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Sample records for cancer cell-derived microvesicles

  1. Microfluidic isolation of cancer-cell-derived microvesicles from hetergeneous extracellular shed vesicle populations

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Steven M.; Antonyak, Marc A.; Cerione, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular shed vesicles, including exosomes and microvesicles, are disseminated throughout the body and represent an important conduit of cell communication. Cancer-cell-derived microvesicles have potential as a cancer biomarker as they help shape the tumor microenvironment to promote the growth of the primary tumor and prime the metastatic niche. It is likely that, in cancer cell cultures, the two constituent extracellular shed vesicle subpopulations, observed in dynamic light scattering, represent an exosome population and a cancer-cell-specific microvesicle population and that extracellular shed vesicle size provides information about provenance and cargo. We have designed and implemented a novel microfluidic technology that separates microvesicles, as a function of diameter, from heterogeneous populations of cancer-cell-derived extracellular shed vesicles. We measured cargo carried by the microvesicle subpopulation processed through this microfluidic platform. Such analyses could enable future investigations to more accurately and reliably determine provenance, functional activity, and mechanisms of transformation in cancer. PMID:25342569

  2. Breast Cancer Exosome-like Microvesicles and Salivary Gland Cells Interplay Alters Salivary Gland Cell-Derived Exosome-like Microvesicles In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Chang S.; Wong, David T. W.

    2012-01-01

    Saliva is a useful biofluid for the early detection of disease, but how distal tumors communicate with the oral cavity and create disease-specific salivary biomarkers remains unclear. Using an in vitro breast cancer model, we demonstrated that breast cancer-derived exosome-like microvesicles are capable of interacting with salivary gland cells, altering the composition of their secreted exosome-like microvesicles. We found that the salivary gland cells secreted exosome-like microvesicles encapsulating both protein and mRNA. We also showed that the interaction with breast cancer-derived exosome-like microvesicles communicated and activated the transcriptional machinery of the salivary gland cells. Thus, the interaction altered the composition of the salivary gland cell-derived exosome-like microvesicles on both the transcriptomically and proteomically. PMID:22448232

  3. Breast cancer exosome-like microvesicles and salivary gland cells interplay alters salivary gland cell-derived exosome-like microvesicles in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lau, Chang S; Wong, David T W

    2012-01-01

    Saliva is a useful biofluid for the early detection of disease, but how distal tumors communicate with the oral cavity and create disease-specific salivary biomarkers remains unclear. Using an in vitro breast cancer model, we demonstrated that breast cancer-derived exosome-like microvesicles are capable of interacting with salivary gland cells, altering the composition of their secreted exosome-like microvesicles. We found that the salivary gland cells secreted exosome-like microvesicles encapsulating both protein and mRNA. We also showed that the interaction with breast cancer-derived exosome-like microvesicles communicated and activated the transcriptional machinery of the salivary gland cells. Thus, the interaction altered the composition of the salivary gland cell-derived exosome-like microvesicles on both the transcriptomically and proteomically.

  4. Colorectal cancer cell-derived microvesicles are enriched in cell cycle-related mRNAs that promote proliferation of endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hong, Bok Sil; Cho, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Hyunjung; Choi, Eun-Jeong; Rho, Sangchul; Kim, Jongmin; Kim, Ji Hyun; Choi, Dong-Sic; Kim, Yoon-Keun; Hwang, Daehee; Gho, Yong Song

    2009-11-25

    Various cancer cells, including those of colorectal cancer (CRC), release microvesicles (exosomes) into surrounding tissues and peripheral circulation. These microvesicles can mediate communication between cells and affect various tumor-related processes in their target cells. We present potential roles of CRC cell-derived microvesicles in tumor progression via a global comparative microvesicular and cellular transcriptomic analysis of human SW480 CRC cells. We first identified 11,327 microvesicular mRNAs involved in tumorigenesis-related processes that reflect the physiology of donor CRC cells. We then found 241 mRNAs enriched in the microvesicles above donor cell levels, of which 27 were involved in cell cycle-related processes. Network analysis revealed that most of the cell cycle-related microvesicle-enriched mRNAs were associated with M-phase activities. The integration of two mRNA datasets showed that these M-phase-related mRNAs were differentially regulated across CRC patients, suggesting their potential roles in tumor progression. Finally, we experimentally verified the network-driven hypothesis by showing a significant increase in proliferation of endothelial cells treated with the microvesicles. Our study demonstrates that CRC cell-derived microvesicles are enriched in cell cycle-related mRNAs that promote proliferation of endothelial cells, suggesting that microvesicles of cancer cells can be involved in tumor growth and metastasis by facilitating angiogenesis-related processes. This information will help elucidate the pathophysiological functions of tumor-derived microvesicles, and aid in the development of cancer diagnostics, including colorectal cancer.

  5. A Novel Mechanism of Bacterial Toxin Transfer within Host Blood Cell-Derived Microvesicles

    PubMed Central

    Ståhl, Anne-lie; Arvidsson, Ida; Johansson, Karl E.; Chromek, Milan; Rebetz, Johan; Loos, Sebastian; Kristoffersson, Ann-Charlotte; Békássy, Zivile D.; Mörgelin, Matthias; Karpman, Diana

    2015-01-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx) is the main virulence factor of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli, which are non-invasive strains that can lead to hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), associated with renal failure and death. Although bacteremia does not occur, bacterial virulence factors gain access to the circulation and are thereafter presumed to cause target organ damage. Stx was previously shown to circulate bound to blood cells but the mechanism by which it would potentially transfer to target organ cells has not been elucidated. Here we show that blood cell-derived microvesicles, shed during HUS, contain Stx and are found within patient renal cortical cells. The finding was reproduced in mice infected with Stx-producing Escherichia coli exhibiting Stx-containing blood cell-derived microvesicles in the circulation that reached the kidney where they were transferred into glomerular and peritubular capillary endothelial cells and further through their basement membranes followed by podocytes and tubular epithelial cells, respectively. In vitro studies demonstrated that blood cell-derived microvesicles containing Stx undergo endocytosis in glomerular endothelial cells leading to cell death secondary to inhibited protein synthesis. This study demonstrates a novel virulence mechanism whereby bacterial toxin is transferred within host blood cell-derived microvesicles in which it may evade the host immune system. PMID:25719452

  6. A novel mechanism of bacterial toxin transfer within host blood cell-derived microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Ståhl, Anne-lie; Arvidsson, Ida; Johansson, Karl E; Chromek, Milan; Rebetz, Johan; Loos, Sebastian; Kristoffersson, Ann-Charlotte; Békássy, Zivile D; Mörgelin, Matthias; Karpman, Diana

    2015-02-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx) is the main virulence factor of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli, which are non-invasive strains that can lead to hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), associated with renal failure and death. Although bacteremia does not occur, bacterial virulence factors gain access to the circulation and are thereafter presumed to cause target organ damage. Stx was previously shown to circulate bound to blood cells but the mechanism by which it would potentially transfer to target organ cells has not been elucidated. Here we show that blood cell-derived microvesicles, shed during HUS, contain Stx and are found within patient renal cortical cells. The finding was reproduced in mice infected with Stx-producing Escherichia coli exhibiting Stx-containing blood cell-derived microvesicles in the circulation that reached the kidney where they were transferred into glomerular and peritubular capillary endothelial cells and further through their basement membranes followed by podocytes and tubular epithelial cells, respectively. In vitro studies demonstrated that blood cell-derived microvesicles containing Stx undergo endocytosis in glomerular endothelial cells leading to cell death secondary to inhibited protein synthesis. This study demonstrates a novel virulence mechanism whereby bacterial toxin is transferred within host blood cell-derived microvesicles in which it may evade the host immune system.

  7. Combining magnetic nanoparticles with cell derived microvesicles for drug loading and targeting.

    PubMed

    Silva, Amanda K A; Luciani, Nathalie; Gazeau, Florence; Aubertin, Kelly; Bonneau, Stéphanie; Chauvierre, Cédric; Letourneur, Didier; Wilhelm, Claire

    2015-04-01

    Inspired by microvesicle-mediated intercellular communication, we propose a hybrid vector for magnetic drug delivery. It consists of macrophage-derived microvesicles engineered to enclose different therapeutic agents together with iron oxide nanoparticles. Here, we investigated in vitro how magnetic nanoparticles may influence the vector effectiveness in terms of drug uptake and targeting. Human macrophages were loaded with iron oxide nanoparticles and different therapeutic agents: a chemotherapeutic agent (doxorubicin), tissue-plasminogen activator (t-PA) and two photosensitizers (disulfonated tetraphenyl chlorin-TPCS2a and 5,10,15,20-tetra(m-hydroxyphenyl)chlorin-mTHPC). The hybrid cell microvesicles were magnetically responsive, readily manipulated by magnetic forces and MRI-detectable. Using photosensitizer-loaded vesicles, we showed that the uptake of microvesicles by cancer cells could be kinetically modulated and spatially controlled under magnetic field and that cancer cell death was enhanced by the magnetic targeting. From the clinical editor: In this article, the authors devised a biogenic method using macrophages to produce microvesicles containing both iron oxide and chemotherapeutic agents. They showed that the microvesicles could be manipulated by magnetic force for targeting and subsequent delivery of the drug payload against cancer cells. This smart method could provide a novel way for future fight against cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. MicroRNA-4443 regulates mast cell activation by T cell-derived microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Shefler, Irit; Salamon, Pazit; Levi-Schaffer, Francesca; Mor, Adam; Hershko, Alon Y; Mekori, Yoseph A

    2017-08-16

    The mechanism by which mast cells (MCs) are activated in T cell-mediated inflammatory processes remains elusive. Recently, we have shown that microvesicles derived from activated T cells (mvT*s) can stimulate MCs to degranulate and release several cytokines. The aim of this study was to characterize the contribution of microRNAs (miRs) delivered by microvesicles to MC activation. miR profiling was performed with NanoString technology and validated by using real-time PCR. The biological role of mvT* miR was verified by overexpression of miRs in MCs using mimic or inhibitory molecules and analyzing the effect on their predicted targets. mvT*s were found to downregulate the expression of the tyrosine phosphatase protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type J (PTPRJ), a known extracellular signal-regulated kinase inhibitor. Bioinformatics analysis predicted that miR-4443 regulates the PTPRJ gene expression. Indeed, miR-4443, which was present in mvT*s, was also found to be overexpressed in human MCs stimulated with these MVs. α-Amanitin insensitivity confirmed that overexpression of miR-4443 was not due to transcriptional activation. The luciferase reporter assay indicated that the 3' untranslated region of PTPRJ was targeted by this miR. Transfection of MCs with mimic or inhibitor of miR-4443 resulted in decreased or enhanced PTPRJ expression, respectively. Furthermore, miR-4443 regulated extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation and IL-8 release in MCs activated by mvT*s. These results support a scenario by which T cell-derived microvesicles act as intercellular carriers of functional miR-4443, which might exert heterotypic regulation of PTPRJ gene expression in MCs, leading to their activation in the context of T cell-mediated inflammatory processes. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. T cell-derived microvesicles induce mast cell production of IL-24: relevance to inflammatory skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Shefler, Irit; Pasmanik-Chor, Metsada; Kidron, Dvora; Mekori, Yoseph A; Hershko, Alon Y

    2014-01-01

    It has recently been shown that microvesicles derived from activated T cells can stimulate human mast cells (MCs) to degranulate and release several cytokines. The aim of this study was to characterize microvesicle-induced MC expression patterns. Through identification of unique cytokine and chemokine expression, we attempted to reveal pathogenetic roles for this pathway of MC activation. T cell-derived microvesicles were labeled with PKH67 to allow visualization of their interaction with human MCs. Consequent gene expression profiling was studied by using a whole-genome microarray and analyzed for identification of cellular pathway clusters. Expression of 3 selected genes, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 3 (CCL3), chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 7 (CCL7), and IL24, was validated by means of quantitative RT-PCR and specific ELISA. IL24, which has not been recognized heretofore in MCs, was also tested for its effect on keratinocyte signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 phosphorylation and for its presence in MCs in psoriatic skin lesions. Uptake and internalization of activated T cell-derived microvesicles into human MCs occurred within 24 hours. Microvesicles induced the upregulation of several clusters of genes, notably those that are cytokine related. Among these, IL24 appeared to be a hallmark of microvesicle-induced activation. MC-derived IL-24, in turn, activates keratinocytes in vitro, as manifested by signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) phosphorylation, and is produced in MCs within psoriatic lesions. Production of IL-24 is a unique feature of microvesicle-induced MC activation because its production by these cells has not been recognized thus far. We propose that this MC-derived cytokine might contribute to the pathologic findings in T cell-mediated skin inflammation. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Microvesicles released from human embryonic stem cell derived-mesenchymal stem cells inhibit proliferation of leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yuan; Ma, Yongbin; Chen, Xiang; Ji, Xianyan; Gao, Jianyi; Zhang, Lei; Ye, Kai; Qiao, Fuhao; Dai, Yao; Wang, Hui; Wen, Xiangmei; Lin, Jiang; Hu, Jiabo

    2017-08-01

    Human embryonic stem cell derived-mesenchymal stem cells (hESC‑MSCs) are able to inhibit proliferation of leukemia cells. Microvesicles released from human embryonic stem cell derived-mesenchymal stem cells (hESC‑MSC‑MVs) might play an important part in antitumor activity. Microvesicles were isolated by ultracentrifugation and identified under a scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscope separately. After 48-h cocultured with hESC‑MSCs and hESC‑MSC‑MVs, the number of K562 and HL60 was counted and tumor cell viability was measured by CCK8 assay. The expression of proteins Bcl-2 and Bax were estimated by western blotting. Transmission electron microscope and western blot analysis were adopted to evaluate the autophagy level. Results showed that both hESC‑MSCs and hESC‑MSC‑MVs inhibited proliferation of leukemia cells in a concentration-dependent manner. hESC‑MSC‑MVs reduced the ratio of Bcl/Bax, enhanced the protein level of Beclin-1 and LC3-II conversion, thus upregulating autophagy and apoptosis. In conclusion, microvesicles released from human embryonic stem cell derived-mesenchymal stem cells inhibited tumor growth and stimulated autophagy and excessive autophagy might induce apoptosis.

  11. Improved Flow Cytometric Assessment Reveals Distinct Microvesicle (Cell-Derived Microparticle) Signatures in Joint Diseases

    PubMed Central

    György, Bence; Szabó, Tamás G.; Turiák, Lilla; Wright, Matthew; Herczeg, Petra; Lédeczi, Zsigmond; Kittel, Ágnes; Polgár, Anna; Tóth, Kálmán; Dérfalvi, Beáta; Zelenák, Gergő; Böröcz, István; Carr, Bob; Nagy, György; Vékey, Károly; Gay, Steffen; Falus, András; Buzás, Edit I.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Microvesicles (MVs), earlier referred to as microparticles, represent a major type of extracellular vesicles currently considered as novel biomarkers in various clinical settings such as autoimmune disorders. However, the analysis of MVs in body fluids has not been fully standardized yet, and there are numerous pitfalls that hinder the correct assessment of these structures. Methods In this study, we analyzed synovial fluid (SF) samples of patients with osteoarthritis (OA), rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). To assess factors that may confound MV detection in joint diseases, we used electron microscopy (EM), Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis (NTA) and mass spectrometry (MS). For flow cytometry, a method commonly used for phenotyping and enumeration of MVs, we combined recent advances in the field, and used a novel approach of differential detergent lysis for the exclusion of MV-mimicking non-vesicular signals. Results EM and NTA showed that substantial amounts of particles other than MVs were present in SF samples. Beyond known MV-associated proteins, MS analysis also revealed abundant plasma- and immune complex-related proteins in MV preparations. Applying improved flow cytometric analysis, we demonstrate for the first time that CD3+ and CD8+ T-cell derived SF MVs are highly elevated in patients with RA compared to OA patients (p = 0.027 and p = 0.009, respectively, after Bonferroni corrections). In JIA, we identified reduced numbers of B cell-derived MVs (p = 0.009, after Bonferroni correction). Conclusions Our results suggest that improved flow cytometric assessment of MVs facilitates the detection of previously unrecognized disease-associated vesicular signatures. PMID:23185418

  12. Cranial grafting of stem cell-derived microvesicles improves cognition and reduces neuropathology in the irradiated brain.

    PubMed

    Baulch, Janet E; Acharya, Munjal M; Allen, Barrett D; Ru, Ning; Chmielewski, Nicole N; Martirosian, Vahan; Giedzinski, Erich; Syage, Amber; Park, Audrey L; Benke, Sarah N; Parihar, Vipan K; Limoli, Charles L

    2016-04-26

    Cancer survivors face a variety of challenges as they cope with disease recurrence and a myriad of normal tissue complications brought on by radio- and chemotherapeutic treatment regimens. For patients subjected to cranial irradiation for the control of CNS malignancy, progressive and debilitating cognitive dysfunction remains a pressing unmet medical need. Although this problem has been recognized for decades, few if any satisfactory long-term solutions exist to resolve this serious unintended side effect of radiotherapy. Past work from our laboratory has demonstrated the neurocognitive benefits of human neural stem cell (hNSC) grafting in the irradiated brain, where intrahippocampal transplantation of hNSC ameliorated radiation-induced cognitive deficits. Using a similar strategy, we now provide, to our knowledge, the first evidence that cranial grafting of microvesicles secreted from hNSC affords similar neuroprotective phenotypes after head-only irradiation. Cortical- and hippocampal-based deficits found 1 mo after irradiation were completely resolved in animals cranially grafted with microvesicles. Microvesicle treatment was found to attenuate neuroinflammation and preserve host neuronal morphology in distinct regions of the brain. These data suggest that the neuroprotective properties of microvesicles act through a trophic support mechanism that reduces inflammation and preserves the structural integrity of the irradiated microenvironment.

  13. Cranial grafting of stem cell-derived microvesicles improves cognition and reduces neuropathology in the irradiated brain

    PubMed Central

    Baulch, Janet E.; Acharya, Munjal M.; Allen, Barrett D.; Ru, Ning; Chmielewski, Nicole N.; Martirosian, Vahan; Giedzinski, Erich; Syage, Amber; Park, Audrey L.; Benke, Sarah N.; Parihar, Vipan K.; Limoli, Charles L.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer survivors face a variety of challenges as they cope with disease recurrence and a myriad of normal tissue complications brought on by radio- and chemotherapeutic treatment regimens. For patients subjected to cranial irradiation for the control of CNS malignancy, progressive and debilitating cognitive dysfunction remains a pressing unmet medical need. Although this problem has been recognized for decades, few if any satisfactory long-term solutions exist to resolve this serious unintended side effect of radiotherapy. Past work from our laboratory has demonstrated the neurocognitive benefits of human neural stem cell (hNSC) grafting in the irradiated brain, where intrahippocampal transplantation of hNSC ameliorated radiation-induced cognitive deficits. Using a similar strategy, we now provide, to our knowledge, the first evidence that cranial grafting of microvesicles secreted from hNSC affords similar neuroprotective phenotypes after head-only irradiation. Cortical- and hippocampal-based deficits found 1 mo after irradiation were completely resolved in animals cranially grafted with microvesicles. Microvesicle treatment was found to attenuate neuroinflammation and preserve host neuronal morphology in distinct regions of the brain. These data suggest that the neuroprotective properties of microvesicles act through a trophic support mechanism that reduces inflammation and preserves the structural integrity of the irradiated microenvironment. PMID:27044087

  14. Breast Cancer Microvesicles as a Novel Plasma Biomarker and Therapeutic Target (IDEA)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    1 AD_________________ Award Number: W TITLE: Breast Cancer Microvesicles as a Novel...Cancer Microvesicles as a Novel Plasma Biomarker and Therapeutic Target (IDEA) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W91ZSQ-5323-N656 5b. GRANT...ABSTRACT We have developed a bead capture assay for quantitation of breast cancer tumor microvesicles (MV) to predict clinical outcomes in breast cancer

  15. Breast Cancer Microvesicles as a Novel Plasma Biomarker and Therapeutic Target (IDEA)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-06 -1- 0420 TITLE: Breast Cancer Microvesicles as a...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Breast Cancer Microvesicles as a Novel Plasma Biomarker and Therapeutic Target (IDEA) 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH...We propose to study the ability of quantitation of breast cancer tumor microvesicles (MV) to predict clinical outcomes in breast cancer patients. We

  16. Microvesicles: mediators of extracellular communication during cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Muralidharan-Chari, Vandhana; Clancy, James W.; Sedgwick, Alanna; D'Souza-Schorey, Crislyn

    2010-01-01

    Microvesicles are generated by the outward budding and fission of membrane vesicles from the cell surface. Recent studies suggest that microvesicle shedding is a highly regulated process that occurs in a spectrum of cell types and, more frequently, in tumor cells. Microvesicles have been widely detected in various biological fluids including peripheral blood, urine and ascitic fluids, and their function and composition depend on the cells from which they originate. By facilitating the horizontal transfer of bioactive molecules such as proteins, RNAs and microRNAs, they are now thought to have vital roles in tumor invasion and metastases, inflammation, coagulation, and stem-cell renewal and expansion. This Commentary summarizes recent literature on the properties and biogenesis of microvesicles and their potential role in cancer progression. PMID:20445011

  17. Breast Cancer Microvesicles as a Novel Plasma Biomarker and Therapeutic Target (IDEA)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH06-1-0420 TITLE: Breast Cancer Microvesicles as a Novel...2008 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Breast Cancer Microvesicles as a Novel Plasma Biomarker and Therapeutic Target (IDEA) 5b. GRANT...14. ABSTRACT We have developed a bead capture assay for quantitation of breast cancer tumor microvesicles (MV) to predict clinical outcomes

  18. Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Microvesicles: Could They be Used for Retinal Regeneration?

    PubMed

    Farber, Debora B; Katsman, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) release into the medium in which they are cultured heterogeneous populations of microvesicles (mESMVs), important components of cell-cell communication, that transfer their contents not only to other stem cells but also to cells of other origins. The purpose of these studies was to demonstrate that ESMVs could be the signals that lead the retinal progenitor Müller cells to de-differentiate and re-entry the cell cycle, followed by differentiation along retinal lineages. Indeed, we found that ESMVs induce these processes and change Müller cells' microenvironment towards a more permissive state for tissue regeneration.

  19. Rapid and specific detection of cell-derived microvesicles using a magnetoresistive biochip.

    PubMed

    Cherré, Solène; Fernandes, Elisabete; Germano, José; Dias, Tomás; Cardoso, Susana; Piedade, Moisés S; Rozlosnik, Noemi; Oliveira, Marta I; Freitas, Paulo P

    2017-03-13

    Microvesicles (MVs) are a promising source of diagnostic biomarkers which have gained a wide interest in the biomedical and biosensing field. They can be interpreted as a "fingerprint" of various diseases. Nonetheless, MVs implementation into clinical settings has been hampered by the lack of technologies to accurately characterize, detect and quantify them. Here, we report the specific sensing and quantification of MVs from endothelial cells using a portable magnetoresistive (MR) biochip platform, in less than one hour and within physiologically relevant concentrations (1 × 10(8) MVs per ml). MVs were isolated from both endothelial and epithelial cells undergoing apoptosis, and characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA), which revealed similar MV sizes. Importantly, our results showed that the two distinct MV populations could be discriminated with the MR biochip platform, with over a 5-fold capture efficiency of endothelial MVs in comparison to the control (epithelial MVs). Also, unspecific binding of MVs to BSA was less than 1% of the specific signal. The detection strategy was based on a sandwich immunoassay, where MVs were labelled with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) functionalized with Annexin V and then captured by anti-CD31 antibodies previously immobilized on the surface of the sensor. Results suggest that this approach allows the detection of specific MVs from complex samples such as serum, and highlight the potential of this technology to become a suitable tool for MVs detection as a complementary method of diagnosis.

  20. [Application Prospect of Stem Cell-derived Microvesicles in Regeneration of Injured Tissues].

    PubMed

    Yin, Huiqun; Jiang, Hong

    2015-06-01

    More and more evidence indicates that microvesicles (MVs) play a key role in cell-to-cell communication. The MVs are circular fragments of membrane released from the endosomal compartment as exosomes or shed from the cell surface membranes of most types. Components of donor cells are incorporated into MVs that contain bioactive lipids, proteins, genetic cargoes. MVs derived from stem cells may reprogram cells that survived in injury tissue and favor tissue regeneration by delivering their bioactive cargoes to influence the behaviors of recipient cells. Compared with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), MVs derived from MSCs were found to mimic the beneficial effects of these cells. These proregenerative effects mediated by MVs can be explained by the fact that MVs are enriched in bioactive lipids, anti-apoptotic and pro-stimulatory growth factors or cytokines, and deliver mRNAs, regulatory miRNAs and proteins that improve overall cell function. Therefore, it opens novel perspectives in exploiting these MVs in tissue regeneration and repair. In addition, the use of MVs instead of stem cells could represent a safe and potentially more advantageous alternative to cell-therapy approaches.

  1. Microvesicles released from hormone-refractory prostate cancer cells facilitate mouse pre-osteoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Tomohiro; Ito, Yuko; Ohtsuki, Yoshinori; Ando, Masashi; Tsukamasa, Yasuyuki; Yamada, Nami; Naoe, Tomoki; Akao, Yukihiro

    2012-10-01

    Bone metastasis is often occurs in patients with prostate cancer. There is a vicious cycle for bone metastases involving prostate cancer cells, osteoblasts, and osteoclasts. Acting among those cells during the process of metastasis are several molecules such as bone morphogenetic proteins, platelet-derived growth factor, endothelin-1, matrix metalloproteases, vascular endothelial growth factor, transforming growth factor-β, and insulin-like growth factors. Cell-derived microvesicles are endogenous carriers transporting proteins, mRNAs and miRNAs between cells, which is a candidate for participation in the bone metastasis of these cells. Here, we demonstrated that prostate cancer cells in vitro released microvesicles into the culture medium (PCa-MVs), which was shown by electron microscopic study and nanoparticle tracking analysis. In this study, we found for the first time that these PCa-MVs enhanced osteoblast differentiation mainly through the delivery of PCa cell-derived v-ets erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog 1, which is an osteoblast differentiation related-transcriptional factor.

  2. Longitudinal effects of menopausal hormone treatments on platelet characteristics and cell-derived microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Miller, Virginia M; Lahr, Brian D; Bailey, Kent R; Heit, John A; Harman, S Mitchell; Jayachandran, Muthuvel

    2016-01-01

    Activated platelets serve as a catalyst for thrombin generation and a source of vasoactive and mitogenic factors affecting vascular remodeling. Oral menopausal hormone treatments (MHT) may carry greater thrombotic risk than transdermal products. This study compared effects of oral and transdermal MHT on platelet characteristics, platelet proteins, and platelet-derived microvesicles (MV) in recently menopausal women. Platelets and MV were prepared from blood of a subset of women (n = 117) enrolled in the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study prior to and after 48 months of treatment with either oral conjugated equine estrogen (0.45 mg/day), transdermal 17β-estradiol (50 µg/day), each with intermittent progesterone (200 mg/day for 12 days a month), or placebo pills and patch. Platelet count and expression of platelet P-selectin and fibrinogen receptors were similar across groups. An aggregate measure of 4-year change in vasoactive and mitogenic factors in platelet lysate, by principle component analysis, indicated significantly lower values in both MHT groups compared to placebo. Increases in numbers of tissue factor positive and platelet-derived MV were significantly greater in the transdermal compared to placebo group. MHT was associated with significantly reduced platelet content of vasoactive and mitogenic factors representing a potential mechanism by which MHT may affect vascular remodeling. Various hormonal compositions and doses of MHT could differentially regulate nuclear transcription in bone marrow megakaryocytes and non-genomic pathways in circulating platelets thus determining numbers and characteristics of circulating MV. Thrombotic risk associated with oral MHT most likely involves liver-derived inflammatory/coagulation proteins rather than circulating platelets per se.

  3. Embryonic stem cell-derived microvesicles induce gene expression changes in Müller cells of the retina.

    PubMed

    Katsman, Diana; Stackpole, Emma J; Domin, Daniel R; Farber, Debora B

    2012-01-01

    Cell-derived microvesicles (MVs), recognized as important components of cell-cell communication, contain mRNAs, miRNAs, proteins and lipids and transfer their bioactive contents from parent cells to cells of other origins. We have studied the effect that MVs released from embryonic stem cells (ESMVs) have on retinal progenitor Müller cells. Cultured human Müller cells were exposed to mouse ESMVs every 48 hours for a total of 9 treatments. Morphological changes were observed by light microscopy in the treated cells, which grew as individual heterogeneous cells, compared to the uniform, spindle-like adherent cellular sheets of untreated cells. ESMVs transferred to Müller cells embryonic stem cell (ESC) mRNAs involved in the maintenance of pluripotency, including Oct4 and Sox2, and the miRNAs of the 290 cluster, important regulators of the ESC-specific cell cycle. Moreover, ESMV exposure induced up-regulation of the basal levels of endogenous human Oct4 mRNA in Müller cells. mRNA and miRNA microarrays of ESMV-treated vs. untreated Müller cells revealed the up-regulation of genes and miRNAs involved in the induction of pluripotency, cellular proliferation, early ocular genes and genes important for retinal protection and remodeling, as well as the down-regulation of inhibitory and scar-related genes and miRNAs involved in differentiation and cell cycle arrest. To further characterize the heterogeneous cell population of ESMV-treated Müller cells, their expression of retinal cell markers was compared to that in untreated control cells by immunocytochemistry. Markers for amacrine, ganglion and rod photoreceptors were present in treated but not in control Müller cells. Together, our findings indicate that ESMs induce de-differentiation and pluripotency in their target Müller cells, which may turn on an early retinogenic program of differentiation.

  4. Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Microvesicles Induce Gene Expression Changes in Müller Cells of the Retina

    PubMed Central

    Katsman, Diana; Stackpole, Emma J.; Domin, Daniel R.; Farber, Debora B.

    2012-01-01

    Cell-derived microvesicles (MVs), recognized as important components of cell-cell communication, contain mRNAs, miRNAs, proteins and lipids and transfer their bioactive contents from parent cells to cells of other origins. We have studied the effect that MVs released from embryonic stem cells (ESMVs) have on retinal progenitor Müller cells. Cultured human Müller cells were exposed to mouse ESMVs every 48 hours for a total of 9 treatments. Morphological changes were observed by light microscopy in the treated cells, which grew as individual heterogeneous cells, compared to the uniform, spindle-like adherent cellular sheets of untreated cells. ESMVs transferred to Müller cells embryonic stem cell (ESC) mRNAs involved in the maintenance of pluripotency, including Oct4 and Sox2, and the miRNAs of the 290 cluster, important regulators of the ESC-specific cell cycle. Moreover, ESMV exposure induced up-regulation of the basal levels of endogenous human Oct4 mRNA in Müller cells. mRNA and miRNA microarrays of ESMV-treated vs. untreated Müller cells revealed the up-regulation of genes and miRNAs involved in the induction of pluripotency, cellular proliferation, early ocular genes and genes important for retinal protection and remodeling, as well as the down-regulation of inhibitory and scar-related genes and miRNAs involved in differentiation and cell cycle arrest. To further characterize the heterogeneous cell population of ESMV-treated Müller cells, their expression of retinal cell markers was compared to that in untreated control cells by immunocytochemistry. Markers for amacrine, ganglion and rod photoreceptors were present in treated but not in control Müller cells. Together, our findings indicate that ESMs induce de-differentiation and pluripotency in their target Müller cells, which may turn on an early retinogenic program of differentiation. PMID:23226281

  5. Breast Cancer Microvesicles as a Novel Plasma Biomarker and Therapeutic Target (IDEA)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    at Fort Detrick, Maryland. This project proposed to develop a clinical assay for tumor microvesicles (MV) from the blood of patients with...interest of our laboratory is translational research in tumor metastasis. As part of this goal we are studying tumor microvesicles . These are produced by...Body Task 1. Develop reliable flow cytometry and immunochemical techniques to measure and analyze breast cancer microvesicles from the blood of

  6. Alterations in platelet function and cell-derived microvesicles in recently menopausal women: relationship to metabolic syndrome and atherogenic risk.

    PubMed

    Jayachandran, Muthuvel; Litwiller, Robert D; Lahr, Brian D; Bailey, Kent R; Owen, Whyte G; Mulvagh, Sharon L; Heit, John A; Hodis, Howard N; Harman, S Mitchell; Miller, Virginia M

    2011-12-01

    A woman's risk for metabolic syndrome (MS) increases at menopause, with an associated increase in risk for cardiovascular disease. We hypothesized that early menopause-related changes in platelet activity and concentrations of microvesicles derived from activated blood and vascular cells provide a mechanistic link to the early atherothrombotic process. Thus, platelet functions and cellular origin of blood-borne microvesicles in recently menopausal women (n = 118) enrolled in the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study were correlated with components of MS and noninvasive measures of cardiovascular disease [carotid artery intima medial thickness (CIMT), coronary artery calcium (CAC) score, and endothelial reactive hyperemic index (RHI)]. Specific to individual components of the MS pentad, platelet number increased with increasing waist circumference, and platelet secretion of ATP and expression of P-selectin decreased with increasing blood glucose (p = 0.005) and blood pressure (p < 0.05), respectively. Waist circumference and systolic blood pressure were independently associated with monocyte- and endothelium-derived microvesicles (p < 0.05). Platelet-derived and total procoagulant phosphatidylserine-positive microvesicles, and systolic blood pressure correlated with CIMT (p < 0.05), but not with CAC or RHI. In summary, among recently menopausal women, specific platelet functions and concentrations of circulating activated cell membrane-derived procoagulant microvesicles change with individual components of MS. These cellular changes may explain in part how menopause contributes to MS and, eventually, to cardiovascular disease.

  7. Microvesicles as mediators of intercellular communication in cancer.

    PubMed

    Antonyak, Marc A; Cerione, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    The discovery that cancer cells generate large membrane-enclosed packets of epigenetic information, known as microvesicles (MVs), that can be transferred to other cells and influence their behavior (Antonyak et al., Small GTPases 3:219-224, 2012; Cocucci et al., Trends Cell Biol 19:43-51, 2009; Rak, Semin Thromb Hemost 36:888-906, 2010; Skog et al., Nat Cell Biol 10:1470-1476, 2008) has added a unique perspective to the classical paracrine signaling paradigm. This is largely because, in addition to growth factors and cytokines, MVs contain a variety of components that are not usually thought to be released into the extracellular environment by viable cells including plasma membrane-associated proteins, cytosolic- and nuclear-localized proteins, as well as nucleic acids, particularly RNA transcripts and micro-RNAs (Skog et al., Nat Cell Biol 10:1470-1476, 2008; Al-Nedawi et al., Nat Cell Biol 10:619-624, 2008; Antonyak et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108:4852-4857, 2011; Balaj et al., Nat Commun 2:180, 2011; Choi et al., J Proteome Res 6:4646-4655, 2007; Del Conde et al., Blood 106:1604-1611, 2005; Gallo et al., PLoS One 7:e30679, 2012; Graner et al., FASEB J 23:1541-1557, 2009; Grange et al., Cancer Res 71:5346-5356, 2011; Hosseini-Beheshti et al., Mol Cell Proteomics 11:863-885, 2012; Martins et al., Curr Opin Oncol 25:66-75, 2013; Noerholm et al., BMC Cancer 12:22, 2012; Zhuang et al., EMBO J 31:3513-3523, 2012). When transferred between cancer cells, MVs have been shown to stimulate signaling events that promote cell growth and survival (Al-Nedawi et al., Nat Cell Biol 10:619-624, 2008). Cancer cell-derived MVs can also be taken up by normal cell types that surround the tumor, an outcome that helps shape the tumor microenvironment, trigger tumor vascularization, and even confer upon normal recipient cells the transformed characteristics of a cancer cell (Antonyak et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108:4852-4857, 2011; Martins et al., Curr Opin Oncol 25

  8. The emerging role of exosome and microvesicle- (EMV-) based cancer therapeutics and immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Moore, Colin; Kosgodage, Uchini; Lange, Sigrun; Inal, Jameel M

    2017-03-01

    There is an urgent need to develop new combination therapies beyond existing surgery, radio- and chemo-therapy, perhaps initially combining chemotherapy with the targeting specificities of immunotherapy. For this, strategies to limit inflammation and immuno-suppression and evasion in the tumour microenvironment are also needed. To devise effective new immunotherapies we must first understand tumour immunology, including the roles of T cells, macrophages, myeloid suppressor cells and of exosomes and microvesicles (EMVs) in promoting angiogenesis, tumour growth, drug resistance and metastasis. One promising cancer immunotherapy discussed uses cationic liposomes carrying tumour RNA (RNA-lipoplexes) to provoke a strong anti-viral-like (cytotoxic CD8(+) ) anti-tumour immune response. Mesenchymal stem cell-derived EMVs, with their capacity to migrate towards inflammatory areas including solid tumours, have also been used. As tumour EMVs clearly exacerbate the tumour microenvironment, another therapy option could involve EMV removal. Affinity-based methods to deplete EMVs, including an immuno-depletion, antibody-based affinity substrate, are therefore considered. Finally EMV and exosome-mimetic nanovesicles (NVs) delivery of siRNA or chemotherapeutic drugs that target tumours using peptide ligands for cognate receptors on the tumour cells are discussed. We also touch upon the reversal of drug efflux in EMVs from cancer cells which can sensitize cells to chemotherapy. The use of immunotherapy in combination with the advent of EMVs provides potent therapies to various cancers. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Cancer microvesicles induce tissue factor-related procoagulant activity in endothelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Adesanya, Mufuliat Adeola; Maraveyas, Anthony; Madden, Leigh A

    2017-07-01

    : Microvesicles associated with tissue factor (TF) may play a role in cancer-related venous thromboembolism; however, not much is known about their interaction with the tumour stroma, especially the endothelium or any procoagulant changes seen because of this interaction. Using a head and neck squamous cell carcinoma line (UMSCC81B) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), this study explored the interaction of cancer microvesicles released into cell culture media with endothelial cells in vitro, and assessed the procoagulant activity resulting from this interaction. Cell-free media containing UMSCC81B cancer microvesicles supported coagulation in a concentration-dependent manner, suggesting TF and microvesicle presence, this media was then added to HUVECs and flow cytometry analysis showed a subpopulation of HUVECs that had acquired a significantly high expression of TF, which was dependent upon the concentration of UMSCC81B media containing microvesicles present and confocal microscopy confirmed HUVECs associated with labelled microvesicles. The range of TF-positive HUVECs was determined to be 0, 4.2(±1.4), 12.5(±3.72), and 45.9(±18.7)% for microvesicle-positive media concentration of 0, 25, 50, and 100%, respectively, which resulted in decreasing prothrombin values of more than 600 (no clot), 126.4, 65.8, and 47.8 s. Our results demonstrate that procoagulant microvesicles shed by UMSCC81B induced a procoagulant effect in HUVECs through increased clotting activity and cell membrane surface expression of TF.

  10. Influence of microvesicles in breast cancer metastasis and their therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Arshad Malik, Muhammad Faraz

    2015-03-01

     Microvesicles are membranous sac structures released from cell surfaces of many eukaryotic cells. Their presence in the blood and urine also signify their potential use as biomarkers for early detection and diagnosis of different diseases. At present, synthesis and release of these vesicles from mammary tumor cells and their role in disease progression requires further research. In this report, correlation of microvesicles along with breast cancer metastasis has been explored. Metastasis is a process of a non-randomized set of events, which begins with a loss of cancer cell adhesion at the primary tumor site. Later on, these cells invade the surrounding tissue and enter into circulation. After compromising host immune response, these cells extravasate and localized at the suitable distant site for a secondary growth. Involvement of microvesicles in modulating this process has also been observed. Microvesicles released from primary cancer cells may carry mRNA, miRNAs, DNA and various proteins. These vesicles may also influence multi drug resistance as observed in breast and leukemia cancer cell lines. A thorough understanding of microvesicles synthesis and their potential implication in metastasis would facilitate the design of novel therapeutic approach for breast cancer.

  11. Specific cell-derived microvesicles: linking endothelial function to carotid artery intima-media thickness in low cardiovascular risk menopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Virginia M.; Lahr, Brian D.; Bailey, Kent R.; Hodis, Howard N.; Mulvagh, Sharon L.; Jayachandran, Muthuvel

    2016-01-01

    Background Decreases in endothelial function measured by reactive hyperemic index (RHI) correlated with increases in carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) in recently menopausal women with a low risk cardiovascular profile. Factors linking this association are unknown. Objective Assess, longitudinally, markers of platelet activation and cell-derived, blood-borne microvesicles (MV) in relationship to RHI and CIMT in asymptomatic, low risk menopausal women. Methods RHI by digital pulse tonometry (n=93), CIMT by ultrasound (n=113), measures of platelet activation and specific cell-derived, blood-borne MV were evaluated in women throughout the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study (KEEPS) at Mayo Clinic. Results CIMT, but not RHI, increased significantly over 4 years. The average change in CIMT correlated significantly with the average follow-up values of MV positive for common leukocyte antigen [CD45; ρ=0.285 (P=0.002)] and VCAM-1 [ρ=0.270 (P=0.0040)]. Using principal components analysis (PC) on the aggregate set of average follow-up measures, the first derived PC component representing numbers of MV positive for markers of vascular endothelium, inflammatory cells (leukocyte and monocytes), pro-coagulant (tissue factor), and cell adhesion molecules (ICAM-1 and VCAM-1) associated with changes in RHI and CIMT. Changes in RHI associated with another PC defined by measures of platelet activation (dense granular ATP secretion, surface expression of P-selectin and fibrinogen receptors). Conclusions MV derived from activated endothelial and inflammatory cells, and those expressing cell adhesion and pro-coagulant molecules may reflect early vascular dysfunction in low risk menopausal women. Assays of MV as non-conventional measures to assess cardiovascular risk in asymptomatic women remain to be developed. PMID:26752689

  12. Specific cell-derived microvesicles: Linking endothelial function to carotid artery intima-media thickness in low cardiovascular risk menopausal women.

    PubMed

    Miller, Virginia M; Lahr, Brian D; Bailey, Kent R; Hodis, Howard N; Mulvagh, Sharon L; Jayachandran, Muthuvel

    2016-03-01

    Decreases in endothelial function measured by reactive hyperemic index (RHI) correlated with increases in carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) in recently menopausal women with a low risk cardiovascular profile. Factors linking this association are unknown. Assess, longitudinally, markers of platelet activation and cell-derived, blood-borne microvesicles (MV) in relationship to RHI and CIMT in asymptomatic, low risk menopausal women. RHI by digital pulse tonometry (n = 93), CIMT by ultrasound (n = 113), measures of platelet activation and specific cell-derived, blood-borne MV were evaluated in women throughout the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study (KEEPS) at Mayo Clinic. CIMT, but not RHI, increased significantly over 4 years. The average change in CIMT correlated significantly with the average follow-up values of MV positive for common leukocyte antigen [CD45; ρ = 0.285 (P = 0.002)] and VCAM-1 [ρ = 0.270 (P = 0.0040)]. Using principal components analysis (PC) on the aggregate set of average follow-up measures, the first derived PC representing numbers of MV positive for markers of vascular endothelium, inflammatory cells (leukocyte and monocytes), pro-coagulant (tissue factor), and cell adhesion molecules (ICAM-1 and VCAM-1) associated with changes in RHI and CIMT. Changes in RHI associated with another PC defined by measures of platelet activation (dense granular ATP secretion, surface expression of P-selectin and fibrinogen receptors). MV derived from activated endothelial and inflammatory cells, and those expressing cell adhesion and pro-coagulant molecules may reflect early vascular dysfunction in low risk menopausal women. Assays of MV as non-conventional measures to assess cardiovascular risk in asymptomatic women remain to be developed. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Signal Factors Secreted by 2D and Spheroid Mesenchymal Stem Cells and by Cocultures of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived Microvesicles and Retinal Photoreceptor Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Mao; Zhou, Liang

    2017-01-01

    We aim to identify levels of signal factors secreted by MSCs cultured in 2D monolayers (2D-MSCs), spheroids (spheroids MSCs), and cocultures of microvesicles (MVs) derived from 2D-MSCs or spheroid MSCs and retinal photoreceptor neurons. We seeded 2D-MSCs, spheroid MSCs, and cells derived from spheroids MSCs at equal numbers. MVs isolated from all 3 culture conditions were incubated with 661W cells. Levels of 51 signal factors in conditioned medium from those cultured conditions were quantified with bead-based assay. We found that IL-8, IL-6, and GROα were the top three most abundant signal factors. Moreover, compared to 2D-MSCs, levels of 11 cytokines and IL-2Rα were significantly increased in conditioned medium from spheroid MSCs. Finally, to test if enhanced expression of these factors reflects altered immunomodulating activities, we assessed the effect of 2D-MSC-MVs and 3D-MSC-MVs on CD14+ cell chemoattraction. Compared to 2D-MSC-MVs, 3D-MSC-MVs significantly decreased the chemotactic index of CD14+ cells. Our results suggest that spheroid culture conditions improve the ability of MSCs to selectively secrete signal factors. Moreover, 3D-MSC-MVs also possessed an enhanced capability to promote signal factors secretion compared to 2D-MSC-MVs and may possess enhanced immunomodulating activities and might be a better regenerative therapy for retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:28194184

  14. Proteomic Analysis of Microvesicles Released by the Human Prostate Cancer Cell Line PC-3

    PubMed Central

    Sandvig, Kirsten; Llorente, Alicia

    2012-01-01

    Cancer biomarkers are invaluable tools for cancer detection, prognosis, and treatment. Recently, microvesicles have appeared as a novel source for cancer biomarkers. We present here the results from a proteomic analysis of microvesicles released to the extracellular environment by the metastatic prostate cancer cell line PC-3. Using nanocapillary liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry 266 proteins were identified with two or more peptide sequences. Further analysis showed that 16% of the proteins were classified as extracellular and that intracellular proteins were annotated in a variety of locations. Concerning biological processes, the proteins found in PC-3 cell-released microvesicles are mainly involved in transport, cell organization and biogenesis, metabolic process, response to stimulus, and regulation of biological processes. Several of the proteins identified (tetraspanins, annexins, Rab proteins, integrins, heat shock proteins, cytoskeletal proteins, 14–3-3 proteins) have previously been found in microvesicles isolated from other sources. However, some of the proteins seem to be more specific to the vesicular population released by the metastatic prostate cancer PC-3 cell line. Among these proteins are the tetraspanin protein CD151 and the glycoprotein CUB domain-containing protein 1. Interestingly, our results show these proteins are promising biomarkers for prostate cancer and therefore candidates for clinical validation studies in biological fluids. PMID:22457534

  15. Platelet microvesicles in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Melki, Imene; Tessandier, Nicolas; Zufferey, Anne; Boilard, Eric

    2017-05-01

    Interest in cell-derived extracellular vesicles and their physiological and pathological implications is constantly growing. Microvesicles, also known as microparticles, are small extracellular vesicles released by cells in response to activation or apoptosis. Among the different microvesicles present in the blood of healthy individuals, platelet-derived microvesicles (PMVs) are the most abundant. Their characterization has revealed a heterogeneous cargo that includes a set of adhesion molecules. Similarly to platelets, PMVs are also involved in thrombosis through support of the coagulation cascade. The levels of circulatory PMVs are altered during several disease manifestations such as coagulation disorders, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, cancers, cardiovascular diseases, and infections, pointing to their potential contribution to disease and their development as a biomarker. This review highlights recent findings in the field of PMV research and addresses their contribution to both healthy and diseased states.

  16. Evolution of Cancer Stem-like Cells in Endocrine-Resistant Metastatic Breast Cancers Is Mediated by Stromal Microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Sansone, Pasquale; Berishaj, Marjan; Rajasekhar, Vinagolu K; Ceccarelli, Claudio; Chang, Qing; Strillacci, Antonio; Savini, Claudia; Shapiro, Lauren; Bowman, Robert L; Mastroleo, Chiara; De Carolis, Sabrina; Daly, Laura; Benito-Martin, Alberto; Perna, Fabiana; Fabbri, Nicola; Healey, John H; Spisni, Enzo; Cricca, Monica; Lyden, David; Bonafé, Massimiliano; Bromberg, Jacqueline

    2017-04-15

    The hypothesis that microvesicle-mediated miRNA transfer converts noncancer stem cells into cancer stem cells (CSC) leading to therapy resistance remains poorly investigated. Here we provide direct evidence supporting this hypothesis, by demonstrating how microvesicles derived from cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF) transfer miR-221 to promote hormonal therapy resistance (HTR) in models of luminal breast cancer. We determined that CAF-derived microvesicles horizontally transferred miR-221 to tumor cells and, in combination with hormone therapy, activated an ER(lo)/Notch(hi) feed-forward loop responsible for the generation of CD133(hi) CSCs. Importantly, microvesicles from patients with HTR metastatic disease expressed high levels of miR-221. We further determined that the IL6-pStat3 pathway promoted the biogenesis of onco-miR-221(hi) CAF microvesicles and established stromal CSC niches in experimental and patient-derived breast cancer models. Coinjection of patient-derived CAFs from bone metastases led to de novo HTR tumors, which was reversed with IL6R blockade. Finally, we generated patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models from patient-derived HTR bone metastases and analyzed tumor cells, stroma, and microvesicles. Murine and human CAFs were enriched in HTR tumors expressing high levels of CD133(hi) cells. Depletion of murine CAFs from PDX restored sensitivity to HT, with a concurrent reduction of CD133(hi) CSCs. Conversely, in models of CD133(neg), HT-sensitive cancer cells, both murine and human CAFs promoted de novo HT resistance via the generation of CD133(hi) CSCs that expressed low levels of estrogen receptor alpha. Overall, our results illuminate how microvesicle-mediated horizontal transfer of genetic material from host stromal cells to cancer cells triggers the evolution of therapy-resistant metastases, with potentially broad implications for their control. Cancer Res; 77(8); 1927-41. ©2017 AACR.

  17. Shiga toxin-induced complement-mediated hemolysis and release of complement-coated red blood cell-derived microvesicles in hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Arvidsson, Ida; Ståhl, Anne-Lie; Hedström, Minola Manea; Kristoffersson, Ann-Charlotte; Rylander, Christian; Westman, Julia S; Storry, Jill R; Olsson, Martin L; Karpman, Diana

    2015-03-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) cause hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). This study investigated whether Stx2 induces hemolysis and whether complement is involved in the hemolytic process. RBCs and/or RBC-derived microvesicles from patients with STEC-HUS (n = 25) were investigated for the presence of C3 and C9 by flow cytometry. Patients exhibited increased C3 deposition on RBCs compared with controls (p < 0.001), as well as high levels of C3- and C9-bearing RBC-derived microvesicles during the acute phase, which decreased after recovery. Stx2 bound to P1 (k) and P2 (k) phenotype RBCs, expressing high levels of the P(k) Ag (globotriaosylceramide), the known Stx receptor. Stx2 induced the release of hemoglobin and lactate dehydrogenase in whole blood, indicating hemolysis. Stx2-induced hemolysis was not demonstrated in the absence of plasma and was inhibited by heat inactivation, as well as by the terminal complement pathway Ab eculizumab, the purinergic P2 receptor antagonist suramin, and EDTA. In the presence of whole blood or plasma/serum, Stx2 induced the release of RBC-derived microvesicles coated with C5b-9, a process that was inhibited by EDTA, in the absence of factor B, and by purinergic P2 receptor antagonists. Thus, complement-coated RBC-derived microvesicles are elevated in HUS patients and induced in vitro by incubation of RBCs with Stx2, which also induced hemolysis. The role of complement in Stx2-mediated hemolysis was demonstrated by its occurrence only in the presence of plasma and its abrogation by heat inactivation, EDTA, and eculizumab. Complement activation on RBCs could play a role in the hemolytic process occurring during STEC-HUS. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  18. Detection and isolation of circulating exosomes and microvesicles for cancer monitoring and diagnostics using micro-/nano-based devices

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Jina

    2016-01-01

    In the last several years, nanoscale vesicles that originate from tumor cells and which can be found circulating in the blood (i.e. exosomes and microvesicles) have been discovered to contain a wealth of proteomic and genetic information to monitor cancer progression, metastasis, and drug efficacy. However, the use of exosomes and microvesicles as biomarkers to improve patient care has been limited by their small size (30 nm–1 μm) and the extensive sample preparation required for their isolation and measurement. In this Critical Review, we explore the emerging use of micro and nano-technology to isolate and detect exosomes and microvesicles in clinical samples and the application of this technology to the monitoring and diagnosis of cancer. PMID:26378496

  19. Microvesicles released constitutively from prostate cancer cells differ biochemically and functionally to stimulated microvesicles released through sublytic C5b-9

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, Dan; Moore, Colin; Antwi-Baffour, Samuel; Lange, Sigrun; Inal, Jameel

    2015-05-08

    We have classified microvesicles into two subtypes: larger MVs released upon stimulation of prostate cancer cells, sMVs, and smaller cMVs, released constitutively. cMVs are released as part of cell metabolism and sMVs, released at 10-fold higher levels, produced upon activation, including sublytic C5b-9. From electron microscopy, nanosight tracking analysis, dynamic light scattering and flow cytometry, cMVs (194–210 nm in diameter) are smaller than sMVs (333–385 nm). Furthermore, using a Quartz Crystal Microbalance measuring changes in resonant frequency (Δf) that equate to mass deposited on a sensor, an sMV and a cMV are estimated at 0.267 and 0.241 pg, respectively. sMVs carry more calcium and protein, express higher levels of lipid rafts, GPI-anchored CD55 and phosphatidylserine including deposited C5b-9 compared to cMVs. This may allude to biological differences such as increased bound C4BP on sMVs inhibiting complement more effectively. - Highlights: • Prostate cells release microvesicles constitutively (cMVs) or upon stimulus (sMVs). • sMVs are larger than cMVs and carry more protein, lipid rafts and surface PstSer. • sMVs inhibit complement more effectively than cMVs.

  20. Tumor Cell-Derived Microvesicles Induced Not Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition but Apoptosis in Human Proximal Tubular (HK-2) Cells: Implications for Renal Impairment in Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Aiqi; Kong, Fancong; Liu, Chun-Jie; Yan, Guoxin; Gao, Fei; Guo, Hao; Guo, An-Yuan; Chen, Zhichao; Li, Qiubai

    2017-01-01

    Renal impairment (RI) is one of the hallmarks of multiple myeloma (MM) and carries a poor prognosis. Microvesicles (MVs) are membrane vesicles and play an important role in disease progression. Here, we investigated the role of MVs derived from MM cells (MM-MVs) in RI of MM. We found that MM-MVs significantly inhibited viability and induced apoptosis, but not epithelial-mesenchymal transition in human kidney-2 (HK-2), a human renal tubular epithelial cell line. The protein levels of cleaved caspase-3, 8, and 9, and E-cadherin, were increased, but vementin levels were decreased in the HK-2 cells treated with MM-MVs. Through a comparative sequencing and analysis of RNA content between the MVs from RPMI8226 MM cells (RPMI8226-MVs) and K562 leukemia cells, RPMI8226-MVs were enriched with more renal-pathogenic miRNAs, in which the selective miRNAs may participate in the up-regulation of the levels of cleaved caspase-3. Furthermore, the levels of CD138+ circulating MVs (cirMVs) in the peripheral blood were positively correlated with the severity of RI in newly-diagnosed MM. Our study supports MM-MVs representing a previously undescribed factor and playing a potential role in the development of RI of MM patients, and sheds light on the potential application of CD138+ cirMV counts in precise diagnosis of RI in MM and exploring MM-MVs as a therapeutic target. PMID:28264449

  1. Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Derived Microvesicles Prevent the Rupture of Intracranial Aneurysm in Part by Suppression of Mast Cell Activation via a PGE2-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jia; Kuwabara, Atsushi; Kamio, Yoshinobu; Hu, Shuling; Park, Jeonghyun; Hashimoto, Tomoki; Lee, Jae-Woo

    2017-01-01

    Background Activation of mast cells participates in the chronic inflammation associated with cerebral arteries in intracranial aneurysm formation and rupture. Several studies have shown that the anti-inflammatory effect of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is beneficial for the treatment of aneurysms. However, some long-term safety concerns exist regarding stem cell-based therapy for clinical use. Objective We investigated the therapeutic potential of microvesicles (MVs) derived from human MSCs, anuclear membrane bound fragments with reparative properties, in preventing the rupture of intracranial aneurysm in mice, particularly in the effect of MVs on mast cell activation. Methods and Results Intracranial aneurysm was induced in C57BL/6 mice by the combination of systemic hypertension and intrathecal elastase injection. Intravenous administration of MSC-derived MVs on day 6 and day 9 after aneurysm induction significantly reduced the aneurysmal rupture rate, which was associated with reduced number of activated mast cells in the brain. A23187-induced activation of both primary cultures of murine mast cells and a human mast cell line, LAD2, was suppressed by MVs treatment, leading to a decrease in cytokine release and tryptase and chymase activities. Up-regulation of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production and E-prostanoid 4 (EP4) receptor expression were also observed on mast cells with MVs treatment. Administration of an EP4 antagonist with the MVs eliminated the protective effect of MVs against the aneurysmal rupture in vivo. Conclusions Human MSC-derived MVs prevented the rupture of intracranial aneurysm, in part due to their anti-inflammatory effect on mast cells, which was mediated by PGE2 production and EP4 activation. PMID:27350036

  2. Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Derived Microvesicles Prevent the Rupture of Intracranial Aneurysm in Part by Suppression of Mast Cell Activation via a PGE2-Dependent Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Kuwabara, Atsushi; Kamio, Yoshinobu; Hu, Shuling; Park, Jeonghyun; Hashimoto, Tomoki; Lee, Jae-Woo

    2016-12-01

    Activation of mast cells participates in the chronic inflammation associated with cerebral arteries in intracranial aneurysm formation and rupture. Several studies have shown that the anti-inflammatory effect of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is beneficial for the treatment of aneurysms. However, some long-term safety concerns exist regarding stem cell-based therapy for clinical use. We investigated the therapeutic potential of microvesicles (MVs) derived from human MSCs, anuclear membrane bound fragments with reparative properties, in preventing the rupture of intracranial aneurysm in mice, particularly in the effect of MVs on mast cell activation. Intracranial aneurysm was induced in C57BL/6 mice by the combination of systemic hypertension and intrathecal elastase injection. Intravenous administration of MSC-derived MVs on day 6 and day 9 after aneurysm induction significantly reduced the aneurysmal rupture rate, which was associated with reduced number of activated mast cells in the brain. A23187-induced activation of both primary cultures of murine mast cells and a human mast cell line, LAD2, was suppressed by MVs treatment, leading to a decrease in cytokine release and tryptase and chymase activities. Upregulation of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production and E-prostanoid 4 (EP4) receptor expression were also observed on mast cells with MVs treatment. Administration of an EP4 antagonist with the MVs eliminated the protective effect of MVs against the aneurysmal rupture in vivo. Human MSC-derived MVs prevented the rupture of intracranial aneurysm, in part due to their anti-inflammatory effect on mast cells, which was mediated by PGE2 production and EP4 activation. Stem Cells 2016;34:2943-2955.

  3. Microvesicle removal of anticancer drugs contributes to drug resistance in human pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Muralidharan-Chari, Vandhana; Kohan, Hamed Gilzad; Asimakopoulos, Alexandros G.; Sudha, Thangirala; Sell, Stewart; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Boroujerdi, Mehdi; Davis, Paul J.; Mousa, Shaker A.

    2016-01-01

    High mortality in pancreatic cancer patients is partly due to resistance to chemotherapy. We describe that human pancreatic cancer cells acquire drug resistance by a novel mechanism in which they expel and remove chemotherapeutic drugs from the microenvironment via microvesicles (MVs). Using human pancreatic cancer cells that exhibit varied sensitivity to gemcitabine (GEM), we show that GEM exposure triggers the cancer cells to release MVs in an amount that correlates with that cell line's sensitivity to GEM. The importance of MV-release in gaining drug resistance in GEM-resistant pancreatic cancer cells was confirmed when the inhibition of MV-release sensitized the cells to GEM treatment, both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, MVs remove drugs that are internalized into the cells and that are in the microenvironment. The differences between the drug-resistant and drug-sensitive pancreatic cancer cell lines tested here are explained based on the variable content of influx/efflux proteins present on MVs, which directly dictates the ability of MVs either to trap GEM or to allow GEM to flow back to the microenvironment. PMID:27391262

  4. Extracellular vesicles in cancer: exosomes, microvesicles and the emerging role of large oncosomes.

    PubMed

    Minciacchi, Valentina R; Freeman, Michael R; Di Vizio, Dolores

    2015-04-01

    Since their first description, extracellular vesicles (EVs) have been the topic of avid study in a variety of physiologic contexts and are now thought to play an important role in cancer. The state of knowledge on biogenesis, molecular content and horizontal communication of diverse types of cancer EVs has expanded considerably in recent years. As a consequence, a plethora of information about EV composition and molecular function has emerged, along with the notion that cancer cells rely on these particles to invade tissues and propagate oncogenic signals at distance. The number of in vivo studies, designed to achieve a deeper understanding of the extent to which EV biology can be applied to clinically relevant settings, is rapidly growing. This review summarizes recent studies on cancer-derived EV functions, with an overview about biogenesis and molecular cargo of exosomes, microvesicles and large oncosomes. We also discuss current challenges and emerging technologies that might improve EV detection in various biological systems. Further studies on the functional role of EVs in specific steps of cancer formation and progression will expand our understanding of the diversity of paracrine signaling mechanisms in malignant growth.

  5. Microvesicles as mediators of intercellular communication in cancer--the emerging science of cellular 'debris'.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tae Hoon; D'Asti, Esterina; Magnus, Nathalie; Al-Nedawi, Khalid; Meehan, Brian; Rak, Janusz

    2011-09-01

    Cancer cells emit a heterogeneous mixture of vesicular, organelle-like structures (microvesicles, MVs) into their surroundings including blood and body fluids. MVs are generated via diverse biological mechanisms triggered by pathways involved in oncogenic transformation, microenvironmental stimulation, cellular activation, stress, or death. Vesiculation events occur either at the plasma membrane (ectosomes, shed vesicles) or within endosomal structures (exosomes). MVs are increasingly recognized as mediators of intercellular communication due to their capacity to merge with and transfer a repertoire of bioactive molecular content (cargo) to recipient cells. Such processes may occur both locally and systemically, contributing to the formation of microenvironmental fields and niches. The bioactive cargo of MVs may include growth factors and their receptors, proteases, adhesion molecules, signalling molecules, as well as DNA, mRNA, and microRNA (miRs) sequences. Tumour cells emit large quantities of MVs containing procoagulant, growth regulatory and oncogenic cargo (oncosomes), which can be transferred throughout the cancer cell population and to non-transformed stromal cells, endothelial cells and possibly to the inflammatory infiltrates (oncogenic field effect). These events likely impact tumour invasion, angiogenesis, metastasis, drug resistance, and cancer stem cell hierarchy. Ongoing studies explore the molecular mechanisms and mediators of MV-based intercellular communication (cancer vesiculome) with the hope of using this information as a possible source of therapeutic targets and disease biomarkers in cancer.

  6. Comparison of microRNA expression profiles in K562-cells-derived microvesicles and parental cells, and analysis of their roles in leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaomei; Xiong, Wei; Li, Huiyu

    2016-01-01

    Microvesicles (MVs) are 30-1,000-nm extracellular vesicles that are released from a multitude of cell types and perform diverse cellular functions, including intercellular communication, antigen presentation, and transfer of proteins, messenger RNA and microRNA (also known as miR). MicroRNAs have been demonstrated to be aberrantly expressed in leukemia, and the overall microRNA expression profile may differentiate normal blood cells vs. leukemia cells. MVs containing microRNAs may enable intercellular cross-talk in vivo. This prompted us to investigate specific variations of microRNA expression patterns in MVs derived from leukemia cells. The present study examined the microRNA expression profile of MVs from chronic myeloid leukemia K562 cells and that of MVs from normal human volunteers' peripheral blood cells. The potential targets of the differentially expressed microRNAs were predicted using computational searches. Bioinformatic analyses of the predicted target genes were performed for further evaluation. The present study analyzed microRNAs of MVs derived from leukemia and normal cells, and characterized specific microRNAs expression. The results revealed that MVs derived from K562 cells expressed 181 microRNAs of the 888 microRNAs assessed. Further analysis revealed that 16 microRNAs were downregulated, while 7 were upregulated in these MVs. In addition, significant differences in microRNA expression profiles between MVs derived from K562 cells and K562 cells were identified. The present results revealed that 77 and 122 microRNAs were only expressed in MVs derived from K562 cells and in K562 cells, respectively. There were 104 microRNAs co-expressed in MVs derived from K562 cells and in K562 cells. Target gene-related pathway analyses demonstrated that the majority of the dysregulated microRNAs were involved in pathways associated with leukemia, particularly the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and the p53 signaling pathways. By further conducting

  7. Comparison of microRNA expression profiles in K562-cells-derived microvesicles and parental cells, and analysis of their roles in leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaomei; Xiong, Wei; Li, Huiyu

    2016-12-01

    Microvesicles (MVs) are 30-1,000-nm extracellular vesicles that are released from a multitude of cell types and perform diverse cellular functions, including intercellular communication, antigen presentation, and transfer of proteins, messenger RNA and microRNA (also known as miR). MicroRNAs have been demonstrated to be aberrantly expressed in leukemia, and the overall microRNA expression profile may differentiate normal blood cells vs. leukemia cells. MVs containing microRNAs may enable intercellular cross-talk in vivo. This prompted us to investigate specific variations of microRNA expression patterns in MVs derived from leukemia cells. The present study examined the microRNA expression profile of MVs from chronic myeloid leukemia K562 cells and that of MVs from normal human volunteers' peripheral blood cells. The potential targets of the differentially expressed microRNAs were predicted using computational searches. Bioinformatic analyses of the predicted target genes were performed for further evaluation. The present study analyzed microRNAs of MVs derived from leukemia and normal cells, and characterized specific microRNAs expression. The results revealed that MVs derived from K562 cells expressed 181 microRNAs of the 888 microRNAs assessed. Further analysis revealed that 16 microRNAs were downregulated, while 7 were upregulated in these MVs. In addition, significant differences in microRNA expression profiles between MVs derived from K562 cells and K562 cells were identified. The present results revealed that 77 and 122 microRNAs were only expressed in MVs derived from K562 cells and in K562 cells, respectively. There were 104 microRNAs co-expressed in MVs derived from K562 cells and in K562 cells. Target gene-related pathway analyses demonstrated that the majority of the dysregulated microRNAs were involved in pathways associated with leukemia, particularly the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and the p53 signaling pathways. By further conducting

  8. Identification and characterization of proteins isolated from microvesicles derived from human lung cancer pleural effusions.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung Ok; Choi, Do-Young; Choi, Dong-Sic; Kim, Hee Joung; Kang, Jeong Won; Jung, Jae Hun; Lee, Jeong Hwa; Kim, Jayoung; Freeman, Michael R; Lee, Kye Young; Gho, Yong Song; Kim, Kwang Pyo

    2013-07-01

    Microvesicles (MVs, also known as exosomes, ectosomes, microparticles) are released by various cancer cells, including lung, colorectal, and prostate carcinoma cells. MVs released from tumor cells and other sources accumulate in the circulation and in pleural effusion. Although recent studies have shown that MVs play multiple roles in tumor progression, the potential pathological roles of MV in pleural effusion, and their protein composition, are still unknown. In this study, we report the first global proteomic analysis of highly purified MVs derived from human nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) pleural effusion. Using nano-LC-MS/MS following 1D SDS-PAGE separation, we identified a total of 912 MV proteins with high confidence. Three independent experiments on three patients showed that MV proteins from PE were distinct from MV obtained from other malignancies. Bioinformatics analyses of the MS data identified pathologically relevant proteins and potential diagnostic makers for NSCLC, including lung-enriched surface antigens and proteins related to epidermal growth factor receptor signaling. These findings provide new insight into the diverse functions of MVs in cancer progression and will aid in the development of novel diagnostic tools for NSCLC.

  9. Ultrasmall Magnetically Engineered Ag2Se Quantum Dots for Instant Efficient Labeling and Whole-Body High-Resolution Multimodal Real-Time Tracking of Cell-Derived Microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing-Ya; Chen, Gang; Gu, Yi-Ping; Cui, Ran; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Yu, Zi-Li; Tang, Bo; Zhao, Yi-Fang; Pang, Dai-Wen

    2016-02-17

    Cell-derived microvesicles (MVs) are natural carriers that can transport biological molecules between cells, which are expected to be promising delivery vehicles for therapeutic purposes. Strategies to label MVs are very important for investigation and application of MVs. Herein, ultrasmall Mn-magnetofunctionalized Ag2Se quantum dots (Ag2Se@Mn QDs) integrated with excellent near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging capabilities have been developed for instant efficient labeling of MVs for their in vivo high-resolution dual-mode tracking. The Ag2Se@Mn QDs were fabricated by controlling the reaction of Mn(2+) with the Ag2Se nanocrystals having been pretreated in 80 °C NaOH solution, with an ultrasmall size of ca. 1.8 nm, water dispersibility, high NIR fluorescence quantum yield of 13.2%, and high longitudinal relaxivity of 12.87 mM(-1) s(-1) (almost four times that of the commercial contrast agent Gd-DTPA). The ultrasmall size of the Ag2Se@Mn QDs enables them to be directly and efficiently loaded into MVs by electroporation, instantly and reliably conferring both NIR fluorescence and MR traceability on MVs. Our method for labeling MVs of different origins is universal and free of unfavorable influence on intrinsic behaviors of MVs. The complementary imaging capabilities of the Ag2Se@Mn QDs have made the long-term noninvasive whole-body high-resolution dual-mode tracking of MVs in vivo realized, by which the dynamic biodistribution of MVs has been revealed in a real-time and in situ quantitative manner. This work not only opens a new window for labeling with QDs, but also facilitates greatly the investigation and application of MVs.

  10. Metastatic Mechanisms in Follicular Cell-Derived Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Phay, John E.; Ringel, Matthew D.

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid cancer incidence is rising annually largely related to enhanced detection and of early stage well-differentiated primary tumors. The prognosis for patients with early stage thyroid cancer is outstanding with most patients being cured with surgery. In selected cases, I-131 is administered to treat known or suspected residual or metastatic disease. Even patients with loco-regional metastases typically have an outstanding long-term prognosis, albeit with monitoring and occasional intervention for residual or recurrent disease. In contrast, individuals with distant metastases from thyroid cancer, particular older patients with larger metastatic burdens and those with poorly differentiated tumors, have a poor prognosis. Patients with metastatic anaplastic thyroid cancer have a particularly poor prognosis. Published clinical trials indicate that transient disease control and partial remissions can be achieved with kinase inhibitor therapy directed toward angiogenic targets, and that in some cases, I-131 uptake can be enhanced. However, the direct targets of activity in metastatic lesions are incompletely defined and clear evidence that these treatments increase the duration or quality of life of patients is lacking, underscoring the need for improved knowledge regarding the metastatic process to inform the development of new therapies. In this review, we will focus on current data and hypotheses regarding key regulators of metastatic dormancy, metastatic progression, and the role of putative cancer stem cells. PMID:24036131

  11. Microvesicles released constitutively from prostate cancer cells differ biochemically and functionally to stimulated microvesicles released through sublytic C5b-9.

    PubMed

    Stratton, Dan; Moore, Colin; Antwi-Baffour, Samuel; Lange, Sigrun; Inal, Jameel

    2015-05-08

    We have classified microvesicles into two subtypes: larger MVs released upon stimulation of prostate cancer cells, sMVs, and smaller cMVs, released constitutively. cMVs are released as part of cell metabolism and sMVs, released at 10-fold higher levels, produced upon activation, including sublytic C5b-9. From electron microscopy, nanosight tracking analysis, dynamic light scattering and flow cytometry, cMVs (194-210 nm in diameter) are smaller than sMVs (333-385 nm). Furthermore, using a Quartz Crystal Microbalance measuring changes in resonant frequency (Δf) that equate to mass deposited on a sensor, an sMV and a cMV are estimated at 0.267 and 0.241 pg, respectively. sMVs carry more calcium and protein, express higher levels of lipid rafts, GPI-anchored CD55 and phosphatidylserine including deposited C5b-9 compared to cMVs. This may allude to biological differences such as increased bound C4BP on sMVs inhibiting complement more effectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. iPS-cell derived dendritic cells and macrophages for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Senju, Satoru

    2016-08-01

    Antibody-based anti-cancer immunotherapy was recently recognized as one of the truly effective therapies for cancer patients. Antibodies against cell surface cancer antigens, such as CD20, and also those against immune-inhibitory molecules called "immune checkpoint blockers", such as CTLA4 or PD1, have emerged. Large-scale clinical trials have confirmed that, in some cases, antibody-based drugs are superior to conventional chemotherapeutic agents. These antibody-based drugs are now being manufactured employing a mass-production system by pharmaceutical companies. Anti-cancer therapy by immune cells, i.e. cell-based immunotherapy, is expected to be more effective than antibody therapy, because immune cells can recognize, infiltrate, and act in cancer tissues more directly than antibodies. In order to achieve cell-based anti-cancer immunotherapy, it is necessary to develop manufacturing systems for mass-production of immune cells. Our group has been studying immunotherapy with myeloid cells derived from ES cells or iPS cells. These pluripotent stem cells can be readily propagated under constant culture conditions, with expansion into a large quantity. We consider these stem cells to be the most suitable cellular source for mass-production of immune cells. This review introduces our studies on anti-cancer therapy with iPS cell-derived dendritic cells and iPS cell-derived macrophages.

  13. Cancer immunotherapy using dendritic cell-derived exosomes.

    PubMed

    Amigorena, S

    2000-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent antigen presenting cells and the only ones capable of inducing primary cytotoxic immune responses. We found that DCs secrete a population of membrane vesicles, called exosomes. Exosomes are 60-80 nm vesicles of endocytic origin. The protein composition of exosomes was subjected to a systematic proteomic analysis. Besides MHC and co-stimulatory molecules, exosomes bear several adhesion proteins, most likely involved in their specific subjected to targeting. We also found that exosomes accumulate several cytosolic factors, probably involved in their endosomal biogenesis. Like DCs, exosomes induced immune responses in vivo. Indeed, a single injection of DC-derived exosomes sensitized with tumor peptides induced potent anti tumor immune responses in mice and the eradication of established tumors. Tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes were found in the spleen of exosome-treated mice, and the anti tumor effect of exosomes was sensitive to in vivo depletion of CD8+ T cells. These results show that exosomes induce potent anti tumor effects in vivo, and strongly support the implementation of human DC-derived exosomes for cancer immunotherapy.

  14. Breast cancer cell-derived matrix supports vascular morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hielscher, Abigail C; Qiu, Connie; Gerecht, Sharon

    2012-04-15

    The extracellular matrix (ECM), important for maintaining tissue homeostasis, is abnormally expressed in mammary tumors and additionally plays a crucial role in angiogenesis. We hypothesize that breast cancer cells (BCCs) deposit ECM that supports unique patterns of vascular morphogenesis of endothelial cells (ECs). Evaluation of ECM expression revealed that a nontumorigenic cell line (MCF10A), a tumorigenic cell line (MCF7), and a metastatic cell line (MDA-MB-231) express collagens I and IV, fibronectin, and laminin, with tenascin-C limited to MCF10A and MCF7. The amount of ECM deposited by BCCs was found to be higher in MCF10A compared with MCF7 and MDA231, with all ECM differing in their gross structure but similar in mean fiber diameter. Nonetheless, deposition of ECM from BCC lines was overall difficult to detect and insufficient to support capillary-like structure (CLS) formation of ECs. Therefore, a coculture approach was undertaken in which individual BCC lines were cocultured with fibroblasts. Variation in abundance of deposited ECM, deposition of ECM proteins, such as absent collagen I deposition from MDA231-fibroblast cocultures, and fibril organization was found. Deposited ECM from fibroblasts and each coculture supported rapid CLS formation of ECs. Evaluation of capillary properties revealed that CLS grown on ECM deposited from MDA231-fibroblast cocultures possessed significantly larger lumen diameters, occupied the greatest percentage of area, expressed the highest levels of von Willebrand factor, and expressed the greatest amount of E-selectin, which was upregulated independent of exposure to TNF-α. To our knowledge, this is the first study to report tumor cell ECM-mediated differences in vascular capillary features, and thus offers the framework for future investigations interrogating the role of the tumor ECM in supporting vascular morphogenesis.

  15. Role of stromal cell-derived factor 1α pathway in bone metastatic prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nisha; Duda, Dan G.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Metastatic prostate cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death in men. The primary site of metastasis from prostate cancers is the bone. During the last decade, multiple studies have pointed to the role of the stromal cell-derived factor 1 alpha (SDF1α)/CXCR4 axis in the metastatic spread of the disease, but the mechanisms that underlie this effect are still incompletely understood. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the role of the SDF1α/CXCR4 pathway in bone metastatic prostate cancer. We also discuss the therapeutic potential of disrupting the interaction between prostate tumor cells and bone environment with focus on the SDF1α pathway. PMID:27533927

  16. Tumor-derived exosomes and microvesicles in head and neck cancer: implications for tumor biology and biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Principe, Simona; Hui, Angela Bik-Yu; Bruce, Jeff; Sinha, Ankit; Liu, Fei-Fei; Kislinger, Thomas

    2013-05-01

    Exosomes and microvesicles (MVs) are nanometer-sized, membranous vesicles secreted from many cell types into their surrounding extracellular space and into body fluids. These two classes of extracellular vesicles are regarded as a novel mechanism through which cancer cells, including virally infected cancer cells, regulate their micro-environment via the horizontal transfer of bioactive molecules: proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids (DNA, mRNA, micro-RNAs; oncogenic cargo hence often referred to as oncosomes). In head and neck cancer (HNC), exosomes and MVs have been described in Epstein Barr Virus (EBV)-associated nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC), as well as being positively correlated with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) progression. It has therefore been suggested that HNC-derived vesicles could represent a useful source for biomarker discovery, enriched in tumor antigens and cargo; hence fundamentally important for cancer progression. This current review offers an overall perspective on the roles of exosomes and MVs in HNC biology, focusing on EBV-associated NPC and OSCC. We also highlight the importance of saliva as a proximal and easily accessible bio-fluid for HNC detection, and propose that salivary vesicles might serve as an alternative model in the discovery of novel HNC biomarkers.

  17. Analysis of the potential of cancer cell lines to release tissue factor-containing microvesicles: correlation with tissue factor and PAR2 expression.

