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Sample records for cancer effects modified

  1. Cigarette smoking and endometrial cancer risk: the modifying effect of obesity.

    PubMed

    Polesel, Jerry; Serraino, Diego; Zucchetto, Antonella; Lucenteforte, Ersilia; Dal Maso, Luigino; Levi, Fabio; Negri, Eva; Montella, Maurizio; Franceschi, Silvia; Talamini, Renato; La Vecchia, Carlo

    2009-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between cigarette smoking and endometrial cancer risk by investigating potential modifying effects of menopausal status, obesity, and exogenous hormones. We pooled data from three case-control studies with the same study design conducted in Italy and Switzerland between 1982 and 2006. Overall, 1446 incident endometrial cancers and 4076 hospital controls were enrolled. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using logistic regression models, conditioned on study and centre, and adjusted for age, period of interview, age at menarche, parity, and body mass index. In comparison with never smokers, current smokers showed reduced endometrial cancer risk (OR: 0.80; 95% CI: 0.66-0.96), with a 28% decrease in risk for smoking ≥ 20 cigarettes/day. The association did not vary according to menopausal status, oral contraceptive use, or hormone replacement therapy. However, heterogeneity emerged according to body mass index among postmenopausal women, with obese women showing the greatest risk reduction for current smoking (OR: 0.47; 95% CI: 0.27-0.81). In postmenopausal women, obesity turned out to be an important modifier of the association between cigarette smoking and the risk of endometrial cancer. This finding calls for caution in interpreting the favorable effects of cigarette smoking, considering the toxic and carcinogenic effects of tobacco.

  2. Histone Modifiers in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Idan; Poręba, Elżbieta; Kamieniarz, Kinga; Schneider, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Covalent modifications of histones can regulate all DNA-dependent processes. In the last few years, it has become more and more evident that histone modifications are key players in the regulation of chromatin states and dynamics as well as in gene expression. Therefore, histone modifications and the enzymatic machineries that set them are crucial regulators that can control cellular proliferation, differentiation, plasticity, and malignancy processes. This review discusses the biology and biochemistry of covalent histone posttranslational modifications (PTMs) and evaluates the dual role of their modifiers in cancer: as oncogenes that can initiate and amplify tumorigenesis or as tumor suppressors. PMID:21941619

  3. Studies demonstrate modified T cells effective in treating blood-borne cancers

    Cancer.gov

    At the 2013 American Society of Hematology meeting in Dec. 2013, James Kochenderfer, M.D., NCI, presented findings from two clinical trials evaluating the use of genetically modified immune system T cells as cancer therapy. These reports represent import

  4. Genetic Modifiers of Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    cancer suggesting the presence of genetic modifiers of ovarian cancer in this population. A genome wide association study ( GWAS ) for ovarian cancer...cancer and 1,000 age-matched unaffected BRCA1 carriers. As outlined in detail in our previous annual report, we recently conducted a GWAS of BRCA1...between ovarian cancer risk and SNPs implicated in Aim 1 by genotyping 1,500 BRCA1 ovarian cancer cases and 1,500 unaffected BRCA1 carriers. GWAS

  5. Effects of newspaper coverage on public knowledge about modifiable cancer risks.

    PubMed

    Stryker, Jo Ellen; Moriarty, Cortney M; Jensen, Jakob D

    2008-07-01

    This study explores the relationship between cancer newspaper coverage and public knowledge about cancer prevention, confirming self-reported associations between news exposure and cancer prevention knowledge with descriptions of newspaper coverage of modifiable cancer risks. Content analyses (N = 954) revealed that newspapers pay relatively little attention to cancer prevention. However, there is greater newspaper attention to tobacco and diet than to exercise, sun, and alcohol. Survey analysis (the National Cancer Institute's Health Information National Trends Survey) revealed that after controlling for differences based on gender, race, age, income, and education, attention to health news was significantly associated with knowledge about cancer risks associated with food and smoking but not for knowledge about exercise, sun, or alcohol. These findings conform to the findings of the content analysis data and provide a validation of a self-reported measure of media exposure, as well as evidence suggesting a threshold below which news coverage may not generate public knowledge about cancer prevention.

  6. Decreased risk of cancer in multiple sclerosis patients and analysis of the effect of disease modifying therapies on cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Gaindh, Deeya; Kavak, Katelyn S; Teter, Barbara; Vaughn, Caila B; Cookfair, Diane; Hahn, Theresa; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca

    2016-11-15

    Although dysimmunity is considered an important link between multiple sclerosis (MS), family history and cancer risk, their relationship to the use of disease modifying therapies (DMT) is not fully understood. To assess the observed versus expected number of cancers in MS patients, and family history of cancer, among DMT users and DMT naïve patients. Cancer, DMT use, and family history of cancer were assessed using the New York State Multiple Sclerosis Consortium (NYSMSC) registry. Self-reported cancers in MS patients were tested for associations with DMT use, family history of cancer and other factors. Expected number of cancer cases was estimated using age- and gender-specific prevalence and incidence rates from the general population. The prevalence of cancer in males and females in the NYSMSC cohort was lower than expected (p<0.001). Patients with cancer were older at MS diagnosis and more likely to be female (p<0.001). MS patients with a personal history of cancer were more likely to report DMT use (p<0.001) and family history of cancer (p<0.001). Multivariable analysis did not support a higher risk of cancer after DMT initiation. We report a lower than expected number of cancer cases in MS patients compared to the general population. MS patients with a personal history of cancer were more likely to report DMT use suggesting that DMTs may abrogate the lower incidence of cancer in MS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Modified effect of urinary cadmium on breast cancer risk by selenium.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xue-Ling; He, Jian-Rong; Cen, Yu-Ling; Su, Yi; Chen, Li-Juan; Lin, Ying; Wu, Bang-Hua; Su, Feng-Xi; Tang, Lu-Ying; Ren, Ze-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Previous experimental studies have shown an antagonistic interaction between cadmium and selenium. We explored the interaction between cadmium and selenium on human breast cancer risk. A case-control study, enrolled 240 incident invasive breast cancer patients and 246 age-matched controls from 2 hospitals, was conducted in Guangzhou, China. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used to examine urinary concentrations of cadmium and selenium. Association and interaction of the metal levels with breast cancer risk were tested using generalized additive and logistic regression models. As continuous variables, urinary cadmium [OR (95% CI): 1.16 (1.01-1.34)] but not selenium was significantly linearly associated with breast cancer risk. As tertiles, urinary cadmium did not significantly increase breast cancer risk; whereas women with the second tertile of selenium concentration had a significantly decreased risk of breast cancer as compared with those in the lowest tertile [OR (95% CI): 0.50 (0.30-0.81)]. Among the women with the lowest tertile of selenium, the highest tertile of cadmium significantly increased the risk of breast cancer [OR (95% CI): 2.83 (1.18-6.86)] compared to the lowest tertile of cadmium. A multiplicative interaction was found between tertiles of cadmium and selenium on breast cancer risk (P=0.018), particularly among postmenopausal women. These results suggested that the association of urinary cadmium with breast cancer risk was modified by urinary selenium. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The modifying effect of social class on the relationship between body mass index and breast cancer incidence.

    PubMed

    Torio, Celeste Marie; Klassen, Ann C; Curriero, Frank C; Caballero, Benjamin; Helzlsouer, Kathy

    2010-01-01

    We sought to determine whether social class modifies the effect of BMI on breast cancer incidence. Participants included 5642 postmenopausal White women recruited in 1989 to CLUE II, a prospective cohort study in Washington County, Maryland. We obtained exposure data from CLUE II and the 1990 US Census. We used survival and random-effects Cox proportional hazards analyses to determine the association of social class and BMI with breast cancer incidence. Education was independently associated with increased risk of breast cancer incidence (hazard ratio [HR]=1.06; 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.01, 1.11; P<.05); contextual measures of social class were not. Education modified the effect of BMI at age 21 years (HR=0.98; 95% CI=0.97, 0.99); area-level social class modified the effect of BMI at baseline (HR=0.97; 95% CI=0.94, 0.99) and BMI change (HR=0.98; 95% CI=0.95, 1.00). Subpopulation analyses that were adjusted for hormone use, parity, and breast-feeding found similar effects. Social class moderates the influence of body size on breast cancer incidence. Public health efforts, therefore, should advocate for policies that improve social conditions to decrease the burden of breast cancer.

  9. Genetic Modifiers of Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    association study ( GWAS ) for ovarian cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers was initiated in an effort to identify common genetic variants that modify... GWAS of 1250 BRCA1 mutation carriers diagnosed with breast cancer and 1250 unaffected BRCA1 carriers using Human660W-Quad arrays. The 1250 unaffected...cancer on H uman660W-Quad arrays. In addition we acquired GWAS genotype data for 120 additional BRCA1 mutation carriers affected with ovarian

  10. Biocompatible APTES-PEG modified magnetite nanoparticles: effective carriers of antineoplastic agents to ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Javid, Amaneh; Ahmadian, Shahin; Saboury, Ali Akbar; Kalantar, Seyed Mehdi; Rezaei-Zarchi, Saeed; Shahzad, Sughra

    2014-05-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles are particularly attractive for drug delivery applications because of their size-dependent superparamagnetism, low toxicity, and biocompatibility with cells and tissues. Surface modification of iron oxide nanoparticles with biocompatible polymers is potentially beneficial to prepare biodegradable nanocomposite-based drug delivery agents for in vivo and in vitro applications. In the present study, the bare (10 nm) and polyethylene glycol (PEG)-(3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) (PA) modified (17 nm) superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIO NPs) were synthesized by coprecipitation method. The anticancer drugs, doxorubicin (DOX) and paclitaxel (PTX), were separately encapsulated into the synthesized polymeric nanocomposites for localized targeting of human ovarian cancer in vitro. Surface morphology analysis by scanning electron microscopy showed a slight increase in particle size (27 ± 0.7 and 30 ± 0.45 nm) with drug loading capacities of 70 and 61.5 % and release capabilities of 90 and 93 % for the DOX- and PTX-AP-SPIO NPs, respectively (p < 0.001). Ten milligrams/milliliter DOX- and PTX-loaded AP-SPIO NPs caused a significant amount of cytotoxicity and downregulation of antiapoptotic proteins, as compared with same amounts of free drugs (p < 0.001). In vivo antiproliferative effect of present formulation on immunodeficient female Balb/c mice showed ovarian tumor shrinkage from 2,920 to 143 mm(3) after 40 days. The present formulation of APTES-PEG-SPIO-based nanocomposite system of targeted drug delivery proved to be effective enough in order to treat deadly solid tumor of ovarian cancer in vitro and in vivo.

  11. Bioinspired phosphorylcholine-modified polyplexes as an effective strategy for selective uptake and transfection of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lina; Wang, Haibo; Zhang, Yuanfeng; Wang, Youxiang; Hu, Qiaoling; Ji, Jian

    2013-11-01

    We demonstrated here that the phosphorylcholine-modified polyplexes can be explored as effective gene vector for selective uptake and high transfection of cancer cells. 12-acryloyloxy dodecyl phosphorylcholine modified polyethyleneimine (PEI-ADPC) with grafting level about 13%, 8.3% and 4.5% was successfully synthesized. Gel retardation assay indicated that ADPC modification did not affect the DNA condensation ability. The PEI-ADPC13%/DNA and PEI-ADPC8.3%/DNA polyplexes were under 100nm with a beneficial neutral surface at N/P ratio of 30. Sufficient ADPC shell endowed the polyplexes with high colloidal stability and low cytotoxicity. Compared to PEGylated polyplexes, it was interesting to find out that the PEI-ADPC/DNA polyplexes were selectively uptaked by liver cancer HepG2 cells. At the presence of chloroquine to exclude the limitation of lysosome escape, the ADPC-modified polyplexes showed more effective gene transfection in cancer cells than in normal cells because of the selective cell uptake. In conclusion, the convenient PC-modification modality was found to have both the function of biostability in the physiological environment and targetability toward cancer cells uniquely, which might have great potential use in cancer gene therapy.

  12. Relevant reduction effect with a modified thermoplastic mask of rotational error for glottic cancer in IMRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jae Hong; Jung, Joo-Young; Cho, Kwang Hwan; Ryu, Mi Ryeong; Bae, Sun Hyun; Moon, Seong Kwon; Kim, Yong Ho; Choe, Bo-Young; Suh, Tae Suk

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the glottis rotational error (GRE) by using a thermoplastic mask for patients with the glottic cancer undergoing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). We selected 20 patients with glottic cancer who had received IMRT by using the tomotherapy. The image modalities with both kilovoltage computed tomography (planning kVCT) and megavoltage CT (daily MVCT) images were used for evaluating the error. Six anatomical landmarks in the image were defined to evaluate a correlation between the absolute GRE (°) and the length of contact with the underlying skin of the patient by the mask (mask, mm). We also statistically analyzed the results by using the Pearson's correlation coefficient and a linear regression analysis ( P <0.05). The mask and the absolute GRE were verified to have a statistical correlation ( P < 0.01). We found a statistical significance for each parameter in the linear regression analysis (mask versus absolute roll: P = 0.004 [ P < 0.05]; mask versus 3D-error: P = 0.000 [ P < 0.05]). The range of the 3D-errors with contact by the mask was from 1.2% - 39.7% between the maximumand no-contact case in this study. A thermoplastic mask with a tight, increased contact area may possibly contribute to the uncertainty of the reproducibility as a variation of the absolute GRE. Thus, we suggest that a modified mask, such as one that covers only the glottis area, can significantly reduce the patients' setup errors during the treatment.

  13. Biological Response Modifiers in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Reang, Purabi; Gupta, Madhur; Kohli, Kamlesh

    2006-01-01

    We have seen a surge in the use of immunotherapy for the treatment of cancer. Biological response modifiers can act passively by enhancing the immunologic response to tumor cells or actively by altering the differentiation/growth of tumor cells. Active immunotherapy with cytokines such as interferons (IFNs) and interleukins (IL-2) is a form of nonspecific active immune stimulation. The use of IL-2 has recently been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma and metastatic colorectal cancer. Considerable success has been achieved with the use of immunotherapy, especially in the area of passive immunotherapy using monoclonal antibodies – in particular, radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies. In addition to the various monoclonal antibodies that have been used in clinical trials, other strategies such as the use of antiangiogenic agents and matrix metalloprotease inhibitors (MMPIs) have also met with some success. Recently, the FDA approved bevacizumab, an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) agent, for the treatment of metastatic melanoma. This review also sheds light on the various angiogenesis inhibitors in clinical trials, the increasing use of thalidomide in cancer, and the upcoming potential cancer vaccines designed to activate cell-mediated immune responses against tumor antigens. PMID:17415315

  14. Common genetic polymorphisms modify the effect of smoking on absolute risk of bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Rothman, Nathaniel; Figueroa, Jonine D; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Han, Summer S; Baris, Dalsu; Jacobs, Eric J; Malats, Nuria; De Vivo, Immaculata; Albanes, Demetrius; Purdue, Mark P; Sharma, Sapna; Fu, Yi-Ping; Kogevinas, Manolis; Wang, Zhaoming; Tang, Wei; Tardón, Adonina; Serra, Consol; Carrato, Alfredo; García-Closas, Reina; Lloreta, Josep; Johnson, Alison; Schwenn, Molly; Karagas, Margaret R; Schned, Alan; Andriole, Gerald; Grubb, Robert; Black, Amanda; Gapstur, Susan M; Thun, Michael; Diver, William Ryan; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Virtamo, Jarmo; Hunter, David J; Caporaso, Neil; Landi, Maria Teresa; Hutchinson, Amy; Burdett, Laurie; Jacobs, Kevin B; Yeager, Meredith; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Chanock, Stephen J; Silverman, Debra T; Chatterjee, Nilanjan

    2013-04-01

    Bladder cancer results from the combined effects of environmental and genetic factors, smoking being the strongest risk factor. Evaluating absolute risks resulting from the joint effects of smoking and genetic factors is critical to assess the public health relevance of genetic information. Analyses included up to 3,942 cases and 5,680 controls of European background in seven studies. We tested for multiplicative and additive interactions between smoking and 12 susceptibility loci, individually and combined as a polygenic risk score (PRS). Thirty-year absolute risks and risk differences by levels of the PRS were estimated for U.S. males aged 50 years. Six of 12 variants showed significant additive gene-environment interactions, most notably NAT2 (P = 7 × 10(-4)) and UGT1A6 (P = 8 × 10(-4)). The 30-year absolute risk of bladder cancer in U.S. males was 6.2% for all current smokers. This risk ranged from 2.9% for current smokers in the lowest quartile of the PRS to 9.9% for current smokers in the upper quartile. Risk difference estimates indicated that 8,200 cases would be prevented if elimination of smoking occurred in 100,000 men in the upper PRS quartile compared with 2,000 cases prevented by a similar effort in the lowest PRS quartile (P(additive) = 1 × 10(-4)). Thus, the potential impact of eliminating smoking on the number of bladder cancer cases prevented is larger for individuals at higher than lower genetic risk. Our findings could have implications for targeted prevention strategies. However, other smoking-related diseases, as well as practical and ethical considerations, need to be considered before any recommendations could be made. ©2012 AACR.

  15. Cost effectiveness of modified fractionation radiotherapy versus conventional radiotherapy for unresected non-small-cell lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Ramaekers, Bram L T; Joore, Manuela A; Lueza, Béranger; Bonastre, Julia; Mauguen, Audrey; Pignon, Jean-Pierre; Le Pechoux, Cecile; De Ruysscher, Dirk K M; Grutters, Janneke P C

    2013-10-01

    Modified fractionation radiotherapy (RT), delivering multiple fractions per day or shortening the overall treatment time, improves overall survival for non -small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients compared with conventional fractionation RT (CRT). However, its cost effectiveness is unknown. Therefore, we aimed to examine and compare the cost effectiveness of different modified RT schemes and CRT in the curative treatment of unresected NSCLC patients. A probabilistic Markov model was developed based on individual patient data from the meta-analysis of radiotherapy in lung cancer (N = 2000). Dutch health care costs, quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), and net monetary benefits (NMBs) were compared between two accelerated schemes (very accelerated RT [VART] and moderately accelerated RT [MART]), two hyperfractionated schemes (using an identical (HRT) or higher (HRT) total treatment dose than CRT) and CRT. All modified fractionations were more effective and costlier than CRT (1.12 QALYs, &OV0556;24,360). VART and MART were most effective (1.30 and 1.32 QALYs) and cost &OV0556;25,746 and &OV0556;26,208, respectively. HRT and HRT yielded less QALYs than the accelerated schemes (1.27 and 1.14 QALYs), and cost &OV0556;26,199 and &OV0556;29,683, respectively. MART had the highest NMB (&OV0556;79,322; 95% confidence interval [CI], &OV0556;35,478-&OV0556;133,648) and was the most cost-effective treatment followed by VART (&OV0556;78,347; 95% CI, &OV0556;64,635-&OV0556;92,526). CRT had an NMB of &OV0556;65,125 (95% CI, &OV0556;54,663-&OV0556;75,537). MART had the highest probability of being cost effective (43%), followed by VART (31%), HRT (24%), HRT (2%), and CRT (0%). Implementing accelerated RT is almost certainly more efficient than current practice CRT and should be recommended as standard RT for the curative treatment of unresected NSCLC patients not receiving concurrent chemo-radiotherapy.

  16. High fat mixed lipid diet modifies protective effects of exercise on 1,2 dimethylhydrazine induced colon cancer in rats.

    PubMed

    Perše, M; Injac, R; Štrukelj, B; Cerar, A

    2012-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of long-term swimming exercise in conjunction with a high fat mixed lipid (HFML) diet on colon cancer (CC) development and lipid peroxidation in the large bowel. We used forty male Wistar rats, which were randomly divided into one control group and four cancer groups: sedentary and swimming groups fed a standard diet (LFCO) and sedentary and swimming groups fed an HFML diet. Corticosterone was determined during the experiment. After 6 months of swimming, the rats were sacrificed and blood, heart, liver, muscle and large bowel were taken for determining the activity of serum enzymes, antioxidant capacity and CC development. The results demonstrate that exercise has a protective role in CC development. Attenuated development of CC and increased levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) in the large bowel of exercised rats show that one of the protective effects of exercise on developing CC is induction of oxidative stress. However, in terms of the combined effects of dietary fat and exercise, our results indicate that the protective role of exercise on CC development is significantly depressed by an HFML diet. An HFML diet significantly reduced the protective influence of exercise on colon carcinogenesis in rats and affected the degree of peroxidation in the large bowel during exercise, as well as concentrations of serum enzymes (LDH, α-HBDH, CK, ALT and AST). Our results indicate that an HFML diet, which reflects the composition of a Western style diet, is a significant modifier of the protective effects of exercise on CC development in rats.

  17. Genetic Modifiers of Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    ovarian cancer, a sizeable proportion of women who carry a deleteriou s mutation will not d evelop this disease . In addition, the findings show that...carriers. Carriers were censored at age of onset of disease for those affected with breast or ovarian cancer and age of last follow up or age at 5...Doerk T, Hillemanns P, Durst M, Runnebaum I, Thompson PJ, Carney ME, Goodman MT, Lurie G, Wang- Gohrke S , Hein R, Chang-Claude J, Rossing MA, Cushing

  18. Biological Response Modifier in Cancer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ronghua; Luo, Feifei; Liu, Xiaoming; Wang, Luman; Yang, Jiao; Deng, Yuting; Huang, Enyu; Qian, Jiawen; Lu, Zhou; Jiang, Xuechao; Zhang, Dan; Chu, Yiwei

    2016-01-01

    Biological response modifiers (BRMs) emerge as a lay of new compounds or approaches used in improving cancer immunotherapy. Evidences highlight that cytokines, Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, and noncoding RNAs are of crucial roles in modulating antitumor immune response and cancer-related chronic inflammation, and BRMs based on them have been explored. In particular, besides some cytokines like IFN-α and IL-2, several Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists like BCG, MPL, and imiquimod are also licensed to be used in patients with several malignancies nowadays, and the first artificial small noncoding RNA (microRNA) mimic, MXR34, has entered phase I clinical study against liver cancer, implying their potential application in cancer therapy. According to amounts of original data, this chapter will review the regulatory roles of TLR signaling, some noncoding RNAs, and several key cytokines in cancer and cancer-related immune response, as well as the clinical cases in cancer therapy based on them.

  19. Causal Aspects of Social Capital of Iranian Patients with Cancer: Evidence of Predictive, Modifying and Descriptive Effects in Health Inequality.

    PubMed

    Tavakol, Mohamad; Naserirad, Mohsen

    2013-10-01

    There is a good literature confirming the effects of social capital on different health domains. The increase in different types of cancer has caused scientists to encounter a number of issues regarding the reasons of affliction by this disease. The aim of this empirical research was to study the causal aspects of social capital of Iranian patients with cancer. The study was a causal-comparative study conducted in the spring and summer of 2010 in Tehran. The sample consists of 212 people selected based on affliction or no affliction to cancer. Social capital emphasizes two dimensions of structure and cognition. Social participation, social trust and sense of social solidarity are considered as different dimensions of social capital. The focus has been on personal social capital. The effect and association of social capital are not significant with any of stomach and colon cancers. The effect and association of social trust are not significant with any of stomach, colon and breast cancers. People with similar social capital in their life have different experiences of cancer-related stress and unhealthy behaviors. Thus a specific feature of a stressful social determinant is not a reliable criterion to determine the degree of stress and the extent of its effect on affliction to cancer.

  20. The modifying effect of patient location on stage-specific survival following colorectal cancer using geosurvival models.

    PubMed

    Chien, Lung-Chang; Schootman, Mario; Pruitt, Sandi L

    2013-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third leading cause of cancer death in the US, and stage at diagnosis is the primary prognostic factor. To date, the interplay between geographic place and individual characteristics such as cancer stage with CRC survival is unexplored. We used a Bayesian geosurvival statistical model to evaluate whether the spatial patterns of CRC survival at the census tract level varies by stage at diagnosis (in situ/local, regional, distant), controlling for patient characteristics, surveillance test use, and treatment using linked 1991-2005 SEER-Medicare data of patients ≥ 66 years old in two US metropolitan areas. The spatial pattern of survival varied by stage at diagnosis for both cancer sites and registries. Significant spatial effects were identified in all census tracts for colon cancer and the majority of census tracts for rectal cancer. Geographic disparities appeared to be highest for distant-stage rectal cancer. Compared to those with in situ/local stage in the same census tracts, patients with distant-stage cancer were at most 7.73 times and 4.69 times more likely to die of colon and rectal cancer, respectively. Moreover, frailty areas for CRC at in situ/local stage more likely have a higher relative risk at regional stage, but not at distant stage. We identified geographic areas with excessive risk of CRC death and demonstrated that spatial patterns varied by both cancer type and cancer stage. More research is needed to understand the moderating pathways between geographic and individual-level factors on CRC survival.

  1. Modifiable risk factors and thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Stansifer, Kyle J; Guynan, John F; Wachal, Brandon M; Smith, Russell B

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate the association between modifiable patient risk factors including tobacco use, alcohol consumption, body mass index (BMI), and thyroid cancer. Retrospective study with chart review. Midwest university hospital. Retrospective study comparing Midwest patients with thyroid cancer from our Thyroid Tumor and Cancer Registry with Midwest controls without a personal history of cancer. Descriptive statistics were created from patient questionnaires and chart reviews. Odds ratios (ORs) were reported for significant associations. There were 467 patients with cancer and 255 controls. The thyroid cancer group included 404 papillary, 47 follicular, 13 medullary, and 3 anaplastic cancers. When comparing all patients with cancer with controls, smoking more than 100 lifetime cigarettes was associated with a reduced cancer risk (OR, 0.68; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.50-0.94). Secondhand smoke exposure did not show a statistically significant relationship to thyroid cancer. Compared with never drinking, current drinking was associated with a reduced cancer risk (OR, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.29-0.73) as was consuming 1 to 2 drinks daily compared to drinking <1 drink daily (OR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.34-0.89). There was no difference between median BMI at age 20 years, lifetime maximum BMI, or current BMI between patients with cancer and controls. Our data showed no positive correlation between tobacco use, alcohol consumption, or obesity and thyroid cancer risk. Our data suggest that tobacco use and mild alcohol consumption may be associated with a slightly reduced risk of thyroid cancer. There was no association between BMI and thyroid cancer in our study population. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2014.

  2. Synergistic effect of chemo-photothermal for breast cancer therapy using folic acid (FA) modified zinc oxide nanosheet.

    PubMed

    Vimala, Karuppaiya; Shanthi, Krishnamurthy; Sundarraj, Shenbagamoorthy; Kannan, Soundarapandian

    2017-02-15

    Modern therapies for malignant breast cancer in clinics are not efficacious and often result in deprived patient compliance owing to squat therapeutic effectiveness and strong systemic side effects. In order to overcome this, we combined chemo-photothermal targeted therapy of breast cancer within one novel multifunctional drug delivery system. Folic Acid-functionalized polyethylene glycol coated Zinc Oxide nanosheet (FA-PEG-ZnO NS), was successfully synthesized, characterized and introduced to the drug delivery field for the first time. A doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded FA-PEG-ZnO NS based system (DOX-FA-PEG-ZnO NS) showed stimulative effect of heat, pH responsive and sustained drug release properties. Cytotoxicity experiments confirmed that combined therapy mediated the maximum rate of death in breast cancer cells compared to that of single chemotherapy or photothermal therapy. In vivo toxicity evaluation showed that the DOX-FA-PEG-ZnO NS contains minimum systemic toxicity in the mice model system. The findings of the present study provided an ideal drug delivery system for breast cancer therapy due to the advanced chemo-photothermal synergistic targeted therapy and good drug release properties of DOX-FA-PEG-ZnO NS, which could effectively avoid frequent and invasive dosing and improve patient compliance. Thus, functionalized-ZnO NS could be used as a novel nanomaterial for selective chemo-photothermal therapy.

  3. Magnetic-composite-modified polycrystalline silicon nanowire field-effect transistor for vascular endothelial growth factor detection and cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsiao-Chien; Qiu, Jian-Tai; Yang, Fu-Liang; Liu, Yin-Chih; Chen, Min-Cheng; Tsai, Rung-Ywan; Yang, Hung-Wei; Lin, Chia-Yi; Lin, Chu-Chi; Wu, Tzong-Shoon; Tu, Yi-Ming; Xiao, Min-Cong; Ho, Chia-Hua; Huang, Chien-Chao; Lai, Chao-Sung; Hua, Mu-Yi

    2014-10-07

    This study proposes a vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) biosensor for diagnosing various stages of cervical carcinoma. In addition, VEGF concentrations at various stages of cancer therapy are determined and compared to data obtained by computed tomography (CT) and cancer antigen 125 (CA-125). The increase in VEGF concentrations during operations offers useful insight into dosage timing during cancer therapy. This biosensor uses Avastin as the biorecognition element for the potential cancer biomarker VEGF and is based on a n-type polycrystalline silicon nanowire field-effect transistor (poly-SiNW-FET). Magnetic nanoparticles with poly[aniline-co-N-(1-one-butyric acid) aniline]-Fe3O4 (SPAnH-Fe3O4) shell-core structures are used as carriers for Avastin loading and provide rapid purification due to their magnetic properties, which prevent the loss of bioactivity; furthermore, the high surface area of these structures increases the quantity of Avastin immobilized. Average concentrations in human blood for species that interfere with detection specificity are also evaluated. The detection range of the biosensor for serum samples covers the results expected from both healthy individuals and cancer patients.

  4. DNA repair single-nucleotide polymorphisms in colorectal cancer and their role as modifiers of the effect of cigarette smoking and alcohol in the Singapore Chinese Health Study.

    PubMed

    Stern, Mariana C; Conti, David V; Siegmund, Kimberly D; Corral, Román; Yuan, Jian-Min; Koh, Woon-Puay; Yu, Mimi C

    2007-11-01

    Recently, we reported that among Singapore Chinese, cigarette smoking and alcohol drinking were independent risk factors for colorectal cancer. Both tobacco smoking and alcohol use are plausible colorectal cancer risk factors, partly due to their ability to induce mutations in the colorectal lumen. In the present study, we investigated the role in colorectal cancer of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in five DNA repair genes: XRCC1 (Arg(194)Trp and Arg(399)Gln), PARP (Val(762)Ala, Lys(940)Arg), XPD (Asp(312)Asn, Lys(751)Gln), OGG1 (Ser(326)Cys), and MGMT (Leu(84)Phe). We conducted this study within the Singapore Chinese Health Study, a population-based cohort of 63,257 middle-aged and older Singapore Chinese men and women enrolled between 1993 and 1998. Our study included 1,176 controls and 310 cases (180 colon and 130 rectum cancer). We observed a positive association between the PARP codon 940 Lys/Arg and Arg/Arg genotypes and colorectal cancer risk [odds ratio (OR), 1.8; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.1-3.1], and an inverse association between the MGMT codon 84 Leu/Phe or Phe/Phe genotypes and colon cancer risk (OR, 0.6; 95% CI, 0.3-0.9), but not rectal cancer (test of heterogeneity by tumor site, P=0.027). We observed evidence that XRCC1 may modify the effects of smoking (interaction P=0.012). The effect of smoking among carriers of the Arg(194)-Gln(399) haplotype was OR=0.7 (95% CI, 0.4-1.1), whereas, among carriers of the Trp(194)-Arg(399) haplotype, it was OR=1.6 (95% CI, 1.1-2.5). We also observed a nonstatistically significant modification of XRCC1 on the effects of alcohol (P=0.245). Whereas alcohol had no effect among carriers of the codon 194 Arg/Arg (OR, 1.0; 95% CI, 0.6-1.7) or Arg/Trp genotypes (OR, 1.1; 95% CI, 0.6-1.9), there was a positive association among carriers of the Trp/Trp genotype (OR, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.0-8.1). Our results support a role for reactive oxygen species as relevant genotoxins that may account for the effects of both smoking

  5. A modified regimen of biweekly gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer is both tolerable and effective: a retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Daniel H.; Krishna, Kavya; Blazer, Marlo; Reardon, Joshua; Wei, Lai; Wu, Christina; Ciombor, Kristen K.; Noonan, Anne M.; Mikhail, Sameh; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios

    2016-01-01

    Background: Treatment with nab-paclitaxel with gemcitabine demonstrates a survival advantage when compared with single-agent gemcitabine. However, the combination is associated with significant toxicities, leading to a high rate of drug discontinuation. We implemented a modified regimen of gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel (mGNabP) in an attempt to minimize toxicities while maintaining efficacy. Methods: A total of 79 evaluable patients with metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma (mPC) treated with a modified regimen of gemcitabine (1000 mg/m2) and nab-paclitaxel (125 mg/m2) on days 1, 15 of every 28-day cycle were identified from our prospective database. A total of 57 patients received this regimen as first-line treatment and were evaluated for toxicities, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). Overall, 22 patients with advanced or metastatic PC treated with the modified regimen outside the first-line setting were only evaluated for toxicities. Results: The median OS and PFS were 10 months [95% confidence interval (CI) 5.9–13 months] and 5.4 months (95% CI 4.1–7.4 months) for patients that received the modified regimen as first-line therapy. Neurotoxicity occurred in 27% with only 1.6% of patients experiencing grade ⩾3 toxicity. The incidence of grade ⩾3 neutropenia was 19%, resulting in growth factor support in 12% of patients. This rate was similar in patients who received the modified regimen for first-line treatment of mPC versus the overall group. Conclusions: A modified regimen of biweekly nab-paclitaxel with gemcitabine is associated with a lower cost, acceptable toxicity profile and appears to be relatively effective in pancreatic cancer. Prospective randomized studies confirming its potential benefits compared with standard weekly mGNabP are warranted. PMID:28203300

  6. A Systematic Review of the Modifying Effect of Anaesthetic Drugs on Metastasis in Animal Models for Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hooijmans, Carlijn R; Geessink, Florentine J; Ritskes-Hoitinga, Merel; Scheffer, Gert Jan

    2016-01-01

    Distant metastasis or local recurrence after primary tumour resection remain a major clinical problem. The anaesthetic technique used during oncologic surgery is suggested to influence the metastatic process. While awaiting the results of ongoing randomised controlled trials (RCTs), we have analyzed the evidence regarding the influence of anaesthetic drugs on experimental tumour metastasis in animal studies. PubMed and Embase were searched until April 21st, 2015. Studies were included in the systematic review when they 1) assessed the effect of an anaesthetic drug used in clinical practice on the number or incidence of metastasis in animal models with experimental cancer, 2) included an appropriate control group, and 3) presented unique data. 20 studies met the inclusion criteria (published between 1958-2010). Data on number of metastases could be retrieved from 17 studies. These studies described 41 independent comparisons, 33 of which could be included in the meta-analysis (MA). The incidence of metastases was studied in 3 unique papers. From these 3 papers, data on 7 independent comparisons could be extracted and included in the MA. Locally administered local anaesthetics appear to decrease the number of metastases (SMD -6.15 [-8.42; -3.88]), whereas general anaesthetics (RD: 0.136 [0.045, 0.226]), and more specifically volatile anaesthetics (SMD 0.54 [0.24; 0.84]), appear to increase the number and risk of metastases in animal models for cancer. Anaesthetics influence the number and incidence of metastases in experimental cancer models. Although more high quality experimental research is necessary, based on the currently available evidence from animal studies, there is no indication to suggest that locally administered local anaesthetics are harmful during surgery in cancer patients. Volatile anaesthetics, however, might increase metastasis in animal models and clinical trials investigating this possibly harmful effect should receive priority. The results of

  7. A Systematic Review of the Modifying Effect of Anaesthetic Drugs on Metastasis in Animal Models for Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Geessink, Florentine J.; Ritskes-Hoitinga, Merel; Scheffer, Gert Jan

    2016-01-01

    Background Distant metastasis or local recurrence after primary tumour resection remain a major clinical problem. The anaesthetic technique used during oncologic surgery is suggested to influence the metastatic process. While awaiting the results of ongoing randomised controlled trials (RCTs), we have analyzed the evidence regarding the influence of anaesthetic drugs on experimental tumour metastasis in animal studies. Methods PubMed and Embase were searched until April 21st, 2015. Studies were included in the systematic review when they 1) assessed the effect of an anaesthetic drug used in clinical practice on the number or incidence of metastasis in animal models with experimental cancer, 2) included an appropriate control group, and 3) presented unique data. Results 20 studies met the inclusion criteria (published between 1958–2010). Data on number of metastases could be retrieved from 17 studies. These studies described 41 independent comparisons, 33 of which could be included in the meta-analysis (MA). The incidence of metastases was studied in 3 unique papers. From these 3 papers, data on 7 independent comparisons could be extracted and included in the MA. Locally administered local anaesthetics appear to decrease the number of metastases (SMD -6.15 [-8.42; -3.88]), whereas general anaesthetics (RD: 0.136 [0.045, 0.226]), and more specifically volatile anaesthetics (SMD 0.54 [0.24; 0.84]), appear to increase the number and risk of metastases in animal models for cancer. Conclusions Anaesthetics influence the number and incidence of metastases in experimental cancer models. Although more high quality experimental research is necessary, based on the currently available evidence from animal studies, there is no indication to suggest that locally administered local anaesthetics are harmful during surgery in cancer patients. Volatile anaesthetics, however, might increase metastasis in animal models and clinical trials investigating this possibly harmful effect

  8. RGD-modified liposomes enhance efficiency of aclacinomycin A delivery: evaluation of their effect in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chan; Li, Xiaoyan; Dong, Chunyan; Zhang, Xuemei; Zhang, Xie; Gao, Yong

    2015-01-01

    In this study, long-circulating Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-modified aclacinomycin A (ACM) liposomes were prepared by thin film hydration method. Their morphology, particle size, encapsulation efficiency, and in vitro release were investigated. The RGD-ACM liposomes was about 160 nm in size and had the visual appearance of a yellowish suspension. The zeta potential was -22.2 mV and the encapsulation efficiency was more than 93%. The drug-release behavior of the RGD-ACM liposomes showed a biphasic pattern, with an initial burst release and followed by sustained release at a constant rate. After being dissolved in phosphate-buffered saline (pH 7.4) and kept at 4°C for one month, the liposomes did not aggregate and still had the appearance of a milky white colloidal solution. In a pharmacokinetic study, rats treated with RGD-ACM liposomes showed slightly higher plasma concentrations than those treated with ACM liposomes. Maximum plasma concentrations of RGD-ACM liposomes and ACM liposomes were 4,532 and 3,425 ng/mL, respectively. RGD-ACM liposomes had a higher AUC0-∞ (1.54-fold), mean residence time (2.09-fold), and elimination half-life (1.2-fold) when compared with ACM liposomes. In an in vivo study in mice, both types of liposomes inhibited growth of human lung adenocarcinoma (A549) cells and markedly decreased tumor size when compared with the control group. There were no obvious pathological tissue changes in any of the treatment groups. Our results indicate that RGD-modified ACM liposomes have a better antitumor effect in vivo than their unmodified counterparts.

  9. Effective cancer therapy with the alpha-particle emitter [211At]astatine in a mouse model of genetically modified sodium/iodide symporter-expressing tumors.

    PubMed

    Petrich, Thorsten; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia; Korkmaz, Zekiye; Samson, Elenore; Helmeke, Hans Jürgen; Meyer, Geerd Jürgen; Knapp, Wolfram H; Pötter, Eyck

    2006-02-15

    The sodium/iodide symporter (NIS) gene is currently explored in several trials to eradicate experimental cancer with radiodine ((131)I) by its beta-emission. We recently characterized NIS-specific cellular uptake of an alternative halide, radioastatine ((211)At), which emits high-energy alpha-particles. The aim of this study was to investigate in vivo effects of the high linear energy transfer (LET) emitter (211)At on tumor growth and outcome in nude mice. We administered radioastatide in a fractionated therapy scheme to NMRI nude mice harboring rapidly growing solid tumors established from a papillary thyroid carcinoma cell line genetically modified to express NIS (K1-NIS). Animals were observed over 1 year. Tumor growth, body weight, blood counts, survival, and side effects were measured compared with control groups without therapy and/or lack of NIS expression. Within 3 months, radioastatide caused complete primary tumor eradication in all cases of K1-NIS tumor-bearing nude mice (n = 25) with no tumor recurrence during 1 year follow-up. Survival rates of the K1-NIS/(211)At group were 96% after 6 months and 60% after 1 year, in contrast to those of control groups (maximum survival 40 days). Our study indicates that (211)At represents a promising substrate for NIS-mediated therapy of various cancers either with endogenous or gene transfer-mediated NIS expression.

  10. Mitochondrial DNA variant interactions modify breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Covarrubias, Daniel; Bai, Ren-Kui; Wong, Lee-Jun C; Leal, Suzanne M

    2008-01-01

    Interactions between mitochondrial deoxyribonucleic acid (mtDNA) variants and the risk of developing breast cancer were investigated using DNA samples collected from non-Jewish European American breast cancer patients and ethnically age-matched female controls. Logistic regression was used to evaluate two-way interactions between 17 mtDNA variants. To control for multiple testing, empirical P values were calculated using permutation. Odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to measure the contribution of variants in modifying the risk of developing breast cancer. A highly significant interaction was identified between variants 12308G and 10398G (empirical P value = 0.0028), with results suggesting these variants increase the risk of a woman developing breast cancer (OR = 3.03; 95% CI 1.53-6.11). Nominal significant P values were also observed for interactions between mtDNA variants 709A and 16189C; 4216C and 10398G; 4216C and 16189C; 10398G and 16159C; 13368A and 16189C; and 14766T and 16519C. However, after adjusting for multiple testing, the P values did not remain significant. Although it is important to elucidate the main effect of mtDNA variants on the risk of developing breast cancer, understanding gene x gene interactions will give a greater knowledge of disease etiology and aid in interpreting a woman's risk of developing breast cancer.

  11. Immediately modifiable risk factors attributable to colorectal cancer in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Naing, Cho; Lai, Pei Kuan; Mak, Joon Wah

    2017-08-04

    This study aimed to estimate potential reductions in case incidence of colorectal cancer attributable to the modifiable risk factors such as alcohol consumption, overweight and physical inactivity amongst the Malaysian population. Gender specific population-attributable fractions (PAFs) for colorectal cancer in Malaysia were estimated for the three selected risk factors (physical inactivity, overweight, and alcohol consumptions). Exposure prevalence were sourced from a large-scale national representative survey. Risk estimates of the relationship between the exposure of interest and colorectal cancer were obtained from published meta-analyses. The overall PAF was then estimated, using the 2013 national cancer incidence data from the Malaysian Cancer Registry. Overall, the mean incidence rate for colorectal cancer in Malaysia from 2008 to 2013 was 21.3 per 100,000 population, with the mean age of 61.6 years (±12.7) and the majority were men (56.6%). Amongst 369 colorectal cancer cases in 2013, 40 cases (20 men, 20 women), 10 cases (9 men, 1 woman) or 20 cases (16 men,4 women) would be prevented, if they had done physical exercises, could reduce their body weight to normal level or avoided alcohol consumption, assuming that these factors are causally related to colorectal cancer. It was estimated that 66 (17.8%;66/369) colorectal cancer cases (42 men, 24 women) who had all these three risk factors for the last 10 years would have been prevented, if they could control these three risk factors through effective preventive measures. Findings suggest that approximately 18% of colorectal cancer cases in Malaysia would be prevented through appropriate preventive measures such as doing regular physical exercises, reducing their body weight to normal level and avoiding alcohol consumption, if these factors are causally related to colorectal cancer. Scaling-up nationwide public health campaigns tailored to increase physical activity, controlling body weight within normal

  12. Dietary fatty acids, luminal modifiers, and risk of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Ikuko; Majumdar, Adhip P.; Land, Susan J.; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.; Severson, Richard K.

    2009-01-01

    Inconsistent observations in epidemiologic studies on the association between total fat intake and colorectal cancer may be ascribed to opposing effects of individual fatty acids and the presence of other dietary constituents that modify luminal or systemic lipid exposure. We analyzed the data from a population-based case-control study that included 1163 cases and 1501 controls to examine the effects of individual fatty acid groups on colorectal cancer risk as well as their interactions with calcium and fiber intake. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated by unconditional logistic regression model according to quartile levels of energy-adjusted fatty acid intake. In the bivariable analyses, the risk of colorectal cancer increased with trans fatty acid (TFA) intake (OR for top vs bottom quartile =1.46, 95% CI 1.17-1.59, p-value for a trend <0.001 ), but the associations was substantially attenuated in multivariable analyses (p-value for a trend =0.176). However, a significant linear trend in the multivariable OR (p=0.029) for TFA was present for subjects with lower calcium intake. Furthermore, multivariable ORs progressively decreased with increasing both omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid intake (P-values for linear trend: 0.033 and 0.011, respectively) for subjects with lower dietary fiber intake. These interactions were also significant or marginally significant (P = 0.085 for TFA, 0.029 for omega-3 and 0.068 for omega-6). Our results suggest that populations with lower intake of luminal modifiers, i.e., calcium and fiber, may have differential risks of colorectal cancer associated with dietary fatty acid intake. PMID:19998336

  13. Modifiable Risk Factors for Lymphedema in Breast Cancer Survivors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: DAMD17-02-1-0387 TITLE: Modifiable Risk Factors for Lymphedema ...Annual 3. DATES COVERED 1 Oct 2005 – 30 Sep 2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Modifiable Risk Factors for Lymphedema in Breast...Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Lymphedema of the arm is a consequence of breast cancer

  14. In vitro cytotoxic effects of modified zinc oxide quantum dots on breast cancer cell lines (MCF7), colon cancer cell lines (HT29) and various fungi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhroueian, Zahra; Dehshiri, Alireza Mozafari; Katouzian, Fatemeh; Esmaeilzadeh, Pegah

    2014-07-01

    An important ideal objective of this study was to perform surface functionalization of fine (1-3 nm) ZnO quantum dot nanoparticles (QD NPs) in order to inhibit decomposition and agglomeration of nanoparticles in aqueous media. Polymers, oily herbal fatty acids, PEG (polyethylene glycol), and organosilanes are the main reagents used in these reactions, because they are completely soluble in water, and can be used as biological probes in nanomedicine. Vegetable fatty acid-capped ZnO (QD NPs) was fabricated by dissolving at a suitable pH after sol-gel method in the presence of nonionic surfactants as efficient templates with a particular HLB (hydrophilic-lipophilic balance) value (9.7 and 8.2). In the present research, we focused on the cellular toxicity of fine zinc oxide QD NPs containing particular blue fluorescence for targeted delivery of MCF7 and HT29 cancer cell lines. The IC50 values were determined as 10.66 and 5.75 µg/ml for MCF7 and HT29, respectively. These findings showed that ZnO QDs have low toxicity in normal cells (MDBK) and can display potential application in cancer chemotherapy in the near future. These properties could result in the generation of a promising candidate in the field of nanobiomedicine. The robust-engineered ZnO QD NPs showed their antibacterial and antifungal activities against Bacillus anthracis, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumonia, and Staphylococcus epidermidis bacteria and also different fungi such as Microsporum gypseum, Microsporum canis, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, Candida albicans, and Candida tropicalis, compared with the standard antibiotic agents like Gentamicin and Clotrimazol.

  15. The Modifier Effect and Property Mutability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampton, James A.; Passanisi, Alessia; Jonsson, Martin L.

    2011-01-01

    The modifier effect is the reduction in perceived likelihood of a generic property sentence, when the head noun is modified. We investigated the prediction that the modifier effect would be stronger for mutable than for central properties, without finding evidence for this predicted interaction over the course of five experiments. However…

  16. Photothermal effects of immunologically modified carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griswold, Ryan T.; Henderson, Brock; Goddard, Jessica; Tan, Yongqiang; Hode, Tomas; Liu, Hong; Nordquist, Robert E.; Chen, Wei R.

    2013-02-01

    Carbon nanotubes have a great potential in the biomedical applications. To use carbon nanotubes in the treatment of cancer, we synthesized an immunologically modified single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) using a novel immunomodifier, glycated chitosan (GC), as an effective surfactant for SWNT. This new composition SWNT-GC was stable due to the strong non-covalent binding between SWNT and GC. The structure of SWNT-GC is presented in this report. The photothermal effect of SWNT-GC was investigated under irradiation of a near-infrared laser. SWNT-GC retained the optical properties of SWNT and the immunological properties of GC. Specifically, the SWNT-GC could selectively absorb a 980-nm light and induce desirable thermal effects in tissue culture and in animals. It could also induce tumor cell destruction, controlled by the laser settings and the doses of SWNT and GC. Laser+SWNT-GC treatment could also induce strong expression of heat shock proteins on the surface of tumor cells. This immunologically modified carbon nanotube could be used for selective photothermal interactions in noninvasive tumor treatment.

  17. Genetic polymorphisms in one-carbon metabolism: associations with CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) in colon cancer and the modifying effects of diet

    PubMed Central

    Curtin, Karen; Slattery, Martha L.; Ulrich, Cornelia M.; Bigler, Jeannette; Levin, Theodore R.; Wolff, Roger K.; Albertsen, Hans; Potter, John D.; Samowitz, Wade S.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated associations between CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) colon cancer and genetic polymorphisms relevant to one-carbon metabolism and thus, potentially the provision of methyl groups and risk of colon cancer. Data from a large, population-based case–control study (916 incident colon cancer cases and 1972 matched controls) were used. Candidate polymorphisms in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), thymidylate synthase (TS), transcobalamin II (TCNII), methionine synthase (MTR), reduced folate carrier (RFC), methylene-tetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase 1 (MTHFD1), dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) and alcohol dehydrogenase 3 (ADH3) were evaluated. CIMP− or CIMP+ phenotype was based on five CpG island markers: MINT1, MINT2, MINT31, p16 and MLH1. The influence of specific dietary factors (folate, methionine, vitamin B12 and alcohol) on these associations was also analyzed. We hypothesized that polymorphisms involved in the provision of methyl groups would be associated with CIMP+ tumors (two or more of five markers methylated), potentially modified by diet. Few associations specific to CIMP+ tumors were observed overall, which does not support the hypothesis that the provision of methyl groups is important in defining a methylator phenotype. However, our data suggest that genetic polymorphisms in MTHFR 1298A > C, interacting with diet, may be involved in the development of highly CpG-methylated colon cancers. AC and CC genotypes in conjunction with a high-risk dietary pattern (low folate and methionine intake and high alcohol use) were associated with CIMP+ (OR = 2.1, 95% CI = 1.3–3.4 versus AA/high risk; P-interaction = 0.03). These results provide only limited support for a role of polymorphisms in one-carbon metabolism in the etiology of CIMP colon cancer. PMID:17449906

  18. Factors that modify risks of radiation-induced cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1988-11-01

    The collective influence of biologic and physical factors that modify risks of radiation-induced cancer introduces uncertainties sufficient to deny precision of estimates of human cancer risk that can be calculated for low-dose radiation in exposed populations. The important biologic characteristics include the tissue sites and cell types, baseline cancer incidence, minimum latent period, time-to-tumor recognition, and the influence of individual host (age and sex) and competing etiologic influences. Physical factors include radiation dose, dose rate, and radiation quality. Statistical factors include time-response projection models, risk coefficients, and dose-response relationships. Other modifying factors include other carcinogens, and other biological sources (hormonal status, immune status, hereditary factors).

  19. Engineering chemically modified viruses for prostate cancer cell recognition.

    PubMed

    Mohan, K; Weiss, G A

    2015-12-01

    Specific detection of circulating tumor cells and characterization of their aggressiveness could improve cancer diagnostics and treatment. Metastasis results from such tumor cells, and causes the majority of cancer deaths. Chemically modified viruses could provide an inexpensive and efficient approach to detect tumor cells and quantitate their cell surface biomarkers. However, non-specific adhesion between the cell surface receptors and the virus surface presents a challenge. This report describes wrapping the virus surface with different PEG architectures, including as fusions to oligolysine, linkers, spacers and scaffolded ligands. The reported PEG wrappers can reduce by >75% the non-specific adhesion of phage to cell surfaces. Dynamic light scattering verified the non-covalent attachment by the reported wrappers as increased sizes of the virus particles. Further modifications resulted in specific detection of prostate cancer cells expressing PSMA, a key prostate cancer biomarker. The approach allowed quantification of PSMA levels on the cell surface, and could distinguish more aggressive forms of the disease.

  20. Childhood cancer in relation to a modified residential wire code

    SciTech Connect

    Savitz, D.A. ); Kaune, W.T. )

    1993-04-22

    Several studies have found associations between wire configuration codes, a proxy for historical residential magnetic field exposure, and childhood cancer. The Wertheimer-Leeper coding method was modified by eliminating the distinction between thick and thin primaries, distinguishing only between open and spun secondaries, and reducing the number of categories from five to three. The association between the modified code and measured magnetic fields was similar to the association with the original wire code. The modified code was used to reanalyze data from a case-control study of childhood cancer in the Denver metropolitan area. In the original study, cases were diagnosed from 1976 to 1983 among children under age 15 and compared to controls selected through random digit dialing. Wire codes for the residence at diagnosis yielded imprecise elevations of two and above for very high current configuration homes or modest 1.5-fold elevations for a dichotomous wire code. In contrast, the modified Wertheimer-Leeper code generated risk estimates that were both precise and markedly elevated for the high wire code (HWC) compared to low wire code (LWC) classifications, with medium wire code (MWC) showing little or no increase in risk. High wire code yielded odds ratios of 1.9 for total cancers (95% CI: 1.1--3.2), 2.9 for leukemias (95% CI: 1.5--5.5), and 2.5 for brain cancer (95% CI: 1.1--5.5) that were not confounded by measured potential risk factors for childhood cancer. These risk estimates are larger than the dichotomized results and more precise than those from the original five-level wire code, though limitations in the original study remain, particularly potential control selection bias. This refined and greatly simplified approach to wire configuration coding may be useful in other studies. 13 refs., 6 tabs.

  1. Preferential recognition of methylglyoxal-modified calf thymus DNA by circulating antibodies in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, M Imtiaz; Ahmad, Saheem; Moinuddin

    2011-08-01

    Methylglyoxal (MG) has been implicated in mutagenesis and cancer. Present study probes the antigenicity of MG damaged DNA in cancer patients. Purified calf thymus DNA was damaged by the synergistic action of MG, lysine (Lys) and CuSO4 for 24 h at 37 degrees C. DNA modifications produced single-strand breaks, hyperchromicity in UV spectrum and increased fluorescence intensity. Binding characteristics of auto-antibodies in cancer patients were assessed by direct binding and inhibition ELISA. These antibodies exhibited enhanced binding with the modified DNA, as compared to the native form. The effect was more pronounced when affinity-purified IgG was used in place of the serum. In conclusion, MG-modified DNA presents unique epitopes which are recognized as non-self by the immune system and may, therefore, be one of the factors for the autoantibody induction in cancer patients.

  2. Epigenetic modulators, modifiers and mediators in cancer aetiology and progression

    PubMed Central

    Feinberg, Andrew P.; Koldobskiy, Michael A.; Göndör, Anita

    2016-01-01

    This year is the tenth anniversary of the publication in this journal of a model suggesting the existence of ‘tumour progenitor genes’. These genes are epigenetically disrupted at the earliest stages of malignancies, even before mutations, and thus cause altered differentiation throughout tumour evolution. The past decade of discovery in cancer epigenetics has revealed a number of similarities between cancer genes and stem cell reprogramming genes, widespread mutations in epigenetic regulators, and the part played by chromatin structure in cellular plasticity in both development and cancer. In the light of these discoveries, we suggest here a framework for cancer epigenetics involving three types of genes: ‘epigenetic mediators’, corresponding to the tumour progenitor genes suggested earlier; ‘epigenetic modifiers’ of the mediators, which are frequently mutated in cancer; and ‘epigenetic modulators’ upstream of the modifiers, which are responsive to changes in the cellular environment and often linked to the nuclear architecture. We suggest that this classification is helpful in framing new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to cancer. PMID:26972587

  3. Specific internalization and synergistic anticancer effect of docetaxel-encapsulated chitosan-modified polymeric nanocarriers: a novel approach in cancer chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asthana, Shalini; Gupta, Pramod K.; Konwar, Rituraj; Chourasia, Manish K.

    2013-09-01

    Nanocarriers can be surface engineered to increase endocytosis for applications in delivery of chemotherapeutics. This study investigated the chitosan (CS)-mediated effects on the anticancer efficacy and uptake of docetaxel-loaded nanometric particles (<250 nm) by MCF-7 tumor cells. Herein, negatively charged poly lactic- co-glycolic acid (PLGA) nanoparticles (-18.4 ± 2.57 mV, 162 ± 6.34 nm), poorly endocytosed by the MCF-7 cells, were subjected to surface modification with CS. It demonstrated significant increase (>5-fold) in intracellular uptake as well as antitumor efficacy of modified nanoparticles (NPs) that explicate the possibility of saccharide marker-mediated tumor targeting along with synergism via proapoptotic effect of CS. Additionally, high positivity of optimized tailored nanocarrier (+23.3 ± 2.02 mV, 242.8 ± 9.42 nm) may have accounted for the increased adsorption-mediated endocytosis, preferably toward tumor cells with negative potential. Developed drug carrier system showed high stability in human blood which is in compliance with mucoadhesive property of CS. Transmission electron microscopy technique was applied to observe shape and morphological features of NPs. Furthermore, in vivo tissue toxicity study revealed safe use of drug at 20 mg/kg dose in nanoparticulate form. Moreover, the enhanced in vitro uptake of these NPs and their cytotoxicity against the tumor cells along with synergistic effect of CS clearly suggest that CS-modified carrier system is a promising candidate for preclinical studies to achieve wider anti-tumor therapeutic window and lower side effects.

  4. Does obesity modify prostate cancer detection in a European cohort?

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Palacios, Nelson; Barrionuevo-Gonzalez, Marta; Ortega-Polledo, Luis-Enrique; Ortiz-Vico, Francisco-Javier; Sanchez-Chapado, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Introduction To investigate prostate-specific antigen (PSA) accuracy and digital rectal examination (DRE) accuracy in detecting prostate cancer according to body mass index (BMI) in Spanish men with an indication of the first prostate biopsy. Material and methods We reviewed the clinical and histopathological data of 1,319 patients who underwent transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate needle biopsy. The patients were categorised according to the BMI as follows: <25 kg/m2 (normal weight); 25–29.9 kg/m2 (overweight); and ≥30 kg/m2 (obese). Receiver operator characteristic curves were used to assess PSA accuracy and DRE accuracy by calculating the area under the curve. Results The obesity rate of the cohort was 14%. PSA accuracy for predicting prostate cancer in each BMI category was 0.52, 0.58 and 0.62, respectively (p = 0.01). After stratification by DRE findings, there was no difference in the performance accuracy of PSA in predicting the presence of cancer across BMI groups in abnormal DRE (p = 0.90). Serum PSA, DRE and BMI were strong predictors of prostate cancer diagnosis (odds ratio 1.07, 2.02 and 1.4, respectively; p <0.001). When the DRE was abnormal, a BMI ≥30 increased the risk of prostate cancer twice. With the addition of BMI to the model, the area under the curve of the combined PSA and DRE for diagnosing prostate cancer improved from 0.60 to 0.63. Conclusions The predictive value of PSA in predicting prostate cancer is not poorer in the obese population and the predictive value of an abnormal DRE in cancer detection is significantly modified by the patient’s BMI. PMID:28461985

  5. Does obesity modify prostate cancer detection in a European cohort?

    PubMed

    Sanchis-Bonet, Angeles; Morales-Palacios, Nelson; Barrionuevo-Gonzalez, Marta; Ortega-Polledo, Luis-Enrique; Ortiz-Vico, Francisco-Javier; Sanchez-Chapado, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    To investigate prostate-specific antigen (PSA) accuracy and digital rectal examination (DRE) accuracy in detecting prostate cancer according to body mass index (BMI) in Spanish men with an indication of the first prostate biopsy. We reviewed the clinical and histopathological data of 1,319 patients who underwent transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate needle biopsy. The patients were categorised according to the BMI as follows: <25 kg/m(2) (normal weight); 25-29.9 kg/m(2) (overweight); and ≥30 kg/m(2) (obese). Receiver operator characteristic curves were used to assess PSA accuracy and DRE accuracy by calculating the area under the curve. The obesity rate of the cohort was 14%. PSA accuracy for predicting prostate cancer in each BMI category was 0.52, 0.58 and 0.62, respectively (p = 0.01). After stratification by DRE findings, there was no difference in the performance accuracy of PSA in predicting the presence of cancer across BMI groups in abnormal DRE (p = 0.90). Serum PSA, DRE and BMI were strong predictors of prostate cancer diagnosis (odds ratio 1.07, 2.02 and 1.4, respectively; p <0.001). When the DRE was abnormal, a BMI ≥30 increased the risk of prostate cancer twice. With the addition of BMI to the model, the area under the curve of the combined PSA and DRE for diagnosing prostate cancer improved from 0.60 to 0.63. The predictive value of PSA in predicting prostate cancer is not poorer in the obese population and the predictive value of an abnormal DRE in cancer detection is significantly modified by the patient's BMI.

  6. A sensitive and selective magnetic graphene composite-modified polycrystalline-silicon nanowire field-effect transistor for bladder cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsiao-Chien; Chen, Yi-Ting; Tsai, Rung-Ywan; Chen, Min-Cheng; Chen, Shi-Liang; Xiao, Min-Cong; Chen, Chien-Lun; Hua, Mu-Yi

    2015-04-15

    In this study, we describe the urinary quantification of apolipoprotein A II protein (APOA2 protein), a biomarker for the diagnosis of bladder cancer, using an n-type polycrystalline silicon nanowire field-effect transistor (poly-SiNW-FET). The modification of poly-SiNW-FET by magnetic graphene with long-chain acid groups (MGLA) synthesized via Friedel-Crafts acylation was compared with that obtained using short-chain acid groups (MGSA). Compared with MGSA, the MGLA showed a higher immobilization degree and bioactivity to the anti-APOA2 antibody (Ab) due to its lower steric hindrance. In addition, the magnetic properties enabled rapid separation and purification during Ab immobilization, ultimately preserving its bioactivity. The Ab-MGLA/poly-SiNW-FET exhibited a linear dependence of relative response to the logarithmical concentration in a range between 19.5pgmL(-1) and 1.95µgmL(-1), with a limit of detection (LOD) of 6.7pgmL(-1). An additional washing step before measurement aimed at excluding the interfering biocomponents ensured the reliability of the assay. We conclude that our biosensor efficiently distinguishes mean values of urinary APOA2 protein concentrations between patients with bladder cancer (29-344ngmL(-1)) and those with hernia (0.425-9.47ngmL(-1)).

  7. Modified nucleosides as biomarkers for early cancer diagnose in exposed populations.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Annerose; Seidel, Peter; Manuwald, Olaf; Herbarth, Olf

    2015-07-08

    There is increasing worldwide interest in developing of markers for tumor diagnosis and identification of individuals who are at high cancer risk. Cancer, like other diseases accompanied by metabolic disorders, causes characteristic effects on cell turnover rate, activity of modifying enzymes, and RNA/DNA modifications. This results in an increased excretion of modified nucleosides in cancer patients. Therefore, for many years modified nucleosides have been suggested as tumor markers. The aim of the study was to elucidate further the usefulness of urinary nucleosides as possible markers at early detection of cancer in persons which are exposed against tumor promoting influences during their working life. Uranium miners are exposed to many kinds of pollutants that can cause health damage even lead to carcinogenesis. We analyzed modified nucleosides in urine samples from 92 miners who are at high risk for lung cancer to assess the levels of nucleosides by a multilayer perceptron (MLP) classifier - a neural network model. Eighteen nucleosides/metabolites were detected with reversed-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). A valid set of urinary metabolites were selected and multivariate statistical technique of multilayer perceptron neural network were applied. In a previous study, MLP shows a sensitivity and specificity of 97 and 85%, respectively. MLP classification including the most relevant markers/nucleosides clearly demonstrates the elevation of RNA metabolism in miners, which is associated with possible malignant disease. We found that there were 30 subjects with early health disorders among 92 uranium workers based on MLP technique using modified nucleosides. The combination of RP-HPLC analysis of modified nucleosides and subsequent MLP analyses represents a promising tool for the development of a non-invasive prediction system and may assist in developing management and surveillance procedures. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. The mechanisms of genetically modified vaccinia viruses for the treatment of cancer.

    PubMed

    Jefferson, Artrish; Cadet, Valerie E; Hielscher, Abigail

    2015-09-01

    The use of oncolytic viruses for the treatment of cancer is an emerging field of cancer research and therapy. Oncolytic viruses are designed to induce tumor specific immunity while replicating selectively within cancer cells to cause lysis of the tumor cells. While there are several forms of oncolytic viruses, the use of vaccinia viruses for oncolysis may be more beneficial than other forms of oncolytic viruses. For example, vaccinia viruses have been shown to exert their anti-tumor effects through genetic engineering strategies which enhance their therapeutic efficacy. This paper will address some of the most common forms of genetically modified vaccinia viruses and will explore the mechanisms whereby they selectively target, enter and destroy cancer cells. Furthermore, this review will highlight how vaccinia viruses activate host immune responses against cancer cells and will address clinical trials evaluating the tumor-directed and killing efficacy of these viruses against solid tumors.

  9. Cancer Cells Hijack PRC2 to Modify Multiple Cytokine Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Michael; Song, Lan; Yu, Tao; Liu, Yu; Liu, Jeffrey C.; McCurdy, Sean; Ma, Anqi; Wither, Joan; Jin, Jian; Zacksenhaus, Eldad; Wrana, Jeffrey L.; Bremner, Rod

    2015-01-01

    Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) is an epigenetic regulator induced in many cancers. It is thought to drive tumorigenesis by repressing division, stemness, and/or developmental regulators. Cancers evade immune detection, and diverse immune regulators are perturbed in different tumors. It is unclear how such cell-specific effects are coordinated. Here, we show a profound and cancer-selective role for PRC2 in repressing multiple cytokine pathways. We find that PRC2 represses hundreds of IFNγ stimulated genes (ISGs), cytokines and cytokine receptors. This target repertoire is significantly broadened in cancer vs non-cancer cells, and is distinct in different cancer types. PRC2 is therefore a higher order regulator of the immune program in cancer cells. Inhibiting PRC2 with either RNAi or EZH2 inhibitors activates cytokine/cytokine receptor promoters marked with bivalent H3K27me3/H3K4me3 chromatin, and augments responsiveness to diverse immune signals. PRC2 inhibition rescues immune gene induction even in the absence of SWI/SNF, a tumor suppressor defective in ~20% of human cancers. This novel PRC2 function in tumor cells could profoundly impact the mechanism of action and efficacy of EZH2 inhibitors in cancer treatment. PMID:26030458

  10. Anti-cancer activities of pH- or heat-modified pectin

    PubMed Central

    Leclere, Lionel; Cutsem, Pierre Van; Michiels, Carine

    2013-01-01

    Despite enormous efforts that have been made in the search for novel drugs and treatments, cancer continues to be a major public health problem. Moreover, the emergence of resistance to cancer chemotherapy often prevents complete remission. Researchers have thus turned to natural products mainly from plant origin to circumvent resistance. Pectin and pH- or heat-modified pectin have demonstrated chemopreventive and antitumoral activities against some aggressive and recurrent cancers. The focus of this review is to describe how pectin and modified pectin display these activities and what are the possible underlying mechanisms. The failure of conventional chemotherapy to reduce mortality as well as serious side effects make natural products, such as pectin-derived products, ideal candidates for exerting synergism in combination with conventional anticancer drugs. PMID:24115933

  11. A polyethylenimine-modified carboxyl-poly(styrene/acrylamide) copolymer nanosphere for co-delivering of CpG and TGF-β receptor I inhibitor with remarkable additive tumor regression effect against liver cancer in mice

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Shuyan; Hu, Jun; Xie, Yuanyuan; Zhou, Qing; Zhu, Yanhong; Yang, Xiangliang

    2016-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy based on nanodelivery systems has shown potential for treatment of various malignancies, owing to the benefits of tumor targeting of nanoparticles. However, induction of a potent T-cell immune response against tumors still remains a challenge. In this study, polyethylenimine-modified carboxyl-styrene/acrylamide (PS) copolymer nano-spheres were developed as a delivery system of unmethylated cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) oligodeoxynucleotides and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) receptor I inhibitors for cancer immunotherapy. TGF-β receptor I inhibitors (LY2157299, LY) were encapsulated to the PS via hydrophobic interaction, while CpG oligodeoxynucleotides were loaded onto the PS through electrostatic interaction. Compared to the control group, tumor inhibition in the PS-LY/CpG group was up to 99.7% without noticeable toxicity. The tumor regression may be attributed to T-cell activation and amplification in mouse models. The results highlight the additive effect of CpG and TGF-β receptor I inhibitors co-delivered in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:28008250

  12. Modified sugar beet pectin induces apoptosis of colon cancer cells via an interaction with the neutral sugar side-chains.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Ellen G; Colquhoun, Ian J; Chau, Hoa K; Hotchkiss, Arland T; Waldron, Keith W; Morris, Victor J; Belshaw, Nigel J

    2016-01-20

    Pectins extracted from a variety of sources and modified with heat and/or pH have previously been shown to exhibit activity towards several cancer cell lines. However, the structural basis for the anti-cancer activity of modified pectin requires clarification. Sugar beet and citrus pectin extracts have been compared. Pectin extracted from sugar beet pulp only weakly affected the viability of colon cancer cells. Alkali treatment increased the anti-cancer effect of sugar beet pectin via an induction of apoptosis. Alkali treatment decreased the degree of esterification (DE) and increased the ratio of rhamnogalacturonan I (RGI) to homogalacturonan. Low DE per se did not play a significant role in the anti-cancer activity. However, the enzymatic removal of galactose and, to a lesser extent, arabinose from the pectin decreased the effect on cancer cells indicating that the neutral sugar-containing RGI regions are important for pectin bioactivity.

  13. Do Environmental Factors Modify the Genetic Risk of Prostate Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Loeb, Stacy; Peskoe, Sarah B.; Joshu, Corinne E.; Huang, Wen-Yi; Hayes, Richard B.; Carter, H. Ballentine; Isaacs, William B.; Platz, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Many SNPs influence prostate cancer risk. To what extent genetic risk can be reduced by environmental factors is unknown. Methods We evaluated effect modification by environmental factors of the association between susceptibility SNPs and prostate cancer in 1,230 incident prostate cancer cases and 1,361 controls, all white and similar ages, nested in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Trial. Genetic risk scores were calculated as number of risk alleles for 20 validated SNPs. We estimated the association between higher genetic risk (≥ 12 SNPs) and prostate cancer within environmental factor strata and tested for interaction. Results Men with ≥12 risk alleles had 1.98, 2.04, and 1.91 times the odds of total, advanced, and nonadvanced prostate cancer, respectively. These associations were attenuated with the use of selenium supplements, aspirin, ibuprofen, and higher vegetable intake. For selenium, the attenuation was most striking for advanced prostate cancer: compared with <12 alleles and no selenium, the OR for ≥12 alleles was 2.06 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.67–2.55] in nonusers and 0.99 (0.38–2.58) in users (Pinteraction = 0.031). Aspirin had the most marked attenuation for nonadvanced prostate cancer: compared with <12 alleles and nonusers, the OR for ≥12 alleles was 2.25 (1.69–3.00) in nonusers and 1.70 (1.25–2.32) in users (Pinteraction = 0.009). This pattern was similar for ibuprofen (Pinteraction = 0.023) and vegetables (Pinteraction = 0.010). Conclusions This study suggests that selenium supplements may reduce genetic risk of advanced prostate cancer, whereas aspirin, ibuprofen, and vegetables may reduce genetic risk of nonadvanced prostate cancer. PMID:25342390

  14. Impact of modifiable lifestyle factors on outcomes after breast cancer diagnosis: the Setouchi Breast Cancer Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Taira, Naruto; Akiyama, Ichiro; Ishihara, Setsuko; Ishibe, Youichi; Kawasaki, Kensuke; Saito, Makoto; Shien, Tadahiko; Nomura, Tsunehisa; Hara, Fumikata; Mizoo, Taeko; Mizota, Yuri; Yamamoto, Seiichiro; Ohsumi, Shozo; Doihara, Hiroyoshi

    2015-06-01

    The primary purpose of this large cohort study is to investigate the effects on breast cancer outcomes of modifiable lifestyle factors after breast cancer diagnosis. These factors include physical activity, smoking, alcohol consumption, obesity and weight gain after diagnosis, alternative medicine and dietary factors. Women diagnosed with Stage 0 to III breast cancer are eligible for participation to this study. Lifestyle, use of alternative medicine, psychosocial factors, reproductive factors and health-related quality of life will be assessed using a questionnaire at the time of breast cancer diagnosis (baseline), and 1, 2, 3 and 5 years after diagnosis. Clinical information and breast cancer outcomes will be obtained from a breast cancer database. The primary endpoint will be disease-free survival. Secondary endpoints are overall survival, health-related quality of life, breast cancer-related symptoms and adverse events. Patient recruitment commenced in February 2013. Enrollment of 2000 breast cancer patients is planned during the 5-year recruitment period. The concept of the study is described in this article. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Critical dose and toxicity index of organs at risk in radiotherapy: Analyzing the calculated effects of modified dose fractionation in non–small cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pedicini, Piernicola; Strigari, Lidia; Benassi, Marcello; Caivano, Rocchina; Fiorentino, Alba; Nappi, Antonio; Salvatore, Marco; Storto, Giovanni

    2014-04-01

    To increase the efficacy of radiotherapy for non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), many schemes of dose fractionation were assessed by a new “toxicity index” (I), which allows one to choose the fractionation schedules that produce less toxic treatments. Thirty-two patients affected by non resectable NSCLC were treated by standard 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) with a strategy of limited treated volume. Computed tomography datasets were employed to re plan by simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The dose distributions from plans were used to test various schemes of dose fractionation, in 3DCRT as well as in IMRT, by transforming the dose-volume histogram (DVH) into a biological equivalent DVH (BDVH) and by varying the overall treatment time. The BDVHs were obtained through the toxicity index, which was defined for each of the organs at risk (OAR) by a linear quadratic model keeping an equivalent radiobiological effect on the target volume. The less toxic fractionation consisted in a severe/moderate hyper fractionation for the volume including the primary tumor and lymph nodes, followed by a hypofractionation for the reduced volume of the primary tumor. The 3DCRT and IMRT resulted, respectively, in 4.7% and 4.3% of dose sparing for the spinal cord, without significant changes for the combined-lungs toxicity (p < 0.001). Schedules with reduced overall treatment time (accelerated fractionations) led to a 12.5% dose sparing for the spinal cord (7.5% in IMRT), 8.3% dose sparing for V{sub 20} in the combined lungs (5.5% in IMRT), and also significant dose sparing for all the other OARs (p < 0.001). The toxicity index allows to choose fractionation schedules with reduced toxicity for all the OARs and equivalent radiobiological effect for the tumor in 3DCRT, as well as in IMRT, treatments of NSCLC.

