural aspects of autoschizis: a new cancer cell death induced by the synergistic action of ascorbate/menadione on human bladder carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Gilloteaux, J; Jamison, J M; Arnold, D; Taper, H S; Summers, J L

    2001-01-01

    Scanning and transmission electron microscopy were employed to further characterize the cytotoxic effects of a ascorbic acid/menadione (or vitamin C/vitamin K3) combination on a human bladder carcinoma T24 cell line. Following 1-h treatment T24 cells display membrane and mitochondrial defects as well as excision of cytoplasmic fragments that contain no organelles. These continuous self-excisions reduce the cell size. Concomitant, nuclear changes, chromatin disassembly, nucleolar condensation and fragmentation, and decreased nuclear volume lead to cell death via a process similar to karyorrhexis and karyolysis. Because this cell death is achieved through a progressive loss of cytoplasm due to self-morsellation, the authors named this mode of cell death autoschizis (from the Greek autos, self, and schizein, to split, as defined in Scanning. 1998; 20: 564-575). This morphological characterization of autoschizic cell death confirms and extends the authors previous reports and demonstrates that this cell death is distinct from apoptosis.

  5. Chaetocin induces endoplasmic reticulum stress response and leads to death receptor 5-dependent apoptosis in human non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xianfang; Guo, Sen; Liu, Xiangguo; Su, Ling

    2015-11-01

    Epigenetic abnormalities are associated with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) initiation and progression. Epigenetic drugs are being studied and in clinical trials. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the apoptosis by the epigenetic agents remains unclear. SUV39H1 is an important methyl-transferase for lysine 9 on histone H3 and usually related to gene transcriptional suppression, and chaetocin acts as the inhibitor of SUV39H1. We demonstrated here that chaetocin effectively suppressed the growth of multiple lung cancer cells through inducing apoptosis in a death receptor 5 (DR5)-dependent manner. Chaetocin treatment activated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress which gave rise to the up-regulation of ATF3 and CHOP. Furthermore, ATF3 and CHOP contributed to the induction of DR5 and subsequent apoptosis. When SUV39H1 was silenced with siRNA, the expression of ATF3, CHOP and DR5 was elevated. Thereafter, knockdown of SUV39H1 induced apoptosis in NSCLC cells. In summary, chaetocin pharmacologically inhibits the activity of SUV39H1 which provokes ER stress and results in up-regulation of ATF3 and CHOP, leading to DR5-dependent apoptosis eventually. These findings provide a novel interpretation on the anti-neoplastic activity of epigenetic drugs as a new therapeutic approach in NSCLC.

  6. Avoidable global cancer deaths and total deaths from smoking.

    PubMed

    Jha, Prabhat

    2009-09-01

    On the basis of current consumption patterns, approximately 450 million adults will be killed by smoking between 2000 and 2050. At least half of these adults will die between 30 and 69 years of age, losing decades of productive life. Cancer and the total deaths due to smoking have fallen sharply in men in high-income countries but will rise globally unless current smokers, most of whom live in low- and middle-income countries, stop smoking before or during middle age. Tripling the taxes on tobacco could rapidly raise cessation rates and deter the initiation of smoking. Higher taxes, regulations on smoking and information for consumers could avoid at least 115 million smoking-associated deaths in the next few decades, including around 25 million cancer deaths.

  7. Activating Cell Death Ligand Signaling Through Proteasome Inhibition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    Activating Cell Death Ligand Signaling Through Proteasome Inhibition PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Steven R Schwarze...SUBTITLE Activating Cell Death Ligand Signaling Through 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Proteasome Inhibition 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-08-1-0392 5c...proteasome inhibition can act as an anti-neoplastic agent in vivo by sensitizing cancer cells to cell death ligands in the tumor microenvironment

  8. Hyperthermia-enhanced TRAIL- and mapatumumab-induced apoptotic death is mediated through mitochondria in human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Xinxin; Kim, Han-Cheon; Kim, Seog-Young; Basse, Per; Park, Bae-Hang; Lee, Byeong-Chel; Lee, Yong J

    2012-05-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the world; death usually results from uncontrolled metastatic disease. Previously, we developed a novel strategy of TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (Apo2L/TRAIL) in combination with hyperthermia to treat hepatic colorectal metastases. However, previous studies suggest a potential hepatocyte cytotoxicity with TRAIL. Unlike TRAIL, anti-human TRAIL receptor antibody induces apoptosis without hepatocyte toxicity. In this study, we evaluated the anti-tumor efficacy of humanized anti-death receptor 4 (DR4) antibody mapatumumab (Mapa) by comparing it with TRAIL in combination with hyperthermia. TRAIL, which binds to both DR4 and death receptor 5 (DR5), was approximately tenfold more effective than Mapa in inducing apoptosis. However, hyperthermia enhances apoptosis induced by either agent. We observed that the synergistic effect was mediated through elevation of reactive oxygen species, c-Jun N-terminal kinase activation, Bax oligomerization, and translocalization to the mitochondria, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, release of cytochrome c to cytosol, activation of caspases, and increase in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage. We believe that the successful outcome of this study will support the application of Mapa in combination with hyperthermia to colorectal hepatic metastases.

  9. Lung cancer death rates fall, helping drive decrease in overall cancer death rates

    Cancer.gov

    The Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, covering the period 1975–2010, showed death rates for lung cancer, which accounts for more than one in four cancer deaths, dropping at a faster pace than in previous years.

  10. Dose-Dependent ATP Depletion and Cancer Cell Death following Calcium Electroporation, Relative Effect of Calcium Concentration and Electric Field Strength

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Emilie Louise; Sozer, Esin Bengisu; Romeo, Stefania; Frandsen, Stine Krog; Vernier, P. Thomas; Gehl, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Background Electroporation, a method for increasing the permeability of membranes to ions and small molecules, is used in the clinic with chemotherapeutic drugs for cancer treatment (electrochemotherapy). Electroporation with calcium causes ATP (adenosine triphosphate) depletion and cancer cell death and could be a novel cancer treatment. This study aims at understanding the relationship between applied electric field, calcium concentration, ATP depletion and efficacy. Methods In three human cell lines — H69 (small-cell lung cancer), SW780 (bladder cancer), and U937 (leukaemia), viability was determined after treatment with 1, 3, or 5 mM calcium and eight 99 μs pulses with 0.8, 1.0, 1.2, 1.4 or 1.6 kV/cm. Fitting analysis was applied to quantify the cell-killing efficacy in presence of calcium. Post-treatment intracellular ATP was measured in H69 and SW780 cells. Post-treatment intracellular ATP was observed with fluorescence confocal microscopy of quinacrine-labelled U937 cells. Results Both H69 and SW780 cells showed dose-dependent (calcium concentration and electric field) decrease in intracellular ATP (p<0.05) and reduced viability. The 50% effective cell kill was found at 3.71 kV/cm (H69) and 3.28 kV/cm (SW780), reduced to 1.40 and 1.15 kV/cm (respectively) with 1 mM calcium (lower EC50 for higher calcium concentrations). Quinacrine fluorescence intensity of calcium-electroporated U937 cells was one third lower than in controls (p<0.0001). Conclusions Calcium electroporation dose-dependently reduced cell survival and intracellular ATP. Increasing extracellular calcium allows the use of a lower electric field. General Significance This study supports the use of calcium electroporation for treatment of cancer and possibly lowering the applied electric field in future trials. PMID:25853661

  11. Honokiol, a potential therapeutic agent, induces cell cycle arrest and program cell death in vitro and in vivo in human thyroid cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chieh-Hsiang; Chen, Shu-Hsin; Chang, Yi-Sheng; Liu, Yi-Wen; Wu, Jin-Yi; Lim, Yun-Ping; Yu, Hui-I; Lee, Ying-Ray

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy, the global incidence rate of which is rapidly rising. Surgery and radioiodine therapies are common and effective treatments only for nonmetastasized primary tumors. Therefore, effective treatment modalities are imperative for patients with radioiodine-resistant thyroid cancer. Honokiol, a biophenolic compound derived from Magnolia spp., has been shown have diverse biological and pharmacological activities, including anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, antiangiogenic, and anticancer properties. In the present study, three human thyroid cancer cell lines, namely anaplastic, follicular, and poorly differentiated thyroid cancer cells, were used to evaluate the chemotherapeutic activity of honokiol. Cell viability, cell cycle, apoptosis, and autophagy induction were determined through flow cytometry and western blot analysis. We found that honokiol treatment can suppress cell growth, induce cell cycle arrest, and enhance the induction of caspase-dependent apoptosis and autophagy in cancer cells. Moreover, honokiol treatment modulated signaling pathways including Akt/mTOR, ERK, JNK, and p38 in the studied cells. In addition, the antitumorigenic activity of honokiol was also confirmed in vitro and in vivo. Our data provide evidence that honokiol has a unique application in chemotherapy for human thyroid cancers.

  12. Inactivation of BRCA2 in human cancer cells identifies a subset of tumors with enhanced sensitivity towards death receptormediated apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    De Toni, Enrico N.; Ziesch, Andreas; Rizzani, Antonia; Török, Helga-Paula; Hocke, Sandra; Lü, Shuai; Wang, Shao-Chun; Hucl, Tomas; Göke, Burkhard; Bruns, Christiane; Gallmeier, Eike

    2016-01-01

    Purpose DNA repair defects due to detrimental BRCA2-mutations confer increased susceptibility towards DNA interstrand-crosslinking (ICL) agents and define patient subpopulations for individualized genotype-based cancer therapy. However, due to the side effects of these drugs, there is a need to identify additional agents, which could be used alone or in combination with ICL-agents. Therefore, we investigated whether BRCA2-mutations might also increase the sensitivity towards TRAIL-receptors (TRAIL-R)-targeting compounds. Experimental design Two independent model systems were applied: a BRCA2 gene knockout and a BRCA2 gene complementation model. The effects of TRAIL-R-targeting compounds and ICL-agents on cell viability, apoptosis and cell cycle distribution were compared in BRCA2-proficient versus-deficient cancer cells in vitro. In addition, the effects of the TRAIL-R2-targeting antibody LBY135 were assessed in vivo using a murine tumor xenograft model. Results BRCA2-deficient cancer cells displayed an increased sensitivity towards TRAIL-R-targeting agents. These effects exceeded and were mechanistically distinguishable from the well-established effects of ICL-agents. In vitro, ICL-agents expectedly induced an early cell cycle arrest followed by delayed apoptosis, whereas TRAIL-R-targeting compounds caused early apoptosis without prior cell cycle arrest. In vivo, treatment with LBY135 significantly reduced the tumor growth of BRCA2-deficient cancer cells in a xenograft model. Conclusions BRCA2 mutations strongly increase the in vitro- and in vivo-sensitivity of cancer cells towards TRAIL-R-mediated apoptosis. This effect is mechanistically distinguishable from the well-established ICL-hypersensitivity of BRCA2-deficient cells. Our study thus defines a new genetic subpopulation of cancers susceptible towards TRAIL-R-targeting compounds, which could facilitate novel therapeutic approaches for patients with BRCA2-deficient tumors. PMID:26843614

  13. Calix[6]arene bypasses human pancreatic cancer aggressiveness: downregulation of receptor tyrosine kinases and induction of cell death by reticulum stress and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Pelizzaro-Rocha, Karin Juliane; de Jesus, Marcelo Bispo; Ruela-de-Sousa, Roberta Regina; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; Reis, Fabiano Souza; de Fátima, Angelo; Ferreira-Halder, Carmen Veríssima

    2013-12-01

    Pancreatic cancer ranks fourth among cancer-related causes of death in North America. Minimal progress has been made in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with late-stage tumors. Moreover, pancreatic cancer aggressiveness is closely related to high levels of pro-survival mediators, which can ultimately lead to rapid disease progression, resistance and metastasis. The main goal of this study was to define the mechanisms by which calix[6]arene, but not other calixarenes, efficiently decreases the aggressiveness of a drug resistant human pancreas carcinoma cell line (Panc-1). Calix[6]arene was more potent in reducing Panc-1 cell viability than gemcitabine and 5-fluorouracil. In relation to the underlying mechanisms of cytotoxic effects, it led to cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase through downregulation of PIM1, CDK2, CDK4 and retinoblastoma proteins. Importantly, calix[6]arene abolished signal transduction of Mer and AXL tyrosine kinase receptors, both of which are usually overexpressed in pancreatic cancer. Accordingly, inhibition of PI3K and mTOR was also observed, and these proteins are positively modulated by Mer and AXL. Despite decreasing the phosphorylation of AKT at Thr308, calix[6]arene caused an increase in phosphorylation at Ser473. These findings in conjunction with increased BiP and IRE1-α provide a molecular basis explaining the capacity of calix[6]arene to trigger endoplasmic reticulum stress and autophagic cell death. Our findings highlight calix[6]arene as a potential candidate for overcoming pancreatic cancer aggressiveness. Importantly, we provide evidence that calix[6]arene affects a broad array of key targets that are usually dysfunctional in pancreatic cancer, a highly desirable characteristic for chemotherapeutics.

  14. Simulating hypoxia-induced acidic environment in cancer cells facilitates mobilization and redox-cycling of genomic copper by daidzein leading to pro-oxidant cell death: implications for the sensitization of resistant hypoxic cancer cells to therapeutic challenges.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Mohammad F; Ahmad, Aamir; Bhat, Showket H; Khan, Husain Y; Zubair, Haseeb; Sarkar, Fazlul H; Hadi, Sheikh M

    2016-04-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the mechanism of action involved in the anti-cancer activity of daidzein and identification of cancer specific micro-environment as therapeutic target of this secondary metabolite derived from soy. Our data indicated that daidzein induces cellular DNA breakage, anti-proliferative effects and apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. We demonstrated that such a daidzein-induced anti-cancer action involves a copper-dependant pathway in which endogenous copper is mobilized by daidzein and redox-cycled to generate reactive oxygen species which act as an upstream signal leading to pro-oxidant cell death. Further in the context of hypoxia being a resistant factor against standard therapies and that an effect secondary to hypoxia is the intracellular acidification, we show that the anticancer activity of daidzein is modulated positively in acidic pH but copper-specific chelator is still able to inhibit daidzein activity. Moreover, an experimental setup of hypoxia mimic (cobalt chloride) revealed an enhanced sensitivity of cancer cells to the cytotoxic effects of daidzein which was neutralized in the presence of neocuproine. The findings support a paradigm shift from the conventional antioxidant property of dietary isoflavones to molecules capable of initiating a pro-oxidant signaling mediated by reactive oxygen species. Further, the clinical relevance of such an action mechanism in cancer chemoprevention is also proposed. This study identified endogenous copper as a molecular target and acidic pH as a modulating factor for the therapeutic activity of daidzein against cancer. The evidence presented highlights the potential of dietary agents as adjuvants to standard therapeutic regimens.

  15. Essential oil of Cephalotaxus griffithii needle inhibits proliferation and migration of human cervical cancer cells: involvement of mitochondria-initiated and death receptor-mediated apoptosis pathways.

    PubMed

    Moirangthem, Dinesh Singh; Laishram, Surbala; Rana, Virendra Singh; Borah, Jagat Chandra; Talukdar, Narayan Chandra

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effect of Cephalotaxus griffithii needle essential oil (CGNO) on proliferation and migration of human cervical cancer (HCC) cells. CGNO treatment decreased the viability of all the tested HCC (HeLa, ME-180 and SiHa) cells. Morphological and DNA fragmentation analysis of CGNO-treated HeLa cells indicated the involvement of apoptosis in inducing HCC cell death. CGNO increased mitochondrial membrane depolarisation and upregulated the expression of caspase-9, caspase-8, caspase-3 and cleaved-PARP. The activity of caspase-8 and caspase-9 was also significantly increased. Wound healing and transwell migration assay demonstrated that CGNO significantly inhibited the migration of HeLa cells to close a scratched wound and also inhibited their migration through filter towards a chemotactic stimulus. Taken together, these results indicated that CGNO inhibited the proliferation and migration of HCC cells. Of note, CGNO induced HeLa cell death through mitochondria-initiated and death receptor-mediated apoptosis pathway.

  16. Programmed cell death ligand-1 (PD-L1) expression by immunohistochemistry: could it be predictive and/or prognostic in non-small cell lung cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Mino-Kenudson, Mari

    2016-01-01

    Blockade of immune checkpoints has recently emerged as a novel therapeutic strategy in various tumors. In particular, monoclonal antibodies targeting programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) or its ligand (PD-L1) have been most studied in lung cancer, and PD-1 inhibitors are now established agents in the management of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The reports on high-profile clinical trials have shown the association of PD-L1 expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) with higher overall response rates to the PD-1/PD-L1 axis blockade suggesting that PD-L1 expression may serve as a predictive marker. Unfortunately, however, each PD-1 or PD-L1 inhibitor is coupled with a specific PD-L1 antibody, IHC protocol and scoring system for the biomarker assessment, making the head-to-head comparison of the studies difficult. Similarly, multiple clinical series that correlated PD-L1 expression with clinicopathologic and/or molecular variables and/or survival have reported conflicting results. The discrepancy could be explained by the differences in ethnicity and/or histologic types included in the studies, but it appears to be attributed in part to the differences in PD-L1 IHC methods. Thus, orchestrated efforts to standardize the PD-L1 IHC are warranted to establish the IHC as a predictive and/or prognostic biomarker in NSCLC. PMID:27458525

  17. Magnetite nanoparticles functionalized with α-tocopheryl succinate (α-TOS) promote selective cervical cancer cell death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angulo-Molina, Aracely; Méndez-Rojas, Miguel Ángel; Palacios-Hernández, Teresa; Contreras-López, Oscar Edel; Hirata-Flores, Gustavo Alonso; Flores-Alonso, Juan Carlos; Merino-Contreras, Saul; Valenzuela, Olivia; Hernández, Jesús; Reyes-Leyva, Julio

    2014-08-01

    The vitamin E analog α-tocopheryl succinate (α-TOS) selectively induces apoptosis in several cancer cells, but it is sensitive to esterases present in cervical cancer cells. Magnetite nanoparticles (Nps) were prepared by a reduction-coprecipitation method; their surface was silanized and conjugated to α-TOS to enhance its resistance. Morphology, size, and crystal structure were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and selected area electron diffraction. Chemical composition was analyzed by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy; functional groups were determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy; and α-TOS content was estimated by thermogravimetric analysis. The cytotoxic activity of α-TOS-Nps was evaluated in non-malignant fibroblasts and cervical cancer cells by means of the colorimetric MTT viability test. Intracellular localization was identified by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Characterization of α-TOS-Nps revealed sphere-like Nps with 15 nm average size, formed by mineral and organic constituents with high stability. α-TOS-Nps were internalized in the nucleus and selectively affected the viability of cervical cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner but were biocompatible with non-malignant fibroblasts. In conclusion, functionalization of magnetite Nps protected the cytotoxic activity of α-TOS in non-sensitive cervical cancer cells.

  18. The miR-27a-calreticulin axis affects drug-induced immunogenic cell death in human colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Colangelo, T; Polcaro, G; Ziccardi, P; Muccillo, L; Galgani, M; Pucci, B; Rita Milone, M; Budillon, A; Santopaolo, M; Mazzoccoli, G; Matarese, G; Sabatino, L; Colantuoni, V

    2016-01-01

    Immunogenic cell death (ICD) evoked by chemotherapeutic agents implies emission of selected damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMP) such as cell surface exposure of calreticulin, secretion of ATP and HMGB1. We sought to verify whether miR-27a is implicated in ICD, having demonstrated that it directly targets calreticulin. To this goal, we exposed colorectal cancer cell lines, genetically modified to express high or low miR-27a levels, to two bona fide ICD inducers (mitoxantrone and oxaliplatin). Low miR-27a-expressing cells displayed more ecto-calreticulin on the cell surface and increased ATP and HMGB1 secretion than high miR-27a-expressing ones in time-course experiments upon drug exposure. A calreticulin target protector counteracted the miR-27a effects while specific siRNAs mimicked them, confirming the results reported. In addition, miR-27a negatively influenced the PERK-mediated route and the late PI3K-dependent secretory step of the unfolded protein response to endoplasmic reticulum stress, suggesting that miR-27a modulates the entire ICD program. Interestingly, upon chemotherapeutic exposure, low miR-27a levels associated with an earlier and stronger induction of apoptosis and with morphological and molecular features of autophagy. Remarkably, in ex vivo setting, under the same chemotherapeutic induction, the conditioned media from high miR-27a-expressing cells impeded dendritic cell maturation while increased the secretion of specific cytokines (interleukin (IL)-4, IL-6, IL-8) and negatively influenced CD4+ T-cell interferon γ production and proliferation, all markers of a tumor immunoevasion strategy. In conclusion, we provide the first evidence that miR-27a impairs the cell response to drug-induced ICD through the regulatory axis with calreticulin. PMID:26913599

  19. Interleukin-8 enhances the effect of colchicine on cell death.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Chikako; Yajima, Chika; Machida, Tetsuro; Kawahito, Yuji; Uchida, Marie; Hisatomi, Hisashi

    2017-03-25

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines are known to be generated in tumors and play important roles in angiogenesis, mitosis, and tumor progression. However, few studies have investigated the synergistic effects of pro-inflammatory cytokines and anticancer drugs on cell death. In the present study, we examined the combined effects of pro-inflammatory cytokines and colchicine on cell death of cancer cells. Colchicine induces G2/M arrest in the cell cycle by binding to tubulin, one of the main constituents of microtubules. SUIT-2 human pancreatic cancer cell line cells overexpressing pro-inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, were treated with colchicine. The effect of colchicine on cell death was enhanced in cells overexpressing IL-8. Moreover, the effect of colchicine on cell death was enhanced in cells overexpressing two IL-8 up-regulators, NF-κB and IL-6, but not in cells overexpressing an IL-8 down-regulator, splicing factor proline/glutamine-rich (SFPQ). Synergistic effects of IL-8 and colchicine were also observed in cells overexpressing IL-8 isoforms lacking the signal peptide. Therefore, IL-8 appeared to function as an enhancer of cell death in cancer cells treated with colchicine. The present results suggest a new role for IL-8 related to cell death of cancer cells.

