Science.gov

Sample records for cancer local recurrence

  1. Reirradiation for locally recurrent breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Marta, Gustavo Nader; Hijal, Tarek; de Andrade Carvalho, Heloisa

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study is to review the current status of reirradiation therapy (Re-RT) for locally recurrent breast cancer. The overall outcome of breast/chest wall Re-RT is difficult to assess because of the wide range of different treatments that a patient may have undergone and the patient's individual features. The local control and complete response rates were reported to be 43-96% and 41-71%, respectively. The combination of Re-RT and hyperthermia seems to be related to improved outcomes. Toxicity rates vary between studies, and Re-RT is generally well tolerated. Re-RT may be considered an option for patients with breast cancer relapse after prior irradiation. Further studies are needed to determine the best irradiation volume and treatment modality for patients with locally recurrent disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Factors associated with breast cancer mortality after local recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Dent, R.; Valentini, A.; Hanna, W.; Rawlinson, E.; Rakovitch, E.; Sun, P.; Narod, S.A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to identify risk factors for mortality after local recurrence in women treated for invasive breast cancer with breast-conserving surgery. Experimental Design Our prospective cohort study included 267 women who were treated with breast-conserving surgery at Women’s College Hospital from 1987 to 1997 and who later developed local recurrence. Clinical information and tumour receptor status were abstracted from medical records and pathology reports. Patients were followed from the date of local recurrence until death or last follow-up. Survival analysis used a Cox proportional hazards model. Results Among the 267 women with a local recurrence, 97 (36.3%) died of breast cancer within 10 years (on average 2.6 years after the local recurrence). The actuarial risk of death was 46.1% at 10 years from recurrence. In a multivariable model, predictors of death included short time from diagnosis to recurrence [hazard ratio (hr) for <5 years compared with ≥10 years: 3.40; 95% confidence interval (ci): 1.04 to 11.1; p = 0.04], progesterone receptor positivity (hr: 0.35; 95% ci: 0.23 to 0.54; p < 0.001), lymph node positivity (hr: 2.1; 95% ci: 1.4 to 3.3; p = 0.001), and age at local recurrence (hr for age >45 compared with age ≤45 years: 0.61; 95% ci: 0.38 to 0.95; p = 0.03). Conclusions The risk of death after local recurrence varies widely. Risk factors for death after local recurrence include node positivity, progesterone receptor negativity, young age at recurrence, and short time from diagnosis to recurrence. PMID:24940101

  3. Microwave ablation as palliative treatment of locally recurrent colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, W; Ye, X; Yang, X; Li, Y; Huang, G; Wang, J; Han, X; Ni, X; Wei, Z; Zheng, A; Meng, M

    2015-12-01

    Patients suffering local recurrence of colorectal cancer which cannot be surgically removed are troubled with severe pain and poor quality of life. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of computed tomography (CT)-guided microwave ablation (MWA) as palliative treatment for recurrent unresectable colorectal cancer. Thirty-one patients were suffering locally recurrent colorectal cancer underwent MWA with CT guidance. The MWA power was set at 60-80 W, 6-8 min. Effectiveness was evaluated by visual analog scale (VAS) with a follow-up of 6-month. Complications were also recorded. Technical success was achieved in all patients. Mean VAS preprocedure was 7.10. Mean VAS postprocedure were as follows: 1 week, 2.65 (P < 0.001); 1 month, 0.81 (P < 0.001); 3 months 0.45 (P < 0.001); and 6 months 0.19 (P < 0.001). No serious complications were observed including intestinal fistulas, bladder fistulas, or peripheral vascular or nerve injury. CT-guided MWA as treatment of recurrent colorectal cancer can quickly and effectively relieve pain. It is a minimally invasive, safe, and efficient palliative treatment of recurrent colorectal cancer.

  4. Imaging of prostate cancer local recurrences: why and how?

    PubMed

    Rouvière, Olivier; Vitry, Thierry; Lyonnet, Denis

    2010-05-01

    Because prostate cancer local recurrences can be efficiently treated by salvage therapies, it becomes critical to detect them early. The first alert is the rise of the prostate specific antigen (PSA) level after the post-treatment nadir, which can correspond to a distant recurrence, a local recurrence or both. This so-called biochemical failure (BF) is defined as PSA level > 0.2 ng/ml after radical prostatectomy (RP) and PSA level > nadir + 2 ng/ml after radiotherapy. There is no consensual definition of BF after cryotherapy, high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation or brachytherapy. Local recurrences after RP are treated by radiotherapy, those after radiotherapy by RP, cryotherapy, brachytherapy or HIFU ablation. Recurrences after cryotherapy or HIFU ablation can be treated by a second session or radiotherapy. Recurrences after brachytherapy are difficult to treat. In patients with BF, MRI can detect local recurrences, whatever the initial treatment was. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI seems particularly accurate. The role of spectroscopy remains controversial. Ultrasound-based techniques are less accurate, but this may change with the advent of ultrasonic contrast media. These recent advances in imaging may improve the outcome of salvage therapies (by improving patient selection and treatment targeting) and should open the way to focal salvage treatments in the near future.

  5. Use of brachytherapy in management of locally recurrent rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Goes, R N; Beart, R W; Simons, A J; Gunderson, L L; Grado, G; Streeter, O

    1997-10-01

    Locally recurrent rectal cancer is associated with poor quality of life and has justified aggressive surgical and adjuvant approaches to control the disease. This study was designed to evaluate if the use of brachytherapy in association with wide surgical excision (debulking operation) can offer reasonable palliation for patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer. Patients with biopsy-proven locally recurrent rectal cancer who were not candidates for intraoperative radiation therapy and who were previously considered as having unresectable tumors were included in the study and were followed-up from May 1981 to November 1990. All of them had undergone laparotomy and had either radical or debulking surgical resection performed. At the same time, brachytherapy was used with temporary or permanent implant of seeds of iridium-192 or iodine-125. Thirty patients were included. Patients ranged in age from 28 to 74 years, and 16 patients were female. No mortality was observed, and morbidity was low (small-bowel obstruction (1 patient), intestinal fistula (1 patient), and urinary fistula (1 patient). Histologic examination of the specimen showed gross residual disease in 67 percent of patients and microscopic disease in 25 percent of patients. Long-term follow-up was possible in 28 patients. Mean follow-up and local control were, respectively, 26.5 months and 37.5 percent for gross residual disease and 34 months and 66 percent for microscopic residual disease. Eighteen patients (64 percent) had locally recurrent rectal cancer under control at the time of the last follow-up, with seven patients (25 percent) having no evidence of local or distant recurrence. This is the first report of brachytherapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer. This appears to offer a therapeutic alternative to patients who are not candidates for intraoperative radiation therapy. Surgical morbidity and mortality are acceptable. Local control in 18 patients (64 percent) is comparable with

  6. Re-irradiation for locally recurrent refractory breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Merino, Tomas; Tran, William T.; Czarnota, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To report an analysis of treatment outcomes of a cohort of patients re-irradiated for locally recurrent refractory breast cancer (LRRBC) Patients and Methods Between 2008 and 2013, 47 women (mean age = 60 years) were re-irradiated for LRRBC. Outcomes were measured using Kaplan-Meier log rank to compare curves and Cox regression for multivariate analysis. Outcomes included overall survival (OS), time to re-treatment, survival without systemic progression, and survival without local recurrence. Results Fifty-six instances of re-irradiation were completed and analyzed. The mean cumulative 2 Gy equivalent dose (EQD2) to the whole breast and tumour cavity (α/β = 3) was 99.8 Gy and 109.1 Gy, respectively. Most patients initially had significant symptoms before RT due to local recurrence. The median time to re-treatment and to systemic failure was 41 and 50 months, respectively. Median follow-up for OS was 17 months and OS was 0.73 (SE = 0.07) at 1 year and 0.67 (SE = 0.07) at 2 years. Local control was 0.62 (SE = 0.07) and 0.5 (0.08) at 1 and 2 years, respectively. Acute radiation dermatitis was G1-2, G3 and G4 in 45, 4 and 1 cases, respectively. One patient presented with necrosis. The most common long term toxicity was G3 fibrosis (n = 4) and telangiectatic changes (n = 3). Multivariable analysis indicated that skin involvement (Hazard Ratio = 6.6 (1.4-31), p = 0.016) and time to local recurrence <2yr (HR 3.1 (1.04-9.7) p = 0.042) predicted local recurrence. Conclusion High dose re-irradiation is feasible for locally RRBC. This approach can have a significant benefit in this very high-risk group. PMID:26459388

  7. Salvage cryotherapy for local recurrence after radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Kvorning Ternov, Klara; Krag Jakobsen, Ane; Bratt, Ola; Ahlgren, Göran

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to present the outcome of patients treated with salvage cryotherapy after radiotherapy for prostate cancer at one institution. Consecutive patients treated between 2007 and 2013 with transperineal cryotherapy for biopsy-verified local recurrence after radiotherapy were investigated. An external reviewer retrieved outcome data retrospectively from medical records. Complications were graded according to the Clavien classification. One patient with less than 1 year of follow-up was excluded from the analysis of side-effects. Thirty patients were included, 29 of whom had a follow-up of at least 1 year. The median follow-up was 2.7 years (range 1-6.5 years). Eleven of the 23 patients without hormonal treatment at the time of cryotherapy reached a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir of less than 0.5 ng/ml. At the end of follow-up five of these 23 patients still had a PSA below 0.5 ng/ml and 10 were free from recurrence according to the Phoenix definition. Clinical recurrence (verified with imaging or biopsies) was detected in 13 patients, six of which were local. One patient died from prostate cancer. Eleven patients had urinary incontinence grade 1-2 and three had grade 3-4, seven had pelvic pain, three had severe but transitory tissue sloughing, three developed a urethral stricture or had prolonged urinary retention, and one developed a urinary fistula 4.5 years after cryotherapy. Salvage cryotherapy should be considered as an alternative to hormonal treatment and surgery for local recurrence after radiotherapy for prostate cancer. The results compare well to those reported from centres with longer experience.

  8. The utility of hyperthermia for local recurrence of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Daigo; Inui, Toshio; Tsubota, Yu; Sueoka, Noriko; Yamamoto, Chizuko; Kuwana, Kayoko; Yamamoto, Mitsuo

    2012-09-27

    Hyperthermia has long been used in combination with chemotherapy or radiation therapy for the treatment of superficial malignancies, in part due to its sensitizing capabilities. Patients who suffer from superficial recurrences of breast cancer have poor clinical outcomes. Skin metastases may particularly impair the quality of life due to the physical appearance, odor and bleeding. A 66-year-old woman underwent mastectomy and axillary lymph node dissection for breast cancer. Nine years post-operatively, local metastases developed in the left axillary area (measuring 5 cm in diameter). Initially the tumor did not respond to radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Therefore, we added hyperthermia combined with them. Eight weeks later, the tumor became nearly flat and the patient noted improved activity in her daily life. Hyperthermia may accelerate the antitumor effects of radiation therapy and chemotherapy. This treatment provides an alternative for unresectable breast cancer skin metastases.

  9. The utility of hyperthermia for local recurrence of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hyperthermia has long been used in combination with chemotherapy or radiation therapy for the treatment of superficial malignancies, in part due to its sensitizing capabilities. Patients who suffer from superficial recurrences of breast cancer have poor clinical outcomes. Skin metastases may particularly impair the quality of life due to the physical appearance, odor and bleeding. Case presentation A 66-year-old woman underwent mastectomy and axillary lymph node dissection for breast cancer. Nine years post-operatively, local metastases developed in the left axillary area (measuring 5 cm in diameter). Initially the tumor did not respond to radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Therefore, we added hyperthermia combined with them. Eight weeks later, the tumor became nearly flat and the patient noted improved activity in her daily life. Conclusion Hyperthermia may accelerate the antitumor effects of radiation therapy and chemotherapy. This treatment provides an alternative for unresectable breast cancer skin metastases. PMID:23017037

  10. Thermoradiotherapy for locally recurrent breast cancer with skin involvement.

    PubMed

    Hehr, T; Lamprecht, U; Glocker, S; Classen, J; Paulsen, F; Budach, W; Bamberg, M

    2001-01-01

    This retrospective analysis investigated the effectiveness and side-effects of combined hyperthermia and radiation therapy in locally recurrent breast cancer after primary modified radical mastectomy. The aim of the thermoradiotherapy was to reduce the substantial risk of symptomatic chest wall disease. Between May 1995-August 1998, 39 extensively pre-treated women with progressive locoregional chest wall tumours were treated with local radiofrequency hyperthermia, given twice a week immediately before radiotherapy. Sixty-two per cent of the patients had received previous radiotherapy, with a median dose of 50 Gy, 64% had received chemotherapy, 36% hormonal therapy, and 13% local therapy with miltefosin, respectively. Nine patients were treated for microscopic residual disease after local tumour excision (R1-resection) and 30 patients for gross macroscopic nodular recurrences. Twenty-seven patients had two adjacent hyperthermia fields at the ipsilateral chest wall to cover the whole irradiation area. Each field received a median of seven local hyperthermia sessions (range 2-12, average 5.6 sessions) just before radiation therapy, with a median dose of 60 Gy (range 30-68 Gy). The monitored maximum(average) and average(average) epicutaneous temperatures were 42.1 degrees C and 41.0 degrees C, respectively. Maximum(average) and average(average) intratumoural temperatures of 43.0 degrees C and 41.1 degrees C, respectively, were achieved in nine chest wall recurrences with intratumoural temperature probes. Concurrent hormonal therapy was administered in 48%, and concurrent chemotherapy in 10% of patients. Median overall survival time was 28 months (Kaplan Meier), with 71% and 54% of patients living 1 and 2 years after thermoradiotherapy. The median time to local failure has not been reached, local tumour control after 2 years being 53%. Actuarial 1 and 2 year local tumour controls for microscopic residual disease were 89%, and for macroscopic nodular recurrences 71% and

  11. Genetic predisposition to early recurrence in clinically localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Borque, Ángel; del Amo, Jokin; Esteban, Luis M; Ars, Elisabet; Hernández, Carlos; Planas, Jacques; Arruza, Antonio; Llarena, Roberto; Palou, Joan; Herranz, Felipe; Raventós, Carles X; Tejedor, Diego; Artieda, Marta; Simon, Laureano; Martínez, Antonio; Carceller, Elena; Suárez, Miguel; Allué, Marta; Sanz, Gerardo; Morote, Juan

    2013-04-01

    WHAT'S KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT? AND WHAT DOES THE STUDY ADD?: Currently available nomograms to predict preoperative risk of early biochemical recurrence (EBCR) after radical prostatectomy are solely based on classic clinicopathological variables. Despite providing useful predictions, these models are not perfect. Indeed, most researchers agree that nomograms can be improved by incorporating novel biomarkers. In the last few years, several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been associated with prostate cancer, but little is known about their impact on disease recurrence. We have identified four SNPs associated with EBCR. The addition of SNPs to classic nomograms resulted in a significant improvement in terms of discrimination and calibration. The new nomogram, which combines clinicopathological and genetic variables, will help to improve prediction of prostate cancer recurrence. To evaluate genetic susceptibility to early biochemical recurrence (EBCR) after radical prostatectomy (RP), as a prognostic factor for early systemic dissemination. To build a preoperative nomogram to predict EBCR combining genetic and clinicopathological factors. We evaluated 670 patients from six University Hospitals who underwent RP for clinically localized prostate cancer (PCa), and were followed-up for at least 5 years or until biochemical recurrence. EBCR was defined as a level prostate-specific antigen >0.4 ng/mL within 1 year of RP; preoperative variables studied were: age, prostate-specific antigen, clinical stage, biopsy Gleason score, and the genotype of 83 PCa-related single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Univariate allele association tests and multivariate logistic regression were used to generate predictive models for EBCR, with clinicopathological factors and adding SNPs. We internally validated the models by bootstrapping and compared their accuracy using the area under the curve (AUC), net reclassification improvement, integrated discrimination improvement

  12. Biochemical recurrence after definitive prostate cancer therapy. Part I: defining and localizing biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Ward, John F; Moul, Judd W

    2005-05-01

    The introduction of prostate-specific antigen into clinical practice heralded a dramatic shift in the epidemiology of prostate cancer. The diagnosis and treatment of lower stage disease in younger men with fewer competing co-morbidities has resulted in a longer period of post-treatment cancer surveillance and the potential for disease recurrence. Life-long periodic prostate-specific antigen testing for biochemical recurrence is standard of care; however, there is no single definition of biochemical recurrence that reliably predicts clinical recurrence. This review explores the complexities of biochemical recurrence, a thorough understanding of which is crucial to making appropriate treatment decisions after primary treatment. It also evaluates the array of diagnostic tests frequently employed when biochemical recurrence has occurred. There is a disconnection between biochemical recurrence and progression to clinical disease. The definition of biochemical recurrence varies both by the prostate-specific antigen cut-point used and by the primary therapy employed. Furthermore, biochemical recurrence by itself appears not to be as reliable a predictor of eventual clinical recurrence as prostate-specific antigen doubling time. Current imaging modalities are rarely useful in localizing disease when biochemical recurrence is first detected. The correct interpretation of biochemical recurrence is crucial to treatment decision-making. New data show that prostate-specific antigen doubling time during prostate-specific antigen recurrence may be a valid surrogate for death from the disease. The potential therefore exists for prostate-specific antigen doubling time to be accepted as a trial endpoint, which might accelerate drug approval by the United States Food and Drug Administration.

  13. Prevalence of local recurrence of colorectal cancer at the Iranian Cancer Institute.

    PubMed

    Omranipour, Ramesh; Mahmoodzadeh, Habibollah; Safavi, Farinaz

    2014-01-01

    Although a great deal of progress has been made in the management of colorectal cancer in terms of neoadjuvant modalities, surgical techniques and adjuvant therapies, the recurrence of tumors remains an enigmatic complication in patients. A better understanding of colorectal cancer and of factors that lead to recurrence of disease can provide helpful information for designing more effective screening and surveillance methods. To investigate the factors that may lead to local recurrence of colorectal cancers. The current retrospective case study evaluated 617 patients admitted to the Iranian Cancer Institute (the largest referral cancer center in the country) from 1995 to 2009 with confirmed colorectal cancer. Patients with distant metastasis, or with pathology other than adenocarcinoma and no follow-up, were excluded (175 patients). The remainder (442) included 294 (66.5%) with rectal cancer and 148 (33.5%) with colon cancer. The median duration of follow-up was 26 months. The total rate of recurrence was 17.4%, comprising 19.6% and 16.3% recurrence rates in colon and rectal cancer, respectively. Recurrence of colorectal cancer was significantly correlated to tumor grade (p<0.008).

  14. Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced, Metastatic, or Locally Recurrent Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-01-15

    Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer; Insular Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Stage III Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage III Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IV Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IV Papillary Thyroid Cancer

  15. [Causes of local recurrence after curative surgery for rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Hôhn, József; Varga, László; Baradnay, Gellért; Simonka, Zsolt; Géczi, Tibor; Nagy, Ferenc; Molnár, Tamás; Maráz, Anikó; Kahán, Zsuzsa; Balogh, Adám

    2003-01-01

    The rate of local recurrence (LR) has been 20-40% after resective surgery for rectal cancer by the traditional - Miles or Dixon - operative technics. The authors performed curative resection in 358 patients with rectal cancer in a 10 year period (01.01.1990 - 31.12.2000) in the Surgical Department of Szeged University. Since 01.01.1996 the authors changed this type of surgery for the Heald technics (total mesorectal excision - TME - with sharp dissection, using the UltraCision device) for the surgical treatment of middle or lower third rectal cancer. To compare the results of the two procedures, the authors analysed their material in two periods: Period I: 01.01.1991 - 31.12.1992: 62 patients operated on with the traditional operative technics; LR 15% within 2 years after surgery. Period II: 01.01.1997 - 31.12.1998: 78 patients operated on with the Heald technics (TME with sharp dissection); LR 6.4% within 2 years after surgery. Based on their results, the authors found that the modern operative technics by Heald, used in the second period of the study, was a relevant factor decreasing LR from 15% to 6.4%, while the gender, age of the patients, ratio of the abdominoperineal extirpation versus anterior resection (APRE/AR) and the free margin of more than 3 cm proved to be irrelevant.

  16. Local Recurrence in Rectal Cancer: Anatomic Localization and Effect on Radiation Target

    SciTech Connect

    Syk, Erik Torkzad, Michael R.; Blomqvist, Lennart; Nilsson, Per J.; Glimelius, Bengt

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the sites of local recurrence after total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer in an effort to optimize the radiation target. Methods and Materials: A total of 155 patients with recurrence after abdominal resection for rectal cancer were identified from a population-based consecutive cohort of 2,315 patients who had undergone surgery by surgeons trained in the total mesorectal excision procedure. A total of 99 cross-sectional imaging studies were retrieved and re-examined by one radiologist. The clinical records were examined for the remaining patients. Results: Evidence of residual mesorectal fat was identified in 50 of the 99 patients. In 83 patients, local recurrence was identified on the imaging studies. All recurrences were within the irradiated volume if the patients had undergone preoperative radiotherapy or within the same volume if they had not. The site of recurrence was in the lower 75% of the pelvis, anatomically below the S1-S2 interspace for all patients. Only 5 of the 44 recurrences in patients with primary tumors >5 cm from the anal verge were in the lowest 20% of the pelvis. Six recurrences involved the lateral lymph nodes. Conclusion: These data suggest that a lowering of the upper limit of the clinical target volume could be introduced. The anal sphincter complex with surrounding tissue could also be excluded in patients with primary tumors >5 cm from the anal verge.

  17. Local recurrence following lung cancer surgery: incidence, risk factors, and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Fedor, David; Johnson, W Rainey; Singhal, Sunil

    2013-09-01

    To date, few large-scale original studies have focused specifically on local recurrence following curative lung cancer surgery. This review seeks to consolidate and analyze data from these studies regarding local recurrence incidence, risk factors, salvage treatments, and outcomes to increase awareness in the Oncology community and to spark new research in this area. PubMed literature was searched for large-scale cohort studies involving recurrence following lung cancer surgery. Studies with a primary focus on local recurrence and studies that examined overall recurrence but provided relevant numerical data on local recurrence were included. Each chosen study's methods were critically analyzed to reconcile as best as possible large differences in reported results across the studies. Up to 24% of patients recur locally following lung cancer surgery. Risk of local recurrence increases with the stage of the primary cancer, but even stage I patients experience local recurrence up to 19% of the time. Overall survival time following local recurrence varies widely across studies, from 7 to 26 months, and may be related to frequency of follow-up visits. Salvage therapy appears to increase survival time. However, estimates of this increase vary widely, and measurements of benefits of the various salvage options are confounded by lack of control of subjects' condition at the time of salvage therapy administration. Local recurrence following lung cancer surgery is a significant problem warranting additional research. At present, data on this topic is scarce. We recommend initiation of additional large-scale studies to clearly define the parameters of local recurrence in order to provide useful guidance to clinicians. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Local recurrence following lung cancer surgery: Incidence, risk factors, and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Fedor, David; Johnson, W. Rainey; Singhal, Sunil

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To date, few large-scale original studies have focused specifically on local recurrence following curative lung cancer surgery. This review seeks to consolidate and analyze data from these studies regarding local recurrence incidence, risk factors, salvage treatments, and outcomes to increase awareness in the Oncology community and to spark new research in this area. Methods PubMed literature was searched for large-scale cohort studies involving recurrence following lung cancer surgery. Studies with a primary focus on local recurrence and studies that examined overall recurrence but provided relevant numerical data on local recurrence were included. Each chosen study’s methods were critically analyzed to reconcile as best as possible large differences in reported results across the studies. Results Up to 24% of patients recur locally following lung cancer surgery. Risk of local recurrence increases with the stage of the primary cancer, but even stage I patients experience local recurrence up to 19% of the time. Overall survival time following local recurrence varies widely across studies, from 7 to 26 months, and may be related to frequency of follow-up visits. Salvage therapy appears to increase survival time. However, estimates of this increase vary widely, and measurements of benefits of the various salvage options are confounded by lack of control of subjects’ condition at the time of salvage therapy administration. Conclusions Local recurrence following lung cancer surgery is a significant problem warranting additional research. At present, data on this topic is scarce. We recommend initiation of additional large-scale studies to clearly define the parameters of local recurrence in order to provide useful guidance to clinicians. PMID:23702313

  19. Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Cancer of the Urothelium

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-01-28

    Localized Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder

  20. Thoracic Re-irradiation for Locally Recurrent Lung Cancer

    PubMed

    Aktan, Meryem; Kanyilmaz, Gul; Koc, Mehmet; Aras, Serhat

    2016-11-01

    Background: Patients with recurrent or progressive lung cancer experience a significant symptom burden, negatively affecting quality of life and reducing life expectancy. Thoracic re-irradiation can be used for palliative treatment to relieve symptoms or as a curative treatment. Methods: Using patient charts, we identified and reviewed 28 cases that had received palliative thoracic re-irradiation for recurrent lung cancer. Results: Before re-irradiation, 32% of patients had stage III non-small cell lung cancer and six had small cell lung cancer. The median interval between treatments was 18.7 months. Median follow-up was 31.2 months from the initial radiotherapy and 5 months after re-irradiation. A better performance status before re-irradiation (<80 vs >80, p=0.09) and a lower overlap 90% isodose (<70 vs >70, p=0.09) showed trends toward improved survival. Grade 1-2 toxicity from re-irradiation was recorded in 12/28 patients, and no grade 3 or 4 acute toxicity was encountered. Conclusion: The role of palliative treatment in survival is not clear but it can provide symptomatic relief in patients, with no high grade toxicity. Further studies with greater patient numbers and longer follow-up times should facilitate determination of the role of this treatment in toxicity and effects on survival. Creative Commons Attribution License

  1. Thoracic Re-irradiation for Locally Recurrent Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aktan, Meryem; Kanyilmaz, Gul; Koc, Mehmet; Aras, Serhat

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with recurrent or progressive lung cancer experience a significant symptom burden, negatively affecting quality of life and reducing life expectancy. Thoracic re-irradiation can be used for palliative treatment to relieve symptoms or as a curative treatment. Methods: Using patient charts, we identified and reviewed 28 cases that had received palliative thoracic re-irradiation for recurrent lung cancer. Results: Before re-irradiation, 32% of patients had stage III non-small cell lung cancer and six had small cell lung cancer. The median interval between treatments was 18.7 months. Median follow-up was 31.2 months from the initial radiotherapy and 5 months after re-irradiation. A better performance status before re-irradiation (<80 vs >80, p=0.09) and a lower overlap 90% isodose (<70 vs >70, p=0.09) showed trends toward improved survival. Grade 1-2 toxicity from re-irradiation was recorded in 12/28 patients, and no grade 3 or 4 acute toxicity was encountered. Conclusion: The role of palliative treatment in survival is not clear but it can provide symptomatic relief in patients, with no high grade toxicity. Further studies with greater patient numbers and longer follow-up times should facilitate determination of the role of this treatment in toxicity and effects on survival. PMID:28032737

  2. A rare presentation of locally re-recurrent colon cancer involving the iliac bone and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Andrew; Babikir, Osman Mahdi; Abboud, Amer; Theodorakis, Spyridon

    2014-10-29

    Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of cancer death in the USA. While locally advanced rectal cancer involving bone has been described extensively, colon cancer locally involving bone has only been described, to our knowledge, in a single case report. In this case report, we describe the presentation and treatment of locally advanced re-recurrent colon cancer involving the iliac bone. We also discuss the available literature on treatment for recurrent and re-recurrent colorectal cancer.

  3. A rare presentation of locally re-recurrent colon cancer involving the iliac bone and a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Andrew; Mahdi Babikir, Osman; Abboud, Amer; Theodorakis, Spyridon

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of cancer death in the USA. While locally advanced rectal cancer involving bone has been described extensively, colon cancer locally involving bone has only been described, to our knowledge, in a single case report. In this case report, we describe the presentation and treatment of locally advanced re-recurrent colon cancer involving the iliac bone. We also discuss the available literature on treatment for recurrent and re-recurrent colorectal cancer. PMID:25355743

  4. Surgery for Locally Recurrent Rectal Cancer: Tips, Tricks, and Pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Warrier, Satish K.; Heriot, Alexander G.; Lynch, Andrew Craig

    2016-01-01

    Rectal cancer can recur locally in up to 10% of the patients who undergo definitive resection for their primary cancer. Surgical salvage is considered appropriate in the curative setting as well as select cases with palliative intent. Disease-free survival following salvage resection is dependent upon achieving an R0 resection margin. A clear understanding of applied surgical anatomy, appropriate preoperative planning, and a multidisciplinary approach to aggressive soft tissue, bony, and vascular resection with appropriate reconstruction is necessary. Technical tips, tricks, and pitfalls that may assist in managing these cancers are discussed and the roles of additional boost radiation and intraoperative radiation therapy in the management of such cancers are also discussed. PMID:27247536

  5. Surgery for Locally Recurrent Rectal Cancer: Tips, Tricks, and Pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Warrier, Satish K; Heriot, Alexander G; Lynch, Andrew Craig

    2016-06-01

    Rectal cancer can recur locally in up to 10% of the patients who undergo definitive resection for their primary cancer. Surgical salvage is considered appropriate in the curative setting as well as select cases with palliative intent. Disease-free survival following salvage resection is dependent upon achieving an R0 resection margin. A clear understanding of applied surgical anatomy, appropriate preoperative planning, and a multidisciplinary approach to aggressive soft tissue, bony, and vascular resection with appropriate reconstruction is necessary. Technical tips, tricks, and pitfalls that may assist in managing these cancers are discussed and the roles of additional boost radiation and intraoperative radiation therapy in the management of such cancers are also discussed.

  6. Local recurrences and distant metastases after conservative breast cancer treatments: partly independent events.

    PubMed

    Veronesi, U; Marubini, E; Del Vecchio, M; Manzari, A; Andreola, S; Greco, M; Luini, A; Merson, M; Saccozzi, R; Rilke, F

    1995-01-04

    Local disease recurrences are a concern in conservative breast cancer surgery, and many studies have attempted to identify risk factors for these events. It is important to distinguish local recurrences linked to increased risk of distant spread from those due to inadequate local treatment. We evaluated the incidence of local and distant recurrences according to demographic, biological, and pathologic variables in a large series of women who were conservatively and uniformly treated for breast cancer, with the aim of identifying women in whom local failure is predictive for distant metastases and who are therefore candidates for aggressive systemic treatment. Medical records of 2233 women who had been hospitalized at the Milan Cancer Institute from 1970 to 1987 were analyzed. All women received quadrantectomy and axillary lymph node dissection followed by radiotherapy for the breast. Quadrantectomy is breast-conserving removal of most of the affected quadrant by a radial incision that includes part of the skin. The end points considered were local failures (including local recurrences and new ipsilateral carcinomas) and distant metastases. Statistical analysis employed the competing risks and multiple failures approaches. There were 119 local recurrences, 32 new ipsilateral carcinomas, and 414 distant metastases as first events. The timing of local failures and distant metastases differed: The yearly probability for local failures was approximately 1% up to the 10th year and for distant metastases was 5% in the 2nd year and decreased progressively until the 8th year. Young age was an important risk factor, with peritumoral lymphatic invasion also predictive for local and distant recurrences. Tumor size and axillary lymph node involvement were not related to local recurrence but were important predictors of distant metastases. Extensive intraductal component was only a risk factor for local recurrence. Early (< 2 years) local failure predicted for distant metastases

  7. Combination Chemotherapy and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced, Metastatic, or Recurrent Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-24

    Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  8. Prognostic Factors for Local, Loco-regional and Systemic Recurrence in Early-stage Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kümmel, A; Kümmel, S; Barinoff, J; Heitz, F; Holtschmidt, J; Weikel, W; Lorenz-Salehi, F; du Bois, A; Harter, P; Traut, A; Blohmer, J U; Ataseven, B

    2015-07-01

    Aim: The risk of recurrence in breast cancer depends on factors such as treatment but also on the intrinsic subtype. We analyzed the risk factors for local, loco-regional and systemic recurrence, evaluated the differences and analyzed the risk of recurrence for different molecular subtypes. Material and Methods: A total of 3054 breast cancer patients who underwent surgery followed by adjuvant treatment at HSK hospital or Essen Mitte Hospital between 1998 and 2011 were analyzed. Based on immunohistochemical parameters, cancers were divided into the following subgroups: luminal A, luminal B (HER2-), luminal B (HER2+), HER2+ and TNBC (triple negative breast cancer). Results: 67 % of tumors were classified as luminal A, 13 % as luminal B (HER2-), 6 % as luminal B (HER2+), 3 % as HER2+ and 11 % as TNBC. After a median follow-up time of 6.6 years there were 100 local (3.3 %), 32 loco-regional (1 %) and 248 distant recurrences (8 %). Five-year recurrence-free survival for the overall patient collective was 92 %. On multivariate analysis, positive nodal status, TNBC subtype and absence of radiation therapy were found to be independent risk factors for all forms of recurrence. Age < 50 years, tumor size, luminal B (HER2-) subtype and breast-conserving therapy were additional risk factors for local recurrence. Compared to the luminal A subtype, the risk of systemic recurrence was higher for all other subtypes; additional risk factors for systemic recurrence were lymphatic invasion, absence of systemic therapy and mastectomy. Conclusion: Overall, the risk of local and loco-regional recurrence was low. In addition to nodal status, subgroup classification was found to be an important factor affecting the risk of recurrence.

  9. Vaginal delivery of carboplatin-loaded thermosensitive hydrogel to prevent local cervical cancer recurrence in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue; Wang, Jin; Wu, Wenbin; Li, Hongjun

    2016-11-01

    Local tumor recurrence after cervical cancer surgery remains a clinical problem. Vaginal delivery of thermosensitive hydrogel may be suited to reduce tumor relapse rate with more efficacy and safety. A pilot study was carried out to evaluate the efficacy of carboplatin-loaded poloxamer hydrogel to prevent local recurrence of cervical cancer after surgery. In vivo vaginal retention evaluation of 27% poloxamer hydrogel in mice was proven to be a suitable vaginal drug delivery formulation due to its low gelation temperature. A mimic orthotopic cervical/vaginal cancer recurrence model after surgery was established by injecting murine cervical cancer cell line U14 into the vaginal submucosa to simulate the residual tumor cells infiltrated in the surgical site, followed by drug administration 24 h later to interfere with the formation/recurrence of the tumor. By infusing fluorescein sodium-loaded hydrogel into the vagina of mice, a maximized accumulation of fluorescein sodium (Flu) in the vagina was achieved and few signals were observed in other organs. When used in the prevention of the cervical cancer formation/recurrence in mice, the carboplatin-loaded poloxamer hydrogel exhibited great efficacy and systemic safety. In conclusion, thermosensitive hydrogel presents a simple, practical approach for the local drug delivery via vagina against cervical cancer recurrence.

  10. [Predictive factors for locally recurrent rectal cancer after primary curative surgery].

    PubMed

    Gao, Haoji; Zhang, Tao; Zhao, Ren

    2015-11-01

    Local recurrence is a major clinical challenge after primary rectal cancer surgery. Although there is a possibility that R0 resection can be achieved, the outcome is still not favorable due to the low R0 resection rate and complexity of the surgery. Therefore prevention has a higher priority over treatment afterwards. As TME principle is accepted worldwide, the local recurrence rate has been reduced dramatically. And there are other factors associated with local recurrence including CRM, operation type, staging and PNI. Proper chemoradiotherapy may reduce the risk, however benefit always comes with side effect, therefore risk stratification is important.

  11. Hyperglycemia and prostate cancer recurrence in men treated for localized prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Jonathan L; Plymate, Stephen R.; Porter, Michael P; Gore, John L; Lin, Dan W; Hu, Elaine; Zeliadt, Steven B

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Obesity is consistently linked with prostate cancer (PCa) recurrence and mortality although the mechanism is unknown. Impaired glucose regulation, which is common among obese individuals, has been hypothesized as a potential mechanism for PCa tumor growth. In this study we explore the relationship between serum glucose at time of treatment and risk of PCa recurrence following initial therapy. Methods The study group was comprised of 1,734 men treated with radical prostatectomy (RP) or radiation therapy (RT) for localized PCa between 2001–2010. Serum glucose levels closest to date of diagnosis were determined. PCa recurrence was determined based on PSA progression (nadir PSA + 2 for RT; PSA ≥ 0.2 for RP) or secondary therapy. Multivariate Cox regression was performed to determine whether glucose level was associated with BCR after adjusting for age, race, BMI, comorbidity, diagnosis of diabetes, Gleason Sum, PSA, treatment, and treatment year. Results Recurrence was identified in 16% of men over a mean follow-up period 41 months (range 1 – 121 months). Those with elevated glucose (≥ 100 mg/dL) had a 50% increased risk of recurrence (HR 1.5, 95% CI: 1.1–2.0) compared to those with a normal glucose level (< 100 mg/dL). This effect was seen in both those undergoing RP (HR 1.9, 95% CI 1.0–3.6) and those treated with RT (HR 1.4, 95% CI 1.0–2.0). Conclusion Glucose levels at the time of PCa diagnosis are an independent predictor of PCa recurrence for men undergoing treatment for localized disease. PMID:23459096

  12. Outcomes of salvage surgery for cure in patients with locally recurrent disease after local excision of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Bikhchandani, Jai; Ong, Gabie K; Dozois, Eric J; Mathis, Kellie L

    2015-03-01

    Local excision for early rectal cancer has gained widespread interest. Currently available imaging modalities have low sensitivity to detect locoregional disease, which may result in understaging and a high risk of recurrence after local excision. The purpose of this work was to study the morbidity, mortality, and long-term oncologic outcomes in a select cohort of patients undergoing salvage surgery for local recurrence after local excision of early rectal cancer. A retrospective review of patient charts was used to determine patterns of disease recurrence and outcomes as a single-institution case series. The study was conducted at a tertiary care cancer center. The study cohort included patients with early rectal cancer treated by local excision who then developed local recurrence for which a multimodal salvage surgery with curative intent was performed between 1997 and 2013 at our center. Log rank tests were used to measure overall and disease-free survival. Twenty-seven patients were identified, with a mean age of 66 ± 12 years. The median time to recurrence was 54 weeks (range, 7-326 weeks). Recurrent disease was luminal in 23 patients, regional (involving both mesorectal and pelvic lymph nodes) in 6 patients, and both luminal and nodal in 2 patients. For salvage surgery, neoadjuvant chemoradiation was used in 12 patients (44%), and radiation alone was used in 1 patient. Sphincter-preserving surgery was performed in 9 patients (33%). R0 resection was achieved in 25 patients (93%). Four patients received intraoperative radiation therapy. Five-year overall survival was 50% (95% CI, 30%-74%), and re-recurrence-free survival was 47% (95% CI, 25%-68%). This study was limited by its retrospective nature, small patient cohort, referral bias, and selection bias. Even in highly selected patients who undergo surgery for local recurrence after transanal excision of early stage rectal cancer, oncologic outcomes are poor.

  13. [Post-recurrence survival after surgical resection of non-small cell lung cancer with local recurrence].

    PubMed

    Yokouchi, Hideoki; Miyazaki, Masaki; Miyamoto, Takeaki; Tsuji, Fumio; Ebisui, Chikara; Murata, Kohei

    2014-11-01

    We retrospectively evaluated the clinical outcomes of 192 consecutive patients with local recurrence after complete resection of non-small cell lung cancer NSCLC). The initial local recurrent site was the resection stump in 5 patients the chest wall in 3 patients, mediastinum in 1 patient, and diaphragm in 1 patient), and the hilar and/or mediastinal lymph node (HMLN) in 17 patients. The sites of distant metastasis were the lungs in 10 patients, pleura in 4 patients, brain in 7 patients, liver in 5 patients, bone in 4 patients, and other sites in 4 patients. Treatments after initial recurrence included surgery in 2 patients, radiotherapy in 5 patients, chemotherapy in 9 patients, and chemo-radiotherapy in 5 patients. Only 1 patient received supportive care. The response to radiotherapy was a complete response (R) in 1 patient, partial response (PR) in 5 patients, stable disease (SD )in 3 patients, and progressive disease (PD )in 1 patient. The best response of all lines of chemotherapy was CR in 3 patients, PR in 4 patients, SD in 3 patients, and PD in 4 patients. The median post-recurrence survival (PRS) time with local recurrence was better than that with distant metastasis (23 vs 14 months); however, the best PRS was obtained in patients with recurrence in the lungs (29 months). A CR for more than 2 years was obtained in 1 patient after surgery, in 1 patient after radiotherapy, and in 2 patients after chemotherapy. Although local recurrence of resected NSCLC can be potentially controlled by using local treatments - such as surgery and radiotherapy - or systemic chemotherapy, curative aggressive treatment should be considered when required.

  14. DOES ENDOSCOPIC ULTRASOUND IMPROVE DETECTION OF LOCALLY RECURRENT ANAL SQUAMOUS CELL CANCER?

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Carrie Y.; Weiser, Martin R.; Paty, Philip B.; Guillem, Jose G.; Nash, Garrett M.; Garcia-Aguilar, Julio; Patil, Sujata; Temple, Larissa K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Evaluating patients for recurrent anal cancer after primary treatment can be difficult due to distorted anatomy and scarring. Many institutions incorporate endoscopic ultrasound to improve detection, but the effectiveness is unknown. Objective To compare the effectiveness of digital rectal exam and endoscopic ultrasound during routine follow-up of anal cancer patients in detecting locally recurrent disease. Design Retrospective, single-institution review Settings Oncologic tertiary referral center Patients 175 patients with nonmetastatic anal squamous cell cancer without persistent disease after primary chemoradiotherapy who had at least one post-treatment ultrasound and examination by a colorectal surgeon. Main Outcome Measures First modality to detect local recurrence, concordance, crude cancer detection rate, sensitivity, specificity, and predictive value. Results 855 endoscopic ultrasounds and 873 digital rectal exams were performed during 35 months median follow-up. Overall, ultrasound detected 7 (0.8%) mesorectal and 32 (3.7%) anal canal abnormalities; digital exam detected 69 (7.9%) anal canal abnormalities. Locally recurrent disease was found on biopsy in 8 patients, all detected first or only with digital exam. Four patients did not have an ultrasound at the time of diagnosis of recurrence. The concordance of ultrasound and digital exam in detecting recurrent disease was fair at 0.37 (SE 0.08, 95% CI 0.21-0.54) and there was no difference in crude cancer detection rate, sensitivity, specificity, and negative or positive predictive values. Limitations The heterogeneity of follow-up timing and exams is not standardized in this study but is reflective of general practice. Conclusions Endoscopic ultrasound did not provide any advantage over digital rectal examination in identifying locally recurrent anal cancer, and should not be recommended for routine surveillance. PMID:25585077

  15. VEGF Trap in Treating Patients With Recurrent, Locally Advanced, or Metastatic Cancer of the Urothelium

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-10

    Adenocarcinoma of the Bladder; Distal Urethral Cancer; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Proximal Urethral Cancer; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Urethral Cancer; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage III Urethral Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Urethral Cancer Associated With Invasive Bladder Cancer

  16. Collecting and Studying Blood and Tissue Samples From Patients With Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Prostate or Bladder/Urothelial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-06

    Healthy Control; Localized Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Bone; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Soft Tissues; Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Recurrent Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  17. Salvage cryotherapy with third-generation technology for locally recurrent prostate cancer after radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Lian, Huibo; Yang, Rong; Lin, Tingsheng; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Gutian; Guo, Hongqian

    2016-09-01

    To present the intermediate results of the use of third-generation cryotherapy as salvage treatment for locally recurrent prostate cancer after radiation therapy. From January 2006 to July 2010, 32 patients with locally recurrent prostate cancer after radiotherapy underwent salvage cryoablation using third-generation technology. Biochemical recurrence-free survival (BRFS) was defined as the time period from salvage treatment to the date of biochemical recurrence (Phoenix definition of nadir +2 ng/ml). Complications were classified as grades 1-5 according to the modified Clavien system. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify potential risk factors associated with recurrence after salvage cryotherapy. The median follow-up was 63 months (range 38-92). Mild complications (grades 1 and 2) included mild incontinence (9.4 %), acute rectal pain (31.3 %), hematuria (6.3 %), scrotal edema (9.4 %), urinary tract infection (3.1 %), lower urinary tract symptoms (15.6 %) and erectile dysfunction (57.1 %). Severe events (grade 3) included severe incontinence (3.1 %) and urethral sloughing (3.1 %). The rate of rectourethral fistula and urinary retention was absent. The 5-year overall survival was 92.3 %. The 5-year cancer-specific survival was 100 %. The 5-year BRFS rate using the Phoenix definition was 43.5 %. A multivariate analysis disclosed that PSA at cryoablation was the only predictive factor for biochemical recurrence. Salvage cryotherapy using third-generation technology offers a safe and effective alternative for locally recurrent prostate cancer after radiation therapy. Additional studies with longer follow-up are necessary to determine the sustained efficacy of this procedure.

  18. Risk factors for local recurrence after en bloc endoscopic submucosal dissection for early gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju Yup; Cho, Kwang Bum; Kim, Eun Soo; Park, Kyung Sik; Lee, Yoo Jin; Lee, Yoon Suk; Jang, Byoung Kuk; Chung, Woo Jin; Hwang, Jae Seok

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate factors related to recurrence following en bloc resection using endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) in patients with early gastric cancer (EGC). METHODS: A total of 1121 patients (1215 lesions) who had undergone ESD for gastric neoplasia between April 2003 and May 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Data from 401 patients (415 lesions) were analyzed, following the exclusion of those who underwent piecemeal resection, with deep resection margin invasion or lateral margin infiltration, and diagnosed with benign lesions. RESULTS: Local recurrence after en bloc ESD was found in 36 cases (8.7%). Unclear resection margins, long procedure times, and narrow safety margins were identified as risk factors for recurrence. Lesions located in the upper third of the stomach showed a higher rate of recurrence than those located in the lower third of the stomach (OR = 2.9, P = 0.03). The probability of no recurrence for up to 24 mo was 79.9% in those with a safety resection margin ≤ 1 mm and 89.5% in those with a margin > 1 mm (log-rank test, P = 0.03). CONCLUSION: Even in cases in which en bloc ESD is performed for EGC, local recurrence still occurs. To reduce local recurrences, more careful assessment will be needed prior to the implementation of ESD in cases in which the tumor is located in the upper third of the stomach. In addition, clear identification of tumor boundaries as well as the securing of sufficient safety resection margins will be important. PMID:27076871

  19. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Controlling Severe Bleeding From Recurrent Locally-Advanced Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aksoy, Şefika; Akçe, Bülent; Kılıçkesmez, Özgür; Gürsü, Rıza Umar; Çakır, Mehmet Semih; Nazlı, Mehmet Ali; Aren, Acar

    2016-01-01

    One of the rare but most challenging issues in the management of the locally-advanced breast cancer (LABC) is life-threatening bleeding from the fungating and/or ulcerating focus (foci) of these tumors. Breast surgeons may need the assistance of interventional radiologists to solve this urgent condition if surgery cannot provide sufficient benefit. Herein, we report a case of recurrent locally-advanced breast cancer that presented with sudden severe bleeding, which was stopped by an interventional radiologist via transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE). In addition, we evaluate the role of interventional radiology in patients with breast cancer who present with bleeding from the breast by reviewing the relevant literature.

  20. Imaging techniques for local recurrence of prostate cancer: for whom, why and how?

    PubMed

    Rouvière, O

    2012-04-01

    Since there are salvage solutions, it is important to detect local recurrence of prostate cancer as early as possible. The first sign is "biochemical failure" in that the prostate specific antigen (PSA) concentration rises again. The definition of biochemical failure varies depending on the initial treatment: PSA greater than 0.2ng/mL after prostatectomy, nadir+2ng/mL after radiotherapy. There is no standardised definition of biochemical failure after cryotherapy, focused ultrasound, or brachytherapy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (particularly dynamic MRI) can detect local recurrence with good sensitivity. The role of spectroscopy is still under discussion. For the moment, ultrasound techniques are less effective than MRI.

  1. [Local Microwave Hyperthermia for Advanced or Recurrent Breast Cancer].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Chizuko; Yamamoto, Daigo; Tsubota, Yu; Sueoka, Noriko; Kawakami, Katsuhiro; Yamamoto, Mitsuo

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of our study was to test the efficacy and toxicity of hyperthermia for treating breast cancer. Ten patients received treatment (AC, paclitaxel, S-1, and aromatase inhibitor) in combination with hyperthermia. The hyperthermia device was a microwave heating device with water loaded and water-cooled waveguides. The temperature was monitored subcutaneously in the skin under the aperture of the waveguide. Two patients had a partial response to treatment with only mild toxicity (grade 1 acute skin toxicity). Therefore, hyperthermia combined with chemotherapy for treating breast cancer seems to be effective and generally tolerable. A larger patient cohort is needed to confirm these results in the future.

  2. Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid in Treating Patients With Metastatic and/or Locally Advanced or Locally Recurrent Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-23

    Insular Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Stage II Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage II Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IV Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IV Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma

  3. Whither surgical quality assurance of breast cancer surgery (surgical margins and local recurrence) after paterson.

    PubMed

    Bundred, N J; Thomas, J; Dixon, J M J

    2017-07-05

    The Kennedy report into the actions of the disgraced Breast Surgeon, Paterson focussed on issues of informed consent for mastectomy, management of surgical margins and raised concerns about local recurrence rates and the increasing emphasis on cosmesis after mastectomy for breast cancer. This article assesses whether Kennedy's recommendations apply to the UK as a whole and how to address these issues. New GMC advice on consent and newer nonevidenced innovations in immediate reconstruction have altered the level of informed consent required. Patients deserve a better understanding of the issues of oncological versus cosmetic outcomes on which to base their decisions. Involvement of the whole multidisciplinary team including Oncologists is necessary in surgical planning. Failure to obtain clear microscopic margins at mastectomy leads to an increased local recurrence, yet has received little attention in the UK. Whereas, other countries have used surgical quality assurance audits to reduce local recurrence; local recurrence rates are not available and the extent of variation across the UK in margin involvement after surgery, its management and relationship to local recurrence needs auditing prospectively to reduce unnecessary morbidity. To reassure public, patients and the NHS management, an accreditation system with more rigour than NHSBSP QA and peer review is now required. Resource and efforts to support its introduction will be necessary from the Royal College of Surgeons and the Association of Breast Surgeons. New innovations require careful evaluation before their backdoor introduction to the NHS. Private Hospitals need to have the same standards imposed.

  4. Postoperative 125I brachytherapy delivered by digital model obturators for recurrent or locally advanced maxillary cancers.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ming-wei; Zhang, Jian-guo; Tong, Dai; Zhang, Jie; Zheng, Lei; Zhang, Yi; Yu, Guang-yan

    2012-11-01

    We aimed to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of postoperative (125) I brachytherapy delivered by use of digital model obturators for recurrent or locally advanced maxillary cancers. Retrospective study. From 2006 to 2008, 12 patients (seven females; median age, 65 years; range, 22-86 years) with recurrent or locally advanced maxillary cancers showing positive margins after surgery underwent (125) I brachytherapy by use of digital model obturators and interstitial implants. The radioactivity was 18.5 to 33.3 MBq per seed, and the prescription dose was 80 to 160 Gy. Functional outcome of patients was evaluated by the Performance Status Scale (PSS) for head and neck cancer before and after brachytherapy. The (125) I seeds and dosages were well distributed in the radiation fields, and all patients had higher PSS scores after than before treatment with obturators. During a median follow-up of 53 months (range, 28-62 months), local control at 3 and 5 years was 83.3% and 66.7%, respectively, with a mean local control time of 53.5 ± 3.79 months. Overall survival at 3 and 5 years was 91.7% and 71.4%, respectively, with a mean survival time of 56.6 ± 2.99 months. Two patients died due to local recurrence, and one patient died due to lung metastasis. No patient had severe complications during follow-up. (125) I brachytherapy delivered by digital model obturator is effective in treating maxillary cancers with positive margins after maxillectomy for advanced or recurrent cancer. The method may improve the quality of life of patients with maxillary defects. Laryngoscope, 2012. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  5. 6.3 MeV fast neutrons in the treatment of patients with locally advanced and locally recurrent breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Velikaya, V. V. Startseva, Zh. A.; Musabaeva, L. I. Lisin, V. A.

    2016-08-02

    The study included 135 breast cancer patients (70 patients with locally recurrent breast cancer and 65 patients with locally advanced breast cancer with unfavorable prognostic factors) who received the neutron therapy alone or in combination with the photon therapy. The neutron therapy was shown to be effective in multimodality treatment of patients with locally advanced and locally recurrent breast cancer. The 8-year survival rate in patients without repeated breast cancer recurrence was 87.6 ± 8.7% after the neutron and neutron-photon therapy and 54.3 ± 9.2% after the electron beam therapy.

  6. 6.3 MeV fast neutrons in the treatment of patients with locally advanced and locally recurrent breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velikaya, V. V.; Musabaeva, L. I.; Lisin, V. A.; Startseva, Zh. A.

    2016-08-01

    The study included 135 breast cancer patients (70 patients with locally recurrent breast cancer and 65 patients with locally advanced breast cancer with unfavorable prognostic factors) who received the neutron therapy alone or in combination with the photon therapy. The neutron therapy was shown to be effective in multimodality treatment of patients with locally advanced and locally recurrent breast cancer. The 8-year survival rate in patients without repeated breast cancer recurrence was 87.6 ± 8.7% after the neutron and neutron-photon therapy and 54.3 ± 9.2% after the electron beam therapy.

  7. [A Case of Local Recurrence of Bile Duct Cancer Completely Responding to Chemoradiotherapy with S-1].

    PubMed

    Yamamichi, Keigo; Sueyoshi, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Yoshito; Sakaguchi, Tatsuma; Hishikawa, Hidehiko; Ueda, Aiko; Matsuura, Takashi; Ozaki, Takashi; Saito, Takuya

    2015-11-01

    An 80-year-old man with common bile duct cancer was treated by pancreaticoduodenectomy with D2 lymph node dissection in October 2005. The patient presented with frequent episodes of bloody-mucous rectal discharge in July 2009. An abdominal CT demonstrated local recurrence at the hepatoduodenal ligament. We treated him with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) with single-dose S-1 chemotherapy. After 6 months, we diagnosed a complete response (CR) by follow-up CT. The patient was treated with S-1 for 3 years after the diagnosis of a CR. He is alive without disease 6 years after the diagnosis of the recurrence. Concurrent CRT with S-1 chemotherapy may be the therapy of choice for recurrence of bile duct cancer.

  8. Interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy in locally advanced and recurrent vulvar cancer

    PubMed Central

    Białas, Brygida; Fijałkowski, Marek; Wojcieszek, Piotr; Szlag, Marta; Cholewka, Agnieszka; Ślęczka, Maciej; Kołosza, Zofia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the study was to report our experience with high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (HDR-ISBT) in locally advanced and recurrent vulvar cancer. Material and methods Between 2004 and 2014, fourteen women with locally advanced or recurrent vulvar cancer were treated using HDR-ISBT in our Centre. High-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy was performed as a separate treatment or in combination with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) (given prior to brachytherapy). Results Patients were divided into: group I (n = 6) with locally advanced tumors, stages III-IVA after an incisional biopsy only, and group II (n = 8) with recurrent vulvar cancer after previous radical surgery. In group I, median follow up was 12 months (range 7-18 months); 1-year overall survival (OS) was 83%. Transient arrest of cancer growth or tumor regression was noticed in all patients but 4/6 developed relapse. Median time to failure was 6.3 months (range 3-11 months). The 1-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 33%. In group II, median follow up was 28 months (range 13-90 months). The 1-year and 3-year OS was 100% and 80%, respectively. The arrest of cancer growth or tumor regression was achieved in all patients. In 4/8 patients neither clinical nor histological symptoms of relapse were observed but 4/8 women experienced relapse. Median time to failure was 31 months (range 13-76 months). The 1-year and 3-year PFS was 100% and 62.5%, respectively. Two patients (14.3%) in group II had severe late toxicity (G3). Conclusions High-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy is a well-tolerated treatment option in selected patients with advanced or recurrent vulvar cancer. It is a safe and effective treatment modality for advanced and recurrent vulvar cancer, yielding good local control with acceptable late treatment related side effects. In our study, patients with recurrent vulvar cancer had better results in HDR-ISBT treatment, probably because of the smaller tumor volume. This

  9. Detection of Local Cancer Recurrence After Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer: Physician Performance Versus Radiomic Assessment.

    PubMed

    Mattonen, Sarah A; Palma, David A; Johnson, Carol; Louie, Alexander V; Landis, Mark; Rodrigues, George; Chan, Ian; Etemad-Rezai, Roya; Yeung, Timothy P C; Senan, Suresh; Ward, Aaron D

    2016-04-01

    Stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) is a guideline-specified treatment option for early-stage lung cancer. However, significant posttreatment fibrosis can occur and obfuscate the detection of local recurrence. The goal of this study was to assess physician ability to detect timely local recurrence and to compare physician performance with a radiomics tool. Posttreatment computed tomography (CT) scans (n=182) from 45 patients treated with SABR (15 with local recurrence matched to 30 with no local recurrence) were used to measure physician and radiomic performance in assessing response. Scans were individually scored by 3 thoracic radiation oncologists and 3 thoracic radiologists, all of whom were blinded to clinical outcomes. Radiomic features were extracted from the same images. Performances of the physician assessors and the radiomics signature were compared. When taking into account all CT scans during the whole follow-up period, median sensitivity for physician assessment of local recurrence was 83% (range, 67%-100%), and specificity was 75% (range, 67%-87%), with only moderate interobserver agreement (κ = 0.54) and a median time to detection of recurrence of 15.5 months. When determining the early prediction of recurrence within <6 months after SABR, physicians assessed the majority of images as benign injury/no recurrence, with a mean error of 35%, false positive rate (FPR) of 1%, and false negative rate (FNR) of 99%. At the same time point, a radiomic signature consisting of 5 image-appearance features demonstrated excellent discrimination, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.85, classification error of 24%, FPR of 24%, and FNR of 23%. These results suggest that radiomics can detect early changes associated with local recurrence that are not typically considered by physicians. This decision support system could potentially allow for early salvage therapy of patients with local recurrence after SABR. Copyright

  10. Very late local recurrence after surgery for prostate cancer unaccompanied by detectable PSA levels.

    PubMed

    Roemeling, S; van Leenders, G J L H; Schröder, F H

    2006-01-01

    The possibility and possible aetiology of local prostate cancer (PC) recurrence despite undetectable prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels are highlighted. A case of a local recurrence 8.5 years after radical prostatectomy for Gleason 3+4 PC is presented. It demonstrates that PC can recur, even after a prolonged period of time (8.5 years), despite undetectable levels (i.e. <0.02 ng/ml) of PSA. In conclusion, the decision to omit digital rectal examination from the follow-up regimens of men with undetectable PSA levels could be justified. In such exceptional cases, however, PC recurrence would be either missed or would only be diagnosed after a considerable delay.

  11. Laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) for treatment of local recurrences in patients with breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, M. Samy; El-Shehry, A. H.; Philipp, Carsten M.; Torsten, U.; Weitzel, H.; Berlien, Hans-Peter

    1998-01-01

    The effect of laser induced thermotherapy (LITT) as palliative method in otherwise pre-treated patients (irradiation, chemotherapy and/or surgery) with local recurrences of breast cancer should be investigated. In 7 women, an interstitial laser application was performed percutaneously into the center of the diseased tissue. The laser used was a Nd:YAG laser with a wavelength of 1064 nm. Heat expansion was controlled digitally and monitored by ultrasound and color coded duplex sonography (CCDS) respectively. This minimal invasive method enabled the precise coagulation of the tumor without destruction of the skin or ulceration, although the areas had been pre-treated by irradiation up to 60 Gy, before. All patients are scheduled in a long-time follow-up. The CCDS-guided interstitial laser therapy is a safe and minimal invasive method for palliative treatment of subcutaneous local recurrences of breast cancer.

  12. Management of Biochemical Recurrence after Primary Localized Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Darwish, Oussama M.; Raj, Ganesh V.

    2012-01-01

    Clinically localized prostate cancer is typically managed by well established therapies like radical prostatectomy, brachytherapy, and external beam radiation therapy. While many patients can be cured with definitive local therapy, some will have biochemical recurrence (BCR) of disease detected by a rising serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Management of these patients is nuanced and controversial. The natural history indicates that a majority of patients with BCR will not die from prostate cancer but from other causes. Despite this, a vast majority of patients with BCR are empirically treated with non-curable systemic androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), with its myriad of real and potential side effects. In this review article, we examined the very definition of BCR after definitive local therapy, the current status of imaging studies in its evaluation, the need for additional therapies, and the factors involved in the decision making in the choice of additional therapies. This review aims to help clinicians with the management of patients with BCR. The assessment of prognostic factors including absolute PSA level, time to recurrence, PSA kinetics, multivariable nomograms, imaging, and biopsy of the prostatic bed may help stratify the patients into localized or systemic recurrence. Patients with low-risk of systemic disease may be cured by a salvage local therapy, while those with higher risk of systemic disease may be offered the option of ADT or a clinical trial. An algorithm incorporating these factors is presented. PMID:22655274

  13. Salvage high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Pellizzon, Antônio Cássio Assis

    2016-01-01

    For tumors of the lower third of the rectum, the only safe surgical procedure is abdominal-perineal resection. High-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy is a promising treatment for local recurrence of previously irradiated lower rectal cancer, due to the extremely high concentrated dose delivered to the tumor and the sparing of normal tissue, when compared with a course of external beam radiation therapy. PMID:27403021

  14. Radiomics versus physician assessment for the early prediction of local cancer recurrence after stereotactic radiotherapy for lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattonen, Sarah A.; Johnson, Carol; Palma, David A.; Rodrigues, George; Louie, Alexander V.; Senan, Suresh; Yeung, Timothy P. C.; Ward, Aaron D.

    2016-03-01

    Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) has recently become a standard treatment option for patients with early-stage lung cancer, which achieves local control rates similar to surgery. Local recurrence following SABR typically presents after one year post-treatment. However, benign radiological changes mimicking local recurrence can appear on CT imaging following SABR, complicating the assessment of response. We hypothesize that subtle changes on early post- SABR CT images are important in predicting the eventual incidence of local recurrence and would be extremely valuable to support timely salvage interventions. The objective of this study was to extract radiomic image features on post-SABR follow-up images for 45 patients (15 with local recurrence and 30 without) to aid in the early prediction of local recurrence. Three blinded thoracic radiation oncologists were also asked to score follow-up images as benign injury or local recurrence. A radiomic signature consisting of five image features demonstrated a classification error of 24%, false positive rate (FPR) of 24%, false negative rate (FNR) of 23%, and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.85 at 2-5 months post-SABR. At the same time point, three physicians assessed the majority of images as benign injury for overall errors of 34-37%, FPRs of 0-4%, and FNRs of 100%. These results suggest that radiomics can detect early changes associated with local recurrence which are not typically considered by physicians. We aim to develop a decision support system which could potentially allow for early salvage therapy of patients with local recurrence following SABR.

  15. Blood transfusions and local tumor recurrence in colorectal cancer. Evidence of a noncausal relationship.

    PubMed Central

    Busch, O R; Hop, W C; Marquet, R L; Jeekel, J

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The authors analyzed the effect of blood transfusions on the pattern of colorectal cancer recurrence. BACKGROUND. Retrospective studies suggest that blood transfusions are associated with a poor prognosis in patients who undergo operations for colorectal malignancies. In a previously published, randomized trial, it was investigated whether autologous blood transfusions could overcome this putative detrimental effect. However, this did not appear to be the case. METHODS. In the current study, the authors analyzed the patterns of recurrence in 420 patients who underwent curative operations for colorectal cancer. RESULTS. Patients who did not require transfusions (N = 143) had significantly better disease-free survival than those who did need transfusions (N = 277); percentages at 4 years were 73% and 59%, respectively (p = 0.001). No difference was found between both groups in comparing cumulative percentages of patients having metastases; percentages at 4 years were 25% in the group that did not undergo transfusion and 27% in the transfused group. The percentage of cases having local recurrence, however, was significantly increased (p = 0.0006) in the transfused group as compared with the group that did not undergo transfusion; percentages at 4 years were 20% and 3%, respectively. The groups of patients receiving only allogeneic, only autologous, or both types of transfusions all had a significantly higher incidence of local recurrence than the patients who did not receive transfusions, but no differences were found between these three groups. CONCLUSIONS. These findings suggest that the association between blood transfusions and prognosis in colorectal cancer is a result of the circumstances that necessitate transfusions, leading to the development of local recurrences, but not of distant metastases. PMID:7986147

  16. A historical account of breast cancer surgery: beware of local recurrence but be not radical.

    PubMed

    Halsted, Charles P; Benson, John R; Jatoi, Ismail

    2014-01-01

    In the late 19th century, William Halsted proposed the radical mastectomy, which became the standard surgical treatment of breast cancer for nearly 100 years. Later in this period, theories suggesting that breast cancer was a systemic disease at inception were championed by Bernard Fisher. This alternative hypothesis of biological predeterminism was based upon results of randomized clinical trials comparing breast conserving therapy with mastectomy, which showed similar overall survival outcomes. Nonetheless, data from meta-analyses suggest that inadequate local therapy can increase risk of local recurrence, which can subsequently increase mortality. In this review, the authors provide an historical account of how local therapy of breast cancer has evolved in the face of improved adjuvant therapies and better understanding of disease biology.

  17. Advanced Imaging for the Early Diagnosis of Local Recurrence Prostate Cancer after Radical Prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Musio, Daniela; Proietti, Camilla; Indino, Elena Lucia; Megna, Valentina; Schillaci, Orazio; Catalano, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Currently the diagnosis of local recurrence of prostate cancer (PCa) after radical prostatectomy (RT) is based on the onset of biochemical failure which is defined by two consecutive values of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) higher than 0.2 ng/mL. The aim of this paper was to review the current roles of advanced imaging in the detection of locoregional recurrence. A nonsystematic literature search using the Medline and Cochrane Library databases was performed up to November 2013. Bibliographies of retrieved and review articles were also examined. Only those articles reporting complete data with clinical relevance for the present review were selected. This review article is divided into two major parts: the first one considers the role of PET/CT in the restaging of PCa after RP; the second part is intended to provide the impact of multiparametric-MRI (mp-MRI) in the depiction of locoregional recurrence. Published data indicate an emerging role for mp-MRI in the depiction of locoregional recurrence, while the performance of PET/CT still remains unclear. Moreover Mp-MRI, thanks to functional techniques, allows to distinguish between residual glandular healthy tissue, scar/fibrotic tissue, granulation tissue, and tumour recurrence and it may also be able to assess the aggressiveness of nodule recurrence. PMID:24757679

  18. Advanced imaging for the early diagnosis of local recurrence prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Panebianco, Valeria; Barchetti, Flavio; Musio, Daniela; De Felice, Francesca; Proietti, Camilla; Indino, Elena Lucia; Megna, Valentina; Schillaci, Orazio; Catalano, Carlo; Tombolini, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Currently the diagnosis of local recurrence of prostate cancer (PCa) after radical prostatectomy (RT) is based on the onset of biochemical failure which is defined by two consecutive values of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) higher than 0.2 ng/mL. The aim of this paper was to review the current roles of advanced imaging in the detection of locoregional recurrence. A nonsystematic literature search using the Medline and Cochrane Library databases was performed up to November 2013. Bibliographies of retrieved and review articles were also examined. Only those articles reporting complete data with clinical relevance for the present review were selected. This review article is divided into two major parts: the first one considers the role of PET/CT in the restaging of PCa after RP; the second part is intended to provide the impact of multiparametric-MRI (mp-MRI) in the depiction of locoregional recurrence. Published data indicate an emerging role for mp-MRI in the depiction of locoregional recurrence, while the performance of PET/CT still remains unclear. Moreover Mp-MRI, thanks to functional techniques, allows to distinguish between residual glandular healthy tissue, scar/fibrotic tissue, granulation tissue, and tumour recurrence and it may also be able to assess the aggressiveness of nodule recurrence.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging for localization of prostate cancer in the setting of biochemical recurrence.

    PubMed

    Panebianco, Valeria; Barchetti, Flavio; Grompone, Marcello Domenico; Colarieti, Anna; Salvo, Vincenzo; Cardone, Gianpiero; Catalano, Carlo

    2016-07-01

    The clinical suspicion of local recurrence of prostate cancer after radical treatment is based on the onset of biochemical failure. The use of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for prostate cancer has increased over recent years, mainly for detection, staging, and active surveillance. However, suspicion of recurrence in the set of biochemical failure is becoming a significant reason for clinicians to request multiparametric MRI. Radiologists should be able to recognize the normal posttreatment MRI findings. Fibrosis and atrophic remnant seminal vesicles (SV) after radical prostatectomy are often found and must be differentiated from local relapse. Moreover, brachytherapy, external beam radiotherapy, and focal therapies tend to diffusely decrease the signal intensity of the peripheral zone on T2-weighted images due to the loss of water content, consequently mimicking tumor and hemorrhage. The combination of T2-weighted images and functional studies like diffusion-weighted imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging improves the identification of local relapse. Tumor recurrence tends to restrict on diffusion images and avidly enhances after contrast administration. The authors provide a review of the normal findings and the signs of local tumor relapse after radical prostatectomy, external beam radiotherapy, brachytherapy and focal therapies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Chemoradiation Including Paclitaxel for Locally Recurrent Muscle-invasive Bladder Cancer in Elderly Patients.

    PubMed

    Käsmann, Lukas; Manig, Lisa; Janssen, Stefan; Rades, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate outcomes and toxicities of chemoradiation with a less intensive paclitaxel regimen for locally recurrent bladder cancer. Three elderly patients received simultaneous chemoradiation for recurrent muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Chemotherapy included two courses (three times 25 mg/m(2) over 1.5 weeks) of paclitaxel. Radiotherapy doses were 59.4 Gy to the bladder and 50.4 Gy to regional lymph nodes. Survival, local control and toxicities were retrospectively evaluated. One patient died after 71 months, two were alive after 69 and 98 months, respectively. No local recurrence was not observed. Five-year survival and local control rates were 100%. Two patients experienced grade 1 acute dysuria, one patient grade 1 diarrhea. Late toxicities were also mild; two patients had grade 1 dysuria. Chemoradiation with a less intensive paclitaxel regimen resulted in excellent 5-year results and was very well tolerated. It may be a reasonable option for elderly patients who cannot tolerate more intensive approaches. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  1. Salvage local therapy for radiation-recurrent prostate cancer – where are we?

