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Sample records for cancer loss-of-heterozygosity region

  1. CHARACTERIZATION OF A LOSS OF HETEROZYGOSITY CANCER HAZARD IDENTIFICATION ASSAY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tumor development generally requires the loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at one or more loci. Thus, the ability to determine whether a chemical is capable of causing LOH is an important part of cancer hazard identification. The mouse lymphoma assay detects a broad spectrum of geneti...

  2. Microsatellite instability and loss of heterozygosity in gastric cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, B.G.; Pulitzer, D.R.; Moehlmann, R.D.

    1994-09-01

    In order to detect regions of DNA containing tumor suppressor genes involved in the development of gastric cancer, we evaluated loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in 78 gastric adenocarcinomas. A total of 46 microsatellite markers were employed, which detected at least one site per arm of each autosome in the human genome, including several markers linked to known tumor suppressor genes (TP53, APC, DCC, RB1, and BRCA1). We detected elevated rates of LOH at D3S1478 on chromosome 3p21 (44%, or 22 of 50 cases), at D12S78 at 12q14q24.33 (39%), and 37% at D9S157 on 9p, three sites not previously known to be affected in gastric cancer. Another locus on chromosome 12q, D12S97, showed LOH in 40% of informative cases. LOH was detected on chromosome 17p near TP53 in 66% of informative cases (23 of 35). Microsatellite instability (MI) was observed in 22% of the cancers. Tumors varied greatly in percentage of sites exhibiting MI, from 0% to 77% of sites tested. These findings expand the description of the genetic lesions occurring in gastric cancer.

  3. A map of nuclear matrix attachment regions within the breast cancer loss-of-heterozygosity region on human chromosome 16q22.1.

    PubMed

    Shaposhnikov, Sergey A; Akopov, Sergey B; Chernov, Igor P; Thomsen, Preben D; Joergensen, Claus; Collins, Andrew R; Frengen, Eirik; Nikolaev, Lev G

    2007-03-01

    There is abundant evidence that the DNA in eukaryotic cells is organized into loop domains that represent basic structural and functional units of chromatin packaging. To explore the DNA domain organization of the breast cancer loss-of-heterozygosity region on human chromosome 16q22.1, we have identified a significant portion of the scaffold/matrix attachment regions (S/MARs) within this region. Forty independent putative S/MAR elements were assigned within the 16q22.1 locus. More than 90% of these S/MARs are AT rich, with GC contents as low as 27% in 2 cases. Thirty-nine (98%) of the S/MARs are located within genes and 36 (90%) in gene introns, of which 15 are in first introns of different genes. The clear tendency of S/MARs from this region to be located within the introns suggests their regulatory role. The S/MAR resource constructed may contribute to an understanding of how the genes in the region are regulated and of how the structural architecture and functional organization of the DNA are related. PMID:17188460

  4. Loss of heterozygosity and its correlation with expression profiles in subclasses of invasive breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhigang C; Lin, Ming; Wei, Lee-Jen; Li, Cheng; Miron, Alexander; Lodeiro, Gabriella; Harris, Lyndsay; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Tanenbaum, David M; Meyerson, Matthew; Iglehart, James D; Richardson, Andrea

    2004-01-01

    Gene expression array profiles identify subclasses of breast cancers with different clinical outcomes and different molecular features. The present study attempted to correlate genomic alterations (loss of heterozygosity; LOH) with subclasses of breast cancers having distinct gene expression signatures. Hierarchical clustering of expression array data from 89 invasive breast cancers identified four major expression subclasses. Thirty-four of these cases representative of the four subclasses were microdissected and allelotyped using genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism detection arrays (Affymetrix, Inc.). LOH was determined by comparing tumor and normal single nucleotide polymorphism allelotypes. A newly developed statistical tool was used to determine the chromosomal regions of frequent LOH. We found that breast cancers were highly heterogeneous, with the proportion of LOH ranging widely from 0.3% to >60% of heterozygous markers. The most common sites of LOH were on 17p, 17q, 16q, 11q, and 14q, sites reported in previous LOH studies. Signature LOH events were discovered in certain expression subclasses. Unique regions of LOH on 5q and 4p marked a subclass of breast cancers with "basal-like" expression profiles, distinct from other subclasses. LOH on 1p and 16q occurred preferentially in a subclass of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancers. Finding unique LOH patterns in different groups of breast cancer, in part defined by expression signatures, adds confidence to newer schemes of molecular classification. Furthermore, exclusive association between biological subclasses and restricted LOH events provides rationale to search for targeted genes.

  5. Imprinted survival genes preclude loss of heterozygosity of chromosome 7 in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Boot, Arnoud; Oosting, Jan; de Miranda, Noel Fcc; Zhang, Yinghui; Corver, Willem E; van de Water, Bob; Morreau, Hans; van Wezel, Tom

    2016-09-01

    The genomes of a wide range of cancers, including colon, breast, and thyroid cancers, frequently show copy number gains of chromosome 7 and rarely show loss of heterozygosity. The molecular basis for this phenomenon is unknown. Strikingly, oncocytic follicular thyroid carcinomas can display an extreme genomic profile, with homozygosity of all chromosomes except for chromosome 7. The observation that homozygosity of chromosome 7 is never observed suggests that retention of heterozygosity is essential for cells. We hypothesized that cell survival genes are genetically imprinted on either of two copies of chromosome 7, which thwarts loss of heterozygosity at this chromosome in cancer cells. By employing a DNA methylation screen and gene expression analysis, we identified six imprinted genes that force retention of heterozygosity on chromosome 7. Subsequent knockdown of gene expression showed that CALCR, COPG2, GRB10, KLF14, MEST, and PEG10 were essential for cancer cell survival, resulting in reduced cell proliferation, G1 -phase arrest, and increased apoptosis. We propose that imprinted cell survival genes provide a genetic basis for retention of chromosome 7 heterozygosity in cancer cells. The monoallelically expressed cell survival genes identified in this study, and the cellular pathways that they are involved in, offer new therapeutic targets for the treatment of tumours showing retention of heterozygosity on chromosome 7. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27265324

  6. Loss of heterozygosity and microsatellite instability as predictive markers among Iranian esophageal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Forghanifard, Mohammad Mahdi; Vahid, Elham Emami; Dadkhah, Ezzat; Gholamin, Mehran; Noghabi, Samaneh Broumand; Ghahraman, Martha; Farzadnia, Mehdi; Abbaszadegan, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Variation in microsatellite sequences that are dispersed in the genome has been linked to a deficiency in cellular mismatch repair system and defects in several genes of this system are involved in carcinogenesis. Our aim in this study was to illustrate microsatellite DNA alteration in esophageal cancer. Materials and Methods: DNA was extracted from formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissues from surgical and matched margin-normal samples. Microsatellite instability (MSI) and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) were studied in 50 cases of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) by amplifying six microsatellite markers: D13S260 (13q12.3), D13S267 (13q12.3), D9S171 (9p21), D2S123 (2p), D5S2501 (5q21) and TP53 (17p13.1) analyzed on 6% denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Results: Statistical analysis indicated a near significant reverse correlation between grade and LOH (P= 0.068, correlation coefficient= -0.272). Specifically, increased LOH in tumor DNA has a significant correlation with increased differentiation from poorly differentiated to well differentiated tumors (P= 0.002 and P= 0.016 respectively). In addition, higher number of chromosomal loci with LOH showed a reverse correlation with lymph node metastasis (P= 0.026, correlation coefficient= -0.485). Furthermore, there was a positive correlation between addiction and MSI (P= 0.026, correlation coefficient= 0.465). Conclusion: Microsatellite DNA alterations may be a prognostic tool for detection and the evolution of prognosis in patients with SCC of esophagus. It can be concluded that regional lymph node metastasis would be less likely with increased heterozygote loci and addiction with any of opium, cigarette, water pipe or alcohol can be a susceptibility factor(s) for MSI. PMID:27635196

  7. Loss of heterozygosity and microsatellite instability as predictive markers among Iranian esophageal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Forghanifard, Mohammad Mahdi; Vahid, Elham Emami; Dadkhah, Ezzat; Gholamin, Mehran; Noghabi, Samaneh Broumand; Ghahraman, Martha; Farzadnia, Mehdi; Abbaszadegan, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Variation in microsatellite sequences that are dispersed in the genome has been linked to a deficiency in cellular mismatch repair system and defects in several genes of this system are involved in carcinogenesis. Our aim in this study was to illustrate microsatellite DNA alteration in esophageal cancer. Materials and Methods: DNA was extracted from formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissues from surgical and matched margin-normal samples. Microsatellite instability (MSI) and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) were studied in 50 cases of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) by amplifying six microsatellite markers: D13S260 (13q12.3), D13S267 (13q12.3), D9S171 (9p21), D2S123 (2p), D5S2501 (5q21) and TP53 (17p13.1) analyzed on 6% denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Results: Statistical analysis indicated a near significant reverse correlation between grade and LOH (P= 0.068, correlation coefficient= -0.272). Specifically, increased LOH in tumor DNA has a significant correlation with increased differentiation from poorly differentiated to well differentiated tumors (P= 0.002 and P= 0.016 respectively). In addition, higher number of chromosomal loci with LOH showed a reverse correlation with lymph node metastasis (P= 0.026, correlation coefficient= -0.485). Furthermore, there was a positive correlation between addiction and MSI (P= 0.026, correlation coefficient= 0.465). Conclusion: Microsatellite DNA alterations may be a prognostic tool for detection and the evolution of prognosis in patients with SCC of esophagus. It can be concluded that regional lymph node metastasis would be less likely with increased heterozygote loci and addiction with any of opium, cigarette, water pipe or alcohol can be a susceptibility factor(s) for MSI.

  8. Loss of heterozygosity and PCR artifacts in a microsatellite analysis of psoriasis and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Jeong Sun; Jo, Bo-Kyong; Park, Chul Jong; Yi, Jong Yuk; Lee, Jun Young; Rhyu, Mun-Gan

    2002-01-01

    Although a loss of heterozygosity (LOH) is commonly observed using microsatellite markers in a cell-proliferating malignant disorder, controversial findings of psoriasis, a keratinocyte-outgrowth disease, remain to be explained. It was hypothesized that unstable natures of the microsatellite markers for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) might give a rise to either a false-positive or -negative LOH. Twenty-one frozen skin tissues and 33 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded archives were obtained from patients with psoriatic plaques and colorectal cancers, respectively. In the frozen psoriatic skin, two of the 17 microsatellite markers selected from 11 chromosomal arms were associated with artifact LOHs that were not reproduced in repeated PCRs. The remaining 15 stable microsatellite markers with few PCR artifacts demonstrated a borderline-level LOH in cases with an ambiguous heterozygosity such as a juxtaposed allelic band. Infrequent LOHs (3 out of 242 heterozygous markers, 1.2%) were detected in psoriatic cases with two separate alleles. In colorectal cancers, a set of the 15 stable microsatellite markers identified a minimal borderline-level LOH at the cut-off point that was same with that of psoriasis. These results indicate that the selection of reproducible microsatellite sequences and the cautious criteria for informative heterozygosity are required to obtain the reliable LOH results from variable genomic DNAs, and that psoriatic lesions harbor few LOH. PMID:12378016

  9. Lysyl oxidase is a tumor suppressor gene inactivated by methylation and loss of heterozygosity in human gastric cancers.

    PubMed

    Kaneda, Atsushi; Wakazono, Kuniko; Tsukamoto, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Naoko; Yagi, Yukiko; Tatematsu, Masae; Kaminishi, Michio; Sugimura, Takashi; Ushijima, Toshikazu

    2004-09-15

    Lysyl oxidase (LOX) and HRAS-like suppressor (HRASLS) are silenced in human gastric cancers and are reported to have growth-suppressive activities in ras-transformed mouse/rat fibroblasts. Here, we analyzed whether or not LOX and HRASLS are tumor suppressor genes in human gastric cancers. Loss of heterozygosity and promoter methylation of LOX were detected in 33% (9 of 27) and 27% (26 of 96) of gastric cancers, respectively. Biallelic methylation and loss of heterozygosity with promoter methylation were also demonstrated in gastric cancers. Silencing of LOX was also observed in colon, lung, and ovarian cancer cell lines. As for mutations, only one possible somatic mutation was found by analysis of 96 gastric cancer samples and 58 gastric and other cancer cell lines. When LOX was introduced into a gastric cancer cell line, MKN28, in which LOX and HRASLS were silenced, it reduced the number of anchorage-dependent colonies to 57 to 61%, and the number of anchorage-independent colonies to 11 to 23%. Sizes of tumors formed in nude mice were reduced to 19 to 26%. Growth suppression in soft agar assay was also observed in another gastric cancer cell line, KATOIII. On the other hand, neither loss of heterozygosity nor a somatic mutation was detected in HRASLS, and its introduction into MKN28 did not suppress the growth in vitro or in vivo. These data showed that LOX is a tumor suppressor gene inactivated by methylation and loss of heterozygosity in gastric cancers, and possibly also in other cancers. PMID:15374948

  10. The Adaptive Response in p53 Cancer Prone Mice: Loss of heterozygosity and Genomic Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Josee, Lavoie; Dolling, Jo-Anna; Mitchel, Ron E.J.; Boreham, Douglas R.

    2004-09-28

    mice, only numerical aberrations were observed in 5 to 20% of the cells. There seem to be an age related increase in numerical aberrations as mice grow old. The results indicate that the presence of a defective copy of the Trp53 gene does not seem to affect spontaneous chromosomal instability or in response to chronic low dose exposure to g-radiation. In previous studies it was speculated that low dose and low dose rate in vivo exposure to g-radiation induces an adaptive response, which reduces the risk of cancer death generated by subsequent DNA damage from either spontaneous or radiation induced events due to enhanced recombinational repair. Induced recombination could result from reversion to homozygosity at Trp53 gene locus (Trp53 +/- to +/+) or loss of heterozygosity in unexposed mice (Trp53 +/- to -/-). This hypothesis was investigated using the quantitative real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction (QRT-PCR) quantification method and the novel Rolling Circle Amplification technique (RCA). For these purposes, spleenocytes and bone marrow cells from all the mice were isolated for cell fixation and DNA extraction. The defective Trp53 allele is generated by integration of a portion of the cloning vector pKONEO DNA into the coding sequence. Therefore, the genotypic changes are monitored based on the detection of the NEO allele and the normal Trp53 allele in the cells. To evaluate loss of heterozygosity at the Trp53 gene locus in a cell, detection of the NEO allele and the normal Trp53 allele using the dual color RCA was utilized. In our hands, this protocol did not give the required sensitivity. The gene signal enumeration was inconsistent and not reproducible. The protocol was modified and could not be optimized. Therefore, the QRT-PCR method was selected to evaluate the loss of heterozygosity with greater sensitivity and efficiency. A set of 4 primers was designed to target the NEO allele and the normal Trp53 allele in a PCR experiment using the LightCycler instrument

  11. Loss of heterozygosity at E-cadherin and other loci on chromosome 16 in ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Han, H.; Chen, S.S.; Yang-Feng, T.L.

    1994-09-01

    Our study of genome-wide screening and mapping of genetic aberrations by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) revealed that the copy number of DNA sequences on chromosome 16q was reduced in a significant number of ovarian tumors. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) on 16q has only been reported in ovarian tumors from the Japanese population; this arm has not been thoroughly studied in most LOH analyses of ovarian cancers. We have investigated LOH status at four chromosome 16q loci in 74 common epithelial ovarian tumors (benign and borderline 16, grade I 5, GII 6 and GIII 47). LOH frequencies of .27 (9/33), .19 (10/54), .23 (8/35) and .24 (10/42) were found at HP, D16S408, D16S421 and E-cadherin (E-cad) loci, respectively. Considering overall LOH on chromosome 16q, 26 out of 62 cases (41.9%) heterozygous for one or more loci showed LOH at a minimum of one locus. Our results are consistent with the observation made by CGH and also imply that most LOH in 16q is associated with physical deletion of at least a portion of 16q. E-cad is an intercellular adhesion molecule of epithelial tissues, and reduced E-cad expression is associated with invasiveness of several cancers (breast, bladder, lung, etc.). Thus E-cad may function as a tumor suppressor gene. In addition, the cell matrix adhesion regulator gene (CMAR), which is located distal to E-cad, may be a second candidate. This possibility is currently being investigated by additional LOH analysis. Southern analysis of DNA from tumors with LOH using a full-length E-cad cDNA probe detected only Pvull and MspI polymorphisms but no gross alterations in the remaining alleles. Further studies by SSCP, which explore the possible inactivating mutations in the remaining E-cad alleles, are in progress.

  12. Loss of heterozygosity analysis of microsatellites on multiple chromosome regions in dysplasia and squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus

    PubMed Central

    LIU, MING; ZHANG, FENG; LIU, SHEN; ZHAO, WEN; ZHU, JING; ZHANG, XIAOLI

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the molecular events in the carcinogenesis of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and to identify biomarkers for early detection of the disease. Matched precancerous and cancerous tissues resected from 34 esophageal cancer patients from Chongqing, southern China, were compared to evaluate the extent of loss of heterozygosity (LOH). Sixteen microsatellite markers on chromosome regions 3p, 4p, 5q, 8p, 9p, 9q, 11p, 13q and 17p were used for PCR-based LOH analysis. The overall frequency of LOH at the 16 microsatellite loci was significantly increased as the pathological status of the resection specimens changed from low-grade dysplasia (LGD) to high-grade dysplasia (HGD) and SCC (P<0.001). A total of 8 markers showed LOH in the LGD samples. In addition, heterozygosity was regained at 4 loci in the SCC samples of 4 patients, respectively, in comparison to the results for these loci in the HGD samples. The overall rate of LOH increased significantly with the deterioration of the lesions, indicating that tumorigenesis of the esophageal squamous epithelia is a progressive process involving accumulative changes in LOH. The 8 loci showing allelic loss in the LGD samples may be involved in the early-stage tumorigenesis of ESCC, and LOH analysis at these loci may help improve the early detection of this disease. Regain of heterozygosity found in certain patients suggests the possibility of genetic heterogeneity in the tumori-genesis of esophageal cancer. PMID:22977611

  13. High incidence of microsatellite instability and loss of heterozygosity in three loci in breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to evaluate potential chemotherapy-induced microsatellite instability, loss of heterozygosity, loss of expression in mismatch repair proteins and associations with clinical findings in breast cancer patients, especially resistance to chemotherapy and/or development of other tumors in the four years following chemotherapy treatment. Methods A comprehensive study of chemotherapy-related effects with a follow-up period of 48 months post treatment was conducted. A total of 369 peripheral blood samples were collected from 123 de novo breast cancer patients. Microsatellite instability and loss of heterozygosity in five commonly used marker loci (including Tp53-Alu of the tumor suppressor gene TP53) were analyzed in blood samples. Sampling was conducted on three occasions; 4–5 weeks prior to the first chemotherapy session (pre-treatment), to serve as a baseline, followed by two consecutive draws at 12 weeks intervals from the first collection. Mismatch repair protein expression was evaluated in cancer tissues using immunohistochemistry for three mismatch-repair related proteins. Results A total of 70.7% of the patients showed microsatellite instability for at least one locus, including 18.6% marked as high-positive and 52.1% as low-positive; 35.8% showed loss of heterozygosity in addition to microsatellite instability, while 29.3% exhibited microsatellite stability. The following incidence rates for microsatellite instability and loss of heterozygosity were detected: 39.1% positive for Tp53-Alu, 31.1% for locus Mfd41, and 25.3% for locus Mfd28. A higher occurrence of loss of heterozygosity was noted with alleles 399 and 404 of Tp53-Alu. The mismatch repair protein expression analysis showed that the chemotherapy caused a loss of 29.3% in hMLH1 expression, and 18.7% and 25.2% loss in hMSH2 and P53 expression, respectively. A strong correlation between low or deficient hMSH2 protein expression and occurrence of mismatch repair/loss

  14. Loss of heterozygosity for defined regions on chromosomes 3, 11 and 17 in carcinomas of the uterine cervix.

    PubMed Central

    Kersemaekers, A. M.; Hermans, J.; Fleuren, G. J.; van de Vijver, M. J.

    1998-01-01

    Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) frequently occurs in squamous cell carcinomas of the uterine cervix and indicates the probable sites of tumour-suppressor genes that play a role in the development of this tumour. To define the localization of these tumour-suppressor genes, we studied loss of heterozygosity in 64 invasive cervical carcinomas (stage IB and IIA) using the polymerase chain reaction with 24 primers for polymorphic repeats of known chromosomal localization. Chromosomes 3, 11, 13, 16 and 17, in particular, were studied. LOH was frequently found on chromosome 11, in particular at 11q22 (46%) and 11q23.3 (43%). LOH on chromosome 11p was not frequent. On chromosome 17p13.3, a marker (D17S513) distal to p53 showed 38% LOH, whereas p53 itself showed only 20% LOH. On the short arm of chromosome 3, LOH was frequently found (41%) at 3p21.1. The beta-catenin gene is located in this chromosomal region. Therefore, expression of beta-catenin protein was studied in 39 cases using immunohistochemistry. Staining of beta-catenin at the plasma membrane of tumour cells was present in 38 cases and completely absent in only one case. The tumour-suppressor gene on chromosome 3p21.1 may be beta-catenin in this one case, but (an)other tumour-suppressor gene(s) must also be present in this region. For the other chromosomes studied, 13q (BRCA-2) and 16q (E-cadherin), only sporadic losses (< 15% of cases) were found. Expression of E-cadherin was found in all of 37 cases but in six cases the staining was very weak. No correlation was found between clinical and histological parameters and losses on chromosome 3p, 11q and 17p. In addition to LOH, microsatellite instability was found in one tumour for almost all loci and in eight tumours for one to three loci. In conclusion, we have identified three loci with frequent LOH, which may harbour new tumour-suppressor genes, and found microsatellite instability in 14% of cervical carcinomas. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9460988

  15. Clonal dynamics following p53 loss of heterozygosity in Kras-driven cancers.

    PubMed

    Muzumdar, Mandar Deepak; Dorans, Kimberly Judith; Chung, Katherine Minjee; Robbins, Rebecca; Tammela, Tuomas; Gocheva, Vasilena; Li, Carman Man-Chung; Jacks, Tyler

    2016-01-01

    Although it has become increasingly clear that cancers display extensive cellular heterogeneity, the spatial growth dynamics of genetically distinct clones within developing solid tumours remain poorly understood. Here we leverage mosaic analysis with double markers (MADM) to trace subclonal populations retaining or lacking p53 within oncogenic Kras-initiated lung and pancreatic tumours. In both models, p53 constrains progression to advanced adenocarcinomas. Comparison of lineage-related p53 knockout and wild-type clones reveals a minor role of p53 in suppressing cell expansion in lung adenomas. In contrast, p53 loss promotes both the initiation and expansion of low-grade pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanINs), likely through differential expression of the p53 regulator p19ARF. Strikingly, lineage-related cells are often dispersed in lung adenomas and PanINs, contrasting with more contiguous growth of advanced subclones. Together, these results support cancer type-specific suppressive roles of p53 in early tumour progression and offer insights into clonal growth patterns during tumour development. PMID:27585860

  16. Clonal dynamics following p53 loss of heterozygosity in Kras-driven cancers

    PubMed Central

    Muzumdar, Mandar Deepak; Dorans, Kimberly Judith; Chung, Katherine Minjee; Robbins, Rebecca; Tammela, Tuomas; Gocheva, Vasilena; Li, Carman Man-Chung; Jacks, Tyler

    2016-01-01

    Although it has become increasingly clear that cancers display extensive cellular heterogeneity, the spatial growth dynamics of genetically distinct clones within developing solid tumours remain poorly understood. Here we leverage mosaic analysis with double markers (MADM) to trace subclonal populations retaining or lacking p53 within oncogenic Kras-initiated lung and pancreatic tumours. In both models, p53 constrains progression to advanced adenocarcinomas. Comparison of lineage-related p53 knockout and wild-type clones reveals a minor role of p53 in suppressing cell expansion in lung adenomas. In contrast, p53 loss promotes both the initiation and expansion of low-grade pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanINs), likely through differential expression of the p53 regulator p19ARF. Strikingly, lineage-related cells are often dispersed in lung adenomas and PanINs, contrasting with more contiguous growth of advanced subclones. Together, these results support cancer type-specific suppressive roles of p53 in early tumour progression and offer insights into clonal growth patterns during tumour development. PMID:27585860

  17. Loss of heterozygosity of chromosome 13q33-34 region and molecular analysis of ING1 and p53 genes in bladder carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Igci, Mehri; Arslan, Ahmet; Erturhan, Sakip; Igci, Yusuf Ziya; Pala, Elif; Gogebakan, Bulent; Karakok, Metin; Cakmak, Ecir Ali; Cengiz, Beyhan

    2015-02-01

    Cancer is a consequence of accumulation of genetic and epigenetic alterations in the cell which can lead to activation of oncogenes or inactivation of tumor suppressor genes (TSG). Since members of ING family were discovered as TSGs in different cancer types, it was aimed to analyze the chromosome 13q33-34 region, ING1 and p53 genes in bladder cancer. 30 paired normal and tumor tissues were investigated in terms of microdeletion of chromosome 13q33-34 region, ING1 expression and mutation status of ING1 and p53 genes. Because there is no data available about the transcription factors which bind to ING1 promoter, the promoter sequence was analyzed via Genomatix-MatInspector and TFSEARCH softwares. Used DS markers were D13S285, D13S1315, D13S796, D13S278, D13S158, and D13S779 where loss of heterozygosity (LOH) results were as 23.3, 20, 6.7, 3.3, 6.7, and 0 %, respectively. The highest LOH scores were obtained with markers D13S285 and D13S1315 which are flanking the ING1. Seven of 30 cases showed alteration in expression (p > 0.05). However, no mutation was detected in the exons of ING1. One patient showed a two-nucleotide deletion in p53 gene. However no significant TSG activity of ING1 was observed while higher activity was reported in different cancer types. As for the LOH data 13q33-34 region may contain different candidate TSGs like COL4A1, COL4A2 and SOX1. As a result of computational promoter analysis, some factors like ABL, E2F, HIF1, SOX, P53, BPTF, NRSF, c-Rel and c-ETS were associated with the promoter region. Molecular analysis of ING1 promoter warrants further analysis.

  18. Mutations of the KIT gene and loss of heterozygosity of the PTEN region in a primary malignant melanoma arising from a mature cystic teratoma of the ovary.

    PubMed

    Tate, Genshu; Tajiri, Takuma; Suzuki, Takao; Mitsuya, Toshiyuki

    2009-04-01

    A tumor suppressor gene at 10q23.3, designated PTEN, encoding a dual-specificity phosphatase with lipid and protein phosphatase activity, has been shown to play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of a variety of human cancers. A frequent loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at 10q is found in melanoma; however, little is known about the role of PTEN in the pathogenesis of a primary malignant melanoma derived from ovarian mature cystic teratoma, which is an extremely rare melanoma. This study examined the genetic alterations involved in the mitogen-activated protein kinase and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase pathways in an ovarian malignant melanoma. A LOH analysis revealed hemizygous deletion around and in the PTEN gene not only in the ovarian melanoma but also in a mature cystic teratoma. Another case of ovarian mature cystic teratomas in the absence of melanoma also showed allelic loss of the PTEN region. To date, mutations of BRAF, NRAS, and KIT genes have been reported in malignant melanomas. In the present study, D816H and K558E mutations of the KIT gene were revealed in the melanoma arising from a mature cystic teratoma, but not in a mature cystic teratoma. No mutations of the BRAF and NRAS genes were found in the melanoma. These results indicate that LOH of the PTEN region is one of the molecular alterations of an ovarian mature cystic teratoma and a KIT mutation is an additional promotional event associated with the oncogenesis of a melanoma arising from an ovarian mature cystic teratoma.

  19. Loss of heterozygosity on chromosome 16 in sporadic Wilms' tumour.

    PubMed Central

    Grundy, R. G.; Pritchard, J.; Scambler, P.; Cowell, J. K.

    1998-01-01

    To establish whether loss of heterozygosity (LOH) for chromosome 16q in Wilms' tumours confers an adverse prognosis, DNA from 40 Wilms' tumour/normal pairs were analysed using highly polymorphic microsatellite markers along the length of 16q. Fifteen per cent of tumours showed LOH for 16q. Although the common region of allele loss spanned the 16q24-qter region, a second distinct region of LOH was identified in 16q21. Five out of six tumours showing LOH were either (1) high stage or (2) low stage with unfavourable histology. In addition, there was a higher mortality rate in patients showing LOH for 16q than those that did not. These data strongly support the suggestion that LOH for 16q is associated with an adverse prognosis. Images Figure 1 PMID:9820177

  20. Loss of heterozygosity in the chromosomal region 12p12-13 is very common in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and permits the precise localization of a tumor-suppressor gene distinct from p27KIP1.

    PubMed

    Cavé, H; Gérard, B; Martin, E; Guidal, C; Devaux, I; Weissenbach, J; Elion, J; Vilmer, E; Grandchamp, B

    1995-11-15

    Abnormalities of the short arm of chromosome 12 are relatively common in hematologic malignancies and deletions of the region. 12p12-13 are found in approximately 5% of the patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). As a potent inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases, p27KIP1 prevents the progression of the cell cycle and the gene encoding p27KIP1 represents a potential tumor-suppressor gene. Its recent assignment to the chromosomal region (12p12.3) prompted us to study the p27KIP1 gene in a series of 61 children with ALL. Microsatellite polymorphic markers flanking the p27KIP1 gene were analyzed to detect losses of heterozygosity (LOH). Eleven patients displayed LOH for at least one of the markers. The deleted are encompassed the p27KIP1 gene locus in 10 cases, but inactivation of the remaining allele by deletion, translocation, or mutation was never observed. In addition, in 1 patient, the p27KIP1 gene was situated outside of the region of LOH. Thus, p27KIP1 does not seem to be the target gene of 12p12-13 alterations. However, this study indicates that 12p12-13 alterations at the molecular level, which are present in about 27% of the children with B-lineage ALL, are much more common than had previously been reported by usual chromosome analysis. Moreover, LOH mapping allowed us to better define the location of a putative tumor-suppressor gene implicated in these malignancies and should therefore help in identifying this gene.

  1. Very CIN-ful: whole chromosome instability promotes tumor suppressor loss of heterozygosity.

    PubMed

    Sotillo, Rocio; Schvartzman, Juan-Manuel; Benezra, Robert

    2009-12-01

    Mechanisms by which whole chromosome instability lead to tumorigenesis have eluded the cancer research field. In this issue of Cancer Cell, Baker et al. show that CIN induced by a defective mitotic checkpoint, under certain genetic and tissue contexts, leads to accelerated loss of heterozygosity of a tumor suppressor gene.

  2. Losses of heterozygosity in oral and oropharyngeal epithelial carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Grati, F R; Sirchia, S M; Garagiola, I; Sironi, E; Galioto, S; Rossella, F; Serafini, P; Dulcetti, F; Bozzetti, A; Brusati, R; Simoni, G

    2000-04-01

    We analyzed 25 oral and oropharyngeal epithelial carcinomas for loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and microsatellite instability by using 55 oligonucleotide repeat markers located in 45 chromosomal regions. The aim was to identify which chromosomal regions and tumor-suppressor genes (TSGs) are preferentially lost in these tumors and to relate LOH at specific loci to clinicopathologic data. The analysis was performed on tumor tissue and on a corresponding normal tissue (blood lymphocytes) with the use of the polymerase chain reaction technique followed by microsatellite allele separation with denaturing gel electrophoresis. Thirty-two of 45 chromosomal regions demonstrated a significant (>/=20%) incidence of LOH. An allelic loss of >/=50% was found in 9p21 (77.8%), 8p22-23 (70%), 3p12 (61.5%), 1p36.1 and 12q22 (60%), 3q28 (57.1%), 5q23.3 (54.5%), 3p25-26, 3p24, and 7q35 (50%). We did not find any microsatellite instability. Our results suggest that in addition to a group of TSGs, pleiotropic for several tumor types, other suppressor genes are specifically involved in oral and oropharyngeal carcinogenesis.

  3. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in familial tumors of BRCA1 kindreds

    SciTech Connect

    Neuhausen, S.L.; Marshall, C.J.; Goldgar, D.E.

    1994-09-01

    In this study, we examined two families previously linked to BRCA1. Identification of recombinants in kindreds K2082 and K2035 had narrowed the region to between D17S776 and D17S1184, respectively. Further delineation of the region may be accomplished by examining loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in familial tumors. Five ovarian and six breast tumors from kindred K2082 (including two from sporadic breast cases) and three breast tumors from kindred K2035 were tested for LOH using six BRCA1-linked polymorphic STR markers and one marker at TP53. The two tumors from K2082 which did not share the linked haplotype did not show LOH in the BRCA1 region, nor did one of the tumors from a 17q-linked breast cancer case. Four ovarian and three breast tumors showed complete loss for the BRCA1 region. One ovarian and three breast tumors showed LOH only within the BRCA1 region. In all instances where LOH in the BRCA1 region was observed, the wild type allele was lost. These results therefore confirm the observation of Smith et al. (1992), and provide additional evidence that BRCA1 is a tumor suppressor gene. One of the breast tumors which showed loss within the BRCA1 region allowed us to narrow the region further.

  4. Loss of heterozygosity at chromosome 1p in different solid human tumours: association with survival

    PubMed Central

    Ragnarsson, G; Eiriksdottir, G; Johannsdottir, J Th; Jonasson, J G; Egilsson, V; Ingvarsson, S

    1999-01-01

    The distal half of chromosome 1p was analysed with 15 polymorphic microsatellite markers in 683 human solid tumours at different locations. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) was observed at least at one site in 369 cases or 54% of the tumours. LOHs detected ranged from 30–64%, depending on tumour location. The major results regarding LOH at different tumour locations were as follows: stomach, 20/38 (53%); colon and rectum, 60/109 (55%); lung, 38/63 (60%); breast, 145/238 (61%); endometrium, 18/25 (72%); ovary, 17/31 (55%); testis, 11/30 (37%); kidney, 22/73 (30%); thyroid, 4/14 (29%); and sarcomas, 9/14 (64%). High percentages of LOH were seen in the 1p36.3, 1p36.1, 1p35–p34.3, 1p32 and 1p31 regions, suggesting the presence of tumour-suppressor genes. All these regions on chromosome 1p show high LOH in more than one tumour type. However, distinct patterns of LOH were detected at different tumour locations. There was a significant separation of survival curves, with and without LOH at chromosome 1p, in the breast cancer patients. Multivariate analysis showed that LOH at 1p in breast tumours is a better indicator for prognosis than the other variables tested in our model, including nodal metastasis. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10188892

  5. Loss of heterozygosity in human ductal breast tumors indicates a recessive mutation on chromosome 13

    SciTech Connect

    Lundberg, C.; Skoog, L.; Cavenee, W.K.; Nordenskjoeld, M.

    1987-04-01

    The genotypes at chromosomal loci defined by recombinant DNA probes revealing restriction fragment length polymorphisms were determined in constitutional and tumor tissue from 10 cases of ductal breast cancer: eight premenopausal females and two males. Somatic loss of constitutional heterozygosity was observed at loci on chromosome 13 in primary tumor tissue from three females and one male. In two cases, specific loss of heterozygosity at three distinct genetic loci along the length of the chromosome was observed. In another case, concurrent loss of alleles at loci on chromosomes 2, 13, 14, and 20 was detected, whereas a fourth case showed loss of heterozygosity for chromosomes 5 and 13. In each instance, the data were consistent with loss of one of the homologous chromosomes by mitotic nondisjunction. Analysis of loci on several other chromosomes showed retention of constitutional heterozygosity suggesting the relative specificity of the events. In contrast, similar analyses of other breast cancers, including comedocarcinoma, medullary carcinoma, and juvenile secretory carcinoma, showed no loss of alleles at loci on chromosome 13. These data indicate that the pathogenesis of ductal breast cancer may, in a substantial proportion of cases, involve unmasking of a recessive locus on chromosome 13 and suggest the involvement of such a locus in heritable forms of this disease.

  6. SNP array analysis reveals novel genomic abnormalities including copy neutral loss of heterozygosity in anaplastic oligodendrogliomas.

    PubMed

    Idbaih, Ahmed; Ducray, François; Dehais, Caroline; Courdy, Célia; Carpentier, Catherine; de Bernard, Simon; Uro-Coste, Emmanuelle; Mokhtari, Karima; Jouvet, Anne; Honnorat, Jérôme; Chinot, Olivier; Ramirez, Carole; Beauchesne, Patrick; Benouaich-Amiel, Alexandra; Godard, Joël; Eimer, Sandrine; Parker, Fabrice; Lechapt-Zalcman, Emmanuelle; Colin, Philippe; Loussouarn, Delphine; Faillot, Thierry; Dam-Hieu, Phong; Elouadhani-Hamdi, Selma; Bauchet, Luc; Langlois, Olivier; Le Guerinel, Caroline; Fontaine, Denys; Vauleon, Elodie; Menei, Philippe; Fotso, Marie Janette Motsuo; Desenclos, Christine; Verrelle, Pierre; Verelle, Pierre; Ghiringhelli, François; Noel, Georges; Labrousse, François; Carpentier, Antoine; Dhermain, Frédéric; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Figarella-Branger, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    Anaplastic oligodendrogliomas (AOD) are rare glial tumors in adults with relative homogeneous clinical, radiological and histological features at the time of diagnosis but dramatically various clinical courses. Studies have identified several molecular abnormalities with clinical or biological relevance to AOD (e.g. t(1;19)(q10;p10), IDH1, IDH2, CIC and FUBP1 mutations).To better characterize the clinical and biological behavior of this tumor type, the creation of a national multicentric network, named "Prise en charge des OLigodendrogliomes Anaplasiques (POLA)," has been supported by the Institut National du Cancer (InCA). Newly diagnosed and centrally validated AOD patients and their related biological material (tumor and blood samples) were prospectively included in the POLA clinical database and tissue bank, respectively.At the molecular level, we have conducted a high-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism array analysis, which included 83 patients. Despite a careful central pathological review, AOD have been found to exhibit heterogeneous genomic features. A total of 82% of the tumors exhibited a 1p/19q-co-deletion, while 18% harbor a distinct chromosome pattern. Novel focal abnormalities, including homozygously deleted, amplified and disrupted regions, have been identified. Recurring copy neutral losses of heterozygosity (CNLOH) inducing the modulation of gene expression have also been discovered. CNLOH in the CDKN2A locus was associated with protein silencing in 1/3 of the cases. In addition, FUBP1 homozygous deletion was detected in one case suggesting a putative tumor suppressor role of FUBP1 in AOD.Our study showed that the genomic and pathological analyses of AOD are synergistic in detecting relevant clinical and biological subgroups of AOD. PMID:23071531

  7. SNP Array Analysis Reveals Novel Genomic Abnormalities Including Copy Neutral Loss of Heterozygosity in Anaplastic Oligodendrogliomas

    PubMed Central

    Idbaih, Ahmed; Ducray, François; Dehais, Caroline; Courdy, Célia; Carpentier, Catherine; de Bernard, Simon; Uro-Coste, Emmanuelle; Mokhtari, Karima; Jouvet, Anne; Honnorat, Jérôme; Chinot, Olivier; Ramirez, Carole; Beauchesne, Patrick; Benouaich-Amiel, Alexandra; Godard, Joël; Eimer, Sandrine; Parker, Fabrice; Lechapt-Zalcman, Emmanuelle; Colin, Philippe; Loussouarn, Delphine; Faillot, Thierry; Dam-Hieu, Phong; Elouadhani-Hamdi, Selma; Bauchet, Luc; Langlois, Olivier; Le Guerinel, Caroline; Fontaine, Denys; Vauleon, Elodie; Menei, Philippe; Fotso, Marie Janette Motsuo; Desenclos, Christine; Verelle, Pierre; Ghiringhelli, François; Noel, Georges; Labrousse, François; Carpentier, Antoine; Dhermain, Frédéric; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Figarella-Branger, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    Anaplastic oligodendrogliomas (AOD) are rare glial tumors in adults with relative homogeneous clinical, radiological and histological features at the time of diagnosis but dramatically various clinical courses. Studies have identified several molecular abnormalities with clinical or biological relevance to AOD (e.g. t(1;19)(q10;p10), IDH1, IDH2, CIC and FUBP1 mutations). To better characterize the clinical and biological behavior of this tumor type, the creation of a national multicentric network, named “Prise en charge des OLigodendrogliomes Anaplasiques (POLA),” has been supported by the Institut National du Cancer (InCA). Newly diagnosed and centrally validated AOD patients and their related biological material (tumor and blood samples) were prospectively included in the POLA clinical database and tissue bank, respectively. At the molecular level, we have conducted a high-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism array analysis, which included 83 patients. Despite a careful central pathological review, AOD have been found to exhibit heterogeneous genomic features. A total of 82% of the tumors exhibited a 1p/19q-co-deletion, while 18% harbor a distinct chromosome pattern. Novel focal abnormalities, including homozygously deleted, amplified and disrupted regions, have been identified. Recurring copy neutral losses of heterozygosity (CNLOH) inducing the modulation of gene expression have also been discovered. CNLOH in the CDKN2A locus was associated with protein silencing in 1/3 of the cases. In addition, FUBP1 homozygous deletion was detected in one case suggesting a putative tumor suppressor role of FUBP1 in AOD. Our study showed that the genomic and pathological analyses of AOD are synergistic in detecting relevant clinical and biological subgroups of AOD. PMID:23071531

  8. Genetic background influences loss of heterozygosity patterns in radiation-induced mouse thymic lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Hang, Michael; Huang, Yurong; Snijders, Antoine M.; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have revealed that p53 heterozygous (p53+/−) mice are extremely susceptible to radiation-induced tumorigenesis. To investigate whether genetic background influences radiation induced tumor susceptibility, we crossed p53+/− 129/Sv mice with genetically diverse strains to generate p53+/− F1 hybrids. The results showed that genetic background had a profound impact on tumor latency after exposure to gamma radiation, while the tumor spectrum did not change. We further characterized the thymic lymphomas that arose in the p53+/− mice by genome-wide loss of heterozygosity (LOH) analyses and found that genetic background strongly influenced the frequency of LOH and the loss of which parental allele on different chromosomes. Further research is needed to identify which genetic variations control the LOH patterns in radiation-induced thymic lymphomas and to evaluate its relevance to human cancers. PMID:25932465

  9. Overlapping loss of heterozygosity by mitotic recombination on mouse chromosome 7F1-ter in skin carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, A B; Navone, N M; Aldaz, C M; Conti, C J

    1991-01-01

    A significant role for mouse chromosome 7 abnormalities during chemically induced skin carcinogenesis has been advanced based on previous cytogenetic and molecular studies. To determine the frequency of allelic losses at different loci of chromosome 7 in skin tumors induced in the outbred SENCAR mouse stock by a two-stage initiation-promotion protocol, we compared the constitutional and tumor genotypes of premalignant papillomas and squamous cell carcinomas for loss of heterozygosity at different informative loci. In a previous study, these tumors had been analyzed for their allelic composition at the Harvey ras-1 (Ha-ras-1) locus and it was found that 39% of squamous cell carcinomas had lost the normal Ha-ras-1 allele exhibiting 3 or 2 copies of the mutated counterpart or gene amplification. In the present study, by combining Southern blot and polymerase chain reaction fragment length polymorphism analyses, we detected complete loss of heterozygosity at the beta-globin (Hbb) locus, distal to Ha-ras-1, in 15 of 20 (75%) skin carcinomas. In addition, 5 of 5 informative cases attained homozygosity at the int-2 locus, 27 centimorgans distal to Hbb. Polymerase chain reaction analysis of DNA extracted from papillomas devoid of stromal contamination by fluorescence-activated sorting of single cell dispersions immunolabeled with anti-keratin 13 antibody revealed loss of heterozygosity at the Hbb locus, demonstrating that this event occurs during premalignant stages of tumor development. Interestingly, loss of heterozygosity was only detected in late-stage lesions exhibiting a high degree of dysplasia and areas of microinvasion. Analysis of allelic ratios by densitometric scanning of tumors that had become homozygous at Hbb but retained heterozygosis at Ha-ras-1 indicated mitotic recombination as the mechanism underlying loss of heterozygosity on mouse chromosome 7 during chemically induced skin carcinogenesis. These findings are consistent with the presence of a putative

  10. Loss of heterozygosity and mutational analyses of the ACTRII gene locus in human colorectal tumors.

    PubMed

    Olaru, Andreea; Mori, Yuriko; Yin, Jing; Wang, Suna; Kimos, Martha C; Perry, Kellie; Xu, Yan; Sato, Fumiaki; Selaru, Florin M; Deacu, Elena; Sterian, Anca; Shibata, David; Abraham, John M; Meltzer, Stephen J

    2003-12-01

    The activin type II receptorgene (ACTRII) is mutated in 58.1% of microsatellite-unstable (MSI-H) colorectal cancers and is a close relative of the TGFbeta-1 type II receptor, which is known to be involved in both MSI-H and non-MSI-H colorectal carcinogenesis. We therefore sought to determine whether ACTRII was involved in non-MSI-H colorectal cancers. We evaluated ACTRII inactivation by allelic deletion, loss of mRNA expression, or somatic mutation in 51 non-MSI-H colon cancers. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at the ACTRII locus (2q23.1) was found in 9 (17.6%) of 51 primary tumors. Loss of ACTRII mRNA expression was seen in one (14.3%) of the seven LOH-positive primary tumors from which total RNA was available. We also performed DNA sequencing analysis of tumors showing LOH. One LOH-positive primary tumor exhibited a novel germline missense sequence alteration (amino acid substitution, 117 Ile to Phe) that was not found in 23 additional normal individuals, implying that this alteration is not a frequent polymorphism. We conclude that ACTRII is probably involved in both non-MSI-H and MSI-H colorectal carcinogenesis, but more frequently in the latter subgroup.

  11. Loss of heterozygosity in heavy-ion-induced murine T-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Kakinuma, Shizuko; Kubo, Ayumi; Amasaki, Yoshiko; Nojima, Kumie; Monobe, Manami; Majima, Hideyuki J; Imaoka, Tatsuhiko; Nishimura, Mayumi; Shimada, Yoshiya

    2003-10-01

    One of the important concerns for astronauts in space environment is cancer risk associated with cosmic radiation, including heavy particle carbon-ions. But little information on cancer risk is available. In the present study, we investigated the induction of and cellular and molecular characteristics of T-cell lymphomas of B6C3F1 mice induced by carbon-ions and X-rays. The incidence, the latent period and the surface expression of T-cell differentiation antigens were similar between carbon-ion- and X-ray-induced lymphomas. The size of T-cell lymphomas induced by carbon-ions was significantly smaller than that by X-rays. Molecular analysis indicated that high frequency of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) was found on chromosomes 4, 11, 12 and 19 in both lymphomas. Interestingly, the frequency of LOH on chromosome 11 was much higher, but that on chromosome 12 was lower in carbon-ion-induced T-cell lymphomas than in X-ray-induced ones. These results indicate that mechanistic differences may exist between carbon-ion- and X-ray-induced lymphomagenesis. PMID:14676366

  12. Association of loss of heterozygosity with cytogenetic abnormalities in acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, R F; Serio, F M; Silva, M R R; Briones, M R S; Chauffaille, M L L F

    2008-07-01

    Deletions on chromosomes 5 and 7 are frequently seen in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). It is assumed that these deletions indicate loss of tumor suppressor genes on these chromosomes and until these tumor suppressor genes are identified, the functional consequences of these deletions and the molecular basis of these myeloid disorders cannot be completely understood. We evaluated loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in 44 patients (18 MDS and 26 AML, diagnosed according to WHO classification criteria) at diagnosis, using a four-microsatellite marker panel: an intragenic marker on the 7th intron of gene IRF-1 of the 5q31.1 region and three markers located inside the 7q31.1 region and correlated the LOH with karyotype abnormalities. The microsatellites chosen corresponded to chromosome regions frequently deleted in MDS/AML. The samples with Q (peak area) less than or equal to 0.50 were indicative of LOH. The percent of informative samples (i.e., heterozygous) for the intragenic microsatellite in gene IRF-1 and in loci D7S486, D7S515 and D7S522 were 66.6, 73.7, 75.5, and 48.8%, respectively. Cytogenetic abnormalities by G-banding were found in 36% (16/44) of the patients (2 of 18 MDS and 14 of 26 AML patients). We found a significantly positive association of the occurrence of LOH with abnormal karyotype (P < 0.05; chi-square test) and there were cases with LOH but the karyotype was normal (by G-banding). These data indicate that LOH in different microsatellite markers is possibly an event previous to chromosomal abnormalities in these myeloid neoplasias.

  13. Autosomal mutants of proton-exposed kidney cells display frequent loss of heterozygosity on nonselected chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Grygoryev, Dmytro; Dan, Cristian; Gauny, Stacey; Eckelmann, Bradley; Ohlrich, Anna P; Connolly, Marissa; Lasarev, Michael; Grossi, Gianfranco; Kronenberg, Amy; Turker, Mitchell S

    2014-05-01

    High-energy protons found in the space environment can induce mutations and cancer, which are inextricably linked. We hypothesized that some mutants isolated from proton-exposed kidneys arose through a genome-wide incident that causes loss of heterozygosity (LOH)-generating mutations on multiple chromosomes (termed here genomic LOH). To test this hypothesis, we examined 11 pairs of nonselected chromosomes for LOH events in mutant cells isolated from the kidneys of mice exposed to 4 or 5 Gy of 1 GeV protons. The mutant kidney cells were selected for loss of expression of the chromosome 8-encoded Aprt gene. Genomic LOH events were also assessed in Aprt mutants isolated from isogenic cultured kidney epithelial cells exposed to 5 Gy of protons in vitro. Control groups were spontaneous Aprt mutants and clones isolated without selection from the proton-exposed kidneys or cultures. The in vivo results showed significant increases in genomic LOH events in the Aprt mutants from proton-exposed kidneys when compared with spontaneous Aprt mutants and when compared with nonmutant (i.e., nonselected) clones from the proton-exposed kidneys. A bias for LOH events affecting chromosome 14 was observed in the proton-induced Aprt mutants, though LOH for this chromosome did not confer increased radiation resistance. Genomic LOH events were observed in Aprt mutants isolated from proton-exposed cultured kidney cells; however the incidence was fivefold lower than in Aprt mutants isolated from exposed intact kidneys, suggesting a more permissive environment in the intact organ and/or the evolution of kidney clones prior to their isolation from the tissue. We conclude that proton exposure creates a subset of viable cells with LOH events on multiple chromosomes, that these cells form and persist in vivo, and that they can be isolated from an intact tissue by selection for a mutation on a single chromosome.

  14. Genome-Wide Loss of Heterozygosity and DNA Copy Number Aberration in HPV-Negative Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Their Associations with Disease-Specific Survival.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chu; Zhang, Yuzheng; Loomis, Melissa M; Upton, Melissa P; Lohavanichbutr, Pawadee; Houck, John R; Doody, David R; Mendez, Eduardo; Futran, Neal; Schwartz, Stephen M; Wang, Pei

    2015-01-01

    Oral squamous cell cancer of the oral cavity and oropharynx (OSCC) is associated with high case-fatality. For reasons that are largely unknown, patients with the same clinical and pathologic staging have heterogeneous response to treatment and different probability of recurrence and survival, with patients with Human Papillomavirus (HPV)-positive oropharyngeal tumors having the most favorable survival. To gain insight into the complexity of OSCC and to identify potential chromosomal changes that may be associated with OSCC mortality, we used Affymtrix 6.0 SNP arrays to examine paired DNA from peripheral blood and tumor cell populations isolated by laser capture microdissection to assess genome-wide loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and DNA copy number aberration (CNA) and their associations with risk factors, tumor characteristics, and oral cancer-specific mortality among 75 patients with HPV-negative OSCC. We found a highly heterogeneous and complex genomic landscape of HPV-negative tumors, and identified regions in 4q, 8p, 9p and 11q that seem to play an important role in oral cancer biology and survival from this disease. If confirmed, these findings could assist in designing personalized treatment or in the creation of models to predict survival in patients with HPV-negative OSCC.

  15. Genome-Wide Loss of Heterozygosity and DNA Copy Number Aberration in HPV-Negative Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Their Associations with Disease-Specific Survival.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chu; Zhang, Yuzheng; Loomis, Melissa M; Upton, Melissa P; Lohavanichbutr, Pawadee; Houck, John R; Doody, David R; Mendez, Eduardo; Futran, Neal; Schwartz, Stephen M; Wang, Pei

    2015-01-01

    Oral squamous cell cancer of the oral cavity and oropharynx (OSCC) is associated with high case-fatality. For reasons that are largely unknown, patients with the same clinical and pathologic staging have heterogeneous response to treatment and different probability of recurrence and survival, with patients with Human Papillomavirus (HPV)-positive oropharyngeal tumors having the most favorable survival. To gain insight into the complexity of OSCC and to identify potential chromosomal changes that may be associated with OSCC mortality, we used Affymtrix 6.0 SNP arrays to examine paired DNA from peripheral blood and tumor cell populations isolated by laser capture microdissection to assess genome-wide loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and DNA copy number aberration (CNA) and their associations with risk factors, tumor characteristics, and oral cancer-specific mortality among 75 patients with HPV-negative OSCC. We found a highly heterogeneous and complex genomic landscape of HPV-negative tumors, and identified regions in 4q, 8p, 9p and 11q that seem to play an important role in oral cancer biology and survival from this disease. If confirmed, these findings could assist in designing personalized treatment or in the creation of models to predict survival in patients with HPV-negative OSCC. PMID:26247464

  16. Genome-Wide Loss of Heterozygosity and DNA Copy Number Aberration in HPV-Negative Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Their Associations with Disease-Specific Survival

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chu; Zhang, Yuzheng; Loomis, Melissa M.; Upton, Melissa P.; Lohavanichbutr, Pawadee; Houck, John R.; Doody, David R.; Mendez, Eduardo; Futran, Neal; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Wang, Pei

    2015-01-01

    Oral squamous cell cancer of the oral cavity and oropharynx (OSCC) is associated with high case-fatality. For reasons that are largely unknown, patients with the same clinical and pathologic staging have heterogeneous response to treatment and different probability of recurrence and survival, with patients with Human Papillomavirus (HPV)-positive oropharyngeal tumors having the most favorable survival. To gain insight into the complexity of OSCC and to identify potential chromosomal changes that may be associated with OSCC mortality, we used Affymtrix 6.0 SNP arrays to examine paired DNA from peripheral blood and tumor cell populations isolated by laser capture microdissection to assess genome-wide loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and DNA copy number aberration (CNA) and their associations with risk factors, tumor characteristics, and oral cancer-specific mortality among 75 patients with HPV-negative OSCC. We found a highly heterogeneous and complex genomic landscape of HPV-negative tumors, and identified regions in 4q, 8p, 9p and 11q that seem to play an important role in oral cancer biology and survival from this disease. If confirmed, these findings could assist in designing personalized treatment or in the creation of models to predict survival in patients with HPV-negative OSCC. PMID:26247464

  17. Homozygous deletions on the short arm of chromosome 9 in ovarian adenocarcinoma cell lines and loss of heterozygosity in sporadic tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Chenevix-Trench, G.; Kerr, J.; Hurst, T.; Sanderson, B.; Coglan, M.; Ward, B.; Khoo, S.K. ); Friedlander, M.; Leary, J.

    1994-07-01

    Rat ovarian surface epithelial cells transformed spontaneously in vitro have been found to have homozygous deletions of the interferon alpha (IFNA) gene. This suggests that inactivation of a tumor-suppressor gene in this region may be crucial for the development of ovarian cancer. The authors therefore used microsatellite markers and Southern analysis to examine the homologous region in humans - the short arm of chromosome 9 - for deletions in sporadic ovarian adenocarcinomas and ovarian tumor cell lines. Loss of heterozygosity occurred in 34 (37%) of 91 informative sporadic tumors, including some benign, low-malignant-potential and early-stage tumors, suggesting that it is an early event in the development of ovarian adenocarcinoma. Furthermore, homozygous deletions on 9p were found in 2 of 10 independent cell lines. Deletion mapping of the tumors and lines indicates that the candidate suppressor gene inactivated as a consequence lies between D9S171 and the IFNA locus, a region that is also deleted in several other tumors and that contains the melanoma predisposition gene, MLM. 52 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Frequent loss of heterozygosity and altered expression of the candidate tumor suppressor gene 'FAT' in human astrocytic tumors

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background We had earlier used the comparison of RAPD (Random Amplification of Polymorphic DNA) DNA fingerprinting profiles of tumor and corresponding normal DNA to identify genetic alterations in primary human glial tumors. This has the advantage that DNA fingerprinting identifies the genetic alterations in a manner not biased for locus. Methods In this study we used RAPD-PCR to identify novel genomic alterations in the astrocytic tumors of WHO grade II (Low Grade Diffuse Astrocytoma) and WHO Grade IV (Glioblastoma Multiforme). Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of the altered region was studied by microsatellite and Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) markers. Expression study of the gene identified at the altered locus was done by semi-quantitative reverse-transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR). Results Bands consistently altered in the RAPD profile of tumor DNA in a significant proportion of tumors were identified. One such 500 bp band, that was absent in the RAPD profile of 33% (4/12) of the grade II astrocytic tumors, was selected for further study. Its sequence corresponded with a region of FAT, a putative tumor suppressor gene initially identified in Drosophila. Fifty percent of a set of 40 tumors, both grade II and IV, were shown to have Loss of Heterozygosity (LOH) at this locus by microsatellite (intragenic) and by SNP markers. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR showed low FAT mRNA levels in a major subset of tumors. Conclusion These results point to a role of the FAT in astrocytic tumorigenesis and demonstrate the use of RAPD analysis in identifying specific alterations in astrocytic tumors. PMID:19126244

  19. Molecular genetic analysis of flow-sorted ovarian tumour cells: improved detection of loss of heterozygosity.

    PubMed Central

    Abeln, E. C.; Corver, W. E.; Kuipers-Dijkshoorn, N. J.; Fleuren, G. J.; Cornelisse, C. J.

    1994-01-01

    Detection of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) is usually performed on homogenised tumour specimens. In this type of analysis samples with a low percentage of tumour cells have to be excluded and possible intra-tumour heterogeneity is obscured. In this study we report the application of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-driven LOH detection with in total 22 microsatellite markers for chromosome 1q, 3p, 3q, 4p, 6p, 6q, 11p, 11q, 17p, 17q, 18p, 18q, Xp and Xq on flow-sorted cells from fresh and paraffin-embedded ovarian tumour tissue. Titration experiments showed that LOH can be detected with as few as 100 cell equivalents of DNA. Clear examples of LOH could be detected in the sorted aneuploid fractions from one unilateral and two bilateral ovarian tumours from three patients. In two samples the sorted fraction was less than 10% of the total sample. The bilateral tumours from the same patient showed loss of identical alleles for one marker (case OV64) and two markers (case OV69), indicative of their monoclonal origin. Multiparameter flow cytometry using two different ovarian tumour markers (MOv18 and BMA180), an anti-cytokeratin monoclonal antibody (MAb) (M9), an anti-vimentin MAb (V9) and a MAb against the panepithelial antigen 17-1A on the fresh ascites cells of the fourth ovarian cancer patient was used to investigate possible intra-tumour heterogeneity. We showed the presence of at least three phenotypically different populations, of which the diploid, keratin-positive, vimentin-negative population showed a similar LOH pattern as the aneuploid population (DNA index = 1.7), indicative of its neoplastic origin. The same LOH pattern was shown in an omentum metastasis from this patient also having the same aneuploid DNA index of 1.7. The sharing of the same LOH pattern by the diploid and aneuploid tumour cell populations suggests that the observed allele loss events occurred before the development of aneuploidy. PCR on flow-sorted cells is thus an important tool to study

  20. Phytophthora capsici - Loss of Heterozygosity (LOH): A Widespread Mechanism for Rapid Adaptation ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    ScienceCinema

    Mudge, Joanne [NCGR

    2016-07-12

    Joanne Mudge on "Phytophthora capsici - Loss of Heterozygosity (LOH): A Widespread Mechanism for Rapid Mutation" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  1. Phytophthora capsici - Loss of Heterozygosity (LOH): A Widespread Mechanism for Rapid Adaptation ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Mudge, Joanne

    2012-06-01

    Joanne Mudge on "Phytophthora capsici - Loss of Heterozygosity (LOH): A Widespread Mechanism for Rapid Mutation" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  2. An integer programming formulation of the parsimonious loss of heterozygosity problem.