  16. Critical dose and toxicity index of organs at risk in radiotherapy: analyzing the calculated effects of modified dose fractionation in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Pedicini, Piernicola; Strigari, Lidia; Benassi, Marcello; Caivano, Rocchina; Fiorentino, Alba; Nappi, Antonio; Salvatore, Marco; Storto, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    To increase the efficacy of radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), many schemes of dose fractionation were assessed by a new "toxicity index" (I), which allows one to choose the fractionation schedules that produce less toxic treatments. Thirty-two patients affected by non resectable NSCLC were treated by standard 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) with a strategy of limited treated volume. Computed tomography datasets were employed to re plan by simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The dose distributions from plans were used to test various schemes of dose fractionation, in 3DCRT as well as in IMRT, by transforming the dose-volume histogram (DVH) into a biological equivalent DVH (BDVH) and by varying the overall treatment time. The BDVHs were obtained through the toxicity index, which was defined for each of the organs at risk (OAR) by a linear quadratic model keeping an equivalent radiobiological effect on the target volume. The less toxic fractionation consisted in a severe/moderate hyper fractionation for the volume including the primary tumor and lymph nodes, followed by a hypofractionation for the reduced volume of the primary tumor. The 3DCRT and IMRT resulted, respectively, in 4.7% and 4.3% of dose sparing for the spinal cord, without significant changes for the combined-lungs toxicity (p < 0.001). Schedules with reduced overall treatment time (accelerated fractionations) led to a 12.5% dose sparing for the spinal cord (7.5% in IMRT), 8.3% dose sparing for V20 in the combined lungs (5.5% in IMRT), and also significant dose sparing for all the other OARs (p < 0.001). The toxicity index allows to choose fractionation schedules with reduced toxicity for all the OARs and equivalent radiobiological effect for the tumor in 3DCRT, as well as in IMRT, treatments of NSCLC. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. SU-E-T-79: A Study of the Effect of Clinical Tumor Volume Displacement On the Dosage of Post Modified Radical Mastectomy Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Plans for Left-Sided Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, W; Ma, C; Li, D; Wu, F

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To explore the effect of clinical tumor volume (CTV) displacement on the dosage of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans for left-sided breast cancer after modified radical mastectomy. Methods: We created 2 sets of IMRT plans based on PTV0.5 and PTV0.7 (with CTV displacement of 0.5cm and 0.7cm respectively) for each of the ten consecutive left-sided breast cancer patients after modified radical mastectomy, and compared the difference in PTV coverage and organ at risk (OAR) sparing between the two groups. And then, we compared the difference in PTV coverage in IMRT plans based on PTV0.5 between the group with properly estimated CTV displacement (presuming the actual CTV displacement was 0.5cm) and the one with underestimated CTV displacement (presuming the actual CTV displacement was 0.7cm). The difference in results between the corresponding two groups was compared using paired-sample t-test. P values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: IMRT plans derived from PTV0.5 had more homogenous PTV coverage, and less heart, left lung, right breast, right lung, left humeral head and B-P radiation exposure, as well as less total Mu as compared with the ones stemmed from PTV0.7 (all p<0.05). IMRT plans with appropriate estimation of CTV displacement had better PTV coverage compared with the ones with underestimated CTV displacement (all p<0.01). Conclusion: The IMRT plans with smaller CTV displacement in post modified radical mastectomy radiotherapy for left-sided breast cancer has dosimetrical advantages over the ones with larger CTV displacement. Underestimation of CTV displacement can lead to significant reduction of PTV coverage. Individually quantifying and minimizing CTV displacement can significantly improve PTV coverage and OAR (including heart and left lung) sparing. This work was supported by the Medical Scientific Research Foundation of Guangdong Procvince (A2014455 to Changchun Ma)

  18. Peptide-modified gold nanoparticles for improved cancer therapeutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Celina; Prooijen, Monique V.; Chithrani, Devika B.

    2014-03-01

    The field of nanotechnology is currently undergoing explosive development on many fronts. The technology is expected to generate innovations and play a critical role in cancer therapeutics. Among other nanoparticle (NP) systems, there has been tremendous progress made in the use of spherical gold NPs (GNPs) in cancer therapeutics. In treating cancer, radiation therapy and chemotherapy remain the most widely used treatment options. These nanostructures further provide strategies for improving loading, targeting, and controlling the release of drugs to minimize the side effects of highly toxic anticancer drugs used in chemotherapy. Our recent results show enhancement of cell death during radiation therapy when GNPs are targeted to nucleus. In addition, we have seen enhanced therapeutic effects when GNPs are used as anticancer drug carriers. Hence, gold nanostructures provide a versatile platform to integrate many therapeutic options leading to effective combinational therapy in the fight against cancer. A multifunctional platform based on gold nanostructures with targeting ligands, therapeutic molecules, and imaging contrast agents will hold the possibility of promising directions in cancer research.

  19. A modified thymosin alpha 1 inhibits the growth of breast cancer both in vitro and in vivo: suppressment of cell proliferation, inducible cell apoptosis and enhancement of targeted anticancer effects.

    PubMed

    Lao, Xingzhen; Li, Bin; Liu, Meng; Shen, Chen; Yu, Tingting; Gao, Xiangdong; Zheng, Heng

    2015-10-01

    Thymosin alpha 1 (Tα1) is commonly used for treating several diseases; however its usage has been limited because of poor penetration of the target tissue, such as tumor cells. In the present study, Tα1-iRGD, a peptide by conjugating Tα1 with the iRGD fragment, was evaluated its performance in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. Compared with the wild-type peptide, Tα1-iRGD was more selective in binding tumor cells in the cell attachment assay. Furthermore, the MTT assay confirmed that Tα1-iRGD proved more effective in significantly inhibiting the growth of MCF-7 cells in contrast to the general inhibition displayed by Tα1. Further, conjugation of Tα1 with iRGD preserved the immunomodulatory activity of the drug by increasing the proliferation of mouse spleen lymphocytes. Further, compared with Tα1 treatment, Tα1-iRGD treatment of MCF-7 cells considerably increased the number of cells undergoing apoptosis, resulting in a dose-dependent inhibition of cancer cell growth, which was associated with a much better effect on up-regulation of the expression of BCL2-associated X protein (Bax), caspase 9, etc. More importantly, treatment with Ta1-iRGD was more efficacious than treatment with Ta1 in vivo. This study highlights the importance of iRGD on enhancement of cell penetration and tumor accumulation. In summary, our findings demonstrate that the novel modified Tα1 developed in this study has the potential to be used for treating breast cancer.

  20. The fractions of cancer attributable to modifiable factors: A global review.

    PubMed

    Whiteman, David C; Wilson, Louise F

    2016-10-01

    Worldwide, the burden of cancer is rising, stimulating efforts to develop strategies to control these diseases. Primary prevention, a key control strategy, aims to reduce cancer incidence through programs directed towards reducing population exposure to known causal factors. Before enacting such strategies, it is necessary to estimate the likely effect on cancer incidence if exposures to known causal factors were reduced or eliminated. The population attributable fraction (PAF) is the epidemiological measure which quantifies this potential reduction in incidence. We surveyed the literature to document and summarise the proportions of cancers across the globe attributable to modifiable causes, specifically tobacco smoke, alcohol, overweight/obesity, insufficient physical activity, solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation and dietary factors (insufficient fruit, non-starchy vegetables and fibre; red/processed meat; salt). In total, we identified 55 articles that presented PAF estimates for one or more causes. Information coverage was not uniform, with many articles reporting cancer PAFs due to overweight/obesity, alcohol and tobacco, but fewer reporting PAFs for dietary factors or solar UV radiation. At all cancer sites attributable to tobacco and alcohol, median PAFs were markedly lower for women than men. Smoking contributed to very high median PAFs (>50%) for cancers of the lung and larynx. Median PAFs for men, attributable to alcohol, were high (25-50%) for cancers of the oesophagus, oral cavity/pharynx, larynx and liver. For cancers causally associated with overweight/obesity, high median PAFs were reported for oesophageal adenocarcinoma (men 29%, women 37%), gallbladder (men 11%, women 42%) and endometrium (36%). The cancer PAF literature is growing rapidly. Repeating this survey in the future should lead to more precise estimates of the potentially preventable fractions of cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Hyaluronic acid-modified multiwalled carbon nanotubes for targeted delivery of doxorubicin into cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xueyan; Tao, Lei; Wen, Shihui; Hou, Wenxiu; Shi, Xiangyang

    2015-03-20

    Development of novel drug carriers for targeted cancer therapy with high efficiency and specificity is of paramount importance and has been one of the major topics in current nanomedicine. Here we report a general approach to using multifunctional multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as a platform to encapsulate an anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) for targeted cancer therapy. In this approach, polyethyleneimine (PEI)-modified MWCNTs were covalently conjugated with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FI) and hyaluronic acid (HA). The formed MWCNT/PEI-FI-HA conjugates were characterized via different techniques and were used as a new carrier system to encapsulate the anticancer drug doxorubicin for targeted delivery to cancer cells overexpressing CD44 receptors. We show that the formed MWCNT/PEI-FI-HA/DOX complexes with a drug loading percentage of 72% are water soluble and stable. In vitro release studies show that the drug release rate under an acidic condition (pH 5.8, tumor cell microenvironment) is higher than that under physiological condition (pH 7.4). Cell viability assay demonstrates that the carrier material has good biocompatibility in the tested concentration range, and the MWCNT/PEI-FI-HA/DOX complexes can specifically target cancer cells overexpressing CD44 receptors and exert growth inhibition effect to the cancer cells. The developed HA-modified MWCNTs hold a great promise to be used as an efficient anticancer drug carrier for tumor-targeted chemotherapy.

  2. Late radiation side effects, cosmetic outcomes and pain in breast cancer patients after breast-conserving surgery and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy : Risk-modifying factors.

    PubMed

    Hille-Betz, Ursula; Vaske, Bernhard; Bremer, Michael; Soergel, Philipp; Kundu, Sudip; Klapdor, Rüdiger; Hillemanns, Peter; Henkenberens, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to identify parameters influencing the risk of late radiation side effects, fair or poor cosmetic outcomes (COs) and pain in breast cancer patients after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Between 2006 and 2013, 159 patients were treated at the Hannover Medical School. Physician-rated toxicity according to the LENT-SOMA criteria, CO and pain were assessed by multivariate analysis. LENT-SOMA grade 1-4 toxicity was observed as follows: fibrosis 10.7 %, telangiectasia 1.2 %, arm oedema 8.8 % and breast oedema 5.0 %. In addition, 15.1 % of patients reported moderate or severe breast pain, and 21.4 % complained about moderate or severe pain in the arm or shoulder. In multivariate analysis, axillary clearing (AC) was significantly associated with lymphoedema of the arm [odds ratio (OR) 4.37, p = 0.011, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.4-13.58]. Breast oedema was also highly associated with AC (OR 10.59, p = 0.004, 95 % CI 2.1-53.36), a ptosis grade 2/3 or pseudoptosis and a bra size ≥ cup C (OR 5.34, p = 0.029, 95 % CI 1.2-24.12). A ptosis grade 2/3 or pseudoptosis and a bra size ≥ cup C were the parameters significantly associated with an unfavourable CO (OR 3.19, p = 0.019, 95 % CI 1.2-8.4). Concerning chronic breast pain, we found a trend related to the prescribed radiation dose including boost (OR 1.077, p = 0.060, 95 % CI 0.997-1.164). Chronic shoulder or arm pain was statistically significantly associated with lymphoedema of the arm (OR 3.9, p = 0.027, 95 % CI 1.17-13.5). Chronic arm and breast oedema were significantly influenced by the extent of surgery (AC). Ptotic and large breasts were significantly associated with unfavourable COs and chronic breast oedema. Late toxicities exclusive breast pain were not associated with radiotherapy parameters.

  3. Modifiable Prostate Cancer Risk Reduction and Early Detection Behaviors in Black Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odedina, Folakemi T.; Scrivens, John J., Jr.; Larose-Pierre, Margareth; Emanuel, Frank; Adams, Angela Denise; Dagne, Getachew A.; Pressey, Shannon Alexis; Odedina, Oladapo

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To explore the personal factors related to modifiable prostate cancer risk-reduction and detection behaviors among black men. Methods: Three thousand four hundred thirty (3430) black men were surveyed and structural equation modeling employed to test study hypotheses. Results: Modifiable prostate cancer risk-reduction behavior was found…

  4. Modifiable Prostate Cancer Risk Reduction and Early Detection Behaviors in Black Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odedina, Folakemi T.; Scrivens, John J., Jr.; Larose-Pierre, Margareth; Emanuel, Frank; Adams, Angela Denise; Dagne, Getachew A.; Pressey, Shannon Alexis; Odedina, Oladapo

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To explore the personal factors related to modifiable prostate cancer risk-reduction and detection behaviors among black men. Methods: Three thousand four hundred thirty (3430) black men were surveyed and structural equation modeling employed to test study hypotheses. Results: Modifiable prostate cancer risk-reduction behavior was found…

  5. Hyaluronic acid-modified zirconium phosphate nanoparticles for potential lung cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Ranwei; Liu, Tiecheng; Wang, Ke

    2017-02-01

    Novel tumor-targeting zirconium phosphate (ZP) nanoparticles modified with hyaluronic acid (HA) were developed (HA-ZP), with the aim of combining the drug-loading property of ZP and the tumor-targeting ability of HA to construct a tumor-targeting paclitaxel (PTX) delivery system for potential lung cancer therapy. The experimental results indicated that PTX loading into the HA-ZP nanoparticles was as high as 20.36%±4.37%, which is favorable for cancer therapy. PTX-loaded HA-ZP nanoparticles increased the accumulation of PTX in A549 lung cancer cells via HA-mediated endocytosis and exhibited superior anticancer activity in vitro. In vivo anticancer efficacy assay revealed that HA-ZP nanoparticles possessed preferable anticancer abilities, which exhibited minimized toxic side effects of PTX and strong tumor-suppression potential in clinical application.

  6. Genetic variation in UGT genes modify the associations of NSAIDs with risk of colorectal cancer: colon cancer family registry.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Dominique; Koepl, Lisel M; Poole, Elizabeth M; Balavarca, Yesilda; Xiao, Liren; Baron, John A; Hsu, Li; Coghill, Anna E; Campbell, Peter T; Kleinstein, Sarah E; Figueiredo, Jane C; Lampe, Johanna W; Buck, Katharina; Potter, John D; Kulmacz, Richard J; Jenkins, Mark A; Hopper, John L; Win, Aung K; Newcomb, Polly A; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Makar, Karen W

    2014-07-01

    The use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is associated with reduced risk of colorectal neoplasia. Previous studies have reported that polymorphisms in NSAID-metabolizing enzymes central to NSAID metabolism including UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGT) and cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2C9 may modify this protective effect. We investigated whether 35 functionally relevant polymorphisms within CYP2C9 and UGT genes were associated with colorectal cancer risk or modified the protective effect of NSAIDs on colorectal cancer susceptibility, using 1,584 colorectal cancer cases and 2,516 unaffected sibling controls from the Colon Cancer Family Registry. A three-SNP genotype in UGT1A6 (G-A-A; Ala7-Thr181-Arg184) and the Asp85 variant in UGT2B15 increased the risk of colorectal cancer (OR 3.87; 95% CI 1.04-14.45 and OR 1.34; 95% CI 1.10-1.63, respectively). We observed interactions between UGT1A3 Thr78Thr (A>G) and NSAID use (P-interaction = 0.02), a three-SNP genotype within UGT2B4 and ibuprofen use (P-interaction = 0.0018), as well as UGT2B15 Tyr85Asp (T>G) and aspirin use (P-interaction = 0.01). The interaction with the UGT2B4 and the UGT2B15 polymorphisms were noteworthy at the 25% FDR level. This study highlights the need for further pharmacogenetic studies to identify individuals who might benefit from NSAID use as part of developing effective strategies for prevention of colorectal neoplasia. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. The miR-608 rs4919510 polymorphism may modify cancer susceptibility based on type.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shuangshuang; Yuan, Weiyan; Shen, Yu; Lu, Xiao; Li, Yue; Tian, Tian; Jiang, Liying; Zhuang, Xun; Wu, Jianqing; Chu, Minjie

    2017-06-01

    Previous meta-analysis has not shown different effects of miR-608 rs4919510 polymorphism in specific cancer types and reported no significant association between rs4919510 and cancer risk among Chinese. However, more recent findings have been inconsistent. Therefore, we performed an updated meta-analysis to examine whether this polymorphism is associated with cancer risk based on ethnicity and type. A total of 18 case-control studies, comprising 12,517 cases and 15,624 controls, were included in our study. Surprisingly, in contrast with previous meta-analysis, a significant association between the rs4919510 polymorphism and cancer risk was observed in Chinese (CG vs CC: odds ratio = 1.11; 95% confidence interval = 1.04-1.19). In further stratified analyses based on cancer type, rs4919510 was significantly associated with an increased risk of papillary thyroid cancer (CG vs CC: odds ratio = 1.25; 95% confidence interval = 1.01-1.54) and exhibited borderline significant associations with increased risk of gastric cancer (GG vs CC: odds ratio = 1.27; 95% confidence interval = 1.00-1.62) and lung cancer (CG vs CC: odds ratio = 1.14; 95% confidence interval = 0.99-1.32), but a decreased risk of colorectal cancer (GG vs CC: odds ratio = 0.74; 95% confidence interval = 0.60-0.91). Moreover, the RegulomeDB database indicated that rs4919510 may affect the expression of two nearby genes ( SEMA4G and MRPL43), and the Cancer Genome Atlas database revealed that the expression level of SEMA4G was significantly lower in colorectal cancer and lung cancer tissues than that in adjacent non-tumour tissues, while the expression level of SEMA4G was significantly higher in gastric cancer tissues than that in adjacent non-tumour tissues. These findings provide evidence that the miR-608 rs4919510 polymorphism may modify cancer susceptibility in a type-specific manner. Furthermore, SEMA4G may function as an oncogene or tumour suppressor to regulate

  8. Breast cancer survival among young women: a review of the role of modifiable lifestyle factors.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Darren R; Brockton, Nigel T; Kotsopoulos, Joanne; Cotterchio, Michelle; Boucher, Beatrice A; Courneya, Kerry S; Knight, Julia A; Olivotto, Ivo A; Quan, May Lynn; Friedenreich, Christine M

    2016-04-01

    Almost 7% of breast cancers are diagnosed among women age 40 years and younger in Western populations. Clinical outcomes among young women are worse. Early age-of-onset increases the risk of contralateral breast cancer, local and distant recurrence, and subsequent mortality. Breast cancers in young women (BCYW) are more likely to present with triple-negative (TNBC), TP53-positive, and HER-2 over-expressing tumors than among older women. However, despite these known differences in breast cancer outcomes and tumor subtypes, there is limited understanding of the basic biology, epidemiology, and optimal therapeutic strategies for BCYW. Several modifiable lifestyle factors associated with reduced risk of developing breast cancer have also been implicated in improved prognosis among breast cancer survivors of all ages. Given the treatment-related toxicities and the extended window for late effects, long-term lifestyle modifications potentially offer significant benefits to BCYW. In this review, we propose a model identifying three main areas of lifestyle factors (energy imbalance, inflammation, and dietary nutrient adequacy) that may influence survival in BCYW. In addition, we provide a summary of mechanisms of action and a synthesis of previous research on each of these topics.

  9. Transferrin-modified PLGA nanoparticles significantly increase the cytotoxicity of paclitaxel in bladder cancer cells by increasing intracellular retention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Shihua; Zhang, Yi; Yu, Chengfan; Wang, Gang; Zhang, Zhihong; Li, Ningchen; Na, Yanqun

    2014-10-01

    To improve the anticancer effects of paclitaxel (Tax) on bladder cancer, transferrin-modified and unmodified poly( d,l lactide- co-glycolide) nanoparticles (NPs) were generated to deliver Tax. The characteristics of the NPs and the drug-release profiles were evaluated. The cytotoxicity levels of blank NPs and Tax-loaded NPs in the bladder cancer cell lines MBT-2, J-82, and TCC Sup were determined. The uptakes and retentions of the NPs by the cell lines and the intracellular distribution of the NPs were also studied. The results showed similar NPs characteristics and drug-release profiles for NPs with and without transferrin modification. The sizes of NPs with and without transferrin modification were 206 and 278 nm, respectively; the Z-potentials were -23.5 and -24.3 mV, respectively; the drug loadings were 6.5 and 6.7 % w/w, respectively. No cytotoxicity was observed in the bladder cancer cells exposed to blank NPs. Both types of Tax-loaded NPs, however, had significantly higher cytotoxicity levels compared with the Tax solution in the bladder cancer cells. The transferrin-modified, Tax-loaded NPs were significantly more cytotoxic than the Tax-loaded NPs without modification in the MBT-2 and TCC Sup cells. There were no significant differences in NP uptakes between transferrin-modified and unmodified NPs in any of the three studied bladder cancer cell lines; however, the retentions of the modified NPs were significantly higher in the MBT-2 and TCC Sup cells. These findings suggest that NPs can significantly improve the anticancer effect of Tax in bladder cells. Furthermore, transferrin-modified NPs can improve the anticancer effect by increasing intracellular retention and not by increasing uptake. The transferrin-modified NPs are promising drug delivery vehicle for bladder cancer treatment.

  10. Chimeric Antigen Receptors Modified T-Cells for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Hanren; Wang, Yao; Lu, Xuechun

    2016-01-01

    The genetic modification and characterization of T-cells with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) allow functionally distinct T-cell subsets to recognize specific tumor cells. The incorporation of costimulatory molecules or cytokines can enable engineered T-cells to eliminate tumor cells. CARs are generated by fusing the antigen-binding region of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) or other ligand to membrane-spanning and intracellular-signaling domains. They have recently shown clinical benefit in patients treated with CD19-directed autologous T-cells. Recent successes suggest that the modification of T-cells with CARs could be a powerful approach for developing safe and effective cancer therapeutics. Here, we briefly review early studies, consider strategies to improve the therapeutic potential and safety, and discuss the challenges and future prospects for CAR T-cells in cancer therapy. PMID:26819347

  11. Chimeric Antigen Receptors Modified T-Cells for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Dai, Hanren; Wang, Yao; Lu, Xuechun; Han, Weidong

    2016-07-01

    The genetic modification and characterization of T-cells with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) allow functionally distinct T-cell subsets to recognize specific tumor cells. The incorporation of costimulatory molecules or cytokines can enable engineered T-cells to eliminate tumor cells. CARs are generated by fusing the antigen-binding region of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) or other ligand to membrane-spanning and intracellular-signaling domains. They have recently shown clinical benefit in patients treated with CD19-directed autologous T-cells. Recent successes suggest that the modification of T-cells with CARs could be a powerful approach for developing safe and effective cancer therapeutics. Here, we briefly review early studies, consider strategies to improve the therapeutic potential and safety, and discuss the challenges and future prospects for CAR T-cells in cancer therapy.

  12. p53 status as effect modifier of the association between pre-treatment fasting glucose and breast cancer outcomes in non diabetic, HER2 positive patients treated with trastuzumab

    PubMed Central

    Maugeri-Saccà, Marcello; Melucci, Elisa; Benedetto, Anna Di; Lauro, Luigi Di; Pizzuti, Laura; Sergi, Domenico; Terrenato, Irene; Esposito, Luca; Iannuzzi, Carmelina Antonella; Pasquale, Raffaella; Botti, Claudio; Fuhrman, Barbara; Giordano, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Mounting evidence supports the role of p53 in metabolic processes involved in breast carcinogenesis. We investigated whether p53 status affects the association of pre-treatment fasting glucose with treatment outcomes in 106 non diabetic, HER2 positive breast cancer patients treated with trastuzumab. p53 status was validated against gene sequencing of selected codons in 49 patients. The Kaplan–Meier method and log rank test were used to compare survival by categories of fasting glucose in the overall population and separate settings. Cox models included age and body mass index. Direct sequencing confirmed the lack of mutations in 73.7% of p53 negative patients and their presence in 53.3% of p53 positive cases. At 66 months, 88.3% of patients with glucose ≤ 89.0 mg/dl (median value) did not experiment disease progression compared with 70.0% in the highest category (p=0.034), with glucose being an independent predictor (p=0.046). Stratified analysis confirmed this association in p53 negative patients only (p=0.01). In the early setting, data suggested longer disease free survival in p53 negative patients in the lowest glucose category (p=0.053). In our study, p53 status acted as effect modifier of the investigated association. This may help differentiate target sub-groups and affect outcomes interpretation in similarly characterized patients. PMID:25071015

  13. Hyaluronan-modified superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for bimodal breast cancer imaging and photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rui-Meng; Fu, Chao-Ping; Fang, Jin-Zhi; Xu, Xiang-Dong; Wei, Xin-Hua; Tang, Wen-Jie; Jiang, Xin-Qing; Zhang, Li-Ming

    2017-01-01

    Theranostic nanoparticles with both imaging and therapeutic abilities are highly promising in successful diagnosis and treatment of the most devastating cancers. In this study, the dual-modal imaging and photothermal effect of hyaluronan (HA)-modified superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (HA-SPIONs), which was developed in a previous study, were investigated for CD44 HA receptor-overexpressing breast cancer in both in vitro and in vivo experiments. Heat is found to be rapidly generated by near-infrared laser range irradiation of HA-SPIONs. When incubated with CD44 HA receptor-overexpressing MDA-MB-231 cells in vitro, HA-SPIONs exhibited significant specific cellular uptake and specific accumulation confirmed by Prussian blue staining. The in vitro and in vivo results of magnetic resonance imaging and photothermal ablation demonstrated that HA-SPIONs exhibited significant negative contrast enhancement on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and photothermal effect targeted CD44 HA receptor-overexpressing breast cancer. All these results indicated that HA-SPIONs have great potential for effective diagnosis and treatment of cancer.

  14. Hyaluronan-modified superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for bimodal breast cancer imaging and photothermal therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Rui-Meng; Fu, Chao-Ping; Fang, Jin-Zhi; Xu, Xiang-Dong; Wei, Xin-Hua; Tang, Wen-Jie; Jiang, Xin-Qing; Zhang, Li-Ming

    2017-01-01

    Theranostic nanoparticles with both imaging and therapeutic abilities are highly promising in successful diagnosis and treatment of the most devastating cancers. In this study, the dual-modal imaging and photothermal effect of hyaluronan (HA)-modified superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (HA-SPIONs), which was developed in a previous study, were investigated for CD44 HA receptor-overexpressing breast cancer in both in vitro and in vivo experiments. Heat is found to be rapidly generated by near-infrared laser range irradiation of HA-SPIONs. When incubated with CD44 HA receptor-overexpressing MDA-MB-231 cells in vitro, HA-SPIONs exhibited significant specific cellular uptake and specific accumulation confirmed by Prussian blue staining. The in vitro and in vivo results of magnetic resonance imaging and photothermal ablation demonstrated that HA-SPIONs exhibited significant negative contrast enhancement on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and photothermal effect targeted CD44 HA receptor-overexpressing breast cancer. All these results indicated that HA-SPIONs have great potential for effective diagnosis and treatment of cancer. PMID:28096667

  15. Transferrin surface-modified PLGA nanoparticles-mediated delivery of a proteasome inhibitor to human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Frasco, Manuela F; Almeida, Gabriela M; Santos-Silva, Filipe; Pereira, Maria do Carmo; Coelho, Manuel A N

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a drug delivery system based on poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles for an efficient and targeted action of the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib against pancreatic cancer cells. The PLGA nanoparticles were formulated with a poloxamer, and further surface-modified with transferrin for tumor targeting. The nanoparticles were characterized as polymer carriers of bortezomib, and the cellular uptake and growth inhibitory effects were evaluated in pancreatic cells. Cellular internalization of nanoparticles was observed in normal and cancer cells, but with higher uptake by cancer cells. The sustained release of the loaded bortezomib from PLGA nanoparticles showed cytotoxic effects against pancreatic normal and cancer cells. Noteworthy differential cytotoxicity was attained by transferrin surface-modified PLGA nanoparticles since significant cell growth inhibition by delivered bortezomib was only observed in cancer cells. These findings demonstrate that the ligand transferrin enhanced the targeted delivery of bortezomib-loaded PLGA nanoparticles to pancreatic cancer cells. These in vitro results highlight the transferrin surface-modified PLGA nanoparticles as a promising system for targeted delivery of anticancer drugs.

  16. Monitoring modifiable risk factors for breast cancer: an obligation for health professionals.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Verónica Guerra; Baez, Antonieta Fazzi; Cofré González, Carmen Gloria; Miño González, Carmen Gloria

    2017-06-08

    SYNOPSIS Worldwide, breast cancer is the most common disease in women and constitutes the second leading cause of cancer death in this population. The factors that contribute to the risk of occurrence are divided into nonmodifiable and modifiable factors. Although there are interventions in primary care to prevent the disease, these measures have not produced the desired changes in women's health. This article reviews the major modifiable risk factors for breast cancer and describes how these factors can affect the incidence of cancer in women. This information shows that modifiable risk factors (such as physical activity, diet, obesity, and use of alcohol and tobacco) can influence the occurrence of breast cancer, in part depending on the life stage of a woman, including menopausal status. Timely prevention at the primary care level is one of the most important areas on which health professionals need to focus in order to help reduce the incidence of breast cancer.

  17. Modifiers of exposure--response estimates for lung cancer among miners exposed to radon progeny

    SciTech Connect

    Hornung, R.W.; Deddens, J.; Roscoe, R.

    1995-03-01

    The association between lung cancer and exposure to radon decay products has been well established. Despite agreement on this point, there is still some degree of uncertainty regarding characteristics of the exposure-response relationship. The use of studies of underground miners to estimate lung cancer risks due to residential radon exposure depends upon a better understanding of factors potentially modifying the exposure-response relationship. Given the diversity in study populations regarding smoking status, mining conditions, risk analysis methodology, and referent populations, the risk estimates across studies are quite similar. However, several factors partially contributing to differences in risk estimates are modified by attained age, time since last exposure, exposure rate, and cigarette smoking patterns. There is growing agreement across studies that relative risk decreases with attained age and time since last exposure. Several studies have also found an inverse exposure-rate effect, i.e., low exposure rates for protracted duration of exposure are more hazardous than equivalent cumulative exposures received at higher rates for shorter periods of time. Additionally, the interaction between radon exposure and cigarette smoking appears to be intermediate between additive and multiplicative in a growing number of studies. Quantitative estimates of these modifying factors are given using a new analysis of data from the latest update of the Colorado Plateau uranium miners cohort. 24 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Harmonic Scalpel versus Electrocautery Dissection in Modified Radical Mastectomy for Breast Cancer: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jinbo; Yu, Yinghua; Wei, Changyuan; Qin, Qinghong; Mo, Qinguo; Yang, Weiping

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite the common use of conventional electrocautery in modified radical mastectomy for breast cancer, the harmonic scalpel is recently emerging as a dominant surgical instrument for dissection and haemostasis, which is thought to reduce the morbidity, such as seroma and blood loss. But the results of published trials are inconsistent. So we made the meta-analysis to assess the intraoperative and postoperative endpoints among women undergoing modified radical mastectomy with harmonic scalpel or electrocautery. Methods A comprehensive literature search of case-control studies from PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library databases involving modified radical mastectomy with harmonic scalpel or electrocautery was performed. We carried out a meta-analysis of primary endpoints including postoperative drainage, seroma development, intraoperative blood loss and secondly endpoints including operative time and wound complications. We used odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to evaluate the effect size for categorical outcomes and standardised mean differences (SMDs) for continuous outcomes. Results A total of 11 studies with 702 patients were included for this meta-analysis. There was significant difference in total postoperative drainage (SMD: -0.74 [95%CI: -1.31, -0.16]; P< 0.01), seroma development[OR: 0.49 (0.34, 0.70); P < 0.01], intraoperative blood loss(SMD: -1.14 [95%CI: -1.81,-0.47]; P < 0.01) and wound complications [OR: 0.38 (0.24, 0.59); P < 0.01] between harmonic scalpel dissection and standard electrocautery in modified radical mastectomy for breast cancer. No difference was found as for operative time between harmonic scalpel dissection and standard electrocautery (SMD: 0.04 [95%CI: -0.41, 0.50]; P = 0.85). Conclusion Compared to standard electrocautery, harmonic scalpel dissection presents significant advantages in decreasing postoperative drainage, seroma development, intraoperative blood loss and wound complications in

  19. Harmonic Scalpel versus Electrocautery Dissection in Modified Radical Mastectomy for Breast Cancer: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jinbo; Yu, Yinghua; Wei, Changyuan; Qin, Qinghong; Mo, Qinguo; Yang, Weiping

    2015-01-01

    Despite the common use of conventional electrocautery in modified radical mastectomy for breast cancer, the harmonic scalpel is recently emerging as a dominant surgical instrument for dissection and haemostasis, which is thought to reduce the morbidity, such as seroma and blood loss. But the results of published trials are inconsistent. So we made the meta-analysis to assess the intraoperative and postoperative endpoints among women undergoing modified radical mastectomy with harmonic scalpel or electrocautery. A comprehensive literature search of case-control studies from PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library databases involving modified radical mastectomy with harmonic scalpel or electrocautery was performed. We carried out a meta-analysis of primary endpoints including postoperative drainage, seroma development, intraoperative blood loss and secondly endpoints including operative time and wound complications. We used odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to evaluate the effect size for categorical outcomes and standardised mean differences (SMDs) for continuous outcomes. A total of 11 studies with 702 patients were included for this meta-analysis. There was significant difference in total postoperative drainage (SMD: -0.74 [95%CI: -1.31, -0.16]; P< 0.01), seroma development[OR: 0.49 (0.34, 0.70); P < 0.01], intraoperative blood loss(SMD: -1.14 [95%CI: -1.81,-0.47]; P < 0.01) and wound complications [OR: 0.38 (0.24, 0.59); P < 0.01] between harmonic scalpel dissection and standard electrocautery in modified radical mastectomy for breast cancer. No difference was found as for operative time between harmonic scalpel dissection and standard electrocautery (SMD: 0.04 [95%CI: -0.41, 0.50]; P = 0.85). Compared to standard electrocautery, harmonic scalpel dissection presents significant advantages in decreasing postoperative drainage, seroma development, intraoperative blood loss and wound complications in modified radical mastectomy for breast

  20. Low-molecular-weight protamine-modified PLGA nanoparticles for overcoming drug-resistant breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huixin; Zhao, Yongxing; Wang, Huiyuan; Gong, Junbo; He, Huining; Shin, Meong Cheol; Yang, Victor C; Huang, Yongzhuo

    2014-10-28

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major challenge for cancer therapy. Herein, we report a simple yet effective system, cell-penetrating peptide (CPP)-assisted poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid nanoparticles (PLGA NPs), for improving doxorubicin (DOX) delivery and overcoming MDR cancer. We selected the naturally derived CPP low-molecular-weight protamine (LMWP) to modify PLGA NP for enhanced drug delivery. We demonstrated that multiple mechanisms ("synergistic multipronged delivery") were responsible for the anti-MDR effects of LMWP/PLGA NP. This delivery system could boost intracellular and intranuclear delivery, thereby circumventing drug efflux. Use of a P-glycoprotein inhibitor did not further increase the efficiency of intracellular delivery of LMWP/PLGA/DOX NP, suggesting that delivery of LMWP-based NP was not affected by transporter-mediated drug efflux. Importantly, enhanced uptake and penetration within the tumor was found in mice given LMWP-based NP. LMWP/PLGA NP effectively arrested tumor growth in mice harboring drug-resistant breast tumors, thereby improving treatment outcomes without detectable toxicities. These data suggest that our system could provide effective yet safe anti-MDR cancer therapy based on a synergistic, multipronged drug-delivery strategy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Chemically Modified Bacteriophage as a Streamlined Approach to Noninvasive Breast Cancer Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-10-1-1017 TITLE: Chemically Modified Bacteriophage as a...COVERED 28 September 2010 – 27 September 2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Chemically Modified Bacteriophage as a Streamlined...invasive alternative, my research involves the chemical modification and subsequent use of filamentous bacteriophage targeting specific breast cancer

  2. Smoking may modify the association between neoadjuvant chemotherapy and survival from ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Kelemen, Linda E; Warren, Graham W; Koziak, Jennifer M; Köbel, Martin; Steed, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Tobacco smoking by cancer patients is associated with increased mortality. Less is known of the impact of smoking on recurrence risk and interaction with chemotherapy treatment. We examined these associations in ovarian cancer. Patients were identified from the Alberta Cancer Registry between 1978 and 2010 and were oversampled for less-common histologic ovarian tumor types. Medical records were abstracted for 678 eligible patients on lifestyle, medical and cancer treatment, and review of pathology slides was performed for 605 patients. We estimated hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) using Cox proportional hazard models adjusted for age at diagnosis, race, stage and residual disease. Among patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy (N=432), current smoking was significantly associated with shorter duration of overall (OS; HR, 8.56; 95% CI, 1.50-48.7) and progression-free (PFS; HR, 5.74; 95% CI, 1.05-31.4) survival from mucinous ovarian cancer only. There was no significant association between neoadjuvant chemotherapy and survival. However, among patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy (N=44), current smokers had shorter PFS (HR, 4.32; 95% CI, 1.36-13.8; N=32 progressed/9 censored events) compared to never smokers, but the HRs were not statistically different across smoking categories (P interaction=0.87). Adverse associations were observed between smoking status and OS or PFS among patients with mucinous ovarian cancer receiving adjuvant chemotherapy. No significant effect was found from neoadjuvant chemotherapy on PFS overall; however, smoking may modify this association. Although needing replication, these findings suggest that patients may benefit from smoking cessation interventions prior to treatment with chemotherapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A Multicountry Ecological Study of Cancer Incidence Rates in 2008 with Respect to Various Risk-Modifying Factors

    PubMed Central

    Grant, William B.

    2013-01-01

    Observational and ecological studies are generally used to determine the presence of effect of cancer risk-modifying factors. Researchers generally agree that environmental factors such as smoking, alcohol consumption, poor diet, lack of physical activity, and low serum 25-hdyroxyvitamin D levels are important cancer risk factors. This ecological study used age-adjusted incidence rates for 21 cancers for 157 countries (87 with high-quality data) in 2008 with respect to dietary supply and other factors, including per capita gross domestic product, life expectancy, lung cancer incidence rate (an index for smoking), and latitude (an index for solar ultraviolet-B doses). The factors found to correlate strongly with multiple types of cancer were lung cancer (direct correlation with 12 types of cancer), energy derived from animal products (direct correlation with 12 types of cancer, inverse with two), latitude (direct correlation with six types, inverse correlation with three), and per capita gross national product (five types). Life expectancy and sweeteners directly correlated with three cancers, animal fat with two, and alcohol with one. Consumption of animal products correlated with cancer incidence with a lag time of 15–25 years. Types of cancer which correlated strongly with animal product consumption, tended to correlate weakly with latitude; this occurred for 11 cancers for the entire set of countries. Regression results were somewhat different for the 87 high-quality country data set and the 157-country set. Single-country ecological studies have inversely correlated nearly all of these cancers with solar ultraviolet-B doses. These results can provide guidance for prevention of cancer. PMID:24379012

  4. BYSTANDERS, ADAPTIVE RESPONSES AND GENOMIC INSTABILITY - POTENTIAL MODIFIERS OF LOW-DOSE CANCER RESPONSES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bystanders, Adaptive Responses and Genomic Instability -Potential Modifiers ofLow-Dose
    Cancer Responses
    .
    There has been a concerted effort in the field of radiation biology to better understand cellular
    responses that could have an impact on the estin1ation of cancer...

  5. BYSTANDERS, ADAPTIVE RESPONSES AND GENOMIC INSTABILITY - POTENTIAL MODIFIERS OF LOW-DOSE CANCER RESPONSES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bystanders, Adaptive Responses and Genomic Instability -Potential Modifiers ofLow-Dose
    Cancer Responses
    .
    There has been a concerted effort in the field of radiation biology to better understand cellular
    responses that could have an impact on the estin1ation of cancer...

  6. Modifiable Risk Factors for Lymphedema in Breast Cancer Survivors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: DAMD17-02-1-0387 TITLE: Modifiable Risk Factors for Lymphedema ...Final 3. DATES COVERED 1 Oct 2004 – 30 Sep 2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Modifiable Risk Factors for Lymphedema in Breast...axillary lymph nodes removed were followed for the development of arm lymphedema . Participants completed a baseline interview and subsequent

  7. Nucleotide excision repair polymorphisms may modify ionizing radiation-related breast cancer risk in US radiologic technologists

    PubMed Central

    Rajaraman, Preetha; Bhatti, Parveen; Doody, Michele Morin; Simon, Steven L.; Weinstock, Robert M.; Linet, Martha S.; Rosenstein, Marvin; Stovall, Marilyn; Alexander, Bruce H.; Preston, Dale L.; Sigurdson, Alice J.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation has been consistently associated with increased risk of female breast cancer. Although the majority of DNA damage caused by ionizing radiation is corrected by the base-excision repair pathway, certain types of multiple-base damage can only be repaired through the nucleotide excision repair pathway. In a nested case–control study of breast cancer in US radiologic technologists exposed to low levels of ionizing radiation (858 cases, 1,083 controls), we examined whether risk of breast cancer conferred by radiation was modified by nucleotide excision gene polymorphisms ERCC2 (XPD) rs13181, ERCC4 (XPF) rs1800067 and rs1800124, ERCC5 (XPG) rs1047769 and rs17655; and ERCC6 rs2228526. Of the 6 ERCC variants examined, only ERCC5 rs17655 showed a borderline main effect association with breast cancer risk (ORGC = 1.1, ORCC = 1.3; p-trend = 0.08), with some indication that individuals carrying the C allele variant were more susceptible to the effects of occupational radiation (EOR/GyGG = 1.0, 95% CI = <0, 6.0; EOR/GyGC/CC = 5.9, 95% CI = 0.9, 14.4; phet = 0.10). ERCC2 rs13181, although not associated with breast cancer risk overall, statistically significantly modified the effect of occupational radiation dose on risk of breast cancer (EOR/GyAA = 9.1, 95% CI = 2.1–21.3; EOR/GyAC/CC = 0.6, 95% CI = <0, 4.6; phet = 0.01). These results suggest that common variants in nucleotide excision repair genes may modify the association between occupational radiation exposure and breast cancer risk. PMID:18767034

  8. Optimization in expression and purification of modified apoptin as selective anti-cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahlan, Muhamad; Wiseso, Anggoro; Hermansyah, Heri; Yohda, Masafumi

    2017-02-01

    Cancer is a disease caused by abnormal growth of tissue cells of the body that turn into cancer cells. Apoptin from Chicken Anemia Virus is known to have the ability to trigger apoptosis in cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, but not in normal cells. The production of Apoptin was done on Escherichia coli via plasmid pET9a and modified to improve the efficiency and ease of purification using IMAC nickel, by adding a few tags and cleavage site. The expected result is modified Apoptin and evidence of proteins expressed through SDS-PAGE analysis.

  9. Endoscopic optical coherence tomography with a modified microelectromechanical systems mirror for detection of bladder cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Tuqiang; Xie, Huikai; Fedder, Gary K.; Pan, Yingtian

    2003-11-01

    Experimental results of a modified micromachined microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) mirror for substantial enhancement of the transverse laser scanning performance of endoscopic optical coherence tomography (EOCT) are presented. Image distortion due to buckling of MEMS mirror in our previous designs was analyzed and found to be attributed to excessive internal stress of the transverse bimorph meshes. The modified MEMS mirror completely eliminates bimorph stress and the resultant buckling effect, which increases the wobbling-free angular optical actuation to greater than 37°, exceeding the transverse laser scanning requirements for EOCT and confocal endoscopy. The new optical coherence tomography (OCT) endoscope allows for two-dimensional cross-sectional imaging that covers an area of 4.2 mm × 2.8 mm (limited by scope size) and at roughly 5 frames/s instead of the previous area size of 2.9 mm × 2.8 mm and is highly suitable for noninvasive and high-resolution imaging diagnosis of epithelial lesions in vivo. EOCT images of normal rat bladders and rat bladder cancers are compared with the same cross sections acquired with conventional bench-top OCT. The results clearly demonstrate the potential of EOCT for in vivo imaging diagnosis and precise guidance for excisional biopsy of early bladder cancers.

  10. Gestational Exposure as Epigenetic Modifier of Breast Cancer Risk

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    do not have mutations in the BRCA-1 gene (BRCA- 1+/+), but have absent or markedly reduced levels of BRCA-1 similar to those observed in hereditary ... hereditary and sporadic breast cancers. 2. KEYWORDS BRCA-1, triple-negative breast cancer, AhR, epigenetic, estrogen receptor-a, hereditary breast

  11. Effects of SBS Content on the Performance of Modified Asphalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Chuanyi; Li, Ning; Zhao, Wei; Cai, Chuanfeng

    2017-06-01

    The effects of different dosage SBS (Styrene-butadiene-styrene) modifiers on the properties of asphalt were compared and analyzed from the temperature sensitivity, high temperature performance and low temperature performance of modified asphalt. The results show that with the increase of the content of SBS modifier, the softening point and kinematic viscosity of SBS modified asphalt are increased and the high temperature performance is improved. The low temperature ductility is improved; the penetration of modified asphalt is reduced, the temperature sensitivity of the asphalt is reduced. However, when the content of modifier is more than 4%, the penetration index of SBS modified asphalt decreases linearly with the increase of the content of modifier, and the temperature sensitivity increases. The engineering application should be determined according to the specific technical requirements.

  12. Magnesium in drinking water modifies the association between trihalomethanes and the risk of death from colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Hsin-Wei; Peng, Chiung-Yu; Feng, Anne; Wu, Trong-Neng; Yang, Chun-Yuh

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to (1) examine the relationship between total trihalomethanes (TTHM) levels in public water supplies and death attributed to colon cancer and (2) determine whether magnesium (Mg) levels in drinking water modify the effects of TTHM on risk of colon cancer development. A matched case-control study was used to investigate the relationship between the risk of death attributed to colon cancer and exposure to total trihalomethanes (TTHM) in drinking water in 53 municipalities in Taiwan. All colon cancer deaths of the 53 municipalities from 1998 through 2007 were obtained from the Bureau of Vital Statistics of the Taiwan Provincial Department of Health. Controls were deaths from other causes and were pair-matched to the cancer cases by gender, year of birth, and year of death. Each matched control was selected randomly from the set of possible controls for each cancer case. Data on TTHM levels in drinking water were collected from Taiwan Environmental Protection Administration. Information on the levels of Mg in drinking water was obtained from the Taiwan Water Supply Corporation. The municipality of residence for cancer cases and controls was presumed to be the source of the subject's TTHM and Mg exposure via drinking water. Relative to individuals whose TTHM exposure levels were <4.9 ppb, the adjusted odds ration (OR) (with 95% confidence interval [CI]) for colon cancer was 1.14 (1.01-1.28) for individuals who had resided in municipalities served by drinking water with a TTHM exposure≥4.9 ppb. Evidence of an interaction between drinking-water TTHM and Mg intake via drinking water was noted. This is the first study to report an effect modification by Mg intake from drinking water in association between TTHM exposure and risk of colon cancer occurrence. Better knowledge of this modifying factor will help in public policymaking and setting health standards.

  13. Therapy of peritoneal murine cancer with biological response modifiers.

    PubMed

    Salup, R R; Herberman, R B; Chirigos, M A; Back, T; Wiltrout, R H

    1985-01-01

    We have used a murine renal adenocarcinoma of spontaneous origin (Renca) inplanted in the peritoneal cavity to study the therapeutic potential of biological response modifiers (BRMs) used alone or in conjunction with chemotherapy. This tumor model is therapeutically challenging since following intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection, the tumor grows progressively with hemorrhagic ascites, abdominal metastases to lymph nodes, liver, spleen, most serous membranes, and, in some animals, metastases to extra-abdominal sites (lungs). In the absence of therapy, death invariably occurs within 36 +/- 2 days. The tumor is efficiently lysed in 4 hours by peritoneal cells isolated from mice treated with BRMs. Both MVE-2 and rIL-2 significantly increased the survival time of tumor-bearing mice, but only treatment with MVE-2 led to definite cures of i.p. Renca. A single i.p. injection of MVE-2 cured 20% of the tumor-bearing mice, while repeated i.p. administration of this drug at 12 day intervals cured 70% of i.p. Renca-bearing mice. Combined therapy with doxorubicin hydrochloride and a single dose of MVE-2 cured 90% of tumor-bearing animals. The superior therapeutic efficiency of MVE-2 compared to that of the rIL-2 may be due to its ability, after i.p. inoculation, to generate and maintain high levels of cytotoxic effector cell activity for an elevated period of time within the peritoneal cell population. Additionally, MVE-2 augments effector cell activity in the liver, lungs, spleen, and blood and may therefore more efficiently interfere with metastasis formation in those compartments. The additive effects of MVE-2 and the chemotherapeutic agent suggest that more effective therapy may be achieved by the combination of immunotherapy with BRMs with chemotherapeutic drugs.

  14. [Can new molecular profiles in epithelial ovarian cancer modify therapeutics?

    PubMed

    Lavoué, V; Rousselin, A; Delplanque, S; Pinsard, M; Henno, S; Foucher, F; Levêque, J; de la Motte Rouge, T

    2017-02-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) affects 4500 women a year in France, with a survival of 30% at 5 years. Treatment is based on extensive surgery and chemotherapy. Around 15% of EOCs are due to genetic mutation predisposition essentially with mutated BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Four histological subtypes are described (serous, endometrioid, and mucinous cells to clear), corresponding to different carcinogenesis and distinct molecular mutations. High-grade serous EOCs have a mutation of the BRCA genes in 20-30% of cases. This mutation causes a deficit of repair by homologous recombination of DNA in case of double strand break, allowing greater sensitivity to platinum salts and the use of PARP inhibitors, a protein involved in the repair of single-strand breaks of DNA. PARP inhibitors have shown efficacy in patients mutated BRCA but this effectiveness remains to be demonstrated in patients without congenital mutation, but with acquired BRCAness profile EOC. The BRCAness profile is defined by a tumor having a defect in DNA repair counterpart (not limited to BRCA mutation). Molecular definition of BRCAness is still not consensual but is necessary for the use of PARP inhibitors. Gene expression analyses have identified four subgroups of high-grade serous CEO: mesenchymal, proliferative, differentiated and immunoreactive. These four subtypes, not mutually exclusive, although correlated with prognosis, are not yet used in clinical routine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Reduced graphene oxide modified smart conducting paper for cancer biosensor.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Saurabh; Kumar, Suveen; Srivastava, Saurabh; Yadav, Birendra K; Lee, Seung H; Sharma, Jai G; Doval, Dinesh C; Malhotra, Bansi D

    2015-11-15

    We report results of the studies relating to the fabrication of a paper based sensor comprising of poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) ( PSS) and reduced graphene oxide (RGO) composite. The effect of various solvents like methanol, ethylene glycol and H2SO4 on the electrical conductivity of PSS coated Whatman paper has been investigated. The conductivity of this solution processed conducting paper significantly increases from ~1.16×10(-4) S cm(-1) up to ~3.57×10(-2) S cm(-1) (~300 times) on treatment with ethylene glycol. The observed significant increase in electrical conductivity is due to conformational rearrangement in the polymer and is due to strong non-covalent cooperative interaction between PEDOT and the cellulose molecules. Further, incorporation of RGO into the conducting paper results in improved electrochemical performance and signal stability. This paper electrode is a promising alternative over the expensive conventional electrodes (ITO, gold and glassy carbon), that are known to have limited application in smart point-of-care (POC) devices. This low cost, flexible and environment friendly conducting paper based biosensor utilized for cancer biomarker (carcinoembryonic antigen, CEA) detection reveals high sensitivity of 25.8 µA ng(-1) mL cm(-2) in the physiological range, 1-10 ng mL(-1). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Modifiers of Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Friebel, Tara M.; Domchek, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    Background There is substantial variability in cancer risk in women who have inherited a BRCA1 or BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) mutation. Numerous factors have been hypothesized to modify these risks, but studies are of variable quality, and it remains unclear which of these may be of value in clinical risk assessment. Methods PubMed and Web of Science databases were searched for articles published through September 2013. Fixed effects meta-analysis was done using the hazard ratios and/or odds ratios to estimate the pooled effect estimates (ES) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to identify factors that are associated with cancer risk modification in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. Results We identified 44 nonoverlapping studies that met predefined quality criteria. Sufficient evidence is available to make clinically relevant inferences about a number of cancer risk modifiers. The only variable examined that produced a probable association was late age at first live birth, a meta-analysis showed a decrease in the risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers with women aged 30 years or older vs. women younger than 30 years (ES = 0.65; 95% CI =0.42 to 0.99). The same was shown for women aged 25 to 29 years versus those aged less than 25 years (ES = 0.69; 95% CI = 0.48 to 0.99). Breastfeeding and tubal ligation were associated with reduced ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers; oral contraceptives were associated with reduced risk among BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. Smoking was associated with increased breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers only. Conclusions Data assessing many potential risk modifiers are inadequate, and many have not been externally validated. Although additional studies are required to confirm some associations, sufficient information is available for some risk factors to be used in risk counseling or lifestyle modification to minimize cancer risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. PMID:24824314

  17. Genetic polymorphisms in MMP 2, 9 and 3 genes modify lung cancer risk and survival

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) are proteolytic enzymes that contribute to all stages of tumour progression, including the later stages of invasion and metastasis. Genetic variants in the MMP genes may influence the biological function of these enzymes and change their role in carcinogenesis and progression. We have investigated the association between the -735 C/T, the -1171 5A/6A, and the -1562 C/T polymorphisms in the MMP2, MMP3 and MMP9 genes, respectively, and the risk and survival of lung cancer. Methods The case-control study includes 879 lung cancer patients and 803 controls from a Caucasian population in Spain (CAPUA study). Genotypes were determined by PCR-RFLP. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using unconditional logistic regression. The Kaplan-Meier method, long-rank test and Cox's were used for the survival analysis. Results The MMP9 -1562 T/T genotype was associated with a statistically significant decreased risk of developing lung cancer (OR = 0.23; 95% CI: 0.06-0.85), whereas no association was found for the MMP2 -735 C/T and MMP3 -1171 5A/6A polymorphisms. The MMP2 -735 T/T genotype was statistically significantly associated with a decreased survival in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, identified as an independent prognosis factor of survival (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.79; 95% CI: 1.00-3.20). In contrast, no association was found between the MMP3 -1171 5A/6A and the MMP9 -1562 C/T polymorphisms and survival. Conclusions These findings support the hypothesis that the MMP9 -1562 C/T polymorphism is associated with a protective effect against the development of lung cancer and suggest that the MMP2 -735 C/T polymorphism modify the length of survival in NSCLC patients. PMID:22455335

  18. Diagnosis of Brain Metastases from Lung Cancer Using a Modified Electromagnetism like Mechanism Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kun-Huang; Wang, Kung-Jeng; Adrian, Angelia Melani; Wang, Kung-Min; Teng, Nai-Chia

    2016-01-01

    Brain metastases are commonly found in patients that are diagnosed with primary malignancy on their lung. Lung cancer patients with brain metastasis tend to have a poor survivability, which is less than 6 months in median. Therefore, an early and effective detection system for such disease is needed to help prolong the patients' survivability and improved their quality of life. A modified electromagnetism-like mechanism (EM) algorithm, MEM-SVM, is proposed by combining EM algorithm with support vector machine (SVM) as the classifier and opposite sign test (OST) as the local search technique. The proposed method is applied to 44 UCI and IDA datasets, and 5 cancers microarray datasets as preliminary experiment. In addition, this method is tested on 4 lung cancer microarray public dataset. Further, we tested our method on a nationwide dataset of brain metastasis from lung cancer (BMLC) in Taiwan. Since the nature of real medical dataset to be highly imbalanced, the synthetic minority over-sampling technique (SMOTE) is utilized to handle this problem. The proposed method is compared against another 8 popular benchmark classifiers and feature selection methods. The performance evaluation is based on the accuracy and Kappa index. For the 44 UCI and IDA datasets and 5 cancer microarray datasets, a non-parametric statistical test confirmed that MEM-SVM outperformed the other methods. For the 4 lung cancer public microarray datasets, MEM-SVM still achieved the highest mean value for accuracy and Kappa index. Due to the imbalanced property on the real case of BMLC dataset, all methods achieve good accuracy without significance difference among the methods. However, on the balanced BMLC dataset, MEM-SVM appears to be the best method with higher accuracy and Kappa index. We successfully developed MEM-SVM to predict the occurrence of brain metastasis from lung cancer with the combination of SMOTE technique to handle the class imbalance properties. The results confirmed that MEM

  19. Advancements in Applications of Surface Modified Nanomaterials for Cancer Theranostics.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Iffat Zareen; Kuddus, Mohammad; Ahmad, Asad; Tabassum, Heena; Mabood, Abdul

    2017-10-02

    Nanostructured material is a solid material with at least one dimension in the nanoscale range. Desired control of the properties and effects of nanostructures can invent new devices and technologies, as the physical and chemical properties of nanostructures are distinctly different from those of a single atom or its bulk phase. This difference in the properties is due to different spatial structures and shapes, phase changes, energetics, electronic structure, chemical reactivity, and catalytic properties of large, finite systems, and their assemblies. Theranostic involves the study of compounds which combines the modalities of therapy and diagnostic imaging. In the same essence, nanostructured materials based polymers finds numerous applications in biomedical and pharmaceutical industries. Researches are focused for novel nanomaterials based on polymers by exploiting their intrinsic physicochemical and biological properties. By surface modification of the nanomaterials specific targeting properties towards specific molecules and receptors in various types of cells could be achieved. Biocompatible nanoparticles have shown various theranostic applications in which they support both laboratory diagnostic and therapeutic. Recent studies have shown the possible uses of nanoparticles as diagnostic agents in MRI as well as in drug delivery systems. It is evident by the latest applications of nanoparticles in the development of sensitive biosensors. The most important theranostic application of nanoparticles is the treatment of cancer. In most of the cases, it is the late diagnosis of the disease which increases the mortality rate. Moreover, the toxic effect of the chemotherapeutic drugs on the normal cells of the body is another major drawback of the treatment. Therefore, theranostics appears to be very helpful and realistic area in the diagnosis and targeted drug delivery of this particular disease. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email

  20. A Phase I Study on Adoptive Immunotherapy Using Gene-Modified T Cells for Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kershaw, Michael H.; Westwood, Jennifer A.; Parker, Linda L.; Wang, Gang; Eshhar, Zelig; Mavroukakis, Sharon A.; White, Donald E.; Wunderlich, John R.; Canevari, Silvana; Rogers-Freezer, Linda; Chen, Clara C.; Yang, James C.; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Hwu, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    Purpose A phase I study was conducted to assess the safety of adoptive immunotherapy using gene-modified autologous T cells for the treatment of metastatic ovarian cancer. Experimental Design T cells with reactivity against the ovarian cancer – associated antigen α-folate receptor (FR) were generated by genetic modification of autologous T cells with a chimeric gene incorporating an anti-FR single-chain antibody linked to the signaling domain of the Fc receptor γ chain. Patients were assigned to one of two cohorts in the study. Eight patients in cohort 1received a dose escalation of T cells in combination with high-dose interleukin-2, and six patients in cohort 2 received dual-specific T cells (reactive with both FR and allogeneic cells) followed by immunization with allogeneic peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Results Five patients in cohort 1 experienced some grade 3 to 4 treatment-related toxicity that was probably due to interleukin-2 administration, which could be managed using standard measures. Patients in cohort 2 experienced relatively mild side effects with grade 1to 2 symptoms. No reduction in tumor burden was seen in any patient. Tracking 111In-labeled adoptively transferred T cells in cohort 1revealed a lack of specific localization of T cells to tumor except in one patient where some signal was detected in a peritoneal deposit. PCR analysis showed that gene-modified T cells were present in the circulation in large numbers for the first 2 days after transfer, but these quickly declined to be barely detectable 1month later in most patients. An inhibitory factor developed in the serum of three of six patients tested over the period of treatment, which significantly reduced the ability of gene-modified T cells to respond against FR+ tumor cells. Conclusions Large numbers of gene-modified tumor-reactive T cells can be safely given to patients, but these cells do not persist in large numbers long term. Future studies need to employ strategies to

  1. Colloidal stability of gold nanoparticles modified with thiol compounds: bioconjugation and application in cancer cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jie; Huang, Xiangyi; Liu, Heng; Zan, Feng; Ren, Jicun

    2012-03-06

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are attractive alternative optical probes and good biocompatible materials due to their special physical and chemical properties. However, GNPs have a tendency to aggregate particularly in the presence of high salts and certain biological molecules such as nucleic acids and proteins. How to improve the stability of GNPs and their bioconjugates in aqueous solution is a critical issue in bioapplications. In this study, we first synthesized 17 nm GNPs in aqueous solution and then modified them with six thiol compounds, including glutathione, mercaptopropionic acid (MPA), cysteine, cystamine, dihydrolipoic acid, and thiol-ending polyethylene glycol (PEG-SH), via a Au-S bond. We systematically investigated the effects of the thiol ligands, buffer pH, and salt concentrations of the solutions on the colloidal stability of GNPs using UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. We found that GNPs modified with PEG-SH were the most stable in aqueous solution compared to other thiol compounds. On the basis of the above results, we developed a simple and efficient approach for modification of GNPs using a mixture of PEG-SH and MPA as ligands. These biligand-modified GNPs were facilely conjugated to antibody using 1-ethyl-3-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl]carbodiimide and N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide as linkage reagents. We conjugated GNPs to epidermal growth factor receptor antibodies and successfully used the antibody-GNP conjugates as targeting probes for imaging of cancer cells using the illumination of a dark field. Compared to current methods for modification and conjugation of GNPs, our method described here is simple, has a low cost, and has potential applications in bioassays and cancer diagnostics and studies.

  2. Effects of preparation process on performance of rubber modified asphalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hanbing; Luo, Guobao; Wang, Xianqiang; Jiao, Yubo

    2015-06-01

    The rational utilization of waste rubber tire is essential for the environmental protection. Utilizing rubber particles to modify asphalt can not only improve asphalt performance, but also help the recycling of waste materials. Considering the effect of different preparation process parameters on the performance of rubber modified asphalt, this paper analyzes the effects of the shear temperature, shear time and shear rate on the performance of rubber modified asphalt, and provided a reference for its preparation.

  3. Elimination of Progressive Mammary Cancer by Repeated Administrations of Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Modified T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Globerson-Levin, Anat; Waks, Tova; Eshhar, Zelig

    2014-01-01

    Continuous oncogenic processes that generate cancer require an on-going treatment approach to eliminate the transformed cells, and prevent their further development. Here, we studied the ability of T cells expressing a chimeric antibody-based receptor (CAR) to offer a therapeutic benefit for breast cancer induced by erbB-2. We tested CAR-modified T cells (T-bodies) specific to erbB-2 for their antitumor potential in a mouse model overexpressing a human erbB-2 transgene that develops mammary tumors. Comparing the antitumor reactivity of CAR-modified T cells under various therapeutic settings, either prophylactic, prior to tumor development, or therapeutically. We found that repeated administration of CAR-modified T cells is required to eliminate spontaneously developing mammary cancer. Systemic, as well as intratumoral administered CAR-modified T cells accumulated at tumor sites and eventually eliminated the malignant cells. Interestingly, within a few weeks after a single CAR T cells' administration, and rejection of primary lesion, tumors usually relapsed both in treated mammary gland and at remote sites; however, repeated injections of CAR-modified T cells were able to control the secondary tumors. Since spontaneous tumors can arise repeatedly, especially in the case of syndromes characterized by specific susceptibility to cancer, multiple administrations of CAR-modified T cells can serve to control relapsing disease. PMID:24572294

  4. Elimination of progressive mammary cancer by repeated administrations of chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cells.

    PubMed

    Globerson-Levin, Anat; Waks, Tova; Eshhar, Zelig

    2014-05-01

    Continuous oncogenic processes that generate cancer require an on-going treatment approach to eliminate the transformed cells, and prevent their further development. Here, we studied the ability of T cells expressing a chimeric antibody-based receptor (CAR) to offer a therapeutic benefit for breast cancer induced by erbB-2. We tested CAR-modified T cells (T-bodies) specific to erbB-2 for their antitumor potential in a mouse model overexpressing a human erbB-2 transgene that develops mammary tumors. Comparing the antitumor reactivity of CAR-modified T cells under various therapeutic settings, either prophylactic, prior to tumor development, or therapeutically. We found that repeated administration of CAR-modified T cells is required to eliminate spontaneously developing mammary cancer. Systemic, as well as intratumoral administered CAR-modified T cells accumulated at tumor sites and eventually eliminated the malignant cells. Interestingly, within a few weeks after a single CAR T cells' administration, and rejection of primary lesion, tumors usually relapsed both in treated mammary gland and at remote sites; however, repeated injections of CAR-modified T cells were able to control the secondary tumors. Since spontaneous tumors can arise repeatedly, especially in the case of syndromes characterized by specific susceptibility to cancer, multiple administrations of CAR-modified T cells can serve to control relapsing disease.

  5. Modifiable risk factors of lung cancer in "never-smoker" women.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jong-Myon

    2015-01-01

    Korean women with a history of never smoking and with adenocarcinoma showed an increasing trend in lung cancer occurrence during 2002 to 2012. The two modifiable factors of never-smoker lung cancer in women are hormone and oncogenic virus infection. Based on previous studies, hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and human papillomavirus (HPV) infection might afford protection or be a risk factor, respectively. It is necessary to perform a pooled analysis of cohort studies to evaluate HRT and never-smoker lung cancer in women and a systematic review of case-control studies to determine the association between HPV infection and never-smoker lung cancer.

  6. Classification of lung cancer patients and controls by chromatography of modified nucleosides in serum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McEntire, John E.; Kuo, Kenneth C.; Smith, Mark E.; Stalling, David L.; Richens, Jack W.; Zumwalt, Robert W.; Gehrke, Charles W.; Papermaster, Ben W.

    1989-01-01

    A wide spectrum of modified nucleosides has been quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography in serum of 49 male lung cancer patients, 35 patients with other cancers, and 48 patients hospitalized for nonneoplastic diseases. Data for 29 modified nucleoside peaks were normalized to an internal standard and analyzed by discriminant analysis and stepwise discriminant analysis. A model based on peaks selected by a stepwise discriminant procedure correctly classified 79% of the cancer and 75% of the noncancer subjects. It also demonstrated 84% sensitivity and 79% specificity when comparing lung cancer to noncancer subjects, and 80% sensitivity and 55% specificity in comparing lung cancer to other cancers. The nucleoside peaks having the greatest influence on the models varied dependent on the subgroups compared, confirming the importance of quantifying a wide array of nucleosides. These data support and expand previous studies which reported the utility of measuring modified nucleoside levels in serum and show that precise measurement of an array of 29 modified nucleosides in serum by high-performance liquid chromatography with UV scanning with subsequent data modeling may provide a clinically useful approach to patient classification in diagnosis and subsequent therapeutic monitoring.

  7. Percutaneous penetration modifiers and formulation effects.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Diksha; Costache, Aurora; Michniak-Kohn, Bozena

    2010-02-15

    The enhancement/retardation of percutaneous permeation of diethyl-m-toluamide (DEET) in the presence of five percutaneous penetration modifiers (laurocapram, 3-dodecanoyloxazolidin-2-one (N-0915), S,S-dimethyl-N-(4-bromobenzoyl) iminosulfurane (DMBIS), S,S-dimethyl-N-(2-methoxycarbonylbenzenesulfonyl) iminosulfurane (DMMCBI) and tert-butyl 1-dodecyl-2-oxoazepan-3-yl-carbamate (TBDOC)) was investigated. These permeation modifiers were formulated in either water, propylene glycol (PG), ethanol or polyethylene glycol 400 (PEG 400). The permeation studies indicated that laurocapram enhanced DEET permeation in PG, but retarded in PEG 400. Likewise, N-0915 acted as a retardant with ethanol and PEG 400, but not with water. DMBIS decreased the permeation with ethanol as compared to permeation with water, PEG 400 or PG. Similarly, DMMCB acted as a retardant with ethanol and PEG 400, but not with water or PG. TBDOC formulations revealed its activity as a retardant with ethanol, but behaved as enhancer with water, PG and PEG 400. In addition, penetration modifier interactions with stratum corneum ceramide were investigated using chemical modeling. This investigation is significant since it confirms the role of pharmaceutical formulations and shows for the first time that an enhancer can become a retardant or vice versa depending upon the vehicle in which it is applied to the skin. Hence, we should be using the term "penetration modifiers" for all such compounds. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. pH-sensitive, polymer modified, plasma stable niosomes: promising carriers for anti-cancer drugs

    PubMed Central

    Tila, Dena; Yazdani-Arazi, Seyede Narjes; Ghanbarzadeh, Saeed; Arami, Sanam; Pourmoazzen, Zhaleh

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was the design and evaluation of a novel plasma stable, pH-sensitive niosomal formulation of Mitoxantrone by a modified ethanol injection method. Cholesterol hemisuccinate was added instead of cholesterol in order to produce pH-sensitivity property and using PEG-Poly (monomethyl itaconate)-CholC6 (PEG-PMMI-CholC6) copolymer introduced simultaneously pH-sensitivity and plasma stability properties in prepared niosomes. The pH-sensitivity and cytotoxicity of Mitoxantrone niosomes were evaluated in vitro in phosphate buffer with different pHs as well as using human ovarian cancer cell line (OVCAR-3), human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Results showed that both cholesterol derivatives bearing formulations had pH-sensitive property and were found to release their contents under mild acidic conditions rapidly. In addition, the PEG-PMMI-CholC6-based niosomes could reserve the pH-sensitivity after incubation in plasma. Both Mitoxantrone-loaded pH-sensitive niosomes showed higher cytotoxicity than the conventional niosomes on OVCAR-3 and MCF-7 cell lines. However, both pH-sensitive niosomes exhibited lower cytotoxic effect on HUVEC cell line. Plasma stable, pH-sensitive niosomes could improve the cytotoxic effect and reduce the side effects of anti-tumor drugs. PMID:26417350

  9. The AIB1 polyglutamine repeat does not modify breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Spurdle, Amanda B; Antoniou, Antonis C; Kelemen, Livia; Holland, Helene; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret R; Smith, Paula L; Greene, Mark H; Simard, Jacques; Plourde, Marie; Southey, Melissa C; Godwin, Andrew K; Beck, Jeanne; Miron, Alexander; Daly, Mary B; Santella, Regina M; Hopper, John L; John, Esther M; Andrulis, Irene L; Durocher, Francine; Struewing, Jeffery P; Easton, Douglas F; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2006-01-01

    This is by far the largest study of its kind to date, and further suggests that AIB1 does not play a substantial role in modifying the phenotype of BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. The AIB1 gene encodes the AIB1/SRC-3 steroid hormone receptor coactivator, and amplification of the gene and/or protein occurs in breast and ovarian tumors. A CAG/CAA repeat length polymorphism encodes a stretch of 17 to 29 glutamines in the HR-interacting carboxyl-terminal region of the protein which is somatically unstable in tumor tissues and cell lines. There is conflicting evidence regarding the role of this polymorphism as a modifier of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. To further evaluate the evidence for an association between AIB1 glutamine repeat length and breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, we have genotyped this polymorphism in 1,090 BRCA1 and 661 BRCA2 mutation carriers from Australia, Europe, and North America. There was no evidence for an increased risk associated with AIB1 glutamine repeat length. Given the large sample size, with more than adequate power to detect previously reported effects, we conclude that the AIB1 glutamine repeat does not substantially modify risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. (Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2006;15(1):76-9).

  10. Genetic variant in the telomerase gene modifies cancer risk in Lynch syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bellido, Fernando; Guinó, Elisabet; Jagmohan-Changur, Shantie; Seguí, Nuria; Pineda, Marta; Navarro, Matilde; Lázaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Vasen, Hans F A; Moreno, Victor; Capellá, Gabriel; Wijnen, Juul T; Valle, Laura

    2013-05-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) is an inherited cancer-predisposing disorder caused by germline mutations in the mismatch repair (MMR) genes. The high variability in individual cancer risk observed among LS patients suggests the existence of modifying factors. Identifying genetic modifiers of risk could help implement personalized surveillance programs based on predicted cancer risks. Here we evaluate the role of the telomerase (hTERT) rs2075786 SNP as a cancer-risk modifier in LS, studying 255 and 675 MMR gene mutation carriers from Spain and the Netherlands, respectively. The study of the Spanish sample revealed that the minor allele (A) confers increased cancer risk at an early age. The analysis of the Dutch sample confirmed the association of the A allele, especially in homozygosity, with increased cancer risk in mutation carriers under the age of 45 (relative riskLSca<45_AA=2.90; 95% confidence interval=1.02-8.26). Rs2075786 is associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) risk neither in the general population nor in non-Lynch CRC families. In silico studies predicted that the SNP causes the disruption of a transcription binding site for a retinoid receptor, retinoid X receptor alpha, probably causing early telomerase activation and therefore accelerated carcinogenesis. Notably, cancer-affected LS patients with the AA genotype have shorter telomeres than those with GG. In conclusion, MMR gene mutation carriers with hTERT rs2075786 are at high risk to develop a LS-related tumor at an early age. Cancer-preventive measures and stricter cancer surveillance at early ages might help prevent or early detect cancer in these mutation carriers.