    PubMed Central

    Zdrojowy, Romuald; Dembowski, Janusz; Małkiewicz, Bartosz; Tupikowski, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Prostate cancer is the most frequent cancer among males in Europe and a leading cause of cancer deaths, with similar proportion in other developed countries. For more than twenty years, external-beam radiation therapy, alongside with radical prostatectomy, has been used as a primary radical therapeutic approach for localized prostate cancer. Yet, EBRT failures relate to 22–69% following curative radiotherapy (± androgen deprivation therapy). Additionally, a proportion of these men will have a biopsy-proven local recurrence. Material and methods The Medline and Web of Science databases were searched without a time limit during March 2016 using the terms ‘prostate cancer’ in conjunction with ‘radiotherapy’, ‘recurrence’, ‘biochemical’, ‘salvage’, ‘brachytherapy’, ‘prostatectomy’, ‘HIFU’, ‘cryotherapy’ and ‘focal’. The search was limited to the English, Polish, German and Spanish literature. Results Currently, salvage treatment after failed radiotherapy includes radical prostatectomy, brachytherapy and ablative whole-gland therapies, such as cryotherapy and high intensity focused ultrasound. New approaches, so called focal salvage therapy, involve ablation of only the zone of recurrence in order to decrease tissue injury and therefore to diminish morbidity. Conclusions At present no authoritative recommendations can be concluded because of the absence of randomized data with standardized definitions and protocols. Nevertheless, we believe that local salvage treatment should be at least considered in patients after biochemical relapse following radiotherapy. PMID:27729992

  2. Local treatment of oligometastatic recurrence in patients with resected non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Yano, Tokujiro; Okamoto, Tatsuro; Haro, Akira; Fukuyama, Seiichi; Yoshida, Tsukihisa; Kohno, Mikihiro; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2013-12-01

    We previously reported a retrospective study indicating the prognostic impact of the local treatment of oligometastatic recurrence after a complete resection for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In the present study, we prospectively observed postoperative oligometastatic patients and investigated the effects of local treatment on progression-free survival (PFS). Using a prospectively maintained database of patients with completely resected NSCLC treated between October 2007 and December 2011, we identified 52 consecutive patients with postoperative recurrence, excluding second primary lung cancer. Of these patients, 31 suffering from distant metastases alone without primary site recurrence were included in this study. According to the definition of 'oligometastases' as a limited number of distant metastases ranging from one to three, 17 patients had oligometastatic disease. Of those 17 patients, four patients with only brain metastasis were excluded from the analysis. The oligometastatic sites included the lungs in five patients, bone in four patients, the lungs and brain in two patients, the adrenal glands in one patient and soft tissue in one patient. Eleven of the 13 patients first received local treatment. Three patients (lung, adrenal gland, soft tissue) underwent surgical resection, and the remaining eight patients received radiotherapy. The median PFS was 20 months in the oligometastatic patients who received local treatment. There were five patients with a PFS of longer than two years. The metastatic sites in these patients varied, and one patient had three lesions. On the other hand, the two remaining patients first received a systemic chemotherapy of their own selection. The PFS of these two patients was five and 15 months, respectively. Local therapy is a choice for first-line treatment in patients with postoperative oligometastatic recurrence. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Toward four-dimensional image-guided adaptive brachytherapy in locally recurrent endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Fokdal, Lars; Ørtoft, Gitte; Hansen, Estrid S; Røhl, Lisbeth; Pedersen, Erik Morre; Tanderup, Kari; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate clinical outcome and feasibility of a four-dimensional image-guided adaptive brachytherapy concept in patients with locally recurrent endometrial cancer. Forty-three patients with locally recurrent endometrial cancer were included. Treatment consisted of conformal external beam radiotherapy followed by a boost using pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy (BT). Large tumors were treated with MRI-guided interstitial BT. Small tumors were treated with CT-guided intracavitary BT. The planning aim (total external beam radiotherapy and BT) for high-risk clinical target volume was D90 > 80 Gy, whereas constraints for organs at risk were D2cc ≤ 90 Gy for bladder and D2cc ≤ 70 Gy for rectum, sigmoid, and bowel in terms of equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions. Median high-risk clinical target volume was 18 cm(3) (range, 0-91). D90 was 82 Gy (range, 77-88). D2cc to bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were 67 Gy (range, 50-81), 67 Gy (range, 51-77), and 55 Gy (range, 44-68), respectively. Median followup was 30 months (6-88). Two-year local control rate was 92% (standard error [SE], 5). Disease-free survival rate and overall survival rate was 59% (SE, 8) and 78% (SE, 7), respectively. Patients with low- to intermediate-risk for recurrence had a 2-year disease-free survival rate of 72% (SE, 9) compared with 42% (SE, 12) in patients with high risk for recurrence (p = 0.04). Late morbidity Grade 3 was recorded in 5 (12%) patients. Four-dimensional image-guided adaptive brachytherapy is feasible in locally recurrent endometrial cancer. Local control rate is good. Systemic control remains a problem in patients with high risk for recurrence. Copyright © 2014 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Thermoradiotherapy of the chest wall in locally advanced or recurrent breast cancer with marginal resection.

    PubMed

    Welz, S; Hehr, T; Lamprecht, U; Scheithauer, H; Budach, W; Bamberg, M

    2005-03-01

    Evaluation of the efficacy of combined hyperthermia and radiotherapy (TRT) in high-risk breast cancer patients with microscopic involved margins (R1) after mastectomy or with resected locoregional, early recurrence with close margins or R1-resection. Main endpoint was local tumour control (LC); secondary endpoints were overall survival (OS), disease free survival (DFS) and acute toxicity. Between 1997-2001, 50 patients were treated with TRT. Thirteen patients (group 1) received a post-operative TRT in a high-risk situation (free margin <1 cm or R1, N+), 37 patients (group 2) received TRT after close/R1 resection of a locoregional recurrence. Thirteen out of 37 patients in group 2 already had had two-to-seven recurrences prior to TRT. Median radiation dose was 60 Gy (range: 44-66.4 Gy), the additional local hyperthermia (>41 degrees C, 60 min) was given twice a week. Median follow-up for patients at risk was 28 months. All statistical tests were done using Statistica software. Actuarial OS for all patients at 3 years accounted for 89%, DFS for 68% and LC for 80%. Actuarial OS was 90% for group 1 and 89% for group 2, with four patients having died so far. DFS at 3 years was 64% in group 1 and 69% in group 2, actuarial 3 year LC was 75% and 81%, respectively. For patients with recurrent chest wall disease, there was no difference concerning local control between patients who underwent TRT with or without prior radiation. No prognostic factors could be detected due to the small number of patients investigated. The combined modality treatment was well tolerated. Grade IV toxicity, according to the Common Toxicity Criteria, did not occur. The results concerning local tumour control and overall survival in these high-risk patients are promising, especially for TRT for the treatment of local recurrences. A longer follow-up is needed to estimate late toxicity.

  5. Weekly paclitaxel combined with local hyperthermia in the therapy of breast cancer locally recurrent after mastectomy--a pilot experience.

    PubMed

    Zoul, Z; Filip, S; Melichar, B; Dvorák, J; Odrázka, K; Petera, J

    2004-08-01

    The combination of chemotherapy and hyperthermia (HT) is a promising approach in the treatment of malignant tumors. In the present report we evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of a combination of weekly paclitaxel combined with local hyperthermia in breast cancer. 7 patients were treated for inoperable local recurrence of breast cancer after mastectomy, irradiation, and chemotherapy or hormonal therapy. They weekly received paclitaxel (60-80 mg/m(2)) in 3-h infusions followed by local HT 41-44 degrees C for 45 min for 6-18 cycles. Objective local response was observed in all treated patients (complete response in 4 patients and partial response in 3 patients). There were no grade 3 or 4 toxicities, neurologic toxicity or hypersensitivity reactions. Local tolerance to this regimen was also good, with only 4 patients developing mild transient erythema. Our experience indicates that the combination of weekly paclitaxel and HT may be effective in the treatment of locally recurrent breast cancer after mastectomy.

  6. [PSMA-radioguided surgery in localized recurrent prostate cancer : Current and future aspects].

    PubMed

    Rauscher, I; Eiber, M; Jilg, C A; Gschwend, J E; Maurer, T

    2017-01-01

    Recently, PSMA-radioguided surgery (PSMA-RGS) was introduced for targeted resection of localized prostate cancer recurrence. Prerequisite for preoperative patient selection and localization of tumor recurrence is a positive (68)Ga-HBED-CC PSMA positron emission tomography (PET) scan with preferably only singular soft tissue or lymph node recurrence. After injection of In-PSMA I&T or Tc-PSMA-I&S single photon emission computer tomography (SPECT)/computer tomography (CT) examination is performed in every patient to verify radiotracer uptake in tumor lesions. In a preliminary study, (111)In-PSMA I&T SPECT/CT could detect about half of the (68)Ga-HBED-CC PSMA PET-positive lesions, while nearly all PET-positive lesions could be detected using PSMA-RGS and also five additional lesions compared to (68)Ga-HBED-CC-PSMA PET. Follow-up data from 55 patients show a PSA reduction >50% and >90% in 44 (80%) and 29 (53%) patients, respectively. In 34 (62%) patients, a PSA drop to <0.2 ng/ml was observed. In all, 15 (27%) patients received further PC-specific treatment; the remaining 40 (73%) patients did not undergo further treatment. In 33% of patients, surgery-related complications were noted; however, most were regarded as minor. Thus, PSMA-RGS seems to be of high value in patients with localized prostate cancer recurrence with exact localization and resection of metastatic tissue. However, patient selection based on (68)Ga-PSMA PET imaging and clinical parameters is crucial to obtain satisfactory oncological results.

  7. Salvage abdominoperineal resection and perineal wound healing in local recurrent or persistent anal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferenschild, Floris T J; Vermaas, Maarten; Hofer, Stefan O; Verhoef, Cornelis; Eggermont, Alexander M M; de Wilt, Johannes H W

    2005-11-01

    The primary treatment for anal cancer is chemoradiation (CRT). Failures after CRT are potentially curable with an abdominoperineal resection (APR). A major problem of surgery in the anal area is poor healing of the perineal wound. Between 1985 and 2000, 129 patients treated for anal cancer were retrospectively reviewed. Of the 24 patients with local failure, 18 patients were treated with an APR. The aim of this study was to review the results and long-term outcome after salvage APR, with special emphasis on perineal wound healing. Mean age at diagnosis was 59 (range: 41-83) years. After a median of 16 months, only 2 patients developed a local recurrence. The 5-year overall survival was 30%. In 11 patients the perineal wound was closed primarily, in 3 patients the perineal wound was left open, and in 4 patients a vertical rectus abdominus musculocutaneous (VRAM) flap was used. Perineal wound breakdown occurred in 5 of the 14 patients (36%) not treated with primary muscle reconstruction. In all patients treated with a VRAM flap the perineal wound healed primarily. In the present study salvage APR in recurrent or persistent anal cancer results in good local control and 5-year overall survival of 30%. When performing an APR a VRAM flap reconstruction should be considered to prevent disabling perineal wound complications.

  8. Charcoal tattoo localization for differentiated thyroid cancer recurrence in the central compartment of the neck.

    PubMed

    Soprani, F; Bondi, F; Puccetti, M; Armaroli, V

    2012-04-01

    Recurrence of differentiated thyroid cancer can often require further surgical options. Reoperations may carry significant risk of surgical complications; additionally, as the anatomy is subverted, there is the possibility of leaving residual neoplasm. In order to avoid such problems during reoperation for differentiated thyroid cancer recurrence, we have introduced the technique of preoperative ultrasound-guided tattooing localization of the lymphatic structure to be removed with a 4% solution of active charcoal. Using ultrasound guidance, the lesion is identified and 0.5-2 ml of colloidal charcoal is injected near the lesion. The extraction of the needle is accompanied by injection at constant pressure of other charcoal as to leave a trace of colouring along the path of the needle up to the skin. The preoperative injection was well tolerated in all cases. In the last 5 years, we have used this technique in 13 patients with suspected recurrence in the central compartment (all from papillary carcinomas). Postoperative ultrasound and histological examination confirmed the removal of the lesion in all patients; in one case, the lesion was a parathyroid cyst. Complications were observed in two of 13 (15.4%) cases (one transitory hypoparathyroidism, and one transitory vocal cord paresis). Considering our experience, charcoal tattoo localization can be considered a safe, low-cost technique that is extremely useful for facilitating surgical procedures, and reduces the risk of iatrogenic damage.

  9. [Complete response of locally recurrent anorectal cancer to proton beam therapy alone--a case report].

    PubMed

    Ie, Masafumi; Yamaguchi, Tomohiro; Kinugasa, Yusuke; Sato, Sumito; Yamakawa, Yushi; Kagawa, Hiroyasu; Tomioka, Hiroyuki; Shiomi, Akio; Fuji, Hiroshi; Murayama, Shigeyuki

    2014-12-01

    We report a case of locally recurrent anorectal cancer treated with proton beam therapy (PBT) alone that led to a clinically complete response. A 70-year-old woman with paraparesis due to infantile paralysis underwent abdominoperineal resection (APR) and D3 lymphadenectomy for anorectal cancer (PERb, type 2, 50×40 mm, muc-tub1, M1a[lung], Stage IV a]. Three months after APR, right middle and right lower lobectomies were performed for synchronous lung metastases. Adjuvant chemotherapy was not administered. One year and 8 months after APR, computed tomography (CT) showed local recurrence of the tumor (29×28 mm), which contacted the right ischial spine. Pelvic exenteration combined with sacral resection was not performed because of the patient's poor performance status. PBT (70 Gy [RBE]/25 F/5 week) was administered for treatment of the recurred tumor. CT revealed that the tumor disappeared 1 year after PBT, which was defined as complete response. The patient is alive and has not experienced recurrence for 7 years.

  10. Local Recurrence After Complete Clinical Response and Watch and Wait in Rectal Cancer After Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation: Impact of Salvage Therapy on Local Disease Control

    SciTech Connect

    Habr-Gama, Angelita; Gama-Rodrigues, Joaquim; São Julião, Guilherme P.; Proscurshim, Igor; Sabbagh, Charles; Lynn, Patricio B.; Perez, Rodrigo O.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To review the risk of local recurrence and impact of salvage therapy after Watch and Wait for rectal cancer with complete clinical response (cCR) after chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: Patients with cT2-4N0-2M0 distal rectal cancer treated with CRT (50.4-54 Gy + 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy) and cCR at 8 weeks were included. Patients with cCR were enrolled in a strict follow-up program with no immediate surgery (Watch and Wait). Local recurrence-free survival was compared while taking into account Watch and Wait strategy alone and Watch and Wait plus salvage. Results: 90 of 183 patients experienced cCR at initial assessment after CRT (49%). When early tumor regrowths (up to and including the initial 12 months of follow-up) and late recurrences were considered together, 28 patients (31%) experienced local recurrence (median follow-up time, 60 months). Of those, 26 patients underwent salvage therapy, and 2 patients were not amenable to salvage. In 4 patients, local re-recurrence developed after Watch and Wait plus salvage. The overall salvage rate for local recurrence was 93%. Local recurrence-free survival at 5 years was 69% (all local recurrences) and 94% (after salvage procedures). Thirteen patients (14%) experienced systemic recurrence. The 5-year cancer-specific overall survival and disease-free survival for all patients (including all recurrences) were 91% and 68%, respectively. Conclusions: Local recurrence may develop in 31% of patients with initial cCR when early regrowths (≤12 months) and late recurrences are grouped together. More than half of these recurrences develop within 12 months of follow-up. Salvage therapy is possible in ≥90% of recurrences, leading to 94% local disease control, with 78% organ preservation.

  11. Locally recurrent non-small-cell lung cancer after complete surgical resection.

    PubMed

    Shaw, E G; Brindle, J S; Creagan, E T; Foote, R L; Trastek, V F; Buskirk, S J

    1992-12-01

    Between Jan. 1, 1976, and Dec. 31, 1985, at our institution, 37 patients who had undergone prior complete surgical resection of non-small-cell lung cancer received definitive thoracic radiation therapy (TRT) for locally recurrent disease. Of the 37 recurrences, 33 were in the pulmonary parenchyma or the hilar, mediastinal, or supraclavicular lymph nodes; the other 4 were in the chest wall. The initial stage of disease was I in 43%, II in 35%, and IIIA in 19%, whereas at the time of local recurrence, the stage was I in 8%, II in 11%, IIIA in 57%, IIIB in 22%, and IV in 3% (this patient had multiple pulmonary nodules encompassible within a single TRT field). The locally recurrent lesions were squamous cell carcinoma in 30%, adenocarcinoma or large-cell carcinoma in 46%, mixed types in 5%, and unknown type in 19%. All patients received megavoltage TRT, most often 4,000 cGy in 10 fractions administered in a split-course schedule. In addition, 15 patients received multiagent chemotherapy, usually a combination of cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin hydrochloride, and cisplatin or a regimen that included these drugs. The 2-year and 5-year survivals were 30% and 4%, respectively, and the median duration of survival was 13.7 months. Survival was not improved by the addition of chemotherapy. Approximately half of the patients had radiographic and symptomatic responses after TRT. Of 33 patients assessable for post-TRT patterns of failure, 46% had local failure only, 18% had local plus systemic failure, and 32% had systemic failure only. Two-thirds of the patients died as a direct consequence of progressive chest disease, despite receiving TRT.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Nonsurgical Management of Cervical Cancer: Locally Advanced, Recurrent, and Metastatic Disease, Survivorship, and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Mackay, Helen J.; Wenzel, Lari; Mileshkin, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Overview Despite the declining incidence of cervical cancer as a result of the introduction of screening programs, globally it remains a leading cause of cancer-related death in women. Outcomes for patients who are diagnosed with anything but early-stage disease remain poor. Here we examine emerging strategies to improve the treatment of locally advanced disease. We discuss emerging biologic data, which are informing our investigation of new therapeutic interventions in persistent, recurrent, and metastatic cervical cancer. We recognize the importance of interventions to improve quality of life and to prevent long-term sequelae in women undergoing treatment. Finally, and perhaps most importantly, we recognize the need for global collaboration and advocacy to improve the outcome for all women at risk of and diagnosed with this disease. PMID:25993189

  13. Long-term outcomes of ethanol injection therapy for locally recurrent papillary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Young; Kim, Seok-Mo; Chang, Hojin; Kim, Bup-Woo; Lim, Chi Young; Lee, Yong Sang; Chang, Hang-Seok; Park, Cheong Soo

    2017-06-29

    The standard treatment regimen for locally recurrent lesions is total thyroidectomy, or complete removal of the recurrent thyroid lesion within the thyroid bed. However, reoperation increases the risk of complications and patients have to undergo general anesthesia. Percutaneous ethanol injection therapy represents a far less invasive procedure without general anesthesia and with lower risk of complications. Thirty-four patients who received PEIT at Yonsei University Medical Center between October 2002 and August 2009 for recurrent cervical nodal metastases of differentiated papillary thyroid cancer were included in this retrospective study. During a minimum follow-up of 60 months, treatment outcomes were determined by measuring the lesion size prior to the first injection and 3 months after the last injection. A total of 46 recurrent lesions were detected in 34 patients. Five patients underwent surgery and PEIT was administered to the remaining 19 and 22 lesions in the central compartment and lateral neck lymph nodes, respectively. Size increases were observed in seven (17.1%) lesions, whereas no changes in size and decreases were detected in 10 (24.4%) and 24 (58.5%) lesions. Patients with increased lymph nodes were significantly older (65.3 ± 14.4 vs. 48.2 ± 16.3 years; p = 0.02) and had smaller sizes (9.3 ± 1.0 vs. 12.3 ± 6.4 mm; p = 0.012). Although reoperation remains the first-line treatment for recurrent thyroid cancer, PEIT may be considered as a treatment option in selected patients with lesions larger than 1 cm who are ineligible for surgery or have refused reoperation.

  14. Salvage image-guided intensity modulated or stereotactic body reirradiation of local recurrence of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jereczek-Fossa, B A; Fodor, C; Bazzani, F; Maucieri, A; Ronchi, S; Ferrario, S; Colangione, S P; Gerardi, M A; Caputo, M; Cecconi, A; Gherardi, F; Vavassori, A; Comi, S; Cambria, R; Garibaldi, C; Cattani, F; De Cobelli, O; Orecchia, R

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To retrospectively evaluate external beam reirradiation (re-EBRT) delivered to the prostate/prostatic bed for local recurrence, after radical or adjuvant/salvage radiotherapy (RT). Methods: 32 patients received re-EBRT between February 2008 and October 2013. All patients had clinical/radiological local relapse in the prostate or prostatic bed and no distant metastasis. re-EBRT was delivered with selective RT technologies [stereotactic RT including CyberKnifeTM (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA); image-guidance and intensity-modulated RT etc.]. Toxicity was evaluated using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer criteria. Biochemical control was assessed according to the Phoenix definition (NADIR + 2 ng ml−1). Results: Acute urinary toxicity: G0, 24 patients; G1, 6 patients; G2, 2 patients. Acute rectal toxicity: G0, 28 patients; G1, 2 patients; and G2, 1 patient. Late urinary toxicity (evaluated in 30 cases): G0, 23 patients; G1, 6 patients; G2, 1 patient. Late renal toxicity: G0, 25 patients; G1, 5 patients. A mean follow-up of 21.3 months after re-EBRT showed that 13 patients were free of cancer, 3 were alive with biochemical relapse and 12 patients were alive with clinically evident disease. Four patients had died: two of disease progression and two of other causes. Conclusion: re-EBRT using modern technology is a feasible approach for local prostate cancer recurrence offering 2-year tumour control in about half of the patients. Toxicity of re-EBRT is low. Future studies are needed to identify the patients who would benefit most from this treatment. Advances in knowledge: Our series, based on experience in one hospital alone, shows that re-EBRT for local relapse of prostate cancer is feasible and offers a 2-year cure in about half of the patients. PMID:26055506

  15. Reoperative sentinel lymph node biopsy is feasible for locally recurrent breast cancer, but is it worthwhile?

    PubMed Central

    Ugras, Stacy; Matsen, Cindy; Eaton, Anne; Stempel, Michelle; Morrow, Monica; Cody, Hiram S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction reoperative sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) is feasible in patients with local recurrence (LR) of invasive breast cancer, but it remains unclear if this procedure affects either treatment or outcome. Here we ask whether axillary restaging (versus none) at the time of LR affects the rate of subsequent events: axillary failure, non-axillary recurrence, distant metastasis or death. Methods we queried our institutional database to identify patients treated surgically for invasive breast cancer with a negative SLNB (1997–2000) who developed ipsilateral breast or chest wall recurrence as a first event. We excluded those with gross nodal disease at the time of LR. The cumulative incidence of subsequent events was estimated using competing risks methodology. Results of 1527 patients with negative SLN at initial surgery, 83 had an ipsilateral breast (79) or chest wall recurrence (4) with clinically negative regional nodes. 47 (57%) were treated with and 36 (43%) without axillary surgery. Primary tumor characteristics were similar between groups, although time to LR was shorter in the no-axillary-surgery group (median 3.4 versus 6.5 years, p<0.05). All patients in the axillary surgery group and 94% of patients in the no-axillary–surgery group had surgical excision of their LR, and the use of subsequent radiation and systemic therapy was similar between groups. At a median follow-up of 4.2 years from the time of LR, the rates of axillary failure, non-axillary failure, distant metastasis and death were low and did not differ between groups. Conclusions among breast cancer patients with LR and clinically negative nodes, our results question the value of axillary restaging but invite confirmation in larger patient cohorts. Since randomized trials support the value of systemic therapy for all patients with invasive LR, reoperative SLNB, although feasible, may not be necessary. PMID:26644258

  16. Differentiating locally recurrent rectal cancer from scar tissue: Value of diffusion-weighted MRI.

    PubMed

    Grosu, Sergio; Schäfer, Arnd-Oliver; Baumann, Tobias; Manegold, Philipp; Langer, Mathias; Gerstmair, Axel

    2016-07-01

    To determine a cut-off apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value distinguishing local recurrence from scar tissue in patients with rectal cancer treated with complete surgical tumour removal. 72 patients were retrospectively included. Patients underwent 1.5T MRI including multiplanar T2-weighted turbo-spin-echo sequences (TSE) and axial single-shot epi-diffusion-weighted sequences (EPSE). Two independent observers measured mean tumour and scar tissue ADCs by manually drawing regions of interest (ROIs). The t-test and ROC analysis were used for comparison and determining an optimal discrimination threshold. As reference standard histopathological results were used in 23 patients (32%) and clinical follow-up in 49 patients (68%). Recurrent rectal cancer was found in 30 patients (4 female, 26 male, median age 63.13 years) and treatment related changes such as scar tissue in 42 patients (11 female, 31 male, median age 63.67 years). The mean ADC value of tumour recurrence was 1.02×10(-3)mm(2)/s (0.63-1.44×10(-3)mm(2)/s) and of scar tissue 1.77×10(-3)mm(2)/s (1.11-2.41×10(-3)mm(2)/s) showing a statistically significant difference (p<0.001). The cut-off ADC value was 1.34×10(-3)mm(2)/s with a sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 93%, 91%, and 92% respectively. Diffusion weighted MRI allows for the differentiation of tumour recurrence from scar tissue after surgical resection of rectal cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Hyperthermia and radiation therapy for locally advanced or recurrent breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Refaat, Tamer; Sachdev, Sean; Sathiaseelan, Vythialinga; Helenowski, Irene; Abdelmoneim, Salah; Pierce, Margaret C; Woloschak, Gayle; Small, William; Mittal, Bharat; Kiel, Krystyna D

    2015-08-01

    This study aims to report the outcome and toxicity of combined hyperthermia (HT) and radiation therapy (RT) in treatment of locally advanced or loco-regionally recurrent breast cancer. Patients treated with HT and RT from January 1991 to December 2007 were reviewed. RT doses for previously irradiated patients were > 40 Gy and for RT naïve patients > 60 Gy, at 1.8-2 Gy/day. HT was planned for 2 sessions/week, immediately after RT, for a minimum of 20 min and for > 4 sessions. Superficial or interstitial applicators were used with temperature measured by superficial or interstitial thermistors based on target thickness. HT treatment was assessed by thermal equivalent dose (TED), > 42.5 °C and > 43 °C. Endpoints included treatment response, lack of local progression (local control), and survival. 127 patients received HT and RT to 167 sites. These included the intact breast (24.4%), chest wall/skin (67.7%), and breast/chest wall and nodes (7.9%). At a median follow-up of 13 months (mean 30 ± 38), improved overall survival was significantly associated with increasing RT dose (p < 0.0001), median TED 42.5 °C ≥ 200 min (p = 0.003), and local control (p = 0.0002). Local control at last follow-up was seen in 55.1% of patients. Complete response was significantly associated with median TED 42.5 °C ≥ 200 min (p = 0.002) and median TED 43 °C ≥ 100 min (p = 0.03). HT and RT are effective for locally advanced or recurrent breast cancer in patients that have been historically difficult to treat by RT alone. Over 50% of patients achieved control of locoregional disease. Overall survival was improved with local control. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. HYPERTHERMIA AND RADIATION THERAPY FOR LOCALLY ADVANCED OR RECURRENT BREAST CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Refaat, Tamer; Sachdev, Sean; Sathiaseelan, Vythialinga; Helenowski, Irene; Abdelmoneim, Salah; Pierce, Margaret C; Woloschak, Gayle; Small, William; Mittal, Bharat; Kiel, Krystyna D.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This study aims to report the outcome and toxicity of combined hyperthermia (HT) and radiation therapy (RT) in treatment of locally advanced or loco-regionally recurrent breast cancer. Patients and Methods Patients treated with HT and RT from January 1991 to December 2007 were reviewed. RT doses for previously irradiated patients were >40 Gy and for RT naïve patients >60 Gy, at 1.8–2 Gy/day. HT was planned for 2 sessions/week, immediately after RT, for a minimum of 20 minutes and for >4 sessions. Superficial or interstitial applicators were used with temperature measured by superficial or interstitial thermisters based on target thickness. HT treatment was assessed by thermal equivalent dose (TED), >42.5°C and >43°C. Endpoints included treatment response, lack of local progression (local control), and survival. Results 127 patients received HT and RT to 167 sites. These included the intact breast (24.4%), chest wall/skin (67.7%), and breast/chest wall and nodes (7.9%). At a median follow-up of 13 months (mean 30±38), improved overall survival was significantly associated with increasing RT dose (p<0.0001), median TED 42.5°C≥200 minutes (p=0.003), and local control (p=0.0002). Local control at last follow-up was seen in 55.1% of patients. Complete response was significantly associated with median TED 42.5°C≥200 minutes (p=0.002) and median TED 43°C≥100 minutes (p=0.03). Conclusion HT and RT are effective for locally advanced or recurrent breast cancer in patients that have been historically difficult to treat by RT alone. Over 50% of patients achieved control of locoregional disease. Overall survival was improved with local control. PMID:25900383

  19. Transanal Endoscopic Microsurgery (TEM) Following Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation for Rectal Cancer: Outcomes of Salvage Resection for Local Recurrence.

    PubMed

    Perez, Rodrigo Oliva; Habr-Gama, Angelita; São Julião, Guilherme Pagin; Proscurshim, Igor; Fernandez, Laura Melina; de Azevedo, Rafael Ulysses; Vailati, Bruna B; Fernandes, Felipe Alexandre; Gama-Rodrigues, Joaquim

    2016-04-01

    Transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) has been considered an alternative for selected patients with rectal cancer following neoadjuvant chemoradiation (CRT). Immediate total mesorectal completion for all patients with unfavorable pathological features would result in unnecessary protectomies in a significant proportion of patients. Instead, salvage total mesorectal excision (TME) could be restricted for patients developing local recurrence. The aim of the present study is to determine oncological outcomes of salvage resection for local recurrences following CRT and TEM. Consecutive patients undergoing TEM following neoadjuvant CRT for rectal cancer were reviewed. Patients with "near" complete response to CRT (≤3 cm; ycT1-2N0) were offered TEM. Salvage surgery was attempted in the event of a local recurrence. A total of 53 patients were managed by CRT followed by TEM. Unfavorable pathological features were present in 36 patients (68 %). None of the patients underwent immediate completion TME. There were 12 patients who developed local recurrence resulting in a 2-year local recurrence-free survival of 77 % (95 % CI, 53-100 %). Of these patients, 9 developed exclusively local recurrences, and all had at least 1 unfavorable pathological feature in the specimen after TEM (100 %). Eight patients (8 of 9) underwent salvage resection (abdominoperineal resection [APR] in 87 %) with CRM+ in 7 of 8 patients (87 %). Four patients developed local re-recurrence after a median 36 months of follow-up. The 2-year local re-recurrence free survival was 60 %. Salvage resection for local recurrence following CRT and TEM is associated with high rates of R1 resection (CRM+) and local re-recurrence. Immediate completion of TME should be considered for patients with unfavorable pathological features after TEM.

  20. Reirradiation combined with hyperthermia in recurrent breast cancer results in a worthwhile local palliation

    PubMed Central

    Zee, J van der; Holt, B van der; Rietveld, P J M; Helle, P A; Wijnmaalen, A J; Putten, W L J van; Rhoon, G C van

    1999-01-01

    Both experimental and clinical research have shown that hyperthermia (HT) gives valuable additional effects when applied in combination with radiotherapy (RT). The purpose of this study was evaluation of results in patients with recurrent breast cancer, treated at the Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center (DHCC) with reirradiation (re-RT; eight fractions of 4 Gy twice weekly) combined with HT. All 134 patients for whom such treatment was planned were included in the analysis. The complete response rate in 119 patients with macroscopic tumour was 71%. Including the 15 patients with microscopic disease, the local control rate was 73%. The median duration of local control was 32 months, and toxicity was acceptable. The complete response (CR) rate was higher, and the toxicity was less with the later developed 433-MHz HT technique compared with the 2450-MHz technique used initially. With this relatively well-tolerated treatment, palliation by local tumour control of a worthwhile duration is achieved in the majority of patients. The technique used for hyperthermia appeared to influence the achieved results. The value of HT in addition to this re-RT schedule has been confirmed by a prospective randomized trial in a similar patient group. In The Netherlands, this combined treatment is offered as standard to patients with breast cancer recurring in previously irradiated areas. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10027317

  1. Prognostic Factors Affecting Locally Recurrent Rectal Cancer and Clinical Significance of Hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk Kuhn, Hildegard; Schultze, Juergen; Homann, Nils; Brandenburg, Bernd; Schulte, Rainer; Krull, Andreas; Schild, Steven E.; Dunst, Juergen

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate potential prognostic factors, including hemoglobin levels before and during radiotherapy, for associations with survival and local control in patients with unirradiated locally recurrent rectal cancer. Patients and Methods: Ten potential prognostic factors were investigated in 94 patients receiving radiotherapy for recurrent rectal cancer: age ({<=}68 vs. {>=}69 years), gender, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (0-1 vs. 2-3), American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage ({<=}II vs. III vs. IV), grading (G1-2 vs. G3), surgery, administration of chemotherapy, radiation dose (equivalent dose in 2-Gy fractions: {<=}50 vs. >50 Gy), and hemoglobin levels before (<12 vs. {>=}12 g/dL) and during (majority of levels: <12 vs. {>=}12 g/dL) radiotherapy. Multivariate analyses were performed, including hemoglobin levels, either before or during radiotherapy (not both) because these are confounding variables. Results: Improved survival was associated with better performance status (p < 0.001), lower AJCC stage (p = 0.023), surgery (p = 0.011), chemotherapy (p = 0.003), and hemoglobin levels {>=}12 g/dL both before (p = 0.031) and during (p < 0.001) radiotherapy. On multivariate analyses, performance status, AJCC stage, and hemoglobin levels during radiotherapy maintained significance. Improved local control was associated with better performance status (p = 0.040), lower AJCC stage (p = 0.010), lower grading (p = 0.012), surgery (p < 0.001), chemotherapy (p < 0.001), and hemoglobin levels {>=}12 g/dL before (p < 0.001) and during (p < 0.001) radiotherapy. On multivariate analyses, chemotherapy, grading, and hemoglobin levels before and during radiotherapy remained significant. Subgroup analyses of the patients having surgery demonstrated the extent of resection to be significantly associated with local control (p = 0.011) but not with survival (p = 0.45). Conclusion: Predictors for outcome in patients who received radiotherapy for

  2. True Local Recurrences after Breast Conserving Surgery have Poor Prognosis in Patients with Early Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sarsenov, Dauren; Ilgun, Serkan; Ordu, Cetin; Alco, Gul; Bozdogan, Atilla; Elbuken, Filiz; Nur Pilanci, Kezban; Agacayak, Filiz; Erdogan, Zeynep; Eralp, Yesim; Dincer, Maktav

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study was aimed at investigating clinical and histopathologic features of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrences (IBTR) and their effects on survival after breast conservation therapy. Methods: 1,400 patients who were treated between 1998 and 2007 and had breast-conserving surgery (BCS) for early breast cancer (cT1-2/N0-1/M0) were evaluated. Demographic and pathologic parameters, radiologic data, treatment, and follow-up related features of the patients were recorded. Results: 53 patients (3.8%) had IBTR after BCS within a median follow-up of 70 months. The mean age was 45.7 years (range, 27-87 years), and 22 patients (41.5%) were younger than 40 years. 33 patients (62.3%) had true recurrence (TR) and 20 were classified as new primary (NP). The median time to recurrence was shorter in TR group than in NP group (37.0 (6-216) and 47.5 (11-192) months respectively; p = 0.338). Progesterone receptor positivity was significantly higher in the NP group (p = 0.005). The overall 5-year survival rate in the NP group (95.0%) was significantly higher than that of the TR group (74.7%, p < 0.033). Multivariate analysis showed that younger age (<40 years), large tumor size (>20 mm), high grade tumor and triple-negative molecular phenotype along with developing TR negatively affected overall survival (hazard ratios were 4.2 (CI 0.98-22.76), 4.6 (CI 1.07-13.03), 4.0 (CI 0.68-46.10), 6.5 (CI 0.03-0.68), and 6.5 (CI 0.02- 0.80) respectively, p < 0.05). Conclusions: Most of the local recurrences after BCS in our study were true recurrences, which resulted in a poorer outcome as compared to new primary tumors. Moreover, younger age (<40), large tumor size (>2 cm), high grade, triple negative phenotype, and having true recurrence were identified as independent prognostic factors with a negative impact on overall survival in this dataset of patients with recurrent breast cancer. In conjunction with a more intensive follow-up program, the role of adjuvant therapy

  3. Preoperative localization of neck recurrences from thyroid cancer: charcoal tattooing under ultrasound guidance.

    PubMed

    Chami, Linda; Hartl, Dana; Leboulleux, Sophie; Baudin, Eric; Lumbroso, Jean; Schlumberger, Martin; Travagli, Jean Paul

    2015-03-01

    Reoperation for thyroid cancer recurrence is a surgical challenge in previously dissected necks, and there is a need for a reliable procedure for surgeon guidance. In this study, the usefulness of preoperative charcoal tattooing for surgical guidance was evaluated. From July 2007 to May 2010, 53 patients (40 females; Mage=44 years, range 19-76 years) were prospectively included for preoperative localization of neck recurrences from differentiated (n=46) or medullary thyroid cancer (n=7). Preoperative cytological assessment was performed for at least one lesion in each patient. Ultrasound (US) imaging was performed with high-frequency probes (8-14 Mhz). Micronized peat charcoal (0.5-3 mL) was injected under US guidance using a 25 gauge needle, 0-15 days preoperatively. A total of 106 lesions were selected for charcoal tattooing. Of these, 101 had been tattooed, and 102 were removed (85 metastases, 17 benign on pathology). The tolerance of charcoal injection was good in all but three patients. A mean volume of 1 mL of charcoal was injected with a mean of two targets per patient. Charcoal labeling facilitated intraoperative detection in 56 "difficult" lesions (i.e., small size, dense fibrosis, anatomical pitfalls), and charcoal trace facilitated intraoperative guidance in 17 lesions. Feasibility and usefulness rates were 83% and 70.7% respectively. These findings suggest that charcoal tattooing under US guidance is an easy to implement, safe, and useful procedure for surgeon guidance in neck reoperation for thyroid cancer.

  4. Scintimammography in conjunction with ultrasonography for local breast cancer recurrence in post-mastectomy breast

    PubMed Central

    Usmani, S; Khan, H; Ahmed, N; Marafi, F; Garvie, N

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the usefulness of 99Tcm-methoxy-isobutyl-isonitrile (MIBI) scintimammography and ultrasonography, alone and in combination, for the detection of chest wall recurrence in the post-mastectomy breast. A total of 41 consecutive post-mastectomy patients (mean age 46.6 years; median age 45 years) with clinical suspicion of breast cancer recurrence were evaluated. For scintimammography all patients received a 740–900 MBq iv injection of 99Tcm-MIBI; planar images were taken 5–10 min post-injection followed by supine single photon emission CT. Breast ultrasonography was performed in each patient using a 7.5 MHz transducer. Both MIBI uptake and ultrasound findings were documented using standard protocols. All patients had fine needle aspiration cytology biopsy (FNAC), core biopsy or excision biopsy for final tissue diagnosis. Of the 41 patients, 24 had true positive signs of local breast cancer recurrence upon ultrasonography, 10 were diagnosed as true negatives, a sensitivity of 86%, specificity 77%, positive predictive value (PPV) 89%, negative predictive value (NPV) 71% and accuracy 83% (p = 0.001). By comparison, scintimammography findings were found to be true positive in 25 patients and true negative in 12 patients — sensitivity 89%, specificity 92%, PPV 96%, NPV 80% and accuracy 90% (p = 0.001). Using a combination of these two modalities, the combined sensitivity was 100%, specificity 77%, PPV 90%, NPV 100% and accuracy 93%. The high NPV of the two studies in combination implies a potential use of this approach to exclude recurrent disease in patients with a low initial index of suspicion and/or when histology is indeterminate. PMID:20965904

  5. Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy as Reirradiation for Locally Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Roh, Kwang-Won; Jang, Ji-Sun; Kim, Min-Sik; Sun, Dong-Il; Kim, Bum-Soo; Jung, So-Lyoung; Kang, Jin-Hyoung; Yoo, Eun-Jung; Yoon, Sei-Chul; Jang, Hong-Seok; Chung, Su-Mi; Kim, Yeon-Sil

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: We report early preliminary experience with CyberKnife radiosurgery (RS) as salvage treatment for locally recurrent head and neck cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: Between March 2004 and August 2006, 36 patients (44 sites) were treated with CyberKnife RS as reirradiation for locally recurrent HNC. Treatment sites were as follows: nasopharynx (8), maxillary sinus (8), neck lymph nodes (8), skull base (7), nasal cavity (4), retropharyngeal lymph nodes (3), orbit (2), and others (4). Total doses administered were 18-40 Gy (median, 30 Gy) in 3 to 5 fractions to the 65%-85% isodose line for 3-5 consecutive days. Previous external radiation dose ranged from 39.6 to 134.4 Gy (median, 70.2 Gy). Gross tumor volume ranged from 0.2 to 114.9 cm{sup 3} (median, 22.6 cm{sup 3}). Median follow-up was 17.3 months. Results: Thirty-five of 44 sites were evaluated for response. Fifteen (42.9%) sites achieved complete response, 13 sites (37.1%) achieved a partial response, 3 (8.6%) sites maintained stable disease, and 4 sites (11.4%) showed tumor progression. Grade III acute complications were noted in 13 patients. Late complications were observed in three patients (1 bone necrosis, 2 soft tissue necrosis) during follow-up. Conclusion: These preliminary results suggest that fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery is an effective treatment modality as a salvage treatment with good short-term local control. The early overall response rate is encouraging. However, more experience and a longer follow-up are necessary to determine the role of fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery as a salvage treatment of locally recurrent HNC and to define long-term complications.

  6. Combined Modality Therapy Including Intraoperative Electron Irradiation for Locally Recurrent Colorectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Haddock, Michael G.; Miller, Robert C.; Nelson, Heidi; Pemberton, John H.; Dozois, Eric J.; Alberts, Steven R.; Gunderson, Leonard L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate survival, relapse patterns, and prognostic factors in patients with colorectal cancer relapse treated with curative-intent therapy, including intraoperative electron radiation therapy (IOERT). Methods and Materials: From April 1981 through January 2008, 607 patients with recurrent colorectal cancer received IOERT as a component of treatment. IOERT was preceded or followed by external radiation (median dose, 45.5 Gy) in 583 patients (96%). Resection was classified as R0 in 227 (37%), R1 in 224 (37%), and R2 in 156 (26%). The median IOERT dose was 15 Gy (range, 7.5-30 Gy). Results: Median overall survival was 36 months. Five- and 10-year survival rates were 30% and 16%, respectively. Survival estimates at 5 years were 46%, 27%, and 16% for R0, R1, and R2 resection, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that R0 resection, no prior chemotherapy, and more recent treatment (in the second half of the series) were associated with improved survival. The 3-year cumulative incidence of central, local, and distant relapse was 12%, 23%, and 49%, respectively. Central and local relapse were more common in previously irradiated patients and in those with subtotal resection. Toxicity Grade 3 or higher partially attributable to IOERT was observed in 66 patients (11%). Neuropathy was observed in 94 patients (15%) and was more common with IOERT doses exceeding 12.5 Gy. Conclusions: Long-term survival and disease control was achievable in patients with locally recurrent colorectal cancer. Continued evaluation of curative-intent, combined-modality therapy that includes IOERT is warranted in this high-risk population.

  7. Reirradiation combined with hyperthermia in recurrent breast cancer results in a worthwhile local palliation.

    PubMed

    van der Zee, J; van der Holt, B; Rietveld, P J; Helle, P A; Wijnmaalen, A J; van Putten, W L; van Rhoon, G C

    1999-02-01

    Both experimental and clinical research have shown that hyperthermia (HT) gives valuable additional effects when applied in combination with radiotherapy (RT). The purpose of this study was evaluation of results in patients with recurrent breast cancer, treated at the Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center (DHCC) with reirradiation (re-RT; eight fractions of 4 Gy twice weekly) combined with HT. All 134 patients for whom such treatment was planned were included in the analysis. The complete response rate in 119 patients with macroscopic tumour was 71%. Including the 15 patients with microscopic disease, the local control rate was 73%. The median duration of local control was 32 months, and toxicity was acceptable. The complete response (CR) rate was higher, and the toxicity was less with the later developed 433-MHz HT technique compared with the 2450-MHz technique used initially. With this relatively well-tolerated treatment, palliation by local tumour control of a worthwhile duration is achieved in the majority of patients. The technique used for hyperthermia appeared to influence the achieved results. The value of HT in addition to this re-RT schedule has been confirmed by a prospective randomized trial in a similar patient group. In The Netherlands, this combined treatment is offered as standard to patients with breast cancer recurring in previously irradiated areas.

  8. Hyperthermia combined with radiation therapy in the treatment of local recurrent breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ben-Yosef, Rami; Vigler, Nili; Inbar, Moshe; Vexler, Akiva

    2004-07-01

    Hyperthermia combined with radiation therapy was shown to be more effective in local recurrent breast cancer than radiotherapy alone, but its use is limited due to technical difficulties, stringent reimbursement policies and because it is time consuming. To report our experience with a simple and convenient XRT + HT delivery system. XRT was delivered through either electron or photon beams (total dose 30-40 Gy in previously irradiated fields or 50-70 Gy in non-irradiated fields). Hyperthermia was delivered by a dedicated HT device operating at 915 MHz. The heating session lasted 45 minutes. The maximal tumor surface temperature was set at 45 degrees C and modified according to patient comfort. No intratumoral (invasive) thermometry was used. At least two HT sessions were scheduled to each HT field during the entire XRT treatment period. Tumor response was evaluated every 3 months after completion of treatment. The overall survival was measured from XRT + HT initiation until the last follow-up. Fifteen women underwent 114 HT treatments delivered through 28 HT fields. Twenty-four HT fields (15 patients) were previously irradiated. There was complete infield response in 10 fields (6 patients), partial response in 8 fields (4 patients), no response or progressive disease in 4 fields (3 patients), and no parameters in 6 fields (5 patients). Eighteen fields (64%) had complete or partial response. Seven patients had outfield recurrence despite wide XRT + HT fields. Ulceration was the only major side effect (three patients, three fields). The combined HT+XRT delivery system, with no invasive thermometry, is a simple and effective method for treating local recurrent breast cancer.

  9. Recurrent or residual pelvic bowel cancer: accuracy of MRI local extent before salvage surgery.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Philip; Carrington, Bernadette M; Swindell, Ric; Shanks, Johnathan H; O'dwyer, Sarah T

    2002-06-01

    To determine pre-operative MRI accuracy in assessing local disease extent in recurrent/residual pelvic bowel cancer by comparing MRI assessment and staging examination under anaesthesia (EUA), with laparotomy/histopathological findings. Twenty-seven consecutive patients with recurrent (n = 21) or residual (n = 6) pelvic bowel cancer (13 of the rectum, eleven of the anus and three of the colon) underwent EUA and pelvic MRI (1T) using a phased array pelvic coil. Retrospective analysis of eight specific anatomical regions for tumour involvement on MRI was performed. Findings at EUA and biopsy were recorded. The MRI and EUA findings were correlated with findings at surgery and histopathology. Statistical comparison between MRI and EUA results was performed using the chi-squared test. Overall MRI accuracy in determining tumour invasion for all sites assessed was 452/499 (91%), sensitivity was 95/109 (87%), specificity was 357/390 (92%), positive predictive value (PPV) was 95/128 (74%) and negative predictive value (NPV) was 357/371 (96%). PPV and NPV for specific areas were 21/38 (55%) and 134/136 (99%) for genitourinary tract, 4/6 (67%) and 61/65 (94%) for pelvic side wall, 21/26 (81%) and 40/41 (98%) for pelvic floor, 1/6 (17%) and 40/43 (93%) for the posterior pelvis pre-sacrum/sacrum. For those anatomical sites evaluated by both EUA and MRI, MRI was superior to EUA, with an accuracy of 89% vs 73% (P < 0.05). MRI is an accurate technique for assessing disease extent in recurrent/residual pelvic bowel cancer. Copyright 2002 The Royal College of Radiologists.

  10. Loss of PTEN expression is associated with increased risk of recurrence after prostatectomy for clinically localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Chaux, Alcides; Peskoe, Sarah B; Gonzalez-Roibon, Nilda; Schultz, Luciana; Albadine, Roula; Hicks, Jessica; De Marzo, Angelo M; Platz, Elizabeth A; Netto, George J

    2012-11-01

    PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog on chromosome 10) is one of the most frequently lost tumor suppressor genes in human cancers and it has been described in more than two-thirds of patients with advanced/aggressive prostate cancer. Previous studies suggest that, in prostate cancer, genomic PTEN loss is associated with tumor progression and poor prognosis. Thus, we evaluated whether immunohistochemical PTEN expression in prostate cancer glands was associated with higher risk of recurrence, using a nested case-control study that included 451 men who recurred and 451 men who did not recur with clinically localized prostate cancer treated by radical prostatectomy. Recurrence was defined as biochemical recurrence (serum prostate-specific antigen >0.2 ng/ml) or clinical recurrence (local recurrence, systemic metastases, or prostate cancer-related death). Cases and controls were matched on pathological T stage, Gleason score, race/ethnicity, and age at surgery. Odds ratios of recurrence and 95% confidence intervals were estimated using conditional logistic regression to account for the matching factors and to adjust for year of surgery, preoperative prostate-specific antigen concentrations, and status of surgical margins. Men who recurred had a higher proportion of PTEN negative expression (16 vs 11%, P=0.05) and PTEN loss (40 vs 31%, P=0.02) than controls. Men with markedly decreased PTEN staining had a higher risk of recurrence (odds ratio=1.67; 95% confidence intervals 1.09, 2.57; P=0.02) when compared with all other men. In summary, in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer treated by prostatectomy, decreased PTEN expression was associated with an increased risk of recurrence, independent of known clinicopathological factors.

  11. Reirradiation of Locally Recurrent Nasopharynx Cancer With External Beam Radiotherapy With or Without Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Koutcher, Lawrence; Lee, Nancy; Zelefsky, Michael; Chan, Kelvin; Cohen, Gilad; Pfister, David; Kraus, Dennis; Wolden, Suzanne

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: To determine survival rates of patients with locally recurrent nasopharynx cancer (LRNPC) treated with modern therapeutic modalities. Methods and Materials: From July 1996 to March 2008, 29 patients were reirradiated for LRNPC. Thirteen patients received combined-modality treatment (CMT), consisting of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) followed by intracavitary brachytherapy, whereas 16 received EBRT alone. The median age was 50 years, 59% were male, 38% were Asian, 69% had World Health Organization Class III histology, and 86% were treated for their first recurrence. Nine, 6, 8, and 6 patients had recurrent Stage I, II, III, and IV disease, respectively. Patients in the EBRT-alone group had more advanced disease. Median time to reirradiation was 3.9 years. In total, 93% underwent imaging with positron emission tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging before reirradiation, 83% received intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and 93% received chemotherapy, which was platinum-based in 85% of cases. Results: The median follow-up for all patients was 45 months and for surviving patients was 54 months. Five-year actuarial local control, event-free survival, and overall survival rates were 52%, 44%, and 60%, respectively. No difference was observed between patients treated with EBRT or CMT. Overall survival was superior in patients who achieved local control (p = 0.0003). The incidence of late Grade >=3 events in patients re-treated with EBRT alone was significantly increased compared with those receiving CMT (73% vs. 8%; p = 0.005). Conclusions: In this modern reirradiation series of patients with LRNPC, favorable overall survival compared with historical series was achieved. Patients treated with CMT experienced significantly fewer severe late effects compared with those treated with EBRT.

  12. Management of Biochemically Recurrent Prostate Cancer After Local Therapy: Evolving Standards of Care and New Directions

    PubMed Central

    Paller, Channing J.; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S.

    2013-01-01

    Among men treated with prostatectomy or radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer, the state of an increasing prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level is known as biochemical recurrence (BCR). BCR can be predictive of the development of subsequent distant metastases and ultimately death, but BCR often predates other signs of clinical progression by several years. Although patients may be concerned about their rising PSA levels, physicians attempting to address patient anxiety must inform them that BCR is not typically associated with imminent death from disease, and that the natural history of biochemical progression may be prolonged. Misinterpretation of the significance of early changes in PSA may cause patients to receive androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) prematurely, especially in settings where the disease is unlikely to impact survival. In addition, knowledge of the morbidities associated with ADT (hot flashes, impotence, sarcopenia, metabolic syndrome, bone loss, and increased risk of vascular disease) has accelerated the search for alternative treatment options for these patients. Clinical trials investigating when and how to best use and supplement hormonal therapies in this patient population are under way, as are trials of novel nonhormonal targeted agents, immunotherapies, natural products, and other pharmaceuticals that have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for other indications. This review will summarize the acceptable standards of care for the management of biochemically recurrent prostate cancer, and will also outline some novel experimental approaches for the treatment of this disease state. PMID:23416859

  13. Salvage surgery for local recurrence after carbon ion radiotherapy for patients with lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Mizobuchi, Teruaki; Yamamoto, Naoyoshi; Nakajima, Mio; Baba, Masayuki; Miyoshi, Kentaro; Nakayama, Haruhiko; Watanabe, Syun-Ichi; Katoh, Ryoichi; Kohno, Tadasu; Kamiyoshihara, Mitsuhiro; Nishio, Wataru; Kamada, Tadashi; Fujisawa, Takehiko; Yoshino, Ichiro

    2016-05-01

    Carbon ion radiotherapy (CIRT) has been expected to be an alternative for surgery for early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and adopted as the second-best choice even in operable patients although local recurrence after CIRT is sometimes experienced. The purpose of this study was to investigate the demographic data, perioperative courses and therapeutic outcomes of patients who underwent salvage resection for local recurrence after CIRT. From November 1994 to February 2012, CIRT was applied for 602 c-T1/T2/T3N0M0 NSCLC lesions of 599 patients at the National Institute of Radiological Science. A total of 95 (16%) patients were diagnosed as having local recurrence, of whom 12 underwent salvage surgeries. The medical records were retrospectively reviewed. There were 7 men and 5 women (mean age, 63 ± 7.4 years). The clinical stages upon initial presentation with NSCLC were as follows: 4 IA, 7 IB and 1 IIB. All the patients were operable, but refused surgery and underwent CIRT. The median progression-free survival time after CIRT was 20 months (range, 7.1-77 months), and salvage surgery was performed at a median of 24 months (range, 9-78 months) after CIRT. All surgeries were successfully performed without any significant CIRT-related adhesions during the surgery, resulting in no mortality or Clavien-Dindo grade 3-4 postoperative complications. However, the distribution of pathological stages was as follows: 4 IA, 3 IB, 2 IIB, 2 IIIA and 1 IV, which included 6 upstages from the clinical stages before CIRT. The Kaplan-Meier estimate of overall survival after the salvage surgery showed that the 3-year survival rate was 82%. The dose intensity of CIRT spared the hilum of the lungs and parietal pleura, none of the patients developed adhesions outside of the radiation field, such that the salvage surgeries for local recurrence after CIRT were safe and feasible. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio

  14. Recurrent Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... you may have received after your first breast cancer diagnosis was intended to kill any cancer cells that ... 35 at the time of their original breast cancer diagnosis, face a higher risk of recurrent breast cancer. ...

  15. Partial breast irradiation as second conservative treatment for local breast cancer recurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Hannoun-Levi, Jean-Michel . E-mail: jean-michel.hannoun-levi@fccc.edu; Houvenaeghel, Gilles; Ellis, Steve; Teissier, Eric; Alzieu, Claude; Lallement, Michel; Cowen, Didier

    2004-12-01

    Purpose: Mastectomy is the treatment of reference for local relapse after breast cancer (BC). The aim of this study was to document the feasibility and the results of associating lumpectomy with partial breast irradiation by interstitial brachytherapy (IB) as local treatment for an isolated ipsilateral BC local recurrence (LR). Methods and materials: Between 1975 and 1996 at Marseille and Nice Cancer Institutes, 4026 patients received lumpectomy and radiotherapy (RT) (50-80 Gy) for a localized breast cancer of which 473 presented a LR. Among these patients, 69 (14.6%) received a second lumpectomy followed by IB, which delivered 30 Gy (Nice, n = 24) or 45-50 Gy (Marseille, n = 45) with 3 to 8 {sup 192}Ir wires in 1 or 2 planes on the 85% isodose. Results: Median age at LR was 58.2 years, median follow-up since primary BC was 10 years, and median follow-up after the second conservative treatment was 50.2 months (range, 2-139 months). Immediate tolerance was good in all cases. Grade 2 to 3 long-term complications (LTC) according to IB dose were 0%, 28%, and 32%, respectively, for 30 Gy, 45 to 46 Gy, and 50 Gy (p 0.01). Grade 2 to 3 LTC according to total dose were 4% and 30%, respectively, for total doses (initial RT plus IB) {<=} 100 Gy or >100 Gy (p = 0.008). Logistic regression showed that the only factor associated with Grade 2 to 3 complications was higher IB doses (p = 0.01). We noted 11 second LRs (LR2), 10 distant metastases (DM), and 5 specific deaths. LR2 occurred either in the tumor bed (50.8%) or close to the tumor bed (34.3%) or in another quadrant (14.9%). Kaplan-Meier 5-year freedom from (FF) LR2 (FFLR2), FFDM, and DFS were 77.4%, 86.7%, and 68.9%, respectively. Overall 5-year survival (OS) was 91.8%. Univariate analysis showed the following factors associated with a higher FFLR2: (1) number of wires used for IB (3-4 vs. 5-8 wires, p = 0.006), (2) IB doses (30-45 Gy vs. 46-60 Gy, p = 0.05), (3) number of planes (1 vs. 2, p = 0.05), (4) interval between

  16. French current management and oncological results of locally recurrent rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Denost, Q; Faucheron, J L; Lefevre, J H; Panis, Y; Cotte, E; Rouanet, P; Jafari, M; Capdepont, M; Rullier, E

    2015-12-01

    There is a significant worldwide variation in practice regarding the criteria for operative intervention and overall management in patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC). A survival benefit has been described for patients with clear resection margins in patients undergoing surgery for LRRC which is seen as an important surgical quality indicator. A prospective French national database was established in 2008 which recorded procedures undertaken for locally recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC). Overall and Disease-Free Survival (OS, DFS) were assessed retrospectively. We report the variability and the heterogeneity of LRRC management in France as well as 5-year oncological outcomes. In this national report, 104 questionnaires were completed at 29 French surgical centres with a high variability of cases-loaded. Patients had preoperative treatment in 86% of cases. Surgical procedures included APER (36%), LAR (25%), Hartmann's procedure (21%) and pelvic exenterations (15.5%). Four patients had a low sacrectomy (S4/S5). There were no postoperative deaths and overall morbidity was 41%. R0 was achieved in 60%, R1 and R2 in 29% and 11%, respectively. R0 resection resulted in a 5-year OS of 35% compared to 12% and 0% for respectively R1 and R2 (OR = 2.04; 95% CI: 1.4-2.98; p < 0.001). OS was similar between R2 and non-resected patients (OR = 1.47; 95% CI: 0.58-3.76; p = 0.418). Our data is in accordance with the literature except the rate of extended resection procedures. This underlines the selective character of operative indications for LRRC in France as well as the care variability and the absence of optimal clinical pathway regarding these patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Local triple-combination therapy results in tumour regression and prevents recurrence in a colon cancer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conde, João; Oliva, Nuria; Zhang, Yi; Artzi, Natalie

    2016-10-01

    Conventional cancer therapies involve the systemic delivery of anticancer agents that neither discriminate between cancer and normal cells nor eliminate the risk of cancer recurrence. Here, we demonstrate that the combination of gene, drug and phototherapy delivered through a prophylactic hydrogel patch leads, in a colon cancer mouse model, to complete tumour remission when applied to non-resected tumours and to the absence of tumour recurrence when applied following tumour resection. The adhesive hydrogel patch enhanced the stability and provided local delivery of embedded nanoparticles. Spherical gold nanoparticles were used as a first wave of treatment to deliver siRNAs against Kras, a key oncogene driver, and rod-shaped gold nanoparticles mediated the conversion of near-infrared radiation into heat, causing the release of a chemotherapeutic as well as thermally induced cell damage. This local, triple-combination therapy can be adapted to other cancer cell types and to molecular targets associated with disease progression.

  18. Preoperative androgen deprivation therapy for localized prostate cancer: Delayed biochemical recurrence in high-risk disease

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Sumanta K.; Ruel, Nora; Voglezang, Nicholas; Chang, Mark; Wilson, Timothy G.; Jones, Jeremy O.; Yuh, Bertram

    2016-01-01

    Background The role of preoperative androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for localized prostate cancer is controversial; prospective assessments have yielded varying results. We sought to define a subset of patients with a higher likelihood of benefit from preoperative ADT. Methods An institutional database including consecutive patients receiving definitive surgery for localized prostate cancer was interrogated. Patients recorded as having received preoperative ADT were matched in a 1:2 fashion to patients who had not received prior ADT. Patients were matched on the basis of clinicopathologic characteristics, use of adjuvant treatment strategies, and duration of PSA follow-up. Time to biochemical recurrence (TTBR) was compared using the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test for the overall study population and in subsets defined by D’Amico risk. Results No significant differences in clinicopathologic characteristics were noted between recipients (n=101) and matched non-recipients (n=196) of preoperative ADT. Although not statistically significant, positive surgical margin rates, seminal vesicle invasion and extracapsular extension were less frequent in patients receiving preoperative ADT. Furthermore, a lesser incidence of perioperative complications was noted in this group (7.4% v 18.4%). No significant differences were noted in TTBR between recipients and non-recipients of preoperative ADT in the overall study population. However, amongst patients with high-risk disease, TTBR was significantly longer in those patients who had received preoperative ADT (P=0.004). Conclusions The data presented herein suggest a potential benefit with preoperative ADT in patients with high-risk localized prostate cancer. Consideration should be given to enriching for this subset in preoperative studies of novel endocrine therapies. PMID:24342128

  19. Radiosensitization of Chemotherapy-Refractory, Locally Advanced or Locally Recurrent Breast Cancer With Trastuzumab: A Phase II Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, Janet K.; Halle, Jan; Ferraro, Madlyn; Carey, Lisa; Moore, Dominic T.; Ollila, David; Sartor, Carolyn I.

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Trastuzumab (Herceptin), an anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) antibody, has been shown to be an effective radiosensitizer in preclinical studies. The present Phase II trial evaluated trastuzumab plus radiotherapy in patients with HER2-positive, chemotherapy-refractory, locally advanced or locoregionally recurrent breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had measurable disease, normal cardiac function, and biopsy-confirmed residual HER2-positive disease. Patients received weekly trastuzumab (2 mg/kg intravenously), concurrent with radiotherapy (50 Gy) to the breast and regional lymph nodes for 5 weeks. If feasible, surgery followed radiotherapy. The primary endpoint was safety, and the secondary endpoint was efficacy (pathologic response and interval to symptomatic local progression). Results: Of the 19 patients enrolled, 7 were ineligible and received radiotherapy alone and 12 received therapy per protocol. Of these 12 patients, 11 had a Stage T4 diagnosis. Grade 3 toxicities included skin (n = 2) and lymphopenia (n = 1). One patient experienced delayed wound healing after surgery. No patients developed symptomatic cardiac dysfunction. Of the 7 patients who had undergone mastectomy, 3 (43%) had a substantial pathologic response (complete response or microscopic residual disease), significantly more than a comparison cohort (2 of 38 or 5%, p = .02). The median interval to symptomatic local progression was not reached. The median overall survival was 39 months. Conclusion: This is the first prospective trial providing evidence for a radiosensitizing effect of trastuzumab in breast cancer. The combination of trastuzumab and radiotherapy was well tolerated.

  20. Pathological Predictors for Site of Local Recurrence After Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, Supriya; Toi, Ants; Taback, Nathan; Evans, Andrew; Haider, Masoom A.; Milosevic, Michael; Bristow, Robert G.; Chung, Peter; Bayley, Andrew; Morton, Gerard; Vesprini, Danny; Warde, Padraig; Catton, Charles; Menard, Cynthia

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Rational design of targeted radiotherapy (RT) in prostate cancer (Pca) hinges on a better understanding of spatial patterns of recurrence. We sought to identify pathological factors predictive for site of local recurrence (LR) after external beam RT. Methods and Materials: Prospective databases were reviewed to identify men with LR after RT from 1997 through 2009. Patients with biochemical failure and biopsy-confirmed Pca more than 2 years after RT were evaluated. Prediction for site of recurrence based on the following pretreatment factors was determined on independent and cluster-sextant basis: presence of malignancy, dominant vs. nondominant percentage core length (PCL) involvement, PCL {>=} or <40%, and Gleason score. Sites of dominant PCL were defined as sextants with peak PCL involvement minus 10%, and >5% for each patient. Results: Forty-one patients with low-intermediate risk Pca constituted the study cohort. Median time to biopsy after RT was 51 months (range, 24-145). Of 246 sextants, 74 were involved with tumor at baseline. When sextants are treated as independent observations the presence of malignancy (77% vs. 22%, p = 0.0001), dominant PCL (90% vs. 46%, p = 0.0001), and PCL {>=}40% (89% vs. 68 %, p = 0.04) were found to be significant predictors for LR, although PCL {>=}40% did not retain statistical significance if sextants were considered correlated. The vast majority of patients (95%) recurred at the original site of dominant PCL or PCL {>=}40%, and 44% also recurred in regions of nondominant PCL <40% (n = 8) and/or benign sampling (n = 14) at baseline. Conclusions: LR after RT predominantly occurs in regions bearing higher histological tumor burden but are not isolated to these sites. Our data highlights the value of spatially resolved baseline pathological sampling and may assist in the design of clinical trials tailoring RT dose prescriptions to subregions of the prostate gland.

  1. Local Recurrence and Breast Oncological Surgery in Young Women With Breast Cancer: The POSH Observational Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Maishman, Tom; Cutress, Ramsey I; Hernandez, Aurea; Gerty, Sue; Copson, Ellen R; Durcan, Lorraine; Eccles, Diana M

    2017-07-01

    To assess clinical and surgical factors affecting local recurrence and survival in young breast cancer patients in the Prospective study of Outcomes in Sporadic versus Hereditary breast cancer (POSH). Emerging data suggest young age is a predictor of increased local recurrence. POSH is a prospective cohort of 3024 women of 18 to 40 years with breast cancer. Cohort characteristics were grouped by mastectomy or BCS. Endpoints were local-recurrence interval (LRI), distant disease-free interval (DDFI), and overall survival (OS); described using cumulative-hazard and Kaplan-Meier plots and multivariable analyses by Flexible Parametric and Cox regression models. Mastectomy was performed in 1464 patients and breast-conserving surgery (BCS) in 1395. Patients undergoing mastectomy had larger tumors and higher proportions of positive family history, estrogen receptor+, progesterone receptor+, and/or human epidermal growth factor receptor 2+ tumors. Local events accounted for 15% of recurrences. LRI by surgical type varied over time with LRI similar at 18 months (1.0% vs 1.0%, P = 0.348) but higher for BCS at 5 and 10 years (5.3% vs 2.6%, P < 0.001; and 11.7% vs 4.9%, P < 0.001, respectively). Similar results were found in the adjusted model. Conversely, distant-metastases and deaths were lower for BCS but not after adjusting for prognostic factors. After mastectomy chest-wall radiotherapy was associated with improved LRI (hazard ratio, HR = 0.46, P = 0.015). Positive surgical margins, and development of local recurrence predicted for reduced DDFI (HR = 0.50, P < 0.001; and HR = 0.29, P = 0.001, respectively). Surgical extent appears less important for DDFI than completeness of excision or, where appropriate, chest-wall radiotherapy. Despite higher local-recurrence rates for BCS, surgical type does not influence DDFI or OS after adjusting for known prognostic factors in young breast cancer patients.

  2. Role of blood tumor markers in predicting metastasis and local recurrence after curative resection of colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yifan; Zhai, Zhiwei; Li, Zhongmin; Wang, Lin; Gu, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the prognostic value of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), CA199, CA724 and CA242 in peripheral blood and local draining venous blood in colon cancer patients after curative resection. Methods: 92 colon cancer patients who received curative resection were retrospectively analyzed. The CEA, CA199, CA724 and CA242 were detected in peripheral blood and local draining venous blood. Results: Metastasis or local recurrence was found in 29 (29/92, 31.5%) patients during follow-up period. 92 patients were divided into two groups: metastasis/local recurrence group (n = 29) and non-metastasis/local recurrence group (n = 63). Peripheral venous CEA, CA199, CA724 and CA242 (p-CEA, p-CA199, p-CA724 and p-CA242) were comparable between two groups (P > 0.05). The median draining venous CEA (d-CEA) in metastases/local recurrence group (23.7 ± 6.9 ng/ml) was significantly higher than that in non-metastases/local recurrence group (18.1 ± 6.3 ng/ml; P < 0.05), but marked differences were not observed in draining venous CA199, CA724 and CA242 (d-CA199, d-CA724 and d-CA242) between two groups (P > 0.05). The optimal cut-off value of d-CEA was 2.76 ng/ml, with the sensitivity and specificity of 90% and 40% in the prediction of metastasis or local recurrence, respectively. d-CEA correlated with tumor differentiation, T stage, TNM stage, metastasis and local recurrence. Subgroup analysis showed that, of 41 patients with stage II colon cancer, the optimal cut-off value of d-CEA was 8.78 ng/mL, and the sensitivity and specificity were 87.5% and 69.7% in the prediction of metastasis or local recurrence, respectively. Conclusion: d-CEA may be a prognostic factor for stage II colon cancer patients. PMID:25785084

  3. Value of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI to Detect Local Tumor Recurrence in Primary Head and Neck Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young Jun; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Sung, Yu Sub; Yoon, Ra Gyoung; Park, Ji Eun; Nam, Soon Yuhl; Baek, Jung Hwan

    2016-05-01

    Treatment failures in head and neck cancer patients are mainly related to locoregional tumor recurrence. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of model-free dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) to detect local recurrence during the surveillance of head and neck cancer patients.Our retrospective study enrolled 24 patients with primary head and neck cancer who had undergone definitive treatment. Patients were grouped into local recurrence (n = 12) or posttreatment change (n = 12) groups according to the results of biopsy or clinicoradiologic follow-up. The types of time-signal intensity (TSI) curves were classified as follows: "progressive increment" as type I, "plateau" as type II, and "washout" as type III. TSI curve types and their parameters (i.e., wash-in, Emax, Tmax, area under the curve [AUC]60, AUC90, and AUC120) were compared between the 2 study groups.The distributions of TSI curve types for local recurrence versus posttreatment change were statistically significant (P < 0.001) (i.e., 0% vs 83.3% for type I, 58.3% vs 16.7% for type II, and 41.7% vs 0% for type III). There were statistically significant differences in Emax, Tmax, and all of the AUC parameters between 2 groups (P < 0.0083 [0.05/6]). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses indicated that the TSI curve type was the best predictor of local recurrence with a sensitivity of 100% (95% CI, 73.5-100.0) and a specificity of 83.3% (95% CI, 51.6-97.9) (cutoff with type II).Model-free DCE-MRI using TSI curves and TSI curve-derived parameters detects local recurrence in head and neck cancer patients with a high diagnostic accuracy.

  4. Factors Associated with the Incidence of Local Recurrences of Breast Cancer in Women Who Underwent Conservative Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tovar, Juliana Rodrigues; Zandonade, Eliana; Amorim, Maria Helena Costa

    2014-01-01

    Conservative surgery is considered the procedure of choice for women who are affected by early stage tumours. The local recurrence of cancer as a consequence of breast tissue conservation is a growing concern. This study aimed to describe the sociodemographic and clinical profiles of women who had local recurrences of breast cancer after conservative surgery and to examine the associations between sociodemographic and clinical variables and the incidence of tumour recurrence in these women. The retrospective cohort included 880 women who were diagnosed with breast cancer and underwent conservative surgery between January 2000 and December 2010. Recurrences occurred in 60 patients, and the mean age of the women at diagnosis was 48.8 years. Predictive factors for local recurrence were young age (<39 years) (P = 0.028 and OR = 10.93), surgical margin involvement (P = 0.001 and OR = 3.66), and Her-2 overexpression (P = 0.045 and OR = 1.94). The establishment of sociodemographic and clinical characteristics might help to select optimum treatments, which is a crucial challenge for public health in Brazil, especially with regard to reductions of surgery and hospitalisation expenditures in the Unified Health System (Sistema Único de Saúde—SUS). PMID:25530886

  5. Pattern of Local Recurrence and Distant Metastasis in Breast Cancer By Molecular Subtype

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xingrao; Baig, Ayesha; Kasymjanova, Goulnar; Kafi, Kamran; Holcroft, Christina; Mekouar, Hind; Carbonneau, Annie; Bahoric, Boris; Sultanem, Khalil

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: No longer considered a single disease entity, breast cancer is being classified into several distinct molecular subtypes based on gene expression profiling. These subtypes appear to carry prognostic implications and have the potential to be incorporated into treatment decisions. In this study, we evaluated patterns of local recurrence (LR), distant metastasis (DM), and association of survival with molecular subtype in breast cancer patients in the post–adjuvant radiotherapy setting. Material and Methods: The medical records of 1,088 consecutive, non-metastatic breast cancer patients treated at a single institution between 2004 and 2012 were reviewed. Estrogen/progesterone receptors (ER/PR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) enrichment were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Patients were categorized into one of four subtypes: luminal-A (LA; ER/PR+, HER2-, Grade 1-2), luminal-B (LB; ER/PR+, HER2-, Grade > 2), HER2 over-expression (HER2; ER/PR-, HER2+), and triple negative (TN; ER/PR-, HER2-).  Results: The median follow-up time was 6.9 years. During the follow-up, 16% (174/1,088) of patients failed initial treatment and developed either LR (48) or DM (126). The prevalence of LR was the highest in TN (12%) and the lowest in LA (2%). Breast or chest wall relapse was the most frequent site (≈80%) of recurrence in LA, LB, and HER2 subtypes, whereas the regional lymph nodes and chest wall were the common sites of relapse in the TN group (50.0%). DM rates were 6.4% in LA, 12.1% in LB, 19.2% in HER2, and 27.4% in TN subgroups. Five-year survival rates were 84%, 83%, 84%, and 77% in the LA, LB, HER2 and TN subgroups, respectively. There was a statistically significant association between survival and molecular subtypes in an univariate analysis. In the adjusted multivariate analysis, the following variables were independent prognostic factors for survival: T stage, N stage, and molecular subtype. Conclusions: Of the four

  6. [A Case of Local Recurrence and Lung Metastasis from a Rectal Cancer Treated with Systemic Chemotherapy and Cyberknife].