    PubMed

    Ettelaie, Camille; Collier, Mary Ew; Featherby, Sophie; Benelhaj, Naima E; Greenman, John; Maraveyas, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Despite the association of cancer-derived circulating tissue factor (TF)-containing microvesicles and hypercoagulable state, correlations with the incidence of thrombosis remain unclear. In this study the upregulation of TF release upon activation of various cancer cell lines, and the correlation with TF and PAR2 expression and/or activity was examined. Microvesicle release was induced by PAR2 activation in seventeen cell lines and released microvesicle density, microvesicle-associated TF activity, and phoshpatidylserine-mediated activity were measured. The time-course for TF release was monitored over 90 min in each cell line. In addition, TF mRNA expression, cellular TF protein and cell-surface TF activities were quantified. Moreover, the relative expression of PAR2 mRNA and cellular protein were analysed. Any correlations between the above parameters were examined by determining the Pearson's correlation coefficients. TF release as microvesicles peaked between 30-60 min post-activation in the majority of cell lines tested. The magnitude of the maximal TF release positively correlated with TF mRNA (c = 0.717; p < 0.001) and PAR2 mRNA (c = 0.770; p < 0.001) expressions while the percentage increase correlated with PAR2 mRNA (c = 0.601; p = 0.011) and protein (c = 0.714; p < 0.001). There was only a weak correlation between resting TF release, and microvesicle release. However, TF release in resting cells did not significantly correlate with any of the parameters examined. Furthermore, TF mRNA expression correlated with PAR2 mRNA expression (c = 0.745; p < 0.001). In conclusion, our data suggest that TF and PAR2 mRNA, and PAR2 protein are better indicators of the ability of cancer cells to release TF and may constitute more accurate predictors of risk of thrombosis.

  18. Circulating Microvesicles Are Elevated Acutely following Major Burns Injury and Associated with Clinical Severity.

    PubMed

    O'Dea, Kieran P; Porter, John R; Tirlapur, Nikhil; Katbeh, Umar; Singh, Suveer; Handy, Jonathan M; Takata, Masao

    2016-01-01

    Microvesicles are cell-derived signaling particles emerging as important mediators and biomarkers of systemic inflammation, but their production in severe burn injury patients has not been described. In this pilot investigation, we measured circulating microvesicle levels following severe burns, with severe sepsis patients as a comparator group. We hypothesized that levels of circulating vascular cell-derived microvesicles are elevated acutely following burns injury, mirroring clinical severity due to the early onset and prevalence of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) in these patients. Blood samples were obtained from patients with moderate to severe thermal injury burns, with severe sepsis, and from healthy volunteers. Circulating microvesicles derived from total leukocytes, granulocytes, monocytes, and endothelial cells were quantified in plasma by flow cytometry. All circulating microvesicle subpopulations were elevated in burns patients on day of admission (day 0) compared to healthy volunteers (leukocyte-microvesicles: 3.5-fold, p = 0.005; granulocyte-microvesicles: 12.8-fold, p<0.0001; monocyte-microvesicles: 20.4-fold, p<0.0001; endothelial- microvesicles: 9.6-fold, p = 0.01), but decreased significantly by day 2. Microvesicle levels were increased with severe sepsis, but less consistently between patients. Leukocyte- and granulocyte-derived microvesicles on day 0 correlated with clinical assessment scores and were higher in burns ICU non-survivors compared to survivors (leukocyte MVs 4.6 fold, p = 0.002; granulocyte MVs 4.8 fold, p = 0.003). Mortality prediction analysis of area under receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.92 (p = 0.01) for total leukocyte microvesicles and 0.85 (p = 0.04) for granulocyte microvesicles. These findings demonstrate, for the first time, acute increases in circulating microvesicles following burns injury in patients and point to their potential role in propagation of sterile SIRS-related pathophysiology.

  19. Fas signal promotes lung cancer growth by recruiting myeloid-derived suppressor cells via cancer cell-derived PGE2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongliang; Liu, Qiuyan; Zhang, Minggang; Yu, Yizhi; Liu, Xia; Cao, Xuetao

    2009-03-15

    Fas/FasL system has been extensively investigated with respect to its capacity to induce cellular apoptosis. However, accumulated evidences show that Fas signaling also exhibits nonapoptotic functions, such as induction of cell proliferation and differentiation. Lung cancer is one of cancer's refractory to the immunotherapy, however, the underlying mechanisms remain to be fully understood. In this study, we show that Fas overexpression does not affect in vitro growth of 3LL cells, but promotes lung cancer growth in vivo. However, such tumor-promoting effect is not observed in FasL-deficient (gld) mice, and also not observed in the immune competent mice once inoculation with domain-negative Fas-overexpressing 3LL cells, suggesting the critical role of Fas signal in the promotion of lung cancer growth in vivo. More accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) and Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells is found in tumors formed by inoculation with Fas-overexpressing 3LL cells, but not domain-negative Fas-overexpressing 3LL cells. Accordingly, Fas-ligated 3LL lung cancer cells can chemoattract more MDSC but not regulatory T cells in vitro. Furthermore, Fas ligation induces 3LL lung cancer cells to produce proinflammatory factor PGE(2) by activating p38 pathway, and in turn, 3LL cells-derived PGE(2) contribute to the Fas ligation-induced MDSC chemoattraction. Furthermore, in vivo administration of cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor can significantly reduce MDSC accumulation in the Fas-overexpressing tumor. Therefore, our results demonstrate that Fas signal can promote lung cancer growth by recruiting MDSC via cancer cell-derived PGE(2), thus providing new mechanistic explanation for the role of inflammation in cancer progression and immune escape.

  20. Tumour microvesicles contain retrotransposon elements and amplified oncogene sequences

    PubMed Central

    Balaj, Leonora; Lessard, Ryan; Dai, Lixin; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Pomeroy, Scott L.; Breakefield, Xandra O.; Skog, Johan

    2011-01-01

    Tumour cells release an abundance of microvesicles containing a selected set of proteins and RNAs. Here, we show that tumour microvesicles also carry DNA, which reflects the genetic status of the tumour, including amplification of the oncogene c-Myc. We also find amplified c-Myc in serum microvesicles from tumour-bearing mice. Further, we find remarkably high levels of retrotransposon RNA transcripts, especially for some human endogenous retroviruses, such as LINE-1 and Alu retrotransposon elements, in tumour microvesicles and these transposable elements could be transferred to normal cells. These findings expand the nucleic acid content of tumour microvesicles to include: elevated levels of specific coding and non-coding RNA and DNA, mutated and amplified oncogene sequences and transposable elements. Thus, tumour microvesicles contain a repertoire of genetic information available for horizontal gene transfer and potential use as blood biomarkers for cancer. PMID:21285958

  1. Functional role of microvesicles in gastrointestinal malignancies.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, Kelly; Correa, Robert; Zhou, Tianhao; Johnson, Christopher; Francis, Heather; Glaser, Shannon; Venter, Julie; Alpini, Gianfranco; Meng, Fanyin

    2013-04-01

    Microvesicles (MVs) are derived from the plasma membrane and are released into the intracellular space by outward budding and fission of the plasma membrane of cells. Various studies have shown high regulation of microvesicles shedding from cells widespread throughout the body, often involving cancerous cells. MVs are originated from the endosomal membrane compartment, and after fusion with the plasma membrane, they are shed from the cell surface of activated cells. Therefore, microvesicles may be secreted by activated malignant and normal cells and play a role in cellular communication during cancer development. Microvesicles are found in many biological fluids in the body and have been demonstrated to receive their functionality from the parent cell from which they are derived. MVs facilitate the transfer of proteins and other molecules, thereby allowing for interaction with cells and tissues far away from the originating cell. This functionality has caused researchers to view microvesicles as a primary component of tumor progression and development. This commentary summarizes recent literature on the properties and biogenesis of microvesicles, and their influence on gastrointestinal tumor progression.

  2. Functional role of microvesicles in gastrointestinal malignancies

    PubMed Central

    McDaniel, Kelly; Correa, Robert; Zhou, Tianhao; Johnson, Christopher; Francis, Heather; Glaser, Shannon; Venter, Julie; Alpini, Gianfranco

    2013-01-01

    Microvesicles (MVs) are derived from the plasma membrane and are released into the intracellular space by outward budding and fission of the plasma membrane of cells. Various studies have shown high regulation of microvesicles shedding from cells widespread throughout the body, often involving cancerous cells. MVs are originated from the endosomal membrane compartment, and after fusion with the plasma membrane, they are shed from the cell surface of activated cells. Therefore, microvesicles may be secreted by activated malignant and normal cells and play a role in cellular communication during cancer development. Microvesicles are found in many biological fluids in the body and have been demonstrated to receive their functionality from the parent cell from which they are derived. MVs facilitate the transfer of proteins and other molecules, thereby allowing for interaction with cells and tissues far away from the originating cell. This functionality has caused researchers to view microvesicles as a primary component of tumor progression and development. This commentary summarizes recent literature on the properties and biogenesis of microvesicles, and their influence on gastrointestinal tumor progression. PMID:24432300

  3. Cancer Cell-Derived Extracellular Vesicles Are Associated with Coagulopathy Causing Ischemic Stroke via Tissue Factor-Independent Way: The OASIS-CANCER Study

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Oh Young; Chung, Jong-Won; Lee, Mi Ji; Kim, Suk Jae; Cho, Yeon Hee; Kim, Gyeong-Moon; Chung, Chin-Sang; Lee, Kwang Ho; Ahn, Myung-Ju; Moon, Gyeong Joon

    2016-01-01

    Background Cancer and stroke, which are known to be associated with one another, are the most common causes of death in the elderly. However, the pathomechanisms that lead to stroke in cancer patients are not well known. Circulating extracellular vesicles (EVs) play a role in cancer-associated thrombosis and tumor progression. Therefore, we hypothesized that cancer cell-derived EVs cause cancer-related coagulopathy resulting in ischemic stroke. Methods Serum levels of D-dimer and EVs expressing markers for cancer cells (epithelial cell adhesion molecule [CD326]), tissue factor (TF [CD142]), endothelial cells (CD31+CD42b-), and platelets (CD62P) were measured using flow cytometry in (a) 155 patients with ischemic stroke and active cancer (116 − cancer-related, 39 − conventional stroke mechanisms), (b) 25 patients with ischemic stroke without cancer, (c) 32 cancer patients without stroke, and (d) 101 healthy subjects. Results The levels of cancer cell-derived EVs correlated with the levels of D-dimer and TF+ EVs. The levels of cancer cell-derived EVs (CD326+ and CD326+CD142+) were higher in cancer-related stroke than in other groups (P<0.05 in all the cases). Path analysis showed that cancer cell-derived EVs are related to stroke via coagulopathy as measured by D-dimer levels. Poor correlation was observed between TF+ EV and D-dimer, and path analysis demonstrated that cancer cell-derived EVs may cause cancer-related coagulopathy independent of the levels of TF+ EVs. Conclusions Our findings suggest that cancer cell-derived EVs mediate coagulopathy resulting in ischemic stroke via TF-independent mechanisms. PMID:27427978

  4. Chronic inhibition of tumor cell-derived VEGF enhances the malignant phenotype of colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Vascular endothelial growth factor-a (VEGF)-targeted therapies have become an important treatment for a number of human malignancies. The VEGF inhibitors are actually effective in several types of cancers, however, the benefits are transiently, and the vast majority of patients who initially respond to the therapies will develop resistance. One of possible mechanisms for the acquired resistance may be the direct effect(s) of VEGF inhibitors on tumor cells expressing VEGF receptors (VEGFR). Thus, we investigated here the direct effect of chronic VEGF inhibition on phenotype changes in human colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. Methods To chronically inhibit cancer cell-derived VEGF, human CRC cell lines (HCT116 and RKO) were chronically exposed (2 months) to an anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody (mAb) or were disrupted the Vegf gene (VEGF-KO). Effects of VEGF family members were blocked by treatment with a VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (VEGFR-TKI). Hypoxia-induced apoptosis under VEGF inhibited conditions was measured by TUNEL assay. Spheroid formation ability was assessed using a 3-D spheroid cell culture system. Results Chronic inhibition of secreted/extracellular VEGF by an anti-VEGF mAb redundantly increased VEGF family member (PlGF, VEGFR1 and VEGFR2), induced a resistance to hypoxia-induced apoptosis, and increased spheroid formation ability. This apoptotic resistance was partially abrogated by a VEGFR-TKI, which blocked the compensate pathway consisted of VEGF family members, or by knockdown of Vegf mRNA, which inhibited intracellular function(s) of all Vegf gene products. Interestingly, chronic and complete depletion of all Vegf gene products by Vegf gene knockout further augmented these phenotypes in the compensate pathway-independent manner. These accelerated phenotypes were significantly suppressed by knockdown of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α that was up-regulated in the VEGF-KO cell lines. Conclusions Our findings suggest that chronic

  5. Microvesicles in Autoimmune Diseases.

    PubMed

    Liu, M-L; Williams, K J; Werth, V P

    During apoptosis or activation, cells can release a subcellular structure, called a membrane microvesicle (also known as microparticle) into the extracellular environment. Microvesicles bud-off as a portion of cell membrane with its associated proteins and lipids surrounding a cytosolic core that contains intracellular proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids (DNA, RNA, siRNA, microRNA, lncRNA). Biologically active molecules on the microvesicle surface and encapsulated within can act on recipient cells as a novel mode of intercellular communication. Apoptosis has long been known to be involved in the development of diseases of autoimmunity. Abnormally persistent microvesicles, particularly apoptotic microvesicles, can accelerate autoimmune responses locally in specific organs and tissues as well as systemically. In this review, we focus on studies implicating microvesicles in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases and their complications. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Interactions between colon cancer cells and tumor-infiltrated macrophages depending on cancer cell-derived colony stimulating factor 1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huayang; Shao, Qianqian; Sun, Jintang; Ma, Chao; Gao, Wenjuan; Wang, Qingjie; Zhao, Lei; Qu, Xun

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tumor-infiltrated macrophages were potential targets of the immune therapy for patients with colon cancer. Colony stimulating factor 1 (CSF1) is a primary chemoattractant and functional regulator for macrophages, and therefore would be a feasible intervention for the macrophage-targeting therapeutics. However, the expression of CSF1 in colon cancer microenvironment and its roles in cancer development is largely unknown. In the present study, we found that CSF1 was over-expressed exclusively in colon cancer cells and was correlated with macrophages infiltration. The high CSF1 expression and macrophages infiltration were related to the tumor–node-metastasis (TNM) stage of colon cancer, and suggested to be positively associated with survival of colon cancer patients. In the in vitro studies based on an indirect Transwell system, we found that co-culture with macrophage promoted CSF1 production in colon cancer cells. Further investigation on regulatory mechanisms suggested that CSF1 production in colon cancer cells was dependent on PKC pathway, which was activated by IL-8, mainly produced by macrophages. Moreover, colon cancer cell-derived CSF1 drove the recruitment of macrophages and re-educated their secretion profile, including the augment of IL-8 production. The mice tumor xenografts study also found that over-expression of CSF1 in colon cancer cells promoted intratumoral infiltration of macrophages, and partially suppressed tumor growth. In all, our results demonstrated that CSF1 was an important factor in the colon cancer microenvironment, involving in the interactions between colon cancer cells and tumor-infiltrated macrophages. PMID:27141406

  7. Interactions between colon cancer cells and tumor-infiltrated macrophages depending on cancer cell-derived colony stimulating factor 1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huayang; Shao, Qianqian; Sun, Jintang; Ma, Chao; Gao, Wenjuan; Wang, Qingjie; Zhao, Lei; Qu, Xun

    2016-04-01

    Tumor-infiltrated macrophages were potential targets of the immune therapy for patients with colon cancer. Colony stimulating factor 1 (CSF1) is a primary chemoattractant and functional regulator for macrophages, and therefore would be a feasible intervention for the macrophage-targeting therapeutics. However, the expression of CSF1 in colon cancer microenvironment and its roles in cancer development is largely unknown. In the present study, we found that CSF1 was over-expressed exclusively in colon cancer cells and was correlated with macrophages infiltration. The high CSF1 expression and macrophages infiltration were related to the tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage of colon cancer, and suggested to be positively associated with survival of colon cancer patients. In the in vitro studies based on an indirect Transwell system, we found that co-culture with macrophage promoted CSF1 production in colon cancer cells. Further investigation on regulatory mechanisms suggested that CSF1 production in colon cancer cells was dependent on PKC pathway, which was activated by IL-8, mainly produced by macrophages. Moreover, colon cancer cell-derived CSF1 drove the recruitment of macrophages and re-educated their secretion profile, including the augment of IL-8 production. The mice tumor xenografts study also found that over-expression of CSF1 in colon cancer cells promoted intratumoral infiltration of macrophages, and partially suppressed tumor growth. In all, our results demonstrated that CSF1 was an important factor in the colon cancer microenvironment, involving in the interactions between colon cancer cells and tumor-infiltrated macrophages.

  8. Revisiting tumor angiogenesis: vessel co-option, vessel remodeling, and cancer cell-derived vasculature formation.

    PubMed

    Qian, Chao-Nan; Tan, Min-Han; Yang, Jun-Ping; Cao, Yun

    2016-01-08

    Tumor growth and metastasis depend on the establishment of tumor vasculature to provide oxygen, nutrients, and other essential factors. The well-known vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling is crucial for sprouting angiogenesis as well as recruitment of circulating progenitor endothelial cells to tumor vasculature, which has become therapeutic targets in clinical practice. However, the survival benefits gained from targeting VEGF signaling have been very limited, with the inevitable development of treatment resistance. In this article, we discuss the most recent findings and understanding on how solid tumors evade VEGF-targeted therapy, with a special focus on vessel co-option, vessel remodeling, and tumor cell-derived vasculature establishment. Vessel co-option may occur in tumors independently of sprouting angiogenesis, and sprouting angiogenesis is not always required for tumor growth. The differences between vessel-like structure and tubule-like structure formed by tumor cells are also introduced. The exploration of the underlying mechanisms of these alternative angiogenic approaches would not only widen our knowledge of tumor angiogenesis but also provide novel therapeutic targets for better controlling cancer growth and metastasis.

  9. Protein typing of circulating microvesicles allows real-time monitoring of glioblastoma therapy.

    PubMed

    Shao, Huilin; Chung, Jaehoon; Balaj, Leonora; Charest, Alain; Bigner, Darell D; Carter, Bob S; Hochberg, Fred H; Breakefield, Xandra O; Weissleder, Ralph; Lee, Hakho

    2012-12-01

    Glioblastomas shed large quantities of small, membrane-bound microvesicles into the circulation. Although these hold promise as potential biomarkers of therapeutic response, their identification and quantification remain challenging. Here, we describe a highly sensitive and rapid analytical technique for profiling circulating microvesicles directly from blood samples of patients with glioblastoma. Microvesicles, introduced onto a dedicated microfluidic chip, are labeled with target-specific magnetic nanoparticles and detected by a miniaturized nuclear magnetic resonance system. Compared with current methods, this integrated system has a much higher detection sensitivity and can differentiate glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) microvesicles from nontumor host cell-derived microvesicles. We also show that circulating GBM microvesicles can be used to analyze primary tumor mutations and as a predictive metric of treatment-induced changes. This platform could provide both an early indicator of drug efficacy and a potential molecular stratifier for human clinical trials.

  10. Microvesicles and viral infection.

    PubMed

    Meckes, David G; Raab-Traub, Nancy

    2011-12-01

    Cells secrete various membrane-enclosed microvesicles from their cell surface (shedding microvesicles) and from internal, endosome-derived membranes (exosomes). Intriguingly, these vesicles have many characteristics in common with enveloped viruses, including biophysical properties, biogenesis, and uptake by cells. Recent discoveries describing the microvesicle-mediated intercellular transfer of functional cellular proteins, RNAs, and mRNAs have revealed additional similarities between viruses and cellular microvesicles. Apparent differences include the complexity of viral entry, temporally regulated viral expression, and self-replication proceeding to infection of new cells. Interestingly, many virally infected cells secrete microvesicles that differ in content from their virion counterparts but may contain various viral proteins and RNAs. For the most part, these particles have not been analyzed for their content or functions during viral infection. However, early studies of microvesicles (L-particles) secreted from herpes simplex virus-infected cells provided the first evidence of microvesicle-mediated intercellular communication. In the case of Epstein-Barr virus, recent evidence suggests that this tumorigenic herpesvirus also utilizes exosomes as a mechanism of cell-to-cell communication through the transfer of signaling competent proteins and functional microRNAs to uninfected cells. This review focuses on aspects of the biology of microvesicles with an emphasis on their potential contributions to viral infection and pathogenesis.

  11. Microvesicles and Viral Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Meckes, David G.; Raab-Traub, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    Cells secrete various membrane-enclosed microvesicles from their cell surface (shedding microvesicles) and from internal, endosome-derived membranes (exosomes). Intriguingly, these vesicles have many characteristics in common with enveloped viruses, including biophysical properties, biogenesis, and uptake by cells. Recent discoveries describing the microvesicle-mediated intercellular transfer of functional cellular proteins, RNAs, and mRNAs have revealed additional similarities between viruses and cellular microvesicles. Apparent differences include the complexity of viral entry, temporally regulated viral expression, and self-replication proceeding to infection of new cells. Interestingly, many virally infected cells secrete microvesicles that differ in content from their virion counterparts but may contain various viral proteins and RNAs. For the most part, these particles have not been analyzed for their content or functions during viral infection. However, early studies of microvesicles (L-particles) secreted from herpes simplex virus-infected cells provided the first evidence of microvesicle-mediated intercellular communication. In the case of Epstein-Barr virus, recent evidence suggests that this tumorigenic herpesvirus also utilizes exosomes as a mechanism of cell-to-cell communication through the transfer of signaling competent proteins and functional microRNAs to uninfected cells. This review focuses on aspects of the biology of microvesicles with an emphasis on their potential contributions to viral infection and pathogenesis. PMID:21976651

  12. Complement Interactions with Blood Cells, Endothelial Cells and Microvesicles in Thrombotic and Inflammatory Conditions.

    PubMed

    Karpman, Diana; Ståhl, Anne-lie; Arvidsson, Ida; Johansson, Karl; Loos, Sebastian; Tati, Ramesh; Békássy, Zivile; Kristoffersson, Ann-Charlotte; Mossberg, Maria; Kahn, Robin

    2015-01-01

    The complement system is activated in the vasculature during thrombotic and inflammatory conditions. Activation may be associated with chronic inflammation on the endothelial surface leading to complement deposition. Complement mutations allow uninhibited complement activation to occur on platelets, neutrophils, monocytes, and aggregates thereof, as well as on red blood cells and endothelial cells. Furthermore, complement activation on the cells leads to the shedding of cell derived-microvesicles that may express complement and tissue factor thus promoting inflammation and thrombosis. Complement deposition on red blood cells triggers hemolysis and the release of red blood cell-derived microvesicles that are prothrombotic. Microvesicles are small membrane vesicles ranging from 0.1 to 1 μm, shed by cells during activation, injury and/or apoptosis that express components of the parent cell. Microvesicles are released during inflammatory and vascular conditions. The repertoire of inflammatory markers on endothelial cell-derived microvesicles shed during inflammation is large and includes complement. These circulating microvesicles may reflect the ongoing inflammatory process but may also contribute to its propagation. This overview will describe complement activation on blood and endothelial cells and the release of microvesicles from these cells during hemolytic uremic syndrome, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and vasculitis, clinical conditions associated with enhanced thrombosis and inflammation.

  13. Regulated delivery of molecular cargo to invasive tumour-derived microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Clancy, James W; Sedgwick, Alanna; Rosse, Carine; Muralidharan-Chari, Vandhana; Raposo, Graca; Method, Michael; Chavrier, Philippe; D'Souza-Schorey, Crislyn

    2015-04-21

    Cells release multiple, distinct forms of extracellular vesicles including structures known as microvesicles, which are known to alter the extracellular environment. Despite growing understanding of microvesicle biogenesis, function and contents, mechanisms regulating cargo delivery and enrichment remain largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that in amoeboid-like invasive tumour cell lines, the v-SNARE, VAMP3, regulates delivery of microvesicle cargo such as the membrane-type 1 matrix metalloprotease (MT1-MMP) to shedding microvesicles. MT1-MMP delivery to nascent microvesicles depends on the association of VAMP3 with the tetraspanin CD9 and facilitates the maintenance of amoeboid cell invasion. VAMP3-shRNA expression depletes shed vesicles of MT1-MMP and decreases cell invasiveness when embedded in cross-linked collagen matrices. Finally, we describe functionally similar microvesicles isolated from bodily fluids of ovarian cancer patients. Together these studies demonstrate the importance of microvesicle cargo sorting in matrix degradation and disease progression.

  14. Regulated Delivery of Molecular Cargo to Invasive Tumor-derived Microvesicles

    PubMed Central

    Clancy, James W.; Sedgwick, Alanna; Rosse, Carine; Muralidharan-Chari, Vandhana; Raposo, Graca; Method, Michael; Chavrier, Philippe; D'Souza-Schorey, Crislyn

    2015-01-01

    Cells release multiple, distinct, forms of extracellular vesicles including structures known as microvesicles which are known to alter the extracellular environment. Despite growing understanding of microvesicle biogenesis, function, and contents, mechanisms regulating cargo delivery and enrichment remain largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that in amoeboid-like invasive tumor cell lines, the v-SNARE, VAMP3, regulates delivery of microvesicle cargo such as the membrane-type 1 matrix metalloprotease (MT1-MMP) to shedding microvesicles. MT1-MMP delivery to nascent microvesicles depends on the association of VAMP3 with the tetraspanin CD9 and facilitates the maintenance of amoeboid cell invasion. VAMP3-shRNA expression depletes shed vesicles of MT1-MMP and decreases cell invasiveness when embedded in cross-linked collagen matrices. Finally, we describe functionally similar microvesicles isolated from bodily fluids of ovarian cancer patients. Together these studies demonstrate the importance of microvesicle cargo sorting in matrix degradation and disease progression. PMID:25897521

  15. Structural basis for the interaction of human β-defensin 6 and its putative chemokine receptor CCR2 and breast cancer microvesicles.

    PubMed

    De Paula, V S; Gomes, N S F; Lima, L G; Miyamoto, C A; Monteiro, R Q; Almeida, F C L; Valente, A P

    2013-11-15

    Human β-defensins (hBDs) are believed to function as alarm molecules that stimulate the adaptive immune system when a threat is present. In addition to its antimicrobial activity, defensins present other activities such as chemoattraction of a range of different cell types to the sites of inflammation. We have solved the structure of the hBD6 by NMR spectroscopy that contains a conserved β-defensin domain followed by an extended C-terminus. We use NMR to monitor the interaction of hBD6 with microvesicles shed by breast cancer cell lines and with peptides derived from the extracellular domain of CC chemokine receptor 2 (Nt-CCR2) possessing or not possessing sulfation on Tyr26 and Tyr28. The NMR-derived model of the hBD6/CCR2 complex reveals a contiguous binding surface on hBD6, which comprises amino acid residues of the α-helix and β2-β3 loop. The microvesicle binding surface partially overlaps with the chemokine receptor interface. NMR spin relaxation suggests that free hBD6 and the hBD6/CCR2 complex exhibit microsecond-to-millisecond conformational dynamics encompassing the CCR2 binding site, which might facilitate selection of the molecular configuration optimal for binding. These data offer new insights into the structure-function relation of the hBD6-CCR2 interaction, which is a promising target for the design of novel anticancer agents. © 2013.

  16. Antithrombin Activity of Erythrocyte Microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Levin, G Ya; Sukhareva, E G

    2017-04-01

    Coagulation and optical (based on chromogenic substrate) methods were employed to examine antithrombin activity of erythrocytes and erythrocyte-derived microvesicles isolated days 7, 14, 21, and 28 on erythrocyte storage. The erythrocyte-derived microvesicles decelerated fibrin clot formation from fibrinogen in the presence of exogenous thrombin both with and without heparin. Microvesicles reduced optical density of chromogenic substrate. These data suggest that erythrocyte-derived microvesicles display a prominent antithrombin activity, which significantly increases during erythrocyte storage.

  17. Cancer cell-derived IL-1α induces CCL22 and the recruitment of regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Wiedemann, Gabriela Maria; Knott, Max Martin Ludwig; Vetter, Viola Katharina; Rapp, Moritz; Haubner, Sascha; Fesseler, Julia; Kühnemuth, Benjamin; Layritz, Patrick; Thaler, Raffael; Kruger, Stephan; Ormanns, Steffen; Mayr, Doris; Endres, Stefan; Anz, David

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In cancer patients, immunosuppression through regulatory T cells (Treg) is a crucial component of tumor immune evasion and contributes to disease progression. Tumor-infiltrating Treg in particular suppress local effector T cell responses and are associated with poor prognosis in tumors such as human pancreatic cancer or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The chemokine CCL22 is known to recruit Treg into the tumor tissue and many types of human tumors are known to express high levels of CCL22. The mechanisms leading to intratumoral secretion of CCL22 are so far unknown. We demonstrate here that intratumoral CCL22 is induced in tumor-infiltrating immune cells through cancer cell-derived interleukin-1 (IL-1α). In pancreatic cancer and HCC, CCL22 is produced by intratumoral dendritic cells, while the cancer cells themselves do not secrete CCL22 in vitro and in vivo. Incubation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) or murine splenocytes with tumor cells or tumor cell supernatants strongly induced CCL22 secretion in vitro. Tumor cell supernatants contained IL-1 and CCL22 induction in PBMC could be specifically prevented by the IL-1 receptor antagonist anakinra or by transfection of tumor cell lines with IL-1 siRNA, leading to a suppression of Treg migration. In conclusion, we identify here tumor cell-derived IL-1α as a major inducer of the Treg attracting chemokine CCL22 in human cancer cells. Therapeutic blockade of the IL-1 pathway could represent a promising strategy to inhibit tumor-induced immunosuppression. PMID:27757295

  18. Cancer cell-derived IL-1α induces CCL22 and the recruitment of regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, Gabriela Maria; Knott, Max Martin Ludwig; Vetter, Viola Katharina; Rapp, Moritz; Haubner, Sascha; Fesseler, Julia; Kühnemuth, Benjamin; Layritz, Patrick; Thaler, Raffael; Kruger, Stephan; Ormanns, Steffen; Mayr, Doris; Endres, Stefan; Anz, David

    2016-01-01

    In cancer patients, immunosuppression through regulatory T cells (Treg) is a crucial component of tumor immune evasion and contributes to disease progression. Tumor-infiltrating Treg in particular suppress local effector T cell responses and are associated with poor prognosis in tumors such as human pancreatic cancer or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The chemokine CCL22 is known to recruit Treg into the tumor tissue and many types of human tumors are known to express high levels of CCL22. The mechanisms leading to intratumoral secretion of CCL22 are so far unknown. We demonstrate here that intratumoral CCL22 is induced in tumor-infiltrating immune cells through cancer cell-derived interleukin-1 (IL-1α). In pancreatic cancer and HCC, CCL22 is produced by intratumoral dendritic cells, while the cancer cells themselves do not secrete CCL22 in vitro and in vivo. Incubation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) or murine splenocytes with tumor cells or tumor cell supernatants strongly induced CCL22 secretion in vitro. Tumor cell supernatants contained IL-1 and CCL22 induction in PBMC could be specifically prevented by the IL-1 receptor antagonist anakinra or by transfection of tumor cell lines with IL-1 siRNA, leading to a suppression of Treg migration. In conclusion, we identify here tumor cell-derived IL-1α as a major inducer of the Treg attracting chemokine CCL22 in human cancer cells. Therapeutic blockade of the IL-1 pathway could represent a promising strategy to inhibit tumor-induced immunosuppression.

  19. A Comprehensive Review on Exosomes and Microvesicles as Epigenetic Factors.

    PubMed

    Bakhshandeh, Behnaz; Kamaleddin, Mohammad Amin; Aalishah, Khadijeh

    2017-01-01

    Exosomes and microvesicles, which are released by most of the cells, play important roles in intracellular correspondence by transferring DNA, messenger RNA, micro RNA, and other types of RNA and proteins. Exosomes and microvesicles may contribute to the distribution of cancers and diseases through delivering the pathogenic agents to the non-infected cells; in cancers, they can modify the cells in the tumor niche and lead them to transformation. In addition, these vesicles can affect stem cell activity and their physiological properties. On the other hand, exosomes and microvesicles can be applied in the therapeutic strategies as they are small, non-viral, flexible and able to cross biological barriers. In this review, we focused on some details about the exosomes and microvesicles both functionally and structurally.

  20. Identification of a Conserved Glycan Signature for Microvesicles

    PubMed Central

    Batista, Bianca S.; Eng, William S.; Pilobello, Kanoelani T.; Hendricks-Muñoz, Karen D.; Mahal, Lara K.

    2011-01-01

    Microvesicles (exosomes) are important mediators of intercellular communication, playing a role in immune regulation, cancer progression and the spread of infectious agents. The biological functions of these small vesicles are dependent upon their composition, which is regulated by mechanisms that are not well understood. Although numerous proteomic studies of these particles exist, little is known about their glycosylation. Carbohydrates are involved in protein trafficking and cellular recognition. Glycomic analysis may thus provide valuable insights into microvesicle biology. In this study, we analyzed glycosylation patterns of microvesicles derived from a variety of biological sources using lectin microarray technology. Comparison of the microvesicle glycomes with their parent cell membranes revealed both enrichment and depletion of specific glycan epitopes in these particles. These include enrichment in high mannose, polylactosamine, α-2,6 sialic acid, and complex N-linked glycans and exclusion of terminal blood group A and B antigens. The polylactosamine signature derives from distinct glycoprotein cohorts in microvesicles of different origins. Taken together our data point to the emergence of microvesicles from a specific membrane microdomain, implying a role for glycosylation in microvesicle protein sorting. PMID:21859146

  1. Therapeutic potential of CAR-T cell-derived exosomes: a cell-free modality for targeted cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiang-Jun; Sun, Xu-Yong; Huang, Kuan-Ming; Zhang, Li; Yang, Zhuo-Shun; Zou, Dan-Dan; Wang, Bin; Warnock, Garth L; Dai, Long-Jun; Luo, Jie

    2015-12-29

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-based T-cell adoptive immunotherapy is a distinctively promising therapy for cancer. The engineering of CARs into T cells provides T cells with tumor-targeting capabilities and intensifies their cytotoxic activity through stimulated cell expansion and enhanced cytokine production. As a novel and potent therapeutic modality, there exists some uncontrollable processes which are the potential sources of adverse events. As an extension of this impactful modality, CAR-T cell-derived exosomes may substitute CAR-T cells to act as ultimate attackers, thereby overcoming some limitations. Exosomes retain most characteristics of parent cells and play an essential role in intercellular communications via transmitting their cargo to recipient cells. The application of CAR-T cell-derived exosomes will make this cell-based therapy more clinically controllable as it also provides a cell-free platform to diversify anticancer mediators, which responds effectively to the complexity and volatility of cancer. It is believed that the appropriate application of both cellular and exosomal platforms will make this effective treatment more practicable.

  2. High-Throughput Single-Cell Derived Sphere Formation for Cancer Stem-Like Cell Identification and Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Chih; Ingram, Patrick N.; Fouladdel, Shamileh; McDermott, Sean P.; Azizi, Ebrahim; Wicha, Max S.; Yoon, Euisik

    2016-01-01

    Considerable evidence suggests that many malignancies are driven by a cellular compartment that displays stem cell properties. Cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) can be identified by expression of cell surface markers or enzymatic activity, but these methods are limited by phenotypic heterogeneity and plasticity of CSCs. An alternative phenotypic methodology based on in-vitro sphere formation has been developed, but it is typically labor-intensive and low-throughput. In this work, we present a 1,024-microchamber microfluidic platform for single-cell derived sphere formation. Utilizing a hydrodynamic capturing scheme, more than 70% of the microchambers capture only one cell, allowing for monitoring of sphere formation from heterogeneous cancer cell populations for identification of CSCs. Single-cell derived spheres can be retrieved and dissociated for single-cell analysis using a custom 96-gene panel to probe heterogeneity within the clonal CSC spheres. This microfluidic platform provides reliable and high-throughput sphere formation for CSC identification and downstream clonal analysis. PMID:27292795

  3. High-Throughput Single-Cell Derived Sphere Formation for Cancer Stem-Like Cell Identification and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Chih; Ingram, Patrick N.; Fouladdel, Shamileh; McDermott, Sean P.; Azizi, Ebrahim; Wicha, Max S.; Yoon, Euisik

    2016-06-01

    Considerable evidence suggests that many malignancies are driven by a cellular compartment that displays stem cell properties. Cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) can be identified by expression of cell surface markers or enzymatic activity, but these methods are limited by phenotypic heterogeneity and plasticity of CSCs. An alternative phenotypic methodology based on in-vitro sphere formation has been developed, but it is typically labor-intensive and low-throughput. In this work, we present a 1,024-microchamber microfluidic platform for single-cell derived sphere formation. Utilizing a hydrodynamic capturing scheme, more than 70% of the microchambers capture only one cell, allowing for monitoring of sphere formation from heterogeneous cancer cell populations for identification of CSCs. Single-cell derived spheres can be retrieved and dissociated for single-cell analysis using a custom 96-gene panel to probe heterogeneity within the clonal CSC spheres. This microfluidic platform provides reliable and high-throughput sphere formation for CSC identification and downstream clonal analysis.

  4. Therapeutic potential of CAR-T cell-derived exosomes: a cell-free modality for targeted cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Yang, Zhuo-Shun; Zou, Dan-Dan; Wang, Bin; Warnock, Garth L.; Dai, Long-Jun; Luo, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-based T-cell adoptive immunotherapy is a distinctively promising therapy for cancer. The engineering of CARs into T cells provides T cells with tumor-targeting capabilities and intensifies their cytotoxic activity through stimulated cell expansion and enhanced cytokine production. As a novel and potent therapeutic modality, there exists some uncontrollable processes which are the potential sources of adverse events. As an extension of this impactful modality, CAR-T cell-derived exosomes may substitute CAR-T cells to act as ultimate attackers, thereby overcoming some limitations. Exosomes retain most characteristics of parent cells and play an essential role in intercellular communications via transmitting their cargo to recipient cells. The application of CAR-T cell-derived exosomes will make this cell-based therapy more clinically controllable as it also provides a cell-free platform to diversify anticancer mediators, which responds effectively to the complexity and volatility of cancer. It is believed that the appropriate application of both cellular and exosomal platforms will make this effective treatment more practicable. PMID:26496034

  5. Dynamic microvesicle release and clearance within the cardiovascular system: triggers and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ayers, Lisa; Nieuwland, Rienk; Kohler, Malcolm; Kraenkel, Nicolle; Ferry, Berne; Leeson, Paul

    2015-12-01

    Interest in cell-derived microvesicles (or microparticles) within cardiovascular diagnostics and therapeutics is rapidly growing. Microvesicles are often measured in the circulation at a single time point. However, it is becoming clear that microvesicle levels both increase and decrease rapidly in response to certain stimuli such as hypoxia, acute cardiac stress, shear stress, hypertriglyceridaemia and inflammation. Consequently, the levels of circulating microvesicles will reflect the balance between dynamic mechanisms for release and clearance. The present review describes the range of triggers currently known to lead to microvesicle release from different cellular origins into the circulation. Specifically, the published data are used to summarize the dynamic impact of these triggers on the degree and rate of microvesicle release. Secondly, a summary of the current understanding of microvesicle clearance via different cellular systems, including the endothelial cell and macrophage, is presented, based on reported studies of clearance in experimental models and clinical scenarios, such as transfusion or cardiac stress. Together, this information can be used to provide insights into potential underlying biological mechanisms that might explain the increases or decreases in circulating microvesicle levels that have been reported and help to design future clinical studies. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  6. The granulin-epithelin precursor/PC-cell-derived growth factor is a growth factor for epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Jones, Monica Brown; Michener, Chad M; Blanchette, James O; Kuznetsov, Vladimir A; Raffeld, Mark; Serrero, Ginette; Emmert-Buck, Michael R; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Krizman, David B; Liotta, Lance A; Kohn, Elise C

    2003-01-01

    The role of growth factors in ovarian cancer development and progression is complex and multifactorial. We hypothesized that new growth factors may be identified through the molecular analysis of ovarian tumors as they exist in their native environment. RNA extracted from microdissected serous low malignant potential (LMP) and invasive ovarian tumors was used to construct cDNA libraries. A total of 7300 transcripts were randomly chosen for sequencing, and those transcripts were statistically evaluated. Reverse transcription-PCR and immunohistochemistry were used to validate the findings in tumor tissue samples. Ovarian cancer cell lines were used to test gene effects on monolayer growth, proliferative capacity, and density-independent growth. Analysis of the pooled library transcripts revealed 26 genes differentially expressed between LMP and invasive ovarian cancers. The granulin-epithelin precursor [GEP/PC-cell derived growth factor (PCDGF)] was expressed only in the invasive ovarian cancer libraries (P < 0.028) and was absent in the LMP libraries (0 of 2872 clones). All of the invasive tumor epithelia, 20% of the LMP tumor epithelia, and all of the stroma from both subsets expressed GEP by reverse transcription-PCR. Immunohistochemical staining for GEP was diffuse and cytosolic in invasive ovarian cancer tumor cells compared with occasional, punctate, and apical staining in LMP tumor epithelia. Antisense transfection of GEP into ovarian cancer cell lines resulted in down-regulation of GEP production, reduction in cell growth (P < 0.002), decrease in the S-phase fraction (P < 0.04), and loss of density-independent growth potential (P < 0.01). cDNA library preparation from microdissected tumor epithelium provided a selective advantage for the identification of growth factors for epithelial ovarian cancer. Differential granulin expression in tumor samples and the antiproliferative effects of its antisense down-regulation suggest that GEP may be a new autocrine

  7. Tumor-associated macrophages induce capillary morphogenesis of lymphatic endothelial cells derived from human gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Tauchi, Yukie; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Kumamoto, Kanako; Tokumoto, Mao; Sakimura, Chie; Sakurai, Katsunobu; Kimura, Kenjiro; Toyokawa, Takahiro; Amano, Ryosuke; Kubo, Naoshi; Muguruma, Kazuya; Yashiro, Masakazu; Maeda, Kiyoshi; Ohira, Masaichi; Hirakawa, Kosei

    2016-08-01

    Tumor lymphangiogenesis is a major prognostic indicator of gastric cancer. Tumor-induced inflammation has been shown to attract tumor-associated macrophages that affect lymphangiogenesis. However, detailed mechanisms of macrophage-induced lymphangiogenesis have not been elucidated. Here, we evaluated the interaction between tumor-associated macrophages and lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) derived from lymph nodes (LNs) of human gastric cancer. Lymphatic endothelial cells were directly or indirectly cocultured with macrophages from healthy human blood, with or without the supernatant of the gastric cancer cell line, OCUM-12. We analyzed the effect of cancer pretreated macrophages and of macrophages from metastatic LNs of gastric cancer on LECs. We observed morphological changes of LECs in coculture and assessed the gene expression of possible lymphangiogenic molecules of macrophages and LECs after contact coculture, and of cancer pretreated macrophages, by quantitative RT-PCR. Specimens of metastatic LN of gastric cancer were immunofluorescently stained. We found that tubulogenesis of LECs was observed only in the contact coculture model. OCUM-12 cells promoted macrophage-induced tubulogenesis of LECs. Relative gene expression of MMP and adhesion molecules was significantly upregulated in both capillary-forming LECs and cocultured macrophages. Cancer pretreated macrophages upregulated lymphangiogenic factors including inflammatory cytokines, MMPs, adhesion molecules, and vascular endothelial growth factor-C. Blocking of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and macrophage activation suppressed tubulogenesis of LECs. Immunohistochemistry showed macrophages localized around lymphatic vessels. Our results suggested that interaction between LECs and macrophages may be an important initial step of tumor lymphangiogenesis developing LN metastasis. Understanding of its mechanisms could be useful for future therapeutics of gastric cancer.

  8. miR-200a targets Gelsolin: A novel mechanism regulating secretion of microvesicles in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ya; Zhang, Yanfen; Wang, Lujing; Zhao, Ruiqi; Qiao, Yu; Han, Dong; Sun, Qian; Dong, Nazhen; Liu, Yicong; Wu, Dantong; Zhang, Xuemei; Huang, Ning; Ma, Ning; Zhao, Weiming; Liu, Yanhong; Gao, Xu

    2017-05-01

    Microvesicle biogenesis is a highly regulated process. Aberrant release of microvesicles from cancer cells have been associated with their invasiveness and prognosis. However, the mechanism of aberrant release remains poorly understood. Herein, we found that hepatocellular carcinoma cells shed more microvesicles than normal hepatocytes and miR-200a were shown to inhibit the release of microvesicles in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Then, we confirmed that miR-200a might target Gelsolin and change cytoskeleton to regulate microvesicles secretion. Further miR-200a may inhibit the proliferation of adjacent cells by inhibiting the release of microvesicles. Collectively, our findings indicate that miR-200a regulated the microvesicle biogenesis involved in the hepatocellular carcinoma progression.

  9. Stromal cell derived factor-1 and CXCR4 expression in colorectal cancer promote liver metastasis.

    PubMed

    Amara, Sameh; Chaar, Ines; Khiari, Meriem; Ounissi, Donia; Weslati, Marwa; Boughriba, Rahma; Hmida, Abdelmajid B; Bouraoui, Saadia

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that SDF-1 and CXCR4 are expressed in certain cancer cells, and malignant cells use this chemokine/receptor system to promote tumor progression and metastasis. However, the pathophysiological significance of their expression in colorectal cancer (CRC) tissue has not been fully elucidated. The purpose of this study was to assess SDF-1/CXCR4 expression and to explore its contribution to colorectal cancer. We examined SDF-1 and CXCR4 mRNA expression in 124 primary colorectal tumour and 35 liver metastases tissues and matched adjacent noncancerous tissues by reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR). Furthermore, their expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. The relationship between SDF-1/CXCR4 expression and clinicopathological features were analyzed by appropriate statistics. X2 test and Kaplan-Meier analysis were used to investigate the correlation between the ligand-receptor expression and prognosis of colorectal cancer patients. The relative mRNA expression of SDF-1 and CXCR4 was significantly elevated in colorectal cancer tissues as compared with adjacent noncancerous tissues (P < 0.001). The high expression of proteins expression in colorectal cancer tissues was significantly correlated with tumor grade (P = 0.0001), clinical stage (P < 0.05), and lymphatic invasion (P < 0.05). Furthermore, patients with CXCR4 nuclear-type expression showed more frequent lymph node metastasis (p = 0.021), advanced clinical stage (p = 0.001) and lymphatic invasion (p = 0.03) than those with cytoplasm staining-type. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed that high expression of the couple SDF-1/CXCR4 correlated with poor prognosis of colorectal cancer patients (P < 0.001). SDF-1 and CXCR4 may play an important role in the progression of colorectal cancer. The present data suggest that there is a significant association between SDF-1/CXCR4 to enhance the liver metastases causing poor prognosis. Those proteins may potentially be used as an independent

  10. In Vivo Efficacy of Umbilical Cord Blood Stem Cell-Derived NK Cells in the Treatment of Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Veluchamy, John P.; Lopez-Lastra, Silvia; Spanholtz, Jan; Bohme, Fenna; Kok, Nina; Heideman, Daniëlle A. M.; Verheul, Henk M. W.; Di Santo, James P.; de Gruijl, Tanja D.; van der Vliet, Hans J.

    2017-01-01

    Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) act by inhibiting EGFR downstream signaling and by eliciting a natural killer (NK) cell-mediated antitumor response. The IgG1 mAb cetuximab has been used for treatment of RASwt metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients, showing limited efficacy. In the present study, we address the potential of adoptive NK cell therapy to overcome these limitations investigating two allogeneic NK cell products, i.e., allogeneic activated peripheral blood NK cells (A-PBNK) and umbilical cord blood stem cell-derived NK cells (UCB-NK). While cetuximab monotherapy was not effective against EGFR− RASwt, EGFR+ RASmut, and EGFR+ BRAFmut cells, A-PBNK were able to initiate lysis of EGFR+ colon cancer cells irrespective of RAS or BRAF status. Cytotoxic effects of A-PBNK (but not UCB-NK) were further potentiated significantly by coating EGFR+ colon cancer cells with cetuximab. Of note, a significantly higher cytotoxicity was induced by UCB-NK in EGFR−RASwt (42 ± 8 versus 67 ± 7%), EGFR+ RASmut (20 ± 2 versus 37 ± 6%), and EGFR+ BRAFmut (23 ± 3 versus 43 ± 7%) colon cancer cells compared to A-PBNK and equaled the cytotoxic efficacy of the combination of A-PBNK and cetuximab. The antitumor efficacy of UCB-NK cells against cetuximab-resistant human EGFR+ RASmut colon cancer cells was further confirmed in an in vivo preclinical mouse model where UCB-NK showed enhanced antitumor cytotoxicity against colon cancer independent of EGFR and RAS status. As UCB-NK have been proven safe in a recently conducted phase I clinical trial in acute myeloid leukemia, a fast translation into clinical proof of concept for mCRC could be considered. PMID:28220124

  11. Adult stromal cells derived from human adipose tissue provoke pancreatic cancer cell death both in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cousin, Beatrice; Ravet, Emmanuel; Poglio, Sandrine; De Toni, Fabienne; Bertuzzi, Mélanie; Lulka, Hubert; Touil, Ismahane; André, Mireille; Grolleau, Jean-Louis; Péron, Jean-Marie; Chavoin, Jean-Pierre; Bourin, Philippe; Pénicaud, Luc; Casteilla, Louis; Buscail, Louis; Cordelier, Pierre

    2009-07-17

    Normal tissue homeostasis is maintained by dynamic interactions between epithelial cells and their microenvironment. Disrupting this homeostasis can induce aberrant cell proliferation, adhesion, function and migration that might promote malignant behavior. Indeed, aberrant stromal-epithelial interactions contribute to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) spread and metastasis, and this raises the possibility that novel stroma-targeted therapies represent additional approaches for combating this malignant disease. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of human stromal cells derived from adipose tissue (ADSC) on pancreatic tumor cell proliferation. Co-culturing pancreatic tumor cells with ADSC and ADSC-conditioned medium sampled from different donors inhibited cancer cell viability and proliferation. ADSC-mediated inhibitory effect was further extended to other epithelial cancer-derived cell lines (liver, colon, prostate). ADSC conditioned medium induced cancer cell necrosis following G1-phase arrest, without evidence of apoptosis. In vivo, a single intra-tumoral injection of ADSC in a model of pancreatic adenocarcinoma induced a strong and long-lasting inhibition of tumor growth. These data indicate that ADSC strongly inhibit PDAC proliferation, both in vitro and in vivo and induce tumor cell death by altering cell cycle progression. Therefore, ADSC may constitute a potential cell-based therapeutic alternative for the treatment of PDAC for which no effective cure is available.

  12. Adult Stromal Cells Derived from Human Adipose Tissue Provoke Pancreatic Cancer Cell Death both In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Cousin, Beatrice; Ravet, Emmanuel; Poglio, Sandrine; De Toni, Fabienne; Bertuzzi, Mélanie; Lulka, Hubert; Touil, Ismahane; André, Mireille; Grolleau, Jean-Louis; Péron, Jean-Marie; Chavoin, Jean-Pierre; Bourin, Philippe; Pénicaud, Luc; Casteilla, Louis; Buscail, Louis; Cordelier, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Background Normal tissue homeostasis is maintained by dynamic interactions between epithelial cells and their microenvironment. Disrupting this homeostasis can induce aberrant cell proliferation, adhesion, function and migration that might promote malignant behavior. Indeed, aberrant stromal-epithelial interactions contribute to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) spread and metastasis, and this raises the possibility that novel stroma-targeted therapies represent additional approaches for combating this malignant disease. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of human stromal cells derived from adipose tissue (ADSC) on pancreatic tumor cell proliferation. Principal Findings Co-culturing pancreatic tumor cells with ADSC and ADSC-conditioned medium sampled from different donors inhibited cancer cell viability and proliferation. ADSC-mediated inhibitory effect was further extended to other epithelial cancer-derived cell lines (liver, colon, prostate). ADSC conditioned medium induced cancer cell necrosis following G1-phase arrest, without evidence of apoptosis. In vivo, a single intra-tumoral injection of ADSC in a model of pancreatic adenocarcinoma induced a strong and long-lasting inhibition of tumor growth. Conclusion These data indicate that ADSC strongly inhibit PDAC proliferation, both in vitro and in vivo and induce tumor cell death by altering cell cycle progression. Therefore, ADSC may constitute a potential cell-based therapeutic alternative for the treatment of PDAC for which no effective cure is available. PMID:19609435

  13. PlGF Knockdown Decreases Tumorigenicity and Stemness Properties of Spheroid Body Cells Derived from Gastric Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Mahmoodi, Fatemeh; Akrami, Hassan

    2017-04-01

    Placental growth factor (PlGF) a member of the vascular endothelial growth factor family regulates some cell processes such as survival, growth of vascular endothelial cells, invasiveness, and also involves in pathological angiogenesis and metastasis in most cancers. Cancer stem cells are believed to be the main reason for the tumor relapse and resistance to therapy. These cells have various characteristics as same as normal tissue-specific adult stem cells including self-renewability and potent to differentiate into various cell types. However, the function of PlGF in gastric cancer stem cells is not well understood. We have investigated the effect of PlGF knockdown on the tumorigenicity and stem cell properties of spheroid body cells derived from two human gastric cancer cell lines. In this study, we isolated spheroid body cells which have stemness properties from MKN-45 and AGS without using growth factors. Validation of spheroid body cells was confirmed by various methods. Then the effects of PlGF knockdown were investigated on in vitro tumorigenicity, differentiation, migration, angiogenesis, and transcription levels of stemness markers of spheroid body cells. Our findings indicated that isolation of spheroid body cells from MKN-45 and AGS cells without using growth factors is an easy and inexpensive method to isolate cancer stem cells and knockdown of PlGF in spheroid body cells reduced in vitro tumorigenicity and stemness properties of spheroid body cells such as Self-renewal ability, colony forming, migratory, and MMPs activities and decreased ability to differentiation and angiogenesis. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 851-859, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibition Enhances Proliferation of NKT Cells Derived from Patients with Laryngeal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Klatka, Janusz; Grywalska, Ewelina; Hymos, Anna; Guz, Małgorzata; Polberg, Krzysztof; Roliński, Jacek; Stepulak, Andrzej

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze whether inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 by celecoxib and the subsequent enhancement in the proliferation of natural killer T (NKT) cells could play a role in dendritic cell (DC)-based laryngeal cancer (LC) immunotherapy. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were obtained from 48 male patients diagnosed with LC and 30 control patients without cancer disease. Neoplastic cell lysate preparations were made from cancer tissues obtained after surgery and used for in vitro DCs generation. NKT cells proliferation assay was performed based on (3)H-thymidine incorporation assay. An increased proliferation of NKT cells was obtained from control patients compared to NKT cells obtained from LC patients regardless of the type of stimulation or treatment. In the patient group diagnosed with LC, COX-2 inhibition resulted in a significantly enhanced proliferation of NKT cells when stimulated with autologous DCs than NKT cells stimulated with DCs without COX-2 inhibition. These correlations were not present in the control group. Higher proliferation rate of NKT cells was also observed in non-metastatic and highly differentiated LC, which was independent of the type of stimulation or treatment. COX-2 inhibition could be regarded as immunotherapy-enhancing tool in patients with LC. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  15. Optimization of the tissue source, malignancy, and initial substrate of tumor cell-derived matrices to increase cancer cell chemoresistance against 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Hoshiba, Takashi; Tanaka, Masaru

    2015-02-13

    The low chemoresistance of in vitro cancer cells inhibits the development of new anti-cancer drugs. Thus, development of a new in vitro culture system is required to increase the chemoresistance of in vitro cancer cells. Tumor cell-derived matrices have been reported to increase the chemoresistance of in vitro cancer cells. However, it remains unclear how tissue sources and the malignancy of cells used for the preparation of matrices affect the chemoresistance of tumor cell-derived matrices. Moreover, it remains unclear how the initial substrates used for the preparation of matrices affect the chemoresistance. In this study, we compared the effects of tissue sources and the malignancy of tumor cells, as well as the effect of the initial substrates on chemoresistance against 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). The chemoresistance of breast and colon cancer cells against 5-FU increased on matrices prepared with cells derived from the corresponding original tissues with higher malignancy. Moreover, the chemoresistance against 5-FU was altered on matrices prepared using different initial substrates that exhibited different characteristics of protein adsorption. Taken together, these results indicated that the appropriate selection of tissue sources, malignancy of tumor cells, and initial substrates used for matrix preparation is important for the preparation of tumor cell-derived matrices for chemoresistance assays.

  16. Stromal Cells Derived from Visceral and Obese Adipose Tissue Promote Growth of Ovarian Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Nowicka, Aleksandra; Solley, Travis N.; Wei, Caimiao; Parikh, Aaroh; Court, Laurence; Burks, Jared K.; Andreeff, Michael; Woodward, Wendy A.; Dadbin, Ali; Kolonin, Mikhail G.; Lu, Karen H.; Klopp, Ann H.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity, and in particular visceral obesity, has been associated with an increased risk of developing cancers as well as higher rates of mortality following diagnosis. The impact of obesity on adipose-derived stromal cells (ASC), which contribute to the formation of tumor stroma, is unknown. Here we hypothesized that visceral source and diet-induced obesity (DIO) changes the ASC phenotype, contributing to the tumor promoting effects of obesity. We found that ASC isolated from subcutaneous (SC-ASC) and visceral (V-ASC) white adipose tissue(WAT) of lean(Le) and obese(Ob) mice exhibited similar mesenchymal cell surface markers expression, and had comparable effects on ovarian cancer cell proliferation and migration. Obese and visceral derived ASC proliferated slower and exhibited impaired differentiation into adipocytes and osteocytes in vitro as compared to ASC derived from subcutaneous WAT of lean mice. Intraperitoneal co-injection of ovarian cancer cells with obese or visceral derived ASC, but not lean SC-ASC, increased growth of intraperitoneal ID8 tumors as compared to controls. Obese and V-ASC increased stromal infiltration of inflammatory cells, including CD3+ T cells and F4/80+ macrophages. Obese and visceral derived ASC, but not lean SC-ASC, increased expression of chemotactic factors IL-6, MIP-2, and MCP-1 when cultured with tumor cells. Overall, these results demonstrate that obese and V-ASC have a unique phenotype, with more limited proliferation and differentiation capacity but enhanced expression of chemotactic factors in response to malignant cells which support infiltration of inflammatory cells and support tumor growth and dissemination. PMID:26317219

  17. Chemotherapeutic Vulnerability of Triple-negative Breast Cancer Cell-derived Tumors to Pretreatment with Vernonia amygdalina Aqueous Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Carolyn B.; Mcdowell, Roderick; Feleke, Kidus; Deer, Evangeline; Stamps, Symone; Thames, Easter; Singh, Vikash; Pervin, Shehla

    2016-01-01

    Background Unresponsive to most clinical therapies, triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is the dominant biological cause of population-based racioethnic disparities in breast cancer mortality in the United States. We report the chemotherapeutic vulnerability of TNBC cells and stem cell-derived tumors to Vernonia amygdalina aqueous leaf extracts (VA extracts). VA extracts arrest cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in vitro and inhibit growth of implanted tumors and show chemo-preventive efficacy in vivo. Materials and Methods HRAS cells and MDA-MB-468 cells were subcutaneously implanted into nude mice with or without pretreatment with VA extracts before chemotherapeutic treatment with VA extracts and/or paclitaxel to evaluate their ability to inhibit tumor growth. Results The most significant reduction in tumor volume was observed in the MDA-MB-468 cell-induced tumors following VA extract pre-treatment compared to those from HRAS cell implantation. Conclusion VA extracts induce apoptosis, exhibit additive effects, inhibit tumor growth and display chemo-preventive actions against TNBCs. PMID:27466496

  18. Differentiating sepsis from non-infectious systemic inflammation based on microvesicle-bacteria aggregation.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, I K; Bertazzo, S; O'Callaghan, D J P; Schlegel, A A; Kallepitis, C; Antcliffe, D B; Gordon, A C; Stevens, M M

    2015-08-28

    Sepsis is a severe medical condition and a leading cause of hospital mortality. Prompt diagnosis and early treatment has a significant, positive impact on patient outcome. However, sepsis is not always easy to diagnose, especially in critically ill patients. Here, we present a conceptionally new approach for the rapid diagnostic differentiation of sepsis from non-septic intensive care unit patients. Using advanced microscopy and spectroscopy techniques, we measure infection-specific changes in the activity of nano-sized cell-derived microvesicles to bind bacteria. We report on the use of a point-of-care-compatible microfluidic chip to measure microvesicle-bacteria aggregation and demonstrate rapid (≤1.5 hour) and reliable diagnostic differentiation of bacterial infection from non-infectious inflammation in a double-blind pilot study. Our study demonstrates the potential of microvesicle activities for sepsis diagnosis and introduces microvesicle-bacteria aggregation as a potentially useful parameter for making early clinical management decisions.

  19. Dendritic cell-derived interleukin-15 is crucial for therapeutic cancer vaccine potency

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Tian, Shenghe; Liu, Zuqiang; Zhang, Jiying; Zhang, Meili; Bosenberg, Marcus W; Kedl, Ross M; Waldmann, Thomas A; Storkus, Walter J; Falo, Louis D; You, Zhaoyang

    2014-01-01

    IL-15 supports improved antitumor immunity. How to best incorporate IL-15 into vaccine formulations for superior cancer immunotherapy remains a challenge. DC-derived IL-15 (DCIL-15) notably has the capacity to activate DC, to substitute for CD4+ Th and to potentiate vaccine efficacy making IL-15-based therapies attractive treatment options. We observed in transplantable melanoma, glioma and metastatic breast carcinoma models that DCIL-15-based DNA vaccines in which DC specifically express IL-15 and simultaneously produce tumor Aghsp70 were able to mediate potent therapeutic efficacy that required both host Batf3+ DC and CD8+ T cells. In an inducible BrafV600E/Pten-driven murine melanoma model, DCIL-15 (not rIL-15)-based DNA vaccines elicited durable therapeutic CD8+ T cell-dependent antitumor immunity. DCIL-15 was found to be superior to rIL-15 in “licensing” both mouse and human DC, and for activating CD8+ T cells. Such activation occurred even in the presence of Treg, without a need for CD4+ Th, but was IL-15/IL-15Rα-dependent. A single low-dose of DCIL-15 (not rIL-15)-based DC vaccines induced therapeutic antitumor immunity. CD14+ DC emigrating from human skin explants genetically-immunized by IL-15 and Aghsp70 were more effective than similar DC emigrating from the explants genetically-immunized by Aghsp70 in the presence of rIL-15 in expressing membrane-bound IL-15/IL-15Rα and activating CD8+ T cells. These results support future clinical use of DCIL-15 as a therapeutic agent in battling cancer. PMID:25941586

  20. In Vivo Efficacy of Umbilical Cord Blood Stem Cell-Derived NK Cells in the Treatment of Metastatic Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Veluchamy, John P; Lopez-Lastra, Silvia; Spanholtz, Jan; Bohme, Fenna; Kok, Nina; Heideman, Daniëlle A M; Verheul, Henk M W; Di Santo, James P; de Gruijl, Tanja D; van der Vliet, Hans J

    2017-01-01

    Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) act by inhibiting EGFR downstream signaling and by eliciting a natural killer (NK) cell-mediated antitumor response. The IgG1 mAb cetuximab has been used for treatment of RAS(wt) metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients, showing limited efficacy. In the present study, we address the potential of adoptive NK cell therapy to overcome these limitations investigating two allogeneic NK cell products, i.e., allogeneic activated peripheral blood NK cells (A-PBNK) and umbilical cord blood stem cell-derived NK cells (UCB-NK). While cetuximab monotherapy was not effective against EGFR(-) RAS(wt), EGFR(+) RAS(mut), and EGFR(+) BRAF(mut) cells, A-PBNK were able to initiate lysis of EGFR(+) colon cancer cells irrespective of RAS or BRAF status. Cytotoxic effects of A-PBNK (but not UCB-NK) were further potentiated significantly by coating EGFR(+) colon cancer cells with cetuximab. Of note, a significantly higher cytotoxicity was induced by UCB-NK in EGFR(-)RAS(wt) (42 ± 8 versus 67 ± 7%), EGFR(+) RAS(mut) (20 ± 2 versus 37 ± 6%), and EGFR(+) BRAF(mut) (23 ± 3 versus 43 ± 7%) colon cancer cells compared to A-PBNK and equaled the cytotoxic efficacy of the combination of A-PBNK and cetuximab. The antitumor efficacy of UCB-NK cells against cetuximab-resistant human EGFR(+) RAS(mut) colon cancer cells was further confirmed in an in vivo preclinical mouse model where UCB-NK showed enhanced antitumor cytotoxicity against colon cancer independent of EGFR and RAS status. As UCB-NK have been proven safe in a recently conducted phase I clinical trial in acute myeloid leukemia, a fast translation into clinical proof of concept for mCRC could be considered.

  1. Cancer Stem Cells are Depolarized Relative to Normal Stem Cells Derived from Human Livers.

    PubMed

    Bautista, Wendy; Lipschitz, Jeremy; McKay, Andrew; Minuk, Gerald Y

    2017-01-01

    The inability to distinguish cancer (CSCs) from normal stem cells (NSCs) has hindered attempts to identify safer, more effective therapies for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The aim of this study was to document and compare cell membrane potential differences (PDs) of CSCs and NSCs derived from human HCC and healthy livers respectively and determine whether altered GABAergic innervation could explain the differences. Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) positive stem cells were isolated from human liver tissues by magnetic bead separations. Cellular PDs were recorded by microelectrode impalement of freshly isolated cells. GABAA receptor subunit expression was documented by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunofluorescence. CSCs were significantly depolarized (-7.0 ± 1.3 mV) relative to NSCs (-23.0 ± 1.4 mV, p &lt; 0.01). The depolarized state was associated with different GABAA receptor subunit expression profiles wherein phasic transmission, represented by GAGAA α3 subunit expression, was prevalent in CSCs while tonic transmission, represented by GABAA α6 subunit expression, prevailed in NSCs. In addition, GABAA subunits α3, β3, ϒ3 and δ were strongly expressed in CSCs while GABAA π expression was dominant in NSCs. CSCs and NSCs responded similarly to GABAA receptor agonists (ΔPD: 12.5 ± 1.2 mV and 11.0 ± 3.5 mV respectively). The results of this study indicate that CSCs are significantly depolarized relative to NSCs and these differences are associated with differences in GABAA receptor subunit expression. Together they provide new insights into the pathogenesis and possible treatment of human HCC.

  2. Time-lapse imaging of primary preneoplastic mammary epithelial cells derived from genetically engineered mouse models of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Nakles, Rebecca E; Millman, Sarah L; Cabrera, M Carla; Johnson, Peter; Mueller, Susette; Hoppe, Philipp S; Schroeder, Timm; Furth, Priscilla A

    2013-02-08

    Time-lapse imaging can be used to compare behavior of cultured primary preneoplastic mammary epithelial cells derived from different genetically engineered mouse models of breast cancer. For example, time between cell divisions (cell lifetimes), apoptotic cell numbers, evolution of morphological changes, and mechanism of colony formation can be quantified and compared in cells carrying specific genetic lesions. Primary mammary epithelial cell cultures are generated from mammary glands without palpable tumor. Glands are carefully resected with clear separation from adjacent muscle, lymph nodes are removed, and single-cell suspensions of enriched mammary epithelial cells are generated by mincing mammary tissue followed by enzymatic dissociation and filtration. Single-cell suspensions are plated and placed directly under a microscope within an incubator chamber for live-cell imaging. Sixteen 650 μm x 700 μm fields in a 4x4 configuration from each well of a 6-well plate are imaged every 15 min for 5 days. Time-lapse images are examined directly to measure cellular behaviors that can include mechanism and frequency of cell colony formation within the first 24 hr of plating the cells (aggregation versus cell proliferation), incidence of apoptosis, and phasing of morphological changes. Single-cell tracking is used to generate cell fate maps for measurement of individual cell lifetimes and investigation of cell division patterns. Quantitative data are statistically analyzed to assess for significant differences in behavior correlated with specific genetic lesions.

  3. Expression Profiling of Circulating Microvesicles Reveals Intercellular Transmission of Oncogenic Pathways.

    PubMed

    Milani, Gloria; Lana, Tobia; Bresolin, Silvia; Aveic, Sanja; Pastò, Anna; Frasson, Chiara; Te Kronnie, Geertruy

    2017-06-01

    Circulating microvesicles have been described as important players in cell-to-cell communication carrying biological information under normal or pathologic condition. Microvesicles released by cancer cells may incorporate diverse biomolecules (e.g., active lipids, proteins, and RNA), which can be delivered and internalized by recipient cells, potentially altering the gene expression of recipient cells and eventually impacting disease progression. Leukemia in vitro model systems were used to investigate microvesicles as vehicles of protein-coding messages. Several leukemic cells (K562, LAMA-87, TOM-1, REH, and SHI-1), each carrying a specific chromosomal translocation, were analyzed. In the leukemic cells, these chromosomal translocations are transcribed into oncogenic fusion transcripts and the transfer of these transcripts was monitored from leukemic cells to microvesicles for each of the cell lines. Microarray gene expression profiling was performed to compare transcriptomes of K562-derived microvesicles and parental K562 cells. The data show that oncogenic BCR-ABL1 transcripts and mRNAs related to basic functions of leukemic cells were included in microvesicles. Further analysis of microvesicles cargo revealed a remarkable enrichment of transcripts related to cell membrane activity, cell surface receptors, and extracellular communication when compared with parental K562 cells. Finally, coculturing of healthy mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) with K562-derived microvesicles displayed the transfer of the oncogenic message, and confirmed the increase of target cell proliferation as a function of microvesicle dosage.Implications: This study provides novel insight into tumor-derived microvesicles as carriers of oncogenic protein-coding messages that can potentially jeopardize cell-directed therapy, and spread to other compartments of the body. Mol Cancer Res; 15(6); 683-95. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. Silencing of human papillomavirus (HPV) E6/E7 oncogene expression affects both the contents and the amounts of extracellular microvesicles released from HPV-positive cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Honegger, Anja; Leitz, Jenny; Bulkescher, Julia; Hoppe-Seyler, Karin; Hoppe-Seyler, Felix

    2013-10-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) E6/E7 oncogenes play a crucial role in the HPV-induced carcinogenesis. In this study, the authors investigated whether silencing of endogenous HPV E6/E7 expression may influence the contents or amounts of extracellular microvesicles (eMVs) released from HPV-positive cancer cells. It was found that eMVs secreted from HeLa cells are enriched for Survivin protein. RNA interference studies revealed that maintenance of both intracellular and microvesicular Survivin amounts was strongly dependent on continuous E6/E7 expression. This indicates that intracellular HPV activities are translated into visible alterations of protein contents in eMVs. Besides Survivin, eMVs from HeLa cells contain additional members of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) family (XIAP, c-IAP1 and Livin). In contrast, no evidence for the presence of the HPV E6 and E7 oncoproteins in eMVs was obtained. Moreover, it was found that silencing of HPV E6/E7 expression led to a significant increase of exosomes-representing eMVs of endocytic origin-released from HeLa cells. This effect was associated with the reinduction of p53, stimulation of the p53 target genes TSAP6 and CHMP4C that can enhance exosome production and induction of senescence. Taken together, these results show that silencing of HPV E6/E7 oncogene expression profoundly affects both the composition and amounts of eMVs secreted by HPV-positive cancer cells. This indicates that HPVs can induce molecular signatures in eMVs that may affect intercellular communication and could be explored for diagnostic purposes.

  5. Biomechanical profile of cancer stem-like/tumor-initiating cells derived from a progressive ovarian cancer model.

    PubMed

    Babahosseini, Hesam; Ketene, Alperen N; Schmelz, Eva M; Roberts, Paul C; Agah, Masoud

    2014-07-01

    We herein report, for the first time, the mechanical properties of ovarian cancer stem-like/tumor-initiating cells (CSC/TICs). The represented model is a spontaneously transformed murine ovarian surface epithelial (MOSE) cell line that mimics the progression of ovarian cancer from early/non-tumorigenic to late/highly aggressive cancer stages. Elastic modulus measurements via atomic force microscopy (AFM) illustrate that the enriched CSC/TICs population (0.32±0.12kPa) are 46%, 61%, and 72% softer (P<0.0001) than their aggressive late-stage, intermediate, and non-malignant early-stage cancer cells, respectively. Exposure to sphingosine, an anti-cancer agent, induced an increase in the elastic moduli of CSC/TICs by more than 46% (0.47±0.14kPa, P<0.0001). Altogether, our data demonstrate that the elastic modulus profile of CSC/TICs is unique and responsive to anti-cancer treatment strategies that impact the cytoskeleton architecture of cells. These findings increase the chance for obtaining distinctive cell biomechanical profiles with the intent of providing a means for effective cancer detection and treatment control. This novel study utilized atomic force microscopy to demonstrate that the elastic modulus profile of cancer stem cell-like tumor initiating cells is unique and responsive to anti-cancer treatment strategies that impact the cytoskeleton of these cells. These findings pave the way to the development of unique means for effective cancer detection and treatment control. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Cancer vaccine therapy using genetically modified induced pluripotent stem cell-derived dendritic cells expressing the TAA gene].

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Hiromitsu; Ojima, Toshiyasu; Nakamori, Mikihito; Nakamura, Masaki; Hayata, Keiji; Katsuda, Masahiro; Iida, Takeshi; Miyazawa, Motoki; Iwahashi, Makoto; Yamaue, Hiroki

    2013-11-01

    It is generally accepted that the difficulty in obtaining a sufficient number of functional dendritic cells (DCs) poses a serious problem in DC-based immunotherapy. Therefore, we used induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived DCs (iPSDCs) instead. If the therapeutic efficacy of iPSDCs was equivalent to that of bone marrow-derived DCs( BMDCs), then the above-mentioned problems may be solved. In this study, we generated iPSDCs from iPS cells and compared their capacity to mature and migrate to the regional lymph nodes with that of BMDCs. We adenovirally transduced the hgp100 gene, which codes for a natural tumor antigen, into the DCs and immunized the mice with these genetically modified DCs. The cytotoxic activity of CD8( +) cytotoxic T lymphocytes( CTLs) was assayed using a 51Cr-release assay. The therapeutic efficacy of the vaccination was examined in a subcutaneous tumor model. Our results demonstrated that iPSDCs equaled BMDCs in terms of their maturation and migration capacity. Furthermore, hgp100-specific CTLs were generated in mice that were immunized with the genetically modified iPSDCs. These CTLs exhibited a high level of cytotoxicity against B16 cells, which is similar to that exhibited by CTLs generated in BMDCs immunized mice. Moreover, vaccination with genetically modified iPSDCs elicited a high level of therapeutic efficacy equaling that of vaccination with BMDCs. This study clarified experimentally that genetically modified iPSDCs are equivalent to BMDCs in terms of tumor-associated antigen-specific therapeutic antitumor immunity. This vaccination strategy may therefore be useful for future clinical application as a cancer vaccine.

  7. Proteomic analysis of microvesicles from plasma of healthy donors reveals high individual variability.

    PubMed

    Bastos-Amador, Patricia; Royo, Felix; Gonzalez, Esperanza; Conde-Vancells, Javier; Palomo-Diez, Laura; Borras, Francesc E; Falcon-Perez, Juan M

    2012-06-27

    Healthy blood plasma is required for several therapeutic procedures. To maximize successful therapeutic outcomes it is critical to control the quality of blood plasma. Clearly initiatives to improve the safety of blood transfusions will have a high economical and social impact. A detailed knowledge of the composition of healthy blood plasma is essential to facilitate such improvements. Apart from free proteins, lipids and metabolites, blood plasma also contains cell-derived microvesicles, including exosomes and microparticles from several different cellular origins. In this study, we have purified microvesicles smaller than 220nm from plasma of healthy donors and performed proteomic, ultra-structural, biochemical and functional analyses. We have detected 161 microvesicle-associated proteins, including many associated with the complement and coagulation signal-transduction cascades. Several proteases and protease inhibitors associated with acute phase responses were present, indicating that these microvesicles may be involved in these processes. There was a remarkably high variability in the protein content of plasma from different donors. In addition, we report that this variability could be relevant for their interaction with cellular systems. This work provides valuable information on plasma microvesicles and a foundation to understand microvesicle biology and clinical implications.

  8. Tumor tropism of intravenously injected human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem cells and their gene therapy application in a metastatic breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Lam, Dang Hoang; Goh, Sally Sallee; Lee, Esther Xingwei; Zhao, Ying; Tay, Felix Chang; Chen, Can; Du, Shouhui; Balasundaram, Ghayathri; Shahbazi, Mohammad; Tham, Chee Kian; Ng, Wai Hoe; Toh, Han Chong; Wang, Shu

    2012-05-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells can serve as an accessible and reliable source for the generation of functional human cells for medical therapies. In this study, we used a conventional lentiviral transduction method to derive human-induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from primary human fibroblasts and then generated neural stem cells (NSCs) from the iPS cells. Using a dual-color whole-body imaging technology, we demonstrated that after tail vein injection, these human NSCs displayed a robust migratory capacity outside the central nervous system in both immunodeficient and immunocompetent mice and homed in on established orthotopic 4T1 mouse mammary tumors. To investigate whether the iPS cell-derived NSCs can be used as a cellular delivery vehicle for cancer gene therapy, the cells were transduced with a baculoviral vector containing the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase suicide gene and injected through tail vein into 4T1 tumor-bearing mice. The transduced NSCs were effective in inhibiting the growth of the orthotopic 4T1 breast tumor and the metastatic spread of the cancer cells in the presence of ganciclovir, leading to prolonged survival of the tumor-bearing mice. The use of iPS cell-derived NSCs for cancer gene therapy bypasses the sensitive ethical issue surrounding the use of cells derived from human fetal tissues or human embryonic stem cells. This approach may also help to overcome problems associated with allogeneic transplantation of other types of human NSCs.

  9. Microvesicles released from tumor cells disrupt epithelial cell morphology and contractility.

    PubMed

    Bordeleau, Francois; Chan, Bryan; Antonyak, Marc A; Lampi, Marsha C; Cerione, Richard A; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A

    2016-05-24

    During tumor progression, cancer cells interact and communicate with non-malignant cells within their local microenvironment. Microvesicles (MV) derived from human cancer cells play an important role in mediating this communication. Another critical aspect of cancer progression involves widespread ECM remodeling, which occur both at the primary and metastatic sites. ECM remodeling and reorganization within the tumor microenvironment is generally attributed to fibroblasts. Here, using MCF10a cells, a well-characterized breast epithelial cell line that exhibits a non-malignant epithelial phenotype, and MVs shed by aggressive MDA-MB-231 carcinoma cells, we show that non-malignant epithelial cells can participate in ECM reorganization of 3D collagen matrices following their treatment with cancer cell-derived MVs. In addition, MVs trigger several changes in epithelial cells under 3D culture conditions. Furthermore, we show that this ECM reorganization is associated with an increase in cellular traction force following MV treatment, higher acto-myosin contractility, and higher FAK activity. Overall, our findings suggest that MVs derived from tumor cells can contribute to ECM reorganization occurring within the tumor microenvironment by enhancing the contractility of non-malignant epithelial cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Differentiating sepsis from non-infectious systemic inflammation based on microvesicle-bacteria aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, I. K.; Bertazzo, S.; O'Callaghan, D. J. P.; Schlegel, A. A.; Kallepitis, C.; Antcliffe, D. B.; Gordon, A. C.; Stevens, M. M.