  11. Genetic variant in the telomerase gene modifies cancer risk in Lynch syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bellido, Fernando; Guinó, Elisabet; Jagmohan-Changur, Shantie; Seguí, Nuria; Pineda, Marta; Navarro, Matilde; Lázaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Vasen, Hans FA; Moreno, Victor; Capellá, Gabriel; Wijnen, Juul T; Valle, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) is an inherited cancer-predisposing disorder caused by germline mutations in the mismatch repair (MMR) genes. The high variability in individual cancer risk observed among LS patients suggests the existence of modifying factors. Identifying genetic modifiers of risk could help implement personalized surveillance programs based on predicted cancer risks. Here we evaluate the role of the telomerase (hTERT) rs2075786 SNP as a cancer-risk modifier in LS, studying 255 and 675 MMR gene mutation carriers from Spain and the Netherlands, respectively. The study of the Spanish sample revealed that the minor allele (A) confers increased cancer risk at an early age. The analysis of the Dutch sample confirmed the association of the A allele, especially in homozygosity, with increased cancer risk in mutation carriers under the age of 45 (relative riskLSca<45_AA=2.90; 95% confidence interval=1.02–8.26). Rs2075786 is associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) risk neither in the general population nor in non-Lynch CRC families. In silico studies predicted that the SNP causes the disruption of a transcription binding site for a retinoid receptor, retinoid X receptor alpha, probably causing early telomerase activation and therefore accelerated carcinogenesis. Notably, cancer-affected LS patients with the AA genotype have shorter telomeres than those with GG. In conclusion, MMR gene mutation carriers with hTERT rs2075786 are at high risk to develop a LS-related tumor at an early age. Cancer-preventive measures and stricter cancer surveillance at early ages might help prevent or early detect cancer in these mutation carriers. PMID:22948024

  12. Cancers in Australia in 2010 attributable to modifiable factors: summary and conclusions.

    PubMed

    Whiteman, David C; Webb, Penelope M; Green, Adele C; Neale, Rachel E; Fritschi, Lin; Bain, Christopher J; Parkin, D Max; Wilson, Louise F; Olsen, Catherine M; Nagle, Christina M; Pandeya, Nirmala; Jordan, Susan J; Antonsson, Annika; Kendall, Bradley J; Hughes, Maria Celia B; Ibiebele, Torukiri I; Miura, Kyoko; Peters, Susan; Carey, Renee N

    2015-10-01

    To estimate the numbers and proportions of cancers occurring in Australia in 2010 attributable to modifiable causal factors. We estimated the population attributable fraction (PAF) of cancers associated with exposure to 13 causal factors using standard formulae incorporating exposure prevalence and relative risk data. We also calculated the potential impact of changing exposure to some factors. A total of 32% of all cancers diagnosed in Australia in 2010 (excluding keratinocyte cancers) were attributable to the 13 factors assessed (men 33%; women 31%). Leading factors were tobacco smoke (PAF all cancers: 13.4%), solar radiation (6.2%), inadequate diet (6.1%) and overweight/obesity (3.4%). Factors conferring highest PAFs differed by sex: highest PAFs for men were tobacco smoke (15.8%), solar radiation (7.1%) and alcohol (3.0%); while highest PAFs for women were tobacco smoke (10.1%), solar radiation (5.0%) and overweight/obesity (4.5%). Sites with the highest counts of potentially preventable cancers were lung (8,569), colorectal (7,404), melanoma of the skin (7,220) and breast (3,233). At least one in three cancers in Australia is attributable to exposure to known modifiable factors. Up to 37,000 cancers could be prevented in Australia each year if the population avoided exposure to 13 common factors known or strongly suspected to cause cancer. © 2015 The Authors.

  13. Cancers in Australia in 2010 attributable to modifiable factors: summary and conclusions

    PubMed Central

    Whiteman, David C; Webb, Penelope M; Green, Adele C; Neale, Rachel E; Fritschi, Lin; Bain, Christopher J; Parkin, D Max; Wilson, Louise F; Olsen, Catherine M; Nagle, Christina M; Pandeya, Nirmala; Jordan, Susan J; Antonsson, Annika; Kendall, Bradley J; Hughes, Maria Celia B; Ibiebele, Torukiri I; Miura, Kyoko; Peters, Susan; Carey, Renee N

    2015-01-01

    Objective To estimate the numbers and proportions of cancers occurring in Australia in 2010 attributable to modifiable causal factors. Methods We estimated the population attributable fraction (PAF) of cancers associated with exposure to 13 causal factors using standard formulae incorporating exposure prevalence and relative risk data. We also calculated the potential impact of changing exposure to some factors. Results A total of 32% of all cancers diagnosed in Australia in 2010 (excluding keratinocyte cancers) were attributable to the 13 factors assessed (men 33%; women 31%). Leading factors were tobacco smoke (PAF all cancers: 13.4%), solar radiation (6.2%), inadequate diet (6.1%) and overweight/obesity (3.4%). Factors conferring highest PAFs differed by sex: highest PAFs for men were tobacco smoke (15.8%), solar radiation (7.1%) and alcohol (3.0%); while highest PAFs for women were tobacco smoke (10.1%), solar radiation (5.0%) and overweight/obesity (4.5%). Sites with the highest counts of potentially preventable cancers were lung (8,569), colorectal (7,404), melanoma of the skin (7,220) and breast (3,233). Conclusions At least one in three cancers in Australia is attributable to exposure to known modifiable factors. Implications Up to 37,000 cancers could be prevented in Australia each year if the population avoided exposure to 13 common factors known or strongly suspected to cause cancer. PMID:26437735

  14. Magnesium in drinking water modifies the association between nitrate ingestion and risk of death from esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yen-Hsiung; Chen, Pei-Shih; Chiu, Hui-Fen; Yang, Chun-Yuh

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore whether magnesium (Mg) levels in drinking water modified the effects of nitrate on esophageal cancer risk occurrence. A matched cancer case-control study was used to investigate the relationship between the risk of death from esophageal cancer and exposure to nitrate in drinking water in Taiwan. All esophageal cancer deaths of Taiwan residents from 2006 through 2010 were obtained from the Bureau of Vital Statistics of the Taiwan Provincial Department of Health. Controls were deaths from other causes and were pair-matched to cancer cases by gender, year of birth, and year of death. Information on the levels of nitrate-nitrogen (NO(3)-N) and Mg in drinking water were collected from Taiwan Water Supply Corporation (TWSC). The municipality of residence for cancer cases and controls was presumed to be the source of the subject's NO(3)-N and Mg exposure via drinking water. Evidence of an interaction was noted between drinking water NO(3)-N and Mg intake. This is the first study to report effect modification by Mg intake originating from drinking water on an association between NO(3)-N exposure and increased risk mortality attributed to esophageal cancer.

  15. Modified arabinoxylan rice bran (MGN-3/Biobran) enhances yeast-induced apoptosis in human breast cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ghoneum, Mamdooh; Gollapudi, Sastry

    2005-01-01

    We have recently reported that phagocytosis of killed Saccharomyces cerevisiae, baker's yeast, induced apoptosis in human breast cancer cell lines MCF-7, ZR-75-1 and HCC70. In this study we have evaluated the effect of treatment with MGN-3, a modified arabinoxylan from rice bran, on phagocytosis and yeast-induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells. Cancer cells were cultured with yeast at a ratio of 1:10 in the absence or presence of MGN-3, and the percentages of phagocytic and apoptotic cancer cells were examined by flow cytometry and by cytospin preparations. Cancer cells treated with MGN-3 exhibited increased percentages of attachment (200%) and uptake of yeast (313%) by MCF-7 cells at 0.5 hr, as compared with cells without MGN-3. In addition, treatment with MGN-3 resulted in a 2 fold increase in the percentage of apoptotic MCF-7 cells, 2.5 fold for ZR-75 cells and 1.8 fold for HCC70 cells. MGN-3 effect was dose-dependent and associated with increased activation of caspases 8 and 9 in MCF-7 cells, and caspases 8, 9 and 3 in HCC70 cells. This data demonstrates that MGN-3 accelerates phagocytosis-induced apoptosis of cancer cells, which may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of breast cancer.

  16. dbEM: A database of epigenetic modifiers curated from cancerous and normal genomes.

    PubMed

    Singh Nanda, Jagpreet; Kumar, Rahul; Raghava, Gajendra P S

    2016-01-18

    We have developed a database called dbEM (database of Epigenetic Modifiers) to maintain the genomic information of about 167 epigenetic modifiers/proteins, which are considered as potential cancer targets. In dbEM, modifiers are classified on functional basis and comprise of 48 histone methyl transferases, 33 chromatin remodelers and 31 histone demethylases. dbEM maintains the genomic information like mutations, copy number variation and gene expression in thousands of tumor samples, cancer cell lines and healthy samples. This information is obtained from public resources viz. COSMIC, CCLE and 1000-genome project. Gene essentiality data retrieved from COLT database further highlights the importance of various epigenetic proteins for cancer survival. We have also reported the sequence profiles, tertiary structures and post-translational modifications of these epigenetic proteins in cancer. It also contains information of 54 drug molecules against different epigenetic proteins. A wide range of tools have been integrated in dbEM e.g. Search, BLAST, Alignment and Profile based prediction. In our analysis, we found that epigenetic proteins DNMT3A, HDAC2, KDM6A, and TET2 are highly mutated in variety of cancers. We are confident that dbEM will be very useful in cancer research particularly in the field of epigenetic proteins based cancer therapeutics. This database is available for public at URL: http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/dbem.

  17. dbEM: A database of epigenetic modifiers curated from cancerous and normal genomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh Nanda, Jagpreet; Kumar, Rahul; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a database called dbEM (database of Epigenetic Modifiers) to maintain the genomic information of about 167 epigenetic modifiers/proteins, which are considered as potential cancer targets. In dbEM, modifiers are classified on functional basis and comprise of 48 histone methyl transferases, 33 chromatin remodelers and 31 histone demethylases. dbEM maintains the genomic information like mutations, copy number variation and gene expression in thousands of tumor samples, cancer cell lines and healthy samples. This information is obtained from public resources viz. COSMIC, CCLE and 1000-genome project. Gene essentiality data retrieved from COLT database further highlights the importance of various epigenetic proteins for cancer survival. We have also reported the sequence profiles, tertiary structures and post-translational modifications of these epigenetic proteins in cancer. It also contains information of 54 drug molecules against different epigenetic proteins. A wide range of tools have been integrated in dbEM e.g. Search, BLAST, Alignment and Profile based prediction. In our analysis, we found that epigenetic proteins DNMT3A, HDAC2, KDM6A, and TET2 are highly mutated in variety of cancers. We are confident that dbEM will be very useful in cancer research particularly in the field of epigenetic proteins based cancer therapeutics. This database is available for public at URL: http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/dbem.

  18. Recent developments in the ability to predict and modify breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Prado, Arturo; Andrades, Patricio; Parada, Francisco

    2010-10-01

    The identification of women at higher risk for breast cancer is a matter of public health and anyone who participates in any treatment modality of this condition (this includes the plastic surgeon) should be aware of the tools and predictive models of breast cancer. Screening for breast cancer in the community, and probably during the daily plastic surgery consultation, until recently, was limited to decisions about when to initiate a mammography study. New developments that predict and modify breast cancer risk must be clearly understood by our specialty through identification of women at higher risk for breast cancer and be familiar with the current issues related to screening and risk-reduction measures. In this review, we discuss current knowledge regarding the recent data of breast cancer risk, screening strategies for high-risk women and medical and surgical approaches to reduce breast cancer risk. Patients with breast cancer belong to one of three groups: a. Sporadic breast cancer (75%)--patients without family history or those who have a breast biopsy with proliferative changes. b. Genetic mutation breast cancer (5%)--women who have a genetic predisposition, and most of these are attributable to mutations in the breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) and breast cancer susceptibility gene 2 (BRCA2). c. Cluster family breast cancer (20%)--seen in women with a relevant history of breast cancer in the family and breast biopsy with proliferative breast changes with no association with mutations.Those at high risk for breast cancer should investigate the family history with genetic testing consideration, clinical history, including prior breast biopsies and evaluation of mammographic density. Tools for breast cancer risk assessment include the Gail and Claus model, genetic screening,BRCAPRO and others that are evaluated in this review.

  19. Quercetin-Based Modified Porous Silicon Nanoparticles for Enhanced Inhibition of Doxorubicin-Resistant Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zehua; Balasubramanian, Vimalkumar; Bhat, Chinmay; Vahermo, Mikko; Mäkilä, Ermei; Kemell, Marianna; Fontana, Flavia; Janoniene, Agne; Petrikaite, Vilma; Salonen, Jarno; Yli-Kauhaluoma, Jari; Hirvonen, Jouni; Zhang, Hongbo; Santos, Hélder A

    2017-02-01

    One of the most challenging obstacles in nanoparticle's surface modification is to achieve the concept that one ligand can accomplish multiple purposes. Upon such consideration, 3-aminopropoxy-linked quercetin (AmQu), a derivative of a natural flavonoid inspired by the structure of dopamine, is designed and subsequently used to modify the surface of thermally hydrocarbonized porous silicon (PSi) nanoparticles. This nanosystem inherits several advanced properties in a single carrier, including promoted anticancer efficiency, multiple drug resistance (MDR) reversing, stimuli-responsive drug release, drug release monitoring, and enhanced particle-cell interactions. The anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) is efficiently loaded into this nanosystem and released in a pH-dependent manner. AmQu also effectively quenches the fluorescence of the loaded DOX, thereby allowing the use of the nanosystem for monitoring the intracellular drug release. Furthermore, a synergistic effect with the presence of AmQu is observed in both normal MCF-7 and DOX-resistant MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Due to the similar structure as dopamine, AmQu may facilitate both the interaction and internalization of PSi into the cells. Overall, this PSi-based platform exhibits remarkable superiority in both multifunctionality and anticancer efficiency, making this nanovector a promising system for anti-MDR cancer treatment.

  20. Genetically modified T cells in cancer therapy: opportunities and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Sharpe, Michaela; Mount, Natalie

    2015-01-01

    Tumours use many strategies to evade the host immune response, including downregulation or weak immunogenicity of target antigens and creation of an immune-suppressive tumour environment. T cells play a key role in cell-mediated immunity and, recently, strategies to genetically modify T cells either through altering the specificity of the T cell receptor (TCR) or through introducing antibody-like recognition in chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) have made substantial advances. The potential of these approaches has been demonstrated in particular by the successful use of genetically modified T cells to treat B cell haematological malignancies in clinical trials. This clinical success is reflected in the growing number of strategic partnerships in this area that have attracted a high level of investment and involve large pharmaceutical organisations. Although our understanding of the factors that influence the safety and efficacy of these therapies has increased, challenges for bringing genetically modified T-cell immunotherapy to many patients with different tumour types remain. These challenges range from the selection of antigen targets and dealing with regulatory and safety issues to successfully navigating the routes to commercial development. However, the encouraging clinical data, the progress in the scientific understanding of tumour immunology and the improvements in the manufacture of cell products are all advancing the clinical translation of these important cellular immunotherapies. PMID:26035842

  1. Genetically modified T cells in cancer therapy: opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Michaela; Mount, Natalie

    2015-04-01

    Tumours use many strategies to evade the host immune response, including downregulation or weak immunogenicity of target antigens and creation of an immune-suppressive tumour environment. T cells play a key role in cell-mediated immunity and, recently, strategies to genetically modify T cells either through altering the specificity of the T cell receptor (TCR) or through introducing antibody-like recognition in chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) have made substantial advances. The potential of these approaches has been demonstrated in particular by the successful use of genetically modified T cells to treat B cell haematological malignancies in clinical trials. This clinical success is reflected in the growing number of strategic partnerships in this area that have attracted a high level of investment and involve large pharmaceutical organisations. Although our understanding of the factors that influence the safety and efficacy of these therapies has increased, challenges for bringing genetically modified T-cell immunotherapy to many patients with different tumour types remain. These challenges range from the selection of antigen targets and dealing with regulatory and safety issues to successfully navigating the routes to commercial development. However, the encouraging clinical data, the progress in the scientific understanding of tumour immunology and the improvements in the manufacture of cell products are all advancing the clinical translation of these important cellular immunotherapies.

  2. Obesity and menopause modify the epigenomic profile of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Crujeiras, Ana B; Diaz-Lagares, Angel; Stefansson, Olafur A; Macias-Gonzalez, Manuel; Sandoval, Juan; Cueva, Juan; Lopez-Lopez, Rafael; Moran, Sebastian; Jonasson, Jon G; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Olafsdottir, Elinborg; Tinahones, Francisco J; Carreira, Marcos C; Casanueva, Felipe F; Esteller, Manel

    2017-07-01

    Obesity is a high risk factor for breast cancer. This relationship could be marked by a specific methylome. The current work was aimed to explore the impact of obesity and menopausal status on variation in breast cancer methylomes. Data from Infinium 450K array-based methylomes of 64 breast tumors were coupled with information on BMI and menopausal status. Additionally, DNA methylation results were validated in 18 non-tumor and 81 tumor breast samples. Breast tumors arising in either pre- or postmenopausal women stratified by BMI or menopausal status alone were not associated with a specific DNA methylation pattern. Intriguingly, the DNA methylation pattern identified in association with the high-risk group (postmenopausal women with high BMI (>25) and premenopausal women with normal or low BMI < 25) exclusively characterized by hypermethylation of 1287 CpG sites as compared with the low-risk group. These CpG sites included the promoter region of fourteen protein-coding genes of which CpG methylation over the ZNF577 promoter region represents the top scoring associated event. In an independent cohort, the ZNF577 promoter methylation remained statistically significant in association with the high-risk group. Additionally, the impact of ZNF577 promoter methylation on mRNA expression levels was demonstrated in breast cancer cell lines after treatment with a demethylating agent (5-azacytidine). In conclusion, the epigenome of breast tumors is affected by a complex interaction between BMI and menopausal status. The ZNF577 methylation quantification is clearly relevant for the development of novel biomarkers of precision therapy in breast cancer. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  3. Enhanced recognition of hydroxyl radical modified plasmid DNA by circulating cancer antibodies.

    PubMed

    Khan, F; Ali, A; Ali, R

    2005-06-01

    Reactive oxygen species have been implicated in various human diseases which are also responsible for the elimination of invading pathogens. In disease state and inflammatory responses, the excess of these radicals damage cellular macromolecules. DNA is susceptible to attacks by OH-induced damage. Oxidative DNA damage is an important factor in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. In the present study, purified plasmid Bluescript DNA was modified by hydroxyl radical. Modifications incurred in DNA were characterized by physico-chemical techniques. Sera from patients of cancer were studied for their binding to native and hydroxyl radical modified plasmid DNA. Direct binding ELISA and competition binding results indicated that autoantibodies in cancer showed higher recognition to ROS-plasmid DNA as compared to the native form. Retarded mobility of the immune complex formation between IgG isolated from cancer sera using native and ROS-plasmid DNA as antigens reiterated preferential recognition of modified plasmid DNA by cancer autoantibodies. Therefore, it can be concluded that circulating autoantibodies in cancer sera bind preferentially to ROS-plasmid DNA as compared to native polymer. The data presented in the present communication suggest a role of ROS in the etiology of cancer.

  4. Modifiable Risk Factors and Major Cardiac Events Among Adult Survivors of Childhood Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Gregory T.; Oeffinger, Kevin C.; Chen, Yan; Kawashima, Toana; Yasui, Yutaka; Leisenring, Wendy; Stovall, Marilyn; Chow, Eric J.; Sklar, Charles A.; Mulrooney, Daniel A.; Mertens, Ann C.; Border, William; Durand, Jean-Bernard; Robison, Leslie L.; Meacham, Lillian R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the relative contribution of modifiable cardiovascular risk factors on the development of major cardiac events in aging adult survivors of childhood cancer. Patients and Methods Among 10,724 5-year survivors (median age, 33.7 years) and 3,159 siblings in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study, the prevalence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, and obesity was determined, along with the incidence and severity of major cardiac events such as coronary artery disease, heart failure, valvular disease, and arrhythmia. On longitudinal follow-up, rate ratios (RRs) of subsequent cardiac events associated with cardiovascular risk factors and cardiotoxic therapy were assessed in multivariable Poisson regression models. Results Among survivors, the cumulative incidence of coronary artery disease, heart failure, valvular disease, and arrhythmia by 45 years of age was 5.3%, 4.8%, 1.5%, and 1.3%, respectively. Two or more cardiovascular risk factors were reported by 10.3% of survivors and 7.9% of siblings. The risk for each cardiac event increased with increasing number of cardiovascular risk factors (all Ptrend < .001). Hypertension significantly increased risk for coronary artery disease (RR, 6.1), heart failure (RR, 19.4), valvular disease (RR, 13.6), and arrhythmia (RR, 6.0; all P values < .01). The combined effect of chest-directed radiotherapy plus hypertension resulted in potentiation of risk for each of the major cardiac events beyond that anticipated on the basis of an additive expectation. Hypertension was independently associated with risk of cardiac death (RR, 5.6; 95% CI, 3.2 to 9.7). Conclusion Modifiable cardiovascular risk factors, particularly hypertension, potentiate therapy-associated risk for major cardiac events in this population and should be the focus of future interventional studies. PMID:24002505

  5. Polymorphisms in genes of the steroid receptor superfamily modify postmenopausal breast cancer risk associated with menopausal hormone therapy.

    PubMed

    2010-06-15

    Menopausal hormone therapy (HT) is associated with increased breast cancer risk among postmenopausal women. Nuclear receptors are involved in steroid hormone- and xenobiotic-mediated signal transduction playing a crucial role in regulating gene expression. Therefore, variations within these genes may influence HT-associated breast cancer risk. We investigated 3,149 postmenopausal breast cancer patients and 5,489 controls from 2 German population-based case-control studies. Thirty-three polymorphisms selected on the basis of known or putative functional relevance located in ESR1, ESR2, PGR, PXR and AR were genotyped. Conditional logistic regression was used to assess multiplicative statistical interaction between polymorphisms and duration of estrogen-progestagen therapy and of estrogen monotherapy with regard to breast cancer risk assuming log-additive and codominant modes of inheritance. We observed an increased risk for women carrying short AR_(CAG) alleles of <22 repeats associated with combined estrogen-progestagen therapy compared with those with long alleles (> or =22 repeats) (p(interaction) = 0.03). Additionally, risk associated with combination therapy use was significantly modified by 2 PXR polymorphisms with reduction of risk effects in carriers of the minor PXR_rs6785049_G and PXR_rs1054191_A alleles (p(interaction) = 0.04 and 0.05, respectively). Variants in both ESR1 and ESR2 modified risk associated with estrogen monotherapy use. Higher risk were observed in homozygotes for the major ESR1_rs910416_T allele (p(interaction) < 0.01) and in homozygotes for the minor ESR2_rs1271572_T, major ESR2_rs4986938_G and minor ESR2_rs928554_G alleles (p(interaction) = 0.02, 0.05, 0.02, respectively). Risk effect modification by ESR1_rs910416 and AR_(CAG)n polymorphisms remained significant after correction for multiple testing. We conclude that genetic variants in nuclear receptor genes may modify HT-associated postmenopausal breast cancer risk.

  6. Breast cancer risk and 6q22.33: combined results from Breast Cancer Association Consortium and Consortium of Investigators on Modifiers of BRCA1/2.

    PubMed

    Kirchhoff, Tomas; Gaudet, Mia M; Antoniou, Antonis C; McGuffog, Lesley; Humphreys, Manjeet K; Dunning, Alison M; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Flyger, Henrik; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Ahn, Sei-Hyun; Dork, Thilo; Schürmann, Peter; Karstens, Johann H; Hillemanns, Peter; Couch, Fergus J; Olson, Janet; Vachon, Celine; Wang, Xianshu; Cox, Angela; Brock, Ian; Elliott, Graeme; Reed, Malcolm W R; Burwinkel, Barbara; Meindl, Alfons; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Broeks, Annegien; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Van 't Veer, Laura J; Braaf, Linde M; Johnson, Nichola; Fletcher, Olivia; Gibson, Lorna; Peto, Julian; Turnbull, Clare; Seal, Sheila; Renwick, Anthony; Rahman, Nazneen; Wu, Pei-Ei; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Shen, Chen-Yang; Southey, Melissa C; Hopper, John L; Hammet, Fleur; Van Dorpe, Thijs; Dieudonne, Anne-Sophie; Hatse, Sigrid; Lambrechts, Diether; Andrulis, Irene L; Bogdanova, Natalia; Antonenkova, Natalia; Rogov, Juri I; Prokofieva, Daria; Bermisheva, Marina; Khusnutdinova, Elza; van Asperen, Christi J; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Hooning, Maartje J; Devilee, Peter; Margolin, Sara; Lindblom, Annika; Milne, Roger L; Arias, José Ignacio; Zamora, M Pilar; Benítez, Javier; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Giles, Graham G; Spurdle, Amanda B; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Holland, Helene; Healey, Sue; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kauppinen, Jaana; Kataja, Vesa; Agnarsson, Bjarni A; Caligo, Maria A; Godwin, Andrew K; Nevanlinna, Heli; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Fredericksen, Zachary; Lindor, Noralane; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Loman, Niklas; Karlsson, Per; Stenmark Askmalm, Marie; Melin, Beatrice; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Verheus, Martijn; Rookus, Matti A; Seynaeve, Caroline; Oldenburg, Rogier A; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J; Ausems, Margreet G E M; Aalfs, Cora M; Gille, Hans J P; Wijnen, Juul T; Gómez García, Encarna B; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare T; Frost, Debra; Luccarini, Craig; Pichert, Gabriella; Davidson, Rosemarie; Chu, Carol; Eccles, Diana; Ong, Kai-Ren; Cook, Jackie; Douglas, Fiona; Hodgson, Shirley; Evans, D Gareth; Eeles, Rosalind; Gold, Bert; Pharoah, Paul D P; Offit, Kenneth; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F

    2012-01-01

    Recently, a locus on chromosome 6q22.33 (rs2180341) was reported to be associated with increased breast cancer risk in the Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) population, and this association was also observed in populations of non-AJ European ancestry. In the present study, we performed a large replication analysis of rs2180341 using data from 31,428 invasive breast cancer cases and 34,700 controls collected from 25 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). In addition, we evaluated whether rs2180341 modifies breast cancer risk in 3,361 BRCA1 and 2,020 BRCA2 carriers from 11 centers in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). Based on the BCAC data from women of European ancestry, we found evidence for a weak association with breast cancer risk for rs2180341 (per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.03, 95% CI 1.00-1.06, p = 0.023). There was evidence for heterogeneity in the ORs among studies (I(2) = 49.3%; p = <0.004). In CIMBA, we observed an inverse association with the minor allele of rs2180341 and breast cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers (per-allele OR = 0.89, 95%CI 0.80-1.00, p = 0.048), indicating a potential protective effect of this allele. These data suggest that that 6q22.33 confers a weak effect on breast cancer risk.

  7. Breast Cancer Risk and 6q22.33: Combined Results from Breast Cancer Association Consortium and Consortium of Investigators on Modifiers of BRCA1/2

    PubMed Central

    Antoniou, Antonis C.; McGuffog, Lesley; Humphreys, Manjeet K.; Dunning, Alison M.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Flyger, Henrik; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Ahn, Sei-Hyun; Dork, Thilo; Schürmann, Peter; Karstens, Johann H.; Hillemanns, Peter; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet; Vachon, Celine; Wang, Xianshu; Cox, Angela; Brock, Ian; Elliott, Graeme; Reed, Malcolm W.R.; Burwinkel, Barbara; Meindl, Alfons; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Broeks, Annegien; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Van ‘t Veer, Laura J.; Braaf, Linde M.; Johnson, Nichola; Fletcher, Olivia; Gibson, Lorna; Peto, Julian; Turnbull, Clare; Seal, Sheila; Renwick, Anthony; Rahman, Nazneen; Wu, Pei-Ei; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Shen, Chen-Yang; Southey, Melissa C.; Hopper, John L.; Hammet, Fleur; Van Dorpe, Thijs; Dieudonne, Anne-Sophie; Hatse, Sigrid; Lambrechts, Diether; Andrulis, Irene L.; Bogdanova, Natalia; Antonenkova, Natalia; Rogov, Juri I.; Prokofieva, Daria; Bermisheva, Marina; Khusnutdinova, Elza; van Asperen, Christi J.; Tollenaar, Robert A.E.M.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Devilee, Peter; Margolin, Sara; Lindblom, Annika; Milne, Roger L.; Arias, José Ignacio; Zamora, M. Pilar; Benítez, Javier; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Giles, Graham G.; kConFab; Group, AOCS Study; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Holland, Helene; Healey, Sue; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kauppinen, Jaana; Kataja, Vesa; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Caligo, Maria A.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Fredericksen, Zachary; Lindor, Noralane; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; SWE-BRCA; Loman, Niklas; Karlsson, Per; Askmalm, Marie Stenmark; Melin, Beatrice; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; HEBON; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Verheus, Martijn; Rookus, Matti A.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Oldenburg, Rogier A.; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J.; Ausems, Margreet G.E.M.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Gille, Hans J.P.; Wijnen, Juul T.; Gómez García, Encarna B.; EMBRACE; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare T.; Frost, Debra; Luccarini, Craig; Pichert, Gabriella; Davidson, Rosemarie; Chu, Carol; Eccles, Diana; Ong, Kai-Ren; Cook, Jackie; Douglas, Fiona; Hodgson, Shirley; Evans, D. Gareth; Eeles, Rosalind; Gold, Bert; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Offit, Kenneth; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, a locus on chromosome 6q22.33 (rs2180341) was reported to be associated with increased breast cancer risk in the Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) population, and this association was also observed in populations of non-AJ European ancestry. In the present study, we performed a large replication analysis of rs2180341 using data from 31,428 invasive breast cancer cases and 34,700 controls collected from 25 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). In addition, we evaluated whether rs2180341 modifies breast cancer risk in 3,361 BRCA1 and 2,020 BRCA2 carriers from 11 centers in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). Based on the BCAC data from women of European ancestry, we found evidence for a weak association with breast cancer risk for rs2180341 (per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.03, 95% CI 1.00–1.06, p = 0.023). There was evidence for heterogeneity in the ORs among studies (I2 = 49.3%; p = <0.004). In CIMBA, we observed an inverse association with the minor allele of rs2180341 and breast cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers (per-allele OR = 0.89, 95%CI 0.80–1.00, p = 0.048), indicating a potential protective effect of this allele. These data suggest that that 6q22.33 confers a weak effect on breast cancer risk. PMID:22768030

  8. Passive smoking and cooking oil fumes (COF) may modify the association between tea consumption and oral cancer in Chinese women.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fa; He, Baochang; Hu, Zhijian; Huang, Jiangfeng; Liu, Fangping; Yan, Lingjun; Lin, Zheng; Zheng, Xiaoyan; Lin, Lisong; Zhang, Zuofeng; Cai, Lin

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the confounding effects of passive smoking and COF exposure on association between tea and oral cancer in Chinese women. A case-control study including 207 female oral cancer cases and 480 age-matched controls was performed in Fujian, China. Data were collected with a structured questionnaire by face-to-face interviews. The effects of tea consumption on oral cancer were, respectively, adjusted for Model-1 and Model-2 using logistic regression analysis. Model-1 did not adjusted for passive smoking and COF; Model-2 included the variables in Model-1, passive smoking and COF. Tea consumption was associated with a decreased risk of oral cancer in females: The OR was 0.498 (95 % CI 0.312-0.795) for Model-1 and 0.565 (95 % CI 0.352-0.907) for Model-2. The ORs for all the categories of tea consumption estimated by Model-2 were slightly higher than Model-1. When stratified by passive smoking, the statistically significant association between tea drinking and oral cancer was only emerged in non-passive smoking women. Stratification by COF found tea drinking was still associated with a decreased risk of oral cancer for women who have light-COF exposure, but an increased risk for those who subjected to heavy exposure. A negative, multiplicative interaction was found between tea consumption and COF exposure for oral cancer, but not found between tea consumption and passive smoking. Tea consumption reduces the risk of oral cancer in Chinese women, but this effect is modified by the carcinogenic effects of passive smoking and COF exposure.

  9. Inhibitory impacts of chemically modified tetracycline-3 and underlying mechanism in human cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lin; Xu, Jiaying; Yang, Yang; Chong, Yu; Liu, Chang; Jiao, Yang; Fan, Saijun

    2013-09-01

    Chemically modified tetracyclines (CMTs) have been rationally designed from tetracyclines. The CMTs that show the antimicrobial properties are eliminated, whereas matrix metalloproteinase inhibitory properties are retained. Interestingly, CMT-3 (COL-3, by eliminating the dimethylamino, methyl, and hydroxyl functionalities on the basic tetracycline structure), one of the CMTs, has shown strong anticancer activity. In this study, we found that CMT-3 showed dose-dependent and time-dependent cytotoxicity in HeLa and Siha cells, two human cervical cancer cell lines. HeLa cells were more sensitive to CMT-3 compared with Siha cells. The antiproliferation potential of CMT-3 was associated with the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway, increasing reactive oxygen species level, and proapoptosis protein (e.g. caspase-3) expression, but decreasing antiapoptosis protein expression (e.g. Bcl-2). N-acetylcysteine (a reactive oxygen species inhibitor) and Z-LEHD-FMK significantly reduced or blocked the apoptosis event resulting from cytotoxic effect of CMT-3. CMT-3 also induced G0/G1 phase arrest with the reduction of cell cycle regulatory protein cyclin E and the translocation of NF-κB from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Our findings provide the important foundation for further investigation of the underlying mechanism for the anticancer activity of CMT-3 and the potential application of CMT-3 as a new therapeutic candidate for clinical cervical cancer therapy.

  10. Population attributable risks for modifiable lifestyle factors and breast cancer in New Zealand women.

    PubMed

    Hayes, J; Richardson, A; Frampton, C

    2013-11-01

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed invasive cancer in New Zealand women and modifiable lifestyle risk factors may contribute to this. To estimate population attributable risks for modifiable lifestyle factors and breast cancer in New Zealand. Estimates of the magnitude of the impact of modifiable lifestyle risk factors for breast cancer (relative risks and odds ratios obtained from published epidemiological studies) and the prevalence of exposure in New Zealand were used to calculate the population attributable risk percent (PAR%) for each risk factor. The PAR% show the relative importance of these considered risk factors and give an indication of the potential impact of reducing the prevalence of these lifestyle risk factors on the incidence of breast cancer in New Zealand. Six modifiable lifestyle factors were identified for breast cancer. These were obesity, lack of physical activity, high alcohol intake, oral contraceptive use, hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and delayed first birth. The PAR% for these risk factors ranged from 1% for delayed first birth to 10% for obesity (16% for Maori women and 17% for Pacific women). The most important primary preventive strategies to reduce the risk of breast cancer in New Zealand are lifestyle changes to reduce obesity, promoting regular physical activity (which may in turn reduce the prevalence of obesity), reducing HRT use and avoiding high alcohol intake. Strategies that encourage regular physical activity and reduce obesity could also have other benefits, such as reduced risks of cardiovascular disease and diabetes. © 2013 The Authors; Internal Medicine Journal © 2013 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  11. Polyaniline modified flexible conducting paper for cancer detection

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Saurabh; Sen, Anindita; Kumar, Suveen; Augustine, Shine; Malhotra, Bansi D.; Yadav, Birendra K.; Mishra, Sandeep

    2016-05-16

    We report results of studies relating to the fabrication of a flexible, disposable, and label free biosensing platform for detection of the cancer biomarker (carcinoembryonic antigen, CEA). Polyaniline (PANI) has been electrochemically deposited over gold sputtered paper (Au@paper) for covalent immobilization of monoclonal carcinoembryonic antibodies (anti-CEA). The bovine serum albumin (BSA) has been used for blocking nonspecific binding sites at the anti-CEA conjugated PANI/Au@Paper. The PANI/Au@Paper, anti-CEA/PANI/Au@Paper, and BSA/anti-CEA/PANI/Au@Paper platforms have been characterized using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transmission infrared spectroscopy, chronoamperometry, and electrochemical impedance techniques. The results of the electrochemical response studies indicate that this BSA/anti-CEA/PANI/Au@paper electrode has sensitivity of 13.9 μA ng{sup −1} ml cm{sup 2}, shelf life of 22 days, and can be used to estimate CEA in the range of 2–20 ng ml{sup −1}. This paper sensor has been validated by detection of CEA in serum samples of cancer patients via immunoassay technique.

  12. Polyaniline modified flexible conducting paper for cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Saurabh; Sen, Anindita; Kumar, Suveen; Augustine, Shine; Yadav, Birendra K.; Mishra, Sandeep; Malhotra, Bansi D.

    2016-05-01

    We report results of studies relating to the fabrication of a flexible, disposable, and label free biosensing platform for detection of the cancer biomarker (carcinoembryonic antigen, CEA). Polyaniline (PANI) has been electrochemically deposited over gold sputtered paper (Au@paper) for covalent immobilization of monoclonal carcinoembryonic antibodies (anti-CEA). The bovine serum albumin (BSA) has been used for blocking nonspecific binding sites at the anti-CEA conjugated PANI/Au@Paper. The PANI/Au@Paper, anti-CEA/PANI/Au@Paper, and BSA/anti-CEA/PANI/Au@Paper platforms have been characterized using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transmission infrared spectroscopy, chronoamperometry, and electrochemical impedance techniques. The results of the electrochemical response studies indicate that this BSA/anti-CEA/PANI/Au@paper electrode has sensitivity of 13.9 μA ng-1 ml cm2, shelf life of 22 days, and can be used to estimate CEA in the range of 2-20 ng ml-1. This paper sensor has been validated by detection of CEA in serum samples of cancer patients via immunoassay technique.

  13. Effects of doxorubicin-encapsulating AG73 peptide-modified liposomes on tumor selectivity and cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Negishi, Yoichi; Hamano, Nobuhito; Omata, Daiki; Fujisawa, Azusa; Manandhar, Maya; Nomizu, Motoyoshi; Aramaki, Yukihiko

    2011-01-01

    Doxorubicin-encapsulating liposomal formulations, known as Doxil, have been used for the treatment of Kaposi’s sarcoma and ovarian cancer. However, there is still a need for a drug delivery system for doxorubicin that limits the treatment’s side effects, namely, mucositis and hand-and-foot syndrome. The AG73 peptide derived from the laminin α1 chain is a ligand for syndecans, and syndecan-2 is highly expressed in some cancer cells. In this study, to develop a safer and more selective liposomal formulation, we prepared doxorubicin-encapsulating AG73 peptide-modified liposomes (AG73–Dox). First, we assessed the selectivity of AG73–Dox for cancer cells, including syndecan-2 over-expressing cells, using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. AG73–Dox showed selective cellular uptake on cancer cells and enhancement of the intracellular uptake. Next, we examined the cytotoxicity of AG73–Dox using a WST assay. AG73–Dox exhibited a higher cytotoxicity against cancer cells than other control liposomes. In addition, we showed that the antitumor efficacy of AG73–Dox in vivo was better than that of free Dox. When we examined the biodistribution of liposomes, AG73 peptide-modified liposomes (AG73-L) tended to bind to intratumoral vessels and extravasated in the tumor tissue. Thus, further optimization of AG73-L toward tumor targeting may lead to a development of a useful tool for cancer therapy. PMID:25755984

  14. Potential adverse health effects of genetically modified crops.

    PubMed

    Bakshi, Anita

    2003-01-01

    Genetically modified crops have the potential to eliminate hunger and starvation in millions of people, especially in developing countries because the genetic modification can produce large amounts of foods that are more nutritious. Large quantities are produced because genetically modified crops are more resistant to pests and drought. They also contain greater amounts of nutrients, such as proteins and vitamins. However, there are concerns about the safety of genetically modified crops. The concerns are that they may contain allergenic substances due to introduction of new genes into crops. Another concern is that genetic engineering often involves the use of antibiotic-resistance genes as "selectable markers" and this could lead to production of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains that are resistant to available antibiotics. This would create a serious public health problem. The genetically modified crops might contain other toxic substances (such as enhanced amounts of heavy metals) and the crops might not be "substantially equivalent" in genome, proteome, and metabolome compared with unmodified crops. Another concern is that genetically modified crops may be less nutritious; for example, they might contain lower amounts of phytoestrogens, which protect against heart disease and cancer. The review of available literature indicates that the genetically modified crops available in the market that are intended for human consumption are generally safe; their consumption is not associated with serious health problems. However, because of potential for exposure of a large segment of human population to genetically modified foods, more research is needed to ensure that the genetically modified foods are safe for human consumption.

  15. Modified sugar beet pectin induces apoptosis of colon cancer cells via interaction with the neutral sugar side-chains

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pectins extracted from a variety of sources and modified with heat and/or pH have previously been shown to exhibit activity towards several cancer cell lines. However, the structural basis for the anti-cancer activity of modified pectin requires clarification. Sugar beet and citrus pectin extracts h...

  16. PTD-Modified ATTEMPTS for Enhanced Toxin-based Cancer Therapy: An In Vivo Proof-of-Concept Study

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Meong Cheol; Zhang, Jian; Min, Kyoung Ah; He, Huining; David, Allan E.; Huang, Yongzhuo; Yang, Victor C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the feasibility of applying PTD-modified ATTEMPTS (Antibody Targeted Triggered Electrically Modified Prodrug-Type Strategy) for enhanced toxin therapy for the treatment of cancer. Methods A heparin-functionalized murine anti-CEA monoclonal antibody (mAb), T84.66-heparin (T84.66-Hep), was chemically synthesized and characterized for specific binding to CEA overexpressed cells. The T84.66-Hep was then applied to the PTD-modified ATTEMPTS approach and the crucial features of the drug delivery system (DDS), ‘antibody targeting’ and ‘heparin/protamine-based prodrug’, were evaluated in vitro to examine whether it could selective delivery a PTD-modified toxin, recombinant TAT-gelonin chimera (TAT-Gel), to CEA high expression cancer cells (LS174T). Furthermore, the feasibility of the drug delivery system (DDS) was assessed in vivo by biodistribution and efficacy studies using LS174T s.c. xenograft tumor bearing mice. Results T84.66-Hep displayed specific binding, but limited internalization (35% after 48 h incubation) to CEA high expression LS174T cells over low expression HCT116 cells. When mixed together with TAT-Gel, the T84.66-Hep formed a strong yet reversible complex. This complex formation provided an effective means of active tumor targeting of TAT-Gel, by 1) directing the TAT-Gel to CEA overexpressed tumor cells and 2) preventing nonspecific cell transduction to non-targeted normal cells. The cell transduction of TAT-Gel could, however, be efficiently reversed by addition of protamine. Feasibility of in vivo tumor targeting and “protamine-induced release” of TAT-Gel from the T84.66-Hep counterpart was confirmed by biodistribution and preliminary efficacy studies. Conclusions This study successfully demonstrated in vitro and in vivo the applicability of PTD-modified ATTEMPTS for toxin-based cancer therapy. PMID:25701313

  17. Preferential recognition of auto-antibodies against 4-hydroxynonenal modified DNA in the cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Faisal, Mohammad; Shahab, Uzma; Alatar, Abdulrahman A; Ahmad, Saheem

    2017-01-20

    The structural perturbations in DNA molecule may be caused by a break in a strand, a missing base from the backbone, or a chemically changed base. These alterations in DNA that occurs naturally can result from metabolic or hydrolytic processes. DNA damage plays a major role in the mutagenesis, carcinogenesis, aging and various other patho-physiological conditions. DNA damage can be induced through hydrolysis, exposure to reactive oxygen species (ROS) and other reactive carbonyl metabolites including 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE). 4-HNE is an important lipid peroxidation product which has been implicated in the mutagenesis and carcinogenesis processes. The present study examines to probe the presence of auto-antibodies against 4-hydroxynonenal damaged DNA (HNE-DNA) in various cancer subjects. In this study, the purified calf thymus DNA was damaged by the action of 4-HNE. The DNA was incubated with 4-HNE for 24 h at 37°C temperature. The binding characteristics of cancer auto-antibodies were assessed by direct binding and competitive inhibition ELISA. DNA modifications produced hyperchromicity in UV spectrum and decreased fluorescence intensity. Cancer sera exhibited enhanced binding with the 4-HNE modified calf thymus DNA as compared to its native conformer. The 4-HNE modified DNA presents unique epitopes which may be one of the factors for the auto-antibody induction in cancer patients. The HNE modified DNA presents unique epitopes which may be one of the factors for the autoantibody induction in cancer patients. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. The use of genetically modified mice in cancer risk assessment: Challenges and limitations*

    PubMed Central

    Eastmond, David A.; Vulimiri, Suryanarayana V.; French, John E.; Sonawane, Babasaheb

    2015-01-01

    The use of genetically modified (GM) mice to assess carcinogenicity is playing an increasingly important role in the safety evaluation of chemicals. While progress has been made in developing and evaluating mouse models such as the Trp53+/−, Tg.AC and the rasH2, the suitability of these models as replacements for the conventional rodent cancer bioassay and for assessing human health risks remains uncertain. The objective of this research was to evaluate the use of accelerated cancer bioassays with GM mice for assessing the potential health risks associated with exposure to carcinogenic agents. We compared the published results from the GM bioassays to those obtained in the National Toxicology Program’s conventional chronic mouse bioassay for their potential use in risk assessment. Our analysis indicates that the GM models are less efficient in detecting carcinogenic agents but more consistent in identifying non-carcinogenic agents. We identified several issues of concern related to the design of the accelerated bioassays (e.g., sample size, study duration, genetic stability and reproducibility) as well as pathway-dependency of effects, and different carcinogenic mechanisms operable in GM and non-GM mice. The use of the GM models for dose-response assessment is particularly problematic as these models are, at times, much more or less sensitive than the conventional rodent cancer bioassays. Thus, the existing GM mouse models may be useful for hazard identification, but will be of limited use for dose-response assessment. Hence, caution should be exercised when using GM mouse models to assess the carcinogenic risks of chemicals. PMID:23985072

  19. Breast Cancer and Modifiable Lifestyle Factors in Argentinean Women: Addressing Missing Data in a Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Coquet, Julia Becaria; Tumas, Natalia; Osella, Alberto Ruben; Tanzi, Matteo; Franco, Isabella; Diaz, Maria Del Pilar

    2016-01-01

    A number of studies have evidenced the effect of modifiable lifestyle factors such as diet, breastfeeding and nutritional status on breast cancer risk. However, none have addressed the missing data problem in nutritional epidemiologic research in South America. Missing data is a frequent problem in breast cancer studies and epidemiological settings in general. Estimates of effect obtained from these studies may be biased, if no appropriate method for handling missing data is applied. We performed Multiple Imputation for missing values on covariates in a breast cancer case-control study of Córdoba (Argentina) to optimize risk estimates. Data was obtained from a breast cancer case control study from 2008 to 2015 (318 cases, 526 controls). Complete case analysis and multiple imputation using chained equations were the methods applied to estimate the effects of a Traditional dietary pattern and other recognized factors associated with breast cancer. Physical activity and socioeconomic status were imputed. Logistic regression models were performed. When complete case analysis was performed only 31% of women were considered. Although a positive association of Traditional dietary pattern and breast cancer was observed from both approaches (complete case analysis OR=1.3, 95%CI=1.0-1.7; multiple imputation OR=1.4, 95%CI=1.2-1.7), effects of other covariates, like BMI and breastfeeding, were only identified when multiple imputation was considered. A Traditional dietary pattern, BMI and breastfeeding are associated with the occurrence of breast cancer in this Argentinean population when multiple imputation is appropriately performed. Multiple Imputation is suggested in Latin America’s epidemiologic studies to optimize effect estimates in the future. PMID:27892664

  20. Modified approach for extraperitoneal laparoscopic staging for locally advanced cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Gil-Moreno, A; Maffuz, A; Díaz-Feijoo, B; Puig, O; Martínez-Palones, J M; Pérez, A; García, A; Xercavins, J

    2007-12-01

    Describe a modified approach to the technique for staging laparoscopic extraperitoneal aortic and common iliac lymph node dissection for locally advanced cervical cancer.Retrospective, nonrandomized clinical study. (Canadian Task Force classification II-2), setting in an acute-care, teaching hospital. Thirty-six patients with locally advanced cervical cancer underwent laparoscopic surgical staging via extraperitoneal approach with the conventional or the modified technique from August 2001 through September 2004. Clinical outcomes in 23 patients who were operated on with the conventional technique using index finger for first trocar entrance; 12 patients with the modified technique using direct trocar entrance, were compared. One patient was excluded due to peritoneal carcinomatosis. Technique, baseline characteristics, histopathologic variables and surgical outcome were measured. There were no significant differences in patients basal characteristics on comparative analysis between conventional and modified technique. With our proposed modified technique, we obtained a reduced surgical procedure duration and blood loss. The proposed modified surgical technique offers some advantages, is an easier approach because the parietal pelvic peritoneum is elastic and this helps to avoid its disruption at time of trocar insertion, size of incision is shorter, we achieved no CO2 leak through the trocar orifice, and wound suture is fast and simple.

  1. Sex Hormone Binding Globulin Modifies Testosterone Action and Metabolism in Prostate Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Huika; Pham, Thy; McWhinney, Brett C; Ungerer, Jacobus P; Pretorius, Carel J; Richard, Derek J; Mortimer, Robin H; d'Emden, Michael C; Richard, Kerry

    2016-01-01

    Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG) is the major serum carrier of sex hormones. However, growing evidence suggests that SHBG is internalised and plays a role in regulating intracellular hormone action. This study was to determine whether SHBG plays a role in testosterone uptake, metabolism, and action in the androgen sensitive LNCaP prostate cancer cell line. Internalisation of SHBG and testosterone, the effects of SHBG on testosterone uptake, metabolism, regulation of androgen responsive genes, and cell growth were assessed. LNCaP cells internalised SHBG by a testosterone independent process. Testosterone was rapidly taken up and effluxed as testosterone-glucuronide; however this effect was reduced by the presence of SHBG. Addition of SHBG, rather than reducing testosterone bioavailability, further increased testosterone-induced expression of prostate specific antigen and enhanced testosterone-induced reduction of androgen receptor mRNA expression. Following 38 hours of testosterone treatment cell morphology changed and growth declined; however, cotreatment with SHBG abrogated these inhibitory effects. These findings clearly demonstrate that internalised SHBG plays an important regulatory and intracellular role in modifying testosterone action and this has important implications for the role of SHBG in health and disease.

  2. Sex Hormone Binding Globulin Modifies Testosterone Action and Metabolism in Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huika; Ungerer, Jacobus P.; Pretorius, Carel J.; Mortimer, Robin H.; d'Emden, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG) is the major serum carrier of sex hormones. However, growing evidence suggests that SHBG is internalised and plays a role in regulating intracellular hormone action. This study was to determine whether SHBG plays a role in testosterone uptake, metabolism, and action in the androgen sensitive LNCaP prostate cancer cell line. Internalisation of SHBG and testosterone, the effects of SHBG on testosterone uptake, metabolism, regulation of androgen responsive genes, and cell growth were assessed. LNCaP cells internalised SHBG by a testosterone independent process. Testosterone was rapidly taken up and effluxed as testosterone-glucuronide; however this effect was reduced by the presence of SHBG. Addition of SHBG, rather than reducing testosterone bioavailability, further increased testosterone-induced expression of prostate specific antigen and enhanced testosterone-induced reduction of androgen receptor mRNA expression. Following 38 hours of testosterone treatment cell morphology changed and growth declined; however, cotreatment with SHBG abrogated these inhibitory effects. These findings clearly demonstrate that internalised SHBG plays an important regulatory and intracellular role in modifying testosterone action and this has important implications for the role of SHBG in health and disease. PMID:27990161

  3. Modified docetaxel, cisplatin and capecitabine for stage IV gastric cancer in Japanese patients: A feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Osamu; Matsuoka, Ayumu; Miyahara, Ryoji; Funasaka, Kohei; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Fukaya, Masahide; Nagino, Masato; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Goto, Hidemi; Ando, Yuichi

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the feasibility of chemotherapy including fluoropyrimidine, platinum and taxane with modified dosages for unresectable gastric cancer in Japanese patients. METHODS We performed a feasibility study of a modified docetaxel, cisplatin and capecitabine (DCX) regimen for stage IV gastric cancer. In particular, 30 or 40 mg/m2 of docetaxel on day 1, 60 mg/m2 of cisplatin on day 1, and 2000 mg/m2 of capecitabine for 2 wk were administered every three weeks. RESULTS Three patients were treated with modified DCX (mDCX) with 30 mg/m2 docetaxel, and five patients were treated with this regimen with 40 mg/m2 docetaxel. Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia was observed in six of the eight patients; no patients exhibited febrile neutropenia. Partial response was achieved in four of the eight patients. Three patients underwent gastrectomy, which achieved R0 resection without residual tumors in dissected lymph nodes. In one of these three patients, resected specimens revealed pathological complete response in the primary lesion and in lymph nodes. CONCLUSION mDCX was well tolerated by Japanese patients with stage IV gastric cancer. This regimen might be useful for allowing gastric cancer patients with distant lymph node metastasis to undergo conversion surgery. PMID:28246483

  4. Genetic modifiers of CHEK2*1100delC associated breast cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Muranen, Taru A.; Greco, Dario; Blomqvist, Carl; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Khan, Sofia; Hogervorst, Frans; Verhoef, Senno; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Dunning, Alison M.; Shah, Mitul; Luben, Robert; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Schoemaker, Minouk; Swerdlow, Anthony; García-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine; Dörk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Hall, Per; Li, Jingmei; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Bermisheva, Marina; Kristensen, Vessela; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Peto, Julian; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Hillemans, Peter; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian; Lambrechts, Diether; Moisse, Matthieu; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Martens, John W.M.; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Giles, Graham G.; Milne, Roger L.; Brenner, Hermann; Arndt, Volker; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Devilee, Peter; Seynaeve, Caroline; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; John, Esther M.; Whittemore, Alice S.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Dennis, Joe; Easton, Douglas F.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Nevanlinna, Heli

    2016-01-01

    Purpose CHEK2*1100delC is a founder variant in European populations conferring a 2–3 fold increased risk of breast cancer (BC). Epidemiologic and family studies have suggested that the risk associated with CHEK2*1100delC is modified by other genetic factors in a multiplicative fashion. We have investigated this empirically using data from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). Methods With genotype data of 39,139 (624 1100delC carriers) BC patients and 40,063 (224) healthy controls from 32 BCAC studies, we analyzed the combined risk effects of CHEK2*1100delC and 77 common variants in terms of a polygenic risk score (PRS) and pairwise interaction. Results The PRS conferred an odds ratio (OR) of 1.59 [95% CI 1.21–2.09] per standard deviation for BC for CHEK2*1100delC carriers and 1.58 [1.55–1.62] for non-carriers. No evidence for deviation from the multiplicative model was found. The OR for the highest quintile of the PRS was 2.03 [0.86–4.78] for CHEK2*1100delC carriers placing them to the high risk category according to UK NICE guidelines. OR for the lowest quintile was 0.52 [0.16–1.74], indicating life-time risk close to population average. Conclusion Our results confirm the multiplicative nature of risk effects conferred by CHEK2*1100delC and the common susceptibility variants. Furthermore, the PRS could identify the carriers at a high life-time risk for clinical actions. PMID:27711073

  5. [Automatic segmentation of clustered breast cancer cells based on modified watershed algorithm and concavity points searching].

    PubMed

    Tong, Zhen; Pu, Lixin; Dong, Fangjie

    2013-08-01

    As a common malignant tumor, breast cancer has seriously affected women's physical and psychological health even threatened their lives. Breast cancer has even begun to show a gradual trend of high incidence in some places in the world. As a kind of common pathological assist diagnosis technique, immunohistochemical technique plays an important role in the diagnosis of breast cancer. Usually, Pathologists isolate positive cells from the stained specimen which were processed by immunohistochemical technique and calculate the ratio of positive cells which is a core indicator of breast cancer in diagnosis. In this paper, we present a new algorithm which was based on modified watershed algorithm and concavity points searching to identify the positive cells and segment the clustered cells automatically, and then realize automatic counting. By comparison of the results of our experiments with those of other methods, our method can exactly segment the clustered cells without losing any geometrical cell features and give the exact number of separating cells.

  6. Application of wavelet transformation and adaptive neighborhood based modified backpropagation (ANMBP) for classification of brain cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werdiningsih, Indah; Zaman, Badrus; Nuqoba, Barry

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents classification of brain cancer using wavelet transformation and Adaptive Neighborhood Based Modified Backpropagation (ANMBP). Three stages of the processes, namely features extraction, features reduction, and classification process. Wavelet transformation is used for feature extraction and ANMBP is used for classification process. The result of features extraction is feature vectors. Features reduction used 100 energy values per feature and 10 energy values per feature. Classifications of brain cancer are normal, alzheimer, glioma, and carcinoma. Based on simulation results, 10 energy values per feature can be used to classify brain cancer correctly. The correct classification rate of proposed system is 95 %. This research demonstrated that wavelet transformation can be used for features extraction and ANMBP can be used for classification of brain cancer.

  7. Modified metabolic syndrome and second cancers in women: A case control study

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Mendoza, Carlos-Manuel; Pérez-Chávez, Ernesto; Fuente-Vera, Tania-Angélica De-la

    2016-01-01

    Background: According to some studies, the metabolic syndrome causes diverse primary cancers; however, there is no evidence about metabolic syndrome impact on second cancers development in women. Aim: To find out the implication of the modified metabolic syndrome in women with second cancers. Materials and Methods: This was a case–control study, at a general hospital in Mexico City, in women with second cancers (cases) and age-matched women with only one neoplasm (controls). The analysis comprised: Tumor (s), anthropometric features, and body mass index (BMI); moreover, presence of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and fasting serum levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides and glucose. Results: The sample was of nine cases and 27 controls. In cases, the metabolic syndrome (diabetes mellitus or glucose > 99 mg/dL + hypertension or blood pressure ≥ 135/85 mm Hg + triglycerides > 149 mg/dL or BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2) was more frequent (odds ratio 20.8, 95% confidence interval: 1.9–227.1). Conclusion: Our results suggest that in women, the modified metabolic syndrome may be a risk factor for second cancers. PMID:28032086

  8. Magnetic hyperthermia and pH-responsive effective drug delivery to the sub-cellular level of human breast cancer cells by modified CoFe2O4 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Oh, Yunok; Moorthy, Madhappan Santha; Manivasagan, Panchanathan; Bharathiraja, Subramaniyan; Oh, Junghwan

    2017-02-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MNPs) have been extensively utilized in a wide range of biomedical applications including magnetic hyperthermia agent. To improve the efficiency of the MNPs in therapeutic applications, in this study, we have synthesized CoFe2O4 nanoparticles and its surface was further functionalized with meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA). The anticancer agent, Doxorubucin (DOX) was conjugated with CoFe2O4@DMSA nanoparticle to evaluate the combined effects of thermotherapy and chemotherapy. The drug delivery efficiency of the DOX loaded CoFe2O4@DMSA nanoparticles were examined based on magnetically triggered delivery of DOX into the subcellular level of cancer cells by using MDA-MB-231 cell line. The amine part of the DOX molecules were effectively attached through an electrostatic interactions and/or hydrogen bonding interactions with the carboxylic acid groups of the DMSA functionalities present onto the surface of the CoFe2O4 nanoparticles. The DOX loaded CoFe2O4@DMSA nanoparticles can effectively uptake with cancer cells via typical endocytosis process. After endocytosis, DOX release from CoFe2O4 nanoparticles was triggered by intracellular endosomal/lysosomal acidic environments and the localized heat can be generated under an alternating magnetic field (AMF). In the presence of AMF, the released DOX molecules were accumulated with high concentrations into the subcellular level at a desired sites and exhibited a synergistic effect of an enhanced cell cytotoxicity by the combined effects of thermal-chemotherapy. Importantly, pH- and thermal-responsive Dox-loaded CoFe2O4 nanoparticles induced significant cellular apoptosis more efficiently mediated by active mitochondrial membrane and ROS generation than the free Dox. Thus, the Dox-loaded CoFe2O4@DMSA nanoparticles can be used as a potential therapeutic agent in cancer therapy by combining the thermo-chemotherapy techniques. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Cancers in Australia in 2010 attributable to modifiable factors: introduction and overview

    PubMed Central

    Whiteman, David C; Webb, Penelope M; Green, Adele C; Neale, Rachel E; Fritschi, Lin; Bain, Christopher J; Parkin, D Max; Wilson, Louise F; Olsen, Catherine M; Nagle, Christina M; Pandeya, Nirmala; Jordan, Susan J; Antonsson, Annika; Kendall, Bradley J; Hughes, Maria Celia B; Ibiebele, Torukiri I; Miura, Kyoko; Peters, Susan; Carey, Renee N

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the approach underpinning a national project to estimate the numbers and proportions of cancers occurring in Australia in 2010 that are attributable to modifiable causal factors. Methods We estimated the population attributable fraction (PAF) (or prevented fraction) of cancers associated with exposure to causal (or preventive) factors using standard formulae. Where possible, we also estimated the potential impact on cancer incidence resulting from changes in prevalence of exposure. Analyses were restricted to factors declared causal by international agencies: tobacco smoke; alcohol; solar radiation; infectious agents; obesity; insufficient physical activity; insufficient intakes of fruits, vegetables and fibre; red and processed meat; menopausal hormone therapy (MHT); oral contraceptive pill (OCP); and insufficient breast feeding. Separately, we estimated numbers of cancers prevented by: aspirin; sunscreen; MHT; and OCP use. We discuss assumptions pertaining to latent periods between exposure and cancer onset, choices of prevalence data and risk estimates, and approaches to sensitivity analyses. Results Numbers and population attributable fractions of cancer are presented in accompanying papers. Conclusions This is the first systematic assessment of population attributable fractions of cancer in Australia. PMID:26437722

  10. Effective fermion kinematics from modified quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandre, J.; Leite, J.

    2016-10-01

    We consider a classical fermion and a classical scalar, propagating on two different kinds of four-dimensional diffeomorphism breaking gravity backgrounds, and we derive the one-loop effective dispersion relation for matter, after integrating out gravitons. One gravity model involves quadratic divergences at one-loop, as in Einstein gravity, and the other model is the z = 3 non-projectable Horava-Lifshitz gravity, which involves logarithmic divergences only. Although these two models behave differently in the ultraviolet, the IR phenomenology for matter fields is comparable: (i) for generic values for the parameters, both models identify 1010 GeV as the characteristic scale above which they are not consistent with current upper bounds on Lorentz symmetry violation; (ii) for both models, there is always a fine-tuning of parameters which allows the cancellation of the indicator for Lorentz symmetry violation.

  11. Enhanced uptake and transport of PLGA-modified nanoparticles in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Sims, Lee B; Curtis, Louis T; Frieboes, Hermann B; Steinbach-Rankins, Jill M

    2016-04-22

    Uncoordinated cellular proliferation and dysregulated angiogenesis in solid tumors are coupled with inadequate tissue, blood, and lymphatic vascularization. Consequently, tumors are often characterized by hypoxic regions with limited access to vascular-borne substances. In particular, systemically administered nanoparticles (NPs) targeting tumor cells and relying on vascular access to reach tumor tissue can suffer from limited therapeutic efficacy due to inhomogeneous intra-tumor distribution and insufficient cellular internalization of NPs. To circumvent these challenges, NP surfaces can be modified to facilitate tumor interstitial transport and cellular uptake. We create poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid NPs modified with MPG, polyethylene glycol (PEG), MPG/PEG, and Vimentin (VIM), and evaluate their cellular uptake in 2D (monolayer) cell culture of human cervical carcinoma (HeLa). We compare NP performance by evaluating uptake by non-cancerous vaginal (VK2) cells. We further assess NP interstitial transport in hypo-vascularized lesions by evaluating the effect of the various modifications on NP penetration in 3D cell culture of the HeLa cells. Results show that after 24 h incubation with HeLa cells in monolayer, MPG, MPG/PEG, PEG, and VIM NPs were internalized at 66×, 24×, 30×, and 15× that of unmodified NPs, respectively. In contrast, incubation with VK2 cells in monolayer showed that MPG , MPG/PEG , PEG , and VIM NPs internalized at 6.3×, 4.3×, 12.4×, and 3.0× that of unmodified NPs, respectively. Uptake was significantly enhanced in tumorigenic vs. normal cells, with internalization of MPG NPs by HeLa cells being twice that of PEG NPs by VK2 cells. After 24 h incubation in HeLa 3D cell culture, MPG and MPG/PEGNPs were internalized 2× and 3× compared to PEG and VIM NPs, respectively. Whereas MPG NPs were internalized mostly in the cell culture periphery (1.2×, 1.4×, and 2.7× that of PEG, MPG/PEG, and VIM NPs, respectively), PEG NPs at

  12. Comparison of modified Cherney incision and vertical midline incision for management of early stage cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, San Hui; Yim, Ga Won; Lee, Dae Woo; Kim, Sang Wun; Kim, Sunghoon; Kim, Jae Wook; Kim, Young Tae

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare operative feasibility and surgical outcome of the modified Cherney incision and vertical midline incision in patients undergoing radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy. Between March 2005 and December 2007, retrospective data of 78 patients (n=17; modified Cherney incision, n=61; vertical midline incision) with early stage cervical cancer who received radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy were reviewed. Baseline characteristics of patients who underwent modified Cherney incision and vertical midline incision were similar except for age (mean+/-SD: 32.3+/-3.4 yr vs. 52.5+/-8.4 yr, p<0.001). Patients who received modified Cherney incision had earlier initiation of soft diet (mean+/-SD: 46.5+/-19.5 hr vs. 56.4+/-25.4 hr, p<0.016) and shorter hospital stay compared to those who received vertical midline incision (mean+/-SD: 18.0+/-4.8 days vs. 21.7+/-3.7 days, p<0.042). There was no difference in the number of dissected pelvic lymph nodes, hemoglobin change, postoperative pain, postoperative ileus, Foley indwelling duration, and perioperative complications. Excluding the selection bias for age, there was no significant difference of the clinical outcome between the modified Cherney incision group and the vertical midline incision group. Modified Cherney incision can be cosmetically performed in young age women obtaining equal number of lymph nodes without increased operative morbidity compared to vertical midline incision.

  13. Modified methylene blue injection improves lymph node harvest in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianpei; Huang, Pinjie; Zheng, Zongheng; Chen, Tufeng; Wei, Hongbo

    2017-04-01

    The presence of nodal metastases in rectal cancer plays an important role in accurate staging and prognosis, which depends on adequate lymph node harvest. The aim of this prospective study is to investigate the feasibility and survival benefit of improving lymph node harvest by a modified method with methylene blue injection in rectal cancer specimens. One hundred and thirty-one patients with rectal cancer were randomly assigned to the control group in which lymph nodes were harvested by palpation and sight, or to the methylene blue group using a modified method of injection into the superior rectal artery with methylene blue. Analysis of clinicopathologic records, including a long-term follow-up, was performed. In the methylene blue group, 678 lymph nodes were harvested by simple palpation and sight. Methylene blue injection added 853 lymph nodes to the total harvest as well as 32 additional metastatic lymph nodes, causing a shift to node-positive stage in four patients. The average number of lymph nodes harvested was 11.7 ± 3.4 in the control group and 23.2 ± 4.7 in the methylene blue group, respectively. The harvest of small lymph nodes (<5 mm) and the average number of metastatic nodes were both significantly higher in the methylene blue group. The modified method of injection with methylene blue had no impact on overall survival. The modified method with methylene blue injection improved lymph node harvest in rectal cancer, especially small node and metastatic node retrieval, which provided more accurate staging. However, it was not associated with overall survival. © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  14. Prostate volume modifies the association between obesity and prostate cancer or high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Fowke, Jay H; Motley, Saundra S; Wills, Marcia; Cookson, Michael S; Concepcion, Raoul S; Eckstein, Charles W; Chang, Sam S; Smith, Joseph A

    2007-05-01

    The relationship between obesity and prostate cancer remains unclear. We investigated the effect of prostate volume on the obesity and prostate cancer association. With a multi-centered, rapid-recruitment protocol, weight and body size measurements were collected prior to diagnosis, and medical charts were reviewed for pathology results (n = 420 controls, 119 high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) cases, and 286 cancer cases (41% Gleason > 6). In multivariable logistic regression models adjusting for age, PSA levels and history, DRE results, and number of cores at biopsy, the association between BMI and cancer was restricted to men with a smaller prostate volume (volume < 40 cm(3): OR(BMI > or = 30) = 2.17 (1.09, 4.32), p (trend) = 0.02; volume > or = 40 cm(3): OR(BMI > or = 30) = 0.77 (0.34, 1.77), p (trend) = 0.17; p (interaction) = 0.03). Similarly, the WHR and PIN association was significantly modified by prostate volume (volume < 40 cm(3): OR((WHR: Tertile 3 vs. T1)) = 3.76 (1.54, 9.21) (p (trend) < 0.01); volume > or = 40 m(3): OR((WHR: T3 vs. T1)) = 0.63 (0.32, 1.23) (p (trend) = 0.17); p (interaction) < 0.01). In conclusion, prostate volume acts as a modifier, and BMI and WHR are significantly associated with prostate cancer or PIN, respectively, in the absence of biopsy sampling error derived from obesity-related prostate enlargement.

  15. Assessing absolute changes in breast cancer risk due to modifiable risk factors.

    PubMed

    Quante, Anne S; Herz, Julia; Whittemore, Alice S; Fischer, Christine; Strauch, Konstantin; Terry, Mary Beth

    2015-07-01

    Clinical risk assessment involves absolute risk measures, but information on modifying risk and preventing cancer is often communicated in relative terms. To illustrate the potential impact of risk factor modification in model-based risk assessment, we evaluated the performance of the IBIS Breast Cancer Risk Evaluation Tool, with and without current body mass index (BMI), for predicting future breast cancer occurrence in a prospective cohort of 665 postmenopausal women. Overall, IBIS's accuracy (overall agreement between observed and assigned risks) and discrimination (AUC concordance between assigned risks and outcomes) were similar with and without the BMI information. However, in women with BMI > 25 kg/m(2), adding BMI information improved discrimination (AUC = 63.9 % and 61.4 % with and without BMI, P < 0.001). The model-assigned 10-year risk difference for a woman with high (27 kg/m(2)) versus low (21 kg/m(2)) BMI was only 0.3 % for a woman with neither affected first-degree relatives nor BRCA1 mutation, compared to 4.5 % for a mutation carrier with three such relatives. This contrast illustrates the value of using information on modifiable risk factors in risk assessment and in sharing information with patients of their absolute risks with and without modifiable risk factors.

  16. Modifying the osteoblastic niche with zoledronic acid in vivo—Potential implications for breast cancer bone metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Haider, Marie-Therese; Holen, Ingunn; Dear, T. Neil; Hunter, Keith; Brown, Hannah K.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Bone metastasis is the most common complication of advanced breast cancer. The associated cancer-induced bone disease is treated with bone-sparing agents like zoledronic acid. Clinical trials have shown that zoledronic acid also reduces breast cancer recurrence in bone; potentially by modifying the bone microenvironment surrounding disseminated tumour cells. We have characterised the early effects of zoledronic acid on key cell types of the metastatic niche in vivo, and investigated how these modify the location of breast tumour cells homing to bone. Methods Female mice were treated with a single, clinically achievable dose of zoledronic acid (100 μg/kg) or PBS. Bone integrity, osteoclast and osteoblast activity and number/mm trabecular bone on 1, 3, 5 and 10 days after treatment were assessed using μCT, ELISA (TRAP, PINP) and bone histomorphometry, respectively. The effect of zoledronic acid on osteoblasts was validated in genetically engineered mice with GFP-positive osteoblastic cells. The effects on growth plate cartilage were visualised by toluidine blue staining. For tumour studies, mice were injected i.c. with DID-labelled MDA-MB-231-NW1-luc2 breast cancer cells 5 days after zoledronic acid treatment, followed by assessment of tumour cell homing to bone and soft tissues by multiphoton microscopy, flow cytometry and ex vivo cultures. Results As early as 3 days after treatment, animals receiving zoledronic acid had significantly increased trabecular bone volume vs. control. This rapid bone effect was reflected in a significant reduction in osteoclast and osteoblast number/mm trabecular bone and reduced bone marker serum levels (day 3–5). These results were confirmed in mice expressing GFP in osteoblastic linage cells. Pre-treatment with zoledronic acid caused accumulation of an extra-cellular matrix in the growth plate associated with a trend towards preferential [1] homing of tumour cells to osteoblast-rich areas of bone, but without

  17. Evidence for SMAD3 as a modifier of breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Current attempts to identify genetic modifiers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 associated risk have focused on a candidate gene approach, based on knowledge of gene functions, or the development of large genome-wide association studies. In this study, we evaluated 24 SNPs tagged to 14 candidate genes derived through a novel approach that analysed gene expression differences to prioritise candidate modifier genes for association studies. Methods We successfully genotyped 24 SNPs in a cohort of up to 4,724 BRCA1 and 2,693 BRCA2 female mutation carriers from 15 study groups and assessed whether these variants were associated with risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Results SNPs in five of the 14 candidate genes showed evidence of association with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 or BRCA2 carriers (P < 0.05). Notably, the minor alleles of two SNPs (rs7166081 and rs3825977) in high linkage disequilibrium (r2 = 0.77), located at the SMAD3 locus (15q22), were each associated with increased breast cancer risk for BRCA2 mutation carriers (relative risk = 1.25, 95% confidence interval = 1.07 to 1.45, Ptrend = 0.004; and relative risk = 1.20, 95% confidence interval = 1.03 to 1.40, Ptrend = 0.018). Conclusions This study provides evidence that the SMAD3 gene, which encodes a key regulatory protein in the transforming growth factor beta signalling pathway and is known to interact directly with BRCA2, may contribute to increased risk of breast cancer in BRCA2 mutation carriers. This finding suggests that genes with expression associated with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation status are enriched for the presence of common genetic modifiers of breast cancer risk in these populations. PMID:21114847

  18. Evidence for SMAD3 as a modifier of breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Walker, Logan C; Fredericksen, Zachary S; Wang, Xianshu; Tarrell, Robert; Pankratz, Vernon S; Lindor, Noralane M; Beesley, Jonathan; Healey, Sue; Chen, Xiaoqing; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Tirapo, Carole; Giraud, Sophie; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Muller, Danièle; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Delnatte, Capucine; Schmutzler, Rita K; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Schönbuchner, Ines; Deissler, Helmut; Meindl, Alfons; Hogervorst, Frans B; Verheus, Martijn; Hooning, Maartje J; van den Ouweland, Ans Mw; Nelen, Marcel R; Ausems, Margreet Gem; Aalfs, Cora M; van Asperen, Christi J; Devilee, Peter; Gerrits, Monique M; Waisfisz, Quinten; Szabo, Csilla I; Easton, Douglas F; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare T; Frost, Debra; Harrington, Patricia; Evans, D Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Chu, Carol; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Ong, Kai-Ren; Cook, Jackie; Rebbeck, Tim; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Singer, Christian F; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Dressler, Anne-Catharina; Pfeiler, Georg; Godwin, Andrew K; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Nevanlinna, Heli; Agnarsson, Bjarni A; Caligo, Maria Adelaide; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Liljegren, Annelie; Arver, Brita; Karlsson, Per; Melin, Beatrice; Sinilnikova, Olga M; McGuffog, Lesley; Antoniou, Antonis C; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Spurdle, Amanda B; Couch, Fergus J

    2010-01-01

    Current attempts to identify genetic modifiers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 associated risk have focused on a candidate gene approach, based on knowledge of gene functions, or the development of large genome-wide association studies. In this study, we evaluated 24 SNPs tagged to 14 candidate genes derived through a novel approach that analysed gene expression differences to prioritise candidate modifier genes for association studies. We successfully genotyped 24 SNPs in a cohort of up to 4,724 BRCA1 and 2,693 BRCA2 female mutation carriers from 15 study groups and assessed whether these variants were associated with risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. SNPs in five of the 14 candidate genes showed evidence of association with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 or BRCA2 carriers (P < 0.05). Notably, the minor alleles of two SNPs (rs7166081 and rs3825977) in high linkage disequilibrium (r² = 0.77), located at the SMAD3 locus (15q22), were each associated with increased breast cancer risk for BRCA2 mutation carriers (relative risk = 1.25, 95% confidence interval = 1.07 to 1.45, P(trend) = 0.004; and relative risk = 1.20, 95% confidence interval = 1.03 to 1.40, P(trend) = 0.018). This study provides evidence that the SMAD3 gene, which encodes a key regulatory protein in the transforming growth factor beta signalling pathway and is known to interact directly with BRCA2, may contribute to increased risk of breast cancer in BRCA2 mutation carriers. This finding suggests that genes with expression associated with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation status are enriched for the presence of common genetic modifiers of breast cancer risk in these populations.