    PubMed

    Uchino, Tairin; Mishima, Hideyuki; Osawa, Takaaki; Matsumura, Tatsuki; Komaya, Kenichi; Kimura, Kengo; Ando, Keiichi; Saito, Takuya; Ishiguro, Seiji; Ohashi, Norifumi; Arikawa, Takashi; Komatsu, Shunichiro; Miyachi, Masahiko; Mizumatsu, Shinichiro; Sano, Tsuyoshi

    2015-11-01

    A 73-year-old man underwent abdominoperineal resection for a rectal cancer. He developed a hip pain 3 years and 6 months after the surgery. A CT scan revealed a local recurrence in the perineum and multiple lung metastases in the bilateral lung. He received systemic chemotherapy consisting of XELOX with bevacizumab. Thereafter, the hip pain was slightly relieved. The hip pain worsened 1 year and 6 months after the recurrence. The border between the perineal tumor and skin was very narrow, and conventional radiation therapy could cause a perineal skin necrosis and subsequent poor wound healing. Therefore, we selected a Cyberknife treatment. The hip pain was relieved and a CT scan showed a reduction of the perineal tumor's size after the Cyberknife treatment. A Cyberknife treatment may be effective and promising as palliation for patients with local recurrence of rectal cancer.

  7. Varying recurrence rates and risk factors associated with different definitions of local recurrence in patients with surgically resected, stage I nonsmall cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Varlotto, John M; Recht, Abram; Flickinger, John C; Medford-Davis, Laura N; Dyer, Anne-Marie; DeCamp, Malcolm M

    2010-05-15

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of different definitions of local recurrence on the reported patterns of failure and associated risk factors in patients who undergo potentially curative resection for stage I nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The study included 306 consecutive patients who were treated from 2000 to 2005 without radiotherapy. Local recurrence was defined either as 'radiation' (r-LR) (according to previously defined postoperative radiotherapy fields), including the bronchial stump, staple line, ipsilateral hilum, and ipsilateral mediastinum; or as 'comprehensive' (c-LR), including the same sites plus the ipsilateral lung and contralateral mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes. All recurrences that were not classified as "local" were considered to be distal. The median follow-up was 33 months. The proportions of c-LR and r-LR at 2 years, 3 years, and 5 years were 14%, 21%, and 29%, respectively, and 7%, 12%, and 16%, respectively. Significant risk factors for c-LR on multivariate analysis were diabetes, lymphatic vascular invasion, and tumor size; and significant factors for r-LR were resection of less than a lobe and lymphatic vascular invasion. The proportions of distant (non-local) recurrence using these definitions at 2 years, 3 years, and 5 years were 10%, 12%, and 18%, respectively, and 14%, 19%, and 29%, respectively. Significant risk factors for distant failure were histology when using the c-LR definition and tumor size when using the r-LR definition. Local recurrence increased nearly 2-fold when a broad definition was used instead of a narrow definition. The definition also affected which factors were associated significantly with both local and distant failure on multivariate analysis. Comparable definitions must be used when analyzing different series. (c) 2010 American Cancer Society.

  8. Brain metastases as site of first and isolated recurrence of breast cancer: the role of systemic therapy after local treatment.

    PubMed

    Niwińska, Anna

    2016-10-01

    The role of systemic treatment was assessed after local therapy for breast cancer patients who developed central nervous system (CNS) metastases as a first and isolated recurrence. Subjects were 128 breast cancer patients with brain metastases as the first and isolated site of recurrence that were selected from 673 consecutive breast cancer patients with brain metastases treated at the same institution. Median survival from brain metastases in patients with and without systemic treatment after local therapy was respectively 15 and 4 months (p < 0.001). In patients with a Karnofsky Performance Status ≥70 and those <70, survival was respectively 16 and 5.5 months (p < 0.001). The median survival from brain metastasis in patients with solitary brain metastasis, with and without systemic treatment after local therapy, was respectively 22 and 7 months (p = 0.003). Cox multivariate analysis demonstrated that good performance status, solitary brain metastasis and systemic therapy undertaken after local treatment were factors which prolonged survival. However patient survival was adversely affected by those having leptomeningeal metastasis associated with brain parenchymal lesions. Systemic therapy, undertaken after local treatment improved survival in those patients with breast cancer and brain metastases as the site of first and isolated recurrence. Further study is required in order to fully establish the role of systemic treatment for this patient group.

  9. Co-occurring gland angularity in localized subgraphs: predicting biochemical recurrence in intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, George; Sparks, Rachel; Ali, Sahirzeeshan; Shih, Natalie N C; Feldman, Michael D; Spangler, Elaine; Rebbeck, Timothy; Tomaszewski, John E; Madabhushi, Anant

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative histomorphometry (QH) refers to the application of advanced computational image analysis to reproducibly describe disease appearance on digitized histopathology images. QH thus could serve as an important complementary tool for pathologists in interrogating and interpreting cancer morphology and malignancy. In the US, annually, over 60,000 prostate cancer patients undergo radical prostatectomy treatment. Around 10,000 of these men experience biochemical recurrence within 5 years of surgery, a marker for local or distant disease recurrence. The ability to predict the risk of biochemical recurrence soon after surgery could allow for adjuvant therapies to be prescribed as necessary to improve long term treatment outcomes. The underlying hypothesis with our approach, co-occurring gland angularity (CGA), is that in benign or less aggressive prostate cancer, gland orientations within local neighborhoods are similar to each other but are more chaotically arranged in aggressive disease. By modeling the extent of the disorder, we can differentiate surgically removed prostate tissue sections from (a) benign and malignant regions and (b) more and less aggressive prostate cancer. For a cohort of 40 intermediate-risk (mostly Gleason sum 7) surgically cured prostate cancer patients where half suffered biochemical recurrence, the CGA features were able to predict biochemical recurrence with 73% accuracy. Additionally, for 80 regions of interest chosen from the 40 studies, corresponding to both normal and cancerous cases, the CGA features yielded a 99% accuracy. CGAs were shown to be statistically signicantly ([Formula: see text]) better at predicting BCR compared to state-of-the-art QH methods and postoperative prostate cancer nomograms.

  10. Atezolizumab With or Without Eribulin Mesylate in Treating Patients With Recurrent Locally Advanced or Metastatic Urothelial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-04

    Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma; Recurrent Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Recurrent Urethral Urothelial Carcinoma; Recurrent Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Renal Pelvis Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage III Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage III Renal Pelvis Carcinoma; Stage III Ureter Cancer; Stage III Urethral Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage IV Renal Pelvis Carcinoma; Stage IV Ureter Cancer; Stage IV Urethral Cancer; Ureter Urothelial Carcinoma

  11. HIFU therapy for local recurrence of prostate cancer after external beam radiotherapy and radical prostatectomy - 5,5 years experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solovov, V. A.; Vozdvizhenskiy, M. O.; Matysh, Y. S.

    2017-03-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the clinical efficacy of high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation (HIFU) for local recurrence of prostate cancer after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and radical prostatectomy (RPE). Materials and Methods: During 2007-2013 years 47 patients with local recurrence of prostate cancer after EBRT and RPE undertook HIFU therapy on the system "Ablaterm» (EDAP, France). Relapse arose after an average of 2 years after EBRT and RPE. Median follow-up after HIFU therapy was 38 (12-60) months. The mean age was 68.5 ± 5.8 years. The median PSA level before HIFU - 15.4 (7-48) ng / mL. Results: In 34 patients (72.3%) at six months after treatment the median PSA was 0.4 (0-3.2) ng / mL, in 48 months - 0.9 (0.4-7.5) ng / mL. In 13 patients (27.7%) at 6 months was observed progression of the disease. In general, after a 5-year follow-up 72.3% of the patients had no data for the progression and recurrence. Conclusion: HIFU therapy in patients with local recurrence of prostate cancer after EBRT and RPE is minimally invasive and effective technology.

  12. The Matrix Metalloproteinase-7 Polymorphism Rs10895304 Is Associated With Increased Recurrence Risk in Patients With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jaboin, Jerry J.; Hwang, Misun; Lopater, Zachary; Chen Heidi; Ray, Geoffrey L.; Perez, Carmen; Cai Qiuyin; Wills, Marcia L.; Lu Bo

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether selected high-risk matrix metalloproteinase-7 single nucleotide polymorphisms influence clinicopathologic outcomes in patients with early-stage prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Two hundred twelve prostate cancer patients treated with radical prostatectomy were evaluated with a median follow-up of 9.8 years. Genotyping was performed using hybridization with custom-designed allele-specific probes. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms within the matrix metalloproteinase-7 gene were assessed with respect to age at diagnosis, margin status, extracapsular extension, lymph node involvement, recurrence-free survival, and overall survival in paraffin-embedded prostate tissue specimens from patients with early-stage prostate cancer who underwent radical prostatectomy. Results: Rs10895304 was the sole significant polymorphism. The A/G genotype of rs10895304 had a statistically significant association with recurrence-free survival in postprostatectomy patients (p = 0.0061, log-rank test). The frequency of the risk-reducing genotype (A/A) was 74%, whereas that of the risk-enhancing genotypes (A/G and G/G) were 20% and 6%, respectively. Multivariable Cox regression analyses detected a significant association between rs10895304 and recurrences after adjustment for known prognostic factors. The G allele of this polymorphism was associated with increased risk of prostate cancer recurrence (adjusted hazards ratio, 3.375; 95% confidence interval 1.567-7.269; p < 0.001). The other assayed polymorphisms were not significant, and no correlations were made to other clinical variables. Conclusions: The A/G genotype of rs10895304 is predictive of decreased recurrence-free survival in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer. Our data suggest that for this subset of patients, prostatectomy alone may not be adequate for local control. This is a novel and relevant marker that should be evaluated for improved risk stratification of patients who

  13. Dosimetric analysis of isocentrically shielded volumetric modulated arc therapy for locally recurrent nasopharyngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jia-Yang; Huang, Bao-Tian; Xing, Lei; Chang, Daniel T.; Peng, Xun; Xie, Liang-Xi; Lin, Zhi-Xiong; Li, Mei

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the dosimetric characteristics of an isocentrically shielded RapidArc (IS-RA) technique for treatment of locally recurrent nasopharyngeal cancer (lrNPC). In IS-RA, the isocenter was placed at the center of the pre-irradiated brainstem (BS)/spinal cord (SC) and the jaws were set to shield the BS/SC while ensuring the target coverage during the whole gantry rotation. For fifteen patients, the IS-RA plans were compared with the conventional RapidArc (C-RA) regarding target coverage, organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing and monitor units (MUs). The relationship between the dose reduction of BS/SC and some geometric parameters including the angle extended by the target with respect to the axis of BS/SC (Ang_BSSC), the minimum distance between the target and BS/SC (Dist_Min) and the target volume were evaluated. The IS-RA reduced the BS/SC doses by approximately 1–4 Gy on average over the C-RA, with more MUs. The IS-RA demonstrated similar target coverage and sparing of other OARs except for slightly improved sparing of optic structures. More dose reduction in the isocentric region was observed in the cases with larger Ang_BSSC or smaller Dist_Min. Our results indicated that the IS-RA significantly improves the sparing of BS/SC without compromising dosimetric requirements of other involved structures for lrNPC. PMID:27173670

  14. Reirradiation of locally recurrent nasopharyngeal cancer: history, advances, and promises for the future.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lin; Lu, Jiade J

    2016-04-01

    Local or locoregional recurrence of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) after high-dose radiotherapy remains a significant clinical problem. This is especially important in regions of the world in which NPC is endemic, such as Southern China. In this review, we briefly present the evolution in the definitive treatment of NPC, but focus more so on the historical and contemporary treatment approaches and outcomes utilized in the recurrent setting. Specifically, we highlight the various treatment strategies (repeat surgery, brachytherapy, conventional re-irradiation, SRS/SBRT, and salvage IMRT), and their technical, physical and biological limitations. Special attention is given towards salvage IMRT, as this is becoming the standard of care for locally recurrent NPC. Further, it is the most commonly indicated modality, since it can be used to treat larger tumors and more extensive disease stages, which represent the majority of recurrent cases. Predictive and prognostic factors for the efficacy of repeat treatment are discussed as well. The toxicities brought about by repeat radiotherapy courses are also highlighted, with an emphasis on their impact on mortality and quality of life, which underscore the difficulty that this clinical entity presents. Lastly, the rationale for particle radiation therapy, which is potentially safer and more efficacious, for the treatment of locally recurrent NPC is presented.

  15. Maximum vs. Mono Androgen Blockade and the Risk of Recurrence in Men With Localized Prostate Cancer Undergoing Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ronald C. Sadetsky, Natalia; Chen, M.-H.; Carroll, Peter R.; D'Amico, Anthony V.

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: We examined whether maximum androgen blockade (MAB) is associated with a decreased recurrence risk vs. single-agent androgen suppression (monotherapy) for men undergoing brachytherapy (BT) for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Data from 223 men in Cancer of the Prostate Strategic Urologic Research Endeavor database who received androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) concurrent with BT for intermediate- or high-risk prostatic adenocarcinoma were included; 159 (71%) received MAB, and 64 (29%) monotherapy (luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist or anti-androgen alone). Cox regression analysis was performed to assess whether the choice of ADT was associated with disease recurrence adjusting for known prognostic factors. Results: Men who received MAB had similar Gleason scores, T categories, and pretreatment prostate-specific antigen as those who received monotherapy. After a median follow-up of 49 months, the use of MAB was not associated with a decrease in the risk recurrence (p = 0.72), after adjusting for known prognostic factors. A higher PSA at diagnosis (p = 0.03) and younger age at diagnosis (p < 0.01) were associated with increased recurrence risk. The 3-year recurrence free survival was 76% for patients in both monotherapy and MAB groups. Conclusions: There are varied practice patterns in physicians' choice of the extent of concurrent ADT when used with brachytherapy for men with intermediate- or high-risk prostate cancer. Given a lack of demonstrated superiority from either ADT choice, both appear to be reasonable options.

  16. Chest Reirradiation With External Beam Radiotherapy for Locally Recurrent Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Jeremic, Branislav; Videtic, Gregory M.M.

    2011-07-15

    Lung cancer remains one of the most prevalent and deadliest malignancies worldwide. For 2008, the International Agency for the Research of Cancer (IARC) estimated 1.6 million new cancer cases of lung cancer (1.095 million in men and 0.514 million in women), with an associated 1.38 million deaths (0.95 million in men and 0.43 million in women). In the United States, lung cancer remained the number one cancer killer for both sexes in 2009, with 219,440 new cases diagnosed overall and an estimated 159,390 deaths. Recent biological and technological advances in lung cancer management notwithstanding, disease recurrence is still the dominant cause of death after initial treatment of lung cancer. This is irrespective of histology (NSCLC vs. small cell cancer), stage (early vs. locally advanced vs. metastatic), or initial treatment (surgery, RT, chemotherapy [CHT] or combinations thereof). Time to recurrence of lung cancer is not predictable, with some failures appearing early and others manifesting years later. Patterns of failure are also not easily anticipated as local (e.g., lung parenchyma, bronchial stump, or chest wall), regional (e.g., mediastinal lymph nodes), or distant (e.g., brain, liver, or bone) recurrences can appear alone or in combination. Whatever the presentation, recurrent lung cancer has historically been judged almost universally fatal as only rarely did efforts at treatment lead to control, let alone cure. More importantly, recurrence is often associated with significant distress requiring substantial supportive treatment. Recurrence leads ultimately to a significant decrease in patient quality of life, making further interventions even more limited. Because of the bleak outcome associated with recurrence, palliative retreatment has nonetheless often been attempted precisely as a means of preventing this decline in quality of life and/or reversing symptoms. However, complicating these attempts at retreatment has been the forms of initial therapy

  17. Radicality of resection and survival after multimodality treatment is influenced by subsite of locally recurrent rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kusters, Miranda; Dresen, Raphaëla C; Martijn, Hendrik; Nieuwenhuijzen, Grard A; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; van den Berg, Hetty A; Beets-Tan, Regina G H; Rutten, Harm J T

    2009-12-01

    To analyze results of multimodality treatment in relation to subsite of locally recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC). A total of 170 patients with LRRC who underwent treatment between 1994 and 2008 were studied. The basic principle of multimodality treatment was preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy, intended radical surgery, and intraoperative radiotherapy. The subsites of LRRC were classified as presacral, posterolateral, (antero)lateral, anterior, anastomotic, or perineal. Subsites were related to radicality of the resection, local re-recurrence rate, distant metastasis rate, and cancer-specific survival. R0 resections were achieved in 54% of the patients, and 5-year cancer-specific survival was 40.5%. The worst outcomes were seen in presacral LRRC, with only 28% complete resections and 19% 5-year survival (p = 0.03 vs. other subsites). Anastomotic LRRC resulted in the most favorable outcomes, with 77% R0 resections and 60% 5-year survival (p = 0.04). Generally, if a complete resection was achieved, survival improved, except in posterolateral LRRC. Local re-recurrence and metastasis rate were lowest in anastomotic LRRC. Classification of the subsite of LRRC is a predictor of potentially resectable and consequently curable disease. Treatment of posterior LRRC imposes poor results, whereas anastomotic LRRC location shows superior results.

  18. Radicality of Resection and Survival After Multimodality Treatment is Influenced by Subsite of Locally Recurrent Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kusters, Miranda; Dresen, Raphaela C.; Martijn, Hendrik; Nieuwenhuijzen, Grard A.; Velde, Cornelis J.H. van de; Berg, Hetty A. van den; Beets-Tan, Regina G.H.; Rutten, Harm J.T.

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To analyze results of multimodality treatment in relation to subsite of locally recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC). Method and Materials: A total of 170 patients with LRRC who underwent treatment between 1994 and 2008 were studied. The basic principle of multimodality treatment was preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy, intended radical surgery, and intraoperative radiotherapy. The subsites of LRRC were classified as presacral, posterolateral, (antero)lateral, anterior, anastomotic, or perineal. Subsites were related to radicality of the resection, local re-recurrence rate, distant metastasis rate, and cancer-specific survival. Results: R0 resections were achieved in 54% of the patients, and 5-year cancer-specific survival was 40.5%. The worst outcomes were seen in presacral LRRC, with only 28% complete resections and 19% 5-year survival (p = 0.03 vs. other subsites). Anastomotic LRRC resulted in the most favorable outcomes, with 77% R0 resections and 60% 5-year survival (p = 0.04). Generally, if a complete resection was achieved, survival improved, except in posterolateral LRRC. Local re-recurrence and metastasis rate were lowest in anastomotic LRRC. Conclusions: Classification of the subsite of LRRC is a predictor of potentially resectable and consequently curable disease. Treatment of posterior LRRC imposes poor results, whereas anastomotic LRRC location shows superior results.

  19. Tenascin-C expression in invasion border of early breast cancer: a predictor of local and distant recurrence.

    PubMed Central

    Jahkola, T.; Toivonen, T.; Virtanen, I.; von Smitten, K.; Nordling, S.; von Boguslawski, K.; Haglund, C.; Nevanlinna, H.; Blomqvist, C.

    1998-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated an association between distant metastasis and the expression of the extracellular matrix glycoprotein tenascin-C (Tn-C) in the invasion border of small axillary node-negative breast carcinomas. Our purpose was to assess the relationship between the expression of Tn-C in the tumour invasion border and several histopathological and biological variables and to compare their usefulness in predicting local and distant disease recurrences. The original patient group consisted of 143 women with axillary node-negative breast cancer (one bilateral) treated with breast-conserving surgery and post-operative radiotherapy, and followed for a median of 8 years. Because of the small number of recurrences an additional group of 15 similarly treated women with recurrent breast cancer was also studied. The size of the tumour, its histology, including a possible intraductal component, and grade were re-evaluated. The expression of erbB-2, p53, Ki-67 and Tn-C was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Ploidy and S-phase fraction (SPF) were assessed by flow cytometry. The only statistically significant prognostic factor for local recurrence was Tn-C expression in the invasion border. For metastasis Ki-67 positivity, tumour size and Tn-C expression in the invasion border were statistically significant, but Ki-67 positivity was the only independent prognostic factor. Tn-C expression in the invasion border was associated with a higher proliferation rate measured by Ki-67 and SPF, which is consistent with the suggested growth-promoting activity of Tn-C. Tn-C may be a useful marker in selecting patients for adjuvant therapies to reduce the rate of both local and distant cancer recurrences. Images Figure 1 PMID:9836485

  20. Ipilimumab and Local Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Recurrent Melanoma, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Colon, or Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-12

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  1. Evaluation of 1p Losses in Primary Carcinomas, Local Recurrences and Peripheral Metastases from Colorectal Cancer Patients1

    PubMed Central

    Thorstensen, Lin; Qvist, Hanne; Heim, Sverre; Liefers, Gerrit-Jan; Nesland, Jahn M; Giercksky, Karl-Erik; Lothe, Ragnhild A

    2000-01-01

    Abstract Cytogenetic and molecular genetic analyses of colorectal adenomas and carcinomas have shown that loss of the distal part of chromosome arm 1p is common, particularly in tumors of the left colon. Because the importance of 1p loss in colorectal cancer metastases is unknown, we compared the frequency, exact site and extent of 1p deletions in primary carcinomas (n=28), local recurrences (n=19) and metastases (n=33) from 67 colorectal cancer patients using 14 markers in an allelic imbalance study. Loss of 1p was found in 50% of the primary carcinomas, 33% of the local recurrences, and 64% of the metastases, revealing a significant difference between the local recurrences and the metastases (P=.04). The smallest region of 1p deletion overlap (SRO) defined separately for each group of lesions had the region between markers D1S2647 and D1S2644, at 1p35–36, in common. The genes PLA2G2A (1p35.1–36) and TP73 (1p36.3) were shown to lie outside this consistently lost region, suggesting that neither of them are targets for the 1p loss. In the second part of the study, microdissected primary carcinomas and distant metastases from the same colorectal cancer patients (n=18) were analyzed, and the same 1p genotype was found in the majority of patients (12/18, 67%). The finding that primary carcinoma cells with metastatic ability usually contain 1p deletions, and that some cases lacking 1p alterations in the primary tumor acquire such changes during growth of a metastatic lesion, supports the notion that 1p loss may be important both early and late in colorectal carcinogenesis, with the apparent exception of local recurrences. PMID:11228544

  2. Lung Cancer Indicators Recurrence

    Cancer.gov

    This study describes prognostic factors for lung cancer spread and recurrence, as well as subsequent risk of death from the disease. The investigators observed that regardless of cancer stage, grade, or type of lung cancer, patients in the study were more

  3. Prostate cancer transrectal HIFU ablation: detection of local recurrences using T2-weighted and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Rouvière, Olivier; Girouin, Nicolas; Glas, Ludivine; Ben Cheikh, Alexandre; Gelet, Albert; Mège-Lechevallier, Florence; Rabilloud, Muriel; Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Lyonnet, Denis

    2010-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate T2-weighted (T2w) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI in detecting local cancer recurrences after prostate high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation. Fifty-nine patients with biochemical recurrence after prostate HIFU ablation underwent T2-weighted and DCE MRI before transrectal biopsy. For each patient, biopsies were performed by two operators: operator 1 (blinded to MR results) performed random and colour Doppler-guided biopsies ("routine biopsies"); operator 2 obtained up to three cores per suspicious lesion on MRI ("targeted biopsies"). Seventy-seven suspicious lesions were detected on DCE images (n = 52), T2w images (n = 2) or both (n = 23). Forty patients and 41 MR lesions were positive at biopsy. Of the 36 remaining MR lesions, 20 contained viable benign glands. Targeted biopsy detected more cancers than routine biopsy (36 versus 27 patients, p = 0.0523). The mean percentages of positive cores per patient and of tumour invasion of the cores were significantly higher for targeted biopsies (p < 0.0001). The odds ratios of the probability of finding viable cancer and viable prostate tissue (benign or malignant) at targeted versus routine biopsy were respectively 3.35 (95% CI 3.05-3.64) and 1.38 (95% CI 1.13-1.63). MRI combining T2-weighted and DCE images is a promising method for guiding post-HIFU biopsy towards areas containing recurrent cancer and viable prostate tissue.

  4. Age, breast cancer subtype approximation, and local recurrence after breast-conserving therapy.

    PubMed

    Arvold, Nils D; Taghian, Alphonse G; Niemierko, Andrzej; Abi Raad, Rita F; Sreedhara, Meera; Nguyen, Paul L; Bellon, Jennifer R; Wong, Julia S; Smith, Barbara L; Harris, Jay R

    2011-10-10

    Prior results of breast-conserving therapy (BCT) have shown substantial rates of local recurrence (LR) in young patients with breast cancer (BC). We studied 1,434 consecutive patients with invasive BC who received BCT from December 1997 to July 2006. Ninety-one percent received adjuvant systemic therapy; no patients received trastuzumab. Five BC subtypes were approximated: estrogen receptor (ER) or progesterone receptor (PR) positive, HER2 negative, and grades 1 to 2 (ie, luminal A); ER positive or PR positive, HER2 negative, and grade 3 (ie, luminal B); ER or PR positive, and HER2 positive (ie, luminal HER2); ER negative, PR negative, and HER2 positive (ie, HER2); and ER negative, PR negative, and HER2 negative (ie, triple negative). Actuarial rates of LR were calculated by using the Kaplan-Meier method. Median follow-up was 85 months. Overall 5-year cumulative incidence of LR was 2.1% (95% CI, 1.4% to 3.0%). The 5-year cumulative incidence of LR was 5.0% (95% CI, 3.0% to 8.3%) for age quartile 23 to 46 years; 2.2% (95% CI, 1.0% to 4.6%) for ages 47 to 54 years; 0.9% (95% CI, 0.3% to 2.6%) for ages 55 to 63 years; and 0.6% (95% CI, 0.1% to 2.2%) for ages 64 to 88 years. The 5-year cumulative incidence of LR was 0.8% (95% CI, 0.4% to 1.8%) for luminal A; 2.3% (95% CI, 0.8% to 5.9%) for luminal B; 1.1% (95% CI, 0.2% 7.4%) for luminal HER2; 10.8% (95% CI, 4.6% to 24.4%) for HER2; and 6.7% (95% CI, 3.6% to 12.2%) for triple negative. On multivariable analysis, increasing age was associated with decreased risk of LR (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.94 to 0.99; P = .009). In the era of systemic therapy and BC subtyping, age remains an independent prognostic factor after BCT. However, the risk of LR for young women appears acceptably low.

  5. Re-irradiation of the chest wall for local breast cancer recurrence : Results of salvage brachytherapy with hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Auoragh, A; Strnad, V; Ott, O J; Beckmann, M W; Fietkau, R

    2016-09-01

    Following mastectomy and adjuvant external beam radiation therapy in patients with breast cancer, the incidence of local or locoregional recurrence is approximately 9 % (2-20 %). Alongside the often limited possibilities of surgical treatment, radiation therapy combined with superficial hyperthermia is the most effective local therapy. In the present work, a retrospective analysis of salvage brachytherapy combined with superficial hyperthermia for chest wall recurrences is presented. Between 2004 and 2011, 18 patients with a total of 23 target volumes resulting from chest wall recurrences after previously mastectomy and external beam radiation therapy (median 56 Gy, range 50-68 Gy) were treated with superficial brachytherapy as salvage treatment: 8 patients (44 %) had macroscopic tumor, 3 (17 %) had microscopic tumor (R1), and 7 (39 %) had undergone R0 resection and were treated due to risk factors. A dose of 50 Gy was given (high-dose rate [HDR] and pulsed-dose rate [PDR] procedures). In all, 5 of 23 patients (22 %) received additional concurrent chemotherapy, and in 20 of 23 (87 %) target volumes additional superficial hyperthermia was carried out twice weekly. The 5‑year local recurrence-free survival was 56 %, the disease-free survival was 28 %, and a 5-year overall survival was 22 %. Late side effects Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC) grade 3 were reported in 17 % of the patients: 2 of 18 (11 %) had CTC grade 3 fibrosis, and 1 of 18 (6 %) had a chronic wound healing disorder. Re-irradiation as salvage brachytherapy with superficial hyperthermia for chest wall recurrences is a feasible and safe treatment with good local control results and acceptable late side effects.

  6. Risk Factors for Local and Distant Recurrence After Surgical Treatment in Patients With Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Dziedzic, Dariusz Adam; Rudzinski, Piotr; Langfort, Renata; Orlowski, Tadeusz

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify independent perioperative and pathologic variables associated with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) recurrence after complete surgical resection. A retrospective examination was performed of a prospectively maintained database of patients who underwent resection for NSCLC from January 2009 to January 2014 at a multi-institution. Clinicopathologic variables were evaluated for their influence on frequency of recurrence. Cox proportional regression hazard model analysis examined the association of recurrence in NSCLC. Of these patients, 2816 (19.3%) experienced recurrence of primary cancer. Local or distant recurrence was found in 20.5% and 79.5% of patients, respectively. Median follow-up was 27.9 months (range, 11.4-66.0 months). The analysis indicated independent effects of the following risk factors on the risk of recurrence: age 64-90 years (hazard ratio [HR], 1.136; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.024-1.261), histologic type adenocarcinoma (HR, 1.117; 95% CI 1.005-1.24), blood vessel invasion (HR, 1.236; 95% CI, 1.124-1.359), lymphatic vessel invasion (HR, 1.287; 95% CI, 1.176-1.409), visceral pleural invasion (HR, 1.641; 95% CI, 1.215-2.218), N1 disease (HR, 1.142; 95% CI, 0.99-1.316), N2 disease (HR, 1.596; 95% CI, 1.271-1.649), tumor size of 20-30 mm (HR, 1.235; 95% CI, 1.081-1.41), 30-50 mm (HR, 1.544; 95% CI, 1.33-1.792), 50-70 mm (HR, 1.521; 95% CI, 1.275-1.815), and 70-100 mm (HR, 1.71; 95% CI, 1.385-2.11), pneumonectomy (HR, 1.08; 95% CI, 0.97-1.203), and sublobar resection (HR, 1.762; 95% CI, 1.537-2.019). In the largest series reported to date on postresection recurrence of NSCLC, increasing pathologic stage, advanced age, pneumonectomy, sublobar resection, lymphatic and blood vessel invasion, and visceral pleural invasion were independently associated with local and distant recurrence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Prognosis of patients with local recurrence after mastectomy or conservative surgery for early-stage invasive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Fodor, J; Major, T; Polgár, C; Orosz, Z; Sulyok, Z; Kásler, M

    2008-06-01

    Between 1983 and 1987, 1309 women with stage I or II breast cancer underwent mastectomy (n=894) or conservative surgery (CS, n=415). Of these patients, 124 developed an isolated local recurrence (ILR): chest wall, 56 and in-breast, 68. The 10-year actuarial rate of cause-specific survival after treatment for ILR was 52%. On multivariate analysis three independent prognostic factors for the risk of death after ILR were identified: operability of recurrence (operable vs. inoperable, relative risk [RR]: 5.9), age at initial diagnosis (>40 vs. < or = 40 years, RR: 2.2) and time to ILR (>24 vs. < or = 24 months, RR: 2). Initial lymph node stage (negative vs. positive) showed borderline significance (p=0.06), and type of initial surgery (CS vs. mastectomy) and recurrent tumor grade (1-2 vs. 3) were not independent predictors of survival. In the mastectomy group, single surgical scar recurrence with initial node negative stage predicted good prognosis, and the 10-year survival was 85%. In the CS group, the 10-year survival rate was 88% with new primary tumor and 54% with true recurrence (p=0.01), and the type of salvage surgery (mastectomy vs. repeat complete excision) had no significant impact on survival (p=0.2). The majority (n=44) of CS patients developed < or = 2 cm in-breast recurrence, and the 10-year survival was 81% after both salvage excision (n=28) and mastectomy (n=16). The identified unfavorable prognostic factors are pointers of the forthcoming systemic progression. Patients with < or = 2 cm in-breast recurrence might receive a second CS.

  8. Local hyperthermia, radiation, and chemotherapy in recurrent breast cancer is feasible and effective except for inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Feyerabend, T; Wiedemann, G J; Jäger, B; Vesely, H; Mahlmann, B; Richter, E

    2001-04-01

    To investigate the feasibility and effectiveness of radiochemothermotherapy (triple-modality therapy) in patients with inoperable recurrent breast cancer. Patients with inoperable recurrent lesions, World Health Organization (WHO) performance status of 2 or greater, life expectancy of more than 3 months, adequate bone marrow, hepatic and renal function were eligible for this Phase I/II study. Conventionally fractionated or hyperfractionated radiotherapy (RT) was performed. Once-weekly local hyperthermia (HT) combined with chemotherapy (CT; epirubicin 20 mg/m(2), ifosfamide 1.5 g/m(2)) was applied within 30 min after RT. Twenty-five patients, all heavily pretreated (18/25 preirradiated), received a mean total dose of 49 Gy. The median number of HT/CT sessions was 4. Skin toxicity was low, whereas bone marrow toxicity was significant (leucopenia Grade 3/4 in 14/1 patients). The overall response rate was 80% with a complete response (CR) rate of 44%. Response rates in patients with noninflammatory disease (n = 14; CR 10 patients, partial response [PR] 3 patients) were far better than in patients with inflammatory disease (n = 11; CR 1 patient, PR 6 patients). In patients with recurrent breast cancer, triple-modality therapy is feasible with acceptable toxicity. High remission rates can be achieved in noninflammatory disease, however, local control is limited to a few months. Whether the addition of chemotherapy has a clear-cut advantage to radiothermotherapy alone remains an open question.

  9. GTI-2040 and Docetaxel in Treating Patients With Recurrent, Metastatic, or Unresectable Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Prostate Cancer, or Other Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Prostate Cancer; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Prostate Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  10. CD44 and PTGS2 methylation are independent prognostic markers for biochemical recurrence among prostate cancer patients with clinically localized disease.

    PubMed

    Woodson, Karen; O'Reilly, Keith J; Ward, David E; Walter, Jack; Hanson, Jeffrey; Walk, Elyse L; Tangrea, Joseph A

    2006-01-01

    Up to 30% of men with clinically localized disease who receive radical prostatectomy develop a biochemical recurrence. Gene methylation in tumor tissue may distinguish men with aggressive cancer. This study evaluated methylation of GSTP1, RARb2, CD44 and PTGS2 with biochemical recurrence among 60 patients who underwent radical prostatectomy using logistic regression and Kaplan Meier time to event analysis. Methylation of GSTP1 and RARbeta2 was not associated with recurrence, however, CD44 and PTGS2 methylation were significant predictors. In multivariate models adjusting for Gleason grade, the methylation profile of CD44 and PTGS2 combined was an independent predictor of biochemical recurrence (associated with 9-fold increased risk). In addition, Kaplan Meier analysis showed CD44 and PTGS2 methylation was associated with shorter time to recurrence. CD44 and PTGS2 methylation may predict biochemical recurrence in prostate cancer patients undergoing radical prostatectomy and if validated in larger studies, may identify patients with aggressive cancer.

  11. Imaging for Prostate Cancer Recurrence.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Tobias; Eiber, Matthias; Fanti, Stefano; Budäus, Lars; Panebianco, Valeria

    2016-06-01

    Correct identification of metastatic sites in recurrent prostate cancer (PCa) is of crucial importance because it leads to further treatment decisions. To provide an overview on current imaging procedures and their performance in recurrent PCa. Medline search via PubMed was performed with the keywords imaging, recurrent, and prostate cancer as well as more detailed searches including the keywords bone scan, bone scintigraphy, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, PET, choline, FDG, prostate-specific membrane antigen, and PSMA, with emphasis on recent literature from 2010 to the present. Non-English published literature was excluded. Abstracts and full-text articles were reviewed and assessed for relevant content. In diagnostic imaging and particularly with newer technologies like positron emission tomography (PET), a profound lack of prospectively designed studies in recurrent PCa has to be noted. In most studies histologic validation has only been performed in a subset of patient cohorts. Heterogeneity of included patient cohorts, lack of standardized assessment, as well as diverging end points, hamper systematic comparison of different image modalities. Thus evidence for currently used imaging in recurrent PCa is only presented descriptively. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as well as bone scintigraphy still represent the standard imaging for recurrent PCa; however, particularly for detection of local recurrence, multiparametric MRI is a valuable imaging modality. PET using choline and particularly tracers against prostate-specific membrane antigen might improve visualization of metastatic lesions. These findings need to be validated in prospective trials. Imaging of recurrent prostate cancer (PCa) is important to guide further treatment. Computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and bone scintigraphy represent the current standard. Positron emission tomography, especially with cancer

  12. Cisplatin and Fluorouracil Compared With Carboplatin and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Inoperable Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Anal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-22

    Anal Basaloid Carcinoma; Anal Canal Cloacogenic Carcinoma; Anal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Anal Canal Carcinoma; Recurrent Anal Canal Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Anal Canal Cancer; Stage IV Anal Canal Cancer

  13. Predictors of 5-year local, regional, and distant recurrent events in a population-based cohort of breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Fung, Filgen; Cornacchi, Sylvie D; Vanniyasingam, Thuva; Dao, Dyda; Thabane, Lehana; Simunovic, Marko; Hodgson, Nicole; O'Brien, Mary Ann; Reid, Susan; Heller, Barbara; Lovrics, Peter J

    2017-02-01

    The study purpose was to identify tumor and surgeon predictors of local recurrence (LR), regional recurrence (RR), and distant metastasis (DM) after breast cancer (BC) surgery in a population-based cohort. Consecutive BC surgical cases from 12 hospitals in South Central Ontario between May 2006 and October 2006 were included. Data collected on chart review included patient and tumor factors, surgery type, adjuvant treatment, surgeon specialty, surgeon case volume, and practice type. Univariate and multivariable survival analyses were performed. Median follow-up was 5.5 years for 402 patients (97% of sample). LR, RR, and DM occurred in 18 (4.5%), 10 (2.5%), and 47 (12%) patients, respectively. Significant predictors of BC recurrence (LR or RR or DM) were tumor size and grade, nodal status, and lymphovascular invasion on multivariable analysis. Tumor factors such as size, grade, lymphovascular invasion, and nodal status predicted BC recurrence, while practice type, surgeon specialty, and case volume did not. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Local recurrence risk after previous salvage mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, M; Iwase, T; Okumura, Y; Yoshida, A; Masuda, N; Nakatsukasa, K; Shien, T; Tanaka, S; Komoike, Y; Taguchi, T; Arima, N; Nishimura, R; Inaji, H; Ishitobi, M

    2016-07-01

    Breast-conserving surgery is a standard treatment for early breast cancer. For ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) after breast-conserving surgery, salvage mastectomy is the current standard surgical procedure. However, it is not rare for patients with IBTR who have received salvage mastectomy to develop local recurrence. In this study, we examined the risk factors of local recurrence after salvage mastectomy for IBTR. A total of 118 consecutive patients who had histologically confirmed IBTR without distant metastases and underwent salvage mastectomy without irradiation for IBTR between 1989 and 2008 were included from eight institutions in Japan. The risk factors of local recurrence were assessed. The median follow-up period from salvage mastectomy for IBTR was 4.6 years. Patients with pN2 or higher on diagnosis of the primary tumor showed significantly poorer local recurrence-free survival than those with pN0 or pN1 at primary tumor (p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that the lymph node status of the primary tumor was a significantly independent predictive factor of local recurrence-free survival (p = 0.02). The lymph node status of the primary tumor might be a predictive factor of local recurrence-free survival after salvage mastectomy for IBTR. Further research and validation studies are needed. (UMIN-CTR number UMIN000008136). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Phase I trial of motexafin-lutetium-mediated interstitial photodynamic therapy in patients with locally recurrent prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stripp, Diana C. H.; Mick, Rosemarie; Zhu, Timothy C.; Whittington, Richard; Smith, Debbie; Dimofte, Andreea; Finlay, Jarod C.; Miles, Jeremy; Busch, Theresa M.; Shin, Daniel; Kachur, Alex; Tochner, Zelig A.; Malkowicz, S. Bruce; Glatstein, Eli; Hahn, Stephen M.

    2004-06-01

    Therapeutic options for patients with locally recurrent prostate cancer after treatment with radiation therapy are limited. An ongoing Phase I trial of interstitial photodynamic therapy (PDT) with the photosensitizer motexafin lutetium (MLu) was initiated in year 2000 for men with locally recurrent prostate cancer. The primary objective of this trial is to determine the maximally tolerated dose of motexafin lutetium-mediated PDT. Twelve men with biopsy-proven recurrent prostate cancer and no evidence of distant metastatic disease have been enrolled. Pre-treatment evaluation included an MRI of the prostate, bone scan, laboratory studies, cystoscopy, and transrectal ultrasound. Treatment plans were generated based upon the ultrasound findings. PDT dose was escalated by increasing the motexafin lutetium dose, increasing the 732 nm light dose, and decreasing the drug-light interval. Motexafin lutetium doses ranged from 0.5 to 2 mg/kg administered IV 3, 6, or 24 hours prior to 732 nm light delivery. The light dose measured in real time with in situ spherical detectors was 25-100 J/cm2 for all patients. Light was delivered through optical fibers inserted through a transperineal brachytherapy template in the operating room and optical property measurements were made before and after light therapy. Prostate biopsies were obtained before and after light delivery for spectrofluorometric measurements of photosensitizer uptake. Twelve patients have completed protocol treatment on eight dose levels without dose-limiting toxicity. Grade I PDT-related genitourinary symptoms were observed. One patient had Grade II urinary urgency that was urinary catheter-related. No rectal or other GI PDT-related toxicities were observed. Measurements of motexafin lutetium in prostate tissue demonstrated the presence of photosensitizer at all dose levels. Conclusions: Motexafin lutetium-mediated PDT designed to treat comprehensively the entired prostate gland has been well-tolerated at the doses

  16. Pre- and post-operative nomograms to predict recurrence-free probability in korean men with clinically localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Kang, Minyong; Jeong, Chang Wook; Choi, Woo Suk; Park, Yong Hyun; Cho, Sung Yong; Lee, Sangchul; Lee, Seung Bae; Ku, Ja Hyeon; Hong, Sung Kyu; Byun, Seok-Soo; Jeong, Hyeon; Kwak, Cheol; Kim, Hyeon Hoe; Lee, Eunsik; Lee, Sang Eun

    2014-01-01

    Although the incidence of prostate cancer (PCa) is rapidly increasing in Korea, there are few suitable prediction models for disease recurrence after radical prostatectomy (RP). We established pre- and post-operative nomograms estimating biochemical recurrence (BCR)-free probability after RP in Korean men with clinically localized PCa. Our sampling frame included 3,034 consecutive men with clinically localized PCa who underwent RP at our tertiary centers from June 2004 through July 2011. After inappropriate data exclusion, we evaluated 2,867 patients for the development of nomograms. The Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to develop pre- and post-operative nomograms that predict BCR-free probability. Finally, we resampled from our study cohort 200 times to determine the accuracy of our nomograms on internal validation, which were designated with concordance index (c-index) and further represented by calibration plots. Over a median of 47 months of follow-up, the estimated BCR-free rate was 87.8% (1 year), 83.8% (2 year), and 72.5% (5 year). In the pre-operative model, Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA), the proportion of positive biopsy cores, clinical T3a and biopsy Gleason score (GS) were independent predictive factors for BCR, while all relevant predictive factors (PSA, extra-prostatic extension, seminal vesicle invasion, lymph node metastasis, surgical margin, and pathologic GS) were associated with BCR in the post-operative model. The c-index representing predictive accuracy was 0.792 (pre-) and 0.821 (post-operative), showing good fit in the calibration plots. In summary, we developed pre- and post-operative nomograms predicting BCR-free probability after RP in a large Korean cohort with clinically localized PCa. These nomograms will be provided as the mobile application-based SNUH Prostate Cancer Calculator. Our nomograms can determine patients at high risk of disease recurrence after RP who will benefit from adjuvant therapy.

  17. Completion pneumonectomy and chemoradiotherapy as treatment options in local recurrence of non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sławiński, Grzegorz; Musik, Martyna; Marciniak, Łukasz; Dyszkiewicz, Wojciech; Piwkowski, Cezary; Gałęcki, Bartłomiej

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The selection of treatment for local recurrence in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) depends on the possibility of performing a radical tumor resection, the patient's performance status, and cardiopulmonary efficiency. Compared with chemoradiotherapy, surgical treatment offers a greater chance of long-term survival, but results in completion pneumonectomy and is associated with a relatively high rate of complications. Aim of the study Aim of the study was to evaluate early and long-term results of surgery and conservative treatment (chemoradiotherapy) in patients with local NSCLC recurrence. Material and methods Between 1998 and 2011, 1697 NSCLC patients underwent lobectomy or bilobectomy at the Department of Thoracic Surgery in Poznań. Among them, 137 patients (8.1%) were diagnosed with cancer recurrence; chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy was provided to 116 patients; 21 patients (15.3%) were treated with completion pneumonectomy. The median time from primary surgery to recurrence was 13.4 months. No metastases to N2 lymph nodes were observed among the patients undergoing surgery; in 7 patients N1 lymph node metastases were confirmed. Results The rate of complications after surgery was significantly higher in comparison with conservative therapy (80.9% vs. 48.3%). Patients treated with surgery were most likely to suffer from complications associated with the circulatory system (80.9%), while hematologic complications were dominant in the group undergoing oncological treatment (41.4%). There were no perioperative deaths after completion pneumonectomy. The age of the patients was the only factor which significantly influenced the incidence of complications in both groups of patients. Analysis of the survival curves demonstrated statistically significant differences in survival between the groups treated with surgery, chemoradiotherapy, and chemotherapy (p = 0.00001). Five-year survival probability was significantly higher among patients

  18. Computed tomographic features predictive of local recurrence in patients with early stage lung cancer treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Halpenny, Darragh; Ridge, Carole A; Hayes, Sara; Zheng, Junting; Moskowitz, Chaya S; Rimner, Andreas; Ginsberg, Michelle S

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to identify computed tomography (CT) features of local recurrence (LR) after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung cancer. Two hundred eighteen patients underwent SBRT for lung cancer from January 1st, 2006 to March 1st, 2011. Signs of LR recorded: opacity with new bulging margin, opacification of air bronchograms, enlarging pleural effusion, new or enlarging mass, and increased lung density at the treatment site. A new bulging margin at the treatment site was the only feature significantly associated with LR (P<.005). Most CT features classically associated with LR following conventional radiation therapy are unreliable for predicting LR following SBRT. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Intraoperative Radiation Therapy Reduces Local Recurrence Rates in Patients With Microscopically Involved Circumferential Resection Margins After Resection of Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Alberda, Wijnand J.; Verhoef, Cornelis; Nuyttens, Joost J.; Meerten, Esther van; Rothbarth, Joost; Wilt, Johannes H.W. de; Burger, Jacobus W.A.

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) is advocated by some for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) who have involved or narrow circumferential resection margins (CRM) after rectal surgery. This study evaluates the potentially beneficial effect of IORT on local control. Methods and Materials: All surgically treated patients with LARC treated in a tertiary referral center between 1996 and 2012 were analyzed retrospectively. The outcome in patients treated with IORT with a clear but narrow CRM (≤2 mm) or a microscopically involved CRM was compared with the outcome in patients who were not treated with IORT. Results: A total of 409 patients underwent resection of LARC, and 95 patients (23%) had a CRM ≤ 2 mm. Four patients were excluded from further analysis because of a macroscopically involved resection margin. In 43 patients with clear but narrow CRMs, there was no difference in the cumulative 5-year local recurrence-free survival of patients treated with (n=21) or without (n=22) IORT (70% vs 79%, P=.63). In 48 patients with a microscopically involved CRM, there was a significant difference in the cumulative 5-year local recurrence-free survival in favor of the patients treated with IORT (n=31) compared with patients treated without IORT (n=17) (84 vs 41%, P=.01). Multivariable analysis confirmed that IORT was independently associated with a decreased local recurrence rate (hazard ratio 0.24, 95% confidence interval 0.07-0.86). There was no significant difference in complication rate of patients treated with or without IORT (65% vs 52%, P=.18) Conclusion: The current study suggests that IORT reduces local recurrence rates in patients with LARC with a microscopically involved CRM.

  20. CD133-targeted paclitaxel delivery inhibits local tumor recurrence in a mouse model of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Suresh Kumar; Roger, Emilie; Toti, Udaya; Niu, Lin; Ohlfest, John R; Panyam, Jayanth

    2013-11-10

    Expression of the membrane protein CD133 marks a subset of cancer cells with drug resistant phenotype and enhanced tumor initiating ability in xenotransplantation assays. Because drug resistance and tumor relapse are significant problems, approaches to eliminate these cells are urgently needed. As a step towards achieving this goal, we developed polymeric nanoparticles targeting CD133 by conjugating an anti-CD133 monoclonal antibody to nanoparticles formulated using poly(D,L lactide-co-glycolide) polymer. Nanoparticles were loaded with paclitaxel, a microtubule-stabilizing anticancer agent, as well as with 6-coumarin, a fluorescent probe. CD133-targeted nanoparticles (CD133NPs) were efficiently internalized by Caco-2 cells, which abundantly express CD133 (>9-fold higher uptake than non-targeted control nanoparticles). The effectiveness of CD133NPs in reducing tumor initiating cell (TIC) fraction was investigated using mammosphere formation and soft-agar colony formation assays. Free paclitaxel treatment was not effective in decreasing the TIC population relative to untreated control, whereas CD133NPs effectively decreased the number of mammospheres and colonies formed. In vivo studies in the MDA-MB-231 xenograft model showed that free paclitaxel was initially effective in inhibiting tumor growth but the tumors rebounded rapidly once the treatment was stopped. Tumor regrowth was significantly lower when paclitaxel was delivered through CD133NPs (tumor volume was 518.6±228 vs. 1370.9±295mm(3) for free paclitaxel at 63days; P<0.05). Our studies thus show that encapsulation of paclitaxel in CD133NPs results in a significant decrease in the TIC population and improved therapeutic efficacy compared to that with free paclitaxel treatment. These results indicate the potential of targeting anticancer therapeutics to CD133+ cells for reducing tumor recurrence. © 2013.

  1. Preoperative hyperfractionated chemoradiation for locally recurrent rectal cancer in patients previously irradiated to the pelvis: A multicentric phase II study

    SciTech Connect

    Valentini, Vincenzo . E-mail: vvalentini@rm.unicatt.it; Morganti, Alessio G.; Gambacorta, M. Antonietta; Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Doglietto, G. Battista; Coco, Claudio; De Paoli, Antonino; Rossi, Carlo; Di Russo, Annamaria; Valvo, Francesca; Bolzicco, Giampaolo; Dalla Palma, Maurizio

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: The combination of irradiation and total mesorectal excision for rectal carcinoma has significantly lowered the incidence of local recurrence. However, a new problem is represented by the patient with locally recurrent cancer who has received previous irradiation to the pelvis. In these patients, local recurrence is very often not easily resectable and reirradiation is expected to be associated with a high risk of late toxicity. The aim of this multicenter phase II study is to evaluate the response rate, resectability rate, local control, and treatment-related toxicity of preoperative hyperfractionated chemoradiation for locally recurrent rectal cancer in patients previously irradiated to the pelvis. Methods and Materials: Patients with histologically proven pelvic recurrence of rectal carcinoma, with the absence of extrapelvic disease or bony involvement and previous pelvic irradiation with doses {<=}55 Gy; age {>=}18 years; performance status (PS) (Karnofsky) {>=}60, and who gave institutional review board-approved written informed consent were treated by preoperative chemoradiation. Radiotherapy was delivered to a planning target volume (PTV2) including the gross tumor volume (GTV) plus a 4-cm margin, with a dose of 30 Gy (1.2 Gy twice daily with a minimum 6-h interval). A boost was delivered, with the same fractionation schedule, to a PTV1 including the GTV plus a 2-cm margin (10.8 Gy). During the radiation treatment, concurrent chemotherapy was delivered (5-fluorouracil, protracted intravenous infusion, 225 mg/m{sup 2}/day, 7 days per week). Four to 6 weeks after the end of chemoradiation, patients were evaluated for tumor resectability, and, when feasible, surgical resection of recurrence was performed between 6-8 weeks from the end of chemoradiation. Adjuvant chemotherapy was prescribed to all patients, using Raltitrexed, 3 mg/square meter (sm), every 3 weeks, for a total of 5 cycles. Patients were staged using the computed tomography (CT)-based F

  2. PREDICTORS OF INFLAMMATORY LOCAL RECURRENCE AFTER BREAST-CONSERVING THERAPY FOR BREAST CANCER: MATCHED CASE-CONTROL STUDY.

    PubMed

    Akoum, Riad; Abdalla, Eddie K; Saade, Michel; Awdeh, Adnan; Abi-Aad, Fouad; Bejjani, Noha; Ghossain, Antoine; Brihi, Emile; Audi, Akram

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory local recurrence (ILR) after breast-conserving surgery for noninflammatory breast cancer (BC) is associated with dismal prognosis. Risk factors for ILR are not well defined. Between 2001 and 2010, twelve patients at our hospital developed ILR after breast-conserving surgery, adjuvant chemotherapy, and radiotherapy for BC. We compared their clinico-pathological characteristics to those of 24 patients with noninflammatory local recurrence (non-ILR), 24 patients with distant metastases, and 48 disease-free controls, matched for age and observation period. The median time to ILR was 10 months. In univariate analysis, extent of lymph node involvement (p < 0.05), multifocality (p < 0.05), c-erbB2 overexpression (p < 0.05), and lymphovascular invasion (LVI) (p < 0.001) affected the risk of ILR. Conditional logistic regression analysis showed a significant association between ILR and combined LVI and high histopathological grade. The odds ratio (OR) for ILR versus non-ILR was 6.14 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.48-25.38) and for ILR versus distant metastases it was 3.05 (95% CI 0.09-97.83) when both LVI and high histopathological grade were present. Patients with family history of BC were more likely to present with ILR than non-ILR (OR 5.47; 95% CI 1.55-19.31) or distant relapse (OR 5.62; 95% CI 0.26-119.95). Pre- and postmenopausal women with high-grade BC and LVI are at increased risk to develop ILR, especially in the presence of family history of BC. Identification of risk factors for this lethal form of recurrent BC may lead to more effective preventive treatment strategies in properly selected patients.

  3. Temsirolimus in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Locally Advanced Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-05

    Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Papillary Serous Carcinoma; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIC Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IVA Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IVB Endometrial Carcinoma

  4. Early PET imaging with [68]Ga-PSMA-11 increases the detection rate of local recurrence in prostate cancer patients with biochemical recurrence.

    PubMed

    Uprimny, Christian; Kroiss, Alexander Stephan; Fritz, Josef; Decristoforo, Clemens; Kendler, Dorota; von Guggenberg, Elisabeth; Nilica, Bernhard; Maffey-Steffan, Johanna; di Santo, Gianpaolo; Bektic, Jasmin; Horninger, Wolfgang; Virgolini, Irene Johanna

    2017-09-01

    PET/CT using (68)Ga-labelled prostate-specific membrane antigen PSMA-11 (HBEDD-CC) has emerged as a promising imaging method in the diagnostic evaluation of prostate cancer (PC) patients with biochemical recurrence. However, assessment of local recurrence (LR) may be limited by intense physiologic tracer accumulation in the urinary bladder on whole-body scans, normally conducted 60 min post-tracer injection (p.i.). It could be shown on early dynamic imaging studies that (68)Ga-PSMA-11 uptake in PC lesions occurs earlier than tracer accumulation in the urinary bladder. This study aims to investigate whether early static PET acquisition increases detection rate of local recurrence on (68)Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT in comparison to PET imaging 60 min p.i.. 203 consecutive PC patients with biochemical failure referred to (68)Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT were analysed retrospectively (median prostate specific antigen (PSA) value: 1.44 ng/ml). In addition to whole-body PET/CT scans 60 min p.i., early static imaging of the pelvis was performed, starting at a median time of 283 s p.i. (range: 243-491 s). Assessment was based on visual analysis and calculation of maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of pathologic lesions present in the pelvic area found on early PET imaging and on 60 min-PET scans. 26 patients (12.8%) were judged positive for LR on PET scans 60 min p.i. (median SUVmax: 10.8; range: 4.7-40.9), whereas 50 patients (24.6%) revealed a lesion suggestive of LR on early PET imaging (median SUVmax: 5.9; range: 2.9-17.6), resulting in a significant rise in detection rate (p < 0.001). Equivocal findings on PET scans 60 min p.i. decreased significantly with the help of early imaging (15.8% vs. 4.5% of patients; p < 0.001). Tracer activity in the urinary bladder with a median SUVmax of 8.2 was present in 63 patients on early PET scans (31.0%). However, acquisition starting time of early PET scans differed significantly in the patient groups with and without urinary

  5. Local recurrence after surgery for non-small cell lung cancer: a recursive partitioning analysis of multi-institutional data.

    PubMed

    Kelsey, Chris R; Higgins, Kristin A; Peterson, Bercedis L; Chino, Junzo P; Marks, Lawrence B; D'Amico, Thomas A; Varlotto, John M

    2013-10-01

    To define subgroups at high risk of local recurrence (LR) after surgery for non-small cell lung cancer using a recursive partitioning analysis (RPA). This Institutional Review Board-approved study included patients who underwent upfront surgery for I-IIIA non-small cell lung cancer at Duke Cancer Institute (primary set) or at other participating institutions (validation set). The 2 data sets were analyzed separately and identically. Disease recurrence at the surgical margin, ipsilateral hilum, and/or mediastinum was considered an LR. Recursive partitioning was used to build regression trees for the prediction of local recurrence-free survival (LRFS) from standard clinical and pathological factors. LRFS distributions were estimated with the Kaplan-Meier method. The 1411 patients in the primary set had a 5-year LRFS rate of 77% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.74-0.81), and the 889 patients in the validation set had a 5-year LRFS rate of 76% (95% CI, 0.72-0.80). The RPA of the primary data set identified 3 terminal nodes based on stage and histology. These nodes and their 5-year LRFS rates were as follows: (1) stage I/adenocarcinoma, 87% (95% CI, 0.83-0.90); (2) stage I/squamous or large cell, 72% (95% CI, 0.65-0.79); and (3) stage II-IIIA, 62% (95% CI, 0.55-0.69). The validation RPA identified 3 terminal nodes based on lymphovascular invasion (LVI) and stage: (1) no LVI/stage IA, 82% (95% CI, 0.76-0.88); (2) no LVI/stage IB-IIIA, 73% (95% CI, 0.69-0.80); and (3) LVI, 58% (95% CI, 0.47-0.69). The risk of LR was similar in the primary and validation patient data sets. There was discordance between the 2 data sets regarding the clinical factors that best segregate patients into risk groups. Copyright © 2013 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Immune Adjuvant Activity of Pre-Resectional Radiofrequency Ablation Protects against Local and Systemic Recurrence in Aggressive Murine Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Fumito; Ku, Amy W.; Bucsek, Mark J.; Muhitch, Jason B.; Vardam-Kaur, Trupti; Kim, Minhyung; Fisher, Daniel T.; Camoriano, Marta; Khoury, Thaer; Skitzki, Joseph J.; Gollnick, Sandra O.; Evans, Sharon S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose While surgical resection is a cornerstone of cancer treatment, local and distant recurrences continue to adversely affect outcome in a significant proportion of patients. Evidence that an alternative debulking strategy involving radiofrequency ablation (RFA) induces antitumor immunity prompted the current investigation of the efficacy of performing RFA prior to surgical resection (pre-resectional RFA) in a preclinical mouse model. Experimental Design Therapeutic efficacy and systemic immune responses were assessed following pre-resectional RFA treatment of murine CT26 colon adenocarcinoma. Results Treatment with pre-resectional RFA significantly delayed tumor growth and improved overall survival compared to sham surgery, RFA, or resection alone. Mice in the pre-resectional RFA group that achieved a complete response demonstrated durable antitumor immunity upon tumor re-challenge. Failure to achieve a therapeutic benefit in immunodeficient mice confirmed that tumor control by pre-resectional RFA depends on an intact adaptive immune response rather than changes in physical parameters that make ablated tumors more amenable to a complete surgical excision. RFA causes a marked increase in intratumoral CD8+ T lymphocyte infiltration, thus substantially enhancing the ratio of CD8+ effector T cells: FoxP3+ regulatory T cells. Importantly, pre-resectional RFA significantly increases the number of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells within the tumor microenvironment and tumor-draining lymph node but had no impact on infiltration by myeloid-derived suppressor cells, M1 macrophages or M2 macrophages at tumor sites or in peripheral lymphoid organs (i.e., spleen). Finally, pre-resectional RFA of primary tumors delayed growth of distant tumors through a mechanism that depends on systemic CD8+ T cell-mediated antitumor immunity. Conclusion Improved survival and antitumor systemic immunity elicited by pre-resectional RFA support the translational potential of this neoadjuvant

  7. Prognostic index score and clinical prediction model of local regional recurrence after mastectomy in breast cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Skye Hongiun . E-mail: skye@mail.kfcc.org.tw; Horng, C.-F.; Clarke, Jennifer L.; Tsou, M.-H.; Tsai, Stella Y.; Chen, C.-M.; Jian, James J.; Liu, M.-C.; West, Mike; Huang, Andrew T.; Prosnitz, Leonard R.

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: To develop clinical prediction models for local regional recurrence (Lr) of breast carcinoma after mastectomy that will be superior to the conventional measures of tumor size and nodal status. Methods and Materials: Clinical information from 1,010 invasive breast cancer patients who had primary modified radical mastectomy formed the database of the training and testing of clinical prognostic and prediction models of LRR. Cox proportional hazards analysis and Bayesian tree analysis were the core methodologies from which these models were built. To generate a prognostic index model, 15 clinical variables were examined for their impact on LRR. Patients were stratified by lymph node involvement (<4 vs. {>=}4) and local regional status (recurrent vs. control) and then, within strata, randomly split into training and test data sets of equal size. To establish prediction tree models, 255 patients were selected by the criteria of having had LRR (53 patients) or no evidence of LRR without postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) (202 patients). Results: With these models, patients can be divided into low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups on the basis of axillary nodal status, estrogen receptor status, lymphovascular invasion, and age at diagnosis. In the low-risk group, there is no influence of PMRT on either LRR or survival. For intermediate-risk patients, PMRT improves LR control but not metastases-free or overall survival. For the high-risk patients, however, PMRT improves both LR control and metastasis-free and overall survival. Conclusion: The prognostic score and predictive index are useful methods to estimate the risk of LRR in breast cancer patients after mastectomy and for estimating the potential benefits of PMRT. These models provide additional information criteria for selection of patients for PMRT, compared with the traditional selection criteria of nodal status and tumor size.

  8. [Sacral resection in surgical treatment of locally advanced primary and recurrent rectal and anal cancer: short-term outcomes].

    PubMed

    Tsarkov, P V; Efetov, S K; Sidorova, L V; Tulina, I A

    2017-01-01

    To assess safety of rectum removal with distal sacral resection. The short-term results of surgical treatment of primary and recurrent locally advanced rectal and anal cancer with sacral fixation have been analyzed. 32 patients underwent combined operations with sacral resection at the level of S2-S5. In 12 patients only one point of tumor fixation (F1) was revealed, 10 patients had two points of fixation (F2), three patients had three fixation points (F3) and in 7 cases the tumor was fixed to four points (F4) of fixation to different pelvic structures. Mean intraoperative blood loss and surgery time was 551±81 ml and 320±20 min in cases of sacral fixation only that was significantly lower compared with F2 cases - 1278±551 ml and 433±45 min, F3 cases - 2200±600 ml and 620±88 min, F4 cases - 2157±512.5 ml and 519±52,3 min, respectively (р<0.05). Complications requiring surgical intervention occurred in 9% patients (n=3). Among 23 patients with intact bladder and ureters urinary disorders occurred in 42% (n=10). Resection margin was negative along posterior surface of the specimen in all cases. Advanced surgery with distal sacral resection is advisable for radical removal of locally advanced and recurrent rectal and anal canal cancer fixed to the sacrum with negative resection margin. These operations are feasible in specialized centers and should be performed by specially trained oncological or colorectal surgeon.

  9. Histopathological predictors for local recurrence in patients with T3 and T4 rectal cancers without preoperative chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Akagi, Yoshito; Hisaka, Toru; Mizobe, Tomoaki; Kinugasa, Tetsushi; Ogata, Yutaka; Shirouzu, Kazuo

    2014-11-01

    Identification of suitable predictors of local recurrence (LR) in patients with rectal cancer would be of clinical benefit. The aim of this study was to identify histopathological factors that could predict LR. A total of 796 stage II/III patients with pT3 and pT4 rectal cancer who did not undergo preoperative chemoradiation were enrolled. LR was defined as intra-pelvic recurrence only. Histopathological factors related to LR were investigated. LR was found in 25 patients (6.1%) with stage II and 54 patients (13.9%) with stage IIIB/IIIC. In patients with stage II, distance of mesorectal extension (DME) >4 mm (P = 0.011) and positive venous invasion (P = 0.035) were independent factors that predicted LR. In patients with stage IIIB/IIIC, circumferential resection margin (CRM) ≤1 mm (P = 0.003) and positive lymphatic invasion (P = 0.006) were independent factors. The cumulative 5-year LR rate was higher (11.9%) in patients with a combination of DME > 4 mm and/or positive venous invasion for stage II (P < 0.001), and was also higher in patients with a combination of CRM≤1 mm and/or positive lymphatic invasion for stage IIIB and IIIC (22.2%; P < 0.002, and 34.3%; P < 0.006, respectively). Important histopathological predictors for LR in patients with pT3 and pT4 rectal cancer were different at each stage. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Salvage high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation for prostate cancer local recurrence after external-beam radiation therapy: prognostic value of prostate MRI.

    PubMed

    Rouvière, O; Sbihi, L; Gelet, A; Chapelon, J-Y

    2013-07-01

    To assess the prognostic value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before salvage high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for locally recurrent prostate cancer after external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Forty-six patients who underwent prostate MRI before salvage HIFU for locally recurrent prostate cancer after EBRT were retrospectively studied. HIFU failure was defined as a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) value >nadir + 2 ng/ml (Phoenix criteria) or positive follow-up biopsy or initiation of any other salvage therapy. The following prognostic parameters were assessed: neoadjuvant hormone therapy, clinical stage and Gleason score of recurrence, PSA level and velocity at HIFU treatment, and six MRI-derived parameters (prostate volume, tumour volume, extracapsular extension, seminal vesicle invasion, tumour extension into the apex or anterior to the urethra). Two factors were significant independent predictors of salvage HIFU failure: the PSA level at HIFU treatment (p < 0.012; risk ratio: 1.15, 95% CI: 1.03-1.29) and the tumour extension anterior to the urethra, as assessed by MRI (p = 0.046, risk ratio: 2.51, 95% CI: 1.02-6.16). The location of cancer recurrence anterior to the urethra on MRI is an independent significant predictor of salvage HIFU failure for locally recurrent prostate cancer after EBRT. Therefore, MRI may be useful for patient selection before post-EBRT salvage HIFU ablation. Copyright © 2013 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Opioids and cancer recurrence.

    PubMed

    Juneja, Rohit

    2014-06-01

    With the majority of deaths from cancer because of their metastases, strategies to reduce this from occurring are at the forefront of treatment. It has been hypothesized that morphine may result in an increase in cancer metastases, following many in-vitro and animal studies, but the evidence from human retrospective data is inconclusive. This article will explore the possible mechanisms by which opioids can impact on the natural history of the cancer cell and whether they are likely to be harmful in individuals with cancer. Although there have been trials demonstrating benefits with regional anaesthesia techniques (opioid sparing) in the surgical population, it is not clear whether the source of the benefit arises directly from the avoidance of opioids or an added benefit afforded by regional anaesthesia. Research has shown that in particular cancer cell types, morphine may actually be beneficial and that the μ-opioid receptor (MOR) plays a role in cancer disease. With the crystal structure of the MOR having recently been elucidated, this may offer new opportunities for treatments aimed at reducing cancer metastasis. The role opioids play in the development of cancer metastasis and recurrence is far from clear and appears to differ depending on the cancer cell type in question. Prospective randomized controlled trials are currently underway in humans to help clarify the situation further and there results are awaited with anticipation. The negative impact of pain on the immune system is well documented and it appears that appropriate analgesia is paramount in minimizing this. Opioids still constitute a central role in the management of moderate-to-severe cancer pain.

  12. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Localization of Recurrent Prostate Cancer After External Beam Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Haider, Masoom A. Chung, Peter; Sweet, Joan; Toi, Ants; Jhaveri, Kartik; Menard, Cynthia; Warde, Padraig; Trachtenberg, John; Lockwood, Gina M.Math.; Milosevic, Michael

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To compare the performance of T2-weighted (T2w) imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the prostate gland in the localization of recurrent prostate cancer in patients with biochemical failure after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: T2-weighted imaging and DCE MRI were performed in 33 patients with suspected relapse after EBRT. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI was performed with a temporal resolution of 95 s. Voxels enhancing at 46 s after injection to a greater degree than the mean signal intensity of the prostate at 618 s were considered malignant. Results from MRI were correlated with biopsies from six regions in the peripheral zone (PZ) (base, mid, and apex). The percentage of biopsy core positive for malignancy from each region was correlated with the maximum diameter of the tumor on DCE MRI with a linear regression model. Results: On a sextant basis, DCE MRI had significantly better sensitivity (72% [21of 29] vs. 38% [11 of 29]), positive predictive value (46% [21 of 46] vs. 24% [11 of 45]) and negative predictive value (95% [144 of 152] vs. 88% [135 of 153] than T2w imaging. Specificities were high for both DCE MRI and T2w imaging (85% [144 of 169] vs. 80% [135 of 169]). There was a linear relationship between tumor diameters on DCE MRI and the percentage of cancer tissue in the corresponding biopsy core (r = 0.9, p < 0.001), with a slope of 1.2. Conclusions: Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI performs better than T2w imaging in the detection and localization of prostate cancer in the peripheral zone after EBRT. This may be helpful in the planning of salvage therapy.

  13. Development and validation of automatic tools for interactive recurrence analysis in radiation therapy: optimization of treatment algorithms for locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In radiation oncology recurrence analysis is an important part in the evaluation process and clinical quality assurance of treatment concepts. With the example of 9 patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer we developed and validated interactive analysis tools to support the evaluation workflow. Methods After an automatic registration of the radiation planning CTs with the follow-up images, the recurrence volumes are segmented manually. Based on these volumes the DVH (dose volume histogram) statistic is calculated, followed by the determination of the dose applied to the region of recurrence and the distance between the boost and recurrence volume. We calculated the percentage of the recurrence volume within the 80%-isodose volume and compared it to the location of the recurrence within the boost volume, boost + 1 cm, boost + 1.5 cm and boost + 2 cm volumes. Results Recurrence analysis of 9 patients demonstrated that all recurrences except one occurred within the defined GTV/boost volume; one recurrence developed beyond the field border/outfield. With the defined distance volumes in relation to the recurrences, we could show that 7 recurrent lesions were within the 2 cm radius of the primary tumor. Two large recurrences extended beyond the 2 cm, however, this might be due to very rapid growth and/or late detection of the tumor progression. Conclusion The main goal of using automatic analysis tools is to reduce time and effort conducting clinical analyses. We showed a first approach and use of a semi-automated workflow for recurrence analysis, which will be continuously optimized. In conclusion, despite the limitations of the automatic calculations we contributed to in-house optimization of subsequent study concepts based on an improved and validated target volume definition. PMID:24499557

  14. Exemestane With or Without Entinostat in Treating Patients With Recurrent Hormone Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer That is Locally Advanced or Metastatic

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-08-01

    Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Male Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  15. Exeresis and Brachytherapy as Salvage Treatment for Local Recurrence After Conservative Treatment for Breast Cancer: Results of a Ten-Year Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Guix, Benjamin; Lejarcegui, Jose Antonio; Tello, Jose Ignacio; Zanon, Gabriel; Henriquez, Ivan; Finestres, Fernando; Martinez, Antonio; Fernandez-Ibiza, Jaume; Quinzanos, Luis; Palombo, Pau; Encinas, Xavier; Guix, Ines

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To analyze the long-term results of a pilot study assessing excision and brachytherapy as salvage treatment for local recurrence after conservative treatment of breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Between December 1990 and March 2001, 36 patients with breast-only recurrence less than 3 cm in diameter after conservative treatment for Stage I or II breast carcinoma were treated with local excision followed by high-dose rate brachytherapy implants (30 Gy in 12 fractions over a period of 5 days). No patient was lost to follow-up. Special attention was paid to local, regional, or distant recurrences; survival; cosmesis; and early and late side effects. Results: All patients completed treatment. During follow-up (range, 1-13 years), 8 patients presented metastases (2 regional and 6 distant) as their first site of failure, 1 had a differed local recurrence, and 1 died of the disease. Actuarial results at 10 years were as follows: local control, 89.4%; disease-free survival, 64.4%; and survival, 96.7%. Cosmetic results were satisfactory in 90.4%. No patient had Grade 3 or 4 early or late complications. Of the 11 patients followed up for at least 10 years, all but 1 still had their breast in place at the 10-year stage. Conclusions: High-dose rate brachytherapy is a safe, effective treatment for small-size, low-risk local recurrence after local excision in conservatively treated patients. The dose of 30 Gy of high-dose rate brachytherapy (12 fractions over a period of 5 days twice daily) was well tolerated. The excellent results support the use of breast preservation as salvage treatment in selected patients with local recurrence after conservative treatment for breast cancer.