  20. Combination of PTEN and {gamma}-Ionizing Radiation Enhances Cell Death and G{sub 2}/M Arrest Through Regulation of AKT Activity and p21 Induction in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jong Kuk; Jung, Hae-Yun; Park, Seon Ho; Kang, Seung Yi; Yi, Mi-Rang; Um, Hong Duck; Hong, Sung Hee

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: To identify the role of phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) during {gamma}-ionizing radiation ({gamma}-IR) treatment for non-small-cell lung cancer cells. Methods and Materials: Wild-type PTEN or mutant forms of PTEN plasmids were transfected to construct stable transfectants of the NCI-H1299 non-small-cell lung cancer cell line. Combined effects of PTEN expression and IR treatment were tested using immunoblot, clonogenic, and cell-counting assays. Related signaling pathways were studied with immunoblot and kinase assays. Results: At steady state, stable transfectants showed almost the same proliferation rate but had different AKT phosphorylation patterns. When treated with {gamma}-IR, wild-type PTEN transfectants showed higher levels of cell death compared with mock vector or mutant transfectants, and showed increased G{sub 2}/M cell-cycle arrest accompanied by p21 induction and CDK1 inactivation. NCI-H1299 cells were treated with phosphosinositide-3 kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway inhibitor (LY29002), resulting in reduced AKT phosphorylation levels. Treatment of NCI-H1299 cells with LY29002 and {gamma}-IR resulted in increased cell-cycle arrest and p21 induction. Endogenous wild-type PTEN-containing NCI-H460 cells were treated with PTEN-specific siRNA and then irradiated with {gamma}-IR: however reduced PTEN levels did not induce cell-cycle arrest or p21 expression. Conclusions: Taken together, these findings indicate that PTEN may modulate cell death or the cell cycle via AKT inactivation by PTEN and {gamma}-IR treatment. We also propose that a PTEN-PI3K/AKT-p21-CDK1 pathway could regulate cell death and the cell cycle by {gamma}-IR treatment.

  1. Epicatechin gallate induces cell death via p53 activation and stimulation of p38 and JNK in human colon cancer SW480 cells.

    PubMed

    Cordero-Herrera, Isabel; Martín, María Angeles; Bravo, Laura; Goya, Luis; Ramos, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    The tea flavonoid epicatechin gallate (ECG) exhibits a wide range of biological activities. In this study, the in vitro anticancer effects of ECG on SW480 colon cancer cell line was investigated by analyzing the cell cycle, apoptosis, key proteins involved in cellular survival/proliferation, namely AKT/phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), and the role of p53 in these processes. ECG induced cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1-S phase border associated with the stimulation of p21, p-p53, and p53 and the suppression of cyclins D1 and B1. Exposure of SW480 cells to ECG also led to apoptosis as determined by time-dependent changes in caspase-3 activity, MAPKs [extracellular regulated kinase (ERK), p38, and c-jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK)], p21 and p53 activation, and AKT inhibition. The presence of pifithrin, an inhibitor of p53 function, blocked ECG-induced apoptosis as was manifested by restored cell viability and caspase-3 activity to control values and reestablished the balance among Bcl-2 anti- and proapoptotic protein levels. Interestingly, ECG also inhibited p53 protein and RNA degradation, contributing to the stabilization of p53. In addition, JNK and p38 have been identified as necessary for ECG-induced apoptosis, upon activation by p53. The results suggest that the activation of the p53-p38/JNK cascade is required for ECG-induced cell death in SW480 cells.

  2. Galloflavin, a new lactate dehydrogenase inhibitor, induces the death of human breast cancer cells with different glycolytic attitude by affecting distinct signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Farabegoli, F; Vettraino, M; Manerba, M; Fiume, L; Roberti, M; Di Stefano, G

    2012-11-20

    Galloflavin (GF), a recently identified lactate dehydrogenase inhibitor, hinders the proliferation of cancer cells by blocking glycolysis and ATP production. The aim of the present experiments was to study the effect of this compound on breast cancer cell lines reproducing different pathological subtypes of this tumor: MCF-7 (the well differentiated form), MDA-MB-231 (the aggressive triple negative tumor) and MCF-Tam (a sub-line of MCF-7 with acquired tamoxifen resistance). We observed marked differences in the energetic metabolism of these cell lines. Compared to MCF-7 cells, both MDA-MB-231 and MCF-Tam cells exhibited higher LDH levels and glucose uptake and showed lower capacity of oxygen consumption. In spite of these differences, GF exerted similar growth inhibitory effects. This result was explained by the finding of a constitutively activated stress response in MDA-MB-231 and MCF-Tam cells, which reproduce the poor prognosis tumor forms. As a further proof, different signaling pathways were found to be involved in the antiproliferative action of GF. In MCF-7 cells we observed a down regulation of the ERα-mediated signaling needed for cell survival. On the contrary, in MCF-Tam and MDA-MB-231 cells growth inhibition appeared to be contributed by an oxidative stress condition. The prevalent mechanism of cell death was found to be apoptosis induction. Because of the clinical relevance of breast cancer forms having the triple negative and/or chemoresistant phenotype, our results showing comparable effects of GF even on aggressively growing cells encourage further studies to verify the potential of this compound in improving the chemotherapy of breast cancer.

  3. Pancreatic β Cell Mass Death

    PubMed Central

    Marrif, Husnia I.; Al-Sunousi, Salma I.

    2016-01-01

    Type two diabetes (T2D) is a challenging metabolic disorder for which a cure has not yet been found. Its etiology is associated with several phenomena, including significant loss of insulin-producing, beta cellcell) mass via progressive programmed cell death and disrupted cellular autophagy. In diabetes, the etiology of β cell death and the role of mitochondria are complex and involve several layers of mechanisms. Understanding the dynamics of those mechanisms could permit researchers to develop an intervention for the progressive loss of β cells. Currently, diabetes research has shifted toward rejuvenation and plasticity technology and away from the simplified approach of hormonal compensation. Diabetes research is currently challenged by questions such as how to enhance cell survival, decrease apoptosis and replenish β cell mass in diabetic patients. In this review, we discuss evidence that β cell development and mass formation are guided by specific signaling systems, particularly hormones, transcription factors, and growth factors, all of which could be manipulated to enhance mass growth. There is also strong evidence that β cells are dynamically active cells, which, under specific conditions such as obesity, can increase in size and subsequently increase insulin secretion. In certain cases of aggressive or advanced forms of T2D, β cells become markedly impaired, and the only alternatives for maintaining glucose homeostasis are through partial or complete cell grafting (the Edmonton protocol). In these cases, the harvesting of an enriched population of viable β cells is required for transplantation. This task necessitates a deep understanding of the pharmacological agents that affect β cell survival, mass, and function. The aim of this review is to initiate discussion about the important signals in pancreatic β cell development and mass formation and to highlight the process by which cell death occurs in diabetes. This review also examines the

  4. MUC13 protects colorectal cancer cells from death by activating the NF-κB pathway and is a potential therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Y H; He, Y; Hasnain, S Z; Wang, R; Tong, H; Clarke, D T; Lourie, R; Oancea, I; Wong, K Y; Lumley, J W; Florin, T H; Sutton, P; Hooper, J D; McMillan, N A; McGuckin, M A

    2017-02-02

    MUC13 is a transmembrane mucin glycoprotein that is over produced by many cancers, although its functions are not fully understood. Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) is a key transcription factor promoting cancer cell survival, but therapeutically targeting this pathway has proved difficult because NF-κB has pleiotropic functions. Here, we report that MUC13 prevents colorectal cancer cell death by promoting two distinct pathways of NF-kB activation, consequently upregulating BCL-XL. MUC13 promoted tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-induced NF-κB activation by interacting with TNFR1 and the E3 ligase, cIAP1, to increase ubiquitination of RIPK1. MUC13 also promoted genotoxin-induced NF-κB activation by increasing phosphorylation of ATM and SUMOylation of NF-κB essential modulator. Moreover, elevated expression of cytoplasmic MUC13 and NF-κB correlated with colorectal cancer progression and metastases. Our demonstration that MUC13 enhances NF-κB signaling in response to both TNF and DNA-damaging agents provides a new molecular target for specific inhibition of NF-κB activation. As proof of principle, silencing MUC13 sensitized colorectal cancer cells to killing by cytotoxic drugs and inflammatory signals and abolished chemotherapy-induced enrichment of CD133(+) CD44(+) cancer stem cells, slowed xenograft growth in mice, and synergized with 5-fluourouracil to induce tumor regression. Therefore, these data indicate that combining chemotherapy and MUC13 antagonism could improve the treatment of metastatic cancers.

  5. Inhibition of microRNA-21 via locked nucleic acid-anti-miR suppressed metastatic features of colorectal cancer cells through modulation of programmed cell death 4.

    PubMed

    Nedaeinia, Reza; Sharifi, Mohammadreza; Avan, Amir; Kazemi, Mohammad; Nabinejad, Abdolreza; Ferns, Gordon A; Ghayour-Mobarhan, Majid; Salehi, Rasoul

    2017-03-01

    Colorectal cancer is among the most lethal of malignancies, due to its propensity to metastatic spread and multifactorial-chemoresistance. The latter property supports the need to identify novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of colorectal cancer. MicroRNAs are endogenous non-coding small RNA molecules that function as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. Recently, programmed cell death 4 has been identified as a protein that increases during apoptosis. This gene is among the potential targets of miR-21 (OncomiR). Locked nucleic acid-modified oligonucleotides have recently emerged as a potential therapeutic option for targeting microRNAs. The aim of this study was to explore the functional role of locked nucleic acid-anti-miR-21 in the LS174T cell line in vitro and in vivo models. LS174T cells were treated with locked nucleic acid-anti-miR-21 for 24, 48, and 72 h in vitro. The expression of miR-21 and PDCD4 at messenger RNA (mRNA) level was evaluated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, while the protein level of PDCD4 was determined by Western blotting. Cell migratory behavior and the cluster-forming ability of cells were assessed before and after therapy. The disseminated tumor cells were assessed in the chick chorioallantoic membrane model by Alu quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Locked nucleic acid-anti-miR-21 was transfected successfully into the LS174T cells and inhibited the expression of miR-21. Locked nucleic acid-anti-miR-21 inhibited the migration and the number of cells forming clusters. Moreover, we found that locked nucleic acid-anti-miR-21 transfection was associated with a significant reduction in metastatic properties as assessed by the in ovo model. Our findings demonstrated the novel therapeutic potential of locked nucleic acid-anti-miR-21 in colon adenocarcinoma with high miR-21 expression.

  6. Down-regulation of PAR1 activity with a pHLIP-based allosteric antagonist induces cancer cell death.

    PubMed

    Burns, Kelly E; Thévenin, Damien

    2015-12-15

    Even though abnormal expression of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and of their ligands is observed in many cancer cells of various origins, only a few anti-cancer compounds directly act on their signalling. One promising approach to modulate their activity consists of targeting the receptor cytoplasmic surfaces interacting with the associated G-proteins using peptides mimicking the intracellular loops of the receptor. Thus, to be fully effective, the peptide mimics must be selectively targeted to the tumour while sparing healthy tissues, translocated across the cell membrane and stay anchored to the cytoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane. In the present study, we introduce a novel way to selectively target and inhibit the activity of a GPCR in cancer cells under acidic conditions, such as those found in solid tumours. We find that the conjugation of a peptide fragment derived from the third intracellular loop (i3) of the protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) to a peptide that can selectively target tumours solely based on their acidity [pH(Low) Insertion Peptide (pHLIP)], produces a construct capable of effectively down-regulating PAR1 activity in a concentration- and pH-dependent manner and of inducing a potent cytotoxic effect in a panel of cancer cells that is proportional to the relative level of receptor expression at the cell surface. This strategy not only allows for a more selective targeting and specific intracellular delivery than current approaches, but also offers new possibilities for developing novel anti-cancer drugs targeting GPCRs.

  7. Smad7 knockdown activates protein kinase RNA-associated eIF2α pathway leading to colon cancer cell death.

    PubMed

    De Simone, Veronica; Bevivino, Gerolamo; Sedda, Silvia; Izzo, Roberta; Laudisi, Federica; Dinallo, Vincenzo; Franzè, Eleonora; Colantoni, Alfredo; Ortenzi, Angela; Salvatori, Silvia; Rossi, Piero; Sica, Giuseppe S; Fantini, Massimo C; Stolfi, Carmine; Monteleone, Giovanni

    2017-03-16

    Upregulation of Smad7, an inhibitor of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), occurs in sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC) and knockdown of Smad7 inhibits CRC cell growth, a phenomenon that associates with decreased expression of cell division cycle 25 homolog A and arrest of cells in the S phase of the cell cycle. These findings occur in CRC cells unresponsive to TGF-β1, thus suggesting the existence of a Smad7-mediated TGF-β1-independent mechanism that controls CRC cell behavior. Here we show that Smad7 inhibition with a specific Smad7 antisense oligonucleotide upregulates eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α (eIF2α) phosphorylation, a transcription factor involved in the regulation of cell cycle arrest and induction of cell death, and induces activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein homology protein (CHOP), two downstream targets of eIF2α. Among the upstream kinases that control eIF2α phosphorylation, the serine-threonine protein kinase RNA (PKR), but not general control non-derepressible 2 (GCN2) and protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK), is activated by Smad7 knockdown. PKR silencing abolishes Smad7 antisense-induced eIF2α phosphorylation and ATF4/CHOP induction, thereby preventing Smad7 antisense-driven cell death. Smad7 inhibition diminishes interaction of PKR with protein kinase inhibitor p58 (p58(IPK)), a cellular inhibitor of PKR, but does not change the expression and/or activity of other factors involved in the control of PKR activation. These findings delineate a novel mechanism by which Smad7 knockdown promotes CRC cell death.

  8. Cancer death rates in US congressional districts.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Rebecca L; Sahar, Liora; Portier, Kenneth M; Ward, Elizabeth M; Jemal, Ahmedin

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the cancer burden is important for informing and advocating cancer prevention and control. Mortality data are readily available for states and counties, but not for congressional districts, from which representatives are elected and which may be more influential in compelling legislation and policy. The authors calculated average annual cancer death rates during 2002 to 2011 for each of the 435 congressional districts using mortality data from the National Center for Health Statistics and population estimates from the US Census Bureau. Age-standardized death rates were mapped for all sites combined and separately for cancers of the lung and bronchus, colorectum, breast, and prostate by race/ethnicity and sex. Overall cancer death rates vary by almost 2-fold and are generally lowest in Mountain states and highest in Appalachia and areas of the South. The distribution is similar for lung and colorectal cancers, with the lowest rates consistently noted in districts in Utah. However, for breast and prostate cancers, while the highest rates are again scattered throughout the South, the geographic pattern is less clear and the lowest rates are in Hawaii and southern Texas and Florida. Within-state heterogeneity is limited, particularly for men, with the exceptions of Texas, Georgia, and Florida. Patterns also vary by race/ethnicity. For example, the highest prostate cancer death rates are in the West and north central United States among non-Hispanic whites, but in the deep South among African Americans. Hispanics have the lowest rates except for colorectal cancer in Wyoming, eastern Colorado, and northern New Mexico. These data can facilitate cancer control and stimulate conversation about the relationship between cancer and policies that influence access to health care and the prevalence of behavioral and environmental risk factors.

  9. Characterization of HJ-PI01 as a novel Pim-2 inhibitor that induces apoptosis and autophagic cell death in triple-negative human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yu-qian; Yin, Yi-qiong; Liu, Jie; Wang, Gui-hua; Huang, Jian; Zhu, Ling-juan; Wang, Jin-hui

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Pim-2 is a short-lived serine/threonine kinase, which plays a key role in metastasis of breast cancer through persistent activation of STAT3. Although the crystal structure of Pim-2 has been reported, but thus far no specific Pim-2-targeted compounds have been reported. In this study, we identified a novel Pim-2 inhibitor, HJ-PI01, by in silico analysis and experimental validation. Methods: The protein-protein interaction (PPI) network, chemical synthesis, molecular docking, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to design and discover the new Pim-2 inhibitor HJ-PI01. The anti-tumor effects of HJ-PI01 were evaluated in human breast MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468, MDA-MB-436, MCF-7 cells in vitro and in MDA-MB-231 xenograft mice, which were treated with HJ-PI01 (40 mg·kg−1·d−1, ig) with or without lienal polypeptide (50 mg·kg−1·d−1, ip) for 10 d. The apoptosis/autophage-inducing mechanisms of HJ-PI01 were elucidated using Western blots, immunoblots, flow cytometry, transmission electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy. Results: Based on the PrePPI network, the potential partners interacting with Pim-2 in regulating apoptosis (160 protein pairs) and autophagy (47 protein pairs) were identified. Based on the structural characteristics of Pim-2, a total of 15 compounds (HJ-PI01 to HJ-P015) were synthesized, which showed moderate or remarkable anti-proliferative potency in the human breast cancer cell lines tested. The most effective compound HJ-PI01 exerted a robust inhibition on MDA-MB-231 cells compared with chlorpromazine and the pan-Pim inhibitor PI003. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation revealed that HJ-PI01 had a good binding score with Pim-2. Moreover, HJ-PI01 (300 nmol/L) induced death receptor-dependent and mitochondrial apoptosis as well as autophagic death in MDA-MB-231 cells. In MDA-MB-231 xenograft mice, administration of HJ-PI01 remarkably inhibited the tumor growth and induced tumor cell apoptosis in vivo. Co-administration of

  10. The pentacyclic triterpenoid, plectranthoic acid, a novel activator of AMPK induces apoptotic death in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Nosheen; Syed, Deeba N; Khan, Mohammad Imran; Adhami, Vaqar M; Mirza, Bushra; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2016-01-26

    Epidemiologic studies indicated that diabetics treated with metformin had a lower incidence of cancer than those taking other anti-diabetes drugs. This led to a surge in the efforts for identification of safer and more effective metformin mimetic compounds. The plant Ficus microcarpa is widely used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes in traditional medicine in South Asia. We obtained extracts from this plant and identified a small molecule, plectranthoic acid (PA), with potent 5'AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) activating properties far superior than metformin. AMPK is the central hub of metabolic regulation and a well-studied therapeutic target for metabolic syndrome, type-2 diabetes and cancer. We observed that treatment of prostate cancer (PCa) cells with PA inhibited proliferation and induced G0/G1 phase cell cycle arrest that was associated with up-regulation of cyclin kinase inhibitors p21/CIP1 and p27/KIP1. PA treatment suppressed mTOR/S6K signaling and induced apoptosis in PCa cells in an AMPK-dependent manner. Interestingly, PA-induced autophagy in PCa cells was found to be independent of AMPK activation. Combination studies of PA and metformin demonstrated that metformin had an inhibitory effect on PA-induced AMPK activation and suppressed PA-mediated apoptosis. Given the anti-proliferative role of PA in cancer and its potent anti-hyperglycemic activity, we suggest that PA should be explored further as a novel activator of AMPK for its ultimate use for the prevention of cancers and treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  11. The pentacyclic triterpenoid, plectranthoic acid, a novel activator of AMPK induces apoptotic death in prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Nosheen; Syed, Deeba N.; Khan, Mohammad Imran; Adhami, Vaqar M.; Mirza, Bushra; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies indicated that diabetics treated with metformin had a lower incidence of cancer than those taking other anti-diabetes drugs. This led to a surge in the efforts for identification of safer and more effective metformin mimetic compounds. The plant Ficus microcarpa is widely used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes in traditional medicine in South Asia. We obtained extracts from this plant and identified a small molecule, plectranthoic acid (PA), with potent 5′AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) activating properties far superior than metformin. AMPK is the central hub of metabolic regulation and a well-studied therapeutic target for metabolic syndrome, type-2 diabetes and cancer. We observed that treatment of prostate cancer (PCa) cells with PA inhibited proliferation and induced G0/G1 phase cell cycle arrest that was associated with up-regulation of cyclin kinase inhibitors p21/CIP1 and p27/KIP1. PA treatment suppressed mTOR/S6K signaling and induced apoptosis in PCa cells in an AMPK-dependent manner. Interestingly, PA-induced autophagy in PCa cells was found to be independent of AMPK activation. Combination studies of PA and metformin demonstrated that metformin had an inhibitory effect on PA-induced AMPK activation and suppressed PA-mediated apoptosis. Given the anti-proliferative role of PA in cancer and its potent anti-hyperglycemic activity, we suggest that PA should be explored further as a novel activator of AMPK for its ultimate use for the prevention of cancers and treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:26683363

  12. Alternative Cell Death Pathways and Cell Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Fulda, Simone

    2013-01-01

    While necroptosis has for long been viewed as an accidental mode of cell death triggered by physical or chemical damage, it has become clear over the last years that necroptosis can also represent a programmed form of cell death in mammalian cells. Key discoveries in the field of cell death research, including the identification of critical components of the necroptotic machinery, led to a revised concept of cell death signaling programs. Several regulatory check and balances are in place in order to ensure that necroptosis is tightly controlled according to environmental cues and cellular needs. This network of regulatory mechanisms includes metabolic pathways, especially those linked to mitochondrial signaling events. A better understanding of these signal transduction mechanisms will likely contribute to open new avenues to exploit our knowledge on the regulation of necroptosis signaling for therapeutic application in the treatment of human diseases. PMID:23401689

  13. Activation-induced cell death of memory CD8+ T cells from pleural effusion of lung cancer patients is mediated by the type II Fas-induced apoptotic pathway.