    PubMed

    Catanzaro, Daniele; Labbé, Martine; Halldórsson, Bjarni V

    2013-01-01

    A loss of heterozygosity (LOH) event occurs when, by the laws of Mendelian inheritance, an individual should be heterozygote at a given site but, due to a deletion polymorphism, is not. Deletions play an important role in human disease and their detection could provide fundamental insights for the development of new diagnostics and treatments. In this paper, we investigate the parsimonious loss of heterozygosity problem (PLOHP), i.e., the problem of partitioning suspected polymorphisms from a set of individuals into a minimum number of deletion areas. Specifically, we generalize Halldórsson et al.'s work by providing a more general formulation of the PLOHP and by showing how one can incorporate different recombination rates and prior knowledge about the locations of deletions. Moreover, we show that the PLOHP can be formulated as a specific version of the clique partition problem in a particular class of graphs called undirected catch-point interval graphs and we prove its general $({\\cal NP})$-hardness. Finally, we provide a state-of-the-art integer programming (IP) formulation and strengthening valid inequalities to exactly solve real instances of the PLOHP containing up to 9,000 individuals and 3,000 SNPs. Our results give perspectives on the mathematics of the PLOHP and suggest new directions on the development of future efficient exact solution approaches.

  3. Immune escape from NY-ESO-1-specific T-cell therapy via loss of heterozygosity in the MHC.

    PubMed

    Klippel, Z K; Chou, J; Towlerton, A M; Voong, L N; Robbins, P; Bensinger, W I; Warren, E H

    2014-03-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy of tumors with T cells specific for the cancer-testis antigen NY-ESO-1 has shown great promise in preclinical models and in early stage clinical trials. Tumor persistence or recurrence after NY-ESO-1-specific therapy occurs, however, and the mechanisms of recurrence remain poorly defined. In a murine xenograft model of NY-ESO-1(+) multiple myeloma, we observed tumor recurrence after adoptive transfer of CD8(+) T cells genetically redirected to the prototypic NY-ESO-1157-165 peptide presented by HLA-A*02:01. Analysis of the myeloma cells that had escaped from T-cell control revealed intact expression of NY-ESO-1 and B2M, but selective, complete loss of HLA-A*02:01 expression from the cell surface. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) involving the HLA-A locus was identified in the tumor cells, and further analysis revealed selective loss of the allele encoding HLA-A*02:01. Although LOH involving the MHC has not been described in myeloma patients with persistent or recurrent disease after immune therapies such as allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), it has been described in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia who relapsed after allogeneic HCT. These results suggest that MHC loss should be evaluated in patients with myeloma and other cancers who relapse after adoptive NY-ESO-1-specific T-cell therapy.

  4. Fragile Site Instability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Causes Loss of Heterozygosity by Mitotic Crossovers and Break-Induced Replication

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Shaylynn D.; Casper, Anne M.

    2013-01-01

    Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at tumor suppressor loci is a major contributor to cancer initiation and progression. Both deletions and mitotic recombination can lead to LOH. Certain chromosomal loci known as common fragile sites are susceptible to DNA lesions under replication stress, and replication stress is prevalent in early stage tumor cells. There is extensive evidence for deletions stimulated by common fragile sites in tumors, but the role of fragile sites in stimulating mitotic recombination that causes LOH is unknown. Here, we have used the yeast model system to study the relationship between fragile site instability and mitotic recombination that results in LOH. A naturally occurring fragile site, FS2, exists on the right arm of yeast chromosome III, and we have analyzed LOH on this chromosome. We report that the frequency of spontaneous mitotic BIR events resulting in LOH on the right arm of yeast chromosome III is higher than expected, and that replication stress by low levels of polymerase alpha increases mitotic recombination 12-fold. Using single-nucleotide polymorphisms between the two chromosome III homologs, we mapped the locations of recombination events and determined that FS2 is a strong hotspot for both mitotic reciprocal crossovers and break-induced replication events under conditions of replication stress. PMID:24068975

  5. Loss of heterozygosity occurs at the D11S29 locus on chromosome 11q23 in invasive cervical carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Bethwaite, P. B.; Koreth, J.; Herrington, C. S.; McGee, J. O.

    1995-01-01

    Allelotypic detection of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) has been used to identify putative tumour-suppressor genes. Loci on human chromosome 11q23 are frequently altered in malignant disease, and LOH has been reported at an anonymous D11S29 locus at 11q23 in a proportion of breast and ovarian cancers and malignant melanomas. Previous studies have reported a high frequency of LOH in cervical carcinoma mapping to 11q23. Using polymerase chain reaction techniques employing probes for a recently described polymorphic dinucleotide microsatellite within this locus, we have searched for LOH in 69 cases of invasive cervical carcinoma. Genomic material was microdissected from sections cut from archival paraffin-embedded material, using the patients' constitutional genotype as a control Sixty-two (90%) of the cases were informative, and LOH occurred in 25/62 (40%) of tumours. Loss of an arm or single chromosome 11 is a well-recognised event in cervical carcinoma, and by employing other microsatellite polymorphisms mapping to 11q13 and 11p11-p12 we excluded those cases with widespread allelic loss. By doing so, LOH at D11S29 was found in 16/53 (30%) of tumours. The findings suggest a putative tumour-suppressor gene on 11q involved in cervical carcinogenesis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:7710949

  6. Chromosome 3p loss of heterozygosity and mutation analysis of the FHIT and beta-cat genes in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

    PubMed Central

    González, M V; Pello, M F; Ablanedo, P; Suárez, C; Alvarez, V; Coto, E

    1998-01-01

    AIMS: To study the loss of heterozygosity at the short arm of chromosome 3 in primary tumours from patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck; to determine whether the FHIT gene, mapped to 3p14.2 and the CTNNB1 (beta-cat) gene, mapped to 3p21, are deleted or mutated in these tumours. METHODS: DNA was extracted from fresh tumours. Loss of heterozygosity was assessed by microsatellite analysis of the following markers: D3S1283 and D3S1286 (3p24), D3S966 (3p21), and D3S1300 (3P14.2). Homozygous deletion was determined by radioactive multiplex polymerase chain reaction of exons 5 and 6 of the FHIT gene. The presence of mutations in FHIT exon 5 and beta-cat exon 3 was studied by single strand conformation polymorphism. RESULTS: 50% of informative cases (25/50) showed loss of heterozygosity for at least one of the 3p markers. 3p21 was the region with the highest rate of allelic deletion (63%). No point mutation was found in FHIT exon 5 or beta-cat exon 3. No case showed homozygous deletion for the FHIT (exons 5 and 6) or the beta-cat exon 3. CONCLUSIONS: The short arm of chromosome 3 is often deleted in the head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. In the remaining alleles of the FHIT or beta-cat genes, no evidence was found for point mutations or deletions, documented in other common carcinomas. Inactivation could occur by different mechanisms such as methylation, or other genes (not studied here) could be target of allelic losses in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Images PMID:9797729

  7. Rapid mechanisms for generating genome diversity: whole ploidy shifts, aneuploidy, and loss of heterozygosity.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Richard J; Forche, Anja; Berman, Judith

    2014-10-01

    Human fungal pathogens can exist in a variety of ploidy states, including euploid and aneuploid forms. Ploidy change has a major impact on phenotypic properties, including the regulation of interactions with the human host. In addition, the rapid emergence of drug-resistant isolates is often associated with the formation of specific supernumerary chromosomes. Pathogens such as Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans appear particularly well adapted for propagation in multiple ploidy states with novel pathways driving ploidy variation. In both species, heterozygous cells also readily undergo loss of heterozygosity (LOH), leading to additional phenotypic changes such as altered drug resistance. Here, we examine the sexual and parasexual cycles that drive ploidy variation in human fungal pathogens and discuss ploidy and LOH events with respect to their far-reaching roles in fungal adaptation and pathogenesis. PMID:25081629

  8. Cytological evidence for assortment mitosis leading to loss of heterozygosity in rice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Richard R-C; Li, Xiaomei; Chatterton, N Jerry

    2006-05-01

    In the root meristem cells of the rice line AMR, which causes loss of heterozygosity in its hybrids, both normal and assortment mitoses were observed. During normal mitosis, chromosomes did not form homologous pairs at metaphase; all chromosomes lined up at the equatorial plate and 2 chromatids of each chromosome disjoined at the centromere and moved toward opposite poles. During assortment mitosis, varying numbers of paired homologues were observed at mitotic metaphase. Two groups of 12 chromosomes separated and moved towards the opposite poles of daughter cells with few chromosomes having their chromatids separated at anaphase. These observations support the proposed mechanism that is responsible for early genotype fixation in rice hybrids involving AMR.

  9. PCR-based microsatellite polymorphisms in the detection of loss of heterozygosity in fresh and archival tumour tissue.

    PubMed

    Gruis, N A; Abeln, E C; Bardoel, A F; Devilee, P; Frants, R R; Cornelisse, C J

    1993-08-01

    PCR-based microsatellite polymorphisms have proved their power in genetic linkage analysis and other identification methods, due to their high information content and even distribution over the chromosomes. In the present study we applied microsatellite polymorphisms to detect loss of heterozygosity in fresh (snap-frozen) and in archival ovarian tumour tissue. Clear allele losses were found in fresh and paraffin embedded tumour samples. Conventional Southern analysis of flanking markers on the same tumour DNA samples confirmed the observed losses detected by microsatellite polymorphisms. Titration experiments suggest that loss of heterozygosity remains detectable in tumour samples despite 60% contamination with normal DNA. This technique provides a fast and reproducible alternative to conventional Southern blotting in the detection of loss of heterozygosity, with the crucial additional advantages of minimal sample requirements, making archival material available for genetic investigation. PMID:8102243

  10. Frequent loss of heterozygosity on chromosome 17 at 17q11.2-q12 in Barrett's adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Swift, A.; Risk, J. M.; Kingsnorth, A. N.; Wright, T. A.; Myskow, M.; Field, J. K.

    1995-01-01

    Allelic loss on chromosome 17 in 18 Barrett's oesophageal tumours was analysed with 17 polymorphic microsatellite markers. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of one or more markers was seen in 72% (13 of 18) tumours on 17p and 56% (10 of 18) on 17q. The highest 17p losses were found at D17S799 (62%, five of eight) and D17S261 (55%, five of nine), while loss at the p53 locus was 31% (5 of 16). The highest loss on 17q was found at the TCF-2 (17q11.2-q12) locus with 66% (8 of 12) LOH. TCF-2 was the only marker lost in two of the tumour samples; furthermore, TCF-2 was lost in four other tumours which retained heterozygosity at the markers on either side of it, D17S261 and D17S740. Six markers were used to assess LOH at 17q11.2-q12, and five of eight of the tumour specimens which had LOH at TCF-2 had no other loss on 17q. No statistically significant correlations were found between loss on 17q or 17p and any clinicopathological parameters. We propose from these data that the 17q11.2-q12 region contains a novel predisposing gene in Barrett's adenocarcinomas and may represent the site of a tumour-suppressor gene. PMID:7734326

  11. A study of loss of heterozygosity at 70 loci in anaplastic astrocytoma and glioblastoma multiforme with implications for tumor evolution.

    PubMed Central

    Wooten, E. C.; Fults, D.; Duggirala, R.; Williams, K.; Kyritsis, A. P.; Bondy, M. L.; Levin, V. A.; O'Connell, P.

    1999-01-01

    Cancers that arise from astrocytes in the adult CNS present as either anaplastic astrocytomas (AAs) or as more aggressive glioblastomas multiforme (GBMs). GBMs either form de novo or progress from AAs. We proposed to examine the molecular genetic relationship between these CNS tumors by conducting a genome-wide allelic imbalance analysis that included 70 loci on examples of AA and GBM. We found significant loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at 13 discrete chromosomal loci in both AAs and GBMs. Loss was significant in both AAs and GBMs at 9 of these loci. AAs show the highest rates of LOH at chromosomes 1p, 4q, 6p, 9p, 11p, 11q, 13q, 14q, 15p, 17p, 17q, and 19q. GBMs showed the greatest losses at 1p, 6q, 8p, 9p, 10p, 10q, 11p, 13q, 17p, 17q, 18p, 18q, and 19q. GBMs also demonstrated significant amplification at the epidermal growth factor receptor locus (7p12). These data suggest that there are three classes of loci involved in glioma evolution. First are loci that are likely involved in early events in the evolution of both AAs and GBMs. The second class consists of AA-specific loci, typified by higher LOH frequency than observed in GBMs (4q, 6p, 17p, 17q, 19q). The third class consists of GBM-specific loci (6q, 8p, 10, 18q). Damage at these loci may either lead to de novo GBMs or permit existing AAs to progress to GBMs. Glioma-related LOH profiles may have prognostic implications that could lead to better diagnosis and treatment of brain cancer patients. PMID:11550311

  12. Loss of heterozygosity drives clonal diversity of Phytophthora capsici in China.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jian; Diao, Yongzhao; Zhou, Yuxin; Lin, Dong; Bi, Yang; Pang, Zhili; Trout Fryxell, Rebecca; Liu, Xili; Lamour, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    Phytophthora capsici causes significant loss to pepper (Capsicum annum) in China and our goal was to develop single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers for P. capsici and characterize genetic diversity nationwide. Eighteen isolates of P. capsici from locations worldwide were re-sequenced and candidate nuclear and mitochondrial SNPs identified. From 2006 to 2012, 276 isolates of P. capsici were recovered from 136 locations in 27 provinces and genotyped using 45 nuclear and 2 mitochondrial SNPs. There were two main mitochondrial haplotypes and 95 multi-locus genotypes (MLGs) identified. Genetic diversity was geographically structured with a high level of genotypic diversity in the north and on Hainan Island in the south, suggesting outcrossing contributes to diversity in these areas. The remaining areas of China are dominated by four clonal lineages that share mitochondrial haplotypes, are almost exclusively the A1 or A2 mating type and appear to exhibit extensive diversity based on loss of heterozygosity (LOH). Analysis of SNPs directly from infected peppers confirmed LOH in field populations. One clonal lineage is dominant throughout much of the country. The overall implications for long-lived genetically diverse clonal lineages amidst a widely dispersed sexual population are discussed. PMID:24349339

  13. Loss of heterozygosity 4q24 and TET2 mutations associated with myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Jankowska, Anna M.; Szpurka, Hadrian; Tiu, Ramon V.; Makishima, Hideki; Afable, Manuel; Huh, Jungwon; O'Keefe, Christine L.; Ganetzky, Rebecca; McDevitt, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities are frequent in myeloid malignancies, but in most cases of myelodysplasia (MDS) and myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN), underlying pathogenic molecular lesions are unknown. We identified recurrent areas of somatic copy number–neutral loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and deletions of chromosome 4q24 in a large cohort of patients with myeloid malignancies including MDS and related mixed MDS/MPN syndromes using single nucleotide polymorphism arrays. We then investigated genes in the commonly affected area for mutations. When we sequenced TET2, we found homozygous and hemizygous mutations. Heterozygous and compound heterozygous mutations were found in patients with similar clinical phenotypes without LOH4q24. Clinical analysis showed most TET2 mutations were present in patients with MDS/MPN (58%), including CMML (6/17) or sAML (32%) evolved from MDS/MPN and typical MDS (10%), suggesting they may play a ubiquitous role in malignant evolution. TET2 mutations affected conserved domains and the N terminus. TET2 is widely expressed in hematopoietic cells but its function is unknown, and it lacks homology to other known genes. The frequency of mutations in this candidate myeloid regulatory gene suggests an important role in the pathogenesis of poor prognosis MDS/MPN and sAML and may act as a disease gene marker for these often cytogenetically normal disorders. PMID:19372255

  14. Loss of heterozygosity at the human leukocyte antigen locus in thymic epithelial tumors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuan; Wang, Guojin; Zhang, Peng; Liu, Yimei; Yao, Yuanyuan; Wang, Hai; Wang, Yuanguo

    2015-01-01

    Background To study the relationship between loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) locus and the pathogenicity and clinicopathological features of thymic epithelial tumors (TET). Methods Tumor and adjacent normal tissues were isolated from 36 TET patients. Five microsatellite loci (D6S1666, D6S265, D6S273, DS6276, and D6S291) within the HLA locus were amplified by polymerase chain reaction. DNA sequencing was used to measure the frequency of microsatellite LOH. Results LOH was identified in at least one locus in 83.6% of TET patients. LOH frequency at D6S1666, D6S265, D6S273, D6S276, and D6S291 was 44.4%, 16.7%, 30.5%, 38.9%, and 36.1% respectively. There was no significant association between LOH frequency in TET with tumor severity, or in the presence or absence of myasthenia gravis. Conclusions D6S1666, D6S265, D6S273, DS6S276, and D6S29 are sensitive loci for studying microsatellite LOH in TET. LOH within the HLA complex is implicated in the occurrence and development of TET, with the HLA-DQA1 gene likely involved. However, an understanding of the relationship between LOH and the clinicopathological features of TET requires a larger sample size than that of the present study. PMID:26557913

  15. Loss of heterozygosity occurs predominantly, but not exclusively, in the epithelial compartment of pleomorphic adenoma.

    PubMed

    Poetsch, Micaela; Zimmermann, Anett; Wolf, Eduard; Kleist, Britta

    2005-07-01

    Pleomorphic adenoma (PA), being the most common benign tumor of the salivary glands, is composed of epithelial and mesenchymal compartments. In this study, we analyzed 19 microsatellite markers from chromosomal arms 6q, 8q, 9p, 12q, and 17p in 31 PAs and 3 carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenomas (CXPAs) as well as 11 other non-PA-related carcinomas of the salivary gland for comparison. In our analysis, we differentiated between epithelial and mesenchymal tissues. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in PAs was most often found in 8q (32%) and 12q (29%). Two of the three CXPAs displayed allelic loss at all chromosomal arms investigated, whereas the results of the non-PA-related carcinomas were rather heterogeneous. LOH could not only be detected in the epithelial, but also in the mesenchymal, compartments of a subset of PAs, especially at chromosomal arm 8q. Concerning the CXPAs, we were able to demonstrate allelic losses not only in the malignant epithelial compartment, but also in the residual adenoma parts. Our data give further evidence that alterations in 8q may be an early event in PA tumorigenesis, whereas LOH in 12q may characterize cells with the potential to transform in CXPAs.

  16. [Early loss of heterozygosity on chromosome arm 16q in flat epithelial atypia of the breast. Detection by microsatellite analyses].

    PubMed

    Schmidt, H; Dahrenmöller, C; Agelepoulos, K; Hungermann, D; Böcker, W

    2008-11-01

    With the improvement of breast carcinoma screening, pre-malignant cell lesions such as flat epithelial atypia (FEA) are detected more frequently. Several studies have demonstrated that FEA show features of a ductal neoplasia, but is it really a precursor lesion? We have started a comparative genetic analysis of a panel of nine microsatellite markers on six different chromosomal regions to investigate whether FEAs show the same characteristic genetic alterations as ductal carcinomas in situ (DCISs) and invasive carcinoma of the breast. FEAs, DCISs and invasive carcinomas of the same patients were microdissected using PALM micro laser technology. DNA was isolated using the QIAamp DNA Micro Kit (QIAGEN). We have investigated a set of the polymorphic microsatellite markers D7S522, D8S522, NEFL, D10S541 (PTEN), D13S153 (RB1), D16S400, D16S402, D16S422 and D17S855 (BRCA1) using multiplex PCR for the detection of allelic imbalances. Most of the investigated FEAs showed a lower frequency of loss of heterozygosity than associated DCISs or invasive carcinomas. However, we were able to detect the same alterations in FEAs as in DCISs or invasive carcinomas in a number of cases. Notably, the microsatellite marker on 16q showed more prevalent allelic imbalances in FEAs than the other investigated markers. One of the hallmarks in the pathogenesis of a large subgroup of invasive breast carcinomas is the early loss of chromosome arm 16q. In this study, we were able to detect frequent genetic alterations on chromosome 16q in FEAs, associated DCISs and invasive carcinomas. This suggests that FEA is a precursor lesion in the low-grade pathway.

  17. Different mechanisms of radiation-induced loss of heterozygosity in two human lymphoid cell lines from a single donor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiese, C.; Gauny, S. S.; Liu, W. C.; Cherbonnel-Lasserre, C. L.; Kronenberg, A.

    2001-01-01

    Allelic loss is an important mutational mechanism in human carcinogenesis. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at an autosomal locus is one outcome of the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and can occur by deletion or by mitotic recombination. We report that mitotic recombination between homologous chromosomes occurred in human lymphoid cells exposed to densely ionizing radiation. We used cells derived from the same donor that express either normal TP53 (TK6 cells) or homozygous mutant TP53 (WTK1 cells) to assess the influence of TP53 on radiation-induced mutagenesis. Expression of mutant TP53 (Met 237 Ile) was associated with a small increase in mutation frequencies at the hemizygous HPRT (hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase) locus, but the mutation spectra were unaffected at this locus. In contrast, WTK1 cells (mutant TP53) were 30-fold more susceptible than TK6 cells (wild-type TP53) to radiation-induced mutagenesis at the TK1 (thymidine kinase) locus. Gene dosage analysis combined with microsatellite marker analysis showed that the increase in TK1 mutagenesis in WTK1 cells could be attributed, in part, to mitotic recombination. The microsatellite marker analysis over a 64-cM region on chromosome 17q indicated that the recombinational events could initiate at different positions between the TK1 locus and the centromere. Virtually all of the recombinational LOH events extended beyond the TK1 locus to the most telomeric marker. In general, longer LOH tracts were observed in mutants from WTK1 cells than in mutants from TK6 cells. Taken together, the results demonstrate that the incidence of radi-ation-induced mutations is dependent on the genetic background of the cell at risk, on the locus examined, and on the mechanisms for mutation available at the locus of interest.

  18. NF1 gene mutations and loss of heterozygosity in constitutional and tumor tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Abernathy, C.R.; Colman, S.D.; Ho, V.T.

    1994-09-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a common autosomal dominant disorder characterized by neurofibromas, cafe-au-lait spots, and Lisch nodules. NF1 patients are at increased risk for certain types of malignancies such as brain tumors, sarcomas, and leukemias. NF1 is caused by disrupting mutations of the NF1 gene (17q11.2), with half of cases caused by new mutation. Less than 50 constitutional mutations have thus far been reported, with only one recurring. We are pursuing mutation analysis in germline and tumor tissues from NF1 patients (and non-NF1 tumors) by heteroduplex analysis (HDA) and SSCP, simultaneously testing for large deletions by Southern blots and loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH) studies. HDA has so far identified 18 exon mutations/variants in 110 unrelated patients (3/4 of exons tested), including splice mutations, insertions, deletions, and point changes. RT-PCR analysis in our four clearly-inactivating mutations showed that all four mutant alleles are expressed. This suggests that aberrant forms of the protein (neurofibromin) may be produced, which may shed light on yet-unknown functions. In a study of 10 new-mutations parent-child sets, one very mildly-affected patient showed LOH of an entire NF1 allele, in contrast to other patients reported who have similar deletions and a severe phenotype. This mutation is materally-derived, which is unusual given that over 90% of new mutations are thought to be of paternal origin. Preliminary LOH studies in one new-mutation patient indicate large independent somatic deletions involving the maternal NF1 allele in several neurofibromas, implicating the two-hit tumor suppressor system in neurofibroma formation. no other losses on chromosome 17 are evident, and blood and tumor karyotypes are normal. We are attempting to identify the germline mutation, confirm the somatic findings, and find the boundaries of the deletions.

  19. Recurrent 1; 17 translocations in human neuroblastoma reveal nonhomologous mitotic recombination during the S/G2 phase as a novel mechanism for loss of heterozygosity

    SciTech Connect

    Caron, H.; Sluis, P. van; Westerveld, A.; Slater, R.; Versteeg, R.; Kraker, J. de; Voute, P.A. ); Roy, N. van; Speleman, F.

    1994-08-01

    Neuroblastomas often show loss of heterozygosity of the chromosomal region 1p36 (LOH 1p), probably reflecting loss of a tumor-suppressor gene. Here the authors describe three neuroblastoma tumors and two cell lines in which LOH 1p results from an unbalanced translocation between the p arm of chromosome 1 and the q arm of chromosome 17. Southern blot and cytogenetic analyses show that in all cases the chromosome 17 homologue from which the 1;17 translocation was derived is still present and intact. This suggests a model in which a translocation between the short arm of chromosome 1 and the long arm of chromosome 17 takes place in the S/G2 phase of the cell cycle and results in LOH 1p. Nonhomologous mitotic recombination in the S/G2 phase is a novel mechanism of LOH. 24 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Loss of heterozygosity on 10q and microsatellite instability in advanced stages of primary cutaneous T-cell lymphoma and possible association with homozygous deletion of PTEN.

    PubMed

    Scarisbrick, J J; Woolford, A J; Russell-Jones, R; Whittaker, S J

    2000-05-01

    Previous cytogenetic studies of primary cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) were based on limited numbers of patients and seldom showed consistent nonrandom chromosomal abnormalities. In this study, 54 tumor DNA samples from patients with CTCL were analyzed for loss of heterozygosity on 10q. Allelic loss was identified in 10 samples, all of which were from the 44 patients with mycosis fungoides (10/44 patients; 23%). Of the patients with allelic loss, 3 were among the 29 patients with early-stage myosis fungoides (T(1) or T(2)) (3/29 patients; 10%), whereas the other 7 were among the 15 patients with advanced cutaneous disease (T(3) or T(4)) (7/15 patients; 47%). The overlapping region of deletion was between 10q23 and 10q24. In addition, microsatellite instability (MSI) was present in 13 of the 54 samples (24%), 12 from patients with mycosis fungoides and 1 from a patient with Sezary syndrome. There was also an association between MSI and disease progression in patients with mycosis fungoides, with 6 of 15 (40%) patients with MSI having advanced cutaneous disease and only 6 of 29 (21%) having early-stage disease. Samples with allelic loss on 10q were analyzed for abnormalities of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN (10q23.3). No tumor-specific mutations were detected, but homozygous deletion was found in 2 patients. Thus, we found loss of heterozygosity on 10q and MSI in advanced cutaneous stages of mycosis fungoides. These findings indicate that a tumor suppressor gene or genes in this region may be associated with disease progression. Furthermore, abnormalities of PTEN may be important in the pathogenesis of mycosis fungoides, but our data imply that this gene is rarely inactivated by small deletions or point mutations. (Blood. 2000;95:2937-2942)

  1. Mitotic crossover promotes leukemogenesis in children born with TEL-AML1 via the generation of loss of heterozygosity at 12p.

    PubMed

    Ivanovski, Ivan; Garavelli, Livia; Djurić, Olivera; Ćirović, Aleksandar; Škorić, Dejan; Ivanovski, Petar I

    2015-01-01

    TEL-AML1 (ETV6-RUNX1) fusion gene which is formed prenatally in 1% of the newborns, is a common genetic abnormality in childhood Bcell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia. But only one child out of a hundred children born with this fusion gene develops leukemia (bottleneck phenomenon) later in its life, if contracts the second mutation. In other words, out of a hundred children born with TEL-AML1 only one child is at risk for leukemia development, which means that TEL-AML1 fusion gene is not sufficient for overt leukemia. There is a stringent requirement for a second genetic abnormality for leukemia development and this is the real or the ultimate cause of the leukemia bottleneck phenomenon. In most cases of TEL-AML1+ leukemia, the translocation t(12;21) is complemented with the loss of the normal TEL gene, not involved in the translocation, on the contralateral 12p. The loss of the normal TEL gene, i.e. loss of heterozygosity at 12p, occurs postnatally during the mitotic proliferation of TEL-AML1+ cell in the mitotic crossing over process. Mitotic crossing over is a very rare event with a frequency rate of 10-6 in a 10 kb region. The exploration and identification of the environmental exposure(s) that cause(s) proliferation of the TELAML1+ cell in which approximately 106 mitoses are generated to cause 12p loss of heterozygosity, i.e. TEL gene deletion, may contribute to the introduction of preventive measures for leukemia. PMID:26429121

  2. Copy number and loss of heterozygosity detected by SNP array of formalin-fixed tissues using whole-genome amplification.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Angela; Drozdov, Ignat; Guerra, Eliete; Ouzounis, Christos A; Warnakulasuriya, Saman; Gleeson, Michael J; McGurk, Mark; Tavassoli, Mahvash; Odell, Edward W

    2011-01-01

    The requirement for large amounts of good quality DNA for whole-genome applications prohibits their use for small, laser capture micro-dissected (LCM), and/or rare clinical samples, which are also often formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE). Whole-genome amplification of DNA from these samples could, potentially, overcome these limitations. However, little is known about the artefacts introduced by amplification of FFPE-derived DNA with regard to genotyping, and subsequent copy number and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) analyses. Using a ligation adaptor amplification method, we present data from a total of 22 Affymetrix SNP 6.0 experiments, using matched paired amplified and non-amplified DNA from 10 LCM FFPE normal and dysplastic oral epithelial tissues, and an internal method control. An average of 76.5% of SNPs were called in both matched amplified and non-amplified DNA samples, and concordance was a promising 82.4%. Paired analysis for copy number, LOH, and both combined, showed that copy number changes were reduced in amplified DNA, but were 99.5% concordant when detected, amplifications were the changes most likely to be 'missed', only 30% of non-amplified LOH changes were identified in amplified pairs, and when copy number and LOH are combined ∼50% of gene changes detected in the unamplified DNA were also detected in the amplified DNA and within these changes, 86.5% were concordant for both copy number and LOH status. However, there are also changes introduced as ∼20% of changes in the amplified DNA are not detected in the non-amplified DNA. An integrative network biology approach revealed that changes in amplified DNA of dysplastic oral epithelium localize to topologically critical regions of the human protein-protein interaction network, suggesting their functional implication in the pathobiology of this disease. Taken together, our results support the use of amplification of FFPE-derived DNA, provided sufficient samples are used to increase power

  3. Malignant mixed tumors of the salivary gland: a study of loss of heterozygosity in tumor suppressor genes.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Melissa H; Fowler, Jason; Ducatman, Barbara; Barnes, Leon; Hunt, Jennifer L

    2006-03-01

    Carcinosarcomas and carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma of the salivary glands are rare tumors that fit into the broader category of malignant mixed tumors. Although most evidence has suggested that the different morphologic components arise from a common clonal origin, there are very few studies that have provided molecular evidence for this clonality. In this study, we examined a set of seven carcinosarcomas and four carcinomas ex pleomorphic adenoma for tumor suppressor gene loss of heterozygosity, in order to assess the clonal patterns in the varying components. Microdissection was performed to obtain each morphological component and tumor suppressor gene loci on 3p, 5q, 9p, 17p, 17q, and 18q were analyzed. The fractional allelic loss (FAL) was calculated for each area, and the different targets were compared for their molecular profile. The overall mean FAL of the malignant targets was 42%. In carcinosarcomas, the sarcomatous targets had a higher mean FAL than the carcinomatous targets (68 vs 46%, respectively) and in carcinomas ex pleomorphic adenoma, the mean FAL in the benign component was 11 vs 46% seen in the carcinomatous component. The most frequently lost genetic loci were p53 (17p13, 73%), nm23-H1 (17q21, 55%), and DCC (18q21, 50%). Loss of heterozygosity of 17q21 and 9p21 only occurred in carcinosarcomas and not in carcinomas ex pleomorphic adenoma. Within the carcinosarcomas, the mutational profiles were conserved between epithelial and sarcomatous areas. In carcinomas ex pleomorphic adenoma, loss of heterozygosity was uncommon in the benign component, but the mutations were conserved in the corresponding malignant areas. These results support the hypothesis that the carcinomatous and sarcomatous components of carcinosarcomas are clonally related. Furthermore, these data support prior studies that suggest a common clonal origin for the benign and malignant components of carcinomas ex pleomorphic adenoma.

  4. Mapping of chromosome 20 for loss of heterozygosity in childhood ALL reveals a 1,000-kb deletion in one patient.

    PubMed

    Couque, N; Chambon-Pautas, C; Cavé, H; Bardet, V; Duval, M; Vilmer, E; Grandchamp, B

    1999-12-01

    The long arm of chromosome 20 displays recurrent loss of heterozygosity (LOH) for microsatellite markers in blast cells from children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. To further characterize the region of deletion and to precisely establish its frequency, we searched for LOH in 103 children with ALL using polymorphic markers in the previously described region of interest, namely between D20S101 and D20S887. LOH was detected in nine patients (ie with a frequency of 8.7%). Interestingly, in one patient, a small deletion was found, flanked proximally by D20S850 and distally by M201, a dinucleotide repeat identified from chromosome 20 sequences. The distance between these two markers is approximately 1000 kb. The occurrence of non-random deletions of the long arm of chromosome 20 has previously been observed in myeloid malignancies (myeloproliferative disorders and myelodysplastic syndromes) in 5-10% of patients. The small deletion in our patient is located within the common region of deletion of myeloproliferative disorders suggesting that a tumor suppressor gene may be the common target of the deletions in various types of hematological malignancies.

  5. Recurrent loss of heterozygosity in 1p36 associated with TNFRSF14 mutations in IRF4 translocation negative pediatric follicular lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Martin-Guerrero, Idoia; Salaverria, Itziar; Burkhardt, Birgit; Szczepanowski, Monika; Baudis, Michael; Bens, Susanne; de Leval, Laurence; Garcia-Orad, Africa; Horn, Heike; Lisfeld, Jasmin; Pellissery, Shoji; Klapper, Wolfram; Oschlies, Ilske; Siebert, Reiner

    2013-08-01

    Pediatric follicular lymphoma is a rare disease that differs genetically and clinically from its adult counterpart. With the exception of pediatric follicular lymphoma with IRF4-translocation, the genetic events associated with these lymphomas have not yet been defined. We applied array-comparative genomic hybridization and molecular inversion probe assay analyses to formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues from 18 patients aged 18 years and under with IRF4 translocation negative follicular lymphoma. All evaluable cases lacked t(14;18). Only 6 of 16 evaluable cases displayed chromosomal imbalances with gains or amplifications of 6pter-p24.3 (including IRF4) and deletion and copy number neutral-loss of heterozygosity in 1p36 (including TNFRSF14) being most frequent. Sequencing of TNFRSF14 located in the minimal region of loss in 1p36.32 showed nine mutations in 7 cases from our series. Two subsets of pediatric follicular lymphoma were delineated according to the presence of molecular alterations, one with genomic aberrations associated with higher grade and/or diffuse large B-cell lymphoma component and more widespread disease, and another one lacking genetic alterations associated with more limited disease.

  6. Hamartomas from patients with tuberous sclerosis show loss of heterozygosity for chromosome 9q34

    SciTech Connect

    Green, A.J.; Sepp, T.; Yates, J.R.W. |

    1994-09-01

    We have previously shown allele loss in hamartomas from cases of tuberous sclerosis (TSC) for markers in the region of the recently characterized TSC2 gene on chromosome 16p13.3. Germline deletions in the TSC2 gene have been shown in 5% of patients with TSC. These data strongly suggest that the TSC2 gene acts as a tumor suppressor gene. We hypothesised that hamartomas from patients with TSC can also show allele loss for markers on chromosome 9q34 in the region of the TSC1 gene. We studied 7 hamartomas (3 renal angiomyolipomas, 3 giant cell astrocytomas, and a cardiac rhabdomyoma) from 7 cases of TSC, none of which showed allele loss for markers on chromosome 16p13.3. Eight microsatellite markers were analyzed, comprising from centromeric to telomeric, ASS - D9S64 - D9S149 -D9S150 - DBH - D9S66 - D9S114 - D9S67. Two hamartomas (one renal angiomyolipoma and one giant cell astrocytoma) showed allele loss for at least two markers. The region of allele loss involved the TSC1 locus, but did not include D9S149 or D9S67. We have shown allele loss in two of seven TSC hamartomas in the region of the TSC1 gene on 9q34. Based on this deletion mapping, we suggest that the TSC1 gene on 9a34, like the TSC2 gene, acts as a tumor suppressor gene.

  7. Phenotypic Consequences of a Spontaneous Loss of Heterozygosity in a Common Laboratory Strain of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Ciudad, Toni; Hickman, Meleah; Bellido, Alberto; Berman, Judith; Larriba, Germán

    2016-07-01

    By testing the susceptibility to DNA damaging agents of several Candida albicans mutant strains derived from the commonly used laboratory strain, CAI4, we uncovered sensitivity to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) in CAI4 and its derivatives, but not in CAF2-1. This sensitivity is not a result of URA3 disruption because the phenotype was not restored after URA3 reintroduction. Rather, we found that homozygosis of a short region of chromosome 3R (Chr3R), which is naturally heterozygous in the MMS-resistant-related strains CAF4-2 and CAF2-1, confers MMS sensitivity and modulates growth polarization in response to MMS. Furthermore, induction of homozygosity in this region in CAF2-1 or CAF4-2 resulted in MMS sensitivity. We identified 11 genes by SNP/comparative genomic hybridization containing only the a alleles in all the MMS-sensitive strains. Four candidate genes, SNF5, POL1, orf19.5854.1, and MBP1, were analyzed by generating hemizygous configurations in CAF2-1 and CAF4-2 for each allele of all four genes. Only hemizygous MBP1a/mbp1b::SAT1-FLIP strains became MMS sensitive, indicating that MBP1a in the homo- or hemizygosis state was sufficient to account for the MMS-sensitive phenotype. In yeast, Mbp1 regulates G1/S genes involved in DNA repair. A second region of homozygosis on Chr2L increased MMS sensitivity in CAI4 (Chr3R homozygous) but not CAF4-2 (Chr3R heterozygous). This is the first example of sign epistasis in C. albicans.

  8. Genome Sequencing and Mapping Reveal Loss of Heterozygosity as a Mechanism for Rapid Adaptation in the Vegetable Pathogen Phytophthora capsici

    SciTech Connect

    Lamour, Kurt H.; Mudge, Joann; Gobena, Daniel; Hurtado-Gonzales, Oscar P.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Kuo, Alan; Miller, Neil A.; Rice, Brandon J.; Raffaele, Sylvain; Cano, Liliana M.; Bharti, Arvind K.; Donahoo, Ryan S.; Finely, Sabra; Huitema, Edgar; Hulvey, Jon; Platt, Darren; Salamov, Asaf; Savidor, Alon; Sharma, Rahul; Stam, Remco; Sotrey, Dylan; Thines, Marco; Win, Joe; Haas, Brian J.; Dinwiddie, Darrell L.; Jenkins, Jerry; Knight, James R.; Affourtit, Jason P.; Han, Cliff S.; Chertkov, Olga; Lindquist, Erika A.; Detter, Chris; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Kamoun, Sophien; Kingsmore, Stephen F.

    2012-02-07

    The oomycete vegetable pathogen Phytophthora capsici has shown remarkable adaptation to fungicides and new hosts. Like other members of this destructive genus, P. capsici has an explosive epidemiology, rapidly producing massive numbers of asexual spores on infected hosts. In addition, P. capsici can remain dormant for years as sexually recombined oospores, making it difficult to produce crops at infested sites, and allowing outcrossing populations to maintain significant genetic variation. Genome sequencing, development of a high-density genetic map, and integrative genomic or genetic characterization of P. capsici field isolates and intercross progeny revealed significant mitotic loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in diverse isolates. LOH was detected in clonally propagated field isolates and sexual progeny, cumulatively affecting >30percent of the genome. LOH altered genotypes for more than 11,000 single-nucleotide variant sites and showed a strong association with changes in mating type and pathogenicity. Overall, it appears that LOH may provide a rapid mechanism for fixing alleles and may be an important component of adaptability for P. capsici.

  9. Population Polymorphism of Nuclear Mitochondrial DNA Insertions Reveals Widespread Diploidy Associated with Loss of Heterozygosity in Debaryomyces hansenii ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Jacques, Noémie; Sacerdot, Christine; Derkaoui, Meriem; Dujon, Bernard; Ozier-Kalogeropoulos, Odile; Casaregola, Serge

    2010-01-01

    Debaryomyces hansenii, a yeast that participates in the elaboration of foodstuff, displays important genetic diversity. Our recent phylogenetic classification of this species led to the subdivision of the species into three distinct clades. D. hansenii harbors the highest number of nuclear mitochondrial DNA (NUMT) insertions known so far for hemiascomycetous yeasts. Here we assessed the intraspecific variability of the NUMTs in this species by testing their presence/absence first in 28 strains, with 21 loci previously detected in the completely sequenced strain CBS 767T, and second in a larger panel of 77 strains, with 8 most informative loci. We were able for the first time to structure populations in D. hansenii, although we observed little NUMT insertion variability within the clades. We determined the chronology of the NUMT insertions, which turned out to correlate with the previously defined taxonomy and provided additional evidence that colonization of nuclear genomes by mitochondrial DNA is a dynamic process in yeast. In combination with flow cytometry experiments, the NUMT analysis revealed the existence of both haploid and diploid strains, the latter being heterozygous and resulting from at least four crosses among strains from the various clades. As in the diploid pathogen Candida albicans, to which D. hansenii is phylogenetically related, we observed a differential loss of heterozygosity in the diploid strains, which can explain some of the large genetic diversity found in D. hansenii over the years. PMID:20048048

  10. Genome sequencing and mapping reveal loss of heterozygosity as a mechanism for rapid adaptation in the vegetable pathogen Phytophthora capsici

    PubMed Central

    Lamour, Kurt H.; Mudge, Joann; Gobena, Daniel; Hurtado-Gonzales, Oscar P.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Kuo, Alan; Miller, Neil A.; Rice, Brandon J.; Raffaele, Sylvain; Cano, Liliana M.; Bharti, Arvind K.; Donahoo, Ryan S.; Finley, Sabra; Huitema, Edgar; Hulvey, Jon; Platt, Darren; Salamov, Asaf; Savidor, Alon; Sharma, Rahul; Stam, Remco; Storey, Dylan; Thines, Marco; Win, Joe; Haas, Brian J.; Dinwiddie, Darrell L.; Jenkins, Jerry; Knight, James R.; Affourtit, Jason P.; Han, Cliff S.; Chertkov, Olga; Lindquist, Erika A.; Detter, Chris; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Kamoun, Sophien; Kingsmore, Stephen F.

    2013-01-01

    The oomycete vegetable pathogen Phytophthora capsici has shown remarkable adaptation to fungicides and new hosts. Like other members of this destructive genus, P. capsici has an explosive epidemiology, rapidly producing massive numbers of asexual spores on infected hosts. In addition, P. capsici can remain dormant for years as sexually-recombined oospores, making it difficult to produce crops at infested sites, and allowing outcrossing populations to maintain significant genetic variation. Genome sequencing, development of a high-density genetic map, and integrative genomic/genetic characterization of P. capsici field isolates and intercross progeny revealed significant mitotic loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and higher levels of SNVs than those reported for humans, plants, and P. infestans. LOH was detected in clonally propagated field isolates and sexual progeny, cumulatively affecting >30% of the genome. LOH altered genotypes for more than 11,000 single nucleotide variant (SNV) sites and showed a strong association with changes in mating type and pathogenicity. Overall, it appears that LOH may provide a rapid mechanism for fixing alleles and may be an important component of adaptability for P. capsici. PMID:22712506

  11. Copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity is prevalent and a late event in the pathogenesis of FLT3/ITD AML.

    PubMed

    Stirewalt, D L; Pogosova-Agadjanyan, E L; Tsuchiya, K; Joaquin, J; Meshinchi, S

    2014-01-01

    Patients with high FLT3 internal tandem duplication allelic ratios (FLT3/ITD-ARs) have a poor prognosis. Single-nucleotide polymorphism/comparative genomic hybridization, single-cell PCR and colony-forming assays were used to evaluate genotypic evolution of high FLT3/ITD-ARs in 85 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. Microarrays were used to examine molecular pathways disrupted in leukemic blasts with high FLT3/ITD-ARs. Copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity (CN-LOH) was identified at the FLT3 locus in diagnostic samples with high FLT3/ITD-ARs (N=11), but not in samples with low FLT3/ITD-ARs (N=24), FLT3-activating loop mutations (N=11) or wild-type FLT3 (N=39). Single-cell assays showed that homozygous FLT3/ITD genotype was present in subsets of leukemic blasts at diagnosis but became the dominant clone at relapse. Less differentiated CD34(+)/CD33(-) progenitor colonies were heterozygous for FLT3/ITD, whereas more differentiated CD34(+)/CD33(+) progenitor colonies were homozygous for FLT3/ITD. Expression profiling revealed that samples harboring high FLT3/ITD-ARs aberrantly expressed genes within the recombination/DNA repair pathway. Thus, the development of CN-LOH at the FLT3 locus, which results in high FLT3/ITD-ARs, likely represents a late genomic event that occurs after the acquisition of the FLT3/ITD. Although the etiology underlying the development of CN-LOH remains to be clarified, the disruption in recombination/DNA repair pathway, which is present before the development of LOH, may have a role. PMID:24786392

  12. Effects of a Topically Applied Bioadhesive Berry Gel on Loss of Heterozygosity Indices in Premalignant Oral Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Shumway, Brian S.; Kresty, Laura A.; Larsen, Peter E.; Zwick, Jared C.; Lu, Bo; Fields, Henry W.; Mumper, Russell J.; Stoner, Gary D.; Mallery, Susan R.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to assess the effects of topical application of a 10% (w/w) freeze-dried black raspberry (FBR) gel on oral intraepithelial neoplasia (IEN) variables that included histologic diagnoses and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) indices. Microsatellite instability and/or LOH at tumor suppressor gene – associated chromosomal loci have been associated with a higher risk for oral IEN progression to oral squamous cell carcinoma. Previously, our laboratories have shown that FBRs are well tolerated and possess potent antioxidant, apoptotic, and differentiation-inducing properties. Experimental Design Each participant with IEN served as their own internal control. Before treatment, all lesions were photographed, and lesional tissue was hemisected to obtain a pretreatment diagnosis and baseline biochemical and molecular variables. Gel dosing (0.5 g applied four times daily for 6 weeks) was initiated 1 week after the initial biopsy. Genomic DNA was isolated from laser-captured basilar and suprabasilar surface epithelial cells followed by PCR amplification using primer sets that targeted known and presumed tumor suppressor gene loci associated with INK4a/ARF, p53, and FHIT. Allelic imbalance was determined by sequence analysis using normal participant tissues to establish microsatellite marker peak patterns and allele sizes. Results Confirming earlier phase I data, none of the 27 participants developed FBR gel – associated toxicities. Furthermore, our results show histologic regression in a subset of patients as well as statistically significant reduction in LOH at tumor suppressor gene – associated loci. Conclusions These preliminary data suggest that further evaluation of berry gels for oral IEN chemoprevention is warranted. PMID:18413833

  13. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP)-Based Loss of Heterozygosity (LOH) Testing by Real Time PCR in Patients Suspect of Myeloproliferative Disease

    PubMed Central

    Huijsmans, Cornelis J. J.; Poodt, Jeroen; Damen, Jan; van der Linden, Johannes C.; Savelkoul, Paul H. M.; Pruijt, Johannes F. M.; Hilbink, Mirrian; Hermans, Mirjam H. A.

    2012-01-01

    During tumor development, loss of heterozygosity (LOH) often occurs. When LOH is preceded by an oncogene activating mutation, the mutant allele may be further potentiated if the wild-type allele is lost or inactivated. In myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) somatic acquisition of JAK2V617F may be followed by LOH resulting in loss of the wild type allele. The occurrence of LOH in MPN and other proliferative diseases may lead to a further potentiating the mutant allele and thereby increasing morbidity. A real time PCR based SNP profiling assay was developed and validated for LOH detection of the JAK2 region (JAK2LOH). Blood of a cohort of 12 JAK2V617F-positive patients (n = 6 25–50% and n = 6>50% JAK2V617F) and a cohort of 81 patients suspected of MPN was stored with EDTA and subsequently used for validation. To generate germ-line profiles, non-neoplastic formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue from each patient was analyzed. Results of the SNP assay were compared to those of an established Short Tandem Repeat (STR) assay. Both assays revealed JAK2LOH in 1/6 patients with 25–50% JAK2V617F. In patients with >50% JAK2V617F, JAK2LOH was detected in 6/6 by the SNP assay and 5/6 patients by the STR assay. Of the 81 patients suspected of MPN, 18 patients carried JAK2V617F. Both the SNP and STR assay demonstrated the occurrence of JAK2LOH in 5 of them. In the 63 JAK2V617F-negative patients, no JAK2LOH was observed by SNP and STR analyses. The presented SNP assay reliably detects JAK2LOH and is a fast and easy to perform alternative for STR analyses. We therefore anticipate the SNP approach as a proof of principle for the development of LOH SNP-assays for other clinically relevant LOH loci. PMID:22768290

  14. Loss of heterozygosity on chromosome 11q13 in two families with acromegaly/gigantism is independent of mutations of the multiple endocrine neoplasia type I gene.

    PubMed

    Gadelha, M R; Prezant, T R; Une, K N; Glick, R P; Moskal, S F; Vaisman, M; Melmed, S; Kineman, R D; Frohman, L A

    1999-01-01

    Familial acromegaly/gigantism occurring in the absence of multiple endocrine neoplasia type I (MEN-1) or the Carney complex has been reported in 18 families since the biochemical diagnosis of GH excess became available, and the genetic defect is unknown. In the present study we examined 2 unrelated families with isolated acromegaly/gigantism. In family A, 3 of 4 siblings were affected, with ages at diagnosis of 19, 21, and 23 yr. In family B, 5 of 13 siblings exhibited the phenotype and were diagnosed at 13, 15, 17, 17, and 24 yr of age. All 8 affected patients had elevated basal GH levels associated with high insulin-like growth factor I levels and/or nonsuppressible serum GH levels during an oral glucose tolerance test. GHRH levels were normal in affected members of family A. An invasive macroadenoma was found in 6 subjects, and a microadenoma was found in 1 subject from family B. The sequence of the GHRH receptor complementary DNA in 1 tumor from family A was normal. There was no history of consanguinity in either family, and the past medical history and laboratory results excluded MEN-1 and the Carney complex in all affected and unaffected screened subjects. Five of 8 subjects have undergone pituitary surgery to date, and paraffin-embedded pituitary blocks were available for analysis. Loss of heterozygosity on chromosome 11q13 was studied by comparing microsatellite polymorphisms of leukocyte and tumor DNA using PYGM (centromeric) and D11S527 (telomeric), markers closely linked to the MEN-1 tumor suppressor gene. All tumors exhibited a loss of heterozygosity at both markers. Sequencing of the MEN-1 gene revealed no germline mutations in either family, nor was a somatic mutation found in tumor DNA from one subject in family A. The integrity of the MEN-1 gene in this subject was further supported by demonstration of the presence of MEN-1 messenger ribonucleic acid, as assessed by RT-PCR. These data indicate that loss of heterozygosity in these affected family

  15. Clinical significance of previously cryptic copy number alterations and loss of heterozygosity in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome determined using combined array comparative genomic hybridization plus single-nucleotide polymorphism microarray analyses.

    PubMed

    Koh, Kyung-Nam; Lee, Jin Ok; Seo, Eul Ju; Lee, Seong Wook; Suh, Jin Kyung; Im, Ho Joon; Seo, Jong Jin

    2014-07-01

    The combined array comparative genomic hybridization plus single-nucleotide polymorphism microarray (CGH+SNP microarray) platform can simultaneously detect copy number alterations (CNA) and copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity (LOH). Eighteen children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (n=15) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) (n=3) were studied using CGH+SNP microarray to evaluate the clinical significance of submicroscopic chromosomal aberrations. CGH+SNP microarray revealed CNAs at 14 regions in 9 patients, while metaphase cytogenetic (MC) analysis detected CNAs in 11 regions in 8 patients. Using CGH+SNP microarray, LOHs>10 Mb involving terminal regions or the whole chromosome were detected in 3 of 18 patients (17%). CGH+SNP microarray revealed cryptic LOHs with or without CNAs in 3 of 5 patients with normal karyotypes. CGH+SNP microarray detected additional cryptic CNAs (n=2) and LOHs (n=5) in 6 of 13 patients with abnormal MC. In total, 9 patients demonstrated additional aberrations, including CNAs (n=3) and/or LOHs (n=8). Three of 15 patients with AML and terminal LOH>10 Mb demonstrated a significantly inferior relapse-free survival rate (P=0.041). This study demonstrates that CGH+SNP microarray can simultaneously detect previously cryptic CNAs and LOH, which may demonstrate prognostic implications.

  16. Microsatellite Instability and Loss of Heterozygosity at Chromosomal Location 18q: Prospective Evaluation of Biomarkers for Stages II and III Colon Cancer—A Study of CALGB 9581 and 89803

    PubMed Central

    Bertagnolli, Monica M.; Redston, Mark; Compton, Carolyn C.; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Mayer, Robert J.; Goldberg, Richard M.; Colacchio, Thomas A.; Saltz, Leonard B.; Warren, Robert S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Colorectal cancer (CRC) develops as a result of a series of accumulated genomic changes that produce oncogene activation and tumor suppressor gene loss. These characteristics may classify CRC into subsets of distinct clinical behaviors. Patients and Methods We studied two of these genomic defects—mismatch repair deficiency (MMR-D) and loss of heterozygosity at chromosomal location 18q (18qLOH)—in patients enrolled onto two phase III cooperative group trials for treatment of potentially curable colon cancer. These trials included prospective secondary analyses to determine the relationship between these markers and treatment outcome. A total of 1,852 patients were tested for MMR status and 955 (excluding patients with MMR-D tumors) for 18qLOH. Results Compared with stage III, more stage II tumors were MMR-D (21.3% v 14.4%; P < .001) and were intact at 18q (24.2% v 15.1%; P = .001). For the combined cohort, patients with MMR-D tumors had better 5-year disease-free survival (DFS; 0.76 v 0.67; P < .001) and overall survival (OS; 0.81 v 0.78; P = .029) than those with MMR intact (MMR-I) tumors. Among patients with MMR-I tumors, the status of 18q did not affect outcome, with 5-year values for patients with 18q intact versus 18qLOH tumors of 0.74 versus 0.65 (P = .18) for DFS and 0.81 versus 0.77 (P = .18) for OS. Conclusion We conclude that MMR-D tumor status, but not the presence of 18qLOH, has prognostic value for stages II and III colon cancer. PMID:21747089

  17. The Clark Phase-able Sample Size Problem: Long-Range Phasing and Loss of Heterozygosity in GWAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halldórsson, Bjarni V.; Aguiar, Derek; Tarpine, Ryan; Istrail, Sorin

    A phase transition is taking place today. The amount of data generated by genome resequencing technologies is so large that in some cases it is now less expensive to repeat the experiment than to store the information generated by the experiment. In the next few years it is quite possible that millions of Americans will have been genotyped. The question then arises of how to make the best use of this information and jointly estimate the haplotypes of all these individuals. The premise of the paper is that long shared genomic regions (or tracts) are unlikely unless the haplotypes are identical by descent (IBD), in contrast to short shared tracts which may be identical by state (IBS). Here we estimate for populations, using the US as a model, what sample size of genotyped individuals would be necessary to have sufficiently long shared haplotype regions (tracts) that are identical by descent (IBD), at a statistically significant level. These tracts can then be used as input for a Clark-like phasing method to obtain a complete phasing solution of the sample. We estimate in this paper that for a population like the US and about 1% of the people genotyped (approximately 2 million), tracts of about 200 SNPs long are shared between pairs of individuals IBD with high probability which assures the Clark method phasing success. We show on simulated data that the algorithm will get an almost perfect solution if the number of individuals being SNP arrayed is large enough and the correctness of the algorithm grows with the number of individuals being genotyped.

  18. Acquired copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity of chromosome 1p as a molecular event associated with marrow fibrosis in MPL-mutated myeloproliferative neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Pietra, Daniela; Guglielmelli, Paola; Bordoni, Roberta; Casetti, Ilaria; Milanesi, Chiara; Sant’Antonio, Emanuela; Ferretti, Virginia; Pancrazzi, Alessandro; Rotunno, Giada; Severgnini, Marco; Pietrelli, Alessandro; Astori, Cesare; Fugazza, Elena; Pascutto, Cristiana; Boveri, Emanuela; Passamonti, Francesco; De Bellis, Gianluca; Vannucchi, Alessandro; Cazzola, Mario

    2013-01-01

    We studied mutations of MPL exon 10 in patients with essential thrombocythemia (ET) or primary myelofibrosis (PMF), first investigating a cohort of 892 consecutive patients. MPL mutation scanning was performed on granulocyte genomic DNA by using a high-resolution melt assay, and the mutant allele burden was evaluated by using deep sequencing. Somatic mutations of MPL, all but one involving codon W515, were detected in 26/661 (4%) patients with ET, 10/187 (5%) with PMF, and 7/44 (16%) patients with post-ET myelofibrosis. Comparison of JAK2 (V617F)–mutated and MPL-mutated patients showed only minor phenotypic differences. In an extended group of 62 MPL-mutated patients, the granulocyte mutant allele burden ranged from 1% to 95% and was significantly higher in patients with PMF or post-ET myelofibrosis compared with those with ET. Patients with higher mutation burdens had evidence of acquired copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity (CN-LOH) of chromosome 1p in granulocytes, consistent with a transition from heterozygosity to homozygosity for the MPL mutation in clonal cells. A significant association was found between MPL-mutant allele burden greater than 50% and marrow fibrosis. These observations suggest that acquired CN-LOH of chromosome 1p involving the MPL location may represent a molecular mechanism of fibrotic transformation in MPL-mutated myeloproliferative neoplasms. PMID:23575445

  19. Clonal evolution and clinical significance of copy number neutral loss of heterozygosity of chromosome arm 6p in acquired aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Betensky, Marisol; Babushok, Daria; Roth, Jacquelyn J; Mason, Philip J; Biegel, Jaclyn A; Busse, Tracy M; Li, Yimei; Lind, Curt; Papazoglou, Anna; Monos, Dimitri; Podsakoff, Gregory; Bessler, Monica; Olson, Timothy S

    2016-01-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia (aAA) results from the T cell-mediated autoimmune destruction of hematopoietic stem cells. Factors predicting response to immune suppression therapy (IST) or development of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) are beginning to be elucidated. Our recent data suggest most patients with aAA treated with IST develop clonal somatic genetic alterations in hematopoietic cells. One frequent acquired abnormality is copy-number neutral loss of heterozygosity on chromosome 6p (6p CN-LOH) involving the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) locus. We hypothesized that because 6p CN-LOH clones may arise from selective pressure to escape immune surveillance through deletion of HLA alleles, the development of 6p CN-LOH may affect response to IST. We used single nucleotide polymorphism array genotyping and targeted next-generation sequencing of HLA alleles to assess frequency of 6p CN-LOH, identity of HLA alleles lost through 6p CN-LOH, and impact of 6p CN-LOH on response to IST. 6p CN-LOH clones were present in 11.3% of patients, remained stable over time, and were not associated with development of MDS-defining cytogenetic abnormalities. Notably, no patient with 6p CN-LOH treated with IST achieved a complete response. In summary, clonal 6p CN-LOH in aAA defines a unique subgroup of patients that may provide insights into hematopoietic clonal evolution. PMID:26702937

  20. Screening for RB1 mutations in tumor tissue using denaturing high performance liquid chromatography, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, and loss of heterozygosity analysis.

    PubMed

    Sellner, Loryn N; Edkins, Edward; Smith, Nicholas

    2006-01-01

    Retinoblastoma is a malignant retinal neoplasm arising in infancy as a result of inactivating mutations in both alleles of the retinoblastoma susceptibility gene, RB1. Identification of the causative RB1 mutations in a patient assists in the clinical management of the affected patient and risk assessment of family members, principally on the basis of whether there is a germline mutation. In this paper, we describe our experience with molecular analysis of RB1 mutations in tumor and nontumor samples from 18 retinoblastoma patients, using multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification (MLPA) to detect large deletions or duplications, microsatellite analysis to detect loss of heterozygosity (LOH), and denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (D-HPLC) analysis to detect point mutations and small insertions or deletions. We found LOH in 71% of all cases, and 83% of these were due to acquired isodisomy rather than chromosomal deletions. Small mutations identified by D-HPLC accounted for 78% of the non-LOH mutations, and large deletions/duplications detected by MLPA accounted for the remaining 22%. We give the first report of a large, multiexon duplication in RB1 of exons 8 to 18. PMID:16808635

  1. Silencing NKD2 by promoter region hypermethylation promotes gastric cancer invasion and metastasis by up-regulating SOX18 in human gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yan; Cao, Baoping; Yang, Yunsheng; Linghu, Enqiang; Zhan, Qimin; Lu, Youyong; Yu, Yingyan; Herman, James G; Guo, Mingzhou

    2015-10-20

    Naked cuticle homolog2 (NKD2) is located in chromosome 5p15.3, which is frequently loss of heterozygosity in human colorectal and gastric cancers. In order to understand the mechanism of NKD2 in gastric cancer development, 6 gastric cancer cell lines and 196 cases of human primary gastric cancer samples were involved. Methylation specific PCR (MSP), gene expression array, flow cytometry, transwell assay and xenograft mice model were employed in this study. The expression of NKD1 and NKD2 was silenced by promoter region hypermethylation. NKD1 and NKD2 were methylated in 11.7% (23/196) and 53.1% (104/196) in human primary gastric cancer samples. NKD2 methylation is associated with cell differentiation, TNM stage and distant metastasis significantly (all P < 0.05), and the overall survival time is longer in NKD2 unmethylated group compared to NKD2 methylated group (P < 0.05). Restoration of NKD2 expression suppressed cell proliferation, colony formation, cell invasion and migration, induced G2/M phase arrest, and sensitized cancer cells to docetaxel. NKD2 inhibits SOX18 and MMP-2,7,9 expression and suppresses BGC823 cell xenograft growth. In conclusion, NKD2 methylation may serve as a poor prognostic and chemo-sensitive marker in human gastric cancer. NKD2 impedes gastric cancer metastasis by inhibiting SOX18.