  16. [Comparative evaluation of the efficiency of different magnetic resonance imaging procedures in the recognition of local recurrence of prostate cancer: preliminary results].

    PubMed

    Kapustin, V V; Gromov, A I; Koshurnikov, D S

    2012-01-01

    The paper considers the role of different procedures of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of a local recurrence of the disease in patients undergoing radical prostatectomy (RPE) for prostate cancer (PC). A study group comprised 12 patients who had developed a biochemical recurrence with no evidence of systemic progression of the disease in different periods after RPE. All the patients underwent multiphase MRI using T1-T2-weighted, diffusion-weighted, and postcontrast images. The MRI pattern of a cystourethral anastomotic area was analyzed from T2-weighted (T2-WI), diffusion-weighted (DWI), and postcontrast images (PCI) in all the patients. The local recurrence of PC was verified in them, using puncture biopsy under transrectal ultrasound guidance, by keeping in mind the MRI pattern. The use of DWI and postcontrast sequences was shown to substantially enhance the sensitivity of MRI in the diagnosis of local recurrences of PC as compared to an isolated analysis of T2WI (0.83, 0.67, and 0.42, respectively). Thus, in patients with a suspected local recurrence of PC after RPE, the visual estimate of DWI and PCI during small pelvic MRI makes it possible to considerably improve the recognition of a tumor nodule and to increase the efficiency of morphological verification of a recurrence of the disease.

  17. Imaging characteristics of local recurrences after stereotactic body radiation therapy for stage I non-small cell lung cancer: Evaluation of mass-like fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Shinya; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Hoshi, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Background This study aimed to evaluate stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in terms of radiation-induced changes and computed tomography (CT) features of local recurrence by 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG-PET). Methods From January 2006 to December 2012, 81 patients with NSCLC received SBRT. Follow-up consisted of non-contrast enhanced CT scans performed before and every four months after SBRT. In addition, 18F-FDG-PET/CT was conducted before SBRT for each patient, and one year later for each case suspected of recurrence. The CT findings were classified into two categories: mass-like fibrosis and others. The mass-like fibrosis category was subdivided into two patterns: mass-like consolidation (with air bronchogram) and mass-like opacity. Results Six patients had histologically confirmed local recurrence, including 83% (5/6) with mass-like opacity pattern and one case of modified conventional pattern (P = 0.02). In contrast, the non-recurrent group exhibited only 7% (5/75) with mass-like opacity and 13% (10/75) with mass-like consolidation pattern. Five patients with local recurrence presented with the mass-like opacity pattern, compared with 33% of patients (5/15) from the non-recurrent group (P = 0.01) and showed an increase in maximum diameter at ≥12 months after SBRT. The recurrent group also had a significantly higher standardized uptake value (SUVmax) than the non-recurrent group (P < 0.001), with all values >5 (range: 5.7–25.4). Conclusion The following characteristics of mass-like fibrosis should be considered indicators of local recurrence after SBRT: opacity pattern, increasing maximum diameter, and SUVmax > 5. PMID:26273357

  18. Extracapsular tumor spread and the risk of local, axillary and supraclavicular recurrence in node-positive, premenopausal patients with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, G.; Cole, B. F.; Castiglione-Gertsch, M.; Holmberg, S. B.; Lindtner, J.; Golouh, R.; Collins, J.; Crivellari, D.; Thürlimann, B.; Simoncini, E.; Fey, M. F.; Gelber, R. D.; Coates, A. S.; Price, K. N.; Goldhirsch, A.; Viale, G.; Gusterson, B. A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Extracapsular tumor spread (ECS) has been identified as a possible risk factor for breast cancer recurrence, but controversy exists regarding its role in decision making for regional radiotherapy. This study evaluates ECS as a predictor of local, axillary, and supraclavicular recurrence. Patients and methods: International Breast Cancer Study Group Trial VI accrued 1475 eligible pre- and perimenopausal women with node-positive breast cancer who were randomly assigned to receive three to nine courses of classical combination chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and fluorouracil. ECS status was determined retrospectively in 933 patients based on review of pathology reports. Cumulative incidence and hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated using methods for competing risks analysis. Adjustment factors included treatment group and baseline patient and tumor characteristics. The median follow-up was 14 years. Results: In univariable analysis, ECS was significantly associated with supraclavicular recurrence (HR = 1.96; 95% confidence interval 1.23–3.13; P = 0.005). HRs for local and axillary recurrence were 1.38 (P = 0.06) and 1.81 (P = 0.11), respectively. Following adjustment for number of lymph node metastases and other baseline prognostic factors, ECS was not significantly associated with any of the three recurrence types studied. Conclusions: Our results indicate that the decision for additional regional radiotherapy should not be based solely on the presence of ECS. PMID:18385202

  19. [The synergistic effect of local microwave hyperthermia and chemotherapy for advanced or recurrent breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Chizuko; Yamamoto, Daigo; Tsubota, Yu; Sueoka, Noriko; Kawakami, Katsuhiro; Yamamoto, Mitsuo

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of our study was to test the efficacy and toxicity of hyperthermia in conjunction with chemotherapy for breast cancer. Between 2009 and 2014, 6 patients diagnosed with breast carcinoma were selected for this retrospective study. Patients received standard chemotherapy (AC followed by paclitaxel ) in combination with hyperthermia. The hyperthermia device employed microwave heating with water loaded and water-cooled waveguides. The temperature was monitored subcutaneously in the skin under the aperture of the waveguide. Following hyperthermia therapy, 4 patients had a partial response to treatment and the toxicity was mild, consisting of Grade 1 acute skin toxicity. Therefore, hyperthermia combined with chemotherapy for breast cancer seems to be effective and generally tolerable. A larger patient cohort is needed to confirm these results.

  20. Solitary recurrence of castration-resistant prostate cancer with low or undetectable levels of prostate specific antigen salvaged with local ablative radiation therapy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    WANG, CHIACHIEN JAKE; YING, JAMES; KAPUR, PAYAL; WOHLFELD, BRYAN; ROEHRBORN, CLAUS; KIM, DONG W. NATHAN

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer recurrences are usually first detected by increased levels of prostate specific antigen (PSA), and systemic therapy is often initiated if distant metastasis is confirmed. However, low or nearly undetectable levels of PSA in the modern era of ultrasensitive PSA assay may be difficult to interpret in patients with a history of prostate cancer. Deciding whether to initiate additional systemic therapy in limited indolent metastatic disease while balancing the quality of life of the patient and ensuring the oncologic control of the disease may be challenging. In the present study, the case of a biopsy-confirmed solitary spine recurrence of prostate cancer with nearly undetectable but persistent levels of PSA (0.05 ng/ml) is reported. Treatment of the recurrence with local ablative radiotherapy improved the pain experienced by the patient, and reduced his levels of PSA to undetectable limits (<0.05 ng/ml). Repeated imaging analysis, PSA assay and clinical assessment demonstrated durable control of the disease without the requirement for additional systemic treatments. The present case highlighted the importance of initiating appropriate work-up according to the clinical scenario. Local treatment for solitary or oligometastatic recurrence of prostate cancer may enhance the effectiveness of current therapeutic strategies and benefit certain patients. PMID:26870272

  1. The Incremental Value of Contrast-Enhanced MRI in the Detection of Biopsy-Proven Local Recurrence of Prostate Cancer After Radical Prostatectomy: Effect of Reader Experience

    PubMed Central

    Wassberg, Cecilia; Akin, Oguz; Vargas, Hebert Alberto; Shukla-Dave, Amita; Zhang, Jingbo; Hricak, Hedvig

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study is to retrospectively assess the incremental value of contrast-enhanced MRI (CE-MRI) to T2-weighted MRI in the detection of postsurgical local recurrence of prostate cancer by readers of different experience levels, using biopsy as the reference standard. MATERIALS AND METHODS Fifty-two men with biochemical recurrence after prostatectomy underwent 1.5-T endorectal MRI with multiphase contrast-enhanced imaging and had biopsy within 3 months of MRI. Two radiologists (reader 1 had 1 year and reader 2 had 6 years of experience) independently reviewed each MRI study and classified the likelihood of recurrent cancer on a 5-point scale. Areas under receiver operating characteristic curves (Az) were calculated to assess readers’ diagnostic performance with T2-weighted MRI alone and combined with CE-MRI. Interobserver agreement was assessed using Cohen kappa statistics. RESULTS Thirty-three patients (63%) had biopsy-proven local recurrence of prostate cancer. With the addition of CE-MRI to T2-weighted imaging, the Az for cancer detection increased significantly for reader 1 (0.77 vs 0.85; p = 0.0435) but not for reader 2 (0.86 vs 0.88; p = 0.7294). The use of CE-MRI improved interobserver agreement from fair (κ = 0.39) to moderate (κ = 0.58). CONCLUSION CE-MRI increased interobserver agreement and offered incremental value to T2-weighted MRI in the detection of locally recurrent prostate cancer for the relatively inexperienced reader. PMID:22826397

  2. Fractionated Boron Neutron Capture Therapy in Locally Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer: A Prospective Phase I/II Trial.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling-Wei; Chen, Yi-Wei; Ho, Ching-Yin; Hsueh Liu, Yen-Wan; Chou, Fong-In; Liu, Yuan-Hao; Liu, Hong-Ming; Peir, Jinn-Jer; Jiang, Shiang-Huei; Chang, Chi-Wei; Liu, Ching-Sheng; Lin, Ko-Han; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Chu, Pen-Yuan; Lo, Wen-Liang; Kao, Shou-Yen; Yen, Sang-Hue

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the efficacy and safety of fractionated boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for recurrent head and neck (H&N) cancer after photon radiation therapy. In this prospective phase 1/2 trial, 2-fraction BNCT with intravenous L-boronophenylalanine (L-BPA, 400 mg/kg) was administered at a 28-day interval. Before each fraction, fluorine-18-labeled-BPA-positron emission tomography was conducted to determine the tumor/normal tissue ratio of an individual tumor. The prescription dose (D80) of 20 Gy-Eq per fraction was selected to cover 80% of the gross tumor volume by using a dose volume histogram, while minimizing the volume of oral mucosa receiving >10 Gy-Eq. Tumor responses and adverse effects were assessed using the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors v1.1 and the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0, respectively. Seventeen patients with a previous cumulative radiation dose of 63-165 Gy were enrolled. All but 2 participants received 2 fractions of BNCT. The median tumor/normal tissue ratio was 3.4 for the first fraction and 2.5 for the second, whereas the median D80 for the first and second fraction was 19.8 and 14.6 Gy-Eq, respectively. After a median follow-up period of 19.7 months (range, 5.2-52 mo), 6 participants exhibited a complete response and 6 exhibited a partial response. Regarding acute toxicity, 5 participants showed grade 3 mucositis and 1 participant showed grade 4 laryngeal edema and carotid hemorrhage. Regarding late toxicity, 2 participants exhibited grade 3 cranial neuropathy. Four of six participants (67%) receiving total D80 > 40 Gy-Eq had a complete response. Two-year overall survival was 47%. Two-year locoregional control was 28%. Our results suggested that 2-fraction BNCT with adaptive dose prescription was effective and safe in locally recurrent H&N cancer. Modifications to our protocol may yield more satisfactory results in the future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Results of a pooled analysis of IOERT containing multimodality treatment for locally recurrent rectal cancer: Results of 565 patients of two major treatment centres.

    PubMed

    Holman, F A; Bosman, S J; Haddock, M G; Gunderson, L L; Kusters, M; Nieuwenhuijzen, G A P; van den Berg, H; Nelson, H; Rutten, H J

    2017-01-01

    Aim of this study is analysing the pooled results of Intra-Operative Electron beam Radiotherapy (IOERT) containing multimodality treatment of locally recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC) of two major treatment centres. Five hundred sixty five patients with LRRC who underwent multimodality-treatment up to 2010 were studied. The preferred treatment was preoperative chemo-radiotherapy, surgery and IOERT. In uni- and multivariate analyses risk factors for local re-recurrence, distant metastasis free survival, relapse free survival, cancer-specific survival and overall survival were studied. Two hundred fifty one patients (44%) underwent a radical (R0) resection. In patients who had no preoperative treatment the R0 resection rate was 26%, and this was 43% and 50% for patients who respectively received preoperative re-(chemo)-irradiation or full-course radiotherapy (p < 0.0001). After uni- and multivariate analysis it was found that all oncologic parameters were influenced by preoperative treatment and radicality of the resection. Patients who were re-irradiated had a similar outcome compared to patients, who were radiotherapy naive and could undergo full-course treatment, except the chance of local re-recurrence was higher for re-irradiated patients. Waiting-time between preoperative radiotherapy and IOERT was inversely correlated with the chance of local re-recurrence, and positively correlated with the chance of a R0 resection. R0 resection is the most important factor influencing oncologic parameters in treatment of LRRC. Preoperative (chemo)-radiotherapy increases the chance of achieving radical resections and improves oncologic outcomes. Short waiting-times between preoperative treatment and IOERT improves the effectiveness of IOERT to reduce the chance of a local re-recurrence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ The Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  4. [Local recurrence based on size after conservative surgery in breast cancer stage T1-T2. A population-based study].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ramos, David; Fortea-Sanchis, Carlos; Escrig-Sos, Javier; Prats-de Puig, Miguel; Queralt-Martín, Raquel; Salvador-Sanchis, José Luís

    2014-01-01

    Conservative surgery can be regarded as the standard treatment for most early stage breast tumors. However, a minority of patients treated with conservative surgery will present local or locoregional recurrence. Therefore, it is of interest to evaluate the possible factors associated with this recurrence. A population-based retrospective study using data from the Tumor Registry of Castellón (Valencia, Spain) of patients operated on for primary nonmetastatic breast cancer between January 2000 and December 2008 was designed. Kaplan-Meier curves and log-rank test to estimate 5-year local recurrence were used. Two groups of patients were defined, one with conservative surgery and another with nonconservative surgery. Cox multivariate analysis was conducted. The total number of patients was 410. Average local recurrence was 6.8%. In univariate analysis, only tumor size and lymph node involvement showed significant differences. On multivariate analysis, independent prognostic factors were conservative surgery (hazard ratio [HR] 4.62; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.12-16.82), number of positive lymph nodes (HR 1.07; 95% CI: 1.01-1.17) and tumor size (in mm) (HR 1.02; 95% CI: 1.01-1.06). Local recurrence after breast-conserving surgery is higher in tumors >2 cm. Although tumor size should not be a contraindication for conservative surgery, it should be a risk factor to be considered.

  5. Pathways to Breast Cancer Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer remains a deadly disease, even with all the recent technological advancements. Early intervention has made an impact, but an overwhelmingly large number of breast cancer patients still live under the fear of “recurrent” disease. Breast cancer recurrence is clinically a huge problem and one that is largely not well understood. Over the years, a number of factors have been studied with an overarching aim of being able to prognose recurrent disease. This paper attempts to provide an overview of our current knowledge of breast cancer recurrence and its associated challenges. Through a survey of the literature on cancer stem cells (CSCs), epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), various signaling pathways such as Notch/Wnt/hedgehog, and microRNAs (miRNAs), we also examine the hypotheses that are currently under investigation for the prevention of breast cancer recurrence. PMID:23533807

  6. Methodology to predict a maximum follow-up period for breast cancer patients without significantly reducing the chance of detecting a local recurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mould, Richard F.; Asselain, Bernard; DeRycke, Yann

    2004-03-01

    For breast cancer where the prognosis of early stage disease is very good and even when local recurrences do occur they can present several years after treatment, the hospital resources required for annual follow-up examinations of what can be several hundreds of patients are financially significant. If, therefore, there is some method to estimate a maximum length of follow-up Tmax necessary, then cost savings of physicians' time as well as outpatient workload reductions can be achieved. In modern oncology where expenses continue to increase exponentially due to staff salaries and the expense of chemotherapy drugs and of new treatment and imaging technology, the economic situation can no longer be ignored. The methodology of parametric modelling, based on the lognormal distribution is described, showing that useful estimates for Tmax can be made, by making a trade-off between Tmax and the fraction of patients who will experience a delay in detection of their local recurrence. This trade-off depends on the chosen tail of the lognormal. The methodology is described for stage T1 and T2 breast cancer and it is found that Tmax = 4 years which is a significant reduction on the usual maximum of 10 years of follow-up which is employed by many hospitals for breast cancer patients. The methodology is equally applicable for cancers at other sites where the prognosis is good and some local recurrences may not occur until several years post-treatment.

  7. Local recurrence after curative resection for rectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Jung-A; Huh, Jung Wook; Kim, Hee Cheol; Park, Yoon Ah; Cho, Yong Beom; Yun, Seong Hyeon; Lee, Woo Yong; Chun, Ho-Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Local recurrence of rectal cancer is difficult to treat, may cause severe and disabling symptoms, and usually has a fatal outcome. The aim of this study was to document the clinical nature of locally recurrent rectal cancer and to determine the effect of surgical resection on long-term survival. A retrospective review was conducted of the prospectively collected medical records of 2485 patients with primary rectal adenocarcinoma who underwent radical resection between September 1994 and December 2008. In total, 147 (5.9%) patients exhibited local recurrence. The most common type of local recurrence was lateral recurrence, whereas anastomotic recurrence was the most common type in patients without preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). Tumor location with respect to the anal verge significantly affected the local recurrence rate (P < 0.001), whereas preoperative CCRT did not affect the local recurrence rate (P = 0.433). Predictive factors for surgical resection of recurrent rectal cancer included less advanced tumor stage (P = 0.017, RR = 3.840, 95% CI = 1.271–11.597), axial recurrence (P < 0.001, RR = 5.772, 95% CI = 2.281–14.609), and isolated local recurrence (P = 0.006, RR = 8.679, 95% CI = 1.846–40.815). Overall survival after diagnosis of local recurrence was negatively influenced by advanced pathologic tumor stage (P = 0.040, RR = 1.867, 95% CI = 1.028–3.389), positive CRM (P = 0.001, RR = 12.939, 95% CI = 2.906–57.604), combined distant metastases (P = 0.001, RR = 2.086, 95% CI = 1.352–3.218), and nonsurgical resection of recurrent tumor (P < 0.001, RR = 4.865, 95% CI = 2.586–9.153). In conclusion, the clinical outcomes of local recurrence after curative resection of rectal cancer are diverse. Surgical resection of locally recurrent rectal cancer should be considered as an initial treatment, especially in patients with less advanced tumors and axial recurrence. PMID:27399067

  8. Liposomal doxorubicin in conjunction with reirradiation and local hyperthermia treatment in recurrent breast cancer: a phase I/II trial.

    PubMed

    Kouloulias, Vassilios E; Dardoufas, Costas E; Kouvaris, John R; Gennatas, Costas S; Polyzos, Aris K; Gogas, Helen J; Sandilos, Panagiotis H; Uzunoglu, Nikolaos K; Malas, Elias G; Vlahos, Lambros J

    2002-02-01

    This is the first study to evaluate the tolerability and activity of liposomal doxorubicin (Caelyx; Schering-Plough Pharmaceuticals) < or =60 mg/km(2) in patients with locally recurrent breast cancer, when administered in conjunction with reirradiation and local hyperthermia treatment. Fifteen female patients, who had undergone a radical mastectomy and conventional radiotherapy (60 Gy) in the front chest wall, were entered on a multimodal protocol consisting of initial treatment with radiotherapy and a monthly infusion of liposomal doxorubicin < or =60 mg/m(2) in conjunction with local hyperthermia treatment. All patients received reirradiation up to a total dose of 30.6 Gy (1.8 Gy/fraction, 5 days a week). To evaluate the drug's safety, the first 5 patients initially received a dose of 40 mg/m(2) liposomal doxorubicin, which was then escalated to 60 mg/m(2). The other 10 patients received 60 mg/m(2) for all six cycles of chemotherapy. Hyperthermia (HT) was produced in the region of interest (ROI) using waveguides at a frequency of 433 MHz. The RSS was obtained from the curves representing the change in the ROI's surface with time for each patient, as fitted by linear regression. Linear regression analysis was used to study the relationship between the time interval from liposomal doxorubicin infusion to HT and the RSS. At doses of < or =60 mg/m(2), liposomal doxorubicin was well tolerated, with only mild hematological and nonhematological toxicity. All patients showed an objective measurable response, with 3 patients (20%) demonstrating a clinically complete response. There was a significant correlation between the duration of response and Avg Min T(90) > 44 degrees C (r(s) = 0.917, P < 0.0001) and the Mean[Tmin] (r(s) = 0.909, P < 0.0001). The RSS was significantly correlated with the interval between liposomal doxorubicin infusion and HT, as the smaller the time interval, the greater the clinical benefit (r = 0.76, P = 0.001). The multimodal treatment was

  9. Local Recurrence in Women With Stage I Breast Cancer: Declining Rates Over Time in a Large, Population-Based Cohort

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, Joycelin; Truong, Pauline T.; Smith, Sally L.; Lu, Linghong; Lesperance, Mary; Olivotto, Ivo A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether local recurrence (LR) risk has changed over time among women with stage I breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy. Methods and Materials: Subjects were 5974 women aged ≥50 years diagnosis with pT1N0 breast cancer from 1989 to 2006, treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiation therapy. Clinicopathologic characteristics, treatment, and LR outcomes were compared among 4 cohorts stratified by year of diagnosis: 1989 to 1993 (n=1077), 1994 to 1998 (n=1633), 1999 to 2002 (n=1622), and 2003 to 2006 (n=1642). Multivariable analysis was performed, with year of diagnosis as a continuous variable. Results: Median follow-up time was 8.6 years. Among patients diagnosed in 1989 to 1993, 1994 to 1998, 1999 to 2002, and 2003 to 2006, the proportions of grade 1 tumors increased (16% vs 29% vs 40% vs 39%, respectively, P<.001). Surgical margin clearance rates increased from 82% to 93% to 95% and 88%, respectively (P<.001). Over time, the proportions of unknown estrogen receptor (ER) status decreased (29% vs 10% vs 1.2% vs 0.5%, respectively, P<.001), whereas ER-positive tumors increased (56% vs 77% vs 86% vs 86%, respectively, P<.001). Hormone therapy use increased (23% vs 23% vs 62% vs 73%, respectively, P<.001), and chemotherapy use increased (2% vs 5% vs 10% vs 13%, respectively, P<.001). The 5-year cumulative incidence rates of LR over the 4 time periods were 2.8% vs 1.7% vs 0.9% vs 0.8%, respectively (Gray's test, P<.001). On competing risk multivariable analysis, year of diagnosis was significantly associated with decreased LR (hazard ratio, 0.92 per year, P=.0003). Relative to grade 1 histology, grades 2, 3, and unknown were associated with increased LR. Hormone therapy use was associated with reduced LR. Conclusion: Significant changes in the multimodality management of stage I breast cancer have occurred over the past 2 decades. More favorable-risk tumors were diagnosed, and margin clearance and systemic therapy use

  10. Prognostic Value of Triple-Negative Phenotype at the Time of Locally Recurrent, Conservatively Treated Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Parikh, Rahul R.; Housman, Douglas; Yang Qifeng; Toppmeyer, Deborah; Wilson, Lynn D.; Haffty, Bruce G.

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic value of triple-negative (TN) ER, PR, Her2/neu basal-like carcinoma of the breast, at the time of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) after conservative surgery and radiation treatment (RT). Methods and Materials: A tissue microarray was constructed of 47 IBTR specimens of patients who experienced an IBTR after conservative surgery and RT that were processed and stained for ER, PR, and HER2/neu. Results: At a median post-recurrence follow-up of 7.5 years, the 5-year overall survival (OS) and disease metastasis-free survival (DMFS) after IBTR were 91.4% and 83.0%, respectively. Median time to tumor recurrence (TTR) and IBTR was shorter in the TN phenotype (3.88 vs. 5.00 years; p = 0.09). The TN tumors were not associated with size of local recurrence or recurrence elsewhere in the breast. Despite administration of standard chemotherapy at the time of IBTR, the 5-year DMFS and 5-year OS for the TN cohort were 48.6% and 72.7%, respectively. The 5-year DMFS was 48.6% for TN tumors and 90.8% for non-TN tumors (p < 0.01). By univariate analysis, significant factors associated with poor 5-year DMFS and OS after IBTR included: TN phenotype (p < 0.01), TTR 3 years or less (p < 0.01), local recurrence at or near the original tumor site (p = 0.08). In multivariate analysis, TN was a significant independent predictor of poorer 5-year DMFS (relative risk, 5.91; 95% confidence interval, 1.83-19.01; p < 0.01) after IBTR. Conclusions: Although patients experiencing an IBTR have a relatively favorable prognosis, those with IBTR events of the TN phenotype had a rather poor prognosis despite receiving standard chemotherapy. Strategies with novel systemic therapies to improve outcomes in patients experiencing IBTR of the TN phenotype are warranted.

  11. KRAS Mutant Status, p16 and β-catenin Expression May Predict Local Recurrence in Patients Who Underwent Transanal Endoscopic Microsurgery (TEMS) for Stage I Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sideris, Michail; Moorhead, Jane; Diaz-Cano, Salvador; Bjarnason, Ingvar; Haji, Amyn; Papagrigoriadis, Savvas

    2016-10-01

    Transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEMS) is emerging as an alternative treatment for rectal cancer Stage I. There remains a risk of local recurrence. The Aim of the study was to study the effect of biomarkers in local recurrence for Stage I rectal cancer following TEMS plus or minus radiotherapy. This is a case control study where we compared 10 early rectal cancers that had recurred, against 19 cases with no recurrence, total 29 patients (age=28.25-86.87, mean age=67.92 years, SD=14.91, Male, N=18, Female, N=11). All patients underwent TEMS for radiological Stage I rectal cancer (yT1N0M0 or yT2N0M0) established with combination of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and endorectal ultrasound. We prospectively collected all data on tumour histology, morphological features, as well as follow-up parameters. Molecular analysis was performed to identify their status on BRAF, KRAS, p16 O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) and β-catenin. Out of 29 specimens analyzed, 19 were KRAS wild type (65.9%) and 10 mutant (34.5%). Recurrence of the tumour was noted in 10 cases (34.5%) from which 60% were pT1 (N=6) and 40% pT2 (N=4). There was a statistically significant association between KRAS mutant status and local recurrence (N=6, p=0.037). P16 expression greater than 5% (mean=10.8%, min=0, max=95) is linked with earlier recurrence within 11.70 months (N=7, p=0.004). Membranous β-catenin expression (N=12, 48%) was also related with KRAS mutant status (p=0.006) but not with survival (p>0.05). BRAF gene was found to be wild type in all cases tested (N=23). KRAS/p16/β-catenin could be used as a combined biomarker for prediction of local recurrence and stratification of the risk for further surgery. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  12. Two phase I dose-escalation/pharmacokinetics studies of low temperature liposomal doxorubicin (LTLD) and mild local hyperthermia in heavily pretreated patients with local regionally recurrent breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zagar, Timothy M; Vujaskovic, Zeljko; Formenti, Silvia; Rugo, Hope; Muggia, Franco; O'Connor, Brigid; Myerson, Robert; Stauffer, Paul; Hsu, I-Chow; Diederich, Chris; Straube, William; Boss, Mary-Keara; Boico, Alina; Craciunescu, Oana; Maccarini, Paolo; Needham, David; Borys, Nicholas; Blackwell, Kimberly L; Dewhirst, Mark W

    2014-08-01

    Unresectable chest wall recurrences of breast cancer (CWR) in heavily pretreated patients are especially difficult to treat. We hypothesised that thermally enhanced drug delivery using low temperature liposomal doxorubicin (LTLD), given with mild local hyperthermia (MLHT), will be safe and effective in this population. This paper combines the results of two similarly designed phase I trials. Eligible CWR patients had progressed on the chest wall after prior hormone therapy, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy. Patients were to get six cycles of LTLD every 21-35 days, followed immediately by chest wall MLHT for 1 hour at 40-42 °C. In the first trial 18 subjects received LTLD at 20, 30, or 40 mg/m2; in the second trial, 11 subjects received LTLD at 40 or 50 mg/m2. The median age of all 29 patients enrolled was 57 years. Thirteen patients (45%) had distant metastases on enrolment. Patients had received a median dose of 256 mg/m2 of prior anthracyclines and a median dose of 61 Gy of prior radiation. The median number of study treatments that subjects completed was four. The maximum tolerated dose was 50 mg/m2, with seven subjects (24%) developing reversible grade 3-4 neutropenia and four (14%) reversible grade 3-4 leucopenia. The rate of overall local response was 48% (14/29, 95% CI: 30-66%), with. five patients (17%) achieving complete local responses and nine patients (31%) having partial local responses. LTLD at 50 mg/m2 and MLHT is safe. This combined therapy produces objective responses in heavily pretreated CWR patients. Future work should test thermally enhanced LTLD delivery in a less advanced patient population.

  13. Two phase I dose-escalation/pharmacokinetics studies of low temperature liposomal doxorubicin (LTLD) and mild local hyperthermia in heavily pretreated patients with local regionally recurrent breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zagar, Timothy M.; Vujaskovic, Zeljko; Formenti, Silvia; Rugo, Hope; O’Connor, Brigid; Myerson, Robert; Stauffer, Paul; Hsu, I-Chow; Diederich, Chris; Straube, William; Boss, Mary-Keara; Boico, Alina; Craciunescu, Oana; Maccarini, Paolo; Needham, David; Borys, Nicholas; Blackwell, Kimberly L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Unresectable chest wall recurrences of breast cancer (CWR) in heavily pretreated patients are especially difficult to treat. We hypothesised that thermally enhanced drug delivery using low temperature liposomal doxorubicin (LTLD), given with mild local hyperthermia (MLHT), will be safe and effective in this population. Patients and methods This paper combines the results of two similarly designed phase I trials. Eligible CWR patients had progressed on the chest wall after prior hormone therapy, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy. Patients were to get six cycles of LTLD every 21–35 days, followed immediately by chest wall MLHT for 1 hour at 40–42 °C. In the first trial 18 subjects received LTLD at 20, 30, or 40 mg/m2; in the second trial, 11 subjects received LTLD at 40 or 50 mg/m2. Results The median age of all 29 patients enrolled was 57 years. Thirteen patients (45%) had distant metastases on enrolment. Patients had received a median dose of 256 mg/m2 of prior anthracyclines and a median dose of 61 Gy of prior radiation. The median number of study treatments that subjects completed was four. The maximum tolerated dose was 50 mg/m2, with seven subjects (24%) developing reversible grade 3–4 neutropenia and four (14%) reversible grade 3–4 leucopenia. The rate of overall local response was 48% (14/29, 95% CI: 30–66%), with. five patients (17%) achieving complete local responses and nine patients (31%) having partial local responses. Conclusion LTLD at 50 mg/m2 and MLHT is safe. This combined therapy produces objective responses in heavily pretreated CWR patients. Future work should test thermally enhanced LTLD delivery in a less advanced patient population. PMID:25144817

  14. Does Local Recurrence of Prostate Cancer After Radiation Therapy Occur at the Site of Primary Tumor? Results of a Longitudinal MRI and MRSI Study

    SciTech Connect

    Arrayeh, Elnasif; Westphalen, Antonio C.; Kurhanewicz, John; Roach, Mack; Jung, Adam J.; Carroll, Peter R.; Coakley, Fergus V.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To determine if local recurrence of prostate cancer after radiation therapy occurs at the same site as the primary tumor before treatment, using longitudinal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and MR spectroscopic imaging to assess dominant tumor location. Methods and Materials: This retrospective study was HIPAA compliant and approved by our Committee on Human Research. We identified all patients in our institutional prostate cancer database (1996 onward) who underwent endorectal MR imaging and MR spectroscopic imaging before radiotherapy for biopsy-proven prostate cancer and again at least 2 years after radiotherapy (n = 124). Two radiologists recorded the presence, location, and size of unequivocal dominant tumor on pre- and postradiotherapy scans. Recurrent tumor was considered to be at the same location as the baseline tumor if at least 50% of the tumor location overlapped. Clinical and biopsy data were collected from all patients. Results: Nine patients had unequivocal dominant tumor on both pre- and postradiotherapy imaging, with mean pre- and postradiotherapy dominant tumor diameters of 1.8 cm (range, 1-2.2) and 1.9 cm (range, 1.4-2.6), respectively. The median follow-up interval was 7.3 years (range, 2.7-10.8). Dominant recurrent tumor was at the same location as dominant baseline tumor in 8 of 9 patients (89%). Conclusions: Local recurrence of prostate cancer after radiation usually occurs at the same site as the dominant primary tumor at baseline, suggesting supplementary focal therapy aimed at enhancing local tumor control would be a rational addition to management.

  15. Salvage Stereotactic Reirradiation With or Without Cetuximab for Locally Recurrent Head-and-Neck Cancer: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Comet, Benedicte; Kramar, Andrew; Faivre-Pierret, Mathieu; Dewas, Sylvain; Coche-Dequeant, Bernard; Degardin, Marian; Lefebvre, Jean-Louis; Lacornerie, Thomas; Lartigau, Eric F.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Normal tissues tolerance limits the use of reirradiation for recurrent head-and-neck cancers (HNC). Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) could offer precise irradiation while sparing healthy tissues. Results of a feasibility study using SBRT with or without cetuximab are reported for reirradiation of recurrent primary HNC. Methods and Materials: Patients with inoperable recurrent, or new primary tumor, in a previously irradiated area were included. Reirradiation dose was 36 Gy in six fractions of 6 Gy to the 85% isodose line covering 95% of the planning target volume. Patients with squamous cell carcinoma received concomitant cetuximab. Results: Between June 2007 and January 2010, 40 patients were prospectively treated for 43 lesions. Median age was 60 and median tumor size was 29 mm. Fifteen patients received concomitant cetuximab and 1 received concomitant cisplatin. Median follow-up was 25.6 months with 34 patients evaluable for tumor response. Median overall survival was 13.6 months and response rate was 79.4% (15 complete and 12 partial responses). Grade 3 toxicity occurred in 4 patients. Conclusion: These results suggest that short SBRT with or without cetuximab is an effective salvage treatment with good response rate in this poor prognosis population with previously irradiated HNC. Treatment is feasible and, with appropriate care to limiting critical structure, acute toxicities are acceptable. A prospective multicenter Phase II trial of SRT and concomitant cetuximab in recurrent HNC squamous cell carcinoma is ongoing.

  16. Detection of locally radio-recurrent prostate cancer at multiparametric MRI: Can dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging be omitted?

    PubMed

    Alonzo, F; Melodelima, C; Bratan, F; Vitry, T; Crouzet, S; Gelet, A; Rouvière, O

    2016-04-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the added value of dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) imaging in detecting locally radio-recurrent prostate cancer using multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) at 3Tesla (T). We retrospectively analyzed 45 patients with rising prostate-specific antigen level after prostate radiotherapy who underwent mpMRI [T2-weighted (T2w), diffusion-weighted (Dw) and DCE imaging] at 3T before prostate biopsy. Four readers assigned a 5-level Likert score of cancer likelihood in 8 prostate sectors (6 sextants, 2 seminal vesicles) on T2w+Dw and T2w+Dw+DCE images. Biopsy results were used as the standard of reference. T2w+Dw and T2w+Dw+DCE imaging had similar areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves on per-sector (0.87-0.89 vs. 0.87-0.89; P=0.19-0.78) and per-lobe (0.82-0.94 vs. 0.80-0.91; P=0.21-0.84) analysis. Using a Likert score≥2/5 for diagnosis threshold, T2w+Dw+DCE imaging showed non-significantly higher sensitivities on per-sector (0.56-0.72 vs. 0.52-0.73, P=0.34-0.69) and per-lobe (0.80-0.90 vs. 0.73-0.88; P=0.63-0.99) analysis. It also showed non-significantly lower specificities on per-sector (0.74-0.89 vs. 0.82-0.89; P=0.09-0.99) and per-lobe (0.48-0.81 vs. 0.61-0.84; P=0.10-0.99) analysis. Weighted kappa values were respectively 0.57-0.70 and 0.55-0.66 for T2w+Dw and T2w+Dw+DCE imaging at the sector level, and 0.66-0.83 and 0.58-0.85 at the lobe level. The use of DCE MR imaging tends to increase sensitivity and decrease specificity for all readers, but the differences are not significant. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  17. Surgery for locally advanced recurrent colorectal cancer involving the aortoiliac axis: can we achieve R0 resection and long-term survival?

    PubMed

    Abdelsattar, Zaid M; Mathis, Kellie L; Colibaseanu, Dorin T; Merchea, Amit; Bower, Thomas C; Larson, David W; Dozois, Eric J

    2013-06-01

    Locally advanced, recurrent colorectal cancer involving the aortoiliac axis may be considered a contraindication for curative surgery because of the technical challenges of achieving a negative margin resection and an assumed poor prognosis. The aim of this study was to assess oncologic outcomes and the ability to achieve an R0 resection in these patients. A retrospective review of a prospectively maintained colorectal cancer database identified 406 consecutive patients who underwent surgery for locally recurrent colorectal cancer between 1997 and 2007. This study was conducted at an academic multidisciplinary tertiary center. The demographic and clinicopathological features of patients undergoing resection for locally advanced disease involving the aortoiliac axis at our institution were reviewed. Twelve patients (7 women, median age 51 years) were identified. Major vessel involvement included internal iliac artery (n = 7), common iliac artery (n = 5), external iliac artery (n = 3), aorta (n = 3), internal iliac vein (n = 2), and external iliac vein (n = 1). R0 resection was achieved in 7 patients, and R1 resection in 5. Eleven patients received intraoperative radiation therapy. Vascular reconstruction (3 aorta, 5 common iliac, 3 external iliac) included synthetic interposition grafts, femoral-femoral bypasses, or primary anastomosis. One patient underwent venous reconstruction of the external iliac vein. No graft complications were encountered, and graft patency at 4 years was 100%. Thirty-day morbidity was seen in 9 patients, 8 of whom had Clavien grade <3. Thirty-day mortality was nil. Overall and disease-free survival at 4 years was 55% and 45%. This study was limited by its sample size, retrospective design, and the number of outcome events. R0 resection of locally advanced recurrent colorectal cancer involving the aortoiliac axis was achieved in over 50% of patients. Overall and disease-free survival was comparable to outcomes seen with locally advanced

  18. Hyperthermia and radiation therapy of local-regional recurrent breast cancer: prognostic factors for response and local control of diffuse or nodular tumors.

    PubMed

    Kapp, D S; Barnett, T A; Cox, R S; Lee, E R; Lohrbach, A; Fessenden, P

    1991-05-01

    Over the past decade, hyperthermia has been extensively studied as an adjuvant to radiation therapy in the management of local-regional metastases from adenocarcinoma of the breast. A retrospective review of our experience from July 1982 to January 1990 identified 241 fields in 89 patients which satisfied the following criteria: biopsy confirmation of recurrent or metastatic adenocarcinoma of the breast; involvement of the chest wall and/or regional lymph nodes with diffuse or nodular metastases; treatment which included radiation therapy and externally administered hyperthermia during which mechanically-mapped and/or multipoint normal tissue and intratumoral temperatures were monitored; and at least one follow-up evaluation at 3 weeks or more after completion of treatment. The majority of fields were in patients who had extensive prior treatment including radiation therapy (68%), chemotherapy (86%), and hormonal therapy (58%). Treatment consisted of radiation therapy (average dose: 39.88 Gy) and hyperthermia (1-12 treatments; average 3.12); concurrent chemotherapy or hormonal therapy were also administered in 3% and 32% of the fields, respectively. Parameters characterizing the initial breast cancer, the patient and tumor at the time of hyperthermia, and the treatment were studied in univariate and multivariate analyses with complete response rate at the time of maximum tumor regression and duration of local control as endpoints. The treatments were well tolerated with no life-threatening complications noted. The means for all fields of the mean minimum, mean maximum, and mean average measured intratumoral temperatures were 40.3 degrees C, 44.6 degrees C, and 42.4 degrees C, respectively. At 3 weeks following completion of radiation therapy, response rates were: complete response (52%), partial response (8%), no response (17%), and continuing regression (monotonic regression to less than 50% of initial volume) was noted in 22% of the fields. At the time of maximum

  19. DEAR1 Is a Dominant Regulator of Acinar Morphogenesis and an Independent Predictor of Local Recurrence-Free Survival in Early-Onset Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lott, Steven T.; Chen, Nanyue; Chandler, Dawn S.; Yang, Qifeng; Wang, Luo; Rodriguez, Marivonne; Xie, Hongyan; Balasenthil, Seetharaman; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Sahin, Aysegul A.; Chaung, Katrina; Zhang, Baili; Olufemi, Shodimu-Emmanu; Chen, Jinyun; Adams, Henry; Band, Vimla; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Frazier, Marsha L.; Keyomarsi, Khandan; Hunt, Kelly K.; Sen, Subrata; Haffty, Bruce; Hewitt, Stephen M.; Krahe, Ralf; Killary, Ann McNeill

    2009-01-01

    Background Breast cancer in young women tends to have a natural history of aggressive disease for which rates of recurrence are higher than in breast cancers detected later in life. Little is known about the genetic pathways that underlie early-onset breast cancer. Here we report the discovery of DEAR1 (ductal epithelium–associated RING Chromosome 1), a novel gene encoding a member of the TRIM (tripartite motif) subfamily of RING finger proteins, and provide evidence for its role as a dominant regulator of acinar morphogenesis in the mammary gland and as an independent predictor of local recurrence-free survival in early-onset breast cancer. Methods and Findings Suppression subtractive hybridization identified DEAR1 as a novel gene mapping to a region of high-frequency loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in a number of histologically diverse human cancers within Chromosome 1p35.1. In the breast epithelium, DEAR1 expression is limited to the ductal and glandular epithelium and is down-regulated in transition to ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), an early histologic stage in breast tumorigenesis. DEAR1 missense mutations and homozygous deletion (HD) were discovered in breast cancer cell lines and tumor samples. Introduction of the DEAR1 wild type and not the missense mutant alleles to complement a mutation in a breast cancer cell line, derived from a 36-year-old female with invasive breast cancer, initiated acinar morphogenesis in three-dimensional (3D) basement membrane culture and restored tissue architecture reminiscent of normal acinar structures in the mammary gland in vivo. Stable knockdown of DEAR1 in immortalized human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs) recapitulated the growth in 3D culture of breast cancer cell lines containing mutated DEAR1, in that shDEAR1 clones demonstrated disruption of tissue architecture, loss of apical basal polarity, diffuse apoptosis, and failure of lumen formation. Furthermore, immunohistochemical staining of a tissue microarray from a

  20. Local control rate after the combination of re-irradiation and hyperthermia for irresectable recurrent breast cancer: Results in 248 patients.

    PubMed

    Linthorst, Marianne; Baaijens, Margreet; Wiggenraad, Ruud; Creutzberg, Carien; Ghidey, Wendimagegn; van Rhoon, Gerard C; van der Zee, Jacoba

    2015-11-01

    Randomized studies have shown that adding hyperthermia (HT) to re-irradiation (re-RT) improves treatment outcome for patients with breast cancer recurrences. We evaluated the efficacy and side effects in patients treated with re-RT and HT for irresectable locoregional breast cancer recurrences. From September 1996 to December 2011, 248 patients with a macroscopic breast cancer recurrence were treated with re-RT and HT. Radiotherapy (RT) was applied to a dose of 32 Gy in 4 Gy fractions, twice weekly. HT was prescribed once weekly after RT. Primary endpoints for this analysis were complete response (CR) and local control (LC). Secondary endpoints were overall survival (OS), and toxicity. Patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related characteristics predictive for the endpoints were identified in univariate and multivariate analyses. The median follow-up period was 32 months. The CR rate was 70%. At 1, 3, and 5 years LC was 53%, 40% and 39%, and OS was 66%, 32%, and 18%, respectively. OS after 10 years was 10%. Thermal burns developed in 23% patients, healing with conservative measures. The incidence of 5 years late grade 3 toxicity was 1%. A few patients survived more than 10 years without evidence of disease. The combination of re-RT and HT results in a high rate of long-term LC with acceptable late toxicity, and many patients remained locally controlled for the rest of their survival period. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Local recurrence of small cell lung cancer following radiofrequency ablation is induced by HIF-1α expression in the transition zone

    PubMed Central

    WAN, JUN; WU, WEI; ZHANG, RENQUAN

    2016-01-01

    Local recurrence of lung cancer following radiofrequency ablation (RFA) treatment is common. The aims of the present study were to assess how RFA treatment affects the growth of small cell lung cancer (SCLC) micrometastases in the transition zone (TZ) surrounding the ablated region and in the reference zones (RZs) of the ablated or unablated lobes and to identify the molecular mechanism(s) of lung cancer recurrence following RFA treatment. After lung micrometastases of human SCLCs had formed, RFA treatment was applied to the right upper lobe (RUL) of the lung in nude mice. Hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α expression, proliferation and angiogenesis potential both in the TZ and RZ were evaluated over time. Separately, at day 1, 7 and 14 following RFA treatment, the growth of micrometastases showed an ~2-fold increase in the TZ compared to the RZ of the unablated lobe, as the right lower lobe (RLL) and the growth of micrometastases in the RZ of the RUL was also induced by RFA. In addition, accelerated tumor growth in the TZ was induced by HIF-1α, but was not associated with tissue angiogenesis potential. We concluded that local recurrences of SCLCs caused by overproliferation of micrometastases following RFA treatment were driven by HIF-1α, although angiogenesis was not the driving force in the TZ. PMID:26750332

  2. Clinically Significant Prostate Cancer Local Recurrence After Radiation Therapy Occurs at the Site of Primary Tumor: Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Step-Section Pathology Evidence

    SciTech Connect

    Pucar, Darko Hricak, Hedvig; Shukla-Dave, Amita; Kuroiwa, Kentaro; Drobnjak, Marija; Eastham, James; Scardino, Peter T.; Zelefsky, Michael J.

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: To determine whether prostate cancer local recurrence after radiation therapy (RT) occurs at the site of primary tumor by retrospectively comparing the tumor location on pre-RT and post-RT magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and using step-section pathology after salvage radical prostatectomy (SRP) as the reference standard. Methods and Materials: Nine patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with intensity modulated RT (69-86.4 Gy), and had pre-RT and post-RT prostate MRI, biopsy-proven local recurrence, and SRP. The location and volume of lesions on pre-RT and post-RT MRI were correlated with step-section pathology findings. Tumor foci >0.2 cm{sup 3} and/or resulting in extraprostatic disease on pathology were considered clinically significant. Results: All nine significant tumor foci (one in each patient; volume range, 0.22-8.63 cm{sup 3}) were detected both on pre-RT and post-RT MRI and displayed strikingly similar appearances on pre-RT and post-RT MRI and step-section pathology. Two clinically insignificant tumor foci ({<=}0.06 cm{sup 3}) were not detected on imaging. The ratios between tumor volumes on pathology and on post-RT MRI ranged from 0.52 to 2.80. Conclusions: Our study provides a direct visual confirmation that clinically significant post-RT local recurrence occurs at the site of primary tumor. Our results are in agreement with reported clinical and pathologic results and support the current practice of boosting the radiation dose within the primary tumor using imaging guidance. They also suggest that monitoring of primary tumor with pre-RT and post-RT MRI could lead to early detection of local recurrence amenable to salvage treatment.

  3. Relationship between interval from surgery to radiotherapy and local recurrence rate in patients with endometrioid-type endometrial cancer: a retrospective mono-institutional Italian study.

    PubMed

    Fabrini, Maria Grazia; Gadducci, Angiolo; Perrone, Franco; La Liscia, Concetta; Cosio, Stefania; Moda, Stefano; Guerrieri, Maria Elena; Grandinetti, Antonella; Greco, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    To assess the relationship between the timing of radiotherapy and the risk of local failure in patients with endometrioid-type endometrial cancer who had undergone surgery and adjuvant external pelvic radiotherapy (with or without brachytherapy), but not chemotherapy. One hundred and seventy seven patients were analyzed in this study. The median follow-up of the survivors was 72 months. Radiotherapy was delivered after a median time of 14.6 weeks from surgery and the median overall treatment time was 6.4 weeks. The tumor relapsed in 32 (18.1%) patients after a median time of 21 months. The local recurrence (vaginal or central pelvic) occurred in 11 patients. The local recurrence rate was associated with tumor grade (p=0.02), myometrial invasion (p=0.046), FIGO stage (p=0.003), pathological node status (p=0.037) and time interval from surgery to radiotherapy using 9 weeks as the cut-off value (p=0.046), but not with the overall treatment time. All the local relapses occurred in patients who received adjuvant irradiation after an interval from surgery >9 weeks. The time interval from surgery to radiotherapy might affect the local recurrence rate in patients not receiving chemotherapy. Every possible effort should be made to start radiotherapy within 9 weeks, when radiotherapy only is deemed necessary as adjuvant treatment.

  4. Salvage surgery for locoregional recurrence or persistent tumor after high dose chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Dickhoff, C; Dahele, M; Paul, M A; van de Ven, P M; de Langen, A J; Senan, S; Smit, E F; Hartemink, K J

    2016-04-01

    Curative intent treatment options for locoregional recurrence or persistent tumor after radical chemoradiotherapy for locally-advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are limited. In selected patients, surgery can be technically feasible, although it is widely believed to be hazardous. As data regarding the outcome of this approach is sparse, we evaluated our institutional experience with salvage surgery. Patients with a pulmonary resection for in-field locoregional recurrence or persistent tumor after high dose chemoradiotherapy (≥60 Gy) for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer, were identified and retrospectively analyzed. A total of 15 patients treated between January 2007 and August 2015 were eligible for evaluation. In 13 patients (87%), the indication for surgery was a locoregional recurrence, while 2 patients had persistent tumor. The prior median radiotherapy dose was 66 Gy (range 60-70). All patients underwent an anatomical resection, with 8 patients having a pneumonectomy, and all pathological specimens revealed the presence of viable tumor. The in-hospital morbidity rate was 40% (6 patients), and the 90-day mortality rate was 6.7% (1 patient). Median follow-up was 12.1 months. The estimated median overall and event-free survivals were 46 months and 43.6 months, respectively. Salvage surgery for locoregional recurrence or persistent tumor after high dose chemoradiotherapy, resulted in acceptable morbidity, mortality and promising outcome. It should be considered as a treatment option for selected patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Bortezomib Followed by the Addition of Doxorubicin at Disease Progression in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced, Recurrent, or Metastatic Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma (Cancer) of the Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Salivary Gland Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma; Stage III Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IV Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer

  6. Salvage focal prostate cryoablation for locally recurrent prostate cancer after radiotherapy: initial results from the cryo on-line data registry.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong-Hong; Elshafei, Ahmed; Agarwal, Gautum; Ruckle, Herbert; Powsang, Julio; Jones, J Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Several investigators have tried to apply salvage focal prostate cryoablation to small numbers of patients with biopsy-proven unilateral recurrent prostate cancer (PCa) after radiotherapy with the aim of decreasing complications of salvage cryoablation. We report contemporary outcomes of salvage focal cryoablation for locally recurrent PCa after radiotherapy within the Cryo On-Line Data (COLD) Registry. We queried the COLD Registry to identify patients diagnosed as locally recurrent PCa after radiotherapy and treated with salvage focal cryoablation. Patients with hormone ablation after cryotherapy were excluded. The biochemical disease-free survival and morbidities were analyzed. Biochemical failure was defined using the Phoenix definition. From 2002 to 2012, 91 patients with biopsy-proven radio-recurrent PCa underwent salvage focal cryoablation with curative intent. The biochemical disease-free survival rates were 95.3%, 72.4%, and 46.5% at 1, 3, and 5 years, respectively. Positive biopsies after salvage focal cryoablation were observed in four of 14 patients who underwent biopsy (28.6%). Rectourethral fistula was observed in three cases (3.3%). Urinary retention was observed in six cases (6.6%). Incontinence (requiring pad use) was reported in five cases (5.5%). Intercourse was reported in 10 of 20 patients (50%) who reported potency before salvage focal cryoablation. The outcomes from this observational study indicate that salvage focal cryoablation can be an effective treatment with encouraging potency preservation for patients with locally recurrent PCa after radiotherapy. However, other morbidity including rectourethral fistula and incontinence are not clearly lower than for patients treated with salvage whole gland cryoablation. Studies with longer follow-up, more patients, and direct comparison to salvage whole gland cryoablation are needed before recommending salvage focal cryoablation as a standard treatment option for these patients. © 2014 Wiley

  7. Lapatinib in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Biliary Tract or Liver Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-18

    Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  8. No increase of local recurrence rate in breast cancer patients treated with skin-sparing mastectomy followed by immediate breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    van Mierlo, D R J; Lopez Penha, T R; Schipper, R J; Martens, M H; Serroyen, J; Lobbes, M B I; Heuts, E M; Tuinder, S; Smidt, M L

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of local recurrence after SSM with IBR and to determine whether complications lead to postponement of adjuvant therapy. Patients that underwent IBR after SSM between 2004 and 2011 were included. A total of 157 reconstruction procedures were performed in 147 patients for invasive breast cancer (n = 117) and ductal carcinoma in situ (n = 40). The median follow-up was 39 months [range 6-97]. Estimated 5-year local recurrence rate was 2.9% (95% CI 0.1-5.7). The median time to start adjuvant therapy was 27.5 days [range 19-92] in 18 patients with complications, and 23.5 days [range 8-54] in 46 patients without complications (p = 0.025). In our single-institution cohort, IBR after SSM carried an acceptable local recurrence rate. Complications caused a delay of adjuvant treatment but this was within guidelines and therefore not clinically relevant. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. [Therapy of recurrent cervical cancer].

    PubMed

    Sekiba, K; Hayase, R

    1990-09-01

    1,122 uterine cancer patients above FIGO stage I a were treated at our hospital in the decade from 1980 to 1989. Total 69 patients diagnosed as recurrent cervical cancer had 82 lesions in 11 sites. The most frequent recurrent sites were uterus, vaginal stump and vaginal wall; the second sites were parametrium and pelvic wall. Radiotherapy and hyperthermia were done to patients with these lesions. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy were used to patients with distant metastatic lesions to left supraclavicular lymph nodes and lung. But there has been no good results.

  10. Local recurrence rates are low in high-risk neoadjuvant breast cancer in the I-SPY 1 Trial (CALGB 150007/150012; ACRIN 6657).

    PubMed

    Cureton, Elizabeth L; Yau, Christina; Alvarado, Michael D; Krontiras, Helen; Ollila, David W; Ewing, Cheryl A; Monnier, Sindy; Esserman, Laura J

    2014-09-01

    Increasingly, women with stage 2 and 3 breast cancers receive neoadjuvant therapy, after which many are eligible for breast-conserving surgery (BCS). The question often arises as to whether BCS, if achievable, provides adequate local control. We report the results of local recurrence (LR) from the I-SPY 1 Trial in the setting of maximal multidisciplinary treatment where approximately 50 % of patients were treated with BCS. We analyzed data from the I-SPY 1 Trial. Women with tumors ≥3 cm from nine clinical breast centers received neoadjuvant doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide and paclitaxel followed by definitive surgical therapy, and radiation at physician discretion. LR following mastectomy and BCS were analyzed in relation to clinical characteristics and response to therapy as measured by residual cancer burden. Of the 237 patients enrolled in the I-SPY 1 Trial, 206 were available for analysis. Median tumor size was 6.0 cm, and median follow-up was 3.9 years. Fourteen patients (7 %) had LR and 45 (22 %) had distant recurrence (DR). Of the 14 patients with LR, nine had synchronous DR; one had DR > 2 years later. Only four (2 % of evaluable patients) had LR alone. The rate of LR was low after mastectomy and after BCS, even in the setting of significant residual disease. Overall, these patients at high risk for early recurrence, treated with maximal multidisciplinary treatment, had low LR. Recurrence was associated with aggressive biological features such as more advanced stage at presentation, where LR occurs most frequently in the setting of DR.

  11. Interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy as salvage treatment for locally recurrent prostate cancer after definitive radiation therapy: Toxicity and 5-year outcome.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ping; van der Horst, Christof; Kimmig, Bernhard; Zinsser, Fabian; Poppe, Bjoern; Luetzen, Ulf; Juenemann, Klaus-Peter; Dunst, Juergen; Siebert, Frank-André

    We report our results with interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) as a salvage therapy option after external beam therapy with or without BT. Emphasis was put on toxicity and 5-year outcome. From 2003 to 2011, 29 patients with local failure after previous radiotherapy for prostate cancer were treated with salvage interstitial HDR-BT. The diagnosis of local recurrence was made on the basis of choline positron emission tomography. Salvage HDR-BT was given in three fractions with a single dose of 10 Gy per fraction and weekly. The target volume covered the peripheral zone of the prostate and the positron emission tomography-positive area. Acute and late toxicities were documented according to common terminology criteria for adverse events (CTCAE v 4.0). Twenty-two patients with minimum followup of 60 months were analyzed. The 5-year overall survival was 95.5% with a disease-specific survival of 100%. The 5-year biochemical control was 45%. Late grade 2 gastrointestinal toxicities were observed in two patients (9%). No grade 3 or higher gastrointestinal late toxicities were observed. Urinary incontinence found in 2 patients (9%) and grade 2 obstruction of urinary tract occurred in one patient (4%). Interstitial HDR-BT was feasible and effective in the treatment of locally recurrent prostate cancer after definitive radiotherapy. The long-term toxicity was low and acceptable. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The use of personalized biomarkers and liquid biopsies to monitor treatment response and disease recurrence in locally advanced rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiation.

    PubMed

    Carpinetti, Paola; Donnard, Elisa; Bettoni, Fabiana; Asprino, Paula; Koyama, Fernanda; Rozanski, Andrei; Sabbaga, Jorge; Habr-Gama, Angelita; Parmigiani, Raphael B; Galante, Pedro A F; Perez, Rodrigo O; Camargo, Anamaria A

    2015-11-10

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (nCRT) followed by surgery is the mainstay treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. Variable degrees of tumor regression are observed after nCRT and alternative treatment strategies, including close surveillance without immediate surgery, have been investigated to spare patients with complete tumor regression from potentially adverse outcomes of radical surgery. However, clinical and radiological assessment of response does not allow accurate identification of patients with complete response. In addition, surveillance for recurrence is similarly important for these patients, as early detection of recurrence allows salvage resections and adjuvant interventions. We report the use of liquid biopsies and personalized biomarkers for monitoring treatment response to nCRT and detecting residual disease and recurrence in patients with rectal cancer. We sequenced the whole-genome of four rectal tumors to identify patient-specific chromosomal rearrangements that were used to monitor circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in liquid biopsies collected at diagnosis and during nCRT and follow-up. We compared ctDNA levels to clinical, radiological and pathological response to nCRT. Our results indicate that personalized biomarkers and liquid biopsies may not be sensitive for the detection of microscopic residual disease. However, it can be efficiently used to monitor treatment response to nCRT and detect disease recurrence, preceding increases in CEA levels and radiological diagnosis. Similar good results were observed when assessing tumor response to systemic therapy and disease progression. Our study supports the use of personalized biomarkers and liquid biopsies to tailor the management of rectal cancer patients, however, replication in a larger cohort is necessary to introduce this strategy into clinical practice.

  13. The use of personalized biomarkers and liquid biopsies to monitor treatment response and disease recurrence in locally advanced rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Carpinetti, Paola; Donnard, Elisa; Bettoni, Fabiana; Asprino, Paula; Koyama, Fernanda; Rozanski, Andrei; Sabbaga, Jorge; Habr-Gama, Angelita; Parmigiani, Raphael B.; Galante, Pedro A.F.; Perez, Rodrigo O.; Camargo, Anamaria A.

    2015-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (nCRT) followed by surgery is the mainstay treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. Variable degrees of tumor regression are observed after nCRT and alternative treatment strategies, including close surveillance without immediate surgery, have been investigated to spare patients with complete tumor regression from potentially adverse outcomes of radical surgery. However, clinical and radiological assessment of response does not allow accurate identification of patients with complete response. In addition, surveillance for recurrence is similarly important for these patients, as early detection of recurrence allows salvage resections and adjuvant interventions. We report the use of liquid biopsies and personalized biomarkers for monitoring treatment response to nCRT and detecting residual disease and recurrence in patients with rectal cancer. We sequenced the whole-genome of four rectal tumors to identify patient-specific chromosomal rearrangements that were used to monitor circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in liquid biopsies collected at diagnosis and during nCRT and follow-up. We compared ctDNA levels to clinical, radiological and pathological response to nCRT. Our results indicate that personalized biomarkers and liquid biopsies may not be sensitive for the detection of microscopic residual disease. However, it can be efficiently used to monitor treatment response to nCRT and detect disease recurrence, preceding increases in CEA levels and radiological diagnosis. Similar good results were observed when assessing tumor response to systemic therapy and disease progression. Our study supports the use of personalized biomarkers and liquid biopsies to tailor the management of rectal cancer patients, however, replication in a larger cohort is necessary to introduce this strategy into clinical practice. PMID:26451609

  14. Breast cancer local recurrence under the form of inflammatory carcinoma, treated with concurrent radiation and chemotherapy, a case report

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Isabel; Pereira, Helena; Azevedo, Isabel; Conde, João; Bravo, Isabel; Craveiro, Rogéria; Pereira, Deolinda

    2013-01-01

    The authors present a case report of a patient with breast cancer diagnosed in 2005, treated with conservative surgery, adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy, followed by hormonal therapy until 2010, who relapsed under the form of inflammatory breast cancer in 2011. After tumor progression detected during primary systemic therapy, a concurrent radiation and radiosensitizing chemotherapy were proposed. There was a significant clinical response to this treatment, enabling curative chance with total mastectomy. The histological examination of the breast and regional lymph nodes revealed a complete response, since there was no evidence of residual tumor. There are few reports concerning concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy in locally advanced breast cancer, but it could be a suitable “loco regional rescue therapy” to further reduce tumor progression and allow curative surgery. Study of this treatment strategy in randomized clinical trials is warranted. PMID:24936322

  15. Phase 2, multicenter, single-arm study of eribulin mesylate with trastuzumab as first-line therapy for locally recurrent or metastatic HER2-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wilks, Sharon; Puhalla, Shannon; O'Shaughnessy, Joyce; Schwartzberg, Lee; Berrak, Erhan; Song, James; Cox, David; Vahdat, Linda

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess efficacy and safety of eribulin with trastuzumab as first-line therapy for locally recurrent or metastatic HER2+ breast cancer. In this multicenter, phase II, single-arm study, patients with recurrent or metastatic HER2+ breast cancer received eribulin mesylate at 1.4 mg/m(2) intravenously (I.V.) on days 1 and 8 of each 21-day cycle with an initial trastuzumab dose of 8 mg/kg I.V. on day 1, followed by 6 mg/kg of trastuzumab on day 1 of each subsequent cycle. Tumor assessments were conducted every 6 weeks for the first 6 cycles and every 12 weeks thereafter. The primary end point was ORR, and secondary end points included PFS, TTR, DOR, and safety. Fifty-two patients were enrolled. Fifty-one patients (98.1%) had metastatic disease, 25 (48.1%) with liver metastases, 24 (46.2%) with lung metastases, and 19 (36.5%) with bone metastases. Patients received a median of 10.0 cycles of eribulin and 11.0 cycles of trastuzumab. The ORR was 71.2% (n = 37) with median TTR of 1.3 months, DOR of 11.1 months, and PFS of 11.6 months. The most common Grade 3/4 treatment-emergent adverse events were neutropenia in 20 (38.5%) patients, peripheral neuropathy in 14 (26.9%; all Grade 3) patients, fatigue in 4 (7.7%) patients, and febrile neutropenia in 4 (7.7%) patients. Because of the high ORR, prolonged median PFS, and acceptable safety profile, combination eribulin/trastuzumab is an acceptable treatment option for locally recurrent or metastatic HER2+ breast cancer. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Tumour volume is an independent predictor of prostate-specific antigen recurrence in patients undergoing radical prostatectomy for clinically localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Bradford A; Shappell, Scott B; Chang, Sam S; Wells, Nancy; Farnham, Scott B; Smith, Joseph A; Cookson, Michael S

    2006-06-01

    Authors from the USA sought to establish the relationship between tumour volume, pathological stage and outcomes after radical prostatectomy. In a large series of patients they found that tumour volume was correlated directly with pathological stage, and that it was independently correlated with PSA recurrence. The authors suggested that tumour volume had a potential use for prognostication in patients undergoing radical prostatectomy. Two papers, one from the USA and one from Germany, advise a re-staging TUR in patients with superficial bladder cancer who are at high risk of early tumour progression. In a large series of patients they found that residual tumour after initial resection was commoner than might be expected, and that the second resection indicated the way to earlier radical treatment and a better prognosis. To establish the relationship between tumour volume (TV), pathological stage and outcome after radical prostatectomy (RP), as TV is theoretically an important variable in prostate cancer pathology, but to date it has not been routinely reported and its independent prognostic significance is not well defined. The study included 431 consecutive patients undergoing RP for clinically localized cancer, from January 2000 to January 2002, who had a pathological examination of totally submitted whole-mount processed RP specimens. In addition to Gleason grade, tumour stage and margin assessment by standard techniques, TV was determined by digital planimetry. The total TV or index TV, for cases with obvious discrete separate tumours, were correlated with pathological stage and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) recurrence. The mean (range) follow-up was 25.4 (6-51) months, and the mean TV for all patients was 3.28 (0.4-38.8) mL. There was a direct correlation between TV and pathological stage (P < 0.001). The TV for organ-confined and extraprostatic disease was 2.09 and 6.02 mL, respectively (P < 0.001). In a multivariate analysis, TV was an independent

  17. Association with pregnancy increases the risk of local recurrence but does not impact overall survival in breast cancer: A case-control study of 87 cases.

    PubMed

    Genin, A S; De Rycke, Y; Stevens, D; Donnadieu, A; Langer, A; Rouzier, R; Lerebours, F

    2016-12-01

    Pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC) constitutes 7% of all BCs in young women. The prognosis of PABC remains controversial. In this study, we evaluated the impact of the association of pregnancy with BC on the rates of overall survival (OS), disease free survival (DFS), and distant and local recurrence-free survival. We conducted a retrospective unicenter case-control study. We enrolled PABC patients treated at our institution between 1992 and 2009. For each case, 2 BC controls were matched for age and year of diagnosis. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to assess the parameters associated with prognosis. Eighty-seven PABC patients were enrolled and matched with 174 controls. The univariate analysis did not reveal any significant differences in OS, DFS or distant recurrence rates between the 2 groups. Pregnancy associated status, a tumor larger than T2 and neoadjuvant chemotherapy as the primary treatment were significantly associated with an increased risk of local relapse. The multivariate analysis showed that the pregnancy associated status and the tumor size were strong prognostic factors of local recurrence. Pregnancy associated status negates the prognostic value of tumor size, as both T0-T2 and T3-T4 PABC patients have the same poor prognosis as control BC patients with T3-T4 tumors. Interestingly, although PABC patients have more locally advanced tumors, they did not have a higher rate of radical surgery than the control BC patients. Pregnancy associated status is a strong prognostic factor of local relapse in BC. In PABC patients, when possible, radical surgery should be the preferred first treatment step. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. [Local recurrence of paratesticular rhabdomyosarcoma].

    PubMed

    Rabii, R; Moufid, K; Fekak, H; Dassouli, B; Joual, A; Bennani, S; el Mrini, M; Benjelloun, S

    2002-10-01

    We report an uncommon case of scrotal recurrence of embryonal paratesticular rhabdomyosarcoma in 19 year old man after 3 years later. The diagnosis was suspected clinically and confirmed by histopathology study after resection of the scrotal tumor. About this case, the authors discuss the diagnosis and the management of this tumor.

  19. [Recurrent breast cancer obtained long-term survival with local treatment(surgery and stereotactic body radiotherapy)and systemic therapy].

    PubMed

    Morioka, Emi; Ohno, Yukako; Noguchi, Miki; Nakano, Yasuharu; Noguchi, Masakuni; Kosaka, Takeo; Takanaka, Tsuyoshi

    2012-11-01

    A 52-year-old woman developed right breast cancer and underwent modified radical mastectomy in 1994. Histologically, the tumor was invasive ductal carcinoma. She was positive for estrogen receptor (ER) but negative for progesterone receptor(PgR), while her human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2(HER2) status was not examined. Although she received adjuvant hormone therapy and chemotherapy[cyclophosphamide+doxorubicin+5-fluorouraci(l CAF), 6 courses ], she underwent partial pulmonary resection on both sides with right oophorectomy in 1997. Subsequently, she was treated with weekly doses paclitaxel(12 courses). However, she developed a pulmonary metastasis in the left breast. In 2002, she underwent a partial left pulmonary resection (ER-positive and HER2 3+) and treatment with an aromatase inhibitor. Subsequently, she was treated with trastuzumab because of repeated lung metastasis. A complete response was obtained after the administration of trastuzumab. In 2008, she developed bone metastasis in the sternum and the left seventh rib, and subsequently underwent stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). She was treated with trastuzumab and aromatase inhibitor. At present, she is free of pain and is still living 15 years after breast cancer recurrence. This case suggests that the interaction of local treatment(surgery and SBRT) and systemic therapy(chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, and monoclonal therapy) may improve the survival of patients with recurrent breast cancer.

  20. Combination of Iodine-125 brachytherapy and chemotherapy for locally recurrent stage III non-small cell lung cancer after concurrent chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaojuan; Li, Jin; Zhong, Xiaoming; He, Jingdong

    2015-10-06

    Locally recurrent non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) poses a great challenge to physicians. This study aimed to explore the efficacy and safety of the combination of brachytherapy and docetaxel and cisplatin for the treatment of locally recurrent stage III NSCLC. Fifty two patients with locally recurrent stage III NSCLC after concurrent chemoradiotherapy were randomly divided into two groups (n = 26). The patients in experimental group were treated with implantation of radioactive (125)I seeds and DP regimen (docetaxel 60 mg/m(2)/cisplatin 75 mg/m(2)). Patients in control group received DP chemotherapy. The local control rate (LCR), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall response rate (ORR) were defined according to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST). With a median follow-up time of 11 months, PFS and LCR was 8 months (95 % CI: 6.99-9.01 months) vs. 5.5 months (95 % CI: 4.43-6.57 months) (P < 0.05) and 10 months (95 % CI: 8.72-11.28 months) vs. 6.2 months (95 % CI: 5.27-7.13 months) (P < 0.05) in the experimental and control groups, respectively. The ORR did not differ between treatment groups and was noted to be 69.2 % and 57.7 %, respectively (P >0.05). There was no occurrence of severe complications in experimental and control groups. The combination of (125)I brachytherapy and second-line chemotherapy is superior to chemotherapy alone and is an effective and safe therapy for this disease. ChiCTR-IOR-15006560.

  1. Exclusive intraoperative radiotherapy for invasive breast cancer in elderly patients (>70 years): proportion of eligible patients and local recurrence-free survival.

