Science.gov

Sample records for cancer effects modified

  1. Cigarette smoking and endometrial cancer risk: the modifying effect of obesity.

    PubMed

    Polesel, Jerry; Serraino, Diego; Zucchetto, Antonella; Lucenteforte, Ersilia; Dal Maso, Luigino; Levi, Fabio; Negri, Eva; Montella, Maurizio; Franceschi, Silvia; Talamini, Renato; La Vecchia, Carlo

    2009-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between cigarette smoking and endometrial cancer risk by investigating potential modifying effects of menopausal status, obesity, and exogenous hormones. We pooled data from three case-control studies with the same study design conducted in Italy and Switzerland between 1982 and 2006. Overall, 1446 incident endometrial cancers and 4076 hospital controls were enrolled. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using logistic regression models, conditioned on study and centre, and adjusted for age, period of interview, age at menarche, parity, and body mass index. In comparison with never smokers, current smokers showed reduced endometrial cancer risk (OR: 0.80; 95% CI: 0.66-0.96), with a 28% decrease in risk for smoking ≥ 20 cigarettes/day. The association did not vary according to menopausal status, oral contraceptive use, or hormone replacement therapy. However, heterogeneity emerged according to body mass index among postmenopausal women, with obese women showing the greatest risk reduction for current smoking (OR: 0.47; 95% CI: 0.27-0.81). In postmenopausal women, obesity turned out to be an important modifier of the association between cigarette smoking and the risk of endometrial cancer. This finding calls for caution in interpreting the favorable effects of cigarette smoking, considering the toxic and carcinogenic effects of tobacco.

  2. Genetic Modifiers of Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    cancer suggesting the presence of genetic modifiers of ovarian cancer in this population. A genome wide association study ( GWAS ) for ovarian cancer...cancer and 1,000 age-matched unaffected BRCA1 carriers. As outlined in detail in our previous annual report, we recently conducted a GWAS of BRCA1...between ovarian cancer risk and SNPs implicated in Aim 1 by genotyping 1,500 BRCA1 ovarian cancer cases and 1,500 unaffected BRCA1 carriers. GWAS

  3. Studies demonstrate modified T cells effective in treating blood-borne cancers

    Cancer.gov

    At the 2013 American Society of Hematology meeting in Dec. 2013, James Kochenderfer, M.D., NCI, presented findings from two clinical trials evaluating the use of genetically modified immune system T cells as cancer therapy. These reports represent import

  4. Effects of newspaper coverage on public knowledge about modifiable cancer risks.

    PubMed

    Stryker, Jo Ellen; Moriarty, Cortney M; Jensen, Jakob D

    2008-07-01

    This study explores the relationship between cancer newspaper coverage and public knowledge about cancer prevention, confirming self-reported associations between news exposure and cancer prevention knowledge with descriptions of newspaper coverage of modifiable cancer risks. Content analyses (N = 954) revealed that newspapers pay relatively little attention to cancer prevention. However, there is greater newspaper attention to tobacco and diet than to exercise, sun, and alcohol. Survey analysis (the National Cancer Institute's Health Information National Trends Survey) revealed that after controlling for differences based on gender, race, age, income, and education, attention to health news was significantly associated with knowledge about cancer risks associated with food and smoking but not for knowledge about exercise, sun, or alcohol. These findings conform to the findings of the content analysis data and provide a validation of a self-reported measure of media exposure, as well as evidence suggesting a threshold below which news coverage may not generate public knowledge about cancer prevention.

  5. Genetic Modifiers of Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    association study ( GWAS ) for ovarian cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers was initiated in an effort to identify common genetic variants that modify... GWAS of 1250 BRCA1 mutation carriers diagnosed with breast cancer and 1250 unaffected BRCA1 carriers using Human660W-Quad arrays. The 1250 unaffected...cancer on H uman660W-Quad arrays. In addition we acquired GWAS genotype data for 120 additional BRCA1 mutation carriers affected with ovarian

  6. Bioinspired phosphorylcholine-modified polyplexes as an effective strategy for selective uptake and transfection of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lina; Wang, Haibo; Zhang, Yuanfeng; Wang, Youxiang; Hu, Qiaoling; Ji, Jian

    2013-11-01

    We demonstrated here that the phosphorylcholine-modified polyplexes can be explored as effective gene vector for selective uptake and high transfection of cancer cells. 12-acryloyloxy dodecyl phosphorylcholine modified polyethyleneimine (PEI-ADPC) with grafting level about 13%, 8.3% and 4.5% was successfully synthesized. Gel retardation assay indicated that ADPC modification did not affect the DNA condensation ability. The PEI-ADPC13%/DNA and PEI-ADPC8.3%/DNA polyplexes were under 100nm with a beneficial neutral surface at N/P ratio of 30. Sufficient ADPC shell endowed the polyplexes with high colloidal stability and low cytotoxicity. Compared to PEGylated polyplexes, it was interesting to find out that the PEI-ADPC/DNA polyplexes were selectively uptaked by liver cancer HepG2 cells. At the presence of chloroquine to exclude the limitation of lysosome escape, the ADPC-modified polyplexes showed more effective gene transfection in cancer cells than in normal cells because of the selective cell uptake. In conclusion, the convenient PC-modification modality was found to have both the function of biostability in the physiological environment and targetability toward cancer cells uniquely, which might have great potential use in cancer gene therapy.

  7. Relevant reduction effect with a modified thermoplastic mask of rotational error for glottic cancer in IMRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jae Hong; Jung, Joo-Young; Cho, Kwang Hwan; Ryu, Mi Ryeong; Bae, Sun Hyun; Moon, Seong Kwon; Kim, Yong Ho; Choe, Bo-Young; Suh, Tae Suk

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the glottis rotational error (GRE) by using a thermoplastic mask for patients with the glottic cancer undergoing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). We selected 20 patients with glottic cancer who had received IMRT by using the tomotherapy. The image modalities with both kilovoltage computed tomography (planning kVCT) and megavoltage CT (daily MVCT) images were used for evaluating the error. Six anatomical landmarks in the image were defined to evaluate a correlation between the absolute GRE (°) and the length of contact with the underlying skin of the patient by the mask (mask, mm). We also statistically analyzed the results by using the Pearson's correlation coefficient and a linear regression analysis ( P <0.05). The mask and the absolute GRE were verified to have a statistical correlation ( P < 0.01). We found a statistical significance for each parameter in the linear regression analysis (mask versus absolute roll: P = 0.004 [ P < 0.05]; mask versus 3D-error: P = 0.000 [ P < 0.05]). The range of the 3D-errors with contact by the mask was from 1.2% - 39.7% between the maximumand no-contact case in this study. A thermoplastic mask with a tight, increased contact area may possibly contribute to the uncertainty of the reproducibility as a variation of the absolute GRE. Thus, we suggest that a modified mask, such as one that covers only the glottis area, can significantly reduce the patients' setup errors during the treatment.

  8. Biological Response Modifiers in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Reang, Purabi; Gupta, Madhur; Kohli, Kamlesh

    2006-01-01

    We have seen a surge in the use of immunotherapy for the treatment of cancer. Biological response modifiers can act passively by enhancing the immunologic response to tumor cells or actively by altering the differentiation/growth of tumor cells. Active immunotherapy with cytokines such as interferons (IFNs) and interleukins (IL-2) is a form of nonspecific active immune stimulation. The use of IL-2 has recently been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma and metastatic colorectal cancer. Considerable success has been achieved with the use of immunotherapy, especially in the area of passive immunotherapy using monoclonal antibodies – in particular, radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies. In addition to the various monoclonal antibodies that have been used in clinical trials, other strategies such as the use of antiangiogenic agents and matrix metalloprotease inhibitors (MMPIs) have also met with some success. Recently, the FDA approved bevacizumab, an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) agent, for the treatment of metastatic melanoma. This review also sheds light on the various angiogenesis inhibitors in clinical trials, the increasing use of thalidomide in cancer, and the upcoming potential cancer vaccines designed to activate cell-mediated immune responses against tumor antigens. PMID:17415315

  9. High fat mixed lipid diet modifies protective effects of exercise on 1,2 dimethylhydrazine induced colon cancer in rats.

    PubMed

    Perše, M; Injac, R; Štrukelj, B; Cerar, A

    2012-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of long-term swimming exercise in conjunction with a high fat mixed lipid (HFML) diet on colon cancer (CC) development and lipid peroxidation in the large bowel. We used forty male Wistar rats, which were randomly divided into one control group and four cancer groups: sedentary and swimming groups fed a standard diet (LFCO) and sedentary and swimming groups fed an HFML diet. Corticosterone was determined during the experiment. After 6 months of swimming, the rats were sacrificed and blood, heart, liver, muscle and large bowel were taken for determining the activity of serum enzymes, antioxidant capacity and CC development. The results demonstrate that exercise has a protective role in CC development. Attenuated development of CC and increased levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) in the large bowel of exercised rats show that one of the protective effects of exercise on developing CC is induction of oxidative stress. However, in terms of the combined effects of dietary fat and exercise, our results indicate that the protective role of exercise on CC development is significantly depressed by an HFML diet. An HFML diet significantly reduced the protective influence of exercise on colon carcinogenesis in rats and affected the degree of peroxidation in the large bowel during exercise, as well as concentrations of serum enzymes (LDH, α-HBDH, CK, ALT and AST). Our results indicate that an HFML diet, which reflects the composition of a Western style diet, is a significant modifier of the protective effects of exercise on CC development in rats.

  10. Biological Response Modifier in Cancer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ronghua; Luo, Feifei; Liu, Xiaoming; Wang, Luman; Yang, Jiao; Deng, Yuting; Huang, Enyu; Qian, Jiawen; Lu, Zhou; Jiang, Xuechao; Zhang, Dan; Chu, Yiwei

    2016-01-01

    Biological response modifiers (BRMs) emerge as a lay of new compounds or approaches used in improving cancer immunotherapy. Evidences highlight that cytokines, Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, and noncoding RNAs are of crucial roles in modulating antitumor immune response and cancer-related chronic inflammation, and BRMs based on them have been explored. In particular, besides some cytokines like IFN-α and IL-2, several Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists like BCG, MPL, and imiquimod are also licensed to be used in patients with several malignancies nowadays, and the first artificial small noncoding RNA (microRNA) mimic, MXR34, has entered phase I clinical study against liver cancer, implying their potential application in cancer therapy. According to amounts of original data, this chapter will review the regulatory roles of TLR signaling, some noncoding RNAs, and several key cytokines in cancer and cancer-related immune response, as well as the clinical cases in cancer therapy based on them.

  11. The modifying effect of patient location on stage-specific survival following colorectal cancer using geosurvival models.

    PubMed

    Chien, Lung-Chang; Schootman, Mario; Pruitt, Sandi L

    2013-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third leading cause of cancer death in the US, and stage at diagnosis is the primary prognostic factor. To date, the interplay between geographic place and individual characteristics such as cancer stage with CRC survival is unexplored. We used a Bayesian geosurvival statistical model to evaluate whether the spatial patterns of CRC survival at the census tract level varies by stage at diagnosis (in situ/local, regional, distant), controlling for patient characteristics, surveillance test use, and treatment using linked 1991-2005 SEER-Medicare data of patients ≥ 66 years old in two US metropolitan areas. The spatial pattern of survival varied by stage at diagnosis for both cancer sites and registries. Significant spatial effects were identified in all census tracts for colon cancer and the majority of census tracts for rectal cancer. Geographic disparities appeared to be highest for distant-stage rectal cancer. Compared to those with in situ/local stage in the same census tracts, patients with distant-stage cancer were at most 7.73 times and 4.69 times more likely to die of colon and rectal cancer, respectively. Moreover, frailty areas for CRC at in situ/local stage more likely have a higher relative risk at regional stage, but not at distant stage. We identified geographic areas with excessive risk of CRC death and demonstrated that spatial patterns varied by both cancer type and cancer stage. More research is needed to understand the moderating pathways between geographic and individual-level factors on CRC survival.

  12. Synergistic effect of chemo-photothermal for breast cancer therapy using folic acid (FA) modified zinc oxide nanosheet.

    PubMed

    Vimala, Karuppaiya; Shanthi, Krishnamurthy; Sundarraj, Shenbagamoorthy; Kannan, Soundarapandian

    2017-02-15

    Modern therapies for malignant breast cancer in clinics are not efficacious and often result in deprived patient compliance owing to squat therapeutic effectiveness and strong systemic side effects. In order to overcome this, we combined chemo-photothermal targeted therapy of breast cancer within one novel multifunctional drug delivery system. Folic Acid-functionalized polyethylene glycol coated Zinc Oxide nanosheet (FA-PEG-ZnO NS), was successfully synthesized, characterized and introduced to the drug delivery field for the first time. A doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded FA-PEG-ZnO NS based system (DOX-FA-PEG-ZnO NS) showed stimulative effect of heat, pH responsive and sustained drug release properties. Cytotoxicity experiments confirmed that combined therapy mediated the maximum rate of death in breast cancer cells compared to that of single chemotherapy or photothermal therapy. In vivo toxicity evaluation showed that the DOX-FA-PEG-ZnO NS contains minimum systemic toxicity in the mice model system. The findings of the present study provided an ideal drug delivery system for breast cancer therapy due to the advanced chemo-photothermal synergistic targeted therapy and good drug release properties of DOX-FA-PEG-ZnO NS, which could effectively avoid frequent and invasive dosing and improve patient compliance. Thus, functionalized-ZnO NS could be used as a novel nanomaterial for selective chemo-photothermal therapy.

  13. Magnetic-composite-modified polycrystalline silicon nanowire field-effect transistor for vascular endothelial growth factor detection and cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsiao-Chien; Qiu, Jian-Tai; Yang, Fu-Liang; Liu, Yin-Chih; Chen, Min-Cheng; Tsai, Rung-Ywan; Yang, Hung-Wei; Lin, Chia-Yi; Lin, Chu-Chi; Wu, Tzong-Shoon; Tu, Yi-Ming; Xiao, Min-Cong; Ho, Chia-Hua; Huang, Chien-Chao; Lai, Chao-Sung; Hua, Mu-Yi

    2014-10-07

    This study proposes a vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) biosensor for diagnosing various stages of cervical carcinoma. In addition, VEGF concentrations at various stages of cancer therapy are determined and compared to data obtained by computed tomography (CT) and cancer antigen 125 (CA-125). The increase in VEGF concentrations during operations offers useful insight into dosage timing during cancer therapy. This biosensor uses Avastin as the biorecognition element for the potential cancer biomarker VEGF and is based on a n-type polycrystalline silicon nanowire field-effect transistor (poly-SiNW-FET). Magnetic nanoparticles with poly[aniline-co-N-(1-one-butyric acid) aniline]-Fe3O4 (SPAnH-Fe3O4) shell-core structures are used as carriers for Avastin loading and provide rapid purification due to their magnetic properties, which prevent the loss of bioactivity; furthermore, the high surface area of these structures increases the quantity of Avastin immobilized. Average concentrations in human blood for species that interfere with detection specificity are also evaluated. The detection range of the biosensor for serum samples covers the results expected from both healthy individuals and cancer patients.

  14. A modified regimen of biweekly gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer is both tolerable and effective: a retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Daniel H.; Krishna, Kavya; Blazer, Marlo; Reardon, Joshua; Wei, Lai; Wu, Christina; Ciombor, Kristen K.; Noonan, Anne M.; Mikhail, Sameh; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios

    2016-01-01

    Background: Treatment with nab-paclitaxel with gemcitabine demonstrates a survival advantage when compared with single-agent gemcitabine. However, the combination is associated with significant toxicities, leading to a high rate of drug discontinuation. We implemented a modified regimen of gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel (mGNabP) in an attempt to minimize toxicities while maintaining efficacy. Methods: A total of 79 evaluable patients with metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma (mPC) treated with a modified regimen of gemcitabine (1000 mg/m2) and nab-paclitaxel (125 mg/m2) on days 1, 15 of every 28-day cycle were identified from our prospective database. A total of 57 patients received this regimen as first-line treatment and were evaluated for toxicities, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). Overall, 22 patients with advanced or metastatic PC treated with the modified regimen outside the first-line setting were only evaluated for toxicities. Results: The median OS and PFS were 10 months [95% confidence interval (CI) 5.9–13 months] and 5.4 months (95% CI 4.1–7.4 months) for patients that received the modified regimen as first-line therapy. Neurotoxicity occurred in 27% with only 1.6% of patients experiencing grade ⩾3 toxicity. The incidence of grade ⩾3 neutropenia was 19%, resulting in growth factor support in 12% of patients. This rate was similar in patients who received the modified regimen for first-line treatment of mPC versus the overall group. Conclusions: A modified regimen of biweekly nab-paclitaxel with gemcitabine is associated with a lower cost, acceptable toxicity profile and appears to be relatively effective in pancreatic cancer. Prospective randomized studies confirming its potential benefits compared with standard weekly mGNabP are warranted. PMID:28203300

  15. RGD-modified liposomes enhance efficiency of aclacinomycin A delivery: evaluation of their effect in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chan; Li, Xiaoyan; Dong, Chunyan; Zhang, Xuemei; Zhang, Xie; Gao, Yong

    2015-01-01

    In this study, long-circulating Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-modified aclacinomycin A (ACM) liposomes were prepared by thin film hydration method. Their morphology, particle size, encapsulation efficiency, and in vitro release were investigated. The RGD-ACM liposomes was about 160 nm in size and had the visual appearance of a yellowish suspension. The zeta potential was -22.2 mV and the encapsulation efficiency was more than 93%. The drug-release behavior of the RGD-ACM liposomes showed a biphasic pattern, with an initial burst release and followed by sustained release at a constant rate. After being dissolved in phosphate-buffered saline (pH 7.4) and kept at 4°C for one month, the liposomes did not aggregate and still had the appearance of a milky white colloidal solution. In a pharmacokinetic study, rats treated with RGD-ACM liposomes showed slightly higher plasma concentrations than those treated with ACM liposomes. Maximum plasma concentrations of RGD-ACM liposomes and ACM liposomes were 4,532 and 3,425 ng/mL, respectively. RGD-ACM liposomes had a higher AUC0-∞ (1.54-fold), mean residence time (2.09-fold), and elimination half-life (1.2-fold) when compared with ACM liposomes. In an in vivo study in mice, both types of liposomes inhibited growth of human lung adenocarcinoma (A549) cells and markedly decreased tumor size when compared with the control group. There were no obvious pathological tissue changes in any of the treatment groups. Our results indicate that RGD-modified ACM liposomes have a better antitumor effect in vivo than their unmodified counterparts.

  16. Mitochondrial DNA variant interactions modify breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Covarrubias, Daniel; Bai, Ren-Kui; Wong, Lee-Jun C; Leal, Suzanne M

    2008-01-01

    Interactions between mitochondrial deoxyribonucleic acid (mtDNA) variants and the risk of developing breast cancer were investigated using DNA samples collected from non-Jewish European American breast cancer patients and ethnically age-matched female controls. Logistic regression was used to evaluate two-way interactions between 17 mtDNA variants. To control for multiple testing, empirical P values were calculated using permutation. Odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to measure the contribution of variants in modifying the risk of developing breast cancer. A highly significant interaction was identified between variants 12308G and 10398G (empirical P value = 0.0028), with results suggesting these variants increase the risk of a woman developing breast cancer (OR = 3.03; 95% CI 1.53-6.11). Nominal significant P values were also observed for interactions between mtDNA variants 709A and 16189C; 4216C and 10398G; 4216C and 16189C; 10398G and 16159C; 13368A and 16189C; and 14766T and 16519C. However, after adjusting for multiple testing, the P values did not remain significant. Although it is important to elucidate the main effect of mtDNA variants on the risk of developing breast cancer, understanding gene x gene interactions will give a greater knowledge of disease etiology and aid in interpreting a woman's risk of developing breast cancer.

  17. Modifiable Risk Factors for Lymphedema in Breast Cancer Survivors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: DAMD17-02-1-0387 TITLE: Modifiable Risk Factors for Lymphedema ...Annual 3. DATES COVERED 1 Oct 2005 – 30 Sep 2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Modifiable Risk Factors for Lymphedema in Breast...Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Lymphedema of the arm is a consequence of breast cancer

  18. Opposite modifying effects of HR and NHEJ deficiency on cancer risk in Ptc1 heterozygous mouse cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Tanori, M; Pasquali, E; Leonardi, S; Giardullo, P; Di Majo, V; Taccioli, G; Essers, J; Kanaar, R; Mullenders, L H; Atkinson, M J; Mancuso, M; Saran, A; Pazzaglia, S

    2011-11-24

    Heterozygous Patched1 (Ptc1(+/-)) mice are prone to medulloblastoma (MB), and exposure of newborn mice to ionizing radiation dramatically increases the frequency and shortens the latency of MB. In Ptc1(+/-) mice, MB is characterized by loss of the normal remaining Ptc1 allele, suggesting that genome rearrangements may be key events in MB development. Recent evidence indicates that brain tumors may be linked to defects in DNA-damage repair processes, as various combinations of targeted deletions in genes controlling cell-cycle checkpoints, apoptosis and DNA repair result in MB in mice. Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR) contribute to genome stability, and deficiencies in either pathway predispose to genome rearrangements. To test the role of defective HR or NHEJ in tumorigenesis, control and irradiated Ptc1(+/-) mice with two, one or no functional Rad54 or DNA-protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) alleles were monitored for MB development. We also examined the effect of Rad54 or DNA-PKcs deletion on the processing of endogenous and radiation-induced double-strand breaks (DSBs) in neural precursors of the developing cerebellum, the cells of origin of MB. We found that, although HR and NHEJ collaborate in protecting cells from DNA damage and apoptosis, they have opposite roles in MB tumorigenesis. In fact, although Rad54 deficiency increased both spontaneous and radiation-induced MB development, DNA-PKcs disruption suppressed MB tumorigenesis. Together, our data provide the first evidence that Rad54-mediated HR in vivo is important for suppressing tumorigenesis by maintaining genomic stability.

  19. In vitro cytotoxic effects of modified zinc oxide quantum dots on breast cancer cell lines (MCF7), colon cancer cell lines (HT29) and various fungi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhroueian, Zahra; Dehshiri, Alireza Mozafari; Katouzian, Fatemeh; Esmaeilzadeh, Pegah

    2014-07-01

    An important ideal objective of this study was to perform surface functionalization of fine (1-3 nm) ZnO quantum dot nanoparticles (QD NPs) in order to inhibit decomposition and agglomeration of nanoparticles in aqueous media. Polymers, oily herbal fatty acids, PEG (polyethylene glycol), and organosilanes are the main reagents used in these reactions, because they are completely soluble in water, and can be used as biological probes in nanomedicine. Vegetable fatty acid-capped ZnO (QD NPs) was fabricated by dissolving at a suitable pH after sol-gel method in the presence of nonionic surfactants as efficient templates with a particular HLB (hydrophilic-lipophilic balance) value (9.7 and 8.2). In the present research, we focused on the cellular toxicity of fine zinc oxide QD NPs containing particular blue fluorescence for targeted delivery of MCF7 and HT29 cancer cell lines. The IC50 values were determined as 10.66 and 5.75 µg/ml for MCF7 and HT29, respectively. These findings showed that ZnO QDs have low toxicity in normal cells (MDBK) and can display potential application in cancer chemotherapy in the near future. These properties could result in the generation of a promising candidate in the field of nanobiomedicine. The robust-engineered ZnO QD NPs showed their antibacterial and antifungal activities against Bacillus anthracis, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumonia, and Staphylococcus epidermidis bacteria and also different fungi such as Microsporum gypseum, Microsporum canis, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, Candida albicans, and Candida tropicalis, compared with the standard antibiotic agents like Gentamicin and Clotrimazol.

  20. Genetic polymorphisms in one-carbon metabolism: associations with CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) in colon cancer and the modifying effects of diet

    PubMed Central

    Curtin, Karen; Slattery, Martha L.; Ulrich, Cornelia M.; Bigler, Jeannette; Levin, Theodore R.; Wolff, Roger K.; Albertsen, Hans; Potter, John D.; Samowitz, Wade S.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated associations between CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) colon cancer and genetic polymorphisms relevant to one-carbon metabolism and thus, potentially the provision of methyl groups and risk of colon cancer. Data from a large, population-based case–control study (916 incident colon cancer cases and 1972 matched controls) were used. Candidate polymorphisms in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), thymidylate synthase (TS), transcobalamin II (TCNII), methionine synthase (MTR), reduced folate carrier (RFC), methylene-tetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase 1 (MTHFD1), dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) and alcohol dehydrogenase 3 (ADH3) were evaluated. CIMP− or CIMP+ phenotype was based on five CpG island markers: MINT1, MINT2, MINT31, p16 and MLH1. The influence of specific dietary factors (folate, methionine, vitamin B12 and alcohol) on these associations was also analyzed. We hypothesized that polymorphisms involved in the provision of methyl groups would be associated with CIMP+ tumors (two or more of five markers methylated), potentially modified by diet. Few associations specific to CIMP+ tumors were observed overall, which does not support the hypothesis that the provision of methyl groups is important in defining a methylator phenotype. However, our data suggest that genetic polymorphisms in MTHFR 1298A > C, interacting with diet, may be involved in the development of highly CpG-methylated colon cancers. AC and CC genotypes in conjunction with a high-risk dietary pattern (low folate and methionine intake and high alcohol use) were associated with CIMP+ (OR = 2.1, 95% CI = 1.3–3.4 versus AA/high risk; P-interaction = 0.03). These results provide only limited support for a role of polymorphisms in one-carbon metabolism in the etiology of CIMP colon cancer. PMID:17449906

  1. Photothermal effects of immunologically modified carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griswold, Ryan T.; Henderson, Brock; Goddard, Jessica; Tan, Yongqiang; Hode, Tomas; Liu, Hong; Nordquist, Robert E.; Chen, Wei R.

    2013-02-01

    Carbon nanotubes have a great potential in the biomedical applications. To use carbon nanotubes in the treatment of cancer, we synthesized an immunologically modified single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) using a novel immunomodifier, glycated chitosan (GC), as an effective surfactant for SWNT. This new composition SWNT-GC was stable due to the strong non-covalent binding between SWNT and GC. The structure of SWNT-GC is presented in this report. The photothermal effect of SWNT-GC was investigated under irradiation of a near-infrared laser. SWNT-GC retained the optical properties of SWNT and the immunological properties of GC. Specifically, the SWNT-GC could selectively absorb a 980-nm light and induce desirable thermal effects in tissue culture and in animals. It could also induce tumor cell destruction, controlled by the laser settings and the doses of SWNT and GC. Laser+SWNT-GC treatment could also induce strong expression of heat shock proteins on the surface of tumor cells. This immunologically modified carbon nanotube could be used for selective photothermal interactions in noninvasive tumor treatment.

  2. The Modifier Effect and Property Mutability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampton, James A.; Passanisi, Alessia; Jonsson, Martin L.

    2011-01-01

    The modifier effect is the reduction in perceived likelihood of a generic property sentence, when the head noun is modified. We investigated the prediction that the modifier effect would be stronger for mutable than for central properties, without finding evidence for this predicted interaction over the course of five experiments. However…

  3. Factors that modify risks of radiation-induced cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1988-11-01

    The collective influence of biologic and physical factors that modify risks of radiation-induced cancer introduces uncertainties sufficient to deny precision of estimates of human cancer risk that can be calculated for low-dose radiation in exposed populations. The important biologic characteristics include the tissue sites and cell types, baseline cancer incidence, minimum latent period, time-to-tumor recognition, and the influence of individual host (age and sex) and competing etiologic influences. Physical factors include radiation dose, dose rate, and radiation quality. Statistical factors include time-response projection models, risk coefficients, and dose-response relationships. Other modifying factors include other carcinogens, and other biological sources (hormonal status, immune status, hereditary factors).

  4. Engineering chemically modified viruses for prostate cancer cell recognition.

    PubMed

    Mohan, K; Weiss, G A

    2015-12-01

    Specific detection of circulating tumor cells and characterization of their aggressiveness could improve cancer diagnostics and treatment. Metastasis results from such tumor cells, and causes the majority of cancer deaths. Chemically modified viruses could provide an inexpensive and efficient approach to detect tumor cells and quantitate their cell surface biomarkers. However, non-specific adhesion between the cell surface receptors and the virus surface presents a challenge. This report describes wrapping the virus surface with different PEG architectures, including as fusions to oligolysine, linkers, spacers and scaffolded ligands. The reported PEG wrappers can reduce by >75% the non-specific adhesion of phage to cell surfaces. Dynamic light scattering verified the non-covalent attachment by the reported wrappers as increased sizes of the virus particles. Further modifications resulted in specific detection of prostate cancer cells expressing PSMA, a key prostate cancer biomarker. The approach allowed quantification of PSMA levels on the cell surface, and could distinguish more aggressive forms of the disease.

  5. Preferential recognition of methylglyoxal-modified calf thymus DNA by circulating antibodies in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, M Imtiaz; Ahmad, Saheem; Moinuddin

    2011-08-01

    Methylglyoxal (MG) has been implicated in mutagenesis and cancer. Present study probes the antigenicity of MG damaged DNA in cancer patients. Purified calf thymus DNA was damaged by the synergistic action of MG, lysine (Lys) and CuSO4 for 24 h at 37 degrees C. DNA modifications produced single-strand breaks, hyperchromicity in UV spectrum and increased fluorescence intensity. Binding characteristics of auto-antibodies in cancer patients were assessed by direct binding and inhibition ELISA. These antibodies exhibited enhanced binding with the modified DNA, as compared to the native form. The effect was more pronounced when affinity-purified IgG was used in place of the serum. In conclusion, MG-modified DNA presents unique epitopes which are recognized as non-self by the immune system and may, therefore, be one of the factors for the autoantibody induction in cancer patients.

  6. Epigenetic modulators, modifiers and mediators in cancer aetiology and progression

    PubMed Central

    Feinberg, Andrew P.; Koldobskiy, Michael A.; Göndör, Anita

    2016-01-01

    This year is the tenth anniversary of the publication in this journal of a model suggesting the existence of ‘tumour progenitor genes’. These genes are epigenetically disrupted at the earliest stages of malignancies, even before mutations, and thus cause altered differentiation throughout tumour evolution. The past decade of discovery in cancer epigenetics has revealed a number of similarities between cancer genes and stem cell reprogramming genes, widespread mutations in epigenetic regulators, and the part played by chromatin structure in cellular plasticity in both development and cancer. In the light of these discoveries, we suggest here a framework for cancer epigenetics involving three types of genes: ‘epigenetic mediators’, corresponding to the tumour progenitor genes suggested earlier; ‘epigenetic modifiers’ of the mediators, which are frequently mutated in cancer; and ‘epigenetic modulators’ upstream of the modifiers, which are responsive to changes in the cellular environment and often linked to the nuclear architecture. We suggest that this classification is helpful in framing new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to cancer. PMID:26972587

  7. Specific internalization and synergistic anticancer effect of docetaxel-encapsulated chitosan-modified polymeric nanocarriers: a novel approach in cancer chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asthana, Shalini; Gupta, Pramod K.; Konwar, Rituraj; Chourasia, Manish K.

    2013-09-01

    Nanocarriers can be surface engineered to increase endocytosis for applications in delivery of chemotherapeutics. This study investigated the chitosan (CS)-mediated effects on the anticancer efficacy and uptake of docetaxel-loaded nanometric particles (<250 nm) by MCF-7 tumor cells. Herein, negatively charged poly lactic- co-glycolic acid (PLGA) nanoparticles (-18.4 ± 2.57 mV, 162 ± 6.34 nm), poorly endocytosed by the MCF-7 cells, were subjected to surface modification with CS. It demonstrated significant increase (>5-fold) in intracellular uptake as well as antitumor efficacy of modified nanoparticles (NPs) that explicate the possibility of saccharide marker-mediated tumor targeting along with synergism via proapoptotic effect of CS. Additionally, high positivity of optimized tailored nanocarrier (+23.3 ± 2.02 mV, 242.8 ± 9.42 nm) may have accounted for the increased adsorption-mediated endocytosis, preferably toward tumor cells with negative potential. Developed drug carrier system showed high stability in human blood which is in compliance with mucoadhesive property of CS. Transmission electron microscopy technique was applied to observe shape and morphological features of NPs. Furthermore, in vivo tissue toxicity study revealed safe use of drug at 20 mg/kg dose in nanoparticulate form. Moreover, the enhanced in vitro uptake of these NPs and their cytotoxicity against the tumor cells along with synergistic effect of CS clearly suggest that CS-modified carrier system is a promising candidate for preclinical studies to achieve wider anti-tumor therapeutic window and lower side effects.

  8. The mechanisms of genetically modified vaccinia viruses for the treatment of cancer.

    PubMed

    Jefferson, Artrish; Cadet, Valerie E; Hielscher, Abigail

    2015-09-01

    The use of oncolytic viruses for the treatment of cancer is an emerging field of cancer research and therapy. Oncolytic viruses are designed to induce tumor specific immunity while replicating selectively within cancer cells to cause lysis of the tumor cells. While there are several forms of oncolytic viruses, the use of vaccinia viruses for oncolysis may be more beneficial than other forms of oncolytic viruses. For example, vaccinia viruses have been shown to exert their anti-tumor effects through genetic engineering strategies which enhance their therapeutic efficacy. This paper will address some of the most common forms of genetically modified vaccinia viruses and will explore the mechanisms whereby they selectively target, enter and destroy cancer cells. Furthermore, this review will highlight how vaccinia viruses activate host immune responses against cancer cells and will address clinical trials evaluating the tumor-directed and killing efficacy of these viruses against solid tumors.

  9. Cancer Cells Hijack PRC2 to Modify Multiple Cytokine Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Michael; Song, Lan; Yu, Tao; Liu, Yu; Liu, Jeffrey C.; McCurdy, Sean; Ma, Anqi; Wither, Joan; Jin, Jian; Zacksenhaus, Eldad; Wrana, Jeffrey L.; Bremner, Rod

    2015-01-01

    Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) is an epigenetic regulator induced in many cancers. It is thought to drive tumorigenesis by repressing division, stemness, and/or developmental regulators. Cancers evade immune detection, and diverse immune regulators are perturbed in different tumors. It is unclear how such cell-specific effects are coordinated. Here, we show a profound and cancer-selective role for PRC2 in repressing multiple cytokine pathways. We find that PRC2 represses hundreds of IFNγ stimulated genes (ISGs), cytokines and cytokine receptors. This target repertoire is significantly broadened in cancer vs non-cancer cells, and is distinct in different cancer types. PRC2 is therefore a higher order regulator of the immune program in cancer cells. Inhibiting PRC2 with either RNAi or EZH2 inhibitors activates cytokine/cytokine receptor promoters marked with bivalent H3K27me3/H3K4me3 chromatin, and augments responsiveness to diverse immune signals. PRC2 inhibition rescues immune gene induction even in the absence of SWI/SNF, a tumor suppressor defective in ~20% of human cancers. This novel PRC2 function in tumor cells could profoundly impact the mechanism of action and efficacy of EZH2 inhibitors in cancer treatment. PMID:26030458

  10. A sensitive and selective magnetic graphene composite-modified polycrystalline-silicon nanowire field-effect transistor for bladder cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsiao-Chien; Chen, Yi-Ting; Tsai, Rung-Ywan; Chen, Min-Cheng; Chen, Shi-Liang; Xiao, Min-Cong; Chen, Chien-Lun; Hua, Mu-Yi

    2015-04-15

    In this study, we describe the urinary quantification of apolipoprotein A II protein (APOA2 protein), a biomarker for the diagnosis of bladder cancer, using an n-type polycrystalline silicon nanowire field-effect transistor (poly-SiNW-FET). The modification of poly-SiNW-FET by magnetic graphene with long-chain acid groups (MGLA) synthesized via Friedel-Crafts acylation was compared with that obtained using short-chain acid groups (MGSA). Compared with MGSA, the MGLA showed a higher immobilization degree and bioactivity to the anti-APOA2 antibody (Ab) due to its lower steric hindrance. In addition, the magnetic properties enabled rapid separation and purification during Ab immobilization, ultimately preserving its bioactivity. The Ab-MGLA/poly-SiNW-FET exhibited a linear dependence of relative response to the logarithmical concentration in a range between 19.5pgmL(-1) and 1.95µgmL(-1), with a limit of detection (LOD) of 6.7pgmL(-1). An additional washing step before measurement aimed at excluding the interfering biocomponents ensured the reliability of the assay. We conclude that our biosensor efficiently distinguishes mean values of urinary APOA2 protein concentrations between patients with bladder cancer (29-344ngmL(-1)) and those with hernia (0.425-9.47ngmL(-1)).

  11. A polyethylenimine-modified carboxyl-poly(styrene/acrylamide) copolymer nanosphere for co-delivering of CpG and TGF-β receptor I inhibitor with remarkable additive tumor regression effect against liver cancer in mice

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Shuyan; Hu, Jun; Xie, Yuanyuan; Zhou, Qing; Zhu, Yanhong; Yang, Xiangliang

    2016-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy based on nanodelivery systems has shown potential for treatment of various malignancies, owing to the benefits of tumor targeting of nanoparticles. However, induction of a potent T-cell immune response against tumors still remains a challenge. In this study, polyethylenimine-modified carboxyl-styrene/acrylamide (PS) copolymer nano-spheres were developed as a delivery system of unmethylated cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) oligodeoxynucleotides and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) receptor I inhibitors for cancer immunotherapy. TGF-β receptor I inhibitors (LY2157299, LY) were encapsulated to the PS via hydrophobic interaction, while CpG oligodeoxynucleotides were loaded onto the PS through electrostatic interaction. Compared to the control group, tumor inhibition in the PS-LY/CpG group was up to 99.7% without noticeable toxicity. The tumor regression may be attributed to T-cell activation and amplification in mouse models. The results highlight the additive effect of CpG and TGF-β receptor I inhibitors co-delivered in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:28008250

  12. Modified sugar beet pectin induces apoptosis of colon cancer cells via an interaction with the neutral sugar side-chains.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Ellen G; Colquhoun, Ian J; Chau, Hoa K; Hotchkiss, Arland T; Waldron, Keith W; Morris, Victor J; Belshaw, Nigel J

    2016-01-20

    Pectins extracted from a variety of sources and modified with heat and/or pH have previously been shown to exhibit activity towards several cancer cell lines. However, the structural basis for the anti-cancer activity of modified pectin requires clarification. Sugar beet and citrus pectin extracts have been compared. Pectin extracted from sugar beet pulp only weakly affected the viability of colon cancer cells. Alkali treatment increased the anti-cancer effect of sugar beet pectin via an induction of apoptosis. Alkali treatment decreased the degree of esterification (DE) and increased the ratio of rhamnogalacturonan I (RGI) to homogalacturonan. Low DE per se did not play a significant role in the anti-cancer activity. However, the enzymatic removal of galactose and, to a lesser extent, arabinose from the pectin decreased the effect on cancer cells indicating that the neutral sugar-containing RGI regions are important for pectin bioactivity.

  13. Do Environmental Factors Modify the Genetic Risk of Prostate Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Loeb, Stacy; Peskoe, Sarah B.; Joshu, Corinne E.; Huang, Wen-Yi; Hayes, Richard B.; Carter, H. Ballentine; Isaacs, William B.; Platz, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Many SNPs influence prostate cancer risk. To what extent genetic risk can be reduced by environmental factors is unknown. Methods We evaluated effect modification by environmental factors of the association between susceptibility SNPs and prostate cancer in 1,230 incident prostate cancer cases and 1,361 controls, all white and similar ages, nested in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Trial. Genetic risk scores were calculated as number of risk alleles for 20 validated SNPs. We estimated the association between higher genetic risk (≥ 12 SNPs) and prostate cancer within environmental factor strata and tested for interaction. Results Men with ≥12 risk alleles had 1.98, 2.04, and 1.91 times the odds of total, advanced, and nonadvanced prostate cancer, respectively. These associations were attenuated with the use of selenium supplements, aspirin, ibuprofen, and higher vegetable intake. For selenium, the attenuation was most striking for advanced prostate cancer: compared with <12 alleles and no selenium, the OR for ≥12 alleles was 2.06 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.67–2.55] in nonusers and 0.99 (0.38–2.58) in users (Pinteraction = 0.031). Aspirin had the most marked attenuation for nonadvanced prostate cancer: compared with <12 alleles and nonusers, the OR for ≥12 alleles was 2.25 (1.69–3.00) in nonusers and 1.70 (1.25–2.32) in users (Pinteraction = 0.009). This pattern was similar for ibuprofen (Pinteraction = 0.023) and vegetables (Pinteraction = 0.010). Conclusions This study suggests that selenium supplements may reduce genetic risk of advanced prostate cancer, whereas aspirin, ibuprofen, and vegetables may reduce genetic risk of nonadvanced prostate cancer. PMID:25342390

  14. SU-E-T-79: A Study of the Effect of Clinical Tumor Volume Displacement On the Dosage of Post Modified Radical Mastectomy Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Plans for Left-Sided Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, W; Ma, C; Li, D; Wu, F

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To explore the effect of clinical tumor volume (CTV) displacement on the dosage of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans for left-sided breast cancer after modified radical mastectomy. Methods: We created 2 sets of IMRT plans based on PTV0.5 and PTV0.7 (with CTV displacement of 0.5cm and 0.7cm respectively) for each of the ten consecutive left-sided breast cancer patients after modified radical mastectomy, and compared the difference in PTV coverage and organ at risk (OAR) sparing between the two groups. And then, we compared the difference in PTV coverage in IMRT plans based on PTV0.5 between the group with properly estimated CTV displacement (presuming the actual CTV displacement was 0.5cm) and the one with underestimated CTV displacement (presuming the actual CTV displacement was 0.7cm). The difference in results between the corresponding two groups was compared using paired-sample t-test. P values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: IMRT plans derived from PTV0.5 had more homogenous PTV coverage, and less heart, left lung, right breast, right lung, left humeral head and B-P radiation exposure, as well as less total Mu as compared with the ones stemmed from PTV0.7 (all p<0.05). IMRT plans with appropriate estimation of CTV displacement had better PTV coverage compared with the ones with underestimated CTV displacement (all p<0.01). Conclusion: The IMRT plans with smaller CTV displacement in post modified radical mastectomy radiotherapy for left-sided breast cancer has dosimetrical advantages over the ones with larger CTV displacement. Underestimation of CTV displacement can lead to significant reduction of PTV coverage. Individually quantifying and minimizing CTV displacement can significantly improve PTV coverage and OAR (including heart and left lung) sparing. This work was supported by the Medical Scientific Research Foundation of Guangdong Procvince (A2014455 to Changchun Ma)

  15. Critical dose and toxicity index of organs at risk in radiotherapy: Analyzing the calculated effects of modified dose fractionation in non–small cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pedicini, Piernicola; Strigari, Lidia; Benassi, Marcello; Caivano, Rocchina; Fiorentino, Alba; Nappi, Antonio; Salvatore, Marco; Storto, Giovanni

    2014-04-01

    To increase the efficacy of radiotherapy for non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), many schemes of dose fractionation were assessed by a new “toxicity index” (I), which allows one to choose the fractionation schedules that produce less toxic treatments. Thirty-two patients affected by non resectable NSCLC were treated by standard 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) with a strategy of limited treated volume. Computed tomography datasets were employed to re plan by simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The dose distributions from plans were used to test various schemes of dose fractionation, in 3DCRT as well as in IMRT, by transforming the dose-volume histogram (DVH) into a biological equivalent DVH (BDVH) and by varying the overall treatment time. The BDVHs were obtained through the toxicity index, which was defined for each of the organs at risk (OAR) by a linear quadratic model keeping an equivalent radiobiological effect on the target volume. The less toxic fractionation consisted in a severe/moderate hyper fractionation for the volume including the primary tumor and lymph nodes, followed by a hypofractionation for the reduced volume of the primary tumor. The 3DCRT and IMRT resulted, respectively, in 4.7% and 4.3% of dose sparing for the spinal cord, without significant changes for the combined-lungs toxicity (p < 0.001). Schedules with reduced overall treatment time (accelerated fractionations) led to a 12.5% dose sparing for the spinal cord (7.5% in IMRT), 8.3% dose sparing for V{sub 20} in the combined lungs (5.5% in IMRT), and also significant dose sparing for all the other OARs (p < 0.001). The toxicity index allows to choose fractionation schedules with reduced toxicity for all the OARs and equivalent radiobiological effect for the tumor in 3DCRT, as well as in IMRT, treatments of NSCLC.

  16. Peptide-modified gold nanoparticles for improved cancer therapeutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Celina; Prooijen, Monique V.; Chithrani, Devika B.

    2014-03-01

    The field of nanotechnology is currently undergoing explosive development on many fronts. The technology is expected to generate innovations and play a critical role in cancer therapeutics. Among other nanoparticle (NP) systems, there has been tremendous progress made in the use of spherical gold NPs (GNPs) in cancer therapeutics. In treating cancer, radiation therapy and chemotherapy remain the most widely used treatment options. These nanostructures further provide strategies for improving loading, targeting, and controlling the release of drugs to minimize the side effects of highly toxic anticancer drugs used in chemotherapy. Our recent results show enhancement of cell death during radiation therapy when GNPs are targeted to nucleus. In addition, we have seen enhanced therapeutic effects when GNPs are used as anticancer drug carriers. Hence, gold nanostructures provide a versatile platform to integrate many therapeutic options leading to effective combinational therapy in the fight against cancer. A multifunctional platform based on gold nanostructures with targeting ligands, therapeutic molecules, and imaging contrast agents will hold the possibility of promising directions in cancer research.

  17. Hyaluronic acid-modified multiwalled carbon nanotubes for targeted delivery of doxorubicin into cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xueyan; Tao, Lei; Wen, Shihui; Hou, Wenxiu; Shi, Xiangyang

    2015-03-20

    Development of novel drug carriers for targeted cancer therapy with high efficiency and specificity is of paramount importance and has been one of the major topics in current nanomedicine. Here we report a general approach to using multifunctional multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as a platform to encapsulate an anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) for targeted cancer therapy. In this approach, polyethyleneimine (PEI)-modified MWCNTs were covalently conjugated with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FI) and hyaluronic acid (HA). The formed MWCNT/PEI-FI-HA conjugates were characterized via different techniques and were used as a new carrier system to encapsulate the anticancer drug doxorubicin for targeted delivery to cancer cells overexpressing CD44 receptors. We show that the formed MWCNT/PEI-FI-HA/DOX complexes with a drug loading percentage of 72% are water soluble and stable. In vitro release studies show that the drug release rate under an acidic condition (pH 5.8, tumor cell microenvironment) is higher than that under physiological condition (pH 7.4). Cell viability assay demonstrates that the carrier material has good biocompatibility in the tested concentration range, and the MWCNT/PEI-FI-HA/DOX complexes can specifically target cancer cells overexpressing CD44 receptors and exert growth inhibition effect to the cancer cells. The developed HA-modified MWCNTs hold a great promise to be used as an efficient anticancer drug carrier for tumor-targeted chemotherapy.

  18. Genetic variation in UGT genes modify the associations of NSAIDs with risk of colorectal cancer: colon cancer family registry.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Dominique; Koepl, Lisel M; Poole, Elizabeth M; Balavarca, Yesilda; Xiao, Liren; Baron, John A; Hsu, Li; Coghill, Anna E; Campbell, Peter T; Kleinstein, Sarah E; Figueiredo, Jane C; Lampe, Johanna W; Buck, Katharina; Potter, John D; Kulmacz, Richard J; Jenkins, Mark A; Hopper, John L; Win, Aung K; Newcomb, Polly A; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Makar, Karen W

    2014-07-01

    The use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is associated with reduced risk of colorectal neoplasia. Previous studies have reported that polymorphisms in NSAID-metabolizing enzymes central to NSAID metabolism including UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGT) and cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2C9 may modify this protective effect. We investigated whether 35 functionally relevant polymorphisms within CYP2C9 and UGT genes were associated with colorectal cancer risk or modified the protective effect of NSAIDs on colorectal cancer susceptibility, using 1,584 colorectal cancer cases and 2,516 unaffected sibling controls from the Colon Cancer Family Registry. A three-SNP genotype in UGT1A6 (G-A-A; Ala7-Thr181-Arg184) and the Asp85 variant in UGT2B15 increased the risk of colorectal cancer (OR 3.87; 95% CI 1.04-14.45 and OR 1.34; 95% CI 1.10-1.63, respectively). We observed interactions between UGT1A3 Thr78Thr (A>G) and NSAID use (P-interaction = 0.02), a three-SNP genotype within UGT2B4 and ibuprofen use (P-interaction = 0.0018), as well as UGT2B15 Tyr85Asp (T>G) and aspirin use (P-interaction = 0.01). The interaction with the UGT2B4 and the UGT2B15 polymorphisms were noteworthy at the 25% FDR level. This study highlights the need for further pharmacogenetic studies to identify individuals who might benefit from NSAID use as part of developing effective strategies for prevention of colorectal neoplasia. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Modifiable Prostate Cancer Risk Reduction and Early Detection Behaviors in Black Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odedina, Folakemi T.; Scrivens, John J., Jr.; Larose-Pierre, Margareth; Emanuel, Frank; Adams, Angela Denise; Dagne, Getachew A.; Pressey, Shannon Alexis; Odedina, Oladapo

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To explore the personal factors related to modifiable prostate cancer risk-reduction and detection behaviors among black men. Methods: Three thousand four hundred thirty (3430) black men were surveyed and structural equation modeling employed to test study hypotheses. Results: Modifiable prostate cancer risk-reduction behavior was found…

  20. Transferrin-modified PLGA nanoparticles significantly increase the cytotoxicity of paclitaxel in bladder cancer cells by increasing intracellular retention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Shihua; Zhang, Yi; Yu, Chengfan; Wang, Gang; Zhang, Zhihong; Li, Ningchen; Na, Yanqun

    2014-10-01

    To improve the anticancer effects of paclitaxel (Tax) on bladder cancer, transferrin-modified and unmodified poly( d,l lactide- co-glycolide) nanoparticles (NPs) were generated to deliver Tax. The characteristics of the NPs and the drug-release profiles were evaluated. The cytotoxicity levels of blank NPs and Tax-loaded NPs in the bladder cancer cell lines MBT-2, J-82, and TCC Sup were determined. The uptakes and retentions of the NPs by the cell lines and the intracellular distribution of the NPs were also studied. The results showed similar NPs characteristics and drug-release profiles for NPs with and without transferrin modification. The sizes of NPs with and without transferrin modification were 206 and 278 nm, respectively; the Z-potentials were -23.5 and -24.3 mV, respectively; the drug loadings were 6.5 and 6.7 % w/w, respectively. No cytotoxicity was observed in the bladder cancer cells exposed to blank NPs. Both types of Tax-loaded NPs, however, had significantly higher cytotoxicity levels compared with the Tax solution in the bladder cancer cells. The transferrin-modified, Tax-loaded NPs were significantly more cytotoxic than the Tax-loaded NPs without modification in the MBT-2 and TCC Sup cells. There were no significant differences in NP uptakes between transferrin-modified and unmodified NPs in any of the three studied bladder cancer cell lines; however, the retentions of the modified NPs were significantly higher in the MBT-2 and TCC Sup cells. These findings suggest that NPs can significantly improve the anticancer effect of Tax in bladder cells. Furthermore, transferrin-modified NPs can improve the anticancer effect by increasing intracellular retention and not by increasing uptake. The transferrin-modified NPs are promising drug delivery vehicle for bladder cancer treatment.

  1. Chimeric Antigen Receptors Modified T-Cells for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Dai, Hanren; Wang, Yao; Lu, Xuechun; Han, Weidong

    2016-07-01

    The genetic modification and characterization of T-cells with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) allow functionally distinct T-cell subsets to recognize specific tumor cells. The incorporation of costimulatory molecules or cytokines can enable engineered T-cells to eliminate tumor cells. CARs are generated by fusing the antigen-binding region of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) or other ligand to membrane-spanning and intracellular-signaling domains. They have recently shown clinical benefit in patients treated with CD19-directed autologous T-cells. Recent successes suggest that the modification of T-cells with CARs could be a powerful approach for developing safe and effective cancer therapeutics. Here, we briefly review early studies, consider strategies to improve the therapeutic potential and safety, and discuss the challenges and future prospects for CAR T-cells in cancer therapy.

  2. Chimeric Antigen Receptors Modified T-Cells for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Hanren; Wang, Yao; Lu, Xuechun

    2016-01-01

    The genetic modification and characterization of T-cells with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) allow functionally distinct T-cell subsets to recognize specific tumor cells. The incorporation of costimulatory molecules or cytokines can enable engineered T-cells to eliminate tumor cells. CARs are generated by fusing the antigen-binding region of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) or other ligand to membrane-spanning and intracellular-signaling domains. They have recently shown clinical benefit in patients treated with CD19-directed autologous T-cells. Recent successes suggest that the modification of T-cells with CARs could be a powerful approach for developing safe and effective cancer therapeutics. Here, we briefly review early studies, consider strategies to improve the therapeutic potential and safety, and discuss the challenges and future prospects for CAR T-cells in cancer therapy. PMID:26819347

  3. p53 status as effect modifier of the association between pre-treatment fasting glucose and breast cancer outcomes in non diabetic, HER2 positive patients treated with trastuzumab

    PubMed Central

    Maugeri-Saccà, Marcello; Melucci, Elisa; Benedetto, Anna Di; Lauro, Luigi Di; Pizzuti, Laura; Sergi, Domenico; Terrenato, Irene; Esposito, Luca; Iannuzzi, Carmelina Antonella; Pasquale, Raffaella; Botti, Claudio; Fuhrman, Barbara; Giordano, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Mounting evidence supports the role of p53 in metabolic processes involved in breast carcinogenesis. We investigated whether p53 status affects the association of pre-treatment fasting glucose with treatment outcomes in 106 non diabetic, HER2 positive breast cancer patients treated with trastuzumab. p53 status was validated against gene sequencing of selected codons in 49 patients. The Kaplan–Meier method and log rank test were used to compare survival by categories of fasting glucose in the overall population and separate settings. Cox models included age and body mass index. Direct sequencing confirmed the lack of mutations in 73.7% of p53 negative patients and their presence in 53.3% of p53 positive cases. At 66 months, 88.3% of patients with glucose ≤ 89.0 mg/dl (median value) did not experiment disease progression compared with 70.0% in the highest category (p=0.034), with glucose being an independent predictor (p=0.046). Stratified analysis confirmed this association in p53 negative patients only (p=0.01). In the early setting, data suggested longer disease free survival in p53 negative patients in the lowest glucose category (p=0.053). In our study, p53 status acted as effect modifier of the investigated association. This may help differentiate target sub-groups and affect outcomes interpretation in similarly characterized patients. PMID:25071015

  4. Hyaluronan-modified superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for bimodal breast cancer imaging and photothermal therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Rui-Meng; Fu, Chao-Ping; Fang, Jin-Zhi; Xu, Xiang-Dong; Wei, Xin-Hua; Tang, Wen-Jie; Jiang, Xin-Qing; Zhang, Li-Ming

    2017-01-01

    Theranostic nanoparticles with both imaging and therapeutic abilities are highly promising in successful diagnosis and treatment of the most devastating cancers. In this study, the dual-modal imaging and photothermal effect of hyaluronan (HA)-modified superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (HA-SPIONs), which was developed in a previous study, were investigated for CD44 HA receptor-overexpressing breast cancer in both in vitro and in vivo experiments. Heat is found to be rapidly generated by near-infrared laser range irradiation of HA-SPIONs. When incubated with CD44 HA receptor-overexpressing MDA-MB-231 cells in vitro, HA-SPIONs exhibited significant specific cellular uptake and specific accumulation confirmed by Prussian blue staining. The in vitro and in vivo results of magnetic resonance imaging and photothermal ablation demonstrated that HA-SPIONs exhibited significant negative contrast enhancement on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and photothermal effect targeted CD44 HA receptor-overexpressing breast cancer. All these results indicated that HA-SPIONs have great potential for effective diagnosis and treatment of cancer. PMID:28096667

  5. Transferrin surface-modified PLGA nanoparticles-mediated delivery of a proteasome inhibitor to human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Frasco, Manuela F; Almeida, Gabriela M; Santos-Silva, Filipe; Pereira, Maria do Carmo; Coelho, Manuel A N

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a drug delivery system based on poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles for an efficient and targeted action of the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib against pancreatic cancer cells. The PLGA nanoparticles were formulated with a poloxamer, and further surface-modified with transferrin for tumor targeting. The nanoparticles were characterized as polymer carriers of bortezomib, and the cellular uptake and growth inhibitory effects were evaluated in pancreatic cells. Cellular internalization of nanoparticles was observed in normal and cancer cells, but with higher uptake by cancer cells. The sustained release of the loaded bortezomib from PLGA nanoparticles showed cytotoxic effects against pancreatic normal and cancer cells. Noteworthy differential cytotoxicity was attained by transferrin surface-modified PLGA nanoparticles since significant cell growth inhibition by delivered bortezomib was only observed in cancer cells. These findings demonstrate that the ligand transferrin enhanced the targeted delivery of bortezomib-loaded PLGA nanoparticles to pancreatic cancer cells. These in vitro results highlight the transferrin surface-modified PLGA nanoparticles as a promising system for targeted delivery of anticancer drugs.

  6. Modifiers of exposure--response estimates for lung cancer among miners exposed to radon progeny

    SciTech Connect

    Hornung, R.W.; Deddens, J.; Roscoe, R.

    1995-03-01

    The association between lung cancer and exposure to radon decay products has been well established. Despite agreement on this point, there is still some degree of uncertainty regarding characteristics of the exposure-response relationship. The use of studies of underground miners to estimate lung cancer risks due to residential radon exposure depends upon a better understanding of factors potentially modifying the exposure-response relationship. Given the diversity in study populations regarding smoking status, mining conditions, risk analysis methodology, and referent populations, the risk estimates across studies are quite similar. However, several factors partially contributing to differences in risk estimates are modified by attained age, time since last exposure, exposure rate, and cigarette smoking patterns. There is growing agreement across studies that relative risk decreases with attained age and time since last exposure. Several studies have also found an inverse exposure-rate effect, i.e., low exposure rates for protracted duration of exposure are more hazardous than equivalent cumulative exposures received at higher rates for shorter periods of time. Additionally, the interaction between radon exposure and cigarette smoking appears to be intermediate between additive and multiplicative in a growing number of studies. Quantitative estimates of these modifying factors are given using a new analysis of data from the latest update of the Colorado Plateau uranium miners cohort. 24 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. A Multicountry Ecological Study of Cancer Incidence Rates in 2008 with Respect to Various Risk-Modifying Factors

    PubMed Central

    Grant, William B.

    2013-01-01

    Observational and ecological studies are generally used to determine the presence of effect of cancer risk-modifying factors. Researchers generally agree that environmental factors such as smoking, alcohol consumption, poor diet, lack of physical activity, and low serum 25-hdyroxyvitamin D levels are important cancer risk factors. This ecological study used age-adjusted incidence rates for 21 cancers for 157 countries (87 with high-quality data) in 2008 with respect to dietary supply and other factors, including per capita gross domestic product, life expectancy, lung cancer incidence rate (an index for smoking), and latitude (an index for solar ultraviolet-B doses). The factors found to correlate strongly with multiple types of cancer were lung cancer (direct correlation with 12 types of cancer), energy derived from animal products (direct correlation with 12 types of cancer, inverse with two), latitude (direct correlation with six types, inverse correlation with three), and per capita gross national product (five types). Life expectancy and sweeteners directly correlated with three cancers, animal fat with two, and alcohol with one. Consumption of animal products correlated with cancer incidence with a lag time of 15–25 years. Types of cancer which correlated strongly with animal product consumption, tended to correlate weakly with latitude; this occurred for 11 cancers for the entire set of countries. Regression results were somewhat different for the 87 high-quality country data set and the 157-country set. Single-country ecological studies have inversely correlated nearly all of these cancers with solar ultraviolet-B doses. These results can provide guidance for prevention of cancer. PMID:24379012

  8. BYSTANDERS, ADAPTIVE RESPONSES AND GENOMIC INSTABILITY - POTENTIAL MODIFIERS OF LOW-DOSE CANCER RESPONSES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bystanders, Adaptive Responses and Genomic Instability -Potential Modifiers ofLow-Dose
    Cancer Responses
    .
    There has been a concerted effort in the field of radiation biology to better understand cellular
    responses that could have an impact on the estin1ation of cancer...

  9. Lymphedema as a Cancer Treatment Side Effect

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer is Treated Side Effects Dating, Sex, and Reproduction Advanced Cancer For Children For Teens For Young ... Cancer is Treated Side Effects Dating, Sex, and Reproduction Advanced Cancer For Children For Teens For Young ...

  10. Modifiable Risk Factors for Lymphedema in Breast Cancer Survivors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: DAMD17-02-1-0387 TITLE: Modifiable Risk Factors for Lymphedema ...Final 3. DATES COVERED 1 Oct 2004 – 30 Sep 2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Modifiable Risk Factors for Lymphedema in Breast...axillary lymph nodes removed were followed for the development of arm lymphedema . Participants completed a baseline interview and subsequent

  11. Optimization in expression and purification of modified apoptin as selective anti-cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahlan, Muhamad; Wiseso, Anggoro; Hermansyah, Heri; Yohda, Masafumi

    2017-02-01

    Cancer is a disease caused by abnormal growth of tissue cells of the body that turn into cancer cells. Apoptin from Chicken Anemia Virus is known to have the ability to trigger apoptosis in cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, but not in normal cells. The production of Apoptin was done on Escherichia coli via plasmid pET9a and modified to improve the efficiency and ease of purification using IMAC nickel, by adding a few tags and cleavage site. The expected result is modified Apoptin and evidence of proteins expressed through SDS-PAGE analysis.

  12. Endoscopic optical coherence tomography with a modified microelectromechanical systems mirror for detection of bladder cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Tuqiang; Xie, Huikai; Fedder, Gary K.; Pan, Yingtian

    2003-11-01

    Experimental results of a modified micromachined microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) mirror for substantial enhancement of the transverse laser scanning performance of endoscopic optical coherence tomography (EOCT) are presented. Image distortion due to buckling of MEMS mirror in our previous designs was analyzed and found to be attributed to excessive internal stress of the transverse bimorph meshes. The modified MEMS mirror completely eliminates bimorph stress and the resultant buckling effect, which increases the wobbling-free angular optical actuation to greater than 37°, exceeding the transverse laser scanning requirements for EOCT and confocal endoscopy. The new optical coherence tomography (OCT) endoscope allows for two-dimensional cross-sectional imaging that covers an area of 4.2 mm × 2.8 mm (limited by scope size) and at roughly 5 frames/s instead of the previous area size of 2.9 mm × 2.8 mm and is highly suitable for noninvasive and high-resolution imaging diagnosis of epithelial lesions in vivo. EOCT images of normal rat bladders and rat bladder cancers are compared with the same cross sections acquired with conventional bench-top OCT. The results clearly demonstrate the potential of EOCT for in vivo imaging diagnosis and precise guidance for excisional biopsy of early bladder cancers.

  13. Genetic polymorphisms in MMP 2, 9 and 3 genes modify lung cancer risk and survival

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) are proteolytic enzymes that contribute to all stages of tumour progression, including the later stages of invasion and metastasis. Genetic variants in the MMP genes may influence the biological function of these enzymes and change their role in carcinogenesis and progression. We have investigated the association between the -735 C/T, the -1171 5A/6A, and the -1562 C/T polymorphisms in the MMP2, MMP3 and MMP9 genes, respectively, and the risk and survival of lung cancer. Methods The case-control study includes 879 lung cancer patients and 803 controls from a Caucasian population in Spain (CAPUA study). Genotypes were determined by PCR-RFLP. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using unconditional logistic regression. The Kaplan-Meier method, long-rank test and Cox's were used for the survival analysis. Results The MMP9 -1562 T/T genotype was associated with a statistically significant decreased risk of developing lung cancer (OR = 0.23; 95% CI: 0.06-0.85), whereas no association was found for the MMP2 -735 C/T and MMP3 -1171 5A/6A polymorphisms. The MMP2 -735 T/T genotype was statistically significantly associated with a decreased survival in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, identified as an independent prognosis factor of survival (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.79; 95% CI: 1.00-3.20). In contrast, no association was found between the MMP3 -1171 5A/6A and the MMP9 -1562 C/T polymorphisms and survival. Conclusions These findings support the hypothesis that the MMP9 -1562 C/T polymorphism is associated with a protective effect against the development of lung cancer and suggest that the MMP2 -735 C/T polymorphism modify the length of survival in NSCLC patients. PMID:22455335

  14. A Phase I Study on Adoptive Immunotherapy Using Gene-Modified T Cells for Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kershaw, Michael H.; Westwood, Jennifer A.; Parker, Linda L.; Wang, Gang; Eshhar, Zelig; Mavroukakis, Sharon A.; White, Donald E.; Wunderlich, John R.; Canevari, Silvana; Rogers-Freezer, Linda; Chen, Clara C.; Yang, James C.; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Hwu, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    Purpose A phase I study was conducted to assess the safety of adoptive immunotherapy using gene-modified autologous T cells for the treatment of metastatic ovarian cancer. Experimental Design T cells with reactivity against the ovarian cancer – associated antigen α-folate receptor (FR) were generated by genetic modification of autologous T cells with a chimeric gene incorporating an anti-FR single-chain antibody linked to the signaling domain of the Fc receptor γ chain. Patients were assigned to one of two cohorts in the study. Eight patients in cohort 1received a dose escalation of T cells in combination with high-dose interleukin-2, and six patients in cohort 2 received dual-specific T cells (reactive with both FR and allogeneic cells) followed by immunization with allogeneic peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Results Five patients in cohort 1 experienced some grade 3 to 4 treatment-related toxicity that was probably due to interleukin-2 administration, which could be managed using standard measures. Patients in cohort 2 experienced relatively mild side effects with grade 1to 2 symptoms. No reduction in tumor burden was seen in any patient. Tracking 111In-labeled adoptively transferred T cells in cohort 1revealed a lack of specific localization of T cells to tumor except in one patient where some signal was detected in a peritoneal deposit. PCR analysis showed that gene-modified T cells were present in the circulation in large numbers for the first 2 days after transfer, but these quickly declined to be barely detectable 1month later in most patients. An inhibitory factor developed in the serum of three of six patients tested over the period of treatment, which significantly reduced the ability of gene-modified T cells to respond against FR+ tumor cells. Conclusions Large numbers of gene-modified tumor-reactive T cells can be safely given to patients, but these cells do not persist in large numbers long term. Future studies need to employ strategies to

  15. Modifiable risk factors of lung cancer in "never-smoker" women.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jong-Myon

    2015-01-01

    Korean women with a history of never smoking and with adenocarcinoma showed an increasing trend in lung cancer occurrence during 2002 to 2012. The two modifiable factors of never-smoker lung cancer in women are hormone and oncogenic virus infection. Based on previous studies, hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and human papillomavirus (HPV) infection might afford protection or be a risk factor, respectively. It is necessary to perform a pooled analysis of cohort studies to evaluate HRT and never-smoker lung cancer in women and a systematic review of case-control studies to determine the association between HPV infection and never-smoker lung cancer.

  16. Elimination of progressive mammary cancer by repeated administrations of chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cells.

    PubMed

    Globerson-Levin, Anat; Waks, Tova; Eshhar, Zelig

    2014-05-01

    Continuous oncogenic processes that generate cancer require an on-going treatment approach to eliminate the transformed cells, and prevent their further development. Here, we studied the ability of T cells expressing a chimeric antibody-based receptor (CAR) to offer a therapeutic benefit for breast cancer induced by erbB-2. We tested CAR-modified T cells (T-bodies) specific to erbB-2 for their antitumor potential in a mouse model overexpressing a human erbB-2 transgene that develops mammary tumors. Comparing the antitumor reactivity of CAR-modified T cells under various therapeutic settings, either prophylactic, prior to tumor development, or therapeutically. We found that repeated administration of CAR-modified T cells is required to eliminate spontaneously developing mammary cancer. Systemic, as well as intratumoral administered CAR-modified T cells accumulated at tumor sites and eventually eliminated the malignant cells. Interestingly, within a few weeks after a single CAR T cells' administration, and rejection of primary lesion, tumors usually relapsed both in treated mammary gland and at remote sites; however, repeated injections of CAR-modified T cells were able to control the secondary tumors. Since spontaneous tumors can arise repeatedly, especially in the case of syndromes characterized by specific susceptibility to cancer, multiple administrations of CAR-modified T cells can serve to control relapsing disease.

  17. Classification of lung cancer patients and controls by chromatography of modified nucleosides in serum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McEntire, John E.; Kuo, Kenneth C.; Smith, Mark E.; Stalling, David L.; Richens, Jack W.; Zumwalt, Robert W.; Gehrke, Charles W.; Papermaster, Ben W.

    1989-01-01

    A wide spectrum of modified nucleosides has been quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography in serum of 49 male lung cancer patients, 35 patients with other cancers, and 48 patients hospitalized for nonneoplastic diseases. Data for 29 modified nucleoside peaks were normalized to an internal standard and analyzed by discriminant analysis and stepwise discriminant analysis. A model based on peaks selected by a stepwise discriminant procedure correctly classified 79% of the cancer and 75% of the noncancer subjects. It also demonstrated 84% sensitivity and 79% specificity when comparing lung cancer to noncancer subjects, and 80% sensitivity and 55% specificity in comparing lung cancer to other cancers. The nucleoside peaks having the greatest influence on the models varied dependent on the subgroups compared, confirming the importance of quantifying a wide array of nucleosides. These data support and expand previous studies which reported the utility of measuring modified nucleoside levels in serum and show that precise measurement of an array of 29 modified nucleosides in serum by high-performance liquid chromatography with UV scanning with subsequent data modeling may provide a clinically useful approach to patient classification in diagnosis and subsequent therapeutic monitoring.

  18. Magnesium in drinking water modifies the association between nitrate ingestion and risk of death from esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yen-Hsiung; Chen, Pei-Shih; Chiu, Hui-Fen; Yang, Chun-Yuh

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore whether magnesium (Mg) levels in drinking water modified the effects of nitrate on esophageal cancer risk occurrence. A matched cancer case-control study was used to investigate the relationship between the risk of death from esophageal cancer and exposure to nitrate in drinking water in Taiwan. All esophageal cancer deaths of Taiwan residents from 2006 through 2010 were obtained from the Bureau of Vital Statistics of the Taiwan Provincial Department of Health. Controls were deaths from other causes and were pair-matched to cancer cases by gender, year of birth, and year of death. Information on the levels of nitrate-nitrogen (NO(3)-N) and Mg in drinking water were collected from Taiwan Water Supply Corporation (TWSC). The municipality of residence for cancer cases and controls was presumed to be the source of the subject's NO(3)-N and Mg exposure via drinking water. Evidence of an interaction was noted between drinking water NO(3)-N and Mg intake. This is the first study to report effect modification by Mg intake originating from drinking water on an association between NO(3)-N exposure and increased risk mortality attributed to esophageal cancer.

  19. Modified arabinoxylan rice bran (MGN-3/Biobran) enhances yeast-induced apoptosis in human breast cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ghoneum, Mamdooh; Gollapudi, Sastry

    2005-01-01

    We have recently reported that phagocytosis of killed Saccharomyces cerevisiae, baker's yeast, induced apoptosis in human breast cancer cell lines MCF-7, ZR-75-1 and HCC70. In this study we have evaluated the effect of treatment with MGN-3, a modified arabinoxylan from rice bran, on phagocytosis and yeast-induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells. Cancer cells were cultured with yeast at a ratio of 1:10 in the absence or presence of MGN-3, and the percentages of phagocytic and apoptotic cancer cells were examined by flow cytometry and by cytospin preparations. Cancer cells treated with MGN-3 exhibited increased percentages of attachment (200%) and uptake of yeast (313%) by MCF-7 cells at 0.5 hr, as compared with cells without MGN-3. In addition, treatment with MGN-3 resulted in a 2 fold increase in the percentage of apoptotic MCF-7 cells, 2.5 fold for ZR-75 cells and 1.8 fold for HCC70 cells. MGN-3 effect was dose-dependent and associated with increased activation of caspases 8 and 9 in MCF-7 cells, and caspases 8, 9 and 3 in HCC70 cells. This data demonstrates that MGN-3 accelerates phagocytosis-induced apoptosis of cancer cells, which may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of breast cancer.

  20. pH-sensitive, polymer modified, plasma stable niosomes: promising carriers for anti-cancer drugs

    PubMed Central

    Tila, Dena; Yazdani-Arazi, Seyede Narjes; Ghanbarzadeh, Saeed; Arami, Sanam; Pourmoazzen, Zhaleh

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was the design and evaluation of a novel plasma stable, pH-sensitive niosomal formulation of Mitoxantrone by a modified ethanol injection method. Cholesterol hemisuccinate was added instead of cholesterol in order to produce pH-sensitivity property and using PEG-Poly (monomethyl itaconate)-CholC6 (PEG-PMMI-CholC6) copolymer introduced simultaneously pH-sensitivity and plasma stability properties in prepared niosomes. The pH-sensitivity and cytotoxicity of Mitoxantrone niosomes were evaluated in vitro in phosphate buffer with different pHs as well as using human ovarian cancer cell line (OVCAR-3), human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Results showed that both cholesterol derivatives bearing formulations had pH-sensitive property and were found to release their contents under mild acidic conditions rapidly. In addition, the PEG-PMMI-CholC6-based niosomes could reserve the pH-sensitivity after incubation in plasma. Both Mitoxantrone-loaded pH-sensitive niosomes showed higher cytotoxicity than the conventional niosomes on OVCAR-3 and MCF-7 cell lines. However, both pH-sensitive niosomes exhibited lower cytotoxic effect on HUVEC cell line. Plasma stable, pH-sensitive niosomes could improve the cytotoxic effect and reduce the side effects of anti-tumor drugs. PMID:26417350

  1. Genetic variant in the telomerase gene modifies cancer risk in Lynch syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bellido, Fernando; Guinó, Elisabet; Jagmohan-Changur, Shantie; Seguí, Nuria; Pineda, Marta; Navarro, Matilde; Lázaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Vasen, Hans F A; Moreno, Victor; Capellá, Gabriel; Wijnen, Juul T; Valle, Laura

    2013-05-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) is an inherited cancer-predisposing disorder caused by germline mutations in the mismatch repair (MMR) genes. The high variability in individual cancer risk observed among LS patients suggests the existence of modifying factors. Identifying genetic modifiers of risk could help implement personalized surveillance programs based on predicted cancer risks. Here we evaluate the role of the telomerase (hTERT) rs2075786 SNP as a cancer-risk modifier in LS, studying 255 and 675 MMR gene mutation carriers from Spain and the Netherlands, respectively. The study of the Spanish sample revealed that the minor allele (A) confers increased cancer risk at an early age. The analysis of the Dutch sample confirmed the association of the A allele, especially in homozygosity, with increased cancer risk in mutation carriers under the age of 45 (relative riskLSca<45_AA=2.90; 95% confidence interval=1.02-8.26). Rs2075786 is associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) risk neither in the general population nor in non-Lynch CRC families. In silico studies predicted that the SNP causes the disruption of a transcription binding site for a retinoid receptor, retinoid X receptor alpha, probably causing early telomerase activation and therefore accelerated carcinogenesis. Notably, cancer-affected LS patients with the AA genotype have shorter telomeres than those with GG. In conclusion, MMR gene mutation carriers with hTERT rs2075786 are at high risk to develop a LS-related tumor at an early age. Cancer-preventive measures and stricter cancer surveillance at early ages might help prevent or early detect cancer in these mutation carriers.

  2. Cancers in Australia in 2010 attributable to modifiable factors: summary and conclusions

    PubMed Central

    Whiteman, David C; Webb, Penelope M; Green, Adele C; Neale, Rachel E; Fritschi, Lin; Bain, Christopher J; Parkin, D Max; Wilson, Louise F; Olsen, Catherine M; Nagle, Christina M; Pandeya, Nirmala; Jordan, Susan J; Antonsson, Annika; Kendall, Bradley J; Hughes, Maria Celia B; Ibiebele, Torukiri I; Miura, Kyoko; Peters, Susan; Carey, Renee N

    2015-01-01

    Objective To estimate the numbers and proportions of cancers occurring in Australia in 2010 attributable to modifiable causal factors. Methods We estimated the population attributable fraction (PAF) of cancers associated with exposure to 13 causal factors using standard formulae incorporating exposure prevalence and relative risk data. We also calculated the potential impact of changing exposure to some factors. Results A total of 32% of all cancers diagnosed in Australia in 2010 (excluding keratinocyte cancers) were attributable to the 13 factors assessed (men 33%; women 31%). Leading factors were tobacco smoke (PAF all cancers: 13.4%), solar radiation (6.2%), inadequate diet (6.1%) and overweight/obesity (3.4%). Factors conferring highest PAFs differed by sex: highest PAFs for men were tobacco smoke (15.8%), solar radiation (7.1%) and alcohol (3.0%); while highest PAFs for women were tobacco smoke (10.1%), solar radiation (5.0%) and overweight/obesity (4.5%). Sites with the highest counts of potentially preventable cancers were lung (8,569), colorectal (7,404), melanoma of the skin (7,220) and breast (3,233). Conclusions At least one in three cancers in Australia is attributable to exposure to known modifiable factors. Implications Up to 37,000 cancers could be prevented in Australia each year if the population avoided exposure to 13 common factors known or strongly suspected to cause cancer. PMID:26437735

  3. dbEM: A database of epigenetic modifiers curated from cancerous and normal genomes.