  2. Silencing NKD2 by promoter region hypermethylation promotes gastric cancer invasion and metastasis by up-regulating SOX18 in human gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yunsheng; Linghu, Enqiang; Zhan, Qimin; Lu, Youyong; Yu, Yingyan; Herman, James G.; Guo, Mingzhou

    2015-01-01

    Naked cuticle homolog2 (NKD2) is located in chromosome 5p15.3, which is frequently loss of heterozygosity in human colorectal and gastric cancers. In order to understand the mechanism of NKD2 in gastric cancer development, 6 gastric cancer cell lines and 196 cases of human primary gastric cancer samples were involved. Methylation specific PCR (MSP), gene expression array, flow cytometry, transwell assay and xenograft mice model were employed in this study. The expression of NKD1 and NKD2 was silenced by promoter region hypermethylation. NKD1 and NKD2 were methylated in 11.7% (23/196) and 53.1% (104/196) in human primary gastric cancer samples. NKD2 methylation is associated with cell differentiation, TNM stage and distant metastasis significantly (all P < 0.05), and the overall survival time is longer in NKD2 unmethylated group compared to NKD2 methylated group (P < 0.05). Restoration of NKD2 expression suppressed cell proliferation, colony formation, cell invasion and migration, induced G2/M phase arrest, and sensitized cancer cells to docetaxel. NKD2 inhibits SOX18 and MMP-2,7,9 expression and suppresses BGC823 cell xenograft growth. In conclusion, NKD2 methylation may serve as a poor prognostic and chemo-sensitive marker in human gastric cancer. NKD2 impedes gastric cancer metastasis by inhibiting SOX18. PMID:26396173

  3. Pathogenesis and Consequences of Uniparental Disomy in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Makishima, Hideki; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P.

    2012-01-01

    Systematic application of new genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism arrays has demonstrated that somatically acquired regions of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) without changes in copy number frequently occur in many types of cancer. Until recently, the ubiquity of this type of chromosomal defect had remained unrecognized as it cannot be detected using routine cytogenetic technologies. Random and recurrent patterns of copy-neutral LOH, also referred to as uniparental disomy (UPD), can be found in specific cancer types and probably contribute to clonal outgrowth owing to various mechanisms. In this review we explore the types, topography, genesis, pathophysiological consequences and clinical implications of UPD. PMID:21518781

  4. The evolution of loss of heterozygosity on chromosome 17 during the progression to barrett's adenocarcinoma involves a unique combination of target sites in individual specimens.

    PubMed

    Dunn, J R; Garde, J; Dolan, K; Gosney, J R; Oates, B C; Watson, A J; Fielding, P; Field, J K

    2000-10-01

    We have previously identified thirteen common minimally deleted regions (MRs) on chromosome 17 in twelve Barrett's esophageal adenocarcinoma (BOA) specimens using 41 precisely mapped microsatellite markers (Dunn et al., Oncogene, 17: 987-993, 1999). The aim of the present study has been to identify the earliest sites of loss on this chromosome that arise and persist during the progression to BOA. This has been undertaken by the analysis of multiple carefully microdissected tissue samples from each of five esophagectomy specimens, several of which contained identifiable premalignant tissue. Our data demonstrate a stepwise accumulation of loss in each analyzed specimen, consistent with a single clonal pathway in four specimens and several coexisting pathways in one specimen. Several clonal anomalies (loss preceding heterozygosity and variable intrasample degrees of loss at different markers) were also observed. Within extensively deleted regions of the tumor (seen in three specimens), small deletions were detected in premalignant tissue, predominantly at the site of our identified MRs, and these losses were seen to expand and merge during the progression to BOA. Clonal losses at MRs were first detected in tissue showing early changes histologically, including Barrett's intestinal metaplasia and intermediate-grade dysplasia. Our results provide further support for many of the MRs we have previously identified, thereby adding to evidence for the existence of multiple novel cancer-associated genes on chromosome 17 involved in the development of BOA.

  5. Identification of a 7-cM region of frequent allelic loss on chromosome band 16p13.3 that is specifically associated with anaplastic thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kadota, M; Tamaki, Y; Sakita, I; Komoike, Y; Miyazaki, M; Ooka, M; Masuda, N; Fujiwara, Y; Ohnishi, T; Tomita, N; Sekimoto, M; Ohue, M; Ikeda, T; Kobayashi, T; Horii, A; Monden, M

    2000-01-01

    A total of 17 primary thyroid cancer specimens including seven anaplastic cancers, two papillary cancers adjacent to the anaplastic cancers, and eight papillary cancers were analyzed for loss of heterozygosity (LOH) on chromosome arm 16p. All tumors of anaplastic cancer showed LOHs at one or more loci, and a 7-cM region of the smallest deleted region was found on 16p13.3 between D16S423 and D16S406. This LOH was specifically found in the anaplastic cancer and not in the papillary thyroid cancer. Our present results suggest localization of the putative tumor suppressor gene on 16p13.3, which is likely to play an important role in the anaplastic transformation of thyroid cancer.

  6. Transformed aggressive γδ-variant T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemia with acquired copy neutral loss of heterozygosity at 17q11.2q25.3 and additional aberrations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Ramchandren, Radhakrishnan; Papenhausen, Peter; Loughran, Thomas P; Sokol, Lubomir

    2014-09-01

    T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemia (T-LGLL) is a rare indolent lymphoproliferative disorder characterized by cytopenias, splenomegaly, and various degrees of T-cell lymphocytosis, due to a clonal expansion of CD8-positive cytotoxic T-cells. Phenotypic variants of T-LGLL include CD4(+) /CD8(-) T-cells, with dual CD4(-) /CD8(-) /γδ(+) T-cells being even rarer. Cytogenetic abnormalities in T-LGLL have rarely been reported, and there is scientific debate regarding the existence of aggressive or transformed variants of T-LGLL. We report a patient with T-LGLL, γδ variant, with nearly 20-year-long duration of cytopenias before transformation to an unusual clinical scenario, manifesting with marked lymphocytosis >100 × 10(9) /L and infiltration of lymph nodes, tonsils, and subcutaneous tissue. Single-nucleotide polymorphism assays revealed acquired copy neutral loss of heterozygosity at 17q and deletion of 3p21.31, in addition to trisomy 5, monosomy X, and monosomy 21. These genetic abnormalities provided a better understanding of the molecular nature and the potentiality of disease transformation. PMID:24635703

  7. A radiation hybrid map of the BRCA1 region

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connell, P.; Taylor, T.; Hundley, J.E.; Johnson-Pais, T.L.; Reus, B.; Leach, R.J. )

    1994-03-01

    A locus on chromosome 17q, designated BRCA1', has been identified as a predisposition gene for breast cancer. A panel of chromosome 17-specific radiation-reduced somatic cell hybrid clones has been assembled for high-resolution mapping of chromosome 17. A series of 35 markers, known to span the BRCA1 locus, were tested against this hybrid panel by PCR assays. Statistical analysis of these data yields a BRCA1 radiation hybrid map at a density sufficient to initiate YAC cloning and pulsed-field gel electrophoretic mapping of the candidate regional In addition, many of the markers reveal genetic polymorphisms and may be tested in breast cancer families and in loss-of-heterozygosity studies of sporadic breast cancers to better define the BRCA1 gene candidate region. 33 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  8. Loss of heterozygosity on 10q23.3 and mutation of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN in benign endometrial cyst of the ovary: possible sequence progression from benign endometrial cyst to endometrioid carcinoma and clear cell carcinoma of the ovary.

    PubMed

    Sato, N; Tsunoda, H; Nishida, M; Morishita, Y; Takimoto, Y; Kubo, T; Noguchi, M

    2000-12-15

    Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at locus 10q23.3 and mutation of the PTEN tumor suppressor gene occur frequently in both endometrial carcinoma and ovarian endometrioid carcinoma. To investigate the potential role of the PTEN gene in the carcinogenesis of ovarian endometrioid carcinoma and its related subtype, clear cell carcinoma, we examined 20 ovarian endometrioid carcinomas, 24 clear cell carcinomas, and 34 solitary endometrial cysts of the ovary for LOH at 10q23.3 and point mutations within the entire coding region of the PTEN gene. LOH was found in 8 of 19 ovarian endometrioid carcinomas (42.1%), 6 of 22 clear cell carcinomas (27.3%), and 13 of 23 solitary endometrial cysts (56.5%). In 5 endometrioid carcinomas synchronous with endometriosis, 3 cases displayed LOH events common to both the carcinoma and the endometriosis, 1 displayed an LOH event in only the carcinoma, and 1 displayed no LOH events in either lesion. In 7 clear cell carcinomas synchronous with endometriosis, 3 displayed LOH events common to both the carcinoma and the endometriosis, 1 displayed an LOH event in only the carcinoma, and 3 displayed no LOH events in either lesion. In no cases were there LOH events in the endometriosis only. Somatic mutations in the PTEN gene were identified in 4 of 20 ovarian endometrioid carcinomas (20.0%), 2 of 24 clear cell carcinomas (8.3%), and 7 of 34 solitary endometrial cysts (20.6%). These results indicate that inactivation of the PTEN tumor suppressor gene is an early event in the development of ovarian endometrioid carcinoma and clear cell carcinoma of the ovary.

  9. YAC contigs covering an 8-megabase region of 3p deleted in the small-cell lung cancer cell line U2020.

    PubMed

    Todd, S; Roche, J; Hahner, L; Bolin, R; Drabkin, H A; Gemmill, R M

    1995-01-01

    Somatic deletions of chromosome 3p occur at high frequencies in cancers of kidney, breast, cervix, head and neck, nasopharynx, and lung. The frequency of 3p deletion in lung cancer approaches 100% among small cell lesions and 70 to 80% in non-small cell lesions. This evidence strongly implies that one or more tumor suppressor genes of potentially widespread significance reside within the deleted region(s). Precise definition of the deleted target region(s) has been difficult due to the extensive area(s) lost and use of markers with low informativeness. However, improved definition remains essential to permit isolation of putative tumor suppressor genes from 3p. The identification of several small, homozygous 3p deletions in lung cancer cell lines has provided a critical resource that will assist this search. The U2020 cell line contains a small homozygous deletion that maps to a very proximal region of 3p and includes the marker D3S3. We previously identified a subset of DNA markers located within the deleted region and determined their relative order by pulsed-field gel mapping studies. In the present report, we describe the development of YAC contigs that span the majority of the deleted region and link up to flanking markers on both sides. The centromere proximal portion of the contig crosses the breakpoint from an X;3 translocation located within 3p12 providing both location and orientation to the map. PCR-based (CA)n microsatellite polymorphisms have been localized within and flanking the deletion region. These markers should greatly facilitate loss-of-heterozygosity studies of this region in human cancer. The contig provides a direct means for isolation of putative tumor suppressor genes from this segment of 3p. PMID:7774917

  10. Characterization of 10 new polymorphic dinucleotide repeats and generation of a high-density microsatellite-based physical map of the BRCA1 region of chromosome 17q21

    SciTech Connect

    Couch, F.J.; Xu, J.; Weber, B.L.

    1994-12-01

    A familial early onset breast cancer gene (BRCA1) has been localized to chromosome 17q21. To aid in the identification of this gene a number of new microsatellite markers from the D17S857 to D17S78 region were isolated and characterized. These markers, along with previously published markers from the region, were localized on a physical map by STS content mapping of cosmids from the BRCA1 interval. This high-density STS map of the BRCA1 region will be useful for linkage studies of families with apparent inherited breast cancer and for loss of heterozygosity analysis of breast tumor DNAs. 19 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Refined-mapping of the novel TSG within the 17q24.3 chromosomal region in non-small cell lung cancer samples

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wayren; Wang, Yiching; Chu, Woeichyn; Tseng, Ruochia

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer mortality in Taiwan. It has been previously demonstrated that alterations to tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) are involved in the multi-step carcinogenesis process that results in the development of human cancer, including lung cancer. Both copies of the TSG must be inactivated for their function to be lost. As a result, it is important to search for the genomic regions that potentially contain TSGs and to investigate the etiological association of lung cancer with the allelic deletion of various candidate TSGs. Previous genome-wide loss of heterozygosity (LOH) data has demonstrated that the chromosome region at 17q24.3 was a novel and frequent LOH region that was associated with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In the present study, refined mapping using 9 additional microsatellite markers was performed targeting chromosome 17q24.3 by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-LOH analysis. The allelic loss pattern across 48 available tumors indicates that the minimal deletion region was located between markers D17S1882 and D17S2193 and spanned a distance of approximately 2.7 Mb, reaching 65% LOH at locus D17S1816. A putative gene, LOC51321 (AMZ2), was postulated to be the deletion target on 17q24.3 based on the findings from these NSCLC samples. Reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) expression analysis indicated reduced expression of LOC51321 in 54% (7/13) of the NSCLC cell lines tested and 36% (19/53) of the NSCLC tumor tissue samples analyzed. In CL1-5-F4 cells, low mRNA and protein expression of LOC51321 were associated with the promoter hypermethylation, as determined by RT-PCR, western blotting and methylation-specific PCR assays. In addition, treatment with 5-Aza-deoxycytosine successfully restored mRNA expression by de-methylating the putative promoter region in CL1-5-F4 cells that lacked LOC51321 expression, but did harbor the relevant methylated promoter. These findings indicate that LOC51321 may be involved in lung

  12. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) for markers on chromosome 8q in a human chondrosarcoma cell line and in a tumor that developed in a man with Hereditary Multiple Exostoses (HME)

    SciTech Connect

    Raskind, W.H.; Conrad, E.U.; Robbins, J.R.

    1994-09-01

    HME is an autosomal dominant disorder in which multiple benign cartilage-capped lesions develop on otherwise histologically normal bones. The majority of chondrosarcomas are sporadic, but the presence of HME greatly increases the risk to develop this tumor. Sarcoma may also arise in sporadically-occurring exostoses. The study of inherited disorders that predispose to malignant diseases has led to discoveries regarding molecular changes involved in carcinogenesis in general. In an analogous manner, somatic mutations in HME genes may be responsible for sporadic exostoses and/or chondrosarcomas. HME is genetically heterogeneous; EXT genes have been assigned to 8q24, the pericentromeric region of 11 and 19p11-p13. We compared chondrosarcoma cell DNA to DNA from white blood cells for LOH at polymorphic loci in these 3 regions. LOH for 4 of 5 markers in 8q24 was detected in a chondrosarcoma that arose in a man with HME. Heterozygosity was retained for markers and chromosomes 11 and 19. We then evaluated cultured cells from 10 sporadic chondrosarcomas. LOH for multiple markers in 8q24 was detected in a cell line, Ch-1, established from an aggressive tumor, but not in 9 other tumors. Of the 9 tumors studied, only the Ch-1 line exhibited LOH for chromosome 11 markers. LOH for a 19p marker was not detected in any of 6 tumors examined, including Ch-1. The karyotype of Ch-1 contains many structurally rearranged chromosomes. The two chromosome 11s appear normal but both chromosome 8 homologues have been replaced by der(8)t(5;8)(q22;q21.2). LOH at 8q24 was also detected in the uncultured tumor. These results suggest that genes responsible for HME may have tumor suppressor functions whose loss may be related to the development of a subset of chondrosarcomas.

  13. Northeast Regional Cancer Institute's Cancer Surveillance and Risk Factor Program

    SciTech Connect

    Lesko, Samuel M.

    2007-07-31

    OBJECTIVES The Northeast Regional Cancer Institute is conducting a program of ongoing epidemiologic research to address cancer disparities in northeast Pennsylvania. Of particular concern are disparities in the incidence of, stage at diagnosis, and mortality from colorectal cancer. In northeast Pennsylvania, age-adjusted incidence and mortality rates for colorectal cancer are higher, and a significantly smaller proportion of new colorectal cancer cases are diagnosed with local stage disease than is observed in comparable national data. Further, estimates of the prevalence of colorectal cancer screening in northeast Pennsylvania are lower than the US average. The Northeast Regional Cancer Institute’s research program supports surveillance of common cancers, investigations of cancer risk factors and screening behaviors, and the development of resources to further cancer research in this community. This project has the following specific objectives: I. To conduct cancer surveillance in northeast Pennsylvania. a. To monitor incidence and mortality for all common cancers, and colorectal cancer, in particular, and b. To document changes in the stage at diagnosis of colorectal cancer in this high-risk, underserved community. II. To conduct a population-based study of cancer risk factors and screening behavior in a six county region of northeast Pennsylvania. a. To monitor and document changes in colorectal cancer screening rates, and b. To document the prevalence of cancer risk factors (especially factors that increase the risk of colorectal cancer) and to identify those risk factors that are unusually common in this community. APPROACH Cancer surveillance was conducted using data from the Northeast Regional Cancer Institute’s population-based Regional Cancer Registry, the Pennsylvania Cancer Registry, and NCI’s SEER program. For common cancers, incidence and mortality were examined by county within the region and compared to data for similar populations in the US

  14. SDPR functions as a metastasis suppressor in breast cancer by promoting apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Ozturk, Sait; Papageorgis, Panagiotis; Wong, Chen Khuan; Lambert, Arthur W.; Abdolmaleky, Hamid M.; Thiagalingam, Arunthathi; Cohen, Herbert T.; Thiagalingam, Sam

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic dissemination of breast cancer cells represents a significant clinical obstacle to curative therapy. The loss of function of metastasis suppressor genes is a major rate-limiting step in breast cancer progression that prevents the formation of new colonies at distal sites. However, the discovery of new metastasis suppressor genes in breast cancer using genomic efforts has been slow, potentially due to their primary regulation by epigenetic mechanisms. Here, we report the use of model cell lines with the same genetic lineage for the identification of a novel metastasis suppressor gene, serum deprivation response (SDPR), localized to 2q32-33, a region reported to be associated with significant loss of heterozygosity in breast cancer. In silico metaanalysis of publicly available gene expression datasets suggests that the loss of expression of SDPR correlates with significantly reduced distant-metastasis–free and relapse-free survival of breast cancer patients who underwent therapy. Furthermore, we found that stable SDPR overexpression in highly metastatic breast cancer model cell lines inhibited prosurvival pathways, shifted the balance of Bcl-2 family proteins in favor of apoptosis, and decreased migration and intravasation/extravasation potential, with a corresponding drastic suppression of metastatic nodule formation in the lungs of NOD/SCID mice. Moreover, SDPR expression is silenced by promoter DNA methylation, and as such it exemplifies epigenetic regulation of metastatic breast cancer progression. These observations highlight SDPR as a potential prognostic biomarker and a target for future therapeutic applications. PMID:26739564

  15. Cancer mortality in agricultural regions of Minnesota.

    PubMed Central

    Schreinemachers, D M; Creason, J P; Garry, V F

    1999-01-01

    Because of its unique geology, Minnesota can be divided into four agricultural regions: south-central region one (corn, soybeans); west-central region two (wheat, corn, soybeans); northwest region three (wheat, sugar beets, potatoes); and northeast region four (forested and urban in character). Cancer mortality (1980-1989) in agricultural regions one, two, and three was compared to region four. Using data compiled by the National Center for Health Statistics, cancer mortality was summarized by 5-year age groups, sex, race, and county. Age-standardized mortality rate ratios were calculated for white males and females for all ages combined, and for children aged 0-14. Increased mortality rate ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were observed for the following cancer sites: region one--lip (men), standardized rate ratio (SRR) = 2.70 (CI, 1.08-6.71); nasopharynx (women), SRR = 3.35 (CI, 1.20-9.31); region two--non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (women), SRR = 1.35 (CI, 1.09-1.66); and region three--prostate (men), SRR = 1.12 (CI, 1.00-1.26); thyroid (men), SRR = 2.95 (CI, 1.35-6.44); bone (men), SRR = 2.09 (CI, 1. 00-4.34); eye (women), SRR = 5.77 (CI, 1.90-17.50). Deficits of smoking-related cancers were noted. Excess cancers reported are consistent with earlier reports of agriculturally related cancers in the midwestern United States. However, reports on thyroid and bone cancer in association with agricultural pesticides are few in number. The highest use of fungicides occurs in region three. Ethylenebisdithiocarbamates, whose metabolite is a known cause of thyroid cancer in rats, are frequently applied. This report provides a rationale for evaluation of the carcinogenic potential of this suspect agent in humans. Images Figure 1 PMID:10064550

  16. LARG at chromosome 11q23 has functional characteristics of a tumor suppressor in human breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, Danny C.T.; Rudduck, Christina; Chin, Koei; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Lie, Daniel K.H.; Chua, Constance L.M.; Wong, Chow Yin; Hong, Ga Sze; Gray, Joe; Lee, Ann S.G.

    2008-05-06

    Deletion of 11q23-q24 is frequent in a diverse variety of malignancies, including breast and colorectal carcinoma, implicating the presence of a tumor suppressor gene at that chromosomal region. We show here that LARG, from 11q23, has functional characteristics of a tumor suppressor. We examined a 6-Mb region on 11q23 by high-resolution deletion mapping, utilizing both loss of heterozygosity (LOH) analysis and microarray comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). LARG (also called ARHGEF12), identified from the analyzed region, was underexpressed in 34% of primary breast carcinomas and 80% of breast cancer cell lines including the MCF-7 line. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification on 30 primary breast cancers and six breast cancer cell lines showed that LARG had the highest frequency of deletion compared to the BCSC-1 and TSLC1 genes, two known candidate tumor suppressor genes from 11q. In vitro analysis of breast cancer cell lines that underexpress LARG showed that LARG could be reactivated by trichostatin A, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, but not by 5-Aza-2{prime}-deoxycytidine, a demethylating agent. Bisulfite sequencing and quantitative high-throughput analysis of DNA methylation confirmed the lack of CpG island methylation in LARG in breast cancer. Restoration of LARG expression in MCF-7 cells by stable transfection resulted in reduced proliferation and colony formation, suggesting that LARG has functional characteristics of a tumor suppressor gene.

  17. Cancer prevention in the Asia Pacific region.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Keun-Young

    2010-01-01

    Cancer incidences as well as the most prevalent cancer types vary greatly across Asian countries since people have differing health behaviors as well as lifestyle factors related to cancer risk. Countries have varying systems of government organization, laws, resources, facilities, and management strategies for addressing the cancer burden. Examples such as Korea and Japan with existing national cancer control programs need to focus on early screening and detection and quality of screening methods. If screening and detection increase to cover more than 50% of the target population, survival rate increases and thus the number of cancer patients detected increases resulting in higher medical cost. Thus, expansion of cancer screening, in addition to smoking prevention, immunization increase, and diet control awareness, are needed for cancer prevention strategies. Countries such as Thailand, China, Malaysia, and Turkey need to begin organized efforts to reduce cancer deaths through state-wide cancer screening programs. Strategies focused on increasing survival among cancer patients are also needed. In addition, government organizations and law regulations need to be in place as the first step towards cancer prevention. For the countries such as Nepal, Pakistan, Mongolia, and Iraq which do not have any cancer-related organizations in place, the first step that is needed is to raise public awareness about cancer; a public awareness campaign is the number one priority and should begin immediately. The easiest and most feasible step at this point is dissemination of cancer education materials during school health education and physical health screening. This must be started immediately because we need to avoid the development of existing cancers where patients will need to seek specialized cancer treatment facilities that are non-existent in these regions. In addition, hospitals need to take a step further and start undergoing registration of cancer prevalence and

  18. Genetic identification of multiple loci that control breast cancer susceptibility in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Shepel, L A; Lan, H; Haag, J D; Brasic, G M; Gheen, M E; Simon, J S; Hoff, P; Newton, M A; Gould, M N

    1998-01-01

    We have used a rat model of induced mammary carcinomas in an effort to identify breast cancer susceptibility genes. Using genetic crosses between the carcinoma-resistant Copenhagen (COP) and carcinoma-sensitive Wistar-Furth rats, we have confirmed the identification of the Mcs1 locus that modulates tumor number. We have now also identified two additional loci, Mcs2 and Mcs3. These three loci map to chromosomes 2, 7, and 1, respectively, and interact additively to suppress mammary carcinoma development in the COP strain. They are responsible for a major portion of the tumor-resistant phenotype of the COP rat. No loss of heterozygosity was observed surrounding the three loci. A fourth COP locus, Mcs4, has also been identified on chromosome 8 and acts in contrast to increase the number of carcinomas. These results show that mammary carcinoma susceptibility in the COP rat is a polygenic trait. Interestingly, a polymorphism in the human genomic region homologous to the rat Mcs4 region is associated with an increased breast cancer risk in African-American women. The isolation of the Mcs genes may help elucidate novel mechanisms of carcinogenesis, provide information important for human breast cancer risk estimation, and also provide unique drug discovery targets for breast cancer prevention. PMID:9584103

  19. Selection of microsatellite markers for bladder cancer diagnosis without the need for corresponding blood.

    PubMed

    van Tilborg, Angela A G; Kompier, Lucie C; Lurkin, Irene; Poort, Ricardo; El Bouazzaoui, Samira; van der Keur, Kirstin; Zuiverloon, Tahlita; Dyrskjot, Lars; Orntoft, Torben F; Roobol, Monique J; Zwarthoff, Ellen C

    2012-01-01

    Microsatellite markers are used for loss-of-heterozygosity, allelic imbalance and clonality analyses in cancers. Usually, tumor DNA is compared to corresponding normal DNA. However, normal DNA is not always available and can display aberrant allele ratios due to copy number variations in the genome. Moreover, stutter peaks may complicate the analysis. To use microsatellite markers for diagnosis of recurrent bladder cancer, we aimed to select markers without stutter peaks and a constant ratio between alleles, thereby avoiding the need for a control DNA sample. We investigated 49 microsatellite markers with tri- and tetranucleotide repeats in regions commonly lost in bladder cancer. Based on analysis of 50 blood DNAs the 12 best performing markers were selected with few stutter peaks and a constant ratio between peaks heights. Per marker upper and lower cut off values for allele ratios were determined. LOH of the markers was observed in 59/104 tumor DNAs. We then determined the sensitivity of the marker panel for detection of recurrent bladder cancer by assaying 102 urine samples of these patients. Sensitivity was 63% when patients were stratified for LOH in their primary tumors. We demonstrate that up-front selection of microsatellite markers obliterates the need for a corresponding blood sample. For diagnosis of bladder cancer recurrences in urine this significantly reduces costs. Moreover, this approach facilitates retrospective analysis of archival tumor samples for allelic imbalance.

  20. Mutation analysis of aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) gene in colorectal, breast, and prostate cancers.

    PubMed

    Georgitsi, M; Karhu, A; Winqvist, R; Visakorpi, T; Waltering, K; Vahteristo, P; Launonen, V; Aaltonen, L A

    2007-01-29

    Germline mutations in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) gene were recently identified in individuals with pituitary adenoma predisposition (PAP). These patients have prolactin (PRL) or growth hormone (GH) oversecreting pituitary adenomas, the latter exhibiting acromegaly or gigantism. Loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH) analysis revealed that AIP is lost in PAP tumours, suggesting that it acts as a tumour-suppressor gene. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein is involved in several pathways, but it is best characterised as a cytoplasmic partner of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). To examine the possible role of AIP in the genesis of common cancers, we performed somatic mutation screening in a series of 373 colorectal cancers (CRCs), 82 breast cancers, and 44 prostate tumour samples. A missense R16H (47G>A) change was identified in two CRC samples, as well as in the respective normal tissues, but was absent in 209 healthy controls. The remaining findings were silent, previously unreported, changes of the coding, non-coding, or untranslated regions of AIP. These results suggest that somatic AIP mutations are not common in CRC, breast, and prostate cancers. PMID:17242703

  1. A candidate region for Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome defined by genetic and physical mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Wainwright, B.; Negus, K.; Berkman, J.

    1994-09-01

    Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCCS, or Gorlin`s syndrome) is a cancer predisposition syndrome charcterized by multiple basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) and diverse developmental defects. The gene responsible for NBCCS, which is most likely to be a tumor suppressor gene, has previously been mapped to 9q22.3-q31 in a 12 cM interval between the microsatellite marker loci D9S12 and D9S109. Combined multipoint and haplotype analyses of Australian pedigrees has further refined the localization to a 2 cM interval between markers D9S196 and D9S180. Our loss of heterozygosity (LOH) studies from sporadic (n= 58) and familial (n=41) BCCs indicate that 50% have deletions within the NBCCS candidate region. All LOH is consistent with the genetic mapping of the NBCCS locus. Additionally, one sporadic tumor indicates that the smallest region of overlap in the deletions is within the interval D9S287 (proximal) and D9S180 (distal). A series of YAC clones from within this region has been mapped by FISH to examine chimerism. These clones, which have been mapped with respect to one another, form a contig which encompasses the candidate region from D9S196 to D9S180.

  2. Aberrant expression of the candidate tumor suppressor gene DAL-1 due to hypermethylation in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao; Xu, Man; Cui, Xiaobo; Liu, Yixin; Zhang, Yi; Sui, Yu; Wang, Dong; Peng, Lei; Wang, Dexu; Yu, Jingcui

    2016-01-01

    By allelotyping for loss of heterozygosity (LOH), we previously identified a deletion region that harbors the candidate tumor suppressor gene DAL-1 at 18p11.3 in sporadic gastric cancers (GCs). The expression and function of DAL-1 in GCs remained unclear. Here, we demonstrated that the absence of or notable decreases in the expression of DAL-1 mRNA and protein was highly correlated with CpG hypermethylation of the DAL-1 promoter in primary GC tissues and in GC cell lines. Furthermore, abnormal DAL-1 subcellular localization was also observed in GC cells. Exogenous DAL-1 effectively inhibited cancer cell proliferation, migration, invasion and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT); exogenous DAL-1 also promoted apoptosis in GC AGS cells. When endogenous DAL-1 was knocked down in GC HGC-27 cells, the cells appeared highly aggressive. Taken together, these findings provide solid evidence that aberrant expression of DAL-1 by hypermethylation in the promoter region results in tumor suppressor gene behavior that plays important roles in the malignancy of GCs. Understanding the role of it played in the molecular pathogenesis of GC, DAL-1 might be a potential biomarker for molecular diagnosis and evaluation of the GC. PMID:26923709

  3. Novel Genes Associated with Colorectal Cancer Are Revealed by High Resolution Cytogenetic Analysis in a Patient Specific Manner

    PubMed Central

    Al Qarni, Saeed; Al Rodayyan, Maha; Muhammed Mustafa, Sabeena; Deeb, Ahmad; Al Sheikh, Ebthehal; Afzal Khan, Mohammed; Johani, Mishal; Yousef, Zeyad

    2013-01-01

    Genomic abnormalities leading to colorectal cancer (CRC) include somatic events causing copy number aberrations (CNAs) as well as copy neutral manifestations such as loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and uniparental disomy (UPD). We studied the causal effect of these events by analyzing high resolution cytogenetic microarray data of 15 tumor-normal paired samples. We detected 144 genes affected by CNAs. A subset of 91 genes are known to be CRC related yet high GISTIC scores indicate 24 genes on chromosomes 7, 8, 18 and 20 to be strongly relevant. Combining GISTIC ranking with functional analyses and degree of loss/gain we identify three genes in regions of significant loss (ATP8B1, NARS, and ATP5A1) and eight in regions of gain (CTCFL, SPO11, ZNF217, PLEKHA8, HOXA3, GPNMB, IGF2BP3 and PCAT1) as novel in their association with CRC. Pathway and target prediction analysis of CNA affected genes and microRNAs, respectively indicates TGF-β signaling pathway to be involved in causing CRC. Finally, LOH and UPD collectively affected nine cancer related genes. Transcription factor binding sites on regions of >35% copy number loss/gain influenced 16 CRC genes. Our analysis shows patient specific CRC manifestations at the genomic level and that these different events affect individual CRC patients differently. PMID:24204606

  4. Microsatellite instability in tumor and nonneoplastic colorectal cells from hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer and sporadic high microsatellite-instable tumor patients.

    PubMed

    Dietmaier, W; Gänsbauer, S; Beyser, K; Renke, B; Hartmann, A; Rümmele, P; Jauch, K W; Hofstädter, F; Rüschoff, J

    2000-01-01

    Genetic alterations such as loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and microsatellite instability (MSI) have been frequently studied in various tumor types. Genetic heterogeneity of nonneoplastic cells has not yet been sufficiently investigated. However, genomic instability in normal cells could be a potentially important issue, in particular when these cells are used as reference in LOH and MSI analyses of tumor samples. In order to investigate possible genetic abnormalities in normal colorectal cells of tumor patients, MSI analyses of normal colonic mucosa were performed. Up to 15 different laser-microdissected normal regions containing 50-150 cells were investigated in each of 15 individual microsatellite-stable, sporadic high microsatellite-instable (MSI-H) and hereditary non-polyposis coli cancer (HNPCC) colorectal cancer patients. Frequent MSI and heterogeneity in the MSI pattern were found both in normal and tumor cells from 10 HNPCC and sporadic MSI-H tumor patients whose tumors had defect mismatch repair protein expressions. This observation shows that MSI can also occur in nonneoplastic cells which has to be considered in MSI analyses for molecular HNPCC screening. In addition, considerable genetic heterogeneity was detected in all MSI-H (sporadic and HNPCC) tumors when analyzing five different regions with less than 150 cells, respectively. These differences were not detectable in larger tumor regions containing about 10,000 cells. Thus, heterogeneity of the MSI pattern (e.g. intratumoral MSI) is an important feature of tumors with the MSI-H phenotype.

  5. New genetic variants of LATS1 detected in urinary bladder and colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Saadeldin, Mona K; Shawer, Heba; Mostafa, Ahmed; Kassem, Neemat M; Amleh, Asma; Siam, Rania

    2014-01-01

    LATS1, the large tumor suppressor 1 gene, encodes for a serine/threonine kinase protein and is implicated in cell cycle progression. LATS1 is down-regulated in various human cancers, such as breast cancer, and astrocytoma. Point mutations in LATS1 were reported in human sarcomas. Additionally, loss of heterozygosity of LATS1 chromosomal region predisposes to breast, ovarian, and cervical tumors. In the current study, we investigated LATS1 genetic variations including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), in 28 Egyptian patients with either urinary bladder or colon cancers. The LATS1 gene was amplified and sequenced and the expression of LATS1 at the RNA level was assessed in 12 urinary bladder cancer samples. We report, the identification of a total of 29 variants including previously identified SNPs within LATS1 coding and non-coding sequences. A total of 18 variants were novel. Majority of the novel variants, 13, were mapped to intronic sequences and un-translated regions of the gene. Four of the five novel variants located in the coding region of the gene, represented missense mutations within the serine/threonine kinase catalytic domain. Interestingly, LATS1 RNA steady state levels was lost in urinary bladder cancerous tissue harboring four specific SNPs (16045 + 41736 + 34614 + 56177) positioned in the 5'UTR, intron 6, and two silent mutations within exon 4 and exon 8, respectively. This study identifies novel single-base-sequence alterations in the LATS1 gene. These newly identified variants could potentially be used as novel diagnostic or prognostic tools in cancer.

  6. New genetic variants of LATS1 detected in urinary bladder and colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Saadeldin, Mona K.; Shawer, Heba; Mostafa, Ahmed; Kassem, Neemat M.; Amleh, Asma; Siam, Rania

    2015-01-01

    LATS1, the large tumor suppressor 1 gene, encodes for a serine/threonine kinase protein and is implicated in cell cycle progression. LATS1 is down-regulated in various human cancers, such as breast cancer, and astrocytoma. Point mutations in LATS1 were reported in human sarcomas. Additionally, loss of heterozygosity of LATS1 chromosomal region predisposes to breast, ovarian, and cervical tumors. In the current study, we investigated LATS1 genetic variations including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), in 28 Egyptian patients with either urinary bladder or colon cancers. The LATS1 gene was amplified and sequenced and the expression of LATS1 at the RNA level was assessed in 12 urinary bladder cancer samples. We report, the identification of a total of 29 variants including previously identified SNPs within LATS1 coding and non-coding sequences. A total of 18 variants were novel. Majority of the novel variants, 13, were mapped to intronic sequences and un-translated regions of the gene. Four of the five novel variants located in the coding region of the gene, represented missense mutations within the serine/threonine kinase catalytic domain. Interestingly, LATS1 RNA steady state levels was lost in urinary bladder cancerous tissue harboring four specific SNPs (16045 + 41736 + 34614 + 56177) positioned in the 5′UTR, intron 6, and two silent mutations within exon 4 and exon 8, respectively. This study identifies novel single-base-sequence alterations in the LATS1 gene. These newly identified variants could potentially be used as novel diagnostic or prognostic tools in cancer. PMID:25628642

  7. Identifying Human Genome-Wide CNV, LOH and UPD by Targeted Sequencing of Selected Regions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Li, Wei; Xia, Yingying; Wang, Chongzhi; Tang, Y Tom; Guo, Wenying; Li, Jinliang; Zhao, Xia; Sun, Yepeng; Hu, Juan; Zhen, Hefu; Zhang, Xiandong; Chen, Chao; Shi, Yujian; Li, Lin; Cao, Hongzhi; Du, Hongli; Li, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Copy-number variations (CNV), loss of heterozygosity (LOH), and uniparental disomy (UPD) are large genomic aberrations leading to many common inherited diseases, cancers, and other complex diseases. An integrated tool to identify these aberrations is essential in understanding diseases and in designing clinical interventions. Previous discovery methods based on whole-genome sequencing (WGS) require very high depth of coverage on the whole genome scale, and are cost-wise inefficient. Another approach, whole exome genome sequencing (WEGS), is limited to discovering variations within exons. Thus, we are lacking efficient methods to detect genomic aberrations on the whole genome scale using next-generation sequencing technology. Here we present a method to identify genome-wide CNV, LOH and UPD for the human genome via selectively sequencing a small portion of genome termed Selected Target Regions (SeTRs). In our experiments, the SeTRs are covered by 99.73%~99.95% with sufficient depth. Our developed bioinformatics pipeline calls genome-wide CNVs with high confidence, revealing 8 credible events of LOH and 3 UPD events larger than 5M from 15 individual samples. We demonstrate that genome-wide CNV, LOH and UPD can be detected using a cost-effective SeTRs sequencing approach, and that LOH and UPD can be identified using just a sample grouping technique, without using a matched sample or familial information. PMID:25919136

  8. Alteration of WWOX in human cancer, a clinical view

    PubMed Central

    Baryła, Izabela; Styczeń-Binkowska, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    WWOX gene is located in FRA16D, the highly affected chromosomal fragile site. Its tumor suppressor activity has been proposed on a basis of numerous genomic alterations reported in chromosome 16q23.3–24.1 locus. WWOX is affected in many cancers, showing as high as 80% loss of heterozygosity in breast tumors. Unlike most tumor suppressors impairing of both alleles of WWOX is very rare. Despite cellular and animal models information on a WWOX role in cancer tissue is limited and sometimes confusing. This review summarizes information on WWOX in human tumors. PMID:25681467

  9. Allelotyping in mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome: common regions of allelic loss identified on 9p, 10q, and 17p.

    PubMed

    Scarisbrick, J J; Woolford, A J; Russell-Jones, R; Whittaker, S J

    2001-09-01

    Allelotyping studies have been extensively used in a wide variety of malignancies to define chromosomal regions of allelic loss and sites of putative tumor suppressor genes; however, until now this technique has not been used in cutaneous lymphoma. We have analyzed 51 samples from patients with mycosis fungoides and 15 with Sézary syndrome using methods to detect loss of heterozygosity. Micro satellite markers were selected on 15 chromosomal arms because of their proximity to either known tumor suppressor genes or chromosomal abnormalities identified in previous cytogenetic studies in cutaneous lymphoma. Allelic loss was present in 45% of patients with mycosis fungoides and 67% with Sézary syndrome. Loss of heterozygosity was found in over 10% of patients with mycosis fungoides on 9p, 10q, 1p, and 17p and was present in 37% with early stage (T1 and T2) and 57% with advanced disease (T3 and T4). Allelic loss on 1p and 9p were found in all stages of mycosis fungoides, whereas losses on 17p and 10q were limited to advanced disease. In Sézary syndrome high rates of loss of heterozygosity were detected on 9p (46%) and 17p (42%) with lower rates on 2p (12%), 6q (7%), and 10q (12%). There was no significant difference in the age at diagnosis or number of treatments received by those with loss of heterozygosity and those without, suggesting that increasing age and multiple treatments do not predispose to allelic loss. These results provide the basis for further studies defining more accurately chromosomal regions of deletions and candidate tumor suppressor genes involved in mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome.

  10. Evidence of the presence of both oncogene and tumor suppressor gene on chromosome 1q in primary breast cancer, together with a genic dosage effect

    SciTech Connect

    Bieche, I.; Champeme, M.H.; Lidereau, R.

    1994-09-01

    Alterations of the long arm of chromosome 1 are the most consistent cytogenetic abnormalities found in human breast carcinoma. We examined genetic alterations on chromosome 1q in 124 human breast tumors, using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) markers mapping to the long (thirteen markers) and the short arm (four markers). Imbalance of heterozygosity at one or more loci on the long arm was observed in 80 (65%) of the 124 tumors. Among these 80 tumor DNAs, 38 showed a gain of heterozygosity (GOH), 16 a loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and one both GOH and LOH, at each locus on the long arm, indicating that 55 tumor DNAs had a gain and/or loss of the entire long arm of chromosome 1. Detailed alteration mapping of the other 25 tumors showing partial alterations of chromosome 1q identified two distinct altered regions: a smallest common deleted region at 1q21-31 and a smallest common overrepresented region at 1q41-q44. The results suggest that both oncogene(s) and tumor suppressor gene(s) are present on chromosome 1q and are associated with breast carcinomas. Moreover, the frequent loss or gain of a whole copy of chromosome 1q suggests that involvement a genic dosage effect in the pathogenesis of breast cancer.

  11. Novel high-grade serous epithelial ovarian cancer cell lines that reflect the molecular diversity of both the sporadic and hereditary disease

    PubMed Central

    Carmona, Euridice; Portelance, Lise; Arcand, Suzanna L.; Rahimi, Kurosh; Tonin, Patricia N.; Provencher, Diane; Mes-Masson, Anne-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Few cell line models of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) have been developed for the high-grade serous (HGS) subtype, which is the most common and lethal form of gynaecological cancer. Here we describe the establishment of six new EOC cell lines spontaneously derived from HGS tumors (TOV2978G, TOV3041G and TOV3291G) or ascites (OV866(2), OV4453 and OV4485). Exome sequencing revealed somatic TP53 mutations in five of the cell lines. One cell line has a novel BRCA1 splice-site mutation, and another, a recurrent BRCA2 nonsense mutation, both of germline origin. The novel BRCA1 mutation induced abnormal splicing, mRNA instability, resulting in the absence of BRCA1 protein. None of the cell lines harbor mutations in KRAS or BRAF, which are characteristic of other EOC subtypes. SNP arrays showed that all of the cell lines exhibited structural chromosomal abnormalities, copy number alterations and regions of loss of heterozygosity, consistent with those described for HGS. Four cell lines were able to produce 3D-spheroids, two exhibited anchorage-independent growth, and three (including the BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutated cell lines) formed tumors in SCID mice. These novel HGS EOC cell lines and their detailed characterization provide new research tools for investigating the most common and lethal form of EOC. PMID:26622941

  12. Molecular analysis of gastric differentiated-type intramucosal and submucosal cancers.

    PubMed

    Sugai, Tamotsu; Habano, Wataru; Endoh, Masaki; Konishi, Yasuhiro; Akasaka, Risaburo; Toyota, Minoru; Yamano, Hiroo; Koeda, Keisuke; Wakabayashi, Go; Suzuki, Kazuyuki

    2010-12-01

    Identification of the molecular characteristics of intramucosal (IMCs) and submucosal cancers (SMCs) is essential to our understanding of early gastric carcinogenesis. However, little is known regarding the differences between the 2 lesions. One hundred and forty-eight patients with primary early gastric cancer [IMC, 106; SMC, 42] were characterized for expression of cell cycle-related proteins and loss of heterozygosity (LOH). We also examined microsatellite instability (MSI) and methylation status. For LOH and methylation studies, we used a panel of 17 microsatellite markers (3p, 4p, 5q, 9p. 13q, 17p, 18q and 22q) and promoter regions of 9 genes (MLH-1, RUNX3, p16, HPP1, RASSF2A, SFRP1, DKK-1, ZFP64 and SALL4) that are frequently altered or methylated in gastric cancers. Overexpression of p53 and cyclin D1 was observed in SMC. In addition, low expression of p27 was more frequent in SMC than in IMC. Frequencies of 4p, 9p, 13q and 22q were significantly higher in SMC than in IMC. The SALL4 gene was frequently methylated in SMC compared with IMC. However, other gene methylations were common in both IMC and SMC. The frequency of LOH-high status/methylation-low status was significantly higher in SMC than in IMC. However, LOH-low status/methylation-high status in SMC was more frequently found in IMC. Our data confirm that methylation of cancer-related genes plays a major role in the development of IMCs. Importantly, the results also show that gastric submucosal progression is characterized by the accumulation of specific genetic alterations. In addition, changes of cell cycle-related proteins are associated with cancer progression.

  13. Recurrent Somatic Mutations in Regulatory Regions of Human Cancer Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Melton, Collin; Reuter, Jason A.; Spacek, Damek V.; Snyder, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant regulation of gene expression in cancer can promote survival and proliferation of cancer cells. Here we integrate TCGA whole genome sequencing data of 436 patients from eight cancer subtypes with ENCODE and other regulatory annotations to identify point mutations in regulatory regions. We find evidence for positive selection of mutations in transcription factor binding sites, consistent with these sites regulating important cancer cell functions. Using a novel method that adjusts for sample- and genomic locus-specific mutation rate, we identify recurrently mutated sites across cancer patients. Mutated regulatory sites include known sites in the TERT promoter and many novel sites, including a subset in proximity to cancer genes. In reporter assays, two novel sites display decreased enhancer activity upon mutation. These data demonstrate that many regulatory regions contain mutations under selective pressure and suggest a larger role for regulatory mutations in cancer than previously appreciated. PMID:26053494

  14. Allelic loss at chromosome 13q12-q13 is associated with poor prognosis in familial and sporadic breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, J.; Johannsson, O.; Håkansson, S.; Olsson, H.; Borg, A.

    1996-01-01

    Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) was analysed in 84 primary tumours from sporadic, familial and hereditary breast cancer using five microsatellite markers spanning the chromosomal region 13q12-q13 which harbours the BRCA2 breast cancer susceptibility gene, and using one other marker located within the RBI tumour-suppressor gene at 13q14. LOH at the BRCA2 region was found in 34% and at RBI in 27% of the tumours. Selective LOH at BRCA2 occurred in 7% of the tumours, whereas selective LOH at RBI was observed in another 7%. Moreover, a few tumours demonstrated a restricted deletion pattern, suggesting the presence of additional tumour-suppressor genes both proximal and distal of BRCA2. LOH at BRCA2 was significantly correlated to high S-phase values, low oestrogen and progesterone receptor content and DNA non-diploidy. LOH at BRCA2 was also associated, albeit non-significantly, with large tumour size and the ductal and medullar histological types. No correlation was found with lymph node status, patient age or a family history of breast cancer. A highly significant and independent correlation existed between LOH at BRCA2 and early recurrence and death. LOH at RBI was not associated with the above mentioned factors or prognosis. The present study does not provide conclusive evidence that BRCA2 is the sole target for deletions at 13q12-q13 in breast tumours. However, the results suggest that inactivation of one or several tumour-suppressor genes in the 13q12-q13 region confer a strong tumour growth potential and poor prognosis in both familial and sporadic breast cancer. Images Figure 1 PMID:8932343

  15. Analysis of gains and losses of DNA sequences along all human chromosomes by comparative genomic hybridization implicates 6q and several other chromosomal sites as putative tumor suppressor gene loci in prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Visakorpi, T.; Karhu, R.; Kallioniemi, A.

    1994-09-01

    Genetic changes associated with the development of prostate cancer are poorly known. We sought to identify regions that contain important genes for the development of prostate cancer by using comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) for genome-wide screening of gains and losses of DNA sequences. In CGH, differentially labeled tumor and normal DNAs are co-hybridized to normal metaphase spreads to visualize chromosomal regions with losses and gains of DNA sequences. Analysis of 31 uncultured primary prostate cancers showed that deletions predominated over gains with a ratio of 5:1. The most commonly deleted regions were 8p; 32% (minimal common region p12-pter), 13q; 32% (q21-q31), 6q; 22% (cen-q21), 16q; 19% (cen-q23), 18q; 19% (q22-qter) and 9p; 16%(p23-pter). Gain of the entire long arm of chromosome 8 was found in 6% of cases but no high-level amplifications were found in any of the specimens. Of the aberrations found by CGH, 6q represents a previously unreported, major site for deletion in prostate cancer. Analysis of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) was used to confirm the presence of 6q and other deletions found by CGH. LOH and CGH data showed an about 75% concordance. The significance of genetic aberrations in prostate cancer are being evaluated by correlating CGH findings with clinical outcome as well as by comparing genetic changes observed in the primary tumor with those found in recurrent lesions and metastases of the same patient.

  16. Frontiers of cancer care in Asia-Pacific region: cancer care in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Koh, ES; Do, VT; Barton, MB

    2008-01-01

    Cancer has a significant impact on the Australian community. One in three men and one in four women will develop cancer by the age of 75. The estimated annual health expenditure due to cancer in 2000-1 in Australia was $2.7 billion, representing 5.5% of the country’s total healthcare expenditure. An historical overview of the national cancer control strategies in Australia is provided. In males, the five most common cancers in order of decreasing incidence are: prostate cancer, colorectal cancer, lung cancer, melanoma and lymphoma, while for Australian women, breast cancer is the most common cancer. Key epidemiologic information about these common cancers, current management issues and comprehensive national clinical practice guidelines (where available) are highlighted. Aspects of skin cancer, a particularly common cancer in the Australian environment – with a focus on melanoma – are also included. Cancer outcomes in Australia, measured by selected outcomes, are among the best in the world. However, there is still evidence of health inequalities, especially among patients residing in regional and remote areas, the indigenous population and people from lower socio-economic classes. Limitations of current cancer care practices in Australia, including provision of oncology services, resources and other access issues, as well as suggested improvements for future cancer care, are summarised. Ongoing implementation of national and state cancer control plans and evaluation of their effectiveness will be needed to pursue the goal of optimal cancer care in Australia. PMID:21611000

  17. Patterns of somatic uniparental disomy identify novel tumor suppressor genes in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Torabi, Keyvan; Miró, Rosa; Fernández-Jiménez, Nora; Quintanilla, Isabel; Ramos, Laia; Prat, Esther; del Rey, Javier; Pujol, Núria; Killian, J. Keith; Meltzer, Paul S.; Fernández, Pedro Luis; Ried, Thomas; Lozano, Juan José; Camps, Jordi; Ponsa, Immaculada

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is characterized by specific patterns of copy number alterations (CNAs), which helped with the identification of driver oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes (TSGs). More recently, the usage of single nucleotide polymorphism arrays provided information of copy number neutral loss of heterozygosity, thus suggesting the occurrence of somatic uniparental disomy (UPD) and uniparental polysomy (UPP) events. The aim of this study is to establish an integrative profiling of recurrent UPDs/UPPs and CNAs in sporadic CRC. Our results indicate that regions showing high frequencies of UPD/UPP mostly coincide with regions typically involved in genomic losses. Among them, chromosome arms 3p, 5q, 9q, 10q, 14q, 17p, 17q, 20p, 21q and 22q preferentially showed UPDs/UPPs over genomic losses suggesting that tumor cells must maintain the disomic state of certain genes to favor cellular fitness. A meta-analysis using over 300 samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas confirmed our findings. Several regions affected by recurrent UPDs/UPPs contain well-known TSGs, as well as novel candidates such as ARID1A, DLC1, TCF7L2 and DMBT1. In addition, VCAN, FLT4, SFRP1 and GAS7 were also frequently involved in regions of UPD/UPP and displayed high levels of methylation. Finally, sequencing and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of the gene APC underlined that a somatic UPD event might represent the second hit to achieve biallelic inactivation of this TSG in colorectal tumors. In summary, our data define a profile of somatic UPDs/UPPs in sporadic CRC and highlights the importance of these events as a mechanism to achieve the inactivation of TSGs. PMID:26243311

  18. Patterns of somatic uniparental disomy identify novel tumor suppressor genes in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Torabi, Keyvan; Miró, Rosa; Fernández-Jiménez, Nora; Quintanilla, Isabel; Ramos, Laia; Prat, Esther; del Rey, Javier; Pujol, Núria; Killian, J Keith; Meltzer, Paul S; Fernández, Pedro Luis; Ried, Thomas; Lozano, Juan José; Camps, Jordi; Ponsa, Immaculada

    2015-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is characterized by specific patterns of copy number alterations (CNAs), which helped with the identification of driver oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes (TSGs). More recently, the usage of single nucleotide polymorphism arrays provided information of copy number neutral loss of heterozygosity, thus suggesting the occurrence of somatic uniparental disomy (UPD) and uniparental polysomy (UPP) events. The aim of this study is to establish an integrative profiling of recurrent UPDs/UPPs and CNAs in sporadic CRC. Our results indicate that regions showing high frequencies of UPD/UPP mostly coincide with regions typically involved in genomic losses. Among them, chromosome arms 3p, 5q, 9q, 10q, 14q, 17p, 17q, 20p, 21q and 22q preferentially showed UPDs/UPPs over genomic losses suggesting that tumor cells must maintain the disomic state of certain genes to favor cellular fitness. A meta-analysis using over 300 samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas confirmed our findings. Several regions affected by recurrent UPDs/UPPs contain well-known TSGs, as well as novel candidates such as ARID1A, DLC1, TCF7L2 and DMBT1. In addition, VCAN, FLT4, SFRP1 and GAS7 were also frequently involved in regions of UPD/UPP and displayed high levels of methylation. Finally, sequencing and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of the gene APC underlined that a somatic UPD event might represent the second hit to achieve biallelic inactivation of this TSG in colorectal tumors. In summary, our data define a profile of somatic UPDs/UPPs in sporadic CRC and highlights the importance of these events as a mechanism to achieve the inactivation of TSGs.

  19. Patterns of somatic uniparental disomy identify novel tumor suppressor genes in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Torabi, Keyvan; Miró, Rosa; Fernández-Jiménez, Nora; Quintanilla, Isabel; Ramos, Laia; Prat, Esther; del Rey, Javier; Pujol, Núria; Killian, J Keith; Meltzer, Paul S; Fernández, Pedro Luis; Ried, Thomas; Lozano, Juan José; Camps, Jordi; Ponsa, Immaculada

    2015-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is characterized by specific patterns of copy number alterations (CNAs), which helped with the identification of driver oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes (TSGs). More recently, the usage of single nucleotide polymorphism arrays provided information of copy number neutral loss of heterozygosity, thus suggesting the occurrence of somatic uniparental disomy (UPD) and uniparental polysomy (UPP) events. The aim of this study is to establish an integrative profiling of recurrent UPDs/UPPs and CNAs in sporadic CRC. Our results indicate that regions showing high frequencies of UPD/UPP mostly coincide with regions typically involved in genomic losses. Among them, chromosome arms 3p, 5q, 9q, 10q, 14q, 17p, 17q, 20p, 21q and 22q preferentially showed UPDs/UPPs over genomic losses suggesting that tumor cells must maintain the disomic state of certain genes to favor cellular fitness. A meta-analysis using over 300 samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas confirmed our findings. Several regions affected by recurrent UPDs/UPPs contain well-known TSGs, as well as novel candidates such as ARID1A, DLC1, TCF7L2 and DMBT1. In addition, VCAN, FLT4, SFRP1 and GAS7 were also frequently involved in regions of UPD/UPP and displayed high levels of methylation. Finally, sequencing and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of the gene APC underlined that a somatic UPD event might represent the second hit to achieve biallelic inactivation of this TSG in colorectal tumors. In summary, our data define a profile of somatic UPDs/UPPs in sporadic CRC and highlights the importance of these events as a mechanism to achieve the inactivation of TSGs. PMID:26243311

  20. DNA repair genes implicated in triple negative familial non-BRCA1/2 breast cancer predisposition

    PubMed Central

    Ollier, Marie; Radosevic-Robin, Nina; Kwiatkowski, Fabrice; Ponelle, Flora; Viala, Sandrine; Privat, Maud; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Bernard-Gallon, Dominique; Penault-Llorca, Frédérique; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Bidet, Yannick

    2015-01-01

    Among breast cancers, 10 to 15% of cases would be due to hereditary risk. In these familial cases, mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 are found in only 15% to 20%, meaning that new susceptibility genes remain to be found. Triple-negative breast cancers represent 15% of all breast cancers, and are generally aggressive tumours without targeted therapies available. Our hypothesis is that some patients with triple negative breast cancer could share a genetic susceptibility different from other types of breast cancers. We screened 36 candidate genes, using pyrosequencing, in all the 50 triple negative breast cancer patients with familial history of cancer but no BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation of a population of 3000 families who had consulted for a familial breast cancer between 2005 and 2013. Any mutations were also sequenced in available relatives of cases. Protein expression and loss of heterozygosity were explored in tumours. Seven deleterious mutations in 6 different genes (RAD51D, MRE11A, CHEK2, MLH1, MSH6, PALB2) were observed in one patient each, except the RAD51D mutation found in two cases. Loss of heterozygosity in the tumour was found for 2 of the 7 mutations. Protein expression was absent in tumour tissue for 5 mutations. Taking into consideration a specific subtype of tumour has revealed susceptibility genes, most of them in the homologous recombination DNA repair pathway. This may provide new possibilities for targeted therapies, along with better screening and care of patients. PMID:26328243

  1. DNA repair genes implicated in triple negative familial non-BRCA1/2 breast cancer predisposition.

    PubMed

    Ollier, Marie; Radosevic-Robin, Nina; Kwiatkowski, Fabrice; Ponelle, Flora; Viala, Sandrine; Privat, Maud; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Bernard-Gallon, Dominique; Penault-Llorca, Frédérique; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Bidet, Yannick

    2015-01-01

    Among breast cancers, 10 to 15% of cases would be due to hereditary risk. In these familial cases, mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 are found in only 15% to 20%, meaning that new susceptibility genes remain to be found. Triple-negative breast cancers represent 15% of all breast cancers, and are generally aggressive tumours without targeted therapies available. Our hypothesis is that some patients with triple negative breast cancer could share a genetic susceptibility different from other types of breast cancers. We screened 36 candidate genes, using pyrosequencing, in all the 50 triple negative breast cancer patients with familial history of cancer but no BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation of a population of 3000 families who had consulted for a familial breast cancer between 2005 and 2013. Any mutations were also sequenced in available relatives of cases. Protein expression and loss of heterozygosity were explored in tumours. Seven deleterious mutations in 6 different genes (RAD51D, MRE11A, CHEK2, MLH1, MSH6, PALB2) were observed in one patient each, except the RAD51D mutation found in two cases. Loss of heterozygosity in the tumour was found for 2 of the 7 mutations. Protein expression was absent in tumour tissue for 5 mutations. Taking into consideration a specific subtype of tumour has revealed susceptibility genes, most of them in the homologous recombination DNA repair pathway. This may provide new possibilities for targeted therapies, along with better screening and care of patients. PMID:26328243

  2. BRG1 and LKB1: tales of two tumor suppressor genes on chromosome 19p and lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Nieto, Salvador; Sanchez-Cespedes, Montse

    2009-04-01

    Losses of heterozygosity (LOH) of the short arm of chromosome 19 are frequent in lung cancer, suggesting that one or more tumor suppressor genes are present in this region. The LKB1 gene, also called STK11, is somatically inactivated through point mutations and large deletions in lung tumors, demonstrating that LKB1 is a target of the LOH of this chromosomal arm. Data from several independent groups have provided information about the profiles of lung tumors with LKB1 inactivation and it is generally agreed that this alteration strongly predominates in non-small cell lung cancer, in particular adenocarcinomas, in smokers. The LKB1 protein has serine-threonine kinase activity and is involved in the regulation of the cell energetic checkpoint through the phosphorylation and activation of adenosine monophosphate-dependent kinase (AMPK). LKB1 is also involved in other processes such as cell polarization, probably through substrates other than AMPK. Interestingly, another gene on chromosome 19p, BRG1, encoding a component of the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex, has emerged as a tumor suppressor gene that is altered in lung tumors. Similar to LKB1, BRG1 is somatically inactivated by point mutations or large deletions in lung tumors featuring LOH of chromosome 19p. These observations suggest an important role for BRG1 in lung cancer and highlight the need to further our understanding of the function of Brahma/SWI2-related gene 1 (BRG1) in cancer. Finally, simultaneous mutations at LKB1 and BRG1 are common in lung cancer cells, which exemplifies how a single event, LOH of chromosome 19p in this instance, targets two different tumor suppressors.