    PubMed

    Lambaudie, Eric; Houvenaeghel, Gilles; Ziouèche, Amira; Knight, Sophie; Dravet, François; Garbay, Jean Remy; Giard, Sylvie; Charitansky, Hélène; Cohen, Monique; Faure, Christelle; Hudry, Delphine; Azuar, Paul; Villet, Richard; Gimbergues, Pierre; de Lara, Christine Tunon; Tallet, Agnès; Bannier, Marie; Minsat, Mathieu; Resbeut, Michel

    2016-11-15

    To estimate the proportion of elderly patients (>70 years) with breast cancer eligible for an Exclusive IntraOperative RadioTherapy (E-IORT) and to evaluate their local recurrence-free survival rate. This retrospective study examining two cohorts focuses on patients over 70 years old: a multi-centric cohort of 1411 elderly patients and a mono-centric cohort of 592 elderly patients. All patients underwent conservative surgery followed by external radiotherapy for T0-T3 N0-N1 invasive breast cancer, between 1980 and 2008. Within each cohort two groups were identified according to the inclusion criteria of the RIOP trial (R group) and TARGIT E study (T group). Each group was divided into two sub-groups, patients eligible (E) or non-eligible (nE) for IORT. The population of patients that were eligible in the TARGIT E study but not in the RIOP trial were also studied in both cohorts. The proportion of patients eligible for IORT was calculated, according to the eligibility criteria of each study. A comparison of the 5-year local or locoregional recurrence-free survival rate between eligible vs non-eligible patients was made. In both cohorts, the proportion of patients eligible according to the RIOP trial's eligibility criteria was 35.4 and 19.3%, and according to the TARGIT E study criteria was 60.9 and 45.3%. The 5-year locoregional recurrence-free survival rate was not significantly different between RE and RnE groups, TE and TnE groups. In both cohorts RE and (TE-RE) groups were not significantly different. Our results encourage further necessary studies to define and to extend the eligibility criteria for per operative exclusive radiotherapy.

  2. Local Tumor Control and Normal Tissue Toxicity of Pulsed Low-Dose Rate Radiotherapy for Recurrent Lung Cancer: An In Vivo Animal Study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Wang, Bin; Chen, Xiaoming; Cvetkovic, Dusica; Chen, Lili; Lang, Jinyi; Ma, C-M

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates (1) local tumor control and (2) normal tissue toxicity of pulsed low-dose rate radiotherapy (PLDR) for recurrent lung cancer. For study 1, nude mice were implanted with A549 tumors and divided into the following 3 groups: (1) control (n = 10), (2) conventional radiotherapy (RT; n = 10), and (3) PLDR (n = 10). Tumor-bearing mice received 2 Gy daily dose for 2 consecutive days. Weekly magnetic resonance imaging was used for tumor growth monitoring. For study 2, 20 mice received 8 Gy total body irradiation either continuously (n = 10) or 40 × 0.2 Gy pulses with 3-minute intervals (n = 10). For study 1, both conventional RT and PLDR significantly inhibited the growth of A549 xenografts compared with the control group (>35% difference in the mean tumor volume; P < .05). The PLDR results were slightly better than conventional RT (8% difference in the mean tumor volume; P > .05). For study 2, the average weight was 20.94 ± 1.68 g and 25.69 ± 1.27 g and the survival time was 8 days and 12 days for mice treated with conventional RT and PLDR (P < .05), respectively. This study showed that PLDR could control A549 tumors as effectively as conventional RT, and PLDR induced much less normal tissue toxicity than conventional RT. Thus, PLDR would be a good modality for recurrent lung cancers. This article reports our results of an in vivo animal investigation of PLDR for the treatment of recurrent cancers, which may not be eligible for treatment because of the dose limitations on nearby healthy organs that have been irradiated in previous treatments. This was the first in vivo study to quantify the tumor control and normal tissue toxicities of PLDR using mice with implanted tumors, and our findings provided evidence to support the clinical trials that employ PLDR treatment techniques.

  3. [Evaluation of modalities for recurrent breast cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Tohnosu, N; Onoda, S; Okuyama, K; Koide, Y; Awano, T; Kinoshita, H; Matsubara, H; Sano, T; Nakaichi, H; Isono, K

    1990-12-20

    Of 342 breast cancer patients radically operated on in the Second Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, Chiba University during 1965-1988, treatment for 75 recurrent patients were evaluated by the initial modes of recurrence. The modes of recurrence were classified into distant metastases, local lymph node recurrence (axillary, parasternal and supraclavicular nodes) and chest wall recurrence according to the General Rules for Clinical and Pathological Recording of Breast Cancer. Of 75 recurrent patients, distant metastases were seen as common as 77.3%, followed by recurrences of local lymph nodes (14.7%) and chest wall (8.0%). The number of patients in each mode of recurrence increased in relation to increase in the size of tumor and the number of metastatic lymph nodes at the time of the first operation. Histologically, scirrhous carcinoma was most common in chest wall recurrence. 2-year disease-free survival rates of distant metastases, local lymph node recurrence and chest wall recurrence were 44.6%, 24.2% and 16.7%, respectively. 5-year survival of bone metastasis with chemo-endocrine therapy was as significantly favorable as 60%, compared to chemo- or radiotherapy alone (p less than 0.01). However, 5-year survival of lung metastasis with or without endocrine therapy revealed no significant difference. Local lymph node recurrence with the combination of resection, radio- and/or chemotherapy produced a trend toward showing more favorable survival than that without resection.

  4. Therapeutic application of injectable thermosensitive hydrogel in preventing local breast cancer recurrence and improving incision wound healing in a mouse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Na; Gong, Changyang; Qian, Zhiyong; Luo, Feng; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Helan; Wei, Yuquan

    2012-08-01

    Many drug delivery systems (DDSs) have been investigated for local targeting of malignant disease with the intention of increasing anti-tumor activity and minimizing systemic toxicity. An injectable thermosensitive hydrogel was applied to prevent locoregional recurrence of 4T1 breast cancer in a mouse model. The presented hydrogel, which is based on poly(ethyleneglycol)-poly(ε-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG-PCL-PEG, PECE), flows freely at normal temperature, forms a gel within seconds in situ at body temperature, and eventually releases the drug in a consistent and sustained fashion as it gradually biodegrades. Locoregional recurrence after primary tumor removal was significantly inhibited in mice treated with the paclitaxel (PTX)-loaded PECE hydrogel subcutaneously (9.1%) administered, compared with the blank hydrogel (80.0%), systemic (77.8%) and locally (75.0%) administered PTX, and the control group (100%) (P < 0.01). In addition, tensile strength measurements of the surgical incisions showed that the PECE hydrogel accelerates wound healing at postoperative day 7 (P < 0.05), and days 4 and 14 (P > 0.05), in agreement with histopathological examinations. This novel DDSs represents a promising approach for local adjuvant therapy in malignant disease.

  5. Therapeutic application of injectable thermosensitive hydrogel in preventing local breast cancer recurrence and improving incision wound healing in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lei, Na; Gong, ChangYang; Qian, ZhiYong; Luo, Feng; Wang, Cheng; Wang, HeLan; Wei, YuQuan

    2012-09-21

    Many drug delivery systems (DDSs) have been investigated for local targeting of malignant disease with the intention of increasing anti-tumor activity and minimizing systemic toxicity. An injectable thermosensitive hydrogel was applied to prevent locoregional recurrence of 4T1 breast cancer in a mouse model. The presented hydrogel, which is based on poly(ethyleneglycol)-poly(ε-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG-PCL-PEG, PECE), flows freely at normal temperature, forms a gel within seconds in situ at body temperature, and eventually releases the drug in a consistent and sustained fashion as it gradually biodegrades. Locoregional recurrence after primary tumor removal was significantly inhibited in mice treated with the paclitaxel (PTX)-loaded PECE hydrogel subcutaneously (9.1%) administered, compared with the blank hydrogel (80.0%), systemic (77.8%) and locally (75.0%) administered PTX, and the control group (100%) (P < 0.01). In addition, tensile strength measurements of the surgical incisions showed that the PECE hydrogel accelerates wound healing at postoperative day 7 (P < 0.05), and days 4 and 14 (P > 0.05), in agreement with histopathological examinations. This novel DDSs represents a promising approach for local adjuvant therapy in malignant disease.

  6. Salvage Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) for Locally Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Cancer after Definitive IMRT: A Novel Scenario of the Modern Era.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lin; Wang, Lei; Shen, Chunying; Hu, Chaosu; Wang, Lei; Lu, Jiade J

    2016-09-12

    Locally recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma (rNPC) after definitive IMRT occurs in 10% of all cases and represents a distinct clinical entity that has been selectively enriched by radio-resistant cancer cells. Therefore, we report of the outcomes of 77 patients who had repeat salvage-IMRT for rNPC after only a definitive course of IMRT. Various clinical outcomes were measured. Log-rank tests were used to detect differences in the survival outcomes between factor-defined subgroups. Multivariable analysis was performed using the Cox proportional hazard model. The median follow-up time was 25.7 months (range 3.0-75.7 months), measured from the time of recurrence. The median OS time and PFS time of the entire cohort was 37.0 and 20.5 months, respectively. Thirty-four patients (44.2%) died. Approximately 35% of these patients died from disease progression, but 53% were from treatment-induced severe adverse effects (SAEs) without evidence of disease progression. Higher T-classification of the recurrent tumor and the development of SAEs were found to be the only independent and significant adverse prognostic factors on multivariable analysis. These outcomes underscore the particularly virulent characteristics of rNPC after definitive IMRT. Concerning is the impact of re-irradiation toxicity on patient mortality.

  7. Salvage Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) for Locally Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Cancer after Definitive IMRT: A Novel Scenario of the Modern Era

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Lin; Wang, Lei; Shen, Chunying; Hu, Chaosu; Wang, Lei; Lu, Jiade J.

    2016-01-01

    Locally recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma (rNPC) after definitive IMRT occurs in 10% of all cases and represents a distinct clinical entity that has been selectively enriched by radio-resistant cancer cells. Therefore, we report of the outcomes of 77 patients who had repeat salvage-IMRT for rNPC after only a definitive course of IMRT. Various clinical outcomes were measured. Log-rank tests were used to detect differences in the survival outcomes between factor-defined subgroups. Multivariable analysis was performed using the Cox proportional hazard model. The median follow-up time was 25.7 months (range 3.0–75.7 months), measured from the time of recurrence. The median OS time and PFS time of the entire cohort was 37.0 and 20.5 months, respectively. Thirty-four patients (44.2%) died. Approximately 35% of these patients died from disease progression, but 53% were from treatment-induced severe adverse effects (SAEs) without evidence of disease progression. Higher T-classification of the recurrent tumor and the development of SAEs were found to be the only independent and significant adverse prognostic factors on multivariable analysis. These outcomes underscore the particularly virulent characteristics of rNPC after definitive IMRT. Concerning is the impact of re-irradiation toxicity on patient mortality. PMID:27616024

  8. Local recurrence rates after radiofrequency ablation or resection of colorectal liver metastases. Analysis of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer #40004 and #40983.

    PubMed

    Tanis, E; Nordlinger, B; Mauer, M; Sorbye, H; van Coevorden, F; Gruenberger, T; Schlag, P M; Punt, C J A; Ledermann, J; Ruers, T J M

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study is to describe local tumour control after radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and surgical resection (RES) of colorectal liver metastases (CLM) in two independent European Organisations for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) studies. Only 10-20% of patients with newly diagnosed CLM are eligible for curative RES. RFA has found a place in daily practice for unresectable CLM. There are no prospective trials comparing RFA to RES for resectable CLM. The CLOCC trial randomised 119 patients with unresectable CLM between RFA (±RES)+adjuvant FOLFOX (±bevacizumab) versus FOLFOX (±bevacizumab) alone. The EPOC trial randomised 364 patients with resectable CLM between RES±perioperative FOLFOX. We describe the local control of resected patients with lesions ≤4 cm in the perioperative chemotherapy arm of the EPOC trial (N=81) and the RFA arm of the CLOCC trial (N=55). Local recurrence (LR) rate for RES was 7.4% per patient and 5.5% per lesion. LR rate for RFA was 14.5% per patient and 6.0% per lesion. When lesion size was limited to 30 mm, LR rate for RFA lesions was 2.9% per lesion. Non-local hepatic recurrences were more often observed in RFA patients than in RES patients, 30.9% and 22.3% respectively. Patients receiving RFA had a more advanced disease. LR rate after RFA for lesions with a limited size is low. The local control per lesion does not appear to differ greatly between RFA and surgical resection. This study supports the local control of RFA in patients with limited liver metastases. Future studies should evaluate in which patients RFA could be an equal alternative to liver resection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Local Recurrence After Hepatic Radiofrequency Coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Mulier, Stefaan; Ni, Yicheng; Jamart, Jacques; Ruers, Theo; Marchal, Guy; Michel, Luc

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to analyze the factors that influence local recurrence after radiofrequency coagulation of liver tumors. Summary Background Data: Local recurrence rate varies widely between 2% and 60%. Apart from tumor size as an important risk factor for local recurrence, little is known about the impact of other factors. Methods: An exhaustive literature search was carried out for the period from January 1, 1990 to January 1, 2004. Only series with a minimal follow-up of 6 months and/or mean follow-up of 12 months were included. Univariate and multivariate meta-analyses were carried out. Results: Ninety-five independent series were included, allowing the analysis of the local recurrence rate of 5224 treated liver tumors. In a univariate analysis, tumor-dependent factors with significantly less local recurrences were: smaller size, neuroendocrine metastases, nonsubcapsular location, and location away from large vessels. Physician-dependent favorable factors were: surgical (open or laparoscopic) approach, vascular occlusion, general anesthesia, a 1-cm intentional margin, and a greater physician experience. In a multivariate analysis, significantly less local recurrences were observed for small size (P < 0.001) and a surgical (versus percutaneous) approach (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Radiofrequency coagulation by laparoscopy or laparotomy results in superior local control, independent of tumor size. The percutaneous route should mainly be reserved for patients who cannot tolerate a laparoscopy or laparotomy. The short-term benefits of less invasiveness for the percutaneous route do not outweigh the longer-term higher risk of local recurrence. PMID:16041205

  10. TLR8 Agonist VTX-2337 and Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced, Recurrent, or Metastatic Squamous Cell Cancer of Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-03

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage

  11. Updated results of a phase I trial of motexafin lutetium-mediated interstitial photodynamic therapy in patients with locally recurrent prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Verigos, Kosmas; Stripp, Diana C Hsiung; Mick, Rosemarie; Zhu, Timothy C; Whittington, Richard; Smith, Debbie; Dimofte, Andreea; Finlay, Jarod; Busch, Theresa M; Tochner, Zelig A; Malkowicz, S; Glatstein, Eli; Hahn, Stephen M

    2006-01-01

    Locally recurrent prostate cancer after treatment with radiation therapy is a clinical problem with few acceptable treatments. One potential treatment, photodynamic therapy (PDT), is a modality that uses laser light, drug photosensitizer, and oxygen to kill tumor cells through direct cellular cytotoxicity and/or through destruction of tumor vasculature. A Phase I trial of interstitial PDT with the photosensitizer Motexafin lutetium was initiated in men with locally recurrent prostate cancer. In this ongoing trial, the primary objective is to determine the maximally tolerated dose of Motexafin lutetium-mediated PDT. Other objectives include evaluation of Motexafin lutetium uptake from prostate tissue using a spectrofluorometric assay and evaluation of optical properties in the human prostate. Fifteen men with biopsy-proven locally recurrent prostate cancer and no evidence of distant metastatic disease have been enrolled and 14 have been treated. Treatment plans were developed using transrectal ultrasound images. The PDT dose was escalated by increasing the Motexafin lutetium dose, increasing the 732 ran light dose, and decreasing the drug-light interval. Motexafin lutetium doses ranged from 0.5 to 2 mg/kg administered IV 24, 6, or 3 hr prior to 732 ran light delivery. The light dose, measured in real time with in situ spherical detectors was 25-100 J/cm2. Light was delivered via optical fibers inserted through a transperineal brachytherapy template in the operating room. Optical property measurements were made before and after light therapy. Prostate biopsies were obtained before and after light delivery for spectrofluorometric measurements of photosensitizer uptake. Fourteen patients have completed protocol treatment on eight dose levels without dose-limiting toxicity. Grade I genitourinary symptoms that are PDT related have been observed. One patient had Grade II urinary urgency that was urinary catheter related. No rectal or other gastrointestinal PDT-related tox

  12. Risk factors for local recurrence of fibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Machado, V; Troncoso, S; Mejías, L; Idoate, M Á; San-Julián, M

    To evaluate the clinical, radiological and histological factors that can predict local recurrence of fibromatosis. A retrospective study was conducted on 51 patients diagnosed with fibromatosis in this hospital from 1983 to 2014. The mean follow-up was 83 months. A study was made of the clinical parameters, location, depth, size, surgical margins, and proliferation index (Ki-67). An evaluation was also made of the risk of recurrence depending on the adjuvant treatment and the relationship between treatment and patient functionality. Tumour location and depth were identified as risk factors for local recurrence, showing statistically significant differences (P<.001 and P=.003, respectively). There were no statistically significant differences in age, gender, size, surgical margins, or adjuvant treatments, or in the Musculoskeletal Tumour Society Score according to the treatment received. The mean Ki-67 was 1.9% (range 1-4), and its value was not associated with the risk of recurrence. Deep fibromatosis fascia tumours, and those located in extremities are more aggressive than superficial tumours and those located in trunk. The Ki-67 has no predictive value in local recurrence of fibromatosis. Radiotherapy, chemotherapy, or other adjuvant treatments such as tamoxifen have not been effective in local control of the disease. Given the high recurrence rate, even with adequate margins, a wait and see attitude should be considered in asymptomatic patients and/or stable disease. Copyright © 2017 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. The Quality of Cervical Cancer Brachytherapy Implantation and the Impact on Local Recurrence and Disease-Free Survival in RTOG Prospective Trials 0116 and 0128

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, A.N.; Moughan, J.; Small, W.; Levenback, C.; Iyer, R.; Hymes, S.; Dicker, A.P.; Miller, B.; Erickson, B.; Gaffney, D.K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To determine the impact of brachytherapy implant quality on outcome among cervical cancer patients treated on RTOG prospective trials 0116 and 0128. Materials and Methods All enrolled patients received concurrent chemo-radiation followed by brachytherapy. Individual brachytherapy parameters, including the symmetry of ovoids in relation to the tandem, displacement of ovoids in relation to the cervical os, tandem bisecting the ovoids, tandem in the mid-pelvis, and appropriateness of packing, were scored for each implant. Multivariate (MV) Cox proportional hazard models were constructed for each parameter for local recurrence (LR), regional recurrence (RR), distant recurrence (DR), disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Results Records for 103 patients were analyzed. The median follow-up time was 24.5 months. Patients with unacceptable symmetry of ovoids to the tandem had a significantly higher risk of LR than patients in the acceptable group (HR=2.67, 95% C.I. = [1.11, 6.45], p=0.03). Patients with displacement of ovoids in relation to the cervical os had a significantly increased risk of LR (HR=2.50, 95% C.I. = [1.05, 5.93], p=0.04) and a lower DFS rate (HR=2.28, 95% C.I. = [1.18, 4.41], p=0.01). Inappropriate placement of packing resulted in a lower DFS rate (HR=2.06, 95% C.I. = [1.08, 3.92], p=0.03). Conclusion Assessment of the quality of a brachytherapy implant is imperative, as proper placement impacts patient disease-free survival. If feasible, inappropriate placements should be corrected prior to treatment initiation. Brachytherapy applicators for cervical cancer should preferably be placed and assessed by experienced practitioners. PMID:22193645

  14. The quality of cervical cancer brachytherapy implantation and the impact on local recurrence and disease-free survival in radiation therapy oncology group prospective trials 0116 and 0128.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Akila N; Moughan, Jennifer; Small, William; Levenback, Charles; Iyer, Revathy; Hymes, Sharon; Dicker, Adam P; Miller, Brigitte; Erickson, Beth; Gaffney, David K

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the impact of brachytherapy implant quality on outcome among cervical cancer patients treated on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group prospective trials 0116 and 0128. All enrolled patients received concurrent chemoradiation followed by brachytherapy. Individual brachytherapy parameters, including the symmetry of ovoids in relation to the tandem, displacement of ovoids in relation to the cervical os, tandem bisecting the ovoids, tandem in the midpelvis, and appropriateness of packing, were scored for each implant. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were constructed for each parameter for local recurrence (LR), regional recurrence, distant recurrence, disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival. Records for 103 patients were analyzed. The median follow-up time was 24.5 months. Patients with unacceptable symmetry of ovoids to the tandem had a significantly higher risk of LR than patients in the acceptable group (hazard ratio [HR], 2.67; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.11-6.45; P = 0.03). Patients with displacement of ovoids in relation to the cervical os had a significantly increased risk of LR (HR, 2.50; 95% CI, 1.05-5.93; P = 0.04) and a lower DFS rate (HR, 2.28; 95% CI, 1.18-4.41; P = 0.01). Inappropriate placement of packing resulted in a lower DFS rate (HR, 2.06; 95% CI, 1.08-3.92; P = 0.03). Assessment of the quality of a brachytherapy implant is imperative, as proper placement has an impact on patient DFS. If feasible, inappropriate placements should be corrected before treatment initiation. Brachytherapy applicators for cervical cancer should preferably be placed and assessed by experienced practitioners.

  15. Stress Reduction in Improving Quality of Life in Patients With Recurrent Gynecologic or Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-08

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Fatigue; Leydig Cell Tumor; Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Pain; Peritoneal Carcinomatosis; Pseudomyxoma Peritonei; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Recurrent Vaginal Cancer; Recurrent Vulvar Cancer

  16. Cetuximab for the treatment of locally advanced and recurrent/metastatic oral cancer: An investigation of distant metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Naruse, Tomofumi; Yanamoto, Souichi; Matsushita, Yuki; Sakamoto, Yuki; Morishita, Kota; Ohba, Seigo; Shiraishi, Takeshi; Yamada, Shin-Ichi; Asahina, Izumi; Umeda, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to assess the efficacy and safety of cetuximab therapy for patients with locally advanced (LA) and recurrent/metastatic (R/M) oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), with a specific focus on distant metastases (DMs). Data from 21 patients with unresectable LA and R/M OSCC treated with cetuximab therapy in our department between December, 2012 and July, 2015 were reviewed. The endpoint was the time-to-progression and the assessments made were tumor response rate, progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS) and safety. The overall response rate was 57.1%, with a complete response (CR) rate of 33.3%. The overall median PFS and OS were 5.5 and 8.0 months, respectively. For patients with DMs, the overall response rate was 60.0%, with a CR rate of 40.0%. The median PFS and OS were 3.8 and 5.8 months, respectively. In addition, improved 1-year OS was observed following approval of cetuximab, although the differences between the group of patients treated after that time and historical controls were not statistically significantly (P=0.246). Grade 3–4 adverse events included infusion reaction (4 cases), neutropenia, hypophosphatemia, upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage, liver toxicity and mucositis (1 case each). There was one cetuximab-related death due to interstitial pneumonia. An acne-like rash was observed in all cases, but no grade 3 or 4 rash was reported. Hypomagnesemia was observed in 10 cases. Our results suggest that cetuximab may display significant therapeutic efficacy in patients with unresectable LA and R/M OSCC, including those with DMs. PMID:27446558

  17. Salvage stereotactic body radiotherapy for locally recurrent non-small cell lung cancer after sublobar resection and i(125) vicryl mesh brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Gill, Beant S; Clump, David A; Burton, Steven A; Christie, Neil A; Schuchert, Matthew J; Heron, Dwight E

    2015-01-01

    Locally recurrent non-small cell lung cancer (LR-NSCLC) remains challenging to treat, particularly in patients having received prior radiotherapy. Heterogeneous populations and varied treatment intent in existing literature result in significant limitations in evaluating efficacy of lung re-irradiation. In order to better establish the impact of re-irradiation in patients with LR-NSCLC following high-dose radiotherapy, we report outcomes for patients treated with prior sublobar resection and brachytherapy that subsequently underwent stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). A retrospective review of patients initially treated with sublobar resection and I(125) vicryl mesh brachytherapy, who later developed LR-NSCLC along the suture line, was performed. Patients received salvage SBRT with curative intent. Dose and fractionation were based on tumor location and size, with a median prescription dose of 48 Gy in 4 fractions (range 20-60 Gy in 1-4 fractions). Thirteen consecutive patients were identified with median follow-up of 2.1 years (range 0.7-5.6 years). Two in-field local failures occurred at 7.5 and 11.1 months, resulting in 2-year local control of 83.9% (95% CI, 63.5-100.0%). Two-year disease-free survival and overall survival estimates were 38.5% (95% CI, 0.0-65.0%) and 65.8% (95% CI, 38.2-93.4%). Four patients (31%) remained disease-free at last follow-up. All but one patient who experienced disease recurrence developed isolated or synchronous distant metastases. Only one patient (7.7%) developed grade ≥3 toxicity, consisting of grade 3 esophageal stricture following a centrally located recurrence previously treated with radiofrequency ablation. Despite high-local radiation doses delivered to lung parenchyma previously with I(125) brachytherapy, re-irradiation with SBRT for LR-NSCLC results in excellent local control with limited morbidity, allowing for potential disease cure in a subset of patients.

  18. Mucoadhesive Oral Wound Rinse in Preventing and Treating Stomatitis in Patients With ER- or PR-Positive Metastatic or Locally Recurrent Breast Cancer That Cannot be Removed by Surgery Receiving Everolimus

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-07

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Oral Complications; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  19. Local recurrences in cervical cancer patients in the setting of image-guided brachytherapy: A comparison of spatial dose distribution within a matched-pair analysis

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Maximilian P.; Kirisits, Christian; Nesvacil, Nicole; Dimopoulos, Johannes C.A.; Berger, Daniel; Pötter, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Purpose It has been shown that a cumulative dose of ⩾87 Gy (EQD2) of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and image guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT) to the high risk clinical target volume (HR CTV) confer a local control rate >95% in locally advanced cervical cancer. This study examines the dose distribution within the HR CTV and intermediate (IR) CTV in patients with cervical cancer treated with definitive EBRT +/− concomitant chemotherapy and MRI-based IGABT between patients with local recurrence (LR) and patients in continuous complete local remission (CCLR). Material and methods From 1998 to 2010, 265 patients were treated with definitive EBRT +/− concomitant chemotherapy and IGABT. Twenty-four LRs were documented. For the statistical analysis all patients with LR were matched to patients in CCLR from our database according to the following criteria: FIGO stage, histology, lymph node status, tumour size and chemotherapy. DVH parameters (D50, D90, D98, D100) were reported for HR CTV and IR CTV. In order to report the minimum dose in the region where the recurrence occurred, the HR CTV/IR CTV were divided into four quadrants on transversal planes. The minimum dose at the HR CTV/IR CTV contour was measured (within the corresponding quadrant closest to the LR) in the treatment planning system. A mean minimum point dose (MPD) was calculated by averaging these measurements on four consecutive slices at the level of the recurrence for each of the 4 brachytherapy fractions. EQD2 doses were calculated by summation of all BT and external beam therapy fractions. For each matched patient in the control group the measurements were performed on the same quadrant and at the same level. Results Sufficient image data were available for 21 LRs. Eight central failures and 13 non-central failures were observed. The mean D90 and D100 for HR CTV were 77 Gy and 61 Gy for patients with LR and 95 Gy and 71 Gy for patients in CCLR, respectively (p < 0.01). The MPD for HR

  20. Genetic variants of the CYP1B1 gene as predictors of biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy in localized prostate cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Gu, Cheng-Yuan; Qin, Xiao-Jian; Qu, Yuan-Yuan; Zhu, Yu; Wan, Fang-Ning; Zhang, Gui-Ming; Sun, Li-Jiang; Zhu, Yao; Ye, Ding-Wei

    2016-07-01

    Clinically localized prostate cancer is curative. Nevertheless many patients suffered from biochemical recurrence (BCR) after radical prostatectomy (RP). Mounting evidence suggest that estrogen and xenobiotic carcinogens play an essential role in progression of prostate cancervia oxidative estrogen metabolism. CYP1B1 is an enzyme involved in the hydroxylation of estrogens, a reaction of key relevance in estrogen metabolism. Given the role of CYP1B1 in the oxidative metabolism of endogenous/exogenous estrogen and compounds, CYP1B1 polymorphisms have the potential to modify its expression and subsequently lead to progression. We hypothesize that genetic variants of the CYP1B1 gene may influence clinical outcome in clinically localized prostate cancer patients. In this cohort study, we genotyped 9 tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from the CYP1B1 gene in 312 patients treated with RP. For replication, these SNPs were genotyped in an independent cohort of 426 patients. The expression level of CYP1B1 in the adjacent normal prostate tissues was quantified by reverse transcription and real-time polymerase chain reaction. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazard models were utilized to identify SNPs that correlated with BCR. CYP1B1 rs1056836 was significantly associated with BCR (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.69; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.40-0.89, P = 0.002) and relative CYP1B1 mRNA expression. Our findings suggest inherited genetic variation in the CYP1B1 gene may contribute to variable clinical outcomes for patients with clinically localized prostate cancer.

  1. Genetic variants of the CYP1B1 gene as predictors of biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy in localized prostate cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Cheng-Yuan; Qin, Xiao-Jian; Qu, Yuan-Yuan; Zhu, Yu; Wan, Fang-Ning; Zhang, Gui-Ming; Sun, Li-Jiang; Zhu, Yao; Ye, Ding-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Clinically localized prostate cancer is curative. Nevertheless many patients suffered from biochemical recurrence (BCR) after radical prostatectomy (RP). Mounting evidence suggest that estrogen and xenobiotic carcinogens play an essential role in progression of prostate cancervia oxidative estrogen metabolism. CYP1B1 is an enzyme involved in the hydroxylation of estrogens, a reaction of key relevance in estrogen metabolism. Given the role of CYP1B1 in the oxidative metabolism of endogenous/exogenous estrogen and compounds, CYP1B1 polymorphisms have the potential to modify its expression and subsequently lead to progression. We hypothesize that genetic variants of the CYP1B1 gene may influence clinical outcome in clinically localized prostate cancer patients. In this cohort study, we genotyped 9 tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from the CYP1B1 gene in 312 patients treated with RP. For replication, these SNPs were genotyped in an independent cohort of 426 patients. The expression level of CYP1B1 in the adjacent normal prostate tissues was quantified by reverse transcription and real-time polymerase chain reaction. Kaplan–Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazard models were utilized to identify SNPs that correlated with BCR. CYP1B1 rs1056836 was significantly associated with BCR (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.69; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.40–0.89, P = 0.002) and relative CYP1B1 mRNA expression. Our findings suggest inherited genetic variation in the CYP1B1 gene may contribute to variable clinical outcomes for patients with clinically localized prostate cancer. PMID:27399092

  2. [Recurrent urological cancer--diagnose and treatment].

    PubMed

    Takeshima, H; Akaza, H

    1998-02-01

    Clinical efforts to spare bladder function even in the case of muscle invasive recurrent bladder cancer is taking. Early detection of recurrence is essential for bladder sparing, and both urinary NMP22 and BTA are thought to have potency to detect recurrence of bladder cancer earlier than urinary cytology. Intravesical administration of BCG for superficial bladder cancer and intraarterial injection of chemoagents (Methotrexate and Cisplatin) with radiation for muscle invasive bladder cancer are thought to play important roles in sparing the bladder. Early detection of recurrent prostate cancer is becoming easier by ultrasensitive PSA assay. Though the value of early detection of recurrence is not proven since the benefits of early hormonal treatment have not yet been established, that should be a good indicator to evaluate new and coming treatments and play a important role to develop an effective treatment for recurrent prostate cancer.

  3. Electrochemotherapy of chest wall breast cancer recurrence.

    PubMed

    Sersa, Gregor; Cufer, Tanja; Paulin, Snezna Marija; Cemazar, Maja; Snoj, Marko

    2012-08-01

    Chest wall breast cancer recurrence after mastectomy is a disease difficult to treat. Its incidence varies between 5% and 30% in different subset of patients. When possible, radical surgical therapy represents the main treatment approach, however when the disease progresses and/or treatments are not successful, ulceration, bleeding, lymphedema and psychological distress of progressive disease significantly decrease the quality of the remaining life of a patient. When surgical excision of chest wall recurrence is not possible, other local treatments such as radiotherapy, radiotherapy with hyperthermia, topical chemotherapy and electrochemotherapy might be taken into account. Electrochemotherapy provides safe, efficient and non-invasive locoregional treatment approach for chest wall breast cancer recurrence. Several clinical studies have demonstrated high efficacy and a good safety profile of electrochemotherapy applied in single or multiple consecutive sessions, till clinical response was reached. Electrochemotherapy can be performed either with cisplatin injected intratumorally or with bleomycin given intratumorally or intravenously. Furthermore, it can be effectively used in heavily pre-treated areas, after surgery, radiotherapy or systemic chemotherapy. These are the advantages that might demand its use especially in patients with pre-treated extensive disease and in frail elderly patients. With development of the technology electrochemotherapy could even be suggested as a primary local therapy in patients not suitable for surgical removal of the primary tumor. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Clinical potential of boron neutron capture therapy for locally recurrent inoperable previously irradiated head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Lim, Diana; Quah, Daniel S C; Leech, Michelle; Marignol, Laure

    2015-12-01

    This review compares the safety and efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in the treatment of previously irradiated, inoperable locoregional recurrent HNC patients and compares BNCT against the standard treatment of platinum-based chemotherapy. Our analysis of published clinical trials highlights efficacy of BNCT associated with mild side effects. However, the use of BNCT should be explored in stratified randomised trials.

  5. Primary Recurrence in the Lung is Related to Favorable Prognosis in Patients with Pancreatic Cancer and Postoperative Recurrence.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Biao; Ohuchida, Kenoki; Yan, Zilong; Okumura, Takashi; Ohtsuka, Takao; Nakamura, Masafumi

    2017-06-20

    The pattern of recurrence affects the clinical outcome in tumor patients. However, the clinical significance of lung metastasis as the primary recurrence site after resection in patients with pancreatic cancer remains unclear. This study aimed to clarify the clinical significance of the primary recurrence site in patients with pancreatic cancer, in terms of prognosis and clinicopathological features. This retrospective cohort study included 220 patients with postoperative recurrence after pancreatectomy for pancreatic cancer and classified by primary site of recurrence. We focused on patients with lung metastasis as the primary recurrence and investigated its correlation with prognosis and clinicopathological factors. Twenty-four (11%) patients had lung metastasis as the primary recurrence. This recurrence pattern had the best prognosis among all recurrence patterns, including liver metastasis and local recurrence. Patients with lung metastasis as the primary recurrence had favorable overall survival and survival from the date of recurrence compared with patients with other primary recurrence sites in both univariate (P = 0.0008 and P = 0.0005) and multivariate analyses (P = 0.0051 and P = 0.0068). In terms of clinicopathological features of resected pancreatic tumors, lung metastasis as the primary recurrence was associated with lower tumor stage and histologic grade, and less vascular invasion and residual tumor volume than liver metastasis. Pancreatic cancer patients with lung metastasis as the primary recurrence after pancreatectomy have a better prognosis than those with other recurrence patterns.

  6. Low p53 Binding Protein 1 (53BP1) Expression Is Associated With Increased Local Recurrence in Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Breast-Conserving Surgery and Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Neboori, Hanmanth J.R.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Wu Hao; Yang Qifeng; Aly, Amal; Goyal, Sharad; Schiff, Devora; Moran, Meena S.; Golhar, Ryan; Chen Chunxia; Moore, Dirk; and others

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether the expression of p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1) has prognostic significance in a cohort of early-stage breast cancer patients treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy (BCS+RT). Methods and Materials: A tissue microarray of early-stage breast cancer treated with BCS+RT from a cohort of 514 women was assayed for 53BP1, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and HER2 expression by immunohistochemistry. Through log-rank tests and univariate and multivariate models, the staining profile of each tumor was correlated with clinical endpoints, including ipsilateral breast recurrence-free survival (IBRFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), recurrence-free survival (RFS), and overall survival (OS). Results: Of the 477 (93%) evaluable tumors, 63 (13%) were scored as low. Low expression of 53BP1 was associated with worse outcomes for all endpoints studied, including 10-year IBRFS (76.8% vs. 90.5%; P=.01), OS (66.4% vs. 81.7%; P=.02), CSS (66.0% vs. 87.4%; P<.01), DMFS (55.9% vs. 87.0%; P<.01), and RFS (45.2% vs. 80.6%; P<.01). Multivariate analysis incorporating various clinico-pathologic markers and 53BP1 expression found that 53BP1 expression was again an independent predictor of all endpoints (IBRFS: P=.0254; OS: P=.0094; CSS: P=.0033; DMFS: P=.0006; RFS: P=.0002). Low 53BP1 expression was also found to correlate with triple-negative (TN) phenotype (P<.01). Furthermore, in subset analysis of all TN breast cancer, negative 53BP1 expression trended for lower IBRFS (72.3% vs. 93.9%; P=.0361) and was significant for worse DMFS (48.2% vs. 86.8%; P=.0035) and RFS (37.8% vs. 83.7%; P=.0014). Conclusion: Our data indicate that low 53BP1 expression is an independent prognostic indicator for local relapse among other endpoints in early-stage breast cancer and TN breast cancer patients treated with BCS+RT. These results should be verified in larger cohorts of patients to validate their clinical

  7. How well does the new lung cancer staging system predict for local/regional recurrence after surgery?: A comparison of the TNM 6 and 7 systems.

    PubMed

    Pepek, Joseph M; Chino, Junzo P; Marks, Lawrence B; D'amico, Thomas A; Yoo, David S; Onaitis, Mark W; Ready, Neal E; Hubbs, Jessica L; Boyd, Jessamy; Kelsey, Chris R

    2011-04-01

    To evaluate how well the tumor, node, metastasis (TNM) 6 and TNM 7 staging systems predict rates of local/regional recurrence (LRR) after surgery alone for non-small cell lung cancer. All patients who underwent surgery for non-small cell lung cancer at Duke between 1995 and 2005 were reviewed. Those undergoing sublobar resections, with positive margins or involvement of the chest wall, or those who received any chemotherapy or radiation therapy (RT) were excluded. Disease recurrence at the surgical margin, or within ipsilateral hilar and/or mediastinal lymph nodes, was considered as a LRR. Stage was assigned based on both TNM 6 and TNM 7. Rates of LRR were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. A Cox regression analysis evaluated the hazard ratio of LRR by stage within TNM 6 and TNM 7. A total of 709 patients were eligible for the analysis. Median follow-up was 32 months. For all patients, the 5-year actuarial risk of LRR was 23%. Conversion from TNM 6 to TNM 7 resulted in 21% stage migration (upstaging in 13%; downstaging in 8%). Five-year rates of LRR for stages IA, IB, IIA, IIB, and IIIA disease using TNM 6 were 16%, 26%, 43%, 35%, and 40%, respectively. Using TNM 7, corresponding rates were 16%, 23%, 37%, 39%, and 30%, respectively. The hazard ratios for LRR were statistically different for IA and IB in both TNM 6 and 7 but were also different for IB and IIA in TNM 7. LRR risk increases monotonically for stages IA to IIB in the new TNM 7 system. This information might be valuable when designing future studies of postoperative RT.

  8. Radiotherapy and brachytherapy for recurrent colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nag, S. )

    1991-05-01

    Radical surgical excision of locoregional recurrence of colorectal carcinoma usually produces the best survival and should be attempted whenever possible. However, recurrences are often unresectable; hence palliative local therapy may be indicated. There are several options for the radiation therapy of local, unresectable, recurrent, or metastatic colorectal cancer. Whole pelvis irradiation of 4,000-5,000 cGy followed by a coned-down boost of 1,000-1,500 cGy generally provides good symptomatic palliation in 80-90% of patients, but long-term control or cure is rarely achieved. External beam irradiation of 2,000-3,000 cGy to the whole liver with or without concurrent chemotherapy may be used for palliation of metastatic disease to the liver. A combination of intraoperative radiation therapy applied directly to the tumor bed and external beam irradiation may improve local control and survival rates. Multiple options are available for the intraoperative use of brachytherapy which can deliver high radiation doses to the residual tumor, or tumor bed, sparing normal tissue.

  9. A Randomized Phase II Trial of Short-Course Androgen Deprivation Therapy With or Without Bevacizumab for Patients With Recurrent Prostate Cancer After Definitive Local Therapy

    PubMed Central

    McKay, Rana R.; Zurita, Amado J.; Werner, Lillian; Bruce, Justine Y.; Carducci, Michael A.; Stein, Mark N.; Heath, Elisabeth I.; Hussain, Arif; Tran, Hai T.; Sweeney, Christopher J.; Ross, Robert W.; Kantoff, Philip W.; Slovin, Susan F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Patients with recurrent prostate cancer after local treatment make up a heterogeneous population for whom androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is the usual treatment. The purpose of this randomized phase II trial was to investigate the efficacy and toxicity of short-course ADT with or without bevacizumab in men with hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. Patients and Methods Eligible patients had an increasing prostate-specific antigen (PSA) of ≤ 50 ng/mL and PSA doubling time of less than 18 months. Patients had either no metastases or low burden, asymptomatic metastases (lymph nodes < 3 cm and five or fewer bone metastases). Patients were randomly assigned 2:1 to a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist, bicalutamide and bevacizumab or ADT alone, for 6 months. The primary end point was PSA relapse-free survival (RFS). Relapse was defined as a PSA of more than 0.2 ng/mL for prostatectomy patients or PSA of more than 2.0 ng/mL for primary radiation therapy patients. Results Sixty-six patients received ADT + bevacizumab and 36 received ADT alone. Patients receiving ADT + bevacizumab had a statistically significant improvement in RFS compared with patients treated with ADT alone (13.3 months for ADT + bevacizumab v 10.2 months for ADT alone; hazard ratio, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.29 to 0.77; log-rank P = .002). Hypertension was the most common adverse event in patients receiving ADT + bevacizumab (36%). Conclusion ADT combined with bevacizumab resulted in an improved RFS for patients with hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. Long-term follow-up is needed to determine whether some patients have a durable PSA response and are able to remain off ADT for prolonged periods. Our data provide rationale for combining vascular endothelial growth factor–targeting therapy with ADT in hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. PMID:27044933

  10. Local salvage therapy for late (≥2 years) metastatic and local relapse of renal cell cancer is a potentially curative treatment irrespective of the site of recurrence.

    PubMed

    Grüllich, Carsten; Vallet, Sonia; Hecht, Christopher; Duensing, Stephan; Hadaschik, Boris; Jäger, Dirk; Hohenfellner, Markus; Pahernik, Sascha

    2016-05-01

    The primary treatment approach to locoregional renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is surgical resection. Most relapses occur within the first 2 years but some patients experience late recurrences. Surgical resection of oligometastatic disease may be considered a curative option for relapsed RCC. However, limited data are available of long-term follow-up of late relapse regarding treatment choice. We identified 104 patients with RCC from our database, who relapsed after≥2 years from resection of their primary tumor. Median age at primary diagnosis was 61 years and sex distribution was F:M = 40:64. Histology was clear cell, n = 103 and papillary, n = 1. Sites of relapse were local, n = 14 (13.4%); lung only, n = 25 (24.0%); or extrapulmonary, n = 65 (62.5%). Treatment at first relapse was local therapy (LT) in n = 60 (57.7%) patients, of these, n = 55 patients had surgery done and n = 5 patients had underwent radiotherapy. Systemic therapy was used in n = 9 (8.7%) patients. Overall, 35 patients received best supportive care (33.7%). We found a median overall survival (OS) of 49.8 months (95% CI: 29.3-70.2) and a progression-free survival (PFS) of 21.6 months (95% CI: 12.6-30.5) for all patients. Patients receiving LT had a median OS of 99.9 months (95% CI: 77.2-122.6) and a PFS of 31.1 months (95% CI: 21.5-40.7). Patients treated with systemic therapy, in turn, had an OS of 21.1 months (95% CI: 8.4-33.8) and a PFS of 4 months (95% CI: 1.0-6.2). Patients who received best supportive care had an OS of 10 months (95% CI: 1.3-18.7). This difference was highly significant (log rank for PFS: P<0.001; log rank for OS: P<0.003). Subgroup analysis of the LT group showed a superior outcome for local relapses (OS: not reached, PFS: 61.4mo [95% CI: 28.5-9.2]) compared to visceral relapses (OS: 35.5mo [95% CI: 17.9-53.1], PFS: 21.1mo [95% CI: 19.2-22.9]). Local salvage therapy should be considered the first therapeutic option in late relapse of RCC irrespective of the site of relapse

  11. Trials show delayed recurrence in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Bender, Eric

    2013-06-01

    Phase I trials of 2 treatments for recurrent ovarian cancer-a 2-step immunotherapy treatment and an antibody-drug conjugate-demonstrated promising early results in delaying recurrence, in work presented at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2013.

  12. Clinical impact of PSMA-based (18)F-DCFBC PET/CT imaging in patients with biochemically recurrent prostate cancer after primary local therapy.

    PubMed

    Mena, Esther; Lindenberg, Maria L; Shih, Joanna H; Adler, Stephen; Harmon, Stephanie; Bergvall, Ethan; Citrin, Deborah; Dahut, William; Ton, Anita T; McKinney, Yolanda; Weaver, Juanita; Eclarinal, Philip; Forest, Alicia; Afari, George; Bhattacharyya, Sibaprasad; Mease, Ronnie C; Merino, Maria J; Pinto, Peter; Wood, Bradford J; Jacobs, Paula; Pomper, Martin G; Choyke, Peter L; Turkbey, Baris

    2017-09-11

    The purpose of our study was to assess (18)F-DCFBC PET/CT, a PSMA targeted PET agent, for lesion detection and clinical management of biochemical relapse in prostate cancer patients after primary treatment. This is a prospective IRB-approved study of 68 patients with documented biochemical recurrence after primary local therapy consisting of radical prostatectomy (n = 50), post radiation therapy (n = 9) or both (n = 9), with negative conventional imaging. All 68 patients underwent whole-body (18)F-DCFBC PET/CT, and 62 also underwent mpMRI within one month. Lesion detection with (18)F-DCFBC was correlated with mpMRI findings and pre-scan PSA levels. The impact of (18)F-DCFBC PET/CT on clinical management and treatment decisions was established after 6 months' patient clinical follow-up. Forty-one patients (60.3%) showed at least one positive (18)F-DCFBC lesion, for a total of 79 lesions, 30 in the prostate bed, 39 in lymph nodes, and ten in distant sites. Tumor recurrence was confirmed by either biopsy (13/41 pts), serial CT/MRI (8/41) or clinical follow-up (15/41); there was no confirmation in five patients, who continue to be observed. The (18)F-DCFBC and mpMRI findings were concordant in 39 lesions (49.4%), and discordant in 40 lesions (50.6%); the majority (n = 32/40) of the latter occurring because the recurrence was located outside the mpMRI field of view. (18)F-DCFBC PET positivity rates correlated with PSA values and 15%, 46%, 83%, and 77% were seen in patients with PSA values <0.5, 0.5 to <1.0, 1.0 to <2.0, and ≥2.0 ng/mL, respectively. The optimal cut-off PSA value to predict a positive (18)F-DCFBC scan was 0.78 ng/mL (AUC = 0.764). A change in clinical management occurred in 51.2% (21/41) of patients with a positive (18)F-DCFBC result, generally characterized by starting a new treatment in 19 patients or changing the treatment plan in two patients. (18)F-DCFBC detects recurrences in 60.3% of a population of patients with biochemical

  13. Local-Regional Recurrence With and Without Radiation Therapy After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Mastectomy for Clinically Staged T3N0 Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nagar, Himanshu; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A.; Strom, Eric A.; Perkins, George H.; Oh, Julia L.; Tereffe, Welela; Woodward, Wendy A.; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana M.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Yu, Tse-Kuan

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine local-regional recurrence (LRR) risk according to whether postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) was used to treat breast cancer patients with clinical T3N0 disease who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) and mastectomy. Methodsand Materials: Clinicopathology data from 162 patients with clinical T3N0 breast cancer who received NAC and underwent mastectomy were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 119 patients received PMRT, and 43 patients did not. The median number of axillary lymph nodes (LNs) dissected was 15. Actuarial rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using the log-rank test. Results: At a median follow-up of 75 months, 15 of 162 patients developed LRR. For all patients, the 5-year LRR rate was 9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 4%-14%). The 5-year LRR rate for those who received PMRT was 4% (95% CI, 1%-9%) vs. 24% (95% CI, 10%-39%) for those who did not receive PMRT (p <0.001). A significantly higher proportion of irradiated patients had pathology involved LNs and were {<=}40 years old. Among patients who had pathology involved LNs, the LRR rate was lower in those who received PMRT (p <0.001). A similar trend was observed for those who did not have pathology involved LN disease. Among nonirradiated patients, the appearance of pathologic LN disease after NAC was the only clinicopathologic factor examined that significantly correlated with the risk of LRR. Conclusions: Breast cancer patients with clinical T3N0 disease treated with NAC and mastectomy but without PMRT had a significant risk of LRR, even when there was no pathologic evidence of LN involvement present after NAC. PMRT was effective in reducing the LRR rate. We suggest PMRT should be considered for patients with clinical T3N0 disease.

  14. Intraoperative radiation therapy in recurrent ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yap, O.W. Stephanie . E-mail: stbeast@stanford.edu; Kapp, Daniel S.; Teng, Nelson N.H.; Husain, Amreen

    2005-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate disease outcomes and complications in patients with recurrent ovarian cancer treated with cytoreductive surgery and intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT). Methods and Materials: A retrospective study of 24 consecutive patients with ovarian carcinoma who underwent secondary cytoreduction and intraoperative radiation therapy at our institution between 1994 and 2002 was conducted. After optimal cytoreductive surgery, IORT was delivered with orthovoltage X-rays (200 kVp) using individually sized and beveled cone applications. Outcomes measures were local control of disease, progression-free interval, overall survival, and treatment-related complications. Results: Of these 24 patients, 22 were available for follow-up analysis. Additional treatment at the time of and after IORT included whole abdominopelvic radiation, 9; pelvic or locoregional radiation, 5; chemotherapy, 6; and no adjuvant treatment, 2. IORT doses ranged from 9-14 Gy (median, 12 Gy). The anatomic sites treated were pelvis (sidewalls, vaginal cuff, presacral area, anterior pubis), para-aortic and paracaval lymph node beds, inguinal region, or porta hepatitis. At a median follow-up of 24 months, 5 patients remain free of disease, whereas 17 patients have recurred, of whom 4 are alive with disease and 13 died from disease. Five patients recurred within the radiation fields for a locoregional relapse rate of 32% and 12 patients recurred at distant sites with a median time to recurrence of 13.7 months. Five-year overall survival was 22% with a median survival of 26 months from time of IORT. Nine patients (41%) experienced Grade 3 toxicities from their treatments. Conclusion: In carefully selected patients with locally recurrent ovarian cancer, combined IORT and tumor reductive surgery is reasonably tolerated and may contribute to achieving local control and disease palliation.

  15. Repeated iodine-125 seed implantations combined with external beam radiotherapy for the treatment of locally recurrent or metastatic stage III/IV non-small cell lung cancer: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Dan, Gang; Jiang, Jianqing; Zheng, Yifeng; Zheng, Xiushan; Deng, Dan

    2016-09-13

    Recurrent or metastatic lung cancer is difficult to manage. This retrospective study aimed to assess the efficacy of repeated iodine-125 seed implantations combined with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for locally recurrent or metastatic stage-III/IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Eighteen previously treated stage-III/IV NSCLC patients with local or metastatic recurrences underwent 1-to-3 iodine-125 implantations. Six of these patients received palliative EBRT and six patients received combined chemotherapy using gemcitabine and cisplatin. Near-term treatment efficacy was evaluated 3 months after seed implantation by comparing changes in tumor size on computed tomography images; the evaluated outcomes were complete response, partial response, stable disease, and local tumor control rate. Long-term efficacy was assessed based on 1- and 2-year survival rates. Patients were followed up for 6 to 50 months. The overall (i.e., complete + partial) response rate was 87.4 %. The local control rates after the first, second, and third years were 94.1, 58.8 and 41.2 %, respectively. The results of this study demonstrated that repeated implantation of radioactive particles combined with EBRT is a safe treatment that effectively controlled local recurrence and metastasis of stage III/IV NSCLC.

  16. Overall survival and local recurrence of 406 completely resected stage IIIa-N2 non-small cell lung cancer patients: questionnaire survey of the Japan Clinical Oncology Group to plan for clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Ichinose, Y; Kato, H; Koike, T; Tsuchiya, R; Fujisawa, T; Shimizu, N; Watanabe, Y; Mitsudomi, T; Yoshimura, M

    2001-10-01

    the group of completely resected stage IIIA-N2 non-small cell lung cancer patients (NSCLC) is considered to be heterogeneous in various aspects including survival and the recurrent pattern. In the present study, we attempted to clarify the factors which separate these patients into high and low risk groups based on the survival and local recurrence. a questionnaire survey on the survival and local recurrence of non-small cell lung cancer patients with pathological stage IIIA-N2 disease who underwent a complete resection from January 1992 to December 1993 was performed by the Japan Clinical Oncology Group as of July 1999. The information on the survival of 406 patients and that of local recurrence in 332 of them was available. the 5-year survival of the 406 patients was 31.0%. In a univariate analysis, the age, clinical and pathological T status, number of N2 stations, pathological N1 disease, operative modality and postoperative radiotherapy were all found to be important prognostic factors. Clinical N2 disease marginally influenced the survival (P=0.07). In a multivariate analysis of these variables including clinical N2 disease, the survival was significantly worse in the case of multiple N2 stations (hazard ratio=1.741), the presence of pathological N1 disease (1.403), pathological T2 or 3 disease (1.399) and an age older than 65 (1.327). The rate of freedom from any local recurrence at the bronchial stump, or in the hilar, mediastinal or supraclavicular lymph nodes at 5 years was 64%. In a univariate analysis of the freedom from local recurrence, the clinical N status, pathological T status, pathological N1 disease and number of N2 stations were all found to be important prognostic factors. A multivariate analysis revealed the freedom from local recurrence to be adversely influenced by multiple N2 stations (hazard ratio=2.05), and the presence of either clinical N1 or 2 (1.733) disease. The 5-year survival and the rate of freedom from local recurrence at 5

  17. Role of Hormonal Treatment in Prostate Cancer Patients with Nonmetastatic Disease Recurrence After Local Curative Treatment: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    van den Bergh, Roderick C N; van Casteren, Niels J; van den Broeck, Thomas; Fordyce, Eve R; Gietzmann, William K M; Stewart, Fiona; MacLennan, Steven; Dabestani, Saeed; Bellmunt, Joaquim; Bolla, Michel; Briers, Erik; Cornford, Philip; Joniau, Steven; Mason, Malcolm D; Matveev, Vsevolod; van der Poel, Henk G; van der Kwast, Theo H; Rouvière, Olivier; Wiegel, Thomas; Lam, Thomas B; Mottet, Nicolas

    2016-05-01

    The relative benefits and harms of hormonal treatment (HT) versus no or deferred HT in patients with nonmetastatic prostate cancer (PCa) relapse after primary curative therapy are controversial. To assess the effectiveness of HT for nonmetastatic PCa relapse, prognostic factors for treatment outcome, timing of treatment, and the most effective treatment strategy to provide guidance for clinical practice. A systematic literature search was undertaken incorporating Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Library (search ended March 2015). Studies were critically appraised for risk of bias. The outcomes included overall and cancer-specific survival, metastasis-free survival, symptom-free survival, progression to castrate resistance, adverse events, and quality of life. Of 9687 articles identified, 27 studies were eligible for inclusion (2 RCTs, 8 nonrandomised comparative studies, and 17 case series). The results suggest that only a subgroup of patients, especially those with high-risk disease, may benefit from early HT. The main predictors for unfavourable outcomes were shorter PSA doubling time (<6-12 mo) and higher Gleason score (>7). Early HT may be warranted for patients with high-risk disease. An intermittent HT strategy appears feasible. Most studies had a moderate to high risks of bias. HT for PCa relapse after primary therapy with curative intent should be reserved for patients at highest risk of progression and with a long life expectancy. The potential benefits of starting HT should be judiciously balanced against the associated harms. This article summarises the evidence on the benefits and harms of hormonal treatment in prostate cancer (PCa) patients in whom the disease has recurred following earlier curative treatment. We found that only a select group of patients with aggressive PCa and a fast rising prostate-specific antigen may benefit from early hormonal treatment (HT), whereas in others HT may be more harmful than beneficial. Copyright © 2015 European

  18. Impact of symptom burden on work-related abilities in patients with locally recurrent or metastatic breast cancer: Results from a substudy of the VIRGO observational cohort study.

    PubMed

    Cleeland, Charles S; Mayer, Musa; Dreyer, Nancy A; Yim, Yeun Mi; Yu, Elaine; Su, Zhaohui; Mun, Yong; Sloan, Jeff A; Kaufman, Peter A

    2014-12-01

    Limited data exist on the association of symptom burden, daily activity impairment, and work productivity (WP) in patients with advanced breast cancer. This cross-sectional analysis evaluated baseline patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in patients with locally recurrent or metastatic breast cancer (MBC) receiving first-line hormonal therapy or chemotherapy and/or targeted therapy in the VIRGO observational study. The primary PRO study endpoint, symptom severity and interference score, was measured using the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory (MDASI). Secondary endpoints included Activity Level Scale (ALS), health-related quality of life (HRQOL), and Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Questionnaire (WPAI:SHP) scores. Overall, 152 patients (chemotherapy cohort, 104; hormonal therapy cohort, 48) answered questionnaires. Fatigue, decreased sexual interest, disturbed sleep, emotional distress, and drowsiness were the most common severe symptoms, and were of moderate-to-severe intensity in 38.8%-52.0% of patients. Mean percent daily activity impairment was 30% for study patients, and WP impairment ranged from 20% to 40% across indices in employed patients (n, 58). Significant positive correlations existed for MDASI severity and interference scores with activity impairment and WP indices (Pearson correlation coefficients [R] = 0.47-0.82; p < 0.0001). ALS and overall HRQOL correlated negatively with these indices (R = -0.41 to -0.60; p ≤ 0.001). After adjustment for potential confounders, MDASI symptom interference and ALS were significant predictors of activity and WP impairment. Our results indicate patients receiving treatment for MBC are symptomatic with significant daily activity and/or WP impairment. Symptom severity and interference, functional status, and overall HRQOL were moderately correlated with perceived work-related ability.

  19. Prostate Cancer Local Recurrence Detected With Both (18)F-Fluciclovine and PSMA-targeted (18)F-DCFPyL PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Gorin, Michael A; Pienta, Kenneth J; Pomper, Martin G; Rowe, Steven P

    2017-09-01

    We present the case of a 79-year-old man with an elevated postprostatectomy prostate-specific antigen level who was sequentially imaged with positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) using (18)F-fluciclovine followed by PSMA-targeted (18)F-DCFPyL. Although both imaging tests successfully identified the same pelvic recurrence, each radiotracer had its relative merits. This case highlights the differences between these two PET radiotracers, which are increasingly being used to image men with recurrent prostate cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Breast-conserving surgery in locally advanced breast cancer submitted to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Safety and effectiveness based on ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence and long-term follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Carrara, Guilherme Freire Angotti; Scapulatempo-Neto, Cristovam; Abrahão-Machado, Lucas Faria; Brentani, Maria Mitzi; Nunes, João Soares; Folgueira, Maria Aparecida Azevedo Koike; da Costa Vieira, René Aloisio

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence after breast-conserving surgery for locally advanced breast cancer. METHODS: A retrospective observational cohort study was performed in patients with locally advanced breast cancer submitted to breast-conserving surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy based on an adriamycin-cyclophosphamide-paclitaxel regimen. We evaluated the clinical, pathologic, immunohistochemistry, and surgical factors that contribute to ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence and locoregional recurrence. A Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox model were used to evaluate the main factors related to disease-free survival. RESULTS: Of the 449 patients who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy, 98 underwent breast-conserving surgery. The average diameter of the tumors was 5.3 cm, and 87.2% reached a size of up to 3 cm. Moreover, 86.7% were classified as clinical stage III, 74.5% had T3-T4 tumors, 80.5% had N1-N2 axilla, and 89.8% had invasive ductal carcinoma. A pathologic complete response was observed in 27.6% of the tumors, and 100.0% of samples had free margins. The 5-year actuarial overall survival rate was 81.2%, and the mean follow-up was 72.8 months. The rates of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence and locoregional recurrence were 11.2% and 15.3%, respectively. Multifocal morphology response was the only factor related to ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence disease-free survival (p=0.04). A multivariate analysis showed that the pathologic response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST)-breast cutoff was the only factor related to locoregional recurrence disease-free survival (p=0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Breast-conserving surgery is a safe and effective therapy for selected locally advanced breast tumors. PMID:28355358

  1. Pelvic Lymph Node Status Assessed by 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography Predicts Low-Risk Group for Distant Recurrence in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer: A Prospective Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Sokbom; Park, Jung-Yeol; Lim, Myung-Chul; Song, Yong-Joong; Park, Se-Hyun; Kim, Seok-Ki; Chung, Dae-Chul; Seo, Sang-Soo; Kim, Joo-Young; Park, Sang-Yoon

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To develop a prediction model to identify a low-risk group for distant recurrence in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer treated by concurrent chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: Prospectively, 62 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer were recruited as a training cohort. Clinical variables and parameters obtained from positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging were analyzed by logistic regression. For the test set, 54 patients were recruited independently. To identify the low-risk group, negative likelihood ratio (LR) less than 0.2 was set to be a cutoff. Results: Among the training cohort, multivariate logistic analysis revealed that advanced International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage and a high serum squamous cancer cell (SCC) antigen level were significant risk factors (p = 0.015 and 0.025, respectively). Using the two parameters, criteria to determine a low-risk subset for distant recurrence were postulated: (1) FIGO Stage IIB or less and (2) pretreatment SCC < 2.4 (Model A). Positive pelvic node on PET completely predicted all cases with distant recurrence and thus was considered as another prediction model (Model B). In the test cohort, although Model A did not showed diagnostic performance, Model B completely predicted all cases with distant recurrence and showed a sensitivity of 100% with negative LR of 0. Across the training and test cohort (n = 116), the false negative rate was 0 (95% confidence interval 0%-7.6%). Conclusions: Positive pelvic node on PET is a useful marker in prediction of distant recurrence in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer who are treated with concurrent chemoradiation.

  2. DEGRO practical guidelines for radiotherapy of breast cancer VI: therapy of locoregional breast cancer recurrences.

    PubMed

    Harms, Wolfgang; Budach, W; Dunst, J; Feyer, P; Fietkau, R; Haase, W; Krug, D; Piroth, M D; Sautter-Bihl, M-L; Sedlmayer, F; Souchon, R; Wenz, F; Sauer, R

    2016-04-01

    To update the practical guidelines for radiotherapy of patients with locoregional breast cancer recurrences based on the current German interdisciplinary S3 guidelines 2012. A comprehensive survey of the literature using the search phrases "locoregional breast cancer recurrence", "chest wall recurrence", "local recurrence", "regional recurrence", and "breast cancer" was performed, using the limits "clinical trials", "randomized trials", "meta-analysis", "systematic review", and "guidelines". Patients with isolated in-breast or regional breast cancer recurrences should be treated with curative intent. Mastectomy is the standard of care for patients with ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence. In a subset of patients, a second breast conservation followed by partial breast irradiation (PBI) is an appropriate alternative to mastectomy. If a second breast conservation is performed, additional irradiation should be mandatory. The largest reirradiation experience base exists for multicatheter brachytherapy; however, prospective clinical trials are needed to clearly define selection criteria, long-term local control, and toxicity. Following primary mastectomy, patients with resectable locoregional breast cancer recurrences should receive multimodality therapy including systemic therapy, surgery, and radiation +/- hyperthermia. This approach results in high local control rates and long-term survival is achieved in a subset of patients. In radiation-naive patients with unresectable locoregional recurrences, radiation therapy is mandatory. In previously irradiated patients with a high risk of a second local recurrence after surgical resection or in patients with unresectable recurrences, reirradiation should be strongly considered. Indication and dose concepts depend on the time interval to first radiotherapy, presence of late radiation effects, and concurrent or sequential systemic treatment. Combination with hyperthermia can further improve tumor control. In patients with

  3. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Alone for Localized Prostate Cancer in Patients at Moderate or High Risk of Biochemical Recurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Hoskin, Peter; Rojas, Ana; Lowe, Gerry; Bryant, Linda; Ostler, Peter; Hughes, Rob; Milner, Jessica; Cladd, Helen

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) morbidity and biochemical control of disease in patients with localized prostate adenocarcinoma treated with escalating doses per fraction of high-dose rate brachytherapy alone. Methods and Materials: A total of 197 patients were treated with 34 Gy in four fractions, 36 Gy in four fractions, 31.5 Gy in three fractions, or 26 Gy in two fractions. Median follow-up times were 60, 54, 36, and 6 months, respectively. Results: Incidence of early Grade {>=} 3 GU morbidity was 3% to 7%, and Grade 4 was 0% to 4%. During the first 12 weeks, the highest mean International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) value was 14, and between 6 months and 5 years it was 8. Grade 3 or 4 early GI morbidity was not observed. The 3-year actuarial rate of Grade 3 GU was 3% to 16%, and was 3% to 7% for strictures requiring surgery (4-year rate). An incidence of 1% Grade 3 GI events was seen at 3 years. Late Grade 4 GU or GI events were not observed. At 3 years, 99% of patients with intermediate-risk and 91% with high-risk disease were free of biochemical relapse (log-rank p = 0.02). Conclusions: There was no significant difference in urinary and rectal morbidity between schedules. Biochemical control of disease in patients with intermediate and high risk of relapse was good.

  4. Prediction of Prostate Cancer Recurrence Using Quantitative Phase Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridharan, Shamira; Macias, Virgilia; Tangella, Krishnarao; Kajdacsy-Balla, André; Popescu, Gabriel

    2015-05-01

    The risk of biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer among individuals who undergo radical prostatectomy for treatment is around 25%. Current clinical methods often fail at successfully predicting recurrence among patients at intermediate risk for recurrence. We used a label-free method, spatial light interference microscopy, to perform localized measurements of light scattering in prostatectomy tissue microarrays. We show, for the first time to our knowledge, that anisotropy of light scattering in the stroma immediately adjoining cancerous glands can be used to identify patients at higher risk for recurrence. The data show that lower value of anisotropy corresponds to a higher risk for recurrence, meaning that the stroma adjoining the glands of recurrent patients is more fractionated than in non-recurrent patients. Our method outperformed the widely accepted clinical tool CAPRA-S in the cases we interrogated irrespective of Gleason grade, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels and pathological tumor-node-metastasis (pTNM) stage. These results suggest that QPI shows promise in assisting pathologists to improve prediction of prostate cancer recurrence.

  5. Conservative treatment of a recto-urethral fistula due to salvage HIFU for local recurrence of prostate cancer, 5 years after radical prostatectomy and external beam radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Topazio, Luca; Perugia, Claudio; Finazzi-Agro, Enrico

    2012-11-09

    Recto-urethral fistula is one of the most serious complications caused by high-intensity-focused ultrasound used as salvage treatment for recurrence of prostate cancer after brachytherapy or external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). We report the case of a recto-urethral fistula in a 68-year-old patient, who previously had undergone radical prostatectomy and EBRT for prostate cancer (pT3 N0 Mx). The fistula was treated conservatively by an indwelling Foley catheter, without the creation of an intestinal diversion. The fistula was assessed initially by a retrograde and a CT scan of the pelvis with contrast medium and reassessed periodically by means of retrograde urethrograms. To date, 24 months after this episode, no evidence of recurrence of the fistula has been found.

  6. Prostate cancer: 1HMRS-DCEMR at 3T versus [(18)F]choline PET/CT in the detection of local prostate cancer recurrence in men with biochemical progression after radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP).

    PubMed

    Panebianco, Valeria; Sciarra, Alessandro; Lisi, Danilo; Galati, Francesca; Buonocore, Valeria; Catalano, Carlo; Gentile, Vincenzo; Laghi, Andrea; Passariello, Roberto

    2012-04-01

    This study compares proton magnetic resonancespectroscopic imaging (1H-MRSI) and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) combined techniques at 3T magnet versus [(18)F]choline PET/computed tomography (CT) in the detection of local prostate cancer recurrence in patients with biochemical progression after radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP). 84 consecutive patients at high risk of local recurrence underwent combined 1HMRSI-DCEMR and 18-Fcholine- PET/CT. MR scan protocol included turbo spin echo (TSE) T2-weighted sequences in the axial, sagittal and coronal planes; three-dimensional (3D) chemical shift imaging (CSI) sequences with spectral/spatial pulses optimized for quantitative detection of choline and citrate; dynamic contrast enhanced gradient-echo (GRE) T1-weighted sequence. The population was divided into two groups. Group A included 28 patients with a lesion size ranging between 5.00mm and 7.2mm and PSA reduction following radiation therapy. Group B included 56 patients with a lesion size between 7.6mm and 19.4mm. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and accuracy were evaluated and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were performed. In Group A combined 1H-MRSI and DCE-MRI showed a sensitivity of 92%, a specificity of 75% (PPV 96%) while PET-CT examination showed a sensitivity of 62% and a specificity of 50% (PPV 88%) in identifying local recurrence. The accuracy of MRI was 89% while PET-CT showed an accuracy of 60%. Areas under the ROC curve (AUC) values for MR and PET-CT were 0.833 and 0.562, respectively. In Group B combined 1H-MRSI and DCEMR showed a sensitivity of 94% and a specificity of 100% (PPV 100%) with accuracy of 94%. PET-CT had a sensitivity of 92% and a specificity of 33% (PPV 98%) with accuracy of 91%. The AUCs for MR and PET-CT values were 0.971 and 0.837, respectively. The diagnostic accuracy of combined 1HMRSI-DCEMR was higher than PET/CT to identify local prostate cancer recurrence

  7. Localized Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... a decision aid for men with clinically localized prostate cancer (available at http://effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/prostate_da) ... A Decision Aid for Men With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer Page 1 of 24 Introduction Men with clinically ...

  8. Midline involvement as a risk factor for vulvar cancer recurrence.

    PubMed

    Stankevica, Jekaterina; Macuks, Ronalds; Baidekalna, Ieva; Donina, Simona

    2012-01-01

    This observational study was to identify risk factors for vulvar cancer recurrence. In the study 107 patients with primary vulvar cancer were analyzed. Surgical treatment consisted of radical excision of the primary tumor in combination with unilateral or bilateral superficial and deep inguinofemoral lymphadenectomy through separate incisions. Patients with deeper tumor invasion >1 mm or wider than 2 cm and/or groin lymphnode metastases were referred for adjuvant radiotherapy. Those with large primary vulvar tumors received neoadjuvant radiotherapy of 30 Gy followed by surgical treatment and adjuvant radiotherapy. Most of patients had only primary radiotherapy to the vulva and inguinal lymph nodes and only 34.5% of patients were eligible for surgical treatment. In 5 year follow-up period 25.2% (27) patients were alive without the disease, 15.0% (16) were alive with the disease and 59.8% (64) were dead. 60.7% (65) patients experienced local recurrence and 2.8% (3) patients had distant metastases. Median survival for patients without recurrent disease was 38.9 ± 3.2 months and 36.0 ± 2.6 months with no statistically significant difference. Patients with early stage vulvar cancer had longer mean survival rates-for stage I 53.1 ± 3.4 months, 38.4 ± 4.4 months for stage II and 33.4 ± 2.6 and 15.6 ± 5.2 months for patients with stage III and stage IV vulvar cancer, respectively. The only significant prognostic factor predicting vulvar cancer recurrence was involvement of the midline. Patients having midline involvement of vulvar cancer has lower recurrence risk, probably because of receiving more aggressive treatment. There is a tendency for lower vulvar cancer recurrence risk for patients over 70 years of age and patients who are receiving radiotherapy as an only treatment without surgery, but tendency for higher risk of recurrence in patients with multifocal vulvar cancer.