    PubMed

    Singh Nanda, Jagpreet; Kumar, Rahul; Raghava, Gajendra P S

    2016-01-18

    We have developed a database called dbEM (database of Epigenetic Modifiers) to maintain the genomic information of about 167 epigenetic modifiers/proteins, which are considered as potential cancer targets. In dbEM, modifiers are classified on functional basis and comprise of 48 histone methyl transferases, 33 chromatin remodelers and 31 histone demethylases. dbEM maintains the genomic information like mutations, copy number variation and gene expression in thousands of tumor samples, cancer cell lines and healthy samples. This information is obtained from public resources viz. COSMIC, CCLE and 1000-genome project. Gene essentiality data retrieved from COLT database further highlights the importance of various epigenetic proteins for cancer survival. We have also reported the sequence profiles, tertiary structures and post-translational modifications of these epigenetic proteins in cancer. It also contains information of 54 drug molecules against different epigenetic proteins. A wide range of tools have been integrated in dbEM e.g. Search, BLAST, Alignment and Profile based prediction. In our analysis, we found that epigenetic proteins DNMT3A, HDAC2, KDM6A, and TET2 are highly mutated in variety of cancers. We are confident that dbEM will be very useful in cancer research particularly in the field of epigenetic proteins based cancer therapeutics. This database is available for public at URL: http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/dbem.

  4. dbEM: A database of epigenetic modifiers curated from cancerous and normal genomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh Nanda, Jagpreet; Kumar, Rahul; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a database called dbEM (database of Epigenetic Modifiers) to maintain the genomic information of about 167 epigenetic modifiers/proteins, which are considered as potential cancer targets. In dbEM, modifiers are classified on functional basis and comprise of 48 histone methyl transferases, 33 chromatin remodelers and 31 histone demethylases. dbEM maintains the genomic information like mutations, copy number variation and gene expression in thousands of tumor samples, cancer cell lines and healthy samples. This information is obtained from public resources viz. COSMIC, CCLE and 1000-genome project. Gene essentiality data retrieved from COLT database further highlights the importance of various epigenetic proteins for cancer survival. We have also reported the sequence profiles, tertiary structures and post-translational modifications of these epigenetic proteins in cancer. It also contains information of 54 drug molecules against different epigenetic proteins. A wide range of tools have been integrated in dbEM e.g. Search, BLAST, Alignment and Profile based prediction. In our analysis, we found that epigenetic proteins DNMT3A, HDAC2, KDM6A, and TET2 are highly mutated in variety of cancers. We are confident that dbEM will be very useful in cancer research particularly in the field of epigenetic proteins based cancer therapeutics. This database is available for public at URL: http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/dbem.

  5. Recent developments in the ability to predict and modify breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Prado, Arturo; Andrades, Patricio; Parada, Francisco

    2010-10-01

    The identification of women at higher risk for breast cancer is a matter of public health and anyone who participates in any treatment modality of this condition (this includes the plastic surgeon) should be aware of the tools and predictive models of breast cancer. Screening for breast cancer in the community, and probably during the daily plastic surgery consultation, until recently, was limited to decisions about when to initiate a mammography study. New developments that predict and modify breast cancer risk must be clearly understood by our specialty through identification of women at higher risk for breast cancer and be familiar with the current issues related to screening and risk-reduction measures. In this review, we discuss current knowledge regarding the recent data of breast cancer risk, screening strategies for high-risk women and medical and surgical approaches to reduce breast cancer risk. Patients with breast cancer belong to one of three groups: a. Sporadic breast cancer (75%)--patients without family history or those who have a breast biopsy with proliferative changes. b. Genetic mutation breast cancer (5%)--women who have a genetic predisposition, and most of these are attributable to mutations in the breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) and breast cancer susceptibility gene 2 (BRCA2). c. Cluster family breast cancer (20%)--seen in women with a relevant history of breast cancer in the family and breast biopsy with proliferative breast changes with no association with mutations.Those at high risk for breast cancer should investigate the family history with genetic testing consideration, clinical history, including prior breast biopsies and evaluation of mammographic density. Tools for breast cancer risk assessment include the Gail and Claus model, genetic screening,BRCAPRO and others that are evaluated in this review.

  6. Quercetin-Based Modified Porous Silicon Nanoparticles for Enhanced Inhibition of Doxorubicin-Resistant Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zehua; Balasubramanian, Vimalkumar; Bhat, Chinmay; Vahermo, Mikko; Mäkilä, Ermei; Kemell, Marianna; Fontana, Flavia; Janoniene, Agne; Petrikaite, Vilma; Salonen, Jarno; Yli-Kauhaluoma, Jari; Hirvonen, Jouni; Zhang, Hongbo; Santos, Hélder A

    2017-02-01

    One of the most challenging obstacles in nanoparticle's surface modification is to achieve the concept that one ligand can accomplish multiple purposes. Upon such consideration, 3-aminopropoxy-linked quercetin (AmQu), a derivative of a natural flavonoid inspired by the structure of dopamine, is designed and subsequently used to modify the surface of thermally hydrocarbonized porous silicon (PSi) nanoparticles. This nanosystem inherits several advanced properties in a single carrier, including promoted anticancer efficiency, multiple drug resistance (MDR) reversing, stimuli-responsive drug release, drug release monitoring, and enhanced particle-cell interactions. The anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) is efficiently loaded into this nanosystem and released in a pH-dependent manner. AmQu also effectively quenches the fluorescence of the loaded DOX, thereby allowing the use of the nanosystem for monitoring the intracellular drug release. Furthermore, a synergistic effect with the presence of AmQu is observed in both normal MCF-7 and DOX-resistant MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Due to the similar structure as dopamine, AmQu may facilitate both the interaction and internalization of PSi into the cells. Overall, this PSi-based platform exhibits remarkable superiority in both multifunctionality and anticancer efficiency, making this nanovector a promising system for anti-MDR cancer treatment.

  7. Interleukin-27 expression modifies prostate cancer cell crosstalk with bone and immune cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zolochevska, Olga; Diaz-Quiñones, Adriana O; Ellis, Jayne; Figueiredo, Marxa L

    2013-05-01

    Prostate cancer is frequently associated with bone metastases, where the crosstalk between tumor cells and key cells of the bone microenvironment (osteoblasts, osteoclasts, immune cells) amplifies tumor growth. We have explored the potential of a novel cytokine, interleukin-27 (IL-27), for inhibiting this malignant crosstalk, and have examined the effect of autocrine IL-27 on prostate cancer cell gene expression, as well as the effect of paracrine IL-27 on gene expression in bone and T cells. In prostate tumor cells, IL-27 upregulated genes related to its signaling pathway while downregulating malignancy-related receptors and cytokine genes involved in gp130 signaling, as well as several protease genes. In both undifferentiated and differentiated osteoblasts, IL-27 modulated upregulation of genes related to its own signaling pathway as well as pro-osteogenic genes. In osteoclasts, IL-27 downregulated several genes typically involved in malignancy and also downregulated osteoclastogenesis-related genes. Furthermore, an osteogenesis-focused real-time PCR array revealed a more extensive profile of pro-osteogenic gene changes in both osteoblasts and osteoclasts. In T-lymphocyte cells, IL-27 upregulated several activation-related genes and also genes related to the IL-27 signaling pathway and downregulated several genes that could modulate osteoclastogenesis. Overall, our results suggest that IL-27 may be able to modify interactions between prostate tumor and bone microenvironment cells and thus could be used as a multifunctional therapeutic for restoring bone homeostasis while treating metastatic prostate tumors.

  8. Genetically modified T cells in cancer therapy: opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Michaela; Mount, Natalie

    2015-04-01

    Tumours use many strategies to evade the host immune response, including downregulation or weak immunogenicity of target antigens and creation of an immune-suppressive tumour environment. T cells play a key role in cell-mediated immunity and, recently, strategies to genetically modify T cells either through altering the specificity of the T cell receptor (TCR) or through introducing antibody-like recognition in chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) have made substantial advances. The potential of these approaches has been demonstrated in particular by the successful use of genetically modified T cells to treat B cell haematological malignancies in clinical trials. This clinical success is reflected in the growing number of strategic partnerships in this area that have attracted a high level of investment and involve large pharmaceutical organisations. Although our understanding of the factors that influence the safety and efficacy of these therapies has increased, challenges for bringing genetically modified T-cell immunotherapy to many patients with different tumour types remain. These challenges range from the selection of antigen targets and dealing with regulatory and safety issues to successfully navigating the routes to commercial development. However, the encouraging clinical data, the progress in the scientific understanding of tumour immunology and the improvements in the manufacture of cell products are all advancing the clinical translation of these important cellular immunotherapies.

  9. Enhanced recognition of hydroxyl radical modified plasmid DNA by circulating cancer antibodies.

    PubMed

    Khan, F; Ali, A; Ali, R

    2005-06-01

    Reactive oxygen species have been implicated in various human diseases which are also responsible for the elimination of invading pathogens. In disease state and inflammatory responses, the excess of these radicals damage cellular macromolecules. DNA is susceptible to attacks by OH-induced damage. Oxidative DNA damage is an important factor in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. In the present study, purified plasmid Bluescript DNA was modified by hydroxyl radical. Modifications incurred in DNA were characterized by physico-chemical techniques. Sera from patients of cancer were studied for their binding to native and hydroxyl radical modified plasmid DNA. Direct binding ELISA and competition binding results indicated that autoantibodies in cancer showed higher recognition to ROS-plasmid DNA as compared to the native form. Retarded mobility of the immune complex formation between IgG isolated from cancer sera using native and ROS-plasmid DNA as antigens reiterated preferential recognition of modified plasmid DNA by cancer autoantibodies. Therefore, it can be concluded that circulating autoantibodies in cancer sera bind preferentially to ROS-plasmid DNA as compared to native polymer. The data presented in the present communication suggest a role of ROS in the etiology of cancer.

  10. Breast cancer risk and 6q22.33: combined results from Breast Cancer Association Consortium and Consortium of Investigators on Modifiers of BRCA1/2.

    PubMed

    Kirchhoff, Tomas; Gaudet, Mia M; Antoniou, Antonis C; McGuffog, Lesley; Humphreys, Manjeet K; Dunning, Alison M; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Flyger, Henrik; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Ahn, Sei-Hyun; Dork, Thilo; Schürmann, Peter; Karstens, Johann H; Hillemanns, Peter; Couch, Fergus J; Olson, Janet; Vachon, Celine; Wang, Xianshu; Cox, Angela; Brock, Ian; Elliott, Graeme; Reed, Malcolm W R; Burwinkel, Barbara; Meindl, Alfons; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Broeks, Annegien; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Van 't Veer, Laura J; Braaf, Linde M; Johnson, Nichola; Fletcher, Olivia; Gibson, Lorna; Peto, Julian; Turnbull, Clare; Seal, Sheila; Renwick, Anthony; Rahman, Nazneen; Wu, Pei-Ei; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Shen, Chen-Yang; Southey, Melissa C; Hopper, John L; Hammet, Fleur; Van Dorpe, Thijs; Dieudonne, Anne-Sophie; Hatse, Sigrid; Lambrechts, Diether; Andrulis, Irene L; Bogdanova, Natalia; Antonenkova, Natalia; Rogov, Juri I; Prokofieva, Daria; Bermisheva, Marina; Khusnutdinova, Elza; van Asperen, Christi J; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Hooning, Maartje J; Devilee, Peter; Margolin, Sara; Lindblom, Annika; Milne, Roger L; Arias, José Ignacio; Zamora, M Pilar; Benítez, Javier; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Giles, Graham G; Spurdle, Amanda B; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Holland, Helene; Healey, Sue; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kauppinen, Jaana; Kataja, Vesa; Agnarsson, Bjarni A; Caligo, Maria A; Godwin, Andrew K; Nevanlinna, Heli; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Fredericksen, Zachary; Lindor, Noralane; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Loman, Niklas; Karlsson, Per; Stenmark Askmalm, Marie; Melin, Beatrice; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Verheus, Martijn; Rookus, Matti A; Seynaeve, Caroline; Oldenburg, Rogier A; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J; Ausems, Margreet G E M; Aalfs, Cora M; Gille, Hans J P; Wijnen, Juul T; Gómez García, Encarna B; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare T; Frost, Debra; Luccarini, Craig; Pichert, Gabriella; Davidson, Rosemarie; Chu, Carol; Eccles, Diana; Ong, Kai-Ren; Cook, Jackie; Douglas, Fiona; Hodgson, Shirley; Evans, D Gareth; Eeles, Rosalind; Gold, Bert; Pharoah, Paul D P; Offit, Kenneth; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F

    2012-01-01

    Recently, a locus on chromosome 6q22.33 (rs2180341) was reported to be associated with increased breast cancer risk in the Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) population, and this association was also observed in populations of non-AJ European ancestry. In the present study, we performed a large replication analysis of rs2180341 using data from 31,428 invasive breast cancer cases and 34,700 controls collected from 25 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). In addition, we evaluated whether rs2180341 modifies breast cancer risk in 3,361 BRCA1 and 2,020 BRCA2 carriers from 11 centers in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). Based on the BCAC data from women of European ancestry, we found evidence for a weak association with breast cancer risk for rs2180341 (per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.03, 95% CI 1.00-1.06, p = 0.023). There was evidence for heterogeneity in the ORs among studies (I(2) = 49.3%; p = <0.004). In CIMBA, we observed an inverse association with the minor allele of rs2180341 and breast cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers (per-allele OR = 0.89, 95%CI 0.80-1.00, p = 0.048), indicating a potential protective effect of this allele. These data suggest that that 6q22.33 confers a weak effect on breast cancer risk.

  11. Breast Cancer Risk and 6q22.33: Combined Results from Breast Cancer Association Consortium and Consortium of Investigators on Modifiers of BRCA1/2

    PubMed Central

    Antoniou, Antonis C.; McGuffog, Lesley; Humphreys, Manjeet K.; Dunning, Alison M.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Flyger, Henrik; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Ahn, Sei-Hyun; Dork, Thilo; Schürmann, Peter; Karstens, Johann H.; Hillemanns, Peter; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet; Vachon, Celine; Wang, Xianshu; Cox, Angela; Brock, Ian; Elliott, Graeme; Reed, Malcolm W.R.; Burwinkel, Barbara; Meindl, Alfons; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Broeks, Annegien; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Van ‘t Veer, Laura J.; Braaf, Linde M.; Johnson, Nichola; Fletcher, Olivia; Gibson, Lorna; Peto, Julian; Turnbull, Clare; Seal, Sheila; Renwick, Anthony; Rahman, Nazneen; Wu, Pei-Ei; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Shen, Chen-Yang; Southey, Melissa C.; Hopper, John L.; Hammet, Fleur; Van Dorpe, Thijs; Dieudonne, Anne-Sophie; Hatse, Sigrid; Lambrechts, Diether; Andrulis, Irene L.; Bogdanova, Natalia; Antonenkova, Natalia; Rogov, Juri I.; Prokofieva, Daria; Bermisheva, Marina; Khusnutdinova, Elza; van Asperen, Christi J.; Tollenaar, Robert A.E.M.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Devilee, Peter; Margolin, Sara; Lindblom, Annika; Milne, Roger L.; Arias, José Ignacio; Zamora, M. Pilar; Benítez, Javier; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Giles, Graham G.; kConFab; Group, AOCS Study; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Holland, Helene; Healey, Sue; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kauppinen, Jaana; Kataja, Vesa; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Caligo, Maria A.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Fredericksen, Zachary; Lindor, Noralane; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; SWE-BRCA; Loman, Niklas; Karlsson, Per; Askmalm, Marie Stenmark; Melin, Beatrice; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; HEBON; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Verheus, Martijn; Rookus, Matti A.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Oldenburg, Rogier A.; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J.; Ausems, Margreet G.E.M.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Gille, Hans J.P.; Wijnen, Juul T.; Gómez García, Encarna B.; EMBRACE; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare T.; Frost, Debra; Luccarini, Craig; Pichert, Gabriella; Davidson, Rosemarie; Chu, Carol; Eccles, Diana; Ong, Kai-Ren; Cook, Jackie; Douglas, Fiona; Hodgson, Shirley; Evans, D. Gareth; Eeles, Rosalind; Gold, Bert; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Offit, Kenneth; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, a locus on chromosome 6q22.33 (rs2180341) was reported to be associated with increased breast cancer risk in the Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) population, and this association was also observed in populations of non-AJ European ancestry. In the present study, we performed a large replication analysis of rs2180341 using data from 31,428 invasive breast cancer cases and 34,700 controls collected from 25 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). In addition, we evaluated whether rs2180341 modifies breast cancer risk in 3,361 BRCA1 and 2,020 BRCA2 carriers from 11 centers in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). Based on the BCAC data from women of European ancestry, we found evidence for a weak association with breast cancer risk for rs2180341 (per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.03, 95% CI 1.00–1.06, p = 0.023). There was evidence for heterogeneity in the ORs among studies (I2 = 49.3%; p = <0.004). In CIMBA, we observed an inverse association with the minor allele of rs2180341 and breast cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers (per-allele OR = 0.89, 95%CI 0.80–1.00, p = 0.048), indicating a potential protective effect of this allele. These data suggest that that 6q22.33 confers a weak effect on breast cancer risk. PMID:22768030

  12. Early Detection of Breast Cancer Using Posttranslationally Modified Biomarkers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    Globo H (16-18), sialosyl-TF (19-22) and advanced glycation end products (AGE) (23, 24). However, we are lacking of specific antibodies for this...we found out that the sialosyl-TF and advanced glycation end products (AGE) are too low to detect or the sensitivity of these antibodies are not...and Zima, T. (2007) Receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE)--soluble form (sRAGE) and gene polymorphisms in patients with breast cancer

  13. Polymorphisms in genes of the steroid receptor superfamily modify postmenopausal breast cancer risk associated with menopausal hormone therapy.

    PubMed

    2010-06-15

    Menopausal hormone therapy (HT) is associated with increased breast cancer risk among postmenopausal women. Nuclear receptors are involved in steroid hormone- and xenobiotic-mediated signal transduction playing a crucial role in regulating gene expression. Therefore, variations within these genes may influence HT-associated breast cancer risk. We investigated 3,149 postmenopausal breast cancer patients and 5,489 controls from 2 German population-based case-control studies. Thirty-three polymorphisms selected on the basis of known or putative functional relevance located in ESR1, ESR2, PGR, PXR and AR were genotyped. Conditional logistic regression was used to assess multiplicative statistical interaction between polymorphisms and duration of estrogen-progestagen therapy and of estrogen monotherapy with regard to breast cancer risk assuming log-additive and codominant modes of inheritance. We observed an increased risk for women carrying short AR_(CAG) alleles of <22 repeats associated with combined estrogen-progestagen therapy compared with those with long alleles (> or =22 repeats) (p(interaction) = 0.03). Additionally, risk associated with combination therapy use was significantly modified by 2 PXR polymorphisms with reduction of risk effects in carriers of the minor PXR_rs6785049_G and PXR_rs1054191_A alleles (p(interaction) = 0.04 and 0.05, respectively). Variants in both ESR1 and ESR2 modified risk associated with estrogen monotherapy use. Higher risk were observed in homozygotes for the major ESR1_rs910416_T allele (p(interaction) < 0.01) and in homozygotes for the minor ESR2_rs1271572_T, major ESR2_rs4986938_G and minor ESR2_rs928554_G alleles (p(interaction) = 0.02, 0.05, 0.02, respectively). Risk effect modification by ESR1_rs910416 and AR_(CAG)n polymorphisms remained significant after correction for multiple testing. We conclude that genetic variants in nuclear receptor genes may modify HT-associated postmenopausal breast cancer risk.

  14. Modifiable Risk Factors and Major Cardiac Events Among Adult Survivors of Childhood Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Gregory T.; Oeffinger, Kevin C.; Chen, Yan; Kawashima, Toana; Yasui, Yutaka; Leisenring, Wendy; Stovall, Marilyn; Chow, Eric J.; Sklar, Charles A.; Mulrooney, Daniel A.; Mertens, Ann C.; Border, William; Durand, Jean-Bernard; Robison, Leslie L.; Meacham, Lillian R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the relative contribution of modifiable cardiovascular risk factors on the development of major cardiac events in aging adult survivors of childhood cancer. Patients and Methods Among 10,724 5-year survivors (median age, 33.7 years) and 3,159 siblings in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study, the prevalence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, and obesity was determined, along with the incidence and severity of major cardiac events such as coronary artery disease, heart failure, valvular disease, and arrhythmia. On longitudinal follow-up, rate ratios (RRs) of subsequent cardiac events associated with cardiovascular risk factors and cardiotoxic therapy were assessed in multivariable Poisson regression models. Results Among survivors, the cumulative incidence of coronary artery disease, heart failure, valvular disease, and arrhythmia by 45 years of age was 5.3%, 4.8%, 1.5%, and 1.3%, respectively. Two or more cardiovascular risk factors were reported by 10.3% of survivors and 7.9% of siblings. The risk for each cardiac event increased with increasing number of cardiovascular risk factors (all Ptrend < .001). Hypertension significantly increased risk for coronary artery disease (RR, 6.1), heart failure (RR, 19.4), valvular disease (RR, 13.6), and arrhythmia (RR, 6.0; all P values < .01). The combined effect of chest-directed radiotherapy plus hypertension resulted in potentiation of risk for each of the major cardiac events beyond that anticipated on the basis of an additive expectation. Hypertension was independently associated with risk of cardiac death (RR, 5.6; 95% CI, 3.2 to 9.7). Conclusion Modifiable cardiovascular risk factors, particularly hypertension, potentiate therapy-associated risk for major cardiac events in this population and should be the focus of future interventional studies. PMID:24002505

  15. Inhibitory impacts of chemically modified tetracycline-3 and underlying mechanism in human cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lin; Xu, Jiaying; Yang, Yang; Chong, Yu; Liu, Chang; Jiao, Yang; Fan, Saijun

    2013-09-01

    Chemically modified tetracyclines (CMTs) have been rationally designed from tetracyclines. The CMTs that show the antimicrobial properties are eliminated, whereas matrix metalloproteinase inhibitory properties are retained. Interestingly, CMT-3 (COL-3, by eliminating the dimethylamino, methyl, and hydroxyl functionalities on the basic tetracycline structure), one of the CMTs, has shown strong anticancer activity. In this study, we found that CMT-3 showed dose-dependent and time-dependent cytotoxicity in HeLa and Siha cells, two human cervical cancer cell lines. HeLa cells were more sensitive to CMT-3 compared with Siha cells. The antiproliferation potential of CMT-3 was associated with the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway, increasing reactive oxygen species level, and proapoptosis protein (e.g. caspase-3) expression, but decreasing antiapoptosis protein expression (e.g. Bcl-2). N-acetylcysteine (a reactive oxygen species inhibitor) and Z-LEHD-FMK significantly reduced or blocked the apoptosis event resulting from cytotoxic effect of CMT-3. CMT-3 also induced G0/G1 phase arrest with the reduction of cell cycle regulatory protein cyclin E and the translocation of NF-κB from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Our findings provide the important foundation for further investigation of the underlying mechanism for the anticancer activity of CMT-3 and the potential application of CMT-3 as a new therapeutic candidate for clinical cervical cancer therapy.

  16. Modified sugar beet pectin induces apoptosis of colon cancer cells via interaction with the neutral sugar side-chains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pectins extracted from a variety of sources and modified with heat and/or pH have previously been shown to exhibit activity towards several cancer cell lines. However, the structural basis for the anti-cancer activity of modified pectin requires clarification. Sugar beet and citrus pectin extracts h...

  17. Polyaniline modified flexible conducting paper for cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Saurabh; Sen, Anindita; Kumar, Suveen; Augustine, Shine; Yadav, Birendra K.; Mishra, Sandeep; Malhotra, Bansi D.

    2016-05-01

    We report results of studies relating to the fabrication of a flexible, disposable, and label free biosensing platform for detection of the cancer biomarker (carcinoembryonic antigen, CEA). Polyaniline (PANI) has been electrochemically deposited over gold sputtered paper (Au@paper) for covalent immobilization of monoclonal carcinoembryonic antibodies (anti-CEA). The bovine serum albumin (BSA) has been used for blocking nonspecific binding sites at the anti-CEA conjugated PANI/Au@Paper. The PANI/Au@Paper, anti-CEA/PANI/Au@Paper, and BSA/anti-CEA/PANI/Au@Paper platforms have been characterized using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transmission infrared spectroscopy, chronoamperometry, and electrochemical impedance techniques. The results of the electrochemical response studies indicate that this BSA/anti-CEA/PANI/Au@paper electrode has sensitivity of 13.9 μA ng-1 ml cm2, shelf life of 22 days, and can be used to estimate CEA in the range of 2-20 ng ml-1. This paper sensor has been validated by detection of CEA in serum samples of cancer patients via immunoassay technique.

  18. PTD-Modified ATTEMPTS for Enhanced Toxin-based Cancer Therapy: An In Vivo Proof-of-Concept Study

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Meong Cheol; Zhang, Jian; Min, Kyoung Ah; He, Huining; David, Allan E.; Huang, Yongzhuo; Yang, Victor C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the feasibility of applying PTD-modified ATTEMPTS (Antibody Targeted Triggered Electrically Modified Prodrug-Type Strategy) for enhanced toxin therapy for the treatment of cancer. Methods A heparin-functionalized murine anti-CEA monoclonal antibody (mAb), T84.66-heparin (T84.66-Hep), was chemically synthesized and characterized for specific binding to CEA overexpressed cells. The T84.66-Hep was then applied to the PTD-modified ATTEMPTS approach and the crucial features of the drug delivery system (DDS), ‘antibody targeting’ and ‘heparin/protamine-based prodrug’, were evaluated in vitro to examine whether it could selective delivery a PTD-modified toxin, recombinant TAT-gelonin chimera (TAT-Gel), to CEA high expression cancer cells (LS174T). Furthermore, the feasibility of the drug delivery system (DDS) was assessed in vivo by biodistribution and efficacy studies using LS174T s.c. xenograft tumor bearing mice. Results T84.66-Hep displayed specific binding, but limited internalization (35% after 48 h incubation) to CEA high expression LS174T cells over low expression HCT116 cells. When mixed together with TAT-Gel, the T84.66-Hep formed a strong yet reversible complex. This complex formation provided an effective means of active tumor targeting of TAT-Gel, by 1) directing the TAT-Gel to CEA overexpressed tumor cells and 2) preventing nonspecific cell transduction to non-targeted normal cells. The cell transduction of TAT-Gel could, however, be efficiently reversed by addition of protamine. Feasibility of in vivo tumor targeting and “protamine-induced release” of TAT-Gel from the T84.66-Hep counterpart was confirmed by biodistribution and preliminary efficacy studies. Conclusions This study successfully demonstrated in vitro and in vivo the applicability of PTD-modified ATTEMPTS for toxin-based cancer therapy. PMID:25701313

  19. The use of genetically modified mice in cancer risk assessment: Challenges and limitations*

    PubMed Central

    Eastmond, David A.; Vulimiri, Suryanarayana V.; French, John E.; Sonawane, Babasaheb

    2015-01-01

    The use of genetically modified (GM) mice to assess carcinogenicity is playing an increasingly important role in the safety evaluation of chemicals. While progress has been made in developing and evaluating mouse models such as the Trp53+/−, Tg.AC and the rasH2, the suitability of these models as replacements for the conventional rodent cancer bioassay and for assessing human health risks remains uncertain. The objective of this research was to evaluate the use of accelerated cancer bioassays with GM mice for assessing the potential health risks associated with exposure to carcinogenic agents. We compared the published results from the GM bioassays to those obtained in the National Toxicology Program’s conventional chronic mouse bioassay for their potential use in risk assessment. Our analysis indicates that the GM models are less efficient in detecting carcinogenic agents but more consistent in identifying non-carcinogenic agents. We identified several issues of concern related to the design of the accelerated bioassays (e.g., sample size, study duration, genetic stability and reproducibility) as well as pathway-dependency of effects, and different carcinogenic mechanisms operable in GM and non-GM mice. The use of the GM models for dose-response assessment is particularly problematic as these models are, at times, much more or less sensitive than the conventional rodent cancer bioassays. Thus, the existing GM mouse models may be useful for hazard identification, but will be of limited use for dose-response assessment. Hence, caution should be exercised when using GM mouse models to assess the carcinogenic risks of chemicals. PMID:23985072

  20. Hyaluronan-modified magnetic nanoclusters for detection of CD44-overexpressing breast cancer by MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Lim, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Hyun-Ouk; Jang, Eunji; Park, Joseph; Lee, Kwangyeol; Suh, Jin-Suck; Huh, Yong-Min; Haam, Seungjoo

    2011-11-01

    We fabricated hyaluronan-modified magnetic nanoclusters (HA-MNCs) for detection of CD44-overexpressing breast cancer using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. CD44 is closely associated with cancer growth, including proliferation, metastasis, invasion, and angiogenesis. Hence, pyrenyl hyaluronan (Py-HA) conjugates were synthesized as CD44-targetable surfactants with hyaluronan (HA) and 1-pyrenylbutyric acid (Py) to modify hyaluronan on hydrophobic magnetic nanocrystals. Subsequently, HA-MNCs were fabricated using the nano-emulsion method; magnetic nanocrystals were simultaneously self-assembled with Py-HA conjugates, and their physical and magnetic properties depended on the degree of substitution (DS) of Py in Py-HA conjugates. HA-MNCs exhibited superior targeting efficiency with MR sensitivity as well as excellent biocompatibility through in vitro/in vivo studies. This suggests that HA-MNCs can be a potent cancer specific molecular imaging agent via targeted detection of CD44 with MR imaging.

  1. Magnetic hyperthermia and pH-responsive effective drug delivery to the sub-cellular level of human breast cancer cells by modified CoFe2O4 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Oh, Yunok; Moorthy, Madhappan Santha; Manivasagan, Panchanathan; Bharathiraja, Subramaniyan; Oh, Junghwan

    2017-02-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MNPs) have been extensively utilized in a wide range of biomedical applications including magnetic hyperthermia agent. To improve the efficiency of the MNPs in therapeutic applications, in this study, we have synthesized CoFe2O4 nanoparticles and its surface was further functionalized with meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA). The anticancer agent, Doxorubucin (DOX) was conjugated with CoFe2O4@DMSA nanoparticle to evaluate the combined effects of thermotherapy and chemotherapy. The drug delivery efficiency of the DOX loaded CoFe2O4@DMSA nanoparticles were examined based on magnetically triggered delivery of DOX into the subcellular level of cancer cells by using MDA-MB-231 cell line. The amine part of the DOX molecules were effectively attached through an electrostatic interactions and/or hydrogen bonding interactions with the carboxylic acid groups of the DMSA functionalities present onto the surface of the CoFe2O4 nanoparticles. The DOX loaded CoFe2O4@DMSA nanoparticles can effectively uptake with cancer cells via typical endocytosis process. After endocytosis, DOX release from CoFe2O4 nanoparticles was triggered by intracellular endosomal/lysosomal acidic environments and the localized heat can be generated under an alternating magnetic field (AMF). In the presence of AMF, the released DOX molecules were accumulated with high concentrations into the subcellular level at a desired sites and exhibited a synergistic effect of an enhanced cell cytotoxicity by the combined effects of thermal-chemotherapy. Importantly, pH- and thermal-responsive Dox-loaded CoFe2O4 nanoparticles induced significant cellular apoptosis more efficiently mediated by active mitochondrial membrane and ROS generation than the free Dox. Thus, the Dox-loaded CoFe2O4@DMSA nanoparticles can be used as a potential therapeutic agent in cancer therapy by combining the thermo-chemotherapy techniques.

  2. Modified approach for extraperitoneal laparoscopic staging for locally advanced cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Gil-Moreno, A; Maffuz, A; Díaz-Feijoo, B; Puig, O; Martínez-Palones, J M; Pérez, A; García, A; Xercavins, J

    2007-12-01

    Describe a modified approach to the technique for staging laparoscopic extraperitoneal aortic and common iliac lymph node dissection for locally advanced cervical cancer.Retrospective, nonrandomized clinical study. (Canadian Task Force classification II-2), setting in an acute-care, teaching hospital. Thirty-six patients with locally advanced cervical cancer underwent laparoscopic surgical staging via extraperitoneal approach with the conventional or the modified technique from August 2001 through September 2004. Clinical outcomes in 23 patients who were operated on with the conventional technique using index finger for first trocar entrance; 12 patients with the modified technique using direct trocar entrance, were compared. One patient was excluded due to peritoneal carcinomatosis. Technique, baseline characteristics, histopathologic variables and surgical outcome were measured. There were no significant differences in patients basal characteristics on comparative analysis between conventional and modified technique. With our proposed modified technique, we obtained a reduced surgical procedure duration and blood loss. The proposed modified surgical technique offers some advantages, is an easier approach because the parietal pelvic peritoneum is elastic and this helps to avoid its disruption at time of trocar insertion, size of incision is shorter, we achieved no CO2 leak through the trocar orifice, and wound suture is fast and simple.

  3. Potential adverse health effects of genetically modified crops.

    PubMed

    Bakshi, Anita

    2003-01-01

    Genetically modified crops have the potential to eliminate hunger and starvation in millions of people, especially in developing countries because the genetic modification can produce large amounts of foods that are more nutritious. Large quantities are produced because genetically modified crops are more resistant to pests and drought. They also contain greater amounts of nutrients, such as proteins and vitamins. However, there are concerns about the safety of genetically modified crops. The concerns are that they may contain allergenic substances due to introduction of new genes into crops. Another concern is that genetic engineering often involves the use of antibiotic-resistance genes as "selectable markers" and this could lead to production of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains that are resistant to available antibiotics. This would create a serious public health problem. The genetically modified crops might contain other toxic substances (such as enhanced amounts of heavy metals) and the crops might not be "substantially equivalent" in genome, proteome, and metabolome compared with unmodified crops. Another concern is that genetically modified crops may be less nutritious; for example, they might contain lower amounts of phytoestrogens, which protect against heart disease and cancer. The review of available literature indicates that the genetically modified crops available in the market that are intended for human consumption are generally safe; their consumption is not associated with serious health problems. However, because of potential for exposure of a large segment of human population to genetically modified foods, more research is needed to ensure that the genetically modified foods are safe for human consumption.

  4. Sex Hormone Binding Globulin Modifies Testosterone Action and Metabolism in Prostate Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Huika; Pham, Thy; McWhinney, Brett C; Ungerer, Jacobus P; Pretorius, Carel J; Richard, Derek J; Mortimer, Robin H; d'Emden, Michael C; Richard, Kerry

    2016-01-01

    Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG) is the major serum carrier of sex hormones. However, growing evidence suggests that SHBG is internalised and plays a role in regulating intracellular hormone action. This study was to determine whether SHBG plays a role in testosterone uptake, metabolism, and action in the androgen sensitive LNCaP prostate cancer cell line. Internalisation of SHBG and testosterone, the effects of SHBG on testosterone uptake, metabolism, regulation of androgen responsive genes, and cell growth were assessed. LNCaP cells internalised SHBG by a testosterone independent process. Testosterone was rapidly taken up and effluxed as testosterone-glucuronide; however this effect was reduced by the presence of SHBG. Addition of SHBG, rather than reducing testosterone bioavailability, further increased testosterone-induced expression of prostate specific antigen and enhanced testosterone-induced reduction of androgen receptor mRNA expression. Following 38 hours of testosterone treatment cell morphology changed and growth declined; however, cotreatment with SHBG abrogated these inhibitory effects. These findings clearly demonstrate that internalised SHBG plays an important regulatory and intracellular role in modifying testosterone action and this has important implications for the role of SHBG in health and disease.

  5. Sex Hormone Binding Globulin Modifies Testosterone Action and Metabolism in Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huika; Ungerer, Jacobus P.; Pretorius, Carel J.; Mortimer, Robin H.; d'Emden, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG) is the major serum carrier of sex hormones. However, growing evidence suggests that SHBG is internalised and plays a role in regulating intracellular hormone action. This study was to determine whether SHBG plays a role in testosterone uptake, metabolism, and action in the androgen sensitive LNCaP prostate cancer cell line. Internalisation of SHBG and testosterone, the effects of SHBG on testosterone uptake, metabolism, regulation of androgen responsive genes, and cell growth were assessed. LNCaP cells internalised SHBG by a testosterone independent process. Testosterone was rapidly taken up and effluxed as testosterone-glucuronide; however this effect was reduced by the presence of SHBG. Addition of SHBG, rather than reducing testosterone bioavailability, further increased testosterone-induced expression of prostate specific antigen and enhanced testosterone-induced reduction of androgen receptor mRNA expression. Following 38 hours of testosterone treatment cell morphology changed and growth declined; however, cotreatment with SHBG abrogated these inhibitory effects. These findings clearly demonstrate that internalised SHBG plays an important regulatory and intracellular role in modifying testosterone action and this has important implications for the role of SHBG in health and disease. PMID:27990161

  6. Modified docetaxel, cisplatin and capecitabine for stage IV gastric cancer in Japanese patients: A feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Osamu; Matsuoka, Ayumu; Miyahara, Ryoji; Funasaka, Kohei; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Fukaya, Masahide; Nagino, Masato; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Goto, Hidemi; Ando, Yuichi

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the feasibility of chemotherapy including fluoropyrimidine, platinum and taxane with modified dosages for unresectable gastric cancer in Japanese patients. METHODS We performed a feasibility study of a modified docetaxel, cisplatin and capecitabine (DCX) regimen for stage IV gastric cancer. In particular, 30 or 40 mg/m2 of docetaxel on day 1, 60 mg/m2 of cisplatin on day 1, and 2000 mg/m2 of capecitabine for 2 wk were administered every three weeks. RESULTS Three patients were treated with modified DCX (mDCX) with 30 mg/m2 docetaxel, and five patients were treated with this regimen with 40 mg/m2 docetaxel. Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia was observed in six of the eight patients; no patients exhibited febrile neutropenia. Partial response was achieved in four of the eight patients. Three patients underwent gastrectomy, which achieved R0 resection without residual tumors in dissected lymph nodes. In one of these three patients, resected specimens revealed pathological complete response in the primary lesion and in lymph nodes. CONCLUSION mDCX was well tolerated by Japanese patients with stage IV gastric cancer. This regimen might be useful for allowing gastric cancer patients with distant lymph node metastasis to undergo conversion surgery. PMID:28246483

  7. [Automatic segmentation of clustered breast cancer cells based on modified watershed algorithm and concavity points searching].

    PubMed

    Tong, Zhen; Pu, Lixin; Dong, Fangjie

    2013-08-01

    As a common malignant tumor, breast cancer has seriously affected women's physical and psychological health even threatened their lives. Breast cancer has even begun to show a gradual trend of high incidence in some places in the world. As a kind of common pathological assist diagnosis technique, immunohistochemical technique plays an important role in the diagnosis of breast cancer. Usually, Pathologists isolate positive cells from the stained specimen which were processed by immunohistochemical technique and calculate the ratio of positive cells which is a core indicator of breast cancer in diagnosis. In this paper, we present a new algorithm which was based on modified watershed algorithm and concavity points searching to identify the positive cells and segment the clustered cells automatically, and then realize automatic counting. By comparison of the results of our experiments with those of other methods, our method can exactly segment the clustered cells without losing any geometrical cell features and give the exact number of separating cells.

  8. Genetic modifiers of CHEK2*1100delC associated breast cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Muranen, Taru A.; Greco, Dario; Blomqvist, Carl; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Khan, Sofia; Hogervorst, Frans; Verhoef, Senno; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Dunning, Alison M.; Shah, Mitul; Luben, Robert; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Schoemaker, Minouk; Swerdlow, Anthony; García-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine; Dörk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Hall, Per; Li, Jingmei; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Bermisheva, Marina; Kristensen, Vessela; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Peto, Julian; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Hillemans, Peter; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian; Lambrechts, Diether; Moisse, Matthieu; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Martens, John W.M.; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Giles, Graham G.; Milne, Roger L.; Brenner, Hermann; Arndt, Volker; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Devilee, Peter; Seynaeve, Caroline; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; John, Esther M.; Whittemore, Alice S.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Dennis, Joe; Easton, Douglas F.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Nevanlinna, Heli

    2016-01-01

    Purpose CHEK2*1100delC is a founder variant in European populations conferring a 2–3 fold increased risk of breast cancer (BC). Epidemiologic and family studies have suggested that the risk associated with CHEK2*1100delC is modified by other genetic factors in a multiplicative fashion. We have investigated this empirically using data from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). Methods With genotype data of 39,139 (624 1100delC carriers) BC patients and 40,063 (224) healthy controls from 32 BCAC studies, we analyzed the combined risk effects of CHEK2*1100delC and 77 common variants in terms of a polygenic risk score (PRS) and pairwise interaction. Results The PRS conferred an odds ratio (OR) of 1.59 [95% CI 1.21–2.09] per standard deviation for BC for CHEK2*1100delC carriers and 1.58 [1.55–1.62] for non-carriers. No evidence for deviation from the multiplicative model was found. The OR for the highest quintile of the PRS was 2.03 [0.86–4.78] for CHEK2*1100delC carriers placing them to the high risk category according to UK NICE guidelines. OR for the lowest quintile was 0.52 [0.16–1.74], indicating life-time risk close to population average. Conclusion Our results confirm the multiplicative nature of risk effects conferred by CHEK2*1100delC and the common susceptibility variants. Furthermore, the PRS could identify the carriers at a high life-time risk for clinical actions. PMID:27711073

  9. Modified metabolic syndrome and second cancers in women: A case control study

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Mendoza, Carlos-Manuel; Pérez-Chávez, Ernesto; Fuente-Vera, Tania-Angélica De-la

    2016-01-01

    Background: According to some studies, the metabolic syndrome causes diverse primary cancers; however, there is no evidence about metabolic syndrome impact on second cancers development in women. Aim: To find out the implication of the modified metabolic syndrome in women with second cancers. Materials and Methods: This was a case–control study, at a general hospital in Mexico City, in women with second cancers (cases) and age-matched women with only one neoplasm (controls). The analysis comprised: Tumor (s), anthropometric features, and body mass index (BMI); moreover, presence of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and fasting serum levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides and glucose. Results: The sample was of nine cases and 27 controls. In cases, the metabolic syndrome (diabetes mellitus or glucose > 99 mg/dL + hypertension or blood pressure ≥ 135/85 mm Hg + triglycerides > 149 mg/dL or BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2) was more frequent (odds ratio 20.8, 95% confidence interval: 1.9–227.1). Conclusion: Our results suggest that in women, the modified metabolic syndrome may be a risk factor for second cancers. PMID:28032086

  10. Cancers in Australia in 2010 attributable to modifiable factors: introduction and overview

    PubMed Central

    Whiteman, David C; Webb, Penelope M; Green, Adele C; Neale, Rachel E; Fritschi, Lin; Bain, Christopher J; Parkin, D Max; Wilson, Louise F; Olsen, Catherine M; Nagle, Christina M; Pandeya, Nirmala; Jordan, Susan J; Antonsson, Annika; Kendall, Bradley J; Hughes, Maria Celia B; Ibiebele, Torukiri I; Miura, Kyoko; Peters, Susan; Carey, Renee N

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the approach underpinning a national project to estimate the numbers and proportions of cancers occurring in Australia in 2010 that are attributable to modifiable causal factors. Methods We estimated the population attributable fraction (PAF) (or prevented fraction) of cancers associated with exposure to causal (or preventive) factors using standard formulae. Where possible, we also estimated the potential impact on cancer incidence resulting from changes in prevalence of exposure. Analyses were restricted to factors declared causal by international agencies: tobacco smoke; alcohol; solar radiation; infectious agents; obesity; insufficient physical activity; insufficient intakes of fruits, vegetables and fibre; red and processed meat; menopausal hormone therapy (MHT); oral contraceptive pill (OCP); and insufficient breast feeding. Separately, we estimated numbers of cancers prevented by: aspirin; sunscreen; MHT; and OCP use. We discuss assumptions pertaining to latent periods between exposure and cancer onset, choices of prevalence data and risk estimates, and approaches to sensitivity analyses. Results Numbers and population attributable fractions of cancer are presented in accompanying papers. Conclusions This is the first systematic assessment of population attributable fractions of cancer in Australia. PMID:26437722

  11. Assessing absolute changes in breast cancer risk due to modifiable risk factors.

    PubMed

    Quante, Anne S; Herz, Julia; Whittemore, Alice S; Fischer, Christine; Strauch, Konstantin; Terry, Mary Beth

    2015-07-01

    Clinical risk assessment involves absolute risk measures, but information on modifying risk and preventing cancer is often communicated in relative terms. To illustrate the potential impact of risk factor modification in model-based risk assessment, we evaluated the performance of the IBIS Breast Cancer Risk Evaluation Tool, with and without current body mass index (BMI), for predicting future breast cancer occurrence in a prospective cohort of 665 postmenopausal women. Overall, IBIS's accuracy (overall agreement between observed and assigned risks) and discrimination (AUC concordance between assigned risks and outcomes) were similar with and without the BMI information. However, in women with BMI > 25 kg/m(2), adding BMI information improved discrimination (AUC = 63.9 % and 61.4 % with and without BMI, P < 0.001). The model-assigned 10-year risk difference for a woman with high (27 kg/m(2)) versus low (21 kg/m(2)) BMI was only 0.3 % for a woman with neither affected first-degree relatives nor BRCA1 mutation, compared to 4.5 % for a mutation carrier with three such relatives. This contrast illustrates the value of using information on modifiable risk factors in risk assessment and in sharing information with patients of their absolute risks with and without modifiable risk factors.

  12. Does calcium in drinking water modify the association between nitrate in drinking water and risk of death from colon cancer?

    PubMed

    Chiu, Hui-Fen; Tsai, Shang-Shyue; Chen, Pei-Shih; Wu, Trong-Neng; Yang, Chun-Yuh

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this study was to explore whether calcium (Ca) levels in drinking water modified the effects of nitrate on colon cancer risk. A matched case-control study was used to investigate the relationship between the risk of death from colon cancer and exposure to nitrate in drinking water in Taiwan. All colon cancer deaths of Taiwan residents from 2003 through 2007 were obtained from the Bureau of Vital Statistics of the Taiwan Provincial Department of Health. Controls were deaths from other causes and were pair-matched to the cases by gender, year of birth and year of death. Information on the levels of nitrate-nitrogen (NO(3)-N) and Ca in drinking water have been collected from Taiwan Water Supply Corporation (TWSC). The municipality of residence for cases and controls was assumed to be the source of the subject's NO(3)-N and Ca exposure via drinking water. We observed evidence of an interaction between drinking water NO(3)-N and Ca intake via drinking water. This is the first study to report effect modification by Ca intake from drinking water on the association between NO(3)-N exposure and risk of colon cancer mortality.

  13. Evidence for SMAD3 as a modifier of breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Current attempts to identify genetic modifiers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 associated risk have focused on a candidate gene approach, based on knowledge of gene functions, or the development of large genome-wide association studies. In this study, we evaluated 24 SNPs tagged to 14 candidate genes derived through a novel approach that analysed gene expression differences to prioritise candidate modifier genes for association studies. Methods We successfully genotyped 24 SNPs in a cohort of up to 4,724 BRCA1 and 2,693 BRCA2 female mutation carriers from 15 study groups and assessed whether these variants were associated with risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Results SNPs in five of the 14 candidate genes showed evidence of association with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 or BRCA2 carriers (P < 0.05). Notably, the minor alleles of two SNPs (rs7166081 and rs3825977) in high linkage disequilibrium (r2 = 0.77), located at the SMAD3 locus (15q22), were each associated with increased breast cancer risk for BRCA2 mutation carriers (relative risk = 1.25, 95% confidence interval = 1.07 to 1.45, Ptrend = 0.004; and relative risk = 1.20, 95% confidence interval = 1.03 to 1.40, Ptrend = 0.018). Conclusions This study provides evidence that the SMAD3 gene, which encodes a key regulatory protein in the transforming growth factor beta signalling pathway and is known to interact directly with BRCA2, may contribute to increased risk of breast cancer in BRCA2 mutation carriers. This finding suggests that genes with expression associated with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation status are enriched for the presence of common genetic modifiers of breast cancer risk in these populations. PMID:21114847

  14. Thiolated chitosan-modified PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles for oral chemotherapy of lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Liqin; Li, Xuemin; Liu, Lingrong; Zhang, Qiqing

    2013-02-01

    Oral chemotherapy is a key step towards `chemotherapy at home', a dream of cancer patients, which will radically change the clinical practice of chemotherapy and greatly improve the quality of life of the patients. In this research, three types of nanoparticle formulation from commercial PCL and self-synthesized d-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (PLA-PCL-TPGS) random copolymer were prepared in this research for oral delivery of antitumor agents, including thiolated chitosan-modified PCL nanoparticles, unmodified PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles, and thiolated chitosan-modified PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles. Firstly, the PLA-PCL-TPGS random copolymer was synthesized and characterized. Thiolated chitosan greatly increases its mucoadhesiveness and permeation properties, thus increasing the chances of nanoparticle uptake by the gastrointestinal mucosa and improving drug absorption. The PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles were found by FESEM that they are of spherical shape and around 200 nm in diameter. The surface charge of PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles was reversed from anionic to cationic after thiolated chitosan modification. The thiolated chitosan-modified PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles have significantly higher level of the cell uptake than that of thiolated chitosan-modified PLGA nanoparticles and unmodified PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles. In vitro cell viability studies showed advantages of the thiolated chitosan-modified PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles over Taxol® in terms of cytotoxicity against A549 cells. It seems that the mucoadhesive nanoparticles can increase paclitaxel transport by opening tight junctions and bypassing the efflux pump of P-glycoprotein. In conclusion, PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles modified by thiolated chitosan could enhance the cellular uptake and cytotoxicity, which revealed a potential application for oral chemotherapy of lung cancer.

  15. Effective fermion kinematics from modified quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandre, J.; Leite, J.

    2016-10-01

    We consider a classical fermion and a classical scalar, propagating on two different kinds of four-dimensional diffeomorphism breaking gravity backgrounds, and we derive the one-loop effective dispersion relation for matter, after integrating out gravitons. One gravity model involves quadratic divergences at one-loop, as in Einstein gravity, and the other model is the z = 3 non-projectable Horava-Lifshitz gravity, which involves logarithmic divergences only. Although these two models behave differently in the ultraviolet, the IR phenomenology for matter fields is comparable: (i) for generic values for the parameters, both models identify 1010 GeV as the characteristic scale above which they are not consistent with current upper bounds on Lorentz symmetry violation; (ii) for both models, there is always a fine-tuning of parameters which allows the cancellation of the indicator for Lorentz symmetry violation.

  16. Amine-modified hyaluronic acid-functionalized porous silicon nanoparticles for targeting breast cancer tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Patrick V.; Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Mäkilä, Ermei; Kaasalainen, Martti; Salonen, Jarno; Hirvonen, Jouni; Santos, Hélder A.

    2014-08-01

    Active targeting of nanoparticles to receptor-overexpressing cancer cells has great potential for enhancing the cellular uptake of nanoparticles and for reducing fast clearance of the nanoparticles from the body. Herein, we present a preparation method of a porous silicon (PSi)-based nanodelivery system for breast cancer targeting, by covalently conjugating a synthesized amide-modified hyaluronic acid (HA+) derived polymer on the surface of undecylenic acid-modified thermally hydrocarbonized PSi (UnTHCPSi) nanoparticles. The resulting UnTHCPSi-HA+ nanoparticles showed relatively small size, reduced polydispersibility, high biocompatibility, improved colloidal and human plasma stability, as well as enhanced cellular interactions and internalization. Moreover, we demonstrated that the enhanced cellular association of UnTHCPSi-HA+ relies on the capability of the conjugated HA+ to bind and consequently target CD44 receptors expressed on the surface of breast cancer cells, thus making the HA+-functionalized UnTHCPSi nanoparticles a suitable and promising nanoplatform for the targeting of CD44-overexpressing breast tumors and for drug delivery.Active targeting of nanoparticles to receptor-overexpressing cancer cells has great potential for enhancing the cellular uptake of nanoparticles and for reducing fast clearance of the nanoparticles from the body. Herein, we present a preparation method of a porous silicon (PSi)-based nanodelivery system for breast cancer targeting, by covalently conjugating a synthesized amide-modified hyaluronic acid (HA+) derived polymer on the surface of undecylenic acid-modified thermally hydrocarbonized PSi (UnTHCPSi) nanoparticles. The resulting UnTHCPSi-HA+ nanoparticles showed relatively small size, reduced polydispersibility, high biocompatibility, improved colloidal and human plasma stability, as well as enhanced cellular interactions and internalization. Moreover, we demonstrated that the enhanced cellular association of Un

  17. WCRF/AICR recommendation adherence and breast cancer incidence among postmenopausal women with and without non-modifiable risk factors.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Sarah J O; Inoue-Choi, Maki; Lazovich, DeAnn; Robien, Kim

    2016-06-01

    Taller height, family history of breast cancer, greater number of years of potential fertility and nulliparity are established non-modifiable risk factors for postmenopausal breast cancer. Greater adherence to the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) diet, physical activity and body weight recommendations has previously been shown to be associated with lower breast cancer risk. However, no prior studies have evaluated whether women with non-modifiable risk factors receive similar benefits from recommendation adherence compared to women without these risk factors. In the Iowa Women's Health Study prospective cohort, we investigated whether associations of WCRF/AICR recommendation adherence differed by the presence/absence of non-modifiable breast cancer risk factors. Baseline (1986) questionnaire data from 36,626 postmenopausal women were used to create adherence scores for the WCRF/AICR recommendations (maximum score = 8.0). Overall and single recommendation adherence in relation to breast cancer risk (n = 3,189 cases) across levels of non-modifiable risk factors were evaluated using proportional hazards regression. Mean adherence score was 5.0 points (range: 0.5-8.0). Higher adherence scores (score ≥ 6.0 vs. ≤ 3.5, HR = 0.76, 95% CI = 0.67-0.87), and adherence to the individual recommendations for body weight and alcohol intake were associated with a lower breast cancer incidence. While not statistically significant among women with more non-modifiable risk factors (score ≥ 6.0 vs. ≤ 3.5, HR = 0.76, 95% CI = 0.36-1.63), hazard ratios were comparable to women with the no non-modifiable risk factors (score ≥ 6.0 vs. ≤ 3.5, HR = 0.74, 95% CI = 0.49-0.93) (p-interaction = 0.57). WCRF/AICR recommendation adherence is associated with lower breast cancer risk, regardless of non-modifiable risk factor status.

  18. The Impact of Chemotherapy, Radiation and Epigenetic Modifiers in Cancer Cell Expression of Immune Inhibitory and Stimulatory Molecules and Anti-Tumor Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Chacon, Jessica Ann; Schutsky, Keith; Powell, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Genomic destabilizers, such as radiation and chemotherapy, and epigenetic modifiers are used for the treatment of cancer due to their apoptotic effects on the aberrant cells. However, these therapies may also induce widespread changes within the immune system and cancer cells, which may enable tumors to avoid immune surveillance and escape from host anti-tumor immunity. Genomic destabilizers can induce immunogenic death of tumor cells, but also induce upregulation of immune inhibitory ligands on drug-resistant cells, resulting in tumor progression. While administration of immunomodulatory antibodies that block the interactions between inhibitory receptors on immune cells and their ligands on tumor cells can mediate cancer regression in a subset of treated patients, it is crucial to understand how genomic destabilizers alter the immune system and malignant cells, including which inhibitory molecules, receptors and/or ligands are upregulated in response to genotoxic stress. Knowledge gained in this area will aid in the rational design of trials that combine genomic destabilizers, epigenetic modifiers and immunotherapeutic agents that may be synergized to improve clinical responses and prevent tumor escape from the immune system. Our review article describes the impact genomic destabilizers, such as radiation and chemotherapy, and epigenetic modifiers have on anti-tumor immunity and the tumor microenvironment. Although genomic destabilizers cause DNA damage on cancer cells, these therapies can also have diverse effects on the immune system, promote immunogenic cell death or survival and alter the cancer cell expression of immune inhibitor molecules. PMID:27854240

  19. Common variants of the BRCA1 wild-type allele modify the risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Cox, David G; Simard, Jacques; Sinnett, Daniel; Hamdi, Yosr; Soucy, Penny; Ouimet, Manon; Barjhoux, Laure; Verny-Pierre, Carole; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Szabo, Csilla; Greene, Mark H; Mai, Phuong L; Andrulis, Irene L; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Caligo, Maria A; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Kaufman, Bella; Paluch, Shani S; Borg, Åke; Karlsson, Per; Askmalm, Marie Stenmark; Bustinza, Gisela Barbany; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Benítez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti A; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; Ausems, Margreet G E M; Aalfs, Cora M; van Asperen, Christi J; Devilee, Peter; Gille, Hans J J P; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Evans, D Gareth; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Adlard, Julian; Paterson, Joan; Eason, Jacqueline; Godwin, Andrew K; Remon, Marie-Alice; Moncoutier, Virginie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Lasset, Christine; Giraud, Sophie; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Sobol, Hagay; Eisinger, François; Bressac de Paillerets, Brigitte; Caron, Olivier; Delnatte, Capucine; Goldgar, David; Miron, Alex; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Buys, Saundra; Southey, Melissa C; Terry, Mary Beth; Singer, Christian F; Dressler, Anne-Catharina; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Hansen, Thomas V O; Johannsson, Oskar; Piedmonte, Marion; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Basil, Jack B; Blank, Stephanie; Toland, Amanda E; Montagna, Marco; Isaacs, Claudine; Blanco, Ignacio; Gayther, Simon A; Moysich, Kirsten B; Schmutzler, Rita K; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Fiebig, Britta; Caldes, Trinidad; Laframboise, Rachel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Chen, Xiaoqing; Beesley, Jonathan; Spurdle, Amanda B; Neuhausen, Susan L; Ding, Yuan C; Couch, Fergus J; Wang, Xianshu; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Bernard, Loris; Radice, Paolo; Easton, Douglas F; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Sinilnikova, Olga M

    2011-12-01

    Mutations in the BRCA1 gene substantially increase a woman's lifetime risk of breast cancer. However, there is great variation in this increase in risk with several genetic and non-genetic modifiers identified. The BRCA1 protein plays a central role in DNA repair, a mechanism that is particularly instrumental in safeguarding cells against tumorigenesis. We hypothesized that polymorphisms that alter the expression and/or function of BRCA1 carried on the wild-type (non-mutated) copy of the BRCA1 gene would modify the risk of breast cancer in carriers of BRCA1 mutations. A total of 9874 BRCA1 mutation carriers were available in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA) for haplotype analyses of BRCA1. Women carrying the rare allele of single nucleotide polymorphism rs16942 on the wild-type copy of BRCA1 were at decreased risk of breast cancer (hazard ratio 0.86, 95% confidence interval 0.77-0.95, P = 0.003). Promoter in vitro assays of the major BRCA1 haplotypes showed that common polymorphisms in the regulatory region alter its activity and that this effect may be attributed to the differential binding affinity of nuclear proteins. In conclusion, variants on the wild-type copy of BRCA1 modify risk of breast cancer among carriers of BRCA1 mutations, possibly by altering the efficiency of BRCA1 transcription.

  20. Amine-modified hyaluronic acid-functionalized porous silicon nanoparticles for targeting breast cancer tumors

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Patrick V.; Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Mäkilä, Ermei; Kaasalainen, Martti; Salonen, Jarno; Hirvonen, Jouni; Santos, Hélder A.

    2014-01-01

    Active targeting of nanoparticles to receptor-overexpressing cancer cells has great potential for enhancing the cellular uptake of nanoparticles and for reducing fast clearance of the nanoparticles from the body. Herein, we present a preparation method of a porous silicon (PSi)-based nanodelivery system for breast cancer targeting, by covalently conjugating a synthesized amide-modified hyaluronic acid (HA+) derived polymer on the surface of undecylenic acid-modified thermally hydrocarbonized PSi (UnTHCPSi) nanoparticles. The resulting UnTHCPSi–HA+ nanoparticles showed relatively small size, reduced polydispersibility, high biocompatibility, improved colloidal and human plasma stability, as well as enhanced cellular interactions and internalization. Moreover, we demonstrated that the enhanced cellular association of UnTHCPSi–HA+ relies on the capability of the conjugated HA+ to bind and consequently target CD44 receptors expressed on the surface of breast cancer cells, thus making the HA+-functionalized UnTHCPSi nanoparticles a suitable and promising nanoplatform for the targeting of CD44-overexpressing breast tumors and for drug delivery. PMID:25074521

  1. Antibacterial effect of silver nanofilm modified stainless steel surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, F.; Kennedy, J.; Dhillon, M.; Flint, S.

    2015-03-01

    Bacteria can attach to stainless steel surfaces, resulting in the colonization of the surface known as biofilms. The release of bacteria from biofilms can cause contamination of food such as dairy products in manufacturing plants. This study aimed to modify stainless steel surfaces with silver nanofilms and to examine the antibacterial effectiveness of the modified surface. Ion implantation was applied to produce silver nanofilms on stainless steel surfaces. 35 keV Ag ions were implanted with various fluences of 1 × 1015 to 1 × 1017 ions•cm-2 at room temperature. Representative atomic force microscopy characterizations of the modified stainless steel are presented. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry spectra revealed the implanted atoms were located in the near-surface region. Both unmodified and modified stainless steel coupons were then exposed to two types of bacteria, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Streptococcus thermophilus, to determine the effect of the surface modification on bacterial attachment and biofilm development. The silver modified coupon surface fluoresced red over most of the surface area implying that most bacteria on coupon surface were dead. This study indicates that the silver nanofilm fabricated by the ion implantation method is a promising way of reducing the attachment of bacteria and delay biofilm formation.

  2. Enhancement of radiotherapy by ceria nanoparticles modified with neogambogic acid in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Feng; Zhang, Xiao Hong; Hu, Xiao Dan; Zhang, Wei; Lou, Zhi Chao; Xie, Li Hua; Liu, Pei Dang; Zhang, Hai Qian

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the main strategies for cancer treatment but has significant challenges, such as cancer cell resistance and radiation damage to normal tissue. Radiosensitizers that selectively increase the susceptibility of cancer cells to radiation can enhance the effectiveness of radiotherapy. We report here the development of a novel radiosensitizer consisting of monodispersed ceria nanoparticles (CNPs) covered with the anticancer drug neogambogic acid (NGA-CNPs). These were used in conjunction with radiation in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, and the efficacy and mechanisms of action of this combined treatment approach were evaluated. NGA-CNPs potentiated the toxic effects of radiation, leading to a higher rate of cell death than either treatment used alone and inducing the activation of autophagy and cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase, while pretreatment with NGA or CNPs did not improve the rate of radiation-induced cancer cells death. However, NGA-CNPs decreased both endogenous and radiation-induced reactive oxygen species formation, unlike other nanomaterials. These results suggest that the adjunctive use of NGA-CNPs can increase the effectiveness of radiotherapy in breast cancer treatment by lowering the radiation doses required to kill cancer cells and thereby minimizing collateral damage to healthy adjacent tissue. PMID:26316742

  3. Improved Anticancer Photothermal Therapy Using the Bystander Effect Enhanced by Antiarrhythmic Peptide Conjugated Dopamine-Modified Reduced Graphene Oxide Nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiantao; Lin, Yu-Hsin; Yang, Lingyan; Huang, Chih-Ching; Chen, Liliang; Wang, Wen-Cheng; Chen, Guan-Wen; Yan, Junyan; Sawettanun, Saranta; Lin, Chia-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Despite tremendous efforts toward developing novel near-infrared (NIR)-absorbing nanomaterials, improvement in therapeutic efficiency remains a formidable challenge in photothermal cancer therapy. This study aims to synthesize a specific peptide conjugated polydopamine-modified reduced graphene oxide (pDA/rGO) nanocomposite that promotes the bystander effect to facilitate cancer treatment using NIR-activated photothermal therapy. To prepare a nanoplatform capable of promoting the bystander effect in cancer cells, we immobilized antiarrhythmic peptide 10 (AAP10) on the surface of dopamine-modified rGO (AAP10-pDA/rGO). Our AAP10-pDA/rGO could promote the bystander effect by increasing the expression of connexin 43 protein in MCF-7 breast-cancer cells. Because of its tremendous ability to absorb NIR absorption, AAP10-pDA/rGO offers a high photothermal effect under NIR irradiation. This leads to a massive death of MCF-7 cells via the bystander effect. Using tumor-bearing mice as the model, it is found that NIR radiation effectively ablates breast tumor in the presence of AAP10-pDA/rGO and inhibits tumor growth by ≈100%. Therefore, this research integrates the bystander and photothermal effects into a single nanoplatform in order to facilitate an efficient photothermal therapy. Furthermore, our AAP10-pDA/rGO, which exhibits both hyperthermia and the bystander effect, can prevent breast-cancer recurrence and, therefore, has great potential for future clinical and research applications.

  4. Modified Devine Exclusion for Unresectable Distal Gastric Cancer in Symptomatic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Moreno, María Carmen; Martí-Obiol, Roberto; López, Fernando; Ortega, Joaquín

    2017-01-01

    Background In patients with outlet obstruction syndrome and/or severe anemia secondary to unresectable gastric cancer (GC), partial stomach-partitioning gastrojejunostomy, or modified Devine exclusion, is a surgical alternative. Methods A retrospective study was conducted on patients with unresectable distal GC treated with modified Devine exclusion as palliative surgery between February 2005 and December 2015. It consisted of a series of 10 patients with outlet obstruction syndrome and/or severe anemia. The outcomes of this technique were based on oral tolerance, blood transfusions, postoperative complications, and survival. Results Early oral tolerance and a low rate of blood transfusions were observed postoperatively. There was no postoperative mortality and a very low complication rate without anastomotic leakage. Median survival was 9 months. Conclusions Partial stomach-partitioning gastrojejunostomy is a safe procedure for unresectable GC which can improve the quality of life of these patients. PMID:28203132

  5. Development and evaluation of bevacizumab-modified pegylated cationic liposomes using cellular and in vivo models of human pancreatic cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuesters, Geoffrey M.

    Targeting the tumor vascular supply in a homogenous manner is a difficult task to achieve with the use of pegylated cationic liposomes (PCLs) alone. Our formulation consisting of bevacizumab conjugated to the distal end of PEG on PCLs was thus developed in an effort to eliminate some of this heterogeneity as well as to increase tumor targeting overall. This study focuses on pancreatic cancer, which has the poorest five-year survival rate of all cancers because of its late diagnosis. The addition of bevacizumab will target tumor areas because it binds to VEGF which is secreted by tumors in high levels. In vitro, we showed that pancreatic cancer cells (Capan-1, HPAF-II and PANC-1) all secrete VEGF into media at different levels, with Capan-1 producing the most and HPAF-II producing the least. A murine endothelial cell line, MS1-VEGF, produces and secretes the most VEGF. A human microvascular endothelial cell line (HMEC-1) was grown in two different conditions, with and without VEGF in the media. Modifying PCLs with bevacizumab enhanced the binding and uptake of PCLs by some pancreatic and endothelial cells in vitro, particularly the cells that had or secreted the most significant amount of VEGF in the media. This translated into enhanced tumor targeting in a biodistribution study using a Capan-1 subcutaneous pancreatic tumor model. This also showed enhanced blood retention compared to the unmodified PCLs while it diminished uptake by the spleen and increased uptake by the kidney. To test the therapeutic benefit of this enhanced uptake and targeting, an anti-angiogenic agent, 2-methoxyestradiol was incorporated into the formulation with 20% incorporation efficiency. Both the unmodified and modified drug-loaded PCLs were the least efficacious against Capan-1, moderately effective against HPAF-II, PANC-1, MS1-VEGF and HMEC-1 grown without VEGF in the media and most efficacious against HMEC-1 grown with VEGF which had the most VEGF present in the media. Multiple in vivo

  6. Ubiquitin-Fold Modifier 1 Acts as a Positive Regulator of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Hee Min; Park, Jong Ho; Jeon, Young Joo; Chung, Chin Ha

    2015-01-01

    Estrogen receptor-α (ERα) is a steroid hormone-sensitive transcription factor that plays a critical role in development of breast cancer. The binding of estrogen to ERα triggers the recruitment of transcriptional co-activators as well as chromatin remodeling factors to estrogen-responsive elements (ERE) of ERα target genes. This process is tightly associated with post-translational modifications (PTMs) of ERα and its co-activators for promotion of transcriptional activation, which leads to proliferation of a large subset of breast tumor cells. These PTMs include phosphorylation, acetylation, methylation, and conjugation by ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like proteins. Ubiquitin-fold modifier 1 (UFM1), one of ubiquitin-like proteins, has recently been shown to be ligated to activating signal co-integrator 1 (ASC1), which acts as a transcriptional co-activator of nuclear receptors. Here, we discuss the mechanistic connection between ASC1 modification by UFM1 and ERα transactivation, and highlight how the interplay of these processes is involved in development of breast cancer. We also discuss potential use of UFM1-conjugating system as therapeutic targets against not only breast cancer but also other nuclear receptor-mediated cancers. PMID:25852645

  7. Dietary effects on breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, R.G. )

    1991-07-20

    Professor Lee and colleagues show a significant effect of dietary red meat intake, no effect of fat, and a protective effect of soya protein on the risk of breast cancer in young women in Singapore. They do not ascribe the red-meat effect to fat in the meat, and offer no alternative explanation. Red meat contains the most readily absorbed form of dietary iron, and there is evidence that increased body iron stores raise cancer risk, perhaps by one or both of two possible mechanisms: (1) boosting the availability of an essential nutrient for cancer cells, and (2) increasing the production of oxygen radicals. In addition, there is some evidence from studies in animals for a role for iron in mammary-tumor induction. Thompson et al administered 1-methyl-1-nitrosourea to groups of rats receiving normal rat chow, a low-iron diet, or an iron-supplemented diet. The group receiving dietary iron supplementation had the greatest mammary-tumor burden, whereas that receiving an iron-restricted diet had fewer tumors than the group on the normal diet (although this latter effect may have resulted merely from reduced body weight in the rats on an iron-restricted diet). The protective effect of soya protein seen by Lee et al may also be related to iron metabolism. Soy beans are a source of phytate, a constituent of most cereals, nuts, and legumes, that avidly binds iron in such a way that it is incapable of catalyzing the production of oxygen radicals. The protective effect of soya protein may be shared by increased intakes of other plant products that are high in phytate but either not consumed in quantity in Singapore or not assessed in the questionnaire Lee et al administered.

  8. Can selenium be a modifier of cancer risk in CHEK2 mutation carriers?

    PubMed

    Gupta, Satish; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Lubinski, Jan; Jakubowska, Anna

    2013-11-01

    Selenium is an essential trace element for humans, playing an important role in various major metabolic pathways. Selenium helps to protect the body from the poisonous effects of heavy metals and other harmful substances. Medical studies have provided evidence of selenium supplementation in preventing certain cancers. Low and too high selenium (Se) status correlates with increased risk of e.g. lung, larynx, colorectal and prostate cancers. A higher level of selenium and supplementation with selenium has been shown to be associated with substantially reduced cancer mortality. Selenium exerts its biological roles through selenoproteins, which are involved in oxidoreductions, redox signalling, antioxidant defence, thyroid hormone metabolism and immune responses. Checkpoint kinase 2 (CHEK2) is an important signal transducer of cellular responses to DNA damage and acts as a tumour suppressor gene. Mutations in the CHEK2 gene have been shown to be associated with increased risks of several cancers. Four common mutations in CHEK2 gene (1100delC, IVS2+1G>A, del5395 and I157T) have been identified in the Polish population. Studies have provided evidence that CHEK2-truncating and/or missense mutations are associated with increased risk of breast, prostate, thyroid, colon and kidney cancers. The variability in penetrance and cancer expression in CHEK2 mutation carriers can probably be explained by the influence of other genetic or environmental factors. One of the possible candidates is Se, which together with genetic variations in selenoprotein genes may influence susceptibility to cancer risk.

  9. Modified habitats influence kelp epibiota via direct and indirect effects.

    PubMed

    Marzinelli, Ezequiel M; Underwood, Antony J; Coleman, Ross A

    2011-01-01

    Addition of man-made structures alters abiotic and biotic characteristics of natural habitats, which can influence abundances of biota directly and/or indirectly, by altering the ecology of competitors or predators. Marine epibiota in modified habitats were used to test hypotheses to distinguish between direct and indirect processes. In Sydney Harbour, kelps on pier-pilings supported greater covers of bryozoans, particularly of the non-indigenous species Membranipora membranacea, than found on natural reefs. Pilings influenced these patterns and processes directly due to the provision of shade and indirectly by altering abundances of sea-urchins which, in turn, affected covers of bryozoans. Indirect effects were more important than direct effects. This indicates that artificial structures affect organisms living on secondary substrata in complex ways, altering the biodiversity and indirectly affecting abundances of epibiota. Understanding how these components of habitats affect ecological processes is necessary to allow sensible prediction of the effects of modifying habitats on the ecology of organisms.

  10. Physical, Heritable and Age-Related Factors as Modifiers of Radiation Cancer Risk in Patched Heterozygous Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Pazzaglia, Simonetta Pasquali, Emanuela M.Sc.; Tanori, Mirella; Mancuso, Mariateresa; Leonardi, Simona; Di Majo, Vincenzo; Rebessi, Simonetta; Saran, Anna

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To address the tumorigenic potential of exposure to low/intermediate doses of ionizing radiation and to identify biological factors influencing tumor response in a mouse model highly susceptible to radiogenic cancer. Methods and Materials: Newborn Ptc1 heterozygous mice were exposed to X-ray doses of 100, 250, and 500 mGy, and tumor development was monitored for their lifetime. Additional groups were irradiated with the same doses and sacrificed at fixed times for determination of short-term endpoints, such as apoptosis and early preneoplastic lesions in cerebellum. Finally, groups of Ptc1 heterozygous mice were bred on the C57BL/6 background to study the influence of common variant genes on radiation response. Results: We have identified a significant effect of low-intermediate doses of radiation (250 and 500 mGy) in shortening mean survival and inducing early and more progressed stages of tumor development in the cerebellum of Ptc1{sup +/-} mice. In addition, we show that age at exposure and heritable factors are potent modifiers of radiation-related cancer risk. Conclusions: The Ptc1 knockout mouse model offers a highly sensitive system that may potentially help to improve understanding and quantification of risk at low doses, such as doses experienced in occupational and medical exposures, and clarify the complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors underlying cancer susceptibility.

  11. Three Measurable and Modifiable Enteric Microbial Biotransformations Relevant to Cancer Prevention and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Interdisciplinary scientific evaluation of the human microbiota has identified three enteric microbial biotransformations of particular relevance for human health and well-being, especially cancer. Two biotransformations are counterproductive; one is productive. First, selective bacteria can reverse beneficial hepatic hydroxylation to produce toxic secondary bile acids, especially deoxycholic acid. Second, numerous bacterial species can reverse hepatic detoxification—in a sense, retoxify hormones and xeonobiotics—by deglucuronidation. Third, numerous enteric bacteria can effect a very positive biotransformation through the production of butyrate, a small chain fatty acid with anti-cancer activity. Each biotransformation is addressed in sequence for its relevance in representative gastrointestinal and extra-intestinal cancers. This is not a complete review of their connection with every type of cancer. The intent is to introduce the reader to clinically relevant microbial biochemistry plus the emerging evidence that links these to both carcinogenesis and treatment. Included is the evidence base to guide counseling for potentially helpful dietary adjustments. PMID:24891992

  12. CAR-modified T-cell therapy for cancer: an updated review.

    PubMed

    Haji-Fatahaliha, Mostafa; Hosseini, Maryam; Akbarian, Asiye; Sadreddini, Sanam; Jadidi-Niaragh, Farhad; Yousefi, Mehdi

    2016-09-01

    The use of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T cells is a promising approach for cancer immunotherapy. These genetically modified receptors contain an antigen-binding moiety, a hinge region, a transmembrane domain, and an intracellular costimulatory domain resulting in T-cell activation subsequent to antigen binding. Optimal tumor removal through CAR-modified T cells requires suitable target antigen selection, co-stimulatory signaling domain, and the ability of CAR T cells to traffic, persist, and retain antitumor function after adoptive transfer. There are several elements which can improve antitumor function of CAR T cells, including signaling, conditioning chemotherapy and irradiation, tumor burden of the disease, T-cell phenotype, and supplementary cytokine usage. This review outlines four generations of CAR. The pre-clinical and clinical studies showed that this technique has a great potential for treatment of solid and hematological malignancies. The main purpose of the current review is to focus on the pre-clinical and clinical developments of CAR-based immunotherapy.

