Science.gov

Sample records for cancer frequency intensity

  1. Low intensity and frequency pulsed electromagnetic fields selectively impair breast cancer cell viability.

    PubMed

    Crocetti, Sara; Beyer, Christian; Schade, Grit; Egli, Marcel; Fröhlich, Jürg; Franco-Obregón, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    A common drawback of many anticancer therapies is non-specificity in action of killing. We investigated the potential of ultra-low intensity and frequency pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) to kill breast cancer cells. Our criteria to accept this technology as a potentially valid therapeutic approach were: 1) cytotoxicity to breast cancer cells and; 2) that the designed fields proved innocuous to healthy cell classes that would be exposed to the PEMFs during clinical treatment. MCF7 breast cancer cells and their normal counterparts, MCF10 cells, were exposed to PEMFs and cytotoxic indices measured in order to design PEMF paradigms that best kill breast cancer cells. The PEMF parameters tested were: 1) frequencies ranging from 20 to 50 Hz; 2) intensities ranging from 2 mT to 5 mT and; 3) exposure durations ranging from 30 to 90 minutes per day for up to three days to determine the optimum parameters for selective cancer cell killing. We observed a discrete window of vulnerability of MCF7 cells to PEMFs of 20 Hz frequency, 3 mT magnitude and exposure duration of 60 minutes per day. The cell damage accrued in response to PEMFs increased with time and gained significance after three days of consecutive daily exposure. By contrast, the PEMFs parameters determined to be most cytotoxic to breast cancer MCF-7 cells were not damaging to normal MCF-10 cells. Based on our data it appears that PEMF-based anticancer strategies may represent a new therapeutic approach to treat breast cancer without affecting normal tissues in a manner that is non-invasive and can be potentially combined with existing anti-cancer treatments.

  2. Low Intensity and Frequency Pulsed Electromagnetic Fields Selectively Impair Breast Cancer Cell Viability

    PubMed Central

    Crocetti, Sara; Beyer, Christian; Schade, Grit; Egli, Marcel; Fröhlich, Jürg; Franco-Obregón, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Introduction A common drawback of many anticancer therapies is non-specificity in action of killing. We investigated the potential of ultra-low intensity and frequency pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) to kill breast cancer cells. Our criteria to accept this technology as a potentially valid therapeutic approach were: 1) cytotoxicity to breast cancer cells and; 2) that the designed fields proved innocuous to healthy cell classes that would be exposed to the PEMFs during clinical treatment. Methods MCF7 breast cancer cells and their normal counterparts, MCF10 cells, were exposed to PEMFs and cytotoxic indices measured in order to design PEMF paradigms that best kill breast cancer cells. The PEMF parameters tested were: 1) frequencies ranging from 20 to 50 Hz; 2) intensities ranging from 2 mT to 5 mT and; 3) exposure durations ranging from 30 to 90 minutes per day for up to three days to determine the optimum parameters for selective cancer cell killing. Results We observed a discrete window of vulnerability of MCF7 cells to PEMFs of 20 Hz frequency, 3 mT magnitude and exposure duration of 60 minutes per day. The cell damage accrued in response to PEMFs increased with time and gained significance after three days of consecutive daily exposure. By contrast, the PEMFs parameters determined to be most cytotoxic to breast cancer MCF-7 cells were not damaging to normal MCF-10 cells. Conclusion Based on our data it appears that PEMF-based anticancer strategies may represent a new therapeutic approach to treat breast cancer without affecting normal tissues in a manner that is non-invasive and can be potentially combined with existing anti-cancer treatments. PMID:24039828

  3. Efficacy of low-frequency low-intensity electrotherapy in the treatment of breast cancer-related lymphoedema: a cross-over randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Belmonte, Roser; Tejero, Marta; Ferrer, Montse; Muniesa, Josep Maria; Duarte, Esther; Cunillera, Oriol; Escalada, Ferran

    2012-07-01

    To compare the efficacy of low-frequency low-intensity electrotherapy and manual lymphatic drainage in the treatment of chronic upper limb breast cancer-related lymphoedema. Cross-over single-blind random clinical trial. Rehabilitation service. Thirty-six women with chronic upper limb breast cancer-related lymphoedema. Patients were randomized to undergo 10 sessions of manual lymphatic drainage followed by 10 sessions of low-frequency low-intensity electrotherapy or to undergo first low-frequency low-intensity electrotherapy followed by manual lymphatic drainage. There was a month of washout time between treatments. Each patient was examined just before and after each treatment. Researchers and outcome assessors were blinded for assigned treatment. Outcomes were lymphoedema volume, pain, heaviness and tightness, and health-related quality of life measured with the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy Questionnaire for Breast Cancer version 4 (FACT-B+4). Carry-over, period and treatment effects were analysed. Treatment effect was assessed using paired t-test. Thirty patients finalized treatment. Comparing the changes in low-frequency low-intensity electrotherapy with manual lymphatic drainage changes, there were no significant differences. Low-frequency low-intensity electrotherapy did not reduce lymphoedema volume (mean of change = 19.77 mL, P = 0.36), but significant reductions were observed in pain, heaviness and tightness (mean of change = 13.1, 16.2 and 6.4 mm, respectively), and FACT-B+4 summaries improved significantly (Trial Outcome Index mean of change = 5.4, P = 0.015). Manual lymphatic drainage showed no significant changes in any of the outcomes Although there are no significant differences between treatment changes, the observed trend towards a better health-related quality of life is remarkable in low-frequency low-intensity electrotherapy.

  4. Efficacy of low-frequency low-intensity electrotherapy in the treatment of breast cancer-related lymphoedema: a cross-over randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Tejero, Marta; Ferrer, Montse; Muniesa, Josep M; Duarte, Esther; Cunillera, Oriol; Escalada, Ferran

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare the efficacy of low-frequency low-intensity electrotherapy and manual lymphatic drainage in the treatment of chronic upper limb breast cancer-related lymphoedema. Design: Cross-over single-blind random clinical trial. Setting: Rehabilitation service. Participants: Thirty-six women with chronic upper limb breast cancer-related lymphoedema. Methods: Patients were randomized to undergo 10 sessions of manual lymphatic drainage followed by 10 sessions of low-frequency low-intensity electrotherapy or to undergo first low-frequency low-intensity electrotherapy followed by manual lymphatic drainage. There was a month of washout time between treatments. Each patient was examined just before and after each treatment. Researchers and outcome assessors were blinded for assigned treatment. Measures: Outcomes were lymphoedema volume, pain, heaviness and tightness, and health-related quality of life measured with the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy Questionnaire for Breast Cancer version 4 (FACT-B+4). Carry-over, period and treatment effects were analysed. Treatment effect was assessed using paired t-test. Results: Thirty patients finalized treatment. Comparing the changes in low-frequency low-intensity electrotherapy with manual lymphatic drainage changes, there were no significant differences. Low-frequency low-intensity electrotherapy did not reduce lymphoedema volume (mean of change = 19.77 mL, P = 0.36), but significant reductions were observed in pain, heaviness and tightness (mean of change = 13.1, 16.2 and 6.4 mm, respectively), and FACT-B+4 summaries improved significantly (Trial Outcome Index mean of change = 5.4, P = 0.015). Manual lymphatic drainage showed no significant changes in any of the outcomes Conclusion: Although there are no significant differences between treatment changes, the observed trend towards a better health-related quality of life is remarkable in low-frequency low-intensity electrotherapy. PMID:22172923

  5. Developing estimates of frequency and intensity of exposure to three types of metalworking fluids in a population-based case-control study of bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Friesen, Melissa C; Park, Dong-Uk; Colt, Joanne S; Baris, Dalsu; Schwenn, Molly; Karagas, Margaret R.; Armenti, Karla R.; Johnson, Alison; Silverman, Debra T; Stewart, Patricia A

    2014-01-01

    Background A systematic, transparent, and data-driven approach was developed to estimate frequency and intensity of exposure to straight, soluble, and synthetic/semi-synthetic metalworking fluids (MWFs) within a case-control study of bladder cancer in New England. Methods We assessed frequency using individual-level information from job-specific questionnaires wherever possible, then derived and applied job group-level patterns to likely exposed jobs with less information. Intensity estimates were calculated using a statistical model developed from measurements and determinants extracted from the published literature. Results For jobs with probabilities of exposure ≥0.5, median frequencies were 8 to 10 hours per week, depending on MWF type. Median intensities for these jobs were 2.5, 2.1, and 1.0 mg/m3 for soluble, straight, and synthetic/semi-synthetic MWFs, respectively. Conclusions Compared to case-by-case assessment, these data-driven decision rules are transparent and reproducible and may result in less biased estimates. These rules can also aid future exposure assessments of MWFs in population-based studies. PMID:25060071

  6. Optimization of low-frequency low-intensity ultrasound-mediated microvessel disruption on prostate cancer xenografts in nude mice using an orthogonal experimental design

    PubMed Central

    YANG, YU; BAI, WENKUN; CHEN, YINI; LIN, YANDUAN; HU, BING

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to provide a complete exploration of the effect of sound intensity, frequency, duty cycle, microbubble volume and irradiation time on low-frequency low-intensity ultrasound (US)-mediated microvessel disruption, and to identify an optimal combination of the five factors that maximize the blockage effect. An orthogonal experimental design approach was used. Enhanced US imaging and acoustic quantification were performed to assess tumor blood perfusion. In the confirmatory test, in addition to acoustic quantification, the specimens of the tumor were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and observed using light microscopy. The results revealed that sound intensity, frequency, duty cycle, microbubble volume and irradiation time had a significant effect on the average peak intensity (API). The extent of the impact of the variables on the API was in the following order: Sound intensity; frequency; duty cycle; microbubble volume; and irradiation time. The optimum conditions were found to be as follows: Sound intensity, 1.00 W/cm2; frequency, 20 Hz; duty cycle, 40%; microbubble volume, 0.20 ml; and irradiation time, 3 min. In the confirmatory test, the API was 19.97±2.66 immediately subsequent to treatment, and histological examination revealed signs of tumor blood vessel injury in the optimum parameter combination group. In conclusion, the Taguchi L18 (3)6 orthogonal array design was successfully applied for determining the optimal parameter combination of API following treatment. Under the optimum orthogonal design condition, a minimum API of 19.97±2.66 subsequent to low-frequency and low-intensity mediated blood perfusion blockage was obtained. PMID:26722279

  7. Optimization of low-frequency low-intensity ultrasound-mediated microvessel disruption on prostate cancer xenografts in nude mice using an orthogonal experimental design.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y U; Bai, Wenkun; Chen, Yini; Lin, Yanduan; Hu, Bing

    2015-11-01

    The present study aimed to provide a complete exploration of the effect of sound intensity, frequency, duty cycle, microbubble volume and irradiation time on low-frequency low-intensity ultrasound (US)-mediated microvessel disruption, and to identify an optimal combination of the five factors that maximize the blockage effect. An orthogonal experimental design approach was used. Enhanced US imaging and acoustic quantification were performed to assess tumor blood perfusion. In the confirmatory test, in addition to acoustic quantification, the specimens of the tumor were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and observed using light microscopy. The results revealed that sound intensity, frequency, duty cycle, microbubble volume and irradiation time had a significant effect on the average peak intensity (API). The extent of the impact of the variables on the API was in the following order: Sound intensity; frequency; duty cycle; microbubble volume; and irradiation time. The optimum conditions were found to be as follows: Sound intensity, 1.00 W/cm(2); frequency, 20 Hz; duty cycle, 40%; microbubble volume, 0.20 ml; and irradiation time, 3 min. In the confirmatory test, the API was 19.97±2.66 immediately subsequent to treatment, and histological examination revealed signs of tumor blood vessel injury in the optimum parameter combination group. In conclusion, the Taguchi L18 (3)(6) orthogonal array design was successfully applied for determining the optimal parameter combination of API following treatment. Under the optimum orthogonal design condition, a minimum API of 19.97±2.66 subsequent to low-frequency and low-intensity mediated blood perfusion blockage was obtained.

  8. Trends in Northern Hemisphere surface cyclone frequency and intensity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCabe, G.J.; Clark, M.P.; Serreze, M.C.

    2001-01-01

    One of the hypothesized effects of global warming from increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases is a change in the frequency and/or intensity of extratropical cyclones. In this study, winter frequencies and intensities of extratropical cyclones in the Northern Hemisphere for the period 1959-97 are examined to determine if identifiable trends are occurring. Results indicate a statistically significant decrease in midlatitude cyclone frequency and a significant increase in high-latitude cyclone frequency. In addition, storm intensity has increased in both the high and midlatitudes. The changes in storm frequency correlate with changes in winter Northern Hemisphere temperature and support hypotheses that global warming may result in a northward shift of storm tracks in the Northern Hemisphere.

  9. Intensity and fundamental frequency control in tracheoesophageal voice

    PubMed Central

    Schindler, A; Canale, A; Cavalot, AL; Albera, R; Capaccio, P; Ottaviani, F; Schindler, O

    2005-01-01

    Summary Tracheo-oesophageal voice prostheses are currently widely used following total laryngectomy. Data on maximum phonation time and spectrum have been studied by various Authors and are well known. On the contrary, intensity and fundamental frequency control have received little attention. Intensity and fundamental frequency play an important role in the prosodic aspects of speech. Fundamental frequency variations have been studied in tone language speakers, but the ability to voluntarily change intensity and fundamental frequency remain to be fully investigated. Aim of the present study was to analyse the ability of tracheo-oesophageal voice users to change intensity and fundamental frequency. A total of 12 male subjects who underwent total laryngectomy, in whom a tracheo-oesophageal prosthesis had been inserted, were considered. Maximum phonation time was calculated. Each subject was asked to utter an /a/ as loud as possible and an /a/ as soft as possible. Each subject was then asked to utter an /a/ at comfortable pitch and then at an interval of a fifth. Intensity as well as fundamental frequency variations were compared using Wilcoxon signed rank test. Correlation between maximum phonation time and variation in intensity and in fundamental frequency as well as between the two latter variables was calculated using Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient. Mean maximum phonation time was 8 (± 3.8) sec. Mean energy was 50 (± 4.8) dB SPL for soft phonation and 68 (± 4.7) dB SPL for loud phonation. The difference observed was statistically significant (p < 0.02). Mean fundamental frequency values were 106 (± 14) Hz and 135 (± 34) Hz at the interval of a fifth. The difference observed was statistically significant (p < 0.02). Tracheo-oesophageal voice users were able to change intensity and fundamental frequency, but their control was rather poor. Variations in intensity, as well as fundamental frequency, did not show any correlation with maximum phonation

  10. Problems of intensive therapy in childhood cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Skelton, J.; Pizzo, P.A.

    1986-07-15

    Tremendous progress has been made in the treatment of childhood cancers. Certain hematologic malignancies have an impressive cure rate with the current intensive antineoplastic treatment regimens. There is optimism that the treatment of children who have advanced stage solid tumors with intensive, multimodality therapy may improve their chances for long-term survival. These treatment programs, though potentially curative, are highly toxic, with severe myelosuppression and damage to other organ systems. An awareness of these potential toxicities, an understanding of how to prevent or minimize certain problems, and the ability to treat those complications which do arise are all essential to the successful management of childhood cancer. 206 references.

  11. Observed emotion frequency versus intensity as predictors of socioemotional maladjustment.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Maciel M; Eisenberg, Nancy; Valiente, Carlos; Spinrad, Tracy L; VanSchyndel, Sarah K; Diaz, Anjolii; Berger, Rebecca H; Silva, Kassondra M; Southworth, Jody; Piña, Armando A

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess whether observed emotional frequency (the proportion of instances an emotion was observed) and intensity (the strength of an emotion when it was observed) uniquely predicted kindergartners' (N = 301) internalizing and externalizing problems. Analyses were tested in a structural equation modeling (SEM) framework with data from multireporters (reports of problem behaviors from teachers and parents) and naturalistic observations of emotion in the fall semester. For observed positive emotion, both frequency and intensity negatively predicted parent- or teacher-reported internalizing symptoms. Anger frequency positively predicted parent- and teacher-reported externalizing symptoms, whereas anger intensity positively predicted parent- and teacher-reported externalizing and parent-reported internalizing symptoms. The findings support the importance of examining both aspects of emotion when predicting maladjustment.

  12. Intensity and frequency: dimensions underlying positive and negative affect.

    PubMed

    Diener, E; Larsen, R J; Levine, S; Emmons, R A

    1985-05-01

    Research on emotions and several happiness scales suggest that positive and negative affect are strongly inversely correlated. However, work on subjective well-being indicates that over time, positive and negative affect are independent across persons. In order to reconcile this inconsistency, two dimensions are proposed for personal affective structure: the frequency of positive versus negative affect and the intensity of affect. Subjects in three studies completed daily and momentary reports on their moods. In support of the intensity dimension, the correlations between positive and negative intensity were strong and positive in all three studies. The intensities of specific emotions across persons were also highly correlated. Across the three studies the frequency and intensity of affect varied independently. Although average levels of positive and negative affect showed low correlations, this relation became strongly inverse when intensity was partialed out. Thus the intensity dimension helps explain the relative independence of positive and negative affect. In addition, emotional intensity is offered as a new personality dimension that manifests interesting characteristics.

  13. Bayesian estimation of rainfall intensity-duration-frequency relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van de Vyver, H.

    2015-10-01

    Rainfall intensity-duration-frequency (IDF) curves are one of the most commonly used tools in water resources engineering. They give an idea of how return levels of extreme rainfall intensities vary with duration over a range of return periods. It is assumed that the annual maximum intensity follows the generalised extreme value (GEV) distribution. Conventional methods of estimating IDF relationships do not provide estimates of uncertainty. We propose a Bayesian framework for handling uncertainties in IDF models. Firstly, we collect annual maximum intensity data over a relevant range of rainfall durations. Secondly, we define an approximate likelihood, the ;independence; likelihood, in which the correlations have been ignored between maximum intensity data of different durations. Finally, we apply Bayesian inference to obtain the adjusted posterior, which accounts for likelihood misspecification. A comparison with earlier methods, without any adjustment amongst others, shows that the adjusted posteriors are considerably wider.

  14. Enhancing a tone by shifting its frequency or intensity.

    PubMed

    Erviti, Mayalen; Semal, Catherine; Demany, Laurent

    2011-06-01

    When a test sound consisting of pure tones with equal intensities is preceded by a precursor sound identical to the test sound except for a reduction in the intensity of one tone, an auditory "enhancement" phenomenon occurs: In the test sound, the tone which was previously softer stands out perceptually. Here, enhancement was investigated using inharmonic sounds made up of five pure tones well resolved in the auditory periphery. It was found that enhancement can be elicited not only by increases in intensity but also by shifts in frequency. In both cases, when the precursor and test sounds are separated by a 500-ms delay, inserting a burst of pink noise during the delay has little effect on enhancement. Presenting the precursor and test sounds to opposite ears rather than to the same ear significantly reduces the enhancement resulting from increases in intensity, but not the enhancement resulting from shifts in frequency. This difference suggests that the mechanisms of enhancement are not identical for the two types of change. For frequency shifts, enhancement may be partly based on the existence of automatic "frequency-shift detectors" [Demany and Ramos, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 117, 833-841 (2005)]. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  15. Intensity autocorrelation measurements of frequency combs in the terahertz range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benea-Chelmus, Ileana-Cristina; Rösch, Markus; Scalari, Giacomo; Beck, Mattias; Faist, Jérôme

    2017-09-01

    We report on direct measurements of the emission character of quantum cascade laser based frequency combs, using intensity autocorrelation. Our implementation is based on fast electro-optic sampling, with a detection spectral bandwidth matching the emission bandwidth of the comb laser, around 2.5 THz. We find the output of these frequency combs to be continuous even in the locked regime, but accompanied by a strong intensity modulation. Moreover, with our record temporal resolution of only few hundreds of femtoseconds, we can resolve correlated intensity modulation occurring on time scales as short as the gain recovery time, about 4 ps. By direct comparison with pulsed terahertz light originating from a photoconductive emitter, we demonstrate the peculiar emission pattern of these lasers. The measurement technique is self-referenced and ultrafast, and requires no reconstruction. It will be of significant importance in future measurements of ultrashort pulses from quantum cascade lasers.

  16. Radio Frequency Ablation for Primary Liver Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The Medical Advisory Secretariat undertook a review of the evidence on the safety, clinical effectiveness, and cost-effectiveness of radio frequency ablation (RFA) compared with other treatments for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in Ontario. Background Liver cancer is the fifth most common type of cancer globally, although it is most prevalent in Asia and Africa. The incidence of liver cancer has been increasing in the Western world, primarily because of an increased prevalence of hepatitis B and C. Data from Cancer Care Ontario from 1998 to 2002 suggest that the age-adjusted incidence of liver cancer in men rose slightly from 4.5 cases to 5.4 cases per 100,000 men. For women, the rates declined slightly, from 1.8 cases to 1.4 cases per 100,000 women during the same period. Most people who present with symptoms of liver cancer have a progressive form of the disease. The rates of survival in untreated patients in the early stage of the disease range from 50% to 82% at 1 year and 26% to 32% at 2 years. Patients with more advanced stages have survival rates ranging from 0% to 36% at 3 years. Surgical resection and transplantation are the procedures that have the best prognoses; however, only 15% to 20% of patients presenting with liver cancer are eligible for surgery. Resection is associated with a 50% survival rate at 5 years. The Technology: Radio Frequency Ablation RFA is a relatively new technique for the treatment of small liver cancers that cannot be treated with surgery. This technique applies alternating high-frequency electrical currents to the cancerous tissue. The intense heat leads to thermal coagulation that can kill the tumour. RFA is done under general or local anesthesia and can be done percutaneously (through the skin with a small needle), laparoscopically (microinvasively, using a small video camera), or intraoperatively. Percutaneous RFA is usually a day procedure. Methods The leading international

  17. Dependence of estimated precipitation frequency and intensity on data resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Di; Dai, Aiguo

    2017-07-01

    Precipitation frequency (F) and intensity (I) are important characteristics that climate models often fail to simulate realistically. Their estimates are highly sensitive to the spatial and temporal resolutions of the input data and this further complicates the comparison between models and observations. Here, we analyze 3-hourly precipitation data on a 0.25° grid from two satellite-derived datasets, namely TRMM 3B42 and CMORPH_V1.0, to quantify this dependence of the estimated precipitation F and I on data resolution. We then develop a simple probability-based relationship to explain this dependence, and examine the spatial and seasonal variations in the estimated F and I fields. As expected, precipitation F (I) increases (decreases) with the size of the grid box or time interval over which the data are averaged, but the magnitude of this change varies with location, and is strongest in the tropics and weakest in the subtropics. Our simple relationship can quantitatively explain this dependence of the estimated F and I on the spatial or temporal resolution of the input data. This demonstrates that large differences in the estimated F and I can arise purely from the differences in the spatial or temporal resolution of the input data. The results highlight the need to have similar resolution in comparing two datasets or between observations and models. Our estimates show that extremely low frequencies (<1%) are seen over the subtropics while the highest frequencies (20-40%) are located mostly over the tropics, and that the high frequency results from both longer and more frequent precipitation events. Precipitation intensity is more uniformly distributed than frequency. Strong correlations between the amount and frequency confirm the notion that the frequency plays a bigger role than intensity in determining precipitation variations.

  18. Frequency domain stress intensity calibration of damped cracked panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, James F.; Rizzi, Stephen A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses two schemes for doing finite element K calibration in the frequency domain. The baseline scheme uses the definition of K as a limit toward the crack tip. The limiting process requires using a very fine mesh around the crack tip making the scheme computationally very expensive. It is shown that the behavior of K as a function of frequency is very similar to a modal response. Taking advantage of this, a more efficient scheme involves a modal analysis of the cracked sheet and scaling the response to that of the static stress intensity. In this way, only a static K calibration need be performed. All the examples shown are for a frequency range spanning multiple resonances and with two levels of damping.

  19. Hot flashes in breast cancer survivors: Frequency, severity and impact.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hao-Yuan; Jotwani, Aparna C; Lai, Yeur-Hur; Jensen, Mark P; Syrjala, Karen L; Fann, Jesse R; Gralow, Julie

    2016-06-01

    To (1) determine the frequency and severity of hot flashes, (2) examine the associations between hot flash frequency and severity and quality of life, and (3) identify the predictors of hot flash activity in breast cancer survivors. The study used a cross-sectional design and mailed survey of 253 breast cancer survivors recruited from a cancer wellness clinic. Participants provided information regarding cancer history, hot flashes, pain intensity, sleep problems, physical functioning, and psychological functioning. About half of the survivors reported at least one hot flash in the past 24 h (45%) or past week (52%). The average frequency of hot flashes was 1.9 in the past 24 h and 1.8 in the past week. Hot flash severity was usually mild or asymptomatic. However, participants with hot flashes reported significantly more sleep problems and higher pain severity than those reporting no hot flashes. Moreover, the severity of hot flashes was associated with more sleep problems, higher pain severity, and more psychological dysfunction. History of hormonal suppression therapy and younger age predicted hot flash activity in the study sample. In breast cancer survivors, hot flashes are common and are associated with unpleasant symptoms and poor quality of life. Research is needed to determine if treatments that reduce the frequency and severity of hot flashes in breast cancer survivors also result in improvements in symptoms such as sleep problems, pain, and psychological dysfunction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Frequency and Intensity of drought events over Ebro River basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valencia, J. L.; Saa-Requejo, A.; Gascó, J. M.; Tarquis, A. M.

    2012-04-01

    Lately, several researchers have pointed out that climate change is expected to increase temperatures and lower rainfall in Mediterranean regions, simultaneously increasing the intensity of extreme rainfall events. These changes could have consequences regarding rainfall regime, erosion, sediment transport and water quality, soil management, and new designs in diversion ditches. Climate change is expected to result in increasingly unpredictable and variable rainfall, in amount and timing, changing seasonal patterns and increasing the frequency of extreme weather events. Consequently, the evolution of frequency and intensity of drought periods is of most important as in agro-ecosystems many processes will be affected by them. Realising the complex and important consequences of an increasing frequency of extreme droughts at the Ebro River basin, our aim is to study the evolution of drought events at this site statistically, with emphasis on the occurrence and intensity of them. For this purpose, fourteen meteorological stations were selected based on the length of the rainfall series and the climatic classification to obtain a representative untreated dataset from the river basin. Daily rainfall series from 1957 to 2002 were obtained from each meteorological station and no-rain period frequency as the consecutive numbers of days were extracted. Based on this data, we study changes in the probability distribution in several sub-periods. Moreover we used the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) for identification of drought events in a year scale and then we use this index to fit log-linear models to the contingency tables between the SPI index and the sub-periods, this adjusted is carried out with the help of ANOVA inference. Funding provided by ENESA, under projects P030225764 and P070225564, and by Spanish Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación (MICINN) through project no. AGL2010-21501/AGR is greatly appreciated.

  1. Intensity noise correlations in a two-frequency VECSEL.

    PubMed

    De, S; Pal, V; El Amili, A; Pillet, G; Baili, G; Alouini, M; Sagnes, I; Ghosh, R; Bretenaker, F

    2013-02-11

    We present an experimental and theoretical study of the intensity noise correlation between the two orthogonally polarized modes in a dual frequency Vertical External Cavity Surface Emitting Laser (VECSEL). The dependence of the noise correlation spectra on the non-linear coupling between the two orthogonally polarized modes is put into evidence. Our results show that for small coupling the noise correlation amplitude and phase spectra remain nearly flat (around -6 dB and 0° respectively) within the frequency range of our interest (from 100 kHz to 100 MHz). But for higher values of the coupling constant the low frequency behaviors (below 1-2 MHz) of the correlation amplitude and phase spectra are drastically changed, whereas above this cut-off frequency (1-2 MHz) the correlation spectra are almost independent of coupling strength. The theoretical model is based on the assumptions that the only source of noise in the frequency range of our interest for the two modes are pump noises, which are white noises of equal amplitude but partially correlated.

  2. Diversity-disturbance relationships: frequency and intensity interact.

    PubMed

    Hall, Alex R; Miller, Adam D; Leggett, Helen C; Roxburgh, Stephen H; Buckling, Angus; Shea, Katriona

    2012-10-23

    An influential ecological theory, the intermediate disturbance hypothesis (IDH), predicts that intermediate levels of disturbance will maximize species diversity. Empirical studies, however, have described a wide variety of diversity-disturbance relationships (DDRs). Using experimental populations of microbes, we show that the form of the DDR depends on an interaction between disturbance frequency and intensity. We find that diversity shows a monotonically increasing, unimodal or flat relationship with disturbance, depending on the values of the disturbance aspects considered. These results confirm recent theoretical predictions, and potentially reconcile the conflicting body of empirical evidence on DDRs.

  3. Diversity–disturbance relationships: frequency and intensity interact

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Alex R.; Miller, Adam D.; Leggett, Helen C.; Roxburgh, Stephen H.; Buckling, Angus; Shea, Katriona

    2012-01-01

    An influential ecological theory, the intermediate disturbance hypothesis (IDH), predicts that intermediate levels of disturbance will maximize species diversity. Empirical studies, however, have described a wide variety of diversity–disturbance relationships (DDRs). Using experimental populations of microbes, we show that the form of the DDR depends on an interaction between disturbance frequency and intensity. We find that diversity shows a monotonically increasing, unimodal or flat relationship with disturbance, depending on the values of the disturbance aspects considered. These results confirm recent theoretical predictions, and potentially reconcile the conflicting body of empirical evidence on DDRs. PMID:22628097

  4. Hazard from intense low-frequency acoustic impulses. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Price, G.R.

    1986-10-01

    It was predicted that because the ear is spectrally tuned, it should be most affected by intense impulses with spectral peaks near the frequency where it is tuned best (3.0 kHz for the human ear) and progressively less affected by impulses at lower frequencies. This prediction is counter to all the DRCs for impulse noise; therefore, an adequate test is essential. In order to augment the data on hearing loss to low-spectral-frequency impulses, three groups of cats (eight, nine, and ten animals) were exposed on one occasion to 50 impulses from a 105-mm howitzer at peak SPLs of 153, 159, and 166 dB. Threshold shifts were measured electrophysiologically on the day of exposure (CTS) and following a 2-month recovery period (PTS). Maximum PTSs appeared at 4 kHz (even though the spectral peak of the impulse had been at about 100 Hz), and CTSs recovered into PTSs about half as large. Furthermore, the group data, even small CTSs tended to have a permanent component. These data raise the question as to whether or not any threshold shift persisting an hour or two after exposure to high levels should be considered tolerable. When compared with data from rifle fire exposures, the data confirmed the earlier prediction that as the spectral frequency drops, hazard declines at the rate of a little more than 3 dB/oct, contrary to the rating by existing DRCs.

  5. Pain in Persons With Postpolio Syndrome: Frequency, Intensity, and Impact

    PubMed Central

    Stoelb, Brenda L.; Carter, Gregory T.; Abresch, Richard T.; Purekal, Sophia; McDonald, Craig M.; Jensen, Mark P.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To describe the frequency, intensity, and impact of pain in persons with postpoliomyelitis syndrome (PPS). Design Retrospective, cross-sectional survey. Setting Community-based survey. Participants Convenience sample of people with PPS. Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures Overall intensity and duration of pain, pain sites, pain interference, pain treatments, and relief provided by pain treatments. Results A total of 91% (n=57) of the study participants (N=63) reported pain. The most frequently reported pain sites were the shoulders, lower back, legs, and hips. Participants reported pain intensity to be the greatest in the knees, legs, wrists, lower back, and head. Pain interfered most with sleep and with activities requiring a high level of musculoskeletal involvement. Respondents also reported pain problems that were more severe than those of the general population and than those of a sample of people with multiple sclerosis. Many treatments had been tried previously for pain, but continued use of treatments was reported by relatively few participants at the time of the survey. Conclusions The findings indicate that pain is a persistent and common problem in persons with PPS, highlighting the need for effective and accessible pain treatments for this population. PMID:18929021

  6. Convective Cloud Towers and Precipitation Initiation, Frequency and Intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vant-hull, B.; Mahani, S. E.; Autones, F.; Rabin, R.; Mecikalski, J. R.; Khanbilvardi, R.

    2012-12-01

    : Geosynchronous satellite retrieval of precipitation is desirable because it would provide continuous observation throughout most of the globe in regions where radar data is not available. In the current work the distribution of precipitation rates is examined as a function of cloud tower area and cloud top temperature. A thunderstorm tracking algorithm developed at Meteo-France is used to track cumulus towers that are matched up with radar data at 5 minute 1 km resolution. It is found that roughly half of the precipitation occurs in the cloud mass that surrounds the towers, and when a tower is first detected the precipitation is already in progress 50% of the time. The average density of precipitation per area is greater as the towers become smaller and colder, yet the averaged shape of the precipitation intensity distribution is remarkably constant in all convective situations with cloud tops warmer than 220 K. This suggests that on average all convective precipitation events look the same, unaffected by the higher frequency of occurrence per area inside the convective towers. Only once the cloud tops are colder than 220 K does the precipitation intensity distribution become weighted towards higher instantaneous intensities. Radar precipitation shown in shades of green to blue, lightning in orange; black diamonds are coldest points in each tower. Ratio of number of pixels of given precipitation inside versus outside the convective towers, for various average cloud top temperatures. A flat plot indicates the distribution of rainfall inside and outside the towers has the same shape.

  7. Frequency conversion of high-intensity, femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, P S

    1997-06-01

    Almost since the invention of the laser, frequency conversion of optical pulses via non- linear processes has been an area of active interest. However, third harmonic generation using ~(~1 (THG) in solids is an area that has not received much attention because of ma- terial damage limits. Recently, the short, high-intensity pulses possible with chirped-pulse amplification (CPA) laser systems allow the use of intensities on the order of 1 TW/cm2 in thin solids without damage. As a light source to examine single-crystal THG in solids and other high field inter- actions, the design and construction of a Ti:sapphire-based CPA laser system capable of ultimately producing peak powers of 100 TW is presented. Of special interest is a novel, all-reflective pulse stretcher design which can stretch a pulse temporally by a factor of 20,000. The stretcher design can also compensate for the added material dispersion due to propagation through the amplifier chain and produce transform-limited 45 fs pulses upon compression. A series of laser-pumped amplifiers brings the peak power up to the terawatt level at 10 Hz, and the design calls for additional amplifiers to bring the power level to the 100 TW level for single shot operation. The theory for frequency conversion of these short pulses is presented, focusing on conversion to the third harmonic in single crystals of BBO, KD*P, and d-LAP (deuterated I-arginine phosphate). Conversion efficiencies of up to 6% are obtained with 500 fs pulses at 1053 nm in a 3 mm thick BBO crystal at 200 GW/cm 2. Contributions to this process by unphasematched, cascaded second harmonic generation and sum frequency generation are shown to be very significant. The angular relationship between the two orders is used to measure the tensor elements of C = xt3)/4 with Crs = -1.8 x 1O-23 m2/V2 and .15Cri + .54Crs = 4.0 x 1O-23 m2/V2. Conversion efficiency in d-LAP is about 20% that in BBO and conversion efficiency in KD*P is 1% that of BBO. It is calculated

  8. Aftereffects of Intense Low-Frequency Sound on Spontaneous Otoacoustic Emissions: Effect of Frequency and Level.

    PubMed

    Jeanson, Lena; Wiegrebe, Lutz; Gürkov, Robert; Krause, Eike; Drexl, Markus

    2017-02-01

    The presentation of intense, low-frequency (LF) sound to the human ear can cause very slow, sinusoidal oscillations of cochlear sensitivity after LF sound offset, coined the "Bounce" phenomenon. Changes in level and frequency of spontaneous otoacoustic emissions (SOAEs) are a sensitive measure of the Bounce. Here, we investigated the effect of LF sound level and frequency on the Bounce. Specifically, the level of SOAEs was tracked for minutes before and after a 90-s LF sound exposure. Trials were carried out with several LF sound levels (93 to 108 dB SPL corresponding to 47 to 75 phons at a fixed frequency of 30 Hz) and different LF sound frequencies (30, 60, 120, 240 and 480 Hz at a fixed loudness level of 80 phons). At an LF sound frequency of 30 Hz, a minimal sound level of 102 dB SPL (64 phons) was sufficient to elicit a significant Bounce. In some subjects, however, 93 dB SPL (47 phons), the lowest level used, was sufficient to elicit the Bounce phenomenon and actual thresholds could have been even lower. Measurements with different LF sound frequencies showed a mild reduction of the Bounce phenomenon with increasing LF sound frequency. This indicates that the strength of the Bounce not only is a simple function of the spectral separation between SOAE and LF sound frequency but also depends on absolute LF sound frequency, possibly related to the magnitude of the AC component of the outer hair cell receptor potential.

  9. Hazard from intense low-frequency acoustic impulses.

    PubMed

    Price, G R

    1986-10-01

    It was predicted that because the ear is spectrally tuned, it should be most affected by intense impulses with spectral peaks near the frequency where it is tuned best (3.0 kHz for the human ear) and progressively less affected by impulses at lower frequencies [G.R. Price, Scand. Audiol. Suppl. 16, 111-121 (1982)]. This prediction is counter to all the DRCs for impulse noise; therefore an adequate test is essential. In order to augment the data on hearing loss to low-spectral-frequency impulses, three groups of cats (eight, nine, and ten animals) were exposed on one occasion to 50 impulses from a 105-mm howitzer at peak SPLs of 153, 159, and 166 dB. Threshold shifts were measured electrophysiologically on the day of exposure (CTS) and following a 2-month recovery period (PTS). Maximum PTSs appeared at 4 kHz (even though the spectral peak of the impulse had been at about 100 Hz), and CTSs recovered into PTSs about half as large. Furthermore, for group data, even small CTSs tended to have a permanent component. These data raise the question as to whether or not any threshold shift persisting an hour or two after exposure to high levels should be considered tolerable. When compared with data from rifle fire exposures, the data confirmed the earlier prediction that as the spectral frequency drops, hazard declines at the rate of a little more than 3 dB/oct, contrary to the rating by existing DRCs.

  10. Frequency and intensity of comet showers from the Oort cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Heisler, J.; Alcock, C.; Tremaine, S.

    1987-05-01

    The nature of new comets and the frequency and intensity of comet showers are presently studied by means of a simulation in which an ensemble of one million comets is perturbed at random times by the Bahcall-Soneira (1980) Galaxy model's population of main sequence stars and white dwarfs. The time-integrated flux is dominated by the showers for comets whose semimajor axes are less than about 30,000 AU. The inclusion of tidal effects increases the loss rate of comets with semimajor axes between 10,000 and 20,000 AU by a factor of about 4, so that the Galactic tide, rather than individual stellar perturbations, is the dominant Oort cloud evolution-driving mechanism. 44 references.

  11. Power-frequency fields and cancer.

    PubMed

    Moulder, J E

    1998-01-01

    There is a widespread public perception that exposure to "EMF" is linked to cancer. This concern stems largely from a few epidemiological studies that appear to show an association between cancer and residence near power lines. However, the epidemiological evidence for such a link falls far short of that needed to conclude that a causal relationship exists, and examination of the biophysics leads to the conclusion that biological effects are implausible at the field strengths encountered in environmental settings. In a case such as this, where the epidemiological evidence for a link between an agent and a disease is weak to nonexistent and the effect is biophysically and/or biochemically implausible, laboratory evidence becomes critical for risk evaluation. The mechanisms of carcinogenesis are sufficiently well established that laboratory studies can be used to assess whether an agent has carcinogenic potential. There are approximately 100 published reports that have looked for evidence that power-frequency fields have genotoxic or epigenetic activity. These studies have found no replicated evidence that power-frequency fields have the potential to either cause or contribute to cancer. Of the few studies that have shown some evidence for carcinogenic activity, most have used exposure conditions with little relevance to real world exposure, none have been replicated, and many have failed direct attempts at replication. In conjunction with the epidemiology and biophysics, this leads to the conclusion that a causal association between power-frequency fields and cancer is not only unproven, but rather unlikely.

  12. Frequency and intensity noise in an injection-locked, solid-state laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farinas, Alejandro D.; Gustafson, Eric K.; Byer, Robert L.

    1995-02-01

    We have calculated transfer functions for frequency and intensity fluctuations in an injection-locked solid-state laser. At modulation frequencies well below the locking frequency we find significant frequency-noise reduction, and at modulation frequencies above the locking frequency we find that the frequency noise is that of the free-running slave laser. Our intensity-noise theory predicts substantial damping of relaxation oscillations in the slave laser. To verify these results we have measured the frequency and intensity noise of a 5-W, injection-locked Nd:YAG laser.

  13. Calculation of externally applied electric field intensity for disruption of cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Sardari, Dariush; Verga, Nicolae

    2010-06-01

    It is already known that electrostatic, magnetostatic, extremely low-frequency electric fields, and pulsed electric field could be utilized in cancer treatment. The healing effect depends on frequency and amplitude of electric field. In the present work, a simple theoretical model is developed to estimate the intensity of electrostatic field that damages a living cell during division. By this model, it is shown that magnification of electric field in the bottleneck of dividing cell is enough to break chemical bounds between molecules by an avalanche process. Our model shows that the externally applied electric field of 4 V/cm intensity is able to hurt a cancer cell at the dividing stage.

  14. Updated Intensity - Duration - Frequency Curves Under Different Future Climate Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragno, E.; AghaKouchak, A.

    2016-12-01

    Current infrastructure design procedures rely on the use of Intensity - Duration - Frequency (IDF) curves retrieved under the assumption of temporal stationarity, meaning that occurrences of extreme events are expected to be time invariant. However, numerous studies have observed more severe extreme events over time. Hence, the stationarity assumption for extreme analysis may not be appropriate in a warming climate. This issue raises concerns regarding the safety and resilience of the existing and future infrastructures. Here we employ historical and projected (RCP 8.5) CMIP5 runs to investigate IDF curves of 14 urban areas across the United States. We first statistically assess changes in precipitation extremes using an energy-based test for equal distributions. Then, through a Bayesian inference approach for stationary and non-stationary extreme value analysis, we provide updated IDF curves based on climatic model projections. This presentation summarizes the projected changes in statistics of extremes. We show that, based on CMIP5 simulations, extreme precipitation events in some urban areas can be 20% more severe in the future, even when projected annual mean precipitation is expected to remain similar to the ground-based climatology.

  15. Radar QPE for hydrological design: Intensity-Duration-Frequency curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, Francesco; Morin, Efrat

    2015-04-01

    Intensity-duration-frequency (IDF) curves are widely used in flood risk management since they provide an easy link between the characteristics of a rainfall event and the probability of its occurrence. They are estimated analyzing the extreme values of rainfall records, usually basing on raingauge data. This point-based approach raises two issues: first, hydrological design applications generally need IDF information for the entire catchment rather than a point, second, the representativeness of point measurements decreases with the distance from measure location, especially in regions characterized by steep climatological gradients. Weather radar, providing high resolution distributed rainfall estimates over wide areas, has the potential to overcome these issues. Two objections usually restrain this approach: (i) the short length of data records and (ii) the reliability of quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE) of the extremes. This work explores the potential use of weather radar estimates for the identification of IDF curves by means of a long length radar archive and a combined physical- and quantitative- adjustment of radar estimates. Shacham weather radar, located in the eastern Mediterranean area (Tel Aviv, Israel), archives data since 1990 providing rainfall estimates for 23 years over a region characterized by strong climatological gradients. Radar QPE is obtained correcting the effects of pointing errors, ground echoes, beam blockage, attenuation and vertical variations of reflectivity. Quantitative accuracy is then ensured with a range-dependent bias adjustment technique and reliability of radar QPE is assessed by comparison with gauge measurements. IDF curves are derived from the radar data using the annual extremes method and compared with gauge-based curves. Results from 14 study cases will be presented focusing on the effects of record length and QPE accuracy, exploring the potential application of radar IDF curves for ungauged locations and

  16. Single-frequency CW Ti:sapphire laser with intensity noise manipulation and continuous frequency-tuning.

    PubMed

    Jin, Pixian; Lu, Huadong; Wei, Yixiao; Su, Jing; Peng, Kunchi

    2017-01-01

    We present a tunable single-frequency CW Ti:sapphire laser with intensity noise manipulation. The manipulation of the laser intensity noise is realized by varying the frequency of the modulation signal loaded on the electrodes of an intracavity electro-optic etalon. A lithium niobate (LiNbO3) crystal is used to act as the electro-optic etalon, and its electro-optic effect is utilized to modulate the intracavity laser intensity for locking itself to the oscillating wavelength of the laser to implement continuous frequency-tuning. When the electro-optic etalon is locked to the oscillating mode of the Ti:sapphire laser with arbitrarily selected modulation frequency, the maximal continuous frequency-tuning range can reach to 20 GHz, and the laser intensity noise is successfully manipulated simultaneously.

  17. Low Frequency Acoustic Intensity Propagation Modeling in Shallow Water Waveguides

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    examine the acoustic pressure and intensity features present in several environments of interest. Free field propagation and analytically tractable...acoustic pressure and intensity features present in several environments of interest. Free field propagation and analytically tractable planar...is available commercially [1]. While numerous scenarios involve radiation of energy into a quiescent free field , there are similar problems in which

  18. Analysis of cancer patients admitted to intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Aksoy, Yakup; Kaydu, Ayhan; Sahin, Omer Fatih; Kacar, Cem Kivilcim

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The present study is an analysis of cancer patients who received follow-up treatment for either cancer-related complications or treatment-associated side effects while hospitalized in the intensive care unit (ICU). METHODS: Records of cancer patients treated at Dr. Lütfi Kırdar Kartal Training and Research Hospital ICU between January 1, 2011 and December 31, 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Demographic data and type of cancer were recorded in prepared forms and subsequently analyzed. RESULTS: Among 2240 ICU patients treated and hospitalized between January 1, 2011 and December 31, 2012, 482 cancer patients were identified and included in the study. Percentage of cancer patients in ICU was 23.9%. Male to female ratio was determined to be 1.55. First 3 most common cancers found were colorectal (19.7%), lung (15.7%), and stomach cancers (11.6%). Mortality rate of cancer patients hospitalized in ICU was 46.6%. Larynx, lung, urinary bladder, skin, rectosigmoid, hematological, and kidney cancer were more prevalent in male patients, whereas esophageal cancer was seen in more female patients than male patients. Incidence of stomach, brain, and pancreatic cancers, as well as unclassified tumors, was found to be unrelated to gender. CONCLUSION: Rectosigmoid cancer was most common type of cancer observed in our ICU. Esophageal cancer was observed in more females than males, while larynx cancer was more frequently present in males. PMID:28275754

  19. Using spiral intensity profile to quantify head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Koon Y.; Shanna, Yachna; Raza, S. Hussain; Chen, Zhuo (Georgia); Muller, Susan; Wang, May D.

    2016-01-01

    During the analysis of microscopy images, researchers locate regions of interest (ROI) and extract relevant information within it. Identifying the ROI is mostly done manually and subjectively by pathologists. Computer algorithms could help in reducing their workload and improve reproducibility. In particular, we want to assess the validity of the folic acid receptor as a biomarker for head and neck cancer. We are only interested in folic acid receptors appearing in cancerous tissue. Therefore, the first step is to segment images into cancerous and noncancerous regions. We propose to use a spiral intensity profile for segmentation of light microscopy images. Many algorithms identify objects in an image by considering pixel intensity and spatial information separately. Our algorithm integrates intensity and spatial information by considering the change, or profile, of pixel intensity in a spiral fashion. Using a spiral intensity profile can also perform segmentation at different scales from cancer regions to nuclei cluster to individual nuclei. We compared our algorithm with manually segmented image and obtained a specificity of 83.7% and sensitivity of 61.1%. Spiral intensity profiles can be used as a feature to improve other segmentation algorithms. Segmentation of cancerous images at different scales allows effective quantification of folic acid receptor inside cancerous regions, nuclei clusters, or individual cells.

  20. Prognostic Value of p53 Expression Intensity in Urothelial Cancers.

    PubMed

    Qamar, Samina; Inam, Qazi Adil; Ashraf, Sobia; Khan, M Safdar; Khokhar, M Abbas; Awan, Nukhbatullah

    2017-04-01

    To determine association of immunohistochemical expression intensity of p53 with grade and stage of urothelial cancers. Descriptive cross-sectional analytical study. Pathology Department, King Edward Medical University, Lahore, from January to December 2016. Data of transurethral resection/radical cystesctomy urinary bladder biopsies was collected. Clinical, radiological and cystoscopic findings of patients were noted from patients' charts in the Urology Ward. Biopsies were graded histologically according to WHO 2004 grading system. TNM system was used for pathological staging. On selected slides, immunoshistochemistry for p53 was applied. Nuclear immunoreactivity was considered positive if present in >10% of tumor cells and negative if <10% of tumor cells. Intensity was considered weak (less than 15% cells) and strong (more than 15% cells). Data was analyzed by SPSS version 21. Linear-by-linear association was calculated between p53 expression and stage of urothelial tumors, Chi-Square test was used to see association between grade and intensity of p53. Qualitative variables, like grade and stage of carcinoma along with p53 expression, were calculated in terms of frequencies and percentages. P ≤ 0.05 was taken as significant. Out of the 70 patients, 61 (87%) were males and 9 (13%) females. Out of 25 low grade lesions, 4 (16%) cases were p53 positive; and out of 45 high grade lesions, 41 (91%) cases were p53 positive. There was 33% (2/6 cases) positivity in Tis, 55% (16/29 cases) in T1, 72% in T2 (21/29), and 100% in T3a (5/5 cases) and T3b (1/1 case). Strong intensity of p53 staining was noted to be 5.4% (n=25) of low grade and 94.6% (n=45) of high grade tumors. p53 expression was greater and more frequently strong in higher grade and stage of urothelial carcinoma. It can be used as a prognostic marker in predicting higher grade and stage of bladder cancer.

  1. Comparison of aerobic exercise intensity prescription methods in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kirkham, Amy A; Campbell, Kristin L; McKenzie, Donald C

    2013-08-01

    Exercise plays an important role in cancer rehabilitation, but a precise prescription of exercise intensity is required to maximize the benefits of this intervention. It is unknown whether different methods of prescribing aerobic exercise intensity achieve the same intensity. Breast cancer treatments may alter exercise response and thereby may affect the accuracy of these methods. The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy and achieved intensity of four common methods of prescribing exercise intensity within and between breast cancer patients recently finished chemotherapy (n = 10), survivors finished treatment (n = 10), and healthy controls (n = 10). The methods compared were as follows: the American College of Sports Medicine's metabolic equation for treadmill walking (METW), heart rate reserve (HRR), direct heart rate (DIRECT HR), and RPE. The methods were used to prescribe 60% oxygen consumption reserve (VO2R) in four randomly assigned 10-min periods of treadmill walking with expired gas collection to evaluate 1) achieved intensity (measured % VO2R) and 2) accuracy (defined as: [60% VO2R-achieved intensity]). The accuracy of the methods was not equivalent across groups (P = 0.04). HRR and METW did not differ across groups and were most accurate in patients. HRR, METW, and DIRECT HR were all more accurate than RPE in survivors (P ≤ 0.01). RPE was the least accurate in all groups. The accuracy of DIRECT HR was much lower in patients than that in survivors and controls (P ≤ 0.01). The four methods of exercise intensity prescription varied in accuracy in prescribing 60% VO2R and did not achieve equivalent exercise intensities within breast cancer patients, survivors, and healthy controls. HRR and METW were the most accurate methods for exercise intensity prescription in breast cancer patients and survivors.

  2. Projection of future changes in the frequency of intense tropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugi, Masato; Murakami, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Kohei

    2017-07-01

    Recent modeling studies have consistently shown that the global frequency of tropical cyclones will decrease but that of very intense tropical cyclones may increase in the future warmer climate. It has been noted, however, that the uncertainty in the projected changes in the frequency of very intense tropical cyclones, particularly the changes in the regional frequency, is very large. Here we present a projection of the changes in the frequency of intense tropical cyclones estimated by a statistical downscaling of ensemble of many high-resolution global model experiments. The results indicate that the changes in the frequency of very intense (category 4 and 5) tropical cyclones are not uniform on the globe. The frequency will increase in most regions but decrease in the south western part of Northwest Pacific, the South Pacific, and eastern part of the South Indian Ocean.

  3. Anti-inflammatory effects of low-intensity extremely high-frequency electromagnetic radiation: frequency and power dependence.

    PubMed

    Gapeyev, A B; Mikhailik, E N; Chemeris, N K

    2008-04-01

    Using a model of acute zymosan-induced footpad edema in NMRI mice, the frequency and power dependence of anti-inflammatory effect of low-intensity extremely high-frequency electromagnetic radiation (EHF EMR) was found. Single whole-body exposure of animals to EHF EMR at the intensity of 0.1 mW/cm(2) for 20 min at 1 h after zymosan injection reduced both the footpad edema and local hyperthermia on average by 20% at the frequencies of 42.2, 51.8, and 65 GHz. Some other frequencies from the frequency range of 37.5-70 GHz were less effective or not effective at all. At fixed frequency of 42.2 GHz and intensity of 0.1 mW/cm(2), the effect had bell-shaped dependence on exposure duration with a maximum at 20-40 min. Reduction of intensity to 0.01 mW/cm(2) resulted in a change of the effect dependence on exposure duration to a linear one. Combined action of cyclooxygenase inhibitor sodium diclofenac and EHF EMR exposure caused a partial additive effect of decrease in footpad edema. Combined action of antihistamine clemastine and EHF EMR exposure caused a dose-dependent abolishment of the anti-inflammatory effect of EHF EMR. The results obtained suggest that arachidonic acid metabolites and histamine are involved in realization of anti-inflammatory effects of low-intensity EHF EMR.

  4. Bidirectional Shifting Effects of the Sound Intensity on the Best Frequency in the Rat Auditory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Can; Zhang, Guangwei; Zhou, Chang; Wang, Lijuan; Yan, Sumei; Zhou, Yi; Xiong, Ying

    2017-01-01

    Frequency and intensity are two independent attributes of sound stimuli. Psychoacoustic studies have found that the sound intensity can affect the perception of frequency; however, the underlying neuronal mechanism remains largely unknown. To investigate if and how the sound level affects the frequency coding for auditory cortical neurons, we recorded the activities of neuronal ensembles and single neurons, as well as the synaptic input evoked by pure tones of different frequency and intensity combinations, in layer 4 of the rat primary auditory cortex. We found that the best frequency (BF) shifted bidirectionally with the increases in intensity. Specifically, the BF of neurons with a low characteristic frequency (CF) shifted lower, whereas the BF of neurons with a higher CF shifted higher. Meanwhile, we found that these shifts in the BF can lead to the expansion of high- and low-frequency areas in the tonotopic map, increasing the evenness of the BF distribution at high intensities. Our results revealed that the frequency tuning can bidirectionally shift with an increase in the sound intensity at both the cellular and population level. This finding is consistent with the perceptual illusions observed in humans and could provide a potential mechanism for this psychoacoustic effect. PMID:28290533

  5. Frequency, intensity and impact of premenstrual syndrome in medical students.

    PubMed

    Nisar, Nusrat; Zehra, Nishat; Haider, Gulfareen; Munir, Aftab Afroz; Sohoo, Nisar Ahmed

    2008-08-01

    To determine the frequency and severity of Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) in medical college students, evaluate the impact of the condition on the quality of life and find out the associated risk factors. An observational study. Isra University Hospital, Hyderabad, Sindh, Pakistan, from August to December 2006. Unmarried medical students aged 18-25 years with regular menstrual period for the last 06 months were recruited by convenience sampling. PMS-related data was collected on daily record of severity of problems (DRSP) for two prospective cycles. Health-related quality of life data was collected on medical outcome study Short Form 36 (Sf - 36) after taking informed consent from participants. Descriptive and inferential analysis was done by two-tailed t-test and multivariate logistic regression analysis. Study participants (n=172) had mean age of 21.2 + 1.9 years. Eighty-nine (51%) girls met the criteria for PMS recording to ICD - 10, among them, 53 (59.5%) had mild PMS, 26 (29.2%) had moderate and 10 (11.2%) had severe PMS. Ten (5.8%) girls were found to have Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder (PMDD) according to DSM - IV criteria. The order of frequency of symptoms were anger, irritability, anxiety, tiredness, difficult concentration, mood swings and physical symptoms like breast tenderness and general body discomfort with great impairment in social life / activities and work efficiency/productivity. Dysmenorrhea (p=0.003) and family history of premenstrual syndrome (p < 0.001) were significantly associated with premenstrual syndrome on univariate and multivariate analysis. Sf - 36 score on Mental Component Summary (MCS) and Physical Component Summary (PCS) were significantly lower in the affected group. Premenstrual syndrome is a common problem in young girls which adversely affects their educational performance and emotional well-being. Strategies should be adopted for detection and management of PMS in young girls.

  6. Mechanisms underlying intensity-dependent changes in cortical selectivity for frequency-modulated sweeps.

    PubMed

    Razak, K A

    2012-04-01

    Frequency-modulated (FM) sweeps are common components of species-specific vocalizations. The intensity of FM sweeps can cover a wide range in the natural environment, but whether intensity affects neural selectivity for FM sweeps is unclear. Bats, such as the pallid bat, which use FM sweeps for echolocation, are suited to address this issue, because the intensity of echoes will vary with target distance. In this study, FM sweep rate selectivity of pallid bat auditory cortex neurons was measured using downward sweeps at different intensities. Neurons became more selective for FM sweep rates present in the bat's echolocation calls as intensity increased. Increased selectivity resulted from stronger inhibition of responses to slower sweep rates. The timing and bandwidth of inhibition generated by frequencies on the high side of the excitatory tuning curve [sideband high-frequency inhibition (HFI)] shape rate selectivity in cortical neurons in the pallid bat. To determine whether intensity-dependent changes in FM rate selectivity were due to altered inhibition, the timing and bandwidth of HFI were quantified at multiple intensities using the two-tone inhibition paradigm. HFI arrived faster relative to excitation as sound intensity increased. The bandwidth of HFI also increased with intensity. The changes in HFI predicted intensity-dependent changes in FM rate selectivity. These data suggest that neural selectivity for a sweep parameter is not static but shifts with intensity due to changes in properties of sideband inhibition.

  7. Distinguishing between frequency and intensity of health-related symptoms from diary assessments.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Stefan; Stone, Arthur A

    2014-09-01

    This study investigated the utility of distinguishing between the frequency and intensity of self-reported symptoms using diary-based assessments in a representative sample of U.S. residents. Data from the 2010 American Time Use Survey were analyzed, in which 12,000 respondents provided a diary about the prior day and rated their pain, tiredness, stress, and sadness for three of the day's episodes. A "two-part" latent variable modeling strategy was applied to estimate the frequency (propensity of its presence) and intensity (mean level when present) of each symptom from the diary ratings. Regression analyses comparing differences in symptom frequency and intensity across demographic factors (gender, age, income, education) were conducted to evaluate the utility of the distinction. Frequency and intensity measures were reliably estimated from 3 daily episodes, were moderately intercorrelated for each symptom domain (rs .39 to .60), and were differentially associated with demographic factors. Gender differences were evident only in symptom intensity, not frequency, with women reporting more intense symptoms. Comparisons by age showed pronounced declines in the frequency of tiredness and stress in older age, with no age-differences in the intensity of these symptoms. Higher socioeconomic status was associated with a lower intensity of pain, tiredness, stress, and sadness, but a higher frequency of tiredness and stress. A useful distinction between symptom frequency and intensity may be made from diary-based assessments. It reveals demographic differences that are otherwise obscured and enables a more detailed characterization of health-related experiences in people's daily life. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Distinguishing between frequency and intensity of health-related symptoms from diary assessments

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Stefan; Stone, Arthur A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study investigated the utility of distinguishing between the frequency and intensity of self-reported symptoms using diary-based assessments in a representative sample of U.S. residents. Methods Data from the 2010 American Time Use Survey were analyzed, in which 12,000 respondents provided a diary about the prior day and rated their pain, tiredness, stress, and sadness for three of the day's episodes. A "two-part" latent variable modeling strategy was applied to estimate the frequency (propensity of its presence) and intensity (mean level when present) of each symptom from the diary ratings. Regression analyses comparing differences in symptom frequency and intensity across demographic factors (gender, age, income, education) were conducted to evaluate the utility of the distinction. Results Frequency and intensity measures were reliably estimated from 3 daily episodes, were moderately intercorrelated for each symptom domain (rs .39 to .60), and were differentially associated with demographic factors. Gender differences were evident only in symptom intensity, not frequency, with women reporting more intense symptoms. Comparisons by age showed pronounced declines in the frequency of tiredness and stress in older age, with no age-differences in the intensity of these symptoms. Higher socioeconomic status was associated with a lower intensity of pain, tiredness, stress, and sadness, but a higher frequency of tiredness and stress. Conclusion A useful distinction between symptom frequency and intensity may be made from diary-based assessments. It reveals demographic differences that are otherwise obscured and enables a more detailed characterization of health-related experiences in people's daily life. PMID:25149030

  9. Frequency Distribution of Seismic Intensity in Japan between 1950 and 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, M.; Kohayakawa, Y.

    2012-12-01

    JMA Seismic Intensity is an index of seismic ground motion which is frequently used and reported in the media. While it is always difficult to represent complex ground motion with one index, the fact that it is widely accepted in the society makes the use of JMA Seismic Intensity preferable when seismologists communicate with the public and discuss hazard assessment and risk management. With the introduction on JMA Instrumental Intensity in 1996, the number of seismic intensity observation sites has substantially increased and the spatial coverage has improved vastly. Together with a long history of non-instrumental intensity records, the intensity data represent some aspects of the seismic ground motion in Japan. We investigate characteristics of seismic ground motion between 1950 and 2009 utilizing JMA Seismic Intensity Database. Specifically we are interested in the frequency distribution of intensity recordings. Observations of large intensity is rare compared to those of small intensity, and previous studies such as Ikegami [1961] demonstrated that frequency distribution of observed intensity obeys an exponential law, which is equivalent to the Ishimoto-Iida law [Ishimoto & Iida, 1939]. Such behavior could be used to empirically construct probabilistic seismic hazard maps [e.g., Kawasumi, 1951]. For the recent instrumental intensity data as well as pre-instrumental data, we are able to confirm that Ishimoto-Iida law explains the observation. Exponents of the Ishimoto-Iida law, or slope of the exponential law in the semi-log plot, is approximately 0.5. At stations with long recordings, there is no apparent difference between pre-instrumental and instrumental intensities when Ishimoto-Iida law is used as a measure. Numbers of average intensity reports per year and exponents of the frequency distribution curve vary regionally and local seismicity is apparently the controlling factor. The observed numbers of large intensity is slightly less than extrapolated and

  10. Effect of low-intensity extremely high frequency radiation on reproductive function in wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Subbotina, T I; Tereshkina, O V; Khadartsev, A A; Yashin, A A

    2006-08-01

    The exposure to low-intensity extremely high frequency electromagnetic radiation during spermatogenesis was accompanied by pathological changes, which resulted in degeneration and polymorphism of spermatozoa. The number of newborn rats increased in the progeny of irradiated animals.

  11. Features of electromagnetic radiation time-and-frequency fluctuation intensity distributions from human brain structures.

    PubMed

    Kublanov, V S; Gasilov, V L; Kazakov, Y E

    2000-01-01

    Time-and-frequency fluctuation intensity distributions' analysis is made of the electromagnetic radiation obtained from deep human brain structures. The role of monitoring the distribution changes due to various cerebral circulation disorders is explained.

  12. Intense electrostatic waves near the upper hybrid resonance frequency. [beyond plasmapause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurth, W. S.; Craven, J. D.; Frank, L. A.; Gurnett, D. A.

    1979-01-01

    Plasma wave measurements using instruments on the Imp 6 and Hawkeye satellites are utilized in a study of very intense electrostatic waves near the upper hybrid resonance frequency in the region just outside the plasmapause. Studies of these electrostatic disturbances show that the events occur at local times and at magnetic latitudes varying from the equator to 50 deg, and the polarization of these waves is such that the wave electric field vector is oriented perpendicular to the geomagnetic field. In most cases the center frequency of the intense waves corresponds to an (n + 1/2) fg(-) harmonic near the upper hybrid resonance frequency. The hot distribution on function is described for a few events showing temperature anisotropy and a loss cone distribution. A possible mechanism for producing intense waves near the upper hybrid resonance frequency is suggested, and evidence which indicates that the intense electrostatic waves may be a source of nonthermal continuum radiation is given.

  13. Mortality of patients with cancer admitted to intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Ñamendys-Silva, Silvio A; González-Herrera, María O; Herrera-Gómez, Angel

    2013-03-01

    Outcomes of critically ill cancer patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) had improved; it could be associated with medical advances in critical care, introduction of new anticancer treatments, and better supportive care. Recent reports have described ICU mortality for critically ill cancer patients ranged from 15.9% to 32%. During the period 2007 to 2011, a total of 1418 critically ill cancer patients were admitted to our ICU with a mortality rate lower (17.5%) than that reported by other centers. The ICUs around the world should consider the improvement in the prognosis of critically ill cancer patients who require critical care and they should not be denied ICU admission only on the basis of a patient having cancer.

  14. A REVIEW OF LOW-INTENSITY ULTRASOUND FOR CANCER THERAPY

    PubMed Central

    WOOD, ANDREW K. W.; SEHGAL, CHANDRA M.

    2015-01-01

    The literature describing the use of low-intensity ultrasound in four major areas of cancer therapy was reviewed - sonodynamic therapy, ultrasound mediated chemotherapy, ultrasound mediated gene delivery and antivascular ultrasound therapy. Each technique consistently resulted in the death of cancer cells and the bioeffects of ultrasound were primarily attributed to thermal actions and inertial cavitation. In each therapeutic modality, theranostic contrast agents composed of microbubbles played a role in both therapy and vascular imaging. The development of these agents is important as it establishes a therapeutic-diagnostic platform which can monitor the success of anti-cancer therapy. Little attention, however, has been given to either the direct assessment of the underlying mechanisms of the observed bioeffects or to the viability of these therapies in naturally occurring cancers in larger mammals; if such investigations provided encouraging data there could be a prompt application of a therapy technique in treating cancer patients. PMID:25728459

  15. Estimation of Thermodynamic and Dynamic Contribution on Regional Precipitation Intensity and Frequency Changes under Global Warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.-A.; Chou, C.; Chen, C.-T.

    2012-04-01

    From global point of view, an increased tendency of mean precipitation, which is associated with a shift toward more intense and extreme precipitation, has been found in observations and global warming simulations. However, changes in regional precipitation might be different due to contributions of thermodynamic and dynamic components. It implies that changes in regional rainfall intensity and frequency, which is connected to regional mean precipitation changes, should be more complicated under global warming. To understand how regional intensity and frequency will change under global warming, the global warming simulations from the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 3 (CMIP3) multimodel dataset in the A1B scenario were examined in this study. Over regions with increased mean precipitation, positive precipitation anomaly is usually contributed by more frequent heavy rain and enhanced rainfall intensity, even though there are less light rain events in the future. On the other hand, over regions with decreased mean precipitation, negative precipitation anomaly is associated with decreases in frequency for almost every rain events and weakened rainfall intensity, even though there are more very heavy and light rain events. The thermodynamic component is uniform in different regions, and tends to enhance precipitation frequency and intensity, while the dynamic component varies with regions, and can either enhance or reduce precipitation frequency and intensity.

  16. Responses of Middle-Frequency Modulations in Vocal Fundamental Frequency to Different Vocal Intensities and Auditory Feedback.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shao-Hsuan; Fang, Tuan-Jen; Yu, Jen-Fang; Lee, Guo-She

    2017-09-01

    Auditory feedback can make reflexive responses on sustained vocalizations. Among them, the middle-frequency power of F0 (MFP) may provide a sensitive index to access the subtle changes in different auditory feedback conditions. Phonatory airflow temperature was obtained from 20 healthy adults at two vocal intensity ranges under four auditory feedback conditions: (1) natural auditory feedback (NO); (2) binaural speech noise masking (SN); (3) bone-conducted feedback of self-generated voice (BAF); and (4) SN and BAF simultaneously. The modulations of F0 in low-frequency (0.2 Hz-3 Hz), middle-frequency (3 Hz-8 Hz), and high-frequency (8 Hz-25 Hz) bands were acquired using power spectral analysis of F0. Acoustic and aerodynamic analyses were used to acquire vocal intensity, maximum phonation time (MPT), phonatory airflow, and MFP-based vocal efficiency (MBVE). SN and high vocal intensity decreased MFP and raised MBVE and MPT significantly. BAF showed no effect on MFP but significantly lowered MBVE. Moreover, BAF significantly increased the perception of voice feedback and the sensation of vocal effort. Altered auditory feedback significantly changed the middle-frequency modulations of F0. MFP and MBVE could well detect these subtle responses of audio-vocal feedback. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Frequency dependence and intensity fluctuations due to shallow water internal waves.

    PubMed

    Badiey, Mohsen; Katsnelson, Boris G; Lynch, James F; Pereselkov, Serguey

    2007-08-01

    A theory and experimental results for sound propagation through an anisotropic shallow water environment are presented to examine the frequency dependence of the scintillation index in the presence of internal waves. The theory of horizontal rays and vertical modes is used to establish the azimutal and frequency behavior of the sound intensity fluctuations, specifically for shallow water broadband acoustic signals propagating through internal waves. This theory is then used to examine the frequency dependent, anisotropic acoustic field measured during the SWARM'95 experiment. The frequency dependent modal scintillation index is described for the frequency range of 30-200 Hz on the New Jersey continental shelf.

  18. Frequency and Intensity Stabilization of Planar Waveguide-External Cavity Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellez, Gregorio; Shoen, Steven; Quetschke, Volker

    2012-02-01

    Planar Waveguide External Cavity Lasers (PW-ECL) show an immense potential for use in precision measurement tasks and space missions because of its compactness and simple design. We show the techniques used to frequency and intensity stabilize a PW-ECL 1550nm laser system with the goal of achieving a frequency stability of 30 Hz/sqrt(Hz) and a RIN of less than 10-6. These PW-ECL systems are a potential replacement for Non-Planar Ring Oscillator (NPRO) laser systems, which have become a standard for low-noise interferometric applications, if the PW-ECL can meet the required stability. We present the initial experimental results of the intensity and frequency stabilization setup and we show a comparison between PW-ECL lasers and NPRO lasers with respect to measurements and applications requiring a high frequency and intensity stability.

  19. Intensity of lifetime physical activity and breast cancer risk among Polish women.

    PubMed

    Kruk, Joanna

    2009-03-01

    Physical activity is associated with a lower risk of breast cancer, although research findings are inconsistent regarding the type, duration, intensity, and frequency of activities that are necessary to reduce the risk, as well as dependence on menopausal status. To address these issues, I examined the effect of physical activity on breast cancer risk among 858 Polish invasive breast cancer cases and 1085 controls. Data on components of lifetime household, occupational, and recreational activities were collected in 2003-2007, using a self-administered questionnaire. Odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals were estimated using unconditional logistic regression analyses and a full assessment of confounding variables. For all types of physical activity, odds ratios were calculated for self-reported and compendium-based assigned levels of activity. Moderate- and vigorous-intensity total and recreational activities, as well as moderate- and long-lasting low-intensity household activities, lowered the risk by at least 44% for the highest versus lowest quartiles of activity in both menopausal groups. The associations were linear (P(trend) < or = 0.009). There was a suggestion of a risk reduction for occupational activity among post-menopausal women. These findings show that a risk reduction can be achieved by vigorous-intensity activities or by longer-lasting activities of moderate-intensity.