    PubMed

    Prado-Garcia, Heriberto; Romero-Garcia, Susana; Morales-Fuentes, Jorge; Aguilar-Cazares, Dolores; Lopez-Gonzalez, Jose Sullivan

    2012-07-01

    Lung cancer is the second most common form of cancer and the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Pleural effusions, containing high numbers of mononuclear and tumor cells, are frequent in patients with advanced stages of lung cancer. We reported that in pleural effusions from primary lung cancer, the CD8+ T cell subpopulation, and particularly the terminally differentiated subset, is reduced compared to that of non-malignant effusions. We analyzed the participation of activation-induced cell death (AICD) and extrinsic pathways (type I or II) as mechanisms for the decrease in pleural effusion CD8+ T cell subpopulation. Pleural effusion or peripheral blood CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, from lung cancer patients, were stimulated with anti-CD3 antibody and analyzed for (a) apoptosis by annexin-V-binding and TUNEL assay, (b) transcript levels of Fas ligand (FasL) and TRAIL by real-time RT-PCR, (c) expression of FasL and TRAIL, measured as integrated mean fluorescence intensities (iMFI) by flow cytometry, (d) expression of Bcl-2 and BIM molecules, measured as MFI, and (e) apoptosis inhibition using caspase-8 and -9 inhibitors. Pleural effusion CD8+ T cells, but not CD4+ T cells, from cancer patients underwent AICD. Blocking FasL/Fas pathway protected from AICD. Upregulation of FasL and TRAIL expressions was found in pleural effusion CD8+ T cells, which also showed a subset of Bcl-2 low cells. In memory CD8+ T cells, AICD depended on both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways. Hence, in the pleural space of lung cancer patients, AICD might compromise the antitumor function of CD8+ T cells.

  14. Recovery of cellular E-cadherin precedes replenishment of estrogen receptor and estrogen-dependent proliferation of breast cancer cells rescued from a death stimulus.

    PubMed

    Malaguti, Claudia; Rossini, Gian Paolo

    2002-08-01

    Loss of estrogen-responsiveness and impaired E-cadherin expression/function has been linked to increased metastatic potential of breast cancer cells. In this study, we report that proliferation of breast cancer cells can resume following removal of a toxic stimulus causing severe impairment of cell adhesion and estrogen responsiveness. This type of response was induced by okadaic acid (OA) in MCF-7 cells, and was accompanied by an almost complete block of DNA synthesis, loss of cell-cell contact and cell detachment from culture dishes, loss of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and E-cadherin, whereas only a weak, if any, inhibition of protein synthesis could be observed. These responses were detected in MCF-7 cells after a 1-day treatment with 50 nM OA, and could be reversed if OA-treated cells were recovered in a culture medium devoid of the toxin, so that rescued cells resumed growth 8-12 days after replating. By pulse-chase experiments, we found that protein synthesis was not significantly affected in rescued cells, whose DNA synthesis, instead, was almost completely blocked during the first days of MCF-7 cell rescue from OA treatment. We also analyzed E-cadherin, mitogen activated protein kinase isoforms ERK1 and ERK2, Bcl-2 and BAX proteins during the rescue of MCF-7 cells from OA-induced cell death, and found that their expression followed temporally defined patterns. Cellular levels of E-cadherin returned to control levels within the first days of the rescue, followed by ER, ERK1, and ERK2, and finally by Bcl-2 and BAX proteins. Under our experimental conditions, restoration of cell adhesion did not require a functional ER system, but recovery of a normal ER pool accompanied resumption of estrogen-dependent proliferation of OA-treated MCF-7 cells.

  15. Programmed death-1 upregulation is correlated with dysfunction of tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T lymphocytes in human non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Huang, Shengdong; Gong, Dejun; Qin, Yanghua; Shen, Qian

    2010-09-01

    T-cell tolerance is an important mechanism for tumor escape, but the molecular pathways involved in T-cell tolerance remain poorly understood. It remains unknown whether the inhibitory immunoreceptor programmed death-1 (PD-1) plays a role in conditions of human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In this study, we detected PD-1 expression on CD8+ T cells from healthy control peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and the PBMCs of NSCLC patients as well as NSCLC tissues. Results showed that tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T cells had increased PD-1 expression and impaired immune function, including reducing cytokine production capability and impairing capacity to proliferate. Blockade of the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway by the PD-L1-specific antibody partially restored cytokine production and cell proliferation. These data provide direct evidence that the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway is involved in CD8+ T-cell dysfunction in NSCLC patients. Moreover, blocking this pathway provides a potential therapy target in lung cancer.

  16. Identification of CETP as a molecular target for estrogen positive breast cancer cell death by cholesterol depleting agents

    PubMed Central

    Esau, Luke; Sagar, Sunil; Bangarusamy, Dhinoth; Kaur, Mandeep

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol and its metabolites act as steroid hormone precursors, which promote estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer (BC) progression. Development of cholesterol targeting anticancer drugs has been hindered due to the lack of knowledge of viable molecular targets. Till now, Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) has been envisaged as a feasible molecular target in atherosclerosis, but for the first time, we show that CETP contributes to BC cell survival when challenged with cholesterol depleting agents. We show that MCF-7 CETP knockout BC cells pose less resistance towards cytotoxic compounds (Tamoxifen and Acetyl Plumbagin (AP)), and were more susceptible to intrinsic apoptosis. Analysis of differentially expressed genes using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA), in vivo tumor inhibition, and in vitro phenotypic responses to AP revealed a unique CETP-centric cholesterol pathway involved in sensitizing ER+ BC cells to intrinsic mitochondrial apoptosis. Furthermore, analysis of cell line, tissue and patient data available in publicly available databases linked elevated CETP expression to cancer, cancer relapse and overall poor survival. Overall, our findings highlight CETP as a pharmacologically relevant and unexploited cellular target in BC. The work also highlights AP as a promising chemical entity for preclinical investigations as a cholesterol depleting anticancer therapeutic agent. PMID:28050232

  17. Identification of CETP as a molecular target for estrogen positive breast cancer cell death by cholesterol depleting agents.

    PubMed

    Esau, Luke; Sagar, Sunil; Bangarusamy, Dhinoth; Kaur, Mandeep

    2016-09-01

    Cholesterol and its metabolites act as steroid hormone precursors, which promote estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer (BC) progression. Development of cholesterol targeting anticancer drugs has been hindered due to the lack of knowledge of viable molecular targets. Till now, Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) has been envisaged as a feasible molecular target in atherosclerosis, but for the first time, we show that CETP contributes to BC cell survival when challenged with cholesterol depleting agents. We show that MCF-7 CETP knockout BC cells pose less resistance towards cytotoxic compounds (Tamoxifen and Acetyl Plumbagin (AP)), and were more susceptible to intrinsic apoptosis. Analysis of differentially expressed genes using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA), in vivo tumor inhibition, and in vitro phenotypic responses to AP revealed a unique CETP-centric cholesterol pathway involved in sensitizing ER+ BC cells to intrinsic mitochondrial apoptosis. Furthermore, analysis of cell line, tissue and patient data available in publicly available databases linked elevated CETP expression to cancer, cancer relapse and overall poor survival. Overall, our findings highlight CETP as a pharmacologically relevant and unexploited cellular target in BC. The work also highlights AP as a promising chemical entity for preclinical investigations as a cholesterol depleting anticancer therapeutic agent.

  18. Use of Telemorace Inhibition in Combination with Anti-Cancer Drugs to Induce Cell Death in Tumor Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    mitotic spindle, excluding specificity for DNA -damaging agents at least in the context of the mutant hTR. Altogether, our data indicate that interfering...drugs upon telomerase inhibition in HeLa cells, and suggested a specific interaction between telomer- ase and the DNA repair process in human cells (11...response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and

  19. Investigation of the dose- and time-dependence of the induction of different types of cell death in a small‑cell lung cancer cell line: Implementation of the repairable-conditionally repairable model.

    PubMed

    Makris, Nikos; Edgren, Margareta; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Lind, Bengt K

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify and model various types of cell death for a small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell line (U1690) after exposure to a 137Cs source and as well as to compare the linear-quadratic (LQ) and repairable-conditionally repairable model (RCR). This study is based on four different experiments that were taken place at Cancer Centrum Karolinska (CCK). A human small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell line after the exposure to a 137Cs source was used for the extraction of the clonogenic cell survival curve. Additionally, for the determination and quantification of various modes of cell death the method of fluorescence staining was implemented, where the cell deaths were categorized based on morphological characteristics. The percentage of cells in each phase of the cell cycle was investigated with flow cytometry analysis. The quantification of senescent cells was performed by staining the samples with senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-Gal) solution and then scoring as senescent cells those that had incorporated the substance. These data were introduced into a maximum likelihood fitting to calculate the best estimates of the parameters used by the examined model. In this model, the modes of cell death are divided into three categories: apoptotic, senescent and other types of cell death (necrotic/apoptotic, necrotic, micronuclei and giant). In the clonogenic cell survival assay, the fitting of the RCR model gives a χ(2)-value of 6.10 whereas for the LQ model became 9.61. In the fluorescence microscopy and senescence assay, the probability of the three different modes of cell death on day 2 seems to increases with a dose up to about 10 Gy where there is saturation. On day 7 a significant induction of apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner was evident, whereas senescence was slightly increased in response to dose but not to time. As for the 'other types of cell death' mode on day 7 showed a higher probability than the one on day

  20. Cell Proliferation, Cell Death, and Size Regulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-10-01

    predicted to encode a novel 582 amino acid protein, perhaps interacting with molybdopterin. It is possible that the pie gene encodes a novel enzyme protecting against cell death during growth and development.

  1. Novel indole-based tambjamine-analogues induce apoptotic lung cancer cell death through p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Manuel-Manresa, Pilar; Korrodi-Gregório, Luís; Hernando, Elsa; Villanueva, Alberto; Martínez-García, David; Rodilla, Ananda M; Ramos, Ricard; Fardilha, Margarida; Moya, Juan; Quesada, Roberto; Soto-Cerrato, Vanessa; Perez-Tomas, Ricardo

    2017-04-10

    Lung cancer has become the leading killer cancer worldwide, due to late diagnosis and lack of efficient anticancer drugs. We have recently described novel natural-derived tambjamine analogues that are potent anion transporters capable of disrupting cellular ion balance, inducing acidification of the cytosol and hyperpolarization of cellular plasma membranes. Although these tambjamine analogues were able to compromise cell survival, their molecular mechanism of action remains largely unknown. Herein we characterize the molecular cell responses induced by highly active indole-based tambjamine analogues treatment in lung cancer cells. Expression changes produced after compounds treatment comprised genes related to apoptosis, cell cycle, growth factors and its receptors, protein kinases and topoisomerases, among others. Dysregulation of BCL2 and BIRC5/survivin genes suggested the apoptotic pathway as the induced molecular cell death mechanism. In fact, activation of several pro-apoptotic markers (caspase 9, caspase 3 and PARP) and reversion of the cytotoxic effect upon treatment with an apoptosis inhibitor (Z-VAD-FMK) were observed. Moreover, members of the Bcl-2 protein family suffered changes after tambjamine analogues treatment, with a concomitant protein decrease towards the pro-survival members. Besides this, it was observed cellular accumulation of ROS upon compound treatment and an activation of the stress-kinase p38 MAPK route that, when inhibited, reverted the cytotoxic effect of the tambjamine analogues. Finally, a significant therapeutic effect of these compounds was observed in subcutaneous and orthotopic lung cancer mice models. Taken together, these results shed light on the mechanism of action of novel cytotoxic anionophores and demonstrate the therapeutic effects against lung cancer.

  2. Suppression of PC-1/PrLZ sensitizes prostate cancer cells to ionizing radiation by attenuating DNA damage repair and inducing autophagic cell death

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Fang; Xiao, Bei-Bei; Wang, Hongtao; Song, Man; Wang, Li; Zhou, Jianguang; Wang, Jian; Li, Shanhu

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy is promising and effective for treating prostate cancer but the addition of a tumor cell radiosensitizer would improve therapeutic outcomes. PC-1/PrLZ, a TPD52 protein family member is frequently upregulated in advanced prostate cancer cells and may be a biomarker of aggressive prostate cancer. Therefore, we investigated the potential role of PC-1/PrLZ for increasing radioresistance in human prostate cancer cell lines. Growth curves and survival assays after g-ray irradiation confirmed that depletion of endogenous PC-1/PrLZ significantly increased prostate cancer cell radiosensitivity. Irradiation (IR) increased PC-1/PrLZ expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner and increased radiosensitivity in PC-1/PrLZ-suppressed cells was partially due to decreased DNA double strand break (DBS) repair which was measured with comet and gH2AX foci assays. Furthermore, depletion of PC-1/PrLZ impaired the IR-induced G2/M checkpoint, which has been reported to be correlate with radioresistance in cancer cells. PC-1/PrLZ-deficient cells exhibited higher level of autophagy when compared with control cells. Thus, specific inhibition of PC-1/PrLZ might provide a novel therapeutic strategy for radiosensitizing prostate cancer cells. PMID:27694690

  3. Ferroptosis: an iron-dependent form of nonapoptotic cell death.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Scott J; Lemberg, Kathryn M; Lamprecht, Michael R; Skouta, Rachid; Zaitsev, Eleina M; Gleason, Caroline E; Patel, Darpan N; Bauer, Andras J; Cantley, Alexandra M; Yang, Wan Seok; Morrison, Barclay; Stockwell, Brent R

    2012-05-25

    Nonapoptotic forms of cell death may facilitate the selective elimination of some tumor cells or be activated in specific pathological states. The oncogenic RAS-selective lethal small molecule erastin triggers a unique iron-dependent form of nonapoptotic cell death that we term ferroptosis. Ferroptosis is dependent upon intracellular iron, but not other metals, and is morphologically, biochemically, and genetically distinct from apoptosis, necrosis, and autophagy. We identify the small molecule ferrostatin-1 as a potent inhibitor of ferroptosis in cancer cells and glutamate-induced cell death in organotypic rat brain slices, suggesting similarities between these two processes. Indeed, erastin, like glutamate, inhibits cystine uptake by the cystine/glutamate antiporter (system x(c)(-)), creating a void in the antioxidant defenses of the cell and ultimately leading to iron-dependent, oxidative death. Thus, activation of ferroptosis results in the nonapoptotic destruction of certain cancer cells, whereas inhibition of this process may protect organisms from neurodegeneration.

  4. Distinct CPT-induced deaths in lung cancer cells caused by clathrin-mediated internalization of CP micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu-Sheng; Cheng, Ru-You; Lo, Yu-Lun; Hsu, Chin; Chen, Su-Hwei; Chiu, Chien-Chih; Wang, Li-Fang

    2016-02-01

    We previously synthesized a chondroitin sulfate-graft-poly(ε-caprolactone) copolymer (H-CP) with a high content of poly(ε-caprolactone) (18.7 mol%), which self-assembled in water into a rod-like micelle to encapsulate hydrophobic camptothecin (CPT) in the core (micelle/CPT) for tumor-targeted drug delivery. As a result of the recognition of the micelle by CD44, the micelle/CPT entered CRL-5802 cells efficiently and released CPT efficaciously, resulting in higher tumor suppression than commercial CPT-11. In this study, H1299 cells were found to have a higher CD44 expression than CRL-5802 cells. However, the lower CD44-expressing CRL-5802 cells had a higher percentage of cell death and higher cellular uptake of the micelle/CPT than the higher CD44-expressing H1299 cells. Examination of the internalization pathway of the micelle/CPT in the presence of different endocytic chemical inhibitors showed that the CRL-5802 cells involved clathrin-mediated endocytosis, which was not found in the H1299 cells. Analysis of the cell cycle of the two cell lines exposed to the micelle/CPT revealed that the CRL-5802 cells arrested mainly in the S phase and the H1299 cells arrested mainly in the G2-M phase. A consistent result was also found in the evaluation of γ-H2AX expression, which was about three-fold higher in the CRL-5802 cells than in the H1299 cells. A near-infrared dye, IR780, was encapsulated into the micelle to observe the in vivo biodistribution of the micelle/IR780 in tumor-bearing mice. The CRL-5802 tumor showed a higher fluorescence intensity than the H1299 tumor at any tracing time after 1 h. Thus we tentatively concluded that CRL-5802 cells utilized the clathrin-mediated internalization pathway and arrested in the S phase on exposure to the micelle/CPT; all are possible reasons for the better therapeutic outcome in CRL-5802 cells than in H1299 cells.We previously synthesized a chondroitin sulfate-graft-poly(ε-caprolactone) copolymer (H-CP) with a high content of

  5. Ferroptosis is an autophagic cell death process.

    PubMed

    Gao, Minghui; Monian, Prashant; Pan, Qiuhui; Zhang, Wei; Xiang, Jenny; Jiang, Xuejun

    2016-09-01

    Ferroptosis is an iron-dependent form of regulated necrosis. It is implicated in various human diseases, including ischemic organ damage and cancer. Here, we report the crucial role of autophagy, particularly autophagic degradation of cellular iron storage proteins (a process known as ferritinophagy), in ferroptosis. Using RNAi screening coupled with subsequent genetic analysis, we identified multiple autophagy-related genes as positive regulators of ferroptosis. Ferroptosis induction led to autophagy activation and consequent degradation of ferritin and ferritinophagy cargo receptor NCOA4. Consistently, inhibition of ferritinophagy by blockage of autophagy or knockdown of NCOA4 abrogated the accumulation of ferroptosis-associated cellular labile iron and reactive oxygen species, as well as eventual ferroptotic cell death. Therefore, ferroptosis is an autophagic cell death process, and NCOA4-mediated ferritinophagy supports ferroptosis by controlling cellular iron homeostasis.

  6. Effects of a novel carbocyclic analog of pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine nucleoside on pleiotropic induction of cell death in prostate cancer cells with different androgen responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Suh, Hyewon; Choi, Ko-woon; Lee, Jongbok; Ryou, Chongsuk; Rhee, Hakjune; Lee, Chul-Hoon

    2016-02-15

    Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer and is one of the leading causes of male cancer death in the world. Recently, in the course of our screening for a novel anticancer compound, we synthesized carbocyclic analogs of pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine nucleoside; compounds 5, and 6. In the current study, we report the effects of compound 5 on pleiotropic induction of cell death via up-regulation of AR-associated p21(Cip1) protein in prostate cancer cells with different androgen responsiveness, such as LNCaP (androgen-dependent and -sensitive), LNCaP(C4-2) (androgen-independent and -sensitive; androgen-refractory), and DU145 (androgen-independent and -insensitive) cells. The treatment of LNCaP cells with 6 μM compound 5 for 24 h stimulated the androgen receptor (AR) activity and dramatically up-regulated transcription (56-fold) of p21(Cip1), which, in turn, induces typical apoptosis in the cells. However, induction of apoptosis through up-regulation (23-fold) of AR-associated p21(Cip1) achieved in LNCaP(C4-2) cells was possible by intensive cell treatment with compound 5 (9 μM, 48 h), because the cells are less sensitive and independent to androgen than LNCaP cells. Furthermore, 6 μM compound 5-treated DU145 cells, which exhibit extremely low AR activation due to no androgen responsiveness and dependency, showed neither up-regulation of p21(Cip1) nor apoptotic induction. Instead, a different type of cell death, autophagy-like death through the LC3B-associated autophagosome formation, was obviously induced in DU145 cells. Taken together, our results suggest that pleiotropic induction of prostate cancer cell death by compound 5 is determined by how efficiently and how abundantly androgen-dependent activation of the AR occurs, whereas compound 6 shows no induction of apoptosis in LNCaP cells.