  13. Specific growth inhibition of ErbB2‑expressing human breast cancer cells by genetically modified NK‑92 cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Yang, Bo; Sun, Tingting; Lin, Lin; Hu, Yi; Deng, Muhong; Yang, Junlan; Liu, Tianyi; Li, Jinyu; Sun, Shengjie; Jiao, Shunchang

    2015-01-01

    The natural killer cell line NK‑92 shows great cytotoxicity against various types of cancer. Several types of solid tumor cells, however, can effectively resist NK-mediated lysis by interaction of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules with NK cell inhibitory receptors. To generate a eukaryotic expression vector encoding chimeric antigen receptor scFv anti-erbB2-CD28-ζ and to investigate the expression and action of this chimeric antigen receptor in cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo, NK‑92 cells were genetically modified with an scFv anti-erbB2-CD28-ζ chimeric recep-tor by optimized electro-poration using the Amaxa Nucleofector system. The expression of the chimeric receptor was evaluated by RT-PCR and immunofluorescence. The ability of the genetically modified NK‑92 cells to induce cell death in tumor targets was assessed in vitro and in vivo. The transduced NK‑92-anti-erbB2 scFv-CD28-ζ cells expressing high levels of the fusion protein on the cell surface were analyzed by fluorescence-activated cell-sorting (FACS) analysis. These cells specifically enhanced the cell death of the erbB2‑expressing human breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-453 and SKBr3. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of genetically modified NK‑92 cells specifically reduced tumor size and lung metastasis of nude mice bearing established MDA-MB-453 cells, and significantly enhanced the survival period of these mice. The genetically modified NK‑92 cells significantly enhanced the killing of erbB2‑expressing cancer and may be a novel therapeutic strategy for erbB2‑expressing cancer cells.

  14. RGD peptide-modified multifunctional dendrimer platform for drug encapsulation and targeted inhibition of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    He, Xuedan; Alves, Carla S; Oliveira, Nilsa; Rodrigues, João; Zhu, Jingyi; Bányai, István; Tomás, Helena; Shi, Xiangyang

    2015-01-01

    Development of multifunctional nanoscale drug-delivery systems for targeted cancer therapy still remains a great challenge. Here, we report the synthesis of cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide-conjugated generation 5 (G5) poly(amidoamine) dendrimers for anticancer drug encapsulation and targeted therapy of cancer cells overexpressing αvβ3 integrins. In this study, amine-terminated G5 dendrimers were used as a platform to be sequentially modified with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FI) via a thiourea linkage and RGD peptide via a polyethylene glycol (PEG) spacer, followed by acetylation of the remaining dendrimer terminal amines. The developed multifunctional dendrimer platform (G5.NHAc-FI-PEG-RGD) was then used to encapsulate an anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX). We show that approximately six DOX molecules are able to be encapsulated within each dendrimer platform. The formed complexes are water-soluble, stable, and able to release DOX in a sustained manner. One- and two-dimensional NMR techniques were applied to investigate the interaction between dendrimers and DOX, and the impact of the environmental pH on the release rate of DOX from the dendrimer/DOX complexes was also explored. Furthermore, cell biological studies demonstrate that the encapsulation of DOX within the G5.NHAc-FI-PEG-RGD dendrimers does not compromise the anticancer activity of DOX and that the therapeutic efficacy of the dendrimer/DOX complexes is solely related to the encapsulated DOX drug. Importantly, thanks to the role played by RGD-mediated targeting, the developed dendrimer/drug complexes are able to specifically target αvβ3 integrin-overexpressing cancer cells and display specific therapeutic efficacy to the target cells. The developed RGD peptide-targeted multifunctional dendrimers may thus be used as a versatile platform for targeted therapy of different types of αvβ3 integrin-overexpressing cancer cells.

  15. Attractive Casimir effect in an infrared modified gluon bag model

    SciTech Connect

    Oxman, L.E.; Amaral, R.L.P.G.

    2005-12-15

    In this work, we are motivated by previous attempts to derive the vacuum contribution to the bag energy in terms of familiar Casimir energy calculations for spherical geometries. A simple infrared modified model is introduced which allows studying the effects of the analytic structure as well as the geometry in a clear manner. In this context, we show that if a class of infrared vanishing effective gluon propagators is considered, then the renormalized vacuum energy for a spherical bag is attractive, as required by the bag model to adjust hadron spectroscopy.

  16. A non-synonymous polymorphism in IRS1 modifies risk of developing breast and ovarian cancers in BRCA1 and ovarian cancer in BRCA2 mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yuan C.; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Shani-Shimon–Paluch; Kaufman, Bella; Liljegren, Annelie; Lindblom, Annika; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Melin, Beatrice; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Byrski, Tomasz; Osorio, Ana; Cajal, Teresa Ramóny; Stavropoulou, Alexandra V; Benítez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti; Aalfs, Cora M.; de Lange, Judith L.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E.J.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; van Asperen, Christi J.; García, Encarna B. Gómez; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Jager, Agnes; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Easton, Douglas F.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve D.; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Ros; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Brewer, Carole; Tischkowitz, Marc; Godwin, Andrew K.; Pathak, Harsh; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Barjhoux, Laure; Léoné, Mélanie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; de Pauw, Antoine; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Dreyfus, Hélène; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Collonge-Rame, Marie-Agnès; Sokolowska, Johanna; Buys, Saundra; Daly, Mary; Miron, Alex; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy; John, Esther M; Southey, Melissa; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F; Maria, Muy-Kheng Tea; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Hansen, Thomas v. O.; Ejlertsen, Bent; Johannsson, Oskar Th.; Offit, Kenneth; Sarrel, Kara; Gaudet, Mia M.; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Piedmonte, Marion R; Andrews, Lesley; Cohn, David; DeMars, Leslie R.; DiSilvestro, Paul; Rodriguez, Gustavo; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Isaacs, Claudine; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Ramus, Susan J; Sucheston, Lara; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; Ganz, Patricia A.; Beattie, Mary S.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Meindl, Alfons; Arnold, Norbert; Niederacher, Dieter; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Gadzicki, Dorotehea; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Deissler, Helmut; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Kast, Karin; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Simard, Jacques; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Tomlinson, Gail E.; Weitzel, Jeffrey; Garber, Judy E.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Rubinstein, Wendy S.; Tung, Nadine; Blum, Joanne L.; Narod, Steven A.; Brummel, Sean; Gillen, Daniel L.; Lindor, Noralane; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Couch, Fergus J.; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Greene, Mark H.; Loud, Jennifer T.; Mai, Phuong L.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Thomassen, Mads; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Caligo, Maria A.; Lee, Andrew; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Neuhausen, Susan L.

    2012-01-01

    Background We previously reported significant associations between genetic variants in insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) and breast cancer risk in women carrying BRCA1 mutations. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether the IRS1 variants modified ovarian cancer risk and were associated with breast cancer risk in a larger cohort of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Methods IRS1 rs1801123, rs1330645, and rs1801278 were genotyped in samples from 36 centers in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). Data were analyzed by a retrospective cohort approach modeling the associations with breast and ovarian cancer risks simultaneously. Analyses were stratified by BRCA1 and BRCA2 status and mutation class in BRCA1 carriers. Results Rs1801278 (Gly972Arg) was associated with ovarian cancer risk for both BRCA1 [Hazard ratio (HR) = 1.43; 95% CI: 1.06–1.92; p = 0.019] and BRCA2 mutation carriers (HR=2.21; 95% CI: 1.39–3.52, p=0.0008). For BRCA1 mutation carriers, the breast cancer risk was higher in carriers with class 2 mutations than class 1 (mutations (class 2 HR=1.86, 95% CI: 1.28–2.70; class 1 HR=0.86, 95%CI:0.69–1.09; p-for difference=0.0006). Rs13306465 was associated with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 class 2 mutation carriers (HR = 2.42; p = 0.03). Conclusion The IRS1 Gly972Arg SNP, which affects insulin-like growth factor and insulin signaling, modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers and breast cancer risk in BRCA1 class 2 mutation carriers. Impact These findings may prove useful for risk prediction for breast and ovarian cancers in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. PMID:22729394

  17. Climate Effects of Cloud Modified CCN-Cloud Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, S. R., Jr.; Hudson, J. G.

    2015-12-01

    Cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) play an important role in the climate system through the indirect aerosol effect (IAE). IAE is one of the least understood aspects of the climate system as many cloud processes are complicated. Many studies of aerosol-cloud interaction involve CCN interaction with cloud droplet concentrations (Nc), cloud microphysics, and radiative properties. However, fewer studies investigate how cloud processes modify CCN. Upon evaporation from non-precipitating clouds, CCN distributions develop bimodal shaped distributions (Hoppel et al. 1986). Activated CCN participate in cloud processing that is either chemical: aqueous oxidation; or physical: Brownian scavenging, collision and coalescence. Chemical processing does not change CCN concentration (NCCN) but reduces critical supersaturations (Sc; larger size) (Feingold and Kreidenweis, 2000) while physical processing reduces NCCN and Sc. These processes create the minima in the bimodal CCN distributions (Hudson et al., 2015). Updraft velocity (W) and NCCN are major factors on how these modified CCN distributions affect clouds. Panel a shows two nearby CCN distributions in the MArine Stratus/stratocumulus Experiment (MASE), which have similar concentrations, but the bimodal one (red) has been modified by cloud processing. In a simplified cloud droplet model, the modified CCN then produces higher Nc (panel b) and smaller droplet mean diameters (MD; panel c) when compared to the unmodified CCN (black) for W lower than 50 cm/s. The better CCN (lower Sc) increase competition among droplets reducing MD and droplet distribution spread (σ) which acts to reduce drizzle. Competition is created by limited available condensate due to lower S created by the low W (<50 cm/s) typical of stratus. The increased Nc of the modified CCN in stratus then increases IAE in the climate system. At higher W (>50 cm/s) typical of cumuli, Ncis reduced and MD is increased from the modified CCN distribution (panels b & c). Here

  18. Reviewing Cancer Care Team Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Taplin, Stephen H.; Weaver, Sallie; Salas, Eduardo; Chollette, Veronica; Edwards, Heather M.; Bruinooge, Suanna S.; Kosty, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The management of cancer varies across its type, stage, and natural history. This necessitates involvement of a variety of individuals and groups across a number of provider types. Evidence from other fields suggests that a team-based approach helps organize and optimize tasks that involve individuals and groups, but team effectiveness has not been fully evaluated in oncology-related care. Methods: We undertook a systematic review of literature published between 2009 and 2014 to identify studies of all teams with clear membership, a comparator group, and patient-level metrics of cancer care. When those teams included two or more people with specialty training relevant to the care of patients with cancer, we called them multidisciplinary care teams (MDTs). After reviews and exclusions, 16 studies were thoroughly evaluated: two addressing screening and diagnosis, 11 addressing treatment, two addressing palliative care, and one addressing end-of-life care. The studies included a variety of end points (eg, adherence to quality indicators, patient satisfaction with care, mortality). Results: Teams for screening and its follow-up improved screening use and reduced time to follow-up colonoscopy after an abnormal screen. Discussion of cases within MDTs improved the planning of therapy, adherence to recommended preoperative assessment, pain control, and adherence to medications. We did not see convincing evidence that MDTs affect patient survival or cost of care, or studies of how or which MDT processes and structures were associated with success. Conclusion: Further research should focus on the association between team processes and structures, efficiency in delivery of care, and mortality. PMID:25873056

  19. Allelopathic effect of methanolic extracts of genetically modified and non-genetically modified canola on soybean.

    PubMed

    Syed, Kashmala; Shinwari, Zabta Khan

    2016-03-01

    This study on the effect of genetically modified (GM) and non-GM canola on soybean was carried out for physiological and biochemical biosafety assessment of GM canola. Methanolic extracts of GM and non-GM canola were assessed on seed germination and growth of soybean (Glycine max L.) under sterilized conditions. The extracts applied were of 3, 5, and 10% concentrations. The results showed that methanolic extracts of both GM and non-GM canola improved the germination percentage. However, germination rate index was significantly decreased with concomitant increase in mean germination time of soybean. A significant rate of decrease was observed in root fresh weight while increase in shoot length took place; when treatment of GM canola extracts were applied, however, no effect was observed in shoot fresh weight. A significant increase in protein contents, as well as phenolic, carotenoids, proline, and chlorophyll a content, was observed when different GM canola treatments (3, 5, and 10%) were applied to soybean; however, a significant rate of reduction in chlorophyll b content was observed by the application of GM canola treatment. Similar results were observed for superoxide dismutase, peroxidase, and catalase activities. A significant increase in the sugar content levels was observed when GM canola treatments (3, 5, and 10%) were applied to soybean.

  20. Rare alleles of the HRAS polymorphism do not modify the risk of breast or ovarian cancer in BRCA1 carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Phelan, C.; Tonin, P.; Lynch, H.T.

    1994-09-01

    The presence of one of the rare alleles of a minisatellite polymorphism at the HRAS locus on chromosome 11p15 has been associated with a roughly two-fold increase in the risk of breast cancer. The BRCA1 gene on chromosome 17q12-21 is responsible for the majority of the families with the breast-ovarian cancer syndrome. It is estimated that 87% of BRCA1 carriers will be affected with breast cancer by age 70. The relative risk for premenopausal breast cancer in carriers, compared to non-carriers, is roughly 100. Because of the wide range in ages of onset of cancer among BRCA1 carriers, it is likely that additional factors modify the risk of cancer. The role of other modifying genetic loci has not been studied. Through haplotype analysis we have identified 199 female BRCA1 carriers above the age of 20 years in 25 linked families. 127 of these women have been diagnosed with cancer and 72 are currently healthy. DNA was available on 59 carriers. Each sample was typed for the HRAS polymorphism by PCR, using primers flanking the minisatellite. Rare alleles were identified in 18 carriers. The penetrance of the BRCA1 gene was not higher among those women who carried a rare HRAS allele (mean age of onset 49 years) than among those who carried two common alleles (mean age of onset 43 years) (p= 0.59; log rank test). Similar results were obtained for ovarian cancer. These data do not support the hypothesis that the HRAS locus modified the risk of cancer among carriers of mutations in BRCA1.

  1. Targeted and pH-responsive delivery of doxorubicin to cancer cells using multifunctional dendrimer-modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wen, Shihui; Liu, Hui; Cai, Hongdong; Shen, Mingwu; Shi, Xiangyang

    2013-09-01

    We report the use of multifunctional dendrimer-modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) for targeted and pH-responsive delivery of doxorubicin (DOX) into cancer cells. In this study, amine-terminated generation 5 poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers modified with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FI) and folic acid (FA) were covalently linked to acid-treated MWCNTs, followed by acetylation of the remaining dendrimer terminal amines to neutralize the positive surface potential. The formed multifunctional MWCNTs (MWCNT/G5.NHAc-FI-FA) were characterized via different techniques. Then, the MWCNT/G5.NHAc-FI-FA was used to load DOX for targeted and pH-responsive delivery to cancer cells overexpressing high-affinity folic acid receptors (FAR). We showed that the MWCNT/G5.NHAc-FI-FA enabled a high drug payload and encapsulation efficiency both up to 97.8% and the formed DOX/MWCNT/G5.NHAc-FI-FA complexes displayed a pH-responsive release property with fast DOX release under acidic environment and slow release at physiological pH conditions. Importantly, the DOX/MWCNT/G5.NHAc-FI-FA complexes displayed effective therapeutic efficacy, similar to that of free DOX, and were able to target to cancer cells overexpressing high-affinity FAR and effectively inhibit the growth of the cancer cells. The synthesized multifunctional dendrimer-modified MWCNTs may be used as a targeted and pH-responsive delivery system for targeting therapy of different types of cancer cells.

  2. Unintended effects in genetically modified crops: revealed by metabolomics?

    PubMed

    Rischer, Heiko; Oksman-Caldentey, Kirsi-Marja

    2006-03-01

    In Europe the commercialization of food derived from genetically modified plants has been slow because of the complex regulatory process and the concerns of consumers. Risk assessment is focused on potential adverse effects on humans and the environment, which could result from unintended effects of genetic modifications: unintended effects are connected to changes in metabolite levels in the plants. One of the major challenges is how to analyze the overall metabolite composition of GM plants in comparison to conventional cultivars, and one possible solution is offered by metabolomics. The ultimate aim of metabolomics is the identification and quantification of all small molecules in an organism; however, a single method enabling complete metabolome analysis does not exist. Given a comprehensive extraction method, a hierarchical strategy--starting with global fingerprinting and followed by complementary profiling attempts--is the most logical and economic approach to detect unintended effects in GM crops.

  3. Apoptotic Effects of Chrysin in Human Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Khoo, Boon Yin; Chua, Siang Ling; Balaram, Prabha

    2010-01-01

    Chrysin is a natural flavonoid currently under investigation due to its important biological anti-cancer properties. In most of the cancer cells tested, chrysin has shown to inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis, and is more potent than other tested flavonoids in leukemia cells, where chrysin is likely to act via activation of caspases and inactivation of Akt signaling in the cells. Moreover, structure-activity relationships have revealed that the chemical structure of chrysin meets the key structural requirements of flavonoids for potent cytotoxicity in leukemia cells. It is possible that combination therapy or modified chrysin could be more potent than single-agent use or administration of unmodified chrysin. This study may help to develop ways of improving the effectiveness of chrysin in the treatment of leukemia and other human cancers in vitro. PMID:20559509

  4. [Unintended effects assessment of genetically modified crops using omics techniques].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Li, Yan-Yan

    2013-12-01

    Safety assessment is the essential process for commercial application of genetically modified (GM) crops. Omics techniques can be used to evaluate the safety of GM crops unbiasedly at different biological levels, such as transcripts, proteins and metabolites. In the present review, the researches on unintended effects assessment of GM crops using transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomic techniques in recent ten years have been summarized. The facts show that the environmental factors (growing area and season) and genotype difference play greater roles than gene insertion does for most unintended variations in GM crops.

  5. [Construction of biotin-modified polymeric micelles for pancreatic cancer targeted photodynamic therapy].

    PubMed

    Deng, Chun-yue; Long, Ying-ying; Liu, Sha; Chen, Zhang-bao; Li, Chong

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we explored the feasibility of biotin-mediated modified polymeric micelles for pancreatic cancer targeted photodynamic therapy. Poly (ethylene glycol)-distearoyl phosphatidyl ethanolamine (mPEG2000-DSPE) served as the drug-loaded material, biotin-poly(ethylene glycol)-distearoyl phosphatidyl ethanolamine (Biotin-PEG3400-DSPE) as the functional material and the polymeric micelles were prepared by a thin-film hydration method. The targeting capability of micelles was investigated by cell uptake assay in vitro and fluorescence imaging in vivo and the amounts of Biotin-PEG-DSPE were optimized accordingly. Hypocrellin B (HB), a novel photosensitizer was then encapsulated in biotinylated polymeric micelles and the anti-tumor efficacy was evaluated systemically in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that micelles with 5 mol % Biotin-PEG-DSPE demonstrated the best targeting capability than those with 20 mol % or 0.5 mol % of corresponding materials. This formulation has a small particle size [mean diameter of (36.74 ± 2.16) nm] with a homogeneous distribution and high encapsulation efficiency (80.06 ± 0.19) %. The following pharmacodynamics assays showed that the biotinylated micelles significantly enhanced the cytotoxicity of HB against tumor cells in vitro and inhibited tumor growth in vivo, suggesting a promising potential of this formulation for treatment of pancreatic cancer, especially those poorly permeable, or insensitive to radiotherapy and chemotherapy.

  6. Hyaluronic acid modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to CD44-overexpressing cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Meihua; Jambhrunkar, Siddharth; Thorn, Peter; Chen, Jiezhong; Gu, Wenyi; Yu, Chengzhong

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, a targeted drug delivery system has been developed based on hyaluronic acid (HA) modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs). HA-MSNs possess a specific affinity to CD44 over-expressed on the surface of a specific cancer cell line, HCT-116 (human colon cancer cells). The cellular uptake performance of fluorescently labelled MSNs with and without HA modification has been evaluated by confocal microscopy and fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis. Compared to bare MSNs, HA-MSNs exhibit a higher cellular uptake via HA receptor mediated endocytosis. An anticancer drug, doxorubicin hydrochloride (Dox), has been loaded into MSNs and HA-MSNs as drug delivery vehicles. Dox loaded HA-MSNs show greater cytotoxicity to HCT-116 cells than free Dox and Dox-MSNs due to the enhanced cell internalization behavior of HA-MSNs. It is expected that HA-MSNs have a great potential in targeted delivery of anticancer drugs to CD44 over-expressing tumors.

  7. Anti-Tumor Effects after Adoptive Transfer of IL-12 Transposon-Modified Murine Splenocytes in the OT-I-Melanoma Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Galvan, Daniel L; O'Neil, Richard T; Foster, Aaron E; Huye, Leslie; Bear, Adham; Rooney, Cliona M; Wilson, Matthew H

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of gene modified T cells provides possible immunotherapy for patients with cancers refractory to other treatments. We have previously used the non-viral piggyBac transposon system to gene modify human T cells for potential immunotherapy. However, these previous studies utilized adoptive transfer of modified human T cells to target cancer xenografts in highly immunodeficient (NOD-SCID) mice that do not recapitulate an intact immune system. Currently, only viral vectors have shown efficacy in permanently gene-modifying mouse T cells for immunotherapy applications. Therefore, we sought to determine if piggyBac could effectively gene modify mouse T cells to target cancer cells in a mouse cancer model. We first demonstrated that we could gene modify cells to express murine interleukin-12 (p35/p40 mIL-12), a transgene with proven efficacy in melanoma immunotherapy. The OT-I melanoma mouse model provides a well-established T cell mediated immune response to ovalbumin (OVA) positive B16 melanoma cells. B16/OVA melanoma cells were implanted in wild type C57Bl6 mice. Mouse splenocytes were isolated from C57Bl6 OT-I mice and were gene modified using piggyBac to express luciferase. Adoptive transfer of luciferase-modified OT-I splenocytes demonstrated homing to B16/OVA melanoma tumors in vivo. We next gene-modified OT-I cells to express mIL-12. Adoptive transfer of mIL-12-modified mouse OT-I splenocytes delayed B16/OVA melanoma tumor growth in vivo compared to control OT-I splenocytes and improved mouse survival. Our results demonstrate that the piggyBac transposon system can be used to gene modify splenocytes and mouse T cells for evaluating adoptive immunotherapy strategies in immunocompetent mouse tumor models that may more directly mimic immunotherapy applications in humans.

  8. Modified Habitats Influence Kelp Epibiota via Direct and Indirect Effects

    PubMed Central

    Marzinelli, Ezequiel M.; Underwood, Antony J.; Coleman, Ross A.

    2011-01-01

    Addition of man-made structures alters abiotic and biotic characteristics of natural habitats, which can influence abundances of biota directly and/or indirectly, by altering the ecology of competitors or predators. Marine epibiota in modified habitats were used to test hypotheses to distinguish between direct and indirect processes. In Sydney Harbour, kelps on pier-pilings supported greater covers of bryozoans, particularly of the non-indigenous species Membranipora membranacea, than found on natural reefs. Pilings influenced these patterns and processes directly due to the provision of shade and indirectly by altering abundances of sea-urchins which, in turn, affected covers of bryozoans. Indirect effects were more important than direct effects. This indicates that artificial structures affect organisms living on secondary substrata in complex ways, altering the biodiversity and indirectly affecting abundances of epibiota. Understanding how these components of habitats affect ecological processes is necessary to allow sensible prediction of the effects of modifying habitats on the ecology of organisms. PMID:21755011

  9. Evaluation of Rint1 as a modifier of intestinal tumorigenesis and cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Otterpohl, Karla L.; Gould, Karen A.

    2017-01-01

    The Rad50 Interacting Protein 1 (Rint1) influences cellular homeostasis through maintenance of endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi and centrosome integrity and regulation of vesicle transport, autophagy and the G2/M checkpoint. Rint1 has been postulated to function as a tumor suppressor as well as an oncogene, with its role depending perhaps upon the precise cellular and/or experimental context. In humans, heterozygosity for germline missense variants in RINT1 have, in some studies, been associated with increased risk of both breast and Lynch syndrome type cancers. However, it is not known if these germline variants represent loss of function alleles or gain of function alleles. Based upon these findings, as well as our initial consideration of Rint1 as a potential candidate for Mom5, a genetic modifier of intestinal tumorigenesis in ApcMin/+ mice, we sought to explicitly examine the impact of Rint1 on tumorigenesis in ApcMin/+ mice. However, heterozygosity for a knockout of Rint1 had no impact on tumorigenesis in Rint1+/-; ApcMin/+ mice. Likewise, we found no evidence to suggest that the remaining Rint1 allele was lost somatically in intestinal tumors in ApcMin/+ mice. Interestingly, in contrast to what has been observed in Rint1+/- mice on a mixed genetic background, Rint1+/- mice on a pure C57BL/6J background did not show spontaneous tumor development. We also evaluated colorectal cancer data available in the COSMIC and ONCOMINE databases and found that RINT1 overexpression, as well as the presence of somatic missense mutations in RINT1 were associated with colorectal cancer development. In vitro evaluation of two missense variants in RINT1 suggested that such variants do have the potential to impact RINT1 function. PMID:28264000

  10. Candidate genetic modifiers for breast and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Peterlongo, Paolo; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Rudolph, Anja; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Easton, Douglas F.; Hamann, Ute; Wilkening, Stefan; Chen, Bowang; Rookus, Matti A.; Schmidt, Marjanka K; van der Baan, Frederieke H.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Walker, Logan C.; Lose, Felicity; Maia, Ana-Teresa; Montagna, Marco; Matricardi, Laura; Lubinski, Jan; Jakubowska, Anna; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Arun, Banu K.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Orsulic, Sandra; Lester, Jenny; Chung, Wendy K.; Miron, Alex; Southey, Melissa C.; Goldgar, David E.; Buys, Saundra S.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Jønson, Lars; Osorio, Ana; Martínez-Bouzas, Cristina; Benitez, Javier; Conway, Edye E.; Blazer, Kathleen R.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Barile, Monica; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Mariette, Frederique; Fortuzzi, Stefano; Viel, Alessandra; Giannini, Giuseppe; Papi, Laura; Martayan, Aline; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Radice, Paolo; Vratimos, Athanassios; Fostira, Florentia; Garber, Judy E.; Donaldson, Alan; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D. Gareth R.; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Brady, Angela; Cook, Jackie; Tischkowitz, Marc; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E.; Kennedy, M. John; Rogers, Mark T.; Porteous, Mary E.; Morrison, Patrick J.; Platte, Radka; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley V.; Ellis, Steve; Cole, Trevor; Godwin, Andrew K.; Claes, Kathleen; Van Maerken, Tom; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Buecher, Bruno; Delnatte, Capucine; Houdayer, Claude; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Damiola, Francesca; Coupier, Isabelle; Barjhoux, Laure; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Golmard, Lisa; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Caron, Olivier; Pujol, Pascal; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Belotti, Muriel; Piedmonte, Marion; Friedlander, Michael L.; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Copeland, Larry J; de la Hoya, Miguel; Segura, Pedro Perez; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; van Os, Theo A.M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E.J.; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Vreeswijk, Maaike P.G.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ausems, Margreet G.E.M.; van Doorn, Helena C.; Collée, J. Margriet; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Arason, Adalgeir; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Olswold, Curtis; Couch, Fergus J.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Wang, Xianshu; Szabo, Csilla I.; Offit, Kenneth; Corines, Marina; Jacobs, Lauren; Robson, Mark E.; Zhang, Liying; Joseph, Vijai; Berger, Andreas; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Geschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng M.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Rennert, Gad; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Andrulis, Irene L.; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Laitman, Yael; Rantala, Johanna; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Ehrencrona, Hans; Askmalm, Marie Stenmark; Borg, Åke; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Healey, Sue; Lee, Andrew; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Friedman, Eitan

    2014-01-01

    Background BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and non-genetic modifying factors. In this study we evaluated the putative role of variants in many candidate modifier genes. Methods Genotyping data from 15,252 BRCA1 and 8,211 BRCA2 mutation carriers, for known variants (n=3,248) located within or around 445 candidate genes, were available through the iCOGS custom-designed array. Breast and ovarian cancer association analysis was performed within a retrospective cohort approach. Results The observed p-values of association ranged between 0.005-1.000. None of the variants was significantly associated with breast or ovarian cancer risk in either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers, after multiple testing adjustments. Conclusion There is little evidence that any of the evaluated candidate variants act as modifiers of breast and/or ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. Impact Genome-wide association studies have been more successful at identifying genetic modifiers of BRCA1/2 penetrance than candidate gene studies. PMID:25336561

  11. Effects of Modifier Type on Properties of in Situ Organo-Montmorillonite Modified Wood Flour/Poly(lactic acid) Composites.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ru; Chen, Yu; Cao, Jinzhen

    2016-01-13

    Wood flour (WF) was modified with sodium-montmorillonite (Na-MMT) and two types of surfactant modifiers, namely, didecyl dimethylammonium chloride (DDAC) and sodium dodecyl sulfonate (SDS) though a two-step process inside WF. The thus-modified WFs were characterized, and the effects of MMT type on physical, mechanical, and thermal properties of their composites with poly(lactic acid) (PLA) were investigated. The results showed: (1) either DDAC or SDS could modified Na-MMT into OMMT, and then uniformly distributed in WF cell walls; (2) OMMT improved the physical properties, most mechanical properties, and thermal properties of the composites except for the impact strength; and (3) compared with SDS, DDAC seemed to perform better in properties of composites. However, DDAC showed some negative effect on the early stage of composite thermal decomposition.

  12. Dark energy or modified gravity? An effective field theory approach

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomfield, Jolyon; Flanagan, Éanna É.; Park, Minjoon; Watson, Scott E-mail: eef3@cornell.edu E-mail: gswatson@syr.edu

    2013-08-01

    We take an Effective Field Theory (EFT) approach to unifying existing proposals for the origin of cosmic acceleration and its connection to cosmological observations. Building on earlier work where EFT methods were used with observations to constrain the background evolution, we extend this program to the level of the EFT of the cosmological perturbations — following the example from the EFT of Inflation. Within this framework, we construct the general theory around an assumed background which will typically be chosen to mimic ΛCDM, and identify the parameters of interest for constraining dark energy and modified gravity models with observations. We discuss the similarities to the EFT of Inflation, but we also identify a number of subtleties including the relationship between the scalar perturbations and the Goldstone boson of the spontaneously broken time translations. We present formulae that relate the parameters of the fundamental Lagrangian to the speed of sound, anisotropic shear stress, effective Newtonian constant, and Caldwell's varpi parameter, emphasizing the connection to observations. It is anticipated that this framework will be of use in constraining individual models, as well as for placing model-independent constraints on dark energy and modified gravity model building.

  13. A Modified In vitro Invasion Assay to Determine the Potential Role of Hormones, Cytokines and/or Growth Factors in Mediating Cancer Cell Invasion.

    PubMed

    Bagati, Archis; Koch, Zethan; Bofinger, Diane; Goli, Haneesha; Weiss, Laura S; Dau, Rosie; Thomas, Megha; Zucker, Shoshanna N

    2015-04-24

    Blood serum serves as a chemoattractant towards which cancer cells migrate and invade, facilitating their intravasation into microvessels. However, the actual molecules towards which the cells migrate remain elusive. This modified invasion assay has been developed to identify targets which drive cell migration and invasion. This technique compares the invasion index under three conditions to determine whether a specific hormone, growth factor, or cytokine plays a role in mediating the invasive potential of a cancer cell. These conditions include i) normal fetal bovine serum (FBS), ii) charcoal-stripped FBS (CS-FBS), which removes hormones, growth factors, and cytokines and iii) CS-FBS + molecule (denoted "X"). A significant change in cell invasion with CS-FBS as compared to FBS, indicates the involvement of hormones, cytokines or growth factors in mediating the change. Individual molecules can then be added back to CS-FBS to assay their ability to reverse or rescue the invasion phenotype. Furthermore, two or more factors can be combined to evaluate the additive or synergistic effects of multiple molecules in driving or inhibiting invasion. Overall, this method enables the investigator to determine whether hormones, cytokines, and/or growth factors play a role in cell invasion by serving as chemoattractants or inhibitors of invasion for a particular type of cancer cell or a specific mutant. By identifying specific chemoattractants and inhibitors, this modified invasion assay may help to elucidate signaling pathways that direct cancer cell invasion.

  14. Generation of more effective cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Fenoglio, Daniela; Traverso, Paolo; Parodi, Alessia; Kalli, Francesca; Zanetti, Maurizio; Filaci, Gilberto

    2013-12-01

    Cancer vaccines represent a promising therapeutic approach for which prime time is imminent. However, clinical efficacy must be improved in order for cancer vaccines to become a valid alternative or complement to traditional cancer treatments. Considerable efforts have been undertaken so far to better understand the fundamental requirements for clinically-effective cancer vaccines. Recent data emphasize that important requirements, among others, are (1) the use of multi-epitope immunogens, possibly deriving from different tumor antigens; (2) the selection of effective adjuvants; (3) the association of cancer vaccines with agents able to counteract the regulatory milieu present in the tumor microenvironment; and (4) the need to choose the definitive formulation and regimen of a vaccine after accurate preliminary tests comparing different antigen formulations. The first requirement deals with issues related to HLA restriction of tumor antigen presentation, as well as usefulness of tumor antigen spreading and counteraction of immune escape phenomena, linked to tumor antigen down-modulation, for an effective anti-cancer immune response. The second point underscores the necessity of optimal activation of innate immunity to achieve an efficient adaptive anti-cancer immune response. The third point focuses on the importance to inhibit subsets of regulatory cells. The last requirement stresses the concept that the regimen and formulation of the vaccine impacts profoundly on cancer vaccine efficacy. A new generation of cancer vaccines, provided with both immunological and clinical efficacy, will hopefully soon address these requirements.

  15. [Effect of KI modified clay on elemental mercury removal efficiency].

    PubMed

    Shen, Bo-Xiong; Chen, Jian-Hong; Cai, Ji; He, Chuan; Li, Zhuo

    2014-08-01

    Adsorption tests of elemental mercury were carried out by using KI modified clay (bentonite) in simulated flue gas under different conditions. Brunauer-Emett-Teller measurement (BET), Fourier Transform Infraredspectroscopy (FTIR) and Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) were used to analyze the physical and chemical properties of the materials. Compared with the original bentonite, Hg(0) removal efficiency and Hg(0) adsorption capacity were drastically improved by the KI treatment. The experiment results also indicated that temperature could enhance the property of Hg(0) adsorption. Chemical adsorption was the dominant part in the process of Hg(0) adsorption. O2 was a beneficial factor for Hg(0) adsorption. SO2 was found to have a slight promotional effect on Hg(0) adsorption. The existence of H2O exhibited a dramatic inhibitory effect on Hg(0) adsorption.

  16. Preoperative Modified FOLFIRINOX Treatment Followed by Capecitabine-Based Chemoradiation for Borderline Resectable Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Matthew H. G.; Shi, Qian; Ahmad, Syed A.; Herman, Joseph M.; Marsh, Robert de W.; Collisson, Eric; Schwartz, Lawrence; Frankel, Wendy; Martin, Robert; Conway, William; Truty, Mark; Kindler, Hedy; Lowy, Andrew M.; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios; Philip, Philip; Talamonti, Mark; Cardin, Dana; LoConte, Noelle; Shen, Perry; Hoffman, John P.; Venook, Alan P.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Although consensus statements support the preoperative treatment of borderline resectable pancreatic cancer, no prospective, quality-controlled, multicenter studies of this strategy have been conducted. Existing studies are retrospective and confounded by heterogeneity in patients studied, therapeutic algorithms used, and outcomes reported. OBJECTIVE To determine the feasibility of conducting studies of multimodality therapy for borderline resectable pancreatic cancer in the cooperative group setting. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A prospective, multicenter, single-arm trial of a multimodality treatment regimen administered within a study framework using centralized quality control with the cooperation of 14 member institutions of the National Clinical Trials Network. Twenty-nine patients with biopsy-confirmed pancreatic cancer preregistered, and 23 patients with tumors who met centrally reviewed radiographic criteria registered. Twenty-two patients initiated therapy (median age, 64 years [range, 50–76 years]; 55% female). Patients registered between May 29, 2013, and February 7,2014. INTERVENTIONS Patients received modified FOLFIRINOX treatment (85 mg/m2 of oxaliplatin, 180 mg/m2 of irinotecan hydrochloride, 400 mg/m2 of leucovorin calcium, and then 2400 mg/m2 of 5-fluorouracil for 4 cycles) followed by 5.5 weeks of external-beam radiation (50.4 Gy delivered in 28 daily fractions) with capecitabine (825 mg/m2 orally twice daily) prior to pancreatectomy. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Feasibility, defined by the accrual rate, the safety of the preoperative regimen, and the pancreatectomy rate. RESULTS The accrual rate of 2.6 patients per month was superior to the anticipated rate. Although 14 of the 22 patients (64% [95% CI, 41%–83%]) had grade 3 or higher adverse events, 15 of the 22 patients (68% [95% CI, 49%–88%]) underwent pancreatectomy. Of these 15 patients, 12 (80%) required vascular resection, 14 (93%) had microscopically negative margins

  17. Common variants associated with breast cancer in genome-wide association studies are modifiers of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianshu; Pankratz, V Shane; Fredericksen, Zachary; Tarrell, Robert; Karaus, Mary; McGuffog, Lesley; Pharaoh, Paul D P; Ponder, Bruce A J; Dunning, Alison M; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Houdayer, Claude; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Hooning, Maartje J; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J; Spurdle, Amanda; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Schmutzler, Rita K; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Domchek, Susan M; Nathanson, Katherine L; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Singer, Christian F; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Dressler, Catherina; Fink, Anneliese; Szabo, Csilla I; Zikan, Michal; Foretova, Lenka; Claes, Kathleen; Thomas, Gilles; Hoover, Robert N; Hunter, David J; Chanock, Stephen J; Easton, Douglas F; Antoniou, Antonis C; Couch, Fergus J

    2010-07-15

    Recent studies have identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that significantly modify breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Since these risk modifiers were originally identified as genetic risk factors for breast cancer in genome-wide association studies (GWASs), additional risk modifiers for BRCA1 and BRCA2 may be identified from promising signals discovered in breast cancer GWAS. A total of 350 SNPs identified as candidate breast cancer risk factors (P < 1 x 10(-3)) in two breast cancer GWAS studies were genotyped in 3451 BRCA1 and 2006 BRCA2 mutation carriers from nine centers. Associations with breast cancer risk were assessed using Cox models weighted for penetrance. Eight SNPs in BRCA1 carriers and 12 SNPs in BRCA2 carriers, representing an enrichment over the number expected, were significantly associated with breast cancer risk (P(trend) < 0.01). The minor alleles of rs6138178 in SNRPB and rs6602595 in CAMK1D displayed the strongest associations in BRCA1 carriers (HR = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.69-0.90, P(trend) = 3.6 x 10(-4) and HR = 1.25, 95% CI: 1.10-1.41, P(trend) = 4.2 x 10(-4)), whereas rs9393597 in LOC134997 and rs12652447 in FBXL7 showed the strongest associations in BRCA2 carriers (HR = 1.55, 95% CI: 1.25-1.92, P(trend) = 6 x 10(-5) and HR = 1.37, 95% CI: 1.16-1.62, P(trend) = 1.7 x 10(-4)). The magnitude and direction of the associations were consistent with the original GWAS. In subsequent risk assessment studies, the loci appeared to interact multiplicatively for breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. Promising candidate SNPs from GWAS were identified as modifiers of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. Upon further validation, these SNPs together with other genetic and environmental factors may improve breast cancer risk assessment in these populations.

  18. Effect of surface modifiers on an ectoenzyme: granulocyte 5'-nucleotidase.

    PubMed

    Smolen, J E; Karnovsky, M L

    1980-05-01

    Several agents that react with plasma membranes, namely the native lectins concanavalin A, Ricinus communis agglutinin, and wheat germ agglutinin, the modified lectin succinyl concanavalin A, and sodium meta-periodate, inhibited the ecto-5'-nucleotidase of intact guinea pig granulocytes. Stimulation of the enzyme was not observed at any lectin concentration. Inhibition by native lectins could be blocked or reversed by appropriate competing hapten sugars. In the case of concanavalin A, reversal could be achieved at 37 degrees C, but not at 5 degrees C. When lectins were used in combination with each other, the effects were found to be largely independent. However, when concanavalin A and R. communis agglutinin were applied together, complications arose because the former lectin binds to the latter as well as to the cell surface. To avoid some of the complexities inherent in studying intact cell 5'-nucleotidase and to gain additional information about the system, two broken cell enzyme preparations were also examined. The enzyme of plasma membrane-enriched fractions was inhibited by all five agents mentioned above. 5'-Nucleotidase solubilized in sodium deoxycholate was inhibited by the four lectins but stimulated by periodate. The effects of the surface modifiers on kinetic data for all three enzyme preparations are consistent with the hypothesis that direct interactions with the enzyme molecule give rise to changes in Vmax; interactions at membrane sites other than 5'-nucleotidase itself could cause increases in apparent Km values. Effects of interactions of ectoenzymes with plant lectins may serve as models for phenomena that result from cell-cell interactions or from interactions of animal cells with lectin-like components of the cellular environment.

  19. Individual Effect Modifiers of Dust Exposure Effect on Cardiovascular Morbidity

    PubMed Central

    Vodonos, Alina; Friger, Michael; Katra, Itzhak; Krasnov, Helena; Zahger, Doron; Schwartz, Joel; Novack, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Background High concentrations of particulate matter (PM) air pollution have been associated with death and hospital admissions due to cardiovascular morbidity. However, it is not clear a) whether high levels of non-anthropogenic PM from dust storms constitute a health risk; and b) whether these health risks are exacerbated in a particular demographic. Methods This study comprised all patients above 18 years old admitted to Soroka University Medical Center (1000 bed tertiary hospital, Be’er- Sheva, Israel, 2001–2010) with a primary diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Data on meteorological parameters and PM10 (particulate matter <10 μm in aerodiameter) were obtained from monitoring stations in the city of Be'er-Sheva. Data were analyzed using a case crossover analysis to examine the effect of dust exposure on hospitalization due to ACS and the interaction with co-morbidities and demographic factors. Results There were 16,734 hospitalizations due to ACS during the study period. The estimated odds of hospitalization due to ACS was significantly associated with PM10 during non dust storm days at the same day of the exposure (lag0); OR = 1.014 (95%CI 1.001–1.027) for a 10 μg/m3 increase, while a delayed response (lag1) was found during the dust storm days; OR = 1.007 (95%CI 1.002–1.012). The effect size for the dust exposure association was larger for older (above the age of 65), female or Bedouin patients. Conclusions Exposure to non-anthropogenic PM is associated with cardiovascular morbidity. Health risk associated dust exposure is gender and age specific with older women and Bedouin patients being the most vulnerable groups. PMID:26381397

  20. Modified zeolite-based catalyst for effective extinction hydrocracking

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, T.Y. )

    1989-10-01

    The shape selectivity of zeolites makes them generally ineffective for extinction hydrocracking of polycyclic aromatic feeds. To overcome this problem, the zeolite can be modified with an amorphous cracking component to form a composite catalyst. This composite catalyst will be effective for extinction hydrocracking and retain the superior performance characteristics of a zeolite catalyst at the same time because the zeolite and the amorphous components of the catalyst operate complementarily. To illustrate this principle, NiW/REX-NiW/SiO/sub 2/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ composite catalyst was tested in the pilot plant. It was active, low in aging rate, resistant to nitrogen poisoning and high in selectivities for naphthas. The aged catalyst could be oxidatively regenerated to fully recover the activity and the product selectivities. This composite catalyst was superior to both individual (zeolite and amorphous) components for extinction hydrocracking. Catalysts similar to this have been used commercially for many years.

  1. Modified international e-Delphi survey to define healthcare professional competencies for working with teenagers and young adults with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Rachel M; Feltbower, Richard G; Aslam, Natasha; Raine, Rosalind; Whelan, Jeremy S; Gibson, Faith

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To provide international consensus on the competencies required by healthcare professionals in order to provide specialist care for teenagers and young adults (TYA) with cancer. Design Modified e-Delphi survey. Setting International, multicentre study. Participants Experts were defined as professionals having worked in TYA cancer care for more than 12 months. They were identified through publications and professional organisations. Methods Round 1, developed from a previous qualitative study, included 87 closed-ended questions with responses on a nine-point Likert scale and further open-ended responses to identify other skills, knowledge and attitudes. Round 2 contained only items with no consensus in round 1 and suggestions of additional items of competency. Consensus was defined as a median score ranging from 7 to 9 and strength of agreement using mean absolute deviation of the median. Results A total of 179 registered to be members of the expert panel; valid responses were available from 158 (88%) in round 1 and 136/158 (86%) in round 2. The majority of participants were nurses (35%) or doctors (39%) from Europe (55%) or North America (35%). All 87 items in round 1 reached consensus with an additional 15 items identified for round 2, which also reached consensus. The strength of agreement was mostly high for statements. The areas of competence rated most important were agreed to be: ‘Identify the impact of disease on young people's life’ (skill), ‘Know about side effects of treatment and how this might be different to those experienced by children or older adults’ (knowledge), ‘Honesty’ (attitude) and ‘Listen to young people's concerns’ (aspect of communication). Conclusions Given the high degree of consensus, this list of competencies should influence education curriculum, professional development and inform workforce planning. Variation in strength of agreement for some competencies between professional groups should be explored

  2. Rapid, Effective DNA Isolation from Osmanthus via Modified Alkaline Lysis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Variability of leaf structure and presence of secondary metabolites in mature leaf tissue present a challenge for reliable DNA extraction from Osmanthus species and cultivars. The objective of this study was to develop a universal rapid, effective, and cost-efficient method of DNA isolation for Osmanthus mature leaf tissue. Four different methods were used to isolate DNA from 8 cultivars of Osmanthus. Absorbance spectra, DNA concentration, appearance on agarose gel, and performance in PCR were used to analyze quality, quantity, and integrity of isolated DNA. Methods were ranked in order, based on total quantity, quality, and performance points as the following: 1) solid-phase extraction (SPE), 2) modified alkaline lysis (SDS), 3) cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) with chloroform (CHL), and 4) CTAB with phenol/chloroform (PHE). Total DNA, isolated via SPE, showed the least contamination but the lowest mean quantity (9.6 ± 3.4 μg) and highest cost. The highest quantity of DNA was isolated via SDS (117 ± 54.1 μg). SPE and SDS resolved the most individuals on agarose gel, whereas the 2 CTAB methods had poorly resolved gels. All methods except PHE performed well in PCR. Additions to the modified alkaline lysis method increased A260:A230 by up to 59% without affecting yield. With the use of SDS, an average of 1000 μg/g DNA was isolated from fresh leaf tissue of 18 samples in ∼1.5 h at a cost of 0.74 U.S. dollars (USD)/sample. We recommend improved alkaline lysis as a rapid, effective, and cost-efficient method of isolating DNA from Osmanthus species. PMID:26816495

  3. Rapid, Effective DNA Isolation from Osmanthus via Modified Alkaline Lysis.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Lisa

    2016-07-01

    Variability of leaf structure and presence of secondary metabolites in mature leaf tissue present a challenge for reliable DNA extraction from Osmanthus species and cultivars. The objective of this study was to develop a universal rapid, effective, and cost-efficient method of DNA isolation for Osmanthus mature leaf tissue. Four different methods were used to isolate DNA from 8 cultivars of Osmanthus. Absorbance spectra, DNA concentration, appearance on agarose gel, and performance in PCR were used to analyze quality, quantity, and integrity of isolated DNA. Methods were ranked in order, based on total quantity, quality, and performance points as the following: 1) solid-phase extraction (SPE), 2) modified alkaline lysis (SDS), 3) cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) with chloroform (CHL), and 4) CTAB with phenol/chloroform (PHE). Total DNA, isolated via SPE, showed the least contamination but the lowest mean quantity (9.6 ± 3.4 μg) and highest cost. The highest quantity of DNA was isolated via SDS (117 ± 54.1 μg). SPE and SDS resolved the most individuals on agarose gel, whereas the 2 CTAB methods had poorly resolved gels. All methods except PHE performed well in PCR. Additions to the modified alkaline lysis method increased A260:A230 by up to 59% without affecting yield. With the use of SDS, an average of 1000 μg/g DNA was isolated from fresh leaf tissue of 18 samples in ∼1.5 h at a cost of 0.74 U.S. dollars (USD)/sample. We recommend improved alkaline lysis as a rapid, effective, and cost-efficient method of isolating DNA from Osmanthus species.

  4. MATERNAL EFFECTS IN ADVANCED HYBRIDS OF GENETICALLY MODIFIED AND NON-GENETICALLY MODIFIED BRASSICA SPECIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identification of fitness traits potentially impacted by gene flow from genetically modified (GM) crops to compatible relatives is of interest in risk assessments for GM crops. Reciprocal crosses were made between GM canola, Brassica napus cv. RaideRR that expresses CP4 EPSPS fo...

  5. Platelet effects on ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Davis, Ashley N; Afshar-Kharghan, Vahid; Sood, Anil K

    2014-06-01

    Growing understanding of the role of thrombocytosis, high platelet turnover, and the presence of activated platelets in the circulation in cancer progression and metastasis has brought megakaryocytes into focus. Platelet biology is essential to hemostasis, vascular integrity, angiogenesis, inflammation, innate immunity, wound healing, and cancer biology. However, before megakaryocyte/platelet-directed therapies can be considered for clinical use, understanding of the mechanism and biology of paraneoplastic thrombocytosis in malignancy is required. Here, we provide an overview of the clinical implications, biological significance, and mechanisms of paraneoplastic thrombocytosis in the context of ovarian cancer.

  6. Socioeconomic Status Modifies the Seasonal Effect on Blood Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Cois, Annibale; Ehrlich, Rodney

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Seasonal variations in blood pressure have been consistently reported. However, uncertainty remains about the size of the seasonal effect in different regions, and about factors that explain the differences observed across and within populations. Using data from a national panel study, we investigated seasonal variations in blood pressure in the South African adult population, and whether these variations differed across socioeconomic strata. We estimated age-specific seasonal effects on blood pressure using a multilevel structural equation model, with repeated measurements nested within subjects. Effect modification by socioeconomic status was assessed by repeating the analyses in the subpopulations defined by levels of education, household income per capita, and type of housing. In men and women, season had a statistically significant effect on blood pressure, with higher levels in winter and lower levels in summer. For systolic blood pressure, the magnitude of the seasonal effect was 4.25/4.21 mmHg (women/men) and was higher in the older age groups. For diastolic blood pressure, the effect size was 4.00/4.01 mmHg, with no evident age trend. Seasonal effects were higher among subjects in the lowest socioeconomic classes than in the highest, with differences between 2.4 and 7.7 mmHg, depending on gender, whether systolic or diastolic blood pressure, and socioeconomic status indicator. In the South African adult population, blood pressure shows seasonal variation modified by age and socioeconomic status. These variations have epidemiological, clinical, and public health implications, including the prospect of population level intervention to reduce elevated risk of cold weather cardiovascular morbidity. PMID:26334893

  7. Identification of a BRCA2-Specific Modifier Locus at 6p24 Related to Breast Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Vijai, Joseph; Klein, Robert J.; Kirchhoff, Tomas; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Dunning, Alison M.; Lee, Andrew; Dennis, Joe; Healey, Sue; Dicks, Ed; Soucy, Penny; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Wang, Xianshu; Eldridge, Ronald C.; Tessier, Daniel C.; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Peock, Susan; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Peterlongo, Paolo; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Piedmonte, Marion; Singer, Christian F.; Thomassen, Mads; Hansen, Thomas v. O.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Blanco, Ignacio; Greene, Mark H.; Garber, Judith; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Goldgar, David E.; D'Andrea, Emma; Caldes, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Osorio, Ana; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Arason, Adalgeir; Rennert, Gad; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Kets, Carolien M.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Wijnen, Juul T.; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve; Fineberg, Elena; Platte, Radka; Evans, D. Gareth; Jacobs, Chris; Adlard, Julian; Tischkowitz, Marc; Porteous, Mary E.; Damiola, Francesca; Golmard, Lisa; Barjhoux, Laure; Longy, Michel; Belotti, Muriel; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Manoukian, Siranoush; Barile, Monica; Genuardi, Maurizio; Arnold, Norbert; Meindl, Alfons; Sutter, Christian; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Domchek, Susan M.; Pfeiler, Georg; Friedman, Eitan; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Robson, Mark; Shah, Sohela; Lazaro, Conxi; Mai, Phuong L.; Benitez, Javier; Southey, Melissa C.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Fasching, Peter A.; Peto, Julian; Humphreys, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Burwinkel, Barbara; Guénel, Pascal; Bojesen, Stig E.; Milne, Roger L.; Brenner, Hermann; Lochmann, Magdalena; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Dörk, Thilo; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Lambrechts, Diether; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Radice, Paolo; Giles, Graham G.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Winqvist, Robert; Devillee, Peter; García-Closas, Montserrat; Schoof, Nils; Hooning, Maartje J.; Cox, Angela; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Jakubowska, Anna; Orr, Nick; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M. Rosario; Hall, Per; Couch, Fergus J.; Simard, Jacques; Altshuler, David; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Offit, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Common genetic variants contribute to the observed variation in breast cancer risk for BRCA2 mutation carriers; those known to date have all been found through population-based genome-wide association studies (GWAS). To comprehensively identify breast cancer risk modifying loci for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we conducted a deep replication of an ongoing GWAS discovery study. Using the ranked P-values of the breast cancer associations with the imputed genotype of 1.4 M SNPs, 19,029 SNPs were selected and designed for inclusion on a custom Illumina array that included a total of 211,155 SNPs as part of a multi-consortial project. DNA samples from 3,881 breast cancer affected and 4,330 unaffected BRCA2 mutation carriers from 47 studies belonging to the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 were genotyped and available for analysis. We replicated previously reported breast cancer susceptibility alleles in these BRCA2 mutation carriers and for several regions (including FGFR2, MAP3K1, CDKN2A/B, and PTHLH) identified SNPs that have stronger evidence of association than those previously published. We also identified a novel susceptibility allele at 6p24 that was inversely associated with risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers (rs9348512; per allele HR = 0.85, 95% CI 0.80–0.90, P = 3.9×10−8). This SNP was not associated with breast cancer risk either in the general population or in BRCA1 mutation carriers. The locus lies within a region containing TFAP2A, which encodes a transcriptional activation protein that interacts with several tumor suppressor genes. This report identifies the first breast cancer risk locus specific to a BRCA2 mutation background. This comprehensive update of novel and previously reported breast cancer susceptibility loci contributes to the establishment of a panel of SNPs that modify breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers. This panel may have clinical utility for women with BRCA2 mutations weighing options for medical

  8. Lipid-modified G4-decoy oligonucleotide anchored to nanoparticles: delivery and bioactivity in pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Cogoi, S.; Jakobsen, U.; Pedersen, E. B.; Vogel, S.; Xodo, L. E.

    2016-01-01

    KRAS is mutated in >90% of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. As its inactivation leads to tumour regression, mutant KRAS is considered an attractive target for anticancer drugs. In this study we report a new delivery strategy for a G4-decoy oligonucleotide that sequesters MAZ, a transcription factor essential for KRAS transcription. It is based on the use of palmitoyl-oleyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) liposomes functionalized with lipid-modified G4-decoy oligonucleotides and a lipid-modified cell penetrating TAT peptide. The potency of the strategy in pancreatic cancer cells is demonstrated by cell cytometry, confocal microscopy, clonogenic and qRT-PCR assays. PMID:27929127

  9. Mapping Complex Traits in a Diversity Outbred F1 Mouse Population Identifies Germline Modifiers of Metastasis in Human Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Winter, Jean M; Gildea, Derek E; Andreas, Jonathan P; Gatti, Daniel M; Williams, Kendra A; Lee, Minnkyong; Hu, Ying; Zhang, Suiyuan; Mullikin, James C; Wolfsberg, Tyra G; McDonnell, Shannon K; Fogarty, Zachary C; Larson, Melissa C; French, Amy J; Schaid, Daniel J; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Churchill, Gary A; Crawford, Nigel P S

    2017-01-25

    It is unclear how standing genetic variation affects the prognosis of prostate cancer patients. To provide one controlled answer to this problem, we crossed a dominant, penetrant mouse model of prostate cancer to Diversity Outbred mice, a collection of animals that carries over 40 million SNPs. Integration of disease phenotype and SNP variation data in 493 F1 males identified a metastasis modifier locus on Chromosome 8 (LOD = 8.42); further analysis identified the genes Rwdd4, Cenpu, and Casp3 as functional effectors of this locus. Accordingly, analysis of over 5,300 prostate cancer patient samples revealed correlations between the presence of genetic variants at these loci, their expression levels, cancer aggressiveness, and patient survival. We also observed that ectopic overexpression of RWDD4 and CENPU increased the aggressiveness of two human prostate cancer cell lines. In aggregate, our approach demonstrates how well-characterized genetic variation in mice can be harnessed in conjunction with systems genetics approaches to identify and characterize germline modifiers of human disease processes.

  10. Lung cancer biomarkers for the assessment of modified risk tobacco products: an oxidative stress perspective.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Frazer J; Luettich, Karsta; Gregg, Evan O

    2013-05-01

    Manufacturers have developed prototype cigarettes yielding reduced levels of some tobacco smoke toxicants, when tested using laboratory machine smoking under standardised conditions. For the scientific assessment of modified risk tobacco products, tests that offer objective, reproducible data, which can be obtained in a much shorter time than the requirements of conventional epidemiology are needed. In this review, we consider whether biomarkers of biological effect related to oxidative stress can be used in this role. Based on published data, urinary 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2-deoxyguanosine, thymidine glycol, F2-isoprostanes, serum dehydroascorbic acid to ascorbic acid ratio and carotenoid concentrations show promise, while 4-hydroxynonenal requires further qualification.

  11. Structure Optimization of 21,23-Core-Modified Porphyrins Absorbing Long-Wavelength Light as Potential Photosensitizers Against Breast Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    promising dithiaporphyrin from in vitro studies is being evaluated in toxicity studies in vivo. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Photodynamic therapy , breast cancer...objectives of this project are two fold: one was to train the former PI, Dr. Youngjae You, as an photodynamic cancer therapy expert in breast cancer...of core- modified porphyrins as photosensitizers for the photodynamic therapy of cancer. In the first year, we made eighteen new 21,23-core

  12. Semisynthesis of SY-1 for investigation of breast cancer stem cell selectivity of C-ring-modified salinomycin analogues.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaoli; Borgström, Björn; Månsson, Linda; Persson, Lo; Oredsson, Stina; Hegardt, Cecilia; Strand, Daniel

    2014-07-18

    Salinomycin, a naturally occurring polyether ionophore was recently found to selectively reduce the proportion of CD44(+)/CD24(-) cells, a phenotype associated with breast cancer stem cells. Subsequent studies from our group showed that chemical modification of the allylic C20 hydroxyl of salinomycin, located at the C-ring, can enhance the activity of derivatives against breast cancer cells over 5-fold compared to the native structure. Access to C-ring-modified salinomycin analogues is thus of interest from both a mechanistic and a synthetic perspective. Here, we report efficient strategies for gram scale synthesis of the natural product SY-1 (20-deoxy salinomycin), and a saturated analogue, 18,19-dihydro SY-1, for a comparative in vitro investigation of the biological profiles of these compounds with that of salinomycin. Across several assays, the deoxygenated structures required higher concentrations to elicit similar cellular responses to that of salinomycin. Similarly to salinomycin, SY-1 or 18,19-dihydro SY-1 treatment was found to reduce the proportion of CD44(+)/CD24(-) cells with essentially complete selectivity up to ∼IC25. Importantly, the proportion of CD44(+)/CD24(-) cells showed a pronounced U-shaped dose response curve for salinomycin and its derivatives, but not for paclitaxel. The concentration for maximum response in this assay followed differences in IC50 for salinomycin and its analogues, which emphasizes the importance of taking concentration dependence into account when comparing effects on the CD44(+)/CD24(-) phenotype. Small differences in the global conformation within the triad of compounds investigated together with differences in activity across assays emphasize the importance of substitution at C20 for the activity of salinomycin and its derivatives.

  13. Effects of modified atmosphere on crop productivity and mineral content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chagvardieff, P.; Dimon, B.; Souleimanov, A.; Massimino, D.; Le Bras, S.; Péan, M.; Louche-Teissandier, D.

    1997-01-01

    Wheat, potato, pea and tomato crops were cultivated from seeding to harvest in a controlled and confined growth chamber at elevated CO_2 concentration (3700 muL.L^-1) to examine the effects on biomass production and edible part yields. Different responses to high CO_2 were recorded, ranging from a decline in productivity for wheat, to slight stimulation for potatoes, moderate increase for tomatoes, and very large enhancement for pea. Mineral content in wheat and pea seeds was not greatly modified by the elevated CO_2. Short-term experiments (17 d) were conducted on potato at high (3700 muL.L^-1) and very high (20,000 muL.L^-1) CO_2 concentration and/or low O_2 partial pressure (~ 20,600 muL.L^-1 or 2 kPa). Low O_2 was more effective than high CO_2 in total biomass accumulation, but development was affected: Low O_2 inhibited tuberization, while high CO_2 significantly increased production of tubers.

  14. Hyaluronic Acid Modified Hollow Prussian Blue Nanoparticles Loading 10-hydroxycamptothecin for Targeting Thermochemotherapy of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Lijia; shao, shangmin; Wang, Yang; Yang, Yongbo; Yue, Xiuli; Dai, Zhifei

    2016-01-01

    This paper reported the fabrication of a multifunctional nanoplatform by modifying hollow Prussian blue nanoparticles with hyaluronic acid grafting polyethylene glycol, followed by loading 10-hydroxycamptothecin for tumor-targeted thermochemotherapy. It was found that the surface modification of hollow Prussian blue nanoparticles with hyaluronic acid grafting polyethylene endowed a great colloidal stability, long blood circulation time and the capability for targeting Hela cells over-expressing the CD44 receptor. The obtained nanoagent exhibited efficient photothermal effect and a light triggered and stepwise release behavior of 10-hydroxycamptothecin due to the strong optical absorption in the near-infrared region. The investigations on the body weight change, histological injury and blood biochemical indexes showed that such nanoagent had excellent biocompatibility for medical application. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments proved that the combination of chemotherapy and photothermal therapy through the agent of hyaluronic acid modified Prussian blue nanoparticles loading 10-hydroxycamptothecin could significantly improve the therapeutic efficacy compared with either therapy alone because of a good synergetic effect. PMID:26722372

  15. Hyaluronic Acid Modified Hollow Prussian Blue Nanoparticles Loading 10-hydroxycamptothecin for Targeting Thermochemotherapy of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jing, Lijia; Shao, Shangmin; Wang, Yang; Yang, Yongbo; Yue, Xiuli; Dai, Zhifei

    2016-01-01

    This paper reported the fabrication of a multifunctional nanoplatform by modifying hollow Prussian blue nanoparticles with hyaluronic acid grafting polyethylene glycol, followed by loading 10-hydroxycamptothecin for tumor-targeted thermochemotherapy. It was found that the surface modification of hollow Prussian blue nanoparticles with hyaluronic acid grafting polyethylene endowed a great colloidal stability, long blood circulation time and the capability for targeting Hela cells over-expressing the CD44 receptor. The obtained nanoagent exhibited efficient photothermal effect and a light triggered and stepwise release behavior of 10-hydroxycamptothecin due to the strong optical absorption in the near-infrared region. The investigations on the body weight change, histological injury and blood biochemical indexes showed that such nanoagent had excellent biocompatibility for medical application. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments proved that the combination of chemotherapy and photothermal therapy through the agent of hyaluronic acid modified Prussian blue nanoparticles loading 10-hydroxycamptothecin could significantly improve the therapeutic efficacy compared with either therapy alone because of a good synergetic effect.

  16. Food effect on bioavailability of modified-release trimetazidine tablets.

    PubMed

    Ozbay, Latif; Unal, Durisehvar Ozer; Erol, Dilek

    2012-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate a food effect on the bio-availability of modified-release (MR) trimetazidine tablets in 36 healthy volunteers. Trimetazidine, an anti-ischemic drug, protects the myocardial cell from the harmful effects of ischemia. The authors investigated the effect of being under a fasting or fed state at the time of drug intake on the bioavailability of trimetazidine 35-mg MR tablets in a randomized, open-label, crossover, 2-arm, 4-period, 2-sequence bioequivalence study design with a 14-day washout period. Plasma concentration of trimetazidine was assayed in timed samples with a validated high- performance liquid chromatography/mass selective detector that had a lower limit of quantification of 2.5 ng/mL. Test and reference formulations gave a mean trimetazidine C(max) of 63.26 ng/mL and 69.18 ng/mL for the fasting state and 64.19 ng/mL and 63.11 ng/mL for the fed state, respectively. The AUC(0-tlast) mean of trimetazidine was 726.31 ng·h/mL and 733.01 ng·h/mL for the fasting state and 706.40 ng·h/mL and 691.40 ng·h/mL for the fed state for test/reference formulations. There were no significant differences in pharmacokinetic parameters between the 2 formulations and the fasting/fed states. The authors showed that there is no food effect and no need for a 4-period study to evaluate the bioequivalence of trimetazidine MR tablets.

  17. Effects of Using Modified Items to Test Students with Persistent Academic Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Stephen N.; Kettler, Ryan J.; Beddow, Peter A.; Kurz, Alexander; Compton, Elizabeth; McGrath, Dawn; Bruen, Charles; Hinton, Kent; Palmer, Porter; Rodriguez, Michael C.; Bolt, Daniel; Roach, Andrew T.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of using modified items in achievement tests to enhance accessibility. An experiment determined whether tests composed of modified items would reduce the performance gap between students eligible for an alternate assessment based on modified achievement standards (AA-MAS) and students not eligible, and the…

  18. Genetic Mapping in Mice Identifies DMBT1 as a Candidate Modifier of Mammary Tumors and Breast Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Blackburn, Anneke C.; Hill, Linda Z.; Roberts, Amy L.; Wang, Jun; Aud, Dee; Jung, Jimmy; Nikolcheva, Tania; Allard, John; Peltz, Gary; Otis, Christopher N.; Cao, Qing J.; Ricketts, Reva St. J.; Naber, Stephen P.; Mollenhauer, Jan; Poustka, Annemarie; Malamud, Daniel; Jerry, D. Joseph

    2007-01-01

    Low-penetrance breast cancer susceptibility alleles seem to play a significant role in breast cancer risk but are difficult to identify in human cohorts. A genetic screen of 176 N2 backcross progeny of two Trp53+/− strains, BALB/c and C57BL/6, which differ in their susceptibility to mammary tumors, identified a modifier of mammary tumor susceptibility in an ∼25-Mb interval on mouse chromosome 7 (designated SuprMam1). Relative to heterozygotes, homozygosity for BALB/c alleles of SuprMam1 significantly decreased mammary tumor latency from 70.7 to 61.1 weeks and increased risk twofold (P = 0.002). Dmbt1 (deleted in malignant brain tumors 1) was identified as a candidate modifier gene within the SuprMam1 interval because it was differentially expressed in mammary tissues from BALB/c-Trp53+/− and C57BL/6-Trp53+/− mice. Dmbt1 mRNA and protein was reduced in mammary glands of the susceptible BALB/c mice. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated that DMBT1 protein expression was also significantly reduced in normal breast tissue from women with breast cancer (staining score, 1.8; n = 46) compared with cancer-free controls (staining score, 3.9; n = 53; P < 0.0001). These experiments demonstrate the use of Trp53+/− mice as a sensitized background to screen for low-penetrance modifiers of cancer. The results identify a novel mammary tumor susceptibility locus in mice and support a role for DMBT1 in suppression of mammary tumors in both mice and women. PMID:17525270

  19. Modifying effect of the County Level Health Indices on Cardiopulmonary Effects Associated with Wildfire Exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background and Aims: Socioeconomic status (SES) is a known risk factor for cardiopulmonary health and some studies suggest SES may be an effect modifier for health effects associated with exposure to air pollution. We investigated the synergistic impact of health disparities on ...

  20. Selective biophysical interactions of surface modified nanoparticles with cancer cell lipids improve tumor targeting and gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Blanka; Peetla, Chiranjeevi; Adjei, Isaac M; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2013-07-01

    Targeting gene- or drug-loaded nanoparticles (NPs) to tumors and ensuring their intratumoral retention after systemic administration remain key challenges to improving the efficacy of NP-based therapeutics. Here, we investigate a novel targeting approach that exploits changes in lipid metabolism and cell membrane biophysics that occur during malignancy. We hypothesized that modifications to the surface of NPs that preferentially increase their biophysical interaction with the membrane lipids of cancer cells will improve intratumoral retention and in vivo efficacy upon delivery of NPs loaded with a therapeutic gene. We have demonstrated that different surfactants, incorporated onto the NPs' surface, affect the biophysical interactions of NPs with the lipids of cancer cells and normal endothelial cells. NPs surface modified with didodecyldimethylammoniumbromide (DMAB) demonstrated greater interaction with cancer cell lipids, which was 6.7-fold greater than with unmodified NPs and 5.5-fold greater than with endothelial cell lipids. This correlated with increased uptake of DMAB-modified NPs with incubation time by cancer cells compared to other formulations of NPs and to uptake by endothelial cells. Upon systemic injection, DMAB-NPs demonstrated a 4.6-fold increase in tumor accumulation compared to unmodified NPs which also correlated to improved efficacy of p53 gene therapy. Characterization of the biophysical interactions between NPs and lipid membranes of tumors or other diseased tissues/organs may hold promise for engineering targeted delivery of therapeutics.

  1. The effects of laser immunotherapy on cancer cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahavar, Cody F.; Zhou, Feifan; Hasanjee, Aamr M.; Layton, Elivia; Lam, Anh; Chen, Wei R.; Vaughan, Melville B.

    2016-03-01

    Laser immunotherapy (LIT) uses laser irradiation and immunological stimulation to target all types of metastases and creates a long-term tumor resistance. Glycated chitosan (GC) is the immunological stimulant used in LIT. Interestingly, GC can act as a surfactant for single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) to immunologically modify SWNTs. SWNT-GC retains the optical properties of SWNTs and the immunological functions of GC to help increase the selectivity of the laser and create a more optimal immune response. One essential aspect of understanding this immune response is knowing how laser irradiation affects cancer cells' ability to metastasize. In this experiment, a cell migration assay was performed. A 2mm circular elastomer plugs were placed at the bottom of multi-well dishes. Pre-cancerous keratinocytes, different tumor cells, and fibroblasts were then plated separately in treated wells. Once the cells reached 100% confluence, they were irradiated by either a 980nm or 805nm wavelength laser. The goal was to determine the effects of laser irradiation and immunological stimulation on cancer cell migration in vitro, paying the way to understand the mechanism of LIT in treating metastatic tumors in cancer patients.

  2. Chemically Modified Bacteriophage as a Streamlined Approach to Noninvasive Breast Cancer Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    Tessier, T. E.; Bryant, H. C.; Huber, D. L.; Larson, R. S.; Flynn, E. R. Detection of breast cancer cells using targeted magnetic nanoparticles and ultra...sensitive magnetic field sensors. Breast Cancer Res. 2011, 13, R108. (29) Wang, M.; Thanou, M. Targeting Nanoparticles to Cancer . Pharmacol. Res...Streamlined Approach to Noninvasive Breast Cancer Imaging PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Michelle E. Farkas, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION

  3. Surface modified multifunctional nanomedicines for simultaneous imaging and therapy of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Barar, Jaleh; Omidi, Yadollah

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: To date, a growing number of advanced anticancer nanomedicines (e.g., Doxil®, Lipoxal®, DepoCyte®) have entered into different phases of clinical trials. However, most of these medicaments fail to differentiate between diseased and normal cells. They also do not have capability of real time monitoring of disease status trough on-demand imaging/sensing of target molecule(s). Multifunctional nanomedicines and theranostics can resolve such limitations, while formulation of these advanced seamless systems appear to involve various sophisticated process, exploiting several bioconjugations. Methods: Recent works upon multifunctional nanomedicines for simultaneous imaging and therapy of cancer have been systematically reviewed, focusing on surface modification and application of advanced nanobiomaterials. Results: Ultimate therapy of malignancies, as complex systems, demands implementation of seamless nanosystems (NSs) that can specifically target the cancerous cells and smartly deliver the anticancer agent(s) into the desired target site. Engineering of such NSs requires in-situ coordination of various technologies (e.g., synthesis, surface modification and bioconjugation) in order to achieve improved pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics outcomes. Conclusion: Seamless multimodal NSs have potential to simultaneously target and monitor the tumor cells through homing and imaging/sensing devices and deliver the therapeutic agents. However, to achieve superior pharmacokinetics with maximal efficacy and minimal side effects, these advanced NSs need to become much more intelligent to sense the disease condition and liberate therapeutics on demand. PMID:24790893

  4. Monodisperse magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles modified with water soluble polymers for the diagnosis of breast cancer by MRI method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezayan, Ali Hossein; Mousavi, Majid; Kheirjou, Somayyeh; Amoabediny, Ghasem; Ardestani, Mehdi Shafiee; Mohammadnejad, Javad

    2016-12-01

    In this study, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were synthesized via co-precipitation method. To enhance the biocompatibility and colloidal stability of the synthesized nanoparticles, they were modified with carboxyl functionalized PEG via dopamine (DPA) linker. Both modified and unmodified Fe3O4 nanoparticles exhibited super paramagnetic behavior (particle size below 20 nm). The saturation magnetization (Ms) of PEGdiacid-modified Fe3O4 was 45 emu/g, which was less than the unmodified Fe3O4 nanoparticles (70 emu/g). This difference indicated that PEGdiacid polymer was immobilized on the surface of Fe3O4 nanoparticles successfully. To evaluate the efficiency of the resulting nanoparticles as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), different concentration of MNPs and different value of echo time TE were investigated. The results showed that by increasing the concentration of the nanoparticles, transverse relaxation time (T2) decreased, which subsequently resulted in MR signal enhancement. T2-weighted MR images of the different concentration of MNPs in different value of echo time TE indicated that MR signal intensity increased with increase in TE value up to 66 and then remained constant. The cytotoxicity effect of the modified and unmodified nanoparticles was evaluated in three different concentrations (12, 60 and 312 mg l-1) on MDA-MB-231 cancer cells for 24 and 48 h. In both tested time (24 and 48 h) for all three samples, the modified nanoparticles had long life time than unmodified nanoparticles. Cellular uptake of modified MNPs was 80% and reduced to 9% by the unmodified MNPs.

  5. The Anti-Cancer Effect of Polyphenols against Breast Cancer and Cancer Stem Cells: Molecular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Abdal Dayem, Ahmed; Choi, Hye Yeon; Yang, Gwang-Mo; Kim, Kyeongseok; Saha, Subbroto Kumar; Cho, Ssang-Goo

    2016-01-01

    The high incidence of breast cancer in developed and developing countries, and its correlation to cancer-related deaths, has prompted concerned scientists to discover novel alternatives to deal with this challenge. In this review, we will provide a brief overview of polyphenol structures and classifications, as well as on the carcinogenic process. The biology of breast cancer cells will also be discussed. The molecular mechanisms involved in the anti-cancer activities of numerous polyphenols, against a wide range of breast cancer cells, in vitro and in vivo, will be explained in detail. The interplay between autophagy and apoptosis in the anti-cancer activity of polyphenols will also be highlighted. In addition, the potential of polyphenols to target cancer stem cells (CSCs) via various mechanisms will be explained. Recently, the use of natural products as chemotherapeutics and chemopreventive drugs to overcome the side effects and resistance that arise from using chemical-based agents has garnered the attention of the scientific community. Polyphenol research is considered a promising field in the treatment and prevention of breast cancer. PMID:27657126

  6. Effect of modified yam (Dioscorea esculenta) flour on some physicochemical and sensory properties of synbiotic yoghurt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handayani, M. N.; Cakrawati, D.; Handayani, S.

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the study were to know characteristics of yam modified flour; to know the effect of modified yam flour on some physicochemical and sensory properties of synbiotic yoghurt and to determine the concentration level of modified yam flour to produce symbiotic yoghurt preferred by panelists. The reasearch was conducted using one factor complete randomized design. Modified yam flour was added to yoghurt at concentration of 2%, 4%, 6%. The effect of physical modification were investigated. Proximate analysis showed modified yam flour consist of 7.66% moisture content, 1.42% ash content, 10.16%, dietary fiber, 7.49% inulin, and 71.78% total starch content. Result obtained that modified yam flour has yield of 10.54%, the modified yam flour showed solubility and water absopsion of 77,63% and 136,65 respectively. The addition of modified yam flour on yoghurt resulted significantly difference effect on texture, but did not have significantly difference on colour, flavour and aroma. Modified yam flour added yoghurt thickness because it was gelatinized when added to yoghurt at 40°C. Sensory analysis conducted with hedonic test showed synbiotic yoghurt added with 2% of modified yam flour most preferred by panellists. Synbiotic yoghurt with 2% of modified yam flour has pH number of 4, 8 and total acid tirated of 1, 7%.