  19. Does calcium in drinking water modify the association between nitrate in drinking water and risk of death from colon cancer?

    PubMed

    Chiu, Hui-Fen; Tsai, Shang-Shyue; Chen, Pei-Shih; Wu, Trong-Neng; Yang, Chun-Yuh

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this study was to explore whether calcium (Ca) levels in drinking water modified the effects of nitrate on colon cancer risk. A matched case-control study was used to investigate the relationship between the risk of death from colon cancer and exposure to nitrate in drinking water in Taiwan. All colon cancer deaths of Taiwan residents from 2003 through 2007 were obtained from the Bureau of Vital Statistics of the Taiwan Provincial Department of Health. Controls were deaths from other causes and were pair-matched to the cases by gender, year of birth and year of death. Information on the levels of nitrate-nitrogen (NO(3)-N) and Ca in drinking water have been collected from Taiwan Water Supply Corporation (TWSC). The municipality of residence for cases and controls was assumed to be the source of the subject's NO(3)-N and Ca exposure via drinking water. We observed evidence of an interaction between drinking water NO(3)-N and Ca intake via drinking water. This is the first study to report effect modification by Ca intake from drinking water on the association between NO(3)-N exposure and risk of colon cancer mortality.

  20. Thiolated chitosan-modified PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles for oral chemotherapy of lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Liqin; Li, Xuemin; Liu, Lingrong; Zhang, Qiqing

    2013-02-01

    Oral chemotherapy is a key step towards `chemotherapy at home', a dream of cancer patients, which will radically change the clinical practice of chemotherapy and greatly improve the quality of life of the patients. In this research, three types of nanoparticle formulation from commercial PCL and self-synthesized d-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (PLA-PCL-TPGS) random copolymer were prepared in this research for oral delivery of antitumor agents, including thiolated chitosan-modified PCL nanoparticles, unmodified PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles, and thiolated chitosan-modified PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles. Firstly, the PLA-PCL-TPGS random copolymer was synthesized and characterized. Thiolated chitosan greatly increases its mucoadhesiveness and permeation properties, thus increasing the chances of nanoparticle uptake by the gastrointestinal mucosa and improving drug absorption. The PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles were found by FESEM that they are of spherical shape and around 200 nm in diameter. The surface charge of PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles was reversed from anionic to cationic after thiolated chitosan modification. The thiolated chitosan-modified PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles have significantly higher level of the cell uptake than that of thiolated chitosan-modified PLGA nanoparticles and unmodified PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles. In vitro cell viability studies showed advantages of the thiolated chitosan-modified PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles over Taxol® in terms of cytotoxicity against A549 cells. It seems that the mucoadhesive nanoparticles can increase paclitaxel transport by opening tight junctions and bypassing the efflux pump of P-glycoprotein. In conclusion, PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles modified by thiolated chitosan could enhance the cellular uptake and cytotoxicity, which revealed a potential application for oral chemotherapy of lung cancer.

  1. Thiolated chitosan-modified PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles for oral chemotherapy of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liqin; Li, Xuemin; Liu, Lingrong; Zhang, Qiqing

    2013-02-09

    Oral chemotherapy is a key step towards 'chemotherapy at home', a dream of cancer patients, which will radically change the clinical practice of chemotherapy and greatly improve the quality of life of the patients. In this research, three types of nanoparticle formulation from commercial PCL and self-synthesized d-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (PLA-PCL-TPGS) random copolymer were prepared in this research for oral delivery of antitumor agents, including thiolated chitosan-modified PCL nanoparticles, unmodified PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles, and thiolated chitosan-modified PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles. Firstly, the PLA-PCL-TPGS random copolymer was synthesized and characterized. Thiolated chitosan greatly increases its mucoadhesiveness and permeation properties, thus increasing the chances of nanoparticle uptake by the gastrointestinal mucosa and improving drug absorption. The PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles were found by FESEM that they are of spherical shape and around 200 nm in diameter. The surface charge of PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles was reversed from anionic to cationic after thiolated chitosan modification. The thiolated chitosan-modified PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles have significantly higher level of the cell uptake than that of thiolated chitosan-modified PLGA nanoparticles and unmodified PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles. In vitro cell viability studies showed advantages of the thiolated chitosan-modified PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles over Taxol® in terms of cytotoxicity against A549 cells. It seems that the mucoadhesive nanoparticles can increase paclitaxel transport by opening tight junctions and bypassing the efflux pump of P-glycoprotein. In conclusion, PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles modified by thiolated chitosan could enhance the cellular uptake and cytotoxicity, which revealed a potential application for oral chemotherapy of lung cancer.

  2. A modified technique for high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy in advanced cancer of the cervix.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vinay; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Menon, Vinod; Sharma, Dayanand

    2003-01-01

    To develop a modified technique for high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy in cervical cancer stage IIIb. Cervical carcinoma FIGO Stage III accounts for > 60% of all cervical cancers with radiation being the mainstay of treatment for most patients. After external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), the cervix is often flush with the vagina and the shape of the vagina may be conical with its apex at the external os level. All patients receive 2 applications with HDR brachytherapy. At the first application after the placement of the central tandem, only one ovoid is inserted and the other ovoid is replaced by a rubber tube, and the applicator assembly is fixed as usual. The contralateral ovoid is inserted at the subsequent application. To date, 21 locally advanced cervical cancer patients have been treated using this technique. In these patients, the mean dose to right and left Point A was 93% (range, 86-100%; median, 93%) and 95% (range, 90-100%; median, 95%), respectively. The variation of doses to the contralateral Point A was 1-14%. The mean dose to the rectal and bladder mucosa was 62% (range, 43-80%; median, 64%) and 80% (range, 50-110%; median, 71%), respectively. This modified HDR intracavitary technique may prove an alternative for centers where interstitial brachytherapy for cancer of the cervix is not available.

  3. Modified nucleosides: an accurate tumour marker for clinical diagnosis of cancer, early detection and therapy control

    PubMed Central

    Seidel, A; Brunner, S; Seidel, P; Fritz, G I; Herbarth, O

    2006-01-01

    Modified nucleosides, regarded as indicators for the whole-body turnover of RNAs, are excreted in abnormal amounts in the urine of patients with malignancies. To test their usefulness as tumour markers and to compare them with the conventional tumour markers, fractionated urine samples were analysed using chromatography. The excretion patterns of nucleosides of 68 cancer patients with malignant and benign tumours and 41 healthy controls have been studied. Significant elevations in the total sum and the concentrations of at least three (or four) of indicator nucleosides cytidine, pseudouridine, 2-pyridone-5-carboxamide-N1-ribofuranoside, N2,N2-dimethylguanine, 1-methylguanosine, 2-methylguanosine and 1-methyladenosine indicate a tumour with a sensitivity of 54% (77%) and a specificity of 86% (98%). Using an artificial neural network analysis, a sensitivity of 97% and a specificity of 85% were achieved in differentiating between tumour and control volunteers. The comparison with carcinoembryonic antigen, cancer antigen 15-3 und tissue polypeptide antigen indicates that urinary nucleosides may be useful tumour markers. This study suggests that the simultaneous determination of modified nucleosides and creatinine in urine samples of patients with cancer leads to an advantage to current methods and is a useful method to detect cancer early and to control the success of therapy. PMID:16685264

  4. Previous tonsillectomy modifies odds of tonsil and base of tongue cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zevallos, Jose P; Mazul, Angela L; Rodriguez, Nidia; Weissler, Mark C; Brennan, Paul; Anantharaman, Devasena; Abedi-Ardekani, Behnoush; Neil Hayes, D; Olshan, Andrew F

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tonsillectomy is a commonly performed surgical procedure that involves removal of the palatine tonsils. The purpose of this study is to examine the association between previous tonsillectomy and odds of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) in a large population-based case–control study. We hypothesise that previous tonsillectomy is associated with a decreased odds of tonsil cancer with no impact on the odds of developing base of tongue (BOT) cancer. Methods: This was a population-based, frequency-matched case–control study with multinomial logistic regression, including 1378 controls, 108 BOT cancer cases, and 198 tonsil cancer cases. Demographic and risk factor data were collected using a structured questionnaire during an in-home visit conducted by trained nurse-interviewers. The human papillomavirus (HPV) tumour status was determined through Luminex-based multiplex PCR and p16 status by immunohistochemistry. Results: Previous tonsillectomy was associated with a nearly two-fold increased odds of BOT cancer (OR=1.95, 95% CI 1.25–3.06, P=0.003) and a large decrease in the odds of tonsil cancer (OR=0.22, 95% CI 0.13–0.36, P<0.001). When HPV status was considered, tonsillectomy was associated with a decreased odds of HPV-positive tonsil cancer (OR=0.17, 95% CI 0.08–0.34, P<0.001) and an increased risk of HPV-positive BOT cancer (OR=2.46, 95% CI 1.22–4.95, P=0.012). When p16 status was considered, tonsillectomy was associated with an increased odds of p16-positive BOT cancer (OR=2.24, 95% CI 1.16–4.35, P=0.017) and a decreased odds of p16-positive tonsil cancer (OR=0.14, 95% CI 0.07–0.31, P<0.001). Conclusions: Previous tonsillectomy modifies the odds of both tonsil and BOT cancer, with decreased odds of tonsil cancer and increased odds of BOT cancer. A history of previous tonsillectomy may play a role in OPSCC risk stratification when considered along with other covariates such as sexual history, smoking status, and age. PMID

  5. Previous tonsillectomy modifies odds of tonsil and base of tongue cancer.

    PubMed

    Zevallos, Jose P; Mazul, Angela L; Rodriguez, Nidia; Weissler, Mark C; Brennan, Paul; Anantharaman, Devasena; Abedi-Ardekani, Behnoush; Neil Hayes, D; Olshan, Andrew F

    2016-03-29

    Tonsillectomy is a commonly performed surgical procedure that involves removal of the palatine tonsils. The purpose of this study is to examine the association between previous tonsillectomy and odds of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) in a large population-based case-control study. We hypothesise that previous tonsillectomy is associated with a decreased odds of tonsil cancer with no impact on the odds of developing base of tongue (BOT) cancer. This was a population-based, frequency-matched case-control study with multinomial logistic regression, including 1378 controls, 108 BOT cancer cases, and 198 tonsil cancer cases. Demographic and risk factor data were collected using a structured questionnaire during an in-home visit conducted by trained nurse-interviewers. The human papillomavirus (HPV) tumour status was determined through Luminex-based multiplex PCR and p16 status by immunohistochemistry. Previous tonsillectomy was associated with a nearly two-fold increased odds of BOT cancer (OR=1.95, 95% CI 1.25-3.06, P=0.003) and a large decrease in the odds of tonsil cancer (OR=0.22, 95% CI 0.13-0.36, P<0.001). When HPV status was considered, tonsillectomy was associated with a decreased odds of HPV-positive tonsil cancer (OR=0.17, 95% CI 0.08-0.34, P<0.001) and an increased risk of HPV-positive BOT cancer (OR=2.46, 95% CI 1.22-4.95, P=0.012). When p16 status was considered, tonsillectomy was associated with an increased odds of p16-positive BOT cancer (OR=2.24, 95% CI 1.16-4.35, P=0.017) and a decreased odds of p16-positive tonsil cancer (OR=0.14, 95% CI 0.07-0.31, P<0.001). Previous tonsillectomy modifies the odds of both tonsil and BOT cancer, with decreased odds of tonsil cancer and increased odds of BOT cancer. A history of previous tonsillectomy may play a role in OPSCC risk stratification when considered along with other covariates such as sexual history, smoking status, and age.

  6. Antibacterial effect of silver nanofilm modified stainless steel surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, F.; Kennedy, J.; Dhillon, M.; Flint, S.

    2015-03-01

    Bacteria can attach to stainless steel surfaces, resulting in the colonization of the surface known as biofilms. The release of bacteria from biofilms can cause contamination of food such as dairy products in manufacturing plants. This study aimed to modify stainless steel surfaces with silver nanofilms and to examine the antibacterial effectiveness of the modified surface. Ion implantation was applied to produce silver nanofilms on stainless steel surfaces. 35 keV Ag ions were implanted with various fluences of 1 × 1015 to 1 × 1017 ions•cm-2 at room temperature. Representative atomic force microscopy characterizations of the modified stainless steel are presented. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry spectra revealed the implanted atoms were located in the near-surface region. Both unmodified and modified stainless steel coupons were then exposed to two types of bacteria, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Streptococcus thermophilus, to determine the effect of the surface modification on bacterial attachment and biofilm development. The silver modified coupon surface fluoresced red over most of the surface area implying that most bacteria on coupon surface were dead. This study indicates that the silver nanofilm fabricated by the ion implantation method is a promising way of reducing the attachment of bacteria and delay biofilm formation.

  7. Amine-modified hyaluronic acid-functionalized porous silicon nanoparticles for targeting breast cancer tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Patrick V.; Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Mäkilä, Ermei; Kaasalainen, Martti; Salonen, Jarno; Hirvonen, Jouni; Santos, Hélder A.

    2014-08-01

    Active targeting of nanoparticles to receptor-overexpressing cancer cells has great potential for enhancing the cellular uptake of nanoparticles and for reducing fast clearance of the nanoparticles from the body. Herein, we present a preparation method of a porous silicon (PSi)-based nanodelivery system for breast cancer targeting, by covalently conjugating a synthesized amide-modified hyaluronic acid (HA+) derived polymer on the surface of undecylenic acid-modified thermally hydrocarbonized PSi (UnTHCPSi) nanoparticles. The resulting UnTHCPSi-HA+ nanoparticles showed relatively small size, reduced polydispersibility, high biocompatibility, improved colloidal and human plasma stability, as well as enhanced cellular interactions and internalization. Moreover, we demonstrated that the enhanced cellular association of UnTHCPSi-HA+ relies on the capability of the conjugated HA+ to bind and consequently target CD44 receptors expressed on the surface of breast cancer cells, thus making the HA+-functionalized UnTHCPSi nanoparticles a suitable and promising nanoplatform for the targeting of CD44-overexpressing breast tumors and for drug delivery.Active targeting of nanoparticles to receptor-overexpressing cancer cells has great potential for enhancing the cellular uptake of nanoparticles and for reducing fast clearance of the nanoparticles from the body. Herein, we present a preparation method of a porous silicon (PSi)-based nanodelivery system for breast cancer targeting, by covalently conjugating a synthesized amide-modified hyaluronic acid (HA+) derived polymer on the surface of undecylenic acid-modified thermally hydrocarbonized PSi (UnTHCPSi) nanoparticles. The resulting UnTHCPSi-HA+ nanoparticles showed relatively small size, reduced polydispersibility, high biocompatibility, improved colloidal and human plasma stability, as well as enhanced cellular interactions and internalization. Moreover, we demonstrated that the enhanced cellular association of Un

  8. Alterations in p53, BRCA1, ATM, PIK3CA, and HER2 genes and their effect in modifying clinicopathological characteristics and overall survival of Bulgarian patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bozhanov, Stefan S; Angelova, Svetla G; Krasteva, Maria E; Markov, Tsanko L; Christova, Svetlana L; Gavrilov, Ivan G; Georgieva, Elena I

    2010-11-01

    Though p53, BRCA1, ATM, PIK3CA, and HER2 genes are shown to be involved in various aspects of breast carcinogenesis, their functional relationship and clinical value are still disputable. We investigated the genetic status or expression profile of these genes to further elucidate their clinical significance. PCR-SSCP-Sequencing of p53, BRCA1, ATM, and PIK3CA was performed in 145 Bulgarian patients with sporadic breast cancer. Expression profiles of HER2 were determined by ICH and CISH. Relationship between mutations and clinicopathological characteristics was evaluated by Chi-squared and Fisher's exact tests. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard test and Kaplan-Meier analysis were used to evaluate differences in overall survival between groups. The frequency of p53 (22.07%), BRCA1 (0.69%), ATM (7.59%), and PIK3CA (31.25%) alterations and HER2 (21.21%) overexpression was estimated. Mutated p53 was associated with tumor size (P = 0.033) and grade of malignancy (P = 0.001), ATM--with grade of malignancy (P = 0.032), and PIK3CA--with PR-positive tumors (P = 0.047). HER2 overexpression correlated with age of diagnosis (P = 0.009), tumor size (P = 0.0004), and ER expression (P = 0.011). Univariate survival analysis showed that mutated p53 is an indicator for worse outcome (P = 0.041). Combination of two genetic abnormalities did not correlate with more aggressive carcinogenesis and worse overall survival. Our data indicated that p53, BRCA1, ATM, PIK3CA, and HER2 alterations specifically correlate with clinicopathological characteristics of Bulgarian patients with breast cancer. Of these genes, only mutated p53 showed significant, though not independent, negative effect on overall survival.

  9. Effects of Modified Orthography on the Identification of Printed Words.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pufpaff, Lisa A.; Blischak, Doreen M.; Lloyd, Lyle L.

    2000-01-01

    Four adults with moderate to severe mental retardation received reading instruction under two conditions, traditional orthography and modified orthography in which a line drawing is superimposed upon the printed word. Results showed that traditional orthography was a more effective method for word identification. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  10. The Impact of Chemotherapy, Radiation and Epigenetic Modifiers in Cancer Cell Expression of Immune Inhibitory and Stimulatory Molecules and Anti-Tumor Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Chacon, Jessica Ann; Schutsky, Keith; Powell, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Genomic destabilizers, such as radiation and chemotherapy, and epigenetic modifiers are used for the treatment of cancer due to their apoptotic effects on the aberrant cells. However, these therapies may also induce widespread changes within the immune system and cancer cells, which may enable tumors to avoid immune surveillance and escape from host anti-tumor immunity. Genomic destabilizers can induce immunogenic death of tumor cells, but also induce upregulation of immune inhibitory ligands on drug-resistant cells, resulting in tumor progression. While administration of immunomodulatory antibodies that block the interactions between inhibitory receptors on immune cells and their ligands on tumor cells can mediate cancer regression in a subset of treated patients, it is crucial to understand how genomic destabilizers alter the immune system and malignant cells, including which inhibitory molecules, receptors and/or ligands are upregulated in response to genotoxic stress. Knowledge gained in this area will aid in the rational design of trials that combine genomic destabilizers, epigenetic modifiers and immunotherapeutic agents that may be synergized to improve clinical responses and prevent tumor escape from the immune system. Our review article describes the impact genomic destabilizers, such as radiation and chemotherapy, and epigenetic modifiers have on anti-tumor immunity and the tumor microenvironment. Although genomic destabilizers cause DNA damage on cancer cells, these therapies can also have diverse effects on the immune system, promote immunogenic cell death or survival and alter the cancer cell expression of immune inhibitor molecules. PMID:27854240

  11. Development of effective modified cellulase for cellulose hydrolysis process

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.W.; Kajiuchi, Toshio . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1995-02-20

    Cellulase was modified with amphilic copolymers made of [alpha]-allyl-[omega]-methoxy polyoxyalkylene (POA) and maleic acid anhydride (MAA) to improve the cellulose hydrolytic reactivity and cellulase separation. Amino groups of the cellulase molecule are covalently coupled with the MAA functional groups of the copolymer. At the maximum degree of modification (DM) of 55%, the modified cellulase activity retained more than 80% of the unmodified native cellulase activity. The modified cellulase shows greater stability against temperature, pH, and organic solvents, and demonstrated greater conversion of substrate than native cellulase does. Cellulase modification is also useful for controlling strong adsorption of cellulase onto substrate. Moreover, cellulase modified with the amphiphilic copolymer displays different separation characteristics which are new. One is a reactive two-phase partition and another is solubility in organic solvents. It appears that these characteristics of modified cellulase work very effectively in the hydrolysis of cellulose as a total system, which constitutes the purification of cellulase from culture broth, hydrolysis of cellulose, and recovery of cellulase from the reaction mixture.

  12. Hyaluronan-modified magnetic nanoclusters for detection of CD44-overexpressing breast cancer by MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Lim, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Hyun-Ouk; Jang, Eunji; Park, Joseph; Lee, Kwangyeol; Suh, Jin-Suck; Huh, Yong-Min; Haam, Seungjoo

    2011-11-01

    We fabricated hyaluronan-modified magnetic nanoclusters (HA-MNCs) for detection of CD44-overexpressing breast cancer using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. CD44 is closely associated with cancer growth, including proliferation, metastasis, invasion, and angiogenesis. Hence, pyrenyl hyaluronan (Py-HA) conjugates were synthesized as CD44-targetable surfactants with hyaluronan (HA) and 1-pyrenylbutyric acid (Py) to modify hyaluronan on hydrophobic magnetic nanocrystals. Subsequently, HA-MNCs were fabricated using the nano-emulsion method; magnetic nanocrystals were simultaneously self-assembled with Py-HA conjugates, and their physical and magnetic properties depended on the degree of substitution (DS) of Py in Py-HA conjugates. HA-MNCs exhibited superior targeting efficiency with MR sensitivity as well as excellent biocompatibility through in vitro/in vivo studies. This suggests that HA-MNCs can be a potent cancer specific molecular imaging agent via targeted detection of CD44 with MR imaging. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Amine-modified hyaluronic acid-functionalized porous silicon nanoparticles for targeting breast cancer tumors

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Patrick V.; Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Mäkilä, Ermei; Kaasalainen, Martti; Salonen, Jarno; Hirvonen, Jouni; Santos, Hélder A.

    2014-01-01

    Active targeting of nanoparticles to receptor-overexpressing cancer cells has great potential for enhancing the cellular uptake of nanoparticles and for reducing fast clearance of the nanoparticles from the body. Herein, we present a preparation method of a porous silicon (PSi)-based nanodelivery system for breast cancer targeting, by covalently conjugating a synthesized amide-modified hyaluronic acid (HA+) derived polymer on the surface of undecylenic acid-modified thermally hydrocarbonized PSi (UnTHCPSi) nanoparticles. The resulting UnTHCPSi–HA+ nanoparticles showed relatively small size, reduced polydispersibility, high biocompatibility, improved colloidal and human plasma stability, as well as enhanced cellular interactions and internalization. Moreover, we demonstrated that the enhanced cellular association of UnTHCPSi–HA+ relies on the capability of the conjugated HA+ to bind and consequently target CD44 receptors expressed on the surface of breast cancer cells, thus making the HA+-functionalized UnTHCPSi nanoparticles a suitable and promising nanoplatform for the targeting of CD44-overexpressing breast tumors and for drug delivery. PMID:25074521

  14. Modified Bat Algorithm for Feature Selection with the Wisconsin Diagnosis Breast Cancer (WDBC) Dataset

    PubMed

    Jeyasingh, Suganthi; Veluchamy, Malathi

    2017-05-01

    Early diagnosis of breast cancer is essential to save lives of patients. Usually, medical datasets include a large variety of data that can lead to confusion during diagnosis. The Knowledge Discovery on Database (KDD) process helps to improve efficiency. It requires elimination of inappropriate and repeated data from the dataset before final diagnosis. This can be done using any of the feature selection algorithms available in data mining. Feature selection is considered as a vital step to increase the classification accuracy. This paper proposes a Modified Bat Algorithm (MBA) for feature selection to eliminate irrelevant features from an original dataset. The Bat algorithm was modified using simple random sampling to select the random instances from the dataset. Ranking was with the global best features to recognize the predominant features available in the dataset. The selected features are used to train a Random Forest (RF) classification algorithm. The MBA feature selection algorithm enhanced the classification accuracy of RF in identifying the occurrence of breast cancer. The Wisconsin Diagnosis Breast Cancer Dataset (WDBC) was used for estimating the performance analysis of the proposed MBA feature selection algorithm. The proposed algorithm achieved better performance in terms of Kappa statistic, Mathew’s Correlation Coefficient, Precision, F-measure, Recall, Mean Absolute Error (MAE), Root Mean Square Error (RMSE), Relative Absolute Error (RAE) and Root Relative Squared Error (RRSE). Creative Commons Attribution License

  15. Dietary fat-dependent transcriptional architecture and copy number alterations associated with modifiers of mammary cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Ryan R; La Merrill, Michele; Hunter, Kent W; Sørensen, Peter; Threadgill, David W; Pomp, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a complex disease resulting from a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Among environmental factors, body composition and intake of specific dietary components like total fat are associated with increased incidence of breast cancer and metastasis. We previously showed that mice fed a high-fat diet have shorter mammary cancer latency, increased tumor growth and more pulmonary metastases than mice fed a standard diet. Subsequent genetic analysis identified several modifiers of metastatic mammary cancer along with widespread interactions between cancer modifiers and dietary fat. To elucidate diet-dependent genetic modifiers of mammary cancer and metastasis risk, global gene expression profiles and copy number alterations from mammary cancers were measured and expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) identified. Functional candidate genes that colocalized with previously detected metastasis modifiers were identified. Additional analyses, such as eQTL by dietary fat interaction analysis, causality and database evaluations, helped to further refine the candidate loci to produce an enriched list of genes potentially involved in the pathogenesis of metastatic mammary cancer. PMID:20354763

  16. Common variants of the BRCA1 wild-type allele modify the risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Cox, David G; Simard, Jacques; Sinnett, Daniel; Hamdi, Yosr; Soucy, Penny; Ouimet, Manon; Barjhoux, Laure; Verny-Pierre, Carole; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Szabo, Csilla; Greene, Mark H; Mai, Phuong L; Andrulis, Irene L; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Caligo, Maria A; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Kaufman, Bella; Paluch, Shani S; Borg, Åke; Karlsson, Per; Askmalm, Marie Stenmark; Bustinza, Gisela Barbany; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Benítez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti A; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; Ausems, Margreet G E M; Aalfs, Cora M; van Asperen, Christi J; Devilee, Peter; Gille, Hans J J P; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Evans, D Gareth; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Adlard, Julian; Paterson, Joan; Eason, Jacqueline; Godwin, Andrew K; Remon, Marie-Alice; Moncoutier, Virginie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Lasset, Christine; Giraud, Sophie; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Sobol, Hagay; Eisinger, François; Bressac de Paillerets, Brigitte; Caron, Olivier; Delnatte, Capucine; Goldgar, David; Miron, Alex; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Buys, Saundra; Southey, Melissa C; Terry, Mary Beth; Singer, Christian F; Dressler, Anne-Catharina; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Hansen, Thomas V O; Johannsson, Oskar; Piedmonte, Marion; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Basil, Jack B; Blank, Stephanie; Toland, Amanda E; Montagna, Marco; Isaacs, Claudine; Blanco, Ignacio; Gayther, Simon A; Moysich, Kirsten B; Schmutzler, Rita K; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Fiebig, Britta; Caldes, Trinidad; Laframboise, Rachel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Chen, Xiaoqing; Beesley, Jonathan; Spurdle, Amanda B; Neuhausen, Susan L; Ding, Yuan C; Couch, Fergus J; Wang, Xianshu; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Bernard, Loris; Radice, Paolo; Easton, Douglas F; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Sinilnikova, Olga M

    2011-12-01

    Mutations in the BRCA1 gene substantially increase a woman's lifetime risk of breast cancer. However, there is great variation in this increase in risk with several genetic and non-genetic modifiers identified. The BRCA1 protein plays a central role in DNA repair, a mechanism that is particularly instrumental in safeguarding cells against tumorigenesis. We hypothesized that polymorphisms that alter the expression and/or function of BRCA1 carried on the wild-type (non-mutated) copy of the BRCA1 gene would modify the risk of breast cancer in carriers of BRCA1 mutations. A total of 9874 BRCA1 mutation carriers were available in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA) for haplotype analyses of BRCA1. Women carrying the rare allele of single nucleotide polymorphism rs16942 on the wild-type copy of BRCA1 were at decreased risk of breast cancer (hazard ratio 0.86, 95% confidence interval 0.77-0.95, P = 0.003). Promoter in vitro assays of the major BRCA1 haplotypes showed that common polymorphisms in the regulatory region alter its activity and that this effect may be attributed to the differential binding affinity of nuclear proteins. In conclusion, variants on the wild-type copy of BRCA1 modify risk of breast cancer among carriers of BRCA1 mutations, possibly by altering the efficiency of BRCA1 transcription.

  17. Common variants of the BRCA1 wild-type allele modify the risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Cox, David G.; Simard, Jacques; Sinnett, Daniel; Hamdi, Yosr; Soucy, Penny; Ouimet, Manon; Barjhoux, Laure; Verny-Pierre, Carole; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Szabo, Csilla; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Caligo, Maria A.; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Kaufman, Bella; Paluch, Shani S.; Borg, Åke; Karlsson, Per; Stenmark Askmalm, Marie; Barbany Bustinza, Gisela; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Benítez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti A.; van den Ouweland, Ans M.W.; Ausems, Margreet G.E.M.; Aalfs, Cora M.; van Asperen, Christi J.; Devilee, Peter; Gille, Hans J.J.P.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Evans, D. Gareth; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Adlard, Julian; Paterson, Joan; Eason, Jacqueline; Godwin, Andrew K.; Remon, Marie-Alice; Moncoutier, Virginie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Lasset, Christine; Giraud, Sophie; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Sobol, Hagay; Eisinger, François; Bressac de Paillerets, Brigitte; Caron, Olivier; Delnatte, Capucine; Goldgar, David; Miron, Alex; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Buys, Saundra; Southey, Melissa C.; Terry, Mary Beth; Singer, Christian F.; Dressler, Anne-Catharina; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Hansen, Thomas V.O.; Johannsson, Oskar; Piedmonte, Marion; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Basil, Jack B.; Blank, Stephanie; Toland, Amanda E.; Montagna, Marco; Isaacs, Claudine; Blanco, Ignacio; Gayther, Simon A.; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Fiebig, Britta; Caldes, Trinidad; Laframboise, Rachel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Chen, Xiaoqing; Beesley, Jonathan; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan C.; Couch, Fergus J.; Wang, Xianshu; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Bernard, Loris; Radice, Paolo; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Sinilnikova, Olga M.

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the BRCA1 gene substantially increase a woman's lifetime risk of breast cancer. However, there is great variation in this increase in risk with several genetic and non-genetic modifiers identified. The BRCA1 protein plays a central role in DNA repair, a mechanism that is particularly instrumental in safeguarding cells against tumorigenesis. We hypothesized that polymorphisms that alter the expression and/or function of BRCA1 carried on the wild-type (non-mutated) copy of the BRCA1 gene would modify the risk of breast cancer in carriers of BRCA1 mutations. A total of 9874 BRCA1 mutation carriers were available in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA) for haplotype analyses of BRCA1. Women carrying the rare allele of single nucleotide polymorphism rs16942 on the wild-type copy of BRCA1 were at decreased risk of breast cancer (hazard ratio 0.86, 95% confidence interval 0.77–0.95, P = 0.003). Promoter in vitro assays of the major BRCA1 haplotypes showed that common polymorphisms in the regulatory region alter its activity and that this effect may be attributed to the differential binding affinity of nuclear proteins. In conclusion, variants on the wild-type copy of BRCA1 modify risk of breast cancer among carriers of BRCA1 mutations, possibly by altering the efficiency of BRCA1 transcription. PMID:21890493

  18. Modified habitats influence kelp epibiota via direct and indirect effects.

    PubMed

    Marzinelli, Ezequiel M; Underwood, Antony J; Coleman, Ross A

    2011-01-01

    Addition of man-made structures alters abiotic and biotic characteristics of natural habitats, which can influence abundances of biota directly and/or indirectly, by altering the ecology of competitors or predators. Marine epibiota in modified habitats were used to test hypotheses to distinguish between direct and indirect processes. In Sydney Harbour, kelps on pier-pilings supported greater covers of bryozoans, particularly of the non-indigenous species Membranipora membranacea, than found on natural reefs. Pilings influenced these patterns and processes directly due to the provision of shade and indirectly by altering abundances of sea-urchins which, in turn, affected covers of bryozoans. Indirect effects were more important than direct effects. This indicates that artificial structures affect organisms living on secondary substrata in complex ways, altering the biodiversity and indirectly affecting abundances of epibiota. Understanding how these components of habitats affect ecological processes is necessary to allow sensible prediction of the effects of modifying habitats on the ecology of organisms.

  19. Enhancement of radiotherapy by ceria nanoparticles modified with neogambogic acid in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Feng; Zhang, Xiao Hong; Hu, Xiao Dan; Zhang, Wei; Lou, Zhi Chao; Xie, Li Hua; Liu, Pei Dang; Zhang, Hai Qian

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the main strategies for cancer treatment but has significant challenges, such as cancer cell resistance and radiation damage to normal tissue. Radiosensitizers that selectively increase the susceptibility of cancer cells to radiation can enhance the effectiveness of radiotherapy. We report here the development of a novel radiosensitizer consisting of monodispersed ceria nanoparticles (CNPs) covered with the anticancer drug neogambogic acid (NGA-CNPs). These were used in conjunction with radiation in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, and the efficacy and mechanisms of action of this combined treatment approach were evaluated. NGA-CNPs potentiated the toxic effects of radiation, leading to a higher rate of cell death than either treatment used alone and inducing the activation of autophagy and cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase, while pretreatment with NGA or CNPs did not improve the rate of radiation-induced cancer cells death. However, NGA-CNPs decreased both endogenous and radiation-induced reactive oxygen species formation, unlike other nanomaterials. These results suggest that the adjunctive use of NGA-CNPs can increase the effectiveness of radiotherapy in breast cancer treatment by lowering the radiation doses required to kill cancer cells and thereby minimizing collateral damage to healthy adjacent tissue. PMID:26316742

  20. Detection of Genes Modifying Sensitivity to Proteasome Inhibitors Using a shRNA Library in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    TITLE: Detection of genes modifying sensitivity to proteasome inhibitors using a shRNA Library in Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Gregory J...shRNA Library in Breast Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Gregory J. Hannon, Ph.D. 5d. PROJECT NUMBER...clinical trials for breast and lung cancers . We are identifying genes that mediate resistance against Velcade that could serve as potential drug

  1. Modified Devine Exclusion for Unresectable Distal Gastric Cancer in Symptomatic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Moreno, María Carmen; Martí-Obiol, Roberto; López, Fernando; Ortega, Joaquín

    2017-01-01

    Background In patients with outlet obstruction syndrome and/or severe anemia secondary to unresectable gastric cancer (GC), partial stomach-partitioning gastrojejunostomy, or modified Devine exclusion, is a surgical alternative. Methods A retrospective study was conducted on patients with unresectable distal GC treated with modified Devine exclusion as palliative surgery between February 2005 and December 2015. It consisted of a series of 10 patients with outlet obstruction syndrome and/or severe anemia. The outcomes of this technique were based on oral tolerance, blood transfusions, postoperative complications, and survival. Results Early oral tolerance and a low rate of blood transfusions were observed postoperatively. There was no postoperative mortality and a very low complication rate without anastomotic leakage. Median survival was 9 months. Conclusions Partial stomach-partitioning gastrojejunostomy is a safe procedure for unresectable GC which can improve the quality of life of these patients. PMID:28203132

  2. Codelivery of paclitaxel and small interfering RNA by octadecyl quaternized carboxymethyl chitosan-modified cationic liposome for combined cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ran; Wang, Shi-Bin; Chen, Ai-Zheng; Chen, Wei-Guang; Liu, Yuan-Gang; Wu, Wen-Guo; Kang, Yong-Qiang; Ye, Shi-Fu

    2015-09-01

    Conventional therapeutic approaches for cancer are limited by cancer cell resistance, which has impeded their clinical applications. The main goal of this work was to investigate the combined antitumor effect of paclitaxel with small interfering RNA modified by cationic liposome formed from modified octadecyl quaternized carboxymethyl chitosan. The cationic liposome was composed of 3β-[N-(N', N'-dimethylaminoethane)-carbamoyl]-cholesterol, dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine, and octadecyl quaternized carboxymethyl chitosan. The cationic liposome properties were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering and zeta potential measurements, transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and gel retardation assay. The cationic liposome exhibited good properties, such as a small particle size, a narrow particle size distribution, a good spherical shape, a smooth surface, and a good binding ability with small interfering RNA. Most importantly, when combined with paclitaxel and small interfering RNA, the composite cationic liposome induced a great enhancement in the antitumor activity, which showed a significantly higher in vitro cytotoxicity in Bcap-37 cells than liposomal paclitaxel or small interfering RNA alone. In conclusion, the results indicate that cationic liposome could be further developed as a codelivery system for chemotherapy drugs and therapeutic small interfering RNAs. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Development and evaluation of bevacizumab-modified pegylated cationic liposomes using cellular and in vivo models of human pancreatic cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuesters, Geoffrey M.

    Targeting the tumor vascular supply in a homogenous manner is a difficult task to achieve with the use of pegylated cationic liposomes (PCLs) alone. Our formulation consisting of bevacizumab conjugated to the distal end of PEG on PCLs was thus developed in an effort to eliminate some of this heterogeneity as well as to increase tumor targeting overall. This study focuses on pancreatic cancer, which has the poorest five-year survival rate of all cancers because of its late diagnosis. The addition of bevacizumab will target tumor areas because it binds to VEGF which is secreted by tumors in high levels. In vitro, we showed that pancreatic cancer cells (Capan-1, HPAF-II and PANC-1) all secrete VEGF into media at different levels, with Capan-1 producing the most and HPAF-II producing the least. A murine endothelial cell line, MS1-VEGF, produces and secretes the most VEGF. A human microvascular endothelial cell line (HMEC-1) was grown in two different conditions, with and without VEGF in the media. Modifying PCLs with bevacizumab enhanced the binding and uptake of PCLs by some pancreatic and endothelial cells in vitro, particularly the cells that had or secreted the most significant amount of VEGF in the media. This translated into enhanced tumor targeting in a biodistribution study using a Capan-1 subcutaneous pancreatic tumor model. This also showed enhanced blood retention compared to the unmodified PCLs while it diminished uptake by the spleen and increased uptake by the kidney. To test the therapeutic benefit of this enhanced uptake and targeting, an anti-angiogenic agent, 2-methoxyestradiol was incorporated into the formulation with 20% incorporation efficiency. Both the unmodified and modified drug-loaded PCLs were the least efficacious against Capan-1, moderately effective against HPAF-II, PANC-1, MS1-VEGF and HMEC-1 grown without VEGF in the media and most efficacious against HMEC-1 grown with VEGF which had the most VEGF present in the media. Multiple in vivo

  4. Immunotherapy with gene-modified T cells: limiting side effects provides new challenges.

    PubMed

    Stauss, H J; Morris, E C

    2013-11-01

    Genetic tools have been developed to efficiently engineer T-cell specificity and enhance T-cell function. Chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) use the antibody variable segments to direct specificity against cell surface molecules. T-cell receptors (TCR) can redirect T cells to intracellular target proteins, fragments of which are presented in the peptide-binding groove of HLA molecules. A recent clinical trial with CAR-modified T cells redirected against the B-cell lineage antigen CD19 showed dramatic clinical benefit in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia patients. Similarly, impressive clinical responses were seen in melanoma and synovial cell carcinoma with TCR-modified T cells redirected against the melanocyte lineage antigen MART-1 and the testis-cancer antigen NY-ESO-1. However, on and off-target toxicity was associated with most of these clinical responses, and fatal complications have been observed in some patients treated with gene modified T cells. This review will discuss factors that might contribute to toxic side effects of therapy with gene modified T cells, and outline potential strategies to retain anticancer activity while reducing unwanted side effects.

  5. Comparative histopathological characterization of prostate cancer in Saudi patients by conventional and 2005 ISUP modified gleason systems.

    PubMed

    Al Suhaibani, Entissar Sulaiman; Kizilbash, Nadeem Abbas; Al Beladi, Fatima

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the characterization of prostate cancer using the conventional and 2005 ISUP modified Gleason systems. The study employed samples from 40 prostate cancer patients with resection, biopsy and RP materials. The majority of cases (95%) comprised adenocarcinoma of the prostate with a modified combined Gleason score of 7 in 20 of the cases (50%). Upgrading of Gleason scores to a score of 7 occurred in more than 45% of the cases. The study successfully showed that by the use of the 2005 ISUP modified Gleason system, score 6 cancers decreased from 25% to 17.5% of cases, whereas score 7 cancers increased from 45% to 50%.

  6. Pre-Clinical Studies of Epigenetic Therapies Targeting Histone Modifiers in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huffman, Kenneth; Martinez, Elisabeth D.

    2013-01-01

    Treatment options for lung cancer patients have been generally limited to standard therapies or targeted interventions which involve a small number of known mutations. Although the targeted therapies are initially successful, they most often result in drug resistance, relapse, and mortality. We now know that the complexity of lung cancer comes not only from genomic changes, but also from aberrant epigenetic regulatory events. Epigenetic therapies have shown promise as single agents in the treatment of hematological malignancies but have yet to meet this expectation in solid tumors thus fostering researchers to pursue new approaches in the development and use of epigenetic interventions. Here, we review some recent pre-clinical findings involving the use of drugs targeting histone modifying enzymes both as single agents and as co-therapies against lung cancer. A greater understanding of the impact of these epigenetic compounds in lung cancer signaling is needed and further evaluation in vivo is warranted in several cases based on the pre-clinical activity of a subset of compounds discussed in this review, including drugs co-targeting HDACs and EGF receptor, targeting Brd4 and targeting Jumonji histone demethylases. PMID:24058902

  7. Ubiquitin-Fold Modifier 1 Acts as a Positive Regulator of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Hee Min; Park, Jong Ho; Jeon, Young Joo; Chung, Chin Ha

    2015-01-01

    Estrogen receptor-α (ERα) is a steroid hormone-sensitive transcription factor that plays a critical role in development of breast cancer. The binding of estrogen to ERα triggers the recruitment of transcriptional co-activators as well as chromatin remodeling factors to estrogen-responsive elements (ERE) of ERα target genes. This process is tightly associated with post-translational modifications (PTMs) of ERα and its co-activators for promotion of transcriptional activation, which leads to proliferation of a large subset of breast tumor cells. These PTMs include phosphorylation, acetylation, methylation, and conjugation by ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like proteins. Ubiquitin-fold modifier 1 (UFM1), one of ubiquitin-like proteins, has recently been shown to be ligated to activating signal co-integrator 1 (ASC1), which acts as a transcriptional co-activator of nuclear receptors. Here, we discuss the mechanistic connection between ASC1 modification by UFM1 and ERα transactivation, and highlight how the interplay of these processes is involved in development of breast cancer. We also discuss potential use of UFM1-conjugating system as therapeutic targets against not only breast cancer but also other nuclear receptor-mediated cancers. PMID:25852645

  8. [Reconstruction of zygomatic-facial massive defect using modified bilobed flap after resection of skin cancer].

    PubMed

    Ling, Bin; Abass, Keremu; Hu, Mei; Yin, Xiaopeng; Hu, Lulu; Lin, Zhaoquan; Gong, Zhongcheng

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the clinical application of the modified bilobed flap in the reconstruction of zygomatic-facial massive defect after resection of skin cancer. Between August 2009 and October 2011, 15 patients with skin cancer in the zygomatic-facial region underwent defect reconstruction using modified bilobed flaps after surgical removal. There were 12 males and 3 females, aged 52-78 years (mean, 64.1 years). The disease duration was 1-14 months (mean, 4.6 months). Among the patients, there were 11 cases of basal cell carcinoma and 4 cases of squamous cell carcinoma; 1 patient had infection and the others had no skin ulceration; and tumor involved the skin layer in all patients. According to TNM staging, 13 cases were rated as T2N0M2 and 2 cases as T3N0M3. The defect size ranged from 4.0 cm x 2.5 cm to 6.5 cm x 4.0 cm after cancer resection. The modified bilobed flaps consisting of pre-auricular flap and post-auricular flap was used to repair the defect after cancer resection. The size ranged from 4.0 cm x 2.5 cm to 6.5 cm x 4.0 cm of the first flap and from 3.0 cm x 2.0 cm to 5.0 cm x 3.0 cm of the second flap. Partial incision dehiscence occurred in 1 case, and was cured after dressing change; the flaps survived and incision healed primarily in the other cases. Fourteen patients were followed up 12-24 months (mean, 18.7 months). No recurrence was found, and the patients had no obvious face asymmetry or skin scar with normal closure of eyelid and facial nerve function. At last follow-up, the results were very satisfactory in 5 cases, satisfactory in 7 cases, generally satisfactory in 1 case, and dissatisfactory in 1 case. The pre- and post-auricular bilobed flaps could be used to reconstruct the massive defects in the zygomatic-facial region after resection of skin cancer.

  9. Former poison gas workers and cancer: incidence and inhibition of tumor formation by treatment with biological response modifier N-CWS.

    PubMed Central

    Yamakido, M; Ishioka, S; Hiyama, K; Maeda, A

    1996-01-01

    Mustard gas is known to have mutagenic and carcinogenic effects on animal and human cells. In this report, 1,632 male Japanese who worked in poison gas factories at some time between the years 1927 and 1945 were studied to determine comparative risk for development of cancer, the reference population being data on Japanese males overall. The standardized mortality ratio (SMR) for lung cancer in workers directly and indirectly involved in the production of mustard gas was significantly elevated. In addition, SMR for lung cancer in worker who had worked for more than 5 years was also significantly elevated. Thus, poison gas workers who had engaged in the production of mustard gas or related work for more than 5 years are a high-risk group for lung cancer. Under the cancer preventive program, Nocardia rubra cell-wall skeleton (N-CWS) was administered to 146 former poison gas workers. During a 4.5 year observation period, development of cancers was found in 7 treated workers and 17 untreated controls. After elimination of the influence of smoking level, a significant suppression of development of cancers was noted in the N-CWS-treated workers as compared to the untreated controls. Although the molecular mechanisms of carcinogenesis in former poison gas workers remains unclear, our study proposes the possible effect of biological response modifiers in the prevention of cancer development in high-risk human subjects. PMID:8781369

  10. Development of generic quality indicators for patient-centered cancer care by using a RAND modified Delphi method.

    PubMed

    Uphoff, Eleonora P M M; Wennekes, Lianne; Punt, Cornelis J A; Grol, Richard P T M; Wollersheim, Hub C H; Hermens, Rosella P M G; Ottevanger, Petronella B

    2012-01-01

    Despite growing attention to patient-centered care, the needs of cancer patients are not always met. Using a RAND modified Delphi method, this study aimed to systematically develop evidence-based indicators, to be used to measure the quality of patient-centered cancer care as a first step toward improvement. First, key recommendations were identified from literature and were distributed over 5 domains of patient-centered cancer care: communication, physical support, psychosocial care, after-care, and organization of care. Generic key recommendations, with best available evidence, were selected from guidelines. A multidisciplinary panel of patients and medical professionals (n = 14) rated and prioritized these recommendations in a written procedure. Subsequently, the panel discussed the recommendations at a consensus meeting. Key recommendations were identified for communication (n = 32), physical support (n = 13), psychosocial care (n = 25), after-care (n = 11), and organization of care (n = 11). For all domains, recommendations based on high-level evidence were identified except for after-care and physical support. The panel developed 17 indicators concerning criteria for communication and informed consent, evaluation of communication skills, provision of information, examination of emotional health, appointment of a care coordinator, physical complaints, follow-up, rehabilitation, psychosocial effects of waiting times, and self-management. A set of 17 indicators for patient-centered cancer care resulted from this study. Evidence support was available for most indicators. This set provides an opportunity to measure and improve the quality of patient-centered cancer care. It is generic and therefore applies to many patients.

  11. Can selenium be a modifier of cancer risk in CHEK2 mutation carriers?

    PubMed

    Gupta, Satish; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Lubinski, Jan; Jakubowska, Anna

    2013-11-01

    Selenium is an essential trace element for humans, playing an important role in various major metabolic pathways. Selenium helps to protect the body from the poisonous effects of heavy metals and other harmful substances. Medical studies have provided evidence of selenium supplementation in preventing certain cancers. Low and too high selenium (Se) status correlates with increased risk of e.g. lung, larynx, colorectal and prostate cancers. A higher level of selenium and supplementation with selenium has been shown to be associated with substantially reduced cancer mortality. Selenium exerts its biological roles through selenoproteins, which are involved in oxidoreductions, redox signalling, antioxidant defence, thyroid hormone metabolism and immune responses. Checkpoint kinase 2 (CHEK2) is an important signal transducer of cellular responses to DNA damage and acts as a tumour suppressor gene. Mutations in the CHEK2 gene have been shown to be associated with increased risks of several cancers. Four common mutations in CHEK2 gene (1100delC, IVS2+1G>A, del5395 and I157T) have been identified in the Polish population. Studies have provided evidence that CHEK2-truncating and/or missense mutations are associated with increased risk of breast, prostate, thyroid, colon and kidney cancers. The variability in penetrance and cancer expression in CHEK2 mutation carriers can probably be explained by the influence of other genetic or environmental factors. One of the possible candidates is Se, which together with genetic variations in selenoprotein genes may influence susceptibility to cancer risk.

  12. Physical, Heritable and Age-Related Factors as Modifiers of Radiation Cancer Risk in Patched Heterozygous Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Pazzaglia, Simonetta Pasquali, Emanuela M.Sc.; Tanori, Mirella; Mancuso, Mariateresa; Leonardi, Simona; Di Majo, Vincenzo; Rebessi, Simonetta; Saran, Anna

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To address the tumorigenic potential of exposure to low/intermediate doses of ionizing radiation and to identify biological factors influencing tumor response in a mouse model highly susceptible to radiogenic cancer. Methods and Materials: Newborn Ptc1 heterozygous mice were exposed to X-ray doses of 100, 250, and 500 mGy, and tumor development was monitored for their lifetime. Additional groups were irradiated with the same doses and sacrificed at fixed times for determination of short-term endpoints, such as apoptosis and early preneoplastic lesions in cerebellum. Finally, groups of Ptc1 heterozygous mice were bred on the C57BL/6 background to study the influence of common variant genes on radiation response. Results: We have identified a significant effect of low-intermediate doses of radiation (250 and 500 mGy) in shortening mean survival and inducing early and more progressed stages of tumor development in the cerebellum of Ptc1{sup +/-} mice. In addition, we show that age at exposure and heritable factors are potent modifiers of radiation-related cancer risk. Conclusions: The Ptc1 knockout mouse model offers a highly sensitive system that may potentially help to improve understanding and quantification of risk at low doses, such as doses experienced in occupational and medical exposures, and clarify the complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors underlying cancer susceptibility.

  13. Oral complications of cancer therapies. Pretherapy interventions to modify salivary dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, A.; Atkinson, J.C.; Macynski, A.A.; Fox, P.C. )

    1990-01-01

    Salivary gland dysfunction is a common side effect of cancer therapies. Salivary secretions are reduced rapidly after starting head and neck radiotherapy. Salivary gland dysfunction has also been linked to bone marrow transplantation and to cytotoxic chemotherapy. Salivary gland stimulation during radiation has been suggested as a means of reducing radiation damage. Results of an ongoing study investigating the effects of pilocarpine on radiation-induced salivary gland dysfunction suggest that parotid function was preserved, but not submandibular/sublingual function. Also, patients receiving pilocarpine had less frequent oral complaints. Further research is necessary to develop means of preventing or alleviating the salivary side effects of cancer therapies. 37 references.

  14. Attractive Casimir effect in an infrared modified gluon bag model

    SciTech Connect

    Oxman, L.E.; Amaral, R.L.P.G.

    2005-12-15

    In this work, we are motivated by previous attempts to derive the vacuum contribution to the bag energy in terms of familiar Casimir energy calculations for spherical geometries. A simple infrared modified model is introduced which allows studying the effects of the analytic structure as well as the geometry in a clear manner. In this context, we show that if a class of infrared vanishing effective gluon propagators is considered, then the renormalized vacuum energy for a spherical bag is attractive, as required by the bag model to adjust hadron spectroscopy.

  15. Three Measurable and Modifiable Enteric Microbial Biotransformations Relevant to Cancer Prevention and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Interdisciplinary scientific evaluation of the human microbiota has identified three enteric microbial biotransformations of particular relevance for human health and well-being, especially cancer. Two biotransformations are counterproductive; one is productive. First, selective bacteria can reverse beneficial hepatic hydroxylation to produce toxic secondary bile acids, especially deoxycholic acid. Second, numerous bacterial species can reverse hepatic detoxification—in a sense, retoxify hormones and xeonobiotics—by deglucuronidation. Third, numerous enteric bacteria can effect a very positive biotransformation through the production of butyrate, a small chain fatty acid with anti-cancer activity. Each biotransformation is addressed in sequence for its relevance in representative gastrointestinal and extra-intestinal cancers. This is not a complete review of their connection with every type of cancer. The intent is to introduce the reader to clinically relevant microbial biochemistry plus the emerging evidence that links these to both carcinogenesis and treatment. Included is the evidence base to guide counseling for potentially helpful dietary adjustments. PMID:24891992

  16. Population attributable risk of modifiable risk factors associated with invasive breast cancer in women aged 45-69 years in Queensland, Australia.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Louise F; Page, Andrew N; Dunn, Nathan A M; Pandeya, Nirmala; Protani, Melinda M; Taylor, Richard J

    2013-12-01

    To quantify the population attributable risk of key modifiable risk factors associated with breast cancer incidence in Queensland, Australia. Population attributable fractions (PAFs) for high body mass index (BMI), use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT), alcohol consumption and inadequate physical activity were calculated, using prevalence data from a representative survey of women attending mammographic screening at BreastScreen Queensland in 2008 and relative risk estimates sourced from published literature. Attributable cancers were calculated using 'underlying' breast cancer incidence data for 2008 based on Poisson regression models, adjusting for the inflation of incidence due to the effects of mammographic screening. Attributable burden of breast cancer due to high body mass index (BMI), use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT), alcohol consumption and inadequate physical activity. In Queensland women aged 45-69 years, an estimated 12.1% (95% CI: 11.6-12.5%) of invasive breast cancers were attributable to high BMI in post-menopausal women who have never used HRT; 2.8% (95% CI: 2.7-2.9%) to alcohol consumption; 7.6% (95% CI: 7.4-7.9%) to inadequate physical activity in post-menopausal women and 6.2% (95% CI: 5.5-7.0%) to current use of HRT after stratification by BMI and type of HRT used. Combined, just over one quarter (26.0%; 95% CI: 25.4-26.6%) of all invasive breast cancers in Queensland women aged 45-69 years in 2008 were attributable to these modifiable risk factors. There is benefit in targeting prevention strategies to modify lifestyle behaviours around BMI, physical activity, HRT use and alcohol consumption, as a reduction in these risk factors could decrease invasive breast cancer incidence in the Queensland population. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. CAR-modified T-cell therapy for cancer: an updated review.

    PubMed

    Haji-Fatahaliha, Mostafa; Hosseini, Maryam; Akbarian, Asiye; Sadreddini, Sanam; Jadidi-Niaragh, Farhad; Yousefi, Mehdi

    2016-09-01

    The use of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T cells is a promising approach for cancer immunotherapy. These genetically modified receptors contain an antigen-binding moiety, a hinge region, a transmembrane domain, and an intracellular costimulatory domain resulting in T-cell activation subsequent to antigen binding. Optimal tumor removal through CAR-modified T cells requires suitable target antigen selection, co-stimulatory signaling domain, and the ability of CAR T cells to traffic, persist, and retain antitumor function after adoptive transfer. There are several elements which can improve antitumor function of CAR T cells, including signaling, conditioning chemotherapy and irradiation, tumor burden of the disease, T-cell phenotype, and supplementary cytokine usage. This review outlines four generations of CAR. The pre-clinical and clinical studies showed that this technique has a great potential for treatment of solid and hematological malignancies. The main purpose of the current review is to focus on the pre-clinical and clinical developments of CAR-based immunotherapy.

  18. Family history of breast cancer and short-term effects of childbirths on breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Albrektsen, Grethe; Heuch, Ivar; Thoresen, Steinar; Kvåle, Gunnar

    2006-09-15

    The long-term protective effect of a pregnancy on breast cancer risk is preceded by a short-term adverse effect, possibly reflecting a promoting effect of pregnancy hormones. In the present study, we explore whether a family history of breast cancer modifies time-related effects of pregnancies, with special emphasis on the transient increase in risk of breast cancer shortly after birth. Our study cohort comprises 1,067,289 Norwegian women aged 20-74 years. The mean follow-up time was 18 years. Incidence rate ratios were estimated by Poisson regression analyses of person-years at risk. Of the 7,377 women diagnosed with breast cancer during follow-up, a total of 828 (11%) had a mother or a sister with breast cancer diagnosis. Women with a family history of breast cancer had a 2-3-fold higher risk of breast cancer than did women without any affected family member, highest for those with a relative diagnosed before they were 50 years. Similar to women without a familial excess risk, increasing parity was associated with an overall protective effect among women with a familial predisposition, regardless of age at diagnosis of the relative. Whereas women with no familial excess risk experienced a transient increase in risk mainly after late age births, women with a family history of breast cancer experienced an adverse effect of pregnancies also at younger ages. The present results give further support to the hypothesis that the adverse effect of a term birth can be explained by a promoting effect of pregnancy hormones.

  19. Chemically-Modified Peptides Targeting the PDZ Domain of GIPC as a Therapeutic Approach for Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Chitta Ranjan; Rupasinghe, Chamila N.; Dutta, Shamit K; Bhattacharya, Santanu; Wang, Enfeng; Spaller, Mark R.; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2012-01-01

    GIPC (GAIP-interacting protein, C terminus) represents a new target class for the discovery of chemotherapeutics. While many of the current generation of anticancer agents function by directly binding to intracellular kinases or cell surface receptors, the disruption of cytosolic protein-protein interactions mediated by non-enzymatic domains is an underdeveloped avenue for inhibiting cancer growth. One such example is the PDZ domain of GIPC. Previously we developed a molecular probe, the cell permeable octapeptide CR1023 (N-myristoyl-PSQSSSEA), which diminished proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells. We have expanded upon that discovery using a chemical modification approach, and here report a series of cell permeable, side chain-modified lipopeptides that target the GIPC PDZ domain in vitro and in vivo. These peptides exhibit significant activity against pancreatic and breast cancers, both in vitro and in animal models. CR1166 (N-myristoyl-PSQSK(εN-4-bromobenzoyl)SK(εN-4-bromobenzoyl)A), bearing two halogenated aromatic units on alternate side chains, was found to be the most active compound, with pronounced down-regulation of EGFR/1GF-1R expression. We hypothesize that these organic acid-modified residues extend the productive reach of the peptide beyond the canonical binding pocket, which defines the limit of accessibility for the native proteinogenic sequences that the PDZ domain has evolved to recognize. Cell permeability is achieved with N-terminal lipidation using myristate, rather than a larger CPP (cell-penetrating peptide) sequence. This, in conjunction with optimization of targeting through side chain modification, has yielded an approach that will allow the discovery and development of next-generation cellular probes for GIPC PDZ as well as other PDZ domains. PMID:22292614

  20. Chemically modified peptides targeting the PDZ domain of GIPC as a therapeutic approach for cancer.

    PubMed

    Patra, Chitta Ranjan; Rupasinghe, Chamila N; Dutta, Shamit K; Bhattacharya, Santanu; Wang, Enfeng; Spaller, Mark R; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2012-04-20

    GIPC (GAIP-interacting protein, C terminus) represents a new target class for the discovery of chemotherapeutics. While many of the current generation of anticancer agents function by directly binding to intracellular kinases or cell surface receptors, the disruption of cytosolic protein-protein interactions mediated by non-enzymatic domains is an underdeveloped avenue for inhibiting cancer growth. One such example is the PDZ domain of GIPC. Previously we developed a molecular probe, the cell-permeable octapeptide CR1023 (N-myristoyl-PSQSSSEA), which diminished proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells. We have expanded upon that discovery using a chemical modification approach and here report a series of cell-permeable, side chain-modified lipopeptides that target the GIPC PDZ domain in vitro and in vivo. These peptides exhibit significant activity against pancreatic and breast cancers, both in cellular and animal models. CR1166 (N-myristoyl-PSQSK(εN-4-bromobenzoyl)SK(εN-4-bromobenzoyl)A), bearing two halogenated aromatic units on alternate side chains, was found to be the most active compound, with pronounced down-regulation of EGFR/1GF-1R expression. We hypothesize that these organic acid-modified residues extend the productive reach of the peptide beyond the canonical binding pocket, which defines the limit of accessibility for the native proteinogenic sequences that the PDZ domain has evolved to recognize. Cell permeability is achieved with N-terminal lipidation using myristate, rather than a larger CPP (cell-penetrating peptide) sequence. This, in conjunction with optimization of targeting through side chain modification, has yielded an approach that will allow the discovery and development of next-generation cellular probes for GIPC PDZ as well as for other PDZ domains.

  1. Climate Effects of Cloud Modified CCN-Cloud Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, S. R., Jr.; Hudson, J. G.

    2015-12-01

    Cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) play an important role in the climate system through the indirect aerosol effect (IAE). IAE is one of the least understood aspects of the climate system as many cloud processes are complicated. Many studies of aerosol-cloud interaction involve CCN interaction with cloud droplet concentrations (Nc), cloud microphysics, and radiative properties. However, fewer studies investigate how cloud processes modify CCN. Upon evaporation from non-precipitating clouds, CCN distributions develop bimodal shaped distributions (Hoppel et al. 1986). Activated CCN participate in cloud processing that is either chemical: aqueous oxidation; or physical: Brownian scavenging, collision and coalescence. Chemical processing does not change CCN concentration (NCCN) but reduces critical supersaturations (Sc; larger size) (Feingold and Kreidenweis, 2000) while physical processing reduces NCCN and Sc. These processes create the minima in the bimodal CCN distributions (Hudson et al., 2015). Updraft velocity (W) and NCCN are major factors on how these modified CCN distributions affect clouds. Panel a shows two nearby CCN distributions in the MArine Stratus/stratocumulus Experiment (MASE), which have similar concentrations, but the bimodal one (red) has been modified by cloud processing. In a simplified cloud droplet model, the modified CCN then produces higher Nc (panel b) and smaller droplet mean diameters (MD; panel c) when compared to the unmodified CCN (black) for W lower than 50 cm/s. The better CCN (lower Sc) increase competition among droplets reducing MD and droplet distribution spread (σ) which acts to reduce drizzle. Competition is created by limited available condensate due to lower S created by the low W (<50 cm/s) typical of stratus. The increased Nc of the modified CCN in stratus then increases IAE in the climate system. At higher W (>50 cm/s) typical of cumuli, Ncis reduced and MD is increased from the modified CCN distribution (panels b & c). Here

  2. Allelopathic effect of methanolic extracts of genetically modified and non-genetically modified canola on soybean.

    PubMed

    Syed, Kashmala; Shinwari, Zabta Khan

    2016-03-01

    This study on the effect of genetically modified (GM) and non-GM canola on soybean was carried out for physiological and biochemical biosafety assessment of GM canola. Methanolic extracts of GM and non-GM canola were assessed on seed germination and growth of soybean (Glycine max L.) under sterilized conditions. The extracts applied were of 3, 5, and 10% concentrations. The results showed that methanolic extracts of both GM and non-GM canola improved the germination percentage. However, germination rate index was significantly decreased with concomitant increase in mean germination time of soybean. A significant rate of decrease was observed in root fresh weight while increase in shoot length took place; when treatment of GM canola extracts were applied, however, no effect was observed in shoot fresh weight. A significant increase in protein contents, as well as phenolic, carotenoids, proline, and chlorophyll a content, was observed when different GM canola treatments (3, 5, and 10%) were applied to soybean; however, a significant rate of reduction in chlorophyll b content was observed by the application of GM canola treatment. Similar results were observed for superoxide dismutase, peroxidase, and catalase activities. A significant increase in the sugar content levels was observed when GM canola treatments (3, 5, and 10%) were applied to soybean.

  3. Dietary effects on breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, R.G. )

    1991-07-20

    Professor Lee and colleagues show a significant effect of dietary red meat intake, no effect of fat, and a protective effect of soya protein on the risk of breast cancer in young women in Singapore. They do not ascribe the red-meat effect to fat in the meat, and offer no alternative explanation. Red meat contains the most readily absorbed form of dietary iron, and there is evidence that increased body iron stores raise cancer risk, perhaps by one or both of two possible mechanisms: (1) boosting the availability of an essential nutrient for cancer cells, and (2) increasing the production of oxygen radicals. In addition, there is some evidence from studies in animals for a role for iron in mammary-tumor induction. Thompson et al administered 1-methyl-1-nitrosourea to groups of rats receiving normal rat chow, a low-iron diet, or an iron-supplemented diet. The group receiving dietary iron supplementation had the greatest mammary-tumor burden, whereas that receiving an iron-restricted diet had fewer tumors than the group on the normal diet (although this latter effect may have resulted merely from reduced body weight in the rats on an iron-restricted diet). The protective effect of soya protein seen by Lee et al may also be related to iron metabolism. Soy beans are a source of phytate, a constituent of most cereals, nuts, and legumes, that avidly binds iron in such a way that it is incapable of catalyzing the production of oxygen radicals. The protective effect of soya protein may be shared by increased intakes of other plant products that are high in phytate but either not consumed in quantity in Singapore or not assessed in the questionnaire Lee et al administered.

  4. Modified gold-based siRNA nanotherapeutics for targeted therapy of triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Shahbazi, Reza; Asik, Elif; Kahraman, Nermin; Turk, Mustafa; Ozpolat, Bulent; Ulubayram, Kezban

    2017-08-01

    In this study, we aimed to therapeutically target eukaryotic elongation factor 2 kinase (eEF-2K) in an in vivo triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) tumor model. We synthesized a highly monodisperse nanoformulation using polyethylenimine-modified gold nanoparticles (AuNP-PEI) as siRNA delivery vehicle and evaluated gene downregulation. We found that AuNP-PEI/eEF-2K nanoformulation was highly effective for in vitro and in vivo gene downregulation and showed remarkable antitumor efficacy that was associated with eEF-2K knockdown, inhibition of Src and MAPK-ERK signaling pathways in a TNBC orthotopic tumor model. Our study suggests that eEF-2K plays an important role in TNBC tumorigenesis and its inhibition by AuNP-PEI/eEF-2K siRNA-based nanotherapeutics may be a potential therapeutic strategy for TNBC.

  5. Unintended effects in genetically modified crops: revealed by metabolomics?

    PubMed

    Rischer, Heiko; Oksman-Caldentey, Kirsi-Marja

    2006-03-01

    In Europe the commercialization of food derived from genetically modified plants has been slow because of the complex regulatory process and the concerns of consumers. Risk assessment is focused on potential adverse effects on humans and the environment, which could result from unintended effects of genetic modifications: unintended effects are connected to changes in metabolite levels in the plants. One of the major challenges is how to analyze the overall metabolite composition of GM plants in comparison to conventional cultivars, and one possible solution is offered by metabolomics. The ultimate aim of metabolomics is the identification and quantification of all small molecules in an organism; however, a single method enabling complete metabolome analysis does not exist. Given a comprehensive extraction method, a hierarchical strategy--starting with global fingerprinting and followed by complementary profiling attempts--is the most logical and economic approach to detect unintended effects in GM crops.

  6. Specific growth inhibition of ErbB2‑expressing human breast cancer cells by genetically modified NK‑92 cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Yang, Bo; Sun, Tingting; Lin, Lin; Hu, Yi; Deng, Muhong; Yang, Junlan; Liu, Tianyi; Li, Jinyu; Sun, Shengjie; Jiao, Shunchang

    2015-01-01

    The natural killer cell line NK‑92 shows great cytotoxicity against various types of cancer. Several types of solid tumor cells, however, can effectively resist NK-mediated lysis by interaction of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules with NK cell inhibitory receptors. To generate a eukaryotic expression vector encoding chimeric antigen receptor scFv anti-erbB2-CD28-ζ and to investigate the expression and action of this chimeric antigen receptor in cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo, NK‑92 cells were genetically modified with an scFv anti-erbB2-CD28-ζ chimeric recep-tor by optimized electro-poration using the Amaxa Nucleofector system. The expression of the chimeric receptor was evaluated by RT-PCR and immunofluorescence. The ability of the genetically modified NK‑92 cells to induce cell death in tumor targets was assessed in vitro and in vivo. The transduced NK‑92-anti-erbB2 scFv-CD28-ζ cells expressing high levels of the fusion protein on the cell surface were analyzed by fluorescence-activated cell-sorting (FACS) analysis. These cells specifically enhanced the cell death of the erbB2‑expressing human breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-453 and SKBr3. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of genetically modified NK‑92 cells specifically reduced tumor size and lung metastasis of nude mice bearing established MDA-MB-453 cells, and significantly enhanced the survival period of these mice. The genetically modified NK‑92 cells significantly enhanced the killing of erbB2‑expressing cancer and may be a novel therapeutic strategy for erbB2‑expressing cancer cells.

  7. [Unintended effects assessment of genetically modified crops using omics techniques].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Li, Yan-Yan

    2013-12-01

    Safety assessment is the essential process for commercial application of genetically modified (GM) crops. Omics techniques can be used to evaluate the safety of GM crops unbiasedly at different biological levels, such as transcripts, proteins and metabolites. In the present review, the researches on unintended effects assessment of GM crops using transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomic techniques in recent ten years have been summarized. The facts show that the environmental factors (growing area and season) and genotype difference play greater roles than gene insertion does for most unintended variations in GM crops.

  8. RGD peptide-modified multifunctional dendrimer platform for drug encapsulation and targeted inhibition of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    He, Xuedan; Alves, Carla S; Oliveira, Nilsa; Rodrigues, João; Zhu, Jingyi; Bányai, István; Tomás, Helena; Shi, Xiangyang

    2015-01-01

    Development of multifunctional nanoscale drug-delivery systems for targeted cancer therapy still remains a great challenge. Here, we report the synthesis of cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide-conjugated generation 5 (G5) poly(amidoamine) dendrimers for anticancer drug encapsulation and targeted therapy of cancer cells overexpressing αvβ3 integrins. In this study, amine-terminated G5 dendrimers were used as a platform to be sequentially modified with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FI) via a thiourea linkage and RGD peptide via a polyethylene glycol (PEG) spacer, followed by acetylation of the remaining dendrimer terminal amines. The developed multifunctional dendrimer platform (G5.NHAc-FI-PEG-RGD) was then used to encapsulate an anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX). We show that approximately six DOX molecules are able to be encapsulated within each dendrimer platform. The formed complexes are water-soluble, stable, and able to release DOX in a sustained manner. One- and two-dimensional NMR techniques were applied to investigate the interaction between dendrimers and DOX, and the impact of the environmental pH on the release rate of DOX from the dendrimer/DOX complexes was also explored. Furthermore, cell biological studies demonstrate that the encapsulation of DOX within the G5.NHAc-FI-PEG-RGD dendrimers does not compromise the anticancer activity of DOX and that the therapeutic efficacy of the dendrimer/DOX complexes is solely related to the encapsulated DOX drug. Importantly, thanks to the role played by RGD-mediated targeting, the developed dendrimer/drug complexes are able to specifically target αvβ3 integrin-overexpressing cancer cells and display specific therapeutic efficacy to the target cells. The developed RGD peptide-targeted multifunctional dendrimers may thus be used as a versatile platform for targeted therapy of different types of αvβ3 integrin-overexpressing cancer cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Intracellular modifiers of integrin alpha 6p production in aggressive prostate and breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kacsinta, Apollo D; Rubenstein, Cynthia S; Sroka, Isis C; Pawar, Sangita; Gard, Jaime M; Nagle, Raymond B; Cress, Anne E

    2014-11-14

    Cancer metastasis is a multi-step process in which tumor cells gain the ability to invade beyond the primary tumor and colonize distant sites. The mechanisms regulating the metastatic process confer changes to cell adhesion receptors including the integrin family of receptors. Our group previously discovered that the α6 integrin (ITGA6/CD49f) is post translationally modified by urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) and its receptor, urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR), to form the variant ITGA6p. This variant of ITGA6 is a cleaved form of the receptor that lacks the ligand-binding domain. Although it is established that the uPA/uPAR axis drives ITGA6 cleavage, the mechanisms regulating cleavage have not been defined. Intracellular integrin dependent "inside-out" signaling is a major regulator of integrin function and the uPA/uPAR axis. We hypothesized that intracellular signaling molecules play a role in formation of ITGA6p to promote cell migration during cancer metastasis. In order to test our hypothesis, DU145 and PC3B1 prostate cancer and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines were treated with small interfering RNA targeting actin and the intracellular signaling regulators focal adhesion kinase (FAK), integrin linked kinase (ILK), and paxillin. The results demonstrated that inhibition of actin, FAK, and ILK expression resulted in significantly increased uPAR expression and ITGA6p production. Inhibition of actin increased ITGA6p, although inhibition of paxillin did not affect ITGA6p formation. Taken together, these results suggest that FAK and ILK dependent "inside-out" signaling, and actin dynamics regulate extracellular production of ITGA6p and the aggressive phenotype. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Modified Habitats Influence Kelp Epibiota via Direct and Indirect Effects

    PubMed Central

    Marzinelli, Ezequiel M.; Underwood, Antony J.; Coleman, Ross A.