    2015-08-01

    Sepsis is a severe medical condition and a leading cause of hospital mortality. Prompt diagnosis and early treatment has a significant, positive impact on patient outcome. However, sepsis is not always easy to diagnose, especially in critically ill patients. Here, we present a conceptionally new approach for the rapid diagnostic differentiation of sepsis from non-septic intensive care unit patients. Using advanced microscopy and spectroscopy techniques, we measure infection-specific changes in the activity of nano-sized cell-derived microvesicles to bind bacteria. We report on the use of a point-of-care-compatible microfluidic chip to measure microvesicle-bacteria aggregation and demonstrate rapid (<=1.5 hour) and reliable diagnostic differentiation of bacterial infection from non-infectious inflammation in a double-blind pilot study. Our study demonstrates the potential of microvesicle activities for sepsis diagnosis and introduces microvesicle-bacteria aggregation as a potentially useful parameter for making early clinical management decisions.Sepsis is a severe medical condition and a leading cause of hospital mortality. Prompt diagnosis and early treatment has a significant, positive impact on patient outcome. However, sepsis is not always easy to diagnose, especially in critically ill patients. Here, we present a conceptionally new approach for the rapid diagnostic differentiation of sepsis from non-septic intensive care unit patients. Using advanced microscopy and spectroscopy techniques, we measure infection-specific changes in the activity of nano-sized cell-derived microvesicles to bind bacteria. We report on the use of a point-of-care-compatible microfluidic chip to measure microvesicle-bacteria aggregation and demonstrate rapid (<=1.5 hour) and reliable diagnostic differentiation of bacterial infection from non-infectious inflammation in a double-blind pilot study. Our study demonstrates the potential of microvesicle activities for sepsis diagnosis and

  11. Hyaluronan production enhances shedding of plasma membrane-derived microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Rilla, Kirsi; Pasonen-Seppänen, Sanna; Deen, Ashik J; Koistinen, Ville V T; Wojciechowski, Sara; Oikari, Sanna; Kärnä, Riikka; Bart, Genevieve; Törrönen, Kari; Tammi, Raija H; Tammi, Markku I

    2013-08-01

    Many cell types secrete plasma membrane-bound microvesicles, suggested to play an important role in tissue morphogenesis, wound healing, and cancer spreading. However, the mechanisms of their formation have remained largely unknown. It was found that the tips of long microvilli induced in cells by overexpression of hyaluronan synthase 3 (HAS3) were detach into the culture medium as microvesicles. Moreover, several cell types with naturally active hyaluronan synthesis released high numbers of plasma membrane-derived vesicles, and inhibition of hyaluronan synthesis reduced their formation. The vesicles contained HAS, and were covered with a thick hyaluronan coat, a part of which was retained even after purification with high-speed centrifugation. HAS3 overexpressing MDCK cells cultured in a 3-D matrix as epithelial cysts released large amounts of HAS- and hyaluronan-positive vesicles from their basal surfaces into the extracellular matrix. As far as we know, hyaluronan synthesis is one of the first molecular mechanisms shown to stimulate the production of microvesicles. The microvesicles have a potential to deliver the hyaluronan synthase machinery and membrane and cytoplasmic materials to other cells, influencing tissue regeneration, inflammation and tumor progression.

  12. Characterization of Membrane-shed Microvesicles from Cytokine-stimulated β-Cells Using Proteomics Strategies*

    PubMed Central

    Palmisano, Giuseppe; Jensen, Søren Skov; Le Bihan, Marie-Catherine; Lainé, Jeanne; McGuire, James N.; Pociot, Flemming; Larsen, Martin Røssel

    2012-01-01

    Microparticles and exosomes are two of the most well characterized membrane-derived microvesicles released either directly from the plasma membrane or released through the fusion of intracellular multivesicular bodies with the plasma membrane, respectively. They are thought to be involved in many significant biological processes such as cell to cell communication, rescue from apoptosis, and immunological responses. Here we report for the first time a quantitative study of proteins from β-cell-derived microvesicles generated after cytokine induced apoptosis using stable isotope labeled amino acids in cell culture combined with mass spectrometry. We identified and quantified a large number of β-cell-specific proteins and proteins previously described in microvesicles from other cell types in addition to new proteins located to these vesicles. In addition, we quantified specific sites of protein phosphorylation and N-linked sialylation in proteins associated with microvesicles from β-cells. Using pathway analysis software, we were able to map the most distinctive changes between microvesicles generated during growth and after cytokine stimulation to several cell death and cell signaling molecules including tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 1A, tumor necrosis factor, α-induced protein 3, tumor necrosis factor-interacting kinase receptor-interacting serine-threonine kinase 1, and intercellular adhesion molecule 1. PMID:22345510

  13. Characterization of membrane-shed microvesicles from cytokine-stimulated β-cells using proteomics strategies.

    PubMed

    Palmisano, Giuseppe; Jensen, Søren Skov; Le Bihan, Marie-Catherine; Lainé, Jeanne; McGuire, James N; Pociot, Flemming; Larsen, Martin Røssel

    2012-08-01

    Microparticles and exosomes are two of the most well characterized membrane-derived microvesicles released either directly from the plasma membrane or released through the fusion of intracellular multivesicular bodies with the plasma membrane, respectively. They are thought to be involved in many significant biological processes such as cell to cell communication, rescue from apoptosis, and immunological responses. Here we report for the first time a quantitative study of proteins from β-cell-derived microvesicles generated after cytokine induced apoptosis using stable isotope labeled amino acids in cell culture combined with mass spectrometry. We identified and quantified a large number of β-cell-specific proteins and proteins previously described in microvesicles from other cell types in addition to new proteins located to these vesicles. In addition, we quantified specific sites of protein phosphorylation and N-linked sialylation in proteins associated with microvesicles from β-cells. Using pathway analysis software, we were able to map the most distinctive changes between microvesicles generated during growth and after cytokine stimulation to several cell death and cell signaling molecules including tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 1A, tumor necrosis factor, α-induced protein 3, tumor necrosis factor-interacting kinase receptor-interacting serine-threonine kinase 1, and intercellular adhesion molecule 1.

  14. Essential roles of the interaction between cancer cell-derived chemokine, CCL4, and intra-bone CCR5-expressing fibroblasts in breast cancer bone metastasis.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Soichiro; Baba, Tomohisa; Nishimura, Tatsunori; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro; Hashimoto, Shin-Ichi; Gotoh, Noriko; Mukaida, Naofumi

    2016-08-01

    From a murine breast cancer cell line, 4T1, we established a subclone, 4T1.3, which consistently metastasizes to bone upon its injection into the mammary fat pad. 4T1.3 clone exhibited similar proliferation rate and migration capacity as the parental clone. However, the intra-bone injection of 4T1.3 clone caused larger tumors than that of the parental cells, accompanied with increases in fibroblast, but not osteoclast or osteoblast numbers. 4T1.3 clone displayed an enhanced expression of a chemokine, CCL4, but not its specific receptor, CCR5. CCL4 shRNA-transfection of 4T1.3 clone had few effects on its in vitro properties, but reduced the tumorigenicity arising from the intra-bone injection. Moreover, intra-bone injection of 4T1.3 clone caused smaller tumors in mice deficient in CCR5 or those receiving CCR5 antagonist than in wild-type mice. The reduced tumor formation was associated with attenuated accumulation of CCR5-positive fibroblasts expressing connective tissue growth factor (CTGF)/CCN2. Tumor cell-derived CCL4 could induce fibroblasts to express CTGF/CCN2, which could support 4T1.3 clone proliferation under hypoxic culture conditions. Thus, the CCL4-CCR5 axis can contribute to breast cancer metastasis to bone by mediating the interaction between cancer cells and fibroblasts in bone cavity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Inhibition of tissue factor pathway inhibitor increases the sensitivity of thrombin generation assay to procoagulant microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Gheldof, Damien; Mullier, François; Chatelain, Bernard; Dogné, Jean-Michel; Chatelain, Christian

    2013-07-01

    Patients with cancer have a seven-fold to 10-fold increased risk of developing venous thromboembolism (VTE). Circulating microvesicles could be a predictive biomarker for VTE in cancer. Thrombin generation assay (TGA) is a useful technique to detect procoagulant activity of microvesicles. However, TGA suffers from a lack of sensitivity due to the presence of tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) in plasma. The aim of the study was to improve the sensitivity of TGA to tissue factor by limiting the interference of TFPI. Serial dilutions of MDA-MB231 cells were incubated for 45 min at 37°C to generate microvesicles. Samples were then centrifuged and supernatants that contain microvesicles were used for TGA. Normal pooled plasma was incubated with inhibitor of TFPI or was diluted twice to decrease plasma level of TFPI. Lagtime was used as a surrogate marker of TGA to detect procoagulant activity of microvesicles. Inhibition of TFPI decreased twice the cell concentration needed for a significant reduction of lagtime and decreased 2.4-fold the intraassay variability. Plasma dilution had no impact on the TGA sensitivity when TGA was triggered by microvesicles derived from MDA-MB-231. Thrombin generation is a very sensitive method to study the procoagulant activity of tissue factor bearing microvesicles. The sensitivity can be increased by inhibition of TFPI with specific monoclonal antibody against its Kunitz domain I. A two times plasma dilution is an interesting cheaper alternative to study the procoagulant activity of microvesicles by TGA with a good sensitivity, especially when low plasma quantities are available.

  16. MicroRNA-containing microvesicles regulating inflammation in association with atherosclerotic disease.

    PubMed

    Hulsmans, Maarten; Holvoet, Paul

    2013-10-01

    In addition to intracellular organelles, eukaryotic cells contain extracellular organelles which are released, or shed, into the microenvironment. In practice, most human studies have examined mixed populations containing both exosomes and shedding microvesicles (also called ectosomes or microparticles); only a few studies have rigorously distinguished between the two. Accordingly, in this review, exosomes and shedding microvesicles are collectively called microvesicles. The first aim of this review was to discuss the role of microvesicles in cell-to-cell communication in general and in specific interactions between cells in chronic inflammation associated with atherosclerotic disease. Hereby, we focused on cell-specific microvesicles derived from platelets, endothelial cells and monocyte and monocyte-derived cells. The latter were also found to be associated with inflammation in obesity and type 2 diabetes prior to atherosclerotic disease, and cancer. Our second aim was to discuss specific changes in microvesicle content in relation with inflammation associated with metabolic and atherosclerotic disease, and cancer. Because many studies supported the putative diagnostic value of microRNAs, we emphasized therein changes in microRNA content rather than protein or lipid content. The most interesting microRNAs in inflammatory microvesicles in association with metabolic and cardiovascular diseases were found to be the let-7 family, miR-17/92 family, miR-21, miR-29, miR-126, miR-133, miR-146, and miR-155. These data warrant further investigation of the potential of microvesicles as putative biomarkers and as novel carriers for the cell-specific transfer of microRNAs and other therapeutic agents.

  17. Thrombin generation assay and transmission electron microscopy: a useful combination to study tissue factor-bearing microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Gheldof, Damien; Hardij, Julie; Cecchet, Francesca; Chatelain, Bernard; Dogné, Jean-Michel; Mullier, François

    2013-01-01

    Patients with cancer have a 7- to 10-fold increased risk of developing venous thromboembolism. Circulating microvesicles could be a useful predictive biomarker for venous thromboembolism in cancer. Validated and standardised techniques that could be used to determine the complete microvesicle phenotype are required. These were two-fold: a) to characterise tissue factor (TF)-bearing microvesicles released by cultured breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 by flow cytometry (FCM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and thrombin generation assay (TGA); and b) to validate the sensitivity and variability intra/inter-assay of TGA as a useful method to study the procoagulant activity (PCA) of microvesicles. Cultured breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 were incubated for 45 minutes at 37°C. Samples were then centrifuged or not at 4,500 g for 15 minutes, and cells and MVs or MV-containing supernatants were used for TEM, FCM and TGA. In activity assays, microvesicles (i.e. cell-depleted supernatants) were incubated with anti-TF antibodies or with annexin V to assess the contribution of TF and phospholipids to the PCA. Alternatively, supernatants were filtered through 0.1, 0.22, 0.45 or 0.65 µm membranes and subjected to TGA. The majority of the PCA was associated with microvesicles smaller than 0.1 µm, and the mean microvesicle size estimated by TEM after 10,000 g centrifugation was 121±54 nm with a majority of vesicles between 100 and 200 nm. Microvesicles derived from 5,000 MDA-MB-231cells/ml were sufficient to significantly increase the thrombin generation of normal pooled plasma. TEM, FCM and filtration coupled to TGA represent a useful combination to study the PCA of TF-bearing microvesicles, whatever their size. And it will be interesting to implement these techniques in patients.

  18. Mesenchymal stem cells derived from normal gingival tissue inhibit the proliferation of oral cancer cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiaoli; Zhang, Zhihui; Han, Ying; Song, Jiangyuan; Xu, Xiangliang; Jin, Jianqiu; Su, Sha; Mu, Dongdong; Liu, Xiaodan; Xu, Si; Cui, Hongwei; Zhao, Zhongfang; Wang, Yixiang; Liu, Hongwei

    2016-11-01

    The interplay between tumor cells and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) within tumor microenvironment plays a significant role in tumor development, and thus might be exploited for therapeutic intervention. In this study, we isolated MSCs from normal gingival tissue (GMSCs), and detected the effect of GMSCs on oral cancer cells via direct co-culture and indirect co-culture systems. The cell proliferation assay of direct co-culture showed that GMSCs could inhibit the growth of oral cancer cells. Conditioned medium derived from GMSCs (GMSCs-CM) also exerted an anticancer effect, which indicates that soluble factors in GMSCs-CM played a dominant role in GMSCs-induced cancer cell growth inhibition. To investigate the mechanism, we performed apoptosis assay by flow cytometry, and confirmed that cancer cell apoptosis induced by GMSCs could be a reason for the effect of GMSCs on the growth of oral cancer cells. Western blotting also confirmed that GMSCs could upregulate expression of pro-apoptotic genes including p-JNK, cleaved PARP, cleaved caspase-3, Bax expression and downregulate proliferation- and anti-apoptosis-related gene expression such as p-ERK1/2, Bcl-2, CDK4, cyclin D1, PCNA and survivin. Importantly, the inhibitory effect of GMSCs on cancer cells can partially be restored by blockade of JNK pathway. Moreover, animal studies showed that GMSCs exerted an anticancer effect after oral cancer cells and GMSCs were co-injected with oral cancer cells. Taken together, our data suggest that GMSCs can suppress oral cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo via altering the surrounding microenvironment of oral cancer cells, which indicates that GMSCs have a potential use in the management of oral dysplasia and oral cancer in future.

  19. Human brain endothelial cell-derived COX-2 facilitates extravasation of breast cancer cells across the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyue Yim; Kim, Youn-Jae; Yoo, Heon; Lee, Seung Hoon; Park, Jong Bae; Kim, Ho Jin

    2011-12-01

    With improvements in systemic control, metastasis to the brain has been more frequently found in patients with breast cancer. In order to gain access to the brain, breast cancer cells must overcome the blood-brain barrier (BBB), a highly selective filter against cellular and soluble substances. Human brain endothelial cells (HBECs) comprise a major element of the BBB, and breast cancer cells first encounter and pass through them for extravasation. To date, however, the precise role of HBECs in metastasis to the brain is unknown. In this study, we examined how HBECs take part in the extravasation process. In an established in vitro model of the BBB, unexpectedly, the transmigration of breast cancer cells was markedly enhanced in the presence of HBECs than in their absence, suggesting that HBECs facilitate the transmigration of breast cancer cells rather than acting as a barrier against them. We then showed that cyclooxygenase (COX-2) induced from HBECs rather than that from breast cancer cells plays a key role in the transmigration. Moreover, expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2) mediating the transmigration was induced in HBECs by COX-2 after co-culture with breast cancer cells. Taken together, our results suggest that COX-2 and MMP-2 produced from HBECs facilitate the extravasation of breast cancer cells across the BBB.

  20. Sphere formation assay is not an effective method for cancer stem cell derivation and characterization from the Caco-2 colorectal cell line.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui; Zhang, Haihong; Hu, Yue; Xia, Qiu; Liu, Chenlu; Li, Yingnan; Yu, Bin; Gu, Tiejun; Zhang, Xizhen; Yu, Xianghui; Kong, Wei

    2014-03-01

    Although the existence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) has been demonstrated in colorectal cancer, further investigation is hindered by controversies over their surface markers. The sphere formation assay is widely used as in vitro method for derivation and characterization of CSCs based on the intrinsic self-renewal property of these cells. Isolated cancer cells that form tumorspheres are generally recognized as CSCs with self-renewal and tumorigenic capacities. In this study, colon spheres grown from Caco-2 cells in the sphere formation assay were separated from other differentiated cells and characterized. Compared with Caco-2 cells, the derived colon spheres lost several CSC properties. The colon spheres contained decreased levels of specific colorectal CSC surface markers as well as low levels of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters typically overexpressed in CSCs, resulting in the near loss of their chemoresistance ability. Furthermore, cells that developed as colon spheres with strong self-renewal ability in vitro lost their tumorigenic capacity in vivo compared with Caco-2 cells, which could establish tumors in non-obese diabetic/severe-combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID) mice. The results indicated that the Caco-2 cell derived colon spheres did not consist of colorectal CSCs. Thus, the well-accepted sphere formation assay may not be an effective method for CSC isolation and characterization from the Caco-2 colorectal cancer cell line.

  1. Dissection of stromal and cancer cell-derived signals in melanoma xenografts before and after treatment with DMXAA

    PubMed Central

    Henare, K; Wang, L; Wang, L-Cs; Thomsen, L; Tijono, S; Chen, C-Jj; Winkler, S; Dunbar, P R; Print, C; Ching, L-M

    2012-01-01

    Background: The non-malignant cells of the tumour stroma have a critical role in tumour biology. Studies dissecting the interplay between cancer cells and stromal cells are required to further our understanding of tumour progression and methods of intervention. For proof-of-principle of a multi-modal approach to dissect the differential effects of treatment on cancer cells and stromal cells, we analysed the effects of the stromal-targeting agent 5,6-dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid on melanoma xenografts. Methods: Flow cytometry and multi-colour immunofluorescence staining was used to analyse leukocyte numbers in xenografts. Murine-specific and human-specific multiplex cytokine panels were used to quantitate cytokines produced by stromal and melanoma cells, respectively. Human and mouse Affymetrix microarrays were used to separately identify melanoma cell-specific and stromal cell-specific gene expression. Results: 5,6-Dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid activated pro-inflammatory signalling pathways and cytokine expression from both stromal and cancer cells, leading to neutrophil accumulation and haemorrhagic necrosis and a delay in tumour re-growth of 26 days in A375 melanoma xenografts. Conclusion: 5,6-Dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid and related analogues may potentially have utility in the treatment of melanoma. The experimental platform used allowed distinction between cancer cells and stromal cells and can be applied to investigate other tumour models and anti-cancer agents. PMID:22415295

  2. Susceptibility to cytotoxic T cell lysis of cancer stem cells derived from cervical and head and neck tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Liao, Tian; Kaufmann, Andreas M; Qian, Xu; Sangvatanakul, Voramon; Chen, Chao; Kube, Tina; Zhang, Guoyou; Albers, Andreas E

    2013-01-01

    To explore cancer stem cell susceptibility to a host's cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)-mediated immune response. We compared the susceptibility of putative CSC generated from cancer cell lines to immunologic recognition and killing by alloantigen-specific CD8(+) CTL. CSC-enriched spheroid culture-derived cells (SDC) exhibited higher expression of ALDH, ICAM1 and of stem/progenitor cell markers on all 3 tumor cell lines investigated and lower MHC class I on the cervical cancer cell line as compared to their monolayer-derived cells (MDC). The expression of ICAM1 and MHCI was upregulated by IFN-γ treatment. CSC populations were less sensitive to MHC class I-restricted alloantigen-specific CD8(+) CTL lysis as compared to matched MDC. IFN-γ pretreatment resulted in over-proportionally enhanced lysis of SDC. Finally, the subset of ALDH(high) expressing SDC presented more sensitivity toward CD8(+) CTL killing than the ALDH(low) SDC. Tumor therapy resistance has been attributed to cancer stem cells (CSC). We show in vitro susceptibility of CSC to CTL-mediated lysis. Immunotherapy targeting of ALDH(+) CSC may therefore be a promising approach. Our results and method may be helpful for the development and optimization of adjuvants, as here exemplified for INF-γ, for CSC-targeted vaccines, independent of the availability of CSC-specific antigens.

  3. Cultivation and identification of colon cancer stem cell-derived spheres from the Colo205 cell line.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying-fei; Xiao, Bing; Tu, San-fang; Wang, Yuan-yuan; Zhang, Xiao-lang

    2012-03-01

    Our group established a method to culture spheres under serum-free culture condition. However, the biological characteristics and the tumorigenicity of spheres are unknown. Here, we demonstrate that sphere cells expressed high levels of the putative colorectal cancer stem cell markers CD133 and CD44. The CD133-positive rates were 13.27 ± 5.62, 52.71 ± 16.97 and 16.47 ± 2.45% in sphere cells, regular Colo205 cells and differentiated sphere cells, respectively, while the CD44-positive rates were 62.92 ± 8.38, 79.06 ± 12.10 and 47.80 ± 2.5%, respectively, and the CD133/CD44-double-positive rates were 10.77 ± 4.96, 46.89 ± 19.17 and 12.41 ± 2.27%, respectively (P < 0.05). Cancer sphere cells formed crypt-like structures in 3-D culture. Moreover, cells from cancer spheres exhibited more tumorigenicity than regular Colo205 cells in a xenograft assay. The cancer sphere cells displayed much higher oncogenicity than regular Colo205 cells to initiate neoplasms, as assayed by H&E staining, Musashi-1 staining and electron microscopy. Our findings indicated that the sphere cells were enriched with cancer stem cells (CSCs), and exhibited more proliferation capacity, more differentiation potential and especially more tumorigenicity than regular Colo205 cells in vitro and in vivo. Further isolation and characterization of these CSCs may provide new insights for novel therapeutic targets and prognostic markers.

  4. Synovial Sarcoma Microvesicles Harbor the SYT-SSX Fusion Gene Transcript: Comparison of Different Methods of Detection and Implications in Biomarker Research

    PubMed Central

    Fricke, A.; Ullrich, P. V.; Cimniak, A. F. V.; Follo, M.; Nestel, S.; Heimrich, B.; Nazarenko, I.; Stark, G. B.; Bannasch, H.; Braig, D.; Eisenhardt, S. U.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Synovial sarcoma is an aggressive soft-tissue malignancy. This study examines the presence of the SYT-SSX fusion transcript in synovial sarcoma microvesicles as well as its potential role as a biomarker for synovial sarcoma. Patients and Methods. Microvesicle release of synovial sarcoma cells was examined by transmission electron microscopy. RNA-content was analyzed by qPCR, nested PCR, nested qPCR, and droplet digital PCR to compare their sensitivity for detection of the SYT-SSX fusion gene transcript. Whole blood RNA, RNA of mononuclear cells, and microvesicle RNA of synovial sarcoma patients were analyzed for the presence of the fusion gene transcripts. Results. Electron microscopic analysis revealed synovial sarcoma cells releasing membrane-enclosed microvesicles. In vitro, the SYT-SSX fusion gene transcript was detected in both synovial sarcoma cells and microvesicles. Nested qPCR proved to be the most sensitive in detecting the SYT-SSX fusion gene mRNA. In contrast, the fusion gene transcript was not detected in peripheral blood cells and microvesicles of synovial sarcoma patients. Conclusion. Synovial sarcoma cells release microvesicles harboring the SYT-SSX fusion transcript. Nested qPCR proved to be the most sensitive in detecting the SYT-SSX fusion gene mRNA; however, more sensitive assays are needed to detect cancer-specific microvesicles in the peripheral blood of cancer patients. PMID:27069481

  5. Synovial Sarcoma Microvesicles Harbor the SYT-SSX Fusion Gene Transcript: Comparison of Different Methods of Detection and Implications in Biomarker Research.

    PubMed

    Fricke, A; Ullrich, P V; Cimniak, A F V; Follo, M; Nestel, S; Heimrich, B; Nazarenko, I; Stark, G B; Bannasch, H; Braig, D; Eisenhardt, S U

    2016-01-01

    Background. Synovial sarcoma is an aggressive soft-tissue malignancy. This study examines the presence of the SYT-SSX fusion transcript in synovial sarcoma microvesicles as well as its potential role as a biomarker for synovial sarcoma. Patients and Methods. Microvesicle release of synovial sarcoma cells was examined by transmission electron microscopy. RNA-content was analyzed by qPCR, nested PCR, nested qPCR, and droplet digital PCR to compare their sensitivity for detection of the SYT-SSX fusion gene transcript. Whole blood RNA, RNA of mononuclear cells, and microvesicle RNA of synovial sarcoma patients were analyzed for the presence of the fusion gene transcripts. Results. Electron microscopic analysis revealed synovial sarcoma cells releasing membrane-enclosed microvesicles. In vitro, the SYT-SSX fusion gene transcript was detected in both synovial sarcoma cells and microvesicles. Nested qPCR proved to be the most sensitive in detecting the SYT-SSX fusion gene mRNA. In contrast, the fusion gene transcript was not detected in peripheral blood cells and microvesicles of synovial sarcoma patients. Conclusion. Synovial sarcoma cells release microvesicles harboring the SYT-SSX fusion transcript. Nested qPCR proved to be the most sensitive in detecting the SYT-SSX fusion gene mRNA; however, more sensitive assays are needed to detect cancer-specific microvesicles in the peripheral blood of cancer patients.

  6. Leukemia cell microvesicles promote survival in umbilical cord blood hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Razmkhah, Farnaz; Soleimani, Masoud; Mehrabani, Davood; Karimi, Mohammad Hossein; Kafi-Abad, Sedigheh Amini

    2015-01-01

    Microvesicles can transfer their contents, proteins and RNA, to target cells and thereby transform them. This may induce apoptosis or survival depending on cell origin and the target cell. In this study, we investigate the effect of leukemic cell microvesicles on umbilical cord blood hematopoietic stem cells to seek evidence of apoptosis or cell survival. Microvesicles were isolated from both healthy donor bone marrow samples and Jurkat cells by ultra-centrifugation and were added to hematopoietic stem cells sorted from umbilical cord blood samples by magnetic associated cell sorting (MACS) technique. After 7 days, cell count, cell viability, flow cytometry analysis for hematopoietic stem cell markers and qPCR for P53 gene expression were performed. The results showed higher cell number, higher cell viability rate and lower P53 gene expression in leukemia group in comparison with normal and control groups. Also, CD34 expression as the most important hematopoietic stem cell marker, did not change during the treatment and lineage differentiation was not observed. In conclusion, this study showed anti-apoptotic effect of leukemia cell derived microvesicles on umbilical cord blood hematopoietic stem cells.

  7. Leukemia cell microvesicles promote survival in umbilical cord blood hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Razmkhah, Farnaz; Soleimani, Masoud; Mehrabani, Davood; Karimi, Mohammad Hossein; Kafi-abad, Sedigheh Amini

    2015-01-01

    Microvesicles can transfer their contents, proteins and RNA, to target cells and thereby transform them. This may induce apoptosis or survival depending on cell origin and the target cell. In this study, we investigate the effect of leukemic cell microvesicles on umbilical cord blood hematopoietic stem cells to seek evidence of apoptosis or cell survival. Microvesicles were isolated from both healthy donor bone marrow samples and Jurkat cells by ultra-centrifugation and were added to hematopoietic stem cells sorted from umbilical cord blood samples by magnetic associated cell sorting (MACS) technique. After 7 days, cell count, cell viability, flow cytometry analysis for hematopoietic stem cell markers and qPCR for P53 gene expression were performed. The results showed higher cell number, higher cell viability rate and lower P53 gene expression in leukemia group in comparison with normal and control groups. Also, CD34 expression as the most important hematopoietic stem cell marker, did not change during the treatment and lineage differentiation was not observed. In conclusion, this study showed anti-apoptotic effect of leukemia cell derived microvesicles on umbilical cord blood hematopoietic stem cells. PMID:26862318

  8. Exosomes and microvesicles: extracellular vesicles for genetic information transfer and gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yi; El Andaloussi, Samir; Wood, Matthew J A

    2012-10-15

    Exosomes and microvesicles are extracellular nanovesicles released by most but not all cells. They are specifically equipped to mediate intercellular communication via the transfer of genetic information, including the transfer of both coding and non-coding RNAs, to recipient cells. As a result, both exosomes and microvesicles play a fundamental biological role in the regulation of normal physiological as well as aberrant pathological processes, via altered gene regulatory networks and/or via epigenetic programming. For example, microvesicle-mediated genetic transfer can regulate the maintenance of stem cell plasticity and induce beneficial cell phenotype modulation. Alternatively, such vesicles play a role in tumor pathogenesis and the spread of neurodegenerative diseases via the transfer of specific microRNAs and pathogenic proteins. Given this natural property for genetic information transfer, the possibility of exploiting these vesicles for therapeutic purposes is now being investigated. Stem cell-derived microvesicles appear to be naturally equipped to mediate tissue regeneration under certain conditions, while recent evidence suggests that exosomes might be harnessed for the targeted delivery of human genetic therapies via the introduction of exogenous genetic cargoes such as siRNA. Thus, extracellular vesicles are emerging as potent genetic information transfer agents underpinning a range of biological processes and with therapeutic potential.

  9. Cancer stem-like cells derived from chemoresistant tumors have a unique capacity to prime tumorigenic myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Yamashina, Tsunaki; Baghdadi, Muhammad; Yoneda, Akihiro; Kinoshita, Ichiro; Suzu, Shinya; Dosaka-Akita, Hirotoshi; Jinushi, Masahisa

    2014-05-15

    Resistance to anticancer therapeutics greatly affects the phenotypic and functional properties of tumor cells, but how chemoresistance contributes to the tumorigenic activities of cancer stem-like cells remains unclear. In this study, we found that a characteristic of cancer stem-like cells from chemoresistant tumors (CSC-R) is the ability to produce a variety of proinflammatory cytokines and to generate M2-like immunoregulatory myeloid cells from CD14(+) monocytes. Furthermore, we identified the IFN-regulated transcription factor IRF5 as a CSC-R-specific factor critical for promoting M-CSF production and generating tumorigenic myeloid cells. Importantly, myeloid cells primed with IRF5(+) CSC-R facilitate the tumorigenic and stem cell activities of bulk tumors. Importantly, the activation of IRF5/M-CSF pathways in tumor cells were correlated with the number of tumor-associated CSF1 receptor(+) M2 macrophages in patients with non-small lung cancer. Collectively, our findings show how chemoresistance affects the properties of CSCs in their niche microenvironments.

  10. Identifying microRNA-mRNA regulatory network in gemcitabine-resistant cells derived from human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yehua; Pan, Yan; Xu, Litao; Chen, Lianyu; Liu, Luming; Chen, Hao; Chen, Zhen; Meng, Zhiqiang

    2015-06-01

    Pancreatic cancer is unresectable in over 80 % of patients owing to difficulty in early diagnosis. Chemotherapy is the most frequently adopted therapy for advanced pancreatic cancer. The development of drug resistance to gemcitabine (GEM), which is always used in standard chemotherapy, often results in therapeutic failure. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the gemcitabine resistance remain unclear. Therefore, we sought to explore the microRNA-mRNA network that is associated with the development of gemcitabine resistance and to identify molecular targets for overcoming the gemcitabine resistance. By exposing SW1990 pancreatic cancer cells to long-term gemcitabine with increasing concentrations, we established a gemcitabine-resistant cell line (SW1990/GEM) with a high IC50 (the concentration needed for 50 % growth inhibition, 847.23 μM). The mRNA and microRNA expression profiles of SW1990 cells and SW1990/GEM cells were determined using RNA-seq analysis. By comparing the results in control SW1990 cells, 507 upregulated genes and 550 downregulated genes in SW1990/GEM cells were identified as differentially expressed genes correlated with gemcitabine sensitivity. Gene ontology (GO) analysis showed that the differentially expressed genes were related to diverse biological processes. The upregulated genes were mainly associated with drug response and apoptosis, and the downregulated genes were correlated with cell cycle progression and RNA splicing. Concurrently, the differentially expressed microRNAs, which are the important player in drug resistance development, were also examined in SW1990/GEM cells, and 56 differential microRNAs were identified. Additionally, the expression profiles of selected genes and microRNAs were confirmed by using Q-PCR assays. Furthermore, combining the differentially expressed microRNAs and mRNAs as well as the predicted targets for these microRNAs, a core microRNA-mRNA regulatory network was constructed, which included hub micro

  11. Cathepsin B Mediates the pH-Dependent Proinvasive Activity of Tumor-Shed Microvesicles1

    PubMed Central

    Giusti, Ilaria; D'Ascenzo, Sandra; Millimaggi, Danilo; Taraboletti, Giulia; Carta, Gaspare; Franceschini, Nicola; Pavan, Antonio; Dolo, Vincenza

    2008-01-01

    Vesicles shed by cancer cells are known to mediate several tumor-host interactions. Tumor microenvironment may, in turn, influence the release and the activity of tumor-shed microvesicles. In this study, we investigated the molecular mediators of the pH-dependent proinvasive activity of tumor-shed vesicles. Gelatinase zymography showed increased microvesicle activity of matrix metalloproteinases 9 and 2 as a result of acid exposure (pH 5.6) compared to pH 7.4. Thus, we reasoned that the cysteine protease cathepsin B might play a role in mediating the pH-dependent activation of gelatinases. Cathepsin B expression in tumor-shed microvesicles was confirmed by Western blot analysis and zymography. The activity of vesicle-associated cathepsin B measured using Z-Arg-Arg-pNA as substrate was significantly increased at acidic pH values. Inhibition of protease activity by the cysteine protease inhibitor, E-64, and treatment of ovarian cancer cells with small interfering RNA against cathepsin B suppressed the ability of tumor-shed microvesicles to stimulate both gelatinase activation and the invasiveness of endothelial cells observed at low pH values. We conclude that microvesicle shedding is a major secretory pathway for cathepsin B release from tumor cells. Hence, the acidic microenvironment found in most solid tumors may contribute to cathepsin B-mediated proinvasive capabilities of tumor-shed vesicles. PMID:18472965

  12. Cancer-initiating cells derived from established cervical cell lines exhibit stem-cell markers and increased radioresistance

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cancer-initiating cells (CICs) are proposed to be responsible for the generation of metastasis and resistance to therapy. Accumulating evidences indicates CICs are found among different human cancers and cell lines derived from them. Few studies address the characteristics of CICs in cervical cancer. We identify biological features of CICs from four of the best-know human cell lines from uterine cervix tumors. (HeLa, SiHa, Ca Ski, C-4 I). Methods Cells were cultured as spheres under stem-cell conditions. Flow cytometry was used to detect expression of CD34, CD49f and CD133 antigens and Hoechst 33342 staining to identify side population (SP). Magnetic and fluorescence-activated cell sorting was applied to enrich and purify populations used to evaluate tumorigenicity in nude mice. cDNA microarray analysis and in vitro radioresistance assay were carried out under standard conditions. Results CICs, enriched as spheroids, were capable to generate reproducible tumor phenotypes in nu-nu mice and serial propagation. Injection of 1 × 103 dissociated spheroid cells induced tumors in the majority of animals, whereas injection of 1 × 105 monolayer cells remained nontumorigenic. Sphere-derived CICs expressed CD49f surface marker. Gene profiling analysis of HeLa and SiHa spheroid cells showed up-regulation of CICs markers characteristic of the female reproductive system. Importantly, epithelial to mesenchymal (EMT) transition-associated markers were found highly expressed in spheroid cells. More importantly, gene expression analysis indicated that genes required for radioresistance were also up-regulated, including components of the double-strand break (DSB) DNA repair machinery and the metabolism of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Dose-dependent radiation assay indicated indeed that CICs-enriched populations exhibit an increased resistance to ionizing radiation (IR). Conclusions We characterized a self-renewing subpopulation of CICs found among four well known human

  13. Exosomes for Immunoregulation and Therapeutic Intervention in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuan; Pei, Zenglin; Chen, Jinyun; Ji, Chunxia; Xu, Jianqing; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes, as a subset of extracellular vesicles, function as a mode of intercellular communication and molecular transfer, and facilitate the direct extracellular transfer of proteins, lipids, and miRNAs/mRNAs/DNAs between cells. Cancers have adapted exosomes and related microvesicles as a pathway that can suppress the immune system and establish a fertile local and distant environment to support neoplastic growth, invasion, and metastasis; these tumor-derived exosomes affect immunoregulation mechanisms, including immune activation and immune suppression. Immune cell-derived exosomes can modulate the immune response in cancer, which supports the belief that these membranous vesicles are immunotherapeutic reagents. In this review, we discuss the recent advances in the cancer immunotherapy, roles of exosomes in cancer, immunoregulation of tumor-derived exosomes, and immunomodulation by immune cell-derived exosomes. The topics covered here highlight novel insights into the development of efficient exosome-based cancer vaccines for cancer therapeutic intervention. PMID:27326251

  14. Stromal cell-derived factor-1{alpha} (SDF-1{alpha}/CXCL12) stimulates ovarian cancer cell growth through the EGF receptor transactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Porcile, Carola; Bajetto, Adriana . E-mail: bajetto@cba.unige.it; Barbieri, Federica; Barbero, Simone; Bonavia, Rudy; Biglieri, Marianna; Pirani, Paolo; Florio, Tullio . E-mail: florio@cba.unige.it; Schettini, Gennaro

    2005-08-15

    Ovarian cancer (OC) is the leading cause of death in gynecologic diseases in which there is evidence for a complex chemokine network. Chemokines are a family of proteins that play an important role in tumor progression influencing cell proliferation, angiogenic/angiostatic processes, cell migration and metastasis, and, finally, regulating the immune cells recruitment into the tumor mass. We previously demonstrated that astrocytes and glioblastoma cells express both the chemokine receptor CXCR4 and its ligand stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1), and that SDF-1{alpha} treatment induced cell proliferation, supporting the hypothesis that chemokines may play an important role in tumor cells' growth in vitro. In the present study, we report that CXCR4 and SDF-1 are expressed in OC cell lines. We demonstrate that SDF-1{alpha} induces a dose-dependent proliferation in OC cells, by the specific interaction with CXCR4 and a biphasic activation of ERK1/2 and Akt kinases. Our results further indicate that CXCR4 activation induces EGF receptor (EGFR) phosphorylation that in turn was linked to the downstream intracellular kinases activation, ERK1/2 and Akt. In addition, we provide evidence for cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase (c-Src) involvement in the SDF-1/CXCR4-EGFR transactivation. These results suggest a possible important 'cross-talk' between SDF-1/CXCR4 and EGFR intracellular pathways that may link signals of cell proliferation in ovarian cancer.

  15. Silencing stem cell factor attenuates stemness and inhibits migration of cancer stem cells derived from Lewis lung carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Wang, JianTao; Li, Zhixi; Liu, YanYang; Jiang, Ming; Li, Yan; Cao, Dan; Zhao, Maoyuan; Wang, Feng; Luo, Feng

    2016-06-01

    Stem cell factor (SCF) plays an important role in tumor growth and metastasis. However, the function of SCF in regulating stemness and migration of cancer stem cells (CSCs) remains largely undefined. Here, we report that non-adhesive culture system can enrich and expand CSCs derived from Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells and that the expression level of SCF in CSCs was higher than those in LLC cells. Silencing SCF via short hairpin (sh) RNA lentivirus transduction attenuated sphere formation and inhibited expressions of stemness genes, ALDH1, Sox2, and Oct4 of CSCs in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, SCF-silenced CSCs inhibited the migration and epithelial-mesenchymal transition, with decreased expression of N-cadherin, Vimentin, and increased expression of E-cadherin in vitro and in vivo. Finally, SCF-short hairpin RNA (shRNA) lentivirus transduction suppressed tumorigenicity of CSCs. Taken together, our findings unraveled an important role of SCF in CSCs derived from LLC cells. SCF might serve as a novel target for lung cancer therapy.

  16. Blood/plasma secretome and microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Inal, Jameel M; Kosgodage, Uchini; Azam, Sarah; Stratton, Dan; Antwi-Baffour, Samuel; Lange, Sigrun

    2013-11-01

    A major but hitherto overseen component of the blood/plasma secretome is that of extracellular vesicles (EVs) which are shed from all blood cell types. These EVs are made up of microvesicles (MVs) and exosomes. MVs, 100nm-1μm in diameter, are released from the cell surface, and are a rich source of non-conventionally secreted proteins lacking a conventional signal peptide, and thus not secreted by the classical secretory pathways. Exosomes are smaller vesicles (≤100nm) having an endocytic origin and released upon multivesicular body fusion with the plasma membrane. Both vesicle types play major roles in intercellular cross talk and constitute an important component of the secretome especially in the area of biomarkers for cancer. The release of EVs, which are found in all the bodily fluids, is enhanced in cancer and a major focus of cancer proteomics is therefore targeted at EVs. The blood/plasma secretome is also a source of EVs, potentially diagnostic of infectious disease, whether from EVs released from infected cells or from the pathogens themselves. Despite the great excitement in this field, as is stated here and in other parts of this Special issue entitled: An Updated Secretome, much of the EV research, whether proteomic or functional in nature, urgently needs standardisation both in terms of nomenclature and isolation protocols. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: An Updated Secretome.

  17. Hypoxia Affects the Structure of Breast Cancer Cell-Derived Matrix to Support Angiogenic Responses of Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Hielscher, Abigail; Qiu, Connie; Porterfield, Josh; Smith, Quinton; Gerecht, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia, a common feature of the tumor environment and participant in tumor progression, is known to alter gene and protein expression of several Extracellular Matrix (ECM) proteins, many of which have roles in angiogenesis. Previously, we reported that ECM deposited from co-cultures of Neonatal Fibroblasts (NuFF) with breast cancer cells, supported 3-dimensional vascular morphogenesis. Here, we sought to characterize the hypoxic ECM and to identify whether the deposited ECM induce angiogenic responses in Endothelial Cells (ECs). NuFF and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells were co-cultured, subjected to alternating cycles of 24 hours of 1% (hypoxia) and 21% (atmospheric) oxygen and de-cellularized for analyses of deposited ECM. We report differences in mRNA expression profiles of matrix proteins and crosslinking enzymes relevant to angiogenesis in hypoxia-exposed co-cultures. Interestingly, overt differences in the expression of ECM proteins were not detected in the de-cellularized ECM; however, up-regulation of the cell-binding fragment of fibronecin was observed in the conditioned media of hypoxic co-cultures. Ultrastructure analyses of the de-cellularized ECM revealed differences in fiber morphology with hypoxic fibers more compact and aligned, occupying a greater percent area and having larger diameter fibers than atmospheric ECM. Examining the effect of hypoxic ECM on angiogenic responses of ECs, morphological differences in Capillary-Like Structures (CLS) formed atop de-cellularized hypoxic and atmospheric ECM were not evident. Interestingly, we found that hypoxic ECM regulated the expression of angiogenic factors and matrix metalloproteinases in CLS. Overall, we report that in vitro, hypoxia does not alter the composition of the ECM deposited by co-cultures of NuFF/MDA-MB-231, but rather alters fiber morphology, and induces vascular expression of angiogenic growth factors and metalloproteinases. Taken together, these results have important implications for

  18. Leukemia microvesicles affect healthy hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Razmkhah, Farnaz; Soleimani, Masoud; Mehrabani, Davood; Karimi, Mohammad Hossein; Amini Kafi-Abad, Sedigheh; Ramzi, Mani; Iravani Saadi, Mahdiyar; Kakoui, Javad

    2017-02-01

    Microvesicles are released by different cell types and shuttle mRNAs and microRNAs which have the possibility to transfer genetic information to a target cell and alter its function. Acute myeloid leukemia is a malignant disorder, and leukemic cells occupy all the bone marrow microenvironment. In this study, we investigate the effect of leukemia microvesicles on healthy umbilical cord blood hematopoietic stem cells to find evidence of cell information transferring. Leukemia microvesicles were isolated from acute myeloid leukemia patients and were co-incubated with healthy hematopoietic stem cells. After 7 days, cell count, hematopoietic stem cell-specific cluster of differentiation (CD) markers, colony-forming unit assay, and some microRNA gene expressions were assessed. Data showed a higher number of hematopoietic stem cells after being treated with leukemia microvesicles compared with control (treated with no microvesicles) and normal (treated with normal microvesicles) groups. Also, increased levels of microRNA-21 and microRNA-29a genes were observed in this group, while colony-forming ability was still maintained and high ranges of CD34(+), CD34(+)CD38(-), CD90(+), and CD117(+) phenotypes were observed as stemness signs. Our results suggest that leukemia microvesicles are able to induce some effects on healthy hematopoietic stem cells such as promoting cell survival and some microRNAs deregulation, while stemness is maintained.

  19. A Safety Checkpoint to Eliminate Cancer Risk of the Immune Evasive Cells Derived from Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    He, Jingjin; Rong, Zhili; Fu, Xuemei; Xu, Yang

    2017-01-16

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) hold great promise in the regenerative therapy of many currently untreatable human diseases. One of the key bottlenecks is the immune rejection of hESC-derived allografts by the recipient. To overcome this challenge, we have established new approaches to induce immune protection of hESC-derived allografts through the coexpression of immune suppressive molecules CTLA4-Ig and PD-L1. However, this in turn raises a safety concern of cancer risk because these hESC-derived cells can evade immune surveillance. To address this safety concern, we developed a safety checkpoint so that the immune evasive hESC-derived cells in the graft can be effectively eliminated if any cellular transformation is detected. In this context, we knock-in the suicidal gene herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVTK) into the constitutive HPRT locus of CP hESCs (knock-in hESCs expressing CTLA4-Ig and PD-L1), denoted CPTK hESCs. Employing humanized mice (Hu-mice) reconstituted with human immune system, we demonstrated that the CPTK hESC-derived cells are protected from immune rejection. In addition, CPTK hESC-derived cells can be efficiently eliminated in vitro and in vivo with FDA approved TK-targeting drug ganciclovir. Therefore, this new safety checkpoint improves the feasibility to use the immune evasive hESC-derived cells for regenerative medicine. Stem Cells 2017.

  20. Overview of Extracellular Microvesicles in Drug Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Conde-Vancells, Javier; Gonzalez, Esperanza; Lu, Shelly C.; Mato, Jose M.; Falcon-Perez, Juan M.

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Liver is the major body reservoir for enzymes involved in the metabolism of endogenous and xenobiotic compounds. Recently, it has been shown that hepatocytes release exosome-like vesicles to the extracellular medium, and the proteomic characterization of these hepatocyte-secreted exosomes has revealed the presence of several of these enzymes on them. Areas covered in this review A systematic bibliographic search focus on two related aspects: 1) xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes that have been detected in microvesicles, and 2) microvesicles which are in the blood stream or secreted by cell-types with clear interactions with this fluid. What the reader will gain A discussion of these hepatocyte-secreted vesicles along with others microvesicles as enzymatic carriers in the context of extrahepatic drug-metabolizing systems. Take home message The contribution of many tissues including the liver to the microvesicles plasma population is supported by several reports. On the other hand, many enzymes involved in the metabolism of drugs have been detected in microvesicles. Together, these observations argue positively through a role of hepatic-microvesicles in spreading the liver metabolizing activities through the body contributing in this manner to extrahepatic drug metabolism systems what could be relevant for body homeostasis and pharmaceutical interests. PMID:20192903

  1. Label-free real-time acoustic sensing of microvesicle release from prostate cancer (PC3) cells using a Quartz Crystal Microbalance

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, Dan; Lange, Sigrun; Kholia, Sharad; Jorfi, Samireh; Antwi-Baffour, Samuel; Inal, Jameel

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • Microvesiculating cells record loss of mass on a Quartz Crystal Microbalance. • Using the Quartz Crystal Microbalance microvesicles are measured at 0.24 pg. • The QCM-D reveals loss in viscoelastic properties in microvesiculating cells. - Abstract: Using a Quartz Crystal Microbalance with dissipation monitoring, QCM-D (label-free system) measuring changes in resonant frequency (Δf) that equate to mass deposited on a sensor, we showed the attachment, over a 60 min period, of a monolayer of PC3 cells to the gold electrodes of the quartz crystal sensor, which had been rendered hydrophilic. That MVs were released upon BzATP stimulation of cells was confirmed by NTA analysis (average 250 nm diameter), flow cytometry, showing high phosphatidylserine exposition and by fluorescent (Annexin V Alexa Fluor® 488-positive) and electron microscopy. Over a period of 1000s (16.7 min) during which early apoptosis increased from 4% plateauing at 10% and late apoptosis rose to 2%, the Δf increased 20 Hz, thereupon remaining constant for the last 1000s of the experiment. Using the Sauerbrey equation, the loss in mass, which corresponded to the release of 2.36 × 10{sup 6} MVs, was calculated to be 23 ng. We therefore estimated the mass of an MV to be 0.24 pg. With the deposition on the QCM-D of 3.5 × 10{sup 7} MVs over 200s, the decrease in Δf (Hz) gave an estimate of 0.235 pg per MV.

  2. Microvesicle Production after Trauma and Its Clinical Impact on Venothromboembolism

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-10-2-0110 TITLE: Microvesicle Production after Trauma and Its Clinical Impact...October 2013 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 27September2012-26September2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Microvesicle Production after Trauma...analysis of thrombin generation and procagulant microvesicles noted after traumatic injury relative to healthy volunteers 15. SUBJECT TERMS- Polytrauma

  3. Biology and biogenesis of shed microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Tricarico, Christopher; Clancy, James; D'Souza-Schorey, Crislyn

    2016-08-05

    The ability of cells to transmit bioactive molecules to recipient cells and the extracellular environment is a fundamental requirement for both normal physiology and disease pathogenesis. It has traditionally been thought that soluble factors released from cells were responsible for this cellular signaling but recent research has revealed a fundamental role for microvesicles in this process. Microvesicles are heterogeneous membrane-bound sacs that are shed from the surface of cells into the extracellular environment in a highly regulated process. They are shed following the selective incorporation of a host of molecular cargo including multiple types of proteins and nucleic acids. In addition to providing new insight into the etiology of complex human diseases, microvesicles also show great promise as a tool for advanced diagnosis and therapy as we move forward into a new age of personalized medicine. Here we review current status of the rapidly evolving field of microvesicle biology, highlighting critical regulatory roles for several small GTPases in the biology and biogenesis of shed microvesicles.

  4. Microvesicles: What is the Role in Multiple Sclerosis?

    PubMed

    Carandini, Tiziana; Colombo, Federico; Finardi, Annamaria; Casella, Giacomo; Garzetti, Livia; Verderio, Claudia; Furlan, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Microvesicles are a recently described way of cell communication that has been implicated in a number of biological processes, including neuroinflammation. Widely investigated as biomarkers in oncology and neurological disorders, little is known of the role of microvesicles in the pathogenesis of diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). Several evidences suggest that pro-inflammatory microglia and infiltrating macrophages release microvesicles that spread inflammatory signals and alter neuronal functions. We review here available information on microvesicles, with a special focus on microglia and macrophage microvesicles, in the pathogenesis of MS, and as potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets.

  5. Microvesicles from platelets: novel drivers of vascular inflammation.

    PubMed

    Vajen, T; Mause, S F; Koenen, R R

    2015-08-01

    Microvesicles are receiving increased attention not only as biomarkers but also as mediators of cell communication and as integral effectors of disease. Platelets present a major source of microvesicles and release these microvesicles either spontaneously or upon activation. Platelet-derived microvesicles retain many features of their parent cells and have been shown to exert modulatory effects on vascular and immune cells. Accordingly, microvesicles from platelets can be measured at increased levels in patients with cardiovascular disease or individuals at risk. In addition, isolated microvesicles from platelets were shown to exert immunomodulatory actions on various cell types. In this review the various aspects of platelet-derived microvesicles including release, clearance, measurement, occurrence during disease and relevance for the pathophysiology of vascular inflammation will be discussed.

  6. Acoustic Purification of Extracellular Microvesicles

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyungheon; Shao, Huilin; Weissleder, Ralph; Lee, Hakho

    2015-01-01

    Microvesicles (MVs) are an increasingly important source for biomarker discovery and clinical diagnostics. The small size of MVs and their presence in complex biological environment, however, pose practical technical challenges, particularly when sample volumes are small. We herein present an acoustic nano-filter system that size-specifically separates MVs in a continuous and contact-free manner. The separation is based on ultrasound standing waves that exert differential acoustic force on MVs according to their size and density. By optimizing the design of the ultrasound transducers and underlying electronics, we were able to achieve a high separation yield and resolution. The “filter size-cutoff” can be controlled electronically in situ and enables versatile MV-size selection. We applied the acoustic nano-filter to isolate nanoscale (<200 nm) vesicles from cell culture media as well as MVs in stored red blood cell products. With the capacity for rapid and contact-free MV isolation, the developed system could become a versatile preparatory tool for MV analyses. PMID:25672598

  7. Acoustic purification of extracellular microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyungheon; Shao, Huilin; Weissleder, Ralph; Lee, Hakho

    2015-03-24

    Microvesicles (MVs) are an increasingly important source for biomarker discovery and clinical diagnostics. The small size of MVs and their presence in complex biological environment, however, pose technical challenges in sample preparation, particularly when sample volumes are small. We herein present an acoustic nanofilter system that size-specifically separates MVs in a continuous and contact-free manner. The separation uses ultrasound standing waves to exert differential acoustic force on MVs according to their size and density. By optimizing the design of the ultrasound transducers and underlying electronics, we were able to achieve a high separation yield and resolution. The "filter size-cutoff" can be controlled electronically in situ, which enables versatile MV-size selection. We applied the acoustic nanofilter to isolate nanoscale (<200 nm) vesicles from cell culture media as well as MVs in stored red blood cell products. With the capacity for rapid and contact-free MV isolation, the developed system could become a versatile preparatory tool for MV analyses.

  8. Hybrid clone cells derived from human breast epithelial cells and human breast cancer cells exhibit properties of cancer stem/initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Gauck, Daria; Keil, Silvia; Niggemann, Bernd; Zänker, Kurt S; Dittmar, Thomas

    2017-08-02

    The biological phenomenon of cell fusion has been associated with cancer progression since it was determined that normal cell × tumor cell fusion-derived hybrid cells could exhibit novel properties, such as enhanced metastatogenic capacity or increased drug resistance, and even as a mechanism that could give rise to cancer stem/initiating cells (CS/ICs). CS/ICs have been proposed as cancer cells that exhibit stem cell properties, including the ability to (re)initiate tumor growth. Five M13HS hybrid clone cells, which originated from spontaneous cell fusion events between M13SV1-EGFP-Neo human breast epithelial cells and HS578T-Hyg human breast cancer cells, and their parental cells were analyzed for expression of stemness and EMT-related marker proteins by Western blot analysis and confocal laser scanning microscopy. The frequency of ALDH1-positive cells was determined by flow cytometry using AldeRed fluorescent dye. Concurrently, the cells' colony forming capabilities as well as the cells' abilities to form mammospheres were investigated. The migratory activity of the cells was analyzed using a 3D collagen matrix migration assay. M13HS hybrid clone cells co-expressed SOX9, SLUG, CK8 and CK14, which were differently expressed in parental cells. A variation in the ALDH1-positive putative stem cell population was observed among the five hybrids ranging from 1.44% (M13HS-7) to 13.68% (M13HS-2). In comparison to the parental cells, all five hybrid clone cells possessed increased but also unique colony formation and mammosphere formation capabilities. M13HS-4 hybrid clone cells exhibited the highest colony formation capacity and second highest mammosphere formation capacity of all hybrids, whereby the mean diameter of the mammospheres was comparable to the parental cells. In contrast, the largest mammospheres originated from the M13HS-2 hybrid clone cells, whereas these cells' mammosphere formation capacity was comparable to the parental breast cancer cells. All M13HS

  9. Colon cancer cell-derived 12(S)-HETE induces the retraction of cancer-associated fibroblast via MLC2, RHO/ROCK and Ca(2+) signalling.

    PubMed

    Stadler, Serena; Nguyen, Chi Huu; Schachner, Helga; Milovanovic, Daniela; Holzner, Silvio; Brenner, Stefan; Eichsteininger, Julia; Stadler, Mira; Senfter, Daniel; Krenn, Liselotte; Schmidt, Wolfgang M; Huttary, Nicole; Krieger, Sigurd; Koperek, Oskar; Bago-Horvath, Zsuzsanna; Brendel, Konstantin Alexander; Marian, Brigitte; de Wever, Oliver; Mader, Robert M; Giessrigl, Benedikt; Jäger, Walter; Dolznig, Helmut; Krupitza, Georg

    2016-12-24

    Retraction of mesenchymal stromal cells supports the invasion of colorectal cancer cells (CRC) into the adjacent compartment. CRC-secreted 12(S)-HETE enhances the retraction of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and therefore, 12(S)-HETE may enforce invasivity of CRC. Understanding the mechanisms of metastatic CRC is crucial for successful intervention. Therefore, we studied pro-invasive contributions of stromal cells in physiologically relevant three-dimensional in vitro assays consisting of CRC spheroids, CAFs, extracellular matrix and endothelial cells, as well as in reductionist models. In order to elucidate how CAFs support CRC invasion, tumour spheroid-induced CAF retraction and free intracellular Ca(2+) levels were measured and pharmacological- or siRNA-based inhibition of selected signalling cascades was performed. CRC spheroids caused the retraction of CAFs, generating entry gates in the adjacent surrogate stroma. The responsible trigger factor 12(S)-HETE provoked a signal, which was transduced by PLC, IP3, free intracellular Ca(2+), Ca(2+)-calmodulin-kinase-II, RHO/ROCK and MYLK which led to the activation of myosin light chain 2, and subsequent CAF mobility. RHO activity was observed downstream as well as upstream of Ca(2+) release. Thus, Ca(2+) signalling served as central signal amplifier. Treatment with the FDA-approved drugs carbamazepine, cinnarizine, nifedipine and bepridil HCl, which reportedly interfere with cellular calcium availability, inhibited CAF-retraction. The elucidation of signalling pathways and identification of approved inhibitory drugs warrant development of intervention strategies targeting tumour-stroma interaction.

  10. Tumour-derived microvesicles carry several surface determinants and mRNA of tumour cells and transfer some of these determinants to monocytes.

    PubMed

    Baj-Krzyworzeka, Monika; Szatanek, Rafał; Weglarczyk, Kazimierz; Baran, Jarosław; Urbanowicz, Barbara; Brański, Piotr; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z; Zembala, Marek

    2006-07-01

    This study was designed to determine the characteristics of tumour cell-derived microvesicles (TMV) and their interactions with human monocytes. TMV were shed spontaneously by three different human cancer cell lines but their release was significantly increased upon activation of the cells with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). TMV showed the presence of several surface determinants of tumour cells, e.g. HLA class I, CD29, CD44v7/8, CD51, chemokine receptors (CCR6, CX3CR1), extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN), epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), but their level of expression differed from that on cells they originated from. TMV also carried mRNA for growth factors: vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), interleukin-8 (IL-8) and surface determinants (CD44H). TMV were localized at the monocytes surface following their short exposure to TMV, while at later times intracellularly. TMV transferred CCR6 and CD44v7/8 to monocytes, exerted antiapoptotic effect on monocytes and activated AKT kinase (Protein Kinase B). Thus, TMV interact with monocytes, alter their immunophenotype and biological activity. This implicates the novel mechanism by which tumour infiltrating macrophages may be affected by tumour cells not only by a direct cell to cell contact, soluble factors but also by TMV.

  11. Isolation and Proteomic Analysis of Microvesicles and Exosomes from HT22 Cells and Primary Neurons.

    PubMed

    Witas, Richard; Chaput, Dale; Khan, Hirah; Stevens, Stanley M; Kang, David

    2017-01-01

    Exosomes and microvesicles are extracellular vesicles (EVs) released by most cell types. The role of EVs as a method of intercellular communication has led to these vesicles becoming a major area of interest in a variety of scientific fields including neuroscience. Emerging evidence is now demonstrating that the biomolecular composition of EVs, especially exosomes, can play a role in the progression of disease including various neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. In addition to the miRNA profiles of EVs, these vesicles also show interesting changes in protein expression profiles under different physiological and pathological conditions. Characterization of these profiles could prove valuable for both understanding disease pathogenesis and for the discovery of new biomarkers of disease. In this chapter, we describe a protocol for isolation of exosomes and microvesicles from immortalized HT22 cells and primary cortical neurons with sufficient yield and low serum contamination required for downstream analysis and label-free relative quantitation by mass spectrometry.

  12. Resistin-induced stromal cell-derived factor-1 expression through Toll-like receptor 4 and activation of p38 MAPK/ NFκB signaling pathway in gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yung-Yu; Shen, Chien-Heng; Huang, Wen-Shih; Chin, Chih-Chien; Kuo, Yi-Hung; Hsieh, Meng Chiao; Yu, Hong-Ren; Chang, Te-Sheng; Lin, Tseng-Hsi; Chiu, Yung-Wei; Chen, Cheng-Nan; Kuo, Hsing-Chun; Tung, Shui-Yi

    2014-06-14

    Stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) (CXC chemokine ligand-12)/CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) is involved in the carcinogenesis of human gastric cancer, where it stimulates angiogenesis and favors metastasis of tumor cells to distant organs. In addition, resistin is suggested to be an important link between obesity and the development of gastric cancer. Resistin has identified as an important player in inflammatory responses, and emerged as a mediator in inflammation-associated cancer. A limited number of studies have investigated the association of resistin and SDF-1 with gastric cancer. Herein, we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which resistin influences the expression of SDF-1 in gastric carcinoma cells. Human gastric cancer cell lines were exposed to doses of resistin; SDF-1 expression and secretion levels were then determined. Real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting analyses were performed to clarify molecular changes. Inhibition of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) by a competitive antagonist inhibited resistin-induced SDF-1 expression. Pharmacological inhibitors and small interfering RNA (siRNA) demonstrated that activation of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway is critical for resistin-induced SDF-1 expression mediated by TLR4. The promoter activity and transcription factor enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay revealed that resistin induced expression of SDF-1 mediated by NF-κB in gastric cancer cells. Inhibition of p38 MARK activation blocked the SDF-1-induced expression and the SDF-1 promoter activity in the cancer gastric cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed that inhibition of p38 MARK activation also blocked the resistin-increased NF-κB-DNA-binding activity. Resistin-induced SDF-1 upregulation by activation of TLR4, p38 MARK and NF-κB may explain a new role of resistin in the link of obesity and gastric cancer.

  13. Resistin-induced stromal cell-derived factor-1 expression through Toll-like receptor 4 and activation of p38 MAPK/ NFκB signaling pathway in gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) (CXC chemokine ligand-12)/CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) is involved in the carcinogenesis of human gastric cancer, where it stimulates angiogenesis and favors metastasis of tumor cells to distant organs. In addition, resistin is suggested to be an important link between obesity and the development of gastric cancer. Resistin has identified as an important player in inflammatory responses, and emerged as a mediator in inflammation-associated cancer. A limited number of studies have investigated the association of resistin and SDF-1 with gastric cancer. Herein, we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which resistin influences the expression of SDF-1 in gastric carcinoma cells. Results Human gastric cancer cell lines were exposed to doses of resistin; SDF-1 expression and secretion levels were then determined. Real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting analyses were performed to clarify molecular changes. Inhibition of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) by a competitive antagonist inhibited resistin-induced SDF-1 expression. Pharmacological inhibitors and small interfering RNA (siRNA) demonstrated that activation of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway is critical for resistin-induced SDF-1 expression mediated by TLR4. The promoter activity and transcription factor enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay revealed that resistin induced expression of SDF-1 mediated by NF-κB in gastric cancer cells. Inhibition of p38 MARK activation blocked the SDF-1-induced expression and the SDF-1 promoter activity in the cancer gastric cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed that inhibition of p38 MARK activation also blocked the resistin-increased NF-κB-DNA-binding activity. Conclusions Resistin-induced SDF-1 upregulation by activation of TLR4, p38 MARK and NF-κB may explain a new role of resistin in the link of obesity and gastric cancer. PMID:24929539

  14. Highly-purified exosomes and shed microvesicles isolated from the human colon cancer cell line LIM1863 by sequential centrifugal ultrafiltration are biochemically and functionally distinct.

    PubMed

    Xu, Rong; Greening, David W; Rai, Alin; Ji, Hong; Simpson, Richard J

    2015-10-01

    unambiguous protein identifications, respectively, with 256 proteins in common. A salient finding was the first report of 350 proteins uniquely identified in sMVs may of which have the potential to enable discrimination of this EV subtype from exosomes (notably, members of the septin family, kinesin-like protein (KIF23), exportin-2/chromosome segregation like-1 protein (CSE1L), and Rac GTPase-activating protein 1 (RACGAP1)). We report for the first time that both SCUF-Exos and SCUF-sMVs isolated from LIM1863 colon cancer cells induce invasion of recipient NIH3T3 cells. Interestingly, the SCUF-sMVs promote invasion to a significantly greater extent (3-fold) than SCUF-Exos. This analytical SCUF method for fractionating EVs is potentially scalable using tangential flow filtration, thereby providing a solid foundation for future in-depth functional studies of EV subtypes using diverse cell types and functional assays. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Role of Platelet-Derived Microvesicles As Crosstalk Mediators in Atherothrombosis and Future Pharmacology Targets: A Link between Inflammation, Atherosclerosis, and Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Badimon, Lina; Suades, Rosa; Fuentes, Eduardo; Palomo, Iván; Padró, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Reports in the last decade have suggested that the role of platelets in atherosclerosis and its thrombotic complications may be mediated, in part, by local secretion of platelet-derived microvesicles (pMVs), small cell blebs released during the platelet activation process. MVs are the most abundant cell-derived microvesicle subtype in the circulation. High concentrations of circulating MVs have been reported in patients with atherosclerosis, acute vascular syndromes, and/or diabetes mellitus, suggesting a potential correlation between the quantity of microvesicles and the clinical severity of the atherosclerotic disease. pMVs are considered to be biomarkers of disease but new information indicates that pMVs are also involved in signaling functions. pMVs evoke or promote haemostatic and inflammatory responses, neovascularization, cell survival, and apoptosis, processes involved in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease. This review is focused on the complex cross-talk between platelet-derived microvesicles, inflammatory cells and vascular elements and their relevance in the development of the atherosclerotic disease and its clinical outcomes, providing an updated state-of-the art of pMV involvement in atherothrombosis and pMV potential use as therapeutic agent influencing cardiovascular biomedicine in the future. PMID:27630570

  16. Role of Platelet-Derived Microvesicles As Crosstalk Mediators in Atherothrombosis and Future Pharmacology Targets: A Link between Inflammation, Atherosclerosis, and Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Badimon, Lina; Suades, Rosa; Fuentes, Eduardo; Palomo, Iván; Padró, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Reports in the last decade have suggested that the role of platelets in atherosclerosis and its thrombotic complications may be mediated, in part, by local secretion of platelet-derived microvesicles (pMVs), small cell blebs released during the platelet activation process. MVs are the most abundant cell-derived microvesicle subtype in the circulation. High concentrations of circulating MVs have been reported in patients with atherosclerosis, acute vascular syndromes, and/or diabetes mellitus, suggesting a potential correlation between the quantity of microvesicles and the clinical severity of the atherosclerotic disease. pMVs are considered to be biomarkers of disease but new information indicates that pMVs are also involved in signaling functions. pMVs evoke or promote haemostatic and inflammatory responses, neovascularization, cell survival, and apoptosis, processes involved in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease. This review is focused on the complex cross-talk between platelet-derived microvesicles, inflammatory cells and vascular elements and their relevance in the development of the atherosclerotic disease and its clinical outcomes, providing an updated state-of-the art of pMV involvement in atherothrombosis and pMV potential use as therapeutic agent influencing cardiovascular biomedicine in the future.

  17. Neuroendocrine-like cells -derived CXCL10 and CXCL11 induce the infiltration of tumor-associated macrophage leading to the poor prognosis of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lu; Xu, He-Yang; Wang, Jie; Chu, Zhong-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Our previous study revealed that neuroendocrine differentiation in colorectal cancer is one of the important factors leading to worse prognosis. In this study, we apply immunohistochemical staining, Western-blot, RT-PCR and ELISA to investigate the underlying mechanism that how the neuroendocrine differentiation to affect the prognosis of colorectal cancer. The interaction of colorectal cancer cells, neuroendocrine-like cells and tumor-associated macrophages in colorectal cancer progress is also investigated. By analyzing 82 cases of colorectal cancer patients treated in our institution, we found that colorectal adenocarcinoma with neuroendocrine differentiation had increasing number of tumor-associated macrophages and worse prognosis. Further evaluation of cytology showed that neuroendocrine cells have the ability to recruit tumor-associated macrophages to infiltrate the tumor tissue, and the tumor-associated macrophages enhance the proliferation and invasion abilities of the colon cancer cells. Moreover, we confirmed that CXCL10 and CXCL11 are the key chemokines in neuroendocrine-like cells and they promote the chemotaxis activity of tumor-associated macrophages. The secretion of CXCL10 and CXCL11 by neuroendocrine-like cells can recruit tumor-associated macrophages to infiltrate in tumor tissues. The latter enhances the proliferation and invasion of colorectal cancer cell and lead to poor prognosis. PMID:27034164

  18. C-src enriched serum microvesicles are generated in malignant plasma cell dyscrasia.

    PubMed

    Di Noto, Giuseppe; Paolini, Lucia; Zendrini, Andrea; Radeghieri, Annalisa; Caimi, Luigi; Ricotta, Doris

    2013-01-01

    Plasma cell dyscrasias are immunosecretory disorders that can lead to hematological malignancies such as Multiple Myeloma (MM). MM accounts for 15% of all hematologic cancers, and those diagnosed with MM typically become severely ill and have a low life expectancy. Monoclonal immunoglobulin Free Light Chains (FLC) are present in the serum and urine of many patients with plasma cell diseases. The biological differences between monoclonal FLCs, produced under malignant or benign dyscrasias, has not yet been characterized. In the present study, we show that endothelial and heart muscle cell lines internalize kappa and lambda FLCs. After internalization, FLCs are rerouted in the extracellular space via microvesicles and exosomes that can be re-internalized in contiguous cells. Only FLCs secreted from malignant B Lymphocytes were carried in Hsp70, annexin V, and c-src positive vesicles. In both MM and AL Amyloidosis patients we observed an increase in microvesicle and exosome production. Isolated serum vesicles from MM, AL Amyloidosis and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) patients contained FLCs. Furthermore MM and AL amyloidosis vesicles were strongly positive for Hsp70, annexin V, and c-src compared to MGUS and control patients. These are the first data implying that FLCs reroute via microvesicles in the blood stream, and also suggest a potential novel mechanism of c-src activation in plasma cell dyscrasia.

  19. C-src Enriched Serum Microvesicles Are Generated in Malignant Plasma Cell Dyscrasia

    PubMed Central

    Zendrini, Andrea; Radeghieri, Annalisa; Caimi, Luigi; Ricotta, Doris

    2013-01-01

    Plasma cell dyscrasias are immunosecretory disorders that can lead to hematological malignancies such as Multiple Myeloma (MM). MM accounts for 15% of all hematologic cancers, and those diagnosed with MM typically become severely ill and have a low life expectancy. Monoclonal immunoglobulin Free Light Chains (FLC) are present in the serum and urine of many patients with plasma cell diseases. The biological differences between monoclonal FLCs, produced under malignant or benign dyscrasias, has not yet been characterized. In the present study, we show that endothelial and heart muscle cell lines internalize kappa and lambda FLCs. After internalization, FLCs are rerouted in the extracellular space via microvesicles and exosomes that can be re-internalized in contiguous cells. Only FLCs secreted from malignant B Lymphocytes were carried in Hsp70, annexin V, and c-src positive vesicles. In both MM and AL Amyloidosis patients we observed an increase in microvesicle and exosome production. Isolated serum vesicles from MM, AL Amyloidosis and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) patients contained FLCs. Furthermore MM and AL amyloidosis vesicles were strongly positive for Hsp70, annexin V, and c-src compared to MGUS and control patients. These are the first data implying that FLCs reroute via microvesicles in the blood stream, and also suggest a potential novel mechanism of c-src activation in plasma cell dyscrasia. PMID:23940647

  20. High Expression of Stromal Cell-Derived Factor 1 (SDF-1) and NF-κB Predicts Poor Prognosis in Cervical Cancer.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhiwang; Zhang, Xia; Ye, Xiaojuan; Feng, Chan; Yang, Guang; Lu, Yonglin; Lin, Yun; Dong, Chunyan

    2017-01-11

    BACKGROUND SDF-1 and NF-κB are associated with the prognosis of a wide range of cancers, but their value in cervical cancer remains controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of SDF-1and NF-κB in cervical cancer and their significance in clinical prognosis. MATERIAL AND METHODS The expression of SDF-1and NF-κB in 105 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded cervical cancer tissues and the adjacent tissues was examined by immunohistochemistry (IHC). The results were semi-quantitatively scored and analyzed by chi-square test. The overall survival times (OS) were collected by follow-up and analyzed by Kaplan-Meier analysis. RESULTS The expression level of both SDF-1and NF-κB in cervical cancer are higher than that in the adjacent tissues (P<0.05). SDF-1 expression are correlated with tumor size and FIGO histology grade (P<0.05). NF-κB expression are correlated with tumor size and FIGO histology grade, and lymph node metastasis (LNM) status (P<0.05). The patients with a positive expression of SDF-1or NF-κB tended to have much shorter survival time than patients with negative expression. In addition, multivariate Cox regression analysis demonstrated that SDF-1 expression and lymph node metastasis are independent predictors of the OS in cervical cancer patients. CONCLUSIONS The expression of SDF-1 is significantly associated with tumor size and FIGO histology grade. The expression of NF-κB is significantly associated with tumor size, FIGO histology grade, and lymph node metastasis. The positive SDF-1or NF-κB expression is significantly correlated with poor prognosis. These may be valuable biomarkers for the prognosis and the potential therapeutic targets of cervical cancer.

  1. Paclitaxel-resistant cancer cell-derived secretomes elicit ABCB1-associated docetaxel cross-resistance and escape from apoptosis through FOXO3a-driven glycolytic regulation

    PubMed Central

    Aldonza, Mark Borris D; Hong, Ji-Young; Lee, Sang Kook

    2017-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced cancer cell secretomes promote resistance due, in part, to a predominant glycolytic energy metabolism, which drives aggressive cancer cell proliferation. However, the characterization of these secretomes and the molecular events that associate them with acquired drug resistance remain poorly understood. In this study, we show that secretomes of cancer cells with high-level paclitaxel resistance stimulated cell proliferation and suppressed drug-induced apoptosis of drug-sensitive cells. We also found that drug (docetaxel)-stimulated induction of interferon-α (IFN-α), IFN-λ and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) release in drug-sensitive cells was lowered by these secretomes. The promotion of cell proliferation by paclitaxel-resistant (PacR) cancer cell secretomes was associated, in part, with an increase in S phase of the cell cycle and downregulation of the cell death pathway that supports escape from apoptosis. In addition, we also found that the regulation of targeted glycolysis in PacR cancer cells alters the effects of the secretomes on cell growth, apoptosis, ATP generation and acquired drug resistance. Further study revealed that the deletion of FOXO3a transcription exacerbates glycolytic shift-induced apoptosis by rescuing TRAIL expression. By generating a docetaxel–cross-resistant PacR cancer cell line (PacR/DCT), we further clarified the role of FOXO3a in glycolysis-associated mediation of P-glycoprotein/ABCB1 hyperactivity that induces docetaxel cross-resistance. These findings suggest that suppression of the cellular energy supply by targeting glycolysis may inhibit the multiplicity of acquired chemotherapy resistance. Therefore, the therapeutic inhibition of FOXO3a might direct glycolysis to induce apoptosis and overcome multidrug resistance in cancer cells. PMID:28104912

  2. High Expression of Stromal Cell-Derived Factor 1 (SDF-1) and NF-κB Predicts Poor Prognosis in Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhiwang; Zhang, Xia; Ye, Xiaojuan; Feng, Chan; Yang, Guang; Lu, Yonglin; Lin, Yun; Dong, Chunyan

    2017-01-01

    Background SDF-1 and NF-κB are associated with the prognosis of a wide range of cancers, but their value in cervical cancer remains controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of SDF-1and NF-κB in cervical cancer and their significance in clinical prognosis. Material/Methods The expression of SDF-1and NF-κB in 105 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded cervical cancer tissues and the adjacent tissues was examined by immunohistochemistry (IHC). The results were semi-quantitatively scored and analyzed by chi-square test. The overall survival times (OS) were collected by follow-up and analyzed by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Results The expression level of both SDF-1and NF-κB in cervical cancer are higher than that in the adjacent tissues (P<0.05). SDF-1 expression are correlated with tumor size and FIGO histology grade (P<0.05). NF-κB expression are correlated with tumor size and FIGO histology grade, and lymph node metastasis (LNM) status (P<0.05). The patients with a positive expression of SDF-1or NF-κB tended to have much shorter survival time than patients with negative expression. In addition, multivariate Cox regression analysis demonstrated that SDF-1 expression and lymph node metastasis are independent predictors of the OS in cervical cancer patients. Conclusions The expression of SDF-1 is significantly associated with tumor size and FIGO histology grade. The expression of NF-κB is significantly associated with tumor size, FIGO histology grade, and lymph node metastasis. The positive SDF-1or NF-κB expression is significantly correlated with poor prognosis. These may be valuable biomarkers for the prognosis and the potential therapeutic targets of cervical cancer. PMID:28074045

  3. Macrophages are recruited to hypoxic tumor areas and acquire a Pro-Angiogenic M2-Polarized phenotype via hypoxic cancer cell derived cytokines Oncostatin M and Eotaxin

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Chakrapani; Tewari, Brij Nath; Kanchan, Ranjana Kumari; Baghel, Khemraj Singh; Nautiyal, Naveen; Shrivastava, Richa; Kaur, Harbeer; Bhatt, Madan Lal Bramha; Bhadauria, Smrati

    2014-01-01

    TAMs, a unique and distinct M2-skewed myeloid population of tumor stroma, exhibiting pro-tumor functions is fast emerging as a potential target for anti-cancer immunotherapy. Macrophage-recruitment and M2-polarization represent key TAMs-related phenomenon that are amenable to therapeutic intervention. However successful translation of these approaches into effective therapeutic regimen requires better characterization of tumor-microenvironment derived signals that regulate macrophage recruitment and their polarization. Owing to hypoxic milieu being a persistent feature of tumor-microenvironment and a major contributor to malignancy and treatment resistance, the current study was planned with an aim to decipher tumor cell responses to hypoxia vis-a-vis macrophage homing and phenotype switching. Here, we show that hypoxia-primed cancer cells chemoattract and polarize macrophages to pro-angiogenic M2-polarized subtype via Eotaxin and Oncostatin M. Concordantly, hypoxic regions of human breast-cancer specimen exhibited elevated Eotaxin and Oncostatin M levels with concurrently elevated M2-macrophage content. Blockade of Eotaxin/Oncostatin M not only prevented hypoxic breast-cancer cells from recruiting and polarizing macrophages towards an M2-polarized phenotype and retarded tumor progression in 4T1/BALB/c-syngenic-mice-model of breast-cancer but also enhanced the efficacy of anti-angiogenic Bevacizumab. The findings established these two cytokines as novel targets for devising effective anticancer therapy particularly for tumors that are refractory or develop resistance to anti-angiogenic therapeutics. PMID:25051364

  4. Evidence for epithelial-mesenchymal transition in cancer stem-like cells derived from carcinoma cell lines of the cervix uteri.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jiaying; Liu, Xishi; Ding, Ding

    2015-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) paradigm is one possible way to understand the genesis of cancer, and cervical cancer in particular. We quantified and enriched ALDH1(+) cells within cervical cancer cell lines and subsequently characterized their phenotypical and functional properties like invasion capacity and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). ALDH1 expression in spheroid-derived cells (SDC) and the parental monolayer-derived cell (MDC) line was compared by flow-cytometry. Invasion capability was evaluated by Matrigel assay and expression of EMT-related genes Twist 1, Twist 2, Snail 1, Snail 2, Vimentin and E-cadherin by real-time PCR. ALDH1 expression was significantly higher in SDC. ALDH1(+) cells showed increased colony-formation. SDC expressed lower levels of E-cadherin and elevated levels of Twist 1, Twist 2, Snail 1, Snail 2 and Vimentin compared to MDC. Cervical cancer cell lines harbor potential CSC, characterized by ALDH1 expression as well as properties like invasiveness, colony-forming ability, and EMT. CSC can be enriched by anchorage-independent culture techniques, which may be important for the investigation of their contribution to therapy resistance, tumor recurrence and metastasis.