  7. Hyaluronic acid modified mesoporous carbon nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to CD44-overexpressing cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Long; Jiao, Jian; Cui, Yu; Guo, Jingwen; Han, Ning; Di, Donghua; Chang, Di; Wang, Pu; Jiang, Tongying; Wang, Siling

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, hyaluronic acid (HA) functionalized uniform mesoporous carbon spheres (UMCS) were synthesized for targeted enzyme responsive drug delivery using a facile electrostatic attraction strategy. This HA modification ensured stable drug encapsulation in mesoporous carbon nanoparticles in an extracellular environment while increasing colloidal stability, biocompatibility, cell-targeting ability, and controlled cargo release. The cellular uptake experiments of fluorescently labeled mesoporous carbon nanoparticles, with or without HA functionalization, demonstrated that HA-UMCS are able to specifically target cancer cells overexpressing CD44 receptors. Moreover, the cargo loaded doxorubicin (DOX) and verapamil (VER) exhibited a dual pH and hyaluronidase-1 responsive release in the tumor microenvironment. In addition, VER/DOX/HA-UMCS exhibited a superior therapeutic effect on an in vivo HCT-116 tumor in BALB/c nude mice. In summary, it is expected that HA-UMCS will offer a new method for targeted co-delivery of drugs to tumors overexpressing CD44 receptors.

  8. Targeting Cancer Metabolism - Revisiting the Warburg Effects

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Quangdon; Lee, Hyunji; Park, Jisoo; Kim, Seon-Hwan; Park, Jongsun

    2016-01-01

    After more than half of century since the Warburg effect was described, this atypical metabolism has been standing true for almost every type of cancer, exhibiting higher glycolysis and lactate metabolism and defective mitochondrial ATP production. This phenomenon had attracted many scientists to the problem of elucidating the mechanism of, and reason for, this effect. Several models based on oncogenic studies have been proposed, such as the accumulation of mitochondrial gene mutations, the switch from oxidative phosphorylation respiration to glycolysis, the enhancement of lactate metabolism, and the alteration of glycolytic genes. Whether the Warburg phenomenon is the consequence of genetic dysregulation in cancer or the cause of cancer remains unknown. Moreover, the exact reasons and physiological values of this peculiar metabolism in cancer remain unclear. Although there are some pharmacological compounds, such as 2-deoxy-D-glucose, dichloroacetic acid, and 3-bromopyruvate, therapeutic strategies, including diet, have been developed based on targeting the Warburg effect. In this review, we will revisit the Warburg effect to determine how much scientists currently understand about this phenomenon and how we can treat the cancer based on targeting metabolism. PMID:27437085

  9. Effective Removal of Heavy Metals from Wastewater Using Modified Clay.

    PubMed

    Song, Mun-Seon; Vijayarangamuthu, K; Han, EunJi; Jeon, Ki-Joon

    2016-05-01

    We report an economical and eco-friendly way to remove the heavy metal pollutant using modified clay. The modification of clay was done by calcining the natural clay from Kyushu region in Japan. Further, the removal efficiency for various pH and contact time was evaluated. The morphology of the clays was studied using the scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The structural and chemical analyses of modified clay were done by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and Energy dispersion analysis (EDAX) to understand the properties related to the removal of heavy metal pollutant. Further, we studied the absorption efficiency of clay for various pH and contacting time using Ni polluted water. The modified clays show better removal efficiency for all pH with different saturation time. The adsorption follows pseudo-second order kinetics and the adsorption capacity of modified clay is 1.5 times larger than that of natural clay. The increase in the adsorption efficiency of modified clay was correlated to the increase in hematite phase along with increase in surface area due to surface morphological changes.

  10. Effect of ageing on rheological properties of storage-stable SBS/sulfur-modified asphalts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng; Yu, Jianying; Wu, Shaopeng

    2010-10-15

    Oxidative ageing as an inevitable process in practical road paving has a great effect on the properties of polymer-modified asphalts (PMAs). In this article, the effect of short-term and long-term oxidative ageing on the rheological, physical properties and the morphology of the styrene-butadiene-styrene (SBS)- and storage-stable SBS/sulfur-modified asphalts was studied, respectively. The analysis on the rheological and physical properties of the PMAs before and after ageing showed the two major effects of ageing. On one hand, ageing prompted the degradation of polymer and increased the viscous behaviour of the modified binders, on the other, ageing changed the asphalt compositions and improved the elastic behaviour of the modified binders. The final performance of the aged binders depended on the combined effect. After ageing, the storage-stable SBS/sulfur-modified asphalts showed an obvious viscous behaviour compare with the SBS-modified asphalts and this led to an improved low-temperature creep property. The rutting resistance of the SBS-modified asphalts declined by the addition of sulfur due to the structural instability of the SBS/sulfur-modified asphalts. The rheological properties of the modified binders before and after ageing also depended strongly on the structural characteristics of SBS. The observation by using optical microscopy showed the compatibility between asphalt and SBS was improved with further ageing, especially for the storage-stable SBS/sulfur-modified asphalts.

  11. Could age modify the effect of genetic variants in IL6 and TNF-α genes in multiple myeloma?

    PubMed

    Martino, Alessandro; Buda, Gabriele; Maggini, Valentina; Lapi, Francesco; Lupia, Antonella; Di Bello, Domenica; Orciuolo, Enrico; Galimberti, Sara; Barale, Roberto; Petrini, Mario; Rossi, Anna Maria

    2012-05-01

    Cytokines play a central role in multiple myeloma (MM) pathogenesis thus genetic variations within cytokines coding genes could influence MM susceptibility and therapy outcome. We investigated the impact of 8 SNPs in these genes in 202 MM cases and 235 controls also evaluating their impact on therapy outcome in a subset of 91 patients. Despite the overall negative findings, we found a significant age-modified effect of IL6 and TNF-α SNPs, on MM risk and therapy outcome, respectively. Therefore, this observation suggests that genetic variation in inflammation-related genes could be an important mediator of the complex interplay between ageing and cancer.

  12. The cancer preventive effects of edible mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tongtong; Beelman, Robert B; Lambert, Joshua D

    2012-12-01

    An increasing body of scientific literature suggests that dietary components may exert cancer preventive effects. Tea, soy, cruciferous vegetables and other foods have been investigated for their cancer preventive potential. Some non-edible mushrooms like Reishi (Ganoderma lucidum) have a history use, both alone and in conjunction with standard therapies, for the treatment of various diseases including cancer in some cultures. They have shown efficacy in a number of scientific studies. By comparison, the potential cancer preventive effects of edible mushrooms have been less well-studied. With similar content of putative effective anticancer compounds such as polysaccharides, proteoglycans, steroids, etc., one might predict that edible mushrooms would also demonstrate anticancer and cancer preventive activity. In this review, available data for five commonly-consumed edible mushrooms: button mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus), A. blazei, oyster mushrooms (Pleurotus ostreatus), shiitake mushrooms (Lentinus edodes), and maitake (Grifola frondosa) mushrooms is discussed. The results of animal model and human intervention studies, as well as supporting in vitro mechanistic studies are critically evaluated. Weaknesses in the current data and topics for future work are highlighted.

  13. Genetic variation as a modifier of association between therapeutic exposure and subsequent malignant neoplasms in cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Smita

    2015-03-01

    Subsequent malignant neoplasms (SMNs) are associated with significant morbidity and are a major cause of premature mortality among cancer survivors. Several large studies have demonstrated a strong association between the radiation and/or chemotherapy used to treat primary cancer and the risk of developing SMNs. However, for any given therapeutic exposure, the risk of developing an SMN varies between individuals. Genomic variation can potentially modify the association between therapeutic exposures and SMN risk and may explain the observed interindividual variability. In this review, the author provides a brief overview of the current knowledge regarding the role of genomic variation in the development of therapy-related SMNs and discusses the methodological challenges in undertaking an endeavor to develop a deeper understanding of the molecular underpinnings of therapy-related SMNs, such as an appropriate study design, the identification of an adequately sized study population together with a reliable plan for collecting and maintaining high-quality DNA, clinical validation of the phenotype, and the selection of an appropriate approach or platform for genotyping. Understanding the factors that can modify the risk of treatment-related SMNs is critical to developing targeted intervention strategies and optimizing risk-based health care for cancer survivors.

  14. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy in Treating Long-Term Gastrointestinal Adverse Effects Caused by Radiation Therapy in Patients With Pelvic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-07-14

    Bladder Cancer; Cervical Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Endometrial Cancer; Gastrointestinal Complications; Long-term Effects Secondary to Cancer Therapy in Adults; Ovarian Cancer; Prostate Cancer; Radiation Toxicity; Sarcoma; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Vaginal Cancer

  15. In vitro and in vivo targeting imaging of pancreatic cancer using a Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoprobe modified with anti-mesothelin antibody

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang; Le, Wenjun; Mei, Tianxiao; Wang, Tiegong; Chen, Luguang; Lei, Yi; Cui, Shaobin; Chen, Bingdi; Cui, Zheng; Shao, Chengwei

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly malignant disease with a 5-year survival rate <5% mainly due to lack of early diagnosis and effective therapy. In an effort to improve the early diagnostic rate of pancreatic cancer, a nanoprobe Fe3O4@SiO2 modified with anti-mesothelin antibody (A-MFS) was prepared to target cells and tumor tissues highly expressing mesothelin in vitro (human pancreatic cancer cell line SW1990) and in vivo (subcutaneously transplanted tumors) studies. The A-MFS probe was successfully prepared and was spherical and uniform with a hydrodynamic diameter between 110 and 130 nm. Cell Counting Kit-8 testing indicated that A-MFS was nontoxic in vitro and in vivo studies. The in vitro study showed that the A-MFS probe specifically targeted SW1990 cells with high mesothelin expression. The in vivo study was conducted in Siemens 3.0 T magnetic resonance imaging. The average T2-weighted signal values of the xenografts were 966.533±31.56 before injecting A-MFS and 691.133±56.84 before injecting saline solution. After injection of 0.1 mL A-MFS via nude mouse caudal vein for 2.5 hours, the average T2-weighted signal of the xenograft decreased by 342.533±42.6. The signal value decreased by −61.233±33.9 and −58.7±19.4 after injection of the saline and Fe3O4@SiO2. The decrease of tumor signal by A-MFS was much more significant than that by saline and Fe3O4@SiO2 (P<0.05). The results demonstrated the high stability and nontoxicity of A-MFS, which effectively targeted pancreatic cancer in vitro and in vivo. A-MFS is a promising agent for diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. PMID:27274243

  16. Effects of Chemotherapy on the Brain in Women With Newly Diagnosed Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-12

    Breast Cancer; Chemotherapeutic Agent Toxicity; Cognitive/Functional Effects; Fatigue; Long-term Effects Secondary to Cancer Therapy in Adults; Neurotoxicity; Psychosocial Effects of Cancer and Its Treatment

  17. Synthesis of glycyrrhetinic acid-modified chitosan 5-fluorouracil nanoparticles and its inhibition of liver cancer characteristics in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Mingrong; Gao, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yong; Chen, Houxiang; He, Bing; Xu, Hongzhi; Li, Yingchun; Han, Jiang; Zhang, Zhiping

    2013-09-17

    Nanoparticle drug delivery (NDDS) is a novel system in which the drugs are delivered to the site of action by small particles in the nanometer range. Natural or synthetic polymers are used as vectors in NDDS, as they provide targeted, sustained release and biodegradability. Here, we used the chitosan and hepatoma cell-specific binding molecule, glycyrrhetinic acid (GA), to synthesize glycyrrhetinic acid-modified chitosan (GA-CTS). The synthetic product was confirmed by Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and ¹H-nuclear magnetic resonance (¹H-NMR). By combining GA-CTS and 5-FU (5-fluorouracil), we obtained a GA-CTS/5-FU nanoparticle, with a particle size of 217.2 nm, a drug loading of 1.56% and a polydispersity index of 0.003. The GA-CTS/5-FU nanoparticle provided a sustained release system comprising three distinct phases of quick, steady and slow release. We demonstrated that the nanoparticle accumulated in the liver. In vitro data indicated that it had a dose- and time-dependent anti-cancer effect. The effective drug exposure time against hepatic cancer cells was increased in comparison with that observed with 5-FU. Additionally, GA-CTS/5-FU significantly inhibited the growth of drug-resistant hepatoma, which may compensate for the drug-resistance of 5-FU. In vivo studies on an orthotropic liver cancer mouse model demonstrated that GA-CTS/5-FU significantly inhibited tumor growth, resulting in increased survival time.

  18. Mechanistic Effects of Calcitriol in Cancer Biology

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Lorenza; Díaz-Muñoz, Mauricio; García-Gaytán, Ana Cristina; Méndez, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Besides its classical biological effects on calcium and phosphorus homeostasis, calcitriol, the active vitamin D metabolite, has a broad variety of actions including anticancer effects that are mediated either transcriptionally and/or via non-genomic pathways. In the context of cancer, calcitriol regulates the cell cycle, induces apoptosis, promotes cell differentiation and acts as anti-inflammatory factor within the tumor microenvironment. In this review, we address the different mechanisms of action involved in the antineoplastic effects of calcitriol. PMID:26102214

  19. Cancer and Stroma-Targeted Immunotherapy with a Genetically Modified DC Vaccine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    of Defense (DOD) Breast Cancer Research Program (BCRP) Era of Hope Meeting, August 2-5, 2011. Orlando Marriott World Center Hotel , Orlando, FL. 2... Marriott World Center Hotel , Orlando, FL. 2. Publication: Kakarla S, Song XT, Gottschalk S. Cancer-associated fibroblasts as targets for

  20. Cancer and Stroma-Targeted Immunotherapy with a Genetically Modified DC Vaccine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    Department of Defense (DOD) Breast Cancer Research Program (BCRP) Era of Hope Meeting, August 2-5, 2011. Orlando Marriott World Center Hotel , Orlando, FL...DOD) Breast Cancer Research Program (BCRP) Era of Hope Meeting, August 2-5, 2011. Orlando Marriott World Center Hotel , Orlando, FL

  1. Neurocognitive Effects of Treatment for Childhood Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Robert W.; Haser, Jennifer K.

    2006-01-01

    We review research on the neuropsychological effects that central nervous system (CNS) cancer treatments have on the cognitive abilities of children and adolescents. The authors focus on the two most common malignancies of childhood: leukemias and brain tumors. The literature review is structured so as to separate out earlier studies, generally…

  2. Effects of Brassicaceae Isothiocyanates on Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Novío, Silvia; Cartea, María Elena; Soengas, Pilar; Freire-Garabal, Manuel; Núñez-Iglesias, María Jesús

    2016-05-12

    Despite the major progress made in the field of cancer biology, cancer is still one of the leading causes of mortality, and prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the most encountered malignancies among men. The effective management of this disease requires developing better anticancer agents with greater efficacy and fewer side effects. Nature is a large source for the development of chemotherapeutic agents, with more than 50% of current anticancer drugs being of natural origin. Isothiocyanates (ITCs) are degradation products from glucosinolates that are present in members of the family Brassicaceae. Although they are known for a variety of therapeutic effects, including antioxidant, immunostimulatory, anti-inflammatory, antiviral and antibacterial properties, nowadays, cell line and animal studies have additionally indicated the chemopreventive action without causing toxic side effects of ITCs. In this way, they can induce cell cycle arrest, activate apoptosis pathways, increase the sensitivity of resistant PCa to available chemodrugs, modulate epigenetic changes and downregulate activated signaling pathways, resulting in the inhibition of cell proliferation, progression and invasion-metastasis. The present review summarizes the chemopreventive role of ITCs with a particular emphasis on specific molecular targets and epigenetic alterations in in vitro and in vivo cancer animal models.

  3. Cancer treatment: fertility and sexual side effects in women

    MedlinePlus

    Radiotherapy - fertility; Radiation - fertility; Chemotherapy - fertility; Sexual dysfunction - cancer treatment ... Many cancer treatments can cause sexual side effects. But you are more likely to have these side effects if ...

  4. Prostate Cancer Treatments Have Varying Side Effects, Study Shows

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164200.html Prostate Cancer Treatments Have Varying Side Effects, Study Shows Even ' ... News) -- The long-term side effects of different prostate cancer treatments vary -- and knowing that may help men ...

  5. Effect of Audiovisual Cancer Programs on Patients and Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassileth, Barrie R.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Four audiovisual programs about cancer and cancer treatment were evaluated. Cancer patients, their families, and friends were asked to complete questionnaires before and after watching a program to determine the effects of the program on their knowledge of cancer, anxiety levels, and perceived ability to communicate with the staff. (Author/MLW)

  6. Multifunctional hyaluronic acid modified graphene oxide loaded with mitoxantrone for overcoming drug resistance in cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Lin; Feng, Qianhua; Wang, Yating; Yang, Xiaomin; Ren, Junxiao; Shi, Yuyang; Shan, Xiaoning; Yuan, Yujie; Wang, Yongchao; Zhang, Zhenzhong

    2016-01-01

    Multifunctional nanosheets (HA-GO/Pluronic) with targeted chemo-photothermal properties were successfully developed for controlled delivery of mitoxantrone (MIT) to overcome multidrug resistance (MDR). In vitro release profiles displayed that both an acidic environment and a NIR laser could trigger and accelerate the release of a drug, which ensured nanosheets were stable in blood circulation and released MIT within tumor cells under laser irradiation. HA-GO/Pluronic nanosheets were taken up into MCF-7/ADR cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis, which further facilitated escapement of P-gp efflux. Compared with MIT solution, MIT/HA-GO/Pluronic showed greater cytotoxicity and increase in cellular MIT accumulation in MCF-7/ADR cells. Cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest studies also revealed that MIT/HA-GO/Pluronic was more potent than MIT/GO/Pluronic and MIT solution. The anticancer efficacy in vivo was evaluated in MCF-7 and MCF-7/ADR-bearing mice, and inhibition of tumors by MIT/HA-GO/Pluronic with NIR laser irradiation was the most effective among all MIT formulations. In summary, the MIT/HA-GO/Pluronic system had striking functions such as P-gp reversible inhibitor and anticancer efficacy, and could present a promising platform for drug-resistant cancer treatment.

  7. VSL#3 probiotic modifies mucosal microbial composition but does not reduce colitis-associated colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Arthur, Janelle C.; Gharaibeh, Raad Z.; Uronis, Joshua M.; Perez-Chanona, Ernesto; Sha, Wei; Tomkovich, Sarah; Mühlbauer, Marcus; Fodor, Anthony A.; Jobin, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Although probiotics have shown success in preventing the development of experimental colitis-associated colorectal cancer (CRC), beneficial effects of interventional treatment are relatively unknown. Here we show that interventional treatment with VSL#3 probiotic alters the luminal and mucosally-adherent microbiota, but does not protect against inflammation or tumorigenesis in the azoxymethane (AOM)/Il10−/− mouse model of colitis-associated CRC. VSL#3 (109 CFU/animal/day) significantly enhanced tumor penetrance, multiplicity, histologic dysplasia scores, and adenocarcinoma invasion relative to VSL#3-untreated mice. Illumina 16S sequencing demonstrated that VSL#3 significantly decreased (16-fold) the abundance of a bacterial taxon assigned to genus Clostridium in the mucosally-adherent microbiota. Mediation analysis by linear models suggested that this taxon was a contributing factor to increased tumorigenesis in VSL#3-fed mice. We conclude that VSL#3 interventional therapy can alter microbial community composition and enhance tumorigenesis in the AOM/Il10−/− model. PMID:24100376

  8. Oral Delivery of DMAB-Modified Docetaxel-Loaded PLGA-TPGS Nanoparticles for Cancer Chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hongbo; Zheng, Yi; Tian, Ge; Tian, Yan; Zeng, Xiaowei; Liu, Gan; Liu, Kexin; Li, Lei; Li, Zhen; Mei, Lin; Huang, Laiqiang

    2011-12-01

    Three types of nanoparticle formulation from biodegradable PLGA-TPGS random copolymer were developed in this research for oral administration of anticancer drugs, which include DMAB-modified PLGA nanoparticles, unmodified PLGA-TPGS nanoparticles and DMAB-modified PLGA-TPGS nanoparticles. Firstly, the PLGA-TPGS random copolymer was synthesized and characterized. DMAB was used to increase retention time at the cell surface, thus increasing the chances of particle uptake and improving oral drug bioavailability. Nanoparticles were found to be of spherical shape with an average particle diameter of around 250 nm. The surface charge of PLGA-TPGS nanoparticles was changed to positive after DMAB modification. The results also showed that the DMAB-modified PLGA-TPGS nanoparticles have significantly higher level of the cellular uptake than that of DMAB-modified PLGA nanoparticles and unmodified PLGA-TPGS nanoparticles. In vitro, cytotoxicity experiment showed advantages of the DMAB-modified PLGA-TPGS nanoparticle formulation over commercial Taxotere® in terms of cytotoxicity against MCF-7 cells. In conclusion, oral chemotherapy by DMAB-modified PLGA-TPGS nanoparticle formulation is an attractive and promising treatment option for patients.

  9. CD24 Is a Genetic Modifier for Risk and Progression of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yifan; Li, Bingjin; Zhang, Xingyi; Sonpavde, Guru P.; Jiao, Kenneth; Zhang, Andrea; Zhang, Guangxin; Sun, Mei; Chu, Chengjing; Li, Feng; Wang, Lizhong; Cui, Ranji; Liu, Runhua

    2016-01-01

    CD24 plays an oncogenic role in the onset and progression of various human cancers, including prostate cancer. In the present study, we identified two linkage disequilibrium blocks with four recombination hotspot motifs in human CD24 locus. To elucidate whether genetic variants of CD24 associated with susceptibility to prostate cancer and its disease status, we conducted a case-control association study with two P170 C/T and P-534 A/C polymorphisms of CD24 in 590 patients with prostate cancer and 590 healthy controls. A significant increased risk of prostate cancer was found in men with the P170T/T genotype over the P170C/C genotype (odd ratio=1.74, 95% confidence interval=1.16–2.63, P=0.008), and in men with the P-534C/C genotype over the P-534A/A genotype (odd ratio=1.47, 95% confidence interval=1.18–2.26, P=0.003). Cochran-Armitage trend analysis showed that the P170T allele was significantly correlated with an increased risk of prostate cancer progression (P = 0.029, trend between genotypes and stages) and this observation was also validated in an independent sample cohort. Next, we found that tumors with P170T or P-534C alleles had more 2-fold increased protein expressions of CD24 as compared to those with P170C or P-534A alleles, respectively. Likewise, tumors with a combination of P170T/T and P-534C/C genotypes were associated with a high mRNA level of CD24. Our data suggest a significant association of CD24 genetic variants with prostate cancer onset and progression, which provides new insight into molecular genetics of prostate cancer; however, these findings need to be validated in multiple independent cohorts. PMID:27377469

  10. [Downstaging after neoadjuvant therapy for rectal cancer modifies the planned original surgery].

    PubMed

    Scutari, F; Tramutola, G; Morlino, A; Rossi, M T; Manzione, L; Rosati, G; Sopranzi, A

    2008-01-01

    Cancer of the rectum has been for more years burdened with a heavy rate of local relapse about 30%. The introduction of total meso-rectum excision has reduced the rate of up to 5-8%. Later more studies proved how the preoperative radiotherapy was able to reduce the rate of local relapse. The Authors introduce studies about downstaging after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer and discuss about their own series from 2005 to 2007.

  11. The Modifying Effects of Education and Income on Hispanics Reporting Perceived Discrimination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardarelli, Roberto; Cardarelli, Kathryn Marie; Chiapa, Ana Luz

    2007-01-01

    Research has shown that experiences of discrimination negatively affect health. However, little is known about whether socioeconomic position modifies the reporting of perceived discrimination. This cross-sectional study of 69 participants investigated the modifying effects of education and income on the reporting of perceived discrimination among…

  12. β-Diketone modified trastuzumab: a next-generation of Herceptin for resistant breast cancer cells?

    PubMed

    Lu, Jianguo; Pu, Jun; Lu, Xiaozhao; Fu, Haiyan; Wei, Mengying; Yang, Guodong

    2012-11-01

    Despite the initial efficacy of trastuzumab (commercially named Herceptin), acquired resistance in a majority of patients remains the biggest hurdle in breast cancer therapy. Recently, the Scripps Research Institute developed a method termed "instant immunity", in which antibodies (chemical programmed antibody) are rapidly induced by chemicals like β-diketone. When β-diketone is chemically linked to peptides specifically targeting cancer cells, the instant chemical programmed antibody would clear the cancer cells through antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement-directed cytotoxicity (CDC). This novel strategy has a super advantage over passive immunization or immunization with recombinant or vectored vaccines because it induces a universal immune response and memory. Theoretically, combination of the cancer cell specific recognition advantage of trastuzumab and cancerous cell clearance of active immunization would be an option for trastuzumab resistant patients, which harbors both the advantages of cancer specific targeting of trastuzumab and active immunization of the "instant immunity", implicating a better clinical outcome. Further studies are needed to verify our hypothesis, which is worth validating.

  13. [A Case of Advanced Rectal Cancer Resected Successfully after Induction Chemotherapy with Modified FOLFOX6 plus Panitumumab].

    PubMed

    Yukawa, Yoshimi; Uchima, Yasutake; Kawamura, Minori; Takeda, Osami; Hanno, Hajime; Takayanagi, Shigenori; Hirooka, Tomoomi; Dozaiku, Toshio; Hirooka, Takashi; Aomatsu, Naoki; Hirakawa, Toshiki; Iwauchi, Takehiko; Nishii, Takafumi; Morimoto, Junya; Nakazawa, Kazunori; Takeuchi, Kazuhiro

    2016-05-01

    We report a case of advanced colon cancer that was effectively treated with mFOLFOX6 plus panitumumab combination chemotherapy. The patient was a 54-year-old man who had type 2 colon cancer of the rectum. An abdominal CT scan demonstrated rectal cancer with bulky lymph node metastasis and 1 hepatic node (rectal cancer SI [bladder retroperitoneum], N2M0H1P0, cStage IV). He was treated with mFOLFOX6 plus panitumumab as neoadjuvant chemotherapy. After 4 courses of chemotherapy, CT revealed that the primary lesion and regional metastatic lymph nodes had reduced in size (rectal cancer A, N1H1P0M0, cStage IV). Anterior rectal resection with D3 nodal dissection and left lateral segmentectomy of the liver was performed. The histological diagnosis was tubular adenocarcinoma (tub2-1), int, INF a, pMP, ly0, v0, pDM0, pPM0, R0. He was treated with 4 courses of mFOLFOX6 after surgery. The patient has been in good health without a recurrence for 2 years and 5 months after surgery. This case suggests that induction chemotherapy with mFOLFOX6 plus panitumumab is a potentially effective regimen for advanced colon cancer.

  14. EFFECTS OF NEUTRAL PARTICLES ON MODIFIED SHOCKS AT SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ohira, Yutaka; Takahara, Fumio

    2010-09-20

    H{alpha} emission from supernova remnants (SNRs) implies the existence of neutral hydrogens in the ambient medium. In the precursor of an SNR shock modified by cosmic rays (CRs), upstream plasmas are pushed by the CR pressure, but neutral particles are not, so that the relative velocity appears and some neutral particles become pickup ions by the charge exchange process in the precursor. We investigate how the pickup ions generated in the precursor affect the shock structure and the particle acceleration. If the CR pressure is larger than 20% of the shock ram pressure, the compression of the subshock becomes smaller than that without pickup ions because of the pressure of the pickup ions. Moreover, even if the shock is modified by CRs, the total compression ratio can be smaller than 4. In addition, the pickup ions play an important role for the injection into the particle acceleration. If the shock is a quasi-perpendicular shock and if the multiply reflected ion acceleration occurs, the CR spectrum can be harder than that of the test particle diffusive shock acceleration below GeV.

  15. Radiation effects on cancer risks in the Life Span Study cohort.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Kazunori; Ozasa, Kotaro; Katayama, Hiroaki; Shore, Roy E; Okubo, Toshiteru

    2012-10-01

    To determine late health effects of radiation in atomic bomb survivors, the Radiation Effects Research Foundation has been conducting studies on the Life Span Study (LSS) population, which consists of 93,000 atomic bomb survivors and 27,000 controls. A recent report on the incidence of solid cancers estimates that at the age of 70 y, after exposure at the age of 30 y, solid-cancer rates increase by about 35% per Gy for men and 58% per Gy for women. The age-at-exposure is an important risk modifier. Furthermore, it seems that radiation-associated increases in cancer rates persist throughout life. In addition, radiation has similar effects upon first-primary and second-primary cancer risks. A recent report on leukemia mortality suggested that the effect of radiation on leukemia mortality persisted for more than five decades. In addition, a significant dose-response for myelodysplastic syndrome is found in Nagasaki LSS members 40-60 y after radiation exposure. In view of the nature of the continuing increase in solid cancers, the LSS should continue to provide important new information on cancer risks, as most survivors still alive today were exposed to the atomic bomb radiation under the age of 20 y and are now entering their cancer-prone years.

  16. Diet and lifestyle factors modify immune/inflammation response genes to alter breast cancer risk and prognosis: The Breast Cancer Health Disparities Study

    PubMed Central

    Lundgreen, Abbie; Torres-Mejia, Gabriela; Wolff, Roger K.; Hines, Lisa; Baumgartner, Kathy; John, Esther M.

    2014-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF) and toll-like receptors (TLR) are important mediators of inflammation. We examined 10 of these genes with respect to breast cancer risk and mortality in a genetically admixed population of Hispanic/Native American (NA) (2111 cases, 2597 controls) and non-Hispanic white (NHW) (1481 cases, 1585 controls) women. Additionally, we explored if diet and lifestyle factors modified associations with these genes. Overall, these genes (collectively) were associated with breast cancer risk among women with >70% NA ancestry (PARTP = 0.0008), with TLR1 rs7696175 being the primary risk contributor (OR 1.77, 95% CI 1.25, 2.51). Overall, TLR1 rs7696175 (HR 1.40, 95% CI 1.03, 1.91; Padj=0.032), TLR4 rs5030728 (HR 1.96, 95% CI 1.30, 2.95; Padj=0.014), and TNFRSF1A rs4149578 (HR 2.71, 95% CI 1.28, 5.76; Padj=0.029) were associated with increased breast cancer mortality. We observed several statistically significant interactions after adjustment for multiple comparisons, including interactions between our dietary oxidative balance score and CD40LG and TNFSF1A; between cigarette smoking and TLR1, TLR4, and TNF; between body mass index (BMI) among pre-menopausal women and TRAF2; and between regular use of aspirin/non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and TLR3 and TRA2. In conclusion, our findings support a contributing role of certain TNF-α and TLR genes in both breast cancer risk and survival, particularly among women with higher NA ancestry. Diet and lifestyle factors appear to be important mediators of the breast cancer risk associated with these genes. PMID:25332681

  17. Diet and lifestyle factors modify immune/inflammation response genes to alter breast cancer risk and prognosis: the Breast Cancer Health Disparities Study.

    PubMed

    Slattery, Martha L; Lundgreen, Abbie; Torres-Mejia, Gabriela; Wolff, Roger K; Hines, Lisa; Baumgartner, Kathy; John, Esther M

    2014-12-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF) and toll-like receptors (TLR) are important mediators of inflammation. We examined 10 of these genes with respect to breast cancer risk and mortality in a genetically admixed population of Hispanic/Native American (NA) (2111 cases, 2597 controls) and non-Hispanic white (NHW) (1481 cases, 1585 controls) women. Additionally, we explored if diet and lifestyle factors modified associations with these genes. Overall, these genes (collectively) were associated with breast cancer risk among women with >70% NA ancestry (P(ARTP) = 0.0008), with TLR1 rs7696175 being the primary risk contributor (OR 1.77, 95% CI 1.25, 2.51). Overall, TLR1 rs7696175 (HR 1.40, 95% CI 1.03, 1.91; P(adj) = 0.032), TLR4 rs5030728 (HR 1.96, 95% CI 1.30, 2.95; P(adj) = 0.014), and TNFRSF1A rs4149578 (HR 2.71, 95% CI 1.28, 5.76; P(adj) = 0.029) were associated with increased breast cancer mortality. We observed several statistically significant interactions after adjustment for multiple comparisons, including interactions between our dietary oxidative balance score and CD40LG and TNFSF1A; between cigarette smoking and TLR1, TLR4, and TNF; between body mass index (BMI) among pre-menopausal women and TRAF2; and between regular use of aspirin/non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and TLR3 and TRA2. In conclusion, our findings support a contributing role of certain TNF-α and TLR genes in both breast cancer risk and survival, particularly among women with higher NA ancestry. Diet and lifestyle factors appear to be important mediators of the breast cancer risk associated with these genes.

  18. Co-delivery of Doxorubicin Encapsulated PLGA Nanoparticles and Bcl-xL shRNA Using Alkyl-Modified PEI into Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimian, Mahboubeh; Taghavi, Sahar; Mokhtarzadeh, Ahad; Ramezani, Mohammad; Hashemi, Maryam

    2017-02-24

    In recent years, much effort has been focused on an appropriate combination of chemotherapeutic drugs and nucleic acids to exploit additive or synergistic therapeutic effects and overcome many obstacles such as the reduction of side effects and drug resistance. Short hairpin RNA (shRNA) has designed to allow the production of small interfering RNA (siRNA) within the cells and offer long-lasting silencing of target genes. In this study, alkyl-modified polyethylenimine (PEI 10 kD) was used for co-delivery of doxorubicin (DOX) encapsulated into poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) and Bcl-xL shRNA (one class of molecules that block apoptosis of tumor cells) into breast cancer cells. Our results demonstrated that modification of PEI with alkyl chain could enhance the induction of apoptosis in tumor cells by suppression of Bcl-xL gene using Bcl-xL shRNA more than PEI alone. On the other hand, DOX encapsulated into PLGA had more synergistic effect with shRNA in comparison with DOX alone. In conclusion, combination of PLGA-DOX NPs and alkyl-PEI/shRNA complexes may have promising applications in breast cancer therapy.

  19. Captopril-polyethyleneimine conjugate modified gold nanoparticles for co-delivery of drug and gene in anti-angiogenesis breast cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Manhong; Li, Yong; Huang, Xiaohui; Lu, Xizhi

    2015-01-01

    Captopril-polyethyleneimine (CP) containing low molecular weight polyethyleneimine and anti-angiogenesis drug captopril conjugated via an amide bond was fabricated to modify gold nanoparticles and complex with siRNA to construct siRNA/CP/GNP complexes for the co-delivery of drug and siRNA in anti-angiogenesis breast cancer therapy. The self-assembled siRNA/CP/GNP complexes exhibited desirable and homogenous particle size, reasonable positive charges and condensation ability, and effective gene-silencing property in vitro. In addition, siRNA/CP/GNP complexes co-delivering captopril and siRNA achieved combined angiogenesis suppression by more effectively downregulating the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA and protein via different pathways in vitro, as compared to mono-delivery systems. In vivo investigation on nude mice bearing MDA-MB435 tumor xenografts revealed that siRNA/CP/GNP complexes possessed satisfying tumor homing ability and strong antitumor activity. These findings suggested that siRNA/CP/GNP complexes could be an ideal system for simultaneous transfer of drug and siRNA, which might be a new promising strategy for effective breast cancer therapy.

  20. Aptamer-modified gold nanoparticles for targeting breast cancer cells through light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yu-Fen; Lin, Yang-Wei; Lin, Zong-Hong; Chang, Huan-Tsung

    2009-05-01

    In this study, we demonstrated the potential use of nucleic acid ligand (aptamers) conjugated gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for cancer cell detection. Through specific binding of the aptamers toward platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), MDA-MB-231 and Hs578T cells (cancer cells) that over-express PDGF, interact with Apt-AuNPs to a greater extent than do H184B5F5/M10 cells (normal cells). These results were confirmed through inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry measurements of the gold ion concentrations within these cells. Aggregation of the Apt-AuNPs in the cytoplasm of the cancer cells led to the generation of an intense scattered light upon photo-illumination; this phenomenon allows the differentiation of cancer cells from normal cells using a dark field optical microscope. The presence of Apt-AuNPs suppressed the proliferation of MDA-MB-231 cancer cells, but not H184B5F5/M10 cells.

  1. Videos to influence: a systematic review of effectiveness of video-based education in modifying health behaviors.

    PubMed

    Tuong, William; Larsen, Elizabeth R; Armstrong, April W

    2014-04-01

    This systematic review examines the effectiveness of videos in modifying health behaviors. We searched PubMed (1975-2012), PsycINFO (1975-2012), EMBASE (1975-2012), and CINAHL (1983-2012) for controlled clinical trials that examined the effectiveness of video interventions in changing health behaviors. Twenty-eight studies comprised of 12,703 subjects were included in the systematic review. Video interventions were variably effective for modifying health behaviors depending on the target behaviors to be influenced. Video interventions appear to be effective in breast self-examination, prostate cancer screening, sunscreen adherence, self-care in patients with heart failure, HIV testing, treatment adherence, and female condom use. However, videos have not shown to be effective in influencing addiction behaviors when they are not tailored. Compared to loss-framing, gain-framed messages may be more effective in promoting certain types of health behavior change. Also, video modeling may facilitate learning of new behaviors and can be an important consideration in future video interventions.

  2. Targeted delivery system for cancer cells consist of multiple ligands conjugated genetically modified CCMV capsid on doxorubicin GNPs complex

    PubMed Central

    Barwal, Indu; Kumar, Rajiv; Kateriya, Suneel; Dinda, Amit Kumar; Yadav, Subhash Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Targeted nano-delivery vehicles were developed from genetically modified Cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) capsid by ligands bioconjugation for efficient drug delivery in cancer cells. RNA binding (N 1-25aa) and β-hexamer forming (N 27-41aa) domain of capsid was selectively deleted by genetic engineering to achieve the efficient in vitro assembly without natural cargo. Two variants of capsids were generated by truncating 41 and 26 amino acid from N terminus (NΔ41 and NΔ26) designated as F1 and F2 respectively. These capsid were optimally self-assembled in 1:2 molar ratio (F1:F2) to form a monodisperse nano-scaffold of size 28 nm along with chemically conjugated modalities for visualization (fluorescent dye), targeting (folic acid, FA) and anticancer drug (doxorubicin). The cavity of the nano-scaffold was packed with doxorubicin conjugated gold nanoparticles (10 nm) to enhance the stability, drug loading and sustained release of drug. The chimeric system was stable at pH range of 4–8. This chimeric nano-scaffold system showed highly specific receptor mediated internalization (targeting) and ~300% more cytotoxicity (with respect to FA− delivery system) to folate receptor positive Michigan Cancer Foundation-7 (MCF7) cell lines. The present system may offer a programmable nano-scaffold based platform for developing chemotherapeutics for cancer. PMID:27872483

  3. Expert consensus document: Semantics in active surveillance for men with localized prostate cancer - results of a modified Delphi consensus procedure.

    PubMed

    Bruinsma, Sophie M; Roobol, Monique J; Carroll, Peter R; Klotz, Laurence; Pickles, Tom; Moore, Caroline M; Gnanapragasam, Vincent J; Villers, Arnauld; Rannikko, Antti; Valdagni, Riccardo; Frydenberg, Mark; Kakehi, Yoshiyuki; Filson, Christopher P; Bangma, Chris H

    2017-03-14

    Active surveillance (AS) is broadly described as a management option for men with low-risk prostate cancer, but semantic heterogeneity exists in both the literature and in guidelines. To address this issue, a panel of leading prostate cancer specialists in the field of AS participated in a consensus-forming project using a modified Delphi method to reach international consensus on definitions of terms related to this management option. An iterative three-round sequence of online questionnaires designed to address 61 individual items was completed by each panel member. Consensus was considered to be reached if ≥70% of the experts agreed on a definition. To facilitate a common understanding among all experts involved and resolve potential ambiguities, a face-to-face consensus meeting was held between Delphi survey rounds two and three. Convenience sampling was used to construct the panel of experts. In total, 12 experts from Australia, France, Finland, Italy, the Netherlands, Japan, the UK, Canada and the USA participated. By the end of the Delphi process, formal consensus was achieved for 100% (n = 61) of the terms and a glossary was then developed. Agreement between international experts has been reached on relevant terms and subsequent definitions regarding AS for patients with localized prostate cancer. This standard terminology could support multidisciplinary communication, reduce the extent of variations in clinical practice and optimize clinical decision making.

  4. Evaluation of Modified Categorical Data Fuzzy Clustering Algorithm on the Wisconsin Breast Cancer Dataset

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The early diagnosis of breast cancer is an important step in a fight against the disease. Machine learning techniques have shown promise in improving our understanding of the disease. As medical datasets consist of data points which cannot be precisely assigned to a class, fuzzy methods have been useful for studying of these datasets. Sometimes breast cancer datasets are described by categorical features. Many fuzzy clustering algorithms have been developed for categorical datasets. However, in most of these methods Hamming distance is used to define the distance between the two categorical feature values. In this paper, we use a probabilistic distance measure for the distance computation among a pair of categorical feature values. Experiments demonstrate that the distance measure performs better than Hamming distance for Wisconsin breast cancer data. PMID:27022504

  5. Incidence rate of female breast cancer in urban Shijiazhuang in 2012 and modifiable risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Denggui; He, Yutong; Wei, Lizhen; Zhang, Nan; Li, Shumei; Wen, Xiaoduo; Yang, Yi; Wang, Guiying; Wang, Shijie; Geng, Cuizhi; Liu, Yunjiang

    2016-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is diagnosed more frequently among urban than rural women in China; however, the incidence among women in Shijiazhuang is unknown. Methods As registered Chinese citizens are entitled to complete public medical insurance coverage, the incidence rate was estimated using reimbursement records of first hospitalization. Results Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women in Shijiazhuang. The crude rate and age‐standardized incidence rates by China (ASRC) and world (ASRW) standards were 59.6, 48.5 and 45.5/100 000 in 2012. Mean age at diagnosis was 55.1 years. Incidence increased with age, peaking at 165.1 at 70–74. In comparison with urban women in other Chinese cities, incidence in Shijiazhuang was similar to Shanghai (ASRC 46.6) and Suzhou (ASRW 45). When compared with 31 other Chinese cities, Shijiazhuang ranked second highest behind Guangzhou (ASRW 46.6), and the ASRW correlated significantly with gross domestic product per capita among the 32 cities. The breast cancer ASRW in Shijiazhuang was 2.7 times the rate of 41 rural Chinese counties (17). When compared with GLOBOCAN 2012 data according to the Human Development Index, breast cancer incidence in Shijiazhuang matched countries with a high human development index (ASRW 45.2). Conclusion Breast cancer incidence in Shijiazhuang in 2012 was the highest in China, matching the rate in countries with high social economic development. This rate may continue to rise, parallel with urbanization, and may be associated with changing reproductive patterns and Westernization. Prevention methods need to be incorporated. PMID:27766774

  6. Exploiting the Immunological Effects of Standard Treatments in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    Exploiting the Immunological Effects of Standard Treatments in Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Brad H. Nelson, Ph.D...From - To) 1 MAR 2008 - 28 FEB 2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Exploiting the immunological effects of standard treatments in 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...treatment of prostate cancer. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Tumor immunology , immunotherapy, prostate cancer, antibody, T cell, tumor antigen, hormone therapy

  7. Immunotherapy against metastatic bladder cancer by combined administration of granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor and interleukin-2 surface modified MB49 bladder cancer stem cells vaccine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-Yan; Hua, Rui; Liu, Li; Zhan, Xiaomin; Chen, Simei; Quan, Song; Chu, Qing-Jun; Zhu, Yong-Tong

    2017-02-16

    In previous studies, it has been shown that the granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) or interleukin-2 (IL-2) surface modified MB49 bladder cancer stem cells (MCSCs) vaccine could induce a specific antitumor immunity and against bladder cancer in mice model respectively. However, whether combined administration of GM-CSF and IL-2 could produce specific immune responses to cancer stem cells (CSCs) was uncertain. MCSCs were established and characterized. GM-CSF and IL-2 MCSCs vaccines were prepared and bioactivity was evaluated. The therapeutic, protective, specific, and memorial immune response animal experiments were designed. Tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes assay, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, flow cytometry assay were performed to indentify whether vaccine caused an antitumor immunity. Streptavidin (SA)-GM-CSF and SA-IL-2 MCSCs vaccines were prepared successfully. Such vaccines inhibited the volume of tumor and prolonged the survival of the mice in animal experiments. The express of IgG or IFN-c, the portion of dendritic cells, CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells were highest in the combined vaccines group than the SA-GM-CSF vaccine group, the SA-IL-2 vaccine group, the MCSCs group and the PBS group. The combined of GM-CSF and IL-2 vaccines could induce better antitumor immunity than a vaccine alone.

  8. [Cancer vaccine therapy using genetically modified induced pluripotent stem cell-derived dendritic cells expressing the TAA gene].

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Hiromitsu; Ojima, Toshiyasu; Nakamori, Mikihito; Nakamura, Masaki; Hayata, Keiji; Katsuda, Masahiro; Iida, Takeshi; Miyazawa, Motoki; Iwahashi, Makoto; Yamaue, Hiroki

    2013-11-01

    It is generally accepted that the difficulty in obtaining a sufficient number of functional dendritic cells (DCs) poses a serious problem in DC-based immunotherapy. Therefore, we used induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived DCs (iPSDCs) instead. If the therapeutic efficacy of iPSDCs was equivalent to that of bone marrow-derived DCs( BMDCs), then the above-mentioned problems may be solved. In this study, we generated iPSDCs from iPS cells and compared their capacity to mature and migrate to the regional lymph nodes with that of BMDCs. We adenovirally transduced the hgp100 gene, which codes for a natural tumor antigen, into the DCs and immunized the mice with these genetically modified DCs. The cytotoxic activity of CD8( +) cytotoxic T lymphocytes( CTLs) was assayed using a 51Cr-release assay. The therapeutic efficacy of the vaccination was examined in a subcutaneous tumor model. Our results demonstrated that iPSDCs equaled BMDCs in terms of their maturation and migration capacity. Furthermore, hgp100-specific CTLs were generated in mice that were immunized with the genetically modified iPSDCs. These CTLs exhibited a high level of cytotoxicity against B16 cells, which is similar to that exhibited by CTLs generated in BMDCs immunized mice. Moreover, vaccination with genetically modified iPSDCs elicited a high level of therapeutic efficacy equaling that of vaccination with BMDCs. This study clarified experimentally that genetically modified iPSDCs are equivalent to BMDCs in terms of tumor-associated antigen-specific therapeutic antitumor immunity. This vaccination strategy may therefore be useful for future clinical application as a cancer vaccine.

  9. [Effect of SDS on the adsorption of Cd2+ onto amphoteric modified bentonites].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Tao; Meng, Zhao-Fu; Yang, Ya-Ti; Yang, Shu-Ying; Li, Bin; Xu, Shao-e

    2014-07-01

    Under different modified ratios, temperatures, pH and ionic strengths, the effect of sodium dodecyl sulfonate (SDS) on the adsorption of Cd2+ onto bentonites which modified with amphoteric modifier dodecyl dimethyl betaine (BS-12) was studied by batch experiments, and the adsorption mechanism was also discussed. Results showed that the adsorption of Cd2+ on amphoteric bentonites can be enhanced significantly by SDS combined modification, Cd2+ adsorption decreases in the order: BS + 150SDS (BS-12 + 150% SDS) > BS + 100SDS (BS-12 + 100% SDS) > BS +50SDS(BS-12 + 50% SDS) > BS + 25SDS (BS-12 + 25% SDS) > BS (BS-12) > CK (unmodified soil). The adsorption isotherm can be described by the Langmuir equation. The change of temperature effect from positive on CK and amphoteric bentonites to negative on BS + 150SDS bentonites is observed with an increase of SDS modified ratio. The pH has little influence on Cd2+ adsorption on bentonites. The adsorption of Cd2+ on bentonites decreases with ionic strength rise, but the effect of ionic strength can be reduced with an increase of SDS modified ratio also. The adsorption thermodynamic parameters demonstrated that the adsorption of Cd2+ on modified bentonites was spontaneously controlled by entropy increment. When the SDS modified ratio is lower than 100% CEC, the adsorption of Cd2+ on modified bentonites is a process with characteristics of both enthalpy increment and entropy increment, while the SDS modified ratio is equal to or higher than 100% CEC, the adsorption of Cd2+ on modified bentonites becomes a process of enthalpy decrement and entropy increment.

  10. Heat-modified citrus pectin induces apoptosis-like cell death and autophagy in HepG2 and A549 cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Leclere, Lionel; Fransolet, Maude; Cote, Francois; Cambier, Pierre; Arnould, Thierry; Van Cutsem, Pierre; Michiels, Carine

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is still one of the leading causes of death worldwide, and finding new treatments remains a major challenge. Previous studies showed that modified forms of pectin, a complex polysaccharide present in the primary plant cell wall, possess anticancer properties. Nevertheless, the mechanism of action of modified pectin and the pathways involved are unclear. Here, we show that citrus pectin modified by heat treatment induced cell death in HepG2 and A549 cells. The induced cell death differs from classical apoptosis because no DNA cleavage was observed. In addition, Z-VAD-fmk, a pan-caspase inhibitor, did not influence the observed cell death in HepG2 cells but appeared to be partly protective in A549 cells, indicating that heat-modified citrus pectin might induce caspase-independent cell death. An increase in the abundance of the phosphatidylethanolamine-conjugated Light Chain 3 (LC3) protein and a decrease in p62 protein abundance were observed in both cell types when incubated in the presence of heat-modified citrus pectin. These results indicate the activation of autophagy. To our knowledge, this is the first time that autophagy has been revealed in cells incubated in the presence of a modified form of pectin. This autophagy activation appears to be protective, at least for A549 cells, because its inhibition with 3-methyladenine increased the observed modified pectin-induced cytotoxicity. This study confirms the potential of modified pectin to improve chemotherapeutic cancer treatments.

  11. A novel class of mitochondria-targeted soft electrophiles modifies mitochondrial proteins and inhibits mitochondrial metabolism in breast cancer cells through redox mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Vayalil, Praveen K; Oh, Joo-Yeun; Zhou, Fen; Diers, Anne R; Smith, M Ryan; Golzarian, Hafez; Oliver, Patsy G; Smith, Robin A J; Murphy, Michael P; Velu, Sadanandan E; Landar, Aimee

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in screening and treatment over the past several years, breast cancer remains a leading cause of cancer-related death among women in the United States. A major goal in breast cancer treatment is to develop safe and clinically useful therapeutic agents that will prevent the recurrence of breast cancers after front-line therapeutics have failed. Ideally, these agents would have relatively low toxicity against normal cells, and will specifically inhibit the growth and proliferation of cancer cells. Our group and others have previously demonstrated that breast cancer cells exhibit increased mitochondrial oxygen consumption compared with non-tumorigenic breast epithelial cells. This suggests that it may be possible to deliver redox active compounds to the mitochondria to selectively inhibit cancer cell metabolism. To demonstrate proof-of-principle, a series of mitochondria-targeted soft electrophiles (MTSEs) has been designed which selectively accumulate within the mitochondria of highly energetic breast cancer cells and modify mitochondrial proteins. A prototype MTSE, IBTP, significantly inhibits mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, resulting in decreased breast cancer cell proliferation, cell attachment, and migration in vitro. These results suggest MTSEs may represent a novel class of anti-cancer agents that prevent cancer cell growth by modification of specific mitochondrial proteins.

  12. A Novel Class of Mitochondria-Targeted Soft Electrophiles Modifies Mitochondrial Proteins and Inhibits Mitochondrial Metabolism in Breast Cancer Cells through Redox Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Vayalil, Praveen K.; Oh, Joo-Yeun; Zhou, Fen; Diers, Anne R.; Smith, M. Ryan; Golzarian, Hafez; Oliver, Patsy G.; Smith, Robin A. J.; Murphy, Michael P.; Velu, Sadanandan E.; Landar, Aimee

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in screening and treatment over the past several years, breast cancer remains a leading cause of cancer-related death among women in the United States. A major goal in breast cancer treatment is to develop safe and clinically useful therapeutic agents that will prevent the recurrence of breast cancers after front-line therapeutics have failed. Ideally, these agents would have relatively low toxicity against normal cells, and will specifically inhibit the growth and proliferation of cancer cells. Our group and others have previously demonstrated that breast cancer cells exhibit increased mitochondrial oxygen consumption compared with non-tumorigenic breast epithelial cells. This suggests that it may be possible to deliver redox active compounds to the mitochondria to selectively inhibit cancer cell metabolism. To demonstrate proof-of-principle, a series of mitochondria-targeted soft electrophiles (MTSEs) has been designed which selectively accumulate within the mitochondria of highly energetic breast cancer cells and modify mitochondrial proteins. A prototype MTSE, IBTP, significantly inhibits mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, resulting in decreased breast cancer cell proliferation, cell attachment, and migration in vitro. These results suggest MTSEs may represent a novel class of anti-cancer agents that prevent cancer cell growth by modification of specific mitochondrial proteins. PMID:25785718

  13. Selective effects of a fiber chimeric conditionally replicative adenovirus armed with hep27 gene on renal cancer cell.

    PubMed

    Fang, Lin; Cheng, Qian; Liu, Wenshun; Zhang, Jie; Ge, Yan; Zhang, Qi; Li, Liantao; Liu, Junjie; Zheng, Junnian

    2016-06-02

    ASBTARCT Adenoviruses mediated cancer gene therapies are widely investigated and show a promising effect on cancer treatment. However, efficient gene transfer varies among different cancer cell lines based on the expression of coxsakie adenovirus receptor (CAR). Hep27, a member of dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) family, can bind to Mdm2, resulting in the attenuation of Mdm2-mediated p53 degradation. Here we constructed a fiber chimeric adenovirus carrying hep27 gene (F5/35-ZD55-Hep27), in which the fiber protein of 5-serotype adenovirus (Ad5) was substituted by that of 35-serotype adenovirus (Ad35), aiming to facilitate the infection for renal cancer cells and develop the role of hep27 in cancer therapy. We evaluated the CAR and CD46 (a membrane cofactor protein for Ad35) expression in four kinds of renal cancer cells and assessed the relationship between receptors and infection efficiency. 5/35 fiber-modified adenovirus had a much promising infectivity compared with Ad5-based vector in renal cancer cells. F5/35-ZD55-Hep27 had enhanced antitumor activity against human renal cancer cells compared to the other groups. Further, hep27 mediated p53 and cleaved-PARP upregulation and mdm2 downregulation was involved and caused increased apoptosis. Moreover, F5/35-ZD55-Hep27 significantly suppressed tumor growth in subcutaneous renal cancer cell xenograft models. Our data demonstrated that 5/35 fiber-modified adenovirus F5/35-ZD55-Hep27 transferred into renal cancers efficiently and increased p53 to induce cancer cell apoptosis. Thus 5/35 fiber-modified adenoviral vector F5/35-ZD55-Hep27 might a promising vector and antitumor reagent for renal cancer gene therapy.

  14. Identifying opportunities for nature engagement in cancer care practice and design: protocol for four-round modified electronic Delphi

    PubMed Central

    Blaschke, Sarahg; O'Callaghan, Clare C; Schofield, Penelope

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Opportunities to engage with nature have shown relevance in experiences of health and recovery of patients with cancer and are attracting interest in cancer care practice and design. Such healthcare innovations can widen the horizon of possible supportive care solutions but require deliberate and rigorous investigation to ensure responsible action is taken and wastage avoided. This protocol outlines a study designed to solicit knowledge from relevant experts drawn from a range of healthcare practitioners, management representatives, designers and researchers to explore levels of opinion consensus for determining opportunities for, and barriers to, providing helpful nature engagement in cancer care settings. Methods and analysis A 4-round modified electronic Delphi methodology will be used to conduct a structured, iterative feedback process for querying and synthesising expert opinion. Round 1 administers an open-ended questionnaire to a panel of selected, relevant experts who will consider the own recommendations of patients with cancer for nature engagement (drawn from a preceding investigation) before contributing salient issues (items) with relevance to the topic. Round 2 circulates anonymised summaries of responses back to the experts who verify and, if they wish, reconsider their own responses. Rounds 3 and 4 determine and rank experts' top 10 items using a 10-point Likert-type scale. Descriptive statistics (median and mean scores) will be calculated to indicate the items' relative importance. Levels of consensus will be explored with consensus defined as 75% agreement. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval for this study was obtained from the Institution's Human Research Ethics Committee (blinded for review). It is anticipated that the results will be published in peer-reviewed journals and presented in a variety of forums. PMID:28274965

  15. Polymorphisms in the XRCC1 gene modify survival of bladder cancer patients treated with chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sacerdote, Carlotta; Guarrera, Simonetta; Ricceri, Fulvio; Pardini, Barbara; Polidoro, Silvia; Allione, Alessandra; Critelli, Rossana; Russo, Alessia; Andrew, Angeline S; Ye, Yuanqing; Wu, Xifeng; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Bosio, Andrea; Casetta, Giovanni; Cucchiarale, Giuseppina; Destefanis, Paolo; Gontero, Paolo; Rolle, Luigi; Zitella, Andrea; Fontana, Dario; Vineis, Paolo; Matullo, Giuseppe

    2013-10-15

    Survival of bladder cancer patients depends on several factors including disease stage and grade at diagnosis, age, health status of the patient and the applied treatment. Several studies investigated the role of DNA repair genetic variants in cancer susceptibility, but only few studies investigated their role in survival and response to chemotherapy for bladder cancer. We genotyped 28 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in DNA repair genes in 456 bladder cancer patients, reconstructed haplotypes and calculated a score for combinations of the SNPs. We estimated Hazard Ratios (adjHR) for time to death. Among patients treated with chemotherapy, variant alleles of five SNPs in the XRCC1 gene conferred better survival (rs915927 adjHR 0.55 (95%CI 0.32-0.94); rs76507 adjHR 0.48 (95%CI 0.27-0.84); rs2854501 adjHR 0.25 (95%CI 0.12-0.52); rs2854509 adjHR 0.21 (95%CI 0.09-0.46); rs3213255 adjHR 0.46 (95%CI 0.26-0.80). In this group of patients, an increasing number of variant alleles in a XRCC1 gene score were associated with a better survival (26% decrease of risk of death for each additional variant allele in XRCC1). By functional analyses we demonstrated that the previous XRCC1 SNPs confer lower DNA repair capacity. This may support the hypothesis that survival in these patients may be modulated by the different DNA repair capacity determined by genetic variants. Chemotherapy treated cancer patients bearing an increasing number of "risky" alleles in XRCC1 gene had a better survival, suggesting that a proficient DNA repair may result in resistance to therapy and shorter survival. This finding may have clinical implications for the choice of therapy.

  16. Effects of modifying agents on surface modifications of magnesium oxide whiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yun; Liu, Bei; Yang, Jinjun; Jia, Junping; You, Chen; Chen, Minfang

    2016-12-01

    In this work, the MgO whiskers have been treated by several modifying agents including the mixture of DL-malic acid oligo-L-lactide (g), aluminate coupling agent (Al) and stearic acid (Sa). The morphologies, covering quantity, compositions and components of the whiskers before and after the modifications were investigated by SEM, TG, XRD and FT-IR, respectively. Comparisons have been made on the morphologies of modified whiskers by different modifiers tailoring. The results show that the MgO whiskers treated by stearic acid have superior performance to the others, especially in terms of uniform dispersion. In contrast, both the mixture of DL-malic acid oligo-L-lactide and aluminate coupling agent have the negative effects on whiskers' dispersibility. FT-IR reveals that the chemical bonds were formed between the whiskers and each modifying agent and the XRD testing demonstrate that the crystal structures of the modified whiskers were well maintained without significant change.

  17. The modified high-density survival assay is the useful tool to predict the effectiveness of fractionated radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Yoshikazu; Mori, Miyuki; Oikawa, Toshiyuki; Shimura, Tsutomu; Ohtake, Yosuke; Mori, Shiro; Ohkubo, Yasuhito; Fukumoto, Manabu

    2010-01-01

    The high-density survival (HDS) assay was originally elaborated to assess cancer cell responses to therapeutic agents under the influence of intercellular communication. Here, we simplified the original HDS assay and studied its applicability for the detection of cellular radioresistance. We have recently defined clinically relevant radioresistant (CRR) cells, which continue to proliferate with daily exposure to 2 gray (Gy) of X-rays for more than 30 days in vitro. We established human CRR cell lines, HepG2-8960-R from HepG2, and SAS-R1 and -R2 from SAS, respectively. In an attempt to apply the HDS assay to detect radioresistance with clinical relevance, we simplified the original HDS assay by scoring the total number of surviving cells after exposure to X-rays. The modified HDS assay successfully detected radioresistance with clinical relevance. The modified HDS assay detected CRR phenotype, which is not always detectable by clonogenic assay. Therefore, we believe that the modified HDS assay presented in this study is a powerful tool to predict the effectiveness of fractionated radiotherapy against malignant tumors.

  18. Structure Optimization of 21, 23-Core-Modified Porphyrins Absorbing Long-Wavelength Light as Potential Photosensitizers Against Breast Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    21,23-core-modified porphyrins and the phototoxicity therapy ; Mitochondria; Cytochrom c oxidase. * Corresponding authors. Tel.: +1 716 645 6800x2197; fax...process by PDT, there might be a taraet site inside the cell to trigger 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES Photodynamic therapy , breast cancer, core...6 Introduction The objectives of this project are two fold: one is to train the PI, Dr. Youngjae You, as an photodynamic cancer therapy expert in

  19. Cancer preventive effects of flavonoids--a review.

    PubMed

    Le Marchand, Loïc

    2002-08-01

    A cancer protective effect from plant-derived foods has been found with uncommon consistency in epidemiologic studies. However, it has been difficult to identify specific components responsible for this effect. Many phytochemicals have been shown to be biologically active and they may interact to protect against cancer. In recent years, experimental studies have provided growing evidence for the beneficial action of flavonoids on multiple cancer-related biological pathways (carcinogen bioactivation, cell-signaling, cell cycle regulation, angiogenesis, oxidative stress, inflammation). Although the epidemiologic data on flavonoids and cancer are still limited and conflicting, some protective associations have been suggested for flavonoid-rich foods (soy and premenopausal breast cancer; green tea and stomach cancer; onion and lung cancer). This review focuses on the biological effects of the main flavonoids, as well as the epidemiologic evidence that support their potential cancer protective properties.

  20. [Modifying effect of nitrites on pulmonary blastogenesis and viral leukogenesis in mice: role of nitric oxide and dioxide].

    PubMed

    Il'nitskiĭ, A P; Reutov, V P; Ryzhova, N I; Kolpakova, A S; Deriagina, V P; Nekrasova, E A; Savluchinskaia, L A; Travkin, A G

    2000-01-01

    The long-term effects of sodium nitrite (NaNO2) on carcinogenesis induced by urethane (total dose 1.0 mg/g body weight) in low-grade cancer F1 (C57BLxCBA) and high-grade A/Snell mice and on viral (Rausher leukemia virus) leukomogenesis in Balb/c mice. The murine intake of NaNO2 with water (50 mg/l) causes a statistically significant increase in the number of adenomas in the lung. Examining the mechanism of conversion of NO2- to NO led to the assumption that the free radical compounds NO and NO2 are involved in the potentiating action of NO2 on blastomogenesis. The use of the oxidant emoxypine (3-hydroxypyridine) confirmed the above. The role of NO and NO2 in the intracellular processes under the modifying effects of nitrites and nitrates on blastomogenesis is analyzed.

  1. A modified hTERT Promoter-directed Oncolytic Adenovirus Replication with Concurrent Inhibition of TGFβ Signaling for Breast Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zebin; Robbins, John S.; Pister, Amanda; Zafar, M. Behzad; Zhang, Zhen-Wei; Gupta, Janhavi; Lee, K. Jessica; Neuman, Kam; Yun, Chae-Ok; Guise, Theresa; Seth, Prem

    2009-01-01

    Our laboratory is interested to develop oncolytic adenoviral vectors that can be administered systemically for the treatment of breast cancer. To restrict viral replication in breast tumor cells, we have constructed mhTERTAd.sTβRFc, a 01/07 based adenoviral vector expressing the soluble form of TGFβ receptor II fused with human Fc IgG1 (sTGFβRIIFc) gene, in which viral replication is under the control of modified human telomerase reverse transcriptase (mhTERT) promoter. In addition, mhTERTAd.sTβRFc-mediated sTGFβRIIFc production would target growth factor-β (TGFβ) pathway known to contribute to the tumor progression breast cancer metastasis. We chose to use mhTERT promoter because it was found to be relatively more active (approximately 20-times) in breast cancer cells compared to normal human cells. We showed that infection of MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast cancer cells for 48 hrs with mhTERTAd.sTβRFc produced high levels of sTGFβRIIFc (greater than 1 μg/ml) in the medium. Breast cancer cells produced nearly 6,000-fold increase in the viral titers during 48 hrs infection period. However, mhTERTAd.sTβRFc replication was attenuated in normal cells. Infection of breast cancer cells with a replication deficient virus Ad(E1-).sTβRFc also produced high levels of sTGFβRIIFc, but under these conditions no detectable viral replication was observed. Adenoviral-mediated production of sTGFβRIIFc was shown to bind with TGFβ-1, and abolished the effects of TGFβ-1 on downstream SMAD-3 phosphorylation. The administration of mhTERTAd.sTβRFc intravenously into MDA-MB-231 human xenograft bearing mice resulted in significant inhibition of tumor growth, and production of sTGFβRIIFc in the blood. On the other hand, intravenous injection of Ad(E1-).sTβRFc did not exhibit significant inhibition of the tumor growth, but resulted in the sTGFβRIIFc in the blood, suggesting that viral replication along with sTGFβRIIFc protein production play a critical role in inducing

  2. A modified hTERT promoter-directed oncolytic adenovirus replication with concurrent inhibition of TGFbeta signaling for breast cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Z; Robbins, J S; Pister, A; Zafar, M B; Zhang, Z-W; Gupta, J; Lee, K J; Newman, K; Neuman, K; Yun, C-O; Guise, T; Seth, P

    2010-04-01

    We were interested in developing oncolytic adenoviral vectors that can be administered systemically for the treatment of breast cancer. To restrict viral replication in breast tumor cells, we constructed mhTERTAd.sTbetaRFc, a 01/07-based adenoviral vector expressing the soluble form of transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta) receptor II fused with the human Fc IgG1 (sTGFbetaRIIFc) gene, in which viral replication is under the control of a modified human telomerase reverse transcriptase (mhTERT) promoter. In addition, mhTERTAd.sTbetaRFc-mediated sTGFbetaRIIFc production targets the TGFbeta pathway known to contribute to the tumor progression of breast cancer metastasis. We chose to use the mhTERT promoter because it was found to be relatively more active (approximately 20 times) in breast cancer cells compared with normal human cells. We showed that infection of MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast cancer cells for 48 h with mhTERTAd.sTbetaRFc produced high levels of sTGFbetaRIIFc (greater than 1 microg ml(-1)) in the medium. Breast cancer cells produced nearly a 6000-fold increase in viral titers during the 48 h infection period. However, mhTERTAd.sTbetaRFc replication was attenuated in normal cells. Infection of breast cancer cells with a replication-deficient virus Ad(E1(-)).sTbetaRFc also produced high levels of sTGFbetaRIIFc, but under these conditions, no detectable viral replication was observed. Adenoviral-mediated production of sTGFbetaRIIFc was shown to bind with TGFbeta-1, and to abolish the effects of TGFbeta-1 on downstream SMAD-3 phosphorylation. The administration of mhTERTAd.sTbetaRFc intravenously into MDA-MB-231 human xenograft-bearing mice resulted in a significant inhibition of tumor growth and production of sTGFbetaRIIFc in the blood. Conversely, intravenous injection of Ad(E1(-)).sTbetaRFc did not show a significant inhibition of tumor growth, but resulted in sTGFbetaRIIFc in the blood, suggesting that viral replication along with s

  3. A modified Trastuzumab antibody for the immunohistochemical detection of HER-2 overexpression in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bussolati, G; Montemurro, F; Righi, L; Donadio, M; Aglietta, M; Sapino, A

    2005-04-11

    The immunohistochemical determination of HER-2 to identify patients with advanced breast cancer candidates for Trastuzumab treatment proved neither accurate nor fully reliable, possibly because none of the current reagents detects the specific antigenic site target of Trastuzumab. To circumvent this problem, we conjugated the NH2 groups of Trastuzumab with biotin, and the compound obtained, designated BiotHER, was added directly to tissue sections. Biotin-labelling was revealed with horseradish peroxidase-conjugated streptavidin. Specificity and sensitivity of BiotHER immunostaining with respect to HER-2 amplification were tested on 164 breast carcinoma samples. BiotHER staining was detected on the tumour cell membrane of 12% of all specimens and in 49% specimens with gene amplification, while absent in nonamplified tumours. Predictivity of BiotHER status with respect to the clinical outcome was analysed in 54 patients with HER-2 amplified advanced breast cancer treated with Trastuzumab plus chemotherapy. BiotHER staining, detected in 50% of tumours with HER-2 amplification, was an independent predictor of clinical outcome. In fact, BiotHER positivity was independently associated with increased likelihood of tumour response and reduced risk of tumour progression and death. Biotinylated Trastuzumab can thus be used for immunohistochemical detection of HER-2 overexpression in breast cancer, and has the potential to identify patients likely to benefit from Trastuzumab treatment.

  4. SLC22A3 polymorphisms do not modify pancreatic cancer risk, but may influence overall patient survival

    PubMed Central

    Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice; Strouhal, Ondrej; Hughes, David J.; Holcatova, Ivana; Oliverius, Martin; Kala, Zdenek; Campa, Daniele; Rizzato, Cosmeri; Canzian, Federico; Pezzilli, Raffaele; Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata; Malecka-Panas, Ewa; Sperti, Cosimo; Federico Zambon, Carlo; Pedrazzoli, Sergio; Fogar, Paola; Milanetto, Anna Caterina; Capurso, Gabriele; Delle Fave, Gianfranco; Valente, Roberto; Gazouli, Maria; Malleo, Giuseppe; Teresa Lawlor, Rita; Strobel, Oliver; Hackert, Thilo; Giese, Nathalia; Vodicka, Pavel; Vodickova, Ludmila; Landi, Stefano; Tavano, Francesca; Gioffreda, Domenica; Piepoli, Ada; Pazienza, Valerio; Mambrini, Andrea; Pedata, Mariangela; Cantore, Maurizio; Bambi, Franco; Ermini, Stefano; Funel, Niccola; Lemstrova, Radmila; Soucek, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Expression of the solute carrier (SLC) transporter SLC22A3 gene is associated with overall survival of pancreatic cancer patients. This study tested whether genetic variability in SLC22A3 associates with pancreatic cancer risk and prognosis. Twenty four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) tagging the SLC22A3 gene sequence and regulatory elements were selected for analysis. Of these, 22 were successfully evaluated in the discovery phase while six significant or suggestive variants entered the validation phase, comprising a total study number of 1,518 cases and 3,908 controls. In the discovery phase, rs2504938, rs9364554, and rs2457571 SNPs were significantly associated with pancreatic cancer risk. Moreover, rs7758229 associated with the presence of distant metastases, while rs512077 and rs2504956 correlated with overall survival of patients. Although replicated, the association for rs9364554 did not pass multiple testing corrections in the validation phase. Contrary to the discovery stage, rs2504938 associated with survival in the validation cohort, which was more pronounced in stage IV patients. In conclusion, common variation in the SLC22A3 gene is unlikely to significantly contribute to pancreatic cancer risk. The rs2504938 SNP in SLC22A3 significantly associates with an unfavorable prognosis of pancreatic cancer patients. Further investigation of this SNP effect on the molecular and clinical phenotype is warranted. PMID:28272475

  5. Non-cancer health effects of pesticides

    PubMed Central

    Sanborn, M.; Kerr, K.J.; Sanin, L.H.; Cole, D.C.; Bassil, K.L.; Vakil, C.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate whether there are associations between exposure to pesticides and 4 chronic non-cancer health effects: dermatologic, neurologic, reproductive, and genotoxic effects. DATA SOURCES We searched PreMedline, MEDLINE, and LILACS using the key word pesticide combined with the term for the specific health effect being searched. Reviewers scanned the references of all articles for additional relevant studies. STUDY SELECTION Studies since 1992 were assessed using structured inclusion and quality-of-methods criteria. Studies scoring <4 on a 7-point global methodologic quality scale were excluded. In total, 124 studies were included. These studies had a mean quality score of 4.88 out of 7. SYNTHESIS Strong evidence of association with pesticide exposure was found for all neurologic outcomes, genotoxicity, and 4 of 6 reproductive effects: birth defects, fetal death, altered growth, and other outcomes. Exposure to pesticides generally doubled the level of genetic damage as measured by chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes. Only a few high-quality studies focused on the dermatologic effects of pesticides. In some of these studies, rates of dermatitis were higher among those who had had high exposure to pesticides on the job. CONCLUSION Evidence from research on humans consistently points to positive associations between pesticide exposure and 3 of the 4 non-cancer health outcomes studied. Physicians have a dual role in educating individual patients about the risks of exposure and in reducing exposure in the community by advocating for restrictions on use of pesticides. PMID:17934035

  6. Efficient CD44-targeted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of breast cancer cells using hyaluronic acid (HA)-modified MnFe2O4 nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taeksu; Lim, Eun-Kyung; Lee, Jaemin; Kang, Byunghoon; Choi, Jihye; Park, Hyo Seon; Suh, Jin-Suck; Huh, Yong-Min; Haam, Seungjoo

    2013-04-01

    Targeted molecular imaging with hyaluronic acid (HA) has been highlighted in the diagnosis and treatment of CD44-overexpressing cancer. CD44, a receptor for HA, is closely related to the growth of cancer including proliferation, metastasis, invasion, and angiogenesis. For the efficient detection of CD44, we fabricated a few kinds of HA-modified MnFe2O4 nanocrystals (MNCs) to serve as specific magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agents (HA-MRCAs) and compared physicochemical properties, biocompatibility, and the CD44 targeting efficiency. Hydrophobic MNCs were efficiently phase-transferred using aminated polysorbate 80 (P80) synthesized by introducing spermine molecules on the hydroxyl groups of P80. Subsequently, a few kinds of HA-MRCAs were fabricated, conjugating different ratios of HA on the equal amount of phase-transferred MNCs. The optimized conjugation ratio of HA against magnetic content was identified to exhibit not only effective CD44 finding ability but also high cell viability through in vitro experiments. The results of this study demonstrate that the suggested HA-MRCA shows strong potential to be used for accurate tumor diagnosis.

  7. The NSL Chromatin-Modifying Complex Subunit KANSL2 Regulates Cancer Stem-like Properties in Glioblastoma That Contribute to Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Ferreyra Solari, Nazarena E; Belforte, Fiorella S; Canedo, Lucía; Videla-Richardson, Guillermo A; Espinosa, Joaquín M; Rossi, Mario; Serna, Eva; Riudavets, Miguel A; Martinetto, Horacio; Sevlever, Gustavo; Perez-Castro, Carolina

    2016-09-15

    KANSL2 is an integral subunit of the nonspecific lethal (NSL) chromatin-modifying complex that contributes to epigenetic programs in embryonic stem cells. In this study, we report a role for KANSL2 in regulation of stemness in glioblastoma (GBM), which is characterized by heterogeneous tumor stem-like cells associated with therapy resistance and disease relapse. KANSL2 expression is upregulated in cancer cells, mainly at perivascular regions of tumors. RNAi-mediated silencing of KANSL2 in GBM cells impairs their tumorigenic capacity in mouse xenograft models. In clinical specimens, we found that expression levels of KANSL2 correlate with stemness markers in GBM stem-like cell populations. Mechanistic investigations showed that KANSL2 regulates cell self-renewal, which correlates with effects on expression of the stemness transcription factor POU5F1. RNAi-mediated silencing of POU5F1 reduced KANSL2 levels, linking these two genes to stemness control in GBM cells. Together, our findings indicate that KANSL2 acts to regulate the stem cell population in GBM, defining it as a candidate GBM biomarker for clinical use. Cancer Res; 76(18); 5383-94. ©2016 AACR.

  8. Modified effective dielectric function for metallic granular composites with high percolation threshold.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiong-Rui; Zhang, Zong-Suo; Liu, Shao-Ding; Hao, Zhong-Hua

    2010-03-01

    We propose the effective dielectric function theory of metal granular composites modified with the metal particle size. The modified theory is used to explain the electrical conductivity, resonant plasmon absorption, and large nonlinear absorption of Au-TiO2 granular composite films with high-density metallic particles and a high electric percolation threshold. It is revealed that the decreasing metal particle size leads to an increasing percolation threshold and large enhancement of optical nonlinearity of the composites.