  3. Clues to the pathogenesis of familial colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, L.A.; Peltomaeki, P.; Pylkkaenen, L.; Chappelle, A. de la ); Leach, F.S.; Powell, S.M.; Jen, J.; Hamilton, S.R.; Petersen, G.M.; Kinzler, K.W.; Vogelstein, B. Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD ); Sistonen, P. Finnish Red Cross Blood Transfusion Service, Helsinki ); Mecklin, J.P. ); Jaervinen, H. )

    1993-05-07

    A predisposition to colorectal cancer is shown to be linked to markers on chromosome 2 in some families. Molecular features of familial cancers were compared with those of sporadic colon cancers. Neither the familial nor sporadic cancers showed loss of heterozygosity for chromosome 2 markers, and the incidence of mutations in KRAS, P53, and APC was similar in the two groups of tumors. Most of the familial cancers, however, had widespread alterations in short repeated DNA sequences, suggesting that numerous replication errors had occurred during tumor development. Thirteen percent of sporadic cancers had identical abnormalities and these cancers shared biologic properties with the familial cases. These data suggest a mechanism for familial tumorigenesis different from that mediated by classic tumor suppressor genes. 22 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Asian Cancer Registry Forum 2014 - regional cooperation for cancer registration: priorities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Moore, Malcolm A; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Bray, Freddie

    2014-01-01

    On February 6-7th, the Thai National Cancer Institute, the International Agency for Research on Cancer and its Mumbai Hub for Cancer Registration, together with the International Association of Cancer Registries and the APOCP/APJCP, jointly organized an Asian cancer registry forum to discuss regional cooperation for cancer registration. Held in the Grande Mercure Fortune Hotel, Bangkok, the meeting brought together leading scientists in cancer registration from South-East and North-East Asia as well as Australia, India and Iran and IARC itself, with coverage of various priorities and challenges of cancer registries regarding cancer control policy, operational parameters, assessment of survival and contributions to screening, for example. The current situation was highlighted and future directions and possible expansion of activities were discussed, with especial attention to the necessity for networks to help improve cancer registration across Asia and Africa.

  5. Targeting CXCL12 from FAP-expressing carcinoma-associated fibroblasts synergizes with anti-PD-L1 immunotherapy in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Feig, Christine; Jones, James O; Kraman, Matthew; Wells, Richard J B; Deonarine, Andrew; Chan, Derek S; Connell, Claire M; Roberts, Edward W; Zhao, Qi; Caballero, Otavia L; Teichmann, Sarah A; Janowitz, Tobias; Jodrell, Duncan I; Tuveson, David A; Fearon, Douglas T

    2013-12-10

    An autochthonous model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) permitted the analysis of why immunotherapy is ineffective in this human disease. Despite finding that PDA-bearing mice had cancer cell-specific CD8(+) T cells, the mice, like human patients with PDA, did not respond to two immunological checkpoint antagonists that promote the function of T cells: anti-cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (α-CTLA-4) and α-programmed cell death 1 ligand 1 (α-PD-L1). Immune control of PDA growth was achieved, however, by depleting carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) that express fibroblast activation protein (FAP). The depletion of the FAP(+) stromal cell also uncovered the antitumor effects of α-CTLA-4 and α-PD-L1, indicating that its immune suppressive activity accounts for the failure of these T-cell checkpoint antagonists. Three findings suggested that chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 12 (CXCL12) explained the overriding immunosuppression by the FAP(+) cell: T cells were absent from regions of the tumor containing cancer cells, cancer cells were coated with the chemokine, CXCL12, and the FAP(+) CAF was the principal source of CXCL12 in the tumor. Administering AMD3100, a CXCL12 receptor chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 4 inhibitor, induced rapid T-cell accumulation among cancer cells and acted synergistically with α-PD-L1 to greatly diminish cancer cells, which were identified by their loss of heterozygosity of Trp53 gene. The residual tumor was composed only of premalignant epithelial cells and inflammatory cells. Thus, a single protein, CXCL12, from a single stromal cell type, the FAP(+) CAF, may direct tumor immune evasion in a model of human PDA.

  6. Epidemiology of prostate cancer in the Asia-Pacific region.

    PubMed

    Baade, Peter D; Youlden, Danny R; Cramb, Susanna M; Dunn, Jeff; Gardiner, Robert A

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to examine and compare available data on incidence, mortality and survival for countries in the Asia-Pacific region. Incidence data were obtained from GLOBOCAN 2008, other online data sources and individual cancer registries. Country-specific mortality statistics by individual year were sourced from the World Health Organization Statistical Information System Mortality Database. All incidence and mortality rates were directly age-standardised to the Segi World Standard population and joinpoint models were used to assess trends. Data on survival were obtained from country-specific published reports where available. Approximately 14% (122,000) of all prostate cancers diagnosed worldwide in 2008 were within the Asia-Pacific region (10 per 100,000 population), with three out of every four of these prostate cancer cases diagnosed in either Japan (32%), China (28%) or Australia (15%). There were also about 42,000 deaths due to prostate cancer in the Asia-Pacific region (3 per 100,000). For the nine countries with incidence trend data available, eight showed recent significant increases in prostate cancer incidence. In contrast, recent decreases in prostate cancer mortality have been reported for Australia, Japan and New Zealand, but mortality has increased in several other countries. The lack of population-based data across most of the countries in this region limits the ability of researchers to understand and report on the patterns and distribution of this important cancer. Governments and health planners typically require quantitative evidence as a motivation for change. Unless there is a widespread commitment to improve the collection and reporting of data on prostate cancer it is likely that the burden of prostate cancer will continue to increase. Enhancing knowledge transfer between countries where there are differentials in capacity, policy and experience may provide the necessary impetus and opportunity to overcome at least some of

  7. Epidemiology of prostate cancer in the Asia-Pacific region

    PubMed Central

    Baade, Peter D.; Youlden, Danny R.; Cramb, Susanna M.; Dunn, Jeff; Gardiner, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to examine and compare available data on incidence, mortality and survival for countries in the Asia-Pacific region. Incidence data were obtained from GLOBOCAN 2008, other online data sources and individual cancer registries. Country-specific mortality statistics by individual year were sourced from the World Health Organization Statistical Information System Mortality Database. All incidence and mortality rates were directly age-standardised to the Segi World Standard population and joinpoint models were used to assess trends. Data on survival were obtained from country-specific published reports where available. Approximately 14% (122,000) of all prostate cancers diagnosed worldwide in 2008 were within the Asia-Pacific region (10 per 100,000 population), with three out of every four of these prostate cancer cases diagnosed in either Japan (32%), China (28%) or Australia (15%). There were also about 42,000 deaths due to prostate cancer in the Asia-Pacific region (3 per 100,000). For the nine countries with incidence trend data available, eight showed recent significant increases in prostate cancer incidence. In contrast, recent decreases in prostate cancer mortality have been reported for Australia, Japan and New Zealand, but mortality has increased in several other countries. The lack of population-based data across most of the countries in this region limits the ability of researchers to understand and report on the patterns and distribution of this important cancer. Governments and health planners typically require quantitative evidence as a motivation for change. Unless there is a widespread commitment to improve the collection and reporting of data on prostate cancer it is likely that the burden of prostate cancer will continue to increase. Enhancing knowledge transfer between countries where there are differentials in capacity, policy and experience may provide the necessary impetus and opportunity to overcome at least some of

  8. Paternal Uniparental Disomy 11p15.5 in the Pancreatic Nodule of an Infant With Costello Syndrome: Shared Mechanism for Hyperinsulinemic Hypoglycemia in Neonates With Costello and Beckwith–Wiedemann Syndrome and Somatic Loss of Heterozygosity in Costello Syndrome Driving Clonal Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Gripp, Karen W.; Robbins, Katherine M.; Sheffield, Brandon S.; Lee, Anna F.; Patel, Millan S.; Yip, Stephen; Doyle, Daniel; Stabley, Deborah; Sol-Church, Katia

    2016-01-01

    Costello syndrome (CS) entails a cancer predisposition and is caused by activating HRAS mutations, typically arising de novo in the paternal germline. Hypoglycemia is common in CS neonates. A previously reported individual with the rare HRAS p.Gln22Lys had hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia. Autopsy showed a discrete pancreatic nodule. The morphologic and immunohistochemistry findings, including loss of p57Kip2 protein, were identical to a focal lesion of congenital hyperinsulinism, however, no KCNJ11 or ABCC8 mutation was identified and germline derived DNA showed no alternation of the maternal or paternal 11p15 alleles. Here we report paternal uniparental disomy (pUPD) within the lesion, similar to the pUPD11p15.5 in Beckwith–Wiedemann syndrome (BWS). The similar extent of the pUPD suggests a similar mechanism driving hyperinsulinemia in both conditions. After coincidental somatic LOH and pUPD, the growth promoting effects of the paternally derived HRAS mutation, in combination with the increased function of the adjacent paternally expressed IGF2, may together result in clonal expansion. Although this somatic LOH within pancreatic tissue resulted in hyperinsulinism, similar LOH in mesenchymal cells may drive embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS). Interestingly, biallelic IGF2 expression has been linked to rhabdomyosarcoma tumorigenesis and pUPD11 occurred in all 8 ERMS samples from CS individuals. Somatic KRAS and HRAS mutations occur with comparable frequency in isolated malignancies. Yet, the malignancy risk in CS is notably higher than in Noonan syndrome with a KRAS mutation. It is conceivable that HRAS co-localization with IGF2 and the combined effect of pUPD 11p15.5 on both genes contributes to the oncogenic potential. PMID:26572961

  9. Allelic loss of 10q23.3, the PTEN gene locus in cervical carcinoma from Northern Indian population.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, M Moshahid Alam; Alam, M Shabbir; Mehdi, Syed Jafar; Ali, Asgar; Batra, Swaraj

    2012-04-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common malignant diseases affecting women worldwide. Studies on loss of heterozygosity have been made for PTEN gene specific microsatellite markers in malignancies like breast, ovary and lungs and the results have shown a significant association. However the role of this gene is not clearly understood in cervical cancer from Indian population. A total of 135 cervical carcinoma tissues samples were analyzed for loss of heterozygosity. DNA was isolated from the samples and their matched control specimens. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using primer specific for two intragenic markers (D10S198 & D10S192) and one marker (D10S541) in flanking region and further electrophoresed on 8% denaturing polyacrylamide gel. Overall, 31 out of 133(23%) informative cases showed loss of heterozygosity in at least one locus in the region examined. The percentage of loss of heterozygosity for these markers ranged from 8% (D10S192) to 13% (D10S198). Loss of heterozygosity was more frequently detected in intragenic region (D10S198 & D10S192) than in flanking region, D10S541 (21% versus 9%). These data argue that PTEN is a tumor suppressor gene whose inactivation may play an important role in the carcinoma of uterine cervix.

  10. Oral cancer in Libya and development of regional oral cancer registries: A review.

    PubMed

    BenNasir, E; El Mistiri, M; McGowan, R; Katz, R V

    2015-10-01

    The aims of this paper are three-fold: (1) to summarize the current epidemiological data on oral cancer in Libya as reported in the published literature and as compared to other national oral cancer rates in the region; (2) to present both the history of the early development, and future goals, of population-based oral cancer tumor registries in Libya as they partner with the more established regional and international population-based cancer tumor registries; and, (3) to offer recommendations that will likely be required in the near future if these nascent, population-based Libyan oral cancer registries are to establish themselves as on-going registries for describing the oral cancer disease patterns and risk factors in Libya as well as for prevention and treatment. This comprehensive literature review revealed that the current baseline incidence of oral cancer in Libya is similar to those of other North Africa countries and China, but is relatively low compared to the United Kingdom, the United States, and India. The recently established Libyan National Cancer Registry Program, initiated in 2007, while envisioning five cooperating regional cancer registries, continues to operate at a relatively suboptimal level. Lack of adequate levels of national funding continue to plague its development…and the accompanying quality of service that could be provided to the Libyan people.

  11. Colorectal cancer carcinogenesis: a review of mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Tariq, Kanwal; Ghias, Kulsoom

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cancer in women and the third most common in men globally. CRC arises from one or a combination of chromosomal instability, CpG island methylator phenotype, and microsatellite instability. Genetic instability is usually caused by aneuploidy and loss of heterozygosity. Mutations in the tumor suppressor or cell cycle genes may also lead to cellular transformation. Similarly, epigenetic and/or genetic alterations resulting in impaired cellular pathways, such as DNA repair mechanism, may lead to microsatellite instability and mutator phenotype. Non-coding RNAs, more importantly microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs have also been implicated at various CRC stages. Understanding the specific mechanisms of tumorigenesis and the underlying genetic and epigenetic traits is critical in comprehending the disease phenotype. This paper reviews these mechanisms along with the roles of various non-coding RNAs in CRCs. PMID:27144067

  12. Regional but fatal: Intraperitoneal metastasis in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jia; Wu, Nan-Die; Liu, Bao-Rui

    2016-09-01

    Peritoneal carcinomatosis appears to be the most common pattern of metastasis or recurrence and is associated with poor prognosis in gastric cancer patients. Many efforts have been made to improve the survival in patients with peritoneal metastasis. Hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy remains a widely accepted strategy in the treatment of peritoneal dissemination. Several phase II-III studies confirmed that the combined cytoreducitve surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy resulted in longer survival in patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis. In addition, proper selection and effective regional treatment in patients with high risk of peritoneal recurrence after resection will further improve prognosis in local advanced gastric cancer patients. PMID:27672270

  13. Regional but fatal: Intraperitoneal metastasis in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jia; Wu, Nan-Die; Liu, Bao-Rui

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneal carcinomatosis appears to be the most common pattern of metastasis or recurrence and is associated with poor prognosis in gastric cancer patients. Many efforts have been made to improve the survival in patients with peritoneal metastasis. Hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy remains a widely accepted strategy in the treatment of peritoneal dissemination. Several phase II-III studies confirmed that the combined cytoreducitve surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy resulted in longer survival in patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis. In addition, proper selection and effective regional treatment in patients with high risk of peritoneal recurrence after resection will further improve prognosis in local advanced gastric cancer patients. PMID:27672270

  14. Regional but fatal: Intraperitoneal metastasis in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jia; Wu, Nan-Die; Liu, Bao-Rui

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneal carcinomatosis appears to be the most common pattern of metastasis or recurrence and is associated with poor prognosis in gastric cancer patients. Many efforts have been made to improve the survival in patients with peritoneal metastasis. Hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy remains a widely accepted strategy in the treatment of peritoneal dissemination. Several phase II-III studies confirmed that the combined cytoreducitve surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy resulted in longer survival in patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis. In addition, proper selection and effective regional treatment in patients with high risk of peritoneal recurrence after resection will further improve prognosis in local advanced gastric cancer patients.

  15. Loss of the tumor suppressor spinophilin (PPP1R9B) increases the cancer stem cell population in breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, I; Verdugo-Sivianes, E M; Castilla, M A; Melendez, R; Marin, J J; Muñoz-Galvan, S; Lopez-Guerra, J L; Vieites, B; Ortiz-Gordillo, M J; De León, J M; Praena-Fernandez, J M; Perez, M; Palacios, J; Carnero, A

    2016-05-01

    The spinophilin (Spn, PPP1R9B) gene is located at 17q21.33, a region frequently associated with microsatellite instability and loss of heterozygosity, especially in breast tumors. Spn is a regulatory subunit of phosphatase1a (PP1), which targets the catalytic subunit to distinct subcellular locations. Spn downregulation reduces PPP1CA activity against the retinoblastoma protein, pRb, thereby maintaining higher levels of phosphorylated pRb. This effect contributes to an increase in the tumorigenic properties of cells in certain contexts. Here, we explored the mechanism of how Spn downregulation contributes to the malignant phenotype and poor prognosis in breast tumors and found an increase in the stemness phenotype. Analysis of human breast tumors showed that Spn mRNA and protein are reduced or lost in 15% of carcinomas, correlating with a worse prognosis, a more aggressive tumor phenotype and triple-negative tumors, whereas luminal tumors showed high Spn levels. Downregulation of Spn by shRNA increased the stemness properties along with the expression of stem-related genes (Sox2, KLF4, Nanog and OCT4), whereas ectopic overexpression of Spn cDNA reduced these properties. Breast tumor stem cells appeared to have low levels of Spn mRNA, and Spn loss correlated with increased stem-like cell appearance in breast tumors as indicated by an increase in CD44+/CD24- cells. A reduction of the levels of PPP1CA mimicked the cancer stem-like cell phenotype of Spn downregulation, suggesting that the mechanism of Spn involves PP1a. These increased cancer stem cell-like properties with reduced Spn might account for the malignant phenotype observed in Spn-loss tumors and may contribute to a worse patient prognosis.

  16. Water contamination and esophageal cancer at Gassim Region, Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect

    Amer, M.H.; El-Yazigi, A.; Hannan, M.A.; Mohamed, M.E. )

    1990-05-01

    Between January 1980 and December 1982, 183 patients with histologically confirmed carcinoma of the esophagus who were referred to a tertiary referral hospital were studied. Thirty-two (17%) patients were referred from Gassim Region at the north central part of Saudi Arabia. In contrast, only 5% of total cancer patient referrals were from this area. A case-control study showed a significant regional difference within Saudi Arabia and the most referrals from Gassim area. A prospective case-control study showed persistently high numbers of referrals from that region during 1983-1987. When patients from Gassim Region were compared with those referred from other locations, no statistical differences were noted between the two groups except for the source of drinking water. Water analysis from Gassim area showed a high solid content with elevated levels of calcium, magnesium, and to a lesser extent, chromium iron, cadmium, and cobalt. Traces of petroleum oil were found in five of six water samples from Gassim during 1983, compared with 3 of 49 samples from other areas. Mutagenicity tests on water specimens form Gassim Region indicated the presence of possible carcinogens. It is being suggested that the high prevalence of esophageal cancer in this region may be related to contamination of water by impurities such as petroleum oils. Malnutrition, particularly vitamin A deficiency, as well as other factors may have promoted such malignancies.

  17. Endometrial and cervical cancer: incidence and mortality among women in the Lodz region

    PubMed Central

    Leśniczak, Beata; Krasomski, Grzegorz; Oszukowski, Przemysław; Woźniak, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Introduction By the early 21st century the most common cancer of female genitals in Poland was cervical cancer. Now endometrial cancer ranks first. The aim of this study was to analyse the incidence and mortality of endometrial and cervical cancer among women in the Lodz region. Material and methods Data on the incidence and mortality of endometrial and cervical cancer among inhabitants of the Lodz region were obtained from the National Cancer Registry and Bulletin of Cancer Cases in the Lodz region. The analysis covered ten consecutive years beginning in 2001. Results The number of new cases reported in 2010 exceeded that observed in 2001 by 181. The standardized incidence rate of endometrial cancer increased by 6.3, while the standardized incidence rate of cervical cancer decreased by 1.4. Conclusions In the years 2001-2010, the incidence of endometrial cancer increased by 88.3% and that of cervical cancer decreased by 6.5% among inhabitants of the Lodz region. In the years 2001-2010, mortality of endometrial cancer increased by 24.5% and that of cervical cancer decreased by 12.6%. In 2010, the highest crude incidence rates in the Lodz region of both endometrial and cervical cancer at 39.1 were recorded in the district town of Piotrków. PMID:26528109

  18. Mutation analysis of PALB2 in BRCA1 and BRCA2-negative breast and/or ovarian cancer families from Eastern Ontario, Canada

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background PALB2 has emerged as a breast cancer susceptibility gene. Mutations in PALB2 have been identified in almost all breast cancer populations studied to date, but the rarity of these mutations and lack of information regarding their penetrance makes genetic counseling for these families challenging. We studied BRCA1/2 -negative breast and/or ovarian cancer families to a) assess the contribution of PALB2 mutations in this series and b) identify clinical, pathological and family history characteristics that might make PALB2 screening more efficient. Methods The coding region of the PALB2 gene was analyzed in 175 probands with family histories of breast and/or ovarian cancer ascertained from a single Canadian institution in Eastern Ontario. Results We identified 2 probands with PALB2 mutations that are known or strongly considered to be pathogenic and 3 probands with missense mutations that are possibly pathogenic. One of the identified truncating mutations [c.3113G > A (p.Gly1000_Trp1038del – major product)], has been previously described while the other four mutations [c.3507_3508delTC (p.H1170Ffs*19), c.1846G > C (p.D616H), c.3418 T > G (p.W1140G), c.3287A > G (p.N1096S)] have not been previously reported. Loss of heterozygosity was detected in two breast tumors from one c.3507_3508delTC mutation carrier but not in other available tumors from that family or in tumors from carriers of other mutations. Conclusions PALB2 mutation screening identifies a small, but significant number of mutations in BRCA1/2 -negative breast and/or ovarian cancer families. We show that mutations are more likely to be found in families with three or more breast cancers as well as other BRCA2-related cancers. In our cohort, both clearly pathogenic mutations were identified in premenopausal breast cancer cases (2/77, 2.6%). Testing should be preferentially offered to affected women from such families. PMID:25225577

  19. CDH1 promoter hypermethylation and E-cadherin protein expression in infiltrating breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Caldeira, José Roberto F; Prando, Érika C; Quevedo, Francisco C; Neto, Francisco A Moraes; Rainho, Cláudia A; Rogatto, Silvia R

    2006-01-01

    Background The E-cadherin gene (CDH1) maps, at chromosome 16q22.1, a region often associated with loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in human breast cancer. LOH at this site is thought to lead to loss of function of this tumor suppressor gene and was correlated with decreased disease-free survival, poor prognosis, and metastasis. Differential CpG island methylation in the promoter region of the CDH1 gene might be an alternative way for the loss of expression and function of E-cadherin, leading to loss of tissue integrity, an essential step in tumor progression. Methods The aim of our study was to assess, by Methylation-Specific Polymerase Chain Reaction (MSP), the methylation pattern of the CDH1 gene and its possible correlation with the expression of E-cadherin and other standard immunohistochemical parameters (Her-2, ER, PgR, p53, and K-67) in a series of 79 primary breast cancers (71 infiltrating ductal, 5 infiltrating lobular, 1 metaplastic, 1 apocrine, and 1 papillary carcinoma). Results CDH1 hypermethylation was observed in 72% of the cases including 52/71 ductal, 4/5 lobular carcinomas and 1 apocrine carcinoma. Reduced levels of E-cadherin protein were observed in 85% of our samples. Although not statistically significant, the levels of E-cadherin expression tended to diminish with the CDH1 promoter region methylation. In the group of 71 ductal cancinomas, most of the cases of showing CDH1 hypermethylation also presented reduced levels of expression of ER and PgR proteins, and a possible association was observed between CDH1 methylation and ER expression (p = 0.0301, Fisher's exact test). However, this finding was not considered significant after Bonferroni correction of p-value. Conclusion Our preliminary findings suggested that abnormal CDH1 methylation occurs in high frequencies in infiltrating breast cancers associated with a decrease in E-cadherin expression in a subgroup of cases characterized by loss of expression of other important genes to the mammary

  20. A common region of deletion on chromosome 17q in both sporadic and familial epithelial ovarian tumors distal to BRCA1

    SciTech Connect

    Godwin, A.K.; Vanderveer, L.; Schultz, D.C.; Altomare, D.A.; Buetow, K.H.; Daly, M.; Getts, L.A.; Masny, A.; Rosenblum, N.

    1994-10-01

    Linkage analysis in familial breast and ovarian cancer and studies of allelic deletion in sporadic ovarian tumors have identified a region on chromosome 17q containing a candidate tumor-suppressor gene (referred to as BRCA1) of likely importance in ovarian carcinogenesis. We have examined normal and tumor DNA samples from 32 patients with sporadic and 8 patients with familial forms of the disease, for loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at 21 loci on chromosome 17 (7 on 17p and 14 on 17q). LOH on 17p was 55% (22/40) for informative 17p13.1 and 17p13.3 markers. When six polymorphic markers flanking the familial breast/ovarian cancer susceptibility locus on 17q12-q21 were used, LOH was 58% (23/40), with one tumor showing telomeric retention. Evaluation of a set of markers positioned telomeric to BRCA1 resulted in the highest degree of LOH, 73% (29/40), indicating that a candidate locus involved in ovarian cancer may reside distal to BRCA1. Five of the tumors demonstrating allelic loss for 17q markers were from individuals with a strong family history of breast and ovarian cancer. More important, two of these tumors (unique patient number [UPN] 57 and UPN 79) retained heterozygosity for all informative markers spanning the BRCA1 locus but showed LOH at loci distal to but not including the anonymous markers CMM86 (D17S74) and 42D6 (D17S588), respectively. Deletion mapping of seven cases (two familial and five sporadic) showing limited LOH on 17q revealed a common region of deletion, distal to GH and proximal to D17S4, that spans {approximately} 25 cM. These results suggest that a potential tumor-suppressor gene involved in both sporadic and familial ovarian cancer may reside on the distal portion of chromosome 17q and is distinct from the BRCA1 gene. 58 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Genetic and molecular alterations associated with oral squamous cell cancer (Review).

    PubMed

    Pérez-Sayáns, Mario; Somoza-Martín, José M; Barros-Angueira, Francisco; Reboiras-López, María D; Gándara Rey, José M; García-García, Abel

    2009-12-01

    The development of oral squamous cell cancer (OSCC) is a multistep process involving the accumulation of multiple genetic alterations modulated by genetic pre-disposition and environmental influences such as tobacco and alcohol use, chronic inflammation, and viral infections. All of these factors can lead to a wide range of genetic and molecular alterations that can be detected using a range of molecular studies. The alterations mostly affect two large groups of genes: oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, which can be either inactivated or overexpressed through mutations, loss of heterozygosity, deletions, or epigenetic modifications such as methylation. Other molecules that are closely associated with tumor pathogenesis and prognosis also exist and warrant further study. Important advances in molecular biology are helping to shed light on oral cancer and thus aiding in the early diagnosis and development of new personalized treatment approaches. The purpose of the review is to explore the genetic and molecular alterations associated with OSCC.

  2. The haplotype-resolved genome and epigenome of the aneuploid HeLa cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Adey, Andrew; Burton, Joshua N; Kitzman, Jacob O; Hiatt, Joseph B; Lewis, Alexandra P; Martin, Beth K; Qiu, Ruolan; Lee, Choli; Shendure, Jay

    2013-08-01

    The HeLa cell line was established in 1951 from cervical cancer cells taken from a patient, Henrietta Lacks. This was the first successful attempt to immortalize human-derived cells in vitro. The robust growth and unrestricted distribution of HeLa cells resulted in its broad adoption--both intentionally and through widespread cross-contamination--and for the past 60 years it has served a role analogous to that of a model organism. The cumulative impact of the HeLa cell line on research is demonstrated by its occurrence in more than 74,000 PubMed abstracts (approximately 0.3%). The genomic architecture of HeLa remains largely unexplored beyond its karyotype, partly because like many cancers, its extensive aneuploidy renders such analyses challenging. We carried out haplotype-resolved whole-genome sequencing of the HeLa CCL-2 strain, examined point- and indel-mutation variations, mapped copy-number variations and loss of heterozygosity regions, and phased variants across full chromosome arms. We also investigated variation and copy-number profiles for HeLa S3 and eight additional strains. We find that HeLa is relatively stable in terms of point variation, with few new mutations accumulating after early passaging. Haplotype resolution facilitated reconstruction of an amplified, highly rearranged region of chromosome 8q24.21 at which integration of the human papilloma virus type 18 (HPV-18) genome occurred and that is likely to be the event that initiated tumorigenesis. We combined these maps with RNA-seq and ENCODE Project data sets to phase the HeLa epigenome. This revealed strong, haplotype-specific activation of the proto-oncogene MYC by the integrated HPV-18 genome approximately 500 kilobases upstream, and enabled global analyses of the relationship between gene dosage and expression. These data provide an extensively phased, high-quality reference genome for past and future experiments relying on HeLa, and demonstrate the value of haplotype resolution for

  3. Intermediate endpoint biomarkers for lung cancer chemoprevention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacAulay, Calum E.; Lam, Stephen; Klein-Parker, Helga; Gazdar, Adi; Guillaud, Martial; Payne, Peter W.; Le Riche, Jean C.; Dawe, Chris; Band, Pierre; Palcic, Branko

    1998-04-01

    Given the demographics of current and ex-smoking populations in North America, lung cancer will be a major problem in the foreseeable future. Early detection and treatment of lung cancer holds great promise for the management of this disease. Unlike cervical cancer, the physical, complete removal/destruction of all dysplastic lesions in the bronchial tree is not possible; however, treatment of the lesions using a chemopreventive agent is. Intermediate biomarkers have been used to screen promising chemopreventive agents for larger population studies. We have examined the natural history of lung cancer development by following a group of subjects at high risk of developing lung cancer using fluorescence endoscopy to identify the areas of abnormality for biopsy. Approximately 900 biopsies have been collected in this fashion and graded by at least two experienced, expert pathologists. Using an interactive version of the Cyto-Savant (Oncometrics Imaging Corp.), cytometric and tissue architectural data were collected from these biopsies. Using only the data from the normal and invasive cancer biopsies, quantitative morphometric and architectural indices were generated and calculated for all the collected biopsies. These indices were compared with Loss of Heterozygosity (LOH) of ten sites commonly associated with cancer. These results and the application of these quantitative measures to two small chemoprevention studies will be reported.

  4. Hyperplastic polyposis: association with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Leggett, B A; Devereaux, B; Biden, K; Searle, J; Young, J; Jass, J

    2001-02-01

    Hyperplastic polyposis is a loosely defined syndrome initially thought not to confer a clinically important predisposition to colorectal cancer. The aim of the current study was to examine the clinical, histologic, and molecular features of a prospective series of cases meeting a strict definition of the condition. Twelve patients were identified, seven of whom had developed colorectal cancer. Most polyps were hyperplastic, but 11 patients also had polyps containing dysplasia as either serrated adenomas. mixed polyps, or traditional adenomas. The mean percentage of dysplastic polyps in patients with cancer was 35%, and in patients without cancer, 11% (p < 0.05). Microsatellite instability (MSI) was present in 3 of 47 hyperplastic polyps and two of eight serrated adenomas. Kras was mutated in 8 of 47 hyperplastic polyps and two of eight serrated adenomas. No polyps showed loss of heterozygosity of chromosomes 5q, 1p, or 18q. Two of seven cancers showed a high level of MSI. It is concluded that hyperplastic polyposis is associated with a high risk of colorectal cancer. Hyperplastic polyps are the dominant type of polyp, but most cases have some dysplastic epithelium. A higher proportion of dysplastic polyps is associated with increased cancer risk. Clonal genetic changes are observed in some hyperplastic polyps and serrated adenomas.

  5. Sociodemographic Parameters of Esophageal Cancer in Northwest India: A Regional Cancer Center Experience of 10 Years

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Akhil; Kumar, Vanita; Singhal, Mukesh Kumar; Nirban, Raj Kumar; Beniwal, Surender Kumar; Kumar, Harvindra Singh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite various advances in the treatment of Esophageal Cancer (EC), being one of the least responsive tumors to cancer therapy, the overall prognosis remains poor. Therefore, it is significant to understand various sociodemographic factors associated with EC to find out various schemes for primary prevention of the disease. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective analysis of medical records of the EC patients registered in the regional cancer center of northwest India from January 2003 to December 2012. The site of the disease and the histology were also recorded in addition to the various sociodemographic parameters. Results: Out of 55,742 patients registered in our hospital; 3,667 were diagnosed to have EC. Male:female ratio was 1.15:1. The mean age was 54.6 ± 11.74 years; 66.15% of the patients were illiterate and 48.6% belonged to the low socioeconomic status. Smoking and alcohol consumption were identified as risk factors in 48 and 25.6% of the patients, respectively. Conclusions: The etiology in majority of the patients is linked to tobacco and alcohol, thus, modification of life style with limiting the use of addictions may be an effective strategy in the prevention of this dreaded and mostly incurable disease. PMID:26435600

  6. Prediction of Potential Cancer-Risk Regions Based on Transcriptome Data: Towards a Comprehensive View

    PubMed Central

    Alisoltani, Arghavan; Fallahi, Hossein; Ebrahimi, Mahdi; Ebrahimi, Mansour; Ebrahimie, Esmaeil

    2014-01-01

    A novel integrative pipeline is presented for discovery of potential cancer-susceptibility regions (PCSRs) by calculating the number of altered genes at each chromosomal region, using expression microarray datasets of different human cancers (HCs). Our novel approach comprises primarily predicting PCSRs followed by identification of key genes in these regions to obtain potential regions harboring new cancer-associated variants. In addition to finding new cancer causal variants, another advantage in prediction of such risk regions is simultaneous study of different types of genomic variants in line with focusing on specific chromosomal regions. Using this pipeline we extracted numbers of regions with highly altered expression levels in cancer condition. Regulatory networks were also constructed for different types of cancers following the identification of altered mRNA and microRNAs. Interestingly, results showed that GAPDH, LIFR, ZEB2, mir-21, mir-30a, mir-141 and mir-200c, all located at PCSRs, are common altered factors in constructed networks. We found a number of clusters of altered mRNAs and miRNAs on predicted PCSRs (e.g.12p13.31) and their common regulators including KLF4 and SOX10. Large scale prediction of risk regions based on transcriptome data can open a window in comprehensive study of cancer risk factors and the other human diseases. PMID:24796549

  7. Incidence and mortality of female breast cancer in the Asia-Pacific region

    PubMed Central

    Youlden, Danny R.; Cramb, Susanna M.; Yip, Cheng Har; Baade, Peter D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To provide an overview of the incidence and mortality of female breast cancer for countries in the Asia-Pacific region. Methods Statistical information about breast cancer was obtained from publicly available cancer registry and mortality databases (such as GLOBOCAN), and supplemented with data requested from individual cancer registries. Rates were directly age-standardised to the Segi World Standard population and trends were analysed using joinpoint models. Results Breast cancer was the most common type of cancer among females in the region, accounting for 18% of all cases in 2012, and was the fourth most common cause of cancer-related deaths (9%). Although incidence rates remain much higher in New Zealand and Australia, rapid rises in recent years were observed in several Asian countries. Large increases in breast cancer mortality rates also occurred in many areas, particularly Malaysia and Thailand, in contrast to stabilising trends in Hong Kong and Singapore, while decreases have been recorded in Australia and New Zealand. Mortality trends tended to be more favourable for women aged under 50 compared to those who were 50 years or older. Conclusion It is anticipated that incidence rates of breast cancer in developing countries throughout the Asia-Pacific region will continue to increase. Early detection and access to optimal treatment are the keys to reducing breast cancer-related mortality, but cultural and economic obstacles persist. Consequently, the challenge is to customise breast cancer control initiatives to the particular needs of each country to ensure the best possible outcomes. PMID:25009752

  8. EXCESS CANCER MORTALITY IN AGRICULTURAL REGIONS OF MINNESOTA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because of its unique geology, Minnesota can be divided into four agricultural regions: south-central region one (corn, soybeans); west-central region two (wheat, corn, soybeans); northwest region three (wheat, sugar beets, potatoes); and northeast region four (forested and urban...

  9. An Investigation of Cancer Rates in the Argentia Region, Newfoundland and Labrador: An Ecological Study

    PubMed Central

    Duke, Pauline; Godwin, Marshall; Peach, Mandy; Fortier, Jacqueline; Bornstein, Stephen; Buehler, Sharon; McCrate, Farah; Pike, Andrea; Wang, Peizhong Peter; Cullen, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The Argentia region of Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada, was home to a US naval base during a 40-year period between the 1940s and the 1990s. Activities on the base resulted in contamination of the soil and groundwater in the region with chemicals such as heavy metals and dioxins, and residents have expressed concern about higher rates of cancer in their community. This study investigated the rate of cancer diagnosis that is disproportionately high in the Argentia region. Methods. Cases of cancer diagnosed between 1985 and 2011 were obtained for the Argentia region, two comparison communities, and the province of Newfoundland and Labrador. Crude and age-standardized incidence rates of cancer diagnosis were calculated and compared. The crude incidence rate was adjusted for differences in age demographics using census data, and age-standardized incidence rates were compared. Results. Although the Argentia region had a higher crude rate of cancer diagnosis, the age-standardized incidence rate did not differ significantly from the comparison communities or the provincial average. Argentia has an aging population, which may have influenced the perception of increased cancer diagnosis in the community. Conclusions. We did not detect an increased burden of cancer in the Argentia region. PMID:26633979

  10. Functional annotation of HOT regions in the human genome: implications for human disease and cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Chen, Hebing; Liu, Feng; Ren, Chao; Wang, Shengqi; Bo, Xiaochen; Shu, Wenjie

    2015-06-26

    Advances in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and large-scale sequencing studies have resulted in an impressive and growing list of disease- and trait-associated genetic variants. Most studies have emphasised the discovery of genetic variation in coding sequences, however, the noncoding regulatory effects responsible for human disease and cancer biology have been substantially understudied. To better characterise the cis-regulatory effects of noncoding variation, we performed a comprehensive analysis of the genetic variants in HOT (high-occupancy target) regions, which are considered to be one of the most intriguing findings of recent large-scale sequencing studies. We observed that GWAS variants that map to HOT regions undergo a substantial net decrease and illustrate development-specific localisation during haematopoiesis. Additionally, genetic risk variants are disproportionally enriched in HOT regions compared with LOT (low-occupancy target) regions in both disease-relevant and cancer cells. Importantly, this enrichment is biased toward disease- or cancer-specific cell types. Furthermore, we observed that cancer cells generally acquire cancer-specific HOT regions at oncogenes through diverse mechanisms of cancer pathogenesis. Collectively, our findings demonstrate the key roles of HOT regions in human disease and cancer and represent a critical step toward further understanding disease biology, diagnosis, and therapy.

  11. Black raspberries in cancer clinical trials: Past, present and future

    PubMed Central

    Kresty, Laura A.; Mallery, Susan R.; Stoner, Gary D.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Black raspberries (BRB) inhibit a broad range of cancers in preclinical models, including in vivo models of oral, esophageal, colon, breast and skin cancer. Promising preclinical results have led to clinical evaluations in cancer patients or patients at increased risk for cancer development. OBJECTIVE To summarize clinical investigations targeting cancer or precancerous lesions with BRB and discuss future directions. METHODS A thorough literature search was conducted through December 1, 2015 to identify all published studies evaluating BRB in cancer focused clinical trials. RESULTS Research investigating BRB in clinical settings report positive effects on preneoplastic lesions or cancers of the oral cavity, esophagus and colon. BRB treatment resulted in: histologic regression of oral intraepithelial neoplasia associated with improved histologic grade and significantly reduced loss of heterozygosity at tumor suppressor gene loci, modulated genes linked to RNA processing and growth factor recycling; in the colon, BRB inhibited FAP-associated polyp progression, demethylated tumor suppressor genes and improved plasma cytokine profiles; in Barrett’s patients, BRB consumption increased tissue levels of GST-pi and decreased 8-isoprostane, a marker of lipid peroxidation/oxidative stress. CONCLUSIONS The precise dose, duration and optimum mode of BRB delivery for cancer inhibition remains to be fully elucidated. Common themes across studies support that BRB are anti-proliferative, anti- inflammatory, reduce oxidative stress and restore tumor suppressive activity. Future directions are included in the conclusions section. PMID:27594930

  12. Black raspberries in cancer clinical trials: Past, present and future

    PubMed Central

    Kresty, Laura A.; Mallery, Susan R.; Stoner, Gary D.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Black raspberries (BRB) inhibit a broad range of cancers in preclinical models, including in vivo models of oral, esophageal, colon, breast and skin cancer. Promising preclinical results have led to clinical evaluations in cancer patients or patients at increased risk for cancer development. OBJECTIVE To summarize clinical investigations targeting cancer or precancerous lesions with BRB and discuss future directions. METHODS A thorough literature search was conducted through December 1, 2015 to identify all published studies evaluating BRB in cancer focused clinical trials. RESULTS Research investigating BRB in clinical settings report positive effects on preneoplastic lesions or cancers of the oral cavity, esophagus and colon. BRB treatment resulted in: histologic regression of oral intraepithelial neoplasia associated with improved histologic grade and significantly reduced loss of heterozygosity at tumor suppressor gene loci, modulated genes linked to RNA processing and growth factor recycling; in the colon, BRB inhibited FAP-associated polyp progression, demethylated tumor suppressor genes and improved plasma cytokine profiles; in Barrett’s patients, BRB consumption increased tissue levels of GST-pi and decreased 8-isoprostane, a marker of lipid peroxidation/oxidative stress. CONCLUSIONS The precise dose, duration and optimum mode of BRB delivery for cancer inhibition remains to be fully elucidated. Common themes across studies support that BRB are anti-proliferative, anti- inflammatory, reduce oxidative stress and restore tumor suppressive activity. Future directions are included in the conclusions section.

  13. Women's knowledge, attitudes and practice about breast cancer screening in the region of Monastir (Tunisia).

    PubMed

    El Mhamdi, Sana; Bouanene, Ines; Mhirsi, Amel; Sriha, Asma; Ben Salem, Kamel; Soltani, Mohamed Soussi

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer remains a worldwide public health problem. In Tunisia, it is considered to be the primary women's cancer and causes high morbidity and mortality. This study aimed to investigate female knowledge, attitudes and practice of breast cancer screening in the region of Monastir (Tunisia). We conducted a descriptive cross-sectional design exploring knowledge, attitudes and practices of women in the region of Monastir on breast cancer screening. The study was conducted in health centres of this region from 1 March 2009 to 30 June 2009. Data were collected via a structured questionnaire containing 15 items on demographic status, knowledge of risk factors and screening methods and attitudes towards the relevance and effectiveness of breast cancer screening. A scoring scheme was used to score women's responses. A total of 900 women agreed to take part in the study. Their mean age was 41.6±12.4 years and 64% did not exceed the primary level of education. According to the constructed scores, 92% of participants had poor knowledge of the specific risk factors for breast cancer and 63.2% had poor knowledge of the screening methods. Proper practice of breast cancer screening was observed in 14.3% of cases. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that good knowledge of risk factors and screening methods, higher level of education and positive family history of breast cancer were independently correlated with breast cancer screening practice. This study revealed poor knowledge of breast cancer and the screening methods as well as low levels of practice of breast cancer screening among women in the region of Monastir. Results justify educational programs to raise women's adherence to breast cancer screening programs in Tunisia.

  14. Causative relationship between diabetes mellitus and breast cancer in various regions of Saudi Arabia: an overview.

    PubMed

    Arif, Jamal M; Al-Saif, Ahmad M; Al-Karrawi, Mohammed A; Al-Sagair, Othman A

    2011-01-01

    The unwarranted connection between diabetes mellitus and breast cancer has gained new ground in recent years. Breast cancer in Saudi females accounts for approximately 21% of all cancers and the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) in Saudi females is also 21.5%. DM is diagnosed in the age group of 30+ years with possible exposure to predisposing factors like hyperinsulinemia and obesity at younger age. Further, 12% of the breast cancer cases are diagnosed in the young females aged 20-34 years. Despite the readily available access to healthcare facilities in the Kingdom, a large number of diabetics, approximately 27.9%, were unaware of having diabetes mellitus. This subpopulation is quite susceptible of developing breast cancer at later age. This review discusses common etiological and predisposing factors for breast cancer and diabetes, regional distribution and possible correlation of diabetes and cancer in Saudi Arabia.

  15. Environmental effect and genetic influence: a regional cancer predisposition survey in the Zonguldak region of Northwest Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadir, Selahattin; Önen-Hall, A. Piril; Aydin, S. Nihal; Yakicier, Cengiz; Akarsu, Nurten; Tuncer, Murat

    2008-03-01

    The Cretaceous-Eocene volcano-sedimentary units of the Zonguldak region of the western Black Sea consist of subalkaline andesite and tuff, and sandstone dominated by smectite, kaolinite, accessory chlorite, illite, mordenite, and analcime associated with feldspar, quartz, opal-CT, amphibole, and calcite. Kaolinization, chloritization, sericitization, albitization, Fe-Ti-oxidation, and the presence of zeolite, epidote, and illite in andesitic rocks and tuffaceous materials developed as a result of the degradation of a glass shards matrix, enclosed feldspar, and clinopyroxene-type phenocrysts, due to alteration processes. The association of feldspar and glass with smectite and kaolinite, and the suborientation of feldspar-edged, subparallel kaolinite plates to fracture axes may exhibit an authigenic smectite or kaolinite. Increased alteration degree upward in which Al, Fe, and Ti are gained, and Si, Na, K, and Ca are depleted, is due to the alteration following possible diagenesis and hydrothermal activities. Micromorphologically, fibrous mordenite in the altered units and the presence of needle-type chrysotile in the residential buildings in which cancer cases lived were detected. In addition, the segregation pattern of cancer susceptibility in the region strongly suggested an environmental effect and a genetic influence on the increased cancer incidence in the region. The most likely diagnosis was Li-Fraumeni syndrome, which is one of the hereditary cancer predisposition syndromes; however, no mutations were observed in the p53 gene, which is the major cause of Li-Fraumeni syndrome. The micromorphology observed in the altered units in which cancer cases were detected may have a role in the expression of an unidentified gene, but does not explain alone the occurrence of cancer as a primary cause in the region.

  16. Patterns and functional implications of rare germline variants across 12 cancer types

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Charles; Xie, Mingchao; Wendl, Michael C.; Wang, Jiayin; McLellan, Michael D.; Leiserson, Mark D. M.; Huang, Kuan-lin; Wyczalkowski, Matthew A.; Jayasinghe, Reyka; Banerjee, Tapahsama; Ning, Jie; Tripathi, Piyush; Zhang, Qunyuan; Niu, Beifang; Ye, Kai; Schmidt, Heather K.; Fulton, Robert S.; McMichael, Joshua F.; Batra, Prag; Kandoth, Cyriac; Bharadwaj, Maheetha; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Miller, Christopher A.; Kanchi, Krishna L.; Eldred, James M.; Larson, David E.; Welch, John S.; You, Ming; Ozenberger, Bradley A.; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Walter, Matthew J.; Ellis, Matthew J.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Graubert, Timothy A.; Dipersio, John F.; Ley, Timothy J.; Wilson, Richard K.; Goodfellow, Paul J.; Raphael, Benjamin J.; Chen, Feng; Johnson, Kimberly J.; Parvin, Jeffrey D.; Ding, Li

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale cancer sequencing data enable discovery of rare germline cancer susceptibility variants. Here we systematically analyse 4,034 cases from The Cancer Genome Atlas cancer cases representing 12 cancer types. We find that the frequency of rare germline truncations in 114 cancer-susceptibility-associated genes varies widely, from 4% (acute myeloid leukaemia (AML)) to 19% (ovarian cancer), with a notably high frequency of 11% in stomach cancer. Burden testing identifies 13 cancer genes with significant enrichment of rare truncations, some associated with specific cancers (for example, RAD51C, PALB2 and MSH6 in AML, stomach and endometrial cancers, respectively). Significant, tumour-specific loss of heterozygosity occurs in nine genes (ATM, BAP1, BRCA1/2, BRIP1, FANCM, PALB2 and RAD51C/D). Moreover, our homology-directed repair assay of 68 BRCA1 rare missense variants supports the utility of allelic enrichment analysis for characterizing variants of unknown significance. The scale of this analysis and the somatic-germline integration enable the detection of rare variants that may affect individual susceptibility to tumour development, a critical step toward precision medicine. PMID:26689913

  17. Patterns and functional implications of rare germline variants across 12 cancer types.

    PubMed

    Lu, Charles; Xie, Mingchao; Wendl, Michael C; Wang, Jiayin; McLellan, Michael D; Leiserson, Mark D M; Huang, Kuan-Lin; Wyczalkowski, Matthew A; Jayasinghe, Reyka; Banerjee, Tapahsama; Ning, Jie; Tripathi, Piyush; Zhang, Qunyuan; Niu, Beifang; Ye, Kai; Schmidt, Heather K; Fulton, Robert S; McMichael, Joshua F; Batra, Prag; Kandoth, Cyriac; Bharadwaj, Maheetha; Koboldt, Daniel C; Miller, Christopher A; Kanchi, Krishna L; Eldred, James M; Larson, David E; Welch, John S; You, Ming; Ozenberger, Bradley A; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Walter, Matthew J; Ellis, Matthew J; Mardis, Elaine R; Graubert, Timothy A; Dipersio, John F; Ley, Timothy J; Wilson, Richard K; Goodfellow, Paul J; Raphael, Benjamin J; Chen, Feng; Johnson, Kimberly J; Parvin, Jeffrey D; Ding, Li

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale cancer sequencing data enable discovery of rare germline cancer susceptibility variants. Here we systematically analyse 4,034 cases from The Cancer Genome Atlas cancer cases representing 12 cancer types. We find that the frequency of rare germline truncations in 114 cancer-susceptibility-associated genes varies widely, from 4% (acute myeloid leukaemia (AML)) to 19% (ovarian cancer), with a notably high frequency of 11% in stomach cancer. Burden testing identifies 13 cancer genes with significant enrichment of rare truncations, some associated with specific cancers (for example, RAD51C, PALB2 and MSH6 in AML, stomach and endometrial cancers, respectively). Significant, tumour-specific loss of heterozygosity occurs in nine genes (ATM, BAP1, BRCA1/2, BRIP1, FANCM, PALB2 and RAD51C/D). Moreover, our homology-directed repair assay of 68 BRCA1 rare missense variants supports the utility of allelic enrichment analysis for characterizing variants of unknown significance. The scale of this analysis and the somatic-germline integration enable the detection of rare variants that may affect individual susceptibility to tumour development, a critical step toward precision medicine. PMID:26689913

  18. The Role of Sialyl-Tn in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Munkley, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Activation of an aberrant glycosylation pathway in cancer cells can lead to expression of the onco-foetal sialyl-Tn (sTn) antigen. STn is a truncated O-glycan containing a sialic acid α-2,6 linked to GalNAc α-O-Ser/Thr and is associated with an adverse outcome and poor prognosis in cancer patients. The biosynthesis of the sTn antigen has been linked to the expression of the sialytransferase ST6GalNAc1, and also to mutations in and loss of heterozygosity of the COSMC gene. sTn neo- or over-expression occurs in many types of epithelial cancer including gastric, colon, breast, lung, oesophageal, prostate and endometrial cancer. sTn is believed to be carried by a variety of glycoproteins and may influence protein function and be involved in tumour development. This review discusses how the role of sTn in cancer development and tumour cell invasiveness might be organ specific and occur through different mechanisms depending on each cancer type or subtype. As the sTn-antigen is expressed early in carcinogenesis targeting sTn in cancer may enable the targeting of tumours from the earliest stage. PMID:26927062

  19. Delineation of a 6 cM commonly deleted region in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia on the 6q chromosomal arm.

    PubMed

    Gérard, B; Cavé, H; Guidal, C; Dastugue, N; Vilmer, E; Grandchamp, B

    1997-02-01

    Deletion of the long arm of human chromosome 6 in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has been shown by cytogenetic studies in 4-11% of cases. To characterize further the region of deletion and to precisely establish its frequency, we studied loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in 120 children with ALL using polymorphic markers located from the 6q14-15 chromosomal band to the telomere. LOH was detected in eight patients. A single region of LOH, flanked distally by D6S1594 and proximally by D6S301 was detected. These DNA markers are separated by 6 cM and are approximately located at the 6q21-22 band. Our present results delineate a region that is likely to contain a tumor-suppressor gene involved in a subset of childhood ALLs.

  20. Regional variation in incidence for smoking and alcohol related cancers in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Henau, Kris; Van Eycken, Elizabeth; Silversmit, Geert; Pukkala, Eero

    2015-02-01

    The prevalence of life habits may vary substantially within a country. Incidence maps of strongly related diseases can illustrate the distribution of these life style habits. In this study we explored the spatial variation in Belgium for different cancers related to alcohol and/or tobacco. From the Belgian Cancer Registry, municipality specific World Standardised incidence rates for the years 2004-2011 are used to create detailed smoothed cancer maps by subsite or histology for cancers of oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, oesophagus, liver and lung. Cancer incidence is compared both visually (from incidence maps) and with Poisson regression analysis using mortality from chronic liver disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease as a proxy for alcohol and tobacco prevalence, respectively. The incidence rates for oral cavity, pharyngeal and laryngeal cancer were comparable with the alcohol gradient. However, glottic cancer revealed a pattern that was more comparable with lung cancer. These two tumour types resembled more closely to the smoking pattern. Oesophageal cancer showed two patterns: squamous cell carcinoma was highly comparable with the background alcohol consumption, while adenocarcinoma was unrelated to one of our two proxies. Our approach and results are an encouraging example how data from a young cancer registry can be used in studies describing the regional cancer burden. The results can be useful for primary prevention to increase awareness for the public, authorities and health care professionals in specific subpopulations. PMID:25466934

  1. Regional variation in incidence for smoking and alcohol related cancers in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Henau, Kris; Van Eycken, Elizabeth; Silversmit, Geert; Pukkala, Eero

    2015-02-01

    The prevalence of life habits may vary substantially within a country. Incidence maps of strongly related diseases can illustrate the distribution of these life style habits. In this study we explored the spatial variation in Belgium for different cancers related to alcohol and/or tobacco. From the Belgian Cancer Registry, municipality specific World Standardised incidence rates for the years 2004-2011 are used to create detailed smoothed cancer maps by subsite or histology for cancers of oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, oesophagus, liver and lung. Cancer incidence is compared both visually (from incidence maps) and with Poisson regression analysis using mortality from chronic liver disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease as a proxy for alcohol and tobacco prevalence, respectively. The incidence rates for oral cavity, pharyngeal and laryngeal cancer were comparable with the alcohol gradient. However, glottic cancer revealed a pattern that was more comparable with lung cancer. These two tumour types resembled more closely to the smoking pattern. Oesophageal cancer showed two patterns: squamous cell carcinoma was highly comparable with the background alcohol consumption, while adenocarcinoma was unrelated to one of our two proxies. Our approach and results are an encouraging example how data from a young cancer registry can be used in studies describing the regional cancer burden. The results can be useful for primary prevention to increase awareness for the public, authorities and health care professionals in specific subpopulations.

  2. Detection of TP53 mutation, loss of heterozygosity and DNA content in fine-needle aspirates of breast carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Lavarino, C.; Corletto, V.; Mezzelani, A.; Della Torre, G.; Bartoli, C.; Riva, C.; Pierotti, M. A.; Rilke, F.; Pilotti, S.

    1998-01-01

    Recent preclinical and clinical data suggest that TP53 status and TP53 mutations may be important in determining tumour aggressiveness and therapy response. In this study we investigate the feasibility of a structural and quantitative analysis of TP53 on fine-needle aspiration (FNA) material obtained from 31 consecutive female patients with breast carcinoma, enrolled in a primary chemotherapy protocol. Tumours were screened for p53 protein overexpression and TP53 mutations (exons 5-8) using immunocytochemistry, polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) and DNA sequencing analyses, and finally using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis. Positive nuclear staining was identified in six cases whereas mutations were detected in nine. Although the immunoreactive pattern fitted fully with the characterized TP53 mutation type, the considerable number of null p53 mutations (i.e. four) coupled with the lack of information regarding the localization of TP53 mutations make immunocytochemistry an inadequate indicator of TP53 function deregulation. Combining molecular and FISH analyses, we detected three cases with TP53 deletion and one case with deletion and mutation. Finally, DNA static-image analysis performed on 29 cases showed aneuploidy in 26 cases, which included all TP53-mutated cases. The present results show that FNA may assist clinical decisions by allowing the evaluation of a variety of biological parameters relevant for prognosis and treatment planning. Images Figure 1 PMID:9459157

  3. PCR-RFLP studies on chromosome 3p in formaldehyde-fixed, paraffin-embedded cervical cancer tissues.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, F; Rabbitts, P H; Sundresan, V; Hagmar, B

    1994-09-15

    Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) has been extensively studied on the short arm of chromosome 3, and functional proofs have been obtained defining a tumor-suppressor locus at 3p21-22. We examined 31 paraffin-embedded cervical cancer samples for LOH, using 5 PCR-primer pairs, located around 3p21. Allele loss was found in 19 out of the 27 informative samples (70%) while 13 out of 23 informative samples (56%) had LOH located at 3p21-22. More of the human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive samples had LOH compared to the HPV-negative samples, giving only a weak association between loss of allele and HPV integration. Modifications of the DNA in the formaldehyde-fixed samples were detected, and further studies will be required to clarify how such artifacts may affect restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) studies on fixed tissues.