  20. Fast electron beam measurements from relativistically intense, frequency-doubled laser-solid interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, R. H. H.; Pérez, F.; Streeter, M. J. V.; Clark, E. L.; Davies, J. R.; Schlenvoigt, H.-P.; Santos, J. J.; Hulin, S.; Lancaster, K. L.; Dorchies, F.; Fourment, C.; Vauzour, B.; Soloviev, A. A.; Baton, S. D.; Rose, S. J.; Norreys, P. A.

    2013-09-01

    Experimental measurements of the fast electron beam created by the interaction of relativistically intense, frequency-doubled laser light with planar solid targets and its subsequent transport within the target are presented and compared with those of a similar experiment using the laser fundamental frequency. Using frequency-doubled laser light, the fast electron source size is significantly reduced, while evidence suggests the divergence angle may be reduced. Pyrometric measurements of the target rear surface temperature and the Cu Kα imager data indicate the laser to fast electron absorption fraction is reduced using frequency doubled laser light. Bremsstrahlung measurements indicate the fast electron temperature is 125 keV, while the laser energy absorbed into forward-going fast electrons was found to be 16 ± 4% for frequency doubled light at a mean laser intensity of 5 ± 3 × 1018 W cm-2.

  1. Dependence of low-frequency sonophoresis on ultrasound parameters; distance of the horn and intensity.

    PubMed

    Terahara, T; Mitragotri, S; Kost, J; Langer, R

    2002-03-20

    Sonophoresis at a frequency of 20 kHz has been shown to enhance transdermal drug delivery, a phenomenon referred to as low-frequency sonophoresis. This study provides an investigation of the dependence of low-frequency sonophoresis on various ultrasound parameters, including the distance of the horn from the skin, intensity, and frequency. We performed in vitro experiments with full thickness pig skin to measure enhancements of skin conductivity and drug permeability. Ultrasound was applied to pretreat the skin using a sonicator operating at a frequency of either 20 or 40 kHz. We also measured pitting of aluminum foil to measure cavitation, which is the principal mechanism of low-frequency sonophoresis. The skin conductivity enhancement was found to be inversely proportional to the distance of the horn from the skin. As the intensity increased, skin conductivity enhancement also increased up to a certain threshold, and then dropped off. The intensities (I(max)) at which maximum enhancement occur are about 14 W/cm2 for 20 kHz and 17 W/cm2 for 40 kHz. These findings may be useful in optimizing low-frequency sonophoresis. Overall, the dependence of transport on ultrasound parameters is similar to that of aluminum foil pitting. These results support the role of cavitation in low-frequency sonophoresis.

  2. Cancer Knowledge and Examination Frequency in College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craun, Ann M.; Deffenbacher, Jerry L.

    1981-01-01

    A study investigated whether the personality construct of repression-sensitization could identify which college students would or would not practice regular examinations for breast, cervical, or testicular cancer. Although knowledge of cancer increased after the lecture, no change was found in the frequency of breast self-examination while…

  3. Cancer Knowledge and Examination Frequency in College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craun, Ann M.; Deffenbacher, Jerry L.

    1981-01-01

    A study investigated whether the personality construct of repression-sensitization could identify which college students would or would not practice regular examinations for breast, cervical, or testicular cancer. Although knowledge of cancer increased after the lecture, no change was found in the frequency of breast self-examination while…

  4. The Relation between Frequency of E-Cigarette Use and Frequency and Intensity of Cigarette Smoking among South Korean Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Ah; Lee, Sungkyu; Cho, Hong-Jun

    2017-03-14

    The prevalence of adolescent electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use has increased in most countries. This study aims to determine the relation between the frequency of e-cigarette use and the frequency and intensity of cigarette smoking. Additionally, the study evaluates the association between the reasons for e-cigarette use and the frequency of its use. Using the 2015 Korean Youth Risk Behavior Web-Based Survey, we included 6655 adolescents with an experience of e-cigarette use who were middle and high school students aged 13-18 years. We compared smoking experience, the frequency and intensity of cigarette smoking, and the relation between the reasons for e-cigarette uses and the frequency of e-cigarette use. The prevalence of e-cigarette ever and current (past 30 days) users were 10.1% and 3.9%, respectively. Of the ever users, approximately 60% used e-cigarettes not within 1 month. On the other hand, 8.1% used e-cigarettes daily. The frequent and intensive cigarette smoking was associated with frequent e-cigarette uses. The percentage of frequent e-cigarette users (≥10 days/month) was 3.5% in adolescents who did not smoke within a month, but 28.7% among daily smokers. Additionally, it was 9.1% in smokers who smoked less than 1 cigarette/month, but 55.1% in smokers who smoked ≥20 cigarettes/day. The most common reason for e-cigarette use was curiosity (22.9%), followed by the belief that they are less harmful than conventional cigarettes (18.9%), the desire to quit smoking (13.1%), and the capacity for indoor use (10.7%). Curiosity was the most common reason among less frequent e-cigarette users; however, the desire to quit smoking and the capacity for indoor use were the most common reasons among more frequent users. Results showed a positive relation between frequency or intensity of conventional cigarette smoking and the frequency of e-cigarette use among Korean adolescents, and frequency of e-cigarette use differed according to the reason for the use of

  5. The Relation between Frequency of E-Cigarette Use and Frequency and Intensity of Cigarette Smoking among South Korean Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Ah; Lee, Sungkyu; Cho, Hong-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The prevalence of adolescent electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use has increased in most countries. This study aims to determine the relation between the frequency of e-cigarette use and the frequency and intensity of cigarette smoking. Additionally, the study evaluates the association between the reasons for e-cigarette use and the frequency of its use. Materials and Methods: Using the 2015 Korean Youth Risk Behavior Web-Based Survey, we included 6655 adolescents with an experience of e-cigarette use who were middle and high school students aged 13–18 years. We compared smoking experience, the frequency and intensity of cigarette smoking, and the relation between the reasons for e-cigarette uses and the frequency of e-cigarette use. Results: The prevalence of e-cigarette ever and current (past 30 days) users were 10.1% and 3.9%, respectively. Of the ever users, approximately 60% used e-cigarettes not within 1 month. On the other hand, 8.1% used e-cigarettes daily. The frequent and intensive cigarette smoking was associated with frequent e-cigarette uses. The percentage of frequent e-cigarette users (≥10 days/month) was 3.5% in adolescents who did not smoke within a month, but 28.7% among daily smokers. Additionally, it was 9.1% in smokers who smoked less than 1 cigarette/month, but 55.1% in smokers who smoked ≥20 cigarettes/day. The most common reason for e-cigarette use was curiosity (22.9%), followed by the belief that they are less harmful than conventional cigarettes (18.9%), the desire to quit smoking (13.1%), and the capacity for indoor use (10.7%). Curiosity was the most common reason among less frequent e-cigarette users; however, the desire to quit smoking and the capacity for indoor use were the most common reasons among more frequent users. Conclusions: Results showed a positive relation between frequency or intensity of conventional cigarette smoking and the frequency of e-cigarette use among Korean adolescents, and frequency of e

  6. Systems for controlling the intensity variations in a laser beam and for frequency conversion thereof

    DOEpatents

    Skupsky, Stanley; Craxton, R. Stephen; Soures, John

    1990-01-01

    In order to control the intensity of a laser beam so that its intensity varies uniformly and provides uniform illumination of a target, such as a laser fusion target, a broad bandwidth laser pulse is spectrally dispersed spatially so that the frequency components thereof are spread apart. A disperser (grating) provides an output beam which varies spatially in wavelength in at least one direction transverse to the direction of propagation of the beam. Temporal spread (time delay) across the beam is corrected by using a phase delay device (a time delay compensation echelon). The dispersed beam may be amplified with laser amplifiers and frequency converted (doubled, tripled or quadrupled in frequency) with nonlinear optical elements (birefringent crystals). The spectral variation across the beam is compensated by varying the angle of incidence on one of the crystals with respect to the crystal optical axis utilizing a lens which diverges the beam. Another lens after the frequency converter may be used to recollimate the beam. The frequency converted beam is recombined so that portions of different frequency interfere and, unlike interference between waves of the same wavelength, there results an intensity pattern with rapid temoral oscillations which average out rapidly in time thereby producing uniform illumination on target. A distributed phase plate (also known as a random phase mask), through which the spectrally dispersed beam is passed and then focused on a target, is used to provide the interference pattern which becomes nearly modulation free and uniform in intensity in the direction of the spectral variation.

  7. Systems for controlling the intensity variations in a laser beam and for frequency conversion thereof

    DOEpatents

    Skupsky, S.; Craxton, R.S.; Soures, J.

    1990-10-02

    In order to control the intensity of a laser beam so that its intensity varies uniformly and provides uniform illumination of a target, such as a laser fusion target, a broad bandwidth laser pulse is spectrally dispersed spatially so that the frequency components thereof are spread apart. A disperser (grating) provides an output beam which varies spatially in wavelength in at least one direction transverse to the direction of propagation of the beam. Temporal spread (time delay) across the beam is corrected by using a phase delay device (a time delay compensation echelon). The dispersed beam may be amplified with laser amplifiers and frequency converted (doubled, tripled or quadrupled in frequency) with nonlinear optical elements (birefringent crystals). The spectral variation across the beam is compensated by varying the angle of incidence on one of the crystals with respect to the crystal optical axis utilizing a lens which diverges the beam. Another lens after the frequency converter may be used to recollimate the beam. The frequency converted beam is recombined so that portions of different frequency interfere and, unlike interference between waves of the same wavelength, there results an intensity pattern with rapid temporal oscillations which average out rapidly in time thereby producing uniform illumination on target. A distributed phase plate (also known as a random phase mask), through which the spectrally dispersed beam is passed and then focused on a target, is used to provide the interference pattern which becomes nearly modulation free and uniform in intensity in the direction of the spectral variation. 16 figs.

  8. Intensity and frequency dependence of laryngeal afferent inputs to respiratory hypoglossal motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Mifflin, S W

    1997-12-01

    Inspiratory hypoglossal motoneurons (IHMs) mediate contraction of the genioglossus muscle and contribute to the regulation of upper airway patency. Intracellular recordings were obtained from antidromically identified IHMs in anesthetized, vagotomized cats, and IHM responses to electrical activation of superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) afferent fibers at various frequencies and intensities were examined. SLN stimulus frequencies <2 Hz evoked an excitatory-inhibitory postsynaptic potential (EPSP-IPSP) sequence or only an IPSP in most IHMs that did not change in amplitude as the stimulus was maintained. During sustained stimulus frequencies of 5-10 Hz, there was a reduction in the amplitude of SLN-evoked IPSPs with time with variable changes in the EPSP. At stimulus frequencies >25 Hz, the amplitude of EPSPs and IPSPs was reduced over time. At a given stimulus frequency, increasing stimulus intensity enhanced the decay of the SLN-evoked postsynaptic potentials (PSPs). Frequency-dependent attenuation of SLN inputs to IHMs also occurred in newborn kittens. These results suggest that activation of SLN afferents evokes different PSP responses in IHMs depending on the stimulus frequency. At intermediate frequencies, inhibitory inputs are selectively filtered so that excitatory inputs predominate. At higher frequencies there was no discernible SLN-evoked PSP temporally locked to the SLN stimuli. Alterations in SLN-evoked PSPs could play a role in the coordination of genioglossal contraction during respiration, swallowing, and other complex motor acts where laryngeal afferents are activated.

  9. Improvement of flatness of optical frequency comb based on nonlinear effect of intensity modulator.

    PubMed

    Dou, Yujie; Zhang, Hongming; Yao, Minyu

    2011-07-15

    Optical frequency comb (OFC) generated using cascaded intensity and phase modulators was experimentally demonstrated. Very flat OFC can be achieved by cascading intensity and phase modulators driven directly by sinusoidal waveform, where chirped fiber Bragg grating or specially tailored radio frequency waveforms are not required. It is found that the spectral flatness of OFC is related to direct current (DC) bias of intensity modulator and the optimum ratio of DC bias to half-wave voltage is 0.35. In the experiment, 15 comb lines within 1 dB spectral power variation are obtained at 10 GHz microwave frequency. The experimental results agree well with the simulation. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  10. Monaural loudness adaptation for middle-intensity middle-frequency signals: the importance of measurement technique.

    PubMed

    Tannen, R S; Weiler, E M; Warm, J S; Dember, W N; Simon, J O

    2001-10-01

    Using the Simple Adaptation technique (SA) and the Ipsilateral Comparison Paradigm (ICP), the authors studied monaural loudness adaptation to a middle-intensity [60 dB(A)] tone at signal frequencies of 250, 1000, and 4000 Hz in the left and right ears. Adaptation effects were absent when the SA procedure was used. However, they were observed uniformly across all frequency values with the ICP, a result that challenges the assertion in the literature, on the basis of SA measures, that loudness adaptation for middle-intensity signals occurs only at frequencies above 4000 Hz. The ICP features periodic intensity modulations (+/-10 dB relative to the base signal) to accommodate listeners' needs for referents by which they can gauge subtle changes in the loudness of the adapting tone, a key component that is missing in the SA method. Adaptation effects in this investigation were similar in both ears, supporting the equal susceptibility assumption common in loudness adaptation studies.

  11. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Treatment for Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yufeng

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is under high mortality but has few effective treatment modalities. High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is becoming an emerging approach of noninvasively ablating solid tumor in clinics. A variety of solid tumors have been tried on thousands of patients in the last fifteen years with great success. The principle, mechanism, and clinical outcome of HIFU were introduced first. All 3022 clinical cases of HIFU treatment for the advanced pancreatic cancer alone or in combination with chemotherapy or radiotherapy in 241 published papers were reviewed and summarized for its efficacy, pain relief, clinical benefit rate, survival, Karnofsky performance scale (KPS) score, changes in tumor size, occurrence of echogenicity, serum level, diagnostic assessment of outcome, and associated complications. Immune response induced by HIFU ablation may become an effective way of cancer treatment. Comments for a better outcome and current challenges of HIFU technology are also covered. PMID:25053938

  12. Technology insight: High-intensity focused ultrasound for urologic cancers.

    PubMed

    Chaussy, Christian; Thüroff, Stefan; Rebillard, Xavier; Gelet, Albert

    2005-04-01

    The growing interest in high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) technology is mainly due to its many potential applications as a minimally invasive therapy. It has been introduced to urologic oncology as a treatment for prostate and kidney cancers. While its application in the kidney is still at the clinical feasibility phase, HIFU technology is currently used in daily practice in Europe for the treatment of prostate cancer. Literature describing the results of HIFU for prostate cancer is mainly based on several series of patients from clinical development teams. The latest published results suggest that HIFU treatment is a valuable option for well-differentiated and moderately-differentiated tumors, as well as for local recurrence after external-beam radiation therapy.

  13. Cancer in Chiang Mai, North Thailand. A Relative Frequency Study

    PubMed Central

    Menakanit, W.; Muir, C. S.; Jain, D. K.

    1971-01-01

    The relative frequency of histologically diagnosed cancer at the Chiang Mai Medical School in North Thailand in 1964-67 inclusive is examined. Most of the 1877 cancers seen are in Thais (males, 927; females, 908), the remainder arising in Chinese (males, 21; females, 12), Hill People (males, 6; females, 1) and others (females, 2). The cancers in Thais are presented by site, sex and 10-year age-group together with the relative frequency (crude and corrected for age). In Thais, the outstanding finding is the extraordinarily high frequency of cancer of the hypopharyngeal-laryngeal region in both sexes (males, 18.4 per cent; females, 3.4 per cent). This may be associated with the smoking of a local variety of the cigar called “keeyo” This cigar, smoked in the usual manner, contains approximately equal quantities of home-grown, sun-dried, Thai tobacco and the chopped bark of the “koi” tree (Streblus asper). In women, who also smoke “keeyo”, the frequency of hypopharyngeal-laryngeal cancer is unusually high by occidental standards. There is no sex difference in the frequency of bronchial cancer (4 per cent). In males cancer of the penis, in second rank (6.6 per cent) is much more frequent than cancer of the prostate and testis combined. Stomach and skin cancers (ICD 191) are in third place (each 5.7 per cent). In females the most frequent cancers are cervix uteri (19.8 per cent), breast (8.8 per cent) and skin (ICD 191) (6.1 per cent). Cancers of the lip and skin of the head and neck are more frequent in females than in males. Choriocarcinoma is common (1.9 per cent) and there is a large number of vulvar cancers in young women (2.6 per cent). The geography, economy and medical facilities of Chiang Mai Province are described. It is considered that, although there is likely to be considerable under-reporting of internal cancers, the high frequency of hypopharyngeallaryngeal cancer is not due to selective bias. ImagesFig. 2 PMID:5165581

  14. Frequency and intensity of palaeofloods at the interface of Atlantic and Mediterranean climate domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, B.; Vogel, H.; Crouzet, C.; Etienne, D.; Anselmetti, F. S.

    2016-02-01

    Mediterranean climatic influences was explored by studying a lake sequence (Lake Foréant) of the Western European Alps. High-resolution sedimentological and geochemical analysis revealed 171 event layers, 168 of which result from past flood events over the last millennium. The layer thickness was used as a proxy of intensity of past floods. Because the Foréant palaeoflood record is in agreement with the documented variability of historical floods resulting from local and mesoscale, summer-to-autumn convective events, it is assumed to highlight changes in flood frequency and intensity related to such events typical of both Atlantic (local events) and Mediterranean (mesoscale events) climatic influences. Comparing the Foréant record with other Atlantic-influenced and Mediterranean-influenced regional flood records highlights a common feature in all flood patterns that is a higher flood frequency during the cold period of the Little Ice Age (LIA, AD 1300-1900). In contrast, high-intensity flood events are apparent during both the cold LIA and the warm Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA, AD 950-1250). However, there is a tendency towards higher frequencies of high-intensity flood events during the warm MCA. The MCA extremes could mean that under the global warming scenario, we might see an increase in intensity (not in frequency). However, the flood frequency and intensity in the course of the 20th century warming trend did not change significantly. Uncertainties in future evolution of flood intensity lie in the interpretation of the lack of 20th century extremes (transition or stable?) and the different climate forcing factors between the two periods (greenhouse gases vs. solar and/or volcanic eruptions).

  15. Frequency and intensity of palaeofloods at the interface of Atlantic and Mediterranean climate domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Bruno; Vogel, Hendrik; Crouzet, Christian; Etienne, David; Anselmetti, Flavio S.

    2016-04-01

    The long-term response of the flood activity to both Atlantic and Mediterranean climatic influences was explored by studying a lake sequence (Lake Foréant) of the Western European Alps. High-resolution sedimentological and geochemical analysis revealed 171 event layers, 168 of which result from past flood events over the last millennium. The layer thickness was used as a proxy of intensity of past floods. Because the Foréant palaeoflood record is in agreement with the documented variability of historical floods resulting from local and mesoscale, summer-to-autumn convective events, it is assumed to highlight changes in flood frequency and intensity related to such events typical of both Atlantic (local events) and Mediterranean (meso-scale events) climatic influences. Comparing the Foréant record with other Atlantic-influenced and Mediterranean-influenced regional flood records highlights a common feature in all flood patterns that is a higher flood frequency during the cold period of the Little Ice Age (LIA, AD 1300-1900). In contrast, high-intensity flood events are apparent during both, the cold LIA and the warm Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA, AD 950-1250). However, there is a tendency towards higher frequencies of high-intensity flood events during the warm MCA. The MCA extremes could mean that under the global warming scenario, we might see an increase in intensity (not in frequency). However, the flood frequency and intensity in course of 20th century warming trend did not change significantly. Uncertainties in future evolution of flood intensity lie in the interpretation of the lack of 20th century extremes (transition or stable?) and the different climate forcing factors between the two periods (greenhouse gases vs. solar/volcanic eruptions).

  16. Quantifying the effect of forests on frequency and intensity of rockfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moos, Christine; Dorren, Luuk; Stoffel, Markus

    2017-02-01

    Forests serve as a natural means of protection against small rockfalls. Due to their barrier effect, they reduce the intensity and the propagation probability of falling rocks and thus reduce the occurrence frequency of a rockfall event for a given element at risk. However, despite established knowledge on the protective effect of forests, they are generally neglected in quantitative rockfall risk analyses. Their inclusion in quantitative rockfall risk assessment would, however, be necessary to express their efficiency in monetary terms and to allow comparison of forests with other protective measures, such as nets and dams. The goal of this study is to quantify the effect of forests on the occurrence frequency and intensity of rockfalls. We therefore defined an onset frequency of blocks based on a power-law magnitude-frequency distribution and determined their propagation probabilities on a virtual slope based on rockfall simulations. Simulations were run for different forest and non-forest scenarios under varying forest stand and terrain conditions. We analysed rockfall frequencies and intensities at five different distances from the release area. Based on two multivariate statistical prediction models, we investigated which of the terrain and forest characteristics predominantly drive the role of forest in reducing rockfall occurrence frequency and intensity and whether they are able to predict the effect of forest on rockfall risk. The rockfall occurrence frequency below forested slopes is reduced between approximately 10 and 90 % compared to non-forested slope conditions; whereas rockfall intensity is reduced by 10 to 70 %. This reduction increases with increasing slope length and decreases with decreasing tree density, tree diameter and increasing rock volume, as well as in cases of clustered or gappy forest structures. The statistical prediction models reveal that the cumulative basal area of trees, block volume and horizontal forest structure represent key

  17. [Application of low-intensity and ultrahigh frequency electromagnetic radiation in modern pediatric practice].

    PubMed

    Azov, N A; Azova, E A

    2009-01-01

    The use of an Amfit-0,2/10-01 apparatus generating low-intensity ultrahigh frequency (UHF) electromagnetic radiation improved efficiency of therapy of sick children. This treatment allowed to reduce the frequency of intake of anesthetics in the post-operative period, correct metabolic disorders in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus, reduce severity of diabetic nephropathy and polyneuropathy, prevent formation of fresh foci of lipoid necrobiosis. The results of the study indicate that the use of low-intensity UHF electromagnetic radiation may be recommended for more extensive introduction into practical clinical work of pediatric endocrinologists and surgeons.

  18. Intratympanic manganese administration revealed sound intensity and frequency dependent functional activity in rat auditory pathway.

    PubMed

    Jin, Seong-Uk; Lee, Jae-Jun; Hong, Kwan Soo; Han, Mun; Park, Jang-Woo; Lee, Hui Joong; Lee, Sangheun; Lee, Kyu-Yup; Shin, Kyung Min; Cho, Jin Ho; Cheong, Chaejoon; Chang, Yongmin

    2013-09-01

    The cochlear plays a vital role in the sense and sensitivity of hearing; however, there is currently a lack of knowledge regarding the relationships between mechanical transduction of sound at different intensities and frequencies in the cochlear and the neurochemical processes that lead to neuronal responses in the central auditory system. In the current study, we introduced manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI), a convenient in vivo imaging method, for investigation of how sound, at different intensities and frequencies, is propagated from the cochlear to the central auditory system. Using MEMRI with intratympanic administration, we demonstrated differential manganese signal enhancements according to sound intensity and frequencies in the ascending auditory pathway of the rat after administration of intratympanic MnCl2.Compared to signal enhancement without explicit sound stimuli, auditory structures in the ascending auditory pathway showed stronger signal enhancement in rats who received sound stimuli of 10 and 40 kHz. In addition, signal enhancement with a stimulation frequency of 40 kHz was stronger than that with 10 kHz. Therefore, the results of this study seem to suggest that, in order to achieve an effective response to high sound intensity or frequency, more firing of auditory neurons, or firing of many auditory neurons together for the pooled neural activity is needed.

  19. Associating high intensity and modulated frequency of TENS delays analgesic tolerance in rats.

    PubMed

    Lima, L V; Cruz, K M L; Abner, T S S; Mota, C M D; Agripino, M E J; Santana-Filho, V J; DeSantana, J M

    2015-03-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a non-invasive analgesic resource extensively used in painful conditions. However, preclinical studies suggest that the prolonged use of TENS results in the development of tolerance to its analgesic effect. The present study investigated the analgesic effect and development of tolerance to TENS with four different stimulation protocols. Male Wistar rats induced with joint inflammation were divided into four groups: sensory intensity, low motor intensity, high motor intensity and sham groups. TENS was applied daily for 20 min with alternating frequency between 4 and 100 Hz until tolerance development was evidenced. Mechanical hyperalgesia was measured before and after each TENS daily application. After TENS, tolerance was evidenced There was a significant reduction in the mechanical withdrawal threshold in all groups 24 h after induction of inflammation (p  <  0.01). We observed a loss of analgesic efficacy of TENS around the 12th, 19th and 19th days in the groups treated with sensory intensity, low motor intensity and high motor intensity, respectively (p < 0.02) when analysed using paired measurements and compared with the control. The association between frequency variation and intensity at motor level promotes a delay in the development of analgesic tolerance to TENS, optimizing and extending its therapeutic effectiveness. © 2014 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  20. Effect of laser intensity on radio frequency emissions from laser induced breakdown of atmospheric air

    SciTech Connect

    Vinoth Kumar, L.; Manikanta, E.; Leela, Ch.; Prem Kiran, P. E-mail: prem@uohyd.ac.in

    2016-06-07

    The studies on the effect of input laser intensity, through the variation of laser focusing geometry, on radio frequency (RF) emissions, over 30–1000 MHz from nanosecond (ns) and picosecond (ps) laser induced breakdown (LIB) of atmospheric air are presented. The RF emissions from the ns and ps LIB were observed to be decreasing and increasing, respectively, when traversed from tight to loose focusing conditions. The angular and radial intensities of the RF emissions from the ns and ps LIB are found to be consistent with sin{sup 2}θ/r{sup 2} dependence of the electric dipole radiation. The normalized RF emissions were observed to vary with incident laser intensity (Iλ{sup 2}), indicating the increase in the induced dipole moment at moderate input laser intensities and the damping of radiation due to higher recombination rate of plasma at higher input laser intensities.

  1. Regional and yearly variations of hail frequency and intensity in France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthet, C.; Dessens, J.; Sanchez, J. L.

    2011-06-01

    In addition to the ground seeding hail prevention project, the Association Nationale d'Etude et de Lutte contre les Fléaux Atmosphériques (ANELFA) operates hailpad networks in four of the most hailed regions of France: Atlantic, Pyrenean, Central and Mediterranean. During the past 22 years of continuous measurements, more than five thousand point hailfalls have been recorded at 922 stations (mean annual value) installed in a 66,500 km² area. At the scale of a region and of a hail season, hail is found to be the product of two nearly independent parameters, the frequency and the mean intensity of hailfalls. The frequency is highest in the Pyrenean region, while the intensity is highest both in the Pyrenean and Central regions. This can be explained, for the frequency, by the proximity of Spain, and, for the intensity, by the mean hailstone size distributions which are different in the continental and maritime regions. The time variations and trends of hail during the 1989-2009 period are computed from the data at 457 stations which never changed during this period. The annual frequency is subject to cyclic variations, while the yearly mean intensity is affected by irregular severe hail events. The frequency did not change significantly during the period, while the intensity increased by 70%. The mean monthly distribution of hail is bimodal, with two maximums in May and July, suggesting that two types of meteorological conditions are at the origin of hailstorms. April and May are solely responsible for the mean hail increase observed during the period. A computation of the year-to-year correlation between hail intensity and mean minimum surface temperature for each month suggests that the large hail increase in April and May is at least partially due to the observed concomitant increase in temperature, and then may be a consequence of global warning.

  2. Odor frequency and odor annoyance. Part I: assessment of frequency, intensity and hedonic tone of environmental odors in the field.

    PubMed

    Sucker, Kirsten; Both, Ralf; Bischoff, Michael; Guski, Rainer; Winneke, Gerhard

    2008-05-01

    Odors can be evaluated as being pleasant or unpleasant (hedonic tone), but this differentiation was not incorporated into environmental odor regulation. In order to study the hedonic-induced modification of dose-response associations for community odor annoyance a pertinent field study was conducted. This paper covers the first step, namely the development and validation of a standardized human observation strategy for the direct quantification of the frequency, intensity, and hedonic tone of environmental odors in the field. Grids with equidistant observation points were located around six industrial odor sources, two with pleasant (sweets, rusk bakery), two with neutral (textile production, seed oil production), and two with unpleasant odor emissions (fat refinery, cast iron production). These points were visited by trained observers, screened for normal olfaction and reliable performance, in a systematic fashion for an observation time of 10 min duration. Exposure-related information from the observers in terms of frequency, intensity (six-point scale) and hedonic tone (nine-point scale) were compared to that of 1,456 residents using the same rating scales. Residents evaluated the industrial odors more intense and more unpleasant than the panelists. Furthermore, for the residents only negative relations between odor intensity and hedonic tone were found while for the observer pleasant odor became more pleasant with increasing intensity. Instead of three classes of industrial odors, namely pleasant, neutral and unpleasant, the responses allowed only for two odor classes, namely pleasant and not pleasant, the latter also covering the neutral category. The developed methodology has been shown to yield valid information about odor exposure in the field. With regard to different application settings the discrepancies between external observers and affected residents are discussed in terms of different information processing strategies, namely stimulus-based (bottom

  3. Patients with cancer in the intensive monitoring unit. New perspectives.

    PubMed

    Prieto Del Portillo, I; Polo Zarzuela, M; Pujol Varela, I

    2014-10-01

    In recent years, there has been a significant improvement in the survival of patients with cancer in intensive care units (ICUs). Advances in medical and surgical treatments and better selection of patients has helped improve the life expectancy of this type of patient. An appropriate and early resuscitation in the ICU, without initial limitations on the life support techniques, has been shown to also decrease the mortality of patients with cancer. At present, we should not deny admission to the ICU based only on the underlying neoplastic disease. However, the mortality rate for patients with cancer in the ICU, especially those with hematologic disease, remains high. In some cases, an ICU admission test (ICU test) is required for at least 3 days to identify patients who can benefit from intensive treatment. We would like to propose a decision algorithm for ICU admission that will help in making decisions in an often complex situation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Rapid skin permeabilization by the simultaneous application of dual-frequency, high-intensity ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Schoellhammer, Carl M; Polat, Baris E; Mendenhall, Jonathan; Maa, Ruby; Jones, Brianna; Hart, Douglas P; Langer, Robert; Blankschtein, Daniel

    2012-10-28

    Low-frequency ultrasound has been studied extensively due to its ability to enhance skin permeability. In spite of this effort, improvements in enhancing the efficacy of transdermal ultrasound treatments have been limited. Currently, when greater skin permeability is desired at a given frequency, one is limited to increasing the intensity or the duration of the ultrasound treatment, which carries the risk of thermal side effects. Therefore, the ability to increase skin permeability without increasing ultrasound intensity or treatment time would represent a significant and desirable outcome. Here, we hypothesize that the simultaneous application of two distinct ultrasound frequencies, in the range of 20 kHz to 3 MHz, can enhance the efficacy of ultrasound exposure. Aluminum foil pitting experiments showed a significant increase in cavitational activity when two frequencies were applied instead of just one low frequency. Additionally, in vitro tests with porcine skin indicated that the permeability and resulting formation of localized transport regions are greatly enhanced when two frequencies (low and high) are used simultaneously. These results were corroborated with glucose (180 Da) and inulin (5000 Da) transdermal flux experiments, which showed greater permeant delivery both into and through the dual-frequency pre-treated skin.

  5. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder's Frequency and Intensity Ratings Are Associated with Factor Structure Differences in Military Veterans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elhai, Jon D.; Palmieri, Patrick A.; Biehn, Tracey L.; Frueh, B. Christopher; Magruder, Kathryn M.

    2010-01-01

    We examined possible differences in the factor structure of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) on the basis of whether frequency or intensity symptom response formats were used to assess PTSD. Participants included 669 veterans recruited from an epidemiological study of four Veterans Affairs Medical Centers' primary care clinics in the…

  6. Relationship between Frequency and Intensity of Physical Activity and Health Behaviors of Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delisle, Tony T.; Werch, Chudley E.; Wong, Alvin H.; Bian, Hui; Weiler, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Background: While studies have determined the importance of physical activity in advancing health outcomes, relatively few have explored the relationship between exercise and various health behaviors of adolescents. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between frequency and intensity of physical activity and both health risk…

  7. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder's Frequency and Intensity Ratings Are Associated with Factor Structure Differences in Military Veterans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elhai, Jon D.; Palmieri, Patrick A.; Biehn, Tracey L.; Frueh, B. Christopher; Magruder, Kathryn M.

    2010-01-01

    We examined possible differences in the factor structure of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) on the basis of whether frequency or intensity symptom response formats were used to assess PTSD. Participants included 669 veterans recruited from an epidemiological study of four Veterans Affairs Medical Centers' primary care clinics in the…

  8. Relationship between Frequency and Intensity of Physical Activity and Health Behaviors of Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delisle, Tony T.; Werch, Chudley E.; Wong, Alvin H.; Bian, Hui; Weiler, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Background: While studies have determined the importance of physical activity in advancing health outcomes, relatively few have explored the relationship between exercise and various health behaviors of adolescents. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between frequency and intensity of physical activity and both health risk…

  9. Trade-off between intensity and frequency of global tropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Nam-Young; Elsner, James B.

    2015-07-01

    Global tropical cyclone climate has been investigated with indicators of frequency, intensity and activity. However, a full understanding of global warming's influence on tropical cyclone climate remains elusive because of the incomplete nature of these indicators. Here we form a complete three-dimensional variability space of tropical cyclone climate where the variabilities are continuously linked and find that global ocean warmth best explains the out-of-phase relationship between intensity and frequency of global tropical cyclones. In a year with greater ocean warmth, the tropical troposphere is capped by higher pressure anomaly in the middle and upper troposphere even with higher moist static energy anomaly in the lower troposphere, which is thought to inhibit overall tropical cyclone occurrences but lead to greater intensities. A statistical consequence is the trade-off between intensity and frequency. We calculate an average increase in global tropical cyclone intensity of 1.3 m s-1 over the past 30 years of ocean warming occurring at the expense of 6.1 tropical cyclones worldwide.

  10. Trade-off between Intensity and Frequency of Global Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, N. Y.; Elsner, J.

    2015-12-01

    Global tropical cyclone climate has been investigated with indicators of frequency, intensity and activity. However, a full understanding of global warming's influence on tropical cyclone climate remains elusive because of the incomplete nature of these indicators. Here we form a complete three-dimensional variability space of tropical cyclone climate where the variabilities are continuously linked and find that global ocean warmth best explains the out-of-phase relationship between intensity and frequency of global tropical cyclones. In a year with greater ocean warmth, the tropical troposphere is capped by higher pressure anomaly in the middle and upper troposphere even with higher moist static energy anomaly in the lower troposphere, which is thought to inhibit overall tropical cyclone occurrences but lead to greater intensities. Statistical consequence is the trade-off between intensity and frequency. We calculate an average increase in global tropical cyclone intensity of 1.3 m/s over the past 30 years of ocean warming occurring at the expense of 6.1 tropical cyclones worldwide.

  11. Effects of intensity and frequency of crown damage on resprouting of Erica arborea L. (Ericaceae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riba, Miquel

    1998-02-01

    A clipping experiment was conducted to analyse the effects of intensity and frequency of crown damage on compensatory responses by resprouting in the shrub species Erica arborea. Increased sprout removal (crown damage intensity) promoted recruitment and increased the total dry weight of new sprout cohorts. Mean size (diameter) of new sprout cohorts was greater under increased intensity of crown damage, although no differences in size variability (CV) were obtained. Increased crown damage events stimulated recruitment of new sprouts, but had no effect on their total dry weight and reduced their mean size. Increased intensity and frequency of crown damage also promoted growth (RGR) of uncut sprouts according to local position on the lignotuber. The results show that qualitatively different compensatory responses can be obtained depending on the modular structure of the genet and the frequency and intensity of crown damage. They also suggest that competition for underground resources might be important for explaining the interactions among sprouts within the genet. Modular behavior in resprouting species under extreme disturbance regimes (e.g. heavy grazing after fire) is also expected to have a negative effect on overall genet growth and reproduction.

  12. Is There a Relationship Between Snoring Sound Intensity and Frequency and OSAS Severity?

    PubMed

    Acar, Mustafa; Yazıcı, Demet; Bayar Muluk, Nuray; Hancı, Deniz; Seren, Erdal; Cingi, Cemal

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between snoring sounds and severity of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). A total number of 103 snoring patients (60 males and 43 females) were evaluated by means of polysomnographic findings and snoring sound recordings. Snoring sound intensity was assessed using fast Fourier transform (FFT) method by measuring maximal frequency (Fmax) and average snoring sound intensity level (SSIL). Maximal frequency and SSIL are correlated with apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), REM AHI, and severity of the OSAS. So, as the severity of the OSAS increased, so did the Fmax and SSIL of the snoring recordings, meaning patients started snoring louder with more frequency. In older patients, in females, in severe OSAS group, and in patients with higher body mass index (BMI), AHI and AHI REM values and SSIL and Fmax values increased. As mean oxygen (O2) saturation and lowest O2 saturation decreased, SSIL and Fmax values increased. Maximal frequency and SSIL analysis of the snoring sound increased in severe OSAS patients. People should be aware of the importance of snoring sounds. In particular, patients with snoring sounds increasing in intensity and of higher frequency should discuss with their physicians the possibility of OSAS. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Peri-threshold encoding of stimulus frequency and intensity in the M100 latency.

    PubMed

    Stufflebeam, S M; Poeppel, D; Rowley, H A; Roberts, T P

    1998-01-05

    Recent work has suggested that, in addition to spatial tonotopy, pitch and timbre information may be encoded in the temporal activity of the auditory cortex. Specifically, the post-stimulus latency of the maximal cortical evoked neuromagnetic field (M100 or N1m) is a function of stimulus frequency. We investigated the additional effect of varying the stimulus intensity on the M100 response. A 37-channel biomagnetometer recorded neuromagnetic fields over the temporal lobe of healthy volunteers in response to monaurally presented tones. The frequency dependence of the M100 latency remained remarkably invariant even at low stimulus intensity. Thus, for peri-threshold stimuli, frequency information appears encoded in the temporal form of the evoked response.

  14. Modeled Impact of Anthropogenic Warming on the Frequency of Intense Atlantic Hurricanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Morris A.; Knutson, Thomas R.; Tuleya, Robert E.; Sirutis, Joseph J.; Vecchi, Gabriel A.; Garner, Stephen T.; Held, Isaac M.

    2010-01-01

    Several recent models suggest that the frequency of Atlantic tropical cyclones could decrease as the climate warms. However, these models are unable to reproduce storms of category 3 or higher intensity. We explored the influence of future global warming on Atlantic hurricanes with a downscaling strategy by using an operational hurricane-prediction model that produces a realistic distribution of intense hurricane activity for present-day conditions. The model projects nearly a doubling of the frequency of category 4 and 5 storms by the end of the 21st century, despite a decrease in the overall frequency of tropical cyclones, when the downscaling is based on the ensemble mean of 18 global climate-change projections. The largest increase is projected to occur in the Western Atlantic, north of 20°N.

  15. Modeled impact of anthropogenic warming on the frequency of intense Atlantic hurricanes.

    PubMed

    Bender, Morris A; Knutson, Thomas R; Tuleya, Robert E; Sirutis, Joseph J; Vecchi, Gabriel A; Garner, Stephen T; Held, Isaac M

    2010-01-22

    Several recent models suggest that the frequency of Atlantic tropical cyclones could decrease as the climate warms. However, these models are unable to reproduce storms of category 3 or higher intensity. We explored the influence of future global warming on Atlantic hurricanes with a downscaling strategy by using an operational hurricane-prediction model that produces a realistic distribution of intense hurricane activity for present-day conditions. The model projects nearly a doubling of the frequency of category 4 and 5 storms by the end of the 21st century, despite a decrease in the overall frequency of tropical cyclones, when the downscaling is based on the ensemble mean of 18 global climate-change projections. The largest increase is projected to occur in the Western Atlantic, north of 20 degrees N.

  16. TCIQ: An identification by intensity and frequency of potent testing cues in science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kermis, William J.

    Everyone experiences some anxiety while taking an examination. High-test-anxious (HTA) and low-test-anxious (LTA) students are described by two characteristic differences: frequency and intensity of anxious responses and attentional direction to testing cues. The purposes of this study were threefold: (1) to report potent testing cues (i.e., 90% response agreement for both intensity and frequency) that were identified by HTA and LTA students; (2) to report differences between HTA and LTA students for frequencies and intensities of responses to testing cues; and (3) to report differences between HTA and LTA students of attentional direction to testing cues. A pool of 396 males and females who were enrolled in physical geology completed the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. A random sample consisting of 93 HTA and 40 LTA subjects completed the Test Cues Identification Questionnaire (TCIQ). The TCIQ consists of 28 disruptive items and 27 helpful items. Subjects responded with both frequency and intensity ratings for all of the 55 items in the TCIQ. Results revealed that 22 items were viewed by subjects as potent testing cues. Empirical evidence obtained did not support previous theoretical reports of differences between HTA and LTA students for either frequency and intensity of anxious responses or attentional direction to the set of disruptive and helpful testing cues. Although test anxiousness did not appear to be associated with those two characteristics differences, a discriminant analysis revealed 24 items in the TCIQ which significantly, 2 (24) = 47.59, p < 0.004, separated HTA and LTA subjects responses. Apparently, HTA and LTA students differ in their responses to specific disruptive and helpful cues but not in their responses to the set of testing cues as was previously postulated.

  17. The effect of rainfall trends in the estimation of intensity-duration-frequency curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, S. C. P.; de Lima, M. I. P.; de Lima, J. L. M. P.; Coelho, M. F. E. S.

    2010-05-01

    Intensity-duration-frequency (IDF) curves are extensively used as tools for the planning and design of many engineering projects. The design of urban drainage systems is an example where short-duration extreme rainfall has particular importance. The estimation of IDF curves is based on the assumption that the rainfall time series are stationary. However, the observed intensity-frequency relation in rain does not stay unchanged over time. Recent studies are stressing that in the next decades more frequent extreme rainfall events, of a given magnitude, could be expected. Thus, it is pertinent to understand the information in the IDF curves in the context of a changing climate. This work focuses on characterizing the effect of trends in short-term rainfall on the estimation of IDF curves. The study uses rainfall-intensity annual maxima for 5, 10, 15, 30 and 60 minutes events. The data are from 11 meteorological stations, located in Mainland Portugal; the record lengths range from 29 to 41 years. Two versions of IDF curves were obtained: one was estimated from the original series and the other one from the series obtained after the trend component was removed. For each rainfall event-duration, the intensity trend was studied using the Mann-Kendall nonparametric test and the Sen's nonparametric method. Although the majority of the rainfall series did not exhibit any sign of statistically significant trends, the characterization of the effect of those trends (or changes of behaviour over time) on the IDF curves suggests that there is a need to revise and update the existing formulation of the intensity-duration-frequency relationships. Whilst, in general, the analyses reveal no simple pattern for changes in the rainfall process over time and for different geographical locations, we are led to conclude that hydrological risk assessment should pay attention to the increased uncertainty in rainfall intensity-duration-frequency estimations.

  18. Effects of Stimulus Intensity on Low-Frequency Toneburst Cochlear Microphonic Waveforms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ming

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates changes in amplitude and delays in low-frequency toneburst cochlear microphonic (CM) waveforms recorded at the ear canal in response to different stimulus intensities. Ten volunteers aged 20-30 were recruited. Low-frequency CM waveforms at 500 Hz in response to a 14-ms toneburst were recorded from an ear canal electrode using electrocochleography techniques. The data was statistically analyzed in order to confirm whether the differences were significant in the effects of stimulus intensity on the amplitudes and delays of the low-frequency CM waveforms. Electromagnetic interference artifacts can jeopardize CM measurements but such artifacts can be avoided. The CM waveforms can be recorded at the ear canal in response to a toneburst which is longer than that used in ABR measurements. The CM waveforms thus recorded are robust, and the amplitude of CM waveforms is intensity-dependent. In contrast, the delay of CM waveforms is intensity-independent, which is different from neural responses as their delay or latency is intensity-dependent. These findings may be useful for development of the application of CM measurement as a supplementary approach to otoacoustic emission (OAE) measurement in the clinic which is severely affected by background acoustic noise. The development of the application in the assessment of low-frequency cochlear function may become possible if a further series of studies can verify the feasibility, but it is not meant to be a substitute for audiometry or OAE measurements. The measurement of detection threshold of CM waveform responses using growth function approach may become possible in the clinic. The intensity-independent nature of CMs with regards to delay measurements may also become an impacting factor for differential diagnoses and for designing new research studies. PMID:26557341

  19. Body mass index, lifetime smoking intensity and lung cancer risk.

    PubMed

    El-Zein, Mariam; Parent, Marie-Elise; Nicolau, Belinda; Koushik, Anita; Siemiatycki, Jack; Rousseau, Marie-Claude

    2013-10-01

    There is as yet no generally accepted explanation for the common finding that low body mass index (BMI) is associated with an increased risk of lung cancer. We investigated this association in a Canadian population-based case-control study (1996-2002) with a particular view to assessing the hypothesis that the observed association was due to residual confounding by smoking. Analyses were based on 1,076 cases and 1,439 controls who provided their height at enrollment and their weight at two points in time, at age 20 and 2 years before enrollment. BMI, in kg/m(2) , was classified into underweight (<18.5), normal (18.5-24.9), overweight (25.0-29.9), and obese (≥30). Smoking history was synthesized into a comprehensive smoking index (CSI) that integrated duration, intensity and time since quitting. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for BMI-lung cancer associations were estimated, adjusting for CSI as well as several sociodemographic, lifestyle and occupational factors. The normal BMI category was used as the reference. Among those who were underweight at age 20, there was a lower risk of lung cancer (OR = 0.69, 95% CI: 0.50-0.95). Conversely, lung cancer risk was increased among those who were underweight 2 years before enrollment (OR = 2.30, 95% CI: 1.30-4.10). The results were almost identical when stratifying analyses based on smoking history into never/lighter and heavier smokers. The inverse association between recent BMI and lung cancer is unlikely to be largely attributable to residual confounding by smoking. Reverse causality or a true relationship between BMI and lung cancer remain plausible.

  20. Does increased urination frequency protect against bladder cancer?

    PubMed

    Silverman, Debra T; Alguacil, Juan; Rothman, Nathaniel; Real, Francisco X; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Cantor, Kenneth P; Malats, Nuria; Tardon, Adonina; Serra, Consol; Garcia-Closas, Reina; Carrato, Alfredo; Lloreta, Josep; Samanic, Claudine; Dosemeci, Mustafa; Kogevinas, Manolis

    2008-10-01

    Experimental studies suggest that increased urination frequency may reduce bladder cancer risk if carcinogens are present in the urine. Only 2 small studies of the effect of increased urination frequency on bladder cancer risk in humans have been conducted with conflicting results. Our purpose was to evaluate the effect of urination frequency on risk of bladder cancer in a large, multicenter case-control study. We analyzed data based on interviews conducted with 884 patients with newly diagnosed, bladder cancer and 996 controls from 1998 to 2001 in Spain. We observed a consistent, inverse trend in risk with increasing nighttime voiding frequency in both men (p = 0.0003) and women (p = 0.07); voiding at least 2 times per night was associated with a significant, 40-50% risk reduction. The protective effect of nocturia was apparent among study participants with low, moderate and high water consumption. The risk associated with cigarette smoking was reduced by nocturia. Compared with nonsmokers who did not urinate at night, current smokers who did not urinate at night had an OR of 7.0 (95% CI = 4.7-10.2), whereas those who voided at least twice per night had an OR of 3.3 (95% CI = 1.9-5.8) (p value for trend = 0.0005). Our findings suggest a strong protective effect of nocturia on bladder cancer risk, providing evidence in humans that bladder cancer risk is related to the contact time of the urothelium with carcinogens in urine. Increased urination frequency, coupled with possible dilution of the urine from increased water intake, may diminish the effect of urinary carcinogens on bladder cancer risk.

  1. Bio-effects and safety of low-intensity, low-frequency ultrasonic exposure.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Farzaneh; McLoughlin, Ian V; Chauhan, Sunita; ter-Haar, Gail

    2012-04-01

    Low-frequency (LF) ultrasound (20-100 kHz) has a diverse set of industrial and medical applications. In fact, high power industrial applications of ultrasound mainly occupy this frequency range. This range is also used for various therapeutic medical applications including sonophoresis (ultrasonic transdermal drug delivery), dentistry, eye surgery, body contouring, the breaking of kidney stones and eliminating blood clots. While emerging LF applications such as ultrasonic drug delivery continue to be developed and undergo translation for human use, significant gaps exist in the coverage of safety standards for this frequency range. Accordingly, the need to understand the biological effects of LF ultrasound is becoming more important. This paper presents a broad overview of bio-effects and safety of LF ultrasound as an aid to minimize and control the risk of these effects. Its particular focus is at low intensities where bio-effects are initially observed. To generate a clear perspective of hazards in LF exposure, the mechanisms of bio-effects and the main differences in action at low and high frequencies are investigated and a survey of harmful effects of LF ultrasound at low intensities is presented. Mechanical and thermal indices are widely used in high frequency diagnostic applications as a means of indicating safety of ultrasonic exposure. The direct application of these indices at low frequencies needs careful investigation. In this work, using numerical simulations based on the mathematical and physical rationale behind the indices at high frequencies, it is observed that while thermal index (TI) can be used directly in the LF range, mechanical index (MI) seems to become less reliable at lower frequencies. Accordingly, an improved formulation for the MI is proposed for frequencies below 500 kHz.

  2. Glottal open quotient in singing: measurements and correlation with laryngeal mechanisms, vocal intensity, and fundamental frequency.

    PubMed

    Henrich, Nathalie; D'Alessandro, Christophe; Doval, Boris; Castellengo, Michèle

    2005-03-01

    This article presents the results of glottal open-quotient measurements in the case of singing voice production. It explores the relationship between open quotient and laryngeal mechanisms, vocal intensity, and fundamental frequency. The audio and electroglottographic signals of 18 classically trained male and female singers were recorded and analyzed with regard to vocal intensity, fundamental frequency, and open quotient. Fundamental frequency and open quotient are derived from the differentiated electroglottographic signal, using the DECOM (DEgg Correlation-based Open quotient Measurement) method. As male and female phonation may differ in respect to vocal-fold vibratory properties, a distinction is made between two different glottal configurations, which are called laryngeal mechanisms: mechanism 1 (related to chest, modal, and male head register) and mechanism 2 (related to falsetto for male and head register for female). The results show that open quotient depends on the laryngeal mechanisms. It ranges from 0.3 to 0.8 in mechanism 1 and from 0.5 to 0.95 in mechanism 2. The open quotient is strongly related to vocal intensity in mechanism 1 and to fundamental frequency in mechanism 2.

  3. Glottal open quotient in singing: Measurements and correlation with laryngeal mechanisms, vocal intensity, and fundamental frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henrich, Nathalie; D'Alessandro, Christophe; Doval, Boris; Castellengo, Michèle

    2005-03-01

    This article presents the results of glottal open-quotient measurements in the case of singing voice production. It explores the relationship between open quotient and laryngeal mechanisms, vocal intensity, and fundamental frequency. The audio and electroglottographic signals of 18 classically trained male and female singers were recorded and analyzed with regard to vocal intensity, fundamental frequency, and open quotient. Fundamental frequency and open quotient are derived from the differentiated electroglottographic signal, using the DECOM (DEgg Correlation-based Open quotient Measurement) method. As male and female phonation may differ in respect to vocal-fold vibratory properties, a distinction is made between two different glottal configurations, which are called laryngeal mechanisms: mechanism 1 (related to chest, modal, and male head register) and mechanism 2 (related to falsetto for male and head register for female). The results show that open quotient depends on the laryngeal mechanisms. It ranges from 0.3 to 0.8 in mechanism 1 and from 0.5 to 0.95 in mechanism 2. The open quotient is strongly related to vocal intensity in mechanism 1 and to fundamental frequency in mechanism 2. .

  4. Multidie LED combined with homogenizing optics to improve frequency response and intensity for FLIM applications.

    PubMed

    Liu, H-T; Lin, W-L; Feng, Y-L; Lin, Y; Chen, Y-C

    2017-03-15

    Application of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) in frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) has been limited by the trade-off between modulation frequency and illumination intensity of LEDs, which affects the signal-to-noise ratio in fluorescence lifetime measurements. To increase modulation frequency without sacrificing output power of LEDs, we propose to use LEDs with multiple dice connected in series. The LED capacitance was reduced with series connection; therefore, the frequency response of multidie LED was significantly increased. LEDs in visible light, including blue, green, amber and red, were all applicable in FLIM. We also present a homogenizing optics design, so that multidie LEDs produced uniform illumination on the same focal spot. When the homogenizing optics was combined with multicolour emitters, it provides multiple colour selection in a compact and convenient design.

  5. Electric-field effects on the OH vibrational frequency and infrared absorption intensity for water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermansson, Kersti

    1993-07-01

    The variations of the anharmonic OH frequency and the infrared absorption intensity with field strength have been calculated for the uncoupled OH stretching vibration of a water molecule in a static, homogeneous electric field using ab initio methods at the MP4 level with a nearly saturated basis set. The OH frequency is found to be virtually independent of the field components perpendicular to the vibrating OH bond. For the parallel component, the frequency vs field curve is close to quadratic, with a maximum for a slightly negative (directed from H to O) field strength. The external field perturbation, defined as Vext(E∥,rOH)=Vtot(E∥, rOH)-Vfree(rOH), is found to be closely linear in rOH, except when the field strength E∥ is both large and negative. The linear external force constant is almost perfectly accounted for by the sum of two terms, -E∥ṡdμ∥free/drOH and -1/2ṡE∥ṡ∂μ∥induced/∂rOH. These derivatives are quite insensitive to the choice of basis-set. The ∂μ∥induced/∂rOH derivative is approximately proportional to E∥, and gives rise to the arclike shape of the frequency vs field curve. The frequency maximum occurs where ∂μ∥tot/∂rOH≊0. It is the sign of dμ∥free/drOH which determines that the frequency maximum occurs at a negative field strength for water (but at a positive field strength for OH-, for example), i.e., that a frequency red-shift (blue-shift for OH-) occurs when the molecule is bound. The linear relationship between the infrared absorption intensity and frequency of the water OH vibration is derived.

  6. Mid-frequency acoustic propagation in shallow water on the New Jersey shelf: mean intensity.

    PubMed

    Tang, Dajun; Henyey, Frank S; Wang, Zhongkang; Williams, Kevin L; Rouseff, Daniel; Dahl, Peter H; Quijano, Jorge; Choi, Jee Woong

    2008-09-01

    Mid-frequency (1-10 kHz) sound propagation was measured at ranges 1-9 km in shallow water in order to investigate intensity statistics. Warm water near the bottom results in a sound speed minimum. Environmental measurements include sediment sound speed and water sound speed and density from a towed conductivity-temperature-depth chain. Ambient internal waves contribute to acoustic fluctuations. A simple model involving modes with random phases predicts the mean transmission loss to within a few dB. Quantitative ray theory fails due to near axial focusing. Fluctuations of the intensity field are dominated by water column variability.

  7. Generation of Low-Frequency Electromagnetic Waves by Spectrally Broad Intense Laser Pulses in a Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsintsadze, L. N.; Tajima, T.; Nishikawa, K.; Koga, J. K.; Nakagawa, K.; Kishimoto, Y.

    A new mechanism for the emission of low-frequency electromagnetic (EM) waves, including the generation of a quasistatic magnetic field, by a relativistically intense laser pulse with a wide spectrum is presented. The emission is due to modulational and filamentational instabilities of the photon gas in a plasma. The generation of the magnetic field is associated with a significant change in the laser pulse shape during the propagation. This process is identified in our 2D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations with a high intensity (1019

  8. Effects of shock intensity and duration on the frequency of biting attack by squirrel monkeys1

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, R. R.; Azrin, N. H.; Renfrew, J. W.

    1968-01-01

    Squirrel monkeys were periodically exposed to brief tail-shocks in the presence of a rubber tube connected to a pneumatic switch. Biting attack upon this tube was found to be a decreasing function of time since shock delivery and a direct function of shock intensity and duration. These results parallel findings in investigations employing more “naturalistic” social situations, indicating that attack against the inanimate and animate environment is a direct function of the intensity of an aversive stimulus. The results also demonstrate that frequency of biting attack as a datum is sensitive to several experimental manipulations. PMID:4965986

  9. Switching circuit to improve the frequency modulation difference-intensity THz quantum cascade laser imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Saat, N. K.; Dean, P.; Khanna, S. P.; Salih, M.; Linfield, E. H.; Davies, A. G.

    2015-04-24

    We demonstrate new switching circuit for difference-intensity THz quantum cascade laser (QCL) imaging by amplitude modulation and lock in detection. The switching circuit is designed to improve the frequency modulation so that it can stably lock the amplitude modulation of the QCL and the detector output. The combination of a voltage divider and a buffer in switching circuit to quickly switch the amplitude of the QCL biases of 15.8 V and 17.2 V is successfully to increase the frequency modulation up to ∼100 Hz.

  10. Frequency and intensity analysis of the nu3, nu4, and nu6 bands of formaldehyde

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuter, D. C.; Nadler, S.; Daunt, S. J.; Johns, J. W. C.

    1989-01-01

    The infrared spectra of the nu3, nu4, and nu6 bands of formaldehyde in the region from 890/cm to 1580/cm have been obtained at high resolution using tunable diode laser and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy. The transition frequencies have been analyzed using a Hamiltonian including terms through sextic in centrifugal distortion and including five interstate vibration-rotation coupling terms. Excited-state pure rotational transitions are also included in the data, and their frequencies are reproduced well. Individual measured line intensities are used to determine dipole derivatives and band strengths using the fully coupled, asymmetric top eigenvectors.

  11. Intensity correlations and entanglement by frequency doubling in a two-port resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, O.-K.; Saffman, M.

    2006-08-15

    We show that nonclassical intensity correlations and quadrature entanglement can be generated by frequency doubling in a resonator with two output ports. We predict twin-beam intensity correlations 6 dB below the coherent-state limit, and that the product of the inference variances of the quadrature fluctuations gives an Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen correlation coefficient of V{sub EPR}=0.64<1, using the criterion of Reid [Phys. Rev. A 40, 913 (1989)]. Comparison with an entanglement source based on combining two frequency doublers with a beam splitter shows that the dual-ported resonator provides stronger entanglement at lower levels of individual beam squeezing. Calculations are performed using a self-consistent propagation method that does not invoke a mean-field approximation. Results are given for physically realistic parameters that account for the Gaussian shape of the intracavity beams, as well as intracavity losses.

  12. Retrieval of complex χ(2) parts for quantitative analysis of sum-frequency generation intensity spectra

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Matthias J.; Koelsch, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Vibrational sum-frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy has become an established technique for in situ surface analysis. While spectral recording procedures and hardware have been optimized, unique data analysis routines have yet to be established. The SFG intensity is related to probing geometries and properties of the system under investigation such as the absolute square of the second-order susceptibility χ(2)2. A conventional SFG intensity measurement does not grant access to the complex parts of χ(2) unless further assumptions have been made. It is therefore difficult, sometimes impossible, to establish a unique fitting solution for SFG intensity spectra. Recently, interferometric phase-sensitive SFG or heterodyne detection methods have been introduced to measure real and imaginary parts of χ(2) experimentally. Here, we demonstrate that iterative phase-matching between complex spectra retrieved from maximum entropy method analysis and fitting of intensity SFG spectra (iMEMfit) leads to a unique solution for the complex parts of χ(2) and enables quantitative analysis of SFG intensity spectra. A comparison between complex parts retrieved by iMEMfit applied to intensity spectra and phase sensitive experimental data shows excellent agreement between the two methods. PMID:26450297

  13. Effects of low-intensity ultrahigh frequency electromagnetic radiation on inflammatory processes.

    PubMed

    Lushnikov, K V; Shumilina, Yu V; Yakushina, V S; Gapeev, A B; Sadovnikov, V B; Chemeris, N K

    2004-04-01

    Low-intensity ultrahigh frequency electromagnetic radiation (42 GHz, 100 microW/cm(2)) reduces the severity of inflammation and inhibits production of active oxygen forms by inflammatory exudate neutrophils only in mice with inflammatory process. These data suggest that some therapeutic effects of electromagnetic radiation can be explained by its antiinflammatory effect which is realized via modulation of functional activity of neutrophils in the focus of inflammation.

  14. Circularly polarized harmonic generation by intense bicircular laser pulses: electron recollision dynamics and frequency dependent helicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandrauk, André D.; Mauger, François; Yuan, Kai-Jun

    2016-12-01

    Numerical solutions of time-dependent Schrödinger equations for one and two electron cyclic molecules {{{H}}}nq+ exposed to intense bichromatic circularly polarized laser pulses of frequencies {ω }1 and {ω }2, such that {ω }1/{ω }2={n}1/{n}2 (integer) produce circularly polarized high order harmonics with a cut-off recollision maximum energy at and greater than the linear polarization law (in atomic units) {N}m{ω }1={I}p+3.17{U}p, where I p is the ionization potential and {U}p={(2{E}0)}2/4{ω }2 is the ponderomotive energy defined by the field E 0 (intensity I={{cE}}02/8π ) from each pulse and mean frequency ω =({ω }1+{ω }2)/2 . An electron recollision model in a rotating frame at rotating frequency {{Δ }}ω =({ω }1-{ω }2)/2 predicts this simple result as a result of recollision dynamics in a combination of bichromatic circularly polarized pulses. The harmonic helicities and their intensities are shown to depend on compatible symmetries of the net pulse electric fields with that of the molecules.

  15. Validation of simulated earthquake ground motions based on evolution of intensity and frequency content

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rezaeian, Sanaz; Zhong, Peng; Hartzell, Stephen; Zareian, Farzin

    2015-01-01

    Simulated earthquake ground motions can be used in many recent engineering applications that require time series as input excitations. However, applicability and validation of simulations are subjects of debate in the seismological and engineering communities. We propose a validation methodology at the waveform level and directly based on characteristics that are expected to influence most structural and geotechnical response parameters. In particular, three time-dependent validation metrics are used to evaluate the evolving intensity, frequency, and bandwidth of a waveform. These validation metrics capture nonstationarities in intensity and frequency content of waveforms, making them ideal to address nonlinear response of structural systems. A two-component error vector is proposed to quantify the average and shape differences between these validation metrics for a simulated and recorded ground-motion pair. Because these metrics are directly related to the waveform characteristics, they provide easily interpretable feedback to seismologists for modifying their ground-motion simulation models. To further simplify the use and interpretation of these metrics for engineers, it is shown how six scalar key parameters, including duration, intensity, and predominant frequency, can be extracted from the validation metrics. The proposed validation methodology is a step forward in paving the road for utilization of simulated ground motions in engineering practice and is demonstrated using examples of recorded and simulated ground motions from the 1994 Northridge, California, earthquake.

  16. Real-time seismic intensity prediction using frequency-dependent site amplification factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogiso, Masashi; Aoki, Shigeki; Hoshiba, Mitsuyuki

    2016-05-01

    A promising approach for the next generation of earthquake early warning system is based on predicting ground motion directly from observed ground motion, without any information of hypocenter. In this study, we predicted seismic intensity at the target stations from the observed ground motion at adjacent stations, employing two different methods of correction for site amplification factors. The first method was frequency-dependent correction prediction, in which we used a digital causal filter to correct the site amplification for the observed waveform in the time domain. The second method was scalar correction, in which we used average differences in seismic intensity between two stations for the site amplification correction. Results from thousands of station pairs that covered almost all of Japan showed that seismic intensity prediction with frequency-dependent correction prediction was more accurate than prediction with scalar correction. Frequency-dependent correction for site amplification in the time domain may lead to more accurate prediction of ground motion in real time.

  17. Differential control of respiratory frequency and tidal volume during high-intensity interval training.

    PubMed

    Nicolò, Andrea; Marcora, Samuele M; Bazzucchi, Ilenia; Sacchetti, Massimo

    2017-08-01

    What is the central question of this study? By manipulating recovery intensity and exercise duration during high-intensity interval training (HIIT), we tested the hypothesis that fast inputs contribute more than metabolic stimuli to respiratory frequency (fR ) regulation. What is the main finding and its importance? Respiratory frequency, but not tidal volume, responded rapidly and in proportion to changes in workload during HIIT, and was dissociated from some markers of metabolic stimuli in response to both experimental manipulations, suggesting that fast inputs contribute more than metabolic stimuli to fR regulation. Differentiating between fR and tidal volume may help to unravel the mechanisms underlying exercise hyperpnoea. Given that respiratory frequency (fR ) has been proposed as a good marker of physical effort, furthering the understanding of how fR is regulated during exercise is of great importance. We manipulated recovery intensity and exercise duration during high-intensity interval training (HIIT) to test the hypothesis that fast inputs (including central command) contribute more than metabolic stimuli to fR regulation. Seven male cyclists performed an incremental test, a 10 and a 20 min continuous time trial (TT) as preliminary tests. Subsequently, recovery intensity and exercise duration were manipulated during HIIT (30 s work and 30 s active recovery) by performing four 10 min and one 20 min trial (recovery intensities of 85, 70, 55 and 30% of the 10 min TT mean workload; and 85% of the 20 min TT mean workload). The work intensity of the HIIT sessions was self-paced by participants to achieve the best performance possible. When manipulating recovery intensity, fR , but not tidal volume (VT ), showed a fast response to the alternation of the work and recovery phases, proportional to the extent of workload variations. No association between fR and gas exchange responses was observed. When manipulating exercise duration, fR and rating of

  18. Formulation of Intensity-Duration-Frequency Curves Incorporating Non-Stationarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousef, L. A.; Ouarda, T.

    2013-12-01

    The methodology behind the formulation of Intensity-Duration-Frequency (IDF) curves dates back to the 1930's. They are a commonly used tool in the planning and design of water-related projects. The principle of any IDF formula is to find the relationship between three variables of rainfall events: the intensity of the event, its duration, and its expected frequency. The general IDF methodology proposed by Koutsoyiannis et al. (1998) provides a simple expression of the relationship between the intensity of rainfall with its duration and frequency. The use of this general relationship has become increasingly popular in the literature, due to how it eliminates the complexity involved with other alternative relationships. Current research advances recognize the existence of non-stationarity in records of hydroclimatic variables, rendering it necessary for it to be incorporated into analyses involving these variables. Non-stationarity is caused by the changes in climate and environment across the world. Numerous studies have proven that neglecting to incorporate non-stationarity does have an impact on the results of modeling hydroclimatic variables. Examples of models worked with previously, taking non-stationarity into consideration, are Flood-Duration-Frequency (QDF) and Flood-Frequency-Analysis (FFA). The purpose of this study is to incorporate the non-stationarity that exists in rainfall records into the general IDF relationship, by making the parameters involved in it time-dependent. The Generalized Extreme Value (GEV) distribution is proposed as the distribution function to be used with the time dependent numerator of the general IDF relationship. Generalized Maximum Likelihood (GML) estimators are proposed to be used for determining the parameters of the GEV function, based on the work of El Adlouni et al. (2007).

  19. Estimation of bending wave intensity in beams using the frequency response technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linjama, J.; Lahti, T.

    1992-02-01

    The frequency response approach is applied to the measurement of bending wave intensity, with two or four accelerometers being used. Based on the known structural intensity equations, a comprehensive set of frequency domain expressions is derived for power measurements in a beam. A practical procedure is developed for the general four-transducer method, which allows a usual dual channel FFT analyzer to be employed in multi-channel measurements. The procedure uses the sequential frequency response technique, and is applicable if the situation remains stationary during the data acquisition. In addition, expressions are derived for the determination of the force- and moment-related bending wave power components separately. In a laboratory experiment, the power carried by bending waves was measured in a simple beam, and the methods developed were tested and compared. The frequency response approach was shown to work well in detecting the total power. The estimation of the two bending wave power components, both in the near and the far field, was also demonstrated.

  20. [Reparative Osteogenesis and Angiogenesis in Low Intensity Electromagnetic Radiation of Ultra-High Frequency].

    PubMed

    Iryanov, Y M; Kiryanov, N A

    2015-01-01

    Non-drug correction of reparative bone tissue regeneration in different pathological states - one of the most actual problems of modern medicine. Our aim was to conduct morphological analysis of the influence of electromagnetic radiation of ultra-high frequency and low intensity on reparative osteogenesis and angiogenesis in fracture treatment under transosseous osteosynthesis. A controlled nonrandomized study was carried out. In the experiment conducted on rats we modeled tibial fracture with reposition and fixation of the bone fragments both in control and experimental groups. In the animals of the experimental group the fracture zone was exposed to low intensity electromagnetic radiation of ultra-high frequency. Exposure simulation was performed in the control group. The operated bones were examined using radiography, light and electronic microscopy, X-ray electronic probe microanalysis. It has been established that electromagnetic radiation of ultra-high frequency sessions in fracture treatment stimulate secretory activity and degranulation of mast cells, produce microcirculatory bed vascular permeability increase, endotheliocyte migration phenotype expression, provide endovascular endothelial outgrowth formation, activate reparative osteogenesis and angiogenesis while fracture reparation becomes the one of the primary type. The full periosteal, intermediary and intraosteal bone union was defined in 28 days. Among the therapeutic benefits of electromagnetic radiation of ultra-high frequency in fracture treatment we can detect mast cell secretorv activity stimulation and endovascular anziozenesis activation.

  1. Frequency-domain light intensity spectrum analyzer based on temporal convolution.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liao; Duan, Yuhua; Zhang, Chi; Zhang, Xinliang

    2017-07-15

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a new type of all-optical radio frequency (RF) spectrum analyzer based on temporal convolution and cross-phase modulation (XPM) that can be regarded as the frequency-domain counterpart of a conventional light intensity spectrum analyzer (LISA). The XPM effect converts the intensity envelope of an optical signal to the phase of the probe signal, while the temporal convolution helps to enable the RF spectrum to be temporally resolved with a high frame rate. This frequency-domain LISA (f-LISA) has experimentally demonstrated an 800-GHz observation bandwidth with 1.25-GHz resolution (1 GHz for a single frequency) and a 94-MHz frame rate. To showcase its potential applications, this analyzer has successfully characterized the dynamic RF spectrum of an ultrafast wavelength-switching signal with a 10-ns switching interval. We believe that it is promising for some ultrafast dynamic RF spectrum acquisition applications, e.g., fast tuning lasers and real-time channel monitoring.

  2. Membrane properties specialize mammalian inner hair cells for frequency or intensity encoding

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Stuart L

    2015-01-01

    The auditory pathway faithfully encodes and relays auditory information to the brain with remarkable speed and precision. The inner hair cells (IHCs) are the primary sensory receptors adapted for rapid auditory signaling, but they are not thought to be intrinsically tuned to encode particular sound frequencies. Here I found that under experimental conditions mimicking those in vivo, mammalian IHCs are intrinsically specialized. Low-frequency gerbil IHCs (~0.3 kHz) have significantly more depolarized resting membrane potentials, faster kinetics, and shorter membrane time constants than high-frequency cells (~30 kHz). The faster kinetics of low-frequency IHCs allow them to follow the phasic component of sound (frequency-following), which is not required for high-frequency cells that are instead optimally configured to encode sustained, graded responses (intensity-following). The intrinsic membrane filtering of IHCs ensures accurate encoding of the phasic or sustained components of the cell’s in vivo receptor potential, crucial for sound localization and ultimately survival. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08177.001 PMID:26544545

  3. Frequency domain approach for time-resolved pump-probe microscopy using intensity modulated laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, J.; Kawasumi, K.; Kobayashi, T.