  5. Microvesicles: potential markers and mediators of endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming-Lin; Williams, Kevin Jon

    2012-04-01

    Microvesicles (also known as microparticles) are small membranous structures that are released from platelets and cells upon activation or during apoptosis. Microvesicles have been found in blood, urine, synovial fluid, extracellular spaces of solid organs, atherosclerotic plaques, tumors, and elsewhere. Here, we focus on new clinical and basic work that implicates microvesicles as markers and mediators of endothelial dysfunction and hence novel contributors to cardiovascular and other diseases. Advances in the detection of microvesicles and the use of cell type-specific markers to determine their origin have allowed studies that associated plasma concentrations of specific microvesicles with major types of endothelial dysfunction - namely, inappropriate or maladaptive vascular tone, leukocyte recruitment, and thrombosis. Recent investigations have highlighted microvesicular transport of key biologically active molecules besides tissue factor, such as ligands for pattern-recognition receptors, elements of the inflammasome, and morphogens. Microvesicles generated from human cells under different pathologic circumstances, for example, during cholesterol loading or exposure to endotoxin, carry different subsets of these molecules and thereby alter endothelial function through several distinct, well characterized molecular pathways. Clinical and basic studies indicate that microvesicles may be novel markers and mediators of endothelial dysfunction. This work has advanced our understanding of the development of cardiovascular and other diseases. Opportunities and obstacles to clinical applications are discussed.

  6. Extracellular vesicles: Exosomes, microvesicles, and friends

    PubMed Central

    Stoorvogel, Willem

    2013-01-01

    Cells release into the extracellular environment diverse types of membrane vesicles of endosomal and plasma membrane origin called exosomes and microvesicles, respectively. These extracellular vesicles (EVs) represent an important mode of intercellular communication by serving as vehicles for transfer between cells of membrane and cytosolic proteins, lipids, and RNA. Deficiencies in our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms for EV formation and lack of methods to interfere with the packaging of cargo or with vesicle release, however, still hamper identification of their physiological relevance in vivo. In this review, we focus on the characterization of EVs and on currently proposed mechanisms for their formation, targeting, and function. PMID:23420871

  7. Distinct functions of macrophage-derived and cancer cell-derived cathepsin Z combine to promote tumor malignancy via interactions with the extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    Akkari, Leila; Gocheva, Vasilena; Kester, Jemila C.; Hunter, Karen E.; Quick, Marsha L.; Sevenich, Lisa; Wang, Hao-Wei; Peters, Christoph; Tang, Laura H.; Klimstra, David S.; Reinheckel, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    During the process of tumor progression, cancer cells can produce the requisite growth- and invasion-promoting factors and can also rely on noncancerous cells in the tumor microenvironment as an alternative, cell-extrinsic source. However, whether the cellular source influences the function of such tumor-promoting factors remains an open question. Here, we examined the roles of the cathepsin Z (CtsZ) protease, which is provided by both cancer cells and macrophages in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in humans and mice. We found that tumor proliferation was exclusively regulated by cancer cell-intrinsic functions of CtsZ, whereas tumor invasion required contributions from both macrophages and cancer cells. Interestingly, several of the tumor-promoting functions of CtsZ were not dependent on its described catalytic activity but instead were mediated via the Arg–Gly–Asp (RGD) motif in the enzyme prodomain, which regulated interactions with integrins and the extracellular matrix. Together, these results underscore the complexity of interactions within the tumor microenvironment and indicate that cellular source can indeed impact molecular function. PMID:25274726

  8. High-efficiency lysis of cervical cancer by allogeneic NK cells derived from umbilical cord progenitors is independent of HLA status.

    PubMed

    Veluchamy, John P; Heeren, A Marijne; Spanholtz, Jan; van Eendenburg, Jaap D H; Heideman, Daniëlle A M; Kenter, Gemma G; Verheul, Henk M; van der Vliet, Hans J; Jordanova, Ekaterina S; de Gruijl, Tanja D

    2017-01-01

    Down-regulation of HLA in tumor cells, low numbers and dysfunctionality of NK cells are commonly observed in patients with end-stage cervical cancer. Adoptive transfer of high numbers of cytotoxic NK cells might be a promising treatment approach in this setting. Here, we explored the cytotoxic efficacy on ten cervical cancer cell lines of activated allogeneic NK cells from two sources, i.e., peripheral blood (PBNK) with and without cetuximab (CET), a tumor-specific monoclonal antibody directed against EGFR, or derived from umbilical cord blood (UCB-NK). Whereas CET monotherapy was ineffective against the panel of cervical cancer cell lines, irrespective of their EGFR expression levels and despite their RAS (wt) status, it significantly enhanced the in vitro cytotoxic efficacy of activated PBNK (P = 0.002). Equally superior cytotoxicity over activated PBNK alone was achieved by UCB-NK (P < 0.001). Both PBNK- and UCB-NK-mediated cytotoxic activity was dependent on the NK-activating receptors natural killer group 2, member D receptor (NKG2D) and DNAX accessory molecule-1 (DNAM-1) (P < 0.05) and unrelated to expression levels of the inhibitory receptors HLA-E and/or HLA-G. Most strikingly, whereas the PBNK's cytotoxic activity was inversely correlated with HLA-ABC levels (P = 0.036), PBNK + CET and UCB-NK cytotoxicity were entirely independent of HLA-ABC expression. In conclusion, this study provides a rationale to initiate a clinical trial for cervical cancer with adoptively transferred allogeneic NK cells, employing either UCB-NK or PBNK + CET for EGFR-expressing tumors. Adoptive transfer of UCB-NK might serve as a generally applicable treatment for cervical cancer, enabled by HLA-, histology- and HPV-independent killing mechanisms.

  9. Tumor-derived mesenchymal stem cells and orthotopic site increase the tumor initiation potential of putative mouse mammary cancer stem cells derived from MMTV-PyMT mice.

    PubMed

    Lanza, Denise Grant; Ma, Jun; Guest, Ian; Uk-Lim, Chang; Glinskii, Anna; Glinsky, Gennadi; Sell, Stewart

    2012-12-01

    The ability to transplant mammary cancer stem cells, identified by the phenotype CD24(+)CD29(+)CD49f(+)Sca-1(low), is dependent on the microenvironment in which the cells are placed. Using the MMTV-PyMT mouse model of mammary cancer, we now report two methods of tumor growth enhancement: contributions of tumor stroma in the form of tumor-derived mesenchymal stem cells and orthotopic vs. heterotopic transplantation sites. To support evidence of stem cell function, tumor-derived mesenchymal stem cells differentiated into adipocyte- and osteocyte-like cells after culture in specific medium. Co-injection of tumor-initiating cells with tumor-derived mesenchymal stem cells significantly increased tumor initiation compared to subcutaneous injection of TICs alone; co-injection also allowed tumor initiation with a single TIC. Interestingly, we observed the formation of sarcomas after co-injections of tumor-derived mesenchymal stem cells or mouse embryonic fibroblasts with TICs; sarcomas are not observed in spontaneous MMTV-PyMT tumors and rarely observed in injections of TICs alone. Tumor initiation was also significantly increased in the orthotopic injection site compared to heterotopic injections. We conclude that tumor stroma and orthotopic sites both enhance tumor initiation by mammary cancer stem cells.

  10. MET-dependent cancer invasion may be preprogrammed by early alterations of p53-regulated feedforward loop and triggered by stromal cell-derived HGF.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Chang-Il; Choi, Jinhyang; Zhou, Zongxiang; Flesken-Nikitin, Andrea; Tarakhovsky, Alexander; Nikitin, Alexander Yu

    2011-11-15

    MET, a receptor protein tyrosine kinase activated by hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), is a crucial determinant of metastatic progression. Recently, we have identified p53 as an important regulator of MET-dependent cell motility and invasion. This regulation occurs via feedforward loop suppressing MET expression by miR-34-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Here, by using Dicer conditional knockout, we provide further evidence for microRNA-independent MET regulation by p53. Furthermore, we show that while MET levels increase immediately after p53 inactivation, mutant cells do not contain active phosphorylated MET and remain non-invasive for a long latency period at contrary to cell culture observations. Evaluation of mouse models of ovarian and prostate carcinogenesis indicates that formation of desmoplastic stroma, associated production of HGF by stromal cells and coinciding MET phosphorylation precede cancer invasion. Thus, initiation mutation of p53 is sufficient for preprogramming motile and invasive properties of epithelial cells, but the stromal reaction may represent a critical step for their manifestation during cancer progression.

  11. Two-dimensional electrophoretic comparison of metastatic and non-metastatic human breast tumors using in vitro cultured epithelial cells derived from the cancer tissues

    PubMed Central

    Vydra, Jan; Selicharová, Irena; Smutná, Kateřina; Šanda, Miloslav; Matoušková, Eva; Buršíková, Eva; Prchalová, Markéta; Velenská, Zuzana; Coufal, David; Jiráček, Jiří

    2008-01-01

    Background Breast carcinomas represent a heterogeneous group of tumors diverse in behavior, outcome, and response to therapy. Identification of proteins resembling the tumor biology can improve the diagnosis, prediction, treatment selection, and targeting of therapy. Since the beginning of the post-genomic era, the focus of molecular biology gradually moved from genomes to proteins and proteomes and to their functionality. Proteomics can potentially capture dynamic changes in protein expression integrating both genetic and epigenetic influences. Methods We prepared primary cultures of epithelial cells from 23 breast cancer tissue samples and performed comparative proteomic analysis. Seven patients developed distant metastases within three-year follow-up. These samples were included into a metastase-positive group, the others formed a metastase-negative group. Two-dimensional electrophoretical (2-DE) gels in pH range 4–7 were prepared. Spot densities in 2-DE protein maps were subjected to statistical analyses (R/maanova package) and data-mining analysis (GUHA). For identification of proteins in selected spots, liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was employed. Results Three protein spots were significantly altered between the metastatic and non-metastatic groups. The correlations were proven at the 0.05 significance level. Nucleophosmin was increased in the group with metastases. The levels of 2,3-trans-enoyl-CoA isomerase and glutathione peroxidase 1 were decreased. Conclusion We have performed an extensive proteomic study of mammary epithelial cells from breast cancer patients. We have found differentially expressed proteins between the samples from metastase-positive and metastase-negative patient groups. PMID:18416831

  12. Characterization of cancer stem-like cells derived from a side population of a human gallbladder carcinoma cell line, SGC-996

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xin-xing; Wang, Jian; Wang, Hao-lu; Wang, Wei; Yin, Xiao-bin; Li, Qi-wei; Chen, Yu-ying; Yi, Jing

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We sorted SP cells from a human gallbladder carcinoma cell lines, SGC-996. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SP cells displayed higher proliferation and stronger clonal-generating capability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SP cells showed more migratory and invasive abilities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SP cells were more resistant and tumorigenic than non-SP counterparts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ABCG2 might be a candidate as a marker for SP cells. -- Abstract: The cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis proposes that CSCs, which can renew themselves proliferate infinitely, and escape chemotherapy, become the root of recurrence and metastasis. Previous studies have verified that side population (SP) cells, characterized by their ability to efflux lipophilic substrate Hoechst 33342, to share many characteristics of CSCs in multiplying solid tumors. The purpose of this study was to sort SP cells from a human gallbladder carcinoma cell line, SGC-996 and to preliminarily identify the biological characteristics of SP cells from the cell line. Using flow cytometry we effectively sorted SP cells from the cell line SGC-996. SP cells not only displayed higher proliferative, stronger clonal-generating, more migratory and more invasive capacities, but showed stronger resistance. Furthermore, our experiments demonstrated that SP cells were more tumorigenic than non-SP counterparts in vivo. Real-time PCR analysis and immunocytochemistry showed that the expression of ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2) was significantly higher in SP cells. Hence, these results collectively suggest that SP cells are progenitor/stem-like cells and ABCG2 might be a candidate marker for SP cells in human gallbladder cancer.

  13. Microvesicle Production After Trauma and its Clinical Impact on Venothromboembolism

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-10-2-0110 TITLE: Microvesicle Production After Trauma and Its Clinical Impact on Venothromboembolism PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...SUBTITLE Microvesicle Production After Trauma and its Clinical Impact on Veno-thrombolism. 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...veins which cause a life -threatening event known as venous thromboembolism (VTE). We began enrollment of patients into the study on 2 February 2011

  14. Glioblastoma microvesicles promote endothelial cell proliferation through Akt/beta-catenin pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shihai; Sun, Junfeng; Lan, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma tumor cells release microvesicles, which contain mRNA, miRNA and angiogenic proteins. These tumor-derived microvesicles transfer genetic information and proteins to normal cells. Previous reports demonstrated that the increased microvesicles in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with glioblastoma up-regulate procoagulant activity. The concentration of microvesicles was closely related to thromboembolism incidence and clinical therapeutic effects of glioblastoma patients. However, it is still not clear how CSF microvesicles and what factors affect glioblastoma development. In this study, we collected the plasma and CSF from glioblastoma patients and healthy volunteers. Microvesicles acquired from serum or CSF were added to cultured endothelial cells. And the effects of these microvesicles on endothelial cells were examined. Our results showed that microvesicles from CSF of patients, but not from circulating blood, promoted endothelial cells migration and proliferation in vitro. In addition, the degree of endothelial cell proliferation triggered by microvesicles from CSF was reduced when treated with siRNA targeting Akt/beta-catenin, suggesting that the Akt/beta-catenin pathway is involved in the microvesicle-initiated endothelial cell proliferation. In conclusion, glioblastoma mainly affects microvesicles within CSF without showing significant impact on microvesicles in circulating blood. Microvesicles from the CSF of glioblastoma patients may initiate endothelial cell growth and thus promote cell invasion. This effect may be directly exerted by activated Akt/beta-catenin pathway.

  15. Cavin-1/PTRF alters prostate cancer cell-derived extracellular vesicle content and internalization to attenuate extracellular vesicle-mediated osteoclastogenesis and osteoblast proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Inder, Kerry L.; Ruelcke, Jayde E.; Petelin, Lara; Moon, Hyeongsun; Choi, Eunju; Rae, James; Blumenthal, Antje; Hutmacher, Dietmar; Saunders, Nicholas A.; Stow, Jennifer L.; Parton, Robert G.; Hill, Michelle M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Tumour-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) play a role in tumour progression; however, the spectrum of molecular mechanisms regulating EV secretion and cargo selection remain to be fully elucidated. We have reported that cavin-1 expression in prostate cancer PC3 cells reduced the abundance of a subset of EV proteins, concomitant with reduced xenograft tumour growth and metastasis. Methods We examined the functional outcomes and mechanisms of cavin-1 expression on PC3-derived EVs (PC3-EVs). Results PC3-EVs were internalized by osteoclast precursor RAW264.7 cells and primary human osteoblasts (hOBs) in vitro, stimulating osteoclastogenesis 37-fold and hOB proliferation 1.5-fold, respectively. Strikin gly, EVs derived from cavin-1-expressing PC3 cells (cavin-1-PC3-EVs) failed to induce multinucleate osteoblasts or hOB proliferation. Cavin-1 was not detected in EVs, indicating an indirect mechanism of action. EV morphology, size and quantity were also not affected by cavin-1 expression, suggesting that cavin-1 modulated EV cargo recruitment rather than release. While cavin-1-EVs had no osteoclastogenic function, they were internalized by RAW264.7 cells but at a reduced efficiency compared to control EVs. EV surface proteins are required for internalization of PC3-EVs by RAW264.7 cells, as proteinase K treatment abolished uptake of both control and cavin-1-PC3-EVs. Removal of sialic acid modifications by neuraminidase treatment increased the amount of control PC3-EVs internalized by RAW264.7 cells, without affecting cavin-1-PC3-EVs. This suggests that cavin-1 expression altered the glycosylation modifications on PC3-EV surface. Finally, cavin-1 expression did not affect EV in vivo tissue targeting as both control and cavin-1-PC3-EVs were predominantly retained in the lung and bone 24 hours after injection into mice. Discussion Taken together, our results reveal a novel pathway for EV cargo sorting, and highlight the potential of utilizing cavin-1-mediated

  16. Cavin-1/PTRF alters prostate cancer cell-derived extracellular vesicle content and internalization to attenuate extracellular vesicle-mediated osteoclastogenesis and osteoblast proliferation.

    PubMed

    Inder, Kerry L; Ruelcke, Jayde E; Petelin, Lara; Moon, Hyeongsun; Choi, Eunju; Rae, James; Blumenthal, Antje; Hutmacher, Dietmar; Saunders, Nicholas A; Stow, Jennifer L; Parton, Robert G; Hill, Michelle M

    2014-01-01

    Tumour-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) play a role in tumour progression; however, the spectrum of molecular mechanisms regulating EV secretion and cargo selection remain to be fully elucidated. We have reported that cavin-1 expression in prostate cancer PC3 cells reduced the abundance of a subset of EV proteins, concomitant with reduced xenograft tumour growth and metastasis. We examined the functional outcomes and mechanisms of cavin-1 expression on PC3-derived EVs (PC3-EVs). PC3-EVs were internalized by osteoclast precursor RAW264.7 cells and primary human osteoblasts (hOBs) in vitro, stimulating osteoclastogenesis 37-fold and hOB proliferation 1.5-fold, respectively. Strikin gly, EVs derived from cavin-1-expressing PC3 cells (cavin-1-PC3-EVs) failed to induce multinucleate osteoblasts or hOB proliferation. Cavin-1 was not detected in EVs, indicating an indirect mechanism of action. EV morphology, size and quantity were also not affected by cavin-1 expression, suggesting that cavin-1 modulated EV cargo recruitment rather than release. While cavin-1-EVs had no osteoclastogenic function, they were internalized by RAW264.7 cells but at a reduced efficiency compared to control EVs. EV surface proteins are required for internalization of PC3-EVs by RAW264.7 cells, as proteinase K treatment abolished uptake of both control and cavin-1-PC3-EVs. Removal of sialic acid modifications by neuraminidase treatment increased the amount of control PC3-EVs internalized by RAW264.7 cells, without affecting cavin-1-PC3-EVs. This suggests that cavin-1 expression altered the glycosylation modifications on PC3-EV surface. Finally, cavin-1 expression did not affect EV in vivo tissue targeting as both control and cavin-1-PC3-EVs were predominantly retained in the lung and bone 24 hours after injection into mice. Taken together, our results reveal a novel pathway for EV cargo sorting, and highlight the potential of utilizing cavin-1-mediated pathways to attenuate metastatic

  17. Colorectal cancer cell-derived microRNA200 modulates the resistance of adjacent blood endothelial barriers in vitro.

    PubMed

    Holzner, Silvio; Senfter, Daniel; Stadler, Serena; Staribacher, Anna; Nguyen, Chi Huu; Gaggl, Anna; Geleff, Silvana; Huttary, Nicole; Krieger, Sigurd; Jäger, Walter; Dolznig, Helmut; Mader, Robert M; Krupitza, Georg

    2016-11-01

    Since cancer cells, when grown as spheroids, display drug sensitivity and radiation resistance patterns such as seen in vivo we recently established a three‑dimensional (3D) in vitro model recapitulating colorectal cancer (CRC)-triggered lymphatic endothelial cell (LEC)‑barrier breaching to study mechanisms of intra‑/extravasation. CRC metastasizes not only through lymphatics but also through blood vessels and here we extend the 3D model to the interaction of blood endothelial cells (BECs) with naïve and 5‑fluorouracil (5‑FU)‑resistant CRC CCL227 cells. The 3D model enabled quantifying effects of tumour‑derived microRNA200 (miR200) miR200a, miR200b, miR200c, miR141 and miR429 regarding the induction of so-called 'circular chemorepellent‑induced defects' (CCIDs) within the BEC‑barrier, which resemble gates for tumour transmigration. For this, miR200 precursors were individually transfected and furthermore, the modulation of ZEB family expression was analysed by western blotting. miR200c, miR141 and miR429, which are contained in exosomes from naïve CCL227 cells, downregulated the expression of ZEB2, SNAI and TWIST in BECs. The exosomes of 5‑FU‑resistant CCL227‑RH cells, which are devoid of miR200, accelerated CCID formation in BEC monolayers as compared to exosomes from naïve CCL227 cells. This confirmed the reported role of ZEB2 and SNAI in CRC metastasis and highlighted the active contribution of the stroma in the metastatic process. CCL227 spheroids affected the integrity of BEC and LEC barriers alike, which was in agreement with the observation that CRC metastasizes via blood stream (into the liver) as well as via lymphatics (into lymph nodes and lungs). This further validated the CRC/LEC and CRC/BEC in vitro model to study mechanisms of CRC spreading through vascular systems. Treatment of CCL227‑RH cells with the HDAC inhibitors mocetinostat and sulforaphane reduced CCID formation to the level triggered by naïve CCL227

  18. Microvesicles Contribute to the Bystander Effect of DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaozeng; Wei, Fengxiang; Major, Pierre; Al-Nedawi, Khalid; Al Saleh, Hassan A; Tang, Damu

    2017-04-07

    Genotoxic treatments elicit DNA damage response (DDR) not only in cells that are directly exposed but also in cells that are not in the field of treatment (bystander cells), a phenomenon that is commonly referred to as the bystander effect (BE). However, mechanisms underlying the BE remain elusive. We report here that etoposide and ultraviolet (UV) exposure stimulate the production of microvesicles (MVs) in DU145 prostate cancer cells. MVs isolated from UV-treated DU145 and A431 epidermoid carcinoma cells as well as etoposide-treated DU145 cells induced phosphorylation of ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) at serine 1981 (indicative of ATM activation) and phosphorylation of histone H2AX at serine 139 (γH2AX) in naïve DU145 cells. Importantly, neutralization of MVs derived from UV-treated cells with annexin V significantly reduced the MV-associated BE activities. Etoposide and UV are known to induce DDR primarily through the ATM and ATM- and Rad3-related (ATR) pathways, respectively. In this regard, MV is likely a common source for the DNA damage-induced bystander effect. However, pre-treatment of DU145 naïve cells with an ATM (KU55933) inhibitor does not affect the BE elicited by MVs isolated from etoposide-treated cells, indicating that the BE is induced upstream of ATM actions. Taken together, we provide evidence supporting that MVs are a source of the DNA damage-induced bystander effect.

  19. Microvesicles preparation from mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Rad, Fariba; Pourfathollah, Ali Akbar; Yari, Fatemeh; Mohammadi, Saeed; Kheirandish, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles are particles ranged from 30 nm to 5μm and subcategorized into three groups; exosomes, microvesicles and apoptotic bodies, each of which have different biological impact. Lack of a standard method for the detection and isolation of MVs has led to a challenging issue that is a worth considering. In this study, we isolated MVs from the conditioned medium of UC-MSCs by four different schemes of ultracentrifugation. We examined the efficacy of differential centrifugation ranging from 10,000×g to 60,000×g on UCMSCs- derived microvesicles yield and purity. The fractions were evaluated by Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) method, total protein quantification and flow cytometry. UC-MSCs were spindle cells that adhered to plastic culture flasks. These cells expressed MSC markers such as CD44 and CD73, whereas were negative for hematopoietic markers CD45 and CD34. UC-MSCparticles were successfully isolated. Particles were heterogeneous vesicles of approximately 50 to 1250 nm in diameter that bear the surface-expressed molecules UC-MSCs such as; CD90, CD106, CD166 and CD44, and negative for CD34, CD63, and CD9. According to the results of DLS method, centrifugation at 10,000, 20,000, 40,000 and 60,000 ×g, all gave MVs of less than 1000 nm. It is of notion that only at the centrifugation rates of 40,000 and 60,000×g, particles of less than 100 nm in diameter were also obtained. The choice of exact speed greatly influences the purity of MVs and their yield. Our findings indicate that centrifugation at 20,000×g is appropriate for the purification of UC-MSC-MVs.

  20. Dynamic flux of microvesicles modulate parasite-host cell interaction of Trypanosoma cruzi in eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, M I; Deolindo, P; de Messias-Reason, I J; Arigi, Emma A; Choi, H; Almeida, I C; Evans-Osses, I

    2017-04-01

    Extracellular vesicles released from pathogens may alter host cell functions. We previously demonstrated the involvement of host cell-derived microvesicles (MVs) during early interaction between Trypanosoma cruzi metacyclic trypomastigote (META) stage and THP-1 cells. Here, we aim to understand the contribution of different parasite stages and their extracellular vesicles in the interaction with host cells. First, we observed that infective host cell-derived trypomastigote (tissue culture-derived trypomastigote [TCT]), META, and noninfective epimastigote (EPI) stages were able to induce different levels of MV release from THP-1 cells; however, only META and TCT could increase host cell invasion. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer microscopy revealed that THP-1-derived MVs can fuse with parasite-derived MVs. Furthermore, MVs derived from the TCT-THP-1 interaction showed a higher fusogenic capacity than those from META- or EPI-THP-1 interaction. However, a higher presence of proteins from META (25%) than TCT (12%) or EPI (5%) was observed in MVs from parasite-THP-1 interaction, as determined by proteomics. Finally, sera from patients with chronic Chagas disease at the indeterminate or cardiac phase differentially recognized antigens in THP-1-derived MVs resulting only from interaction with infective stages. The understanding of intracellular trafficking and the effect of MVs modulating the immune system may provide important clues about Chagas disease pathophysiology. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Smart blood cell and microvesicle-based Trojan horse drug delivery: Merging expertise in blood transfusion and biomedical engineering in the field of nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu-Wen; Goubran, Hadi; Seghatchian, Jerard; Burnouf, Thierry

    2016-04-01

    Therapeutic and diagnostic applications of nanomedicine are playing increasingly important roles in human health. Various types of synthetic nanoparticles, including liposomes, micelles, and other nanotherapeutic platforms and conjugates, are being engineered to encapsulate or carry drugs for treating diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular disorders, neurodegeneration, and inflammations. Nanocarriers are designed to increase the half-life of drugs, decrease their toxicity and, ideally, target pathological sites. Developing smart carriers with the capacity to deliver drugs specifically to the microenvironment of diseased cells with minimum systemic toxicity is the goal. Blood cells, and potentially also the liposome-like micro- and nano-vesicles they generate, may be regarded as ideally suited to perform such specific targeting with minimum immunogenic risks. Blood cell membranes are "decorated" with complex physiological receptors capable of targeting and communicating with other cells and tissues and delivering their content to the surrounding pathological microenvironment. Blood cells, such as erythrocytes, have been developed as permeable carriers to release drugs to diseased tissues or act as biofactory allowing enzymatic degradation of a pathological substrate. Interestingly, attempts are also being made to improve the targeting capacity of synthetic nanoparticles by "decorating" their surface with blood cell membrane receptor-like biochemical structures. Research is needed to further explore the benefits that blood cell-derived microvesicles, as a Trojan horse delivery systems, can bring to the arsenal of therapeutic micro- and nanotechnologies. This short review focuses on the therapeutic roles that red blood cells and platelets can play as smart drug-delivery systems, and highlights the benefits that blood transfusion expertise can bring to this exciting and novel biomedical engineering field.

  2. Simplified protocol for flow cytometry analysis of fluorescently labeled exosomes and microvesicles using dedicated flow cytometer

    PubMed Central

    Pospichalova, Vendula; Svoboda, Jan; Dave, Zankruti; Kotrbova, Anna; Kaiser, Karol; Klemova, Dobromila; Ilkovics, Ladislav; Hampl, Ales; Crha, Igor; Jandakova, Eva; Minar, Lubos; Weinberger, Vit; Bryja, Vitezslav

    2015-01-01

    Flow cytometry is a powerful method, which is widely used for high-throughput quantitative and qualitative analysis of cells. However, its straightforward applicability for extracellular vesicles (EVs) and mainly exosomes is hampered by several challenges, reflecting mostly the small size of these vesicles (exosomes: ~80–200 nm, microvesicles: ~200–1,000 nm), their polydispersity, and low refractive index. The current best and most widely used protocol for beads-free flow cytometry of exosomes uses ultracentrifugation (UC) coupled with floatation in sucrose gradient for their isolation, labeling with lipophilic dye PKH67 and antibodies, and an optimized version of commercial high-end cytometer for analysis. However, this approach requires an experienced flow cytometer operator capable of manual hardware adjustments and calibration of the cytometer. Here, we provide a novel and fast approach for quantification and characterization of both exosomes and microvesicles isolated from cell culture media as well as from more complex human samples (ascites of ovarian cancer patients) suitable for multiuser labs by using a flow cytometer especially designed for small particles, which can be used without adjustments prior to data acquisition. EVs can be fluorescently labeled with protein-(Carboxyfluoresceinsuccinimidyl ester, CFSE) and/or lipid- (FM) specific dyes, without the necessity of removing the unbound fluorescent dye by UC, which further facilitates and speeds up the characterization of microvesicles and exosomes using flow cytometry. In addition, double labeling with protein- and lipid-specific dyes enables separation of EVs from common contaminants of EV preparations, such as protein aggregates or micelles formed by unbound lipophilic styryl dyes, thus not leading to overestimation of EV numbers. Moreover, our protocol is compatible with antibody labeling using fluorescently conjugated primary antibodies. The presented methodology opens the possibility for

  3. Simplified protocol for flow cytometry analysis of fluorescently labeled exosomes and microvesicles using dedicated flow cytometer.

    PubMed

    Pospichalova, Vendula; Svoboda, Jan; Dave, Zankruti; Kotrbova, Anna; Kaiser, Karol; Klemova, Dobromila; Ilkovics, Ladislav; Hampl, Ales; Crha, Igor; Jandakova, Eva; Minar, Lubos; Weinberger, Vit; Bryja, Vitezslav

    2015-01-01

    Flow cytometry is a powerful method, which is widely used for high-throughput quantitative and qualitative analysis of cells. However, its straightforward applicability for extracellular vesicles (EVs) and mainly exosomes is hampered by several challenges, reflecting mostly the small size of these vesicles (exosomes: ~80-200 nm, microvesicles: ~200-1,000 nm), their polydispersity, and low refractive index. The current best and most widely used protocol for beads-free flow cytometry of exosomes uses ultracentrifugation (UC) coupled with floatation in sucrose gradient for their isolation, labeling with lipophilic dye PKH67 and antibodies, and an optimized version of commercial high-end cytometer for analysis. However, this approach requires an experienced flow cytometer operator capable of manual hardware adjustments and calibration of the cytometer. Here, we provide a novel and fast approach for quantification and characterization of both exosomes and microvesicles isolated from cell culture media as well as from more complex human samples (ascites of ovarian cancer patients) suitable for multiuser labs by using a flow cytometer especially designed for small particles, which can be used without adjustments prior to data acquisition. EVs can be fluorescently labeled with protein-(Carboxyfluoresceinsuccinimidyl ester, CFSE) and/or lipid- (FM) specific dyes, without the necessity of removing the unbound fluorescent dye by UC, which further facilitates and speeds up the characterization of microvesicles and exosomes using flow cytometry. In addition, double labeling with protein- and lipid-specific dyes enables separation of EVs from common contaminants of EV preparations, such as protein aggregates or micelles formed by unbound lipophilic styryl dyes, thus not leading to overestimation of EV numbers. Moreover, our protocol is compatible with antibody labeling using fluorescently conjugated primary antibodies. The presented methodology opens the possibility for routine

  4. Cell-derived microparticles and the lung.

    PubMed

    Nieri, Dario; Neri, Tommaso; Petrini, Silvia; Vagaggini, Barbara; Paggiaro, Pierluigi; Celi, Alessandro

    2016-09-01

    Cell-derived microparticles are small (0.1-1 μm) vesicles shed by most eukaryotic cells upon activation or during apoptosis. Microparticles carry on their surface, and enclose within their cytoplasm, molecules derived from the parental cell, including proteins, DNA, RNA, microRNA and phospholipids. Microparticles are now considered functional units that represent a disseminated storage pool of bioactive effectors and participate both in the maintenance of homeostasis and in the pathogenesis of diseases. The mechanisms involved in microparticle generation include intracellular calcium mobilisation, cytoskeleton rearrangement, kinase phosphorylation and activation of the nuclear factor-κB. The role of microparticles in blood coagulation and inflammation, including airway inflammation, is well established in in vitro and animal models. The role of microparticles in human pulmonary diseases, both as pathogenic determinants and biomarkers, is being actively investigated. Microparticles of endothelial origin, suggestive of apoptosis, have been demonstrated in the peripheral blood of patients with emphysema, lending support to the hypothesis that endothelial dysfunction and apoptosis are involved in the pathogenesis of the disease and represent a link with cardiovascular comorbidities. Microparticles also have potential roles in patients with asthma, diffuse parenchymal lung disease, thromboembolism, lung cancer and pulmonary arterial hypertension. Copyright ©ERS 2016.

  5. Microglial Microvesicle Secretion and Intercellular Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Turola, Elena; Furlan, Roberto; Bianco, Fabio; Matteoli, Michela; Verderio, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Microvesicles (MVs) are released from almost all cell brain types into the microenvironment and are emerging as a novel way of cell-to-cell communication. This review focuses on MVs discharged by microglial cells, the brain resident myeloid cells, which comprise ∼10–12% of brain population. We summarize first evidence indicating that MV shedding is a process activated by the ATP receptor P2X7 and that shed MVs represent a secretory pathway for the inflammatory cytokine IL-β. We then discuss subsequent findings which clarify how IL-1 β can be locally processed and released from MVs into the extracellular environment. In addition, we describe the current understanding about the mechanism of P2X7-dependent MV formation and membrane abscission, which, by involving sphingomyelinase activity and ceramide formation, may share similarities with exosome biogenesis. Finally we report our recent results which show that microglia-derived MVs can stimulate neuronal activity and participate to the propagation of inflammatory signals, and suggest new areas for future investigation. PMID:22661954

  6. Circulating Membrane-Derived Microvesicles in Redox Biology

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Michael Craig; Hillery, Cheryl A.; Hogg, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Microparticles or microvesicles (MV) are sub-cellular membrane blebs shed from all cells in response to various stimuli. MVs carry a battery of signaling molecules, many of them related to redox-regulated processes. The role of MVs, either as a cause or result of cellular redox signaling has been increasingly recognized over the past decade. This is in part due to advances in flow cytometry and its detection of MVs. Notably, recent studies have shown circulating MVs from platelets and endothelial cells drive reactive species-dependent angiogenesis; circulating MVs in cancer alter the microenvironment and enhance invasion through horizontal transfer of mutated proteins and nucleic acids, and harbor redox-regulated matrix metalloproteinases and pro-coagulative surface molecules; and circulating MVs from RBCs and other cells modulate cell-cell interactions through scavenging or production of nitric oxide and other free radicals. While our recognition of MVs in redox-related processes is growing, especially in the vascular biology field, much remains unknown regarding the various biologic and pathologic functions of MVs. Like reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, MVs were originally believed to have a solely a pathological role in biology. And like our understanding of reactive species, it is now clear that MVs also play an important role in normal growth, development, and homeostasis. We are just beginning to understand how MVs are involved in various biological processes—developmental, homeostatic and pathological—and the role of MVs in redox signaling is an rich and exciting area of investigation. PMID:24751526

  7. Regenerating the injured kidney with human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell-derived exosomes.

    PubMed

    Dorronsoro, Akaitz; Robbins, Paul D

    2013-04-25

    Transplantation of adult stem cells is being used to facilitate repair or regeneration of damaged or diseased tissues. However, in many cases, the therapeutic effects of the injected stem cells are mediated by factors secreted by stem cells and not by differentiation of the transplanted stem cells. Recent reports have identified a class of microvesicles, termed exosomes, released by stem cells that are able to confer therapeutic effects on injured renal and cardiac tissue. In this issue of Stem Cell Research & Therapy, Zhou and colleagues demonstrate the ability of exosomes derived from human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hucMSCs), but not non-stem cell-derived exosomes, to improve acute kidney injury induced by cisplatin in rats. The authors demonstrate that hucMSC exosomes can reduce cisplatin-mediated renal oxidative stress and apoptosis in vivo and increase renal epithelial cell proliferation in culture. These results suggest that stem cell-derived exosomes, which are easy to isolate and safer to use than the parental stem cells, could have significant clinical utility.

  8. Exosomes as Novel microRNA-Delivery Vehicles to Modulate Prostate Cancer Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    specifically packaged in these 40-100 nm microvesicles and secreted from prostate cancer cells are important in the progression to aggressive disease... microvesicles and secreted from prostate cancer cells are important in the progression to aggressive disease. In this exploratory award, we are

  9. Nucleic acids within urinary exosomes/microvesicles are potential biomarkers for renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Kevin C.; Bond, Daniel T.; McKee, Mary; Skog, Johan; Păunescu, Teodor G.; Da Silva, Nicolas; Brown, Dennis; Russo, Leileata M.

    2015-01-01

    Urinary exosomes or microvesicles are being studied intensively to identify potential new biomarkers for renal disease. We sought to identify whether these microvesicles contain nucleic acids. We isolated microvesicles from human urine in the same density range as that previously described for urinary exosomes and found them to have an RNA integrity profile similar to that of kidney tissue, including 18S and 28S rRNA. This profile was better preserved in urinary microvesicles compared with whole cells isolated from urine, suggesting that microvesicles may protect RNA during urine passage. We were able to detect mRNA in the human urinary microvesicles encoding proteins from all regions of the nephron and the collecting duct. Further, to provide a proof of principle, we found that microvesicles isolated from the urine of the V-ATPase B1 subunit knockout mice lacked mRNA of this subunit while containing a normal amount of the B2 subunit and aquaporin 2. The microvesicles were found to be contaminated with extraneous DNA potentially on their surface; therefore, we developed a rapid and reliable means to isolate nucleic acids from within urine microvesicles devoid of this extraneous contamination. Our study provides an experimental strategy for the routine isolation and use of urinary microvesicles as a novel and non-invasive source of nucleic acids to further renal disease biomarker discovery. PMID:20428099

  10. Macrophage microvesicles induce macrophage differentiation and miR-223 transfer

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Noura; Wang, Yijie; Dakhlallah, Duaa; Moldovan, Leni; Agarwal, Kitty; Batte, Kara; Shah, Prexy; Wisler, Jon; Eubank, Tim D.; Tridandapani, Susheela; Paulaitis, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    Microvesicles are small membrane-bound particles comprised of exosomes and various-sized extracellular vesicles. These are released by several cell types. Microvesicles have a variety of cellular functions from communication to mediating growth and differentiation. Microvesicles contain proteins and nucleic acids. Previously, we showed that plasma microvesicles contain microRNAs (miRNAs). Based on our previous report, the majority of peripheral blood microvesicles are derived from platelets, while mononuclear phagocytes, including macrophages, are the second most abundant population. Here, we characterized macrophage-derived microvesicles and explored their role in the differentiation of naive monocytes. We also identified the miRNA content of the macrophage-derived microvesicles. We found that RNA molecules contained in the macrophage-derived microvesicles were transported to target cells, including mono cytes, endothelial cells, epithelial cells, and fibroblasts. Furthermore, we found that miR-223 was transported to target cells and was functionally active. Based on our observations, we hypothesize that microvesicles bind to and activate target cells. Furthermore, we find that microvesicles induce the differentiation of macrophages. Thus, defining key components of this response may identify novel targets to regulate host defense and inflammation. PMID:23144169

  11. Nucleic acids within urinary exosomes/microvesicles are potential biomarkers for renal disease.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Kevin C; Bond, Daniel T; McKee, Mary; Skog, Johan; Păunescu, Teodor G; Da Silva, Nicolas; Brown, Dennis; Russo, Leileata M

    2010-07-01

    Urinary exosomes or microvesicles are being studied intensively to identify potential new biomarkers for renal disease. We sought to identify whether these microvesicles contain nucleic acids. We isolated microvesicles from human urine in the same density range as that previously described for urinary exosomes and found them to have an RNA integrity profile similar to that of kidney tissue, including 18S and 28S rRNA. This profile was better preserved in urinary microvesicles compared with whole cells isolated from urine, suggesting that microvesicles may protect RNA during urine passage. We were able to detect mRNA in the human urinary microvesicles encoding proteins from all regions of the nephron and the collecting duct. Further, to provide a proof of principle, we found that microvesicles isolated from the urine of the V-ATPase B1 subunit knockout mice lacked mRNA of this subunit while containing a normal amount of the B2 subunit and aquaporin 2. The microvesicles were found to be contaminated with extraneous DNA potentially on their surface; therefore, we developed a rapid and reliable means to isolate nucleic acids from within urine microvesicles devoid of this extraneous contamination. Our study provides an experimental strategy for the routine isolation and use of urinary microvesicles as a novel and non-invasive source of nucleic acids to further renal disease biomarker discovery.

  12. Macrophage microvesicles induce macrophage differentiation and miR-223 transfer.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Noura; Wang, Yijie; Dakhlallah, Duaa; Moldovan, Leni; Agarwal, Kitty; Batte, Kara; Shah, Prexy; Wisler, Jon; Eubank, Tim D; Tridandapani, Susheela; Paulaitis, Michael E; Piper, Melissa G; Marsh, Clay B

    2013-02-07

    Microvesicles are small membrane-bound particles comprised of exosomes and various-sized extracellular vesicles. These are released by several cell types. Microvesicles have a variety of cellular functions from communication to mediating growth and differentiation. Microvesicles contain proteins and nucleic acids. Previously, we showed that plasma microvesicles contain microRNAs (miRNAs). Based on our previous report, the majority of peripheral blood microvesicles are derived from platelets, while mononuclear phagocytes, including macrophages, are the second most abundant population. Here, we characterized macrophage-derived microvesicles and explored their role in the differentiation of naive monocytes. We also identified the miRNA content of the macrophage-derived microvesicles. We found that RNA molecules contained in the macrophage-derived microvesicles were transported to target cells, including mono cytes, endothelial cells, epithelial cells, and fibroblasts. Furthermore, we found that miR-223 was transported to target cells and was functionally active. Based on our observations, we hypothesize that microvesicles bind to and activate target cells. Furthermore, we find that microvesicles induce the differentiation of macrophages. Thus, defining key components of this response may identify novel targets to regulate host defense and inflammation.

  13. Microvesicles of pregnant women receiving low molecular weight heparin improve trophoblast function.

    PubMed

    Shomer, Einat; Katzenell, Sarah; Zipori, Yaniv; Rebibo-Sabbah, Annie; Brenner, Benjamin; Aharon, Anat

    2016-01-01

    Microvesicles including exosomes and microparticles, participate in the placental-maternal crosstalk in normal pregnancies and gestational vascular complications (GVC). Low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) is known to reduce the risk of placenta-mediated pregnancy complications. This study was aimed to characterize microvesicles of pregnant women receiving LMWH and explore microvesicle involvement in trophoblast and endothelial cell function. Microvesicles were isolated from blood samples obtained from non-pregnant women, healthy pregnant women (HP) and pregnant woman treated with LMWH. Microvesicle protein contents were assessed by protein array and ELISA. Microvesicle effects on early stage trophoblasts, term trophoblasts and endothelial cell migration, angiogenesis and apoptosis were evaluated. Microvesicles derived from the group treated with LMWH contained higher levels of several proangiogenic proteins compared to those of HP women. Exposure of endothelial cells to circulating microvesicles derived from HP and LMWH treated groups induced significantly higher cell migration and branch tube formation compared to untreated cells. The effect of microvesicles from HP- and LMWH groups on early-stage trophoblast migration was similar. Microvesicles derived from these two study groups significantly decreased early-stage trophoblast apoptosis, while microvesicles derived from the HP-group (but not from the LMWH-group) significantly increased the term trophoblast apoptosis (TUNEL assay) compared to untreated cells. Therapy with LMWH affects patients' microvesicle content, leading to normalization of invasion, angiogenesis activity and survival of endothelial and trophoblast cells in vitro. The effects of LMWH on microvesicles may point to an additional mechanism of heparin action in high-risk pregnancy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. [STRUCTURAL CHARACTERIZATION OF PLATELETS AND PLATELET-DERIVED MICROVESICLES].

    PubMed

    Ponomareva, A A; Nevzorova, T A; Mordakhanova, E R; Andrianova, I A; Litvinov, R I

    2016-01-01

    Platelets are the anucleated blood cells, wich together with the fibrin stop bleeding (hemostasis). Cellular microvesicles are membrane-surrounded microparticles released into extracellular space upon activation and/or apoptosis of various cells. Platelet-derived macrovesicles from the major population of circulating blood microparticles that play an important role in hemostasis and thrombosis. Despite numerous studies on the pathophysiology of platelet-derived macrovesicles, mechanisms of their formation and structural details remain poorly understood. Here we investigated the ultrastructure of parental platelets and platelet-derived microvesicles formed in vitro by quiescent cells as well as by cells stimulated with one of the following activators: arachidonic acid, ADP, thrombin, calcium ionophore A23187. Using transmission electron microscopy of human platelets and isolated microvesicles, we analyzed the intracellular origin, steps of formation, structural diversity, and size distributions of the subcellular particles. We have revealed that thrombin, unlike other stimuli, not only induced vesiculation of the plasma membrane but also caused break-up of the cells followed by formation of microparticles that are comparable with microvesicles by size. A fraction of these microparticles contained cellular organelles surrounded by a thin membrane. The size of platelet-derived macrovesicles varied from 30 nm to 500 nm, however, the size distributions depended on the nature of a cell-activating stimulus. The results obtained provide new information about the formation of platelet-derived macrovesicles and their structural diversity, wich is important to understand their multiple functions in normal and disease states.

  15. Number of microvesicles in peripheral blood and ability of plasma to induce adhesion between phospholipid membranes in 19 patients with gastrointestinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Jansa, Rado; Sustar, Vid; Frank, Mojca; Susanj, Petra; Bester, Janez; Mancek-Keber, Mateja; Krzan, Mojca; Iglic, Ales

    2008-01-01

    It was recently shown that the plasma protein-mediated attractive interaction between phospholipid membranes could in the budding process cause adhesion of the bud to the mother membrane [J. Urbanija, N. Tomsic, M. Lokar, A. Ambrozic, S. Cucnik, M. Kanduser, B. Rozman, A. Iglic, V. Kralj-Iglic, Coalescence of phospholipid membranes as a possible origin of anticoagulant effect of serum proteins, Chem. Phys. Lipids 150 (2007) 49-57]. Since in the in vivo conditions the budding of cell membranes leads to the release of microvesicles into the circulation, a hypothesis was put forward that the ability of plasma to cause adhesion between membranes supresses the microvesiculation process. In the present work, this hypothesis was tested in a population of 19 patients with gastrointestinal diseases. The number of microvesicles in peripheral blood of patients was determined by flow cytometry while the ability of plasma to cause adhesion between membranes was determined by adding patient's plasma to the suspension of giant phospholipid vesicles created by electroformation method, and measuring the average effective angle of contact between the adhered vesicles. Statistically significant negative correlations between the number of microvesicles and the average effective angle of contact (Pearson coefficient -0.50, p=0.031) and between the number of microvesicles per number of platelets and the average effective angle of contact (Pearson coefficient -0.64, p=0.003) were found, which is in favor of the above hypothesis. Patients with gastrointestinal cancer had larger number of microvesicles (difference 140%, statistical significance 0.033) and smaller average effective angle of contact (difference 20%, statistical significance 0.013) compared to patients with other gastrointestinal diseases.

  16. Protein typing of circulating microvesicles allows real-time monitoring of glioblastoma therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Huilin; Chung, Jaehoon; Balaj, Leonora; Weissleder, Ralph; Lee, Hakho

    2013-03-01

    Glioblastomas shed large quantities of small, membrane-bound microvesicles (MVs) into the circulation. While these hold promise as potential biomarkers of therapeutic response, there remain hurdles to their identification and quantitation. Here, we describe a highly sensitive and rapid analytical technique for profiling circulating MVs directly from blood samples of glioblastoma patients. MVs, introduced onto a dedicated microfluidic chip, are labeled with target-specific magnetic nanoparticles and detected by a miniaturized nuclear magnetic resonance system. Compared with current standard assays (e.g., Western blotting, ELISA and flow cytometry), this integrated system has a much higher detection sensitivity, and can differentiate glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) MVs from non-tumor host cell-derived MVs. The system further showed that circulating GBM MVs could serve as a surrogate for primary tumor by reflecting its molecular signature and a predictor of treatment-induced changes. We expect that this converging nanotechnology platform would have a wide range of applications, providing both an earlier indicator of drug efficacy and a potential molecular stratifier for human clinical trials.

  17. Characterization of physical properties of tissue factor-containing microvesicles and a comparison of ultracentrifuge-based recovery procedures.

    PubMed

    Ettelaie, Camille; Collier, Mary E W; Maraveyas, Anthony; Ettelaie, Rammile

    2014-01-01

    Microvesicles were isolated from the conditioned media of 3 cell lines (MDA-MB-231, AsPC-1 and A375) by ultracentrifugation at a range of relative centrifugal forces, and the tissue factor (TF) protein and activity, microvesicle number, size distribution and relative density compared. Also, by expressing TF-tGFP in cells and isolating the microvesicles, the relative density of TF-containing microvesicles was established. Nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA) indicated that the larger-diameter microvesicles (>200 nm) were primarily sedimented at 100,000g and possessed TF-dependent thrombin and factor Xa generation potential, while in the absence of factor VII, all microvesicles possessed some thrombin generation capacity. Immuno-precipitation of TF-containing microvesicles followed by NTA also indicated the range of these microvesicles to be 200-400 nm. Analysis of the microvesicles by gradient density centrifugation showed that lower-density (<1.1 g/ml) microvesicles were mainly present in the samples recovered at 100,000g and were associated with TF antigen and activity. Analysis of these fractions by NTA confirmed that these fractions were principally composed of the larger-diameter microvesicles. Similar analysis of microvesicles from healthy or patient plasma supported those obtained from conditioned media indicating that TF activity was mainly associated with lower-density microvesicles. Furthermore, centrifugation of healthy plasma, supplemented with TF-tGFP-containing microvesicles, resulted in 67% retrieval of the fluorescent microvesicles at 100,000g, but only 26% could be recovered at 20,000g. Pre-centrifugation of conditioned media or plasma at 10,000g improved the speed and yield of recovered TF-containing microvesicles by subsequent centrifugation at either 20,000g or 100,000g. In conclusion, TF appears to be associated with low-density (1.03-1.08 g/ml), larger-diameter (200-350 nm) microvesicles.

  18. Characterization of physical properties of tissue factor–containing microvesicles and a comparison of ultracentrifuge-based recovery procedures

    PubMed Central

    Ettelaie, Camille; Collier, Mary E. W.; Maraveyas, Anthony; Ettelaie, Rammile

    2014-01-01

    Microvesicles were isolated from the conditioned media of 3 cell lines (MDA-MB-231, AsPC-1 and A375) by ultracentrifugation at a range of relative centrifugal forces, and the tissue factor (TF) protein and activity, microvesicle number, size distribution and relative density compared. Also, by expressing TF-tGFP in cells and isolating the microvesicles, the relative density of TF-containing microvesicles was established. Nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA) indicated that the larger-diameter microvesicles (>200 nm) were primarily sedimented at 100,000g and possessed TF-dependent thrombin and factor Xa generation potential, while in the absence of factor VII, all microvesicles possessed some thrombin generation capacity. Immuno-precipitation of TF-containing microvesicles followed by NTA also indicated the range of these microvesicles to be 200–400 nm. Analysis of the microvesicles by gradient density centrifugation showed that lower-density (<1.1 g/ml) microvesicles were mainly present in the samples recovered at 100,000g and were associated with TF antigen and activity. Analysis of these fractions by NTA confirmed that these fractions were principally composed of the larger-diameter microvesicles. Similar analysis of microvesicles from healthy or patient plasma supported those obtained from conditioned media indicating that TF activity was mainly associated with lower-density microvesicles. Furthermore, centrifugation of healthy plasma, supplemented with TF-tGFP-containing microvesicles, resulted in 67% retrieval of the fluorescent microvesicles at 100,000g, but only 26% could be recovered at 20,000g. Pre-centrifugation of conditioned media or plasma at 10,000g improved the speed and yield of recovered TF-containing microvesicles by subsequent centrifugation at either 20,000g or 100,000g. In conclusion, TF appears to be associated with low-density (1.03–1.08 g/ml), larger-diameter (200–350 nm) microvesicles. PMID:25206957

  19. Microvesicle Production After Trauma and its Clinical Impact on Veno-thrombolism

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-10-2-0110 TITLE: Microvesicle Production After Trauma and Its Clinical...2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Microvesicle Production After Trauma and its Clinical Impact on Veno-thrombolism. 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-10-2...samples of over 230 patients and 64 volunteers. In our preliminary analysis of thrombin generation and procoagulant microvesicle analysis, we have

  20. C1-Inhibitor Decreases the Release of Vasculitis-Like Chemotactic Endothelial Microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Mossberg, Maria; Ståhl, Anne-Lie; Kahn, Robin; Kristoffersson, Ann-Charlotte; Tati, Ramesh; Heijl, Caroline; Segelmark, Mårten; Leeb-Lundberg, L M Fredrik; Karpman, Diana

    2017-08-01

    The kinin system is activated during vasculitis and may contribute to chronic inflammation. C1-inhibitor is the main inhibitor of the kinin system. In this study, we investigated the presence of the kinin B1 receptor on endothelial microvesicles and its contribution to the inflammatory process. Compared with controls (n=15), patients with acute vasculitis (n=12) had markedly higher levels of circulating endothelial microvesicles, identified by flow cytometry analysis, and significantly more microvesicles that were positive for the kinin B1 receptor (P<0.001). Compared with microvesicles from wild-type cells, B1 receptor-positive microvesicles derived from transfected human embryonic kidney cells induced a significant neutrophil chemotactic effect, and a B1 receptor antagonist blocked this effect. Likewise, patient plasma induced neutrophil chemotaxis, an effect decreased by reduction of microvesicle levels and by blocking the B1 receptor. We used a perfusion system to study the effect of patient plasma (n=6) and control plasma (n=6) on the release of microvesicles from glomerular endothelial cells. Patient samples induced the release of significantly more B1 receptor-positive endothelial microvesicles than control samples, an effect abrogated by reduction of the microvesicles in the perfused samples. Perfusion of C1-inhibitor-depleted plasma over glomerular endothelial cells promoted excessive release of B1 receptor-positive endothelial microvesicles compared with normal plasma, an effect significantly decreased by addition of C1-inhibitor or B1 receptor-antagonist. Thus, B1 receptor-positive endothelial microvesicles may contribute to chronic inflammation by inducing neutrophil chemotaxis, and the reduction of these microvesicles by C1-inhibitor should be explored as a potential treatment for neutrophil-induced inflammation. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  1. [The influence of erythrocyte-derived microvesicles on aggregation of platelets in burn injury].

    PubMed

    Levin, G Ya; Sukhareva, E G

    2015-01-01

    Burn Injury is accompanied by a significant homeostasis disorder, including the disorder of primary homeostasis, associated with aggregation of platelets. The role of erythrocyte-derived microvesicles in this process has not undergone thorough research. Microvesicles were isolated from washed erythrocytes after one day of storage by ultracentrifugation at 100000 g. The number of MVs was determined by flow cytometry and was standardized in the samples. Heparin-dependent and heparin-independent antithrombin activity in erythrocyte microvesicles was studied by coagulation method. We studied platelet aggregation induced and not induced by ADP under the conditions of artificial shear flow. It was shown that at the early stage of bum injury the number of erythrocyte-derived microvesicles in blood demonstrated a 4.2-fold ncrease. We determined that microvesicles, derived from the erythrocytes of burn patients displayed a significantly less aggregation activity than the microvesicles from donors. The main reason is a considerably lower antithrombin activity in the erythrocyte microvesicles of bum patients. Thus, we can conclude that the decrease of antiaggregation and antithrombin activity of erythrocyte microvesicles associated with the increase in their concentration in blood contributes to thrombophilia of bum patients. Keywords: erythrocytes, microvesicles, bum injury, platelet aggregation, antithrombin activity

  2. Fluorescent immortalized human adipose derived stromal cells (hASCs-TS/GFP+) for studying cell drug delivery mediated by microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Coccè, Valentina; Balducci, Luigi; Falchetti, Maria Laura; Pascucci, Luisa; Ciusani, Emilio; Brini, Anna Teresa; Sisto, Francesca; Piovani, Giovanna; Alessandri, Giulio; Parati, Eugenio; Cabeza, Laura; Pessina, Augusto

    2017-03-27

    A new tool for the drug delivery is based on the use of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (MSCs) loaded in vitro with anti-cancer drugs. Unfortunately, the restricted lifespan of MSCs represents a significant limitation to produce them in high amounts and for long time studies. Immortalized MSCs from adipose tissue (hASC) have been generated as good source of cells with stable features. These cells could improve the development of standardized procedures for both in vitro and preclinical studies. Furthermore they facilitate procedures for preparing large amounts of secretome containing microvesicles (MVs). We used human adipose tissue derived MSCs immortalized with hTERT+SV40 (TS) genes and transfected with GFP (hASCs-TS/GFP+). This line was investigate for its ability to uptake and release anticancer drugs. Microvesicles associated to paclitaxel (MVs/PTX) were isolated, quantified, and tested on pancreatic cancer cells. The line hASCs-TS/GFP+ maintained the main mesenchymal characters and was able to uptake and release, in active form, both paclitaxel and gemcitabine. From paclitaxel loaded hASCs-TS/GFP+ cells were isolated microvesicles in sufficient amount to inhibit "in vitro" the proliferation of pancreatic tumor cells. Our study suggests that human immortalized MSCs could be used for a large scale production of cells for mediated drug delivery. Moreover, the secretion of drug-associated MVs could represent a new way for producing new drug formulation by "biogenesis". In the context of the "advanced cell therapy procedure", the MVs/PTX production would be less resource and time consuming and it could possibly contribute to simplification of GMP procedures. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. Trophoblast Glycoprotein (TPGB/5T4) in Human Placenta: Expression, Regulation, and Presence in Extracellular Microvesicles and Exosomes.

    PubMed

    Alam, S M K; Jasti, S; Kshirsagar, S K; Tannetta, D S; Dragovic, R A; Redman, C W; Sargent, I L; Hodes, H C; Nauser, T L; Fortes, T; Filler, A M; Behan, K; Martin, D R; Fields, T A; Petroff, B K; Petroff, M G

    2017-01-01

    Many parallels exist between growth and development of the placenta and that of cancer. One parallel is shared expression of antigens that may have functional importance and may be recognized by the immune system. Here, we characterize expression and regulation of one such antigen, Trophoblast glycoprotein (TPGB; also called 5T4), in the placenta across gestation, in placentas of preeclamptic (PE) pregnancies, and in purified microvesicles and exosomes. Trophoblast glycoprotein expression was analyzed by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. Regulation of 5T4 in cytotrophoblast cells was examined under either differentiating conditions of epidermal growth factor or under varying oxygen conditions. Microvesicles and exosomes were purified from supernatant of cultured and perfused placentas. Trophoblast glycoprotein expression was prominent at the microvillus surface of syncytiotrophoblast and on the extravillous trophoblast cells, with minimal expression in undifferentiated cytotrophoblasts and normal tissues. Trophoblast glycoprotein expression was elevated in malignant tumors. In cytotrophoblasts, 5T4 was induced by in vitro differentiation, and its messenger RNA (mRNA) was increased under conditions of low oxygen. PE placentas expressed higher 5T4 mRNA than matched control placentas. Trophoblast glycoprotein was prominent within shed placental microvesicles and exosomes. Given the potential functional and known immunological importance of 5T4 in cancer, these studies reveal a class of proteins that may influence placental development and/or sensitize the maternal immune system. In extravillous trophoblasts, 5T4 may function in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition during placentation. The role of syncytiotrophoblast 5T4 is unknown, but its abundance in shed syncytial vesicles may signify route of sensitization of the maternal immune system.

  4. Microvesicles as a potential biomarker of neoplastic diseases and their role in development and progression of neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Kajdos, Magdalena; Janas, Łukasz; Kolasa-Zwierzchowska, Dorota; Wilczyński, Jacek R; Stetkiewicz, Tomasz

    2015-12-01

    Neoplastic diseases together with cardiovascular diseases are the most frequent causes of death in the Polish population. Cancers of reproductive organs with breast cancer are responsible for the highest morbidity and mortality in women suffering from neoplasm diseases. Asymptomatic dynamics of the development of a neoplasm and no deviations from the normal level of laboratory results contribute to the fact that malignant diseases are diagnosed too late. The aim of modern medicine is to diagnose cancer at the earliest stage, however, there is no sufficiently sensitive and specific biomarker which can be used for diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic purposes. Cellular interactions play the main role in the development, angiogenesis and invasiveness of a tumor. Recent research suggests the possibility of microvesicles (MVs) involvement in communication between cells. The MVs ability to fuse with various cells is used in cell-to-cell contact. Microvesicles cargo may include growth factors, their receptors, protease, adhesion molecules, signaling molecules and the sequence of DNA, mRNA, and micro-RNA. Larger quantities of MVs released from neoplastic cells affect both the local environment and systematic range causing metastases and progression. The research on molecular mechanisms of MVs' release and the presence of characteristic oncogenes in blood of patients with neoplasms is being carried out. Confirmation of MVs presence in patients' serum can potentially serve as useful information for therapeutic purposes and as the biomarker of a neoplastic disease.

  5. Microvesicles as a potential biomarker of neoplastic diseases and their role in development and progression of neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Kajdos, Magdalena; Janas, Łukasz; Kolasa-Zwierzchowska, Dorota; Wilczyński, Jacek R.

    2015-01-01

    Neoplastic diseases together with cardiovascular diseases are the most frequent causes of death in the Polish population. Cancers of reproductive organs with breast cancer are responsible for the highest morbidity and mortality in women suffering from neoplasm diseases. Asymptomatic dynamics of the development of a neoplasm and no deviations from the normal level of laboratory results contribute to the fact that malignant diseases are diagnosed too late. The aim of modern medicine is to diagnose cancer at the earliest stage, however, there is no sufficiently sensitive and specific biomarker which can be used for diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic purposes. Cellular interactions play the main role in the development, angiogenesis and invasiveness of a tumor. Recent research suggests the possibility of microvesicles (MVs) involvement in communication between cells. The MVs ability to fuse with various cells is used in cell-to-cell contact. Microvesicles cargo may include growth factors, their receptors, protease, adhesion molecules, signaling molecules and the sequence of DNA, mRNA, and micro-RNA. Larger quantities of MVs released from neoplastic cells affect both the local environment and systematic range causing metastases and progression. The research on molecular mechanisms of MVs’ release and the presence of characteristic oncogenes in blood of patients with neoplasms is being carried out. Confirmation of MVs presence in patients’ serum can potentially serve as useful information for therapeutic purposes and as the biomarker of a neoplastic disease. PMID:26848301

  6. The role of platelet microvesicles in intercellular communication.

    PubMed

    Edelstein, Leonard C

    2017-05-01

    In recent years, there has been exponential growth in the interest in microvesicles, which is reflected by the number of publications. Initially referred to as "platelet dust" by Peter Wolf in 1967, platelet microvesicles (PMV) are now recognized as important mediators of intercellular communication. There are examples of PMV exerting physiological effects on almost all hematological and vascular cell types, including monocytes, macrophages, neutrophils, T-cells, endothelium cells, and smooth muscle cells (SMCs). PMV can exert these effects by multiple methods: extracellular signaling through receptors, transfer of surface molecules, and delivery of intracellular contents including miRNA. Recent work suggests a complex environment in which cellular contents are being shared multi-directionally between multiple cell types. This review will focus on the communicative properties of PMV.

  7. Enhanced activation of dendritic cells by autologous apoptotic microvesicles in MRL/lpr mice.

    PubMed

    Dieker, Jürgen; Hilbrands, Luuk; Thielen, Astrid; Dijkman, Henry; Berden, Jo H; van der Vlag, Johan

    2015-04-16

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is associated with a persistent circulation of modified autoantigen-containing apoptotic debris that might be capable of breaking tolerance. We aimed to evaluate apoptotic microvesicles obtained from lupus or control mice for the presence of apoptosis-associated chromatin modifications and for their capacity to stimulate dendritic cells (DC) from lupus and control mice. Apoptotic microvesicles were in vitro generated from splenocytes, and ex vivo isolated from plasma of both MRL/lpr lupus mice and normal BALB/c mice. Microvesicles were analyzed using flow cytometry. Bone marrow-derived (BM)-DC cultured from MRL/lpr or BALB/c mice were incubated with microvesicles and CD40 expression and cytokine production were determined as measure of activation. Microvesicles derived from apoptotic splenocytes or plasma of MRL/lpr mice contained more modified chromatin compared to microvesicles of BALB/c mice, and showed enhanced activation of DC, either from MRL/lpr or BALB/c mice, and consecutively an enhanced DC-mediated activation of splenocytes. The content of apoptosis-modified chromatin in microvesicles of apoptotic splenocytes correlated with their potency to induce interleukin-6 (IL-6) production by DC. Microvesicle-activated MRL/lpr DC showed a significant higher production of IL-6 and tumor growth factor-β (TGF-β) compared to BALB/c DC, and were more potent in the activation of splenocytes. Apoptotic microvesicles from MRL/lpr mice are more potent activators of DC, and DC from MRL/lpr mice appear relatively more sensitive to activation by apoptotic microvesicles. Our findings indicate that aberrations at the level of apoptotic microvesicles and possibly DC contribute to the autoimmune response against chromatin in MRL/lpr mice.

  8. Microvesicles of women with gestational hypertension and preeclampsia affect human trophoblast fate and endothelial function.

    PubMed

    Shomer, Einat; Katzenell, Sarah; Zipori, Yaniv; Sammour, Rami N; Isermann, Berend; Brenner, Benjamin; Aharon, Anat

    2013-11-01

    Microvesicles shedding from cell membrane affect inflammation, apoptosis, and angiogenesis. We hypothesize that microvesicles of women with gestational vascular complications reflect pathophysiological state of the patients and affect their endothelial and trophoblast cell function. Microvesicles of healthy pregnant women, women with gestational hypertension, mild, or severe preeclampsia/toxemia, were characterized, and their effects on early-stage or term trophoblasts and endothelial cells were evaluated using apoptosis, migration, and tube formation assays. Patient subgroups differed significantly only in proteinuria levels, therefore their microvesicles were assessed as 1 group, demonstrating higher levels of inflammatory and angiogenic proteins compared with those of healthy pregnant women. In endothelial cells, microvesicles of healthy pregnant women reduced caspase 3/7 activity, increased migration, and induced tube formation. These processes were suppressed by microvesicles of women with gestational vascular complications. In early-stage trophoblasts, microvesicles of healthy pregnant women decreased apoptosis compared with untreated cells (6±5% versus 13.8±5.8%; P<0.001) and caspase 3/7 activity and induced higher migration (39.7±10.1 versus 20.3±8.3 mm2; P<0.001). This effect was mediated through extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway. Conversely, microvesicles of women with gestational vascular complications increased term trophoblast apoptosis compared with cells exposed to microvesicles of healthy pregnant women (15.1±3.3% versus 6.5±2.1%; P<0.001) and inhibited early-stage trophoblasts migration (21.4±18.5 versus 39.7±10.1 mm2; P<0.001). In conclusion, microvesicle content and effects on endothelial and trophoblast cells vary according to the physiological/pathological state of a pregnant woman. Microvesicles seem to play a pivotal role in the course of pregnancy, which could potentially result in gestational vascular complications.

  9. Thrombogenic microvesicles and white matter hyperintensities in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Raz, Limor; Jayachandran, M; Tosakulwong, Nirubol; Lesnick, Timothy G; Wille, Samantha M; Murphy, Matthew C; Senjem, Matthew L; Gunter, Jeffrey L; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Jack, Clifford R; Miller, Virginia M; Kantarci, Kejal

    2013-03-05

    To determine the association of conventional cardiovascular risk factors, markers of platelet activation, and thrombogenic blood-borne microvesicles with white matter hyperintensity (WMH) load and progression in recently menopausal women. Women (n = 95) enrolled in the Mayo Clinic Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study underwent MRI at baseline and at 18, 36, and 48 months after randomization to hormone treatments. Conventional cardiovascular risk factors, carotid intima-medial thickness, coronary arterial calcification, plasma lipids, markers of platelet activation, and thrombogenic microvesicles were measured at baseline. WMH volumes were calculated using a semiautomated segmentation algorithm based on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery MRI. Correlations of those parameters with baseline WMH and longitudinal change in WMH were adjusted for age, months past menopause, and APOE ε4 status in linear regression analysis. At baseline, WMH were present in all women. The WMH to white matter volume fraction at baseline was 0.88% (0.69%, 1.16%). WMH volume increased by 122.1 mm(3) (95% confidence interval: -164.3, 539.5) at 36 months (p = 0.003) and 155.4 mm(3) (95% confidence interval: -92.13, 599.4) at 48 months (p < 0.001). These increases correlated with numbers of platelet-derived and total thrombogenic microvesicles at baseline (p = 0.03). Associations of platelet-derived, thrombogenic microvesicles at baseline and increases in WMH suggest that in vivo platelet activation may contribute to a cascade of events leading to development of WMH in recently menopausal women.

  10. Thrombogenic microvesicles and white matter hyperintensities in postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Raz, Limor; Jayachandran, M.; Tosakulwong, Nirubol; Lesnick, Timothy G.; Wille, Samantha M.; Murphy, Matthew C.; Senjem, Matthew L.; Gunter, Jeffrey L.; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Jack, Clifford R.; Miller, Virginia M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the association of conventional cardiovascular risk factors, markers of platelet activation, and thrombogenic blood-borne microvesicles with white matter hyperintensity (WMH) load and progression in recently menopausal women. Methods: Women (n = 95) enrolled in the Mayo Clinic Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study underwent MRI at baseline and at 18, 36, and 48 months after randomization to hormone treatments. Conventional cardiovascular risk factors, carotid intima-medial thickness, coronary arterial calcification, plasma lipids, markers of platelet activation, and thrombogenic microvesicles were measured at baseline. WMH volumes were calculated using a semiautomated segmentation algorithm based on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery MRI. Correlations of those parameters with baseline WMH and longitudinal change in WMH were adjusted for age, months past menopause, and APOE ε4 status in linear regression analysis. Results: At baseline, WMH were present in all women. The WMH to white matter volume fraction at baseline was 0.88% (0.69%, 1.16%). WMH volume increased by 122.1 mm3 (95% confidence interval: −164.3, 539.5) at 36 months (p = 0.003) and 155.4 mm3 (95% confidence interval: −92.13, 599.4) at 48 months (p < 0.001). These increases correlated with numbers of platelet-derived and total thrombogenic microvesicles at baseline (p = 0.03). Conclusion: Associations of platelet-derived, thrombogenic microvesicles at baseline and increases in WMH suggest that in vivo platelet activation may contribute to a cascade of events leading to development of WMH in recently menopausal women. PMID:23408873

  11. Mesenchymal stromal cells derived from cervical cancer tumors induce TGF-β1 expression and IL-10 expression and secretion in the cervical cancer cells, resulting in protection from cytotoxic T cell activity.

    PubMed

    García-Rocha, R; Moreno-Lafont, M; Mora-García, M L; Weiss-Steider, B; Montesinos, J J; Piña-Sánchez, P; Monroy-García, A

    2015-12-01

    Cervical cancer (CeCa) tumors are characterized by increased expression of TGF-β1 and IL-10, which are correlated with downregulated expression of major histocompatibility complex class I antigens (HLA-I) on cancer cells and a reduced immune response mediated by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are important components in the tumor microenvironment that have been suggested to contribute to cancer progression through the induction of TGF-β1 and IL-10. In this study, we provided evidence that MSCs derived from cervical tumors (CeCa-MSCs) cocultured with CeCa cells induced significant expression of TGF-β1 and secretion of IL-10 by CeCa cells compared to MSCs derived from the normal cervix (NCx-MSCs) and normal bone marrow (BM-MSCs; gold standard). This increase in expression was associated with a significant downregulation of HLA-I molecules and protection of the cells against specific CTL lysis. Interestingly, the addition of the neutralizing antibody anti-TGF-β to the CeCa/CeCa-MSCs coculture strongly inhibited the expression and production of IL-10 by CeCa cells. Anti-TGF-β as well as anti-IL-10 also abolished HLA-I downregulation, and reversed the inhibition of CTL cytotoxicity. These results provide evidence that TGF-β1 and IL-10 could play an important role in the downregulation of HLA-I molecules on CeCa cells induced by tumor MSCs. Our findings suggest a novel mechanism through which MSCs may protect tumor cells from immune recognition by specific CTLs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Host cell invasion by Staphylococcus aureus stimulates the shedding of microvesicles.

    PubMed

    DeWalt, Robin I; Petkovich, Daniel A; Zahrt, Ashley N; Bruns, Heather A; McDowell, Susan A

    2013-03-22

    During severe sepsis, microvesicles that are positive for tissue factor (TF) are at increased levels within blood and in pulmonary lavage. These microvesicles potentially disperse TF, the major initiator of the coagulation cascade, throughout multiple organ systems, initiating fibrin deposition and resultant ischemia. The source of these microvesicles has remained incompletely defined. Although TF(+) microvesicles are shed from cells that express nascent TF transcript in response to injury, recent findings revealed that circulating, full-length TF protein is detectable prior to these nascent transcripts. This finding suggested that the protein is released from constitutive sources as an acute response. We examined whether Staphylococcus aureus, the Gram-positive bacteria that is emerging as one of the most common etiologic agents in sepsis, is capable of stimulating the release of TF(+) microvesicles from a pulmonary cell line that constitutively expresses TF protein. We found that host cell invasion stimulated an acute release of TF(+) microvesicles and that these microvesicles mediated the transfer of the protein to TF-negative endothelial cells. We also found that transfer was inhibited by cholesterol-lowering simvastatin. Taken together, our findings reveal that S. aureus pathogenesis extends to the acute release of TF(+) microvesicles and that inhibiting dispersal by this mechanism may provide a therapeutic target. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Plasma C4d+ Endothelial Microvesicles Increase in Acute Antibody-Mediated Rejection.

    PubMed

    Tower, Cindy M; Reyes, Morayma; Nelson, Karen; Leca, Nicolae; Kieran, Niamh; Muczynski, Kimberly; Jefferson, Jonathan A; Blosser, Christopher; Kukla, Aleksandra; Maurer, David; Chandler, Wayne; Najafian, Behzad

    2017-09-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) is a major cause of kidney allograft loss. Currently, AMR diagnosis relies on biopsy which is an invasive procedure. A noninvasive biomarker of acute AMR could lead to early diagnosis and treatment of this condition and improve allograft outcome. Microvesicles are membrane-bound vesicles released from the cell surface after injury. We hypothesized that because AMR is associated with allograft endothelial injury and C4d deposition, plasma microvesicles positive for endothelial (CD144) marker and C4d are increased in this condition. We studied microvesicle concentration in the plasma of 95 kidney transplant patients with allograft dysfunction and compared with 23 healthy volunteers. Biopsy diagnosis and scoring was performed using Banff classification. In the 28 subjects with AMR, the density of C4d+/CD144+ microvesicles was on average 11-fold (P = 0.002) higher than transplant recipients with no AMR and 24-fold (P = 0.008) than healthy volunteers. Densities of C4d+ and C4d+/annexin V+ (C4d+/AVB+) microvesicles were also increased in AMR patients compared with no AMR and healthy subjects. C4d+/AVB+ microvesicles correlated with AMR biopsy severity. Nine patients with acute AMR that received treatment showed a mean 72% decrease (P = 0.01) in C4d+/CD144+ microvesicle concentration compared with pretreatment values. Quantification of plasma C4d+ microvesicles provides information about presence of AMR, its severity and response to treatment in transplant patients.

  14. Quantitative proteomics of extracellular vesicles derived from human primary and metastatic colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Dong-Sic; Choi, Do-Young; Hong, Bok Sil; Jang, Su Chul; Kim, Dae-Kyum; Lee, Jaewook; Kim, Yoon-Keun; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Gho, Yong Song

    2012-01-01

    Cancer cells actively release extracellular vesicles (EVs), including exosomes and microvesicles, into surrounding tissues. These EVs play pleiotropic roles in cancer progression and metastasis, including invasion, angiogenesis, and immune modulation. However, the proteomic differences between primary and metastatic cancer cell-derived EVs remain unclear. Here, we conducted comparative proteomic analysis between EVs derived from human primary colorectal cancer cells (SW480) and their metastatic derivatives (SW620). Using label-free quantitation, we identified 803 and 787 proteins in SW480 EVs and SW620 EVs, respectively. Based on comparison between the estimated abundance of EV proteins, we identified 368 SW480 EV-enriched and 359 SW620 EV-enriched proteins. SW480 EV-enriched proteins played a role in cell adhesion, but SW620 EV-enriched proteins were associated with cancer progression and functioned as diagnostic indicators of metastatic cancer; they were overexpressed in metastatic colorectal cancer and played roles in multidrug resistance. As the first proteomic analysis comparing primary and metastatic cancer-derived EVs, this study increases our understanding of the pathological function of EVs in the metastatic process and provides useful biomarkers for cancer metastasis.

  15. Exosomes as Biomarker Enriched Microvesicles: Characterization of Exosomal Proteins Derived from a Panel of Prostate Cell Lines with Distinct AR Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini-Beheshti, Elham; Pham, Steven; Adomat, Hans; Li, Na; Tomlinson Guns, Emma S.