  4. Esophageal squamous cell cancer in a highly endemic region

    PubMed Central

    Asombang, Akwi W; Kayamba, Violet; Lisulo, Mpala M; Trinkaus, Kathryn; Mudenda, Victor; Sinkala, Edford; Mwanamakondo, Stayner; Banda, Themba; Soko, Rose; Kelly, Paul

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To identify risk factors associated with esophageal cancer in Zambia and association between dietary intake and urinary 8-iso prostaglandin F2α (8-isoPGF2α). METHODS: We conducted a prospective, case control study at the University Teaching Hospital. Subjects included both individuals admitted to the hospital and those presenting for an outpatient upper endoscopy. Esophageal cancer cases were compared to age and sex-matched controls. Cases were defined as patients with biopsy proven esophageal cancer; controls were defined as subjects without endoscopic evidence of esophageal cancer. Clinical and dietary data were collected using a standard questionnaire, developed a priori. Blood was collected for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) serology. Urine was collected, and 8-isoPGF2α was measured primarily by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and expressed as a ratio to creatinine. RESULTS: Forty five controls (mean age 54.2 ± 15.3, 31 male) and 27 cases (mean age 54.6 ± 16.4, 17 males) were studied. Body mass index was lower in cases (median 16.8) than controls (median 23.2), P = 0.01. Histopathologically, 25/27 (93%) were squamous cell carcinoma and 2/27 (7%) adenocarcinoma. More cases smoked cigarettes (OR = 11.24, 95%CI: 1.37-92.4, P = 0.02) but alcohol consumption and HIV seropositivity did not differ significantly (P = 0.14 for both). Fruit, vegetables and fish consumption did not differ significantly between groups (P = 0.11, 0.12, and 0.10, respectively). Mean isoprostane level was significantly higher in cases (0.03 ng/mg creatinine) than controls (0.01 ng/mg creatinine) (OR = 2.35, 95%CI: 1.19-4.65, P = 0.014). CONCLUSION: Smoking and isoprostane levels were significantly associated with esophageal cancer in Zambians, but diet, HIV status, and alcohol consumption were not. PMID:26973419

  5. Evaluation of rapid microsatellite analysis of paraffin-embedded specimens in screening for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Raedle, J; Brieger, A; Trojan, J; Hardt, T; Herrmann, G; Zeuzem, S

    1999-05-01

    Length alterations in short repetitive DNA sequences, termed microsatellite instability (MSI), are used as a diagnostic criterion of replication errors caused by various mutations in at least five mismatch repair genes. Therefore, MSI analysis is useful in clinical practice to identify patients with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). MSI can be detected by amplification of microsatellite loci in DNA extracted from paraffin-embedded tumor and corresponding peritumoral specimens after numerous time consuming steps limiting the clinical utilities. Rapid microsatellite analysis, a efficient and rapid DNA extraction technique based on Triton X-100 preincubation, was compared with the conventional DNA extraction for HNPCC screening in colorectal tumor specimens from 12 patients. Five complex and two noncomplex (CA)n microsatellite loci were tested, with use of multicolor fluorescent analysis. MSI and loss of heterozygosity in colorectal tumor samples could equally be assessed with the two DNA preparation methods, whereas the number of initially unsuccessful DNA extractions from paraffin-embedded tissue specimens and overall duration for MSI analysis were significantly reduced when rapid microsatellite analysis was used. A replication error-positive phenotype was detected in 2 of 10 patients with a positive family history for colorectal cancer, and diagnosis of HNPCC was finally confirmed by detection of a specific germline mutation. The described rapid microsatellite analysis is less time consuming and more efficient, and, in general, it reduces the risk of contamination by limiting the number of steps required. Therefore, it might replace current DNA extraction procedures. Furthermore, techniques using fluorescent polymerase chain reaction and semiautomated DNA sequencer allow for precise, observer-independent, and rapid scoring in MSI and loss of heterozygosity assessment. A combination of our rapid DNA extraction method and the use of a highly specific

  6. Detectable clonal mosaicism and its relationship to aging and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Kevin B; Yeager, Meredith; Zhou, Weiyin; Wacholder, Sholom; Wang, Zhaoming; Rodriguez-Santiago, Benjamin; Hutchinson, Amy; Deng, Xiang; Liu, Chenwei; Horner, Marie-Josephe; Cullen, Michael; Epstein, Caroline G; Burdett, Laurie; Dean, Michael C; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Sampson, Joshua; Chung, Charles C; Kovaks, Joseph; Gapstur, Susan M; Stevens, Victoria L; Teras, Lauren T; Gaudet, Mia M; Albanes, Demetrius; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Virtamo, Jarmo; Taylor, Philip R; Freedman, Neal D; Abnet, Christian C; Goldstein, Alisa M; Hu, Nan; Yu, Kai; Yuan, Jian-Min; Liao, Linda; Ding, Ti; Qiao, You-Lin; Gao, Yu-Tang; Koh, Woon-Puay; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Tang, Ze-Zhong; Fan, Jin-Hu; Aldrich, Melinda C; Amos, Christopher; Blot, William J; Bock, Cathryn H; Gillanders, Elizabeth M; Harris, Curtis C; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Kolonel, Laurence N; Le Marchand, Loic; McNeill, Lorna H; Rybicki, Benjamin A; Schwartz, Ann G; Signorello, Lisa B; Spitz, Margaret R; Wiencke, John K; Wrensch, Margaret; Wu, Xifeng; Zanetti, Krista A; Ziegler, Regina G; Figueroa, Jonine D; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Malats, Nuria; Marenne, Gaelle; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Baris, Dalsu; Schwenn, Molly; Johnson, Alison; Landi, Maria Teresa; Goldin, Lynn; Consonni, Dario; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Rotunno, Melissa; Rajaraman, Preetha; Andersson, Ulrika; Freeman, Laura E Beane; Berg, Christine D; Buring, Julie E; Butler, Mary A; Carreon, Tania; Feychting, Maria; Ahlbom, Anders; Gaziano, J Michael; Giles, Graham G; Hallmans, Goran; Hankinson, Susan E; Hartge, Patricia; Henriksson, Roger; Inskip, Peter D; Johansen, Christoffer; Landgren, Annelie; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Michaud, Dominique S; Melin, Beatrice S; Peters, Ulrike; Ruder, Avima M; Sesso, Howard D; Severi, Gianluca; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Visvanathan, Kala; White, Emily; Wolk, Alicja; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zheng, Wei; Silverman, Debra T; Kogevinas, Manolis; Gonzalez, Juan R; Villa, Olaya; Li, Donghui; Duell, Eric J; Risch, Harvey A; Olson, Sara H; Kooperberg, Charles; Wolpin, Brian M; Jiao, Li; Hassan, Manal; Wheeler, William; Arslan, Alan A; Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, H; Fuchs, Charles S; Gallinger, Steven; Gross, Myron D; Holly, Elizabeth A; Klein, Alison P; LaCroix, Andrea; Mandelson, Margaret T; Petersen, Gloria; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Bracci, Paige M; Canzian, Federico; Chang, Kenneth; Cotterchio, Michelle; Giovannucci, Edward L; Goggins, Michael; Bolton, Judith A Hoffman; Jenab, Mazda; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Krogh, Vittorio; Kurtz, Robert C; McWilliams, Robert R; Mendelsohn, Julie B; Rabe, Kari G; Riboli, Elio; Tjønneland, Anne; Tobias, Geoffrey S; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Elena, Joanne W; Yu, Herbert; Amundadottir, Laufey; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z; Kraft, Peter; Schumacher, Fredrick; Stram, Daniel; Savage, Sharon A; Mirabello, Lisa; Andrulis, Irene L; Wunder, Jay S; García, Ana Patiño; Sierrasesúmaga, Luis; Barkauskas, Donald A; Gorlick, Richard G; Purdue, Mark; Chow, Wong-Ho; Moore, Lee E; Schwartz, Kendra L; Davis, Faith G; Hsing, Ann W; Berndt, Sonja I; Black, Amanda; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Brinton, Louise A; Lissowska, Jolanta; Peplonska, Beata; McGlynn, Katherine A; Cook, Michael B; Graubard, Barry I; Kratz, Christian P; Greene, Mark H; Erickson, Ralph L; Hunter, David J; Thomas, Gilles; Hoover, Robert N; Real, Francisco X; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Caporaso, Neil E; Tucker, Margaret; Rothman, Nathaniel; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A; Chanock, Stephen J

    2012-01-01

    In an analysis of 31,717 cancer cases and 26,136 cancer-free controls drawn from 13 genome-wide association studies (GWAS), we observed large chromosomal abnormalities in a subset of clones from DNA obtained from blood or buccal samples. Mosaic chromosomal abnormalities, either aneuploidy or copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity, of size >2 Mb were observed in autosomes of 517 individuals (0.89%) with abnormal cell proportions between 7% and 95%. In cancer-free individuals, the frequency increased with age; 0.23% under 50 and 1.91% between 75 and 79 (p=4.8×10−8). Mosaic abnormalities were more frequent in individuals with solid-tumors (0.97% versus 0.74% in cancer-free individuals, OR=1.25, p=0.016), with a stronger association for cases who had DNA collected prior to diagnosis or treatment (OR=1.45, p=0.0005). Detectable clonal mosaicism was common in individuals for whom DNA was collected at least one year prior to diagnosis of leukemia compared to cancer-free individuals (OR=35.4, p=3.8×10−11). These findings underscore the importance of the role and time-dependent nature of somatic events in the etiology of cancer and other late-onset diseases. PMID:22561519

  7. Cervical cancer screening coverage in a high-incidence region.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Cibelli; Fonseca, Allex Jardim da; Sibajev, Alexander; Souza, Camila Iasmim de Andrade; Araújo, Daniela Souza; Teles, Daniele Aparecida de Freitas; Carvalho, Stéphanie Gomes Lins de; Cavalcante, Kyldery Wendell Moura; Rabelo, Wendell Lima

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the coverage of a cervical cancer screening program in a city with a high incidence of the disease in addition to the factors associated with non-adherence to the current preventive program. METHODS A cross-sectional study based on household surveys was conducted. The sample was composed of women between 25 and 59 years of age of the city of Boa Vista, RR, Northern Brazil who were covered by the cervical cancer screening program. The cluster sampling method was used. The dependent variable was participation in a women's health program, defined as undergoing at least one Pap smear in the 36 months prior to the interview; the explanatory variables were extracted from individual data. A generalized linear model was used. RESULTS 603 women were analyzed, with an mean age of 38.2 years (SD = 10.2). Five hundred and seventeen women underwent the screening test, and the prevalence of adherence in the last three years was up to 85.7% (95%CI 82.5;88.5). A high per capita household income and recent medical consultation were associated with the lower rate of not being tested in multivariate analysis. Disease ignorance, causes, and prevention methods were correlated with chances of non-adherence to the screening system; 20.0% of the women were reported to have undergone opportunistic and non-routine screening. CONCLUSIONS The informed level of coverage is high, exceeding the level recommended for the control of cervical cancer. The preventive program appears to be opportunistic in nature, particularly for the most vulnerable women (with low income and little information on the disease). Studies on the diagnostic quality of cervicovaginal cytology and therapeutic schedules for positive cases are necessary for understanding the barriers to the control of cervical cancer.

  8. Cervical cancer screening coverage in a high-incidence region

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Cibelli; da Fonseca, Allex Jardim; Sibajev, Alexander; Souza, Camila Iasmim de Andrade; Araújo, Daniela Souza; Teles, Daniele Aparecida de Freitas; de Carvalho, Stéphanie Gomes Lins; Cavalcante, Kyldery Wendell Moura; Rabelo, Wendell Lima

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the coverage of a cervical cancer screening program in a city with a high incidence of the disease in addition to the factors associated with non-adherence to the current preventive program. METHODS A cross-sectional study based on household surveys was conducted. The sample was composed of women between 25 and 59 years of age of the city of Boa Vista, RR, Northern Brazil who were covered by the cervical cancer screening program. The cluster sampling method was used. The dependent variable was participation in a women’s health program, defined as undergoing at least one Pap smear in the 36 months prior to the interview; the explanatory variables were extracted from individual data. A generalized linear model was used. RESULTS 603 women were analyzed, with an mean age of 38.2 years (SD = 10.2). Five hundred and seventeen women underwent the screening test, and the prevalence of adherence in the last three years was up to 85.7% (95%CI 82.5;88.5). A high per capita household income and recent medical consultation were associated with the lower rate of not being tested in multivariate analysis. Disease ignorance, causes, and prevention methods were correlated with chances of non-adherence to the screening system; 20.0% of the women were reported to have undergone opportunistic and non-routine screening. CONCLUSIONS The informed level of coverage is high, exceeding the level recommended for the control of cervical cancer. The preventive program appears to be opportunistic in nature, particularly for the most vulnerable women (with low income and little information on the disease). Studies on the diagnostic quality of cervicovaginal cytology and therapeutic schedules for positive cases are necessary for understanding the barriers to the control of cervical cancer. PMID:25741655

  9. Regional variations in cancer survival: Impact of tumour stage, socioeconomic status, comorbidity and type of treatment in Norway.

    PubMed

    Skyrud, Katrine Damgaard; Bray, Freddie; Eriksen, Morten Tandberg; Nilssen, Yngvar; Møller, Bjørn

    2016-05-01

    Cancer survival varies by place of residence, but it remains uncertain whether this reflects differences in tumour, patient and treatment characteristics (including tumour stage, indicators of socioeconomic status (SES), comorbidity and information on received surgery and radiotherapy) or possibly regional differences in the quality of delivered health care. National population-based data from the Cancer Registry of Norway were used to identify cancer patients diagnosed in 2002-2011 (n = 258,675). We investigated survival from any type of cancer (all cancer sites combined), as well as for the six most common cancers. The effect of adjusting for prognostic factors on regional variations in cancer survival was examined by calculating the mean deviation, defined by the mean absolute deviation of the relative excess risks across health services regions. For prostate cancer, the mean deviation across regions was 1.78 when adjusting for age and sex only, but decreased to 1.27 after further adjustment for tumour stage. For breast cancer, the corresponding mean deviations were 1.34 and 1.27. Additional adjustment for other prognostic factors did not materially change the regional variation in any of the other sites. Adjustment for tumour stage explained most of the regional variations in prostate cancer survival, but had little impact for other sites. Unexplained regional variations after adjusting for tumour stage, SES indicators, comorbidity and type of treatment in Norway may be related to regional inequalities in the quality of cancer care.

  10. Genetic polymorphisms in the 9p21 region associated with risk of multiple cancers.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Qing; Pfeiffer, Ruth M; Hyland, Paula L; Shi, Jianxin; Gu, Fangyi; Wang, Zhaoming; Bhattacharjee, Samsiddhi; Luo, Jun; Xiong, Xiaoqin; Yeager, Meredith; Deng, Xiang; Hu, Nan; Taylor, Philip R; Albanes, Demetrius; Caporaso, Neil E; Gapstur, Susan M; Amundadottir, Laufey; Chanock, Stephen J; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Landi, Maria Teresa; Tucker, Margaret A; Goldstein, Alisa M; Yang, Xiaohong R

    2014-12-01

    The chromosome 9p21 region has been implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple cancers. We analyzed 9p21 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from eight genome-wide association studies (GWAS) with data deposited in dbGaP, including studies of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), gastric cancer (GC), pancreatic cancer, renal cell carcinoma (RCC), lung cancer (LC), breast cancer (BrC), bladder cancer (BC) and prostate cancer (PrC). The number of subjects ranged from 2252 (PrC) to 7619 (LC). SNP-level analyses for each cancer were conducted by logistic regression or random-effects meta-analysis. A subset-based statistical approach (ASSET) was performed to combine SNP-level P values across multiple cancers. We calculated gene-level P values using the adaptive rank truncated product method. We identified that rs1063192 and rs2157719 in the CDKN2A/2B region were significantly associated with ESCC and rs2764736 (3' of TUSC1) was associated with BC (P ≤ 2.59 × 10(-6)). ASSET analyses identified four SNPs significantly associated with multiple cancers: rs3731239 (CDKN2A intronic) with ESCC, GC and BC (P = 3.96 × 10(-) (4)); rs10811474 (3' of IFNW1) with RCC and BrC (P = 0.001); rs12683422 (LINGO2 intronic) with RCC and BC (P = 5.93 × 10(-) (4)) and rs10511729 (3' of ELAVL2) with LC and BrC (P = 8.63 × 10(-) (4)). At gene level, CDKN2B, CDKN2A and CDKN2B-AS1 were significantly associated with ESCC (P ≤ 4.70 × 10(-) (5)). Rs10511729 and rs10811474 were associated with cis-expression of 9p21 genes in corresponding cancer tissues in the expression quantitative trait loci analysis. In conclusion, we identified several genetic variants in the 9p21 region associated with the risk of multiple cancers, suggesting that this region may contribute to a shared susceptibility across different cancer types. PMID:25239644

  11. e-Driver: a novel method to identify protein regions driving cancer

    PubMed Central

    Porta-Pardo, Eduard; Godzik, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Most approaches used to identify cancer driver genes focus, true to their name, on entire genes and assume that a gene, treated as one entity, has a specific role in cancer. This approach may be correct to describe effects of gene loss or changes in gene expression; however, mutations may have different effects, including their relevance to cancer, depending on which region of the gene they affect. Except for rare and well-known exceptions, there are not enough data for reliable statistics for individual positions, but an intermediate level of analysis, between an individual position and the entire gene, may give us better statistics than the former and better resolution than the latter approach. Results: We have developed e-Driver, a method that exploits the internal distribution of somatic missense mutations between the protein’s functional regions (domains or intrinsically disordered regions) to find those that show a bias in their mutation rate as compared with other regions of the same protein, providing evidence of positive selection and suggesting that these proteins may be actual cancer drivers. We have applied e-Driver to a large cancer genome dataset from The Cancer Genome Atlas and compared its performance with that of four other methods, showing that e-Driver identifies novel candidate cancer drivers and, because of its increased resolution, provides deeper insights into the potential mechanism of cancer driver genes identified by other methods. Availability and implementation: A Perl script with e-Driver and the files to reproduce the results described here can be downloaded from https://github.com/eduardporta/e-Driver.git Contact: adam@godziklab.org or eppardo@sanfordburnham.org Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25064568

  12. The Relationship between Eating and Lifestyle Habits and Cancer in Van Lake Region: Another Endemic Region for Esophageal and Gastric Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Celik, Sebahattin; Yılmaz, E. Murat; Özden, Ferhat; Kotan, Cetin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To examine the relationship between esophageal and gastric cancers commonly seen in Van Lake region and the traditional eating habits of the geography. Materials and Methods. Esophageal and gastric cancer cases, who underwent surgery between January 1, 2012, and December 31, 2013, were examined. Pathology reports of the patients and presence of Helicobacter pylori (HP) were recorded. Surveys were filled by face to face meeting or telephone call. Control group was created with randomly selected individuals without any cancer diagnosis having age, gender, and socioeconomic characteristics similar to patient group. All data were analyzed using SAS.9.3 statistical programme. Results. Compared with the control group, herby cheese consumption (a component of eating habits) and smoking were significantly higher in the patient group (P < 0.001). Tandoor exposure is compared in terms of female gender, and significant difference was found between the groups (P = 0.0013). As a result of the analysis with logistic regression more than 150 gr of herby cheese consumption per day was found to increase the cancer risk (odds ratio 1.017; 95% CI: 1.012–1.022). Conclusion. A high consumption of herby cheese, cooking bread on tandoor, and heavy smoking were seen to be important risk factors for esophageal and gastric cancers. PMID:25648523

  13. Roles of cancer registries in enhancing oncology drug access in the Asia-Pacific region.

    PubMed

    Soon, Swee-Sung; Lim, Hwee-Yong; Lopes, Gilberto; Ahn, Jeonghoon; Hu, Min; Ibrahim, Hishamshah Mohd; Jha, Anand; Ko, Bor-Sheng; Lee, Pak Wai; Macdonell, Diana; Sirachainan, Ekaphop; Wee, Hwee-Lin

    2013-01-01

    Cancer registries help to establish and maintain cancer incidence reporting systems, serve as a resource for investigation of cancer and its causes, and provide information for planning and evaluation of preventive and control programs. However, their wider role in directly enhancing oncology drug access has not been fully explored. We examined the value of cancer registries in oncology drug access in the Asia-Pacific region on three levels: (1) specific registry variable types; (2) macroscopic strategies on the national level; and (3) a regional cancer registry network. Using literature search and proceedings from an expert forum, this paper covers recent cancer registry developments in eight economies in the Asia-Pacific region - Australia, China, Hong Kong, Malaysia, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, and Thailand - and the ways they can contribute to oncology drug access. Specific registry variables relating to demographics, tumor characteristics, initial treatment plans, prognostic markers, risk factors, and mortality help to anticipate drug needs, identify high-priority research area and design access programs. On a national level, linking registry data with clinical, drug safety, financial, or drug utilization databases allows analyses of associations between utilization and outcomes. Concurrent efforts should also be channeled into developing and implementing data integrity and stewardship policies, and providing clear avenues to make data available. Less mature registry systems can employ modeling techniques and ad-hoc surveys while increasing coverage. Beyond local settings, a cancer registry network for the Asia-Pacific region would offer cross-learning and research opportunities that can exert leverage through the experiences and capabilities of a highly diverse region. PMID:23725106

  14. Integrated epigenomic analyses of enhancer as well as promoter regions in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Su-Jin; Kim, Mirang; Bae, Dong-Hyuck; Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Kim, Hee-Jin; Han, Myoung-Eun; Oh, Sae-Ock; Kim, Yong Sung; Kim, Seon-Young

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal DNA methylation is an epigenetic mechanism that promotes gastric carcinogenesis. While the abnormal methylation at promoter regions has been characterized for many genes, the function of DNA methylation marks at distal regulatory regions in gastric cancer remains poorly described. Here, we performed RNA-seq, MBD-seq, and H3K27ac ChIP-seq on gastric tissues and cell lines to understand the epigenetic changes in the distal as well as the proximal regulatory regions. In total, 257,651 significant DMRs (Differentially methylated regions) were identified in gastric cancer, and the majority of these DMRs were located in the intergenic, intronic, and non-coding RNA regions. We identified the aberrant expression of many genes and lncRNAs due to changes in DNA methylation. Furthermore, we profiled the molecular subtype-specific methylation patterns in gastric cancer to characterize subtype-specific regulators that undergo DNA methylation changes. Our findings provide insights for understanding methylation changes at distal regulatory regions and reveal novel epigenetic targets in gastric cancer. PMID:27016420

  15. Global and regional estimates of cancer mortality and incidence by site: II. results for the global burden of disease 2000

    PubMed Central

    Shibuya, Kenji; Mathers, Colin D; Boschi-Pinto, Cynthia; Lopez, Alan D; Murray, Christopher JL

    2002-01-01

    Background Mortality estimates alone are not sufficient to understand the true magnitude of cancer burden. We present the detailed estimates of mortality and incidence by site as the basis for the future estimation of cancer burden for the Global Burden of Disease 2000 study. Methods Age- and sex- specific mortality envelope for all malignancies by region was derived from the analysis of country life-tables and cause of death. We estimated the site-specific cancer mortality distributions from vital records and cancer survival model. The regional cancer mortality by site is estimated by disaggregating the regional cancer mortality envelope based on the mortality distribution. Estimated incidence-to-mortality rate ratios were used to back calculate the final cancer incidence estimates by site. Results In 2000, cancer accounted for over 7 million deaths (13% of total mortality) and there were more than 10 million new cancer cases world wide in 2000. More than 60% of cancer deaths and approximately half of new cases occurred in developing regions. Lung cancer was the most common cancers in the world, followed by cancers of stomach, liver, colon and rectum, and breast. There was a significant variations in the distribution of site-specific cancer mortality and incidence by region. Conclusions Despite a regional variation, the most common cancers are potentially preventable. Cancer burden estimation by taking into account both mortality and morbidity is an essential step to set research priorities and policy formulation. Also it can used for setting priorities when combined with data on costs of interventions against cancers. PMID:12502432

  16. Prognostic value of genomic alterations in minimal residual cancer cells purified from the blood of breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Austrup, F; Uciechowski, P; Eder, C; Böckmann, B; Suchy, B; Driesel, G; Jäckel, S; Kusiak, I; Grill, H-J; Giesing, M

    2000-01-01

    The prognostic value of disseminated tumour cells derived from 353 breast cancer patients was evaluated. Disseminated tumour cells were purified from blood using a newly established method and nucleic acids were subsequently isolated. We investigated genomic imbalances (GI) such as mutation, amplification and loss of heterozygosity of 13 tumour suppressor genes and 2 proto-oncogenes using DNA from isolated minimal residual cancer cells. Significant correlations were found between genomic alterations of the DCC - and c-erbB-2 genes in disseminated breast cancer cells and actuarial relapse-free survival. Furthermore, increasing numbers of genomic imbalances measured in disseminated tumour cells were significantly associated with worse prognosis of recurrent disease. Logistic regression and Cox multivariate analysis led to the identification of genomic imbalances as an independent prognostic factor. Determination of disseminated tumour cells by genotyping of oncogenes and tumour suppressor genes seems not only to be a useful adjunct in follow up of carcinoma patients but provides also valuable additional individualized prognostic and predictive information in breast cancer patients beyond the TNM system. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11104564

  17. Alternative staging of regional lymph nodes in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Szczepanik, Antoni M.; Paszko, Agata; Szura, Miroslaw; Scully-Horner, Thecla; Kulig, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The TNM pN stage based on the number of metastatic lymph nodes is an independent prognostic factor in gastric cancer. Many studies have highlighted the phenomenon of stage migration and problems in comparing groups of patients with different numbers of total lymph nodes harvested within TNM staging. The current version of UICC/AJCC and JGCA TNM classifications postulates a minimal number of 16 lymph nodes as the base for N stage determination. Alternative systems such as lymph node ratio (LNR), positive to negative lymph node ratio (PNLNR), and LOGODDS (or LODDS), were implemented to increase the quality of LN assessment. These methods have reached the background in the literature, but to date no standard approach according to the cut-offs for the stages has been implemented. LOGODDS is the method that most reflects the number of harvested lymph nodes. The rationale for alternative staging methods, their correlations, and limitations are presented. PMID:27713774

  18. Cancer Incidence Among Police Officers in a U.S. Northeast Region: 1976–2006

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Luenda E.; Burchfiel, Cecil M.; Andrew, Michael E.; Violanti, John M

    2015-01-01

    Police officers are exposed to occupational hazards which may put them at increased risk of cancer. We examined the incidence of cancer in a cohort of 2,234 white-male police officers in Buffalo, New York. The study population was followed for 31 years (1976–2006). The incidence of cancer, ascertained using a population-based tumor registry, was compared with 9 US regions using the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) program data. Four hundred and six officers (18.2%) developed cancer between 1976 and 2006. The risk of overall cancer among police officers was found to be similar to the general white-male population (Standardized Incidence Ratio [SIR] = 0.94, 95%, Confidence Interval [CI] = 0.85–1.03). An elevated risk of Hodgkin ‘s lymphoma was observed relative to the general population (SIR = 3.34, 95%, CI= 1.22–7.26). The risk of brain cancer, although only slightly elevated relative to the general population (SIR = 1.61, 95%, CI = 0.73–3.05), was significantly increased with 30 years or more of service (SIR = 2.92, 95%, CI = 1.07–6.36). Incidence ratios were significantly lower than expected for skin and bladder cancer. Police officers were at increased risk of Hodgkin’s lymphoma overall and of brain cancer after 30 years of service. PMID:22900461

  19. Incidence and tumour stages of breast cancer in the region of Aachen, Germany.

    PubMed

    Seemayer, C A; Breuer, Elisabeth; Kroll, G; Markus-Sellhaus, S; Reineke, T H; Mittermayer, C

    2002-03-01

    We present epidemiological data of female breast cancer in the region of Aachen (Germany) including incidence and tumour stages for the period 1996-1997. Furthermore, we compare epidemiological data from Aachen with data from the directly neighbouring Dutch region South-Middle Limburg before and after the introduction of a national mammographic screening programme. The field study of breast cancer was undertaken at the Institute of Pathology and Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Aachen, supported by the Federal Ministry of Health (Germany), using data files from the Cancer Registry Aachen. The patient's consent to collect all data concerning her epidemiological and social situation as well as information on the outcome of disease was obtained in 83.4% of all cases. The remaining 16.6% of the cases without a patient's consent are based on histopathological reports. Only those patients are included who were documented as residing in the region of Aachen at the time of diagnosis. Tumour cases were counted according to International Agency for Research on Cancer rules and tumour stages are classified according to UICC guidelines. Incidence rates are calculated as crude value, adapted to the European and World Standard population (ESR, WSR), and the age specific incidence is presented in 5-year intervals. The cumulative risk is assessed for a certain life span by summarizing the age-specific incidences. The age-standardized breast cancer incidence rate in Aachen was 94 per 100 000 women in 1996 and 90 cases of invasive breast cancer per 100 000 women in 1997 according to the ESR. The cumulative risk of developing breast cancer in the life span ranging from 0 to 74 years is approximately 8%. The stage distribution of breast cancer reveals only 4% favourable carcinomata in situ, but 12% advanced T4 tumours. T1 and T2 tumour stages count for about 40% and T3 tumour stages about 4%. Incidence rates and the tumour stages of breast cancer in the region of

  20. [The perioperative period in cancer surgery: a critical moment! Is there a role for regional anesthesia in preventing cancer recurrence?].

    PubMed

    Beloeil, H; Nouette-Gaulain, K

    2012-06-01

    Surgical treatment of cancer is usually necessary but it can paradoxically aggravate the patient outcome by increasing the risk of recurrence. Many perioperative factors have been shown to contribute to the dissemination of the tumor: surgery itself, stress, inflammation, pain, anaesthetic drugs, blood transfusion, etc. The type of anaesthesia chosen in the cancer patient could then be crucial and influence the evolution of the disease. Experimental, preclinical and retrospective studies have suggested that a regional anesthesia associated or not with a general anesthesia for carcinologic surgery might reduce the risk of cancer recurrence. This text reviews the factors promoting the recurrence of tumors after carcinologic surgery and the potential possibilities of protection associated with the type of anaesthesia chosen.

  1. Epigenetic regulation in cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a disease arising from both genetic and epigenetic modifications of DNA that contribute to changes in gene expression in the cell. Genetic modifications include loss or amplification of DNA, loss of heterozygosity (LOH) as well as gene mutations. Epigenetic changes in cancer are generally thought to be brought about by alterations in DNA and histone modifications that lead to the silencing of tumour suppressor genes and the activation of oncogenic genes. Other consequences that result from epigenetic changes, such as inappropriate expression or repression of some genes in the wrong cellular context, can also result in the alteration of control and physiological systems such that a normal cell becomes tumorigenic. Excessive levels of the enzymes that act as epigenetic modifiers have been reported as markers of aggressive breast cancer and are associated with metastatic progression. It is likely that this is a common contributor to the recurrence and spread of the disease. The emphasis on genetic changes, for example in genome-wide association studies and increasingly in whole genome sequencing analyses of tumours, has resulted in the importance of epigenetic changes having less attention until recently. Epigenetic alterations at both the DNA and histone level are increasingly being recognised as playing a role in tumourigenesis. Recent studies have found that distinct subgroups of poor-prognosis tumours lack genetic alterations but are epigenetically deregulated, pointing to the important role that epigenetic modifications and/or their modifiers may play in cancer. In this review, we highlight the multitude of epigenetic changes that can occur and will discuss how deregulation of epigenetic modifiers contributes to cancer progression. We also discuss the off-target effects that epigenetic modifiers may have, notably the effects that histone modifiers have on non-histone proteins that can modulate protein expression and activity, as well as the role of

  2. Assessing needs and assets for building a regional network infrastructure to reduce cancer related health disparities.

    PubMed

    Wells, Kristen J; Lima, Diana S; Meade, Cathy D; Muñoz-Antonia, Teresita; Scarinci, Isabel; McGuire, Allison; Gwede, Clement K; Pledger, W Jack; Partridge, Edward; Lipscomb, Joseph; Matthews, Roland; Matta, Jaime; Flores, Idhaliz; Weiner, Roy; Turner, Timothy; Miele, Lucio; Wiese, Thomas E; Fouad, Mona; Moreno, Carlos S; Lacey, Michelle; Christie, Debra W; Price-Haywood, Eboni G; Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Coppola, Domenico; Sodeke, Stephen O; Green, B Lee; Lichtveld, Maureen Y

    2014-06-01

    Significant cancer health disparities exist in the United States and Puerto Rico. While numerous initiatives have been implemented to reduce cancer disparities, regional coordination of these efforts between institutions is often limited. To address cancer health disparities nation-wide, a series of regional transdisciplinary networks through the Geographic Management Program (GMaP) and the Minority Biospecimen/Biobanking Geographic Management Program (BMaP) were established in six regions across the country. This paper describes the development of the Region 3 GMaP/BMaP network composed of over 100 investigators from nine institutions in five Southeastern states and Puerto Rico to develop a state-of-the-art network for cancer health disparities research and training. We describe a series of partnership activities that led to the formation of the infrastructure for this network, recount the participatory processes utilized to develop and implement a needs and assets assessment and implementation plan, and describe our approach to data collection. Completion, by all nine institutions, of the needs and assets assessment resulted in several beneficial outcomes for Region 3 GMaP/BMaP. This network entails ongoing commitment from the institutions and institutional leaders, continuous participatory and engagement activities, and effective coordination and communication centered on team science goals.

  3. Cure fraction model with random effects for regional variation in cancer survival.

    PubMed

    Seppä, Karri; Hakulinen, Timo; Kim, Hyon-Jung; Läärä, Esa

    2010-11-30

    Assessing regional differences in the survival of cancer patients is important but difficult when separate regions are small or sparsely populated. In this paper, we apply a mixture cure fraction model with random effects to cause-specific survival data of female breast cancer patients collected by the population-based Finnish Cancer Registry. Two sets of random effects were used to capture the regional variation in the cure fraction and in the survival of the non-cured patients, respectively. This hierarchical model was implemented in a Bayesian framework using a Metropolis-within-Gibbs algorithm. To avoid poor mixing of the Markov chain, when the variance of either set of random effects was close to zero, posterior simulations were based on a parameter-expanded model with tailor-made proposal distributions in Metropolis steps. The random effects allowed the fitting of the cure fraction model to the sparse regional data and the estimation of the regional variation in 10-year cause-specific breast cancer survival with a parsimonious number of parameters. Before 1986, the capital of Finland clearly stood out from the rest, but since then all the 21 hospital districts have achieved approximately the same level of survival.

  4. Exome-Scale Discovery of Hotspot Mutation Regions in Human Cancer Using 3D Protein Structure.

    PubMed

    Tokheim, Collin; Bhattacharya, Rohit; Niknafs, Noushin; Gygax, Derek M; Kim, Rick; Ryan, Michael; Masica, David L; Karchin, Rachel

    2016-07-01

    The impact of somatic missense mutation on cancer etiology and progression is often difficult to interpret. One common approach for assessing the contribution of missense mutations in carcinogenesis is to identify genes mutated with statistically nonrandom frequencies. Even given the large number of sequenced cancer samples currently available, this approach remains underpowered to detect drivers, particularly in less studied cancer types. Alternative statistical and bioinformatic approaches are needed. One approach to increase power is to focus on localized regions of increased missense mutation density or hotspot regions, rather than a whole gene or protein domain. Detecting missense mutation hotspot regions in three-dimensional (3D) protein structure may also be beneficial because linear sequence alone does not fully describe the biologically relevant organization of codons. Here, we present a novel and statistically rigorous algorithm for detecting missense mutation hotspot regions in 3D protein structures. We analyzed approximately 3 × 10(5) mutations from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and identified 216 tumor-type-specific hotspot regions. In addition to experimentally determined protein structures, we considered high-quality structural models, which increase genomic coverage from approximately 5,000 to more than 15,000 genes. We provide new evidence that 3D mutation analysis has unique advantages. It enables discovery of hotspot regions in many more genes than previously shown and increases sensitivity to hotspot regions in tumor suppressor genes (TSG). Although hotspot regions have long been known to exist in both TSGs and oncogenes, we provide the first report that they have different characteristic properties in the two types of driver genes. We show how cancer researchers can use our results to link 3D protein structure and the biologic functions of missense mutations in cancer, and to generate testable hypotheses about driver mechanisms. Our results

  5. Childhood cancer and parental use of tobacco: findings from the inter-regional epidemiological study of childhood cancer (IRESCC)

    PubMed Central

    Sorahan, T; McKinney, P A; Mann, J R; Lancashire, R J; Stiller, C A; Birch, J M; Dodd, H E; Cartwright, R A

    2001-01-01

    Parental smoking data have been re-abstracted from the interview records of the Inter-Regional Epidemiological Study of Childhood Cancer (IRESCC) to test further the hypothesis that paternal cigarette smoking is a risk factor for the generality of childhood cancer. Reported cigarette smoking habits for the parents of 555 children diagnosed with cancer in the period 1980–1983 were compared, in two separate matched pairs analyses, with similar information for the parents of 555 children selected from GP lists (GP controls) and for the parents of 555 hospitalized children (hospital controls). When cases were compared with GP controls there was a statistically significant positive trend (P = 0.02) between the risk of childhood cancer and paternal daily consumption of cigarettes before the pregnancy; there was no significant trend for maternal smoking habit. When cases were compared with hospital controls there was a statistically significant negative trend (P< 0.001) between the risk of childhood cancer and maternal daily consumption of cigarettes before the pregnancy; there was no significant trend for paternal smoking habit. Neither of the significant trends could be explained by adjustment for socioeconomic grouping, ethnic origin or parental age at the birth of the child, or by simultaneous analysis of parental smoking habits. Relations between maternal consumption of cigarettes and birth weights suggested that (maternal) smoking data were equally reliable for case and control subjects, although comparisons with national data suggested that the hospital control parents were unusually heavy smokers. These findings give some support for the hypothesis that paternal cigarette smoking is a potential risk factor for the generality of childhood cancers. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www. bjcancer.com PMID:11139329

  6. Serum Cadmium Levels in Pancreatic Cancer Patients from the East Nile Delta Region of Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Kriegel, Alison M.; Soliman, Amr S.; Zhang, Qing; El-Ghawalby, Nabih; Ezzat, Farouk; Soultan, Ahmed; Abdel-Wahab, Mohamed; Fathy, Omar; Ebidi, Gamal; Bassiouni, Nadia; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Abbruzzese, James L.; Lacey, Michelle R.; Blake, Diane A.

    2006-01-01

    The northeast Nile Delta region exhibits a high incidence of early-onset pancreatic cancer. It is well documented that this region has one of the highest levels of pollution in Egypt. Epidemiologic studies have suggested that cadmium, a prevalent pollutant in the northeast Nile Delta region, plays a role in the development of pancreatic cancer. Objective: We aimed to assess serum cadmium levels as markers of exposure in pancreatic cancer patients and noncancer comparison subjects from the same region in Egypt. Design and Participants: We assessed serum cadmium levels of 31 newly diagnosed pancreatic cancer patients and 52 hospital comparison subjects from Mansoura, Egypt. Evaluation/Measurements: Serum cadmium levels were measured using a novel immunoassay procedure. Results: We found a significant difference between the mean serum cadmium levels in patients versus comparison subjects (mean ± SD, 11.1 ± 7.7 ng/mL vs. 7.1 ± 5.0 ng/mL, respectively; p = 0.012) but not in age, sex, residence, occupation, or smoking status. The odds ratio (OR) for pancreatic cancer risk was significant for serum cadmium level [OR = 1.12; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.04–1.23; p = 0.0089] and farming (OR = 3.25; 95% CI, 1.03–11.64; p = 0.0475) but not for age, sex, residence, or smoking status. Conclusions: The results from this pilot study suggest that pancreatic cancer in the East Nile Delta region is significantly associated with high levels of serum cadmium and farming. Relevance to Clinical Practice/Public Health: Future studies should further investigate the etiologic relationship between cadmium exposure and pancreatic carcinogenesis in cadmium-exposed populations. PMID:16393667

  7. Analysis of Individual Protein Regions Provides Novel Insights on Cancer Pharmacogenomics

    PubMed Central

    Pardo, Eduard Porta; Godzik, Adam

    2015-01-01

    The promise of personalized cancer medicine cannot be fulfilled until we gain better understanding of the connections between the genomic makeup of a patient's tumor and its response to anticancer drugs. Several datasets that include both pharmacologic profiles of cancer cell lines as well as their genomic alterations have been recently developed and extensively analyzed. However, most analyses of these datasets assume that mutations in a gene will have the same consequences regardless of their location. While this assumption might be correct in some cases, such analyses may miss subtler, yet still relevant, effects mediated by mutations in specific protein regions. Here we study such perturbations by separating effects of mutations in different protein functional regions (PFRs), including protein domains and intrinsically disordered regions. Using this approach, we have been able to identify 171 novel associations between mutations in specific PFRs and changes in the activity of 24 drugs that couldn't be recovered by traditional gene-centric analyses. Our results demonstrate how focusing on individual protein regions can provide novel insights into the mechanisms underlying the drug sensitivity of cancer cell lines. Moreover, while these new correlations are identified using only data from cancer cell lines, we have been able to validate some of our predictions using data from actual cancer patients. Our findings highlight how gene-centric experiments (such as systematic knock-out or silencing of individual genes) are missing relevant effects mediated by perturbations of specific protein regions. All the associations described here are available from http://www.cancer3d.org. PMID:25568936

  8. Gastric cancer mortality trends in Spain, 1976-2005, differences by autonomous region and sex

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of oncologic death worldwide. One of the most noteworthy characteristics of this tumor's epidemiology is the marked decline reported in its incidence and mortality in almost every part of the globe in recent decades. This study sought to describe gastric cancer mortality time trends in Spain's regions for both sexes. Methods Mortality data for the period 1976 through 2005 were obtained from the Spanish National Statistics Institute. Cases were identified using the International Classification of Diseases 9th and 10th revision (codes 151 and C16, respectively). Crude and standardized mortality rates were calculated by geographic area, sex, and five-year period. Joinpoint regression analyses were performed to ascertain whether changes in gastric cancer mortality trends had occurred, and to estimate the annual percent change by sex and geographic area. Results Gastric cancer mortality decreased across the study period, with the downward trend being most pronounced in women and in certain regions situated in the interior and north of mainland Spain. Across the study period, there was an overall decrease of 2.90% per annum among men and 3.65% per annum among women. Generally, regions in which the rate of decline was sharpest were those that had initially registered the highest rates. However, the rate of decline was not constant throughout the study period: joinpoint analysis detected a shift in trend for both sexes in the early 1980s. Conclusion Gastric cancer mortality displayed in both sexes a downward trend during the study period, both nationally and regionally. The different trend in rates in the respective geographic areas translated as greater regional homogeneity in gastric cancer mortality by the end of the study period. In contrast, rates in women fell more than did those in men. The increasing differences between the sexes could indicate that some risk factors may be modifying the sex-specific pattern of

  9. Trends in corrected lung cancer mortality rates in Brazil and regions

    PubMed Central

    Malta, Deborah Carvalho; de Abreu, Daisy Maria Xavier; de Moura, Lenildo; Lana, Gustavo C; Azevedo, Gulnar; França, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To describe the trend in cancer mortality rates in Brazil and regions before and after correction for underreporting of deaths and redistribution of ill-defined and nonspecific causes. METHODS The study used data of deaths from lung cancer among the population aged from 30 to 69 years, notified to the Mortality Information System between 1996 and 2011, corrected for underreporting of deaths, non-registered sex and age , and causes with ill-defined or garbage codes according to sex, age, and region. Standardized rates were calculated by age for raw and corrected data. An analysis of time trend in lung cancer mortality was carried out using the regression model with autoregressive errors. RESULTS Lung cancer in Brazil presented higher rates among men compared to women, and the South region showed the highest death risk in 1996 and 2011. Mortality showed a trend of reduction for males and increase for women. CONCLUSIONS Lung cancer in Brazil presented different distribution patterns according to sex, with higher rates among men and a reduction in the mortality trend for men and increase for women. PMID:27355467

  10. TALEN mediated somatic mutagenesis in murine models of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuyuan; Li, Lin; Kendrick, Sara L.; Gerard, Robert D.; Zhu, Hao

    2014-01-01

    Cancer genome sequencing has identified numerous somatic mutations whose biological relevance is uncertain. In this study, we used genome-editing tools to create and analyze targeted somatic mutations in murine models of liver cancer. TALEN were designed against β-catenin (Ctnnb1) and Apc, two commonly mutated genes in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), to generate isogenic HCC cell lines. Both mutant cell lines exhibited evidence of Wnt pathway dysregulation. We asked if these TALENs could create targeted somatic mutations after hydrodynamic transfection (HDT) into mouse liver. TALENs targeting β-catenin promoted endogenous HCC carrying the intended gain-of-function mutations. However, TALENs targeting Apc were not as efficient in inducing in vivo homozygous loss-of-function mutations. We hypothesized that hepatocyte polyploidy might be protective against TALEN-induced loss of heterozygosity (LOH), and indeed Apc gene editing was less efficient in tetraploid than in diploid hepatocytes. To increase efficiency, we administered adenoviral Apc TALENs and found that we could achieve a higher mutagenesis rate in vivo. Our results demonstrate that genome-editing tools can enable the in vivo study of cancer genes and faithfully recapitulate the mosaic nature of mutagenesis in mouse cancer models. PMID:25070752

  11. Incidence analyses of bladder cancer in the Nile delta region of Egypt.

    PubMed

    Fedewa, Stacey A; Soliman, Amr S; Ismail, Kadry; Hablas, Ahmed; Seifeldin, Ibrahim A; Ramadan, Mohamed; Omar, Hoda G; Nriagu, Jerome; Wilson, Mark L

    2009-10-01

    Bladder cancer is the most common malignancy among Egyptian males and previously has been attributed to Schistosoma infection, a major risk factor for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Recently, transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) incidence has been increasing while SCC has declined. To investigate this shift, we analyzed the geographical patterns of all bladder cancers cases recorded in Egypt's Gharbiah Population-Based Cancer Registry from 1999 through 2002. Data on tumor grade, stage, and morphology, as well as smoking, community of residence, age and sex, were collected on 1209 bladder cancer cases. Age-adjusted incidence rates were calculated for males, females, and the total population for the eight administrative Districts and 316 communities in Gharbiah. Incidence Rate Ratios (IRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were computed using Poisson Regression. The male age-adjusted incidence rate (IR) in Gharbiah Province was 13.65/100,000 person years (PY). The District of Kotour had the highest age-adjusted IR 28.96/100,000 among males. The District of Kotour also had the highest IRR among all Districts, IRR=2.15 95% CI (1.72, 2.70). Kotour's capital city had the highest bladder cancer incidence among the 316 communities (IR=73.11/100,000 PY). Future studies on sources and types of environmental pollution and exposures in relation to the spatial patterns of bladder cancer, particularly in Kotour District, may improve our understating of risk factors for bladder cancer in the region. PMID:19762298

  12. Incidence analyses of bladder cancer in the Nile delta region of Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Fedewa, Stacey A.; Soliman, Amr S.; Ismail, Kadry; Hablas, Ahmed; Seifeldin, Ibrahim A.; Ramadan, Mohamed; Omar, Hoda G.; Nriagu, Jerome; Wilson, Mark L.

    2009-01-01

    Bladder cancer is the most common malignancy among Egyptian males and previously has been attributed to Schistosoma infection, a major risk factor for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Recently, transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) incidence has been increasing while SCC has declined. To investigate this shift, we analyzed the geographical patterns of all bladder cancers cases recorded in Egypt’s Gharbiah Population-Based Cancer Registry from 1999 through 2002. Data on tumor grade, stage, and morphology, as well as smoking, community of residence, age and sex, were collected on 1,209 bladder cancer cases. Age-adjusted incidence rates were calculated for males, females, and the total population for the eight administrative Districts and 316 communities in Gharbiah. Incidence Rate Ratios (IRR) and 95% Confidence Intervals (CI) were computed using Poisson Regression. The male age-adjusted incidence rate (IR) in Gharbiah Province was 13.65/100,000 person years (PY). The District of Kotour had the highest age-adjusted IR 28.96/100,000 among males. The District of Kotour also had the highest IRR among all Districts, IRR=2.15 95% CI (1.72, 2.70). Kotour’s capital city had the highest bladder cancer incidence among the 316 communities (IR=73.11/100,000 PY). Future studies on sources and types of environmental pollution and exposures in relation to the spatial patterns of bladder cancer, particularly in Kotour District, may improve our understating of risk factors for bladder cancer in the region. PMID:19762298

  13. No role for human papillomavirus infection in oral cancers in a region in southern India.

    PubMed

    Laprise, Claudie; Madathil, Sreenath A; Allison, Paul; Abraham, Priya; Raghavendran, Anantharam; Shahul, Hameed P; ThekkePurakkal, Akhil-Soman; Castonguay, Geneviève; Coutlée, François; Schlecht, Nicolas F; Rousseau, Marie-Claude; Franco, Eduardo L; Nicolau, Belinda

    2016-02-15

    Oral cancer is a major public health issue in India with ∼ 77,000 new cases and 52,000 deaths yearly. Paan chewing, tobacco and alcohol use are strong risk factors for this cancer in India. Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are also related to a subset of head and neck cancers (HNCs). We examined the association between oral HPV and oral cancer in a sample of Indian subjects participating in a hospital-based case-control study. We recruited incident oral cancer cases (N = 350) and controls frequency-matched by age and sex (N = 371) from two main referral hospitals in Kerala, South India. Sociodemographic and behavioral data were collected by interviews. Epithelial cells were sampled using Oral CDx® brushes from the oral cancer site and the normal mucosa. Detection and genotyping of 36 HPV genotypes were done using a polymerase chain reaction protocol. Data collection procedures were performed by qualified dentists via a detailed protocol with strict quality control, including independent HPV testing in India and Canada. HPV DNA was detected in none of the cases or controls. Associations between oral cancer and risk factors usually associated with HPV infection, such as oral sex and number of lifetime sexual partners, were examined by logistic regression and were not associated with oral cancer. Lack of a role for HPV infection in this study may reflect cultural or religious characteristics specific to this region in India that are not conducive to oral HPV transmission. A nationwide representative prevalence study is needed to investigate HPV prevalence variability among Indian regions. PMID:26317688

  14. No role for human papillomavirus infection in oral cancers in a region in southern India.

    PubMed

    Laprise, Claudie; Madathil, Sreenath A; Allison, Paul; Abraham, Priya; Raghavendran, Anantharam; Shahul, Hameed P; ThekkePurakkal, Akhil-Soman; Castonguay, Geneviève; Coutlée, François; Schlecht, Nicolas F; Rousseau, Marie-Claude; Franco, Eduardo L; Nicolau, Belinda

    2016-02-15

    Oral cancer is a major public health issue in India with ∼ 77,000 new cases and 52,000 deaths yearly. Paan chewing, tobacco and alcohol use are strong risk factors for this cancer in India. Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are also related to a subset of head and neck cancers (HNCs). We examined the association between oral HPV and oral cancer in a sample of Indian subjects participating in a hospital-based case-control study. We recruited incident oral cancer cases (N = 350) and controls frequency-matched by age and sex (N = 371) from two main referral hospitals in Kerala, South India. Sociodemographic and behavioral data were collected by interviews. Epithelial cells were sampled using Oral CDx® brushes from the oral cancer site and the normal mucosa. Detection and genotyping of 36 HPV genotypes were done using a polymerase chain reaction protocol. Data collection procedures were performed by qualified dentists via a detailed protocol with strict quality control, including independent HPV testing in India and Canada. HPV DNA was detected in none of the cases or controls. Associations between oral cancer and risk factors usually associated with HPV infection, such as oral sex and number of lifetime sexual partners, were examined by logistic regression and were not associated with oral cancer. Lack of a role for HPV infection in this study may reflect cultural or religious characteristics specific to this region in India that are not conducive to oral HPV transmission. A nationwide representative prevalence study is needed to investigate HPV prevalence variability among Indian regions.

  15. Cronkhite-Canada syndrome containing colon cancer and serrated adenoma lesions.

    PubMed

    Yashiro, Masakazu; Kobayashi, Hikaru; Kubo, Naoshi; Nishiguchi, Yukio; Wakasa, Kenichi; Hirakawa, Kosei

    2004-01-01

    We describe a case of Cronkhite-Canada syndrome associated with sigmoid colon cancer, and provide a literature review. A 77-year-old man was diagnosed with sigmoid colon cancer after presenting with hypoproteinemia, nail atrophy, loss of scalp hair, hyperpigmentation, and gastrointestinal polyposis. The findings were consistent with Cronkhite-Canada syndrome. The colon polyps were histologically serrated adenomas, whose crypts showed a saw-toothed growth pattern with dysplasia, or tubular adenoma. Cronkhite-Canada syndrome associated with colon cancer has been reported in 31 cases. The availability of histologic material permitted reexamination of 25 of these cases. Serrated adenoma of the polypoid lesions was retrospectively found in 10 (40%) of the 25 cases. By comparison, the incidence of serrated adenomas has been estimated to occur in about 1% of all general polyps. Taken together, it is suggested that Cronkhite-Canada syndrome associated with colorectal cancer frequently has polyps containing serrated adenoma lesions. In the case described here, microsatellite instability and overexpression of the p53 protein were found in the cancer lesion and serrated adenoma lesions, and none of the lesions showed a loss of heterozygosity of various genes or K-RAS mutations. Thus, genetic alterations between the serrated adenoma and the colorectal cancer was correlated in this case. These findings suggested the possibility of a serrated adenoma-carcinoma sequence in this case of Cronkhite-Canada syndrome.

  16. Dietary habits of lung cancer patients from the Lower Silesia region of Poland

    PubMed Central

    Porębska, Irena; Gołecki, Marcin; Prescha, Anna; Pieczyńska, Joanna; Kosacka, Monika; Ilow, Rafał; Grajeta, Halina; Jankowska, Renata; Biernat, Jadwiga

    2015-01-01

    Aim of the study Assessment of lung cancer patients’ dietary habits before treatment enable medical staff to provide more individual, precise and complex care to patients, taking into consideration their nutritional status. The aim of this study was, therefore, to evaluate dietary habits related to lung cancer risk of lung cancer patients in comparison with controls from the Lower Silesia region of Poland. Material and methods Assessments of dietary habits, based on a validated questionnaire related to lung cancer risk were performed on 92 lung cancer patients and compared with the results obtained in 157 controls. Dietary patterns were evaluated concerning on eating frequency of high- and low- glycemic index products, vegetables and fruits, vegetable and fruit juices, green tea, liquid dairy products, meat and fried products over the previous year. Alcohol consumption was assessed on a dichotomous scale (yes or no). Results Majority of patients had inappropriate dietary habits, such as low consumption of low GI cereal products, vegetables, fruit and green tea, and a high consumption frequency of fried products. Conclusions Reported dietary mistakes indicate the need for dietary education among people at lung cancer risk and with newly diagnosed disease, to enhance their nutritional status. PMID:26793024

  17. Comprehensive genetic assessment of the ESR1 locus identifies a risk region for endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    O’Mara, Tracy A; Glubb, Dylan M; Painter, Jodie N; Cheng, Timothy; Dennis, Joe; Attia, John; Holliday, Elizabeth G; McEvoy, Mark; Scott, Rodney J; Ashton, Katie; Proietto, Tony; Otton, Geoffrey; Shah, Mitul; Ahmed, Shahana; Healey, Catherine S; Gorman, Maggie; Martin, Lynn; Hodgson, Shirley; Fasching, Peter A; Hein, Alexander; Beckmann, Matthias W; Ekici, Arif B; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Li, Jingmei; Dürst, Matthias; Runnebaum, Ingo; Hillemanns, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Lambrechts, Diether; Depreeuw, Jeroen; Annibali, Daniela; Amant, Frederic; Zhao, Hui; Goode, Ellen L; Dowdy, Sean C; Fridley, Brooke L; Winham, Stacey J; Salvesen, Helga B; Njølstad, Tormund S; Trovik, Jone; Werner, Henrica MJ; Tham, Emma; Liu, Tao; Mints, Miriam; Bolla, Manjeet K; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Wang, Qin; Hopper, John L; Peto, Julian; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Burwinkel, Barbara; Brenner, Hermann; Meindl, Alfons; Brauch, Hiltrud; Lindblom, Annika; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Couch, Fergus J; Giles, Graham G; Kristensen, Vessela N; Cox, Angela; Pharoah, Paul D P; Dunning, Alison M; Tomlinson, Ian; Easton, Douglas F; Thompson, Deborah J; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2015-01-01

    Excessive exposure to estrogen is a well-established risk factor for endometrial cancer (EC), particularly for cancers of endometrioid histology. The physiological function of estrogen is primarily mediated by estrogen receptor alpha, encoded by ESR1. Consequently, several studies have investigated whether variation at the ESR1 locus is associated with risk of EC, with conflicting results. We performed comprehensive fine-mapping analyses of 3,633 genotyped and imputed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 6,607 EC cases and 37,925 controls. There was evidence of an EC risk signal located at a potential alternative promoter of the ESR1 gene (lead SNP rs79575945, P = 1.86 × 10−5), which was stronger for cancers of endometrioid subtype (P = 3.76 × 10−6). Bioinformatic analysis suggests that this risk signal is in a functionally important region targeting ESR1, and eQTL analysis found that rs79575945 was associated with expression of SYNE1, a neighbouring gene. In summary, we have identified a single EC risk signal located at ESR1, at study-wide significance. Given SNPs located at this locus have been associated with risk for breast cancer, also a hormonally driven cancer, this study adds weight to the rationale for performing informed candidate fine-scale genetic studies across cancer types. PMID:26330482

  18. Comprehensive genetic assessment of the ESR1 locus identifies a risk region for endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    O'Mara, Tracy A; Glubb, Dylan M; Painter, Jodie N; Cheng, Timothy; Dennis, Joe; Attia, John; Holliday, Elizabeth G; McEvoy, Mark; Scott, Rodney J; Ashton, Katie; Proietto, Tony; Otton, Geoffrey; Shah, Mitul; Ahmed, Shahana; Healey, Catherine S; Gorman, Maggie; Martin, Lynn; Hodgson, Shirley; Fasching, Peter A; Hein, Alexander; Beckmann, Matthias W; Ekici, Arif B; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Li, Jingmei; Dürst, Matthias; Runnebaum, Ingo; Hillemanns, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Lambrechts, Diether; Depreeuw, Jeroen; Annibali, Daniela; Amant, Frederic; Zhao, Hui; Goode, Ellen L; Dowdy, Sean C; Fridley, Brooke L; Winham, Stacey J; Salvesen, Helga B; Njølstad, Tormund S; Trovik, Jone; Werner, Henrica M J; Tham, Emma; Liu, Tao; Mints, Miriam; Bolla, Manjeet K; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Wang, Qin; Hopper, John L; Peto, Julian; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Burwinkel, Barbara; Brenner, Hermann; Meindl, Alfons; Brauch, Hiltrud; Lindblom, Annika; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Couch, Fergus J; Giles, Graham G; Kristensen, Vessela N; Cox, Angela; Pharoah, Paul D P; Dunning, Alison M; Tomlinson, Ian; Easton, Douglas F; Thompson, Deborah J; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2015-10-01

    Excessive exposure to estrogen is a well-established risk factor for endometrial cancer (EC), particularly for cancers of endometrioid histology. The physiological function of estrogen is primarily mediated by estrogen receptor alpha, encoded by ESR1. Consequently, several studies have investigated whether variation at the ESR1 locus is associated with risk of EC, with conflicting results. We performed comprehensive fine-mapping analyses of 3633 genotyped and imputed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 6607 EC cases and 37 925 controls. There was evidence of an EC risk signal located at a potential alternative promoter of the ESR1 gene (lead SNP rs79575945, P=1.86×10(-5)), which was stronger for cancers of endometrioid subtype (P=3.76×10(-6)). Bioinformatic analysis suggests that this risk signal is in a functionally important region targeting ESR1, and eQTL analysis found that rs79575945 was associated with expression of SYNE1, a neighbouring gene. In summary, we have identified a single EC risk signal located at ESR1, at study-wide significance. Given SNPs located at this locus have been associated with risk for breast cancer, also a hormonally driven cancer, this study adds weight to the rationale for performing informed candidate fine-scale genetic studies across cancer types. PMID:26330482

  19. [Elective radiotherapy of the regional lymph node areas in breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Poortmans, P-M-P

    2006-11-01

    In breast cancer patients, the incidence of involvement of the regional lymph nodes and the risk for developing a locoregional recurrence are highly influenced by several prognostic factors. A meta-analysis of the EBCTCG showed a reduction of about 70% of the locoregional recurrence rate with radiotherapy for all patients, independent of age, characteristics of the tumour or the administration of systemic treatment. At the same time, this meta-analysis confirmed that radiotherapy can lead to an increased risk for developing contralateral breast cancer and to an increase in the risk of non-breast cancer related mortality, mainly due to cardiac and pulmonary toxicity. Because of this, the net effect of regional radiotherapy will be strongly influenced by the individual risk factors of the patients and by the quality of the technical aspects of the radiotherapy. The thin line between the benefits of elective regional lymph node irradiation and the possible late toxicity for patients with early stage breast cancer is currently the subject of several prospective randomised trials, the results of which will only become available in several years. Moreover, recent developments in the field of novel prognostic factors will open completely new ways to be explored, which might give us new tools for estimating the individual benefit/risk ratio for every single patient. PMID:16962355

  20. Locally constrained active contour: a region-based level set for ovarian cancer metastasis segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianfei; Yao, Jianhua; Wang, Shijun; Linguraru, Marius George; Summers, Ronald M.

    2014-03-01

    Accurate segmentation of ovarian cancer metastases is clinically useful to evaluate tumor growth and determine follow-up treatment. We present a region-based level set algorithm with localization constraints to segment ovarian cancer metastases. Our approach is established on a representative region-based level set, Chan-Vese model, in which an active contour is driven by region competition. To reduce over-segmentation, we constrain the level set propagation within a narrow image band by embedding a dynamic localization function. The metastasis intensity prior is also estimated from image regions within the level set initialization. The localization function and intensity prior force the level set to stop at the desired metastasis boundaries. Our approach was validated on 19 ovarian cancer metastases with radiologist-labeled ground-truth on contrast-enhanced CT scans from 15 patients. The comparison between our algorithm and geodesic active contour indicated that the volume overlap was 75+/-10% vs. 56+/-6%, the Dice coefficient was 83+/-8% vs. 63+/-8%, and the average surface distance was 2.2+/-0.6mm vs. 4.4+/-0.9mm. Experimental results demonstrated that our algorithm outperformed traditional level set algorithms.

  1. Changing Trends of Skin Cancer: A Tertiary Care Hospital Study in Malwa Region of Punjab

    PubMed Central

    Banipal, Raja Paramjeet Singh; Bhatti, Deepak John; Yadav, Hanuman Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Skin cancer constitutes a small but significant proportion of patients with cancer. Although the presence of eumelanin in dark skin is protective against the development of skin cancer, it is increasingly being diagnosed in the Indian population. Aim To study the profile of skin cancer patients presenting to a tertiary hospital in Malwa area of Punjab, India. Materials and Methods Retrospective study was done to analyse the profile of skin cancer patients who attended the institution over one year from 1st December 2013 to 30th November 2014. A comprehensive review of aetiology and related risk factors was done to correlate the environmental factors with high skin cancer prevalence in this region. Results Skin cancer constituted (3.18%) 84 out of 2638 patients registered with cancer of all types. The age of the patients was 62±14.2 years and ranged from 27 to 92 yrs. Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) was the most common histological type(46/84, 54.76%) followed by squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) (31/84, 36.91%) and malignant melanoma (MM) (7/84, 8.33%). Male: female ratio was found to be 0.79:1. BCC showed higher female preponderance (p<0.05). Head and Neck was the commonest site involved (p<0.05). Majority (88%) of patients were from rural area. 92% of patients were directly into the profession of agriculture with history of prolonged exposure to sunlight. Conclusion Skin cancer constitutes a small but significant proportion of patients with cancers. This study highlights a paradoxically increasing trend of BCC and female preponderance. Head and neck is the most common site involved. Exposure to Ultra Violet B (UVB) radiation and higher levels of arsenic in drinking water has been reported to be associated with skin cancers. Limited studies show that levels of arsenic and pesticides were higher in the samples of drinking water in Malwa area of Punjab. Therefore a multipronged strategy to provide safe drinking water supply and discouraging the indiscriminate

  2. [A multicenter trial of regional medical cooperation for cancer chemotherapy after the great East Japan earthquake].