    2011-01-01

    Addition of man-made structures alters abiotic and biotic characteristics of natural habitats, which can influence abundances of biota directly and/or indirectly, by altering the ecology of competitors or predators. Marine epibiota in modified habitats were used to test hypotheses to distinguish between direct and indirect processes. In Sydney Harbour, kelps on pier-pilings supported greater covers of bryozoans, particularly of the non-indigenous species Membranipora membranacea, than found on natural reefs. Pilings influenced these patterns and processes directly due to the provision of shade and indirectly by altering abundances of sea-urchins which, in turn, affected covers of bryozoans. Indirect effects were more important than direct effects. This indicates that artificial structures affect organisms living on secondary substrata in complex ways, altering the biodiversity and indirectly affecting abundances of epibiota. Understanding how these components of habitats affect ecological processes is necessary to allow sensible prediction of the effects of modifying habitats on the ecology of organisms. PMID:21755011

  11. Candidate genetic modifiers for breast and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Peterlongo, Paolo; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Moysich, Kirsten B; Rudolph, Anja; Schmutzler, Rita K; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Eeles, Rosalind A; Easton, Douglas F; Hamann, Ute; Wilkening, Stefan; Chen, Bowang; Rookus, Matti A; Schmidt, Marjanka K; van der Baan, Frederieke H; Spurdle, Amanda B; Walker, Logan C; Lose, Felicity; Maia, Ana-Teresa; Montagna, Marco; Matricardi, Laura; Lubinski, Jan; Jakubowska, Anna; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Nussbaum, Robert L; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Arun, Banu K; Karlan, Beth Y; Orsulic, Sandra; Lester, Jenny; Chung, Wendy K; Miron, Alex; Southey, Melissa C; Goldgar, David E; Buys, Saundra S; Janavicius, Ramunas; Dorfling, Cecilia M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Ding, Yuan Chun; Neuhausen, Susan L; Hansen, Thomas V O; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Jønson, Lars; Osorio, Ana; Martínez-Bouzas, Cristina; Benitez, Javier; Conway, Edye E; Blazer, Kathleen R; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Barile, Monica; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Mariette, Frederique; Fortuzzi, Stefano; Viel, Alessandra; Giannini, Giuseppe; Papi, Laura; Martayan, Aline; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Radice, Paolo; Vratimos, Athanassios; Fostira, Florentia; Garber, Judy E; Donaldson, Alan; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D Gareth R; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Brady, Angela; Cook, Jackie; Tischkowitz, Marc; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E; Kennedy, M John; Rogers, Mark T; Porteous, Mary E; Morrison, Patrick J; Platte, Radka; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley V; Ellis, Steve; Cole, Trevor; Godwin, Andrew K; Claes, Kathleen; Van Maerken, Tom; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Buecher, Bruno; Delnatte, Capucine; Houdayer, Claude; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Damiola, Francesca; Coupier, Isabelle; Barjhoux, Laure; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Golmard, Lisa; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Caron, Olivier; Pujol, Pascal; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Belotti, Muriel; Piedmonte, Marion; Friedlander, Michael L; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Copeland, Larry J; de la Hoya, Miguel; Segura, Pedro Perez; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; van Os, Theo A M; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; van der Hout, Annemarie H; Vreeswijk, Maaike P G; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ausems, Margreet G E M; van Doorn, Helena C; Collée, J Margriet; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Arason, Adalgeir; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Teixeira, Manuel R; Olswold, Curtis; Couch, Fergus J; Lindor, Noralane M; Wang, Xianshu; Szabo, Csilla I; Offit, Kenneth; Corines, Marina; Jacobs, Lauren; Robson, Mark E; Zhang, Liying; Joseph, Vijai; Berger, Andreas; Singer, Christian F; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Geschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng M; Phelan, Catherine M; Greene, Mark H; Mai, Phuong L; Rennert, Gad; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Andrulis, Irene L; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Laitman, Yael; Rantala, Johanna; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Ehrencrona, Hans; Askmalm, Marie Stenmark; Borg, Åke; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Healey, Sue; Lee, Andrew; Pharoah, Paul D P; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Friedman, Eitan

    2015-01-01

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and nongenetic modifying factors. In this study, we evaluated the putative role of variants in many candidate modifier genes. Genotyping data from 15,252 BRCA1 and 8,211 BRCA2 mutation carriers, for known variants (n = 3,248) located within or around 445 candidate genes, were available through the iCOGS custom-designed array. Breast and ovarian cancer association analysis was performed within a retrospective cohort approach. The observed P values of association ranged between 0.005 and 1.000. None of the variants was significantly associated with breast or ovarian cancer risk in either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers, after multiple testing adjustments. There is little evidence that any of the evaluated candidate variants act as modifiers of breast and/or ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. Genome-wide association studies have been more successful at identifying genetic modifiers of BRCA1/2 penetrance than candidate gene studies. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. WCRF/AICR recommendation adherence and breast cancer incidence among postmenopausal women with and without non-modifiable risk factors.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Sarah J O; Inoue-Choi, Maki; Lazovich, DeAnn; Robien, Kim

    2016-06-01

    Taller height, family history of breast cancer, greater number of years of potential fertility and nulliparity are established non-modifiable risk factors for postmenopausal breast cancer. Greater adherence to the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) diet, physical activity and body weight recommendations has previously been shown to be associated with lower breast cancer risk. However, no prior studies have evaluated whether women with non-modifiable risk factors receive similar benefits from recommendation adherence compared to women without these risk factors. In the Iowa Women's Health Study prospective cohort, we investigated whether associations of WCRF/AICR recommendation adherence differed by the presence/absence of non-modifiable breast cancer risk factors. Baseline (1986) questionnaire data from 36,626 postmenopausal women were used to create adherence scores for the WCRF/AICR recommendations (maximum score = 8.0). Overall and single recommendation adherence in relation to breast cancer risk (n = 3,189 cases) across levels of non-modifiable risk factors were evaluated using proportional hazards regression. Mean adherence score was 5.0 points (range: 0.5-8.0). Higher adherence scores (score ≥ 6.0 vs. ≤ 3.5, HR = 0.76, 95% CI = 0.67-0.87), and adherence to the individual recommendations for body weight and alcohol intake were associated with a lower breast cancer incidence. While not statistically significant among women with more non-modifiable risk factors (score ≥ 6.0 vs. ≤ 3.5, HR = 0.76, 95% CI = 0.36-1.63), hazard ratios were comparable to women with the no non-modifiable risk factors (score ≥ 6.0 vs. ≤ 3.5, HR = 0.74, 95% CI = 0.49-0.93) (p-interaction = 0.57). WCRF/AICR recommendation adherence is associated with lower breast cancer risk, regardless of non-modifiable risk factor status. © 2016 UICC.

  13. WCRF/AICR recommendation adherence and breast cancer incidence among postmenopausal women with and without non-modifiable risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Sarah J. O.; Inoue-Choi, Maki; Lazovich, DeAnn; Robien, Kim

    2017-01-01

    Taller height, family history of breast cancer, greater number of years of potential fertility and nulliparity are established non-modifiable risk factors for postmenopausal breast cancer. Greater adherence to the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) diet, physical activity and body weight recommendations has previously been shown to be associated with lower breast cancer risk. However, no prior studies have evaluated whether women with non-modifiable risk factors receive similar benefits from recommendation adherence compared to women without these risk factors. In the Iowa Women’s Health Study prospective cohort, we investigated whether associations of WCRF/AICR recommendation adherence differed by the presence/absence of non-modifiable breast cancer risk factors. Baseline (1986) questionnaire data from 36,626 postmenopausal women were used to create adherence scores for the WCRF/AICR recommendations (maximum score=8.0). Overall and single recommendation adherence in relation to breast cancer risk (n=3,189 cases) across levels of non-modifiable risk factors were evaluated using proportional hazards regression. Mean adherence score was 5.0 points (range: 0.5–8.0). Higher adherence scores (score ≥6.0 vs. ≤3.5, HR=0.76, 95% CI=0.67–0.87), and adherence to the individual recommendations for body weight and alcohol intake were associated with a lower breast cancer incidence. While not statistically significant among women with more non-modifiable risk factors (score ≥6.0 vs. ≤3.5, HR=0.76, 95% CI=0.36–1.63), hazard ratios were comparable to women with the no non-modifiable risk factors (score ≥6.0 vs. ≤3.5, HR=0.74, 95% CI=0.49–0.93) (p-interaction=0.57). WCRF/AICR recommendation adherence is associated with lower breast cancer risk, regardless of non-modifiable risk factor status. PMID:26756307

  14. Effects of Modifier Type on Properties of in Situ Organo-Montmorillonite Modified Wood Flour/Poly(lactic acid) Composites.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ru; Chen, Yu; Cao, Jinzhen

    2016-01-13

    Wood flour (WF) was modified with sodium-montmorillonite (Na-MMT) and two types of surfactant modifiers, namely, didecyl dimethylammonium chloride (DDAC) and sodium dodecyl sulfonate (SDS) though a two-step process inside WF. The thus-modified WFs were characterized, and the effects of MMT type on physical, mechanical, and thermal properties of their composites with poly(lactic acid) (PLA) were investigated. The results showed: (1) either DDAC or SDS could modified Na-MMT into OMMT, and then uniformly distributed in WF cell walls; (2) OMMT improved the physical properties, most mechanical properties, and thermal properties of the composites except for the impact strength; and (3) compared with SDS, DDAC seemed to perform better in properties of composites. However, DDAC showed some negative effect on the early stage of composite thermal decomposition.

  15. Modified de Gramont with oxaliplatin in the first-line treatment of advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Braun, M S; Adab, F; Bradley, C; McAdam, K; Thomas, G; Wadd, N J; Rea, D; Philips, R; Twelves, C; Bozzino, J; MacMillan, C; Saunders, M P; Counsell, R; Anderson, H; McDonald, A; Stewart, J; Robinson, A; Davies, S; Richards, F J; Seymour, M T

    2003-10-06

    We previously reported high activity for oxaliplatin and a modified de Gramont regimen (OxMdG) in a single centre study of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. We now report results with a further 56 patients treated at 14 centres. Low rates of grade 3 and 4 toxicity were seen, with no toxic deaths. Objective response rates were CR/PR=53%; NC=34.7%; PD=12.2%. Median time to progression was 8.3 months and overall survival was 14.5 months. This regimen is more convenient than those based around the conventional de Gramont regimen but is highly active and well tolerated; it forms part of a current UK MRC phase 3 trial.

  16. Dark energy or modified gravity? An effective field theory approach

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomfield, Jolyon; Flanagan, Éanna É.; Park, Minjoon; Watson, Scott E-mail: eef3@cornell.edu E-mail: gswatson@syr.edu

    2013-08-01

    We take an Effective Field Theory (EFT) approach to unifying existing proposals for the origin of cosmic acceleration and its connection to cosmological observations. Building on earlier work where EFT methods were used with observations to constrain the background evolution, we extend this program to the level of the EFT of the cosmological perturbations — following the example from the EFT of Inflation. Within this framework, we construct the general theory around an assumed background which will typically be chosen to mimic ΛCDM, and identify the parameters of interest for constraining dark energy and modified gravity models with observations. We discuss the similarities to the EFT of Inflation, but we also identify a number of subtleties including the relationship between the scalar perturbations and the Goldstone boson of the spontaneously broken time translations. We present formulae that relate the parameters of the fundamental Lagrangian to the speed of sound, anisotropic shear stress, effective Newtonian constant, and Caldwell's varpi parameter, emphasizing the connection to observations. It is anticipated that this framework will be of use in constraining individual models, as well as for placing model-independent constraints on dark energy and modified gravity model building.

  17. Human adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cell pigment epithelium–derived factor cytotherapy modifies genetic and epigenetic profiles of prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zolochevska, Olga; Shearer, Joseph; Ellis, Jayne; Fokina, Valentina; Shah, Forum; Gimble, Jeffrey M.; Figueiredo, Marxa L.

    2014-01-01

    Background aims Adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (ASCs) are promising tools for delivery of cytotherapy against cancer. However, ASCs can exert profound effects on biological behavior of tumor cells. Our study aimed to examine the influence of ASCs on gene expression and epigenetic methylation profiles of prostate cancer cells as well as the impact of expressing a therapeutic gene on modifying the interaction between ASCs and prostate cancer cells. Methods ASCs were modified by lentiviral transduction to express either green fluorescent protein as a control or pigment epithelium–derived factor (PEDF) as a therapeutic molecule. PC3 prostate cancer cells were cultured in the presence of ASC culture–conditioned media (CCM), and effects on PC3 or DU145. Ras cells were examined by means of real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, EpiTect methyl prostate cancer–focused real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction arrays, and luciferase reporter assays. Results ASCs transduced with lentiviral vectors were able to mediate expression of several tumor-inhibitory genes, some of which correlated with epigenetic methylation changes on cocultured PC3 prostate cancer cells. When PC3 cells were cultured with ASC-PEDF CCM, we observed a shift in the balance of gene expression toward tumor inhibition, which suggests that PEDF reduces the potential tumor-promoting activity of unmodified ASCs. Conclusions These results suggest that ASC-PEDF CCM can promote reprogramming of tumor cells in a paracrine manner. An improved understanding of genetic and epigenetic events in prostate cancer growth in response to PEDF paracrine therapy would enable a more effective use of ASC-PEDF, with the goal of achieving safer yet more potent anti-tumor effects. PMID:24424267

  18. A non-synonymous polymorphism in IRS1 modifies risk of developing breast and ovarian cancers in BRCA1 and ovarian cancer in BRCA2 mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yuan C.; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Shani-Shimon–Paluch; Kaufman, Bella; Liljegren, Annelie; Lindblom, Annika; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Melin, Beatrice; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Byrski, Tomasz; Osorio, Ana; Cajal, Teresa Ramóny; Stavropoulou, Alexandra V; Benítez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti; Aalfs, Cora M.; de Lange, Judith L.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E.J.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; van Asperen, Christi J.; García, Encarna B. Gómez; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Jager, Agnes; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Easton, Douglas F.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve D.; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Ros; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Brewer, Carole; Tischkowitz, Marc; Godwin, Andrew K.; Pathak, Harsh; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Barjhoux, Laure; Léoné, Mélanie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; de Pauw, Antoine; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Dreyfus, Hélène; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Collonge-Rame, Marie-Agnès; Sokolowska, Johanna; Buys, Saundra; Daly, Mary; Miron, Alex; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy; John, Esther M; Southey, Melissa; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F; Maria, Muy-Kheng Tea; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Hansen, Thomas v. O.; Ejlertsen, Bent; Johannsson, Oskar Th.; Offit, Kenneth; Sarrel, Kara; Gaudet, Mia M.; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Piedmonte, Marion R; Andrews, Lesley; Cohn, David; DeMars, Leslie R.; DiSilvestro, Paul; Rodriguez, Gustavo; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Isaacs, Claudine; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Ramus, Susan J; Sucheston, Lara; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; Ganz, Patricia A.; Beattie, Mary S.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Meindl, Alfons; Arnold, Norbert; Niederacher, Dieter; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Gadzicki, Dorotehea; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Deissler, Helmut; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Kast, Karin; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Simard, Jacques; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Tomlinson, Gail E.; Weitzel, Jeffrey; Garber, Judy E.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Rubinstein, Wendy S.; Tung, Nadine; Blum, Joanne L.; Narod, Steven A.; Brummel, Sean; Gillen, Daniel L.; Lindor, Noralane; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Couch, Fergus J.; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Greene, Mark H.; Loud, Jennifer T.; Mai, Phuong L.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Thomassen, Mads; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Caligo, Maria A.; Lee, Andrew; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Neuhausen, Susan L.

    2012-01-01

    Background We previously reported significant associations between genetic variants in insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) and breast cancer risk in women carrying BRCA1 mutations. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether the IRS1 variants modified ovarian cancer risk and were associated with breast cancer risk in a larger cohort of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Methods IRS1 rs1801123, rs1330645, and rs1801278 were genotyped in samples from 36 centers in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). Data were analyzed by a retrospective cohort approach modeling the associations with breast and ovarian cancer risks simultaneously. Analyses were stratified by BRCA1 and BRCA2 status and mutation class in BRCA1 carriers. Results Rs1801278 (Gly972Arg) was associated with ovarian cancer risk for both BRCA1 [Hazard ratio (HR) = 1.43; 95% CI: 1.06–1.92; p = 0.019] and BRCA2 mutation carriers (HR=2.21; 95% CI: 1.39–3.52, p=0.0008). For BRCA1 mutation carriers, the breast cancer risk was higher in carriers with class 2 mutations than class 1 (mutations (class 2 HR=1.86, 95% CI: 1.28–2.70; class 1 HR=0.86, 95%CI:0.69–1.09; p-for difference=0.0006). Rs13306465 was associated with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 class 2 mutation carriers (HR = 2.42; p = 0.03). Conclusion The IRS1 Gly972Arg SNP, which affects insulin-like growth factor and insulin signaling, modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers and breast cancer risk in BRCA1 class 2 mutation carriers. Impact These findings may prove useful for risk prediction for breast and ovarian cancers in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. PMID:22729394

  19. Modifiable endoscopic factors that influence the adenoma detection rate in colorectal cancer screening colonoscopies.

    PubMed

    Jover, Rodrigo; Zapater, Pedro; Polanía, Eduardo; Bujanda, Luis; Lanas, Angel; Hermo, José A; Cubiella, Joaquín; Ono, Akiko; González-Méndez, Yanira; Peris, Antonio; Pellisé, María; Seoane, Agustín; Herreros-de-Tejada, Alberto; Ponce, Marta; Marín-Gabriel, José C; Chaparro, María; Cacho, Guillermo; Fernández-Díez, Servando; Arenas, Juan; Sopeña, Federico; de-Castro, Luisa; Vega-Villaamil, Pablo; Rodríguez-Soler, María; Carballo, Fernando; Salas, Dolores; Morillas, Juan D; Andreu, Montserrat; Quintero, Enrique; Castells, Antoni

    2013-03-01

    Adenoma detection rate (ADR) has become the most important quality indicator for colonoscopy. The aim of this study was to investigate which modifiable factors, directly related to the endoscopic procedure, influenced the ADR in screening colonoscopies. Observational, nested study. Multicenter, randomized, controlled trials. Asymptomatic people aged 50 to 69 years were eligible for a multicenter, randomized, controlled trial designed to compare colonoscopy and fecal immunochemical testing in colorectal cancer screening. A total of 4539 individuals undergoing a direct screening colonoscopy were included in this study. Colonoscopy. Bowel cleansing, sedation, withdrawal time in normal colonoscopies, and cecal intubation were analyzed as possible predictors of adenoma detection by using logistic regression analysis, adjusted for age and sex. In multivariate analysis, after adjustment for age and sex, factors independently related to the ADR were a mean withdrawal time longer than 8 minutes (odds ratio [OR] 1.51; 95% CI, 1.17-1.96) in normal colonoscopies and split preparation (OR 1.26; 95% CI, 1.01-1.57). For advanced adenomas, only withdrawal time maintained statistical significance in the multivariate analysis. For proximal adenomas, withdrawal time and cecal intubation maintained independent statistical significance, whereas only withdrawal time longer than 8 minutes and a <10-hour period between the end of preparation and colonoscopy showed independent associations for distal adenomas. Only endoscopic variables have been analyzed. Withdrawal time was the only modifiable factor related to the ADR in colorectal cancer screening colonoscopies associated with an increased detection rate of overall, advanced, proximal, and distal adenomas. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Anti-Tumor Effects after Adoptive Transfer of IL-12 Transposon-Modified Murine Splenocytes in the OT-I-Melanoma Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Galvan, Daniel L; O'Neil, Richard T; Foster, Aaron E; Huye, Leslie; Bear, Adham; Rooney, Cliona M; Wilson, Matthew H

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of gene modified T cells provides possible immunotherapy for patients with cancers refractory to other treatments. We have previously used the non-viral piggyBac transposon system to gene modify human T cells for potential immunotherapy. However, these previous studies utilized adoptive transfer of modified human T cells to target cancer xenografts in highly immunodeficient (NOD-SCID) mice that do not recapitulate an intact immune system. Currently, only viral vectors have shown efficacy in permanently gene-modifying mouse T cells for immunotherapy applications. Therefore, we sought to determine if piggyBac could effectively gene modify mouse T cells to target cancer cells in a mouse cancer model. We first demonstrated that we could gene modify cells to express murine interleukin-12 (p35/p40 mIL-12), a transgene with proven efficacy in melanoma immunotherapy. The OT-I melanoma mouse model provides a well-established T cell mediated immune response to ovalbumin (OVA) positive B16 melanoma cells. B16/OVA melanoma cells were implanted in wild type C57Bl6 mice. Mouse splenocytes were isolated from C57Bl6 OT-I mice and were gene modified using piggyBac to express luciferase. Adoptive transfer of luciferase-modified OT-I splenocytes demonstrated homing to B16/OVA melanoma tumors in vivo. We next gene-modified OT-I cells to express mIL-12. Adoptive transfer of mIL-12-modified mouse OT-I splenocytes delayed B16/OVA melanoma tumor growth in vivo compared to control OT-I splenocytes and improved mouse survival. Our results demonstrate that the piggyBac transposon system can be used to gene modify splenocytes and mouse T cells for evaluating adoptive immunotherapy strategies in immunocompetent mouse tumor models that may more directly mimic immunotherapy applications in humans.

  1. Calcitriol increases Dicer expression and modifies the microRNAs signature in SiHa cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    González-Duarte, Ramiro José; Cázares-Ordoñez, Verna; Romero-Córdoba, Sandra; Díaz, Lorenza; Ortíz, Víctor; Freyre-González, Julio Augusto; Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo; Larrea, Fernando; Avila, Euclides

    2015-08-01

    MicroRNAs play important roles in cancer biology. Calcitriol, the hormonal form of vitamin D3, regulates microRNAs expression in tumor cells. In the present study we asked if calcitriol would modify some of the components of the microRNA processing machinery, namely, Drosha and Dicer, in calcitriol-responsive cervical cancer cells. We found that calcitriol treatment did not affect Drosha mRNA; however, it significantly increased Dicer mRNA and protein expression in VDR-positive SiHa and HeLa cells. In VDR-negative C33-A cells, calcitriol had no effect on Dicer mRNA. We also found a vitamin D response element in Dicer promoter that interacts in vitro to vitamin D and retinoid X receptors. To explore the biological plausibility of these results, we asked if calcitriol alters the microRNA expression profile in SiHa cells. Our results revealed that calcitriol regulates the expression of a subset of microRNAs with potential regulatory functions in cancer pathways, such as miR-22, miR-296-3p, and miR-498, which exert tumor-suppressive effects. In summary, the data indicate that in SiHa cells, calcitriol stimulates the expression of Dicer possibly through the vitamin D response element located in its promoter. This may explain the calcitriol-dependent modulation of microRNAs whose target mRNAs are related to anticancer pathways, further adding to the various anticancer mechanisms of calcitriol.

  2. Rare alleles of the HRAS polymorphism do not modify the risk of breast or ovarian cancer in BRCA1 carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Phelan, C.; Tonin, P.; Lynch, H.T.

    1994-09-01

    The presence of one of the rare alleles of a minisatellite polymorphism at the HRAS locus on chromosome 11p15 has been associated with a roughly two-fold increase in the risk of breast cancer. The BRCA1 gene on chromosome 17q12-21 is responsible for the majority of the families with the breast-ovarian cancer syndrome. It is estimated that 87% of BRCA1 carriers will be affected with breast cancer by age 70. The relative risk for premenopausal breast cancer in carriers, compared to non-carriers, is roughly 100. Because of the wide range in ages of onset of cancer among BRCA1 carriers, it is likely that additional factors modify the risk of cancer. The role of other modifying genetic loci has not been studied. Through haplotype analysis we have identified 199 female BRCA1 carriers above the age of 20 years in 25 linked families. 127 of these women have been diagnosed with cancer and 72 are currently healthy. DNA was available on 59 carriers. Each sample was typed for the HRAS polymorphism by PCR, using primers flanking the minisatellite. Rare alleles were identified in 18 carriers. The penetrance of the BRCA1 gene was not higher among those women who carried a rare HRAS allele (mean age of onset 49 years) than among those who carried two common alleles (mean age of onset 43 years) (p= 0.59; log rank test). Similar results were obtained for ovarian cancer. These data do not support the hypothesis that the HRAS locus modified the risk of cancer among carriers of mutations in BRCA1.

  3. Effects of modified penoplasty for concealed penis in children.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao; Li, Ning; Luo, Yi-Ge; Wang, Hong; Tang, Xian-Ming; Chen, Jia-Bo; Dong, Chun-Qiang; Liu, Qiang; Dong, Kun; Su, Cheng; Yang, Ti-Quan

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of modified penoplasty in the management of concealed penis. We retrospectively reviewed 96 consecutive patients with concealed penis, which had been surgically corrected between July 2013 and July 2015. All patients underwent modified Shiraki phalloplasty. All patients were scheduled for regular follow-up at 1, 3, and 6 months after the surgery. Data on the patients' age, operative time, postoperative complications, and parents' satisfaction grade were collected and analyzed. The mean follow-up period was 17.4 months (range 7-31 months). The mean operative time was 63.2 ± 8.7 min. The mean perpendicular penile length was 1.89 ± 0.77 cm preoperatively and 4.42 ± 0.87 cm postoperatively, with an improved mean length of 2.5 ± 0.68 cm in the flaccid state postoperatively (p < 0.05). The patients' satisfaction grades after the surgery were improved significantly (p < 0.05). Fifty-two patients had penile lymphedema postoperatively; however, it disappeared spontaneously within 3 months. Additionally, postoperative wound infection occurred in two patients. There were no complications such as flap necrosis, penile shaft contracture, voiding difficulty, and erection difficulties. The modified Shiraki phalloplasty for concealed penis can achieve maximum utilization of prepuce to assure coverage of the exposed penile shaft. It has fewer complications, achieving marked asthetics, and functional improvement. It is a relatively ideal means for treating concealed penis.

  4. [Effect of KI modified clay on elemental mercury removal efficiency].

    PubMed

    Shen, Bo-Xiong; Chen, Jian-Hong; Cai, Ji; He, Chuan; Li, Zhuo

    2014-08-01

    Adsorption tests of elemental mercury were carried out by using KI modified clay (bentonite) in simulated flue gas under different conditions. Brunauer-Emett-Teller measurement (BET), Fourier Transform Infraredspectroscopy (FTIR) and Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) were used to analyze the physical and chemical properties of the materials. Compared with the original bentonite, Hg(0) removal efficiency and Hg(0) adsorption capacity were drastically improved by the KI treatment. The experiment results also indicated that temperature could enhance the property of Hg(0) adsorption. Chemical adsorption was the dominant part in the process of Hg(0) adsorption. O2 was a beneficial factor for Hg(0) adsorption. SO2 was found to have a slight promotional effect on Hg(0) adsorption. The existence of H2O exhibited a dramatic inhibitory effect on Hg(0) adsorption.

  5. Targeted and pH-responsive delivery of doxorubicin to cancer cells using multifunctional dendrimer-modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wen, Shihui; Liu, Hui; Cai, Hongdong; Shen, Mingwu; Shi, Xiangyang

    2013-09-01

    We report the use of multifunctional dendrimer-modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) for targeted and pH-responsive delivery of doxorubicin (DOX) into cancer cells. In this study, amine-terminated generation 5 poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers modified with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FI) and folic acid (FA) were covalently linked to acid-treated MWCNTs, followed by acetylation of the remaining dendrimer terminal amines to neutralize the positive surface potential. The formed multifunctional MWCNTs (MWCNT/G5.NHAc-FI-FA) were characterized via different techniques. Then, the MWCNT/G5.NHAc-FI-FA was used to load DOX for targeted and pH-responsive delivery to cancer cells overexpressing high-affinity folic acid receptors (FAR). We showed that the MWCNT/G5.NHAc-FI-FA enabled a high drug payload and encapsulation efficiency both up to 97.8% and the formed DOX/MWCNT/G5.NHAc-FI-FA complexes displayed a pH-responsive release property with fast DOX release under acidic environment and slow release at physiological pH conditions. Importantly, the DOX/MWCNT/G5.NHAc-FI-FA complexes displayed effective therapeutic efficacy, similar to that of free DOX, and were able to target to cancer cells overexpressing high-affinity FAR and effectively inhibit the growth of the cancer cells. The synthesized multifunctional dendrimer-modified MWCNTs may be used as a targeted and pH-responsive delivery system for targeting therapy of different types of cancer cells.

  6. Satisfactory surgical outcome of T2 gastric cancer after modified D2 lymphadenectomy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shupeng; Wu, Liangliang; Wang, Xiaona; Ding, Xuewei; Liang, Han

    2017-04-01

    Though D2 lymphadenectomy has been increasingly regarded as standard surgical procedure for advanced gastric cancer (GC), the modified D2 (D1 + 7, 8a and 9) lymphadenectomy may be more suitable than D2 dissection for T2 stage GC. The purpose of this study is to elucidate whether the surgical outcome of modified D2 lymphadenectomy was comparable to that of standard D2 dissection in T2 stage GC patients. A retrospective cohort study with 77 cases and 77 controls matched for baseline characteristics was conducted. Patients were categorized into two groups according to the extent of lymphadenectomy: the modified D2 group (mD2) and the standard D2 group (D2). Surgical outcome and recurrence date were compared between the two groups. The 5-year overall survival (OS) rate was 71.4% for patients accepted mD2 lymphadenectomy and 70.1% for those accepted standard D2, respectively, and the difference was not statistically significant. Multivariate survival analysis revealed that curability, tumor size, TNM stage and postoperative complications were independently prognostic factors for T2 stage GC patients. Patients in the mD2 group tended to have less intraoperative blood loss (P=0.001) and shorter operation time (P<0.001) than those in the D2 group. While there were no significant differences in recurrence rate and types, especially lymph node recurrence, between the two groups. The surgical outcome of mD2 lymphadenectomy was equal to that of standard D2, and the use of mD2 instead of standard D2 can be a better option for T2 stage GC.

  7. Do alcoholic beverages, obesity and other nutritional factors modify the risk of familial colorectal cancer? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Fardet, Anthony; Druesne-Pecollo, Nathalie; Touvier, Mathilde; Latino-Martel, Paule

    2017-09-07

    Individuals with family history of colorectal cancer are at higher risk of colorectal cancer than the general population. Until now, guidelines for familial colorectal cancer risk have only pointed at early diagnosis efforts via screening tests and surveillance, and payed scarce or no attention to lowering exposure to modifiable risk factors, notably nutritional factors. We conducted a systematic review of epidemiological studies investigating the associations between nutritional factors, family history of colorectal cancer, and colorectal cancer risk. From the 5312 abstracts identified until December 2016, 184 full text articles were examined for eligibility. Finally, 31 articles (21 from case-control studies, 9 from cohort studies and 1 from an intervention study) met inclusion criteria and were analyzed. Mainly, the combinations of family history of colorectal cancer and higher consumptions of alcoholic beverages, red or processed meat, or overweight/obesity increase the risk of colorectal cancer. Consistently, a strong increase is observed with the combinations of family history of colorectal cancer and unhealthy dietary patterns/lifestyles. Statistically significant interactions between these nutritional factors, family history of colorectal cancer and colorectal cancer risk are reported. Other data are inconclusive and additional prospective studies are needed. For the first time, our findings highlight that addressing high consumption of alcoholic beverages, red or processed meat, and overweight/obesity, and more largely the exposure to multiple unhealthy dietary/nutritional behaviors could offer new perspectives of prevention to individuals with family history of colorectal cancer. A better information of these patients and of health professionals on these nutritional modifiable risk factors is recommended. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Hyaluronic acid modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to CD44-overexpressing cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Meihua; Jambhrunkar, Siddharth; Thorn, Peter; Chen, Jiezhong; Gu, Wenyi; Yu, Chengzhong

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, a targeted drug delivery system has been developed based on hyaluronic acid (HA) modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs). HA-MSNs possess a specific affinity to CD44 over-expressed on the surface of a specific cancer cell line, HCT-116 (human colon cancer cells). The cellular uptake performance of fluorescently labelled MSNs with and without HA modification has been evaluated by confocal microscopy and fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis. Compared to bare MSNs, HA-MSNs exhibit a higher cellular uptake via HA receptor mediated endocytosis. An anticancer drug, doxorubicin hydrochloride (Dox), has been loaded into MSNs and HA-MSNs as drug delivery vehicles. Dox loaded HA-MSNs show greater cytotoxicity to HCT-116 cells than free Dox and Dox-MSNs due to the enhanced cell internalization behavior of HA-MSNs. It is expected that HA-MSNs have a great potential in targeted delivery of anticancer drugs to CD44 over-expressing tumors.

  9. [Construction of biotin-modified polymeric micelles for pancreatic cancer targeted photodynamic therapy].

    PubMed

    Deng, Chun-yue; Long, Ying-ying; Liu, Sha; Chen, Zhang-bao; Li, Chong

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we explored the feasibility of biotin-mediated modified polymeric micelles for pancreatic cancer targeted photodynamic therapy. Poly (ethylene glycol)-distearoyl phosphatidyl ethanolamine (mPEG2000-DSPE) served as the drug-loaded material, biotin-poly(ethylene glycol)-distearoyl phosphatidyl ethanolamine (Biotin-PEG3400-DSPE) as the functional material and the polymeric micelles were prepared by a thin-film hydration method. The targeting capability of micelles was investigated by cell uptake assay in vitro and fluorescence imaging in vivo and the amounts of Biotin-PEG-DSPE were optimized accordingly. Hypocrellin B (HB), a novel photosensitizer was then encapsulated in biotinylated polymeric micelles and the anti-tumor efficacy was evaluated systemically in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that micelles with 5 mol % Biotin-PEG-DSPE demonstrated the best targeting capability than those with 20 mol % or 0.5 mol % of corresponding materials. This formulation has a small particle size [mean diameter of (36.74 ± 2.16) nm] with a homogeneous distribution and high encapsulation efficiency (80.06 ± 0.19) %. The following pharmacodynamics assays showed that the biotinylated micelles significantly enhanced the cytotoxicity of HB against tumor cells in vitro and inhibited tumor growth in vivo, suggesting a promising potential of this formulation for treatment of pancreatic cancer, especially those poorly permeable, or insensitive to radiotherapy and chemotherapy.

  10. Genetic modifiers of menopausal hormone replacement therapy and breast cancer risk: A genome-wide interaction study

    PubMed Central

    Rudolph, Anja; Hein, Rebecca; Lindström, Sara; Beckmann, Lars; Behrens, Sabine; Liu, Jianjun; Aschard, Hugues; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Jean; Truong, Thérèse; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Menegaux, Florence; Brüning, Thomas; Harth, Volker; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Southey, Melissa; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Eriksson, Mikael; Humpreys, Keith; Darabi, Hatef; Olson, Janet E.; Stevens, Kristen N.; Vachon, Celine M.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nicholas; Schoemaker, Minouk; Webb, Penny M.; Guénel, Pascal; Brauch, Hiltrud; Giles, Graham; García-Closas, Montserrat; Czene, Kamila; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Couch, Fergus J.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Swerdlow, Anthony; Hunter, David J.; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Easton, Douglas F.; Hall, Per; Nevanlinna, Heli; Kraft, Peter; Chang-Claude, Jenny

    2013-01-01

    Women using menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) are at increased risk to develop breast cancer (BC). To detect genetic modifiers of the association between current use of MHT and BC risk, we conducted a meta-analysis of four genome-wide case-only studies followed by replication in eleven case-control studies. We used a case-only design to assess interactions between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and current MHT use on risk of overall and lobular BC. The discovery stage included 2,920 cases (541 lobular) from four genome-wide association studies. The top 1,391 SNPs showing P-values for interaction (Pint) <3.0×10−03 were selected for replication using pooled case-control data from eleven studies of the Breast Cancer Association Consortium, including 7,689 cases (676 lobular) and 9,266 controls. Fixed effects meta-analysis was used to derive combined Pint. No SNP reached genome-wide significance in either the discovery or combined stage. We observed effect modification of current MHT use on overall BC risk by two SNPs on chr13 near POMP (combined Pint≤8.9×10−06), two SNPs in SLC25A21 (combined Pint≤4.8×10−05), and three SNPs in PLCG2 (combined Pint≤4.5×10−05). The association between lobular BC risk was potentially modified by one SNP in TMEFF2 (combined Pint≤2.7×10−05), one SNP in CD80 (combined Pint≤8.2×10−06), three SNPs on chr17 near TMEM132E (combined Pint≤2.2×10−06), and two SNPs on chr18 near SLC25A52 (combined Pint≤4.6×10−05). In conclusion, polymorphisms in genes related to solute transportation in mitochondria, transmembrane signaling and immune cell activation are potentially modifying BC risk associated with current use of MHT. These findings warrant replication in independent studies. PMID:24080446

  11. Evaluation of Rint1 as a modifier of intestinal tumorigenesis and cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Otterpohl, Karla L.; Gould, Karen A.

    2017-01-01

    The Rad50 Interacting Protein 1 (Rint1) influences cellular homeostasis through maintenance of endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi and centrosome integrity and regulation of vesicle transport, autophagy and the G2/M checkpoint. Rint1 has been postulated to function as a tumor suppressor as well as an oncogene, with its role depending perhaps upon the precise cellular and/or experimental context. In humans, heterozygosity for germline missense variants in RINT1 have, in some studies, been associated with increased risk of both breast and Lynch syndrome type cancers. However, it is not known if these germline variants represent loss of function alleles or gain of function alleles. Based upon these findings, as well as our initial consideration of Rint1 as a potential candidate for Mom5, a genetic modifier of intestinal tumorigenesis in ApcMin/+ mice, we sought to explicitly examine the impact of Rint1 on tumorigenesis in ApcMin/+ mice. However, heterozygosity for a knockout of Rint1 had no impact on tumorigenesis in Rint1+/-; ApcMin/+ mice. Likewise, we found no evidence to suggest that the remaining Rint1 allele was lost somatically in intestinal tumors in ApcMin/+ mice. Interestingly, in contrast to what has been observed in Rint1+/- mice on a mixed genetic background, Rint1+/- mice on a pure C57BL/6J background did not show spontaneous tumor development. We also evaluated colorectal cancer data available in the COSMIC and ONCOMINE databases and found that RINT1 overexpression, as well as the presence of somatic missense mutations in RINT1 were associated with colorectal cancer development. In vitro evaluation of two missense variants in RINT1 suggested that such variants do have the potential to impact RINT1 function. PMID:28264000

  12. Evaluation of Modified Glasgow Prognostic Score for Pancreatic Cancer: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Imaoka, Hiroshi; Mizuno, Nobumasa; Hara, Kazuo; Hijioka, Susumu; Tajika, Masahiro; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Ishihara, Makoto; Yogi, Tatsuji; Tsutsumi, Hideharu; Fujiyoshi, Toshihisa; Sato, Takamitsu; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Niwa, Yasumasa; Yamao, Kenji

    2016-02-01

    The modified Glasgow prognostic score (mGPS) is known to be useful in determining the prognosis of cancers. However, the utility of mGPS for pancreatic cancer (PC) has been examined based primarily on a surgical series of early-stage cancers. The purpose of this study was to examine the utility of mGPS for PC of all stages using a retrospective cohort design. We conducted a retrospective cohort study using data from a computerized database. A total of 807 patients with pathologically confirmed PC were analyzed (mGPS-0, n = 620; mGPS-1, n = 153; mGPS-2, n = 34). Median overall survival (OS) was significantly worse for the mGPS-1 group than for the mGPS-0 group (5.8 vs 15.8 months, respectively) but was comparable between the mGPS-2 and mGPS-1 groups (4.8 vs 5.8 months, respectively). After adjustment, both mGPS-1 and mGPS-2 were independent predictive factors of OS (mGPS-1: hazard ratio, 1.772; 95% confidence interval, 1.417-2.215; mGPS-2: hazard ratio, 2.033; 95% confidence interval, 1.284-3.219). Subgroup analysis showed that OS was significantly worse in the mGPS-1 and mGPS-2 groups than in the mGPS-0 group for all except the following 2 subgroups: localized disease and curative resection. The present results show that the mGPS is an independent prognostic factor in patients with PC, especially for advanced-stage disease.

  13. Classifying linearly shielded modified gravity models in effective field theory.

    PubMed

    Lombriser, Lucas; Taylor, Andy

    2015-01-23

    We study the model space generated by the time-dependent operator coefficients in the effective field theory of the cosmological background evolution and perturbations of modified gravity and dark energy models. We identify three classes of modified gravity models that reduce to Newtonian gravity on the small scales of linear theory. These general classes contain enough freedom to simultaneously admit a matching of the concordance model background expansion history. In particular, there exists a large model space that mimics the concordance model on all linear quasistatic subhorizon scales as well as in the background evolution. Such models also exist when restricting the theory space to operators introduced in Horndeski scalar-tensor gravity. We emphasize that whereas the partially shielded scenarios might be of interest to study in connection with tensions between large and small scale data, with conventional cosmological probes, the ability to distinguish the fully shielded scenarios from the concordance model on near-horizon scales will remain limited by cosmic variance. Novel tests of the large-scale structure remedying this deficiency and accounting for the full covariant nature of the alternative gravitational theories, however, might yield further insights on gravity in this regime.

  14. 2'-O-methyl-modified phosphorothioate antisense oligonucleotides have reduced non-specific effects in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Byong Hoon; Bochkareva, Elena; Bochkarev, Alexey; Mou, Tung-Chung; Gray, Donald M

    2004-01-01

    Antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) have biological activity in treating various forms of cancer. The antisense effects of two types of 20mer ODNs, phosphorothioate-modified ODNs (S-ODNs) and S-ODNs with 12 2'-O-methyl groups (Me-S-ODNs), targeted to sites 109 and 277 of bcl-2 mRNA, were compared. Both types were at least as effective as G3139 (Genta, Inc.) in reducing the level of Bcl-2 protein in T24 cells following a 4 h transfection at a dose of 0.1 micro M. Circular dichroism spectra showed that both types formed A-form duplexes with the complementary RNA, and the melting temperatures were in the order of Me-S-ODN.RNA > normal DNA.RNA > S-ODN.RNA. In comparison with the S-ODN, the Me-S-ODN had reduced toxic growth inhibitory effects, was less prone to bind the DNA-binding domain A of human replication protein A, and was as resistant to serum nucleases. Neither type of oligomer induced apoptosis, according to a PARP-cleavage assay. Hybrids formed with Me-S-ODN sequences were less sensitive to RNase H degradation than those formed with S-ODN sequences. Despite this latter disadvantage, the addition of 2'-O-methyl groups to a phosphorothioate-modified ODN is advantageous because of increased stability of binding and reduced non-specific effects.

  15. Effect of surface modifiers on an ectoenzyme: granulocyte 5'-nucleotidase.

    PubMed

    Smolen, J E; Karnovsky, M L

    1980-05-01

    Several agents that react with plasma membranes, namely the native lectins concanavalin A, Ricinus communis agglutinin, and wheat germ agglutinin, the modified lectin succinyl concanavalin A, and sodium meta-periodate, inhibited the ecto-5'-nucleotidase of intact guinea pig granulocytes. Stimulation of the enzyme was not observed at any lectin concentration. Inhibition by native lectins could be blocked or reversed by appropriate competing hapten sugars. In the case of concanavalin A, reversal could be achieved at 37 degrees C, but not at 5 degrees C. When lectins were used in combination with each other, the effects were found to be largely independent. However, when concanavalin A and R. communis agglutinin were applied together, complications arose because the former lectin binds to the latter as well as to the cell surface. To avoid some of the complexities inherent in studying intact cell 5'-nucleotidase and to gain additional information about the system, two broken cell enzyme preparations were also examined. The enzyme of plasma membrane-enriched fractions was inhibited by all five agents mentioned above. 5'-Nucleotidase solubilized in sodium deoxycholate was inhibited by the four lectins but stimulated by periodate. The effects of the surface modifiers on kinetic data for all three enzyme preparations are consistent with the hypothesis that direct interactions with the enzyme molecule give rise to changes in Vmax; interactions at membrane sites other than 5'-nucleotidase itself could cause increases in apparent Km values. Effects of interactions of ectoenzymes with plant lectins may serve as models for phenomena that result from cell-cell interactions or from interactions of animal cells with lectin-like components of the cellular environment.

  16. Candidate genetic modifiers for breast and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Peterlongo, Paolo; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Rudolph, Anja; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Easton, Douglas F.; Hamann, Ute; Wilkening, Stefan; Chen, Bowang; Rookus, Matti A.; Schmidt, Marjanka K; van der Baan, Frederieke H.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Walker, Logan C.; Lose, Felicity; Maia, Ana-Teresa; Montagna, Marco; Matricardi, Laura; Lubinski, Jan; Jakubowska, Anna; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Arun, Banu K.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Orsulic, Sandra; Lester, Jenny; Chung, Wendy K.; Miron, Alex; Southey, Melissa C.; Goldgar, David E.; Buys, Saundra S.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Jønson, Lars; Osorio, Ana; Martínez-Bouzas, Cristina; Benitez, Javier; Conway, Edye E.; Blazer, Kathleen R.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Barile, Monica; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Mariette, Frederique; Fortuzzi, Stefano; Viel, Alessandra; Giannini, Giuseppe; Papi, Laura; Martayan, Aline; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Radice, Paolo; Vratimos, Athanassios; Fostira, Florentia; Garber, Judy E.; Donaldson, Alan; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D. Gareth R.; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Brady, Angela; Cook, Jackie; Tischkowitz, Marc; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E.; Kennedy, M. John; Rogers, Mark T.; Porteous, Mary E.; Morrison, Patrick J.; Platte, Radka; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley V.; Ellis, Steve; Cole, Trevor; Godwin, Andrew K.; Claes, Kathleen; Van Maerken, Tom; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Buecher, Bruno; Delnatte, Capucine; Houdayer, Claude; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Damiola, Francesca; Coupier, Isabelle; Barjhoux, Laure; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Golmard, Lisa; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Caron, Olivier; Pujol, Pascal; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Belotti, Muriel; Piedmonte, Marion; Friedlander, Michael L.; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Copeland, Larry J; de la Hoya, Miguel; Segura, Pedro Perez; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; van Os, Theo A.M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E.J.; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Vreeswijk, Maaike P.G.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ausems, Margreet G.E.M.; van Doorn, Helena C.; Collée, J. Margriet; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Arason, Adalgeir; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Olswold, Curtis; Couch, Fergus J.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Wang, Xianshu; Szabo, Csilla I.; Offit, Kenneth; Corines, Marina; Jacobs, Lauren; Robson, Mark E.; Zhang, Liying; Joseph, Vijai; Berger, Andreas; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Geschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng M.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Rennert, Gad; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Andrulis, Irene L.; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Laitman, Yael; Rantala, Johanna; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Ehrencrona, Hans; Askmalm, Marie Stenmark; Borg, Åke; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Healey, Sue; Lee, Andrew; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Friedman, Eitan

    2014-01-01

    Background BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and non-genetic modifying factors. In this study we evaluated the putative role of variants in many candidate modifier genes. Methods Genotyping data from 15,252 BRCA1 and 8,211 BRCA2 mutation carriers, for known variants (n=3,248) located within or around 445 candidate genes, were available through the iCOGS custom-designed array. Breast and ovarian cancer association analysis was performed within a retrospective cohort approach. Results The observed p-values of association ranged between 0.005-1.000. None of the variants was significantly associated with breast or ovarian cancer risk in either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers, after multiple testing adjustments. Conclusion There is little evidence that any of the evaluated candidate variants act as modifiers of breast and/or ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. Impact Genome-wide association studies have been more successful at identifying genetic modifiers of BRCA1/2 penetrance than candidate gene studies. PMID:25336561

  17. Protein phosphatase 2A subunit gene haplotypes and proliferative breast disease modify breast cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, William D.; Breyer, Joan P.; Bradley, Kevin M.; Schuyler, Peggy A.; Plummer, W. Dale; Sanders, Melinda E.; Page, David L.; Smith, Jeffrey R.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a major cellular phosphatase and plays key regulatory roles in growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. Women diagnosed with benign proliferative breast disease are at increased risk for the subsequent development of breast cancer. METHODS We evaluated genetic variation of PP2A holoenzyme subunits for potential contribution to breast cancer risk. We performed a nested case-control investigation of a cohort of women with a history of benign breast disease. Subjects were followed for an average of 18 years; DNA prepared from the original archival benign breast biopsy (1954 – 1995) was available for 450 women diagnosed with breast cancer on follow-up, and for 890 of their 900 controls who were matched on race, age, and year of entry biopsy. RESULTS Single allele- and haplotype-based tests of association were conducted, with assessment of significance by permutation testing. We identified significant risk and protective haplotypes of PPP2R1A, giving odds ratios of 1.63 (95% CI 1.3 – 2.1) and 0.55 (95% CI 0.41 – 0.76), respectively. These odds ratios remained significant upon adjustment for multiple comparisons. Women with both the risk PPP2R1A haplotype and a history of proliferative breast disease had an odds ratio of 2.44 (95% CI 1.7 – 3.5) for the subsequent development of breast cancer. The effects of haplotypes for two regulatory subunit genes, PPP2R2A and PPP2R5E on breast cancer risk were nominally significant, but did not remain significant upon adjustment for multiple comparisons. CONCLUSION This evidence supports the previously hypothesized role of PP2A as a tumor suppressor gene in breast cancer. PMID:19890961

  18. Improved Anticancer Photothermal Therapy Using the Bystander Effect Enhanced by Antiarrhythmic Peptide Conjugated Dopamine-Modified Reduced Graphene Oxide Nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiantao; Lin, Yu-Hsin; Yang, Lingyan; Huang, Chih-Ching; Chen, Liliang; Wang, Wen-Cheng; Chen, Guan-Wen; Yan, Junyan; Sawettanun, Saranta; Lin, Chia-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Despite tremendous efforts toward developing novel near-infrared (NIR)-absorbing nanomaterials, improvement in therapeutic efficiency remains a formidable challenge in photothermal cancer therapy. This study aims to synthesize a specific peptide conjugated polydopamine-modified reduced graphene oxide (pDA/rGO) nanocomposite that promotes the bystander effect to facilitate cancer treatment using NIR-activated photothermal therapy. To prepare a nanoplatform capable of promoting the bystander effect in cancer cells, we immobilized antiarrhythmic peptide 10 (AAP10) on the surface of dopamine-modified rGO (AAP10-pDA/rGO). Our AAP10-pDA/rGO could promote the bystander effect by increasing the expression of connexin 43 protein in MCF-7 breast-cancer cells. Because of its tremendous ability to absorb NIR absorption, AAP10-pDA/rGO offers a high photothermal effect under NIR irradiation. This leads to a massive death of MCF-7 cells via the bystander effect. Using tumor-bearing mice as the model, it is found that NIR radiation effectively ablates breast tumor in the presence of AAP10-pDA/rGO and inhibits tumor growth by ≈100%. Therefore, this research integrates the bystander and photothermal effects into a single nanoplatform in order to facilitate an efficient photothermal therapy. Furthermore, our AAP10-pDA/rGO, which exhibits both hyperthermia and the bystander effect, can prevent breast-cancer recurrence and, therefore, has great potential for future clinical and research applications. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Effect of age on the relationship of occupational social class with prevalence of modifiable cardiovascular risk factors and cardiovascular diseases. A population-based cross-sectional study from European Prospective Investigation into Cancer - Norfolk (EPIC-Norfolk).

    PubMed

    Myint, Phyo K; Luben, Robert N; Welch, Ailsa A; Bingham, Sheila A; Wareham, Nicholas J; Khaw, Kay-Tee

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies on cardiovascular risk profile in different socioeconomic status were focused on younger populations and many of them have not been able to take into account age and sex differences. To investigate the relationship of occupational social class with the prevalence of cardiovascular disease risk factors and cardiovascular diseases in younger (<65 years) and older (>or=65 years) men and women. A population-based-cross sectional study was conducted in a general community in Norfolk, United Kingdom. Participants were 23,085 men and women aged 40-79 years, recruited from general practice age-sex registers as part of European Prospective Investigation into Cancer-Norfolk (EPIC-Norfolk). The prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors and cardiovascular diseases were examined. The prevalence of smoking was significantly higher in those in manual social classes particularly in the younger (<65) age group. Younger women in manual social classes were more likely to be smokers compared to older women in the same social class. Being in manual social classes was associated with higher cholesterol levels in women but lower cholesterol levels in men. Manual social class was associated with higher physical activity in those younger than 65 years but this association was reversed in those 65 years or older. Occupational social class is differently related to cardiovascular risk factors in individuals depending on their age and sex. This may reflect differences in behavior at work and leisure, which vary by sex and pre- and postretirement. Interventions to promote health and reduce social inequalities need to take age and gender into account. Copyright 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. MATERNAL EFFECTS IN ADVANCED HYBRIDS OF GENETICALLY MODIFIED AND NON-GENETICALLY MODIFIED BRASSICA SPECIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identification of fitness traits potentially impacted by gene flow from genetically modified (GM) crops to compatible relatives is of interest in risk assessments for GM crops. Reciprocal crosses were made between GM canola, Brassica napus cv. RaideRR that expresses CP4 EPSPS fo...

  1. MATERNAL EFFECTS IN ADVANCED HYBRIDS OF GENETICALLY MODIFIED AND NON-GENETICALLY MODIFIED BRASSICA SPECIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identification of fitness traits potentially impacted by gene flow from genetically modified (GM) crops to compatible relatives is of interest in risk assessments for GM crops. Reciprocal crosses were made between GM canola, Brassica napus cv. RaideRR that expresses CP4 EPSPS fo...

  2. Individual Effect Modifiers of Dust Exposure Effect on Cardiovascular Morbidity

    PubMed Central

    Vodonos, Alina; Friger, Michael; Katra, Itzhak; Krasnov, Helena; Zahger, Doron; Schwartz, Joel; Novack, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Background High concentrations of particulate matter (PM) air pollution have been associated with death and hospital admissions due to cardiovascular morbidity. However, it is not clear a) whether high levels of non-anthropogenic PM from dust storms constitute a health risk; and b) whether these health risks are exacerbated in a particular demographic. Methods This study comprised all patients above 18 years old admitted to Soroka University Medical Center (1000 bed tertiary hospital, Be’er- Sheva, Israel, 2001–2010) with a primary diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Data on meteorological parameters and PM10 (particulate matter <10 μm in aerodiameter) were obtained from monitoring stations in the city of Be'er-Sheva. Data were analyzed using a case crossover analysis to examine the effect of dust exposure on hospitalization due to ACS and the interaction with co-morbidities and demographic factors. Results There were 16,734 hospitalizations due to ACS during the study period. The estimated odds of hospitalization due to ACS was significantly associated with PM10 during non dust storm days at the same day of the exposure (lag0); OR = 1.014 (95%CI 1.001–1.027) for a 10 μg/m3 increase, while a delayed response (lag1) was found during the dust storm days; OR = 1.007 (95%CI 1.002–1.012). The effect size for the dust exposure association was larger for older (above the age of 65), female or Bedouin patients. Conclusions Exposure to non-anthropogenic PM is associated with cardiovascular morbidity. Health risk associated dust exposure is gender and age specific with older women and Bedouin patients being the most vulnerable groups. PMID:26381397

  3. Reviewing Cancer Care Team Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Taplin, Stephen H.; Weaver, Sallie; Salas, Eduardo; Chollette, Veronica; Edwards, Heather M.; Bruinooge, Suanna S.; Kosty, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The management of cancer varies across its type, stage, and natural history. This necessitates involvement of a variety of individuals and groups across a number of provider types. Evidence from other fields suggests that a team-based approach helps organize and optimize tasks that involve individuals and groups, but team effectiveness has not been fully evaluated in oncology-related care. Methods: We undertook a systematic review of literature published between 2009 and 2014 to identify studies of all teams with clear membership, a comparator group, and patient-level metrics of cancer care. When those teams included two or more people with specialty training relevant to the care of patients with cancer, we called them multidisciplinary care teams (MDTs). After reviews and exclusions, 16 studies were thoroughly evaluated: two addressing screening and diagnosis, 11 addressing treatment, two addressing palliative care, and one addressing end-of-life care. The studies included a variety of end points (eg, adherence to quality indicators, patient satisfaction with care, mortality). Results: Teams for screening and its follow-up improved screening use and reduced time to follow-up colonoscopy after an abnormal screen. Discussion of cases within MDTs improved the planning of therapy, adherence to recommended preoperative assessment, pain control, and adherence to medications. We did not see convincing evidence that MDTs affect patient survival or cost of care, or studies of how or which MDT processes and structures were associated with success. Conclusion: Further research should focus on the association between team processes and structures, efficiency in delivery of care, and mortality. PMID:25873056

  4. Clinical Significance of Ischemia-Modified Albumin in the Diagnosis of Doxorubicin-Induced Myocardial Injury in Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yinghuan; Kang, Wanjun; Bao, Yongxin; Jiao, Fubin; Ma, Yiran

    2013-01-01

    Background Ischemia-modified albumin is an altered serum albumin that forms under conditions of oxidative stress, a state also associated with doxorubicin-induced myocardial injury. Objective The aim of this study was to better assess diagnostic and prognostic significance of ischemia-modified albumin in patients with breast cancer undergoing doxorubicin chemotherapy. Methods Blood samples were collected from 152 breast cancer patients before and after each cycle of doxorubicin chemotherapy to measure the serum levels of ischemia-modified albumin, cardiac troponin T and creatine kinase-MB. We also monitored cardiac function during a 12 month follow-up. Results There was a significant difference in ischemia-modified albumin levels before and after each cycle of chemotherapy and the ischemia-modified albumin concentration positively correlated with the cumulative dose of doxorubicin (r = 0.212, P < 0.05). The combination of ischemia-modified albumin with cardiac troponin T and creatine kinase-MB increased the sensitivity to 0.920 and the specificity to 0.830 in the diagnosis of doxorubicin-induced myocardial injury. The optimal cutoff for ischemia-modified albumin concentration was 112.09 U/ml. The rate of change for ischemia-modified albumin levels correlated negatively with the rate of change for left ventricular ejection fraction at one year (r = –0.221, P < 0.05). Conclusion Ischemia-modified albumin may be a clinically potential new marker for diagnosing doxorubicin-induced myocardial injury, and is helpful to predict long-term impairment of cardiac function. PMID:24223946

  5. Preoperative Modified FOLFIRINOX Treatment Followed by Capecitabine-Based Chemoradiation for Borderline Resectable Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Matthew H. G.; Shi, Qian; Ahmad, Syed A.; Herman, Joseph M.; Marsh, Robert de W.; Collisson, Eric; Schwartz, Lawrence; Frankel, Wendy; Martin, Robert; Conway, William; Truty, Mark; Kindler, Hedy; Lowy, Andrew M.; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios; Philip, Philip; Talamonti, Mark; Cardin, Dana; LoConte, Noelle; Shen, Perry; Hoffman, John P.; Venook, Alan P.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Although consensus statements support the preoperative treatment of borderline resectable pancreatic cancer, no prospective, quality-controlled, multicenter studies of this strategy have been conducted. Existing studies are retrospective and confounded by heterogeneity in patients studied, therapeutic algorithms used, and outcomes reported. OBJECTIVE To determine the feasibility of conducting studies of multimodality therapy for borderline resectable pancreatic cancer in the cooperative group setting. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A prospective, multicenter, single-arm trial of a multimodality treatment regimen administered within a study framework using centralized quality control with the cooperation of 14 member institutions of the National Clinical Trials Network. Twenty-nine patients with biopsy-confirmed pancreatic cancer preregistered, and 23 patients with tumors who met centrally reviewed radiographic criteria registered. Twenty-two patients initiated therapy (median age, 64 years [range, 50–76 years]; 55% female). Patients registered between May 29, 2013, and February 7,2014. INTERVENTIONS Patients received modified FOLFIRINOX treatment (85 mg/m2 of oxaliplatin, 180 mg/m2 of irinotecan hydrochloride, 400 mg/m2 of leucovorin calcium, and then 2400 mg/m2 of 5-fluorouracil for 4 cycles) followed by 5.5 weeks of external-beam radiation (50.4 Gy delivered in 28 daily fractions) with capecitabine (825 mg/m2 orally twice daily) prior to pancreatectomy. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Feasibility, defined by the accrual rate, the safety of the preoperative regimen, and the pancreatectomy rate. RESULTS The accrual rate of 2.6 patients per month was superior to the anticipated rate. Although 14 of the 22 patients (64% [95% CI, 41%–83%]) had grade 3 or higher adverse events, 15 of the 22 patients (68% [95% CI, 49%–88%]) underwent pancreatectomy. Of these 15 patients, 12 (80%) required vascular resection, 14 (93%) had microscopically negative margins

  6. Apoptotic Effects of Chrysin in Human Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Khoo, Boon Yin; Chua, Siang Ling; Balaram, Prabha

    2010-01-01

    Chrysin is a natural flavonoid currently under investigation due to its important biological anti-cancer properties. In most of the cancer cells tested, chrysin has shown to inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis, and is more potent than other tested flavonoids in leukemia cells, where chrysin is likely to act via activation of caspases and inactivation of Akt signaling in the cells. Moreover, structure-activity relationships have revealed that the chemical structure of chrysin meets the key structural requirements of flavonoids for potent cytotoxicity in leukemia cells. It is possible that combination therapy or modified chrysin could be more potent than single-agent use or administration of unmodified chrysin. This study may help to develop ways of improving the effectiveness of chrysin in the treatment of leukemia and other human cancers in vitro. PMID:20559509

  7. A Modified In vitro Invasion Assay to Determine the Potential Role of Hormones, Cytokines and/or Growth Factors in Mediating Cancer Cell Invasion.

    PubMed

    Bagati, Archis; Koch, Zethan; Bofinger, Diane; Goli, Haneesha; Weiss, Laura S; Dau, Rosie; Thomas, Megha; Zucker, Shoshanna N

    2015-04-24

    Blood serum serves as a chemoattractant towards which cancer cells migrate and invade, facilitating their intravasation into microvessels. However, the actual molecules towards which the cells migrate remain elusive. This modified invasion assay has been developed to identify targets which drive cell migration and invasion. This technique compares the invasion index under three conditions to determine whether a specific hormone, growth factor, or cytokine plays a role in mediating the invasive potential of a cancer cell. These conditions include i) normal fetal bovine serum (FBS), ii) charcoal-stripped FBS (CS-FBS), which removes hormones, growth factors, and cytokines and iii) CS-FBS + molecule (denoted "X"). A significant change in cell invasion with CS-FBS as compared to FBS, indicates the involvement of hormones, cytokines or growth factors in mediating the change. Individual molecules can then be added back to CS-FBS to assay their ability to reverse or rescue the invasion phenotype. Furthermore, two or more factors can be combined to evaluate the additive or synergistic effects of multiple molecules in driving or inhibiting invasion. Overall, this method enables the investigator to determine whether hormones, cytokines, and/or growth factors play a role in cell invasion by serving as chemoattractants or inhibitors of invasion for a particular type of cancer cell or a specific mutant. By identifying specific chemoattractants and inhibitors, this modified invasion assay may help to elucidate signaling pathways that direct cancer cell invasion.

  8. Socioeconomic Status Modifies the Seasonal Effect on Blood Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Cois, Annibale; Ehrlich, Rodney

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Seasonal variations in blood pressure have been consistently reported. However, uncertainty remains about the size of the seasonal effect in different regions, and about factors that explain the differences observed across and within populations. Using data from a national panel study, we investigated seasonal variations in blood pressure in the South African adult population, and whether these variations differed across socioeconomic strata. We estimated age-specific seasonal effects on blood pressure using a multilevel structural equation model, with repeated measurements nested within subjects. Effect modification by socioeconomic status was assessed by repeating the analyses in the subpopulations defined by levels of education, household income per capita, and type of housing. In men and women, season had a statistically significant effect on blood pressure, with higher levels in winter and lower levels in summer. For systolic blood pressure, the magnitude of the seasonal effect was 4.25/4.21 mmHg (women/men) and was higher in the older age groups. For diastolic blood pressure, the effect size was 4.00/4.01 mmHg, with no evident age trend. Seasonal effects were higher among subjects in the lowest socioeconomic classes than in the highest, with differences between 2.4 and 7.7 mmHg, depending on gender, whether systolic or diastolic blood pressure, and socioeconomic status indicator. In the South African adult population, blood pressure shows seasonal variation modified by age and socioeconomic status. These variations have epidemiological, clinical, and public health implications, including the prospect of population level intervention to reduce elevated risk of cold weather cardiovascular morbidity. PMID:26334893

  9. Neuroprotective and disease-modifying effects of the ketogenic diet

    PubMed Central

    Gasior, Maciej; Rogawski, Michael A.; Hartman, Adam L.

    2008-01-01

    The ketogenic diet has been in clinical use for over 80 years, primarily for the symptomatic treatment of epilepsy. A recent clinical study has raised the possibility that exposure to the ketogenic diet may confer long-lasting therapeutic benefits for patients with epilepsy. Moreover, there is evidence from uncontrolled clinical trials and studies in animal models that the ketogenic diet can provide symptomatic and disease-modifying activity in a broad range of neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease, and may also be protective in traumatic brain injury and stroke. These observations are supported by studies in animal models and isolated cells that show that ketone bodies, especially β-hydroxybutyrate, confer neuroprotection against diverse types of cellular injury. This review summarizes the experimental, epidemiological and clinical evidence indicating that the ketogenic diet could have beneficial effects in a broad range of brain disorders characterized by the death of neurons. Although the mechanisms are not yet well defined, it is plausible that neuroprotection results from enhanced neuronal energy reserves, which improve the ability of neurons to resist metabolic challenges, and possibly through other actions including antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. As the underlying mechanisms become better understood, it will be possible to develop alternative strategies that produce similar or even improved therapeutic effects without the need for exposure to an unpalatable and unhealthy, high-fat diet. PMID:16940764

  10. Modified naphthalene diimide as a suitable tetraplex DNA ligand: application to cancer diagnosis and anti-cancer drug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takenaka, Shigeori

    2017-07-01

    It is known that naphthalene diimide carrying two substituents binds to DNA duplex with threading intercalation. Naphthalene diimide carrying ferrocene moieties, ferrocenylnaphthalene diimide (FND), formed a stable complex with DNA duplex and an electrochemical gene detection was achieved with current signal generated from FND bound to the DNA duplex between target DNA and DNA probe immobilized electrode. FND couldn't bind to the mismatched and its surrounding region of DNA duplex and thus FND was applied to the precision detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using the improved discrimination ability between fully matched and mismatched DNA hybrids and multi-electrode chip. Some of FND derivatives bound to telomere DNA tetraplex stronger than to DNA duplex and was applied to cancer diagnosis as a measure of the elongated telomere DNA with telomerase as a suitable maker of cancer. Furthermore, cyclic naphthalene diimides realized the extremely high preference for DNA tetraplex over DNA duplex. Such molecules will open an effective anti-cancer drug based on telomerase specific inhibitor.

  11. Common variants associated with breast cancer in genome-wide association studies are modifiers of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xianshu; Pankratz, V. Shane; Fredericksen, Zachary; Tarrell, Robert; Karaus, Mary; McGuffog, Lesley; Pharaoh, Paul D.P.; Ponder, Bruce A.J.; Dunning, Alison M.; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Houdayer, Claude; Hogervorst, Frans B.L.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J.; Spurdle, Amanda; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Singer, Christian F.; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Dressler, Catherina; Fink, Anneliese; Szabo, Csilla I.; Zikan, Michal; Foretova, Lenka; Claes, Kathleen; Thomas, Gilles; Hoover, Robert N.; Hunter, David J.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Easton, Douglas F.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Couch, Fergus J.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that significantly modify breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Since these risk modifiers were originally identified as genetic risk factors for breast cancer in genome-wide association studies (GWASs), additional risk modifiers for BRCA1 and BRCA2 may be identified from promising signals discovered in breast cancer GWAS. A total of 350 SNPs identified as candidate breast cancer risk factors (P < 1 × 10−3) in two breast cancer GWAS studies were genotyped in 3451 BRCA1 and 2006 BRCA2 mutation carriers from nine centers. Associations with breast cancer risk were assessed using Cox models weighted for penetrance. Eight SNPs in BRCA1 carriers and 12 SNPs in BRCA2 carriers, representing an enrichment over the number expected, were significantly associated with breast cancer risk (Ptrend < 0.01). The minor alleles of rs6138178 in SNRPB and rs6602595 in CAMK1D displayed the strongest associations in BRCA1 carriers (HR = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.69–0.90, Ptrend = 3.6 × 10−4 and HR = 1.25, 95% CI: 1.10–1.41, Ptrend = 4.2 × 10−4), whereas rs9393597 in LOC134997 and rs12652447 in FBXL7 showed the strongest associations in BRCA2 carriers (HR = 1.55, 95% CI: 1.25–1.92, Ptrend = 6 × 10−5 and HR = 1.37, 95% CI: 1.16–1.62, Ptrend = 1.7 × 10−4). The magnitude and direction of the associations were consistent with the original GWAS. In subsequent risk assessment studies, the loci appeared to interact multiplicatively for breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. Promising candidate SNPs from GWAS were identified as modifiers of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. Upon further validation, these SNPs together with other genetic and environmental factors may improve breast cancer risk assessment in these populations. PMID:20418484

  12. Common variants associated with breast cancer in genome-wide association studies are modifiers of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianshu; Pankratz, V Shane; Fredericksen, Zachary; Tarrell, Robert; Karaus, Mary; McGuffog, Lesley; Pharaoh, Paul D P; Ponder, Bruce A J; Dunning, Alison M; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Houdayer, Claude; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Hooning, Maartje J; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J; Spurdle, Amanda; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Schmutzler, Rita K; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Domchek, Susan M; Nathanson, Katherine L; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Singer, Christian F; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Dressler, Catherina; Fink, Anneliese; Szabo, Csilla I; Zikan, Michal; Foretova, Lenka; Claes, Kathleen; Thomas, Gilles; Hoover, Robert N; Hunter, David J; Chanock, Stephen J; Easton, Douglas F; Antoniou, Antonis C; Couch, Fergus J

    2010-07-15

    Recent studies have identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that significantly modify breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Since these risk modifiers were originally identified as genetic risk factors for breast cancer in genome-wide association studies (GWASs), additional risk modifiers for BRCA1 and BRCA2 may be identified from promising signals discovered in breast cancer GWAS. A total of 350 SNPs identified as candidate breast cancer risk factors (P < 1 x 10(-3)) in two breast cancer GWAS studies were genotyped in 3451 BRCA1 and 2006 BRCA2 mutation carriers from nine centers. Associations with breast cancer risk were assessed using Cox models weighted for penetrance. Eight SNPs in BRCA1 carriers and 12 SNPs in BRCA2 carriers, representing an enrichment over the number expected, were significantly associated with breast cancer risk (P(trend) < 0.01). The minor alleles of rs6138178 in SNRPB and rs6602595 in CAMK1D displayed the strongest associations in BRCA1 carriers (HR = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.69-0.90, P(trend) = 3.6 x 10(-4) and HR = 1.25, 95% CI: 1.10-1.41, P(trend) = 4.2 x 10(-4)), whereas rs9393597 in LOC134997 and rs12652447 in FBXL7 showed the strongest associations in BRCA2 carriers (HR = 1.55, 95% CI: 1.25-1.92, P(trend) = 6 x 10(-5) and HR = 1.37, 95% CI: 1.16-1.62, P(trend) = 1.7 x 10(-4)). The magnitude and direction of the associations were consistent with the original GWAS. In subsequent risk assessment studies, the loci appeared to interact multiplicatively for breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. Promising candidate SNPs from GWAS were identified as modifiers of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. Upon further validation, these SNPs together with other genetic and environmental factors may improve breast cancer risk assessment in these populations.

  13. Effects of modified atmosphere on crop productivity and mineral content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chagvardieff, P.; Dimon, B.; Souleimanov, A.; Massimino, D.; Le Bras, S.; Péan, M.; Louche-Teissandier, D.

    1997-01-01

    Wheat, potato, pea and tomato crops were cultivated from seeding to harvest in a controlled and confined growth chamber at elevated CO_2 concentration (3700 muL.L^-1) to examine the effects on biomass production and edible part yields. Different responses to high CO_2 were recorded, ranging from a decline in productivity for wheat, to slight stimulation for potatoes, moderate increase for tomatoes, and very large enhancement for pea. Mineral content in wheat and pea seeds was not greatly modified by the elevated CO_2. Short-term experiments (17 d) were conducted on potato at high (3700 muL.L^-1) and very high (20,000 muL.L^-1) CO_2 concentration and/or low O_2 partial pressure (~ 20,600 muL.L^-1 or 2 kPa). Low O_2 was more effective than high CO_2 in total biomass accumulation, but development was affected: Low O_2 inhibited tuberization, while high CO_2 significantly increased production of tubers.

  14. Alcohol use and drunk driving: the modifying effect of impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Moan, Inger Synnøve; Norström, Thor; Storvoll, Elisabet E

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was twofold: (a) to examine how an increase in the frequency of heavy drinking episodes affects the incidence of drunk driving and (b) to examine whether the effect of alcohol use on drunk driving is contingent on impulsivity. Two waves of the Young in Norway Longitudinal Study were applied (N = 2,603; response rate: 67%), when the respondents were on average 17 (1994) and 28 (2005) years of age. Measurements consisted of self-reported heavy episodic drinking, drunk driving, and impulsivity. The first difference method was applied to estimate the association between heavy episodic drinking and drunk driving. This means that changes in the frequency of drunk driving were regressed on changes in the frequency of drinking. In this way, the effects of time-invariant confounders were eliminated. The results showed that every additional episode of heavy drinking was associated with a 2.6% increase in the frequency of drunk driving. The increase for males was significantly higher than among females. The analyses supported the hypothesis that impulsivity modifies the association between alcohol use and drunk driving. The association between drinking and drunk driving is significantly stronger among those with a high score on impulsivity compared with those who have a low score.

  15. The Effect of Random Voids in the Modified Gurson Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Huiyang; Yazzie, Kyle; Chawla, Nikhilesh; Jiang, Hanqing

    2012-02-01

    The porous plasticity model (usually referred to as the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman model or modified Gurson model) has been widely used in the study of microvoid-induced ductile fracture. In this paper, we studied the effects of random voids on the porous plasticity model. Finite-element simulations were conducted to study a copper/tin/copper joint bar under uniaxial tension using the commercial finite-element package ABAQUS. A randomly distributed initial void volume fraction with different types of distribution was introduced, and the effects of this randomness on the crack path and macroscopic stress-strain behavior were studied. It was found that consideration of the random voids is able to capture more detailed and localized deformation features, such as different crack paths and different ultimate tensile strengths, and meanwhile does not change the macroscopic stress-strain behavior. It seems that the random voids are able to qualitatively explain the scattered observations in experiments while keeping the macroscopic measurements consistent.

  16. Modified international e-Delphi survey to define healthcare professional competencies for working with teenagers and young adults with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Rachel M; Feltbower, Richard G; Aslam, Natasha; Raine, Rosalind; Whelan, Jeremy S; Gibson, Faith

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To provide international consensus on the competencies required by healthcare professionals in order to provide specialist care for teenagers and young adults (TYA) with cancer. Design Modified e-Delphi survey. Setting International, multicentre study. Participants Experts were defined as professionals having worked in TYA cancer care for more than 12 months. They were identified through publications and professional organisations. Methods Round 1, developed from a previous qualitative study, included 87 closed-ended questions with responses on a nine-point Likert scale and further open-ended responses to identify other skills, knowledge and attitudes. Round 2 contained only items with no consensus in round 1 and suggestions of additional items of competency. Consensus was defined as a median score ranging from 7 to 9 and strength of agreement using mean absolute deviation of the median. Results A total of 179 registered to be members of the expert panel; valid responses were available from 158 (88%) in round 1 and 136/158 (86%) in round 2. The majority of participants were nurses (35%) or doctors (39%) from Europe (55%) or North America (35%). All 87 items in round 1 reached consensus with an additional 15 items identified for round 2, which also reached consensus. The strength of agreement was mostly high for statements. The areas of competence rated most important were agreed to be: ‘Identify the impact of disease on young people's life’ (skill), ‘Know about side effects of treatment and how this might be different to those experienced by children or older adults’ (knowledge), ‘Honesty’ (attitude) and ‘Listen to young people's concerns’ (aspect of communication). Conclusions Given the high degree of consensus, this list of competencies should influence education curriculum, professional development and inform workforce planning. Variation in strength of agreement for some competencies between professional groups should be explored

  17. Developing an effective breast cancer vaccine.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Hatem

    2010-07-01

    Harnessing the immune response in treating breast cancer would potentially offer a less toxic, more targeted approach to eradicating residual disease. Breast cancer vaccines are being developed to effectively train cytotoxic T cells to recognize and kill transformed cells while sparing normal ones. However, achieving this goal has been problematic due to the ability of established cancers to suppress and evade the immune response. A review of the literature on vaccines and breast cancer treatment was conducted, specifically addressing strategies currently available, as well as appropriate settings, paradigms for vaccine development and response monitoring, and challenges with immunosuppression. Multiple issues need to be addressed in order to optimize the benefits offered by breast cancer vaccines. Primary issues include the following: (1) cancer vaccines will likely work better in a minimal residual disease state, (2) clinical trial design for immunotherapy should incorporate recommendations from expert groups such as the Cancer Vaccine Working Group and use standardized immune response measurements, (3) the presently available cancer vaccine approaches, including dendritic cell-based, tumor-associated antigen peptide-based, and whole cell-based, have various pros and cons, (4) to date, no one approach has been shown to be superior to another, and (5) vaccines will need to be combined with immunoregulatory agents to overcome tumor-related immunosuppression. Combining a properly optimized cancer vaccine with novel immunomodulating agents that overcome tumor-related immunosuppression in a well-designed clinical trial offers the best hope for developing an effective breast cancer vaccine strategy.