    2014-09-01

    We present a scheme for time-resolved pump-probe microscopy using intensity modulated laser diodes. The modulation frequencies of the pump and probe beams are varied up to 500 MHz with fixed frequency detuning typically set at 15 kHz. The frequency response of the pump-probe signal is detected using a lock-in amplifier referenced at the beat frequency. This frequency domain method is capable of characterizing the nanosecond to picosecond relaxation dynamics of sample species without the use of a high speed detector or a high frequency lock-in amplifier. Furthermore, as the pump-probe signal is based on the nonlinear interaction between the two laser beams and the sample, our scheme provides better spatial resolution than the conventional diffraction-limited optical microscopes. Time-resolved pump-probe imaging of fluorescence beads and aggregates of quantum dots demonstrates that this method is useful for the microscopic analysis of optoelectronic devices. The system is implemented using compact and low-cost laser diodes, and thus has a broad range of applications in the fields of photochemistry, optical physics, and biological imaging.

  4. EFFECTS OF FREQUENCY OF WRITING AND INTENSITY OF TEACHER EVALUATION UPON HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS' PERFORMANCE IN WRITTEN COMPOSITION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ARNOLD, LOIS V.; BURTON, DWIGHT L.

    THE PROBLEM OF THIS RESEARCH WAS TO INVESTIGATE THE EFFECTS OF FREQUENCY OF WRITING AND INTENSITY OF TEACHER EVALUATION UPON PERFORMANCE BY STUDENTS OF VARYING ABILITIES. THE STUDY WAS DESIGNED TO INCLUDE EIGHT 10TH-GRADE CLASSES WITH TWO TEACHERS FOLLOWING FOUR DIFFERENT APPROACHES TO INTENSITY OF TEACHER EVALUATION AND FREQUENCY OF WRITING.…

  5. [Pain relief by low-intensity frequency-modulated millimeter waves acting on the acupuncture points].

    PubMed

    Samosiuk, I Z; Kulikovich, Iu N; Tamarova, Z A; Samosiuk, N I; Kazhanova, A K

    2000-01-01

    Analgetic effect of low-intensive frequency-modulated millimetric waves (MW) was studied in mice with formalin induced nociceptive behavior reaction (licking of defeat hindpaw). MW were applied to the acupoint E 36 of the defeat hindpaw. The following MW were used: 60 GHz (1) and 118 GHz (2) which were modulated by 4 Hz; noise MW within the range of 42-95 GHz (3) and 90-140 GHz (4) which were modulated in accidental order by frequencies 1-60 Hz; combinations of fixed frequencies with noise - 60 GHz + noise 42-95 GHz (5) and 118 GHz + noise 90-140 GHz (6). All used MW combinations suppressed licking of the defeat hindpaw and increased duration of sleep and eating. The strongest analgesia was achieved in series 1-3 (42.4-69.7%), the weakest in series 6 and 4 of the experiment (12.2-19.7%).

  6. An intense, cold, velocity-controlled molecular beam by frequency-chirped laser slowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truppe, S.; Williams, H. J.; Fitch, N. J.; Hambach, M.; Wall, T. E.; Hinds, E. A.; Sauer, B. E.; Tarbutt, M. R.

    2017-02-01

    Using frequency-chirped radiation pressure slowing, we precisely control the velocity of a pulsed CaF molecular beam down to a few m s–1, compressing its velocity spread by a factor of 10 while retaining high intensity: at a velocity of 15 m s–1 the flux, measured 1.3 m from the source, is 7 × 105 molecules per cm2 per shot in a single rovibrational state. The beam is suitable for loading a magneto-optical trap or, when combined with transverse laser cooling, improving the precision of spectroscopic measurements that test fundamental physics. We compare the frequency-chirped slowing method with the more commonly used frequency-broadened slowing method.

  7. Radio Frequency Ultrasound Time Series Signal Analysis to Evaluate High-intensity Focused Ultrasound Lesion Formation Status in Tissue.

    PubMed

    Mobasheri, Saeedeh; Behnam, Hamid; Rangraz, Parisa; Tavakkoli, Jahan

    2016-01-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a novel treatment modality used by scientists and clinicians in the recent decades. This modality has had a great and significant success as a noninvasive surgery technique applicable in tissue ablation therapy and cancer treatment. In this study, radio frequency (RF) ultrasound signals were acquired and registered in three stages of before, during, and after HIFU exposures. Different features of RF time series signals including the sum of amplitude spectrum in the four quarters of the frequency range, the slope, and intercept of the best-fit line to the entire power spectrum and the Shannon entropy were utilized to distinguish between the HIFU-induced thermal lesion and the normal tissue. We also examined the RF data, frame by frame to identify exposure effects on the formation and characteristics of a HIFU thermal lesion at different time steps throughout the treatment. The results obtained showed that the spectrum frequency quarters and the slope and intercept of the best fit line to the entire power spectrum both increased two times during the HIFU exposures. The Shannon entropy, however, decreased after the exposures. In conclusion, different characteristics of RF time series signal possess promising features that can be used to characterize ablated and nonablated tissues and to distinguish them from each other in a quasi-quantitative fashion.

  8. Radio Frequency Ultrasound Time Series Signal Analysis to Evaluate High-intensity Focused Ultrasound Lesion Formation Status in Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Mobasheri, Saeedeh; Behnam, Hamid; Rangraz, Parisa; Tavakkoli, Jahan

    2016-01-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a novel treatment modality used by scientists and clinicians in the recent decades. This modality has had a great and significant success as a noninvasive surgery technique applicable in tissue ablation therapy and cancer treatment. In this study, radio frequency (RF) ultrasound signals were acquired and registered in three stages of before, during, and after HIFU exposures. Different features of RF time series signals including the sum of amplitude spectrum in the four quarters of the frequency range, the slope, and intercept of the best-fit line to the entire power spectrum and the Shannon entropy were utilized to distinguish between the HIFU-induced thermal lesion and the normal tissue. We also examined the RF data, frame by frame to identify exposure effects on the formation and characteristics of a HIFU thermal lesion at different time steps throughout the treatment. The results obtained showed that the spectrum frequency quarters and the slope and intercept of the best fit line to the entire power spectrum both increased two times during the HIFU exposures. The Shannon entropy, however, decreased after the exposures. In conclusion, different characteristics of RF time series signal possess promising features that can be used to characterize ablated and nonablated tissues and to distinguish them from each other in a quasi-quantitative fashion. PMID:27186536

  9. Planck intermediate results. XXII. Frequency dependence of thermal emission from Galactic dust in intensity and polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Alves, M. I. R.; Aniano, G.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Burigana, C.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Guillet, V.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D. L.; Helou, G.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Magalhães, A. M.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oppermann, N.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Salerno, E.; Sandri, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wandelt, B. D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2015-04-01

    Planck has mapped the intensity and polarization of the sky at microwave frequencies with unprecedented sensitivity. We use these data to characterize the frequency dependence of dust emission. We make use of the Planck 353 GHz I, Q, and U Stokes maps as dust templates, and cross-correlate them with the Planck and WMAP data at 12 frequencies from 23 to 353 GHz, over circular patches with 10° radius. The cross-correlation analysis is performed for both intensity and polarization data in a consistent manner. The results are corrected for the chance correlation between the templates and the anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background. We use a mask that focuses our analysis on the diffuse interstellar medium at intermediate Galactic latitudes. We determine the spectral indices of dust emission in intensity and polarization between 100 and 353 GHz, for each sky patch. Both indices are found to be remarkably constant over the sky. The mean values, 1.59 ± 0.02 for polarization and 1.51 ± 0.01 for intensity, for a mean dust temperature of 19.6 K, are close, but significantly different (3.6σ). We determine the mean spectral energy distribution (SED) of the microwave emission, correlated with the 353 GHz dust templates, by averaging the results of the correlation over all sky patches. We find that the mean SED increases for decreasing frequencies at ν< 60 GHz for both intensity and polarization. The rise of the polarization SED towards low frequencies may be accounted for by a synchrotron component correlated with dust, with no need for any polarization of the anomalous microwave emission. We use a spectral model to separate the synchrotron and dust polarization and to characterize the spectral dependence of the dust polarization fraction. The polarization fraction (p) of the dust emission decreases by (21 ± 6)% from 353 to 70 GHz. We discuss this result within the context of existing dust models. The decrease in p could indicate differences in polarization

  10. Trends in the Annual Frequency of Atlantic Basin Intense Hurricanes: Implications for the Near-Term

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    1998-01-01

    During the interval of 1944-1997, 120 intense hurricanes (category 3, 4, or 5 on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane scale) have been observed in the Atlantic basin. These intense hurricanes have had an observed annual frequency of 0-7 events per year (having a mean, mode, and median equal to about 2 events per year), being preferentially lower during El Ninio years and higher during non-El Ninio years. Also, it has recently been established that a long-term downward trend in the annual frequency of intense hurricanes, spanning about five decades, has taken place, although this trend can, alternatively, be explained as a shift from a more active state prior to the mid 1960's to a less active state thereafter (rather than as a simple linear decline). In this paper, on the basis of 10-yr moving averages, the long4erm trend of the frequency of intense hurricanes is compared against one for the annual mean temperature at Armagh Observatory, Northern Ireland (which serves as a proxy for climatic change). Interestingly, the two sets of 10-yr moving averages correlate extremely well, especially, when incorporating a slight 6-yr lag between them (with temperature leading; r = 0.90). This suggests that the current leading trend of temperature, which had been downward, but now is upward, may portend a return to the more active state for intense hurricanes. Thus, the 1998 season (presuming the abatement of El Ninio prior to the start of the hurricane season), and for several years thereafter (at least, into the early years of the next millennium), may have an annual frequency of intense hurricanes that is commensurate with the previously observed active state that was seen prior to the mid 1960's. If true, then, the shift to the more active state, probably, occurred in the mid-to-late 1980's, apparently, having gone undetected because of the masking, or modulating, effect of El Ninio, which has been rampant since the mid-to-late 1980's.

  11. Analysis of fundamental frequency, jitter, shimmer and vocal intensity in children with phonological disorders.

    PubMed

    Wertzner, Haydée F; Schreiber, Solange; Amaro, Luciana

    2005-01-01

    Phonological Disorder is a disturbance of primary manifestation of undefined causes that makes speech become unintelligible. The analysis of vocal parameters becomes important in the process of diagnosis of this disorder, since voice disorders could interfere in the production of speech sounds. The objective of this study was to verify vocal characteristics related to the intensity and fundamental frequency--F0--and their disturbance indexes--jitter and shimmer--in children with phonological disorders. Clinical prospective with transversal cohort. There were 40 children, 20 of them with phonological disorders and 20 with no speech and language disturbances. Phonological exams with the ABFW infantile language test and spontaneous speech were applied. The Computer Speech Lab was used to record and perform acoustic analyses of the vowels /a/, /e/, /i/, through the vocal parameters: fundamental frequency, intensity, jitter and shimmer. F0--vowel /e/ was smaller, on average, in the Phonological Disorder Group and it was 126 Hz in the Control Group. To shimmer and jitter there was no evidence that the means of the Phonological Disorder Group were different from the ones of the Control Group (p= 0.191, p= 0.865, respectively). As for intensity, there was evidence that the average did not differ in the Phonological Disorder Group and the Control Group (p= 0.002). The frequency of the vowel /e/ was smaller in the Phonological Disorder Group. There was difference between the two groups regarding the means of intensity of vowels /a/, /e/ and /i/, smaller in the Phonological Disorder Group. No differences between the groups were found regarding the averages of jitter and shimmer.

  12. Future change of North Pacific blocking in CMIP5 models - frequency and intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Joong-Bae; Lee, Doo Young

    2017-04-01

    Future change in frequency and intensity of wintertime North pacific blocking are investigated with phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) participating models. The current status and future changes in climatological blocking activity over the North Pacific region are investigated using historical and two Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP4.5 and 8.5) simulations for boreal winters (December-February) over a 30-year period. The future change in the Pacific blocking frequency and intensity are examined in terms of the projected meridional thickness gradient, Hadley circulation changes, and changes in the probability distribution of categorized blocking strength. With historical simulations, five CMIP5 models show better performance in reproducing climatological blocking events over the Pacific region. These models are selected for the analyses of the projected blocking activities. Projected blocking activity shows that the climatological winter Pacific blocking frequencies and mean values have tendency to decrease under global warming conditions. This trend is closely linked with the strong upper level westerly wind, resulting in less meandering air flow, consistent with the enhanced meridional temperature gradients at mid-latitude in the future climate. The decreased frequency in climatological atmospheric blocking over the Pacific under warming may also be influenced by the strengthening of the north-south temperature gradients due to the poleward extension of Hadley circulation in the subtropics. The climatology of the Pacific blocking intensity in boreal winter also tends to decrease slightly due to a future reduction in the number of strong blocking events. Acknowledgement : This work was funded by the Korea Meteorological Administration Research and Development Program under grant KMIPA 2015-2081

  13. Coupled solitons of intense high-frequency and low-frequency waves in Zakharov-type systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gromov, Evgeny; Malomed, Boris

    2016-12-01

    One-parameter families of exact two-component solitary-wave solutions for interacting high-frequency (HF) and low-frequency (LF) waves are found in the framework of Zakharov-type models, which couple the nonlinear Schrödinger equation for intense HF waves to the Boussinesq (Bq) or Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation for the LF component through quadratic terms. The systems apply, in particular, to the interaction of surface (HF) and internal (LF) waves in stratified fluids. These solutions are two-component generalizations of the single-component Bq and KdV solitons. Perturbed dynamics and stability of the solitary waves are studied in detail by means of analytical and numerical methods. Essentially, they are stable against separation of the HF and LF components if the latter one is shaped as a potential well acting on the HF field, and unstable, against splitting of the two components, with a barrier-shaped LF one. Collisions between the solitary waves are studied by means of direct simulations, demonstrating a trend to merger of in-phase solitons, and elastic interactions of out-of-phase ones.

  14. Coupled solitons of intense high-frequency and low-frequency waves in Zakharov-type systems.

    PubMed

    Gromov, Evgeny; Malomed, Boris

    2016-12-01

    One-parameter families of exact two-component solitary-wave solutions for interacting high-frequency (HF) and low-frequency (LF) waves are found in the framework of Zakharov-type models, which couple the nonlinear Schrödinger equation for intense HF waves to the Boussinesq (Bq) or Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation for the LF component through quadratic terms. The systems apply, in particular, to the interaction of surface (HF) and internal (LF) waves in stratified fluids. These solutions are two-component generalizations of the single-component Bq and KdV solitons. Perturbed dynamics and stability of the solitary waves are studied in detail by means of analytical and numerical methods. Essentially, they are stable against separation of the HF and LF components if the latter one is shaped as a potential well acting on the HF field, and unstable, against splitting of the two components, with a barrier-shaped LF one. Collisions between the solitary waves are studied by means of direct simulations, demonstrating a trend to merger of in-phase solitons, and elastic interactions of out-of-phase ones.

  15. Dosimetrically Triggered Adaptive Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Karen; Stewart, James; Kelly, Valerie; Xie, Jason; Brock, Kristy K.; Moseley, Joanne; Cho, Young-Bin; Fyles, Anthony; Lundin, Anna; Rehbinder, Henrik; Löf, Johan; Jaffray, David A.; Milosevic, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: The widespread use of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for cervical cancer has been limited by internal target and normal tissue motion. Such motion increases the risk of underdosing the target, especially as planning margins are reduced in an effort to reduce toxicity. This study explored 2 adaptive strategies to mitigate this risk and proposes a new, automated method that minimizes replanning workload. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with cervical cancer participated in a prospective clinical study and underwent pretreatment and weekly magnetic resonance (MR) scans over a 5-week course of daily external beam radiation therapy. Target volumes and organs at risk (OARs) were contoured on each of the scans. Deformable image registration was used to model the accumulated dose (the real dose delivered to the target and OARs) for 2 adaptive replanning scenarios that assumed a very small PTV margin of only 3 mm to account for setup and internal interfractional motion: (1) a preprogrammed, anatomy-driven midtreatment replan (A-IMRT); and (2) a dosimetry-triggered replan driven by target dose accumulation over time (D-IMRT). Results: Across all 30 patients, clinically relevant target dose thresholds failed for 8 patients (27%) if 3-mm margins were used without replanning. A-IMRT failed in only 3 patients and also yielded an additional small reduction in OAR doses at the cost of 30 replans. D-IMRT assured adequate target coverage in all patients, with only 23 replans in 16 patients. Conclusions: A novel, dosimetry-triggered adaptive IMRT strategy for patients with cervical cancer can minimize the risk of target underdosing in the setting of very small margins and substantial interfractional motion while minimizing programmatic workload and cost.

  16. Intensity modulated radiotherapy for elderly bladder cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To review our experience and evaluate treatment planning using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and helical tomotherapy (HT) for the treatment of elderly patients with bladder cancer. Methods From November 2006 through November 2009, we enrolled 19 elderly patients with histologically confirmed bladder cancer, 9 in the IMRT and 10 in the HT group. The patients received 64.8 Gy to the bladder with or without concurrent chemotherapy. Conventional 4-field "box" pelvic radiation therapy (2DRT) plans were generated for comparison. Results The median patient age was 80 years old (range, 65-90 years old). The median survival was 21 months (5 to 26 months). The actuarial 2-year overall survival (OS) for the IMRT vs. the HT group was 26.3% vs .37.5%, respectively; the corresponding values for disease-free survival were 58.3% vs. 83.3%, respectively; for locoregional progression-free survival (LRPFS), the values were 87.5% vs. 83.3%, respectively; and for metastases-free survival, the values were 66.7% vs. 60.0%, respectively. The 2-year OS rates for T1, 2 vs. T3, 4 were 66.7% vs. 35.4%, respectively (p = 0.046). The 2-year OS rate was poor for those whose RT completion time greater than 8 weeks when compared with the RT completed within 8 wks (37.9% vs. 0%, p = 0.004). Conclusion IMRT and HT provide good LRPFS with tolerable toxicity for elderly patients with invasive bladder cancer. IMRT and HT dosimetry and organ sparing capability were superior to that of 2DRT, and HT provides better sparing ability than IMRT. The T category and the RT completion time influence OS rate. PMID:21679408

  17. Conventional frequency ultrasonic biomarkers of cancer treatment response in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Falou, Omar; Tadayyon, Hadi; Al-Mahrouki, Azza; Tran, William; Papanicolau, Naum; Kolios, Michael C; Czarnota, Gregory J

    2013-06-01

    Conventional frequency quantitative ultrasound in conjunction with textural analysis techniques was investigated to monitor noninvasively the effects of cancer therapies in an in vivo preclinical model. Conventional low-frequency (∼7 MHz) and high-frequency (∼20 MHz) ultrasound was used with spectral analysis, coupled with textural analysis on spectral parametric maps, obtained from xenograft tumor-bearing animals (n = 20) treated with chemotherapy to extract noninvasive biomarkers of treatment response. Results indicated statistically significant differences in quantitative ultrasound-based biomarkers in both low- and high-frequency ranges between untreated and treated tumors 12 to 24 hours after treatment. Results of regression analysis indicated a high level of correlation between quantitative ultrasound-based biomarkers and tumor cell death estimates from histologic analysis. Applying textural characterization to the spectral parametric maps resulted in an even stronger correlation (r (2) = 0.97). The results obtained in this research demonstrate that quantitative ultrasound at a clinically relevant frequency can monitor tissue changes in vivo in response to cancer treatment administration. Using higher order textural information extracted from quantitative ultrasound spectral parametric maps provides more information at a high sensitivity related to tumor cell death.

  18. Regional analysis of Intensity-Duration-Frequency Relationships in Slovakia using Scaling Model Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecho, J.; Faško, P.; Gaál, L.; Lapin, M.; Šâstný, P.

    2009-09-01

    Short-term rainfall intensity maxima might gain a rising tendency in the future as a consequence of the global warming. The monitoring and statistical as well as spatial analyses of above-mentioned precipitation characteristics are highly important, because of observed negative impacts linked with their occurrence. Probabilistic modeling and statistical analysis of relationships between rainfall intensity and its duration as well as frequency (generally express by Intensity-Duration-Frequency curves) represents on of the most commonly used tools in the flood risk management, water resources engineering as well as for flood protection projects. A set of IDF-curves defines a relation between the mean intensity of precipitation, the duration of the aggregation time of the rainfall and return period of the event. There are some statistical techniques how to establish the IDF-curves for annual maximum precipitation totals with selected duration. At-site frequency analysis of rainfall data evaluated separately for particular meteorological station is frequently used method of Intensity-Duration-Frequency relationships estimation. For many years the Gumbel as well as Pearson III-type distribution have been utilized as the most suitable theoretical distribution in the order to model the extreme rainfall events. These relationships are not accurate and reliable since they depend on many assumptions such as distribution selection for each duration. Some distributions require a large number of parameters, and are not time-independent. New theoretical findings suggest to replace the Gumbel distribution by other type of Extreme Value distribution (most commonly by General Extreme Value "GEV" distribution). Apart from testing the appropriate theoretical distribution we also focused in the contribution on application of some scaling properties to establish scaling behaviour of statistical moments over different durations. The IDF-curves are developed for gauged sites based mainly

  19. Cigarette smoking and cancer: intensity patterns in the alpha-tocopherol, beta-carotene cancer prevention study in Finnish men.

    PubMed

    Lubin, Jay H; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Albanes, Demetrius

    2008-04-15

    Relative risks for lung and bladder cancers by smoking intensity level off at more than 15-20 cigarettes per day. A three-parameter excess relative risk model in pack-years and intensity quantified this leveling (Lubin et al., Am J Epidemiol 2007;166:479-89). Above 15-20 cigarettes per day was an "inverse exposure rate" effect whereby, for equal pack-years, the excess relative risk/pack-year decreased with increasing intensity; that is, smoking at a lower intensity for a longer duration was more deleterious than smoking at a higher intensity for a shorter duration. After adjustment for pack-years, intensity effects were quantitatively homogeneous across multiple case-control studies of lung, bladder, oral cavity, pancreas, and esophagus cancers. The authors extended those analyses to examine intensity patterns for incident bladder, esophagus, kidney, larynx, liver, lung, oropharynx, and pancreas cancers by using data from a single prospective cohort in Finland, the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study, with follow-up from enrollment, which occurred between 1985 and 1988, through April 2004. At more than 10 cigarettes per day, they found an inverse exposure rate pattern for each cancer site. After adjustment for pack-years, intensity effects were quantitatively homogeneous across the diverse cancer sites and homogeneous with intensity effects from the prior analysis of multiple studies. Consistency of intensity patterns suggested a general phenomenon and may provide clues to the molecular basis of smoking-related cancer risk.

  20. Reconfigurable broadband microwave photonic intensity differentiator based on an integrated optical frequency comb source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xingyuan; Wu, Jiayang; Shoeiby, Mehrdad; Nguyen, Thach G.; Chu, Sai T.; Little, Brent E.; Morandotti, Roberto; Mitchell, Arnan; Moss, David J.

    2017-09-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a microwave photonic intensity differentiator based on a Kerr optical comb generated by a compact integrated micro-ring resonator (MRR). The on-chip Kerr optical comb, containing a large number of comb lines, serves as a high-performance multi-wavelength source for implementing a transversal filter, which will greatly reduce the cost, size, and complexity of the system. Moreover, owing to the compactness of the integrated MRR, frequency spacings of up to 200-GHz can be achieved, enabling a potential operation bandwidth of over 100 GHz. By programming and shaping individual comb lines according to calculated tap weights, a reconfigurable intensity differentiator with variable differentiation orders can be realized. The operation principle is theoretically analyzed, and experimental demonstrations of the first-, second-, and third-order differentiation functions based on this principle are presented. The radio frequency amplitude and phase responses of multi-order intensity differentiations are characterized, and system demonstrations of real-time differentiations for a Gaussian input signal are also performed. The experimental results show good agreement with theory, confirming the effectiveness of our approach.

  1. Effects of disturbance frequency, intensity, and area on assemblages of stream macroinvertebrates.

    PubMed

    McCabe, D J; Gotelli, N J

    2000-08-01

    Disturbance frequency, intensity, and areal extent may influence the effects of disturbance on biological communities. Furthermore, these three factors may have interacting effects on biological diversity. We manipulated the frequency, intensity, and area of disturbance in a full-factorial design on artificial substrates and measured responses of benthic macroinvertebrates in a northern Vermont stream. Macroinvertebrate abundance was lower in all disturbance treatments than in the undisturbed control. As in most other studies in streams, species density (number of species/sample) was lower in disturbed treatments than in undisturbed controls. However, species density is very sensitive to total abundance of a sample, which is usually reduced by disturbance. We used a rarefaction method to compare species richness based on an equivalent number of individuals. In rarefied samples, species richness was higher in all eight disturbed treatments than in the undisturbed control, with significant increases in species richness for larger areas and greater intensities of disturbance. Increases in species richness in response to disturbance were consistent within patches, among patches with similar disturbance histories, and among patches with differing disturbance histories. These results provide some support for Huston's dynamic-equilibrium model but do not support the intermediate-disturbance hypothesis. Our analyses demonstrate that species richness and species density can generate opposite patterns of community response to disturbance. The interplay of abundance, species richness, and species density has been neglected in previous tests of disturbance models.

  2. Phantom pain reduction by low-frequency and low-intensity electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Bókkon, István; Till, Attila; Grass, Friedrich; Erdöfi Szabó, Attila

    2011-09-01

    Although various treatments have been presented for phantom pain, there is little proof supporting the benefits of pharmacological treatments, surgery or interventional techniques, electroconvulsive therapy, electrical nerve stimulation, far infrared ray therapy, psychological therapies, etc. Here, we report the preliminary results for phantom pain reduction by low-frequency and intensity electromagnetic fields under clinical circumstances. Our method is called as Electromagnetic-Own-Signal-Treatment (EMOST). Fifteen people with phantom limb pain participated. The patients were treated using a pre-programmed, six sessions. Pain intensity was quantified upon admission using a 0-10 verbal numerical rating scale. Most of the patients (n = 10) reported a marked reduction in the intensity of phantom limb pain. Several patients also reported about improvement in their sleep and mood quality, or a reduction in the frequency of phantom pain after the treatments. No improvements in the reduction of phantom limb pain or sleep and mood improvement were reported in the control group (n = 5). Our nonlinear electromagnetic EMOST method may be a possible therapeutic application in the reduction of phantom limb pain. Here, we also suggest that some of the possible effects of the EMOST may be achieved via the redox balance of the body and redox-related neural plasticity.

  3. The body self and the frequency, intensity and acceptance of menopausal symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Wycisk, Jowita

    2015-01-01

    Introduction There are many studies on the concept of body image (usually understood narrowly as body acceptance) in menopausal women, but relationships between the body self and menopausal symptoms have not been explored yet. In the research discussed in this paper, a complex model of the body self, including its functions, body identity and body image, has been presented. Aim of the study Aim of the study was to explore the relationships between different aspects of the body self, and the frequency, intensity and acceptance of menopausal symptoms. Material and methods The investigated sample consisted of 81 women (age: 51.8 ± 4.2 years; range: 45-58 years). The authors used an extended version of the Menopause Symptom List and the Body Self Questionnaire. Results Perception of sensations, interpretation and regulation of emotions and physical states as well as body identity were the most important correlates of the intensity and frequency of menopausal symptoms (psychological, vasomotor and somatic). Among the body image aspects investigated in the study, the appearance evaluation was associated with the frequency of vasomotor and psychological symptoms. The level of acceptance of symptoms was only related to the ability to cope with emotions and physical needs. Conclusions The findings indicate that aspects of the body self (which are stable personality traits) are significant for the way women experience menopausal symptoms. PMID:26327894

  4. [Mapping of lichen frequencies as a tool in evaluating intensity of pollution].

    PubMed

    Kunze, Martin

    1972-06-01

    With the hitherto existing methods of mapping lichen distribution usually only a qualitative record of only relatively great differences in the intensity of pollution is possible. By the following method of evaluating the frequency of the lichen species on individual trunks even very small differences in intensity of pollution can be detected, and quantitative gradation is possible. The lichens growing on the trunks of isolated trees in the surroundings of factories or other pollutants have been investigated. A "ladder" enclosing ten panels is used to determine the frequency: the calculation is made electronically and permits statistical statements about the quantity of the lichens to be made. The numerical material evaluated consists of reproduceable data obtained by a standardized method that appears to be suitable for routine use.As an example the occurrence of some lichen species in the surroundings of a potassium chloride mine is shown. Zones can be recognized by changes in frequency of the variously sensitive species. The following species show increasing sensitivity to the pollution under consideration: Parmelia sulcata, Parmelia dubia, Hypogymnia physodes, Evernia prunastri, Pseudevernia furfuracea.

  5. Bivariate frequency analysis of rainfall intensity and duration for urban stormwater infrastructure design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Changhyun; Qin, Xiaosheng; Gan, Thian Yew; Tung, Yeou-Koung; De Michele, Carlo

    2017-10-01

    This study presents a storm-event based bivariate frequency analysis approach to determine design rainfalls in which, the number, intensity and duration of actual rainstorm events were considered. To derive more realistic design storms, the occurrence probability of an individual rainstorm event was determined from the joint distribution of storm intensity and duration through a copula model. Hourly rainfall data were used at three climate stations respectively located in Singapore, South Korea and Canada. It was found that the proposed approach could give a more realistic description of rainfall characteristics of rainstorm events and design rainfalls. As results, the design rainfall quantities from actual rainstorm events at the three studied sites are consistently lower than those obtained from the conventional rainfall depth-duration-frequency (DDF) method, especially for short-duration storms (such as 1-h). It results from occurrence probabilities of each rainstorm event and a different angle for rainfall frequency analysis, and could offer an alternative way of describing extreme rainfall properties and potentially help improve the hydrologic design of stormwater management facilities in urban areas.

  6. Vibrotactile perceived intensity for mobile devices as a function of direction, amplitude, and frequency.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Inwook; Seo, Jongman; Kim, Myongchan; Choi, Seungmoon

    2013-01-01

    Vibrotactile rendering is an emerging interaction method for information transmission in mobile devices, replacing or supplementing visual and auditory displays. To design effective vibrotactile actuators or display algorithms, an understanding of the perceived intensity (strength) of their vibrations is essential. This paper aims to build a robust model for the perceived intensities of mobile device vibrations, which can be immediately used by engineers and application designers. To this end, we carried out two psychophysical experiments using absolute magnitude estimation procedures. In Experiment I, we investigated the effects of vibration direction and device weight on the perceived intensity of mobile device vibrations. The vibration directions tested (height, width, and depth), and the device weights (90-130 g) were determined considering those of contemporary mobile devices. Only the vibration direction was found to be a statistically significant factor, showing the highest perceived intensities along the height direction of a mobile device. In Experiment II, we measured the perceived intensities of vibrations with various amplitudes and frequencies along the three vibration directions. Then, for each direction, a psychophysical magnitude function and equal sensation contours were constructed based on Stevens' power law, which clearly visualize the consequences of vibration parameter changes on the resulting perceptual strength. In addition, we found a monotonic relationship between the physical power of vibration absorbed by the hand and the resulting perceived intensity. This suggests that the former, which is greatly easier to acquire in practice, is a reliable predictor of the latter. We expect that the results of this study can provide immediate knowledge about the perceptual strength of vibrations that engineers and applications developers will find useful.

  7. Frequency and Outcome of Meningitis in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit of Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Jawaid, Amna; Bano, Surriya; Haque, Anwar Ul; Arif, Khubaib

    2016-08-01

    Meningitis is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide in intensive care settings. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency and outcome in children with meningitis through a retrospective chart review done in pediatric intensive care unit of a tertiary care hospital from January 2000 to December 2014. During these 14 years, 64 patients were admitted with meningitis in pediatric intensive care unit. Out of 64, 36 were diagnosed with pyogenic meningitis, 18 patients with viral meningitis, and 10 with tuberculous meningitis. Most complications were observed in the initial 48 hours. Most common presentation was altered level of consciouness in 50 (78.1%), seizure in 38 (59.4%), and shock in 23 (35.9%) patients. Ventilatory support was required in 30 (46.9%) patients and inotropic support in 26 (40.6%). During stay in pediatric intensive care unit, there was 7.8% mortality. Although meningitis was an infrequent cause of hospitalization at the study centre, but it was an important infectious cause of mortality and morbidity in pediatric age group and associated with high neurological sequelae.

  8. Cell-stimulation therapy of lateral epicondylitis with frequency-modulated low-intensity electric current.

    PubMed

    Aliyev, R M; Geiger, G

    2012-03-01

    In addition to the routine therapy, the patients with lateral epicondylitis included into experimental group were subjected to a 12-week cell-stimulation therapy with low-intensity frequency-modulated electric current. The control group received the same routine therapy and sham stimulation (the therapeutic apparatus was not energized). The efficiency of this microcurrent therapy was estimated by comparing medical indices before therapy and at the end of a 12-week therapeutic course using a 10-point pain severity numeric rating scale (NRS) and Roles-Maudsley pain score. The study revealed high therapeutic efficiency of cell-stimulation with low-intensity electric current resulting probably from up-regulation of intracellular transmitters, interleukins, and prostaglandins playing the key role in the regulation of inflammation.

  9. Development of Intensity-Duration-Frequency curves at ungauged sites: risk management under changing climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liew, San Chuin; Raghavan, Srivatsan V.; Liong, Shie-Yui

    2014-12-01

    The impact of a changing climate is already being felt on several hydrological systems both on a regional and sub-regional scale of the globe. Southeast Asia is one of the regions strongly affected by climate change. With climate change, one of the anticipated impacts is an increase in the intensity and frequency of extreme rainfall which further increase the region's flood catastrophes, human casualties and economic loss. Optimal mitigation measures can be undertaken only when stormwater systems are designed using rainfall Intensity-Duration-Frequency (IDF) curves derived from a long and good quality rainfall data. Developing IDF curves for the future climate can be even more challenging especially for ungauged sites. The current practice to derive current climate's IDF curves for ungauged sites is, for example, to `borrow' or `interpolate' data from regions of climatologically similar characteristics. Recent measures to derive IDF curves for present climate was performed by extracting rainfall data from a high spatial resolution Regional Climate Model driven by ERA-40 reanalysis dataset. This approach has been demonstrated on an ungauged site (Java, Indonesia) and the results were quite promising. In this paper, the authors extend the application of the approach to other ungauged sites particularly in Peninsular Malaysia. The results of the study undoubtedly have significance contribution in terms of local and regional hydrology (Malaysia and Southeast Asian countries). The anticipated impacts of climate change especially increase in rainfall intensity and its frequency appreciates the derivation of future IDF curves in this study. It also provides policy makers better information on the adequacy of storm drainage design, for the current climate at the ungauged sites, and the adequacy of the existing storm drainage to cope with the impacts of climate change.

  10. Self-focusing of intense high frequency electromagnetic waves in a collisional magnetoactive plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Niknam, A. R.; Hashemzadeh, M.; Aliakbari, A.; Majedi, S.; Haji Mirzaei, F.

    2011-11-15

    The self-focusing of an intense electromagnetic beam in a collisional magnetoactive plasma has been investigated by the perturbation method. Considering the relativistic and ponderomotive nonlinearities and the first three terms of perturbation expansion for the electron density and velocity, the nonlinear wave equation is obtained. This wave equation is solved by applying the source dependent expansion method and the evolution of electromagnetic beam spot-size is discussed. It is shown that the laser spot-size decreases with increasing the collision frequency and external magnetic field strength.

  11. A statistical analysis of the association between tropical cyclone intensity change and tornado frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Todd W.

    2016-07-01

    Tropical cyclones often produce tornadoes that have the potential to compound the injury and fatality counts and the economic losses associated with tropical cyclones. These tornadoes do not occur uniformly through time or across space. Multiple statistical methods were used in this study to analyze the association between tropical cyclone intensity change and tornado frequency. Results indicate that there is an association between the two and that tropical cyclones tend to produce more tornadoes when they are weakening, but the association is weak. Tropical cyclones can also produce a substantial number of tornadoes when they are relatively stable or strengthening.

  12. Microbubble mediated dual-frequency high intensity focused ultrasound thrombolysis: An In vitro study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suo, Dingjie; Jin, Zhiyang; Jiang, Xiaoning; Dayton, Paul A.; Jing, Yun

    2017-01-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has recently emerged as a promising alternative approach for thrombolysis. However, the high acoustic energy required by HIFU could elicit thermal damage bioeffects, impeding the clinical translation of this technique. This paper investigates the use of dual-frequency focused ultrasound (DFFU) mediated by microbubbles (MBs) to minimize the acoustic power required for thrombolysis in vitro. It was found that MBs, with sufficient concentration, could significantly lower the power threshold for thrombolysis for both DFFU and single-frequency focused ultrasound (SFFU). In addition, SFFU needs about 96%-156% higher energy to achieve the same thrombolysis efficiency as that of DFFU. The thrombolysis efficiency is also found to increase with the duty cycle. The measured cavitation signals reveal that the enhanced inertial cavitation is likely responsible for the improved thrombolysis under DFFU and MBs.

  13. Epidemiological studies of radio frequency exposures and human cancer.

    PubMed

    Elwood, J Mark

    2003-01-01

    Epidemiological studies of radio frequency (RF) exposures and human cancers include studies of military and civilian occupational groups, people who live near television and radio transmitters, and users of mobile phones. Many types of cancer have been assessed, with particular attention given to leukemia and brain tumors. The epidemiological results fall short of the strength and consistency of evidence that is required to come to a conclusion that RF emissions are a cause of human cancer. Although the epidemiological evidence in total suggests no increased risk of cancer, the results cannot be unequivocally interpreted in terms of cause and effect. The results are inconsistent, and most studies are limited by lack of detail on actual exposures, short follow-up periods, and the limited ability to deal with other relevant factors. In some studies, there may be substantial biases in the data used. For these same reasons, the studies are unable to confidently exclude any possibility of an increased risk of cancer. Further research to clarify the situation is justified. Priorities include further studies of leukemia in both adults and children, and of cranial tumors in relationship to mobile phone use. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. [Modalities of breast cancer irradiation in 2016: Aims and indications of intensity modulated radiation therapy].

    PubMed

    Bourgier, C; Fenoglietto, P; Lemanski, C; Ducteil, A; Charissoux, M; Draghici, R; Azria, D

    2016-10-01

    Irradiation techniques for breast cancer (arctherapy, tomotherapy) are evolving and intensity-modulated radiation therapy is being increasingly considered for the management of these tumours. Here, we propose a review of intensity-modulated radiation therapy planning issues, clinical toxicities and indications for breast cancer.

  15. Relationship of Various Open Quotients With Acoustic Property, Phonation Types, Fundamental Frequency, and Intensity.

    PubMed

    Yokonishi, Hisayuki; Imagawa, Hiroshi; Sakakibara, Ken-Ichi; Yamauchi, Akihito; Nito, Takaharu; Yamasoba, Tatsuya; Tayama, Niro

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, we examined the relationship between various open quotients (Oqs) and phonation types, fundamental frequency (F0), and intensity by multivariate linear regression analysis (MVA) to determine which Oq best reflects vocal fold vibratory characteristics. Using high-speed digital imaging (HSDI), a sustained vowel /e/ at different phonation types, F0s, and intensities was recorded from six vocally healthy male volunteers: the types of phonation included modal, falsetto, modal breathy, and modal pressed phonations; and each phonation was performed at different F0s and intensities. Electroglottography (EGG) and sound signals were simultaneously recorded with HSDI. From the obtained data, 10 conventional Oqs (four Oqs from the glottal area function, four kymographic Oqs, and two EGG-derived Oqs) and two newly introduced Oqs (Oq(edge)+ and Oq(edge)) were evaluated. And, relationships between various Oqs and phonation types, F0, and intensity were evaluated by MVA. Among the various Oqs, Oq(edge)+ and Oq(edge) revealed the strongest correlations with an acoustic property and could best describe changes in phonation types: Oq(edge) was found to be better than Oq(edge)¯. Oq(MLK), the average of five Oqs from five-line multiline kymography was a very good alternative to Oq(edge)¯. EGG-derived Oqs were able to differentiate between modal phonation and falsetto phonation, but it was necessary to consider the change of F0 simultaneously. MVA showed the changes in Oq values between modal and other phonation types, the degree of involvement of intensity, and no relationship between F0 and Oqs. Among Oqs evaluated in this study, Oq(edge)+ and Oq(edge) were considered to best reflect the vocal fold vibratory characteristics. Copyright © 2016 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Intensity statistics of very high frequency sound scattered from wind-driven waves.

    PubMed

    Walstead, Sean P; Deane, Grant B

    2016-05-01

    The interaction of vhf 100-1000 kHz underwater sound with the ocean surface is explored. The bistatic forward scatter of 300 kHz sound is measured in a wind driven wave channel. Fluctuations in arrival amplitude are described by the scintillation index (SI) which is a measure of arrival intensity variance. SI initially increases with wind speed but eventually saturates to a value of 0.5 when the root-mean-square (rms) roughness is 0.5 mm. An adjusted scintillation index (SI*) is suggested that accounts for the multiple arrivals and properly saturates to a value of 1. Fluctuations in arrival time do not saturate and increase proportionately to the dominant surface wave component. Forward scattering is modeled at frequencies ranging from 50 to 2000 kHz using the Helmholtz-Kirchhoff integral with surface wave realizations derived from wave gauge data. The amplitude and temporal statistics of the simulated scattering agree well with measured data. Intensity saturation occurs at lower wind speeds for higher frequency sound. Both measured and modeled vhf sound is characterized by many surface arrivals at saturation. Doppler shifts associated with wave motion are expected to vary rapidly for vhf sound however further analysis is required.

  17. Chronic neck pain and exercise interventions: frequency, intensity, time, and type principle.

    PubMed

    O'Riordan, Cliona; Clifford, Amanda; Van De Ven, Pepijn; Nelson, John

    2014-04-01

    To identify the most effective components in an active exercise physiotherapy treatment intervention for chronic neck pain based on the frequency, intensity, time, and type (FITT) exercise method of tailoring physical activity recommendations to the individual needs and goals of patients. Databases, including the Allied and Complementary Medicine Database, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health, MEDLINE, SPORTDiscus, Biomedical Reference Collection, and Academic Search Premier, were searched for relevant articles. Quantitative design studies that included active exercise as part of a multimodal or stand-alone approach were selected. Only studies scoring ≥6 on the Physiotherapy Evidence Database Scale were included in the review because this reflected a good level of evidence. Study methodologies and relevant outcome measures, including isometric strength, Neck Disability Index scores, and pain scores, were extracted from relevant articles and grouped together for appraisal and synthesis. Evidence from selected articles was synthesized according to the FITT exercise principal to determine the most effective exercise type, frequency, and intensity in the treatment of chronic neck pain. Physiotherapy interventions using a multimodal approach appear to produce more beneficial outcomes in terms of increased strength, improved function, and health-related quality of life and reduced pain scores. Active strengthening exercises appear to be beneficial for all of these outcomes; the inclusion of additional stretching and aerobic exercise components appear to enhance the benefits of an exercise intervention. Copyright © 2014 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The Interannual Stability of Cumulative Frequency Distributions for Convective System Size and Intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohr, Karen I.; Molinari, John; Thorncroft, Chris D,

    2010-01-01

    The characteristics of convective system populations in West Africa and the western Pacific tropical cyclone basin were analyzed to investigate whether interannual variability in convective activity in tropical continental and oceanic environments is driven by variations in the number of events during the wet season or by favoring large and/or intense convective systems. Convective systems were defined from TRMM data as a cluster of pixels with an 85 GHz polarization-corrected brightness temperature below 255 K and with an area at least 64 km 2. The study database consisted of convective systems in West Africa from May Sep for 1998-2007 and in the western Pacific from May Nov 1998-2007. Annual cumulative frequency distributions for system minimum brightness temperature and system area were constructed for both regions. For both regions, there were no statistically significant differences among the annual curves for system minimum brightness temperature. There were two groups of system area curves, split by the TRMM altitude boost in 2001. Within each set, there was no statistically significant interannual variability. Sub-setting the database revealed some sensitivity in distribution shape to the size of the sampling area, length of sample period, and climate zone. From a regional perspective, the stability of the cumulative frequency distributions implied that the probability that a convective system would attain a particular size or intensity does not change interannually. Variability in the number of convective events appeared to be more important in determining whether a year is wetter or drier than normal.

  19. Intensity modulated radiation therapy for breast cancer: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Buwenge, Milly; Cammelli, Silvia; Ammendolia, Ilario; Tolento, Giorgio; Zamagni, Alice; Arcelli, Alessandra; Macchia, Gabriella; Deodato, Francesco; Cilla, Savino; Morganti, Alessio G

    2017-01-01

    Background Owing to highly conformed dose distribution, intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has the potential to improve treatment results of radiotherapy (RT). Postoperative RT is a standard adjuvant treatment in conservative treatment of breast cancer (BC). The aim of this review is to analyze available evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on IMRT in BC, particularly in terms of reduction of side effects. Methods A literature search of the bibliographic database PubMed, from January 1990 through November 2016, was performed. Only RCTs published in English were included. Results Ten articles reporting data from 5 RCTs fulfilled the selection criteria and were included in our review. Three out of 5 studies enrolled only selected patients in terms of increased risk of toxicity. Three studies compared IMRT with standard tangential RT. One study compared the results of IMRT in the supine versus the prone position, and one study compared standard treatment with accelerated partial breast IMRT. Three studies reported reduced acute and/or late toxicity using IMRT compared with standard RT. No study reported improved quality of life. Conclusion IMRT seems able to reduce toxicity in selected patients treated with postoperative RT for BC. Further analyses are needed to better define patients who are candidates for this treatment modality. PMID:28293119

  20. Intensity-Duration-Frequency (IDF) rainfall curves, for data series and climate projection in African cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Paola, Francesco; Giugni, Maurizio; Topa, Maria Elena; Coly, Adrien; Yeshitela, Kumelachew; Kombe, Wilbard; Tonye, Emmanuel; Touré, Hamidou

    2013-04-01

    The intensity-duration-frequency curves are used in hydrology to express in a synthetic way, the link between the maximum rainfall height h and a generic duration d of a rainfall event, fixed a given return period T. Generally, IDF curves can be characterized by a bi-parameter power law: h(d,T) = a(T)dn where a(T), and n are the parameters that have to be estimated through a probabilistic approach. An intensity-duration-frequency analysis starts by gathering time series record of different durations and extracting annual extremes for each duration. The annual extreme data are then fitted by a probability distribution. The present study, carried out within the FP7-ENV-2010 CLUVA project (CLimate change and Urban Vulnerability in Africa), regards the evaluation of the IDF curves for five case studies: Addis Ababa (Ethiopia), Dar Es Salaam (Tanzania), Douala (Cameroon), Ouagadouogou (Burkina Faso) and Saint Louis (Senegal). The probability distribution chosen to fit the annual extreme data is the classic Gumbel distribution. However, for the case studies, only the maximum annual daily rainfall heights are available. Therefore, to define the IDF curves and the extreme values in a smaller time window (10', 30', 1h, 3h, 6h, 12h), it is required to develop disaggregation techniques of the collected data, in order to generate a synthetic sequence of rainfall, with statistical properties equal to the recorded data. The daily rainfalls were disaggregated using two models: short-time intensity disaggregation model (10', 30', 1h); cascade-based disaggregation model (3h, 6h, 12h). On the basis of disaggegation models and Gumbel distribution , the parameters of the IDF curves for the five test cities were evaluated. In order to estimate the contingent influence of climate change on the IDF curves, the illustrated procedure has been applied to the climate (rainfall) simulations over the time period 2010-2050 provided by the CMCC (Centro Euro-Mediterraneo sui Cambiamenti Climatici

  1. Effects of Disturbance Intensity and Frequency on Bacterial Community Composition and Function

    PubMed Central

    Berga, Mercè; Székely, Anna J.; Langenheder, Silke

    2012-01-01

    Disturbances influence community structure and ecosystem functioning. Bacteria are key players in ecosystems and it is therefore crucial to understand the effect of disturbances on bacterial communities and how they respond to them, both compositionally and functionally. The main aim of this study was to test the effect of differences in disturbance strength on bacterial communities. For this, we implemented two independent short-term experiments with dialysis bags containing natural bacterial communities, which were transplanted between ambient and ‘disturbed’ incubation tanks, manipulating either the intensity or the frequency of a salinity disturbance. We followed changes in community composition by terminal restriction fragment analysis (T-RFLP) and measured various community functions (bacterial production, carbon substrate utilization profiles and rates) directly after and after a short period of recovery under ambient conditions. Increases in disturbance strength resulted in gradually stronger changes in bacterial community composition and functions. In the disturbance intensity experiment, the sensitivity to the disturbance and the ability of recovery differed between different functions. In the disturbance frequency experiment, effects on the different functions were more consistent and recovery was not observed. Moreover, in case of the intensity experiment, there was also a time lag in the responses of community composition and functions, with functional responses being faster than compositional ones. To summarize, our study shows that disturbance strength has the potential to change the functional performance and composition of bacterial communities. It further highlights that the overall effects, rates of recovery and the degree of congruence in the response patterns of community composition and functioning along disturbance gradients depend on the type of function and the character of the disturbance. PMID:22606316

  2. Assessing Climate change Impacts to Rainfall Intensity-Duration-Frequency Curves over the Florida Panhandle &Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, D. K.; Wang, D.; Obeysekera, J.; Hagen, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    The type, amount, intensity and frequency of rainfall are being directly influenced and altered due to potential climate changes. Consideration should be given to a revision of the rainfall intensity-duration-frequency (IDF) curve, developed based on the historical rainfall data, for storm water drainage design and flood control facilities. Proper adaptation by quantifying the potential effects of climate changes is one of the major ways to reduce vulnerability. As a result, updating IDF curves based on the future climate condition is very important for managing the hydraulic structures. In this study, the climate change impact to rainfall IDF curves over the Florida panhandle and peninsula are assessed using the COAPS Regional Downscaling data from the Florida Climate Institute. The COAPS Land-Atmosphere Regional Ensemble Climate Change Experiment for the Southeast United States at 10-km resolution consists of three regional climate models (RCM) by downscaling the general circulation models: the Community Climate System Model (CCSM), the Hadley Centre Coupled Model version 3 (HadCM3), and the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory GCM (GFDL). The RCMs have been performed for the historical simulations (1969-1999) and the future projections (2038-2070) under the AR4 A2 emissions scenario. In this study, more than 30-years of hourly precipitation data are gathered from 57 weather stations in Florida. The performance of the RCMs is evaluated by comparing historical simulations with observations. The parameters of generalized extreme value (GEV) distributions including location, scale, and shape parameters are mapped for the period of 1969-1999 and 2038-2070. The spatial distribution map of rainfall intensity under various durations and return periods will be presented. The response on the Florida panhandle will be compared and contrasted with that of the larger peninsula. These maps will provide insight that can lead to a useful engineering tool for designing the

  3. The BDNF Val66Met Polymorphism Modulates Sleep Intensity: EEG Frequency- and State-Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Bachmann, Valérie; Klein, Carina; Bodenmann, Sereina; Schäfer, Nikolaus; Berger, Wolfgang; Brugger, Peter; Landolt, Hans-Peter

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: EEG slow waves are the hallmark of deep NREM sleep and may reflect the restorative functions of sleep. Evidence suggests that increased sleep slow waves after sleep deprivation reflect plastic synaptic processes, and that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is causally involved in their homeostatic regulation. The functional Val66Met polymorphism of the gene encoding pro-BDNF causes impaired activity-dependent secretion of mature BDNF protein. We investigated whether this polymorphism contributes to the pronounced inter-individual variation in sleep slow wave activity (SWA) in humans. Setting: Sleep laboratory in temporal isolation unit. Participants: Eleven heterozygous Met allele carriers and 11 individually sex- and age-matched Val/Val homozygotes. Interventions: Forty hours prolonged wakefulness. Measurements and Results: Cognitive performance, subjective state, and waking and sleep EEG in baseline and after sleep deprivation were studied. Val/Val homozygotes showed better response accuracy than Met allele carriers on a verbal 2-back working memory task. This difference did not reflect genotype-dependent differences in sleepiness, well-being, or sustained attention. In baseline and recovery nights, deep stage 4 sleep and NREM sleep intensity as quantified by EEG SWA (0.75-4.5 Hz) were higher in Val/Val compared to Val/Met genotype. Similar to sleep deprivation, the difference was most pronounced in the first NREM sleep episode. By contrast, increased activity in higher EEG frequencies (> 6 Hz) in wakefulness and REM sleep was distinct from the effects of prolonged wakefulness. Conclusion: BDNF contributes to the regulation of sleep slow wave oscillations, suggesting that genetically determined variation in neuronal plasticity modulates NREM sleep intensity in humans. Citation: Bachmann V; Klein C; Bodenmann S; Schäfer N; Berger W; Brugger P; Landolt HP. The BDNF Val66Met polymorphism modulates sleep intensity: EEG frequency- and state

  4. Impact of climate change on intensity-duration-frequency (IDF) curves in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J.

    2013-12-01

    Changes in climate may potentially alter extreme rainfall intensity in most regions. In order for government agencies and design engineers to incorporate potential future changes into assessment and design processes, tools for planning and design should be capable of considering non-stationary climate conditions. In this study, potential changes in intensity-duration-frequency (IDF) curves at a range of locations in the United States, which are often used for assessment of extreme rainfall events, are explored using climate model historic runs, reanalysis runs, and future climate projections. The concept of the adjustment factor, which represents the general ability of climate models in representing the reanalysis data that is a reasonable estimate of actual gridded historical climate at the model grid scale, is applied to investigate potential impacts of climate change on IDF curves. For most of the study regions, future climate projections suggest an increase in the intensity of extreme storms for a given return period and duration with strong regional variations. The results also reveal the dependence of the adjustment factor values on return period and storm durations as related to the characteristics of extreme rainfalls, as it varies significantly with region, storm duration, and return period. We illustrate that impacts of climate change on extreme hydrologic events are highly regional and thus such assessments should be performed for specific locations.

  5. Extremely low frequency fields and cancer: laboratory studies

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Larry E. )

    1998-10-01

    There is now convincing evidence from a large number of laboratories, that exposure to extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic and electric fields produces biological responses in animals. However, no animal studies clearly demonstrate deleterious effects of ELF fields, although several are suggestive of potential health impacts. A major current emphasis in laboratory research is to determine whether or not the reported epidemiological studies that suggest an association between EMF exposure and risk of cancer are supported in studies using animal models. Several approaches are outlined in the experimental approach to this question. With specific reference to the radiofrequencies (RF) associated with wireless technology, even less research has been carried out than with ELF. Particularly, in regard to research on carcinogenesis and RF exposure in animals, little is known This section addresses laboratory studies in animals exposed to extremely low-power-frequency EMF, the relevance of which, to RF, is unknown. However, the approaches used with ELF may be useful in guiding laboratory research on the issue of RF exposure and cancer. From the perspective of laboratory animal studies, this paper will discuss studies investigating the potential relationship between ELF magnetic and/or electric field exposure and the risk of cancer.

  6. Direct ultrashort-pulse intensity and phase retrieval by frequency-resolved optical gating and a computational neural network.

    PubMed

    Krumbügel, M A; Ladera, C L; Delong, K W; Fittinghoff, D N; Sweetser, J N; Trebino, R

    1996-01-15

    Ultrashort-laser-pulse retrieval in frequency-resolved optical gating has previously required an iterative algorithm. Here, however, we show that a computational neural network can directly and rapidly recover the intensity and phase of a pulse.

  7. Transient analysis of the dynamic stress intensity factors using SGBEM for frequency-domain elastodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Phan, Anh-Vu; Gray, Leonard J; Salvadori, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a two-dimensional symmetric-Galerkin boundary integral formulation for elastodynamic fracture analysis in the frequency domain is described. The numerical implementation is carried out with quadratic elements, allowing the use of an improved quarter-point element for accurately determining frequency responses of the dynamic stress intensity factors (DSIFs). To deal with singular and hypersingular integrals, the formulation is decomposed into two parts: the first part is identical to that for elastostatics while the second part contains at most logarithmic singularities. The treatment of the elastostatic singular and hypersingular singular integrals employs an exterior limit to the boundary, while the weakly singular integrals in the second part are handled by Gauss quadrature. Time histories (transient responses) of the DSIFs can be obtained in a post-processing step by applying the fast Fourier transform (FFT) and inverse FFT to the frequency responses of these DSIFs. Several test examples are presented for the calculation of the DSIFs due to two types of impact loading: Heaviside step loading and blast loading. The results suggest that the combination of symmetric-Galerkin and FFT algorithms in determining transient responses of the DSIFs is robust and effective.

  8. Crop Frequency Mapping for Land Use Intensity Estimation During Three Decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Michael; Tindall, Dan

    2016-08-01

    Crop extent and frequency maps are an important input to inform the debate around land value and competitive land uses, food security and sustainability of agricultural practices. Such spatial datasets are likely to support decisions on natural resource management, planning and policy. The complete Landsat Time Series (LTS) archive for 23 Landsat footprints in western Queensland from 1987 to 2015 was used in a multi-temporal mapping approach. Spatial, spectral and temporal information were combined in multiple crop-modelling steps, supported by on ground training data sampled across space and time for the classes Crop and No-Crop. Temporal information within summer and winter growing seasons for each year were summarised, and combined with various vegetation indices and band ratios computed from a mid-season spectral-composite image. All available temporal information was spatially aggregated to the scale of image segments in the mid- season composite for each growing season and used to train a random forest classifier for a Crop and No- Crop classification. Validation revealed that the predictive accuracy varied by growing season and region to be within k = 0.88 to 0.97 and are thus suitable for mapping current and historic cropping activity. Crop frequency maps were produced for all regions at different time intervals. The crop frequency maps were validated separately with a historic crop information time series. Different land use intensities and conversions e.g. from agricultural to pastures are apparent and potential drivers of these conversions are discussed.

  9. Directional migration of cancer cells induced by a blue light intensity gradient.

    PubMed

    Lan, Chien-Chih; Lu, Eugene Youjhen; Pan, Huei-Jyuan; Lee, Chau-Hwang

    2015-07-01

    We used a spatial light modulator to project an optical micropattern of 473 nm light with a quartic intensity gradient on a single lung cancer cell. We observed that the intracellular amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) of the cancer cells were proportional to the intensity of the blue light, and the blue light intensity gradients could drive directional cell migration. This optically induced directional cell migration was inhibited by a ROS scavenger in the culture medium in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, the ROS levels in fibroblasts were saturated by the blue light at low intensity and therefore the fibroblasts did not exhibit directional migration in the intensity gradient.

  10. Relative importance of precipitation frequency and intensity in inter-annual variation of precipitation in Singapore during 1980-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Babovic, Vladan

    2017-04-01

    Observed studies on inter-annual variation of precipitation provide insight into the response of precipitation to anthropogenic climate change and natural climate variability. Inter-annual variation of precipitation results from the concurrent variations of precipitation frequency and intensity, understanding of the relative importance of frequency and intensity in the variability of precipitation can help fathom its changing properties. Investigation of the long-term changes of precipitation schemes has been extensively carried out in many regions across the world, however, detailed studies of the relative importance of precipitation frequency and intensity in inter-annual variation of precipitation are still limited, especially in the tropics. Therefore, this study presents a comprehensive framework to investigate the inter-annual variation of precipitation and the dominance of precipitation frequency and intensity in a tropical urban city-state, Singapore, based on long-term (1980-2013) daily precipitation series from 22 rain gauges. First, an iterative Mann-Kendall trend test method is applied to detect long-term trends in precipitation total, frequency and intensity at both annual and seasonal time scales. Then, the relative importance of precipitation frequency and intensity in inducing the inter-annual variation of wet-day precipitation total is analyzed using a dominance analysis method based on linear regression. The results show statistically significant upward trends in wet-day precipitation total, frequency and intensity at annual time scale, however, these trends are not evident during the monsoon seasons. The inter-annual variation of wet-day precipitation is mainly dominated by precipitation intensity for most of the stations at annual time scale and during the Northeast monsoon season. However, during the Southwest monsoon season, the inter-annual variation of wet-day precipitation is mainly dominated by precipitation frequency. These results have

  11. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy for neoadjuvant treatment of gastric cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Knab, Brian; Rash, Carla; Farrey, Karl; Jani, Ashesh B. . E-mail: jani@rover.uchicago.edu

    2006-01-01

    Radiation therapy plays an integral role in the treatment of gastric cancer in the postsurgery setting, the inoperable/palliative setting, and, as in the case of the current report, in the setting of neoadjuvant therapy prior to surgery. Typically, anterior-posterior/posterior-anterior (AP/PA) or 3-field techniques are used. In this report, we explore the use of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment in a patient whose care was transferred to our institution after 3-field radiotherapy (RT) was given to a dose of 30 Gy at an outside institution. If the 3-field plan were continued to 50 Gy, the volume of irradiated liver receiving greater than 30 Gy would have been unacceptably high. To deliver the final 20 Gy, an opposed parallel AP/PA plan and an IMRT plan were compared to the initial 3-field technique for coverage of the target volume as well as dose to the kidneys, liver, small bowel, and spinal cord. Comparison of the 3 treatment techniques to deliver the final 20 Gy revealed reduced median and maximum dose to the whole kidney with the IMRT plan. For this 20-Gy boost, the volume of irradiated liver was lower for both the IMRT plan and the AP/PA plan vs. the 3-field plan. Comparing the IMRT boost plan to the AP/PA boost-dose range (<10 Gy) in comparison to the AP/PA plan; however, the IMRT plan irradiated a smaller liver volume within the higher dose region (>10 Gy) in comparison to the AP/PA plan. The IMRT boost plan also irradiated a smaller volume of the small bowel compared to both the 3-field plan and the AP/PA plan, and also delivered lower dose to the spinal cord in comparison to the AP/PA plan. Comparison of the composite plans revealed reduced dose to the whole kidney using IMRT. The V20 for the whole kidney volume for the composite IMRT plan was 30% compared to approximately 60% for the composite AP/PA plan. Overall, the dose to the liver receiving greater than 30 Gy was lower for the composite IMRT plan and was well below acceptable limits

  12. Electrically detected magnetic resonance signal intensity at resonant frequencies from 300 to 900 MHz in a constant microwave field.

    PubMed

    Sato, T; Yokoyama, H; Ohya, H; Kamada, H

    1999-08-01

    A method for electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) measurement at different ESR frequencies under a constant alternating magnetic field has been established wherein the accurate relationship between EDMR signal intensity (from a photoexcited silicon crystal and a silicon diode) and a resonant frequency of 300 to 900 MHz (UHF band) was systematically clarified. EDMR signal intensity from a photoexcited silicon crystal against a resonant frequency fitted the curve of y = a(1 - e(-bx)) well, which approached a constant value at higher frequencies. The increase in the EDMR signal intensity from the silicon diode at higher resonant frequencies was smaller than that from the photoexcited silicon crystal. The difference can be explained by the influence of the skin effect; i.e., the microwaves do not penetrate deep into a highly conductive sample at higher frequencies. EDMR signal intensities of samples vs microwave power were measured at 890 MHz. The EDMR signal intensity from the silicon diode continued to increase as the microwave power was increased, while the signal intensity from the photoexcited silicon crystal saturated within the range. The difference can be similarly explained: due to the skin effect, the microwaves gradually penetrate into the silicon diode as the power increases, so that even when saturation has been reached outside, the microwave field inside the diode does not reach the saturation level. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  13. Changes in heat waves characteristics over Extremadura (SW Spain): duration, intensity and frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acero, Javier; Parey, Sylvie; Fernández-Fernández, María Isabel; Carrasco, Víctor Manuel; Agustín García, José

    2016-04-01

    Heat waves (HW) are increasing and its consequences are important not only for the effects over the population but also for the agriculture and biodiversity. That's why trends in heat wave events over Extremadura, a Region located in the southwest of Spain and characterized by irrigated land with crops like corn or tomatoes growing in summers, has been studied. Heat waves are defined as days occurring above the 95th percentile of the summer (June-August) maximum temperature time series. Another event named as Warm Event (WE) has been studied and defined as exceedance over the 75th percentile. For this purpose, a set of 13 regularly distributed daily maximum temperature time series was selected from a larger database for the Region of Extremadura for the common period 1965-2014. A stochastic seasonal functional heteroscedastic auto-regressive model developed to simulate daily (minimum, maximum, or mean) temperature time series coherent with observed time series (Parey et al., 2014, Dacunha-Castelle et al., 2015) has been used. This stochastic temperature generator is used to reproduce 1000 time series equivalent to the observed ones in order to investigate the significance of the changes in HW characteristics: duration, intensity and frequency; using different sub-periods length for the observed period. The results show that the changes in HW frequencies of the last 10-year sub-period comparing to the first are significant for 7 of the 13 observatories but the changes in HW durations and intensities are not significant. But when considering the lower threshold (75th percentile) to study changes in WE characteristics, frequency shows significant changes in 8 observatories, duration for 4 observatories and intensity for 2. Then, the parameters of the WE are increasing higher than the corresponding to the HW events. References: Parey, S., T. T. H. Hoang, and D. Dacunha-Castelle (2014), Validation of a stochastic temperature generator focusing on extremes, and an

  14. Intensity and Timing in Life of Recreational Physical Activity in Relation to Breast Cancer Risk Among Pre- and Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Regular recreational physical activity has been found to be associated with a decrease in breast cancer risk in women in the majority of epidemiologic studies, but research findings are inconsistent regarding the intensity of activity and timing in life. To address these issues the relations of moderate and vigorous intensity recreational physical activity during ages 14-20, 21-34, 35-50, and over age 50 years to pre- and postmenopausal breast cancer risk were examined. A case-control study of 858 women, with histological confirmation of invasive breast cancer, and 1085 controls, free of any cancer diagnosis, all subjects aged 28-79 years was conducted in the Region of Western Pomerania (Poland). Physical activity was assessed using a self-administered questionnaire with questions on type of activity, duration, frequency, and intensity for each type of activity. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of breast cancer associated with physical activity were calculated using unconditional logistic regression. Vigorous physical activity at ages 14-20 and 21-34 years lowered breast cancer risk by at least 35% in premenopausal women and by at least 51% in postmenopausal women for the highest versus lowest quartiles of the activity. The risk was also reduced in postmenopausal women who reported on average more than 1.74 hours per week of vigorous intensity recreational activity in ages >50 years (OR = 0.58; 95%CI = 0.27-0.97; P for trend = 0.013). For moderate activity the relationships remained statistically significant only in postmenopausal women active during ages 14- 20 years. The results indicate also a plausible risk reduction among premeno-pausal women. These results support the hypothesis that recrea-tional activity, particularly done early in life, is associated with a decrease in the invasive breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women. Among premenopausal women, only vigorous forms of activity may significantly decrease the risk. Key points

  15. Nonstationary Precipitation Intensity-Duration-Frequency Curves for Infrastructure Design in a Changing Climate

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Linyin; AghaKouchak, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Extreme climatic events are growing more severe and frequent, calling into question how prepared our infrastructure is to deal with these changes. Current infrastructure design is primarily based on precipitation Intensity-Duration-Frequency (IDF) curves with the so-called stationary assumption, meaning extremes will not vary significantly over time. However, climate change is expected to alter climatic extremes, a concept termed nonstationarity. Here we show that given nonstationarity, current IDF curves can substantially underestimate precipitation extremes and thus, they may not be suitable for infrastructure design in a changing climate. We show that a stationary climate assumption may lead to underestimation of extreme precipitation by as much as 60%, which increases the flood risk and failure risk in infrastructure systems. We then present a generalized framework for estimating nonstationary IDF curves and their uncertainties using Bayesian inference. The methodology can potentially be integrated in future design concepts. PMID:25403227

  16. Nonstationary precipitation Intensity-Duration-Frequency curves for infrastructure design in a changing climate.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Linyin; AghaKouchak, Amir

    2014-11-18

    Extreme climatic events are growing more severe and frequent, calling into question how prepared our infrastructure is to deal with these changes. Current infrastructure design is primarily based on precipitation Intensity-Duration-Frequency (IDF) curves with the so-called stationary assumption, meaning extremes will not vary significantly over time. However, climate change is expected to alter climatic extremes, a concept termed nonstationarity. Here we show that given nonstationarity, current IDF curves can substantially underestimate precipitation extremes and thus, they may not be suitable for infrastructure design in a changing climate. We show that a stationary climate assumption may lead to underestimation of extreme precipitation by as much as 60%, which increases the flood risk and failure risk in infrastructure systems. We then present a generalized framework for estimating nonstationary IDF curves and their uncertainties using Bayesian inference. The methodology can potentially be integrated in future design concepts.

  17. Nonstationary Precipitation Intensity-Duration-Frequency Curves for Infrastructure Design in a Changing Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Linyin; Aghakouchak, Amir

    2014-11-01

    Extreme climatic events are growing more severe and frequent, calling into question how prepared our infrastructure is to deal with these changes. Current infrastructure design is primarily based on precipitation Intensity-Duration-Frequency (IDF) curves with the so-called stationary assumption, meaning extremes will not vary significantly over time. However, climate change is expected to alter climatic extremes, a concept termed nonstationarity. Here we show that given nonstationarity, current IDF curves can substantially underestimate precipitation extremes and thus, they may not be suitable for infrastructure design in a changing climate. We show that a stationary climate assumption may lead to underestimation of extreme precipitation by as much as 60%, which increases the flood risk and failure risk in infrastructure systems. We then present a generalized framework for estimating nonstationary IDF curves and their uncertainties using Bayesian inference. The methodology can potentially be integrated in future design concepts.

  18. Time-varying extreme rainfall intensity-duration-frequency curves in a changing climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarhadi, Ali; Soulis, Eric D.

    2017-03-01

    Anthropogenic climate change influences the nature and probabilistic behavior of extreme climate phenomena over time. Current infrastructure design of water systems, however, is based on intensity-duration-frequency (IDF) curves that assume extreme precipitation will not significantly change. To sustain the reliability of infrastructure designs in a changing environment, time-varying nonstationary-based IDF curves must replace the static stationary-based IDF curves. This study outlines a fully time varying risk framework using Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo techniques to incorporate the impact of different complex nonstationary conditions on the occurrence of extreme precipitation in the Great Lakes area. The results demonstrate the underestimation of the extreme precipitation using stationary assumptions and the importance of updating infrastructure design strategies in a changing climate.

  19. Uncertainty of Intensity-Duration-Frequency (IDF) curves due to varied climate baseline periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadhel, Sherien; Rico-Ramirez, Miguel Angel; Han, Dawei

    2017-04-01

    Storm water management systems depend on Intensity-Duration-Frequency (IDF) curves as a standard design tool. However, due to climate change, the extreme precipitation quantiles represented by IDF curves will be subject to alteration over time. Currently, a common approach is to adopt a single benchmark period for bias correction, which is inadequate in deriving reliable future IDF curves. This study assesses the expected changes between the IDF curves of the current climate and those of a projected future climate and the uncertainties associated with such curves. To provide future IDF curves, daily precipitation data simulated by a 1-km regional climate model were temporally bias corrected by using eight reference periods with a fixed length of 30 years and a moving window of 5 years between the cases for the period 1950-2014. Then the bias-corrected data were further disaggregated into ensemble of 5-min series by using an algorithm which combines the Nonparametric Prediction (NPRED) model and the method of fragments (MoF) framework. The algorithm uses the radar data to resample the disaggregated future rainfall fragments conditioned to the daily rainfall and temperature data. The disaggregated data were then aggregated into different durations based on concentration time. The results suggest that uncertainty in the percentage of change in the projected rainfall compared to the rainfall in the current climate varies significantly depending on which of the eight reference periods are used for the bias correction. Both the maximum projection of rainfall intensity and the maximum change in future projections are affected by using different reference periods for different frequencies and durations. Such an important issue has been largely ignored by the engineering community and this study has shown the importance of including the uncertainty of benchmarking periods in bias-correcting future climate projections.