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Shoko; Seya, Yukiko; Murayama, Motoko; Ogasawara, Kimiyo; Kisara, Shigeki; Ishii, Tadashi; Sugawara, Michie; Chida, Yasunori; Kanbe, Mariko; Kakudo, Yuichi; Mano, Nariyasu; Ishioka, Chikashi

    2013-03-01

    The Great East Japan Earthquake was the first disaster we experienced after the administration of oncology care had mostly shifted from hospitals to outpatient departments in Japan. Disaster medical assistance teams(DMATs)were deployed immediately after the disaster, and actively assisted during the acute phase of the catastrophe. After experiencing the earthquake, we realized the necessity of medical support teams, even for chronic disease. Here we report a multicenter trial of regional medical cooperation for cancer chemotherapy. First, soon after the earthquake, representatives from the regional hospitals discussed the proper roles for each institution. As agreed to in the discussion, cancer patients were redistributed from a disaster base hospital to a local general hospital, and oncologists supported the other regional hospitals on a regular basis. This broad regional network functioned well and patients resumed their treatment as soon as the situation allowed. Second, we performed a survey of the patients and found that the most important problem was patients' lack of understanding of their own illnesses. Third, we conducted an opinion survey of medical professionals on regional medical cooperation. Based on the trial, we found it important in disasters to establish regional cooperation and solid communication systems, and to promote patient education.

  3. Accuracy of FDG-PET to diagnose lung cancer in a region of endemic granulomatous disease

    PubMed Central

    Deppen, Stephen; Putnam, Joe B.; Andrade, Gabriela; Speroff, Theodore; Nesbitt, Jonathan C.; Lambright, Eric S.; Massion, Pierre P.; Walker, Ron; Grogan, Eric L.

    2011-01-01

    Background 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) is used to evaluate suspicious pulmonary lesions due to its diagnostic accuracy. The southeastern United States has a high prevalence of infectious granulomatous lung disease, and the accuracy of FDGPET may be reduced in this population. We examined the diagnostic accuracy of FDG-PET in patients with known or suspected NSCLC treated at our institution. Methods 279 patients identified through our prospective database, underwent an operation for known or suspected lung cancer. Preoperative FDG-PET in 211 eligible patients was defined by standardized uptake value, SUV > 2.5 or by description (“moderate” or “intense”) as avid. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, likelihood ratios, and decision diagrams were calculated for FDG-PET in all patients and in patients with indeterminate nodules. Results In all eligible patients (n=211), sensitivity and specificity of FDG-PET were 92% and 40%. Positive and negative predictive values were 86% and 55%. Overall FDG-PET accuracy to diagnose lung cancer was 81%. Preoperative positive likelihood ratio for FDG-PET diagnosis of lung cancer in this population was 1.5 compared to previously published values of 7.1. In 113 indeterminate lesions, 65% had lung cancer and the sensitivity and specificity were 89% and 40% respectively. 24 benign nodules (60%) had false positive FDG-PET scans. 22 of 43 benign nodules (51%) were granulomas. Conclusions In a region with endemic granulomatous diseases, the specificity of FDG-PET for diagnosis of lung cancer was 40%. Clinical decisions and future clinical predictive models for lung cancer must accommodate regional variation of FDG-PET scan results. PMID:21592456

  4. Association between adjuvant regional radiotherapy and cognitive function in breast cancer patients treated with conservation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shibayama, Osamu; Yoshiuchi, Kazuhiro; Inagaki, Masatoshi; Matsuoka, Yutaka; Yoshikawa, Eisho; Sugawara, Yuriko; Akechi, Tatsuo; Wada, Noriaki; Imoto, Shigeru; Murakami, Koji; Ogawa, Asao; Akabayashi, Akira; Uchitomi, Yosuke

    2014-01-01

    Although protracted cognitive impairment has been reported to occur after radiotherapy even when such therapy is not directed to brain areas, the mechanism remains unclear. This study investigated whether breast cancer patients exposed to local radiotherapy showed lower cognitive function mediated by higher plasma interleukin (IL)-6 levels than those unexposed. We performed the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised (WMS-R) and measured plasma IL-6 levels for 105 breast cancer surgical patients within 1 year after the initial therapy. The group differences in each of the indices of WMS-R were investigated between cancer patients exposed to adjuvant regional radiotherapy (n = 51) and those unexposed (n = 54) using analysis of covariance. We further investigated a mediation effect by plasma IL-6 levels on the relationship between radiotherapy and the indices of WMS-R using the bootstrapping method. The radiotherapy group showed significantly lower Immediate Verbal Memory Index and Delayed Recall Index (P = 0.001, P = 0.008, respectively). Radiotherapy exerted an indirect effect on the lower Delayed Recall Index of WMS-R through elevation of plasma IL-6 levels (bootstrap 95% confidence interval = −2.6626 to −0.0402). This study showed that breast cancer patients exposed to adjuvant regional radiotherapy in conservation therapy might have cognitive impairment even several months after their treatment. The relationship between the therapy and the cognitive impairment could be partially mediated by elevation of plasma IL-6 levels. PMID:24756915

  5. Risks of Lung Cancer due to Radon Exposure among the Regions of Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye Ah; Lee, Won Kyung; Lim, Dohee; Park, Su Hyun; Baik, Sun Jung; Kong, Kyoung Ae; Jung-Choi, Kyunghee; Park, Hyesook

    2015-05-01

    Radon is likely the second most common cause of lung cancer after smoking. We estimated the lung cancer risk due to radon using common risk models. Based on national radon survey data, we estimated the population-attributable fraction (PAF) and the number of lung cancer deaths attributable to radon. The exposure-age duration (EAD) and exposure-age concentration (EAC) models were used. The regional average indoor radon concentration was 37.5 95 Bq/m(3). The PAF for lung cancer was 8.3% (European Pooling Study model), 13.5% in males and 20.4% in females by EAD model, and 19.5% in males and 28.2% in females by EAC model. Due to differences in smoking by gender, the PAF of radon-induced lung cancer deaths was higher in females. In the Republic of Korea, the risk of radon is not widely recognized. Thus, information about radon health risks is important and efforts are needed to decrease the associated health problems.

  6. Regional spectroscopy of paraffin-embedded breast cancer tissue using pulsed terahertz transmission imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Tyler; El-Shenawee, Magda; Campbell, Lucas

    2016-03-01

    This work seeks to obtain the properties of paraffin-embedded breast cancer tumor tissues using transmission imaging and spectroscopy. Formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded breast tumors are first sectioned into slices of 20 μm and 30 μm and placed between two tsurupica slides. The slides are then scanned in a pulsed terahertz system using transmission imaging. The tissue regions in adjacent pathology section are compared to the transmission imaging scan in order to define a region of points over which to average the electrical properties results from the scan.

  7. Comparable frequency of BRCA1, BRCA2 and TP53 germline mutations in a multi-ethnic Asian cohort suggests TP53 screening should be offered together with BRCA1/2 screening to early-onset breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Germline TP53 mutations cause an increased risk to early-onset breast cancer in Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) families and the majority of carriers identified through breast cancer cohorts have LFS or Li-Fraumeni-like (LFL) features. However, in Asia and in many low resource settings, it is challenging to obtain accurate family history and we, therefore, sought to determine whether the presence of early-onset breast cancer is an appropriate selection criteria for germline TP53 testing. Methods A total of 100 patients with early-onset breast cancer (≤ 35 years) treated at University Malaya Medical Centre between 2003 and 2009, were analyzed for germline mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2 and TP53 by full DNA sequencing. Of the mutations identified, we examined their likely pathogenicity on the basis of prevalence in a case-control cohort, co-segregation analyses and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in tumor tissues. Results We identified 11 BRCA1 (11%) and 6 BRCA2 (6%) germline carriers among early-onset breast cancer patients. Of the 83 BRCA-negative patients, we identified four exonic variants and three intronic variants in TP53. Of these, two exonic variants are clinically relevant (E346X and p. G334_R335dup6) and two novel missense mutations (A138V and E285K) are likely to be clinically relevant, on the basis of co-segregation and loss of heterozygosity (LOH). Notably, E285K was found in two unrelated individuals and haplotype analyses suggest a founder effect. Two of the three intronic variants are likely benign based on their prevalence in a control population. Clinically relevant TP53 germline mutations were identified in three of the four patients (75%) with a family history of at least two LFS-linked cancers (breast, bone or soft tissue sarcoma, brain tumors or adrenocortical cancer); 1 of the 17 patients (6%) with a family history of breast cancer only, and 1 of the 62 patients (< 2%) with no family history of breast or LFS-linked cancers. Conclusions Our

  8. Automatic glandular and tubule region segmentation in histological grading of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Kien; Barnes, Michael; Srinivas, Chukka; Chefd'hotel, Christophe

    2015-03-01

    In the popular Nottingham histologic score system for breast cancer grading, the pathologist analyzes the H and E tissue slides and assigns a score, in the range of 1-3, for tubule formation, nuclear pleomorphism and mitotic activity in the tumor regions. The scores from these three factors are added to give a final score, ranging from 3-9 to grade the cancer. Tubule score (TS), which reflects tubular formation, is a value in 1-3 given by manually estimating the percentage of glandular regions in the tumor that form tubules. In this paper, given an H and E tissue image representing a tumor region, we propose an automated algorithm to detect glandular regions and detect the presence of tubules in these regions. The algorithm first detects all nuclei and lumen candidates in the input image, followed by identifying tumor nuclei from the detected nuclei and identifying true lumina from the lumen candidates using a random forest classifier. Finally, it forms the glandular regions by grouping the closely located tumor nuclei and lumina using a graph-cut-based method. The glandular regions containing true lumina are considered as the ones that form tubules (tubule regions). To evaluate the proposed method, we calculate the tubule percentage (TP), i.e., the ratio of the tubule area to the total glandular area for 353 H and E images of the three TSs, and plot the distribution of these TP values. This plot shows the clear separation among these three scores, suggesting that the proposed algorithm is useful in distinguishing images of these TSs.

  9. Genomic Changes in Normal Breast Tissue in Women at Normal Risk or at High Risk for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Danforth, David N.

    2016-01-01

    Sporadic breast cancer develops through the accumulation of molecular abnormalities in normal breast tissue, resulting from exposure to estrogens and other carcinogens beginning at adolescence and continuing throughout life. These molecular changes may take a variety of forms, including numerical and structural chromosomal abnormalities, epigenetic changes, and gene expression alterations. To characterize these abnormalities, a review of the literature has been conducted to define the molecular changes in each of the above major genomic categories in normal breast tissue considered to be either at normal risk or at high risk for sporadic breast cancer. This review indicates that normal risk breast tissues (such as reduction mammoplasty) contain evidence of early breast carcinogenesis including loss of heterozygosity, DNA methylation of tumor suppressor and other genes, and telomere shortening. In normal tissues at high risk for breast cancer (such as normal breast tissue adjacent to breast cancer or the contralateral breast), these changes persist, and are increased and accompanied by aneuploidy, increased genomic instability, a wide range of gene expression differences, development of large cancerized fields, and increased proliferation. These changes are consistent with early and long-standing exposure to carcinogens, especially estrogens. A model for the breast carcinogenic pathway in normal risk and high-risk breast tissues is proposed. These findings should clarify our understanding of breast carcinogenesis in normal breast tissue and promote development of improved methods for risk assessment and breast cancer prevention in women. PMID:27559297

  10. Genomic Changes in Normal Breast Tissue in Women at Normal Risk or at High Risk for Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Danforth, David N

    2016-01-01

    Sporadic breast cancer develops through the accumulation of molecular abnormalities in normal breast tissue, resulting from exposure to estrogens and other carcinogens beginning at adolescence and continuing throughout life. These molecular changes may take a variety of forms, including numerical and structural chromosomal abnormalities, epigenetic changes, and gene expression alterations. To characterize these abnormalities, a review of the literature has been conducted to define the molecular changes in each of the above major genomic categories in normal breast tissue considered to be either at normal risk or at high risk for sporadic breast cancer. This review indicates that normal risk breast tissues (such as reduction mammoplasty) contain evidence of early breast carcinogenesis including loss of heterozygosity, DNA methylation of tumor suppressor and other genes, and telomere shortening. In normal tissues at high risk for breast cancer (such as normal breast tissue adjacent to breast cancer or the contralateral breast), these changes persist, and are increased and accompanied by aneuploidy, increased genomic instability, a wide range of gene expression differences, development of large cancerized fields, and increased proliferation. These changes are consistent with early and long-standing exposure to carcinogens, especially estrogens. A model for the breast carcinogenic pathway in normal risk and high-risk breast tissues is proposed. These findings should clarify our understanding of breast carcinogenesis in normal breast tissue and promote development of improved methods for risk assessment and breast cancer prevention in women. PMID:27559297

  11. Tumor suppressors status in cancer cell line Encyclopedia.

    PubMed

    Sonkin, Dmitriy; Hassan, Mehedi; Murphy, Denis J; Tatarinova, Tatiana V

    2013-08-01

    Tumor suppressors play a major role in the etiology of human cancer, and typically achieve a tumor-promoting effect upon complete functional inactivation. Bi-allelic inactivation of tumor suppressors may occur through genetic mechanisms (such as loss of function mutation, copy number (CN) loss, or loss of heterozygosity (LOH)), epigenetic mechanisms (such as promoter methylation or histone modification), or a combination of the two. We report systematically derived status of 69 known or putative tumor suppressors, across 799 samples of the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia. In order to generate such resource we constructed a novel comprehensive computational framework for the assessment of tumor suppressor functional "status". This approach utilizes several orthogonal genomic data types, including mutation data, copy number, LOH and expression. Through correlation with additional data types (compound sensitivity and gene set activity) we show that this integrative method provides a more accurate assessment of tumor suppressor status than can be inferred by expression, copy number, or mutation alone. This approach has the potential for a more realistic assessment of tumor suppressor genes for both basic and translational oncology research.

  12. Telomerase activity in human cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, J.

    2000-10-01

    The overall goal of this collaborative project was to investigate the role in malignant cells of both chromosome telomeres, and telomerase, the enzyme that replicates telomeres. Telomeres are highly conserved nucleoprotein complexes located at the ends of eucaryotic chromosomes. Telomere length in somatic cells is reduced by 40--50 nucleotide pairs with every cell division due to incomplete replication of terminal DNA sequences and the absence of telomerase, the ribonucleoprotein that adds telomere DNA to chromosome ends. Although telomerase is active in cells with extended proliferative capacities, including more than 85% of tumors, work performed under this contract demonstrated that the telomeres of human cancer cells are shorter than those of paired normal cells, and that the length of the telomeres is characteristic of particular types of cancers. The extent of telomere shortening ostensibly is related to the number of cell divisions the tumor has undergone. It is believed that ongoing cell proliferation leads to the accumulation and fixation of new mutations in tumor cell lineages.Therefore, it is not unreasonable to assume that the degree of phenotypic variability is related to the proliferative history of the tumor, and therefore to telomere length, implying a correlation with prognosis. In some human tumors, short telomeres are also correlated with genomic instabilities, including interstitial chromosome translocation, loss of heterozygosity, and aneuoploidy. Moreover, unprotected chromosome ends are highly recombinogenic and telomere shortening in cultured human cells correlates with the formation of dicentric chromosomes, suggesting that critically short telomeres not only identify, but also predispose, cells to genomic instability, again implying a correlation with prognosis. Therefore, telomere length or content could be an important predictor of metastatic potential or responsiveness to various therapeutic modalities.

  13. Identification of significantly mutated regions across cancer types highlights a rich landscape of functional molecular alterations

    PubMed Central

    Araya, Carlos L.; Cenik, Can; Reuter, Jason A.; Kiss, Gert; Pande, Vijay S.; Snyder, Michael P.; Greenleaf, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer sequencing studies have primarily identified cancer-driver genes by the accumulation of protein-altering mutations. An improved method would be annotation-independent, sensitive to unknown distributions of functions within proteins, and inclusive of non-coding drivers. We employed density-based clustering methods in 21 tumor types to detect variably-sized significantly mutated regions (SMRs). SMRs reveal recurrent alterations across a spectrum of coding and non-coding elements, including transcription factor binding sites and untranslated regions mutated in up to ∼15% of specific tumor types. SMRs reveal spatial clustering of mutations at molecular domains and interfaces, often with associated changes in signaling. Mutation frequencies in SMRs demonstrate that distinct protein regions are differentially mutated among tumor types, as exemplified by a linker region of PIK3CA in which biophysical simulations suggest mutations affect regulatory interactions. The functional diversity of SMRs underscores both the varied mechanisms of oncogenic misregulation and the advantage of functionally-agnostic driver identification. PMID:26691984

  14. Regional variation in colorectal cancer testing and geographic availability of care in a publicly insured population.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Stephanie B; Kuo, Tzy-Mey; Goyal, Ravi K; Meyer, Anne-Marie; Hassmiller Lich, Kristen; Gillen, Emily M; Tyree, Seth; Lewis, Carmen L; Crutchfield, Trisha M; Martens, Christa E; Tangka, Florence; Richardson, Lisa C; Pignone, Michael P

    2014-09-01

    Despite its demonstrated effectiveness, colorectal cancer (CRC) testing is suboptimal, particularly in vulnerable populations such as those who are publicly insured. Prior studies provide an incomplete picture of the importance of the intersection of multilevel factors affecting CRC testing across heterogeneous geographic regions where vulnerable populations live. We examined CRC testing across regions of North Carolina by using population-based Medicare and Medicaid claims data from disabled individuals who turned 50 years of age during 2003-2008. We estimated multilevel models to examine predictors of CRC testing, including distance to the nearest endoscopy facility, county-level endoscopy procedural rates, and demographic and community contextual factors. Less than 50% of eligible individuals had evidence of CRC testing; men, African-Americans, Medicaid beneficiaries, and those living furthest away from endoscopy facilities had significantly lower odds of CRC testing, with significant regional variation. These results can help prioritize intervention strategies to improve CRC testing among publicly insured, disabled populations.

  15. Regional Relapse After Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Duprez, Frederic; Bonte, Katrien; De Neve, Wilfried; Boterberg, Tom; De Gersem, Werner; Madani, Indira

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the regional relapse rate in the elective neck using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed the data from 285 patients treated with IMRT between 2000 and 2008. The median dose prescription to the primary tumor and involved lymph nodes was 69 Gy in 32 fractions. The elective neck was treated simultaneously according to Protocol 1 (multiple dose prescription levels of 56-69 Gy; 2-Gy normalized isoeffective dose, 51-70 Gy; 222 patients) or Protocol 2 (one dose prescription level of 56 Gy; 2-Gy normalized isoeffective dose, 51 Gy; 63 patients). Primary surgery or lymph node dissection was performed before IMRT in 72 (25%) and 157 (55%) patients, respectively. Also, 92 patients (32%) received concomitant chemotherapy. The median follow-up of living patients was 27.4 months (range, 0.3-99). Results: Regional, local, and distant relapse were observed in 16 (5.6%), 35 (12.3%), and 47 (16.5%) patients, respectively. The 2- and 5-year rate of regional relapse was 7% and 10%, respectively, with a trend favoring Protocol 2 (p = 0.06). Seven isolated regional relapses were detected at a median follow-up of 7.3 months in patients treated with Protocol 1 and none in those treated with Protocol 2. Percutaneous gastrostomy was required more frequently in patients who received Protocol 1 (p = 0.079). Conclusion: Isolated regional relapse is rare after IMRT for head-and-neck cancer. Elective neck node doses >51 Gy for a 2-Gy normalized isoeffective dose do not seem to improve regional control.

  16. Novel and recurrent BRCA2 mutations in Italian breast/ovarian cancer families widen the ovarian cancer cluster region boundaries to exons 13 and 14.

    PubMed

    Coppa, Anna; Buffone, Amelia; Capalbo, Carlo; Nicolussi, Arianna; D'Inzeo, Sonia; Belardinilli, Francesca; Colicchia, Valeria; Petroni, Marialaura; Granato, Teresa; Midulla, Cecilia; Zani, Massimo; Ferraro, Sergio; Screpanti, Isabella; Gulino, Alberto; Giannini, Giuseppe

    2014-12-01

    Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer are mainly linked to mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes which confer a similar cumulative risk of developing breast cancer. Importantly, while BRCA2 mutation carriers generally have a lower cumulative risk for ovarian cancer, mutations clustered in the central portion of BRCA2 are associated with a higher proportion of ovarian compared with breast cancer cases. The boundaries of this ovarian cancer cluster region (OCCR) have been tentatively defined within a 3.3 kb region of BRCA2 exon 11, and herein, we reassessed these boundaries using our series of Italian breast/ovarian cancer families. We used direct sequencing to investigate BRCA mutations in 367 breast/ovarian cancer families. We also studied the association between the location of the mutations and the ovarian cancer phenotype in our cohort of BRCA2-mutated families. We observed the novel c.7309_7309delA frameshift mutation and the c.7007G>A deleterious mutation in BRCA2 exons 14 and 13, respectively, in five independent Italian families characterized by a high proportion of ovarian cancer cases. Of note, a significantly higher proportion of ovarian versus breast cancer cases was associated not only with mutations in the previously defined OCCR (OR = 5.91; p = 0.004), but also with the exon 13-14 region (OR = 7.37; p = 0.001) in our BRCA2-mutated families. Our data provide initial evidence for a novel putative OCCR in BRCA2 exons 13-14.

  17. Regional variation in the management of metastatic gastric cancer in Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Mahar, A.L.; Coburn, N.G.; Kagedan, D.J.; Viola, R.; Johnson, A.P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Geographic variation in cancer care is common when clear clinical management guidelines do not exist. In the present study, we sought to describe health care resource consumption by patients with metastatic gastric cancer (gc) and to investigate the possibility of regional variation. Methods In this population-based cohort study of patients with stage iv gastric adenocarcinoma diagnosed between 1 April 2005 and 31 March 2008, chart review and administrative health care data were linked to study resource utilization outcomes (for example, clinical investigations, treatments) in the province of Ontario. The study took a health care system perspective with a 2-year time frame. Chi-square tests were used to compare proportions of resource utilization, and analysis of variance compared mean per-patient resource consumption between geographic regions. Results A cohort of 1433 patients received 4690 endoscopic investigations, 12,033 computed tomography exams, 12,774 radiography exams, and 5059 ultrasonography exams. Nearly all patients were seen by a general practitioner (98%) and a specialist (99%), and were hospitalized (95%) or visited the emergency department (87%). Fewer than half received chemotherapy (43%), gastrectomy (37%), or radiotherapy (28%). The mean number of clinical investigations, physician visits, hospitalizations, and instances of patient accessing the emergency department or receiving radiotherapy or stent placement varied significantly by region. Conclusions Variations in health care resource utilization for metastatic gc patients are observed across the regions of Ontario. Whether those differences reflect differential access to resources, patient preference, or physician preference is not known. The observed variation might reflect a lack of guidelines based on high-quality evidence and could partly be ameliorated with regionalization of gc care to high-volume centres. PMID:27536175

  18. MicroRNA-373 (miR-373) post-transcriptionally regulates large tumor suppressor, homolog 2 (LATS2) and stimulates proliferation in human esophageal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kuen-Haur; Goan, Yih-Gang; Hsiao, Michael; Lee, Chien-Hsing; Jian, Shu-Huei; Lin, Jen-Tai; Chen, Yuh-Ling; Lu, Pei-Jung

    2009-09-10

    LATS2 is a member of the LATS tumor suppressor family. It has been implicated in regulation of the cell cycle and apoptosis. Frequent loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of LATS2 has been reported in human esophageal cancer. But, the LATS2 gene expression and its regulatory mechanism in esophageal cancer remain unclear. The present study has shown that LATS2 protein expression was mediated by miR-373 at the post-transcriptional level and inversely correlated with miR-373 amounts in esophageal cancer cell lines. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the direct inhibition of LATS2 protein was mediated by miR-373 and manipulated the expression of miR-373 to affect esophageal cancer cells growth. Moreover, this correlation was supported by data collected ex vivo, in which esophageal cancer tissues from esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) patients were analyzed. Finally, by miRNA microarray analysis, four miRNAs including miR-373 were over-expressed in ESCC samples. Our findings reveal that miR-373 would be a potential oncogene and it participates in the carcinogenesis of human esophageal cancer by suppressing LATS2 expression.

  19. MicroRNA-373 (miR-373) post-transcriptionally regulates large tumor suppressor, homolog 2 (LATS2) and stimulates proliferation in human esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kuen-Haur; Goan, Yih-Gang; Hsiao, Michael; Lee, Chien-Hsing; Jian, Shu-Huei; Lin, Jen-Tai; Chen, Yuh-Ling; Lu, Pei-Jung

    2009-09-10

    LATS2 is a member of the LATS tumor suppressor family. It has been implicated in regulation of the cell cycle and apoptosis. Frequent loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of LATS2 has been reported in human esophageal cancer. But, the LATS2 gene expression and its regulatory mechanism in esophageal cancer remain unclear. The present study has shown that LATS2 protein expression was mediated by miR-373 at the post-transcriptional level and inversely correlated with miR-373 amounts in esophageal cancer cell lines. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the direct inhibition of LATS2 protein was mediated by miR-373 and manipulated the expression of miR-373 to affect esophageal cancer cells growth. Moreover, this correlation was supported by data collected ex vivo, in which esophageal cancer tissues from esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) patients were analyzed. Finally, by miRNA microarray analysis, four miRNAs including miR-373 were over-expressed in ESCC samples. Our findings reveal that miR-373 would be a potential oncogene and it participates in the carcinogenesis of human esophageal cancer by suppressing LATS2 expression.

  20. Local regional effectiveness of surgery and radiation therapy in the treatment of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Montague, E.D.; Fletcher, G.H.

    1985-05-01

    Although gross tumor can be controlled with high doses of radiation therapy, control is achieved at the expense of severe radiation sequelae. In order to improve tumor control with minimum complications, the field of treatment should contain only subclinical disease. This article reviews the successful combination of surgery for the removal of gross cancer and radiation of moderate dose for the treatment of subclinical disease in patients with breast cancer. In patients with clinically favorable and operable disease, the combination of a radical or modified radical mastectomy and postoperative radiation therapy of 5000 rad to the peripheral lymphatics and chest wall can secure 90% of the treated areas. For patients with locally and regionally advanced breast cancer, the combination of a simple mastectomy and dissection of the lateral axilla followed by postoperative irradiation of 5000 rad in 5 weeks to the chest wall, axilla, and peripheral lymphatic areas will control more than 85% of the patients treated as compared with approximately 70% control when surgery or radiotherapy alone is used, even with chemotherapy. Yet another clinical application of the subclinical disease concept is the successful combination of conservation surgery (whether segmental mastectomy, quadrantectomy, or wide excision) for gross tumor in the breast and axilla and irradiation for residual microscopic and multiple foci of tumor, yielding more than 90% control of locoregional disease with survival rates equal to those patients treated with radical or modified radical mastectomy. Results of multiple clinical trials and reported series are reviewed.

  1. Cervical cancer screening and HPV vaccine acceptability among rural and urban women in Kilimanjaro Region, Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Melissa S; Skrastins, Emily; Fitzpatrick, Ryan; Jindal, Priya; Oneko, Olola; Yeates, Karen; Booth, Christopher M; Carpenter, Jennifer; Aronson, Kristan J

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine cervical cancer screening coverage and the knowledge, attitudes and barriers toward screening tests among women in rural and urban areas of Tanzania, as well as explore how they view the acceptability of the HPV vaccine and potential barriers to vaccination. Setting A cross-sectional study using interview-administered questionnaires was conducted using multistage random sampling within urban and rural areas in Kilimanjaro Region, Tanzania. Participants Women aged 18–55 were asked to participate in the survey. The overall response rate was 97.5%, with a final sample of 303 rural and 272 urban dwelling women. Primary and secondary outcome measures Descriptive and simple test statistics were used to compare across rural and urban strata. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to estimate ORs and 95% CIs. Results Most women (82%) reported they had heard of cervical cancer, while self-reported cervical cancer screening among women was very low (6%). In urban areas, factors associated with screening were: older age (OR=4.14, 95% CI 1.86 to 9.24 for ages 40–49, and OR=8.38, 95% CI 2.10 to 33.4 for >50 years), having health insurance (OR=4.15, 95% CI 1.52 to 11.4), and having knowledge about cervical cancer (OR=5.81, 95% CI 1.58 to 21.4). In contrast, among women residing in rural areas, only condom use (OR=6.44, 95% CI 1.12 to 37.1) was associated with screening. Women from both rural and urban areas had low vaccine-related knowledge; however, most indicated they would be highly accepting if it were readily available (93%). Conclusions The current proportion of women screened for cervical cancer is very low in Kilimanjaro Region, and our study has identified several modifiable factors that could be addressed to increase screening rates. Although best implemented concurrently, the availability of prophylactic vaccination for girls may provide an effective means of prevention if they are unable to access screening in the future. PMID

  2. Constant denaturant gel electrophoresis as a rapid screening technique for p53 mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Børresen, A L; Hovig, E; Smith-Sørensen, B; Malkin, D; Lystad, S; Andersen, T I; Nesland, J M; Isselbacher, K J; Friend, S H

    1991-01-01

    At present, mutation of the p53 gene appears to be the most common genetic alteration found in human cancers. These mutations can occur within many different regions of the gene. We have developed a modification of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis termed "constant denaturant gel electrophoresis" (CDGE), which provides a rapid and sensitive method to screen the four conserved regions within the p53 gene where the majority of p53 mutations have been reported. The sensitivity of CDGE was first tested with known p53 mutations in all four conserved regions. The CDGE technique was then used to screen 32 breast carcinomas that had been analyzed by immunohistochemical methods for altered p53 protein levels and whose DNA had already been shown to have loss of heterozygosity for a chromosome 17p marker. By immunostaining techniques, only 6 of the 32 tumors had elevated p53 expression. However, CDGE detected p53 mutations in 11 of the 32 tumors. DNA sequence analysis was performed to determine the nucleotide positions of these mutations in all 11 samples. Loss of heterozygosity for the pYNZ22 or p144D6 markers did not associate with either the loss of heterozygosity at the p53 locus or the mutations detected by CDGE. We conclude that CDGE is a rapid and effective technique to screen for p53 mutations. Images PMID:1924299

  3. A polymorphic minisatellite region of BORIS regulates gene expression and its rare variants correlate with lung cancer susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Se-Lyun; Roh, Yun-Gil; Chu, In-Sun; Heo, Jeonghoon; Kim, Seung Il; Chang, Heekyung; Kang, Tae-Hong; Chung, Jin Woong; Koh, Sang Seok; Larionov, Vladimir; Leem, Sun-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant expression of BORIS/CTCFL (Brother of the Regulator of Imprinted Sites/CTCF-like protein) is reported in different malignancies. In this study, we characterized the entire promoter region of BORIS/CTCFL, including the CpG islands, to assess the relationship between BORIS expression and lung cancer. To simplify the construction of luciferase reporter cassettes with various-sized portions of the upstream region, genomic copies of BORIS were isolated using TAR cloning technology. We analyzed three promoter blocks: the GATA/CCAAT box, the CpG islands and the minisatellite region BORIS-MS2. Polymorphic minisatellite sequences were isolated from genomic DNA prepared from the blood of controls and cases. Of the three promoter blocks, the GATA/CCAAT box was determined to be a critical element of the core promoter, while the CpG islands and the BORIS-MS2 minisatellite region were found to act as regulators. Interestingly, the polymorphic minisatellite region BORIS-MS2 was identified as a negative regulator that repressed the expression levels of luciferase reporter cassettes less effectively in cancer cells compared with normal cells. We also examined the association between the size of BORIS-MS2 and lung cancer in a case-control study with 590 controls and 206 lung cancer cases. Rare alleles of BORIS-MS2 were associated with a statistically significantly increased risk of lung cancer (odds ratio, 2.04; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-4.08; and P=0.039). To conclude, our data provide information on the organization of the BORIS promoter region and gene regulation in normal and cancer cells. In addition, we propose that specific alleles of the BORIS-MS2 region could be used to identify the risk for lung cancer. PMID:27416782

  4. A polymorphic minisatellite region of BORIS regulates gene expression and its rare variants correlate with lung cancer susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Se-Lyun; Roh, Yun-Gil; Chu, In-Sun; Heo, Jeonghoon; Kim, Seung Il; Chang, Heekyung; Kang, Tae-Hong; Chung, Jin Woong; Koh, Sang Seok; Larionov, Vladimir; Leem, Sun-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant expression of BORIS/CTCFL (Brother of the Regulator of Imprinted Sites/CTCF-like protein) is reported in different malignancies. In this study, we characterized the entire promoter region of BORIS/CTCFL, including the CpG islands, to assess the relationship between BORIS expression and lung cancer. To simplify the construction of luciferase reporter cassettes with various-sized portions of the upstream region, genomic copies of BORIS were isolated using TAR cloning technology. We analyzed three promoter blocks: the GATA/CCAAT box, the CpG islands and the minisatellite region BORIS-MS2. Polymorphic minisatellite sequences were isolated from genomic DNA prepared from the blood of controls and cases. Of the three promoter blocks, the GATA/CCAAT box was determined to be a critical element of the core promoter, while the CpG islands and the BORIS-MS2 minisatellite region were found to act as regulators. Interestingly, the polymorphic minisatellite region BORIS-MS2 was identified as a negative regulator that repressed the expression levels of luciferase reporter cassettes less effectively in cancer cells compared with normal cells. We also examined the association between the size of BORIS-MS2 and lung cancer in a case–control study with 590 controls and 206 lung cancer cases. Rare alleles of BORIS-MS2 were associated with a statistically significantly increased risk of lung cancer (odds ratio, 2.04; 95% confidence interval, 1.02–4.08; and P=0.039). To conclude, our data provide information on the organization of the BORIS promoter region and gene regulation in normal and cancer cells. In addition, we propose that specific alleles of the BORIS-MS2 region could be used to identify the risk for lung cancer. PMID:27416782

  5. [Immunohistochemical study using a double fluorescent staining on the regional lymph nodes of gastric cancers].

    PubMed

    Chono, S

    1990-01-01

    For the purpose to investigate the immunological anti-tumor function of lymphocytes in the regional lymph nodes of gastric cancer, a double staining procedure using several monoclonal antibodies against the surface membranes of T and NK cells with fluorescent antibody technique was conducted. The number of CD11b+ cells out of CD8+ cells was small with almost all being CD11b- belonging to cytotoxic T cells. Leu8+ cells and Leu8- cells out of CD4+ cells were recognized in equal numbers and were reciprocal. The ratio of CD4+ Leu8-/CD4+ demonstrated an increase in the group injected with OK-432. The ratio of OKT9+ or OKIa1+ occupied in CD8+ or CD4+ cells was only several percent, and few in number. An increase for the ratio of CD4+ OKT9+/CD4+ was observed in the group injected with IL-2. Similar increases for the ratio of CD4+ OKIa1+/CD4+ were obtained in the group injected with OK-432 and in the metastatic group, respectively. The Leu7+ CD16+ cells were not observed. The Leu7- CD16+ cells were observed in a part where metastases were focused. These results indicated that lymphocytes in regional lymphocyte of gastric cancer might hold the hidden anti-tumor effect, but did not display the full function without preoperative intratumor injection of BRM such as IL-2 or OK-432.

  6. Cancer cell imaging and photothermal therapy in the near-infrared region by using gold nanorods.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaohua; El-Sayed, Ivan H; Qian, Wei; El-Sayed, Mostafa A

    2006-02-15

    Due to strong electric fields at the surface, the absorption and scattering of electromagnetic radiation by noble metal nanoparticles are strongly enhanced. These unique properties provide the potential of designing novel optically active reagents for simultaneous molecular imaging and photothermal cancer therapy. It is desirable to use agents that are active in the near-infrared (NIR) region of the radiation spectrum to minimize the light extinction by intrinsic chromophores in native tissue. Gold nanorods with suitable aspect ratios (length divided by width) can absorb and scatter strongly in the NIR region (650-900 nm). In the present work, we provide an in vitro demonstration of gold nanorods as novel contrast agents for both molecular imaging and photothermal cancer therapy. Nanorods are synthesized and conjugated to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (anti-EGFR) monoclonal antibodies and incubated in cell cultures with a nonmalignant epithelial cell line (HaCat) and two malignant oral epithelial cell lines (HOC 313 clone 8 and HSC 3). The anti-EGFR antibody-conjugated nanorods bind specifically to the surface of the malignant-type cells with a much higher affinity due to the overexpressed EGFR on the cytoplasmic membrane of the malignant cells. As a result of the strongly scattered red light from gold nanorods in dark field, observed using a laboratory microscope, the malignant cells are clearly visualized and diagnosed from the nonmalignant cells. It is found that, after exposure to continuous red laser at 800 nm, malignant cells require about half the laser energy to be photothermally destroyed than the nonmalignant cells. Thus, both efficient cancer cell diagnostics and selective photothermal therapy are realized at the same time.

  7. Cancer cell imaging and photothermal therapy in the near-infrared region by using gold nanorods.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaohua; El-Sayed, Ivan H; Qian, Wei; El-Sayed, Mostafa A

    2006-02-15

    Due to strong electric fields at the surface, the absorption and scattering of electromagnetic radiation by noble metal nanoparticles are strongly enhanced. These unique properties provide the potential of designing novel optically active reagents for simultaneous molecular imaging and photothermal cancer therapy. It is desirable to use agents that are active in the near-infrared (NIR) region of the radiation spectrum to minimize the light extinction by intrinsic chromophores in native tissue. Gold nanorods with suitable aspect ratios (length divided by width) can absorb and scatter strongly in the NIR region (650-900 nm). In the present work, we provide an in vitro demonstration of gold nanorods as novel contrast agents for both molecular imaging and photothermal cancer therapy. Nanorods are synthesized and conjugated to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (anti-EGFR) monoclonal antibodies and incubated in cell cultures with a nonmalignant epithelial cell line (HaCat) and two malignant oral epithelial cell lines (HOC 313 clone 8 and HSC 3). The anti-EGFR antibody-conjugated nanorods bind specifically to the surface of the malignant-type cells with a much higher affinity due to the overexpressed EGFR on the cytoplasmic membrane of the malignant cells. As a result of the strongly scattered red light from gold nanorods in dark field, observed using a laboratory microscope, the malignant cells are clearly visualized and diagnosed from the nonmalignant cells. It is found that, after exposure to continuous red laser at 800 nm, malignant cells require about half the laser energy to be photothermally destroyed than the nonmalignant cells. Thus, both efficient cancer cell diagnostics and selective photothermal therapy are realized at the same time. PMID:16464114

  8. Sentinel node biopsy in breast cancer: short time results show appropriate regional control.

    PubMed

    Fait, V; Chrenko, V

    2007-01-01

    Sentinel node biopsy becomes a standard diagnostic and therapeutic tool in breast cancer in certain indications, while in other indications its validity is still reviewed. The authors present their experience with this method. In the years 2000-2006 700 patients underwent surgery. 704 sentinel node biopsies were performed (bilaterally in 4 cases), 7 times surgery was unsuccessful. In the unsuccessful cases immediate axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) was performed. 985 sentinel nodes were found, the average was 1.4 nodes, maximum 6 nodes. In 7 patients contralateral ALND for node positive contralateral cancer was necessary along with sentinel node biopsy. A positive sentinel lymph node (SLN) was found in 188 (26.9%) patients. A strong correlation between tumor size and lymph node positivity was found, 5.3% in pT1a, and 40.4% in pT2, respectively. The sentinel node metastases could be divided according to their size. The number of affected further nodes did correlate with this size, yet with the exception of isolated tumor cell detection, small size metastases did not exclude the possibility of further affection. Our findings support the role of sentinel node biopsy in breast cancer. 332 patients reached at least 2 years of follow up by the time of statistic evaluation, 2.5% of SLN negative and 5.6% of SLN positive patients experienced a recurrence. All of these recurrences were distant with no regional (axillary) involvement to this date. We conclude that sentinel node biopsy is not only a safe and accurate diagnostic tool, but it also provides acceptable regional control of the disease. PMID:17447860

  9. Gastric cancer incidence and mortality is associated with altitude in the mountainous regions of Pacific Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Javier; Correa, Pelayo; Ferreccio, Catterina; Hernandez-Suarez, Gustavo; Herrero, Rolando; Cavazza-Porro, Maria; Dominguez, Ricardo; Morgan, Douglas

    2013-01-01

    In Latin America, gastric cancer is a leading cancer, and countries in the region have some of the highest mortality rates worldwide, including Chile, Costa Rica, and Colombia. Geographic variation in mortality rates is observed both between neighboring countries and within nations. We discuss epidemiological observations suggesting an association between altitude and gastric cancer risk in Latin America. In the Americas, the burden of gastric cancer mortality is concentrated in the mountainous areas along the Pacific rim, following the geography of the Andes sierra, from Venezuela to Chile, and the Sierra Madre and Cordillera de Centroamérica, from southern Mexico to Costa Rica. Altitude is probably a surrogate for host genetic, bacterial, dietary, and environmental factors that may cluster in the mountainous regions. For example, H. pylori strains from patients of the Andean Nariño region of Colombia display European ancestral haplotypes, whereas strains from the Pacific coast are predominantly of African origin. The observation of higher gastric cancer rates in the mountainous areas is not universal: the association is absent in Chile, where risk is more strongly associated with the age of H. pylori acquisition and socio-economic determinants. The dramatic global and regional variations in gastric cancer incidence and mortality rates offer the opportunity for scientific discovery and focused prevention programs. PMID:23224271

  10. Gastric cancer incidence and mortality is associated with altitude in the mountainous regions of Pacific Latin America.

    PubMed

    Torres, Javier; Correa, Pelayo; Ferreccio, Catterina; Hernandez-Suarez, Gustavo; Herrero, Rolando; Cavazza-Porro, Maria; Dominguez, Ricardo; Morgan, Douglas

    2013-02-01

    In Latin America, gastric cancer is a leading cancer, and countries in the region have some of the highest mortality rates worldwide, including Chile, Costa Rica, and Colombia. Geographic variation in mortality rates is observed both between neighboring countries and within nations. We discuss epidemiological observations suggesting an association between altitude and gastric cancer risk in Latin America. In the Americas, the burden of gastric cancer mortality is concentrated in the mountainous areas along the Pacific rim, following the geography of the Andes sierra, from Venezuela to Chile, and the Sierra Madre and Cordillera de Centroamérica, from southern Mexico to Costa Rica. Altitude is probably a surrogate for host genetic, bacterial, dietary, and environmental factors that may cluster in the mountainous regions. For example, H. pylori strains from patients of the Andean Nariño region of Colombia display European ancestral haplotypes, whereas strains from the Pacific coast are predominantly of African origin. The observation of higher gastric cancer rates in the mountainous areas is not universal: the association is absent in Chile, where risk is more strongly associated with the age of H. pylori acquisition and socio-economic determinants. The dramatic global and regional variations in gastric cancer incidence and mortality rates offer the opportunity for scientific discovery and focused prevention programs.

  11. Magnesium, zinc, arsenic, selenium and platinum urinary excretion from cancer patients of Antofagasta region, Chile: multi-metal approach

    PubMed Central

    Pizarro, I; Rivera, L; Ávila, J; Cortés, P

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the short-term 24 h urinary excretion of platinum, arsenic, selenium, magnesium and zinc in patients with lung cancer and with cancer other than lungs treated with cisplatin or/and carboplatin from Antofagasta, Chile. Design Urine measurements of Pt and Se were made by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry, As by hydride-generation atomic absorption spectrometry and Mg and Zn by means of flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Setting All samples were provided by the Oncological Centre of Antofagasta Regional Hospital (Region of Antofagasta, Chile). Participants Ninety 24-h urine samples from cancer patients after the infusion of Pt-base drugs and 10 24-h urine samples from cancer patients not treated with metal-base drugs. Main outcome measures Concentrations of Pt, Se, As, Zn and Mg coming from 24-h urine samples. Results Pt excreted was not significantly different between patients with lung and other cancers treated with cisplatin. The excretion of Mg, Zn and Se was greater than As. Then, Pt favours the excretion of essential elements. For lung and other types of cancers treated with drugs without Pt, excretion of Mg, Zn and Se was also greater than that of As, suggesting antagonism Mg-Zn-Se–anti-cancer drug relationship. Conclusions The amounts of Mg, Zn and Se excreted were greater than for As either with or without Pt-containing drugs, suggesting antagonist Mg-Zn-Se–anti-cancer drug relationships. The excretion of As, Mg, Zn and Se is induced by Pt. Knowledge obtained can contribute to understanding the arsenic cancer mechanism and the As-Mg-Zn-Se-Pt inter-element association for lung cancer and other types of cancer. PMID:27757244

  12. Cancer of the ampulla of Vater: chromosome 17p allelic loss is associated with poor prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Scarpa, A; Di, P; Talamini, G; Falconi, M; Lemoine, N; Iacono, C; Achille, A; Baron, A; Zamboni, G

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Cancer of the ampulla of Vater kills 60% of affected patients. Local spread of the tumour (T stage) is the only reliable prognostic factor. Nevertheless, any cancer stage includes long term survivors and patients dying from the disease. The molecular anomalies involved in this process have the potential to serve as additional prognostic markers.
AIM—To evaluate if allelic losses (LOH) of chromosomes 17p and 18q may be of prognostic value in multivariate survival analysis.
METHODS—We examined 53 ampullary cancers for chromosome 17p and 18q LOH using microsatellite markers and DNA from paraffin embedded tumours. All patients were treated by surgery alone (pancreaticoduodenectomy). Multivariate survival analysis included age, sex, tumour size, macroscopic appearance, grade of differentiation, T stage, lymph node metastasis, and chromosome 17p and 18q status.
RESULTS—Chromosome 17p and 18q LOH were detected in 28 (53%) and 18 (34%) cancers, respectively. Multivariate survival analysis indicated chromosome 17p status as an independent prognostic factor together with T stage. The five year survival for chromosome 17p retention and 17p loss was 80% and 7%, respectively. The risk of death from cancer within the five year follow up period for patients with cancers harbouring chromosome 17p LOH was 11 times higher than that of patients with cancers retaining chromosome 17p (p<0.0001), regardless of the tumour stage at diagnosis.
CONCLUSIONS—Chromosome 17p status is an independent prognostic factor among ampullary cancers at the same stage. The combined use of T stage and chromosome 17p status may help in deciding whether ampullary cancer patients require additional therapy other than surgery alone.


Keywords: ampulla of Vater; cancer; loss of heterozygosity; microsatellites; allelotyping; microsatellite instability PMID:10807898

  13. Association of germline microRNA SNPs in pre-miRNA flanking region and breast cancer risk and survival: the Carolina Breast Cancer Study

    PubMed Central

    Bensen, Jeannette T.; Tse, Chiu Kit; Nyante, Sarah J.; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.; Cole, Stephen R.; Millikan, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Common germline variation in the 5′ region proximal to precursor (pre-) miRNA gene sequences is evaluated for association with breast cancer risk and survival among African Americans and Caucasians. Methods We genotyped 9 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within 6 miRNA gene regions previously associated with breast cancer, in 1972 cases and 1776 controls. In a race-stratified analysis using unconditional logistic regression, odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated to evaluate SNP association with breast cancer risk. Additionally, hazard ratios (HR) for breast cancer-specific mortality were estimated. Results 2 miR-185 SNPs provided suggestive evidence of an inverse association with breast cancer risk (rs2008591, OR = 0.72 (95% CI = 0.53 – 0.98, p-value = 0.04) and rs887205, OR = 0.71 (95% CI = 0.52 – 0.96, p-value = 0.03), respectively) among African Americans. Two SNPs, miR-34b/34c (rs4938723, HR = 0.57 (95% CI = 0.37 – 0.89, p-value = 0.01)) and miR-206 (rs6920648, HR = 0.77 (95% CI = 0.61 – 0.97, p-value = 0.02)), provided evidence of association with breast cancer survival. Further adjustment for stage resulted in more modest associations with survival (HR = 0.65 (95% CI = 0.42 – 1.02, p-value = 0.06 and HR = 0.79 (95% CI = 0.62 – 1.00, p-value = 0.05, respectively). Conclusions Our results suggest that germline variation in the 5' region proximal to pre-miRNA gene sequences may be associated with breast cancer risk among African Americans and breast cancer-specific survival generally, however further validation is needed to confirm these findings. PMID:23526039

  14. Regional, racial, and gender differences in colorectal cancer screening in middle-aged African-Americans and Whites.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Phyllis M; Suzuki, Rie

    2012-12-01

    African-Americans have higher incidence and mortality from colorectal cancer than non-African-Americans. Early detection with colorectal cancer (CRC) screening reduces untimely death because the test can detect abnormalities and precancerous polyps in the colon and rectum. However, African-Americans aged 50 and older continue to have low CRC screening adherence. A retrospective analysis was conducted on data from the 2010 National Health Interview Survey to examine trends in self-reported CRC screening by geographic region, race, and gender. African-Americans, particularly men, were less likely to have been screened for colon cancer compared to all races and genders in this study. Individuals in the south were more likely to receive CRC screening than other regions. Colon cancer education and interventions are needed among low-adherent groups to promote the benefits of early detection with CRC screening.

  15. Long non-coding RNA containing ultraconserved genomic region 8 promotes bladder cancer tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Durso, Montano; Romanelli, Alessandra; Avitabile, Concetta; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Messere, Anna; Bruzzese, Dario; Vannini, Ivan; Marinelli, Luciana; Novellino, Ettore; Zhang, Wei; Incoronato, Mariarosaria; Ilardi, Gennaro; Staibano, Stefania; Marra, Laura; Franco, Renato; Perdonà, Sisto; Terracciano, Daniela; Czerniak, Bogdan; Liguori, Giovanna L.; Colonna, Vincenza; Fabbri, Muller; Febbraio, Ferdinando

    2016-01-01

    Ultraconserved regions (UCRs) have been shown to originate non-coding RNA transcripts (T-UCRs) that have different expression profiles and play functional roles in the pathophysiology of multiple cancers. The relevance of these functions to the pathogenesis of bladder cancer (BlCa) is speculative. To elucidate this relevance, we first used genome-wide profiling to evaluate the expression of T-UCRs in BlCa tissues. Analysis of two datasets comprising normal bladder tissues and BlCa specimens with a custom T-UCR microarray identified ultraconserved RNA (uc.) 8+ as the most upregulated T-UCR in BlCa tissues, although its expression was lower than in pericancerous bladder tissues. These results were confirmed on BlCa tissues by real-time PCR and by in situ hybridization. Although uc.8+ is located within intron 1 of CASZ1, a zinc-finger transcription factor, the transcribed non-coding RNA encoding uc.8+ is expressed independently of CASZ1. In vitro experiments evaluating the effects of uc.8+ silencing, showed significantly decreased capacities for cancer cell invasion, migration, and proliferation. From this, we proposed and validated a model of interaction in which uc.8+ shuttles from the nucleus to the cytoplasm of BlCa cells, interacts with microRNA (miR)-596, and cooperates in the promotion and development of BlCa. Using computational analysis, we investigated the miR-binding domain accessibility, as determined by base-pairing interactions within the uc.8+ predicted secondary structure, RNA binding affinity, and RNA species abundance in bladder tissues and showed that uc.8+ is a natural decoy for miR-596. Thus uc.8+ upregulation results in increased expression of MMP9, increasing the invasive potential of BlCa cells. These interactions between evolutionarily conserved regions of DNA suggest that natural selection has preserved this potentially regulatory layer that uses RNA to modulate miR levels, opening up the possibility for development of useful markers for

  16. Long non-coding RNA containing ultraconserved genomic region 8 promotes bladder cancer tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, Michele; Ferro, Matteo; Terreri, Sara; Durso, Montano; Romanelli, Alessandra; Avitabile, Concetta; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Messere, Anna; Bruzzese, Dario; Vannini, Ivan; Marinelli, Luciana; Novellino, Ettore; Zhang, Wei; Incoronato, Mariarosaria; Ilardi, Gennaro; Staibano, Stefania; Marra, Laura; Franco, Renato; Perdonà, Sisto; Terracciano, Daniela; Czerniak, Bogdan; Liguori, Giovanna L; Colonna, Vincenza; Fabbri, Muller; Febbraio, Ferdinando; Calin, George A; Cimmino, Amelia

    2016-04-12

    Ultraconserved regions (UCRs) have been shown to originate non-coding RNA transcripts (T-UCRs) that have different expression profiles and play functional roles in the pathophysiology of multiple cancers. The relevance of these functions to the pathogenesis of bladder cancer (BlCa) is speculative. To elucidate this relevance, we first used genome-wide profiling to evaluate the expression of T-UCRs in BlCa tissues. Analysis of two datasets comprising normal bladder tissues and BlCa specimens with a custom T-UCR microarray identified ultraconserved RNA (uc.) 8+ as the most upregulated T-UCR in BlCa tissues, although its expression was lower than in pericancerous bladder tissues. These results were confirmed on BlCa tissues by real-time PCR and by in situ hybridization. Although uc.8+ is located within intron 1 of CASZ1, a zinc-finger transcription factor, the transcribed non-coding RNA encoding uc.8+ is expressed independently of CASZ1. In vitro experiments evaluating the effects of uc.8+ silencing, showed significantly decreased capacities for cancer cell invasion, migration, and proliferation. From this, we proposed and validated a model of interaction in which uc.8+ shuttles from the nucleus to the cytoplasm of BlCa cells, interacts with microRNA (miR)-596, and cooperates in the promotion and development of BlCa. Using computational analysis, we investigated the miR-binding domain accessibility, as determined by base-pairing interactions within the uc.8+ predicted secondary structure, RNA binding affinity, and RNA species abundance in bladder tissues and showed that uc.8+ is a natural decoy for miR-596. Thus uc.8+ upregulation results in increased expression of MMP9, increasing the invasive potential of BlCa cells. These interactions between evolutionarily conserved regions of DNA suggest that natural selection has preserved this potentially regulatory layer that uses RNA to modulate miR levels, opening up the possibility for development of useful markers for

  17. Ancestral links of Chesapeake Bay region African Americans to specific Bight of Bonny (West Africa) microethnic groups and increased frequency of aggressive breast cancer in both regions.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Fatimah L C

    2008-01-01

    The high frequency of aggressive, early onset, and highly fatal breast cancer among Chesapeake Bay region African Americans suggests that there may be a contributing ancestral component. This study identifies the region's founding African, European, and Native American Indian populations using ethnogenetic layering and identifies the microethnic substructure of each founding continental aggregate. The largest component (38%) of the enslaved Africans brought to the Chesapeake Bay originally came from the coastal and hinterlands of the Bight of Bonny, a region with very high rates of aggressive, early onset breast cancer. Ethnogenetic layering is applied a second time to reveal the microethnic groups of the Bight of Bonny hinterlands with historical links to the Chesapeake Bay region. These analyses identify the specific microethnic groups within this region of Africa that may be the sources of relevant polymorphisms contributing to the etiology of aggressive breast cancer in the Chesapeake Bay. This report suggests a historical link between specific African microethnic groups and a US health disparity.

  18. A method to determine the mammographic regions that show early changes due to the development of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karemore, Gopal; Nielsen, Mads; Karssemeijer, Nico; Brandt, Sami S.

    2014-11-01

    It is well understood nowadays that changes in the mammographic parenchymal pattern are an indicator of a risk of breast cancer and we have developed a statistical method that estimates the mammogram regions where the parenchymal changes, due to breast cancer, occur. This region of interest is computed from a score map by utilising the anatomical breast coordinate system developed in our previous work. The method also makes an automatic scale selection to avoid overfitting while the region estimates are computed by a nested cross-validation scheme. In this way, it is possible to recover those mammogram regions that show a significant difference in classification scores between the cancer and the control group. Our experiments suggested that the most significant mammogram region is the region behind the nipple and that can be justified by previous findings from other research groups. This result was conducted on the basis of the cross-validation experiments on independent training, validation and testing sets from the case-control study of 490 women, of which 245 women were diagnosed with breast cancer within a period of 2-4 years after the baseline mammograms. We additionally generalised the estimated region to another, mini-MIAS study and showed that the transferred region estimate gives at least a similar classification result when compared to the case where the whole breast region is used. In all, by following our method, one most likely improves both preclinical and follow-up breast cancer screening, but a larger study population will be required to test this hypothesis.

  19. Knowledge of Cervical Cancer Screening among Women across Different Socio-Economic Regions of China

    PubMed Central

    Di, Jiangli; Rutherford, Shannon; Wu, Jiuling; Song, Bo; Ma, Lan; Chen, Jingyi; Chu, Cordia

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective China has a high burden of cervical cancer (CC) and wide disparities in CC burden exist among different socio-economic regions. In order to reduce these disparities, China’s government launched the National Cervical Cancer Screening Program in Rural Areas (NCCSPRA) in 2009. Understanding the factors associated with underutilization of CC screening among target populations is important to improve the screening participation rate, and a high participation rate is key to achieving the goals of a screening program. However, data on the knowledge of CC among target populations in program areas is lacking in China. This study will investigate the knowledge of CC prevention and control among women in specific project counties to develop a better understanding of factors that might influence CC screening participation in order to improve the implementation of the NCCSPRA. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted and face-to-face interview questionnaires were completed by 308 women who received CC screening services in 6 project counties of NCCSPRA across different socio-economic regions of China. ANOVA and Chi-square tests were used to compare the knowledge rates and scores across the different subgroups. Logistic regression was conducted to examine factors associated with knowledge level. Results The overall CC knowledge rate of the target population was only 19.5%. Regional socio-economic level, advice from doctors, age, and educational status were strong predictors of knowledge level of CC screening. Significantly lower knowledge rates and scores were identified in older women (55–64 years old), less educated women (with primary school or illiterate), women in less developed regions and women who did not receive any advice about screening results from doctors. Conclusion The knowledge of CC screening among women in the project counties of NCCSPRA was found to be very poor. Given the importance of knowledge in encouraging

  20. Inter- and intra-tumor profiling of multi-regional colon cancer and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Kogita, Akihiro; Yoshioka, Yasumasa; Sakai, Kazuko; Togashi, Yosuke; Sogabe, Shunsuke; Nakai, Takuya; Okuno, Kiyotaka; Nishio, Kazuto

    2015-02-27

    Intra- and inter-tumor heterogeneity may hinder personalized molecular-target treatment that depends on the somatic mutation profiles. We performed mutation profiling of formalin-fixed paraffin embedded tumors of multi-regional colon cancer and characterized the consequences of intra- and inter-tumor heterogeneity and metastasis using targeted re-sequencing. We performed targeted re-sequencing on multiple spatially separated samples obtained from multi-regional primary colon carcinoma and associated metastatic sites in two patients using next-generation sequencing. In Patient 1 with four primary tumors (P1-1, P1-2, P1-3, and P1-4) and one liver metastasis (H1), mutually exclusive pattern of mutations was observed in four primary tumors. Mutations in primary tumors were identified in three regions; KARS (G13D) and APC (R876*) in P1-2, TP53 (A161S) in P1-3, and KRAS (G12D), PIK3CA (Q546R), and ERBB4 (T272A) in P1-4. Similar combinatorial mutations were observed between P1-4 and H1. The ERBB4 (T272A) mutation observed in P1-4, however, disappeared in H1. In Patient 2 with two primary tumors (P2-1 and P2-2) and one liver metastasis (H2), mutually exclusive pattern of mutations were observed in two primary tumors. We identified mutations; KRAS (G12V), SMAD4 (N129K, R445*, and G508D), TP53 (R175H), and FGFR3 (R805W) in P2-1, and NRAS (Q61K) and FBXW7 (R425C) in P2-2. Similar combinatorial mutations were observed between P2-1 and H2. The SMAD4 (N129K and G508D) mutations observed in P2-1, however, were nor detected in H2. These results suggested that different clones existed in primary tumors and metastatic tumor in Patient 1 and 2 likely originated from P1-4 and P2-1, respectively. In conclusion, we detected the muti-clonalities between intra- and inter-tumors based on mutational profiling in multi-regional colon cancer using next-generation sequencing. Primary region from which metastasis originated could be speculated by mutation profile. Characterization of inter- and

  1. Frameshift mutation of WISP3 gene and its regional heterogeneity in gastric and colorectal cancers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju Hwa; Choi, Youn Jin; Je, Eun Mi; Kim, Ho Shik; Yoo, Nam Jin; Lee, Sug Hyung

    2016-04-01

    WISP3 is involved in many cancer-related processes including epithelial-mesenchymal transition, cell death, invasion, and metastasis and is considered a tumor suppressor. The aim of our study was to find whether WISP3 gene was mutated and expressionally altered in gastric (GC) and colorectal cancers (CRCs). WISP3 gene possesses a mononucleotide repeat in the coding sequence that could be mutated in cancers with high microsatellite instability (MSI-H). We analyzed 79 GCs and 156 CRCs, and found that GCs (8.8%) and CRCs (10.5%) with MSI-H, but not those with microsatellite stable/low MSI, harbored a frameshift mutation. We also analyzed intratumoral heterogeneity (ITH) of the frameshift mutation in 16 CRCs and found that the WISP3 mutation exhibited regional ITH in 25% of the CRCs. In immunohistochemistry, loss of WISP3 expression was identified in 24% of GCs and 21% of CRCs. The loss of expression was more common in those with WISP3 mutation than with wild-type WISP3 and those with MSI-H than with microsatellite stable/low MSI. Our data indicate that WISP3 harbored not only frameshift mutation but also mutational ITH and loss of expression, which together might play a role in tumorigenesis of GC and CRC with MSI-H by inhibiting tumor suppressor functions of WISP3. Our data also suggest that mutation analysis in multiregions is needed for a proper evaluation of mutation status in GC and CRC with MSI-H.