  18. Food effect on bioavailability of modified-release trimetazidine tablets.

    PubMed

    Ozbay, Latif; Unal, Durisehvar Ozer; Erol, Dilek

    2012-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate a food effect on the bio-availability of modified-release (MR) trimetazidine tablets in 36 healthy volunteers. Trimetazidine, an anti-ischemic drug, protects the myocardial cell from the harmful effects of ischemia. The authors investigated the effect of being under a fasting or fed state at the time of drug intake on the bioavailability of trimetazidine 35-mg MR tablets in a randomized, open-label, crossover, 2-arm, 4-period, 2-sequence bioequivalence study design with a 14-day washout period. Plasma concentration of trimetazidine was assayed in timed samples with a validated high- performance liquid chromatography/mass selective detector that had a lower limit of quantification of 2.5 ng/mL. Test and reference formulations gave a mean trimetazidine C(max) of 63.26 ng/mL and 69.18 ng/mL for the fasting state and 64.19 ng/mL and 63.11 ng/mL for the fed state, respectively. The AUC(0-tlast) mean of trimetazidine was 726.31 ng·h/mL and 733.01 ng·h/mL for the fasting state and 706.40 ng·h/mL and 691.40 ng·h/mL for the fed state for test/reference formulations. There were no significant differences in pharmacokinetic parameters between the 2 formulations and the fasting/fed states. The authors showed that there is no food effect and no need for a 4-period study to evaluate the bioequivalence of trimetazidine MR tablets.

  19. Lung cancer biomarkers for the assessment of modified risk tobacco products: an oxidative stress perspective.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Frazer J; Luettich, Karsta; Gregg, Evan O

    2013-05-01

    Manufacturers have developed prototype cigarettes yielding reduced levels of some tobacco smoke toxicants, when tested using laboratory machine smoking under standardised conditions. For the scientific assessment of modified risk tobacco products, tests that offer objective, reproducible data, which can be obtained in a much shorter time than the requirements of conventional epidemiology are needed. In this review, we consider whether biomarkers of biological effect related to oxidative stress can be used in this role. Based on published data, urinary 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2-deoxyguanosine, thymidine glycol, F2-isoprostanes, serum dehydroascorbic acid to ascorbic acid ratio and carotenoid concentrations show promise, while 4-hydroxynonenal requires further qualification.

  20. Effects of Using Modified Items to Test Students with Persistent Academic Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Stephen N.; Kettler, Ryan J.; Beddow, Peter A.; Kurz, Alexander; Compton, Elizabeth; McGrath, Dawn; Bruen, Charles; Hinton, Kent; Palmer, Porter; Rodriguez, Michael C.; Bolt, Daniel; Roach, Andrew T.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of using modified items in achievement tests to enhance accessibility. An experiment determined whether tests composed of modified items would reduce the performance gap between students eligible for an alternate assessment based on modified achievement standards (AA-MAS) and students not eligible, and the…

  1. Effects of Using Modified Items to Test Students with Persistent Academic Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Stephen N.; Kettler, Ryan J.; Beddow, Peter A.; Kurz, Alexander; Compton, Elizabeth; McGrath, Dawn; Bruen, Charles; Hinton, Kent; Palmer, Porter; Rodriguez, Michael C.; Bolt, Daniel; Roach, Andrew T.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of using modified items in achievement tests to enhance accessibility. An experiment determined whether tests composed of modified items would reduce the performance gap between students eligible for an alternate assessment based on modified achievement standards (AA-MAS) and students not eligible, and the…

  2. Lifestyle and cancer: effect of parental divorce.

    PubMed

    Hemminki, Kari; Chen, Bowang

    2006-12-01

    According to previous studies, divorced individuals have increased risks of cancers related to alcohol and tobacco consumption and sexual habits, but the increases are balanced with decreased risks of many common cancers. In the present study, cancer risks were analyzed for 0-70-year-old offspring of divorced parents, on the basis the Swedish Family-Cancer Database with cancer data from the years 1958 to 2002. We calculated standardized incidence ratios for cancer among offspring of divorced parents (19,000 cancer patients) and compared them with offspring of stably married parents (121,000 cancer patients). Standardized incidence ratios were adjusted for many factors, including socio-economic status. Offspring of divorced parents were divided into groups depending on whether their mothers, fathers or both had had children with different partners. Offspring of divorced parents had an increased risk of upper aerodigestive tract, esophageal, anal, pancreatic, lung and cervical cancers. Decreased risks were noted for Hodgkin's disease and bone cancer. For Hodgkin's disease, the data suggest protective effects through early exposure to childhood pathogens but for bone cancer mechanisms remain to be established. The overall cancer risk for offspring of divorced parents was at or above unity. The results show that offspring of divorced parents have increased cancer risks at tobacco-related, alcohol-related and sex-related sites, in analogy to their parent, but they lack decreased risks at common sites, experienced by their parents. Divorce is becoming increasingly common in many countries and any deviant cancer patterns among offspring of divorced parents will have an impact on the population risk.

  3. Lipid-modified G4-decoy oligonucleotide anchored to nanoparticles: delivery and bioactivity in pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Cogoi, S.; Jakobsen, U.; Pedersen, E. B.; Vogel, S.; Xodo, L. E.

    2016-01-01

    KRAS is mutated in >90% of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. As its inactivation leads to tumour regression, mutant KRAS is considered an attractive target for anticancer drugs. In this study we report a new delivery strategy for a G4-decoy oligonucleotide that sequesters MAZ, a transcription factor essential for KRAS transcription. It is based on the use of palmitoyl-oleyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) liposomes functionalized with lipid-modified G4-decoy oligonucleotides and a lipid-modified cell penetrating TAT peptide. The potency of the strategy in pancreatic cancer cells is demonstrated by cell cytometry, confocal microscopy, clonogenic and qRT-PCR assays. PMID:27929127

  4. Generation of more effective cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Fenoglio, Daniela; Traverso, Paolo; Parodi, Alessia; Kalli, Francesca; Zanetti, Maurizio; Filaci, Gilberto

    2013-12-01

    Cancer vaccines represent a promising therapeutic approach for which prime time is imminent. However, clinical efficacy must be improved in order for cancer vaccines to become a valid alternative or complement to traditional cancer treatments. Considerable efforts have been undertaken so far to better understand the fundamental requirements for clinically-effective cancer vaccines. Recent data emphasize that important requirements, among others, are (1) the use of multi-epitope immunogens, possibly deriving from different tumor antigens; (2) the selection of effective adjuvants; (3) the association of cancer vaccines with agents able to counteract the regulatory milieu present in the tumor microenvironment; and (4) the need to choose the definitive formulation and regimen of a vaccine after accurate preliminary tests comparing different antigen formulations. The first requirement deals with issues related to HLA restriction of tumor antigen presentation, as well as usefulness of tumor antigen spreading and counteraction of immune escape phenomena, linked to tumor antigen down-modulation, for an effective anti-cancer immune response. The second point underscores the necessity of optimal activation of innate immunity to achieve an efficient adaptive anti-cancer immune response. The third point focuses on the importance to inhibit subsets of regulatory cells. The last requirement stresses the concept that the regimen and formulation of the vaccine impacts profoundly on cancer vaccine efficacy. A new generation of cancer vaccines, provided with both immunological and clinical efficacy, will hopefully soon address these requirements.

  5. Identification of a BRCA2-Specific Modifier Locus at 6p24 Related to Breast Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Vijai, Joseph; Klein, Robert J.; Kirchhoff, Tomas; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Dunning, Alison M.; Lee, Andrew; Dennis, Joe; Healey, Sue; Dicks, Ed; Soucy, Penny; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Wang, Xianshu; Eldridge, Ronald C.; Tessier, Daniel C.; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Peock, Susan; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Peterlongo, Paolo; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Piedmonte, Marion; Singer, Christian F.; Thomassen, Mads; Hansen, Thomas v. O.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Blanco, Ignacio; Greene, Mark H.; Garber, Judith; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Goldgar, David E.; D'Andrea, Emma; Caldes, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Osorio, Ana; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Arason, Adalgeir; Rennert, Gad; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Kets, Carolien M.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Wijnen, Juul T.; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve; Fineberg, Elena; Platte, Radka; Evans, D. Gareth; Jacobs, Chris; Adlard, Julian; Tischkowitz, Marc; Porteous, Mary E.; Damiola, Francesca; Golmard, Lisa; Barjhoux, Laure; Longy, Michel; Belotti, Muriel; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Manoukian, Siranoush; Barile, Monica; Genuardi, Maurizio; Arnold, Norbert; Meindl, Alfons; Sutter, Christian; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Domchek, Susan M.; Pfeiler, Georg; Friedman, Eitan; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Robson, Mark; Shah, Sohela; Lazaro, Conxi; Mai, Phuong L.; Benitez, Javier; Southey, Melissa C.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Fasching, Peter A.; Peto, Julian; Humphreys, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Burwinkel, Barbara; Guénel, Pascal; Bojesen, Stig E.; Milne, Roger L.; Brenner, Hermann; Lochmann, Magdalena; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Dörk, Thilo; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Lambrechts, Diether; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Radice, Paolo; Giles, Graham G.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Winqvist, Robert; Devillee, Peter; García-Closas, Montserrat; Schoof, Nils; Hooning, Maartje J.; Cox, Angela; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Jakubowska, Anna; Orr, Nick; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M. Rosario; Hall, Per; Couch, Fergus J.; Simard, Jacques; Altshuler, David; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Offit, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Common genetic variants contribute to the observed variation in breast cancer risk for BRCA2 mutation carriers; those known to date have all been found through population-based genome-wide association studies (GWAS). To comprehensively identify breast cancer risk modifying loci for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we conducted a deep replication of an ongoing GWAS discovery study. Using the ranked P-values of the breast cancer associations with the imputed genotype of 1.4 M SNPs, 19,029 SNPs were selected and designed for inclusion on a custom Illumina array that included a total of 211,155 SNPs as part of a multi-consortial project. DNA samples from 3,881 breast cancer affected and 4,330 unaffected BRCA2 mutation carriers from 47 studies belonging to the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 were genotyped and available for analysis. We replicated previously reported breast cancer susceptibility alleles in these BRCA2 mutation carriers and for several regions (including FGFR2, MAP3K1, CDKN2A/B, and PTHLH) identified SNPs that have stronger evidence of association than those previously published. We also identified a novel susceptibility allele at 6p24 that was inversely associated with risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers (rs9348512; per allele HR = 0.85, 95% CI 0.80–0.90, P = 3.9×10−8). This SNP was not associated with breast cancer risk either in the general population or in BRCA1 mutation carriers. The locus lies within a region containing TFAP2A, which encodes a transcriptional activation protein that interacts with several tumor suppressor genes. This report identifies the first breast cancer risk locus specific to a BRCA2 mutation background. This comprehensive update of novel and previously reported breast cancer susceptibility loci contributes to the establishment of a panel of SNPs that modify breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers. This panel may have clinical utility for women with BRCA2 mutations weighing options for medical

  6. Mapping Complex Traits in a Diversity Outbred F1 Mouse Population Identifies Germline Modifiers of Metastasis in Human Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Winter, Jean M; Gildea, Derek E; Andreas, Jonathan P; Gatti, Daniel M; Williams, Kendra A; Lee, Minnkyong; Hu, Ying; Zhang, Suiyuan; Mullikin, James C; Wolfsberg, Tyra G; McDonnell, Shannon K; Fogarty, Zachary C; Larson, Melissa C; French, Amy J; Schaid, Daniel J; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Churchill, Gary A; Crawford, Nigel P S

    2017-01-25

    It is unclear how standing genetic variation affects the prognosis of prostate cancer patients. To provide one controlled answer to this problem, we crossed a dominant, penetrant mouse model of prostate cancer to Diversity Outbred mice, a collection of animals that carries over 40 million SNPs. Integration of disease phenotype and SNP variation data in 493 F1 males identified a metastasis modifier locus on Chromosome 8 (LOD = 8.42); further analysis identified the genes Rwdd4, Cenpu, and Casp3 as functional effectors of this locus. Accordingly, analysis of over 5,300 prostate cancer patient samples revealed correlations between the presence of genetic variants at these loci, their expression levels, cancer aggressiveness, and patient survival. We also observed that ectopic overexpression of RWDD4 and CENPU increased the aggressiveness of two human prostate cancer cell lines. In aggregate, our approach demonstrates how well-characterized genetic variation in mice can be harnessed in conjunction with systems genetics approaches to identify and characterize germline modifiers of human disease processes.

  7. Modifying effect of the County Level Health Indices on Cardiopulmonary Effects Associated with Wildfire Exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background and Aims: Socioeconomic status (SES) is a known risk factor for cardiopulmonary health and some studies suggest SES may be an effect modifier for health effects associated with exposure to air pollution. We investigated the synergistic impact of health disparities on ...

  8. Modifying effect of the County Level Health Indices on Cardiopulmonary Effects Associated with Wildfire Exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background and Aims: Socioeconomic status (SES) is a known risk factor for cardiopulmonary health and some studies suggest SES may be an effect modifier for health effects associated with exposure to air pollution. We investigated the synergistic impact of health disparities on ...

  9. EGF-modified mPEG-PLGA-PLL nanoparticle for delivering doxorubicin combined with Bcl-2 siRNA as a potential treatment strategy for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiangyu; Wang, Qi; Qin, Liubing; Fu, Hao; Fang, Yiwei; Han, Baoshan; Duan, Yourong

    2016-10-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have been widely used as carriers to deliver siRNA and chemotherapeutic agents. Bcl-2 siRNA has been widely used to induce cancer cell apoptosis, and doxorubicin (Dox) can destroy cancer cells by binding with cancer cell DNA. To investigate the therapeutic effect on lung cancer of simultaneously delivering Dox and Bcl-2-siRNA using epidermal growth factor (EGF) modified monomethoxy (polyethylene glycol)-poly (D, L-lactide-co-glycolide)-poly(L-lysine) (mPEG-PLGA-PLL, PEAL) NPs (EGF-PEAL). EGF-PEAL NPs were characterized with respect to size, zeta potential and morphology. Cytotoxicity and drug (or siRNA) loading capacity of EGF-PEAL NPs were analyzed. Cellular uptake, drug release profile, cell killing effects of Dox and Bcl-2-siRNA-loaded EGF-PEAL NPs were assessed. Biodistribution and therapeutic effects of Dox and Bcl-2-siRNA EGF-PEAL NPs were evaluated in H1299 tumor-bearing mice. EGF-PEAL NPs or PEAL NPs had nearly negligible cytotoxicity toward H1299 cells. Dox and Bcl-2-siRNA gradually released from EGF-PEAL NPs and exhibited sustained release patterns. Dox and Bcl-2-siRNA-loaded NPs were taken up by cells and induced the apoptosis of H1299 cells more effectively than using Dox or Bcl-2 siRNA alone. With the intravenous injection of PEAL NPs into H1299 xenografted mice, we found that combination treatment suppressed lung cancer growth and reduced Bcl-2 expression in tumor tissue, and EGF-PEAL NPs concentrated in lung tumor much more than non-targeted PEAL NPs. We conclude that co-delivery of Dox and Bcl-2-siRNA by tumor-targeted EGF-PEAL NPs could significantly inhibit lung cancer growth.

  10. Hyaluronic Acid Modified Hollow Prussian Blue Nanoparticles Loading 10-hydroxycamptothecin for Targeting Thermochemotherapy of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Lijia; shao, shangmin; Wang, Yang; Yang, Yongbo; Yue, Xiuli; Dai, Zhifei

    2016-01-01

    This paper reported the fabrication of a multifunctional nanoplatform by modifying hollow Prussian blue nanoparticles with hyaluronic acid grafting polyethylene glycol, followed by loading 10-hydroxycamptothecin for tumor-targeted thermochemotherapy. It was found that the surface modification of hollow Prussian blue nanoparticles with hyaluronic acid grafting polyethylene endowed a great colloidal stability, long blood circulation time and the capability for targeting Hela cells over-expressing the CD44 receptor. The obtained nanoagent exhibited efficient photothermal effect and a light triggered and stepwise release behavior of 10-hydroxycamptothecin due to the strong optical absorption in the near-infrared region. The investigations on the body weight change, histological injury and blood biochemical indexes showed that such nanoagent had excellent biocompatibility for medical application. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments proved that the combination of chemotherapy and photothermal therapy through the agent of hyaluronic acid modified Prussian blue nanoparticles loading 10-hydroxycamptothecin could significantly improve the therapeutic efficacy compared with either therapy alone because of a good synergetic effect. PMID:26722372

  11. Hyaluronic Acid Modified Hollow Prussian Blue Nanoparticles Loading 10-hydroxycamptothecin for Targeting Thermochemotherapy of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jing, Lijia; Shao, Shangmin; Wang, Yang; Yang, Yongbo; Yue, Xiuli; Dai, Zhifei

    2016-01-01

    This paper reported the fabrication of a multifunctional nanoplatform by modifying hollow Prussian blue nanoparticles with hyaluronic acid grafting polyethylene glycol, followed by loading 10-hydroxycamptothecin for tumor-targeted thermochemotherapy. It was found that the surface modification of hollow Prussian blue nanoparticles with hyaluronic acid grafting polyethylene endowed a great colloidal stability, long blood circulation time and the capability for targeting Hela cells over-expressing the CD44 receptor. The obtained nanoagent exhibited efficient photothermal effect and a light triggered and stepwise release behavior of 10-hydroxycamptothecin due to the strong optical absorption in the near-infrared region. The investigations on the body weight change, histological injury and blood biochemical indexes showed that such nanoagent had excellent biocompatibility for medical application. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments proved that the combination of chemotherapy and photothermal therapy through the agent of hyaluronic acid modified Prussian blue nanoparticles loading 10-hydroxycamptothecin could significantly improve the therapeutic efficacy compared with either therapy alone because of a good synergetic effect.

  12. Reducing Interstitial Fluid Pressure and Inhibiting Pulmonary Metastasis of Breast Cancer by Gelatin Modified Cationic Lipid Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xuan; Zhang, Jun; Huang, Zun; Zuo, Tiantian; Lu, Qing; Wu, Guangyu; Shen, Qi

    2017-09-06

    Interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) in tumor is much higher than that in normal tissue, and it constitutes a great obstacle for the delivery of antitumor drugs, thus becoming a potential target for cancer therapy. In this study, cationic nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) were modified by low molecular weight gelatin to achieve the desirable reduction of tumor IFP and improve the drug delivery. In this way, the chemotherapy of formulations on tumor proliferation and pulmonary metastasis was further improved. The nanoparticles were used to load three drugs, docetaxel (DTX), quercetin (Qu), and imatinib (IMA), with high encapsulation efficiency of 89.54%, 96.45%, and 60.13%, respectively. GNP-DTX/Qu/IMA nanoparticles exhibited an enzyme-sensitive drug release behavior, and the release rate could be mediated by matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-9). Cellular uptake and MTT assays showed that the obtained GNP-DTX/Qu/IMA could be internalized into human breast 4T1 cells effectively and exhibited the strongest cytotoxicity. Moreover, GNP-DTX/Qu/IMA demonstrated obvious advantages in inducing apoptosis and mediating the expression of apoptosis-related proteins (Caspase 3, Caspase 9, and bcl-2). In the wound-healing assay, GNP-DTX/Qu/IMA exhibited evidently inhibition of cell migration. The benefits of tumor IFP reduction induced by GNP-DTX/Qu/IMA were further proved after a continuous administration to 4T1 tumor-bearing mice. Finally, in the in vivo antitumor assays, GNP-DTX/Qu/IMA displayed stronger antitumor efficiency as well as suppression on pulmonary metastasis. In conclusion, the GNP-DTX/Qu/IMA system might be a promising strategy for metastatic breast cancer treatment.

  13. Semisynthesis of SY-1 for investigation of breast cancer stem cell selectivity of C-ring-modified salinomycin analogues.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaoli; Borgström, Björn; Månsson, Linda; Persson, Lo; Oredsson, Stina; Hegardt, Cecilia; Strand, Daniel

    2014-07-18

    Salinomycin, a naturally occurring polyether ionophore was recently found to selectively reduce the proportion of CD44(+)/CD24(-) cells, a phenotype associated with breast cancer stem cells. Subsequent studies from our group showed that chemical modification of the allylic C20 hydroxyl of salinomycin, located at the C-ring, can enhance the activity of derivatives against breast cancer cells over 5-fold compared to the native structure. Access to C-ring-modified salinomycin analogues is thus of interest from both a mechanistic and a synthetic perspective. Here, we report efficient strategies for gram scale synthesis of the natural product SY-1 (20-deoxy salinomycin), and a saturated analogue, 18,19-dihydro SY-1, for a comparative in vitro investigation of the biological profiles of these compounds with that of salinomycin. Across several assays, the deoxygenated structures required higher concentrations to elicit similar cellular responses to that of salinomycin. Similarly to salinomycin, SY-1 or 18,19-dihydro SY-1 treatment was found to reduce the proportion of CD44(+)/CD24(-) cells with essentially complete selectivity up to ∼IC25. Importantly, the proportion of CD44(+)/CD24(-) cells showed a pronounced U-shaped dose response curve for salinomycin and its derivatives, but not for paclitaxel. The concentration for maximum response in this assay followed differences in IC50 for salinomycin and its analogues, which emphasizes the importance of taking concentration dependence into account when comparing effects on the CD44(+)/CD24(-) phenotype. Small differences in the global conformation within the triad of compounds investigated together with differences in activity across assays emphasize the importance of substitution at C20 for the activity of salinomycin and its derivatives.

  14. A noninvasive cancer detection strategy based on gold nanoparticle surface-enhanced raman spectroscopy of urinary modified nucleosides isolated by affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shangyuan; Zheng, Zuci; Xu, Yuanji; Lin, Jinyong; Chen, Guannan; Weng, Cuncheng; Lin, Duo; Qiu, Sufang; Cheng, Min; Huang, Zufang; Wang, Lan; Chen, Rong; Xie, Shusen; Zeng, Haishan

    2017-05-15

    The search for tumor biomarkers in the urine for cancer diagnosis is currently a hot topic in clinical oncology, with potential for cancer screening and diagnosis. Modified nucleosides excreted through the urine are considered to be a general tumor marker for various cancer types. Herein, we explore a new method that utilizes surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy to obtain a complete biochemical profile of urinary modified nucleosides. In our method, modified nucleosides are first isolated from urine sample utilizing the excellent separation ability of affinity chromatography; then supplemented with gold (Au) nanoparticles as substrate for SERS spectroscopy analysis. The obtained SERS spectra present rich diagnostic and fingerprinting type signatures of urinary modified nucleosides. The utility of this new method in cancer detection was evaluated by analyzing urine samples from three groups of subjects: nasopharyngeal cancer patients (n=62), esophageal cancer patients (n=55), and healthy volunteers (n=52). Partial least squares and linear discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) were used to analyze and classify the SERS spectra of urinary modified nucleosides from nasopharyngeal cancer, esophageal cancer, and the normal group, achieving diagnostic sensitivities of 95.2%, 90.9% and 98.1% and specificities of 97.2%, 98.2% and 95.7%, respectively. These results demonstrated great potential of this novel method for non-invasive and label-free cancer detection and screening. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Toward Liquid Biopsy: Determination of the Humoral Immune Response in Cancer Patients Using HaloTag Fusion Protein-Modified Electrochemical Bioplatforms.

    PubMed

    Garranzo-Asensio, María; Guzman-Aranguez, Ana; Povés, Carmen; Fernández-Aceñero, María Jesús; Torrente-Rodríguez, Rebeca M; Ruiz-Valdepeñas Montiel, Víctor; Domínguez, Gemma; Frutos, Luis San; Rodríguez, Nuria; Villalba, Mayte; Pingarrón, José M; Campuzano, Susana; Barderas, Rodrigo

    2016-12-20

    Autoantibodies raised against tumor-associated antigens have shown high promise as clinical biomarkers for reliable diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy monitoring of cancer. An electrochemical disposable biosensor for the specific and sensitive determination of p53-specific autoantibodies has been developed for the first time in this work. This biosensor involves the use of magnetic microcarriers (MBs) modified with covalently immobilized HaloTag fusion p53 protein as solid supports for the selective capture of specific autoantibodies. After magnetic capture of the modified MBs onto screen-printed carbon working electrodes, the amperometric signal using the system hydroquinone/H2O2 was related to the levels of p53-autoantibodies in the sample. The biosensor was applied for the analysis of sera from 24 patients with high-risk of developing colorectal cancer and 6 from patients already diagnosed with colorectal (4) and ovarian (2) cancer. The developed biosensor was able to determine p53 autoantibodies with a sensitivity higher than that of a commercial standard ELISA using a just-in-time produced protein in a simpler protocol with less sample volume and easily miniaturized and cost-effective instrumentation.

  16. Testosterone regulates thyroid cancer progression by modifying tumor suppressor genes and tumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lisa J.; Xiong, Yin; Nilubol, Naris; He, Mei; Bommareddi, Swaroop; Zhu, Xuguang; Jia, Li; Xiao, Zhen; Park, Jeong-Won; Xu, Xia; Patel, Dhaval; Willingham, Mark C.; Cheng, Sheue-yann; Kebebew, Electron

    2015-01-01

    Cancer gender disparity has been observed for a variety of human malignancies. Thyroid cancer is one such cancer with a higher incidence in women, but more aggressive disease in men. There is scant evidence on the role of sex hormones on cancer initiation/progression. Using a transgenic mouse model of follicular thyroid cancer (FTC), we found castration led to lower rates of cancer in females and less advanced cancer in males. Mechanistically, less advanced cancer in castrated males was due to increased expression of tumor suppressor (Glipr1, Sfrp1) and immune-regulatory genes and higher tumor infiltration with M1 macrophages and CD8 cells. Functional study showed that GLIPR1 reduced cell growth and increased chemokine secretion (Ccl5) that activates immune cells. Our data demonstrate that testosterone regulates thyroid cancer progression by reducing tumor suppressor gene expression and tumor immunity. PMID:25576159

  17. Platelet effects on ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Davis, Ashley N; Afshar-Kharghan, Vahid; Sood, Anil K

    2014-06-01

    Growing understanding of the role of thrombocytosis, high platelet turnover, and the presence of activated platelets in the circulation in cancer progression and metastasis has brought megakaryocytes into focus. Platelet biology is essential to hemostasis, vascular integrity, angiogenesis, inflammation, innate immunity, wound healing, and cancer biology. However, before megakaryocyte/platelet-directed therapies can be considered for clinical use, understanding of the mechanism and biology of paraneoplastic thrombocytosis in malignancy is required. Here, we provide an overview of the clinical implications, biological significance, and mechanisms of paraneoplastic thrombocytosis in the context of ovarian cancer.

  18. Cancer nanotechnology: enhanced therapeutic response using peptide-modified gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yang, Celina; Neshatian, Mehrnoosh; van Prooijen, Monique

    2014-07-01

    The applications of nanoparticles (NPs) for improved therapeutics are at the forefront of cancer nanotechnology. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have been extensively used due to their ability to act as both an anticancer drug carrier in chemotherapy and as a dose enhancer in radiotherapy. GNPs used in the studies were predominantly localized in the cell cytoplasm. However, the therapeutic response can be further enhanced if NPs can be effectively targeted into the nucleus. Here, we present an effective strategy for designing a GNP-peptide complex for nuclear targeting. Two peptides were conjugated onto a NP: One peptide enhanced the uptake while the other peptide enhanced the nuclear delivery. The nuclear targeted cells displayed a four-fold increase in the therapeutic response when treated with radiation as compared to untargeted ones. There was a modest increase in the DNA damage for radiated cells with nuclear targeted GNPs. This research will establish a more successful NP-based platform for combining more than one treatment modality, such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy, and creates a more aggressive approach in eradicating cancer.

  19. Genetic Mapping in Mice Identifies DMBT1 as a Candidate Modifier of Mammary Tumors and Breast Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Blackburn, Anneke C.; Hill, Linda Z.; Roberts, Amy L.; Wang, Jun; Aud, Dee; Jung, Jimmy; Nikolcheva, Tania; Allard, John; Peltz, Gary; Otis, Christopher N.; Cao, Qing J.; Ricketts, Reva St. J.; Naber, Stephen P.; Mollenhauer, Jan; Poustka, Annemarie; Malamud, Daniel; Jerry, D. Joseph

    2007-01-01

    Low-penetrance breast cancer susceptibility alleles seem to play a significant role in breast cancer risk but are difficult to identify in human cohorts. A genetic screen of 176 N2 backcross progeny of two Trp53+/− strains, BALB/c and C57BL/6, which differ in their susceptibility to mammary tumors, identified a modifier of mammary tumor susceptibility in an ∼25-Mb interval on mouse chromosome 7 (designated SuprMam1). Relative to heterozygotes, homozygosity for BALB/c alleles of SuprMam1 significantly decreased mammary tumor latency from 70.7 to 61.1 weeks and increased risk twofold (P = 0.002). Dmbt1 (deleted in malignant brain tumors 1) was identified as a candidate modifier gene within the SuprMam1 interval because it was differentially expressed in mammary tissues from BALB/c-Trp53+/− and C57BL/6-Trp53+/− mice. Dmbt1 mRNA and protein was reduced in mammary glands of the susceptible BALB/c mice. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated that DMBT1 protein expression was also significantly reduced in normal breast tissue from women with breast cancer (staining score, 1.8; n = 46) compared with cancer-free controls (staining score, 3.9; n = 53; P < 0.0001). These experiments demonstrate the use of Trp53+/− mice as a sensitized background to screen for low-penetrance modifiers of cancer. The results identify a novel mammary tumor susceptibility locus in mice and support a role for DMBT1 in suppression of mammary tumors in both mice and women. PMID:17525270

  20. Effect of modified yam (Dioscorea esculenta) flour on some physicochemical and sensory properties of synbiotic yoghurt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handayani, M. N.; Cakrawati, D.; Handayani, S.

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the study were to know characteristics of yam modified flour; to know the effect of modified yam flour on some physicochemical and sensory properties of synbiotic yoghurt and to determine the concentration level of modified yam flour to produce symbiotic yoghurt preferred by panelists. The reasearch was conducted using one factor complete randomized design. Modified yam flour was added to yoghurt at concentration of 2%, 4%, 6%. The effect of physical modification were investigated. Proximate analysis showed modified yam flour consist of 7.66% moisture content, 1.42% ash content, 10.16%, dietary fiber, 7.49% inulin, and 71.78% total starch content. Result obtained that modified yam flour has yield of 10.54%, the modified yam flour showed solubility and water absopsion of 77,63% and 136,65 respectively. The addition of modified yam flour on yoghurt resulted significantly difference effect on texture, but did not have significantly difference on colour, flavour and aroma. Modified yam flour added yoghurt thickness because it was gelatinized when added to yoghurt at 40°C. Sensory analysis conducted with hedonic test showed synbiotic yoghurt added with 2% of modified yam flour most preferred by panellists. Synbiotic yoghurt with 2% of modified yam flour has pH number of 4, 8 and total acid tirated of 1, 7%.

  1. Effective Removal of Heavy Metals from Wastewater Using Modified Clay.

    PubMed

    Song, Mun-Seon; Vijayarangamuthu, K; Han, EunJi; Jeon, Ki-Joon

    2016-05-01

    We report an economical and eco-friendly way to remove the heavy metal pollutant using modified clay. The modification of clay was done by calcining the natural clay from Kyushu region in Japan. Further, the removal efficiency for various pH and contact time was evaluated. The morphology of the clays was studied using the scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The structural and chemical analyses of modified clay were done by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and Energy dispersion analysis (EDAX) to understand the properties related to the removal of heavy metal pollutant. Further, we studied the absorption efficiency of clay for various pH and contacting time using Ni polluted water. The modified clays show better removal efficiency for all pH with different saturation time. The adsorption follows pseudo-second order kinetics and the adsorption capacity of modified clay is 1.5 times larger than that of natural clay. The increase in the adsorption efficiency of modified clay was correlated to the increase in hematite phase along with increase in surface area due to surface morphological changes.

  2. Genetic variation as a modifier of association between therapeutic exposure and subsequent malignant neoplasms in cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Smita

    2015-03-01

    Subsequent malignant neoplasms (SMNs) are associated with significant morbidity and are a major cause of premature mortality among cancer survivors. Several large studies have demonstrated a strong association between the radiation and/or chemotherapy used to treat primary cancer and the risk of developing SMNs. However, for any given therapeutic exposure, the risk of developing an SMN varies between individuals. Genomic variation can potentially modify the association between therapeutic exposures and SMN risk and may explain the observed interindividual variability. In this review, the author provides a brief overview of the current knowledge regarding the role of genomic variation in the development of therapy-related SMNs and discusses the methodological challenges in undertaking an endeavor to develop a deeper understanding of the molecular underpinnings of therapy-related SMNs, such as an appropriate study design, the identification of an adequately sized study population together with a reliable plan for collecting and maintaining high-quality DNA, clinical validation of the phenotype, and the selection of an appropriate approach or platform for genotyping. Understanding the factors that can modify the risk of treatment-related SMNs is critical to developing targeted intervention strategies and optimizing risk-based health care for cancer survivors. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  3. Selective biophysical interactions of surface modified nanoparticles with cancer cell lipids improve tumor targeting and gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Blanka; Peetla, Chiranjeevi; Adjei, Isaac M; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2013-07-01

    Targeting gene- or drug-loaded nanoparticles (NPs) to tumors and ensuring their intratumoral retention after systemic administration remain key challenges to improving the efficacy of NP-based therapeutics. Here, we investigate a novel targeting approach that exploits changes in lipid metabolism and cell membrane biophysics that occur during malignancy. We hypothesized that modifications to the surface of NPs that preferentially increase their biophysical interaction with the membrane lipids of cancer cells will improve intratumoral retention and in vivo efficacy upon delivery of NPs loaded with a therapeutic gene. We have demonstrated that different surfactants, incorporated onto the NPs' surface, affect the biophysical interactions of NPs with the lipids of cancer cells and normal endothelial cells. NPs surface modified with didodecyldimethylammoniumbromide (DMAB) demonstrated greater interaction with cancer cell lipids, which was 6.7-fold greater than with unmodified NPs and 5.5-fold greater than with endothelial cell lipids. This correlated with increased uptake of DMAB-modified NPs with incubation time by cancer cells compared to other formulations of NPs and to uptake by endothelial cells. Upon systemic injection, DMAB-NPs demonstrated a 4.6-fold increase in tumor accumulation compared to unmodified NPs which also correlated to improved efficacy of p53 gene therapy. Characterization of the biophysical interactions between NPs and lipid membranes of tumors or other diseased tissues/organs may hold promise for engineering targeted delivery of therapeutics.

  4. Evaulation of cancer and non-cancer effects of cumene ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Cumene, also known as isopropyl benzene, is a volatile liquid. We have systematically reviewed published literature to evaluate cancer and noncancer effects of cumene. Cumene, readily absorbed via inhalation is distributed in several tissues, metabolized extensively by cytochrome P-450 isozymes within hepatic and extra-hepatic tissues and excreted through urine. Although, there are no epidemiological cancer studies for humans, chronic inhalation exposure studies in rat and mouse have shown increased nasal lesions including atrophy, basal cell hyperplasia, atypical hyperplasia and hyperplasia of the olfactory epithelium glands. To present the information at the Society of Toxicology Meeting.

  5. Effect of ageing on rheological properties of storage-stable SBS/sulfur-modified asphalts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng; Yu, Jianying; Wu, Shaopeng

    2010-10-15

    Oxidative ageing as an inevitable process in practical road paving has a great effect on the properties of polymer-modified asphalts (PMAs). In this article, the effect of short-term and long-term oxidative ageing on the rheological, physical properties and the morphology of the styrene-butadiene-styrene (SBS)- and storage-stable SBS/sulfur-modified asphalts was studied, respectively. The analysis on the rheological and physical properties of the PMAs before and after ageing showed the two major effects of ageing. On one hand, ageing prompted the degradation of polymer and increased the viscous behaviour of the modified binders, on the other, ageing changed the asphalt compositions and improved the elastic behaviour of the modified binders. The final performance of the aged binders depended on the combined effect. After ageing, the storage-stable SBS/sulfur-modified asphalts showed an obvious viscous behaviour compare with the SBS-modified asphalts and this led to an improved low-temperature creep property. The rutting resistance of the SBS-modified asphalts declined by the addition of sulfur due to the structural instability of the SBS/sulfur-modified asphalts. The rheological properties of the modified binders before and after ageing also depended strongly on the structural characteristics of SBS. The observation by using optical microscopy showed the compatibility between asphalt and SBS was improved with further ageing, especially for the storage-stable SBS/sulfur-modified asphalts.

  6. Nanoparticle Design Strategies for Effective Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Velpurisiva, Praveena; Gad, Aniket; Piel, Brandon; Jadia, Rahul; Rai, Prakash

    2017-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy is a rapidly evolving and paradigm shifting treatment modality that adds a strong tool to the collective cancer treatment arsenal. It can be effective even for late stage diagnoses and has already received clinical approval. Tumors are known to not only avoid immune surveillance but also exploit the immune system to continue local tumor growth and metastasis. Because of this, most immunotherapies, particularly those directed against solid cancers, have thus far only benefited a small minority of patients. Early clinical substantiation lends weight to the claim that cancer immunotherapies, which are adaptive and enduring treatment methods, generate much more sustained and robust anticancer effects when they are effectively formulated in nanoparticles or scaffolds than when they are administered as free drugs. Engineering cancer immunotherapies using nanomaterials is, therefore, a very promising area worthy of further consideration and investigation. This review focuses on the recent advances in cancer immunoengineering using nanoparticles for enhancing the therapeutic efficacy of a diverse range of immunotherapies. The delivery of immunostimulatory agents to antitumor immune cells, such as dendritic or antigen presenting cells, may be a far more efficient tactic to eradicate tumors than delivery of conventional chemotherapeutic and cytotoxic drugs to cancer cells. In addition to its immense therapeutic potential, immunoengineering using nanoparticles also provides a valuable tool for unearthing and understanding the basics of tumor biology. Recent research using nanoparticles for cancer immunotherapy has demonstrated the advantage of physicochemical manipulation in improving the delivery of immunostimulatory agents. In vivo studies have tested a range of particle sizes, mostly less than 300 nm, and particles with both positive and negative zeta potentials for various applications. Material composition and surface modifications have been shown to

  7. Nanoparticle Design Strategies for Effective Cancer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Velpurisiva, Praveena; Gad, Aniket; Piel, Brandon; Jadia, Rahul; Rai, Prakash

    2017-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy is a rapidly evolving and paradigm shifting treatment modality that adds a strong tool to the collective cancer treatment arsenal. It can be effective even for late stage diagnoses and has already received clinical approval. Tumors are known to not only avoid immune surveillance but also exploit the immune system to continue local tumor growth and metastasis. Because of this, most immunotherapies, particularly those directed against solid cancers, have thus far only benefited a small minority of patients. Early clinical substantiation lends weight to the claim that cancer immunotherapies, which are adaptive and enduring treatment methods, generate much more sustained and robust anticancer effects when they are effectively formulated in nanoparticles or scaffolds than when they are administered as free drugs. Engineering cancer immunotherapies using nanomaterials is, therefore, a very promising area worthy of further consideration and investigation. This review focuses on the recent advances in cancer immunoengineering using nanoparticles for enhancing the therapeutic efficacy of a diverse range of immunotherapies. The delivery of immunostimulatory agents to antitumor immune cells, such as dendritic or antigen presenting cells, may be a far more efficient tactic to eradicate tumors than delivery of conventional chemotherapeutic and cytotoxic drugs to cancer cells. In addition to its immense therapeutic potential, immunoengineering using nanoparticles also provides a valuable tool for unearthing and understanding the basics of tumor biology. Recent research using nanoparticles for cancer immunotherapy has demonstrated the advantage of physicochemical manipulation in improving the delivery of immunostimulatory agents. In vivo studies have tested a range of particle sizes, mostly less than 300 nm, and particles with both positive and negative zeta potentials for various applications. Material composition and surface modifications have been shown to

  8. Treatment of childhood cancers: late effects.

    PubMed

    2015-10-01

    In France, about 1 in 1000 young adults aged 20 to 30 years is a survivor of childhood cancer and is thus faced with late effects of their cancer and its treatment (radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy). What are the late effects of childhood cancer therapy? A systematic review by the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) provides useful information based on European and North American data. Cancer treatments can have many long-term consequences that depend on the drugs and doses used, radiation therapy protocols and irradiated organs, and age at the time of treatment. Cytotoxic drugs and radiation can both cause infertility. Abdominopelvic radiation therapy in girls has been linked to an increased risk of premature delivery and other complications of pregnancy. No increase in birth defects has been reported among children born to childhood cancer survivors. Anthracyclines and radiation therapy can cause cardiomyopathy. Neck irradiation can lead to thyroid disorders, and cranial irradiation to growth retardation. Chemotherapy can cause osteonecrosis and loss of bone density, but without an increased risk of fracture. The risk of cognitive impairment and structural abnormalities of the brain is higher when the child is younger or receives a high cumulative dose of cranial irradiation or total irradiation dosage. Some cytotoxic drugs can damage the kidneys. Cranial radiation therapy can cause long-term neuroendocrine disorders and growth disorders, especially when the dose exceeds 18 Gy. Cytotoxic drugs (alkylating agents, etoposide, etc.) and radiation therapy can cause second cancers of a different histological type. One analysis of second cancers showed a median time to onset of 7 years for solid tumours and 2.5 years for lymphoma and leukaemia. Better knowledge of the late effects of childhood cancer therapy can help orient the choice of treatment towards less harmful options or, if necessary, implement measures aimed at preventing late adverse

  9. Modifying effect of calcium/magnesium intake ratio and mortality: a population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Qi; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Deng, Xinqing; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Li, Honglan; Yang, Gong; Shrubsole, Martha J; Ji, Butian; Cai, Hui; Chow, Wong-Ho; Gao, Yu-Tang; Zheng, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Magnesium (Mg) and calcium (Ca) antagonise each other in (re)absorption, inflammation and many other physiological activities. Based on mathematical estimation, the absorbed number of Ca or Mg depends on the dietary ratio of Ca to Mg intake. We hypothesise that the dietary Ca/Mg ratio modifies the effects of Ca and Mg on mortality due to gastrointestinal tract cancer and, perhaps, mortality due to diseases occurring in other organs or systems. Design Prospective studies. Setting Population-based cohort studies (The Shanghai Women's Health Study and the Shanghai Men's Health Study) conducted in Shanghai, China. Participants 74 942 Chinese women aged 40–70 years and 61 500 Chinese men aged 40–74 years participated in the study. Primary outcome measures All-cause mortality and disease-specific mortality. Results In this Chinese population with a low Ca/Mg intake ratio (a median of 1.7 vs around 3.0 in US populations), intakes of Mg greater than US Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA) levels (320 mg/day among women and 420 mg/day among men) were related to increased risks of total mortality for both women and men. Consistent with our hypothesis, the Ca/Mg intake ratio significantly modified the associations of intakes of Ca and Mg with mortality risk, whereas no significant interactions between Ca and Mg in relation to outcome were found. The associations differed by gender. Among men with a Ca/Mg ratio >1.7, increased intakes of Ca and Mg were associated with reduced risks of total mortality, and mortality due to coronary heart diseases. In the same group, intake of Ca was associated with a reduced risk of mortality due to cancer. Among women with a Ca/Mg ratio ≤1.7, intake of Mg was associated with increased risks of total mortality, and mortality due to cardiovascular diseases and colorectal cancer. Conclusions These results, if confirmed, may help to understand the optimal balance between Ca and Mg in the aetiology and prevention of these

  10. Highly Stable and Biocompatible Mushroom β-Glucan Modified Gold Nanorods for Cancer Photothermal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaojie; Zhou, Jiajing; Liu, Chaoran; Xiong, Qirong; Duan, Hongwei; Cheung, Peter

    2017-10-10

    Naturally-occurring β-glucans have been widely regarded as a natural source for functional foods and pharmaceuticals due to their immunomodulatory property and antitumor activity. However, physicochemically stable and the biocompatible β-glucans are rarely explored as a carrier for nanomaterials to overcome the problems of aggregation and nanotoxicity. Here, we have developed a highly stable and biocompatible mushroom β-glucan coated gold nanorods (AuNR-Glu) for cancer photothermal therapy by integrating Pleurotus tuber-regium (PTR) sclerotial β-glucan (Glu) and plasmonic gold nanorods (AuNRs) photothermal-active in the second near-infrared (NIR-II) window. AuNR-Glu showed high colloidal stability in various biological media, even in simulated gastric fluid. Moreover, AuNR-Glu had low cytotoxicity and high photothermal stability which are excellent characteristics as photothermal agent for cancer therapy. In vitro experiments showed that AuNR-Glu nanohybrid was effective against MCF-7 (only 4.5 ± 0.9% viability) at a low dose of 20 μg/mL under NIR-II at a safe laser power density (0.75 W/cm2). Natural mushroom β-glucans are potential functional polymer to fabricate nanohybrid for biomedical applications.

  11. Surface modified multifunctional nanomedicines for simultaneous imaging and therapy of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Barar, Jaleh; Omidi, Yadollah

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: To date, a growing number of advanced anticancer nanomedicines (e.g., Doxil®, Lipoxal®, DepoCyte®) have entered into different phases of clinical trials. However, most of these medicaments fail to differentiate between diseased and normal cells. They also do not have capability of real time monitoring of disease status trough on-demand imaging/sensing of target molecule(s). Multifunctional nanomedicines and theranostics can resolve such limitations, while formulation of these advanced seamless systems appear to involve various sophisticated process, exploiting several bioconjugations. Methods: Recent works upon multifunctional nanomedicines for simultaneous imaging and therapy of cancer have been systematically reviewed, focusing on surface modification and application of advanced nanobiomaterials. Results: Ultimate therapy of malignancies, as complex systems, demands implementation of seamless nanosystems (NSs) that can specifically target the cancerous cells and smartly deliver the anticancer agent(s) into the desired target site. Engineering of such NSs requires in-situ coordination of various technologies (e.g., synthesis, surface modification and bioconjugation) in order to achieve improved pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics outcomes. Conclusion: Seamless multimodal NSs have potential to simultaneously target and monitor the tumor cells through homing and imaging/sensing devices and deliver the therapeutic agents. However, to achieve superior pharmacokinetics with maximal efficacy and minimal side effects, these advanced NSs need to become much more intelligent to sense the disease condition and liberate therapeutics on demand. PMID:24790893

  12. Modifiable risk factors for adherence to adjuvant endocrine therapy among breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Jacob Arriola, Kimberly R; Mason, Tamara A; Bannon, Kari Ann; Holmes, Carol; Powell, Cecil Lamonte; Horne, Kandra; O'Regan, Ruth

    2014-04-01

    Breast cancer incidence and mortality are declining due to improvements in early detection and treatment. One advance in treatment is the development of adjuvant endocrine therapy (AET) for women with hormone receptor positive breast cancer. Despite strong evidence linking AET to better health outcomes, AET adherence continues to be suboptimal. This study tests the hypothesis that patient beliefs about medication mediate the relationship between frequency of physician communication and AET adherence. This cross-sectional study utilizes data from patient self-report and medical chart abstraction (N=200). Survey measures included frequency of physician communication, patient beliefs about medicine, AET adherence, and demographic characteristics. Necessity beliefs mediated the relationship between frequency of physician communication and medication adherence (necessity beliefs β=.18, p<.05; physician communication β=.13, p>.05). There was no evidence of medication concerns mediating the relationship between frequency of physician communication and medication adherence. More frequent physician communication that shapes what patients believe about AET importance may be associated with greater AET adherence; however, frequent physician communication that shapes patient concerns about side effects may not be associated with greater AET adherence. Research is needed to enhance understanding of the type of physician communication that is most consistently associated with patient beliefs about medication and AET adherence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Monodisperse magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles modified with water soluble polymers for the diagnosis of breast cancer by MRI method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezayan, Ali Hossein; Mousavi, Majid; Kheirjou, Somayyeh; Amoabediny, Ghasem; Ardestani, Mehdi Shafiee; Mohammadnejad, Javad

    2016-12-01

    In this study, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were synthesized via co-precipitation method. To enhance the biocompatibility and colloidal stability of the synthesized nanoparticles, they were modified with carboxyl functionalized PEG via dopamine (DPA) linker. Both modified and unmodified Fe3O4 nanoparticles exhibited super paramagnetic behavior (particle size below 20 nm). The saturation magnetization (Ms) of PEGdiacid-modified Fe3O4 was 45 emu/g, which was less than the unmodified Fe3O4 nanoparticles (70 emu/g). This difference indicated that PEGdiacid polymer was immobilized on the surface of Fe3O4 nanoparticles successfully. To evaluate the efficiency of the resulting nanoparticles as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), different concentration of MNPs and different value of echo time TE were investigated. The results showed that by increasing the concentration of the nanoparticles, transverse relaxation time (T2) decreased, which subsequently resulted in MR signal enhancement. T2-weighted MR images of the different concentration of MNPs in different value of echo time TE indicated that MR signal intensity increased with increase in TE value up to 66 and then remained constant. The cytotoxicity effect of the modified and unmodified nanoparticles was evaluated in three different concentrations (12, 60 and 312 mg l-1) on MDA-MB-231 cancer cells for 24 and 48 h. In both tested time (24 and 48 h) for all three samples, the modified nanoparticles had long life time than unmodified nanoparticles. Cellular uptake of modified MNPs was 80% and reduced to 9% by the unmodified MNPs.

  14. Modifying the communicative effectiveness of fire prevention signs

    Treesearch

    William S. Folkman

    1966-01-01

    Two versions of a commonly used U.S. Forest Service sign ('America Needs Productive Forests') were tested on four adult special-interest groups in Butte County, California. Half the members were shown the regularly used sign; the other half, a modified sign that included the Smokey Bear symbol. Responses to questionnaires by both groups suggested that each...

  15. Could age modify the effect of genetic variants in IL6 and TNF-α genes in multiple myeloma?

    PubMed

    Martino, Alessandro; Buda, Gabriele; Maggini, Valentina; Lapi, Francesco; Lupia, Antonella; Di Bello, Domenica; Orciuolo, Enrico; Galimberti, Sara; Barale, Roberto; Petrini, Mario; Rossi, Anna Maria

    2012-05-01

    Cytokines play a central role in multiple myeloma (MM) pathogenesis thus genetic variations within cytokines coding genes could influence MM susceptibility and therapy outcome. We investigated the impact of 8 SNPs in these genes in 202 MM cases and 235 controls also evaluating their impact on therapy outcome in a subset of 91 patients. Despite the overall negative findings, we found a significant age-modified effect of IL6 and TNF-α SNPs, on MM risk and therapy outcome, respectively. Therefore, this observation suggests that genetic variation in inflammation-related genes could be an important mediator of the complex interplay between ageing and cancer.

  16. High mammographic breast density predicts locoregional recurrence after modified radical mastectomy for invasive breast cancer: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Sen; Chen, Jenny Ling-Yu; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Kuo, Sung-Hsin; Jaw, Fu-Shan; Tseng, Yao-Hui; Ko, Wei-Chun; Chang, Yeun-Chung

    2016-12-01

    We aimed to evaluate the influence of mammographic breast density at diagnosis on the risk of cancer recurrence and survival outcomes in patients with invasive breast cancer after modified radical mastectomy. This case-control study included 121 case-control pairs of women diagnosed with invasive breast cancer between 2004 and 2009, and who had undergone modified radical mastectomy and had mammographic breast density measured before or at diagnosis. Women with known locoregional recurrence or distant metastasis were matched by pathological disease stage, age, and year of diagnosis to women without recurrence. Locoregional recurrence was defined as recurrence in the ipsilateral chest wall, or axillary, internal mammary, or supraclavicular nodes. The median follow-up duration was 84.0 months for case patients and 92.9 months for control patients. Patients with heterogeneously dense (50-75% density) and extremely dense (>75% density) breasts had an increased risk of locoregional recurrence (hazard ratios 3.1 and 5.7, 95% confidence intervals 1.1-9.8 and 1.2-34.9, p = 0.043 and 0.048, respectively) than did women with less dense breasts. Positive margins after surgery also increased the risk of locoregional recurrence (hazard ratio 3.3, 95% confidence interval 1.3-8.3, p = 0.010). Multivariate analysis that included dense breasts (>50% density), positive margin, no adjuvant radiotherapy, and no adjuvant chemotherapy revealed that dense breasts were significant factors for predicting locoregional recurrence risk (hazard ratio 3.6, 95% confidence interval 1.2-11.1, p = 0.025). Our results demonstrate that dense breast tissue (>50% density) increased the risk of locoregional recurrence after modified radical mastectomy in patients with invasive breast cancer. Additional prospective studies are necessary to validate these findings. The study is retrospectively registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02771665 , on May 11, 2016.

  17. Hyaluronic acid modified mesoporous carbon nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to CD44-overexpressing cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Long; Jiao, Jian; Cui, Yu; Guo, Jingwen; Han, Ning; Di, Donghua; Chang, Di; Wang, Pu; Jiang, Tongying; Wang, Siling

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, hyaluronic acid (HA) functionalized uniform mesoporous carbon spheres (UMCS) were synthesized for targeted enzyme responsive drug delivery using a facile electrostatic attraction strategy. This HA modification ensured stable drug encapsulation in mesoporous carbon nanoparticles in an extracellular environment while increasing colloidal stability, biocompatibility, cell-targeting ability, and controlled cargo release. The cellular uptake experiments of fluorescently labeled mesoporous carbon nanoparticles, with or without HA functionalization, demonstrated that HA-UMCS are able to specifically target cancer cells overexpressing CD44 receptors. Moreover, the cargo loaded doxorubicin (DOX) and verapamil (VER) exhibited a dual pH and hyaluronidase-1 responsive release in the tumor microenvironment. In addition, VER/DOX/HA-UMCS exhibited a superior therapeutic effect on an in vivo HCT-116 tumor in BALB/c nude mice. In summary, it is expected that HA-UMCS will offer a new method for targeted co-delivery of drugs to tumors overexpressing CD44 receptors.

  18. The CYP1A2 genotype modifies the association between coffee consumption and breast cancer risk among BRCA1 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Kotsopoulos, Joanne; Ghadirian, Parviz; El-Sohemy, Ahmed; Lynch, Henry T; Snyder, Carrie; Daly, Mary; Domchek, Susan; Randall, Susan; Karlan, Beth; Zhang, Phil; Zhang, Shiyu; Sun, Ping; Narod, Steven A

    2007-05-01

    We have recently reported that, among BRCA1 mutation carriers, the consumption of caffeinated coffee was associated with a significant reduction in breast cancer risk. Because the metabolism of caffeine is primarily by CYP1A2, we examined whether or not the CYP1A2 genotype modifies the association between a history of coffee consumption and the risk of breast cancer. A common A to C polymorphism in the CYP1A2 gene is associated with decreased enzyme inducibility and impaired caffeine metabolism. Information regarding coffee consumption habits and the CYP1A2 genotype was available for 411 BRCA1 mutation carriers (170 cases and 241 controls). We estimated the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for breast cancer associated with the CYP1A2 genotype and a history of coffee consumption before age 35, adjusting for potential confounders. The CYP1A2 genotype did not affect breast cancer risk. Among women with at least one variant C allele (AC or CC), those who consumed coffee had a 64% reduction in breast cancer risk, compared with women who never consumed coffee (OR, 0.36; 95% CI, 0.18-0.73). A significant protective effect of coffee consumption was not observed among women with the CYP1A2 AA genotype (OR, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.49-1.77). Similar results were obtained when the analysis was restricted to caffeinated coffee. This study suggests that caffeine protects against breast cancer in women with a BRCA1 mutation and illustrates the importance of integrating individual genetic variability when assessing diet-disease associations.

  19. [Radiologic side effects of cancer therapy].

    PubMed

    Beule, Annette; Tarkkanen, Maija

    2015-01-01

    Cancer therapy agents can cause a vast spectrum of side effects which can be detected with various imaging techniques. These side effects can affect all organs and vary from non-symptomatic to fatal. The rapid evolution of cancer therapy brings constantly new agents into clinical practice. Some side effects may be detected only after the marketing approval of the therapy. The radiological findings usually lead into a suspicion of a drug side effect especially if there are no other imminent causes for the findings. Collaboration between the radiologist and the treating physician is essential in the diagnostic work-up.

  20. New Strategies in Engineering T-cell Receptor Gene-Modified T cells to More Effectively Target Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Thomas M; Stromnes, Ingunn M; Chapuis, Aude G; Greenberg, Philip D

    2015-12-01

    The immune system, T cells in particular, have the ability to target and destroy malignant cells. However, antitumor immune responses induced from the endogenous T-cell repertoire are often insufficient for the eradication of established tumors, as illustrated by the failure of cancer vaccination strategies or checkpoint blockade for most tumors. Genetic modification of T cells to express a defined T-cell receptor (TCR) can provide the means to rapidly generate large numbers of tumor-reactive T cells capable of targeting tumor cells in vivo. However, cell-intrinsic factors as well as immunosuppressive factors in the tumor microenvironment can limit the function of such gene-modified T cells. New strategies currently being developed are refining and enhancing this approach, resulting in cellular therapies that more effectively target tumors and that are less susceptible to tumor immune evasion. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. The effects of laser immunotherapy on cancer cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahavar, Cody F.; Zhou, Feifan; Hasanjee, Aamr M.; Layton, Elivia; Lam, Anh; Chen, Wei R.; Vaughan, Melville B.

    2016-03-01

    Laser immunotherapy (LIT) uses laser irradiation and immunological stimulation to target all types of metastases and creates a long-term tumor resistance. Glycated chitosan (GC) is the immunological stimulant used in LIT. Interestingly, GC can act as a surfactant for single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) to immunologically modify SWNTs. SWNT-GC retains the optical properties of SWNTs and the immunological functions of GC to help increase the selectivity of the laser and create a more optimal immune response. One essential aspect of understanding this immune response is knowing how laser irradiation affects cancer cells' ability to metastasize. In this experiment, a cell migration assay was performed. A 2mm circular elastomer plugs were placed at the bottom of multi-well dishes. Pre-cancerous keratinocytes, different tumor cells, and fibroblasts were then plated separately in treated wells. Once the cells reached 100% confluence, they were irradiated by either a 980nm or 805nm wavelength laser. The goal was to determine the effects of laser irradiation and immunological stimulation on cancer cell migration in vitro, paying the way to understand the mechanism of LIT in treating metastatic tumors in cancer patients.

  2. Evaluation of copy-number variants as modifiers of breast and ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 pathogenic variant carriers

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Logan C; Marquart, Louise; Pearson, John F; Wiggins, George A R; O'Mara, Tracy A; Parsons, Michael T; Barrowdale, Daniel; McGuffog, Lesley; Dennis, Joe; Benitez, Javier; Slavin, Thomas P; Radice, Paolo; Frost, Debra; Godwin, Andrew K; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Isaacs, Claudine; Peshkin, Beth N; Caldes, Trinidad; Hogervorst, Frans BL; Lazaro, Conxi; Jakubowska, Anna; Montagna, Marco; Chen, Xiaoqing; Offit, Kenneth; Hulick, Peter J; Andrulis, Irene L; Lindblom, Annika; Nussbaum, Robert L; Nathanson, Katherine L; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Couch, Fergus J; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2017-01-01

    Genome-wide studies of patients carrying pathogenic variants (mutations) in BRCA1 or BRCA2 have reported strong associations between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and cancer risk. To conduct the first genome-wide association analysis of copy-number variants (CNVs) with breast or ovarian cancer risk in a cohort of 2500 BRCA1 pathogenic variant carriers, CNV discovery was performed using multiple calling algorithms and Illumina 610k SNP array data from a previously published genome-wide association study. Our analysis, which focused on functionally disruptive genomic deletions overlapping gene regions, identified a number of loci associated with risk of breast or ovarian cancer for BRCA1 pathogenic variant carriers. Despite only including putative deletions called by at least two or more algorithms, detection of selected CNVs by ancillary molecular technologies only confirmed 40% of predicted common (>1% allele frequency) variants. These include four loci that were associated (unadjusted P<0.05) with breast cancer (GTF2H2, ZNF385B, NAALADL2 and PSG5), and two loci associated with ovarian cancer (CYP2A7 and OR2A1). An interesting finding from this study was an association of a validated CNV deletion at the CYP2A7 locus (19q13.2) with decreased ovarian cancer risk (relative risk=0.50, P=0.007). Genomic analysis found this deletion coincides with a region displaying strong regulatory potential in ovarian tissue, but not in breast epithelial cells. This study highlighted the need to verify CNVs in vitro, but also provides evidence that experimentally validated CNVs (with plausible biological consequences) can modify risk of breast or ovarian cancer in BRCA1 pathogenic variant carriers. PMID:28145423

  3. Genetic Variation as a Modifier of Association between Therapeutic Exposure and Subsequent Malignant Neoplasms in Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Smita

    2014-01-01

    Subsequent malignant neoplasms (SMNs) are associated with significant morbidity and are a major cause of premature mortality among cancer survivors. Several large studies have demonstrated a strong association between the radiation and/or chemotherapy used to treat the primary cancer and the risk of developing SMNs. However, for any given therapeutic exposure, the risk of developing an SMN varies between individuals. Genomic variation can potentially modify the association between therapeutic exposures and SMN risk, and can possibly explain the observed inter-individual variability. This article provides a brief overview of the current knowledge regarding the role of genomic variation in the development of therapy-related SMNs. This article also discusses the methodological challenges in undertaking an endeavor to develop a deeper understanding of the molecular underpinnings of therapy-related SMNs, such as, an appropriate study design, identification of an adequately sized study population together with a reliable plan for collecting and maintaining high quality DNA, clinical validation of the phenotype, and selection of an appropriate approach or platform for genotyping. Understanding the modifiers of risk of treatment-related SMNs is critical to developing targeted intervention strategies and optimizing risk-based health care of cancer survivors. PMID:25355167

  4. Finasteride modifies the relation between serum C-peptide and prostate cancer risk: results from the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial

    PubMed Central

    Neuhouser, Marian L.; Till, Cathee; Kristal, Alan; Goodman, Phyllis; Hoque, Ashraful; Platz, Elizabeth A.; Hsing, Ann W.; Albanes, Demetrius; Parnes, Howard L.; Pollak, Michael

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hyperinsulinemia and obesity-related metabolic disturbances are common and have been associated with increased cancer risk and poor prognosis. METHODS Data are from a case-control study within the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial (PCPT), a randomized, placebo-controlled trial testing finasteride vs. placebo for primary prevention of prostate cancer. Cases (n=1803) and controls (n= 1797) were matched on age, PCPT treatment arm, and family history of prostate cancer; controls included all eligible non-whites. Outcomes were biopsy-determined. Baseline bloods were assayed for serum C-peptide (marker of insulin secretion) and leptin (an adipokine) using ELISA. Logistic regression calculated odds ratios for total prostate cancer and polytomous logistic regression calculated odds ratios for low-grade (Gleason < 7) and high-grade (Gleason ≥ 7) disease. Results were stratified by treatment arm for C-peptide. RESULTS For men on placebo, higher vs. lower serum C-peptide was associated with a near two-fold increased risk of high-grade prostate cancer (Gleason ≥ 7) (multivariate-adjusted OR= 1.88, 95%CI 1.19-2.97, p trend = 0.004). When C-peptide was modeled as a continuous variable, every unit increase in [log(C-peptide)], resulted in a 39% increased risk of high-grade disease (p=0.01). In contrast, there was no significant relationship between C-peptide and high-grade prostate cancer among men receiving finasteride. Leptin was not independently associated with high-grade prostate cancer. CONCLUSIONS These results support findings from other observational studies that high serum C-peptide and insulin-resistance, but not leptin, are associated with increased risk of high-grade prostate cancer. Our novel finding is that the C-peptide-associated risk was attenuated by use of finasteride. PMID:20179296

  5. In vitro and in vivo targeting imaging of pancreatic cancer using a Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoprobe modified with anti-mesothelin antibody

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang; Le, Wenjun; Mei, Tianxiao; Wang, Tiegong; Chen, Luguang; Lei, Yi; Cui, Shaobin; Chen, Bingdi; Cui, Zheng; Shao, Chengwei

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly malignant disease with a 5-year survival rate <5% mainly due to lack of early diagnosis and effective therapy. In an effort to improve the early diagnostic rate of pancreatic cancer, a nanoprobe Fe3O4@SiO2 modified with anti-mesothelin antibody (A-MFS) was prepared to target cells and tumor tissues highly expressing mesothelin in vitro (human pancreatic cancer cell line SW1990) and in vivo (subcutaneously transplanted tumors) studies. The A-MFS probe was successfully prepared and was spherical and uniform with a hydrodynamic diameter between 110 and 130 nm. Cell Counting Kit-8 testing indicated that A-MFS was nontoxic in vitro and in vivo studies. The in vitro study showed that the A-MFS probe specifically targeted SW1990 cells with high mesothelin expression. The in vivo study was conducted in Siemens 3.0 T magnetic resonance imaging. The average T2-weighted signal values of the xenografts were 966.533±31.56 before injecting A-MFS and 691.133±56.84 before injecting saline solution. After injection of 0.1 mL A-MFS via nude mouse caudal vein for 2.5 hours, the average T2-weighted signal of the xenograft decreased by 342.533±42.6. The signal value decreased by −61.233±33.9 and −58.7±19.4 after injection of the saline and Fe3O4@SiO2. The decrease of tumor signal by A-MFS was much more significant than that by saline and Fe3O4@SiO2 (P<0.05). The results demonstrated the high stability and nontoxicity of A-MFS, which effectively targeted pancreatic cancer in vitro and in vivo. A-MFS is a promising agent for diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. PMID:27274243

  6. Liposomes modify the subcellular distribution of sclareol uptake by HCT-116 cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Paradissis, Agnès; Hatziantoniou, Sophia; Georgopoulos, Aristidis; Psarra, Anna-Maria G; Dimas, Konstantinos; Demetzos, Costas

    2007-01-01

    The uptake of free and liposome-incorporated sclareol and its effect on the growth of human cancer cell line HCT-116 was investigated. Recovery of free and liposomal sclareol in cytosol, nuclei and crude membranes was monitored over time. HCT-116 cells were incubated with 100 microM of free or liposomal sclareol up to 96 h. Intact cells were subjected to subcellular fractionation in order to obtain highly purified fractions of nuclei, cytosol, and crude membranes. Sclareol was extracted from intact cells and from the subcellular fractions using the Bligh-Dyer method and was measured by HPTLC/FID. The effect of sclareol on cell growth was found time dependent. Free sclareol exhibited high toxicity, while the liposomal sclareol showed reduced cytotoxicity but retained the ability to reduce the cell growth rate. The uptake of sclareol by the cells was faster and higher compared to that of its liposomal form. The concentration of sclareol in the three subcellular fractions showed that liposomal sclareol is incorporated in crude membranes and from there it is released in cytosol and nuclei in a time dependent manner, while free sclareol passes directly in the cytosol. These results suggest that liposomal sclareol retains its growth inhibiting activity while its cytotoxic action is diminished. These findings could be due to the sustained delivery of sclareol to the different subcellular sites.

  7. Synthesis of glycyrrhetinic acid-modified chitosan 5-fluorouracil nanoparticles and its inhibition of liver cancer characteristics in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Mingrong; Gao, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yong; Chen, Houxiang; He, Bing; Xu, Hongzhi; Li, Yingchun; Han, Jiang; Zhang, Zhiping

    2013-09-17

    Nanoparticle drug delivery (NDDS) is a novel system in which the drugs are delivered to the site of action by small particles in the nanometer range. Natural or synthetic polymers are used as vectors in NDDS, as they provide targeted, sustained release and biodegradability. Here, we used the chitosan and hepatoma cell-specific binding molecule, glycyrrhetinic acid (GA), to synthesize glycyrrhetinic acid-modified chitosan (GA-CTS). The synthetic product was confirmed by Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and ¹H-nuclear magnetic resonance (¹H-NMR). By combining GA-CTS and 5-FU (5-fluorouracil), we obtained a GA-CTS/5-FU nanoparticle, with a particle size of 217.2 nm, a drug loading of 1.56% and a polydispersity index of 0.003. The GA-CTS/5-FU nanoparticle provided a sustained release system comprising three distinct phases of quick, steady and slow release. We demonstrated that the nanoparticle accumulated in the liver. In vitro data indicated that it had a dose- and time-dependent anti-cancer effect. The effective drug exposure time against hepatic cancer cells was increased in comparison with that observed with 5-FU. Additionally, GA-CTS/5-FU significantly inhibited the growth of drug-resistant hepatoma, which may compensate for the drug-resistance of 5-FU. In vivo studies on an orthotropic liver cancer mouse model demonstrated that GA-CTS/5-FU significantly inhibited tumor growth, resulting in increased survival time.

  8. PEGylated hyaluronic acid-modified liposomal delivery system with anti-γ-glutamylcyclotransferase siRNA for drug-resistant MCF-7 breast cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Ran, Rui; Liu, Yayuan; Gao, Huile; Kuang, Qifang; Zhang, Qianyu; Tang, Jie; Fu, Han; Zhang, Zhirong; He, Qin

    2015-02-01

    Human chromosome 7 open reading frame 24 has been identified as a tumor-related protein, and later it was shown to be γ-glutamylcyclotransferase (GGCT). This protein is upregulated in various types of cancer and is proved to be associated with cellular proliferation. RNA interference is an effective method to achieve highly specific gene regulation. In this study, the anti-GGCT siRNA was incorporated into a comprehensively evaluated polyethylene glycol-hyaluronic acid-modified liposomal siRNA delivery system (PEG-HA-NP) for drug-resistant MCF-7 breast cancer therapy by systemic administration. The PEG-HA-NP had a diameter of 216 nm and a zeta potential of -17.4 mV. Transfection of anti-GGCT siRNA-loaded PEG-HA-NP could achieve effective GGCT downregulation and induce the subsequent cell cytotoxicity against MCF-7/ADR cells. Systemic administration of PEG-HA-NP at 0.35 mg/kg siRNA could retard the tumor growth and induce necrosis of tumor tissue while showing no obvious toxicity to normal tissues. Therefore, systemic administration of anti-GGCT-loaded PEG-HA-NP was proved to be a promising strategy for drug-resistant MCF-7 breast cancer therapy. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  9. Cancer and Stroma-Targeted Immunotherapy with a Genetically Modified DC Vaccine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    Department of Defense (DOD) Breast Cancer Research Program (BCRP) Era of Hope Meeting, August 2-5, 2011. Orlando Marriott World Center Hotel , Orlando, FL...DOD) Breast Cancer Research Program (BCRP) Era of Hope Meeting, August 2-5, 2011. Orlando Marriott World Center Hotel , Orlando, FL

  10. [The significance of modifying factors in evaluating the effect of radionuclides].

    PubMed

    Kalistratova, V S; Nisimov, P G; Zaikina, T I; Spiridonov, A V

    1992-01-01

    The authors provide the data obtained in experimental animals, pertaining to the influence of certain modifying factors on metabolism and biological effects induced by radioactive isotopes of iodine, by transuranium elements and beryllium. Out of all the modifying factors investigated, the form of the introduced compound and age turned out the most significant ones.

  11. The Modifying Effects of Education and Income on Hispanics Reporting Perceived Discrimination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardarelli, Roberto; Cardarelli, Kathryn Marie; Chiapa, Ana Luz

    2007-01-01

    Research has shown that experiences of discrimination negatively affect health. However, little is known about whether socioeconomic position modifies the reporting of perceived discrimination. This cross-sectional study of 69 participants investigated the modifying effects of education and income on the reporting of perceived discrimination among…

  12. The effect on biological and moisture resistance of epichlorohydrin chemically modified wood

    Treesearch

    Rebecca E. Ibach; Beom-Goo Lee

    2002-01-01

    Southern pine solid wood and fiber were chemically modified with epichlorohydrin to help in understanding the role of moisture in the mechanism of biological effectiveness of chemically modified wood. The solid wood had weight gains from 11% to 34%, while the fiber had weight gains from 9% to 75%. After modification, part of the specimens were water leached for 2 weeks...

  13. Developing effective cancer pain education programs.

    PubMed

    Martin, Michelle Y; Pisu, Maria; Kvale, Elizabeth A; Johns, Shelley A

    2012-08-01

    Pain is prevalent, burdensome, and undertreated in individuals with cancer across the disease trajectory. Providing patients and family caregivers with psychosocial support and education to manage cancer pain is a core component of quality care that can result in significant clinical benefit. In this review, we: (1) outline an approach for developing and assessing the effectiveness of education programs for adults with cancer pain; (2) discuss considerations for tailoring programs to the needs of diverse populations and those with limited health literacy skills; (3) describe the resource needs and costs of developing a program; (4) highlight innovative approaches to cancer pain education. We conclude with recommendations for future research and the next generation of educational interventions.

  14. Effect of a Modified Kaolin Treatment on Serum Immunoglobulins

    PubMed Central

    Inouye, Sakae; Kono, Reisaku

    1972-01-01

    After kaolin treatment of fetal rabbit serum, 7S antibody titers were reduced more than 19S titers. This reduction was less when the kaolin treatment was performed at pH 9.0 than when it was performed at pH 7.3. A modification of the kaolin treatment of sera for use in the hemagglutination-inhibiting antibody titration, in which the hemagglutination reaction is performed at a neutral pH, is recommended. The advantage of the modified method is that adsorption of immunoglobulins to kaolin is minimized when serum is treated at a lower dilution with pH 9.0 kaolin, followed by reduction of the pH of the supernatant fluid to neutrality with a „serum adjusting diluent.” When the serum was diluted with physiological saline before kaolin treatment, a great decrease in serum immunoglobulin concentrations occurred. This decrease was found to be less in the modified kaolin treatment than in the conventional pH 7.3 kaolin treatment. PMID:4622816

  15. EFFECTS OF NEUTRAL PARTICLES ON MODIFIED SHOCKS AT SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ohira, Yutaka; Takahara, Fumio

    2010-09-20

    H{alpha} emission from supernova remnants (SNRs) implies the existence of neutral hydrogens in the ambient medium. In the precursor of an SNR shock modified by cosmic rays (CRs), upstream plasmas are pushed by the CR pressure, but neutral particles are not, so that the relative velocity appears and some neutral particles become pickup ions by the charge exchange process in the precursor. We investigate how the pickup ions generated in the precursor affect the shock structure and the particle acceleration. If the CR pressure is larger than 20% of the shock ram pressure, the compression of the subshock becomes smaller than that without pickup ions because of the pressure of the pickup ions. Moreover, even if the shock is modified by CRs, the total compression ratio can be smaller than 4. In addition, the pickup ions play an important role for the injection into the particle acceleration. If the shock is a quasi-perpendicular shock and if the multiply reflected ion acceleration occurs, the CR spectrum can be harder than that of the test particle diffusive shock acceleration below GeV.