  20. Intensity-Duration-Frequency (IDF) rainfall curves, for data series and climate projection in African cities.

    PubMed

    De Paola, Francesco; Giugni, Maurizio; Topa, Maria Elena; Bucchignani, Edoardo

    2014-01-01

    Changes in the hydrologic cycle due to increase in greenhouse gases cause variations in intensity, duration, and frequency of precipitation events. Quantifying the potential effects of climate change and adapting to them is one way to reduce urban vulnerability. Since rainfall characteristics are often used to design water structures, reviewing and updating rainfall characteristics (i.e., Intensity-Duration-Frequency (IDF) curves) for future climate scenarios is necessary (Reg Environ Change 13(1 Supplement):25-33, 2013). The present study regards the evaluation of the IDF curves for three case studies: Addis Ababa (Ethiopia), Dar Es Salaam (Tanzania) and Douala (Cameroon). Starting from daily rainfall observed data, to define the IDF curves and the extreme values in a smaller time window (10', 30', 1 h, 3 h, 6 h, 12 h), disaggregation techniques of the collected data have been used, in order to generate a synthetic sequence of rainfall, with statistical properties similar to the recorded data. Then, the rainfall pattern of the three test cities was analyzed and IDF curves were evaluated. In order to estimate the contingent influence of climate change on the IDF curves, the described procedure was applied to the climate (rainfall) simulations over the time period 2010-2050, provided by CMCC (Centro Euro-Mediterraneo sui Cambiamenti Climatici). The evaluation of the IDF curves allowed to frame the rainfall evolution of the three case studies, considering initially only historical data, then taking into account the climate projections, in order to verify the changes in rainfall patterns. The same set of data and projections was also used for evaluating the Probable Maximum Precipitation (PMP).

  1. Nonstationary Intensity-Duration-Frequency Curves for Drainge Infrastructure Coping with Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byung Sik; Jeung, Se Jin; Lee, Dong Seop; Han, Woo Suk

    2015-04-01

    As the abnormal rainfall condition has been more and more frequently happen and serious by climate change and variabilities, the question whether the design of drainage system could be prepared with abnormal rainfall condition or not has been on the rise. Usually, the drainage system has been designed by rainfall I-D-F (Intensity-Duration-Frequency) curve with assumption that I-D-F curve is stationary. The design approach of the drainage system has limitation not to consider the extreme rainfall condition of which I-D-F curve is non-stationary by climate change and variabilities. Therefore, the assumption that the I-D-F curve is stationary to design drainage system maybe not available in the climate change period, because climate change has changed the characteristics of extremes rainfall event to be non-stationary. In this paper, design rainfall by rainfall duration and non-stationary I-D-F curve are derived by the conditional GEV distribution considering non-stationary of rainfall characteristics. Furthermore, the effect of designed peak flow with increase of rainfall intensity was analyzed by distributed rainfall-runoff model, S-RAT(Spatial Runoff Assessment Tool). Although there are some difference by rainfall duration, the traditional I-D-F curves underestimates the extreme rainfall events for high-frequency rainfall condition. As a result, this paper suggest that traditional I-D-F curves could not be suitable for the design of drainage system under climate change condition. Keywords : Drainage system, Climate Change, non-stationary, I-D-F curves This research was supported by a grant 'Development of multi-function debris flow control technique considering extreme rainfall event' [NEMA-Natural-2014-74] from the Natural Hazard Mitigation Research Group, National Emergency Management Agency of KOREA

  2. Optical Frequency Optimization of a High Intensity Laser Power Beaming System Utilizing VMJ Photovoltaic Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raible, Daniel E.; Dinca, Dragos; Nayfeh, Taysir H.

    2012-01-01

    An effective form of wireless power transmission (WPT) has been developed to enable extended mission durations, increased coverage and added capabilities for both space and terrestrial applications that may benefit from optically delivered electrical energy. The high intensity laser power beaming (HILPB) system enables long range optical 'refueling" of electric platforms such as micro unmanned aerial vehicles (MUAV), airships, robotic exploration missions and spacecraft platforms. To further advance the HILPB technology, the focus of this investigation is to determine the optimal laser wavelength to be used with the HILPB receiver, which utilizes vertical multi-junction (VMJ) photovoltaic cells. Frequency optimization of the laser system is necessary in order to maximize the conversion efficiency at continuous high intensities, and thus increase the delivered power density of the HILPB system. Initial spectral characterizations of the device performed at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) indicate the approximate range of peak optical-to-electrical conversion efficiencies, but these data sets represent transient conditions under lower levels of illumination. Extending these results to high levels of steady state illumination, with attention given to the compatibility of available commercial off-the-shelf semiconductor laser sources and atmospheric transmission constraints is the primary focus of this paper. Experimental hardware results utilizing high power continuous wave (CW) semiconductor lasers at four different operational frequencies near the indicated band gap of the photovoltaic VMJ cells are presented and discussed. In addition, the highest receiver power density achieved to date is demonstrated using a single photovoltaic VMJ cell, which provided an exceptionally high electrical output of 13.6 W/sq cm at an optical-to-electrical conversion efficiency of 24 percent. These results are very promising and scalable, as a potential 1.0 sq m HILPB receiver of

  3. Projected changes in precipitation intensity and frequency over complex topography: a multi-model perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Andreas; Keller, Denise; Liniger, Mark; Rajczak, Jan; Schär, Christoph; Appenzeller, Christof

    2014-05-01

    Fundamental changes in the hydrological cycle are expected in a future warmer climate. This is of particular relevance for the Alpine region, as a source and reservoir of several major rivers in Europe and being prone to extreme events such as floodings. For this region, climate change assessments based on the ENSEMBLES regional climate models (RCMs) project a significant decrease in summer mean precipitation under the A1B emission scenario by the mid-to-end of this century, while winter mean precipitation is expected to slightly rise. From an impact perspective, projected changes in seasonal means, however, are often insufficient to adequately address the multifaceted challenges of climate change adaptation. In this study, we revisit the full matrix of the ENSEMBLES RCM projections regarding changes in frequency and intensity, precipitation-type (convective versus stratiform) and temporal structure (wet/dry spells and transition probabilities) over Switzerland and surroundings. As proxies for raintype changes, we rely on the model parameterized convective and large-scale precipitation components. Part of the analysis involves a Bayesian multi-model combination algorithm to infer changes from the multi-model ensemble. The analysis suggests a summer drying that evolves altitude-specific: over low-land regions it is associated with wet-day frequency decreases of convective and large-scale precipitation, while over elevated regions it is primarily associated with a decline in large-scale precipitation only. As a consequence, almost all the models project an increase in the convective fraction at elevated Alpine altitudes. The decrease in the number of wet days during summer is accompanied by decreases (increases) in multi-day wet (dry) spells. This shift in multi-day episodes also lowers the likelihood of short dry spell occurrence in all of the models. For spring and autumn the combined multi-model projections indicate higher mean precipitation intensity north of the

  4. The Interannual Stability of Cumulative Frequency Distributions for Convective System Size and Intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohr, Karen I.; Molinari, John; Thorncroft, Chris

    2009-01-01

    The characteristics of convective system populations in West Africa and the western Pacific tropical cyclone basin were analyzed to investigate whether interannual variability in convective activity in tropical continental and oceanic environments is driven by variations in the number of events during the wet season or by favoring large and/or intense convective systems. Convective systems were defined from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) data as a cluster of pixels with an 85-GHz polarization-corrected brightness temperature below 255 K and with an area of at least 64 square kilometers. The study database consisted of convective systems in West Africa from May to September 1998-2007, and in the western Pacific from May to November 1998-2007. Annual cumulative frequency distributions for system minimum brightness temperature and system area were constructed for both regions. For both regions, there were no statistically significant differences between the annual curves for system minimum brightness temperature. There were two groups of system area curves, split by the TRMM altitude boost in 2001. Within each set, there was no statistically significant interannual variability. Subsetting the database revealed some sensitivity in distribution shape to the size of the sampling area, the length of the sample period, and the climate zone. From a regional perspective, the stability of the cumulative frequency distributions implied that the probability that a convective system would attain a particular size or intensity does not change interannually. Variability in the number of convective events appeared to be more important in determining whether a year is either wetter or drier than normal.

  5. Rainfall intensity-duration-frequency relationships derived from large partial duration series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Zvi, Arie

    2009-03-01

    SummaryA procedure is proposed for basing intensity-duration-frequency (IDF) curves on partial duration series (PDS) which are substantially larger than those commonly used for this purpose. The PDS are derived from event maxima series (EMS), composed of the maximum average intensities, over a given duration, determined for all rainfall events recorded at a station. The generalized Pareto distribution (GP) is fitted to many PDS nested within the EMS and the goodness-of-fit is determined by the Anderson-Darling test. The best fitted distribution is selected for predicting intensities associated with the given duration and with a number of recurrence intervals. This procedure was repeated for eleven rainfall durations, from 5 to 240 min, at four stations of the Israel Meteorological Service. For comparison, the GP and the generalized extreme value (GEV) distributions were fitted to annual maxima series (AMS) and the Gumbel and lognormal distributions were fitted to the PDS and to the AMS at these stations. In almost all cases, the GP distribution well fits to ranges of PDS within an EMS, while in a few cases the best fit is fair only. Another result is that the GP distribution does not fit to AMS and to EMS. The GEV distribution well fits to most AMS, and fairly fits to the others. The Gumbel and the lognormal distributions well fit to most of the AMS and to a very few PDS. In most cases of good fits of different distributions, the predicted values by the different distributions are not much different from one another. This indicates the importance of good fit of the distribution and of the power of the AD test used for determining it. In most cases the best fit of the GP distribution is to a PDS series substantially larger than its corresponding AMS. In most cases, the standard error of the estimated 100-year intensity, through the best fitted GP to PDS, is smaller than that estimated through the GEV fitted to the corresponding AMS. All these make the proposed

  6. Segmentation of 3-D High-Frequency Ultrasound Images of Human Lymph Nodes Using Graph Cut With Energy Functional Adapted to Local Intensity Distribution.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Jen-Wei; Mamou, Jonathan; Wang, Yao; Saegusa-Beecroft, Emi; Machi, Junji; Feleppa, Ernest J

    2017-10-01

    Previous studies by our group have shown that 3-D high-frequency quantitative ultrasound (QUS) methods have the potential to differentiate metastatic lymph nodes (LNs) from cancer-free LNs dissected from human cancer patients. To successfully perform these methods inside the LN parenchyma (LNP), an automatic segmentation method is highly desired to exclude the surrounding thin layer of fat from QUS processing and accurately correct for ultrasound attenuation. In high-frequency ultrasound images of LNs, the intensity distribution of LNP and fat varies spatially because of acoustic attenuation and focusing effects. Thus, the intensity contrast between two object regions (e.g., LNP and fat) is also spatially varying. In our previous work, nested graph cut (GC) demonstrated its ability to simultaneously segment LNP, fat, and the outer phosphate-buffered saline bath even when some boundaries are lost because of acoustic attenuation and focusing effects. This paper describes a novel approach called GC with locally adaptive energy to further deal with spatially varying distributions of LNP and fat caused by inhomogeneous acoustic attenuation. The proposed method achieved Dice similarity coefficients of 0.937±0.035 when compared with expert manual segmentation on a representative data set consisting of 115 3-D LN images obtained from colorectal cancer patients.

  7. Modelling stock order flows with non-homogeneous intensities from high-frequency data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorshenin, Andrey K.; Korolev, Victor Yu.; Zeifman, Alexander I.; Shorgin, Sergey Ya.; Chertok, Andrey V.; Evstafyev, Artem I.; Korchagin, Alexander Yu.

    2013-10-01

    A micro-scale model is proposed for the evolution of such information system as the limit order book in financial markets. Within this model, the flows of orders (claims) are described by doubly stochastic Poisson processes taking account of the stochastic character of intensities of buy and sell orders that determine the price discovery mechanism. The proposed multiplicative model of stochastic intensities makes it possible to analyze the characteristics of the order flows as well as the instantaneous proportion of the forces of buyers and sellers, that is, the imbalance process, without modelling the external information background. The proposed model gives the opportunity to link the micro-scale (high-frequency) dynamics of the limit order book with the macro-scale models of stock price processes of the form of subordinated Wiener processes by means of limit theorems of probability theory and hence, to use the normal variance-mean mixture models of the corresponding heavy-tailed distributions. The approach can be useful in different areas with similar properties (e.g., in plasma physics).

  8. Intensity, duration, and frequency of precipitation extremes under 21st-century warming scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Shih-Chieh; Ganguly, Auroop R

    2011-01-01

    Recent research on the projection of precipitation extremes has either focused on conceptual physical mechanisms that generate heavy precipitation or rigorous statistical methods that extrapolate tail behavior. However, informing both climate prediction and impact assessment requires concurrent physically and statistically oriented analysis. A combined examination of climate model simulations and observation-based reanalysis data sets suggests more intense and frequent precipitation extremes under 21st-century warming scenarios. Utilization of statistical extreme value theory and resampling-based uncertainty quantification combined with consideration of the Clausius-Clapeyron relationship reveals consistently intensifying trends for precipitation extremes at a global-average scale. However, regional and decadal analyses reveal specific discrepancies in the physical mechanisms governing precipitation extremes, as well as their statistical trends, especially in the tropics. The intensifying trend of precipitation extremes has quantifiable impacts on intensity-duration-frequency curves, which in turn have direct implications for hydraulic engineering design and water-resources management. The larger uncertainties at regional and decadal scales suggest the need for caution during regional-scale adaptation or preparedness decisions. Future research needs to explore the possibility of uncertainty reduction through higher resolution global climate models, statistical or dynamical downscaling, as well as improved understanding of precipitation extremes processes.

  9. Intensity - Duration - Frequency Curves for U.S. Cities in a Warming Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragno, Elisa; AghaKouchak, Amir; Love, Charlotte; Vahedifard, Farshid; Cheng, Linyin; Lima, Carlos

    2017-04-01

    Current infrastructure design procedures rely on the use of Intensity - Duration - Frequency (IDF) curves retrieved under the assumption of temporal stationarity, meaning that occurrences of extreme events are expected to be time invariant. However, numerous studies have observed more severe extreme events over time. Hence, the stationarity assumption for extreme analysis may not be appropriate in a warming climate. This issue raises concerns regarding the safety and resilience of infrastructures and natural slopes. Here we employ daily precipitation data from historical and projected (RCP 8.5) CMIP5 runs to investigate IDF curves of 14 urban areas across the United States. We first statistically assess changes in precipitation extremes using an energy-based test for equal distributions. Then, through a Bayesian inference approach for stationary and non-stationary extreme value analysis, we provide updated IDF curves based on future climatic model projections. We show that, based on CMIP5 simulations, U.S cities may experience extreme precipitation events up to 20% more intense and twice as frequently, relative to historical records, despite the expectation of unchanged annual mean precipitation.

  10. High-frequency ultrasound imaging for breast cancer biopsy guidance

    PubMed Central

    Cummins, Thomas; Yoon, Changhan; Choi, Hojong; Eliahoo, Payam; Kim, Hyung Ham; Yamashita, Mary W.; Hovanessian-Larsen, Linda J.; Lang, Julie E.; Sener, Stephen F.; Vallone, John; Martin, Sue E.; Kirk Shung, K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Image-guided core needle biopsy is the current gold standard for breast cancer diagnosis. Microcalcifications, an important radiographic finding on mammography suggestive of early breast cancer such as ductal carcinoma in situ, are usually biopsied under stereotactic guidance. This procedure, however, is uncomfortable for patients and requires the use of ionizing radiation. It would be preferable to biopsy microcalcifications under ultrasound guidance since it is a faster procedure, more comfortable for the patient, and requires no radiation. However, microcalcifications cannot reliably be detected with the current standard ultrasound imaging systems. This study is motivated by the clinical need for real-time high-resolution ultrasound imaging of microcalcifications, so that biopsies can be accurately performed under ultrasound guidance. We have investigated how high-frequency ultrasound imaging can enable visualization of microstructures in ex vivo breast tissue biopsy samples. We generated B-mode images of breast tissue and applied the Nakagami filtering technique to help refine image output so that microcalcifications could be better assessed during ultrasound-guided core biopsies. We describe the preliminary clinical results of high-frequency ultrasound imaging of ex vivo breast biopsy tissue with microcalcifications and without Nakagami filtering and the correlation of these images with the pathology examination by hematoxylin and eosin stain and whole slide digital scanning. PMID:26693167

  11. Very low frequency radio events with a reduced intensity observed by the low-altitude DEMETER spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Záhlava, J.; Němec, F.; Santolík, O.; Kolmašová, I.; Parrot, M.; Rodger, C. J.

    2015-11-01

    We present results of a systematic study of unusual very low frequency (VLF) radio events with a reduced intensity observed in the frequency-time spectrograms measured by the low-orbiting Detection of Electro-Magnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions (DEMETER) spacecraft. They occur exclusively on the nightside. During these events, the intensity of fractional hop whistlers at specific frequencies is significantly reduced. These frequencies are usually above about 3.4 kHz (second Earth-ionosphere waveguide cutoff frequency), but about 20% of events extend down to about 1.7 kHz (first Earth-ionosphere waveguide cutoff frequency). The frequencies of a reduced intensity vary smoothly with time. We have inspected 6.5 years of DEMETER data, and we identified in total 1601 such events. We present a simple model of the event formation based on the wave propagation in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide. We apply the model to two selected events, and we demonstrate that the model is able to reproduce both the minimum frequencies of the events and their approximate frequency-time shapes. The overall geographic distribution of the events is shifted by about 3000 km westward and slightly southward with respect to the areas with high long-term average lightning activity. We demonstrate that this shift is related to the specific DEMETER orbit, and we suggest its qualitative explanation by the east-west asymmetry of the wave propagation in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide.

  12. Demeter/ICE Experiment: Study of low frequency transmitter intensity variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudjada, M. Y.; Moldovan, I.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Al-Haddad, E.; Biagi, P. F.; Parrot, M.

    2012-04-01

    We report on low frequency (LF) transmitter signal recorded by the 'Instrument Capteur Electrique' (ICE) experiment onboard the DEMETER micro-satellite. We mainly consider the signal emitted by the Brasov broadcasting station (25.60E, 45.75N) at frequency of about 153 kHz. We analyze the reception conditions of this transmitter several weeks before the occurrence of the Vrancea earthquakes, on October, 27th, 2004. Ground-based observations revealed the presence of sudden decrease of the Y-component of the magnetic field at Muntele Rosu Observatory (Romania), at about 68 km from the epicenter, as reported by Moldovan et al. (Rom. Journ. Phys., Vol. 54, Nos. 1-2, p. 249-261, Bucharest, 2009). In this contribution we attempt to check if the LF Brasov signal was also subject to similar disturbances as observed by the ground-station. We focus on the variation of the LF transmitter intensity levels, several weeks before and after the Vrancea earthquake occurrence. We discuss the physical parameters which may disturb the signal reception in particular the geomagnetic activity and the signal to noise ratios.

  13. Frequencies of poor metabolizers of cytochrome P450 2C19 in esophagus cancer, stomach cancer, lung cancer and bladder cancer in Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Wei-Xing; Chen, Shu-Qing

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the association between cytochrome P450 2C19 (CYP2C19) gene polymorphism and cancer susceptibility by genotyping of CYP2C19 poor metabolizers (PMs) in cancer patients. METHODS: One hundred and thirty-five cases of esophagus cancer, 148 cases of stomach cancer, 212 cases of lung cancer, 112 cases of bladder cancer and 372 controls were genotyped by allele specific amplification-polymerase chain reaction (ASA-PCR) for CYP2C19 PMs. The frequencies of PMs in cancer groups and control group were compared. RESULTS: The frequencies of PMs of CYP2C19 were 34.1% (46/135) in the group of esophagus cancer patients, 31.8% (47/148) in the stomach cancer patients, 34.4% (73/212) in the group of lung cancer patients, only 4.5% (5/112) in the bladder cancer patients and 14.0% (52/372) in control group. There were statistical differences between the cancer groups and control group (esophagus cancer, χ2 = 25.65, P < 0.005, OR = 3.18, 95%CI = 2.005-5.042; stomach cancer, χ2 = 21.70, P < 0.005, OR = 2.86, 95%CI = 1.820-4.501; lung cancer, χ2 = 33.58, P < 0.005, OR = 3.23, 95%CI = 1.503-6.906; bladder cancer, χ2 = 7.50, P < 0.01, OR = 0.288, 95%CI = 0.112-0.740). CONCLUSION: CYP2C19 PMs have a high incidence of esophagus cancer, stomach cancer and lung cancer, conversely they have a low incidence of bladder cancer. It suggests that CYP2C19 may participate in the activation of procarcinogen of esophagus cancer, stomach cancer and lung cancer, but may involve in the detoxification of carcinogens of bladder cancer. PMID:15222046

  14. Design and test of miniaturized glass ceramics HeNe laser with frequency and intensity simultaneously stabilized

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zhimeng; Yang, Kaiyong; Lu, Guangfeng; Long, Xingwu; Zhang, Bin; Xu, Yunong

    2010-10-01

    A miniaturized HeNe laser with intensity and frequency simultaneously stabilized is described. The laser uses a monoblock glass ceramics as its tube to construct an improved steady structure. The closed loop cavity length control system stabilizes its frequency and the discharge current regulating system stabilizes its intensity. The electronic system integrating power supply and stabilization system is designed within two small circuit boards. The laser tube and circuit boards are assembled into a small package with dimensions of 180 mm×100 mm×150 mm. The laser outputs s-polarized light at wavelength of 632.99 nm with power of 0.44 mW. Test results show that its frequency stability can reach 8.4×10-11 (1s Allan variance over 3 h) and frequency reproducibility at 1.3×10-8. The laser's intensity stability is 0.011% over 9 h.

  15. Radio-frequency ablation of hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kanellos, I; Demetriades, H; Blouhos, K; Tsachalis, T; Pramateftakis, M G; Betsis, D

    2004-11-01

    The aim of our study is to present the preliminary results of an ongoing radio-frequency (RF) ablation study in patients with hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer. From November 2003, two patients affected with metachronous liver metastases from colorectal cancer were treated with RF ablation. The mean age of the patients was 66 years (58 and 74 years). Tumours were unifocal right-lobe lesions in one patient and bifocal in the second patient. Under general anaesthesia, a Radionics 200-W RF generator was used to ablate lesions with H2O-cooled electrodes via laparotomy. Patients' follow-up ranged from two to five months including evaluation of salient clinical, radiological and laboratory parameters. The patients experienced moderate-to-severe pain in the right abdomen lasting for 2-3 days and mild fever for 3-6 days after treatment. During the follow-up period no local recurrence was observed. RF ablation emerges to be a promising method for the treatment of hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer.

  16. Extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields and cancer: the epidemiologic evidence.

    PubMed Central

    Bates, M N

    1991-01-01

    This paper reviews the epidemiologic evidence that low frequency electromagnetic fields generated by alternating current may be a cause of cancer. Studies examining residential exposures of children and adults and studies of electrical and electronics workers are reviewed. Using conventional epidemiologic criteria for inferring causal associations, including strength and consistency of the relationship, biological plausibility, and the possibility of bias as an explanation, it is concluded that the evidence is strongly suggestive that such radiation is carcinogenic. The evidence is strongest for brain and central nervous system cancers in electrical workers and children. Weaker evidence supports an association with leukemia in electrical workers. Some evidence also exists for an association with melanoma in electrical workers. Failure to find consistent evidence of a link between residential exposures and adult cancers may be attributable to exposure misclassification. Studies so far have used imperfect surrogates for any true biologically effective magnetic field exposure. The resulting exposure misclassification has produced relative risk estimates that understate any true risk. PMID:1821368

  17. Antibiotic Susceptibility and mecA Frequency in Staphylococcus epidermidis, Isolated From Intensive Care Unit Patients

    PubMed Central

    Najar-Peerayeh, Shahin; Jazayeri Moghadas, Ali; Behmanesh, Mehrdad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS), especially Staphylococcus epidermidis, are considered as normal flora of human epithelia and also important opportunistic pathogens for nosocomial infections. S. epidermidis can also act as a reservoir for mecA, responsible for high-level resistance to methicillin and transferring it to S. aureus. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of S. epidermidis as well as antibiotic susceptibility pattern and mecA prevalence in S. epidermidis isolated from intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted from September 2010 to September 2011 and 184 coagulase-negative staphylococci were collected from different clinical samples in three hospitals. S. epidermidis was identified by conventional bacteriological tests. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed using disk diffusion method. Frequency of mecA was detected by specific PCR. Results: Frequency of S. epidermidis was 34.8%, the most susceptibility was seen to linezolid and vancomycin, and the least susceptibility was seen to tetracycline.Majority of the S. epidermidis isolates carried mecA (92.2%). The most common resistant pattern was trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline, erythromycin, and methicillin resistance, found in 23.4% of the isolates, followed by resistance to methicillin as the second-most common resistant pattern, observed in 20.3% of the isolates. Conclusions: Frequency of S. epidermidis was significantly lower, compared to other studies. Presence rate of mecA and susceptibility to linezolid and vancomycin did not show significant differences with other investigations, while resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was significantly lower compared to other investigations, and resistance to tetracycline was significantly higher in comparison to other investigations. Presence of methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis in ICU patients, especially in individuals with

  18. Auditory cortical N100 in pre- and post-synaptic auditory neuropathy to frequency or intensity changes of continuous tones

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrijevic, Andrew; Starr, Arnold; Bhatt, Shrutee; Michalewski, Henry J.; Zeng, Fan-Gang; Pratt, Hillel

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Auditory cortical N100s were examined in ten auditory neuropathy (AN) subjects as objective measures of impaired hearing. Methods Latency and amplitudes of N100 in AN to increases of frequency (4–50%) or intensity (4–8 dB) of low (250 Hz) or high (4000 Hz) frequency tones were compared with results from normal-hearing controls. The sites of auditory nerve dysfunction were pre-synaptic (n=3) due to otoferlin mutations causing temperature sensitive deafness, post-synaptic (n=4) affecting other cranial and/or peripheral neuropathies, and undefined (n=3). Results AN consistently had N100s only to the largest changes of frequency or intensity whereas controls consistently had N100s to all but the smallest frequency and intensity changes. N100 latency in AN was significantly delayed compared to controls, more so for 250 than for 4000 Hz and more so for changes of intensity compared to frequency. N100 amplitudes to frequency change were significantly reduced in ANs compared to controls, except for pre-synaptic AN in whom amplitudes were greater than controls. N100 latency to frequency change of 250 but not of 4000 Hz was significantly related to speech perception scores. Conclusions As a group, AN subjects’ N100 potentials were abnormally delayed and smaller, particularly for low frequency. The extent of these abnormalities differed between pre- and post-synaptic forms of the disorder. Significance Abnormalities of auditory cortical N100 in AN reflect disorders of both temporal processing (low frequency) and neural adaptation (high frequency). Auditory N100 latency to the low frequency provides an objective measure of the degree of impaired speech perception in AN. PMID:20822952

  19. Splitting intensity measurements of North America and finite-frequency modeling of upper mantle anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongsresawat, Sutatcha

    micro terranes with both continental and oceanic origins throughout its accretion history making it a very complex geological setting including the presence of the north-striking western Idaho shear zone (WISZ) in the middle. We deployed 85 temporary seismic stations with station-spacing of ˜30 km during 2011--2013 and passively recorded seismic data for an average duration of 1.5 years. The SKS phase of the seismogram is used to obtain splitting intensity, which we use to model realistic 3-D upper-mantle anisotropy. There are two parts in this study, first SKS splitting intensity measurements were made from seismograms recorded at 83 IDOR seismic stations and 45 USArray-TA stations, which consist of analyzing more than 75,000 individual traces. As a result, we obtain high-resolution and spatially coherent shear-wave splitting dataset of the IDOR region. Second, we use back-azimuthal variations of splitting intensity at all stations to model for 3-D anisotropy using the finite-frequency approach. Preliminary models show depth-dependent behaviors of both fast polarization direction and strength of anisotropy down to ˜150 km where the model starts to show poor resolution due to the size of the SKS fresnel zone. Last, we show preliminary inverted models for 3-D upper-mantle anisotropy of North America as well as our progress of spherical coordinate inversion of the USArray-TA splitting measurements. This will set up a starting point for performing a joint-inversion with surface wave dataset that will be measured at exact seismic stations. This last task will be exercised by the help of 3-D finite-frequency Frechet sensitivity kernels for surface waveforms based on the Born approximation with a model parametrized for hexagonal symmetry. Their formulation will provide a complementary approach to invert surface wave data in combination with our SI data for upper mantle anisotropy model of North America with highest resolution for the first time.

  20. [The frequency of cancer in France: Most recent data and trends].

    PubMed

    Ribassin-Majed, Laureen; Le-Teuff, Gwénaël; Hill, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    We present and discuss recent data on the frequency of cancer in France and on cancer survival. In the male population, the incidence of prostate and head and neck cancers diminishes rapidly and the incidence of the other common cancers: lung and colorectal diminishes less markedly; cancer mortality decreases for most sites. In the female population, the incidence of breast cancer diminishes rapidly, the incidence of colorectal and uterus cancers diminish less markedly and the incidence of lung cancer increases very fast: the mortality trends are similar. Cancer survival has improved in the last 16 years but some of the improvements are an artifact induced by overdiagnosis.

  1. Confocal dual-frequency enhances the damaging effect of high-intensity focused ultrasound in tissue-mimicking phantom.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Sheng-Li; Hu, Bing; Jiang, Li-Xin; He, Pei-Zhong; Xia, Rong-Min; Shou, Wen-De

    2008-01-01

    The volume of the lesions created by conventional single-frequency high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is small, which leads to long treatment duration in patients who are undergoing tumor ablation. In this study, the lesions induced by confocal dual-frequency HIFU in an optically transparent tissue-mimicking phantom were investigated and compared with the lesions created by conventional single-frequency HIFU. The results show that using different exposure times resulted in lesions of different sizes in both dual-frequency and single-frequency HIFU modes at the same spatially averaged intensity level (ISAL = 4900 W cm(-2)), but the lesion dimensions made in dual-frequency mode were significantly larger than those made in single-frequency mode. Difference frequency acoustic fields that exist in the confocal region of dual-frequency HIFU may be the reason for the enlargement of the lesions' dimensions. The dual-frequency HIFU mode may represent a new technique to improve the ablation efficiency of HIFU. The total time for the ablation of a tumor can be reduced, thus requiring less therapy time and reducing possible patient complications.

  2. Neurons in the inferior colliculus of the rat show stimulus-specific adaptation for frequency, but not for intensity

    PubMed Central

    Duque, Daniel; Wang, Xin; Nieto-Diego, Javier; Krumbholz, Katrin; Malmierca, Manuel S.

    2016-01-01

    Electrophysiological and psychophysical responses to a low-intensity probe sound tend to be suppressed by a preceding high-intensity adaptor sound. Nevertheless, rare low-intensity deviant sounds presented among frequent high-intensity standard sounds in an intensity oddball paradigm can elicit an electroencephalographic mismatch negativity (MMN) response. This has been taken to suggest that the MMN is a correlate of true change or “deviance” detection. A key question is where in the ascending auditory pathway true deviance sensitivity first emerges. Here, we addressed this question by measuring low-intensity deviant responses from single units in the inferior colliculus (IC) of anesthetized rats. If the IC exhibits true deviance sensitivity to intensity, IC neurons should show enhanced responses to low-intensity deviant sounds presented among high-intensity standards. Contrary to this prediction, deviant responses were only enhanced when the standards and deviants differed in frequency. The results could be explained with a model assuming that IC neurons integrate over multiple frequency-tuned channels and that adaptation occurs within each channel independently. We used an adaptation paradigm with multiple repeated adaptors to measure the tuning widths of these adaption channels in relation to the neurons’ overall tuning widths. PMID:27066835

  3. Neurons in the inferior colliculus of the rat show stimulus-specific adaptation for frequency, but not for intensity.

    PubMed

    Duque, Daniel; Wang, Xin; Nieto-Diego, Javier; Krumbholz, Katrin; Malmierca, Manuel S

    2016-04-12

    Electrophysiological and psychophysical responses to a low-intensity probe sound tend to be suppressed by a preceding high-intensity adaptor sound. Nevertheless, rare low-intensity deviant sounds presented among frequent high-intensity standard sounds in an intensity oddball paradigm can elicit an electroencephalographic mismatch negativity (MMN) response. This has been taken to suggest that the MMN is a correlate of true change or "deviance" detection. A key question is where in the ascending auditory pathway true deviance sensitivity first emerges. Here, we addressed this question by measuring low-intensity deviant responses from single units in the inferior colliculus (IC) of anesthetized rats. If the IC exhibits true deviance sensitivity to intensity, IC neurons should show enhanced responses to low-intensity deviant sounds presented among high-intensity standards. Contrary to this prediction, deviant responses were only enhanced when the standards and deviants differed in frequency. The results could be explained with a model assuming that IC neurons integrate over multiple frequency-tuned channels and that adaptation occurs within each channel independently. We used an adaptation paradigm with multiple repeated adaptors to measure the tuning widths of these adaption channels in relation to the neurons' overall tuning widths.

  4. Interactions of subglottal pressure and neuromuscular activation on fundamental frequency and intensity.

    PubMed

    Chhetri, Dinesh K; Park, Soo Jin

    2016-05-01

    Fundamental frequency (F0) and intensity sound pressure level (SPL) of voice are controlled by intrinsic laryngeal muscle (ILM) activation and subglottal pressure (Psub). Their interactions were investigated. In an in vivo canine model, the thyroarytenoid (TA), lateral cricoarytenoid/interarytenoid (LCA/IA), and cricothyroid (CT) muscles were independently activated from threshold to maximal contraction by neuromuscular stimulation in various combinations, whereas airflow was increased to phonation onset pressure and beyond. The resultant acoustic output was analyzed for effects of Psub on vibratory stability, F0, and SPL. Muscle activation plots and vocal range profiles by individual ILM activation states were analyzed. Cricothyroid activation increased phonation onset F0, but vibration was less stable in high CT conditions and displayed vibratory mode change. In addition, a decrease in F0 with increased Psub was observed in high CT conditions. Intensity increased with Psub in all conditions, but the slope was greater at high CT, low TA/LCA/IA activations. Lateral cricoarytenoid/interarytenoid activation improved vocal efficiency. To maintain same F0 with increasing SPL (messa di voce), TA activation was decreased and LCA/IA activation was increased. The same F0 and SPL could be achieved with a variety of ILM activation combinations. Cricothyroid is primarily required for increasing F0, whereas TA can increase or decrease F0 and SPL. Lateral cricoarytenoid/interarytenoid activation likely maintains vocal fold adduction during increased Psub and improves vocal efficiency. This study also demonstrates laryngeal motor equivalence, the ability of the larynx to achieve the same target F0 and SPL with multiple combinations of ILM activation. N/A. Laryngoscope, 126:1123-1130, 2016. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  5. Design study of a radio-frequency quadrupole for high-intensity beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahng, Jungbae; Kim, Eun-San; Choi, Bong-Hyuk

    2017-07-01

    The Rare isotope Accelerator Of Newness (RAON) heavy-ion accelerator has been designed for the Rare Isotope Science Project (RISP) in Korea. The RAON will produce heavy-ion beams from 660-MeV-proton to 200-MeV/u-uranium with continuous wave (CW) power of 400 kW to support research in various scientific fields. Its system consists of an ECR ion source, LEBTs with 10 keV/u, CW RFQ accelerator with 81.25 MHz and 500 keV/u, a MEBT system, and a SC linac. In detail, the driver linac system consists of a Quarter Wave Resonator (QWR) section with 81.25 MHz and a Half Wave Resonator (HWR) section with 162.5 MHz, Linac-1, and a Spoke Cavity section with 325 MHz, Linac-2. These linacs have been designed to optimize the beam parameters to meet the required design goals. At the same time, a light-heavy ion accelerator with high-intensity beam, such as proton, deuteron, and helium beams, is required for experiments. In this paper, we present the design study of the high intensity RFQ for a deuteron beam with energies from 30 keV/u to 1.5 MeV/u and currents in the mA range. This system is composed of an Penning Ionization Gauge ion source, short LEBT with a RF deflector, and shared SC Linac. In order to increase acceleration efficiency in a short length with low cost, the 2nd harmonic of 162.5 MHz is applied as the operation frequency in the D+ RFQ design. The D+ RFQ is designed with 4.97 m, 1.52 bravery factor. Since it operates with 2nd harmonic frequency, the beam should be 50% of the duty factor while the cavity should be operated in CW mode, to protect the downstream linac system. We focus on avoiding emittance growth by the space-charge effect and optimizing the RFQ to achieve a high transmission and low emittance growth. Both the RFQ beam dynamics study and RFQ cavity design study for two and three dimensions will be discussed. Supported by Korea University Future Research Grant

  6. High Intensity Focused Ultrasound for Cancer Therapy--harnessing its non-linearity

    SciTech Connect

    Haar, Gail ter

    2008-06-24

    In medicine in general, and for cancer treatments in particular, there is a drive to find effective non-invasive therapies. High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) represents one such technique. In principle, it is simple--a high energy ultrasound beam is brought to a tight focus within a target which may lie several centimetres below the skin surface (for example, in a tumour of the liver), and is used to destroy a selected tissue volume. The main mechanism for cell killing in a HIFU beam is heat. Ultrasound energy absorption is frequency dependent, the higher frequencies being absorbed most strongly. Significant thermal advantage may therefore be gained from non-linear propagation, which generates higher harmonics, in tissue. Acoustic cavitation and thermal exsolution of gas (boiling) also contribute to tissue damage. This activity leads to the local mechanical disruption of cells. In addition, the non-linear oscillation of these bubbles leads to enhanced energy deposition. The acoustic emissions from such bubbles are characteristic of their behaviour and may be correlated to some extent with the appearance of the disruption produced. The more widespread clinical acceptance of HIFU is awaiting faster, and more efficient, energy delivery and treatment monitoring. A better understanding of the nonlinear aspects of HIFU propagation in tissue is thus important if this technique is to benefit more patients.

  7. High Intensity Focused Ultrasound for Cancer Therapy—harnessing its non-linearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ter Haar, Gail

    2008-06-01

    In medicine in general, and for cancer treatments in particular, there is a drive to find effective non-invasive therapies. High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) represents one such technique. In principle, it is simple—a high energy ultrasound beam is brought to a tight focus within a target which may lie several centimetres below the skin surface (for example, in a tumour of the liver), and is used to destroy a selected tissue volume. The main mechanism for cell killing in a HIFU beam is heat. Ultrasound energy absorption is frequency dependent, the higher frequencies being absorbed most strongly. Significant thermal advantage may therefore be gained from non-linear propagation, which generates higher harmonics, in tissue. Acoustic cavitation and thermal exsolution of gas (boiling) also contribute to tissue damage. This activity leads to the local mechanical disruption of cells. In addition, the non-linear oscillation of these bubbles leads to enhanced energy deposition. The acoustic emissions from such bubbles are characteristic of their behaviour and may be correlated to some extent with the appearance of the disruption produced. The more widespread clinical acceptance of HIFU is awaiting faster, and more efficient, energy delivery and treatment monitoring. A better understanding of the nonlinear aspects of HIFU propagation in tissue is thus important if this technique is to benefit more patients.

  8. Frequency and intensity of extreme drought in the Delaware Basin, 1600-2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauffman, G. J.; Vonck, K. J.

    2011-05-01

    The frequency and severity of drought in the Delaware Basin between 1600 and 2002 are examined using the Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) estimated from tree ring data and correlated with reconstructed annual low flows. In the Delaware Basin, the most severe drought in nearly a century occurred during 1995-2002 as the Brandywine River, Delaware's largest surface water supply, ran dry at its mouth and declined to the lowest flow on record since 1912. To evaluate the long-term context of the 1995-2002 droughts given a variable hydroclimate, tree ring and PDSI data were correlated to reconstruct flows along the river to 1600, the beginning of European exploration to the Delaware Bay. Reconstructed PDSI and low flows were fit using general extreme value (GEV) distributions to estimate drought frequency. Some variability is present as reconstructed low flows tend to overestimate recorded streamflow in severe dry years, a finding reported by others. Some uncertainty appears in the correlations as the coefficient of multiple determination (CRSQ) between recorded and estimated PDSI from tree ring data is 0.50-0.54, a level of variance considered to be "quite good," and the coefficient of determination (r2) between PDSI and low flow is 0.52. Given the uncertainty, PDSI and reconstructed low flow data both agree that the most extreme drought in 400 years occurred during 1635, and the drought of 1995-2000 was historically extreme with differences only in the degree of severity. On the basis of PDSI, the 2002, 1999, and 1995 droughts were the sixth, twelfth, and seventeenth most severe in 400 years with frequencies of once every 50, 33, and 16 years, respectively. Based on low flow, the 2002, 1999, and 1995 droughts were the second, fourth, and ninth most severe since 1600 with frequencies of once every 200, 100, and 50 years, respectively. The record drought of 2002 has a low probability of reoccurring in any given year (2.0% by PDSI and 0.5% by low flow), but droughts

  9. Suppression of the low frequency intensity noise of a single-frequency Yb3+-doped phosphate fiber laser at 1083 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Z.; Li, C.; Xu, S.; Yang, C.; Mo, S.; Chen, D.; Peng, M.; Yang, Z.

    2014-06-01

    The suppression of the low frequency intensity noise of a 1083 nm single-frequency Yb3+-doped phosphate fiber laser is reported. The noise suppression scheme is to use a liquid crystal device as a variable attenuator to modulate the laser power to close to the desired level. The achieved long term (12 h) laser instability is less than 0.2%, while the relative intensity noise (RIN) has been decreased to lower than -140 dB Hz-1 at frequencies from 250 Hz to 1 kHz. Moreover, the laser linewidth value remains the same as before suppression, while the degree of polarization (DOP) declined slightly.

  10. Optimization of Breast Cancer Treatment by Dynamic Intensity Modulated Electron Radiotherapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: DAMD17-01-1-0435 TITLE: Optimization of Breast Cancer Treatment by...Optimization of Breast Cancer Treatment by Dynamic Intensity Modulated Electron Radiotherapy 5b. GRANT NUMBER DAMD17-01-1-0435 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  11. High-Frequency Acoustic Impedance Imaging of Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Fadhel, Muhannad N; Berndl, Elizabeth S L; Strohm, Eric M; Kolios, Michael C

    2015-10-01

    Variations in the acoustic impedance throughout cells and tissue can be used to gain insight into cellular microstructures and the physiologic state of the cell. Ultrasound imaging can be used to create a map of the acoustic impedance, on which fluctuations can be used to help identify the dominant ultrasound scattering source in cells, providing information for ultrasound tissue characterization. The physiologic state of a cell can be inferred from the average acoustic impedance values, as many cellular physiologic changes are linked to an alteration in their mechanical properties. A recently proposed method, acoustic impedance imaging, has been used to measure the acoustic impedance maps of biological tissues, but the method has not been used to characterize individual cells. Using this method to image cells can result in more precise acoustic impedance maps of cells than obtained previously using time-resolved acoustic microscopy. We employed an acoustic microscope using a transducer with a center frequency of 375 MHz to calculate the acoustic impedance of normal (MCF-10 A) and cancerous (MCF-7) breast cells. The generated acoustic impedance maps and simulations suggest that the position of the nucleus with respect to the polystyrene substrate may have an effect on the measured acoustic impedance value of the cell. Fluorescence microscopy and confocal microscopy were used to correlate acoustic impedance images with the position of the nucleus within the cell. The average acoustic impedance statistically differed between normal and cancerous breast cells (1.636 ± 0.010 MRayl vs. 1.612 ± 0.006 MRayl), indicating that acoustic impedance could be used to differentiate between normal and cancerous cells. Copyright © 2015 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Neutron intensity modulation and time-focusing with integrated Larmor and resonant frequency techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Jinkui Hamilton, William A.; Robertson, J. L.; Crow, Lowell; Lee, Sung-Woo; Kang, Yoon W.

    2015-09-14

    The analysis of neutron diffraction experiments often assumes that neutrons are elastically scattered from the sample. However, there is growing evidence that a significant fraction of the detected neutrons is in fact inelastically scattered, especially from soft materials and aqueous samples. Ignoring these inelastic contributions gives rise to inaccurate experimental results. To date, there has been no simple method with broad applicability for inelastic signal separation in neutron diffraction experiments. Here, we present a simple and robust method that we believe could be suited for this purpose. We use two radio frequency resonant spin flippers integrated with a Larmor precession field to modulate the neutron intensity and to encode the inelastic scattering information into the neutron data. All three components contribute to the spin encoding. The Larmor field serves several additional purposes. Its usage facilitates neutron time-focusing, eliminates the need for stringent magnetic shielding, and allows for compact setups. The scheme is robust, simple, and flexible. We believe that, with further improvements, it has the potential of adding inelastic signal discrimination capabilities to many existing diffraction instruments in the future.

  13. High-sensitivity intensity correlation measurements for photon statistics at terahertz frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benea-Chelmus, Ileana-Cristina; Bonzon, Christopher; Faist, Jérôme

    2017-02-01

    Recently, intensity correlation measurements have been reported for the first time in the Terahertz range, where a time-domain version of a Hanbury Brown Twiss setup based on electro-optic sampling was employed. This technique proved its usefulness for fundamental studies of photon correlations of bunched (thermal) and Poissonian (coherent) light, but not only so. Also in practical applications, it has been employed to determine the temporal emission pattern of Terahertz Quantum Cascade Laser based Frequency Combs, which are very promising devices for future highly integrated spectrometers. The key parameter of this technique is its short temporal resolution. Up to date, the technique still does not provide the necessary sensitivity for exploring the yet vacuous regime of single photons in the terahertz. In this work we present our recent efforts for increasing the sensitivity of electro-optic sampling, by means of cryogenic cooling and novel organic materials for the Terahertz range. In particular, we present a novel device for collinear electro-optic detection, which features a high-aspect ratio antenna on a quartz substrate with a plasmonic gap filled by electro-optic molecules.

  14. Effects of rise-fall time, frequency, and intensity on the early/middle evoked response.

    PubMed

    Beattie, R C; Moretti, M; Warren, V

    1984-05-01

    Auditory evoked responses to tone pips were recorded on 10 normally hearing adults. Tone pips centered at 500 and 2000 Hz with 1, 2, and 4 ms rise-fall times were presented at intensities of 40, 30, 20, and 10 dB nHL. The band-pass of the recording-amplifier system was set to 55 and 3000 Hz. Responses were measured during the first 25 ms following the onset of the stimulus and the first three prominent waves were labeled P10, N15, and P20. The results indicated that varying rise-fall times from 1 to 4 ms had little effect on the detectability of these waves. Consequently, the 4-ms rise-fall time was recommended because of its greater frequency specificity. The number of identifiable responses was similar for both 500 and 2000 Hz for waves P10, N15, and P20. The similarity in the number of detectable responses suggests that any of these waves may be used as a threshold indicator. The acoustic/physiologic mechanisms underlying the latency changes are discussed.

  15. Remote excitation of neuronal circuits using low-intensity, low-frequency ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Tyler, William J; Tufail, Yusuf; Finsterwald, Michael; Tauchmann, Monica L; Olson, Emily J; Majestic, Cassondra

    2008-01-01

    Possessing the ability to noninvasively elicit brain circuit activity yields immense experimental and therapeutic power. Most currently employed neurostimulation methods rely on the somewhat invasive use of stimulating electrodes or photon-emitting devices. Due to its ability to noninvasively propagate through bone and other tissues in a focused manner, the implementation of ultrasound (US) represents a compelling alternative approach to current neuromodulation strategies. Here, we investigated the influence of low-intensity, low-frequency ultrasound (LILFU) on neuronal activity. By transmitting US waveforms through hippocampal slice cultures and ex vivo mouse brains, we determined LILFU is capable of remotely and noninvasively exciting neurons and network activity. Our results illustrate that LILFU can stimulate electrical activity in neurons by activating voltage-gated sodium channels, as well as voltage-gated calcium channels. The LILFU-induced changes in neuronal activity were sufficient to trigger SNARE-mediated exocytosis and synaptic transmission in hippocampal circuits. Because LILFU can stimulate electrical activity and calcium signaling in neurons as well as central synaptic transmission we conclude US provides a powerful tool for remotely modulating brain circuit activity.

  16. Development of Sub-Daily Intensity Duration Frequency (IDF) Curves for Major Urban Areas in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, H.; Mishra, V.

    2014-12-01

    Extreme precipitation events disrupt urban transportation and cause enormous damage to infrastructure. Urban areas are fast responding catchments due to significant impervious surface. Stormwater designs based on daily rainfall data provide inadequate information. We, therefore, develop intensity-duration-frequency curves using sub-daily (1 hour to 12 hour) rainfall data for 57 major urban areas in India. While rain gage stations data from urban areas are most suitable, but stations are unevenly distributed and their data have gaps and inconsistencies. Therefore, we used hourly rainfall data from the Modern Era Retrospective-analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA), which provides a long term data (1979 onwards). Since reanalysis products have uncertainty associated with them we need to enhance their accuracy before their application. We compared daily rain gage station data obtained from Global Surface Summary of Day Data (GSOD) available for 65 stations for the period of 2000-2010 with gridded daily rainfall data provided by Indian Meteorological Department (IMD). 3-hourly data from NOAA/Climate Prediction Center morphing technique (CMORPH), Precipitation Estimation from Remotely Sensed Information using Artificial Neural Networks (PERSIANN), and the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Multisatellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) were aggregated to daily for comparison with GSOD station data . TMPA is found to be best correlated with GSOD data. We used TMPA data to correct MERRA's hourly precipitation, which were applied to develop IDF curves. We compared results with IDF curves from empirical methods and found substantial disparities in the existing stormwater designs in India.

  17. [The frequency of pharmacological pain relief in university neonatal intensive care units].

    PubMed

    Prestes, Ana Claudia Y; Guinsburg, Ruth; Balda, Rita C X; Marba, Sérgio T M; Rugolo, Lígia M S S; Pachi, Paulo R; Bentlin, Maria Regina

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the use of drugs to relieve procedural pain of newborn infants hospitalized in Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU) of university hospitals. A prospective cohort study of all newborn infants hospitalized in four NICU during October 2001. The following data were collected: demographic data of patients; clinical morbidity; number of potentially painful procedures and frequency of analgesic administration. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to study the factors associated with the use of analgesia in this cohort of patients with SPSS 8.0. Ninety-one newborn infants were admitted to the NICU during the study period (1,025 patient-days). Only 25% of the 1,025 patient-days received any systemic analgesia. No specific drug was administered to relieve acute pain during any of the following painful procedures: arterial, venous, capillary and lumbar punctures and tracheal intubation. For chest tube insertion, 100% of newborn infants received specific analgesia. For the insertion of central catheters, 8% of the newborn infants received analgesia. Only nine of the 17 newborn infants that underwent surgical procedures received any dose of analgesics during the postoperative period. Regarding patients who received analgesia, the drug of choice was fentanyl in 93%. The presence of mechanical ventilation increased 6.9 times the chance of the newborn receiving analgesia and the presence of a chest tube increased this chance by 5.0 times. It is necessary to train health professionals in order to shorten the lag between scientific knowledge regarding newborn pain and clinical practice.

  18. Acute toxicity of hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Drodge, C.S.; Boychak, O.; Patel, S.; Usmani, N.; Amanie, J.; Parliament, M.B.; Murtha, A.; Field, C.; Ghosh, S.; Pervez, N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Dose-escalated hypofractionated radiotherapy (hfrt) using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (imrt), with inclusion of the pelvic lymph nodes (plns), plus androgen suppression therapy (ast) in high-risk prostate cancer patients should improve patient outcomes, but acute toxicity could limit its feasibility. Methods Our single-centre phase ii prospective study enrolled 40 high-risk prostate cancer patients. All patients received hfrt using imrt with daily mega-voltage computed tomography imaging guidance, with 95% of planning target volumes (ptv68 and ptv50) receiving 68 Gy and 50 Gy (respectively) in 25 daily fractions. The boost volume was targeted to the involved plns and the prostate (minus the urethra plus 3 mm and minus 3 mm from adjacent rectal wall) and totalled up to 75 Gy in 25 fractions. Acute toxicity scores were recorded weekly during and 3 months after radiotherapy (rt) administration. Results For the 37 patients who completed rt and the 3-month follow-up, median age was 65.5 years (range: 50–76 years). Disease was organ-confined (T1c–T2c) in 23 patients (62.1%), and node-positive in 5 patients (13.5%). All patients received long-term ast. Maximum acute genitourinary (gu) and gastrointestinal (gi) toxicity peaked at grade 2 in 6 of 36 evaluated patients (16.6%) and in 4 of 31 evaluated patients (12.9%) respectively. Diarrhea and urinary frequency were the chief complaints. Dose–volume parameters demonstrated no correlation with toxicity. The ptv treatment objectives were met in 36 of the 37 patients. Conclusions This hfrt dose-escalation trial in high-risk prostate cancer has demonstrated the feasibility of administering 75 Gy in 25 fractions with minimal acute gi and gu toxicities. Further follow-up will report late toxicities and outcomes. PMID:25908924

  19. Exercise training intensity prescription in breast cancer survivors: validity of current practice and specific recommendations.

    PubMed

    Scharhag-Rosenberger, Friederike; Kuehl, Rea; Klassen, Oliver; Schommer, Kai; Schmidt, Martina E; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Wiskemann, Joachim; Steindorf, Karen

    2015-12-01

    Cancer survivors are recommended to perform 150 min/week of moderate or 75 min/week of vigorous aerobic exercise, but it remains unclear how moderate and vigorous intensities can be prescribed. Therefore, it was investigated whether and how intensity prescriptions for healthy adults by the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) need to be adapted for breast cancer survivors. Fifty-two breast cancer survivors (stage 0-III, age 52 ± 9 years, BMI 25.4 ± 3.5 kg/m2) performed cardiopulmonary exercise tests at the end of primary therapy. Intensity classes defined as percentages of maximal heart rate (HRmax), heart rate reserve (HRR), and maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) were compared to the ACSM's intensity classes using oxygen uptake reserve as reference. The prescriptions for moderate and vigorous exercise intensities were significantly different between breast cancer survivors and healthy adults when using VO2max (moderate 50-66 vs. 46-63 and vigorous 67-91 vs. 64-90% VO2max) or HRR (moderate 26-50 vs. 40-59 and vigorous 51-88 vs. 60-89 % HRR), but not when using HRmax (moderate 65-76 vs. 64-76 and vigorous 77-94 vs. 77-95% HRmax). In breast cancer survivors, intensity prescriptions for healthy adults result in considerably too intense training if HRR is used as guiding factor. Prescriptions using VO2max result in a slightly too low exercise intensity, whereas recommendations in percentages of HRmax appear valid. Cancer survivors should not uncritically adopt exercise intensity prescriptions for healthy adults. Specific prescriptions for the studied population are provided.

  20. Prevention of Slip-Related Backward Balance Loss: Effect of Session Intensity and Frequency on Long-Term Retention

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Tanvi; Pai, Yi-Chung

    2008-01-01

    Objective To examine effects of session intensity (number of slip exposures) and frequency on retention of acquired adaptation for prevention of backward balance loss following repeated-slip training. Setting Biomechanics research laboratory. Participants Healthy young subjects (N=46; 21 males). Intervention Twenty-four subjects experienced a high-intensity session of 24 repeated right-side slips; 12 received additional single-slip sessions at a frequency of 1-week, 2-week, and 1-month, while the rest got no ancillary training. Another 24 subjects received a low-intensity initial session of a single slip; 12 received the same high-frequency ancillary training, while the rest got none. All groups were retested with a single-slip, 4 months after first session. Main Outcome Measures Incidence of backward balance loss, gait stability, and limb support. Results The high-intensity groups irrespective of ancillary training displayed similar improvements in all 3 outcome measures. Remarkably, the low-intensity group receiving ancillary training also significantly improved in all measures, with retention comparable to that observed in the other 2 groups. A single slip exposure without ancillary sessions was insufficient to yield longer-term effect. Conclusions Frequent ancillary sessions may be unnecessary for slip-related fall prevention up to 4 months, if initial session intensity is sufficient. Furthermore, the minimum of a single slip may be as effective, if subject is exposed to frequent ancillary sessions. PMID:19154827

  1. Intensity noise in diode-pumped single-frequency Nd:YAG lasers and its control by electronic feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, Thomas J.

    1990-01-01

    The power spectrum of the relative intensity noise (RIN) of single-frequency diode-pumped Nd:YAG lasers is observed to be shot-noise limited at frequencies above 20 MHz for a photocurrent of up to 4.4 mA. Relaxation oscillations result in noise 60-70 dB above shot noise at a few hundred kHz. These relaxation oscillations have been suppressed using electronic feedback.

  2. Effect of air-sea coupling on the frequency distribution of intense tropical cyclones over the northwestern Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, Tomomichi; Mizuta, Ryo; Adachi, Yukimasa; Murakami, Hiroyuki; Ose, Tomoaki

    2015-12-01

    Effect of air-sea coupling on the frequency distribution of intense tropical cyclones (TCs) over the northwestern Pacific (NWP) region is investigated using an atmosphere and ocean coupled general circulation model (AOGCM). Monthly varying flux adjustment enables AOGCM to simulate both subseasonal air-sea interaction and realistic seasonal to interannual sea surface temperature (SST) variability. The maximum of intense TC distribution around 20-30°N in the AGCM shifts equatorward in the AOGCM due to the air-sea coupling. Hence, AOGCM reduces northward intense TC distribution bias seen in AGCM. Over the NWP, AOGCM-simulated SST variability is large around 20-30°N where the warm mixed layer becomes shallower rapidly. Active entrainment from subsurface water over this region causes stronger SST cooling, and hence, TC intensity decreases. These results suggest that air-sea coupling characterized by subsurface oceanic condition causes more realistic distribution of intense TCs over the NWP.

  3. Photobiomodulation of breast and cervical cancer stem cells using low-intensity laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Kiro, N E; Hamblin, M R; Abrahamse, H

    2017-06-01

    Breast and cervical cancers are dangerous threats with regard to the health of women. The two malignancies have reached the highest record in terms of cancer-related deaths among women worldwide. Despite the use of novel strategies with the aim to treat and cure advanced stages of cancer, post-therapeutic relapse believed to be caused by cancer stem cells is one of the challenges encountered during tumor therapy. Therefore, further attention should be paid to cancer stem cells when developing novel anti-tumor therapeutic approaches. Low-intensity laser irradiation is a form of phototherapy making use of visible light in the wavelength range of 630-905 nm. Low-intensity laser irradiation has shown remarkable results in a wide range of medical applications due to its biphasic dose and wavelength effect at a cellular level. Overall, this article focuses on the cellular responses of healthy and cancer cells after treatment with low-intensity laser irradiation alone or in combination with a photosensitizer as photodynamic therapy and the influence that various wavelengths and fluencies could have on the therapeutic outcome. Attention will be paid to the biomodulative effect of low-intensity laser irradiation on cancer stem cells.

  4. A single-frequency, diode-pumped Nd:YLF laser at 657 nm: a frequency and intensity noise comparison with an extended cavity diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunez Portela, M.; Wetter, N. U.; Zondy, J. J.; Cruz, F. C.

    2013-02-01

    We report on a continuous wave, diode-pumped, intracavity frequency-doubled Nd:YLF (yttrium lithium fluoride) single-frequency ring laser designed for high-resolution spectroscopy of the calcium intercombination transition at 657 nm. We measured its frequency modulation (FM) and amplitude modulation (AM) noise and compared it with an extended cavity diode laser (ECDL). The Nd:YLF laser has much lower FM noise, extending to 50 kHz in comparison with 5 MHz for the ECDL, and slightly higher AM noise, transferred from the pump diode laser. This characterization is important for the design of servo-systems for frequency or intensity stabilization, and also for quantum optics experiments. A Nd:YLF laser at 657 nm can become an attractive high-power ‘local oscillator’ for a calcium optical clock, with a fundamental ‘telecom wavelength’ that can be directly used for remote transfer in optical fibers.

  5. Radio frequency radiation-induced hyperthermia using Si nanoparticle-based sensitizers for mild cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Tamarov, Konstantin P; Osminkina, Liubov A; Zinovyev, Sergey V; Maximova, Ksenia A; Kargina, Julia V; Gongalsky, Maxim B; Ryabchikov, Yury; Al-Kattan, Ahmed; Sviridov, Andrey P; Sentis, Marc; Ivanov, Andrey V; Nikiforov, Vladimir N; Kabashin, Andrei V; Timoshenko, Victor Yu

    2014-11-13

    Offering mild, non-invasive and deep cancer therapy modality, radio frequency (RF) radiation-induced hyperthermia lacks for efficient biodegradable RF sensitizers to selectively target cancer cells and thus avoid side effects. Here, we assess crystalline silicon (Si) based nanomaterials as sensitizers for the RF-induced therapy. Using nanoparticles produced by mechanical grinding of porous silicon and ultraclean laser-ablative synthesis, we report efficient RF-induced heating of aqueous suspensions of the nanoparticles to temperatures above 45-50 °C under relatively low nanoparticle concentrations (<1 mg/mL) and RF radiation intensities (1-5 W/cm(2)). For both types of nanoparticles the heating rate was linearly dependent on nanoparticle concentration, while laser-ablated nanoparticles demonstrated a remarkably higher heating rate than porous silicon-based ones for the whole range of the used concentrations from 0.01 to 0.4 mg/mL. The observed effect is explained by the Joule heating due to the generation of electrical currents at the nanoparticle/water interface. Profiting from the nanoparticle-based hyperthermia, we demonstrate an efficient treatment of Lewis lung carcinoma in vivo. Combined with the possibility of involvement of parallel imaging and treatment channels based on unique optical properties of Si-based nanomaterials, the proposed method promises a new landmark in the development of new modalities for mild cancer therapy.

  6. Radio frequency radiation-induced hyperthermia using Si nanoparticle-based sensitizers for mild cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tamarov, Konstantin P.; Osminkina, Liubov A.; Zinovyev, Sergey V.; Maximova, Ksenia A.; Kargina, Julia V.; Gongalsky, Maxim B.; Ryabchikov, Yury; Al-Kattan, Ahmed; Sviridov, Andrey P.; Sentis, Marc; Ivanov, Andrey V.; Nikiforov, Vladimir N.; Kabashin, Andrei V.; Timoshenko, Victor Yu

    2014-01-01

    Offering mild, non-invasive and deep cancer therapy modality, radio frequency (RF) radiation-induced hyperthermia lacks for efficient biodegradable RF sensitizers to selectively target cancer cells and thus avoid side effects. Here, we assess crystalline silicon (Si) based nanomaterials as sensitizers for the RF-induced therapy. Using nanoparticles produced by mechanical grinding of porous silicon and ultraclean laser-ablative synthesis, we report efficient RF-induced heating of aqueous suspensions of the nanoparticles to temperatures above 45-50°C under relatively low nanoparticle concentrations (<1 mg/mL) and RF radiation intensities (1–5 W/cm2). For both types of nanoparticles the heating rate was linearly dependent on nanoparticle concentration, while laser-ablated nanoparticles demonstrated a remarkably higher heating rate than porous silicon-based ones for the whole range of the used concentrations from 0.01 to 0.4 mg/mL. The observed effect is explained by the Joule heating due to the generation of electrical currents at the nanoparticle/water interface. Profiting from the nanoparticle-based hyperthermia, we demonstrate an efficient treatment of Lewis lung carcinoma in vivo. Combined with the possibility of involvement of parallel imaging and treatment channels based on unique optical properties of Si-based nanomaterials, the proposed method promises a new landmark in the development of new modalities for mild cancer therapy. PMID:25391603

  7. Radio frequency radiation-induced hyperthermia using Si nanoparticle-based sensitizers for mild cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamarov, Konstantin P.; Osminkina, Liubov A.; Zinovyev, Sergey V.; Maximova, Ksenia A.; Kargina, Julia V.; Gongalsky, Maxim B.; Ryabchikov, Yury; Al-Kattan, Ahmed; Sviridov, Andrey P.; Sentis, Marc; Ivanov, Andrey V.; Nikiforov, Vladimir N.; Kabashin, Andrei V.; Timoshenko, Victor Yu

    2014-11-01

    Offering mild, non-invasive and deep cancer therapy modality, radio frequency (RF) radiation-induced hyperthermia lacks for efficient biodegradable RF sensitizers to selectively target cancer cells and thus avoid side effects. Here, we assess crystalline silicon (Si) based nanomaterials as sensitizers for the RF-induced therapy. Using nanoparticles produced by mechanical grinding of porous silicon and ultraclean laser-ablative synthesis, we report efficient RF-induced heating of aqueous suspensions of the nanoparticles to temperatures above 45-50°C under relatively low nanoparticle concentrations (<1 mg/mL) and RF radiation intensities (1-5 W/cm2). For both types of nanoparticles the heating rate was linearly dependent on nanoparticle concentration, while laser-ablated nanoparticles demonstrated a remarkably higher heating rate than porous silicon-based ones for the whole range of the used concentrations from 0.01 to 0.4 mg/mL. The observed effect is explained by the Joule heating due to the generation of electrical currents at the nanoparticle/water interface. Profiting from the nanoparticle-based hyperthermia, we demonstrate an efficient treatment of Lewis lung carcinoma in vivo. Combined with the possibility of involvement of parallel imaging and treatment channels based on unique optical properties of Si-based nanomaterials, the proposed method promises a new landmark in the development of new modalities for mild cancer therapy.

  8. What are the best covariates for developing non-stationary rainfall Intensity-Duration-Frequency relationship?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agilan, V.; Umamahesh, N. V.

    2017-03-01

    Present infrastructure design is primarily based on rainfall Intensity-Duration-Frequency (IDF) curves with so-called stationary assumption. However, in recent years, the extreme precipitation events are increasing due to global climate change and creating non-stationarity in the series. Based on recent theoretical developments in the Extreme Value Theory (EVT), recent studies proposed a methodology for developing non-stationary rainfall IDF curve by incorporating trend in the parameters of the Generalized Extreme Value (GEV) distribution using Time covariate. But, the covariate Time may not be the best covariate and it is important to analyze all possible covariates and find the best covariate to model non-stationarity. In this study, five physical processes, namely, urbanization, local temperature changes, global warming, El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) cycle and Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) are used as covariates. Based on these five covariates and their possible combinations, sixty-two non-stationary GEV models are constructed. In addition, two non-stationary GEV models based on Time covariate and one stationary GEV model are also constructed. The best model for each duration rainfall series is chosen based on the corrected Akaike Information Criterion (AICc). From the findings of this study, it is observed that the local processes (i.e., Urbanization, local temperature changes) are the best covariate for short duration rainfall and global processes (i.e., Global warming, ENSO cycle and IOD) are the best covariate for the long duration rainfall of the Hyderabad city, India. Furthermore, the covariate Time is never qualified as the best covariate. In addition, the identified best covariates are further used to develop non-stationary rainfall IDF curves of the Hyderabad city. The proposed methodology can be applied to other situations to develop the non-stationary IDF curves based on the best covariate.

  9. Interactions of Subglottal Pressure and Neuromuscular Activation on Fundamental Frequency and Intensity

    PubMed Central

    Chhetri, Dinesh K.; Park, Soo Jin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Fundamental frequency (F0) and intensity (SPL) of voice are controlled by intrinsic laryngeal muscle (ILM) activation and subglottal pressure (Psub). Their interactions were investigated.s Methods In an in vivo canine model, the thyroarytenoid (TA), lateral cricoarytenoid/interarytenoid (LCA/IA), and the cricothyroid (CT) muscles were independently activated from threshold to maximal contraction by neuromuscular stimulation in various combinations while airflow was increased to phonation onset pressure and beyond. The resultant acoustic output was analyzed for effects of Psub on vibratory stability, F0 and SPL. Muscle activation plots and vocal range profiles by individual ILM activation states were analyzed. Results CT activation increased phonation onset F0, but vibration was less stable in high CT conditions and displayed vibratory mode change. In addition, in high CT conditions, a decrease in F0 with increased Psub was observed. SPL increased with Psub in all conditions but the slope was greater at high CT, low TA/LCA/IA activations. LCA/IA activation improved vocal efficiency. To maintain same F0 with increasing SPL (messa di voce), TA activation was decreased and LCA/IA activation was increased. The same F0 and SPL could be achieved with a variety of ILM activation combinations. Conclusions CT is primarily required for increasing F0, while TA can increase or decrease F0 and SPL. LCA/IA likely maintains vocal fold adduction during increased Psub and improves vocal efficiency. This study also demonstrates laryngeal motor equivalence, the ability of the larynx to achieve the same target F0 and SPL with multiple combinations of ILM activation. PMID:26971707

  10. Effect of pulse repetition frequency of high-intensity focused ultrasound on in vitro thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenjing; Zhou, Yufeng

    2017-03-01

    Vascular occlusion by the thrombi is the main reason for ischemic stroke and deep vein thrombosis. High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and histotripsy or microtripsy pulses can effectively dissolve the blood clot with no use of thrombolytic agent and ultrasound contrast agent (microbubbles). In this study, HIFU bursts at the same duty cycle (2%) but varied pulse repetition frequency (PRF) from 1Hz to 1000Hz were delivered to in vitro porcine blood clot for 30s. Thrombolysis efficiency initially increases slightly with the PRF, 86.4±10.3%, 89.9±11.9, and 92.9±12.8% at the PRF of 1Hz, 10Hz, and 100Hz, respectively, without significant difference (p>0.05), but then drops dramatically to 37.9±6.9% at the PRF of 1000Hz (p<0.05). The particle size in the supernatant of dissolution is 547.1±129.5nm, which suggests the disruption of thrombi into the subcellular level. Thrombi motion during HIFU exposure shows violent motion and significant curling at the low PRF, rotation about its axis with occasional curling at the moderate PRF, and localized vibration at the high PRF due to the generation of acoustic radiation force and streaming. Quantitative analysis of recorded motion shows the axial displacement decreases with the PRF of delivered HIFU bursts, from 3.9±1.5mm at 1Hz to 0.7±0.4mm at 1000Hz. Bubble cavitation during HIFU exposure to the blood clot was also monitored. The increase of PRF led to the increase of inertial cavitation but the decrease of stable cavitation. In summary, the PRF of delivered HIFU bursts at the same output energy has a significant effect on the thrombi motion, bubble cavitation activities, and subsequently thrombolysis efficiencies.

  11. A Comparative Study of Fibroid Ablation Rates Using Radio Frequency or High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Meng Xin; He Guangbin; Zhang Jun; Han Zenghui; Yu Ming; Zhang Miaomiao; Tang Yu; Fang Ling; Zhou Xiaodong

    2010-08-15

    This study compared the technical success of fibroid devascularization using high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and radio frequency (RF) to provide an experimental basis for the clinical selection of a suitable, minimally invasive method for treating uterine fibroids. Patients were randomly divided into two groups and treated with HIFU or RF accordingly. The two groups of patients were divided again into subgroups A, B, and C based on fibroid diameter and subgroups A', B', and C' based on fibroid blood supply grades. The fibroid diameters in subgroups A, B, and C were 2.0 cm {<=} D < 4.0 cm, 4.0 cm {<=} D<6.0 cm and 6.0 cm {<=} D<8.0 cm, respectively, and fibroid blood supplies were classified into three grades corresponding to subgroups A', B', and C', respectively. The complete ablation rates of the two treatments were compared by contrast-enhanced ultrasound. Both treatments were effective, but the general complete ablation rate of RF was higher than that of HIFU (p < 0.05). The comparison between the two treatments in subgroup A and subgroup A' showed that the complete ablation rate of HIFU was as good as that of RF (p > 0.05). In other subgroups, the complete ablation rates of RF were better than those of HIFU (p < 0.05). No severe complications were observed after these two treatments. RF can be applied for the majority of fibroids. As a noninvasive therapy, HIFU could be the preferred method for the treatment of small, hypovascular fibroids.