  9. Is the effect of surface modifying molecules on antibacterial activity universal for a given material?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Alexander; Liu, Fangzhou; Leung, Yu Hang; Ma, Angel P. Y.; Djurišić, Aleksandra B.; Leung, Frederick C. C.; Chan, Wai Kin; Lee, Hung Kay

    2014-08-01

    Antibacterial activity of nanomaterials is strongly dependent on their properties, and their stability and toxicity can be varied using surface coatings. We investigated the effect of different surface modifying molecules on the antibacterial properties of two ZnO nanoparticle samples. We found that the starting surface properties of the nanoparticles have significant effects on the attachment of the surface modifying molecules and consequent antibacterial activity. Two out of five investigated surface modifying molecules not only had a significant difference in the magnitude of their effect on different nanoparticles, but also resulted in the opposite effects on two ZnO nanoparticle samples (an enhancement of antibacterial activity for one and a reduction of antibacterial activity for the other ZnO sample). This indicates that no general rule on the effect of a specific molecule on the toxicity of a metal oxide nanoparticle can be derived without knowing the nanoparticle properties, due to the fact that surface modifier attachment onto the surface is affected by the initial surface properties.Antibacterial activity of nanomaterials is strongly dependent on their properties, and their stability and toxicity can be varied using surface coatings. We investigated the effect of different surface modifying molecules on the antibacterial properties of two ZnO nanoparticle samples. We found that the starting surface properties of the nanoparticles have significant effects on the attachment of the surface modifying molecules and consequent antibacterial activity. Two out of five investigated surface modifying molecules not only had a significant difference in the magnitude of their effect on different nanoparticles, but also resulted in the opposite effects on two ZnO nanoparticle samples (an enhancement of antibacterial activity for one and a reduction of antibacterial activity for the other ZnO sample). This indicates that no general rule on the effect of a specific

  10. [Effects of physical activity on cancer risk and disease progression after cancer diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Steindorf, K; Schmidt, M; Ulrich, C

    2012-01-01

    Numerous epidemiologic studies have demonstrated that regular physical activity convincingly reduces risk for colon cancer, probably for endometrium and postmenopausal breast cancer, and possibly for premenopausal breast, prostate, lung, and pancreas cancer. Relative risk reductions range from 10-30%. On the absolute scale about 9-19% of the most frequent cancers can be attributed to a lack of sufficient physical activity. Thus, exercise, as a modifiable health behavior, has a strong potential for primary cancer prevention. Current recommendations call for at least 30-60 min of moderate to vigorous activity daily. Physical activity is also increasingly gaining importance in cancer treatment and is now considered to be feasible, safe, and even recommended in almost all stages of disease. Randomized-controlled trials show that disease- and treatment-related symptoms, such as fatigue, sleep disorders, and depression which sometimes limit quality of life in cancer patients over years, can be reduced by physical activity. For disease-specific and total mortality, clinical studies are not yet available. However, preliminary observational studies with breast, colon, and prostate cancer patients show risk reductions.

  11. Combinatorial-Designed Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-Targeted Chitosan Nanoparticles for Encapsulation and Delivery of Lipid-Modified Platinum Derivatives in Wild-Type and Resistant Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Ana Vanessa; Singh, Amit; Bousbaa, Hassan; Ferreira, Domingos; Sarmento, Bruno; Amiji, Mansoor M

    2015-12-07

    Development of efficient and versatile drug delivery platforms to overcome the physical and biological challenges in cancer therapeutics is an area of great interest, and novel materials are actively sought for such applications. Recent strides in polymer science have led to a combinatorial approach for generating a library of materials with different functional identities that can be "mixed and matched" to attain desired characteristics of a delivery vector. We have applied the combinatorial design to chitosan (CS), where the polymer backbone has been modified with polyethylene glycol, epidermal growth factor receptor-binding peptide, and lipid derivatives of varying chain length to encapsulate hydrophobic drugs. Cisplatin, cis-([PtCl2(NH3)2]), is one of the most potent chemotherapy drugs broadly administered for cancer treatment. Cisplatin is a hydrophilic drug, and in order for it to be encapsulated in the developed nanosystems, it was modified with lipids of varying chain length. The library of four CS derivatives and six platinum derivatives was self-assembled in aqueous medium and evaluated for physicochemical characteristics and cytotoxic effects in platinum-sensitive and -resistant lung cancer cells. The results show that the lipid-modified platinate encapsulation into CS nanoparticles significantly improved cellular cytotoxicity of the drug. In this work, we have also reinforced the idea that CS is a multifaceted system that can be as successful in delivering small molecules as it has been as a nucleic acids carrier.

  12. Quality of Life and Cost Effectiveness of Prostate Cancer Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    AD Award Number: W81XWH-04-1-0257 TITLE: Quality of Life and Cost Effectiveness of Prostate Cancer Treatment PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ravishankar...patients across two ethnic groups, (2) analyze and compare short and long term cost-effectiveness of prostate cancer treatment across ethnic groups; and...cost-effectiveness of prostate cancer treatment across ethnic groups; and (3) analyze and compare resource utilization patterns, treatment modalities

  13. New Strategies in Engineering T-Cell Receptor Gene-Modified T Cells to More Effectively Target Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Thomas M.; Stromnes, Ingunn M.; Chapuis, Aude G.; Greenberg, Philip D.

    2016-01-01

    The immune system, and T cells in particular, have the ability to target and destroy malignant cells. However, anti-tumor immune responses induced from the endogenous T cell repertoire are often insufficient for the eradication of established tumors, as illustrated by the failure of cancer vaccination strategies or checkpoint blockade for most tumors. Genetic modification of T cells to express a defined T cell receptor (TCR) can provide the means to rapidly generate large numbers of tumor-reactive T cells capable of targeting tumor cells in vivo. However, cell-intrinsic factors as well as immunosuppressive factors in the tumor microenvironment can limit the function of such gene-modified T cells. New strategies currently being developed are refining and enhancing this approach, resulting in cellular therapies that more effectively target tumors and that are less susceptible to tumor immune-evasion. PMID:26463711

  14. New Strategies in Engineering T-cell Receptor Gene-Modified T cells to More Effectively Target Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Thomas M; Stromnes, Ingunn M; Chapuis, Aude G; Greenberg, Philip D

    2015-12-01

    The immune system, T cells in particular, have the ability to target and destroy malignant cells. However, antitumor immune responses induced from the endogenous T-cell repertoire are often insufficient for the eradication of established tumors, as illustrated by the failure of cancer vaccination strategies or checkpoint blockade for most tumors. Genetic modification of T cells to express a defined T-cell receptor (TCR) can provide the means to rapidly generate large numbers of tumor-reactive T cells capable of targeting tumor cells in vivo. However, cell-intrinsic factors as well as immunosuppressive factors in the tumor microenvironment can limit the function of such gene-modified T cells. New strategies currently being developed are refining and enhancing this approach, resulting in cellular therapies that more effectively target tumors and that are less susceptible to tumor immune evasion.

  15. Properties of modified dry masonry mixtures for effective masonry units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, V.; Rozovskaya, T.

    2015-01-01

    The paper is devoted to the problem of the development of dry light-weight mixtures with hollow ceramics microspheres (CMS) for masonry works. For the one-layer fencing structures including effective masonry units, the use of "warm" masonry mortars is necessary. The used light-weight masonry mortars do not provide the brand strength and thermal uniformity of the fencing structures because of high average density. The CMS are effective light-weight aggregate for such mortars. The influence of the dosage of CMS on the physics- and-mechanics parameters and the technological properties of the masonry mortars has been studied. The optimal mixture compositions have been obtained and their main properties have been determined. The influence of an air-entraining admixture and redispersible polymer powders on the average density and physics-and-mechanics parameters of the masonry mortars have been studied. The optimal compositions of light-weight dry masonry mixtures with CMS have been suggested. It has been established that the mortars, obtained from such mixtures, have the requisite average density, the water retention capacity more than 95 %, high homogeneity and high strength characteristics. The application of the proposed mixtures enables to reduce the construction material costs and to improve the energy efficiency of the fencing structures.

  16. Exercise Modifies the Gut Microbiota with Positive Health Effects

    PubMed Central

    Monda, Vincenzo; Villano, Ines; Messina, Antonietta; Valenzano, Anna; Esposito, Teresa; Moscatelli, Fiorenzo; Viggiano, Andrea; Cibelli, Giuseppe; Chieffi, Sergio; Monda, Marcellino

    2017-01-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract (GIT) is inhabited by a wide cluster of microorganisms that play protective, structural, and metabolic functions for the intestinal mucosa. Gut microbiota is involved in the barrier functions and in the maintenance of its homeostasis. It provides nutrients, participates in the signaling network, regulates the epithelial development, and affects the immune system. Considering the microbiota ability to respond to homeostatic and physiological changes, some researchers proposed that it can be seen as an endocrine organ. Evidence suggests that different factors can determine changes in the gut microbiota. These changes can be both quantitative and qualitative resulting in variations of the composition and metabolic activity of the gut microbiota which, in turn, can affect health and different disease processes. Recent studies suggest that exercise can enhance the number of beneficial microbial species, enrich the microflora diversity, and improve the development of commensal bacteria. All these effects are beneficial for the host, improving its health status. In this paper, we intend to shed some light over the recent knowledge of the role played by exercise as an environmental factor in determining changes in microbial composition and how these effects could provide benefits to health and disease prevention. PMID:28357027

  17. Heating effects on modifying carbon surface by reactive plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, Yori; Katoh, Masaaki; Ohte, Takeo; Ohtani, Sugio; Kojima, Akira; Saitoh, Naoya

    1996-07-01

    In the surface modification by plasma, surface properties changes with time after the plasma treatment. Such changes should be avoided for practical application. Glassy carbon (GC) was subjected to simultaneous plasma and heat treatments in order to investigate the respective effects. Source gases were tetrafluoromethane (CF 4) and oxygen (O 2). Treatment time and heating temperature of the GC plate were 30 min and 200-500°C, respectively. The surface properties before and after plasma treatment were studied with contact angle measurements and ESCA. When the GC was heated at 400°C during CF 4 plasma treatment, the contact angle after plasma treatment was 133° and constant even after 24 h. At 500°C during O 2 plasma treatment, the contact angle after plasma treatment was 0° and constant even after 24 h. It is found that heating carbon surface during CF 4 or O 2 plasma treatment is effective to stop the change with time after plasma treatment.

  18. Exercise Modifies the Gut Microbiota with Positive Health Effects.

    PubMed

    Monda, Vincenzo; Villano, Ines; Messina, Antonietta; Valenzano, Anna; Esposito, Teresa; Moscatelli, Fiorenzo; Viggiano, Andrea; Cibelli, Giuseppe; Chieffi, Sergio; Monda, Marcellino; Messina, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract (GIT) is inhabited by a wide cluster of microorganisms that play protective, structural, and metabolic functions for the intestinal mucosa. Gut microbiota is involved in the barrier functions and in the maintenance of its homeostasis. It provides nutrients, participates in the signaling network, regulates the epithelial development, and affects the immune system. Considering the microbiota ability to respond to homeostatic and physiological changes, some researchers proposed that it can be seen as an endocrine organ. Evidence suggests that different factors can determine changes in the gut microbiota. These changes can be both quantitative and qualitative resulting in variations of the composition and metabolic activity of the gut microbiota which, in turn, can affect health and different disease processes. Recent studies suggest that exercise can enhance the number of beneficial microbial species, enrich the microflora diversity, and improve the development of commensal bacteria. All these effects are beneficial for the host, improving its health status. In this paper, we intend to shed some light over the recent knowledge of the role played by exercise as an environmental factor in determining changes in microbial composition and how these effects could provide benefits to health and disease prevention.

  19. Morphological Effect of Non-targeted Biomolecule-Modified MNPs on Reticuloendothelial System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao; Hu, Yan; Xiao, Jie; Cheng, Dengfeng; Xiu, Yan; Shi, Hongcheng

    2015-09-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) with special morphology were commonly used as biomaterials, while morphological effects of non-targeted biomolecule-modified MNPs on biological behaviors were still unclear. In this research, spherical and rod-like Fe3O4 in a comparable size were synthesized and then surface-modified by bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a model of non-targeted biomolecule-modified MNPs. Morphological effects were featured by TEM and quantification of in vitro phagocytic uptake, as well as the in vivo quantification of particles in reticuloendothelial system (RES)-related organs of normal Kunming mice. For these non-targeted BSA-modified MNPs, intracellular distributions were the same, but the rod-like MNPs were more likely to be uptake by macrophages; furthermore, the BSA-modified MNPs gathered in RES-related organs soon after intravenous injection, but the rod-like ones were expelled from the lung more quickly and expelled from the spleen more slowly. These preliminary results may be referable if MNPs or other similar biomolecule-modified nanoparticles were used.

  20. Morphological Effect of Non-targeted Biomolecule-Modified MNPs on Reticuloendothelial System.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao; Hu, Yan; Xiao, Jie; Cheng, Dengfeng; Xiu, Yan; Shi, Hongcheng

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) with special morphology were commonly used as biomaterials, while morphological effects of non-targeted biomolecule-modified MNPs on biological behaviors were still unclear. In this research, spherical and rod-like Fe3O4 in a comparable size were synthesized and then surface-modified by bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a model of non-targeted biomolecule-modified MNPs. Morphological effects were featured by TEM and quantification of in vitro phagocytic uptake, as well as the in vivo quantification of particles in reticuloendothelial system (RES)-related organs of normal Kunming mice. For these non-targeted BSA-modified MNPs, intracellular distributions were the same, but the rod-like MNPs were more likely to be uptake by macrophages; furthermore, the BSA-modified MNPs gathered in RES-related organs soon after intravenous injection, but the rod-like ones were expelled from the lung more quickly and expelled from the spleen more slowly. These preliminary results may be referable if MNPs or other similar biomolecule-modified nanoparticles were used.

  1. Synergistic Effect of SH003 and Doxorubicin in Triple-negative Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Woo, Sang-Mi; Kim, Ah Jeong; Choi, Youn Kyung; Shin, Young Cheol; Cho, Sung-Gook; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2016-11-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is highly aggressive, resulting in poor prognosis. Chemotherapy of TNBC relies on anti-cancer agents with strong cytotoxicity, but it causes several side effects with recurrence. While combinational approaches of chemotherapeutics have been highlighted as a new treatment strategy for TNBC to reduce side effects, combinations of anti-cancer agents with herbal medicines have not been reported. We recently reported that newly modified traditional Chinese medicine named SH003 inhibited TNBC growth. Considering a combinational strategy for TNBC treatment, we further studied synergistic effects of SH003 with various anti-cancer drugs in TNBC treatment. Here, we demonstrate that SH003 shows a synergistic effect with doxorubicin on TNBC treatment. Our in vitro cell viability assays revealed that SH003 and doxorubicin showed a synergistic effect in the well-defined TNBC cell line, MDA-MB-231. Moreover, we found that the combinational treatment caused Caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death. Our in vivo mouse xenograft tumor growth assays confirmed that combinational treatment of SH003 with doxorubicin repressed MDA-MB-231 tumor growth with no weight loss. Therefore, we conclude that the combinational treatment of SH003 with doxorubicin shows the synergism in TNBC treatment, and suggest that SH003 can be used together with conventional anti-cancer drugs in chemotherapeutic approaches. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Sexual dysfunction and infertility as late effects of cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Schover, Leslie R; van der Kaaij, Marleen; van Dorst, Eleonora; Creutzberg, Carien; Huyghe, Eric; Kiserud, Cecilie E

    2014-06-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a common consequence of cancer treatment, affecting at least half of men and women treated for pelvic malignancies and over a quarter of people with other types of cancer. Problems are usually linked to damage to nerves, blood vessels, and hormones that underlie normal sexual function. Sexual dysfunction also may be associated with depression, anxiety, relationship conflict, and loss of self-esteem. Innovations in cancer treatment such as robotic surgery or more targeted radiation therapy have not had the anticipated result of reducing sexual dysfunction. Some new and effective cancer treatments, including aromatase inhibitors for breast cancer or chemoradiation for anal cancer also have very severe sexual morbidity. Cancer-related infertility is an issue for younger patients, who comprise a much smaller percentage of total cancer survivors. However, the long-term emotional impact of being unable to have a child after cancer can be extremely distressing. Advances in knowledge about how cancer treatments may damage fertility, as well as newer techniques to preserve fertility, offer hope to patients who have not completed their childbearing at cancer diagnosis. Unfortunately, surveys in industrialised nations confirm that many cancer patients are still not informed about potential changes to their sexual function or fertility, and all modalities of fertility preservation remain underutilised. After cancer treatment, many patients continue to have unmet needs for information about restoring sexual function or becoming a parent. Although more research is needed on optimal clinical practice, current studies suggest a multidisciplinary approach, including both medical and psychosocial treatment options.

  3. Foot massage. A nursing intervention to modify the distressing symptoms of pain and nausea in patients hospitalized with cancer.

    PubMed

    Grealish, L; Lomasney, A; Whiteman, B

    2000-06-01

    This article describes the findings of an empirical study on the use of foot massage as a nursing intervention in patients hospitalized with cancer. The study was developed from the earlier work of Ferrell-Torry and Glick (1992). In a sample of 87 subjects, a 10-minute foot massage (5 minutes per foot) was found to have a significant immediate effect on the perceptions of pain, nausea, and relaxation when measured with a visual analog scale. The use of foot massage as a complementary method is recommended as a relatively simple nursing intervention for patients experiencing nausea or pain related to the cancer experience. Further research into its effectiveness in the management of these symptoms by the family at home is warranted.

  4. Long-Lasting WNT-TCF Response Blocking and Epigenetic Modifying Activities of Withanolide F in Human Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Seth, Chandan; Mas, Christophe; Conod, Arwen; Mueller, Jens; Siems, Karsten; Kuciak, Monika; Borges, Isabel; Ruiz i Altaba, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    The WNT-TCF signaling pathway participates in adult tissue homeostasis and repair, and is hyperactive in a number of human diseases including cancers of the colon. Whereas to date there are no antagonists approved for patient use, a potential problem for their sustained use is the blockade of WNT signaling in healthy tissues, thus provoking potentially serious co-lateral damage. Here we have screened a library of plant and microorganism small molecules for novel WNT signaling antagonists and describe withanolide F as a potent WNT-TCF response blocker. This steroidal lactone inhibits TCF-dependent colon cancer xenograft growth and mimics the effects of genetic blockade of TCF and of ivermectin, a previously reported WNT-TCF blocker. However, withanolide F is unique in that it imposes a long-lasting repression of tumor growth, WNT-TCF targets and cancer stem cell clonogenicity after drug treatment. These findings are paralleled by its modulation of chromatin regulators and its alteration of overall H3K4me1 levels. Our results open up the possibility to permanently repress essential signaling responses in cancer cells through limited treatments with small molecules. PMID:27973612

  5. Mammary renin-angiotensin system-regulating aminopeptidase activities are modified in rats with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    del Pilar Carrera, Maria; Ramírez-Expósito, Maria Jesus; Mayas, Maria Dolores; García, Maria Jesus; Martínez-Martos, Jose Manuel

    2010-12-01

    Angiotensin II in particular and/or the local renin-angiotensin system in general could have an important role in epithelial tissue growth and modelling; therefore, it is possible that it may be involved in breast cancer. In this sense, previous works of our group showed a predominating role of angiotensin II in tumoral tissue obtained from women with breast cancer. However, although classically angiotensin II has been considered the main effector peptide of the renin-angiotensin system cascade, several of its catabolism products such as angiotensin III and angiotensin IV also possess biological functions. These peptides are formed through the activity of several proteolytic regulatory enzymes of the aminopeptidase type, also called angiotensinases. The aim of this work was to analyse several specific angiotensinase activities involved in the renin-angiotensin system cascade in mammary tissue from control rats and from rats with mammary tumours induced by N-methyl-nitrosourea (NMU), which may reflect the functional status of their target peptides under the specific conditions brought about by the tumoural process. The results show that soluble and membrane-bound specific aspartyl aminopeptidase activities and membrane-bound glutamyl aminopeptidase activity increased in mammary tissue from NMU-treated animals and soluble aminopeptidase N and aminopeptidase B activities significantly decreased in mammary tissue from NMU-treated rats. These changes support the existence of a local mammary renin-angiotensin system and that this system and its putative functions in breast tissue could be altered by the tumour process, in which we suggest a predominant role of angiotensin III. All described data about the renin-angiotensin system in mammary tissue support the idea that it must be involved in normal breast tissue functions, and its disruption could be involved in one or more steps of the carcinogenesis process.

  6. Effectiveness of a Modified Rapid Toilet Training Workshop for Parents of Children with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinald, Katherine; Mirenda, Pat

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with developmental disabilities often experience challenges in acquiring toileting skills, which highlights a need for effective toilet training strategies that can be readily disseminated to caregivers. The purpose of this multiple baseline study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a modified rapid toilet training workshop provided…

  7. Assessing the Treatment Effects in Apraxia of Speech: Introduction and Evaluation of the Modified Diadochokinesis Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurkmans, Joost; Jonkers, Roel; Boonstra, Anne M.; Stewart, Roy E.; Reinders-Messelink, Heleen A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The number of reliable and valid instruments to measure the effects of therapy in apraxia of speech (AoS) is limited. Aims: To evaluate the newly developed Modified Diadochokinesis Test (MDT), which is a task to assess the effects of rate and rhythm therapies for AoS in a multiple baseline across behaviours design. Methods: The…

  8. Targeted PRINTRTM nanoparticles for effective cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGowan, Kelly Marie

    Conventional therapeutics for the treatment of cancer are often faced with challenges such as systemic biodistribution within the body, drug degradation in vivo, low bioavailability at the site of disease, and off-target toxicity. As such, particulate drug delivery systems have been developed with the aim of minimizing these limitations of current therapies. Through the PRINTRTM (Particle Replication in Non-wetting Templates) technology, hydrogel nanoparticles, prepared from biocompatible poly(ethylene glycol) and acid-sensitive silyl ether crosslinkers, were functionalized and conjugated with targeting ligands for the folate receptor (FR), HER2 receptor, and transferrin receptor (TfR). By conjugating specific ligands to nanoparticles to impart specificity, highly selective targeting and internalization (>80%) of nanoparticles were demonstrated in various cancer cell lines. The extent of cellular uptake of targeted nanoparticles was dependent on the surface characteristics of the nanoparticles, particle concentration, and kinetics. Because a negative surface charge reduces nonspecific cellular uptake, attaching monoclonal antibodies to the surface of negatively charged PRINT nanoparticles facilitated specific binding of the antibodies to cellular surface receptors that subsequently triggered receptor-mediated endocytosis. Additionally, the multivalent nature of nanoparticles influenced cellular uptake. Specifically, nanoparticles with a higher valence internalized more rapidly and efficiently than those with a lower valence. Nanoparticles that selectively target and accumulate within diseased cells have the potential of minimizing drug degradation under physiological conditions, enhancing bioavailability at the tumor, improving the efficacy of the drug, and reducing toxicity from systemic biodistribution. Drug delivery through targeted nanoparticles was achieved by loading nanoparticles with silyl ether-modified gemcitabine prodrugs. Covalently reacting the prodrug

  9. Effect of accelerated weathering on surface chemistry of modified wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temiz, Ali; Terziev, Nasko; Eikenes, Morten; Hafren, Jonas

    2007-04-01

    In this study, the effects of UV-light irradiation and water spray on colour and surface chemistry of scots pine sapwood samples were investigated. The specimens were treated with chromated copper arsenate (CCA), a metal-free propiconazol-based formulation, chitosan, furfuryl alcohol and linseed and tall oils. The weathering experiment was performed by cycles of 2 h UV-light irradiation followed by water spray for 18 min. The changes at the surface of the weathered samples were characterised by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR); colour characterizations were performed by measuring CIELab parameters. The results show that all treatment methods except chitosan treatment provided lower colour changes than the control groups after 800 h exposure in weathering test cycle, but differences between chitosan and control were also small. The lowest colour changes were found on linseed oil (full cell process) and CCA treated wood. FT-IR results show that oil treatment (linseed and tall oil) decreased the intensities of a lignin specific peak (1500-1515 cm -1). Absorption band changes at 1630-1660 cm -1 were reduced by all treatments.

  10. Molecular insights into the OGG1 gene, a cancer risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations carriers

    PubMed Central

    Benitez-Buelga, Carlos; Vaclová, Tereza; Ferreira, Sofia; Urioste, Miguel; Inglada-Perez, Lucia; Soberón, Nora; Blasco, Maria A.; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier

    2016-01-01

    We have recently shown that rs2304277 variant in the OGG1 glycosidase gene of the Base Excision Repair pathway can increase ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers. In the present study, we aimed to explore the role of this genetic variant on different genome instability hallmarks to explain its association with cancer risk. We have evaluated the effect of this polymorphism on OGG1 transcriptional regulation and its contribution to telomere shortening and DNA damage accumulation. For that, we have used a series of 89 BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, 74 BRCAX cases, 60 non-carrier controls and 23 lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL) derived from BRCA1 mutation carriers and non-carriers. We have identified that this SNP is associated to a significant OGG1 transcriptional down regulation independently of the BRCA mutational status and that the variant may exert a synergistic effect together with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations on DNA damage and telomere shortening. These results suggest that this variant, could be associated to a higher cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers, due to an OGG1 transcriptional down regulation and its effect on genome instability. PMID:27015555

  11. Newton's second law versus modified-inertia MOND: A test using the high-latitude effect

    SciTech Connect

    Ignatiev, A. Yu.

    2008-05-15

    The modified-inertia MOND is an approach that proposes a change in Newton's second law at small accelerations as an alternative to dark matter. Recently it was suggested that this approach can be tested in terrestrial laboratory experiments. One way of doing the test is based on the static high-latitude equinox modified-inertia effect: around each equinox date, 2 spots emerge on the Earth where static bodies experience spontaneous displacement due to the violation of Newton's second law required by the modified-inertia MOND. Here, a detailed theory of this effect is developed and estimates of the magnitude of the signal due to the effect are obtained. The expected displacement of a mirror in a gravitational-wave interferometer is found to be about 10{sup -14} m. Some experimental aspects of the proposal are discussed.

  12. Newton's second law versus modified-inertia MOND: A test using the high-latitude effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatiev, A. Yu.

    2008-05-01

    The modified-inertia MOND is an approach that proposes a change in Newton’s second law at small accelerations as an alternative to dark matter. Recently it was suggested that this approach can be tested in terrestrial laboratory experiments. One way of doing the test is based on the static high-latitude equinox modified-inertia effect: around each equinox date, 2 spots emerge on the Earth where static bodies experience spontaneous displacement due to the violation of Newton’s second law required by the modified-inertia MOND. Here, a detailed theory of this effect is developed and estimates of the magnitude of the signal due to the effect are obtained. The expected displacement of a mirror in a gravitational-wave interferometer is found to be about 10-14m. Some experimental aspects of the proposal are discussed.

  13. Cell-like features imprinted in the physical nano- and micro-topography of the environment modify the responses to anti-cancer drugs of endometrial cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tan, Li Hui; Sykes, Peter H; Alkaisi, Maan M; Evans, John J

    2017-02-14

    Topographical features of cells at nanometre resolution were fabricated in polystyrene. The study investigated the effect of physical topography on the response of cancer cells to the common anticancer drugs, paclitaxel and doxorubicin. Human endometrial cancer cells (Ishikawa) were incubated on substrates containing cell-like features that had been fabricated using our bioimprint methodology to create moulds of cells with positive (convex) and negative (concave) topography. Control cultures were performed on flat substrates. Effects of the drugs on caspase-3 expression, proliferating nuclear antigen (PCNA) expression, cell number and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion were determined. Results revealed that the topography influenced the cell responses in a drug-dependent manner i.e. paclitaxel effects were sensitive to topography differently to those of doxorubicin. In addition, function signalling pathways were sensitive to the detailed topography i.e. positive imprint and negative imprint induced distinct response patterns. The results in this study show for the first time that a culture surface with cell-like topography, that has both nano- and micro-resolution, influences endometrial cancer cell responses to chemotherapy drugs. The effects are dependent on the topography and also on the chemotherapy drug. In particular, the platforms described have potential to provide substrates with high physical relevancy on which to undertake preclinical testing of new drugs. The method also allows for use of different cell types to provide cell-specific topography. The results imply that physical architecture of the cancer cell environment may be a suitable prospective target to enhance clinical activity of traditional drugs. Additionally or alternatively we provide compelling support for the notion that understanding the physical component of the nano- and micro-environment may encourage a redirection of drug development. Further, our observation that the

  14. Biological response modifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1988-10-01

    Much of what used to be called immunotherapy is now included in the term biological response modifiers. Biological response modifiers (BRMs) are those agents or approaches that modify the relationship between the tumor and host by modifying the host's biological response to tumor cells with resultant therapeutic effects. Most of the early work with BRMs centered around observations of spontaneous tumor regression and the association of tumor regression with concurrent bacterial infections. The BRM can modify the host response by increasing the host's antitumor responses through augmentation and/or restoration of effector mechanisms or mediators of the host's defense or decrease the deleterious component by the host's reaction, increasing the host's defenses by the administration of natural biologics (or the synthetic derivatives thereof) as effectors or mediators of an antitumor response, augmenting the host's response to modified tumor cells or vaccines, which might stimulate a greater response by the host or increase tumor-cell sensitivity to an existing response, decreasing the transformation and/or increase differentiation (maturation) of tumor cells, or increasing the ability of the host to tolerate damage by cytotoxic modalities of cancer treatment.

  15. Biological response modifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1991-10-01

    Much of what used to be called immunotherapy is now included in the term biological response modifiers. Biological response modifiers (BRMs) are defined as those agents or approaches that modify the relationship between the tumor and host by modifying the host's biological response to tumor cells with resultant therapeutic effects.'' Most of the early work with BRMs centered around observations of spontaneous tumor regression and the association of tumor regression with concurrent bacterial infections. The BRM can modify the host response in the following ways: Increase the host's antitumor responses through augmentation and/or restoration of effector mechanisms or mediators of the host's defense or decrease the deleterious component by the host's reaction; Increase the host's defenses by the administration of natural biologics (or the synthetic derivatives thereof) as effectors or mediators of an antitumor response; Augment the host's response to modified tumor cells or vaccines, which might stimulate a greater response by the host or increase tumor-cell sensitivity to an existing response; Decrease the transformation and/or increase differentiation (maturation) of tumor cells; or Increase the ability of the host to tolerate damage by cytotoxic modalities of cancer treatment.

  16. Use of expression data and the CGEMS genome-wide breast cancer association study to identify genes that may modify risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Walker, Logan C; Waddell, Nic; Ten Haaf, Anette; Grimmond, Sean; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2008-11-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 confer an increased lifetime risk of developing breast or ovarian cancer, but variable penetrance suggests that cancer susceptibility is influenced in part by modifier genes. Microarray expression profiling was conducted for 69 irradiated lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from healthy controls, or from cancer-affected women with a strong family history of breast and ovarian cancer carrying pathogenic mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2, or with no BRCA1/2 mutations (BRCAX). Genes discriminating between BRCA1, BRCA2 or BRCAX and controls were stratified based on irradiation response and/or cell cycle involvement. Gene lists were aligned against genes tagged with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) determined by the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS) Breast Cancer Whole Genome Association Scan to be nominally associated with breast cancer risk. Irradiation responsive genes whose expression correlated with BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation status were more likely to be tagged by risk-associated SNPs in the CGEMS dataset (BRCA1, P = 0.0005; BRCA2, P = 0.01). In contrast, irradiation responsive genes correlating with BRCAX status were not enriched in the CGEMS dataset. Classification of expression data by involvement in cell cycle processes did not enrich for genes tagged by risk-associated SNPs, for BRCA1, BRCA2 or BRCAX groups. Using a novel combinatorial approach, we have identified a subset of irradiation responsive genes as high priority candidate BRCA1/2 modifier genes. Similar approaches may be used to identify genes and underlying genetic risk factors that interact with exogenous stimulants to cause or modify any disease, without a priori knowledge of the pathways involved.

  17. Effectiveness of a modified administration protocol for the medical treatment of canine pyometra.

    PubMed

    Contri, Alberto; Gloria, Alessia; Carluccio, Augusto; Pantaleo, Stefania; Robbe, Domenico

    2015-03-01

    Pyometra is one of the most common diseases in intact bitches. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a modified aglepristone protocol for the medical treatment of pyometra in the bitch. Of these, 73 bitches affected by pyometra of different breeds and age (2-14 years old) were enrolled. They were randomly assigned to a control group (CTG - 26 bitches) treated with classical protocol (aglepristone at 0, 1 and 6 days - day 0 = day of the diagnosis) and a modified treated group (MTG - 47 bitches) treated with a different administration protocol (aglepristone at 0, 2, 5 and 8 days). The classical protocol with the anti-progestagen aglepristone was effective in 88.5 % (23/26) of CTG bitches while the modified protocol was effective in all (47/47) of MTG bitches. One of the 23 CTG bitches received a further administration on day 14, which resolved the pyometra, while in the three cases of CTG bitches, in which the treatment was ineffective, an ovariohysterectomy was carried out. The modified protocol showed a success rate of 100 %, compared with the classical protocol proposed in the literature, and no recurrence of the disease was recorded in the 24 months follow up. After treatment, the oestrus onset was earlier than expected (interoestrus of 128 ± 32 days). In this study, the modified treatment protocol showed high efficacy and lack of recurrence within 24 months, suggesting a complete recovery of reproductive function in the bitch, with a normal fertility.

  18. The effect of modified cervical exercise on smartphone users with forward head posture

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Yong- Soo; Kim, Yu- Mi; Shim, Je-myung

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of modified cervical exercise and determine whether such exercise improves the range of motion of the cervical movement in smartphone users with forward head posture. [Subjects and Methods] Some 32 subjects with forward head posture participated in this study. They were randomly allocated to three groups, and the modified cervical exercises were performed either once, twice, or three times per day. The exercise program was followed for four weeks and then the joint range of motion of the participants was measured. [Results] A significantly increased range of motion was seen in all three groups that performed the modified cervical exercises. The analysis of the effects among the three groups indicated that the greatest effect was seen in Group C, members of which performed the modified exercises three times per day. In addition, a significant difference was found between Group A and Group C in terms of the inter-group results. [Conclusion] According to the results of this study, although the modified cervical exercises were performed for only a relatively short duration (four weeks), the exercises brought about an improvement in the forward head posture that was induced by using a smartphone. PMID:28265167

  19. Does the use of specialist palliative care services modify the effect of socioeconomic status on place of death? A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hong; Nicolson, Donald J; Macleod, Una; Allgar, Victoria; Dalgliesh, Christopher; Johnson, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cancer patients in lower socioeconomic groups are significantly less likely to die at home and experience more barriers to access to palliative care. It is unclear whether receiving palliative care may mediate the effect of socioeconomic status on place of death. Aim: This review examines whether and how use of specialist palliative care may modify the effect of socioeconomic status on place of death. Design: A systematic review was conducted. Eligible papers were selected and the quality appraised by two independent reviewers. Data were synthesised using a narrative approach. Data sources: MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO and Web of Knowledge were searched (1997–2013). Bibliographies were scanned and experts contacted. Papers were included if they reported the effect of both socioeconomic status and use of specialist palliative care on place of death for adult cancer patients. Results: Nine studies were included. All study subjects had received specialist palliative care. With regard to place of death, socioeconomic status was found to have (1) no effect in seven studies and (2) an effect in one study. Furthermore, one study found that the effect of socioeconomic status on place of death was only significant when patients received standard specialist palliative care. When patients received more intense care adapted to their needs, the effect of socioeconomic status on place of death was no longer seen. Conclusion: There is some evidence to suggest that use of specialist palliative care may modify the effect of socioeconomic status on place of death. PMID:26330454

  20. Hardness and incipient plasticity in silicate glasses: Origin of the mixed modifier effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjeldsen, Jonas; Smedskjaer, Morten M.; Mauro, John C.; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2014-02-01

    The scaling of Vickers hardness (Hv) in oxide glasses with varying network modifier/modifier ratio is manifested as either a positive or negative deviation from linearity with a maximum deviation at the ratio of about 1:1. In an earlier study [J. Kjeldsen et al., J. Non-Cryst. Solids 369, 61 (2013)], we observed a minimum of Hv in CaO/MgO sodium aluminosilicate glasses at CaO/MgO = 1:1 and postulated that this minimum is linked to a maximum in plastic flow. However, the origin of this link has not been experimentally verified. In this work, we attempt to do so by exploring the links among Hv, volume recovery ratio (VR) and plastic deformation volume (VP) under indentation, glass transition temperature (Tg), Young's modulus (E), and liquid fragility index (m) in CaO/MgO and CaO/Li2O sodium aluminosilicate glasses. We confirm the negative deviations from linearity and find that the maximum deviation (i.e., the so-called mixed modifier effect) of Hv, Tg, and m is at the modifier ratio of 1:1. These deviations increase in intensity as the total modifier concentration increases. We find a strong correlation between VP and Hv for the CaO/MgO series, implying that the minimum in Hv originates primarily from an increased shear flow in the mixed modifier glasses.

  1. [Cost-effectiveness of colorectal cancer screening].

    PubMed

    Heresbach, Denis; Manfrédi, Sylvain; Branger, Bernard; Bretagne, Jean-François

    2006-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening in France is based on a faecal occult blood test every two years in average risk subjects 50-74 years of age while other endoscopic or non-endoscopic screening methods are used in Europe and in the USA. Beside the reduced incidence of and mortality from CRC found in available studies, cost-effectiveness data need to be taken into account. Because of the delay between randomized controlled trials and clinical results, transitional probabilistic models of screening programs are useful for public health policy makers. The aim of the present review was to promote the implementation of cost-effectiveness studies, to provide a guide to analyze cost-effectiveness studies on CRC screening and, to propose a French cost effectiveness study comparing CRC screening strategies. Most of these trials were performed by US or UK authors and demonstrate that the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio varies between 5 000 and 15 000 US dollars/one year life gained, with wide variations: these results were highly dependent on the unit costs of the different devices as well as the predictive values of the screening tests. Although CRC screening programs have been implemented in several administrative districts of France since 2002, and the results of these randomized controlled trials using fecal occult blood have been updated, cost-effectiveness criteria need to be integrated; especially since the results of screening campaigns based on other tools such as flexible sigmoidoscopy should be available in 2007.

  2. Hyaluronic Acid Modified Tantalum Oxide Nanoparticles Conjugating Doxorubicin for Targeted Cancer Theranostics.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yushen; Ma, Xibo; Feng, Shanshan; Liang, Xiao; Dai, Zhifei; Tian, Jie; Yue, Xiuli

    2015-12-16

    Theranostic tantalum oxide nanoparticles (TaOxNPs) of about 40 nm were successfully developed by conjugating functional molecules including polyethylene glycol (PEG), near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye, doxorubicin (DOX), and hyaluronic acid (HA) onto the surface of the nanoparticles (TaOx@Cy7-DOX-PEG-HA NPs) for actively targeting delivery, pH-responsive drug release, and NIR fluorescence/X-ray CT bimodal imaging. The obtained nanoagent exhibits good biocompatibility, high cumulative release rate in the acidic microenvironments, long blood circulation time, and superior tumor-targeting ability. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments show that it can serve as an excellent contrast agent to simultaneously enhance fluorescence imaging and CT imaging greatly. Most importantly, such a nanoagent could enhance the therapeutic efficacy of the tumor greatly and the tumor growth inhibition was evaluated to be 87.5%. In a word, multifunctional TaOx@Cy7-DOX-PEG-HA NPs can serve as a theranostic nanomedicine for fluorescence/X-ray CT bimodal imaging, remote-controlled therapeutics, enabling personalized detection, and treatment of cancer with high efficacy.

  3. Fabricating upconversion fluorescent nanoparticles modified substrate for dynamical control of cancer cells and pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Li, Huanhuan; Chen, Quansheng; Zhao, Jiewen; Urmila, Khulal

    2016-09-07

    Lanthanide-doped upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) have attracted widespread interests in the field of biomedicine because of their unique upconverting capability by converting near infrared (NIR) excitation to visible or ultraviolet (UV) emission. Here, we developed a novel UCNP-based substrate for dynamic capture and release of cancer cells and pathogenic bacteria under NIR-control. The UCNPs harvest NIR light and convert it to ultraviolet light, which subsequently result in the cleavage of photoresponsive linker (PR linker) from the substrate, and on demand allows the release of a captured cell. The results show that after seeding cells for 5 h, the cells were efficiently captured on the surface of the substrate and ˜89.4% of the originally captured S. aureus was released from the surface after exposure to 2 W/cm(2) NIR light for 30 min, and ˜92.1% of HepG2 cells. These findings provide a unique platform for exploring an entirely new application field for this promising luminescent nanomaterial.

  4. Effects of a Modified Hand Compression Bandage for Treatment of Post-Burn Hand Edemas

    PubMed Central

    Park, Won Yong; Joo, So Young; Jang, Ki Un; Seo, Cheong Hoon; Jun, Ah Young

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of a modified hand compression bandage in patients with a post-burn hand edema. Methods Patients were recruited from burn centers. We classified the patients into two groups: the modified hand compression bandage group comprising of 22 patients who had a modified hand compression bandage and received conventional physical therapy and the conventionally treated group, comprising of 20 patients who received only conventional physical therapy during the 4-week period post-burn. Hand circumference, hand skin thickness, and hand function were evaluated by grip strength, active range of motion (ROM), Jebsen hand function test, and visual analogue scale (VAS). These assessments were used to evaluate treatment effectiveness prior to the first treatment, 2 weeks after the first treatment, 4 weeks after the first treatment, and 4 months after the first treatment. Results As a result of repeated-measures analysis of variance on hand circumference, skin thickness, VAS, and each metacarpophalangeal joint ROM, we found significant differences that corresponded to time effect (p<0.05) and time×group (reciprocal action) effect (p<0.05). The results of grasp power, Jebsen hand function test, and each proximal interphalangeal joint ROM, show significant differences in accordance with the time effect (p<0.05), however, there was no reciprocal action effect (p>0.05). Conclusion The modified hand compression bandage will be clinically useful for the treatment of patients with post-burn hand edemas. PMID:27152286

  5. Modified Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy in Left Sided Breast Cancer After Radical Mastectomy With Flattening Filter Free Versus Flattened Beams

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Youqun; Chen, Yanyan; Wu, Sangang; Shi, Liwan; Fu, Lirong; Ha, Huiming; Lin, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Conventional volumetric modulated arc therapy (C-VMAT) for breast cancer after radical mastectomy had its limitation that resulted in larger volumes of normal tissue receiving low doses. We explored whether there was a way to deal with this disadvantage and determined the potential benefit of flattening filter-free (FFF) beams. Twenty patients with breast cancer after radical mastectomy were subjected to 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and VMAT treatment planning. For VMAT plans, 3 different designs were employed with RapidArc form: conventional-VMAT plan (C-VMAT), modified-VMAT plan (M-VMAT), and modified-VMAT plan using FFF beams (M-VMAT-F). Plan quality and efficiency were assessed for all plans. For each technique in homogeneity, there were no statistically significant differences. VMAT plans showed superiority compared with 3DCRT in conformity. C-VMAT plans were obviously not only superior to 3DCRT in the medium to high-dose regions (about 15–50 Gy) but also resulted in larger volumes in low-dose regions (about 0–10 Gy). M-VMAT plans were similar to M-VMAT-F. Both of them might significantly reduce the regions of low dose compared with C-VMAT (V5lung: ∼ 11.5%; V5heart: ∼ 23.8%, P < 0.05), even less than 3DCRT in heart irradiation (V2.5heart, 9.4%, P < 0.05). For liver, contralateral breast, and lung irradiation, M-VMAT-F plans were slightly superior to M-VMAT with a reduction of ∼0.08, 0.2, and 0.24 Gy in the respective mean doses (P < 0.05). C-VMAT plans showed superiority compared with 3DCRT, while also resulted in larger volumes of normal tissue receiving low doses. M-VMAT and M-VMAT-F plans might not only reduce the region in the medium to high doses but also have lower volumes in low-dose regions. M-VMAT-F plans were slightly superior compared with M-VMAT due to further contralateral organs sparing. PMID:27057896

  6. A Prognostic Model for Patients with Triple-Negative Breast Cancer: Importance of the Modified Nottingham Prognostic Index and Age

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Jeanny; Eom, Keun-Yong; Koo, Tae Ryool; Kim, Byoung Hyuck; Kang, Eunyoung; Kim, Sung-Won; Kim, Yu Jung; Park, So Yeon

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Considering the distinctive biology of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), this study aimed to identify TNBC-specific prognostic factors and determine the prognostic value of the Nottingham Prognostic Index (NPI) and its variant indices. Methods A total of 233 patients with newly diagnosed stage I to III TNBC from 2003 to 2012 were reviewed. We retrospectively analyzed the patients' demographics, clinicopathologic parameters, treatment, and survival outcomes. The NPI was calculated as follows: tumor size (cm)×0.2+node status+Scarff-Bloom-Richardson (SBR) grade. The modified NPI (MNPI) was obtained by adding the modified SBR grade rather than the SBR grade. Results The median follow-up was 67.8 months. Five-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were 81.4% and 89.9%, respectively. Multivariate analyses showed that the MNPI was the most significant and common prognostic factor of DFS (p=0.001) and OS (p=0.019). Young age (≤35 years) was also correlated with poor DFS (p=0.006). A recursive partitioning for establishing the prognostic model for DFS was performed based on the results of multivariate analysis. Patients with a low MNPI (≤6.5) were stratified into the low-risk group (p<0.001), and patients with a high MNPI (>6.5) were subdivided into the intermediate (>35 years) and high-risk (≤35 years) groups. Age was not a prognostic factor in patients with a low MNPI, whereas in patients with a high MNPI, it was the second key factor in subdividing patients according to prognosis (p=0.023). Conclusion The MNPI could be used to stratify patients with stage I to III TNBC according to prognosis. It was the most important prognosticator for both DFS and OS. The prognostic significance of young age for DFS differed by MNPI. PMID:28382096

  7. CYP24A1 variant modifies the association between use of oestrogen plus progestogen therapy and colorectal cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Albeniz, Xabier; Rudolph, Anja; Hutter, Carolyn; White, Emily; Lin, Yi; Rosse, Stephanie A; Figueiredo, Jane C; Harrison, Tabitha A; Jiao, Shuo; Brenner, Hermann; Casey, Graham; Hudson, Thomas J; Thornquist, Mark; Le Marchand, Loic; Potter, John; Slattery, Martha L; Zanke, Brent; Baron, John A; Caan, Bette J; Chanock, Stephen J; Berndt, Sonja I; Stelling, Deanna; Fuchs, Charles S; Hoffmeister, Michael; Butterbach, Katja; Du, Mengmeng; James Gauderman, W; Gunter, Marc J; Lemire, Mathieu; Ogino, Shuji; Lin, Jennifer; Hayes, Richard B; Haile, Robert W; Schoen, Robert E; Warnick, Greg S; Jenkins, Mark A; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Lindor, Noralane M; Kolonel, Laurence N; Hopper, John L; Gong, Jian; Seminara, Daniela; Pflugeisen, Bethann M; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Qu, Conghui; Duggan, David; Cotterchio, Michelle; Campbell, Peter T; Carlson, Christopher S; Newcomb, Polly A; Giovannucci, Edward; Hsu, Li; Chan, Andrew T; Peters, Ulrike; Chang-Claude, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    Background: Menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) use has been consistently associated with a decreased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) in women. Our aim was to use a genome-wide gene–environment interaction analysis to identify genetic modifiers of CRC risk associated with use of MHT. Methods: We included 10 835 postmenopausal women (5419 cases and 5416 controls) from 10 studies. We evaluated use of any MHT, oestrogen-only (E-only) and combined oestrogen–progestogen (E+P) hormone preparations. To test for multiplicative interactions, we applied the empirical Bayes (EB) test as well as the Wald test in conventional case–control logistic regression as primary tests. The Cocktail test was used as secondary test. Results: The EB test identified a significant interaction between rs964293 at 20q13.2/CYP24A1 and E+P (interaction OR (95% CIs)=0.61 (0.52–0.72), P=4.8 × 10−9). The secondary analysis also identified this interaction (Cocktail test OR=0.64 (0.52–0.78), P=1.2 × 10−5 (alpha threshold=3.1 × 10−4). The ORs for association between E+P and CRC risk by rs964293 genotype were as follows: C/C, 0.96 (0.61–1.50); A/C, 0.61 (0.39–0.95) and A/A, 0.40 (0.22–0.73), respectively. Conclusions: Our results indicate that rs964293 modifies the association between E+P and CRC risk. The variant is located near CYP24A1, which encodes an enzyme involved in vitamin D metabolism. This novel finding offers additional insight into downstream pathways of CRC etiopathogenesis. PMID:26766742

  8. Effect of Psychosocial Factors on Cancer Risk and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Nakaya, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    Psychosocial factors such as personality traits and depression may alter immune and endocrine function, with possible effects on cancer incidence and survival. Although these factors have been extensively studied as risk and prognostic factors for cancer, the associations remain unclear. The author used data from prospective cohort studies in population-based and clinical databases to investigate these relations. The findings do not support the hypotheses that personality traits and depression are direct risk factors for cancer and cancer survival. Some researchers have recently reported that cancer affects the psychological status of the partners and family members of cancer patients. The mechanisms underlying this hypothesis imply the existence of not only psychological distress from caregiving and grief but also a shared unhealthy lifestyle. Only a few studies have suggested that major psychosocial problems develop in partners of cancer patients. The present study used nationwide population-based data to investigate depression risk among male partners of women with breast cancer. The results support the hypothesis that such men are at increased risk of depression. In conclusion, the effects of personality traits and depression on cancer risk and survival appear to be extremely small. In addition, partners of cancer patients were at increased risk of depression. Screening partners and family members of cancer patients for depressive symptoms is therefore an important concern for research in psycho-oncology. PMID:24270060

  9. Anthracycline Drugs on Modified Surface of Quercetin-Loaded Polymer Nanoparticles: A Dual Drug Delivery Model for Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Chabita; Kaushik, Agrima; Das, Asmita; Pal, Sandip; Majumder, Debashis

    2016-01-01

    Polymer nanoparticles are vehicles used for delivery of hydrophobic anti-cancer drugs, like doxorubicin, paclitaxel or chemopreventors like quercetin (Q). The present study deals with the synthesis and characterisation of nano formulations (NFs) from Q loaded PLGA (poly lactic-co-glycolic acid) nano particles (NPs) by surface modification. The surface of Q-loaded (NPs) is modified by coating with biopolymers like bovine serum albumin (BSA) or histones (His). Conventional chemotherapeutic drugs adriamycin (ADR) and mitoxantrone (MTX) are bound to BSA and His respectively before being coated on Q-loaded NPs to nano formulate NF1 and NF2 respectively. The sizes of these NFs are in the range 400–500 nm as ascertained by SEM and DLS measurements. Encapsulation of Q in polymer NPs is confirmed from shifts in FT-IR, TGA and DSC traces of Q-loaded NPs compared to native PLGA and Q. Surface modification in NFs is evidenced by three distinct regions in their TEM images; the core, polymer capsule and the coated surface. Negative zeta potential of Q-loaded NPs shifted to positive potential on surface modification in NF1 and NF2. In vitro release of Q from the NFs lasted up to twenty days with an early burst release. NF2 is better formulation than NF1 as loading of MTX is 85% compared to 23% loading of ADR. Such NFs are expected to overcome multi-drug resistance (MDR) by reaching and treating the target cancerous cells by virtue of size, charge and retention. PMID:27196562

  10. Removal effects and mechanisms of Microcystic aeruginosa by Chitosan-modified Adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xi; Wu, Cuirong; He, Yan; Zhang, Bingru; Li, Fengting

    2010-11-01

    The health of humans and other organisms is threatened by increasingly serious water contamination by algae in all the country's major lakes such as Taihu Lake. This experiment was conducted to investigate the removal effects and mechanism of Microcystic aeruginosa by Chitosan-modified adsorbent, with comparison of polyaluminium chloride (PAC) and poly ferric sulfate (PFS). Microcystic aeruginosa grown in the laboratory was used for this experiment. The results showed that the algae-removal efficiency of Chitosan-modified adsorbent presents a good performance. When the dosage of the adsorbent reached 20 ppm, the turbidity and the chlorophyll a of treated water dropped by 90% and 86%, respectively. Compared to conventional coagulation, the dosage was reduced. The adhesive bridge effect of Chitosan and adsorption of modified adsorbent provided an important complement to subsequent dehydrating treatment for algae.

  11. A novel electrochemical biosensor based on polyadenine modified aptamer for label-free and ultrasensitive detection of human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kun; He, Meng-Qi; Zhai, Fu-Heng; He, Rong-Huan; Yu, Yong-Liang

    2017-05-01

    Simple, rapid, sensitive, and specific detection of cancer cells plays a pivotal role in the diagnosis and prognosis of cancer. A sandwich electrochemical biosensor was developed based on polyadenine (polydA)-aptamer modified gold electrode (GE) and polydA-aptamer functionalized gold nanoparticles/graphene oxide (AuNPs/GO) hybrid for the label-free and selective detection of breast cancer cells (MCF-7) via a differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) technique. Due to the intrinsic affinity between multiple consecutive adenines of polydA sequences and gold, polydA modified aptamer instead of thiol terminated aptamer was immobilized on the surface of GE and AuNPs/GO. The label-free MCF-7 cells could be recognized by polydA-aptamer and self-assembled onto the surface of GE. The polydA-aptamer functionalized AuNPs/GO hybrid could further bind to MCF-7 cells to form a sandwich sensing system. Characterization of the surface modified GE was carried out by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) using Fe(CN)6(3-/4-) as a redox probe. Under the optimized experimental conditions, a detection limit of 8 cellsmL(-1) (3σ/slope) was obtained for MCF-7 cells by the present electrochemical biosensor, along with a linear range of 10-10(5) cellsmL(-1). By virtue of excellent sensitivity, specificity and repeatability, the present electrochemical biosensor provides a potential application in point-of-care cancer diagnosis.

  12. Impact of a modified Broviac maintenance care bundle on bloodstream infections in paediatric cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Furtwängler, Rhoikos; Laux, Carolin; Graf, Norbert; Simon, Arne

    2015-01-01

    Background: During intensive chemotherapy, bloodstream infection (BSI) represents an important complication in paediatric cancer patients. Most patients carry a long-term central venous access device (CVAD). Improved maintenance care of these vascular catheters may decrease the risk of BSI. Methods: Intervention study (adapted CVAD prevention protocol) with two observation periods (P1: 09-2009 until 05-2011; P2: 09-2011 until 05-2013); prospective surveillance of all laboratory confirmed BSIs. In P2, ready to use sterile NaCl 0.9% syringes were used for CVAD flushing and octenidine/isopropanol for the disinfection of catheter hubs and 3-way stopcocks. Results: During P1, 84 patients were included versus 81 patients during P2. There were no significant differences between the two patient populations in terms of median age, gender, underlying malignancy or disease status (first illness or relapse). Nearly all CVADs were Broviac catheters. The median duration from implantation to removal of the CVAD was 192 days (Inter-quartile-range (IQR); 110–288 days) in P1 and 191 days (IQR; 103–270 days) in P2. 28 BSI were diagnosed in 22 patients in P1 (26% of all patients experienced at least one BSI) and 15 BSI in 12 patients in P2 (15% of all patients). The corresponding results for incidence density (ID) were 0.44 (CI95 0.29–0.62) for P1 vs. 0.34 (0.19–0.53) BSI per 100 inpatient days for P2 and for incidence rate (IR) 7.76 (5.16–10.86) in P1 vs. 4.75 (2.66–7.43) BSI per 1,000 inpatient CVAD utilization days. In P1, 9 BSI were caused by CoNS vs. only 2 in P2 (IR 2.49; CI95 0.17–4.17 vs. 0.63; CI95 0.08–1.72). In P1 two BSI (7%) lead to early removal of the device. During P2 one CVAD was prematurely removed due to a Broviac-related BSI (6.7%). Conclusion: The preventive protocol investigated in this study led to a reduction of BSI in paediatric cancer patients. This result was clinically relevant but – due to insufficient power in a single centre observation

  13. Evaluation of chromosome 6p22 as a breast cancer risk modifier locus in a follow-up study of BRCA2 mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Kristen N.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Greene, Mark H.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Thomassen, Mads; Caligo, Maria; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Jakubowska, Anna; Osorio, Ana; Hamann, Ute; Godwin, Andrew K.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Southey, Melissa; Buys, Saundra S.; Singer, Christian F.; Hansen, Thomas V.O.; Arason, Adalgeir; Offit, Kenneth; Piedmonte, Marion; Montagna, Marco; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Tihomirova, Laima; Sucheston, Lara; Beattie, Mary; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Szabo, Csilla I.; Simard, Jacques; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Healey, Sue; Chen, Xiaoqing; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Couch, Fergus J.

    2012-01-01

    Several common germline variants identified through genome-wide association studies of breast cancer risk in the general population have recently been shown to be associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers. When combined, these variants can identify marked differences in the absolute risk of developing breast cancer for mutation carriers, suggesting that additional modifier loci may further enhance individual risk assessment for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Recently, a common variant on 6p22 (rs9393597) was found to be associated with increased breast cancer risk for BRCA2 mutation carriers [Hazard ratio (HR)=1.55, 95% CI 1.25–1.92, p=6.0×10−5]. This observation was based on data from GWAS studies in which, despite statistical correction for multiple comparisons, the possibility of false discovery remains a concern. Here we report on an analysis of this variant in an additional 6,165 BRCA1 and 3,900 BRCA2 mutation carriers from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). In this replication analysis, rs9393597 was not associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA2 mutation carriers [HR=1.09, 95% CI 0.96–1.24, p=0.18]. No association with ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers or with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 mutation carriers was observed. This follow-up study suggests that, contrary to our initial report, this variant is not associated with breast cancer risk among individuals with germline BRCA2 mutations. PMID:23011509

  14. Effects of physical activity on cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Na, Hye-Kyung; Oliynyk, Sergiy

    2011-07-01

    Results of most epidemiological and laboratory studies suggest an inverse relationship between regular exercise and the risk of certain malignancies, such as intestinal, colon, pancreatic, breast, lung, skin, mammary, endometrial, and prostate cancer. However, physical activity can have different influence on carcinogenesis, depending on energy supply and the age of the subject as well as strength, frequency, and length of exercise. The biochemical and molecular basis of the interaction between aerobic physical activity and tumorigenic processes remains poorly understood. Physical activity may generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) to a different extent. Mild oxidative stress caused by moderate physical activity can activate cellular stress response signaling and potentiate cellular antioxidant defense capacity. However, accumulation of relatively large amounts of ROS as a consequence of exhaustive exercise can either directly damage DNA, causing mutation, or promote tumorigenesis by activating proinflammatory signaling. This review highlights the effects of physical activity on various malignancies in the context of redox status modulated during exercise.

  15. Cancer radioimmunotherapy: Development of an effective approach

    SciTech Connect

    DeNardo, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this program is the development of effective approaches for delivering radiation therapy to patients with cancer using radiopharmaceuticals produced from monoclonal antibodies. One major achievement of this program has been the development of a new, Cu-67 chelator (Teta). This chelator firmly holds copper even in the presence of competitive serum proteins. Copper has proven to be labile with other chelators. Also, a single photon emission tomographic camera was purchased with University and philanthropic funds specifically for this program. This allows full-time developmental work on quantitative imaging approaches and in vivo kinetics of our various radiopharmaceutical antibody products. The pharmakinetics of I-123 antibody and antibody fragments have been obtained in patients utilizing quantitative imaging and have demonstrated significant differences as well as the need for long- term studies with I-131 and Cu-67.

  16. Effect of vitamin B supplementation on cancer incidence, death due to cancer, and total mortality

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sui-Liang; Chen, Ting-Song; Ma, Chen-Yun; Meng, Yong-Bin; Zhang, Yu-Fei; Chen, Yi-Wei; Zhou, Yu-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Observational studies have suggested that vitamin B supplementation is associated with cancer risk, but this association remains controversial. A pooled data-based meta-analysis was conducted to summarize the evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) investigating the effects of vitamin B supplementation on cancer incidence, death due to cancer, and total mortality. Methods: PubMed, EmBase, and the Cochrane Library databases were searched to identify trials to fit our analysis through August 2015. Relative risk (RR) was used to measure the effect of vitamin B supplementation on the risk of cancer incidence, death due to cancer, and total mortality using a random-effect model. Cumulative meta-analysis, sensitivity analysis, subgroup analysis, heterogeneity tests, and tests for publication bias were also conducted. Results: Eighteen RCTs reporting the data on 74,498 individuals were included in the meta-analysis. Sixteen of these trials included 4103 cases of cancer; in 6 trials, 731 cancer-related deaths occurred; and in 15 trials, 7046 deaths occurred. Vitamin B supplementation had little or no effect on the incidence of cancer (RR: 1.04; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.98–1.10; P = 0.216), death due to cancer (RR, 1.05; 95% CI: 0.90–1.22; P = 0.521), and total mortality (RR, 1.00; 95% CI: 0.94–1.06; P = 0.952). Upon performing a cumulative meta-analysis for cancer incidence, death due to cancer, and total mortality, the nonsignificance of the effect of vitamin B persisted. With respect to specific types of cancer, vitamin B supplementation significantly reduced the risk of skin melanoma (RR, 0.47; 95% CI: 0.23–0.94; P = 0.032). Conclusion: Vitamin B supplementation does not have an effect on cancer incidence, death due to cancer, or total mortality. It is associated with a lower risk of skin melanoma, but has no effect on other cancers. PMID:27495015

  17. Human Cancer Xenografts in Outbred Nude Mice Can Be Confounded by Polymorphisms in a Modifier of Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zeineldin, Maged; Jensen, Derek; Paranjape, Smita R.; Parelkar, Nikhil K.; Jokar, Iman; Vielhauer, George A.; Neufeld, Kristi L.

    2014-01-01

    Tumorigenicity studies often employ outbred nude mice, in the absence of direct evidence that this mixed genetic background will negatively affect experimental outcome. Here we show that outbred nude mice carry two different alleles of Pla2g2a, a genetic modifier of intestinal tumorigenesis in mice. Here, we identify previous unreported linked polymorphisms in the promoter, noncoding and coding sequences of Pla2g2a and show that outbred nude mice from different commercial providers are heterogeneous for this polymorphic Pla2g2a allele. This heterogeneity even extends to mice obtained from a single commercial provider, which display mixed Pla2g2a genotypes. Notably, we demonstrated that the polymorphic Pla2g2a allele affects orthotopic xenograft establishment of human colon cancer cells in outbred nude mice. This finding establishes a non-cell-autonomous role for Pla2g2a in suppressing intestinal tumorigenesis. Using in vitro reporter assays and pharmacological inhibitors, we show promoter polymorphisms and nonsense-mediated RNA decay (NMD) as underlying mechanisms that lead to low Pla2g2a mRNA levels in tumor-sensitive mice. Together, this study provides mechanistic insight regarding Pla2g2a polymorphisms and demonstrates a non-cell-autonomous role for Pla2g2a in suppressing tumors. Moreover, our direct demonstration that mixed genetic backgrounds of outbred nude mice can significantly affect baseline tumorigenicity cautions against future use of outbred mice for tumor xenograft studies. PMID:24913681

  18. A nomogram improves AJCC stages for colorectal cancers by introducing CEA, modified lymph node ratio and negative lymph node count

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen-yu; Gao, Wei; Luo, Qi-feng; Yin, Xiao-wei; Basnet, Shiva; Dai, Zhen-ling; Ge, Hai-yan

    2016-01-01

    Lymph node stages (pN stages) are primary contributors to survival heterogeneity of the 7th AJCC staging system for colorectal cancer (CRC), indicating spaces for modifications. To implement the modifications, we selected eligible CRC patients from the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database as participants in a training (n = 6675) and a test cohort (n = 6760), and verified tumor deposits to be metastatic lymph nodes to derive modified lymph node count (mLNC), lymph node ratio (mLNR), and positive lymph node count (mPLNC). After multivariate Cox regression analyses with forward stepwise elimination of the mLNC and mPLNC for the training cohort, a nomogram was constructed to predict overall survival (OS) via incorporating preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen, pT stages, negative lymph node count, mLNR and metastasis. Internal validations of the nomogram showed concordance indexes (c-index) of 0.750 (95% CI, 0.736–0.764) and 0.749 before and after corrections for overfitting. Serial performance evaluations indicated that the nomogram outperformed the AJCC stages (c-index = 0.725) with increased accuracy, net benefits, risk assessment ability, but comparable complexity and clinical validity. All the results were reproducible in the test cohort. In summary, the proposed nomogram may serve as an alternative to the AJCC stages. However, validations with longer follow-up periods are required. PMID:27941905

  19. Surgical treatment of larynx T1N0M0 cancer - partial laryngectomy modified Majer-Piquet's intervention.

    PubMed

    Khujadze, M; Vashakidze, N; Kuliashvili, G; Khelashvili, B

    2013-04-01

    The increase of general radiation background in Georgia and some national characteristics such as spicy dishes, high level of alcohol and cigarette consumption, emotional, loud way of speaking result in a high percentage of people suffering from larynx malignant tumor. As generally known, the majority of larynx cancer cases represent surgical indications and only a small percentage submit to radio or chemotherapy. Since the beginning of the previous century, laryngologists have been intensely thinking about maintaining the larynx itself when giving surgical treatment. With this article we aim to introduce you to one of surgical techniques often applied in France. The method is Pr. B. Guerrier's modification of Majer-Piquet's cricohyoidoepiglotopexy, which is very popular in Europe. This consists in reconstructive operation maintaining cricoid cartilage and epiglottis with larynx's pexy when resecting partially. In cases of exact indications the, Majet-Piquet's modified operation provides a perfect: opportunity both to achieve the desirable outcome and maintain the main functions of larynx vocal, swallowing and breathing with a relatively less invasive surgical interference.

  20. Human cancer xenografts in outbred nude mice can be confounded by polymorphisms in a modifier of tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Zeineldin, Maged; Jensen, Derek; Paranjape, Smita R; Parelkar, Nikhil K; Jokar, Iman; Vielhauer, George A; Neufeld, Kristi L

    2014-08-01

    Tumorigenicity studies often employ outbred nude mice, in the absence of direct evidence that this mixed genetic background will negatively affect experimental outcome. Here we show that outbred nude mice carry two different alleles of Pla2g2a, a genetic modifier of intestinal tumorigenesis in mice. Here, we identify previous unreported linked polymorphisms in the promoter, noncoding and coding sequences of Pla2g2a and show that outbred nude mice from different commercial providers are heterogeneous for this polymorphic Pla2g2a allele. This heterogeneity even extends to mice obtained from a single commercial provider, which display mixed Pla2g2a genotypes. Notably, we demonstrated that the polymorphic Pla2g2a allele affects orthotopic xenograft establishment of human colon cancer cells in outbred nude mice. This finding establishes a non-cell-autonomous role for Pla2g2a in suppressing intestinal tumorigenesis. Using in vitro reporter assays and pharmacological inhibitors, we show promoter polymorphisms and nonsense-mediated RNA decay (NMD) as underlying mechanisms that lead to low Pla2g2a mRNA levels in tumor-sensitive mice. Together, this study provides mechanistic insight regarding Pla2g2a polymorphisms and demonstrates a non-cell-autonomous role for Pla2g2a in suppressing tumors. Moreover, our direct demonstration that mixed genetic backgrounds of outbred nude mice can significantly affect baseline tumorigenicity cautions against future use of outbred mice for tumor xenograft studies.

  1. Effect of modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) on quality of Sea Buckthorn during postharvest storage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) has been used to retain the quality of postharvest produce. In the present study the effect of MAP on quality of berry fruit of Sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L., a hardy, deciduous shrub, native to Asia) during refrigerated storage was investigated. Sea buck...

  2. Genetic basis and detection of unintended effects in genetically modified crop plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In January 2014, an international meeting sponsored by the International Life Sciences Institute/Health and Environmental Sciences Institute and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency titled “Genetic Basis of Unintended Effects in Modified Plants” was held in Ottawa, Canada, bringing together over 75 s...

  3. Effect of Fillers Prepared from Enzymatically Modified Proteins on Mechanical Properties of Leather

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In an environment where petroleum feedstuffs are becoming increasingly too expensive for a good cost-effective return, utilization of renewable resources makes economic sense, particularly when these substrates are waste proteins. We have thus proposed the application of enzymatically modified wast...

  4. Effectiveness of the Modified Intensive Toilet Training Method on Teaching Toilet Skills to Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ardiç, Avsar; Cavkaytar, Atilla

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine effectiveness of a modified version of Azrin and Foxx's (1971) intensive toilet training method on teaching of toilet skills to children with autism. This method consists of administering extra fluids and a time schedule, but does not use overcorrection procedures. Implementation requires a study of six…

  5. Effect of feeding cows genetically modified maize on the bacterial community in the bovine rumen.

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, S; Gürtler, P; Albrecht, C

    2007-12-01

    Rumen-cannulated cows (n = 4) were fed successively silage made from either conventional or genetically modified (GM) maize. Results revealed no effects of GM maize on the dynamics of six ruminal bacterial strains (investigated by real-time PCR) compared to the conventional maize silage.

  6. The Effectiveness of Parental Communication in Modifying the Relation between Food Advertising and Children's Consumption Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buijzen, Moniek

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of various types of parental communication in modifying children's responses to television food advertising. In a combined diary-survey study among 234 parents of 4- to 12-year-old children, I investigated how different styles of advertising mediation (active vs. restrictive) and consumer…

  7. Systematic Review of School-based Interventions to Modify Dietary Behavior: Does Intervention Intensity Impact Effectiveness?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Racey, Megan; O'Brien, Charlene; Douglas, Sabrina; Marquez, Olivia; Hendrie, Gilly; Newton, Genevieve

    2016-01-01

    Background: Owing to the associations between diet and health, it is important that effective health promotion strategies establish healthful eating behaviors from an early age. We reviewed the intensity of school-based interventions aimed to modify dietary behavior in preadolescent and adolescents and related intervention characteristics to…

  8. The Effect of a Modified Moore Method on Attitudes and Beliefs in Precalculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Brad; Cooper, Thomas E.; Briggs, Karen S.

    2012-01-01

    As part of a study on the effects of teaching with a Modified Moore Method (MMM), a survey containing 20 items from Schoenfeld's (1989) investigation of attitudes and beliefs about mathematics was administered to students in undergraduate precalculus classes. The study included one section of precalculus taught with an MMM, a student-centered and…

  9. The Effects of Modified Melodic Intonation Therapy on Nonfluent Aphasia: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conklyn, Dwyer; Novak, Eric; Boissy, Adrienne; Bethoux, Francois; Chemali, Kamal

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Positive results have been reported with melodic intonation therapy (MIT) in nonfluent aphasia patients with damage to their left-brain speech processes, using the patient's intact ability to sing to promote functional language. This pilot study sought to determine the immediate effects of introducing modified melodic intonation therapy…

  10. Evaluation of Thermal Oxidative Aging Effect on the Rheological Performance of Modified Asphalt Binders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Cheng

    Modified asphalt binder, which is combined by base binder and additive modifier, has been implemented in pavement industry for more than 30 years. Recently, the oxidative aging mechanism of asphalt binder has been studied for several decades, and appreciable finding results of asphalt binder aging mechanism were achieved from the chemistry and rheological performance aspects. However, most of these studies were conducted with neat binders, the research of aging mechanism of modified asphalt binder was limited. Nowadays, it is still highly necessary to clarify how the asphalt binder aging happens with the modified asphalt binder, what is the effect of the different modifiers (additives) on the binder aging process, how the rheological performance changes under the thermal oxidative aging conditions and so on. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of isothermal oxidative aging conditions on the rheological performance change of the modified and controlled asphalt binders. There were totally 14 different sorts of asphalt binders had been aged in the PAV pans in the air-force drafted ovens at 50°C, 60°C and 85°C for 0.5 day to 240 days. The Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and Dynamic Shear Rheometer (DSR) were used to perform the experiments. The analysis of rheological indices (Low shear viscosity-LSV, Crossover modulus-G*c, Glover-Rowe Parameter-G-R, DSR function-DSR Fn) as a function of carbonyl area (CA) was conducted. With the SBS modification, both of the hardening susceptibility of the rheological index-LSV and G-R decreases compared with the corresponding base binder. The TR increased the hardening susceptibility of all the rheological indexes. While for the G*c, SBS increases the slope of the most modified asphalt binders except A and B_TR_X series binders. The multiple linear regression statistical analysis results indicate that the oxidative aging conditions play an important role on the CA, and rheological performance

  11. Antitumor Effects of Laminaria Extract Fucoxanthin on Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mei, ChengHan; Zhou, ShunChang; Zhu, Lin; Ming, JiaXiong; Zeng, FanDian; Xu, Rong

    2017-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide and non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common type. Marine plants provide rich resources for anticancer drug discovery. Fucoxanthin (FX), a Laminaria japonica extract, has attracted great research interest for its antitumor activities. Accumulating evidence suggests anti-proliferative effects of FX on many cancer cell lines including NSCLCs, but the detailed mechanisms remain unclear. In the present investigation, we confirmed molecular mechanisms and in vivo anti-lung cancer effect of FX at the first time. Flow cytometry, real-time PCR, western blotting and immunohistochemistry revealed that FX arrested cell cycle and induced apoptosis by modulating expression of p53, p21, Fas, PUMA, Bcl-2 and caspase-3/8. These results show that FX is a potent marine drug for human non-small-cell lung cancer treatment. PMID:28212270

  12. Genetically Modified T Cells in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer or Mesothelioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-04

    Advanced Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma; HLA-A*0201 Positive Cells Present; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma; Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage III Pleural Mesothelioma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Pleural Mesothelioma

  13. Simultaneous effect of modified gravity and primordial non-Gaussianity in large scale structure observations

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzatuny, Nareg; Khosravi, Shahram; Baghram, Shant; Moshafi, Hossein E-mail: khosravi@mail.ipm.ir E-mail: hosseinmoshafi@iasbs.ac.ir

    2014-01-01

    In this work we study the simultaneous effect of primordial non-Gaussianity and the modification of the gravity in f(R) framework on large scale structure observations. We show that non-Gaussianity and modified gravity introduce a scale dependent bias and growth rate functions. The deviation from ΛCDM in the case of primordial non-Gaussian models is in large scales, while the growth rate deviates from ΛCDM in small scales for modified gravity theories. We show that the redshift space distortion can be used to distinguish positive and negative f{sub NL} in standard background, while in f(R) theories they are not easily distinguishable. The galaxy power spectrum is generally enhanced in presence of non-Gaussianity and modified gravity. We also obtain the scale dependence of this enhancement. Finally we define galaxy growth rate and galaxy growth rate bias as new observational parameters to constrain cosmology.

  14. Effect of habit modifiers on the morphology and purity of soda ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raditladi, Zukiswa S.; Ngila, Jane C.; Kgarebe, Boitumelo V.

    2003-10-01

    Soda ash was precipitated from T-brine solution (obtained from Botswana ash storage ponds) in the presence of four different habit modifiers namely, aluminum, silicate and Triton X-100 and calcium so as to investigate their effects on soda ash morphology and purity. Aluminum and calcium were found to be the best modifiers. Crystals were identified and characterised using X-ray diffraction, environmental scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. A control sample of T-brine with no modifier, produced fine needles. Different morphologies, ranging from cylindrical through twinned cylinders to inter-grown aggregates, were observed in the presence of the different additives. The rod shaped crystals containing Triton X-100 occluded about 0.86% Cl while aluminum and calcium occluded the least, each 0.22% Cl.

  15. Genetic Variants in MicroRNA Biosynthesis Pathways and Binding Sites Modify Ovarian Cancer Risk, Survival, and Treatment Response

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Dong; Meyer, Larissa; Chang, David W.; Lin, Jie; Pu, Xia; Ye, Yuanqing; Gu, Jian; Wu, Xifeng; Lu, Karen

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNA) play important roles in tumorigenesis. Genetic variations in miRNA processing genes and miRNA binding sites may affect the biogenesis of miRNA and the regulatory effect of miRNAs to their target genes, hence promoting tumorigenesis. This study analyzed 226 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in miRNA processing genes and miRNA binding sites in 339 ovarian cancer cases and 349 healthy controls to assess association with cancer risk, overall survival, and treatment response. Thirteen polymorphisms were found to have significant association with risk. The most significant were 2 linked SNPs (r2 = 0.99), rs2740351 and rs7813 in GEMIN4 [odds ratio (OR) = 0.71; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.57–0.87 and OR = 0.71; 95% CI, 0.57–0.88, respectively]. Unfavorable genotype analysis showed the cumulative effect of these 13 SNPs on risk (P for trend < 0.0001). Potential higher order gene–gene interactions were identified, which categorized patients into different risk groups according to their genotypic signatures. In the clinical outcome study, 24 SNPs exhibited significant association with overall survival and 17 SNPs with treatment response. Notably, patients carrying a rare homozygous genotype of rs1425486 in PDGFC had poorer overall survival [hazard ratio (HR) = 2.69; 95% CI, 1.67–4.33] and worse treatment response (OR = 3.38; 95% CI, 1.39–8.19), compared to carriers of common homozygous and heterozygous genotypes. Unfavorable genotype analyses also showed a strong gene-dosage effect with decreased survival and increased risk of treatment nonresponse in patients with greater number of unfavorable genotypes (P for trend < 0.0001). Taken together, miRNA-related genetic polymorphisms may impact ovarian cancer predisposition and clinical outcome both individually and jointly. PMID:21118967

  16. Effect of chemical heterogeneity on photoluminescence of graphite oxide treated with S-/N-containing modifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahim, Amani M.; Rodríguez-Castellón, Enrique; Montenegro, José María; Bandosz, Teresa J.