  9. High Mammographic Breast Density Is Independent Predictor of Local But Not Distant Recurrence After Lumpectomy and Radiotherapy for Invasive Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Catherine C. Rembert, James; Chew, Karen; Moore, Dan; Kerlikowske, Karla

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Biologically meaningful predictors for locoregional recurrence (LRR) in patients undergoing breast-conserving surgery (BCS) and radiotherapy (RT) are lacking. Tissue components, including extracellular matrix, could confer resistance to ionizing radiation. Fibroglandular and extracellular matrix components of breast tissue relative to adipose tissue can be quantified by the mammographic breast density (MBD), the proportion of dense area relative to the total breast area on mammography. We hypothesized that the MBD might be a predictor of LRR after BCS and RT for invasive breast cancer. Methods and Materials: We conducted a nested case-control study of 136 women with invasive breast cancer who had undergone BCS and RT and had had the MBD ascertained before, or at, diagnosis. Women with known recurrence were matched to women without recurrence by year of diagnosis. The median follow-up was 7.7 years. The percentage of MBD was measured using a computer-based threshold method. Results: Patients with a high MBD ({>=}75% density) vs. low ({<=}25%) were at increased risk of LRR (hazard ratio, 4.30; 95% confidence interval, 0.88-021.0; p = 0.071) but not distant recurrence. In addition, we found a complete inverse correlation between high MBD and obesity (body mass index, {>=}30 kg/m{sup 2}). In a multivariate Cox proportional hazards model, patients with MBD in the greatest quartile were at significantly greater risk of LRR (hazard ratio, 6.6; 95% confidence interval, 1.6-27.7; p = 0.01). Obesity without a high MBD also independently predicted for LRR (hazard ratio, 19.3; 95% confidence interval, 4.5-81.7; p < 0.001). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that a high MBD and obesity are significant independent predictors of LRR after BCS and RT for invasive breast cancer. Additional studies are warranted to validate these findings.

  10. Phase I Trial of Adenovirus-Mediated IL-12 Gene Transduction in Patients with Recurrent Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer Following Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    radiation therapy who are presently not on hormonal therapy. An important part of the screening process is a needle biopsy of the prostate to confirm the...has been amended (see below) to also include patients who had their locally advanced prostate cancer treated with hormonal ablative therapy...the lack of effective therapies for men who have failed definitive radiotherapy or who have locally advanced cancer despite hormone ablative therapy

  11. Early and late vulval cancer recurrences: Are they different?

    PubMed

    Ragupathy, Kalpana; Grandidge, Lisa; Strelley, Katie; Wang, Huan; Tidy, John

    2016-05-01

    Vulval cancers are rare, but after primary treatment, known to recur with a high frequency (30%). Clinico-pathological predictors of recurrence have been established to a great extent. However, there is paucity of literature on predictors of early versus late recurrence. We sought to identify such predictors through a retrospective study of vulval cancer recurrences in a single cancer centre over 11 years. Age of women, depth of invasion/site of primary tumour and presence of background VIN/lichen sclerosus do not appear to affect timing of recurrence. However, vulval cancers that recur after 2 years of primary tumour recognition are more likely to be well-differentiated tumours, have undergone radical surgery and have had a closest disease-free margin >1 cm. Late recurrences are entirely local rather than distant metastases and this translates into a better survival as shown in our study (40 months median survival in the early group versus 112 in the late recurrence group).

  12. Current treatment options for recurrent nasopharyngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suárez, Carlos; Rodrigo, Juan P.; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Shaha, Ashok R.

    2010-01-01

    Loco-regional control rate of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) has improved significantly in the past decade. However, local recurrence still represents a major cause of mortality and morbidity in advanced stages, and management of local failure remains a challenging issue in NPC. The best salvage treatment for local recurrent NPC remains to be determined. The options include brachytherapy, external radiotherapy, stereotactic radiosurgery, and nasopharyngectomy, either alone or in different combinations. In this article we will discuss the different options for salvage of locally recurrent NPC. Retreatment of locally recurrent NPC using radiotherapy, alone or in combination with other treatment modalities, as well as surgery, can result in long-term local control and survival in a substantial proportion of patients. For small-volume recurrent tumors (T1–T2) treated with external radiotherapy, brachytherapy or stereotactic radiosurgery, comparable results to those obtained with surgery have been reported. In contrast, treatment results of advanced-stage locally recurrent NPC are generally more satisfactory with surgery (with or without postoperative radiotherapy) than with reirradiation. PMID:20865269

  13. Esophageal Cancer Recurrence Patterns and Implications for Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Feiran; Sima, Camelia S.; Adusumilli, Prasad S.; Bains, Manjit S.; Sarkaria, Inderpal S.; Rusch, Valerie W.; Rizk, Nabil P.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction After definitive treatment of esophageal cancer, patients are at high risk for recurrence. Consistent follow-up is important for detection and treatment of recurrence. The optimal surveillance regimen remains undefined. We investigated posttreatment recurrence patterns and methods of detection in survivors of esophageal cancer. Methods We retrospectively studied a cohort of patients who had undergone surgical resection for esophageal cancer at our institution between 1996 and 2010. Routine computed tomography (CT) scan and upper endoscopy were performed for surveillance. Results In total, 1147 patients with resected esophageal adenocarcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma were included (median follow-up, 46 months). Of these, 723 (63%) had received neoadjuvant therapy before surgery. During follow-up, there were 595 deaths (52%) and 435 recurrences (38%) (distant [55%], locoregional [28%], or both [17%]). Half of recurrences were detected as a result of symptoms (n = 217), 45% by routine chest and abdominal CT scan (n = 194), and 1% by surveillance upper endoscopy (n = 6). The recurrence rate decreased from 27 per 100 person-years in posttreatment year 1 to 4 per 100 person-years in year 6. In the first 2 years, the rate of recurrence was higher among patients who had received neoadjuvant therapy (35 per 100 person-years) than among those who had not (14 per 100 person-years) (p < 0.001). Conclusions The incidence of recurrence is high after esophagectomy for cancer. Surveillance endoscopy has limited value for detection of asymptomatic local recurrence. The yield from follow-up scans diminishes significantly after the sixth year; surveillance scans after that point are likely unnecessary. PMID:24389438

  14. Benchmarking trial between France and Australia comparing management of primary rectal cancer beyond TME and locally recurrent rectal cancer (PelviCare Trial): rationale and design.

    PubMed

    Denost, Quentin; Saillour, Florence; Masya, Lindy; Martinaud, Helene Maillou; Guillon, Stephanie; Kret, Marion; Rullier, Eric; Quintard, Bruno; Solomon, Michael

    2016-04-04

    Among patients with rectal cancer, 5-10% have a primary rectal cancer beyond the total mesorectal excision plane (PRC-bTME) and 10% recur locally following primary surgery (LRRC). In both cases, patients 'care remains challenging with a significant worldwide variation in practice regarding overall management and criteria for operative intervention. These variations in practice can be explained by structural and organizational differences, as well as cultural dissimilarities. However, surgical resection of PRC-bTME and LRRC provides the best chance of long-term survival after complete resection (R0). With regards to the organization of the healthcare system and the operative criteria for these patients, France and Australia seem to be highly different. A benchmarking-type analysis between French and Australian clinical practice, with regards to the care and management of PRC-bTME and LRRC, would allow understanding of patients' care and management structures as well as individual and collective mechanisms of operative decision-making in order to ensure equitable practice and improve survival for these patients. The current study is an international Benchmarking trial comparing two cohorts of 120 consecutive patients with non-metastatic PRC-bTME and LRRC. Patients with curative and palliative treatment intent are included. The study design has three main parts: (1) French and Australian cohorts including clinical, radiological and surgical data, quality of life (MOS SF36, FACT-C) and distress level (Distress thermometer) at the inclusion, 6 and 12 months; (2) experimental analyses consisting of a blinded inter-country reading of pelvic MRI to assess operatory decisions; (3) qualitative analyses based on MDT meeting observation, semi-structured interviews and focus groups of health professional attendees and conducted by a research psychologist in both countries using the same guides. The primary endpoint will be the clinical resection rate. Secondary end points will

  15. Anesthetic techniques and cancer recurrence after surgery.

    PubMed

    Fodale, Vincenzo; D'Arrigo, Maria G; Triolo, Stefania; Mondello, Stefania; La Torre, Domenico

    2014-01-01

    Many of the most common anesthetics are used in surgical oncology, yet effects on cancer cells are still not known. Anesthesia technique could differentially affect cancer recurrence in oncologic patients undergoing surgery, due to immunosuppression, stimulation of angiogenesis, and dissemination of residual cancer cells. Data support the use of intravenous anesthetics, such as propofol anesthesia, thanks to antitumoral protective effects inhibiting cyclooxygenase 2 and prostaglandins E2 in cancer cells, and stimulation of immunity response; a restriction in the use of volatile anesthetics; restriction in the use of opioids as they suppress humoral and cellular immunity, and their chronic use favors angiogenesis and development of metastases; use of locoregional anesthesia compared with general anesthesia, as locoregional appears to reduce cancer recurrence after surgery. However, these findings must be interpreted cautiously as there is no evidence that simple changes in the practice of anesthesia can have a positive impact on postsurgical survival of cancer patients.

  16. A phase I and pharmacokinetic study of TAS-108 in postmenopausal female patients with locally advanced, locally recurrent inoperable, or progressive metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Blakely, L Johnetta; Buzdar, Aman; Chang, Hsiu-Yin; Frye, Debra; Theriault, Richard; Valero, Vicente; Rivera, Edgardo; Booser, Daniel; Kuritani, Jun; Tsuda, Masuhiro

    2004-08-15

    TAS-108 is a novel steroidal anti-estrogen compound that has a strong binding affinity to the estrogen receptor and, in preclinical studies, has antitumor activity against tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cell lines. The objective of this study was to investigate the safety and the pharmacokinetics in patients with previously treated advanced breast cancer. TAS-108 was administered orally once daily starting at 40 mg/day, with dose escalations of 60, 80, 120, and 160 mg/day. A minimum of three patients were enrolled in each dose level, and, if no drug-related grade 3 or higher adverse events were seen in the first 14 days, the next cohort of patients was treated at the next level. Pharmacokinetic data were obtained on day 1, 2, 15, and 28 of the first course. A total of 16 patients were enrolled, and most had received six to seven prior therapies. Clinical toxicities included nausea, vomiting, hot flashes, headache, weakness and fatigue; all were grade 1-2. TAS-108 had no effect on endometrial thickness based on trans-vaginal ultrasound evaluation. The average duration of therapy was 17.4 weeks (range, 4-60 weeks). The mean terminal half-life ranged from 8.0 to 10.7 hour in the interval of 12 to 24 hours postdose. The mean C(max) ranged from 2.8 to 21.0 ng/mL and AUC(0-t) from 15.1 to 148.7 ng.h/mL, this showed a linear correlation with the dose. TAS-108 was well tolerated in the doses studied with no maximum tolerated dose. The drug has linear pharmacokinetics, and in this heavily treated patient population, there was evidence of biological antitumor activity. A multi-institutional phase II study is planned.

  17. Margin status and the risk of local recurrence in patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy.

    PubMed

    Russo, Andrea L; Arvold, Nils D; Niemierko, Andrzej; Wong, Nathan; Wong, Julia S; Bellon, Jennifer R; Punglia, Rinaa S; Golshan, Mehra; Troyan, Susan L; Brock, Jane E; Harris, Jay R

    2013-07-01

    We sought to assess whether a close surgical margin (>0 and <2 mm) after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) confers an increased risk of local recurrence (LR) compared with a widely negative margin (≥2 mm). We studied 906 women with early-stage invasive breast cancer treated with BCT between January 1998 and October 2006; 91 % received adjuvant systemic therapy. Margins were coded as: (1) widely negative (n = 729), (2) close (n = 85), or (3) close (n = 84)/positive (n = 8) but having no additional tissue to remove according to the surgeon. Cumulative incidence of LR and distant failure (DF) were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Gray's competing-risk regression assessed the effect of margin status on LR and Cox proportional hazards regression assessed the effect on DF, controlling for biologic subtype, age, and number of positive lymph nodes (LNs). Three hundred seventy-seven patients (41.6 %) underwent surgical re-excision, of which 63.5 % had no residual disease. With a median follow-up of 87.5 months, the 5-year cumulative incidence of LR was 2.5 %. The 5-year cumulative incidence of LR by margin status was 2.3 % (95 % CI 1.4-3.8 %) for widely negative, 0 % for close, and 6.4 % (95 % CI 2.7-14.6 %) for no additional tissue, p = 0.3. On multivariate analysis, margin status was not associated with LR; however, triple-negative subtype (AHR 3.7; 95 % CI 1.6-8.8; p = 0.003) and increasing number of positive LNs (AHR 1.6; 95 % CI 1.1-2.3; p = 0.025) were associated. In an era of routine adjuvant systemic therapy, close surgical margins and maximally resected close/positive margins were not associated with an increased risk of LR compared to widely negative margins. Additional studies are needed to confirm this finding.

  18. Future directions for the early detection of colorectal cancer recurrence.

    PubMed

    Walker, Avery S; Johnson, Eric K; Maykel, Justin A; Stojadinovic, Alex; Nissan, Aviram; Brucher, Bjorn; Champagne, Bradley J; Steele, Scott R

    2014-01-01

    Surgical resection remains a mainstay of treatment and is highly effective for localized colorectal cancer. However, ~30-40% of patients develop recurrence following surgery and 40-50% of recurrences are apparent within the first few years after initial surgical resection. Several variables factor into the ultimate outcome of these patients, including the extent of disease, tumor biology, and patient co-morbidities. Additionally, the time from initial treatment to the development of recurrence is strongly associated with overall survival, particularly in patients who recur within one year of their surgical resection. Current post-resection surveillance strategies involve physical examination, laboratory, endoscopic and imaging studies utilizing various high and low-intensity protocols. Ultimately, the goal is to detect recurrence as early as possible, and ideally in the asymptomatic localized phase, to allow initiation of treatment that may still result in cure. While current strategies have been effective, several efforts are evolving to improve our ability to identify recurrent disease at its earliest phase. Our aim with this article is to briefly review the options available and, more importantly, examine emerging and future options to assist in the early detection of colon and rectal cancer recurrence.

  19. Future Directions for the Early Detection of Colorectal Cancer Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Avery S.; Johnson, Eric K.; Maykel, Justin A.; Stojadinovic, Alex; Nissan, Aviram; Brucher, Bjorn; Champagne, Bradley J.; Steele, Scott R.

    2014-01-01

    Surgical resection remains a mainstay of treatment and is highly effective for localized colorectal cancer. However, ~30-40% of patients develop recurrence following surgery and 40-50% of recurrences are apparent within the first few years after initial surgical resection. Several variables factor into the ultimate outcome of these patients, including the extent of disease, tumor biology, and patient co-morbidities. Additionally, the time from initial treatment to the development of recurrence is strongly associated with overall survival, particularly in patients who recur within one year of their surgical resection. Current post-resection surveillance strategies involve physical examination, laboratory, endoscopic and imaging studies utilizing various high and low-intensity protocols. Ultimately, the goal is to detect recurrence as early as possible, and ideally in the asymptomatic localized phase, to allow initiation of treatment that may still result in cure. While current strategies have been effective, several efforts are evolving to improve our ability to identify recurrent disease at its earliest phase. Our aim with this article is to briefly review the options available and, more importantly, examine emerging and future options to assist in the early detection of colon and rectal cancer recurrence. PMID:24790655

  20. Local Recurrence After Uveal Melanoma Proton Beam Therapy: Recurrence Types and Prognostic Consequences

    SciTech Connect

    Caujolle, Jean-Pierre; Paoli, Vincent; Chamorey, Emmanuel; Maschi, Celia; Baillif, Stéphanie; Herault, Joël; Gastaud, Pierre; Hannoun-Levi, Jean Michel

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To study the prognosis of the different types of uveal melanoma recurrences treated by proton beam therapy (PBT). Methods and Materials: This retrospective study analyzed 61 cases of uveal melanoma local recurrences on a total of 1102 patients treated by PBT between June 1991 and December 2010. Survival rates have been determined by using Kaplan-Meier curves. Prognostic factors have been evaluated by using log-rank test or Cox model. Results: Our local recurrence rate was 6.1% at 5 years. These recurrences were divided into 25 patients with marginal recurrences, 18 global recurrences, 12 distant recurrences, and 6 extrascleral extensions. Five factors have been identified as statistically significant risk factors of local recurrence in the univariate analysis: large tumoral diameter, small tumoral volume, low ratio of tumoral volume over eyeball volume, iris root involvement, and safety margin inferior to 1 mm. In the local recurrence-free population, the overall survival rate was 68.7% at 10 years and the specific survival rate was 83.6% at 10 years. In the local recurrence population, the overall survival rate was 43.1% at 10 years and the specific survival rate was 55% at 10 years. The multivariate analysis of death risk factors has shown a better prognosis for marginal recurrences. Conclusion: Survival rate of marginal recurrences is superior to that of the other recurrences. The type of recurrence is a clinical prognostic value to take into account. The influence of local recurrence retreatment by proton beam therapy should be evaluated by novel studies.

  1. Risk of Recurrence in Laryngeal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sørum Falk, Ragnhild; Folkvard Evensen, Jan; Boysen, Morten; Brøndbo, Kjell

    2016-01-01

    A cohort study was undertaken to analyze the risk of recurrence among 1616 patients with primary squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx from 1983 to 2010 at a single, tertiary academic center in Oslo, Norway. The cohort was followed from the date of diagnosis to September 2011. Competing risk regression analysis assessed the association between various risk factors and the risk of recurrence, where death was considered a competing event. Recurrence was observed in 368 patients (23%) during the study period. The majority (71%) of recurrences involved the location of the primary tumor. The overall risk of recurrence during the first three years after initiating treatment was 20.5%. Increased risk of recurrence was observed in patients with supraglottic cancer, younger patients, those with T2–T3 tumors and in patients treated in the earlier part of the study period. Significant factors for recurrence in glottic carcinomas were age, treatment in the earlier part of the study and T-status, whereas age was a significant factor in supraglottic cancer. N-status appeared less significant. In conclusion, follow-up of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma should place particular emphasis on the site of the primary tumor, younger patients, cases of supraglottic cancer and T2-T4 primary tumors, especially during the first three years after treatment. More studies are needed to assess the impact of surgical versus non-surgical treatment, and eventually the significance of recurrence, for disease-specific and overall survival in cases of advanced laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:27716797

  2. Dose-Escalation Study of Thoracic Radiotherapy in Combination With Pemetrexed Plus Cisplatin in Japanese Patients With Locally Advanced Nonsquamous Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Post Hoc Analysis of Survival and Recurrent Sites.

    PubMed

    Niho, Seiji; Nokihara, Hiroshi; Nihei, Keiji; Akimoto, Tetsuo; Sumi, Minako; Ito, Yoshinori; Yoh, Kiyotaka; Goto, Koichi; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Horinouchi, Hidehito; Yamamoto, Noboru; Sekine, Ikuo; Kubota, Kaoru; Ohe, Yuichiro; Tamura, Tomohide

    2016-04-01

    We performed a post hoc analysis of progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and recurrent sites in patients with locally advanced nonsquamous non-small cell lung cancer who were enrolled in a phase I trial of combination chemotherapy consisting of pemetrexed plus cisplatin with concurrent thoracic radiotherapy. Patients received pemetrexed (500 mg/m²) plus cisplatin (75 mg/m²) on day 1 every 3 weeks for 3 cycles plus concurrent thoracic radiotherapy consisting of 60 Gy (n=6) or 66 Gy (n=12); 4 to 6 weeks thereafter, patients received consolidation treatment with pemetrexed (500 mg/m) every 3 weeks for up to 3 cycles. We reviewed the medial records to collect data on progression, recurrent sites, late toxicity, and survival. No late radiation morbidity was observed. Thirteen patients (72%) exhibited disease progression: 8 patients had distant metastases, 8 patients had local recurrence (within the radiation field [n=6], outside the radiation field [n=2], and both [n=1]), and 3 patients had local recurrence plus distant metastases. The median PFS was 10.5 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 8.8-12.3), and the 3-year PFS rate was 28% (95% CI, 7.0-48.6). Ten of the 18 patients died of lung cancer. The median follow-up time for the censored cases was 42.8 months (range, 38.1 to 52.9 mo). The median OS was 27.3 months (95% CI, 13.1-41.6), and the 3-year OS rate was 50% (95% CI, 26.9-73.1). The median PFS and OS in our study were comparable to those of historical chemoradiotherapy controls.

  3. Feasibility of MR Imaging/MR Spectroscopy-Planned Focal Partial Salvage Permanent Prostate Implant (PPI) for Localized Recurrence After Initial PPI for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Charles C.; Hsu, Howard; Pickett, Barby; Crehange, Gilles; Hsu, I-Chow Joe; Dea, Ryan; Weinberg, Vivian; Gottschalk, Alexander R.; Kurhanewicz, John; Shinohara, Katsuto; Roach, Mack

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-planned partial salvage permanent prostate implant (psPPI) among patients with biopsy-proven local recurrence after initial PPI without evidence of distant disease. Methods and Materials: From 2003-2009, 15 patients underwent MRI/magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) planning for salvage brachytherapy (psPPI, I-125 [n=14; 144 Gy]; Pd-103 [n=1; 125 Gy]) without hormone therapy. Full dose was prescribed to areas of recurrence and underdosage, without entire prostate implantation. Limiting urethral and rectal toxicity was prioritized. Follow-up was from salvage date to prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration failure (Phoenix criteria = nadir + 2.0; ASTRO = 3 consecutive rises), recurrence, distant metastases, or last follow-up PSA level. Progression-free survival (PFS) was defined as no PSA failure or biopsy-proven recurrence without all-cause mortality. Toxicity was scored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. Results: At salvage, median age was 68 years, and PSA concentration was 3.5 ng/mL (range, 0.9-5.6 ng/mL). Abnormal MRI/MRS findings were evident in 40% of patients. Biopsy-proven recurrences consisted of a single focus (80%) or 2 foci (20%). At recurrence, Gleason score was 6 (67%) or {>=}7 (27%). Median interval between initial and salvage implantation was 69 months (range, 28-132 months). psPPI planning characteristics limited doses to the rectum (mean V100 = 0.5% [0.07 cc]) and urethra (V100 = 12% [0.3 cc]). At median follow-up (23.3 months; range, 8-88 months), treatment failure (n=2) resulted only in localized recurrence; both patients underwent second psPPI with follow-up PSA tests at 12 and 26 months, resulting in 0.6 and 0.7 ng/mL, respectively. American Society for Radiation Oncology PFS rates at 1, 2, and 3 years were 86.7%, 78.4%, and 62.7%, respectively, with 5 patients for whom treatment failed (n=3 with negative transrectal ultrasound

  4. Pertuzumab in combination with trastuzumab and docetaxel for the treatment of HER2-positive metastatic or locally recurrent unresectable breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Fleeman, Nigel; Bagust, Adrian; Beale, Sophie; Dwan, Kerry; Dickson, Rumona; Proudlove, Chris; Dundar, Yenal

    2015-01-01

    The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) invited the manufacturer of pertuzumab (Roche) to submit evidence for the clinical and cost effectiveness of pertuzumab + trastuzumab + docetaxel for the treatment of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive (HER2+) metastatic or locally recurrent unresectable breast cancer in accordance with the Institute's Single Technology Appraisal (STA) process. The Liverpool Reviews and Implementation Group (LRiG) at the University of Liverpool was commissioned to act as the Evidence Review Group (ERG). This article summarises the ERG's review of the evidence submitted by the manufacturer and provides a summary of the Appraisal Committee's (AC) initial decision. At the time of writing, final guidance had not been published by NICE. The clinical evidence was mainly derived from an ongoing phase III randomised double-blind placebo-controlled international multicentre clinical trial (CLEOPATRA), designed to evaluate efficacy and safety in 808 patients, which compared pertuzumab + trastuzumab + docetaxel (pertuzumab arm) with placebo + trastuzumab + docetaxel (control arm). Both progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were analysed at two data cut-off points-May 2011 (median follow-up of 18 months) and May 2012 (median follow-up of 30 months). At both time points, PFS was significantly longer in the pertuzumab arm (18.5 months compared with 12.4 months in the control arm at the first data cut-off point and 18.7 versus 12.4 months at the second data cut-off point). Assessment of OS benefit suggested an improvement for patients in the pertuzumab arm with a strong trend towards an OS benefit at the second data cut-off point; however, due to the immaturity of the OS data, the magnitude of the OS benefit was uncertain. Importantly, cardiotoxicity was not increased in patients treated with a combination of pertuzumab + trastuzumab + docetaxel. The ERG's main concern with the

  5. Effect of obesity on prostate-specific antigen recurrence after radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer as measured by the 2006 Radiation Therapy Oncology Group-American Society for Therapeutic Radiation and Oncology (RTOG-ASTRO) Phoenix consensus definition.

    PubMed

    Stroup, Sean P; Cullen, Jennifer; Auge, Brian K; L'Esperance, James O; Kang, Song K

    2007-09-01

    Given the limited data regarding the impact of obesity on treatment outcomes after external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) for the definitive treatment of prostate cancer, the authors sought to evaluate the effect of obesity as measured by body mass index (BMI) on biochemical disease recurrence (BCR) using the most current 2006 Radiation Therapy Oncology Group-American Society for Therapeutic Radiation and Oncology (RTOG-ASTRO) Phoenix consensus definition (prostate-specific antigen [PSA] nadir + 2 ng/mL). A retrospective cohort study identified men who underwent primary EBRT for localized prostate cancer between 1989 and 2003 using the Center for Prostate Disease Research (CPDR) Multi-center National Database. BMI was calculated (in kg/m(2)) and the data were analyzed. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were used to determine whether BMI significantly predicted BCR. Of the 1868 eligible patients, 399 (21%) were obese. The median age of the patients and pretreatment PSA level were 70.2 years and 8.2 ng/mL, respectively. Of 1320 patients for whom data were available with which to calculate PSA recurrence (PSA nadir + 2 ng/mL), a total of 554 men (42.0%) experienced BCR. On univariate analysis, BMI was found to be an independent predictor of PSA recurrence (P = .02), as was race, pretreatment PSA level, EBRT dose, clinical T classification, Gleason score, PSA nadir, and the use of androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT). On multivariate analysis, BMI remained a significant predictor of BCR (P = .008). To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study to report the association between obesity and BCR after EBRT for localized prostate cancer as measured by the updated 2006 RTOG-ASTRO definition. A higher BMI is associated with greater odds of BCR after undergoing definitive EBRT.

  6. Impact of Recurrence and Salvage Surgery on Survival After Multidisciplinary Treatment of Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ikoma, Naruhiko; You, Y Nancy; Bednarski, Brian K; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A; Eng, Cathy; Das, Prajnan; Kopetz, Scott; Messick, Craig; Skibber, John M; Chang, George J

    2017-08-10

    Purpose After preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by total mesorectal excision for locally advanced rectal cancer, patients who experience local or systemic relapse of disease may be eligible for curative salvage surgery, but the benefit of this surgery has not been fully investigated. The purpose of this study was to characterize recurrence patterns and investigate the impact of salvage surgery on survival in patients with rectal cancer after receiving multidisciplinary treatment. Patients and Methods Patients with locally advanced (cT3-4 or cN+) rectal cancer who were treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by total mesorectal excision at our institution during 1993 to 2008 were identified. We examined patterns of recurrence location, time to recurrence, treatment factors, and survival. Results A total of 735 patients were included. Tumors were mostly midrectal to lower rectal cancer, with a median distance from the anal verge of 5.0 cm. The most common recurrence site was the lung followed by the liver. Median time to recurrence was shorter in liver-only recurrence (11.2 months) than in lung-only recurrence (18.2 months) or locoregional-only recurrence (24.7 months; P = .001). Salvage surgery was performed in 57% of patients with single-site recurrence and was associated with longer survival after recurrence in patients with lung-only and liver-only recurrence ( P < .001) but not in those with locoregional-only recurrence ( P = .353). Conclusion We found a predilection for lung recurrence in patients with rectal cancer after multidisciplinary treatment. Salvage surgery was associated with prolonged survival in patients with lung-only and liver-only recurrence, but not in those with locoregional recurrence, which demonstrates a need for careful consideration of the indications for resection.

  7. Metformin Hydrochloride, Carboplatin, and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-24

    Ovarian Papillary Serous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

  8. Genetic variants in microRNAs and microRNA target sites predict biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy in localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shu-Pin; Lévesque, Eric; Guillemette, Chantal; Yu, Chia-Cheng; Huang, Chao-Yuan; Lin, Victor C; Chung, I-Che; Chen, Lih-Chyang; Laverdière, Isabelle; Lacombe, Louis; Fradet, Yves; Chang, Ta-Yuan; Lee, Hong-Zin; Juang, Shin-Hun; Bao, Bo-Ying

    2014-12-01

    Recent evidence indicates that microRNAs might participate in prostate cancer initiation, progression and treatment response. Germline variations in microRNAs might alter target gene expression and modify the efficacy of prostate cancer therapy. To determine whether genetic variants in microRNAs and microRNA target sites are associated with the risk of biochemical recurrence (BCR) after radical prostatectomy (RP). We retrospectively studied two independent cohorts composed of 320 Asian and 526 Caucasian men with pathologically organ-confined prostate cancer who had a median follow-up of 54.7 and 88.8 months after RP, respectively. Patients were systematically genotyped for 64 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in microRNAs and microRNA target sites, and their prognostic significance on BCR was assessed by Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox regression model. After adjusting for known clinicopathologic risk factors, two SNPs (MIR605 rs2043556 and CDON rs3737336) remained associated with BCR. The numbers of risk alleles showed a cumulative effect on BCR [perallele hazard ratio (HR) 1.60, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.16-2.21, p for trend = 0.005] in Asian cohort, and the risk was replicated in Caucasian cohort (HR 1.55, 95% CI 1.15-2.08, p for trend = 0.004) and in combined analysis (HR 1.57, 95% CI 1.26-1.96, p for trend <0.001). Results warrant replication in larger cohorts. This is the first study demonstrating that SNPs in microRNAs and microRNA target sites can be predictive biomarkers for BCR after RP.

  9. Vorinostat and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Nasopharyngeal Cancer or Nasal Natural Killer T-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-10

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Stage IV Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IV Nasopharyngeal Undifferentiated Carcinoma AJCC v7

  10. Outcome after local recurrence of osteosarcoma: the St. Jude Children's Research Hospital experience (1970-2000).

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos; Shah, Nirali; McCarville, M Beth; Billups, Catherine A; Neel, Michael N; Rao, Bhaskar N; Daw, Najat C

    2004-05-01

    Despite improvements in therapy for osteosarcoma, approximately 4-10% of patients experience a local recurrence and have a poor prognosis. The authors analyzed prognostic factors for survival in 26 patients with a local recurrence of osteosarcoma who were treated between 1970 and 2000. The initial surgical procedure was amputation in 20 patients (76.9%) and limb salvage in 6 patients (23.1%). The median time from the diagnosis of osteosarcoma to local recurrence was 1.2 years (range, 1.2 months-6.1 years). Eleven patients (42.3%) developed an isolated local recurrence and 15 patients (57.7%) developed local and distant recurrence. The 5-year estimate of postrecurrence survival (PRS) (+/- 1 standard error) for the 26 patients was 19.2% +/- 7.7%. Recurrence > or = 2 years from the time of diagnosis was found to predict a better outcome (5-year PRS of 50.0% +/- 20.4%) compared with earlier recurrence (10.0% +/- 5.5%) (P = 0.037). Patients with negative margins after initial surgery were found to have improved survival (5-year PRS of 33.3% +/- 13.6%) compared with patients with positive margins (7.1% +/- 4.9%) (P = 0.015). Patients who underwent complete surgical resection at the time of recurrence were found to have a better PRS (5-year PRS of 41.7% +/- 14.2%) compared with patients who did not undergo surgery (0% +/- 0%) (P < 0.001). The prognosis for patients after local recurrence of osteosarcoma is poor. Complete surgical resection at the time of recurrence is essential for survival. Positive margins at the time of initial surgical resection and early recurrence appear to be poor prognostic factors. Copyright 2004 American Cancer Society.

  11. [Radiotherapy in pelvic recurrences of rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Morganti, A G; Santoni, R; Osti, M F

    2001-01-01

    Patients with locally recurrent rectal carcinoma have an unfavourable prognosis for the high incidence of distant metastases, the infrequent feasibility of radical surgical resection, and, in these last cases, the high incidence of re-recurrences. Based on the low resectability rate of pelvic recurrences, the clear impact of tumor diameter on resectability and outcome, and the documented possibility to achieve a significant tumor downstaging and downsizing with the use of concurrent chemoradiation, it is evident that the most promising treatment several authors have considered concurrent chemoradiation followed, if feasible, by radical resection. Furthermore, based on the high local and distant failure rate after surgery, the utilization of intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) and adjuvant chemotherapy seems justified. Some published comparisons between patients treated with and without IORT seems to suggest the possible improvement in both local control and survival in these patients. Particularly interesting issues in this field are: 1) the definition of the most effective treatment modality (both in terms of radiation dose, fractionation and techniques, and drugs to be used concurrently to radiotherapy); 2) the analysis of the prognostic impact of several factors, with the aim of designing and validating staging systems of local rectal recurrences; 3) the possibility to treat with relatively high doses also patients previously irradiated on the pelvis.

  12. The recurrence frequency of breast cancer and its prognostic factors in Iranian patients

    PubMed Central

    Shahriari-Ahmadi, Ali; Arabi, Mohsen; Payandeh, Mehrdad; Sadeghi, Masoud

    2017-01-01

    Background: Recurrent breast cancer (BC) after initial treatments is usually associated with poor outcome. The objective of this study is to evaluate baseline characteristics of BC patients to determine their prognostic influence of recurrences. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study of 481 BC patients, 182 patients who had recurrence within the first, second, or third 5 years after diagnosis were included in the study. The significant prognostic factors associated with late or very late recurrence were selected according to the Akaike Information Criterion. Early recurrence was defined as initial recurrence within 5 years following curative surgery irrespective of site. Likewise, late recurrence was defined as initial recurrence after 5 years. Also, very late recurrence was defined as initial recurrence after 10 years. Results: During the follow-up period, 182 recurrences occurred (local recurrence or distant metastasis). All patients were treated with chemotherapy and radiotherapy and the patients with estrogen receptor (ER)- or progesterone receptor (PR)-positive had hormone therapy. There was a significant correlation between histological grade and receptors status with recurrence. In binary logistic regression analysis, ER and PR were significant prognostic factors for early recurrence. Conclusion: High histological grade and immunohistochemical markers (ER- and PR-negative or human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive) are risk factors for recurrence, especially in early recurrence and also between of them, ER is the more significant prognostic factor in early recurrence.

  13. Current Treatment of Isolated Locoregional Breast Cancer Recurrences.

    PubMed

    Harms, Wolfgang; Geretschläger, Andreas; Cescato, Corinne; Buess, Martin; Köberle, Dieter; Asadpour, Branca

    2015-08-01

    Patients with isolated locoregional breast cancer recurrences should be treated with curative intent. Mastectomy is regarded as the standard of care for patients with ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence. In a selected group of patients, partial breast irradiation after second breast-conserving surgery is a viable alternative to mastectomy. If a second breast conservation is performed, additional irradiation should be mandatory, especially in patients who had not been irradiated previously. In case of re-irradiation, the largest experience exists for multi-catheter brachytherapy. Prospective clinical trials are needed to clearly define selection criteria, long-term local control, and toxicity. In patients with resectable locoregional breast cancer recurrences after mastectomy, multi-modal therapy comprising complete resection, radiation therapy in previously unirradiated patients, and systemic therapy results in 5-year disease-free and overall survival rates of 69% and 88%, respectively. In radiation-naive patients with unresectable, isolated locoregional recurrences, radiation therapy is mandatory. In selected patients with previous irradiations and unresectable locoregional recurrences, a second irradiation as part of an individual treatment concept can be applied. The increased risk of severe toxicity should always be weighed up against the potential clinical benefit. A combination therapy with hyperthermia can further improve the treatment results.

  14. Current Treatment of Isolated Locoregional Breast Cancer Recurrences

    PubMed Central

    Harms, Wolfgang; Geretschläger, Andreas; Cescato, Corinne; Buess, Martin; Köberle, Dieter; Asadpour, Branca

    2015-01-01

    Summary Patients with isolated locoregional breast cancer recurrences should be treated with curative intent. Mastectomy is regarded as the standard of care for patients with ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence. In a selected group of patients, partial breast irradiation after second breast-conserving surgery is a viable alternative to mastectomy. If a second breast conservation is performed, additional irradiation should be mandatory, especially in patients who had not been irradiated previously. In case of re-irradiation, the largest experience exists for multi-catheter brachytherapy. Prospective clinical trials are needed to clearly define selection criteria, long-term local control, and toxicity. In patients with resectable locoregional breast cancer recurrences after mastectomy, multi-modal therapy comprising complete resection, radiation therapy in previously unirradiated patients, and systemic therapy results in 5-year disease-free and overall survival rates of 69% and 88%, respectively. In radiation-naive patients with unresectable, isolated locoregional recurrences, radiation therapy is mandatory. In selected patients with previous irradiations and unresectable locoregional recurrences, a second irradiation as part of an individual treatment concept can be applied. The increased risk of severe toxicity should always be weighed up against the potential clinical benefit. A combination therapy with hyperthermia can further improve the treatment results. PMID:26600763

  15. [Difficulties in diagnosis and localization of recurrent medullary thyroid carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Biterman, Arie; Bloch, Boaz; Wolf, Tamir; Baron, Ela; Lephel, Oleg; Cohen, Oded

    2002-02-01

    Recurrent and residual medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) are common in patients following primary surgical resection. Difficulty arises in performing precise localization of the tumor because of anatomical distortion of the neck structures following surgery. To date, no modality has been shown superior to others in the diagnosis of recurrent or residual MTC, and the issue is currently under debate in the literature. We report a case in which secondary recurrence of MTC was detected and localized using a novel combination of preoperative and intraoperative radionuclide imaging, and a method of preventing intraoperative damage to the recurrent laryngeal nerve in the anatomically disrupted neck. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a combination of these three modalities in detection and localization of recurrent MTC, while minimizing the possibility for nerve injury during the operative procedure. Such a therapeutic strategy may prove useful in the management of patients who have previously undergone neck surgery and suffer from anatomical distortion of normal neck structures.

  16. Carboplatin, Gemcitabine Hydrochloride, and Mifepristone in Treating Patients With Advanced Breast Cancer or Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-10

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  17. Predicting the risk of local recurrence in patients with breast cancer: an approach to a new computer-based predictive tool.

    PubMed

    Sanghani, Mona; Balk, Ethan; Cady, Blake; Wazer, David

    2007-10-01

    To develop a new web-based tool, designated IBTR!, which integrates prognostic factors for local recurrence (LR) into a model to predict the 10-year risk of LR after breast conserving surgery (BCS) with or without radiation therapy (RT) with the goal of assisting with patient counseling and medical decision-making. All available randomized trials of BCS alone versus BCS plus RT, meta-analyses, and institutional reports were reviewed to identify the principal prognostic factors for LR after breast-conserving therapy. Patient age, margin status, lymphovascular invasion (LVI), tumor size, tumor grade, use of chemotherapy, and use of hormonal therapy were found to consistently and significantly impact LR across multiple studies. Based upon a composite analysis of the relevant published randomized and nonrandomized studies, relative risk (RR) ratios were estimated and assigned to each prognostic category. These RR ratios were entered into a mathematical model with the 10-year baseline rates of recurrence with and without RT, 7% and 24%, respectively, to predict patient-specific LR risk. Individual data entered into this computer model with regards to patient age, margin status, LVI, tumor size, tumor grade, use of chemotherapy, and use of hormonal therapy will generate patient-specific predicted 10-year LR risk with and without RT. A graphic representation of the relative risk reduction with RT will also be displayed alongside the numerical display. IBTR! is a first attempt at a computer model incorporating LR prognostic factors in an evidence-based fashion to predict individual LR risk and the potential additional benefit from RT.

  18. SBRT for recurrent head and neck cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, M.; Kabarriti, R.; Baliga, S.; Guha, C.; Tome, W.; Kalnicki, S.

    2017-01-01

    The management of patients with recurrent head and neck cancers is complex. Concerns over toxicity with re-irradiation have limited its use in the clinical setting. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) has emerged as a highly conformal and precise type of radiotherapy and has the advantage of sparing normal tissue. Although SBRT is an attractive treatment modality, its use in the clinic is limited, given the technically challenging nature of the procedure. In this review, we attempt to provide a comprehensive overview of the role of re-irradiation in patients with recurrent head and neck cancers, with particular attention to the advent of SBRT and its use with systemic therapies such as cetuximab.

  19. The early predictive value of a decrease of metabolic tumor volume in repeated (18)F-FDG PET/CT for recurrence of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer with concurrent radiochemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Liu, Bo; Fan, Min; Zhou, Tao; Fu, Zheng; Zhang, Zicheng; Li, Hongsheng; Li, Baosheng

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the value of [(18)F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ((18)F FDG PET/CT) to predict recurrence of patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) during the early stage of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). A total of 53 stage III NSCLC patients without diabetics or undergoing surgery were enrolled in the prospective study. Those patients were evaluated by FDG PET before and following 40Gy radiotherapy (RT) with a concurrent cisplatin-based heterogeneous chemotherapy regimen. Semiquantitative assessment was used to determine maximum and mean SUVs (SUVmax/SUVmean) and metabolic tumor volume (MTV) of the primary tumor. The prognostic significance of PET/CT parameters and other clinical variables was assessed using Cox regression analyses. The cutoffs of PET/CT parameters which have been determined by the previous study were used to separate the groups with Kaplan-Meier curves. Recurrence rates at 1- and 2-years were 18.9% (10/53) and 50.9% (27/53) for all patients, respectively. Cox regression analysis showed that the only prognostic factor for recurrence was a decrease of MTV. Using the cutoff of 29.7%, a decrease of MTV can separate the patients into 2 groups with Kaplan-Meier curve successfully. The prospective study has reinforced the early predictive value of MTV in repeated (18)F-FDG PET/CT for recurrence in a subgroup of locally advanced NSCLC who underwent CCRT. A decrease of MTV in (18)F-FDG uptake by the primary tumor correlates with higher LRFS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Prognostic Impact of External Beam Radiation Therapy in Patients Treated With and Without Extended Surgery and Intraoperative Electrons for Locally Recurrent Rectal Cancer: 16-Year Experience in a Single Institution

    SciTech Connect

    Calvo, Felipe A.; Sole, Claudio V.; Alvarez de Sierra, Pedro; Gómez-Espí, Marina; Blanco, Jose; and others

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To analyze prognostic factors associated with survival in patients after intraoperative electrons containing resective surgical rescue of locally recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC). Methods and Materials: From January 1995 to December 2011, 60 patients with LRRC underwent extended surgery (n=38: multiorgan [43%], bone [28%], soft tissue [38%]) or nonextended (n=22) surgical resection, including a component of intraoperative electron-beam radiation therapy (IOERT) to the pelvic recurrence tumor bed. Twenty-eight (47%) of these patients also received external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) (range, 30.6-50.4 Gy). Survival outcomes were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method, and risk factors were identified by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: The median follow-up time was 36 months (range, 2-189 months), and the 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year rates for locoregional control (LRC) and overall survival (OS) were 86%, 52%, and 44%; and 78%, 53%, 43%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, R1 resection, EBRT at the time of pelvic rerecurrence, no tumor fragmentation, and non-lymph node metastasis retained significance with regard to LRR. R1 resection and no tumor fragmentation showed a significant association with OS after adjustment for other covariates. Conclusions: EBRT treatment integrated for rescue, resection radicality, and not involved fragmented resection specimens are associated with improved LRC in patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer. Additionally, tumor fragmentation could be compensated by EBRT. Present results suggest that a significant group of patients with LRRC may benefit from EBRT treatment integrated with extended surgery and IOERT.

  1. SHARE: a French multicenter phase III trial comparing accelerated partial irradiation versus standard or hypofractionated whole breast irradiation in breast cancer patients at low risk of local recurrence.

    PubMed

    Belkacemi, Yazid; Bourgier, Céline; Kramar, Andrew; Auzac, Guillaume; Dumas, Isabelle; Lacornerie, Thomas; Mége, Jean-Pierre; Mijonnet, Sylvie; Lemonnier, Jerôme; Lartigau, Eric

    2013-02-01

    The standard treatment for breast cancer patients at low risk of recurrence is based on conservative surgery followed by radiation therapy delivered to the whole breast. The accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) concept, developed more than 15 years ago, could be an option in selected patients. However, the ideal patient profile for APBI is still not clearly identified. Recent reports from the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and the Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie-European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (GEC-ESTRO) have suggested selection criteria for "suitable patients" who could receive APBI outside of clinical trials. Currently, there are 6 ongoing phase III trials. All are characterized by a significant heterogeneity regarding inclusion criteria and stratification factors. The French UNICANCER trial (SHARE; ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01247233) will randomize 2,800 patients in 3 arms: APBI (1 week) using 3-dimensional (3D) conformal radiotherapy, standard radiotherapy (6.5 weeks), and hypofractionated radiotherapy (3 weeks). In this article, we review the reported retrospective studies as well as older randomized trials. We will also describe the differences between the 6 ongoing phase III trials and the particularities of the French SHARE trial.

  2. Long-term results of local excision for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Paty, Philip B; Nash, Garrett M; Baron, Paul; Zakowski, Maureen; Minsky, Bruce D; Blumberg, David; Nathanson, Daniel R; Guillem, Jose G; Enker, Warren E; Cohen, Alfred M; Wong, W Douglas

    2002-10-01

    To review the authors' experience with local excision of early rectal cancers to assess the effectiveness of initial treatment and of salvage surgery. Local excision for rectal cancer is appealing for its low morbidity and excellent functional results. However, its use is limited by inability to assess regional lymph nodes and uncertainty of oncologic outcome. Patients with T1 and T2 adenocarcinomas of the rectum treated by local excision as definitive surgery between 1969 to 1996 at the authors' institution were reviewed. Pathology slides were reviewed. Among 125 assessable patients, 74 were T1 and 51 were T2. Thirty-one patients (25%) were selected to receive adjuvant radiation therapy. Fifteen of these 31 patients received adjuvant radiation in combination with 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy. Median follow-up was 6.7 years. One hundred fifteen patients (92%) were followed until death or for greater than 5 years, and 69 patients (55%) were followed until death or for greater than 10 years. Recurrence was recorded as local, distant, and overall. Survival was disease-specific. Ten-year local recurrence and survival rates were 17% and 74% for T1 rectal cancers and 26% and 72% for T2 cancers. Median time to relapse was 1.4 years (range 0.4-7.0) for local recurrence and 2.5 years (0.8-7.5) for distant recurrence. In patients receiving radiotherapy, local recurrence was delayed (median 2.1 years vs. 1.1 years), but overall rates of local and overall recurrence and survival rates were similar to patients not receiving radiotherapy. Among 26 cancer deaths, 8 (28%) occurred more than 5 years after local excision. On multivariate analysis, no clinical or pathologic features were predictive of local recurrence. Intratumoral vascular invasion was the only significant predictor of survival. Among 34 patients who developed tumor recurrence, the pattern of first clinical recurrence was predominantly local: 50% local only, 18% local and distant, and 32% distant only. Among the 17

  3. Management of recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Eutimio, Mario Adan; Acosta-Altamirano, Gustavo; Vargas-Aguilar, Víctor Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer is the fifth most common cancer in women. It is usually diagnosed at an advanced stage and is the leading cause of death from gynecologic cancers in women. The overall survival rate at five years is 50% and its treatment is still poor. We need new treatments for patients with recurrent ovarian cancer who are incurable with current management. We review the effectiveness of new biological agents and morbidity and mortality of cytoreductive surgery. Since the hyperthermic increases the effectiveness of chemotherapy and the chance of survival, hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy has been proven to be a promising option, however it still requires further study to be the standard treatment. PMID:25207212

  4. Involved-Field Radiation Therapy for Locoregionally Recurrent Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Aaron P.; Jhingran, Anuja; Klopp, Ann H.; Schmeler, Kathleen M.; Ramirez, Pedro T.; Eifel, Patricia J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of definitive involved-field radiation therapy (IFRT) for selected patients with locoregionally-recurrent ovarian cancer. Methods We retrospectively reviewed records of 102 epithelial ovarian cancer patients treated with definitive IFRT (≥45 Gy). IFRT was directed to localized nodal (49%) and extranodal (51%) recurrences. Results The median time from diagnosis to IFRT was 36 months (range, 1–311), and the median follow-up after IFRT was 37 months (range, 1–123). Patients received a median of three chemotherapy courses before IFRT (range, 0–9). Five-year overall (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) rates after IFRT were 40% and 24% respectively; the 5-year in-field disease control rate was 71%. Thirty-five patients (35%) had no evidence of disease at a median of 38 months after IFRT (range, 7–122), including 25 continuously without disease for a median of 61 months (range, 17–122) and 10 with salvage treatment following disease recurrence, disease-free for a median of 39 months after salvage treatment (range, 7–92). Eight clear cell carcinoma patients had higher 5-year OS (88% versus 37%; p=0.05) and PFS (75% versus 20%; p=0.01) rates than other patients. Patients sensitive to initial platinum chemotherapy had a higher 5-year OS rate than platinum-resistant patients (43% versus 27%, p=0.03). Patients who required chemotherapy for recurrence after IFRT often benefitted from longer chemotherapy-free intervals after than before IFRT. Conclusions Definitive IFRT can yield excellent local control, protracted disease-free intervals, and even cures in carefully selected patients. RT should be considered a tool in the curative management of locoregionally-recurrent ovarian cancer. PMID:23648467

  5. Pattern of local recurrence after conservative surgery and whole-breast irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, Gary M. . E-mail: G_Freedman@FCCC.edu; Anderson, Penny R.; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Eisenberg, Debra F.; Nicolaou, Nicos

    2005-04-01

    Purpose: Most recurrences in the breast after conservative surgery and whole-breast irradiation have been reported to occur within the same quadrant as the initial primary tumor. We analyzed the long-term risk of recurrence by area of the breast after whole-breast irradiation. Materials and Methods: In all, 1,990 women with Stage 0-II breast cancer were treated with conservative surgery and whole-breast irradiation from 1970-1998. Stage was ductal carcinoma in situ in 237, T1 in 1273, and T2 in 480 patients. Of 120 local recurrences, 71 were classified as true local (confined to the original quadrant) and 49 as elsewhere (involving outside the original quadrant). Kaplan-Meier methodology was used to calculate 5-year, 10-year, and 15-year rates of recurrence (95% confidence intervals in parentheses). The median follow-up is 80 months. Results: There was no apparent difference in the 15-year rate of true local vs. elsewhere recurrence, but the time to recurrence was different. The rate of true local recurrence was 2%, 5%, and 7% (5-9%) at 5, 10, and 15 years, respectively. The recurrences elsewhere in the breast were rare at 5 (1%) and 10 (2%) years, but increased to 6 (3-9%) at 15 years. This 15-year rate of elsewhere recurrence was half the rate of contralateral breast cancers of 13% (10-16%). Conclusions: Recurrence elsewhere in the breast is rare for the first 10 years, but by 15 years is nearly equal to true local recurrence even after whole-breast irradiation. The 15-year rate of elsewhere recurrence was half the rate of contralateral breast cancers. This may indicate a therapeutic effect of whole-breast radiation for other areas of the breast. Very long follow-up will be needed for partial breast irradiation with or without tamoxifen to show that the risk of elsewhere recurrence is not significantly different than after whole-breast irradiation.

  6. Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy with Capecitabine, Oxaliplatin and Bevacizumab Followed by Concomitant Chemoradiation and Surgical Resection in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer with High Risk of Recurrence - A Phase II Study.

    PubMed

    Eisterer, Wolfgang; Piringer, Gudrun; DE Vries, Alexander; Öfner, Dietmar; Greil, Richard; Tschmelitsch, Jörg; Samonigg, Hellmut; Sölkner, Lidija; Gnant, Michael; Thaler, Josef

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate feasibility and safety of neoadjuvant chemotherapy with capecitabine, oxaliplatin and bevacizumab followed by concomitant standard chemoradiation and surgical resection in patients with high-risk locally advanced rectal cancer. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-defined high-risk cT3/4 rectal cancer patients were treated with 3 cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy with capecitabine (1,000 mg/m(2) twice daily days 1-14, 22-35, 43-56), oxaliplatin (130 mg/sqm on days 1, 22, 43) and bevacizumab (7.5 mg/kg on days 1, 22, 43) followed by capecitabine (825 mg/m(2) twice daily on radiotherapy days week 1-4) concomitantly with radiotherapy (1.8 Gy daily up to 45 Gy in 5 weeks) and surgical resection by total mesorectal excision. Feasibility, safety, response rate and postoperative morbidity were evaluated. Twenty-five patients were recruited. Median age was 62 years (range=24-78 years) and all patients had Eastern Cooperation Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status 0. From all patients, 79.2% finished neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Twenty patients underwent surgery. Pathologic complete remission rate, R0 resection and T-downstaging were achieved in 25%, 95% and 54.2% of the "intention to treat" (ITT) patients. The most common grade 3 adverse events (AEs) during neoadjuvant chemotherapy were diarrhea (16.6%) and mucositis (12.5%). In one patient, a grade 4 acute renal failure occurred (4.2%). During chemoradiation, skin reactions (5.3%) were the most common grade 3 AEs. Two major perioperative complications required re-intervention. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy with bevacizumab, capecitabine and oxaliplatin followed by concomitant standard chemoradiation is feasible in patients with high-risk locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) and resulted in complete pathologic remission (pCR) rate of 25% and neoadjuvant chemotherapy completion rate of 80%. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  7. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for reirradiation of locally recurrent lung tumors.

    PubMed

    Trakul, Nicholas; Harris, Jeremy P; Le, Quynh-Thu; Hara, Wendy Y; Maxim, Peter G; Loo, Billy W; Diehn, Maximilian

    2012-09-01

    Patients with thoracic tumors that recur after irradiation currently have limited therapeutic options. Retreatment using stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) is appealing for these patients because of its high conformity but has not been studied extensively. Here we report our experience with SABR for lung tumors in previously irradiated regions. We conducted a retrospective study of patients with primary lung cancer or metastatic lung tumors treated with SABR. We identified 17 such tumors in 15 patients and compared their outcomes with those of a cohort of 135 previously unirradiated lung tumors treated with SABR during the same time period. Twelve-month local control (LC) for retreated tumors was 65.5%, compared with 92.1% for tumors receiving SABR as initial treatment. Twelve-month LC was significantly worse for reirradiated tumors in which the time interval between treatments was 16 months or less (46.7%), compared with those with longer intertreatment intervals (87.5%). SABR reirradiation did not lead to significant increases in treatment-related toxicity. SABR for locally recurrent lung tumors arising in previously irradiated fields seems to be feasible and safe for appropriately selected patients. LC of retreated lesions was significantly lower, likely owing to the lower doses used for retreatment. Shorter time to retreatment was associated with increased risk of local failure, suggesting that these tumors may be particularly radioresistant. Our findings suggest that dose escalation may improve LC while maintaining acceptable levels of toxicity for these patients.

  8. Desmoid Tumor of the Chest Wall Mimicking Recurrent Breast Cancer: Multimodality Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyeong A; An, Yeong Yi

    2016-01-01

    Desmoid tumor of breast is a rare benign, locally aggressive tumor with a high recurrence rate. It has been associated with scar from previous breast surgery or trauma. Especially in breast cancer patients with previous operation history, it may simulate recurrent breast cancer clinically and radiologically. We presented multimodality imaging findings (ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography/computed tomography) of chest wall desmoid tumor mimicking recurrent breast cancer in a 38-year-old patient with a history of left modified mastectomy. The desmoid tumor is a rare benign tumor that should be considered in the differential diagnosis of malignant local tumor recurrence after breast cancer operation. Biopsy was required for accurate diagnosis and wide local excision was its appropriate surgical management. PMID:27895871

  9. Surgical adjuvant treatment of locally advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, C M; Abston, S; Fish, J C

    1985-01-01

    The reported incidence of local recurrence after mastectomy for locally advanced breast cancer (TNM Stage III and IV) is between 30% and 50%. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of radiation therapy (XRT) followed by total mastectomy on the incidence of local recurrence in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. Fifty-three patients who presented with locally advanced breast cancer, without distant metastases, were treated with XRT (4500-5000 R) to the breast, chest wall, and regional lymph nodes. Five weeks after completion of XRT, total mastectomy was performed. There were no operative deaths. The complications that occurred in 22 patients after surgery were flap necrosis, wound infection, and seroma. Patients have been followed from 3 to 134 months. Twenty-five patients are alive (3-134 months), 12 free of disease; 28 patients have died with distant metastases (6-67 months). Isolated local recurrence occurred in only two patients. Four patients had local and distant recurrence (total local recurrence is 6/53). The remaining patients all developed distant metastases. We have devised a treatment strategy which significantly decreases the incidence of local recurrence in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. However, the rapid appearance of distant metastases emphasizes the need for systemically active therapy in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. PMID:3994434

  10. Cancer Metastases: Early Dissemination and Late Recurrences

    PubMed Central

    Friberg, Sten; Nyström, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Metastatic cells from a primary tumor can occur before the primary cancer is detected. Metastatic cells can also remain in the patient for many years after removal of the primary tumor without proliferating. These dormant malignant cells can awaken and cause recurrent disease decades after the primary treatment. The purpose of this article is to review the clinical evidence for early dissemination and late recurrences in human malignant tumors. We used the following definitions: dormancy of cells may be defined as a nonproliferating state or an arrest in the cell cycle that results in a prolonged G0 phase. If one accepts the term “late metastases” to indicate a period exceeding 10 years from the removal of the primary tumor, then the two malignancies in which this occurs most frequently are cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) and renal cell carcinoma (RCC). METHODS PubMed, Web of Science, and Scopus were searched with the keywords “metastases,” “early dissemination,” “late recurrences,” “inadvertently transmitted cancer,” “tumor growth rate,” “dormancy,” “circulating tumor cells,” and “transplantation of cancer.” RESULTS Several case reports of early dissemination and late recurrences of various types of malignancies were found. Analyses of the growth rates of several malignant tumors in the original host indicated that the majority of cancers had metastasized years before they were detected. CMM, RCC, and malignant glioblastoma were the three most common malignancies resulting from an organ transplantation. CMM and RCC were also the two most common malignancies that showed dormancy. In several cases of transplanted CMM and RCC, the donor did not have any known malignancy or had had the malignancy removed so long ago that the donor was regarded as cured. CONCLUSION (1) Metastases can frequently exist prior to the detection of the primary tumor. (2) Metastatic cells may reside in organs in the original host that are not

  11. The 21-Gene Recurrence Score and Locoregional Recurrence in Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jegadeesh, Naresh K.; Kim, Sunjin; Prabhu, Roshan S.; Oprea, Gabriela M.; Yu, David S.; Godette, Karen G.; Zelnak, Amelia B.; Mister, Donna; Switchenko, Jeffrey M.; Torres, Mylin A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Although the 21-gene recurrence score (RS) assay has been validated to assess the risk of distant recurrence in hormone receptor-positive breast cancer patients, the relationship between RS and the risk of locoregional recurrence (LRR) remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine if RS is associated with LRR in breast cancer patients and whether this relationship varies based on the type of local treatment [mastectomy or breast-conserving therapy (BCT)]. Methods 163 consecutive estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer patients at our institution had an RS generated from the primary breast tumor between August 2006 and October 2009. Patients were treated with lumpectomy and radiation (BCT) (n = 110) or mastectomy alone (n = 53). Patients were stratified using a pre-determined RS of 25 and then grouped according to local therapy type. Results Median follow-up was 68.2 months. Patients who developed an LRR had stage I or IIA disease, >2 mm surgical margins, and received chemotherapy as directed by RS. While an RS > 25 did not predict for a higher rate of LRR, an RS > 24 was associated with LRR in our subjects. Among mastectomy patients, the 5-year LRR rate was 27.3 % in patients with an RS > 24 versus 10.7 % (p = 0.04) in those whose RS was ≤24. RS was not associated with LRR in patients who received BCT. Conclusions Breast cancer patients treated with mastectomy for tumors that have an RS > 24 are at high risk of LRR and may benefit from post-mastectomy radiation. PMID:25472643

  12. The 21-gene recurrence score and locoregional recurrence in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Jegadeesh, Naresh K; Kim, Sunjin; Prabhu, Roshan S; Oprea, Gabriela M; Yu, David S; Godette, Karen G; Zelnak, Amelia B; Mister, Donna; Switchenko, Jeffrey M; Torres, Mylin A

    2015-04-01

    Although the 21-gene recurrence score (RS) assay has been validated to assess the risk of distant recurrence in hormone receptor-positive breast cancer patients, the relationship between RS and the risk of locoregional recurrence (LRR) remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine if RS is associated with LRR in breast cancer patients and whether this relationship varies based on the type of local treatment [mastectomy or breast-conserving therapy (BCT)]. 163 consecutive estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer patients at our institution had an RS generated from the primary breast tumor between August 2006 and October 2009. Patients were treated with lumpectomy and radiation (BCT) (n = 110) or mastectomy alone (n = 53). Patients were stratified using a pre-determined RS of 25 and then grouped according to local therapy type. Median follow-up was 68.2 months. Patients who developed an LRR had stage I or IIA disease, >2 mm surgical margins, and received chemotherapy as directed by RS. While an RS > 25 did not predict for a higher rate of LRR, an RS > 24 was associated with LRR in our subjects. Among mastectomy patients, the 5-year LRR rate was 27.3 % in patients with an RS > 24 versus 10.7 % (p = 0.04) in those whose RS was ≤ 24. RS was not associated with LRR in patients who received BCT. Breast cancer patients treated with mastectomy for tumors that have an RS > 24 are at high risk of LRR and may benefit from post-mastectomy radiation.

  13. Distribution and Prevalence of Locoregional Recurrence after Video-Assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery for Primary Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Haruki, Tomohiro; Miwa, Ken; Araki, Kunio; Taniguchi, Yuji; Nakamura, Hiroshige

    2016-09-01

    Background The aim of this study is to evaluate cases with locoregional recurrence after video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) for primary lung cancer. Methods We reviewed 248 patients with primary lung cancer who underwent lobectomy or segmentectomy with mediastinal lymph node dissection by VATS between January 2005 and December 2011. Locoregional recurrence is defined as per its occurrence in (1) bronchial stump or lung parenchymal cut end, (2) ipsilateral pleura, and (3) ipsilateral hilar and mediastinal lymph nodes, and we analyzed recurrence rate and significant associated factors for locoregional recurrence by logistic regression analysis. Results There were 47 cases of postoperative recurrence, which consisted of 26 distant, 6 locoregional and distant, and 15 locoregional recurrences. The locoregional recurrence rate was 6.0%. Of the 15 locoregional recurrence cases, there were two cases of bronchial stump and lung parenchyma cut end (0.4%), five cases of ipsilateral pleura (2.0%), and eight cases of ipsilateral hilar and mediastinal lymph nodes (3.2%). Pleural and lymphovascular invasion and advanced stages were significant associated factors in univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis revealed that advanced stages were only a significant associated factor for locoregional recurrence (p < 0.01, odds ratio: 3.3). Conclusion Although locoregional recurrence rates of our surgical treatments for primary lung cancer by VATS might be acceptable, we should explore more effective modalities against pathologically proven local advanced lung cancer for preventing not only distant but also locoregional recurrences.

  14. Crossed pectoralis major myocutaneous flap for recurrent oral cavity cancers

    PubMed Central

    Pancholi, Mayank; Sharma, Sanjay; Desai, Sanjay M.; Agrawal, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Background: Oral cavity cancers are fairly common and have propensity to recur locally. Since Pectoralis Major Myocutaneous (PMMC) flap is the most widely used first flap for reconstruction, it is exhausted at the earliest and recurrence poses a formidable challenge for reconstructive surgeon. Present study evaluated the feasibility of contralateral Pectoralis Major Myocutaneous Flap for reconstruction after resection of recurrent tumour. Methods: This was a study of the patients presenting with recurrent oral cavity cancer after exhausted ipsilateral Pectoralis Major Myocutaneous Flap (PMMC) in whom we used contralateral Pectoralis Major Myocutaneous Flap (Crossed PMMC Flap) for reconstruction between October 2013 to June 2016. Results: Five patients with recurrence underwent reconstruction with contralateral Pectoralis Major Myocutaneous Flap. In all the flap was successfully used to reconstruct defects involving the entire buccal mucosa and in one patient the flap could be used to reconstruct full thickness resection defect(crossed bipedal PMMC Flap) with ease. Conclusion: Crossed Pectoralis Major Myocutaneous Flap can be used safely and reliably for reconstruction of the buccal mucosal defect and in selected patients even for full thickness cheek defect as folded bipaddle Pectoralis Major Myocutaneous Flap.

  15. Local Dynamics in Trained Recurrent Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivkind, Alexander; Barak, Omri

    2017-06-01

    Learning a task induces connectivity changes in neural circuits, thereby changing their dynamics. To elucidate task-related neural dynamics, we study trained recurrent neural networks. We develop a mean field theory for reservoir computing networks trained to have multiple fixed point attractors. Our main result is that the dynamics of the network's output in the vicinity of attractors is governed by a low-order linear ordinary differential equation. The stability of the resulting equation can be assessed, predicting training success or failure. As a consequence, networks of rectified linear units and of sigmoidal nonlinearities are shown to have diametrically different properties when it comes to learning attractors. Furthermore, a characteristic time constant, which remains finite at the edge of chaos, offers an explanation of the network's output robustness in the presence of variability of the internal neural dynamics. Finally, the proposed theory predicts state-dependent frequency selectivity in the network response.

  16. Displacement of the Spleen Mimicking Renal Cell Cancer Recurrence Post-Nephrectomy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Emanuels, Carolina S.; Timmerman, Krista D.; Aijaz, Tabish; Nguyen, Thu-Cuc; Jest, Nathaniel; Drane, Walter E.; Gilbert, Scott M.; Crispen, Paul L.; Su, Li-Ming; Deitte, Lori A.

    2015-01-01

    Local regional recurrence of renal cell cancer post-nephrectomy most often occurs within three years after surgery. Post-nephrectomy, many processes may mimic RCC recurrence. We present the case of a 75 year-old Caucasian male patient with a mass in his renal fossa post-nephrectomy for renal cell cancer, suggesting local recurrence. Use of the technetium-99m sulfur colloid scan showed that the mass was his spleen which had been displaced into the renal fossa. With high index of suspicion, characterization of these processes as splenic in origin would prevent subjecting patients to risks of biopsy or even surgery.

  17. Repeat pancreatectomy for pancreatic ductal cancer recurrence in the remnant pancreas after initial pancreatectomy: is it worthwhile?

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Masaru; Yoshitomi, Hideyuki; Shimizu, Hiroaki; Ohtsuka, Masayuki; Yoshidome, Hiroyuki; Furukawa, Katsunori; Takayasiki, Tsukasa; Kuboki, Satoshi; Okamura, Daiki; Suzuki, Daisuke; Nakajima, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    The clinical implications of repeat completion pancreatectomy for recurrent pancreatic cancer in the remnant pancreas after initial pancreatectomy have not been clarified. We retrospectively analyzed our patients and evaluated the clinical implications of repeat pancreatectomy for isolated local recurrence in the remnant pancreas after initial resection for pancreatic cancer. One-hundred seventy patients who had recurrence of pancreatic cancer out of 326 patients who had initially undergone resection for pancreatic cancer were included in this study. Sixty-seven of 170 recurrent patients were diagnosed as having isolated local recurrence of pancreatic cancer. Eleven of these 67 patients with isolated local recurrence only in the remnant pancreas underwent repeat pancreatectomy. Characteristics and operative outcomes for these 11 patients with repeat pancreatectomy were analyzed and evaluated in comparison with other recurrent patients. Among 170 patients with recurrence after initial resection for pancreatic cancer, the median survival time was 78.2 and 20.3 months after initial resection, in the repeat pancreatectomy group and the unresectable group, respectively (P < .001), and the 2- and 5-year survival probability rates after initial resection were 91%, and 82% vs 42%, and 13%, respectively. Among 67 patients with isolated local recurrence, the median survival time after repeat resection or diagnosis of recurrence was 25.0 and 9.3 months, and the 2- and 5-year survival probability rates after repeat resection or diagnosis of recurrence were and 61% and 46% vs 19% and 6.2% in the repeat pancreatectomy group and the unresectable group, respectively (P < .01). There was no difference in survivals between the unresectable isolated local recurrence group and the unresectable nonlocal recurrence group. Repeat pancreatectomy might bring about beneficial effects on prognosis in selected patients with isolated local recurrence in the remnant pancreas after initial

  18. Recurrent Scattering and Memory Effect at the Anderson Localization Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubry, A.; Cobus, L. A.; Skipetrov, S. E.; van Tiggelen, B. A.; Derode, A.; Page, J. H.

    2014-01-01

    We report on ultrasonic measurements of the propagation operator in a strongly scattering mesoglass. The backscattered field is shown to display a deterministic spatial coherence due to a remarkably large memory effect induced by long recurrent trajectories. Investigation of the recurrent scattering contribution directly yields the probability for a wave to come back close to its starting spot. The decay of this quantity with time is shown to change dramatically near the Anderson localization transition. The singular value decomposition of the propagation operator reveals the dominance of very intense recurrent scattering paths near the mobility edge.

  19. Role of Hyperthermia in Breast Cancer Locoregional Recurrence: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Maluta, Sergio; Kolff, Merel Willemijn

    2015-01-01

    Summary In patients with locoregional recurrences of breast cancer not suitable for resection, subsequent local control is difficult to maintain in previously irradiated areas when reirradiation alone or reirradiation with chemotherapy is used. Due to the limited number of treatment options there is a high risk of subsequent failure and uncontrollable local disease. In this group of patients, local hyperthermia combined with radiotherapy increases the clinical response and local control, adding limited acute and late toxicity, as has been shown in randomized trials. Hyperthermia is an artificial elevation of tissue temperature (range 40-44°C for 30-60 min). If hyperthermia is applied shortly before or after radiation, the effect of radiation is enhanced by influencing intratumoral hypoxia and by inhibiting sublethal damage repair in the tumor. Moreover, hyperthermia combined with radiation reduces the total dose of radiation needed compared to radiation alone, of which a higher dose is needed to obtain the same effect. Few data are available on the combination of radiotherapy and hyperthermia with chemotherapy, although the results of trimodality treatment consisting of reirradiation and hyperthermia together with liposomal doxorubicin are promising. Therefore, this literature review was performed to provide more comprehensive data on the mechanism and use of hyperthermia in locoregional recurrence of breast cancer. PMID:26989361

  20. Durable control of locally recurrent renal cell carcinoma using stereotactic body radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Maclean, Jillian; Breau, Rodney H; Scheida, Nicola; Malone, Shawn

    2014-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is generally poorly responsive to conventional radiation doses, and patients with inoperable local recurrence have limited therapeutic options. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is an increasingly available technology that allows delivery of a radiation schedule providing doses far more biologically effective against cancer cells than conventional radiotherapy. We present a case where durable disease control was achieved using SBRT in a patient with inoperable locally recurrent RCC who presented 18 years from original nephrectomy. The patient remains asymptomatic with no evidence of active disease 30 months following SBRT. This case highlights the need to reconsider the role of therapies with continuing advances in technology. PMID:25199199

  1. Long-term survival outcome after postoperative recurrence of non-small-cell lung cancer: who is 'cured' from postoperative recurrence?