  2. Availability of palliative care services for children with cancer in economically diverse regions of the world

    PubMed Central

    Delgado, Eduardo; Barfield, Raymond C.; Baker, Justin N.; Hinds, Pamela S.; Yang, Jie; Nambayan, Ayda; Quintana, Yuri; Kane, Javier R

    2010-01-01

    Purpose We assessed the availability and quality of palliative care for children with cancer according to national income per capita. Methods We surveyed physicians who care for children with cancer using the Cure4Kids website (http://www.cure4kids.org). Queries addressed oncology practice site; reimbursement; specialized palliative care, pain management, and bereavement care; location of death; decision-making support; and perceived quality of care. Responses were categorized by low -, middle-, and high-income country (LIC, MIC, HIC). Results Of 262 completed questionnaires from 58 countries (response rate, 59.8%), 242 were evaluable (55%). Out-of-pocket payment for oncology (14.8%), palliative care (21.9%), and comfort care medications (24.3%) was most likely to be required in LIC (p<0.001). Availability of specialized palliative care services, pain management, bereavement care, and institutional or national decision-making support was inversely related to income level. Availability of high-potency opioids (p=0.018) and adjuvant drugs (p=0.006) was significantly less likely in LIC. Physicians in LIC were significantly less likely than others to report high-quality pain control (p<0.001), non-pain symptom control (p=0.003), and emotional support (p=0.001); bereavement support (p=0.035); interdisciplinary care (p<0.001); and parental participation in decisions (p=0.013). Conclusion Specialized palliative care services are unavailable to children with cancer in economically diverse regions, but particularly in LIC. Access to adequate palliation is associated with national income. Program development strategies and collaborations less dependent on a single country’s economy are suggested. PMID:20541395

  3. Role of 3’-untranslated region translational control in cancer development, diagnostics and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Vislovukh, Andrii; Vargas, Thaiz Rivera; Polesskaya, Anna; Groisman, Irina

    2014-01-01

    The messenger RNA 3’-untranslated region (3’UTR) plays an important role in regulation of gene expression on the posttranscriptional level. The 3’UTR controls gene expression via orchestrated interaction between the structural components of mRNAs (cis-element) and the specific trans-acting factors (RNA binding proteins and non-coding RNAs). The crosstalk of these factors is based on the binding sequences and/or direct protein-protein interaction, or just functional interaction. Much new evidence that has accumulated supports the idea that several RNA binding factors can bind to common mRNA targets: to the non-overlapping binding sites or to common sites in a competitive fashion. Various factors capable of binding to the same RNA can cooperate or be antagonistic in their actions. The outcome of the collective function of all factors bound to the same mRNA 3’UTR depends on many circumstances, such as their expression levels, affinity to the binding sites, and localization in the cell, which can be controlled by various physiological conditions. Moreover, the functional and/or physical interactions of the factors binding to 3’UTR can change the character of their actions. These interactions vary during the cell cycle and in response to changing physiological conditions. Abnormal functioning of the factors can lead to disease. In this review we will discuss how alterations of these factors or their interaction can affect cancer development and promote or enhance the malignant phenotype of cancer cells. Understanding these alterations and their impact on 3’UTR-directed posttranscriptional gene regulation will uncover promising new targets for therapeutic intervention and diagnostics. We will also discuss emerging new tools in cancer diagnostics and therapy based on 3’UTR binding factors and approaches to improve them. PMID:24600513

  4. Targeting glucose metabolism in cancer: new class of agents for loco-regional and systemic therapy of liver cancer and beyond?

    PubMed Central

    Savic, Lynn Jeanette; Chapiro, Julius; Duwe, Gregor; Geschwind, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most prevalent cancers and the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. In patients with unresectable disease, loco-regional catheter-based intra-arterial therapies (IAT) can achieve selective tumor control while minimizing systemic toxicity. As molecular features of tumor growth and microenvironment are better understood, new targets arise for selective anticancer therapy. Particularly, antiglycolytic drugs that exploit the hyperglycolytic cancer cell metabolism – also known as the ‘Warburg effect’ – have emerged as promising therapeutic options. Thus, future developments will combine the selective character of loco-regional drug delivery platforms with highly specific molecular targeted antiglycolytic agents. This review will exemplify literature on antiglycolytic approaches and particularly focus on intra-arterial delivery methods. PMID:26989470

  5. Potential role of a navigator gene NAV3 in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, E; Ranki, A; Sipilä, L; Karenko, L; Abdel-Rahman, W M; Ovaska, K; Siggberg, L; Aapola, U; Ässämäki, R; Häyry, V; Niiranen, K; Helle, M; Knuutila, S; Hautaniemi, S; Peltomäki, P; Krohn, K

    2012-01-01

    Background: The recently described navigator proteins have a multifaceted role in cytoskeletal dynamics. We report here on the relevance of one of them, navigator 3 (NAV3), in colorectal cancer (CRC). Methods: We analysed changes in chromosome 12 and NAV3 copy number in CRC/adenoma samples of 59 patients and in 6 CRC cell lines, using fluorescence in situ hybridisation, loss of heterozygosity, and array-CGH. NAV3 target genes were identified by siRNA depletion, expression arrays, and immunohistochemistry. Results: NAV3 deletion and chromosome 12 polysomy were detected in 30 and 70% of microsatellite stability (MSS) carcinomas, in 23 and 30% of adenomas and in four of six CRC cell lines. NAV3 amplification was found in 25% of MSS samples. NAV3 alterations correlated with lymph node metastasis. In normal colon cells, NAV3 silencing induced upregulation of interleukin 23 receptor (IL23R) and gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor. In MSS and microsatellite instability tumours, IL23R immunoreactivity correlated with Dukes' staging and lymph node metastases, whereas nuclear beta-catenin correlated with lymph node metastases only. Conclusion: NAV3 copy number changes are frequent in CRC and in adenomas, and upregulation of IL23R, following NAV3 silencing, strongly correlates with Dukes' staging and lymph node metastases. This suggests that NAV3 has a role in linking tissue inflammation to cancer development in the colon. PMID:22173670

  6. Mutations in p53 as potential molecular markers for human breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Runnebaum, I.B.; Nagarajan, M.; Bowman, M.; Soto, D.; Sukumar, S. )

    1991-12-01

    Based on the high incidence of loss of heterozygosity for loci on chromosome 17p in the vicinity of the p53 locus in human breast tumors. The authors investigated the frequency and effects of mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene in mammary neoplasia. They examined the p53 gene in 20 breast cancer cell lines and 59 primary breast tumors. Northern blot analysis, immunoprecipitation, and nucleotide sequencing analysis revealed aberrant mRNA expression, over-expression of protein, and point mutations in the p53 gene in 50% of the cell line tested. A multiplex PCR assay was developed to search for deletions in the p53 genomic locus. Multiplex PCR of genomic DNA showed that up to 36% of primary tumors contained aberrations in the p53 locus. Mutations in exons 5-9 of the p53 gene were found in 10 out of 59 (17%) of the primary tumors studied by single-stranded conformation polymorphism analysis. They conclude that, compared to amplification of HER2/NEU, MYC, or INT2 oncogene loci, p53 gene mutations and deletions are the most frequently observed genetic change in breast cancer related to a single gene. Correlated to disease status, p53 gene mutations could prove to be a valuable marker for diagnosis and/or prognosis of breast neoplasia.

  7. Stromal deletion of the APC tumor suppressor in mice triggers development of endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tanwar, Pradeep S.; Zhang, LiHua; Roberts, Drucilla J.; Teixeira, Jose M.

    2011-01-01

    The contribution of the stromal microenvironment to the progression of endometrial cancer (EC) has not been well explored. We have conditionally expressed a mutant allele of adenomatous polyposis coli (APCcKO) in murine uterine stroma cells to study its effect on uterine development and function. In addition to metrorrhagia, the mice develop complex atypical endometrial gland hyperplasia that progresses to endometrial carcinoma in situ and endometrial adenocarcinoma as evidenced by myometrial invasion. Stromal cells subjacent to the carcinoma cells express αSMA with fewer cells expressing PDGFR-α compared to normal stromal cells suggesting that the mutant stromal cells have acquired a more myofibroblastic phenotype, which have been described as cancer-associated fibroblasts and have been shown to induce carcinogenesis in other organ systems. Analyses of human EC specimens showed substantial αSMA expression in the stroma compared with normal endometrial stroma cells. We also show that APCcKO mutant uteri and human EC have decreased stromal levels of TGFβ and BMP activities and that the mutant uteri failed to respond to exogenous estradiol stimulation. The mutant stroma cells also had higher levels of VEGF and SDF signaling components and diminished expression of ERα and PR which is common in advanced stages of human EC and is an indicator of poor prognosis. Our results indicate that de novo mutation or loss of heterozygosity in stromal APC is sufficient to induce endometrial hyperplasia and endometrial carcinogenesis by mechanisms that are consistent with unopposed estrogen signaling in the endometrial epithelium. PMID:21363919

  8. Lymphangiogenesis in Regional Lymph Nodes Is an Independent Prognostic Marker in Rectal Cancer Patients after Neoadjuvant Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jakob, Christiane; Aust, Daniela E.; Liebscher, Birgit; Baretton, Gustavo B.; Datta, Kaustubh; Muders, Michael H.

    2011-01-01

    One of the major prognostic factors in rectal cancer is lymph node metastasis. The formation of lymph node metastases is dependent on the existence of a premetastatic niche. An important factor preceding metastasis are lymph vessels which are located in the lymph node. Accordingly, the occurrence of intranodal lymphangiogenesis is thought to indicate distant metastasis and worse prognosis. To evaluate the significance of lymph node lymphangiogenesis, we studied formalin fixed, paraffin embedded adenocarcinomas and regional lymph nodes of 203 rectal cancer patients who were treated with neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy and consecutive curative surgery with cancer free surgical margins (R0). Regional lymph node lymph vessels were detected by immunohistochemistry for podoplanin (D2-40). Our results show that the presence of lymphatic vessels in regional lymph nodes significantly affects the disease-free survival in univariate and multivariate analyses. In contrast, there was no correlation between peritumoral or intratumoral lymph vessel density and prognosis. Indeed, our study demonstrates the importance of lymphangiogenesis in regional lymph nodes after neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy and consecutive surgery as an independent prognostic marker. Staining for intranodal lymphangiogenesis and methods of intravital imaging of lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic flow may be a useful strategy to predict long-term outcome in rectal cancer patients. Furthermore, addition of VEGF-blocking agents to standardized neoadjuvant treatment schemes might be indicated in advanced rectal cancer. PMID:22087309

  9. How to identify rectal sub-regions likely involved in rectal bleeding in prostate cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dréan, G.; Acosta, O.; Ospina, J. D.; Voisin, C.; Rigaud, B.; Simon, A.; Haigron, P.; de Crevoisier, R.

    2013-11-01

    Nowadays, the de nition of patient-speci c constraints in prostate cancer radiotherapy planning are solely based on dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters. Nevertheless those DVH models lack of spatial accuracy since they do not use the complete 3D information of the dose distribution. The goal of the study was to propose an automatic work ow to de ne patient-speci c rectal sub-regions (RSR) involved in rectal bleeding (RB) in case of prostate cancer radiotherapy. A multi-atlas database spanning the large rectal shape variability was built from a population of 116 individuals. Non-rigid registration followed by voxel-wise statistical analysis on those templates allowed nding RSR likely correlated with RB (from a learning cohort of 63 patients). To de ne patient-speci c RSR, weighted atlas-based segmentation with a vote was then applied to 30 test patients. Results show the potentiality of the method to be used for patient-speci c planning of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT).

  10. VarDict: a novel and versatile variant caller for next-generation sequencing in cancer research.

    PubMed

    Lai, Zhongwu; Markovets, Aleksandra; Ahdesmaki, Miika; Chapman, Brad; Hofmann, Oliver; McEwen, Robert; Johnson, Justin; Dougherty, Brian; Barrett, J Carl; Dry, Jonathan R

    2016-06-20

    Accurate variant calling in next generation sequencing (NGS) is critical to understand cancer genomes better. Here we present VarDict, a novel and versatile variant caller for both DNA- and RNA-sequencing data. VarDict simultaneously calls SNV, MNV, InDels, complex and structural variants, expanding the detected genetic driver landscape of tumors. It performs local realignments on the fly for more accurate allele frequency estimation. VarDict performance scales linearly to sequencing depth, enabling ultra-deep sequencing used to explore tumor evolution or detect tumor DNA circulating in blood. In addition, VarDict performs amplicon aware variant calling for polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based targeted sequencing often used in diagnostic settings, and is able to detect PCR artifacts. Finally, VarDict also detects differences in somatic and loss of heterozygosity variants between paired samples. VarDict reprocessing of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Lung Adenocarcinoma dataset called known driver mutations in KRAS, EGFR, BRAF, PIK3CA and MET in 16% more patients than previously published variant calls. We believe VarDict will greatly facilitate application of NGS in clinical cancer research. PMID:27060149

  11. VarDict: a novel and versatile variant caller for next-generation sequencing in cancer research

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Zhongwu; Markovets, Aleksandra; Ahdesmaki, Miika; Chapman, Brad; Hofmann, Oliver; McEwen, Robert; Johnson, Justin; Dougherty, Brian; Barrett, J. Carl; Dry, Jonathan R.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate variant calling in next generation sequencing (NGS) is critical to understand cancer genomes better. Here we present VarDict, a novel and versatile variant caller for both DNA- and RNA-sequencing data. VarDict simultaneously calls SNV, MNV, InDels, complex and structural variants, expanding the detected genetic driver landscape of tumors. It performs local realignments on the fly for more accurate allele frequency estimation. VarDict performance scales linearly to sequencing depth, enabling ultra-deep sequencing used to explore tumor evolution or detect tumor DNA circulating in blood. In addition, VarDict performs amplicon aware variant calling for polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based targeted sequencing often used in diagnostic settings, and is able to detect PCR artifacts. Finally, VarDict also detects differences in somatic and loss of heterozygosity variants between paired samples. VarDict reprocessing of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Lung Adenocarcinoma dataset called known driver mutations in KRAS, EGFR, BRAF, PIK3CA and MET in 16% more patients than previously published variant calls. We believe VarDict will greatly facilitate application of NGS in clinical cancer research. PMID:27060149

  12. LINE-1 hypomethylation in normal colon mucosa is associated with poor survival in Chinese patients with sporadic colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yuchen; Li, Yiwei; Nie, Jia; Li, Dawei; Peng, Junjie; Lian, Peng; Li, Bin; Cai, Guoxiang; Li, Xinxiang; Cai, Sanjun

    2015-01-01

    Genetic and epigenetic pathways are not independent in colorectal cancer (CRC) carcinogenesis. We aimed to determine the influence of various molecular features on Chinese patients' colon cancer-specific survival (CCSS). Various genetic and epigenetic modifications were detected in paired tumor and normal mucosa tissue samples. The prognostic variables regarding patient CCSS were determined. Overall, 127 patients, including 83 males and 44 females, completed a median follow-up of 65 (3–85) months. A mean LINE-1 methylation rate of 64.62% (range, 9.45–86.93) was observed. Hypermethylation at the hMLH1 gene promoter was detected in 26 (20.47%) patients. KRAS was mutated in 52 (40.94%) patients. Sixteen (12.60%) patients were confirmed as microsatellite instability (MSI)-High, and 76 (59.84%) were found to have loss of heterozygosity at 18q. The LINE-1 methylation level, MSI status, perineural invasion and distant metastases were confirmed as independent prognostic factors for patient CCSS. A stratified survival analysis further revealed that certain subgroups of patients with LINE-1 hypomethylation had significantly worse survival (all p < 0.05). Our data revealed that both genetic and epigenetic abnormalities can concurrently exist during colonic tumorigenesis. As a global epigenetic change, LINE-1 hypomethylation in normal colon mucosa might be associated with a worse outcome in certain Chinese patients with colon cancer. PMID:26172297

  13. LINE-1 hypomethylation in normal colon mucosa is associated with poor survival in Chinese patients with sporadic colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Changhua; Li, Qingguo; Wu, Yuchen; Li, Yiwei; Nie, Jia; Li, Dawei; Peng, Junjie; Lian, Peng; Li, Bin; Cai, Guoxiang; Li, Xinxiang; Cai, Sanjun

    2015-09-15

    Genetic and epigenetic pathways are not independent in colorectal cancer (CRC) carcinogenesis. We aimed to determine the influence of various molecular features on Chinese patients' colon cancer-specific survival (CCSS). Various genetic and epigenetic modifications were detected in paired tumor and normal mucosa tissue samples. The prognostic variables regarding patient CCSS were determined. Overall, 127 patients, including 83 males and 44 females, completed a median follow-up of 65 (3-85) months. A mean LINE-1 methylation rate of 64.62% (range, 9.45-86.93) was observed. Hypermethylation at the hMLH1 gene promoter was detected in 26 (20.47%) patients. KRAS was mutated in 52 (40.94%) patients. Sixteen (12.60%) patients were confirmed as microsatellite instability (MSI)-High, and 76 (59.84%) were found to have loss of heterozygosity at 18q. The LINE-1 methylation level, MSI status, perineural invasion and distant metastases were confirmed as independent prognostic factors for patient CCSS. A stratified survival analysis further revealed that certain subgroups of patients with LINE-1 hypomethylation had significantly worse survival (all p < 0.05). Our data revealed that both genetic and epigenetic abnormalities can concurrently exist during colonic tumorigenesis. As a global epigenetic change, LINE-1 hypomethylation in normal colon mucosa might be associated with a worse outcome in certain Chinese patients with colon cancer. PMID:26172297

  14. The cost of radiation treatment at an Ontario regional cancer centre.

    PubMed Central

    Wodinsky, H B; Jenkin, R D

    1987-01-01

    The cost of radiation treatment in 1985 at an Ontario regional cancer centre accruing 2500 new patients annually was examined. The radiation treatment department was equipped with three high-energy treatment machines, a treatment simulator and a treatment planning computer and was appropriately staffed. The total average annual cost of operating one high-energy treatment machine was $668,963. Salaries and employee benefits accounted for 78% of the costs. An average of 5439 radiation treatments were given annually with each treatment machine, at a cost $123 per treatment. The cost of a curative course of radiation treatment (average of 21 treatments) was $2583, and the cost of a palliative course (average of 7 treatments) was $861. PMID:3676933

  15. Repetitive DNA alterations in human skin cancers.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Gil R H; Francisco, Guilherme; Teixeira, Lúcia V S; Romão-Correia, Rosana F; Sanches, José A; Neto, Cyro Festa; Ruiz, Itamar R G

    2004-11-01

    Repetitive sequences constitute landmarks for genome regulation, evolution, and chromatin architecture. Patterns of specific and non-specific repetitive sequences change in many types and stages of tumor cells, characterized by band loss, gain, and (de) increased staining of pre-existing bands. In this work, repetitive DNA was studied in search of genome instability of skin cancers: basal and squamous cell carcinomas (BCC and SCC), malignant melanoma (MM), melanocytic nevus (MN), and actinic keratosis (AK) lesions. DNAs were extracted from blood and tumor samples from 21 BCC, 7 SCC, 11 MM and 7 lesions. Banding patterns were obtained by random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD), and specific D9S50 and D9S52 microsatellites (9p21). D9S50 patterns revealed microsatellite instability (MSI) and/or loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in 36% BCC, 25% SCC, and 57% MM tumors. D9S52 microsatellite showed 28.5%; 42.8%; and 71.4% altered tumors, respectively. No microsatellite alterations were found in MN and AK. On the other hand, genomic rearrangements detected by RAPD were present in 100% tumors. In BCC, the mean number of tumor DNA alterations showed predominant gain of bands. On the contrary, MM samples presented loss, or decreased intensity signal of RAPD bands. Genome alterations in skin cancers would result from chromosomal rearrangements, aneuploidy and/or polysomies. The low-cost and quick RAPD technique may reveal unknown genes or DNA sequences associated with tumor development and progression, and may be easily implemented in clinical diagnosis.

  16. Treatment of local–regional prostate cancer detected by PSA screening: benefits and harms according to prognostic factors

    PubMed Central

    Wever, E M; Heijnsdijk, E A M; Draisma, G; Bangma, C H; Roobol, M J; Schröder, F H; de Koning, H J

    2013-01-01

    Background: Men with screen-detected prostate cancer can choose to undergo immediate curative treatment or enter into an expectant management programme. We quantified how the benefits and harms of immediate treatment vary according to the prognostic factors of clinical T-stage, Gleason score, and patient age. Methods: A microsimulation model based on European Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer data was used to predict the benefits and harms of immediate treatment versus delayed treatment of local–regional prostate cancer in men aged 55–74 years. Benefits included life-years gained and reduced probability of death from prostate cancer. Harms included lead time and probability of overdiagnosis. Results: The ratio of mean lead time to mean life-years gained ranged from 1.8 to 31.2, and the additional number of treatments required per prostate cancer death prevented ranged from 0.3 to 11.6 across the different prognostic groups. Both harm–benefit ratios were lowest, most favourable, for men aged 55–59 years and diagnosed with moderate-risk prostate cancer. Ratios were high for men aged 70–74 years regardless of clinical T-stage and Gleason score. Conclusion: Men aged 55–59 years with moderate-risk prostate cancer are predicted to derive greatest benefit from immediate curative treatment. Immediate treatment is least favourable for men aged 70–74 years with either low-risk or high-risk prostate cancer. PMID:23674085

  17. A region of consistent deletion in neuroblastoma maps within human chromosome 1p36.2-36.3

    SciTech Connect

    White, P.S.; Maris, J.M.; Beltinger, C.

    1995-06-06

    Deletion of the short arm of human chromosome 1 is the most common cytogenetic abnormality observed in neuroblastoma. To characterize the region of consistent deletion, we performed loss of heterozygosity (LOH) studies on 122 neuroblastoma tumor samples with 30 distal chromosome 1p polymorphisms. LOH was detected in 32 of the 122 tumors (26%). A single region of LOH, marked distally by D1Z2 and proximally by D1S228, was detected in all tumors demonstrating loss. Also, cells from a patient with a constitutional deletion of 1p36, and from a neuroblastoma cell line with a small 1p36 deletion, were analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Cells from both sources had interstitial deletions of 1p36.2-36.3 which overlapped the consensus region of LOH defined by the tumors. Interstitial deletion in the constitutional case was confirmed by allelic loss studies using the panel of polymorphic markers. Four proposed candidate genes-DAN, ID3 (heir-1), CDC2L1 (p58), and TNFR2-were shown to lie outside of the consensus region of allelic loss, as defined by the above deletions. These results more precisely define the location of a neuroblastoma suppressor gene within 1p36.2-36.3, eliminating 33 centimorgans of proximal 1p36 from consideration. Furthermore, a consensus region of loss, which excludes the four leading candidate genes, was found in all tumors with 1p36 LOH. 31 refs., 4 figs.

  18. The analysis of a large Danish family supports the presence of a susceptibility locus for adenoma and colorectal cancer on chromosome 11q24.

    PubMed

    Rudkjøbing, Laura Aviaja; Eiberg, Hans; Mikkelsen, Hanne Birte; Binderup, Marie Louise Mølgaard; Bisgaard, Marie Luise

    2015-09-01

    Hereditary colorectal cancer accounts for approximately 30% of all colorectal cancers, but currently only 5% of these families can be explained by highly penetrant, inherited mutations. In the remaining 25% it is not possible to perform a gene test to identify the family members who would benefit from prophylactic screening. Consequently, all family members are asked to follow a screening program. The purpose of this study was to localize a new gene which causes colorectal cancer. We performed a linkage analysis using data from a SNP6.0 chip in one large family with 12 affected family members. We extended the linkage analysis with microsatellites (STS) and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP's) and looked for the loss of heterozygosity in tumour tissue. Furthermore, we performed the exome sequencing of one family member and we sequenced candidate genes by use of direct sequencing. Major rearrangements were excluded after karyotyping. The linkage analysis with SNP6 data revealed three candidate areas, on chromosome 2, 6 and 11 respectively, with a LOD score close to two and no negative LOD scores. After extended linkage analysis, the area on chromosome 6 was excluded, leaving areas on chromosome 2 and chromosome 11 with the highest possible LOD scores of 2.6. Two other studies have identified 11q24 as a candidate area for colorectal cancer susceptibility and this area is supported by our results. PMID:25724759

  19. A new breast cancer risk analysis approach using features extracted from multiple sub-regions on bilateral mammograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wenqing; Tseng, Tzu-Liang B.; Zheng, Bin; Zhang, Jianying; Qian, Wei

    2015-03-01

    A novel breast cancer risk analysis approach is proposed for enhancing performance of computerized breast cancer risk analysis using bilateral mammograms. Based on the intensity of breast area, five different sub-regions were acquired from one mammogram, and bilateral features were extracted from every sub-region. Our dataset includes 180 bilateral mammograms from 180 women who underwent routine screening examinations, all interpreted as negative and not recalled by the radiologists during the original screening procedures. A computerized breast cancer risk analysis scheme using four image processing modules, including sub-region segmentation, bilateral feature extraction, feature selection, and classification was designed to detect and compute image feature asymmetry between the left and right breasts imaged on the mammograms. The highest computed area under the curve (AUC) is 0.763 ± 0.021 when applying the multiple sub-region features to our testing dataset. The positive predictive value and the negative predictive value were 0.60 and 0.73, respectively. The study demonstrates that (1) features extracted from multiple sub-regions can improve the performance of our scheme compared to using features from whole breast area only; (2) a classifier using asymmetry bilateral features can effectively predict breast cancer risk; (3) incorporating texture and morphological features with density features can boost the classification accuracy.

  20. Familial prostate cancer: the damage done and lessons learnt

    PubMed Central

    Taherian, Nassim; Hamel, Nancy; Bégin, Louis R.; Bismar, Tarek A.; Goldgar, David E.; Feng, Bing-Jian; Foulkes, William D.

    2014-01-01

    Background A 51-year-old French Canadian man commenced screening for prostate cancer at the request of his family physician given his extensive family history of prostate cancer in five brothers, his father and two paternal uncles. His prostate specific antigen (PSA) level was 4.9ng/ml and a subsequent six-core biopsy revealed the presence of a prostate adenocarcinoma with a Gleason score of 7 (3+4). He was treated with a radical prostatectomy. Repeat PSA tests revealed a gradual rise in PSA levels despite androgen deprivation therapy with bicalutamide and goserelin over the course of 3 years. Genetic evaluation was undertaken in view of his personal and family history. The proband died a year later of widespread metastasis, at the age of 58. Investigations Doppler ultrasound for the proband’s leg, abdominal and pelvic computed tomography (CT) scan with intravenous (IV) and oral contrast as well as chest CT with IV contrast for the assessment of metastatic prostate cancer; genetic counselling and mutation analysis for French Canadian founder mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes; mutations specific analysis of the mother’s formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) breast tissue blocks; examination of loss of heterozygosity at the BRCA2 gene locus; immunohistochemistry to determine the expression of the ERG nuclear oncoprotein in prostate tumours; genotyping with eight selected risk-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs); genetic testing for the G84E variant in the HOXB13 gene Diagnosis Early-onset and aggressive prostate cancer associated with a missense French Canadian BRCA2 founder mutation, c.5857G>T (p.Glu1953*). Management Radical prostatectomy, hormone therapy with bicalutamide and goserelin, palliative chemotherapy initially with docetaxel plus prednisone then with mitoxantrone plus prednisone, as well as genetic counselling and testing for the proband and his family members. PMID:23318356

  1. Breast cancer screening disparities among immigrant women by world region of origin: a population-based study in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Vahabi, Mandana; Lofters, Aisha; Kumar, Matthew; Glazier, Richard H

    2016-07-01

    Rates of mammography screening for breast cancer are disproportionately low in certain subgroups including low-income and immigrant women. The purpose of the study was to examine differences in rates of appropriate breast cancer screening (i.e., screening mammography every 2 years) among Ontario immigrant women by world region of origin and explore the association between appropriate breast cancer screening among these women groups and individual and structural factors. A cohort of 183,332 screening-eligible immigrant women living in Ontario between 2010 and 2012 was created from linked databases and classified into eight world regions of origin. Appropriate screening rates were calculated for each region by age group and selected sociodemographic, immigration, and healthcare-related characteristics. The association between appropriate screening across the eight regions of origin and selected sociodemographic, immigration, and health-related characteristics was explored using multivariate Poisson regression. Screening varied by region of origin, with South Asian women (48.5%) having the lowest and Caribbean and Latin American women (63.7%) the highest cancer screening rates. Factors significantly associated with lower screening across the world regions of origin included living in the lowest income neighborhoods, having a refugee status, being a new immigrant, not having a regular physical examination, not being enrolled in a primary care patient enrollment model, having a male physician, and having an internationally trained physician. Multiple interventions entailing cross-sector collaboration, promotion of patient enrollment models, community engagement, comprehensive and intensive outreach to women, and knowledge translation and transfer to physicians should be considered to address screening disparities among immigrant population. Consideration should be given to design and delivery of culturally appropriate and easily accessible cancer screening programs

  2. [Epidemiology of cervical cancer in a region of western Algeria, 2006-2010].

    PubMed

    Boublenza, L; Hadef, K; Beldjillali, H; Chabni, N; Reguegba, D; Meguenni, K

    2013-05-01

    The authors present a retrospective analysis of data about cervical cancer from 2006 through 2010 in the province (wilaya) of Tlemcen (Algeria). During this five-year study period, 196 cases of cervical cancer were recorded, with a mean age at onset of 48.5 years. These cervical cancers accounted for 13% of all gynecologic cancers. It is the second leading cancer among women in this province, with an incidence of 13.3 per 100 000 women. The health authorities in Algeria must set up an organized screening policy and appropriate treatment to reduce the mortality rate from this cancer.

  3. FAS and FAS ligand polymorphisms in the promoter regions and risk of gastric cancer in Southern China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meilin; Wu, Dongmei; Tan, Ming; Gong, Weida; Xue, Hengchuan; Shen, Hongbin; Zhang, Zhengdong

    2009-08-01

    The FAS and FAS ligand (FASLG) system plays a key role in regulating apoptotic cell death, and corruption of this signaling pathway has been shown to participate in tumorigenesis. Functional promoter polymorphisms of the FAS and FASLG genes can alter transcriptional activities and thus alter risk of cancer. We hypothesized that the FAS -1377G>A, FAS -670A>G, and FASLG -844T>C polymorphisms in the promoter regions are associated with risk of gastric cancer. In a population-based case-control study of 332 gastric cancer cases and 324 controls, we genotyped these three polymorphisms and evaluated their association with risk of gastric cancer. We found that the FAS and FASL genotypes and the FAS haplotypes had no significant associations with risk of gastric cancer. In addition, there was no significant interaction between the FAS and FASL polymorphisms in the development of gastric cancer. The FAS and FASLG polymorphisms may not contribute to risk of gastric cancer in the southern Chinese population.

  4. Disparities in the Use of Radiation Therapy in Patients With Local-Regionally Advanced Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Steve R.; Beal, Shannon H.; Chen, Steven L.; Canter, Robert J.; Khatri, Vijay P.; Chen, Allen; Bold, Richard J.

    2010-11-01

    Background: Radiation therapy (RT) is indicated for the treatment of local-regionally advanced breast cancer (BCa). Hypothesis: We hypothesized that black and Hispanic patients with local-regionally advanced BCa would receive lower rates of RT than their white counterparts. Methods: The Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results database was used to identify white, black, Hispanic, and Asian patients with invasive BCa and {>=}10 metastatic lymph nodes diagnosed between 1988 and 2005. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression evaluated the relationship of race/ethnicity with use of RT. Multivariate models stratified for those undergoing mastectomy or lumpectomy. Results: Entry criteria were met by 12,653 patients. Approximately half of the patients did not receive RT. Most patients were white (72%); the remainder were Hispanic (10.4%), black (10.3%), and Asian (7.3%). On univariate analysis, Hispanics (odd ratio [OR] 0.89; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.79-1.00) and blacks (OR 0.79; 95% CI, 0.70-0.89) were less likely to receive RT than whites. On multivariate analysis, blacks (OR 0.76; 95% CI, 0.67-0.86) and Hispanics (OR 0.80; 95% CI, 0.70-0.90) were less likely than whites to receive RT. Disparities persisted for blacks (OR 0.74; 95% CI, 0.64-0.85) and Hispanics (OR 0.77; 95% CI, 0.67-0.89) who received mastectomy, but not for those who received lumpectomy. Conclusions: Many patients with local-regionally advanced BCa do not receive RT. Blacks and Hispanics were less likely than whites to receive RT. This disparity was noted predominately in patients who received mastectomy. Future efforts at improving rates of RT are warranted. Efforts at eliminating racial/ethnic disparities should focus on black and Hispanic candidates for postmastectomy RT.

  5. Comparison of Various Radiation Therapy Techniques in Breast Cancer Where Target Volume Includes Mammaria Interna Region

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, Mehmet Hakan; Zincircioglu, Seyit Burhanedtin Zorlu, Faruk

    2009-04-01

    In breast cancer radiotherapy, the internal mammary lymphatic chain is treated in the target volume in a group of patients with high-risk criteria. Because of the variability of the anatomic region and structures in the irradiation field, there are a number of different techniques in breast radiotherapy. While irradiating the target volume, we also consider minimizing the dose to critical structures such as heart, lung, and contralateral breast tissue. In this study, we evaluated the dose distribution of different radiotherapy techniques in patients with left-sided breast cancer who had breast-conserving surgery. A three-dimensional computerized planning system (3DCPS) was used for each patient to compare wide-field, oblique photon-electron, and perpendicular photon-electron techniques in terms of dose homogeneities in the target volume; the doses received by the contralateral breast, heart, and lung; and the coverage of the internal mammary chain. Data from 3DCPS were controlled by the Rando-phantom and thermoluminescence dosimetry. Critical structures were irradiated with acceptable dose percentages in addition to the internal mammary chain with both wide-field and photon-electron techniques. We detected more frequent hot spots in the oblique photon-electron technique than in the other techniques, and this situation necessitated changing the junctions. The wide-field technique was easy to perform and exposed less radiation dose to the heart than photon-electron techniques. In conclusion, we suggest the use of the wide-field technique in breast irradiation when the internal mammary area is in the target volume.

  6. Using Social Network Analysis to Evaluate Community Capacity Building of a Regional Community Cancer Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luque, John; Tyson, Dinorah Martinez; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Gwede, Clement; Vadaparampil, Susan; Noel-Thomas, Shalewa; Meade, Cathy

    2010-01-01

    The Tampa Bay Community Cancer Network (TBCCN) is one of 25 Community Network Programs funded by the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) Center to Reduce Cancer Health Disparities with the objectives to create a collaborative infrastructure of academic and community based organizations and to develop effective and sustainable interventions to…

  7. Impact of NGS in the medical sciences: Genetic syndromes with an increased risk of developing cancer as an example of the use of new technologies.

    PubMed

    Lapunzina, Pablo; López, Rocío Ortiz; Rodríguez-Laguna, Lara; García-Miguel, Purificación; Martínez, Augusto Rojas; Martínez-Glez, Víctor

    2014-03-01

    The increased speed and decreasing cost of sequencing, along with an understanding of the clinical relevance of emerging information for patient management, has led to an explosion of potential applications in healthcare. Currently, SNP arrays and Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies are relatively new techniques used to scan genomes for gains and losses, losses of heterozygosity (LOH), SNPs, and indel variants as well as to perform complete sequencing of a panel of candidate genes, the entire exome (whole exome sequencing) or even the whole genome. As a result, these new high-throughput technologies have facilitated progress in the understanding and diagnosis of genetic syndromes and cancers, two disorders traditionally considered to be separate diseases but that can share causal genetic alterations in a group of developmental disorders associated with congenital malformations and cancer risk. The purpose of this work is to review these syndromes as an example of a group of disorders that has been included in a panel of genes for NGS analysis. We also highlight the relationship between development and cancer and underline the connections between these syndromes.

  8. A common cancer-associated DNA polymerase ε mutation causes an exceptionally strong mutator phenotype, indicating fidelity defects distinct from loss of proofreading.

    PubMed

    Kane, Daniel P; Shcherbakova, Polina V

    2014-04-01

    Exonucleolytic proofreading and DNA mismatch repair (MMR) act in series to maintain high-fidelity DNA replication and to avoid mutagenesis. MMR defects elevate the overall mutation rate and are associated with increased cancer incidence. Hypermutable colorectal and endometrial tumors with functional MMR were recently reported to carry amino acid substitutions in the exonuclease domain of DNA polymerase ε (Polε). This created a notion that loss of the proofreading activity of Polε is an initiating cause of some sporadic human cancers. In this study, we identified a somatic P286R substitution in the conserved ExoI motif of Polε in a collection of 52 sporadic colorectal tumor specimens. This change has been repeatedly observed in colorectal and endometrial tumors in previous studies despite many possible ways to inactivate Polε proofreading. To understand the reasons for the recurrent appearance of the P286R variant, we characterized its functional consequences using the yeast model system. An analogous substitution in the yeast Polε produced an unusually strong mutator phenotype exceeding that of proofreading-deficient mutants by two orders of magnitude. This argues that the P286R mutation acts at some level other than loss of exonuclease to elevate cancer risk. Heterozygosity for the variant allele caused a strong mutator effect comparable with that of complete MMR deficiency, providing an explanation for why loss of heterozygosity is not required for the development of Polε-mutant human tumors.

  9. Integration of multiethnic fine-mapping and genomic annotation to prioritize candidate functional SNPs at prostate cancer susceptibility regions

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ying; Hazelett, Dennis J.; Wiklund, Fredrik; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Stram, Daniel O.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Wang, Zhaoming; Rand, Kristin A.; Hoover, Robert N.; Machiela, Mitchell J.; Yeager, Merideth; Burdette, Laurie; Chung, Charles C.; Hutchinson, Amy; Yu, Kai; Xu, Jianfeng; Travis, Ruth C.; Key, Timothy J.; Siddiq, Afshan; Canzian, Federico; Takahashi, Atsushi; Kubo, Michiaki; Stanford, Janet L.; Kolb, Suzanne; Gapstur, Susan M.; Diver, W. Ryan; Stevens, Victoria L.; Strom, Sara S.; Pettaway, Curtis A.; Al Olama, Ali Amin; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Yeboah, Edward D.; Tettey, Yao; Biritwum, Richard B.; Adjei, Andrew A.; Tay, Evelyn; Truelove, Ann; Niwa, Shelley; Chokkalingam, Anand P.; Isaacs, William B.; Chen, Constance; Lindstrom, Sara; Le Marchand, Loic; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Pomerantz, Mark; Long, Henry; Li, Fugen; Ma, Jing; Stampfer, Meir; John, Esther M.; Ingles, Sue A.; Kittles, Rick A.; Murphy, Adam B.; Blot, William J.; Signorello, Lisa B.; Zheng, Wei; Albanes, Demetrius; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie; Nemesure, Barbara; Carpten, John; Leske, M. Cristina; Wu, Suh-Yuh; Hennis, Anselm J. M.; Rybicki, Benjamin A.; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Hsing, Ann W.; Chu, Lisa; Goodman, Phyllis J.; Klein, Eric A.; Zheng, S. Lilly; Witte, John S.; Casey, Graham; Riboli, Elio; Li, Qiyuan; Freedman, Matthew L.; Hunter, David J.; Gronberg, Henrik; Cook, Michael B.; Nakagawa, Hidewaki; Kraft, Peter; Chanock, Stephen J.; Easton, Douglas F.; Henderson, Brian E.; Coetzee, Gerhard A.; Conti, David V.; Haiman, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    Interpretation of biological mechanisms underlying genetic risk associations for prostate cancer is complicated by the relatively large number of risk variants (n = 100) and the thousands of surrogate SNPs in linkage disequilibrium. Here, we combined three distinct approaches: multiethnic fine-mapping, putative functional annotation (based upon epigenetic data and genome-encoded features), and expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analyses, in an attempt to reduce this complexity. We examined 67 risk regions using genotyping and imputation-based fine-mapping in populations of European (cases/controls: 8600/6946), African (cases/controls: 5327/5136), Japanese (cases/controls: 2563/4391) and Latino (cases/controls: 1034/1046) ancestry. Markers at 55 regions passed a region-specific significance threshold (P-value cutoff range: 3.9 × 10−4–5.6 × 10−3) and in 30 regions we identified markers that were more significantly associated with risk than the previously reported variants in the multiethnic sample. Novel secondary signals (P < 5.0 × 10−6) were also detected in two regions (rs13062436/3q21 and rs17181170/3p12). Among 666 variants in the 55 regions with P-values within one order of magnitude of the most-associated marker, 193 variants (29%) in 48 regions overlapped with epigenetic or other putative functional marks. In 11 of the 55 regions, cis-eQTLs were detected with nearby genes. For 12 of the 55 regions (22%), the most significant region-specific, prostate-cancer associated variant represented the strongest candidate functional variant based on our annotations; the number of regions increased to 20 (36%) and 27 (49%) when examining the 2 and 3 most significantly associated variants in each region, respectively. These results have prioritized subsets of candidate variants for downstream functional evaluation. PMID:26162851

  10. Integration of multiethnic fine-mapping and genomic annotation to prioritize candidate functional SNPs at prostate cancer susceptibility regions.

    PubMed

    Han, Ying; Hazelett, Dennis J; Wiklund, Fredrik; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Stram, Daniel O; Berndt, Sonja I; Wang, Zhaoming; Rand, Kristin A; Hoover, Robert N; Machiela, Mitchell J; Yeager, Merideth; Burdette, Laurie; Chung, Charles C; Hutchinson, Amy; Yu, Kai; Xu, Jianfeng; Travis, Ruth C; Key, Timothy J; Siddiq, Afshan; Canzian, Federico; Takahashi, Atsushi; Kubo, Michiaki; Stanford, Janet L; Kolb, Suzanne; Gapstur, Susan M; Diver, W Ryan; Stevens, Victoria L; Strom, Sara S; Pettaway, Curtis A; Al Olama, Ali Amin; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Eeles, Rosalind A; Yeboah, Edward D; Tettey, Yao; Biritwum, Richard B; Adjei, Andrew A; Tay, Evelyn; Truelove, Ann; Niwa, Shelley; Chokkalingam, Anand P; Isaacs, William B; Chen, Constance; Lindstrom, Sara; Le Marchand, Loic; Giovannucci, Edward L; Pomerantz, Mark; Long, Henry; Li, Fugen; Ma, Jing; Stampfer, Meir; John, Esther M; Ingles, Sue A; Kittles, Rick A; Murphy, Adam B; Blot, William J; Signorello, Lisa B; Zheng, Wei; Albanes, Demetrius; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie; Nemesure, Barbara; Carpten, John; Leske, M Cristina; Wu, Suh-Yuh; Hennis, Anselm J M; Rybicki, Benjamin A; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Hsing, Ann W; Chu, Lisa; Goodman, Phyllis J; Klein, Eric A; Zheng, S Lilly; Witte, John S; Casey, Graham; Riboli, Elio; Li, Qiyuan; Freedman, Matthew L; Hunter, David J; Gronberg, Henrik; Cook, Michael B; Nakagawa, Hidewaki; Kraft, Peter; Chanock, Stephen J; Easton, Douglas F; Henderson, Brian E; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Conti, David V; Haiman, Christopher A

    2015-10-01

    Interpretation of biological mechanisms underlying genetic risk associations for prostate cancer is complicated by the relatively large number of risk variants (n = 100) and the thousands of surrogate SNPs in linkage disequilibrium. Here, we combined three distinct approaches: multiethnic fine-mapping, putative functional annotation (based upon epigenetic data and genome-encoded features), and expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analyses, in an attempt to reduce this complexity. We examined 67 risk regions using genotyping and imputation-based fine-mapping in populations of European (cases/controls: 8600/6946), African (cases/controls: 5327/5136), Japanese (cases/controls: 2563/4391) and Latino (cases/controls: 1034/1046) ancestry. Markers at 55 regions passed a region-specific significance threshold (P-value cutoff range: 3.9 × 10(-4)-5.6 × 10(-3)) and in 30 regions we identified markers that were more significantly associated with risk than the previously reported variants in the multiethnic sample. Novel secondary signals (P < 5.0 × 10(-6)) were also detected in two regions (rs13062436/3q21 and rs17181170/3p12). Among 666 variants in the 55 regions with P-values within one order of magnitude of the most-associated marker, 193 variants (29%) in 48 regions overlapped with epigenetic or other putative functional marks. In 11 of the 55 regions, cis-eQTLs were detected with nearby genes. For 12 of the 55 regions (22%), the most significant region-specific, prostate-cancer associated variant represented the strongest candidate functional variant based on our annotations; the number of regions increased to 20 (36%) and 27 (49%) when examining the 2 and 3 most significantly associated variants in each region, respectively. These results have prioritized subsets of candidate variants for downstream functional evaluation.

  11. A single nucleotide polymorphism in the promoter region of let-7 family is associated with lung cancer risk in Chinese.

    PubMed

    Shen, L Q; Xie, Y Z; Qian, X F; Zhuang, Z X; Jiao, Y; Qi, X F

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is a complex polygenic disease and many genetic factors are involved in the development of the disease. As one of the most important and widely studied families of microRNA, let-7 appears to play an important role in initiation and progression of lung cancer. Any small changes in miRNA level or its target point can cause significant changes in gene function. In this study, we examined whether a single-nucleotide polymorphism in the promoter region of the let-7 family (rs10877887) is associated with the susceptibility to and prognosis of lung adenocarcinoma cancer. A hospital-based case-control research model was used in our study. The single-nucleotide polymorphism was genotyped in 69 lung cancer patients and 75 healthy controls by direct sequencing. The correlation between rs10877887 genotypes and the susceptibility to lung cancer was evaluated using an unconditional logistic regression model. Populations with the CT+CC genotype had a significantly increased AC risk compared to those with the TT genotype (CT+CC vs TT: P = 0.043, OR = 2.032, 95%CI = 1.018-4.054). Furthermore, the risk effect was greater in subgroups of females over 60 years old (CT+CC vs TT: OR = 6.857, 95%CI = 1.425-33.008, P = 0.012), and the C allele were confirmed to be a risk factor related to lung cancer in these females (P = 0.012). The single-nucleotide polymorphism rs10877887 in the promoter region of the let-7 family was found to be responsible for the susceptibility to lung adenocarcinoma cancer in Chinese individuals. This association was significantly stronger in females who were more than 60 years old.

  12. Validation study of genes with hypermethylated promoter regions associated with prostate cancer recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Stott-Miller, Marni; Zhao, Shanshan; Wright, Jonathan L.; Kolb, Suzanne; Bibikova, Marina; Klotzle, Brandy; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Fan, Jian-Bing; Feng, Ziding; Stanford, Janet L.

    2014-01-01

    Background One challenge in prostate cancer (PCa) is distinguishing indolent from aggressive disease at diagnosis. DNA promoter hypermethylation is a frequent epigenetic event in PCa, but few studies of DNA methylation in relation to features of more aggressive tumors or PCa recurrence have been completed. Methods We used the Infinium® HumanMethylation450 BeadChip to assess DNA methylation in tumor tissue from 407 patients with clinically localized PCa who underwent radical prostatectomy. Recurrence status was determined by follow-up patient surveys, medical record review, and linkage with the SEER registry. The methylation status of 14 genes for which promoter hypermethylation was previously correlated with advanced disease or biochemical recurrence was evaluated. Average methylation level for promoter region CpGs in patients who recurred compared to those with no evidence of recurrence was analyzed. For two genes with differential methylation, time to recurrence was examined. Results During an average follow-up of 11.7 years, 104 (26%) patients recurred. Significant promoter hypermethylation in at least 50% of CpG sites in two genes, ABHD9 and HOXD3, was found in tumors from patients who recurred compared to those without recurrence. Evidence was strongest for HOXD3 (lowest P = 9.46x10−6), with higher average methylation across promoter region CpGs associated with reduced recurrence-free survival (P = 2×10−4). DNA methylation profiles did not differ by recurrence status for the other genes. Conclusions These results validate the association between promoter hypermethylation of ADHB9 and HOXD3 and PCa recurrence. Impact Tumor DNA methylation profiling may help distinguish PCa patients at higher risk for disease recurrence. PMID:24718283

  13. Does Lymphovascular Invasion Predict Regional Nodal Failure in Breast Cancer Patients With Zero to Three Positive Lymph Nodes Treated With Conserving Surgery and Radiotherapy? Implications for Regional Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Boutrus, Rimoun; Abi-Raad, Rita; Niemierko, Andrzej; Brachtel, Elena F.; Rizk, Levi; Kelada, Alexandra; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To examine the relationship between lymphovascular invasion (LVI) and regional nodal failure (RNF) in breast cancer patients with zero to three positive nodes treated with breast-conservation therapy (BCT). Methods and Materials: The records of 1,257 breast cancer patients with zero to three positive lymph nodes were reviewed. All patients were treated with BCT at Massachusetts General Hospital from 1980 to December 2003. Lymphovascular invasion was diagnosed by hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections and in some cases supported by immunohistochemical stains. Regional nodal failure was defined as recurrence in the ipsilateral supraclavicular, axillary, or internal mammary lymph nodes. Regional nodal failure was diagnosed by clinical and/or radiologic examination. Results: The median follow-up was 8 years (range, 0.1-21 years). Lymphovascular invasion was present in 211 patients (17%). In univariate analysis, patients with LVI had a higher rate of RNF (3.32% vs. 1.15%; p = 0.02). In multivariate analysis, only tumor size, grade, and local failure were significant predictors of RNF (p = 0.049, 0.013, and 0.0001, respectively), whereas LVI did not show a significant relationship with RNF (hazard ratio = 2.07; 95% CI, 0.8-5.5; p = 0.143). The presence of LVI in the T2/3 population did not increase the risk of RNF over that for those with no LVI (p = 0.15). In addition, patients with Grade 3 tumors and positive LVI did not have a higher risk of RNF than those without LVI (p = 0.96). Conclusion: These results suggest that LVI can not be used as a sole indicator for regional nodal irradiation in breast cancer patients with zero to three positive lymph nodes treated with BCT.

  14. Modeling the Etiology of p53-mutated Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Perez, Ricardo E; Shen, Hong; Duan, Lei; Kim, Reuben H; Kim, Terresa; Park, No-Hee; Maki, Carl G

    2016-05-01

    p53 gene mutations are among the most common alterations in cancer. In most cases, missense mutations in one TP53 allele are followed by loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH), so tumors express only mutant p53. TP53 mutations and LOH have been linked, in many cases, with poor therapy response and worse outcome. Despite this, remarkably little is known about how TP53 point mutations are acquired, how LOH occurs, or the cells involved. Nutlin-3a occupies the p53-binding site in MDM2 and blocks p53-MDM2 interaction, resulting in the stabilization and activation of p53 and subsequent growth arrest or apoptosis. We leveraged the powerful growth inhibitory activity of Nutlin-3a to select p53-mutated cells and examined how TP53 mutations arise and how the remaining wild-type allele is lost or inactivated. Mismatch repair (MMR)-deficient colorectal cancer cells formed heterozygote (p53 wild-type/mutant) colonies when cultured in low doses of Nutlin-3a, whereas MMR-corrected counterparts did not. Placing these heterozygotes in higher Nutlin-3a doses selected clones in which the remaining wild-type TP53 was silenced. Our data suggest silencing occurred through a novel mechanism that does not involve DNA methylation, histone methylation, or histone deacetylation. These data indicate MMR deficiency in colorectal cancer can give rise to initiating TP53 mutations and that TP53 silencing occurs via a copy-neutral mechanism. Moreover, the data highlight the use of MDM2 antagonists as tools to study mechanisms of TP53 mutation acquisition and wild-type allele loss or silencing in cells with defined genetic backgrounds.

  15. Combined analysis of copy number alterations by single-nucleotide polymorphism array and MYC status in non-metastatic breast cancer patients: comparison according to the circulating tumor cell status.

    PubMed

    Nadal, R; Salido, M; Nonell, L; Rodríguez-Rivera, M; Puigdecanet, E; Garcia-Puche, J L; Macià, M; Corominas, J M; Serrano, M J; Lorente, J A; Solé, F

    2015-02-01

    Recent technological advances have made it possible to detect circulating tumor cells (CTCs) as a prognostic marker in operable breast cancer patients. Whether the presence of CTCs in cancer patients correlates with molecular alterations in the primary tumor has not been widely explored. We identified 14 primary breast cancer specimens with known CTC status, in order to evaluate the presence of differential genetic aberrations by using SNP array assay. There was a global increase of altered genome, CNA, and copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity (cn-LOH) observed in the CTC-positive (CTC(+)) versus CTC-negative (CTC(-)) cases. As the preliminary results showed a higher proportion of copy number alteration (CNA) at 8q24 (MYC loci) and the available evidence supporting the role of MYC in the processes cancer metastases is conflicting, MYC status was determined in tissue microarray sections in a larger series of patients (n = 49) with known CTC status using FISH. MYC was altered in 62% (16/26) CTC(+) patients and in 43% (6/14) CTC(-) patients (p = 0.25). Based on the observation in our study, future studies involving a larger number of patients should be performed in order to definitively define if this correlation exists.

  16. Combined analysis of copy number alterations by single-nucleotide polymorphism array and MYC status in non-metastatic breast cancer patients: comparison according to the circulating tumor cell status.

    PubMed

    Nadal, R; Salido, M; Nonell, L; Rodríguez-Rivera, M; Puigdecanet, E; Garcia-Puche, J L; Macià, M; Corominas, J M; Serrano, M J; Lorente, J A; Solé, F

    2015-02-01

    Recent technological advances have made it possible to detect circulating tumor cells (CTCs) as a prognostic marker in operable breast cancer patients. Whether the presence of CTCs in cancer patients correlates with molecular alterations in the primary tumor has not been widely explored. We identified 14 primary breast cancer specimens with known CTC status, in order to evaluate the presence of differential genetic aberrations by using SNP array assay. There was a global increase of altered genome, CNA, and copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity (cn-LOH) observed in the CTC-positive (CTC(+)) versus CTC-negative (CTC(-)) cases. As the preliminary results showed a higher proportion of copy number alteration (CNA) at 8q24 (MYC loci) and the available evidence supporting the role of MYC in the processes cancer metastases is conflicting, MYC status was determined in tissue microarray sections in a larger series of patients (n = 49) with known CTC status using FISH. MYC was altered in 62% (16/26) CTC(+) patients and in 43% (6/14) CTC(-) patients (p = 0.25). Based on the observation in our study, future studies involving a larger number of patients should be performed in order to definitively define if this correlation exists. PMID:25286758

  17. Evaluation of rucaparib and companion diagnostics in the PARP inhibitor landscape for recurrent ovarian cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Jenner, Zachary B; Sood, Anil K; Coleman, Robert L

    2016-06-01

    Rucaparib camsylate (CO-338; 8-fluoro-2-{4-[(methylamino)methyl]phenyl}-1,3,4,5-tetrahydro-6H-azepino[5,4,3-cd]indol-6-one ((1S,4R)-7,7-dimethyl-2-oxobicyclo[2.2.1]hept-1-yl)methanesulfonic acid salt) is a PARP1, 2 and 3 inhibitor. Phase I studies identified a recommended Phase II dose of 600 mg orally twice daily. ARIEL2 Part 1 established a tumor genomic profiling test for homologous recombination loss of heterozygosity quantification using a next-generation sequencing companion diagnostic (CDx). Rucaparib received US FDA Breakthrough Therapy designation for treatment of platinum-sensitive BRCA-mutated advanced ovarian cancer patients who received greater than two lines of platinum-based therapy. Comparable to rucaparib development, other PARP inhibitors, such as olaparib, niraparib, veliparib and talazoparib, are developing CDx tests for targeted therapy. PARP inhibitor clinical trials and CDx assays are discussed in this review, as are potential PARP inhibitor combination therapies and likely resistance mechanisms. PMID:27087632

  18. Lung cancer risk and pollution in an industrial region of Northern Spain: a hospital-based case-control study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Asturias, an Autonomous Region in Northern Spain with a large industrial area, registers high lung cancer incidence and mortality. While this excess risk of lung cancer might be partially attributable to smoking habit and occupational exposure, the role of industrial and urban pollution also needs to be assessed. The objective was to ascertain the possible effect of air pollution, both urban and industrial, on lung cancer risk in Asturias. Methods This was a hospital-based case-control study covering 626 lung cancer patients and 626 controls recruited in Asturias and matched by ethnicity, hospital, age, and sex. Distances from the respective participants' residential locations to industrial facilities and city centers were computed. Using logistic regression, odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CIs) for categories of distance to urban and industrial pollution sources were calculated, with adjustment for sex, age, hospital area, tobacco consumption, family history of cancer, and occupation. Results Whereas individuals living near industries displayed an excess risk of lung cancer (OR = 1.49; 95%CI = 0.93-2.39), which attained statistical significance for small cell carcinomas (OR = 2.23; 95%CI = 1.01-4.92), residents in urban areas showed a statistically significant increased risk for adenocarcinoma (OR = 1.92; 95%CI = 1.09-3.38). In the Gijon health area, residents in the urban area registered a statistically significant increased risk of lung cancer (OR = 2.17; 95%CI = 1.25-3.76), whereas in the Aviles health area, no differences in risk were found by area of exposure. Conclusions This study provides further evidence that air pollution is a moderate risk factor for lung cancer. PMID:21266041

  19. Predictions of lung cancer based on county averages for indoor radon versus the historic incidence of regional lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mose, D.G.; Chrosniak, C.E.; Mushrush, G.W. . Center for Basic and Applied Science)

    1992-01-01

    After a decade of effort to determine the health risk associated with indoor radon, the efforts of the US Environmental Protection Agency have prevailed in the US, and 4 pCi/1 is commonly used as an Action Level. Proposals by other groups supporting lower or higher Action Levels have failed, largely due to paucity of information supporting any particular level of indoor radon. The authors' studies have compared indoor radon for zip code and county size areas with parameters such as geology, precipitation and home construction. Their attempts to verify the relative levels of lung cancer using US-EPA estimates of radon-vs-cancer have not been supportive of the EPA risk estimates. In general, when they compare the number of lung cancer cases in particular geological or geographical areas with the indoor radon levels in that area, they find the EPA predicted number of lung cancer cases to exceed the total number of lung cancer cases from all causes. Comparisons show a correlation between the incidence of lung cancer and indoor radon, but the level of risk is about 1/10 that proposed by the US-EPA. Evidently the assumptions used in their studies are flawed. Even though they find lower risk estimates using many counties in several states, fundamental flaws must be present in this type of investigation. Care must be taken in presenting health risks to the general population in cases, such as in indoor radon, where field data do not support risk estimates obtained by other means.