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the leading type of cancer diagnosed in men. In 2010, ∼217,730 new cases of prostate cancer were reported in the United States. Prompt diagnosis of the disease can substantially improve its clinical outcome. Improving capability for early detection, as well as developing new therapeutic targets in advanced disease are research priorities that will ultimately lead to better patient survival. Eukaryotic cells secrete proteins via distinct regulated mechanisms which are either ER/Golgi dependent or microvesicle mediated. The release of microvesicles has been shown to provide a novel mechanism for intercellular communication. Exosomes are nanometer sized cup-shaped membrane vesicles which are secreted from normal and cancerous cells. They are present in various biological fluids and are rich in characteristic proteins. Exosomes may thus have potential both in facilitating early diagnosis via less invasive procedures or be candidates for novel therapeutic approaches for castration resistance prostate cancer. Because exosomes have been shown previously to have a role in cell-cell communication in the local tumor microenvironment, conferring activation of numerous survival mechanisms, we characterized constitutive lipids, cholesterol and proteins from exosomes derived from six prostate cell lines and tracked their uptake in both cancerous and benign prostate cell lines respectively. Our comprehensive proteomic and lipidomic analysis of prostate derived exosomes could provide insight for future work on both biomarker and therapeutic targets for the treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:22723089

  16. Neutrophil-derived microvesicles enter cartilage and protect the joint in inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Headland, Sarah E; Jones, Hefin R; Norling, Lucy V; Kim, Andrew; Souza, Patricia R; Corsiero, Elisa; Gil, Cristiane D; Nerviani, Alessandra; Dell'Accio, Francesco; Pitzalis, Costantino; Oliani, Sonia M; Jan, Lily Y; Perretti, Mauro

    2015-11-25

    Microvesicles (MVs) are emerging as a new mechanism of intercellular communication by transferring cellular lipid and protein components to target cells, yet their function in disease is only now being explored. We found that neutrophil-derived MVs were increased in concentration in synovial fluid from rheumatoid arthritis patients compared to paired plasma. Synovial MVs overexpressed the proresolving, anti-inflammatory protein annexin A1 (AnxA1). Mice deficient in TMEM16F, a lipid scramblase required for microvesiculation, exhibited exacerbated cartilage damage when subjected to inflammatory arthritis. To determine the function of MVs in inflammatory arthritis, toward the possibility of MV-based therapeutics, we examined the role of immune cell-derived MVs in rodent models and in human primary chondrocytes. In vitro, exogenous neutrophil-derived AnxA1(+) MVs activated anabolic gene expression in chondrocytes, leading to extracellular matrix accumulation and cartilage protection through the reduction in stress-adaptive homeostatic mediators interleukin-8 and prostaglandin E2. In vivo, intra-articular injection of AnxA1(+) MV lessened cartilage degradation caused by inflammatory arthritis. Arthritic mice receiving adoptive transfer of whole neutrophils displayed abundant MVs within cartilage matrix and revealed that MVs, but not neutrophils themselves, can penetrate cartilage. Mechanistic studies support a model whereby MV-associated AnxA1 interacts with its receptor FPR2 (formyl peptide receptor 2)/ALX, increasing transforming growth factor-β production by chondrocytes, ultimately leading to cartilage protection. We envisage that MVs, either directly or loaded with therapeutics, can be harnessed as a unique therapeutic strategy for protection in diseases associated with cartilage degeneration. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  17. Microvesicle Subsets in Sepsis Due to Community Acquired Pneumonia Compared to Faecal Peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Lashin, Hazem M S; Nadkarni, Suchita; Oggero, Silvia; Jones, Hefin R; Knight, Julian C; Hinds, Charles J; Perretti, Mauro

    2017-09-19

    Microvesicles (MV) act as a non-soluble means of inter-cellular communication, with effector roles in disease pathogenesis and potentially as biomarkers. Previously, we reported that neutrophil MV expressing alpha-2-macroglobulin (A2MG) are protective in experimental sepsis and associate with survival in a small cohort of patients with sepsis due to community acquired pneumonia (CAP). To characterise MV profiles in sepsis due to CAP or faecal peritonitis (FP) and determine their relation to outcome. To investigate the effects of novel sepsis treatments (granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interferon-υ (IFN-γ)) on MV production and functions in-vitro. Flow cytometry analysis of MV identified the cell of origin and the proportion of A2MG expression in the plasma of patients with sepsis secondary to CAP (n = 60) or FP (n = 40) and compared to healthy volunteers (HV, n = 10). The association between MV subsets and outcome was examined. The ability of GM-CSF and IFN-γ on A2MG MV production from whole blood was examined together with the assessment of their effect on neutrophil and endothelial functions. Circulating cell-derived and A2MG MV were higher in CAP compared to FP and HV. A2MG MV were higher in survivors of CAP, but not in FP. GM-CSF and IFN-γ enhanced A2MG MV production, with these MV eliciting pathogen clearance in vitro. Plasma MV profiles vary according to the source of infection. A2MG MV are associated with survival in CAP but not FP. We propose specific MV subsets as novel biomarkers in sepsis and potential effector for some of the actions of experimental therapeutic interventions.

  18. Urinary Microvesicle-Bound Uromodulin: A Potential Molecular Biomarker in Diabetic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Neng-jun; Ni, Yi-hong; Jia, Hong-ying; Deng, Jing-ti; Jiang, Lu; Zheng, Feng-jie

    2017-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the changes of urinary microvesicle-bound uromodulin and total urinary uromodulin levels in human urine and the correlations with the severity of diabetic kidney disease (DKD). 31 healthy subjects without diabetes and 100 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) were included in this study. The patients with T2DM were divided into three groups based on the urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (UACR): normoalbuminuria group (DM, n = 46); microalbuminuria group (DN1, n = 32); and macroalbuminuria group (DN2, n = 22). We use a specific monoclonal antibody AD-1 to capture the urinary microvesicles. Urinary microvesicle-bound uromodulin and total urinary uromodulin levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Our results showed that the levels of urinary microvesicle-bound uromodulin in DN1 and DN2 groups were significantly higher than those in control group and DM group (P < 0.01). Multiple stepwise linear regression analysis showed that UACR was independent determinant for urinary microvesicle-bound uromodulin (P < 0.05) but not for total urinary uromodulin. These findings suggest that the levels of urinary microvesicle-bound uromodulin are associated with the severity of DKD. The uromodulin in urinary microvesicles may be a specific marker of DKD and potentially may be used to predict the onset and/or monitor the progression of DKD. PMID:28182086

  19. Human adipose mesenchymal stem cell-derived exosomal-miRNAs are critical factors for inducing anti-proliferation signalling to A2780 and SKOV-3 ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Reza, Abu Musa Md Talimur; Choi, Yun-Jung; Yasuda, Hideyo; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2016-01-01

    An enigmatic question exists concerning the pro- or anti-cancer status of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Despite growing interest, this question remains unanswered, and the debate became intensified with new evidences backing each side. Here, we showed that human adipose MSC (hAMSC)-derived conditioned medium (CM) exhibited inhibitory effects on A2780 human ovarian cancer cells by blocking the cell cycle, and activating mitochondria-mediated apoptosis signalling. Explicitly, we demonstrated that exosomes, an important biological component of hAMSC-CM, could restrain proliferation, wound-repair and colony formation ability of A2780 and SKOV-3 cancer cells. Furthermore, hAMSC-CM-derived exosomes induced apoptosis signalling by upregulating different pro-apoptotic signalling molecules, such as BAX, CASP9, and CASP3, as well as downregulating the anti-apoptotic protein BCL2. More specifically, cancer cells exhibited reduced viability following fresh or protease-digested exosome treatment; however, treatment with RNase-digested exosomes could not inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells. Additionally, sequencing of exosomal RNAs revealed a rich population of microRNAs (miRNAs), which exhibit anti-cancer activities by targeting different molecules associated with cancer survival. Our findings indicated that exosomal miRNAs are important players involved in the inhibitory influence of hAMSC-CM towards ovarian cancer cells. Therefore, we believe that these comprehensive results will provide advances concerning ovarian cancer research and treatment. PMID:27929108

  20. Cardiomyocyte microvesicles contain DNA/RNA and convey biological messages to target cells.

    PubMed

    Waldenström, Anders; Gennebäck, Nina; Hellman, Urban; Ronquist, Gunnar

    2012-01-01

    Shedding microvesicles are membrane released vesicles derived directly from the plasma membrane. Exosomes are released membrane vesicles of late endosomal origin that share structural and biochemical characteristics with prostasomes. Microvesicles/exosomes can mediate messages between cells and affect various cell-related processes in their target cells. We describe newly detected microvesicles/exosomes from cardiomyocytes and depict some of their biological functions. Microvesicles/exosomes from media of cultured cardiomyocytes derived from adult mouse heart were isolated by differential centrifugation including preparative ultracentrifugation and identified by transmission electron microscopy and flow cytometry. They were surrounded by a bilayered membrane and flow cytometry revealed presence of both caveolin-3 and flotillin-1 while clathrin and annexin-2 were not detected. Microvesicle/exosome mRNA was identified and out of 1520 detected mRNA, 423 could be directly connected in a biological network. Furthermore, by a specific technique involving TDT polymerase, 343 different chromosomal DNA sequences were identified in the microvesicles/exosomes. Microvesicle/exosomal DNA transfer was possible into target fibroblasts, where exosomes stained for DNA were seen in the fibroblast cytosol and even in the nuclei. The gene expression was affected in fibroblasts transfected by microvesicles/exosomes and among 333 gene expression changes there were 175 upregulations and 158 downregulations compared with controls. Our study suggests that microvesicles/exosomes released from cardiomyocytes, where we propose that exosomes derived from cardiomyocytes could be denoted "cardiosomes", can be involved in a metabolic course of events in target cells by facilitating an array of metabolism-related processes including gene expression changes.

  1. Cardiomyocyte Microvesicles Contain DNA/RNA and Convey Biological Messages to Target Cells

    PubMed Central

    Waldenström, Anders; Gennebäck, Nina; Hellman, Urban; Ronquist, Gunnar

    2012-01-01

    Background Shedding microvesicles are membrane released vesicles derived directly from the plasma membrane. Exosomes are released membrane vesicles of late endosomal origin that share structural and biochemical characteristics with prostasomes. Microvesicles/exosomes can mediate messages between cells and affect various cell-related processes in their target cells. We describe newly detected microvesicles/exosomes from cardiomyocytes and depict some of their biological functions. Methodology/Principal Findings Microvesicles/exosomes from media of cultured cardiomyocytes derived from adult mouse heart were isolated by differential centrifugation including preparative ultracentrifugation and identified by transmission electron microscopy and flow cytometry. They were surrounded by a bilayered membrane and flow cytometry revealed presence of both caveolin-3 and flotillin-1 while clathrin and annexin-2 were not detected. Microvesicle/exosome mRNA was identified and out of 1520 detected mRNA, 423 could be directly connected in a biological network. Furthermore, by a specific technique involving TDT polymerase, 343 different chromosomal DNA sequences were identified in the microvesicles/exosomes. Microvesicle/exosomal DNA transfer was possible into target fibroblasts, where exosomes stained for DNA were seen in the fibroblast cytosol and even in the nuclei. The gene expression was affected in fibroblasts transfected by microvesicles/exosomes and among 333 gene expression changes there were 175 upregulations and 158 downregulations compared with controls. Conclusions/Significance Our study suggests that microvesicles/exosomes released from cardiomyocytes, where we propose that exosomes derived from cardiomyocytes could be denoted “cardiosomes”, can be involved in a metabolic course of events in target cells by facilitating an array of metabolism-related processes including gene expression changes. PMID:22506041

  2. Leukocyte-derived microvesicles dock on glomerular endothelial cells: stardust in the kidney.

    PubMed

    Mack, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Microvesicles are released from the plasma membrane of various cell types, can be taken up by other cells, and can transport membrane proteins and cytosolic contents between cells. Kahn et al. demonstrate that leukocyte-derived microvesicles bearing B1-kinin receptors are enriched in the plasma of vasculitis patients and dock on endothelial cells in the glomerulus. Cell culture experiments suggest that B1-receptors transferred by these microvesicles are functionally active on acceptor cells. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Stem cell plasticity revisited: The continuum marrow model and phenotypic changes mediated by microvesicles

    PubMed Central

    Quesenberry, Peter J.; Dooner, Mark S.; Aliotta, Jason M.

    2010-01-01

    The phenotype of marrow hematopoietic stem cells is determined by cell cycle state and microvesicle entry into the stem cells. The stem cell population is continually changing based on cell cycle transit and thus can only be defined on a population basis. Purification of marrow stem cells only addresses the heterogeneity of these populations. When whole marrow is studied, the long-term repopulating stem cells are in active cell cycle. However, with some variability, when highly purified stem cells are studied, the cells appear to be dormant. Thus, the study of purified stem cells is intrinsically misleading. Tissue-derived microvesicles enhanced by injury effect the phenotype of different cell classes. We propose that previously described stem cell plasticity is due to microvesicle modulation. We further propose a stem cell population model in which the individual cell phenotypes continually changes, but the population phenotype is relatively stable. This, in turn, is modulated by microvesicle and microenvironmental influences. PMID:20382199

  4. Exercise intensity modulates the appearance of circulating microvesicles with proangiogenic potential upon endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Eurico N; González-Alonso, José; Parris, Christopher; Rakobowchuk, Mark

    2016-11-01

    The effect of endurance exercise on circulating microvesicle dynamics and their impact on surrounding endothelial cells is unclear. Here we tested the hypothesis that exercise intensity modulates the time course of platelet (PMV) and endothelial-derived (EMV) microvesicle appearance in the circulation through hemodynamic and biochemical-related mechanisms, and that microvesicles formed during exercise would stimulate endothelial angiogenesis in vitro. Nine healthy young men had venous blood samples taken before, during, and throughout the recovery period after 1 h of moderate [46 ± 2% maximal oxygen uptake (V̇o2max)] or heavy (67 ± 2% V̇o2max) intensity semirecumbent cycling and a time-matched resting control trial. In vitro experiments were performed by incubating endothelial cells with rest and exercise-derived microvesicles to examine their effects on cell angiogenic capacities. PMVs (CD41(+)) increased from baseline only during heavy exercise (from 21 ± 1 × 10(3) to 55 ± 8 × 10(3) and 48 ± 6 × 10(3) PMV/μl at 30 and 60 min, respectively; P < 0.05), returning to baseline early in postexercise recovery (P > 0.05), whereas EMVs (CD62E(+)) were unchanged (P > 0.05). PMVs were related to brachial artery shear rate (r(2) = 0.43) and plasma norepinephrine concentrations (r(2) = 0.21) during exercise (P < 0.05). Exercise-derived microvesicles enhanced endothelial proliferation, migration, and tubule formation compared with rest microvesicles (P < 0.05). These results demonstrate substantial increases in circulating PMVs during heavy exercise and that exercise-derived microvesicles stimulate human endothelial cells by enhancing angiogenesis and proliferation. This involvement of microvesicles may be considered a novel mechanism through which exercise mediates vascular healing and adaptation. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Post-prandial rise of microvesicles in peripheral blood of healthy human donors.

    PubMed

    Suštar, Vid; Bedina-Zavec, Apolonija; Stukelj, Roman; Frank, Mojca; Ogorevc, Eva; Janša, Rado; Mam, Keriya; Veranič, Peter; Kralj-Iglič, Veronika

    2011-03-21

    Microvesicles isolated from body fluids are membrane - enclosed fragments of cell interior which carry information on the status of the organism. It is yet unclear how metabolism affects the number and composition of microvesicles in isolates from the peripheral blood. To study the post - prandial effect on microvesicles in isolates from the peripheral blood of 21 healthy donors, in relation to blood cholesterol and blood glucose concentrations. The average number of microvesicles in the isolates increased 5 hours post - prandially by 52%; the increase was statistically significant (p = 0.01) with the power P = 0.68, while the average total blood cholesterol concentration, average low density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration (LDL-C) and average high density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration (HDL-C) all remained within 2% of their fasting values. We found an 11% increase in triglycerides (p = 0.12) and a 6% decrease in blood glucose (p < 0.01, P = 0.74). The post - prandial number of microvesicles negatively correlated with the post - fasting total cholesterol concentration (r = - 0.46, p = 0.035) while the difference in the number of microvesicles in the isolates between post - prandial and post - fasting states negatively correlated with the respective difference in blood glucose concentration (r = - 0.39, p = 0.05). In a population of healthy human subjects the number of microvesicles in isolates from peripheral blood increased in the post - prandial state. The increase in the number of microvesicles was affected by the fasting concentration of cholesterol and correlated with the decrease in blood glucose.

  6. Involvement of multiple myeloma cell-derived exosomes in osteoclast differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Raimondi, Lavinia; De Luca, Angela; Amodio, Nicola; Manno, Mauro; Raccosta, Samuele; Taverna, Simona; Bellavia, Daniele; Naselli, Flores; Fontana, Simona; Schillaci, Odessa; Giardino, Roberto; Fini, Milena; Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Santoro, Alessandra; De Leo, Giacomo; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Alessandro, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Bone disease is the most frequent complication in multiple myeloma (MM) resulting in osteolytic lesions, bone pain, hypercalcemia and renal failure. In MM bone disease the perfect balance between bone-resorbing osteoclasts (OCs) and bone-forming osteoblasts (OBs) activity is lost in favour of OCs, thus resulting in skeletal disorders. Since exosomes have been described for their functional role in cancer progression, we here investigate whether MM cell-derived exosomes may be involved in OCs differentiation. We show that MM cells produce exosomes which are actively internalized by Raw264.7 cell line, a cellular model of osteoclast formation. MM cell-derived exosomes positively modulate pre-osteoclast migration, through the increasing of CXCR4 expression and trigger a survival pathway. MM cell-derived exosomes play a significant pro-differentiative role in murine Raw264.7 cells and human primary osteoclasts, inducing the expression of osteoclast markers such as Cathepsin K (CTSK), Matrix Metalloproteinases 9 (MMP9) and Tartrate-resistant Acid Phosphatase (TRAP). Pre-osteoclast treated with MM cell-derived exosomes differentiate in multinuclear OCs able to excavate authentic resorption lacunae. Similar results were obtained with exosomes derived from MM patient's sera. Our data indicate that MM-exosomes modulate OCs function and differentiation. Further studies are needed to identify the OCs activating factors transported by MM cell-derived exosomes. PMID:25944696

  7. Microvesicles shed from fibroblasts act as metalloproteinase carriers in a 3-D collagen matrix.

    PubMed

    Laghezza Masci, Valentina; Taddei, Anna Rita; Gambellini, Gabriella; Giorgi, Franco; Fausto, Anna Maria

    2016-01-01

    This study shows that fibroblasts migrating into a collagen matrix release numerous microvesicles into the surrounding medium. By spreading in regions of the matrix far distant from cells of origin, microvesicles carry metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) to act upon the collagen fibrils. As a result, the collagen matrix is gradually transformed from a laminar to a fibrillar type of architecture. As shown by western blots and gelatin zymography, MMP-9 is secreted as a 92 kDa precursor and activated upon release of 82 kDa product into the culture medium. Activation is more efficient under three-dimensional than in two-dimensional culturing conditions. While MMP-9 labeling is associated with intraluminal vesicles clustered inside the microvesicles, the microvesicle's integrin β1 marker is bound to the outer membrane. The intraluminal vesicles are recruited from the cortical cytoplasm and eventually released following uploading inside the microvesicle. Here, we propose that fusion of the intraluminal vesicles with the outer microvesicle's membrane could work as a mechanism controlling the extent to which MMP-9 is first activated and then released extracellularly.

  8. Chitosan-coated microvesicles: Effect of polysaccharide-phospholipid affinity on decafluorobutane dissolution.

    PubMed

    Picheth, Guilherme F; Pirich, Cleverton L; Dos Santos, Larissa A; Camarozano, Ana C; Sierakowski, Maria Rita; Ocampos, Fernanda M; Barison, Andersson; Kaminski, Gabriel A; Pontarolo, Roberto; de Freitas, Rilton Alves

    2016-11-20

    The stability of perfluorinated microvesicles is mainly determined by the presence of interfacial materials and their ability to hinder the gas component diffusibility into the bloodstream. The goal of this study is to increase the persistence of the gaseous-core by introducing chitosan-coated 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC) microvesicles, reducing gas diffusion from microvesicles, and increasing for a long time ultrasonic signals. Our hypothesis was based on the irreversible adhesion of chitosan towards DSPC head groups observed in thin-films models. This affinity enhanced the stabilization of gaseous-core microvesicles, in which the polysaccharide effectively reduced the phospholipid phase transition enthalpy from 383±5.5Jmg(-1) for plain to 150±9.7Jmg(-1) for chitosan-coated microvesicles, providing a more stable structure that diminished the gaseous component lost and provided the persistence of intense (19)F-NMR signals after 48h, twice as long compared to plain samples. As a result, stronger and long-lasting ultrasonic signals were produced by the more stable chitosan-containing microvesicles, thus, presenting great potential to increase the diagnostic and therapeutic applications of perfluorocarbon carries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The influence of thermal trauma on pro- and anticoagulant activity of erythrocyte-derived microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Levin, Grigory; Sukhareva, Ekaterina

    2016-11-01

    The goal of this research was to study the influence of erythrocyte-derived microvesicles on hemostasis parameters during burn. It was found that the number of microvesicles derived from washed erythrocytes of burn patients after 1 day of storage at 37°C was 4.2 times bigger than the number of microvesicles derived from erythrocytes of healthy donors. Hemocoagulation properties of erythrocyte-derived microvesicles of burn patients also change: according to the results of thromboelastography their procoagulant activity increases significantly, at the same time their antithrombin and fibrinilytic activity decrease. Thus, we can conclude that hepercoagulation during burn is to a certain extent caused by the disruption of the balance between procoagulant activity of erythrocyte-derived microvesicles and their antithrombin and fibrinolytic activity. Hypercoagulation effect of erythrocyte-derived microvesicles increases during burn not just because of their changed properties but also due to their increased number after thermal trauma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  10. Human Stem Cell Derived Cardiomyocytes: An Alternative ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Chemical spills and associated deaths in the US has increased 2.6-fold and 16-fold from 1983 to 2012, respectfully. In addition, the number of chemicals to which humans are exposed to in the environment has increased almost 10-fold from 2001 to 2013 within the US. Internationally, a WHO report on the global composite impact of chemicals on health reported that 16% of the total burden of cardiovascular disease was attributed to environmental chemical exposure with 2.5 million deaths per year. Clearly, the cardiovascular system, at all its various developmental and life stages, represents a critical target organ system that can be adversely affected by existing and emerging chemicals (e.g., engineered nanomaterials) in a variety of environmental media. The ability to assess chemical cardiac risk and safety is critically needed but extremely challenging due to the number and categories of chemicals in commerce, as indicated. This presentation\\session will evaluate the use of adult human stem cell derived cardiomyocytes, and existing platforms, as an alternative model to evaluate environmental chemical cardiac toxicity as well as provide key information for the development of predictive adverse outcomes pathways associated with environmental chemical exposures. (This abstract does not represent EPA policy) Rapid and translatable chemical safety screening models for cardiotoxicity current status for informing regulatory decisions, a workshop sponsored by the Society

  11. Tumor-Derived Microvesicles Induce Proangiogenic Phenotype in Endothelial Cells via Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Kawamoto, Taisuke; Ohga, Noritaka; Akiyama, Kosuke; Hirata, Naoya; Kitahara, Shuji; Maishi, Nako; Osawa, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Kazuyuki; Kondoh, Miyako; Shindoh, Masanobu; Hida, Yasuhiro; Hida, Kyoko

    2012-01-01

    Background Increasing evidence indicates that tumor endothelial cells (TEC) differ from normal endothelial cells (NEC). Our previous reports also showed that TEC were different from NEC. For example, TEC have chromosomal abnormality and proangiogenic properties such as high motility and proliferative activity. However, the mechanism by which TEC acquire a specific character remains unclear. To investigate this mechanism, we focused on tumor-derived microvesicles (TMV). Recent studies have shown that TMV contain numerous types of bioactive molecules and affect normal stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment. However, most of the functional mechanisms of TMV remain unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we showed that TMV isolated from tumor cells were taken up by NEC through endocytosis. In addition, we found that TMV promoted random motility and tube formation through the activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt pathway in NEC. Moreover, the effects induced by TMV were inhibited by the endocytosis inhibitor dynasore. Our results indicate that TMV could confer proangiogenic properties to NEC partly via endocytosis. Conclusion We for the first time showed that endocytosis of TMV contributes to tumor angiogenesis. These findings offer new insights into cancer therapies and the crosstalk between tumor and endothelial cells mediated by TMV in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:22479517

  12. Role of Exosomes/Microvesicles in the Nervous System and Use in Emerging Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Charles Pin-Kuang; Breakefield, Xandra Owen

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular membrane vesicles (EMVs) are nanometer sized vesicles, including exosomes and microvesicles capable of transferring DNAs, mRNAs, microRNAs, non-coding RNAs, proteins, and lipids among cells without direct cell-to-cell contact, thereby representing a novel form of intercellular communication. Many cells in the nervous system have been shown to release EMVs, implicating their active roles in development, function, and pathologies of this system. While substantial progress has been made in understanding the biogenesis, biophysical properties, and involvement of EMVs in diseases, relatively less information is known about their biological function in the normal nervous system. In addition, since EMVs are endogenous vehicles with low immunogenicity, they have also been actively investigated for the delivery of therapeutic genes/molecules in treatment of cancer and neurological diseases. The present review summarizes current knowledge about EMV functions in the nervous system under both physiological and pathological conditions, as well as emerging EMV-based therapies that could be applied to the nervous system in the foreseeable future. PMID:22754538

  13. Procoagulant and immunogenic properties of melanoma exosomes, microvesicles and apoptotic vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Muhsin-Sharafaldine, Morad-Rémy; Saunderson, Sarah C.; Dunn, Amy C.; Faed, James M.; Kleffmann, Torsten; McLellan, Alexander D.

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EV) are lipid particles released from eukaryotic cells into the extracellular fluid. Depending on the cell type or mechanism of release, vesicles vary in form and function and exert distinct functions in coagulation and immunity. Tumor cells may constitutively shed vesicles known as exosomes or microvesicles (MV). Alternatively, apoptosis induces the release of apoptotic blebs or vesicles (ApoV) from the plasma membrane. EV have been implicated in thrombotic events (the second highest cause of death in cancer patients) and tumor vesicles contribute to the anti-cancer immune response. In this study, we utilized the well characterized B16 melanoma model to determine the molecular composition and procoagulant and immunogenic potential of exosomes, MV and ApoV. Distinct patterns of surface and cytoplasmic molecules (tetraspanins, integrins, heat shock proteins and histones) were expressed between the vesicle types. Moreover, in vitro coagulation assays revealed that membrane-derived vesicles, namely MV and ApoV, were more procoagulant than exosomes–with tissue factor and phosphatidylserine critical for procoagulant activity. Mice immunized with antigen-pulsed ApoV and challenged with B16 tumors were protected out to 60 days, while lower protection rates were afforded by MV and exosomes. Together the results demonstrate distinct phenotypic and functional differences between vesicle types, with important procoagulant and immunogenic functions emerging for membrane-derived MV and ApoV versus endosome-derived exosomes. This study highlights the potential of EV to contribute to the prothrombotic state, as well as to anti-cancer immunity. PMID:27462921

  14. Procoagulant and immunogenic properties of melanoma exosomes, microvesicles and apoptotic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Muhsin-Sharafaldine, Morad-Rémy; Saunderson, Sarah C; Dunn, Amy C; Faed, James M; Kleffmann, Torsten; McLellan, Alexander D

    2016-08-30

    Extracellular vesicles (EV) are lipid particles released from eukaryotic cells into the extracellular fluid. Depending on the cell type or mechanism of release, vesicles vary in form and function and exert distinct functions in coagulation and immunity. Tumor cells may constitutively shed vesicles known as exosomes or microvesicles (MV). Alternatively, apoptosis induces the release of apoptotic blebs or vesicles (ApoV) from the plasma membrane. EV have been implicated in thrombotic events (the second highest cause of death in cancer patients) and tumor vesicles contribute to the anti-cancer immune response. In this study, we utilized the well characterized B16 melanoma model to determine the molecular composition and procoagulant and immunogenic potential of exosomes, MV and ApoV. Distinct patterns of surface and cytoplasmic molecules (tetraspanins, integrins, heat shock proteins and histones) were expressed between the vesicle types. Moreover, in vitro coagulation assays revealed that membrane-derived vesicles, namely MV and ApoV, were more procoagulant than exosomes-with tissue factor and phosphatidylserine critical for procoagulant activity. Mice immunized with antigen-pulsed ApoV and challenged with B16 tumors were protected out to 60 days, while lower protection rates were afforded by MV and exosomes. Together the results demonstrate distinct phenotypic and functional differences between vesicle types, with important procoagulant and immunogenic functions emerging for membrane-derived MV and ApoV versus endosome-derived exosomes. This study highlights the potential of EV to contribute to the prothrombotic state, as well as to anti-cancer immunity.

  15. Microvesicles Correlated with Components of Metabolic Syndrome in Men with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Lowered Testosterone Levels But Were Unaltered by Testosterone Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Velling Magnussen, Line; Nielsen, Morten Hjuler; Nielsen, Tine Bo; Højlund, Kurt; Andersen, Marianne Skovsager; Handberg, Aase

    2017-01-01

    Aims. To investigate how circulating microvesicle phenotypes correlate with insulin sensitivity, body composition, plasma lipids, and hepatic fat accumulation. We hypothesized that changes elicited by testosterone replacement therapy are reflected in levels of microvesicles. Methods. Thirty-nine type 2 diabetic males with lowered testosterone levels were assigned to either testosterone replacement therapy or placebo and evaluated at baseline and after 24 weeks. Microvesicles were analysed by flow cytometry and defined as lactadherin-binding particles within the 0.1–1.0 μm gate. Microvesicles of platelet, monocyte, and endothelial cell origin were identified by cell-specific markers and their expression of CD36 was investigated. Results. Triglycerides correlated positively with all investigated microvesicle phenotypes in this study (p < 0.05), and indicators of hepatic fat accumulation, alanine aminotransferase, and gamma glutamyltransferase correlated with platelet and endothelial microvesicles and CD36-expressing microvesicles from platelets and monocytes (p < 0.05). BMI, waist circumference, and fat percentage correlated with CD36-expressing monocyte microvesicles (p < 0.05), while insulin sensitivity did not correlate with any microvesicle phenotypes. Microvesicle levels were unaffected by testosterone therapy. Conclusions. Metabolic syndrome components and hepatic fat accumulation correlated with microvesicle phenotypes, supporting the involvement of especially CD36 on monocytes in metabolic syndrome pathogenesis. Although testosterone therapy improved body composition measures, microvesicle phenotype levels were unaffected. This trial was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01560546). PMID:28168203

  16. Microvesicles Correlated with Components of Metabolic Syndrome in Men with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Lowered Testosterone Levels But Were Unaltered by Testosterone Therapy.

    PubMed

    Botha, Jaco; Velling Magnussen, Line; Nielsen, Morten Hjuler; Nielsen, Tine Bo; Højlund, Kurt; Andersen, Marianne Skovsager; Handberg, Aase

    2017-01-01

    Aims. To investigate how circulating microvesicle phenotypes correlate with insulin sensitivity, body composition, plasma lipids, and hepatic fat accumulation. We hypothesized that changes elicited by testosterone replacement therapy are reflected in levels of microvesicles. Methods. Thirty-nine type 2 diabetic males with lowered testosterone levels were assigned to either testosterone replacement therapy or placebo and evaluated at baseline and after 24 weeks. Microvesicles were analysed by flow cytometry and defined as lactadherin-binding particles within the 0.1-1.0 μm gate. Microvesicles of platelet, monocyte, and endothelial cell origin were identified by cell-specific markers and their expression of CD36 was investigated. Results. Triglycerides correlated positively with all investigated microvesicle phenotypes in this study (p < 0.05), and indicators of hepatic fat accumulation, alanine aminotransferase, and gamma glutamyltransferase correlated with platelet and endothelial microvesicles and CD36-expressing microvesicles from platelets and monocytes (p < 0.05). BMI, waist circumference, and fat percentage correlated with CD36-expressing monocyte microvesicles (p < 0.05), while insulin sensitivity did not correlate with any microvesicle phenotypes. Microvesicle levels were unaffected by testosterone therapy. Conclusions. Metabolic syndrome components and hepatic fat accumulation correlated with microvesicle phenotypes, supporting the involvement of especially CD36 on monocytes in metabolic syndrome pathogenesis. Although testosterone therapy improved body composition measures, microvesicle phenotype levels were unaffected. This trial was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01560546).

  17. Method for isolation and molecular characterization of extracellular microvesicles released from brain endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Haqqani, Arsalan S; Delaney, Christie E; Tremblay, Tammy-Lynn; Sodja, Caroline; Sandhu, Jagdeep K; Stanimirovic, Danica B

    2013-01-10

    In addition to possessing intracellular vesicles, eukaryotic cells also produce extracellular microvesicles, ranging from 50 to 1000 nm in diameter that are released or shed into the microenvironment under physiological and pathological conditions. These membranous extracellular organelles include both exosomes (originating from internal vesicles of endosomes) and ectosomes (originating from direct budding/shedding of plasma membranes). Extracellular microvesicles contain cell-specific collections of proteins, glycoproteins, lipids, nucleic acids and other molecules. These vesicles play important roles in intercellular communication by acting as carrier for essential cell-specific information to target cells. Endothelial cells in the brain form the blood-brain barrier, a specialized interface between the blood and the brain that tightly controls traffic of nutrients and macromolecules between two compartments and interacts closely with other cells forming the neurovascular unit. Therefore, brain endothelial cell extracellular microvesicles could potentially play important roles in 'externalizing' brain-specific biomarkers into the blood stream during pathological conditions, in transcytosis of blood-borne molecules into the brain, and in cell-cell communication within the neurovascular unit. To study cell-specific molecular make-up and functions of brain endothelial cell exosomes, methods for isolation of extracellular microvesicles using mass spectrometry-compatible protocols and the characterization of their signature profiles using mass spectrometry -based proteomics were developed. A total of 1179 proteins were identified in the isolated extracellular microvesicles from brain endothelial cells. The microvesicles were validated by identification of almost 60 known markers, including Alix, TSG101 and the tetraspanin proteins CD81 and CD9. The surface proteins on isolated microvesicles could potentially interact with both primary astrocytes and cortical neurons

  18. A liposome-based size calibration method for measuring microvesicles by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Simonsen, J B

    2016-01-01

    ESSENTIALS: A gold standard to determine the sizes of microvesicles by flow cytometry is needed. We used fluorescently labeled liposomes to estimate the size of microvesicles with flow cytometry. We suggest that liposomes are more accurate size calibrators than the commonly used polystyrene beads. The liposome-based size calibrators improve the size assessment of microvesicle made with flow cytometry. During the past years, the need for a gold standard to determine the sizes of extracellular vesicles including microvesicles by flow cytometry has been emphasized. This work suggests that artificial vesicles can be used as calibrators to estimate the size of microvesicles from the side scattering (SSC) measured with flow cytometry. We prepared fluorescently labeled liposomes with different maximum sizes defined by the pore size (200, 400, 800, and 1000 nm) of the membrane used for the extrusion. The fluorescence strengths from the largest liposomes pertaining to each pore size enabled us to verify the correlation between the SSC from a liposome and the corresponding size. This study indicates that artificial vesicles are more accurate size calibrators compared to the commonly used polystyrene calibrator beads illustrated by the SSC from 110 nm polystyrene beads corresponds to the scattering from ~400 nm vesicle-like particles. We also show that this method of size assessment based on SSC has a low resolution that is roughly estimated to be between 60 and 200 nm, dependent on the vesicle size. © 2015 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  19. Cellular transfer of magnetic nanoparticles via cell microvesicles: impact on cell tracking by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Silva, Amanda K Andriola; Wilhelm, Claire; Kolosnjaj-Tabi, Jelena; Luciani, Nathalie; Gazeau, Florence

    2012-05-01

    Cell labeling with magnetic nanoparticles can be used to monitor the fate of transplanted cells in vivo by magnetic resonance imaging. However, nanoparticles initially internalized in administered cells might end up in other cells of the host organism. We investigated a mechanism of intercellular cross-transfer of magnetic nanoparticles to different types of recipient cells via cell microvesicles released under cellular stress. Three cell types (mesenchymal stem cells, endothelial cells and macrophages) were labeled with 8-nm iron oxide nanoparticles. Then cells underwent starvation stress, during which they produced microvesicles that were subsequently transferred to unlabeled recipient cells. The analysis of the magnetophoretic mobility of donor cells indicated that magnetic load was partially lost under cell stress. Microvesicles shed by stressed cells participated in the release of magnetic label. Moreover, such microvesicles were uptaken by naïve cells, resulting in cellular redistribution of nanoparticles. Iron load of recipient cells allowed their detection by MRI. Cell microvesicles released under stress may be disseminated throughout the organism, where they can be uptaken by host cells. The transferred cargo may be sufficient to allow MRI detection of these secondarily labeled cells, leading to misinterpretations of the effectiveness of transplanted cells.

  20. Comparison of three methods for isolation of urinary microvesicles to identify biomarkers of nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rood, Ilse M; Deegens, Jeroen K J; Merchant, Michael L; Tamboer, Wim P M; Wilkey, Daniel W; Wetzels, Jack F M; Klein, Jon B

    2010-10-01

    Urinary microvesicles, such as 40-100 nm exosomes and 100-1000 nm microparticles, contain many proteins that may serve as biomarkers of renal disease. Microvesicles have been isolated by ultracentrifugation or nanomembrane ultrafiltration from normal urine; however, little is known about the efficiency of these methods in isolating microvesicles from patients with nephrotic-range proteinuria. Here we compared three techniques to isolate microvesicles from nephrotic urine: nanomembrane ultrafiltration, ultracentrifugation, and ultracentrifugation followed by size-exclusion chromatography (UC-SEC). Highly abundant urinary proteins were still present in sufficient quantity after ultrafiltration or ultracentrifugation to blunt detection of less abundant microvesicular proteins by MALDI-TOF-TOF mass spectrometry. The microvesicular markers neprilysin, aquaporin-2, and podocalyxin were highly enriched following UC-SEC compared with preparations by ultrafiltration or ultracentrifugation alone. Electron microscopy of the UC-SEC fractions found microvesicles of varying size, compatible with the presence of both exosomes and microparticles. Thus, UC-SEC following ultracentrifugation to further enrich and purify microparticles facilitates the search for prognostic biomarkers that might be used to predict the clinical course of nephrotic syndrome.

  1. Linneg Sca-1high CD49fhigh prostate cancer cells derived from the Hi-Myc mouse model are tumor-initiating cells with basal-epithelial characteristics and differentiation potential in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Saha, Achinto; Blando, Jorge; Fernandez, Irina; Kiguchi, Kaoru; DiGiovanni, John

    2016-05-03

    A cell line was established from ventral prostate (VP) tumors of one-year-old Hi-Myc mice. These cells, called HMVP2 cells, are LinnegSca-1highCD49fhigh with high CD44 and CD29 expression and express CK14, Sca-1 and CD49f (but not CK8), suggesting basal-epithelial characteristics. Furthermore, HMVP2 cells form spheroids and both the cells and spheroids produce tumors in syngeneic mice. After four days of culture, HMVP2 spheroids underwent a gradual transition from LinnegSca-1highCD49fhigh expression to LinnegSca-1lowCD49flow while a subpopulation of the cells retained the original LinnegSca-1highCD49fhigh expression pattern. Additional cell subpopulations expressing Lin positive markers were also present suggesting further differentiation of HMVP2 spheroids. Two additional highly tumorigenic cell lines (HMVP2A1 and HMVP2A2) were isolated from HMVP2 cells after subsequent tumor formation in FVB/N mice. Concurrently, we also established cell lines from the VP of 6 months old Hi-Myc mice (named as HMVP1) and FVB/N mice (called NMVP) having less aggressive growth properties compared to the other three cell lines. AR expression was reduced in HMVP2 cells compared to NMVP and HMVP1 cells and almost absent in HMVP2A1 and HMVP2A2 cells. These cell lines will provide valuable tools for further mechanistic studies as well as preclinical studies to evaluate preventive and/or therapeutic agents for prostate cancer.

  2. Linneg Sca-1high CD49fhigh prostate cancer cells derived from the Hi-Myc mouse model are tumor-initiating cells with basal-epithelial characteristics and differentiation potential in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Irina; Kiguchi, Kaoru; DiGiovanni, John

    2016-01-01

    A cell line was established from ventral prostate (VP) tumors of one-year-old Hi-Myc mice. These cells, called HMVP2 cells, are LinnegSca-1highCD49fhigh with high CD44 and CD29 expression and express CK14, Sca-1 and CD49f (but not CK8), suggesting basal-epithelial characteristics. Furthermore, HMVP2 cells form spheroids and both the cells and spheroids produce tumors in syngeneic mice. After four days of culture, HMVP2 spheroids underwent a gradual transition from LinnegSca-1highCD49fhigh expression to LinnegSca-1lowCD49flow while a subpopulation of the cells retained the original LinnegSca-1highCD49fhigh expression pattern. Additional cell subpopulations expressing Lin positive markers were also present suggesting further differentiation of HMVP2 spheroids. Two additional highly tumorigenic cell lines (HMVP2A1 and HMVP2A2) were isolated from HMVP2 cells after subsequent tumor formation in FVB/N mice. Concurrently, we also established cell lines from the VP of 6 months old Hi-Myc mice (named as HMVP1) and FVB/N mice (called NMVP) having less aggressive growth properties compared to the other three cell lines. AR expression was reduced in HMVP2 cells compared to NMVP and HMVP1 cells and almost absent in HMVP2A1 and HMVP2A2 cells. These cell lines will provide valuable tools for further mechanistic studies as well as preclinical studies to evaluate preventive and/or therapeutic agents for prostate cancer. PMID:26910370

  3. Thrombocyte adhesion and release of extracellular microvesicles correlate with surface morphology of adsorbent polymers for lipid apheresis.

    PubMed

    Weiss, René; Spittler, Andreas; Schmitz, Gerd; Fischer, Michael B; Weber, Viktoria

    2014-07-14

    Whole blood lipid apheresis is clinically applied to reduce low density lipoprotein cholesterol in patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia. Here, we studied the correlation between physicochemical parameters, in particular, surface roughness and blood compatibility, of two polyacrylate-based and a dextran sulfate-based polymer for lipid apheresis. The adsorbent surface roughness was assessed by atomic force microscopy. Freshly isolated human thrombocytes were circulated over adsorbent columns downscaled equivalent to clinical use to study thrombocyte adhesion and microvesicle generation. Quantification of thrombocytes and microvesicles in the flow-through of the columns revealed that both thrombocyte adhesion and microvesicle generation increased with increasing adsorbent surface roughness. Activation of thrombocytes with thrombin receptor-activating peptide-6 favored their adhesion to the adsorbents, as demonstrated by preferential depletion of CD62(+) and PAC-1(+) thrombocytes. Taken together, enhanced polymer surface roughness fostered cell adhesion and microvesicle release, underscoring the role of extracellular microvesicles as markers of cellular activation and of blood compatibility.

  4. Platelets and Platelet-Derived Microvesicles as Immune Effectors in Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Cortez-Espinosa, Nancy; Mayoral, Laura Perez-Campos; Perez-Campos, Eduardo; Cabrera Fuentes, Hector Alejandro; Mayoral, Eduardo Perez-Campos; Martínez-Cruz, Ruth; Canseco, Socorro Pina; Andrade, Gabriel Mayoral; Cruz, Margarito Martinez; Velasco, Itandehui Gallegos; Cruz, Pedro Hernandez

    2017-01-01

    The association between type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and systemic inflammation may increase platelet reactivity and the accelerated development of vascular disease. Platelets are able to modulate the function of immune cells via the direct release of growth factors and pro-inflammatory chemokines through the production of microvesicles. The microvesicles trigger a transcellular delivery system of bioactive molecules to other cells acting as vectors in the exchange of biological information. Here, we consider the influence of platelets and platelet-derived microvesicles on cells of the immune system and the implications in the pathogenesis of T2DM. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. Microvesicles and exosomes: new players in metabolic and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Charlotte; Vicencio, Jose M; Yellon, Derek M; Davidson, Sean M

    2016-02-01

    The past decade has witnessed an exponential increase in the number of publications referring to extracellular vesicles (EVs). For many years considered to be extracellular debris, EVs are now seen as novel mediators of endocrine signalling via cell-to-cell communication. With the capability of transferring proteins and nucleic acids from one cell to another, they have become an attractive focus of research for different pathological settings and are now regarded as both mediators and biomarkers of disease including cardio-metabolic disease. They also offer therapeutic potential as signalling agents capable of targeting tissues or cells with specific peptides or miRNAs. In this review, we focus on the role that microvesicles (MVs) and exosomes, the two most studied classes of EV, have in diabetes, cardiovascular disease, endothelial dysfunction, coagulopathies, and polycystic ovary syndrome. We also provide an overview of current developments in MV/exosome isolation techniques from plasma and other fluids, comparing different available commercial and non-commercial methods. We describe different techniques for their optical/biochemical characterization and quantitation. We also review the signalling pathways that exosomes and MVs activate in target cells and provide some insight into their use as biomarkers or potential therapeutic agents. In summary, we give an updated focus on the role that these exciting novel nanoparticles offer for the endocrine community.

  6. Expression of blood group antigens on red cell microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Oreskovic, R T; Dumaswala, U J; Greenwalt, T J

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether epitopes of the A, B, D, Fya, M, N, S, s, and K blood group antigens are present on microvesicle membranes shed by red cells during storage. Vesicles were isolated from outdated units of blood having and lacking the specified antigens. Diluted antisera were absorbed with fixed quantities of vesicles from red cells with the test antigen and red cells lacking that antigen (controls). The adsorbed and unadsorbed antisera were titrated and scored by using panel cells from persons known to be heterozygous for all the non-AB antigens. The mean titration scores following adsorption with the vesicles from A, B, D, M+N-, M-N+, S+s-, S-s+, and Fy(a+b-) units were appreciably lower than the control scores (0, 0, 3, 2, 2, 0, 4, and 4 vs. 19, 23, 34, 13, 12, 16, 18, and 29, respectively), which indicated the presence of these epitopes on the membrane of shed vesicles. The results following adsorption with K:1,2 vesicles were equivocal.

  7. Polarized release of T-cell-receptor-enriched microvesicles at the immunological synapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhuri, Kaushik; Llodrá, Jaime; Roth, Eric W.; Tsai, Jones; Gordo, Susana; Wucherpfennig, Kai W.; Kam, Lance C.; Stokes, David L.; Dustin, Michael L.

    2014-03-01

    The recognition events that mediate adaptive cellular immunity and regulate antibody responses depend on intercellular contacts between T cells and antigen-presenting cells (APCs). T-cell signalling is initiated at these contacts when surface-expressed T-cell receptors (TCRs) recognize peptide fragments (antigens) of pathogens bound to major histocompatibility complex molecules (pMHC) on APCs. This, along with engagement of adhesion receptors, leads to the formation of a specialized junction between T cells and APCs, known as the immunological synapse, which mediates efficient delivery of effector molecules and intercellular signals across the synaptic cleft. T-cell recognition of pMHC and the adhesion ligand intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) on supported planar bilayers recapitulates the domain organization of the immunological synapse, which is characterized by central accumulation of TCRs, adjacent to a secretory domain, both surrounded by an adhesive ring. Although accumulation of TCRs at the immunological synapse centre correlates with T-cell function, this domain is itself largely devoid of TCR signalling activity, and is characterized by an unexplained immobilization of TCR-pMHC complexes relative to the highly dynamic immunological synapse periphery. Here we show that centrally accumulated TCRs are located on the surface of extracellular microvesicles that bud at the immunological synapse centre. Tumour susceptibility gene 101 (TSG101) sorts TCRs for inclusion in microvesicles, whereas vacuolar protein sorting 4 (VPS4) mediates scission of microvesicles from the T-cell plasma membrane. The human immunodeficiency virus polyprotein Gag co-opts this process for budding of virus-like particles. B cells bearing cognate pMHC receive TCRs from T cells and initiate intracellular signals in response to isolated synaptic microvesicles. We conclude that the immunological synapse orchestrates TCR sorting and release in extracellular microvesicles. These

  8. Polarized release of T-cell-receptor-enriched microvesicles at the immunological synapse.

    PubMed

    Choudhuri, Kaushik; Llodrá, Jaime; Roth, Eric W; Tsai, Jones; Gordo, Susana; Wucherpfennig, Kai W; Kam, Lance C; Stokes, David L; Dustin, Michael L

    2014-03-06

    The recognition events that mediate adaptive cellular immunity and regulate antibody responses depend on intercellular contacts between T cells and antigen-presenting cells (APCs). T-cell signalling is initiated at these contacts when surface-expressed T-cell receptors (TCRs) recognize peptide fragments (antigens) of pathogens bound to major histocompatibility complex molecules (pMHC) on APCs. This, along with engagement of adhesion receptors, leads to the formation of a specialized junction between T cells and APCs, known as the immunological synapse, which mediates efficient delivery of effector molecules and intercellular signals across the synaptic cleft. T-cell recognition of pMHC and the adhesion ligand intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) on supported planar bilayers recapitulates the domain organization of the immunological synapse, which is characterized by central accumulation of TCRs, adjacent to a secretory domain, both surrounded by an adhesive ring. Although accumulation of TCRs at the immunological synapse centre correlates with T-cell function, this domain is itself largely devoid of TCR signalling activity, and is characterized by an unexplained immobilization of TCR-pMHC complexes relative to the highly dynamic immunological synapse periphery. Here we show that centrally accumulated TCRs are located on the surface of extracellular microvesicles that bud at the immunological synapse centre. Tumour susceptibility gene 101 (TSG101) sorts TCRs for inclusion in microvesicles, whereas vacuolar protein sorting 4 (VPS4) mediates scission of microvesicles from the T-cell plasma membrane. The human immunodeficiency virus polyprotein Gag co-opts this process for budding of virus-like particles. B cells bearing cognate pMHC receive TCRs from T cells and initiate intracellular signals in response to isolated synaptic microvesicles. We conclude that the immunological synapse orchestrates TCR sorting and release in extracellular microvesicles. These

  9. Nonsedimentable Microvesicles from Senescing Bean Cotyledons Contain Gel Phase-Forming Phospholipid Degradation Products 1

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Kening; Paliyath, Gopinadhan; Thompson, John E.

    1991-01-01

    A mixture of liquid-crystalline and gel-phase lipid domains is detectable by wide angle x-ray diffraction in smooth microsomal membranes isolated from senescent 7-day-old cotyledons, whereas corresponding membranes from young 2-day-old cotyledons are exclusively liquid-crystalline. The gel-phase domains in the senescent membranes comprise phospholipid degradation products including diacylglycerols, free fatty acids, long-chain aldehydes, and long-chain hydrocarbons. The same complement of phospholipid degradation products is also present in nonsedimentable microvesicles isolated from senescent 7-day-old cotyledons by filtration of a 250,000g, 12-hour supernatant through a 300,000 dalton cut-off filter. The phospholipid degradation products in the microvesicles form gel-phase lipid domains when reconstituted into phospholipid liposomes. Nonsedimentable microvesicles of a similar size, which are again enriched in the same gel-phase-forming phospholipid degradation products, are also generated in vitro from smooth microsomal membranes isolated from 2-day-old cotyledons when Ca2+ is added to activate membrane-associated lipolytic enzymes. The Ca2+-treated membranes do not contain detectable gel-phase domains, suggesting that the phospholipid degradation products are completely removed by microvesiculation. The observations collectively indicate that these nonsedimentable microvesicles serve as a vehicle for moving phospholipid degradation products out of membrane bilayers into the cytosol. As noted previously (Yao K, Paliyath G, Humphrey RW, Hallett FR, Thompson JE [1991] Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 88: 2269-2273), the term “deteriosome” connotes this putative function and would serve to distinguish these microvesicles from other cytoplasmic microvesicles unrelated to deterioration. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7 PMID:16668427

  10. Polarized release of TCR-enriched microvesicles at the T cell immunological synapse

    PubMed Central

    Choudhuri, Kaushik; Llodrá, Jaime; Roth, Eric W.; Tsai, Jones; Gordo, Susana; Wucherpfennig, Kai W.; Kam, Lance; Stokes, David L.; Dustin, Michael L.

    2014-01-01

    The recognition events that mediate adaptive cellular immunity and regulate antibody responses depend on intercellular contacts between T cells and antigen presenting cells (APC)1. T cell signaling is initiated at these contacts when surface-expressed antigen receptors (TCR) recognize peptide fragments (antigens) of pathogens bound to Major Histocompatibility Complex molecules (pMHC) on APCs. This, along with engagement of adhesion receptors, leads to the formation of a specialized junction between T cells and APCs, known as the immunological synapse (IS)3, which mediates efficient delivery of effector molecules and intercellular signals across the synaptic cleft2. T cell recognition of pMHC and the adhesion ligand Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 (ICAM-1) on supported planar bilayers recapitulates the domain organization of the immunological synapse (IS)4–5, which is characterized by central accumulation of TCR5, adjacent to a secretory domain3, both surrounded by an adhesive ring4–5. Although accumulation of TCR at the IS center correlates with T cell function4, this domain is itself largely devoid of TCR signaling activity5–6, and is characterized by an unexplained immobilization of TCR-pMHC complexes relative to the highly dynamic IS periphery4–5. Here we show that centrally accumulated TCR is located on the surface of extracellular microvesicles that bud at the IS center. Tumor susceptibility gene 101 (TSG101)6 sorts TCR for inclusion in microvesicles, while vacuolar protein sorting 4 (VPS4) 7–8 mediates scission of microvesicles from the T cell plasma membrane. The HIV polyprotein GAG co-opts this process for budding of virus-like particles. B cells bearing cognate pMHC receive TCR from T cells and initiate intracellular signals in response to isolated synaptic microvesicles. We conclude that the immunological synapse orchestrates TCR sorting and release in extracellular microvesicles. These microvesicles deliver transcellular signals across

  11. In vivo targets of human placental micro-vesicles vary with exposure time and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Tong, Mancy; Chen, Qi; James, Joanna L; Wise, Michelle R; Stone, Peter R; Chamley, Lawrence W

    2017-06-01

    Throughout human gestation, the placenta extrudes vast quantities of extracellular vesicles (EVs) of different sizes into the maternal circulation. Although multinucleated macro-vesicles are known to become trapped in the maternal lungs and do not enter the peripheral circulation, the maternal organs and cells that smaller placental micro-vesicles interact with in vivo remain unknown. This study aimed to characterise the interaction between placental micro-vesicles and endothelial cells in vitro and to elucidate which organs placental micro-vesicles localise to in vivo Placental macro- and micro-vesicles were isolated from cultured human first trimester placental explants by sequential centrifugation and exposed to human microvascular endothelial cells for up to 72 h. In vivo, placental macro- and micro-vesicles were administered to both non-pregnant and pregnant CD1 mice, and after two or 30 min or 24 h, organs were imaged on an IVIS Kinetic Imager. Placental EVs rapidly interacted with endothelial cells via phagocytic and clathrin-mediated endocytic processes in vitro, with over 60% of maximal interaction being achieved by 30 min of exposure. In vivo, placental macro-vesicles were localised exclusively to the lungs regardless of time of exposure, whereas micro-vesicles were localised to the lungs, liver and kidneys, with different distribution patterns depending on the length of exposure and whether the mouse was pregnant or not. The fact that placental EVs can rapidly interact with endothelial cells and localise to different organs in vivo supports that different size fractions of placental EVs are likely to have different downstream effects on foeto-maternal communication. © 2017 Society for Reproduction and Fertility.

  12. Characteristics of erythrocyte-derived microvesicles and its relation with atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Kai-Yin; Zheng, Lei; Wang, Qian; Hu, Yan-Wei

    2016-12-01

    Microvesicles are formed under many circumstances, especially in atheromatous plaques. Erythrocyte-derived microvesicles (ErMVs) have been proved to promote atherosclerosis by promoting hypercoagulation, mediating inflammation and inducing cell adhesion. Several clinical studies have reported potential roles of ErMVs in cardiovascular disease diagnosis, but the current understanding of ErMVs remains insufficient. In this paper, we will review current research on the formation and degradation of ErMVs and the possible effects of ErMVs in atherosclerosis, discuss potential clinical applications in cardiovascular disease, and hope to raise awareness of the relation with atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Microvesicle-associated microRNA expression is altered upon particulate matter exposure in healthy workers and in A549 cells

    PubMed Central

    Bollati, Valentina; Angelici, Laura; Rizzo, Giovanna; Pergoli, Laura; Rota, Federica; Hoxha, Mirjam; Nordio, Francesco; Bonzini, Matteo; Tarantini, Letizia; Cantone, Laura; Pesatori, Angela C; Apostoli, Pietro; Baccarelli, Andrea A; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease risk has been consistently linked with particulate matter (PM) exposure. Cell-derived microvesicles (MVs) are released into plasma and transfer microRNAs (miRNAs) between tissues. MVs can be produced by the respiratory system in response to proinflammatory triggers, enter the circulatory system and remotely modify gene expression in cardiovascular tissues. However, whether PM affects MV signaling has never been investigated. In this study, we evaluated expression of microRNAs contained within plasma MVs upon PM exposure both in vivo and in vitro. In the in vivo study, we isolated plasma MVs from healthy steel plant workers before and after workplace PM exposure. We measured the expression of 88 MV-associated miRNAs by real-time polymerase chain reaction. To assess a possible source of the MV miRNAs identified in vivo, we measured their miRNA expression in PM-treated A549 pulmonary cell lines in vitro. MiRNA profiling of plasma MVs showed 5.62- and 13.95-fold increased expression of miR-128 and miR-302c, respectively, after 3 days of workplace PM exposure (P < 0.001). According to Ingenuity Pathway Analysis, miR-128 is part of coronary artery disease pathways, and miR-302c is part of coronary artery disease, cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure pathways. In vitro experiments confirmed a dose-dependent expression of miR-128 in MVs released from A549 cells after 6 h of PM treatment (P = 0.030). MiR-302c was expressed neither from A549 cells nor in reference lung RNA. These results suggest novel PM-activated molecular mechanisms that may mediate the effects of air pollution and could lead to the identification of new diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Applied Toxicology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Cell-derived microvesicles (MVs) are found in plasma and may transfer signals between tissues. In this article, we report in-vivo and in-vitro studies demonstrating that Particulate

  14. Internalization and induction of antioxidant messages by microvesicles contribute to the antiapoptotic effects on human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Soleti, Raffaella; Lauret, Emilie; Andriantsitohaina, Ramaroson; Carmen Martínez, Maria

    2012-12-01

    Microvesicles are plasma membrane-derived fragments released from various cell types during activation and/or apoptosis and posses the ability to deliver biological information between cells. Microvesicles generated from T lymphocytes undergoing activation and apoptosis bear the morphogen Sonic Hedgehog, and exert a beneficial potential effect on the cardiovascular system through their dual capacity to increase nitric oxide and reduce reactive oxygen species production. This study investigated the effect of microvesicles on the apoptosis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells triggered by actinomycin D. Microvesicles prevented apoptosis induced by actinomycin D by modulating reactive oxygen species production: during the early phase of apoptosis, microvesicles might act directly as reactive oxygen species scavengers, owing to their ability to carry active antioxidant enzymes, catalase, and isoforms of the superoxide dismutase. Furthermore, their effects were associated with the ability to increase the expression of manganese-superoxide dismutase in endothelial cells, through the internalization process. Interestingly, microvesicles bearing Sonic Hedgehog induced cytoprotection in endothelial cells through the activation of the Sonic Hedgehog pathway. These findings provide additional evidence that microvesicles from T lymphocytes exert their vasculoprotective effects by promoting internalization and induction of antioxidant messages to the endothelial monolayer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Protein Targeting to Exosomes/Microvesicles by Plasma Membrane Anchors*

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Beiyi; Wu, Ning; Yang, Jr-Ming; Gould, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    Animal cells secrete small vesicles, otherwise known as exosomes and microvesicles (EMVs). A short, N-terminal acylation tag can target a highly oligomeric cytoplasmic protein, TyA, into secreted vesicles (Fang, Y., Wu, N., Gan, X., Yan, W., Morell, J. C., and Gould, S. J. (2007) PLoS Biol. 5, 1267–1283). However, it is not clear whether this is true for other membrane anchors or other highly oligomeric, cytoplasmic proteins. We show here that a variety of plasma membrane anchors can target TyA-GFP to sites of vesicle budding and into EMVs, including: (i) a myristoylation tag; (ii) a phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate (PIP2)-binding domain; (iii), a phosphatidylinositol-(3,4,5)-trisphosphate-binding domain; (iv) a prenylation/palmitoylation tag, and (v) a type-1 plasma membrane protein, CD43. However, the relative budding efficiency induced by these plasma membrane anchors varied over a 10-fold range, from 100% of control (AcylTyA-GFP) for the myristoylation tag and PIP2-binding domain, to one-third or less for the others, respectively. Targeting TyA-GFP to endosome membranes by fusion to a phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate-binding domain induced only a slight budding of TyA-GFP, ∼2% of control, and no budding was observed when TyA-GFP was targeted to Golgi membranes via a phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate-binding domain. We also found that a plasma membrane anchor can target two other highly oligomeric, cytoplasmic proteins to EMVs. These observations support the hypothesis that plasma membrane anchors can target highly oligomeric, cytoplasmic proteins to EMVs. Our data also provide additional parallels between EMV biogenesis and retrovirus budding, as the anchors that induced the greatest budding of TyA-GFP are the same as those that mediate retrovirus budding. PMID:21300796

  16. Microvesicles/exosomes as potential novel biomarkers of metabolic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Günter

    2012-01-01

    Biomarkers are of tremendous importance for the prediction, diagnosis, and observation of the therapeutic success of common complex multifactorial metabolic diseases, such as type II diabetes and obesity. However, the predictive power of the traditional biomarkers used (eg, plasma metabolites and cytokines, body parameters) is apparently not sufficient for reliable monitoring of stage-dependent pathogenesis starting with the healthy state via its initiation and development to the established disease and further progression to late clinical outcomes. Moreover, the elucidation of putative considerable differences in the underlying pathogenetic pathways (eg, related to cellular/tissue origin, epigenetic and environmental effects) within the patient population and, consequently, the differentiation between individual options for disease prevention and therapy – hallmarks of personalized medicine – plays only a minor role in the traditional biomarker concept of metabolic diseases. In contrast, multidimensional and interdependent patterns of genetic, epigenetic, and phenotypic markers presumably will add a novel quality to predictive values, provided they can be followed routinely along the complete individual disease pathway with sufficient precision. These requirements may be fulfilled by small membrane vesicles, which are so-called exosomes and microvesicles (EMVs) that are released via two distinct molecular mechanisms from a wide variety of tissue and blood cells into the circulation in response to normal and stress/pathogenic conditions and are equipped with a multitude of transmembrane, soluble and glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins, mRNAs, and microRNAs. Based on the currently available data, EMVs seem to reflect the diverse functional and dysfunctional states of the releasing cells and tissues along the complete individual pathogenetic pathways underlying metabolic diseases. A critical step in further validation of EMVs as biomarkers will rely on

  17. Blast-derived microvesicles in sera from patients with acute myeloid leukemia suppress natural killer cell function via membrane-associated transforming growth factor-beta1.

    PubMed

    Szczepanski, Miroslaw J; Szajnik, Marta; Welsh, Ann; Whiteside, Theresa L; Boyiadzis, Michael

    2011-09-01

    Natural killer cell cytotoxicity is decreased in patients with acute myeloid leukemia in comparison to that in normal controls. Tumor-derived microvesicles present in patients' sera exert detrimental effects on immune cells and may influence tumor progression. We investigated the microvesicle protein level, molecular profile and suppression of natural killer cell activity in patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia. The patients' sera contained higher levels of microvesicles compared to the levels in controls (P<0.001). Isolated microvesicles had a distinct molecular profile: in addition to conventional microvesicle markers, they contained membrane-associated transforming growth factor-β1, MICA/MICB and myeloid blasts markers, CD34, CD33 and CD117. These microvesicles decreased natural killer cell cytotoxicity (P<0.002) and down-regulated expression of NKG2D in normal natural killer cells (P<0.001). Sera from patients with acute myeloid leukemia contained elevated levels of transforming growth factor-β, and urea-mediated dissociation of microvesicles further increased the levels of this protein. Neutralizing anti-transforming growth factor-β1 antibodies inhibited microvesicle-mediated suppression of natural killer cell activity and NKG2D down-regulation. Interleukin-15 protected natural killer cells from adverse effects of tumor-derived microvesicles. We provide evidence for the existence in acute myeloid leukemia of a novel mechanism of natural killer cell suppression mediated by tumor-derived microvesicles and for the ability of interleukin-15 to counteract this suppression.

  18. Microvesicles shed from fibroblasts act as metalloproteinase carriers in a 3-D collagen matrix

    PubMed Central

    Taddei, Anna Rita; Gambellini, Gabriella; Giorgi, Franco; Fausto, Anna Maria

    2016-01-01

    This study shows that fibroblasts migrating into a collagen matrix release numerous microvesicles into the surrounding medium. By spreading in regions of the matrix far distant from cells of origin, microvesicles carry metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) to act upon the collagen fibrils. As a result, the collagen matrix is gradually transformed from a laminar to a fibrillar type of architecture. As shown by western blots and gelatin zymography, MMP-9 is secreted as a 92 kDa precursor and activated upon release of 82 kDa product into the culture medium. Activation is more efficient under three-dimensional than in two-dimensional culturing conditions. While MMP-9 labeling is associated with intraluminal vesicles clustered inside the microvesicles, the microvesicle’s integrin β1 marker is bound to the outer membrane. The intraluminal vesicles are recruited from the cortical cytoplasm and eventually released following uploading inside the microvesicle. Here, we propose that fusion of the intraluminal vesicles with the outer microvesicle’s membrane could work as a mechanism controlling the extent to which MMP-9 is first activated and then released extracellularly. PMID:28936262

  19. Recent advances in mesenchymal stem cell immunomodulation: the role of microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Fierabracci, Alessandra; Del Fattore, Andrea; Luciano, Rosa; Muraca, Marta; Teti, Anna; Muraca, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells are the most widely used cell phenotype for therapeutic applications, the main reasons being their well-established abilities to promote regeneration of injured tissues and to modulate immune responses. Efficacy was reported in the treatment of several animal models of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases and, in clinical settings, for the management of disorders such as GVHD, systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis, and inflammatory bowel disease. The effects of mesenchymal stem cells are believed to be largely mediated by paracrine signals, and several secreted molecules have been identified as contributors to the net biological effect. Recently, it has been recognized that bioactive molecules can be shuttled from cell to cell packed in microvesicles, tiny portions of cytoplasm surrounded by a membrane. Coding and noncoding RNAs are also carried in such microvesicles, transferring relevant biological activity to target cells. Several reports indicate that the regenerative effect of mesenchymal stem cells can be reproduced by microvesicles isolated from their culture medium. More recent evidence suggests that the immunomodulatory effects of mesenchymal stem cells are also at least partially mediated by secreted microvesicles. These findings allow better understanding of the mechanisms involved in cell-to-cell interaction and may have interesting implications for the development of novel therapeutic tools in place of the parent cells.

  20. Stem Cell Microvesicles Transfer Cystinosin to Human Cystinotic Cells and Reduce Cystine Accumulation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Taranta, Anna; Bellomo, Francesco; Emma, Francesco; Besouw, Martine; Levtchenko, Elena; Toelen, Jaan; van den Heuvel, Lambertus; Chu, LeeLee; Zhao, Jing; Young, Yoon Kow; Eliopoulos, Nicoletta; Goodyer, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Cystinosis is a rare disease caused by homozygous mutations of the CTNS gene, encoding a cystine efflux channel in the lysosomal membrane. In Ctns knockout mice, the pathologic intralysosomal accumulation of cystine that drives progressive organ damage can be reversed by infusion of wildtype bone marrow-derived stem cells, but the mechanism involved is unclear since the exogeneous stem cells are rarely integrated into renal tubules. Here we show that human mesenchymal stem cells, from amniotic fluid or bone marrow, reduce pathologic cystine accumulation in co-cultured CTNS mutant fibroblasts or proximal tubular cells from cystinosis patients. This paracrine effect is associated with release into the culture medium of stem cell microvesicles (100–400 nm diameter) containing wildtype cystinosin protein and CTNS mRNA. Isolated stem cell microvesicles reduce target cell cystine accumulation in a dose-dependent, Annexin V-sensitive manner. Microvesicles from stem cells expressing CTNSRed transfer tagged CTNS protein to the lysosome/endosome compartment of cystinotic fibroblasts. Our observations suggest that exogenous stem cells may reprogram the biology of mutant tissues by direct microvesicle transfer of membrane-associated wildtype molecules. PMID:22912749

  1. Impact of biofluid viscosity on size and sedimentation efficiency of the isolated microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Momen-Heravi, Fatemeh; Balaj, Leonora; Alian, Sara; Trachtenberg, Alexander J; Hochberg, Fred H; Skog, Johan; Kuo, Winston Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Microvesicles are nano-sized lipid vesicles released by all cells in vivo and in vitro. They are released physiologically under normal conditions but their rate of release is higher under pathological conditions such as tumors. Once released they end up in the systemic circulation and have been found and characterized in all biofluids such as plasma, serum, cerebrospinal fluid, breast milk, ascites, and urine. Microvesicles represent the status of the donor cell they are released from and they are currently under intense investigation as a potential source for disease biomarkers. Currently, the "gold standard" for isolating microvesicles is ultracentrifugation, although alternative techniques such as affinity purification have been explored. Viscosity is the resistance of a fluid to a deforming force by either shear or tensile stress. The different chemical and molecular compositions of biofluids have an effect on its viscosity and this could affect movements of the particles inside the fluid. In this manuscript we addressed the issue of whether viscosity has an effect on sedimentation efficiency of microvesicles using ultracentrifugation. We used different biofluids and spiked them with polystyrene beads and assessed their recovery using the Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis. We demonstrate that MVs recovery inversely correlates with viscosity and as a result, sample dilutions should be considered prior to ultracentrifugation when processing any biofluids.

  2. Impact of Biofluid Viscosity on Size and Sedimentation Efficiency of the Isolated Microvesicles

    PubMed Central

    Momen-Heravi, Fatemeh; Balaj, Leonora; Alian, Sara; Trachtenberg, Alexander J.; Hochberg, Fred H.; Skog, Johan; Kuo, Winston Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Microvesicles are nano-sized lipid vesicles released by all cells in vivo and in vitro. They are released physiologically under normal conditions but their rate of release is higher under pathological conditions such as tumors. Once released they end up in the systemic circulation and have been found and characterized in all biofluids such as plasma, serum, cerebrospinal fluid, breast milk, ascites, and urine. Microvesicles represent the status of the donor cell they are released from and they are currently under intense investigation as a potential source for disease biomarkers. Currently, the “gold standard” for isolating microvesicles is ultracentrifugation, although alternative techniques such as affinity purification have been explored. Viscosity is the resistance of a fluid to a deforming force by either shear or tensile stress. The different chemical and molecular compositions of biofluids have an effect on its viscosity and this could affect movements of the particles inside the fluid. In this manuscript we addressed the issue of whether viscosity has an effect on sedimentation efficiency of microvesicles using ultracentrifugation. We used different biofluids and spiked them with polystyrene beads and assessed their recovery using the Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis. We demonstrate that MVs recovery inversely correlates with viscosity and as a result, sample dilutions should be considered prior to ultracentrifugation when processing any biofluids. PMID:22661955

  3. Translocation of Endogenous Danger Signal HMGB1 From Nucleus to Membrane Microvesicles in Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Li, Guangping; Liu, Yanxia; Werth, Victoria P; Williams, Kevin Jon; Liu, Ming-Lin

    2016-11-01

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a nuclear protein that can be released from activated or dead cells. Extracellular HMGB1 can serve as a "danger signal" and novel cytokine that mediates sterile inflammation. In addition to its soluble form, extracellular HMGB1 can also be carried by membrane microvesicles. However, the cellular mechanisms responsible for nuclear HMGB1 translocation to the plasma membrane and release onto membrane microvesicles have not been investigated. Tobacco smoking is a major cause of sterile inflammation in many diseases. Smoking also increases blood levels of HMGB1. In this study, we found that exposure of macrophages to tobacco smoke extract (TSE) stimulated HMGB1 expression, redistribution, and release into the extracellular milieu both as a soluble molecule and, surprisingly, as a microvesicle-associated form (TSE-MV). Inhibition of chromosome region maintenance-1 (CRM1), a nuclear exporter, attenuated TSE-induced HMGB1 redistribution from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, and then its release on TSE-MVs. Our study demonstrates a novel mechanism for the translocation of nuclear HMGB1 to the plasma membrane, and then its release in a microvesicle-associated form. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2319-2326, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Monocyte derived microvesicles deliver a cell death message via encapsulated caspase-1.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Anasuya; Mitra, Srabani; Mehta, Sonya; Raices, Raquel; Wewers, Mark D

    2009-09-25

    Apoptosis depends upon the activation of intracellular caspases which are classically induced by either an intrinsic (mitochondrial based) or extrinsic (cytokine) pathway. However, in the process of explaining how endotoxin activated monocytes are able to induce apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells when co-cultured, we uncovered a transcellular apoptosis inducing pathway that utilizes caspase-1 containing microvesicles. Endotoxin stimulated monocytes induce the cell death of VSMCs but this activity is found in 100,000 g pellets of cell free supernatants of these monocytes. This activity is not a direct effect of endotoxin, and is inhibited by the caspase-1 inhibitor YVADcmk but not by inhibitors of Fas-L, IL-1beta and IL-18. Importantly, the apoptosis inducing activity co-purifies with 100 nm sized microvesicles as determined by TEM of the pellets. These microvesicles contain caspase-1 and caspase-1 encapsulation is required since disruption of microvesicular integrity destroys the apoptotic activity but not the caspase-1 enzymatic activity. Thus, monocytes are capable of delivering a cell death message which depends upon the release of microvesicles containing functional caspase-1. This transcellular apoptosis induction pathway describes a novel pathway for inflammation induced programmed cell death.

  5. Monocyte Derived Microvesicles Deliver a Cell Death Message via Encapsulated Caspase-1

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Anasuya; Mitra, Srabani; Mehta, Sonya; Raices, Raquel; Wewers, Mark D.

    2009-01-01

    Apoptosis depends upon the activation of intracellular caspases which are classically induced by either an intrinsic (mitochondrial based) or extrinsic (cytokine) pathway. However, in the process of explaining how endotoxin activated monocytes are able to induce apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells when co-cultured, we uncovered a transcellular apoptosis inducing pathway that utilizes caspase-1 containing microvesicles. Endotoxin stimulated monocytes induce the cell death of VSMCs but this activity is found in 100,000 g pellets of cell free supernatants of these monocytes. This activity is not a direct effect of endotoxin, and is inhibited by the caspase-1 inhibitor YVADcmk but not by inhibitors of Fas-L, IL-1β and IL-18. Importantly, the apoptosis inducing activity co-purifies with 100 nm sized microvesicles as determined by TEM of the pellets. These microvesicles contain caspase-1 and caspase-1 encapsulation is required since disruption of microvesicular integrity destroys the apoptotic activity but not the caspase-1 enzymatic activity. Thus, monocytes are capable of delivering a cell death message which depends upon the release of microvesicles containing functional caspase-1. This transcellular apoptosis induction pathway describes a novel pathway for inflammation induced programmed cell death. PMID:19779610

  6. CD9-positive microvesicles mediate the transfer of molecules to Bovine Spermatozoa during epididymal maturation.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Julieta N; Frenette, Gilles; Belleannée, Clémence; Sullivan, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Acquisition of fertilization ability by spermatozoa during epididymal transit occurs in part by the transfer of molecules from membranous vesicles called epididymosomes. Epididymosomes are heterogeneous in terms of both size and molecular composition. Exosomes and other related small membranous vesicles (30-120 nm) containing tetraspanin proteins on their surface are found in many biological fluids. In this study, we demonstrate that these vesicles are present in bovine cauda epididymal fluid as a subpopulation of epididymosomes. They contain tetraspanin CD9 in addition to other proteins involved in sperm maturation such as P25b, GliPr1L1, and MIF. In order to study the mechanism of protein transfer to sperm, DilC12-labeled unfractionated epididymosomes or CD9-positive microvesicles were coincubated with epididymal spermatozoa, and their transfer was evaluated by flow cytometry. CD9-positive microvesicles from epididymal fluid specifically transferred molecules to spermatozoa, whereas those prepared from blood were unable to do so. The CD9-positive microvesicles transferred molecules to the same sperm regions (acrosome and midpiece) as epididymosomes, with the same kinetics; however, the molecules were preferentially transferred to live sperm and, in contrast to epididymosomes, Zn(2+) did not demonstrate potentiated transfer. Tetraspanin CD9 was associated with other proteins on the membrane surface of CD9-positive microvesicles according to coimmunoprecipitation experiments. CD26 cooperated with CD9 in the molecular transfer to sperm since the amount of molecules transferred was significantly reduced in the presence of specific antibodies. In conclusion, CD9-positive microvesicles are present in bovine cauda epididymal fluid and transfer molecules to live maturing sperm in a tissue-specific manner that involves CD9 and CD26.

  7. Isolation of Exosomes and Microvesicles from Cell Culture Systems to Study Prion Transmission.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, Pascal; Arellano-Anaya, Zaira E; Bernard, Emilien; Gallay, Laure; Provansal, Monique; Lehmann, Sylvain; Schaeffer, Laurent; Raposo, Graça; Vilette, Didier

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are composed of microvesicles and exosomes. Exosomes are small membrane vesicles (40-120 nm sized) of endosomal origin released in the extracellular medium from cells when multivesicular bodies fuse with the plasma membrane, whereas microvesicles (i.e., shedding vesicles, 100 nm to 1 μm sized) bud from the plasma membrane. Exosomes and microvesicles carry functional proteins and nucleic acids (especially mRNAs and microRNAs) that can be transferred to surrounding cells and tissues and can impact multiple dimensions of the cellular life. Most of the cells, if not all, from neuronal to immune cells, release exosomes and microvesicles in the extracellular medium, and all biological fluids including blood (serum/plasma), urine, cerebrospinal fluid, and saliva contain EVs.Prion-infected cultured cells are known to secrete infectivity into their environment. We characterized this cell-free form of prions and showed that infectivity was associated with exosomes. Since exosomes are produced by a variety of cells, including cells that actively accumulate prions, they could be a vehicle for infectivity in body fluids and could participate to the dissemination of prions in the organism. In addition, such infectious exosomes also represent a natural, simple, biological material to get key information on the abnormal PrP forms associated with infectivity.In this chapter, we describe first a method that allows exosomes and microvesicles isolation from prion-infected cell cultures and in a second time the strategies to characterize the prions containing exosomes and their ability to disseminate the prion agent.