    PubMed

    Sekihara, Keigo; Hishida, Tomoyuki; Yoshida, Junji; Oki, Tomonari; Omori, Tomokazu; Katsumata, Shinya; Ueda, Takuya; Miyoshi, Tomohiro; Goto, Masaki; Nakasone, Syoko; Ichikawa, Tomohiro; Matsuzawa, Reiko; Aokage, Keiju; Goto, Koichi; Tsuboi, Masahiro

    2017-09-01

    Since survival after postoperative non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) recurrence is extremely poor, the long-term post-recurrence outcomes are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term post-recurrence outcomes and clarify who are possibly 'cured' in recent clinical practice. We reviewed the medical records of 635 patients who developed postoperative recurrence until 2012 after R0 resection for pathological Stage IA-IIIA NSCLC between 1993 and 2006. Factors associated with post-recurrence survival (PRS) and the characteristics of the long-term (≥5 years) survivors were analysed retrospectively. The 5-year PRS rate of all 635 patients was 13%. Multivariable analysis revealed that female [hazard ratio (HR) = 0.78], adenocarcinoma (HR = 0.77), locoregional (only) recurrence (HR = 0.59) and longer recurrence-free survival (HR = 0.99) were favourably associated with PRS. A total of 51 patients achieved 5-year PRS; however, 32 (63%) were cancer-bearing patients in their fifth post-recurrent year who were mainly treated by epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI). Subsequent PRS curves for cancer-controlled and cancer-bearing groups were different (8-year PRS: 94% vs 31%, P = 0.003). Among 19 cancer-controlled patients in their fifth post-recurrent year, 17 (89%) patients initially received radical local therapy for their recurrence. Two-thirds of 5-year survivors after postoperative NSCLC recurrence had a cancer-bearing status and showed deteriorated subsequent survival. Curability of postoperative NSCLC recurrence should be evaluated in terms of the 'cancer-controlled' status, and 'cured' population is included in the patients who are 'cancer controlled' at the fifth post-recurrent year.

  2. Comparison of 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC and HYNIC-TATE octreotide scintigraphy with FDG PET and 99mTc-MIBI in local recurrent or distant metastatic thyroid cancers.

    PubMed

    Sager, Sait; Kabasakal, Levent; Halac, Metin; Maecke, Helmut; Uslu, Lebriz; Önsel, Çetin; Kanmaz, Bedii

    2013-05-01

    There have been various studies for early diagnosis of local recurrent or distant metastatic thyroid cancers. The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical utility of 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC and 99mTc-HYNIC-TATE, octreotide derivatives, to detect recurrences or distant metastases in 131I-negative thyroglobulin positive thyroid cancer patients and to compare the lesions with FDG PET and 99mTc-MIBI studies in the same patient group. Twenty differentiated thyroid cancer patients, 7 male and 13 female, mean age 54.6 ± 15.3 (range 13-78 years), were included in this study. Eighteen patients had papillary thyroid cancer and 2 had follicular thyroid cancer. Fifteen patients received HYNIC-TOC and 5 patients received HYNIC-TATE as a radiopharmaceutical. All patients underwent whole-body scan 1 and 4 hours after injection of octreotide derivatives and SPECT imagings were performed from the suspicious sites. The lesions that were seen in 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC and 99mTc-HYNIC-TATE studies were compared with 99mTc-MIBI and FDG-PET studies. Among 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC and 99mTc-HYNIC-TATE scintigraphies, 15 patient studies were evaluated as true positive (75%) and 5 were false negative (25%). The total number of lesions in octreotide scintigraphy was 48 in 20 patients. Of 20 patients, 19 had FDG-PET study, 15 of them were evaluated as true positive (78.9%), and 4 them were evaluated as false negative (21.1%). Total number of lesions in FDG PET was 74. 99mTc-MIBI study was positive in 11 patients (55%) and negative in 9 patients (45%). Total number of lesions in 99mTc-MIBI was 25. Technetium-labeled somatostatin receptor scintigraphy analogues HYNIC-TOC and HYNIC-TATE are useful imaging alternatives in somatostatin receptor expressing thyroid cancer patients. Radiolabeling is easy and they are readily available for routine use.

  3. Development of a New Subclavian Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy Method for Locally or Recurrent Advanced Breast Cancer Using an Implanted Catheter-Port System After Redistribution of Arterial Tumor Supply

    SciTech Connect

    Takizawa, Kenji Shimamoto, Hiroshi Ogawa, Yukihisa Yoshimatsu, Misako Yagihashi, Kunihiro Nakajima, Yasuo; Kitanosono, Takashi

    2009-09-15

    Locally or recurrent advanced breast cancers can receive arterial blood supply from various arteries, such as the internal thoracic artery (ITA), the lateral thoracic artery, and the other small arterial branches originating from the subclavian artery. Failure to catheterize and subsequent formation of collateral arterial blood supply from various arteries are some of the reasons why the response to conventional selective transarterial infusion chemotherapy is limited and variable. To overcome this problem, we developed a new subclavian arterial infusion chemotherapy method using an implanted catheter-port system after redistribution of arterial tumor blood supply by embolizing the ITA. We named this technique ('redistributed subclavian arterial infusion chemotherapy' (RESAIC)). Using RESAIC, patients can be treated on an outpatient basis for extended periods of time. Eleven patients underwent RESAIC, and the complete remission and partial response rate in 10 evaluable patients was 90%: complete remission [CR] n = 4, partial remission n = 4, stable disease n = 1, and not evaluable n = 1. Three of four patients with CR had no distant metastasis, and modified radical mastectomy was performed 1 month after conclusion of RESAIC. The resected specimens showed no residual cancer cells, and pathologically confirmed complete remission was diagnosed in each of these cases. Although temporary grade-3 myelosuppression was seen in three patients who were previously treated by systemic chemotherapy, there was no other drug-induced toxicity or procedure-related complications. RESAIC produced a better response and showed no major complications compared with other studies despite the advanced stage of the cancers.

  4. Tumor Wide Horizontal Invasion Predicts Local Recurrence for Scrotal Extramammary Paget’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lujia; Feng, Chenchen; Zhou, Minwei; Zhou, Zhongwen; Ding, Guanxiong; Gao, Peng; Ding, Qiang; Wu, Zhong

    2017-01-01

    Extramammary Paget’s disease (EMPD) is a rare malignancy, and little was known about its prognostic factors and optimal treatment. In the current study, we aimed to discuss clinical and pathological features of scrotal EMPD and determine the prognostic factors for cancer-specific survival and local recurrence. A total of 206 patients with scrotal EMPD lesions surgically treated at our institute were studied. All clinical and pathological data were reviewed. Immunohistochemical staining of TP53 and Ki67 was examined as well. At the last follow-up, 175 patients (84.95%) were alive. Twelve patients (5.83%) had died of the disease due to distant metastases. Fifteen patients (7.28%) developed local recurrences of scrotal EMPD. Ki67 expression was significantly elevated in patients with wide horizontal invasion (P = 0.003). In univariate analysis, high invasion level, presence of nodule, presence of lymphovascular invasion, adnexa invasion, lymph node metastasis and high p53 expression were significant factors for poor cancer-specific survival. In multivariate analysis, high p53 expression was significantly correlated with poor cancer-specific survival. Wide horizontal invasion was independently correlated with local recurrence-free survival of scrotal EMPD. In conclusion, wide horizontal invasion is an independent risk factor for local recurrence-free survival in the patients with scrotal EMPD. PMID:28322288

  5. Palliative Radiofrequency Ablation for Recurrent Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jindal, Gaurav; Friedman, Marc; Locklin, Julia Wood, Bradford J.

    2006-06-15

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive local therapy for cancer. Its efficacy is now becoming well documented in many different organs, including liver, kidney, and lung. The goal of RFA is typically complete eradication of a tumor in lieu of an invasive surgical procedure. However, RFA can also play an important role in the palliative care of cancer patients. Tumors which are surgically unresectable and incompatible for complete ablation present the opportunity for RFA to be used in a new paradigm. Cancer pain runs the gamut from minor discomfort relieved with mild pain medication to unrelenting suffering for the patient, poorly controlled by conventional means. RFA is a tool which can potentially palliate intractable cancer pain. We present here a case in which RFA provided pain relief in a patient with metastatic prostate cancer with pain uncontrolled by conventional methods.

  6. Recurrent breast cancer in the subpectoral space after implant reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Pitcher, Austin A; Chao, Jerry W; Varma, Sonal; Swistel, Alexander J; Otterburn, David M

    2014-04-01

    Breast reconstruction after mastectomy is most commonly performed with a prosthetic implant placed beneath the pectoralis major. Recurrence may rarely be identified in the subpectoral space where the implant was placed. We report a case of recurrent breast cancer after implant-based reconstruction with isolated subpectoral recurrence discovered 5 years later during secondary revision of her reconstructed breast.

  7. Laboratory errors leading to nonmelanoma skin cancer recurrence after Mohs micrographic surgery.

    PubMed

    Zabielinski, Marilyn; Leithauser, Laurel; Godsey, Tonja; Gloster, Hugh M

    2015-08-01

    Compared with standard surgical excision, Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS) provides superior cure rates for nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC). Although cure rates of NMSC approach 99% with MMS, local recurrences occasionally occur. The authors sought to identify histological features during frozen section examination that were associated with local recurrence of NMSC after MMS. A retrospective chart review was performed of patients undergoing a second MMS procedure to treat locally recurrent NMSC over a 20-month period. Histological slides were reviewed to assess for possible causes of local recurrence. Of 3,169 NMSCs treated, 22 were locally recurrent. Possible causes of recurrence identified after MMS included dense inflammation in the final margin at sites affected by tumor in prior slides (27%), visible remaining tumor (23%), missing epidermal or dermal tissue (23%), and actinic keratosis (4%). One recurrence was possibly explained by incorrect mapping. No abnormality could be detected in 18% of cases. Possible limitations include the small sample size, retrospective design, and the possibility that some patients may have been lost to follow-up. Local recurrences after MMS are extremely rare. When recurrences do occur, they can be attributed to errors in histological interpretation or tumor mapping.

  8. Postoperative oligo-recurrence of non-small-cell lung cancer: clinical features and survival†.

    PubMed

    Hishida, Tomoyuki; Yoshida, Junji; Aokage, Keiju; Nagai, Kanji; Tsuboi, Masahiro

    2016-03-01

    Postoperative recurrences of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are usually disseminated and systemic. Recently, the concept of oligo-recurrence, which is theoretically curable by definitive local therapy (DLT), has been proposed in several cancers. The aim of this study was to clarify clinical features and outcomes of patients with postoperative oligo-recurrence of NSCLC. From 3275 patients with resected pathological stage IA-IIIB NSCLC between 1993 and 2011, a total of 768 patients who developed recurrence were included in this study. Oligo-recurrence was defined as 1-3 loco-regional or distant recurrent lesions restricted to a single organ. Other recurrences were classified as poly-recurrence. Second primary lung cancers and suspected lesions were excluded. DLT included surgery, stereotactic radiotherapy and radiotherapy with a 45 Gy or higher dose, performed with curative intent. Oligo-recurrence was identified in 162 (21%) patients, mainly as a solitary recurrence (n = 129, 80%) in regional lymph nodes, brain, lung, bone and adrenal gland, and the proportion of patients with oligo-recurrence increased gradually year by year. The patients with oligo-recurrence had more early-staged disease at initial surgery and a longer time to recurrence than those with poly-recurrence. The entire population of oligo-recurrence patients had better post-recurrence survival (PRS) than those with poly-recurrence (5-year PRS: 32.9 vs 9.9%, P < 0.001). For oligo-recurrence, DLT was totally conducted in 105 (65%) patients as initial treatment. Multivariate analyses revealed that the initial DLT was associated with improved PRS [odds ratio (OR) 0.44; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.29-0.68]. The recurrence location and initial pathological stage did not affect PRS. The 5-year PRS and postoperative progression-free survival rates after DLT were 38.6 and 22.3%, respectively. Of the 10 long-term (≥5-year) progression-free survivors, 9 were those with a solitary recurrence. Initial DLT

  9. Patients With T1 to T2 Breast Cancer With One to Three Positive Nodes Have Higher Local and Regional Recurrence Risks Compared With Node-Negative Patients After Breast-Conserving Surgery and Whole-Breast Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Truong, Pauline T. Jones, Stuart O.; Kader, Hosam A.; Wai, Elaine S.; Speers, Caroline H.; Alexander, Abraham S.; Olivotto, Ivo A.

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate locoregional recurrence according to nodal status in women with T1 to T2 breast cancer and zero to three positive nodes (0-3N+) treated with breast-conserving surgery (BCS). Methods and Materials: The study subjects comprised 5,688 women referred to the British Columbia Cancer Agency between 1989 and 1999 with pT1 to T2, 0-3N+, M0 breast cancer, who underwent breast-conserving surgery with clear margins and radiotherapy (RT) of the whole breast. The 10-year Kaplan-Meier local, regional, and locoregional recurrence (LR, RR, and LRR, respectively) were compared between the N0 (n = 4,433) and 1-3N+ (n = 1,255) cohorts. The LRR was also examined in patients with one to three positive nodes (1-3N+) treated with and without nodal RT. Multivariate analysis was performed using Cox regression modeling. Results: Median follow-up was 8.6 years. Systemic therapy was used in 97% of 1-3N+ and 41% of N0 patients. Nodal RT was used in 35% of 1-3N+ patients. The 10-year recurrence rates in N0 and 1-3N+ cohorts were as follows: LR 5.1% vs. 5.8% (p = 0.04); RR 2.3% vs. 6.1% (p < 0.001), and LRR 6.7% vs. 10.1% (p < 0.001). Among 817 1-3N+ patients treated without nodal RT, 10-year LRR were 13.8% with age <50 years, 20.3% with Grade III, and 23.4% with estrogen receptor (ER)-negative disease. On multivariate analysis, 1-3N+ status was associated with significantly higher LRR (hazard ratio [HR], 1.85; 95% confidence interval, 1.34-2.55, p < 0.001), whereas nodal RT significantly reduced LRR (HR, 0.59; 95% confidence interval, 0.38-0.92, p = 0.02). Conclusion: Patients with 1-3N+ and young age, Grade III, or ER-negative disease have high LRR risks approximating 15% to 20% despite BCS, whole-breast RT and systemic therapy. These patients may benefit with more comprehensive RT volume encompassing the regional nodes.

  10. Sunitinib Malate in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-01-15

    Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

  11. The impact of lobular carcinoma in situ in association with invasive breast cancer on the rate of local recurrence in patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Jolly, Shruti; Kestin, Larry L. . E-mail: lkestin@beaumont.edu; Goldstein, Neal S.; Vicini, Frank A.

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: The significance of lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) associated with invasive breast cancer in patients undergoing breast-conserving therapy (BCT) remains controversial. We examined the impact of the presence and extent of LCIS associated with invasive breast cancer on clinical outcome in BCT patients. Methods and Materials: From 1980 to 1996, 607 cases of invasive breast cancer were treated with BCT. All slides were reviewed by a single pathologist. Positive margin was defined as presence of invasive carcinoma/ductal carcinoma in situ at the inked margin. Multiple clinical, pathologic, and treatment-related variables were analyzed for their association with ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) and true recurrence/marginal miss (TR/MM). Median follow-up was 8.7 years. Results: Fifty-six patients (9%) had LCIS in association with invasive cancer. On univariate analysis, positive final margin, positive/no reexcision, smaller maximum specimen dimension, and the presence of LCIS predicted for IBTR. The 10-year IBTR rate was 14% for cases with LCIS vs. 7% without LCIS (p = 0.04). On multivariate analysis, positive margin (p < 0.01), positive/no reexcision (p = 0.04), and presence of LCIS (p = 0.02) remained independently associated with IBTR; positive margin (p < 0.01) and LCIS (p = 0.04) were also associated with TR/MM failure. When examining only cases with negative final margins, the presence of LCIS remained associated with higher IBTR and TR/MM rates (p < 0.01). Conclusion: The presence of LCIS was independently associated with higher rate of IBTR and TR/MM after BCT for invasive breast cancer. LCIS may have significant premalignant potential and progress to an invasive IBTR at the site of index lesion. The adequacy of excision of LCIS associated with invasive carcinoma should be considered in patients undergoing BCT.

  12. Local Composite Quantile Regression Smoothing for Harris Recurrent Markov Processes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Degui; Li, Runze

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we study the local polynomial composite quantile regression (CQR) smoothing method for the nonlinear and nonparametric models under the Harris recurrent Markov chain framework. The local polynomial CQR regression method is a robust alternative to the widely-used local polynomial method, and has been well studied in stationary time series. In this paper, we relax the stationarity restriction on the model, and allow that the regressors are generated by a general Harris recurrent Markov process which includes both the stationary (positive recurrent) and nonstationary (null recurrent) cases. Under some mild conditions, we establish the asymptotic theory for the proposed local polynomial CQR estimator of the mean regression function, and show that the convergence rate for the estimator in nonstationary case is slower than that in stationary case. Furthermore, a weighted type local polynomial CQR estimator is provided to improve the estimation efficiency, and a data-driven bandwidth selection is introduced to choose the optimal bandwidth involved in the nonparametric estimators. Finally, we give some numerical studies to examine the finite sample performance of the developed methodology and theory. PMID:27667894

  13. Perineal recurrence of prostate cancer six years after trans-perineal brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Vijverberg, Peter; Moerland, Rien; Brand, Eric; van der Voort van Zyp, Jochem; Noteboom, Juus; van Vulpen, Marco

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of perineal recurrence of prostate cancer 6 years after low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer. The most common approach to treat such perineal masses, including those occurring after prior biopsy or surgery, is local excision. We report the use of stereotactic radiotherapy with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) as a novel non-invasive, potentially curative, and patient-friendly alternative to local excision. PMID:25834583

  14. Perineal recurrence of prostate cancer six years after trans-perineal brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Eppinga, Wietse; Vijverberg, Peter; Moerland, Rien; Brand, Eric; van der Voort van Zyp, Jochem; Noteboom, Juus; van Vulpen, Marco

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of perineal recurrence of prostate cancer 6 years after low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer. The most common approach to treat such perineal masses, including those occurring after prior biopsy or surgery, is local excision. We report the use of stereotactic radiotherapy with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) as a novel non-invasive, potentially curative, and patient-friendly alternative to local excision.

  15. Quality of Life and Care Needs of Patients With Persistent or Recurrent Ovarian Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-03

    Anxiety; Fatigue; Nausea and Vomiting; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage I Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  16. Resection of recurrent neck cancer with carotid artery replacement.

    PubMed

    Illuminati, Giulio; Schneider, Fabrice; Minni, Antonio; Calio, Francesco G; Pizzardi, Giulia; Ricco, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-05-01

    The management of patients with recurrent neck cancer invading the carotid artery is controversial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate overall survival rate, primary patency of vascular reconstructions, and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) after en bloc resection of the carotid artery and tumor with in-line polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) carotid grafting, followed by radiotherapy. From 2000 to 2014, 31 consecutive patients with recurrent neck cancer invading the carotid artery underwent en bloc resection and simultaneous carotid artery reconstruction with a PTFE graft, which was associated in 18 cases with a myocutaneous flap. The primary tumor was a squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx in 17 patients and of the hypopharynx in 7, an undifferentiated carcinoma of unknown origin in 4, and an anaplastic carcinoma of the thyroid in 3. All of the patients underwent postoperative radiotherapy (50-70 Gy), and 10 of them also underwent chemotherapy (doxorubicin and cisplatin). None of the patients died or sustained a stroke during the first 30 days after the index procedure. Postoperative morbidity consisted of 6 transitory dysphagias, 3 vocal cord palsies, 2 wound dehiscences, 1 transitory mandibular claudication, and 1 partial myocutaneous flap necrosis. No graft infection occurred during follow-up. Fifteen patients (48%) died from metastatic cancer during a mean follow-up of 45.4 months (range, 8-175 months). None of the patients showed evidence of local recurrence, stroke, or thrombosis of the carotid reconstruction. The 5-year survival rate was 49 ± 10%. The overall number of QALYs was 3.12 (95% confidence interval, 1.87-4.37) with a significant difference between patients without metastasis at the time of redo surgery (n = 26; QALYs, 3.74) and those with metastasis (n = 5; QALYs, 0.56; P = .005). QALYs were also significantly improved in patients with cancer of the larynx (n = 17; QALYs, 4.69) compared to patients presenting with other types of

  17. Radiotherapy and local control in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Valentini, V; Rosetto, M E; Fares, C; Mantini, G; Salvi, G; Turriziani, A

    1998-01-01

    Recurrence is a stage in the natural history of rectal cancer. Preoperative radiotherapy or postoperative radiochemotherapy lower the rate of recurrence, improving local control. From 1980 to 1997, at the "Divisione di Radioterapia" of the "Università Cattolica del S. Cuore" of Rome 380 patients with rectal cancer of early clinical stage T2-3, candidates for surgery for cure, underwent radiation therapy. 119 patients underwent postoperative radiotherapy (45-50 Gy); 45 patients underwent "sandwich" radiotherapy (45 Gy:27 Gy before and 28 Gy after surgery), of whom 7 were treated with preoperative radiotherapy alone; 145 patients underwent preoperative concomitant radiochemotherapy according to 3 different protocols, radiotherapy (38 Gy) combined with mitomycin C and 5-FU; radiotherapy (50.4 Gy) combined with cisplatin and 5-FU; radiotherapy (45 Gy) combined with 5-FU and folinic acid. 71 patients were treated with preoperative radiotherapy (38 Gy) combined with IORT (10 Gy). Median follow-up was 6 years. Overall local control was 85% at 3 years, 83% at 5 years, 81% at 10 years. The rate of local control at 5 years was: 76% for postoperative radiotherapy, 83% for "sandwich" radiotherapy, 84% for preoperative radiochemotherapy and 93% for preoperative radiotherapy combined with IORT. Local control was shown to be significantly better with preoperative treatment as compared to postoperative treatment (p = 0.02). The incidence of metastases was 35% in the patients with local recurrence and 16% in those with local control. The difference in survival was highly significant in patients with local control as compared to those with local recurrence: at 5 years 87% and 32% respectively. Patients with local control showed a lower incidence of metastasis and a better survival.

  18. Combination of radiotherapy and double blockade HER2 with pertuzumab and trastuzumab for HER2-positive metastatic or locally recurrent unresectable and/or metastatic breast cancer: Assessment of early toxicity.

    PubMed

    Ajgal, Z; de Percin, S; Diéras, V; Pierga, J Y; Campana, F; Fourquet, A; Kirova, Y M

    2017-04-01

    We evaluate the early toxicity of concurrent use of radiotherapy, pertuzumab and trastuzumab in patients with HER2-positive metastatic or locally recurrent unresectable breast cancer. A retrospective study was performed in a population of 23 consecutive patients between 2013 and 2015. Radiotherapy was performed on the chest area or metastatic sites during maintenance with pertuzumab and trastuzumab after six cycles of pertuzumab, trastuzumab and docetaxel. Toxicity was assessed according to the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria version 4. Irradiation volumes were whole breast (8 patients) and chest wall (9 patients) at 50Gy in 25 fractions, the supraclavicular nodes (16 patients), the axillary area (nine patients) and the internal mammary nodes (9 patients) at 46Gy in 23 fractions. For five patients, radiotherapy was palliative: bone irradiation (4 patients), whole brain radiotherapy (one patient). Median follow-up was 12.6 months (range: 6.1-21.6 months) since the start of pertuzumab and trastuzumab. One patient presented an asymptomatic decrease of left ventricular ejection fraction below 50%. No symptomatic cardiac events were reported. Two patients presented asymptomatic grade I radiation pneumonitis. Acute skin toxicity was grade III (one patient), grade II (6 patients), and grade I (5 patients). There were two grade II esophagitis. Combination of pertuzumab, trastuzumab and radiotherapy was well tolerated, which should be confirmed by the results of larger studies. Copyright © 2017 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Clinical value of technetium-99m-labeled octreotide scintigraphy in local recurrent or metastatic medullary thyroid cancers: a comparison of lesions with 18F-FDG-PET and MIBI images.

    PubMed

    Sager, Sait; Kabasakal, Levent; Ocak, Meltem; Maecke, Helmut; Uslu, Lebriz; Halaç, Metin; Asa, Sertac; Sager, Günes; Önsel, Çetin; Kanmaz, Bedii

    2013-12-01

    Various studies have been conducted for determining the most optimal method for the early diagnosis of local recurrent or distant metastatic thyroid cancers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical utility of technetium-99m (Tc-99m)-labeled octreotide derivatives in the detection of recurrence or distant metastases in medullary thyroid cancer patients and to compare the lesions with those detected using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG)-PET and Tc-99m MIBI studies in the same patient group. Sixteen medullary thyroid cancer patients [two male and 14 female; mean age 52.0 ± 14.1 years (range 13-72 years)] were included in this study. All patients underwent a whole-body scan 1 and 4 h after injection with octreotide derivatives and single photon emission computed tomography images were taken of the sites suspicious for metastasis. The lesions seen in Tc-99m HYNIC octreotide studies were compared with those seen in 18F-FDG-PET and Tc-99m MIBI studies. Among the Tc-99m-labeled octreotide scintigraphy studies, nine were evaluated as true positive (56.2%) and one was evaluated as false positive (6.2%); six were false negative (37.5%). In 16 patients, the total number of lesions seen on octreotide scintigraphy was 21. Thirteen of the 16 patients underwent 18F-FDG-PET imaging. Of the 13 patients studied, 10 showed true-positive (76.9%) and three showed false-negative (23.1%) results. The total number of lesions seen on 18F-FDG-PET was 23. The Tc-99m MIBI study yielded positive results in seven of 16 patients (43.7%) and negative results in nine patients (56.3%). The total number of lesions on Tc-99m MIBI was 12. The Tc-99m-labeled somatostatin receptor scintigraphy analogs HYNIC-tyrosine octreotide and HYNIC-TATE are useful imaging alternatives in somatostatin receptor-expressing thyroid cancers. Radiolabeling using these analogs is easy and they are readily available for routine use.

  20. Cancer metabolism, stemness and tumor recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Curry, Joseph M.; Tuluc, Madalina; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Ames, Julie A.; Anantharaman, Archana; Butera, Aileen; Leiby, Benjamin; Cognetti, David M.; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P.; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E.

    2013-01-01

    Here, we interrogated head and neck cancer (HNSCC) specimens (n = 12) to examine if different metabolic compartments (oxidative vs. glycolytic) co-exist in human tumors. A large panel of well-established biomarkers was employed to determine the metabolic state of proliferative cancer cells. Interestingly, cell proliferation in cancer cells, as marked by Ki-67 immunostaining, was strictly correlated with oxidative mitochondrial metabolism (OXPHOS) and the uptake of mitochondrial fuels, as detected via MCT1 expression (p < 0.001). More specifically, three metabolic tumor compartments were delineated: (1) proliferative and mitochondrial-rich cancer cells (Ki-67+/TOMM20+/COX+/MCT1+); (2) non-proliferative and mitochondrial-poor cancer cells (Ki-67−/TOMM20−/COX−/MCT1−); and (3) non-proliferative and mitochondrial-poor stromal cells (Ki-67−/TOMM20−/COX−/MCT1−). In addition, high oxidative stress (MCT4+) was very specific for cancer tissues. Thus, we next evaluated the prognostic value of MCT4 in a second independent patient cohort (n = 40). Most importantly, oxidative stress (MCT4+) in non-proliferating epithelial cancer cells predicted poor clinical outcome (tumor recurrence; p < 0.0001; log-rank test), and was functionally associated with FDG-PET avidity (p < 0.04). Similarly, oxidative stress (MCT4+) in tumor stromal cells was specifically associated with higher tumor stage (p < 0.03), and was a highly specific marker for cancer-associated fibroblasts (p < 0.001). We propose that oxidative stress is a key hallmark of tumor tissues that drives high-energy metabolism in adjacent proliferating mitochondrial-rich cancer cells, via the paracrine transfer of mitochondrial fuels (such as L-lactate and ketone bodies). New antioxidants and MCT4 inhibitors should be developed to metabolically target “three-compartment tumor metabolism” in head and neck cancers. It is remarkable that two “non-proliferating” populations of cells (Ki-67−/MCT4+) within the

  1. Radiation Therapy and MK-3475 for Patients With Recurrent/Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer, Renal Cell Cancer, Melanoma, and Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-18

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Recurrent Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Skin Carcinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Lung Cancer; Stage IV Skin Melanoma

  2. Prediction of margin involvement and local recurrence after skin-sparing and simple mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Al-Himdani, S; Timbrell, S; Tan, K T; Morris, J; Bundred, N J

    2016-07-01

    Skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) facilitates immediate breast reconstruction. We investigated locoregional recurrence rates after SSM compared with simple mastectomy and the factors predicting oncological failure. Patients with early breast cancer that underwent mastectomy between 2000 and 2005 at a single institution were studied to ascertain local and systemic recurrence rates between groups. Kaplan-Meier curves and log-rank test were used to evaluate disease-free survival. Patients (n = 577) underwent simple mastectomy (80%) or SSM (20%). Median follow up was 80 months. Patients undergoing SSM were of younger average age, less often had involved lymph nodes (22% vs 44%, p < 0.001), more often had DCIS present (79% vs 53%, p < 0.001) and involved margins (29% vs 15%, p = 0.001). Involved surgical margins were associated with large size (p = 0.001). The 8-year local recurrence (LR) rates were 7.9% for SSM and 5% for simple mastectomy respectively (p = 0.35). Predictors of locoregional recurrence were lymph node involvement (HR 8.0, for >4 nodes, p < 0.001) and involved surgical margins (HR 3.3, p = 0.002). In node negative patients, SSM was a predictor of locoregional recurrence (HR 4.8 [1.1, 19.9], p = 0.033). Delayed reconstruction is more appropriate for node positive early breast cancer after post-mastectomy radiotherapy. Re-excision of involved margins is essential to prevent local recurrence after mastectomy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ the Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  3. Transanal local excision of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Read, D R; Sokil, S; Ruiz-Salas, G

    1995-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with invasive rectal cancer treated by transanal excision between 1978-1989 are presented. Two patients had poorly differentiated tumours and were converted to abdominoperineal resection and one patient had extensive liver metastases documented preoperatively. The remaining twenty-two, mean age 64 years, fulfilled the criteria for local treatment. Eighty-two percent of tumours were T1 or T2 stage. There was no operative mortality. Six complications in five patients occurred, none requiring surgical intervention. Five patients died of unrelated causes without evidence of recurrence at 4, 4, 14, 26 and 58 months. The length of follow-up for the surviving group (17 patients) was 16 to 115 months (mean 63 months). Two patients developed local recurrence at 32 and 60 months. Transanal excision can be curative for selected rectal cancers.

  4. Malignant Bowel Obstruction in Patients With Recurrent Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tran, Elizabeth; Spiceland, Clayton; Sandhu, Nicole P; Jatoi, Aminah

    2016-04-01

    We sought to report incidence, risk factors, and survival related to bowel obstruction in 311 ovarian cancer patients with recurrent disease. A total of 68 (22%) had a documented bowel obstruction during their cancer course, and 49 (16%) developed it after cancer recurrence. Surprisingly, 142 (45%) fit into an "unknown" category (3+ months of data lacking from last contact/death). No risk factors were identified; management included surgery (n = 21), conservative measures (n = 21), and other (n = 7). Documented bowel obstruction was not associated with a statistically significant reduction in survival after cancer recurrence. In conclusion, although bowel obstruction occurs in only a subgroup of patients with ovarian cancer and does not appear to detract from survival after cancer recurrence, limited end-of-life information may be resulting in an underestimation of incidence.

  5. Molecular characteristics of recurrent triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chung-Hsin; Chiu, Jen-Hwey; Yang, Chu-Wen; Wang, Jir-You; Tsai, Yi-Fang; Tseng, Ling-Ming; Chen, Wei-Shone; Shyr, Yi-Ming

    2015-11-01

    Due to the fact that the treatment of breast cancer depends significantly on the molecular markers present in the cancer, including estrogen receptor (+), progesterone receptor (+) or erbB2 receptor (+), further investigation targeting triple‑negative breast cancer (TNBC) subtypes may assist in elucidating the mechanisms of recurrence of TNBC and enable the identification of novel therapeutic strategies for patients with TNBC. The aim of the present study was to compare the gene expression profiles between TNBC samples that were identified as having recurrent and non‑recurrent statuses. Between June 2011 and May 2012, a total of 30 patients with TNBC were examined using a follow-up period of at least 5 years. Their clinicopathological information was retrospectively reviewed and they were classified with a status either of recurrence [n=15 stage II (9), IIIA (2), IIIC (4)] or non‑recurrence [n=15 stage II (6), IIIA (1), IIIC (8)]. The total RNA from tissue samples obtained from the recurrent and non‑recurrent TNBC patients were used to performed oligonucleotide microarray analysis. The dataset was analyzed using GeneSpring software and validated using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Principal component analysis demonstrated that there was a marked difference in the gene expression distribution between the stage IIIc recurrent samples and early stage (stages IIa, IIb and IIIa) recurrent samples. In early stage recurrence, the significant pathway‑associated upregulated genes were matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and genes associated with cancer cell migration (CDH2) and cell adhesion/motility (KRAS, CDC42, RAC1, ICAM and SRGAP2). By contrast, during stage IIIc recurrence, the significant pathway‑associated upregulated genes in the recurrent samples were WNT signaling genes, including WNT 4 and WNT 16. It was concluded that there were markedly different distributions and gene expression profiles between stage IIIc recurrent

  6. Evaluation of the recurrence pattern of gastric cancer after laparoscopic gastrectomy with D2 lymphadenectomy.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Yuichiro; Satoh, Seiji; Umeki, Yusuke; Ishida, Yoshinori; Suda, Koichi; Uyama, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the oncological aspects of gastric cancer following laparoscopic gastrectomy with D2 lymphadenectomy (LG-D2). We retrospectively evaluated the long-term outcomes of 354 patients who underwent LG-D2 for primary gastric cancer. Recurrence patterns and predictors of peritoneal metastasis were analyzed. Median follow-up time was 43.8 months. Five-year overall survival rates for yp/pStages I, II, and III gastric cancer were 93.7, 78.5, and 42.2 %, respectively. Recurrence was observed in 86 patients. Peritoneal metastasis was the most frequent recurrence pattern (n = 51), followed by hepatic metastasis (n = 17). Lymphatic recurrence at distant sites was observed in 10 patients. No locoregional lymph node metastasis or local recurrence was seen. Nine of 51 cases of peritoneal recurrence were detected by probe laparoscopy. Peritoneal recurrence rates were significantly higher in yp/pT4 and yp/pN3 diseases compared with yp/pT ≤ 3 and yp/pN ≤ 2 diseases. Multivariate analyses demonstrated that yp/pT4, yp/pN3, tumor size ≥70 mm, vascular invasion, and undifferentiated tumors were predictors of peritoneal recurrence following LG-D2. Long-term outcomes of gastric cancer following LG-D2, including recurrence patterns and predictors of peritoneal metastasis, were comparable to those following open D2 gastrectomy. LG-D2 showed good local control. Probe laparoscopy after LG may be effective in detecting peritoneal recurrence, which is not determined with less invasive examinations, including a CT scan. Future large-scale prospective studies are desirable to evaluate not only surgical but also oncological benefits and safety of LG-D2 for advanced gastric cancer.

  7. Prevention of lung cancer recurrence using cisplatin-loaded superhydrophobic nanofiber meshes.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Jonah A; Liu, Rong; Freedman, Jonathan D; Padera, Robert; Schwartz, John; Colson, Yolonda L; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2016-01-01

    For early stage lung cancer patients, local cancer recurrence after surgical resection is a significant concern and stems from microscopic disease left behind after surgery. Here we apply a local drug delivery strategy to combat local lung cancer recurrence after resection using non-woven, biodegradable nanofiber meshes loaded with cisplatin. The meshes are fabricated using a scalable electrospinning process from two biocompatible polymers--polycaprolactone and poly(glycerol monostearate-co-caprolactone)--to afford favorable mechanical properties for use in a dynamic tissue such as the lung. Owing to their rough nanostructure and hydrophobic polymer composition, these meshes exhibit superhydrophobicity, and it is this non-wetting nature that sustains the release of cisplatin in a linear fashion over ∼90 days, with anti-cancer efficacy demonstrated using an in vitro Lewis Lung carcinoma (LLC) cell assay. The in vivo evaluation of cisplatin-loaded superhydrophobic meshes in the prevention of local cancer recurrence in a murine model of LLC surgical resection demonstrated a statistically significant increase (p = 0.0006) in median recurrence-free survival to >23 days, compared to standard intraperitoneal cisplatin therapy of equivalent dose. These results emphasize the importance of supplementing cytoreductive surgery with local drug delivery strategies to improve prognosis for lung cancer patients undergoing tumor resection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Prevention of Lung Cancer Recurrence Using Cisplatin-Loaded Superhydrophobic Nanofiber Meshes

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Jonah A.; Liu, Rong; Freedman, Jonathan D.; Padera, Robert; Schwartz, John; Colson, Yolonda L.; Grinstaff, Mark W.

    2016-01-01

    For early stage lung cancer patients, local cancer recurrence after surgical resection is a significant concern and stems from microscopic disease left behind after surgery. Here we apply a local drug delivery strategy to combat local lung cancer recurrence after resection using non-woven, biodegradable nanofiber meshes loaded with cisplatin. The meshes are fabricated using a scalable electrospinning process from two biocompatible polymers—polycaprolactone and poly(glycerol monostearate-co-caprolactone)—to afford favorable mechanical properties for use in a dynamic tissue such as the lung. Owing to their rough nanostructure and hydrophobic polymer composition, these meshes exhibit superhydrophobicity, and it is this non-wetting nature that sustains the release of cisplatin in a linear fashion over ~90 days, with anti-cancer efficacy demonstrated using an in vitro Lewis Lung carcinoma (LLC) cell assay. The in vivo evaluation of cisplatin-loaded superhydrophobic meshes in the prevention of local cancer recurrence in a murine model of LLC surgical resection demonstrated a statistically significant increase (p = 0.0006) in median recurrence-free survival to >23 days, compared to standard intraperitoneal cisplatin therapy of equivalent dose. These results emphasize the importance of supplementing cytoreductive surgery with local drug delivery strategies to improve prognosis for lung cancer patients undergoing tumor resection. PMID:26547283

  9. [Radical prostatectomy: local recurrence and persistence of disease. Is it possible to hypothesize any responsibility of the surgeon?].

    PubMed

    Zattoni, Filiberto; Gigli, Francesca

    2010-01-01

    Radical prostatectomy (RP) represents the most frequently chosen therapeutic option for treating newly diagnosed localized prostate cancer. Cancer recurrence after surgery is linked to biologic variables. But are these the only ones that must be considered to give an explanation of a possible local or distal recurrence, or can it also admit the possibility that an incorrectly conducted surgery has a negative role in the unfavorable evolution after PR? Prostate cancer recurrence, as a matter of fact, is related also to surgical technique. The PR, by definition is a surgical, potentially complicated act. Surgery outcomes depend on a whole series of factors: the surgeon's ability, and the way the surgical procedure is conducted, play an essential role. Here we evaluate the role of biological and surgical factors on biochemical recurrence.

  10. Targeting Quiescent Cancer Cells to Eliminate Tumor Recurrence After Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-14-1-0350 TITLE: Targeting Quiescent Cancer Cells to Eliminate Tumor Recurrence After Therapy PRINCIPAL...30 Sep 2014 - 29 Sep 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTILE Targeting Quiescent Cancer Cells to Eliminate Tumor Recurrence After Therapy 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...cancer. To eradicate chemoresistant tumor cells , it is important to identify the subset of tumor cells that can survive from chemotherapy and

  11. Factors associated with early recurrence after curative surgery for gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Wei-Ming; Meng, Qing-Bin; Yu, Jian-Chun; Ma, Zhi-Qiang; Li, Zhi-Tian

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To characterize patterns of gastric cancer recurrence and patient survival and to identify predictors of early recurrence after surgery. METHODS: Clinicopathological data for 417 consecutive patients who underwent curative resection for gastric cancer were retrospectively analyzed. Tumor and node status was reclassified according to the 7th edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer tumor-node-metastasis classification for carcinoma of the stomach. Survival data came from both the patients’ follow-up records and telephone follow-ups. Recurrent gastric cancer was diagnosed based on clinical imaging, gastroscopy with biopsy, and/or cytological examination of ascites, or intraoperative findings in patients who underwent reoperation. Predictors of early recurrence were compared in patients with pT1 and pT2-4a stage tumors. Pearson’s χ2 test and Fisher’s exact test were used to compare differences between categorical variables. Survival curves were constructed using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared via the log-rank test. Variables identified as potentially important for early recurrence using univariate analysis were determined by multivariate logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: Of 417 gastric cancer patients, 80 (19.2%) were diagnosed with early gastric cancer and the remaining 337 (80.8%) were diagnosed with locally advanced gastric cancer. After a median follow-up period of 56 mo, 194 patients (46.5%) experienced recurrence. The mean time from curative surgery to recurrence in these 194 patients was 24 ± 18 mo (range, 1-84 mo). Additionally, of these 194 patients, 129 (66.5%) experienced recurrence within 2 years after surgery. There was no significant difference in recurrence patterns between early and late recurrence (P < 0.05 each). For pT1 stage gastric cancer, tumor size (P = 0.011) and pN stage (P = 0.048) were associated with early recurrence of gastric tumors. Patient age, pT stage, pN stage, Lauren histotype, lymphovascular

  12. Recurrence of papillary thyroid cancer after optimized surgery.

    PubMed

    Grant, Clive S

    2015-02-01

    Recurrence of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) after optimized surgery requires a full understanding of the disease, especially as it has changed in the last 15 years, what comprises optimized surgery, and the different types and implications of disease relapse that can be encountered. PTC has evolved to tumors that are much smaller than previously seen, largely due to various high quality imaging studies obtained for different reasons, but serendipitously identifying thyroid nodules that prove to be papillary thyroid microcarcinomas (PTMC). With rare exception, these cancers are cured by conservative surgery without additional therapy, and seldom result in recurrent disease. PTC is highly curable in 85% of cases because of its rather innocent biologic behavior. Therefore, the shift in emphasis from disease survival to recurrence is appropriate. As a result of three technologic advances-high-resolution ultrasound (US), recombinant TSH, and highly sensitive thyroglobulin (Tg)-disease relapse can be discovered when it is subclinical. Endocrinologists who largely control administration of radioactive iodine have used it to ablate barely detectable or even biochemically apparent disease, hoping to reduce recurrence and perhaps improve survival. Surgeons, in response to this new intense postoperative surveillance that has uncovered very small volume disease, have responded by utilizing US preoperatively to image this disease, and incorporated varying degrees of lymphadenectomy into their initial treatment algorithm. Bilateral thyroid resection-either total or near-total thyroidectomy-remains the standard for PTC >1 cm, although recent data has re-emphasized the value of unilateral lobectomy in treating even some PTC measuring 1-4 cm. Therapeutic lymphadenectomy has universal approval, but when lymph nodes in the central neck are not worrisome to the surgeon's intraoperative assessment, although that judgment in incorrect up to 50%, whether they should be excised has

  13. Local hyperthermia combined with external irradiation for regional recurrent breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Gong; Mitsumori, Michihide; Ogura, Masakazu; Horii, Naotoshi; Kawamura, Sachiko; Masunaga, Shin-ichiro; Nagata, Yasushi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic effects of hyperthermia in combination with radiotherapy for locoregional recurrence of breast cancer, and to assess the factors related to subsequent local tumor control. Between March 1981 and February 2001, 85 lesions in 73 patients were treated with local hyperthermia combined with external irradiation. Of 75 evaluable lesions, 41 were previously irradiated. Mean radiation dose to the previously unirradiated area was 59.5 +/- 6.8 Gy (range, 40-70 Gy), while a total dose of 43.0 +/- 12.4 Gy (range, 12-74.4 Gy) was administered to previously irradiated tumors. Hyperthermia was administered once or twice per week. The average number of hyperthermia sessions was 4.5 (2-9). Complete responses (CRs) were achieved in 56% (23/41) of previously irradiated and 47% (16/34) of unirradiated tumors. There was no significant difference in the CR rate between the two groups. Compared with the response of bulky/nodular tumors, diffuse/multiple small nodular tumors showed a higher CR rate at 4 weeks after treatment. However, at 6 months after treatment, they showed a significantly lower local control rate. The present findings suggested a significant benefit of local hyperthermia combined with radiotherapy in the treatment of locally recurrent breast cancer, especially for previously irradiated recurrence, by reducing the total irradiation dose. Diffuse/multiple small nodular tumors respond earlier than bulky/large nodular tumors; however, they tend to recur within the treatment field. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic effects of hyperthermia in combination with radiotherapy for locoregional recurrence of breast cancer, and to assess the factors related to subsequent local tumor control.

  14. Recurrence season impacts the survival of epithelial ovarian cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Hui; Man, Ya-Nan; Wu, Xiong-Zhi

    2014-01-01

    Several studies indicated that the diagnosis season affects the prognosis of some cancers, such as examples in the prostate, colon and breast This retrospective study aimed to investigate whether the diagnosis and recurrent season impacts the prognosis of epithelial ovarian cancer patients. From January 2005 to August 2010, 161 epithelial ovarian cancer patients were analyzed and followed up until August 2013. Kaplan- Meier survival curves and the log-rank test were used to make the survival analysis. Multivariate analysis was conducted to identify independent prognostic factors. The prognostic factors of overall survival in epithelial ovarian cancer patients included age, clinical stage, pathological type, histological grade, residual disease after primary surgery, recurrent season and adjuvant chemotherapy cycles. Moreover, clinical stage, histological grade, residual disease after primary surgery, recurrent season and adjuvant chemotherapy cycles also impacted the progression-free survival of epithelial ovarian cancer patients. The diagnosis season did not have a significantly relationship with the survival of operable epithelial ovarian cancer patients. Median overall survival of patients with recurrent month from April to November was 47 months, which was longer (P < 0.001) than that of patients with recurrence month from December to March (19 months). Median progression-free survival of patients with recurrence month from April to November and December to March was 20 and 8 months, respectively (P < 0.001). The recurrence season impacts the survival of epithelial ovarian cancer patients. However, the diagnosed season does not appear to exert a significant influence.

  15. Locally advanced rectal cancer: management challenges

    PubMed Central

    Kokelaar, RF; Evans, MD; Davies, M; Harris, DA; Beynon, J

    2016-01-01

    Between 5% and 10% of patients with rectal cancer present with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC), and 10% of rectal cancers recur after surgery, of which half are limited to locoregional disease only (locally recurrent rectal cancer). Exenterative surgery offers the best long-term outcomes for patients with LARC and locally recurrent rectal cancer so long as a complete (R0) resection is achieved. Accurate preoperative multimodal staging is crucial in assessing the potential operability of advanced rectal tumors, and resectability may be enhanced with neoadjuvant therapies. Unfortunately, surgical options are limited when the tumor involves the lateral pelvic sidewall or high sacrum due to the technical challenges of achieving histological clearance, and must be balanced against the high morbidity associated with resection of the bony pelvis and significant lymphovascular structures. This group of patients is usually treated palliatively and subsequently survival is poor, which has led surgeons to seek innovative new solutions, as well as revisit previously discarded radical approaches. A small number of centers are pioneering new techniques for resection of beyond-total mesorectal excision tumors, including en bloc resections of the sciatic notch and composite resections of the first two sacral vertebrae. Despite limited experience, these new techniques offer the potential for radical treatment of previously inoperable tumors. This narrative review sets out the challenges facing the management of LARCs and discusses evolving management options. PMID:27785074

  16. Impact of Brachytherapy on Local Recurrence Rates After Sublobar Resection: Results From ACOSOG Z4032 (Alliance), a Phase III Randomized Trial for High-Risk Operable Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fernando, Hiran C.; Landreneau, Rodney J.; Mandrekar, Sumithra J.; Nichols, Francis C.; Hillman, Shauna L.; Heron, Dwight E.; Meyers, Bryan F.; DiPetrillo, Thomas A.; Jones, David R.; Starnes, Sandra L.; Tan, Angelina D.; Daly, Benedict D.T.; Putnam, Joe B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose A major concern with sublobar resection (SR) for non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is high local recurrence (LR). Adjuvant brachytherapy may reduce LR This multicenter randomized trial compares SR to SR with brachytherapy (SRB). Patients and Methods High-risk operable patients with NSCLC ≤ 3 cm were randomly assigned to SR or SRB. The primary end point was time to LR, where LR included recurrence at the staple line (local progression), in the primary tumor lobe away from the staple line, and in ipsilateral hilar nodes. The trial was designed to have a 90% power to detect a hazard ratio (HR) of 0.315 in favor of SRB, using a one-sided type I error rate of 0.05 with a sample size of 100 eligible patients in each arm. Results Two hundred twenty-four patients were randomly assigned; 222 patients were evaluable for intent-to-treat analysis. Median age was 71 years (range, 49 to 87 years). No differences were found in baseline characteristics. Median follow-up time was 4.38 years (range, 0.04 to 5.59 years). There was no difference in time to LR (HR, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.51 to 1.98; log-rank P = .98) or in the types of LR. Local progression occurred in only 17 (7.7%) of 222 patients. In patients with potentially compromised margins (margin < 1 cm, margin-to-tumor ratio < 1, positive staple line cytology, wedge resection, nodule size > 2.0 cm), SRB did not reduce LR, although trends favored the SRB arm. This was most marked in 14 patients with positive staple line cytology (HR, 0.22; P = .24). Three-year overall survival rates were similar for patients in the SR (71%) and SRB (71%) arms (P = .97). Conclusion Brachytherapy did not reduce LR after SR. This finding may have been related to closer attention to parenchymal margins by surgeons participating in this study. PMID:24982457

  17. Hyperthermia for locally advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zagar, Timothy M; Oleson, James R; Vujaskovic, Zeljko; Dewhirst, Mark W; Craciunescu, Oana I; Blackwell, Kimberly L; Prosnitz, Leonard R; Jones, Ellen L

    2010-01-01

    Hyperthermia (HT) has a proven benefit for treating superficial malignancies, particularly chest wall recurrences of breast cancer. There has been less research utilising HT in patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC), but available data are promising. HT has been combined with chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy in the neoadjuvant, definitive and adjuvant setting, albeit in series with small numbers of patients. There is only one phase III trial that examines hyperthermia in LABC, also with relatively small numbers of patients. The goal of this review is to highlight important research utilising HT in patients with LABC as well as to suggest future directions for its use.

  18. Hyperthermia for locally advanced breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zagar, Timothy M.; Oleson, James R.; Vujaskovic, Zeljko; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Craciunescu, Oana I.; Blackwell, Kimberly L.; Prosnitz, Leonard R.; Jones, Ellen L.

    2010-01-01

    Hyperthermia (HT) has a proven benefit for treating superficial malignancies, particularly chest wall recurrences of breast cancer. There has been less research utilising HT in patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC), but available data are promising. HT has been combined with chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy in the neoadjuvant, definitive and adjuvant setting, albeit in series with small numbers of patients. There is only one phase III trial that examines hyperthermia in LABC, also with relatively small numbers of patients. The goal of this review is to highlight important research utilising HT in patients with LABC as well as to suggest future directions for its use. PMID:20849257

  19. The interplay of epigenetic therapy and immunity in locally recurrent or metastatic estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer: Correlative analysis of ENCORE 301, a randomized, placebo-controlled phase II trial of exemestane with or without entinostat

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Yusuke; Lee, Min-Jung; Lee, Sunmin; Tomita, Saori; Chumsri, Saranya; Cruickshank, Scott; Ordentlich, Peter; Trepel, Jane B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Entinostat, a class I-selective histone deacetylase inhibitor, has shown promising activity in ENCORE 301, a randomized, placebo-controlled, phase II trial of exemestane with or without entinostat in women with locally recurrent or metastatic estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer progressing on a nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor. ENCORE 301 showed an 8.3-mo improvement in median overall survival among patients who received entinostat. We investigated the impact of entinostat on immune subsets with CD40, HLA-DR, and immune checkpoint receptor expression analyses in 34 patient blood samples from ENCORE 301. We found that entinostat significantly decreased granulocytic and monocytic MDSCs at cycle 1 day 15. MDSC CD40 was significantly downregulated by entinostat. A significant increase in HLA-DR expression on CD14+ monocytes by entinostat was observed. Entinostat did not impact T-cell subsets or T-cell immune checkpoint receptor expression. Our findings suggest that a significant interplay between this epigenetic regimen and host immune homeostatic mechanisms may impact therapeutic outcome. PMID:27999738

  20. Gallbladder cancer manifesting as recurrent common bile duct stone and duodenal ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tzung-Jiun; Lai, Kwok-Hung; Hsu, Ping-I; Tsai, Cheng-Chung; Fu, Ting-Ying

    2009-08-01

    Gallbladder cancer (GBC) is an uncommon disease and is usually asymptomatic. Poor prognosis and high mortality rate have been noted in patients with delayed diagnosis. We report a case of locally advanced GBC with duodenum and colon invasion manifesting as bleeding duodenal ulcer and recurrent common bile duct (CBD) stones. The patient was successfully treated with extended surgery. In patients who have multiple recurrence of CBD stones without common risk factors, concomitant biliary tract malignancy should be included in the differential diagnosis.

  1. Treatment of the postoperative recurrence of lung cancer in octogenarians.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Manabu; Nagashima, Akira; Haro, Akira; Saitoh, Genkichi

    2014-09-01

    Guidelines for the treatment of postoperative recurrent lung cancer in octogenarians do not exist. In this study, we investigated the prognosis of patients with recurrence after the resection of lung cancer and discuss the management of recurrent tumors in octogenarians. This study clinicopathologically evaluated 135 octogenarians who underwent resections for lung cancer at a single institution between 1992 and 2010. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical records of 37 patients with confirmed recurrence. The overall survival of the patients and the treatments used for postoperative recurrence were evaluated. Among 37 patients, six underwent intensive treatment, 14 underwent palliative treatment and 17 received supportive care only. The overall survival rates of the patients in the antitumor treatment groups tended to be associated with a better prognoses than those of the patients in the supportive care only group, but they did not exhibit significantly better prognoses at 1 year (p = 0.202). However, among the patients with a good performance status, the intensive treatment group tended to exhibit prolonged survival. Of the 37 patients with recurrent tumors, five (14%) died of other diseases. Antitumor treatment of postoperative recurrent lung cancer in octogenarians may not always improve the survival rate. However, carefully selecting patients for intensive therapy, such as those with a good performance status, may lead to longer survival rates after postoperative recurrence in octogenarians.

  2. FOXP3 Subcellular Localization Predicts Recurrence in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Weed, Donald T.; Walker, Gail; De La Fuente, Adriana C.; Nazarian, Ronen; Vella, Jennifer L.; Gomez-Fernandez, Carmen R.; Serafini, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Forkhead box protein P3 (FOXP3) expression in tumor infiltrating CD4+T cells is generally associated with an intrinsic capacity to suppress tumor immunity. Based on this notion, different studies have evaluated the prognostic value of this maker in cancer but contradictory results have been found. Indeed, even within the same cancer population, the presence of CD4+FOXP3+T cells has been associated,with either a poor or a good prognosis, or no correlation has beenfound. Here, we demonstrate,in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), that what really represents a prognostic parameter is not the overall expression of FOXP3 but its intracellular localization.While overallFOXP3 expression in tumor infiltrating CD4+T cells does not correlate with tumor recurrence, its intracellular localization within the CD4 cells does: nuclear FOXP3 (nFOXP3) is associated with tumor recurrence within 3 years, while cytoplasmicFOXP3 (cFOXP3) is associated with a lower likelihood of recurrence. Thus, we propose elevated levels of the cFOXP3/nFOXP3 ratio within tumor infiltrating CD4+ T cells as a predictor of OSCC recurrence. PMID:23977174

  3. FOXP3 subcellular localization predicts recurrence in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Weed, Donald T; Walker, Gail; De La Fuente, Adriana C; Nazarian, Ronen; Vella, Jennifer L; Gomez-Fernandez, Carmen R; Serafini, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Forkhead box protein P3 (FOXP3) expression in tumor infiltrating CD4(+)T cells is generally associated with an intrinsic capacity to suppress tumor immunity. Based on this notion, different studies have evaluated the prognostic value of this maker in cancer but contradictory results have been found. Indeed, even within the same cancer population, the presence of CD4(+)FOXP3(+)T cells has been associated,with either a poor or a good prognosis, or no correlation has beenfound. Here, we demonstrate,in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), that what really represents a prognostic parameter is not the overall expression of FOXP3 but its intracellular localization.While overallFOXP3 expression in tumor infiltrating CD4(+)T cells does not correlate with tumor recurrence, its intracellular localization within the CD4 cells does: nuclear FOXP3 (nFOXP3) is associated with tumor recurrence within 3 years, while cytoplasmicFOXP3 (cFOXP3) is associated with a lower likelihood of recurrence. Thus, we propose elevated levels of the cFOXP3/nFOXP3 ratio within tumor infiltrating CD4(+) T cells as a predictor of OSCC recurrence.

  4. Gene Methylation Biomarkers in Sputum and Plasma as Predictors for Lung Cancer Recurrence.

    PubMed

    Belinsky, Steven A; Leng, Shuguang; Wu, Guodong; Thomas, Cynthia L; Picchi, Maria A; Lee, Sandra J; Aisner, Seena; Ramalingam, Suresh; Khuri, Fadlo R; Karp, Daniel D

    2017-09-13

    Detection of methylated genes in exfoliated cells from the lungs of smokers provides an assessment of the extent of field cancerization, is a validated biomarker for predicting lung cancer, and provides some discrimination when interrogated in blood. The potential utility of this 8-gene methylation panel for predicting tumor recurrence has not been assessed. The Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group initiated a prevention trial (ECOG-ACRIN5597) that enrolled resected Stage I non-small cell lung cancer patients who were randomized 2:1 to receive selenized yeast versus placebo for four years. We conducted a correlative biomarker study to assess prevalence for methylation of the 8-gene panel in longitudinally collected sputum and blood after tumor resection to determine if selenium alters their methylation profile and whether this panel predicts local and/or distant recurrence. Patients (n=1561) were enrolled into the prevention trial, 565 participated in the biomarker study with 122 recurrences among that group. Assessing the association between recurrence and risk of gene methylation longitudinally for up to 48 months showed a 1.4-fold increase in odds ratio for methylation in sputum in the placebo group independent of location (local or distant). Kaplan Meier curves evaluating the association between number of methylated genes and time to recurrence showed no increased risk in sputum, while a significant hazard ratio of 1.5 was seen in plasma. Methylation detection in sputum and blood is associated with risk for recurrence. Copyright ©2017, American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Ten Years of Tamoxifen Reduces Breast Cancer Recurrences, Improves Survival

    Cancer.gov

    Taking adjuvant tamoxifen for 10 years after primary treatment leads to a greater reduction in breast cancer recurrences and deaths than taking the drug for only 5 years, according to the results of a large international clinical trial.

  6. Defining Therapy for Recurrent Platinum-sensitive Ovarian Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In this phase III clinical trial, women with platinum-sensitive, recurrent ovarian epithelial, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer will be randomly assigned to undergo secondary cytoreductive surgery, if they are candidates for such surgery, and

  7. Sunitinib Malate in Treating Patients With Iodine-Refractory Recurrent or Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-28

    Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVB Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVB Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVC Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVC Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma

  8. Risk of regional recurrence in triple-negative breast cancer patients: a Dutch cohort study.

    PubMed

    van Roozendaal, Lori M; Smit, Leonie H M; Duijsens, Gaston H N M; de Vries, Bart; Siesling, Sabine; Lobbes, Marc B I; de Boer, Maaike; de Wilt, Johannes H W; Smidt, Marjolein L

    2016-04-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer is associated with early recurrence and low survival rates. Several trials investigate the safety of a more conservative approach of axillary treatment in clinically T1-2N0 breast cancer. Triple-negative breast cancer comprises only 15 % of newly diagnosed breast cancers, which might result in insufficient power for representative results for this subgroup. We aimed to provide a nationwide overview on the occurrence of (regional) recurrences in triple-negative breast cancer patients with a clinically T1-2N0 status. For this cohort study, 2548 women diagnosed between 2005 and 2008 with clinically T1-2N0 triple-negative breast cancer were selected from the Netherlands Cancer Registry. Follow-up data until 2014 were analyzed using Kaplan-Meier. Sentinel lymph node biopsy was performed in 2486 patients, and (completion) axillary lymph node dissection in 562 patients. Final pathologic nodal status was pN0 in 78.5 %, pN1mi in 4.5 %, pN1 in 12.3 %, pN2-3 in 3.6 %, and pNx in 1.1 %. During a follow-up of 5 years, regional recurrence occurred in 2.9 %, local recurrence in 4.2 % and distant recurrence in 12.2 %. Five-year disease-free survival was 78.7 %, distant disease-free survival 80.5 %, and 5-year overall survival 82.3 %. Triple-negative clinically T1-2N0 breast cancer patients rarely develop a regional recurrence. Their disease-free survival is more threatened by distant recurrence, affecting their overall survival. Consequently, it seems justified to include triple-negative breast cancer patients in randomized controlled trials investigating the safety of minimizing axillary staging and treatment.

  9. Health-related quality of life in patients with locally recurrent or metastatic breast cancer treated with etirinotecan pegol versus treatment of physician's choice: Results from the randomised phase III BEACON trial.

    PubMed

    Twelves, Chris; Cortés, Javier; O'Shaughnessy, Joyce; Awada, Ahmad; Perez, Edith A; Im, Seock-Ah; Gómez-Pardo, Patricia; Schwartzberg, Lee S; Diéras, Véronique; Yardley, Denise A; Potter, David A; Mailliez, Audrey; Moreno-Aspitia, Alvaro; Ahn, Jin-Seok; Zhao, Carol; Hoch, Ute; Tagliaferri, Mary; Hannah, Alison L; Rugo, Hope S

    2017-05-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) enhances understanding of treatment effects that impact clinical decision-making. Although the primary end-point was not achieved, the BEACON (BrEAst Cancer Outcomes with NKTR-102) trial established etirinotecan pegol, a long-acting topoisomerase-1 (TOP1) inhibitor, as a promising therapeutic for patients with advanced/metastatic breast cancer (MBC) achieving clinically meaningful benefits in median overall survival (OS) for patients with stable brain metastases, with liver metastases or ≥ 2 sites of metastatic disease compared to treatment of physician's choice (TPC). Reported herein are the findings from the preplanned secondary end-point of HRQoL. HRQoL, assessed by European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 30 (QLQ-C30) (version 3.0) supplemented by the breast cancer-specific Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-BR23), was evaluated post randomisation in 733 of 852 patients with either anthracycline-, taxane- and capecitabine-pretreated locally recurrent or MBC randomised to etirinotecan pegol (n = 378; 145 mg/m(2) every 3 weeks (q3wk)) or single-agent TPC (n = 355). Patients completed assessments at screening, every 8 weeks (q8wk) during treatment, and end-of-treatment. Changes from baseline were analysed, and the proportions of patients achieving differences (≥5 points) in HRQoL scores were compared. Differences were seen favouring etirinotecan pegol up to 32 weeks for global health status (GHS) and physical functioning scales (P < 0.02); numerical improvement was reported in other functional scales. The findings from HRQoL symptom scales were consistent with adverse event profiles; etirinotecan pegol was associated with worsening gastrointestinal symptoms whereas TPC was associated with worsened dyspnoea and other systemic side-effects. Analysis of GHS and physical functioning at disease progression showed a decline in HRQoL in both treatment arms

  10. Local recurrence of soft tissue sarcoma following brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Gemer, L S; Trowbridge, D R; Neff, J; Lin, F; Reddy, E; Evans, R G; Hassanein, R

    1991-03-01

    Twenty-five patients with soft tissue sarcomas were treated with Ir192 implants following wide local excision at our institution between 1982 and 1987. External beam radiotherapy was given in addition to the implant in a majority of patients. The median follow-up in these 25 patients is 36 months (12 to 75 months). Twenty patients have had no evidence of local recurrence following their primary treatment (FFR = 80%). A multivariate analysis using stepwise logistic regression was used to predict failure in 3 years or less. Potential predictors examined included age, sex, tumor location, primary versus recurrent disease, grade, histology, surgical margins, implant only versus implant plus external beam, and a ratio of the volume of tissue which received 65 Gy (TV65) to the tumor volume (TV), that is (TV65/TV). The single variable which was significantly associated with local failure by 3 years was a TV65/TV of less than one. Once this variable was entered into the analysis, no other factor proved statistically significant. Our data suggest that when attempting local control of soft tissue sarcomas with brachytherapy, the volume of tissue receiving 65 Gy (TV65) from both implant and external beam must exceed the volume of the excised lesion (TV). Since the volume of a tumor can be readily determined prior to surgical excision either by CT or MRI scanning, pre-planning of the implant volume could potentially reduce the rate of local failure.

  11. Location of recurrent asymptomatic ovarian cancer through endoscopic ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Joaquim; Formighieri, Beatriz; Filippi, Sheila; Rossini, Lucio

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is frequent and recurrence happens in about 75% of patients. As it presents high rates of relapse, the exams for this diagnosis are widely discussed. Beside this, there have been discussions about benefits for early anatomic diagnosis and whether endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) can be used to track the relapse of the disease. We present a case, in which anatomic location and histological definition of an asymptomatic recurrence of the ovarian cancer was misdiagnosed with conventional methods, but was possible through EUS.

  12. Prospective Validation of a Low Rectal Cancer Magnetic Resonance Imaging Staging System and Development of a Local Recurrence Risk Stratification Model: The MERCURY II Study.

    PubMed

    Battersby, Nicholas J; How, Peter; Moran, Brendan; Stelzner, Sigmar; West, Nicholas P; Branagan, Graham; Strassburg, Joachim; Quirke, Philip; Tekkis, Paris; Pedersen, Bodil Ginnerup; Gudgeon, Mark; Heald, Bill; Brown, Gina

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to validate a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) staging classification that preoperatively assessed the relationship between tumor and the low rectal cancer surgical resection plane (mrLRP). Low rectal cancer oncological outcomes remain a global challenge, evidenced by high pathological circumferential resection margin (pCRM) rates and unacceptable variations in permanent colostomies. Between 2008 and 2012, a prospective, observational, multicenter study (MERCURY II) recruited 279 patients with adenocarcinoma 6 cm or less from the anal verge. MRI assessed the following: mrLRP "safe or unsafe," venous invasion (mrEMVI), depth of spread, node status, tumor height, and tumor quadrant. MRI-based treatment recommendations were compared against final management and pCRM outcomes. Overall pCRM involvement was 9.0% [95% confidence interval (CI), 5.9-12.3], significantly lower than previously reported rates of 30%. Patients with no adverse MRI features and a "safe" mrLRP underwent sphincter-preserving surgery without preoperative radiotherapy, resulting in a 1.6% pCRM rate. The pCRM rate increased 5-fold for an "unsafe" compared with "safe" preoperative mrLRP [odds ratio (OR) = 5.5; 95% CI, 2.3-13.3)]. Posttreatment MRI reassessment indicated a "safe" ymrLRP in 33 of 113 (29.2%), none of whom had ypCRM involvement. In contrast, persistent "unsafe" ymrLRP posttherapy resulted in 17.5% ypCRM involvement. Further independent MRI assessed risk factors were EMVI (OR = 3.8; 95% CI, 1.5-9.6), tumors less than 4.0 cm from the anal verge (OR = 3.4; 95% CI, 1.3-8.8), and anterior tumors (OR = 2.8; 95% CI, 1.1-6.8). The study validated MRI low rectal plane assessment, reducing pCRM involvement and avoiding overtreatment through selective preoperative therapy and rationalized use of permanent colostomy. It also highlights the importance of posttreatment restaging.

  13. Veliparib and Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-04

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Male Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  14. Details of recurrence sites after definitive radiation therapy for cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective This is a retrospective study aimed at clarifying the details of recurrence patterns and sites in patients with cervical cancer treated with definitive radiation therapy (RT). Methods Data were analyzed from consecutive patients, admitted to the University of Tokyo Hospital (Tokyo, Japan) between 2001 and 2013, who had received definitive RT, with or without chemotherapy, for International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages IB–IVA cervical cancer. Results One hundred and thirty-seven patients formed the patient cohort. The median follow-up period for surviving patients was 57.0 months. A complete response was achieved in 121 patients (88%). Of these, 36 (30%) developed a cancer recurrence during follow-up. The first sites of recurrence were located in intra-RT fields in nine, outside RT fields in 20, and both in seven patients. In the intra-RT field group, all patients showed a local recurrence, while no one experienced an isolated pelvic lymph node (PLN) recurrence. In the outside RT field group, the most frequent site of recurrence was lung (60%), and three-quarters of patients were free from intra-RT field recurrence until the last follow-up. Of the entire cohort, including 48 PLN-positive patients, only seven patients (5.1%) developed PLN persistence or recurrence, all in the common iliac, internal iliac, and/or obturator nodes, and all with another synchronous relapse. Conclusion Local disease was a major type of intra-RT field recurrence, while PLN control was favorable even in initially PLN-positive patients. The predominance of outside RT field recurrence alone highlights issues concerning distant control, including the intensity enhancement of systematic therapy. PMID:26463432

  15. ACR Appropriateness Criteria®—Recurrent Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suh, W. Warren; Herman, Joseph M.; Blackstock, A. William; Hong, Theodore S.; Poggi, Matthew M.; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel; Small, William; Thomas, Charles R.; Zook, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions. These Criteria are reviewed every 2 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The development and review of these guidelines includes an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances where evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. Local recurrence of rectal cancer can result in devastating symptoms for patients, including intractable pain and discharge. Prior treatment can limit subsequent treatment options. Preoperative 5-FU based chemoradiotherapy is the treatment of choice for patients with a local recurrence who did not receive adjuvant therapy after initial resection or who might have received chemotherapy alone. Chemoradiotherapy followed by evaluation for surgery is the preferred treatment for patients who have undergone previous radiotherapy after surgery. The inclusion of surgery has resulted in the best outcomes in a majority of studies. Palliative chemoradiotherapy is appropriate for patients who have received previous radiotherapy whose recurrent disease is considered inoperable. Radiotherapy can be delivered on a standard or hyperfractionated treatment schedule. Newer systemic treatments have improved response rates and given physicians more options for treating patients in this difficult situation. The use of induction chemotherapy prior to radiotherapy is an evolving treatment option. Specialized treatment modalities should be used at institutions with experience in these techniques and preferably in patients enrolled in clinical trials. PMID:22574231

  16. Hyperfractionated stereotactic reirradiation for recurrent head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Cvek, Jakub; Knybel, Lukas; Skacelikova, Eva; Stransky, Jiri; Matousek, Petr; Zelenik, Karol; Res, Oldrich; Otahal, Bretislav; Molenda, Lukas; Feltl, David

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this work was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of hyperfractionated stereotactic reirradiation (re-RT) as a treatment for inoperable, recurrent, or second primary head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) that is not suitable for systemic treatment. Forty patients with recurrent or second primary HNSCC were included in this study. The patients had a median gross tumor volume of 76 ml (range 14-193 ml) and a previous radiotherapy dose greater than 60 Gy. Treatment was designed to cover 95 % of the planning target volume (PTV, defined as gross tumor volume [GTV] + 3 mm to account for microscopic spreading, with no additional set-up margin) with the prescribed dose (48 Gy in 16 fractions b.i.d.). Treatment was administered twice daily with a minimum 6 h gap. Uninvolved lymph nodes were not irradiated. Treatment was completed as planned for all patients (with median duration of 11 days, range 9-14 days). Acute toxicity was evaluated using the RTOG/EORTC scale. A 37 % incidence of grade 3 mucositis was observed, with recovery time of ≤ 4 weeks for all of these patients. Acute skin toxicity was never observed to be higher than grade 2. Late toxicity was also evaluated according to the RTOG/EORTC scale. Mandible radionecrosis was seen in 4 cases (10 %); however, neither carotid blowout syndrome nor other grade 4 late toxicity occurred. One-year overall survival (OS) and local progression-free survival (L-PFS) were found to be 33 and 44 %, respectively. Performance status and GTV proved to be significant prognostic factors regarding local control and survival. Hyperfractionated stereotactic re-RT is a reasonable treatment option for patients with recurrent/second primary HNSCC who were previously exposed to high-dose irradiation and who are not candidates for systemic treatment or hypofractionation.

  17. Burden of malignancy after a primary skin cancer: recurrence, multiple skin cancers and second primary cancers.

    PubMed

    Krueger, Hans; Williams, Dan

    2010-01-01

    The current paper summarizes relevant recent research on the high risk of recurrence, multiple skin cancers and second primary cancers in the growing number of people with a history of skin cancer; the ultimate purpose is to better assess the burden of malignancy following skin cancer. A number of challenges exist in identifying and tracking both melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) cases. Most jurisdictions do not routinely track NMSC cases and, even if they do, it is customary to only include the first diagnosis. There are variable rules for counting multiple melanoma cancers, and recurrences are not considered for either major type of skin cancer. Applying insights from recent studies of this issue to Canadian cancer statistics would increase reported diagnoses of NMSC by about 26% and melanoma by 10% in this country. This approach to a fuller assessment of the burden of skin cancers has been called a "diagnosis-based incidence approach" as compared with a "patient-based incidence approach". A further issue that is not usually taken into account when assessing the burden of skin cancers is the 20% to 30% elevated risk of noncutaneous second primary cancers following a primary skin tumour. In summary, individuals with skin cancer are subject to a high risk of recurrence, multiple skin cancers and second primary cancers. This burden should be a special concern in the large and growing pool of individuals with a history of skin cancer, as well as among prevention planners.