  7. Dual Regulation of Cell Death and Cell Survival upon Induction of Cellular Stress by Isopimara-7,15-Dien-19-Oic Acid in Cervical Cancer, HeLa Cells In vitro

    PubMed Central

    Abu, Nadiah; Yeap, Swee K.; Pauzi, Ahmad Z. Mat; Akhtar, M. Nadeem; Zamberi, Nur R.; Ismail, Jamil; Zareen, Seema; Alitheen, Noorjahan B.

    2016-01-01

    The Fritillaria imperialis is an ornamental flower that can be found in various parts of the world including Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, and the Himalayas. The use of this plant as traditional remedy is widely known. This study aims to unveil the anti-cancer potentials of Isopimara-7,15-Dien-19-Oic Acid, extracted from the bulbs of F. imperialis in cervical cancer cell line, HeLa cells. Flow cytometry analysis of cell death, gene expression analysis via cDNA microarray and protein array were performed. Based on the results, Isopimara-7,15-Dien-19-Oic acid simultaneously induced cell death and promoted cell survival. The execution of apoptosis was apparent based on the flow cytometry results and regulation of both pro and anti-apoptotic genes. Additionally, the regulation of anti-oxidant genes were up-regulated especially thioredoxin, glutathione and superoxide dismutase- related genes. Moreover, the treatment also induced the activation of pro-survival heat shock proteins. Collectively, Isopimara-7,15-Dien-19-Oic Acid managed to induce cellular stress in HeLa cells and activate several anti- and pro survival pathways. PMID:27065873

  8. Effect of proton and gamma irradiation on human lung carcinoma cells: Gene expression, cell cycle, cell death, epithelial-mesenchymal transition and cancer-stem cell trait as biological end points.

    PubMed

    Narang, Himanshi; Kumar, Amit; Bhat, Nagesh; Pandey, Badri N; Ghosh, Anu

    2015-10-01

    Proton beam therapy is a cutting edge modality over conventional gamma radiotherapy because of its physical dose deposition advantage. However, not much is known about its biological effects vis-a-vis gamma irradiation. Here we investigated the effect of proton- and gamma- irradiation on cell cycle, death, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and "stemness" in human non-small cell lung carcinoma cells (A549). Proton beam (3MeV) was two times more cytotoxic than gamma radiation and induced higher and longer cell cycle arrest. At equivalent doses, numbers of genes responsive to proton irradiation were ten times higher than those responsive to gamma irradiation. At equitoxic doses, the proton-irradiated cells had reduced cell adhesion and migration ability as compared to the gamma-irradiated cells. It was also more effective in reducing population of Cancer Stem Cell (CSC) like cells as revealed by aldehyde dehydrogenase activity and surface phenotyping by CD44(+), a CSC marker. These results can have significant implications for proton therapy in the context of suppression of molecular and cellular processes that are fundamental to tumor expansion.

  9. ANOVA like analysis of cancer death age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Areia, Aníbal; Mexia, João T.

    2016-06-01

    We use ANOVA to study the influence of year, sex, country and location on the average cancer death age. The data used was from the World Health Organization (WHO) files for 1999, 2003, 2007 and 2011. The locations considered were: kidney, leukaemia, melanoma of skin and oesophagus and the countries: Portugal, Norway, Greece and Romania.

  10. Suppression of extracellular signal-related kinase and activation of p38 MAPK are two critical events leading to caspase-8- and mitochondria-mediated cell death in phytosphingosine-treated human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Moon-Taek; Choi, Jung-A; Kim, Min-Jeong; Um, Hong-Duck; Bae, Sangwoo; Kang, Chang-Mo; Cho, Chul-Koo; Kang, Seongman; Chung, Hee Yong; Lee, Yun-Sil; Lee, Su-Jae

    2003-12-12

    We previously demonstrated that the phytosphingosine-induced apoptosis was accompanied by the concomitant induction of both the caspase-8-mediated and mitochondrial activation-mediated apoptosis pathways. In the present study, we investigated the role of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in the activation of these two distinct cell death pathways induced by phytosphingosine in human cancer cells. Phytosphingosine caused strong induction of caspase-8 activity and caspase-independent Bax translocation to the mitochondria. A rapid decrease of phosphorylated ERK1/2 and a marked increase of p38 MAPK phosphorylation were observed within 10 min after phytosphingosine treatment. Activation of ERK1/2 by pretreatment with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate or forced expression of ERK1/2 attenuated phytosphingosine-induced caspase-8 activation. However, Bax translocation and caspase-9 activation was unaffected, indicating that down-regulation of the ERK activity is specifically required for the phytosphingosine-induced caspase-8-dependent cell death pathway. On the other hand, treatment with SB203580, a p38 MAPK-specific inhibitor, or expression of a dominant negative form of p38 MAPK suppressed phytosphingosine-induced translocation of the proapoptotic protein, Bax, from the cytosol to mitochondria, cytochrome c release, and subsequent caspase-9 activation but did not affect caspase-8 activation, indicating that activation of p38 MAPK is involved in the mitochondrial activation-mediated cell death pathway. Our results suggest that phytosphingosine can utilize two different MAPK signaling pathways for amplifying the apoptosis cascade, enhancing the understanding of the molecular mechanisms utilized by naturally occurring metabolites to regulate cell death. Molecular dissection of the signaling pathways that activate the apoptotic cell death machinery is critical for both our understanding of cell death events and development of cancer therapeutic agents.

  11. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase targeting by the β galactoside binding protein cytokine negates akt gene expression and leads aggressive breast cancer cells to apoptotic death

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Valerie; Mallucci, Livio

    2009-01-01

    , functional inhibition of the catalytic activity of PI3K by the βGBP cytokine and loss of akt mRNA results in apoptotic death. A functional correlation between ERK and the kt gene was also found. The relationship between ERK, akt mRNA, PI3K and cell vulnerability to βGBP challenge was sustained both in mammary ductal cells forced to mimic an aggressive behaviour and in non-aggressive breast cancer cells undergoing an enforced shift into an aggressive phenotype. Conclusions βGBP, a newly discovered physiological inhibitor of PI3K, is a selective and potent inducer of apoptosis in aggressive breast cancer cells. Due to its physiological nature, which carries no chemotherapeutic disadvantages, βGBP has the potential to be safely tested in clinical trials. PMID:19133120

  12. Activation of a Novel Death Pathway, Targeted Necrosis, by p53 Peptides to Circumvent Apoptotic Resistance in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    Virtually all chemotherapy agents, at clinically achievable concentrations, act by inducing cancer cell death via apoptosis, but cancer cells...prostate cancer cells by induction of ?targeted necrosis?. Targeted necrosis has potential clinical utility, since its cell death mechanism retains...Therefore, pretreatment with paclitaxel may prime the cells by induction of Fas ligand so that subsequent exposure to p53p-Ant efficiently activates the Fas/FADD cell death pathway.

  13. Role of polyphenols in cell death control.

    PubMed

    Giovannini, Claudio; Masella, Roberta

    2012-05-01

    Dietary consumption of fruit, vegetables, fish, and olive oil has been demonstrated to exert beneficial effects on human health. This finding may be due to the high content of antioxidant compounds including polyphenols. Current evidence strongly supports a contribution of polyphenols to the prevention of several chronic degenerative diseases such as cancer, atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases, central nervous system disorders, as well as aging. Apoptosis is a genetically controlled and evolutionarily conserved form of cell death of critical importance for the maintenance of tissue homeostasis in the adult organism. The malfunction of the death machinery may play a primary role in various pathologic processes, leading to proliferative or degenerative diseases. Polyphenols can interact with specific steps and/or proteins regulating the apoptotic process in different ways depending on their concentration, the cell system, the type or stage of the pathological process. Because of their ability to modulate cell death, polyphenols have been proposed as chemopreventive and therapeutic agents. This paper reviews and discusses the last 3-year findings related to the principal molecular mechanisms involved in the control of the balance between apoptosis and cell proliferation exerted by polyphenols.

  14. Pancreatic cancer-specific cell death induced in vivo by cytoplasmic-delivered polyinosine-polycytidylic acid

    PubMed Central

    Bhoopathi, Praveen; Quinn, Bridget A.; Gui, Qin; Shen, Xue-Ning; Grossman, Steven R.; Das, Swadesh K.; Sarkar, Devanand; Fisher, Paul B.; Emdad, Luni

    2014-01-01

    Polyinosine-polycytidylic acid (pIC) is a synthetic dsRNA that acts as an immune agonist of TLR3 and RLR to activate dendritic and NK cells that can kill tumor cells. pIC can also trigger apoptosis in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells but its mechanism of action is obscure. In this study, we investigated the potential therapeutic activity of a formulation of pIC with polyethylenimine ([pIC]PEI) in PDAC and investigated its mechanism of action. [pIC]PEI stimulated apoptosis in PDAC cells without affecting normal pancreatic epithelial cells. Mechanistically, [pIC]PEI repressed XIAP and survivin expression and activated an immune response by inducing MDA-5, RIG-I and NOXA. Phosphorylation of AKT was inhibited by [pIC]PEI in PDAC and this event was critical for stimulating apoptosis through XIAP and survivin degradation. In vivo administration of [pIC]PEI inhibited tumor growth via AKT-mediated XIAP degradation in both subcutaneous and quasi-orthotopic-models of PDAC. Taken together, these results offer a preclinical proof-of-concept for the evaluation of [pIC]PEI as an immunochemotherapy to treat pancreatic cancer. PMID:25205107

  15. Adenovirus E4orf4 protein-induced death of p53-/- H1299 human cancer cells follows a G1 arrest of both tetraploid and diploid cells due to a failure to initiate DNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Cabon, Lauriane; Sriskandarajah, Neera; Mui, Melissa Z; Teodoro, Jose G; Blanchette, Paola; Branton, Philip E

    2013-12-01

    The adenovirus E4orf4 protein selectively kills human cancer cells independently of p53 and thus represents a potentially promising tool for the development of novel antitumor therapies. Previous studies suggested that E4orf4 induces an arrest or a delay in mitosis and that both this effect and subsequent cell death rely largely on an interaction with the B55 regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase 2A. In the present report, we show that the death of human H1299 lung carcinoma cells induced by expression of E4orf4 is typified not by an accumulation of cells arrested in mitosis but rather by the presence of both tetraploid and diploid cells that are arrested in G1 because they are unable to initiate DNA synthesis. We believe that these E4orf4-expressing cells eventually die by various processes, including those resulting from mitotic catastrophe.

  16. Identification of Programmed Death Ligand 1-derived Peptides Capable of Inducing Cancer-reactive Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes From HLA-A24+ Patients With Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Minami, Takafumi; Minami, Tomoko; Shimizu, Nobutaka; Yamamoto, Yutaka; De Velasco, Marco; Nozawa, Masahiro; Yoshimura, Kazuhiro; Harashima, Nanae; Harada, Mamoru; Uemura, Hirotsugu

    2015-09-01

    Molecular therapy targeting tumor angiogenesis has been the standard treatment for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). However, despite their significant antitumor effects, most of patients with mRCC have not been cured. Under such circumstances, anticancer immunotherapy has been considered a promising treatment modality for mRCC, and cancer-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are the most powerful effectors among several immune cells. However, anticancer CTLs can be inhibited by several immune inhibitory mechanisms, including the interaction between programmed death 1 (PD-1) and its ligand PD-L1, on T cells and cancer cells, respectively. Alternatively, this also means that PD-L1 could be a promising target for anticancer immunotherapy. Therefore, we searched for PD-L1-derived peptides that are applicable for anticancer vaccine for HLA-A24(+) RCC patients. Among 5 peptides derived from PD-L1, which were prepared based on the binding motif to the HLA-A24(+) allele, both PD-L1(11-19) and PD-L1(41-50) peptides induced peptide-specific CTLs from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of HLA-A24(+) RCC patients. Such PD-L1 peptide-stimulated CD8 T cells showed cytotoxicity against HLA-A24(+) and PD-L1-expressing RCC cells. Although IFN-γ treatment increased PD-L1 expression on PD-L1(low) RCC cells, their sensitivity to cytotoxicity of PD-L1 peptide-stimulated CD8(+) T cells varied between patients. Altogether, these results indicate that both PD-L1(11-19) and PD-L1(41-50) peptides could be candidates for peptide-based anticancer vaccines for HLA-A24(+) mRCC patients.

  17. Hyperthermia enhances mapatumumab-induced apoptotic death through ubiquitin-mediated degradation of cellular FLIP(long) in human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Song, X; Kim, S-Y; Zhou, Z; Lagasse, E; Kwon, Y T; Lee, Y J

    2013-04-04

    Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the world; the main cause of death of colorectal cancer is hepatic metastases, which can be treated with hyperthermia using isolated hepatic perfusion (IHP). In this study, we report that mild hyperthermia potently reduced cellular FLIP(long), (c-FLIP(L)), a major regulator of the death receptor (DR) pathway of apoptosis, thereby enhancing humanized anti-DR4 antibody mapatumumab (Mapa)-mediated mitochondria-independent apoptosis. We observed that overexpression of c-FLIP(L) in CX-1 cells abrogated the synergistic effect of Mapa and hyperthermia, whereas silencing of c-FLIP in CX-1 cells enhanced Mapa-induced apoptosis. Hyperthermia altered c-FLIP(L) protein stability without concomitant reductions in FLIP mRNA. Ubiquitination of c-FLIP(L) was increased by hyperthermia, and proteasome inhibitor MG132 prevented heat-induced downregulation of c-FLIP(L). These results suggest the involvement of the ubiquitin-proteasome system in this process. We also found lysine residue 195 (K195) to be essential for c-FLIP(L) ubiquitination and proteolysis, as mutant c-FLIP(L) lysine 195 arginine (arginine replacing lysine) was left virtually un-ubiquitinated and was refractory to hyperthermia-triggered degradation, and thus partially blocked the synergistic effect of Mapa and hyperthermia. Our observations reveal that hyperthermia transiently reduced c-FLIP(L) by proteolysis linked to K195 ubiquitination, which contributed to the synergistic effect between Mapa and hyperthermia. This study supports the application of hyperthermia combined with other regimens to treat colorectal hepatic metastases.

  18. To Your Health: NLM Update transcript - Geography of cancer deaths

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your Health: NLM Update Transcript Geography of cancer deaths : 03/27/2017 To use the sharing features ... on weekly topics. An overall decline in cancer deaths across the U.S. is not uniform, and research ...

  19. Cell death in the nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Bredesen, Dale E.; Rao, Rammohan V.; Mehlen, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease trigger neuronal cell death through endogenous suicide pathways. Surprisingly, although the cell death itself may occur relatively late in the course of the degenerative process, the mediators of the underlying cell-death pathways have shown promise as potential therapeutic targets. PMID:17051206

  20. Programmed cell death in Giardia.

    PubMed

    Bagchi, Susmita; Oniku, Abraham E; Topping, Kate; Mamhoud, Zahra N; Paget, Timothy A

    2012-06-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) has been observed in many unicellular eukaryotes; however, in very few cases have the pathways been described. Recently the early divergent amitochondrial eukaryote Giardia has been included in this group. In this paper we investigate the processes of PCD in Giardia. We performed a bioinformatics survey of Giardia genomes to identify genes associated with PCD alongside traditional methods for studying apoptosis and autophagy. Analysis of Giardia genomes failed to highlight any genes involved in apoptotic-like PCD; however, we were able to induce apoptotic-like morphological changes in response to oxidative stress (H2O2) and drugs (metronidazole). In addition we did not detect caspase activity in induced cells. Interestingly, we did observe changes resembling autophagy when cells were starved (staining with MDC) and genome analysis revealed some key genes associated with autophagy such as TOR, ATG1 and ATG 16. In organisms such as Trichomonas vaginalis, Entamoeba histolytica and Blastocystis similar observations have been made but no genes have been identified. We propose that Giardia possess a pathway of autophagy and a form of apoptosis very different from the classical known mechanism; this may represent an early form of programmed cell death.

  1. Modulation of P2X4/P2X7/Pannexin-1 sensitivity to extracellular ATP via Ivermectin induces a non-apoptotic and inflammatory form of cancer cell death

    PubMed Central

    Draganov, Dobrin; Gopalakrishna-Pillai, Sailesh; Chen, Yun-Ru; Zuckerman, Neta; Moeller, Sara; Wang, Carrie; Ann, David; Lee, Peter P.

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression of P2X7 receptors correlates with tumor growth and metastasis. Yet, release of ATP is associated with immunogenic cancer cell death as well as inflammatory responses caused by necrotic cell death at sites of trauma or ischemia-reperfusion injury. Using an FDA-approved anti-parasitic agent Ivermectin as a prototype agent to allosterically modulate P2X4 receptors, we can switch the balance between the dual pro-survival and cytotoxic functions of purinergic signaling in breast cancer cells. This is mediated through augmented opening of the P2X4/P2X7-gated Pannexin-1 channels that drives a mixed apoptotic and necrotic mode of cell death associated with activation of caspase-1 and is consistent with pyroptosis. We show that cancer cell death is dependent on ATP release and death signals downstream of P2X7 receptors that can be reversed by inhibition of NADPH oxidases-generated ROS, Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) or mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP). Ivermectin induces autophagy and release of ATP and HMGB1, key mediators of inflammation. Potentiated P2X4/P2X7 signaling can be further linked to the ATP rich tumor microenvironment providing a mechanistic explanation for the tumor selectivity of purinergic receptors modulation and its potential to be used as a platform for integrated cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26552848

  2. The novel pterostilbene derivative ANK-199 induces autophagic cell death through regulating PI3 kinase class III/beclin 1/Atg‑related proteins in cisplatin‑resistant CAR human oral cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Min-Tsang; Chen, Hao-Ping; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Chiang, Jo-Hua; Wu, Tian-Shung; Kuo, Daih-Huang; Huang, Li-Jiau; Kuo, Sheng-Chu; Yang, Jai-Sing

    2014-08-01

    Pterostilbene is an effective chemopreventive agent against multiple types of cancer cells. A novel pterostilbene derivative, ANK-199, was designed and synthesized by our group. Its antitumor activity and mechanism in cisplatin-resistant CAR human oral cancer cells were investigated in this study. Our results show that ANK-199 has an extremely low toxicity in normal oral cell lines. The formation of autophagic vacuoles and acidic vesicular organelles (AVOs) was observed in the ANK-199-treated CAR cells by monodansylcadaverine (MDC) and acridine orange (AO) staining, suggesting that ANK-199 is able to induce autophagic cell death in CAR cells. Neither DNA fragmentation nor DNA condensation was observed, which means that ANK-199-induced cell death is not triggered by apoptosis. In accordance with morphological observation, 3-MA, a specific inhibitor of PI3K kinase class III, can inhibit the autophagic vesicle formation induced by ANK-199. In addition, ANK-199 is also able to enhance the protein levels of autophagic proteins, Atg complex, beclin 1, PI3K class III and LC3-II, and mRNA expression of autophagic genes Atg7, Atg12, beclin 1 and LC3-II in the ANK-199-treated CAR cells. A molecular signaling pathway induced by ANK-199 was therefore summarized. Results presented in this study show that ANK-199 may become a novel therapeutic reagent for the treatment of oral cancer in the near future (patent pending).

  3. Normal development, oncogenesis and programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Liebermann, D A

    1998-09-10

    Meeting's Report -- June 2, 1998, Sugarload Estate Conference Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. A symposium on Normal Development, Oncogenesis and Programmed Cell Death, was held at the Sugarload Estate Conference Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA sponsored by the Fels Cancer Institute, Temple University School of Medicine, with the support of the Alliance Pharmaceutical Corporation. The symposium was organized by Drs Dan A Liebermann and Barbara Hoffman at the Fels. Invited speakers included: Dr Andrei V Gudkov (University of Illinois) who started the symposium talking about 'New cellular factors modulating the tumor suppressor function of p53'; Dr Yuri Lazebnik (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratories) spoke about 'Caspases considered as enemies within'; Dr E Premkumar Reddy (Fels Institute, Temple University) talked about recent exciting findings in his laboratory regarding 'JAK-STATs dedicated signaling pathways'; Dr Michael Greenberg (Harvard University) spoke about 'Signal transduction pathways that regulate differentiation and survival in the developing nervous system'; Dr Richard Kolesnick's (Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center) talk has been focused at 'Stress signals for apoptosis, including Ceramide and c-Jun Kinase/Stress-activated Protein Kinase'; Dr Barbara Hoffman (Fels Institute, Temple University) described research, conducted in collaboration with Dr Dan A Liebermann, aimed at deciphering the roles of 'myc, myb, and E2F as negative regulators of terminal differentiation', using hematopoietic cells as model system. Dr Daniel G Tenen (Harvard Medical School), described studies aimed at understanding the 'Regulation of hematopoietic cell development by lineage specific transcription regulators'. Dr George C Prendergast (The Wistar Institute) talked about the 'Myc-Bin1 signaling pathway in cell death and differentiation. Dr Ruth J Muschel (University of Pennsylvania) spoke about work, conducted in collaboration with Dr WG McKenna, aimed at

  4. Death Concerns among Individuals Newly Diagnosed with Lung Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehto, Rebecca; Therrien, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Confronting the reality of death is an important challenge for individuals facing life-threatening illness such as lung cancer, the leading cause of cancer death. Few studies, however, document the nature of death-related concerns in individuals newly diagnosed with lung cancer. The aims of this exploratory study were to examine unsolicited…

  5. Inhibition of autophagy potentiates pemetrexed and simvastatin-induced apoptotic cell death in malignant mesothelioma and non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Ki-Eun; Kim, Young-Suk; Jung, Jae-Wan; Kwon, Su-Jin; Park, Do-Sim; Cha, Byong-Ki; Oh, Seon-Hee; Yoon, Kwon-Ha; Jeong, Eun-Taik; Kim, Hak-Ryul

    2015-10-06

    Pemetrexed, a multitarget antifolate used to treat malignant mesothelioma and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), has been shown to stimulate autophagy. In this study, we determined whether autophagy could be induced by pemetrexed and simvastatin cotreatment in malignant mesothelioma and NSCLC cells. Furthermore, we determined whether inhibition of autophagy drives apoptosis in malignant mesothelioma and NSCLC cells. Malignant mesothelioma MSTO-211H and A549 NSCLC cells were treated with pemetrexed and simvastatin alone and in combination to evaluate their effect on autophagy and apoptosis. Cotreatment with pemetrexed and simvastatin induced greater caspase-dependent apoptosis and autophagy than either drug alone in malignant mesothelioma and NSCLC cells. 3-Methyladenine (3-MA), ATG5 siRNA, bafilomycin A, and E64D/pepstatin A enhanced the apoptotic potential of pemetrexed and simvastatin, whereas rapamycin and LY294002 attenuated their induction of caspase-dependent apoptosis. Our data indicate that pemetrexed and simvastatin cotreatment augmented apoptosis and autophagy in malignant mesothelioma and NSCLC cells. Inhibition of pemetrexed and simvastatin-induced autophagy was shown to enhance apoptosis, suggesting that this could be a novel therapeutic strategy against malignant mesothelioma and NSCLC.