  12. Intense, carrier frequency and bandwidth tunable quasi single-cycle pulses from an organic emitter covering the Terahertz frequency gap

    PubMed Central

    Vicario, C.; Monoszlai, B.; Jazbinsek, M.; Lee, S. -H.; Kwon, O. -P.; Hauri, C. P.

    2015-01-01

    In Terahertz (THz) science, one of the long-standing challenges has been the formation of spectrally dense, single-cycle pulses with tunable duration and spectrum across the frequency range of 0.1–15 THz (THz gap). This frequency band, lying between the electronically and optically accessible spectra hosts important molecular fingerprints and collective modes which cannot be fully controlled by present strong-field THz sources. We present a method that provides powerful single-cycle THz pulses in the THz gap with a stable absolute phase whose duration can be continuously selected between 68 fs and 1100 fs. The loss-free and chirp-free technique is based on optical rectification of a wavelength-tunable pump pulse in the organic emitter HMQ-TMS that allows for tuning of the spectral bandwidth from 1 to more than 7 octaves over the entire THz gap. The presented source tunability of the temporal carrier frequency and spectrum expands the scope of spectrally dense THz sources to time-resolved nonlinear THz spectroscopy in the entire THz gap. This opens new opportunities towards ultrafast coherent control over matter and light. PMID:26400005

  13. Intense, carrier frequency and bandwidth tunable quasi single-cycle pulses from an organic emitter covering the Terahertz frequency gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicario, C.; Monoszlai, B.; Jazbinsek, M.; Lee, S.-H.; Kwon, O.-P.; Hauri, C. P.

    2015-09-01

    In Terahertz (THz) science, one of the long-standing challenges has been the formation of spectrally dense, single-cycle pulses with tunable duration and spectrum across the frequency range of 0.1-15 THz (THz gap). This frequency band, lying between the electronically and optically accessible spectra hosts important molecular fingerprints and collective modes which cannot be fully controlled by present strong-field THz sources. We present a method that provides powerful single-cycle THz pulses in the THz gap with a stable absolute phase whose duration can be continuously selected between 68 fs and 1100 fs. The loss-free and chirp-free technique is based on optical rectification of a wavelength-tunable pump pulse in the organic emitter HMQ-TMS that allows for tuning of the spectral bandwidth from 1 to more than 7 octaves over the entire THz gap. The presented source tunability of the temporal carrier frequency and spectrum expands the scope of spectrally dense THz sources to time-resolved nonlinear THz spectroscopy in the entire THz gap. This opens new opportunities towards ultrafast coherent control over matter and light.

  14. Acoustic characterization of multi-element, dual-frequency transducers for high-intensity contact ultrasound therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burtnyk, M.; N'Djin, W. A.; Persaud, L.; Bronskill, M.; Chopra, R.

    2012-10-01

    High-intensity contact ultrasound therapy can generate precise volumes of thermal damage in deep-seated tissue using interstitial or intracavitary devices. Multi-element, dual-frequency transducers offer increased spatial control of the heating pattern by enabling modulation of ultrasound power and frequency along the device. The performance and acoustic coupling between elements of simple, multi-element, dual-frequency transducers was measured. Transducer arrays were fabricated by cutting halfway through a rectangular plate of PZT, creating individual 4 × 5 mm segments with fundamental frequency (4.1 MHz) and third harmonic (13.3 MHz). Coupling between elements was investigated using a scanning laser vibrometer to measure transducer surface displacements at each frequency and different acoustic powers (0, 10, 20 W/cm2). The measured acoustic power was proportional to the input electrical power with no hysteresis and efficiencies >50% at both frequencies. Maximum transducer surface displacements were observed near element centers, reducing to ˜1/3-maximum near edges. The power and frequency of neighboring transducer segments had little impact on an element's output. In the worst case, an element operating at 4.1 MHz and 20 W/cm2 coupled only 1.5 W/cm2 to its immediate neighboring element. Multi-element, dual-frequency transducers were successfully constructed using a simple dicing method. Coupling between elements was minor, therefore the power and frequency of each transducer element could be considered independent.

  15. Extremely low frequency electric fields and cancer: assessing the evidence.

    PubMed

    Kheifets, Leeka; Renew, David; Sias, Glenn; Swanson, John

    2010-02-01

    Much of the research and reviews on extremely low frequency (ELF) electric and magnetic fields (EMFs) have focused on magnetic rather than electric fields. Some have considered such focus to be inappropriate and have argued that electric fields should be part of both epidemiologic and laboratory work. This paper fills the gap by systematically and critically reviewing electric-fields literature and by comparing overall strength of evidence for electric versus magnetic fields. The review of possible mechanisms does not provide any specific basis for focusing on electric fields. While laboratory studies of electric fields are few, they do not indicate that electric fields should be the exposure of interest. The existing epidemiology on residential electric-field exposures and appliance use does not support the conclusion of adverse health effects from electric-field exposure. Workers in close proximity to high-voltage transmission lines or substation equipment can be exposed to high electric fields. While there are sporadic reports of increase in cancer in some occupational studies, these are inconsistent and fraught with methodologic problems. Overall, there seems little basis to suppose there might be a risk for electric fields, and, in contrast to magnetic fields, and with a possible exception of occupational epidemiology, there seems little basis for continued research into electric fields. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Radio frequency electromagnetic fields: cancer, mutagenesis, and genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Heynick, Louis N; Johnston, Sheila A; Mason, Patrick A

    2003-01-01

    We present critiques of epidemiologic studies and experimental investigations, published mostly in peer-reviewed journals, on cancer and related effects from exposure to nonionizing electromagnetic fields in the nominal frequency range of 3 kHz to 300 GHz of interest to Subcommittee 4 (SC4) of the International Committee on Electromagnetic Safety (ICES). The major topics discussed are presented under the headings Epidemiologic and Other Findings on Human Exposure, Mammals Exposed In Vivo, Mammalian Live Tissues and Cell Preparations Exposed In Vitro, and Mutagenesis and Genotoxicity in Microorganisms and Fruit Flies. Under each major topic, we present minireviews of papers on various specific endpoints investigated. The section on Epidemiologic and Other Findings on Human Exposure is divided into two subsections, the first on possible carcinogenic effects of exposure from emitters not in physical contact with the populations studied, for example, transmitting antennas and other devices. Discussed in the second subsection are studies of postulated carcinogenic effects from use of mobile phones, with prominence given to brain tumors from use of cellular and cordless telephones in direct physical contact with an ear of each subject. In both subsections, some investigations yielded positive findings, others had negative findings, including papers directed toward experimentally verifying positive findings, and both were reported in a few instances. Further research on various important aspects may resolve such differences. Overall, however, the preponderance of published epidemiologic and experimental findings do not support the supposition that in vivo or in vitro exposures to such fields are carcinogenic.

  17. Frequency of breast cancer, lung cancer, and tobacco use articles in women's magazines from 1987 to 2003.

    PubMed

    Tobler, Kyle J; Wilson, Philip K; Napolitano, Peter G

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the frequency of articles in women's magazines that address breast cancer, lung cancer, and tobacco use from 1987-2003 and to ascertain whether the annual number of articles reflected corresponding cancer mortality rates from breast cancer and lung cancer and the number of female smokers throughout this time period. We reviewed 13 women's magazines published in the United States from 1987-2003 using the search terms breast cancer, lung cancer, smoking, and tobacco. We reviewed the abstracts or entire articles to determine relevance. A total of 1044 articles addressed breast cancer, lung cancer, or tobacco use: 681 articles related to breast cancer, 47 related to lung cancer, and 316 related to tobacco use. The greater number of breast cancer articles compared to lung cancer articles was statistically significant (P value < .0001). The greater number of breast cancer articles compared to lung cancer articles combined with tobacco use articles was also statistically significant (P = .0012). The annual number breast cancer articles compared to the breast cancer mortality rate demonstrated a negative relationship. The annual number of lung cancer articles compared to the lung cancer mortality rate demonstrated no relationship. The annual number of tobacco use articles compared to the annual number of female smokers demonstrated no relationship. Breast cancer was more frequently represented than lung cancer or tobacco use in women's magazines from 1987-2003 despite the increase in lung cancer mortality, a decrease in breast cancer mortality, and an insignificant change in the number of female smokers.

  18. Positive Prehabilitative Effect of Intense Treadmill Exercise for Ameliorating Cancer Cachexia Symptoms in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Jee, Hyunseok; Chang, Ji-Eun; Yang, Eun Joo

    2016-01-01

    Due to the importance of exercise in prehabilitation, we conducted this study to understand the effects of different exercise intensities on cancer-related cachexia. Forty adult male CDF1 mice were randomly divided into a non-cancer control group (N=10, NC), cancer control group (N=10, CC), cancer with moderate exercise group (N=10, ME, 70% maxHR), and cancer with intense exercise group (N=10, SE, 90% maxHR) for obtaining data such as tissue weight and body weight changes, quality of life (QoL) indicators, and levels of cytokines and a muscle homeostasis regulatory protein. We verified that mouse colonic carcinoma cancer cells metastasized based on our observation that the weight of CC group lungs was almost 87% greater than NC group lungs. Survival rates of SE, NC, ME, and CC groups were 100%, 100%, 80%, and 50%, respectively (p<0.01). Other results such as tissue and body weight changes, QoL indicators, and protein analyses also supported our hypothesis that the SE group had improved survival compared to CC and ME groups (p<0.05 and p<0.01, respectively). Our results suggest that exercise, especially intense exercise, improves QoL and survival rate and prevents muscle atrophy. These data suggest that exercise is an optimal prehabilitation choice to alleviate the negative impacts of cancer cachexia. PMID:27994677

  19. Interannual variability of the frequency and intensity of tropical cyclones striking the California coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez, F. J.; Rueda, A.; Barnard, P.; Mori, N.; Nakajo, S.; Albuquerque, J.

    2016-12-01

    Hurricanes hitting California have a very low ocurrence probability due to typically cool ocean temperature and westward tracks. However, damages associated to these improbable events would be dramatic in Southern California and understanding the oceanographic and atmospheric drivers is of paramount importance for coastal risk management for present and future climates. A statistical analysis of the historical events is very difficult due to the limited resolution of atmospheric and oceanographic forcing data available. In this work, we propose a combination of: (a) climate-based statistical downscaling methods (Espejo et al, 2015); and (b) a synthetic stochastic tropical cyclone (TC) model (Nakajo et al, 2014). To build the statistical downscaling model, Y=f(X), we apply a combination of principal component analysis and the k-means classification algorithm to find representative patterns from large-scale may-to-november averaged monthly anomalies of SST and thermocline depth fields in Tropical Pacific (predictor X) and the associated historical tropical cyclones in Eastern North Pacific basin (predictand Y). As data for the historical occurrence and paths of tropical cyclones are scarce, we apply a stochastic TC model which is based on a Monte Carlo simulation of the joint distribution of track, minimum sea level pressure and translation speed of the historical events in the Eastern Central Pacific Ocean. Results will show the ability of the approach to explain the interannual variability of the frequency and intensity of TCs in Southern California, which is clearly related to post El Niño Eastern Pacific and El Niño Central Pacific. References Espejo, A., Méndez, F.J., Diez, J., Medina, R., Al-Yahyai, S. (2015) Seasonal probabilistic forecasting of tropical cyclone activity in the North Indian Ocean, Journal of Flood Risk Management, DOI: 10.1111/jfr3.12197 Nakajo, S., N. Mori, T. Yasuda, and H. Mase (2014) Global Stochastic Tropical Cyclone Model Based on

  20. Backwash intensity and frequency impact the microbial community structure and function in a fixed-bed biofilm reactor.

    PubMed

    Li, Xu; Yuen, Wangki; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2012-11-01

    Linkages among bioreactor operation and performance and microbial community structure were investigated for a fixed-bed biofilm system designed to remove perchlorate from drinking water. Perchlorate removal was monitored to evaluate reactor performance during and after the frequency and intensity of the backwash procedure were changed, while the microbial community structure was studied using clone libraries and quantitative PCR targeting the 16S rRNA gene. When backwash frequency was increased from once per month to once per day, perchlorate removal initially deteriorated and then recovered, and the relative abundance of perchlorate-reducing bacteria (PRB) initially increased and then decreased. This apparent discrepancy suggested that bacterial populations other than PRB played an indirect role in perchlorate removal, likely by consuming dissolved oxygen, a competing electron acceptor. When backwash intensity was increased, the reactor gradually lost its ability to remove perchlorate, and concurrently the relative abundance of PRB decreased. The results indicated that changes in reactor operation had a profound impact on reactor performance through altering the microbial community structure. Backwashing is an important yet poorly characterized procedure when operating fixed-bed biofilm reactors. Compared to backwash intensity, changes in backwash frequency exerted less disturbance on the microbial community in the current study. If this finding can be confirmed in future work, backwash frequency may serve as the primary parameter when optimizing backwash procedures.

  1. Influence of different breathing frequencies on the severity of inspiratory muscle fatigue induced by high-intensity front crawl swimming.

    PubMed

    Jakovljevic, Djordje G; McConnell, Alison K

    2009-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the influence of 2 different breathing frequencies on the magnitude of inspiratory muscle fatigue after high-intensity front crawl swimming. The influence of different breathing frequencies on postexercise blood lactate ([La]) and heart rate (HR) was also examined. Ten collegiate swimmers performed 2 x 200-m front crawl swims at 90% of race pace with the following breathing frequencies: 1) 1 breath every second stroke (B2), and 2) 1 breath every fourth stroke (B4). Maximal inspiratory pressure (PImax) was measured at the mouth from residual volume before (baseline) and after swimming, in a standing position. The HR and [La] were assessed at rest and immediately at the cessation of swimming. The PImax decreased by 21% after B4 and by 11% after B2 compared with baseline (p < 0.05). The [La] was lower by 15% after B4 than after B2 (p < 0.05). The HR was not significantly different between B2 and B4. These data suggest that there is significant global inspiratory muscle fatigue after high-intensity swimming. Inspiratory muscle fatigue is, however, greater when breathing frequency is reduced during high-intensity front crawl swimming. Respiratory muscle training should be used to improve respiratory muscle strength and endurance in swimmers.

  2. Auditory fatigue caused by exposure to different frequency sounds presented at equivalent intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botte, M. C.; Baruch, C.

    1984-02-01

    The hypothesis that equivalent sounds (dBA) at different frequencies produce the same temporary threshold shifts (TTS) is analyzed in order to justify the utilization of A weighting to measure noise fatigue effects. After recording the audiograms of subjects using frequencies from 125 to 8000 Hz and measuring the absolute thresholds of 1 ear, the fatigue measurements were carried out at 24 hr intervals using 1000 Hz and 1 other frequency. A weak tendency to increase of maximum TTS with average frequency is found. The increase is only 5 dB in 4.5 octaves.

  3. Increased risk of cancer in radon-exposed miners with elevated frequency of chromosomal aberrations.

    PubMed

    Smerhovsky, Zdenek; Landa, Karel; Rössner, Pavel; Juzova, Dagmar; Brabec, Marek; Zudova, Zdena; Hola, Nora; Zarska, Hana; Nevsimalova, Emilie

    2002-02-15

    In spite of the extensive use of cytogenetic analysis of human peripheral blood lymphocytes in the biomonitoring of exposure to various mutagens and carcinogens, the long-term effects of an increased frequency of chromosomal aberrations in individuals are still uncertain. Few epidemiologic studies have addressed this issue, and a moderate risk of cancer in individuals with an elevated frequency of chromosomal aberrations has been observed. In the present study, we analyzed data on 1323 cytogenetic assays and 225 subjects examined because of occupational exposures to radon (range of exposure from 1.7 to 662.3 working level month (WLM)). Seventy-five subjects were non-smokers. We found 36 cases of cancer in this cohort. Chromatid breaks were the most frequently observed type of aberrations (mean frequency 1.2 per 100 cells), which statistically significantly correlated with radon exposure (Spearman's correlation coefficient R=0.22, P<0.001). Also, the frequency of aberrant cells (median of 2.5%) correlated with radon exposure (Spearman's correlation coefficient R=0.16, P<0.02). Smoking and silicosis were not associated with results of cytogenetic analyses. The Cox regression models, which accounted for the age at time of first cytogenetic assay, radon exposure, and smoking showed strong and statistically significant associations between cancer incidence and frequency of chromatid breaks and frequency of aberrant cells, respectively. A 1% increase in the frequency of aberrant cells was paralleled by a 62% increase in risk of cancer (P<0.000). An increase in frequency of chromatid breaks by 1 per 100 cells was followed by a 99% increase in risk of cancer (P<0.000). We obtained similar results when we analyzed the incidence of lung cancer and the incidence other than lung cancer separately. Contrary to frequency of chromatid breaks and frequency of aberrant cells, the frequency of chromatid exchanges, and chromosome-type aberrations were not predictive of cancer.

  4. Using phase retrieval to measure the intensity and phase of ultrashort pulses: Frequency-resolved optical gating

    SciTech Connect

    Trebino, R. ); Kane, D.J. )

    1993-05-01

    The authors recently introduced a new technique, frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG). For directly determining the full intensity I(t) and phase [var phi](t) of a single femtosecond pulse. By using almost any instantaneous nonlinear-optical interaction of two replicas of the ultrashort pulse to be measured, FROG involves measuring the spectrum of the signal pulse as a function of the delay between the replicas. The resulting trace of intensity versus frequency and delay yields an intuitive display of the pulse that is similar to the pulse spectrogram, except that the gate is a function of the pulse to be measured. The problem of inverting the FROG trace to obtain the pulse intensity and phase can also be considered a complex two-dimensional phase-retrieval problem. As a result, the FROG trace yields, in principle, an essentially unique pulse intensity and phase. It is shown that this is also the case in practice. An iterative-Fourier-transform algorithm is presented for inverting the FROG trace. The algorithm is unusual in its use of a novel constraint: the mathematical form of the signal field. Without the use of a support constraint, the algorithm performs quite well in practice, even for pulses with serious phase distortions and for experimental data with noise, although it occasionally stagnates when pulses with large intensity fluctuations are used. 49 refs., 15 figs.

  5. Critically ill patients with cancer: chances and limitations of intensive care medicine—a narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Schellongowski, Peter; Sperr, Wolfgang R; Wohlfarth, Philipp; Knoebl, Paul; Rabitsch, Werner; Watzke, Herbert H; Staudinger, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    This narrative review deals with the challenge of defining adequate therapy goals and intensive care unit (ICU) admission criteria for critically ill patients with cancer. Several specific complications of critically ill patients with cancer require close collaborations of intensive care and cancer specialists. Intensivists require a basic understanding of the pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapy of common cancer-specific problems. Cancer specialists must be knowledgeable in preventing, detecting and treating imminent or manifest organ failures. In case of one or more organ dysfunctions, ICU admissions must be evaluated early. In order to properly define the therapy goals for critically ill patients with cancer, decision-makers must be aware of the short-term intensive care prognosis as well as the long-term oncological options and perspectives. Multidisciplinary teamwork is key when it comes down to decisions on ICU admission, planning of therapeutic aims, patient management in the ICU and tailored therapy limiting with smooth transition into a palliative care (PC) setting, whenever appropriate. PMID:27843637

  6. Power density, field intensity, and carrier frequency determinants of RF-energy-induced calcium-ion efflux from brain tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Joines, W.T.; Blackman, C.F.

    1980-01-01

    To explain a carrier frequency dependence reported for radiofrequency (RF)-induced calcium-ion efflux from brain tissue, a chick-brain hemisphere bathed in buffer solution is modeled as a sphere within the uniform field of the incident electromagnetic wave. Calculations on a spherical model show that the average electric-field intensity within the sample remains the same at different carrier frequencies if the incident power density (Pi) is adjusted by an amount that compensates for the change in complex permittivity (epsilon *r) and the change of wavelength, as a function of carrier frequency. The resulting formula for transforming Pi is seen to follow the pattern of both positive and negative demonstrations of calcium-ion efflux that have been observed at carrier frequencies of 50, 147, and 450 MHz. Indeed, all results obtained at these three frequencies, when related by Pi's that produce the same average electric-field intensity within the sample, are seen to be in agreement; no prediction is contradicted by an experiment.

  7. Outcomes for patients with lung cancer admitted to intensive care units

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Alice Mânica; Gazzana, Marcelo Basso; Silva, Denise Rossato

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate the outcomes for patients with lung cancer admitted to intensive care units and assess their clinical and demographic profiles. Methods Retrospective, analytical, observational study, wherein the outcomes for patients diagnosed with lung cancer admitted to the intensive care unit of university hospital from January 2010 until February 2011 were evaluated. Results Thirty-four patients' medical records were included. Twenty-six (76.5%) patients received some type of ventilatory support, of whom 21 (61.8%) used invasive mechanical ventilation and 11 (32.4%) used noninvasive ventilation at some point during their stay at the intensive care unit. Regarding mortality, 12 (35.3%) patients died during hospitalization at the intensive care unit, totaling 15 (44.1%) deaths during the entire hospitalization period; 19 (55.9%) patients were discharged from the hospital. The analysis of the variables showed that the patients who died had remained on invasive mechanical ventilation for a longer period 5.0 (0.25 to 15.0) days than the survivors (1.0 (0 to 1.0) days) (p=0.033) and underwent dialysis during their stay at the intensive care unit (p=0.014). Conclusions The mortality of patients with lung cancer admitted to the intensive care unit is associated with the time spent on invasive mechanical ventilation and the need for dialysis. PMID:23887754

  8. Radio frequency ablation for primary liver cancer: an evidence-based analysis.

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    The Medical Advisory Secretariat undertook a review of the evidence on the safety, clinical effectiveness, and cost-effectiveness of radio frequency ablation (RFA) compared with other treatments for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in Ontario. Liver cancer is the fifth most common type of cancer globally, although it is most prevalent in Asia and Africa. The incidence of liver cancer has been increasing in the Western world, primarily because of an increased prevalence of hepatitis B and C. Data from Cancer Care Ontario from 1998 to 2002 suggest that the age-adjusted incidence of liver cancer in men rose slightly from 4.5 cases to 5.4 cases per 100,000 men. For women, the rates declined slightly, from 1.8 cases to 1.4 cases per 100,000 women during the same period. Most people who present with symptoms of liver cancer have a progressive form of the disease. The rates of survival in untreated patients in the early stage of the disease range from 50% to 82% at 1 year and 26% to 32% at 2 years. Patients with more advanced stages have survival rates ranging from 0% to 36% at 3 years. Surgical resection and transplantation are the procedures that have the best prognoses; however, only 15% to 20% of patients presenting with liver cancer are eligible for surgery. Resection is associated with a 50% survival rate at 5 years. RADIO FREQUENCY ABLATION RFA is a relatively new technique for the treatment of small liver cancers that cannot be treated with surgery. This technique applies alternating high-frequency electrical currents to the cancerous tissue. The intense heat leads to thermal coagulation that can kill the tumour. RFA is done under general or local anesthesia and can be done percutaneously (through the skin with a small needle), laparoscopically (microinvasively, using a small video camera), or intraoperatively. Percutaneous RFA is usually a day procedure. The leading international organizations for health technology assessments, including the Canadian

  9. Evaluation of range-separated hybrid density functionals for the prediction of vibrational frequencies, infrared intensities, and Raman activities†

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Hoyos, Carlos A.; Janesko, Benjamin G.

    2016-01-01

    We present an assessment of different density functionals, with emphasis on range-separated hybrids, for the prediction of fundamental and harmonic vibrational frequencies, infrared intensities, and Raman activities. Additionally, we discuss the basis set convergence of vibrational properties of H2O with long-range corrected hybrids. Our results show that B3LYP is the best functional for predicting vibrational frequencies (both fundamental and harmonic); the screened-PBE hybrid (HSE) density functional works best for infrared intensities, and the long-range corrected PBE (LC-ωPBE), M06-HF, and M06-L density functionals are almost as good as MP2 for predicting Raman activities. We show the predicted Raman spectrum of adenine as an example of a medium-size molecule where a DFT/Sadlej pVTZ calculation is affordable and compare our results against the experimental spectrum. PMID:18989473

  10. Spatial Intensity Duration Frequency Relationships Using Hierarchical Bayesian Analysis for Urban Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupa, Chandra; Mujumdar, Pradeep

    2016-04-01

    In urban areas, quantification of extreme precipitation is important in the design of storm water drains and other infrastructure. Intensity Duration Frequency (IDF) relationships are generally used to obtain design return level for a given duration and return period. Due to lack of availability of extreme precipitation data for sufficiently large number of years, estimating the probability of extreme events is difficult. Typically, a single station data is used to obtain the design return levels for various durations and return periods, which are used in the design of urban infrastructure for the entire city. In an urban setting, the spatial variation of precipitation can be high; the precipitation amounts and patterns often vary within short distances of less than 5 km. Therefore it is crucial to study the uncertainties in the spatial variation of return levels for various durations. In this work, the extreme precipitation is modeled spatially using the Bayesian hierarchical analysis and the spatial variation of return levels is studied. The analysis is carried out with Block Maxima approach for defining the extreme precipitation, using Generalized Extreme Value (GEV) distribution for Bangalore city, Karnataka state, India. Daily data for nineteen stations in and around Bangalore city is considered in the study. The analysis is carried out for summer maxima (March - May), monsoon maxima (June - September) and the annual maxima rainfall. In the hierarchical analysis, the statistical model is specified in three layers. The data layer models the block maxima, pooling the extreme precipitation from all the stations. In the process layer, the latent spatial process characterized by geographical and climatological covariates (lat-lon, elevation, mean temperature etc.) which drives the extreme precipitation is modeled and in the prior level, the prior distributions that govern the latent process are modeled. Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm (Metropolis Hastings

  11. The mechanism of modulation of geoacoustic emission intensity by weak electromagnetic fields in the audio-frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilov, V. A.

    2016-07-01

    We propose a physical mechanism explaining the mechanism of modulation of the geoacoustic emission intensity by an external electromagnetic field in the audio-frequency range, which was previously revealed as a result of borehole measurements at the Petropavlovsk-Kamchatskii geodynamic testing area. It was established that electric double layers (EDL) at the interface between solid and liquid phases in a fluidsaturated geological medium play a key role in the mechanism proposed.

  12. Influence of intensity and frequency of ultrasonic waves on capillary interaction and oil recovery from different rock types.

    PubMed

    Naderi, Khosrow; Babadagli, Tayfun

    2010-03-01

    Oil saturated cylindrical sandstone cores were placed into imbibition cells where they contacted with an aqueous phase and oil recovery performances were tested with and without ultrasonic radiation keeping all other conditions and parameters constant. Experiments were conducted for different initial water saturation, oil viscosity and wettability. The specifications of acoustic sources such as ultrasonic intensity (45-84W/sqcm) and frequency (22 and 40kHz) were also changed. An increase in recovery was observed with ultrasonic energy in all cases. This change was more remarkable for the oil-wet medium. The additional recovery with ultrasonic energy became lower as the oil viscosity increased. We also designed a setup to measure the ultrasonic energy penetration capacity in different media, namely air, water, and slurry (sand+water mixture). A one-meter long water or slurry filled medium was prepared and the ultrasonic intensity and frequency were monitored as a function of distance from the source. The imbibition cells were placed at certain distances from the sources and the oil recovery was recorded. Then, the imbibition recovery was related to the ultrasonic intensity, frequency, and distance from the ultrasonic source.

  13. Exercise motivation: a cross-sectional analysis examining its relationships with frequency, intensity, and duration of exercise

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background It is important to engage in regular physical activity in order to maintain a healthy lifestyle however a large portion of the population is insufficiently active. Understanding how different types of motivation contribute to exercise behavior is an important first step in identifying ways to increase exercise among individuals. The current study employs self-determination theory as a framework from which to examine how motivation contributes to various characteristics of exercise behavior. Methods Regular exercisers (N = 1079; n = 468 males; n = 612 females) completed inventories which assessed the frequency, intensity, and duration with which they exercise, as well as the Behavioral Regulation in Exercise Questionnaire including four additional items assessing integrated regulation. Results Bivariate correlations revealed that all three behavioral indices (frequency, intensity, and duration of exercise) were more highly correlated with more autonomous than controlling regulations. Regression analyses revealed that integrated and identified regulations predicted exercise frequency for males and females. Integrated regulation was found to be the only predictor of exercise duration across both genders. Finally, introjected regulation predicted exercise intensity for females only. Conclusions These findings suggest that exercise regulations that vary in their degree of internalization can differentially predict characteristics of exercise behavior. Furthermore, in the motivational profile of a regular exerciser, integrated regulation appears to be an important determinant of exercise behavior. These results highlight the importance of assessing integrated regulation in exercise settings where the goal of understanding motivated behavior has important health implications. PMID:20181017

  14. Observations of a free-energy source for intense electrostatic waves. [in upper atmosphere near upper hybrid resonance frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurth, W. S.; Frank, L. A.; Gurnett, D. A.; Burek, B. G.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.

    1980-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in understanding intense electrostatic waves near the upper hybrid resonance frequency in terms of the theory of multiharmonic cyclotron emission using a classical loss-cone distribution function as a model. Recent observations by Hawkeye 1 and GEOS 1 have verified the existence of loss-cone distributions in association with the intense electrostatic wave events, however, other observations by Hawkeye and ISEE have indicated that loss cones are not always observable during the wave events, and in fact other forms of free energy may also be responsible for the instability. Now, for the first time, a positively sloped feature in the perpendicular distribution function has been uniquely identified with intense electrostatic wave activity. Correspondingly, we suggest that the theory is flexible under substantial modifications of the model distribution function.

  15. Observations of a free-energy source for intense electrostatic waves. [in upper atmosphere near upper hybrid resonance frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurth, W. S.; Frank, L. A.; Gurnett, D. A.; Burek, B. G.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.

    1980-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in understanding intense electrostatic waves near the upper hybrid resonance frequency in terms of the theory of multiharmonic cyclotron emission using a classical loss-cone distribution function as a model. Recent observations by Hawkeye 1 and GEOS 1 have verified the existence of loss-cone distributions in association with the intense electrostatic wave events, however, other observations by Hawkeye and ISEE have indicated that loss cones are not always observable during the wave events, and in fact other forms of free energy may also be responsible for the instability. Now, for the first time, a positively sloped feature in the perpendicular distribution function has been uniquely identified with intense electrostatic wave activity. Correspondingly, we suggest that the theory is flexible under substantial modifications of the model distribution function.

  16. Radiation-Induced Cancers From Modern Radiotherapy Techniques: Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Versus Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Myonggeun; Ahn, Sung Hwan; Kim, Jinsung; Shin, Dong Ho; Park, Sung Yong; Lee, Se Byeong; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To assess and compare secondary cancer risk resulting from intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and proton therapy in patients with prostate and head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy and proton therapy in the scattering mode were planned for 5 prostate caner patients and 5 head-and-neck cancer patients. The secondary doses during irradiation were measured using ion chamber and CR-39 detectors for IMRT and proton therapy, respectively. Organ-specific radiation-induced cancer risk was estimated by applying organ equivalent dose to dose distributions. Results: The average secondary doses of proton therapy for prostate cancer patients, measured 20-60cm from the isocenter, ranged from 0.4 mSv/Gy to 0.1 mSv/Gy. The average secondary doses of IMRT for prostate patients, however, ranged between 3 mSv/Gy and 1 mSv/Gy, approximately one order of magnitude higher than for proton therapy. Although the average secondary doses of IMRT were higher than those of proton therapy for head-and-neck cancers, these differences were not significant. Organ equivalent dose calculations showed that, for prostate cancer patients, the risk of secondary cancers in out-of-field organs, such as the stomach, lungs, and thyroid, was at least 5 times higher for IMRT than for proton therapy, whereas the difference was lower for head-and-neck cancer patients. Conclusions: Comparisons of organ-specific organ equivalent dose showed that the estimated secondary cancer risk using scattering mode in proton therapy is either significantly lower than the cases in IMRT treatment or, at least, does not exceed the risk induced by conventional IMRT treatment.

  17. Influence of different frequencies of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on the threshold and pain intensity in young subjects

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Adriana de Oliveira; Silvestre, Ana Caroline; da Silva, Cristina Ferreira; Gomes, Mariany Ribeiro; Bonfleur, Maria Lúcia; Bertolini, Gladson Ricardo Flor

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of different transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation frequencies in nociception front of a pressure pain threshold and cold in healthy individuals. Methods Twenty healthy subjects were divided into four groups, all of which have gone through all forms of electrical stimulation at different weeks. Assessments were pre and post-therapy, 20 and 60 minutes after stimulation. To evaluate the pressure pain threshold, an algometer was used with one tapered tip, pressing the hypothenar region until voluntary report the word “pain”. Cold pain intensity was assessed by immersion in water at 5°C for 30 seconds; at the end, the subject was asked to quantify the pain intensity on a Visual Analog Scale for Pain. For electrical stimulation, two electrodes were used near the elbow, for 20 minutes, with an intensity strong, but not painful. The frequency was in accordance with the group: 0Hz (placebo); 7Hz; 100Hz; and 255Hz. Results Both for the assessment of pressure pain threshold as the cold pain intensity, there was no significant difference (p>0.05). Conclusion We conclude that the use of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on dermatomes C6 to C8 produced no significant change in pressure pain threshold or cold discomfort. PMID:25295453

  18. Fiber optic sensing systems using high frequency resonant sensing heads with intensity sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, Grigory; Maitland, Duncan J., IV

    1988-01-01

    Optical fibers have an inherent capability of transmitting high bandwidth analog and digital signals. To apply this property of fiber optics to remote sensing, special sensing heads as well as signal processing electronics have to be developed. In systems employing intensity modulating sensors, there is also a need for a referencing technique to compensate for changes in the transmission of the connecting fibers and light source intensity. Fiber optic sensing systems incorporated in sensing heads of a special configuration are discussed. Different modes of operation as well as resonant conditions are explained. Theoretical and experimental analyses are also given.

  19. Fiber optic sensing systems using high frequency resonant sensing heads with intensity sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, Grigory; Maitland, Duncan J., IV

    1989-01-01

    Optical fibers have an inherent capability of transmitting high bandwidth analog and digital signals. To apply this property of fiber optics to remote sensing, special sensing heads as well as signal processing electronics have to be developed. In systems employing intensity modulating sensors, there is also a need for a referencing technique to compensate for changes in the transmission of the connecting fibers and light source intensity. Fiber optic sensing systems incorporated in sensing heads of a special configuration are discussed. Different modes of operation as well as resonant conditions are explained. Theoretical and experimental analyses are also given.

  20. Fiber optic sensing systems using high frequency resonant sensing heads with intensity sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, Grigory; Maitland, Duncan J., IV

    1989-01-01

    Optical fibers have an inherent capability of transmitting high bandwidth analog and digital signals. To apply this property of fiber optics to remote sensing, special sensing heads as well as signal processing electronics have to be developed. In systems employing intensity modulating sensors, there is also a need for a referencing technique to compensate for changes in the transmission of the connecting fibers and light source intensity. Fiber optic sensing systems incorporated in sensing heads of a special configuration are discussed. Different modes of operation as well as resonant conditions are explained. Theoretical and experimental analyses are also given.

  1. [Antitumor effect of low-intensity extremely high-frequency electromagnetic radiation on a model of solid Ehrlich carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Gapeev, A B; Shved, D M; Mikhaĭlik, E N; Korystov, Iu N; Levitman, M Kh; Shaposhnikova, V V; Sadovnikov, V B; Alekhin, A I; Goncharov, N G; Chemeris, N K

    2009-01-01

    The influence of different exposure regimes of low-intensity extremely high-frequency electromagnetic radiation on the growth rate of solid Ehrlich carcinoma in mice has been studied. It was shown that, at an optimum repetition factor of exposure (20 min daily for five consecutive days after the tumor inoculation), there is a clearly pronounced frequency dependence of the antitumor effect. The analysis of experimental data indicates that the mechanisms of antitumor effects of the radiation may be related to the modification of the immune status of the organism. The results obtained show that extremely high-frequency electromagnetic radiation at a proper selection of exposure regimes can result in distinct and stable antitumor effects.

  2. Low intensity electromagnetic irradiation with 70.6 and 73 GHz frequencies affects Escherichia coli growth and changes water properties.

    PubMed

    Torgomyan, Heghine; Kalantaryan, Vitaly; Trchounian, Armen

    2011-07-01

    The low intensity electromagnetic irradiation (EMI) of the 70.6 and 73 GHz frequency is resonant for Escherichia coli but not for water. In this study, E. coli irradiation with this EMI during 1 h directly and in bi-distilled water or in the assay buffer with those frequencies resulted with noticeable changes in bacterial growth parameters. Furthermore, after EMI, 2 h rest of bacteria renewed their growth in 1.2-fold, but repeated EMI--had no significant action. Moreover, water absorbance, pH, and electric conductance were changed markedly after such irradiation. The results point out that EMI of the 70.6 and 73 GHz frequency can interact with bacteria affecting growth and in the same time with the surrounding medium (water) as well.

  3. Aichi Cancer Center Initial Experience of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Nasopharyngeal Cancer Using Helical Tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kodaira, Takeshi Tomita, Natsuo; Tachibana, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Nakahara, Rie; Inokuchi, Haruo; Fuwa, Nobukazu

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of helical tomotherapy (HT) for patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Methods and Materials: From June 2006 to June 2007, 20 patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma were treated with HT with (n = 18) or without (n = 2) systemic chemotherapy. The primary tumor and involved lymph node (PTV1) were prescribed 70 Gy and the prophylactic region 54 Gy at D95, respectively. The majority of patients received 2 Gy per fraction for PTV1 in 35 fractions. Parotid function was evaluated using quantitative scintigraphy at pretreatment, and posttreatment at 3 months and 1 year later. Results: The median patient age was 53 years, ranging from 15 to 83. Our cohort included 5, 8, 4, 2, and 1 patients with disease Stages IIB, III, IVA, IVB, and IVC, respectively. Histopathological record revealed two for World Health Organization Type I and 18 for Type 2 or 3. The median duration time for treatment preparation was 9.5 days, and all plans were thought to be acceptable regarding dose constraints of both the planning target volume and organ at risk. All patients completed their treatment procedure of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). All patients achieved clinical remission after IMRT. The majority of patients had Grade 3 or higher toxicity of skin, mucosa, and neutropenia. At the median follow-up of 10.9 months, two patients recurred, and one patient died from cardiac disease. Parotid gland function at 1 year after completion of IMRT was significantly improved compared with that at 3 months. Conclusion: HT was clinically effective in terms of IMRT planning and utility for patients with nasopharyngeal cancer.

  4. [Intensity-modulated radiotherapy in head and neck cancer: ethics and methodology].

    PubMed

    Lapeyre, M; Biau, J; Miroir, J; Servagi-Vernat, S; Giraud, P

    2014-10-01

    Numerous studies have shown that intensity-modulated radiation therapy is the standard technique for the radiation treatment of head and neck cancers. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy reduces side effects (xerostomia, dysphagia, fibrosis, etc.) and improves the results for cancer localizations with highly complex shapes such as the cavum or nasal cavity. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy is also a costly technique that necessitates a numerous staff, highly trained, with regular practice. If this technique cannot be available (understaffing, overwork, etc.) the choice between entrusting the patient to a colleague and treating the patient with a less sophisticated technique such as 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy depends on different objective and ethical criteria.

  5. Association of Physical Activity by Type and Intensity With Digestive System Cancer Risk.

    PubMed

    Keum, NaNa; Bao, Ying; Smith-Warner, Stephanie A; Orav, John; Wu, Kana; Fuchs, Charles S; Giovannucci, Edward L

    2016-09-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that common carcinogenic pathways may underlie digestive system cancers. Physical activity may influence these pathways. Yet, to our knowledge, no previous study has evaluated the role of physical activity in overall digestive system cancer risk. To examine the association between physical activity and digestive system cancer risk, accounting for amount, type (aerobic vs resistance), and intensity of physical activity. A prospective cohort study followed 43 479 men from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study from 1986 to 2012. At enrollment, the eligible participants were 40 years or older, were free of cancer, and reported physical activity. Follow-up rates exceeded 90% in each 2-year cycle. The amount of total physical activity expressed in metabolic equivalent of task (MET)-hours/week. Incident cancer of the digestive system encompassing the digestive tract (mouth, throat, esophagus, stomach, small intestine, and colorectum) and digestive accessory organs (pancreas, gallbladder, and liver). Over 686 924 person-years, we documented 1370 incident digestive system cancers. Higher levels of physical activity were associated with lower digestive system cancer risk (hazard ratio [HR], 0.74 for ≥63.0 vs ≤8.9 MET-hours/week; 95% CI, 0.59-0.93; P value for trend = .003). The inverse association was more evident with digestive tract cancers (HR, 0.66 for ≥63.0 vs ≤8.9 MET-hours/week; 95% CI, 0.51-0.87) than with digestive accessary organ cancers. Aerobic exercise was particularly beneficial against digestive system cancers, with the optimal benefit observed at approximately 30 MET-hours/week (HR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.56-0.83; P value for nonlinearity = .02). Moreover, as long as the same level of MET-hour score was achieved from aerobic exercise, the magnitude of risk reduction was similar regardless of intensity of aerobic exercise. Physical activity, as indicated by MET-hours/week, was inversely associated with the risk of

  6. High-Frequency, Moderate-Intensity Training in Sedentary Middle-Aged Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johannessen, S.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    The effects of a five-day-a-week, moderate-intensity aerobic training program were studied in previously sedentary middle-aged women. After 10 weeks of graduated-length sessions of continuous exercise, the subjects showed a 20 percent improvement in maximal oxygen uptake but no change in body weight or composition. Results are discussed.…

  7. Frequency and severity of low back pain in nurses working in intensive care units and influential factors.

    PubMed

    Ovayolu, Ozlem; Ovayolu, Nimet; Genc, Mehtap; Col-Araz, Nilgun

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine the frequency and severity of low back pain and influencing factors in nurses working in intensive care units. This research was conducted as a cross-sectional study with 114 nurses working in the intensive care units in the province of Gaziantep, Turkey. Study data were collected using a questionnaire form and visual analogue scale. It was found that 84.2% of the nurses experienced low back pain, and 66.7% of the nurses evaluated this pain as "a pain with moderate severity". It was determined that nurses who had not received any education on low back pain, who remained standing for long periods of time, who performed interventions that required bending forward, who lifted and repositioned patients, and who did not use any aiding equipment during interventions, experienced more pain and had higher average pain scores. In addition, average pain scores were higher among nurses with master's and doctorate degrees, and those working in internal medicine and pediatric intensive care units and working in shifts. It was observed that many of the nurses working in intensive care units experienced low back pain, and especially those working in internal medicine and pediatric intensive care units and working in shifts had higher average pain scores.

  8. A Distributed Network for Intensive Longitudinal Monitoring in Metastatic Triple-Negative Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Blau, C Anthony; Ramirez, Arturo B; Blau, Sibel; Pritchard, Colin C; Dorschner, Michael O; Schmechel, Stephen C; Martins, Timothy J; Mahen, Elisabeth M; Burton, Kimberly A; Komashko, Vitalina M; Radenbaugh, Amie J; Dougherty, Katy; Thomas, Anju; Miller, Christopher P; Annis, James; Fromm, Jonathan R; Song, Chaozhong; Chang, Elizabeth; Howard, Kellie; Austin, Sharon; Schmidt, Rodney A; Linenberger, Michael L; Becker, Pamela S; Senecal, Francis M; Mecham, Brigham H; Lee, Su-In; Madan, Anup; Ronen, Roy; Dutkowski, Janusz; Heimfeld, Shelly; Wood, Brent L; Stilwell, Jackie L; Kaldjian, Eric P; Haussler, David; Zhu, Jingchun

    2016-01-01

    Accelerating cancer research is expected to require new types of clinical trials. This report describes the Intensive Trial of OMics in Cancer (ITOMIC) and a participant with triple-negative breast cancer metastatic to bone, who had markedly elevated circulating tumor cells (CTCs) that were monitored 48 times over 9 months. A total of 32 researchers from 14 institutions were engaged in the patient's evaluation; 20 researchers had no prior involvement in patient care and 18 were recruited specifically for this patient. Whole-exome sequencing of 3 bone marrow samples demonstrated a novel ROS1 variant that was estimated to be present in most or all tumor cells. After an initial response to cisplatin, a hypothesis of crizotinib sensitivity was disproven. Leukapheresis followed by partial CTC enrichment allowed for the development of a differential high-throughput drug screen and demonstrated sensitivity to investigational BH3-mimetic inhibitors of BCL-2 that could not be tested in the patient because requests to the pharmaceutical sponsors were denied. The number and size of CTC clusters correlated with clinical status and eventually death. Focusing the expertise of a distributed network of investigators on an intensively monitored patient with cancer can generate high-resolution views of the natural history of cancer and suggest new opportunities for therapy. Optimization requires access to investigational drugs. Copyright © 2016 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

  9. Combined Use of Satellite Timing Information and Rain Gauge Measurements for Enhanced Intensity-Duration-Frequency Curves Estimation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmi, V.; Libertino, A.; Sharma, A.; Claps, P.

    2016-12-01

    We propose a new methodology to overcome the limits of the classical rainfall frequency analysis techniques, based on the assimilation of data from different sources, taking into account the morphoclimatic aspects influencing the genesis of super-events. This method allows one to spatially analyze the local information on super-event hazards by properly accounting for all the available data. To achieve this target, satellite products are used to identify the timing of extreme rainfall and characterize rainfall systems also in areas where ground network is lacking or inefficient.We have developed a framework aimed at combining the local gauge information, discontinuous in space and time and often affected by lack of data, with data from TRMM and GPM satellites and climatic regional information, in order to enhance Intensity-Duration-Frequency curves estimation. This combined approach can complement local information, allowing the simulation of design rainfall extremes in sites where historical evidence of that hazard is lacking. The use of satellite data allows working at the global scale, with a significant positive impact on the flood risk estimation in the poorest regions of the world with lack of in-situ observations.We conduct a preliminary test of the methodology using a comprehensive case study in the North-Westhern Italy. The area is characterized by a complex orography and a significant climatic variability, that have led to the most intense rainfall events that have occurred in Italy. Using a cross-validation framework we can denote a significant improvement in the reliability of the obtained Intensity-Duration-Frequency curves especially for the higher intensities.

  10. Lung cancer stem cells and low-intensity laser irradiation: a potential future therapy?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is notably a significant threat when considering worldwide cancer-related deaths. Despite significant advances in treatment modalities, death rates as a result of cancer relapse remain high. Relapse can occur as a result of metastasis. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been implicated as an important contributory factor in the development of metastasis. CSCs have the same characteristics as normal stem cells; that is, they can proliferate indefinitely and are capable of both self-renewal and differentiating into specialized cells. The molecular and cellular characteristics of stem cells and CSCs are coded for by cell-specific genes, which can be analyzed by using molecular assays setting the standard to work from. Low-intensity laser irradiation (LILI) has been applied in the treatment of numerous diseases and pathological conditions. LILI has been shown to stimulate proliferation of cells, capillary growth, and cellular metabolism as observed by adenosine triphosphate activation. It has been shown, by using different dosing levels of LILI, to either stimulate or inhibit cellular functions. One treatment strategy used on cancer cells is photodynamic therapy (PDT), in which cancer cells are treated with a photosensitizer (PS) in combination with laser irradiation. PSs are non-toxic by themselves but, with light activation, cause reactive oxygen species generation, which causes cancer cell death. Cell-specific PSs are being developed for future cancer treatment. In this review, we look at the potential effects of LILI and PDT on lung CSCs. PMID:24153107

  11. Topographic distribution, frequency, and intensity dependence of stimulus-specific adaptation in the inferior colliculus of the rat.

    PubMed

    Duque, Daniel; Pérez-González, David; Ayala, Yaneri A; Palmer, Alan R; Malmierca, Manuel S

    2012-12-05

    The ability to detect unexpected sounds within the environment is an important function of the auditory system, as a rapid response may be required for the organism to survive. Previous studies found a decreased response to repetitive stimuli (standard), but an increased response to rare or less frequent sounds (deviant) in individual neurons in the inferior colliculus (IC) and at higher levels. This phenomenon, known as stimulus-specific adaptation (SSA) has been suggested to underpin change detection. Currently, it is not known how SSA varies within a single neuron receptive field, i.e., it is unclear whether SSA is a unique property of the neuron or a feature that is frequency and/or intensity dependent. In the present experiments, we used the common SSA index (CSI) to quantify and compare the degree of SSA under different stimulation conditions in the IC of the rat. We calculated the CSI at different intensities and frequencies for each individual IC neuron to map the neuronal CSI within the receptive field. Our data show that high SSA is biased toward the high-frequency and low-intensity regions of the receptive field. We also find that SSA is better represented in the earliest portions of the response, and there is a positive correlation between the width of the frequency response area of the neuron and the maximum level of SSA. The present data suggest that SSA in the IC is not mediated by the intrinsic membrane properties of the neurons and instead might be related to an excitatory and/or inhibitory input segregation.

  12. A case-control study of lifetime light intensity physical activity and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Lindsay C; Janssen, Ian; Richardson, Harriet; Lai, Agnes S; Spinelli, John J; Aronson, Kristan J

    2014-01-01

    Physical activity reduces breast cancer risk, although most evidence is for activity in the moderate-to-vigorous intensity range. The effect of light intensity physical activity (LIPA) is unknown. We aimed to determine the association between self-reported lifetime LIPA and pre- and post-menopausal breast cancer risk. Our secondary objective was to analyze risk stratified by estrogen and progesterone tumor receptor status. Data were from a case-control study of 1,110 incident breast cancer cases (388 pre-menopausal; 722 post-menopausal) and 1,172 controls (442 pre-menopausal; 730 post-menopausal) recruited at two Canadian sites. Lifetime leisure-time, household, and occupational physical activity and covariates were assessed by questionnaire. Mean minutes per day of LIPA for each of the age periods 12-17, 18-34, 35-49, ≥50, and the total lifetime were calculated. Odds ratios were calculated using unconditional logistic regression for overall breast cancer risk and using polytomous logistic regression for estrogen receptor (ER)/progesterone receptor (PR)-defined tumor subtypes and were adjusted for moderate-to-vigorous physical activity and other confounders. LIPA was not associated with breast cancer risk at any age period across the life course: odds ratio (OR) = 0.81; 95 % CI 0.53-1.24 for pre-menopausal women and OR = 0.87; 95 % CI 0.64-1.19 for post-menopausal women in the highest vs. lowest categories of total lifetime LIPA. No heterogeneity in risk by ER/PR tumor status was observed. Our results suggest that light intensity physical activity is not associated with breast cancer risk reduction. This finding is important for physical activity recommendations for breast cancer prevention.

  13. Intense high-frequency gyrotron-based microwave beams for material processing

    SciTech Connect

    Hardek, T.W.; Cooke, W.D.; Katz, J.D.; Perry, W.L.; Rees, D.E.

    1997-03-01

    Microwave processing of materials has traditionally utilized frequencies in the 0.915 and 2.45 GHz regions. Microwave power sources are readily available at these frequencies but the relatively long wavelengths can present challenges in uniformly heating materials. An additional difficulty is the poor coupling of ceramic based materials to the microwave energy. Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists, working in conjunction with the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS), have assembled a high-frequency demonstration processing facility utilizing gyrotron based RF sources. The facility is primarily intended to demonstrate the unique features available at frequencies as high as 84 GHz. The authors can readily provide quasi-optical, 37 GHz beams at continuous wave (CW) power levels in the 10 kW range. They have also provided beams at 84 GHz at 10 kW CW power levels. They are presently preparing a facility to demonstrate the sintering of ceramics at 30 GHz. This paper presents an overview of the present demonstration processing facility and describes some of the features they have available now and will have available in the near future.

  14. Midbrain Frequency Representation following Moderately Intense Neonatal Sound Exposure in a Precocious Animal Model (Chinchilla laniger)

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Auditory brain areas undergo reorganization resulting from abnormal sensory input during early postnatal development. This is evident from studies at the cortical level but it remains unclear whether there is reorganization in the auditory midbrain in a species similar to the human, that is, with early hearing onset. We have explored midbrain plasticity in the chinchilla, a precocious species that matches the human in terms of hearing development. Neonatal chinchillas were chronically exposed to a 2 kHz narrowband sound at 70 dB SPL for 4 weeks. Tonotopic maps in inferior colliculus (central nucleus) were defined based on single neuron characteristic frequency. We hypothesized an overrepresentation of the 2 kHz region of the maps. However, we observed a significant decrease in the proportion of neurons dedicated to the 2 kHz octave band and also away from the exposure frequency at 8 kHz. In addition, we report a significant increase in low frequency representation (<1 kHz), again a change to tonotopic mapping distant to the 2 kHz region. Thus in a precocious species, tonotopic maps in auditory midbrain are altered following abnormal stimulation during development. However, these changes are more complex than the overrepresentation of exposure related frequency regions that are often reported. PMID:27895941

  15. Assessing dietary intake in childhood cancer survivors: Food frequency questionnaire versus 24-hour diet recalls

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cancer diagnosis and treatment may influence dietary intake. The validity of using self-reported methods to quantify dietary intake has not been evaluated in childhood cancer survivors. We validated total energy intake (EI) reported from Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) and repeated 24-hour diet r...

  16. Super-resolution imaging using the spatial-frequency filtered intensity fluctuation correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprigg, Jane; Peng, Tao; Shih, Yanhua

    2016-12-01

    We report an experimental demonstration of a nonclassical imaging mechanism with super-resolving power beyond the Rayleigh limit. When the classical image is completely blurred out due to the use of a small imaging lens, by taking advantage of the intensity fluctuation correlation of thermal light, the demonstrated camera recovered the image of the resolution testing gauge. This method could be adapted to long distance imaging, such as satellite imaging, which requires large diameter camera lenses to achieve high image resolution.

  17. Intense low-frequency chorus waves observed by Van Allen Probes: Fine structures and potential effect on radiation belt electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhonglei; Su, Zhenpeng; Zhu, Hui; Xiao, Fuliang; Zheng, Huinan; Wang, Yuming; Shen, Chao; Wang, Shui

    2016-02-01

    Frequency distribution is a vital factor in determining the contribution of whistler mode chorus to radiation belt electron dynamics. Chorus is usually considered to occur in the frequency range 0.1-0.8fce_eq (with the equatorial electron gyrofrequency fce_eq). We here report an event of intense low-frequency chorus with nearly half of wave power distributed below 0.1fce_eq observed by Van Allen Probe A on 27 August 2014. This emission propagated quasi-parallel to the magnetic field and exhibited hiss-like signatures most of the time. The low-frequency chorus can produce the rapid loss of low-energy (˜0.1 MeV) electrons, different from the normal chorus. For high-energy (≥0.5 MeV) electrons, the low-frequency chorus can yield comparable momentum diffusion to that of the normal chorus but much stronger (up to 2 orders of magnitude) pitch angle diffusion near the loss cone.

  18. Frequency of TERT promoter mutations in human cancers.

    PubMed

    Vinagre, João; Almeida, Ana; Pópulo, Helena; Batista, Rui; Lyra, Joana; Pinto, Vasco; Coelho, Ricardo; Celestino, Ricardo; Prazeres, Hugo; Lima, Luis; Melo, Miguel; da Rocha, Adriana Gaspar; Preto, Ana; Castro, Patrícia; Castro, Ligia; Pardal, Fernando; Lopes, José Manuel; Santos, Lúcio Lara; Reis, Rui Manuel; Cameselle-Teijeiro, José; Sobrinho-Simões, Manuel; Lima, Jorge; Máximo, Valdemar; Soares, Paula

    2013-01-01

    Reactivation of telomerase has been implicated in human tumorigenesis, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we report the presence of recurrent somatic mutations in the TERT promoter in cancers of the central nervous system (43%), bladder (59%), thyroid (follicular cell-derived, 10%) and skin (melanoma, 29%). In thyroid cancers, the presence of TERT promoter mutations (when occurring together with BRAF mutations) is significantly associated with higher TERT mRNA expression, and in glioblastoma we find a trend for increased telomerase expression in cases harbouring TERT promoter mutations. Both in thyroid cancers and glioblastoma, TERT promoter mutations are significantly associated with older age of the patients. Our results show that TERT promoter mutations are relatively frequent in specific types of human cancers, where they lead to enhanced expression of telomerase.

  19. Influence of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment to the pancreatic function in pancreatic cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yulan; Ying, Xiao; Hu, Xiaoye; Zhao, Jing; Fang, Xuefeng; Wu, Minghui; Chen, Tian Zhou; Shen, Hong

    2015-05-01

    Present study was designed to investigate the pancreatic endocrine and exocrine function damage after High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) therapy in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. It was a retrospective analysis of blood glucose and amylase changes in 59 advanced pancreatic cancer patients treated with HIFU from 2010 February to 2014 January. The mean glucose and amylase before HIFU treatment were 6.02mmol/L and 59.17 U/L respectively. After HIFU treatment, it was shown that the mean glucose and amylase levels were 5.66mmol/L and 57.86/L respectively. There was no statistical significance between them. No acute pancreatitis was observed. The endocrine and exocrine function of pancreatic cancer patients was not damaged by HIFU treatment. HIFU treatment for the pancreatic cancer patients seems to be safe.

  20. On the Annual Frequency of Intense Hurricanes in Relation to the Extremes of ENSO and the Interludes Between Them

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    1998-01-01

    On the basis of Trenberth's quantitative definition for marking the occurrence of an El Nino, one can precisely identify some 15 El Nino and 10 La Nina events during the interval of 1950-1997. The statistical aspects of these identified extremes and the intervening periods between them (interludes) are determined. Also, a comparison of the appearances of these extremes and interludes with yearly hurricane seasons shows that of the last 48 hurricane seasons, 20 (42%) are El Nino-related (i.e., an El Nino was in progress during all, or part, of the yearly hurricane season - June-November), 13 (27%) are La Nina-related, and 15 (31%) are interlude - related. Combining the two subgroups of La Nino- and interlude - related seasons into a single grouping called non-El Nino-related seasons, one finds that the non-El Nino-related seasons have a mean annual frequency of intense hurricanes measuring 2.8, while the El Nino-related seasons have a mean annual frequency of intense hurricanes measuring 1.3, and the observed difference in the means is inferred to be statistically important at the 99.8% level of confidence. Therefore, during El Nino-related seasons, fewer intense hurricanes (typically, less than or equal to 2) should be expected, while durin(y non-El Nino-related seasons, more (typically, greater than or equal to 2) should be expected. Implications for the upcoming 1998 and future hurricane seasons are discussed.

  1. 6-kyr record of flood frequency and intensity in the western Mediterranean Alps - Interplay of solar and temperature forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre, Sabatier; Bruno, Wilhelm; Francesco, Ficetola Gentile; Fanny, Moiroux; Jérôme, Poulenard; Anne-Lise, Develle; Adeline, Bichet; Wentao, Chen; Cécile, Pignol; Jean-Louis, Reyss; Ludovic, Gielly; Manon, Bajard; Yves, Perrette; Emmanuel, Malet; Pierre, Taberlet; Fabien, Arnaud

    2017-08-01

    The high-resolution sedimentological and geochemical analysis of a sediment sequence from Lake Savine (Western Mediterranean Alps, France) led to the identification of 220 event layers for the last 6000 years. 200 were triggered by flood events and 20 by underwater mass movements possibly related to earthquakes that occurred in 5 clusters of increase seismicity. Because human activity could influence the flood chronicle, the presence of pastures was reconstructed through ancient DNA, which suggested that the flood chronicle was mainly driven by hydroclimate variability. Weather reanalysis of historical floods allow to identify that mesoscale precipitation events called ;East Return; events were the main triggers of floods recorded in Lake Savine. The first part of this palaeoflood record (6-4 kyr BP) was characterized by increases in flood frequency and intensity in phase with Northern Alpine palaeoflood records. By contrast, the second part of the record (i.e., since 4 kyr BP) was phased with Southern Alpine palaeoflood records. These results suggest a palaeohydrological transition at approximately 4 kyr BP, as has been previously described for the Mediterranean region. This may have resulted in a change of flood-prone hydro-meteorological processes, i.e., in the balance between occurrence and intensity of local convective climatic phenomena and their influence on Mediterranean mesoscale precipitation events in this part of the Alps. At a centennial timescale, increases in flood frequency and intensity corresponded to periods of solar minima, affecting climate through atmospheric changes in the Euro-Atlantic sector.

  2. On the Annual Frequency of Intense Hurricanes in Relation to the Extremes of ENSO and the Interludes Between Them

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    1998-01-01

    On the basis of Trenberth's quantitative definition for marking the occurrence of an El Nino, one can precisely identify some 15 El Nino and 10 La Nina events during the interval of 1950-1997. The statistical aspects of these identified extremes and the intervening periods between them (interludes) are determined. Also, a comparison of the appearances of these extremes and interludes with yearly hurricane seasons shows that of the last 48 hurricane seasons, 20 (42%) are El Nino-related (i.e., an El Nino was in progress during all, or part, of the yearly hurricane season - June-November), 13 (27%) are La Nina-related, and 15 (31%) are interlude - related. Combining the two subgroups of La Nino- and interlude - related seasons into a single grouping called non-El Nino-related seasons, one finds that the non-El Nino-related seasons have a mean annual frequency of intense hurricanes measuring 2.8, while the El Nino-related seasons have a mean annual frequency of intense hurricanes measuring 1.3, and the observed difference in the means is inferred to be statistically important at the 99.8% level of confidence. Therefore, during El Nino-related seasons, fewer intense hurricanes (typically, less than or equal to 2) should be expected, while durin(y non-El Nino-related seasons, more (typically, greater than or equal to 2) should be expected. Implications for the upcoming 1998 and future hurricane seasons are discussed.

  3. Symptom Frequency, Intensity, and Distress in Patients with Lower Limb Lymphedema

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Mary S.; Ridner, Sheila H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with lower limb lymphedema experience symptoms of pain, swelling, tightness, and heaviness in their legs. Less is known of the intensity and distress associated with these symptoms. This study sought to identify and compare the symptoms and the level of intensity and distress associated with symptoms by type of lymphatic disruption. Methods and Results: A cross-sectional design was used. Patients completed an online survey that included: a demographic form, the Lymphedema Symptom Intensity and Distress Survey-Leg, and an open-ended question. The most prevalent symptoms were swelling, concerns about looks, heaviness, tightness, fatigue, and reduced physical activity. Statistically significant differences were found among groups in coldness in legs (χ2 (df=3) = 9.0, p = 0.03), lack of confidence in self (χ2 (df=3) = 10.6, p = 0.014), and feeling less sexually attractive (χ2 (df=6) = 12.6, p = 0.049). Group differences were also observed in the intensity of heaviness (χ2 (df=3) = 9.11, p = 0.03), numbness, (χ2 (df=3) = 10.66, p = 0.014), achiness (χ2 (df=3) = 12.40, p = 0.006), skin flakiness (χ2 (df=3) = 13.22, p = 0.004), and lack of interest in sex (χ2 (df=3) = 8.95, p = 0.030). Statistically significant group differences were not found in distress related to symptoms. Conclusions: Despite the number of symptoms reported by patients with lower-limb lymphedema, only a few statistically significant differences in symptoms and level of intensity were observed by type of lymphatic disruption. No statistically significant group differences were found in the distress level associated with any of the symptoms. PMID:26824629

  4. Proactive nurse management guidelines for managing intensive chemotherapy regimens in patients with advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Baker, J; Ajani, J A

    2008-07-01

    Patients with advanced gastric cancer have a poor prognosis. Intensive chemotherapy regimens may be effective for the treatment of this disease but may be associated with a significant number of severe adverse events. Optimal management of these adverse events can improve outcome for the patient. Currently, there is little information in the literature about the nursing management of this particular group of patients. This American study involved the nursing management of all patients with gastric or gastroesophageal cancer enrolled in clinical trials at a single center. Patients had close contact with research nurses and received education about adverse events and how to deal with them. Patients completed a detailed treatment diary for each cycle of treatment. Protocols were established for the management of emergent adverse events. The guidelines developed during this study could help to underpin the role of the specialist oncology nurse and improve the management of patients undergoing intensive chemotherapy for gastric and gastroesophageal cancer, with the potential of improving outcome, or at least quality of life, for the patients. The nurses' role should be pivotal in the management of intensive chemotherapy for gastric and gastroesophageal cancer.

  5. Pain Intensity and Pain Interference in patients with lung cancer: A pilot study of Biopsychosocial Predictors

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Jo Ann; Higgins, Melinda K.; Miller, Andrew H.; Keefe, Francis J.; Khuri, Fadlo R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore biopsychosocial factors (beliefs, depression, catastrophizing cytokines) in individuals newly diagnosed with lung cancer and no pain in order to determine their relationship at diagnosis and across time and to determine whether these factors contribute to pain intensity or pain interference with function at pain onset. Methods A longitudinal, exploratory, pilot study was implemented in a private medical center and a VA medical center in the southeast. Twelve subjects not experiencing pain related to cancer of the lung or its treatment were recruited. A Karnofsky status of 40% and Hemoglobin of 8 grams were required. Five questionnaires were completed and 10 cc of blood was drawn at Baseline; 4 questionnaires and blood draws were repeated monthly for 5 months. One Baseline questionnaire and a pain assessment were added at Final. Demographic, clinical and questionnaire data were summarized; standardized scale scores were calculated. Results Biopsychosocial scores that were low at Baseline increased from T1-T4 but decreased slightly T5-T6. Individuals with higher pain intensity and higher pain interference at Final had higher psychosocial scores at Baseline than individuals with lower pain intensity and lower pain interference at Final. Conclusions Unrelated to disease stage, metastasis or treatment, unique, levels of biopsychosocial factors are observed in patients newly diagnosed with lung cancer who report higher levels of Pain Intensity and higher levels of Pain Interference at the time pain occurs. Replication studies are needed to validate this response pattern and determine the value of repeated individual assessments. PMID:24064756

  6. Micronuclei frequency in peripheral blood lymphocytes of cancer patients: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Iarmarcovai, G; Ceppi, M; Botta, A; Orsière, T; Bonassi, S

    2008-01-01

    Micronuclei (MN) frequency is a biomarker of chromosomal damage, genome instability, and cancer risk that integrates acquired mutations and genetic susceptibility. To evaluate and summarize the evidence reporting association between cancer and MN formation, we performed a meta-analysis assessing the frequency of this biomarker in cancer patients. Findings from 37 publications were retrieved through an extensive search of the MedLine/PubMed database. Given the heterogeneity of the study design, all studies were re-classified into three groups: (i) baseline MN frequency of untreated cancer patients (25 studies), (ii) induced MN frequency in thyroid cancer patients undergoing radioiodine treatment (9 studies), and (iii) radiosensitivity of lymphocytes (12 studies) in untreated cancer patients. A meta-estimate of the frequency ratio (meta-FR) was computed in each group. A significant increase of MN frequency was found in untreated cancer patients (meta-FR=1.45; 95% Confidence Interval (95% CI): 1.28-1.64) and in thyroid cancer patients after radioiodine treatment (meta-FR=2.26; 95% CI: 1.90-2.68). The third meta-analysis showed a negative trend of meta-FR's when plotted vs. the dose used to study patients' radiosensitivity, possibly associated to a high rate of apoptosis. The results of this review substantiate the existing evidence about a role of MN in various steps of carcinogenesis. The relatively small numbers of papers suitable for the meta-analysis call for new and larger studies, possibly based on high-throughput techniques, to further understand the role of MN formation in the occurrence of genetic instability and cancer.

  7. Chronic effects of low-frequency low-intensity electrical stimulation of stretched human muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenkman, Boris S.; Lyubaeva, Ekaterina V.; Popov, Daniil V.; Netreba, Aleksey I.; Bravy, Yan R.; Tarakin, Pavel P.; Lemesheva, Yulia S.; Vinogradova, Olga L.

    2007-02-01

    Effects of low-frequency electrical stimulation, which is currently considered to be a possible countermeasure for long-duration spaceflights, with and without stretch were evaluated. Twelve young male volunteers were randomly distributed into two groups. In one group anterior thigh muscles—knee extensors of both legs were stimulated with frequency of 15 Hz for 4.5 wks, six times a week; each session was 6-h long. In the other group, electrical stimulation with the same parameters was applied to stretched knee extensors. Following stimulation the subjects exhibited an increase in fatigue resistance, and in the succinate dehydrogenase activity and a 10% gain in the percentage of muscle fibers with slow myosin heavy chain isoforms. In a stimulated group the peak voluntary strength went down significantly, the CSA of fast muscle fibers in m. quadriceps femoris became slightly less in size (10%). Electrical stimulation of the stretched muscles induced an insignificant decline in their strength and an increase of cross-sectional area of muscle fibers of both types. Thus chronic low-frequency electrical stimulation may be proposed as a candidate countermeasure against muscle strength and mass loss if it is combined with stretch.

  8. Identification of trends in intensity and frequency of extreme rainfall events in part of the Indian Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, Alok; Ziegler, Alan D.; Wasson, Robert J.; Chow, Winston; Sharma, Mukat L.

    2017-04-01

    Extreme monsoon rainfall is the primary reason of floods and other secondary hazards such as landslides in the Indian Himalaya. Understanding the phenomena of extreme monsoon rainfall is therefore required to study the natural hazards. In this work, we study the characteristics of extreme monsoon rainfall including its intensity and frequency in the Garhwal Himalaya in India, with a focus on the Mandakini River Catchment, the site of devastating flood and multiple large landslides in 2013. We have used two long term rainfall gridded data sets: the Asian Precipitation Highly Resolved Observational Data Integration Towards Evaluation of Water Resources (APHRODITE) product with daily rainfall data from 1951-2007 and the India Meteorological Department (IMD) product with daily rainfall data from 1901 to 2013. Two methods of Mann Kendall and Sen Slope estimator are used to identify the statistical significance and magnitude of trends in intensity and frequency of extreme monsoon rainfall respectively, at a significance level of 0.05. The autocorrelation in the time series of extreme monsoon rainfall is identified and reduced using the methods of: pre-whitening, trend-free pre-whitening, variance correction, and block bootstrap. We define extreme monsoon rainfall threshold as the 99th percentile of time series of rainfall values and any rainfall depth greater than 99th percentile is considered as extreme in nature. With the IMD data set, significant increasing trend in intensity and frequency of extreme rainfall with slope magnitude of 0.55 and 0.02 respectively was obtained in the north of the Mandakini Catchment as identified by all four methods. Significant increasing trend in intensity with a slope magnitude of 0.3 is found in the middle of the catchment as identified by all methods except block bootstrap. In the south of the catchment, significant increasing trend in intensity with a slope magnitude of 0.86 for pre-whitening method and 0.28 for trend-free pre

  9. Super-resolution imaging using the spatial-frequency filtered intensity fluctuation correlation

    PubMed Central

    Sprigg, Jane; Peng, Tao; Shih, Yanhua

    2016-01-01

    We report an experimental demonstration of a nonclassical imaging mechanism with super-resolving power beyond the Rayleigh limit. When the classical image is completely blurred out due to the use of a small imaging lens, by taking advantage of the intensity fluctuation correlation of thermal light, the demonstrated camera recovered the image of the resolution testing gauge. This method could be adapted to long distance imaging, such as satellite imaging, which requires large diameter camera lenses to achieve high image resolution. PMID:27905498

  10. Associations between psychosocial functioning and smiling intensity in patients with head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Juhun; Teo, Irene; Guindani, Michele; Reece, Gregory P; Markey, Mia K; Fingeret, Michelle Cororve

    2015-01-01

    Increasing attention is being given to developing quantitative measures of facial expression. This study used quantitative facial expression analysis to examine associations between smiling intensity and psychosocial functioning in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC). Smiling intensity of 95 HNC patients was measured using 48 quantitative measures calculated from facial photographs with and without a smile. We computed a composite smiling intensity score for each patient representing the degree of similarity to healthy controls. A lower composite score indicates that the person is less expressive, on average, than healthy controls. Patients also completed self-report measures assessing domains of body image and quality of life (QOL). Spearman rank correlations were computed to examine relationships between composite scores and psychosocial functioning. Composite scores were significantly correlated with multiple measures of body image and QOL. Specifically, decreased smiling intensity was associated with feelings of dissatisfaction with one's body, perceived negative social impact of body image, increased use of avoidance as a body image-coping strategy, reduced functional well-being, and greater head and neck cancer-specific issues. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate associations between an objectively quantified facial expression (i.e. smiling) and psychosocial functioning. Most previous studies have measured facial expression qualitatively. These findings indicate that smiling intensity may serve as an important clinical indicator of psychosocial well-being and warrants further clinical investigation.