  18. Lung Cancer Prognosis Before and After Recurrence in a Population-Based Setting

    PubMed Central

    Consonni, Dario; Pierobon, Mariaelena; Rubagotti, Maurizia; Rotunno, Melissa; Goldstein, Alisa; Goldin, Lynn; Lubin, Jay; Wacholder, Sholom; Caporaso, Neil E.; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Tucker, Margaret A.; Pesatori, Angela C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Population-based estimates of absolute risk of lung cancer recurrence, and of mortality rates after recurrence, can inform clinical management. Methods: We evaluated prognostic factors for recurrences and survival in 2098 lung cancer case patients from the general population of Lombardy, Italy, from 2002 to 2005. We conducted survival analyses and estimated absolute risks separately for stage IA to IIIA surgically treated and stage IIIB to IV non–surgically treated patients. Results: Absolute risk of metastases exceeded that of local recurrence in every stage and cell type, highlighting the systemic threat of lung cancer. In stage I, the probability of dying within the first year after diagnosis was 2.7%, but it was 48.3% within first year after recurrence; in stage IV, the probabilities were 57.3% and 80.6%, respectively. Over half the patients died within one year of first metastasis. Although in stages IA to IB about one-third of patients had a recurrence, stage IIA patients had a recurrence risk (61.2%) similar to stage IIB (57.9%) and IIIA (62.8%) patients. Risk of brain metastases in stage IA to IIIA surgically treated non–small cell lung cancer patients increased with increasing tumor grade. Absolute risk of recurrence was virtually identical in adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma patients. Conclusions: This population-based study provides clinically useful estimates of risks of lung cancer recurrence and mortality that are applicable to the general population. These data highlight the need for more effective adjuvant treatments overall and within specific subgroups. The estimated risks of various endpoints are useful for designing clinical trials, whose power depends on absolute numbers of events. PMID:25802059

  19. Lung cancer prognosis before and after recurrence in a population-based setting.

    PubMed

    Consonni, Dario; Pierobon, Mariaelena; Gail, Mitchell H; Rubagotti, Maurizia; Rotunno, Melissa; Goldstein, Alisa; Goldin, Lynn; Lubin, Jay; Wacholder, Sholom; Caporaso, Neil E; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Tucker, Margaret A; Pesatori, Angela C; Landi, Maria Teresa

    2015-06-01

    Population-based estimates of absolute risk of lung cancer recurrence, and of mortality rates after recurrence, can inform clinical management. We evaluated prognostic factors for recurrences and survival in 2098 lung cancer case patients from the general population of Lombardy, Italy, from 2002 to 2005. We conducted survival analyses and estimated absolute risks separately for stage IA to IIIA surgically treated and stage IIIB to IV non-surgically treated patients. Absolute risk of metastases exceeded that of local recurrence in every stage and cell type, highlighting the systemic threat of lung cancer. In stage I, the probability of dying within the first year after diagnosis was 2.7%, but it was 48.3% within first year after recurrence; in stage IV, the probabilities were 57.3% and 80.6%, respectively. Over half the patients died within one year of first metastasis. Although in stages IA to IB about one-third of patients had a recurrence, stage IIA patients had a recurrence risk (61.2%) similar to stage IIB (57.9%) and IIIA (62.8%) patients. Risk of brain metastases in stage IA to IIIA surgically treated non-small cell lung cancer patients increased with increasing tumor grade. Absolute risk of recurrence was virtually identical in adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma patients. This population-based study provides clinically useful estimates of risks of lung cancer recurrence and mortality that are applicable to the general population. These data highlight the need for more effective adjuvant treatments overall and within specific subgroups. The estimated risks of various endpoints are useful for designing clinical trials, whose power depends on absolute numbers of events. Published by Oxford University Press 2015.

  20. Long-Term Results of Local Excision for Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Paty, Philip B.; Nash, Garrett M.; Baron, Paul; Zakowski, Maureen; Minsky, Bruce D.; Blumberg, David; Nathanson, Daniel R.; Guillem, Jose G.; Enker, Warren E.; Cohen, Alfred M.; Wong, W. Douglas

    2002-01-01

    Objective To review the authors’ experience with local excision of early rectal cancers to assess the effectiveness of initial treatment and of salvage surgery. Summary Background Data Local excision for rectal cancer is appealing for its low morbidity and excellent functional results. However, its use is limited by inability to assess regional lymph nodes and uncertainty of oncologic outcome. Methods Patients with T1 and T2 adenocarcinomas of the rectum treated by local excision as definitive surgery between 1969 to 1996 at the authors’ institution were reviewed. Pathology slides were reviewed. Among 125 assessable patients, 74 were T1 and 51 were T2. Thirty-one patients (25%) were selected to receive adjuvant radiation therapy. Fifteen of these 31 patients received adjuvant radiation in combination with 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy. Median follow-up was 6.7 years. One hundred fifteen patients (92%) were followed until death or for greater than 5 years, and 69 patients (55%) were followed until death or for greater than 10 years. Recurrence was recorded as local, distant, and overall. Survival was disease-specific. Results Ten-year local recurrence and survival rates were 17% and 74% for T1 rectal cancers and 26% and 72% for T2 cancers. Median time to relapse was 1.4 years (range 0.4–7.0) for local recurrence and 2.5 years (0.8–7.5) for distant recurrence. In patients receiving radiotherapy, local recurrence was delayed (median 2.1 years vs. 1.1 years), but overall rates of local and overall recurrence and survival rates were similar to patients not receiving radiotherapy. Among 26 cancer deaths, 8 (28%) occurred more than 5 years after local excision. On multivariate analysis, no clinical or pathologic features were predictive of local recurrence. Intratumoral vascular invasion was the only significant predictor of survival. Among 34 patients who developed tumor recurrence, the pattern of first clinical recurrence was predominantly local: 50% local only

  1. Palliative treatment of patients with inoperable locally advanced, recurrent or metastatic head and neck squamous cell cancer, using a low-dose and personalized chemotherapeutic regimen

    PubMed Central

    Bishnoi, Rohit; Bennett, Jeffery; Reisman, David N.

    2017-01-01

    Inoperable or metastatic head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) is known to be associated with a poor patient prognosis. First line therapies include a Taxol, platinum-based antineoplastic and fluorouracil (FU) treatment regimen (TPF) or a platinum-based antineoplastic, FU and EGFR inhibitor treatment regimen (PFE). The toxicity of these regimens is one of the major limiting factors, particularly for palliative treatment. The present study is a retrospective study of 15 patients with HNSCC, where the treatment goal was palliative. Of the 15 patients, 8 received a TPF, while 7 received a PFE. A total of 129 treatment cycles were administered with a median of 9 cycles (range, 3–14). Chemotherapy began with low doses and was subsequently titrated up based on tolerance and response. Positive responses were noted with the lower doses compared with the conventional doses, and maximal doses were not required. The median dose of cisplatin, paclitaxel and 5-FU administered was 40 mg/m2, 80 mg/m2 and 360 mg/m2/day for 5 days, respectively. Cetuximab was used at a standard dose. At the initial follow-up (mean, 64 days; 3 cycles), a 100% disease control rate (DCR) and 80% overall response rate (ORR) was achieved. A positive response, 60% DCR and 60% ORR, was maintained until the late stages of the study (mean, 217 days; 9 cycles). Following termination of chemotherapy after >9 cycles, 4 patients remained disease free for ~1 year. A total of 3 patients exhibited a pathologic complete response despite radiologically exhibiting residual disease. The median progression-free survival time was 10.03 months and the overall survival time was 15.77 months. The only grade 3 hematologic toxicity noted was neutropenia in 3 (20%) patients. Grade 3 vomiting was noted in 1 (6.67%) patient and grade 3 stomatitis was noted in 1 (6.67%) patient. Due to low toxicity patients exhibited improved tolerance to this approach, particularly in terms of palliative care. Furthermore, these results

  2. Increased survival rate by local release of diclofenac in a murine model of recurrent oral carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Will, Olga Maria; Purcz, Nicolai; Chalaris, Athena; Heneweer, Carola; Boretius, Susann; Purcz, Larissa; Nikkola, Lila; Ashammakhi, Nureddin; Kalthoff, Holger; Glüer, Claus-Christian; Wiltfang, Jörg; Açil, Yahya; Tiwari, Sanjay

    Despite aggressive treatment with radiation and combination chemotherapy following tumor resection, the 5-year survival rate for patients with head and neck cancer is at best only 50%. In this study, we examined the therapeutic potential of localized release of diclofenac from electrospun nanofibers generated from poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) polymer. Diclofenac was chosen since anti-inflammatory agents that inhibit cyclooxygenase have shown great potential in their ability to directly inhibit tumor growth as well as suppress inflammation-mediated tumor growth. A mouse resection model of oral carcinoma was developed by establishing tumor growth in the oral cavity by ultrasound-guided injection of 1 million SCC-9 cells in the floor of the mouth. Following resection, mice were allocated into four groups with the following treatment: 1) no treatment, 2) implanted scaffolds without diclofenac, 3) implanted scaffolds loaded with diclofenac, and 4) diclofenac given orally. Small animal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging were utilized for longitudinal determination of tumor recurrence. At the end of 7 weeks following tumor resection, 33% of mice with diclofenac-loaded scaffolds had a recurrent tumor, in comparison to 90%-100% of the mice in the other three groups. At this time point, mice with diclofenac-releasing scaffolds showed 89% survival rate, while the other groups showed survival rates of 10%-25%. Immunohistochemical staining of recurrent tumors revealed a near 10-fold decrease in the proliferation marker Ki-67 in the tumors derived from mice with diclofenac-releasing scaffolds. In summary, the local application of diclofenac in an orthotopic mouse tumor resection model of oral cancer reduced tumor recurrence with significant improvement in survival over a 7-week study period following tumor resection. Local drug release of anti-inflammatory agents should be investigated as a therapeutic option in the prevention of tumor recurrence in oral squamous

  3. Increased survival rate by local release of diclofenac in a murine model of recurrent oral carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Will, Olga Maria; Purcz, Nicolai; Chalaris, Athena; Heneweer, Carola; Boretius, Susann; Purcz, Larissa; Nikkola, Lila; Ashammakhi, Nureddin; Kalthoff, Holger; Glüer, Claus-Christian; Wiltfang, Jörg; Açil, Yahya; Tiwari, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Despite aggressive treatment with radiation and combination chemotherapy following tumor resection, the 5-year survival rate for patients with head and neck cancer is at best only 50%. In this study, we examined the therapeutic potential of localized release of diclofenac from electrospun nanofibers generated from poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) polymer. Diclofenac was chosen since anti-inflammatory agents that inhibit cyclooxygenase have shown great potential in their ability to directly inhibit tumor growth as well as suppress inflammation-mediated tumor growth. A mouse resection model of oral carcinoma was developed by establishing tumor growth in the oral cavity by ultrasound-guided injection of 1 million SCC-9 cells in the floor of the mouth. Following resection, mice were allocated into four groups with the following treatment: 1) no treatment, 2) implanted scaffolds without diclofenac, 3) implanted scaffolds loaded with diclofenac, and 4) diclofenac given orally. Small animal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging were utilized for longitudinal determination of tumor recurrence. At the end of 7 weeks following tumor resection, 33% of mice with diclofenac-loaded scaffolds had a recurrent tumor, in comparison to 90%–100% of the mice in the other three groups. At this time point, mice with diclofenac-releasing scaffolds showed 89% survival rate, while the other groups showed survival rates of 10%–25%. Immunohistochemical staining of recurrent tumors revealed a near 10-fold decrease in the proliferation marker Ki-67 in the tumors derived from mice with diclofenac-releasing scaffolds. In summary, the local application of diclofenac in an orthotopic mouse tumor resection model of oral cancer reduced tumor recurrence with significant improvement in survival over a 7-week study period following tumor resection. Local drug release of anti-inflammatory agents should be investigated as a therapeutic option in the prevention of tumor recurrence in oral squamous

  4. Anesthetic technique and cancer recurrence in oncologic surgery: unraveling the puzzle.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ryungsa

    2017-03-01

    Surgery/anesthetic technique-stimulated immunosuppression in the perioperative period might cause an increase in cancer-related mortality. Whether anesthetic technique can affect the outcomes of cancer patients remains inconclusive. This review discusses data from the available literature on anesthetic techniques applied in oncologic surgery, the long-term outcomes of anesthetic technique, and their relation to survival and cancer recurrence. Searches of the PubMed database up to June 30, 2016, were conducted to identify publications with the terms "anesthetic technique and cancer recurrence," "regional anesthesia and cancer recurrence," "local anesthesia and cancer recurrence," "anesthetic technique and immunosuppression," and "anesthetic technique and oncologic surgery." Surgery/anesthesia-stimulated activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) provides immunosuppression through several soluble factors. Volatile anesthetics and opioids suppress cell-mediated immunity (CMI) and promote the proliferation of cancer cells and angiogenesis, whereas propofol does not suppress CMI and inhibits tumor angiogenesis. Regional anesthesia (RA) protects CMI and diminishes the surgical neuroendocrine stress response by blocking afferent neural transmission that stimulates the HPA axis and SNS, decreasing the requirement for opioids and volatile anesthetics and thereby decreasing cancer recurrence. Preclinical and retrospective studies highlight a potential benefit of anesthetic technique in reducing cancer-related mortality and recurrence by attenuating immunosuppression following surgical treatment in patients with specific types of cancer. Several well-planned, prospective, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are underway that may provide more conclusive and definitive results regarding the benefits of anesthetic technique on survival in oncologic surgery.

  5. The dynamic pattern of recurrence in curatively resected non-small cell lung cancer patients: Experiences at a single institution.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Yoshikane; Muley, Thomas; Safi, Seyer; Rieken, Stefan; Bischoff, Helge; Kappes, Jutta; Warth, Arne; Herth, Felix J F; Dienemann, Hendrik; Hoffmann, Hans

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the hazard function of tumor recurrence in patients with completely (R0) resected non-small cell lung cancer. A total of 1374 patients treated between 2003 and 2009 with complete resection and systematic lymph node dissection were studied. The risk of recurrence at a given time after operation was studied utilizing the cause-specific hazard function. Recurrence was categorized as local recurrence or distant recurrence. The risk distribution was assessed using clinical and pathological factors. The hazard function for recurrence presented an early peak at approximately 10 months after surgery and maintained a tapered plateau-like tail extending up to 8 years. A similar risk pattern was detected for both local recurrence and distant recurrence, while the risk of distant recurrence was higher than that of local recurrence. The double-peaked pattern of hazard rate was present in several subgroups, such as p-stage IA patients. A comparison of histology and status of nodal involvement showed that pN1-2 adenocarcinoma patients demonstrated a high hazard rate of distant recurrence and that pN0 adenocarcinoma patients exhibited a small recurrent risk for a longer time. Squamous cell carcinoma patients showed only little difference in risk. The data may be useful to select patients at high risk of recurrence and may provide information for each patient to decide how to manage the postoperative follow-up individually. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Patterns of regional recurrence after definitive radiotherapy for cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Beadle, Beth M; Jhingran, Anuja; Yom, Sue S; Ramirez, Pedro T; Eifel, Patricia J

    2010-04-01

    To determine the patterns of regional recurrence in patients treated with definitive radiotherapy (RT) for cervical cancer. The records of 198 patients treated with definitive RT for cervical cancer between 1980 and 2000 who experienced a regional recurrence without a central or distal vaginal recurrence were reviewed. All patients received a combination of external-beam RT and intracavitary brachytherapy. In the 180 patients with a documented location of regional recurrence, the relationship between the recurrence and the radiation fields was determined. The median time to regional recurrence was 13 months (range, 2-85 months). Of the 180 patients who had an evaluable regional recurrence, 119 (66%) had a component of marginal failure; 71 patients recurred above-the-field, 2 patients occurred in the inguinal nodes, and 2 patients recurred above-the-field and in the inguinal nodes. In addition, 105 patients (58%) had a component of in-field failure; 59 patients recurred in-field only, 39 patients recurred in-field and above-the-field, 2 patients recurred in-field, above-the-field, and in the inguinal nodes, and 5 patients recurred in-field and in the inguinal nodes. The median survival after regional recurrence was 8 months (range, 0-194 months). Most regional recurrences after definitive RT for cervical cancer include a component of marginal failure, usually immediately superior to the radiation field. These recurrences suggest a deficiency in target volume. Recurrences also occur in-field, suggesting a deficiency in dose. Developments in pretreatment staging, field delineation, dose escalation, and posttreatment surveillance may help to improve outcome in these patients.

  7. Patterns of Regional Recurrence After Definitive Radiotherapy for Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Beadle, Beth M.; Jhingran, Anuja; Yom, Sue S.; Ramirez, Pedro T.; Eifel, Patricia J.

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To determine the patterns of regional recurrence in patients treated with definitive radiotherapy (RT) for cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: The records of 198 patients treated with definitive RT for cervical cancer between 1980 and 2000 who experienced a regional recurrence without a central or distal vaginal recurrence were reviewed. All patients received a combination of external-beam RT and intracavitary brachytherapy. In the 180 patients with a documented location of regional recurrence, the relationship between the recurrence and the radiation fields was determined. Results: The median time to regional recurrence was 13 months (range, 2-85 months). Of the 180 patients who had an evaluable regional recurrence, 119 (66%) had a component of marginal failure; 71 patients recurred above-the-field, 2 patients occurred in the inguinal nodes, and 2 patients recurred above-the-field and in the inguinal nodes. In addition, 105 patients (58%) had a component of in-field failure; 59 patients recurred in-field only, 39 patients recurred in-field and above-the-field, 2 patients recurred in-field, above-the-field, and in the inguinal nodes, and 5 patients recurred in-field and in the inguinal nodes. The median survival after regional recurrence was 8 months (range, 0-194 months). Conclusions: Most regional recurrences after definitive RT for cervical cancer include a component of marginal failure, usually immediately superior to the radiation field. These recurrences suggest a deficiency in target volume. Recurrences also occur in-field, suggesting a deficiency in dose. Developments in pretreatment staging, field delineation, dose escalation, and posttreatment surveillance may help to improve outcome in these patients.

  8. Recurrent thromboembolic events after ischemic stroke in patients with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Samuel; Merkler, Alexander E.; Cheng, Natalie T.; Stone, Jacqueline B.; Kamel, Hooman; Iadecola, Costantino; Elkind, Mitchell S.V.; DeAngelis, Lisa M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the cumulative rate and characteristics of recurrent thromboembolic events after acute ischemic stroke in patients with cancer. Methods: We retrospectively identified consecutive adult patients with active systemic cancer diagnosed with acute ischemic stroke at a tertiary-care cancer center from 2005 through 2009. Two neurologists independently reviewed all electronic records to ascertain the composite outcome of recurrent ischemic stroke, myocardial infarction, systemic embolism, TIA, or venous thromboembolism. Kaplan-Meier statistics were used to determine cumulative outcome rates. In exploratory analyses, Cox proportional hazard analysis was used to evaluate potential independent associations between a priori selected clinical factors and recurrent thromboembolic events. Results: Among 263 study patients, complete follow-up until death was available in 230 (87%). Most patients had an adenocarcinoma as their underlying cancer (60%) and had systemic metastases (69%). Despite a median survival of 84 days (interquartile range 24–419 days), 90 patients (34%; 95% confidence interval 28%–40%) had 117 recurrent thromboembolic events, consisting of 57 cases of venous thromboembolism, 36 recurrent ischemic strokes, 13 myocardial infarctions, 10 cases of systemic embolism, and one TIA. Kaplan-Meier rates of recurrent thromboembolism were 21%, 31%, and 37% at 1, 3, and 6 months, respectively; cumulative rates of recurrent ischemic stroke were 7%, 13%, and 16%. Adenocarcinoma histology (hazard ratio 1.65, 95% confidence interval 1.02–2.68) was independently associated with recurrent thromboembolism. Conclusions: Patients with acute ischemic stroke in the setting of active cancer (especially adenocarcinoma) face a substantial short-term risk of recurrent ischemic stroke and other types of thromboembolism. PMID:24850486

  9. Role of imaging and biopsy to assess local recurrence after definitive treatment for prostate carcinoma (surgery, radiotherapy, cryotherapy, HIFU).

    PubMed

    Martino, Pasquale; Scattoni, Vincenzo; Galosi, Andrea B; Consonni, Paolo; Trombetta, Carlo; Palazzo, Silvano; Maccagnano, Carmen; Liguori, Giovanni; Valentino, Massimo; Battaglia, Michele; Barozzi, Libero

    2011-10-01

    Defining the site of recurrent disease early after definitive treatment for a localized prostate cancer is a critical issue as it may greatly influence the subsequent therapeutic strategy or patient management. A systematic review of the literature was performed by searching Medline from January 1995 up to January 2011. Electronic searches were limited to the English language, and the keywords prostate cancer, radiotherapy [RT], high intensity focused ultrasound [HIFU], cryotherapy [CRIO], transrectal ultrasound [TRUS], magnetic resonance [MRI], PET/TC, and prostate biopsy were used. Despite the fact that diagnosis of a local recurrence is based on PSA values and kinetics, imaging by means of different techniques may be a prerequisite for effective disease management. Unfortunately, prostate cancer local recurrences are very difficult to detect by TRUS and conventional imaging that have shown limited accuracy at least at early stages. On the contrary, functional and molecular imaging such as dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI), and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), offers the possibility of imaging molecular or cellular processes of individual tumors. Recently, PET/CT, using 11C-choline, 18F-fluorocholine or 11C-acetate has been successfully proposed in detecting local recurrences as well as distant metastases. Nevertheless, in controversial cases, it is necessary to perform a biopsy of the prostatic fossa or a biopsy of the prostate to assess the presence of a local recurrence under guidance of MRI or TRUS findings. It is likely that imaging will be extensively used in the future to detect and localize prostate cancer local recurrences before salvage treatment.

  10. Body weight loss as an indicator of breast cancer recurrence.

    PubMed

    Marinho, L A; Rettori, O; Vieira-Matos, A N

    2001-01-01

    Body weight loss (BWL), a major prognostic factor in breast cancer, was included as a parameter to be monitored in the recent breast cancer surveillance guidelines of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. The aim of this work was prospectively to evaluate BWL as an indicator of breast cancer recurrence. Body weight was measured every 2 months for 10.4+/-3.7 (SD) months in 109 disease-free breast cancer patients in stage II node-positive and stage III disease. The correlation between unexplained BWL and recurrence was studied. Attempts were made to define the limits in weight variations among disease-free patients beyond which recurrence could be suspected. Unexplained BWL was observed in 16/19 (84%) patients developing recurrence, versus 9/90 (10%) patients remaining disease-free. There was a significant (p < 0.001) correlation between BWL and recurrence. BWL anticipated the diagnosis of recurrence by 6 (range 4-12) months. Based on the average percentage weight variation +/- 2 SD (95% confidence interval) of the disease-free group, the limits for BWL beyond which recurrence could be suspected were a 5.8% decrease in the last 6 months, 3.6% in the last 2 months or 3.0% of the patient's mean weight. However, because of the large variation in the amplitude of individual weight oscillations among disease-free patients (from < 0.5% to > 5.9% of the mean weight), individual limits derived from the patient's own body weight curve seemed more reliable. The results suggest that unexplained BWL is a valuable indicator of incipient breast cancer recurrence. Careful monitoring of body weight in breast cancer patients during follow-up is encouraged.

  11. Prostate cancer recurrence after radical prostatectomy: the role of 3-T diffusion imaging in multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Panebianco, Valeria; Barchetti, Flavio; Sciarra, Alessandro; Musio, Daniela; Forte, Valerio; Gentile, Vincenzo; Tombolini, Vincenzo; Catalano, Carlo

    2013-06-01

    To validate the role of 3-T diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in the detection of local prostate cancer recurrence after radical prostatectomy (RP). T2-weighted imaging, DWI and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) were performed with a 3-T magnet in 262 patients after RP. Twenty out of 262 patients evaluated were excluded. MRI results were validated by prostate-specific antigen (PSA) reduction after external beam radiotherapy in group A (126 patients, local recurrence size range 4-8 mm) and by transrectal ultrasound biopsy in group B (116 patients, local recurrence size range 9-15 mm). In group A combined T2-weighted and DCE-MRI (T2+DCE) shows 98 % sensitivity, 94 % specificity and 93 % accuracy in identifying local recurrence; combined T2-weighted and DWI with a b value of 3,000 s/mm(2) (T2+DW3) displays 97 % sensitivity, 95 % specificity and 92 % accuracy, while with a b value of 1,000 s/mm(2) (T2+DW1) affords 93 % sensitivity, 89 % specificity and 88 % accuracy. In group B T2+DCE shows 100 % sensitivity, 97 % specificity and 91 % accuracy in detecting local cancer recurrence; T2+DW3 displays 98 % sensitivity, 96 % specificity and 89 % accuracy; T2+DW1 has 94 % sensitivity, 92 % specificity and 86 % accuracy. DCE-MRI is the most reliable technique in detecting local prostate cancer recurrence after RP, though DWI can be proposed as a reliable alternative. • Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI-MRI) is being increasingly used in oncology. • PSA analysis does not distinguish prostate cancer recurrence from distant metastasis. • DWI-MR can diagnose local prostate cancer recurrence after radical prostatectomy. • DWI-MR is almost comparable to DCE-MRI in detecting local recurrence.

  12. [Experience with radiofrequency ablation in the treatment of unresectable pelvic recurrence of rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Mátrai, Zoltán; Fehér, István; Péley, Gábor; Rényi Vámos, Ferenc; Farkas, Emil; Sulyok, Zoltán; Kovács, Tibor; Köves, István

    2005-02-01

    More than half of colorectal cancers are located in the rectum, and the number of such cancers is increasing. In Hungary colorectal cancers are diagnosed predominantly in advanced stages. In the last five years 736 patients with colorectal cancer were operated on at our Department, with the following stage distribution: Dukes A 10%, BI 10%, B2 31%, C 36% and D 13%. The local recurrence rate is decreasing since the introduction of total mesorectal excision and preoperative radiation. Effective treatment options are however poor for unresectable pelvic recurrences. Chemo- and radiotherapy have severe limitations in this advanced stage cancer. In recent years there are a few publications on the minimal-invasive radiofrequency tumour ablation (RFTA) technique, which is an effective treatment for primary and metastatic liver carcinomas and is a new palliative for the local treatment of pelvic recurrence. The aim of this study was to assess the response to treatment using ultrasound-guided radiofrequency ablation in two patients with unresectable pelvic recurrent rectal cancer.

  13. EGEN-001 and Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-11

    Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

  14. Unusual recurrent rectal carcinoma: a cancer field theory viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Vyslouzil, Kamil; Brychtova, Svetlana; Zboril, Pavel; Skalicky, Pavel; Vomackova, Katherine; Bezdekova, Michala; Brychta, Tomas

    2014-09-01

    The rate of rectal cancer locoregional recurrence following radical surgery varies from 4% to 33%. Though the causes are unclear, likely factors include microscopic tumor residues in the lymphatics, positive resection margins and exfoliation of tumor cells and their subsequent intraluminar spread during operation. Other significant factors include type and technique of surgical procedure. Recently, it has been demonstrated that local recurrence may also be associated with the biological behaviour of the tumor and/or with the composition of the cellular microenvironment which creates optimal conditions for the growth and spread of tumor cells. The presented case here is interesting because the tumour recurred early following a curative surgical procedure with negative resection margins, without positive lymph nodes, without infiltration of the pelvic wall and without distant metastases. In patients with a determined risk of genetically altered tumor field encompassing epithelial or stromal changes, a different treatment strategy, including gene therapy, anti-inflammatory or anti-angiogenic therapy should be chosen to minimize increased tumor risk.

  15. First-line bevacizumab plus taxane-based chemotherapy for locally recurrent or metastatic breast cancer: safety and efficacy in an open-label study in 2,251 patients.

    PubMed

    Smith, I E; Pierga, J-Y; Biganzoli, L; Cortés-Funes, H; Thomssen, C; Pivot, X; Fabi, A; Xu, B; Stroyakovskiy, D; Franke, F A; Kaufman, B; Mainwaring, P; Pienkowski, T; De Valk, B; Kwong, A; González-Trujillo, J L; Koza, I; Petrakova, K; Pereira, D; Pritchard, K I

    2011-03-01

    First-line bevacizumab combined with chemotherapy significantly improves efficacy versus chemotherapy alone in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative locally recurrent or metastatic breast cancer (LR/mBC). This large, open-label study further assesses first-line bevacizumab with taxane-based chemotherapy in routine oncology practice. Patients with HER2-negative LR/mBC, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status (PS) of zero to two and no prior chemotherapy for LR/mBC received bevacizumab 10 mg/kg every 2 weeks or 15 mg/kg every 3 weeks plus taxane-based chemotherapy (or other non-anthracycline chemotherapy) until disease progression, unacceptable toxicity or patient withdrawal. The primary end point was safety; time to progression (TtP) was a secondary end point. Median follow-up in 2251 treated patients was 12.7 months. Median age was 53 years and 94% of patients had ECOG PS of zero or one. Bevacizumab was most commonly administered with single-agent paclitaxel (35%), single-agent docetaxel (33%) or taxane-based combination therapy (10%). The most frequent grade ≥3 adverse event (AE) was neutropenia (5.4%). Grade ≥3 AEs previously associated with bevacizumab included hypertension (4.4%), arterial/venous thromboembolism (3.2%), proteinuria (1.7%) and bleeding (1.4%). No new bevacizumab safety signals were observed. Median TtP was 9.5 months (95% confidence interval 9.1-9.9). The study population in ATHENA was more representative of general oncology practice than populations enrolled into randomised trials, although there may have been some bias towards younger, fitter patients. The safety and efficacy of bevacizumab-taxane therapy in this large study were consistent with results from randomised first-line trials.

  16. Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration as a marker of endometrial cancer recurrence.

    PubMed

    Lie, Geoffrey; Morley, Thomas; Chowdhury, Muhammad

    2016-05-18

    An 84-year-old woman developed a cerebellar syndrome having undergone a total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy for endometrial cancer 1 year previously. She was found to be anti-Yo antibody positive and was diagnosed with paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD). A subsequent positron emission tomography scan and lymph node biopsy identified recurrence of her endometrial cancer. This case illustrates how PCD can be an indicator of cancer recurrence, underlines the significance of PCD as a prompt to search for underlying malignancy, and highlights the difficulties PCD poses to the clinician in terms of diagnosis and management.

  17. Inflammatory response, immunosuppression, and cancer recurrence after perioperative blood transfusions

    PubMed Central

    Cata, J. P.; Wang, H.; Gottumukkala, V.; Reuben, J.; Sessler, D. I.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Debate on appropriate triggers for transfusion of allogeneic blood products and their effects on short- and long-term survival in surgical and critically ill patients continue with no definitive evidence or decisive resolution. Although transfusion-related immune modulation (TRIM) is well established, its influence on immune competence in the recipient and its effects on cancer recurrence after a curative resection remains controversial. An association between perioperative transfusion of allogeneic blood products and risk for recurrence has been shown in colorectal cancer in randomized trials; whether the same is true for other types of cancer remains to be determined. This article focuses on the laboratory, animal, and clinical evidence to date on the mechanistic understanding of inflammatory and immune-modulatory effects of blood products and their significance for recurrence in the cancer surgical patient. PMID:23599512

  18. Atezolizumab and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent, Persistent, or Metastatic Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-28

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage IV Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  19. Veliparib, Topotecan Hydrochloride, and Filgrastim or Pegfilgrastim in Treating Patients With Persistent or Recurrent Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-07

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  20. Multivariate survival analysis of the patients with recurrent endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Odagiri, Tetsuji; Hosaka, Masayoshi; Mitamura, Takashi; Konno, Yousuke; Kato, Tatsuya; Kobayashi, Noriko; Sudo, Satoko; Takeda, Mahito; Kaneuchi, Masanori; Sakuragi, Noriaki

    2011-01-01

    Objective Few studies on the prognosticators of the patients with recurrent endometrial cancer after relapse have been reported in the literature. The aim of this study was to determine the prognosticators after relapse in patients with recurrent endometrial cancer who underwent primary complete cytoreductive surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy. Methods Thirty-five patients with recurrent endometrial cancer were included in this retrospective analysis. The prognostic significance of several clinicopathological factors including histologic type, risk for recurrence, time to relapse after primary surgery, number of relapse sites, site of relapse, treatment modality, and complete resection of recurrent tumors were evaluated. Survival analyses were performed by Kaplan-Meier curves and the log-rank test. Independent prognostic factors were determined by multivariate Cox regression analysis. Results Among the clinicopathological factors analyzed, histologic type (p=0.04), time to relapse after primary surgery (p=0.03), and the number of relapse sites (p=0.03) were significantly related to survival after relapse. Multivariate analysis revealed that time to relapse after primary surgery (hazard ratio, 6.8; p=0.004) and the number of relapse sites (hazard ratio, 11.1; p=0.002) were independent prognostic factors for survival after relapse. Survival after relapse could be stratified into three groups by the combination of two independent prognostic factors. Conclusion We conclude that time to relapse after primary surgery, and the number of relapse sites were independent prognostic factors for survival after relapse in patients with recurrent endometrial cancer. PMID:21607089

  1. Chemotherapy and molecular targeting therapy for recurrent cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Naotake; Watari, Hidemichi; Ushijima, Kimio

    2016-04-01

    For patients with primary stage ⅣB, persistent, or recurrent cervical cancer, chemotherapy remains the standard treatment, although it is neither curative nor associated with long-term disease control. In this review, we summarized the history of treatment of recurrent cervical cancer, and the current recommendation for chemotherapy and molecular targeted therapy. Eligible articles were identified by a search of the MEDLINE bibliographical database for the period up to November 30, 2014. The search strategy included the following any or all of the keywords: "uterine cervical cancer", "chemotherapy", and "targeted therapies". Since cisplatin every 21 days was considered as the historical standard treatment for recurrent cervical cancer, subsequent trials have evaluated and demonstrated activity for other agents including paclitaxel, gemcitabine, topotecan and vinorelbine among others. Accordingly, promising agents were incorporated into phase Ⅲ trials. To examine the best agent to combine with cisplatin, several landmark phase Ⅲ clinical trials were conducted by Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG) and Japan Clinical Oncology Group (JCOG). Through, GOG204 and JCOG0505, paclitaxel/cisplatin (TP) and paclitaxel/carboplatin (TC) are now considered to be the recommended therapies for recurrent cervical cancer patients. However, the prognosis of patients who are already resistant to chemotherapy, are very poor. Therefore new therapeutic strategies are urgently required. Molecular targeted therapy will be the most hopeful candidate of these strategies. From the results of GOG240, bevacizumab combined with TP reached its primary endpoint of improving overall survival (OS). Although, the prognosis for recurrent cervical cancer patients is still poor, the results of GOG240 shed light on the usefulness of molecular target agents to chemotherapy in cancer patients. Recurrent cervical cancer is generally considered incurable and current chemotherapy regiments offer only

  2. 1.5T MRI-guided trans-perineal laser ablation of locally recurrent prostate adenocarcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhail, E. Frederick; Mynderse, Lance A.; Callstrom, Matthew R.; Gorny, Krzysztof R.; McNichols, Roger J.; Atwell, Thomas D.; Gettman, Matthew T.; Amrami, Kimberly K.; Kawashima, Akira; Woodrum, David A.

    2010-02-01

    Introduction: Biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer after definitive therapy with radical prostatectomy (RP) is known to occur between 25-30%. We present the first known case of 1.5T MRI guided ablation using laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) for locally recurrent prostate cancer following RP. Methods: The patient elected to undergo MRI-guided LITT of the biopsy proven cancer recurrence using an FDAapproved MRI compatible, 980nm, 15-watt laser system with MR thermometry. Under T2-weighted MR(1.5T Siemens) imaging, guidance and targeting of the lesions with trans-perineal placement of laser applicators. Multiple cycles of laser energy were used to ablate the tumor. A MRI-compatible urethral cooling catheter was placed to prevent urethral thermal damage. Results: Intra-procedural temperature mapping allowed continuous monitoring of the ablation zone and permitted ablation control until tumor coverage was achieved. Additionally, the protective cooling effects of the urethral cooling catheter could also be seen with the temperature mapping. Post-ablation gadolinium and T2 weighted MR imaging demonstrated an ablation defect encompassing the recurrent tumor with no residual hyper-enhancing nodules. Three month follow-up shows no residual or recurrent tumor seen on MR imaging. Conclusion: This represents the first known, successful, MRI-guided, LITT procedures at 1.5T for locally recurrent prostate adenocarcinoma following RP.

  3. Protein domain assignment from the recurrence of locally similar structures

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Chin-Hsien; Sam, Vichetra; Gibrat, Jean-Francois; Garnier, Jean; Munson, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Domains are basic units of protein structure and essential for exploring protein fold space and structure evolution. With the structural genomics initiative, the number of protein structures in the Protein Databank (PDB) is increasing dramatically and domain assignments need to be done automatically. Most existing structural domain assignment programs define domains using the compactness of the domains and/or the number and strength of intra-domain versus inter-domain contacts. Here we present a different approach based on the recurrence of locally similar structural pieces (LSSPs) found by one-against-all structure comparisons with a dataset of 6,373 protein chains from the PDB. Residues of the query protein are clustered using LSSPs via three different procedures to define domains. This approach gives results that are comparable to several existing programs that use geometrical and other structural information explicitly. Remarkably, most of the proteins that contribute the LSSPs defining a domain do not themselves contain the domain of interest. This study shows that domains can be defined by a collection of relatively small locally similar structural pieces containing, on average, four secondary structure elements. In addition, it indicates that domains are indeed made of recurrent small structural pieces that are used to build protein structures of many different folds as suggested by recent studies. PMID:21287617

  4. A submucosal tumor-like recurrence of early esophageal cancer after endoscopic submucosal dissection.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeong Cheon; Kim, Gwang Ha; Park, Do Youn; Seoung, Hyeog Gyu; Lee, Yong Jae; Kim, Ji Hye; Kim, Tae Kyun; I, Hoseok

    2013-03-01

    Early esophageal cancer is defined as a tumor invading the mucosa with or without lymph node or distant organ metastasis. In the current guidelines for early esophageal cancer, absolute indication for endoscopic resection include lesions limited to the epithelium or lamina propria mucosa not exceeding two-thirds of the circumference, and relative indications include lesions limited to the muscularis mucosa or the upper third of the submucosal layer and not accompanied by clinical evidence of lymph node metastasis. After endoscopic submucosal dissection for early esophageal cancer, locally recurrent cancer can occur, especially in the case of incomplete resection. Here, we report a rare case of a submucosal tumor-like recurrence after endoscopic resection of early esophageal cancer.

  5. Management of nodal recurrences of endometrial cancer with IMRT

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Jennifer C.; Allen, Pamela K.; Jhingran, Anuja; Westin, Shannon N.; Lu, Karen H.; Eifel, Patricia J.; Klopp, Ann H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Pelvic and paraortic lymph nodal regions are frequent sites of relapse in women with endometrial cancer who have not undergone adjuvant external beam radiation. We investigated outcomes after definitive management of nodal relapses of endometrial cancer with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods Between 2002-2012, 38 patients with endometrial cancer who had no prior external beam radiation were treated definitively using IMRT for regionally confined pelvic or paraortic nodal recurrences. Thirteen (34%) had chemotherapy prior to radiation, and 21 (55%) received concurrent chemotherapy. The nodal basins were typically treated to 45-50 Gy, with a boost to the gross tumor to a median total of 64.7 Gy (range 59 – 73 Gy). Results The median overall survival from date of recurrence was 46.1 months and the 2-year survival was 71%. Patients who received concurrent chemotherapy had a significantly longer median survival (61.9 months versus 28.7 months, p=0.034). In-field failures were more frequent in patients who received chemotherapy prior to radiation, had a shorter recurrence-free interval, received a lower radiation dose, and had higher tumor grade. Three patients (8%) experienced grade 3-4 late gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity. Conclusions Long-term survival can be achieved in women with nodal recurrences of endometrial cancer. The use of concurrent chemotherapy and dose escalation with IMRT as feasible may improve survival for women with isolated nodal recurrences of endometrial cancer. PMID:26193429

  6. Management of nodal recurrences of endometrial cancer with IMRT.

    PubMed

    Ho, Jennifer C; Allen, Pamela K; Jhingran, Anuja; Westin, Shannon N; Lu, Karen H; Eifel, Patricia J; Klopp, Ann H

    2015-10-01

    Pelvic and paraortic lymph nodal regions are frequent sites of relapse in women with endometrial cancer who have not undergone adjuvant external beam radiation. We investigated outcomes after definitive management of nodal relapses of endometrial cancer with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Between 2002-2012, 38 patients with endometrial cancer who had no prior external beam radiation were treated definitively using IMRT for regionally confined pelvic or paraortic nodal recurrences. Thirteen (34%) had chemotherapy prior to radiation, and 21 (55%) received concurrent chemotherapy. The nodal basins were typically treated to 45-50Gy, with a boost to the gross tumor to a median total of 64.7Gy (range 59-73Gy). The median overall survival from date of recurrence was 46.1months and the 2-year survival was 71%. Patients who received concurrent chemotherapy had a significantly longer median survival (61.9months versus 28.7months, p=0.034). In-field failures were more frequent in patients who received chemotherapy prior to radiation, had a shorter recurrence-free interval, received a lower radiation dose, and had higher tumor grade. Three patients (8%) experienced grade 3-4 late gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity. Long-term survival can be achieved in women with nodal recurrences of endometrial cancer. The use of concurrent chemotherapy and dose escalation with IMRT as feasible may improve survival for women with isolated nodal recurrences of endometrial cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Abdominosacral resection for locally recurring rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Belli, Filiberto; Gronchi, Alessandro; Corbellini, Carlo; Milione, Massimo; Leo, Ermanno

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate feasibility and outcome of abdominal-sacral resection for treatment of locally recurrent rectal adenocarcinoma. METHODS A population of patients who underwent an abdominal-sacral resection for posterior recurrent adenocarcinoma of the rectum at the National Cancer Institute of Milano, between 2005 and 2013, is considered. Retrospectively collected data includes patient characteristics, treatment and pathology details regarding the primary and the recurrent rectal tumor surgical resection. A clinical and instrumental follow-up was performed. Surgical and oncological outcome were investigated. Furthermore an analytical review of literature was conducted in order to compare our case series with other reported experiences. RESULTS At the time of abdomino-sacral resection, the mean age of patients was 55 (range, 38-64). The median operating time was 380 min (range, 270-480). Sacral resection was performed at S2/S3 level in 3 patients, S3/S4 in 3 patients and S4/S5 in 4 patients. The median operating time was 380 ± 58 min. Mean intraoperative blood loss was 1750 mL (range, 200-680). The median hospital stay was 22 d. Overall morbidity was 80%, mainly type II complication according to the Clavien-Dindo classification. Microscopically negative margins (R0) is obtained in all patients. Overall 5-year survival after first surgical procedure is 60%, with a median survival from the first surgery of 88 ± 56 mo. The most common site of re-recurrence was intrapelvic. CONCLUSION Sacral resection represents a feasible approach to posterior rectal cancer recurrence without evidence of distant spreading. An accurate staging is essential for planning the best therapy. PMID:28070232

  8. A Systematic Review of Ovarian Cancer and Fear of Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Ozga, Melissa; Aghajanian, Carol; Myers-Virtue, Shannon; McDonnell, Glynnis; Jhanwar, Sabrina; Hichenberg, Shira; Sulimanoff, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess demographic, medical and psychological factors that are associated with fear of recurrence (FCR) in ovarian cancer patients. Methods We searched PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane, CINAHL, and PsycINFO. For PubMed, a search using Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) was run, as well as a textword search from 1990 to July 2014. Search terms that were used consisted of ovarian terms, fear terms, and recurrence/progression themes. Title and abstract reviews were conducted by two independent reviewers to determine eligibility, and discrepancies were decided by a third reviewer. Full-text reviews of potentially eligible articles were conducted by the review team, which met regularly to ensure the reliability of eligibility ratings across all articles. Results Fifteen articles met our inclusion criteria. Nine were quantitative studies that utilized a cross-sectional design, and six studies consisted of three qualitative studies, two small intervention studies, and one study that utilized content analysis to explore written correspondence among ovarian cancer patients. FCR was reported as a significant concern for both older and younger women at both early and advanced stages. Women were distressed about recurrence at various times during their treatment and post-treatment. FCR was noted to be prevalent around cancer follow-up examinations. Many women report not receiving adequate support for recurrence. FCR was also shown to be linked in some way to hopelessness, faith/spirituality, and PTSD. FCR was also linked to patients’ anxiety about death and dying and the uncertainty of the future of their medical health. Conclusions This review demonstrates that FCR is prevalent in the ovarian cancer population. Cancer recurrence fears are not adequately assessed or treated. More information is needed on the factors that may be related to women’s fears about recurrence in the ovarian cancer population. In addition, a validated measure of FCR among ovarian cancer patients

  9. Chemotherapy and molecular targeting therapy for recurrent cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tsuda, Naotake; Watari, Hidemichi; Ushijima, Kimio

    2016-01-01

    For patients with primary stage ⅣB, persistent, or recurrent cervical cancer, chemotherapy remains the standard treatment, although it is neither curative nor associated with long-term disease control. In this review, we summarized the history of treatment of recurrent cervical cancer, and the current recommendation for chemotherapy and molecular targeted therapy. Eligible articles were identified by a search of the MEDLINE bibliographical database for the period up to November 30, 2014. The search strategy included the following any or all of the keywords: “uterine cervical cancer”, “chemotherapy”, and “targeted therapies”. Since cisplatin every 21 days was considered as the historical standard treatment for recurrent cervical cancer, subsequent trials have evaluated and demonstrated activity for other agents including paclitaxel, gemcitabine, topotecan and vinorelbine among others. Accordingly, promising agents were incorporated into phase Ⅲ trials. To examine the best agent to combine with cisplatin, several landmark phase Ⅲ clinical trials were conducted by Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG) and Japan Clinical Oncology Group (JCOG). Through, GOG204 and JCOG0505, paclitaxel/cisplatin (TP) and paclitaxel/carboplatin (TC) are now considered to be the recommended therapies for recurrent cervical cancer patients. However, the prognosis of patients who are already resistant to chemotherapy, are very poor. Therefore new therapeutic strategies are urgently required. Molecular targeted therapy will be the most hopeful candidate of these strategies. From the results of GOG240, bevacizumab combined with TP reached its primary endpoint of improving overall survival (OS). Although, the prognosis for recurrent cervical cancer patients is still poor, the results of GOG240 shed light on the usefulness of molecular target agents to chemotherapy in cancer patients. Recurrent cervical cancer is generally considered incurable and current chemotherapy regiments

  10. A systematic review of ovarian cancer and fear of recurrence.

    PubMed

    Ozga, Melissa; Aghajanian, Carol; Myers-Virtue, Shannon; McDonnell, Glynnis; Jhanwar, Sabrina; Hichenberg, Shira; Sulimanoff, Isabel

    2015-12-01

    To assess demographic, medical, and psychological factors that are associated with fear of recurrence (FCR) in ovarian cancer patients. We searched PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane, CINAHL, and PsycINFO. For PubMed, a search using Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) was run, as well as a text-word search from 1990 to July of 2014. The search terms used consisted of ovarian terms, fear terms, and recurrence/progression themes. Title and abstract reviews were conducted by two independent reviewers to determine eligibility, and discrepancies were decided by a third reviewer. Full-text reviews of potentially eligible articles were conducted by the review team, which met regularly to ensure the reliability of eligibility ratings across all articles. A total of 15 articles met our inclusion criteria. Nine were quantitative studies that utilized a cross-sectional design, and the other six included three qualitative studies, two small intervention studies, and one study that utilized content analysis to explore written correspondence among ovarian cancer patients. FCR was reported as a significant concern for both older and younger women at both early and advanced stages. Women were distressed about recurrence at various times during their treatment and posttreatment. FCR was noted to be prevalent around cancer follow-up examinations. Many women reported not receiving adequate support for recurrence. FCR was also shown to be linked in some way to hopelessness, faith/spirituality, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). FCR was also linked to patients' anxiety about death and dying and uncertainty about the future of their medical health. This review demonstrates that FCR is prevalent in the ovarian cancer population. Moreover, cancer recurrence fears are not adequately assessed or treated. More information is needed on the factors that may be related to women's fears about recurrence of ovarian cancer. In addition, a validated measure of FCR among ovarian cancer patients as well as

  11. Distant invasive breast cancer recurrence risk in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive T1a and T1b node-negative localized breast cancer diagnosed from 2000 to 2006: a cohort from an integrated health care delivery system.

    PubMed

    Fehrenbacher, Louis; Capra, Angela M; Quesenberry, Charles P; Fulton, Regan; Shiraz, Parveen; Habel, Laurel A

    2014-07-10

    To determine the invasive recurrence (IR) risk among patients with small, node-negative human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) -positive breast cancer. Among 16,975 consecutive patients with invasive breast cancer diagnosed from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2006, in a large, integrated health care system, we identified a cohort of 234 patients with HER2-positive T1aN0M0 or T1bN0M0 (T1abN0M0) disease with a median follow-up of 5.8 years. Kaplan-Meier methods were used to estimate the percentage of patients who were free of invasive recurrence (recurrence-free interval [RFI]) at 5 years for both distant (DRFI) and local (LRFI) recurrences. Of 15 IRs, 47% were locoregional only. Among T1ab patients not treated with adjuvant trastuzumab or chemotherapy (n = 171), the 5-year invasive DRFI was 98.2% (95% CI, 94.5% to 99.4%); it was 99.0% (95% CI, 93.0% to 99.9%) for T1a patients, and 97.0% (95% CI, 88.6% to 99.2%) for T1b patients. Locoregional plus distant 5-year invasive RFI was 97.0% (95% CI, 90.9% to 99.0%) for T1a and 91.9% (95% CI, 81.5% to 96.6%) for T1b patients; it was 89.4% (95% CI, 70.6% to 96.5%) for T1b tumors reported at 1.0 cm. T1b tumors reported at 1.0 cm accounted for 24% of the T1ab cohort, 61% of the cohort total tumor volume, and 75% of distant recurrences. Invasive RFI for T1b 1.0 cm tumors was lower than that for T1a tumors: 84.5% versus 97.4% (P = .009). The distant IR risk of T1a HER2-positive breast cancer appears quite low. The distant IR risk in T1b patients, particularly those with 1.0-cm tumors, is higher. Potential risk differences for T1a and T1b, including the 1.0-cm tumors, should be considered when making treatment decisions. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  12. The effect of surgery type on survival and recurrence in very young women with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Quan, May Lynn; Paszat, Lawrence Frank; Fernandes, Kimberly A; Sutradhar, Rinku; McCready, David R; Rakovitch, Eileen; Warner, Ellen; Wright, Frances C; Hodgson, Nicole; Brackstone, Muriel; Baxter, Nancy N

    2017-02-01

    The impact of surgical treatment on outcomes in breast cacner in very young women remains unclear. We sought to determine the effect of surgery type on risk of recurrence and survival in a population-based cohort. All women diagnosed with breast cancer aged ≤35 (1994-2003) were identified from the Ontario Cancer Registry. Patient, tumor, and treatment variables, including primary surgery, recurrences, and death were abstracted from chart review. Cox regression models were fit to determine the effect of surgery type on recurrence and overall survival. We identified 1,381 patients with 11-year median follow-up of which 793 (57%) had BCS. Of the remaining mastectomy patients, 52% had postmastectomy radiation. Overall, 41% of patients sustained a recurrence of any type and 31% died. Controlling for known confounders, there was no association between type of surgery and death from any cause (HR = 0.98, 95% CI = 0.78, 1.25) or first recurrence (HR = 0.93, 95% CI = 0.75, 1.14). Distant recurrence was most common (13% in BCS; 25.3% in mastectomy) with local recurrence 12.4% after BCS and 7.5% after mastectomy. In this cohort of very young women who were selected for treatment with BCS and mastectomy, we found similar oncologic outcomes. J. Surg. Oncol. 2017;115:122-130. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Lapatinib Ditosylate in Treating Patients With Unresectable Liver or Biliary Tract Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-08

    Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  14. Adjuvant radiation therapy, local recurrence, and the need for salvage therapy in atypical meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Aizer, Ayal A.; Arvold, Nils D.; Catalano, Paul; Claus, Elizabeth B.; Golby, Alexandra J.; Johnson, Mark D.; Al-Mefty, Ossama; Wen, Patrick Y.; Reardon, David A.; Lee, Eudocia Q.; Nayak, Lakshmi; Rinne, Mikael L.; Beroukhim, Rameen; Weiss, Stephanie E.; Ramkissoon, Shakti H.; Abedalthagafi, Malak; Santagata, Sandro; Dunn, Ian F.; Alexander, Brian M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The impact of adjuvant radiation in patients with atypical meningioma remains poorly defined. We sought to determine the impact of adjuvant radiation therapy in this population. Methods We identified 91 patients with World Health Organization grade II (atypical) meningioma managed at Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center between 1997 and 2011. A propensity score model incorporating age at diagnosis, gender, Karnofsky performance status, tumor location, tumor size, reason for diagnosis, and era of treatment was constructed using logistic regression for the outcome of receipt versus nonreceipt of radiation therapy. Propensity scores were then used as continuous covariates in a Cox proportional hazards model to determine the adjusted impact of adjuvant radiation therapy on both local recurrence and the combined endpoint of use of salvage therapy and death due to progressive meningioma. Results The median follow-up in patients without recurrent disease was 4.9 years. After adjustment for pertinent confounding variables, radiation therapy was associated with decreased local recurrence in those undergoing gross total resection (hazard ratio, 0.25; 95% CI, 0.07–0.96; P = .04). No differences in overall survival were seen in patients who did and did not receive radiation therapy. Conclusion Patients who have had a gross total resection of an atypical meningioma should be considered for adjuvant radiation therapy given the improvement in local control. Multicenter, prospective trials are required to definitively evaluate the potential impact of radiation therapy on survival in patients with atypical meningioma. PMID:24891451

  15. Eliminating Late Recurrence to Eradicate Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    diabetes because increased lipid toxicity promotes insulin resistance64. Box 2 | Autophagy and secretion Although autophagy is traditionally viewed as an...affect POMC neuronal function via non -autophagic mechanisms, rather than via the autophagy- dependent control of lipid metabo- lism90. Nevertheless...Overall, these studies revealed two opposing, context- dependent functions for autophagy that potentially influence late recurrent metastatic progression

  16. Efficacy of vinorelbine and zoledronate combination therapy against postoperative recurrence of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Junzo; Furukawa, Kinya; Hosaka, Makoto; Saito, Makoto; Matsushima, Yasushi

    2012-04-01

    We report a case of a response to long-term treatment with vinorelbine and zoledronate in a patient with lymph node and multiple bone metastases after lung cancer surgery. The patient was a 70-year-old male initially examined by a local physician for an abnormal shadow that had been detected on a chest X-ray during a screening examination. CT revealed a mass shadow measuring 28 mm in diameter in the left S10, and because lung cancer was suspected, the patient was admitted to our hospital for the first time and examined. Lung cancer was diagnosed intraoperatively, and left lower lobectomy was performed. The pathological stage was III a, and postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy was performed, but recurrences in the form of lymph node and multiple bone metastases were detected. After diagnosis of the recurrence, the patient was treated with long-term vinorelbine (VNR)biweekly and zoledronate (ZOL) monthly, and a response was obtained. A patient with postoperative recurrence of lung cancer associated with multiple bone metastases responded to combination chemotherapy with VNR and ZOL. VNR was effective against postoperative recurrence in an elderly lung cancer patient with complications, and could be administered safely long-term. ZOL also had a favorable protective effect against skeletal-related events (SREs) in lung cancer, and the results suggested that it also had an antitumor effect in this patient.

  17. Local, regional, and systemic recurrence rates in patients undergoing skin-sparing mastectomy compared with conventional mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Yi, Min; Kronowitz, Steven J; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Feig, Barry W; Symmans, W Fraser; Lucci, Anthony; Ross, Merrick I; Babiera, Gildy V; Kuerer, Henry M; Hunt, Kelly K

    2011-03-01

    Although the use of SSM is becoming more common, there are few data on long-term, local-regional, and distant recurrence rates after treatment. The purpose of this study was to examine the rates of local, regional, and systemic recurrence, and survival in breast cancer patients who underwent skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) or conventional mastectomy (CM) at our institution. Patients with stage 0 to III unilateral breast cancer who underwent total mastectomy at our center from 2000 to 2005 were included in this study. Kaplan-Meier curves were calculated, and the log-rank test was used to evaluate the differences between overall and disease-free survival rates in the 2 groups. Of 1810 patients, 799 (44.1%) underwent SSM and 1011 (55.9%) underwent CM. Patients who underwent CM were older (58.3 vs 49.3 years, P<.0001) and were more likely to have stage IIB or III disease (53.0% vs 31.8%, P<.0001). Significantly more patients in the CM group received neoadjuvant chemotherapy and adjuvant radiation therapy (P<.0001). At a median follow-up of 53 months, 119 patients (6.6%) had local, regional, or systemic recurrences. The local, regional, and systemic recurrence rates did not differ significantly between the SSM and CM groups. After adjusting for clinical TNM stage and age, disease-free survival rates between the SSM and CM groups did not differ significantly. SSM is an acceptable treatment option for patients who are candidates for immediate breast reconstruction. Local-regional recurrence rates are similar to those of patients undergoing CM. Cancer 2011. © 2010 American Cancer Society. Copyright © 2010 American Cancer Society.

  18. Everolimus, Erlotinib Hydrochloride, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer Previously Treated With Radiation Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Cancer

  19. [The treatment options for localized prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Livne, Pinhas M

    2006-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a very common tumor in men. Today the disease is very often diagnosed early because of an elevated PSA without symptoms and the disease is localized to the prostate. Patients with prostate cancer can be divided into 3 subgroups for the carcinoma: favorable, moderate, and poorly. The grouping depends mainly on the Gleason score of the prostate biopsy. According to the Gleason score, favorable cancer is up to score 6 (3 + 3), moderate score 7, and poor--Gleason score 8-10. The other favorable clinical factors are PSA < 10 ng/ml, and clinical stage by DRE of T1C or T2 (no nodule or palpable nodule not extending beyond the prostatic capsule). The treatment options for cure when the prostate cancer is localized are either radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy (external or brachytherapy or combination). Each of these therapies has side effects and each has advantages and disadvantages. Sometimes the treatment choice is not for cure and the options are hormonal treatment or watchful waiting. Twenty to 30% of the patients treated for cure may fail the treatment and have elevation of PSA without any clinical symptoms, or signs of local recurrence or distant spread. Some of these patients with biochemical failure may be cured by salvage treatment: radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy and salvage radical prostatectomy or cryotherapy following failure of radiotherapy.

  20. Prediction of oral cancer recurrence using dynamic Bayesian networks.

    PubMed

    Kourou, Konstantina; Rigas, George; Exarchos, Konstantinos P; Papaloukas, Costas; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I

    2016-08-01

    We propose a methodology for predicting oral cancer recurrence using Dynamic Bayesian Networks. The methodology takes into consideration time series gene expression data collected at the follow-up study of patients that had or had not suffered a disease relapse. Based on that knowledge, our aim is to infer the corresponding dynamic Bayesian networks and subsequently conjecture about the causal relationships among genes within the same time-slice and between consecutive time-slices. Moreover, the proposed methodology aims to (i) assess the prognosis of patients regarding oral cancer recurrence and at the same time, (ii) provide important information about the underlying biological processes of the disease.

  1. Location of recurrent asymptomatic ovarian cancer through endoscopic ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Joaquim; Formighieri, Beatriz; Filippi, Sheila; Rossini, Lucio

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is frequent and recurrence happens in about 75% of patients. As it presents high rates of relapse, the exams for this diagnosis are widely discussed. Beside this, there have been discussions about benefits for early anatomic diagnosis and whether endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) can be used to track the relapse of the disease. We present a case, in which anatomic location and histological definition of an asymptomatic recurrence of the ovarian cancer was misdiagnosed with conventional methods, but was possible through EUS. PMID:25789287

  2. Internal mammary lymph node recurrence: rare but characteristic metastasis site in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Gu, Yajia; Leaw, Shiangjiin; Wang, Zhonghua; Wang, Peihua; Hu, Xichun; Chen, Jiayi; Lu, Jingsong; Shao, Zhimin

    2010-09-07

    To assess the frequency of IMLN recurrence, its associated risk factors with disease-free interval (DFI) and its predicting factors on overall survival time. 133 cases of breast cancer IMLN recurrence were identified via the computerized CT reporting system between February 2003 and June 2008, during which chest CT for patients with breast cancer (n = 8867) were performed consecutively at Cancer Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, China. Patients' charts were retrieved and patients' characteristics, disease characteristics, and treatments after recurrence were collected for analysis. The frequency was 1.5% (133/8867). IMLN recurrence was presented as the first metastatic site in 121 (91%) patients while 88 (66.2%) had other concurrent metastases. Typical chest CT images included swelling of the IMLN at the ipsilateral side with local lump and sternal erosion located mostly between the second and third intercostal space. The median disease-free interval (DFI) of IMLN recurrence was 38 months. The independent factors that could delay the IMLN recurrence were small tumor size (HR 0.5 95%CI: 0.4 - 0.8; p = 0.002), and positive ER/PR disease (HR 0.6, 95% CI: 0.4 - 0.9; p = 0.006). The median survival time after IMLN recurrence was 42 months, with a 5-year survival rate of 30%. Univariate analysis showed four variables significantly influenced the survival time: DFI of IMLN recurrence (p = 0.001), no concurrent distant metastasis (p = 0.024), endocrine therapy for patients with positive ER/PR (p = 0.000), radiotherapy (p = 0.040). The independent factors that reduced the death risk were no concurrent distant metastases (HR: 0.7, 95% CI: 0.4 - 0.9; p = 0.031), endocrine therapy for patients with positive ER/PR status (HR: 0.2, 95% CI: 0.1 - 0.5; p = 0.001) and palliative radiotherapy (HR: 0.3, 95% CI: 0.1- 0.9; p = 0.026). The risk of IMLN recurrence is low and there are certain characteristics features on CT images. ER/PR status is both a risk factor for DFI of IMLN

  3. Altered expression patterns of syndecan-1 and -2 predict biochemical recurrence in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Ledezma, Rodrigo; Cifuentes, Federico; Gallegos, Iván; Fullá, Juan; Ossandon, Enrique; Castellon, Enrique A; Contreras, Héctor R

    2011-05-01

    The clinical features of prostate cancer do not provide an accurate determination of patients undergoing biochemical relapse and are therefore not suitable as indicators of prognosis for recurrence. New molecular markers are needed for proper pre-treatment risk stratification of patients. Our aim was to assess the value of altered expression of syndecan-1 and -2 as a marker for predicting biochemical relapse in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer treated by radical prostatectomy. The expression of syndecan-1 and -2 was examined by immunohistochemical staining in a series of 60 paraffin-embedded tissue samples from patients with localized prostate cancer. Ten specimens from patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia were used as non-malignant controls. Semiquantitative analysis was performed to evaluate the staining patterns. To investigate the prognostic value, Kaplan-Meier survival curves were performed and compared by a log-rank test. In benign samples, syndecan-1 was expressed in basal and secretory epithelial cells with basolateral membrane localisation, whereas syndecan-2 was expressed preferentially in basal cells. In prostate cancer samples, the expression patterns of both syndecans shifted to granular-cytoplasmic localisation. Survival analysis showed a significant difference (P < 0.05) between normal and altered expression of syndecan-1 and -2 in free prostate-specific antigen recurrence survival curves. These data suggest that the expression of syndecan-1 and -2 can be used as a prognostic marker for patients with clinically localized prostate cancer, improving the prostate-specific antigen recurrence risk stratification.

  4. Altered expression patterns of syndecan-1 and -2 predict biochemical recurrence in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ledezma, Rodrigo; Cifuentes, Federico; Gallegos, Iván; Fullá, Juan; Ossandon, Enrique; Castellon, Enrique A; Contreras, Héctor R

    2011-01-01

    The clinical features of prostate cancer do not provide an accurate determination of patients undergoing biochemical relapse and are therefore not suitable as indicators of prognosis for recurrence. New molecular markers are needed for proper pre-treatment risk stratification of patients. Our aim was to assess the value of altered expression of syndecan-1 and -2 as a marker for predicting biochemical relapse in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer treated by radical prostatectomy. The expression of syndecan-1 and -2 was examined by immunohistochemical staining in a series of 60 paraffin-embedded tissue samples from patients with localized prostate cancer. Ten specimens from patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia were used as non-malignant controls. Semiquantitative analysis was performed to evaluate the staining patterns. To investigate the prognostic value, Kaplan–Meier survival curves were performed and compared by a log-rank test. In benign samples, syndecan-1 was expressed in basal and secretory epithelial cells with basolateral membrane localisation, whereas syndecan-2 was expressed preferentially in basal cells. In prostate cancer samples, the expression patterns of both syndecans shifted to granular-cytoplasmic localisation. Survival analysis showed a significant difference (P<0.05) between normal and altered expression of syndecan-1 and -2 in free prostate-specific antigen recurrence survival curves. These data suggest that the expression of syndecan-1 and -2 can be used as a prognostic marker for patients with clinically localized prostate cancer, improving the prostate-specific antigen recurrence risk stratification. PMID:21317913

  5. BMS-247550 in Treating Patients With Liver or Gallbladder Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-13

    Adult Primary Cholangiocellular Carcinoma; Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Extrahepatic Bile Duct; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Localized Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Localized Gallbladder Cancer; Localized Resectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  6. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging-transrectal ultrasound fusion-assisted biopsy for the diagnosis of local recurrence after radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Muller, Berrend G; Kaushal, Aradhana; Sankineni, Sandeep; Lita, Elena; Hoang, Anthony N; George, Arvin K; Rais-Bahrami, Soroush; Kruecker, Jochen; Yan, Pingkun; Xu, Sheng; de la Rosette, Jean J; Merino, Maria J; Wood, Bradford J; Pinto, Peter A; Choyke, Peter L; Turkbey, Baris

    2015-10-01

    Approximately 15% of patients who undergo radical prostatectomy (RP) for prostate cancer develop local recurrence, which is heralded by a rise in serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels. Early detection and treatment of recurrence improves the outcome of salvage treatment. We investigated the ability of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI)-transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) fusion-guided biopsy (FGB) combined with "cognitive biopsy" to confirm local recurrence of prostate cancer after RP. In this retrospective study conducted between January 2010 and December 2014, patients with rising PSA levels after RP who had no known evidence of distant metastases underwent mpMRI including T2-weighted (T2W) imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI at 3 Tesla, and subsequent MRI-ultrasound fusion biopsy with cognitive assistance. The detection rate of locally recurrent disease was determined. A total of 10 patients (mean age = 67y, mean PSA level = 3.44ng/ml) met the inclusion criteria. Of the 10 patients, all had positive findings suspicious for local recurrence on mpMRI per entrance criterion. The most important features on mpMRI were early enhancement on DCE MR images and hypointensity on T2W images. The average lesion diameter on mpMRI was 1.12cm (range: 0.40-2.20cm). All suspicious lesions (16/16, 100%) were positive on T2W MR images, 14 (89%) showed positive features on apparent diffusion coefficient maps of diffusion-weighted images, and 16 (100%) were positive on DCE MR images. MRI-TRUS FGBs were positive in 10/16 lesions (62.5%) and 8/10 (80%) patients. MRI-TRUS FGB with cognitive assistance is able to detect and diagnose locally recurrent lesions after RP, even at low PSA levels. This may facilitate early detection of recurrent disease and improve salvage treatment outcomes. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Predictors of local recurrence in high-grade soft tissue sarcomas: hydrogen peroxide as a local adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Wooldridge, Adam N; Kolovich, Gregory P; Crist, Martha K; Mayerson, Joel L; Scharschmidt, Thomas J

    2013-02-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas have a mortality rate of 40% to 60%, with local recurrence being a poor prognostic factor for overall survival. Three-percent nondiluted hydrogen peroxide is hypothesized to be an effective local adjuvant. The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors for local recurrence in high-grade soft tissue sarcomas and to determine whether using hydrogen peroxide as a local adjuvant reduced the risks of local recurrence and surgical-site infection. Retrospective data were collected for 106 patients surgically treated for high-grade soft tissue sarcomas between 2002 and 2010. The primary endpoint was local recurrence. Eighteen (16.98%) cases of local recurrence occurred. Predictors of local recurrence were margin status, estimated blood loss, and histology (ie, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor), with hazard ratios of 4.44 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.32-14.95), 1.19 (95% CI, 1.06-1.35), and 9.21 (95% CI, 2.11-40.16), respectively. Hydrogen peroxide yielded a statistically insignificant improvement in local recurrence, with a hazard ratio of 0.81 (95% CI, 0.27-2.48) and a reduced risk of surgical site infection, with a hazard ratio of 0.52 (95% CI, 0.15-1.81). Margin status, increased blood loss, and histologic subtype are associated with increased local recurrence risk. Using hydrogen peroxide improved local control and infection rates, but the difference was not statistically significant. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Multiplatform Biomarker Discovery for Bladder Cancer Recurrence Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    De Paoli, Marine; Gogalic, Selma; Sauer, Ursula; Preininger, Claudia; Pandha, Hardev; Simpson, Guy; Horvath, Andras

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (BCa) has a high recurrence rate requiring lifelong surveillance. Urinary biomarkers are promising as simple alternatives to cystoscopy for the diagnosis of recurrent bladder cancer. However, no single marker can achieve the required accuracy. The purpose of this study was to select a multiparameter panel, comprising urinary biomarkers and clinical parameters, for BCa recurrence diagnosis. Experimental Design. Candidate biomarkers were measured in urine samples of BCa patients with recurrence and BCa patients without recurrence. A multiplatform strategy was used for marker quantification comprising a multiplexed microarray and an automated platform for ELISA analysis. A multivariate statistical analysis combined the results from both platforms with the collected clinical data. Results. The best performing combination of biomarkers and clinical parameters achieved an AUC value of 0.91, showing better performance than individual parameters. This panel comprises six biomarkers (cadherin-1, IL-8, ErbB2, IL-6, EN2, and VEGF-A) and three clinical parameters (number of past recurrences, number of BCG therapies, and stage at time of diagnosis). Conclusions. The multiparameter panel could be a useful noninvasive tool for BCa surveillance and potentially impact the clinical management of this disease. Validation of results in an independent cohort is warranted. PMID:27660385

  9. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for re-irradiation of lung cancer recurrence with lower biological effective doses.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nisha R; Lanciano, Rachelle; Sura, Karna; Yang, Jun; Lamond, John; Feng, Jing; Good, Michael; Gracely, Ed J; Komarnicky, Lydia; Brady, Luther

    Few studies have evaluated re-irradiation of lung cancer recurrences with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). This study evaluates outcomes with SBRT re-irradiation for recurrent lung cancer. Two hundred and seventy-eight patients treated with SBRT for lung cancer were retrospectively reviewed. Of those, 26 patients with 29 tumors were re-irradiated with SBRT. Ninety percent of tumors received prior external beam irradiation and 10 % received prior SBRT. Previous median radiation dose was 61.2 Gy with a median 8-month interval from previous radiation. The median re-irradiation SBRT dose was 30 Gy (48 Gy10 biological effective dose (BED)). Endpoints evaluated included local control, overall survival, and progression-free survival. Twenty-five of 29 tumors were evaluable for local control, with 27 tumors (93 %) considered in-field recurrences. In-field crude local control rate was 80 % (20/25) with 1 and 2-year actuarial rates of 78.6 and 65.5 %, respectively. One and 2-year actuarial survival rates were 52.3 and 37.0 %, respectively. One and 2-year actuarial progression-free survival rates were 56.7 and 37.0 %, respectively. Fifty-five percent of patients reported acute/chronic grades 1 and 2 toxicities. No grade 3 or higher toxicities were reported. Patients with recurrent</