  16. The Anti-Cancer Effect of Polyphenols against Breast Cancer and Cancer Stem Cells: Molecular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Abdal Dayem, Ahmed; Choi, Hye Yeon; Yang, Gwang-Mo; Kim, Kyeongseok; Saha, Subbroto Kumar; Cho, Ssang-Goo

    2016-01-01

    The high incidence of breast cancer in developed and developing countries, and its correlation to cancer-related deaths, has prompted concerned scientists to discover novel alternatives to deal with this challenge. In this review, we will provide a brief overview of polyphenol structures and classifications, as well as on the carcinogenic process. The biology of breast cancer cells will also be discussed. The molecular mechanisms involved in the anti-cancer activities of numerous polyphenols, against a wide range of breast cancer cells, in vitro and in vivo, will be explained in detail. The interplay between autophagy and apoptosis in the anti-cancer activity of polyphenols will also be highlighted. In addition, the potential of polyphenols to target cancer stem cells (CSCs) via various mechanisms will be explained. Recently, the use of natural products as chemotherapeutics and chemopreventive drugs to overcome the side effects and resistance that arise from using chemical-based agents has garnered the attention of the scientific community. Polyphenol research is considered a promising field in the treatment and prevention of breast cancer. PMID:27657126

  17. Targeting Cancer Metabolism - Revisiting the Warburg Effects

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Quangdon; Lee, Hyunji; Park, Jisoo; Kim, Seon-Hwan; Park, Jongsun

    2016-01-01

    After more than half of century since the Warburg effect was described, this atypical metabolism has been standing true for almost every type of cancer, exhibiting higher glycolysis and lactate metabolism and defective mitochondrial ATP production. This phenomenon had attracted many scientists to the problem of elucidating the mechanism of, and reason for, this effect. Several models based on oncogenic studies have been proposed, such as the accumulation of mitochondrial gene mutations, the switch from oxidative phosphorylation respiration to glycolysis, the enhancement of lactate metabolism, and the alteration of glycolytic genes. Whether the Warburg phenomenon is the consequence of genetic dysregulation in cancer or the cause of cancer remains unknown. Moreover, the exact reasons and physiological values of this peculiar metabolism in cancer remain unclear. Although there are some pharmacological compounds, such as 2-deoxy-D-glucose, dichloroacetic acid, and 3-bromopyruvate, therapeutic strategies, including diet, have been developed based on targeting the Warburg effect. In this review, we will revisit the Warburg effect to determine how much scientists currently understand about this phenomenon and how we can treat the cancer based on targeting metabolism. PMID:27437085

  18. Normolipidic dietary fat modifies circulating Renin-Angiotensin system-regulating aminopeptidase activities in rat with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ruíz-Sanjuan, María Dolores; Martínez-Martos, José Manuel; Carrera-González, María Pilar; Mayas, María Dolores; García, María Jesús; Arrazola, Marcela; Ramírez-Expósito, María Jesús

    2015-03-01

    Renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has been considered not only as a regulator of systemic volume and electrolyte balance but also has been recently involved in various pathological processes such as cancer. In the etiology of breast cancer, dietary factors have been analyzed and especially the influence of dietary fat has been studied, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we analyzed RAS-regulating enzymes in serum of rats with N-methyl nitrosourea (NMU)-induced breast cancer fed with different diets. Four groups of rats were injected intraperitoneally with 3 doses of 50 mg/kg body weight of NMU at different days after birth and were fed with an AIN-93 commercial diet or AIN-93 diets with 4% fat constituted respectively by extra virgin olive oil, refined sunflower oil, and refined sunflower oil enriched to 50% with oleic acid. After sacrifice, blood and tumor samples were collected by spectrophotometric determinations of RAS-regulating enzymes in plasma and histopathology studies. We show that the type of dietary fat does not influence latency period, incidence of animals with tumors, incidence of mortality, or tumor yield per rat. However, changes were observed in tumor volume and the histopathology. The type of dietary fat also differently modified the enzymes involved in RAS regulation. It might suggest that one of the mechanisms by which dietary fat affects breast cancer is the modification of the RAS system, which may be consider as a new target for integrative therapies. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. Comparison of quality of life of Turkish breast cancer patients receiving breast conserving surgery or modified radical mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Acil, Hande; Cavdar, Ikbal

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the differences in quality of life in patients who received breast conserving surgery (BCS) or modified radical mastectomy (MRM) for breast cancer. A total of 100 women with breast cancer who underwent either BCS or MRM between September 2011 and April 2012 at a private health center and completed their chemotherapy and radiation therapy cycles were included in the study. To assess the quality of life, we used a demographic questionnaire, the European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30) and the Quality of Life assessment in Breast Cancer (EORTC QLQ-BR23). Using QLQ-C30, we found that patients who underwent BCS had better functional status and fewer symptoms than patients who underwent MRM. In QLQ-BR23, independent factors improving the functional scales were BCS, higher level of education and marital status (married); independent factors improving symptoms were BCS, higher level of education, younger age and low and normal body mass index (BMI). In QLQ-C30, independent factors affecting the functional and symptom scales were only BCS and higher level of education. We determined that patients who received BCS had better functional status and less frequent symptoms than patients who underwent MRM.

  20. Evaluation of Cancer and Non-cancer Effects of Cumene ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Cumene, also known as isopropyl benzene, is a volatile liquid. Cumene, readily absorbed via inhalation is distributed in several tissues, metabolized extensively by cytochrome P-450 isozymes within hepatic and extra-hepatic tissues and excreted through urine. No epidemiological cancer studies for humans are available, however, chronic inhalation exposure studies in rat and mouse have shown increased nasal lesions including atrophy, basal cell hyperplasia, atypical hyperplasia and hyperplasia of the olfactory epithelium glands. In addition, increased incidences of renal tubular adenoma or carcinoma that are related to a2u-globin-induced nephropathy were observed in male rats. Alveolar/bronchiolar adenomas and carcinomas of the lung are observed in male and female mice exposed to cumene. Although no multi-generational reproductive toxicity is available for cumene, cumene-exposed rats appeared to stay in estrus cycle longer than the controls. Short-term acute exposures of animals at high concentrations seem to induce transient reversible neurotoxic effects. Overall, inhalation exposure to cumene induced dose-related increased in the occurances of tumors at various sites. These cancer and non-cancer data in rats and mice as well as genotoxicity data provides consistence evidence for carcinogenic effects of cumene. This poster will be presented at the Society of Toxicology Meeting in San Diego California. The goal of this presentation is systematic evaluation of bot

  1. Oral Delivery of DMAB-Modified Docetaxel-Loaded PLGA-TPGS Nanoparticles for Cancer Chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hongbo; Zheng, Yi; Tian, Ge; Tian, Yan; Zeng, Xiaowei; Liu, Gan; Liu, Kexin; Li, Lei; Li, Zhen; Mei, Lin; Huang, Laiqiang

    2011-12-01

    Three types of nanoparticle formulation from biodegradable PLGA-TPGS random copolymer were developed in this research for oral administration of anticancer drugs, which include DMAB-modified PLGA nanoparticles, unmodified PLGA-TPGS nanoparticles and DMAB-modified PLGA-TPGS nanoparticles. Firstly, the PLGA-TPGS random copolymer was synthesized and characterized. DMAB was used to increase retention time at the cell surface, thus increasing the chances of particle uptake and improving oral drug bioavailability. Nanoparticles were found to be of spherical shape with an average particle diameter of around 250 nm. The surface charge of PLGA-TPGS nanoparticles was changed to positive after DMAB modification. The results also showed that the DMAB-modified PLGA-TPGS nanoparticles have significantly higher level of the cellular uptake than that of DMAB-modified PLGA nanoparticles and unmodified PLGA-TPGS nanoparticles. In vitro, cytotoxicity experiment showed advantages of the DMAB-modified PLGA-TPGS nanoparticle formulation over commercial Taxotere® in terms of cytotoxicity against MCF-7 cells. In conclusion, oral chemotherapy by DMAB-modified PLGA-TPGS nanoparticle formulation is an attractive and promising treatment option for patients.

  2. Multifunctional hyaluronic acid modified graphene oxide loaded with mitoxantrone for overcoming drug resistance in cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Lin; Feng, Qianhua; Wang, Yating; Yang, Xiaomin; Ren, Junxiao; Shi, Yuyang; Shan, Xiaoning; Yuan, Yujie; Wang, Yongchao; Zhang, Zhenzhong

    2016-01-01

    Multifunctional nanosheets (HA-GO/Pluronic) with targeted chemo-photothermal properties were successfully developed for controlled delivery of mitoxantrone (MIT) to overcome multidrug resistance (MDR). In vitro release profiles displayed that both an acidic environment and a NIR laser could trigger and accelerate the release of a drug, which ensured nanosheets were stable in blood circulation and released MIT within tumor cells under laser irradiation. HA-GO/Pluronic nanosheets were taken up into MCF-7/ADR cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis, which further facilitated escapement of P-gp efflux. Compared with MIT solution, MIT/HA-GO/Pluronic showed greater cytotoxicity and increase in cellular MIT accumulation in MCF-7/ADR cells. Cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest studies also revealed that MIT/HA-GO/Pluronic was more potent than MIT/GO/Pluronic and MIT solution. The anticancer efficacy in vivo was evaluated in MCF-7 and MCF-7/ADR-bearing mice, and inhibition of tumors by MIT/HA-GO/Pluronic with NIR laser irradiation was the most effective among all MIT formulations. In summary, the MIT/HA-GO/Pluronic system had striking functions such as P-gp reversible inhibitor and anticancer efficacy, and could present a promising platform for drug-resistant cancer treatment.

  3. VSL#3 probiotic modifies mucosal microbial composition but does not reduce colitis-associated colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Arthur, Janelle C.; Gharaibeh, Raad Z.; Uronis, Joshua M.; Perez-Chanona, Ernesto; Sha, Wei; Tomkovich, Sarah; Mühlbauer, Marcus; Fodor, Anthony A.; Jobin, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Although probiotics have shown success in preventing the development of experimental colitis-associated colorectal cancer (CRC), beneficial effects of interventional treatment are relatively unknown. Here we show that interventional treatment with VSL#3 probiotic alters the luminal and mucosally-adherent microbiota, but does not protect against inflammation or tumorigenesis in the azoxymethane (AOM)/Il10−/− mouse model of colitis-associated CRC. VSL#3 (109 CFU/animal/day) significantly enhanced tumor penetrance, multiplicity, histologic dysplasia scores, and adenocarcinoma invasion relative to VSL#3-untreated mice. Illumina 16S sequencing demonstrated that VSL#3 significantly decreased (16-fold) the abundance of a bacterial taxon assigned to genus Clostridium in the mucosally-adherent microbiota. Mediation analysis by linear models suggested that this taxon was a contributing factor to increased tumorigenesis in VSL#3-fed mice. We conclude that VSL#3 interventional therapy can alter microbial community composition and enhance tumorigenesis in the AOM/Il10−/− model. PMID:24100376

  4. DNA methylation modifies the association between obesity and survival after breast cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    McCullough, Lauren E; Chen, Jia; Cho, Yoon Hee; Khankari, Nikhil K; Bradshaw, Patrick T; White, Alexandra J; Garbowski, Gail; Teitelbaum, Susan L; Terry, Mary Beth; Neugut, Alfred I; Hibshoosh, Hanina; Santella, Regina M; Gammon, Marilie D

    2016-02-01

    Mechanisms underlying the poor breast cancer prognosis among obese women are unresolved. DNA methylation levels are linked to obesity and to breast cancer survival. We hypothesized that obesity may work in conjunction with the epigenome to alter prognosis. Using a population-based sample of women diagnosed with first primary breast cancer, we examined modification of the obesity-mortality association by DNA methylation. In-person interviews were conducted approximately 3 months after diagnosis. Weight and height were assessed [to estimate body mass index (BMI)], and blood samples collected. Promoter methylation of 13 breast cancer-related genes was assessed in archived tumor by methylation-specific PCR and Methyl Light. Global methylation in white blood cell DNA was assessed by analysis of long interspersed elements-1 (LINE-1) and with the luminometric methylation assay (LUMA). Vital status among 1308 patients (with any methylation biomarker and complete BMI assessment) was determined after approximately 15 years of follow-up (N = 194/441 deaths due to breast cancer-specific/all-cause mortality). We used Cox proportional hazards regression to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) using two-sided p values of 0.05. Breast cancer-specific mortality was higher among obese (BMI ≥ 30) patients with promoter methylation in APC (HR = 2.47; 95 % CI = 1.43-4.27) and TWIST1 (HR = 4.25; 95 % CI = 1.43-12.70) in breast cancer tissue. Estimates were similar, but less pronounced, for all-cause mortality. Increased all-cause (HR = 1.81; 95 % CI = 1.19-2.74) and breast cancer-specific (HR = 2.61; 95 % CI = 1.45-4.69) mortality was observed among obese patients with the lowest LUMA levels. The poor breast cancer prognosis associated with obesity may depend on methylation profiles, which warrants further investigation.

  5. Factors influencing and modifying the decision to pursue genetic testing for skin cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Alexander L; Jaju, Prajakta D; Li, Shufeng; Halpern-Felsher, Bonnie; Tang, Jean Y; Sarin, Kavita Y

    2017-05-01

    Across cancers, the decision to pursue genetic testing is influenced more by subjective than objective factors. However, skin cancer, which is more prevalent, visual, and multifactorial than many other malignancies, may offer different motivations for pursuing such testing. The primary objective was to determine factors influencing the decision to receive genetic testing for skin cancer risk. A secondary objective was to assess the impact of priming with health questions on the decision to receive testing. We distributed anonymous online surveys through ResearchMatch.org to assess participant health, demographics, motivations, and interest in pursuing genetic testing for skin cancer risk. Two surveys with identical questions but different question ordering were used to assess the secondary objective. We received 3783 responses (64% response rate), and 85.8% desired testing. Subjective factors, including curiosity, perceptions of skin cancer, and anxiety, were the most statistically significant determinants of the decision to pursue testing (P < .001), followed by history of sun exposure (odds ratio 1.85, P < .01) and history of skin cancer (odds ratio 0.5, P = .01). Age and family history of skin cancer did not influence this decision. Participants increasingly chose testing if first queried about health behaviors (P < .0001). The decision to pursue hypothetical testing may differ from in-clinic decision-making. Self-selected, online participants may differ from the general population. Surveys may be subject to response bias. The decision to pursue genetic testing for skin cancer is primarily determined by subjective factors, such as anxiety and curiosity. Health factors, including skin cancer history, also influenced decision-making. Priming with consideration of objective health factors can increase the desire to pursue testing. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The cancer preventive effects of edible mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tongtong; Beelman, Robert B; Lambert, Joshua D

    2012-12-01

    An increasing body of scientific literature suggests that dietary components may exert cancer preventive effects. Tea, soy, cruciferous vegetables and other foods have been investigated for their cancer preventive potential. Some non-edible mushrooms like Reishi (Ganoderma lucidum) have a history use, both alone and in conjunction with standard therapies, for the treatment of various diseases including cancer in some cultures. They have shown efficacy in a number of scientific studies. By comparison, the potential cancer preventive effects of edible mushrooms have been less well-studied. With similar content of putative effective anticancer compounds such as polysaccharides, proteoglycans, steroids, etc., one might predict that edible mushrooms would also demonstrate anticancer and cancer preventive activity. In this review, available data for five commonly-consumed edible mushrooms: button mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus), A. blazei, oyster mushrooms (Pleurotus ostreatus), shiitake mushrooms (Lentinus edodes), and maitake (Grifola frondosa) mushrooms is discussed. The results of animal model and human intervention studies, as well as supporting in vitro mechanistic studies are critically evaluated. Weaknesses in the current data and topics for future work are highlighted.

  7. Cancer and Stroma-Targeted Immunotherapy with a Genetically Modified DC Vaccine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    Ochoa, A.C. Mechanisms of tumor evasion. Cancer Treat Res, 28 ( 2005 ). 5. Kortylewski, M., Kujawski, M., Wang, T., Wei, S., Zhang, S, Pilon-Thomas...multicomponent antitumor immunity. Nat Med, 8 ( 2005 ). 6. Gillanders, W.E., Thalachallour, M. Progress in the development of a breast cancer vaccine...mammaglobin A as an attractive target for vaccine therapy. Breast Diseases: A Year Book Quarterly., 3 (2006). 7. Liyanage, U.K., Moore , T.T., Joo, H-G

  8. [Downstaging after neoadjuvant therapy for rectal cancer modifies the planned original surgery].

    PubMed

    Scutari, F; Tramutola, G; Morlino, A; Rossi, M T; Manzione, L; Rosati, G; Sopranzi, A

    2008-01-01

    Cancer of the rectum has been for more years burdened with a heavy rate of local relapse about 30%. The introduction of total meso-rectum excision has reduced the rate of up to 5-8%. Later more studies proved how the preoperative radiotherapy was able to reduce the rate of local relapse. The Authors introduce studies about downstaging after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer and discuss about their own series from 2005 to 2007.

  9. CD24 Is a Genetic Modifier for Risk and Progression of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yifan; Li, Bingjin; Zhang, Xingyi; Sonpavde, Guru P.; Jiao, Kenneth; Zhang, Andrea; Zhang, Guangxin; Sun, Mei; Chu, Chengjing; Li, Feng; Wang, Lizhong; Cui, Ranji; Liu, Runhua

    2016-01-01

    CD24 plays an oncogenic role in the onset and progression of various human cancers, including prostate cancer. In the present study, we identified two linkage disequilibrium blocks with four recombination hotspot motifs in human CD24 locus. To elucidate whether genetic variants of CD24 associated with susceptibility to prostate cancer and its disease status, we conducted a case-control association study with two P170 C/T and P-534 A/C polymorphisms of CD24 in 590 patients with prostate cancer and 590 healthy controls. A significant increased risk of prostate cancer was found in men with the P170T/T genotype over the P170C/C genotype (odd ratio=1.74, 95% confidence interval=1.16–2.63, P=0.008), and in men with the P-534C/C genotype over the P-534A/A genotype (odd ratio=1.47, 95% confidence interval=1.18–2.26, P=0.003). Cochran-Armitage trend analysis showed that the P170T allele was significantly correlated with an increased risk of prostate cancer progression (P = 0.029, trend between genotypes and stages) and this observation was also validated in an independent sample cohort. Next, we found that tumors with P170T or P-534C alleles had more 2-fold increased protein expressions of CD24 as compared to those with P170C or P-534A alleles, respectively. Likewise, tumors with a combination of P170T/T and P-534C/C genotypes were associated with a high mRNA level of CD24. Our data suggest a significant association of CD24 genetic variants with prostate cancer onset and progression, which provides new insight into molecular genetics of prostate cancer; however, these findings need to be validated in multiple independent cohorts. PMID:27377469

  10. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy modifies serum angiotensinase activities in women with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Expósito, María Jesús; Carrera-González, María del Pilar; Mayas, María Dolores; Dueñas, Basilio; Martínez-Ferrol, Julia; Martínez-Martos, José Manuel

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the putative changes in serum angiotensinase activities (aminopeptidase N, APN; aminopeptidase B, APB; aminopeptidase A, APA; aspartyl aminopeptidase, ASAP) involved in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in women with breast cancer treated or not with a neoadjuvant therapy of paclitaxel and anthracycline and in healthy women volunteers. We fluorometrically analysed serum APN, APB, APA and ASAP activities using their corresponding aminoacyl-β-naphthylamides as substrates in women with breast cancer treated with a neoadjuvant therapy of paclitaxel and anthracycline. When compared with healthy controls, women with breast cancer not treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy, showed a decrease in angiotensinase activity, which support the putative increase of angiotensin II (Ang II) levels, indicating that the tumour process would favour the development of the disease. Also, an increase in APN and APB activities was observed, which support a role for angiotensin IV (Ang IV). In women treated with a neoadjuvant therapy, we described an increase in ASAP and APA activities, supporting the idea that this treatment increases Ang II catabolism. The resulting decrease in Ang II level could lead to an inhibition of the tumour growth. Present results show changes in serum angiotensinase activities in women with breast cancer and in women with breast cancer treated with a neoadjuvant therapy of paclitaxel and anthracycline. Therefore, considerable attention should be focused on the development of RAS blockade therapy as a new strategy for breast cancer treatment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. β-Diketone modified trastuzumab: a next-generation of Herceptin for resistant breast cancer cells?

    PubMed

    Lu, Jianguo; Pu, Jun; Lu, Xiaozhao; Fu, Haiyan; Wei, Mengying; Yang, Guodong

    2012-11-01

    Despite the initial efficacy of trastuzumab (commercially named Herceptin), acquired resistance in a majority of patients remains the biggest hurdle in breast cancer therapy. Recently, the Scripps Research Institute developed a method termed "instant immunity", in which antibodies (chemical programmed antibody) are rapidly induced by chemicals like β-diketone. When β-diketone is chemically linked to peptides specifically targeting cancer cells, the instant chemical programmed antibody would clear the cancer cells through antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement-directed cytotoxicity (CDC). This novel strategy has a super advantage over passive immunization or immunization with recombinant or vectored vaccines because it induces a universal immune response and memory. Theoretically, combination of the cancer cell specific recognition advantage of trastuzumab and cancerous cell clearance of active immunization would be an option for trastuzumab resistant patients, which harbors both the advantages of cancer specific targeting of trastuzumab and active immunization of the "instant immunity", implicating a better clinical outcome. Further studies are needed to verify our hypothesis, which is worth validating.

  12. Modified glasgow prognostic score predicting high conversion ratio in opioid switching from oral oxycodone to transdermal fentanyl in patients with cancer pain

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Shu-Shan; Shang, Li; Li, Ming-E; Zhao, Dong-Mei; Xu, Wen-Hua; Wang, Yao-Qi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify predictive factors for higher conversion ratio in opioid switching from oral oxycodone to transdermal fentanyl (TDF) in patients with cancer pain. The participants of this study were 156 hospitalized cancer patients who underwent opioid switching from oral oxycodone to TDF at the Affiliated Hospital of Binzhou Medical University between January 1st, 2010 and March 31st, 2014. Patient characteristics, modified Glasgow Prognostic Score (mGPS), daily oxycodone dose, and reasons for opioid switching were retrospectively collected. The effect of variables on the conversion ratio was analyzed by multiple regression analysis to identify the predictive factors for higher conversion ratio in opioid switching from oral oxycodone to TDF. The results showed that the mGPS (odds ratio [OR], 2.358; 95% CI 1.379-4.031; P = 0.002), the reason for opioid switching (OR, 0.497; 95% CI, 0.298-0.828; P = 0.007) and equivalent oral morphine dose (OR, 1.700; 95% CI, 1.008-2.867; P = 0.046) were found to be significant predictors requiring higher conversion ratio in opioid switching. This study indicates that higher mGPS, poor pain control before switching and higher equivalent oral morphine dose are significant predictors of a need for higher conversion ratio in opioid switching from oral oxycodone to TDF. These results could contribute to the establishment of evidence-based medicine in cancer pain relief. PMID:26221306

  13. The NSL Chromatin-Modifying Complex Subunit KANSL2 Regulates Cancer Stem-like Properties in Glioblastoma That Contribute to Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Ferreyra Solari, Nazarena E; Belforte, Fiorella S; Canedo, Lucía; Videla-Richardson, Guillermo A; Espinosa, Joaquín M; Rossi, Mario; Serna, Eva; Riudavets, Miguel A; Martinetto, Horacio; Sevlever, Gustavo; Perez-Castro, Carolina

    2016-09-15

    KANSL2 is an integral subunit of the nonspecific lethal (NSL) chromatin-modifying complex that contributes to epigenetic programs in embryonic stem cells. In this study, we report a role for KANSL2 in regulation of stemness in glioblastoma (GBM), which is characterized by heterogeneous tumor stem-like cells associated with therapy resistance and disease relapse. KANSL2 expression is upregulated in cancer cells, mainly at perivascular regions of tumors. RNAi-mediated silencing of KANSL2 in GBM cells impairs their tumorigenic capacity in mouse xenograft models. In clinical specimens, we found that expression levels of KANSL2 correlate with stemness markers in GBM stem-like cell populations. Mechanistic investigations showed that KANSL2 regulates cell self-renewal, which correlates with effects on expression of the stemness transcription factor POU5F1. RNAi-mediated silencing of POU5F1 reduced KANSL2 levels, linking these two genes to stemness control in GBM cells. Together, our findings indicate that KANSL2 acts to regulate the stem cell population in GBM, defining it as a candidate GBM biomarker for clinical use. Cancer Res; 76(18); 5383-94. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  14. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy in Treating Long-Term Gastrointestinal Adverse Effects Caused by Radiation Therapy in Patients With Pelvic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-07-14

    Bladder Cancer; Cervical Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Endometrial Cancer; Gastrointestinal Complications; Long-term Effects Secondary to Cancer Therapy in Adults; Ovarian Cancer; Prostate Cancer; Radiation Toxicity; Sarcoma; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Vaginal Cancer

  15. Effects of Chemotherapy on the Brain in Women With Newly Diagnosed Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-12

    Breast Cancer; Chemotherapeutic Agent Toxicity; Cognitive/Functional Effects; Fatigue; Long-term Effects Secondary to Cancer Therapy in Adults; Neurotoxicity; Psychosocial Effects of Cancer and Its Treatment

  16. Videos to influence: a systematic review of effectiveness of video-based education in modifying health behaviors.

    PubMed

    Tuong, William; Larsen, Elizabeth R; Armstrong, April W

    2014-04-01

    This systematic review examines the effectiveness of videos in modifying health behaviors. We searched PubMed (1975-2012), PsycINFO (1975-2012), EMBASE (1975-2012), and CINAHL (1983-2012) for controlled clinical trials that examined the effectiveness of video interventions in changing health behaviors. Twenty-eight studies comprised of 12,703 subjects were included in the systematic review. Video interventions were variably effective for modifying health behaviors depending on the target behaviors to be influenced. Video interventions appear to be effective in breast self-examination, prostate cancer screening, sunscreen adherence, self-care in patients with heart failure, HIV testing, treatment adherence, and female condom use. However, videos have not shown to be effective in influencing addiction behaviors when they are not tailored. Compared to loss-framing, gain-framed messages may be more effective in promoting certain types of health behavior change. Also, video modeling may facilitate learning of new behaviors and can be an important consideration in future video interventions.

  17. Mechanistic Effects of Calcitriol in Cancer Biology.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Lorenza; Díaz-Muñoz, Mauricio; García-Gaytán, Ana Cristina; Méndez, Isabel

    2015-06-19

    Besides its classical biological effects on calcium and phosphorus homeostasis, calcitriol, the active vitamin D metabolite, has a broad variety of actions including anticancer effects that are mediated either transcriptionally and/or via non-genomic pathways. In the context of cancer, calcitriol regulates the cell cycle, induces apoptosis, promotes cell differentiation and acts as anti-inflammatory factor within the tumor microenvironment. In this review, we address the different mechanisms of action involved in the antineoplastic effects of calcitriol.

  18. Mechanistic Effects of Calcitriol in Cancer Biology

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Lorenza; Díaz-Muñoz, Mauricio; García-Gaytán, Ana Cristina; Méndez, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Besides its classical biological effects on calcium and phosphorus homeostasis, calcitriol, the active vitamin D metabolite, has a broad variety of actions including anticancer effects that are mediated either transcriptionally and/or via non-genomic pathways. In the context of cancer, calcitriol regulates the cell cycle, induces apoptosis, promotes cell differentiation and acts as anti-inflammatory factor within the tumor microenvironment. In this review, we address the different mechanisms of action involved in the antineoplastic effects of calcitriol. PMID:26102214

  19. DNA biosensors based on gold nanoparticles-modified graphene oxide for the detection of breast cancer biomarkers for early diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Ayman Ali; Sánchez, Josep Lluís Acero; O'Sullivan, Ciara K; Abbas, Mohammed Nooredeen

    2017-12-01

    Two different DNA (ERBB2c and CD24c) modified gold nanoparticles and graphene oxide loaded on glassy carbon electrodes were prepared for early detection of breast cancer markers by electrochemical detection of HER2. Comparative study of ERBB2c and CD24c for the detection was carried out. A "sandwich-type" detection strategy was employed in this electrochemical DNA biosensor and its response was measured by amperometric detection. The electrochemical signal enhancement achieved via gold nanoparticles and grapheme oxide system allowed for sensitive detection of the breast cancer biomarker ERBB2 and the control marker CD24. The modified graphene oxide was characterised using Raman spectroscopy, UV-visible spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The various steps involved in the modification of a glassy carbon electrode with graphene oxide, gold nanoparticles and DNA probes, target and reporter probe were electrochemically characterised using cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Using amperometric detection of a horse radish peroxidase label, detection limits of 0.16nM and 0.23nM were obtained with sensitivity 378nA/nM and 219nA/nM for ERBB2 andCD24 respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Immigrants' perceptions of the quality of their cancer care: an Australian comparative study, identifying potentially modifiable factors.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, D; Bell, M L; Butow, P; Sze, M; Vaccaro, L; Dong, S; Liauw, W; Hui, R; Tattersall, M; Ng, W; Asghari, R; Steer, C; Vardy, J; Parente, P; Harris, M; Karanth, N V; King, M; Girgis, A; Eisenbruch, M; Jefford, M

    2014-08-01

    Recent data show a falling cancer mortality in the general population without a similar shift in immigrant outcomes, leading to a greater cancer burden and mortality for immigrants. Our aims were to compare perceived patterns of care in immigrants and native-born cancer patients. This was a hospital-based sample of first-generation immigrants and Australian-born Anglo patients in the first year following diagnosis. It was restricted to Chinese, Arabic, or Greek speakers. Eligible participants, recruited via 16 oncology clinics, were over 18, with cancer (any type or stage), and having commenced treatment at least 1 month previously. Five hundred and seventy-one CALD patients (comprising 145 Arabic, 248 Chinese, and 178 Greek) and a control group of 274 Anglo-Australian patients participated. Immigrants had difficulty communicating with the doctor (73% versus 29%) and understanding the health system (38% versus 10%). Differences were found in 'difficulty knowing who to see' (P = 0.0002), 'length of time to confirm diagnosis' (P = 0.04), wanting more choice about a specialist and hospital (P < 0.0001); being offered the opportunity to see a counselor (P < 0.0001); and actually seeing one (P < 0.0001). There were no significant self-reported differences regarding how cancer was detected, time to see a health professional, or type first seen; however, immigrants reported difficulty knowing who to see. Previous studies showed differences in patterns of care according to socioeconomic status (SES) and educational level. Despite adjusting for age, sex, education, marital status, SES, time since diagnosis, and type of cancer, we did not find significant differences. Instead, we found that understanding of the health system and confidence understanding English were important factors. This study confirmed that immigrants with cancer perceive an inferior quality of cancer care. We highlight potentially modifiable factors including assistance in navigating the health system

  1. Late endocrine effects of childhood cancer.

    PubMed

    Rose, Susan R; Horne, Vincent E; Howell, Jonathan; Lawson, Sarah A; Rutter, Meilan M; Trotman, Gylynthia E; Corathers, Sarah D

    2016-06-01

    The cure rate for paediatric malignancies is increasing, and most patients who have cancer during childhood survive and enter adulthood. Surveillance for late endocrine effects after childhood cancer is required to ensure early diagnosis and treatment and to optimize physical, cognitive and psychosocial health. The degree of risk of endocrine deficiency is related to the child's sex and their age at the time the tumour is diagnosed, as well as to tumour location and characteristics and the therapies used (surgery, chemotherapy or radiation therapy). Potential endocrine problems can include growth hormone deficiency, hypothyroidism (primary or central), adrenocorticotropin deficiency, hyperprolactinaemia, precocious puberty, hypogonadism (primary or central), altered fertility and/or sexual function, low BMD, the metabolic syndrome and hypothalamic obesity. Optimal endocrine care for survivors of childhood cancer should be delivered in a multidisciplinary setting, providing continuity from acute cancer treatment to long-term follow-up of late endocrine effects throughout the lifespan. Endocrine therapies are important to improve long-term quality of life for survivors of childhood cancer.

  2. [Effect of SDS on the adsorption of Cd2+ onto amphoteric modified bentonites].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Tao; Meng, Zhao-Fu; Yang, Ya-Ti; Yang, Shu-Ying; Li, Bin; Xu, Shao-e

    2014-07-01

    Under different modified ratios, temperatures, pH and ionic strengths, the effect of sodium dodecyl sulfonate (SDS) on the adsorption of Cd2+ onto bentonites which modified with amphoteric modifier dodecyl dimethyl betaine (BS-12) was studied by batch experiments, and the adsorption mechanism was also discussed. Results showed that the adsorption of Cd2+ on amphoteric bentonites can be enhanced significantly by SDS combined modification, Cd2+ adsorption decreases in the order: BS + 150SDS (BS-12 + 150% SDS) > BS + 100SDS (BS-12 + 100% SDS) > BS +50SDS(BS-12 + 50% SDS) > BS + 25SDS (BS-12 + 25% SDS) > BS (BS-12) > CK (unmodified soil). The adsorption isotherm can be described by the Langmuir equation. The change of temperature effect from positive on CK and amphoteric bentonites to negative on BS + 150SDS bentonites is observed with an increase of SDS modified ratio. The pH has little influence on Cd2+ adsorption on bentonites. The adsorption of Cd2+ on bentonites decreases with ionic strength rise, but the effect of ionic strength can be reduced with an increase of SDS modified ratio also. The adsorption thermodynamic parameters demonstrated that the adsorption of Cd2+ on modified bentonites was spontaneously controlled by entropy increment. When the SDS modified ratio is lower than 100% CEC, the adsorption of Cd2+ on modified bentonites is a process with characteristics of both enthalpy increment and entropy increment, while the SDS modified ratio is equal to or higher than 100% CEC, the adsorption of Cd2+ on modified bentonites becomes a process of enthalpy decrement and entropy increment.

  3. Dendrimer-entrapped gold nanoparticles modified with RGD peptide and alpha-tocopheryl succinate enable targeted theranostics of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jingyi; Fu, Fanfan; Xiong, Zhijuan; Shen, Mingwu; Shi, Xiangyang

    2015-09-01

    We report here the synthesis of multifunctional dendrimer-entrapped gold nanoparticles (Au DENPs) modified with alpha-tocopheryl succinate (α-TOS) and arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide for targeted chemotherapy and computed tomography (CT) imaging of cancer cells. In this work, generation 5 poly(amidoamine) dendrimers pre-conjugated with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FI), RGD peptide via a polyethylene glycol (PEG) spacer, and PEG-linked α-TOS were used as templates to synthesize AuNPs. Followed by acetylation of the remaining dendrimer terminal amines, multifunctional Au DENPs with an Au core size of 4.0nm were generated. The formed multifunctional Au DENPs were characterized via different techniques. We show that the multifunctional Au DENPs are stable at different pH (5-8) and temperature (4-50°C) conditions and display enhanced efficacy in the generation of reactive oxygen species, which is associated with their increased ability to induce apoptosis. Thanks to the role played by RGD-mediated targeting, the multifunctional Au DENPs are able to target cancer cells overexpressing αvβ3 integrin and specifically inhibit the growth of the cancer cells. Likewise, the existence of AuNPs enabled the multifunctional Au DENPs to have a better X-ray attenuation property than clinically used iodinated CT contrast agents (e.g., Omnipaque) and the use of them as a nanoprobe for targeted CT imaging of cancer cells in vitro. The formed multifunctional Au DENPs may hold great promise to be used as a theranostic platform for cancer theranostics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. [A Case of Advanced Rectal Cancer Resected Successfully after Induction Chemotherapy with Modified FOLFOX6 plus Panitumumab].

    PubMed

    Yukawa, Yoshimi; Uchima, Yasutake; Kawamura, Minori; Takeda, Osami; Hanno, Hajime; Takayanagi, Shigenori; Hirooka, Tomoomi; Dozaiku, Toshio; Hirooka, Takashi; Aomatsu, Naoki; Hirakawa, Toshiki; Iwauchi, Takehiko; Nishii, Takafumi; Morimoto, Junya; Nakazawa, Kazunori; Takeuchi, Kazuhiro

    2016-05-01

    We report a case of advanced colon cancer that was effectively treated with mFOLFOX6 plus panitumumab combination chemotherapy. The patient was a 54-year-old man who had type 2 colon cancer of the rectum. An abdominal CT scan demonstrated rectal cancer with bulky lymph node metastasis and 1 hepatic node (rectal cancer SI [bladder retroperitoneum], N2M0H1P0, cStage IV). He was treated with mFOLFOX6 plus panitumumab as neoadjuvant chemotherapy. After 4 courses of chemotherapy, CT revealed that the primary lesion and regional metastatic lymph nodes had reduced in size (rectal cancer A, N1H1P0M0, cStage IV). Anterior rectal resection with D3 nodal dissection and left lateral segmentectomy of the liver was performed. The histological diagnosis was tubular adenocarcinoma (tub2-1), int, INF a, pMP, ly0, v0, pDM0, pPM0, R0. He was treated with 4 courses of mFOLFOX6 after surgery. The patient has been in good health without a recurrence for 2 years and 5 months after surgery. This case suggests that induction chemotherapy with mFOLFOX6 plus panitumumab is a potentially effective regimen for advanced colon cancer.

  5. Regulatory match effects on a modified Wisconsin Card Sort Task.

    PubMed

    Maddox, W Todd; Filoteo, J Vincent; Glass, Brian D; Markman, Arthur B

    2010-03-01

    The Wisconsin Card Sorting Task (WCST; Heaton, 1980) is commonly used to assess concept formation and set shifting. Cognitive research suggests that set shifting performance is enhanced by a match between a person's regulatory focus (promotion focus: attempting to earn an entry into a cash drawing; prevention focus: attempting to avoid losing an entry into the drawing) and the task reward structure (gains: attempting to maximize points gained; losses: attempting to minimize points lost). A regulatory match results when attempting to earn an entry by maximizing points or attempting to avoid losing an entry by minimizing losses. We test the hypothesis that performance on a modified WCST is accentuated in younger, healthy participants when there is a match between the global performance incentive and the local task reward structure. As predicted, participants in a match showed better set shifting but equivalent initial concept formation when compared with participants in a mismatch. Furthermore, relative to a baseline control group, mismatch participants were significantly worse at set shifting than were participants in a regulatory match. These results suggest that set shifting performance might be impacted by incentive and task reward factors in ways that have not been considered previously.

  6. Evaluation of a candidate breast cancer associated SNP in ERCC4 as a risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/BRCA2 (CIMBA)

    PubMed Central

    Osorio, A; Milne, R L; Pita, G; Peterlongo, P; Heikkinen, T; Simard, J; Chenevix-Trench, G; Spurdle, A B; Beesley, J; Chen, X; Healey, S; Neuhausen, S L; Ding, Y C; Couch, F J; Wang, X; Lindor, N; Manoukian, S; Barile, M; Viel, A; Tizzoni, L; Szabo, C I; Foretova, L; Zikan, M; Claes, K; Greene, M H; Mai, P; Rennert, G; Lejbkowicz, F; Barnett-Griness, O; Andrulis, I L; Ozcelik, H; Weerasooriya, N; Gerdes, A-M; Thomassen, M; Cruger, D G; Caligo, M A; Friedman, E; Kaufman, B; Laitman, Y; Cohen, S; Kontorovich, T; Gershoni-Baruch, R; Dagan, E; Jernström, H; Askmalm, M S; Arver, B; Malmer, B; Domchek, S M; Nathanson, K L; Brunet, J; Ramón y Cajal, T; Yannoukakos, D; Hamann, U; Hogervorst, F B L; Verhoef, S; García, EB Gómez; Wijnen, J T; van den Ouweland, A; Easton, D F; Peock, S; Cook, M; Oliver, C T; Frost, D; Luccarini, C; Evans, D G; Lalloo, F; Eeles, R; Pichert, G; Cook, J; Hodgson, S; Morrison, P J; Douglas, F; Godwin, A K; Sinilnikova, O M; Barjhoux, L; Stoppa-Lyonnet, D; Moncoutier, V; Giraud, S; Cassini, C; Olivier-Faivre, L; Révillion, F; Peyrat, J-P; Muller, D; Fricker, J-P; Lynch, H T; John, E M; Buys, S; Daly, M; Hopper, J L; Terry, M B; Miron, A; Yassin, Y; Goldgar, D; Singer, C F; Gschwantler-Kaulich, D; Pfeiler, G; Spiess, A-C; Hansen, Thomas v O; Johannsson, O T; Kirchhoff, T; Offit, K; Kosarin, K; Piedmonte, M; Rodriguez, G C; Wakeley, K; Boggess, J F; Basil, J; Schwartz, P E; Blank, S V; Toland, A E; Montagna, M; Casella, C; Imyanitov, E N; Allavena, A; Schmutzler, R K; Versmold, B; Engel, C; Meindl, A; Ditsch, N; Arnold, N; Niederacher, D; Deißler, H; Fiebig, B; Varon-Mateeva, R; Schaefer, D; Froster, U G; Caldes, T; de la Hoya, M; McGuffog, L; Antoniou, A C; Nevanlinna, H; Radice, P; Benítez, J

    2009-01-01

    Background: In this study we aimed to evaluate the role of a SNP in intron 1 of the ERCC4 gene (rs744154), previously reported to be associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer in the general population, as a breast cancer risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Methods: We have genotyped rs744154 in 9408 BRCA1 and 5632 BRCA2 mutation carriers from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA) and assessed its association with breast cancer risk using a retrospective weighted cohort approach. Results: We found no evidence of association with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 (per-allele HR: 0.98, 95% CI: 0.93–1.04, P=0.5) or BRCA2 (per-allele HR: 0.97, 95% CI: 0.89–1.06, P=0.5) mutation carriers. Conclusion: This SNP is not a significant modifier of breast cancer risk for mutation carriers, though weak associations cannot be ruled out. PMID:19920816

  7. Evaluation of a candidate breast cancer associated SNP in ERCC4 as a risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/BRCA2 (CIMBA).

    PubMed

    Osorio, A; Milne, R L; Pita, G; Peterlongo, P; Heikkinen, T; Simard, J; Chenevix-Trench, G; Spurdle, A B; Beesley, J; Chen, X; Healey, S; Neuhausen, S L; Ding, Y C; Couch, F J; Wang, X; Lindor, N; Manoukian, S; Barile, M; Viel, A; Tizzoni, L; Szabo, C I; Foretova, L; Zikan, M; Claes, K; Greene, M H; Mai, P; Rennert, G; Lejbkowicz, F; Barnett-Griness, O; Andrulis, I L; Ozcelik, H; Weerasooriya, N; Gerdes, A-M; Thomassen, M; Cruger, D G; Caligo, M A; Friedman, E; Kaufman, B; Laitman, Y; Cohen, S; Kontorovich, T; Gershoni-Baruch, R; Dagan, E; Jernström, H; Askmalm, M S; Arver, B; Malmer, B; Domchek, S M; Nathanson, K L; Brunet, J; Ramón Y Cajal, T; Yannoukakos, D; Hamann, U; Hogervorst, F B L; Verhoef, S; Gómez García, E B; Wijnen, J T; van den Ouweland, A; Easton, D F; Peock, S; Cook, M; Oliver, C T; Frost, D; Luccarini, C; Evans, D G; Lalloo, F; Eeles, R; Pichert, G; Cook, J; Hodgson, S; Morrison, P J; Douglas, F; Godwin, A K; Sinilnikova, O M; Barjhoux, L; Stoppa-Lyonnet, D; Moncoutier, V; Giraud, S; Cassini, C; Olivier-Faivre, L; Révillion, F; Peyrat, J-P; Muller, D; Fricker, J-P; Lynch, H T; John, E M; Buys, S; Daly, M; Hopper, J L; Terry, M B; Miron, A; Yassin, Y; Goldgar, D; Singer, C F; Gschwantler-Kaulich, D; Pfeiler, G; Spiess, A-C; Hansen, Thomas V O; Johannsson, O T; Kirchhoff, T; Offit, K; Kosarin, K; Piedmonte, M; Rodriguez, G C; Wakeley, K; Boggess, J F; Basil, J; Schwartz, P E; Blank, S V; Toland, A E; Montagna, M; Casella, C; Imyanitov, E N; Allavena, A; Schmutzler, R K; Versmold, B; Engel, C; Meindl, A; Ditsch, N; Arnold, N; Niederacher, D; Deissler, H; Fiebig, B; Varon-Mateeva, R; Schaefer, D; Froster, U G; Caldes, T; de la Hoya, M; McGuffog, L; Antoniou, A C; Nevanlinna, H; Radice, P; Benítez, J

    2009-12-15

    In this study we aimed to evaluate the role of a SNP in intron 1 of the ERCC4 gene (rs744154), previously reported to be associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer in the general population, as a breast cancer risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We have genotyped rs744154 in 9408 BRCA1 and 5632 BRCA2 mutation carriers from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA) and assessed its association with breast cancer risk using a retrospective weighted cohort approach. We found no evidence of association with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 (per-allele HR: 0.98, 95% CI: 0.93-1.04, P = 0.5) or BRCA2 (per-allele HR: 0.97, 95% CI: 0.89-1.06, P = 0.5) mutation carriers. This SNP is not a significant modifier of breast cancer risk for mutation carriers, though weak associations cannot be ruled out.

  8. Neurocognitive Effects of Treatment for Childhood Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Robert W.; Haser, Jennifer K.

    2006-01-01

    We review research on the neuropsychological effects that central nervous system (CNS) cancer treatments have on the cognitive abilities of children and adolescents. The authors focus on the two most common malignancies of childhood: leukemias and brain tumors. The literature review is structured so as to separate out earlier studies, generally…

  9. Effects of Brassicaceae Isothiocyanates on Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Novío, Silvia; Cartea, María Elena; Soengas, Pilar; Freire-Garabal, Manuel; Núñez-Iglesias, María Jesús

    2016-05-12

    Despite the major progress made in the field of cancer biology, cancer is still one of the leading causes of mortality, and prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the most encountered malignancies among men. The effective management of this disease requires developing better anticancer agents with greater efficacy and fewer side effects. Nature is a large source for the development of chemotherapeutic agents, with more than 50% of current anticancer drugs being of natural origin. Isothiocyanates (ITCs) are degradation products from glucosinolates that are present in members of the family Brassicaceae. Although they are known for a variety of therapeutic effects, including antioxidant, immunostimulatory, anti-inflammatory, antiviral and antibacterial properties, nowadays, cell line and animal studies have additionally indicated the chemopreventive action without causing toxic side effects of ITCs. In this way, they can induce cell cycle arrest, activate apoptosis pathways, increase the sensitivity of resistant PCa to available chemodrugs, modulate epigenetic changes and downregulate activated signaling pathways, resulting in the inhibition of cell proliferation, progression and invasion-metastasis. The present review summarizes the chemopreventive role of ITCs with a particular emphasis on specific molecular targets and epigenetic alterations in in vitro and in vivo cancer animal models.

  10. Neurocognitive Effects of Treatment for Childhood Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Robert W.; Haser, Jennifer K.

    2006-01-01

    We review research on the neuropsychological effects that central nervous system (CNS) cancer treatments have on the cognitive abilities of children and adolescents. The authors focus on the two most common malignancies of childhood: leukemias and brain tumors. The literature review is structured so as to separate out earlier studies, generally…

  11. Effects of modifying agents on surface modifications of magnesium oxide whiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yun; Liu, Bei; Yang, Jinjun; Jia, Junping; You, Chen; Chen, Minfang

    2016-12-01

    In this work, the MgO whiskers have been treated by several modifying agents including the mixture of DL-malic acid oligo-L-lactide (g), aluminate coupling agent (Al) and stearic acid (Sa). The morphologies, covering quantity, compositions and components of the whiskers before and after the modifications were investigated by SEM, TG, XRD and FT-IR, respectively. Comparisons have been made on the morphologies of modified whiskers by different modifiers tailoring. The results show that the MgO whiskers treated by stearic acid have superior performance to the others, especially in terms of uniform dispersion. In contrast, both the mixture of DL-malic acid oligo-L-lactide and aluminate coupling agent have the negative effects on whiskers' dispersibility. FT-IR reveals that the chemical bonds were formed between the whiskers and each modifying agent and the XRD testing demonstrate that the crystal structures of the modified whiskers were well maintained without significant change.

  12. Aptamer-modified gold nanoparticles for targeting breast cancer cells through light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yu-Fen; Lin, Yang-Wei; Lin, Zong-Hong; Chang, Huan-Tsung

    2009-05-01

    In this study, we demonstrated the potential use of nucleic acid ligand (aptamers) conjugated gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for cancer cell detection. Through specific binding of the aptamers toward platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), MDA-MB-231 and Hs578T cells (cancer cells) that over-express PDGF, interact with Apt-AuNPs to a greater extent than do H184B5F5/M10 cells (normal cells). These results were confirmed through inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry measurements of the gold ion concentrations within these cells. Aggregation of the Apt-AuNPs in the cytoplasm of the cancer cells led to the generation of an intense scattered light upon photo-illumination; this phenomenon allows the differentiation of cancer cells from normal cells using a dark field optical microscope. The presence of Apt-AuNPs suppressed the proliferation of MDA-MB-231 cancer cells, but not H184B5F5/M10 cells.

  13. Epigenetics of breast cancer: modifying role of environmental and bioactive food compounds

    PubMed Central

    Romagnolo, Donato F.; Daniels, Kevin D.; Grunwald, Jonathan T.; Ramos, Stephan A.; Propper, Catherine R.; Selmin, Ornella I.

    2017-01-01

    Scope Reduced expression of tumor suppressor genes (TSG) increases the susceptibility to breast cancer. However, only a small percentage of breast tumors is related to family history and mutational inactivation of TSG. Epigenetics refers to non-mutational events that alter gene expression. Endocrine disruptors found in foods and drinking water may disrupt epigenetically hormonal regulation and increase breast cancer risk. This review centers on the working hypothesis that agonists of the aromatic hydrocarbon receptor (AHR); bisphenol A (BPA); and arsenic compounds, induce in TSG epigenetic signatures that mirror those often seen in sporadic breast tumors. Conversely, it is hypothesized that bioactive food components that target epigenetic mechanisms protect against sporadic breast cancer induced by these disruptors. Methods and results This review highlights 1) overlaps between epigenetic signatures placed in TSG by AHR-ligands, BPA, and arsenic with epigenetic alterations associated with sporadic breast tumorigenesis; and 2) potential opportunities for prevention of sporadic breast cancer with food components that target the epigenetic machinery. Conclusions Characterizing the overlap between epigenetic signatures elicited in TSG by endocrine disruptors with those observed in sporadic breast tumors may afford new strategies for breast cancer prevention with specific bioactive food components or diet. PMID:27144894

  14. Prostate Cancer Treatments Have Varying Side Effects, Study Shows

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164200.html Prostate Cancer Treatments Have Varying Side Effects, Study Shows Even ' ... News) -- The long-term side effects of different prostate cancer treatments vary -- and knowing that may help men ...

  15. Co-delivery of Doxorubicin Encapsulated PLGA Nanoparticles and Bcl-xL shRNA Using Alkyl-Modified PEI into Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimian, Mahboubeh; Taghavi, Sahar; Mokhtarzadeh, Ahad; Ramezani, Mohammad; Hashemi, Maryam

    2017-02-24

    In recent years, much effort has been focused on an appropriate combination of chemotherapeutic drugs and nucleic acids to exploit additive or synergistic therapeutic effects and overcome many obstacles such as the reduction of side effects and drug resistance. Short hairpin RNA (shRNA) has designed to allow the production of small interfering RNA (siRNA) within the cells and offer long-lasting silencing of target genes. In this study, alkyl-modified polyethylenimine (PEI 10 kD) was used for co-delivery of doxorubicin (DOX) encapsulated into poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) and Bcl-xL shRNA (one class of molecules that block apoptosis of tumor cells) into breast cancer cells. Our results demonstrated that modification of PEI with alkyl chain could enhance the induction of apoptosis in tumor cells by suppression of Bcl-xL gene using Bcl-xL shRNA more than PEI alone. On the other hand, DOX encapsulated into PLGA had more synergistic effect with shRNA in comparison with DOX alone. In conclusion, combination of PLGA-DOX NPs and alkyl-PEI/shRNA complexes may have promising applications in breast cancer therapy.

  16. Captopril-polyethyleneimine conjugate modified gold nanoparticles for co-delivery of drug and gene in anti-angiogenesis breast cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Manhong; Li, Yong; Huang, Xiaohui; Lu, Xizhi

    2015-01-01

    Captopril-polyethyleneimine (CP) containing low molecular weight polyethyleneimine and anti-angiogenesis drug captopril conjugated via an amide bond was fabricated to modify gold nanoparticles and complex with siRNA to construct siRNA/CP/GNP complexes for the co-delivery of drug and siRNA in anti-angiogenesis breast cancer therapy. The self-assembled siRNA/CP/GNP complexes exhibited desirable and homogenous particle size, reasonable positive charges and condensation ability, and effective gene-silencing property in vitro. In addition, siRNA/CP/GNP complexes co-delivering captopril and siRNA achieved combined angiogenesis suppression by more effectively downregulating the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA and protein via different pathways in vitro, as compared to mono-delivery systems. In vivo investigation on nude mice bearing MDA-MB435 tumor xenografts revealed that siRNA/CP/GNP complexes possessed satisfying tumor homing ability and strong antitumor activity. These findings suggested that siRNA/CP/GNP complexes could be an ideal system for simultaneous transfer of drug and siRNA, which might be a new promising strategy for effective breast cancer therapy.

  17. Evaluation of Modified Categorical Data Fuzzy Clustering Algorithm on the Wisconsin Breast Cancer Dataset

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The early diagnosis of breast cancer is an important step in a fight against the disease. Machine learning techniques have shown promise in improving our understanding of the disease. As medical datasets consist of data points which cannot be precisely assigned to a class, fuzzy methods have been useful for studying of these datasets. Sometimes breast cancer datasets are described by categorical features. Many fuzzy clustering algorithms have been developed for categorical datasets. However, in most of these methods Hamming distance is used to define the distance between the two categorical feature values. In this paper, we use a probabilistic distance measure for the distance computation among a pair of categorical feature values. Experiments demonstrate that the distance measure performs better than Hamming distance for Wisconsin breast cancer data. PMID:27022504

  18. Long-term health effects among testicular cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Hashibe, Mia; Abdelaziz, Sarah; Al-Temimi, Mohammed; Fraser, Alison; Boucher, Kenneth M; Smith, Ken; Lee, Yuan-Chin Amy; Rowe, Kerry; Rowley, Braden; Daurelle, Micky; Holton, Avery E; VanDerslice, James; Richiardi, Lorenzo; Bishoff, Jay; Lowrance, Will; Stroup, Antoinette

    2016-12-01

    Testicular cancer is diagnosed at a young age and survival rates are high; thus, the long-term effects of cancer treatment need to be assessed. Our objectives are to estimate the incidence rates and determinants of late effects in testicular cancer survivors. We conducted a population-based cohort study of testicular cancer survivors, diagnosed 1991-2007, followed up for a median of 10 years. We identified 785 testicular cancer patients who survived ≥5 years and 3323 men free of cancer for the comparison group. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was used to compare the hazard ratio between the cases and the comparison group and for internal analysis among case patients. Testicular cancer survivors experienced a 24 % increase in risk of long-term health effects >5 years after diagnosis. The overall incidence rate of late effects among testicular cancer survivors was 66.3 per 1000 person years. Higher risks were observed among testicular cancer survivors for hypercholesterolemia, infertility, and orchitis. Chemotherapy and retroperitoneal lymph node dissection appeared to increase the risk of late effects. Being obese prior to cancer diagnosis appeared to be the strongest factor associated with late effects. Testicular cancer survivors were more likely to develop chronic health conditions when compared to cancer-free men. While the late effects risk was increased among testicular cancer survivors, the incidence rates of late effects after cancer diagnosis was fairly low.

  19. Targeted delivery system for cancer cells consist of multiple ligands conjugated genetically modified CCMV capsid on doxorubicin GNPs complex.

    PubMed

    Barwal, Indu; Kumar, Rajiv; Kateriya, Suneel; Dinda, Amit Kumar; Yadav, Subhash Chandra

    2016-11-22

    Targeted nano-delivery vehicles were developed from genetically modified Cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) capsid by ligands bioconjugation for efficient drug delivery in cancer cells. RNA binding (N 1-25aa) and β-hexamer forming (N 27-41aa) domain of capsid was selectively deleted by genetic engineering to achieve the efficient in vitro assembly without natural cargo. Two variants of capsids were generated by truncating 41 and 26 amino acid from N terminus (NΔ41 and NΔ26) designated as F1 and F2 respectively. These capsid were optimally self-assembled in 1:2 molar ratio (F1:F2) to form a monodisperse nano-scaffold of size 28 nm along with chemically conjugated modalities for visualization (fluorescent dye), targeting (folic acid, FA) and anticancer drug (doxorubicin). The cavity of the nano-scaffold was packed with doxorubicin conjugated gold nanoparticles (10 nm) to enhance the stability, drug loading and sustained release of drug. The chimeric system was stable at pH range of 4-8. This chimeric nano-scaffold system showed highly specific receptor mediated internalization (targeting) and ~300% more cytotoxicity (with respect to FA(-) delivery system) to folate receptor positive Michigan Cancer Foundation-7 (MCF7) cell lines. The present system may offer a programmable nano-scaffold based platform for developing chemotherapeutics for cancer.

  20. Targeted delivery system for cancer cells consist of multiple ligands conjugated genetically modified CCMV capsid on doxorubicin GNPs complex

    PubMed Central

    Barwal, Indu; Kumar, Rajiv; Kateriya, Suneel; Dinda, Amit Kumar; Yadav, Subhash Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Targeted nano-delivery vehicles were developed from genetically modified Cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) capsid by ligands bioconjugation for efficient drug delivery in cancer cells. RNA binding (N 1-25aa) and β-hexamer forming (N 27-41aa) domain of capsid was selectively deleted by genetic engineering to achieve the efficient in vitro assembly without natural cargo. Two variants of capsids were generated by truncating 41 and 26 amino acid from N terminus (NΔ41 and NΔ26) designated as F1 and F2 respectively. These capsid were optimally self-assembled in 1:2 molar ratio (F1:F2) to form a monodisperse nano-scaffold of size 28 nm along with chemically conjugated modalities for visualization (fluorescent dye), targeting (folic acid, FA) and anticancer drug (doxorubicin). The cavity of the nano-scaffold was packed with doxorubicin conjugated gold nanoparticles (10 nm) to enhance the stability, drug loading and sustained release of drug. The chimeric system was stable at pH range of 4–8. This chimeric nano-scaffold system showed highly specific receptor mediated internalization (targeting) and ~300% more cytotoxicity (with respect to FA− delivery system) to folate receptor positive Michigan Cancer Foundation-7 (MCF7) cell lines. The present system may offer a programmable nano-scaffold based platform for developing chemotherapeutics for cancer. PMID:27872483

  1. Cyclodextrin-Modified Porous Silicon Nanoparticles for Efficient Sustained Drug Delivery and Proliferation Inhibition of Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Correia, Alexandra; Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Mäkilä, Ermei; Almeida, Sérgio; Salonen, Jarno; Hirvonen, Jouni; Santos, Hélder A

    2015-10-21

    Over the past decade, the potential of polymeric structures has been investigated to overcome many limitations related to nanosized drug carriers by modulating their toxicity, cellular interactions, stability, and drug-release kinetics. In this study, we have developed a successful nanocomposite consisting of undecylenic acid modified thermally hydrocarbonized porous silicon nanoparticles (UnTHCPSi NPs) loaded with an anticancer drug, sorafenib, and surface-conjugated with heptakis(6-amino-6-deoxy)-β-cyclodextrin (HABCD) to show the impact of the surface polymeric functionalization on the physical and biological properties of the drug-loaded nanoparticles. Cytocompatibility studies showed that the UnTHCPSi-HABCD NPs were not toxic to breast cancer cells. HABCD also enhanced the suspensibility and both the colloidal and plasma stabilities of the UnTHCPSi NPs. UnTHCPSi-HABCD NPs showed a significantly increased interaction with breast cancer cells compared to bare NPs and also sustained the drug release. Furthermore, the sorafenib-loaded UnTHCPSi-HABCD NPs efficiently inhibited cell proliferation of the breast cancer cells.

  2. Expert consensus document: Semantics in active surveillance for men with localized prostate cancer - results of a modified Delphi consensus procedure.

    PubMed

    Bruinsma, Sophie M; Roobol, Monique J; Carroll, Peter R; Klotz, Laurence; Pickles, Tom; Moore, Caroline M; Gnanapragasam, Vincent J; Villers, Arnauld; Rannikko, Antti; Valdagni, Riccardo; Frydenberg, Mark; Kakehi, Yoshiyuki; Filson, Christopher P; Bangma, Chris H

    2017-03-14

    Active surveillance (AS) is broadly described as a management option for men with low-risk prostate cancer, but semantic heterogeneity exists in both the literature and in guidelines. To address this issue, a panel of leading prostate cancer specialists in the field of AS participated in a consensus-forming project using a modified Delphi method to reach international consensus on definitions of terms related to this management option. An iterative three-round sequence of online questionnaires designed to address 61 individual items was completed by each panel member. Consensus was considered to be reached if ≥70% of the experts agreed on a definition. To facilitate a common understanding among all experts involved and resolve potential ambiguities, a face-to-face consensus meeting was held between Delphi survey rounds two and three. Convenience sampling was used to construct the panel of experts. In total, 12 experts from Australia, France, Finland, Italy, the Netherlands, Japan, the UK, Canada and the USA participated. By the end of the Delphi process, formal consensus was achieved for 100% (n = 61) of the terms and a glossary was then developed. Agreement between international experts has been reached on relevant terms and subsequent definitions regarding AS for patients with localized prostate cancer. This standard terminology could support multidisciplinary communication, reduce the extent of variations in clinical practice and optimize clinical decision making.

  3. Shmt1 Heterozygosity Impairs Folate-Dependent Thymidylate Synthesis Capacity and Modifies Risk of Apcmin-Mediated Intestinal Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    MacFarlane, Amanda J.; Perry, Cheryll A.; McEntee, Michael F.; Lin, David M.; Stover, Patrick J.

    2010-01-01

    Folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism is required for the de novo synthesis of purines, thymidylate, and S-adenosylmethionine, the primary cellular methyl donor. Impairments in folate metabolism diminish cellular methylation potential and genome stability, which are risk factors for colorectal cancer (CRC). Cytoplasmic serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT1) regulates the partitioning of folate-activated one-carbons between thymidylate and S-adenosylmethionine biosynthesis. Therefore, changes in SHMT1 expression enable the determination of the specific contributions made by thymidylate and S-adenosylmethionine biosynthesis to CRC risk. Shmt1 hemizygosity was associated with a decreased capacity for thymidylate synthesis, due to down regulation of enzymes in its biosynthetic pathway, namely thymidylate synthase and cytoplasmic thymidine kinase. Significant Shmt1-dependent changes to methylation capacity, gene expression and purine synthesis were not observed. Shmt1 hemizygosity was associated with increased risk for intestinal cancer in Apcmin/+ mice through a gene-by-diet interaction, indicating that the capacity for thymidylate synthesis modifies susceptibility to intestinal cancer in Apcmin/+ mice. PMID:21406397

  4. Effect of Audiovisual Cancer Programs on Patients and Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassileth, Barrie R.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Four audiovisual programs about cancer and cancer treatment were evaluated. Cancer patients, their families, and friends were asked to complete questionnaires before and after watching a program to determine the effects of the program on their knowledge of cancer, anxiety levels, and perceived ability to communicate with the staff. (Author/MLW)

  5. Incidence rate of female breast cancer in urban Shijiazhuang in 2012 and modifiable risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Denggui; He, Yutong; Wei, Lizhen; Zhang, Nan; Li, Shumei; Wen, Xiaoduo; Yang, Yi; Wang, Guiying; Wang, Shijie; Geng, Cuizhi; Liu, Yunjiang

    2016-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is diagnosed more frequently among urban than rural women in China; however, the incidence among women in Shijiazhuang is unknown. Methods As registered Chinese citizens are entitled to complete public medical insurance coverage, the incidence rate was estimated using reimbursement records of first hospitalization. Results Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women in Shijiazhuang. The crude rate and age‐standardized incidence rates by China (ASRC) and world (ASRW) standards were 59.6, 48.5 and 45.5/100 000 in 2012. Mean age at diagnosis was 55.1 years. Incidence increased with age, peaking at 165.1 at 70–74. In comparison with urban women in other Chinese cities, incidence in Shijiazhuang was similar to Shanghai (ASRC 46.6) and Suzhou (ASRW 45). When compared with 31 other Chinese cities, Shijiazhuang ranked second highest behind Guangzhou (ASRW 46.6), and the ASRW correlated significantly with gross domestic product per capita among the 32 cities. The breast cancer ASRW in Shijiazhuang was 2.7 times the rate of 41 rural Chinese counties (17). When compared with GLOBOCAN 2012 data according to the Human Development Index, breast cancer incidence in Shijiazhuang matched countries with a high human development index (ASRW 45.2). Conclusion Breast cancer incidence in Shijiazhuang in 2012 was the highest in China, matching the rate in countries with high social economic development. This rate may continue to rise, parallel with urbanization, and may be associated with changing reproductive patterns and Westernization. Prevention methods need to be incorporated. PMID:27766774

  6. Diet and lifestyle factors modify immune/inflammation response genes to alter breast cancer risk and prognosis: The Breast Cancer Health Disparities Study

    PubMed Central

    Lundgreen, Abbie; Torres-Mejia, Gabriela; Wolff, Roger K.; Hines, Lisa; Baumgartner, Kathy; John, Esther M.

    2014-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF) and toll-like receptors (TLR) are important mediators of inflammation. We examined 10 of these genes with respect to breast cancer risk and mortality in a genetically admixed population of Hispanic/Native American (NA) (2111 cases, 2597 controls) and non-Hispanic white (NHW) (1481 cases, 1585 controls) women. Additionally, we explored if diet and lifestyle factors modified associations with these genes. Overall, these genes (collectively) were associated with breast cancer risk among women with >70% NA ancestry (PARTP = 0.0008), with TLR1 rs7696175 being the primary risk contributor (OR 1.77, 95% CI 1.25, 2.51). Overall, TLR1 rs7696175 (HR 1.40, 95% CI 1.03, 1.91; Padj=0.032), TLR4 rs5030728 (HR 1.96, 95% CI 1.30, 2.95; Padj=0.014), and TNFRSF1A rs4149578 (HR 2.71, 95% CI 1.28, 5.76; Padj=0.029) were associated with increased breast cancer mortality. We observed several statistically significant interactions after adjustment for multiple comparisons, including interactions between our dietary oxidative balance score and CD40LG and TNFSF1A; between cigarette smoking and TLR1, TLR4, and TNF; between body mass index (BMI) among pre-menopausal women and TRAF2; and between regular use of aspirin/non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and TLR3 and TRA2. In conclusion, our findings support a contributing role of certain TNF-α and TLR genes in both breast cancer risk and survival, particularly among women with higher NA ancestry. Diet and lifestyle factors appear to be important mediators of the breast cancer risk associated with these genes. PMID:25332681

  7. Diet and lifestyle factors modify immune/inflammation response genes to alter breast cancer risk and prognosis: the Breast Cancer Health Disparities Study.

    PubMed

    Slattery, Martha L; Lundgreen, Abbie; Torres-Mejia, Gabriela; Wolff, Roger K; Hines, Lisa; Baumgartner, Kathy; John, Esther M

    2014-12-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF) and toll-like receptors (TLR) are important mediators of inflammation. We examined 10 of these genes with respect to breast cancer risk and mortality in a genetically admixed population of Hispanic/Native American (NA) (2111 cases, 2597 controls) and non-Hispanic white (NHW) (1481 cases, 1585 controls) women. Additionally, we explored if diet and lifestyle factors modified associations with these genes. Overall, these genes (collectively) were associated with breast cancer risk among women with >70% NA ancestry (P(ARTP) = 0.0008), with TLR1 rs7696175 being the primary risk contributor (OR 1.77, 95% CI 1.25, 2.51). Overall, TLR1 rs7696175 (HR 1.40, 95% CI 1.03, 1.91; P(adj) = 0.032), TLR4 rs5030728 (HR 1.96, 95% CI 1.30, 2.95; P(adj) = 0.014), and TNFRSF1A rs4149578 (HR 2.71, 95% CI 1.28, 5.76; P(adj) = 0.029) were associated with increased breast cancer mortality. We observed several statistically significant interactions after adjustment for multiple comparisons, including interactions between our dietary oxidative balance score and CD40LG and TNFSF1A; between cigarette smoking and TLR1, TLR4, and TNF; between body mass index (BMI) among pre-menopausal women and TRAF2; and between regular use of aspirin/non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and TLR3 and TRA2. In conclusion, our findings support a contributing role of certain TNF-α and TLR genes in both breast cancer risk and survival, particularly among women with higher NA ancestry. Diet and lifestyle factors appear to be important mediators of the breast cancer risk associated with these genes.

  8. CD24 is a genetic modifier for risk and progression of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yifan; Li, Bingjin; Zhang, Xingyi; Sonpavde, Guru P; Jiao, Kenneth; Zhang, Andrea; Zhang, Guangxin; Sun, Mei; Chu, Chengjing; Li, Feng; Wang, Lizhong; Cui, Ranji; Liu, Runhua

    2017-02-01

    CD24 plays an oncogenic role in the onset and progression of various human cancers, including prostate cancer. In the present study, we identified two linkage disequilibrium blocks with four recombination hotspot motifs in human CD24 locus. To elucidate whether genetic variants of CD24 are associated with susceptibility to prostate cancer and its disease status, we conducted a case-control association study with two P170 C/T and P-534 A/C polymorphisms of CD24 in 590 patients with prostate cancer and 590 healthy controls. A significant increased risk of prostate cancer was found in men with the P170(T/T) genotype over the P170(C/C) genotype (odd ratio = 1.74, 95% confidence interval = 1.16-2.63, P = 0.008), and in men with the P-534(C/C) genotype over the P-534(A/A) genotype (odd ratio = 1.47, 95% CI = 1.18-2.26, P = 0.003). Cochran-Armitage trend analysis showed that the P170(T) allele was significantly correlated with an increased risk of prostate cancer progression (P = 0.029, trend between genotypes and stages) and this observation was also validated in an independent sample cohort. Next, we found that tumors with P170(T) or P-534(C) alleles had more twofold increased protein expressions of CD24 as compared to those with P170(C) or P-534(A) alleles, respectively. Likewise, tumors with a combination of P170(T/T) and P-534(C/C) genotypes were associated with a high mRNA level of CD24. Our data suggest a significant association of CD24 genetic variants with prostate cancer onset and progression, which provides new insight into molecular genetics of prostate cancer; however, these findings need to be validated in multiple independent cohorts. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. The modified high-density survival assay is the useful tool to predict the effectiveness of fractionated radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Yoshikazu; Mori, Miyuki; Oikawa, Toshiyuki; Shimura, Tsutomu; Ohtake, Yosuke; Mori, Shiro; Ohkubo, Yasuhito; Fukumoto, Manabu

    2010-01-01

    The high-density survival (HDS) assay was originally elaborated to assess cancer cell responses to therapeutic agents under the influence of intercellular communication. Here, we simplified the original HDS assay and studied its applicability for the detection of cellular radioresistance. We have recently defined clinically relevant radioresistant (CRR) cells, which continue to proliferate with daily exposure to 2 gray (Gy) of X-rays for more than 30 days in vitro. We established human CRR cell lines, HepG2-8960-R from HepG2, and SAS-R1 and -R2 from SAS, respectively. In an attempt to apply the HDS assay to detect radioresistance with clinical relevance, we simplified the original HDS assay by scoring the total number of surviving cells after exposure to X-rays. The modified HDS assay successfully detected radioresistance with clinical relevance. The modified HDS assay detected CRR phenotype, which is not always detectable by clonogenic assay. Therefore, we believe that the modified HDS assay presented in this study is a powerful tool to predict the effectiveness of fractionated radiotherapy against malignant tumors.

  10. Association of tobacco and alcohol use with earlier development of colorectal cancer: should we modify screening guidelines?

    PubMed

    Acott, Alison A; Theus, Sue A; Marchant-Miros, Kathyrn E; Mancino, Anne T

    2008-12-01

    Current guidelines recommend initial colorectal cancer screening at age 50 years for average-risk patients. Alcohol and tobacco use can be associated with earlier onset of colorectal cancer. We hypothesized an earlier age at diagnosis and/or more advanced stage in patients with these habits. We queried our tumor registry for colorectal cancer diagnosed between January 1997 and December 2006. Data were analyzed to evaluate effects of alcohol and tobacco use. Of 335 colorectal cancer patients, 81% used tobacco, 51% used alcohol, 45% used both, and 14% used neither. Current tobacco and alcohol use were associated with younger ages at onset of colorectal cancer. Thirteen of 332 patients were diagnosed with colorectal cancer before age 50 years. All had exposure to alcohol and tobacco. Fifty-four percent (7/13) of these patients presented at stage 3/4 compared with 34% of the overall population. Modification of screening guidelines to include these habits as "high-risk" factors may be indicated.

  11. [Cancer vaccine therapy using genetically modified induced pluripotent stem cell-derived dendritic cells expressing the TAA gene].

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Hiromitsu; Ojima, Toshiyasu; Nakamori, Mikihito; Nakamura, Masaki; Hayata, Keiji; Katsuda, Masahiro; Iida, Takeshi; Miyazawa, Motoki; Iwahashi, Makoto; Yamaue, Hiroki

    2013-11-01

    It is generally accepted that the difficulty in obtaining a sufficient number of functional dendritic cells (DCs) poses a serious problem in DC-based immunotherapy. Therefore, we used induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived DCs (iPSDCs) instead. If the therapeutic efficacy of iPSDCs was equivalent to that of bone marrow-derived DCs( BMDCs), then the above-mentioned problems may be solved. In this study, we generated iPSDCs from iPS cells and compared their capacity to mature and migrate to the regional lymph nodes with that of BMDCs. We adenovirally transduced the hgp100 gene, which codes for a natural tumor antigen, into the DCs and immunized the mice with these genetically modified DCs. The cytotoxic activity of CD8( +) cytotoxic T lymphocytes( CTLs) was assayed using a 51Cr-release assay. The therapeutic efficacy of the vaccination was examined in a subcutaneous tumor model. Our results demonstrated that iPSDCs equaled BMDCs in terms of their maturation and migration capacity. Furthermore, hgp100-specific CTLs were generated in mice that were immunized with the genetically modified iPSDCs. These CTLs exhibited a high level of cytotoxicity against B16 cells, which is similar to that exhibited by CTLs generated in BMDCs immunized mice. Moreover, vaccination with genetically modified iPSDCs elicited a high level of therapeutic efficacy equaling that of vaccination with BMDCs. This study clarified experimentally that genetically modified iPSDCs are equivalent to BMDCs in terms of tumor-associated antigen-specific therapeutic antitumor immunity. This vaccination strategy may therefore be useful for future clinical application as a cancer vaccine.