    2015-03-01

    Graphite oxide (GO) obtained using Hummers method was modified by hydrothermal treatment either with sulfanilic acid or polystyrene (3-ammonium) sulfonate at 100 °C or 85 °C, respectively. Both modifiers contain sulfur in the oxidized forms and nitrogen in the reduced forms. The materials were characterized using FTIR, XPS, thermal analysis, potentiometric titration and SEM. Their photoluminescent properties and their alteration with an addition of Ag+ were also measured. As a result of these modifications nitrogen was introduced to the graphene layers as amines, imides, amides, and sulfur as sulfones and sulfonic acids. Moreover, the presence of polyaniline was detected. This significantly affected the polarity, acid-base character, and conductivity of the materials. Apparently carboxylic groups of GO were involved in the surface reactions. The modified GOs lost their layered structure and the modifications resulted in the high degree of structural and chemical heterogeneity. Photoluminescence in visible light was recorded and linked to the presence of heteroatoms. For the polystyrene (3-ammonium) sulfonate modified sample addition of Ag+ quenched the photoluminescence at low wavelength showing sensitivity as a possible optical detector. No apparent effect was found for the sulfanilic acid modified sample.

  17. Natural Product Shows Effectiveness in Combating Colorectal Cancer | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    An herbal extract used for centuries to prevent heart disease has now been shown to be effective against colorectal cancer when tested in laboratory cell cultures. Scientists from NCI at Frederick found that the natural extract cryptotanshinone (CPT) stops the uncontrolled cell growth characteristic of cancer by interfering with a protein that has been implicated in several cancers, including those of the colon and rectum. The results appear in the journal Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry.

  18. Inhibitory Effect of Baicalin and Baicalein on Ovarian Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianchu; Li, Zhaoliang; Chen, Allen Y.; Ye, Xingqian; Luo, Haitao; Rankin, Gary O.; Chen, Yi Charlie

    2013-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is one of the primary causes of death for women all through the Western world. Baicalin and baicalein are naturally occurring flavonoids that are found in the roots and leaves of some Chinese medicinal plants and are thought to have antioxidant activity and possible anti-angiogenic, anti-cancer, anxiolytic, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective activities. Two kinds of ovarian cancer (OVCAR-3 and CP-70) cell lines and a normal ovarian cell line (IOSE-364) were selected to be investigated in the inhibitory effect of baicalin and baicalein on cancer cells. Largely, baicalin and baicalein inhibited ovarian cancer cell viability in both ovarian cancer cell lines with LD50 values in the range of 45–55 μM for baicalin and 25–40 μM for baicalein. On the other hand, both compounds had fewer inhibitory effects on normal ovarian cells viability with LD50 values of 177 μM for baicalin and 68 μM for baicalein. Baicalin decreased expression of VEGF (20 μM), cMyc (80 μM), and NFkB (20 μM); baicalein decreased expression of VEGF (10 μM), HIF-1α (20 μM), cMyc (20 μM), and NFkB (40 μM). Therefore baicalein is more effective in inhibiting cancer cell viability and expression of VEGF, HIF-1α, cMyc, and NFκB in both ovarian cancer cell lines. It seems that baicalein inhibited cancer cell viability through the inhibition of cancer promoting genes expression including VEGF, HIF-1α, cMyc, and NFκB. Overall, this study showed that baicalein and baicalin significantly inhibited the viability of ovarian cancer cells, while generally exerting less of an effect on normal cells. They have potential for chemoprevention and treatment of ovarian cancers. PMID:23502466

  19. Genetic variation: effect on prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sissung, Tristan M.; Price, Douglas K.; Del Re, Marzia; Ley, Ariel M.; Giovannetti, Elisa; Danesi, Romano

    2014-01-01

    Summary The crucial role of androgens in the development of prostate cancer is well established. The aim of this review is to examine the role of constitutional (germline) and tumor-specific (somatic) polymorphisms within important regulatory genes of prostate cancer. These include genes encoding enzymes of the androgen biosynthetic pathway, the androgen receptor gene, genes that encode proteins of the signal transduction pathways that may have a role in disease progression and survival, and genes involved in prostate cancer angiogenesis. Characterization of deregulated pathways critical to cancer cell growth have lead to the development of new treatments, including the CYP17 inhibitor abiraterone and clinical trials using novel drugs that are ongoing or recently completed [1]. The pharmacogenetics of the drugs used to treat prostate cancer will also be addressed. This review will define how germline polymorphisms are known affect a multitude of pathways, and therefore phenotypes, in prostate cancer etiology, progression, and treatment. PMID:25199985

  20. Enhancing siRNA-based cancer therapy using a new pH-responsive activatable cell-penetrating peptide-modified liposomal system

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Bai; Jia, Xue-Li; Qi, Jin-Long; Yang, Li-Ping; Sun, Wei-Hong; Yan, Xiao; Yang, Shao-Kun; Cao, De-Ying; Du, Qing; Qi, Xian-Rong

    2017-01-01

    As a potent therapeutic agent, small interfering RNA (siRNA) has been exploited to silence critical genes involved in tumor initiation and progression. However, development of a desirable delivery system is required to overcome the unfavorable properties of siRNA such as its high degradability, molecular size, and negative charge to help increase its accumulation in tumor tissues and promote efficient cellular uptake and endosomal/lysosomal escape of the nucleic acids. In this study, we developed a new activatable cell-penetrating peptide (ACPP) that is responsive to an acidic tumor microenvironment, which was then used to modify the surfaces of siRNA-loaded liposomes. The ACPP is composed of a cell-penetrating peptide (CPP), an acid-labile linker (hydrazone), and a polyanionic domain, including glutamic acid and histidine. In the systemic circulation (pH 7.4), the surface polycationic moieties of the CPP (polyarginine) are “shielded” by the intramolecular electrostatic interaction of the inhibitory domain. When exposed to a lower pH, a common property of solid tumors, the ACPP undergoes acid-catalyzed breakage at the hydrazone site, and the consequent protonation of histidine residues promotes detachment of the inhibitory peptide. Subsequently, the unshielded CPP would facilitate the cellular membrane penetration and efficient endosomal/lysosomal evasion of liposomal siRNA. A series of investigations demonstrated that once exposed to an acidic pH, the ACPP-modified liposomes showed elevated cellular uptake, downregulated expression of polo-like kinase 1, and augmented cell apoptosis. In addition, favorable siRNA avoidance of the endosome/lysosome was observed in both MCF-7 and A549 cells, followed by effective cytoplasmic release. In view of its acid sensitivity and therapeutic potency, this newly developed pH-responsive and ACPP-mediated liposome system represents a potential platform for siRNA-based cancer treatment.

  1. Effect of modified hold-relax stretching and static stretching on hamstring muscle flexibility.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Hashim; Iqbal, Amir; Anwer, Shahnawaz; Alghadir, Ahmad

    2015-02-01

    [Purpose] The aim of present study was to compare the effectiveness of modified hold-relax stretching and static stretching in improving the hamstring muscle flexibility. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-five male subjects with hamstring tightness were included in this study. The subjects were randomly placed into three groups: the modified hold-relax stretching, static stretching and control groups. The modified hold-relax stretching group performed 7 seconds of isometric contraction and then relaxed for 5 seconds, and this was repeated five times daily for five consecutive days. The static stretching group received 10 minutes of static stretching with the help of a pulley and weight system for five consecutive days. The control group received only moist heat for 20 minutes for five consecutive days. A baseline reading of passive knee extension (PKE) was taken prior to the intervention; rest measurements were taken immediate post intervention on day 1, day 3, day 5, and after a 1 week follow-up, i.e., at the 12th day. [Results] On comparing the baseline readings of passive knee extension (PKE), there was no difference noted between the three groups. On comparing the posttest readings on day 5 between the 3 groups, a significant difference was noted. However, post hoc analysis revealed an insignificant difference between the modified hold-relax stretching and static stretching groups. There was a significant difference between the static stretching and control groups and between the modified hold-relax stretching and control groups. [Conclusion] The results of this study indicate that both the modified hold-relax stretching technique and static stretching are equally effective, as there was no significant difference in improving the hamstring muscle flexibility between the two groups.

  2. Systemic and Gene Modified Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    pathway. Thus, signaling through AKT, most commonly encountered in andro- gen-independent stages, may not be affected by endo- statin , which partly...intracellular trafficking of endostatin also contribute to the difference in treatment effects. Collectively, these studies suggest that while endo- statin ...and GFP were purchased from Abcam Ltd. (Cambridge, MA). Secondary immunodetection was performed using anti- rat and/or anti- rabbit ABC kits

  3. Synthetic Lethality Screen Identifies RPS6KA2 as Modifier of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Activity in Pancreatic Cancer12

    PubMed Central

    Milosevic, Nada; Kühnemuth, Benjamin; Mühlberg, Leonie; Ripka, Stefanie; Griesmann, Heidi; Lölkes, Carolin; Buchholz, Malte; Aust, Daniela; Pilarsky, Christian; Krug, Sebastian; Gress, Thomas; Michl, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is characterized by a high degree of resistance to chemotherapy. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibition using the small-molecule inhibitor erlotinib was shown to provide a small survival benefit in a subgroup of patients. To identify kinases whose inhibition acts synergistically with erlotinib, we employed a kinome-wide small-interfering RNA (siRNA)-based loss-of-function screen in the presence of erlotinib. Of 779 tested kinases, we identified several targets whose inhibition acted synergistically lethal with EGFR inhibition by erlotinib, among them the S6 kinase ribosomal protein S6 kinase 2 (RPS6KA2)/ribosomal S6 kinase 3. Activated RPS6KA2 was expressed in approximately 40% of 123 human pancreatic cancer tissues. RPS6KA2 was shown to act downstream of EGFR/RAS/mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)/extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK) signaling and was activated by EGF independently of the presence of KRAS mutations. Knockdown of RPS6KA2 by siRNA led to increased apoptosis only in the presence of erlotinib, whereas RPS6KA2 activation or overexpression rescued from erlotinib- and gemcitabine-induced apoptosis. This effect was at least in part mediated by downstream activation of ribosomal protein S6. Genetic as well as pharmacological inhibition of RPS6KA2 by the inhibitor BI-D1870 acted synergistically with erlotinib. By applying this synergistic lethality screen using a kinome-wide RNA interference-library approach, we identified RPS6KA2 as potential drug target whose inhibition synergistically enhanced the effect of erlotinib on tumor cell survival. This kinase therefore represents a promising drug candidate suitable for the development of novel inhibitors for pancreatic cancer therapy. PMID:24403857

  4. Challenges to effective cancer control in China, India, and Russia.

    PubMed

    Goss, Paul E; Strasser-Weippl, Kathrin; Lee-Bychkovsky, Brittany L; Fan, Lei; Li, Junjie; Chavarri-Guerra, Yanin; Liedke, Pedro E R; Pramesh, C S; Badovinac-Crnjevic, Tanja; Sheikine, Yuri; Chen, Zhu; Qiao, You-lin; Shao, Zhiming; Wu, Yi-Long; Fan, Daiming; Chow, Louis W C; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Qiong; Yu, Shiying; Shen, Gordon; He, Jie; Purushotham, Arnie; Sullivan, Richard; Badwe, Rajendra; Banavali, Shripad D; Nair, Reena; Kumar, Lalit; Parikh, Purvish; Subramanian, Somasundarum; Chaturvedi, Pankaj; Iyer, Subramania; Shastri, Surendra Srinivas; Digumarti, Raghunadhrao; Soto-Perez-de-Celis, Enrique; Adilbay, Dauren; Semiglazov, Vladimir; Orlov, Sergey; Kaidarova, Dilyara; Tsimafeyeu, Ilya; Tatishchev, Sergei; Danishevskiy, Kirill D; Hurlbert, Marc; Vail, Caroline; St Louis, Jessica; Chan, Arlene

    2014-04-01

    Cancer is one of the major non-communicable diseases posing a threat to world health. Unfortunately, improvements in socioeconomic conditions are usually associated with increased cancer incidence. In this Commission, we focus on China, India, and Russia, which share rapidly rising cancer incidence and have cancer mortality rates that are nearly twice as high as in the UK or the USA, vast geographies, growing economies, ageing populations, increasingly westernised lifestyles, relatively disenfranchised subpopulations, serious contamination of the environment, and uncontrolled cancer-causing communicable infections. We describe the overall state of health and cancer control in each country and additional specific issues for consideration: for China, access to care, contamination of the environment, and cancer fatalism and traditional medicine; for India, affordability of care, provision of adequate health personnel, and sociocultural barriers to cancer control; and for Russia, monitoring of the burden of cancer, societal attitudes towards cancer prevention, effects of inequitable treatment and access to medicine, and a need for improved international engagement.

  5. Late effects of treatment of cancer in infancy

    SciTech Connect

    Pastore, G.; Antonelli, R.; Fine, W.; Li, F.P.; Sallan, S.E.

    1982-01-01

    Eighty-six children were diagnosed with cancer in infancy, followed for at lest 5 years, and assessed for late effects of disease and therapy. One child subsequently died from respiratory failure and 3 died from second primary cancers. Another patient survived second primary cancers of the skin. The high frequency of new cancers (4 observed, 0.09 expected) was attributable to host susceptibility factors and treatment effects. Kyphoscoliosis was diagnosed in 44 patients, 40 of whom had received radiotherapy to the spine. Other patients had neurologic deficits, pulmonary fibrosis, hypoplastic breasts, bowel adhesions, thyroid nodules, musculoskeletal defects, and liver fibrosis associated with tumor therapy. Sequelae of cancer were more common after treatment in infancy than in later childhood. Improved treatments and knowledge of natural history can reduce adverse effects of therapy.

  6. Students with Cancer: Presenting Issues and Effective Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Root, Melissa M.; Bray, Melissa A.; Maykel, Cheryl; Cross, Karen; Shankar, Nilani L.; Theodore, Lea A.

    2016-01-01

    Practitioners working with children diagnosed with cancer in the school environment must consider several facets in order to effectively work with the child and family. The remission rate for children with cancer is relatively high, so one must consider whether the child is anticipating treatment, actively in treatment, or posttreatment when one…

  7. The NSL chromatin-modifying complex subunit KANSL2 regulates cancer stem-like properties in glioblastoma that contribute to tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ferreyra-Solari, Nazarena; Belforte, Fiorella S.; Canedo, Lucía; Videla-Richardson, Guillermo A.; Espinosa, Joaquín M.; Rossi, Mario; Serna, Eva; Riudavets, Miguel A.; Martinetto, Horacio; Sevlever, Gustavo; Perez-Castro, Carolina

    2016-01-01

    KANSL2 is an integral subunit of the Non-Specific Lethal (NSL) chromatin-modifying complex which contributes to epigenetic programs in embryonic stem cells. In this study, we report a role for KANSL2 in regulation of stemness in glioblastoma (GBM), which is characterized by heterogeneous tumor stem-like cells associated with therapy resistance and disease relapse. KANSL2 expression is upregulated in cancer cells, mainly at perivascular regions of tumors. RNAi-mediated silencing of KANSL2 in GBM cells impairs their tumorigenic capacity in mouse xenograft models. In clinical specimens, we found that expression levels of KANSL2 correlate with stemness markers in GBM stem-like cell populations. Mechanistic investigations showed that KANSL2 regulates cell self-renewal, which correlates with effects on expression of the stemness transcription factor POU5F1. RNAi-mediated silencing of POU5F1 reduced KANSL2 levels, linking these two genes to stemness control in GBM cells. Together, our findings indicate that KANSL2 acts to regulate the stem cell population in GBM, defining it as a candidate GBM biomarker for clinical use. PMID:27406830

  8. Effect of surfactant type and redox polymer type on single-walled carbon nanotube modified electrodes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Tran, Tu O; Ray, Michael T; Brunski, Daniel B; Keay, Joel C; Hickey, David; Johnson, Matthew B; Glatzhofer, Daniel T; Schmidtke, David W

    2013-08-20

    Electrodes modified with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) offer a number of attractive properties for developing novel electrochemical sensors. A common method to immobilize SWNTs onto the electrode surface is by placing a droplet of a SWNT suspension onto the electrode surface and allowing the solvent to evaporate. In order to maximize the properties of individual SWNTs, surfactants are normally present in these suspensions to provide stable and homogeneous SWNT dispersions. In this study we investigated the effect of different surfactants on the electrochemical and enzymatic performance of SWNT modified glassy carbon electrodes (GCEs). Amperometic biosensors for glucose were fabricated by a two-step procedure. In the first step, SWNT films were deposited onto GCEs by solution casting suspensions of SWNTs in water, Triton X-100, Tween 20, sodium cholate or sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (NaDDBS). In the second step, hydrogels containing a redox polymer and the enzyme, glucose oxidase (GOX), were deposited and cross-linked onto the SWNT-modified GCE. Three different redox polymers were tested: 3-ferrocenylpropyl-modified LPEI, (Fc-C3-LPEI), 6-ferrocenylhexyl-modified LPEI, (Fc-C6-LPEI), and poly[(vinylpyridine)Os(bipyridyl)2Cl](2+/3+)(PVP-Os). Biosensors constructed with SWNT films from suspensions of Triton X-100 or Tween 20 generally produced the highest electrochemical and enzymatic responses, with Triton X-100 films producing current densities of ~1.7-2.1 mA/cm(2) for the three different redox polymers. In contrast, biosensors constructed with SWNT films from sodium cholate suspensions resulted in significant decreases in the electrochemical and enzymatic response and in some cases showed no enzymatic activity. The results with SWNT films from NaDDBS suspensions were dependent upon the specific redox polymer used, but in general gave reduced enzymatic responses (~0.05-0.4 mA/cm(2)). These results demonstrate the importance of surfactant type in

  9. Anti-cancer activity of doxorubicin-loaded liposomes co-modified with transferrin and folic acid.

    PubMed

    Sriraman, Shravan Kumar; Salzano, Giusseppina; Sarisozen, Can; Torchilin, Vladimir

    2016-08-01

    Cancer-specific drug delivery represents an attractive approach to prevent undesirable side-effects and increase the accumulation of the drug in the tumor. Surface modification of nanoparticles such as liposomes with targeting moieties specific to the up-regulated receptors on the surface of tumor cells thus represents an effective strategy. Furthermore, since this receptor expression can be heterogeneous, using a dual-combination of targeting moieties may prove advantageous. With this in mind, the anti-cancer activity of PEGylated doxorubicin-loaded liposomes targeted with folic acid (F), transferrin (Tf) or both (F+Tf) was evaluated. The dual-targeted liposomes showed a 7-fold increase in cell association compared to either of the single-ligand targeted ones in human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cell monolayers. The increased penetration and cell association of the dual-targeted liposomes were also demonstrated using HeLa cell spheroids. The in vitro cytotoxicity of the doxorubicin liposomes (LD) was then evaluated using HeLa and A2780-ADR ovarian carcinoma cell monolayers. In both these cell lines, the (F+Tf) LD showed significantly higher cytotoxic effects than the untargeted, or single-ligand targeted liposomes. In a HeLa xenograft model in nude mice, compared to the untreated group, though the untargeted LD showed 42% tumor growth inhibition, both the (F) LD and (F+Tf) LD showed 75% and 79% tumor growth inhibition respectively. These results thus highlight that though the dual-targeted liposomes represent an effective cytotoxic formulation in the in vitro setting, they were equally effective as the folic acid-targeted liposomes in reducing tumor burden in the more complex in vivo setting in this particular model.

  10. Derivation of PM10 size-selected human equivalent concentrations of inhaled nickel based on cancer and non-cancer effects on the respiratory tract.

    PubMed

    Oller, Adriana R; Oberdörster, Günter; Seilkop, Steven K

    2014-08-01

    Abstract Nickel (Ni) in ambient air is predominantly present in the form of oxides and sulfates, with the distribution of Ni mass between the fine (particle aerodynamic diameter < 2.5 µm; PM2.5) and coarser (2.5-10 µm) size-selected aerosol fractions of PM10 dependent on the aerosol's origin. When deriving a long-term health protective reference concentration for Ni in ambient air, the respiratory toxicity and carcinogenicity effects of the predominant Ni compounds in ambient air must be considered. Dosimetric adjustments to account for differences in aerosol particle size and respiratory tract deposition and/or clearance among rats, workers, and the general public were applied to experimentally- and epidemiologically-determined points of departure (PODs) such as no(low)-effect concentrations, for both cancer and non-cancer respiratory effects. This approach resulted in the derivation of threshold-based PM10 size-selected equivalent concentrations (modified PODs) of 0.5 µg Ni/m(3) based on workers' cancer effects and 9-11 µg Ni/m(3) based on rodent respiratory toxicity effects. Sources of uncertainty in exposure extrapolations are described. These are not reference concentrations; rather the derived PM10 size-selected modified PODs can be used as the starting point for the calculation of ambient air reference concentrations for Ni. The described approach is equally applicable to other particulates.

  11. Beyond Warburg effect – dual metabolic nature of cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jiansheng; Wu, Hao; Dai, Chunyan; Pan, Qiangrong; Ding, Zonghui; Hu, Danqing; Ji, Bingyan; Luo, Yan; Hu, Xun

    2014-01-01

    Warburg effect is a dominant phenotype of most cancer cells. Here we show that this phenotype depends on its environment. When cancer cells are under regular culture condition, they show Warburg effect; whereas under lactic acidosis, they show a nonglycolytic phenotype, characterized by a high ratio of oxygen consumption rate over glycolytic rate, negligible lactate production and efficient incorporation of glucose carbon(s) into cellular mass. These two metabolic modes are intimately interrelated, for Warburg effect generates lactic acidosis that promotes a transition to a nonglycolytic mode. This dual metabolic nature confers growth advantage to cancer cells adapting to ever changing microenvironment. PMID:24820099

  12. Prognostic Significance of Modified Advanced Lung Cancer Inflammation Index (ALI) in Patients with Small Cell Lung Cancer_ Comparison with Original ALI

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Saing; Seo, Ja-Young; Park, Inkeun; Ahn, Hee Kyung; Jeong, Yu Mi; Kim, Jeong Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background Advanced lung cancer inflammation index (ALI, body mass index [BMI] x serum albumin/neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio [NLR]) has been shown to predict overall survival (OS) in small cell lung cancer (SCLC). CT enables skeletal muscle to be quantified, whereas BMI cannot accurately reflect body composition. The purpose was to evaluate prognostic value of modified ALI (mALI) using CT-determined L3 muscle index (L3MI, muscle area at L3/height2) beyond original ALI. Methods L3MIs were calculated using the CT images of 186 consecutive patients with SCLC taken at diagnosis, and mALI was defined as L3MI x serum albumin/NLR. Using chi-squared test determined maximum cut-offs for low ALI and low mALI, the prognostic values of low ALI and low mALI were tested using Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazards analysis. Finally, deviance statistics was used to test whether the goodness of fit of the prognostic model is improved by adding mALI as an extra variable. Results Patients with low ALI (cut-off, 31.1, n = 94) had shorter OS than patients with high ALI (median, 6.8 months vs. 15.8 months; p < 0.001), and patients with low mALI (cut-off 67.7, n = 94) had shorter OS than patients with high mALI (median, 6.8 months vs. 16.5 months; p < 0.001). There was no significant difference in estimates of median survival time between low ALI and low mALI (z = 0.000, p = 1.000) and between high ALI and high mALI (z = 0.330, p = 0.740). Multivariable analysis showed that low ALI was an independent prognostic factor for shorter OS (HR, 1.67, p = 0.004), along with advanced age (HR, 1.49, p = 0.045), extensive disease (HR, 2.27, p < 0.001), supportive care only (HR, 7.86, p < 0.001), and elevated LDH (HR, 1.45, p = 0.037). Furthermore, goodness of fit of this prognostic model was not significantly increased by adding mALI as an extra variable (LR difference = 2.220, p = 0.136). Conclusion The present study confirms mALI using CT-determined L3MI has no additional prognostic

  13. Skin Cancer Risk Is Modified by KIR/HLA Interactions That Influence the Activation of Natural Killer Immune Cells.

    PubMed

    Vineretsky, Karin A; Karagas, Margaret R; Christensen, Brock C; Kuriger-Laber, Jacquelyn K; Perry, Ann E; Storm, Craig A; Nelson, Heather H

    2016-01-15

    Natural killer (NK)-cell phenotype is partially mediated through binding of killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) with HLA class I ligands. The KIR gene family is highly polymorphic and not well captured by standard genome-wide association study approaches. Here, we tested the hypothesis that variations in KIR gene content combined with HLA class I ligand status is associated with keratinocyte skin cancers using a population-based study of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). We conducted an interaction analysis of KIR gene content variation and HLA-B (Bw4 vs. Bw6) and HLA-C (C1 vs. C2). KIR centromeric B haplotype was associated with significant risk of multiple BCC tumors (OR, 2.39; 95% confidence interval, 1.10-5.21), and there was a significant interaction between HLA-C and the activating gene KIR2DS3 for BCC (Pinteraction = 0.005). Furthermore, there was significant interaction between HLA-B and telomeric KIR B haplotype (containing the activating genes KIR3DS1 and KIR2DS1) as well as HLA-B and the activating KIR gene KIR2DS5 (Pinteraction 0.001 and 0.012, respectively). Similar but greatly attenuated associations were observed for SCC. Moreover, previous in vitro models demonstrated that p53 is required for upregulation of NK ligands, and accordingly, we observed there was a strong association between the KIR B haplotype and p53 alteration in BCC tumors, with a higher likelihood that KIR B carriers harbor abnormal p53 (P < 0.004). Taken together, our data suggest that functional interactions between KIR and HLA modify risks of BCC and SCC and that KIR encoded by the B genes provides selective pressure for altered p53 in BCC tumors.

  14. Effect of chlorine substituent on cytotoxic activities: Design and synthesis of systematically modified 2,4-diphenyl-5H-indeno[1,2-b]pyridines.

    PubMed

    Kadayat, Tara Man; Park, Seojeong; Jun, Kyu-Yeon; Magar, Til Bahadur Thapa; Bist, Ganesh; Shrestha, Aarajana; Na, Younghwa; Kwon, Youngjoo; Lee, Eung-Seok

    2016-04-01

    In continuation of our previous work, six hydroxylated 2,4-diphenyl-5H-indeno[1,2-b]pyridine analogs were modified by introducing one chlorine functionality at ortho, meta or para position of the 2- or 4-phenyl ring. Eighteen new chlorinated compounds were thus prepared and assessed for topoisomerase inhibitory activity and cytotoxicity against HCT15, T47D, and HeLa cancer cell lines. All of the chlorinated compounds displayed significant cytotoxic effect, revealing potent anticancer activity against T47D breast cancer cells. This functional group modification allowed us to explore the importance of chlorine group substitution for the cytotoxic properties. The information reported here provides valuable insight for further study to develop new anticancer agents using related scaffolds.

  15. Modified Hodge test: A simple and effective test for detection of carbapenemase production

    PubMed Central

    Amjad, A; Mirza, IA; Abbasi, SA; Farwa, U; Malik, N; Zia, F

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives Resistance among bacterial isolates is the leading cause of increased mortality and morbidity worldwide. Carbapenems once thought to be effective are becoming ineffective mostly due to the emergence of carbapenemase. This study was designed to determine in vitro efficacy of Modified Hodge test for detection of carbapenemase production in Gram negative rods. Material and Methods The study was done in the Department of Microbiology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology Rawalpindi Pakistan from January 2010 to December 2010. A total of 200 Gram negative rods from different clinical samples were taken. Those isolates which showed intermediate or susceptible zones i.e 16mm-21mm on disc diffusion were included in the study. These isolates were then subjected to Modified Hodge test. Result Out of 200 isolates, 138 (69%) were positive for carbapenemase production by Modified Hodge test. Out of 138 MHT positive organisms, the frequency of E. coli was 38%, followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (30%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (17%), Acinetobacter baumannii (12%), Citrobacter diversus (2%) and Enterobacter agglomerans (1.4%). Conclusion Modified Hodge test is a simple test which can be performed in the routine lab for detection of carbapenemases in isolates showing intermediate or sensitive zone diameter on disc diffusion. PMID:22530087

  16. [The effect of modified nano-diamonds of detonation synthesis on the protein fractions of human blood].

    PubMed

    Botvich, Iu A; Olkhovskiĭ, I A; Baron, I I; Puzyr', A P; Baron, A V; Bondar', V S

    2013-11-01

    It is established that the modified nano-diamonds of detonation synthesis are able to bind serum proteins of human blood. The relative selectivity is established concerning the effect of modified nano-diamonds of detonation synthesis on beta2- and gamma-globulin fractions of serum. The evidence of concentration dependence of effect of modified nano-diamonds of detonation synthesis from serum proteins is established. The study results make it possible to consider modified nano-diamonds of detonation synthesis as a potential sorbent in technologies of hemodialysis, plasmapheresis, isolation of blood proteins and as a foundation for development of new systems of laboratory diagnostic.

  17. Aurora-A as a Modifier of Breast Cancer Risk in BRCA1/2 Mutation Carriers. Addendum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    case - control studies . • Common genetic variants in genes encoding mitotic regulators are associated with altered risk of breast cancer in a breast...from sporadic breast cancer case - control studies . However, it is likely that polymorphisms in other mitotic regulators alter breast cancer risk in

  18. Synergetic effect in modifying with master alloys having an aluminide cubic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova, E. A.; Kotenkov, P. V.; Pastukhov, E. A.

    2016-02-01

    Experimental data on the preparation of test master alloys Al-Sc-(Zr, Ti, Y), Al-Zr-(Ti, Y), and Al-Ti-Y, which contain two transition metals and are characterized by the formation of aluminides with the L12 cubic lattice (which is identical to the crystal lattice of an aluminum-alloy matrix), are presented. The growth forms of aluminides in alloys of various compositions are demonstrated. Using Al-4% Cu model alloys (experiments were carried out with 15 and 200 g samples cooled at different cooling rates), the modifying ability of the test ternary master alloys and industrial binary master alloys (used for comparison) has been estimated. Synergetic effects of two transition metals, which consist in grain refining in Al-4% Cu alloys, and a substantial difference in the modifying effects of the binary and ternary master alloys have been shown.

  19. Effect of Reprocessing and Accelerated Weathering on Impact-Modified Recycled Blend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, V.; Mohanty, Smita; Biswal, Manoranjan; Nayak, Sanjay K.

    2015-12-01

    Recovery of recycled polycarbonate, acrylonitrile butadiene styrene, high-impact polystyrene, and its blends from waste electrical and electronic equipment plastics products properties were enhanced by the addition of virgin polycarbonate and impact modifier. The optimized blend formulation was processed through five cycles, at processing temperature, 220-240 °C and accelerated weathering up to 700 h. Moreover, the effect of reprocessing and accelerated weathering in the physical properties of the modified blends was investigated by mechanical, thermal, rheological, and morphological studies. The results show that in each reprocessing cycle, the tensile strength and impact strength decreased significantly and the similar behavior has been observed from accelerated weathering. Subsequently, the viscosity decreases and this decrease becomes the effect of thermal and photo-oxidative degradation. This can be correlated with FTIR analysis.

  20. Base-modified thymidines capable of terminating DNA synthesis are novel bioactive compounds with activity in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Borland, Kayla M.; AbdulSalam, Safnas F.; Solivio, Morwena J.; Burke, Matthew P.; Wolfkiel, Patrick R.; Lawson, Sean M.; Stockman, Courtney A.; Andersen, Joel M.; Smith, Skyler; Tolstolutskaya, Julia N.; Gurjar, Purujit N.; Bercz, Aron P.; Merino, Edward J.; Litosh, Vladislav A.

    2015-01-01

    Current FDA-approved chemotherapeutic antimetabolites elicit severe side effects that warrant their improvement; therefore, we designed compounds with mechanisms of action focusing on inhibiting DNA replication rather than targeting multiple pathways. We previously discovered that 5-(α-substituted-2-nitrobenzyloxy)methyluridine-5′-triphosphates were exquisite DNA synthesis terminators; therefore, we synthesized a library of 35 thymidine analogs and evaluated their activity using an MTT cell viability assay of MCF7 breast cancer cells chosen for their vulnerability to these nucleoside derivatives. Compound 3a, having an α-tert-butyl-2-nitro-4-(phenyl)alkynylbenzyloxy group, showed an IC50 of 9 ± 1 μM. The compound is more selective for cancer cells than for fibroblast cells compared with 5-fluorouracil. Treatment of MCF7 cells with 3a elicits the DNA damage response as indicated by phosphorylation of γ-H2A. A primer extension assay of the 5′-triphosphate of 3a revealed that 3aTP is more likely to inhibit DNA polymerase than to lead to termination events upon incorporation into the DNA replication fork. PMID:25778768

  1. Fine-Scale Mapping at 9p22.2 Identifies Candidate Causal Variants That Modify Ovarian Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers.

    PubMed

    Vigorito, Elena; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Beesley, Jonathan; Adlard, Julian; Agnarsson, Bjarni A; Andrulis, Irene L; Arun, Banu K; Barjhoux, Laure; Belotti, Muriel; Benitez, Javier; Berger, Andreas; Bojesen, Anders; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brewer, Carole; Caldes, Trinidad; Caligo, Maria A; Campbell, Ian; Chan, Salina B; Claes, Kathleen B M; Cohn, David E; Cook, Jackie; Daly, Mary B; Damiola, Francesca; Davidson, Rosemarie; Pauw, Antoine de; Delnatte, Capucine; Diez, Orland; Domchek, Susan M; Dumont, Martine; Durda, Katarzyna; Dworniczak, Bernd; Easton, Douglas F; Eccles, Diana; Edwinsdotter Ardnor, Christina; Eeles, Ros; Ejlertsen, Bent; Ellis, Steve; Evans, D Gareth; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Gaddam, Pragna; Ganz, Patricia A; Garber, Judy; Garcia-Barberan, Vanesa; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Gehrig, Andrea; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Giraud, Sophie; Godwin, Andrew K; Goldgar, David E; Hake, Christopher R; Hansen, Thomas V O; Healey, Sue; Hodgson, Shirley; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Houdayer, Claude; Hulick, Peter J; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Izatt, Louise; Izquierdo, Angel; Jacobs, Lauren; Jakubowska, Anna; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M; Vijai, Joseph; Karlan, Beth Y; Kast, Karin; Investigators, KConFab; Khan, Sofia; Kwong, Ava; Laitman, Yael; Lester, Jenny; Lesueur, Fabienne; Liljegren, Annelie; Lubinski, Jan; Mai, Phuong L; Manoukian, Siranoush; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Meindl, Alfons; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Montagna, Marco; Nathanson, Katherine L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Niederacher, Dieter; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Ong, Kai-Ren; Osorio, Ana; Park, Sue Kyung; Paulsson-Karlsson, Ylva; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Peissel, Bernard; Peterlongo, Paolo; Pfeiler, Georg; Phelan, Catherine M; Piedmonte, Marion; Poppe, Bruce; Pujana, Miquel Angel; Radice, Paolo; Rennert, Gad; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Rookus, Matti A; Ross, Eric A; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F; Slavin, Thomas P; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa; Steinemann, Doris; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Sutter, Christian; Szabo, Csilla I; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Teixeira, Manuel R; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary Beth; Thomassen, Mads; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Tihomirova, Laima; Tognazzo, Silvia; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Varesco, Liliana; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Vratimos, Athanassios; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; McGuffog, Lesley; Kirk, Judy; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Hamann, Ute; Lindor, Noralane; Ramus, Susan J; Greene, Mark H; Couch, Fergus J; Offit, Kenneth; Pharoah, Paul D P; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C

    2016-01-01

    Population-based genome wide association studies have identified a locus at 9p22.2 associated with ovarian cancer risk, which also modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We conducted fine-scale mapping at 9p22.2 to identify potential causal variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Genotype data were available for 15,252 (2,462 ovarian cancer cases) BRCA1 and 8,211 (631 ovarian cancer cases) BRCA2 mutation carriers. Following genotype imputation, ovarian cancer associations were assessed for 4,873 and 5,020 SNPs in BRCA1 and BRCA 2 mutation carriers respectively, within a retrospective cohort analytical framework. In BRCA1 mutation carriers one set of eight correlated candidate causal variants for ovarian cancer risk modification was identified (top SNP rs10124837, HR: 0.73, 95%CI: 0.68 to 0.79, p-value 2× 10-16). These variants were located up to 20 kb upstream of BNC2. In BRCA2 mutation carriers one region, up to 45 kb upstream of BNC2, and containing 100 correlated SNPs was identified as candidate causal (top SNP rs62543585, HR: 0.69, 95%CI: 0.59 to 0.80, p-value 1.0 × 10-6). The candidate causal in BRCA1 mutation carriers did not include the strongest associated variant at this locus in the general population. In sum, we identified a set of candidate causal variants in a region that encompasses the BNC2 transcription start site. The ovarian cancer association at 9p22.2 may be mediated by different variants in BRCA1 mutation carriers and in the general population. Thus, potentially different mechanisms may underlie ovarian cancer risk for mutation carriers and the general population.

  2. Fine-Scale Mapping at 9p22.2 Identifies Candidate Causal Variants That Modify Ovarian Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Vigorito, Elena; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Beesley, Jonathan; Adlard, Julian; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Arun, Banu K.; Barjhoux, Laure; Belotti, Muriel; Benitez, Javier; Berger, Andreas; Bojesen, Anders; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brewer, Carole; Caldes, Trinidad; Caligo, Maria A.; Campbell, Ian; Chan, Salina B.; Claes, Kathleen B. M.; Cohn, David E.; Cook, Jackie; Daly, Mary B.; Damiola, Francesca; Davidson, Rosemarie; de Pauw, Antoine; Delnatte, Capucine; Diez, Orland; Domchek, Susan M.; Dumont, Martine; Durda, Katarzyna; Dworniczak, Bernd; Easton, Douglas F.; Eccles, Diana; Edwinsdotter Ardnor, Christina; Eeles, Ros; Ejlertsen, Bent; Ellis, Steve; Evans, D. Gareth; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D.; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Gaddam, Pragna; Ganz, Patricia A.; Garber, Judy; Garcia-Barberan, Vanesa; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Gehrig, Andrea; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Giraud, Sophie; Godwin, Andrew K.; Goldgar, David E.; Hake, Christopher R.; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Healey, Sue; Hodgson, Shirley; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Houdayer, Claude; Hulick, Peter J.; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Isaacs, Claudine; Izatt, Louise; Izquierdo, Angel; Jacobs, Lauren; Jakubowska, Anna; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M.; Vijai, Joseph; Karlan, Beth Y.; Kast, Karin; Investigators, KConFab; Khan, Sofia; Kwong, Ava; Laitman, Yael; Lester, Jenny; Lesueur, Fabienne; Liljegren, Annelie; Lubinski, Jan; Mai, Phuong L.; Manoukian, Siranoush; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Meindl, Alfons; Mensenkamp, Arjen R.; Montagna, Marco; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Niederacher, Dieter; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Ong, Kai-ren; Osorio, Ana; Park, Sue Kyung; Paulsson-Karlsson, Ylva; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Peissel, Bernard; Peterlongo, Paolo; Pfeiler, Georg; Phelan, Catherine M.; Piedmonte, Marion; Poppe, Bruce; Pujana, Miquel Angel; Radice, Paolo; Rennert, Gad; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Rookus, Matti A.; Ross, Eric A.; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F.; Slavin, Thomas P.; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa; Steinemann, Doris; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Sutter, Christian; Szabo, Csilla I.; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary Beth; Thomassen, Mads; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Tihomirova, Laima; Tognazzo, Silvia; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Varesco, Liliana; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Vratimos, Athanassios; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; McGuffog, Lesley; Kirk, Judy; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Hamann, Ute; Lindor, Noralane; Ramus, Susan J.; Greene, Mark H.; Couch, Fergus J.; Offit, Kenneth; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.

    2016-01-01

    Population-based genome wide association studies have identified a locus at 9p22.2 associated with ovarian cancer risk, which also modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We conducted fine-scale mapping at 9p22.2 to identify potential causal variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Genotype data were available for 15,252 (2,462 ovarian cancer cases) BRCA1 and 8,211 (631 ovarian cancer cases) BRCA2 mutation carriers. Following genotype imputation, ovarian cancer associations were assessed for 4,873 and 5,020 SNPs in BRCA1 and BRCA 2 mutation carriers respectively, within a retrospective cohort analytical framework. In BRCA1 mutation carriers one set of eight correlated candidate causal variants for ovarian cancer risk modification was identified (top SNP rs10124837, HR: 0.73, 95%CI: 0.68 to 0.79, p-value 2× 10−16). These variants were located up to 20 kb upstream of BNC2. In BRCA2 mutation carriers one region, up to 45 kb upstream of BNC2, and containing 100 correlated SNPs was identified as candidate causal (top SNP rs62543585, HR: 0.69, 95%CI: 0.59 to 0.80, p-value 1.0 × 10−6). The candidate causal in BRCA1 mutation carriers did not include the strongest associated variant at this locus in the general population. In sum, we identified a set of candidate causal variants in a region that encompasses the BNC2 transcription start site. The ovarian cancer association at 9p22.2 may be mediated by different variants in BRCA1 mutation carriers and in the general population. Thus, potentially different mechanisms may underlie ovarian cancer risk for mutation carriers and the general population. PMID:27463617

  3. Effect of Chromium Addition to the Low Temperature Hot Corrosion Resistance of Platinum Modified Aluminide Coatings.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    Diffusion aluminide coatings were the first coatings developed for hot corrosion resistance. Aluminum is applied to the surface of the superalloy by a...D.H., "Mechanisms of Formation of Diffusion Aluminide Coatings on Nickel-oase Superalloys , Oxidation of Metals, v. 3, pp. 475-477, 1971. 17. Lehnert...Classification) E.FFECT OF CHROMIUJM ADDITION TO THE LOW TEMPERATURE HOT CORROSION RESISTANCE OF PLATINUM MODIFIED ALUMINIDE COATINGS 2 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Dust

  4. Cancer-promoting effects of microbial dysbiosis.

    PubMed

    Sheflin, Amy M; Whitney, Alyssa K; Weir, Tiffany L

    2014-10-01

    Humans depend on our commensal bacteria for nutritive, immune-modulating, and metabolic contributions to maintenance of health. However, this commensal community exists in careful balance that, if disrupted, enters dysbiosis; this has been shown to contribute to the pathogenesis of colon, gastric, esophageal, pancreatic, laryngeal, breast, and gallbladder carcinomas. This development is closely tied to host inflammation, which causes and is aggravated by microbial dysbiosis and increases vulnerability to pathogens. Advances in sequencing technology have increased our ability to catalog microbial species associated with various cancer types across the body. However, defining microbial biomarkers as cancer predictors presents multiple challenges, and existing studies identifying cancer-associated bacteria have reported inconsistent outcomes. Combining metabolites and microbiome analyses can help elucidate interactions between gut microbiota, metabolism, and the host. Ultimately, understanding how gut dysbiosis impacts host response and inflammation will be critical to creating an accurate picture of the role of the microbiome in cancer.

  5. Cancer-Promoting Effects of Microbial Dysbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Sheflin, Amy M.; Whitney, Alyssa K.; Weir, Tiffany L.

    2014-01-01

    Humans depend upon our commensal bacteria for nutritive, immune-modulating and metabolic contributions to maintenance of health. However, this commensal community exists in careful balance that, if disrupted, enters dysbiosis; which has been shown to contribute to the etiology of colon, gastric, esophageal, pancreatic, laryngeal, breast and gallbladder carcinomas. This etiology is closely tied to host inflammation, which causes and is aggravated by microbial dysbiosis while increasing vulnerability to pathogens. Advances in sequencing technology have increased our ability to catalog microbial species associated with various cancer types across the body. However, defining microbial biomarkers as cancer predictors presents multiple challenges and existing studies identifying cancer-associated bacteria have reported inconsistent outcomes. Combining metabolites and microbiome analyses can help elucidate interactions between gut microbiota, metabolism and the host. Ultimately, understanding how gut dysbiosis impacts host response and inflammation will be critical to creating an accurate picture of the role of the microbiome in cancer. PMID:25123079

  6. Effects of Presurgical Treatment for Prostate Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In this study, men diagnosed with androgen-sensitive prostate cancer with intermediate- or high-risk features will be examined with mpMRI, undergo targeted biopsies, and be treated with neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy.

  7. Molecular pathways: Fumarate hydratase-deficient kidney cancer--targeting the Warburg effect in cancer.

    PubMed

    Linehan, W Marston; Rouault, Tracey A

    2013-07-01

    Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell carcinoma (HLRCC) is a hereditary cancer syndrome in which affected individuals are at risk for development of cutaneous and uterine leiomyomas and an aggressive form of type II papillary kidney cancer. HLRCC is characterized by germline mutation of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzyme, fumarate hydratase (FH). FH-deficient kidney cancer is characterized by impaired oxidative phosphorylation and a metabolic shift to aerobic glycolysis, a form of metabolic reprogramming referred to as the Warburg effect. Increased glycolysis generates ATP needed for increased cell proliferation. In FH-deficient kidney cancer, levels of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a cellular energy sensor, are decreased resulting in diminished p53 levels, decreased expression of the iron importer, DMT1, leading to low cellular iron levels, and to enhanced fatty acid synthesis by diminishing phosphorylation of acetyl CoA carboxylase, a rate-limiting step for fatty acid synthesis. Increased fumarate and decreased iron levels in FH-deficient kidney cancer cells inactivate prolyl hydroxylases, leading to stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α and increased expression of genes such as VEGF and glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) to provide fuel needed for rapid growth demands. Several therapeutic approaches for targeting the metabolic basis of FH-deficient kidney cancer are under development or are being evaluated in clinical trials, including the use of agents such as metformin, which would reverse the inactivation of AMPK, approaches to inhibit glucose transport, lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA), the antioxidant response pathway, the heme oxygenase pathway, and approaches to target the tumor vasculature and glucose transport with agents such as bevacizumab and erlotinib. These same types of metabolic shifts, to aerobic glycolysis with decreased oxidative phosphorylation, have been found in a wide variety of other cancer types. Targeting the

  8. CCL3 and CCL20-recruited dendritic cells modified by melanoma antigen gene-1 induce anti-tumor immunity against gastric cancer ex vivo and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To investigate whether dendritic cell (DC) precursors, recruited by injection of chemokine ligand 3 (CCL3) and CCL20, induce anti-tumor immunity against gastric cancer induced by a DC vaccine expressing melanoma antigen gene-1 (MAGE-1) ex vivo and in vivo. Methods B6 mice were injected with CCL3 and CCL20 via the tail vein. Freshly isolated F4/80-B220-CD11c+ cells cultured with cytokines were analyzed by phenotype analysis and mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). For adenoviral (Ad)-mediated gene transduction, cultured F4/80-B220-CD11c+ cells were incubated with Ad-MAGE-1. Vaccination of stimulated DC induced T lymphocytes. The killing effect of these T cells against gastric carcinoma cells was assayed by MTT. INF-γ production was determined with an INF-γ ELISA kit. In the solid tumor and metastases model, DC-based vaccines were used for immunization after challenge with MFC cells. Tumor size, survival of mice, and number of pulmonary metastatic foci were used to assess the therapeutic effect of DC vaccines. Results F4/80-B220-CD11c+ cell numbers increased after CCL3 and CCL20 injection. Freshly isolated F4/80-B220-CD11c+ cells cultured with cytokines were phenotyically identical to typical DC and gained the capacity to stimulate allogeneic T cells. These DCs were transduced with Ad-MAGE-1, which were prepared for DC vaccines expressing tumor antigen. T lymphocytes stimulated by DCs transduced with Ad-MAGE-1 exhibited specific killing effects on gastric carcinoma cells and produced high levels of INF-γ ex vivo. In vivo, tumor sizes of the experimental group were much smaller than both the positive control group and the negative control groups (P < 0.05). Kaplan-Meier survival curves showed that survival of the experimental group mice was significantly longer than the control groups (P < 0.05). In addition, MAGE-1-transduced DCs were also a therapeutic benefit on an established metastatic tumor, resulting in a tremendous decrease in the number of pulmonary

  9. Effect of home-use fluoride gels on resin-modified glass-ionomer cements.

    PubMed

    El-Badrawy, W A; McComb, D

    1998-01-01

    Acidic fluoride gels have been found to significantly damage conventional glass-ionomer cements. In this study the effect to acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) and neutral fluoride gels on the recently introduced resin-modified glass ionomers and a polyacid-modified composite resin (Variglass) was studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Five materials were examined: Photac-Fil, Fuji II LC, Vitremer, Variglass, and Ketac-Fil (control). Groups of five specimens of each material were treated for 24 hours with one of the following: 1) distilled water, 2) neutral fluoride gel, 3) APF gel. Surface micro-structure of treated specimens was examined using SEM, and microphotographs were evaluated using a three-point scale. APF was found to have a deleterious effect on all examined materials, while minimal effects resulted from the neutral fluoride gel compared to the control group. Although showing greater resistance to the APF gel than conventional glass-ionomer cements, resin-modified glass-ionomer materials revealed characteristic immersion and erosion behavior, substantiating their differentiation from a hybrid material containing a preponderance of resin.

  10. Proteomic Analysis of Prostate Cancer Field Effect

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    fragile X mental retardation protein interacting protein 1 [Homo sapiens] alpha-2-macroglobulin precursor [Homo sapiens] filamin A, alpha isoform 1...Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT We have undertaken a novel proteomic approach to identify proteins ...in normal cells, to discover cancer altered protein that could be more abundant in serum or urine since they would come from both benign and cancer

  11. A Modified Spontaneously Closed Defunctioning Tube Ileostomy After Anterior Resection of the Rectum for Rectal Cancer with a Low Colorectal Anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Qin-Song; Hua, Han-Ju; Cheng, Xiao-Bin; Wang, Wei-Bing; Chen, Wen-Bin; Xu, Jia-He; Lin, Jian-Jiang

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study is to introduce a new technique of modified spontaneously closed defunctioning tube ileostomy after anterior resection of the rectum for rectal cancer with a low colorectal anastomosis. Patients with rectal cancer who underwent anterior resection of rectum with a low colorectal anastomosis and chose a modified defunctioning tube ileostomy between March 2012 and August 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Data on the success of the operation procedures, post-operative hospital stay, and post-operative tube ileostomy-related complications were analyzed. One hundred fifty-two patients (87 males and 65 females; 57.1 ± 17.4 years) undergoing the modified defunctioning tube ileostomy after anterior resection for rectal cancer were included. The post-operative hospital stay was 11.9 ± 3.2 days. The tube was removed on days 22.6 ± 4.1 after operation and the ileostomy wound closed spontaneously within 13.1 ± 1.9 days. Twenty-five patients felt tube-associated pain or discomfort, which was relieved after a period of adaptation and appropriate tube adjustment. Nine patients suffered from tube blockage and were treated successfully with saline irrigation. Two patients had intestinal obstruction, which was resolved with conservative treatment. Three patients developed leakage of the distal anastomosis: two were successfully treated with conservative measures and the other completely recovered after reoperation. The modified spontaneously closed defunctioning tube ileostomy appears efficacious and safe. This technique may be used to protect the distal anastomosis and simultaneously decrease the ileostomy complications, and minimize the morbidity and mortality associated with stoma takedown.

  12. Effects of sunscreen on skin cancer and photoaging.

    PubMed

    Iannacone, Michelle R; Hughes, Maria Celia B; Green, Adèle C

    2014-01-01

    Application of sunscreen to the skin is widely used as an adjunct strategy, along with wearing protective clothing and seeking shade, to protect against skin cancer and photoaging that result from excessive sun exposure. Many epidemiological studies of case-control and cohort study design have studied the effects of sunscreen use on skin cancer, and more recently photoaging, but their findings have been mostly uninformative. This review of results of randomized controlled trials shows that the evidence, though limited, supports beneficial effects of sunscreen application on the occurrence of skin cancers and skin photoaging.

  13. Modulatory effects and molecular mechanisms of olive oil and other dietary lipids in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Escrich, Eduard; Solanas, Montserrat; Moral, Raquel; Escrich, Raquel

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women worldwide. In addition to genetic and endocrine factors, the environment, and specifically dietary habits, plays a key role in the aetiology of this malignancy. Epidemiological and, especially, experimental studies have shown a relationship between dietary lipids and breast cancer although there are conflicting results concerning their potential to modify cancer risk in humans. Abundant data have attributed a potential chemopreventive effect to extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO), the main source of fat in the Mediterranean diet, which is associated with low incidence and mortality rates from cardiovascular disease and some cancers, including that of the breast. It is well-established that the healthy effects of EVOO can be attributed both to its particular fatty acid composition (a high content in oleic acid (OA), a suitable quantity of essential polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and a relatively low n-6 PUFA/n-3 PUFA ratio) and its richness in minor bioactive compounds such as squalene and phenolic antioxidants. The specific mechanisms by which EVOO and other dietary lipids may exert their modulatory effects on cancer are not fully understood although abundant research has proposed the following: They influence in the stages of the carcinogenesis process, oxidative stress, alteration of the hormonal status, modification of the structure and function of cell membranes, modulation of cell signalling transduction pathways, regulation of gene expression and influence in the immune system. This article will explore the current knowledge of these mechanisms, including our own results in the context of the international literature.

  14. Ultraviolet photodetectors based on ZnO nanorods-seed layer effect and metal oxide modifying layer effect.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hai; Fang, Guojia; Liu, Nishuang; Zhao, Xingzhong

    2011-02-15

    Pt/ZnO nanorod (NR) and Pt/modified ZnO NR Schottky barrier ultraviolet (UV) photodetectors (PDs) were prepared with different seed layers and metal oxide modifying layer materials. In this paper, we discussed the effect of metal oxide modifying layer on the performance of UV PDs pre- and post-deposition annealing at 300°C, respectively. For Schottky barrier UV PDs with different seed layers, the MgZnO seed layer-PDs without metal oxide coating showed bigger responsivity and larger detectivity (Dλ*) than those of PDs with ZnO seed layer, and the reason was illustrated through energy band theory and the electron transport mechanism. Also the ratio of D254* to D546* was calculated above 8 × 102 for all PDs, which demonstrated that our PDs showed high selectivity for detecting UV light with less influence of light with long wavelength.

  15. Multi-mutational model for cancer based on age-time patterns of radiation effects: 2. Biological aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, M.L.; Pierce, P.A.

    1997-09-04

    Biological properties of relevance when modeling cancers induced in the atom bomb survivors include the wide distribution of the induced cancers across all organs, their biological indistinguishability from background cancers, their rates being proportional to background cancer rates, their rates steadily increasing over at least 50 years as the survivors age, and their radiation dose response being linear. We have successfully described this array of properties with a modified Armitage-Doll model using 5 to 6 somatic mutations, no intermediate growth, and the dose-related replacement of any one of these time-driven mutations by a radiation-induced mutation. Such a model is contrasted to prevailing models that use fewer mutations combined with intervening growth. While the rationale and effectiveness of our model is compelling for carcinogenesis in the atom bomb survivors, the lack of a promotional component may limit the generality of the model for other types of human carcinogenesis.

  16. Comparison of Cancer-specific and General Health Literacy Assessments in an Educated Population: Correlations and Modifying Factors.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Wiley D; Zahnd, Whitney E; Spenner, Allison; Wiley, Celeste; Roles, Rhonda; Potini, Yogitha; Jones, Linda S

    2016-06-01

    An information onslaught accompanies cancer diagnoses, but patient comprehension (health literacy; HL) is frequently low, impacting both immediate care and longer term follow-up. Knowledge and adoption of preventive measures is especially important for cancer survivors due to their increased risk of secondary malignant neoplasms. We sought to evaluate the Test of Functional Health Literacy Adult (S-TOFHLA) against the recently developed cancer-specific Cancer Message Literacy Test (CMLT-r) among an educated population of both cancer survivors and those cancer-free. Participants were recruited 2013 (May through December) from various units within a local hospital and from several local churches, and each completed the S-TOFHLA and CMLT-r and provided demographic information and cancer status. The 109 participants had a mean age of 58 years and were as follows: 65.1 % female; 92.7 % white, 50.4 % college graduates, and 41.3 % cancer survivors. S-TOFHLA scores ranged from 12-36 (mean 34.1) and non-significantly varied by gender, education, cancer status, and age. CMLT-r scores ranged from 28.6-100 % (mean 86.4 %) and significantly varied by education (p = 0.013), but not by gender, cancer status, or age. Overall, CMLT-r and S-TOFHLA significantly correlated (p < 0.001). Assessment scores were skewed towards the maximum with non-significant differences by cancer status. As cancer survivorship improves and as the population becomes more educated, more refined approaches to assess health literacy should be considered. Increased education does not imply increased health literacy, and cancer survivorship does not imply higher health or cancer literacy. Concerted efforts to improve patient understanding and implementation of preventive measures are imperative.

  17. Higher alcohol intake may modify the association between mammographic density and breast cancer: an analysis of three case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Conroy, Shannon M; Koga, Karin; Woolcott, Christy G; Dahl, Timothy; Byrne, Celia; Nagata, Chisato; Ursin, Giske; Yaffe, Martin J; Vachon, Celine M; Maskarinec, Gertraud

    2012-10-01

    Alcohol consumption and mammographic density are established risk factors for breast cancer. This study examined whether the association of mammographic density with breast cancer varies by alcohol intake. Mammographic density was assessed in digitized images for 1207 cases and 1663 controls from three populations (Japan, Hawaii, California) using a computer-assisted method. Associations were estimated by logistic regression. When comparing ever to never drinking, mean density was similar and consumption was not associated with breast cancer risk. However, within the Hawaii/Japan subset, women consuming >1 drink/day had a non-significantly elevated relative risk compared to never drinkers. Also in the Hawaii/Japan population, alcohol intake only modified the association between mammographic density and breast cancer in women consuming >1 drink/day (p(interaction)=0.05) with significant risk estimates of 3.65 and 6.58 for the 2nd and 3rd density tertiles as compared to 1.57 and 1.61 for never drinkers in Hawaii/Japan. Although these findings suggest a stronger association between mammographic density and breast cancer risk for alcohol consumers, the small number of cases requires caution in interpreting the results.

  18. Effects of psoralens as anti-tumoral agents in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Panno, Maria Luisa; Giordano, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    This review examines the biological properties of coumarins, widely distributed at the highest levels in the fruit, followed by the roots, stems and leaves, by considering their beneficial effects in the prevention of some diseases and as anti-cancer agents. These compounds are well known photosensitizing drugs which have been used as pharmaceuticals for a broad number of therapeutic applications requiring cell division inhibitors. Despite this, even in the absence of ultraviolet rays they are active. The current paper mainly focuses on the effects of psoralens on human breast cancer as they are able to influence many aspects of cell behavior, such as cell growth, survival and apoptosis. In addition, analytical and pharmacological data have demonstrated that psoralens antagonize some metabolizing enzymes, affect estrogen receptor stability and counteract cell invasiveness as well as cancer drug resistance. The scientific findings summarized highlight the pleiotropic functions of phytochemical drugs, given that recently their target signals and how these are modified in the cells have been identified. The encouraging results in this field suggest that multiple modulating strategies based on coumarin drugs in combination with canonical chemotherapeutic agents or radiotherapy could be a useful approach to address the treatment of many types of cancer. PMID:25114850

  19. The Fascinating Effects of Baicalein on Cancer: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui; Dong, Yonghui; Gao, Yutong; Du, Zhipeng; Wang, Yuting; Cheng, Peng; Chen, Anmin; Huang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide and a major global health problem. In recent decades, the rates of both mortality and morbidity of cancer have rapidly increased for a variety of reasons. Despite treatment options, there are serious side effects associated with chemotherapy drugs and multiple forms of drug resistance that significantly reduce their effects. There is an accumulating amount of evidence on the pharmacological activities of baicalein (e.g., anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antiviral, and antitumor effects). Furthermore, there has been great progress in elucidating the target mechanisms and signaling pathways of baicalein’s anti-cancer potential. The anti-tumor functions of baicalein are mainly due to its capacities to inhibit complexes of cyclins to regulate the cell cycle, to scavenge oxidative radicals, to attenuate mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK), protein kinase B (Akt) or mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activities, to induce apoptosis by activating caspase-9/-3 and to inhibit tumorinvasion and metastasis by reducing the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2/-9 (MMP-2/-9). In this review, we focused on the relevant biological mechanisms of baicalein involved in inhibiting various cancers, such as bladder cancer, breast cancer, and ovarian cancer. Moreover, we also summarized the specific mechanisms by which baicalein inhibited the growth of various tumors in vivo. Taken together, baicalein may be developed as a potential, novel anticancer drug to treat tumors. PMID:27735841

  20. Chemopreventive effect of apple and berry fruits against colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Jaganathan, Saravana Kumar; Vellayappan, Muthu Vignesh; Narasimhan, Gayathri; Supriyanto, Eko; Octorina Dewi, Dyah Ekashanti; Narayanan, Aqilah Leela T; Balaji, Arunpandian; Subramanian, Aruna Priyadarshini; Yusof, Mustafa

    2014-12-07

    Colon cancer arises due to the conversion of precancerous polyps (benign) found in the inner lining of the colon. Prevention is better than cure, and this is very true with respect to colon cancer. Various epidemiologic studies have linked colorectal cancer with food intake. Apple and berry juices are widely consumed among various ethnicities because of their nutritious values. In this review article, chemopreventive effects of these fruit juices against colon cancer are discussed. Studies dealing with bioavailability, in vitro and in vivo effects of apple and berry juices are emphasized in this article. A thorough literature survey indicated that various phenolic phytochemicals present in these fruit juices have the innate potential to inhibit colon cancer cell lines. This review proposes the need for more preclinical evidence for the effects of fruit juices against different colon cancer cells, and also strives to facilitate clinical studies using these juices in humans in large trials. The conclusion of the review is that these apple and berry juices will be possible candidates in the campaign against colon cancer.

  1. Chemopreventive effect of apple and berry fruits against colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jaganathan, Saravana Kumar; Vellayappan, Muthu Vignesh; Narasimhan, Gayathri; Supriyanto, Eko; Octorina Dewi, Dyah Ekashanti; Narayanan, Aqilah Leela T; Balaji, Arunpandian; Subramanian, Aruna Priyadarshini; Yusof, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    Colon cancer arises due to the conversion of precancerous polyps (benign) found in the inner lining of the colon. Prevention is better than cure, and this is very true with respect to colon cancer. Various epidemiologic studies have linked colorectal cancer with food intake. Apple and berry juices are widely consumed among various ethnicities because of their nutritious values. In this review article, chemopreventive effects of these fruit juices against colon cancer are discussed. Studies dealing with bioavailability, in vitro and in vivo effects of apple and berry juices are emphasized in this article. A thorough literature survey indicated that various phenolic phytochemicals present in these fruit juices have the innate potential to inhibit colon cancer cell lines. This review proposes the need for more preclinical evidence for the effects of fruit juices against different colon cancer cells, and also strives to facilitate clinical studies using these juices in humans in large trials. The conclusion of the review is that these apple and berry juices will be possible candidates in the campaign against colon cancer. PMID:25493015

  2. A model to simulate the haemodynamic effects of right heart pulsatile flow after modified Fontan procedure.

    PubMed Central

    Tamaki, S; Kawazoe, K; Yagihara, T; Abe, T

    1992-01-01

    The effect of pulsatile pulmonary flow after the modified Fontan procedure was examined in a model that simulated the right heart. An inlet overflow tank (preload), axial pulsatile pump, Wind-Kessel model (afterload), and an outlet overflow tank were connected in series. The standard conditions were flow 2.00 l/min with 12 mm Hg preload pressure, 3.0 Wood units resistance, and an outlet overflow tank pressure at 6 mm Hg. The pump rate was set at 80 beats/min. The simulated pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary flow waves produced by this model closely resembled those obtained from patients who had undergone the modified Fontan procedure. All variables except the preload were fixed and changes in pulmonary flow were examined at preload pressures of 8, 12, 15, and 17 mm Hg. As the peak pulmonary arterial pressure increased so did pulmonary flow, until it was greater than during the non-pulsatile state. Because the afterload of this model was fixed, this result suggests that there was a concomitant decrease in resistance. This model indicates that pulsatile pulmonary blood flow is likely to have a beneficial effect on the pulmonary circulation after the modified Fontan procedure. PMID:1540439

  3. Effects of modified Pilates on variability of inter-joint coordination during walking in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sukhoon; Kim, Joo Nyeon; Lim, Hee Sung

    2016-12-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to examine the effects of an 8-week modified Pilates program on the variability of inter-joint coordination in the elderly during walking. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty elderly participants with no recent history of orthopedic abnormalities (age, 67.9 ± 2.7 years; height, 163.7 ± 8.9 cm; weight, 67.1 ± 11.6 kg) were recruited for this study and randomly allocated to a modified Pilates exercise group or a control group. Three-dimensional motion analysis was performed on both groups to evaluate the effects of the Pilates exercise. [Results] There was no significant difference in the joint variability of the ankle, knee, and hip joints between the groups, both before training and after training. However, there was a significant increase in the hip-knee deviation phase value in the exercise group after the program was completed, and this increase was also significant when compared with that in the control group. [Conclusion] This study has demonstrated that an 8-week modified Pilates exercise program can have a positive impact on the gait of elderly participants, potentially by enhancing neuromuscular adjustment, which may have positive implications for reducing their fall risk.

  4. The Effectiveness of Modified Vertical Dome Division Technique in Reducing Nasal Tip Projection in Rhinoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Gandomi, Behrooz; Arzaghi, Mohammad Hossein; Rafatbakhsh, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    Background: The technique of vertical dome division or tip defining, involves incising the lateral crura and vestibular skin at or lateral to the dome or tip defining point. The incision divides the lower lateral cartilage into a lateral segment and a medial segment, which are advanced anteriorly and sutured together to increase tip projection. The present study aimed at assessing a new vertical dome division, which is a modified version of vertical dome technique to decrease nasal tip projection, and increase or decrease nasal tip rotation and other tip deformities. Methods: The medical files of patients undergone rhinoplasty from 2003 to 2008 were retrospectively analyzed. The files were selected from a computerized rhinoplasty database of patients, who had been operated using a modified vertical dome technique and followed-up for one year or more after the surgery. Results: A total of 3756 patients were operated. Complications related to the nasal tip such as bossae, bifidity, persistent tip projection or tip asymmetry was seen in 81 patients (2.1%). Revisions for tip-related problems were performed in 42 patients (1.1%). Conclusions: The findings suggest that the modified vertical dome technique is an effective method for nasal tip deprojection and narrowing via an open approach. The length of follow-up and the large sample size support effectiveness of the technique. PMID:23359623

  5. Effect of penetration modifiers on the dermal and transdermal delivery of drugs and cosmetic active ingredients.

    PubMed

    Otto, A; Wiechers, J W; Kelly, C L; Hadgraft, J; du Plessis, J

    2008-01-01

    In this study the effect of 2 penetration modifiers, dimethyl isosorbide (DMI) and diethylene glycol monoethyl ether (DGME) on the skin delivery of hydroquinone (HQ), salicylic acid (SA) and octadecenedioic acid (DIOIC) was investigated. Ten percent DMI and DGME were separately formulated into oil-in-water emulsions containing 1.8% HQ, SA and DIOIC, respectively. Skin delivery and the flux across split-thickness human skin of the active ingredients were determined using Franz diffusion cells. An emulsion with 10% water incorporated instead of the water-soluble penetration modifiers served as a control. The study showed that neither 10% DMI nor 10% DGME significantly enhanced the skin permeation of the various lipophilic active ingredients or the uptake into the skin. It was hypothesized that the addition of the penetration modifiers to the emulsions not only enhanced the solubility of the various active ingredients in the skin but also in the formulation, resulting in a reduced thermodynamic activity and hence a weaker driving force for penetration. Therefore, the effect of DMI and DGME on the solubility of the active ingredients in the skin was counteracted by a simultaneous reduction in the thermodynamic activity in the formulation.

  6. Effects of modified Pilates on variability of inter-joint coordination during walking in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Roh, SuYeon; Yoon, Sukhoon; Kim, Joo Nyeon; Lim, Hee Sung

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to examine the effects of an 8-week modified Pilates program on the variability of inter-joint coordination in the elderly during walking. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty elderly participants with no recent history of orthopedic abnormalities (age, 67.9 ± 2.7 years; height, 163.7 ± 8.9 cm; weight, 67.1 ± 11.6 kg) were recruited for this study and randomly allocated to a modified Pilates exercise group or a control group. Three-dimensional motion analysis was performed on both groups to evaluate the effects of the Pilates exercise. [Results] There was no significant difference in the joint variability of the ankle, knee, and hip joints between the groups, both before training and after training. However, there was a significant increase in the hip-knee deviation phase value in the exercise group after the program was completed, and this increase was also significant when compared with that in the control group. [Conclusion] This study has demonstrated that an 8-week modified Pilates exercise program can have a positive impact on the gait of elderly participants, potentially by enhancing neuromuscular adjustment, which may have positive implications for reducing their fall risk. PMID:28174474

  7. Factors influencing the transfection efficiency and cellular uptake mechanisms of Pluronic P123-modified polypropyleneimine/pDNA polyplexes in multidrug resistant breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jijin; Hao, Junguo; Fang, Xiaoling; Sha, Xianyi

    2016-04-01

    Generally, the major obstacles for efficient gene delivery are cellular internalization and endosomal escape of nucleic acid such as plasmid DNA (pDNA) or small interfering RNA (siRNA). We previously developed Pluronic P123 modified polypropyleneimine (PPI)/pDNA (P123-PPI/pDNA) polyplexes as a gene delivery system. The results showed that P123-PPI/pDNA polyplexes revealed higher transfection efficiency than PPI/pDNA polyplexes in multidrug resistant breast cancer cells. As a continued effort, the present investigation on the factors influencing the transfection efficiency, cellular uptake mechanisms, and intracellular fate of P123-PPI/pDNA polyplexes is reported. The presence of P123 was the main factor influencing the transfection efficiency of P123-PPI/pDNA polyplexes in MCF-7/ADR cells, but other parameters, such as N/P ratio, FBS concentration, incubation time and temperature were important as well. The endocytic inhibitors against clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME), caveolae-mediated endocytosis (CvME), and macropinocytosis were involved in the internalization to investigate their effects on the cellular uptake and transfection efficiency of P123-PPI/pDNA polyplexes in vitro. The data showed that the internalization of P123-PPI/pDNA polyplexes was obtained from both CME and CvME. Colocalization experiments with TRITC-transferrin (CME indicator), Alexa Fluor 555-CTB (CvME indicator), monoclonal anti-α-tubulin (microtubule indicator), and LysoTracker Green (Endosome/lysosome indicator) were carried out to confirm the internalization routes. The results showed that both CME and CvME played vital roles in the effective transfection of P123-PPI/pDNA polyplexes. Endosome/lysosome system and skeleton, including actin filament and microtubule, were necessary for the transportation after internalization.

  8. Dithiolethione modified valproate and diclofenac increase E-cadherin expression and decrease proliferation of non-small cell lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Moody, Terry W.; Switzer, Christopher; Santana-Flores, Wilmarie; Ridnour, Lisa A.; Berna, Marc; Thill, Michelle; Jensen, Robert T.; Sparatore, Anna; Del Soldato, Piero; Yeh, Grace C; Roberts, David D.; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Wink, David A.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of dithiolethione-modified valproate, diclofenac and sulindac on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells were investigated. Sulfur(S)-valproate and S-diclofenac at 1 μg/ml concentrations significantly reduced prostaglandin (PG)E2 levels in NSCLC cell lines A549 and NCI-H1299 as did the COX-2 inhibitor DuP-697. In vitro, S-valproate, S-diclofenac and S-sulindac half-maximally inhibited the clonal growth of NCI-H1299 cells at 6, 6 and 15 μg/ml, respectively. Using the MTT assay, 10 μg/ml S-valproate, NO-aspirin and Cay10404, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, but not SC-560, a selective COX-1 inhibitor, inhibited the growth of A549 cells. In vivo, 18 mg/kg i.p. of S-valproate and S-diclofenac, but not S-sulindac, significantly inhibited A549 or NCI-H1299 xenograft proliferation in nude mice, but had no effect on the nude mouse body weight. The mechanism by which S-valproate and S-diclofenac inhibited the growth of NSCLC cells was investigated. Nitric oxide-aspirin but not S-valproate caused apoptosis of NSCLC cells. By Western blot, S-valproate and S-diclofenac increased E-cadherin but reduced vimentin and ZEB1 (a transcriptional suppressor of E-cadherin) protein expression in NSCLC cells. Because S-valproate and S-diclofenac inhibit the growth of NSCLC cells and reduce PGE2 levels, they may prove beneficial in the chemoprevention and/or therapy of NSCLC, PMID:19628293

  9. Dielectric properties and aging effects of manganese modified lead iron tungstate relaxor ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, L.; Vilarinho, P.M.; Baptista, J.L.

    1996-06-01

    Mn-doped samples were used to study the effects of Mn dopant on the dielectric properties of PFW ceramics, especially on its aging behavior, since they could add some knowledge on the role of lattice defects on the aging mechanisms of this relaxor ferroelectric. Mn doping does not cause marked changes in the maximum of permittivity ({var_epsilon}{sub rmax}), transition temperature (T{sub 0}), and diffuseness coefficient ({delta}) under the solubility limit, whereas the resistivity increases significantly with increasing the Mn content. Mn-modified PFW ceramics exhibit evident aging behavior and its level increases with the increase in Mn content. The aging shows strong dependence on the frequency and has a log-linear function of aging time. Probable lattice defects in the ceramics are discussed and it is suggested that the acceptor Mn ions are dominantly compensated by oxygen vacancies, providing reorientable dipole pairs which are responsible for the aging process of Mn-modified PFW ceramics.

  10. Probiotic: effectiveness nutrition in cancer treatment and prevention.

    PubMed

    Kich, Débora Mara; Vincenzi, Angélica; Majolo, Fernanda; Volken de Souza, Claucia Fernanda; Goettert, Márcia Inês

    2016-11-29

    Among the neoplasias, colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death in men and women. The increasing incidence of this type of cancer is due to the increase in the population's life expectancy, by the increase in chronic inflammatory bowel diseases, primarily ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, and the change in eating habits. The American Cancer Society (2011) shows that diet might be responsible for approximately 30% of cancer cases in developed countries, moreover when considering only colorectal cancer, the number can reach 30% to 50%. Probiotics are effective in the prevention and treatment of many bowel diseases as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), diarrhea, irritable bowel syndrome, gluten intolerance, gastroenteritis, Helicobacter pyloriinfection, and colon cancer. Classical examples are strains from the Lactobacillus, and Bifidobacteriumgenus that have probiotic proprieties with a potential use in the prophylaxis, as well as in the treatment of a variety of gastrointestinal tract disorders. Researchers are focusing on extremely important studies regarding the possibility of using probiotics to promote a balanced microbiota composition, and a sufficient immunological surveillance system as a way to prevent cancer. Considering the fact that the human intestines host 100 trillion bacteria, including more than 1,000 species, there is still need to perform more in depth investigations in order to find probiotics with potential to prevent, and treat cancerous diseases, adding a very promising effect to this already successful panorama. This revision aims to conduct a review of the most recent studies correlating probiotics and its cancer preventing and treatment potential.

  11. Akt isoform specific effects in ovarian cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Linnerth-Petrik, Nicolle M.; Santry, Lisa A.; Moorehead, Roger; Jücker, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer remains a significant therapeutic problem and novel, effective therapies are needed. Akt is a serine-threonine kinase that is overexpressed in numerous cancers, including ovarian. Mammalian cells express three Akt isoforms which are encoded by distinct genes. Although there are several Akt inhibitors in clinical trials, most indiscriminately target all isoforms. Current in vitro data and animal knockout experiments suggest that the Akt isoforms may have divergent roles. In this paper, we determined the isoform-specific functions of Akt in ovarian cancer cell proliferation in vitro and in ovarian cancer progression in vivo. For in vitro experiments, murine and human ovarian cancer cells were treated with Akt inhibitors and cell viability was assessed. We used two different in vivo approaches to identify the roles of Akt isoforms in ovarian cancer progression and their influence on the primary tumor and tumor microenvironment. In one experiment, wild-type C57Bl6 mice were orthotopically injected with ID8 cells with stable knockdown of Akt isoforms. In a separate experiment, mice null for Akt 1-3 were orthotopically injected with WT ID8 cells (Figure 1). Our data show that inhibition of Akt1 significantly reduced ovarian cancer cell proliferation and inhibited tumor progression in vivo. Conversely, disruption of Akt2 increased tumor growth. Inhibition of Akt3 had an intermediate phenotype, but also increased growth of ovarian cancer cells. These data suggest that there is minimal redundancy between the Akt isoforms in ovarian cancer progression. These findings have important implications in the design of Akt inhibitors for the effective treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:27533079

  12. Modifying the Functional Movement Screen Deep Squat Test: The Effect of Foot and Arm Positional Variations.

    PubMed

    McMillian, Danny J; Rynders, Zach G; Trudeau, Tyler R

    2016-04-01

    The functional movement screen (FMS) was developed as an evaluation tool for assessing the fundamental movement patterns believed to be prerequisites for functional activity. However, some of the FMS component movements, such as the deep overhead squat test (DST), likely represent novel motor challenges on which poor performance might reflect inexperience with the task rather than a movement impairment. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of positional variations on DST scores in a population of young, healthy adults. We hypothesized that self-selecting foot positioning, removal of an overhead component, or changing both aspects of the DST would result in improvement in FMS scores. Twenty healthy subjects completed 4 squatting conditions in a counterbalanced sequence to eliminate carry over effects: DST, modified squat with hands at chest level and feet in the DST position (DSTO), modified squat with arms in the DST position and self-selected foot placement (DSTF), and modified squat with hands at chest level and self-selected foot placement (DSTB). A Friedman's analysis of variance and Wilcoxon signed-ranks' post hoc analysis revealed a significant difference between all squat conditions (p = 0.036), between DSTB-DST groups (p < 0.001), DSTO-DST groups (p = 0.004), and DSTO-DSTB groups (p = 0.046). Each modified squat condition had an average score higher than the DST. These findings suggest that the FMS DST might underestimate an individual's ability to squat during functional tasks that involve self-selected foot and arm placement.