  6. Array-based analysis of the effects of trichostatin A and CG-1521 on cell cycle and cell death in LNCaP prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Roy, Somdutta; Jeffrey, Randy; Tenniswood, Martin

    2008-07-01

    Previous studies comparing the effects of two histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, trichostatin A (TSA) and CG-1521, have shown that these compounds selectively inhibit HDAC and induce differentially acetylated p53 isoforms and assembly of mutually exclusive transcriptional complexes on the p21 promoter. To determine whether the differential transcriptional regulation seen in p21 gene is unique or whether it is representative of the genome-wide effects of these two HDAC inhibitors, we have used microarray and Ingenuity pathway analysis to compare the effects of TSA and CG-1521 on gene expression on LNCaP cells. Gene array analysis confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR shows that CG-1521 modulates the expression of a highly circumscribed group of genes involved in cell cycle progression and cell death. In contrast, TSA appears to induce widespread transrepression of many genes and does not modulate the expression of the same cohort as CG-1521. These data show that the selective effects of CG-1521 and TSA on the assembly of transcription complexes are not unique to the p21 gene and suggest that selective inhibition of HDAC can lead to significant changes in gene expression through the acetylation of transcription factors including but not limited to p53.

  7. Risk of head and neck squamous cell cancer and death in patients with Fanconi anemia who did and did not receive transplants.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Philip S; Socié, Gerard; Alter, Blanche P; Gluckman, Eliane

    2005-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (SCT) is currently the only therapy that can restore normal hematopoiesis in patients with Fanconi anemia (FA). Patients with FA have a high baseline risk of squamous cell cancers (SCCs) of the head, neck, and esophagus, and SCT conditioning may increase SCC incidence. We evaluated the risks of SCC and death in 145 patients with FA in the North American Survey (NAS) cohort who did not receive transplants, and 117 patients with FA in the Hôpital Saint Louis (SLH) cohort who did receive transplants. The age-specific hazard of SCC was 4.4-fold higher in patients who received transplants than in those who did not (P = .003), and SCCs occurred at significantly younger ages in the former (respective medians, 18 and 33 years, P = .004). Survival after SCC was similarly poor in both cohorts (P = .135, median, 13 months). The hazard of SCC increased at a greater than linear rate, to 4.4% per year by age 40 in NAS and 4.7% per year by 10 years after transplant in SLH. In SLH, the hazard of non-SCC death was biphasic, declining significantly (P = .004) from 7.1% per month during the first 6 months after transplant to 0.13% per month (1.6% per year) after the first year. Acute and chronic graft-versus-host diseases were significant SCC risk factors. Adverse event rates in these cohorts provide historical control rates to assess emerging therapies for FA.

  8. A prognostic model of recurrence and death in stage I non-small cell lung cancer utilizing presentation, histopathology, and oncoprotein expression.

    PubMed

    Harpole, D H; Herndon, J E; Wolfe, W G; Iglehart, J D; Marks, J R

    1995-01-01

    In order to construct a multivariate model for predicting early recurrence and cancer death for patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer, 271 consecutive patients (mean age, 63 +/- 8 years) who were diagnosed, treated, and followed at one institution were studied. All patients were clinical stage I with head and chest/abdominal computed tomograms and radionuclide bone scans without evidence of metastatic disease. Pathological material after resection was reviewed to verify histological staging. Follow-up documented the time and location of any recurrence, was a median 56 months in duration, and was complete in all cases. Data recorded included age, sex, smoking history, presenting symptoms, pathological description, and oncoprotein staining for erbB-2 (HER-2/neu), p53, and KI-67 proliferation protein. Immunohistochemistry of oncogene expression was performed on two separate archived paraffin tumor blocks for each patient, with normal lung as control. All analyses were blinded and included Kaplan-Meier survival estimates with Cox proportional hazards regression modeling. Data, including immunohistochemistry, were complete for all 271 patients. Actual 5-year survival was 63% and actuarial 10-year survival was 58%. Significant univariate predictors (P < 0.05) of early recurrence and cancer-death were: male sex; the presence of symptoms; chest pain; type of cough; hemoptysis; tumor size > 3 cm diameter (T2); poor differentiation; vascular invasion; erbB-2 expression; p53 expression; and a higher KI-67 proliferation index (> 5%). An additive oncogene expression curve demonstrated a 5-year survival of 72% for 136 patients without p53 or erbB-2, 58% for 108 patients who expressed either oncogene, and 38% for 27 who expressed both (P < 0.001).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Metabolic rewiring in cancer cells overexpressing the glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper protein (GILZ): Activation of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and sensitization to oxidative cell death induced by mitochondrial targeted drugs.

    PubMed

    André, Fanny; Trinh, Anne; Balayssac, Stéphane; Maboudou, Patrice; Dekiouk, Salim; Malet-Martino, Myriam; Quesnel, Bruno; Idziorek, Thierry; Kluza, Jérome; Marchetti, Philippe

    2017-04-01

    Cancer cell metabolism is largely controlled by oncogenic signals and nutrient availability. Here, we highlighted that the glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ), an intracellular protein influencing many signaling pathways, reprograms cancer cell metabolism to promote proliferation. We provided evidence that GILZ overexpression induced a significant increase of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation as evidenced by the augmentation in basal respiration, ATP-linked respiration as well as respiratory capacity. Pharmacological inhibition of glucose, glutamine and fatty acid oxidation reduced the activation of GILZ-induced mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. At glycolysis level, GILZ-overexpressing cells enhanced the expression of glucose transporters in their plasmatic membrane and showed higher glycolytic reserve. (1)H NMR metabolites quantification showed an up-regulation of amino acid biosynthesis. The GILZ-induced metabolic reprograming is present in various cancer cell lines regardless of their driver mutations status and is associated with higher proliferation rates persisting under metabolic stress conditions. Interestingly, high levels of OXPHOS made GILZ-overexpressing cells vulnerable to cell death induced by mitochondrial pro-oxidants. Altogether, these data indicate that GILZ reprograms cancer metabolism towards mitochondrial OXPHOS and sensitizes cancer cells to mitochondria-targeted drugs with pro-oxidant activities.

  10. Role of programmed cell death in development.

    PubMed

    Ranganath, R M; Nagashree, N R

    2001-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is an integral part of both animal and plant development. In animals, model systems such as Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, and mice have shown a general cell death profile of induction, caspase mediation, cell death, and phagocytosis. Tremendous strides have been made in cell death research in animals in the past decade. The ordering of the C. elegans genes Ced-3, 4 and 9, identification of caspase-activated DNase that degrades nuclear DNA during PCD, identification of signal transduction modules involving caspases as well as the caspase-independent pathway, and the involvement of mitochondria are some of the findings of immense value in understanding animal PCDs. Similarly, the caspase inactivation mechanisms of infecting viruses to stall host cell death give a new dimension to the viral infection process. However, plant cell death profiles provide an entirely different scenario. The presence of a cell wall that cannot be phagocytosed, absence of the hallmarks of animal PCDs such as DNA laddering, formation of apoptotic bodies, a cell-death-specific nuclease, a biochemical machinery of killer enzymes such as caspases all point to novel ways of cell elimination. Large gaps in our understanding of plant cell death have prompted speculative inferences and comparisons with animal cell death mechanisms. This paper deals with both animals and plants for a holistic view on cell death in eukaryotes.

  11. Death receptors as targets for anti-cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Papenfuss, Kerstin; Cordier, Stefanie M; Walczak, Henning

    2008-01-01

    Human tumour cells are characterized by their ability to avoid the normal regulatory mechanisms of cell growth, division and death. The classical chemotherapy aims to kill tumour cells by causing DNA damage-induced apoptosis. However, as many tumour cells posses mutations in intracellular apoptosis-sensing molecules like p53, they are not capable of inducing apoptosis on their own and are therefore resistant to chemotherapy. With the discovery of the death receptors the opportunity arose to directly trigger apoptosis from the outside of tumour cells, thereby circumventing chemotherapeutic resistance. Death receptors belong to the tumour necrosis factor receptor superfamily, with tumour necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-1, CD95 and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand-R1 and -R2 being the most prominent members. This review covers the current knowledge about these four death receptors, summarizes pre-clinical approaches engaging these death receptors in anti-cancer therapy and also gives an overview about their application in clinical trials conducted to date. PMID:19210756

  12. Anticancer metal drugs and immunogenic cell death.

    PubMed

    Terenzi, Alessio; Pirker, Christine; Keppler, Bernhard K; Berger, Walter

    2016-12-01

    Conventional chemotherapeutics, but also innovative precision anticancer compounds, are commonly perceived to target primarily the cancer cell compartment. However, recently it was discovered that some of these compounds can also exert immunomodulatory activities which might be exploited to synergistically enhance their anticancer effects. One specific phenomenon of the interplay between chemotherapy and the anticancer immune response is the so-called "immunogenic cell death" (ICD). ICD was discovered based on a vaccination effect exerted by cancer cells dying from pretreatment with certain chemotherapeutics, termed ICD inducers, in syngeneic transplantation mouse models. Interestingly, only a minority of drugs is able to trigger ICD without a clear-cut relation to chemical structures or their primary modes-of-action. Nevertheless, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress are clearly linked to ICD. With regard to metal drugs, oxaliplatin but not cisplatin is considered a bona fide ICD inducer. Taken into account that several experimental metal compounds are efficient ROS and ER stress mediators, presence of potent ICD inducers within the plethora of novel metal complexes seems feasible and has occasionally been reported. In the light of recent successes in cancer immunotherapy, here we review existing literature regarding anticancer metal drugs and ICD induction. We recommend a more profound investigation of the immunogenic features of experimental anticancer metal drugs.

  13. MAPK signaling mediates sinomenine hydrochloride-induced human breast cancer cell death via both reactive oxygen species-dependent and -independent pathways: an in vitro and in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Li, X; Wang, K; Ren, Y; Zhang, L; Tang, X-J; Zhang, H-M; Zhao, C-Q; Liu, P-J; Zhang, J-M; He, J-J

    2014-01-01

    Sinomenine, the main alkaloid extracted from the medicinal plant Sinomenium acutum, is known for its anti-inflammatory effects. Recent studies have suggested its anti-cancer effect in synovial sarcoma, lung cancer and hepatic cancer. However, the underlying molecular mechanism for its anti-cancer effect still remains unclear. This study investigated the anti-tumor activity of sinomenine hydrochloride (SH), a hydrochloride form of sinomenine, in human breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. We found that SH potently inhibited cell viability of a broad panel of breast cancer cell lines. Two representative breast cancer cell lines, namely ER(−)/PR(−) MDA-MB-231 and ER(+)/PR(+) MCF-7, were used for further investigation. The results showed that SH induced G1/S cell cycle arrest, caused apoptosis and induced ATM/Chk2- and ATR/Chk1-mediated DNA-damage response in MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7. The anti-cancer effect of SH was regulated by increased expression levels of p-ERK, p-JNK and p-38 MAPK. Further studies showed that SH resulted in an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inhibition of ROS by N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) almost blocked SH-induced DNA damage but only mitigated SH-induced MAPK expression changes, suggesting that both ROS-dependent and -independent pathways were involved in MAPK-mediated SH-induced breast cancer cell death. The in vivo study demonstrated that SH effectively inhibited tumor growth without showing significant toxicity. In conclusion, SH induced breast cancer cell death through ROS-dependent and -independent pathways with an upregulation of MAPKs, indicating that SH may be a potential anti-tumor drug for breast cancer treatment. PMID:25077542

  14. MAPK signaling mediates sinomenine hydrochloride-induced human breast cancer cell death via both reactive oxygen species-dependent and -independent pathways: an in vitro and in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Wang, K; Ren, Y; Zhang, L; Tang, X-J; Zhang, H-M; Zhao, C-Q; Liu, P-J; Zhang, J-M; He, J-J

    2014-07-31

    Sinomenine, the main alkaloid extracted from the medicinal plant Sinomenium acutum, is known for its anti-inflammatory effects. Recent studies have suggested its anti-cancer effect in synovial sarcoma, lung cancer and hepatic cancer. However, the underlying molecular mechanism for its anti-cancer effect still remains unclear. This study investigated the anti-tumor activity of sinomenine hydrochloride (SH), a hydrochloride form of sinomenine, in human breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. We found that SH potently inhibited cell viability of a broad panel of breast cancer cell lines. Two representative breast cancer cell lines, namely ER(-)/PR(-) MDA-MB-231 and ER(+)/PR(+) MCF-7, were used for further investigation. The results showed that SH induced G1/S cell cycle arrest, caused apoptosis and induced ATM/Chk2- and ATR/Chk1-mediated DNA-damage response in MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7. The anti-cancer effect of SH was regulated by increased expression levels of p-ERK, p-JNK and p-38 MAPK. Further studies showed that SH resulted in an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inhibition of ROS by N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) almost blocked SH-induced DNA damage but only mitigated SH-induced MAPK expression changes, suggesting that both ROS-dependent and -independent pathways were involved in MAPK-mediated SH-induced breast cancer cell death. The in vivo study demonstrated that SH effectively inhibited tumor growth without showing significant toxicity. In conclusion, SH induced breast cancer cell death through ROS-dependent and -independent pathways with an upregulation of MAPKs, indicating that SH may be a potential anti-tumor drug for breast cancer treatment.

  15. Adjuvant Cationic Liposomes Presenting MPL and IL-12 Induce Cell Death, Suppress Tumor Growth, and Alter the Cellular Phenotype of Tumors in a Murine Model of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) process and present antigens to T lymphocytes, inducing potent immune responses when encountered in association with activating signals, such as pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Using the 4T1 murine model of breast cancer, cationic liposomes containing monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL) and interleukin (IL)-12 were administered by intratumoral injection. Combination multivalent presentation of the Toll-like receptor-4 ligand MPL and cytotoxic 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trmethylammonium-propane lipids induced cell death, decreased cellular proliferation, and increased serum levels of IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. The addition of recombinant IL-12 further suppressed tumor growth and increased expression of IL-1β, TNF-α, and interferon-γ. IL-12 also increased the percentage of cytolytic T cells, DC, and F4/80+ macrophages in the tumor. While single agent therapy elevated levels of nitric oxide synthase 3-fold above basal levels in the tumor, combination therapy with MPL cationic liposomes and IL-12 stimulated a 7-fold increase, supporting the observed cell cycle arrest (loss of Ki-67 expression) and apoptosis (TUNEL positive). In mice bearing dual tumors, the growth of distal, untreated tumors mirrored that of liposome-treated tumors, supporting the presence of a systemic immune response. PMID:25179345

  16. Tetrandrine induces cell death in SAS human oral cancer cells through caspase activation-dependent apoptosis and LC3-I and LC3-II activation-dependent autophagy.

    PubMed

    Huang, An-Cheng; Lien, Jin-Cherng; Lin, Meng-Wei; Yang, Jai-Sing; Wu, Ping-Ping; Chang, Shu-Jen; Lai, Tung-Yuan

    2013-08-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that autophagy is associated with cancer development. Thus, agents to induce autophagy could be employed in some cases for the treatment of cancer. Our results showed that tetrandrine significantly decreased the viability of SAS cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Tetrandrine induced nuclear condensation, demonstrated by DAPI staining. The early events in apoptosis analysed by Annexin V/PI staining indicated that the percentage of cells staining positive for Annexin V was slightly increased in SAS cells with tetrandrine treatment but was much lower following bafilomycin A1 pre-treatment. Tetrandrine caused AVO and MDC induction in SAS cells in a concentration-dependent manner by fluorescence microscopy. Tetrandrine also caused LC-3 expression in SAS cells in a time-dependent manner. Our results show that tetrandrine treatment induced the levels of cleaved caspase-3 in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Tetrandrine treatment induced the levels of LC-3 II, Atg-5, beclin-1, p-S6, p-ULK, p-mTOR, p-Akt (S473) and raptor. Tetrandrine decreased cell viability, but bafilomycin A1, 3-MA, chloroquine and NAC protected tetrandrine-treated SAS cells against decrease of cell viability. Atg-5, beclin-1 siRNA decreased tetrandrine-induced cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved PARP in SAS cells and protected tetrandrine-treated SAS cells against decrease in cell viability. Chloroquine, NAC and bafilomycin A1 also decreased tetrandrine-induced cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved PARP in SAS cells. Our results indicate the tetrandrine induces apoptosis and autophagy of SAS human cancer cells via caspase-dependent and LC3-I and LC3-II‑dependent pathways.

  17. Molecular definitions of cell death subroutines: recommendations of the Nomenclature Committee on Cell Death 2012

    PubMed Central

    Galluzzi, L; Vitale, I; Abrams, J M; Alnemri, E S; Baehrecke, E H; Blagosklonny, M V; Dawson, T M; Dawson, V L; El-Deiry, W S; Fulda, S; Gottlieb, E; Green, D R; Hengartner, M O; Kepp, O; Knight, R A; Kumar, S; Lipton, S A; Lu, X; Madeo, F; Malorni, W; Mehlen, P; Nuñez, G; Peter, M E; Piacentini, M; Rubinsztein, D C; Shi, Y; Simon, H-U; Vandenabeele, P; White, E; Yuan, J; Zhivotovsky, B; Melino, G; Kroemer, G

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, the Nomenclature Committee on Cell Death (NCCD) proposed a set of recommendations for the definition of distinct cell death morphologies and for the appropriate use of cell death-related terminology, including ‘apoptosis', ‘necrosis' and ‘mitotic catastrophe'. In view of the substantial progress in the biochemical and genetic exploration of cell death, time has come to switch from morphological to molecular definitions of cell death modalities. Here we propose a functional classification of cell death subroutines that applies to both in vitro and in vivo settings and includes extrinsic apoptosis, caspase-dependent or -independent intrinsic apoptosis, regulated necrosis, autophagic cell death and mitotic catastrophe. Moreover, we discuss the utility of expressions indicating additional cell death modalities. On the basis of the new, revised NCCD classification, cell death subroutines are defined by a series of precise, measurable biochemical features. PMID:21760595

  18. Yeast Genetics for Delineating Bax/Bc1 Pathway of Cell Death Regulation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-07-01

    Two novel human genes were cloned that inhibit cell death and that therefore may contribute to breast cancer by preventing the normal cell turnover...Bl-1 and Bl-2 for Bax-inhibitors 1 and 2, may provide insights into how to restore the function of Bax in breast cancer which has reduced levels of this cell death promoting protein.