  8. Distinct RNA profiles in subpopulations of extracellular vesicles: apoptotic bodies, microvesicles and exosomes.

    PubMed

    Crescitelli, Rossella; Lässer, Cecilia; Szabó, Tamas G; Kittel, Agnes; Eldh, Maria; Dianzani, Irma; Buzás, Edit I; Lötvall, Jan

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, there has been an exponential increase in the number of studies aiming to understand the biology of exosomes, as well as other extracellular vesicles. However, classification of membrane vesicles and the appropriate protocols for their isolation are still under intense discussion and investigation. When isolating vesicles, it is crucial to use systems that are able to separate them, to avoid cross-contamination. EVS RELEASED FROM THREE DIFFERENT KINDS OF CELL LINES: HMC-1, TF-1 and BV-2 were isolated using two centrifugation-based protocols. In protocol 1, apoptotic bodies were collected at 2,000×g, followed by filtering the supernatant through 0.8 µm pores and pelleting of microvesicles at 12,200×g. In protocol 2, apoptotic bodies and microvesicles were collected together at 16,500×g, followed by filtering of the supernatant through 0.2 µm pores and pelleting of exosomes at 120,000×g. Extracellular vesicles were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy, flow cytometry and the RNA profiles were investigated using a Bioanalyzer(®). RNA profiles showed that ribosomal RNA was primary detectable in apoptotic bodies and smaller RNAs without prominent ribosomal RNA peaks in exosomes. In contrast, microvesicles contained little or no RNA except for microvesicles collected from TF-1 cell cultures. The different vesicle pellets showed highly different distribution of size, shape and electron density with typical apoptotic body, microvesicle and exosome characteristics when analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. Flow cytometry revealed the presence of CD63 and CD81 in all vesicles investigated, as well as CD9 except in the TF-1-derived vesicles, as these cells do not express CD9. Our results demonstrate that centrifugation-based protocols are simple and fast systems to distinguish subpopulations of extracellular vesicles. Different vesicles show different RNA profiles and morphological characteristics, but they are indistinguishable using

  9. Potential role of corneal epithelial cell-derived exosomes in corneal wound healing and neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Han, Kyu-Yeon; Tran, Jennifer A.; Chang, Jin-Hong; Azar, Dimitri T.; Zieske, James D.

    2017-01-01

    Specific factors from the corneal epithelium underlying the stimulation of stromal fibrosis and myofibroblast formation in corneal wound healing have not been fully elucidated. Given that exosomes are known to transfer bioactive molecules among cells and play crucial roles in wound healing, angiogenesis, and cancer, we hypothesized that corneal epithelial cell-derived exosomes may gain access to the underlying stromal fibroblasts upon disruption of the epithelial basement membrane and that they induce signaling events essential for corneal wound healing. In the present study, exosome-like vesicles were observed between corneal epithelial cells and the stroma during wound healing after corneal epithelial debridement. These vesicles were also found in the stroma following anterior stromal keratectomy, in which surgical removal of the epithelium, basement membrane, and anterior stroma was performed. Exosomes secreted by mouse corneal epithelial cells were found to fuse to keratocytes in vitro and to induce myofibroblast transformation. In addition, epithelial cell-derived exosomes induced endothelial cell proliferation and ex vivo aortic ring sprouting. Our results indicate that epithelial cell-derived exosomes mediate communication between corneal epithelial cells and corneal keratocytes as well as vascular endothelial cells. These findings demonstrate that epithelial-derived exosomes may be involved in corneal wound healing and neovascularization, and thus, may serve as targets for potential therapeutic interventions. PMID:28165027

  10. Structural Phenotyping of Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Pasqualini, Francesco Silvio; Sheehy, Sean Paul; Agarwal, Ashutosh; Aratyn-Schaus, Yvonne; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2015-01-01

    Summary Structural phenotyping based on classical image feature detection has been adopted to elucidate the molecular mechanisms behind genetically or pharmacologically induced changes in cell morphology. Here, we developed a set of 11 metrics to capture the increasing sarcomere organization that occurs intracellularly during striated muscle cell development. To test our metrics, we analyzed the localization of the contractile protein α-actinin in a variety of primary and stem-cell derived cardiomyocytes. Further, we combined these metrics with data mining algorithms to unbiasedly score the phenotypic maturity of human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes. PMID:25733020

  11. A Meta-Analysis of Circulating Microvesicles in Patients with Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhida; Cai, Wang; Hu, Shaolan; Xia, Yufei; Wang, Yao; Zhang, Qi; Chen, Liming

    2017-07-10

    Cell-derived microvesicles (MVs) are vesicles released from activated or apoptotic cells. However, the levels of MVs in myocardial infarction have been found inconsistent in researches. To assess the association between MVs and myocardial infarction by conducting a meta-analysis. A systematic literature search on PubMed, Embase, Cochran, Google Scholar electronic database was conducted. Comparison of the MVs levels between myocardial infarction patients and healthy persons were included in our study. Standard Mean Difference (SMD) and 95% confidence interval (CI) in groups were calculated and meta-analyzed. 11 studies with a total of 436 participants were included. Compared with the health persons, AMVs [SMD = 3.65, 95% CI (1.03, 6.27)], PMVs [SMD = 2.88, 95% CI (1.82, 3.93),] and EMVs [SMD = 2.73, 95% CI (1.13, 4.34)], levels were higher in patients with myocardial infarction. However, LMVs levels [SMD = 0.73, 95% CI (-0.57, 2.03)] were not changed significantly in patients with myocardial infarction. AMVs, PMVs and EMVs might be potential biomarkers for myocardial infarction. As microvesículas derivadas de células (MVs) são vesículas liberadas de células ativadas ou apoptóticas. No entanto, os níveis de MVs no infarto do miocárdio foram encontrados inconsistentes nas pesquisas. Avaliar a associação entre MV e infarto do miocárdio por meio de uma meta-análise. Foi realizada uma pesquisa sistemática na literatura em PubMed, Embase, Cochran e no banco de dados eletrônico do Google Scholar. Uma comparação dos níveis de MV entre pacientes com infarto do miocárdio e pessoas saudáveis foi incluída no nosso estudo. A Diferença Média Padrão (DMP) e o intervalo de confiança (IC) de 95% nos grupos foram calculadas e meta-analisadas. Foram incluídos 11 estudos com um total de 436 participantes. Em comparação com as pessoas saudáveis, as MVA [DMP = 3,65, IC 95% (1,03, 6,27)], MVPs [DMP = 2,88, IC 95% (1,82, 3,93)] e MVEs [DMP = 2,73, IC 95% (1

  12. Upregulation of lipid synthesis in small rat adipocytes by microvesicle-associated CD73 from large adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Müller, Günter; Schneider, Marion; Biemer-Daub, Gabriele; Wied, Susanne

    2011-08-01

    Filling-up lipid stores is critical for size increase of mammalian adipocytes. The glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein, CD73, is released from adipocytes into microvesicles in response to the lipogenic stimuli, palmitate, the antidiabetic sulfonylurea drug glimepiride, phosphoinositolglycans (PIG), and H(2)O(2). Upon incubation of microvesicles with adipocytes, CD73 is translocated to cytoplasmic lipid droplets (LD) and esterification is upregulated. The role of CD73-harboring microvesicles in coordinating esterification between differently sized adipocytes was studied here. Populations consisting of either small or large or of both small and large isolated rat adipocytes as well as native adipose tissue pieces from young and old rats were incubated with or depleted of endogenous microvesicles and analyzed for translocation of CD73 and esterification in response to the lipogenic stimuli. Large adipocytes exhibited higher and lower efficacy in releasing CD73 into microvesicles and in translocating CD73 to LD, respectively, compared to small adipocytes. Populations consisting of both small and large adipocytes were more active in esterification in response to the lipogenic stimuli than either small or large adipocytes. With both adipocytes and adipose tissue pieces from young rats esterification stimulation by the lipogenic stimuli was abrogated by depletion of CD73-harboring microvesicles from the incubation medium and interstitial spaces, respectively. In conclusion, stimulus-induced lipid synthesis between differently sized adipocytes is controlled by the release of microvesicle-associated CD73 from large cells and its subsequent translocation to LD of small cells. This information transfer via microvesicles harboring GPI-anchored proteins may shift the burden of triacylglycerol storage from large to small adipocytes.

  13. Characterization of Microvesicles Released from Human Red Blood Cells.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Duc Bach; Ly, Thi Bich Thuy; Wesseling, Mauro Carlos; Hittinger, Marius; Torge, Afra; Devitt, Andrew; Perrie, Yvonne; Bernhardt, Ingolf

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are spherical fragments of cell membrane released from various cell types under physiological as well as pathological conditions. Based on their size and origin, EVs are classified as exosome, microvesicles (MVs) and apoptotic bodies. Recently, the release of MVs from human red blood cells (RBCs) under different conditions has been reported. MVs are released by outward budding and fission of the plasma membrane. However, the outward budding process itself, the release of MVs and the physical properties of these MVs have not been well investigated. The aim of this study is to investigate the formation process, isolation and characterization of MVs released from RBCs under conditions of stimulating Ca2+ uptake and activation of protein kinase C. Experiments were performed based on single cell fluorescence imaging, fluorescence activated cell sorter/flow cytometer (FACS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The released MVs were collected by differential centrifugation and characterized in both their size and zeta potential. Treatment of RBCs with 4-bromo-A23187 (positive control), lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), or phorbol-12 myristate-13 acetate (PMA) in the presence of 2 mM extracellular Ca2+ led to an alteration of cell volume and cell morphology. In stimulated RBCs, exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS) and formation of MVs were observed by using annexin V-FITC. The shedding of MVs was also observed in the case of PMA treatment in the absence of Ca2+, especially under the transmitted bright field illumination. By using SEM, AFM and DLS the morphology and size of stimulated RBCs, MVs were characterized. The sizes of the two populations of MVs were 205.8 ± 51.4 nm and 125.6 ± 31.4 nm, respectively. Adhesion of stimulated RBCs and MVs was observed. The zeta potential of MVs was determined in the range from - 40 mV to - 10 mV depended on the solutions and buffers used. An

  14. Reversing drug resistance of soft tumor-repopulating cells by tumor cell-derived chemotherapeutic microparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jingwei; Zhang, Yi; Tang, Ke; Zhang, Huafeng; Yin, Xiaonan; Li, Yong; Xu, Pingwei; Sun, Yanling; Ma, Ruihua; Ji, Tiantian; Chen, Junwei; Zhang, Shuang; Zhang, Tianzhen; Luo, Shunqun; Jin, Yang; Luo, Xiuli; Li, Chengyin; Gong, Hongwei; Long, Zhixiong; Lu, Jinzhi; Hu, Zhuowei; Cao, Xuetao; Wang, Ning; Yang, Xiangliang; Huang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Developing novel approaches to reverse the drug resistance of tumor-repopulating cells (TRCs) or stem cell-like cancer cells is an urgent clinical need to improve outcomes of cancer patients. Here we show an innovative approach that reverses drug resistance of TRCs using tumor cell-derived microparticles (T-MPs) containing anti-tumor drugs. TRCs, by virtue of being more deformable than differentiated cancer cells, preferentially take up T-MPs that release anti-tumor drugs after entering cells, which in turn lead to death of TRCs. The underlying mechanisms include interfering with drug efflux and promoting nuclear entry of the drugs. Our findings demonstrate the importance of tumor cell softness in uptake of T-MPs and effectiveness of a novel approach in reversing drug resistance of TRCs with promising clinical applications. PMID:27167569

  15. Glioma microvesicles carry selectively packaged coding and non-coding RNAs which alter gene expression in recipient cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cheryl CY; Eaton, Sally A; Young, Paul E; Lee, Maggie; Shuttleworth, Rupert; Humphreys, David T; Grau, Georges E; Combes, Valery; Bebawy, Mary; Gong, Joyce; Brammah, Susan; Buckland, Michael E; Suter, Catherine M

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between glioma cells and their local environment are critical determinants of brain tumor growth, infiltration and neovascularisation. Communication with host cells and stroma via microvesicles represents one pathway by which tumors can modify their surroundings to achieve a tumor-permissive environment. Here we have taken an unbiased approach to identifying RNAs in glioma-derived microvesicles, and explored their potential to regulate gene expression in recipient cells. We find that glioma microvesicles are predominantly of exosomal origin and contain complex populations of coding and noncoding RNAs in proportions that are distinct from those in the cells from which they are derived. Microvesicles show a relative depletion in microRNA compared with their cells of origin, and are enriched in unusual or novel noncoding RNAs, most of which have no known function. Short-term exposure of brain microvascular endothelial cells to glioma microvesicles results in many gene expression changes in the endothelial cells, most of which cannot be explained by direct delivery of transcripts. Our data suggest that the scope of potential actions of tumor-derived microvesicles is much broader and more complex than previously supposed, and highlight a number of new classes of small RNA that remain to be characterized. PMID:23807490

  16. Microvesicles Derived From Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Restore Alveolar Fluid Clearance in Human Lungs Rejected for Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gennai, S; Monsel, A; Hao, Q; Park, J; Matthay, M A; Lee, J W

    2015-09-01

    The need to increase the donor pool for lung transplantation is a major public health issue. We previously found that administration of mesenchymal stem cells "rehabilitated" marginal donor lungs rejected for transplantation using ex vivo lung perfusion. However, the use of stem cells has some inherent limitation such as the potential for tumor formation. In the current study, we hypothesized that microvesicles, small anuclear membrane fragments constitutively released from mesenchymal stem cells, may be a good alternative to using stem cells. Using our well established ex vivo lung perfusion model, microvesicles derived from human mesenchymal stem cells increased alveolar fluid clearance (i.e. ability to absorb pulmonary edema fluid) in a dose-dependent manner, decreased lung weight gain following perfusion and ventilation, and improved airway and hemodynamic parameters compared to perfusion alone. Microvesicles derived from normal human lung fibroblasts as a control had no effect. Co-administration of microvesicles with anti-CD44 antibody attenuated these effects, suggesting a key role of the CD44 receptor in the internalization of the microvesicles into the injured host cell and its effect. In summary, microvesicles derived from human mesenchymal stem cells were as effective as the parent mesenchymal stem cells in rehabilitating marginal donor human lungs. © Copyright 2015 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  17. Glioma microvesicles carry selectively packaged coding and non-coding RNAs which alter gene expression in recipient cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheryl C Y; Eaton, Sally A; Young, Paul E; Lee, Maggie; Shuttleworth, Rupert; Humphreys, David T; Grau, Georges E; Combes, Valery; Bebawy, Mary; Gong, Joyce; Brammah, Susan; Buckland, Michael E; Suter, Catherine M

    2013-08-01

    Interactions between glioma cells and their local environment are critical determinants of brain tumor growth, infiltration and neovascularisation. Communication with host cells and stroma via microvesicles represents one pathway by which tumors can modify their surroundings to achieve a tumor-permissive environment. Here we have taken an unbiased approach to identifying RNAs in glioma-derived microvesicles, and explored their potential to regulate gene expression in recipient cells. We find that glioma microvesicles are predominantly of exosomal origin and contain complex populations of coding and noncoding RNAs in proportions that are distinct from those in the cells from which they are derived. Microvesicles show a relative depletion in microRNA compared with their cells of origin, and are enriched in unusual or novel noncoding RNAs, most of which have no known function. Short-term exposure of brain microvascular endothelial cells to glioma microvesicles results in many gene expression changes in the endothelial cells, most of which cannot be explained by direct delivery of transcripts. Our data suggest that the scope of potential actions of tumor-derived microvesicles is much broader and more complex than previously supposed, and highlight a number of new classes of small RNA that remain to be characterized.

  18. Quality Metrics for Stem Cell-Derived Cardiac Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sheehy, Sean P.; Pasqualini, Francesco; Grosberg, Anna; Park, Sung Jin; Aratyn-Schaus, Yvonne; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2014-01-01

    Summary Advances in stem cell manufacturing methods have made it possible to produce stem cell-derived cardiac myocytes at industrial scales for in vitro muscle physiology research purposes. Although FDA-mandated quality assurance metrics address safety issues in the manufacture of stem cell-based products, no standardized guidelines currently exist for the evaluation of stem cell-derived myocyte functionality. As a result, it is unclear whether the various stem cell-derived myocyte cell lines on the market perform similarly, or whether any of them accurately recapitulate the characteristics of native cardiac myocytes. We propose a multiparametric quality assessment rubric in which genetic, structural, electrophysiological, and contractile measurements are coupled with comparison against values for these measurements that are representative of the ventricular myocyte phenotype. We demonstrated this procedure using commercially available, mass-produced murine embryonic stem cell- and induced pluripotent stem cell-derived myocytes compared with a neonatal mouse ventricular myocyte target phenotype in coupled in vitro assays. PMID:24672752

  19. Progenitor/Stem Cell Fate Determination: Interactive Dynamics of Cell Cycle and Microvesicles

    PubMed Central

    Lee, David; Puente, Napoleon; Faradyan, Sam; Sears, Edmund H.; Amaral, Ashley; Goldberg, Laura; Dooner, Mark S.; Pereira, Mandy; Quesenberry, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    We have shown that hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell phenotype and differentiative potential change throughout cell cycle. Lung-derived microvesicles (LDMVs) also change marrow cell phenotype by inducing them to express pulmonary epithelial cell-specific mRNA and protein. These changes are accentuated when microvesicles isolated from injured lung. We wish to determine if microvesicle-treated stem/progenitor cell phenotype is linked to cell cycle and to the injury status of the lung providing microvesicles. Lineage depleted, Sca-1+ (Lin-/Sca-1+) marrow isolated from mice were cultured with interleukin 3 (IL-3), IL-6, IL-11, and stem cell factor (cytokine-cultured cells), removed at hours zero (cell cycle phase G0/G1), 24 (late G1/early S), and 48 (late S/early G2/M), and cocultured with lung tissue, lung conditioned media (LCM), or LDMV from irradiated or nonirradiated mice. Alternatively, Lin-/Sca-1+ cells not exposed to exogenous cytokines were separated into G0/G1 and S/G2/M cell cycle phase populations by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and used in coculture. Separately, LDMV from irradiated and nonirradiated mice were analyzed for the presence of adhesion proteins. Peak pulmonary epithelial cell-specific mRNA expression was seen in G0/G1 cytokine-cultured cells cocultured with irradiated lung and in late G1/early S cells cocultured with nonirradiated lung. The same pattern was seen in cytokine-cultured Lin-/Sca-1 cells cocultured with LCM and LDMV and when FACS-separated Lin-/Sca-1 cells unexposed to exogenous cytokines were used in coculture. Cells and LDMV expressed adhesion proteins whose levels differed based on cycle status (cells) or radiation injury (LDMV), suggesting a mechanism for microvesicle entry. These data demonstrate that microvesicle modification of progenitor/stem cells is influenced by cell cycle and the treatment of the originator lung tissue. PMID:22214238

  20. A class of extracellular vesicles from breast cancer cells activates VEGF receptors and tumour angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Qiyu; Zhang, Chengliang; Lum, David; Druso, Joseph E.; Blank, Bryant; Wilson, Kristin F.; Welm, Alana; Antonyak, Marc A.; Cerione, Richard A.

    2017-01-01

    Non-classical secretory vesicles, collectively referred to as extracellular vesicles (EVs), have been implicated in different aspects of cancer cell survival and metastasis. Here, we describe how a specific class of EVs, called microvesicles (MVs), activates VEGF receptors and tumour angiogenesis through a unique 90 kDa form of VEGF (VEGF90K). We show that VEGF90K is generated by the crosslinking of VEGF165, catalysed by the enzyme tissue transglutaminase, and associates with MVs through its interaction with the chaperone Hsp90. We further demonstrate that MV-associated VEGF90K has a weakened affinity for Bevacizumab, causing Bevacizumab to be ineffective in blocking MV-dependent VEGF receptor activation. However, treatment with an Hsp90 inhibitor releases VEGF90K from MVs, restoring the sensitivity of VEGF90K to Bevacizumab. These findings reveal a novel mechanism by which cancer cell-derived MVs influence the tumour microenvironment and highlight the importance of recognizing their unique properties when considering drug treatment strategies. PMID:28205552

  1. Stem Cell-Derived Extracellular Vesicles and Immune-Modulation.

    PubMed

    Burrello, Jacopo; Monticone, Silvia; Gai, Chiara; Gomez, Yonathan; Kholia, Sharad; Camussi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Extra-cellular vesicles (EVs) are bilayer membrane structures enriched with proteins, nucleic acids, and other active molecules and have been implicated in many physiological and pathological processes over the past decade. Recently, evidence suggests EVs to play a more dichotomic role in the regulation of the immune system, whereby an immune response may be enhanced or supressed by EVs depending on their cell of origin and its functional state. EVs derived from antigen (Ag)-presenting cells for instance, have been involved in both innate and acquired (or adaptive) immune responses, as Ag carriers or presenters, or as vehicles for delivering active signaling molecules. On the other hand, tumor and stem cell derived EVs have been identified to exert an inhibitory effect on immune responses by carrying immuno-modulatory effectors, such as transcriptional factors, non-coding RNA (Species), and cytokines. In addition, stem cell-derived EVs have also been reported to impair dendritic cell maturation and to regulate the activation, differentiation, and proliferation of B cells. They have been shown to control natural killer cell activity and to suppress the innate immune response (IIR). Studies reporting the role of EVs on T lymphocyte modulation are controversial. Discrepancy in literature may be due to stem cell culture conditions, methods of EV purification, EV molecular content, and functional state of both parental and target cells. However, mesenchymal stem cell-derived EVs were shown to play a more suppressive role by shifting T cells from an activated to a T regulatory phenotype. In this review, we will discuss how stem cell-derived EVs may contribute toward the modulation of the immune response. Collectively, stem cell-derived EVs mainly exhibit an inhibitory effect on the immune system.

  2. Stem Cell-Derived Extracellular Vesicles and Immune-Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Burrello, Jacopo; Monticone, Silvia; Gai, Chiara; Gomez, Yonathan; Kholia, Sharad; Camussi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Extra-cellular vesicles (EVs) are bilayer membrane structures enriched with proteins, nucleic acids, and other active molecules and have been implicated in many physiological and pathological processes over the past decade. Recently, evidence suggests EVs to play a more dichotomic role in the regulation of the immune system, whereby an immune response may be enhanced or supressed by EVs depending on their cell of origin and its functional state. EVs derived from antigen (Ag)-presenting cells for instance, have been involved in both innate and acquired (or adaptive) immune responses, as Ag carriers or presenters, or as vehicles for delivering active signaling molecules. On the other hand, tumor and stem cell derived EVs have been identified to exert an inhibitory effect on immune responses by carrying immuno-modulatory effectors, such as transcriptional factors, non-coding RNA (Species), and cytokines. In addition, stem cell-derived EVs have also been reported to impair dendritic cell maturation and to regulate the activation, differentiation, and proliferation of B cells. They have been shown to control natural killer cell activity and to suppress the innate immune response (IIR). Studies reporting the role of EVs on T lymphocyte modulation are controversial. Discrepancy in literature may be due to stem cell culture conditions, methods of EV purification, EV molecular content, and functional state of both parental and target cells. However, mesenchymal stem cell-derived EVs were shown to play a more suppressive role by shifting T cells from an activated to a T regulatory phenotype. In this review, we will discuss how stem cell-derived EVs may contribute toward the modulation of the immune response. Collectively, stem cell-derived EVs mainly exhibit an inhibitory effect on the immune system. PMID:27597941

  3. Comprehensive proteomic characterization of stem cell-derived extracellular matrices.

    PubMed

    Ragelle, Héloïse; Naba, Alexandra; Larson, Benjamin L; Zhou, Fangheng; Prijić, Miralem; Whittaker, Charles A; Del Rosario, Amanda; Langer, Robert; Hynes, Richard O; Anderson, Daniel G

    2017-06-01

    In the stem-cell niche, the extracellular matrix (ECM) serves as a structural support that additionally provides stem cells with signals that contribute to the regulation of stem-cell function, via reciprocal interactions between cells and components of the ECM. Recently, cell-derived ECMs have emerged as in vitro cell culture substrates to better recapitulate the native stem-cell microenvironment outside the body. Significant changes in cell number, morphology and function have been observed when mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) were cultured on ECM substrates as compared to standard tissue-culture polystyrene (TCPS). As select ECM components are known to regulate specific stem-cell functions, a robust characterization of cell-derived ECM proteomic composition is critical to better comprehend the role of the ECM in directing cellular processes. Here, we characterized and compared the protein composition of ECM produced in vitro by bone marrow-derived MSC, adipose-derived MSC and neonatal fibroblasts from different donors, employing quantitative proteomic methods. Each cell-derived ECM displayed a specific and unique matrisome signature, yet they all shared a common set of proteins. We evaluated the biological response of cells cultured on the different matrices and compared them to cells on standard TCPS. The matrices lead to differential survival and gene-expression profiles among the cell types and as compared to TCPS, indicating that the cell-derived ECMs influence each cell type in a different manner. This general approach to understanding the protein composition of different tissue-specific and cell-derived ECM will inform the rational design of defined systems and biomaterials that recapitulate critical ECM signals for stem-cell culture and tissue engineering.

  4. [Stem cell derived therapy for cutaneous radiation exposure].

    PubMed

    Rezvani, M

    2013-12-01

    Radiation injury to skin results in a variety of deterministic effects including inflammatory reactions and cell depletion leading to distinct clinical symptoms following a defined time pattern. Therapeutic approaches are still limited, a complete restitution of affected areas is so far impossible. In the last few years increasing experimental knowledge about acquisition and administration of autologous stem cells also in the field of radiation injuries has been obtained. Evidence reviewed in this article shows that the beneficial effects of stem cell transplantation are not necessarily due to the replacement of damaged cells by transplanted cells but most probably due in the most part to a paracrine effect. Transplanted cells secrete bioactive factors that initiate the stimulation of the host stem cells to regenerate the damaged tissues. Transplanted stem cells produce trophic factors which aid the systemic healing of the victims. Furthermore, administration of stem cell secretomes in the form of conditioned media containing microvesicles or exosomes can be as effective as administering the stem cells. This hypothesis is supported by findings that cell-free derivatives from hMSCs were useful for wound healing purposes and could circumvent the need for intact cells. Furthermore, the beneficial effect of MSC injection on reperfusion and tissue damage in a mouse model of hind limb ischemia could be attributed to paracrine mechanisms with local release of arteriogenic cytokines. Further evaluation of the paracrine potential of autologous stem cells may open new means for treatment of acute as well as chronic sequelae of cutaneous radiation injuries.

  5. Facilitation of ultrasonic microvesicles on homing and molecular mechanism of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in cerebral infarction patients.

    PubMed

    Chang, F; Xiong, W; Wang, D; Liu, X-Z; Zhang, W; Zhang, M; Jing, P

    2017-10-01

    Cerebral infarction, or ischemia brain stroke, is a common cerebrovascular disease. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) are widely used to treating ischemia disease such as cardiac infarction. Ultrasonic microvesicles may help the targeting of exogenous factors via localized energy blast. Therefore, this study aims to investigate the effect of ultrasonic microvesicles on the homing of BMSCs on artery thrombosis and the associated molecular mechanisms. Rat BMSCs were isolated and cultured. Rats were divided into sham, model, BMSCs, and microvesicles groups. Cerebral infarction model was prepared by ligation of cervical artery and middle cerebral artery. 3×106/kg BMSCs were transplanted via tail veins. Microvesicles were used for assisting BMSCs infusion. Sex-determining region Y (SRY) gene expression was measured by Real-time PCR, while 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining was employed for describing the area of cerebral infarction. The activity of caspase 3 was assayed by test kit. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) mRNA/protein levels, were quantified by Real-time PCR, and Western blotting, respectively. Microvesicle group had significantly elevated SRY expression (p<0.05 compared to BMSCs group). Transplantation of BMSCs remarkably decreased cerebral infarction area, caspase 3 activity or NF-κB expression, and increased VEGF expression (p<0.05 compared to model group). Microvesicle induced BMSCs had more potent effects (p<0.01). Ultrasound microvesicle facilitated homing of BMSCs in cerebral infarction, and improved infarction disease via up-regulating VEGF expression, inhibiting NF-κB expression, and modulating apoptosis.

  6. Mechanisms of Infectivity and Evasion Derived from Microvesicles Cargo Produced by Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Bruna C.; Uehara, Isadora A.; Dias, Laysa O. S.; Brígido, Paula C.; da Silva, Claudio V.; Silva, Marcelo J. B.

    2016-01-01

    Cell invasion by the intracellular protozoans requires interaction of proteins from both the host and the parasite. Many parasites establish chronic infections, showing they have the potential to escape the immune system; for example, Trypanosoma cruzi is an intracellular parasite that causes Chagas disease. Parasite internalization into host cell requires secreted and surface molecules, such as microvesicles. The release of microvesicles and other vesicles, such as exosomes, by different eukaryotic organisms was first observed in the late twentieth century. The characterization and function of these vesicles have recently been the focus of several investigations. In this review, we discuss the release of microvesicles by T. cruzi. The molecular content of these vesicles is composed of several molecules that take place during parasite-host cell interaction and contribute to the parasite-driven mechanism of evasion from the host immune system. These new findings appear to have a profound impact on the comprehension of T. cruzi biology and highlight novel potential strategies for developing more efficient therapeutic approaches. PMID:27921011

  7. Methodology for Isolation, Identification and Characterization of Microvesicles in Peripheral Blood

    PubMed Central

    Jayachandran, Muthuvel; Miller, Virginia M.; Heit, John A.; Owen, Whyte G.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale Analyses of circulating cell membrane-derived microvesicles (MV) have come under scrutiny as potential diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers of disease. However, methods to isolate, label and quantify MV have been neither systematized nor validated. Objective To determine how pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical factors affect plasma MV counts, markers for cell of origin and expression of procoagulant surface phosphatidylserine. Methods and Results Peripheral venous blood samples were collected from healthy volunteers and patients with cardiovascular disease and/or diabetes. Effects of blood sample collection, anticoagulant and sample processing to platelet free plasma (PFP), and MV isolation, staining and storage (freeze-thaw) and cytometer design were evaluated with replicate samples from these populations. The key finding is that use of citrate or EDTA anticoagulants decreases or eliminates microvesicles from plasma by inducing adhesion of the microvesicles to platelets or other formed elements. Protease inhibitor anticoagulants, including heparin, preserve MV counts. A centrifugation protocol was developed in which recovery of isolated MV was high with resolution down to the equivalent light scatter of 0.2 micron latex beads. Each procedure was systematically evaluated for its impact on the MV counts and characteristics. Conclusion This study provides a systematic methodology for MV isolation, identification and quantification, essential for development of MV as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers of disease. PMID:22075275

  8. Fabrication of a microvesicles-incorporated fibrous membrane for controlled delivery applications in tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Nair, Bindu P; Vaikkath, Dhanesh; Mohan, Dhanya S; Nair, Prabha D

    2014-10-13

    A scaffold, which can provide mechanical support for tissue regeneration and simultaneously release functionally active biomolecules are highly desirable for tissue engineering applications. Herein, we report the fabrication of a fibrous mesh of polycaprolactone (PCL) incorporating PCL-pluronic (F127) microvesicles through electrospinning, by exploiting the slow dissolution of PCL in glacial acetic acid (g-AA). Micro-vesicles 1-10 μm in diameter were fabricated through a non-solubility driven spontaneous self-assembly and stabilization of F127 with low molecular weight PCL in tetrahydrofuran-water mixture. Time-dependent stability of the vesicles in g-AA was confirmed prior to the electrospinning. The electrospun membrane was found to be comprised of microvesicles entangled in a fibrous mesh of PCL with a fiber diameter ranging from 50-300 nm. Significant reduction in the release rate of rhodamine-B, an indicator dye from the electrospun membrane, when compared to that from the vesicle alone, evidences the surface coating of the vesicles with high molecular weight PCL during electrospinning. The vesicle incorporated membrane exhibited increased hydrophilicity when compared to the control PCL membrane, possibly due to surface unevenness and the hydrophilic F127. This enhanced surface hydrophilicity led to an increased cell viability of L929 cells on the membrane.

  9. Mechanisms of Infectivity and Evasion Derived from Microvesicles Cargo Produced by Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Borges, Bruna C; Uehara, Isadora A; Dias, Laysa O S; Brígido, Paula C; da Silva, Claudio V; Silva, Marcelo J B

    2016-01-01

    Cell invasion by the intracellular protozoans requires interaction of proteins from both the host and the parasite. Many parasites establish chronic infections, showing they have the potential to escape the immune system; for example, Trypanosoma cruzi is an intracellular parasite that causes Chagas disease. Parasite internalization into host cell requires secreted and surface molecules, such as microvesicles. The release of microvesicles and other vesicles, such as exosomes, by different eukaryotic organisms was first observed in the late twentieth century. The characterization and function of these vesicles have recently been the focus of several investigations. In this review, we discuss the release of microvesicles by T. cruzi. The molecular content of these vesicles is composed of several molecules that take place during parasite-host cell interaction and contribute to the parasite-driven mechanism of evasion from the host immune system. These new findings appear to have a profound impact on the comprehension of T. cruzi biology and highlight novel potential strategies for developing more efficient therapeutic approaches.

  10. Micropost arrays for measuring stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte contractility

    PubMed Central

    Beussman, Kevin M.; Rodriguez, Marita L.; Leonard, Andrea; Taparia, Nikita; Thompson, Curtis R.; Sniadecki, Nathan J.

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes have the potential to be used to study heart disease and maturation, screen drug treatments, and restore heart function. Here, we discuss the procedures involved in using micropost arrays to measure the contractile forces generated by stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes. Cardiomyocyte contractility is needed for the heart to pump blood, so measuring the contractile forces of cardiomyocytes is a straightforward way to assess their function. Microfabrication and soft lithography techniques are utilized to create identical arrays of flexible, silicone microposts from a common master. Micropost arrays are functionalized with extracellular matrix protein to allow cardiomyocytes to adhere to the tips of the microposts. Live imaging is used to capture videos of the deflection of microposts caused by the contraction of the cardiomyocytes. Image analysis code provides an accurate means to quantify these deflections. The contractile forces produced by a beating cardiomyocyte are calculated by modeling the microposts as cantilever beams. We have used this assay to assess techniques for improving the maturation and contractile function of stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes. PMID:26344757

  11. Microvesicles derived from endothelial progenitor cells protect the kidney from ischemia-reperfusion injury by microRNA-dependent reprogramming of resident renal cells.

    PubMed

    Cantaluppi, Vincenzo; Gatti, Stefano; Medica, Davide; Figliolini, Federico; Bruno, Stefania; Deregibus, Maria C; Sordi, Andrea; Biancone, Luigi; Tetta, Ciro; Camussi, Giovanni

    2012-08-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells are known to reverse acute kidney injury by paracrine mechanisms. We previously found that microvesicles released from these progenitor cells activate an angiogenic program in endothelial cells by horizontal mRNA transfer. Here, we tested whether these microvesicles prevent acute kidney injury in a rat model of ischemia-reperfusion injury. The RNA content of microvesicles was enriched in microRNAs (miRNAs) that modulate proliferation, angiogenesis, and apoptosis. After intravenous injection following ischemia-reperfusion, the microvesicles were localized within peritubular capillaries and tubular cells. This conferred functional and morphologic protection from acute kidney injury by enhanced tubular cell proliferation, reduced apoptosis, and leukocyte infiltration. Microvesicles also protected against progression of chronic kidney damage by inhibiting capillary rarefaction, glomerulosclerosis, and tubulointerstitial fibrosis. The renoprotective effect of microvesicles was lost after treatment with RNase, nonspecific miRNA depletion of microvesicles by Dicer knock-down in the progenitor cells, or depletion of pro-angiogenic miR-126 and miR-296 by transfection with specific miR-antagomirs. Thus, microvesicles derived from endothelial progenitor cells protect the kidney from ischemic acute injury by delivering their RNA content, the miRNA cargo of which contributes to reprogramming hypoxic resident renal cells to a regenerative program.

  12. Dendritic Cell-Derived Exosomes Express a Streptococcus pneumoniae Capsular Polysaccharide Type 14 Cross-Reactive Antigen That Induces Protective Immunoglobulin Responses against Pneumococcal Infection in Mice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    in the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). Detection and quantitation of tetraspan-containing microvesicles . The pres- ence of complexed...tetraspan-containing microvesicles were incubated with 1 g/ml of biotinylated MAb specific for CD9 (same as used for capture) or specific for CD81 (clone...CD81) are surface membrane proteins. To quantify the concentration of tetraspan-containing microvesicles in BMDC supernatants, a preparation of purified

  13. Differential Incorporation of CD45, CD80 (B7-1), CD86 (B7-2), and Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I and II Molecules into Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Virions and Microvesicles: Implications for Viral Pathogenesis and Immune Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Esser, Mark T.; Graham, David R.; Coren, Lori V.; Trubey, Charles M.; Bess, Julian W.; Arthur, Larry O.; Ott, David E.; Lifson, Jeffrey D.

    2001-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection results in a functional impairment of CD4+ T cells long before a quantitative decline in circulating CD4+ T cells is evident. The mechanism(s) responsible for this functional unresponsiveness and eventual depletion of CD4+ T cells remains unclear. Both direct effects of cytopathic infection of CD4+ cells and indirect effects in which uninfected “bystander” cells are functionally compromised or killed have been implicated as contributing to the immunopathogenesis of HIV infection. Because T-cell receptor engagement of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules in the absence of costimulation mediated via CD28 binding to CD80 (B7-1) or CD86 (B7-2) can lead to anergy or apoptosis, we determined whether HIV type 1 (HIV-1) virions incorporated MHC class I (MHC-I), MHC-II, CD80, or CD86. Microvesicles produced from matched uninfected cells were also evaluated. HIV infection increased MHC-II expression on T- and B-cell lines, macrophages, and peripheral blood mononclear cells (PBMC) but did not significantly alter the expression of CD80 or CD86. HIV virions derived from all MHC-II-positive cell types incorporated high levels of MHC-II, and both virions and microvesicles preferentially incorporated CD86 compared to CD80. CD45, expressed at high levels on cells, was identified as a protein present at high levels on microvesicles but was not detected on HIV-1 virions. Virion-associated, host cell-derived molecules impacted the ability of noninfectious HIV virions to trigger death in freshly isolated PBMC. These results demonstrate the preferential incorporation or exclusion of host cell proteins by budding HIV-1 virions and suggest that host cell proteins present on HIV-1 virions may contribute to the overall pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection. PMID:11390619

  14. Microvesicles in vascular homeostasis and diseases. Position Paper of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Working Group on Atherosclerosis and Vascular Biology.

    PubMed

    Ridger, Victoria C; Boulanger, Chantal M; Angelillo-Scherrer, Anne; Badimon, Lina; Blanc-Brude, Olivier; Bochaton-Piallat, Marie-Luce; Boilard, Eric; Buzas, Edit I; Caporali, Andreas; Dignat-George, Françoise; Evans, Paul C; Lacroix, Romaric; Lutgens, Esther; Ketelhuth, Daniel F J; Nieuwland, Rienk; Toti, Florence; Tunon, Jose; Weber, Christian; Hoefer, Imo E

    2017-06-28

    Microvesicles are members of the family of extracellular vesicles shed from the plasma membrane of activated or apoptotic cells. Microvesicles were initially characterised by their pro-coagulant activity and described as "microparticles". There is mounting evidence revealing a role for microvesicles in intercellular communication, with particular relevance to hemostasis and vascular biology. Coupled with this, the potential of microvesicles as meaningful biomarkers is under intense investigation. This Position Paper will summarise the current knowledge on the mechanisms of formation and composition of microvesicles of endothelial, platelet, red blood cell and leukocyte origin. This paper will also review and discuss the different methods used for their analysis and quantification, will underline the potential biological roles of these vesicles with respect to vascular homeostasis and thrombosis and define important themes for future research.

  15. Blast-derived microvesicles in sera from patients with acute myeloid leukemia suppress natural killer cell function via membrane-associated transforming growth factor-β1

    PubMed Central

    Szczepanski, Miroslaw J.; Szajnik, Marta; Welsh, Ann; Whiteside, Theresa L.; Boyiadzis, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Background Natural killer cell cytotoxicity is decreased in patients with acute myeloid leukemia in comparison to that in normal controls. Tumor-derived microvesicles present in patients’ sera exert detrimental effects on immune cells and may influence tumor progression. Design and Methods We investigated the microvesicle protein level, molecular profile and suppression of natural killer cell activity in patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia. Results The patients’ sera contained higher levels of microvesicles compared to the levels in controls (P<0.001). Isolated microvesicles had a distinct molecular profile: in addition to conventional microvesicle markers, they contained membrane-associated transforming growth factor-β1, MICA/MICB and myeloid blasts markers, CD34, CD33 and CD117. These microvesicles decreased natural killer cell cytotoxicity (P<0.002) and down-regulated expression of NKG2D in normal natural killer cells (P<0.001). Sera from patients with acute myeloid leukemia contained elevated levels of transforming growth factor-β, and urea-mediated dissociation of microvesicles further increased the levels of this protein. Neutralizing anti-transforming growth factor-β1 antibodies inhibited microvesicle-mediated suppression of natural killer cell activity and NKG2D down-regulation. Interleukin-15 protected natural killer cells from adverse effects of tumor-derived microvesicles. Conclusions We provide evidence for the existence in acute myeloid leukemia of a novel mechanism of natural killer cell suppression mediated by tumor-derived microvesicles and for the ability of interleukin-15 to counteract this suppression. PMID:21606166

  16. Scaling and automation of a high-throughput single-cell-derived tumor sphere assay chip.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Heng; Chen, Yu-Chih; Brien, Riley; Yoon, Euisik

    2016-10-07

    Recent research suggests that cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are the key subpopulation for tumor relapse and metastasis. Due to cancer plasticity in surface antigen and enzymatic activity markers, functional tumorsphere assays are promising alternatives for CSC identification. To reliably quantify rare CSCs (1-5%), thousands of single-cell suspension cultures are required. While microfluidics is a powerful tool in handling single cells, previous works provide limited throughput and lack automatic data analysis capability required for high-throughput studies. In this study, we present the scaling and automation of high-throughput single-cell-derived tumor sphere assay chips, facilitating the tracking of up to ∼10 000 cells on a chip with ∼76.5% capture rate. The presented cell capture scheme guarantees sampling a representative population from the bulk cells. To analyze thousands of single-cells with a variety of fluorescent intensities, a highly adaptable analysis program was developed for cell/sphere counting and size measurement. Using a Pluronic® F108 (poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(propylene glycol)-block-poly(ethylene glycol)) coating on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), a suspension culture environment was created to test a controversial hypothesis: whether larger or smaller cells are more stem-like defined by the capability to form single-cell-derived spheres. Different cell lines showed different correlations between sphere formation rate and initial cell size, suggesting heterogeneity in pathway regulation among breast cancer cell lines. More interestingly, by monitoring hundreds of spheres, we identified heterogeneity in sphere growth dynamics, indicating the cellular heterogeneity even within CSCs. These preliminary results highlight the power of unprecedented high-throughput and automation in CSC studies.

  17. Red blood cell-derived microparticles: An overview.

    PubMed

    Westerman, Maxwell; Porter, John B

    2016-07-01

    The red blood cell (RBC) is historically the original parent cell of microparticles (MPs). In this overview, we describe the discovery and the early history of red cell-derived microparticles (RMPs) and present an overview of the evolution of RMP. We report the formation, characteristics, effects of RMP and factors which may affect RMP evaluation. The review examines RMP derived from both normal and pathologic RBC. The pathologic RBC studies include sickle cell anemia (SCA), sickle cell trait (STr), thalassemia intermedia (TI), hereditary spherocytosis (HS), hereditary elliptocytosis (HE), hereditary stomatocytosis (HSt) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Electrophysiological Properties of Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Risner-Janiczek, Jessica R.; Ungless, Mark A.; Li, Meng

    2011-01-01

    In vitro generation of functional neurons from embryonic stem (ES) cells and induced pluripotent stem cells offers exciting opportunities for dissecting gene function, disease modelling, and therapeutic drug screening. To realize the potential of stem cells in these biomedical applications, a complete understanding of the cell models of interest is required. While rapid advances have been made in developing the technologies for directed induction of defined neuronal subtypes, most published works focus on the molecular characterization of the derived neural cultures. To characterize the functional properties of these neural cultures, we utilized an ES cell model that gave rise to neurons expressing the green fluorescent protein (GFP) and conducted targeted whole-cell electrophysiological recordings from ES cell-derived neurons. Current-clamp recordings revealed that most neurons could fire single overshooting action potentials; in some cases multiple action potentials could be evoked by depolarization, or occurred spontaneously. Voltage-clamp recordings revealed that neurons exhibited neuronal-like currents, including an outward current typical of a delayed rectifier potassium conductance and a fast-activating, fast-inactivating inward current, typical of a sodium conductance. Taken together, these results indicate that ES cell-derived GFP+ neurons in culture display functional neuronal properties even at early stages of differentiation. PMID:21887381

  19. Microvesicles Derived from Indoxyl Sulfate Treated Endothelial Cells Induce Endothelial Progenitor Cells Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Carmona, Andres; Guerrero, Fatima; Buendia, Paula; Obrero, Teresa; Aljama, Pedro; Carracedo, Julia

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a major cause of mortality in chronic kidney disease patients. Indoxyl sulfate (IS) is a typical protein-bound uremic toxin that cannot be effectively cleared by conventional dialysis. Increased IS is associated with the progression of chronic kidney disease and development of cardiovascular disease. After endothelial activation by IS, cells release endothelial microvesicles (EMV) that can induce endothelial dysfunction. We developed an in vitro model of endothelial damage mediated by IS to evaluate the functional effect of EMV on the endothelial repair process developed by endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). EMV derived from IS-treated endothelial cells were isolated by ultracentrifugation and characterized for miRNAs content. The effects of EMV on healthy EPCs in culture were studied. We observed that IS activates endothelial cells and the generated microvesicles (IsEMV) can modulate the classic endothelial roles of progenitor cells as colony forming units and form new vessels in vitro. Moreover, 23 miRNAs were contained in IsEMV including four (miR-181a-5p, miR-4454, miR-150-5p, and hsa-let-7i-5p) that were upregulated in IsEMV compared with control endothelial microvesicles. Other authors have found that miR-181a-5p, miR-4454, and miR-150-5p are involved in promoting inflammation, apoptosis, and cellular senescence. Interestingly, we observed an increase in NFκB and p53, and a decrease in IκBα in EPCs treated with IsEMV. Our data suggest that IS is capable of inducing endothelial vesiculation with different membrane characteristics, miRNAs and other molecules, which makes maintaining of vascular homeostasis of EPCs not fully functional. These specific characteristics of EMV could be used as novel biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis of vascular disease.

  20. Balancing Ethical Pros and Cons of Stem Cell Derived Gametes.

    PubMed

    Segers, Seppe; Mertes, Heidi; de Wert, Guido; Dondorp, Wybo; Pennings, Guido

    2017-07-01

    In this review we aim to provide an overview of the most important ethical pros and cons of stem cell derived gametes (SCD-gametes), as a contribution to the debate about reproductive tissue engineering. Derivation of gametes from stem cells holds promising applications both for research and for clinical use in assisted reproduction. We explore the ethical issues connected to gametes derived from embryonic stem cells (both patient specific and non-patient specific) as well as those related to gametes derived from induced pluripotent stem cells. The technology of SCD-gametes raises moral concerns of how reproductive autonomy relates to issues of embryo destruction, safety, access, and applications beyond clinical infertility.

  1. Functional Characterization of Human Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kirsch, Authors Glenn E.; Obejero-Paz, Carlos A.; Bruening-Wright, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac toxicity is a leading contributor to late-stage attrition in the drug discovery process and to withdrawal of approved from the market. In vitro assays that enable earlier and more accurate testing for cardiac risk provide early stage predictive indicators that aid in mitigating risk. Human cardiomyocytes, the most relevant subjects for early stage testing, are severely limited in supply. But human stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (SC-hCM) are readily available from commercial sources and are increasingly used in academic research, drug discovery and safety pharmacology. As a result, SC-hCM electrophysiology has become a valuable tool to assess cardiac risk associated with drugs. This unit describes techniques for recording individual currents carried by sodium, calcium and potassium ions, as well as single cell action potentials, and impedance recordings from contracting syncytia of thousands of interconnected cells. PMID:25152802

  2. iPS cell derived neuronal cells for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Heilker, Ralf; Traub, Stefanie; Reinhardt, Peter; Schöler, Hans R; Sterneckert, Jared

    2014-10-01

    Owing to the inherent disconnect between drug pharmacology in heterologous cellular models and drug efficacy in vivo, the quest for more predictive in vitro systems is one of the most urgent challenges of modern drug discovery. An improved pharmacological in vitro profiling would employ primary samples of the proper drug-targeted human tissue or the bona fide human disease-relevant cells. With the advent of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell technology the facilitated access to a variety of disease-relevant target cells is now held out in prospect. In this review, we focus on the use of human iPS cell derived neurons for high throughput pharmaceutical drug screening, employing detection technologies that are sufficiently sensitive to measure signaling in cells with physiological target protein expression levels. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Engineering musculoskeletal tissues with human embryonic germ cell derivatives.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Shyni; Hwang, Nathaniel S; Ferran, Angela; Hillel, Alexander; Theprungsirikul, Parnduangjai; Canver, Adam C; Zhang, Zijun; Gearhart, John; Elisseeff, Jennifer

    2010-04-01

    The cells derived from differentiating embryoid bodies of human embryonic germ (hEG) cells express a broad spectrum of gene markers and have been induced toward ecto- and endodermal lineages. We describe here in vitro and in vivo differentiation of hEG-derived cells (LVEC line) toward mesenchymal tissues. The LVEC cells express many surface marker proteins characteristic of mesenchymal stem cells and differentiated into cartilage, bone, and fat. Homogenous hyaline cartilage was generated from cells after 63 population doublings. In vivo results demonstrate cell survival, differentiation, and tissue formation. The high proliferative capacity of hEG-derived cells and their ability to differentiate and form three-dimensional mesenchymal tissues without teratoma formation underscores their significant potential for regenerative medicine. The adopted coculture system also provides new insights into how a microenvironment comprised of extracellular and cellular components may be harnessed to generate hierarchically complex tissues from pluripotent cells.

  4. Cartilage repair using human embryonic stem cell-derived chondroprogenitors.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Aixin; Kapacee, Zoher; Peng, Jiang; Lu, Shibi; Lucas, Robert J; Hardingham, Timothy E; Kimber, Susan J

    2014-11-01

    In initial work, we developed a 14-day culture protocol under potential GMP, chemically defined conditions to generate chondroprogenitors from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). The present study was undertaken to investigate the cartilage repair capacity of these cells. The chondrogenic protocol was optimized and validated with gene expression profiling. The protocol was also applied successfully to two lines of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Chondrogenic cells derived from hESCs were encapsulated in fibrin gel and implanted in osteochondral defects in the patella groove of nude rats, and cartilage repair was evaluated by histomorphology and immunocytochemistry. Genes associated with chondrogenesis were upregulated during the protocol, and pluripotency-related genes were downregulated. Aggregation of chondrogenic cells was accompanied by high expression of SOX9 and strong staining with Safranin O. Culture with PluriSln1 was lethal for hESCs but was tolerated by hESC chondrogenic cells, and no OCT4-positive cells were detected in hESC chondrogenic cells. iPSCs were also shown to generate chondroprogenitors in this protocol. Repaired tissue in the defect area implanted with hESC-derived chondrogenic cells was stained for collagen II with little collagen I, but negligible collagen II was observed in the fibrin-only controls. Viable human cells were detected in the repair tissue at 12 weeks. The results show that chondrogenic cells derived from hESCs, using a chemically defined culture system, when implanted in focal defects were able to promote cartilage repair. This is a first step in evaluating these cells for clinical application for the treatment of cartilage lesions.

  5. Cartilage Repair Using Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Chondroprogenitors

    PubMed Central

    Kapacee, Zoher; Peng, Jiang; Lu, Shibi; Lucas, Robert J.; Hardingham, Timothy E.

    2014-01-01

    In initial work, we developed a 14-day culture protocol under potential GMP, chemically defined conditions to generate chondroprogenitors from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). The present study was undertaken to investigate the cartilage repair capacity of these cells. The chondrogenic protocol was optimized and validated with gene expression profiling. The protocol was also applied successfully to two lines of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Chondrogenic cells derived from hESCs were encapsulated in fibrin gel and implanted in osteochondral defects in the patella groove of nude rats, and cartilage repair was evaluated by histomorphology and immunocytochemistry. Genes associated with chondrogenesis were upregulated during the protocol, and pluripotency-related genes were downregulated. Aggregation of chondrogenic cells was accompanied by high expression of SOX9 and strong staining with Safranin O. Culture with PluriSln1 was lethal for hESCs but was tolerated by hESC chondrogenic cells, and no OCT4-positive cells were detected in hESC chondrogenic cells. iPSCs were also shown to generate chondroprogenitors in this protocol. Repaired tissue in the defect area implanted with hESC-derived chondrogenic cells was stained for collagen II with little collagen I, but negligible collagen II was observed in the fibrin-only controls. Viable human cells were detected in the repair tissue at 12 weeks. The results show that chondrogenic cells derived from hESCs, using a chemically defined culture system, when implanted in focal defects were able to promote cartilage repair. This is a first step in evaluating these cells for clinical application for the treatment of cartilage lesions. PMID:25273540

  6. Stem cell-derived systems in toxicology assessment.

    PubMed

    Suter-Dick, Laura; Alves, Paula M; Blaauboer, Bas J; Bremm, Klaus-Dieter; Brito, Catarina; Coecke, Sandra; Flick, Burkhard; Fowler, Paul; Hescheler, Jürgen; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus; Jennings, Paul; Kelm, Jens M; Manou, Irene; Mistry, Pratibha; Moretto, Angelo; Roth, Adrian; Stedman, Donald; van de Water, Bob; Beilmann, Mario

    2015-06-01

    Industrial sectors perform toxicological assessments of their potential products to ensure human safety and to fulfill regulatory requirements. These assessments often involve animal testing, but ethical, cost, and time concerns, together with a ban on it in specific sectors, make appropriate in vitro systems indispensable in toxicology. In this study, we summarize the outcome of an EPAA (European Partnership of Alternatives to Animal Testing)-organized workshop on the use of stem cell-derived (SCD) systems in toxicology, with a focus on industrial applications. SCD systems, in particular, induced pluripotent stem cell-derived, provide physiological cell culture systems of easy access and amenable to a variety of assays. They also present the opportunity to apply the vast repository of existing nonclinical data for the understanding of in vitro to in vivo translation. SCD systems from several toxicologically relevant tissues exist; they generally recapitulate many aspects of physiology and respond to toxicological and pharmacological interventions. However, focused research is necessary to accelerate implementation of SCD systems in an industrial setting and subsequent use of such systems by regulatory authorities. Research is required into the phenotypic characterization of the systems, since methods and protocols for generating terminally differentiated SCD cells are still lacking. Organotypical 3D culture systems in bioreactors and microscale tissue engineering technologies should be fostered, as they promote and maintain differentiation and support coculture systems. They need further development and validation for their successful implementation in toxicity testing in industry. Analytical measures also need to be implemented to enable compound exposure and metabolism measurements for in vitro to in vivo extrapolation. The future of SCD toxicological tests will combine advanced cell culture technologies and biokinetic measurements to support regulatory and

  7. Stem cell-derived astrocytes: are they physiologically credible?

    PubMed

    Hill, Eric; Nagel, David; Parri, Rheinallt; Coleman, Michael

    2016-11-15

    Astrocytes are now increasingly acknowledged as having fundamental and sophisticated roles in brain function and dysfunction. Unravelling the complex mechanisms that underlie human brain astrocyte-neuron interactions is therefore an essential step on the way to understanding how the brain operates. Insights into astrocyte function to date have almost exclusively been derived from studies conducted using murine or rodent models. Whilst these have led to significant discoveries, preliminary work with human astrocytes has revealed a hitherto unknown range of astrocyte types with potentially greater functional complexity and increased neuronal interaction with respect to animal astrocytes. It is becoming apparent, therefore, that many important functions of astrocytes will only be discovered by direct physiological interrogation of human astrocytes. Recent advancements in the field of stem cell biology have provided a source of human-based models. These will provide a platform to facilitate our understanding of normal astrocyte functions as well as their role in CNS pathology. A number of recent studies have demonstrated that stem cell-derived astrocytes exhibit a range of properties, suggesting that they may be functionally equivalent to their in vivo counterparts. Further validation against in vivo models will ultimately confirm the future utility of these stem cell-based approaches in fulfilling the need for human-based cellular models for basic and clinical research. In this review we discuss the roles of astrocytes in the brain and highlight the extent to which human stem cell-derived astrocytes have demonstrated functional activities that are equivalent to those observed in vivo. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2015 The Physiological Society.

  8. Trophoblast lineage cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ying; Wang, Kai; Chandramouli, Gadisetti V.R.; Knott, Jason G.; Leach, Richard

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Epithelial-like phenotype of trophoblast lineage cells derived from human iPS cells. •Trophoblast lineage cells derived from human iPS cells exhibit trophoblast function. •Trophoblasts from iPS cells provides a proof-of-concept in regenerative medicine. -- Abstract: Background: During implantation, the blastocyst trophectoderm attaches to the endometrial epithelium and continues to differentiate into all trophoblast subtypes, which are the major components of a placenta. Aberrant trophoblast proliferation and differentiation are associated with placental diseases. However, due to ethical and practical issues, there is almost no available cell or tissue source to study the molecular mechanism of human trophoblast differentiation, which further becomes a barrier to the study of the pathogenesis of trophoblast-associated diseases of pregnancy. In this study, our goal was to generate a proof-of-concept model for deriving trophoblast lineage cells from induced pluripotency stem (iPS) cells from human fibroblasts. In future studies the generation of trophoblast lineage cells from iPS cells established from patient’s placenta will be extremely useful for studying the pathogenesis of individual trophoblast-associated diseases and for drug testing. Methods and results: Combining iPS cell technology with BMP4 induction, we derived trophoblast lineage cells from human iPS cells. The gene expression profile of these trophoblast lineage cells was distinct from fibroblasts and iPS cells. These cells expressed markers of human trophoblasts. Furthermore, when these cells were differentiated they exhibited invasive capacity and placental hormone secretive capacity, suggesting extravillous trophoblasts and syncytiotrophoblasts. Conclusion: Trophoblast lineage cells can be successfully derived from human iPS cells, which provide a proof-of-concept tool to recapitulate pathogenesis of patient placental trophoblasts in vitro.

  9. Malignant cell-derived extracellular vesicles express different chromogranin epitopes compared to prostasomes.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Louise; Stridsberg, Mats; Kharaziha, Pedram; Chioureas, Dimitris; Meersman, Niels; Panaretakis, Theocharis; Ronquist, K Göran

    2015-07-01

    Prostasomes are nanosized extracellular vesicles exocytosed by prostate epithelial cells. They have been assigned many roles propitious to sperm in favor of fertilization. Prostatic cancer cells can also produce and secrete extracellular vesicles. We assessed using ELISA, the surface expression of chromogranin proproteins on prostasomes and malignant extracellular vesicles of four different prostate cancer cell-lines, two hormone sensitive and two hormone refractory. We used a panel of chromogranin A and chromogranin B antibodies against peptides in-between hypothetical cleavage sites along the proproteins. A diverging pattern of chromogranin peptides was apparent when comparing prostasomes and malignant extracellular vesicles indicating a phenotypical change. We also compared western blot patterns (prostasomes and malignant extracellular vesicles) for selected antibodies that displayed high absorbances in the ELISA. Western blot analyses revealed various cleavage patterns of those proproteins that were analyzed in prostasomes and extracellular vesicles. Chromogranins are constituents of not only prostasomes but also of malignant prostate cell-derived extracellular vesicles with different amino acid sequences exposed at the membrane surface giving rise to a mosaic pattern. These findings may be of relevance for designing new assays for detection or even possible treatment of prostate cancers. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Application of the PAMONO-Sensor for Quantification of Microvesicles and Determination of Nano-Particle Size Distribution.

    PubMed

    Shpacovitch, Victoria; Sidorenko, Irina; Lenssen, Jan Eric; Temchura, Vladimir; Weichert, Frank; Müller, Heinrich; Überla, Klaus; Zybin, Alexander; Schramm, Alexander; Hergenröder, Roland

    2017-01-27

    The PAMONO-sensor (plasmon assisted microscopy of nano-objects) demonstrated an ability to detect and quantify individual viruses and virus-like particles. However, another group of biological vesicles-microvesicles (100-1000 nm)-also attracts growing interest as biomarkers of different pathologies and needs development of novel techniques for characterization. This work shows the applicability of a PAMONO-sensor for selective detection of microvesicles in aquatic samples. The sensor permits comparison of relative concentrations of microvesicles between samples. We also study a possibility of repeated use of a sensor chip after elution of the microvesicle capturing layer. Moreover, we improve the detection features of the PAMONO-sensor. The detection process utilizes novel machine learning techniques on the sensor image data to estimate particle size distributions of nano-particles in polydisperse samples. Altogether, our findings expand analytical features and the application field of the PAMONO-sensor. They can also serve for a maturation of diagnostic tools based on the PAMONO-sensor platform.

  11. Application of the PAMONO-Sensor for Quantification of Microvesicles and Determination of Nano-Particle Size Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Shpacovitch, Victoria; Sidorenko, Irina; Lenssen, Jan Eric; Temchura, Vladimir; Weichert, Frank; Müller, Heinrich; Überla, Klaus; Zybin, Alexander; Schramm, Alexander; Hergenröder, Roland

    2017-01-01

    The PAMONO-sensor (plasmon assisted microscopy of nano-objects) demonstrated an ability to detect and quantify individual viruses and virus-like particles. However, another group of biological vesicles—microvesicles (100–1000 nm)—also attracts growing interest as biomarkers of different pathologies and needs development of novel techniques for characterization. This work shows the applicability of a PAMONO-sensor for selective detection of microvesicles in aquatic samples. The sensor permits comparison of relative concentrations of microvesicles between samples. We also study a possibility of repeated use of a sensor chip after elution of the microvesicle capturing layer. Moreover, we improve the detection features of the PAMONO-sensor. The detection process utilizes novel machine learning techniques on the sensor image data to estimate particle size distributions of nano-particles in polydisperse samples. Altogether, our findings expand analytical features and the application field of the PAMONO-sensor. They can also serve for a maturation of diagnostic tools based on the PAMONO-sensor platform. PMID:28134825

  12. Initial evidence that blood-borne microvesicles are biomarkers for recurrence and survival in newly diagnosed glioblastoma patients.

    PubMed

    Evans, Sydney M; Putt, Mary; Yang, Xiang-Yang; Lustig, Robert A; Martinez-Lage, Maria; Williams, Dewight; Desai, Arati; Wolf, Ronald; Brem, Steven; Koch, Cameron J

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to determine whether blood-borne microvesicles from newly diagnosed glioblastoma patients could be used as biomarkers. We collected 2.8 mL blood from 16 post-operative patients at the time that they were being simulated for chemoradiation therapy (radiation with concurrent temozolomide). Two additional samples were collected during chemoradiation therapy and a final sample was collected at the end of chemoradiation therapy. Patients continued with the therapy suggested by their physicians, based on tumor conference consensus and were followed for recurrence and overall survival. Microvesicles were isolated using serial centrifugation and stained for surface markers (Annexin V for phosphotidyl serine, CD41 for platelets, anti-EGFR for tumor cells, and CD235 for red blood cells). Flow cytometry analysis was performed. Our findings provide initial evidence that increases in Annexin V positive microvesicle levels during chemoradiation therapy are associated with earlier recurrence and shorter overall survival in newly diagnosed glioblastoma patients. The effect is dramatic, with over a four-fold increase in the hazard ratio for an individual at the 75th versus the 25th percentile. Moreover the pattern of Annexin V positive microvesicles remain significant after adjustment for confounding clinical variables that have previously been shown to be prognostic for recurrence and survival. Inclusion of neutrophil levels at the start of chemoradiation therapy in the model yielded the largest attenuation of the observed association. Further studies will be needed to verify and further investigate the association between these two entities.

  13. Extracellular microvesicle microRNAs in children with sickle cell anaemia with divergent clinical phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Khalyfa, Abdelnaby; Khalyfa, Ahamed A; Akbarpour, Mahzad; Connes, Phillippe; Romana, Marc; Lapping-Carr, Gabrielle; Zhang, Chunling; Andrade, Jorge; Gozal, David

    2016-09-01

    Sickle cell anaemia (SCA) is the most frequent genetic haemoglobinopathy, which exhibits a highly variable clinical course characterized by hyper-coagulable and pro-inflammatory states, as well as endothelial dysfunction. Extracellular microvesicles are released into biological fluids and play a role in modifying the functional phenotype of target cells. We hypothesized that potential differences in plasma-derived extracellular microvesicles (EV) function and cargo from SCA patients may underlie divergent clinical trajectories. Plasma EV from SCA patients with mild, intermediate and severe clinical disease course were isolated, and primary endothelial cell cultures were exposed. Endothelial cell activation, monocyte adhesion, barrier disruption and exosome cargo (microRNA microarrays) were assessed. EV disrupted the endothelial barrier and induced expression of adhesion molecules and monocyte adhesion in a SCA severity-dependent manner compared to healthy children. Microarray approaches identified a restricted signature of exosomal microRNAs that readily distinguished severe from mild SCA, as well as from healthy children. The microRNA candidates were further validated using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction assays, and revealed putative gene targets. Circulating exosomal microRNAs may play important roles in predicting the clinical course of SCA, and in delineation of individually tailored, mechanistically-based clinical treatment approaches of SCA patients in the near future.

  14. Nanoscale live cell optical imaging of the dynamics of intracellular microvesicles in neural cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sohee; Heo, Chaejeong; Suh, Minah; Lee, Young Hee

    2013-11-01

    Recent advances in biotechnology and imaging technology have provided great opportunities to investigate cellular dynamics. Conventional imaging methods such as transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy are powerful techniques for cellular imaging, even at the nanoscale level. However, these techniques have limitations applications in live cell imaging because of the experimental preparation required, namely cell fixation, and the innately small field of view. In this study, we developed a nanoscale optical imaging (NOI) system that combines a conventional optical microscope with a high resolution dark-field condenser (Cytoviva, Inc.) and halogen illuminator. The NOI system's maximum resolution for live cell imaging is around 100 nm. We utilized NOI to investigate the dynamics of intracellular microvesicles of neural cells without immunocytological analysis. In particular, we studied direct, active random, and moderate random dynamic motions of intracellular microvesicles and visualized lysosomal vesicle changes after treatment of cells with a lysosomal inhibitor (NH4Cl). Our results indicate that the NOI system is a feasible, high-resolution optical imaging system for live small organelles that does not require complicated optics or immunocytological staining processes.

  15. Infrared spectroscopic characterization of monocytic microvesicles (microparticles) released upon lipopolysaccharide stimulation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joonsup; Wen, Beryl; Carter, Elizabeth A; Combes, Valery; Grau, Georges E R; Lay, Peter A

    2017-03-17

    Microvesicles (MVs) are involved in cell-cell interactions, including disease pathogenesis. Nondestructive Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectra from MVs were assessed as a technique to provide new biochemical insights into a LPS-induced monocyte model of septic shock. FTIR spectroscopy provided a quick method to investigate relative differences in biomolecular content of different MV populations that was complementary to traditional semiquantitative omics approaches, with which it is difficult to provide information on relative changes between classes (proteins, lipids, nucleic acids, carbohydrates) or protein conformations. Time-dependent changes were detected in biomolecular contents of MVs and in the monocytes from which they were released. Differences in phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylserine contents were observed in MVs released under stimulation, and higher relative concentrations of RNA and α-helical structured proteins were present in stimulated MVs compared with MVs from resting cells. FTIR spectra of stimulated monocytes displayed changes that were consistent with those observed in the corresponding MVs they released. LPS-stimulated monocytes had reduced concentrations of nucleic acids, α-helical structured proteins, and phosphatidylcholine compared with resting monocytes but had an increase in total lipids. FTIR spectra of MV biomolecular content will be important in shedding new light on the mechanisms of MVs and the different roles they play in physiology and disease pathogenesis.-Lee, J., Wen, B., Carter, E. A., Combes, V., Grau, G. E. R., Lay. P. A. Infrared spectroscopic characterization of monocytic microvesicles (microparticles) released upon lipopolysaccharide stimulation.

  16. Investigation of Soluble and Transmembrane CTLA-4 Isoforms in Serum and Microvesicles

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Laura; Hunter, Kara M. D.; Clark, Jan; Rainbow, Daniel B.; Stevens, Helen; Denesha, Jennifer; Duley, Simon; Dawson, Sarah; Coleman, Gillian; Nutland, Sarah; Bell, Gwynneth L.; Moran, Carla; Pekalski, Marcin; Todd, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Expression of the CTLA-4 gene is absolutely required for immune homeostasis, but aspects of its molecular nature remain undefined. In particular, the characterization of the soluble CTLA-4 (sCTLA-4) protein isoform generated by an alternatively spliced mRNA of CTLA4 lacking transmembrane-encoding exon 3 has been hindered by the difficulty in distinguishing it from the transmembrane isoform of CTLA-4, Tm-CTLA-4. In the current study, sCTLA-4 has been analyzed using novel mAbs and polyclonal Abs specific for its unique C-terminal amino acid sequence. We demonstrate that the sCTLA-4 protein is secreted at low levels following the activation of primary human CD4+ T cells and is increased only rarely in the serum of autoimmune patients. Unexpectedly, during our studies aimed to define the kinetics of sCTLA-4 produced by activated human CD4+ T cells, we discovered that Tm-CTLA-4 is associated with microvesicles produced by the activated cells. The functional roles of sCTLA-4 and microvesicle-associated Tm-CTLA-4 warrant further investigation, especially as they relate to the multiple mechanisms of action described for the more commonly studied cell-associated Tm-CTLA-4. PMID:24928993

  17. Microvesicles Produced by Poly(dimethylsiloxane-b-ferrocenylsilane) Block Copolymers in Selective Solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankowski, David; Power-Billard, Nicole; Raez, Jose; Khan, Saad; Manners, Ian; Spontak, Richard

    2004-03-01

    The formation of nanoscopic aggregates via the self-assembly of block copolymers in a selective solvent for one of the blocks is currently a flourishing area of polymer and materials science, and shows tremendous potential for encapsulation applications. In this work, we use transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to investigate the self-organized morphologies of poly(dimethylsiloxaneb-ferrocenylsilane) (PDMS-b-PFS) diblock copolymers in the presence of a selective solvent. In aqueous medium, one copolymer containing a hydrophilic cationic polyferrocene block organizes into microvesicles with a diameter of ˜85 nm in which the organometallic block is located on both the outside and the inside of the aggregates. Cyclic voltammetry confirms that the ferrocene units are subject to sequential oxidation and reduction, in which case these nanoscopic aggregates are considered redox-active. Exposure of a highly asymmetric PDMS-b-PFS copolymer capable of forming nanotubes to high-pressure CO2, a selective solvent for the PDMS block, results in the gradual breakup of the nanotubes and the concurrent formation of micelles. The size of these micelles is sensitive to CO2 pressure and saturation time. At elevated temperatures, microvesicles measuring ˜63 nm in diameter develop.

  18. Divergent endothelial function but similar platelet microvesicle responses following eccentric and concentric cycling at a similar aerobic power output.

    PubMed

    Rakobowchuk, Mark; Ritter, Ophélie; Wilhelm, Eurico Nestor; Isacco, Laurie; Bouhaddi, Malika; Degano, Bruno; Tordi, Nicolas; Mourot, Laurent

    2017-04-01

    Endothelial function and microvesicle concentration changes after acute bouts of continuous eccentric exercise have not been assessed previously nor compared with concentric exercise at similar aerobic power outputs. This method of training may be useful among some clinical populations, but acute responses are not well described. As such, 12 healthy males completed 2 experimental sessions of either 45 min of eccentric or concentric cycling at a matched aerobic power output below the ventilatory threshold. Brachial artery vascular function was assessed throughout 5 min of forearm ischemia and 3 min thereafter, before and at 5 and 40 min of recovery following each exercise session [flow-mediated dilation (FMD)]. Venous blood samples were acquired before each vascular function assessment. FMD significantly decreased after eccentric cycling by 40 min of recovery (P < 0.05), but was unaltered after concentric exercise. No differences in peak hyperemic blood flow velocity occurred neither between modalities nor at any time point (P > 0.05). Platelet-derived microvesicles increased by ~20% after both exercise modalities (P < 0.05) while endothelial-derived microvesicles were unchanged (P > 0.05). Moderate relationships with cardiac output, a surrogate for shear stress, and norepinephrine were apparent (P < 0.05), but there were no relationships with inflammatory or acute phase proteins. In summary, eccentric endurance exercise induced macrovascular endothelial dysfunction; however, endothelial activation determined by endothelial microvesicles did not occur suggesting that this modality may induce oxidative stress but no significant endothelial damage. In addition, the increase in platelet microvesicle concentrations may induce beneficial microvascular adaptations as suggested by previous research.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Continuous eccentric cycling exercise induces substantial skeletal muscle, tendon, and bone strain providing a potentially beneficial stimulus among clinical

  19. Curcumin Modulates Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Cell-Derived Exosomal Function

    PubMed Central

    Osterman, Carlos J. Diaz; Lynch, James C.; Leaf, Patrick; Gonda, Amber; Ferguson Bennit, Heather R.; Griffiths, Duncan; Wall, Nathan R.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has the highest mortality rates of all cancer types. One potential explanation for the aggressiveness of this disease is that cancer cells have been found to communicate with one another using membrane-bound vesicles known as exosomes. These exosomes carry pro-survival molecules and increase the proliferation, survival, and metastatic potential of recipient cells, suggesting that tumor-derived exosomes are powerful drivers of tumor progression. Thus, to successfully address and eradicate pancreatic cancer, it is imperative to develop therapeutic strategies that neutralize cancer cells and exosomes simultaneously. Curcumin, a turmeric root derivative, has been shown to have potent anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory effects in vitro and in vivo. Recent studies have suggested that exosomal curcumin exerts anti-inflammatory properties on recipient cells. However, curcumin’s effects on exosomal pro-tumor function have yet to be determined. We hypothesize that curcumin will alter the pro-survival role of exosomes from pancreatic cancer cells toward a pro-death role, resulting in reduced cell viability of recipient pancreatic cancer cells. The main objective of this study was to determine the functional alterations of exosomes released by pancreatic cancer cells exposed to curcumin compared to exosomes from untreated pancreatic cancer cells. We demonstrate, using an in vitro cell culture model involving pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines PANC-1 and MIA PaCa-2, that curcumin is incorporated into exosomes isolated from curcumin-treated pancreatic cancer cells as observed by spectral studies and fluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, curcumin is delivered to recipient pancreatic cancer cells via exosomes, promoting cytotoxicity as demonstrated by Hoffman modulation contrast microscopy as well as AlamarBlue and Trypan blue exclusion assays. Collectively, these data suggest that the efficacy of curcumin may be enhanced in pancreatic cancer cells through

  20. Lipoxin A4 stimulates endothelial miR-126-5p expression and its transfer via microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Codagnone, Marilina; Recchiuti, Antonio; Lanuti, Paola; Pierdomenico, Anna Maria; Cianci, Eleonora; Patruno, Sara; Mari, Veronica Cecilia; Simiele, Felice; Di Tomo, Pamela; Pandolfi, Assunta; Romano, Mario

    2017-05-01

    The proresolution lipid mediator lipoxin (LX)A4 bestows protective bioactions on endothelial cells. We examined the impact of LXA4 on transcellular endothelial signaling via microRNA (miR)-containing microvesicles. We report LXA4 inhibition of MV release by TNF-α-treated HUVECs, associated with the down-regulation of 18 miR in endothelial microvesicles (EMVs) and the up-regulation of miR-126-5p, both in HUVECs and in EMVs. LXA4 up-regulated miR-126-5p by ∼5-fold in HUVECs and promoted a release of microvesicles (LXA4-EMVs) that enhanced miR-126-5p by ∼7-fold in recipient HUVECs. In these cells, LXA4-EMVs abrogated the up-regulation of VCAM-1, induced in recipient HUVECs by EMVs released by untreated or TNF-α-treated HUVECs. LXA4-EMVs also reduced by ∼40% the expression of SPRED1, which we validated as an miR-126-5p target, whereas they stimulated monolayer repair in an in vitro wound assay. This effect was lost when the EMVs were depleted of miR-126-5p. These results provide evidence that changes in miR expression and microvesicle packaging and transfer represent a mechanism of action of LXA4, which may be relevant in vascular biology and inflammation.-Codagnone, M., Recchiuti, A., Lanuti, P., Pierdomenico, A. M., Cianci, E., Patruno, S., Mari, V. C., Simiele, F., Di Tomo, P., Pandolfi, A., Romano, M. Lipoxin A4 stimulates endothelial miR-126-5p expression and its transfer via microvesicles. © FASEB.

  1. Loss of signalling via Gα13 in germinal centre B-cell-derived lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Muppidi, Jagan R; Schmitz, Roland; Green, Jesse A; Xiao, Wenming; Larsen, Adrien B; Braun, Sterling E; An, Jinping; Xu, Ying; Rosenwald, Andreas; Ott, German; Gascoyne, Randy D; Rimsza, Lisa M; Campo, Elias; Jaffe, Elaine S; Delabie, Jan; Smeland, Erlend B; Braziel, Rita M; Tubbs, Raymond R; Cook, J R; Weisenburger, Dennis D; Chan, Wing C; Vaidehi, Nagarajan; Staudt, Louis M; Cyster, Jason G

    2014-12-11

    Germinal centre B-cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (GCB-DLBCL) is a common malignancy, yet the signalling pathways that are deregulated and the factors leading to its systemic dissemination are poorly defined. Work in mice showed that sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor-2 (S1PR2), a Gα12 and Gα13 coupled receptor, promotes growth regulation and local confinement of germinal centre B cells. Recent deep sequencing studies of GCB-DLBCL have revealed mutations in many genes in this cancer, including in GNA13 (encoding Gα13) and S1PR2 (refs 5,6, 7). Here we show, using in vitro and in vivo assays, that GCB-DLBCL-associated mutations occurring in S1PR2 frequently disrupt the receptor's Akt and migration inhibitory functions. Gα13-deficient mouse germinal centre B cells and human GCB-DLBCL cells were unable to suppress pAkt and migration in response to S1P, and Gα13-deficient mice developed germinal centre B-cell-derived lymphoma. Germinal centre B cells, unlike most lymphocytes, are tightly confined in lymphoid organs and do not recirculate. Remarkably, deficiency in Gα13, but not S1PR2, led to germinal centre B-cell dissemination into lymph and blood. GCB-DLBCL cell lines frequently carried mutations in the Gα13 effector ARHGEF1, and Arhgef1 deficiency also led to germinal centre B-cell dissemination. The incomplete phenocopy of Gα13- and S1PR2 deficiency led us to discover that P2RY8, an orphan receptor that is mutated in GCB-DLBCL and another germinal centre B-cell-derived malignancy, Burkitt's lymphoma, also represses germinal centre B-cell growth and promotes confinement via Gα13. These findings identify a Gα13-dependent pathway that exerts dual actions in suppressing growth and blocking dissemination of germinal centre B cells that is frequently disrupted in germinal centre B-cell-derived lymphoma.