  13. Cellular and molecular effects of yeast probiotics on cancer.

    PubMed

    Saber, Amir; Alipour, Beitollah; Faghfoori, Zeinab; Yari Khosroushahi, Ahmad

    2017-02-01

    The cancer is one of the main causes of human deaths worldwide. The exact mechanisms of initiation and progression of malignancies are not clear yet, but there is a common agreement about the role of colonic microbiota in the etiology of different cancers. Probiotics have been examined for their anti-cancer effects, and different mechanisms have been suggested about their antitumor functions. Nonpathogenic yeasts, as members of probiotics family, can be effective on gut microbiota dysbiosis. Generally safe yeasts have shown so many beneficial effects on human health. Probiotic yeasts influence physiology, metabolism, and immune homeostasis in the colon and contribute to cancer treatment due to possessing anti-inflammatory, anti-proliferative and anti-cancer properties. This study reviews some of the health-beneficial effects of probiotic yeasts and their biological substances like folic acid and β-glucan on cancer and focuses on the possible cellular and molecular mechanisms of probiotic yeasts such as influencing pathogenic bacteria, inactivation of carcinogenic compounds, especially those derived from food, improvement of intestinal barrier function, modulation of immune responses, antitoxic function, apoptosis, and anti-proliferative effects.

  14. Yoga-Based Rehabilitation Program in Reducing Physical and Emotional Side Effects in Patients With Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-23

    Alopecia; Anxiety; Breast Carcinoma; Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Colorectal Carcinoma; Depression; Fatigue; Lung Carcinoma; Nausea and Vomiting; Pain; Psychological Impact of Cancer; Sleep Disorder; Weight Change

  15. Research in Danish cancer rehabilitation: social characteristics and late effects of cancer among participants in the FOCARE research project.

    PubMed

    Høybye, Mette Terp; Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg; Christensen, Jane; Larsen, Lone Ross; Kuhn, Katrin Gaardbo; Jensen, Jette Nygaard; Carlsen, Kathrine; Johansen, Christoffer

    2008-01-01

    Worldwide, the number of cancer survivors is increasing, owing to improvements in cancer therapy, resulting in an increased need to address the physical and mental sequelae of cancer. This paper introduces a Danish psychosocial cancer intervention and presents the baseline characteristics of the cancer survivors with respect to cancer site, sociodemographic variables, social network, lifestyle, self-rated health and the prevalence of cancer-related late effects. The study is part of the FOCARE research project, in which the long-term effects of the rehabilitation programme are evaluated systematically. The study is based on data from a self-administered baseline questionnaire filled in by 2 174 cancer survivors who registered for a 1-week, publicly paid rehabilitation retreat and were invited to participate in the FOCARE study in the period 25 November 2002 to 31 December 2005. The response rate at baseline was 86% (n = 1876). Most participants were younger women with breast cancer. They were generally well educated and working. The cancer survivors reported having comprehensive social networks and being physically active. Several cancer-related symptoms were reported by women with cancers at selected sites, of which fatigue was the most prevalent. More than half reported good-to-excellent self-rated health, while fair-to-poor health was reported by 40%, most of whom were survivors of lung (56%) and haematological (48%) cancers. The results indicate that Danish cancer survivors experience considerably reduced physical health, possibly as late physical effects of treatment. The problems reported by the cancer survivors suggest that cancer rehabilitation should include these aspects of living after cancer and take account of differences among cancer survivors with regard to cancer site, sex, age, family, working status and social position. These challenges might be addressed optimally in multi-dimensional rehabilitation programmes.

  16. Should all breast cancer patients with four or more positive lymph nodes who underwent modified radical mastectomy be treated with postoperative radiotherapy? A population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haiyong; Kong, Li; Zhang, Chenyue; Chen, Dawei; Zhu, Hui; Yu, Jinming

    2016-01-01

    Postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) has become a standard adjuvant postoperative therapy for breast cancer patients with four or more positive lymph nodes. However, some studies have demonstrated that some subgroups of the breast cancer patients with four or more positive lymph nodes did not benefit substantially from PMRT. Therefore, it is of great necessity to identify whether all breast cancer patients with four or more positive lymph nodes who underwent modified radical mastectomy be treated with PMRT. In our study, we first established a prognostic model using the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database between 1998 and 2001. Univariate and multivariate Cox models were used to assess the prognostic factors, and five risk factors individually associated with prognosis including AJCC stage, AJCC T, Grade, ER status, PR status. Prognostic index of PMRT were defined as the number of risk factor (NRF). The NRF scores correlated well with overall survival of PMRT even if the patients were in the sub-poor prognosis group. Then the prognostic model was validated using the SEER database between 2006 and 2009, and the same results were obtained. In conclusion, different from others studies, our study demonstrated that all patients with four or more positive lymph nodes after modified radical mastectomy need to be treated with PMRT ever if the patients belonged to AJCC T4 in a poor prognosis group. PMID:27690343

  17. Comparison of the effect of topical fluorides on the commercially available conventional glass ionomers, resin modified glass ionomers and polyacid modified composite resins--an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Setty, J V; Singh, S; Subba Reddy, V V

    2003-06-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the effect of a single application of three professionally applied topical fluoride agents (Sodium fluoride 2%, Stannous fluoride 8% and APF 1.23%) on the surfaces of six modern esthetic restorative materials used in pediatric dentistry viz., two conventional glass ionomers (Fuji II and Shofu-restorative), two resin modified glass ionomers (Vitremer, with and without glaze, and Photac-fil Quick) and two Polyacid modified composite resins (Luxat and Hytac Aplitip). Mean surface roughness and surface micro hardness (SMH) measurements were the parameters employed for comparison. Results showed that APF gel applications significantly increased the surface roughness measurements and decreased SMH of all tested materials, which was pronounced in conventional glass ionomers when compared with resin modified glass ionomers and polyacid modified composite resins. NaF and SnF2 produced a statistically significant increase in the surface roughness of conventional glass ionomers without any significant change in surface roughness and SMH on rest of the materials tested, except for NaF on SMH values of Fuji II, which was statistically significant.

  18. Genetic basis and detection of unintended effects in genetically modified crop plants.

    PubMed

    Ladics, Gregory S; Bartholomaeus, Andrew; Bregitzer, Phil; Doerrer, Nancy G; Gray, Alan; Holzhauser, Thomas; Jordan, Mark; Keese, Paul; Kok, Esther; Macdonald, Phil; Parrott, Wayne; Privalle, Laura; Raybould, Alan; Rhee, Seung Yon; Rice, Elena; Romeis, Jörg; Vaughn, Justin; Wal, Jean-Michel; Glenn, Kevin

    2015-08-01

    In January 2014, an international meeting sponsored by the International Life Sciences Institute/Health and Environmental Sciences Institute and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency titled "Genetic Basis of Unintended Effects in Modified Plants" was held in Ottawa, Canada, bringing together over 75 scientists from academia, government, and the agro-biotech industry. The objectives of the meeting were to explore current knowledge and identify areas requiring further study on unintended effects in plants and to discuss how this information can inform and improve genetically modified (GM) crop risk assessments. The meeting featured presentations on the molecular basis of plant genome variability in general, unintended changes at the molecular and phenotypic levels, and the development and use of hypothesis-driven evaluations of unintended effects in assessing conventional and GM crops. The development and role of emerging "omics" technologies in the assessment of unintended effects was also discussed. Several themes recurred in a number of talks; for example, a common observation was that no system for genetic modification, including conventional methods of plant breeding, is without unintended effects. Another common observation was that "unintended" does not necessarily mean "harmful". This paper summarizes key points from the information presented at the meeting to provide readers with current viewpoints on these topics.

  19. Anti-Cancer Effect of IN-2001 in MDA-MB-231 Human Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Min, Kyung Nan; Joung, Ki Eun; Kim, Dae-Kee; Sheen, Yhun Yhong

    2012-05-01

    In recent years, inhibition of HDACs has emerged as a potential strategy to reverse aberrant epigenetic changes associated with cancer, and several classes of HDAC inhibitors have been found to have potent and specific anticancer activities in preclinical studies. But their precise mechanism of action has not been elucidated. In this study, a novel synthetic inhibitor of HDAC, 3-(4-dimethylamino phenyl)-N-hydroxy-2-propenamide [IN-2001] was examined for its antitumor activity and the underlying molecular mechanisms of any such activity on human breast cancer cell lines. IN-2001 effectively inhibited cellular HDAC activity (IC50 = 0.585 nM) in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. IN-2001 caused a significant dose-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation in estrogen receptor (ER) negative MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. Cell cycle analysis revealed that the gowth inhibitory effects of IN-2001 might be attributed to cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 and/or G2/Mphase and subsequent apoptosis in human breast cancer cells. These events are accompanied by modulating several cell cycle and apoptosis regulatory genes such as CDK inhibitors p21(WAF1) and p27(KIP1) cyclin D1, and other tumor suppressor genes such as cyclin D2. Collectively, IN-2001 inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in human breast cancer cells and these findings may provide new therapeutic approaches, combination of antiestrogen together with a HDAC inhibitor, in the hormonal therapy-resistant ER-negative breast cancers. In summary, our data suggest that this histone deacetylase inhibitor, IN-2001, is a novel promising therapeutic agent with potent antitumor effects against human breast cancers.

  20. Suppressive Effects of Tea Catechins on Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Li-Ping; Wang, Ao; Ye, Jian-Hui; Zheng, Xin-Qiang; Polito, Curt Anthony; Lu, Jian-Liang; Li, Qing-Sheng; Liang, Yue-Rong

    2016-07-28

    Tea leaf (Camellia sinensis) is rich in catechins, which endow tea with various health benefits. There are more than ten catechin compounds in tea, among which epigallocatechingallate (EGCG) is the most abundant. Epidemiological studies on the association between tea consumption and the risk of breast cancer were summarized, and the inhibitory effects of tea catechins on breast cancer, with EGCG as a representative compound, were reviewed in the present paper. The controversial results regarding the role of tea in breast cancer and areas for further study were discussed.

  1. Suppressive Effects of Tea Catechins on Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Li-Ping; Wang, Ao; Ye, Jian-Hui; Zheng, Xin-Qiang; Polito, Curt Anthony; Lu, Jian-Liang; Li, Qing-Sheng; Liang, Yue-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Tea leaf (Camellia sinensis) is rich in catechins, which endow tea with various health benefits. There are more than ten catechin compounds in tea, among which epigallocatechingallate (EGCG) is the most abundant. Epidemiological studies on the association between tea consumption and the risk of breast cancer were summarized, and the inhibitory effects of tea catechins on breast cancer, with EGCG as a representative compound, were reviewed in the present paper. The controversial results regarding the role of tea in breast cancer and areas for further study were discussed. PMID:27483305

  2. Accounting for outcome misclassification in estimates of the effect of occupational asbestos exposure on lung cancer death.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Jessie K; Cole, Stephen R; Chu, Haitao; Olshan, Andrew F; Richardson, David B

    2014-03-01

    In studies of the health effects of asbestos, lung cancer death is subject to misclassification. We used modified maximum likelihood to explore the effects of outcome misclassification on the rate ratio of lung cancer death per 100 fiber-years per milliliter of cumulative asbestos exposure in a cohort study of textile workers in Charleston, South Carolina, followed from 1940 to 2001. The standard covariate-adjusted estimate of the rate ratio was 1.94 (95% confidence interval: 1.55, 2.44), and modified maximum likelihood produced similar results when we assumed that the specificity of outcome classification was 0.98. With sensitivity assumed to be 0.80 and specificity assumed to be 0.95, estimated rate ratios were further from the null and less precise (rate ratio = 2.17; 95% confidence interval: 1.59, 2.98). In the present context, standard estimates for the effect of asbestos on lung cancer death were similar to estimates accounting for the limited misclassification. However, sensitivity analysis using modified maximum likelihood was needed to verify the robustness of standard estimates, and this approach will provide unbiased estimates in settings with more misclassification.

  3. Effects of modified cellulose nanocrystals on the barrier and migration properties of PLA nano-biocomposites.

    PubMed

    Fortunati, E; Peltzer, M; Armentano, I; Torre, L; Jiménez, A; Kenny, J M

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to report the impact of the addition of cellulose nanocrystals on the barrier properties and on the migration behaviour of poly(lactic acid), PLA, based nano-biocomposites prepared by the solvent casting method. Their microstructure, crystallinity, barrier and overall migration properties were investigated. Pristine (CNC) and surfactant-modified cellulose nanocrystals (s-CNC) were used, and the effect of the cellulose modification and content in the nano-biocomposites was investigated. The presence of surfactant on the nanocrystal surface favours the dispersion of CNC in the PLA matrix. Electron microscopy analysis shows the good dispersion of s-CNC in the nanoscale with well-defined single crystals indicating that the surfactant allowed a better interaction between the cellulose structures and the PLA matrix. Reductions of 34% in water permeability were obtained for the cast films containing 1 wt.% of s-CNC while good oxygen barrier properties were detected for nano-biocomposites with both 1 wt.% and 5 wt.% of modified and un-modified cellulose nanocrystals, underlining the improvement provided by cellulose on the PLA films. Moreover, the migration level of the studied nano-biocomposites was below the overall migration limits required by the current normative for food packaging materials in both non-polar and polar simulants.

  4. Effects of Polyethyleneimine on the Sonochemical Synthesis of Gadolinium Ion-Modified ZnO Nanorods.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seok Cheol; Yun, Won Suk; Sohn, Sang Ho

    2015-01-01

    We prepared gadolinium (Gd) ion-modified ZnO nanorods by a sonochemical decomposition of zinc acetate dehydrate and gadolinium acetate hydrate precursor solutions with and without polyethyleneimine (PEI). We investigated the effects of PEI on the sonochemical synthesis of ZnO nanorods with and without Gd ion modifications. In the case of nascent ZnO nanorods, PEI in the precursor solutions can prohibit radial growth but allow axial growth, resulting in changes in the degree of preferred crystal orientations, and in the PL properties of the resulting nanorods. In the case of Gd ion-modified ZnO nanorods, we observed that the ZnO nanorods, fabricated sonochemically in the precursor solutions with PEI, exhibited a peak broadening of the ZnO(002) crystal plane and decreasing crystal orientation with respect to the c plane. We note that PEI can negatively affect the crystal orientation and crystallinity of Gd ion-modified ZnO nanorods, even though it cannot affect the lattice constant.

  5. Metal substrate effects on pH response of tetracyanoquinodimenthane modified electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Inzelt, G.; Chambers, J.Q.; Kinstle, J.F.; Day, R.W.; Lange, M.A.

    1984-02-01

    In recent work the voltammetric and spectral response of tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) modified electrodes have been described. The effect of pH of the cyclic voltammetry of these modified electrodes can be understood on the basis of the classical 3 x 3 nine-membered square scheme characteristic of quinone-hydroquinone couples. As for other compounds with quinoid structures, TCNQ exhibits quasi-reversible behavior in protic solvents with an apparent direct 2e/sup -/, 2H/sup +/ exchange in acidic pH region. This scheme is complicated further by dimer formation, disproportionation of the anion radical in strongly acidic solutions, and the apparent reduction of neutral TCNQ by hydroxide ions in very basic media (pH > 12). In basic solution the formation of TCNQ/sup -/ is clearly signaled by its electron spin resonance and visible absorption spectra. While quinone-hydroquinone couples do exhibit subtle electrochemical behavior, they are the basis for a widely used and reliable redox pH electrode. Thus an attempt to utilize TCNQ modified electrodes as a pH sensor seemed to be a logical step based on the kinship between TCNQ and benzoquinone. However, the results support the idea that the electrode substrate plays an important role in determining the response to the pH of the bulk solution. 20 references, 1 figure.

  6. Effect of modifying agents on the hydrophobicity and yield of zinc borate synthesized by zinc oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acarali, Nil Baran; Bardakci, Melek; Tugrul, Nurcan; Derun, Emek Moroydor; Piskin, Sabriye

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to synthesize zinc borate using zinc oxide, reference boric acid, and reference zinc borate (reference ZB) as the seed, and to investigate the effects of modifying agents and reaction parameters on the hydrophobicity and yield, respectively. The reaction parameters include reaction time (1-5 h), reactant ratio (H3BO3/ZnO by mass: 2-5), seed ratio (seed crystal/(H3BO3+ZnO) by mass: 0-2wt%), reaction temperature (50-120°C), cooling temperature (10-80°C), and stirring rate (400-700 r/min); the modifying agents involve propylene glycol (PG, 0-6wt%), kerosene (1wt%-6wt%), and oleic acid (OA, 1wt%-6wt%) with solvents (isopropyl alcohol (IPA), ethanol, and methanol). The results of reaction yield obtained from either magnetically or mechanically stirred systems were compared. Zinc borate produced was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and contact angle tests to identify the hydrophobicity. In conclusion, zinc borate is synthesized successfully under the optimized reaction conditions, and the different modifying agents with various solvents affect the hydrophobicity of zinc borate.

  7. Effects of modified Shu-Gan-Liang-Xue decoction combined with anastrozole on osteoblastic proliferation and differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, FEI; HAN, SHUYAN; ZHOU, NING; ZHENG, WENXIAN; LI, PINGPING

    2015-01-01

    Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) are widely used in the treatment of hormone-dependent breast cancer and as a result, aromatase inhibitor-associated bone loss (AIBL) has become a major concern amongst patients receiving AI treatment. Modified Shu-Gan-Liang-Xue decoction (mSGLXD), a clinical prescription, has been used for ameliorating AIBL in patients with breast cancer for decades and has achieved good clinical efficacy. However, the mechanism underlying how mSGLXD influences bone homeostasis and alleviates AIBL has remained elusive. In the present study, mSGLXD was supplemented with Rhizoma Drynariae containing phytoestrogens, and the safety of mSGLXD was evaluated. mSGLXD did not possess estrogenic activity and significantly inhibited the proliferation of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cell line MCF-7, which suggested that mSGLXD was safe for postmenopausal patients with breast cancer. Subsequently, the effects of mSGLXD alone or in combination with anastrozole on osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cell proliferation and differentiation were investigated. Cell counting kit-8, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and biochemical methods, such as ELISA and alizarin red S staining, were used in the present study. It was revealed that mSGLXD not only stimulated MC3T3-E1 cell proliferation, but also upregulated alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin gene and protein expression levels. High concentrations of anastrozole (10 or 100 μmol/l) markedly inhibited MC3T3-E1 cell proliferation, but this inhibitory effect was attenuated by mSGLXD. Furthermore, mSGLXD increased MC3T3-E1 cell mineralization following β-glycerophosphate and ascorbic acid induction. Therefore, the results of the present study suggested that mSGLXD may be a promising adjuvant therapy, with high safety and efficacy, for the prevention and treatment of AIBL in patients with breast cancer who receive AI treatment. PMID:25405542

  8. Radioimmunotherapy of peritoneal human colon cancer xenografts with site-specifically modified sup 212 Bi-labeled antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Simonson, R.B.; Ultee, M.E.; Hauler, J.A.; Alvarez, V.L. )

    1990-02-01

    212Bi is a radioisotope that emits highly cytotoxic alpha-particles. alpha-particles have a high linear energy transfer over a short path length. These properties and the 1-h half-life make this isotope suitable for radioimmunotherapy of peritoneal tumors. Therefore, we wanted to test whether monoclonal antibodies labeled with {sup 212}Bi would be effective in treating such tumors. We conjugated the antibody B72.3, which is reactive with many human adenocarcinomas, to the chelator linker glycyltyrosyl-lysyl-N-epsilon-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid, by reductive amination to the carbohydrate residues of the antibody. Athymic nude mice were injected i.p. with LS174T cells, a human colon cancer cell line. Seven to 13 days later the mice were treated with the {sup 212}Bi-labeled antibody. We treated the mice using single doses of 180-450 microCi or multiple doses of 80-180 microCi on consecutive days. Dissections were performed 9-16 days after the end of treatment. Both the single and multiple doses resulted in a decrease in tumor burden when compared to tumor from mice receiving unlabeled antibody. Mice in the optimum group showed tumor reductions of greater than 90%. Treatment with a {sup 212}Bi-labeled irrelevant antibody was significantly less effective than that with labeled B72.3 antibody. Survival studies showed that mice receiving the labeled antibody had a prolonged survival when compared to control mice.

  9. Enhanced Acoustic Black Hole effect in beams with a modified thickness profile and extended platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Liling; Cheng, Li

    2017-03-01

    The phenomenon of Acoustics Black Hole (ABH) benefits from the bending wave propagating properties inside a thin-walled structure with power-law thickness variation to achieve zero reflection when the structural thickness approaches zero in the ideal scenario. However, manufacturing an ideally tailored power-law profile of a structure with embedded ABH feature can hardly be achieved in practice. Past research showed that the inevitable truncation at the wedge tip of the structure can significantly weaken the expected ABH effect by creating wave reflections. On the premise of the minimum achievable truncation thickness by the current manufacturing technology, exploring ways to ensure and achieve better ABH effect becomes important. In this paper, we investigate this issue by using a previously developed wavelet-decomposed semi-analytical model on an Euler-Bernoulli beam with a modified power-law profile and an extended platform of constant thickness. Through comparisons with the conventional ABH profile in terms of system loss factor and energy distribution, numerical results show that the modified thickness profile brings about a systematic increase in the ABH effect at mid-to-high frequencies, especially when the truncation thickness is small and the profile parameter m is large. The use of an extended platform further increases the ABH effect to broader the frequency band whilst providing rooms for catering particular low frequency applications.

  10. The effect of acupuncture on leukocyte levels in peripheral blood is modified by aspirin.

    PubMed

    Rivas-Vilchis, José Federico; Barrera-Escorcia, Eduardo; Fregoso-Padilla, Martha

    2009-01-01

    It has been shown that acupuncture can modify circulating levels of subpopulations of leukocytes. There have been few investigations on the effect of acupuncture on prostaglandins metabolism. Aspirin is capable of inhibiting the metabolism of prostaglandins and to produce several pharmacological effects. The objective of this study was to determine whether prior administration of aspirin could modify the action of acupuncture on levels of circulating leukocytes. Fourteen healthy males (age: 19-23 years) were recruited from a university student population. This study was a placebo-controlled, prospective, cross-over design. Subjects were randomly assigned into A or B groups. Group A received aspirin 500 mg and group B placebo, after 1 week of a washout period, group A received placebo and group B aspirin. Subjects were given acupuncture with manual needling in GV14 (Dazhui) acupoint 2 hr after receiving medication. The needle was stimulated for 10 sec and was kept in place for 5 min. Leukocytes and their subpopulations were quantified in blood samples taken immediately before and 2 hr after acupuncture treatment. In each subject pre-acupuncture values were compared to those post-acupuncture. The results showed that acupuncture significantly increased overall leukocytes (p=0.006) and neutrophils (p<0.001). Aspirin partially inhibited these effects. The data suggest that the effect of acupuncture on leukocytes may be related to levels of prostaglandins.

  11. Genetic variants in the SWI/SNF complex and smoking collaborate to modify the risk of pancreatic cancer in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Beibei; Tian, Jing; Zhong, Rong; Tian, Yao; Chen, Wei; Qian, Jiaming; Zou, Li; Xiao, Min; Shen, Na; Yang, Hong; Lou, Jiao; Qiu, Qian; Ke, Juntao; Lu, Xinghua; Song, Wei; Li, Hui; Liu, Li; Wang, Li; Miao, Xiaoping

    2015-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is an aggressive malignancy with extremely low 5-year survival rate (<5%). SWItch/Sucrose Non Fermentable (SWI/SNF) complex is a core factor for chromatin-remodeling that utilize energy of ATP hydrolysis to mobilize nucleosomes, and modulate gene transcription. Recent studies have identified recurrent mutations in major components of SWI/SNF in a variety of human cancers, including PC. We conducted a two-stage case-control study to investigate the associations between 14 common variants in 6 genes (SMARCA4, SMCRB1, PBRM1, BRD7, ARID1, and ARID2) encoding major components of the SWI/SNF complex and the risk of PC. Three promising variants, rs11644043, rs11085754, and rs2073389 in the discovery stage comprising 310 cases and 457 controls were further genotyped in the validation stage containing 429 cases and 585 controls. rs11644043 in BRD7 and rs11085754 in SMARCA4 showed consistent significant association with increased risk of PC in both stages, with odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of 2.04 (1.17-3.56) and 1.64 (1.16-2.33) in stage one, and 1.97 (1.24-3.14) and 1.45 (1.04-2.02) in stage two, respectively in a recessive model. Furthermore, the accumulative effects of rs11644043, rs11085754, and rs2073389 in SMARCB1 were observed (P for trend <0.0001). Intriguingly, gene-environmental interactions analysis consistently revealed the potential interactions of rs2073389 (P(add)  - FDR = 6.00 × 10(-4), P(mul)  - FDR = 1.50 × 10(-2)) and rs11085754 (P(add)  - FDR = 0.03) collaborating with smoking to modify the risk of PC. In conclusion, the current study provides evidence that genetic variants of SWI/SNF may contribute to the susceptibility of PC in the Chinese population.

  12. Targeted and ultrasound-triggered drug delivery using liposomes co-modified with cancer cell-targeting aptamers and a thermosensitive polymer.

    PubMed

    Ninomiya, Kazuaki; Yamashita, Takahiro; Kawabata, Shinya; Shimizu, Nobuaki

    2014-07-01

    In this study, we demonstrated the feasibility of targeted and ultrasound-triggered drug delivery using liposomes co-modified with single stranded DNA aptamers that recognized platelet-derived growth factor receptors (PDGFRs) as targeting ligands for breast cancer cells and poly(NIPMAM-co-NIPAM) as the thermosensitive polymer (TSP) to sensitize these liposomes to high temperature. TSP-modified liposomes (TSP liposomes) released encapsulated calcein under 1 MHz ultrasound irradiation for 30 s at 0.5 W/cm(2) as well as the case under incubation for 5 min at 42 °C. Ultrasound-triggered calcein release from TSP liposomes was due to an increased local temperature, resulting from cavitation bubble collapse induced by ultrasound, and not due to an increase in the bulk medium temperature. Liposomes modified with PDGFR aptamers (APT liposomes) bound to MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells through PDGFR aptamers; however, they did not bind to primary human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs). The binding of APT liposomes was greatest for MDA-MB-231 cells, followed by MCF-7, WiDr, and HepG2 cancer cells. In a cell injury assay using doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded APT/TSP liposomes and ultrasound irradiation, cell viability of MDA-MB-231 at 24h after ultrasound irradiation (1 MHz for 30 s at 0.5 W/cm(2)) with DOX-loaded APT/TSP liposomes was 60%, which was lower than that with ultrasound irradiation and DOX-loaded TSP liposomes or with DOX-loaded APT/TSP liposomes alone.

  13. Cost Effectiveness Analysis of Disease-Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs in Rheumatoid Arthritis. A Systematic Review Literature

    PubMed Central

    Benucci, Maurizio; Saviola, Gianantonio; Manfredi, Mariangela; Sarzi-Puttini, Piercarlo; Atzeni, Fabiola

    2011-01-01

    The cost effectiveness of treatments that have changed the “natural history” of a chronic progressive disease needs to be evaluated over the long term. Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are the standard treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and should be started as early as possible. A number of studies have shown that they are effective in improving disease activity and function, and in joint damage. Our review was focused on revision and critical evaluation of the studies including the literature on cost effectiveness of DMARDs (cyclosporine A, sulphasalazine, leflunomide, and methotrexate). The European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations showed that traditional DMARDs are cost effective at the time of disease onset. They are less expensive than biological DMARDs and can be useful in controlling disease activity in early RA. PMID:22162693

  14. Effect of rhamnolipids on initial attachment of bacteria on glass and octadecyltrichlorosilane-modified glass.

    PubMed

    Sodagari, Maysam; Wang, Hua; Newby, Bi-min Zhang; Ju, Lu-Kwang

    2013-03-01

    Bacterial attachment on solid surfaces has various implications in environmental, industrial and medical applications. In this study, the effects of rhamnolipid biosurfactants on initial attachment of bacteria on hydrophilic glass and hydrophobic octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) modified glass were evaluated under continuous-flow conditions. The bacteria investigated were three Gram-negative species Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas putida, and Escherichia coli, and two Gram-positive species Staphylcoccus epidermidis and Bacillus subtilis. Rhamnolipids, at 10 and 200 mg/l, significantly reduced the attachment of all but S. epidermidis on both glass and OTS-modified glass. For S. epidermidis rhamnolipids reduced the attachment on OTS-modified glass but not on glass. Studies were further done to identify the mechanism(s) by which rhamnolipids reduced the cell attachment. The following potential properties of rhamnolipids were investigated: inhibition of microbial growth, change of cell surface hydrophobicity, easier detachment of cells already attached to substratum, and modification of substratum surface properties. Results showed that rhamnolipids were ineffective for the latter two effects. Rhamnolipids, up to 200mg/l, inhibited the growth of B. subtilis, S. epidermidis and P. aeruginosa PAO1 but not the growth of E. coli, P. putida and P. aeruginosa E0340. Also, rhamnolipids tended to increase the hydrophobicity of P. aeruginosa PAO1 and E. coli, decrease the hydrophobicity of P. putida and S. epidermidis, and have no clear effect on the hydrophobicity of B. subtillis. These trends however did not correlate with the observed trend of cell attachment reduction. The responsible mechanism(s) remained unknown.

  15. The importance of being (slightly) modified: The role of rRNA editing on gene expression control and its connections with cancer.

    PubMed

    Penzo, Marianna; Galbiati, Alice; Treré, Davide; Montanaro, Lorenzo

    2016-12-01

    In human ribosomal RNAs, over 200 residues are modified by specific, RNA-driven enzymatic complexes or stand-alone, RNA-independent enzymes. In most cases, modification sites are placed in specific positions within important functional areas of the ribosome. Some evidence indicates that the altered control in ribosomal RNA modifications may affect ribosomal function during mRNA translation. Here we provide an overview of the connections linking ribosomal RNA modifications to ribosome function, and suggest how aberrant modifications may affect the control of the expression of key cancer genes, thus contributing to tumor development. In addition, the future perspectives in this field are discussed.

  16. A locus on 19p13 modifies risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers and is associated with hormone receptor–negative breast cancer in the general population

    PubMed Central

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary S; McGuffog, Lesley; Tarrell, Robert; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Healey, Sue; Morrison, Jonathan; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Lesnick, Timothy; Ghoussaini, Maya; Barrowdale, Daniel; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Evans, D Gareth; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Chu, Carol; Douglas, Fiona; Paterson, Joan; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Houdayer, Claude; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Giraud, Sophie; Lasset, Christine; Remenieras, Audrey; Caron, Olivier; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Rookus, Matti A; Jager, Agnes; van den Ouweland, Ans; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; van der Luijt, Rob B; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; García, Encarna B Gómez; Devilee, Peter; Vreeswijk, Maaike P G; Lubinski, Jan; Jakubowska, Anna; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Górski, Bohdan; Cybulski, Cezary; Spurdle, Amanda B; Holland, Helene; Goldgar, David E; John, Esther M; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa; Buys, Saundra S; Daly, Mary B; Terry, Mary-Beth; Schmutzler, Rita K; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Arnold, Norbert; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Domchek, Susan M; Nathanson, Katherine L; Rebbeck, Timothy; Blum, Joanne L; Piedmonte, Marion; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Wakeley, Katie; Boggess, John F; Basil, Jack; Blank, Stephanie V; Friedman, Eitan; Kaufman, Bella; Laitman, Yael; Milgrom, Roni; Andrulis, Irene L; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Vijai, Joseph; Gaudet, Mia M; Altshuler, David; Guiducci, Candace; Loman, Niklas; Harbst, Katja; Rantala, Johanna; Ehrencrona, Hans; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Thomassen, Mads; Sunde, Lone; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Bonanni, Bernardo; Viel, Alessandra; Radice, Paolo; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Singer, Christian F; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Greene, Mark H; Mai, Phuong L; Loud, Jennifer T; Guidugli, Lucia; Lindor, Noralane M; Hansen, Thomas V O; Nielsen, Finn C; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Garber, Judy; Ramus, Susan J; Gayther, Simon A; Phelan, Catherine; Narod, Stephen; Szabo, Csilla I; Benitez, Javier; Osorio, Ana; Nevanlinna, Heli; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Caligo, Maria A; Beattie, Mary S; Hamann, Ute; Godwin, Andrew K; Montagna, Marco; Casella, Cinzia; Neuhausen, Susan L; Karlan, Beth Y; Tung, Nadine; Toland, Amanda E; Weitzel, Jeffrey; Olopade, Olofunmilayo; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Rubinstein, Wendy S; Arason, Adalgeir; Rennert, Gad; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Brauch, Hiltrud; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Miron, Penelope; Gerty, Sue M; Tapper, William; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Fountzilas, George; Fasching, Peter A; Beckmann, Matthias W; Silva, Isabel dos Santos; Peto, Julian; Lambrechts, Diether; Paridaens, Robert; Rüdiger, Thomas; Försti, Asta; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Diasio, Robert B; Lee, Adam M; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette; Vachon, Celine; Blows, Fiona; Driver, Kristy; Dunning, Alison; Pharoah, Paul P D; Offit, Kenneth; Pankratz, V Shane; Hakonarson, Hakon; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F; Couch, Fergus J

    2011-01-01

    Germline BRCA1 mutations predispose to breast cancer. To identify genetic modifiers of this risk, we performed a genome-wide association study in 1,193 individuals with BRCA1 mutations who were diagnosed with invasive breast cancer under age 40 and 1,190 BRCA1 carriers without breast cancer diagnosis over age 35. We took forward 96 SNPs for replication in another 5,986 BRCA1 carriers (2,974 individuals with breast cancer and 3,012 unaffected individuals). Five SNPs on 19p13 were associated with breast cancer risk (Ptrend = 2.3 × 10−9 to Ptrend = 3.9 × 10−7), two of which showed independent associations (rs8170, hazard ratio (HR) = 1.26, 95% CI 1.17–1.35; rs2363956 HR = 0.84, 95% CI 0.80–0.89). Genotyping these SNPs in 6,800 population-based breast cancer cases and 6,613 controls identified a similar association with estrogen receptor–negative breast cancer (rs2363956 per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 0.83, 95% CI 0.75–0.92, Ptrend = 0.0003) and an association with estrogen receptor–positive disease in the opposite direction (OR = 1.07, 95% CI 1.01–1.14, Ptrend = 0.016). The five SNPs were also associated with triple-negative breast cancer in a separate study of 2,301 triple-negative cases and 3,949 controls (Ptrend = 1 × 10−7 to Ptrend = 8 × 10−5; rs2363956 per-allele OR = 0.80, 95% CI 0.74–0.87, Ptrend = 1.1 × 10−7). PMID:20852631

  17. A modified and cost-effective method for hair cortisol analysis.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Lianbin; Sunesara, Imran; Rehm, Kristina E; Marshall, Gailen D

    2016-01-01

    Hair cortisol may hold potential as a biomarker for assessment of chronic psychological stress. We report a modified and cost-effective method to prepare hair samples for cortisol assay. Hair samples were ground using an inexpensive ball grinder - ULTRA-TURRAX tube drive. Cortisol was extracted from the powder under various defined conditions. The data showed that the optimal conditions for this method include cortisol extraction at room temperature and evaporation using a stream of room air. These findings should allow more widespread research using economical technology to validate the utility of hair cortisol as a biomarker for assessing chronic stress status.

  18. The effect of elastomer chain length on properties of silicone-modified polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, A. K.; St.clair, T. L.; Ezzell, S.

    1981-01-01

    A series of polyimides containing silicone elastomers was synthesized in order to study the effects of the elastomer chain length on polymer properties. The elastomer with repeat units varying from n=10 to 105 was chemically reacted into the backbone of an addition polyimide oligomer via reactive aromatic amine groups. Glass transition temperatures of the elastomer and polyimide phases were observed by torsional braid analysis. The elastomer-modified polyimides were tested as adhesives for bonding titanium in order to determine their potential for aerospace applications. Adhesive lap shear tests were performed before and after aging bonded specimens at elevated temperatures.

  19. Positive and negative effects of IT on cancer registries.

    PubMed

    Mohammadzadeh, Niloofar; Safdari, Reza; Rahimi, Azin

    2013-01-01

    In the new millennium people are facing serious challenges in health care, especially with increasing non- communicable diseases (NCD). One of the most common NCDs is cancer which is the leading cause of death in developed countries and in developing countries is the second cause of death after heart diseases. Cancer registry can make possible the analysis, comparison and development of national and international cancer strategies and planning. Information technology has a vital role in quality improvement and facility of cancer registries. With the use of IT, in addition to gaining general benefits such as monitoring rates of cancer incidence and identifying planning priorities we can also gain specific advantages such as collecting information for a lifetime, creating tele medical records, possibility of access to information by patient, patient empowerment, and decreasing medical errors. In spite of the powerful role of IT, we confront various challenges such as general problems, like privacy of the patient, and specific problems, including possibility of violating patients rights through misrepresentation, omission of human relationships, and decrease in face to face communication between doctors and patients. By implementing appropriate strategies, such as identifying authentication levels, controlling approaches, coding data, and considering technical and content standards, we can optimize the use of IT. The aim of this paper is to emphasize the need for identifying positive and negative effects of modern IT on cancer registry in general and specific aspects as an approach to cancer care management.

  20. Modulation in the activity of lactate dehydrogenase and level of c-Myc and c-Fos by modified base queuine in cancer.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Chandramani; Jaiswal, Yogesh K; Vinayak, Manjula

    2008-01-01

    Cancer is characterized by uncontrolled cell growth, which results from unlimited proliferation and disturbs various cellular activities. Queuine is a highly modified base analogue of guanine found at first anti-codon position of specific tRNAs i.e. tRNA(Tyr), tRNA(His), tRNA(Asp) and tRNA(Asn). These tRNAs are known as Q-family of tRNA. The tRNAs of Q-family are completely modified to Q-tRNAs in terminally differentiated somatic cells, however hypomodification of Q-tRNA is closely associated with cell proliferation and malignancy. Queuosine modification of tRNAs may be essential for normal development, differentiation and cellular functions. Physiological role of queuine remains ill defined but direct or indirect evidences suggest that queuine or Q-tRNA participates in many cellular functions such as regulation of cell proliferation, control of glycolytic metabolism, alteration in expression of proto-oncogenes, modulation of signal transduction pathways but the mechanism is not well known. Increase in LDH-A expression regulated by c-myc is well documented in a variety of tumor cells. Overexpression of proto-oncogenes cause deregulated cellular responses which may lead to development of cancer. The cellular proto-oncogenes like c-myc and c-fos have important role in cell growth, proliferation and differentiation. The present study is aimed to investigate queuine mediated modulation in the activity of lactate dehydrogenase and expression of proto-oncogenes like c-myc and c-fos in T-cell lymphoma (DLAT) induced cancerous mouse. The results indicate that elevated lactate dehydrogenase activity is brought down by queuine treatments and the elevated levels of c-Myc and c-Fos in DLAT cancerous mouse are down-regulated, suggesting that queuine inhibits anaerobic metabolism and cell proliferation.

  1. Anti-cancer effects of nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates on human cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Pengfei; Zhang, Peiying; Mukthavaram, Rajesh; Nomura, Natsuko; Pingle, Sandeep C.; Teng, Dayu; Chien, Shu; Guo, Fang; Kesari, Santosh

    2016-01-01

    Zoledronic acid, a potent nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate (NBP), has been extensively used to limit bone turnover in a various diseases including tumors. Recent clinical studies have demonstrated direct anti-cancer effects of zoledronic acid, in addition to its clinical benefits for skeletal-related events. Here we investigated the effects of 4 clinically available NBPs on human tumor cell proliferation. Our data demonstrate a potent anti-proliferative effect of zoledronic acid against glioblastoma (GBM) cell lines, breast cancer cells and GBM patient-derived lines. Zoledronic acid also effectively inhibited GBM tumor growth in xenograft mouse models. Zoledronic acid strongly stimulated autophagy but not apoptotic signals in all tested cells. Only one intermediate product of cholesterols synthesis pathway, geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) rescued cells from the cytotoxic effects of zoledronic acid. To further investigate the effect of GGPP, we knocked down RABGGTA, which encodes a subunit of the Rabgeranylgeranyltransferase protein. This knockdown induced an effect similar to zoledronic acid in cancer cell lines. These data are promising and suggested a potential for zoledronic acid as an anti-cancer agent, through its ablation of the function of Rab proteins. PMID:27462771

  2. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the p53 pathway genes modify cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers of Jewish-Ashkenazi descent.

    PubMed

    Yarden, Ronit I; Friedman, Eitan; Metsuyanim, Sally; Olender, Tzvia; Ben-Asher, Edna; Papa, Moshe Z

    2010-06-01

    Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are associated with a significantly increased lifetime risk for developing breast and/or ovarian cancer. However, incomplete penetrance and substantial variability in age of disease onset among carriers of the same mutation suggests the involvement of additional modifier genes and/or environmental factors. Somatic inactivating mutations in the p53 gene and genes of the p53 pathway often accompany BRCA1/2-associated tumors. Therefore, we assessed whether these genes are modifiers of penetrance. We genotyped Jewish-Ashkenazi women for functional single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the AKT1 (C>T rs3730358) and the PERP (C>T rs2484067) genes that affect p53-mediated apoptosis, as well as two tag-SNPs in the CHEK2 (C>T rs743184) and the ZBRK1/ZNF350 (G>A rs2278414) genes that encode for proteins involved in growth arrest following DNA damage. The study population included 138 healthy women, 148 breast/ovarian cancer BRCA1/2 mutation carriers, 121 asymptomatic BRCA1/2 mutation carriers, and 210 sporadic noncarrier breast cancer patients. Utilizing lambda(2) and Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed a hazard ratio (HR) of 3.23 (95% CI: 1.44-54, P = 0.0184) for the TT genotype of AKT (rs3730358), HR = 2.105 (95% CI: 1.049-7.434, P = 0.039) for CHEK2 CC genotype (rs743184), and HR = 2.4743 (95% CI: 1.205-11.53, P = 0.022) for the AG genotype of ZBRK1/ZNF350 (rs2278414). No significant association between PERP variants and cancer was identified HR = 0.662 (95% CI: 0.289-1.324, P = 0.261). Our results suggest that genes that act upstream of p53, or participate in the DNA damage response, may modify the risk of cancer in women with mutant BRCA1/2 alleles.

  3. Induction of apoptosis in cancer cells through N-acetyl-l-leucine-modified polyethylenimine-mediated p53 gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Liu; Li, Quanshun

    2015-11-01

    Herein, N-acetyl-L-leucine-modified polyethylenimine was successfully constructed through the EDC/NHS-mediated coupling reaction and employed as vectors to accomplish p53 gene delivery using HeLa (p53wt) and PC-3 cells (p53null) as models. Compared with PEI25K, the derivatives exhibited lower cytotoxicity, protein adsorption and hemolytic activity, together with satisfactory pDNA condensation capability and gene transfection efficiency. After p53 transfection, MTT analysis confirmed that the cell proliferation was inhibited. Flow cytometric analysis showed that the derivative-mediated p53 delivery could induce stronger early apoptosis than PEI25K and Lipofectamine(2000). Further, PC-3 cells showed higher sensitivity to the exogenous p53 transfection than HeLa cells. The mechanism for inducing apoptosis was determined to be up-regulation of p53 expression at both mRNA and protein levels using RT-PCR and western blotting analysis. Expression level and activity analysis of caspase-3, -8 and -9, and mitochondrial membrane potential measurement revealed that p53 transfection mediated by these derivatives facilitated early apoptosis of tumor cells via a mitochondria-dependent apoptosis pathway. Thus, the derivatives showed potential as biocompatible carriers for realizing effective tumor gene therapy.

  4. Modified Panax ginseng Extract Inhibits uPAR-Mediated α[Formula: see text]β1-Integrin Signaling by Modulating Caveolin-1 to Induce Early Apoptosis in Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Hwang, In-Hu; Kwon, Yong-Kyun; Cho, Chong-Kwan; Lee, Yeon-Weol; Sung, Jung-Suk; Joo, Jong-Cheon; Lee, Kyung-Bok; Yoo, Hwa-Seung; Jang, Ik-Soon

    2016-01-01

    Urokinase receptor (uPAR) is enhanced in many human cancer cells and is frequently an indicator of poor prognosis. Activation of [Formula: see text]1-integrin requires caveolin-1 and is regulated by uPAR. However, the underlying molecular mechanism responsible for the interaction between uPAR and [Formula: see text]1-integrin remains obscure. We found that modified regular Panax ginseng extract (MRGX) had a negative modulating effect on the uPAR/[Formula: see text]1-integrin interaction, disrupted the uPAR/integrin interaction by modulating caveoline-1, and caused early apoptosis in cancer cells. Additionally, we found that siRNA-mediated caveoline-1 downregulation inhibited uPAR-mediated [Formula: see text]1-integrin signaling, whereas caveoline-1 up-regulation stimulated the signaling, which suppressed p53 expression, thereby indicating negative crosstalk exists between the integrin [Formula: see text]1 and the p53 pathways. Thus, these findings identify a novel mechanism whereby the inhibition of [Formula: see text]1 integrin and the activation of p53 modulate the expression of the anti-apoptotic proteins that are crucially involved in inducing apoptosis in A549 lung cancer cells. Furthermore, MRGX causes changes in the expressions of members of the Bcl-2 family (Bax and Bcl-2) in a pro-apoptotic manner. In addition, MGRX-mediated inhibition of [Formula: see text]1 integrin attenuates ERK phosphorylation (p-ERK), which up-regulates caspase-8 and Bax. Therefore, ERK may affect mitochondria through a negative regulation of caspase-8 and Bax. Taken together, these findings reveal that MRGX is involved in uPAR-[Formula: see text]1-integrin signaling by modulating caveolin-1 signaling to induce early apoptosis in A549 lung-cancer cells and strongly indicate that MRGX might be useful as a herbal medicine and may lead to the development of new herbal medicine that would suppress the growth of lung-cancer cells.

  5. Apoptotic effect of noscapine in breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Quisbert-Valenzuela, Edwin O; Calaf, Gloria M

    2016-06-01

    Cancer is a public health problem in the world and breast cancer is the most frequently cancer in women. Approximately 15% of the breast cancers are triple-negative. Apoptosis regulates normal growth, homeostasis, development, embryogenesis and appropriate strategy to treat cancer. Bax is a protein pro-apoptotic enhancer of apoptosis in contrast to Bcl-2 with antiapoptotic properties. Initiator caspase-9 and caspase-8 are features of intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis pathway, respectively. NF-κB is a transcription factor known to be involved in the initiation and progression of breast cancer. Noscapine, an alkaloid derived from opium is used as antitussive and showed antitumor properties that induced apoptosis in cancer cell lines. The aim of the present study was to determine the apoptotic effect of noscapine in breast cancer cell lines compared to breast normal cell line. Three cell lines were used: i) a control breast cell line MCF-10F; ii) a luminal-like adenocarcinoma triple-positive breast cell line MCF-7; iii) breast cancer triple-negative cell line MDA-MB-231. Our results showed that noscapine had lower toxicity in normal cells and was an effective anticancer agent that induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells because it increases Bax gene and protein expression in three cell lines, while decreases Bcl-xL gene expression, and Bcl-2 protein expression decreased in breast cancer cell lines. Therefore, Bax/Bcl-2 ratio increased in the three cell lines. This drug increased caspase-9 gene expression in breast cancer cell lines and caspase-8 gene expression increased in MCF-10F and MDA-MB-231. Furthermore, it increased cleavage of caspase-8, suggesting that noscapine-induced apoptosis is probably due to the involvement of extrinsic and intrinsic apoptosis pathways. Antiapoptotic gene and protein expression diminished and proapoptotic gene and protein expression increased noscapine-induced expression, probably due to decrease in NF-κB gene and protein expression

  6. Effects of vascularization on cancer nanochemotherapy outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paiva, L. R.; Ferreira, S. C.; Martins, M. L.

    2016-08-01

    Cancer therapy requires anticancer agents capable of efficient and uniform systemic delivery. One promising route to their development is nanotechnology. Here, a previous model for cancer chemotherapy based on a nanosized drug carrier (Paiva et al., 2011) is extended by including tissue vasculature and a three-dimensional growth. We study through computer simulations the therapy against tumors demanding either large or small nutrient supplies growing under different levels of tissue vascularization. Our results indicate that highly vascularized tumors demand more aggressive therapies (larger injected doses administrated at short intervals) than poorly vascularized ones. Furthermore, nanoparticle endocytic rate by tumor cells, not its selectivity, is the major factor that determines the therapeutic success. Finally, our finds indicate that therapies combining cytotoxic agents with antiangiogenic drugs that reduce the abnormal tumor vasculature, instead of angiogenic drugs that normalize it, can lead to successful treatments using feasible endocytic rates and administration intervals.

  7. Anticancer effect of linalool via cancer-specific hydroxyl radical generation in human colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Kenichi; Zheng, Yun-Wen; Murata, Soichiro; Ito, Hiromu; Nakayama, Ken; Kurokawa, Tomohiro; Sano, Naoki; Nowatari, Takeshi; Villareal, Myra O; Nagano, Yumiko N; Isoda, Hiroko; Matsui, Hirofumi; Ohkohchi, Nobuhiro

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the anticancer mechanisms of the monoterpenoid alcohol linalool in human colon cancer cells. METHODS The cytotoxic effect of linalool on the human colon cancer cell lines and a human fibroblast cell line was examined using the WST-8 assay. The apoptosis-inducing effect of linalool was measured using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling assay and flow cytometry with Annexin V. Oxidative stress was investigated by staining for diphenyl-1-pyrenylphosphine, which is a cellular lipid peroxidation marker, and electron spin resonance spectroscopy. Sixteen SCID mice xenografted with human cancer cells were randomized into 3 groups for in vivo analysis: control and low-dose and high-dose linalool groups. The control group was administered tap water orally every 3 d. The linalool treatment groups were administered 100 or 200 μg/kg linalool solution orally for the same period. All mice were sacrificed under anesthesia 21 d after tumor inoculation, and tumors and organs were collected for immunohistochemistry using an anti-4-hydroxynonenal antibody. Tumor weights were measured and compared between groups. RESULTS Linalool induced apoptosis of cancer cells in vitro, following the cancer-specific induction of oxidative stress, which was measured based on spontaneous hydroxyl radical production and delayed lipid peroxidation. Mice in the high-dose linalool group exhibited a 55% reduction in mean xenograft tumor weight compared with mice in the control group (P < 0.05). In addition, tumor-specific lipid peroxidation was observed in the in vivo model. CONCLUSION Linalool exhibited an anticancer effect via cancer-specific oxidative stress, and this agent has potential for application in colon cancer therapy. PMID:27956800

  8. Effect of Charge and Hydrophobicity on Adsorption of Modified Starches on Polyester.

    PubMed

    Samu; Moulee; Kumar

    1999-12-15

    Polyester fabric (poly(ethylene terephthalate)) is a hydrophobic polymer. Its hydrophobic nature can be a disadvantage for certain applications like dyeing, finishing, detergency, etc. Physical or chemical modification of the polyester to make it more hydrophilic is therefore desirable for certain performance characteristics. Surface modification of polyester to make it hydrophilic can be achieved by adsorbing polymers on the polyester surface. Starch is a commonly available, hydrophilic polymer used in many textile applications that can be used to modify polyester. However, it needs to be chemically modified so that it can adsorb on the polyester fabric and physically modify the fabric characteristics. The polymers used in this study are two different modified starches-cationic and anionic starches and mixtures of the two. The adsorption kinetics on a polyester substrate was studied. The effect of charge and hydrophobicity on adsorption was investigated. Cationic starches were shown to readily adsorb on polyester and this was attributed to electrostatic interactions. Hydrophobic substituents on the cationic moiety resulted in increased adsorption. This was attributed to the weak hydrophobic interaction between the polymer chains which could result in a more coiled polymer conformation. It is hypothesized that more starch molecules are required for surface coverage of the polyester, resulting in an increase in adsorption. Anionic starch was adsorbed on the substrate but at a slower rate than the cationic starches. It is likely that there is a H bonding between acid groups on the starch and the ester groups of the polyester. However, the anionic starch is desorbed when the polyester is placed in an aqueous medium. When a blend of cationic starch and anionic starch was used, a low concentration of anionic starch was seen to increase adsorption, indicating that the polyelectrolyte complex itself may be adsorbing on the substrate. Further increases cause a decrease in

  9. Applicability of modified effective-range theory to positron-atom and positron-molecule scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Idziaszek, Zbigniew; Karwasz, Grzegorz

    2006-06-15

    We analyze low-energy scattering of positrons on Ar atoms and N{sub 2} molecules using the modified effective-range theory (MERT) developed by O'Malley, et al. [J. Math. Phys. 2, 491 (1961)]. We use the formulation of MERT based on exact solutions of the Schroedinger equation with polarization potential rather than low-energy expansions of phase shifts into momentum series. We show that MERT describes the experimental data well, provided that effective-range expansion is performed both for s- and p-wave scattering, which dominate in the considered regime of positron energies (0.4-2 eV). We estimate the values of the s-wave scattering length and the effective range for e{sup +}-Ar and e{sup +}-N{sub 2} collisions.

  10. Early Life and Environmental Risk Factors Modify the Effect of Acculturation on Hispanic Children's Asthma.

    PubMed

    Chavez-Payan, Paola; Grineski, Sara E; Collins, Timothy W

    2015-01-01

    Acculturation tends to erode Hispanic immigrants' initial health advantage. Using a more nuanced conceptualization of acculturation than previous studies, we explore the associations between acculturation and Hispanic children's asthma. Data came from an observational mail survey of caretakers of Hispanic schoolchildren in El Paso, Texas (N = 1,513). Results from generalized linear models (GzLMs) demonstrate that acculturation was a significant positive predictor of asthma. The addition of interaction terms revealed that prenatal smoking, low birth weight, breastfeeding, and pest exposure significantly modified the effect of acculturation on asthma. Results suggest that although higher levels of acculturation were detrimental overall, the effects were not equally damaging for all Hispanic children. Findings foster an understanding of how the effect of acculturation on Hispanic children's asthma is intensified or attenuated by distinct individual-level risk factors.

  11. Effects of feeding calves genetically modified corn bt11: a clinico-biochemical study.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Nobuaki; Murata, Hideo; Mikami, Osamu; Yoshioka, Miyako; Guruge, Keerthi S; Yamanaka, Noriko; Nakajima, Yasuyuki; Miyazaki, Shigeru

    2006-10-01

    Genetically modified corn Bt11 is insect-resistant and expresses Cry1Ab toxin, an insecticidal protein, in kernels. Although Bt11 corn is considered safe based on animal performance, there are no reports available on the clinico-biochemical effects of feeding it to cattle. In this study, we evaluated the effects of feeding Bt11 to calves, using blood and ruminal clinico-biochemical parameters. Our three-month-long feeding experiment demonstrated that calves (n=6), fed with a ration containing 43.3% of Bt11 corn kernels as dry matter, did not develop any discernible clinical, hematological, biochemical, or ruminal abnormalities as compared with control calves (n=6) fed non-Bt11 corn. The results suggest that the transgenic Bt11 has no negative clinico-biochemical effects on calves.

  12. The effectiveness of parental communication in modifying the relation between food advertising and children's consumption behaviour.

    PubMed

    Buijzen, Moniek

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of various types of parental communication in modifying children's responses to television food advertising. In a combined diary-survey study among 234 parents of 4- to 12-year-old children, I investigated how different styles of advertising mediation (active vs. restrictive) and consumer communication (concept-oriented vs. socio-oriented) moderated the relation between children's advertising exposure and their consumption of advertised energy-dense food products. Interaction analysis in regression showed that active advertising mediation (i.e. explaining the purpose and nature of advertising), and socio-oriented consumer communication (i.e. emphasizing control and restrictions) significantly reduced the impact of advertising on children's food consumption. Parental restrictions of advertising exposure were only effective among younger children (<8). These results suggest that critical discussion about advertising and rule making about consumption are most effective in countering the impact of food advertising.

  13. Effect of algal flocculation on dissolved organic matters using cationic starch modified soils.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wenqing; Bi, Lei; Pan, Gang

    2016-07-01

    Modified soils (MSs) are being increasingly used as geo-engineering materials for the sedimentation removal of cyanobacterial blooms. Cationic starch (CS) has been tested as an effective soil modifier, but little is known about its potential impacts on the treated water. This study investigated dissolved organic matters in the bloom water after algal removal using cationic starch modified soils (CS-MSs). Results showed that the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) could be decreased by CS-MS flocculation and the use of higher charge density CS yielded a greater DOC reduction. When CS with the charge density of 0.052, 0.102 and 0.293meq/g were used, DOC was decreased from 3.4 to 3.0, 2.3 and 1.7mg/L, respectively. The excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy and UV254 analysis indicated that CS-MS exhibits an ability to remove some soluble organics, which contributed to the DOC reduction. However, the use of low charge density CS posed a potential risk of DOC increase due to the high CS loading for effective algal removal. When CS with the charge density of 0.044meq/g was used, DOC was increased from 3.4 to 3.9mg/L. This study suggested, when CS-MS is used for cyanobacterial bloom removal, the content of dissolved organic matters in the treated water can be controlled by optimizing the charge density of CS. For the settled organic matters, other measures (e.g., capping treatments using oxygen loaded materials) should be jointly applied after algal flocculation.

  14. Gene Therapy of Breast Cancer: Studies of Selective Promoter/Enhancer-Modified Vectors to Deliver Suicide Genes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-09-01

    gene therapy strategies for breast cancer by translation of studies derived from the DF3/MUCl gene. We have completed Tasks 1 and 2 as outlined in the Statement of Work using the DF3 promoter to selectively drive transgenes in breast cancer cells. The DF3 promoter has been used in an adenoviral vector to selectively detect and eliminate breast cancer cells that contaminate hematopoietic stem cell preparations used in autologous bone marrow transplantation. More recent work has involved modification of the DF3 promoter by adding a Tet-enhancer system to increase expression

  15. The effect of multidisciplinary team care on cancer management.

    PubMed

    Abdulrahman, Ganiy Opeyemi

    2011-01-01

    Over the past 15 years, the multidisciplinary team management of many medical conditions especially cancers has increasingly taken a prominent role in patient management in many hospitals and medical centres in the developed countries. In the United Kingdom, it began to gain prominence following the Calman-Heine report in 1995 which suggested that each Cancer Unit in a hospital should have in place arrangements for non-surgical oncological input into services, with a role for a non-surgical oncologist. The report further suggested that a lead clinician with a well established interest in cancer care should be appointed to organise and coordinate the whole range of cancer services provided within the Cancer Unit. Many people have argued that the multidisciplinary team management of patients has resulted in better care and improved survival. However, there are barriers to the optimal effectiveness of the multidisciplinary team. This paper aims to review various studies on the effectiveness of the multidisciplinary team in the management of cancer patients and also discuss some of the barriers to the multidisciplinary team.

  16. Preclinical and clinical effects of mistletoe against breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Marvibaigi, Mohsen; Supriyanto, Eko; Amini, Neda; Abdul Majid, Fadzilah Adibah; Jaganathan, Saravana Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is among the most frequent types of cancer in women worldwide. Current conventional treatment options are accompanied by side effects. Mistletoe is amongst the important herbal medicines traditionally used as complementary remedies. An increasing number of studies have reported anticancer activity of mistletoe extracts on breast cancer cells and animal models. Some recent evidence suggests that cytotoxic activity of mistletoe may be mediated through different mechanisms. These findings provide a good base for clinical trials. Various studies on mistletoe therapy for breast cancer patients revealed similar findings concerning possible benefits on survival time, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), remission rate, and alleviating adverse reactions to conventional therapy. This review provides an overview of the recent findings on preclinical experiments and clinical trials of mistletoe for its cytotoxic and antitumor activity and its effect on HRQoL in breast cancer patients. Moreover, studies investigating molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying antitumor activity of mistletoe are discussed in this paper. The analyzed trials provided evidence that there might be a combination of pharmacological and motivational aspects mediated by the mistletoe extract application which may contribute to the clinical benefit and positive outcome such as improved HRQoL and self-regulation in breast cancer patients.

  17. Physical activity and its mechanistic effects on prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wekesa, A; Harrison, M; Watson, R W

    2015-09-01

    Beneficial effects of physical activity have been illustrated in numerous aspects of health. With the increasing incidence of prostate cancer and changes in physical activity of men, understanding the link between the two has important implications for changing this cancer burden. Both positive and negative associations between physical activity and prostate cancer have been previously demonstrated in observational epidemiological studies. Elucidating the biological mechanisms would lead to a better understanding of how physical activity influences the progression of prostate cancer. This review was undertaken to: (1) identify evidence in literature that demonstrates the effects of physical activity on skeletal muscle secretomes, (2) indicate the plausible signaling pathways these proteins might activate, and (3) identify evidence in literature that demonstrates the roles of the signaling pathways in prostate cancer progression and regression. We also discuss proposed biological mechanisms and signaling pathways by which physical activity may prevent the development and progression of prostate cancer. We discuss proteins involved in the normal and aberrant growth and development of the prostate gland that may be affected by physical activity. We further identify future directions for research, including a better understanding of the biological mechanisms, the need to standardize physical activity and identify mechanistic end points of physical activity that can then be correlated with outcomes.

  18. Preclinical and Clinical Effects of Mistletoe against Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Marvibaigi, Mohsen; Amini, Neda; Abdul Majid, Fadzilah Adibah; Jaganathan, Saravana Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is among the most frequent types of cancer in women worldwide. Current conventional treatment options are accompanied by side effects. Mistletoe is amongst the important herbal medicines traditionally used as complementary remedies. An increasing number of studies have reported anticancer activity of mistletoe extracts on breast cancer cells and animal models. Some recent evidence suggests that cytotoxic activity of mistletoe may be mediated through different mechanisms. These findings provide a good base for clinical trials. Various studies on mistletoe therapy for breast cancer patients revealed similar findings concerning possible benefits on survival time, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), remission rate, and alleviating adverse reactions to conventional therapy. This review provides an overview of the recent findings on preclinical experiments and clinical trials of mistletoe for its cytotoxic and antitumor activity and its effect on HRQoL in breast cancer patients. Moreover, studies investigating molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying antitumor activity of mistletoe are discussed in this paper. The analyzed trials provided evidence that there might be a combination of pharmacological and motivational aspects mediated by the mistletoe extract application which may contribute to the clinical benefit and positive outcome such as improved HRQoL and self-regulation in breast cancer patients. PMID:25136622

  19. Effect modification of the association between trihalomethanes and pancreatic cancer by drinking water hardness: evidence from an ecological study.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Hui-Fen; Tsai, Shang-Shyue; Wu, Trong-Neng; Yang, Chun-Yuh

    2010-07-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between total trihalomethanes (TTHM) levels in public water supplies and risk of pancreatic cancer and to determine whether calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg) levels in drinking water modify the effects of TTHM on risk to develop pancreatic cancer. A matched case-control study was used to investigate the relationship between the risk of death attributed to pancreatic cancer and exposure to TTHM in drinking water in 53 municipalities in Taiwan. All pancreatic cancer deaths in the 53 municipalities from 1998 through 2007 were obtained from the Bureau of Vital Statistics of the Taiwan Provincial Department of Health. Controls were deaths from other causes and were pair matched to the cancer cases by gender, year of birth, and year of death. Each matched control was selected randomly from the set of possible controls for each cancer case. Data on TTHM levels in drinking water were collected from Taiwan Environmental Protection Administration. Information on the levels of Ca and Mg in drinking water was obtained from the Taiwan Water Supply Corporation. The municipality of residence for cancer cases and controls was presumed to be the source of the subject's TTHM, Ca, and Mg exposure via drinking water. Relative to individuals whose TTHM exposure level < 4.9ppb, the adjusted OR (95% CI) for pancreatic cancer was 1.01 (0.85-1.21) for individuals who resided in municipalities served by drinking water with a TTHM exposure > 4.9ppb. There was no evidence of an interaction of drinking water TTHM levels with low Ca intake via drinking water. However, we observed evidence of an interaction between drinking water TTHM concentrations and Mg intake via drinking water. Our findings showed that the correlation between TTHM exposure and risk of pancreatic cancer is influenced by Mg in drinking water. Increased knowledge of the interaction between Mg and TTHM in reducing pancreatic cancer risk will aid in public policy making

  20. Development, Characterization and Validation of Trastuzumab-Modified Gold Nanoparticles for Molecularly Targeted Radiosensitization of Breast Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, Niladri

    The overexpression of the human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2) in 20--25% of human breast cancers was investigated as a target for development of a gold nanoparticle (AuNP) based radiosensitizer for improving the efficacy of neoadjuvant X-radiation therapy of the disease. HER-2 targeted AuNPs were developed by covalently conjugating trastuzumab, a Health Canada approved monoclonal antibody for the treatment of HER-2-overexpressing breast cancer, to 30 nm AuNPs. Trastuzumab conjugated AuNPs were efficiently internalized by HER-2-overexpressing breast cancer cells (as assessed by darkfield microscopy and transmission electron microscopy) and increased DNA damage from X-radiation in these cells by more than 5-fold. To optimize delivery of AuNPs to HER-2-overexpressing tumors, high resolution microSPECT/CT imaging was used to track the in vivo fate of 111In-labelled non-targeted and HER-2 targeted AuNPs following intravenous (i.v.) or intratumoral (i.t.) injection. For i.v. injection, the effects of GdCl3 (for deactivation of macrophages) and non-specific (anti-CD20) antibody rituximab (for blocking of Fc mediated liver and spleen uptake) were studied. It was found that HER-2 targeting via attachment of trastuzumab paradoxically decreased tumor uptake as a result of faster elimination of the targeted AuNPs from the blood while improving internalization in HER-2-positive tumor cells as compared to non-targeted AuNPs. This phenomenon could be attributed to Fc-mediated recognition and subsequent sequestration of trastuzumab conjugated AuNP by the reticuloendothelial system (RES). Blocking of the RES did not increase tumor uptake of either HER-2 targeted or non-targeted AuNPs. Following i.t. injection, our results suggest that Au-NTs redistribute over time and traffick to the liver via the ipsilateral axillary lymph node leading to comparable exposure as seen with i.v. administration. In contrast, targeted AuNPs are bound and internalized by HER-2

  1. Effects of Tobacco Smoking & Nicotine on Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Petros, William P.; Younis, Islam R.; Ford, James N.; Weed, Scott A.

    2012-01-01

    A substantial number of the world's population continues to smoke tobacco, even in the setting of a cancer diagnosis. Studies have shown that cancer patients with a history of smoking have a worse prognosis. Modulation of several physiologic processes involved in drug disposition has been associated with chronic exposure to tobacco smoke. The most common of these can be categorized into effects on cytochrome P450 mediated metabolism, glucuronidation, and protein binding. Perturbation in the pharmacokinetics of anticancer drugs could result in clinically significant consequences, given they are amongst the most toxic, but potentially beneficial, pharmaceuticals prescribed. Unfortunately, the effect of tobacco smoking on drug disposition has only been explored for a few marketed anticancer drugs, thus very little prescribing information is available to guide clinicians on the vast majority of compounds. The carcinogenic properties of multiple compounds found in tobacco smoke have been well studied, however relatively little attention has been given to the effects of nicotine itself on cancer growth. Emerging data are available which identify nicotine's effects on cancer cell apoptosis, tumor angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. The implications of such are unclear, but may lead to important questions to be addressed regarding approaches to smoking cessation in cancer patients. PMID:23033231

  2. Effects of tobacco smoking and nicotine on cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Petros, William P; Younis, Islam R; Ford, James N; Weed, Scott A

    2012-10-01

    A substantial number of the world's population continues to smoke tobacco, even in the setting of a cancer diagnosis. Studies have shown that patients with cancer who have a history of smoking have a worse prognosis than nonsmokers. Modulation of several physiologic processes involved in drug disposition has been associated with long-term exposure to tobacco smoke. The most common of these processes can be categorized into the effects of smoking on cytochrome P450-mediated metabolism, glucuronidation, and protein binding. Perturbation in the pharmacokinetics of anticancer drugs could result in clinically significant consequences, as these drugs are among the most toxic, but potentially beneficial, pharmaceuticals prescribed. Unfortunately, the effect of tobacco smoking on drug disposition has been explored for only a few marketed anticancer drugs; thus, little prescribing information is available to guide clinicians on the vast majority of these agents. The carcinogenic properties of several compounds found in tobacco smoke have been well studied; however, relatively little attention has been given to the effects of nicotine itself on cancer growth. Data that identify nicotine's effect on cancer cell apoptosis, tumor angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis are emerging. The implications of these data are still unclear but may lead to important questions regarding approaches to smoking cessation in patients with cancer.

  3. Effects of modifiers on the hydrophobicity of SiO2 films from nano-husk ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kejing; Sun, Qingwen; Guo, Yanqing; Dong, Shuhua

    2013-07-01

    Nano-husk ashes were prepared by burning rice-husk with self-propagating method. The super-hydrophobic SiO2 films from nano-husk ash were prepared by sol-gel method using hydroxy silicone oil (HSO), hexamethyldisilazane (HMS), or methyl triethoxysilane (MTS) as modifiers. The effects of modifiers on the hydrophobic property of SiO2 films were studied, and the performances were characterized by the XRD, UV-vis, BET, EDS, SEM, IR, and Contact Angle Analyzer. The results showed that the contact angle of SiO2 films was more than 160° when volume ratio of the modifiers to silicon-sodium solution (SSS) was 0.15. The mechanism of modifiers on SiO2 surfaces is a graft copolymerization. The hydrophobic groups in the modifiers replace the hydroxy groups on SiO2 surfaces and make SiO2 surfaces present super-hydrophobicity.

  4. Effects of heat treatment on the bioactivity of surface-modified titanium in calcium solution.

    PubMed

    Sultana, Razia; Hamada, Kenichi; Ichikawa, Tetsuo; Asaoka, Kenzo

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of heat treatment on the bioactivity of hydrothermal-modified titanium in CaO solution for improved bioactivity by immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF). The hydrothermal treatment of titanium in CaO solution was performed at 121 degrees C at 0.2 MPa for 1 h in an autoclave followed by 1 h heat treatments at 200, 400, 600 and 800 degrees C simultaneously. The bioactivity of titanium was evaluated by hydroxyapatite precipitation during immersion in SBF. Surface microstructure changes after the heat treatments and immersion in SBF were determined by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Heat treatments at high temperatures (600 and 800 degrees C) promoted the synthesis of anatase, increased the thickness of the titanium oxide layer on the modified titanium surface and promoted the synthesis of calcium titanate, which possibly promoted the precipitation of apatite in SBF. The extent of precipitations increased with the time of immersion in SBF and the temperature of the heat treatment. Island-like deposits of needle-like crystals were observed only on the surface of the 600 and 800 degrees C heat-treated specimens after two or four week immersions in SBF. The results suggested that treatments of the surface of hydrothermal-treated titanium specimens at high temperatures (600 and 800 degrees C) could be effective for the surface modification of titanium as an implant material offering better osseointegration.

  5. Effect of H2O2 concentrations on copper removal using the modified hydrothermal biochar.

    PubMed

    Zuo, XiaoJun; Liu, Zhengang; Chen, MinDong

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated effect of H2O2 concentrations on copper removal using H2O2 modified hydrothermal carbonization Cymbopogon schoenanthus L. Spreng (HLG). Sorption behaviors of Cu (II) on the modified HLG by 20% H2O2 (mHLG2) could be the most desirable. Based on Langmuir isotherm, the maximum amount of Cu (II) uptake was in the sequence of mHLG2 (53.8mgg(-1))>mHLG1 (44.2mgg(-1))>mHLG3 (42.0mgg(-1))>mHLG0 (35.8mgg(-1)), which was higher than the results from majority of previous studies, suggesting that H2O2 modification advanced sorption capacity of hydrothermal biochars evidently. Effect mechanisms exploration indicated that the difference of Cu (II) removal by biochars before and after the modification was mainly related to functional groups. Carboxylic group was responsible for the best sorption property of Cu (II) by mHLG2, which was attributed to its significant relationships with H2O2 modification and Cu (II) removal.

  6. The effects of internal radiation exposure on cancer mortality in nuclear workers at Rocketdyne/Atomics International.