  19. BID links ferroptosis to mitochondrial cell death pathways.

    PubMed

    Neitemeier, Sandra; Jelinek, Anja; Laino, Vincenzo; Hoffmann, Lena; Eisenbach, Ina; Eying, Roman; Ganjam, Goutham K; Dolga, Amalia M; Oppermann, Sina; Culmsee, Carsten

    2017-03-09

    Ferroptosis has been defined as an oxidative and iron-dependent pathway of regulated cell death that is distinct from caspase-dependent apoptosis and established pathways of death receptor-mediated regulated necrosis. While emerging evidence linked features of ferroptosis induced e.g. by erastin-mediated inhibition of the Xc(-) system or inhibition of glutathione peroxidase 4 (Gpx4) to an increasing number of oxidative cell death paradigms in cancer cells, neurons or kidney cells, the biochemical pathways of oxidative cell death remained largely unclear. In particular, the role of mitochondrial damage in paradigms of ferroptosis needs further investigation. In the present study, we find that erastin-induced ferroptosis in neuronal cells was accompanied by BID transactivation to mitochondria, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, enhanced mitochondrial fragmentation and reduced ATP levels. These hallmarks of mitochondrial demise are also established features of oxytosis, a paradigm of cell death induced by Xc(-) inhibition by millimolar concentrations of glutamate. Bid knockout using CRISPR/Cas9 approaches preserved mitochondrial integrity and function, and mediated neuroprotective effects against both, ferroptosis and oxytosis. Furthermore, the BID-inhibitor BI-6c9 inhibited erastin-induced ferroptosis, and, in turn, the ferroptosis inhibitors ferrostatin-1 and liproxstatin-1 prevented mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death in the paradigm of oxytosis. These findings show that mitochondrial transactivation of BID links ferroptosis to mitochondrial damage as the final execution step in this paradigm of oxidative cell death.

  20. Heme oxygenase-1 accelerates erastin-induced ferroptotic cell death.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Min-Young; Park, Eunhee; Lee, Seon-Jin; Chung, Su Wol

    2015-09-15

    The oncogenic RAS-selective lethal small molecule Erastin triggers a unique iron-dependent form of nonapoptotic cell death termed ferroptosis. Ferroptosis is dependent upon the production of intracellular iron-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS), but not other metals. However, key regulators remain unknown. The heme oxygenase (HO) is a major intracellular source of iron. In this study, the role of heme oxygenase in Erastin-triggered ferroptotic cancer cell death has been investigated. Zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP), a HO-1 inhibitor, prevented Erastin-triggered ferroptotic cancer cell death. Furthermore, Erastin induced the protein and mRNA levels of HO-1 in HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cells. HO-1+/+ and HO-1-/- fibroblast, HO-1 overexpression, and chycloheximide-treated experiments revealed that the expression of HO-1 has a decisive effects in Erastin-triggered cell death. Hemin and CO-releasing molecules (CORM) promote Erastin-induced ferroptotic cell death, not by biliverdin and bilirubin. In addition, hemin and CORM accelerate the HO-1 expression in the presence of Erastin and increase membranous lipid peroxidation. Thus, HO-1 is an essential enzyme for iron-dependent lipid peroxidation during ferroptotic cell death.

  1. Predictive Efficacy Biomarkers of Programmed Cell Death 1/Programmed Cell Death 1 Ligand Blockade Therapy.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xiao-Na; Fu, Li-Wu

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitors of immune check-point molecule, programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and its ligand, programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1) have attracted much attention in cancer immunotherapy recently due to their durable antitumor effects in various malignances, especially the advanced ones. Unfortunately, only a fraction of patients with advanced tumors could benefit from anti-PD-1/PD-L1 therapy, while others still worsened. The key to this point is that there are no efficient biomarkers for screening anti-PD-1/PD-L1-sensitive patients. In this review, we aim at summarizing the latest advances of anti-PD-1/PDL1 immunotherapy and the potential predictive efficacy biomarkers to provide evidences for identifying anti-PD-1/PDL1- sensitive patients. The present article also includes the patent review coverage on this topic.

  2. Cell biology. Metabolic control of cell death.

    PubMed

    Green, Douglas R; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kroemer, Guido

    2014-09-19

    Beyond their contribution to basic metabolism, the major cellular organelles, in particular mitochondria, can determine whether cells respond to stress in an adaptive or suicidal manner. Thus, mitochondria can continuously adapt their shape to changing bioenergetic demands as they are subjected to quality control by autophagy, or they can undergo a lethal permeabilization process that initiates apoptosis. Along similar lines, multiple proteins involved in metabolic circuitries, including oxidative phosphorylation and transport of metabolites across membranes, may participate in the regulated or catastrophic dismantling of organelles. Many factors that were initially characterized as cell death regulators are now known to physically or functionally interact with metabolic enzymes. Thus, several metabolic cues regulate the propensity of cells to activate self-destructive programs, in part by acting on nutrient sensors. This suggests the existence of "metabolic checkpoints" that dictate cell fate in response to metabolic fluctuations. Here, we discuss recent insights into the intersection between metabolism and cell death regulation that have major implications for the comprehension and manipulation of unwarranted cell loss.

  3. Apoptotic Cell Death and Inhibition of Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Pathway in Human Colon Cancer Cells by an Active Fraction (HS7) from Taiwanofungus camphoratus

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Chi-Tai; Yao, Chih-Jung; Yan, Jiann-Long; Chuang, Shuang-En; Lee, Liang-Ming; Chen, Chien-Ming; Yeh, Chuan-Feng; Li, Chi-Han; Lai, Gi-Ming

    2011-01-01

    Aberrant activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling plays an important role in the development of colon cancer. HS7 is an active fraction extracted from Taiwanofungus camphoratus, which had been widely used as complementary medicine for Taiwan cancer patients in the past decades. In this study, we demonstrated the effects of HS7 on the growth inhibition, apoptosis induction, and Wnt/β-catenin signaling suppression in human colon cancer cells. HS7 significantly inhibited proliferation of HT29, HCT116, and SW480 colon cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The apoptosis induction was evidenced by DNA fragmentation and subG1 accumulation, which was associated with increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, activation of caspase-3 and cleavage of PARP. By using Tcf-dependent luciferase activity assay, HS7 was found to inhibit the β-catenin/Tcf transcriptional activities. In addition, HS7 strongly suppressed the binding of Tcf complexes to its DNA-binding site shown in electrophoretic mobility shift assay. This inhibition was further confirmed by the decreased protein levels of Tcf-4 and β-catenin. The β-catenin/Tcf downstream target genes, such as survivin, c-myc, cyclin D1, MMP7, and MT1-MMP involved in apoptosis, invasion, and angiogenesis were also diminished as well. These results indicate that Taiwanofungus camphoratus may provide a benefit as integrative medicine for the treatment of colon cancer. PMID:21423639

  4. Apoptotic Cell Death and Inhibition of Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Pathway in Human Colon Cancer Cells by an Active Fraction (HS7) from Taiwanofungus camphoratus.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Chi-Tai; Yao, Chih-Jung; Yan, Jiann-Long; Chuang, Shuang-En; Lee, Liang-Ming; Chen, Chien-Ming; Yeh, Chuan-Feng; Li, Chi-Han; Lai, Gi-Ming

    2011-01-01

    Aberrant activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling plays an important role in the development of colon cancer. HS7 is an active fraction extracted from Taiwanofungus camphoratus, which had been widely used as complementary medicine for Taiwan cancer patients in the past decades. In this study, we demonstrated the effects of HS7 on the growth inhibition, apoptosis induction, and Wnt/β-catenin signaling suppression in human colon cancer cells. HS7 significantly inhibited proliferation of HT29, HCT116, and SW480 colon cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The apoptosis induction was evidenced by DNA fragmentation and subG1 accumulation, which was associated with increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, activation of caspase-3 and cleavage of PARP. By using Tcf-dependent luciferase activity assay, HS7 was found to inhibit the β-catenin/Tcf transcriptional activities. In addition, HS7 strongly suppressed the binding of Tcf complexes to its DNA-binding site shown in electrophoretic mobility shift assay. This inhibition was further confirmed by the decreased protein levels of Tcf-4 and β-catenin. The β-catenin/Tcf downstream target genes, such as survivin, c-myc, cyclin D1, MMP7, and MT1-MMP involved in apoptosis, invasion, and angiogenesis were also diminished as well. These results indicate that Taiwanofungus camphoratus may provide a benefit as integrative medicine for the treatment of colon cancer.

  5. Necrosis, and then stress induced necrosis-like cell death, but not apoptosis, should be the preferred cell death mode for chemotherapy: clearance of a few misconceptions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ju; Lou, Xiaomin; Jin, Longyu; Zhou, Rongjia; Liu, Siqi; Xu, Ningzhi; Liao, D. Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Cell death overarches carcinogenesis and is a center of cancer researches, especially therapy studies. There have been many nomenclatures on cell death, but only three cell death modes are genuine, i.e. apoptosis, necrosis and stress-induced cell death (SICD). Like apoptosis, SICD is programmed. Like necrosis, SICD is a pathological event and may trigger regeneration and scar formation. Therefore, SICD has subtypes of stress-induced apoptosis-like cell death (SIaLCD) and stress-induced necrosis-like cell death (SInLCD). Whereas apoptosis removes redundant but healthy cells, SICD removes useful but ill or damaged cells. Many studies on cell death involve cancer tissues that resemble parasites in the host patients, which is a complicated system as it involves immune clearance of the alien cancer cells by the host. Cancer resembles an evolutionarily lower-level organism having a weaker apoptosis potential and poorer DNA repair mechanisms. Hence, targeting apoptosis for cancer therapy, i.e. killing via SIaLCD, will be less efficacious and more toxic. On the other hand, necrosis of cancer cells releases cellular debris and components to stimulate immune function, thus counteracting therapy-caused immune suppression and making necrosis better than SIaLCD for chemo drug development. PMID:25594039

  6. Achyranthes aspera Root Extracts Induce Human Colon Cancer Cell (COLO-205) Death by Triggering the Mitochondrial Apoptosis Pathway and S Phase Cell Cycle Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Shagun; Tandon, Simran

    2014-01-01

    Achyranthes aspera (AA) has been used traditionally for the cure of various disorders. However, the action of root extracts of AA as anticancer agent and its cellular mechanism remain unclear. The aim was to screen the antitumor effect of ethanolic (EAA) and aqueous (AAA) root extracts on the growth of colon cancer COLO-205 cells by testing their cytotoxicity, followed by their effect on clonogenicity, migration, and induction of apoptosis. Mechanisms leading to apoptosis and cell cycle arrest were also investigated by expression studies of caspase-9, caspase-3, Bax, Bcl-2, p16, p21, and p27 genes, followed by flow cytometric analysis for cell cycle distribution. Cytotoxicity screening of AA extracts indicated greater cytotoxic activity of AAA extract against COLO-205 cells. A series of events marked by apoptosis revealed loss of cell viability, chromatin condensation, and DNA fragmentation in AAA treated cells to a greater extent. The mRNA expression levels of caspase-9, caspase-3, Bax, p16, p21, and p27 were markedly increased in the AAA treated cells, along with decreased Bcl-2 expression. The cell cycle arrest at S phase was detected by flow cytometric analysis after treatment with AAA. Overall the study signifies the aqueous extracts as a promising therapeutic candidate against cancer. PMID:25401123

  7. Colon Cancer Rates, Deaths Drop in Americans Over 50

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_163856.html Colon Cancer Rates, Deaths Drop in Americans Over 50 Report suggests higher ... over 50 fell 32 percent since 2000, while deaths from the disease fell by 34 percent. Those ...

  8. Anti program death-1/anti program death-ligand 1 in digestive cancers

    PubMed Central

    de Guillebon, Eléonore; Roussille, Pauline; Frouin, Eric; Tougeron, David

    2015-01-01

    Human tumors tend to activate the immune system regulatory checkpoints as a means of escaping immunosurveillance. For instance, interaction between program death-1 (PD-1) and program death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) will lead the activated T cell to a state of anergy. PD-L1 is upregulated on a wide range of cancer cells. Anti-PD-1 and anti-PD-L1 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), called immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs), have consequently been designed to restore T cell activity. Accumulating data are in favor of an association between PD-L1 expression in tumors and response to treatment. A PD-L1 expression is present in 30% to 50% of digestive cancers. Multiple anti-PD-1 (nivolumab, pembrolizumab) and anti-PD-L1 mAbs (MPDL3280A, Medi4736) are under evaluation in digestive cancers. Preliminary results in metastatic gastric cancer with pembrolizumab are highly promising and phase II will start soon. In metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC), a phase III trial of MPDL3280A as maintenance therapy will shortly be initiated. Trials are also ongoing in metastatic CRC with high immune T cell infiltration (i.e., microsatellite instability). Major challenges are ahead in order to determine how, when and for which patients we should use these ICIs. New radiologic criteria to evaluate tumor response to ICIs are awaiting prospective validation. The optimal therapeutic sequence and association with cytotoxic chemotherapy needs to be established. Finally, biomarker identification will be crucial to selection of patients likely to benefit from ICIs. PMID:26306141

  9. Anti program death-1/anti program death-ligand 1 in digestive cancers.

    PubMed

    de Guillebon, Eléonore; Roussille, Pauline; Frouin, Eric; Tougeron, David

    2015-08-15

    Human tumors tend to activate the immune system regulatory checkpoints as a means of escaping immunosurveillance. For instance, interaction between program death-1 (PD-1) and program death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) will lead the activated T cell to a state of anergy. PD-L1 is upregulated on a wide range of cancer cells. Anti-PD-1 and anti-PD-L1 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), called immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs), have consequently been designed to restore T cell activity. Accumulating data are in favor of an association between PD-L1 expression in tumors and response to treatment. A PD-L1 expression is present in 30% to 50% of digestive cancers. Multiple anti-PD-1 (nivolumab, pembrolizumab) and anti-PD-L1 mAbs (MPDL3280A, Medi4736) are under evaluation in digestive cancers. Preliminary results in metastatic gastric cancer with pembrolizumab are highly promising and phase II will start soon. In metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC), a phase III trial of MPDL3280A as maintenance therapy will shortly be initiated. Trials are also ongoing in metastatic CRC with high immune T cell infiltration (i.e., microsatellite instability). Major challenges are ahead in order to determine how, when and for which patients we should use these ICIs. New radiologic criteria to evaluate tumor response to ICIs are awaiting prospective validation. The optimal therapeutic sequence and association with cytotoxic chemotherapy needs to be established. Finally, biomarker identification will be crucial to selection of patients likely to benefit from ICIs.

  10. Cell Death Signaling and Anticancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Vitale, Ilio; Vacchelli, Erika; Kroemer, Guido

    2011-01-01

    For a long time, it was commonly believed that efficient anticancer regimens would either trigger the apoptotic demise of tumor cells or induce a permanent arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle, i.e., senescence. The recent discovery that necrosis can occur in a regulated fashion and the increasingly more precise characterization of the underlying molecular mechanisms have raised great interest, as non-apoptotic pathways might be instrumental to circumvent the resistance of cancer cells to conventional, pro-apoptotic therapeutic regimens. Moreover, it has been shown that some anticancer regimens engage lethal signaling cascades that can ignite multiple oncosuppressive mechanisms, including apoptosis, necrosis, and senescence. Among these signaling pathways is mitotic catastrophe, whose role as a bona fide cell death mechanism has recently been reconsidered. Thus, anticancer regimens get ever more sophisticated, and often distinct strategies are combined to maximize efficacy and minimize side effects. In this review, we will discuss the importance of apoptosis, necrosis, and mitotic catastrophe in the response of tumor cells to the most common clinically employed and experimental anticancer agents. PMID:22655227

  11. Cell death signaling and anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Vitale, Ilio; Vacchelli, Erika; Kroemer, Guido

    2011-01-01

    For a long time, it was commonly believed that efficient anticancer regimens would either trigger the apoptotic demise of tumor cells or induce a permanent arrest in the G(1) phase of the cell cycle, i.e., senescence. The recent discovery that necrosis can occur in a regulated fashion and the increasingly more precise characterization of the underlying molecular mechanisms have raised great interest, as non-apoptotic pathways might be instrumental to circumvent the resistance of cancer cells to conventional, pro-apoptotic therapeutic regimens. Moreover, it has been shown that some anticancer regimens engage lethal signaling cascades that can ignite multiple oncosuppressive mechanisms, including apoptosis, necrosis, and senescence. Among these signaling pathways is mitotic catastrophe, whose role as a bona fide cell death mechanism has recently been reconsidered. Thus, anticancer regimens get ever more sophisticated, and often distinct strategies are combined to maximize efficacy and minimize side effects. In this review, we will discuss the importance of apoptosis, necrosis, and mitotic catastrophe in the response of tumor cells to the most common clinically employed and experimental anticancer agents.

  12. Predicting lung cancer deaths from smoking prevalence data.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Volker; Ng, Nawi; Tesfaye, Fikru; Becher, Heiko

    2011-11-01

    Reliable data on lung cancer burden is not available from most developing countries as cancer registration is lacking. In a previously proposed model to estimate lung cancer deaths in those countries using smoking prevalence data, we estimated the current yearly number of lung cancer deaths in Ethiopia as 3356, a figure far above the WHO estimate of 1343 and the GLOBOCAN of 748. Our aim was to further develop and validate our estimation procedure. We included additional data on risk estimates for lung cancer mortality of ex-smokers and an approximation of duration of smoking into our model and reanalysed study results on non-smoker mortality, thus building two improved models. For validation the number of lung cancer deaths in Germany (2006), the UK (2006), Canada (2004), and Utah, USA (2000) were estimated based on all three models and compared to the observed number of deaths in these countries. We found that the refined model with a modified estimate of lung cancer mortality rates in non-smokers and a more detailed incorporation of smoking dose categories estimates rather well the observed lung cancer deaths in the above countries. With this model, the updated estimate of yearly lung cancer deaths in Ethiopia is 2946 deaths, close to the previous reported estimate. If Ethiopian lung cancer mortality rates in never-smokers and smoking relative risks are the same as in industrialised countries, our models suggests that WHO lung cancer deaths may be underestimated in Ethiopia.

  13. Insights into the mechanism of cell death induced by saporin delivered into cancer cells by an antibody fusion protein targeting the transferrin receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Daniels-Wells, Tracy R.; Helguera, Gustavo; Rodríguez, José A.; Leoh, Lai Sum; Erb, Michael A.; Diamante, Graciel; Casero, David; Pellegrini, Matteo; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel; Penichet, Manuel L.

    2012-01-01

    We previously developed an antibody-avidin fusion protein (ch128.1Av) that targets the human transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) and exhibits direct cytotoxicity against malignant B cells in an iron-dependent manner. ch128.1Av is also a delivery system and its conjugation with biotinylated saporin (b-SO6), a plant ribosome-inactivating toxin, results in a dramatic iron-independent cytotoxicity, both in malignant cells that are sensitive or resistant to ch128.1Av alone, in which the toxin effectively inhibits protein synthesis and triggers caspase activation. We have now found that the ch128.1Av/b-SO6 complex induces a transcriptional response consistent with oxidative stress and DNA damage, a response that is not observed with ch128.1Av alone. Furthermore, we show that the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine partially blocks saporin-induced apoptosis suggesting that oxidative stress contributes to DNA damage and ultimately saporin-induced cell death. Interestingly, the toxin was detected in nuclear extracts by immunoblotting, suggesting the possibility that saporin might induce direct DNA damage. However, confocal microscopy did not show a clear and consistent pattern of intranuclear localization. Finally, using the long-term culture-initiating cell assay we found that ch128.1Av/b-SO6 is not toxic to normal human hematopoietic stem cells suggesting that this critical cell population would be preserved in therapeutic interventions using this immunotoxin. PMID:23085102

  14. Insights into the mechanism of cell death induced by saporin delivered into cancer cells by an antibody fusion protein targeting the transferrin receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Daniels-Wells, Tracy R; Helguera, Gustavo; Rodríguez, José A; Leoh, Lai Sum; Erb, Michael A; Diamante, Graciel; Casero, David; Pellegrini, Matteo; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel; Penichet, Manuel L

    2013-02-01

    We previously developed an antibody-avidin fusion protein (ch128.1Av) that targets the human transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) and exhibits direct cytotoxicity against malignant B cells in an iron-dependent manner. ch128.1Av is also a delivery system and its conjugation with biotinylated saporin (b-SO6), a plant ribosome-inactivating toxin, results in a dramatic iron-independent cytotoxicity, both in malignant cells that are sensitive or resistant to ch128.1Av alone, in which the toxin effectively inhibits protein synthesis and triggers caspase activation. We have now found that the ch128.1Av/b-SO6 complex induces a transcriptional response consistent with oxidative stress and DNA damage, a response that is not observed with ch128.1Av alone. Furthermore, we show that the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine partially blocks saporin-induced apoptosis suggesting that oxidative stress contributes to DNA damage and ultimately saporin-induced cell death. Interestingly, the toxin was detected in nuclear extracts by immunoblotting, suggesting the possibility that saporin might induce direct DNA damage. However, confocal microscopy did not show a clear and consistent pattern of intranuclear localization. Finally, using the long-term culture-initiating cell assay we found that ch128.1Av/b-SO6 is not toxic to normal human hematopoietic stem cells suggesting that this critical cell population would be preserved in therapeutic interventions using this immunotoxin.

  15. U.S. Cancer Deaths Decline Over Three Decades

    MedlinePlus

    ... explanations for high or increasing rates of cancer deaths in particular regions of the United States, but these factors need further investigation, Murray said. Known cancer risk factors -- smoking, diet and obesity, among others -- combined with poor ...

  16. Skin Cancer Cream Linked to 5 Dog Deaths:

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163145.html Skin Cancer Cream Linked to 5 Dog Deaths: FDA Even ingesting ... have died from exposure to a skin cancer cream prescribed for people, according to the U.S. Food ...