  11. Targeted treatment of cancer with radiofrequency electromagnetic fields amplitude-modulated at tumor-specific frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Jacquelyn W.; Jimenez, Hugo; Pennison, Michael J.; Brezovich, Ivan; Morgan, Desiree; Mudry, Albert; Costa, Frederico P.; Barbault, Alexandre; Pasche, Boris

    2013-01-01

    In the past century, there have been many attempts to treat cancer with low levels of electric and magnetic fields. We have developed noninvasive biofeedback examination devices and techniques and discovered that patients with the same tumor type exhibit biofeedback responses to the same, precise frequencies. Intrabuccal administration of 27.12 MHz radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields (EMF), which are amplitude-modulated at tumor-specific frequencies, results in long-term objective responses in patients with cancer and is not associated with any significant adverse effects. Intrabuccal administration allows for therapeutic delivery of very low and safe levels of EMF throughout the body as exemplified by responses observed in the femur, liver, adrenal glands, and lungs. In vitro studies have demonstrated that tumor-specific frequencies identified in patients with various forms of cancer are capable of blocking the growth of tumor cells in a tissue- and tumor-specific fashion. Current experimental evidence suggests that tumor-specific modulation frequencies regulate the expression of genes involved in migration and invasion and disrupt the mitotic spindle. This novel targeted treatment approach is emerging as an appealing therapeutic option for patients with advanced cancer given its excellent tolerability. Dissection of the molecular mechanisms accounting for the anti-cancer effects of tumor-specific modulation frequencies is likely to lead to the discovery of novel pathways in cancer. PMID:24206915

  12. Targeted treatment of cancer with radiofrequency electromagnetic fields amplitude-modulated at tumor-specific frequencies.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Jacquelyn W; Jimenez, Hugo; Pennison, Michael J; Brezovich, Ivan; Morgan, Desiree; Mudry, Albert; Costa, Frederico P; Barbault, Alexandre; Pasche, Boris

    2013-11-01

    In the past century, there have been many attempts to treat cancer with low levels of electric and magnetic fields. We have developed noninvasive biofeedback examination devices and techniques and discovered that patients with the same tumor type exhibit biofeedback responses to the same, precise frequencies. Intrabuccal administration of 27.12 MHz radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields (EMF), which are amplitude-modulated at tumor-specific frequencies, results in long-term objective responses in patients with cancer and is not associated with any significant adverse effects. Intrabuccal administration allows for therapeutic delivery of very low and safe levels of EMF throughout the body as exemplified by responses observed in the femur, liver, adrenal glands, and lungs. In vitro studies have demonstrated that tumor-specific frequencies identified in patients with various forms of cancer are capable of blocking the growth of tumor cells in a tissue- and tumor-specific fashion. Current experimental evidence suggests that tumor-specific modulation frequencies regulate the expression of genes involved in migration and invasion and disrupt the mitotic spindle. This novel targeted treatment approach is emerging as an appealing therapeutic option for patients with advanced cancer given its excellent tolerability. Dissection of the molecular mechanisms accounting for the anti-cancer effects of tumor-specific modulation frequencies is likely to lead to the discovery of novel pathways in cancer.

  13. Time Evolution of low-Frequency Periodicities in Cosmic ray Intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudela, K.; Rybák, J.; Antalová, A.; Storini, M.

    2002-01-01

    The long-time series of daily means of cosmic-ray intensity observed by four neutron monitors at different cutoff rigidities (Calgary, Climax, Lomnický Štít and Huancayo/Haleakala) were analyzed by means of the wavelet transform method in the period range ~60 to ~1000 days. The contributions of the time evolution of three quasi-periodic cosmic-ray signals (~150 d, ~1.3 yr and ~1.7 yr) to the global one are obtained. While the ~1.7-yr quasi-periodicity, the most remarkable one in the studied interval, strongly contributes to the cosmic ray intensity profile of solar cycle 21 (particularly in 1982), the ~1.3-yr one, which is better correlated with the same periodicity of the interplanetary magnetic field strength, is present as a characteristic feature for the decreasing phases of the cycles 20 and 22. Transitions between these quasi-periodicities are seen in the wavelet power spectra plots. Obtained results support the claimed difference in the solar activity evolution during odd and even solar activity cycles.

  14. Phase and intensity characterization of femtosecond pulses from a chirped-pulse amplifier by frequency-resolved optical gating

    SciTech Connect

    Kohler, B.; Yakovlev, V.V.; Wilson, K.R.; Squier, J.; DeLong, K.W.; Trebino, R.

    1995-03-01

    Frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG) measurements were made to characterize pulses from a Ti:sapphire chirped-pulse amplified laser system. By characterizing both the pulse intensity and the phase, the FROG data provided the first direct observation to our knowledge of residual phase distortion in a chirped-pulse amplifier. The FROG technique was also used to measure the regenerative amplifier dispersion and to characterize an amplitude-shaped pulse. The data provide an experimental demonstration of the value of FROG for characterizing complex pulses, including tailored femtosecond pulses for quantum control.

  15. Representative electromagnetic field intensities near the Clam Lake, Wisconsin and Republic, Michigan ELF (Extremely Low Frequency) facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1984-01-01

    Extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields produced by ELF antennas and commercial power lines at Clam Lake, WI, and by commercial power lines at Republic, MI, have been measured at residences, businesses and forest recreational areas for the continuing assessment of the Navy's ELF Communications Program. The ELF fields from existing antennas at Clam Lake, and from power lines in both states are low. Introducing ELF antenna fields at Republic, MI in several years will not significantly change the electromagnetic environment there. The existing field intensities are interpreted and compared with independent expert, judgment, professional standards-setting and judicial and administrative law opinions regarding safe exposure of the public to ELF electromagnetic fields.

  16. A comparison of intense electrostatic waves near f-UHR with linear instability theory. [upper hybrid resonance frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurth, W. S.; Frank, L. A.; Gurnett, D. A.; Burek, B. J.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Kennel, C. F.; Sentman, D. D.

    1979-01-01

    Intense electrostatic waves near the upper hybrid resonance frequency (f-UHR) have recently been detected near but beyond the plasmapause between + or -50 deg magnetic latitude at all local times. The paper shows that the electrostatic waves observed with the ISEE 1 plasma wave receiver near f-UHR are in qualitative agreement with linear theory of multicyclotron harmonic emissions. The peak amplitudes and bandwidths observed are similar to those calculated for maximum spatial growth rates. Measurements on Hawkeye of similar waves suggest that the electric field polarization is also consistent with theory. For a wide range of plasma parameters, nonconvective instability or large spatial growth rates occur within the cyclotron band encompassing the cold upper hybrid frequency.

  17. How Active is Active Surveillance? Intensity of Followup during Active Surveillance for Prostate Cancer in the United States.

    PubMed

    Loeb, Stacy; Walter, Dawn; Curnyn, Caitlin; Gold, Heather T; Lepor, Herbert; Makarov, Danil V

    2016-09-01

    While major prostate cancer active surveillance programs recommend repeat testing such as prostate specific antigen and prostate biopsy, to our knowledge compliance with such testing is unknown. We determined whether men in the community receive the same intensity of active surveillance testing as in prospective active surveillance protocols. We performed a retrospective cohort study of men 66 years old or older in the SEER (Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results)-Medicare database. These men were diagnosed with prostate cancer from 2001 to 2009, did not receive curative therapy in the year after diagnosis and underwent 1 or more post-diagnosis prostate biopsies. We used multivariable adjusted Poisson regression to determine the association of the frequency of active surveillance testing with patient demographics and clinical features. In 1,349 men with 5 years of followup we determined the proportion who underwent testing as intense as that recommended by the Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and PRIAS (Prostate Cancer Research International Active Surveillance) programs, including 14 or more PSA tests and 2 or more biopsies, and The Johns Hopkins program, including 10 or more prostate specific antigen tests and 4 or more biopsies. Among 5,192 patients undergoing active surveillance greater than 80% had 1 or more prostate specific antigen tests per year but fewer than 13% underwent biopsy beyond the first 2 years. Magnetic resonance imaging was rarely done during the study period. On multivariable analysis recent diagnosis and higher income were associated with a higher frequency of surveillance biopsy while older age and greater comorbidity were associated with fewer biopsies. African American men underwent fewer prostate specific antigen tests but a similar number of biopsies. During 5 years of active surveillance only 11.1% and 5.0% of patients met the testing standards of the Sunnybrook/PRIAS and The Johns Hopkins programs, respectively. In the

  18. Infrared frequencies and intensities for astrophysically important polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon cations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szczepanski, Jan; Vala, Martin

    1993-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been implicated as the carriers of the 'unidentified infrared' (UIR) emission bands observed from the interstellar medium. It has long been thought that these molecules, if present, probably exist as cations. In this paper we present infrared spectra of the cations of five moderate-sized PAHs. The PAH cations have been produced by low-energy electron impact and then trapped and stabilized in argon matrices at 12 K. To date, results have been obtained on naphthalene, anthracene, pyrene, perylene, and coronene. A common feature of the infrared spectra of all these cations is the very different intensity pattern of the ions compared to the neutral parents. Visible and (partial) infrared spectra of the coronene cation are also presented. It is shown that the out-of-plane CH bending mode shifts to a position very close to the UIR band at 11.3 microns. The astrophysical impact of these observations is discussed.

  19. Infrared frequencies and intensities for astrophysically important polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon cations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szczepanski, Jan; Vala, Martin

    1993-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been implicated as the carriers of the 'unidentified infrared' (UIR) emission bands observed from the interstellar medium. It has long been thought that these molecules, if present, probably exist as cations. In this paper we present infrared spectra of the cations of five moderate-sized PAHs. The PAH cations have been produced by low-energy electron impact and then trapped and stabilized in argon matrices at 12 K. To date, results have been obtained on naphthalene, anthracene, pyrene, perylene, and coronene. A common feature of the infrared spectra of all these cations is the very different intensity pattern of the ions compared to the neutral parents. Visible and (partial) infrared spectra of the coronene cation are also presented. It is shown that the out-of-plane CH bending mode shifts to a position very close to the UIR band at 11.3 microns. The astrophysical impact of these observations is discussed.

  20. Assessing Dietary Intake in Childhood Cancer Survivors: Food Frequency Questionnaire Versus 24-Hour Diet Recalls.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang Fang; Roberts, Susan B; Must, Aviva; Wong, William W; Gilhooly, Cheryl H; Kelly, Michael J; Parsons, Susan K; Saltzman, Edward

    2015-10-01

    Cancer diagnosis and treatment may influence dietary intake. The validity of using self-reported methods to quantify dietary intake has not been evaluated in childhood cancer survivors. We validated total energy intake (EI) reported from Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) and repeated 24-hour diet recalls (24HRs) against total energy expenditure (TEE) measured using the doubly labeled water method in 16 childhood cancer survivors. Dietary underreporting, assessed by (EI-TEE)/TEE × 100%, was 22% for FFQ and 1% for repeated 24HRs. FFQ significantly underestimates dietary intake and should not be used to assess the absolute intake of foods and nutrients in childhood cancer survivors.

  1. Generation of very flat optical frequency combs from continuous-wave lasers using cascaded intensity and phase modulators driven by tailored radio frequency waveforms.

    PubMed

    Wu, Rui; Supradeepa, V R; Long, Christopher M; Leaird, Daniel E; Weiner, Andrew M

    2010-10-01

    We demonstrate a scheme based on a cascade of lithium niobate intensity and phase modulators driven by specially tailored RF waveforms to generate an optical frequency comb with very high spectral flatness. In this Letter, we demonstrate a 10 GHz comb with 38 comb lines within a spectral power variation below 1 dB. The number of comb lines that can be generated is limited by the power handling capability of the phase modulator, and this can be scaled without compromising the spectral flatness. Furthermore, the spectral phase of the generated combs in our scheme is almost purely quadratic, which, as we will demonstrate, allows for high-quality pulse compression using only single-mode fiber.

  2. Backreflection diagnostics for ultra-intense laser plasma experiments based on frequency resolved optical gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, F.; Hornung, J.; Schmidt, C.; Eckhardt, M.; Roth, M.; Stöhlker, T.; Bagnoud, V.

    2017-02-01

    We report on the development and implementation of a time resolved backscatter diagnostics for high power laser plasma experiments at the petawatt-class laser facility PHELIX. Pulses that are backscattered or reflected from overcritical plasmas are characterized spectrally and temporally resolved using a specially designed second harmonic generation frequency resolved optical gating system. The diagnostics meets the requirements made by typical experiments, i.e., a spectral bandwidth of more than 30 nm with sub-nanometer resolution and a temporal window of 10 ps with 50 fs temporal resolution. The diagnostics is permanently installed at the PHELIX target area and can be used to study effects such as laser-hole boring or relativistic self-phase-modulation which are important features of laser-driven particle acceleration experiments.

  3. [Pain Intensity and Time to Death of Cancer Patients Referred to Palliative Care].

    PubMed

    Barata, Pedro; Santos, Filipa; Mesquita, Graça; Cardoso, Alice; Custódio, Maria Paula; Alves, Marta; Papoila, Ana Luísa; Barbosa, António; Lawlor, Peter

    2016-11-01

    Pain is a common symptom experienced by cancer patients, especially in those with advanced disease. Our aim was to describe pain intensity in advanced cancer patients, referred to the palliative care unit, the factors underlying moderate to severe pain and its prognostic values. This was a prospective observational study. All patients with mestastatic solid tumors and with no specific oncologic treatment were included. Pain intensity was accessed using the pain scale from Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale, rated from 0 to 10 on a numerical scale, where zero = no pain and 10 = worst possible pain. Between October 2012 and June 2015, a total of 301 patients participated in the study. The median age was 69 years, (37 - 94); most of the patients were men (57%) and 64.8% had a performance status of 3/4. About 42% reported pain severity ≥ 4 and 74% were medicated with opioids. Multivariate analysis indicated a correlation between performance status and reported pain (OR: 1.7; IC 95%: 1.0 - 2.7; p = 0.045). Median overall survival was 37 days (IC 95%: 28 - 46). Patients reporting moderate to severe pain (pain severity ≥ 4) had a median survival of 29 days (IC 95%: 21 - 37), comparing with those who had no or moderate pain with median survival of 49 days (IC 95%: 35 - 63) (p = 0.022). The performance status was associated with more intense pain. The performance status, hospitalization, intra-abdominal metastization and opioid analgesia were associated with shorter time to death in advanced cancer patients referred to palliative care. Cancer pain continues to be a major clinical problem in advanced cancer patients.

  4. Projected changes in the intensity, duration, and frequency of precipitation extremes with implications for flood hazards resilience over India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, V.; Kumar, D.; Ganguly, A. R.

    2013-12-01

    Intensity, duration, and frequency of precipitation extremes, which are important for the design of hydrologic infrastructures and for managing flood hazards, are projected to change in a warming climate. Flood and flash flood disaster risks over India are exacerbated by a growing population, emerging economy, and non-robust infrastructures. However, an assessment of the non-stationary nature of rainfall extremes, particularly with a view to flood and flash flood hazards resilience, has been lacking. Here we show robust changes in the projections of precipitation extremes over India in the 21st-century with metrics that relate directly to structural design and flood hazards management. The results from 32 CMIP5 earth system models over India suggest on an average a two-fold increase in the intensity and frequency of rainfall extremes and the daily 100-year precipitation maxima occurring once every 20 years by the end of the century. The median risks are projected to increase by 55.7, 54, and 35 % for hydrologic structures designed for 20, 50, and 100 year of service life, respectively. Non-stationary behavior of rainfall extremes over India resulting from climate change may require revised standards for the design of hydrologic structures and for investments into flood hazards resilience.

  5. Effect of venous dexamethasone, oral caffeine and acetaminophen on relative frequency and intensity of postdural puncture headache after spinal anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Masoudifar, Mehrdad; Aghadavoudi, Omid; Adib, Sajjad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Postdural puncture headache (PDPH) is a relatively common complication after regional anesthesia, especially in younger people, bothersome to patients and needs prophylaxis to prevent this complication. This study was conducted aiming to determine the preventive effect of dexamethasone plus caffeine and acetaminophen on relative frequency and intensity of PDPH after spinal anesthesia. Materials and Methods: In a clinical trial study, 90 candidates for the lower extremities orthopedic elective operation were divided into two groups of 45 individuals each. Intervention group received the compound of 500 mg acetaminophen +65 mg oral caffeine +8 mg venous dexamethasone an hour before spinal blocking, and the control group received placebo tablets + a dexamethasone equivalent volume of venous normal saline. The level of postoperative headache at the time of entrance to recovery and discharge, 6, 12, 24, 48, and 72 h postoperatively were measured based on Visual Analog Scale criterion in the two groups and then compared with each other. Results: During the study, 24 patients in the control group and 17 patients in the intervention group were afflicted with headache; however, with no significant difference (P = 0.14). Total frequency of headache incidence was 35 times in the control group and 27 times in the intervention group (P = 0.32). Conclusions: Though the taking of acetaminophen + caffeine + dexamethasone is associated with a decrease in headache intensity and duration and decrease in PDPH incidence, compared with placebo, however, no essentially and statistically significant effect was produced. PMID:27169097

  6. Clinical Application of High-intensity Focused Ultrasound in Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Yi-Hsuan; Kuo, Shou-Jen; Tsai, Horng-Der; Chou, Ming-Chih; Yeh, Guang-Perng

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of cancer is an important issue in both developing and developed countries. Clinical use of ultrasound in cancer is not only for the diagnosis but also for the treatment. Focused ultrasound surgery (FUS) is a noninvasive technique. By using the combination of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and imaging method, FUS has the potential to ablate tumor lesions precisely. The main mechanisms of HIFU ablation involve mechanical and thermal effects. Recent advances in HIFU have increased its popularity. Some promising results were achieved in managing various malignancies, including pancreas, prostate, liver, kidney, breast and bone. Other applications include brain tumor ablation and disruption of the blood-brain barrier. We aim at briefly outlining the clinical utility of FUS as a noninvasive technique for a variety of types of cancer treatment. PMID:26918034

  7. Prostate Cancer and Ambient Pesticide Exposure in Agriculturally Intensive Areas in California

    PubMed Central

    Cockburn, Myles; Mills, Paul; Zhang, Xinbo; Zadnick, John; Goldberg, Dan; Ritz, Beate

    2011-01-01

    In a population-based case-control study in California's intensely agricultural Central Valley (2005–2006), the authors investigated relations between environmental pesticide/fungicide exposure and prostate cancer. Cases (n = 173) were obtained from a population-based cancer registry, and controls (n = 162) were obtained from Medicare listings and tax assessor mailings. Past ambient exposures to pesticides/fungicides were derived from residential history and independently recorded pesticide and land-use data, using a novel geographic information systems approach. In comparison with unexposed persons, increased risks of prostate cancer were observed among persons exposed to compounds which may have prostate-specific biologic effects (methyl bromide (odds ratio = 1.62, 95% confidence interval: 1.02, 2.59) and a group of organochlorines (odds ratio = 1.64, 95% confidence interval: 1.02, 2.63)) but not among those exposed to other compounds that were included as controls (simazine, maneb, and paraquat dichloride). The authors assessed the possibility of selection bias due to less-than-100% enrollment of eligible cases and controls (a critical methodological concern in studies of this kind) and determined that there was little evidence of bias affecting the estimated effect size. This study provides evidence of an association between prostate cancer and ambient pesticide exposures in and around homes in intensely agricultural areas. The associations appear specific to compounds with a plausible biologic role in prostate carcinogenesis. PMID:21447478

  8. Frequency and outcome of patients with nonthyroidal illness syndrome in a medical intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Plikat, Katharina; Langgartner, Julia; Buettner, Roland; Bollheimer, L Cornelius; Woenckhaus, Ulrike; Schölmerich, Jürgen; Wrede, Christian E

    2007-02-01

    Acute and chronic critical conditions are associated with reduced serum levels of free triiodothyronine (FT(3)), free thyroxine FT(4), and thyrotropin, known as nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS). It is still controversial whether these changes reflect a protective mechanism or a maladaptive process during prolonged illness. However, larger studies to determine the prevalence of the NTIS and its association with outcome in medical intensive care units (ICUs) are missing. Complete thyroid hormone levels from 247 of 743 patients admitted to our ICU between October 2002 and February 2004 were retrospectively evaluated. From these patients, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health II scores, ICU mortality, length of stay, mechanical ventilation, and concomitant medication were recorded. Ninety-seven patients (44.1%) had low FT(3) levels indicating an NTIS, either with normal (23.6%) or reduced (20.5%) serum thyrotropin levels. Of 97 patients with NTIS, 24 (23.3%) also showed reduced serum FT(4) levels. The NTIS was significantly associated with Acute Physiology and Chronic Health II scores, mortality, length of stay, and mechanical ventilation. In a multivariate Cox regression analysis, the combination of low FT(3) and low FT(4) was an independent risk factor for survival. Nonthyroidal illness syndrome is frequent at a medical ICU. A reduction of FT(4) together with FT(3) is associated with an increase in mortality and might reflect a maladaptive process, thereby worsening the disease.

  9. Position monitoring of low intensity beams using a digital frequency down converter

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, H.; Drennan, C.

    1995-05-05

    In monitoring the position of very low intensity beams a signal processing scheme similar to that used in an amplitude-comparison monopulse radar may be employed. In this scheme, an I-Q demodulator for both the sum and difference channels and a phase detector are needed to detect the beam position. It is complex and costly to implement the signal processing with discrete analog components. However, a newly available HSP50016 Digital Down Converter (DDC) chip has provided an attractive alternative. This DSP chip processes the digitized output of the IF section by first converting the signal to baseband using an in-phase/quadrature mixer and then filtering the result with a combination of a programmable high decimating filter and a fixed FIR shaping filter. The accuracy of the quadrature demodulation, nearly ideal filter shape factor and filter reject-band attenuation make the DDC a favored choice over a discrete analog design in an application dealing with very weak beam signals. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  10. The frequency of painful procedures in neonatal intensive care units in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Ihn Sook; Park, Soon Mi; Lee, Jeon Ma; Choi, Yoon Jin; Lee, Joohyun

    2014-08-01

    This study was to evaluate the performed painful procedures among all sick neonates cared for at two university hospital neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in the Republic of Korea. This prospective study was done with all newborns admitted to the NICUs between 1 October and 20 November 2010. Data collection was done with self-administered questionnaire by each nurse for the first 2 weeks of admission and discontinued if the neonate was discharged, transferred or died. The number of painful procedures, according to general characteristics of the neonates, were compared using Mann-Whitney U-test and Kruskal-Wallis test. Oral suctioning was the most frequently performed procedure, followed by tracheal suctioning and nasal suctioning. The number of painful procedures increased as the gestation period became shorter and birthweight decreased. In conclusion, nurses should reappraise the need for painful procedures, in particular, among neonates with a gestation period of ≤ 27 weeks and babies with ≤ 1000 g of birthweight, and execute their performance only if necessary.

  11. Basic study on pulse-intensity-domain depth-controlled photodynamic therapy for transurethral prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmori, Sayaka; Masuda, Kensuke; Yamakawa, Yuko; Arai, Tsunenori

    2006-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is promising modality for cancer. Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in USA. We proposed transurethral prostate cancer treatment using the pulse-intensity-domain depth-controlled PDT to preserve urethra wall. We have found that photocytotoxicity has been suppressed under high-intensity pulsed excitation with the second generation photosensitizers. We aim to apply this effect to form intact portion on the surface of the irradiated field. Irradiation condition dependence of photocytotoxicity of rat prostate cancer cell line R3327-AT-1 was investigated with two clinical photosensitizers, Porfimer sodium and Talaporfin sodium. A pulsed laser was irradiated with the power energy density ranging from 1.25 to 10 mJ/cm2. Near-infrared luminescence from singlet oxygen in the solution of those two photosensitizers was measured transiently. We performed PDT against a rat subcutaneous prostate tumor mode with Talaporfin sodium (2mg/kg) injected intravenously 1 h prior to the irradiation. The laser was irradiated with the power energy density 2.5 or 10 mW/cm2, with the total fluence of 50 J/cm2. Photocytotoxicity in vitro and the singlet oxygen generation were both suppressed with the 10mJ/cm2 irradiation with Talaporfin sodium, while these with Porfimer sodium were kept relatively constant. The surface of the irradiated field of 1mm in thickness remained intact, while the tumor damaged layer of 1.3 mm in thickness was obtained in the case of 10mJ/cm2 irradiation. We think Talaporfin sodium has high sensitivity to the pulse energy density, which might be useful to realize urethra preserved PDT for prostate cancer.

  12. Effects of different intensities of extremely low frequency pulsed electromagnetic fields on formation of osteoclast-like cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kyle; Chang, Walter Hong-Shong; Wu, Mei-Ling; Shih, Chung

    2003-09-01

    Over the past 30 years, the beneficial therapeutic effects of selected low energy, time varying electromagnetic fields (EMF) have been documented with increasing frequency to treat therapeutically resistant problems of the musculoskeletal system. However, the underlying mechanisms at a cellular level are still not completely understood. In this study, the effects of extremely low frequency pulsed electromagnetic fields (ELF-PEMF) on osteoclastogenesis, cultured from murine bone marrow cells and stimulated by 1,25(OH)(2)D(3), were examined. Primary bone marrow cells were cultured from mature Wistar rats and exposed to ELF-PEMF stimulation daily for 7 days with different intensities of induced electric field (4.8, 8.7, and 12.2 micro V/cm rms) and stimulation times (0.5, 2, and 8 h/day). Recruitment and authentication of osteoclast-like cells were evaluated, respectively, by determining multinuclear, tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) positive cells on day 8 of culture and by the pit formation assay. During the experiments, cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin 1-beta (IL-1beta), and prostaglandin-E(2) (PGE(2)) were assayed using the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). These findings suggest that ELF-PEMF can both enhance (approximately 50%) and suppress (approximately 27%) the formation of osteoclast-like cells in bone marrow culture, depending on the induced electric field intensity. In addition, consistent correlations were observed between TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and osteoclast-like cell number after exposure to different induced electric field intensities of ELF-PEMF. This in vitro study could be considered as groundwork for in vivo ELF-PEMF clinical applications on some osteoclast-associated bone diseases.

  13. Simulation of the Generation of Low Frequency Radiation From Argon Clusters lluminated by High-Intensity Short Pulse Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordova, Clay

    2005-10-01

    The interaction of high-powered lasers with small plasma clusters is of interest due to its range of applications including the generation of fast ions and electrons for advanced accelerators, self-focusing phenomenon in optics, and production of x-ray and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation. We simulate the interaction of high-intensity lasers with solid density clusters using the fully electromagnetic PIC code TurboWAVE^2. We analyze a range of cluster sizes, laser intensities, and pulse durations to investigate the dependence of low frequency radiation production on these parameters. In this poster, we illustrate the results of this study. In particular, we present calculations of the energy absorbed and released from the cluster, as well as an analysis of the far-field radiation distribution, intensity, and power spectrum. Finally, we present conclusions that may guide future simulations and experiments. 1. ccor@lanl.gov 2. D. Gordon et al. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PLASMA SCIENCE, 28 (4), 8/2000, 1135

  14. Low-frequency acoustic pressure, velocity, and intensity thresholds in a bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) and white whale (Delphinapterus leucas).

    PubMed

    Finneran, James J; Carder, Donald A; Ridgway, Sam H

    2002-01-01

    The relative contributions of acoustic pressure and particle velocity to the low-frequency, underwater hearing abilities of the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) and white whale (Delphinapterus leucas) were investigated by measuring (masked) hearing thresholds while manipulating the relationship between the pressure and velocity. This was accomplished by varying the distance within the near field of a single underwater sound projector (experiment I) and using two underwater sound projectors and an active sound control system (experiment II). The results of experiment I showed no significant change in pressure thresholds as the distance between the subject and the sound source was changed. In contrast, velocity thresholds tended to increase and intensity thresholds tended to decrease as the source distance decreased. These data suggest that acoustic pressure is a better indicator of threshold, compared to particle velocity or mean active intensity, in the subjects tested. Interpretation of the results of experiment II (the active sound control system) was difficult because of complex acoustic conditions and the unknown effects of the subject on the generated acoustic field; however, these data also tend to support the results of experiment I and suggest that odontocete thresholds should be reported in units of acoustic pressure, rather than intensity.

  15. Low-frequency acoustic pressure, velocity, and intensity thresholds in a bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) and white whale (Delphinapterus leucas)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finneran, James J.; Carder, Donald A.; Ridgway, Sam H.

    2002-01-01

    The relative contributions of acoustic pressure and particle velocity to the low-frequency, underwater hearing abilities of the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) and white whale (Delphinapterus leucas) were investigated by measuring (masked) hearing thresholds while manipulating the relationship between the pressure and velocity. This was accomplished by varying the distance within the near field of a single underwater sound projector (experiment I) and using two underwater sound projectors and an active sound control system (experiment II). The results of experiment I showed no significant change in pressure thresholds as the distance between the subject and the sound source was changed. In contrast, velocity thresholds tended to increase and intensity thresholds tended to decrease as the source distance decreased. These data suggest that acoustic pressure is a better indicator of threshold, compared to particle velocity or mean active intensity, in the subjects tested. Interpretation of the results of experiment II (the active sound control system) was difficult because of complex acoustic conditions and the unknown effects of the subject on the generated acoustic field; however, these data also tend to support the results of experiment I and suggest that odontocete thresholds should be reported in units of acoustic pressure, rather than intensity.

  16. Correlation between HLA-A2 gene frequency, latitude, ovarian and prostate cancer mortality rates.

    PubMed

    De Petris, Luigi; Bergfeldt, Kjell; Hising, Christina; Lundqvist, Andreas; Tholander, Bengt; Pisa, Pavel; van der Zanden, Henk G M; Masucci, Giuseppe

    2004-01-01

    Molecular-target therapies are novel approaches to the treatment of prostate and ovarian cancer, but to ensure the best response, a very careful selection of patients, based on immunological characteristics, must be performed. We screened for HLA type, 24 patients with advanced ovarian cancer and 26 patients with hormone-refractory prostate cancer, in order to be recruited to vaccine protocols. HLA typing was performed with PCR in ovarian cancer patients and with serological assay in prostate cancer patients. The results were then extended to a population level, comparing the HLA genotype frequencies in Europe with ovarian and prostate cancer mortality rates. An overrepresentation of HLA-A2 phenotype was observed in both patient groups compared to the normal Swedish population (p = 0.01). As it is already known, the higher phenotype frequency of this allele found in Scandinavian countries decreases significantly as one moves further south in Europe. Ovarian and prostate cancer mortality rates decrease as well as the demographic changes in HLA-A2. These observations have to be confirmed by more extended investigations in order to elucidate if HLA-A2 higher frequency is already present at the diagnosis (risk factor) or is selected during the course of the disease (prognostic factor). Moreover, this fact would suggest different strategies for specific immunotherapy in addition to first line conventional treatments.

  17. Multi-model assessment of potential changes in Intensity-Duration-Frequency curves over Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, P. F.

    2013-12-01

    Climate change is expected to modify precipitation patterns across the globe, but there are considerable differences between climate models in their projections of change amplitude for individual locations. Most climate change studies focus on changes in mean precipitation, yet in many hydrological applications extreme precipitation is the main interest. In this study, we examine and compare the statistical properties of extreme precipitation in observational records and in output from the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP) ensemble of regional climate models, focusing specifically on Canada. Climate models have significant biases in extreme precipitation statistics which tend to be relatively more important for shorter-duration rainfall. We propose to deal with this issue by exploiting the fact that extreme rainfall events obey certain temporal scaling laws that we assume will remain largely unaltered in future climates, even if the frequency of these events change. This hypothesis is used to develop IDF curves for different regions of Canada. The general conclusion is that there is evidence of more extreme precipitation in future climates and these changes tend to be relatively more important for shorter durations and for higher return periods. However, the multi-model approach also indicates that the exact amount of change is subject to considerable uncertainties.

  18. Effects of Ohmic Heating, Including Electric Field Intensity and Frequency, on Thermal Inactivation of Bacillus subtilis Spores.

    PubMed

    Murashita, Suguru; Kawamura, Shuso; Koseki, Shigenobu

    2017-01-01

    Methods for microbial inactivation are important in the food industry; however, conventional external heating (CH) reduces food quality. Accordingly, the nonthermal effects of ohmic heating (OH) on Bacillus subtilis spores in a sodium chloride aqueous solution at 101°C (i.e., the boiling point), as well as the effects of electric field intensity and frequency during OH, were investigated. Survival kinetics were compared between OH and external CH. The inactivation effect on B. subtilis was greater for all electric field conditions (5, 10, and 20 V/cm) than for CH. In particular, 20 V/cm showed a significantly higher inactivation effect (P < 0.05) on B. subtilis than those of CH at 8, 10, 12, 14, and 16 min. The survival data were fitted to various primary kinetic models. In the Weibull model and the log-linear model, there were significant differences (P < 0.05) in the rate parameters δ and kmax between OH at 20 V/cm and CH. However, there were no significant differences (P > 0.05) in survival kinetics between 20, 40, and 60 kHz; B. subtilis spores were inactivated more efficiently as the frequency increased. B. subtilis spores were almost completely inactivated at 14 to 16 min for the 60-kHz treatment, but spores were still alive at 20 and 40 kHz for the same treatment times. These results demonstrated that OH inactivates B. subtilis spores more effectively than CH. OH conditions with high electric field intensities and high frequencies resulted in efficient B. subtilis spore inactivation.

  19. Frequency of Germline Mutations in 25 Cancer Susceptibility Genes in a Sequential Series of Patients With Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Nancy U.; Kidd, John; Allen, Brian A.; Singh, Nanda; Wenstrup, Richard J.; Hartman, Anne-Renee; Winer, Eric P.; Garber, Judy E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Testing for germline mutations in BRCA1/2 is standard for select patients with breast cancer to guide clinical management. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) allows testing for mutations in additional breast cancer predisposition genes. The frequency of germline mutations detected by using NGS has been reported in patients with breast cancer who were referred for BRCA1/2 testing or with triple-negative breast cancer. We assessed the frequency and predictors of mutations in 25 cancer predisposition genes, including BRCA1/2, in a sequential series of patients with breast cancer at an academic institution to examine the utility of genetic testing in this population. Methods Patients with stages I to III breast cancer who were seen at a single cancer center between 2010 and 2012, and who agreed to participate in research DNA banking, were included (N = 488). Personal and family cancer histories were collected and germline DNA was sequenced with NGS to identify mutations. Results Deleterious mutations were identified in 10.7% of women, including 6.1% in BRCA1/2 (5.1% in non-Ashkenazi Jewish patients) and 4.6% in other breast/ovarian cancer predisposition genes including CHEK2 (n = 10), ATM (n = 4), BRIP1 (n = 4), and one each in PALB2, PTEN, NBN, RAD51C, RAD51D, MSH6, and PMS2. Whereas young age (P < .01), Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry (P < .01), triple-negative breast cancer (P = .01), and family history of breast/ovarian cancer (P = .01) predicted for BRCA1/2 mutations, no factors predicted for mutations in other breast cancer predisposition genes. Conclusion Among sequential patients with breast cancer, 10.7% were found to have a germline mutation in a gene that predisposes women to breast or ovarian cancer, using a panel of 25 predisposition genes. Factors that predict for BRCA1/2 mutations do not predict for mutations in other breast/ovarian cancer susceptibility genes when these genes are analyzed as a single group. Additional cohorts will be helpful to define

  20. A meta-analysis of MSI frequency and race in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ashktorab, Hassan; Ahuja, Sadhna; Kannan, Lakshmi; Llor, Xavier; Ellis, Nathan A.; Xicola, Rosa M.; Laiyemo, Adeyinka O.; Carethers, John M.; Brim, Hassan; Nouraie, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE African Americans (AA) are at a higher risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) and some studies report a higher frequency of microsatellite instability (MSI) in this population while others report lower frequency compared to Caucasians. AIM To determine and evaluate the association of race and clinical factors with MSI frequency through meta- analysis. METHODS Twenty-two studies out of 15,105 (1997-2015) were evaluated after a search in different literature databases, using keywords “colorectal cancer, microsatellite instability, African Americans, Caucasians and Hispanics”. We used random effect meta-analysis to calculate the MSI frequency in all studies as well as in African American and Caucasian samples. Meta-regression analysis was used to assess the univariate effect of race, gender, age, tumor location and stage on MSI frequency. RESULTS The overall MSI frequency among CRCs was 17% (95%CI: 15%-19%, I²=91%). In studies with available race data, The MSI rate among AAs, Hispanics and Caucasians were 12%, 12% and 14% respectively and was not significantly different. Sub-group analysis of studies with racial information indicates MSI OR of 0.78 for AAs compared to Caucasians. CONCLUSION CRCs demonstrate an overall MSI frequency of 17%. MSI frequency differences between AAs and Caucasians were not pronounced, suggesting that other factors contribute to the racial disparity. The methodological approaches and biological sources of the variation seen in MSI frequency between different studies need to be further investigated. PMID:27120810

  1. A meta-analysis of MSI frequency and race in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ashktorab, Hassan; Ahuja, Sadhna; Kannan, Lakshmi; Llor, Xavier; Ellis, Nathan A; Xicola, Rosa M; Laiyemo, Adeyinka O; Carethers, John M; Brim, Hassan; Nouraie, Mehdi

    2016-04-23

    African Americans (AA) are at a higher risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) and some studies report a higher frequency of microsatellite instability (MSI) in this population while others report lower frequency compared to Caucasians. To determine and evaluate the association of race and clinical factors with MSI frequency through meta- analysis. Twenty-two studies out of 15,105 (1997-2015) were evaluated after a search in different literature databases, using keywords "colorectal cancer, microsatellite instability, African Americans, Caucasians and Hispanics". We used random effect meta-analysis to calculate the MSI frequency in all studies as well as in African American and Caucasian samples. Meta-regression analysis was used to assess the univariate effect of race, gender, age, tumor location and stage on MSI frequency. The overall MSI frequency among CRCs was 17% (95%CI: 15%-19%, I²=91%). In studies with available race data, The MSI rate among AAs, Hispanics and Caucasians were 12%, 12% and 14% respectively and was not significantly different. Sub-group analysis of studies with racial information indicates MSI OR of 0.78 for AAs compared to Caucasians. CRCs demonstrate an overall MSI frequency of 17%. MSI frequency differences between AAs and Caucasians were not pronounced, suggesting that other factors contribute to the racial disparity. The methodological approaches and biological sources of the variation seen in MSI frequency between different studies need to be further investigated.

  2. Characteristics and associations of pain intensity in patients referred to a specialist cancer pain clinic

    PubMed Central

    Pina, Paulo; Sabri, Elham; Lawlor, Peter G

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Uncontrolled cancer pain (CP) may impair quality of life. Given the multidimensional nature of CP, its poor control is often attributed to poor assessment and classification. OBJECTIVES: To determine the characteristics and associations of pain intensity in a specialist CP clinic. METHODS: Consecutive patients referred to the CP clinic of the Portuguese Cancer Institute (Lisbon, Portugal) had standardized initial assessments and status documentation of the following: Brief Pain Inventory ratings for ‘pain now’ as the outcome variable; initial pain intensity (iPI) on a 0 to 10 scale; pain mechanism (using the Douleur Neuropathique 4 tool to assess neuropathic pain); episodic pain; Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group rating; oral morphine equivalent daily dose (MEDD); Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale and Emotional Thermometer scores; and cancer diagnosis, metastases, treatment and pain duration. Univariable analyses were conducted to test the association of independent variables with iPI. Variables with P<0.1 were entered into a multivariable regression model, using backward elimination and a cut-point of P=0.2 for final model selection. RESULTS: Of 371 participants, 285 (77%) had moderate (4 to 6) or severe (7 to 10) iPI. The initial median MEDD was relatively low (30 mg [range 20 mg to 60 mg]). In the multivariable model, higher income, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group rating 3 to 4, cancer diagnosis (head and neck, genitourinary and gastrointestinal), adjuvant use and initial MEDD were associated with iPI (P<0.05). The model’s R2 was 18.6, which explained only 19% of iPI variance. CONCLUSIONS: The diversity of factors associated with pain intensity and their limited explanation of its variance underscore the biopsychosocial complexity of CP. Adequacy of CP management warrants further exploration. PMID:26291125

  3. [Breast Thermal Tomography and High Frequency Ultrasound Imaging in Predicting Breast Cancer: a Preliminary Study].

    PubMed

    He, Yu-shuang; Peng, Yu-lan; Jin, Ya; Zhao, Hai-na; Luo, Hon-hao; Yang, Pan

    2016-01-01

    To determine the clinical value of breast thermal tomography and high frequency ultrasound imaging in diagnosing breast cancer. Breast thermal tomography and high frequency ultrasound imaging were performed in 298 patients with breast lumps. The results were compared with pathological diagnosis. The ultrasound imaging had a sensitivity, specificity and the area under the curve (AUC) of 99.02%, 62.78% and 0.814, respectively, compared with 83.33%, 83.16% and 0.830 of thermal tomography, for diagnosing breast cancer. The two imaging results showed statistical significance in the test of non-inferiority (P < 0.001). A combination of the two imaging results produced a sensitivity, specificity and AUC of 83.33%, 89.79% and 0.866, respectively. Thermal tomography is not inferior to ultrasonography in detecting breast cancer. The two combined can improve specificity and accuracy of the diagnosis of breast cancer.

  4. Diagnostic accuracy of capnography during high-frequency ventilation in neonatal intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Kugelman, Amir; Bromiker, Ruben; Riskin, Arieh; Shoris, Irit; Ronen, Michal; Qumqam, Nelly; Bader, David; Golan, Agenta

    2016-05-01

    High-frequency ventilation (HFV) is a powerful tool for CO2 elimination, and thus requires careful monitoring of CO2 . Our aim was to assess the diagnostic accuracy (correlation, agreement, and trending) of continuous distal capnography (dCap) with PaCO2 in infants ventilated with HFV. This was a prospective, observational, multicenter study. dCap was compared with simultaneous PaCO2 ("gold standard") drawn from indwelling arterial line for patient care in term and preterm infants ventilated with HFV. dCap was obtained via the side-port of a double-lumen endotracheal-tube by a Microstream capnograph with specially designed software for HFV. Twenty-four infants participated in the study (median [range] gestational age [GA]: 26.8 [23.6-38.6] weeks). Analysis included 332 measurements. dCap was in correlation (r = 0.70, P < 0.001) but with less than adequate agreement (mean difference ± SD of the differences: -11.7 ± 10.3 mmHg) with PaCO2 . Comparable findings were found in the subgroup of infants <1,000 g (n = 240 measurements). Correlations were maintained in severe lung disease. Changes in dCap and in PaCO2 for consecutive measurements within each patient were correlated (r = 0.63, P < 0.001). Area under the receiver operating curves (ROC) for dCap to detect high (>60 mmHg) or low (<30 mmHg) PaCO2 was 0.83 (CI: 0.76-0.90) and 0.88 (CI: 0.79-0.97), respectively; P < 0.001. Our prospective study suggests that continuous dCap in infants ventilated with HFV may be helpful for trends and alarm for unsafe levels of PaCO2 . dCap is only a complimentary tool and cannot replace PaCO2 sampling because the agreement between these measurements was less than adequate. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Frequency of TERT Promoter Mutations in Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Stoehr, Robert; Taubert, Helge; Zinnall, Ulrike; Giedl, Johannes; Gaisa, Nadine T; Burger, Maximilian; Ruemmele, Petra; Hurst, Carolyn D; Knowles, Margaret A; Wullich, Bernd; Hartmann, Arndt

    2015-01-01

    Recently, recurrent mutations within the core promoter of the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene generating consensus binding sites for ETS transcription factor family members were described in melanomas and other malignancies (e.g. bladder cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma). These mutations were discussed as early drivers for malignant transformation. In prostate cancer (PrCa) TERT expression has been associated with a poor prognosis and higher risk for disease recurrence. The underlying mechanisms for high TERT expression in PrCa have still not been clarified. To date, data on TERT promoter mutation analysis in PrCa are sparse. Therefore, we performed sequence analysis of the core promoter region of the TERT gene in an unselected cohort of prostate tumors. Sections from 167 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded and cryopreserved prostate tumors were microdissected and used for DNA isolation. The mutation hotspot region within the TERT core promoter (-260 to +60) was analyzed by direct Sanger sequencing or SNaPshot analysis. All cases were analyzed successfully. Mutations within the core promoter of the TERT gene were not detected in any of the cases with all tumors exhibiting a wild-type sequence. TERT core promoter mutations reported from several other malignancies were not detected in our unselected cohort of PrCa. These data indicate that alterations within the core promoter of the TERT gene do not play an important role in prostate carcinogenesis.

  6. Intensity-Duration-Frequency curves from remote sensing datasets: direct comparison of weather radar and CMORPH over the Eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morin, Efrat; Marra, Francesco; Peleg, Nadav; Mei, Yiwen; Anagnostou, Emmanouil N.

    2017-04-01

    Rainfall frequency analysis is used to quantify the probability of occurrence of extreme rainfall and is traditionally based on rain gauge records. The limited spatial coverage of rain gauges is insufficient to sample the spatiotemporal variability of extreme rainfall and to provide the areal information required by management and design applications. Conversely, remote sensing instruments, even if quantitative uncertain, offer coverage and spatiotemporal detail that allow overcoming these issues. In recent years, remote sensing datasets began to be used for frequency analyses, taking advantage of increased record lengths and quantitative adjustments of the data. However, the studies so far made use of concepts and techniques developed for rain gauge (i.e. point or multiple-point) data and have been validated by comparison with gauge-derived analyses. These procedures add further sources of uncertainty and prevent from isolating between data and methodological uncertainties and from fully exploiting the available information. In this study, we step out of the gauge-centered concept presenting a direct comparison between at-site Intensity-Duration-Frequency (IDF) curves derived from different remote sensing datasets on corresponding spatial scales, temporal resolutions and records. We analyzed 16 years of homogeneously corrected and gauge-adjusted C-Band weather radar estimates, high-resolution CMORPH and gauge-adjusted high-resolution CMORPH over the Eastern Mediterranean. Results of this study include: (a) good spatial correlation between radar and satellite IDFs ( 0.7 for 2-5 years return period); (b) consistent correlation and dispersion in the raw and gauge adjusted CMORPH; (c) bias is almost uniform with return period for 12-24 h durations; (d) radar identifies thicker tail distributions than CMORPH and the tail of the distributions depends on the spatial and temporal scales. These results demonstrate the potential of remote sensing datasets for rainfall

  7. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy, protons, and the risk of second cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Eric J. . E-mail: ejh1@columbia.edu

    2006-05-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) allows dose to be concentrated in the tumor volume while sparing normal tissues. However, the downside to IMRT is the potential to increase the number of radiation-induced second cancers. The reasons for this potential are more monitor units and, therefore, a larger total-body dose because of leakage radiation and, because IMRT involves more fields, a bigger volume of normal tissue is exposed to lower radiation doses. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy may double the incidence of solid cancers in long-term survivors. This outcome may be acceptable in older patients if balanced by an improvement in local tumor control and reduced acute toxicity. On the other hand, the incidence of second cancers is much higher in children, so that doubling it may not be acceptable. IMRT represents a special case for children for three reasons. First, children are more sensitive to radiation-induced cancer than are adults. Second, radiation scattered from the treatment volume is more important in the small body of the child. Third, the question of genetic susceptibility arises because many childhood cancers involve a germline mutation. The levels of leakage radiation in current Linacs are not inevitable. Leakage can be reduced but at substantial cost. An alternative strategy is to replace X-rays with protons. However, this change is only an advantage if the proton machine employs a pencil scanning beam. Many proton facilities use passive modulation to produce a field of sufficient size, but the use of a scattering foil produces neutrons, which results in an effective dose to the patient higher than that characteristic of IMRT. The benefit of protons is only achieved if a scanning beam is used in which the doses are 10 times lower than with IMRT.

  8. A Mechanism Underlying Preventive Effect of High-Intensity Training on Colon Cancer.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Kaori; Sato, Koji; Suemoto, Ken; Miyamoto-Mikami, Eri; Fuku, Noriyuki; Higashida, Kazuhiko; Tsuji, Katsunori; Xu, Yuzhong; Liu, Xin; Iemitsu, Motoyuki; Hamaoka, Takafumi; Tabata, Izumi

    2017-09-01

    We examined effects of high-intensity training on chemically induced aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in rat colon. We also investigated mechanisms that may underlie the results obtained, with a focus on secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC), which has been proposed as an exercise-related factor of colon cancer prevention. After an administration of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine, F344 rats executed high-intensity intermittent swimming training (HIIST) (twelve 20-s swimming with a weight [16% body weight] with 10-s pauses between the bouts) 5 d·wk for 4 wk. The acute and chronic effects of the HIIST on SPARC were evaluated in rats. We evaluated the in vitro and in vivo effects of 5' AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activator on SPARC in rat serum and epitrochlearis muscle. In human subjects, we determined serum SPARC after exhaustive bicycling consisting of six to seven bouts of exercise at 170% V˙O2max with 10-s rests between the bouts (high-intensity intermittent bicycling [HIIB]). The SPARC mRNA in human vastus lateralis was measured before and after the HIIB for 4 d·wk for 6 wk (HIIB-training [HIIBT]). The numbers of ACF were lower in the HIIST (47 ± 22) compared with the control (122 ± 47) rats (P < 0.05). SPARC in epitrochlearis and serum after HIIS of the trained rat was higher than that in the control resting rats. In vitro and vivo AMPK stimulation increased mRNA and SPARC protein in rat epitrochlearis, respectively. The human serum SPARC after the HIIB was elevated. SPARC mRNA in human muscle was elevated after the HIIBT. The results demonstrated that HIIST inhibits 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced colon ACF development. This effect may be explained by SPARC induction by the exercise intensity-related factor AMPK, potentially explaining the preventive effects of high-intensity intermittent exercise training against colon cancer.

  9. Frequency format diagram and probability chart for breast cancer risk communication: a prospective, randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Karthik; Crawford, Brianna J; Pruthi, Sandhya; Williams, Constance I; Neal, Lonzetta; Sandhu, Nicole P; Johnson, Ruth E; Wahner-Roedler, Dietlind; Britain, Marcia K; Cha, Stephen S; Ghosh, Amit K

    2008-10-20

    Breast cancer risk education enables women make informed decisions regarding their options for screening and risk reduction. We aimed to determine whether patient education regarding breast cancer risk using a bar graph, with or without a frequency format diagram, improved the accuracy of risk perception. We conducted a prospective, randomized trial among women at increased risk for breast cancer. The main outcome measurement was patients' estimation of their breast cancer risk before and after education with a bar graph (BG group) or bar graph plus a frequency format diagram (BG+FF group), which was assessed by previsit and postvisit questionnaires. Of 150 women in the study, 74 were assigned to the BG group and 76 to the BG+FF group. Overall, 72% of women overestimated their risk of breast cancer. The improvement in accuracy of risk perception from the previsit to the postvisit questionnaire (BG group, 19% to 61%; BG+FF group, 13% to 67%) was not significantly different between the 2 groups (P = .10). Among women who inaccurately perceived very high risk (> or = 50% risk), inaccurate risk perception decreased significantly in the BG+FF group (22% to 3%) compared with the BG group (28% to 19%) (P = .004). Breast cancer risk communication using a bar graph plus a frequency format diagram can improve the short-term accuracy of risk perception among women perceiving inaccurately high risk.

  10. Benefits of adaptive radiation therapy in lung cancer as a function of replanning frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Dial, Christian; Weiss, Elisabeth; Hugo, Geoffrey D.; Siebers, Jeffrey V.

    2016-04-15

    Purpose: To quantify the potential benefit associated with daily replanning in lung cancer in terms of normal tissue dose sparing and to characterize the tradeoff between adaptive benefit and replanning frequency. Methods: A set of synthetic images and contours, derived from weekly active breathing control images of 12 patients who underwent radiation therapy treatment for nonsmall cell lung cancer, is generated for each fraction of treatment using principal component analysis in a way that preserves temporal anatomical trends (e.g., tumor regression). Daily synthetic images and contours are used to simulate four different treatment scenarios: (1) a “no-adapt” scenario that simulates delivery of an initial plan throughout treatment, (2) a “midadapt” scenario that implements a single replan for fraction 18, (3) a “weekly adapt” scenario that simulates weekly adaptations, and (4) a “full-adapt” scenario that simulates daily replanning. An initial intensity modulated radiation therapy plan is created for each patient and replanning is carried out in an automated fashion by reoptimizing beam apertures and weights. Dose is calculated on each image and accumulated to the first in the series using deformable mappings utilized in synthetic image creation for comparison between simulated treatments. Results: Target coverage was maintained and cord tolerance was not exceeded for any of the adaptive simulations. Average reductions in mean lung dose (MLD) and volume of lung receiving 20 Gy or more (V20{sub lung}) were 65 ± 49 cGy (p = 0.000 01) and 1.1% ± 1.2% (p = 0.0006), respectively, for all patients. The largest reduction in MLD for a single patient was 162 cGy, which allowed an isotoxic escalation of the target dose of 1668 cGy. Average reductions in cord max dose, mean esophageal dose (MED), dose received by 66% of the heart (D66{sub heart}), and dose received by 33% of the heart (D33{sub heart}), were 158 ± 280, 117 ± 121, 37 ± 77, and 99 ± 120

  11. High Frequency Migraine Is Associated with Lower Acute Pain Sensitivity and Abnormal Insula Activity Related to Migraine Pain Intensity, Attack Frequency, and Pain Catastrophizing

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Vani A.; Moayedi, Massieh; Keaser, Michael L.; Khan, Shariq A.; Hubbard, Catherine S.; Goyal, Madhav; Seminowicz, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Migraine is a pain disorder associated with abnormal brain structure and function, yet the effect of migraine on acute pain processing remains unclear. It also remains unclear whether altered pain-related brain responses and related structural changes are associated with clinical migraine characteristics. Using fMRI and three levels of thermal stimuli (non-painful, mildly painful, and moderately painful), we compared whole-brain activity between 14 migraine patients and 14 matched controls. Although, there were no significant differences in pain thresholds nor in pre-scan pain ratings to mildly painful thermal stimuli, patients did have aberrant suprathreshold nociceptive processing. Brain imaging showed that, compared to controls, patients had reduced activity in pain modulatory regions including left dorsolateral prefrontal, posterior parietal, and middle temporal cortices and, at a lower-threshold, greater activation in the right mid-insula to moderate pain vs. mild pain. We also found that pain-related activity in the insula was associated with clinical variables in patients, including associations between: bilateral anterior insula and pain catastrophizing (PCS); bilateral anterior insula and contralateral posterior insula and migraine pain intensity; and bilateral posterior insula and migraine frequency at a lower-threshold. PCS and migraine pain intensity were also negatively associated with activity in midline regions including posterior cingulate and medial prefrontal cortices. Diffusion tensor imaging revealed a negative correlation between fractional anisotropy (a measure of white matter integrity; FA) and migraine duration in the right mid-insula and a positive correlation between left mid-insula FA and PCS. In sum, while patients showed lower sensitivity to acute noxious stimuli, the neuroimaging findings suggest enhanced nociceptive processing and significantly disrupted modulatory networks, particularly involving the insula, associated with indices

  12. Intense THz pulses down-regulate genes associated with skin cancer and psoriasis: a new therapeutic avenue?

    PubMed Central

    Titova, Lyubov V.; Ayesheshim, Ayesheshim K.; Golubov, Andrey; Rodriguez-Juarez, Rocio; Woycicki, Rafal; Hegmann, Frank A.; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2013-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) radiation lies between the infrared and microwave regions of the electromagnetic spectrum and is non-ionizing. We show that exposure of artificial human skin tissue to intense, picosecond-duration THz pulses affects expression levels of numerous genes associated with non-melanoma skin cancers, psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. Genes affected by intense THz pulses include nearly half of the epidermal differentiation complex (EDC) members. EDC genes, which are mapped to the chromosomal human region 1q21, encode for proteins that partake in epidermal differentiation and are often overexpressed in conditions such as psoriasis and skin cancer. In nearly all the genes differentially expressed by exposure to intense THz pulses, the induced changes in transcription levels are opposite to disease-related changes. The ability of intense THz pulses to cause concerted favorable changes in the expression of multiple genes implicated in inflammatory skin diseases and skin cancers suggests potential therapeutic applications of intense THz pulses. PMID:23917523

  13. Quasi-classical model of electron rescattering in fields of intense infrared and weak high-frequency laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flegel, A. V.; Frolov, M. V.; Zheltukhin, A. N.; Vvedenskii, N. V.

    2017-04-01

    We study the influence of a weak high-frequency [in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) region] laser pulse on the mechanism of electron rescattering on the parent ion in the processes of high harmonic generation and above-threshold ionisation induced by an intense infrared (IR) laser field. Two scenarios of the three-step rescattering are discussed: with the absorption of the XUV photon at the ionisation step of an atom and with the absorption/emission of a XUV photon at the moment of recombination or scattering of the electron returned by the IR field to the parent ion. Estimates are obtained for the high-energy plateau cutoff positions in the spectra of harmonic generation and above-threshold ionisation.

  14. Sunflower exposed to high-intensity microwave-frequency electromagnetic field: electrophysiological response requires a mechanical injury to initiate

    PubMed Central

    Roux, David; Catrain, Alexandre; Lallechere, Sébastien; Joly, Jean-Christophe

    2015-01-01

    We have monitored the electrical potential variations (EPV) of sunflower plants illuminated by a high-intensity microwave-frequency (2.5 GHz, 1.5 kV/m) electromagnetic field (EMF). We have designed an appropriate set-up that allows parallel temperature and EPV measurements while part of the plant is being exposed to the field. The results show that the considered EMF does not induce plant EPV directly. This electrophysiological response appears only when the EMF leads to a mechanical injury of the tissues via a thermal effect (dielectric heating). Once the plant inner temperature reached a threshold, we systematically observed burn-like lesions associated with the bending of the stem or leaf-stalks. Theses mechanical constraints were rapidly followed by EPVs, moving through the stem. PMID:25482761

  15. Sunflower exposed to high-intensity microwave-frequency electromagnetic field: electrophysiological response requires a mechanical injury to initiate.

    PubMed

    Roux, David; Catrain, Alexandre; Lallechere, Sébastien; Joly, Jean-Christophe

    2015-01-01

    We have monitored the electrical potential variations (EPV) of sunflower plants illuminated by a high-intensity microwave-frequency (2.5 GHz, 1.5 kV/m) electromagnetic field (EMF). We have designed an appropriate set-up that allows parallel temperature and EPV measurements while part of the plant is being exposed to the field. The results show that the considered EMF does not induce plant EPV directly. This electrophysiological response appears only when the EMF leads to a mechanical injury of the tissues via a thermal effect (dielectric heating). Once the plant inner temperature reached a threshold, we systematically observed burn-like lesions associated with the bending of the stem or leaf-stalks. Theses mechanical constraints were rapidly followed by EPVs, moving through the stem.

  16. Intensity-modulated linear-frequency-modulated continuous-wave lidar for distributed media: fundamentals of technique.

    PubMed

    Batet, Oscar; Dios, Federico; Comeron, Adolfo; Agishev, Ravil

    2010-06-10

    We analyze the intensity-modulation frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) technique for lidar remote sensing in the context of its application to distributed media. The goal of the technique is the reproduction of the sounded-medium profile along the emission path. A conceptual analysis is carried out to show the problems the basic version of the method presents for this application. The principal point is the appearance of a bandpass filtering effect, which seems to hinder its use in this context. A modified version of the technique is proposed to overcome this problem. A number of computer simulations confirm the ability of the modified FMCW technique to sound distributed media.

  17. Age-related prevalence, intensity and frequency distribution of gastrointestinal helminth infection in urban slum children from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Bundy, D A; Kan, S P; Rose, R

    1988-01-01

    The gastrointestinal helminth infection status of 1574 children living in a slum area of Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia was assessed by quantitative coprology. Almost two-thirds were infected with Trichuris trichiura, 49.6% with Ascaris lumbricoides, and 5.3% with hookworm. Infection prevalence rose rapidly to a stable asymptote at 7 years of age, and the age-intensity profile was convex with maximal values in the 5-10 year age classes. This pattern was the same for males and females, but differed markedly between different ethnic groups. The frequency distributions of A. lumbricoides and T. trichiura were highly overdispersed (k values were 0.21 and 0.27, respectively), and age-dependent over the 0-8 year age classes. This suggests that the force of infection with these nematodes is lower in infants than in older children.

  18. SPREAD: a high-resolution daily gridded precipitation dataset for Spain - an extreme events frequency and intensity overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano-Notivoli, Roberto; Beguería, Santiago; Ángel Saz, Miguel; Longares, Luis Alberto; de Luis, Martín

    2017-09-01

    A high-resolution daily gridded precipitation dataset was built from raw data of 12 858 observatories covering a period from 1950 to 2012 in peninsular Spain and 1971 to 2012 in Balearic and Canary islands. The original data were quality-controlled and gaps were filled on each day and location independently. Using the serially complete dataset, a grid with a 5 × 5 km spatial resolution was constructed by estimating daily precipitation amounts and their corresponding uncertainty at each grid node. Daily precipitation estimations were compared to original observations to assess the quality of the gridded dataset. Four daily precipitation indices were computed to characterise the spatial distribution of daily precipitation and nine extreme precipitation indices were used to describe the frequency and intensity of extreme precipitation events. The Mediterranean coast and the Central Range showed the highest frequency and intensity of extreme events, while the number of wet days and dry and wet spells followed a north-west to south-east gradient in peninsular Spain, from high to low values in the number of wet days and wet spells and reverse in dry spells. The use of the total available data in Spain, the independent estimation of precipitation for each day and the high spatial resolution of the grid allowed for a precise spatial and temporal assessment of daily precipitation that is difficult to achieve when using other methods, pre-selected long-term stations or global gridded datasets. SPREAD dataset is publicly available at https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/7393.

  19. Effect of frequency tuning on bremsstrahlung spectra, beam intensity, and shape in the 10 GHz NANOGAN electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, G. Mal, Kedar; Kumar, Narender; Lakshmy, P. S.; Mathur, Y.; Kumar, P.; Kanjilal, D.; Roy, A.; Baskaran, R.

    2014-02-15

    Studies on the effect of the frequency tuning on the bremsstrahlung spectra, beam intensities, and beam shape of various ions have been carried out in the 10 GHz NANOGAN ECR ion source. The warm and cold components of the electrons were found to be directly correlated with beam intensity enhancement in case of Ar{sup 9+} but not so for O{sup 5+}. The warm electron component was, however, much smaller compared to the cold component. The effect of the fine tuning of the frequency on the bremsstrahlung spectrum, beam intensities and beam shape is presented.

  20. Diffraction of high-intensity field in focal region as dynamics of nonlinear system with low-frequency dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudenko, O. V.; Hedberg, C. M.

    2015-01-01

    The stationary profile in the focal region of a focused nonlinear acoustic wave is described. Three models following from the Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya (KZ) equation with three independent variables are used: (i) the simplified one-dimensional Ostrovsky-Vakhnenko equation, (ii) the system of equations for paraxial series expansion of the acoustic field in powers of transverse coordinates, and (iii) the KZ equation reduced to two independent variables. The structure of the last equation is analogous to the Westervelt equation. Linearization through the Legendre transformation and reduction to the well-studied Euler-Tricomi equation is shown. At high intensities the stationary profiles are periodic sequences of arc sections having singularities of derivative in their matching points. The occurrence of arc profiles was pointed out by Makov. These appear in different nonlinear systems with low-frequency dispersion. Profiles containing discontinuities (shock fronts) change their form while passing through the focal region and are non-stationary waves. The numerical estimations of maximum pressure and intensity in the focus agree with computer calculations and experimental measurements.

  1. Uncertainty Characterization and Delineation of Nonstationarity in Intensity-Duration-Frequency Curves of Precipitation Relevant for Infrastructural Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, D.; Ganguly, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the degree of stationarity in intensity-duration-frequency (IDF) curves of precipitation extremes relates to the design and maintenance of hydraulic infrastructures and hence to flood resilience. Statistical analysis of observations and climate models forced with projected emissions scenarios point to more frequent and intense precipitation extremes at global and century scales. A statistical delineation of changes in IDF curves at scales relevant for infrastructures has proved elusive, owing to significant spatial variability, data and model quality, and estimation uncertainties. The contribution of climate internal variability, in addition to thresholds and intermittences, has not received much attention in the literature. However, this relatively irreducible component of the uncertainty may dominate for decadal planning horizons, especially at the spatial scales relevant for hydraulic infrastructures. A characterization of the irreducible uncertainties, which in turn yields an envelope of plausible scenarios, may need to be a critical pathway for resilient engineering. Statistical and information theoretic methods are developed or adapted from the literature to characterize predictability and nonstationarity of IDF curves. Risk management methods are examined to develop best practices for translating the characterization of irreducible uncertainty to guidelines for infrastructural decisions and resource allocations.

  2. Construction of intensity-duration-frequency (IDF) curves for precipitation with annual maxima data in Rwanda, Central Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demarée, G. R.; Van de Vyver, H.

    2013-06-01

    Detailed probabilistic information on the intensity of precipitation in Central Africa is highly needed in order to cope with the risk analysis of natural hazards. In the mountainous areas of Rwanda land slides frequently occur and might cause a heavy toll in human lives. The establishment of Intensity-Duration-Frequency curves for precipitation in Central Africa remains a difficult task as adequate long-term data sets for short aggregation times are usually not available. In 1962 recording raingauges were installed at several stations in Rwanda. According to the climatological procedures in use at that time in Congo, Rwanda and Burundi, maximum monthly and annual precipitation depths for fixed-time durations of 15, 30, 45, 60 and 120 min were determined from the rainfall charts. The data set is completed by the monthly and annual daily precipitation extremes from the non-recording raingauge at the stations. The authors used the dataset to establish the IDF-curves for precipitation at 3 stations in Rwanda having more than 20 yr of operation. The fixed-hour intervals of multiple 15 min require the use of a technique converting data from fixed-time intervals into data of arbitrary starting intervals. Therefore, the van Montfort technique was used.

  3. [Suppression of nonspecific resistance of the body under the effect of extremely high frequency electromagnetic radiation of low intensity].

    PubMed

    Kolomytseva, M P; Gapeev, A B; Sadovnikov, V B; Chemeris, N K

    2002-01-01

    The dynamics of leukocyte number and functional activity of peripheral blood neutrophils under whole-body exposure of healthy mice to low-intensity extremely-high-frequency electromagnetic radiation (EHF EMR, 42.0 GHz, 0.15 mW/cm2, 20 min daily) was studied. It was shown that the phagocytic activity of peripheral blood neutrophils was suppressed by about 50% (p < 0.01 as compared with the sham-exposed control) in 2-3 h after the single exposure to EHF EMR. The effect persisted for 1 day after the exposure, and then the phagocytic activity of neutrophils returned to the norm within 3 days. A significant modification of the leukocyte blood profile in mice exposed to EHF EMR for 5 days was observed after the cessation of exposures: the number of leukocytes increased by 44% (p < 0.05 as compared with sham-exposed animals), mostly due to an increase in the lymphocyte content. The supposition was made that EHF EMR effects can be mediated via the metabolic systems of arachidonic acid and the stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity, with subsequent increase in the intracellular cAMP level. The results indicated that the whole-body exposure of healthy mice to low-intensity EHF EMR has a profound effect on the indices of nonspecific immunity.

  4. Prognostic factors in critically ill cancer patients admitted to the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Aygencel, Gulbin; Turkoglu, Melda; Turkoz Sucak, Gulsan; Benekli, Mustafa

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this study is to identify factors predicting intensive care unit (ICU) mortality in cancer patients admitted to a medical ICU. We conducted a retrospective study in 162 consecutive cancer patients admitted to the medical ICU of a 1000-bed university hospital between January 2009 and June 2012. Medical history, physical and laboratory findings on admission, and therapeutic interventions during ICU stay were recorded. The study end point was ICU mortality. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify independent risk factors for ICU mortality. The study cohort consisted of 104 (64.2%) patients with solid tumors and 58 patients (35.8%) with hematological malignancies. The major causes of ICU admission were sepsis/septic shock (66.7%) and respiratory failure (63.6%), respectively. Overall ICU mortality rate was 55 % (n=89). The ICU mortality rates were similar in patients with hematological malignancies and solid tumors (57% vs 53.8%; P=.744). Four variables were independent predictors for ICU mortality in cancer patients: the remission status of the underlying cancer on ICU admission (odds ratio [OR], 0.113; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.027-0.48; P=.003), Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score (OR, 1.12; 95% CI, 1.032-1.215; P=.007), sepsis/septic shock during ICU stay (OR, 8.94; 95% CI, 2.28-35; P=.002), and vasopressor requirement (OR 16.84; 95% CI, 3.98-71.24; P=.0001). Although Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score (OR, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.054-1.61; P=.014), admission through emergency service (OR, 0.005; 95% CI, 0.00-0.69; P=.035), and vasopressor requirement during ICU stay (OR, 140.64; 95% CI, 3.59-5505.5; P=.008) were independent predictors for ICU mortality in patients with hematological malignancies, Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score (OR, 1.83; 95% CI, 1.29-2.6; P=.001), lactate dehydrogenase level on admission (OR, 1.002; 95% CI, 1-1.005; P=.028), sepsis/septic shock during ICU stay (OR

  5. Long-term changes in the frequency, intensity and duration of extreme storm surge events in southern Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cid, Alba; Menéndez, Melisa; Castanedo, Sonia; Abascal, Ana J.; Méndez, Fernando J.; Medina, Raúl

    2016-03-01

    Storm surges are one of the major hazards in coastal regions; positive surge events are added to tidal levels, increasing the risk of coastal flooding by extreme water levels. In this study, changes in the frequency (occurrence rate per year), intensity (magnitude of the extremes) and duration of extreme storm surge events from 1948 to 2013 are investigated using a non-stationary statistical model. To fully model extremes, the time-dependent statistical model combines the Generalized Pareto Distribution (GPD) for studying exceedances over the threshold, and the non-homogeneous Poisson (P) process for studying the occurrence rate of these exceedances. Long-term trends and the association between storm surges and the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) are represented in the model by allowing the parameters in the GPD-P model to be time-dependent. Different spatial patterns in the three analysed properties of storm surges are found in the Atlantic region and the Mediterranean Sea. The up to now uncharted regional patterns of storm surge duration show completely different values between the Atlantic and the Mediterranean regions, being the duration of storms surges in the Atlantic two times longer than the duration in the Mediterranean. For the last half century, we detect positive and negative spatial trends in terms of intensity of storm surge but only significant decreasing rates, of around 2 %, in the number of extreme events per year. Regarding duration, we find positive trends in certain Mediterranean areas, with durations of extreme events increasing at a rate of 0.5-1.5 h/year. Values for the 50-year return level are also estimated, showing a large spatial variability with relatively higher values along the coast. A clear sensitivity of extreme storm surges to negative NAO index is detected, specifically in the western Mediterranean basin. Results show that negative NAO phases lead to an increase in the number of extreme events and also in their intensity.