  12. Toxicity and therapy of cisplatin-loaded EGF modified mPEG-PLGA-PLL nanoparticles for SKOV3 cancer in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunfei; Liu, Peifeng; Qiu, Lihua; Sun, Ying; Zhu, Mingjie; Gu, Liying; Di, Wen; Duan, Yourong

    2013-05-01

    Construction on the nanoparticles with lower toxicity and specific tumor targeting properties is challenging and requires careful design of composition, size, physicochemical properties tailored for the nanoparticles. Here the epidermal growth factor (EGF) modified methoxy polyethylene glycol-polylactic-co-glycolic acid-polylysine (mPEG-PLGA-PLL) encapsulated cisplatin (CDDP) nanoparticles (CDDP-NPs-EGF) was prepared to for solving the toxicity of CDDP and improving therapeutic efficiency. The remarkable features of CDDP-NPs-EGF are increasing cytotoxicity that attribute to effective cell cycle arrest and high cell apoptosis in vitro. In vivo, the CDDP-NPs-EGF change drug distribution, decrease the nephrotoxicity of CDDP and improve significantly therapeutic efficiency without inducing obvious system toxicity, verifying its key role of the CDDP-NPs-EGF in lowering drug toxicity and enhancing the antitumor efficiency for SKOV3 cancer in mice. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Modifying effect of nitrites on pulmonary blastogenesis and viral leukogenesis in mice: role of nitric oxide and dioxide].

    PubMed

    Il'nitskiĭ, A P; Reutov, V P; Ryzhova, N I; Kolpakova, A S; Deriagina, V P; Nekrasova, E A; Savluchinskaia, L A; Travkin, A G

    2000-01-01

    The long-term effects of sodium nitrite (NaNO2) on carcinogenesis induced by urethane (total dose 1.0 mg/g body weight) in low-grade cancer F1 (C57BLxCBA) and high-grade A/Snell mice and on viral (Rausher leukemia virus) leukomogenesis in Balb/c mice. The murine intake of NaNO2 with water (50 mg/l) causes a statistically significant increase in the number of adenomas in the lung. Examining the mechanism of conversion of NO2- to NO led to the assumption that the free radical compounds NO and NO2 are involved in the potentiating action of NO2 on blastomogenesis. The use of the oxidant emoxypine (3-hydroxypyridine) confirmed the above. The role of NO and NO2 in the intracellular processes under the modifying effects of nitrites and nitrates on blastomogenesis is analyzed.

  14. 2′-O-methyl-modified phosphorothioate antisense oligonucleotides have reduced non-specific effects in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Byong Hoon; Bochkareva, Elena; Bochkarev, Alexey; Mou, Tung-Chung; Gray, Donald M.

    2004-01-01

    Antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) have biological activity in treating various forms of cancer. The antisense effects of two types of 20mer ODNs, phosphorothioate-modified ODNs (S-ODNs) and S-ODNs with 12 2′-O-methyl groups (Me-S-ODNs), targeted to sites 109 and 277 of bcl-2 mRNA, were compared. Both types were at least as effective as G3139 (Genta, Inc.) in reducing the level of Bcl-2 protein in T24 cells following a 4 h transfection at a dose of 0.1 µM. Circular dichroism spectra showed that both types formed A-form duplexes with the complementary RNA, and the melting temperatures were in the order of Me-S-ODN·RNA > normal DNA·RNA > S-ODN·RNA. In comparison with the S-ODN, the Me-S-ODN had reduced toxic growth inhibitory effects, was less prone to bind the DNA-binding domain A of human replication protein A, and was as resistant to serum nucleases. Neither type of oligomer induced apoptosis, according to a PARP-cleavage assay. Hybrids formed with Me-S-ODN sequences were less sensitive to RNase H degradation than those formed with S-ODN sequences. Despite this latter disadvantage, the addition of 2′-O-methyl groups to a phosphorothioate-modified ODN is advantageous because of increased stability of binding and reduced non-specific effects. PMID:15064360

  15. Heat-modified citrus pectin induces apoptosis-like cell death and autophagy in HepG2 and A549 cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Leclere, Lionel; Fransolet, Maude; Cote, Francois; Cambier, Pierre; Arnould, Thierry; Van Cutsem, Pierre; Michiels, Carine

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is still one of the leading causes of death worldwide, and finding new treatments remains a major challenge. Previous studies showed that modified forms of pectin, a complex polysaccharide present in the primary plant cell wall, possess anticancer properties. Nevertheless, the mechanism of action of modified pectin and the pathways involved are unclear. Here, we show that citrus pectin modified by heat treatment induced cell death in HepG2 and A549 cells. The induced cell death differs from classical apoptosis because no DNA cleavage was observed. In addition, Z-VAD-fmk, a pan-caspase inhibitor, did not influence the observed cell death in HepG2 cells but appeared to be partly protective in A549 cells, indicating that heat-modified citrus pectin might induce caspase-independent cell death. An increase in the abundance of the phosphatidylethanolamine-conjugated Light Chain 3 (LC3) protein and a decrease in p62 protein abundance were observed in both cell types when incubated in the presence of heat-modified citrus pectin. These results indicate the activation of autophagy. To our knowledge, this is the first time that autophagy has been revealed in cells incubated in the presence of a modified form of pectin. This autophagy activation appears to be protective, at least for A549 cells, because its inhibition with 3-methyladenine increased the observed modified pectin-induced cytotoxicity. This study confirms the potential of modified pectin to improve chemotherapeutic cancer treatments.

  16. Heat-Modified Citrus Pectin Induces Apoptosis-Like Cell Death and Autophagy in HepG2 and A549 Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Leclere, Lionel; Fransolet, Maude; Cote, Francois; Cambier, Pierre; Arnould, Thierry; Van Cutsem, Pierre; Michiels, Carine

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is still one of the leading causes of death worldwide, and finding new treatments remains a major challenge. Previous studies showed that modified forms of pectin, a complex polysaccharide present in the primary plant cell wall, possess anticancer properties. Nevertheless, the mechanism of action of modified pectin and the pathways involved are unclear. Here, we show that citrus pectin modified by heat treatment induced cell death in HepG2 and A549 cells. The induced cell death differs from classical apoptosis because no DNA cleavage was observed. In addition, Z-VAD-fmk, a pan-caspase inhibitor, did not influence the observed cell death in HepG2 cells but appeared to be partly protective in A549 cells, indicating that heat-modified citrus pectin might induce caspase-independent cell death. An increase in the abundance of the phosphatidylethanolamine-conjugated Light Chain 3 (LC3) protein and a decrease in p62 protein abundance were observed in both cell types when incubated in the presence of heat-modified citrus pectin. These results indicate the activation of autophagy. To our knowledge, this is the first time that autophagy has been revealed in cells incubated in the presence of a modified form of pectin. This autophagy activation appears to be protective, at least for A549 cells, because its inhibition with 3-methyladenine increased the observed modified pectin-induced cytotoxicity. This study confirms the potential of modified pectin to improve chemotherapeutic cancer treatments. PMID:25794149

  17. The effects of complex glyoxal based modifiers on properties of cement paste and hardened cement paste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simakova, A.; Kudyakov, A.; Efremova, V.; Latypov, A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the results of research on the effect of organic and glyoxal containing additives on the properties of cement paste and hardened cement paste. Complex modifying additives based on liquid glyoxal increasing the strength of the cement paste by 35-63% were developed. Physico-chemical investigations showed that hardened cement paste modified by polylactic acid with glyoxal has a homogeneous and fine-grained structure. Developed complex modifying additives containing glyoxal are approved for use in production technology of heavy cement concretes with advanced properties.

  18. Immunotherapy against metastatic bladder cancer by combined administration of granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor and interleukin-2 surface modified MB49 bladder cancer stem cells vaccine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-Yan; Hua, Rui; Liu, Li; Zhan, Xiaomin; Chen, Simei; Quan, Song; Chu, Qing-Jun; Zhu, Yong-Tong

    2017-02-16

    In previous studies, it has been shown that the granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) or interleukin-2 (IL-2) surface modified MB49 bladder cancer stem cells (MCSCs) vaccine could induce a specific antitumor immunity and against bladder cancer in mice model respectively. However, whether combined administration of GM-CSF and IL-2 could produce specific immune responses to cancer stem cells (CSCs) was uncertain. MCSCs were established and characterized. GM-CSF and IL-2 MCSCs vaccines were prepared and bioactivity was evaluated. The therapeutic, protective, specific, and memorial immune response animal experiments were designed. Tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes assay, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, flow cytometry assay were performed to indentify whether vaccine caused an antitumor immunity. Streptavidin (SA)-GM-CSF and SA-IL-2 MCSCs vaccines were prepared successfully. Such vaccines inhibited the volume of tumor and prolonged the survival of the mice in animal experiments. The express of IgG or IFN-c, the portion of dendritic cells, CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells were highest in the combined vaccines group than the SA-GM-CSF vaccine group, the SA-IL-2 vaccine group, the MCSCs group and the PBS group. The combined of GM-CSF and IL-2 vaccines could induce better antitumor immunity than a vaccine alone.

  19. Polymorphisms in the XRCC1 gene modify survival of bladder cancer patients treated with chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sacerdote, Carlotta; Guarrera, Simonetta; Ricceri, Fulvio; Pardini, Barbara; Polidoro, Silvia; Allione, Alessandra; Critelli, Rossana; Russo, Alessia; Andrew, Angeline S; Ye, Yuanqing; Wu, Xifeng; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Bosio, Andrea; Casetta, Giovanni; Cucchiarale, Giuseppina; Destefanis, Paolo; Gontero, Paolo; Rolle, Luigi; Zitella, Andrea; Fontana, Dario; Vineis, Paolo; Matullo, Giuseppe

    2013-10-15

    Survival of bladder cancer patients depends on several factors including disease stage and grade at diagnosis, age, health status of the patient and the applied treatment. Several studies investigated the role of DNA repair genetic variants in cancer susceptibility, but only few studies investigated their role in survival and response to chemotherapy for bladder cancer. We genotyped 28 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in DNA repair genes in 456 bladder cancer patients, reconstructed haplotypes and calculated a score for combinations of the SNPs. We estimated Hazard Ratios (adjHR) for time to death. Among patients treated with chemotherapy, variant alleles of five SNPs in the XRCC1 gene conferred better survival (rs915927 adjHR 0.55 (95%CI 0.32-0.94); rs76507 adjHR 0.48 (95%CI 0.27-0.84); rs2854501 adjHR 0.25 (95%CI 0.12-0.52); rs2854509 adjHR 0.21 (95%CI 0.09-0.46); rs3213255 adjHR 0.46 (95%CI 0.26-0.80). In this group of patients, an increasing number of variant alleles in a XRCC1 gene score were associated with a better survival (26% decrease of risk of death for each additional variant allele in XRCC1). By functional analyses we demonstrated that the previous XRCC1 SNPs confer lower DNA repair capacity. This may support the hypothesis that survival in these patients may be modulated by the different DNA repair capacity determined by genetic variants. Chemotherapy treated cancer patients bearing an increasing number of "risky" alleles in XRCC1 gene had a better survival, suggesting that a proficient DNA repair may result in resistance to therapy and shorter survival. This finding may have clinical implications for the choice of therapy.

  20. Parent perceptions of managing child behavioural side-effects of cancer treatment: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Williams, L K; McCarthy, M C

    2015-07-01

    Very little research has examined the role of parenting in managing behavioural side-effects of cancer treatment. The purpose of this paper was to explore parent perceptions of (a) parenting in the context of childhood cancer; (b) the parenting strategies used in the context of managing child behavioural side-effects of cancer treatment; and (c) the perceived impact that cancer-specific parenting strategies have on child behaviour. Participants were 15 mothers of children aged 2-6 years in the maintenance phase of treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia at the Royal Children's Hospital Children's Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Australia. Mothers participated in a one-on-one semi-structured telephone interview using an interview guide which included questions on parenting in the context of childhood cancer, specifically in relation to behavioural side-effects (problems with behaviour, sleep and eating) and any perceived impact cancer-specific parenting may have on the ill child. Many parents reported that following their child's cancer diagnosis, they had to implement a suite of 'new' strategies that 'pre-diagnosis' were used only in moderation, if at all. The most salient theme that emerged was parents' perception that their parenting became more lax since their child's diagnosis. Parents further reported specific parenting strategies for each of the main child behavioural side-effects of cancer treatment. Data from the current qualitative exploratory study highlight the role of specific parenting strategies in managing or assisting child behavioural side-effects of cancer treatment. Further quantitative research is needed to more fully examine the association between parenting and child behavioural outcomes in order to develop modifiable approaches to improving child behavioural side-effects in a paediatric oncology context. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Identifying opportunities for nature engagement in cancer care practice and design: protocol for four-round modified electronic Delphi

    PubMed Central

    Blaschke, Sarahg; O'Callaghan, Clare C; Schofield, Penelope

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Opportunities to engage with nature have shown relevance in experiences of health and recovery of patients with cancer and are attracting interest in cancer care practice and design. Such healthcare innovations can widen the horizon of possible supportive care solutions but require deliberate and rigorous investigation to ensure responsible action is taken and wastage avoided. This protocol outlines a study designed to solicit knowledge from relevant experts drawn from a range of healthcare practitioners, management representatives, designers and researchers to explore levels of opinion consensus for determining opportunities for, and barriers to, providing helpful nature engagement in cancer care settings. Methods and analysis A 4-round modified electronic Delphi methodology will be used to conduct a structured, iterative feedback process for querying and synthesising expert opinion. Round 1 administers an open-ended questionnaire to a panel of selected, relevant experts who will consider the own recommendations of patients with cancer for nature engagement (drawn from a preceding investigation) before contributing salient issues (items) with relevance to the topic. Round 2 circulates anonymised summaries of responses back to the experts who verify and, if they wish, reconsider their own responses. Rounds 3 and 4 determine and rank experts' top 10 items using a 10-point Likert-type scale. Descriptive statistics (median and mean scores) will be calculated to indicate the items' relative importance. Levels of consensus will be explored with consensus defined as 75% agreement. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval for this study was obtained from the Institution's Human Research Ethics Committee (blinded for review). It is anticipated that the results will be published in peer-reviewed journals and presented in a variety of forums. PMID:28274965

  2. Modified effective dielectric function for metallic granular composites with high percolation threshold.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiong-Rui; Zhang, Zong-Suo; Liu, Shao-Ding; Hao, Zhong-Hua

    2010-03-01

    We propose the effective dielectric function theory of metal granular composites modified with the metal particle size. The modified theory is used to explain the electrical conductivity, resonant plasmon absorption, and large nonlinear absorption of Au-TiO2 granular composite films with high-density metallic particles and a high electric percolation threshold. It is revealed that the decreasing metal particle size leads to an increasing percolation threshold and large enhancement of optical nonlinearity of the composites.

  3. Effect of non-Maxwellian electrons on shear flow modified ion acoustic solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafiq, Ammara; Ali Shan, S.; Saleem, H.

    2017-04-01

    Dynamics of shear flow modified ion acoustic wave is investigated assuming electrons to follow q-nonextensive and Cairns distribution functions. A modified linear dispersion relation and electrostatic KdV solitons are analyzed. Results are illustrated considering solar wind and F-region ionospheric plasmas. Effects of non-Maxwellian distribution of electrons on the amplitude and the width of solitons are pointed out in the presence of field-aligned inhomogeneous flow.

  4. A novel class of mitochondria-targeted soft electrophiles modifies mitochondrial proteins and inhibits mitochondrial metabolism in breast cancer cells through redox mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Vayalil, Praveen K; Oh, Joo-Yeun; Zhou, Fen; Diers, Anne R; Smith, M Ryan; Golzarian, Hafez; Oliver, Patsy G; Smith, Robin A J; Murphy, Michael P; Velu, Sadanandan E; Landar, Aimee

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in screening and treatment over the past several years, breast cancer remains a leading cause of cancer-related death among women in the United States. A major goal in breast cancer treatment is to develop safe and clinically useful therapeutic agents that will prevent the recurrence of breast cancers after front-line therapeutics have failed. Ideally, these agents would have relatively low toxicity against normal cells, and will specifically inhibit the growth and proliferation of cancer cells. Our group and others have previously demonstrated that breast cancer cells exhibit increased mitochondrial oxygen consumption compared with non-tumorigenic breast epithelial cells. This suggests that it may be possible to deliver redox active compounds to the mitochondria to selectively inhibit cancer cell metabolism. To demonstrate proof-of-principle, a series of mitochondria-targeted soft electrophiles (MTSEs) has been designed which selectively accumulate within the mitochondria of highly energetic breast cancer cells and modify mitochondrial proteins. A prototype MTSE, IBTP, significantly inhibits mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, resulting in decreased breast cancer cell proliferation, cell attachment, and migration in vitro. These results suggest MTSEs may represent a novel class of anti-cancer agents that prevent cancer cell growth by modification of specific mitochondrial proteins.

  5. A Novel Class of Mitochondria-Targeted Soft Electrophiles Modifies Mitochondrial Proteins and Inhibits Mitochondrial Metabolism in Breast Cancer Cells through Redox Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Vayalil, Praveen K.; Oh, Joo-Yeun; Zhou, Fen; Diers, Anne R.; Smith, M. Ryan; Golzarian, Hafez; Oliver, Patsy G.; Smith, Robin A. J.; Murphy, Michael P.; Velu, Sadanandan E.; Landar, Aimee

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in screening and treatment over the past several years, breast cancer remains a leading cause of cancer-related death among women in the United States. A major goal in breast cancer treatment is to develop safe and clinically useful therapeutic agents that will prevent the recurrence of breast cancers after front-line therapeutics have failed. Ideally, these agents would have relatively low toxicity against normal cells, and will specifically inhibit the growth and proliferation of cancer cells. Our group and others have previously demonstrated that breast cancer cells exhibit increased mitochondrial oxygen consumption compared with non-tumorigenic breast epithelial cells. This suggests that it may be possible to deliver redox active compounds to the mitochondria to selectively inhibit cancer cell metabolism. To demonstrate proof-of-principle, a series of mitochondria-targeted soft electrophiles (MTSEs) has been designed which selectively accumulate within the mitochondria of highly energetic breast cancer cells and modify mitochondrial proteins. A prototype MTSE, IBTP, significantly inhibits mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, resulting in decreased breast cancer cell proliferation, cell attachment, and migration in vitro. These results suggest MTSEs may represent a novel class of anti-cancer agents that prevent cancer cell growth by modification of specific mitochondrial proteins. PMID:25785718

  6. Radiation effects on cancer risks in the Life Span Study cohort.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Kazunori; Ozasa, Kotaro; Katayama, Hiroaki; Shore, Roy E; Okubo, Toshiteru

    2012-10-01

    To determine late health effects of radiation in atomic bomb survivors, the Radiation Effects Research Foundation has been conducting studies on the Life Span Study (LSS) population, which consists of 93,000 atomic bomb survivors and 27,000 controls. A recent report on the incidence of solid cancers estimates that at the age of 70 y, after exposure at the age of 30 y, solid-cancer rates increase by about 35% per Gy for men and 58% per Gy for women. The age-at-exposure is an important risk modifier. Furthermore, it seems that radiation-associated increases in cancer rates persist throughout life. In addition, radiation has similar effects upon first-primary and second-primary cancer risks. A recent report on leukemia mortality suggested that the effect of radiation on leukemia mortality persisted for more than five decades. In addition, a significant dose-response for myelodysplastic syndrome is found in Nagasaki LSS members 40-60 y after radiation exposure. In view of the nature of the continuing increase in solid cancers, the LSS should continue to provide important new information on cancer risks, as most survivors still alive today were exposed to the atomic bomb radiation under the age of 20 y and are now entering their cancer-prone years.

  7. Structure Optimization of 21, 23-Core-Modified Porphyrins Absorbing Long-Wavelength Light as Potential Photosensitizers Against Breast Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    21,23-core-modified porphyrins and the phototoxicity therapy ; Mitochondria; Cytochrom c oxidase. * Corresponding authors. Tel.: +1 716 645 6800x2197; fax...process by PDT, there might be a taraet site inside the cell to trigger 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES Photodynamic therapy , breast cancer, core...6 Introduction The objectives of this project are two fold: one is to train the PI, Dr. Youngjae You, as an photodynamic cancer therapy expert in

  8. Is the effect of surface modifying molecules on antibacterial activity universal for a given material?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Alexander; Liu, Fangzhou; Leung, Yu Hang; Ma, Angel P. Y.; Djurišić, Aleksandra B.; Leung, Frederick C. C.; Chan, Wai Kin; Lee, Hung Kay

    2014-08-01

    Antibacterial activity of nanomaterials is strongly dependent on their properties, and their stability and toxicity can be varied using surface coatings. We investigated the effect of different surface modifying molecules on the antibacterial properties of two ZnO nanoparticle samples. We found that the starting surface properties of the nanoparticles have significant effects on the attachment of the surface modifying molecules and consequent antibacterial activity. Two out of five investigated surface modifying molecules not only had a significant difference in the magnitude of their effect on different nanoparticles, but also resulted in the opposite effects on two ZnO nanoparticle samples (an enhancement of antibacterial activity for one and a reduction of antibacterial activity for the other ZnO sample). This indicates that no general rule on the effect of a specific molecule on the toxicity of a metal oxide nanoparticle can be derived without knowing the nanoparticle properties, due to the fact that surface modifier attachment onto the surface is affected by the initial surface properties.Antibacterial activity of nanomaterials is strongly dependent on their properties, and their stability and toxicity can be varied using surface coatings. We investigated the effect of different surface modifying molecules on the antibacterial properties of two ZnO nanoparticle samples. We found that the starting surface properties of the nanoparticles have significant effects on the attachment of the surface modifying molecules and consequent antibacterial activity. Two out of five investigated surface modifying molecules not only had a significant difference in the magnitude of their effect on different nanoparticles, but also resulted in the opposite effects on two ZnO nanoparticle samples (an enhancement of antibacterial activity for one and a reduction of antibacterial activity for the other ZnO sample). This indicates that no general rule on the effect of a specific

  9. Porphyrin modified trastuzumab improves efficacy of HER2 targeted photodynamic therapy of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Korsak, Barbara; Almeida, Gabriela M; Rocha, Sara; Pereira, Carla; Mendes, Nuno; Osório, Hugo; Pereira, Patrícia M R; Rodrigues, João M M; Schneider, Rudolf J; Sarmento, Bruno; Tomé, João P C; Oliveira, Carla

    2017-10-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is the 3rd deadliest cancer worldwide, due to limited treatment options and late diagnosis. Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) is overexpressed in ∼20% of GC cases and anti-HER2 antibody trastuzumab in combination with conventional chemotherapy, is recognized as standard therapy for HER2-positive metastatic GC. This strategy improves GC patients' survival by 2-3 months, however its optimal results in breast cancer indicate that GC survival may be improved. A new photoimmunoconjugate was developed by conjugating a porphyrin with trastuzumab (Trast:Porph) for targeted photodynamic therapy in HER2-positive GC. Using mass spectrometry analysis, the lysine residues in the trastuzumab structure most prone for porphyrin conjugation were mapped. The in vitro data demonstrates that Trast:Porph specifically binds to HER2-positive cells, accumulates intracellularly, co-localizes with lysosomal marker LAMP1, and induces massive HER2-positive cell death upon cellular irradiation. The high selectivity and cytotoxicity of Trast:Porph based photoimmunotherapy is confirmed in vivo in comparison with trastuzumab alone, using nude mice xenografted with a HER2-positive GC cell line. In the setting of human disease, these data suggest that repetitive cycles of Trast:Porph photoimmunotherapy may be used as an improved treatment strategy in HER2-positive GC patients. © 2017 UICC.

  10. A modified hTERT Promoter-directed Oncolytic Adenovirus Replication with Concurrent Inhibition of TGFβ Signaling for Breast Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zebin; Robbins, John S.; Pister, Amanda; Zafar, M. Behzad; Zhang, Zhen-Wei; Gupta, Janhavi; Lee, K. Jessica; Neuman, Kam; Yun, Chae-Ok; Guise, Theresa; Seth, Prem

    2009-01-01

    Our laboratory is interested to develop oncolytic adenoviral vectors that can be administered systemically for the treatment of breast cancer. To restrict viral replication in breast tumor cells, we have constructed mhTERTAd.sTβRFc, a 01/07 based adenoviral vector expressing the soluble form of TGFβ receptor II fused with human Fc IgG1 (sTGFβRIIFc) gene, in which viral replication is under the control of modified human telomerase reverse transcriptase (mhTERT) promoter. In addition, mhTERTAd.sTβRFc-mediated sTGFβRIIFc production would target growth factor-β (TGFβ) pathway known to contribute to the tumor progression breast cancer metastasis. We chose to use mhTERT promoter because it was found to be relatively more active (approximately 20-times) in breast cancer cells compared to normal human cells. We showed that infection of MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast cancer cells for 48 hrs with mhTERTAd.sTβRFc produced high levels of sTGFβRIIFc (greater than 1 μg/ml) in the medium. Breast cancer cells produced nearly 6,000-fold increase in the viral titers during 48 hrs infection period. However, mhTERTAd.sTβRFc replication was attenuated in normal cells. Infection of breast cancer cells with a replication deficient virus Ad(E1-).sTβRFc also produced high levels of sTGFβRIIFc, but under these conditions no detectable viral replication was observed. Adenoviral-mediated production of sTGFβRIIFc was shown to bind with TGFβ-1, and abolished the effects of TGFβ-1 on downstream SMAD-3 phosphorylation. The administration of mhTERTAd.sTβRFc intravenously into MDA-MB-231 human xenograft bearing mice resulted in significant inhibition of tumor growth, and production of sTGFβRIIFc in the blood. On the other hand, intravenous injection of Ad(E1-).sTβRFc did not exhibit significant inhibition of the tumor growth, but resulted in the sTGFβRIIFc in the blood, suggesting that viral replication along with sTGFβRIIFc protein production play a critical role in inducing

  11. A modified hTERT promoter-directed oncolytic adenovirus replication with concurrent inhibition of TGFbeta signaling for breast cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Z; Robbins, J S; Pister, A; Zafar, M B; Zhang, Z-W; Gupta, J; Lee, K J; Newman, K; Neuman, K; Yun, C-O; Guise, T; Seth, P

    2010-04-01

    We were interested in developing oncolytic adenoviral vectors that can be administered systemically for the treatment of breast cancer. To restrict viral replication in breast tumor cells, we constructed mhTERTAd.sTbetaRFc, a 01/07-based adenoviral vector expressing the soluble form of transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta) receptor II fused with the human Fc IgG1 (sTGFbetaRIIFc) gene, in which viral replication is under the control of a modified human telomerase reverse transcriptase (mhTERT) promoter. In addition, mhTERTAd.sTbetaRFc-mediated sTGFbetaRIIFc production targets the TGFbeta pathway known to contribute to the tumor progression of breast cancer metastasis. We chose to use the mhTERT promoter because it was found to be relatively more active (approximately 20 times) in breast cancer cells compared with normal human cells. We showed that infection of MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast cancer cells for 48 h with mhTERTAd.sTbetaRFc produced high levels of sTGFbetaRIIFc (greater than 1 microg ml(-1)) in the medium. Breast cancer cells produced nearly a 6000-fold increase in viral titers during the 48 h infection period. However, mhTERTAd.sTbetaRFc replication was attenuated in normal cells. Infection of breast cancer cells with a replication-deficient virus Ad(E1(-)).sTbetaRFc also produced high levels of sTGFbetaRIIFc, but under these conditions, no detectable viral replication was observed. Adenoviral-mediated production of sTGFbetaRIIFc was shown to bind with TGFbeta-1, and to abolish the effects of TGFbeta-1 on downstream SMAD-3 phosphorylation. The administration of mhTERTAd.sTbetaRFc intravenously into MDA-MB-231 human xenograft-bearing mice resulted in a significant inhibition of tumor growth and production of sTGFbetaRIIFc in the blood. Conversely, intravenous injection of Ad(E1(-)).sTbetaRFc did not show a significant inhibition of tumor growth, but resulted in sTGFbetaRIIFc in the blood, suggesting that viral replication along with s

  12. Patient preferences for side effects associated with cervical cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Sun, Charlotte; Brown, Alaina J; Jhingran, Anuja; Frumovitz, Michael; Ramondetta, Lois; Bodurka, Diane C

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess patient preferences regarding side effects associated with cervical cancer treatment. The visual analog scale (VAS) and modified standard gamble (SG) were used to elicit preferences of women with no evidence of disease after primary treatment of cervical cancer. Higher scores on VAS and SG indicated more favorable ratings for a given health state. Health states (HS) included vaginal shortening, diarrhea, dietary changes, menopause, moderate nausea/vomiting, rectal bleeding, sexual dysfunction, and urinary self-catheterization. Descriptive statistics, Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney U, and Wilcoxon signed-ranks tests and correlation coefficients were used for statistical analysis. Seventy-eight patients participated in the study. Median age was 44.1 years (range, 24.9-67.8 years). Median time since treatment completion was 31.2 months (range, 1.0-113.3 months). The HSs rated as most favorable by VAS were also rated as most favorable by SG. Increasing age was associated with higher VAS scores for menopause and vaginal shortening (P = 0.04 and 0.036). African Americans had higher VAS scores for dietary changes (P = 0.05), sexual dysfunction (P = 0.028), and diarrhea (P = 0.05) when compared with Hispanic and non-Hispanic white patients. Women receiving radiation had more favorable VAS scores for menopause compared with women undergoing radical hysterectomy (P = 0.05). Women receiving chemotherapy rated urinary self-catheterization less favorably by VAS score compared with those not receiving chemotherapy (P = 0.045). Multiple demographic and clinical factors influence the severity of treatment-related adverse effects perceived by women surviving cervical cancer. A better understanding of factors influencing patient preferences regarding treatment side effects will allow providers to formulate care better tailored to the individual desires of each patient.

  13. Exercise Modifies the Gut Microbiota with Positive Health Effects.

    PubMed

    Monda, Vincenzo; Villano, Ines; Messina, Antonietta; Valenzano, Anna; Esposito, Teresa; Moscatelli, Fiorenzo; Viggiano, Andrea; Cibelli, Giuseppe; Chieffi, Sergio; Monda, Marcellino; Messina, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract (GIT) is inhabited by a wide cluster of microorganisms that play protective, structural, and metabolic functions for the intestinal mucosa. Gut microbiota is involved in the barrier functions and in the maintenance of its homeostasis. It provides nutrients, participates in the signaling network, regulates the epithelial development, and affects the immune system. Considering the microbiota ability to respond to homeostatic and physiological changes, some researchers proposed that it can be seen as an endocrine organ. Evidence suggests that different factors can determine changes in the gut microbiota. These changes can be both quantitative and qualitative resulting in variations of the composition and metabolic activity of the gut microbiota which, in turn, can affect health and different disease processes. Recent studies suggest that exercise can enhance the number of beneficial microbial species, enrich the microflora diversity, and improve the development of commensal bacteria. All these effects are beneficial for the host, improving its health status. In this paper, we intend to shed some light over the recent knowledge of the role played by exercise as an environmental factor in determining changes in microbial composition and how these effects could provide benefits to health and disease prevention.

  14. Exercise Modifies the Gut Microbiota with Positive Health Effects

    PubMed Central

    Monda, Vincenzo; Villano, Ines; Messina, Antonietta; Valenzano, Anna; Esposito, Teresa; Moscatelli, Fiorenzo; Viggiano, Andrea; Cibelli, Giuseppe; Chieffi, Sergio; Monda, Marcellino

    2017-01-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract (GIT) is inhabited by a wide cluster of microorganisms that play protective, structural, and metabolic functions for the intestinal mucosa. Gut microbiota is involved in the barrier functions and in the maintenance of its homeostasis. It provides nutrients, participates in the signaling network, regulates the epithelial development, and affects the immune system. Considering the microbiota ability to respond to homeostatic and physiological changes, some researchers proposed that it can be seen as an endocrine organ. Evidence suggests that different factors can determine changes in the gut microbiota. These changes can be both quantitative and qualitative resulting in variations of the composition and metabolic activity of the gut microbiota which, in turn, can affect health and different disease processes. Recent studies suggest that exercise can enhance the number of beneficial microbial species, enrich the microflora diversity, and improve the development of commensal bacteria. All these effects are beneficial for the host, improving its health status. In this paper, we intend to shed some light over the recent knowledge of the role played by exercise as an environmental factor in determining changes in microbial composition and how these effects could provide benefits to health and disease prevention. PMID:28357027

  15. Does modifying personal responsibility moderate the mental contamination effect?

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Tinisha S; Simonds, Laura M

    2017-12-01

    Mental contamination is the psychological sense of internal dirtiness that arises in the absence of physical contact with a perceived contaminant. Mental contamination can be evoked through imagining perpetrating a moral transgression. This study experimentally evoked mental contamination by asking men to imagine perpetrating a non-consensual kiss. It explored whether reducing sense of personal responsibility for the kiss moderated the mental contamination effect. Male students (N = 60) imagined giving either a consensual or non-consensual kiss. Personal responsibility for the kiss was manipulated in one of two non-consensual kiss conditions by way of the inclusion of social influence information. Feelings of mental contamination were assessed by self-report and through a behavioural index. Mental contamination was successfully induced in the two non-consensual kiss conditions. There was evidence to support the hypothesis that reducing personal responsibility might moderate specific components of mental contamination (shame, dirtiness and urge to cleanse). The effect of responsibility modification was evident in the self-report measures, but not in the behavioural index. The sample comprised male university students which limits generalizability of the findings. The behavioural assessment of mental contamination was limited to a proxy measure. Imagined moral violations are associated with increases in indices of mental contamination. Further research should investigate whether feelings of shame, dirtiness and urge to cleanse are particularly responsive to responsibility modifications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Properties of modified dry masonry mixtures for effective masonry units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, V.; Rozovskaya, T.

    2015-01-01

    The paper is devoted to the problem of the development of dry light-weight mixtures with hollow ceramics microspheres (CMS) for masonry works. For the one-layer fencing structures including effective masonry units, the use of "warm" masonry mortars is necessary. The used light-weight masonry mortars do not provide the brand strength and thermal uniformity of the fencing structures because of high average density. The CMS are effective light-weight aggregate for such mortars. The influence of the dosage of CMS on the physics- and-mechanics parameters and the technological properties of the masonry mortars has been studied. The optimal mixture compositions have been obtained and their main properties have been determined. The influence of an air-entraining admixture and redispersible polymer powders on the average density and physics-and-mechanics parameters of the masonry mortars have been studied. The optimal compositions of light-weight dry masonry mixtures with CMS have been suggested. It has been established that the mortars, obtained from such mixtures, have the requisite average density, the water retention capacity more than 95 %, high homogeneity and high strength characteristics. The application of the proposed mixtures enables to reduce the construction material costs and to improve the energy efficiency of the fencing structures.

  17. Heating effects on modifying carbon surface by reactive plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, Yori; Katoh, Masaaki; Ohte, Takeo; Ohtani, Sugio; Kojima, Akira; Saitoh, Naoya

    1996-07-01

    In the surface modification by plasma, surface properties changes with time after the plasma treatment. Such changes should be avoided for practical application. Glassy carbon (GC) was subjected to simultaneous plasma and heat treatments in order to investigate the respective effects. Source gases were tetrafluoromethane (CF 4) and oxygen (O 2). Treatment time and heating temperature of the GC plate were 30 min and 200-500°C, respectively. The surface properties before and after plasma treatment were studied with contact angle measurements and ESCA. When the GC was heated at 400°C during CF 4 plasma treatment, the contact angle after plasma treatment was 133° and constant even after 24 h. At 500°C during O 2 plasma treatment, the contact angle after plasma treatment was 0° and constant even after 24 h. It is found that heating carbon surface during CF 4 or O 2 plasma treatment is effective to stop the change with time after plasma treatment.

  18. Disease-modifying effect of etanercept versus sulphasalazine on spinal mobility in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Hendrix, Suzanne; Koenig, Andrew; Li, Wenzhi; Singh, Amitabh

    2013-10-01

    To model the estimated disease-modifying effect of etanercept over sulphasalazine in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. A post hoc analysis of data from the Ankylosing Spondylitis Study Comparing ENbrel and Sulfasalazine Dosed Weekly (ASCEND) study was performed using the Natural History Staggered Start (NHSS) method. A mixed model with a linear effect over time was fitted to the ASCEND data and resampling was performed to generate confidence intervals. At week 16, the total additional improvement in Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index of the etanercept arm over the sulphasalazine arm was 0.62 points, of which 31% (0.19 points) was estimated to be due to disease-modifying effect. The analysis of ASCEND data suggests that etanercept may have a larger disease-modifying effect than sulphasalazine. Further research is needed with more objective measures such as magnetic resonance imaging or X-radiography to confirm these results.

  19. Evaluation of a Modified Italian European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition Food Frequency Questionnaire for Individuals with Celiac Disease.

    PubMed

    Mazzeo, Teresa; Roncoroni, Leda; Lombardo, Vincenza; Tomba, Carolina; Elli, Luca; Sieri, Sabina; Grioni, Sara; Bardella, Maria T; Agostoni, Carlo; Doneda, Luisa; Brighenti, Furio; Pellegrini, Nicoletta

    2016-11-01

    To date, it is unclear whether individuals with celiac disease following a gluten-free (GF) diet for several years have adequate intake of all recommended nutrients. Lack of a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) for individuals with celiac disease could be partly responsible for this still-debated issue. The aim of the study is to evaluate the performance of a modified European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) FFQ in estimating nutrient and food intake in a celiac population. In a cross-sectional study, the dietary habits of individuals with celiac disease were reported using a modified Italian EPIC FFQ and were compared to a 7-day weighed food record as a reference method. A total of 200 individuals with histologically confirmed celiac disease were enrolled in the study between October 2012 and August 2014 at the Center for Prevention and Diagnosis of Celiac Disease (Milan, Italy). Nutrient and food category intake were calculated by 7-day weighed food record using an Italian food database integrated with the nutrient composition of 60 GF foods and the modified EPIC FFQ, in which 24 foods were substituted with GF foods comparable for energy and carbohydrate content. An evaluation of the modified FFQ compared to 7-day weighed food record in assessing the reported intake of nutrient and food groups was conducted using Spearman's correlation coefficients and weighted κ. One hundred individuals completed the study. The Spearman's correlation coefficients of FFQ and 7-day weighed food record ranged from .13 to .73 for nutrients and from .23 to .75 for food groups. A moderate agreement, which was defined as a weighted κ value of .40 to .60, was obtained for 30% of the analyzed nutrients, and 40% of the nutrients showed values between .30 and .40. The weighted κ exceeded .40 for 60% of the 15 analyzed food groups. The modified EPIC FFQ demonstrated moderate congruence with a weighed food record in ranking individuals by dietary intakes

  20. Coffee polyphenols change the expression of STAT5B and ATF-2 modifying cyclin D1 levels in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Oleaga, Carlota; Ciudad, Carlos J; Noé, Véronique; Izquierdo-Pulido, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that coffee consumption reduces the risk of cancer, but the molecular mechanisms of its chemopreventive effects remain unknown. To identify differentially expressed genes upon incubation of HT29 colon cancer cells with instant caffeinated coffee (ICC) or caffeic acid (CA) using whole-genome microarrays. ICC incubation of HT29 cells caused the overexpression of 57 genes and the underexpression of 161, while CA incubation induced the overexpression of 12 genes and the underexpression of 32. Using Venn-Diagrams, we built a list of five overexpressed genes and twelve underexpressed genes in common between the two experimental conditions. This list was used to generate a biological association network in which STAT5B and ATF-2 appeared as highly interconnected nodes. STAT5B overexpression was confirmed at the mRNA and protein levels. For ATF-2, the changes in mRNA levels were confirmed for both ICC and CA, whereas the decrease in protein levels was only observed in CA-treated cells. The levels of cyclin D1, a target gene for both STAT5B and ATF-2, were downregulated by CA in colon cancer cells and by ICC and CA in breast cancer cells. Coffee polyphenols are able to affect cyclin D1 expression in cancer cells through the modulation of STAT5B and ATF-2.

  1. SLC22A3 polymorphisms do not modify pancreatic cancer risk, but may influence overall patient survival

    PubMed Central

    Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice; Strouhal, Ondrej; Hughes, David J.; Holcatova, Ivana; Oliverius, Martin; Kala, Zdenek; Campa, Daniele; Rizzato, Cosmeri; Canzian, Federico; Pezzilli, Raffaele; Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata; Malecka-Panas, Ewa; Sperti, Cosimo; Federico Zambon, Carlo; Pedrazzoli, Sergio; Fogar, Paola; Milanetto, Anna Caterina; Capurso, Gabriele; Delle Fave, Gianfranco; Valente, Roberto; Gazouli, Maria; Malleo, Giuseppe; Teresa Lawlor, Rita; Strobel, Oliver; Hackert, Thilo; Giese, Nathalia; Vodicka, Pavel; Vodickova, Ludmila; Landi, Stefano; Tavano, Francesca; Gioffreda, Domenica; Piepoli, Ada; Pazienza, Valerio; Mambrini, Andrea; Pedata, Mariangela; Cantore, Maurizio; Bambi, Franco; Ermini, Stefano; Funel, Niccola; Lemstrova, Radmila; Soucek, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Expression of the solute carrier (SLC) transporter SLC22A3 gene is associated with overall survival of pancreatic cancer patients. This study tested whether genetic variability in SLC22A3 associates with pancreatic cancer risk and prognosis. Twenty four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) tagging the SLC22A3 gene sequence and regulatory elements were selected for analysis. Of these, 22 were successfully evaluated in the discovery phase while six significant or suggestive variants entered the validation phase, comprising a total study number of 1,518 cases and 3,908 controls. In the discovery phase, rs2504938, rs9364554, and rs2457571 SNPs were significantly associated with pancreatic cancer risk. Moreover, rs7758229 associated with the presence of distant metastases, while rs512077 and rs2504956 correlated with overall survival of patients. Although replicated, the association for rs9364554 did not pass multiple testing corrections in the validation phase. Contrary to the discovery stage, rs2504938 associated with survival in the validation cohort, which was more pronounced in stage IV patients. In conclusion, common variation in the SLC22A3 gene is unlikely to significantly contribute to pancreatic cancer risk. The rs2504938 SNP in SLC22A3 significantly associates with an unfavorable prognosis of pancreatic cancer patients. Further investigation of this SNP effect on the molecular and clinical phenotype is warranted. PMID:28272475

  2. Morphological Effect of Non-targeted Biomolecule-Modified MNPs on Reticuloendothelial System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao; Hu, Yan; Xiao, Jie; Cheng, Dengfeng; Xiu, Yan; Shi, Hongcheng

    2015-09-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) with special morphology were commonly used as biomaterials, while morphological effects of non-targeted biomolecule-modified MNPs on biological behaviors were still unclear. In this research, spherical and rod-like Fe3O4 in a comparable size were synthesized and then surface-modified by bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a model of non-targeted biomolecule-modified MNPs. Morphological effects were featured by TEM and quantification of in vitro phagocytic uptake, as well as the in vivo quantification of particles in reticuloendothelial system (RES)-related organs of normal Kunming mice. For these non-targeted BSA-modified MNPs, intracellular distributions were the same, but the rod-like MNPs were more likely to be uptake by macrophages; furthermore, the BSA-modified MNPs gathered in RES-related organs soon after intravenous injection, but the rod-like ones were expelled from the lung more quickly and expelled from the spleen more slowly. These preliminary results may be referable if MNPs or other similar biomolecule-modified nanoparticles were used.

  3. Morphological Effect of Non-targeted Biomolecule-Modified MNPs on Reticuloendothelial System.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao; Hu, Yan; Xiao, Jie; Cheng, Dengfeng; Xiu, Yan; Shi, Hongcheng

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) with special morphology were commonly used as biomaterials, while morphological effects of non-targeted biomolecule-modified MNPs on biological behaviors were still unclear. In this research, spherical and rod-like Fe3O4 in a comparable size were synthesized and then surface-modified by bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a model of non-targeted biomolecule-modified MNPs. Morphological effects were featured by TEM and quantification of in vitro phagocytic uptake, as well as the in vivo quantification of particles in reticuloendothelial system (RES)-related organs of normal Kunming mice. For these non-targeted BSA-modified MNPs, intracellular distributions were the same, but the rod-like MNPs were more likely to be uptake by macrophages; furthermore, the BSA-modified MNPs gathered in RES-related organs soon after intravenous injection, but the rod-like ones were expelled from the lung more quickly and expelled from the spleen more slowly. These preliminary results may be referable if MNPs or other similar biomolecule-modified nanoparticles were used.

  4. Chemically Modified Bacteriophage as a Streamlined Approach to Noninvasive Breast Cancer Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    represents th (%ID/g). Erro es. coli. All p E. coli TG1 e (a tetracy haking at 3 L of the cu rpm. The at 4 °C. Th f and thoro resulting su nded...this research to include: Manuscript in publication: 1. Carrico, Z . M.*; Farkas, M. E.*; Yu, Z .; Hsiao, S. C.; Marks, J. D.; Chokhawala, H.; Clark...Carrico, Z . M.; Tong, G. J.; Wu, W.; Behrens, C. R.; Gray, J. M.; Francis, M. B. “Chemically Modified Bacteriophage as a Streamlined Approach Toward Non

  5. Effect of accelerated weathering on surface chemistry of modified wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temiz, Ali; Terziev, Nasko; Eikenes, Morten; Hafren, Jonas

    2007-04-01

    In this study, the effects of UV-light irradiation and water spray on colour and surface chemistry of scots pine sapwood samples were investigated. The specimens were treated with chromated copper arsenate (CCA), a metal-free propiconazol-based formulation, chitosan, furfuryl alcohol and linseed and tall oils. The weathering experiment was performed by cycles of 2 h UV-light irradiation followed by water spray for 18 min. The changes at the surface of the weathered samples were characterised by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR); colour characterizations were performed by measuring CIELab parameters. The results show that all treatment methods except chitosan treatment provided lower colour changes than the control groups after 800 h exposure in weathering test cycle, but differences between chitosan and control were also small. The lowest colour changes were found on linseed oil (full cell process) and CCA treated wood. FT-IR results show that oil treatment (linseed and tall oil) decreased the intensities of a lignin specific peak (1500-1515 cm -1). Absorption band changes at 1630-1660 cm -1 were reduced by all treatments.

  6. Many Women Mistaken on 'Side Effects' of Breast Cancer Drug

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Many Women Mistaken on 'Side Effects' of Breast Cancer Drug Study shows that normal symptoms of menopause ... HealthDay News) -- Many women at high risk for breast cancer do not take the drug tamoxifen to prevent ...

  7. Effectiveness of a Modified Rapid Toilet Training Workshop for Parents of Children with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinald, Katherine; Mirenda, Pat

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with developmental disabilities often experience challenges in acquiring toileting skills, which highlights a need for effective toilet training strategies that can be readily disseminated to caregivers. The purpose of this multiple baseline study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a modified rapid toilet training workshop provided…

  8. Assessing the Treatment Effects in Apraxia of Speech: Introduction and Evaluation of the Modified Diadochokinesis Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurkmans, Joost; Jonkers, Roel; Boonstra, Anne M.; Stewart, Roy E.; Reinders-Messelink, Heleen A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The number of reliable and valid instruments to measure the effects of therapy in apraxia of speech (AoS) is limited. Aims: To evaluate the newly developed Modified Diadochokinesis Test (MDT), which is a task to assess the effects of rate and rhythm therapies for AoS in a multiple baseline across behaviours design. Methods: The…

  9. Assessing the Treatment Effects in Apraxia of Speech: Introduction and Evaluation of the Modified Diadochokinesis Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurkmans, Joost; Jonkers, Roel; Boonstra, Anne M.; Stewart, Roy E.; Reinders-Messelink, Heleen A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The number of reliable and valid instruments to measure the effects of therapy in apraxia of speech (AoS) is limited. Aims: To evaluate the newly developed Modified Diadochokinesis Test (MDT), which is a task to assess the effects of rate and rhythm therapies for AoS in a multiple baseline across behaviours design. Methods: The…

  10. Effect of chitosan molecular weight on rheological behavious of chitosan modified nanoclay at highly hydrated state

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Effect of chitosan molecular weight (M(cs)) on the rheological properties of chitosan modified clay (CMCs) at highly hydrated state was investigated. With special emphasis on its effect on the thixotropy of CMCs, the structure recovery at rest after underwent a pre-shearing process was further perfo...

  11. Selective effects of a fiber chimeric conditionally replicative adenovirus armed with hep27 gene on renal cancer cell.

    PubMed

    Fang, Lin; Cheng, Qian; Liu, Wenshun; Zhang, Jie; Ge, Yan; Zhang, Qi; Li, Liantao; Liu, Junjie; Zheng, Junnian

    2016-06-02

    ASBTARCT Adenoviruses mediated cancer gene therapies are widely investigated and show a promising effect on cancer treatment. However, efficient gene transfer varies among different cancer cell lines based on the expression of coxsakie adenovirus receptor (CAR). Hep27, a member of dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) family, can bind to Mdm2, resulting in the attenuation of Mdm2-mediated p53 degradation. Here we constructed a fiber chimeric adenovirus carrying hep27 gene (F5/35-ZD55-Hep27), in which the fiber protein of 5-serotype adenovirus (Ad5) was substituted by that of 35-serotype adenovirus (Ad35), aiming to facilitate the infection for renal cancer cells and develop the role of hep27 in cancer therapy. We evaluated the CAR and CD46 (a membrane cofactor protein for Ad35) expression in four kinds of renal cancer cells and assessed the relationship between receptors and infection efficiency. 5/35 fiber-modified adenovirus had a much promising infectivity compared with Ad5-based vector in renal cancer cells. F5/35-ZD55-Hep27 had enhanced antitumor activity against human renal cancer cells compared to the other groups. Further, hep27 mediated p53 and cleaved-PARP upregulation and mdm2 downregulation was involved and caused increased apoptosis. Moreover, F5/35-ZD55-Hep27 significantly suppressed tumor growth in subcutaneous renal cancer cell xenograft models. Our data demonstrated that 5/35 fiber-modified adenovirus F5/35-ZD55-Hep27 transferred into renal cancers efficiently and increased p53 to induce cancer cell apoptosis. Thus 5/35 fiber-modified adenoviral vector F5/35-ZD55-Hep27 might a promising vector and antitumor reagent for renal cancer gene therapy.

  12. New Strategies in Engineering T-Cell Receptor Gene-Modified T Cells to More Effectively Target Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Thomas M.; Stromnes, Ingunn M.; Chapuis, Aude G.; Greenberg, Philip D.

    2016-01-01

    The immune system, and T cells in particular, have the ability to target and destroy malignant cells. However, anti-tumor immune responses induced from the endogenous T cell repertoire are often insufficient for the eradication of established tumors, as illustrated by the failure of cancer vaccination strategies or checkpoint blockade for most tumors. Genetic modification of T cells to express a defined T cell receptor (TCR) can provide the means to rapidly generate large numbers of tumor-reactive T cells capable of targeting tumor cells in vivo. However, cell-intrinsic factors as well as immunosuppressive factors in the tumor microenvironment can limit the function of such gene-modified T cells. New strategies currently being developed are refining and enhancing this approach, resulting in cellular therapies that more effectively target tumors and that are less susceptible to tumor immune-evasion. PMID:26463711

  13. AGE-modified basement membrane cooperates with Endo180 to promote epithelial cell invasiveness and decrease prostate cancer survival.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Teja, Mercedes; Gronau, Julian H; Breit, Claudia; Zhang, Yu Zhi; Minamidate, Ai; Caley, Matthew P; McCarthy, Afshan; Cox, Thomas R; Erler, Janine T; Gaughan, Luke; Darby, Steven; Robson, Craig; Mauri, Francesco; Waxman, Jonathan; Sturge, Justin

    2015-03-01

    Biomechanical strain imposed by age-related thickening of the basal lamina and augmented tissue stiffness in the prostate gland coincides with increased cancer risk. Here we hypothesized that the structural alterations in the basal lamina associated with age can induce mechanotransduction pathways in prostate epithelial cells (PECs) to promote invasiveness and cancer progression. To demonstrate this, we developed a 3D model of PEC acini in which thickening and stiffening of basal lamina matrix was induced by advanced glycation end-product (AGE)-dependent non-enzymatic crosslinking of its major components, collagen IV and laminin. We used this model to demonstrate that antibody targeted blockade of CTLD2, the second of eight C-type lectin-like domains in Endo180 (CD280, CLEC13E, KIAA0709, MRC2, TEM9, uPARAP) that can recognize glycosylated collagens, reversed actinomyosin-based contractility [myosin-light chain-2 (MLC2) phosphorylation], loss of cell polarity, loss of cell-cell junctions, luminal infiltration and basal invasion induced by AGE-modified basal lamina matrix in PEC acini. Our in vitro results were concordant with luminal occlusion of acini in the prostate glands of adult Endo180(Δ) (Ex2-6/) (Δ) (Ex2-6) mice, with constitutively exposed CTLD2 and decreased survival of men with early (non-invasive) prostate cancer with high epithelial Endo180 expression and levels of AGE. These findings indicate that AGE-dependent modification of the basal lamina induces invasive behaviour in non-transformed PECs via a molecular mechanism linked to cancer progression. This study provides a rationale for targeting CTLD2 in Endo180 in prostate cancer and other pathologies in which increased basal lamina thickness and tissue stiffness are driving factors. © 2014 The Authors. The Journal of Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. © 2014 The Authors. The Journal of Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons

  14. Effect of type and loading of surface-modifying agent on mechanical properties of modified geothermal scale powder/stereolithography polymer composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilendo, A. C.; Pajarito, B. B.

    2017-05-01

    This study investigated the effect of stearic acid (SA), glycerol monostearate (GMS) and 3-trimethoxysilylpropyl methacrylate (TSPM) at varied loadings on the hardness and flexural properties of modified geothermal scale powder (GSP)/stereolithography (SLA) polymer composite. TSPM-modified GSP/SLA composite has the highest value of hardness due to increased filler dispersion and crystallinity. Hardness of GSP/SLA composite increases with loading of surface-modifying agent due to increase filler dispersion. Pronounced effect of surface modification to flexural modulus is observed. While low loading of SA and GMS leads to reduction of flexural modulus, increasing loading enhances the said property. Further increase of SA deteriorates the property. TSPM-modified GSP enhances the modulus due to increased crystalline phase of the system owing to TSPM copolymerization. Likewise, addition of SA and GMS increases flexural strength due to efficient reduction of filler agglomerates. However, unreacted TSPM produces weak interfaces and poor adhesion between GSP and SLA matrix.

  15. pH-Sensitive Delivery Vehicle Based on Folic Acid-Conjugated Polydopamine-Modified Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles for Targeted Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wei; Nie, Junpeng; Xu, Lv; Liang, Chaoyu; Peng, Yunmei; Liu, Gan; Wang, Teng; Mei, Lin; Huang, Laiqiang; Zeng, Xiaowei

    2017-06-07

    In this study, we introduced a targeting polymer poly(ethylene glycol)-folic acid (PEG-FA) on the surface of polydopamine (PDA)-modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) to develop the novel nanoparticles (NPs) MSNs@PDA-PEG-FA, which were employed as a drug delivery system loaded with doxorubicin (DOX) as a model drug for cervical cancer therapy. The chemical structure and properties of these NPs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, N2 adsorption/desorption, dynamic light scattering-autosizer, thermogravimetric analysis, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The pH-sensitive PDA coating served as a gatekeeper. The in vitro drug release experiments showed pH-dependent and sustained drug release profiles that could enhance the therapeutic anticancer effect and minimize potential damage to normal cells due to the acidic microenvironment of the tumor. These MSNs@PDA-PEG-FA achieved significantly high targeting efficiency, which was demonstrated by the in vitro cellular uptake and cellular targeting assay. Compared with that of free DOX and DOX-loaded NPs without the folic targeting ligand, the FA-targeted NPs exhibited higher antitumor efficacy in vivo, implying that they are a highly promising potential carrier for cancer treatments.

  16. Efficient CD44-targeted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of breast cancer cells using hyaluronic acid (HA)-modified MnFe2O4 nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taeksu; Lim, Eun-Kyung; Lee, Jaemin; Kang, Byunghoon; Choi, Jihye; Park, Hyo Seon; Suh, Jin-Suck; Huh, Yong-Min; Haam, Seungjoo

    2013-04-01

    Targeted molecular imaging with hyaluronic acid (HA) has been highlighted in the diagnosis and treatment of CD44-overexpressing cancer. CD44, a receptor for HA, is closely related to the growth of cancer including proliferation, metastasis, invasion, and angiogenesis. For the efficient detection of CD44, we fabricated a few kinds of HA-modified MnFe2O4 nanocrystals (MNCs) to serve as specific magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agents (HA-MRCAs) and compared physicochemical properties, biocompatibility, and the CD44 targeting efficiency. Hydrophobic MNCs were efficiently phase-transferred using aminated polysorbate 80 (P80) synthesized by introducing spermine molecules on the hydroxyl groups of P80. Subsequently, a few kinds of HA-MRCAs were fabricated, conjugating different ratios of HA on the equal amount of phase-transferred MNCs. The optimized conjugation ratio of HA against magnetic content was identified to exhibit not only effective CD44 finding ability but also high cell viability through in vitro experiments. The results of this study demonstrate that the suggested HA-MRCA shows strong potential to be used for accurate tumor diagnosis.

  17. Newton's second law versus modified-inertia MOND: A test using the high-latitude effect

    SciTech Connect

    Ignatiev, A. Yu.

    2008-05-15

    The modified-inertia MOND is an approach that proposes a change in Newton's second law at small accelerations as an alternative to dark matter. Recently it was suggested that this approach can be tested in terrestrial laboratory experiments. One way of doing the test is based on the static high-latitude equinox modified-inertia effect: around each equinox date, 2 spots emerge on the Earth where static bodies experience spontaneous displacement due to the violation of Newton's second law required by the modified-inertia MOND. Here, a detailed theory of this effect is developed and estimates of the magnitude of the signal due to the effect are obtained. The expected displacement of a mirror in a gravitational-wave interferometer is found to be about 10{sup -14} m. Some experimental aspects of the proposal are discussed.

  18. Newton's second law versus modified-inertia MOND: A test using the high-latitude effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatiev, A. Yu.

    2008-05-01

    The modified-inertia MOND is an approach that proposes a change in Newton’s second law at small accelerations as an alternative to dark matter. Recently it was suggested that this approach can be tested in terrestrial laboratory experiments. One way of doing the test is based on the static high-latitude equinox modified-inertia effect: around each equinox date, 2 spots emerge on the Earth where static bodies experience spontaneous displacement due to the violation of Newton’s second law required by the modified-inertia MOND. Here, a detailed theory of this effect is developed and estimates of the magnitude of the signal due to the effect are obtained. The expected displacement of a mirror in a gravitational-wave interferometer is found to be about 10-14m. Some experimental aspects of the proposal are discussed.

  19. Physical long-term side-effects in young adult cancer survivors: germ cell tumors model.

    PubMed

    Kourie, Hampig Raphael; Klastersky, Jean A

    2017-07-01

    After the important advances in the treatment of germ cell tumors (GCTs) leading to high cure rates, physical long-term side-effects represent an important cause of death in these young adult survivors. Highlighting these physical long-term side-effects, their monitoring and their prevention modalities is necessary for a better management of these cancer survivors. Impaired fertility, increased risk of developing a second cancer, cardiac, pulmonary, renal and neural toxicity, hearing and vision impairment are the major physical side-effects in young adult cancer survivors. Long-term cardiac toxicity, next to second malignancies, represents life-threatening conditions in testicular cancer survivors. The long-term nephrotoxity in testicular GCTs survivors is most frequently associated to the treatment either in those treated with cisplatin-based chemotherapy, mainly Bleomycine, Etoposide, Cisplatin, or those receiving infradiaphragmatic radiation therapy, whereas pulmonary toxicity is mainly attributed to bleomycin related toxicities. There are no clear and comprehensive data concerning the monitoring and prevention of long-term side-effects in testicular cancer survivors. Physical activity and interventions in modifiable cardiovascular risk factors and lifestyles may reduce the incidence of long-term side-effects in these cancer survivors.

  20. Anti-cancer effect of lactic acid bacteria expressing antioxidant enzymes or IL-10 in a colorectal cancer mouse model.

    PubMed

    Del Carmen, Silvina; de Moreno de LeBlanc, Alejandra; Levit, Romina; Azevedo, Vasco; Langella, Philippe; Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G; LeBlanc, Jean Guy

    2017-01-01

    The association between inflammatory bowel diseases and colorectal cancer is well documented. The genetic modification of lactic acid bacteria as a tool to increase the anti-inflammatory potential of these microorganisms has also been demonstrated. Thus the aim of the present work was to evaluate the anti-cancer potential of different genetically modified lactic acid bacteria (GM-LAB) producing antioxidant enzymes (catalase or superoxide dismutase) or the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 (protein or DNA delivery) using a chemical induced colon cancer murine model. Dimethilhydrazine was used to induce colorectal cancer in mice. The animals received GM-LAB producing anti-oxidant enzymes, IL-10 or a mixture of different GM-LAB. Intestinal damage, enzyme activities and cytokines were evaluated and compared to the results obtained from mice that received the wild type strains from which derived the GM-LAB. All the GM-LAB assayed showed beneficial effects against colon cancer even though they exerted different mechanisms of action. The importance to select LAB with innate beneficial properties as the progenitor strain was demonstrated with the GM-LAB producing anti-oxidant enzymes. In addition, the best effects for the mixtures GM-LAB that combine different anti-inflammatory mechanism. Results indicate that mixtures of selected LAB and GM-LAB could be used as an adjunct treatment to decrease the inflammatory harmful environment associated to colorectal cancer, especially for patients with chronic intestinal inflammation who have an increased risk to develop colorectal cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Potentiation of pH-sensitive polymer-modified liposomes with cationic lipid inclusion as antigen delivery carriers for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yoshizaki, Yuta; Yuba, Eiji; Sakaguchi, Naoki; Koiwai, Kazunori; Harada, Atsushi; Kono, Kenji

    2014-09-01

    Cationic lipid-incorporated liposomes modified with pH-sensitive polymers were prepared by introducing 3, 5-didodecyloxybenzamidine as a cationic lipid to egg yolk phosphatidylcholine liposomes modified with 3-methylglutarylated hyperbranched poly(glycidol) (MGlu-HPG) as a pH-sensitive polymer. These liposomes were stable at neutral pH, but were destabilized below pH 6.0 because MGlu-HPG changed its characteristics from hydrophilic to hydrophobic in response to the pH decrease. Cationic lipid inclusion improved their pH sensitivity at weakly acidic pH and association of liposomes with murine dendritic cell (DC) lines. Cationic lipid-incorporated liposomes delivered entrapped ovalbumin (OVA) molecules not only to cytosol but also to endosome/lysosome. Treatment with cationic lipid-incorporated liposomes induced up-regulation of antigen presentation-involved molecules on DCs, the promotion of cytokine production, and antigen presentation via both major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II molecules. Especially, antigen presentation via MHC class II was promoted by cationic lipid inclusion, which might correspond to efficient endosome/lysosome delivery of OVA. Subcutaneous administration of OVA-loaded cationic lipid-incorporated liposomes induced antigen-specific antibody production in serum and Th1-dominant immune responses in the spleen. Furthermore, administration of the cationic lipid-incorporated liposomes to mice bearing E.G7-OVA tumor more significantly reduced the tumor volume than liposomes without cationic lipids. Therefore, cationic lipid inclusion into pH-sensitive polymer-modified liposomes, which can achieve both efficient antigen intracellular delivery and activation of antigen presenting cell, is an effective approach to develop antigen carriers for efficient cancer immunotherapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Optimization of Landscape Phage Fusion Protein-Modified Polymeric PEG-PE Micelles for Improved Breast Cancer Cell Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Petrenko, Valery A.; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2015-01-01

    Amphiphilic landscape phage fusion proteins with high affinity and selectivity towards breast cancer MCF-7 (Michigan Cancer Foundation-7) cells self-assemble with polymeric PEG-PE conjugates to form mixed micelles (phage-micelles) capable of cancer cell-targeted delivery of poorly-soluble drugs. While the PEG corona provides the stability and longevity to the micelles, its presence is a potential steric difficulties for the interaction of phage fusion protein with cell surface targets. We attempted to address this problem by controlling the length of the PEG block and the phage fusion protein quantity, selecting the optimal ones to produce a reasonable retention of the targeting affinity and selectivity of the MCF-7-specific phage fusion protein. Three PEG-PE conjugates with different PEG lengths were used to construct phage- and plain-micelles, followed by FACS analysis of the effect of the PEG length on their binding affinity and selectivity towards target MCF-7 cells using either a MCF-7 cell monoculture or a cell co-culture model composed of target cancer MCF-7 cells and non-target, non-cancer C166 cells expressing GFP (Green Fluorescent Protein). Both, the length of PEG and quantity of phage fusion protein had a profound impact on the targetability of the phage-micelles. Phage-micelles prepared with PEG2k-PE achieved a desirable binding affinity and selectivity. Incorporation of a minimal concentration of phage protein, up to 0.5%, produced maximal targeting efficiency towards MCF-7 cells. Overall, phage-micelles with PEG2k-PE and 0.5% of phage protein represent the optimal formulation for targeting towards breast cancer cells. PMID:26451274

  3. Docetaxel (DTX)-loaded polydopamine-modified TPGS-PLA nanoparticles as a targeted drug delivery system for the treatment of liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dunwan; Tao, Wei; Zhang, Hongling; Liu, Gan; Wang, Teng; Zhang, Linhua; Zeng, Xiaowei; Mei, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Polydopamine-based surface modification is a simple way to functionalize polymeric nanoparticle (NP) surfaces with ligands and/or additional polymeric layers. In this work, we developed DTX-loaded formulations using polydopamine-modified NPs synthesized using D-α-tocopherol polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate-poly(lactide) (pD-TPGS-PLA/NPs). To target liver cancer cells, galactosamine was conjugated on the prepared NPs (Gal-pD-TPGS-PLA/NPs) to enhance the delivery of DTX via ligand-mediated endocytosis. The size and morphology of pD-TPGS-PLA/NPs and Gal-pD-TPGS-PLA/NPs changed obviously compared with TPGS-PLA/NPs. In vitro studies showed that TPGS-PLA/NPs, pD-TPGS-PLA/NPs and Gal-pD-TPGS-PLA/NPs had similar release profiles of DTX. Both confocal laser scanning microscopy and flow cytometric results showed that coumarin 6-loaded Gal-pD-TPGS-PLA/NPs had the highest cellular uptake efficiency in liver cancer cell line HepG2. Moreover, DTX-loaded Gal-pD-TPGS-PLA/NPs inhibited the growth of HepG2 cells more potently than TPGS-PLA/NPs, pD-TPGS-PLA/NPs, and a clinically available DTX formulation (Taxotere®). The in vivo biodistribution experiments show that the Gal-pD-TPGS-PLA/NPs are specifically targeted to the tumor. Furthermore, the in vivo anti-tumor effects study showed that injecting DTX-loaded Gal-pD-TPGS-PLA/NPs reduced the tumor size most significantly on hepatoma-bearing nude mice. These results suggest that Gal-pD-TPGS-PLA/NPs prepared in the study specifically interacted with the hepatocellular carcinoma cells through ligand-receptor recognition and they may be used as a potentially eligible drug delivery system targeting liver cancers. Polydopamine-based surface modification is a simple way to functionalize polymeric nanoparticle surfaces with ligands and/or additional polymeric layers. In this work, we developed docetaxel (DTX)-loaded formulations using polydopamine-modified NPs synthesized from D-α-tocopherol polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate

  4. Effectiveness of a modified administration protocol for the medical treatment of canine pyometra.

    PubMed

    Contri, Alberto; Gloria, Alessia; Carluccio, Augusto; Pantaleo, Stefania; Robbe, Domenico

    2015-03-01

    Pyometra is one of the most common diseases in intact bitches. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a modified aglepristone protocol for the medical treatment of pyometra in the bitch. Of these, 73 bitches affected by pyometra of different breeds and age (2-14 years old) were enrolled. They were randomly assigned to a control group (CTG - 26 bitches) treated with classical protocol (aglepristone at 0, 1 and 6 days - day 0 = day of the diagnosis) and a modified treated group (MTG - 47 bitches) treated with a different administration protocol (aglepristone at 0, 2, 5 and 8 days). The classical protocol with the anti-progestagen aglepristone was effective in 88.5 % (23/26) of CTG bitches while the modified protocol was effective in all (47/47) of MTG bitches. One of the 23 CTG bitches received a further administration on day 14, which resolved the pyometra, while in the three cases of CTG bitches, in which the treatment was ineffective, an ovariohysterectomy was carried out. The modified protocol showed a success rate of 100 %, compared with the classical protocol proposed in the literature, and no recurrence of the disease was recorded in the 24 months follow up. After treatment, the oestrus onset was earlier than expected (interoestrus of 128 ± 32 days). In this study, the modified treatment protocol showed high efficacy and lack of recurrence within 24 months, suggesting a complete recovery of reproductive function in the bitch, with a normal fertility.

  5. The effect of modified cervical exercise on smartphone users with forward head posture.

    PubMed

    Kong, Yong-Soo; Kim, Yu-Mi; Shim, Je-Myung

    2017-02-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of modified cervical exercise and determine whether such exercise improves the range of motion of the cervical movement in smartphone users with forward head posture. [Subjects and Methods] Some 32 subjects with forward head posture participated in this study. They were randomly allocated to three groups, and the modified cervical exercises were performed either once, twice, or three times per day. The exercise program was followed for four weeks and then the joint range of motion of the participants was measured. [Results] A significantly increased range of motion was seen in all three groups that performed the modified cervical exercises. The analysis of the effects among the three groups indicated that the greatest effect was seen in Group C, members of which performed the modified exercises three times per day. In addition, a significant difference was found between Group A and Group C in terms of the inter-group results. [Conclusion] According to the results of this study, although the modified cervical exercises were performed for only a relatively short duration (four weeks), the exercises brought about an improvement in the forward head posture that was induced by using a smartphone.

  6. The effect of modified cervical exercise on smartphone users with forward head posture

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Yong- Soo; Kim, Yu- Mi; Shim, Je-myung

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of modified cervical exercise and determine whether such exercise improves the range of motion of the cervical movement in smartphone users with forward head posture. [Subjects and Methods] Some 32 subjects with forward head posture participated in this study. They were randomly allocated to three groups, and the modified cervical exercises were performed either once, twice, or three times per day. The exercise program was followed for four weeks and then the joint range of motion of the participants was measured. [Results] A significantly increased range of motion was seen in all three groups that performed the modified cervical exercises. The analysis of the effects among the three groups indicated that the greatest effect was seen in Group C, members of which performed the modified exercises three times per day. In addition, a significant difference was found between Group A and Group C in terms of the inter-group results. [Conclusion] According to the results of this study, although the modified cervical exercises were performed for only a relatively short duration (four weeks), the exercises brought about an improvement in the forward head posture that was induced by using a smartphone. PMID:28265167

  7. Understanding and predicting effects of modified interactions through a qualitative analysis of community structure.

    PubMed

    Dambacher, Jeffrey M; Ramos-Jiliberto, Rodrigo

    2007-09-01

    Models of ecological communities are traditionally based on relationships between pairs of species, where the strengths of per capita interactions are fixed and independent of population abundance. A growing body of literature, however; describes interactions whose strength is modified by the density of either a third species or by one of the species involved in a pairwise interaction. These modified interactions have been treated as indirect effects, and the terminology addressing them is diverse and overlapping. In this paper we develop a general analytical framework based on a qualitative analysis of community structure to account for the consequence of modified interactions in complex ecological communities. Modified interactions are found to create both direct and indirect effects between species. The sign of a direct effect can change in some instances depending on the magnitude of a key variable or parameter, which leads to a threshold change in system structure and dynamics. By considering alternative structures of a community, we extend our ability to model perturbations that move the system far from a previous equilibrium. Using specific examples, we reinterpret existing results, develop hypotheses to guide experiments or management interventions, and explore the role of modified interactions and positive feedback in creating and maintaining alternative stable states. Through a qualitative analysis of community structure, system feedback is demonstrated as being key in understanding and predicting the dynamics of complex ecological communities.

  8. Hardness and incipient plasticity in silicate glasses: Origin of the mixed modifier effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjeldsen, Jonas; Smedskjaer, Morten M.; Mauro, John C.; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2014-02-01

    The scaling of Vickers hardness (Hv) in oxide glasses with varying network modifier/modifier ratio is manifested as either a positive or negative deviation from linearity with a maximum deviation at the ratio of about 1:1. In an earlier study [J. Kjeldsen et al., J. Non-Cryst. Solids 369, 61 (2013)], we observed a minimum of Hv in CaO/MgO sodium aluminosilicate glasses at CaO/MgO = 1:1 and postulated that this minimum is linked to a maximum in plastic flow. However, the origin of this link has not been experimentally verified. In this work, we attempt to do so by exploring the links among Hv, volume recovery ratio (VR) and plastic deformation volume (VP) under indentation, glass transition temperature (Tg), Young's modulus (E), and liquid fragility index (m) in CaO/MgO and CaO/Li2O sodium aluminosilicate glasses. We confirm the negative deviations from linearity and find that the maximum deviation (i.e., the so-called mixed modifier effect) of Hv, Tg, and m is at the modifier ratio of 1:1. These deviations increase in intensity as the total modifier concentration increases. We find a strong correlation between VP and Hv for the CaO/MgO series, implying that the minimum in Hv originates primarily from an increased shear flow in the mixed modifier glasses.

  9. Effect of heat treatment on the corrosion resistance of modified aluminum-magnesium alloys in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Z.; Aleem, A.

    1993-10-01

    Study of modified Al-2.5Mg alloys containing chromium, silica, iron, and manganese in various tempers (O, H-18, T-4, T-6, T-18, and H-34) has shown that their corrosion resistance is significantly altered by thermomechanical treatment and the beneficial effect of chromium on microstructural changes. Modified binary Al-2.5Mg alloys in the T-6 and T-4 tempers exhibit a higher resistance to corrosion in Arabian Gulf water than H-34 tempers due to the beneficial effect of chromium on microstructural changes.

  10. Biological response modifiers

    SciTech Connect