  17. The factors contributing to death anxiety in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Gonen, Gokcen; Kaymak, Semra Ulusoy; Cankurtaran, Eylem Sahin; Karslioglu, Ersin Hatice; Ozalp, Elvan; Soygur, Haldun

    2012-01-01

    Suffering comes in many ways for patients confronting cancer. One of these is an unspecifiable fear about death, which is an existential issue. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between death anxiety and its correlates in cancer patients. Seventy cancer patients were assessed using SCID-I, Templer's Death Anxiety Scale, the Hospital Anxiety (A) and Depression (D) Scale, the Distress Thermometer, the Visual Analogue Scale for pain (VAS), the Global Assessment of Functioning, and Glock and Stark's Dimensions of Religious Commitment scales, and these assessments were compared between cancer patients with and without death anxiety. Multiple regression analysis was conducted after correlation analysis between death anxiety and sociodemographic and clinical variables. Axis I psychiatric diagnosis, pain scores, and negative believes about what will happen after death were found to be higher in patients having death anxiety than patients not having death anxiety. Also life expectancy was perceived as shortened in patients with death anxiety. Death anxiety was associated with anxiety, depressive symptoms, and beliefs about what will happen after death. In conclusion, death anxiety could not be regarded as a natural consequence of having cancer; it is associated with the unresolved psychological and physical distress.

  18. EM23, a natural sesquiterpene lactone, targets thioredoxin reductase to activate JNK and cell death pathways in human cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wen-Bo; Wang, Guo-Cai; Ma, Dong-Lei; Wong, Nai Sum; Xiao, Hao; Liu, Qiu-Ying; Zhou, Guang-Xiong; Li, Yao-Lan; Li, Man-Mei; Wang, Yi-Fei; Liu, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Sesquiterpene lactones (SLs) are the active constituents of a variety of medicinal plants and found to have potential anticancer activities. However, the intracellular molecular targets of SLs and the underlying molecular mechanisms have not been well elucidated. In this study, we observed that EM23, a natural SL, exhibited anti-cancer activity in human cervical cancer cell lines by inducing apoptosis as indicated by caspase 3 activation, XIAP downregulation and mitochondrial dysfunction. Mechanistic studies indicated that EM23-induced apoptosis was mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the knockdown of thioredoxin (Trx) or thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) resulted in a reduction in apoptosis. EM23 attenuated TrxR activity by alkylation of C-terminal redox-active site Sec498 of TrxR and inhibited the expression levels of Trx/TrxR to facilitate ROS accumulation. Furthermore, inhibition of Trx/TrxR system resulted in the dissociation of ASK1 from Trx and the downstream activation of JNK. Pretreatment with ASK1/JNK inhibitors partially rescued cells from EM23-induced apoptosis. Additionally, EM23 inhibited Akt/mTOR pathway and induced autophagy, which was observed to be proapoptotic and mediated by ROS. Together, these results reveal a potential molecular mechanism for the apoptotic induction observed with SL compound EM23, and emphasize its putative role as a therapeutic agent for human cervical cancer. PMID:26758418

  19. Detecting cell death with optical coherence tomography and envelope statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, Golnaz; Yang, Victor X. D.; Czarnota, Gregory J.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2011-02-01

    Currently no standard clinical or preclinical noninvasive method exists to monitor cell death based on morphological changes at the cellular level. In our past work we have demonstrated that quantitative high frequency ultrasound imaging can detect cell death in vitro and in vivo. In this study we apply quantitative methods previously used with high frequency ultrasound to optical coherence tomography (OCT) to detect cell death. The ultimate goal of this work is to use these methods for optically-based clinical and preclinical cancer treatment monitoring. Optical coherence tomography data were acquired from acute myeloid leukemia cells undergoing three modes of cell death. Significant increases in integrated backscatter were observed for cells undergoing apoptosis and mitotic arrest, while necrotic cells induced a decrease. These changes appear to be linked to structural changes observed in histology obtained from the cell samples. Signal envelope statistics were analyzed from fittings of the generalized gamma distribution to histograms of envelope intensities. The parameters from this distribution demonstrated sensitivities to morphological changes in the cell samples. These results indicate that OCT integrated backscatter and first order envelope statistics can be used to detect and potentially differentiate between modes of cell death in vitro.

  20. Statins, Bcl-2, and apoptosis: cell death or cell protection?

    PubMed

    Wood, W Gibson; Igbavboa, Urule; Muller, Walter E; Eckert, Gunter P

    2013-10-01

    Statins have proven their effectiveness in the treatment of cardiovascular disease. This class of drugs has also attracted attention as a potential treatment for dissimilar diseases such as certain types of cancers and neurodegenerative diseases. What appears to be a contradiction is that, in the case of cancer, it has been suggested that statins increase apoptosis and alter levels of Bcl-2 family members (e.g., reduce Bcl-2 and increase Bax), whereas studies mainly using noncancerous cells report opposite effects. This review examined studies reporting on the effects of statins on Bcl-2 family members, apoptosis, cell death, and cell protection. Much, but not all, of the evidence supporting the pro-apoptotic effects of statins is based on data in cancer cell lines and the use of relatively high drug concentrations. Studies indicating an anti-apoptotic effect of statins are fewer in number and generally used much lower drug concentrations and normal cells. Those conclusions are not definitive, and certainly, there is a need for additional research to determine if statin repositioning is justified for noncardiovascular diseases.

  1. Curcumin-loaded nanoparticles induce apoptotic cell death through regulation of the function of MDR1 and reactive oxygen species in cisplatin-resistant CAR human oral cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Pei-Ying; Peng, Shu-Fen; Lee, Chao-Ying; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Tsai, Shih-Chang; Shieh, Tzong-Ming; Wu, Tian-Shung; Tu, Ming-Gene; Chen, Michael Yuanchien; Yang, Jai-Sing

    2013-10-01

    Curcumin is a polyphenolic compound which possesses anticancer potential. It has been shown to induce cell death in a variety of cancer cells, however, its effect on CAL27‑cisplatin-resistant human oral cancer cells (CAR cells) has not been elucidated to date. The low water solubility of curcumin which leads to poor bioavailability, however, has been highlighted as a major limiting factor. In this study, we utilized water-soluble PLGA curcumin nanoparticles (Cur-NPs), and investigated the effects of Cur-NPs on CAR cells. The results showed Cur-NPs induced apoptosis in CAR cells but exhibited low cytotoxicity to normal human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) and normal human oral keratinocytes (OKs). Cur-NPs triggered DNA concentration, fragmentation and subsequent apoptosis. Compared to untreated CAR cells, a more detectable amount of Calcein-AM accumulation was found inside the treated CAR cells. Cur-NPs suppressed the protein and mRNA expression levels of MDR1. Both the activity and the expression levels of caspase-3 and caspase-9 were elevated in the treated CAR cells. The Cur-NP-triggered apoptosis was blocked by specific inhibitors of pan-caspase (z-VAD-fmk), caspase-3 (z-DEVD-fmk), caspase-9 (z-LEHD-fmk) and antioxidant agent (N-acetylcysteine; NAC). Cur-NPs increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, upregulated the protein expression levels of cleaved caspase-3/caspase-9, cytochrome c, Apaf-1, AIF, Bax and downregulated the protein levels of Bcl-2. Our results suggest that Cur-NPs triggered the intrinsic apoptotic pathway through regulating the function of multiple drug resistance protein 1 (MDR1) and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in CAR cells. Cur-NPs could be potentially efficacious in the treatment of cisplatin-resistant human oral cancer.

  2. Lung cancer - small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC are ...

  3. TRAIL death receptors and cancer therapeutics

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Ying Sheikh, M. Saeed

    2007-11-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) also known as Apo2L is an apoptotic molecule that belongs to the tumor necrosis factor superfamily of cytokines. It mediates its apoptotic effects via its cognate death receptors including DR4 and DR5. Agonistic monoclonal antibodies have also been developed that selectively activate TRAIL death receptors to mediate apoptosis. Multiple clinically relevant agents also upregulate the expression of TRAIL death receptors, and cooperate with TRAIL as well as DR4 and DR5-specific agonistic antibodies to exhibit tumor cell killing. TRAIL is currently in phase I clinical trials, whereas DR4 and DR5-specific agonistic antibodies have been tested in phase I and II studies. Thus, TRAIL has clearly distinguished itself from the other family members including TNF-alpha and FasL both of which could not make it to the clinic due to their toxic nature. It is therefore, evident that the future of TRAIL-based therapeutic approaches looks brighter.

  4. Programmed cell death 50 (and beyond)

    PubMed Central

    Lockshin, R A

    2016-01-01

    In the 50 years since we described cell death as ‘programmed,' we have come far, thanks to the efforts of many brilliant researchers, and we now understand the mechanics, the biochemistry, and the genetics of many of the ways in which cells can die. This knowledge gives us the resources to alter the fates of many cells. However, not all cells respond similarly to the same stimulus, in either sensitivity to the stimulus or timing of the response. Cells prevented from dying through one pathway may survive, survive in a crippled state, or die following a different pathway. To fully capitalize on our knowledge of cell death, we need to understand much more about how cells are targeted to die and what aspects of the history, metabolism, or resources available to individual cells determine how each cell reaches and crosses the threshold at which it commits to death. PMID:26564398

  5. Deaths in Canada from lung cancer due to involuntary smoking.

    PubMed Central

    Wigle, D T; Collishaw, N E; Kirkbride, J; Mao, Y

    1987-01-01

    Recently published evidence indicates that involuntary smoking causes an increased risk of lung cancer among nonsmokers. Information was compiled on the proportion of people who had never smoked among victims of lung cancer, the risk of lung cancer for nonsmokers married to smokers and the prevalence of such exposure. On the basis of these data we estimate that 50 to 60 of the deaths from lung cancer in Canada in 1985 among people who had never smoked were caused by spousal smoking; about 90% occurred in women. The total number of deaths from lung cancer attributable to exposure to tobacco smoke from spouses and other sources (mainly the workplace) was derived by applying estimated age- and sex-specific rates of death from lung cancer attributable to such exposure to the population of Canadians who have never smoked; about 330 deaths from lung cancer annually are attributable to such exposure. PMID:3567810

  6. Prognostic impact of programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) and PD-ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression in cancer cells and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in ovarian high grade serous carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kulbe, Hagen; Sehouli, Jalid; Wienert, Stephan; Lindner, Judith; Budczies, Jan; Bockmayr, Michael; Dietel, Manfred; Denkert, Carsten; Braicu, Ioana; Jöhrens, Korinna

    2016-01-01

    Aims Antibodies targeting the checkpoint molecules programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and its ligand PD-L1 are emerging cancer therapeutics. We systematically investigated PD-1 and PD-L1 expression patterns in the poor-prognosis tumor entity high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma. Methods PD-1 and PD-L1 protein expression was determined by immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays from 215 primary cancers both in cancer cells and in tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs). mRNA expression was measured by quantitative reverse transcription PCR. An in silico validation of mRNA data was performed in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) dataset. Results PD-1 and PD-L1 expression in cancer cells, CD3+, PD-1+, and PD-L1+ TILs densities as well as PD-1 and PD-L1 mRNA levels were positive prognostic factors for progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS), with all factors being significant for PFS (p < 0.035 each), and most being significant for OS. Most factors also had prognostic value that was independent from age, stage, and residual tumor. Moreover, high PD-1+ TILs as well as PD-L1+ TILs densities added prognostic value to CD3+TILs (PD-1+: p = 0.002,; PD-L1+: p = 0.002). The significant positive prognostic impact of PD-1 and PD-L1 mRNA expression could be reproduced in the TCGA gene expression datasets (p = 0.02 and p < 0.0001, respectively). Conclusions Despite their reported immune-modulatory function, high PD-1 and PD-L1 levels are indicators of a favorable prognosis in ovarian cancer. Our data indicate that PD-1 and PD-L1 molecules are biologically relevant regulators of the immune response in high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma, which is an argument for the evaluation of immune checkpoint inhibiting drugs in this tumor entity. PMID:26625204

  7. The importance of being dead: cell death mechanisms assessment in anti-sarcoma therapy.

    PubMed

    Rello-Varona, Santiago; Herrero-Martín, David; Lagares-Tena, Laura; López-Alemany, Roser; Mulet-Margalef, Núria; Huertas-Martínez, Juan; Garcia-Monclús, Silvia; García Del Muro, Xavier; Muñoz-Pinedo, Cristina; Tirado, Oscar Martínez

    2015-01-01

    Cell death can occur through different mechanisms, defined by their nature and physiological implications. Correct assessment of cell death is crucial for cancer therapy success. Sarcomas are a large and diverse group of neoplasias from mesenchymal origin. Among cell death types, apoptosis is by far the most studied in sarcomas. Albeit very promising in other fields, regulated necrosis and other cell death circumstances (as so-called "autophagic cell death" or "mitotic catastrophe") have not been yet properly addressed in sarcomas. Cell death is usually quantified in sarcomas by unspecific assays and in most cases the precise sequence of events remains poorly characterized. In this review, our main objective is to put into context the most recent sarcoma cell death findings in the more general landscape of different cell death modalities.

  8. Cytoplasmic vacuolization in cell death and survival

    PubMed Central

    Komissarov, Alexey A.; Rafieva, Lola M.; Kostrov, Sergey V.

    2016-01-01

    Cytoplasmic vacuolization (also called cytoplasmic vacuolation) is a well-known morphological phenomenon observed in mammalian cells after exposure to bacterial or viral pathogens as well as to various natural and artificial low-molecular-weight compounds. Vacuolization often accompanies cell death; however, its role in cell death processes remains unclear. This can be attributed to studying vacuolization at the level of morphology for many years. At the same time, new data on the molecular mechanisms of the vacuole formation and structure have become available. In addition, numerous examples of the association between vacuolization and previously unknown cell death types have been reported. Here, we review these data to make a deeper insight into the role of cytoplasmic vacuolization in cell death and survival. PMID:27331412

  9. Programmed cell death in plant reproduction.

    PubMed

    Wu, H M; Cheun, A Y

    2000-10-01

    Reproductive development is a rich arena to showcase programmed cell death in plants. After floral induction, the first act of reproductive development in some plants is the selective killing of cells destined to differentiate into an unwanted sexual organ. Production of functional pollen grains relies significantly on deterioration and death of the anther tapetum, a tissue whose main function appears to nurture and decorate the pollen grains with critical surface molecules. Degeneration and death in a number of anther tissues result ultimately in anther rupture and dispersal of pollen grains. Female sporogenesis frequently begins with the death of all but one of the meiotic derivatives, with surrounding nucellar cells degenerating in concert with embryo sac expansion. Female tissues that interact with pollen undergo dramatic degeneration, including death, to ensure the encounter of compatible male and female gametes. Pollen and pistil interact to kill invading pollen from an incompatible source. Most observations on cell death in reproductive tissues have been on the histological and cytological levels. We discuss various cell death phenomena in reproductive development with a view towards understanding the biochemical and molecular mechanisms that underlie these processes.

  10. Cell Cycle Regulators and Cell Death in Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Zebell, Sophia G.; Dong, Xinnian

    2015-01-01

    Summary Various cell death mechanisms are integral to host defense in both plants and mammals. Plant defense against biotrophic pathogens is associated with programmed cell death (PCD) of the infected cell. This effector-triggered PCD is partly analogous to pyroptosis, an inflammatory host cell death process that plays a crucial role in defense against microbial infections in mammals. Plant effector-triggered PCD also shares with mammalian apoptosis the involvement of cell cycle regulators as signaling components. Here we explore the similarities between these different cell death programs as they relate to host defense and their relationship to the cell-cycle. PMID:26468745

  11. Basal cell cancer (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Basal cell cancer is a malignant skin tumor involving cancerous changes of basal skin cells. Basal cell skin cancers ... biopsy is needed to prove the diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma. Treatment varies depending on the size, depth, and ...

  12. Immune activation: death, danger and dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Pulendran, Bali

    2004-01-06

    Dendritic cells are critical for host immunity, and sense microbes with pathogen recognition receptors. New evidence indicates that these cells also sense uric acid crystals in dead cells, suggesting that the immune system is conscious not only of pathogens, but also of death and danger.

  13. Plasma levels of soluble programmed death ligand-1 may be associated with overall survival in nonsmall cell lung cancer patients receiving thoracic radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Jianhua; Xi, Qingsong; Zhao, Xueqi; Ji, Minghua; Hu, Guangyuan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Immune-checkpoint signaling plays an important role in immunosuppression of tumors. We aimed to investigate the association of soluble programmed death-ligand 1 (sPD-L1) level in plasma with overall survival (OS) in locally advanced or inoperable nonsmall-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with thoracic radiotherapy (TRT). We used ELISA to evaluate the sPD-L1 levels at diagnosis and during TRT in 126 clinically inoperable NSCLC patients. OS rates were followed up and recorded. SPSS software and GraphPad Prism 5 were used for statistics. In this study, the average sPD-L1 levels at baseline, week 2, and week 4 during TRT and post-TRT were 107.2, 51.3, 65.4, and 111.1 pg/mL, respectively. Levels of sPD-L1 at week 2 and week 4 were significantly less than at baseline, with both P values < 0.001. Using 96.5 pg/mL as the cutoff, patients with lower baseline sPD-L1 level had longer OS than those with higher sPD-L1 level (27.8 months vs 15.5 months, P = 0.005). Using multivariate analysis, the following factors were significantly associated with longer OS: female, adenocarcinoma, higher TRT dose, and lower baseline sPD-L1 level. Patients with both characteristics of lower baseline sPD-L1 level and higher TRT dose (BED10 ≥84 Gy) had the longest OS. To conclude, the lower baseline sPD-L1 level was significantly associated with longer OS in NSCLC patients treated with TRT, which may serve as an independent biomarker and needs further clinical study. PMID:28207525

  14. Real-time monitoring of cisplatin-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Alborzinia, Hamed; Can, Suzan; Holenya, Pavlo; Scholl, Catharina; Lederer, Elke; Kitanovic, Igor; Wölfl, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Since the discovery of cisplatin more than 40 years ago and its clinical introduction in the 1970s an enormous amount of research has gone into elucidating the mechanism of action of cisplatin on tumor cells. With a novel cell biosensor chip system allowing continuous monitoring of respiration, glycolysis, and impedance we followed cisplatin treatment of different cancer cell lines in real-time. Our measurements reveal a first effect on respiration, in all cisplatin treated cell lines, followed with a significant delay by interference with glycolysis in HT-29, HCT-116, HepG2, and MCF-7 cells but not in the cisplatin-resistant cell line MDA-MB-231. Most strikingly, cell death started in all cisplatin-sensitive cell lines within 8 to 11 h of treatment, indicating a clear time frame from exposure, first response to cisplatin lesions, to cell fate decision. The time points of most significant changes were selected for more detailed analysis of cisplatin response in the breast cancer cell line MCF-7. Phosphorylation of selected signal transduction mediators connected with cellular proliferation, as well as changes in gene expression, were analyzed in samples obtained directly from sensor chips at the time points when changes in glycolysis and impedance occurred. Our online cell biosensor measurements reveal for the first time the time scale of metabolic response until onset of cell death under cisplatin treatment, which is in good agreement with models of p53-mediated cell fate decision.

  15. [Pancreatic cancer stem cell].

    PubMed

    Hamada, Shin; Masamune, Atsushi; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2015-05-01

    Prognosis of pancreatic cancer remains dismal due to the resistance against conventional therapies. Metastasis and massive invasion toward surrounding organs hamper radical resection. Small part of entire cancer cells reveal resistance against chemotherapy or radiotherapy, increased tumorigenicity and migratory phenotype. These cells are called as cancer stem cells, as a counter part of normal stem cells. In pancreatic cancer, several cancer stem cell markers have been identified, which enabled detailed characterization of pancreatic cancer stem cells. Recent researches clarified that conventional chemotherapy itself could increase cancer cells with stem cell-phenotype, suggesting the necessity of cancer stem cell-targeting therapy. Based on these observations, pancreatic cancer stem cell-targeting therapies have been tested, which effectively eliminated cancer stem cell fraction and attenuated cancer progression in experimental models. Clinical efficacy of these therapies need to be evaluated, and cancer stem cell-targeting therapy will contribute to improve the prognosis of pancreatic cancer.

  16. Ceramide triggers metacaspase-independent mitochondrial cell death in yeast.

    PubMed

    Carmona-Gutierrez, Didac; Reisenbichler, Angela; Heimbucher, Petra; Bauer, Maria A; Braun, Ralf J; Ruckenstuhl, Christoph; Büttner, Sabrina; Eisenberg, Tobias; Rockenfeller, Patrick; Fröhlich, Kai-Uwe; Kroemer, Guido; Madeo, Frank

    2011-11-15

    The activation of ceramide-generating enzymes, the blockade of ceramide degradation, or the addition of ceramide analogues can trigger apoptosis or necrosis in human cancer cells. Moreover, endogenous ceramide plays a decisive role in the killing of neoplastic cells by conventional anticancer chemotherapeutics. Here, we explored the possibility that membrane-permeable C2-ceramide might kill budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) cells under fermentative conditions, where they exhibit rapid proliferation and a Warburg-like metabolism that is reminiscent of cancer cells. C2-ceramide efficiently induced the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), as well as apoptotic and necrotic cell death, and this effect was not influenced by deletion of the sole yeast metacaspase. However, C2-ceramide largely failed to cause ROS hypergeneration and cell death upon deletion of the mitochondrial genome. Thus, mitochondrial function is strictly required for C2-ceramide-induced yeast lethality. Accordingly, mitochondria from C2-ceramide-treated yeast cells exhibited major morphological alterations including organelle fragmentation and aggregation. Altogether, our results point to a pivotal role of mitochondria in ceramide-induced yeast cell death.