  6. Delirium frequency among advanced cancer patients presenting to an emergency department: A prospective, randomized, observational study.

    PubMed

    Elsayem, Ahmed F; Bruera, Eduardo; Valentine, Alan D; Warneke, Carla L; Yeung, Sai-Ching J; Page, Valda D; Wood, Geri L; Silvestre, Julio; Holmes, Holly M; Brock, Patricia A; Todd, Knox H

    2016-09-15

    The frequency of delirium among patients with cancer presenting to the emergency department (ED) is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine delirium frequency and recognition by ED physicians among patients with advanced cancer presenting to the ED of The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. The study population was a random sample of English-speaking patients with advanced cancer who presented to the ED and met the study criteria. All patients were assessed with the Confusion Assessment Method (CAM) to screen for delirium and with the Memorial Delirium Assessment Scale (MDAS) to measure delirium severity (mild, ≤15; moderate, 16-22; and severe, ≥23). ED physicians were also asked whether their patients were delirious. Twenty-two of the 243 enrolled patients (9%) had CAM-positive delirium, and their median MDAS score was 14 (range, 9-21 [30-point scale]). The median age of the enrolled patients was 62 years (range, 19-89 years). Patients with delirium had a poorer performance status than patients without delirium (P < .001); however, the 2 groups did not differ in other characteristics. Ten of the 99 patients who were 65 years old or older (10%) had CAM-positive delirium, whereas 12 of the 144 patients younger than 65 years (8%) did (P = .6). According to the MDAS scores, delirium was mild in 18 patients (82%) and moderate in 4 patients (18%). Physicians correctly identified delirium in 13 of the CAM-positive delirious patients (59%). Delirium is relatively frequent and is underdiagnosed by physicians in patients with advanced cancer who are visiting the ED. Further research is needed to identify the optimal screening tool for delirium in ED. Cancer 2016. © 2016 American Cancer Society. Cancer 2016;122:2918-2924. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  7. The changes of the frequency specific impedance of the human body due to the resonance in the kHz range in cancer diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalak, K. P.; Nawrocka-Bogusz, H.

    2011-12-01

    The frequency-specific absorption of kHz signals has been postulated for different tissues, trace elements, vitamins, toxins, pathogens, allergens etc. for low-power (μV) signals. An increase in the impedance of the human body is observed only up to the given power of the applied signal. The highest amplification of the given signal being damped by the body makes it possible to determine the intensity of the given process in the body (e.g. amount of the toxin, trace element, intensity of the allergy) being connected with a given frequency spectrum of the signal. The mechanism of frequency-specific absorption can be explained by means of the Quantum Field Theory being applied to the structure of the water. Substantially high coincidence between the frequencies of the rotation of free quasi-excited electrons in coherent domains of water and the frequencies being used in the MORA diagnostics (Med-Tronic GmbH, EN ISO 13485, EN ISO 9001) can be observed. These frequencies are located in the proximity of f = 7kHz · i (i = 1,3,5,7,...). This fact suggests that the coherent domains with the admixtures of the given substances create structure-specific coherent domains that possess frequency-specific absorption spectra. The diagnostic tool called "MORA System diagnosis" was used to investigate 102 patients with different types and stages of cancer. Many signals were observed to be absorbed by many cancer patients, e.g.: 'Cellular defense system', 'Degeneration tendencies', Manganese, Magnesium, Zinc, Selenium, Vitamin E, Glutamine, Glutathione, Cysteine, Candida albicans, Mycosis. The results confirm the role of oxidative stress, immunological system deficiency and mitochondria malfunction in the development of cancer.

  8. Light-Intensity Activity Attenuates Functional Decline in Older Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Cindy K.; Morey, Miriam C.; Desmond, Renee A.; Cohen, Harvey Jay; Sloane, Richard; Snyder, Denise C.; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    While moderate-vigorous intensity physical activities (MVPA) confer the greatest health benefits, evidence suggests that light-intensity activities are also beneficial, particularly for older adults and individuals with moderate-severe comorbidities. Purpose To examine cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between light-intensity activity and physical function in older cancer survivors at increased risk for age- and treatment-related comorbidities, including accelerated functional decline. Methods The analysis included data from 641 breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer survivors (54% female) aged 65 and older who participated in a 1-year, home-based diet and exercise intervention designed to reduce the rate of physical function decline. ANCOVA was used to compare means of physical function across levels of PA intensity (low-light (LLPA): 1.5-2.0 METs; high-light (HLPA): 2.1-2.9 METs; MVPA: ≥3.0 METs). Results In cross-sectional analyses, increasing tertiles of light-intensity activity were associated with higher scores for all 3 measures of physical function (all p-values <0.005), after adjustment for age, sex, BMI, comorbidity, symptoms, and MVPA. Associations were stronger for HLPA than for LLPA. Compared with survivors who decreased or remained stable in MVPA and HLPA at the post-intervention follow-up, those who increased in HLPA, but decreased or remained stable in MVPA, reported higher physical function scores (LSMeans (95% CI): SF-36 physical function subscale: -5.58 (-7.96, -3.20) vs. -2.54 (-5.83, 0.75), p=0.14; basic lower extremity function: -2.00 (-3.45, -0.55) vs. 0.28 (-1.72, 2.28), p=0.07; advanced lower extremity function: -2.58 (-4.00, -1.15) vs. 0.44 (-1.52, 2.40), p=0.01). Conclusion Our findings suggest that increasing light-intensity activities, especially HLPA, may be a viable approach to reducing the rate of physical function decline in individuals who are unable or reluctant to initiate or maintain adequate levels of moderate-intensity

  9. Expert Consensus Contouring Guidelines for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Esophageal and Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Abraham J.; Bosch, Walter R.; Chang, Daniel T.; Hong, Theodore S.; Jabbour, Salma K.; Kleinberg, Lawrence R.; Mamon, Harvey J.; Thomas, Charles R.; Goodman, Karyn A.

    2015-07-15

    Purpose/Objective(s): Current guidelines for esophageal cancer contouring are derived from traditional 2-dimensional fields based on bony landmarks, and they do not provide sufficient anatomic detail to ensure consistent contouring for more conformal radiation therapy techniques such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Therefore, we convened an expert panel with the specific aim to derive contouring guidelines and generate an atlas for the clinical target volume (CTV) in esophageal or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer. Methods and Materials: Eight expert academically based gastrointestinal radiation oncologists participated. Three sample cases were chosen: a GEJ cancer, a distal esophageal cancer, and a mid-upper esophageal cancer. Uniform computed tomographic (CT) simulation datasets and accompanying diagnostic positron emission tomographic/CT images were distributed to each expert, and the expert was instructed to generate gross tumor volume (GTV) and CTV contours for each case. All contours were aggregated and subjected to quantitative analysis to assess the degree of concordance between experts and to generate draft consensus contours. The panel then refined these contours to generate the contouring atlas. Results: The κ statistics indicated substantial agreement between panelists for each of the 3 test cases. A consensus CTV atlas was generated for the 3 test cases, each representing common anatomic presentations of esophageal cancer. The panel agreed on guidelines and principles to facilitate the generalizability of the atlas to individual cases. Conclusions: This expert panel successfully reached agreement on contouring guidelines for esophageal and GEJ IMRT and generated a reference CTV atlas. This atlas will serve as a reference for IMRT contours for clinical practice and prospective trial design. Subsequent patterns of failure analyses of clinical datasets using these guidelines may require modification in the future.

  10. Efficacy of Pulsed 405-nm Light-Emitting Diodes for Antimicrobial Photodynamic Inactivation: Effects of Intensity, Frequency, and Duty Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, Jonathan B.; Given, Martin J.; Wilson, Mark P.; Judd, Martin D.; Timoshkin, Igor V.; MacGregor, Scott J.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective: This study investigates possible advantages in pulsed over continuous 405-nm light-emitting diode (LED) light for bacterial inactivation and energy efficiency. Background: Alternative nonantibiotic methods of disinfection and infection control have become of significant interest. Recent studies have demonstrated the application of systems using 405-nm LEDs for continuous disinfection of the clinical environment, and also for potential treatment of contaminated wounds. Methods: Liquid suspensions of 103 colony-forming units/mL populations of Staphylococcus aureus were subject to pulsed 405-nm light of different frequencies, duty cycles, and intensities and for different lengths of time. Results: Pulsed exposures with the same average irradiance of 16 mW/cm2 and varying duty cycle (25%, 50%, 75%) showed very similar performance compared with continuous exposures, with 95–98% reduction of S. aureus achieved for all duty cycles. The pulsing frequency was varied in intervals from 100 Hz to 10 kHz and appeared to have little effect on antimicrobial efficacy. However, when comparing pulsed with continuous exposure, an improvement in inactivation per unit optical energy was achieved, with results showing an increase of approximately 83% in optical efficiency. Conclusions: These results suggest that under pulsed conditions, a lower energy consumption and lower perceived brightness could be achieved, thus potentially providing improved operating conditions for medical/infection control applications without compromising antimicrobial efficacy. PMID:27759498

  11. [Effect of Low-Intensity 900 MHz Frequency Electromagnetic Radiation on Rat Brain Enzyme Activities Linked to Energy Metabolism].

    PubMed

    Petrosyan, M S; Nersesova, L S; Gazaryants, M G; Meliksetyan, G O; Malakyan, M G; Bajinyan, S A; Akopian, J I

    2015-01-01

    The research deals with the effect of low-intensity 900 MHz frequency electromagnetic radiation (EMR), power density 25 μW/cm2, on the following rat brain and blood serum enzyme activities: creatine kinase (CK), playing a central role in the process of storing and distributing the cell energy, as well as alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) that play a key role in providing the conjunction of carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism. The comparative analysis of the changes in the enzyme activity studied at different times following the two-hour single, as well as fractional, radiation equivalent of the total time showed that the most radiosensitive enzyme is the brain creatine kinase, which may then be recommended as a marker of the radio frequency radiation impact. According to the analysis of the changing dynamics of the CK, ALT and AST activity level, with time these changes acquire the adaptive character and are directed to compensate the damaged cell energy metabolism.

  12. Efficacy of Pulsed 405-nm Light-Emitting Diodes for Antimicrobial Photodynamic Inactivation: Effects of Intensity, Frequency, and Duty Cycle.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Jonathan B; Maclean, Michelle; Given, Martin J; Wilson, Mark P; Judd, Martin D; Timoshkin, Igor V; MacGregor, Scott J

    2017-03-01

    This study investigates possible advantages in pulsed over continuous 405-nm light-emitting diode (LED) light for bacterial inactivation and energy efficiency. Alternative nonantibiotic methods of disinfection and infection control have become of significant interest. Recent studies have demonstrated the application of systems using 405-nm LEDs for continuous disinfection of the clinical environment, and also for potential treatment of contaminated wounds. Liquid suspensions of 10(3) colony-forming units/mL populations of Staphylococcus aureus were subject to pulsed 405-nm light of different frequencies, duty cycles, and intensities and for different lengths of time. Pulsed exposures with the same average irradiance of 16 mW/cm(2) and varying duty cycle (25%, 50%, 75%) showed very similar performance compared with continuous exposures, with 95-98% reduction of S. aureus achieved for all duty cycles. The pulsing frequency was varied in intervals from 100 Hz to 10 kHz and appeared to have little effect on antimicrobial efficacy. However, when comparing pulsed with continuous exposure, an improvement in inactivation per unit optical energy was achieved, with results showing an increase of approximately 83% in optical efficiency. These results suggest that under pulsed conditions, a lower energy consumption and lower perceived brightness could be achieved, thus potentially providing improved operating conditions for medical/infection control applications without compromising antimicrobial efficacy.

  13. Frequency of microorganisms isolated in patients with bacteremia in intensive care units in Colombia and their resistance profiles.

    PubMed

    Cortes, Jorge Alberto; Leal, Aura Lucía; Montañez, Anita María; Buitrago, Giancarlo; Castillo, Juan Sebastián; Guzman, Lucy

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the most frequently found bacterial microorganisms in bloodstream isolates taken from patients in intensive care units in Colombia and their resistance profiles. This was a multicentre descriptive observational study that was carried out between January 2001 and June 2008 with laboratory data from 33 participating hospitals in a surveillance network. The most frequently found microorganisms were coagulase-negative Staphylococci 39.6%, Staphylococcus aureus 12.3%, Klebsiella pneumoniae 8.2%, Escherichia coli 5.7%, Acinetobacter baumannii, 4.0% and Pseudomonas aeruginosa 3.8%. Coagulase-negative Staphylococci registered greater than 70% oxacillin resistance rate. S. aureus presented a change in its multiresistance profile during the years of follow-up. There was a trend towards a lower resistance rate among E. coli and K. pneumoniae isolates during the study period while A. baumannii carbapenem resistance rate exceeded 50%. There has been a change in the frequency of species being isolated with a higher frequency of enterobacteriaceae compared to Gram-positive microorganisms, in general with a high resistance rate. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  14. Superdressed H+2 and H2+3 molecular ions in intense, high-frequency laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, T.; Bandrauk, A. D.

    1995-01-01

    We study the radiative distortion of the lowest two potential surfaces of H+2 and H2+3 molecular ions in a superintense (I>~1016 W/cm2), high-frequency, linearly polarized laser field, using the space-translation or acceleration representation of laser-matter interaction. The electron clouds undergo field-induced redistribution in the molecular ions due to the presence of field-induced ``dichotomous'' dressed Coulomb potentials. Such super-field-dressed systems have a greater tendency to transfer electronic charge into the region between the nuclei and hence become more ``stable'' than the field-free ones. For example, at the equilibrium nuclear separation the dissociation energy of the superdressed H+2 is found to increase by about 20% compared with the field-free H+2. More dramatically, the lowest two surfaces of H2+3 that are repulsive in zero field become attractive (bonding) in the presence of an intense, high-frequency field. The possibility of molecules becoming stabilized against both ionization and dissociation in superintense fields is discussed.

  15. An 11-channel radio frequency phased array coil for magnetic resonance guided high-intensity focused ultrasound of the breast.

    PubMed

    Minalga, E; Payne, A; Merrill, R; Todd, N; Vijayakumar, S; Kholmovski, E; Parker, D L; Hadley, J R

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a radio frequency phased array coil was built to image the breast in conjunction with a magnetic resonance guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU) device designed specifically to treat the breast in a treatment cylinder with reduced water volume. The MRgHIFU breast coil was comprised of a 10-channel phased array coil placed around an MRgHIFU treatment cylinder where nearest-neighbor decoupling was achieved with capacitive decoupling in a shared leg. In addition a single loop coil was placed at the chest wall making a total of 11 channels. The radio frequency coil array design presented in this work was chosen based on ease of implementation, increased visualization into the treatment cylinder, image reconstruction speed, temporal resolution, and resulting signal-to-noise ratio profiles. This work presents a dedicated 11-channel coil for imaging of the breast tissue in the MRgHIFU setup without obstruction of the ultrasound beam and, specifically, compares its performance in signal-to-noise, overall imaging time, and temperature measurement accuracy to that of the standard single chest-loop coil typically used in breast MRgHIFU.

  16. Frequency tuning and intensity coding of sound in the auditory periphery of the lake sturgeon, Acipenser fulvescens.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Michaela; Fay, Richard R; Popper, Arthur N

    2010-05-01

    Acipenser fulvescens, the lake sturgeon, belongs to one of the few extant non-teleost ray-finned (bony) fishes. The sturgeons (family Acipenseridae) have a phylogenetic history that dates back about 250 million years. The study reported here is the first investigation of peripheral coding strategies for spectral analysis in the auditory system in a non-teleost bony fish. We used a shaker system to simulate the particle motion component of sound during electrophysiological recordings of isolated single units from the eighth nerve innervating the saccule and lagena. Background activity and response characteristics of saccular and lagenar afferents (such as thresholds, response-level functions and temporal firing) resembled the ones found in teleosts. The distribution of best frequencies also resembled data in teleosts (except for Carassius auratus, goldfish) tested with the same stimulation method. The saccule and lagena in A. fulvescens contain otoconia, in contrast to the solid otoliths found in teleosts, however, this difference in otolith structure did not appear to affect threshold, frequency tuning, intensity- or temporal responses of auditory afferents. In general, the physiological characteristics common to A. fulvescens, teleosts and land vertebrates reflect important functions of the auditory system that may have been conserved throughout the evolution of vertebrates.

  17. Frequency tuning and intensity coding of sound in the auditory periphery of the lake sturgeon, Acipenser fulvescens

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Michaela; Fay, Richard R.; Popper, Arthur N.

    2010-01-01

    Acipenser fulvescens, the lake sturgeon, belongs to one of the few extant non-teleost ray-finned (bony) fishes. The sturgeons (family Acipenseridae) have a phylogenetic history that dates back about 250 million years. The study reported here is the first investigation of peripheral coding strategies for spectral analysis in the auditory system in a non-teleost bony fish. We used a shaker system to simulate the particle motion component of sound during electrophysiological recordings of isolated single units from the eighth nerve innervating the saccule and lagena. Background activity and response characteristics of saccular and lagenar afferents (such as thresholds, response–level functions and temporal firing) resembled the ones found in teleosts. The distribution of best frequencies also resembled data in teleosts (except for Carassius auratus, goldfish) tested with the same stimulation method. The saccule and lagena in A. fulvescens contain otoconia, in contrast to the solid otoliths found in teleosts, however, this difference in otolith structure did not appear to affect threshold, frequency tuning, intensity- or temporal responses of auditory afferents. In general, the physiological characteristics common to A. fulvescens, teleosts and land vertebrates reflect important functions of the auditory system that may have been conserved throughout the evolution of vertebrates. PMID:20400642

  18. Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) in head and neck cancers - an overview.

    PubMed

    Nutting, C M

    2012-07-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) is effective in head and neck cancers. Following RT, dryness and dysphagia are the 2 major sequelae which alter the quality of life (QOL) significantly in these patients. There is randomized evidence that Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) effectively spares the parotid glands. IMRT has been attempted in all head and neck subsites with encouraging results (discussed below). Role of IMRT in swallowing structure (constrictor muscles) sparing is less clear.Further improvement in results may be possible by using functional imaging at the time of RT planning and by image guidance/verification at the time of treatment delivery. The following text discusses these issues in detail. Head and neck cancer, IMRT.

  19. [High-intensity focused ultrasound and prostate cancer: technology, state of the art and future].

    PubMed

    Vespasiani, G; Asimakopoulos, A D; Finazzi Agrò, E; Virgili, G

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND. The potential applications of the high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) as a minimally invasive therapy of the localized prostate cancer explain the growing interest of the urologic community towards this technique. HIFU has been assessed for its role in the treatment of localized prostate cancer in patients who otherwise would not have benefited from surgery, and in local recurrences after radiation failure. Methods. Relevant information on HIFU treatment was identified through a literature search of published studies. RESULTS. High biochemical efficacy, excellent tumor local control and favorable mid- and long-term oncological data with a low morbidity rate have been shown in many series of patients. CONCLUSIONS. Although HIFU is a recent and emerging technology, it has been well studied and developed to a point that HIFU will undoubtedly be an effective alternative to radiation therapy.

  20. Barrett's oesophagus: frequency and prediction of dysplasia and cancer.

    PubMed

    Falk, Gary W

    2015-02-01

    The incidence of oesophageal adenocarcinoma is continuing to increase at an alarming rate in the Western world today. Barrett's oesophagus is a clearly recognized risk factor for the development of oesophageal adenocarcinoma, but the overwhelming majority of patients with Barrett's oesophagus will never develop oesophageal cancer. A number of endoscopic, histologic and epidemiologic risk factors identify Barrett's oesophagus patients at increased risk for progression to high-grade dysplasia and oesophageal adenocarcinoma. Endoscopic factors include segment length, mucosal abnormalities as seemingly trivial as oesophagitis and the 12 to 6 o'clock hemisphere of the oesophagus. Both intestinal metaplasia and low grade dysplasia, the latter only if confirmed by a pathologist with expertise in Barrett's oesophagus pathologic interpretation are the histologic risk factors for progression. Epidemiologic risk factors include ageing, male gender, obesity, and smoking. Factors that may protect against the development of adenocarcinoma include a diet rich in fruits and vegetables, and the use of proton pump inhibitors, aspirin/NSAIDs and statins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Proton therapy versus intensity modulated x-ray therapy in the treatment of prostate cancer: Estimating secondary cancer risks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontenot, Jonas David

    External beam radiation therapy is used to treat nearly half of the more than 200,000 new cases of prostate cancer diagnosed in the United States each year. During a radiation therapy treatment, healthy tissues in the path of the therapeutic beam are exposed to high doses. In addition, the whole body is exposed to a low-dose bath of unwanted scatter radiation from the pelvis and leakage radiation from the treatment unit. As a result, survivors of radiation therapy for prostate cancer face an elevated risk of developing a radiogenic second cancer. Recently, proton therapy has been shown to reduce the dose delivered by the therapeutic beam to normal tissues during treatment compared to intensity modulated x-ray therapy (IMXT, the current standard of care). However, the magnitude of stray radiation doses from proton therapy, and their impact on this incidence of radiogenic second cancers, was not known. The risk of a radiogenic second cancer following proton therapy for prostate cancer relative to IMXT was determined for 3 patients of large, median, and small anatomical stature. Doses delivered to healthy tissues from the therapeutic beam were obtained from treatment planning system calculations. Stray doses from IMXT were taken from the literature, while stray doses from proton therapy were simulated using a Monte Carlo model of a passive scattering treatment unit and an anthropomorphic phantom. Baseline risk models were taken from the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation VII report. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to characterize the uncertainty of risk calculations to uncertainties in the risk model, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of neutrons for carcinogenesis, and inter-patient anatomical variations. The risk projections revealed that proton therapy carries a lower risk for radiogenic second cancer incidence following prostate irradiation compared to IMXT. The sensitivity analysis revealed that the results of the risk analysis depended only

  2. Evolution in Intensity and Frequency of Extreme Events of Precipitation in Northeast Region and Brazilian Amazon in XXI Century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, P. M.; Veiga, J. A.; Correia, F. S.; Brito, A. L.

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this research was evaluate changes in frequency and intensity of extreme events of precipitation in Brazilian Amazon and Northeast Region, doubling CO2 concentration in agreement of IPCC A2 emissions scenarios (Nakicenovic et al., 2001). For this evaluation was used ETA model (Chou et al., 2011), forced with CCSM3 Global model data (Meehl, 2006) to run 4 experiments, only for January, February and March: 1980-1990, 2000-2010, 2040-2050 and 2090-2100. Using the first decade as reference (1980-1990), was evaluated changes occurred in following decades, with a methodology to classify extremes events adapted from Frich (2002) and Gao (2006). Higher was the class, more intense is the event. An increase of 25% was observed in total precipitation in Brazilian Amazon for the end of XXI century and 12% for extreme events type 1, 9% for events type 2 and 10% for type 3. By the other hand, a 17% decrease of precipitation in Brazilian Northeast was observed, and a pronounced decay of 24% and 15% in extreme events contribution type 1 and 2 to total amount of precipitation, respectively. The difference between total normal type events was positive in this three decades compared with reference decade 1980-1990, varying positively from 4 to 6 thousand events included in normality by decade, these events was decreased in your majority of Class 1 events, which presented a decay of at least 3.500 events by each decade. This suggests an intensification of extreme events, considering that the amount of precipitation by class increased, and the number of events by class decreased. To Northeast region, an increasing in 9% of contribution to events type 3 class was observed, as well as in the frequency of this type of events (about of 700 more events). Major decreasing in number of classes extreme events occur in 2000-2010, to classes 1 and 3, with 7,2 and 5,6%, and by the end of century in class 3, with 4,5%. For the three analyzed decades a total decrease of 8.400 events was

  3. Early Breast Cancer Diagnosis Using Microwave Imaging via Space-Frequency Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vemulapalli, Spandana

    The conventional breast cancer detection methods have limitations ranging from ionizing radiations, low specificity to high cost. These limitations make way for a suitable alternative called Microwave Imaging, as a screening technique in the detection of breast cancer. The discernible differences between the benign, malignant and healthy breast tissues and the ability to overcome the harmful effects of ionizing radiations make microwave imaging, a feasible breast cancer detection technique. Earlier studies have shown the variation of electrical properties of healthy and malignant tissues as a function of frequency and hence stimulates high bandwidth requirement. A Ultrawideband, Wideband and Narrowband arrays have been designed, simulated and optimized for high (44%), medium (33%) and low (7%) bandwidths respectively, using the EM (electromagnetic software) called FEKO. These arrays are then used to illuminate the breast model (phantom) and the received backscattered signals are obtained in the near field for each case. The Microwave Imaging via Space-Time (MIST) beamforming algorithm in the frequency domain, is next applied to these near field backscattered monostatic frequency response signals for the image reconstruction of the breast model. The main purpose of this investigation is to access the impact of bandwidth and implement a novel imaging technique for use in the early detection of breast cancer. Earlier studies show the implementation of the MIST imaging algorithm on the time domain signals via a frequency domain beamformer. The performance evaluation of the imaging algorithm on the frequency response signals has been carried out in the frequency domain. The energy profile of the breast in the spatial domain is created via the frequency domain Parseval's theorem. The beamformer weights calculated using these the MIST algorithm (not including the effect of the skin) has been calculated for Ultrawideband, Wideband and Narrowband arrays, respectively

  4. Effects of the intensity of masking noise on ear canal recorded low-frequency cochlear microphonic waveforms in normal hearing subjects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming

    2014-07-01

    Compared to auditory brainstem responses (ABRs), cochlear microphonics (CMs) may be more appropriate to serve as a supplement to the test of otoacoustic emissions (OAEs). Researchers have shown that low-frequency CMs from the apical cochlea are measurable at the tympanic membrane using high-pass masking noise. Our objective is to study the effect of such noise at different intensities on low-frequency CMs recorded at the ear canal, which is not completely known. Six components were involved in this CM measurement including an ear canal electrode (1), a relatively long and low-frequency toneburst (2), and high-pass masking noise at different intensities (3). The rest components include statistical analysis based on multiple human subjects (4), curve modeling based on amplitudes of CM waveforms (CMWs) and noise intensity (5), and a technique based on electrocochleography (ECochG or ECoG) (6). Results show that low-frequency CMWs appeared clearly. The CMW amplitude decreased with an increase in noise level. It decreased first slowly, then faster, and finally slowly again. In conclusion, when masked with high-pass noise, the low-frequency CMs are measurable at the human ear canal. Such noise reduces the low-frequency CM amplitude. The reduction is noise-intensity dependent but not completely linear. The reduction may be caused by the excited basal cochlea which the low-frequency has to travel and pass through. Although not completely clear, six mechanisms related to such reduction are discussed.

  5. Higher frequency of familial clustering of prostate cancer in French-Canadian men.

    PubMed

    Filion, Edith; Taussky, Daniel; Bahary, Jean-Paul; Maugard, Christine M

    2007-10-01

    Prostate cancer is the second cause of cancer related death in North American men. We investigated the frequency of familial clustering in a French-Canadian population of prostate cancer cases. Between October 2004 and September 2005, 179 consecutively seen patients with localized prostate cancer identified each of their parents as being of French-Canadian descent. They were asked for their family history of cancer in first-degree relatives, age at diagnosis, whether affected relatives were alive, age and markers of tumor aggressiveness, including prostate specific antigen, Gleason and disease stage. ANOVA was used to compare the distribution of quantitative factors according to qualitative factors identified in our population. Differences between qualitative factors were assessed by the Fisher exact test. All p values were 2-sided. Mean age at diagnosis was 67 years. A total of 45 French-Canadian patients (25.1%) had at least 1 first-degree relative with prostate cancer, including 34 (19%) with 1 first-degree relative, 9 with a father-son pair, 25 with a brother-brother pair and 11 (6.1%) with at least 2 first-degree relatives. In our series the frequency of familial clustering defined by at least 1 relative with prostate cancer was high. We found a higher percent of French-Canadian men with at least 1 first-degree relative with prostate cancer than what was previously reported for an unselected population in Canada (25.1% vs 14.7%, p <0.0001). Those preliminary results open a new perspective to a better understanding of familial prostate cancer in the Province of Quebec.

  6. A high frequency of BRCA mutations in young black women with breast cancer residing in Florida.

    PubMed

    Pal, Tuya; Bonner, Devon; Cragun, Deborah; Monteiro, Alvaro N A; Phelan, Catherine; Servais, Lily; Kim, Jongphil; Narod, Steven A; Akbari, Mohammad R; Vadaparampil, Susan T

    2015-12-01

    Black women are disproportionately affected with triple-negative breast cancer and have relatively poor survival. To the authors' knowledge, it is not known to what extent differences in the clinical presentation of breast cancer between non-Hispanic white women and black women can be accounted for by the presence of mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. The authors sought to evaluate the frequency of BRCA pathogenic variants in a population-based sample of young black women with breast cancer. Black women diagnosed with invasive breast cancer at age ≤50 years from 2009 to 2012 were recruited to the study through the Florida Cancer Registry. Participants underwent genetic counseling, completed a study questionnaire, and consented to release of their medical records. Saliva specimens were collected for BRCA sequencing and large rearrangement testing through multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. A DNA sample was evaluated for 396 women, 49 of whom (12.4%) had a mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2. Eight recurrent mutations accounted for 49% of all pathogenic variants. To the authors' knowledge, the prevalence of BRCA mutations among the Florida-based sample of young black women with breast cancer in the current study exceeds that previously reported for non-Hispanic white women. It is appropriate to recommend BRCA testing in all young black women with invasive breast cancer. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  7. Location of residual cancer after transrectal high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation for clinically localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Boutier, Romain; Girouin, Nicolas; Cheikh, Alexandre Ben; Belot, Aurélien; Rabilloud, Muriel; Gelet, Albert; Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Rouvière, Olivier

    2011-12-01

    What's known on the subject ? and What does the study add? Transrectal High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) ablation has been used as a minimally invasive treatment for localized prostate cancer for 15 years. Five-year disease-free survival rates of 66-78% have been reported, challenging the results of external-beam radiation therapy. Usually, a 6-mm safety margin is used in the apex to preserve the urinary sphincter and potency. The influence of this 6-mm margin on the results of the treatment has never been assessed. This retrospective study of a cohort of 99 patients who underwent systematic biopsy 3-6 months after HIFU ablation for prostate cancer (with a 6-mm safety margin in the apex) shows that post-HIFU residual cancer is found more frequently in the apex. Therefore, new strategies improving the prostate destruction at the apex while preserving the urinary continence need to be found. • To evaluate whether the location (apex/midgland/base) of prostate cancer influences the risk of incomplete transrectal high-intensity focused ultrasonography (HIFU) ablation. • We retrospectively studied 99 patients who underwent prostate cancer HIFU ablation (Ablatherm; EDAP, Vaulx-en-Velin, France) with a 6-mm safety margin at the apex, and had systematic biopsies 3-6 months after treatment. • Locations of positive pre- and post-HIFU sextants were compared. • The present study included two analyses. First, sextants negative before and positive after treatment were recoded as positive/positive, hypothesizing that cancer had been missed at pretreatment biopsy. Second, patients with such sextants were excluded. • Pre-HIFU biopsies found cancer in all patients and in 215/594 sextants (36.2%); 55 (25.6%) positive sextants were in the apex, 86 (40%) in the midgland and 74 (34.4%) in the base. • After treatment, residual cancer was found in 36 patients (36.4%) and 50 sextants (8.4%); 30 (60%) positive sextants were in the apex, 12 (24%) in the midgland

  8. Low-frequency Intensity Variation of the South Asian High and its relationship to Boreal Summer Intraseasonal Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Wei; Ren, Xuejuan

    2016-04-01

    and northwest from day -12 to day 0 is associated with the Boreal Summer Intraseasonal Oscillation 2 (BSISO 2) of 10 - 30 days in the Asian monsoon areas. When BSISO2 propagates from subtropics to Asian continents , more anomalous rainfall appear in the Asian monsoon areas, which correspond more anomalous condensation heat release. The anomalous heating stimulate positive height anomalies with an anomalous anticyclonic circulation to its northwest in the upper troposphere, causing the strengthening of the SAH intensity. In addition, the strengthening of the west part of SAH may result from an anomalous low-frequency anticyclonic in the upper troposphere propagating northward from Arabian Sea to Iranian plateau.

  9. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy for previously irradiated, recurrent head-and-neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Jen; Kuo, Jeffrey V; Ramsinghani, Nilam S; Al-Ghazi, Muthana S A L

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate our initial experience in treating previously irradiated, recurrent head-and-neck cancers using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Between July 1997 and September 1999, 12 patients with previously irradiated, locally recurrent head-and-neck cancers were treated with IMRT. These included cancers of the nasopharynx, oropharynx, hypopharynx, larynx, paranasal sinus, skin of the head-and-neck region, and malignant melanoma. Five of these 12 patients had received radiation as the primary treatment, with doses ranging from 66.0 to 126.0 Gy, and the remaining 7 patients had undergone definitive surgeries followed by an adjuvant course of radiation treatment, with doses ranging between 36.0 and 64.8 Gy. Recurrence after the initial course of radiation occurred in periods ranging from 4 to 35 months, with 11 of 12 cases recurring fully in the fields of previous irradiation. Recurrent tumors were treated with IMRT to total doses between 30 to 70 Gy (> 50 Gy in 10 cases) prescribed at the 75% to 92% isodose lines with daily fractions of 1.8 to 2 Gy. The results revealed that acute toxicities were acceptable except in 1 patient who died of aspiration pneumonia during the course of retreatment. There were 4 complete responders, 2 partial responders, and 2 patients with stable disease in the IMRT-treated volumes. Three patients received IMRT as adjuvant treatment following salvage surgery. At 4 to 16 months of follow-up, 7 patients were still alive, with 5 revealing no evidence of disease. In conclusion, this pilot study demonstrates that IMRT offers a viable mode of re-irradiation for recurrent head-and-neck cancers in previously irradiated sites. Longer follow-up time and a larger number of patients are needed to better define the therapeutic advantage of IMRT in recurrent, previously irradiated head-and-neck cancers.

  10. Phase-noise characteristics of a 25-GHz-spaced optical frequency comb based on a phase- and intensity-modulated laser.

    PubMed

    Ishizawa, Atsushi; Nishikawa, Tadashi; Mizutori, Akira; Takara, Hidehiko; Takada, Atsushi; Sogawa, Tetsuomi; Koga, Masafumi

    2013-12-02

    We investigated phase-noise characteristics of both a phase/intensity-modulated laser with 25-GHz mode spacing and a mode-locked fiber laser with carrier-envelope-offset (CEO) locking. As the separation from the frequency of the continuous wave (CW) laser diode (LD) for a seed light source increases, the integrated phase noise of each comb mode of both the phase/intensity-modulated laser and supercontinuum light originating from it increases with the same slope as a function of mode number. The dependence of the integrated phase noise on mode number with the phase/intensity-modulated laser is much larger than with the mode-locked fiber laser of the CEO locking. However, the phase noise of the phase/intensity-modulated laser is extremely lower than that of the mode-locked fiber laser with CEO locking in the frequency region around the CW LD. The phase noise of the phase/intensity-modulated laser with 25-GHz mode spacing and that of the mode-locked fiber laser with the CEO locking could be estimated and were found to be almost the same at the wavelengths required in an f-to-2f self-referencing interferometer. Our experimental results indicate the possibility of achieving an offset-frequency-locked frequency comb with the phase/intensity-modulated laser.

  11. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Sinonasal Cancer: Improved Outcome Compared to Conventional Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dirix, Piet; Vanstraelen, Bianca; Jorissen, Mark; Vander Poorten, Vincent; Nuyts, Sandra

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate clinical outcome and toxicity of postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for malignancies of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. Methods and Materials: Between 2003 and 2008, 40 patients with cancer of the paranasal sinuses (n = 34) or nasal cavity (n = 6) received postoperative IMRT to a dose of 60 Gy (n = 21) or 66 Gy (n = 19). Treatment outcome and toxicity were retrospectively compared with that of a previous patient group (n = 41) who were also postoperatively treated to the same doses but with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy without intensity modulation, from 1992 to 2002. Results: Median follow-up was 30 months (range, 4-74 months). Two-year local control, overall survival, and disease-free survival were 76%, 89%, and 72%, respectively. Compared to the three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy treatment, IMRT resulted in significantly improved disease-free survival (60% vs. 72%; p = 0.02). No grade 3 or 4 toxicity was reported in the IMRT group, either acute or chronic. The use of IMRT significantly reduced the incidence of acute as well as late side effects, especially regarding skin toxicity, mucositis, xerostomia, and dry-eye syndrome. Conclusions: Postoperative IMRT for sinonasal cancer significantly improves disease-free survival and reduces acute as well as late toxicity. Consequently, IMRT should be considered the standard treatment modality for malignancies of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses.

  12. Comprehensive experimental and numerical investigations of the effect of frequency and acoustic intensity on the sonolytic degradation of naphthol blue black in water.

    PubMed

    Ferkous, Hamza; Merouani, Slimane; Hamdaoui, Oualid; Rezgui, Yacine; Guemini, Miloud

    2015-09-01

    In the present work, comprehensive experimental and numerical investigations of the effects of frequency and acoustic intensity on the sonochemical degradation of naphthol blue black (NBB) in water have been carried out. The experiments have been examined at three frequencies (585, 860 and 1140 kHz) and over a wide range of acoustic intensities. The observed experimental results have been discussed using a more realistic approach that combines the single bubble sonochemistry and the number of active bubbles. The single bubble yield has been predicted using a model that combines the bubble dynamics with chemical kinetics consisting of series of chemical reactions (73 reversible reactions) occurring inside an air bubble during the strong collapse. The experimental results showed that the sonochemical degradation rate of NBB increased substantially with increasing acoustic intensity and decreased with increasing ultrasound frequency. The numerical simulations revealed that NBB degraded mainly through the reaction with hydroxyl radical (OH), which is the dominant oxidant detected in the bubble during collapse. The production rate of OH radical inside a single bubble followed the same trend as that of NBB degradation rate. It increased with increasing acoustic intensity and decreased with increasing frequency. The enhancing effect of acoustic intensity toward the degradation of NBB was attributed to the rise of both the individual chemical bubble yield and the number of active bubbles with increasing acoustic intensity. The reducing effect of frequency was attributed to the sharp decrease in the chemical bubble yield with increasing frequency, which would not compensated by the rise of the number of active bubbles with the increase in ultrasound frequency.

  13. Magnetic resonance image-guided versus ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound in the treatment of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sheng; Wu, Pei-Hong

    2013-01-01

    Image-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been used for more than ten years, primarily in the treatment of liver and prostate cancers. HIFU has the advantages of precise cancer ablation and excellent protection of healthy tissue. Breast cancer is a common cancer in women. HIFU therapy, in combination with other therapies, has the potential to improve both oncologic and cosmetic outcomes for breast cancer patients by providing a curative therapy that conserves mammary shape. Currently, HIFU therapy is not commonly used in breast cancer treatment, and efforts to promote the application of HIFU is expected. In this article, we compare different image-guided models for HIFU and reviewed the status, drawbacks, and potential of HIFU therapy for breast cancer. PMID:23237221

  14. High-frequency, high-intensity transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation as treatment of pain after surgical abortion.

    PubMed

    Platon, B; Andréll, P; Raner, C; Rudolph, M; Dvoretsky, A; Mannheimer, C

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the pain-relieving effect and the time spent in the recovery ward after treatment with high-frequency, high-intensity transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) or intravenous (IV) conventional pharmacological treatment after surgical abortion. Two-hundred women who underwent surgical abortion and postoperatively reported a visual analogue scale (VAS) pain score3 were included. The patients were randomised to TENS or conventional pharmacological treatment for their postoperative pain. The TENS treatment was given with a stimulus intensity between 20 and 60 mA during 1 min and repeated once if insufficient pain relief (VAS3). In the conventional pharmacological treatment group, a maximum dose of 100 microg fentanyl was given IV. There was no difference between the groups with regard to pain relief according to the VAS pain score (TENS=VAS 1.3 vs. IV opioids=VAS 1.6; p=0.09) upon discharge from the recovery ward. However, the patients in the TENS group spent shorter time (44 min) in the recovery ward than the conventional pharmacological treatment group (62 min; p<0.0001). The number of patients who needed additional analgesics in the recovery ward was comparable in both groups, as was the reported VAS pain score upon leaving the hospital (TENS=2.0 vs. conventional pharmacological treatment=1.8, NS). These results suggest that the pain-relieving effect of TENS seems to be comparable to conventional pharmacological treatment with IV opioids. Hence, TENS may be a suitable alternative to conventional pain management with IV opioids after surgical abortion. Copyright 2009 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy for oropharyngeal cancer: radiation dosage constraint at the anterior mandible.

    PubMed

    Verdonck, Henk W D; de Jong, Jos M A; Granzier, Marlies E P G; Nieman, Fred H; de Baat, Cees; Stoelinga, Paul J W

    2009-06-01

    Because the survival of endosseous implants in irradiated bone is lower than in non-irradiated bone, particularly if the irradiation dose exceeds 50Gy, a study was carried out to assess the irradiation dose in the anterior mandible, when intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is used. The hypothesis was that adequate IMRT planning in oropharyngeal cancer patients is allowing sufficiently low anterior mandibular bone radiation dosages to safely insert endosseous implants. Ten randomly selected patients with oropharyngeal cancer, primarily treated by intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), were included in this study. First, at five determined positions distributed over the anterior mandible, the appropriate radiation dosages were calculated according to the originally arranged fractionated radiation schedule. Second, for each patient an adjusted fractionated radiation schedule was established with an extra dose constraint which allowed a lower dose in the mandible taking into account that the anterior mandible needs protection against radiation-induced osteoradionecrosis. The goal for the adjusted fractionated radiation schedule was similar as that of the original fractionated radiation schedule, including a desired tumour target dosage of 70Gy and maximum mean local dosages for organs at risk. The data revealed a considerable and statistically significant, irradiation dose reduction in the anterior mandible without compromising the other constraints. As a result of this study it is strongly advised to maximize dose constraint to the anterior mandible when planning irradiation for oropharyngeal cancer patients, using IMRT. This would greatly facilitate successful implant treatment for this group of patients. The fractionated radiation schedules used, should also be used for the planning of the best implant positions by integrating them in the implant planning software.

  16. Effect of intensity-modulated pelvic radiotherapy on second cancer risk in the postoperative treatment of endometrial and cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Zwahlen, Daniel R; Ruben, Jeremy D; Jones, Phillip; Gagliardi, Frank; Millar, Jeremy L; Schneider, Uwe

    2009-06-01

    To estimate and compare intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) in terms of second cancer risk (SCR) for postoperative treatment of endometrial and cervical cancer. To estimate SCR, the organ equivalent dose concept with a linear-exponential, a plateau, and a linear dose-response model was applied to dose distributions, calculated in a planning computed tomography scan of a 68-year-old woman. Three plans were computed: four-field 18-MV 3DCRT and nine-field IMRT with 6- and 18-MV photons. SCR was estimated as a function of target dose (50.4 Gy/28 fractions) in organs of interest according to the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Cumulative SCR relative to 3DCRT was +6% (3% for a plateau model, -4% for a linear model) for 6-MV IMRT and +26% (25%, 4%) for the 18-MV IMRT plan. For an organ within the primary beam, SCR was +12% (0%, -12%) for 6-MV and +5% (-2%, -7%) for 18-MV IMRT. 18-MV IMRT increased SCR 6-7 times for organs away from the primary beam relative to 3DCRT and 6-MV IMRT. Skin SCR increased by 22-37% for 6-MV and 50-69% for 18-MV IMRT inasmuch as a larger volume of skin was exposed. Cancer risk after IMRT for cervical and endometrial cancer is dependent on treatment energy. 6-MV pelvic IMRT represents a safe alternative with respect to SCR relative to 3DCRT, independently of the dose-response model. 18-MV IMRT produces second neutrons that modestly increase the SCR.

  17. Effect of Intensity-Modulated Pelvic Radiotherapy on Second Cancer Risk in the Postoperative Treatment of Endometrial and Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zwahlen, Daniel R. Ruben, Jeremy D.; Jones, Phillip; Gagliardi, Frank; Millar, Jeremy L.; Schneider, Uwe

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: To estimate and compare intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) in terms of second cancer risk (SCR) for postoperative treatment of endometrial and cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: To estimate SCR, the organ equivalent dose concept with a linear-exponential, a plateau, and a linear dose-response model was applied to dose distributions, calculated in a planning computed tomography scan of a 68-year-old woman. Three plans were computed: four-field 18-MV 3DCRT and nine-field IMRT with 6- and 18-MV photons. SCR was estimated as a function of target dose (50.4 Gy/28 fractions) in organs of interest according to the International Commission on Radiological Protection Results: Cumulative SCR relative to 3DCRT was +6% (3% for a plateau model, -4% for a linear model) for 6-MV IMRT and +26% (25%, 4%) for the 18-MV IMRT plan. For an organ within the primary beam, SCR was +12% (0%, -12%) for 6-MV and +5% (-2%, -7%) for 18-MV IMRT. 18-MV IMRT increased SCR 6-7 times for organs away from the primary beam relative to 3DCRT and 6-MV IMRT. Skin SCR increased by 22-37% for 6-MV and 50-69% for 18-MV IMRT inasmuch as a larger volume of skin was exposed. Conclusion: Cancer risk after IMRT for cervical and endometrial cancer is dependent on treatment energy. 6-MV pelvic IMRT represents a safe alternative with respect to SCR relative to 3DCRT, independently of the dose-response model. 18-MV IMRT produces second neutrons that modestly increase the SCR.

  18. Use of radar QPE for the derivation of Intensity-Duration-Frequency curves in a range of climatic regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, Francesco; Morin, Efrat

    2015-12-01

    Intensity-Duration-Frequency (IDF) curves are widely used in flood risk management because they provide an easy link between the characteristics of a rainfall event and the probability of its occurrence. Weather radars provide distributed rainfall estimates with high spatial and temporal resolutions and overcome the scarce representativeness of point-based rainfall for regions characterized by large gradients in rainfall climatology. This work explores the use of radar quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE) for the identification of IDF curves over a region with steep climatic transitions (Israel) using a unique radar data record (23 yr) and combined physical and empirical adjustment of the radar data. IDF relationships were derived by fitting a generalized extreme value distribution to the annual maximum series for durations of 20 min, 1 h and 4 h. Arid, semi-arid and Mediterranean climates were explored using 14 study cases. IDF curves derived from the study rain gauges were compared to those derived from radar and from nearby rain gauges characterized by similar climatology, taking into account the uncertainty linked with the fitting technique. Radar annual maxima and IDF curves were generally overestimated but in 70% of the cases (60% for a 100 yr return period), they lay within the rain gauge IDF confidence intervals. Overestimation tended to increase with return period, and this effect was enhanced in arid climates. This was mainly associated with radar estimation uncertainty, even if other effects, such as rain gauge temporal resolution, cannot be neglected. Climatological classification remained meaningful for the analysis of rainfall extremes and radar was able to discern climatology from rainfall frequency analysis.

  19. Prescribing physical activity: applying the ACSM protocols for exercise type, intensity, and duration across 3 training frequencies.

    PubMed

    Westcott, Wayne L; Winett, Richard A; Annesi, James J; Wojcik, Janet R; Anderson, Eileen S; Madden, Patrick J

    2009-06-01

    When physicians advise patients to attain more physical activity, they usually recommend a walking program. However, in a similar way to no exercise, those embarking on a walking program will typically lose 4 to 6 lb of lean weight and reduce their resting metabolic rate 2% to 3% every decade. These effects may be mitigated by the inclusion of resistance exercise. The American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) minimum exercise guidelines recommend 20 minutes of aerobic activity 3 days per week, and 1 set (8-12 repetitions) of 8 to 10 resistance exercises to train the major muscle groups 2 days per week. However, large-scale testing of these recommendations in a field setting has been minimal. Men and women between 21 and 80 years (N = 1725) [corrected] participated in a 10-week combined strength and aerobic activity program based on the ACSM protocols for exercise intensity and duration across 3 training frequencies (1, 2, or 3 sessions/week). Across all training frequencies, mean changes included a reduction in body fat of 1.97%, a decrease in fat weight of 1.7 kg, an increase in lean weight of 1.35 kg, a reduction in systolic blood pressure of 3.83 mm Hg, and a reduction in diastolic blood pressure of 1.73 mm Hg. More frequent weekly training sessions were associated with greater improvements in body fat percent, fat weight, and lean weight. Participants responded favorably to the ACSM exercise program with a 91% completion rate and a 95% satisfaction rating. This article presents recommendations for prescribing safe, effective, and time-efficient exercise programs.

  20. Intensity modulated radiotherapy induces pro-inflammatory and pro-survival responses in prostate cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    EL-SAGHIRE, HOUSSEIN; VANDEVOORDE, CHARLOT; OST, PIET; MONSIEURS, PIETER; MICHAUX, ARLETTE; DE MEERLEER, GERT; BAATOUT, SARAH; THIERENS, HUBERT

    2014-01-01

    Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is one of the modern conformal radiotherapies that is widely used within the context of cancer patient treatment. It uses multiple radiation beams targeted to the tumor, however, large volumes of the body receive low doses of irradiation. Using γ-H2AX and global genome expression analysis, we studied the biological responses induced by low doses of ionizing radiation in prostate cancer patients following IMRT. By means of different bioinformatics analyses, we report that IMRT induced an inflammatory response via the induction of viral, adaptive, and innate immune signaling. In response to growth factors and immune-stimulatory signaling, positive regulation in the progression of cell cycle and DNA replication were induced. This denotes pro-inflammatory and pro-survival responses. Furthermore, double strand DNA breaks were induced in every patient 30 min after the treatment and remaining DNA repair and damage signaling continued after 18–24 h. Nine genes belonging to inflammatory responses (TLR3, SH2D1A and IL18), cell cycle progression (ORC4, SMC2 and CCDC99) and DNA damage and repair (RAD17, SMC6 and MRE11A) were confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR. This study emphasizes that the risk assessment of health effects from the out-of-field low doses during IMRT should be of concern, as these may increase the risk of secondary cancers and/or systemic inflammation. PMID:24435511

  1. Intensity of Anxiety and Depression in Patients with Lung Cancer in Relation to Quality of Life.

    PubMed

    Polański, Jacek; Chabowski, Mariusz; Chudiak, Anna; Uchmanowicz, Bartosz; Janczak, Dariusz; Rosińczuk, Joanna; Mazur, Grzegorz

    2017-06-02

    Psychological factors, such as the anxiety and depression, which often occur in patients with lung cancer might negatively influence their quality of life. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of anxiety and depression in lung cancer patients on quality of life. The study included 180 lung patients of the mean age of 62.7 ± 9.7 years. The following scales were employed in the study: Quality of Life Questionnaire QLQ-C30 and LC13 scale, and Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HADS). The overall score of quality of life measured by QLQ-C30 was 47.1 ± 23.4 points on a hundred-point scale. Anxiety was diagnosed in 67 patients (37.2%) and depression in 75 patients (41.7%) by HADS. Quality of life was significantly worse in case of anxiety and depression (p < 0.05), which negatively influenced both functional and symptom intensity scales measured with QLQ-C30 and QLQ-LC13. We conclude that early identification of anxiety and depression may help in therapeutic decision-making and may be a useful predictive factor in lung cancer patients.

  2. Risk of secondary cancers from scattered radiation during intensity-modulated radiotherapies for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate and compare the risks of secondary cancers from therapeutic doses received by patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) during intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), volumetric arc therapy (VMAT), and tomotherapy (TOMO). Methods Treatments for five patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) were planned using IMRT, VMAT, and TOMO. Based on the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation VII method, the excess relative risk (ERR), excess absolute risk (EAR), and lifetime attributable risk (LAR) were evaluated from therapeutic doses, which were measured using radiophotoluminescence glass dosimeters (RPLGDs) for each organ inside a humanoid phantom. Results The average organ equivalent doses (OEDs) of 5 patients were measured as 0.23, 1.18, 0.91, 0.95, 0.97, 0.24, and 0.20 Gy for the thyroid, lung, stomach, liver, small intestine, prostate (or ovary), and rectum, respectively. From the OED measurements, LAR incidence were calculated as 83, 46, 22, 30, 2 and 6 per 104 person for the lung, stomach, normal liver, small intestine, prostate (or ovary), and rectum. Conclusions We estimated the secondary cancer risks at various organs for patients with HCC who received different treatment modalities. We found that HCC treatment is associated with a high secondary cancer risk in the lung and stomach. PMID:24886163

  3. Moderate-Intensity Physical Activity Ameliorates the Breast Cancer Risk in Diabetic Women

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Mejía, Gabriela; Angeles-Llerenas, Angélica; Ortega-Olvera, Carolina; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Ziv, Elad; Pulido-Rodríguez, José; García-Solis, Manuel de Jesús; Murillo-Zamora, Efrén; Vázquez-Lara, Julia; Romieu, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the association between self-reported diabetes and the risk of breast cancer (BC) and its interaction with moderate-intensity physical activity in pre- and postmenopausal Mexican women. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A population-based case-control study was conducted using 1,000 incident case subjects and 1,074 control subjects. Blood samples and information on health, diet, physical activity, and anthropometric measurements were obtained. RESULTS The association between diabetes and BC risk decreased with increasing tertiles of moderate-intensity physical activity (odds ratio [OR] = 4.9 [95% CI 2.3–10.8]; 3.0 [1.3–6.9]; and 1.0 [0.1–9.2], respectively, for each tertile) (test for interaction = 0.04). Compared with the women in the lowest tertiles, increased risk was observed in those premenopausal women with the highest serum C-peptide, IGF-1, and IGF-1 binding protein 3 levels. CONCLUSIONS Moderate-intensity physical activity can substantially ameliorate the increased BC risk in diabetic women. PMID:23033240

  4. High-frequency microwave ablation method for enhanced cancer treatment with minimized collateral damage.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jeonghoon; Cho, Jeiwon; Kim, Namgon; Kim, Dae-Duk; Lee, Eunsook; Cheon, Changyul; Kwon, Youngwoo

    2011-10-15

    To overcome the limits of conventional microwave ablation, a new frequency spectrum above 6 GHz has been explored for low-power and low collateral damage ablation procedure. A planar coaxial probe-based applicator, suitable for easy insertion into the human body, was developed for our study to cover a wideband frequency up to 30 GHz. Thermal ablations with small input power (1-3 W) at various microwave frequencies were performed on nude mice xenografted with human breast cancer. Comparative study of ablation efficiencies revealed that 18-GHz microwave results in the largest difference in the temperature rise between cancer and normal tissues as well as the highest ablation efficiency, reaching 20 times that of 2 GHz. Thermal profile study on the composite region of cancer and fat also showed significantly reduced collateral damage using 18 GHz. Application of low-power (1 W) 18-GHz microwave on the nude mice xenografted with human breast cancer cells resulted in recurrence-free treatment. The proposed microwave ablation method can be a very effective process to treat small-sized tumor with minimized invasiveness and collateral damages. Copyright © 2010 UICC.

  5. A High Frequency of BRCA Mutations in Young Black Women with Breast Cancer from Florida

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Tuya; Bonner, Devon; Cragun, Deborah; Monteiro, Alvaro N.A.; Phelan, Catherine; Servais, Lily; Kim, Jongphil; Narod, Steven A.; Akbari, Mohammad R.; Vadaparampil, Susan

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Black women are disproportionately affected with triple negative breast cancer and have relatively poor survival. It is not known to what extent differences in clinical presentation of breast cancer in Non-Hispanic White (NHW) women and Black women can be accounted for by the presence of mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA) genes. We sought to evaluate the frequency of BRCA pathogenic variants in a population-based sample of young Black women with breast cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS Black women diagnosed with invasive breast cancer at or before age 50 from 2009 to 2012 were recruited to the study through the Florida Cancer Registry. Participants underwent genetic counseling, completed a study questionnaire and consented to release of their medical records. Saliva specimens were collected for BRCA sequencing and large rearrangement testing through MLPA. RESULTS A DNA sample was evaluated for 396 women of whom 49 (12.4%) had a mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2. Eight recurrent mutations accounted for 49% of all pathogenic variants. CONCLUSIONS The prevalence of BRCA mutations among our Florida-based sample of young Black women with breast cancer exceeds that previously reported for NHW women. It is appropriate to recommend BRCA testing in all young Black women with invasive breast cancer. PMID:26287763

  6. Analysis of KIR gene frequencies and HLA class I genotypes in breast cancer and control group.

    PubMed

    Jobim, Maria Regina; Jobim, Mariana; Salim, Patrícia H; Portela, Pâmela; Jobim, Luiz Fernando; Leistner-Segal, Sandra; Bittelbrunn, Ana Cristina; Menke, Carlos Henrique; Biazús, Jorge Villanova; Roesler, Rafael; Schwartsmann, Gilberto

    2013-09-01

    Breast cancer is the main cause of cancer-related death among women, with a 0.5% increase in incidence per year. Natural killer cells (NK) are part of the innate immune system recognizing class I HLA molecules on target cells through their membrane receptors, called killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR). The aim of our study was to evaluate the association between the KIR genes and HLA alleles in patients with breast cancer and healthy controls. Two hundred thirty patients with breast cancer and 272 healthy controls were typed for HLA class I and KIR genes by PCR-SSO. When both groups were compared, the presence of inhibitory KIR2DL2 receptors was significantly higher in breast cancer patients than in healthy controls. No significant differences were found for HLA-C2 and HLA-Bw4. However, a higher frequency of HLA-C1 in breast cancer patients was observed. These findings suggest a potential role for the KIR gene system in breast cancer. Further studies to confirm this observation are warranted. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The role of parental perceptions of tic frequency and intensity in predicting tic-related functional impairment in youth with chronic tic disorders.

    PubMed

    Espil, Flint M; Capriotti, Matthew R; Conelea, Christine A; Woods, Douglas W

    2014-12-01

    Tic severity is composed of several dimensions. Tic frequency and intensity are two such dimensions, but little empirical data exist regarding their relative contributions to functional impairment in those with chronic tic disorders (CTD). The present study examined the relative contributions of these dimensions in predicting tic-related impairment across several psychosocial domains. Using data collected from parents of youth with CTD, multivariate regression analyses revealed that both tic frequency and intensity predicted tic-related impairment in several areas; including family and peer relationships, school interference, and social endeavors, even when controlling for the presence of comorbid anxiety symptoms and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder diagnostic status. Results showed that tic intensity predicted more variance across more domains than tic frequency.

  8. The Role of Parental Perceptions of Tic Frequency and Intensity in Predicting Tic-Related Functional Impairment in Youth with Chronic Tic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Espil, Flint M.; Capriotti, Matthew R.; Conelea, Christine A.; Woods, Douglas W.

    2014-01-01

    Tic severity is composed of several dimensions. Tic frequency and intensity are two such dimensions, but little empirical data exist regarding their relative contributions to functional impairment in those with Chronic Tic Disorders (CTD). The present study examined the relative contributions of these dimensions in predicting tic-related impairment across several psychosocial domains. Using data collected from parents of youth with CTD, multivariate regression analyses revealed that both tic frequency and intensity predicted tic-related impairment in several areas; including family and peer relationships, school interference, and social endeavors, even when controlling for the presence of comorbid anxiety symptoms and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder diagnostic status. Results showed that tic intensity predicted more variance across more domains than tic frequency. PMID:24395287

  9. The role of fatty acids in anti-inflammatory effects of low-intensity extremely high-frequency electromagnetic radiation.

    PubMed

    Gapeyev, Andrew B; Kulagina, Tatiana P; Aripovsky, Alexander V; Chemeris, Nikolay K

    2011-07-01

    The effects of low-intensity extremely high-frequency electromagnetic radiation (EHF EMR; 42.2 GHz, 0.1 mW/cm(2) , exposure duration 20 min) on the fatty acid (FA) composition of thymic cells and blood plasma in normal mice and in mice with peritoneal inflammation were studied. It was found that the exposure of normal mice to EHF EMR increased the content of polyunsaturated FAs (PUFAs) (eicosapentaenoic and docosapentaenoic) in thymic cells. Using a model of zymosan-induced peritoneal inflammation, it was shown that the exposure of mice to EHF EMR significantly increased the content of PUFAs (dihomo-γ-linolenic, arachidonic, eicosapentaenoic, docosapentaenoic, and docosahexaenoic) and reduced the content of monounsaturated FAs (MUFAs) (palmitoleic and oleic) in thymic cells. Changes in the FA composition in the blood plasma were less pronounced and manifested themselves as an increase in the level of saturated FAs during the inflammation. The data obtained support the notion that MUFAs are replaced by PUFAs that can enter into the thymic cells from the external media. Taking into account the fact that the metabolites of PUFAs are lipid messengers actively involved in inflammatory and immune reactions, we assume that the increase in the content of n-3 and n-6 PUFAs in phospholipids of cellular membranes facilitates the realization of anti-inflammatory effects of EHF EMR.

  10. [Effect of low-intensity 900 MHz frequency electromagnetic radiation on rat liver and blood serum enzyme activities].

    PubMed

    Nersesova, L S; Petrosian, M S; Gazariants, M G; Mkrtchian, Z S; Meliksetian, G O; Pogosian, L G; Akopian, Zh I

    2014-01-01

    The comparative analysis of the rat liver and blood serum creatine kinase, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase and purine nucleoside phosphorylase post-radiation activity levels after a total two-hour long single and fractional exposure of the animals to low-intensity 900 MHz frequency electromagnetic field showed that the most sensitive enzymes to the both schedules of radiation are the liver creatine kinase, as well as the blood serum creatine kinase and alkaline phosphatase. According to the comparative analysis of the dynamics of changes in the activity level of the liver and blood serum creatine kinase, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and purine nucleoside phosphorylase, both single and fractional radiation schedules do not affect the permeability of a hepatocyte cell membrane, but rather cause changes in their energetic metabolism. The correlation analysis of the post-radiation activity level changes of the investigated enzymes did not reveal a clear relationship between them. The dynamics of post-radiation changes in the activity of investigated enzyme levels following a single and short-term fractional schedules of radiation did not differ essentially.

  11. Reducing Production Basis Risk through Rainfall Intensity Frequency (RIF) Indexes: Global Sensitivity Analysis' Implication on Policy Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muneepeerakul, Chitsomanus; Huffaker, Ray; Munoz-Carpena, Rafael

    2016-04-01

    The weather index insurance promises financial resilience to farmers struck by harsh weather conditions with swift compensation at affordable premium thanks to its minimal adverse selection and moral hazard. Despite these advantages, the very nature of indexing causes the presence of "production basis risk" that the selected weather indexes and their thresholds do not correspond to actual damages. To reduce basis risk without additional data collection cost, we propose the use of rain intensity and frequency as indexes as it could offer better protection at the lower premium by avoiding basis risk-strike trade-off inherent in the total rainfall index. We present empirical evidences and modeling results that even under the similar cumulative rainfall and temperature environment, yield can significantly differ especially for drought sensitive crops. We further show that deriving the trigger level and payoff function from regression between historical yield and total rainfall data may pose significant basis risk owing to their non-unique relationship in the insured range of rainfall. Lastly, we discuss the design of index insurance in terms of contract specifications based on the results from global sensitivity analysis.

  12. Intensity-duration-frequency curves from remote sensing rainfall estimates: comparing satellite and weather radar over the eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, Francesco; Morin, Efrat; Peleg, Nadav; Mei, Yiwen; Anagnostou, Emmanouil N.

    2017-05-01

    Intensity-duration-frequency (IDF) curves are widely used to quantify the probability of occurrence of rainfall extremes. The usual rain gauge-based approach provides accurate curves for a specific location, but uncertainties arise when ungauged regions are examined or catchment-scale information is required. Remote sensing rainfall records, e.g. from weather radars and satellites, are recently becoming available, providing high-resolution estimates at regional or even global scales; their uncertainty and implications on water resources applications urge to be investigated. This study compares IDF curves from radar and satellite (CMORPH) estimates over the eastern Mediterranean (covering Mediterranean, semiarid, and arid climates) and quantifies the uncertainty related to their limited record on varying climates. We show that radar identifies thicker-tailed distributions than satellite, in particular for short durations, and that the tail of the distributions depends on the spatial and temporal aggregation scales. The spatial correlation between radar IDF and satellite IDF is as high as 0.7 for 2-5-year return period and decreases with longer return periods, especially for short durations. The uncertainty related to the use of short records is important when the record length is comparable to the return period ( ˜ 50, ˜ 100, and ˜ 150 % for Mediterranean, semiarid, and arid climates, respectively). The agreement between IDF curves derived from different sensors on Mediterranean and, to a good extent, semiarid climates, demonstrates the potential of remote sensing datasets and instils confidence on their quantitative use for ungauged areas of the Earth.

  13. Difference frequency generation of femtosecond mid infrared pulses employing intense Stokes pulses excitation in a photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yuhong; Knox, Wayne H

    2012-11-05

    We demonstrate a novel method of generating milli-watt level mid-IR (MIR) pulses based on difference frequency mixing of the output from a 40 MHz Yb fiber Chirped Pulse Amplifier (CPA) and the intense Stokes pulses generated in a photonic crystal fiber (PCF) with two closely spaced zero dispersion wavelengths (ZDW). By taking advantage of the unique dispersion profile of the fiber, high power narrowband Stokes pulses are selectively generated in the normal dispersion region of the PCF with up to 1.45 nJ of pulse energy. Mixing with 12 nJ of pump pulses at 1035 nm in a type-II AgGaS(2) crystal yields MIR pulses around 5.5 µm wavelength with up to 3 mW of average power and 75 pJ of pulse energy. The reported method can be extended to generation of other MIR wavelengths by selecting PCFs with different second ZDWs or engineering the fiber dispersion profile via longitudinal tapering.

  14. High-frequency oscillatory ventilation in children with acute respiratory distress syndrome: experience of a pediatric intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Pinzon, Anelise Dentzien; Rocha, Taís Sica da; Ricachinevsky, Cláudia; Piva, Jefferson Pedro; Friedman, Gilberto

    2013-01-01

    To describe the effects of high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) as a rescue ventilatory support in pediatric patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Twenty-five children (1 month < age < 17 years) admitted to a university hospital pediatric intensive care unit (ICU) with ARDS and submitted to HFOV for a minimum of 48 hours after failure of conventional mechanical ventilation were assessed. Twenty eight days after the onset of ARDS, the mortality rate was 52% (13/25). Over the course of 48 hours, the use of HFOV reduced the oxygenation index [38 (31-50) vs. 17 (10-27)] and increased the ratio of partial arterial pressure O2 and fraction of inspired O2 [65 [44-80) vs. 152 (106-213)]. Arterial CO2 partial pressure [54 (45-74) vs. 48 (39-58) mmHg] remained unchanged. The mean airway pressure ranged between 23 and 29 cmH2O. HFOV did not compromise hemodynamics, and a reduction in heart rate was observed (141±32 vs. 119±22 beats/min), whereas mean arterial pressure (66±20 vs. 71±17 mmHg) and inotropic score [44 (17-130) vs. 20 (16-75)] remained stable during this period. No survivors were dependent on oxygen. HFOV improves oxygenation in pediatric patients with ARDS and severe hypoxemia refractory to conventional ventilatory support. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. Adoption of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy For Early-Stage Breast Cancer From 2004 Through 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Elyn H.; Mougalian, Sarah S.; Soulos, Pamela R.; Smith, Benjamin D.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Gross, Cary P.; Yu, James B.

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is a newer method of radiation therapy (RT) that has been increasingly adopted as an adjuvant treatment after breast-conserving surgery (BCS). IMRT may result in improved cosmesis compared to standard RT, although at greater expense. To investigate the adoption of IMRT, we examined trends and factors associated with IMRT in women under the age of 65 with early stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective study of early stage breast cancer patients treated with BCS followed by whole-breast irradiation (WBI) who were ≤65 years old in the National Cancer Data Base from 2004 to 2011. We used logistic regression to identify factors associated with receipt of IMRT (vs standard RT). Results: We identified 11,089 women with early breast cancer (9.6%) who were treated with IMRT and 104,448 (90.4%) who were treated with standard RT, after BCS. The proportion of WBI patients receiving IMRT increased yearly from 2004 to 2009, with 5.3% of WBI patients receiving IMRT in 2004 and 11.6% receiving IMRT in 2009. Further use of IMRT declined afterward, with the proportion remaining steady at 11.0% and 10.7% in 2010 and 2011, respectively. Patients treated in nonacademic community centers were more likely to receive IMRT (odds ratio [OR], 1.36; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.30-1.43 for nonacademic vs academic center). Compared to privately insured patients, the uninsured patients (OR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.70-0.95) and those with Medicaid insurance (OR, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.79-0.95) were less likely to receive IMRT. Conclusions: The use of IMRT rose from 2004 to 2009 and then stabilized. Important nonclinical factors associated with IMRT use included facility type and insurance status.