  2. Cells Derived from Young Bone Marrow Alleviate Renal Aging

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hai-Chun; Rossini, Michele; Ma, Li-Jun; Zuo, Yiqin; Ma, Ji

    2011-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived stem cells may modulate renal injury, but the effects may depend on the age of the stem cells. Here we investigated whether bone marrow from young mice attenuates renal aging in old mice. We radiated female 12-mo-old 129SvJ mice and reconstituted them with bone marrow cells (BMC) from either 8-wk-old (young-to-old) or 12-mo-old (old-to-old) male mice. Transfer of young BMC resulted in markedly decreased deposition of collagen IV in the mesangium and less β-galactosidase staining, an indicator of cell senescence. These changes paralleled reduced expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), PDGF-B (PDGF-B), the transdifferentiation marker fibroblast-specific protein-1 (FSP-1), and senescence-associated p16 and p21. Tubulointerstitial and glomerular cells derived from the transplanted BMC did not show β-galactosidase activity, but after 6 mo, there were more FSP-1-expressing bone marrow-derived cells in old-to-old mice compared with young-to-old mice. Young-to-old mice also exhibited higher expression of the anti-aging gene Klotho and less phosphorylation of IGF-1 receptor β. Taken together, these data suggest that young bone marrow-derived cells can alleviate renal aging in old mice. Direct parenchymal reconstitution by stem cells, paracrine effects from adjacent cells, and circulating anti-aging molecules may mediate the aging of the kidney. PMID:21965376

  3. Large-scale generation of cell-derived nanovesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, W.; Kim, J.; Yoon, J.; Jeong, D.; Cho, S.; Jeong, H.; Yoon, Y. J.; Kim, S. C.; Gho, Y. S.; Park, J.

    2014-09-01

    Exosomes are enclosed compartments that are released from cells and that can transport biological contents for the purpose of intercellular communications. Research into exosomes is hindered by their rarity. In this article, we introduce a device that uses centrifugal force and a filter with micro-sized pores to generate a large quantity of cell-derived nanovesicles. The device has a simple polycarbonate structure to hold the filter, and operates in a common centrifuge. Nanovesicles are similar in size and membrane structure to exosomes. Nanovesicles contain intracellular RNAs ranging from microRNA to mRNA, intracellular proteins, and plasma membrane proteins. The quantity of nanovesicles produced using the device is 250 times the quantity of naturally secreted exosomes. Also, the quantity of intracellular contents in nanovesicles is twice that in exosomes. Nanovesicles generated from murine embryonic stem cells can transfer RNAs to target cells. Therefore, this novel device and the nanovesicles that it generates are expected to be used in exosome-related research, and can be applied in various applications such as drug delivery and cell-based therapy.

  4. Large-scale generation of cell-derived nanovesicles.

    PubMed

    Jo, W; Kim, J; Yoon, J; Jeong, D; Cho, S; Jeong, H; Yoon, Y J; Kim, S C; Gho, Y S; Park, J

    2014-10-21

    Exosomes are enclosed compartments that are released from cells and that can transport biological contents for the purpose of intercellular communications. Research into exosomes is hindered by their rarity. In this article, we introduce a device that uses centrifugal force and a filter with micro-sized pores to generate a large quantity of cell-derived nanovesicles. The device has a simple polycarbonate structure to hold the filter, and operates in a common centrifuge. Nanovesicles are similar in size and membrane structure to exosomes. Nanovesicles contain intracellular RNAs ranging from microRNA to mRNA, intracellular proteins, and plasma membrane proteins. The quantity of nanovesicles produced using the device is 250 times the quantity of naturally secreted exosomes. Also, the quantity of intracellular contents in nanovesicles is twice that in exosomes. Nanovesicles generated from murine embryonic stem cells can transfer RNAs to target cells. Therefore, this novel device and the nanovesicles that it generates are expected to be used in exosome-related research, and can be applied in various applications such as drug delivery and cell-based therapy.

  5. Enriched retinal ganglion cells derived from human embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Katherine P.; Hung, Sandy S. C.; Sharov, Alexei; Lo, Camden Y.; Needham, Karina; Lidgerwood, Grace E.; Jackson, Stacey; Crombie, Duncan E.; Nayagam, Bryony A.; Cook, Anthony L.; Hewitt, Alex W.; Pébay, Alice; Wong, Raymond C. B.

    2016-01-01

    Optic neuropathies are characterised by a loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) that lead to vision impairment. Development of cell therapy requires a better understanding of the signals that direct stem cells into RGCs. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) represent an unlimited cellular source for generation of human RGCs in vitro. In this study, we present a 45-day protocol that utilises magnetic activated cell sorting to generate enriched population of RGCs via stepwise retinal differentiation using hESCs. We performed an extensive characterization of these stem cell-derived RGCs by examining the gene and protein expressions of a panel of neural/RGC markers. Furthermore, whole transcriptome analysis demonstrated similarity of the hESC-derived RGCs to human adult RGCs. The enriched hESC-RGCs possess long axons, functional electrophysiological profiles and axonal transport of mitochondria, suggestive of maturity. In summary, this RGC differentiation protocol can generate an enriched population of functional RGCs from hESCs, allowing future studies on disease modeling of optic neuropathies and development of cell therapies. PMID:27506453

  6. T Cell-Derived Lymphotoxin Regulates Liver Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    TUMANOV, ALEXEI V.; KOROLEVA, EKATERINA P.; CHRISTIANSEN, PETER A.; KHAN, MEHTAB A.; RUDDY, MATTHEW J.; BURNETTE, BYRON; PAPA, SALVATORE; FRANZOSO, GUIDO; NEDOSPASOV, SERGEI A.; FU, YANG-XIN; ANDERS, ROBERT A.

    2011-01-01

    Background & Aims The ability of the liver to regenerate hepatic mass is essential to withstanding liver injury. The process of liver regeneration is tightly regulated by distinct signaling cascades involving components of the innate immune system, cytokines, and growth factors. However, the role of the adaptive immune system in regulation of liver regeneration is not well-defined. The role of adaptive immune system in liver regeneration was investigated in lymphocyte-deficient mice and in conditional lymphotoxin-deficient mice. Methods A model of liver regeneration after 70% partial hepatectomy was used, followed by examination of liver pathology, survival, DNA synthesis, and cytokine expression. Results We found that mice deficient in T cells show a reduced capacity for liver regeneration following partial hepatectomy. Furthermore, surface lymphotoxin, provided by T cells, is critical for liver regeneration. Mice specifically deficient in T-cell lymphotoxin had increased liver damage and a reduced capacity to initiate DNA synthesis after partial hepatectomy. Transfer of splenocytes from wild-type but not lymphotoxin-deficient mice improved liver regeneration in T cell-deficient mice. We found that an agonistic antibody against the lymphotoxin β receptor was able to facilitate liver regeneration by reducing liver injury, increasing interleukin-6 production, hepatocyte DNA synthesis, and survival of lymphocyte-deficient (Rag) mice after partial hepatectomy. Conclusions The adaptive immune system directly regulates liver regeneration via a T cell-derived lymphotoxin axis, and pharmacological stimulation of lymphotoxin β receptor might represent a novel therapeutic approach to improve liver regeneration. PMID:18952083

  7. Cells derived from young bone marrow alleviate renal aging.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hai-Chun; Rossini, Michele; Ma, Li-Jun; Zuo, Yiqin; Ma, Ji; Fogo, Agnes B

    2011-11-01

    Bone marrow-derived stem cells may modulate renal injury, but the effects may depend on the age of the stem cells. Here we investigated whether bone marrow from young mice attenuates renal aging in old mice. We radiated female 12-mo-old 129SvJ mice and reconstituted them with bone marrow cells (BMC) from either 8-wk-old (young-to-old) or 12-mo-old (old-to-old) male mice. Transfer of young BMC resulted in markedly decreased deposition of collagen IV in the mesangium and less β-galactosidase staining, an indicator of cell senescence. These changes paralleled reduced expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), PDGF-B (PDGF-B), the transdifferentiation marker fibroblast-specific protein-1 (FSP-1), and senescence-associated p16 and p21. Tubulointerstitial and glomerular cells derived from the transplanted BMC did not show β-galactosidase activity, but after 6 mo, there were more FSP-1-expressing bone marrow-derived cells in old-to-old mice compared with young-to-old mice. Young-to-old mice also exhibited higher expression of the anti-aging gene Klotho and less phosphorylation of IGF-1 receptor β. Taken together, these data suggest that young bone marrow-derived cells can alleviate renal aging in old mice. Direct parenchymal reconstitution by stem cells, paracrine effects from adjacent cells, and circulating anti-aging molecules may mediate the aging of the kidney.

  8. Activation of Endothelial Pro-resolving Anti-Inflammatory Pathways by Circulating Microvesicles from Non-muscular Myosin Light Chain Kinase-Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Gaceb, Abderahim; Vergori, Luisa; Martinez, M C; Andriantsitohaina, Ramaroson

    2016-01-01

    Microvesicles, small membrane vesicles released from cells, have beneficial and/or deleterious effects in sepsis. We previously reported that non-muscle myosin light chain kinase (nmMLCK) deletion protects mice against endotoxic shock by reducing inflammation. Here, we have evaluated the consequences of nmMLCK deletion on microvesicle phenotypes and their effects on mouse aortic endothelial cells in association with vascular inflammation and endothelial dysfunction during endotoxic shock induced by lipopolysaccharide in mice. Treatment with lipopolysaccharide induced an increase in levels of circulating microvesicles in wild type but not in nmMLCK-deficient mice. Microvesicles from nmMLCK-deficient mice (MVs(nmMLCK-/-)) prevented the inflammatory effects of lipopolysaccharide with concomitant increase of anti- inflammatory and reduction of pro-inflammatory secretome in mouse aortic endothelial cells. In addition, MVs(nmMLCK-/-) reduced the efficacy of lipopolysaccharide to increase aortic oxidative and nitrosative stresses as well as macrophage infiltration in the aorta. Moreover, MVs(nmMLCK-/-) prevented ex vivo endothelial dysfunction, vascular hyporeactivity, and in vivo overproduction of nitric oxide in heart and liver in response to lipopolysaccharide. Altogether, these findings provide evidence that nmMLCK deletion generates circulating microvesicles displaying protective effects by activating endothelial pro-resolving anti-inflammatory pathways allowing the effective down-regulation of oxidative and nitrative stresses associated with endotoxic shock. Thus, nmMLCK plays a pivotal role in susceptibility to sepsis via the control of cellular activation and release of circulating microvesicles.

  9. Coxsackievirus B Exits the Host Cell in Shed Microvesicles Displaying Autophagosomal Markers

    PubMed Central

    Mangale, Vrushali; Rahawi, Shahad; McIntyre, Laura L.; Williams, Wesley; Kha, Nelson; Cruz, Casey; Hancock, Bryan M.; Nguyen, David P.; Sayen, M. Richard; Hilton, Brett J.; Doran, Kelly S.; Segall, Anca M.; Wolkowicz, Roland; Cornell, Christopher T.; Whitton, J. Lindsay; Gottlieb, Roberta A.; Feuer, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3), a member of the picornavirus family and enterovirus genus, causes viral myocarditis, aseptic meningitis, and pancreatitis in humans. We genetically engineered a unique molecular marker, “fluorescent timer” protein, within our infectious CVB3 clone and isolated a high-titer recombinant viral stock (Timer-CVB3) following transfection in HeLa cells. “Fluorescent timer” protein undergoes slow conversion of fluorescence from green to red over time, and Timer-CVB3 can be utilized to track virus infection and dissemination in real time. Upon infection with Timer-CVB3, HeLa cells, neural progenitor and stem cells (NPSCs), and C2C12 myoblast cells slowly changed fluorescence from green to red over 72 hours as determined by fluorescence microscopy or flow cytometric analysis. The conversion of “fluorescent timer” protein in HeLa cells infected with Timer-CVB3 could be interrupted by fixation, suggesting that the fluorophore was stabilized by formaldehyde cross-linking reactions. Induction of a type I interferon response or ribavirin treatment reduced the progression of cell-to-cell virus spread in HeLa cells or NPSCs infected with Timer-CVB3. Time lapse photography of partially differentiated NPSCs infected with Timer-CVB3 revealed substantial intracellular membrane remodeling and the assembly of discrete virus replication organelles which changed fluorescence color in an asynchronous fashion within the cell. “Fluorescent timer” protein colocalized closely with viral 3A protein within virus replication organelles. Intriguingly, infection of partially differentiated NPSCs or C2C12 myoblast cells induced the release of abundant extracellular microvesicles (EMVs) containing matured “fluorescent timer” protein and infectious virus representing a novel route of virus dissemination. CVB3 virions were readily observed within purified EMVs by transmission electron microscopy, and infectious virus was identified within low

  10. Levels of activated platelet-derived microvesicles in patients with soft tissue sarcoma correlate with an increased risk of venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Fricke, A; Ullrich, P V; Cimniak, A F V; Becherer, C; Follo, M; Heinz, J; Scholber, J; Herget, G W; Hauschild, O; Wittel, U A; Stark, G B; Bannasch, H; Braig, D; Eisenhardt, S U

    2017-08-07

    Microvesicles are small vesicles expressing specific antigens from their cells of origin. Elevated levels of microvesicles have been shown to be associated with coagulation disorders as well as with different types of malignancies. This study aims to evaluate a possible correlation of different microvesicle subpopulations with a positive history of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients with soft tissue sarcoma. Annexin V - positive microvesicles, leukocyte (CD45-positive), platelet (CD61-positive), activated platelet (CD62P-, CD63-positive), endothelium-derived (CD62E-positive) and tissue-factor (CD142-positive) microvesicles were identified in the peripheral blood of patients with soft tissue sarcoma (n = 39) and healthy controls (n = 17) using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Both the total amount of Annexin V-positive microvesicles and levels of endothelium-derived (CD62E-positive) microvesicles were shown to decrease significantly after tumor resection (n = 18, p = 0.0395 and p = 0.0109, respectively). Furthermore, the total amount of Annexin V - positive microvesicles as well as leukocyte (CD45-positive) and endothelium-derived (CD62E-positive) microvesicles were significantly higher in patients with grade 3 (G3) soft tissue sarcoma (n = 9) compared to healthy controls (n = 17) (p = 0.0304, p = 0.0254 and p = 0.0357, respectively). Moreover, patients with G3 soft tissue sarcoma (n = 9) presented higher levels of Annexin V-positive and endothelium-derived (CD62E-positive) microvesicles compared to patients with grade 2 (G2) soft tissue sarcoma (n = 8) (p = 0.0483 and p = 0.0045). Patients with grade 1 (G1) soft tissue sarcoma (n = 3) presented with significantly lower levels of platelet (CD61-positive) microvesicles than patients with G3 soft tissue sarcoma (n = 9) (p = 0.0150). In patients with a positive history of VTE (n = 11), significantly higher levels of activated platelet (CD62P- and CD63-positive

  11. Islet Endothelial Cells Derived From Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Jain, Neha; Lee, Eun Jung

    2016-01-01

    The islet endothelium comprises a specialized population of islet endothelial cells (IECs) expressing unique markers such as nephrin and α-1 antitrypsin (AAT) that are not found in endothelial cells in surrounding tissues. However, due to difficulties in isolating and maintaining a pure population of these cells, the information on these islet-specific cells is currently very limited. Interestingly, we have identified a large subpopulation of endothelial cells exhibiting IEC phenotype, while deriving insulin-producing cells from mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). These cells were identified by the uptake of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and were successfully isolated and subsequently expanded in endothelial cell culture medium. Further analysis demonstrated that the mouse embryonic stem cell-derived endothelial cells (mESC-ECs) not only express classical endothelial markers, such as platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM1), thrombomodulin, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) but also IEC-specific markers such as nephrin and AAT. Moreover, mESC-ECs secrete basement membrane proteins such as collagen type IV, laminin, and fibronectin in culture and form tubular networks on a layer of Matrigel, demonstrating angiogenic activity. Further, mESC-ECs not only express eNOS, but also its eNOS expression is glucose dependent, which is another characteristic phenotype of IECs. With the ability to obtain highly purified IECs derived from pluripotent stem cells, it is possible to closely examine the function of these cells and their interaction with pancreatic β-cells during development and maturation in vitro. Further characterization of tissue-specific endothelial cell properties may enhance our ability to formulate new therapeutic angiogenic approaches for diabetes.

  12. Analysis of side population cells derived from dental pulp tissue.

    PubMed

    Kenmotsu, M; Matsuzaka, K; Kokubu, E; Azuma, T; Inoue, T

    2010-12-01

    To investigate the characteristics of side population (SP) cells derived from the dental pulp of young and aged rats. Maxillary and mandibular incisors were extracted from 5-week-old (young) rats and 60- to 80-week-old (aged) rats. Coronal pulp tissue was removed mechanically, and single-cell suspensions were prepared using collagenase and dispase. Cells were stained with Hoechst 33342 and sorted with an fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS). Isolated SP and main population (MP) cells were analysed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemical localization and cell cycle determination. Two-way analysis of variance and the multiple comparison Scheffè test were used for statistical analysis (P<0.05). Approximately 0.40% of pulp cells in young rats and 0.11% in aged rats comprised SP cells. SP cells expressed a higher mRNA level of ATP-binding cassette transporter G2 (ABCG2), but lower mRNA levels of nestin, alkaline phosphatase, p16 and p57 than MP cells in both age groups. Immunohistochemical observation revealed ABCG2-positive cells localized in the cell-rich zone and nestin in the odontoblastic layer in both groups. Furthermore, the majority of both young and aged SP and MP cells were in growth arrest of the G(0) /G(1) phase. The FACS analysis revealed a decrease in the proportion of SP cells with age, whilst p16 mRNA expression indicated an increase in cell senescence. The cell cycles of SP and MP cells from both young and aged dental pulp were generally in the G0/G1 phase. © 2010 International Endodontic Journal.

  13. Muse Cells Derived from Dermal Tissues Can Differentiate into Melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ting; Zhang, Ru-Zhi; Yang, Yu-Hua; Liu, Qi; Li, Di; Pan, Xiao-Ru

    2017-02-07

    The objective of the authors has been to obtain multilineage-differentiating stress-enduring cells (Muse cells) from primary cultures of dermal fibroblasts, identify their pluripotency, and detect their ability to differentiate into melanocytes. The distribution of SSEA-3-positive cells in human scalp skin was assessed by immunohistochemistry, and the distribution of Oct4, Sox2, Nanog, and SSEA-3-positive cells was determined by immunofluorescence staining. The expression levels of Sox2, Oct4, hKlf4, and Nanog mRNAs and proteins in Muse cells were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analyses and Western blots, respectively. These Muse cells differentiated into melanocytes in differentiation medium. The SSEA-3-positive cells were scattered in the basement membrane zone and the dermis, with comparatively more in the sebaceous glands, vascular and sweat glands, as well as the outer root sheath of hair follicles, the dermal papillae, and the hair bulbs. Muse cells, which have the ability to self-renew, were obtained from scalp dermal fibroblasts by flow cytometry sorting with an anti-SSEA-3 antibody. The results of RT-PCR, Western blot, and immunofluorescence staining showed that the expression levels of Oct4, Nanog, Sox2, and Klf4 mRNAs and proteins in Muse cells were significantly different from their parental dermal fibroblasts. Muse cells differentiated into melanocytes when cultured in melanocyte differentiation medium, and the Muse cell-derived melanocytes expressed the melanocyte-specific marker HMB45. Muse cells could be obtained by flow cytometry from primary cultures of scalp dermal fibroblasts, which possessed the ability of pluripotency and self-renewal, and could differentiate into melanocytes in vitro.

  14. Application of nano-LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS for proteomic analysis of microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Kasprzyk, Joanna; Stępień, Ewa; Piekoszewski, Wojciech

    2017-03-01

    Activated platelets and platelet derived microvesicles (PMVs) emerged recently to be promising biomarkers. There is no universal procedure to carry out the proteomic analysis on microvesicles. In this study we proposed a nano-liquid chromatography (nano-LC) technique coupled off-line with a spectrometric measurement MALDI-TOF-MS/MS as a throughput and time-saving procedure. In this study we developed a simplified method to evaluate the protein composition of platelet organelles and PMVs. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) was collected from healthy donors. PMVs were generated from washed and thrombin activated platelets. Activated platelets from every donor were used to compare the PMV proteome. Enzymatic digestion of protein lysate was carried out using Filter Aided Sample Preparation (FASP) method with trypsin as a proteolytic enzyme. Tryptic peptides derived from PMVs and activated platelets were analysed using nano-LC coupled off-line mode with a MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS. PMV and platelet protein identification was performed using the Mascot engine for searching against the Swiss-Prot human database. The precision tolerance was 100ppm for peptide masses and 0.7Da for fragment ion masses. Individual peptide matches with a score above 28 were considered statistically significant. In total, 446 proteins were identified in PMVs and 513 proteins in activated platelets. Among them 190 were specific for activated platelets and 123 were PMV specific. Cellular component analysis of identified proteins revealed that PMVs contained relatively more extracellular proteins than activated platelets (9.6 vs. 6.0 %) and unique synaptic proteins (0.3%). A new simplified bottom-up method for PMV proteome analysis allowed eliminating the drawbacks of the previously used protocols. This approach can be used in PMV proteome identification. Copyright © 2016 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Mesenchymal stem cell-derived exosomes from different sources selectively promote neuritic outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Verrilli, M A; Caviedes, A; Cabrera, A; Sandoval, S; Wyneken, U; Khoury, M

    2016-04-21

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) obtained from bone marrow (BM) have been shown to promote neuronal growth and survival. However, the comparative effects of MSCs of different sources, including menstrual MSCs (MenSCs), BM, umbilical cord and chorion stem cells on neurite outgrowth have not yet been explored. Moreover, the modulatory effects of MSCs may be mediated by paracrine mechanisms, i.e. by molecules contained in the MSC secretome that includes soluble factors and extracellular vesicles such as microvesicles and/or exosomes. The biogenesis of microvesicles, characterized by a vesicle diameter of 50 to 1000 nm, involves membrane shedding while exosomes, of 30 to 100 nm in diameter, originate in the multivesicular bodies within cells. Both vesicle types, which can be harvested from the conditioned media of cell cultures by differential centrifugation steps, regulate the function of target cells due to their molecular content of microRNA, mRNA, proteins and lipids. Here, we compared the effect of human menstrual MSCs (MenSCs) mediated by cell-cell contact, by their total secretome or by secretome-derived extracellular vesicles on neuritic outgrowth in primary neuronal cultures. The contact of MenSCs with cortical neurons inhibited neurite outgrowth while their total secretome enhanced it. The extracellular vesicle fractions showed a distinctive effect: while the exosome-enriched fraction enhanced neurite outgrowth, the microvesicle-enriched fraction displayed an inhibitory effect. When we compared exosome fractions of different human MSC sources, MenSC exosomes showed superior effects on the growth of the longest neurite in cortical neurons and had a comparable effect to BM-SC exosomes on neurite outgrowth in dorsal root ganglia neurons. Thus, the growth-stimulating effects of exosomes derived from MenSCs as well as the opposing effects of both extracellular vesicle fractions provide important information regarding the potential use of MenSCs as therapeutic

  16. CD40L expression in plasma of volunteers following LPS administration: A comparison between assay of CD40L on platelet microvesicles and soluble CD40L.

    PubMed

    Mobarrez, Fariborz; Sjövik, Carolina; Soop, Anne; Hållström, Lars; Frostell, Claes; Pisetsky, David S; Wallén, Håkan

    2015-01-01

    CD40 ligand (CD40L) is a transmembrane protein that is mainly expressed on activated T cells and platelets. This protein, however, may also be shed from cells and circulate in the blood in a soluble form. "Soluble CD40L" has attracted interest as a biomarker as it can interact with CD40 and elicit cellular responses involved in the pathophysiology of various thrombotic and inflammatory conditions. As platelets can release microvesicles following activation, we investigated the expression of CD40L on circulating microvesicles as well as CD40L in plasma, in an experimental model of inflammation in healthy volunteers (i.e., intravenous lipopolysaccharide administration). We studied CD40L quantified as CD40L-positive platelet microvesicles by flow cytometry, and as CD40L in plasma ("soluble CD40L") by an ELISA. Results of these studies showed that levels of CD40L exposed on platelet microvesicles were significantly increased after lipopolysaccharide administration. ELISA measurements of CD40L in plasma ("soluble CD40L") did not show any significant increase in plasma levels over time. Separation of soluble and vesicle-bound CD40L by high-speed centrifugation indicated that the ELISA can also detect CD40L on microvesicles, as a trend toward increased concentrations were observed in the pellet of high-speed centrifuged samples (i.e., in samples in which microvesicles are enriched). Together, these findings suggest that platelet microvesicles are a source of CD40L in the circulation and that CD40L exposure on platelet microvesicles increases following experimentally induced inflammation. Our data also suggest that determining levels of CD40L on microvesicles in plasma samples may provide a more sensitive detection of changes in CD40L expression than measurement of "soluble CD40L" in plasma with an ELISA. In addition, information regarding the cellular source of CD40L can be obtained with a flow cytometry-based microvesicle assay in a way not possible with an ordinary

  17. Tumor-derived microvesicles in the tumor microenvironment: How vesicle heterogeneity can shape the future of a rapidly expanding field.

    PubMed

    Clancy, James W; Tricarico, Christopher J; D'Souza-Schorey, Crislyn

    2015-12-01

    Information transmission from tumor cells to non-tumor cells in the surrounding microenvironment via microvesicles is a more recently studied form of intercellular signaling that can have a marked impact on the tumor microenvironment. Tumor-derived microvesicles (TMVs) are packed with information including signaling proteins and nucleic acids, and can be taken up by target cells, enabling paracrine signaling. While previous research has focused on how vesicles released from pathologic cells differ from normal cells, the heterogeneity that exists within the TMV population itself is not fully characterized, and only beginning to be appreciated. In this review, we summarize current understanding of the biogenesis and roles of shed TMVs in the tumor microenvironment, and speculate on the consequences for tumor cell signaling in light of the hypothesis that there exists variance within the TMV population. The analysis of differential signaling upon cell-TMV interactions provides insights into potential mechanisms of intercellular communication. © 2015 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Altered micro-ribonucleic acid expression profiles of extracellular microvesicles in the seminal plasma of patients with oligoasthenozoospermia.

    PubMed

    Abu-Halima, Masood; Ludwig, Nicole; Hart, Martin; Leidinger, Petra; Backes, Christina; Keller, Andreas; Hammadeh, Mohamad; Meese, Eckart

    2016-10-01

    To determine whether microRNA (miRNA) expression profile is different in extracellular microvesicles collected from seminal plasma of men with oligoasthenozoospermia, to gain further insight into molecular mechanisms underlying male infertility. Microarray with quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction validation and Western blot analysis confirmation. University research and clinical institutes. A total of 24 men, including 12 oligoasthenozoospermic subfertile men and 12 normozoospermic men. None. Statistically significant altered miRNA expression profiles in oligoasthenozoospermic subfertile men compared with normozoospermic fertile men. Extracellular microvesicles including exosomes were isolated from seminal plasma by ultracentrifugation. Presence of exosome-specific proteins was confirmed by Western blotting. In the extracellular microvesicles, we analyzed 1,205 miRNAs by microarray and identified 36 miRNAs with altered expression levels in oligoasthenozoospermic compared with normozoospermic fertile men. Seven miRNAs were overexpressed and 29 miRNAs were underexpressed in oligoasthenozoospermic men. Using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction as an independent method, we confirmed the significantly higher expression levels of miR-765 and miR-1275 and the significantly lower expression level of miR-15a in oligoasthenozoospermic subfertile men as compared with the normozoospermic men. We identified altered expression levels of miRNAs in extracellular microvesicles from seminal plasma as part of the molecular events in the male genital tract. These miRNAs may help to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying male infertility. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) enhances lipopolysaccharide-stimulated tissue factor in human monocytes and monocyte-derived microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Williams, Julie C; Klein, Thomas W; Goldberger, Bruce A; Sleasman, John W; Mackman, Nigel; Goodenow, Maureen M

    2015-01-01

    Immunomodulatory effects in humans of Δ(9-)Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the psychoactive component of marijuana are controversial. Tissue factor (TF), the activator of the extrinsic coagulation cascade, is increased on circulating activated monocytes and is expressed on microvesicles released from activated monocytes during inflammatory conditions, which perpetuate coagulopathies in a number of diseases. In view of the increased medicinal use of marijuana, effects of THC on human monocytes and monocyte-derived microvesicles activated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were investigated. Peak levels of TF procoagulant activity developed in monocytes or microvesicles 6 h following LPS treatment and were unaltered by THC. After 24 h of LPS stimulation, TF activity declined in control-treated or untreated cells and microvesicles, but persisted with THC treatment. Peak TF protein occurred within 6 h of LPS treatment independent of THC; by 24 h, TF protein declined to almost undetectable levels without THC, but was about 4-fold greater with THC. Steady-state TF mRNA levels were similar up to 2 h in the presence of LPS with or without THC, while 10-fold greater TF mRNA levels persisted over 3-24 h with THC treatment. Activation of MAPK or NF-κB pathways was unaltered by THC treatment and inflammatory cytokine IL-6 levels were unchanged. In contrast, TNF and IL-8 levels were enhanced by 20-50 %. THC enhances TF expression in activated monocytes resulting in elevated procoagulant activity. Marijuana use could potentiate coagulopathies in individuals with chronic immune activation such as HIV-1 infection or inflammatory bowel disease.

  20. Low MT-CO1 in Monocytes and Microvesicles Is Associated With Outcome in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Holvoet, Paul; Vanhaverbeke, Maarten; Bloch, Katarzyna; Baatsen, Pieter; Sinnaeve, Peter; Janssens, Stefan

    2016-12-05

    Cytochrome oxidase (COX) IV complex regulates energy production in mitochondria. Impaired COX gene expression is related to obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus, but whether it is directly related to the incidence of cardiovascular events is unknown. We investigated whether COX gene expression in monocytes is predictive for cardiovascular events in coronary artery disease patients. To avoid monocyte isolation from fresh blood, we then aimed to validate our findings in monocyte-derived microvesicles isolated from plasma. We enrolled 142 consecutive patients undergoing diagnostic coronary angiography between June 2010 and January 2011 and followed 67 patients with stable coronary artery disease prospectively for at least 3 years. Twenty-two patients experienced a new cardiovascular event (32.8%). Circulating CD14(+) monocytes and microvesicles were isolated with magnetic beads, and COX mRNA levels were measured with quantitative polymerase chain reaction, after normalization with 5 validated house-keeping genes. Patients in the lowest tertile of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase, subunit I (MT-COI) in monocytes at baseline had a higher risk for developing a new event after adjusting for age, sex, (ex)smoking, body mass index, blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, low-density lipoprotein- and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, triglycerides, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, and number of diseased vessels (harzard ratio [HR], 3.95; 95% CI, 1.63-9.57). Patients in the lowest tertile of MT-COI in monocyte-specific microvesicles had also a higher risk of developing a new event (adjusted HR, 5.00; 95% CI, 1.77-14). In the current blinded study, low MT-COI in monocytes of coronary artery disease patients identifies a population at risk for new cardiovascular events. For the first time, we show that signatures in monocyte-specific microvesicles in plasma have similar predictive properties. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart

  1. Initial evidence that blood-borne microvesicles are biomarkers for recurrence and survival in newly diagnosed glioblastoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Sydney M.; Putt, Mary; Yang, Xiang-Yang; Lustig, Robert A.; Martinez-Lage, Maria; Williams, Dewight; Desai, Arati; Wolf, Ronald; Brem, Steven; Koch, Cameron J.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to determine whether blood-borne microvesicles from newly diagnosed glioblastoma patients could be used as biomarkers. We collected 2.8 mL blood from 16 post-operative patients at the time that they were being simulated for chemoradiation therapy (radiation with concurrent temozolomide). Two additional samples were collected during chemoradiation therapy and a final sample was collected at the end of chemoradiation therapy. Patients continued with the therapy suggested by their physicians, based on tumor conference consensus and were followed for recurrence and overall survival. Microvesicles were isolated using serial centrifugation and stained for surface markers (Annexin V for phosphotidyl serine, CD41 for platelets, anti-EGFR for tumor cells, and CD235 for red blood cells). Flow cytometry analysis was performed. Our findings provide initial evidence that increases in Annexin V positive microvesicle levels during chemoradiation therapy are associated with earlier recurrence and shorter overall survival in newly diagnosed glioblastoma patients. The effect is dramatic, with over a four-fold increase in the hazard ratio for an individual at the 75th versus the 25th percentile. Moreover the pattern of Annexin V positive microvesicles remain significant after adjustment for confounding clinical variables that have previously been shown to be prognostic for recurrence and survival. Inclusion of neutrophil levels at the start of chemoradiation therapy in the model yielded the largest attenuation of the observed association. Further studies will be needed to verify and further investigate the association between these two entities. PMID:26746692

  2. Generating and characterizing the mechanical properties of cell-derived matrices using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tello, Marta; Spenlé, Caroline; Hemmerlé, Joseph; Mercier, Luc; Fabre, Roxane; Allio, Guillaume; Simon-Assmann, Patricia; Goetz, Jacky G

    2016-02-01

    Mechanical interaction between cells and their surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM) controls key processes such as proliferation, differentiation and motility. For many years, two-dimensional (2D) models were used to better understand the interactions between cells and their surrounding ECM. More recently, variation of the mechanical properties of tissues has been reported to play a major role in physiological and pathological scenarios such as cancer progression. The 3D architecture of the ECM finely tunes cellular behavior to perform physiologically relevant tasks. Technical limitations prevented scientists from obtaining accurate assessment of the mechanical properties of physiologically realistic matrices. There is therefore a need for combining the production of high-quality cell-derived 3D matrices (CDMs) and the characterization of their topographical and mechanical properties. Here, we describe methods that allow to accurately measure the young modulus of matrices produced by various cellular types. In the first part, we will describe and review several protocols for generating CDMs matrices from endothelial, epithelial, fibroblastic, muscle and mesenchymal stem cells. We will discuss tools allowing the characterization of the topographical details as well as of the protein content of such CDMs. In a second part, we will report the methodologies that can be used, based on atomic force microscopy, to accurately evaluate the stiffness properties of the CDMs through the quantification of their young modulus. Altogether, such methodologies allow characterizing the stiffness and topography of matrices deposited by the cells, which is key for the understanding of cellular behavior in physiological conditions.

  3. Modeling Doxorubicin-Induced Cardiotoxicity in Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Derived-Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Maillet, Agnes; Tan, Kim; Chai, Xiaoran; Sadananda, Singh N.; Mehta, Ashish; Ooi, Jolene; Hayden, Michael R.; Pouladi, Mahmoud A.; Ghosh, Sujoy; Shim, Winston; Brunham, Liam R.

    2016-01-01

    Doxorubicin is a highly efficacious anti-cancer drug but causes cardiotoxicity in many patients. The mechanisms of doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity (DIC) remain incompletely understood. We investigated the characteristics and molecular mechanisms of DIC in human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hPSC-CMs). We found that doxorubicin causes dose-dependent increases in apoptotic and necrotic cell death, reactive oxygen species production, mitochondrial dysfunction and increased intracellular calcium concentration. We characterized genome-wide changes in gene expression caused by doxorubicin using RNA-seq, as well as electrophysiological abnormalities caused by doxorubicin with multi-electrode array technology. Finally, we show that CRISPR-Cas9-mediated disruption of TOP2B, a gene implicated in DIC in mouse studies, significantly reduces the sensitivity of hPSC-CMs to doxorubicin-induced double stranded DNA breaks and cell death. These data establish a human cellular model of DIC that recapitulates many of the cardinal features of this adverse drug reaction and could enable screening for protective agents against DIC as well as assessment of genetic variants involved in doxorubicin response. PMID:27142468

  4. Stretch Injury of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Derived Neurons in a 96 Well Format

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Sydney A.; Phillips, Jack K.; Costa, J. Tighe; Cho, Frances S.; Oungoulian, Sevan R.; Finan, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity with limited therapeutic options. Traumatic axonal injury (TAI) is an important component of TBI pathology. It is difficult to reproduce TAI in animal models of closed head injury, but in vitro stretch injury models reproduce clinical TAI pathology. Existing in vitro models employ primary rodent neurons or human cancer cell line cells in low throughput formats. This in vitro neuronal stretch injury model employs human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons (hiPSCNs) in a 96 well format. Silicone membranes were attached to 96 well plate tops to create stretchable, culture substrates. A custom-built device was designed and validated to apply repeatable, biofidelic strains and strain rates to these plates. A high content approach was used to measure injury in a hypothesis-free manner. These measurements are shown to provide a sensitive, dose-dependent, multi-modal description of the response to mechanical insult. hiPSCNs transition from healthy to injured phenotype at approximately 35% Lagrangian strain. Continued development of this model may create novel opportunities for drug discovery and exploration of the role of human genotype in TAI pathology. PMID:27671211

  5. Mistletoe lectin modulates intestinal epithelial cell-derived cytokines and B cell IgA secretion.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Su-Yun; Park, Won-Bong

    2009-03-01

    A galactose- and N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-specific lectin (Viscum album L. var. coloratum agglutinin, VCA), which is known for its anti-cancer activity, was isolated from Korean mistletoe. In this study, IEC-6 rat intestinal epithelial cells and IM-9 human B-cells were cultured to determine the effect of VCA on cytokine and immunoglobulin (Ig) secretion. In lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated IEC-6 cells, VCA significantly shifted the interleukin (IL)-2, IL-5, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) secretion toward a more immunostimulatory response. Since intestinal epithelial cell-derived secretions may be capable of affecting local B cell Ig production in a variety of ways, we mimicked this condition by deriving a 2-day culture supernatant from IEC-6 cell line which was treated VCA in the presence or absence of LPS, and adding these supernatants to cultures of IM-9 human B cells. As a result, IgA secretion was significantly enhanced at in the presence of VCA at 10(-8)-10(-4) microg/mL. This study suggests that cytokines derived from IEC by VCA may create an environment which may contribute to the enhancement of IgA secretion seen in mucosal tissues. Overall, the induction of cytokines in intestinal epithelial cells, and IgA in B cells by Korean mistletoe lectin could indicate an enhanced immunosurveillance to prevent intestinal infections or other intestinal pathologies.

  6. Bystander Effect Induced by Electroporation is Possibly Mediated by Microvesicles and Dependent on Pulse Amplitude, Repetition Frequency and Cell Type.

    PubMed

    Prevc, Ajda; Bedina Zavec, Apolonija; Cemazar, Maja; Kloboves-Prevodnik, Veronika; Stimac, Monika; Todorovic, Vesna; Strojan, Primoz; Sersa, Gregor

    2016-10-01

    Bystander effect, a known phenomenon in radiation biology, where irradiated cells release signals which cause damage to nearby, unirradiated cells, has not been explored in electroporated cells yet. Therefore, our aim was to determine whether bystander effect is present in electroporated melanoma cells in vitro, by determining viability of non-electroporated cells exposed to medium from electroporated cells and by the release of microvesicles as potential indicators of the bystander effect. Here, we demonstrated that electroporation of cells induces bystander effect: Cells exposed to electric pulses mediated their damage to the non-electroporated cells, thus decreasing cell viability. We have shown that shedding microvesicles may be one of the ways used by the cells to mediate the death signals to the neighboring cells. The murine melanoma B16F1 cell line was found to be more electrosensitive and thus more prone to bystander effect than the canine melanoma CMeC-1 cell line. In B16F1 cell line, bystander effect was present above the level of electropermeabilization of the cells, with the threshold at 800 V/cm. Furthermore, with increasing electric field intensities and the number of pulses, the bystander effect also increased. In conclusion, electroporation can induce bystander effect which may be mediated by microvesicles, and depends on pulse amplitude, repetition frequency and cell type.

  7. Mesenchymal stromal cell derived extracellular vesicles rescue radiation damage to murine marrow hematopoietic cells

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Sicheng; Dooner, Mark; Cheng, Yan; Papa, Elaine; Del Tatto, Michael; Pereira, Mandy; Deng, Yanhui; Goldberg, Laura; Aliotta, Jason; Chatterjee, Devasis; Stewart, Connor; Carpanetto, Andrea; Collino, Federica; Bruno, Stefania; Camussi, Giovanni; Quesenberry, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have been shown to reverse radiation damage to marrow stem cells. We have evaluated the capacity of MSC-derived extracellular vesicles (MSC-EVs) to mitigate radiation injury to marrow stem cells at 4 hours to 7 days after irradiation. Significant restoration of marrow stem cell engraftment at 4, 24 and 168 hours post-irradiation by exposure to MSC-EVs was observed at 3 weeks to 9 months after transplant and further confirmed by secondary engraftment. Intravenous injection of MSC-EVs to 500cGy exposed mice led to partial recovery of peripheral blood counts and restoration of the engraftment of marrow. The murine hematopoietic cell line, FDC-P1 exposed to 500 cGy, showed reversal of growth inhibition, DNA damage and apoptosis on exposure to murine or human MSC-EVs. Both murine and human MSC-EVs reverse radiation damage to murine marrow cells and stimulate normal murine marrow stem cell/progenitors to proliferate. A preparation with both exosomes and microvesicles was found to be superior to either microvesicles or exosomes alone. Biologic activity was seen in freshly isolated vesicles and in vesicles stored for up to 6 months in 10% DMSO at −80°C. These studies indicate that MSC-EVs can reverse radiation damage to bone marrow stem cells. PMID:27150009

  8. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) as a target in liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Liepelt, Anke; Tacke, Frank

    2016-08-01

    The chemokine stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) or CXCL12 is constitutively expressed in healthy liver. However, its expression increases following acute or chronic liver injury. Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC), hepatic stellate cells (HSC), and malignant hepatocytes are important sources of SDF-1/CXCL12 in liver diseases. CXCL12 is able to activate two chemokine receptors with different downstream signaling pathways, CXCR4 and CXCR7. CXCR7 expression is relevant on LSEC, while HSC, mesenchymal stem cells, and tumor cells mainly respond via CXCR4. Here, we summarize recent developments in the field of liver diseases involving this chemokine and its receptors. SDF-1-dependent signaling contributes to modulating acute liver injury and subsequent tissue regeneration. By activating HSC and recruiting mesenchymal cells from bone marrow, CXCL12 can promote liver fibrosis progression, while CXCL12-CXCR7 interactions endorse proregenerative responses in chronic injury. Moreover, the SDF-1 pathway is linked to development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) by promoting tumor growth, angiogenesis, and HCC metastasis. High hepatic CXCR4 expression has been suggested as a biomarker indicating poor prognosis of HCC patients. Tumor-infiltrating myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) also express CXCR4 and migrate toward CXCL12. Thus CXCL12 inhibition might not only directly block HCC growth but also modulate the tumor microenvironment (angiogenesis, MDSC), thereby sensitizing HCC patients to conventional or emerging novel cancer therapies (e.g., sorafenib, regorafenib, nivolumab, pembrolizumab). We herein summarize the current knowledge on the complex interplay between CXCL12 and CXCR4/CXCR7 in liver diseases and discuss approaches on the therapeutic targeting of these axes in hepatitis, fibrosis, and liver cancer. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Hypoxic tumor-derived microvesicles negatively regulate NK cell function by a mechanism involving TGF-β and miR23a transfer

    PubMed Central

    Berchem, Guy; Noman, Muhammad Zaeem; Bosseler, Manon; Paggetti, Jerome; Baconnais, Sonia; Le cam, Eric; Nanbakhsh, Arash; Moussay, Etienne; Mami-Chouaib, Fathia; Janji, Bassam; Chouaib, Salem

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tumor-derived microvesicles (TD-MVs) are key mediators which are shed by cancer cells and can sensitize neighboring cells in the tumor microenvironment. TD-MVs are extracellular vesicles composed of exosomes and MVs and promote cancer invasion and metastasis. Intratumoral hypoxia is an integral component of all solid tumors. The relationship between hypoxic tumor-shed MVs and NK-mediated cytotoxicity remains unknown. In this paper, we reported that MVs derived from hypoxic tumor cells qualitatively differ from those derived from normoxic tumor cells. Using multiple tumor models, we showed that hypoxic MVs inhibit more NK cell function as compared to normoxic MVs. Hypoxic TD-MVs package two immunosuppressive factors involved in the impairment of natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxicity against different tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. We showed that following their uptake by NK cells, hypoxic TD-MVs transfer TGF-β1 to NK cells, decreasing the cell surface expression of the activating receptor NKG2D, thereby inhibiting NK cell function. MicroRNA profiling revealed the presence of high levels of miR-210 and miR-23a in hypoxic TD-MVs. We demonstrated that miR-23a in hypoxic TD-MVs operates as an additional immunomosuppressive factor, since it directly targets the expression of CD107a in NK cells. To our knowledge, this is the first study to show that hypoxic tumor cells by secreting MVs can educate NK cells and decrease their antitumor immune response. This study highlights the existence of a novel mechanism of immune suppression mediated by hypoxic TD-MVs and further improves our understanding of the immunosuppressive mechanisms prevailing in the hypoxic tumor microenvironment. PMID:27141372

  10. Preclinical Studies of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Astrocyte Transplantation in ALS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    Pluripotent Stem Cell -Derived Astrocyte Transplantation in ALS PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Nicholas J. Maragakis, M.D...Pluripotent Stem Cell -Derived Astrocyte Transplantation in ALS 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-10-1-0520 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d...into astrocytes following transplantation. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Stem Cells , iPS cells , astrocytes, familial ALS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF

  11. Cell-Derived Extracellular Matrix: Basic Characteristics and Current Applications in Orthopedic Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weixiang; Zhu, Yun; Li, Jia; Guo, Quanyi; Peng, Jiang; Liu, Shichen; Yang, Jianhua; Wang, Yu

    2016-06-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a dynamic and intricate microenvironment with excellent biophysical, biomechanical, and biochemical properties, which can directly or indirectly regulate cell proliferation, adhesion, migration, and differentiation, as well as plays key roles in homeostasis and regeneration of tissues and organs. The ECM has attracted a great deal of attention with the rapid development of tissue engineering in the field of regenerative medicine. Tissue-derived ECM scaffolds (also referred to as decellularized tissues and whole organs) are considered a promising therapy for the repair of musculoskeletal defects, including those that are widely used in orthopedics, although there are a few shortcomings. Similar to tissue-derived ECM scaffolds, cell-derived ECM scaffolds also have highly advantageous biophysical and biochemical properties, in particular their ability to be produced in vitro from a number of different cell types. Furthermore, cell-derived ECM scaffolds more closely resemble native ECM microenvironments. The products of cell-derived ECM have a wide range of biomedical applications; these include reagents for cell culture substrates and biomaterials for scaffolds, hybrid scaffolds, and living cell sheet coculture systems. Although cell-derived ECM has only just begun to be investigated, it has great potential as a novel approach for cell-based tissue repair in orthopedic tissue engineering. This review summarizes and analyzes the various types of cell-derived ECM products applied in cartilage, bone, and nerve tissue engineering in vitro or in vivo and discusses future directions for investigation of cell-derived ECM.

  12. Microvesicles from the plasma of elderly subjects and from senescent endothelial cells promote vascular calcification.

    PubMed

    Alique, Matilde; Ruíz-Torres, María Piedad; Bodega, Guillermo; Noci, María Victoria; Troyano, Nuria; Bohórquez, Lourdes; Luna, Carlos; Luque, Rafael; Carmona, Andrés; Carracedo, Julia; Ramírez, Rafael

    2017-03-08

    Vascular calcification is commonly seen in elderly people, though it can also appear in middle-aged subjects affected by premature vascular aging. The aim of this work is to test the involvement of microvesicles (MVs) produced by senescent endothelial cells (EC) and from plasma of elderly people in vascular calcification. The present work shows that MVs produced by senescent cultured ECs, plus those found in the plasma of elderly subjects, promote calcification in vascular smooth muscle cells. Only MVs from senescent ECs, and from elderly subjects' plasma, induced calcification. This ability correlated with these types of MVs' carriage of: a) increased quantities of annexins (which might act as nucleation sites for calcification), b) increased quantities of bone-morphogenic protein, and c) larger Ca contents. The MVs of senescent, cultured ECs, and those present in the plasma of elderly subjects, promote vascular calcification. The present results provide mechanistic insights into the observed increase in vascular calcification-related diseases in the elderly, and in younger patients with premature vascular aging, paving the way towards novel therapeutic strategies.

  13. Ewing sarcoma cells secrete EWS/Fli-1 fusion mRNA via microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Tsugita, Masanori; Yamada, Nami; Noguchi, Shunsuke; Yamada, Kazunari; Moritake, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Katsuji; Akao, Yukihiro; Ohno, Takatoshi

    2013-01-01

    Tumours defined as Ewing sarcoma (ES) constitute a group of highly malignant neoplasms that most often affect children and young adults in the first 2 decades of life. The EWS/Fli-1 fusion gene, a product of the translocation t(11;22) (q24; 12), is detected in 95% of ES patients. Recently, it was validated that cells emit a heterogeneous mixture of vesicular, organelle-like structures (microvesicles, MVs) into their surroundings including blood and body fluids, and that these MVs contain a selected set of tumor-related proteins and high levels of mRNAs and miRNAs. In this present study, we detected the Ewing sarcoma-specific EWS/Fli-1 mRNA in MVs from the culture medium of ES cell lines carrying t(11;22) (q24; 12). Also, we detected this fusion gene in approximately 40% of the blood samples from mice inoculated with xenografts of TC135 or A673 cells. These findings indicate the EWS/Fli-1 mRNA in MVs might be a new non-invasive diagnostic marker for specific cases of Ewing sarcoma.

  14. Therapeutic Effects of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell–derived Microvesicles in Severe Pneumonia in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Monsel, Antoine; Zhu, Ying-gang; Gennai, Stephane; Hao, Qi; Hu, Shuling; Rouby, Jean-Jacques; Rosenzwajg, Michelle; Matthay, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Microvesicles (MVs) are anuclear fragments of cells released from the endosomal compartment or shed from surface membranes. We and other investigators demonstrated that MVs released by mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were as effective as the cells themselves in inflammatory injuries, such as after endotoxin-induced acute lung injury. However, the therapeutic effects of MVs in an infectious model of acute lung injury remain unknown. Objectives: We investigated the effects of human MSC MVs on lung inflammation, protein permeability, bacterial clearance, and survival after severe bacterial pneumonia. Methods: We tested the effects of MVs derived from human MSCs on Escherichia coli pneumonia in mice. We also studied the interactions between MVs and human monocytes and human alveolar epithelial type 2 cells. Measurements and Main Results: Administration of MVs derived from human MSCs improved survival in part through keratinocyte growth factor secretion and decreased the influx of inflammatory cells, cytokines, protein, and bacteria in mice injured with bacterial pneumonia. In primary cultures of human monocytes or alveolar type 2 cells, the uptake of MVs was mediated by CD44 receptors, which were essential for the therapeutic effects. MVs enhanced monocyte phagocytosis of bacteria while decreasing inflammatory cytokine secretion and increased intracellular ATP levels in injured alveolar epithelial type 2 cells. Prestimulation of MSCs with a toll-like receptor 3 agonist further enhanced the therapeutic effects of the released MVs. Conclusions: MVs derived from human MSCs were as effective as the parent stem cells in severe bacterial pneumonia. PMID:26067592

  15. Proteinase 3 Is a Phosphatidylserine-binding Protein That Affects the Production and Function of Microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Martin, Katherine R; Kantari-Mimoun, Chahrazade; Yin, Min; Pederzoli-Ribeil, Magali; Angelot-Delettre, Fanny; Ceroi, Adam; Grauffel, Cédric; Benhamou, Marc; Reuter, Nathalie; Saas, Philippe; Frachet, Philippe; Boulanger, Chantal M; Witko-Sarsat, Véronique

    2016-05-13

    Proteinase 3 (PR3), the autoantigen in granulomatosis with polyangiitis, is expressed at the plasma membrane of resting neutrophils, and this membrane expression increases during both activation and apoptosis. Using surface plasmon resonance and protein-lipid overlay assays, this study demonstrates that PR3 is a phosphatidylserine-binding protein and this interaction is dependent on the hydrophobic patch responsible for membrane anchorage. Molecular simulations suggest that PR3 interacts with phosphatidylserine via a small number of amino acids, which engage in long lasting interactions with the lipid heads. As phosphatidylserine is a major component of microvesicles (MVs), this study also examined the consequences of this interaction on MV production and function. PR3-expressing cells produced significantly fewer MVs during both activation and apoptosis, and this reduction was dependent on the ability of PR3 to associate with the membrane as mutating the hydrophobic patch restored MV production. Functionally, activation-evoked MVs from PR3-expressing cells induced a significantly larger respiratory burst in human neutrophils compared with control MVs. Conversely, MVs generated during apoptosis inhibited the basal respiratory burst in human neutrophils, and those generated from PR3-expressing cells hampered this inhibition. Given that membrane expression of PR3 is increased in patients with granulomatosis with polyangiitis, MVs generated from neutrophils expressing membrane PR3 may potentiate oxidative damage of endothelial cells and promote the systemic inflammation observed in this disease. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Proteinase 3 Is a Phosphatidylserine-binding Protein That Affects the Production and Function of Microvesicles*

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Katherine R.; Kantari-Mimoun, Chahrazade; Yin, Min; Pederzoli-Ribeil, Magali; Angelot-Delettre, Fanny; Ceroi, Adam; Grauffel, Cédric; Benhamou, Marc; Reuter, Nathalie; Saas, Philippe; Frachet, Philippe; Boulanger, Chantal M.; Witko-Sarsat, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    Proteinase 3 (PR3), the autoantigen in granulomatosis with polyangiitis, is expressed at the plasma membrane of resting neutrophils, and this membrane expression increases during both activation and apoptosis. Using surface plasmon resonance and protein-lipid overlay assays, this study demonstrates that PR3 is a phosphatidylserine-binding protein and this interaction is dependent on the hydrophobic patch responsible for membrane anchorage. Molecular simulations suggest that PR3 interacts with phosphatidylserine via a small number of amino acids, which engage in long lasting interactions with the lipid heads. As phosphatidylserine is a major component of microvesicles (MVs), this study also examined the consequences of this interaction on MV production and function. PR3-expressing cells produced significantly fewer MVs during both activation and apoptosis, and this reduction was dependent on the ability of PR3 to associate with the membrane as mutating the hydrophobic patch restored MV production. Functionally, activation-evoked MVs from PR3-expressing cells induced a significantly larger respiratory burst in human neutrophils compared with control MVs. Conversely, MVs generated during apoptosis inhibited the basal respiratory burst in human neutrophils, and those generated from PR3-expressing cells hampered this inhibition. Given that membrane expression of PR3 is increased in patients with granulomatosis with polyangiitis, MVs generated from neutrophils expressing membrane PR3 may potentiate oxidative damage of endothelial cells and promote the systemic inflammation observed in this disease. PMID:26961880

  17. Microvesicles from Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Are Involved in HPC-Microenvironment Crosstalk in Myelodysplastic Patients.

    PubMed

    Muntión, Sandra; Ramos, Teresa L; Diez-Campelo, María; Rosón, Beatriz; Sánchez-Abarca, Luis Ignacio; Misiewicz-Krzeminska, Irena; Preciado, Silvia; Sarasquete, María-Eugenia; de Las Rivas, Javier; González, Marcos; Sánchez-Guijo, Fermín; Del Cañizo, María-Consuelo

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes/microvesicles (MVs) provide a mechanism of intercellular communication. Our hypothesis was that mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) from myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients could modify CD34+ cells properties by MVs. They were isolated from MSC from MDS patients and healthy donors (HD). MVs from 30 low-risk MDS patients and 27 HD were purified by ExoQuick-TC™ or ultracentrifugation and identified by transmission electron microscopy, flow cytometry (FC) and western blot for CD63. Incorporation of MVs into CD34+ cells was analyzed by FC, and confocal and fluorescence microscopy. Changes in hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) properties were assessed from modifications in microRNAs and gene expression in CD34+ cells as well as viability and clonogenic assays of CD34+ cells after MVs incorporation. Some microRNAs were overexpressed in MVs from patients MSC and two of them, miR-10a and miR-15a, were confirmed by RT-PCR. These microRNAs were transferred to CD34+ cells, modifying the expression of MDM2 and P53 genes, which was evaluated by RT-PCR and western blot. Finally, examining CD34+ cells properties after incorporation, higher cell viability (p = 0.025) and clonogenic capacity (p = 0.037) were observed when MVs from MDS patients were incorporated. In summary, we show that BM-MSC release MVs with a different cargo in MDS patients compared with HD. These structures are incorporated into HPC and modify their properties.

  18. Characterization of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Microvesicle Genesis, Morphology and Pluripotent Content

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jing; Ghoroghi, Shima; Benito-Martin, Alberto; Wu, Hao; Unachukwu, Uchenna John; Einbond, Linda Saxe; Guariglia, Sara; Peinado, Hector; Redenti, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Microvesicles (MVs) are lipid bilayer-covered cell fragments that range in diameter from 30 nm–1uM and are released from all cell types. An increasing number of studies reveal that MVs contain microRNA, mRNA and protein that can be detected in the extracellular space. In this study, we characterized induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) MV genesis, content and fusion to retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) in vitro. Nanoparticle tracking revealed that iPSCs released approximately 2200 MVs cell/hour in the first 12 hrs with an average diameter of 122 nm. Electron and light microscopic analysis of iPSCs showed MV release via lipid bilayer budding. The mRNA content of iPSC MVs was characterized and revealed the presence of the transcription factors Oct-3/4, Nanog, Klf4, and C-Myc. The protein content of iPSCs MVs, detected by immunogold electron microscopy, revealed the presence of the Oct-3/4 and Nanog. Isolated iPSC MVs were shown to fuse with RPCs in vitro at multiple points along the plasma membrane. These findings demonstrate that the mRNA and protein cargo in iPSC MVs have established roles in maintenance of pluripotency. Building on this work, iPSC derived MVs may be shown to be involved in maintaining cellular pluripotency and may have application in regenerative strategies for neural tissue. PMID:26797168

  19. MicroRNA biomarkers of Parkinson's disease in serum exosome-like microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiang-Yang; Lu, Jing-Min; Zhao, Zhi-Qiang; Li, Ming-Chao; Lu, Ting; An, Xu-Sheng; Xue, Liu-Jun

    2017-02-20

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive age-related debilitating motor disorder and the second most common neurodegenerative disease after Alzheimer's disease. In this study, we aimed to investigate the expression of 24 candidate miRNAs in PD and to assess their diagnostic value in patients with PD. We collected serum samples from 109 patients with PD and 40 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers (control group). RNAs encapsulated in exosome-like microvesicles in serum were extracted and reverse transcribed. Serum miRNAs were analyzed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), and the ability of the miRNAs to accurately discriminate PD was analyzed by receiver operating characteristic curves. Based on our analysis, we further validated the downregulation of miR-19b and the upregulation of miR-195 and miR-24 in patients with PD. When compared with the control group, the area under the curve (AUC) values for miR-19b, miR-24, and miR-195 were 0.753, 0.908, and 0.697, respectively. Therefore, analysis of the expression levels of miR-19b, miR-24, and miR-195 in serum may be useful for the diagnosis of PD.

  20. Complex N-Linked Glycans Serve as a Determinant for Exosome/Microvesicle Cargo Recruitment*

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yaxuan; Eng, William S.; Colquhoun, David R.; Dinglasan, Rhoel R.; Graham, David R.; Mahal, Lara K.

    2014-01-01

    Exosomes, also known as microvesicles (EMVs), are nano-sized membranous particles secreted from nearly all mammalian cell types. These nanoparticles play critical roles in many physiological processes including cell-cell signaling, immune activation, and suppression and are associated with disease states such as tumor progression. The biological functions of EMVs are highly dependent on their protein composition, which can dictate pathogenicity. Although some mechanisms have been proposed for the regulation of EMV protein trafficking, little attention has been paid to N-linked glycosylation as a potential sorting signal. Previous work from our laboratory found a conserved glycan signature for EMVs, which differed from that of the parent cell membranes, suggesting a potential role for glycosylation in EMV biogenesis. In this study, we further explore the role of glycosylation in EMV protein trafficking. We identify EMV glycoproteins and demonstrate alteration of their recruitment as a function of their glycosylation status upon pharmacological manipulation. Furthermore, we show that genetic manipulation of the glycosylation levels of a specific EMV glycoprotein, EWI-2, directly impacts its recruitment as a function of N-linked glycan sites. Taken together, our data provide strong evidence that N-linked glycosylation directs glycoprotein sorting into EMVs. PMID:25261472

  1. Secretagogue-triggered transfer of membrane proteins from neuroendocrine secretory granules to synaptic-like microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Strasser, J E; Arribas, M; Blagoveshchenskaya, A D; Cutler, D F

    1999-08-01

    The membrane proteins of all regulated secretory organelles (RSOs) recycle after exocytosis. However, the recycling of those membrane proteins that are targeted to both dense core granules (DCGs) and synaptic-like microvesicles (SLMVs) has not been addressed. Since neuroendocrine cells contain both RSOs, and the recycling routes that lead to either organelle overlap, transfer between the two pools of membrane proteins could occur during recycling. We have previously demonstrated that a chimeric protein containing the cytosolic and transmembrane domains of P-selectin coupled to horseradish peroxidase is targeted to both the DCG and the SLMV in PC12 cells. Using this chimera, we have characterized secretagogue-induced traffic in PC12 cells. After stimulation, this chimeric protein traffics from DCGs to the cell surface, internalizes into transferrin receptor (TFnR)-positive endosomes and thence to a population of secretagogue-responsive SLMVs. We therefore find a secretagogue-dependent rise in levels of HRP within SLMVs. In addition, the levels within SLMVs of the endogenous membrane protein, synaptotagmin, as well as a green fluorescent protein-tagged version of vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP)/synaptobrevin, also show a secretagogue-dependent increase.

  2. Secretagogue-triggered Transfer of Membrane Proteins from Neuroendocrine Secretory Granules to Synaptic-like Microvesicles

    PubMed Central

    Strasser, Jane E.; Arribas, Monica; Blagoveshchenskaya, Anastasia D.; Cutler, Daniel F.

    1999-01-01

    The membrane proteins of all regulated secretory organelles (RSOs) recycle after exocytosis. However, the recycling of those membrane proteins that are targeted to both dense core granules (DCGs) and synaptic-like microvesicles (SLMVs) has not been addressed. Since neuroendocrine cells contain both RSOs, and the recycling routes that lead to either organelle overlap, transfer between the two pools of membrane proteins could occur during recycling. We have previously demonstrated that a chimeric protein containing the cytosolic and transmembrane domains of P-selectin coupled to horseradish peroxidase is targeted to both the DCG and the SLMV in PC12 cells. Using this chimera, we have characterized secretagogue-induced traffic in PC12 cells. After stimulation, this chimeric protein traffics from DCGs to the cell surface, internalizes into transferrin receptor (TFnR)-positive endosomes and thence to a population of secretagogue-responsive SLMVs. We therefore find a secretagogue-dependent rise in levels of HRP within SLMVs. In addition, the levels within SLMVs of the endogenous membrane protein, synaptotagmin, as well as a green fluorescent protein-tagged version of vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP)/synaptobrevin, also show a secretagogue-dependent increase. PMID:10436017

  3. Microvesicles from Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Are Involved in HPC-Microenvironment Crosstalk in Myelodysplastic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Muntión, Sandra; Ramos, Teresa L.; Diez-Campelo, María; Rosón, Beatriz; Sánchez-Abarca, Luis Ignacio; Misiewicz-Krzeminska, Irena; Preciado, Silvia; Sarasquete, María-Eugenia; de las Rivas, Javier; González, Marcos; Sánchez-Guijo, Fermín; del Cañizo, María-Consuelo

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes/microvesicles (MVs) provide a mechanism of intercellular communication. Our hypothesis was that mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) from myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients could modify CD34+ cells properties by MVs. They were isolated from MSC from MDS patients and healthy donors (HD). MVs from 30 low-risk MDS patients and 27 HD were purified by ExoQuick-TC™ or ultracentrifugation and identified by transmission electron microscopy, flow cytometry (FC) and western blot for CD63. Incorporation of MVs into CD34+ cells was analyzed by FC, and confocal and fluorescence microscopy. Changes in hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) properties were assessed from modifications in microRNAs and gene expression in CD34+ cells as well as viability and clonogenic assays of CD34+ cells after MVs incorporation. Some microRNAs were overexpressed in MVs from patients MSC and two of them, miR-10a and miR-15a, were confirmed by RT-PCR. These microRNAs were transferred to CD34+ cells, modifying the expression of MDM2 and P53 genes, which was evaluated by RT-PCR and western blot. Finally, examining CD34+ cells properties after incorporation, higher cell viability (p = 0.025) and clonogenic capacity (p = 0.037) were observed when MVs from MDS patients were incorporated. In summary, we show that BM-MSC release MVs with a different cargo in MDS patients compared with HD. These structures are incorporated into HPC and modify their properties. PMID:26836120

  4. Equine Amniotic Microvesicles and Their Anti-Inflammatory Potential in a Tenocyte Model In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Lange-Consiglio, Anna; Perrini, Claudia; Tasquier, Riccardo; Deregibus, Maria Chiara; Camussi, Giovanni; Pascucci, Luisa; Marini, Maria Giovanna; Corradetti, Bruna; Bizzaro, Davide; De Vita, Bruna; Romele, Pietro; Parolini, Ornella; Cremonesi, Fausto

    2016-04-15

    Administration of horse amniotic mesenchymal cells (AMCs) and their conditioned medium (AMC-CM) improves the in vivo recovery of spontaneous equine tendon lesions and inhibits in vitro proliferation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). This process may involve microvesicles (MVs) as an integral component of cell-to-cell communication during tissue regeneration. In this study, the presence and type of MVs secreted by AMCs were investigated and the response of equine tendon cells to MVs was studied using a dose-response curve at different concentrations and times. Moreover, the ability of MVs to counteract in vitro inflammation of tendon cells induced by lipopolysaccharide was studied through the expression of some proinflammatory genes such as metallopeptidase (MPP) 1, 9, and 13 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), and expression of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β). Lastly, the immunomodulatory potential of MVs was investigated. Results show that AMCs secrete MVs ranging in size from 100 to 200 nm. An inverse relationship between concentration and time was found in their uptake by tendon cells: the maximal uptake occurred after 72 h at a concentration of 40 × 10(6) MVs/mL. MVs induced a downregulation of MMP1, MMP9, MMP13, and TNFα expression without affecting PBMC proliferation, contrary to CM and supernatant. Our data suggest that MVs contribute to in vivo healing of tendon lesions, alongside soluble factors in AMC-CM.

  5. The Antioxidant Machinery of Young and Senescent Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells and Their Microvesicles

    PubMed Central

    Alique, Matilde; Bohórquez, Lourdes; Ciordia, Sergio; Mena, María C.; Ramírez, Manuel R.

    2017-01-01

    We examine the antioxidant role of young and senescent human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and their microvesicles (MVs). Proteomic and Western blot studies have shown young HUVECs to have a complete and well-developed antioxidant system. Their MVs also contain antioxidant molecules, though of a smaller and more specific range, specialized in the degradation of hydrogen peroxide and the superoxide anion via the thioredoxin-peroxiredoxin system. Senescence was shown to be associated with a large increase in the size of the antioxidant machinery in both HUVECs and their MVs. These responses might help HUVECs and their MVs deal with the more oxidising conditions found in older cells. Functional analysis confirmed the antioxidant machinery of the MVs to be active and to increase in size with senescence. No glutathione or nonpeptide antioxidant (ascorbic acid and vitamin E) activity was detected in the MVs. Endothelial cells and MVs seem to adapt to higher ROS concentrations in senescence by increasing their antioxidant machinery, although this is not enough to recover completely from the senescence-induced ROS increase. Moreover, MVs could be involved in the regulation of the blood plasma redox status by functioning as ROS scavengers. PMID:28642812

  6. Microvesicles and diabetic complications — novel mediators, potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Chen, Li-ming; Liu, Ming-lin

    2014-01-01

    Microvesicles (MVs), also known as microparticles, are small membrane vesicles released from different cell types under different conditions. MVs have been detected in the circulation and in organs/tissues in various diseases, including diabetes. Patients with different types of diabetes and complications have different cellular MV patterns. Studies have shown that MVs may mediate vascular thrombosis, vascular inflammation, angiogenesis, and other pathological processes of the disease through their procoagulant, pro-inflammatory, pro-angiogenic, proteolytic, and other properties. Therefore, MVs contribute to the development of diabetic macrovascular and microvascular complications. In addition, clinical studies have indicated that changes in MV number and composition may reflect the pathophysiological conditions of disease, and therefore, may serve as potential biomarkers for diagnostic and prognostic use. Understanding MVs' involvement in the pathophysiological conditions may provide insight into disease mechanisms and would also be helpful for the development of novel therapeutic strategies in the future. Here, we review the latest publications from our group and other groups and focus on the involvement of MVs in diabetic complications. PMID:24608676

  7. Microvesicles released from Giardia intestinalis disturb host-pathogen response in vitro.

    PubMed

    Evans-Osses, Ingrid; Mojoli, Andres; Monguió-Tortajada, Marta; Marcilla, Antonio; Aran, Veronica; Amorim, Maria; Inal, Jameel; Borràs, Francesc E; Ramirez, Marcel I

    2017-03-01

    Giardia intestinalis (G.I), is an anaerobic protozoan and the aetiological agent of giardiasis, a diarrhoea present worldwide and associated with poverty. G.I has a simple life cycle alternating between cyst and trophozoite. Cysts are transmitted orally to the stomach and transform to trophozoites in the intestine by a multifactorial process. Recently, microvesicles (MVs) have been found to be released from a wide range of eukaryotic cells. We have observed a release of MVs during the life cycle of G.I., identifying MVs from active trophozoites and from trophozoites differentiating to the cyst form. The aim of the current work was to investigate the role of MVs from G.I in the pathogenesis of giardiasis. MVs from log phase were able to increase the attachment of G. intestinalis trophozoites to Caco-2 cells. Moreover, MVs from G. intestinalis could be captured by human immature dendritic cells, resulting in increased activation and allostimulation of human dendritic cells. Lipid rafts participate in the MV biogenesis and in the attachment to Caco-2 cells. Nevertheless, proteomic analysis from two types of MVs has shown slight differences at the protein levels. An understanding of biogenesis and content of MVs derived from trophozoites might have important implications in the pathogenesis of the disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Identification of an immunogenic protein of Actinobacillus seminis that is present in microvesicles

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Actinobacillus seminis is a gram-negative bacterium of the Pasteurellaceae family that is involved in ovine epididymitis. Looking for a protein specific to this species, we determined the protein profile of subcellular fractions of A. seminis (American Type Culture Collection number 15768): proteins from the outer membrane (OMPs), inner membrane (IMPs), and cytoplasm (CPs). These profiles provide the first data, to our knowledge, regarding subcellular fractions of A. seminis. In the OMP fraction, we identified a protein with a molecular mass of 75 kDa that proved to be immunogenic and apparently specific for A. seminis. This conclusion was based on the reaction of hyperimmune serum of rabbits inoculated with whole cells of A. seminis that was tested against sonicated complete cells of reference strains and field isolates of Brucella ovis, Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, and Histophilus somni. No protein of these bacteria cross-reacted with the 75-kDa protein of A. seminis. Furthermore, when each type of hyperimmune serum was tested against the sonicated cells and each of the subcellular fractions of A. seminis, it did not recognize the A. seminis 75-kDa protein. We also isolated and identified this protein in microvesicles released to the culture supernatant. The results suggest that the 75-kDa protein could be used to establish a diagnostic test specific for ovine epididymitis caused by A. seminis. PMID:16548331

  9. Tumour-derived microvesicles (TMV) mimic the effect of tumour cells on monocyte subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Baj-Krzyworzeka, Monika; Baran, Jaroslaw; Weglarczyk, Kazimierz; Szatanek, Rafal; Szaflarska, Anna; Siedlar, Maciej; Zembala, Marek

    2010-09-01

    Monocytes/macrophages may be affected by tumour cells via cell-to-cell contact, soluble factors and by tumour-derived microvesicles (TMV). Previous observations indicate that TMV interact with monocytes and alter their immunophenotype and activity. This study was designed to determine interactions of TMV with subpopulations (CD14(++)CD16(-) and CD14(+)CD16(++)) of human monocytes. Engulfment of TMV by subsets of monocytes was analysed by flow cytometry. Moreover cytokine release and production of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) and reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNI) by CD14(++)CD16(-) and CD14(+)CD16(++) cells after TMV stimulation was determined. It was found that TMV are engulfed more efficiently by CD14(++)CD16(-) than CD14(+)CD16(++) cells. TMV-activated CD14(++)CD16(-) cells produce more ROI and interleukin -10 (IL-10) than CD14(++)CD16(+). CD14(+)CD16(++) cells following TMV stimulation showed an increased release of tumour necrosis factor alpha, IL-12p40 and RNI. TMV significantly modulate biological activity of monocyte subsets with a pattern similar to tumour cells. Therefore, TMV mimic the activating effect of tumour cells on monocytes as assessed by release of cytokines, ROI and RNI.

  10. Microvesicles from the plasma of elderly subjects and from senescent endothelial cells promote vascular calcification

    PubMed Central

    Bodega, Guillermo; Noci, María Victoria; Troyano, Nuria; Bohórquez, Lourdes; Luna, Carlos; Luque, Rafael; Carmona, Andrés; Carracedo, Julia; Ramírez, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    Vascular calcification is commonly seen in elderly people, though it can also appear in middle-aged subjects affected by premature vascular aging. The aim of this work is to test the involvement of microvesicles (MVs) produced by senescent endothelial cells (EC) and from plasma of elderly people in vascular calcification. The present work shows that MVs produced by senescent cultured ECs, plus those found in the plasma of elderly subjects, promote calcification in vascular smooth muscle cells. Only MVs from senescent ECs, and from elderly subjects' plasma, induced calcification. This ability correlated with these types of MVs' carriage of: a) increased quantities of annexins (which might act as nucleation sites for calcification), b) increased quantities of bone-morphogenic protein, and c) larger Ca contents. The MVs of senescent, cultured ECs, and those present in the plasma of elderly subjects, promote vascular calcification. The present results provide mechanistic insights into the observed increase in vascular calcification-related diseases in the elderly, and in younger patients with premature vascular aging, paving the way towards novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:28278131

  11. Gut commensal microvesicles reproduce parent bacterial signals to host immune and enteric nervous systems.

    PubMed

    Al-Nedawi, Khalid; Mian, M Firoz; Hossain, Nazia; Karimi, Khalil; Mao, Yu-Kang; Forsythe, Paul; Min, Kevin K; Stanisz, Andrew M; Kunze, Wolfgang A; Bienenstock, John

    2015-02-01

    Ingestion of a commensal bacteria, Lactobacillus rhamnosus JB-1, has potent immunoregulatory effects, and changes nerve-dependent colon migrating motor complexes (MMCs), enteric nerve function, and behavior. How these alterations occur is unknown. JB-1 microvesicles (MVs) are enriched for heat shock protein components such as chaperonin 60 heat-shock protein isolated from Escherichia coli (GroEL) and reproduce regulatory and neuronal effects in vitro and in vivo. Ingested labeled MVs were detected in murine Peyer's patch (PP) dendritic cells (DCs) within 18 h. After 3 d, PP and mesenteric lymph node DCs assumed a regulatory phenotype and increased functional regulatory CD4(+)25(+)Foxp3+ T cells. JB-1, MVs, and GroEL similarly induced phenotypic change in cocultured DCs via multiple pathways including C-type lectin receptors specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3 grabbing non-integrin-related 1 and Dectin-1, as well as TLR-2 and -9. JB-1 and MVs also decreased the amplitude of neuronally dependent MMCs in an ex vivo model of peristalsis. Gut epithelial, but not direct neuronal application of, MVs, replicated functional effects of JB-1 on in situ patch-clamped enteric neurons. GroEL and anti-TLR-2 were without effect in this system, suggesting the importance of epithelium neuron signaling and discrimination between pathways for bacteria-neuron and -immune communication. Together these results offer a mechanistic explanation of how Gram-positive commensals and probiotics may influence the host's immune and nervous systems. © FASEB.

  12. Complex N-linked glycans serve as a determinant for exosome/microvesicle cargo recruitment.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yaxuan; Eng, William S; Colquhoun, David R; Dinglasan, Rhoel R; Graham, David R; Mahal, Lara K

    2014-11-21

    Exosomes, also known as microvesicles (EMVs), are nano-sized membranous particles secreted from nearly all mammalian cell types. These nanoparticles play critical roles in many physiological processes including cell-cell signaling, immune activation, and suppression and are associated with disease states such as tumor progression. The biological functions of EMVs are highly dependent on their protein composition, which can dictate pathogenicity. Although some mechanisms have been proposed for the regulation of EMV protein trafficking, little attention has been paid to N-linked glycosylation as a potential sorting signal. Previous work from our laboratory found a conserved glycan signature for EMVs, which differed from that of the parent cell membranes, suggesting a potential role for glycosylation in EMV biogenesis. In this study, we further explore the role of glycosylation in EMV protein trafficking. We identify EMV glycoproteins and demonstrate alteration of their recruitment as a function of their glycosylation status upon pharmacological manipulation. Furthermore, we show that genetic manipulation of the glycosylation levels of a specific EMV glycoprotein, EWI-2, directly impacts its recruitment as a function of N-linked glycan sites. Taken together, our data provide strong evidence that N-linked glycosylation directs glycoprotein sorting into EMVs.

  13. Platelet-derived microvesicles are involved in cardio-protective effects of remote preconditioning.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fang; Liu, Hengchao; Shen, Yong; Zhang, Yingjie; Pan, Shaojun

    2015-01-01

    The ischemia-protective mechanism of remote precondition has been a mystery for a long time. Little was known about details of the inter-organ cardio-protective. Microvesicles, also known as microparticles (MPs), are small membrane-vesicles budding from the plasma membrane of cell. Recent studies have indicated MPs to be an important messenger in various biological processes. Our research mainly examined the hypothesis that remote ischemic conditioning can attenuate heart infarction in a rat after they were subjected to 30 min ischemia and 180 min reperfusion (I/R) by MPs. MPs were extracted from three groups of rat: 1) healthy rats, 2) healthy rats that underwent hindlimb ischemia-reperfusion preconditioning (RIPC) immediately, 3) healthy rats that underwent RIPC in 6 hours. Isolated MPs were transfused into rats that had undergone I/R without RIPC. The transfusion of MPs from rats that underwent RIPC immediately resulted in an increase in platelet-derived MPs in blood and reduction in infarction size, confirmed by 2-3-5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. We further observed the contractile function in hearts after they were subjected to different treatments. However, no significant difference was observed in transfusion of MPs from rats that underwent RIPC in 6 hours. RIPC induces an increase in MPs, and platelet-derived MPs may confer at least part of the remote protective effect against cardiac ischemic-reperfusion injury.