    PubMed Central

    Ritz, B; Morgenstern, H; Crawford-Brown, D; Young, B

    2000-01-01

    We examined the effects of chronic exposure to radionuclides, primarily uranium and mixed-fission products, on cancer mortality in a retrospective cohort study of workers enrolled in the radiation-monitoring program of a nuclear research and development facility. Between 1950 and 1994, 2,297 workers were monitored for internal radiation exposures, and 441 workers died, 134 (30.4%) of them from cancer as the underlying cause. We calculated internal lung-dose estimates based on urinalysis and whole-body and lung counts reported for individual workers. We examined cancer mortality of workers exposed at different cumulative lung-dose levels using complete risk-set analysis for cohort data, adjusting for age, pay type, time since first radiation monitored, and external radiation. In addition, we examined the potential for confounding due to chemical exposures and smoking, explored whether external radiation exposure modifies the effects of internal exposure, and estimated effects after excluding exposures likely to have been unrelated to disease onset. Dose-response relations were observed for death from hemato- and lymphopoietic cancers and from upper aerodigestive tract cancers, adjusting for age, time since first monitored, pay type, and external (gamma) radiation dose. No association was found for other cancers, including cancers of the lung. Despite the small number of exposed deaths from specific cancer types and possible bias due to measurement error and confounding, the positive findings and strong dose-response gradients observed suggest carcinogenic effects of internal radiation to the upper aerodigestive tract and the blood and lymph system in this occupational cohort. However, causal inferences require replication of our results in other populations or confirmation with an extended follow-up of this cohort. PMID:10964795

  7. Pleiotropic effects of genetic risk variants for other cancers on colorectal cancer risk: PAGE, GECCO, and CCFR Consortia

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Iona; Kocarnik, Jonathan M; Dumitrescu, Logan; Lindor, Noralane M; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Avery, Christy L.; Caberto, Christian P; Love, Shelly-Ann; Slattery, Martha L; Chan, Andrew T; Baron, John A; Hindorff, Lucia A; Park, Sungshim Lani; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Hoffmeister, Michael; Kraft, Peter; Butler, Anne; Duggan, David; Hou, Lifang; Carlson, Chris S; Monroe, Kristine R; Lin, Yi; Carty, Cara L; Mann, Sue; Ma, Jing; Giovannucci, Edward L; Fuchs, Charles S; Newcomb, Polly A; Jenkins, Mark A; Hopper, John L; Haile, Robert W; Conti, David V; Campbell, Peter T; Potter, John D; Caan, Bette J; Schoen, Robert E; Hayes, Richard B; Chanock, Stephen J; Berndt, Sonja I; Kury, Sebastien; Bezieau, Stephane; Ambite, Jose Luis; Kumaraguruparan, Gowri; Richardson, Danielle; Goodloe, Robert J; Dilks, Holli H; Baker, Paxton; Zanke, Brent W; Lemire, Mathieu; Gallinger, Steven; Hsu, Li; Jiao, Shuo; Harrison, Tabitha; Seminara, Daniela; Haiman, Christopher A; Kooperberg, Charles; Wilkens, Lynne R; Hutter, Carolyn M; White, Emily; Crawford, Dana C; Heiss, Gerardo; Hudson, Thomas J; Brenner, Hermann; Bush, William S; Casey, Graham; Marchand, Loic Le; Peters, Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    Objective Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified a large number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with a wide array of cancer sites. Several of these variants demonstrate associations with multiple cancers, suggesting pleiotropic effects and shared biological mechanisms across some cancers. We hypothesized that SNPs previously associated with other cancers may additionally be associated with colorectal cancer. In a large-scale study, we examined 171 SNPs previously associated with 18 different cancers for their associations with colorectal cancer. Design We examined 13,338 colorectal cancer cases and 40,967 controls from three consortia: Population Architecture using Genetics and Epidemiology (PAGE), Genetic Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer (GECCO), and the Colon Cancer Family Registry (CCFR). Study-specific logistic regression results, adjusted for age, sex, principal components of genetic ancestry, and/or study specific factors (as relevant) were combined using fixed-effect meta-analyses to evaluate the association between each SNP and colorectal cancer risk. A Bonferroni-corrected p-value of 2.92×10−4 was used to determine statistical significance of the associations. Results Two correlated SNPs— rs10090154 and rs4242382—in Region 1 of chromosome 8q24, a prostate cancer susceptibility region, demonstrated statistically significant associations with colorectal cancer risk. The most significant association was observed with rs4242382 (meta-analysis OR=1.12; 95% CI: 1.07–1.18; P=1.74×10−5), which also demonstrated similar associations across racial/ethnic populations and anatomical sub-sites. Conclusion This is the first study to clearly demonstrate Region 1 of chromosome 8q24 as a susceptibility locus for colorectal cancer, thus adding colorectal cancer to the list of cancer sites linked to this particular multi-cancer risk region at 8q24. PMID:23935004

  8. Effects of Cancer-Associated EPHA3 Mutations on Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cancer genome sequencing efforts recently identified EPHA3, which encodes the EPHA3 receptor tyrosine kinase, as one of the most frequently mutated genes in lung cancer. Although receptor tyrosine kinase mutations often drive oncogenic conversion and tumorigenesis, the oncogenic potential of the EPHA3 mutations in lung cancer remains unknown. Methods We used immunoprecipitation, western blotting, and kinase assays to determine the activity and signaling of mutant EPHA3 receptors. A mutation-associated gene signature was generated from one large dataset, mapped to another training dataset with survival information, and tested in a third independent dataset. EPHA3 expression levels were determined by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction in paired normal-tumor clinical specimens and by immunohistochemistry in human lung cancer tissue microarrays. We assessed tumor growth in vivo using A549 and H1299 human lung carcinoma cell xenografts in mice (n = 7–8 mice per group). Tumor cell proliferation was measured by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation and apoptosis by multiple assays. All P values are from two-sided tests. Results At least two cancer-associated EPHA3 somatic mutations functioned as dominant inhibitors of the normal (wild type) EPHA3 protein. An EPHA3 mutation–associated gene signature that was associated with poor patient survival was identified. Moreover, EPHA3 gene copy numbers and/or expression levels were decreased in tumors from large cohorts of patients with lung cancer (eg, the gene was deleted in 157 of 371 [42%] primary lung adenocarcinomas). Reexpression of wild-type EPHA3 in human lung cancer lines increased apoptosis by suppression of AKT activation in vitro and inhibited the growth of tumor xenografts (eg, for H1299 cells, mean tumor volume with wild-type EPHA3 = 437.4mm3 vs control = 774.7mm3, P < .001). Tumor-suppressive effects of wild-type EPHA3 could be overridden in trans by dominant negative EPHA3

  9. Modifying Effect of Heat Waves on the Relationship between Temperature and Mortality.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won Kyung; Lee, Hye Ah; Park, Hyesook

    2016-05-01

    Studies conducted to evaluate temporal trends of heat-related mortality have not considered the effects of heat waves; although it is known they can affect mortality and act as a modifying factor. After adjusting for long-term trends and seasonality, the effects of temperature on non-accidental deaths in Seoul and Busan (inland and coastal cities, respectively) were analyzed using a generalized additive model of Poisson distribution. We evaluated temporal trends of heat-related mortalities in four periods (1991-1995, 1996-2000, 2001-2005, and 2006-2012). The effects of temperature on mortality were evaluated according to the occurrence of a heat wave and results were compared in the two cities. The effect of temperature on mortality was the greatest in 1991-1995 in Seoul; no significant change was observed in Busan. When we stratified the study period by heat wave status, the risk increase in mortality was 15.9% per 1℃ during years with a heat wave in Seoul, which was much higher than 0.31% increase observed during years without a heat wave. On the other hand, Busan showed a linear relationship between temperature and mortality and no significant difference between years with or without a heat wave. Variations in the relationship between temperature and mortality could be misunderstood if heat waves are not considered. Furthermore, heterogeneity was found in the modifying effect of heat waves on heat-related mortality in inland and coastal cities. The findings of this study help understand relations between temperature and mortality.

  10. Modifying Effect of Heat Waves on the Relationship between Temperature and Mortality

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Studies conducted to evaluate temporal trends of heat-related mortality have not considered the effects of heat waves; although it is known they can affect mortality and act as a modifying factor. After adjusting for long-term trends and seasonality, the effects of temperature on non-accidental deaths in Seoul and Busan (inland and coastal cities, respectively) were analyzed using a generalized additive model of Poisson distribution. We evaluated temporal trends of heat-related mortalities in four periods (1991-1995, 1996-2000, 2001-2005, and 2006-2012). The effects of temperature on mortality were evaluated according to the occurrence of a heat wave and results were compared in the two cities. The effect of temperature on mortality was the greatest in 1991-1995 in Seoul; no significant change was observed in Busan. When we stratified the study period by heat wave status, the risk increase in mortality was 15.9% per 1℃ during years with a heat wave in Seoul, which was much higher than 0.31% increase observed during years without a heat wave. On the other hand, Busan showed a linear relationship between temperature and mortality and no significant difference between years with or without a heat wave. Variations in the relationship between temperature and mortality could be misunderstood if heat waves are not considered. Furthermore, heterogeneity was found in the modifying effect of heat waves on heat-related mortality in inland and coastal cities. The findings of this study help understand relations between temperature and mortality. PMID:27134490

  11. Effects of genetically modified T2A-1 rice on the GI health of rats after 90-day supplement.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yanfang; Xu, Wentao; He, Xiaoyun; Liu, Haiyan; Cao, Sishuo; Qi, Xiaozhe; Huang, Kunlun; Luo, Yunbo

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal toxin (Bt) rice will be commercialized as a main food source. Traditional safety assessments on genetically modified products pay little attention on gastrointestinal (GI) health. More data about GI health of Bt rice must be provided to dispel public' doubts about the potential effects on human health. We constructed an improved safety assessment animal model using a basic subchronic toxicity experiment, measuring a range of parameters including microflora composition, intestinal permeability, epithelial structure, fecal enzymes, bacterial activity, and intestinal immunity. Significant differences were found between rice-fed groups and AIN93G-fed control groups in several parameters, whereas no differences were observed between genetically modified and non-genetically modified groups. No adverse effects were found on GI health resulting from genetically modified T2A-1 rice. In conclusion, this study may offer a systematic safety assessment model for GM material with respect to the effects on GI health.

  12. Effects of genetically modified T2A-1 rice on the GI health of rats after 90-day supplement

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yanfang; Xu, Wentao; He, Xiaoyun; Liu, Haiyan; Cao, Sishuo; Qi, Xiaozhe; Huang, Kunlun; Luo, Yunbo

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal toxin (Bt) rice will be commercialized as a main food source. Traditional safety assessments on genetically modified products pay little attention on gastrointestinal (GI) health. More data about GI health of Bt rice must be provided to dispel public' doubts about the potential effects on human health. We constructed an improved safety assessment animal model using a basic subchronic toxicity experiment, measuring a range of parameters including microflora composition, intestinal permeability, epithelial structure, fecal enzymes, bacterial activity, and intestinal immunity. Significant differences were found between rice-fed groups and AIN93G-fed control groups in several parameters, whereas no differences were observed between genetically modified and non-genetically modified groups. No adverse effects were found on GI health resulting from genetically modified T2A-1 rice. In conclusion, this study may offer a systematic safety assessment model for GM material with respect to the effects on GI health. PMID:23752350

  13. Effectiveness of a modified rapid toilet training workshop for parents of children with developmental disabilities.

    PubMed

    Rinald, Katherine; Mirenda, Pat

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with developmental disabilities often experience challenges in acquiring toileting skills, which highlights a need for effective toilet training strategies that can be readily disseminated to caregivers. The purpose of this multiple baseline study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a modified rapid toilet training workshop provided to the parents of six children with developmental disabilities. In the workshop, parents were taught to implement an instructional protocol that included increased fluid intake, positive reinforcement for correct toileting, scheduled toilet sittings, scheduled chair sittings to teach initiation, neutral redirection for accidents, and procedures to enhance maintenance and generalization. Following the workshop, parents implemented the toilet training protocol at home with their children for 5-8 days, with telephone support from a researcher. Results indicate that the workshop resulted in increased in-toilet urination and defecation and decreased accidents for the five children who completed the study. The results are discussed in relation to previous and future research and implications for practice.

  14. Effects of information on young consumers' willingness to pay for genetically modified food: experimental auction analysis.

    PubMed

    Kajale, Dilip B; Becker, T C

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the effects of information on consumers' willingness to pay (WTP) for genetically modified food (GMF). We used Vickrey second price experimental auction method for elicitation of consumer WTP for GM potato chips and GM soya-chocolate bar. The sample used in this study was university students from Delhi, India. Four information formats (positive, negative, no information, and combined information about GM technology) were used for the examination. The results show that, when students received the combine information they were willing to pay around 17%-20% premium for GMF and when received the negative information they demanded around 22% discount for GMF. While the positive- and the no-information formats alone have no considerable effect on consumers' WTP for GMF. Overall, our findings suggest that while doing marketing of GMF in India, the best strategy is to provide combined information about GM technology.

  15. Surface-modified Diamond Field-effect Transistors for Enzyme-immobilized Biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Kwang-Soup; Degawa, Munenori; Nakamura, Yusuke; Kanazawa, Hirofumi; Umezawa, Hitoshi; Kawarada, Hiroshi

    2004-06-01

    The enzyme sensors using electrolyte-solution-gate diamond field effect transistors (SGFETs) have been developed for the first time. The hydrogen-terminated surface channel of the FETs was modified into partially aminated and oxygen-terminated (H-A-O-terminated) with irradiation of ultraviolet in an ammonia environment. The pH response of that is obtained about 50 mV/pH at pH 2-10. The concentration of substrates (urea or glucose) in the electrolyte solution has been detected by the pH change due to the bio-catalyzed effect of enzyme (urease or glucose oxidase), which is immobilized on the channel of SGFETs. The sensitivity of urea and glucose is approximately 30 mV/decade and 20 mV/decade respectively.

  16. Multiple sclerosis disease-modifying therapies: adverse effect surveillance and management.

    PubMed

    Wingerchuk, Dean M

    2006-03-01

    There are five approved, partially effective, parenteral disease-modifying therapies for multiple sclerosis (MS), including three interferon-beta preparations, glatiramer acetate and the antineoplastic agent mitoxantrone. A sixth drug, natalizumab, was withdrawn from the market in 2005 but could return with increased safety measures. Careful surveillance for, and management of, the minor and serious adverse effects associated with these therapies in routine practice provides the best opportunity for maintaining compliance and achieving maximal therapeutic efficacy. This review outlines the strategies for the prevention, identification and management of the complications associated with administration and ongoing use of current MS therapies. These skills will become increasingly important to those caring for MS patients as contemporary treatment regimens become increasingly complex.

  17. Antiproliferative and antimetastatic effects of emodin on human pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, An; Chen, Hui; Wei, Weitian; Ye, Sheng; Liao, Wei; Gong, Jianming; Jiang, Zhengcai; Wang, Lian; Lin, Shengzhang

    2011-07-01

    Emodin (1, 3, 8-trihydroxy-6-methylanthraquinone) is an active constituent isolated from the root of Rheum palmatum L and is the main effective component of some Chinese herbs and plants. Pharmacological studies have demonstrated that emodin exhibits anti-cancer effects on several human cancers. However, the molecular mechanisms of emodin-mediated tumor regression have not been fully defined. This study was performed to investigate the antiproliferative and antimetastatic effects of emodin on pancreatic cancer in vitro and in vivo. Our results showed that emodin induced a higher percentage of growth inhibition and apoptosis in the pancreatic cancer cell line SW1990 compared to that of control, and emodin suppressed the migration and invasion of SW1990 cells in a dose-dependent manner. To investigate the possible mechanisms involved in these events, we performed electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and Western blot analysis, and found that emodin significantly down-regulated NF-κB DNA-binding activity, survivin and MMP-9 in SW1990 cells. Moreover, the expression of cleaved caspase-3 was up-regulated in SW1990 cells after treatment with emodin. In addition, a metastatic model simulating human pancreatic cancer was established by orthotopic implantation of histologically intact human tumor tissue into the pancreatic wall of nude mice. Oral administration of emodin significantly decreased tumor weight and metastasis compared to control. Furthermore, the expression of NF-κB, survivin and MMP-9 were also suppressed in tumor tissues after treatment with emodin. Collectively, our results indicated that emodin exerts antiproliferative and antimetastatic activity on pancreatic cancer both in vitro and in vivo, which may be related to down-regulation of NF-κB and its regulated molecules such as survivin and MMP-9 proteins. Consequently, these results provide important insights into emodin as an anti-invasive agent for the therapy of human pancreatic cancer.

  18. Effect of a six-month yoga exercise intervention on fitness outcomes for breast cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Daniel C; Darby, Nydia; Gonzalez, Krystle; Boggess, Terri; Morris, Ruth M; Ramirez, Amelie G

    2015-01-01

    Yoga-based exercise has proven to be beneficial for practitioners, including cancer survivors. This study reports on the improvements in physical fitness for 20 breast cancer survivors who participated in a six-month yoga-based exercise program (YE). Results are compared to a comprehensive exercise (CE) program group and a comparison (C) exercise group who chose their own exercises. "Pre" and "post" fitness assessments included measures of anthropometrics, cardiorespiratory capacity, strength and flexibility. Descriptive statistics, effect size (d), dependent sample 't' tests for all outcome measures were calculated for the YE group. Significant improvements included: decreased % body fat (-3.00%, d = -0.44, p < 0.001); increased sit to stand leg strength repetitions (2.05, d = 0.48, p = 0.003); forward reach (3.59 cm, d = 0.61, p = 0.01); and right arm sagittal range of motion (6.50°, d = 0.92, p = 0.05). To compare YE outcomes with the other two groups, a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used. YE participants significantly outperformed C participants on "forward reach" (3.59 cm gained versus -2.44 cm lost), (p = 0.009) and outperformed CE participants (3.59 cm gained versus 1.35 cm gained), but not statistically significant. Our results support yoga-based exercise modified for breast cancer survivors as safe and effective.

  19. Effect of a six month yoga exercise intervention on fitness outcomes for breast cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Daniel C.; Darby, Nydia; Gonzalez, Krystle; Boggess, Terri; Morris, Ruth M.; Ramirez, Amelie G.

    2016-01-01

    Yoga-based exercise has proven to be beneficial for practitioners, including cancer survivors. This study reports on the improvements in physical fitness for 20 breast cancer survivors who participated in a six-month yoga-based (YE) exercise program. Results are compared to a comprehensive exercise (CE) program group and a comparison (C) exercise group who chose their own exercises. “Pre” and “post” fitness assessments included measures of anthropometrics, cardiorespiratory capacity, strength and flexibility. Descriptive statistics, effect size (d), dependent sample ‘t’ tests for all outcome measures were calculated for the YE group. Significant improvements included: decreased % body fat (−3.00%, d = −0.44, p < 0.001); increased sit to stand leg strength repetitions (2.05, d = 0.48, p = 0.003); forward reach (3.59 cm, d = 0.61, p = 0.01); and right arm sagittal range of motion (6.50°, d = 0.92, p= 0.05). To compare YE outcomes with the other two groups, a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used. YE participants significantly outperformed C participants on “forward reach” (3.59 cm gained versus −2.44 cm lost), (p = 0.009) and outperformed CE participants (3.59 cm gained versus 1.35 cm gained), but not statistically significant. Our results support yoga-based exercise modified for breast cancer survivors as safe and effective. PMID:26395825

  20. A Gompertzian model with random effects to cervical cancer growth

    SciTech Connect

    Mazlan, Mazma Syahidatul Ayuni; Rosli, Norhayati

    2015-05-15

    In this paper, a Gompertzian model with random effects is introduced to describe the cervical cancer growth. The parameters values of the mathematical model are estimated via maximum likehood estimation. We apply 4-stage Runge-Kutta (SRK4) for solving the stochastic model numerically. The efficiency of mathematical model is measured by comparing the simulated result and the clinical data of the cervical cancer growth. Low values of root mean-square error (RMSE) of Gompertzian model with random effect indicate good fits.

  1. A Gompertzian model with random effects to cervical cancer growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazlan, Mazma Syahidatul Ayuni; Rosli, Norhayati

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, a Gompertzian model with random effects is introduced to describe the cervical cancer growth. The parameters values of the mathematical model are estimated via maximum likehood estimation. We apply 4-stage Runge-Kutta (SRK4) for solving the stochastic model numerically. The efficiency of mathematical model is measured by comparing the simulated result and the clinical data of the cervical cancer growth. Low values of root mean-square error (RMSE) of Gompertzian model with random effect indicate good fits.

  2. Cancer and non-cancer effects in Japanese atomic bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Little, M P

    2009-06-01

    The survivors of the atomic bombings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki are a general population of all ages and sexes and, because of the wide and well characterised range of doses received, have been used by many scientific committees (International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiations (BEIR)) as the basis of population cancer risk estimates following radiation exposure. Leukaemia was the first cancer to be associated with atomic bomb radiation exposure, with preliminary indications of an excess among the survivors within the first five years after the bombings. An excess of solid cancers became apparent approximately ten years after radiation exposure. With increasing follow-up, excess risks of most cancer types have been observed, the major exceptions being chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, and pancreatic, prostate and uterine cancer. For most solid cancer sites a linear dose response is observed, although in the latest follow-up of the mortality data there is evidence (p = 0.10) for an upward curvature in the dose response for all solid cancers. The only cancer sites which exhibit (upward) curvature in the dose response are leukaemia, and non-melanoma skin and bone cancer. For leukaemia the dose response is very markedly upward curving, indeed largely describable as a pure quadratic dose response, particularly in the low dose (0-2 Sv) range. Even 55 years after the bombings over 40% of the Life Span Study cohort remain alive, so continued follow-up of this group is vital for completing our understanding of long-term radiation effects in people. In general, the relative risks per unit dose among the Japanese atomic bomb survivors are greater than those among comparable subsets in studies of medically exposed individuals. Cell sterilisation largely accounts for the discrepancy in relative risks between these two populations, although other

  3. Histone deacetylase inhibitor-induced cell death in bladder cancer is associated with chromatin modification and modifying protein expression: A proteomic approach

    PubMed Central

    LI, QINGDI QUENTIN; HAO, JIAN-JIANG; ZHANG, ZHENG; HSU, IAWEN; LIU, YI; TAO, ZHEN; LEWI, KEIDREN; METWALLI, ADAM R.; AGARWAL, PIYUSH K.

    2016-01-01

    The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project recently identified the importance of mutations in chromatin remodeling genes in human carcinomas. These findings imply that epigenetic modulators might have a therapeutic role in urothelial cancers. To exploit histone deacetylases (HDACs) as targets for cancer therapy, we investigated the HDAC inhibitors (HDACIs) romidepsin, trichostatin A, and vorinostat as potential chemotherapeutic agents for bladder cancer. We demonstrate that the three HDACIs suppressed cell growth and induced cell death in the bladder cancer cell line 5637. To identify potential mechanisms associated with the anti-proliferative and cytotoxic effects of the HDACIs, we used quantitative proteomics to determine the proteins potentially involved in these processes. Our proteome studies identified a total of 6003 unique proteins. Of these, 2472 proteins were upregulated and 2049 proteins were downregulated in response to HDACI exposure compared to the untreated controls (P<0.05). Bioinformatic analysis further revealed that those differentially expressed proteins were involved in multiple biological functions and enzyme-regulated pathways, including cell cycle progression, apoptosis, autophagy, free radical generation and DNA damage repair. HDACIs also altered the acetylation status of histones and non-histone proteins, as well as the levels of chromatin modification proteins, suggesting that HDACIs exert multiple cytotoxic actions in bladder cancer cells by inhibiting HDAC activity or altering the structure of chromatin. We conclude that HDACIs are effective in the inhibition of cell proliferation and the induction of apoptosis in the 5637 bladder cancer cells through multiple cell death-associated pathways. These observations support the notion that HDACIs provide new therapeutic options for bladder cancer treatment and thus warrant further preclinical exploration. PMID:27082124

  4. Decreased expression of TLR7 in gastric cancer tissues and the effects of TLR7 activation on gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    JIANG, JIONG; DONG, LEI; QIN, BIN; SHI, HAITAO; GUO, XIAOYAN; WANG, YAN

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine the expression of Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) in gastric cancer tissues and investigate the effects of its activation on gastric cancer cells. Patients with gastric cancer (n=30) and patients without gastric cancer (control; n=14) who underwent gastroscopy were enrolled in the study. Gastric cancer and cancer-adjacent tissues were obtained from the patients with gastric cancer, and normal gastric epithelial tissues were obtained from the control patients. The TLR7 mRNA and protein expressions in different tissues were investigated by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blotting and immunohistochemistry. The present study also determined the effects of TLR7 activation by the agonist imiquimod on TLR7 protein expression, proinflammatory cytokine secretion and viability in SGC-7901 gastric cancer cells. The mRNA and protein expression levels of TLR7 were significantly downregulated in gastric cancer tissues compared with cancer-adjacent and normal gastric epithelial tissues (P<0.01). Imiquimod significantly increased TLR7 protein expression levels, and promoted the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 in SGC-7901 cells. Furthermore, imiquimod inhibited the proliferation of SGC-7901 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Thus, the present study identified that the expression of TLR7 was decreased in gastric cancer tissues, and TLR7 activation enhanced TLR7 expression, promoted the production of proinflammatory cytokines and inhibited the growth of gastric cancer cells. PMID:27347192

  5. Characterizing Corrosion Effects of Weak Organic Acids Using a Modified Bono Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuqin; Turbini, Laura J.; Ramjattan, Deepchand; Christian, Bev; Pritzker, Mark

    2013-12-01

    To meet environmental requirements and achieve benefits of cost-effective manufacturing, no-clean fluxes (NCFs) or low-solids fluxes have become popular in present electronic manufacturing processes. Weak organic acids (WOAs) as the activation ingredients in NCFs play an important role, especially in the current lead-free and halogen-free soldering technology era. However, no standard or uniform method exists to characterize the corrosion effects of WOAs on actual metallic circuits of printed wiring boards (PWBs). Hence, the development of an effective quantitative test method for evaluating the corrosion effects of WOAs on the PWB's metallic circuits is imperative. In this paper, the modified Bono test, which was developed to quantitatively examine the corrosion properties of flux residues, is used to characterize the corrosion effects of five WOAs (i.e., abietic acid, succinic acid, glutaric acid, adipic acid, and malic acid) on PWB metallic circuits. Experiments were performed under three temperature/humidity conditions (85°C/85% RH, 60°C/93% RH, and 40°C/93% RH) using two WOA solution concentrations. The different corrosion effects among the various WOAs were best reflected in the testing results at 40°C and 60°C. Optical microscopy was used to observe the morphology of the corroded copper tracks, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) energy-dispersive x-ray (EDX) characterization was performed to determine the dendrite composition.

  6. Modified Whole Effluent Toxicity Test to Assess and Decouple Wastewater Effects from Environmental Gradients

    PubMed Central

    Sauco, Sebastián; Gómez, Julio; Barboza, Francisco R.; Lercari, Diego; Defeo, Omar

    2013-01-01

    Environmental gradients and wastewater discharges produce aggregated effects on marine populations, obscuring the detection of human impact. Classical assessment methods do not include environmental effects in toxicity tests designs, which could lead to incorrect conclusions. We proposed a modified Whole Effluent Toxicity test (mWET) that includes environmental gradients in addition to effluent dilutions, together with the application of Generalized Linear Mixed Models (GLMM) to assess and decouple those effects. We tested this approach, analyzing the lethal effects of wastewater on a marine sandy beach bivalve affected by an artificial canal freshwater discharge used for rice crops irrigation. To this end, we compared bivalve mortality between canal water dilutions (CWd) and salinity controls (SC: without canal water). CWd were prepared by diluting the water effluent (sampled during the pesticide application period) with artificial marine water. The salinity gradient was included in the design by achieving the same final salinities in both CWd and SC, allowing us to account for the effects of salinity by including this variable as a random factor in the GLMM. Our approach detected significantly higher mortalities in CWd, indicating potential toxic effects of the effluent discharge. mWET represents an improvement over the internationally standardized WET tests, since it considers environmental variability and uses appropriate statistical analyses. PMID:23755304

  7. Effective action approach to cosmological perturbations in dark energy and modified gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Battye, Richard A.; Pearson, Jonathan A. E-mail: jp@jb.man.ac.uk

    2012-07-01

    In light of upcoming observations modelling perturbations in dark energy and modified gravity models has become an important topic of research. We develop an effective action to construct the components of the perturbed dark energy momentum tensor which appears in the perturbed generalized gravitational field equations, δG{sup μν} = 8πGδT{sup μν}+δU{sup μν} for linearized perturbations. Our method does not require knowledge of the Lagrangian density of the dark sector to be provided, only its field content. The method is based on the fact that it is only necessary to specify the perturbed Lagrangian to quadratic order and couples this with the assumption of global statistical isotropy of spatial sections to show that the model can be specified completely in terms of a finite number of background dependent functions. We present our formalism in a coordinate independent fashion and provide explicit formulae for the perturbed conservation equation and the components of δU{sup μ}{sub ν} for two explicit generic examples: (i) the dark sector does not contain extra fields, L = L(g{sub μν}) and (ii) the dark sector contains a scalar field and its first derivative L = L(g{sub μν},φ,∇{sub μ}φ). We discuss how the formalism can be applied to modified gravity models containing derivatives of the metric, curvature tensors, higher derivatives of the scalar fields and vector fields.

  8. Void effect analysis of Pb-208 of fast reactors with modified CANDLE burn-up scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Widiawati, Nina Su’ud, Zaki

    2015-09-30

    Void effect analysis of Pb-208 as coolant of fast reactors with modified candle burn-up scheme has been conducted. Lead cooled fast reactor (LFR) is one of the fourth-generation reactor designs. The reactor is designed with a thermal power output of 500 MWt. Modified CANDLE burn-up scheme allows the reactor to have long life operation by supplying only natural uranium as fuel cycle input. This scheme introducing discrete region, the fuel is initially put in region 1, after one cycle of 10 years of burn up it is shifted to region 2 and region 1 is filled by fresh natural uranium fuel. The reactor is designed for 100 years with 10 regions arranged axially. The results of neutronic calculation showed that the void coefficients ranged from −0.6695443 % at BOC to −0.5273626 % at EOC for 500 MWt reactor. The void coefficients of Pb-208 more negative than Pb-nat. The results showed that the reactors with Pb-208 coolant have better level of safety than Pb-nat.

  9. Disease-modifying effect of intravenous immunoglobulin in an experimental model of epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Min; Arumugam, Thiruma V.; Leanage, Gayeshika; Tieng, Quang M.; Yadav, Ashwin; Ullmann, Jeremy F. P.; She, David T.; Truong, Vy; Ruitenberg, Marc J.; Reutens, David C.

    2017-01-01

    Novel therapies that prevent or modify the development of epilepsy following an initiating brain insult could significantly reduce the burden of this disease. In light of evidence that immune mechanisms play an important role in generating and maintaining the epileptic condition, we evaluated the effect of a well-established immunomodulatory treatment, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg), on the development of epilepsy in an experimental model of epileptogenesis. In separate experiments, IVIg was administered either before (pre-treatment) or after (post-treatment) the onset of pilocarpine status epilepticus (SE). Our results show that both pre- and post-treatment with IVIg attenuated acute inflammation in the SE model. Specifically, IVIg reduced local activation of glial cells, complement system activation, and blood-brain barrier damage (BBB), which are all thought to play important roles in the development of epilepsy. Importantly, post-treatment with IVIg was also found to reduce the frequency and duration of subsequent spontaneous recurrent seizures as detected by chronic video-electroencephalographic (video-EEG) recordings. This finding supports a novel application for IVIg, specifically its repurposing as a disease-modifying therapy in epilepsy. PMID:28074934

  10. An effective modified water extraction method for Landsat-8 OLI imagery of mountainous plateau regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, H.; Wang, L.; Jing, L.; Xu, J.

    2016-04-01

    Water body extraction from remote sensing imagery is an efficient way to investigate and monitor water resources. In the study area of this research, a mountainous plateau near Kashgar, China, sparse vegetation and seasonal rivers affect water body extraction. In order to extract water bodies, a modified water body extraction method is proposed in this paper and tested using Landsat-8 OLI imagery. Following this method, binary images are first generated using a classification, a Tasseled Cap transform, and a normalized difference water index, respectively, and then combined to yield a mask. Next, water bodies are delineated by masking the Landsat-8 OLI imagery and then refined by eliminating false areas using a supervised classification. It is demonstrated from the resulting water body maps that terrain related shadows in imagery were effectively eliminated and river tributaries and artificial ditches were precisely delineated, with accuracy up to 94%. Compared with several current water body extraction methods, the modified method yielded water body maps with better visualization and slightly improved accuracy.

  11. Effects of radiation and temperature on iodide sorption by surfactant-modified bentonite.

    PubMed

    Choung, Sungwook; Kim, Minkyung; Yang, Jung-Seok; Kim, Min-Gyu; Um, Wooyong

    2014-08-19

    Bentonite, which is used as an engineered barrier in geological repositories, is ineffective for sorbing anionic radionuclides because of its negatively charged surface. This study modified raw bentonite using a cationic surfactant (i.e., hexadecyltrimethylammonium [HDTMA]-Br) to improve its sorption capability for radioactive iodide. The effects of temperature and radiation on the iodide sorption of surfactant-modified bentonite (SMB) were also evaluated under alkaline pH condition similar to that found in repository environments. Different amounts of surfactant, equivalent to the 50, 100, and 200% cation-exchange capacity of the bentonite, were used to produce the HDTMA-SMB for iodide sorption. The sorption reaction of the SMB with iodide reached equilibrium rapidly within 10 min regardless of temperature and radiation conditions. The rate of iodide sorption increased as the amount of the added surfactant was increased and nonlinear sorption behavior was exhibited. However, high temperature and γ-irradiation ((60)Co) resulted in significantly (∼2-10 times) lower iodide Kd values for the SMB. The results of FTIR, NMR, and XANES spectroscopy analysis suggested that the decrease in iodide sorption may be caused by weakened physical electrostatic force between the HDTMA and iodide, and by the surfactant becoming detached from the SMB during the heating and irradiation processes.

  12. Effects of sintering atmosphere on the physical and mechanical properties of modified BOF slag glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Wen-bin; Li, Yu; Cang, Da-qiang; Zhou, Yuan-yuan; Fan, Yong

    2014-05-01

    This study proposes an efficient way to utilize all the chemical components of the basic oxygen furnace (BOF) slag to prepare high value-added glass-ceramics. A molten modified BOF slag was converted from the melting BOF slag by reducing it and separating out iron component in it, and the modified BOF slag was then quenched in water to form glasses with different basicities. The glasses were subsequently sintered in the temperature range of 600-1000°C in air or nitrogen atmosphere for 1 h. The effects of different atmospheres on the physical and mechanical properties of sintered samples were studied by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and by conducting experiment on evaluating the sintering shrinkage, water absorption and bulk density. It is found that the kinetics of the sintering process is significantly affected by sintering atmosphere. In particular, compared with sintering in air atmosphere, sintering in N2 atmosphere promotes the synergistic growth of pyroxene and melilite crystalline phases, which can contribute to better mechanical properties and denser microstructure.

  13. Effects of Modified Multistage Field Test on Performance and Physiological Responses in Wheelchair Basketball Players

    PubMed Central

    Weissland, Thierry; Faupin, Arnaud; Borel, Benoit; Berthoin, Serge; Leprêtre, Pierre-Marie

    2015-01-01

    A bioenergetical analysis of manoeuvrability and agility performance for wheelchair players is inexistent. It was aimed at comparing the physiological responses and performance obtained from the octagon multistage field test (MFT) and the modified condition in “8 form” (MFT-8). Sixteen trained wheelchair basketball players performed both tests in randomized condition. The levels performed (end-test score), peak values of oxygen uptake (VO2peak), minute ventilation (VEpeak), heart rate (HRpeak), peak and relative blood lactate (Δ[Lact−] = peak – rest values), and the perceived rating exertion (RPE) were measured. MFT-8 induced higher VO2peak and VEpeak values compared to MFT (VO2peak: 2.5 ± 0.6 versus 2.3 ± 0.6 L·min−1 and VEpeak: 96.3 ± 29.1 versus 86.6 ± 23.4 L·min−1; P < 0.05) with no difference in other parameters. Significant relations between VEpeak and end-test score were correlated for both field tests (P < 0.05). At exhaustion, MFT attained incompletely VO2peak and VEpeak. Among experienced wheelchair players, MFT-8 had no effect on test performance but generates higher physiological responses than MFT. It could be explained by demands of wheelchair skills occurring in 8 form during the modified condition. PMID:25802841

  14. Effects of Radiation and Temperature on Iodide Sorption by Surfactant-Modified Bentonite

    SciTech Connect

    Choung, Sungwook; Kim, Min Kyung; Yang, Jungseok; Kim, Min-Gyu; Um, Wooyong

    2014-08-04

    Bentonite, which is used as an engineered barrier in geological repositories, is ineffective for sorbing anionic radionuclides because of its negatively charged surface. This study modified raw bentonite using a cationic surfactant (i.e., hexadecyltrimethylammonium [HDTMA]-Br) to improve its sorption capability for radioactive iodide. The effects of temperature and radiation on the iodide sorption of surfactant-modified bentonite (SMB) were evaluated under alkaline pH condition similar to that found in repository environments. Different amounts of surfactant, equivalent to the 50, 100, and 200% cation-exchange capacity of the bentonite, were used to produce the HDTMA-SMB for iodide sorption. The sorption reaction of the SMB with iodide reached equilibrium rapidly within 10 min regardless of temperature and radiation conditions. The rate of iodide sorption increased as the amount of the added surfactant was increased and nonlinear sorption behavior was exhibited. However, high temperature and γ-irradiation (60Co) resulted in significantly (~2–10 times) lower iodide Kd values for the SMB. The results of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis suggested that the decrease in iodide sorption may be caused by weakened physical electrostatic force between the HDTMA and iodide, and by the surfactant becoming detached from the SMB during the heating and irradiation processes.

  15. Effect of acid concentration and treatment time on acid-alcohol modified jackfruit seed starch properties.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Himjyoti; Paul, Sanjib Kumar; Kalita, Dipankar; Mahanta, Charu Lata

    2011-09-15

    The properties of starch extracted from jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam.) seeds, collected from west Assam after acid-alcohol modification by short term treatment (ST) for 15-30min with concentrated hydrochloric acid and long term treatment (LT) for 1-15days with 1M hydrochloric acid, were investigated. Granule density, freeze thaw stability, solubility and light transmittance of the treated starches increased. A maximum decrease in the degree of polymerisation occurred in ST of 30min (2607.6). Jackfruit starch had 27.1±0.04% amylose content (db), which in ST initially decreased and then increased with the severity of treatment; in LT the effect was irregular. The pasting profile and granule morphology of the treated samples were severely modified. Native starch had the A-type crystalline pattern and crystalline structure increased on treatment. FTIR spectra revealed slight changes in bond stretching and bending. Colour measurement indicated that whiteness increased on treatment. Acid modified jackfruit seed starch can have applications in the food industry.

  16. Sleep duration modifies effects of free ad libitum school meals on adiposity and blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Hjorth, Mads F; Sjödin, Anders; Dalskov, Stine-Mathilde; Damsgaard, Camilla Trab; Michaelsen, Kim F; Biltoft-Jensen, Anja; Andersen, Rikke; Ritz, Christian; Chaput, Jean-Philippe; Astrup, Arne

    2016-01-01

    Insufficient sleep can potentially affect both energy intake and energy expenditure, resulting in obesity and reduced cardiometabolic health. The objective of the study was to investigate if habitual sleep duration of 8- to 11-year-olds modifies the effect of free ad libitum school meals on cardiometabolic markers, body composition, dietary intake, and physical activity. For 2 consecutive 3-month periods, this cluster-randomized, controlled, cross-over trial provided 530 children with school meals or usual lunch brought from home. Dietary intake, activity, and sleep were measured simultaneously for 7 consecutive days using dietary records and accelerometers. Short- and long-sleeping children were defined as lower and upper tertile of sleep duration. Body composition, blood pressure, blood lipids, and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMAIR) were measured/calculated. Overall, school meals compared with lunch from home had positive effects on physical activity and blood pressure in long-sleeping children and negative effects on body fat in short-sleeping children. Short-sleeping children increased fat mass compared with long-sleeping children by 0.21 (95% confidence interval 0.03-0.38) kg, android fat mass by 0.02 (0.001-0.04) kg, waist circumference by 0.73 (0.23-1.24) cm, blood pressure by 1.5 (0.4-2.6) mm Hg, fat intake by 1.1 (0.2-2.0) percentage of energy, and decreased total physical activity by 7.2 (1.6-12.7) % (all P ≤ 0.04), while HOMAIR and blood lipids were not modified by sleep duration (all P ≥ 0.32). In conclusion, the susceptibility to increase abdominal adiposity and blood pressure when exposed to dietary changes can potentially be explained by too little sleep, which results in increased caloric intake and reduced physical activity.

  17. Effect of surface modified hydroxyapatite on the tensile property improvement of HA/PLA composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Lu, X. L.; Zheng, Y. F.

    2008-11-01

    In this study, we modified the surface of hydroxyapatite (HA) particle by ring-opening polymerization of lactide (LA). The modified HA particles were characterized by IR and TGA. It was shown that LA could be graft-polymerized onto the surface of HA. A series of composites based on modified HA/PLA were further prepared and characterized. It indicated that the modified HA particles were well dispersed in PLA matrix than unmodified HA particles and the adhesion between HA particle and PLA matrix was improved. The modified HA/PLA composites showed good mechanical properties than that of unmodified HA/PLA.

  18. Diverse effect of WWOX overexpression in HT29 and SW480 colon cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Nowakowska, Magdalena; Pospiech, Karolina; Lewandowska, Urszula; Piastowska-Ciesielska, Agnieszka W; Bednarek, Andrzej Kazimierz

    2014-09-01

    WW-domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) is the tumour suppressor gene from the common fragile site FRA16D, whose altered expression has been observed in tumours of various origins. Its suppressive role and influence on basic cellular processes such as proliferation and apoptosis have been confirmed in many in vitro and in vivo studies. Moreover, its protein is thought to take part in the regulation of tissue morphogenesis and cell differentiation. However, its role in colon cancer formation remains unclear. The aim of this study was to characterize the influence of WWOX on the process of colon cancerogenesis, the basic features of the cancer cell and its expression profiles. Multiple biological tests, microarray experiments and quantitative reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR were performed on two colon cancer cell lines, HT29 and SW480, which differ in morphology, expression of differentiation markers, migratory characteristics and metastasis potential and which represent negative (HT29) and low (SW480) WWOX expression levels. The cell lines were subjected to retroviral transfection, inducting WWOX overexpression. WWOX was found to have diverse effects on proliferation, apoptosis and the adhesion potential of modified cell lines. Our observations suggest that in the HT29 colon cancer cell line, increased expression of WWOX may result in the transition of cancer cells into a more normal colon epithelium phenotype, while in SW480, WWOX demonstrated well-known tumour suppressor properties. Our results also suggest that WWOX does not behave as classical tumour suppressor gene, and its influence on cell functioning is more global and complicated.

  19. [Anti-metastasis effect of thymoquinone on human pancreatic cancer].

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhi-Hao; Chen, Zhao; Shen, Yue; Huang, Li-Li; Jiang, Ping

    2011-08-01

    Recent studies reported that thymoquinone (TQ), a component derived from the medicinal spice Nigella sativa (also called black cumin), exhibited inhibitory effects on cell proliferation of many cancer cell lines. This study was performed to investigate the anti-metastatic effect of thymoquinone on the pancreatic cancer in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that thymoquinone suppressed the migration and invasion of Panc-1 cells in a does-dependent manner. To investigate the possible mechanisms involved in these events, Western blotting analysis was performed, and found that thymoquinone significantly down-regulates NF-kappaB and MMP-9 in Panc-1 cells. In addition, metastatic model simulating human pancreatic cancer was established by orthotropic implantation of histologically intact pancreatic tumor tissue into the pancreatic wall of nude mice. And administration of thymoquinone significantly reduced tumor metastasis compared to untreated control. Furthermore, the expression of NF-kappaB and MMP-9 in tumor tissues was also suppressed after treatment with thymoquinone. Taken together, the results indicate that thymoquinone exerts anti-metastatic activity on pancreatic cancer both in vitro and in vivo, which may be related to down-regulation of NF-kappaB and its regulated molecules such as MMP-9 protein. Consequently, these results provide important insights into thymoquinone as an antimetastatic agent for the treatment of human pancreatic cancer.

  20. Prognostic effects of 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Results from large epidemiologic studies on the association between vitamin D and gastric cancer are controversial. Vitamin D significantly promotes apoptosis in the undifferentiated gastric cancer cell, but the prognostic effects of its levels are unknown. Methods 197 gastric carcinoma patients who received treatment in the cancer centre of Sun Yat-sen University from January 2002 to January 2006 were involved in the study. The stored blood drawn before any treatment was assayed for 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels. The clinicopathologic data were collected to examine the prognostic effects of vitamin D. Results The mean vitamin D levels of the 197 gastric patients was 49.85 ± 23.68 nmol/L, among whom 114(57.9%) were deficient in Vitamin D(< 50 nmol/L), 67(34%) were insufficient (50-75 nmol/L) and 16(8.1%) were sufficient (> 75 nmol/L). Clinical stage (P = 0.004) and lymph node metastasis classification (P = 0.009) were inversely associated with vitamin D levels. The patients with high vitamin D levels group (≥ 50 nmol/L) had a higher overall survival compared with the low vitamin D levels group (< 50 nmol/L)(P = 0.018). Multivariate analysis indicated that vitamin D levels were an independent prognostic factor of gastric cancer (P = 0.019). Conclusions Vitamin D deficiency may be associated with poor prognosis in gastric cancer. PMID:22284859

  1. The Effects of 17β-estradiol in Cancer are Mediated by Estrogen Receptor Signaling at the Plasma Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Acconcia, Filippo; Marino, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Two different isoforms of the estrogen receptors (i.e., ERα and ERβ) mediate pleiotropic 17β-estradiol (E2)-induced cellular effects. The ERs are principally localized in the nucleus where they act by globally modifying the expression of the E2-target genes. The premise that E2 effects are exclusively mediated through the nuclear localized ERs has been rendered obsolete by research over the last 15 years demonstrating that ERα and ERβ proteins are also localized at the plasma membranes and in other extra-nuclear organelles. The E2 modulation of cancer cell proliferation represents a good example of the impact of membrane-initiated signals on E2 effects. In fact, E2 via ERα elicits rapid signals driving cancer cells to proliferation (e.g., in breast cancer cells), while E2-induced ERβ rapid signaling inhibits proliferation (e.g., in colon cancer cells). In this review we provide with an overview of the complex system of E2-induced signal transduction pathways, their impact on E2-induced cancer cell proliferation, and the participation of E2-induced membrane-initiated signals in tumor environment. PMID:21747767

  2. The effectiveness of different approaches to media literacy in modifying adolescents' responses to alcohol.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Chun Yvonnes

    2013-01-01

    Fearing the negative effect that alcohol advertising might have on adolescents' receptiveness to the consumption of alcohol, health educators have used media literacy as an effective strategy to mitigate the effect of these messages in the media. The present study applied parental mediation to the design and evaluations of a media literacy curriculum that targets alcohol decision-making processes illustrated in the message interpretation process model. The authors conducted a pretest-posttest quasi-experiment of 171 adolescents to examine the effect of a negative evaluative approach and a balanced evaluative approach (a combination of negative and positive evaluative strategies) to media literacy on modifying adolescents' responses to alcohol messages. Results showed that different media literacy approaches had varying degrees of effectiveness on adolescent boys and girls. After receiving a negative media literacy lesson, adolescent boys regarded television characters as less realistic and believed that drinking alcohol had negative consequences. In contrast, adolescent girls benefited more from a balanced evaluative approach as their media skepticism attitude was enhanced. Results suggest that health educators should choose tailored pedagogical approaches that are based on gender to improve decision making regarding alcohol consumption.

  3. Metformin and Ara-a Effectively Suppress Brain Cancer by Targeting Cancer Stem/Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mouhieddine, Tarek H.; Nokkari, Amaly; Itani, Muhieddine M.; Chamaa, Farah; Bahmad, Hisham; Monzer, Alissar; El-Merahbi, Rabih; Daoud, Georges; Eid, Assaad; Kobeissy, Firas H.; Abou-Kheir, Wassim

    2015-01-01

    Background: Gliomas and neuroblastomas pose a great health burden worldwide with a poor and moderate prognosis, respectively. Many studies have tried to find effective treatments for these primary malignant brain tumors. Of interest, the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) pathway was found to be associated with tumorigenesis and tumor survival, leading to many studies on AMPK drugs, especially Metformin, and their potential role as anti-cancer treatments. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a small population of slowly-dividing, treatment-resistant, undifferentiated cancer cells that are being discovered in a multitude of cancers. They are thought to be responsible for replenishing the tumor with highly proliferative cells and increasing the risk of recurrence. Methods: Metformin and 9-β-d-Arabinofuranosyl Adenine (Ara-a) were used to study the role of the AMPK pathway in vitro on U251 (glioblastoma) and SH-SY5Y (neuroblastoma) cell lines. Results: We found that both drugs are able to decrease the survival of U251 and SH-SY5Y cell lines in a 2D as well as a 3D culture model. Metformin and Ara-a significantly decreased the invasive ability of these cancer cell lines. Treatment with these drugs decreased the sphere-forming units (SFU) of U251 cells, with Ara-a being more efficient, signifying the extinction of the CSC population. However, if treatment is withdrawn before all SFUs are extinguished, the CSCs regain some of their sphere-forming capabilities in the case of Metformin but not Ara-a treatment. Conclusion: Metformin and Ara-a have proved to be effective in the treatment of glioblastomas and neuroblastomas, in vitro, by targeting their cancer stem/progenitor cell population, which prevents recurrence. PMID:26635517

  4. Anti-Cancer Effect of IN-2001 in T47D Human Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Joung, Ki Eun; Min, Kyung Nan; Kim, Dae-Kee; Sheen, Yhun Yhong

    2012-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are enzymes involved in the remodelling of chromatin, and have a key role in the epigenetic regulation of gene expression. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are emerging as an exciting new class of potential anti-cancer agents. In recent years, a number of structurally diverse HDAC inhibitors have been identified and these HDAC inhibitors induce growth arrest, differentiation and/or apoptosis of cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. This study aimed at investigating the anti-tumor activity of various HDAC inhibitors, IN-2001, using T47D human breast cancer cells. Moreover, the possible mechanism by which HDAC inhibitors exhibit anti-tumor activity was also explored. In estrogen receptor positive T47D cells, IN-2001, HDAC inhibitor showed anti-proliferative effects in dose-and time-dependent manner. In T47D human breast cancer cells showed anti-tumor activity of IN-2001 and the growth inhibitory effects of IN-2001 were related to the cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis. Flow cytometry studies revealed that IN-2001 showed accumulation of cells at G2/M phase. At the same time, IN-2001 treatment time-dependently increased sub-G1 population, representing apoptotic cells. IN-2001-mediated cell cycle arrest was associated with induction of cdk inhibitor expression. In T47D cells, IN-2001 as well as other HDAC inhibitors treatment significantly increased p21(WAF1) and p27(KIP1) expression. In addition, thymidylate synthase, an essential enzyme for DNA replication and repair, was down-regulated by IN-2001 and other HDAC inhibitors in the T47D human breast cancer cells. In summary, IN-2001 with a higher potency than other HDAC inhibitors induced growth inhibition, cell cycle arrest, and eventual apoptosis in human breast cancer possibly through modulation of cell cycle and apoptosis regulatory proteins, such as cdk inhibitors, cyclins, and thymidylate synthase.

  5. Designing effective vaccines for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sandip P; Osada, Takuya; Lyerly, H Kim; Morse, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Achieving long-term control of colorectal cancers with therapeutic vaccines that generate potent anti-tumor T cell and antibody responses has been a goal for more than two decades. To date, clinical trials of these vaccines have demonstrated induction of immune responses, but clinical benefit has been limited. Improved vector delivery systems with enhanced immunostimulatory properties, decreased immunogenicity against vector and improved antigen presentation are some of the key features of modern tumor vaccines. Furthermore, an improved understanding of the various immunosuppressive factors in the tumor microenvironment and regional lymph nodes, coupled with a burgeoning ability to impair inhibitory immune synapses, highlights a growing opportunity to induce beneficial antigen-specific responses against tumor. The combination of improved antigenic delivery systems, coupled with therapeutic immune activation, represents state-of-the-art colorectal vaccine design concepts with the goal of augmenting immune responses against tumor and improving clinical outcomes.

  6. Effect of Modified Alkaline Supplementation on Syngenic Melanoma Growth in CB57/BL Mice

    PubMed Central

    Spugnini, Enrico Pierluigi; Canese, Rossella; Gugliotta, Alessio; Fidanza, Stefano; Fais, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Tumor extracellular acidity is a hallmark of malignant cancers. Thus, in this study we evaluated the effects of the oral administration of a commercially available water alkalizer (Basenpulver®) (BP) on tumor growth in a syngenic melanoma mouse model. The alkalizer was administered daily by oral gavage starting one week after tumor implantation in CB57/BL mice. Tumors were calipered and their acidity measured by in vivo MRI guided 31P MRS. Furthermore, urine pH was monitored for potential metabolic alkalosis. BP administration significantly reduced melanoma growth in mice; the optimal dose in terms of tolerability and efficacy was 8 g/l (p< 0.05). The in vivo results were supported by in vitro experiments, wherein BP-treated human and murine melanoma cell cultures exhibited a dose-dependent inhibition of tumor cell growth. This investigation provides the first proof of concept that systemic buffering can improve tumor control by itself and that this approach may represent a new strategy in prevention and/or treatment of cancers. PMID:27447181

  7. RGD-modifided oncolytic adenovirus exhibited potent cytotoxic effect on CAR-negative bladder cancer-initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Xu, H; Shen, J; Yang, Y; Wu, S; Xiao, J; Xu, Y; Liu, X-Y; Chu, L

    2015-05-14

    Cancer-initiating cell (CIC) is critical in cancer development, maintenance and recurrence. The reverse expression pattern of coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) and αν integrin in bladder cancer decreases the infection efficiency of adenovirus. We constructed Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-modified oncolytic adenovirus, carrying EGFP or TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) gene (Onco(Ad).RGD-hTERT-EGFP/TRAIL), and applied them to CAR-negative bladder cancer T24 cells and cancer-initiating T24 sphere cells. Onco(Ad).RGD-hTERT-EGFP had enhanced infection ability and cytotoxic effect on T24 cells and T24 sphere cells, but little cytoxicity on normal urothelial SV-HUC-1 cells compared with the unmodified virus Onco(Ad).hTERT-EGFP. Notably, Onco(Ad).RGD-hTERT-TRAIL induced apoptosis in T24 cells and T24 sphere cells. Furthermore, it completely inhibited xenograft initiation established by the oncolytic adenovirus-pretreated T24 sphere cells, and significantly suppressed tumor growth by intratumoral injection. These results provided a promising therapeutic strategy for CAR-negative bladder cancer through targeting CICs.

  8. Modeling cancer immunotherapy: Assessing the effects of lymphocytes on cancer cell growth and motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, R. A.; Zapata, Jair; Condat, C. A.; Deisboeck, Thomas S.

    2013-05-01

    A mesoscopic model is used to describe the effects of lymphocyte activity on a growing tumor. The model yields novel insights into the tumor-immune system interaction. In particular, we found that the presence of a putative chemotactic messenger that helps guide the lymphocytes towards the tumor is not critical to elicit the anti-tumor effects of the immune system, while lymphocytes that block tumor cell migration contribute to limit cancer expansion and thus have a more significant therapeutic impact.

  9. Chloroquine potentiates the anti-cancer effect of 5-fluorouracil on colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Chloroquine (CQ), the worldwide used anti-malarial drug, has recently being focused as a potential anti-cancer agent as well as a chemosensitizer when used in combination with anti-cancer drugs. It has been shown to inhibit cell growth and/or to induce cell death in various types of cancer. 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is the chemotherapeutic agent of first choice in colorectal cancer, but in most cases, resistance to 5-FU develops through various mechanisms. Here, we focused on the combination of CQ as a mechanism to potentiate the inhibitory effect of 5-FU on human colon cancer cells. Methods HT-29 cells were treated with CQ and/or 5-FU, and their proliferative ability, apoptosis and autophagy induction effects, and the affection of the cell cycle were evaluated. The proliferative ability of HT-29 was analyzed by the MTS assay. Apoptosis was quantified by flow-cytometry after double-staining of the cells with AnnexinV/PI. The cell cycle was evaluated by flow-cytometry after staining of cells with PI. Autophagy was quantified by flow-cytometry and Western blot analysis. Finally, to evaluate the fate of the cells treated with CQ and/or 5-FU, the colony formation assay was performed. Results 5-FU inhibited the proliferative activity of HT-29 cells, which was mostly dependent on the arrest of the cells to the G0/G1-phase but also partially on apoptosis induction, and the effect was potentiated by CQ pre-treatment. The potentiation of the inhibitory effect of 5-FU by CQ was dependent on the increase of p21Cip1 and p27Kip1 and the decrease of CDK2. Since CQ is reported to inhibit autophagy, the catabolic process necessary for cell survival under conditions of cell starvation or stress, which is induced by cancer cells as a protective mechanism against chemotherapeutic agents, we also analyzed the induction of autophagy in HT-29. HT-29 induced autophagy in response to 5-FU, and CQ inhibited this induction, a possible mechanism of the potentiation of the anti-cancer

  10. Effects of different surface modifying agents on the cytotoxic and antimicrobial properties of ZnO nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Esparza-González, S C; Sánchez-Valdés, S; Ramírez-Barrón, S N; Loera-Arias, M J; Bernal, J; Meléndez-Ortiz, H Iván; Betancourt-Galindo, R

    2016-12-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) have received considerable attention in the medical field because of their antibacterial properties, primarily for killing and reducing the activity of numerous microorganisms. The purpose of this study was to determine whether surface-modified ZnO NPs exhibit different properties compared with unmodified ZnO. The antimicrobial and cytotoxic properties of modified ZnO NPs as well as their effects on inflammatory cytokine production were evaluated. ZnO NPs were prepared using a wet chemical method. Then, the surfaces of these NPs were modified using 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as modifying agents via a chemical hydrolysis method. According to infrared spectroscopy analysis (FTIR), the structure of the ZnO remained unchanged after modification. Antibacterial assays demonstrated that APTES modification is more effective at inducing an antimicrobial effect against Gram-negative bacteria than against Gram-positive bacteria. Cytotoxicity studies showed that cell viability was dose-dependent; moreover, pristine and APTES-modified ZnO exhibited low cytotoxicity, whereas DMSO-modified ZnO exhibited toxicity even at a low NP concentration. An investigation of inflammatory cytokine production demonstrated that the extent of stimulation was related to the ZnO NP concentration but not to the surface modification, except for IFN-γ and IL-10, which were not detected even at high NP concentrations.

  11. Spatial interactions in a modified Daisyworld model: Heat diffusivity and greenhouse effects.

    PubMed

    Alberti, T; Primavera, L; Vecchio, A; Lepreti, F; Carbone, V

    2015-11-01

    In this work we investigate a modified version of the Daisyworld model, originally introduced by Lovelock and Watson to describe in a simple way the interactions between an Earth-like planet, its biosphere, and the incoming solar radiation. Here a spatial dependency on latitude is included, and both a variable heat diffusivity along latitudes and a simple greenhouse effect description are introduced in the model. We show that the spatial interactions between the variables of the system can locally stabilize the coexistence of the two vegetation types. The feedback on albedo is able to generate equilibrium solutions which can efficiently self-regulate the planet climate, even for values of the solar luminosity relatively far from the current Earth conditions.

  12. Modified atmosphere packaging of precooked vegetables: effect on physicochemical properties and sensory quality.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Carla; Alves, M Rui; Rocha, Susana; Oliveira, M Beatriz P P

    2016-03-01

    This study aims at verifying the effect of three modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) conditions, all with high CO2 and residual or low O2 contents (%O2/%CO2: 0/40; 2.5/40 and 2.5/60), on the quality preservation of several species of precooked vegetables (cabbage, carrots, green beans and bell peppers). The study was carried out for different storage periods (up to 28 days and 6 sampling periods). Physicochemical parameters (pH, acidity, moisture and ash contents, antioxidant activity, colour, and texture), microbial growth, organoleptic properties and consumer acceptability were assessed. Concerning physicochemical parameters and microbial growth only slight changes without any consistent tendency were observed. This was also confirmed by the trained panel that could not discriminate samples with different storage times. Best preservation conditions were obtained with 0%O2/40%CO2, promoting a shelf life extension of almost 12 days more comparing to commercial conditions presently used.

  13. Mesomeric Effects of Graphene Modified with Diazonium Salts: Substituent Type and Position Influence its Properties.

    PubMed

    Bouša, Daniel; Jankovský, Ondřej; Sedmidubský, David; Luxa, Jan; Šturala, Jiří; Pumera, Martin; Sofer, Zdeněk

    2015-12-01

    In the last decade, graphene and graphene derivatives have become some of the most intensively studied materials. Tuning of the electronic and electrochemical properties of graphene is of paramount importance. In this study, six diazonium-modified graphenes containing different functional groups according to the diazonium salt precursor were investigated. These diazonium moieties have a strong mesomeric (resonance) effect and act as either electron-donating or -withdrawing species. Different graphene precursors, such as thermally and chemically reduced graphenes were studied. All the products were characterized in detail by elemental combustion analysis, FTIR spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and cyclic voltammetry. Resistivity and zeta potential measurements were consistent with theoretical (DFT) calculations. The results show that chemical modification of graphene by diazotation strongly influences its properties, creating a huge application potential in microelectronics, energy storage and conversion devices, and electrocatalysis.

  14. Magnetoelectric coupling effect in transition metal modified polycrystalline BiFeO3 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreenivas Puli, Venkata; Kumar Pradhan, Dhiren; Gollapudi, Sreenivasulu; Coondoo, Indrani; Panwar, Neeraj; Adireddy, Shiva; Chrisey, Douglas B.; Katiyar, Ram S.

    2014-11-01

    Rare-earth (Sm) and transition metal (Co) modified polycrystalline BiFeO3 (BFO) thin films have been deposited on Pt/TiO2/SiO2/Si substrate successfully through pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique. Piezoelectric, leakage current and temperature dependent dielectric and magnetic behaviour were investigated for the films. Typical “butterfly-shaped” loop were observed in BSFCO films with an effective piezoelectric constant (d33) ~94 pm/V at 0.6 MV/cm. High dielectric constant ~900 and low dielectric loss ~0.25 were observed at room temperature. M-H loops have shown relatively high saturation magnetization ~35 emu/cm3 at a maximum field of H ~20 kOe. Enhanced magnetoelectric coupling response is observed under applied magnetic field. The multiferroic, piezoelectric, leakage current behaviours were explored. Such studies should be helpful in designing multiferroic materials based on BSFCO films.

  15. Toxic Effects of Modified Fenton Reactions on Xanthobacter flavus FB71†

    PubMed Central

    Büyüksönmez, Fatïh; Hess, Thomas F.; Crawford, Ronald L.; Watts, Richard J.

    1998-01-01

    The toxic effects of modified Fenton reactions on Xanthobacter flavus FB71, measured as microbial survival rates, were determined as part of an investigation of simultaneous abiotic and biotic oxidations of xenobiotic chemicals. A central composite, rotatable experimental design was developed to study the survival rates of X. flavus under various concentrations of hydrogen peroxide and iron(II) and at different initial cell populations. A model based on the experimental results, relating microorganism survival to the variables of peroxide, iron, and cellular concentrations was formulated and fit the data reasonably well, with a coefficient of determination of 0.76. The results of this study indicate that the use of simultaneous abiotic and biotic processes for the treatment of xenobiotic compounds may be possible. PMID:9758796

  16. Combined effects of gamma-irradiation and modified atmosphere packaging on quality of some spices.

    PubMed

    Kirkin, Celale; Mitrevski, Blagoj; Gunes, Gurbuz; Marriott, Philip J

    2014-07-01

    Thyme (Thymus vidgaris L.), rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.), black pepper (Piper nigrum L.) and cumin (Cuminum cyminum L.) in ground form were packaged in either air or 100% N2 and γ-irradiated at 3 different irradiation levels (7kGy, 12kGy, 17kGy). Total viable bacterial count, yeast and mould count, colour, essential oil yield and essential oil composition were determined. Microbial load was not detectable after 12kGy irradiation of all samples. Irradiation resulted in significant changes in colour values of rosemary and black pepper. The discolouration of the irradiated black pepper was lower in modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) compared to air packaging. Essential oil yield of irradiated black pepper and cumin was lower in air packaging compared to MAP. Gamma-irradiation generally decreased monoterpenes and increased oxygenated compounds, but the effect was lower in MAP. Overall, spices should be irradiated under an O2-free atmosphere to minimise quality deterioration.

  17. Spatial interactions in a modified Daisyworld model: Heat diffusivity and greenhouse effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberti, T.; Primavera, L.; Vecchio, A.; Lepreti, F.; Carbone, V.

    2015-11-01

    In this work we investigate a modified version of the Daisyworld model, originally introduced by Lovelock and Watson to describe in a simple way the interactions between an Earth-like planet, its biosphere, and the incoming solar radiation. Here a spatial dependency on latitude is included, and both a variable heat diffusivity along latitudes and a simple greenhouse effect description are introduced in the model. We show that the spatial interactions between the variables of the system can locally stabilize the coexistence of the two vegetation types. The feedback on albedo is able to generate equilibrium solutions which can efficiently self-regulate the planet climate, even for values of the solar luminosity relatively far from the current Earth conditions.

  18. FACTORS WHICH MODIFY THE EFFECT OF SODIUM AND POTASSIUM ON BACTERIAL CELL MEMBRANES.

    PubMed

    HENNEMAN, D H; UMBREIT, W W

    1964-06-01

    Henneman, Dorothy H. (Rutgers, The State University, New Brunswick, N.J.), and W. W. Umbreit. Factors which modify the effect of sodium and potassium on bacterial cell membranes. J. Bacteriol. 87:1266-1273. 1964.-Suspensions of Escherichia coli B, when placed in 0.2 to 0.5 m solutions of NaCl, KCl, or LiCl, show an increased turbidity. With NaCl, this increased turbidity is stable with time; with KCl and LiCl, it is gradually lost. The stability to NaCl with time is due to substances removable from the cell by incubation in phosphate buffer; these materials exist in water washings from such phosphate-incubated cells.

  19. Effect of deoxynivalenol (DON) on growing pigs and its modification by modified yeast cell wall or modified yeast cell wall and bentonite.

    PubMed

    Shehata, S; Richter, W; Schuster, M; Lindermayer, H

    2004-03-01

    The study examined effect of two adsorbents on the toxicity of Deoxynivalenol (DON) in growing pigs in a feeding trial. 24 male growing pigs (average initial body weight 11.5 kg) were assigned to one of six dietary treatments: control (uncontaminated diet); control + 0.5% adsorbent I; DON contaminated diet (1.73 mg/kg); DON contaminated diet + 0.5% adsorbent I; control + 0.5% adsorbent II and DON contaminated diet + 0.5% adsorbent II. Two digestibility trials were conducted on the second and fourth week of the feeding period with a sampling period of 7 days to determine the digestibility of the nutrients and the amounts of DON in faeces and urine. At the end of the experiments, the pigs were slaughtered, followed by blood haematology and biochemi analys. These data suggest that the addition of 0.5% modified yeast cell wall or a combination of modified yeast cell wall and bentonite to the naturally DON - contaminated diets reduce the effect of DON on the immune system of pigs but do not play an significant role in detoxification of DON in growing pigs.

  20. The Effect of Cancer Warning Statements on Alcohol Consumption Intentions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettigrew, Simone; Jongenelis, Michelle I.; Glance, David; Chikritzhs, Tanya; Pratt, Iain S.; Slevin, Terry; Liang, Wenbin; Wakefield, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    In response to increasing calls to introduce warning labels on alcoholic beverages, this study investigated the potential effectiveness of alcohol warning statements designed to increase awareness of the alcohol-cancer link. A national online survey was administered to a diverse sample of Australian adult drinkers (n = 1,680). Along with…

  1. The Effect of Cancer on Suicide among Elderly Holocaust Survivors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakash, Ora; Liphshitz, Irena; Keinan-Boker, Lital; Levav, Itzhak

    2013-01-01

    Jewish-Israelis of European origin with cancer have higher suicide rates relative to their counterparts in the general population. We investigated whether this effect results from the high proportion of Holocaust survivors among them, due to vulnerabilities arising from the earlier traumas they sustained. The study was based on all Jewish-European…

  2. Molecular Effects of 13C/DIM in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    2004), suggesting that I3C and DIM could have some beneficial effects on pancreatic cancer. Curcumin Curcumin is a compound from Curcuma longa ...tumeric). C. longa is a plant widely cultivated in tropical regions of Asia and Central America. Curcumin has recently received considerable attention due

  3. IKK inhibition increases bortezomib effectiveness in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Singha, Bipradeb; Gatla, Himavanth Reddy; Phyo, Sai; Patel, Atish; Chen, Zhe-Sheng; Vancurova, Ivana

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is associated with increased expression of the pro-angiogenic chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8, CXCL8), which induces tumor cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Even though bortezomib (BZ) has shown remarkable anti-tumor activity in hematological malignancies, it has been less effective in ovarian cancer; however, the mechanisms are not understood. We have recently shown that BZ unexpectedly induces the expression of IL-8 in ovarian cancer cells in vitro, by IκB kinase (IKK)-dependent mechanism. Here, we tested the hypothesis that IKK inhibition reduces the IL-8 production and increases BZ effectiveness in reducing ovarian tumor growth in vivo. Our results demonstrate that the combination of BZ and the IKK inhibitor Bay 117085 significantly reduces the growth of ovarian tumor xenografts in nude mice when compared to either drug alone. Mice treated with the BZ/Bay 117085 combination exhibit smallest tumors, and lowest levels of IL-8. Furthermore, the reduced tumor growth in the combination group is associated with decreased tumor levels of S536P-p65 NFκB and its decreased recruitment to IL-8 promoter in tumor tissues. These data provide the first in vivo evidence that combining BZ with IKK inhibitor is effective, and suggest that using IKK inhibitors may increase BZ effectiveness in ovarian cancer treatment. PMID:26267322

  4. The effects of Peer Mediation with Young Children (PMYC) on children's cognitive modifiability.

    PubMed

    Tzuriel, David; Shamir, Adina

    2007-03-01

    Peer mediation with young children is a relatively novel approach aimed at teaching young children how to mediate to their peers. The main benefits of peer mediation are in developing children's mediation teaching style and cognitive modifiability. The peer mediation developed recently is based on Vygotsky's sociocultural and Feuerstein's mediated learning experience theories. The main objectives of the study were to investigate the effects of the Peer Mediation with Young Children (PMYC) programme on children's cognitive modifiability of mediators and learners and to study the effects of cognitive level of the learner and mediator on their cognitive modifiability following the programme. A sample of 178 pupils (89 mediators in Grade 3 and 89 learners in Grade 1) was randomly assigned to experimental (N=43 dyads) and control (N=46 dyads) groups. The mediators in the experimental group participated in the PMYC programme, whereas the mediators in the control group received a substitute intervention aimed at emphasizing general conditions of peer interaction. Following the intervention, mediators of both groups received a demonstration of a multimedia programme as a preparation for the peer mediation interaction and later taught it to their young counterparts. Following the teaching session (e.g. teaching of seriation problems), mediators in both groups were given a dynamic assessment measure of analogies. The learners however were given a test of seriation before and after the intervention. The findings showed that following the intervention the experimental mediators showed higher level of analogies scores, as well as higher improvement on the dynamic analogies measure as compared with control mediators. The experimental learners showed higher pre- to post-intervention achievements on the seriation problems as compared with control learners. The findings showed also that when there was a match between the mediator and learner's cognitive level (i.e. low-low or high

  5. The effect on turkey meat shelf life of modified-atmosphere packaging with an argon mixture.

    PubMed

    Fraqueza, M J; Barreto, A S

    2009-09-01

    There is a lack of knowledge related to the action of Ar on microbial development and prevention of oxidation when applied to raw meat under modified-atmosphere package (MAP). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an anaerobic gas mixture with Ar on spoilage flora growth, color, and lipid oxidation stability of turkey meat under MAP stored at 0 degrees C. Breast muscles samples were collected on different working days from turkey carcasses (BUT9 and BIG6), fast-cooled in a tunnel (-2 degrees C, 2 m.s(-1), 90% RH) for 2 h and selected to be deboned according current practices in industrial slaughterhouses. The breasts were cut into slices that were individually packaged under aerobiosis (P0) and in 4 different modified atmospheres containing different gas mixtures as (P1) 100% N2, (P2) 50% Ar-50% N2, (P3) 50% Ar-50% CO2, and (P4) 50% N2-50% CO2. All samples were stored at 0+/-1 degrees C in the dark for between 12 and 25 d. Meat samples packaged in P0 were analyzed for their microbial and physicochemical characteristics on d 0, 5, and 12 of storage and then extended to 19 and 25 d when samples were under MAP. The microbial shelf life period extension of MAP sliced turkey meat compared with aerobic packaging (5-d shelf life) is 1 wk more for P1 and P2 mixtures, 2 wk for P4, and 3 wk for P3. The Ar-CO2 mixture was more efficient in delaying flora development than CO2-N2 with 1 log difference on the 25th day of storage, for total psychrotrophic counts, total anaerobic counts, and Brochothrix thermosphacta. The presence of Ar on gas mixtures did not seem to have any additional protective effect on lipid turkey meat oxidation.

  6. Removal of nitrate by modified pine sawdust: effects of temperature and co-existing anions.

    PubMed

    Keränen, Anni; Leiviskä, Tiina; Hormi, Osmo; Tanskanen, Juha

    2015-01-01

    The effect of temperature, sulphate and phosphate, and the initial nitrate concentration on nitrate removal was studied with synthetic solutions. Chemically modified pine sawdust (Pinus sylvestris) anion exchange resin (MPSD) was used in the sorption studies. The resin was synthesized by reacting pine sawdust with epichlorohydrin, ethylenediamine and triethylamine in the presence of N,N-dimethylformamide. Nitrate removal was successful at 5-70 °C. Higher temperatures caused nitrate removal to decrease moderately, but sorption capacities of 22.2-32.8 mg/g for NO3-N were achieved. The removal of nitrate in the presence of sulphate or phosphate was studied at concentrations of 30 mg N/l, 10-500 mg S/l and 1-50 mg P/l. A significant decrease in nitrate reduction was observed at sulphate and phosphate concentrations of 100 mg S/l and 50 mg P/l, respectively. The effect of initial nitrate concentration was studied in column. Nitrate sorption was clearly dependent on the initial concentration. Desorption of nitrate in column was completed using about 80 bed volumes of 0.1 M NaCl solution. The sorption data were fitted to the Langmuir, Freundlich and Redlich-Peterson adsorption models. The Redlich-Peterson and Langmuir models gave the best fit, which suggests monolayer sorption. Thermodynamic studies revealed that the sorption of nitrate was spontaneous and exothermic in nature. The results imply that modified pine sawdust could be a feasible alternative in the treatment of real industrial wastewaters.

  7. [Current Status and Effectiveness of Perioperative Oral Health Care Management for Lung Cancer and Esophageal Cancer Patients].

    PubMed

    Nishino, Takeshi; Takizawa, Hiromitsu; Yoshida, Takahiro; Inui, Tomohiro; Takasugi, Haruka; Matsumoto, Daisuke; Kawakita, Naoya; Inoue, Seiya; Sakiyama, Shoji; Tangoku, Akira; Azuma, Masayuki; Yamamura, Yoshiko

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of perioperative oral health care management to decrease the risk of postoperative pneumonia have been reported lately. Since 2014, we introduced perioperative oral health care management for lung cancer and esophageal cancer patients. We report current status and effectiveness of perioperative oral health care management for lung cancer and esophageal cancer patients. Every 100 cases of lung cancer and esophageal cancer patients treated by surgery were classified 2 group with or without perioperative oral health care management and compared about postoperative complications retrospectively. In the lung cancer patients, the group with oral health care management could prevent postoperative pneumonia significantly and had shorter length of hospital stay than the group without oral health care management. In the esophageal cancer patients, there was little occurrence of postoperative pneumonia without significant difference between both group with or without oral health care management. A large number of esophageal cancer patients received neo-adjuvant chemotherapy and some patients developed oral mucositis and received oral care treatment before surgery. Treatment for oral mucositis probably improved oral environment and affected prevention of postoperative pneumonia. Perioperative oral health care management can prevent postoperative pneumonia of lung cancer and esophageal cancer patients by improvement of oral hygiene.

  8. TGF beta secreted by B16 melanoma antagonizes cancer gene immunotherapy bystander effect.

    PubMed

    Penafuerte, Claudia; Galipeau, Jacques

    2008-08-01

    Tumor-targeted delivery of immune stimulatory genes, such as pro-inflammatory cytokines and suicide genes, has shown to cure mouse models of cancer. Total tumor eradication was also found to occur despite subtotal tumor engineering; a phenomenon coined the "bystander effect". The bystander effect in immune competent animals arises mostly from recruitment of a cancer lytic cell-mediated immune response to local and distant tumor cells which escaped gene modification. We have previously described a Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) and Interleukin 2 (IL2) fusokine (aka GIFT2) which serves as a potent anticancer cytokine and it here served as a means to understand the mechanistic underpinnings to the immune bystander effect in an immune competent model of B16 melanoma. As expected, we observed that GIFT2 secreted by genetically engineered B16 tumor cells induces a bystander effect on non modified B16 cells, when admixed in a 1:1 ratio. However, despite keeping the 1:1 ratio constant, the immune bystander effect was completely lost as the total B16 cell number was increased from 10(4) to 10(6) which correlated with a sharp reduction in the number of tumor-infiltrating NK cells. We found that B16 secrete biologically active TGFbeta which in turn inhibited GIFT2 dependent immune cell proliferation in vitro and downregulated IL-2R beta expression and IFN gamma secretion by NK cells. In vivo blockade of B16 originating TGFbeta significantly improved the immune bystander effect arising from GIFT2. We propose that cancer gene immunotherapy of pre-established tumors will be enhanced by blockade of tumor-derived TGFbeta.

  9. Baclofen and 2-hydroxysaclofen modify acute hypolocomotive and antinociceptive effects of nicotine.

    PubMed

    Varani, Andrés P; Aso, Ester; Maldonado, Rafael; Balerio, Graciela N

    2014-09-05

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the possible involvement of GABAB receptors in nicotine-induced hypolocomotion and antinociceptive effects in mice. Animals were exposed to nicotine only once. Acute nicotine hydrogen tartrate salt (3mg/kg; subcutaneous, s.c.) administration induced hypolocomotion and antinociceptive responses in the tail-immersion and the hot-plate tests. The effects of pretreatment with either the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen (1, 2 and 3mg/kg; intraperitoneal, i.p.) or GABAB receptor antagonist 2-hydroxysaclofen (0.25, 0.5 and 1mg/kg; i.p.) were evaluated on these behavioral nicotine responses. The GABAB receptor agonist, baclofen (3mg/kg, i.p.) abolished nicotine-induced antinociceptive effects in the tail-immersion and the hot-plate tests, but did not modify nicotine-induced hypolocomotion. In addition, the GABAB receptor antagonist, 2-hydroxysaclofen (1mg/kg, i.p.) increased nicotine-induced antinociceptive effects in the tail-immersion and the hot-plate tests, and abolished nicotine-induced hypolocomotion. The present results shed light that the GABAB receptor has an important role in mediating specific acute nicotine responses such as hypolocomotion and antinociception in mice.

  10. Modifying effects of vitamin E on chlorpyrifos toxicity in atlantic salmon.

    PubMed

    Olsvik, Pål A; Berntssen, Marc H G; Søfteland, Liv

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate how vitamin E (alpha tocopherol) may ameliorate the toxicity of the pesticide chlorpyrifos in Atlantic salmon. Freshly isolated hepatocytes were exposed to vitamin E, chlorpyrifos or a combination of vitamin E and chlorpyrifos (all 100 μM). Transcriptomics (RNA-seq) and metabolomics were used to screen for effects of vitamin E and chlorpyrifos. By introducing vitamin E, the number of upregulated