  16. Adoption of intensity modulated radiation therapy for early-stage breast cancer from 2004 through 2011.

    PubMed

    Wang, Elyn H; Mougalian, Sarah S; Soulos, Pamela R; Smith, Benjamin D; Haffty, Bruce G; Gross, Cary P; Yu, James B

    2015-02-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is a newer method of radiation therapy (RT) that has been increasingly adopted as an adjuvant treatment after breast-conserving surgery (BCS). IMRT may result in improved cosmesis compared to standard RT, although at greater expense. To investigate the adoption of IMRT, we examined trends and factors associated with IMRT in women under the age of 65 with early stage breast cancer. We performed a retrospective study of early stage breast cancer patients treated with BCS followed by whole-breast irradiation (WBI) who were ≤65 years old in the National Cancer Data Base from 2004 to 2011. We used logistic regression to identify factors associated with receipt of IMRT (vs standard RT). We identified 11,089 women with early breast cancer (9.6%) who were treated with IMRT and 104,448 (90.4%) who were treated with standard RT, after BCS. The proportion of WBI patients receiving IMRT increased yearly from 2004 to 2009, with 5.3% of WBI patients receiving IMRT in 2004 and 11.6% receiving IMRT in 2009. Further use of IMRT declined afterward, with the proportion remaining steady at 11.0% and 10.7% in 2010 and 2011, respectively. Patients treated in nonacademic community centers were more likely to receive IMRT (odds ratio [OR], 1.36; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.30-1.43 for nonacademic vs academic center). Compared to privately insured patients, the uninsured patients (OR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.70-0.95) and those with Medicaid insurance (OR, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.79-0.95) were less likely to receive IMRT. The use of IMRT rose from 2004 to 2009 and then stabilized. Important nonclinical factors associated with IMRT use included facility type and insurance status. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Salvage image-guided intensity modulated or stereotactic body reirradiation of local recurrence of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jereczek-Fossa, B A; Fodor, C; Bazzani, F; Maucieri, A; Ronchi, S; Ferrario, S; Colangione, S P; Gerardi, M A; Caputo, M; Cecconi, A; Gherardi, F; Vavassori, A; Comi, S; Cambria, R; Garibaldi, C; Cattani, F; De Cobelli, O; Orecchia, R

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To retrospectively evaluate external beam reirradiation (re-EBRT) delivered to the prostate/prostatic bed for local recurrence, after radical or adjuvant/salvage radiotherapy (RT). Methods: 32 patients received re-EBRT between February 2008 and October 2013. All patients had clinical/radiological local relapse in the prostate or prostatic bed and no distant metastasis. re-EBRT was delivered with selective RT technologies [stereotactic RT including CyberKnifeTM (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA); image-guidance and intensity-modulated RT etc.]. Toxicity was evaluated using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer criteria. Biochemical control was assessed according to the Phoenix definition (NADIR + 2 ng ml−1). Results: Acute urinary toxicity: G0, 24 patients; G1, 6 patients; G2, 2 patients. Acute rectal toxicity: G0, 28 patients; G1, 2 patients; and G2, 1 patient. Late urinary toxicity (evaluated in 30 cases): G0, 23 patients; G1, 6 patients; G2, 1 patient. Late renal toxicity: G0, 25 patients; G1, 5 patients. A mean follow-up of 21.3 months after re-EBRT showed that 13 patients were free of cancer, 3 were alive with biochemical relapse and 12 patients were alive with clinically evident disease. Four patients had died: two of disease progression and two of other causes. Conclusion: re-EBRT using modern technology is a feasible approach for local prostate cancer recurrence offering 2-year tumour control in about half of the patients. Toxicity of re-EBRT is low. Future studies are needed to identify the patients who would benefit most from this treatment. Advances in knowledge: Our series, based on experience in one hospital alone, shows that re-EBRT for local relapse of prostate cancer is feasible and offers a 2-year cure in about half of the patients. PMID:26055506

  18. Outcomes After Intensity-Modulated Versus Conformal Radiotherapy in Older Men With Nonmetastatic Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bekelman, Justin E.; Mitra, Nandita; Efstathiou, Jason; Liao Kaijun; Sunderland, Robert; Yeboa, Deborah N.; Armstrong, Katrina

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: There is little evidence comparing complications after intensity-modulated (IMRT) vs. three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (CRT) for prostate cancer. The study objective was to test the hypothesis that IMRT, compared with CRT, is associated with a reduction in bowel, urinary, and erectile complications in elderly men with nonmetastatic prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We undertook an observational cohort study using registry and administrative claims data from the SEER-Medicare database. We identified men aged 65 years or older diagnosed with nonmetastatic prostate cancer in the United States between 2002 and 2004 who received IMRT (n = 5,845) or CRT (n = 6,753). The primary outcome was a composite measure of bowel complications. Secondary outcomes were composite measures of urinary and erectile complications. We also examined specific subsets of bowel (proctitis/hemorrhage) and urinary (cystitis/hematuria) events within the composite complication measures. Results: IMRT was associated with reductions in composite bowel complications (24-month cumulative incidence 18.8% vs. 22.5%; hazard ratio [HR] 0.86; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.79-0.93) and proctitis/hemorrhage (HR 0.78; 95% CI, 0.64-0.95). IMRT was not associated with rates of composite urinary complications (HR 0.93; 95% CI, 0.83-1.04) or cystitis/hematuria (HR 0.94; 95% CI, 0.83-1.07). The incidence of erectile complications involving invasive procedures was low and did not differ significantly between groups, although IMRT was associated with an increase in new diagnoses of impotence (HR 1.27, 95% CI, 1.14-1.42). Conclusion: IMRT is associated with a small reduction in composite bowel complications and proctitis/hemorrhage compared with CRT in elderly men with nonmetastatic prostate cancer.

  19. Proton Versus Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: Patterns of Care and Early Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Proton radiotherapy (PRT) is an emerging treatment for prostate cancer despite limited knowledge of clinical benefit or potential harms compared with other types of radiotherapy. We therefore compared patterns of PRT use, cost, and early toxicity among Medicare beneficiaries with prostate cancer with those of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods We performed a retrospective study of all Medicare beneficiaries aged greater than or equal to 66 years who received PRT or IMRT for prostate cancer during 2008 and/or 2009. We used multivariable logistic regression to identify factors associated with receipt of PRT. To assess toxicity, each PRT patient was matched with two IMRT patients with similar clinical and sociodemographic characteristics. The main outcome measures were receipt of PRT or IMRT, Medicare reimbursement for each treatment, and early genitourinary, gastrointestinal, and other toxicity. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results We identified 27,647 men; 553 (2%) received PRT and 27,094 (98%) received IMRT. Patients receiving PRT were younger, healthier, and from more affluent areas than patients receiving IMRT. Median Medicare reimbursement was $32,428 for PRT and $18,575 for IMRT. Although PRT was associated with a statistically significant reduction in genitourinary toxicity at 6 months compared with IMRT (5.9% vs 9.5%; odds ratio [OR] = 0.60, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.38 to 0.96, P = .03), at 12 months post-treatment there was no difference in genitourinary toxicity (18.8% vs 17.5%; OR = 1.08, 95% CI = 0.76 to 1.54, P = .66). There was no statistically significant difference in gastrointestinal or other toxicity at 6 months or 12 months post-treatment. Conclusions Although PRT is substantially more costly than IMRT, there was no difference in toxicity in a comprehensive cohort of Medicare beneficiaries with prostate cancer at 12 months post-treatment. PMID:23243199

  20. Evaluation of Pain Intensity Assessment Tools Among Elderly Patients With Cancer in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsien-Chen; Lai, Yeur-Hur; Lin, Kuan-Chia; Lee, Tzu-Ying; Lin, Hung-Ru

    Effective pain management requires careful assessment of pain. Auditory, visual, cognitive, and motor impairments in elderly people may affect their ability to use pain assessment tools. The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability, validity, and no-response rate of pain scales among elderly patients with cancer pain, as well as patient preference for the scales. A cross-sectional correlational design was used with a convenience sample of 73 elderly cancer patients recruited at a cancer-based hospital in southern Taiwan. Participants were asked to rate their pain by using a numeric rating scale (NRS-11), a facial pain scale (FPS), a verbal descriptor scale (VDS), and a mixed scale (consisting of NRS-11, FPS, and VDS) on 2 consecutive days. Test-retest reliability, as indicated by Spearman rank correlation coefficients for the 24-hour interval pain ratings, ranged from 0.426 to 0.683. The criterion-related validity of the scales was supported by significant Spearman rank-order correlation. The time taken to respond to the scales ranged from 40.3 to 16.2 seconds. The no-response rates for the scales decreased in the order NRS-11 > FPS > mixed scale > VDS. Patient preference for the scales decreased in the order mixed scale > VDS > NRS-11 > FPS. All 4 scales were reliable and valid for assessing cancer pain among elderly patients. Because the no-response rates for the scales depended on educational level and cognitive function, nurses should exercise good judgment in choosing pain intensity assessment tools for use with elderly patients.

  1. Reduced Acute Bowel Toxicity in Patients Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Samuelian, Jason M.; Callister, Matthew D.; Ashman, Jonathan B.; Young-Fadok, Tonia M.; Borad, Mitesh J.; Gunderson, Leonard L.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: We have previously shown that intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) can reduce dose to small bowel, bladder, and bone marrow compared with three-field conventional radiotherapy (CRT) technique in the treatment of rectal cancer. The purpose of this study was to review our experience using IMRT to treat rectal cancer and report patient clinical outcomes. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was conducted of patients with rectal cancer who were treated at Mayo Clinic Arizona with pelvic radiotherapy (RT). Data regarding patient and tumor characteristics, treatment, acute toxicity according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v 3.0, tumor response, and perioperative morbidity were collected. Results: From 2004 to August 2009, 92 consecutive patients were treated. Sixty-one (66%) patients were treated with CRT, and 31 (34%) patients were treated with IMRT. All but 2 patients received concurrent chemotherapy. There was no significant difference in median dose (50.4 Gy, CRT; 50 Gy, IMRT), preoperative vs. postoperative treatment, type of concurrent chemotherapy, or history of previous pelvic RT between the CRT and IMRT patient groups. Patients who received IMRT had significantly less gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity. Sixty-two percent of patients undergoing CRT experienced {>=}Grade 2 acute GI side effects, compared with 32% among IMRT patients (p = 0.006). The reduction in overall GI toxicity was attributable to fewer symptoms from the lower GI tract. Among CRT patients, {>=}Grade 2 diarrhea and enteritis was experienced among 48% and 30% of patients, respectively, compared with 23% (p = 0.02) and 10% (p = 0.015) among IMRT patients. There was no significant difference in hematologic or genitourinary acute toxicity between groups. In addition, pathologic complete response rates and postoperative morbidity between treatment groups did not differ significantly. Conclusions: In the management of rectal cancer, IMRT is associated with a

  2. Patterns of Disease Recurrence Following Treatment of Oropharyngeal Cancer With Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Garden, Adam S.; Dong, Lei; Morrison, William H.; Stugis, Erich M.; Glisson, Bonnie S.; Schwartz, David L.; Kies, Merill S.; Ang, K. Kian; Rosenthal, David I.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To report mature results of a large cohort of patients diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx who were treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: The database of patients irradiated at The University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center was searched for patients diagnosed with oropharyngeal cancer and treated with IMRT between 2000 and 2007. A retrospective review of outcome data was performed. Results: The cohort consisted of 776 patients. One hundred fifty-nine patients (21%) were current smokers, 279 (36%) former smokers, and 337 (43%) never smokers. T and N categories and American Joint Committee on Cancer group stages were distributed as follows: T1/x, 288 (37%); T2, 288 (37%); T3, 113 (15%); T4, 87 (11%); N0, 88(12%); N1/x, 140 (18%); N2a, 101 (13%); N2b, 269 (35%); N2c, 122 (16%); and N3, 56 (7%); stage I, 18(2%); stage II, 40(5%); stage III, 150(19%); and stage IV, 568(74%). Seventy-one patients (10%) presented with nodes in level IV. Median follow-up was 54 months. The 5-year overall survival, locoregional control, and overall recurrence-free survival rates were 84%, 90%, and 82%, respectively. Primary site recurrence developed in 7% of patients, and neck recurrence with primary site control in 3%. We could only identify 12 patients (2%) who had locoregional recurrence outside the high-dose target volumes. Poorer survival rates were observed in current smokers, patients with larger primary (T) tumors and lower neck disease. Conclusions: Patients with oropharyngeal cancer treated with IMRT have excellent disease control. Locoregional recurrence was uncommon, and most often occurred in the high dose volumes. Parotid sparing was accomplished in nearly all patients without compromising tumor coverage.

  3. Postoperative pelvic intensity-modulated radiotherapy in high risk endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Shih, Karin K; Milgrom, Sarah A; Abu-Rustum, Nadeem R; Kollmeier, Marisa A; Gardner, Ginger J; Tew, William P; Barakat, Richard R; Alektiar, Kaled M

    2013-03-01

    According to national surveys, the use of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in gynecologic cancers is on the rise, yet there is still some reluctance to adopt adjuvant IMRT as standard practice. The purpose of this study is to report a single-institution experience using postoperative pelvic IMRT with or without chemotherapy in high-risk endometrial cancer. From 11/2004 to 12/2009, 46 patients underwent hysterectomy/bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy for stage I-III (22% stage I/II and 78% stage III) endometrial cancer. Median IMRT dose was 50.4Gy. Adjuvant chemotherapy was given to 30 (65%) patients. With a median follow-up of 52months, 4 patients recurred: 1 vaginal plus lung metastasis, 2 isolated para-aortic recurrences, and 1 lungs and liver metastasis. Five-year relapse rate was 9% (95% CI, 0-13.6%). Five-year disease-free survival (DFS) was 88% (95% CI, 77-98%) and overall survival (OS) was 97% (95% CI, 90-100%). There were 2 patients with non-hematological grade 3 toxicity: 1 (2%) acute and 1 (2%) chronic gastrointestinal toxicity. In patients treated with IMRT and chemotherapy (n=30), 5 had grade 3 leukopenia, 8 grade 2 anemia, and 2 grade 2 thrombocytopenia. Oncologic outcomes with postoperative IMRT were very good, with DFS and OS rates of >88% at median follow-up of 52months, despite a preponderance (78%) of stage III disease. Toxicity was minimal even in the setting of an aggressive trimodality (65% of patients) approach. Data from this study and emerging data from RTOG trial 0418 demonstrate the advantages of IMRT in high-risk endometrial cancer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A description of the outcomes, frequency, duration, and intensity of occupational, physical, and speech therapy in inpatient stroke rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Karges, Joy; Smallfied, Stacy

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the outcomes, frequency, duration, intensity, and the specific types of therapeutic intervention of inpatient stroke rehabilitation specific to one hospital in the upper midwestern region of the United States following implementation of the IRF PPS. This was a non-experimental retrospective chart review of individuals who received inpatient stroke rehabilitation from January 2003 to June 2004. A total of 80 medical records met inclusion and exclusion criteria. Data were collected on patient and clinical characteristics, FIM scores, LOS, and discharge location as well as the intensity, frequency, and total number of occupational therapy (OT), physical therapy (PT), and speech therapy (ST) treatment sessions, the type of therapy sessions provided, and the type of therapy service providers. LOS was 15.19 days +/- 11.69. There was a significant difference (t =-12.163; p = .000) between FIM total admission score (71.90 +/- 21.47) and FIM total discharge score (92.23 +/- 24.43) ). There was a significant difference in FIM discharge scores (F = 26.494; p = 000) based on discharge location with differences found between the discharge locations of home and skilled nursing facilities (p = .000) and skilled nursing facilities and assisted living facilities (p = .019). Mean number of therapy sessions per subject was 21.73 +/- 18.11 for OT, 21.99 +/- 18.10 for PT, and 18.86 +/- 18.71 for ST. Mean number of sessions per day was 1.72 +/- 0.31 sessions for OT, 1.65 +/- 0.36 sessions for PT, and 1.52 +/- 0.48 for ST. Mean number of minutes provided per session was 29.87 +/- 1.77 minutes for OT, 29.70 +/- 1.65 minutes for PT, and 27.23 +/- 6.64 minutes for ST. Mean intensity (days of therapy/length of stay) was 0.82 +/- 0.13 for OT, 0.85 +/- 0.13 for PT and 0.70 +/- 0.24 for ST. Of the total OT sessions, 97.41% were conducted by the OT and 77.68% were intervention only. Of the total PT sessions, 65.66% were conducted by the PT, 15.35% were

  5. Robust and fast characterization of OCT-based optical attenuation using a novel frequency-domain algorithm for brain cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Wu; Kut, Carmen; Liang, Wenxuan; Li, Xingde

    2017-03-01

    Cancer is known to alter the local optical properties of tissues. The detection of OCT-based optical attenuation provides a quantitative method to efficiently differentiate cancer from non-cancer tissues. In particular, the intraoperative use of quantitative OCT is able to provide a direct visual guidance in real time for accurate identification of cancer tissues, especially these without any obvious structural layers, such as brain cancer. However, current methods are suboptimal in providing high-speed and accurate OCT attenuation mapping for intraoperative brain cancer detection. In this paper, we report a novel frequency-domain (FD) algorithm to enable robust and fast characterization of optical attenuation as derived from OCT intensity images. The performance of this FD algorithm was compared with traditional fitting methods by analyzing datasets containing images from freshly resected human brain cancer and from a silica phantom acquired by a 1310 nm swept-source OCT (SS-OCT) system. With graphics processing unit (GPU)-based CUDA C/C++ implementation, this new attenuation mapping algorithm can offer robust and accurate quantitative interpretation of OCT images in real time during brain surgery.

  6. Robust and fast characterization of OCT-based optical attenuation using a novel frequency-domain algorithm for brain cancer detection

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Wu; Kut, Carmen; Liang, Wenxuan; Li, Xingde

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is known to alter the local optical properties of tissues. The detection of OCT-based optical attenuation provides a quantitative method to efficiently differentiate cancer from non-cancer tissues. In particular, the intraoperative use of quantitative OCT is able to provide a direct visual guidance in real time for accurate identification of cancer tissues, especially these without any obvious structural layers, such as brain cancer. However, current methods are suboptimal in providing high-speed and accurate OCT attenuation mapping for intraoperative brain cancer detection. In this paper, we report a novel frequency-domain (FD) algorithm to enable robust and fast characterization of optical attenuation as derived from OCT intensity images. The performance of this FD algorithm was compared with traditional fitting methods by analyzing datasets containing images from freshly resected human brain cancer and from a silica phantom acquired by a 1310 nm swept-source OCT (SS-OCT) system. With graphics processing unit (GPU)-based CUDA C/C++ implementation, this new attenuation mapping algorithm can offer robust and accurate quantitative interpretation of OCT images in real time during brain surgery. PMID:28327613

  7. Robust and fast characterization of OCT-based optical attenuation using a novel frequency-domain algorithm for brain cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Wu; Kut, Carmen; Liang, Wenxuan; Li, Xingde

    2017-03-22

    Cancer is known to alter the local optical properties of tissues. The detection of OCT-based optical attenuation provides a quantitative method to efficiently differentiate cancer from non-cancer tissues. In particular, the intraoperative use of quantitative OCT is able to provide a direct visual guidance in real time for accurate identification of cancer tissues, especially these without any obvious structural layers, such as brain cancer. However, current methods are suboptimal in providing high-speed and accurate OCT attenuation mapping for intraoperative brain cancer detection. In this paper, we report a novel frequency-domain (FD) algorithm to enable robust and fast characterization of optical attenuation as derived from OCT intensity images. The performance of this FD algorithm was compared with traditional fitting methods by analyzing datasets containing images from freshly resected human brain cancer and from a silica phantom acquired by a 1310 nm swept-source OCT (SS-OCT) system. With graphics processing unit (GPU)-based CUDA C/C++ implementation, this new attenuation mapping algorithm can offer robust and accurate quantitative interpretation of OCT images in real time during brain surgery.

  8. Hypofractionated Intensity-Modulated Arc Therapy for Lymph Node Metastasized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fonteyne, Valerie; De Gersem, Werner; De Neve, Wilfried; Jacobs, Filip; Lumen, Nicolaas; Vandecasteele, Katrien; Villeirs, Geert; De Meerleer, Gert

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To determine the planning results and acute toxicity after hypofractionated intensity-modulated arc radiotherapy and androgen deprivation for lymph node metastasized (Stage N1) prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 31 patients with Stage T1-T4N1M0 prostate cancer were treated with intensity-modulated arc radiotherapy and 3 years of androgen deprivation as primary treatment. The clinical target volume (CTV{sub p}) was the prostate and seminal vesicles. Elective lymph node areas ({sub e}) were delineated and expanded by 2 mm to create the CTV{sub e}. The planning target volumes (PTV{sub p} and PTV{sub e}) were created using a three-dimensional expansion of the CTV{sub p} and CTV{sub e}, respectively, of 7 mm. A median dose of 69.3 Gy and 50 Gy was prescribed to the PTV{sub p} and PTV{sub e} respectively, to be delivered in 25 fractions. Upper and lower gastrointestinal toxicity was scored using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group toxicity and radiotherapy-induced lower intestinal toxicity scoring system. Genitourinary toxicity was scored using a combined Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, LENT-SOMA (late effects normal tissue-subjective, objective, management, analytic), and Common Toxicity Criteria toxicity scoring system. Results: The median follow-up time was 3 months. The mean prescription dose to the CTV{sub p} and PTV{sub p} was 70.4 Gy and 68.6 Gy, respectively. The minimal dose to the CTV{sub e} and PTV{sub e} was 49.0 Gy and 47.0 Gy, respectively. No acute Grade 2 or greater gastrointestinal toxicity occurred. Fourteen patients developed acute Grade 2 lower gastrointestinal toxicity. Acute Grade 3 and 2 genitourinary toxicity developed in 2 and 14 patients, respectively. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that hypofractionated intensity-modulated arc radiotherapy as primary therapy for N1 prostate cancer is feasible with low toxicity.

  9. Cryotherapy versus high-intensity focused ultrasound for treating prostate cancer: Oncological and functional results.

    PubMed

    Donis Canet, F; Sánchez Gallego, M D; Arias Fúnez, F; Duque Ruíz, G; Laso, I; Brasero Burgos, J; Lorca Álvaro, J; Gómez Dos Santos, V; Rodríguez Patrón, R; Burgos Revilla, F J

    2017-08-14

    The increasingly early diagnosis of prostate cancer requires a search for therapeutic alternatives with good oncological results that in turn facilitate a good long-term quality of life. This review analyses 2 minimally invasive therapies for treating localised prostate cancer in terms of oncological and functional results, as well as the complications resulting from the therapies. A systematic literature review was conducted of the treatment of localised prostate cancer with 2 ablative techniques as the primary therapy: cryosurgery or cryotherapy and high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). We included patients who underwent procedures that included the entire gland, with hemiablation or focal therapy, which were indicated for low to intermediate-risk prostate cancer according to the D'Amico criteria. We excluded patients with high-risk prostate cancer and those who underwent any prior treatment for prostate cancer. After conducting the literature search and excluding the studies that did not meet the protocol criteria, we reviewed a total of 14 studies, with a total of 350 patients treated using cryotherapy and 1107 treated with HIFU. All studies were either prospective or retrospective and were not randomised. The patients' mean age was younger than 75 years. Overall, the rate of disease recurrence in the patients treated with cryotherapy varied between 13.2% and 26%, while the rate for those treated with HIFU varied between 7.3% and 67.9%. The overall demonstrated continence at 12 months was 97.6-100% for cryotherapy and 96-100% for HIFU. In terms of sexual potency rates, cryotherapy showed complete potency at 12 months for 86-100% of the patients treated with focal cryotherapy and slightly lower rates for hemiablation (76.9-100%) and total therapy (39%). HIFU showed potency rates of 89%, 52-80% and 33-78% for focal therapy, hemiablation and total therapy, respectively. Both techniques have comparable functional results, although the somewhat poorer

  10. Conventional Frequency Ultrasonic Biomarkers of Cancer Treatment Response In Vivo12

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Falou, Omar; Tadayyon, Hadi; Al-Mahrouki, Azza; Tran, William; Papanicolau, Naum; Kolios, Michael C; Czarnota, Gregory J

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Conventional frequency quantitative ultrasound in conjunction with textural analysis techniques was investigated to monitor noninvasively the effects of cancer therapies in an in vivo preclinical model. METHODS: Conventional low-frequency (∼7 MHz) and high-frequency (∼20 MHz) ultrasound was used with spectral analysis, coupled with textural analysis on spectral parametric maps, obtained from xenograft tumor-bearing animals (n = 20) treated with chemotherapy to extract noninvasive biomarkers of treatment response. RESULTS: Results indicated statistically significant differences in quantitative ultrasound-based biomarkers in both low- and high-frequency ranges between untreated and treated tumors 12 to 24 hours after treatment. Results of regression analysis indicated a high level of correlation between quantitative ultrasound-based biomarkers and tumor cell death estimates from histologic analysis. Applying textural characterization to the spectral parametric maps resulted in an even stronger correlation (r2 = 0.97). CONCLUSION: The results obtained in this research demonstrate that quantitative ultrasound at a clinically relevant frequency can monitor tissue changes in vivo in response to cancer treatment administration. Using higher order textural information extracted from quantitative ultrasound spectral parametric maps provides more information at a high sensitivity related to tumor cell death. PMID:23761215

  11. Extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (EMF) and brain cancer in adults and children: review and comment.

    PubMed Central

    Gurney, J. G.; van Wijngaarden, E.

    1999-01-01

    Epidemiologic and experimental research on the potential carcinogenic effects of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (EMF) has now been conducted for over two decades. Cancer epidemiology studies in relation to EMF have focused primarily on brain cancer and leukemia, both from residential sources of exposure in children and adults and from occupational exposure in adult men. Because genotoxic effects of EMF have not been shown, most recent laboratory research has attempted to show biological effects that could be related to cancer promotion. In this report, we briefly review residential and occupational EMF studies on brain cancer. We also provide a general review of experimental studies as they relate both to the biological plausibility of an EMF-brain cancer relation and to the insufficiency of such research to help guide exposure assessment in epidemiologic studies. We conclude from our review that no recent research, either epidemiologic or experimental, has emerged to provide reasonable support for a causal role of EMF on brain cancer. PMID:11550314

  12. Analysis of KIR gene frequencies and HLA class I genotypes in prostate cancer and control group.

    PubMed

    Portela, P; Jobim, L F; Salim, P H; Koff, W J; Wilson, T J; Jobim, M R; Schwartsmann, G; Roesler, R; Jobim, M

    2012-10-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in men, with a significant increase in incidence and mortality in men over 50 years of age. Natural killer cells (NK) are part of the innate immune system recognizing class I HLA molecules on target cells through their membrane receptors, called killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR). The aim of our study is to evaluate the association between the KIR genes and HLA alleles in patients with prostate cancer and healthy controls. Two hundred patients with prostate cancer and 185 healthy controls were typed for HLA class I and KIR genes by PCR-SSP. When both groups were compared, no significant differences were found for HLA-C group 1 and group 2, HLA-Bw4, HLA-A3 and A11. No difference was seen either in KIR frequency between patients with prostate cancer and controls. In conclusion, our data suggest no potential role for the KIR gene system in prostate cancer.

  13. Radio-frequency radiation exposure from AM radio transmitters and childhood leukemia and brain cancer.

    PubMed

    Ha, Mina; Im, Hyoungjune; Lee, Mihye; Kim, Hyun Joo; Kim, Byung-Chan; Gimm, Yoon-Myoung; Pack, Jeong-Ki

    2007-08-01

    Leukemia and brain cancer patients under age 15 years, along with controls with respiratory illnesses who were matched to cases on age, sex, and year of diagnosis (1993-1999), were selected from 14 South Korean hospitals using the South Korean Medical Insurance Data System. Diagnoses were confirmed through the South Korean National Cancer Registry. Residential addresses were obtained from medical records. A newly developed prediction program incorporating a geographic information system that was modified by the results of actual measurements was used to estimate radio-frequency radiation (RFR) exposure from 31 amplitude modulation (AM) radio transmitters with a power of 20 kW or more. A total of 1,928 leukemia patients, 956 brain cancer patients, and 3,082 controls were analyzed. Cancer risks were estimated using conditional logistic regression adjusted for residential area, socioeconomic status, and community population density. The odds ratio for all types of leukemia was 2.15 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.00, 4.67) among children who resided within 2 km of the nearest AM radio transmitter as compared with those resided more than 20 km from it. For total RFR exposure from all transmitters, odds ratios for lymphocytic leukemia were 1.39 (95% CI: 1.04, 1.86) and 1.59 (95% CI: 1.19, 2.11) for children in the second and third quartiles, respectively, versus the lowest quartile. Brain cancer and infantile cancer were not associated with AM RFR.

  14. Implementation of intensity modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer in a private radiotherapy service in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Poitevin-Chacón, María Adela; Reséndiz González, Gabriel; Alvarado Zermeño, Adriana; Flores Castro, Jesús Manuel; Flores Balcázar, Christian Haydée; Rosales Pérez, Samuel; Pérez Pastenes, Miguel Angel; Rodríguez Laguna, Alejandro; Vázquez Fernández, Patricio; Calvo Fernández, Alejandro; Bastida Ventura, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) allows physicians to deliver higher conformal doses to the tumour, while avoiding adjacent structures. As a result the probability of tumour control is higher and toxicity may be reduced. However, implementation of IMRT is highly complex and requires a rigorous quality assurance (QA) program both before and during treatment. The present article describes the process of implementing IMRT for localized prostate cancer in a radiation therapy department. In our experience, IMRT implementation requires careful planning due to the need to simultaneously implement specialized software, multifaceted QA programs, and training of the multidisciplinary team. Establishing standardized protocols and ensuring close collaboration between a multidisciplinary team is challenging but essential. PMID:25535587

  15. [Pharmacological analysis of anti-inflammatory effects of low-intensity extremely high-frequency electromagnetic radiation].

    PubMed

    Gapeev, A B; Lushnikov, K V; Shumilina, Iu V; Chemeris, N K

    2006-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory effect of low-intensity extremely high-frequency electromagnetic radiation (EHF EMR, 42.0 GHz, 0.1 mW/cm2) was compared with the action of the known anti-inflammatory drug sodium diclofenac and the antihistamine clemastine on acute inflammatory reaction in NMRI mice. The local inflammatory reaction was induced by intraplantar injection of zymosan into the left hind paw. Sodium diclofenac in doses of 2, 3, 5, 10, and 20 mg/kg or clemastine in doses of 0.02, 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, and 0.6 mg/kg were injected intraperitoneally 30 min after the initiation of inflammation. The animals were whole-body exposed to EHF EMR for 20 min at 1 h after the initiation of inflammation. The inflammatory reaction was assessed over 3 - 8 h after the initiation by measuring the footpad edema and hyperthermia of the inflamed paw. Sodium diclofenac in doses of 5 - 20 mg/kg reduced the exudative edema on the average by 26% as compared to the control. Hyperthermia of the inflamed paw decreased to 60% as the dose of was increased diclofenac up to 20 mg/kg. EHF EMR reduced both the footpad edema and hyperthermia by about 20%, which was comparable with the effect of a single therapeutic dose of diclofenac (3 - 5 mg/kg). The combined action of diclofenac and the exposure to the EHF EMR caused a partial additive effect. Clemastine in doses of 0.02-0.4 mg/kg it did not cause any significant effects on the exudative edema, but in a dose of 0.6 mg/kg it reduced edema by 14 - 22% by 5 - 8 h after zymosan injection. Clemastine caused a dose-dependent increase in hyperthermia of inflamed paw at doses of 0.02-0.2 mg/kg and did not affect the hyperthermia at doses of 0.4 and 0.6 mg/kg. The combined action of clemastine and EHF EMR exposure caused a dose-dependent abolishment of the anti-inflammatory effect of EHF EMR. The results obtained suggest that both arachidonic acid metabolites and histamine are involved in the realization of anti-inflammatory effects of low-intensity

  16. Characterization of nonmelanoma skin cancer for light therapy using spatial frequency domain imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rohrbach, Daniel J.; Zeitouni, Nathalie C.; Muffoletto, Daniel; Saager, Rolf; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Sunar, Ulas

    2015-01-01

    The dosimetry of light-based therapies critically depends on both optical and vascular parameters. We utilized spatial frequency domain imaging to quantify optical and vascular parameters, as well as estimated light penetration depth from 17 nonmelanoma skin cancer patients. Our data indicates that there exist substantial spatial variations in these parameters. Characterization of these parameters may inform understanding and optimization of the clinical response of light-based therapies. PMID:26137378

  17. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation with Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Is Feasible for Chinese Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhenyu; Wu, Sangang; Zhou, Juan; Sun, Jiayan; Lin, Qin; Lin, Huanxin; Guan, Xunxing

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Several accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) techniques are being investigated in patients with early-stage breast cancer. The present study evaluated the feasibility, early toxicity, initial efficacy, and cosmetic outcomes of accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for Chinese female patients with early-stage breast cancer after breast-conserving surgery. Methods A total of 38 patients met the inclusion criteria and an accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy (APBI-IMRT) plan was designed for each patient. The prescription dose was 34 Gy in 10 fractions, 3.4 Gy per fraction, twice a day, in intervals of more than 6 hours. Results Of the 38 patients, six patients did not meet the planning criteria. The remaining 32 patients received APBI-IMRT with a mean target volume conformity index of 0.67 and a dose homogeneity index of 1.06. The median follow-up time was 53 months and no local recurrence or distant metastasis was detected. The most common acute toxicities observed within 3 months after radiotherapy were erythema, breast edema, pigmentation, and pain in the irradiated location, among which 43.8%, 12.5%, 31.3%, and 28.1% were grade 1 toxicities, respectively. The most common late toxicities occurring after 3 months until the end of the follow-up period were breast edema, pigmentation, pain in the irradiated location, and subcutaneous fibrosis, among which 6.2%, 28.1%, 21.9%, and 37.5% were grade 1 toxicities, respectively. Thirty-one patients (96.8%) had fine or excellent cosmetic outcomes, and only one patient had a poor cosmetic outcome. Conclusion It is feasible for Chinese females to receive APBI-IMRT after breast conserving surgery. The radiotherapeutic toxicity is acceptable, and both the initial efficacy and cosmetic outcomes are good. PMID:25320624

  18. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer in the Community Setting

    SciTech Connect

    Seung, Steven Bae, Joseph; Solhjem, Matthew; Bader, Stephen; Gannett, David; Hansen, Eric K.; Louie, Jeannie; Underhill, Kelly Cha Christine

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To review outcomes with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in the community setting for the treatment of nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between April 2003 and April 2007, 69 patients with histologically confirmed cancer of the nasopharynx and oropharynx underwent IMRT in our practice. The primary sites included nasopharynx (11), base of tongue (18), and tonsil (40). The disease stage distribution was as follows: 2 Stage I, 11 Stage II, 16 Stage III, and 40 Stage IV. All were treated with a simultaneous integrated boost IMRT technique. The median prescribed doses were 70 Gy to the planning target volume, 59.4 Gy to the high-risk subclinical volume, and 54 Gy to the low-risk subclinical volume. Forty-five patients (65%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Toxicity was graded according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group toxicity criteria. Progression-free and overall survival rates were estimated with the Kaplan-Meier product-limit method. Results: Median duration of follow-up was 18 months. The estimated 2-year local control, regional control, distant control, and overall survival rates were 98%, 100%, 98%, and 90%, respectively. The most common acute toxicities were dermatitis (32 Grade 1, 32 Grade 2, 5 Grade 3), mucositis (8 Grade 1, 33 Grade 2, 28 Grade 3), and xerostomia (0 Grade 1, 29 Grade 2, 40 Grade 3). Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy in the community setting can be accomplished safely and effectively. Systematic internal review systems are recommended for quality control until sufficient experience develops.

  19. Alcohol intake over the life course and breast cancer survival in Western New York Exposures and Breast Cancer (WEB) study: Quantity and intensity of intake

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Anne M.; McCann, Susan E.; Nie, Jing; Edge, Stephen B.; Nochajski, Thomas H.; Russell, Marcia; Trevisan, Maurizio; Freudenheim, Jo L.

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol intake is a risk factor for breast cancer, but the association between alcohol and mortality among breast cancer survivors is poorly understood. We examined the association between alcohol intake from all sources, assessed by cognitive lifetime drinking history, and all-cause and breast cancer mortality among women with breast cancer (N=1097) who participated in a population-based case-control study. Vital status was ascertained through 2006 using the National Death Index. Using Cox Proportional Hazards models, we computed hazard ratios for all-cause and breast cancer mortality in association with alcohol intake. We examined lifetime volume and intensity (drinks per drinking day) of alcohol consumption as well as drinking status during various life periods. Analyses were stratified by menopausal status. After adjustment for total intake, postmenopausal women with consumption of four or more drinks per drinking day over their lifetimes were nearly three times more likely to die from any cause compared to abstainers (HR2.94, 95%CI 1.31,6.62). There was a similar but non-significant association with breast cancer mortality (HR2.68, 95%CI 0.94,7.67). Postmenopausal women who drank one drink or fewer per drinking day between menarche and first birth had a significantly decreased hazard of all-cause (HR0.54, 95%CI 0.31,0.95) and breast cancer mortality (HR0.27, 95%CI 0.09,0.77). Premenopausal breast cancer survival was not associated with drinking intensity. We observed no associations between drinking status or total volume of alcohol intake and breast cancer or all-cause mortality. High-intensity alcohol consumption may be associated with decreased survival in postmenopausal women with breast cancer. Low-intensity alcohol consumption between menarche and first birth may be inversely associated with all-cause and breast cancer mortality; this period may be critical for development of and survival from breast cancer. Intensity of alcohol intake may be a more

  20. Exome sequencing identifies a spectrum of mutation frequencies in advanced and lethal prostate cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Akash; White, Thomas A.; MacKenzie, Alexandra P.; Clegg, Nigel; Lee, Choli; Dumpit, Ruth F.; Coleman, Ilsa; Ng, Sarah B.; Salipante, Stephen J.; Rieder, Mark J.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Corey, Eva; Lange, Paul H.; Morrissey, Colm; Vessella, Robert L.; Nelson, Peter S.; Shendure, Jay

    2011-01-01

    To catalog protein-altering mutations that may drive the development of prostate cancers and their progression to metastatic disease systematically, we performed whole-exome sequencing of 23 prostate cancers derived from 16 different lethal metastatic tumors and three high-grade primary carcinomas. All tumors were propagated in mice as xenografts, designated the LuCaP series, to model phenotypic variation, such as responses to cancer-directed therapeutics. Although corresponding normal tissue was not available for most tumors, we were able to take advantage of increasingly deep catalogs of human genetic variation to remove most germline variants. On average, each tumor genome contained ∼200 novel nonsynonymous variants, of which the vast majority was specific to individual carcinomas. A subset of genes was recurrently altered across tumors derived from different individuals, including TP53, DLK2, GPC6, and SDF4. Unexpectedly, three prostate cancer genomes exhibited substantially higher mutation frequencies, with 2,000–4,000 novel coding variants per exome. A comparison of castration-resistant and castration-sensitive pairs of tumor lines derived from the same prostate cancer highlights mutations in the Wnt pathway as potentially contributing to the development of castration resistance. Collectively, our results indicate that point mutations arising in coding regions of advanced prostate cancers are common but, with notable exceptions, very few genes are mutated in a substantial fraction of tumors. We also report a previously undescribed subtype of prostate cancers exhibiting “hypermutated” genomes, with potential implications for resistance to cancer therapeutics. Our results also suggest that increasingly deep catalogs of human germline variation may challenge the necessity of sequencing matched tumor-normal pairs. PMID:21949389

  1. Marginal Misses After Postoperative Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M.; Farwell, D. Gregory; Luu, Quang; Chen, Leon M.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Purdy, James A.

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To describe the spatial distribution of local-regional recurrence (LRR) among patients treated postoperatively with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials: The medical records of 90 consecutive patients treated by gross total resection and postoperative IMRT for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck from January 2003 to July 2009 were reviewed. Sites of disease were the oral cavity (43 patients), oropharynx (20 patients), larynx (15 patients), and hypopharynx (12 patients). Fifty patients (56%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Results: Seventeen of 90 patients treated with postoperative IMRT experienced LRR, yielding a 2-year estimate of local regional control of 80%. Among the LRR patients, 11 patients were classified as in-field recurrences, occurring within the physician-designated clinical target volume, and 6 patients were categorized as marginal recurrences. There were no out-of-field geographical misses. Sites of marginal LRRs included the contralateral neck adjacent to the spared parotid gland (3 patients), the dermal/subcutaneous surface (2 patients), and the retropharyngeal/retrostyloid lymph node region (1 patient). Conclusions: Although the incidence of geographical misses was relatively low, the possibility of this phenomenon should be considered in the design of target volumes among patients treated by postoperative IMRT for head and neck cancer.

  2. Feasibility of atlas-based active bone marrow sparing intensity modulated radiation therapy for cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Noticewala, Sonal S; Williamson, Casey W; Shen, Hanjie; Sirak, Igor; Tarnawski, Rafal; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Hoh, Carl K; Moore, Kevin L; Mell, Loren K

    2017-05-01

    To test the hypothesis that atlas-based active bone marrow (ABM)-sparing intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) yields similar dosimetric results compared to custom ABM-sparing IMRT for cervical cancer patients. We sampled 62 cervical cancer patients with pre-treatment FDG-PET/CT in training (n=32) or test (n=30) sets. ABM was defined as the subvolume of the pelvic bone marrow (PBM) with standardized uptake value (SUV) above the mean on the average FDG-PET image (ABMAtlas) vs. the individual's PET (ABMCustom). Both were deformed to the planning CT. Overlap between the two subvolumes was measured using the Dice coefficient. Three IMRT plans designed to spare PBM, ABMAtlas, or ABMCustom were compared for 30 test patients. Dosimetric parameters were used to evaluate plan quality. ABMAtlas and ABMCustom volumes were not significantly different (p=0.90), with a mean Dice coefficient of 0.75, indicating good agreement. Compared to IMRT plans designed to spare PBM and ABMCustom, ABMAtlas-sparing IMRT plans achieved excellent target coverage and normal tissue sparing, without reducing dose to ABMCustom (mean ABMCustom dose 29.4Gy vs. 27.1Gyvs. 26.9Gy, respectively; p=0.10); however, PTV coverage and bowel sparing were slightly reduced. Atlas-based ABM sparing IMRT is clinically feasible and may obviate the need for customized ABM-sparing as a strategy to reduce hematologic toxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparative planning evaluation of intensity-modulated radiotherapy techniques for complex lung cancer cases.

    PubMed

    Yartsev, Slav; Chen, Jeff; Yu, Edward; Kron, Tomas; Rodrigues, George; Coad, Terry; Trenka, Kristina; Wong, Eugene; Bauman, Glenn; Dyk, Jake Van

    2006-02-01

    Lung cancer treatment can be one of the most challenging fields in radiotherapy. The aim of the present study was to compare different modalities of radiation delivery based on a balanced scoring scheme for target coverage and normal tissue avoidance. Treatment plans were developed for 15 patients with stage III inoperable non-small cell lung cancer using 3D conformal technique and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Elective nodal irradiation was included for all cases to create the most challenging scenarios with large target volumes. A 2 cm margin was used around the gross tumour volume (GTV) to generate PTV2 and 1cm margin around elective nodes for PTV1 resulting in PTV1 volumes larger than 1000 cm(3) in 13 of the 15 patients. 3D conformal and IMRT plans were generated on a commercial treatment planning system (TheraPlan Plus, Nucletron) with various combinations of beam energies and gantry angles. A 'dose quality factor' (DQF) was introduced to correlate the plan quality with patient specific parameters. A good correlation was found between the quality of the plans and the overlap between PTV1 and lungs. The patient feature factor (PFF), which is a product of several pertinent characteristics, was introduced to facilitate the choice of a particular technique for a particular patient. This approach may allow the evaluation of different treatment options prior to actual planning, subject to validation in larger prospective data sets.

  4. Transrectal high-intensity focused ultrasound in the treatment of localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Rebillard, Xavier; Gelet, Albert; Davin, Jean Louis; Soulie, Michel; Prapotnich, Dominique; Cathelineau, Xavier; Rozet, François; Vallancien, Guy

    2005-01-01

    The literature concerning the efficacy and safety of transrectal high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for the treatment of localized prostate cancer still comprises a relatively small number of articles. The main studies have been published by four teams using an apparatus available in Europe for several years. The recently presented results of the European Multicentre Study and the study by Gelet and associates based on 242 patients with a follow-up of more than 1 year show that HIFU is a valid alternative for the management of welldifferentiated and moderately differentiated localized prostate cancer with an initial PSA 10 years. In two studies, the combination of transurethral resection of the prostate and HIFU limited the risk of postoperative urinary retention without inducing a higher complication rate. In a series of patients presenting recurrence after external-beam radiotherapy, HIFU was found to be a useful therapy, with >80% negative biopsies. The best indications for HIFU are men over the age of 65, those who are not candidates for radical prostatectomy, obese patients, or patients with comorbidities likely to make surgery more difficult. The learning curve for this technique is relatively short, between 10 and 15 patients, for urologists experienced in transrectal ultrasonography. One of the advantages of HIFU is that it can be repeated in the case of recurrence or to re-treat a prostatic site, it involves no radiation, and patients do not suffer from long-term irritative urinary symptoms.

  5. Epidemiological appraisal of studies of residential exposure to power frequency magnetic fields and adult cancers.

    PubMed Central

    Li, C Y; Thériault, G; Lin, R S

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To appraise epidemiological evidence of the purported association between residential exposure to power frequency magnetic fields and adult cancers. METHODS: Literature review and epidemiological evaluation. RESULTS: Seven epidemiological studies have been conducted on the risk of cancer among adults in relation to residential exposure to power frequency magnetic fields. Leukaemia was positively associated with magnetic fields in three case-control studies. The other two case-control studies and two cohort studies did not show such a link. Brain tumours and breast cancer have rarely been examined by these studies. Based on the epidemiological results, the analysis of the role of chance and bias, and the criteria for causal inferences, it seems that the evidence is not strong enough to support the putative causal relation between residential exposure to magnetic fields and adult leukaemia, brain tumours, or breast cancer. Inadequate statistical power is far more a concern than selection bias, information bias, and confounding in interpreting the results from these studies, and in explaining inconsistencies between studies. CONCLUSIONS: Our reviews suggested that the only way to answer whether residential exposure to magnetic fields is capable of increasing the risks of adult cancers is to conduct more studies carefully avoiding methodological flaws, in particular small sample size. We also suggested that the risk of female breast cancer should be the object of additional investigations, and that future studies should attempt to include information on exposure to magnetic fields from workplaces as well as residential exposure to estimate the effects of overall exposure to magnetic fields. PMID:8983460

  6. Frequency, Etiology and Several Sociodemographic Characteristics of Acute Poisoning in Children Treated in the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Azemi, Mehmedali; Berisha, Majlinda; Kolgeci, Selim; Bejiqi, Ramush

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this work has been to present the frequency, etiology and several other socio-demographic characteristics of acute poisoning in children. The treated patients and methods of work: The treated patients were children of all age groups hospitalized in the Pediatric Clinic of Prishtina during year 2009. The study was done retrospectively. The diagnosis was done on the basis of heteroanamnesis and in several cases on the basis of the anamnesis data of a child, routine laboratory tests and toxicologic analysis. Results: 66 (9.4%) poisoned children were treated in the Intensive Care Unit. The biggest number of patients, 37 (56.06%) of them, were male, and out of that number 36 (54.55%) cases were coming from rural areas. The biggest number of them 49 (74.98%) were over 2-6 years old. The poisoning was mostly caused through the digestive tract (ingestion), it happened with 55 cases (83.33%), 56 cases (84,80%) suffered from severe poisoning, whereas 59 cases (89,50%) suffered from accidental poisoning. Regarding the type of the substances that caused poisoning, the most frequent were drugs in 34 (51.50%) cases and pesticides in 20 (30.30%) cases. Among drugs, the most dominant were those belonging to a group of benzodiazepines (10 cases) and metoclopramide (4 cases). Among pesticides the most dominant one that caused poisoning was malation (5 cases), then paration and cipermetrina appeared in 3 cases each. The biggest number of cases, 64 (96.96%) of them, were treated, whereas 2 cases (3.40%) passed away. Conclusion: The practice proved that that our people are not well informed about the poisoning in general, therefore it is necessary that they be educated by the use of all media, written and electronic, as well as other methods of medical education. PMID:23678312

  7. Acinetobacter infections prevalence and frequency of the antibiotics resistance: comparative study of intensive care units versus other hospital units

    PubMed Central

    Uwingabiye, Jean; Frikh, Mohammed; Lemnouer, Abdelhay; Bssaibis, Fatna; Belefquih, Bouchra; Maleb, Adil; Dahraoui, Souhail; Belyamani, Lahcen; Bait, Abdelouahed; Haimeur, Charki; Louzi, Lhoussain; Ibrahimi, Azeddine; Elouennass, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This study aims to determine the Acinetobacter sp clinical isolates frequency and its antibiotic susceptibility pattern by comparing results obtained from the Intensive Care Units (ICUs) to that of other units at the Mohammed V Military Teaching Hospital in Rabat. Methods This is a retrospective study over a 2-years period where we collected all clinical isolates of Acinetobacter sp obtained from samples for infection diagnosis performed on hospitalized patients between 2012 to 2014. Results During the study period, 441 clinical and non-repetitive isolates of Acinetobacter sp were collected representing 6.94% of all bacterial clinical isolates (n = 6352) and 9.6% of Gram negative rods (n = 4569). More than a half of the isolates were from the ICUs and were obtained from 293 infected patients of which 65, 2% (191 cases) were males (sex ratio = 1.9) and the median age was 56 years (interquartile range: 42-68 years). Acinetobacter clinical isolates were obtained from respiratory samples (44.67%) followed by blood cultures (14.51%). The resistance to ciprofloxacin, ceftazidime, piperacillin / tazobactam, imipenem, amikacin, tobramycin, netilmicin, rifampicin and colistin was respectively 87%, 86%, 79%, 76%; 52%, 43%, 33% 32% and 1.7%. The difference in resistance between the ICUs and the other units was statistically significant (p <0.05) except for colistin, tetracycline and rifampicin. Conclusion This paper shows that solving the problem of prevalence and high rate of multidrug resistant Acinetobacter infection which represents a therapeutic impasse, requires the control of the hospital environment and optimizing hands hygiene and antibiotics use in the hospital. PMID:27347280

  8. Low Intensity, High Frequency Vibration Training to Improve Musculoskeletal Function in a Mouse Model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Novotny, Susan A.; Mader, Tara L.; Greising, Angela G.; Lin, Angela S.; Guldberg, Robert E.; Warren, Gordon L.; Lowe, Dawn A.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine if low intensity, high frequency vibration training impacted the musculoskeletal system in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, relative to healthy mice. Three-week old wildtype (n = 26) and mdx mice (n = 22) were randomized to non-vibrated or vibrated (45 Hz and 0.6 g, 15 min/d, 5 d/wk) groups. In vivo and ex vivo contractile function of the anterior crural and extensor digitorum longus muscles, respectively, were assessed following 8 wks of vibration. Mdx mice were injected 5 and 1 days prior to sacrifice with Calcein and Xylenol, respectively. Muscles were prepared for histological and triglyceride analyses and subcutaneous and visceral fat pads were excised and weighed. Tibial bones were dissected and analyzed by micro-computed tomography for trabecular morphometry at the metaphysis, and cortical geometry and density at the mid-diaphysis. Three-point bending tests were used to assess cortical bone mechanical properties and a subset of tibiae was processed for dynamic histomorphometry. Vibration training for 8 wks did not alter trabecular morphometry, dynamic histomorphometry, cortical geometry, or mechanical properties (P≥0.34). Vibration did not alter any measure of muscle contractile function (P≥0.12); however the preservation of muscle function and morphology in mdx mice indicates vibration is not deleterious to muscle lacking dystrophin. Vibrated mice had smaller subcutaneous fat pads (P = 0.03) and higher intramuscular triglyceride concentrations (P = 0.03). These data suggest that vibration training at 45 Hz and 0.6 g did not significantly impact the tibial bone and the surrounding musculature, but may influence fat distribution in mice. PMID:25121503

  9. Low intensity, high frequency vibration training to improve musculoskeletal function in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Novotny, Susan A; Mader, Tara L; Greising, Angela G; Lin, Angela S; Guldberg, Robert E; Warren, Gordon L; Lowe, Dawn A

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine if low intensity, high frequency vibration training impacted the musculoskeletal system in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, relative to healthy mice. Three-week old wildtype (n = 26) and mdx mice (n = 22) were randomized to non-vibrated or vibrated (45 Hz and 0.6 g, 15 min/d, 5 d/wk) groups. In vivo and ex vivo contractile function of the anterior crural and extensor digitorum longus muscles, respectively, were assessed following 8 wks of vibration. Mdx mice were injected 5 and 1 days prior to sacrifice with Calcein and Xylenol, respectively. Muscles were prepared for histological and triglyceride analyses and subcutaneous and visceral fat pads were excised and weighed. Tibial bones were dissected and analyzed by micro-computed tomography for trabecular morphometry at the metaphysis, and cortical geometry and density at the mid-diaphysis. Three-point bending tests were used to assess cortical bone mechanical properties and a subset of tibiae was processed for dynamic histomorphometry. Vibration training for 8 wks did not alter trabecular morphometry, dynamic histomorphometry, cortical geometry, or mechanical properties (P ≥ 0.34). Vibration did not alter any measure of muscle contractile function (P ≥ 0.12); however the preservation of muscle function and morphology in mdx mice indicates vibration is not deleterious to muscle lacking dystrophin. Vibrated mice had smaller subcutaneous fat pads (P = 0.03) and higher intramuscular triglyceride concentrations (P = 0.03). These data suggest that vibration training at 45 Hz and 0.6 g did not significantly impact the tibial bone and the surrounding musculature, but may influence fat distribution in mice.

  10. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) in Localized Prostate Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Alkhorayef, Mohammed; Mahmoud, Mustafa Z.; Alzimami, Khalid S.; Sulieman, Abdelmoneim; Fagiri, Maram A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) applies high-intensity focused ultrasound energy to locally heat and destroy diseased or damaged tissue through ablation. This study intended to review HIFU to explain the fundamentals of HIFU, evaluate the evidence concerning the role of HIFU in the treatment of prostate cancer (PC), review the technologies used to perform HIFU and the published clinical literature regarding the procedure as a primary treatment for PC. Material/Methods Studies addressing HIFU in localized PC were identified in a search of internet scientific databases. The analysis of outcomes was limited to journal articles written in English and published between 2000 and 2013. Results HIFU is a non-invasive approach that uses a precisely delivered ultrasound energy to achieve tumor cell necrosis without radiation or surgical excision. In current urological oncology, HIFU is used clinically in the treatment of PC. Clinical research on HIFU therapy for localized PC began in the 1990s, and the majority of PC patients were treated with the Ablatherm device. Conclusions HIFU treatment for localized PC can be considered as an alternative minimally invasive therapeutic modality for patients who are not candidates for radical prostatectomy. Patients with lower pre-HIFU PSA level and favourable pathologic Gleason score seem to present better oncologic outcomes. Future advances in technology and safety will undoubtedly expand the HIFU role in this indication as more of patient series are published, with a longer follow-up period. PMID:25806099

  11. Intensive or not surveillance of patients with colorectal cancer after curative resection

    PubMed Central

    Rosati, Gerardo

    2010-01-01

    It is common practice to follow patients with colorectal cancer for some years after resection and/or adjuvant treatment. Data are lacking about how often patients should be seen, what tests should be performed, and what surveillance strategy has a significant impact on patient outcome. Seven randomized trials have addressed this issue, but none had sufficient statistical power. Four published meta-analyses have established that overall survival is significantly improved for patients in the more intensive programs of follow-up. This improvement amounts to a risk difference of 7% (95% CI: 3%-12%, P = 0.002) in 5-year survival. This should be partly attributable to more frequent reoperation for cure of asymptomatic recurrence, or more intense follow-up, as well other factors, such increased psychosocial support and well-being, diet and lifestyle optimization, and/or improved treatment of coincidental diseases. A large-scale multicenter European study [Gruppo Italiano di Lavoro per la Diagnosi Anticipata (GILDA)] is underway to answer the question of what constitutes optimal surveillance for patients after primary therapy, based on an adequately powered study. PMID:20333780

  12. Intensive chemotherapy as salvage treatment for solid tumors: focus on germ cell cancer

    PubMed Central

    Selle, F.; Gligorov, J.; Richard, S.; Khalil, A.; Alexandre, I.; Avenin, D.; Provent, S.; Soares, D.G.; Lotz, J.P.

    2014-01-01

    Germ cell tumors present contrasting biological and molecular features compared to many solid tumors, which may partially explain their unusual sensitivity to chemotherapy. Reduced DNA repair capacity and enhanced induction of apoptosis appear to be key factors in the sensitivity of germ cell tumors to cisplatin. Despite substantial cure rates, some patients relapse and subsequently die of their disease. Intensive doses of chemotherapy are used to counter mechanisms of drug resistance. So far, high-dose chemotherapy with hematopoietic stem cell support for solid tumors is used only in the setting of testicular germ cell tumors. In that indication, high-dose chemotherapy is given as the first or late salvage treatment for patients with either relapsed or progressive tumors after initial conventional salvage chemotherapy. High-dose chemotherapy is usually given as two or three sequential cycles using carboplatin and etoposide with or without ifosfamide. The administration of intensive therapy carries significant side effects and can only be efficiently and safely conducted in specialized referral centers to assure optimum patient care outcomes. In breast and ovarian cancer, most studies have demonstrated improvement in progression-free survival (PFS), but overall survival remained unchanged. Therefore, most of these approaches have been dropped. In germ cell tumors, clinical trials are currently investigating novel therapeutic combinations and active treatments. In particular, the integration of targeted therapies constitutes an important area of research for patients with a poor prognosis. PMID:25493378

  13. Time-Limited Trials of Intensive Care for Critically Ill Patients With Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shrime, Mark G.; Ferket, Bart S.; Scott, Daniel J.; Lee, Joon; Barragan-Bradford, Diana; Pollard, Tom; Arabi, Yaseen M.; Al-Dorzi, Hasan M.; Baron, Rebecca M.; Hunink, M. G. Myriam; Celi, Leo A.; Lai, Peggy S.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Time-limited trials of intensive care are commonly used in patients perceived to have a poor prognosis. The optimal duration of such trials is unknown. Factors such as a cancer diagnosis are associated with clinician pessimism and may affect the decision to limit care independent of a patient’s severity of illness. OBJECTIVE To identify the optimal duration of intensive care for short-term mortality in critically ill patients with cancer. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Decision analysis using a state-transition microsimulation model was performed to simulate the hospital course of patients with poor-prognosis primary tumors, metastatic disease, or hematologic malignant neoplasms admitted to medical and surgical intensive care units. Transition probabilities were derived from 920 participants stratified by sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) scores to identify severity of illness. The model was validated in 3 independent cohorts with 349, 158, and 117 participants from quaternary care academic hospitals. Monte Carlo microsimulation was performed, followed by probabilistic sensitivity analysis. Outcomes were assessed in the overall cohort and in solid tumors alone. INTERVENTIONS Time-unlimited vs time-limited trials of intensive care. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES 30-day all-cause mortality and mean survival duration. RESULTS The SOFA scores at ICU admission were significantly associated with mortality. A 3-, 8-, or 15-day trial of intensive care resulted in decreased mean 30-day survival vs aggressive care in all but the sickest patients (SOFA score, 5–9: 48.4% [95% CI, 48.0%–48.8%], 60.6% [95% CI, 60.2%–61.1%], and 66.8% [95% CI, 66.4%–67.2%], respectively, vs 74.6% [95% CI, 74.3%–75.0%] with time-unlimited aggressive care; SOFA score, 10–14: 36.2% [95% CI, 35.8%–36.6%], 44.1% [95% CI, 43.6%–44.5%], and 46.1% [95% CI, 45.6%–46.5%], respectively, vs 48.4% [95% CI, 48.0%–48.8%] with aggressive care; SOFA score, ≥15: 5.8% [95

  14. Dose Intensity in Early-Stage Breast Cancer: A Community Practice Experience

    PubMed Central

    Bretzel, Robert L.; Cameron, Ralph; Gustas, Marc; Garcia, Maria A.; Hoffman, Heather K.; Malhotra, Rosalind; Miller, Karen; Prime, Janine; Favret, Anne

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This retrospective study was a quality initiative to determine practice patterns in adjuvant chemotherapy for early-stage breast cancer (ESBC) and define the incidence and causative factors of suboptimal relative dose intensity (RDI). Our community-based practice participates in ASCO's Quality Oncology Practice Initiative in an effort to improve the quality of care provided to our patients. Most metrics do not have a direct proven correlation with improvement in survival, but measurement of RDI does. Patients and Methods: Our study was a retrospective analysis of patients with ESBC. Each patient was treated on an outpatient basis in a community practice setting. We used the diagnosis criteria of breast cancer to create a list of eligible patients within the data range from our electronic medical record. Inclusion criteria consisted of all women seen in our offices receiving adjuvant chemotherapy for a diagnosis of breast cancer. Exclusion criteria included patients with metastatic disease and patients not receiving chemotherapy. Results: The average weighted RDI for all patients was 98.4%. Of the 834 evaluable patients we reviewed, 102 patients (12.2%) had some reduction in RDI. This subset had an average RDI of 88%. Twenty-nine patients (3.5%) had an RDI of less than 85%. Conclusion: Because decreased RDI has been shown to correlate with decreased overall and disease-free survival rates, we were compelled to measure and determine causative factors in our patients with ESBC. The primary reasons for dose delay and overall reduction in RDI were scheduling and neutropenia. Scheduling delays were initiated by both patients and medical staff, with the majority requested by patients. PMID:21479074

  15. Clinical response of advanced cancer patients to cellular immunotherapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hasumi, Kenichiro; Aoki, Yukimasa; Wantanabe, Ryuko; Mann, Dean L

    2013-01-01

    Patients afflicted with advanced cancers were treated with the intratumoral injection of autologous immature dendritic cells (iDCs) followed by activated T-cell infusion and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). A second round of iDCs and activated T cells was then administered to patients after the last radiation cycle. This complete regimen was repeated for new and recurring lesions after 6 weeks of follow-up. One year post therapy, outcome analyses were performed to evaluate treatment efficacy. Patients were grouped according to both the number and size of tumors and clinical parameters at treatment initiation, including recurrent disease after standard cancer therapy, Stage IV disease, and no prior therapy. Irrespective of prior treatment status, 23/37 patients with ≤ 5 neoplastic lesions that were ≤ 3 cm in diameter achieved complete responses (CRs), and 5/37 exhibited partial responses (PRs). Among 130 individuals harboring larger and more numerous lesions, CRs were observed in 7/74 patients that had received prior SCT and in 2/56 previously untreated patients. Some patients manifested immune responses including an increase in CD8+CD56+ lymphocytes among circulating mononuclear cells in the course of treatment. To prospectively explore the therapeutic use of these cells, CD8+ cells were isolated from patients that had been treated with cellular immunotherapy and IMRT, expanded in vitro, and injected into recurrent metastatic sites in 13 individuals who underwent the same immunoradiotherapeutic regimens but failed to respond. CRs were achieved in 34 of 58 of such recurrent lesions while PRs in 17 of 58. These data support the expanded use of immunoradiotherapy in advanced cancer patients exhibiting progressive disease. PMID:24349874

  16. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer of Unknown Primary: Toxicity and Preliminary Efficacy

    SciTech Connect

    Klem, Michelle L. Mechalakos, James G.; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Singh, Bhuvanesh; Kraus, Dennis; Shaha, Ashok; Shah, Jatin; Pfister, David G.; Lee, Nancy Y.

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: Unknown primary head and neck cancers often require comprehensive mucosal and bilateral neck irradiation. With conventional techniques, significant toxicity can develop. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has the potential to minimize the toxicity. Methods and Materials: Between 2000 and 2005, 21 patients underwent IMRT for unknown primary head and neck cancer at our center. Of the 21 patients, 5 received IMRT with definitive intent and 16 as postoperative therapy; 14 received concurrent chemotherapy and 7 IMRT alone. The target volumes included the bilateral neck and mucosal surface. The median dose was 66 Gy. Acute and chronic toxicities, esophageal strictures, and percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube dependence were evaluated. Progression-free survival, regional progression-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, and overall survival were estimated with Kaplan-Meier curves. Results: With a median follow-up of 24 months, the 2-year regional progression-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, and overall survival rate was 90%, 90%, and 85%, respectively. Acute grade 1 and 2 xerostomia was seen in 57% and 43% of patients, respectively. Salivary function improved with time. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube placement was required in 72% with combined modality treatment and 43% with IMRT alone. Only 1 patient required percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy support at the last follow-up visit. Two patients treated with combined modality and one treated with IMRT alone developed esophageal strictures, but all had improvement or resolution with dilation. Conclusion: The preliminary analysis of IMRT for unknown primary head and neck cancer has shown acceptable toxicity and encouraging efficacy. The analysis of the dosimetric variables showed excellent tumor coverage and acceptable doses to critical normal structures. Esophageal strictures developed but were effectively treated with dilation. Techniques to limit the esophageal dose

  17. Role of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in Reducing Toxicity in Dose Escalation for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Mamgani, Abrahim Heemsbergen, Wilma D.; Peeters, Stephanie T.H.; Lebesque, Joos V.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: To compare the acute and late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity in prostate cancer patients treated to a total dose of 78 Gy with either a three-conformal radiotherapy technique with a sequential boost (SEQ) or a simultaneous integrated boost using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (SIB-IMRT). Patients and Methods: A total of 78 prostate cancer patients participating in the randomized Dutch trial comparing 68 Gy and 78 Gy were the subject of this analysis. They were all treated at the same institution to a total dose of 78 Gy. The median follow-up was 76 and 56 months for the SEQ and SIB-IMRT groups, respectively. The primary endpoints were acute and late GI and GU toxicity. Results: A significantly lower incidence of acute Grade 2 or greater GI toxicity occurred in patients treated with SIB-IMRT compared with SEQ (20% vs. 61%, p = 0.001). For acute GU toxicity and late GI and GU toxicity, the incidence was lower after SIB-IMRT, but these differences were not statistically significant. No statistically significant difference were found in the 5-year freedom from biochemical failure rate (Phoenix definition) between the two groups (70% for the SIB-IMRT group vs. 61% for the SEQ group, p = 0.3). The same was true for the 5-year freedom from clinical failure rate (90% vs. 72%, p = 0.07). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that SIB-IMRT reduced the toxicity without compromising the outcome in patients with localized prostate cancer treated to 78 Gy radiation.

  18. Amino acid metabolism and inflammatory burden in ovarian cancer patients undergoing intense oncological therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lichar Dillon, E.; Volpi, Elena; Wolfe, Robert R.; Sinha, Sandeep; Sanford, Arthur P.; Arrastia, Concepcion D.; Urban, Randall J.; Casperson, Shanon L.; Paddon-Jones, Douglas; Sheffield-Moore, Melinda

    2007-01-01

    Background & Aims Cancer and oncological therapy are associated with a progressive physical deterioration, malnutrition, and enhanced inflammatory burden. Our considerable data showing the strong anabolic potential of amino acids led us to test whether amino acids can acutely stimulate muscle protein synthesis in cancer patients (CA) undergoing intense chemotherapy. Methods Mixed muscle fractional synthesis rate (FSR), rates of phenylalanine appearance and disappearance (Ra and Rd), and net phenylalanine balance (NB) were measured during a primed constant infusion of L-[ring-2H5]phenylalanine. Blood and muscle tissue samples were collected in the basal state and following ingestion of 40 g of amino acids (AA) given in 30 mL boluses every 10 minutes for 3 hours. Serum and tissue cytokines and NF-κB expression in skeletal muscle were measured and compared to normative, healthy older controls (OC). Results Skeletal muscle TNF-α, IL-6, and NF-κB were elevated in CA. FSR and model-derived protein synthesis (Rd) increased significantly from basal to AA (FSR: 0.052 ± 0.009 vs. 0.120 ± 0.008 %•h-1, P<0.001; Rd: 23.1 ± 4.1 vs. 36.4 ± 5.0 nmol•min-1•100mL leg-1, P≤0.05). Model-derived protein breakdown (Ra) remained unchanged from basal to AA.. Phenylalanine NB improved from a negative basal value (-16 ± 2) to zero (0.8 ± 6 nmol•min-1•100 ml leg-1, P≤0.05) following AA. Conclusion Despite advanced cancer, ongoing therapy, and an enhanced inflammatory burden, amino acids were capable of acutely stimulating muscle protein synthesis in these patients. PMID:17804123

  19. Ab initio calculations of vibrational frequencies and infrared intensities for global warning potential of CFC substitutes. CF{sub 3}CH{sub 2}F (HFC-134a)

    SciTech Connect

    Papasavva, S.; Tai, S.; Esslinger, A.; Illinger, K.H.; Kenny, J.E.

    1995-03-16

    We have investigated the feasibility of using ab initio molecular orbital methods for predicting the global warming potential of the proposed chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) substitute CF{sub 3}CH{sub 2}F, HFC-134a. Various levels of theory and basis sets were used to optimize geometry and calculate harmonic vibrational frequencies and infrared intensities for the molecule using the GAUSSIAN 92 software package. In attempting to assess the quality of the computations, we found it necessary to reconsider the vibrational assignments available in the literature. On the basis of the current assignment, we find that for the highest level calculation, MP2/6-31G{sup **}, the calculated harmonic frequencies agree extremely well with the experimentally observed ones at frequencies below 800 cm{sup {minus}1}, with a systematic error toward higher calculated frequencies becoming apparent above 800 cm{sup {minus}1}. At lower levels of theory, the systematic error is apparent at all frequencies. The regularity of the deviation between calculated and observed frequencies makes ab initio calculations of vibrational frequencies much more useful than semiempirical calculations, which tend to show random deviations, as demonstrated with a PM3-UHF calculation in this work. The calculated absolute intensities are in good agreement with the limited experimental measurements previously reported. 23 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Modulated single-bubble sonoluminescence: Dependence of phase of flashes, their intensity and rise/decay times on viscosity, the modulation strength, and frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastikhin, Igor; Djurkovic, Borko

    2004-05-01

    The single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) signal was studied for the case of driving frequency modulated by lower frequency with an offset. In our work, the driving frequency of 28 kHz and the modulation frequencies of 25-1000 Hz were used. The modulation strength of 0.2, 0.5, and 0.8 was defined as the difference of highest and lowest pressures over modulation period. The measurements were performed for water-glycerol mixtures of various viscosities. The measured SBSL signal appeared as a train of flashes for modulation frequencies below 250 Hz, and as a continuous modulated signal for higher frequencies. At the same frequency, the flashes covered similar phase intervals for different modulation strengths and, accordingly, pressure ranges. At higher glycerol concentrations (up to 24%) both the intensity and the stability of flashes increased, due to damped shape instabilities and reduced dancing; however, the phase interval of flashes remained about the same. Such phase-locked behavior can be explained by translational movements of the bubble due to modulated Bjerknes force and changes in the symmetry of the bubble collapse. The changes in intensities and rise/decay times can serve as a measure of the gas exchange between the bubble and its surroundings during silent and luminescent intervals.

  1. Low-Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Intensive Occupational Therapy for Poststroke Patients with Upper Limb Hemiparesis: Preliminary Study of a 15-Day Protocol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kakuda, Wataru; Abo, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Kazushige; Momosaki, Ryo; Yokoi, Aki; Fukuda, Akiko; Ishikawa, Atsushi; Ito, Hiroshi; Tominaga, Ayumi

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the safety and feasibility of a 15-day protocol of low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) combined with intensive occupational therapy (OT) on motor function and spasticity in hemiparetic upper limbs in poststroke patients. Fifteen poststroke patients (age at study entry 55 [plus…

  2. Therapeutic application of 6-Hz-primed low-frequency rTMS combined with intensive speech therapy for post-stroke aphasia.

    PubMed

    Kakuda, Wataru; Abo, Masahiro; Momosaki, Ryo; Morooka, Azusa

    2011-01-01

    To clarify the safety, feasibility and efficacy of 6-Hz-primed low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) combined with intensive speech therapy (ST) for post-stroke aphasic patients. Four adult patients with history of left hemispheric stroke and with motor-dominant aphasia were studied. During 11-day hospitalization, each patient received 18 treatment sessions consisting of 10-min 6-Hz priming stimulation followed by 20-min 1-Hz low-frequency rTMS and intensive ST for 60 min daily. Both the priming stimulation and low-frequency rTMS were applied to the right frontal lobe. The intensive ST was provided on one-to-one basis. Language function was assessed by Standard Language Test of Aphasia (SLTA), Supplementary Test of SLTA (SLTA-ST), and the Japanese version of Western Aphasia Battery (WAB) within 2 weeks prior to the admission and on the day of discharge. The in-patient protocol was successfully completed by all patients without any adverse effects. Each patient showed an increase in the correct answer rate after the intervention. Improvement was found in both expressive and recessive language modalities in all patients. The protocol of 6-Hz-primed low-frequency rTMS and intensive ST for post-stroke aphasia was safe and feasible, suggesting its potential usefulness in the treatment of this population.

  3. Low-Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Intensive Occupational Therapy for Poststroke Patients with Upper Limb Hemiparesis: Preliminary Study of a 15-Day Protocol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kakuda, Wataru; Abo, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Kazushige; Momosaki, Ryo; Yokoi, Aki; Fukuda, Akiko; Ishikawa, Atsushi; Ito, Hiroshi; Tominaga, Ayumi

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the safety and feasibility of a 15-day protocol of low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) combined with intensive occupational therapy (OT) on motor function and spasticity in hemiparetic upper limbs in poststroke patients. Fifteen poststroke patients (age at study entry 55 [plus…

  4. Sedentary behaviors and light-intensity activities in relation to colorectal cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Keum, NaNa; Cao, Yin; Oh, Hannah; Smith-Warner, Stephanie A; Orav, John; Wu, Kana; Fuchs, Charles S; Cho, Eunyoung; Giovannucci, Edward L

    2016-05-01

    A recent meta-analysis found that sedentary behaviors are associated with an increased colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. Yet, the finding on TV viewing time, the most widely used surro