  17. Molecular and Translational Classifications of DAMPs in Immunogenic Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Abhishek D.; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Apetoh, Lionel; Baert, Thais; Birge, Raymond B.; Bravo-San Pedro, José Manuel; Breckpot, Karine; Brough, David; Chaurio, Ricardo; Cirone, Mara; Coosemans, An; Coulie, Pierre G.; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Dini, Luciana; de Witte, Peter; Dudek-Peric, Aleksandra M.; Faggioni, Alberto; Fucikova, Jitka; Gaipl, Udo S.; Golab, Jakub; Gougeon, Marie-Lise; Hamblin, Michael R.; Hemminki, Akseli; Herrmann, Martin; Hodge, James W.; Kepp, Oliver; Kroemer, Guido; Krysko, Dmitri V.; Land, Walter G.; Madeo, Frank; Manfredi, Angelo A.; Mattarollo, Stephen R.; Maueroder, Christian; Merendino, Nicolò; Multhoff, Gabriele; Pabst, Thomas; Ricci, Jean-Ehrland; Riganti, Chiara; Romano, Erminia; Rufo, Nicole; Smyth, Mark J.; Sonnemann, Jürgen; Spisek, Radek; Stagg, John; Vacchelli, Erika; Vandenabeele, Peter; Vandenberk, Lien; Van den Eynde, Benoit J.; Van Gool, Stefaan; Velotti, Francesca; Zitvogel, Laurence; Agostinis, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    The immunogenicity of malignant cells has recently been acknowledged as a critical determinant of efficacy in cancer therapy. Thus, besides developing direct immunostimulatory regimens, including dendritic cell-based vaccines, checkpoint-blocking therapies, and adoptive T-cell transfer, researchers have started to focus on the overall immunobiology of neoplastic cells. It is now clear that cancer cells can succumb to some anticancer therapies by undergoing a peculiar form of cell death that is characterized by an increased immunogenic potential, owing to the emission of the so-called “damage-associated molecular patterns” (DAMPs). The emission of DAMPs and other immunostimulatory factors by cells succumbing to immunogenic cell death (ICD) favors the establishment of a productive interface with the immune system. This results in the elicitation of tumor-targeting immune responses associated with the elimination of residual, treatment-resistant cancer cells, as well as with the establishment of immunological memory. Although ICD has been characterized with increased precision since its discovery, several questions remain to be addressed. Here, we summarize and tabulate the main molecular, immunological, preclinical, and clinical aspects of ICD, in an attempt to capture the essence of this phenomenon, and identify future challenges for this rapidly expanding field of investigation. PMID:26635802

  18. Synthesis, structural characterization and cell death-inducing effect of novel palladium(II) and platinum(II) saccharinate complexes with 2-(hydroxymethyl)pyridine and 2-(2-hydroxyethyl)pyridine on cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ari, Ferda; Aztopal, Nazlihan; Icsel, Ceyda; Yilmaz, Veysel T; Guney, Emel; Buyukgungor, Orhan; Ulukaya, Engin

    2013-11-01

    Four palladium(II) and platinum(II) saccharinate (sac) complexes with 2-(hydroxymethyl)pyridine (2-hmpy) and 2-(2-hydroxyethyl)pyridine (2-hepy), namely trans-[Pd(2-hmpy)2(sac)2]·H2O (1), trans-[Pt(2-hmpy)2(sac)2]·3H2O (2), trans-[Pd(2-hepy)2(sac)2] (3) and trans-[Pt(2-hepy)2(sac)2] (4), have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, UV-vis, IR and NMR. Single crystal X-ray analysis reveals that the metal(II) ions in each complex are coordinated by two sac and two 2-hmpy or 2-hepy ligands with a trans arrangement. Anticancer effects of 1-4 were tested against four different cancer cell lines (A549 and PC3 for lung cancer, C6 for glioblastoma, and Hep3B for liver cancer). Cytotoxicity was first screened by the MTT assay and the results were further confirmed by the ATP assay. The mode of cell death was determined by both histological and biochemical methods. Among the metal complexes, complex 2 resulted in relatively stronger anti-growth effect in a dose-dependent manner (3.13-200μM), compared to the others, by inducing apoptosis.

  19. Epidermal cell death in frogs with chytridiomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Alexandra A.; Skerratt, Lee F.; Berger, Lee

    2017-01-01

    Background Amphibians are declining at an alarming rate, and one of the major causes of decline is the infectious disease chytridiomycosis. Parasitic fungal sporangia occur within epidermal cells causing epidermal disruption, but these changes have not been well characterised. Apoptosis (planned cell death) can be a damaging response to the host but may alternatively be a mechanism of pathogen removal for some intracellular infections. Methods In this study we experimentally infected two endangered amphibian species Pseudophryne corroboree and Litoria verreauxii alpina with the causal agent of chytridiomycosis. We quantified cell death in the epidermis through two assays: terminal transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labelling (TUNEL) and caspase 3/7. Results Cell death was positively associated with infection load and morbidity of clinically infected animals. In infected amphibians, TUNEL positive cells were concentrated in epidermal layers, correlating to the localisation of infection within the skin. Caspase activity was stable and low in early infection, where pathogen loads were light but increasing. In animals that recovered from infection, caspase activity gradually returned to normal as the infection cleared. Whereas, in amphibians that did not recover, caspase activity increased dramatically when infection loads peaked. Discussion Increased cell death may be a pathology of the fungal parasite, likely contributing to loss of skin homeostatic functions, but it is also possible that apoptosis suppression may be used initially by the pathogen to help establish infection. Further research should explore the specific mechanisms of cell death and more specifically apoptosis regulation during fungal infection. PMID:28168107

  20. Methanolic extract of white asparagus shoots activates TRAIL apoptotic death pathway in human cancer cells and inhibits colon carcinogenesis in a preclinical model.

    PubMed

    Bousserouel, Souad; Le Grandois, Julie; Gossé, Francine; Werner, Dalal; Barth, Stephan W; Marchioni, Eric; Marescaux, Jacques; Raul, Francis

    2013-08-01

    Shoots of white asparagus are a popular vegetable dish, known to be rich in many bioactive phytochemicals reported to possess antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory and antitumor activities. We evaluated the anticancer mechanisms of a methanolic extract of Asparagus officinalis L. shoots (Asp) on human colon carcinoma cells (SW480) and their derived metastatic cells (SW620), and Asp chemopreventive properties were also assessed in a model of colon carcinogenesis. SW480 and SW620 cell proliferation was inhibited by 80% after exposure to Asp (80 µg/ml). We demonstrated that Asp induced cell death through the activation of TRAIL DR4/DR5 death receptors leading to the activation of caspase-8 and caspase-3 and to cell apoptosis. By specific blocking agents of DR4/DR5 receptors we were able to prevent Asp-triggered cell death confirming the key role of DR4/DR5 receptors. We found also that Asp (80 µg/ml) was able to potentiate the effects of the cytokine TRAIL on cell death even in the TRAIL-resistant metastatic SW620 cells. Colon carcinogenesis was initiated in Wistar rats by intraperitoneal injections of azoxymethane (AOM), once a week for two weeks. One week after (post-initiation) rats received daily Asp (0.01%, 14 mg/kg body weight) in drinking water. After 7 weeks of Asp-treatment the colon of rats exhibited a 50% reduction of the number of preneoplastic lesions (aberrant crypt foci). In addition Asp induced inhibition of several pro-inflammatory mediators, in association with an increased expression of host-defense mediators. In the colonic mucosa of Asp-treated rats we also confirmed the pro-apoptotic effects observed in vitro including the activation of the TRAIL death‑receptor signaling pathway. Taken together, our data highlight the chemopreventive effects of Asp on colon carcinogenesis and its ability to promote normal cellular homeostasis.

  1. Calcium imaging in neuron cell death.

    PubMed

    Calvo, María; Villalobos, Carlos; Núñez, Lucía

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular Ca2+ is involved in control of a large variety of cell functions including apoptosis and neuron cell death. For example, intracellular Ca2+ overload is critical in neuron cell death induced by excitotoxicity. Thus, single cell monitoring of intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]cyt ) in neurons concurrently with apoptosis and neuron cell death is widely required. Procedures for culture and preparation of primary cultures of hippocampal rat neurons and fluorescence imaging of cytosolic Ca2+ concentration in Fura2/AM -loaded neurons are described. We also describe a method for apoptosis detection by immunofluorescence imaging. Finally, a simple method for concurrent measurements of [Ca2+]cyt and apoptosis in the same neurons is described.

  2. Report to the Nation shows cancer death rates dropping

    Cancer.gov

    The Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1975–2009, shows that overall cancer death rates continued to decline in the United States among both men and women, among all major racial and ethnic groups, and for all of the most common cancer s

  3. The Importance of Being Dead: Cell Death Mechanisms Assessment in Anti-Sarcoma Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rello-Varona, Santiago; Herrero-Martín, David; Lagares-Tena, Laura; López-Alemany, Roser; Mulet-Margalef, Núria; Huertas-Martínez, Juan; Garcia-Monclús, Silvia; García del Muro, Xavier; Muñoz-Pinedo, Cristina; Tirado, Oscar Martínez

    2015-01-01

    Cell death can occur through different mechanisms, defined by their nature and physiological implications. Correct assessment of cell death is crucial for cancer therapy success. Sarcomas are a large and diverse group of neoplasias from mesenchymal origin. Among cell death types, apoptosis is by far the most studied in sarcomas. Albeit very promising in other fields, regulated necrosis and other cell death circumstances (as so-called “autophagic cell death” or “mitotic catastrophe”) have not been yet properly addressed in sarcomas. Cell death is usually quantified in sarcomas by unspecific assays and in most cases the precise sequence of events remains poorly characterized. In this review, our main objective is to put into context the most recent sarcoma cell death findings in the more general landscape of different cell death modalities. PMID:25905041

  4. Programmed death-1 pathway in cancer and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Pedoeem, Ariel; Azoulay-Alfaguter, Inbar; Strazza, Marianne; Silverman, Gregg J; Mor, Adam

    2014-07-01

    Programmed death-1 (PD-1) is a co-receptor that is expressed predominantly by T cells. The binding of PD-1 to its ligands, PD-L1 or PD-L2, is vital for the physiologic regulation of the immune system. A major functional role of the PD-1 signaling pathway is the inhibition of self-reactive T cells, which serve to protect against autoimmune diseases. Elimination of the PD-1 pathway can therefore result in the breakdown of immune tolerance that can ultimately lead to the development of pathogenic autoimmunity. Conversely, tumor cells can at times co-opt the PD-1 pathway to escape from immunosurveillance mechanisms. Therefore, blockade of the PD-1 pathway has become an attractive target in cancer therapy. Recent clinical trials have shown that anti-PD-1 agents have profound effects on solid tumor regression. Current approaches include six agents that are either PD-1 and PD-L1 targeted neutralizing antibodies or fusion proteins. More than forty clinical trials are underway to better define the role of PD-1 blockade in variety of tumor types. In this review we will highlight the basic biology of the PD-1 system and discuss its potential roles in both autoimmunity and cancer. We propose that future research on PD-1 may lead to the translation of fundamental regulatory pathways into the development of practical new approaches for the treatment of autoimmune diseases and cancer.

  5. Cytotoxicity and cell death mechanisms induced by a novel bisnaphthalimidopropyl derivative against the NCI-H460 non-small lung cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Lima, Raquel T; Barron, Gemma A; Grabowska, Joanna A; Bermano, Giovanna; Kaur, Simranjeet; Roy, Nilanjan; Vasconcelos, M Helena; Lin, Paul K T

    2013-03-01

    Some polyamine derivatives, namely the bisnaphthalimidopropyl polyamines (BNIPPs) may have potential as anticancer drugs. Indeed, previous work from some of us had shown that the ability of these molecules to bind to DNA may contribute to their cytotoxicity. However, their precise mode of action has not been fully understood. In the present work, we report for the first time the effect of the previously synthesised compounds, BNIPDaCHM and NPA, together with a new BNIP derivative (BNIP-3,4-DaDPM) in the in vitro growth of a non-small cell lung cancer cell line (NCI-H460). In addition, for the most potent compound (BNIPDaCHM), its activity as sirtuin inhibitor was investigated in vitro and further confirmed in silico. Results in the NCI-H460 cells showed that, from the compounds tested, BNIPDaCHM was the most potent (GI50 of 1.3 μM). In addition, a concentration-dependent alteration in the normal NCI-H460 cell cycle profile was observed following treatment with BNIPDaCHM as well as an increase in the sub-G1 peak (suggestive of apoptotis). This effect was further supported by Annexin V/PI staining and by analysing the expression of proteins related to apoptosis (cleaved PARP and Caspase-3) by Western blot. It was also observed that BNIPDaCHM inhibited the activity of SIRT2 in vitro, but not of SIRT1. Accordingly, this compound also caused a small increase in tubulin acetylation in NCI-H460 cells. To determine the binding potential of BNIPDaCHM on hSIRT2 and to further validate its inhibitory action, in silico docking studies were carried out, which revealed that BNIPDaCHM is composed of an entirely new SIRT2- inhibiting structural scaffold. In conclusion, this study indicates that BNIP derivatives with a novel structural backbone, such as BNIPDaCHM, may have potential as building blocks for novel antitumour agents which might selectively bind to hSIRT-2.

  6. Parvovirus infection-induced cell death and cell cycle arrest

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Aaron Yun; Qiu, Jianming

    2011-01-01

    The cytopathic effects induced during parvovirus infection have been widely documented. Parvovirus infection-induced cell death is often directly associated with disease outcomes (e.g., anemia resulting from loss of erythroid progenitors during parvovirus B19 infection). Apoptosis is the major form of cell death induced by parvovirus infection. However, nonapoptotic cell death, namely necrosis, has also been reported during infection of the minute virus of mice, parvovirus H-1 and bovine parvovirus. Recent studies have revealed multiple mechanisms underlying the cell death during parvovirus infection. These mechanisms vary in different parvoviruses, although the large nonstructural protein (NS)1 and the small NS proteins (e.g., the 11 kDa of parvovirus B19), as well as replication of the viral genome, are responsible for causing infection-induced cell death. Cell cycle arrest is also common, and contributes to the cytopathic effects induced during parvovirus infection. While viral NS proteins have been indicated to induce cell cycle arrest, increasing evidence suggests that a cellular DNA damage response triggered by an invading single-stranded parvoviral genome is the major inducer of cell cycle arrest in parvovirus-infected cells. Apparently, in response to infection, cell death and cell cycle arrest of parvovirus-infected cells are beneficial to the viral cell lifecycle (e.g., viral DNA replication and virus egress). In this article, we will discuss recent advances in the understanding of the mechanisms underlying parvovirus infection-induced cell death and cell cycle arrest. PMID:21331319

  7. Kisspeptin Effect on Endothelial Monocyte Activating Polypeptide II (EMAP-II)-Associated Lymphocyte Cell Death and Metastases in Colorectal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Stathaki, Martha; Armakolas, Athanasios; Dimakakos, Andreas; Kaklamanis, Loukas; Vlachos, Ioannis; Konstantoulakis, Manoussos M; Zografos, George; Koutsilieris, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Kisspeptin is an antimetastatic agent in some cancers that has also been associated with lymphoid cell apoptosis, a phenomenon favoring metastases. Our aim was to determine the association of kisspeptin with lymphocyte apoptosis and the presence of metastases in colorectal cancer patients. Blood was drawn from 69 colon cancer patients and 20 healthy volunteers. Tissue specimens from healthy and pathological tissue were immunohistochemically analyzed for kisspeptin and endothelial monocyte activating polypeptide II (EMAP-II) expression. Blood EMAP-II and soluble Fas ligand (sFasL) levels were examined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. The kisspeptin and EMAP-II expression and secretion levels in the DLD-1 and HT-29 colon cancer cell lines were examined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, whereas lymphocyte viability was assessed by flow cytometry. The effect of kisspeptin on the viability of colon cancer cells was examined by MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide]. Exogenous, synthetic and naturally produced, kisspeptin induces through the G-protein-coupled receptor 54 (GPR54; also known as the kisspeptin receptor) the EMAP-II expression and secretion in colon cancer cell lines, inducing in vitro lymphocyte apoptosis, as verified by the use of an anti-EMAP-II antibody. These results were reversed with the use of kisspeptin inhibitors and by kisspeptin-silencing experiments. Tumor kisspeptin expression was associated with the tumor EMAP-II expression (p < 0.001). Elevated kisspeptin and EMAP-II expression in colon cancer tissues was associated with lack of metastases (p < 0.001) in colon cancer patients. These data indicate the antimetastatic effect of tumor-elevated kisspeptin in colon cancer patients that may be mediated by the effect of kisspeptin on EMAP-II expression in colon cancer tumors in patients with normal serum EMAP-II levels. These findings

  8. Kisspeptin effect on endothelial monocyte activating polypeptide II (EMAP-II)-associated lymphocyte cell death and metastases in colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Stathaki, Martha; Armakolas, Athanasios; Dimakakos, Andreas; Kaklamanis, Loukas; Vlachos, Ioannis; Konstantoulakis, Manoussos M; Zografos, George; Koutsilieris, Michael

    2014-03-18

    Kisspeptin is an antimetastatic agent in some cancers that has also been associated with lymphoid cell apoptosis, a phenomenon favoring metastases. Our aim was to determine the association of kisspeptin with lymphocyte apoptosis and the presence of metastases in colorectal cancer patients. Blood was drawn from 69 colon cancer patients and 20 healthy volunteers. Tissue specimens from healthy and pathological tissue were immunohistochemically analyzed for kisspeptin and endothelial monocyte activating polypeptide II (EMAP-II) expression. Blood EMAP-II and soluble Fas ligand (sFasL) levels were examined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. The kisspeptin and EMAP-II expression and secretion levels in the DLD-1 and HT-29 colon cancer cell lines were examined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, whereas lymphocyte viability was assessed by flow cytometry. The effect of kisspeptin on the viability of colon cancer cells was examined by MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide]. Exogenous, synthetic and naturally produced, kisspeptin induces through the G-protein-coupled receptor 54 (GPR54; also known as the kisspeptin receptor) the EMAP-II expression and secretion in colon cancer cell lines, inducing in vitro lymphocyte apoptosis, as verified by the use of an anti-EMAP-II antibody. These results were reversed with the use of kisspeptin inhibitors and by kisspeptin-silencing experiments. Tumor kisspeptin expression was associated with the tumor EMAP-II expression (p < 0.001). Elevated kisspeptin and EMAP-II expression in colon cancer tissues was associated with lack of metastases (p < 0.001) in colon cancer patients. These data indicate the antimetastatic effect of tumor-elevated kisspeptin in colon cancer patients that may be mediated by the effect of kisspeptin on EMAP-II expression in colon cancer tumors in patients with normal serum EMAP-II levels. These findings

  9. Programmed Cell Death in Animal Development and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Yaron; Steller, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    Programmed Cell Death (PCD) plays a fundamental role in animal development and tissue homeostasis. Abnormal regulation of this process is associated with a wide variety of human diseases, including immunological and developmental disorders, neuro-degeneration, and cancer. Here, we provide a brief historical overview of the field and reflect on myriad functions carried out by PCD during development and explore how PCD is regulated. We also focus on the function and regulation of apoptotic proteins, including caspases, the key executioners of apoptosis, highlighting the non-lethal functions of these proteins in diverse developmental processes including cell differentiation and tissue remodeling. Finally, we explore a growing body of work about the connections between apoptosis, stem cells and cancer, focusing on how apoptotic cells release a variety of signals to communicate with their cellular environment, including factors that promote cell division, tissue regeneration, and wound healing. PMID:22078876

  10. Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 inhibition and sustained extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activation in camptothecin-induced human colon cancer cell death

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Minyoung; Young Kim, Sun; Kim, JongGuk; Kim, Hak-Su; Kim, Sang-Man; Kim, Eun Ju

    2013-01-01

    Camptothecins are commonly used chemotherapeutics; in some models, they enhance signaling via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway through effects on upstream kinases. To evaluate the impact of camptothecin (CPT) on MAPKs in human colon cancer, we studied HCT116 and CaCo2 colon cancer cells. We found that HCT116 cells highly express mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP1), which selectively inactivates extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), whereas MKP1 levels were undetectable in CaCo2 cells. CPT did not affect ERK activity in CaCo2 cells, but did induce a striking increase in ERK activity in HCT116 cells in association with a corresponding decrease in MKP1. The reduction in MKP1 expression occurred at a posttranscriptional level and was blocked by the proteasome inhibitor MG132, whereas that CPT-induced do