  14. Microvesicle and tunneling nanotube mediated intercellular transfer of g-protein coupled receptors in cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Guescini, M.; Leo, G.; Genedani, S.; Carone, C.; Pederzoli, F.; Ciruela, F.; Guidolin, D.; Stocchi, V.; Mantuano, M.; Borroto-Escuela, D.O.; Fuxe, K.; Agnati, L.F.

    2012-03-10

    Recent evidence shows that cells exchange collections of signals via microvesicles (MVs) and tunneling nano-tubes (TNTs). In this paper we have investigated whether in cell cultures GPCRs can be transferred by means of MVs and TNTs from a source cell to target cells. Western blot, transmission electron microscopy and gene expression analyses demonstrate that A{sub 2A} and D{sub 2} receptors are present in released MVs. In order to further demonstrate the involvement of MVs in cell-to-cell communication we created two populations of cells (HEK293T and COS-7) transiently transfected with D{sub 2}R-CFP or A{sub 2A}R-YFP. These two types of cells were co-cultured, and FRET analysis demonstrated simultaneously positive cells to the D{sub 2}R-CFP and A{sub 2A}R-YFP. Fluorescence microscopy analysis also showed that GPCRs can move from one cell to another also by means of TNTs. Finally, recipient cells pre-incubated for 24 h with A{sub 2A}R positive MVs were treated with the adenosine A{sub 2A} receptor agonist CGS-21680. The significant increase in cAMP accumulation clearly demonstrated that A{sub 2A}Rs were functionally competent in target cells. These findings demonstrate that A{sub 2A} receptors capable of recognizing and decoding extracellular signals can be safely transferred via MVs from source to target cells.

  15. Radiation response of mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow and human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad S; Stemig, Melissa E; Takahashi, Yutaka; Hui, Susanta K

    2015-03-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from human pluripotent stem cells are comparable with bone marrow-derived MSCs in their function and immunophenotype. The purpose of this exploratory study was comparative evaluation of the radiation responses of mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow- (BMMSCs) and from human embryonic stem cells (hESMSCs). BMMSCs and hESMSCs were irradiated at 0 Gy (control) to 16 Gy using a linear accelerator commonly used for cancer treatment. Cells were harvested immediately after irradiation, and at 1 and 5 days after irradiation. Cell cycle analysis, colony forming ability (CFU-F), differentiation ability, and expression of osteogenic-specific runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2), adipogenic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), oxidative stress-specific dismutase-1 (SOD1) and Glutathione peroxidase (GPX1) were analyzed. Irradiation arrested cell cycle progression in BMMSCs and hESMSCs. Colony formation ability of irradiated MSCs decreased in a dose-dependent manner. Irradiated hESMSCs showed higher adipogenic differentiation compared with BMMSCs, together with an increase in the adipogenic PPARγ expression. PPARγ expression was upregulated as early as 4 h after irradiation, along with the expression of SOD1. More than 70% downregulation was found in Wnt3A, Wnt4, Wnt 7A, Wnt10A and Wnt11 in BMMSCs, but not in hESMSCs. hESMSCs are highly proliferative but radiosensitive compared with BMMSCs. Increased PPARγ expression relative to RUNX2 and downregulation of Wnt ligands in irradiated MSCs suggest Wnt mediated the fate determination of irradiated MSCs.

  16. Postacute stromal cell-derived factor-1α expression promotes neurovascular recovery in ischemic mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaning; Huang, Jun; He, Xiaosong; Tang, Guanghui; Tang, Yao-Hui; Liu, Yanqun; Lin, Xiaojie; Lu, Yifan; Yang, Guo-Yuan; Wang, Yongting

    2014-06-01

    Acute interventions of stroke are often challenged by a narrow treatment window. In this study, we explore treatments in the postacute phase of stroke with wider windows of opportunity. We investigated the effects of stromal cell-derived factor (SDF-1α) in neurovascular recovery during the postacute phase and downstream signaling pathways, underlying SDF-1α-mediated neurovascular recovery. Adult male Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) mice underwent middle cerebral artery occlusion. One week after middle cerebral artery occlusion, the animals received stereotactic injection of adenoassociated virus (AAV) carrying SDF-1α gene as treatment or AAV-green fluorescent protein as control and were monitored for 5 weeks. Neurobehavioral outcomes were evaluated, and brain atrophy was measured. Neurogenesis and angiogenesis were examined. The proliferation and migration of neural progenitor cells were evaluated. Downstream pathways of SDF-1α were investigated. Inflammatory response was monitored. Neurobehavioral outcomes were improved, and brain atrophy was greatly reduced for ≤5 weeks in AAV-SDF-1α groups when compared with the control. SDF-1 receptor CXCR4 was upregulated and colocalized with neural and endothelial progenitor cells. The number of nestin(+) and doublecortin(+)/bromodeoxyuridine(+) cells in the subventricular zone, doublecortin(+) and neuron(+)/bromodeoxyuridine(+) cells in the perifocal region, and cluster of differentiation (CD)31(+) and bromodeoxyuridine(+)/CD31(+) microvessels are also significantly increased in AAV-SDF-1α groups. Administration of CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 eliminated the beneficial effects of SDF-1α. SDF-1α/CXCR4 interaction activated AKT, extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), and P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways but not the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway. SDF-1α promoted neurogenesis and angiogenesis during the postacute phase of ischemia without eliciting an inflammatory response

  17. The Role of Tumor Cell-Derived Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CTGF/CCN2) in Pancreatic Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Bennewith, Kevin L.; Huang, Xin; Ham, Christine M.; Graves, Edward E.; Erler, Janine T.; Kambham, Neeraja; Feazell, Jonathan; Yang, George P.; Koong, Albert

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is highly aggressive and refractory to existing therapies. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) is a fibrosis-related gene that is thought to play a role in pancreatic tumor progression. However, CCN2 can be expressed in a variety of cell types, and the contribution of CCN2 derived from either tumor cells or stromal cells as it affects the growth of pancreatic tumors is unknown. Using genetic inhibition of CCN2, we have discovered that CCN2 derived from tumor cells is a critical regulator of pancreatic tumor growth. Pancreatic tumor cells derived from CCN2 shRNA-expressing clones showed dramatically reduced growth in soft agar and when implanted subcutaneously. We also observed a role for CCN2 in the growth of pancreatic tumors implanted orthotopically, with tumor volume measurements obtained by PET imaging. Mechanistically, CCN2 protects cells from hypoxia-mediated apoptosis, providing an in vivo selection for tumor cells that express high levels of CCN2. We found that CCN2 expression and secretion was increased in hypoxic pancreatic tumor cells in vitro, and we observed co-localization of CCN2 and hypoxia in pancreatic tumor xenografts and clinical pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Furthermore, we found increased CCN2 staining in clinical pancreatic tumor tissue relative to stromal cells surrounding the tumor, supporting our assertion that tumor cell-derived CCN2 is important for pancreatic tumor growth. Taken together, these data improve our understanding of the mechanisms responsible for pancreatic tumor growth and progression, and also indicate that CCN2 produced by tumor cells represents a viable therapeutic target for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:19179545

  18. Leukocyte Cell-Derived Chemotaxin 2-Associated Amyloidosis: A Recently Recognized Disease with Distinct Clinicopathologic Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Samih H; Dogan, Ahmet; Larsen, Christopher P

    2015-11-06

    Amyloidosis derived from leukocyte cell-derived chemotaxin 2 is a recently recognized form of amyloidosis, and it has already been established as a frequent form of systemic amyloidosis in the United States, with predominant involvement of kidney and liver. The disease has a strong ethnic bias, affecting mainly Hispanics (particularly Mexicans). Additional ethnic groups prone to develop amyloidosis derived from leukocyte cell-derived chemotaxin 2 include Punjabis, First Nations people in British Columbia, and Native Americans. Most patients are elderly who present with chronic renal insufficiency and bland urinary sediment. Proteinuria is variable, being absent altogether in about one third of patients. Liver involvement is frequently an incidental finding. Amyloidosis derived from leukocyte cell-derived chemotaxin 2 deposits shows a characteristic distribution: in the kidney, there is consistent involvement of cortical interstitium, whereas in the liver, there is a preferential involvement of periportal and pericentral vein regions. Concurrent renal disease is frequent, with diabetic nephropathy and IgA nephropathy being the most common. Patient survival is excellent, likely because of the rarity of cardiac involvement, whereas renal survival is guarded, with a median renal survival of 62 months in those without concurrent renal disease. There is currently no efficacious therapy for amyloidosis derived from leukocyte cell-derived chemotaxin 2 amyloidosis. Renal transplantation seems to be a reasonable treatment for patients with advanced renal failure, although the disease may recur in the allograft. The pathogenesis of amyloidosis derived from leukocyte cell-derived chemotaxin 2 amyloidosis has not yet been elucidated. It could be a result of leukocyte cell-derived chemotaxin 2 overexpression by hepatocytes either constitutively (controlled by yet-uncharacterized genetic defects) or secondary to hepatocellular damage. It is critical not to misdiagnose amyloidosis

  19. Improved Methods to Generate Spheroid Cultures from Tumor Cells, Tumor Cells & Fibroblasts or Tumor-Fragments: Microenvironment, Microvesicles and MiRNA

    PubMed Central

    Lao, Zheng; Kelly, Catherine J.; Yang, Xiang-Yang; Jenkins, W. Timothy; Toorens, Erik; Ganguly, Tapan; Evans, Sydney M.; Koch, Cameron J.

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic and prognostic indicators are key components to achieve the goal of personalized cancer therapy. Two distinct approaches to this goal include predicting response by genetic analysis and direct testing of possible therapies using cultures derived from biopsy specimens. Optimally, the latter method requires a rapid assessment, but growing xenograft tumors or developing patient-derived cell lines can involve a great deal of time and expense. Furthermore, tumor cells have much different responses when grown in 2D versus 3D tissue environments. Using a modification of existing methods, we show that it is possible to make tumor-fragment (TF) spheroids in only 2–3 days. TF spheroids appear to closely model characteristics of the original tumor and may be used to assess critical therapy-modulating features of the microenvironment such as hypoxia. A similar method allows the reproducible development of spheroids from mixed tumor cells and fibroblasts (mixed-cell spheroids). Prior literature reports have shown highly variable development and properties of mixed-cell spheroids and this has hampered the detailed study of how individual tumor-cell components interact. In this study, we illustrate this approach and describe similarities and differences using two tumor models (U87 glioma and SQ20B squamous-cell carcinoma) with supporting data from additional cell lines. We show that U87 and SQ20B spheroids predict a key microenvironmental factor in tumors (hypoxia) and that SQ20B cells and spheroids generate similar numbers of microvesicles. We also present pilot data for miRNA expression under conditions of cells, tumors, and TF spheroids. PMID:26208323

  20. Different Angiogenic Potentials of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived from Umbilical Artery, Umbilical Vein, and Wharton's Jelly

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jianjun; Liu, Jingyu; Liu, Yong; Wang, Lei; Jiang, Ruiwei; Diao, Zhenyu; Yan, Guijun; Pèault, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells derived from the umbilical cord (UC) are a favorable source for allogeneic cell therapy. Here, we successfully isolated the stem cells derived from three different compartments of the human UC, including perivascular stem cells derived from umbilical arteries (UCA-PSCs), perivascular stem cells derived from umbilical vein (UCV-PSCs), and mesenchymal stem cells derived from Wharton's jelly (WJ-MSCs). These cells had the similar phenotype and differentiation potential toward adipocytes, osteoblasts, and neuron-like cells. However, UCA-PSCs and UCV-PSCs had more CD146+ cells than WJ-MSCs (P < 0.05). Tube formation assay in vitro showed the largest number of tube-like structures and branch points in UCA-PSCs among the three stem cells. Additionally, the total tube length in UCA-PSCs and UCV-PSCs was significantly longer than in WJ-MSCs (P < 0.01). Microarray, qRT-PCR, and Western blot analysis showed that UCA-PSCs had the highest expression of the Notch ligand Jagged1 (JAG1), which is crucial for blood vessel maturation. Knockdown of Jagged1 significantly impaired the angiogenesis in UCA-PSCs. In summary, UCA-PSCs are promising cell populations for clinical use in ischemic diseases.

  1. Epididymosomes: a heterogeneous population of microvesicles with multiple functions in sperm maturation and storage.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular microvesicles present in the epididymal fluid have been named epididymosomes. Many epididymosome-associated proteins are transferred to spermatozoa during their maturation in the excurrent duct. Epididymosomes are heterogeneous, with their size varying between 50 and 250 nm. Two distinct population of epididymosomes characterized by different protein compositions and diameters have been isolated from the bovine epididymal fluid using different centrifugation protocols. One subpopulation of epididymosomes was characterized by CD9 and other tetraspanin partners. Transfer of proteins from these epididymosomes to maturing spermatozoa in co-incubation experiments was inhibited by antibodies against tetraspanin proteins. This suggests that this subpopulation of epididymosomes is involved in the acquisition of proteins involved in maturation by spermatozoa in the epididymis. The other population of epididymosomes was characterized by ELSPBP1 (epididymal sperm binding protein 1), known for its affinity for the phospholipid choline group. Flow cytometric analyses showed that ELSPBP1-positive epididymosomes only interacted with dying or dead epididymal spermatozoa in a Zn 2 + -dependent manner. BLVRA (biliverdin reductase) was identified as a partner of ELSPBP1. This enzyme reduces biliverdin to bilirubin: two molecules with powerful anti-oxidant properties. We hypothesize that BLVRA is involved in an ROS-scavenging mechanism protecting live epididymal spermatozoa against detrimental molecules (ROS) released by dying cells. Therefore, it appears that there are at least two epididymosome population with distinct functions: targeting specific proteins to transiting spermatozoa by tetraspanin-mediated membrane fusion, and protection of epididymal spermatozoa against ROS released from dying cells. Further work is needed to understand functions of epididymosomes in epididymal physiology and sperm maturation and storage.

  2. High-resolution proteomic and lipidomic analysis of exosomes and microvesicles from different cell sources

    PubMed Central

    Haraszti, Reka A.; Didiot, Marie-Cecile; Sapp, Ellen; Leszyk, John; Shaffer, Scott A.; Rockwell, Hannah E.; Gao, Fei; Narain, Niven R.; DiFiglia, Marian; Kiebish, Michael A.; Aronin, Neil; Khvorova, Anastasia

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs), including exosomes and microvesicles (MVs), are explored for use in diagnostics, therapeutics and drug delivery. However, little is known about the relationship of protein and lipid composition of EVs and their source cells. Here, we report high-resolution lipidomic and proteomic analyses of exosomes and MVs derived by differential ultracentrifugation from 3 different cell types: U87 glioblastoma cells, Huh7 hepatocellular carcinoma cells and human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). We identified 3,532 proteins and 1,961 lipid species in the screen. Exosomes differed from MVs in several different areas: (a) The protein patterns of exosomes were more likely different from their cells of origin than were the protein patterns of MVs; (b) The proteomes of U87 and Huh7 exosomes were similar to each other but different from the proteomes of MSC exosomes, whereas the lipidomes of Huh7 and MSC exosomes were similar to each other but different from the lipidomes of U87 exosomes; (c) exosomes exhibited proteins of extracellular matrix, heparin-binding, receptors, immune response and cell adhesion functions, whereas MVs were enriched in endoplasmic reticulum, proteasome and mitochondrial proteins. Exosomes and MVs also differed in their types of lipid contents. Enrichment in glycolipids and free fatty acids characterized exosomes, whereas enrichment in ceramides and sphingomyelins characterized MVs. Furthermore, Huh7 and MSC exosomes were specifically enriched in cardiolipins; U87 exosomes were enriched in sphingomyelins. This study comprehensively analyses the protein and lipid composition of exosomes, MVs and source cells in 3 different cell types. PMID:27863537

  3. A Novel Role for Pro-Coagulant Microvesicles in the Early Host Defense against Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Oehmcke, Sonja; Westman, Johannes; Malmström, Johan; Mörgelin, Matthias; Olin, Anders I.; Kreikemeyer, Bernd; Herwald, Heiko

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that stimulation of whole blood or peripheral blood mononuclear cells with bacterial virulence factors results in the sequestration of pro-coagulant microvesicles (MVs). These particles explore their clotting activity via the extrinsic and intrinsic pathway of coagulation; however, their pathophysiological role in infectious diseases remains enigmatic. Here we describe that the interaction of pro-coagulant MVs with bacteria of the species Streptococcus pyogenes is part of the early immune response to the invading pathogen. As shown by negative staining electron microscopy and clotting assays, pro-coagulant MVs bind in the presence of plasma to the bacterial surface. Fibrinogen was identified as a linker that, through binding to the M1 protein of S. pyogenes, allows the opsonization of the bacteria by MVs. Surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed a strong interaction between pro-coagulant MVs and fibrinogen with a KD value in the nanomolar range. When performing a mass-spectrometry-based strategy to determine the protein quantity, a significant up-regulation of the fibrinogen-binding integrins CD18 and CD11b on pro-coagulant MVs was recorded. Finally we show that plasma clots induced by pro-coagulant MVs are able to prevent bacterial dissemination and possess antimicrobial activity. These findings were confirmed by in vivo experiments, as local treatment with pro-coagulant MVs dampens bacterial spreading to other organs and improved survival in an invasive streptococcal mouse model of infection. Taken together, our data implicate that pro-coagulant MVs play an important role in the early response of the innate immune system in infectious diseases. PMID:23935504

  4. Lactation-Related MicroRNA Expression in Microvesicles of Human Umbilical Cord Blood

    PubMed Central

    Wang, De-jing; Wang, Chen-meiyi; Wang, Yi-ting; Qiao, Hai; Fang, Liao-qiong; Wang, Zhi-biao

    2016-01-01

    Background The complex process by which lactation is initiated upon neonate delivery remains incompletely understood. Microvesicles (MVs) can transmit microRNAs (miRNAs) into recipient cells to influence cell function, and recent studies have identified miRNAs essential for mammary gland development and lactation. This study aimed to investigate the expression of lactation-related miRNAs in MVs isolated from human umbilical cord blood immediately after delivery. Material/Methods Umbilical cord blood samples were collected from 70 healthy pregnant women, and MVs were isolated through differential centrifugation and characterized by transmission electron microscopy, Western blotting, and nanoparticle tracking analysis. Lactation-related miRNAs were screened using bioinformatics tools for miRNA target prediction, gene ontology, and signaling pathway analyses. miRNA PCR arrays were used for miRNA expression analysis, and the results were validated by real-time PCR. Upon exposure of HBL-100 human mammary epithelial cells to MVs, MV uptake was examined by fluorescence confocal microscopy and β-casein secretion was detected by ELISA. Results Spherical MVs extracted from umbilical cord blood expressed CD63 and had an average diameter of 167.0±77.1 nm. We profiled 337 miRNAs in human umbilical cord blood MVs and found that 85 were related to lactation by bioinformatics analysis. The 25 most differentially expressed lactation-related miRNAs were validated by real-time PCR. MV uptake by HBL-100 cells was after 4 h in culture, and significantly increased secretion of β-casein was observed after 96 h from cells exposed to MVs (P<0.05). Conclusions Umbilical cord blood MVs contain many lactation-related miRNAs and can induce β-casein production by HBL-100 cells in vitro. Thus, umbilical cord blood MVs may mediate secretion of β-casein through miRNAs, thereby playing an important role in fetal-maternal crosstalk. PMID:27885249

  5. Lactation-Related MicroRNA Expression in Microvesicles of Human Umbilical Cord Blood.

    PubMed

    Wang, De-Jing; Wang, Chen-Meiyi; Wang, Yi-Ting; Qiao, Hai; Fang, Liao-Qiong; Wang, Zhi-Biao

    2016-11-24

    BACKGROUND The complex process by which lactation is initiated upon neonate delivery remains incompletely understood. Microvesicles (MVs) can transmit microRNAs (miRNAs) into recipient cells to influence cell function, and recent studies have identified miRNAs essential for mammary gland development and lactation. This study aimed to investigate the expression of lactation-related miRNAs in MVs isolated from human umbilical cord blood immediately after delivery. MATERIAL AND METHODS Umbilical cord blood samples were collected from 70 healthy pregnant women, and MVs were isolated through differential centrifugation and characterized by transmission electron microscopy, Western blotting, and nanoparticle tracking analysis. Lactation-related miRNAs were screened using bioinformatics tools for miRNA target prediction, gene ontology, and signaling pathway analyses. miRNA PCR arrays were used for miRNA expression analysis, and the results were validated by real-time PCR. Upon exposure of HBL-100 human mammary epithelial cells to MVs, MV uptake was examined by fluorescence confocal microscopy and b-casein secretion was detected by ELISA. RESULTS Spherical MVs extracted from umbilical cord blood expressed CD63 and had an average diameter of 167.0±77.1 nm. We profiled 337 miRNAs in human umbilical cord blood MVs and found that 85 were related to lactation by bioinformatics analysis. The 25 most differentially expressed lactation-related miRNAs were validated by real-time PCR. MV uptake by HBL-100 cells was after 4 h in culture, and significantly increased secretion of β-casein was observed after 96 h from cells exposed to MVs (P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS Umbilical cord blood MVs contain many lactation-related miRNAs and can induce β-casein production by HBL-100 cells in vitro. Thus, umbilical cord blood MVs may mediate secretion of β-casein through miRNAs, thereby playing an important role in fetal-maternal crosstalk.

  6. Extracellular Microvesicle Production by Human Eosinophils Activated by “Inflammatory” Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Akuthota, Praveen; Carmo, Lívia A. S.; Bonjour, Kennedy; Murphy, Ryann O.; Silva, Thiago P.; Gamalier, Juliana P.; Capron, Kelsey L.; Tigges, John; Toxavidis, Vasilis; Camacho, Virginia; Ghiran, Ionita; Ueki, Shigeharu; Weller, Peter F.; Melo, Rossana C. N.

    2016-01-01

    A key function of human eosinophils is to secrete cytokines, chemokines and cationic proteins, trafficking, and releasing these mediators for roles in inflammation and other immune responses. Eosinophil activation leads to secretion of pre-synthesized granule-stored mediators through different mechanisms, but the ability of eosinophils to secrete extracellular vesicles (EVs), very small vesicles with preserved membrane topology, is still poorly understood. In the present work, we sought to identify and characterize EVs released from human eosinophils during different conditions: after a culturing period or after isolation and stimulation with inflammatory stimuli, which are known to induce eosinophil activation and secretion: CCL11 (eotaxin-1) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). EV production was investigated by nanoscale flow cytometry, conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and pre-embedding immunonanogold EM. The tetraspanins CD63 and CD9 were used as EV biomarkers for both flow cytometry and ultrastructural immunolabeling. Nanoscale flow cytometry showed that human eosinophils produce EVs in culture and that a population of EVs expressed detectable CD9, while CD63 was not consistently detected. When eosinophils were stimulated immediately after isolation and analyzed by TEM, EVs were clearly identified as microvesicles (MVs) outwardly budding off the plasma membrane. Both CCL11 and TNF-α induced significant increases of MVs compared to unstimulated cells. TNF-α induced amplified release of MVs more than CCL11. Eosinophil MV diameters varied from 20 to 1000 nm. Immunonanogold EM revealed clear immunolabeling for CD63 and CD9 on eosinophil MVs, although not all MVs were labeled. Altogether, we identified, for the first time, that human eosinophils secrete MVs and that this production increases in response to inflammatory stimuli. This is important to understand the complex secretory activities of eosinophils underlying immune responses. The

  7. Extracellular microvesicles from astrocytes contain functional glutamate transporters: regulation by protein kinase C and cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Gosselin, Romain-Daniel; Meylan, Patrick; Decosterd, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Glutamate transport through astrocytic excitatory amino-acid transporters (EAAT)-1 and EAAT-2 is paramount for neural homeostasis. EAAT-1 has been reported in secreted extracellular microvesicles (eMV, such as exosomes) and because the protein kinase C (PKC) family controls the sub-cellular distribution of EAATs, we have explored whether PKCs drive EAATs into eMV. Using rat primary astrocytes, confocal immunofluorescence and ultracentrifugation on sucrose gradient we here report that PKC activation by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) reorganizes EAAT-1 distribution and reduces functional [3H]-aspartate reuptake. Western-blots show that EAAT-1 is present in eMV from astrocyte conditioned medium, together with NaK ATPase and glutamine synthetase all being further increased after PMA treatment. However, nanoparticle tracking analysis reveals that PKC activation did not change particle concentration. Functional analysis indicates that eMV have the capacity to reuptake [3H]-aspartate. In vivo, we demonstrate that spinal astrocytic reaction induced by peripheral nerve lesion (spared nerve injury, SNI) is associated with a phosphorylation of PKC δ together with a shift of EAAT distribution ipsilaterally. Ex vivo, spinal explants from SNI rats release eMV with an increased content of NaK ATPase, EAAT-1 and EAAT-2. These data indicate PKC and cell activation as important regulators of EAAT-1 incorporation in eMV, and raise the possibility that microvesicular EAAT-1 may exert extracellular functions. Beyond a putative role in neuropathic pain, this phenomenon may be important for understanding neural homeostasis and a wide range of neurological diseases associated with astrocytic reaction as well as non-neurological diseases linked to eMV release. PMID:24368897

  8. Regulation of cell adhesion and migration by cell-derived matrices.

    PubMed

    Kutys, Matthew L; Doyle, Andrew D; Yamada, Kenneth M

    2013-10-01

    Three-dimensional in vitro extracellular matrix models provide a physiological alternative to regular two-dimensional cell culture, though they lack the full diversity of molecular composition and physical properties of whole-animal systems. Cell-derived matrices are extracellular matrices that are the product of matrix secretion and assembly by cells cultured at high density in vitro. After the removal of the cells that produced the matrix, an assembled matrix scaffold is left that closely mimics native stromal fiber organization and molecular content. Cell-derived matrices have been shown to impart in vivo-like responses to cells cultured in these matrices. In this review, we focus on mechanisms through which the distinct molecular and topographical composition of cell-derived matrices directs cellular behavior, specifically through regulation of cell-matrix adhesions and subsequent contributions to the process of cell migration. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Melanoma cell-derived exosomes promote epithelial-mesenchymal transition in primary melanocytes through paracrine/autocrine signaling in the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Deyi; Barry, Samantha; Kmetz, Daniel; Egger, Michael; Pan, Jianmin; Rai, Shesh N; Qu, Jifu; McMasters, Kelly M; Hao, Hongying

    2016-07-01

    The tumor microenvironment is abundant with exosomes that are secreted by the cancer cells themselves. Exosomes are nanosized, organelle-like membranous structures that are increasingly being recognized as major contributors in the progression of malignant neoplasms. A critical element in melanoma progression is its propensity to metastasize, but little is known about how melanoma cell-derived exosomes modulate the microenvironment to optimize conditions for tumor progression and metastasis. Here, we provide evidence that melanoma cell-derived exosomes promote phenotype switching in primary melanocytes through paracrine/autocrine signaling. We found that the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway was activated during the exosome-mediated epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-resembling process, which promotes metastasis. Let-7i, an miRNA modulator of EMT, was also involved in this process. We further defined two other miRNA modulators of EMT (miR-191 and let-7a) in serum exosomes for differentiating stage I melanoma patients from non-melanoma subjects. These results provide the first strong molecular evidence that melanoma cell-derived exosomes promote the EMT-resembling process in the tumor microenvironment. Thus, novel strategies targeting EMT and modulating the tumor microenvironment may emerge as important approaches for the treatment of metastatic melanoma.

  10. Solving the puzzle of pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte maturation: piece by piece

    PubMed Central

    Lundy, David J.; Lee, Desy S.

    2017-01-01

    There is a growing need for in vitro models which can serve as platforms for drug screening and basic research. Human adult cardiomyocytes cannot be readily obtained or cultured, and so pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes appear to be an attractive option. Unfortunately, these cells are structurally and functionally immature—more comparable to foetal cardiomyocytes than adult. A recent study by Ruan et al., provides new insights into accelerating the maturation process and takes us a step closer to solving the puzzle of pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte maturation. PMID:28462223

  11. Niacinamide pretreatment reduces microvesicle formation in hairless guinea pigs cutaneously exposed to sulfur mustard. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Yourick, J.J.; Clark, C.R.; Mitcheltree, L.W.

    1991-12-31

    It has been proposed that sulfur mustard (HD) may indirectly activate poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PADPRP) by alkylating cellular DNA (Papirmeister et al., 1985). Activation of PADPRP results in the depletion of cellular NAD+ which initiates a series of biochemical processes that have been proposed to culminate in blister formation. Preventing PADPRP activation and NAD+ depletion should inhibit blister formation. Niacinamide is both an inhibitor of PADPRP and a precursor for NAD+ synthesis. The present study was undertaken to determine whether niacinamide can protect against HD-induced microvesication in cutaneously exposed hairless guinea pigs. Each site was exposed to HD for 8 min by means of a vapor cup. Niacinamide (750 mg/kg, ip) given as a 30-min pretreatment inhibited microvesicle formation by 50% after HD application. However, niacinamide given 2 hr after HD application did not reduce microvesicle formation. There was no benefit when niacinamide was given as both a pretreatment and treatment when compared to niacinamide given only as a pretreatment. The reduction in microvesication 24 hr after HD did not correlate with skin NAD+ content. Niacinamide did not reduce the degree of erythema or edema. Ballooning degeneration of basal epidermal cells was present in some niacinamide pretreated HD exposure sites.

  12. Compound K attenuates stromal cell-derived growth factor 1 (SDF-1)-induced migration of C6 glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyuck; Roh, Hyo Sun; Kim, Jai Eun; Park, Sun Dong; Park, Won Hwan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Stromal cell-derived growth factor 1 (SDF-1), also known as chemokine ligand 12, and chemokine receptor type 4 are involved in cancer cell migration. Compound K (CK), a metabolite of protopanaxadiol-type ginsenoside by gut microbiota, is reported to have therapeutic potential in cancer therapy. However, the inhibitory effect of CK on SDF-1 pathway-induced migration of glioma has not yet been established. MATERIALS/METHODS Cytotoxicity of CK in C6 glioma cells was determined using an EZ-Cytox cell viability assay kit. Cell migration was tested using the wound healing and Boyden chamber assay. Phosphorylation levels of protein kinase C (PKC)α and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) were measured by western blot assay, and matrix metallopeptidases (MMP) were measured by gelatin-zymography analysis. RESULTS CK significantly reduced the phosphorylation of PKCα and ERK1/2, expression of MMP9 and MMP2, and inhibited the migration of C6 glioma cells under SDF-1-stimulated conditions. CONCLUSIONS CK is a cell migration inhibitor that inhibits C6 glioma cell migration by regulating its downstream signaling molecules including PKCα, ERK1/2, and MMPs. PMID:27247721

  13. Ethical aspects of the use of stem cell derived gametes for reproduction.

    PubMed

    Mertes, Heidi; Pennings, Guido

    2010-09-01

    A lot of interest has been generated by the possibility of deriving gametes from embryonic stem cells and bone marrow stem cells. These stem cell derived gametes may become useful for research and for the treatment of infertility. In this article we consider prospectively the ethical issues that will arise if stem cell derived gametes are used in the clinic, making a distinction between concerns that only apply to embryonic stem cell derived gametes and concerns that are also relevant for gametes derived from adult stem cells. At present, it appears preferable to use non-embryonic stem cells for the derivation of gametes. Adult stem cell derived gametes do not present any problems with regard to the moral status of the human embryo, bypass the safety risks linked to SCNT and do not present any ambiguity or novel problems with regard to informed consent, psychological consequences for the child or genetic parenthood. A remaining ethical concern, however, regards the safety of the procedure in terms of the welfare of the resulting children. This should spark a thorough reflection on how far one must go to accommodate a person's wish to have a genetically related child.

  14. Two dimensional electrophysiological characterization of human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte system

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Huanqi; Scharnhorst, Kelsey S.; Stieg, Adam Z.; Gimzewski, James K.; Minami, Itsunari; Nakatsuji, Norio; Nakano, Haruko; Nakano, Atsushi

    2017-01-01

    Stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes provide a promising tool for human developmental biology, regenerative therapies, disease modeling, and drug discovery. As human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes remain functionally fetal-type, close monitoring of electrophysiological maturation is critical for their further application to biology and translation. However, to date, electrophysiological analyses of stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes has largely been limited by biologically undefined factors including 3D nature of embryoid body, sera from animals, and the feeder cells isolated from mouse. Large variability in the aforementioned systems leads to uncontrollable and irreproducible results, making conclusive studies difficult. In this report, a chemically-defined differentiation regimen and a monolayer cell culture technique was combined with multielectrode arrays for accurate, real-time, and flexible measurement of electrophysiological parameters in translation-ready human cardiomyocytes. Consistent with their natural counterpart, amplitude and dV/dtmax of field potential progressively increased during the course of maturation. Monolayer culture allowed for the identification of pacemaking cells using the multielectrode array platform and thereby the estimation of conduction velocity, which gradually increased during the differentiation of cardiomyocytes. Thus, the electrophysiological maturation of the human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes in our system recapitulates in vivo development. This system provides a versatile biological tool to analyze human heart development, disease mechanisms, and the efficacy/toxicity of chemicals. PMID:28266620

  15. Maturation of Stem Cell-Derived Beta-cells Guided by the Expression of Urocortin 3

    PubMed Central

    van der Meulen, Talitha; Huising, Mark O.

    2014-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a devastating disease precipitated by an autoimmune response directed at the insulin-producing beta-cells of the pancreas for which no cure exists. Stem cell-derived beta-cells show great promise for a cure as they have the potential to supply unlimited numbers of cells that could be derived from a patient's own cells, thus eliminating the need for immunosuppression. Current in vitro protocols for the differentiation of stem cell-derived beta-cells can successfully generate pancreatic endoderm cells. In diabetic rodents, such cells can differentiate further along the beta-cell lineage until they are eventually capable of restoring normoglycemia. While these observations demonstrate that stem cell-derived pancreatic endoderm has the potential to differentiate into mature, glucose-responsive beta-cells, the signals that direct differentiation and maturation from pancreatic endoderm onwards remain poorly understood. In this review, we analyze the sequence of events that culminates in the formation of beta-cells during embryonic development. and summarize how current protocols to generate beta-cells have sought to capitalize on this ontogenic template. We place particular emphasis on the current challenges and opportunities which occur in the later stages of beta-cell differentiation and maturation of transplantable stem cell-derived beta-cells. Another focus is on the question how the use of recently identified maturation markers such as urocortin 3 can be instrumental in guiding these efforts. PMID:25148370

  16. Tumour cell-derived exosomes endow mesenchymal stromal cells with tumour-promotion capabilities.

    PubMed

    Lin, L Y; Du, L M; Cao, K; Huang, Y; Yu, P F; Zhang, L Y; Li, F Y; Wang, Y; Shi, Y F

    2016-11-17

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are a major component of the tumour microenvironment. A plethora of elegant studies focusing on tumour-derived MSCs have shown that they, unlike normal MSCs in other tissue, exhibit a strong ability to promote tumour progression. However, the mechanisms underlying the conversion of normal MSCs into tumour-associated MSCs are unknown. We report here a critical role of tumour cell-derived exosomes in endowing bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs) with a tumour-favourable phenotype. Tumour cell-derived exosomes affected neither the growth factor production nor the immunosuppressive property of MSCs; rather, they endowed MSCs with a strong ability to promote macrophage infiltration into B16-F0 melanoma or EL-4 lymphoma. Ablation of macrophages by clodronate liposome administration reversed the tumour-promoting effect of MSCs educated by tumour cell-derived exosomes (TE-MSCs) on the tumour growth. By comparing the chemokine profile of BM-MSCs with that of TE-MSCs, we found that TE-MSCs produced a large amount of CCR2 ligands, CCL2 and CCL7, which are responsible for macrophage recruitment. CCR2-specific inhibitor was found to block the tumour-promoting effect of TE-MSCs. Thus, our investigations demonstrated that tumour cell-derived exosomes confer BM-MSCs the ability to enhance tumour growth. Therefore, we uncovered a novel mechanism underlying the conversion of normal MSCs to tumour-associated MSCs.

  17. Derivation and characterization of a pig embryonic stem cell-derived exocrine pancreatic cell line

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The establishment and initial characterization of a pig embryonic stem cell-derived pancreatic cell line, PICM-31, and a colony-cloned derivative cell line, PICM-31A, is described. The cell lines were propagated for several months at split ratios of 1:3 or 1:5 at each passage on STO feeder cells af...

  18. Functional analysis of carboxylesterase in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived enterocytes.

    PubMed

    Kabeya, Tomoki; Matsumura, Wakana; Iwao, Takahiro; Hosokawa, Masakiyo; Matsunaga, Tamihide

    2017-04-22

    Human carboxylesterase (CES) is a key esterase involved in the metabolism and biotransformation of drugs. Hydrolysis activity in the human small intestine is predominantly mediated by CES2A1 rather than CES1A. In drug development studies, Caco-2 cells are commonly used as a model to predict drug absorption in the human small intestine. However, the expression patterns of CES2A1 and CES1A in Caco-2 cells differ from those in the human small intestine. There are also species-specific differences in CES expression patterns between human and experimental animals. Furthermore, it is difficult to obtain primary human intestinal epithelial cells. Therefore, there is currently no system that can precisely predict features of drug absorption, such as CES-mediated metabolism, in the human intestine. To develop a novel system to evaluate intestinal pharmacokinetics, we analyzed CES expression and function in human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived enterocytes. CES2A1 mRNA and protein levels in human iPS cell-derived enterocytes were comparable to Caco-2 cells, whereas CES1A levels were lower in human iPS cell-derived enterocytes compared with Caco-2 cells. p-nitrophenyl acetate hydrolysis in human iPS cell-derived enterocytes was significantly inhibited by the CES2A1-specific inhibitor telmisartan. Hydrolysis levels of the CES2A1-specific substrate aspirin were similar in human iPS cell-derived enterocytes and Caco-2 cells, whereas hydrolysis of the CES1A-specific substrate monoethylglycylxylidine was observed in Caco-2 cells but not in human iPS cell-derived enterocytes. These findings demonstrated that the expression and activity of CES isozymes in human iPS cell-derived enterocytes are more similar to the human small intestine compared with Caco-2 cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Microvesicle phenotypes are associated with transfusion requirements and mortality in subjects with severe injuries

    PubMed Central

    Matijevic, Nena; Wang, Yao-Wei W.; Holcomb, John B.; Kozar, Rosemary; Cardenas, Jessica C.; Wade, Charles E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Severe injury often results in substantial bleeding and mortality. Injury provokes cellular activation and release of extracellular vesicles. Circulating microvesicles (MVs) are predominantly platelet-derived and highly procoagulant. They support hemostasis and vascular function. The roles of MVs in survival after severe injury are largely unknown. We hypothesized that altered MV phenotypes would be associated with transfusion requirements and poor outcomes. Methods This single-centre study was approved by the Institutional Review Board. The study cohort consisted of patients with major trauma requiring blood product transfusion and 26 healthy controls. Plasma samples for MVs were collected upon admission to the emergency department (n=169) and post-resuscitation (n=42), and analysed by flow cytometry for MV counts and cellular origin: platelet (PMV), erythrocyte (RMV), leukocyte (LMV), endothelial (EMV), tissue factor (TFMV), and annexin V (AVMV). Twenty-four hour mortality is the outcome measurement used to classify survivors versus non-survivors. Data were compared over time and analysed with demographic and clinical data. Results The median age was 34 (IQR 23, 51), 72% were male, Injury Severity Score was 29 (IQR 19, 36), and 24 h mortality was 13%. MV levels and phenotypes differed between patients and controls. Elevated admission EMVs were found both in survivors (409/µL) and non-survivors (393/µL) compared to controls (23/µL, p<0.001) and persisted over time. Admission levels of PMV, AVMV, RMV, and TFMV were significantly lower in patients who died compared to survivors, but were not independently associated with the 24 h mortality rate. Patients with low MV levels at admission received the most blood products within the first 24 h. AVMV and PMV levels either increased over time or stabilized in survivors but decreased in non-survivors, resulting in significantly lower levels at intensive care unit admission in non-survivors (1,048 vs. 1

  20. Macrophage-derived microvesicles promote proliferation and migration of Schwann cell on peripheral nerve repair

    SciTech Connect

    Zhan, Chuan Ma, Cheng-bin; Yuan, Hong-mou; Cao, Bao-yuan; Zhu, Jia-jun

    2015-12-04

    Background: Macrophages have been implicated in peripheral nerve regeneration. However, whether macrophages-derived microvesicles (MVs) are involved in this process remains unknown. In the present study, the effects of macrophages-derived MVs on proliferation and migration of Schwann cells (SCs) were evaluated in both in vitro and in vivo. Methods: Human monocytic leukaemia cell line (THP-1) was successfully driven to M1 and M2 phenotypes by delivery of either IFN-γ or IL-4, respectively. SCs incubated with M1 or M2 macrophages-derived MVs, the cell migration and proliferation were assessed, and expression levels of nerve growth factor (NGF) and Laminin were measured. A rat model of sciatic nerve was established and the effects of macrophages-derived MVs on nerve regeneration were investigated. Results: M2-derived MVs elevated migration, proliferation, NFG and Laminin protein levels of SCs compared with M1-or M0-derived MVs. The relative expression levels of miR-223 were also increased in M2 macrophages and M2-derived MVs. Transfected M2 macrophages with miR-223 inhibitor then co-incubated with SCs, an inhibition of cell migration and proliferation and a down-regulated levels of NFG and Laminin protein expression were observed. In vivo, M2-derived MVs significantly increased the infiltration and axon number of SCs. Conclusion: M2-derived MVs promoted proliferation and migration of SCs in vitro and in vivo, which provided a therapeutic strategy for nerve regeneration. - Highlights: • M2 macrophages-derived MVs elevated migration and proliferation of SCs. • M2 macrophages-derived MVs up-regulated NFG and Laminin expression of SCs. • MiR-223 expression was increased in M2 macrophages-derived MVs. • MiR-223 inhibitor reduced migration and proliferation of SCs co-incubated with MVs. • MiR-223 inhibitor down-regulated NFG and Laminin levels of SCs co-incubated with MVs.

  1. Microvesicles Derived from Inflammation-Challenged Endothelial Cells Modulate Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Functions

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Qunwen; Liu, Hua; Zheng, Chunyan; Zhao, Yuhui; Liao, Xiaorong; Wang, Yan; Chen, Yanfang; Zhao, Bin; Lazartigues, Eric; Yang, Yi; Ma, Xiaotang

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Microvesicles (MV) can modulate the function of recipient cells by transferring their contents. Our previous study highlighted that MV released from tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) plus serum deprivation (SD)-stimulated endothelial progenitor cells, induce detrimental effects on endothelial cells. In this study, we investigated the potential effects of endothelial MV (EMV) on proliferation, migration, and apoptosis of human brain vascular smooth cells (HBVSMC). Methods: EMV were prepared from human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) cultured in a TNF-α plus SD medium. RNase-EMV were made by treating EMV with RNase A for RNA depletion. The proliferation, apoptosis and migration abilities of HBVSMC were determined after co-culture with EMV or RNase-EMV. The Mek1/2 inhibitor, PD0325901, was used for pathway analysis. Western blot was used for analyzing the proteins of Mek1/2, Erk1/2, phosphorylation Erk1/2, activated caspase-3 and Bcl-2. The level of miR-146a-5p was measured by qRT-PCR. Results: (1) EMV significantly promoted the proliferation and migration of HBVSMC. The effects were accompanied by an increase in Mek1/2 and p-Erk1/2, which could be abolished by PD0325901; (2) EMV decreased the apoptotic rate of HBVSMC by approximately 35%, which was accompanied by cleaved caspase-3 down-regulation and Bcl-2 up-regulation; (3) EMV increased miR-146a-5p level in HBVSMC by about 2-folds; (4) RNase-treated EMV were less effective than EMV on HBVSMC activities and miR-146a-5p expression. Conclusion: EMV generated under inflammation challenge can modulate HBVSMC function and fate via their carried RNA. This is associated with activation of theMek1/2/Erk1/2 pathway and caspase-3/Bcl-2 regulation, during which miR-146a-5p may play an important role. The data suggest that EMV derived from inflammation-challenged endothelial cells are detrimental to HBVSMC homeostatic functions, highlighting potential novel therapeutic targets for vascular diseases. PMID

  2. Growth suppression of MCF-7 cancer cell-derived xenografts in nude mice by caveolin-1

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Ping; Wang Xiaohui; Li Fei; Qi Baoju; Zhu Hua; Liu Shuang; Cui Yeqing; Chen Jianwen

    2008-11-07

    Caveolin-1 is an essential structural constituent of caveolae membrane domains that has been implicated in mitogenic signaling and oncogenesis. However, the exact functional role of caveolin-1 still remains controversial. In this report, utilizing MCF-7 human breast adenocarcinoma cells stably transfected with caveolin-1 (MCF-7/cav-1 cells), we demonstrate that caveolin-1 expression dramatically inhibits invasion and migration of these cells. Importantly, in vivo experiments employing xenograft tumor models demonstrated that expression of caveolin-1 results in significant growth inhibition of breast tumors. Moreover, a dramatic delay in tumor progression was observed in MCF-7/cav-1 cells as compared with MCF-7 cells. Histological analysis of tumor sections demonstrated a marked decrease in the percentage of proliferating tumor cells (Ki-67 assay) along with an increase in apoptotic tumor cells (TUNEL assay) in MCF-7/cav-1-treated animals. Our current findings provide for the first time in vivo evidence that caveolin-1 can indeed function as a tumor suppressor in human breast adenocarcinoma derived from MCF-7 cells rather than as a tumor promoter.

  3. Transgene Reactivation in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Derivatives and Reversion to Pluripotency of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Galat, Yekaterina; Perepitchka, Mariana; Jennings, Lawrence J.; Iannaccone, Philip M.; Hendrix, Mary J.C.

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have enormous potential in regenerative medicine and disease modeling. It is now felt that clinical trials should be performed with iPSCs derived with nonintegrative constructs. Numerous studies, however, including those describing disease models, are still being published using cells derived from iPSCs generated with integrative constructs. Our experimental work presents the first evidence of spontaneous transgene reactivation in vitro in several cellular types. Our results show that the transgenes were predominantly silent in parent iPSCs, but in mesenchymal and endothelial iPSC derivatives, the transgenes experienced random upregulation of Nanog and c-Myc. Additionally, we provide evidence of spontaneous secondary reprogramming and reversion to pluripotency in mesenchymal stem cells derived from iPSCs. These findings strongly suggest that the studies, which use cellular products derived from iPSCs generated with retro- or lentiviruses, should be evaluated with consideration of the possibility of transgene reactivation. The in vitro model described here provides insight into the earliest events of culture transformation and suggests the hypothesis that reversion to pluripotency may be responsible for the development of tumors in cell replacement experiments. The main goal of this work, however, is to communicate the possibility of transgene reactivation in retro- or lenti-iPSC derivatives and the associated loss of cellular fidelity in vitro, which may impact the outcomes of disease modeling and related experimentation. PMID:27193052

  4. Microfluidic fabrication of cell-derived nanovesicles as endogenous RNA carriers.

    PubMed

    Jo, Wonju; Jeong, Dayeong; Kim, Junho; Cho, Siwoo; Jang, Su Chul; Han, Chungmin; Kang, Ji Yoon; Gho, Yong Song; Park, Jaesung

    2014-04-07

    Exosomes/microvesicles are known to shuttle biological signals between cells, possibly by transferring biological signal components such as encapsulated RNAs and proteins, plasma membrane proteins, or both. Therefore exosomes are being considered for use as RNA and protein delivery vehicles for various therapeutic applications. However, living cells in nature secrete only a small number of exosomes, and procedures to collect them are complex; these complications impede their use in mass delivery of components to targeted cells. We propose a novel and efficient method that forces cells through hydrophilic microchannels to generate artificial nanovesicles. These mimetic nanovesicles contain mRNAs, intracellular proteins and plasma membrane proteins, and are shaped like cell-secreted exosomes. When recipient cells are exposed to nanovesicles from embryonic stem cells, mRNAs of Oct 3/4 and Nanog are transferred from embryonic stem cells to the target cells. This result suggests that mimetic nanovesicles can be used as vehicles to deliver RNA. This nanovesicle formation method is expected to be used in exosome research and to have applications in drug and RNA-delivery systems.

  5. Proteomic analysis of dendritic cell-derived exosomes: a secreted subcellular compartment distinct from apoptotic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Théry, C; Boussac, M; Véron, P; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, P; Raposo, G; Garin, J; Amigorena, S

    2001-06-15

    Dendritic cells constitutively secrete a population of small (50-90 nm diameter) Ag-presenting vesicles called exosomes. When sensitized with tumor antigenic peptides, dendritic cells produce exosomes, which stimulate anti-tumor immune responses and the rejection of established tumors in mice. Using a systematic proteomic approach, we establish the first extensive protein map of a particular exosome population; 21 new exosomal proteins were thus identified. Most proteins present in exosomes are related to endocytic compartments. New exosomal residents include cytosolic proteins most likely involved in exosome biogenesis and function, mainly cytoskeleton-related (cofilin, profilin I, and elongation factor 1alpha) and intracellular membrane transport and signaling factors (such as several annexins, rab 7 and 11, rap1B, and syntenin). Importantly, we also identified a novel category of exosomal proteins related to apoptosis: thioredoxin peroxidase II, Alix, 14-3-3, and galectin-3. These findings led us to analyze possible structural relationships between exosomes and microvesicles released by apoptotic cells. We show that although they both represent secreted populations of membrane vesicles relevant to immune responses, exosomes and apoptotic vesicles are biochemically and morphologically distinct. Therefore, in addition to cytokines, dendritic cells produce a specific population of membrane vesicles, exosomes, with unique molecular composition and strong immunostimulating properties.

  6. Cancerous epithelial cell lines shed extracellular vesicles with a bimodal size distribution that is sensitive to glutamine inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santana, Steven Michael; Antonyak, Marc A.; Cerione, Richard A.; Kirby, Brian J.

    2014-12-01

    Extracellular shed vesicles (ESVs) facilitate a unique mode of cell-cell communication wherein vesicle uptake can induce a change in the recipient cell's state. Despite the intensity of ESV research, currently reported data represent the bulk characterization of concentrated vesicle samples with little attention paid to heterogeneity. ESV populations likely represent diversity in mechanisms of formation, cargo and size. To better understand ESV subpopulations and the signaling cascades implicated in their formation, we characterize ESV size distributions to identify subpopulations in normal and cancerous epithelial cells. We have discovered that cancer cells exhibit bimodal ESV distributions, one small-diameter and another large-diameter population, suggesting that two mechanisms may govern ESV formation, an exosome population and a cancer-specific microvesicle population. Altered glutamine metabolism in cancer is thought to fuel cancer growth but may also support metastatic niche formation through microvesicle production. We describe the role of a glutaminase inhibitor, compound 968, in ESV production. We have discovered that inhibiting glutamine metabolism significantly impairs large-diameter microvesicle production in cancer cells.

  7. Biochemical and Biologic Characterization of Exosomes and Microvesicles as Facilitators of HIV-1 Infection in Macrophages1

    PubMed Central

    Kadiu, Irena; Narayanasamy, Prabagaran; Dash, Prasanta K.; Zhang, Wei; Gendelman, Howard E.

    2013-01-01

    Exosomes and microvesicles are cell membranous sacs originating from multivesicular bodies and plasma membranes that facilitate long-distance intercellular communications. Lipidomic, proteomic and cell biologic approaches uncovered processes by which the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) can use exosomes and MV to facilitate its dissemination. Macrophage MV and exosomes were isolated by immunoaffinity and sucrose cushion centrifugation and characterized by morphologic, biochemical and molecular assays. HIV-1 was “entrapped” in exosome aggregates. Robust HIV-1 replication followed infection with exosome-enhanced fractions isolated from infected cell supernatants. MV and exosomes facilitated viral infection that was affected by a range of cell surface receptors and adhesion proteins. HIV-1 readily completed its life cycle in human monocyte-derived macrophages but not in CD4 negative cells. The data support a significant role for exosomes as facilitators of viral infection. PMID:22711894

  8. Immunogold detection of L-glutamate and D-serine in small synaptic-like microvesicles in adult hippocampal astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Bergersen, L H; Morland, C; Ormel, L; Rinholm, J E; Larsson, M; Wold, J F H; Røe, A T; Stranna, A; Santello, M; Bouvier, D; Ottersen, O P; Volterra, A; Gundersen, V

    2012-07-01

    Glutamate and the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor ligand D-serine are putative gliotransmitters. Here, we show by immunogold cytochemistry of the adult hippocampus that glutamate and D-serine accumulate in synaptic-like microvesicles (SLMVs) in the perisynaptic processes of astrocytes. The estimated concentration of fixed glutamate in the astrocytic SLMVs is comparable to that in synaptic vesicles of excitatory nerve terminals (≈ 45 and ≈ 55 mM, respectively), whereas the D-serine level is about 6 mM. The vesicles are organized in small spaced clusters located near the astrocytic plasma membrane. Endoplasmic reticulum is regularly found in close vicinity to SLMVs, suggesting that astrocytes contain functional nanodomains, where a local Ca(2+) increase can trigger release of glutamate and/or D-serine.

  9. Peptidyl-prolyl isomerase 1 (Pin1) preserves the phosphorylation state of tissue factor and prolongs its release within microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Ettelaie, Camille; Collier, Mary E W; Featherby, Sophie; Greenman, John; Maraveyas, Anthony

    2017-09-26

    The exposure and release of TF is regulated by post-translational modifications of its cytoplasmic domain. Here, the potential of Pin1 to interact with the cytoplasmic domain of TF, and the outcome on TF function was examined. MDA-MB-231 and transfected-primary endothelial cells were incubated with either Pin1 deactivator Juglone, or its control Plumbagin, as well as transfected with Pin1-specific or control siRNA. TF release into microvesicles following activation, and also phosphorylation and ubiquitination states of cellular-TF were then assessed. Furthermore, the ability of Pin1 to bind wild-type and mutant forms of overexpressed TF-tGFP was investigated by co-immunoprecipitation. Additionally, the ability of recombinant or cellular Pin1 to bind to peptides of the C-terminus of TF, synthesised in different phosphorylation states was examined by binding assays and spectroscopically. Finally, the influence of recombinant Pin1 on the ubiquitination and dephosphorylation of the TF-peptides was examined. Pre-incubation of Pin1 with Juglone but not Plumbagin, reduced TF release as microvesicles and was also achievable following transfection with Pin1-siRNA. This was concurrent with early ubiquitination and dephosphorylation of cellular TF at Ser253. Pin1 co-immunoprecipitated with overexpressed wild-type TF-tGFP but not Ser258→Ala or Pro259→Ala substituted mutants. Pin1 did interact with Ser258-phosphorylated and double-phosphorylated TF-peptides, with the former having higher affinity. Finally, recombinant Pin1 was capable of interfering with the ubiquitination and dephosphorylation of TF-derived peptides. In conclusion, Pin1 is a fast-acting enzyme which may be utilised by cells to protect the phosphorylation state of TF in activated cells prolonging TF activity and release, and therefore ensuring adequate haemostasis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. NDRG2 promoted secreted miR-375 in microvesicles shed from M1 microglia, which induced neuron damage.

    PubMed

    Tang, Li-li; Wu, Yuan-bo; Fang, Chuan-qin; Qu, Ping; Gao, Zong-liang

    2016-01-15

    Microglia microvesicles (MVs) has shown to have significant biological functions under normal conditions. A diversity of miRNAs is involved in neuronal development, survival, function, and plasticity, but the exact functional role of NDRG2 and secreted miR-375 in MVs in neuron damage is poorly understood. We investigated the effect of NDRG2 and secreted miR-375 in MVs shed from M1 microglia on neuron damage. Expression of Nos2, Arg-1, miR-375, syntaxin-1A, NDRG2 and Pdk 1 were evaluated using RT-PCR or western blotting. Cell viability of N2A neuron was quantified by a MTT assay. Microglia can be polarized into different functional phenotypes. Expression of NDRG2 and Nos2 were significantly increased by LPS treatment on N9 cells, whereas treatment with IL-4 dramatically suppressed the expression of NDRG2 and remarkably elevated expression of Arg-1. Besides, MVs shed from LPS-treated N9 microglia significantly inhibited cell viability of N2A neurons and expression of syntaxin-1A, and NDRG2 interference reversed the up-regulated miR-375 in LPS-treated N9 microglia and MVs shed from LPS-treated N9 cells. Furthermore, NDRG2 could modulate miR-375 expression in N9 microglia and MVs. And miR-375 inhibitor remarkably elevated Pdk1 expression in N2A neurons. Finally, miR-375 inhibitor could reverse suppression effect of NDRG2 overexpression on cell viability of N2A neurons and expression of syntaxin-1A. Our results demonstrated that NDRG2 promoted secreted miR-375 in microvesicles shed from M1 microglia, which induced neuron damage. The suppression of NDRG2 and secreted miR-375 in MVs shed from M1 microglia may be potential targets for alleviation of neuron damage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Isolation of syncytiotrophoblast microvesicles and exosomes and their characterisation by multicolour flow cytometry and fluorescence Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis.

    PubMed

    Dragovic, R A; Collett, G P; Hole, P; Ferguson, D J P; Redman, C W; Sargent, I L; Tannetta, D S

    2015-10-01

    The human placenta releases multiple types and sizes of syncytiotrophoblast (STB) extracellular vesicles (EV) into the maternal circulation that exhibit diverse biological activities. The placental perfusion technique enables isolation of these STBEV, but conventional flow cytometry can only be used to phenotype EV down to ∼300 nm in size. Fluorescence Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis (fl-NTA) has the potential to phenotype EV down to ∼50 nm, thereby improving current characterisation techniques. The aims of this study were to prepare microvesicle and exosome enriched fractions from human placental perfusate (n=8) and improve fl-NTA STBEV detection. Differential centrifugation and filtration effectively removed contaminating red blood cells from fresh placental perfusates and pelleted a STB microvesicle (STBMV) fraction (10,000×g pellet - 10KP; NTA modal size 395±12 nm), enriched for the STB marker placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP) and a STB exosome (STBEX) fraction (150,000×g pellet - 150KP; NTA modal size 147±6 nm), enriched for PLAP and exosome markers Alix and CD63. The PLAP positivity of 'standard' 10KP and 150KP pools (four samples/pool), determined by immunobead depletion, was used to optimise fl-NTA camera settings. Individual 10KP and 150KP samples (n=8) were 54.5±5.7% (range 17.8-66.9%) and 30.6±5.6% (range 3.3-51.7%) PLAP positive, respectively. We have developed a reliable method for enriching STBMV and STBEX from placental perfusate. We also standardised fl-NTA settings and improved measurement of PLAP positive EV in STBMV. However, fl-NTA is not as sensitive as anti-PLAP Dynabead capture for STBEX detection, possibly due to STBEX having lower surface expression of PLAP. These important developments will facilitate more detailed studies of the role of STBMV and STBEX in normal and pathological pregnancies. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. An AP-3-dependent mechanism drives synaptic-like microvesicle biogenesis in pancreatic islet beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Suckow, Arthur T; Craige, Branch; Faundez, Victor; Cain, William J; Chessler, Steven D

    2010-07-01

    Pancreatic islet beta-cells contain synaptic-like microvesicles (SLMVs). The origin, trafficking, and role of these SLMVs are poorly understood. In neurons, synaptic vesicle (SV) biogenesis is mediated by two different cytosolic adaptor protein complexes, a ubiquitous AP-2 complex and the neuron-specific AP-3B complex. Mice lacking AP-3B subunits exhibit impaired GABAergic (inhibitory) neurotransmission and reduced neuronal vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT) content. Since beta-cell maturation and exocytotic function seem to parallel that of the inhibitory synapse, we predicted that AP-3B-associated vesicles would be present in beta-cells. Here, we test the hypothesis that AP-3B is expressed in islets and mediates beta-cell SLMV biogenesis. A secondary aim was to test whether the sedimentation properties of INS-1 beta-cell microvesicles are identical to those of bona fide SLMVs isolated from PC12 cells. Our results show that the two neuron-specific AP-3 subunits beta3B and mu3B are expressed in beta-cells, the first time these proteins have been found to be expressed outside the nervous system. We found that beta-cell SLMVs share the same sedimentation properties as PC12 SLMVs and contain SV proteins that sort specifically to AP-3B-associated vesicles in the brain. Brefeldin A, a drug that interferes with AP-3-mediated SV biogenesis, inhibits the delivery of AP-3 cargoes to beta-cell SLMVs. Consistent with a role for AP-3 in the biogenesis of GABAergic SLMV in beta-cells, INS-1 cell VGAT content decreases upon inhibition of AP-3 delta-subunit expression. Our findings suggest that beta-cells and neurons share molecules and mechanisms important for mediating the neuron-specific membrane trafficking pathways that underlie synaptic vesicle formation.

  13. Characterization and prognostic relevance of circulating microvesicles in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Luciana; D'Arena, Giovanni; Simeon, Vittorio; Trino, Stefania; Laurenzana, Ilaria; Caivano, Antonella; La Rocca, Francesco; Villani, Oreste; Mansueto, Giovanna; Deaglio, Silvia; Innocenti, Idanna; Laurenti, Luca; Molica, Stefano; Pietrantuono, Giuseppe; De Stradis, Angelo; Del Vecchio, Luigi; Musto, Pellegrino

    2017-06-01

    Microvescicles (MV) are shedding particles released by normal and neoplastic cells, whose levels in biological fluids highlight their potential role as disease biomarkers and therapeutic targets. By analyzing 131 newly diagnosed chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), we found that the absolute number of serum CLL MV was significantly higher than in controls, in particular in advanced stages of disease. In addition, CD19 + and CD37+, B-cell derived MV, significantly correlated with high tumor burden. Absolute MV number cutoff selected by ROC analysis distinguished Rai stage 0 patients with shorter time to treatment (TTT) from those with more stable disease. Likewise, in the entire cohort, two groups of patients with different overall survival (OS) and different TTT were identified. At multivariate analysis, serum MV independently predicted for OS (along with Rai stage) and TTT (along with Rai stage, lymphocytes and CD38). In conclusion, circulating MV represent a new potential prognostic biomarker in CLL.

  14. Therapeutic potential of lung epithelial progenitor cells derived from embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wetsel, Rick A; Wang, Dachun; Calame, Daniel G

    2011-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells derived from preimplantation blastocysts and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells generated from somatic cell sources are pluripotent and capable of indefinite expansion in vitro. They provide a possible unlimited source of cells that could be differentiated into lung progenitor cells for potential clinical use in pulmonary regenerative medicine. Because of inherent difficulties in deriving endodermal cells from undifferentiated cell cultures, applications using lung epithelial cells derived from ES and iPS cells have lagged behind similar efforts devoted to other tissues, such as the heart and spinal cord. However, during the past several years, significant advances in culture, differentiation, and purification protocols, as well as in bioengineering methodologies, have fueled enthusiasm for the development of stem cell-based lung therapeutics. This article provides an overview of recent research achievements and discusses future technical challenges that must be met before the promise of stem cell applications for lung disease can be realized.

  15. Therapeutic Potential of Lung Epithelial Progenitor Cells Derived from Embryonic and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wetsel, Rick A.; Wang, Dachun; Calame, Daniel G.

    2015-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells derived from preimplantation blastocysts and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells generated from somatic cell sources are pluripotent and capable of indefinite expansion in vitro. They provide a possible unlimited source of cells that could be differentiated into lung progenitor cells for potential clinical use in pulmonary regenerative medicine. Because of inherent difficulties in deriving endodermal cells from undifferentiated cell cultures, applications using lung epithelial cells derived from ES and iPS cells have lagged behind similar efforts devoted to other tissues, such as the heart and spinal cord. However, during the past several years, significant advances in culture, differentiation, and purification protocols, as well as in bioengineering methodologies, have fueled enthusiasm for the development of stem cell–based lung therapeutics. This article provides an overview of recent research achievements and discusses future technical challenges that must be met before the promise of stem cell applications for lung disease can be realized. PMID:21226612

  16. Glucose responsive insulin production from human embryonic germ (EG) cell derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Gregory O.; Yochem, Robert L.; Axelman, Joyce; Sheets, Timothy P.; Kaczorowski, David J.; Shamblott, Michael J. . E-mail: mshambl1@jhmi.edu

    2007-05-11

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus subjects millions to a daily burden of disease management, life threatening hypoglycemia and long-term complications such as retinopathy, nephropathy, heart disease, and stroke. Cell transplantation therapies providing a glucose-regulated supply of insulin have been implemented clinically, but are limited by safety, efficacy and supply considerations. Stem cells promise a plentiful and flexible source of cells for transplantation therapies. Here, we show that cells derived from human embryonic germ (EG) cells express markers of definitive endoderm, pancreatic and {beta}-cell development, glucose sensing, and production of mature insulin. These cells integrate functions necessary for glucose responsive regulation of preproinsulin mRNA and expression of insulin C-peptide in vitro. Following transplantation into mice, cells become insulin and C-peptide immunoreactive and produce plasma C-peptide in response to glucose. These findings suggest that EG cell derivatives may eventually serve as a source of insulin producing cells for the treatment of diabetes.

  17. Stem cell derived interneuron transplants as a treatment for schizophrenia: preclinical validation in a rodent model

    PubMed Central

    Donegan, Jennifer J.; Tyson, Jennifer A.; Branch, Sarah Y.; Beckstead, Michael J.; Anderson, Stewart A.; Lodge, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    An increasing literature suggests that schizophrenia is associated with a reduction in hippocampal interneuron function. Thus, we posit that stem cell-derived interneuron transplants may be an effective therapeutic strategy to reduce hippocampal hyperactivity and attenuate behavioral deficits in schizophrenia. Here we used a dual-reporter embryonic stem cell line to generate enriched populations of parvalbumin (PV)- or somatostatin (SST)-positive interneurons, which were transplanted into the ventral hippocampus of the methylazoxymethanol (MAM) rodent model of schizophrenia. These interneuron transplants integrate within the existing circuitry, reduce hippocampal hyperactivity, and normalize aberrant dopamine neuron activity. Further, interneuron transplants alleviate behaviors that model negative and cognitive symptoms, including deficits in social interaction and cognitive inflexibility. Interestingly, PV- and SST-enriched transplants produced differential effects on behavior, with PV-enriched populations effectively normalizing all the behaviors examined. These data suggest that stem cell-derived interneuron transplants may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for schizophrenia. PMID:27480492

  18. Xenotransplantation of embryonic stem cell-derived motor neurons into the developing chick spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Wichterle, Hynek; Peljto, Mirza; Nedelec, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    A growing number of specific cell types have been successfully derived from embryonic stem cells (ES cells), including a variety of neural cells. In vitro generated cells need to be extensively characterized to establish functional equivalency with their in vivo counterparts. The ultimate test for the ability of ES cell-derived neurons to functionally integrate into neural networks is transplantation into the developing central nervous system, a challenging technique limited by the poor accessibility of mammalian embryos. Here we describe xenotransplantation of mouse embryonic stem cell-derived motor neurons into the developing chick neural tube as an alternative for testing the ability of in vitro generated neurons to survive, integrate, extend axons, and form appropriate synaptic contacts with functionally relevant targets in vivo. Similar methods can be adapted to study functionality of other mammalian cells, including derivatives of human ES cells.

  19. Pluripotent stem cell derived hepatocytes: using materials to define cellular differentiation and tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Lucendo-Villarin, B; Rashidi, H; Cameron, K; Hay, D C

    2016-05-28

    Pluripotent stem cell derived liver cells (hepatocytes) represent a promising alternative to primary tissue for biological and clinical applications. To date, most hepatocyte maintenance and differentiation systems have relied upon the use of animal derived components. This serves as a significant barrier to large scale production and application of stem cell derived hepatocytes. Recently, the use of defined biologics has overcome those limitations in two-dimensional monolayer culture. In order to improve the cell phenotype further, three-dimensional culture systems have been employed to better mimic the in vivo situation, drawing upon materials chemistry, engineering and biology. In this review we discuss efforts in the field, to differentiate pluripotent stem cells towards hepatocytes under defined conditions.

  20. Pluripotent stem cell derived hepatocytes: using materials to define cellular differentiation and tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Lucendo-Villarin, B.; Rashidi, H.; Cameron, K.

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cell derived liver cells (hepatocytes) represent a promising alternative to primary tissue for biological and clinical applications. To date, most hepatocyte maintenance and differentiation systems have relied upon the use of animal derived components. This serves as a significant barrier to large scale production and application of stem cell derived hepatocytes. Recently, the use of defined biologics has overcome those limitations in two-dimensional monolayer culture. In order to improve the cell phenotype further, three-dimensional culture systems have been employed to better mimic the in vivo situation, drawing upon materials chemistry, engineering and biology. In this review we discuss efforts in the field, to differentiate pluripotent stem cells towards hepatocytes under defined conditions. PMID:27746914

  1. hESCCO: development of good practice models for hES cell derivation.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Sarah B; Hunt, Charles; Cornwell, Glenda; Peddie, Valerie; Desousa, Paul; Livie, Morag; Stephenson, Emma L; Braude, Peter R

    2008-01-01

    One response of the UK research community to the public sensitivity and logistical complexity of embryo donation to stem cell research has been the formation of a national network of 'human embryonic stem cell coordinators' (hESCCO). The aim of hESCCO is to contribute to the formation and implementation of national standards for hES cell derivation and banking, in particular the ethical protocols for patient information and informed consent. The hESCCO project is an innovative practical intervention within the broader attempt to establish greater transparency, consistency, efficiency and standardization of hES derivation in the UK. A major outcome of the hESCCO initiative has been the drafting and implementation of a national consent form. The lessons learned in this context may be relevant to other practitioners and regulators as a model of best practice in hES cell derivation.

  2. Large scale production of a mammalian cell derived quadrivalent hepatitis C virus like particle vaccine.

    PubMed

    Earnest-Silveira, L; Christiansen, D; Herrmann, S; Ralph, S A; Das, S; Gowans, E J; Torresi, J

    2016-10-01

    A method for the large-scale production of a quadrivalent mammalian cell derived hepatitis C virus-like particles (HCV VLPs) is described. The HCV core E1 and E2 coding sequences of genotype 1a, 1b, 2a or 3a were co-expressed in Huh7 cell factories using a recombinant adenoviral expression system. The structural proteins self-assembled into VLPs that were purified from Huh7 cell lysates by iodixanol ultracentrifugation and Stirred cell ultrafiltration. Electron microscopy, revealed VLPs of the different genotypes that are morphologically similar. Our results show that it is possible to produce large quantities of individual HCV genotype VLPs with relative ease thus making this approach an alternative for the manufacture of a quadrivalent mammalian cell derived HCV VLP vaccine.

  3. The atopic march: current insights into skin barrier dysfunction and epithelial cell-derived cytokines.

    PubMed

    Han, Hongwei; Roan, Florence; Ziegler, Steven F

    2017-07-01

    Atopic dermatitis often precedes the development of other atopic diseases. The atopic march describes this temporal relationship in the natural history of atopic diseases. Although the pathophysiological mechanisms that underlie this relationship are poorly understood, epidemiological and genetic data have suggested that the skin might be an important route of sensitization to allergens. Animal models have begun to elucidate how skin barrier defects can lead to systemic allergen sensitization. Emerging data now suggest that epithelial cell-derived cytokines such as thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), IL-33, and IL-25 may drive the progression from atopic dermatitis to asthma and food allergy. This review focuses on current concepts of the role of skin barrier defects and epithelial cell-derived cytokines in the initiation and maintenance of allergic inflammation and the atopic march. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. PIEZO2 is required for mechanotransduction in human stem cell-derived touch receptors.

    PubMed

    Schrenk-Siemens, Katrin; Wende, Hagen; Prato, Vincenzo; Song, Kun; Rostock, Charlotte; Loewer, Alexander; Utikal, Jochen; Lewin, Gary R; Lechner, Stefan G; Siemens, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Human sensory neurons are inaccessible for functional examination, and thus little is known about the mechanisms mediating touch sensation in humans. Here we demonstrate that the mechanosensitivity of human embryonic stem (hES) cell-derived touch receptors depends on PIEZO2. To recapitulate sensory neuron development in vitro, we established a multistep differentiation protocol and generated sensory neurons via the intermediate production of neural crest cells derived from hES cells or human induced pluripotent stem (hiPS) cells. The generated neurons express a distinct set of touch receptor-specific genes and convert mechanical stimuli into electrical signals, their most salient characteristic in vivo. Strikingly, mechanosensitivity is lost after CRISPR/Cas9-mediated PIEZO2 gene deletion. Our work establishes a model system that resembles human touch receptors, which may facilitate mechanistic analysis of other sensory subtypes and provide insight into developmental programs underlying sensory neuron diversity.

  5. Negligible immunogenicity of terminally differentiated cells derived from induced pluripotent or embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Araki, Ryoko; Uda, Masahiro; Hoki, Yuko; Sunayama, Misato; Nakamura, Miki; Ando, Shunsuke; Sugiura, Mayumi; Ideno, Hisashi; Shimada, Akemi; Nifuji, Akira; Abe, Masumi

    2013-02-07

    The advantages of using induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) instead of embryonic stem (ES) cells in regenerative medicine centre around circumventing concerns about the ethics of using ES cells and the likelihood of immune rejection of ES-cell-derived tissues. However, partial reprogramming and genetic instabilities in iPSCs could elicit immune responses in transplant recipients even when iPSC-derived differentiated cells are transplanted. iPSCs are first differentiated into specific types of cells in vitro for subsequent transplantation. Although model transplantation experiments have been conducted using various iPSC-derived differentiated tissues and immune rejections have not been observed, careful investigation of the immunogenicity of iPSC-derived tissue is becoming increasingly critical, especially as this has not been the focus of most studies done so far. A recent study reported immunogenicity of iPSC- but not ES-cell-derived teratomas and implicated several causative genes. Nevertheless, some controversy has arisen regarding these findings. Here we examine the immunogenicity of differentiated skin and bone marrow tissues derived from mouse iPSCs. To ensure optimal comparison of iPSCs and ES cells, we established ten integration-free iPSC and seven ES-cell lines using an inbred mouse strain, C57BL/6. We observed no differences in the rate of success of transplantation when skin and bone marrow cells derived from iPSCs were compared with ES-cell-derived tissues. Moreover, we observed limited or no immune responses, including T-cell infiltration, for tissues derived from either iPSCs or ES cells, and no increase in the expression of the immunogenicity-causing Zg16 and Hormad1 genes in regressing skin and teratoma tissues. Our findings suggest limited immunogenicity of transplanted cells differentiated from iPSCs and ES cells.

  6. Transplantation of human stem cell-derived hepatocytes in an animal model of acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Rajesh; Pettinato, Giuseppe; Beeston, John T; Lee, David D; Wen, Xuejun; Mangino, Martin J; Fisher, Robert A

    2015-08-01

    Hepatocyte cell transplantation can be life-saving in patients with acute liver failure (ALF); however, primary human hepatocyte transplantation is limited by the scarcity of donor hepatocytes. We investigated the effect of stem cell-derived, hepatocyte-like cells in an animal xenotransplant model of ALF. Intraperitoneal d-galactosamine was used to develop a lethal model of ALF in the rat. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC), human mesenchymal stem cells, and human iPSC combined with human endothelial cells (iPSC + EC) were differentiated into hepatocyte-like cells and transplanted into the spleens of athymic nude rats with ALF. A reproducible lethal model of ALF was achieved with nearly 90% death within 3 days. Compared with negative controls, rats transplanted with stem cell-derived, hepatocyte-like cells were associated with increased survival. Human albumin was detected in the rat serum 3 days after transplantation in more than one-half the animals transplanted with hepatocyte-like cells. Only animals transplanted with iPSC + EC-derived hepatocytes had serum human albumin at 14 days posttransplant. Transplanted hepatocyte-like cells homed to the injured rat liver, whereas the ECs were only detected in the spleen. Transplantation of stem cell-derived, hepatocyte-like cells improved survival with evidence of in vivo human albumin production. Combining ECs may prolong cell function after transplantation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Angiogenic activity mediates bone repair from human pluripotent stem cell-derived osteogenic cells

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Li; Chen, Qingshan; Quanbeck, Zachary; Bechtold, Joan E.; Kaufman, Dan S.

    2016-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells provide a standardized resource for bone repair. However, criteria to determine which exogenous cells best heal orthopedic injuries remain poorly defined. We evaluated osteogenic progenitor cells derived from both human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). Phenotypic and genotypic analyses demonstrated that these hESCs/hiPSCs are similar in their osteogenic differentiation efficiency and they generate osteogenic cells comparable to osteogenic cells derived from mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs). However, expression of angiogenic factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor in these osteogenic progenitor cells are markedly different, suggesting distinct pro-angiogenic potential of these stem cell derivatives. Studies to repair a femur non-union fracture demonstrate only osteogenic progenitor cells with higher pro-angiogenic potential significantly enhance bone repair in vivo. Together, these studies highlight a key role of pro-angiogenic potential of transplanted osteogenic cells for effective cell-mediated bone repair. PMID:26980556

  8. Methods for Assessing the Electromechanical Integration of Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocyte Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wei-Zhong; Filice, Dominic; Palpant, Nathan J.; Laflamme, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiomyocytes derived from human pluripotent stem cells show tremendous promise for the replacement of myocardium and contractile function lost to infarction. However, until recently, no methods were available to directly determine whether these stem cell-derived grafts actually couple with host myocardium and fire synchronously following transplantation in either intact or injured hearts. To resolve this uncertainty, our group has developed techniques for the intravital imaging of hearts engrafted with stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes that have been modified to express the genetically encoded protein calcium sensor, GCaMP. When combined with the simultaneously recorded electrocardiogram, this protocol allows one to make quantitative assessments as to the presence and extent of host–graft electrical coupling as well as the timing and pattern of graft activation. As described here, this system has been employed to investigate the electromechanical integration of human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes in a guinea pig model of cardiac injury, but analogous approaches should be applicable to other human graft cell types and animal models. PMID:25070341

  9. Methods for assessing the electromechanical integration of human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte grafts.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei-Zhong; Filice, Dominic; Palpant, Nathan J; Laflamme, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Cardiomyocytes derived from human pluripotent stem cells show tremendous promise for the replacement of myocardium and contractile function lost to infarction. However, until recently, no methods were available to directly determine whether these stem cell-derived grafts actually couple with host myocardium and fire synchronously following transplantation in either intact or injured hearts. To resolve this uncertainty, our group has developed techniques for the intravital imaging of hearts engrafted with stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes that have been modified to express the genetically encoded protein calcium sensor, GCaMP. When combined with the simultaneously recorded electrocardiogram, this protocol allows one to make quantitative assessments as to the presence and extent of host-graft electrical coupling as well as the timing and pattern of graft activation. As described here, this system has been employed to investiga