  20. Increased Helicobacter pylori-associated gastric cancer risk in the Andean region of Colombia is mediated by spermine oxidase.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, R; de Sablet, T; Asim, M; Piazuelo, M B; Barry, D P; Verriere, T G; Sierra, J C; Hardbower, D M; Delgado, A G; Schneider, B G; Israel, D A; Romero-Gallo, J; Nagy, T A; Morgan, D R; Murray-Stewart, T; Bravo, L E; Peek, R M; Fox, J G; Woster, P M; Casero, R A; Correa, P; Wilson, K T

    2015-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection causes gastric cancer, the third leading cause of cancer death worldwide. More than half of the world's population is infected, making universal eradication impractical. Clinical trials suggest that antibiotic treatment only reduces gastric cancer risk in patients with non-atrophic gastritis (NAG), and is ineffective once preneoplastic lesions of multifocal atrophic gastritis (MAG) and intestinal metaplasia (IM) have occurred. Therefore, additional strategies for risk stratification and chemoprevention of gastric cancer are needed. We have implicated polyamines, generated by the rate-limiting enzyme ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), in gastric carcinogenesis. During H. pylori infection, the enzyme spermine oxidase (SMOX) is induced, which generates hydrogen peroxide from the catabolism of the polyamine spermine. Herein, we assessed the role of SMOX in the increased gastric cancer risk in Colombia associated with the Andean mountain region when compared with the low-risk region on the Pacific coast. When cocultured with gastric epithelial cells, clinical strains of H. pylori from the high-risk region induced more SMOX expression and oxidative DNA damage, and less apoptosis than low-risk strains. These findings were not attributable to differences in the cytotoxin-associated gene A oncoprotein. Gastric tissues from subjects from the high-risk region exhibited greater levels of SMOX and oxidative DNA damage by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry, and this occurred in NAG, MAG and IM. In Mongolian gerbils, a prototype colonizing strain from the high-risk region induced more SMOX, DNA damage, dysplasia and adenocarcinoma than a colonizing strain from the low-risk region. Treatment of gerbils with either α-difluoromethylornithine, an inhibitor of ODC, or MDL 72527 (N(1),N(4)-Di(buta-2,3-dien-1-yl)butane-1,4-diamine dihydrochloride), an inhibitor of SMOX, reduced gastric dysplasia and carcinoma, as well as apoptosis-resistant cells with DNA

  1. Acute hospital care is the chief driver of regional spending variation in Medicare patients with advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Gabriel A; Li, Ling; Uno, Hajime; Hassett, Michael J; Landon, Bruce E; Schrag, Deborah

    2014-10-01

    The root causes of regional variation in medical spending are poorly understood and vary by clinical condition. To identify drivers of regional spending variation for Medicare patients with advanced cancer, we used linked Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program (SEER)-Medicare data from the period 2004-10. We broke down Medicare spending into thirteen cancer-relevant service categories. We then calculated the contribution of each category to spending and regional spending variation. Acute hospital care was the largest component of spending and the chief driver of regional spending variation, accounting for 48 percent of spending and 67 percent of variation. In contrast, chemotherapy accounted for 16 percent of spending and 10 percent of variation. Hospice care constituted 5 percent of spending. However, variation in hospice spending was fully offset by opposing variation in other categories. Our analysis suggests that the strategy with the greatest potential to improve the value of care for patients with advanced cancer is to reduce reliance on acute hospital care for this patient population.

  2. Tendencies of mortality by prostate cancer in the states of the Central-West Region of Brazil, 1980-2011.

    PubMed

    da Silva, João Francisco Santos; Mattos, Inês Echenique; Aydos, Ricardo Dutra

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed at analyzing the pattern of prostate cancer mortality in the Central-West Region, in the period 1980 - 2011. The quadrennial and annual mortality rates, age-standardized by the world population, were calculated. Polynomial regression models were estimated to analyze trends of mortality in Brazilian regions and in the states of the Central-West Region. Throughout Brazil there was an increase in the magnitude of mortality rates during the study's period. In the Central-West Region, mortality rates from prostate cancer increased from 7.65/100,000 in the period 1980 - 1983, to 14.36/100,000 in the last four years, exceeding the national average. For Mato Grosso do Sul, an increased trend, although not constant, was observed for prostate mortality rates, while those rates showed stability for Mato Grosso and presented a constant trend of increment for Goiás along the studied period. There was a statistically significant negative correlation between mortality rates from prostate cancer and the proportional mortality from ill-defined causes of death in the three states, but no correlations were observed between these rates and the ratios of Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) tests realized. Difficulties in the access to the health services network, better quality of death records with reduction of ill-defined causes and increased use of PSA may have contributed to the mortality pattern observed in the Central-West Region. Further studies are needed to investigate these relationships in order, to better understand the patterns of mortality from this cancer in the Central-West population.

  3. Cervical Cancer Screening in the US–Mexico Border Region: A Binational Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Schiefelbein, Emily L.; Smith, Ruben; Rojas, Rosalba; Mirchandani, Gita G.; McDonald, Jill A.

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer mortality is high along the US–Mexico border. We describe the prevalence of a recent Papanicolaou screening test (Pap) among US and Mexican border women. We analyzed 2006 cross-sectional data from Mexico’s National Survey of Health and Nutrition and the US Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Women aged 20–77 years in 44 US border counties (n = 1,724) and 80 Mexican border municipios (n = 1,454) were studied. We computed weighted proportions for a Pap within the past year by age, education, employment, marital status, health insurance, health status, risk behaviors, and ethnicity and adjusted prevalence ratios (APR) for the US, Mexico, and the region overall. Sixty-five percent (95 %CI 60.3–68.6) of US women and 32 % (95 %CI 28.7–35.2) of Mexican women had a recent Pap. US residence (APR = 2.01, 95 %CI 1.74–2.33), marriage (APR = 1.31, 95 %CI 1.17–1.47) and insurance (APR = 1.38, 95 %CI 1.22–1.56) were positively associated with a Pap test. Among US women, insurance and marriage were associated (APR = 1.21, 95 %CI 1.05–1.38 and 1.33, 95 %CI 1.10–1.61, respectively), and women aged 20–34 years were about 25 % more likely to have received a test than older women. Insurance and marriage were also positively associated with Pap testing among Mexican women (APR = 1.39, 95 %CI 1.17–1.64 and 1.50; 95 %CI 1.23–1.82, respectively), as were lower levels of education (≤8th grade or 9th–12th grade versus some college) (APR = 1.74; 95 %CI 1.21–2.52 and 1.60; 95 %CI 1.03–2.49, respectively). Marriage and insurance were associated with a recent Pap test on both sides of the border. Binational insurance coverage increases and/or cost reductions might bolster testing among unmarried and uninsured women, leading to earlier cervical cancer diagnosis and potentially lower mortality. PMID:22965734

  4. Descriptive epidemiology of human thyroid cancer: experience from a regional registry and the "volcanic factor".

    PubMed

    Malandrino, Pasqualino; Scollo, Claudia; Marturano, Ilenia; Russo, Marco; Tavarelli, Martina; Attard, Marco; Richiusa, Pierina; Violi, Maria Antonia; Dardanoni, Gabriella; Vigneri, Riccardo; Pellegriti, Gabriella

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid cancer (TC), the most common endocrine tumor, has steadily increased worldwide due to the increase of the papillary histotype. The reasons for this spread have not been established. In addition to more sensitive thyroid nodule screening, the effect of environmental factors cannot be excluded. Because high incidences of TC were found in volcanic areas (Hawaii and Iceland), a volcanic environment may play a role in the pathogenesis of TC. In January 2002, the Regional Register for TC was instituted in Sicily. With a population of approximately five million inhabitants with similar genetic and lifestyle features, the coexistence in Sicily of rural, urban, industrial, moderate-to-low iodine intake, and volcanic areas provides a conducive setting for assessing the environmental influences on the etiology of TC. In Sicily, between 2002 and 2004, 1,950 new cases of TC were identified, with an age-standardized rate (world) ASR(w) = 17.8/10(5) in females and 3.7/10(5) in males and a high female/male ratio (4.3:1.0). The incidence of TC was heterogeneous within Sicily. There were 2.3 times more cases in the Catania province (where most of the inhabitants live in the volcanic area of Mt. Etna): ASR(w) = 31.7/10(5) in females and 6.4/10(5) in males vs. 14.1 in females and 3.0 in males in the rest of Sicily. Multivariate analysis documented that residents in the volcanic area of Mt. Etna had a higher risk of TC, compared to the residents in urban, industrial, and iodine deficient areas of Sicily. An abnormally high concentration of several chemicals was found in the drinking water of the Mt. Etna aquifer, which provides water to most of the residents in the Catania province. Our data suggest that environmental carcinogen(s) of volcanic origin may promote papillary TC. Additional analyses, including cancer biological and molecular features, will allow a better understanding of risk factors and etiopathogenetic mechanisms.

  5. The role of lifestyle risk factors on mortality from colorectal cancer in populations of the Asia-Pacific region.

    PubMed

    Huxley, Rachel; Ansary-Moghaddam, A; Huxley, R; Lam, T H; Ueshima, H; Gu, D F; Kim, H C; Woodward, M; Fang, X; Gu, D F; Imai, Y; Pan, W H; Rodgers, A; Suh, I

    2007-01-01

    Although colorectal cancer is one of the leading malignancies worldwide, there are few data on aetiological relationships from the Asia-Pacific region. Therefore, a collaborative study was conducted involving over half a million subjects from 33 cohort studies in the region. Age-adjusted death rates from colorectal cancer, over an average of 6.8 years follow-up, were 12 and 14 per 100,000 person-years among Asian women and men, respectively; corresponding values in Australasia were 31 and 41. Height was strongly associated with death from colorectal cancer: an extra 5 cm of height was associated with 10% (95%confidence interval, 3% - 18% additional risk, after adjustment for other factors. Smoking increased risk by 43% (9% - 88%), although no significant dose-response relationship was discerned (p>0.05). Other significant (p <0.05) risk factors were body mass index and lack of physical activity. There was no significant effect on colorectal cancer mortality for alcohol consumption, waist circumference, fasting blood glucose or diabetes, although the latter conferred a notable 26% additional risk. Height may be a biomarker for some currently unknown genetic, or environmental, risk factors that are related both to skeletal growth and mutanogenesis. Understanding such mechanisms could provide opportunities for novel preventive and therapeutic intervention. PMID:17696730

  6. Reconfiguration of nucleosome-depleted regions at distal regulatory elements accompanies DNA methylation of enhancers and insulators in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Taberlay, Phillippa C.; Statham, Aaron L.; Kelly, Theresa K.

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that cancer-associated epigenetic repression occurs concomitant with CpG island hypermethylation and loss of nucleosomes at promoters, but the role of nucleosome occupancy and epigenetic reprogramming at distal regulatory elements in cancer is still poorly understood. Here, we evaluate the scope of global epigenetic alterations at enhancers and insulator elements in prostate and breast cancer cells using simultaneous genome-wide mapping of DNA methylation and nucleosome occupancy (NOMe-seq). We find that the genomic location of nucleosome-depleted regions (NDRs) is mostly cell type specific and preferentially found at enhancers in normal cells. In cancer cells, however, we observe a global reconfiguration of NDRs at distal regulatory elements coupled with a substantial reorganization of the cancer methylome. Aberrant acquisition of nucleosomes at enhancer-associated NDRs is associated with hypermethylation and epigenetic silencing marks, and conversely, loss of nucleosomes with demethylation and epigenetic activation. Remarkably, we show that nucleosomes remain strongly organized and phased at many facultative distal regulatory elements, even in the absence of a NDR as an anchor. Finally, we find that key transcription factor (TF) binding sites also show extensive peripheral nucleosome phasing, suggesting the potential for TFs to organize NDRs genome-wide and contribute to deregulation of cancer epigenomes. Together, our findings suggest that “decommissioning” of NDRs and TFs at distal regulatory elements in cancer cells is accompanied by DNA hypermethylation susceptibility of enhancers and insulator elements, which in turn may contribute to an altered genome-wide architecture and epigenetic deregulation in malignancy. PMID:24916973

  7. Ultraconserved region-containing Transformer 2β4 controls senescence of colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kajita, K; Kuwano, Y; Satake, Y; Kano, S; Kurokawa, K; Akaike, Y; Masuda, K; Nishida, K; Rokutan, K

    2016-01-01

    Ultraconserved regions (UCRs) are >200 bp genomic segments with perfect human-to-rodent sequence identity. Transcribed UCRs constitute a new category of noncoding RNAs whose functions remain poorly understood. The human transformer 2β (TRA2B) gene contains a 419-bp UCR spanning the 276-bp exon 2 and its neighboring introns. TRA2B exon 2 has premature stop codons, whereas an exon 2-containing splice variant (TRA2β4) was expressed preferentially in the nuclei of human colon cancer cells. TRA2β4 knockdown p53-independently stimulated CDKN1A transcription and increased p21, resulting in the appearance of senescent cells. Biotin pull-down and RNA immunoprecipitation assays revealed that TRA2β4 interacted with Sp1 through a Sp1-binding sequence (485-GGGG-488) in a stem-loop structure of exon 2. Mutation of this sequence (485-AAGG-488) disrupted the stem-loop structure, blocked the interaction with Sp1 and increased CDKN1A transcription. Overexpression of TRA2β4 significantly decreased CDKN1A mRNA levels and accelerated cell growth, but the introduction of the mutation in the Sp1-binding sequence completely canceled these effects. Taken together, TRA2β4 may sequester Sp1 from occupying promoters of target genes including CDKN1A, promoting cell growth by interrupting the senescence-related gene expression program. This novel function of TRA2β4 may uncover an oncogenic function of transcribed UCRs. PMID:27043659

  8. Lung dose analysis in loco-regional hypofractionated radiotherapy of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Attar, Mohammad A.; Bahadur, Yasir A.; Constantinescu, Camelia T.; Eltaher, Maha M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To report the ipsilateral lung dosimetry data of breast cancer (BC) patients treated with loco-regional hypofractionated radiotherapy (HFRT). Methods: Treatment plans of 150 patients treated in the Radiotherapy Unit, King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia between January 2012 and March 2015 by HFRT for BC were retrospectively reviewed. All patients received 42.4 Gy in 16 fractions by tangential and supra-clavicular fields with 6 MV, 18 MV, or mixed energies. Ipsilateral lung dosimetric data V20Gy and mean lung dose (MLD) were recorded. Correlations between lung dose, patient characteristics, and treatment delivery parameters were assessed by a logistic regression test. Results: The mean ipsilateral lung V20Gy was 24.6% and mean MLD was 11.9 Gy. A weak, but statistically significant correlation was found between lung dose and lung volume (p=0.043). The lung dose was significantly decreasing with patient separation and depth of axillary lymph node (ALN) and supra-claviculary lymph nodes (SCLN) (p<0.0001), and increasing with ALN (p=0.001) and SCLN (p=0.003) dose coverage. Lung dose significantly decreased with beam energy (p<0.0001): mean V20Gy was 27.8%, 25.4% for 6 MV, mixed energy, and 21.2% for 18 MV. The use of a low breast-board angle correlates with low lung dose. Conclusion: Our data suggest that the use of high energy photon beams and low breast-board angulation can reduce the lung dose. PMID:27279508

  9. BP1, an Isoform of DLX4 Homeoprotein, Negatively Regulates BRCA1 in Sporadic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kluk, Brian J.; Fu, Yebo; Formolo, Trina A.; Zhang, Lei; Hindle, Anne K.; Man, Yan-gao; Siegel, Robert S.; Berg, Patricia E.; Deng, Chuxia; McCaffrey, Timothy A.; Fu, Sidney W.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Several lines of evidence point to an important role for BP1, an isoform of DLX4 homeobox gene, in breast carcinogenesis and progression. BRCA1 is a well-known player in the etiology of breast cancer. While familial breast cancer is often marked by BRCA1 mutation and subsequent loss of heterozygosity, sporadic breast cancers exhibit reduced expression of wild type BRCA1, and loss of BRCA1 expression may result in tumor development and progression. Methods: The Cister algorithm and Genomatix program were used to identify potential BP1 binding sites in BRCA1 gene. Real-time PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemistry analysis were performed to verify the expression of BRCA1 and BP1 in cell lines and breast cancer tissues. Double-stranded siRNA transfection was carried out for silencing BP1 expression. ChIP and EMSA were used to confirm that BP1 specifically binds to BRCA1. Results: A putative BP1 binding site was identified in the first intron of BRCA1, which was confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipiation and electrophoresis mobility shift assay. BP1 and BRCA1 expression were inversely correlated in breast cancer cell lines and tissues, suggesting that BP1 may suppress BRCA1 transcription through consensus sequence binding. Conclusions: BP1 homeoprotein represses BRCA1 expression through direct binding to its first intron, which is consistent with a previous study which identified a novel transcriptional repressor element located more than 500 base pairs into the first intron of BRCA1, suggesting that the first intron plays an important role in the negative regulation of BRCA1. Although further functional studies are necessary to confirm its repressor activity towards BRCA1, the elucidation of the role of BP1 in breast tumorigenesis holds great promise in establishing BP1 as a novel target for drug therapy. PMID:20877436

  10. Mean Absorbed Dose to the Anal-Sphincter Region and Fecal Leakage among Irradiated Prostate Cancer Survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Alsadius, David; Hedelin, Maria; Lundstedt, Dan; Pettersson, Niclas; Wilderaeng, Ulrica; Steineck, Gunnar

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To supplement previous findings that the absorbed dose of ionizing radiation to the anal sphincter or lower rectum affects the occurrence of fecal leakage among irradiated prostate-cancer survivors. We also wanted to determine whether anatomically defining the anal-sphincter region as the organ at risk could increase the degree of evidence underlying clinical guidelines for restriction doses to eliminate this excess risk. Methods and Materials: We identified 985 men irradiated for prostate cancer between 1993 and 2006. In 2008, we assessed long-term gastrointestinal symptoms among these men using a study-specific questionnaire. We restrict the analysis to the 414 men who had been treated with external beam radiation therapy only (no brachytherapy) to a total dose of 70 Gy in 2-Gy daily fractions to the prostate or postoperative prostatic region. On reconstructed original radiation therapy dose plans, we delineated the anal-sphincter region as an organ at risk. Results: We found that the prevalence of long-term fecal leakage at least once per month was strongly correlated with the mean dose to the anal-sphincter region. Examining different dose intervals, we found a large increase at 40 Gy; {>=}40 Gy compared with <40 Gy gave a prevalence ratio of 3.8 (95% confidence interval 1.6-8.6). Conclusions: This long-term study shows that mean absorbed dose to the anal-sphincter region is associated with the occurrence of long-term fecal leakage among irradiated prostate-cancer survivors; delineating the anal-sphincter region separately from the rectum and applying a restriction of a mean dose <40 Gy will, according to our data, reduce the risk considerably.

  11. Relation of occupations to the regional differences of lung cancer motality in Fukuoka Prefecture.

    PubMed

    Shigematsu, T; Yamasaki, M

    1977-07-01

    Geographic pattern of lung cancer mortality in Fukuoka Prefecture showed elevated mortalities among males in the Chikuho district where many coal-mines had long been operated as one of the biggest coal-mining areas in Japan. The analysis in relations of occupations to lung cancer mortality revealed that consistently significant correlations exist between lung cancer mortality, and mining and quarrying occupations in every census year after World War II. No other occupations showed consistent relations to lung cancer though a few significant correlations were found only in the recent years. The results appear to suggest that elevated risk of lung cancer among coal-mining workers may exist and deserve further analytical study. PMID:592541

  12. Relation of occupations to the regional differences of lung cancer motality in Fukuoka Prefecture.

    PubMed

    Shigematsu, T; Yamasaki, M

    1977-07-01

    Geographic pattern of lung cancer mortality in Fukuoka Prefecture showed elevated mortalities among males in the Chikuho district where many coal-mines had long been operated as one of the biggest coal-mining areas in Japan. The analysis in relations of occupations to lung cancer mortality revealed that consistently significant correlations exist between lung cancer mortality, and mining and quarrying occupations in every census year after World War II. No other occupations showed consistent relations to lung cancer though a few significant correlations were found only in the recent years. The results appear to suggest that elevated risk of lung cancer among coal-mining workers may exist and deserve further analytical study.

  13. The relationships among individual and regional smoking, socioeconomic status, and oral and pharyngeal cancer survival: a mediation analysis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yi; Logan, Henrietta L; Marks, John G; Shenkman, Elizabeth A

    2015-10-01

    Poorer survival from oral and pharyngeal cancer (OPC) has been reported for populations of lower socioeconomic status (SES), adjusting for risk factors such as patient and clinical characteristics. Beyond these risk factors, higher rates of tobacco use may be a mediator for the observed poorer OPC survival for low SES populations. In this study, we aimed to examine the impact of the relationships among SES, individual smoking status, and living in a region with a higher smoking rate on OPC survival. We obtained Florida Cancer Data System data from 1996 to 2010 and merged the data with US Census data and Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data from 1996 to 2010. We built multivariable survival models to quantify the mediational effect of individual smoking on overall and OPC-specific survival, adjusting for regional smoking, demographics, and clinical characteristics. We found that lower SES, individual smoking, and living in a region with a higher smoking rate were all strongly associated with poorer survival. We estimated that the indirect effect of individual smoking accounted for a large part (ranged from 13.3% to 30.2%) of the total effect of SES on overall and OPC-specific survival. In conclusion, individual and regional smoking are both significant and independent predictors of poor cancer survival. Higher rate of individual smoking is partially responsible for poorer cancer survival in low SES populations. Results of this study provide rationale for considering a multi-level approach that simultaneously targets both individual and contextual factors for future smoking cessation interventions.

  14. Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... your life Being exposed to chemicals that can cause cancer Being at risk for skin cancer Depending on ... than nonsmokers. Other forms of tobacco can also cause cancer, such as cigars, chewing tobacco and snuff. If ...

  15. Why Newly Diagnosed Cancer Patients Require Supportive Care? An Audit from a Regional Cancer Center in India

    PubMed Central

    Ghoshal, Sushmita; Miriyala, Raviteja; Elangovan, Arun; Rai, Bhavana

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The present study was planned to record the distressing symptoms of newly diagnosed cancer patients and evaluate how the symptoms were addressed by the treating oncologists. Materials and Methods: All newly diagnosed cancer patients referred to the Department of Radiotherapy during May 2014 were asked to complete a questionnaire after taking their consent. The Edmonton symptom assessment scale-regular questionnaire was used to assess the frequency and intensity of distressing symptoms. The case records of these patients were then reviewed to compare the frequency and intensity documented by the treating physician. The difference in the two sets of symptoms documented was statistically analyzed by nonparametric tests using SPSS software version 16. Results: Eighty-nine patients participated in this study, of which only 19 could fill the questionnaire on their own. Anxiety was the most common symptom (97.8%) followed by depression (89.9%), tiredness (89.9%), and pain (86.5%). The treating physicians recorded pain in 83.1% whereas the other symptoms were either not documented or grossly underreported. Anxiety was documented in 3/87 patients, but depression was not documented in any. Tiredness was documented in 12/80 patients, and loss of appetite in 54/77 patients mentioning them in the questionnaire. Significant statistical correlation could be seen between the presence of pain, anxiety, depression, tiredness, and loss of appetite in the patients. Conclusion: The study reveals that the distressing symptoms experienced by newly diagnosed cancer patients are grossly underreported and inadequately addressed by treating oncologists. Sensitizing the oncologists and incorporating palliative care principles early in the management of cancer patients could improve their holistic care. PMID:27559263

  16. Appropriate and inappropriate imaging rates for prostate cancer go hand in hand by region, as if set by thermostat.

    PubMed

    Makarov, Danil V; Desai, Rani; Yu, James B; Sharma, Richa; Abraham, Nitya; Albertsen, Peter C; Krumholz, Harlan M; Penson, David F; Gross, Cary P

    2012-04-01

    Policy makers interested in containing health care costs are targeting regional variation in utilization, including the use of advanced imaging. However, bluntly decreasing utilization among the highest-utilization regions may have negative consequences. In a cross-sectional study of prostate cancer patients from 2004 to 2005, we found that regions with lower rates of inappropriate imaging also had lower rates of appropriate imaging. Similarly, regions with higher overall imaging rates tended to have not only higher rates of inappropriate imaging, but also higher rates of appropriate imaging. In fact, men with high-risk prostate cancer were more likely to receive appropriate imaging if they resided in areas with higher rates of inappropriate imaging. This "thermostat model" of regional health care utilization suggests that poorly designed policies aimed at reducing inappropriate imaging could limit access to appropriate imaging for high-risk patients. Health care organizations need clearly defined quality metrics and supportive systems to encourage appropriate treatment for patients and to ensure that cost containment does not occur at the expense of quality.

  17. Role of Ultrasonography of Regional Nodal Basins in Staging Triple-Negative Breast Cancer and Implications For Local-Regional Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Shaitelman, Simona F.; Tereffe, Welela; Dogan, Basak E.; Hess, Kenneth R.; Caudle, Abigail S.; Valero, Vicente; Stauder, Michael C.; Krishnamurthy, Savitri; Candelaria, Rosalind P.; Strom, Eric A.; Woodward, Wendy A.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Whitman, Gary J.

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: We sought to determine the rate at which regional nodal ultrasonography would increase the nodal disease stage in patients with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) beyond the clinical stage determined by physical examination and mammography alone, and significantly affect the treatments delivered to these patients. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the charts of women with stages I to III TNBC who underwent physical examination, mammography, breast and regional nodal ultrasonography with needle biopsy of abnormal nodes, and definitive local-regional treatment at our institution between 2004 and 2011. The stages of these patients' disease with and without ultrasonography of the regional nodal basins were compared using the Pearson χ{sup 2} test. Definitive treatments of patients whose nodal disease was upstaged on the basis of ultrasonographic findings were compared to those of patients whose disease stage remained the same. Results: A total of 572 women met the study requirements. In 111 (19.4%) of these patients, regional nodal ultrasonography with needle biopsy resulted in an increase in disease stage from the original stage by physical examination and mammography alone. Significantly higher percentages of patients whose nodal disease was upstaged by ultrasonographic findings compared to that in patients whose disease was not upstaged underwent neoadjuvant systemic therapy (91.9% and 51.2%, respectively; P<.0001), axillary lymph node dissection (99.1% and 34.5%, respectively; P<.0001), and radiation to the regional nodal basins (88.2% and 29.1%, respectively; P<.0001). Conclusions: Regional nodal ultrasonography in TNBC frequently changes the initial clinical stage and plays an important role in treatment planning.

  18. Inter-Regional Epidemiological Study of Childhood Cancer (IRESCC): childhood cancer and the consumption of debendox and related drugs in pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    McKinney, P. A.; Cartwright, R. A.; Stiller, C. A.; Hopton, P. A.; Mann, J. R.; Birch, J. M.; Hartley, A. L.; Waterhouse, J. A.; Johnston, H. E.

    1985-01-01

    Attention has recently focused on the possible teratogenic effects of the combination antiemetic doxylamine succinate, dicyclomine hydrochloride and pyridoxine hydrochloride (Debendox/Bendectin) prescribed to pregnant women. The Inter-Regional Epidemiological Study of Childhood Cancer (IRESCC), a case-control investigation has analysed data derived from interview reports and medical records of 555 mothers of children (under 15 years) with cancer and 1110 mothers of matched control children. Separate analyses of interview reports and medical records both suggested that antiemetic ingestion during the index pregnancy does not increase the risk of developing childhood malignant disease in the exposed foetus. No dose-response relationship was evident. The lack of any significant relative risks held good for diagnostic sub-groups and when the trimester of ingestion was considered. Our results suggest that antimetics of this type are unlikely to be transplacental carcinogens. PMID:4074645

  19. Inter-Regional Epidemiological Study of Childhood Cancer (IRESCC): childhood cancer and the consumption of debendox and related drugs in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    McKinney, P A; Cartwright, R A; Stiller, C A; Hopton, P A; Mann, J R; Birch, J M; Hartley, A L; Waterhouse, J A; Johnston, H E

    1985-12-01

    Attention has recently focused on the possible teratogenic effects of the combination antiemetic doxylamine succinate, dicyclomine hydrochloride and pyridoxine hydrochloride (Debendox/Bendectin) prescribed to pregnant women. The Inter-Regional Epidemiological Study of Childhood Cancer (IRESCC), a case-control investigation has analysed data derived from interview reports and medical records of 555 mothers of children (under 15 years) with cancer and 1110 mothers of matched control children. Separate analyses of interview reports and medical records both suggested that antiemetic ingestion during the index pregnancy does not increase the risk of developing childhood malignant disease in the exposed foetus. No dose-response relationship was evident. The lack of any significant relative risks held good for diagnostic sub-groups and when the trimester of ingestion was considered. Our results suggest that antimetics of this type are unlikely to be transplacental carcinogens.

  20. Evaluating the impacts of screening and smoking cessation programmes on lung cancer in a high-burden region of the USA: a simulation modelling study

    PubMed Central

    Tramontano, Angela C; Sheehan, Deirdre F; McMahon, Pamela M; Dowling, Emily C; Holford, Theodore R; Ryczak, Karen; Lesko, Samuel M; Levy, David T; Kong, Chung Yin

    2016-01-01

    Objective While the US Preventive Services Task Force has issued recommendations for lung cancer screening, its effectiveness at reducing lung cancer burden may vary at local levels due to regional variations in smoking behaviour. Our objective was to use an existing model to determine the impacts of lung cancer screening alone or in addition to increased smoking cessation in a US region with a relatively high smoking prevalence and lung cancer incidence. Setting Computer-based simulation model. Participants Simulated population of individuals 55 and older based on smoking prevalence and census data from Northeast Pennsylvania. Interventions Hypothetical lung cancer control from 2014 to 2050 through (1) screening with CT, (2) intensified smoking cessation or (3) a combination strategy. Primary and secondary outcome measures Primary outcomes were lung cancer mortality rates. Secondary outcomes included number of people eligible for screening and number of radiation-induced lung cancers. Results Combining lung cancer screening with increased smoking cessation would yield an estimated 8.1% reduction in cumulative lung cancer mortality by 2050. Our model estimated that the number of screening-eligible individuals would progressively decrease over time, indicating declining benefit of a screening-only programme. Lung cancer screening achieved a greater mortality reduction in earlier years, but was later surpassed by smoking cessation. Conclusions Combining smoking cessation programmes with lung cancer screening would provide the most benefit to a population, especially considering the growing proportion of patients ineligible for screening based on current recommendations. PMID:26928026

  1. Female breast cancer in Vietnam: a comparison across Asian specific regions

    PubMed Central

    Trieu, Phuong Dung (Yun); Mello-Thoms, Claudia; Brennan, Patrick C.

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed malignancies and the leading cause of cancer death of women over the world. A large number of females with breast cancer in Vietnam and other Southeast Asian (SEA) countries present at an early age with more aggressive tumors compared with women in Australia. Despite experiencing a low incidence rate, the increasing incidence rate among SEA countries exceeds that of the Westernized world. Changes in reproductive factors, environmental exposures, and lifestyle are the possible causes of this trend. However, limited evidence shows that these factors are associated with breast cancer in the Vietnamese population. Breast cancer incidence rates within Vietnam are not uniform and appear to be dependent on geographic location. Findings from this review have important implications for breast cancer control and treatment in Vietnam. A good understanding of the morphology of the breast and the type and nature of breast cancers presenting in Vietnam is required to facilitate the introduction of an effective national breast screening program. PMID:26487968

  2. A consensus plan for action to improve access to cancer care in the association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) region.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Mark

    2014-01-01

    In many countries of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), cancer is an increasing problem due to ageing and a transition to Western lifestyles. Governments have been slow to react to the health consequences of these socioeconomic changes, leading to the risk of a cancer epidemic overwhelming the region. A major limitation to motivating change is the paucity of high-quality data on cancer, and its socioeconomic repercussions, in ASEAN. Two initiatives have been launched to address these issues. First, a study of over 9000 new cancer patients in ASEAN - the ACTION study - which records information on financial difficulties, as well as clinical outcomes, subsequent to the diagnosis. Second, a series of roundtable meetings of key stakeholders and experts, with the broad aim of producing advice for governments in ASEAN to take appropriate account of issues relating to cancer, as well as to generate knowledge and interest through engagement with the media. An important product of these roundtables has been the Jakarta Call to Action on Cancer Control. The growth and ageing of populations is a global challenge for cancer services. In the less developed parts of Asia, and elsewhere, these problems are compounded by the epidemiological transition to Western lifestyles and lack of awareness of cancer at the government level. For many years, health services in less developed countries have concentrated on infectious diseases and mother-and-child health; despite a recent wake-up call (United Nations, 2010), these health services have so far failed to allow for the huge increase in cancer cases to come. It has been estimated that, in Asia, the number of new cancer cases per year will grow from 6.1 million in 2008 to 10.6 million in 2030 (Sankaranarayanan et al., 2014). In the countries of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), corresponding figures are 770 thousand in 2012 (Figure 1), rising to 1.3 million in 2030 (Ferlay et al., 2012). ASEAN

  3. FHIT loss confers cisplatin resistance in lung cancer via the AKT/NF-κB/Slug-mediated PUMA reduction.

    PubMed

    Wu, D-W; Lee, M-C; Hsu, N-Y; Wu, T-C; Wu, J-Y; Wang, Y-C; Cheng, Y-W; Chen, C-Y; Lee, H

    2015-05-01

    Fragile histidine triad (FHIT) loss by the two-hit mechanism of loss of heterozygosity and promoter hypermethylation commonly occurrs in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and may confer cisplatin resistance in NSCLC cells. However, the underlying mechanisms of FHIT loss in cisplatin resistance and the response to cisplatin-based chemotherapy in NSCLC patients have not yet been reported. In the present study, inhibition concentration of 50% cell viability induced by cisplatin (IC50) and soft agar growth and invasion capability were increased and decreased in FHIT-knockdown and -overexpressing cells, respectively. Mechanistically, Slug transcription is upregulated by AKT/NF-κB activation due to FHIT loss and, in turn, Slug suppresses PUMA expression; this decrease of PUMA by FHIT loss is responsible for cisplatin resistance. In addition, cisplatin resistance due to FHIT loss can be conquered by AKT inhibitor-perifosine in xenograft tumors. Among NSCLC patients, low FHIT, high p-AKT, high Slug and low PUMA were correlated with shorter overall survival, relapse-free survival and poorer response to cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Therefore, the AKT inhibitor perifosine might potentially overcome the resistance to cisplatin-based chemotherapy in NSCLC patients with low-FHIT tumors, and consequently improve the outcome. PMID:24998847

  4. FHIT loss confers cisplatin resistance in lung cancer via the AKT/NF-κB/Slug-mediated PUMA reduction.

    PubMed

    Wu, D-W; Lee, M-C; Hsu, N-Y; Wu, T-C; Wu, J-Y; Wang, Y-C; Cheng, Y-W; Chen, C-Y; Lee, H

    2015-05-01

    Fragile histidine triad (FHIT) loss by the two-hit mechanism of loss of heterozygosity and promoter hypermethylation commonly occurrs in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and may confer cisplatin resistance in NSCLC cells. However, the underlying mechanisms of FHIT loss in cisplatin resistance and the response to cisplatin-based chemotherapy in NSCLC patients have not yet been reported. In the present study, inhibition concentration of 50% cell viability induced by cisplatin (IC50) and soft agar growth and invasion capability were increased and decreased in FHIT-knockdown and -overexpressing cells, respectively. Mechanistically, Slug transcription is upregulated by AKT/NF-κB activation due to FHIT loss and, in turn, Slug suppresses PUMA expression; this decrease of PUMA by FHIT loss is responsible for cisplatin resistance. In addition, cisplatin resistance due to FHIT loss can be conquered by AKT inhibitor-perifosine in xenograft tumors. Among NSCLC patients, low FHIT, high p-AKT, high Slug and low PUMA were correlated with shorter overall survival, relapse-free survival and poorer response to cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Therefore, the AKT inhibitor perifosine might potentially overcome the resistance to cisplatin-based chemotherapy in NSCLC patients with low-FHIT tumors, and consequently improve the outcome.

  5. Molecular characterization of a novel cancer cell line established from human carcinoma in pleomorphic adenoma (CaPA-4).

    PubMed

    Fujioka, M; Shimada, K; Kitazawa, S; Maeda, S

    1996-07-17

    A cultured cell line (CaPA-4), derived from an undifferentiated carcinoma in a pleomorphic adenoma of the submandibular gland, was established through xenografted tumors in nude mice. Geneticin treatment eliminated surrounding mouse fibroblasts and yielded enriched tumor cells at an early stage of cell passage. In vitro, the line grew in a cobblestone pattern, revealing its epithelial origin. Chromosomal analysis by Giemsabanding confirmed its human origin, while electron microscopic examination showed its squamous-cell characteristics. CaPA-4 cells stained positive for the c-myc and Ha-ras antibodies. Molecular analysis showed over-expression of both c-myc and Ha-ras mRNA, with point mutation of p53 at codon 248 and of Ha-ras at codon 61. Amplification and rearrangement of the Ha-ras gene were observed; however, no loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of the p53 gene was detected by Southern blotting. This sequence of cancer-related gene activation may represent the malignant transformation from benign pleomorphic adenoma. This report describes the establishment and molecular characterization of this novel cell line from carcinoma in pleomorphic adenoma exhibiting squamous-cell differentiation. This could represent a useful model for investigating the cause of malignant transformation from human salivary-gland mixed tumors.

  6. DNA Methylation in the Exon 1 Region and Complex Regulation of Twist1 Expression in Gastric Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Ayuna; Akiyama, Yoshimitsu; Shimada, Shu; Zhu, Wei-Guo; Yuasa, Yasuhito; Tanaka, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    Twist1 overexpression is frequently observed in various cancers including gastric cancer (GC). Although DNA methylation of the Twist1 gene has been reported in cancer cells, the mechanisms underlying transcriptional activation remain uncertain. In this study, we first examined epigenetic alterations of the Twist1 using Twist1 transcription-positive and -negative cell lines that are derived from our established diffuse-type GC mouse model. Treatment with a DNA demethylation agent 5-aza-dC re-activated Twist1 expression in Twist1 expression-negative GC cells. According to methylation-specific PCR and bisulfite sequencing analysis, methylation at the CpG-rich region within Twist1 coding exon 1, rather than its promoter region, was tightly linked to transcriptional silencing of the Twist1 expression in mouse GC cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that active histone mark H3K4me3 was enriched in Twist1 expression-positive cells, and inactive histone mark H3K9me3 was enriched in Twist1 expression-negative cells. The expression levels of Suv39h1 and Suv39h2, histone methyltransferases for H3K9me3, were inversely correlated with Twist1 expression, and knockdown of Suv39h1 or Suv39h2 induced Twist1 expression. Moreover, Sp1 transcription factor bound to the exon 1 CpG-rich region in Twist1 expression-positive cell lines, and Twist1 expression was diminished by mithramycin, which that interferes with Sp1 binding to CpG-rich regulatory sequences. Our studies suggested that the Twist1 transcription in GC cells might be regulated through potential cooperation of DNA methylation, histone modification in complex with Sp1 binding to CpG-rich regions within the exon 1 region. PMID:26695186

  7. p16INK4A inactivation mechanisms in non-small-cell lung cancer patients occupationally exposed to asbestos.

    PubMed

    Andujar, Pascal; Wang, Jinhui; Descatha, Alexis; Galateau-Sallé, Françoise; Abd-Alsamad, Issam; Billon-Galland, Marie-Annick; Blons, Hélène; Clin, Bénédicte; Danel, Claire; Housset, Bruno; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Le Pimpec-Barthes, Françoise; Letourneux, Marc; Monnet, Isabelle; Régnard, Jean-François; Renier, Annie; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica; Pairon, Jean-Claude; Jaurand, Marie-Claude

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that asbestos fibers constitute the major occupational risk factor and that asbestos acts synergistically with tobacco smoking to induce lung cancer. Although some somatic gene alterations in lung cancer have been linked to tobacco smoke, few data are available on the role of asbestos fibers. P16/CDKN2A is an important tumor suppressor gene that is frequently altered in lung cancer via promoter 5'-CpG island hypermethylation and homozygous deletion, and rarely via point mutation. Many studies suggest that tobacco smoking produces P16/CDKN2A promoter hypermethylation in lung cancer, but the status of this gene in relation to asbestos exposure has yet to be determined. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanism of P16/CDKN2A alterations in lung cancer in asbestos-exposed patients. P16/CDKN2A gene status was studied in 75 human non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cases with well-defined smoking habits, and detailed assessment of asbestos exposure, based on occupational questionnaire and determination of asbestos bodies in lung tissue. The results of this study confirm published data on the effect of tobacco smoke on P16/CDKN2A gene alterations, characterized by significantly higher P16/CDKN2A promoter hypermethylation in heavy smokers (more than 40 pack-years (P-Y)) than in smokers of less than 40 P-Y. These results also demonstrate a higher incidence of loss of heterozygosity and homozygous deletion in asbestos-exposed cases, after adjustment for age and cumulative tobacco consumption, than in unexposed cases (P=0.0062). This study suggests that P16/CDKN2A gene inactivation in asbestos-exposed NSCLC cases mainly occurs via deletion, a feature also found in malignant mesothelioma, a tumor independent of tobacco smoking but associated with asbestos exposure, suggesting a possible relationship with an effect of asbestos fibers.

  8. Evaluation of Thyroid Bed Nodules on Ultrasonography after Total Thyroidectomy: Risk for Loco-Regional Recurrence of Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Chitra; Wartofsky, Leonard; Tefera, Eshetu; Burman, Kenneth D.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We conducted a retrospective chart review of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer who underwent total thyroidectomy to examine the correlation of the persistence of thyroid bed nodules seen on ultrasonography with subsequent loco-regional recurrence. Methods A total of 60 patients with differentiated thyroid cancer were identified who underwent total thyroidectomy, received 131I therapy and had thyroid bed nodules on postoperative surveillance ultrasonography. The ultrasonographic features of the thyroid bed nodules and their progression over time along with serum thyroglobulin (Tg) levels were monitored. Those patients who demonstrated no evidence of recurrence were compared to patients who had recurrence. Results Of the 60 patients, 25% had documented cancer recurrence. Sixty percent of the patients in the recurrence group had an increase in the size of bed nodules as compared to only 7% of the patients in the group without recurrence. An increase in serum Tg of more than 2-fold was seen in 80% of the patients with recurrence and in only 13% (6/45) of the patients without cancer recurrence. The odds of identifying recurrent thyroid cancer in patients with more than a 2-fold increase in serum Tg were 80.5 greater than in patients with a less than 2-fold increase in serum Tg. The odds of identifying recurrent thyroid cancer in patients with the presence of any suspicious thyroid bed nodule were 31.5 times greater than in patients without suspicious thyroid bed nodules. Conclusions Thyroid bed nodules on surveillance ultrasound warrant fine-needle aspiration cytology if they increase in size and number, are persistent and associated with suspicious sonographic features. PMID:26279996

  9. The role of prophylactic cranial irradiation in regionally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. A Southwest Oncology Group Study

    SciTech Connect

    Rusch, V.W.; Griffin, B.R.; Livingston, R.B. )

    1989-10-01

    Lung cancer is the most common malignant disease in the United States. Only the few tumors detected very early are curable, but there has been some progress in the management of more advanced non-small cell lung cancer, particularly in regionally inoperable disease. Prevention of central nervous system relapse is an important issue in this group of patients because brain metastases ultimately develop in 20% to 25% of them. Seventy-three patients with regionally advanced non-small cell lung cancer were entered into a Phase II trial of neutron chest radiotherapy sandwiched between four cycles of chemotherapy including cisplatin, vinblastine, and mitomycin C. Prophylactic cranial irradiation was administered concurrently with chest radiotherapy (3000 cGy in 10 fractions in 15 patients; 3600 cGy in 18 fractions in the remaining 50 patients). Patients underwent computed tomographic scan of the brain before treatment and every 3 months after treatment. The initial overall response rate was 79%, but 65 of the 73 patients have subsequently died of recurrent disease. Median follow-up is 9 months for all 73 patients and 26 months for eight long-term survivors. No patient who completed the prophylactic cranial irradiation program had clinical or radiologic brain metastases. Toxic reactions to prophylactic cranial irradiation included reversible alopecia in all patients, progressive dementia in one patient, and possible optic neuritis in one patient. Both of these patients received 300 cGy per fraction of irradiation. The use of prophylactic cranial irradiation has been controversial, but its safety and efficacy in this trial supports its application in a group of patients at high risk for central nervous system relapse. Further evaluation of prophylactic cranial irradiation in clinical trials for regionally advanced non-small cell lung cancer is warranted.

  10. Microsatellite alteration in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients from a betel quid-prevalent region

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jin-Ching; Wang, Chen-Chi; Jiang, Rong-San; Wang, Wen-Yi; Liu, Shih-An

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the frequency of microsatellite alteration and their impact on survival in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients from an endemic betel quid chewing area. We collected 116 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma specimens along with corresponding surgical margins which were confirmed by pathological examination. Ten oligonucleotide markers were chosen for the assessment of microsatellite alteration. The specimens were amplified by polymerase chain reaction followed by automatic fragment analysis. There were 44 specimens (37.9%) with microsatellite instability (MSI) in at least one marker while more than half of the specimens (n = 68, 58.6%) had loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in at least one marker. Though MSI/LOH was not correlated with the survival of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients, presence of MSI in the tumor-free surgical margins was associated with local recurrence (odds ratio: 15.14; 95% confidence interval: 6.451 ~ 35.53; P < 0.001). Genomic assessment of surgical margin can help surgeons to identify head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients who are at risk of developing local recurrence in a betel quid-prevalent region. PMID:27009367

  11. Regional Variation in Breast Cancer Rates in the United States (Past Initiative)

    Cancer.gov

    Five institutions are being funded to conduct research using epidemiologic and statistical methods for determining whether various factors may account for the geographic differences in breast cancer rates in the United States.

  12. Regional variations in US cancer imaging data: a warning for imaging overuse.

    PubMed

    Makarov, Danil V; Westcott, Gemma

    2015-11-01

    Danil V Makarov speaks to Gemma Westcott, Commissioning Editor: Danil V Makarov is an Assistant Professor and Director of Surgical Research in the Department of Urology at NYU Langone Medical Center (NY, USA). In addition, he is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Population Health. His clinical areas of expertise include prostate cancer, benign prostatic hyperplasia, erectile dysfunction, kidney cancer, urinary tract infections, genitourinary neoplasm, elevated prostate-specific antigen and testicular cancer. In addition, his research interests are in the areas of prostate cancer, health policy and quality of care. An alumnus of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (MD, USA), he completed his residency in urology at Johns Hopkins Hospital and a research fellowship at Yale University School of Medicine (CT, USA).

  13. Innovative techniques in radiation oncology. Clinical research programs to improve local and regional control in cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, L.W.; Markoe, A.M.; Micaily, B.; Fisher, S.A.; Lamm, F.R. )

    1990-02-01

    There is a growing importance in failure analysis in cancer management. In these analyses locoregional failure as the cause of death emerges as a significant problem in many tumor sites, e.g., head and neck cancer, gynecologic cancer, genitourinary cancer. Because of these data, the radiation oncology community has attributed high priority to research efforts to improve locoregional control. These efforts include the following: (1) brachytherapy alone or with external beam radiation therapy or surgery; (2) intraoperative radiation therapy; (3) hyperthermia with radiation therapy; (4) particle irradiation (protons, neutrons, stripped nuclei, and pions); and (5) routes of administration of the treatment, including infusional (intravenous) chemotherapy with radiation therapy, intraarterial monoclonal antibodies with radionuclides, and intraarterial chemotherapy with radiation therapy. Each area of investigation is discussed.

  14. [F-18]-Fluoromisonidazole Quantification of Hypoxia in Human Cancer Patients using Image-derived Blood Surrogate Tissue Reference Regions

    PubMed Central

    Muzi, Mark; Peterson, Lanell M.; O’Sullivan, Janet N.; Fink, James R.; Rajendran, Joseph G.; McLaughlin, Lena J.; Muzi, John P.; Mankoff, David A.; Krohn, Kenneth A.

    2015-01-01

    18F-FMISO is the most widely used PET agent for imaging hypoxia, a condition associated with resistance to tumor therapy. 18F-FMISO equilibrates in normoxic tissues, but is retained under hypoxic conditions because of reduction and binding to macromolecules. A simple tissue-to-blood ratio (TB) is suitable for quantifying hypoxia. A threshold of TB ≥ 1.2 is useful in discriminating the hypoxic volume (HV) of tissue; TBmax is the maximum intensity of the hypoxic region and does not invoke a threshold. Because elimination of blood sampling would simplify clinical use, we tested the validity of using imaging regions as a surrogate for blood sampling. Methods Patients underwent 20 min 18F-FMISO scans during the 90–140 min interval post-injection with venous blood sampling. 223 18F-FMISO patient studies had detectable surrogate blood regions in the field-of-view. Quantitative parameters of hypoxia (TBmax, HV) derived from blood samples were compared to values using surrogate blood regions derived from heart, aorta and/or cerebellum. In a subset of brain cancer patients, parameters from blood samples and from cerebellum were compared for their ability to independently predict outcome. Results Vascular regions of heart showed the highest correlation to measured blood activity (R2 = 0.84). For brain studies, cerebellar activity was similarly correlated to blood samples. In brain cancer patients, Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that image-derived reference regions had nearly identical predictive power as parameters derived from blood, thus obviating the need for venous sampling in these patients. Conclusions Simple static analysis of 18F-FMISO PET captures both the intensity (TBmax) and spatial extent (HV) of tumor hypoxia. An image-derived region to assess blood activity can be used as a surrogate for blood sampling in quantification of hypoxia. PMID:26112020

  15. Peptides from the variable region of specific antibodies are shared among lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    de Costa, Dominique; Broodman, Ingrid; Calame, Wim; Stingl, Christoph; Dekker, Lennard J M; Vernhout, René M; de Koning, Harry J; Hoogsteden, Henk C; Sillevis Smitt, Peter A E; van Klaveren, Rob J; Luider, Theo M; Vanduijn, Martijn M

    2014-01-01

    Late diagnosis of lung cancer is still the main reason for high mortality rates in lung cancer. Lung cancer is a heterogeneous disease which induces an immune response to different tumor antigens. Several methods for searching autoantibodies have been described that are based on known purified antigen panels. The aim of our study is to find evidence that parts of the antigen-binding-domain of antibodies are shared among lung cancer patients. This was investigated by a novel approach based on sequencing antigen-binding-fragments (Fab) of immunoglobulins using proteomic techniques without the need of previously known antigen panels. From serum of 93 participants of the NELSON trial IgG was isolated and subsequently digested into Fab and Fc. Fab was purified from the digested mixture by SDS-PAGE. The Fab containing gel-bands were excised, tryptic digested and measured on a nano-LC-Orbitrap-Mass-spectrometry system. Multivariate analysis of the mass spectrometry data by linear canonical discriminant analysis combined with stepwise logistic regression resulted in a 12-antibody-peptide model which was able to distinguish lung cancer patients from controls in a high risk population with a sensitivity of 84% and specificity of 90%. With our Fab-purification combined Orbitrap-mass-spectrometry approach, we found peptides from the variable-parts of antibodies which are shared among lung cancer patients. PMID:24787687

  16. Long non-coding RNAs harboring miRNA seed regions are enriched in prostate cancer exosomes.

    PubMed

    Ahadi, Alireza; Brennan, Samuel; Kennedy, Paul J; Hutvagner, Gyorgy; Tran, Nham

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) form the largest transcript class in the human transcriptome. These lncRNA are expressed not only in the cells, but they are also present in the cell-derived extracellular vesicles such as exosomes. The function of these lncRNAs in cancer biology is not entirely clear, but they appear to be modulators of gene expression. In this study, we characterize the expression of lncRNAs in several prostate cancer exosomes and their parental cell lines. We show that certain lncRNAs are enriched in cancer exosomes with the overall expression signatures varying across cell lines. These exosomal lncRNAs are themselves enriched for miRNA seeds with a preference for let-7 family members as well as miR-17, miR-18a, miR-20a, miR-93 and miR-106b. The enrichment of miRNA seed regions in exosomal lncRNAs is matched with a concomitant high expression of the same miRNA. In addition, the exosomal lncRNAs also showed an over representation of RNA binding protein binding motifs. The two most common motifs belonged to ELAVL1 and RBMX. Given the enrichment of miRNA and RBP sites on exosomal lncRNAs, their interplay may suggest a possible function in prostate cancer carcinogenesis. PMID:27102850

  17. Long non-coding RNAs harboring miRNA seed regions are enriched in prostate cancer exosomes

    PubMed Central

    Ahadi, Alireza; Brennan, Samuel; Kennedy, Paul J.; Hutvagner, Gyorgy; Tran, Nham

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) form the largest transcript class in the human transcriptome. These lncRNA are expressed not only in the cells, but they are also present in the cell-derived extracellular vesicles such as exosomes. The function of these lncRNAs in cancer biology is not entirely clear, but they appear to be modulators of gene expression. In this study, we characterize the expression of lncRNAs in several prostate cancer exosomes and their parental cell lines. We show that certain lncRNAs are enriched in cancer exosomes with the overall expression signatures varying across cell lines. These exosomal lncRNAs are themselves enriched for miRNA seeds with a preference for let-7 family members as well as miR-17, miR-18a, miR-20a, miR-93 and miR-106b. The enrichment of miRNA seed regions in exosomal lncRNAs is matched with a concomitant high expression of the same miRNA. In addition, the exosomal lncRNAs also showed an over representation of RNA binding protein binding motifs. The two most common motifs belonged to ELAVL1 and RBMX. Given the enrichment of miRNA and RBP sites on exosomal lncRNAs, their interplay may suggest a possible function in prostate cancer carcinogenesis. PMID:27102850

  18. Projected lifetime cancer risks from exposure to regional radioactive fallout in the Marshall Islands.

    PubMed

    Land, Charles E; Bouville, André; Apostoaei, Iulian; Simon, Steven L

    2010-08-01

    Radioactive fallout from nuclear test detonations during 1946-1958 at Bikini and Enewetak Atolls in the Marshall Islands (MI) exposed populations living elsewhere in the MI archipelago. A comprehensive analysis, presented in seven companion papers, has produced estimates of tissue-specific radiation absorbed dose to MI residents at all historically inhabited atolls from internal (ingested) and external irradiation resulting from exposure to radioactive fallout, by calendar year, and by age of the population at time of exposure. The present report deals, for the first time, with the implications of these doses for cancer risk among exposed members of the MI population. Radiation doses differed by geographic location and year of birth, and radiation-related cancer risk depends upon age at exposure and age at observation for risk. Using dose-response models based on committee reports published by the National Research Council and the National Institutes of Health, we project that, during the lifetimes of members of the MI population potentially exposed to ionizing radiation from weapons test fallout deposited during the testing period (1948-1958) and from residual radioactive sources during the subsequent 12 y (1959-1970), perhaps 1.6% (with 90% uncertainty range 0.4% to 3.4%) of all cancers might be attributable to fallout-related radiation exposures. By sub-population, the projected proportion of cancers attributable to radiation from fallout from all nuclear tests conducted in the Marshall Islands is 55% (28% to 69%) among 82 persons exposed in 1954 on Rongelap and Ailinginae, 10% (2.4% to 22%) for 157 persons exposed on Utrik, and 2.2% (0.5% to 4.8%) and 0.8% (0.2% to 1.8%), respectively, for the much larger populations exposed in mid-latitude locations including Kwajalein and in southern locations including Majuro. By cancer type, point estimates of attributable risk varied, by location, between 12% and 95% for thyroid cancer, between 2% and 78% for leukemia, and

  19. PROJECTED LIFETIME CANCER RISKS FROM EXPOSURE TO REGIONAL RADIOACTIVE FALLOUT IN THE MARSHALL ISLANDS

    PubMed Central

    Land, Charles E.; Bouville, Andre; Apostoaei, Iulian; Simon, Steven L.

    2013-01-01

    Radioactive fallout from nuclear test detonations during 1946–1958 at Bikini and Enewetak atolls in the Marshall Islands (MI) exposed populations living elsewhere in the archipelago. A comprehensive analysis, presented in seven companion papers, has produced estimates of tissue-specific radiation absorbed dose to MI residents at all historically inhabited atolls from internal (ingested) and external radioactive components of fallout, by calendar year, and by age of the population at time of exposure. The present report deals, for the first time, with the implications of these doses on cancer risk among exposed members of the MI population. Radiation doses differed by geographic location and year of birth, and radiation-related cancer risk depends upon age at exposure and age at observation for risk. Using dose-response models based on committee reports published by the National Research Council and the National Institutes of Health, we project that, during the lifetimes of members of the MI population potentially exposed to ionizing radiation from weapons test fallout deposited during the testing period (1948–1958) and from residual radioactive sources during the subsequent 12 years (1959–1970), perhaps 1.6% (with 90% uncertainty range 0.4% and 3.4%) of all cancers might be attributable to fallout-related radiation exposures. The projected proportion of cancers attributable to radiation from fallout from all nuclear tests conducted in the Marshall Islands is 55% (28%–69%) among 82 persons exposed in 1954 on Rongelap and Ailinginae, 10% (2%–22%) for 157 persons exposed on Utrik, and 2% (0.5%–5%) and 1% (0.2%–2%), respectively, for the much larger populations exposed in mid-latitude locations including Kwajalein and in southern locations including Majuro. By cancer type, point estimates of attributable risk varied by location, between 12% and 95% for thyroid cancer, between 2% and 78% for leukemia, and between 1% and 55% for all cancers combined. The

  20. Projected lifetime cancer risks from exposure to regional radioactive fallout in the Marshall Islands.

    PubMed

    Land, Charles E; Bouville, André; Apostoaei, Iulian; Simon, Steven L

    2010-08-01

    Radioactive fallout from nuclear test detonations during 1946-1958 at Bikini and Enewetak Atolls in the Marshall Islands (MI) exposed populations living elsewhere in the MI archipelago. A comprehensive analysis, presented in seven companion papers, has produced estimates of tissue-specific radiation absorbed dose to MI residents at all historically inhabited atolls from internal (ingested) and external irradiation resulting from exposure to radioactive fallout, by calendar year, and by age of the population at time of exposure. The present report deals, for the first time, with the implications of these doses for cancer risk among exposed members of the MI population. Radiation doses differed by geographic location and year of birth, and radiation-related cancer risk depends upon age at exposure and age at observation for risk. Using dose-response models based on committee reports published by the National Research Council and the National Institutes of Health, we project that, during the lifetimes of members of the MI population potentially exposed to ionizing radiation from weapons test fallout deposited during the testing period (1948-1958) and from residual radioactive sources during the subsequent 12 y (1959-1970), perhaps 1.6% (with 90% uncertainty range 0.4% to 3.4%) of all cancers might be attributable to fallout-related radiation exposures. By sub-population, the projected proportion of cancers attributable to radiation from fallout from all nuclear tests conducted in the Marshall Islands is 55% (28% to 69%) among 82 persons exposed in 1954 on Rongelap and Ailinginae, 10% (2.4% to 22%) for 157 persons exposed on Utrik, and 2.2% (0.5% to 4.8%) and 0.8% (0.2% to 1.8%), respectively, for the much larger populations exposed in mid-latitude locations including Kwajalein and in southern locations including Majuro. By cancer type, point estimates of attributable risk varied, by location, between 12% and 95% for thyroid cancer, between 2% and 78% for leukemia, and

  1. Hypermethylation of p16 and DAPK promoter gene regions in patients with non-invasive urinary bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jabłonowski, Zbigniew; Reszka, Edyta; Gromadzińska, Jolanta; Wąsowicz, Wojciech; Sosnowski, Marek

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study was to examine the frequency of methylation status in promoter regions of p16 and DAPK genes in patients with non-invasive bladder cancer. Material and methods Forty-two patients (92.9% men, 73.8% smokers, 71.4% T1G1, 19.1% T1G2, 9.5% T1G3) and 36 healthy controls were studied. Isolation of genomic DNA from blood serum and methylation-specific PCR (MSP) were applied. Methylation status – methylated and unmethylated promoter regions of p16 and DAPK genes were analysed. Results Seventeen out of 42 patients (40.5%) had the methylated p16 gene, while methylation of the DAPK gene was seen in 27 of 42 cases (64.3%). In 12 patients (28.6%) both analysed genes were methylated. A statistically significant (p = 0.046) higher frequency of DAPK gene methylation (71.4%) was observed in patients with lower grade (G1) bladder cancer. Conclusions Detection of the aberrant hypermethylation of DAPK and p16 genes in blood DNA from non-invasive bladder cancer patients might offer an effective means for earlier auxiliary diagnosis of the malignancy. PMID:22295037

  2. Human Papillomavirus as a Diagnostic and Prognostic Tool in Cancer of Unknown Primary in the Head and Neck Region.

    PubMed

    Sivars, Lars; Tani, Edneia; Näsman, Anders; Ramqvist, Torbjörn; Munck-Wikland, Eva; Dalianis, Tina

    2016-02-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is recognized as a risk factor for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (SCC), especially tonsillar and base of tongue cancer. Furthermore, HPV-positive tonsillar and base of tongue SCC have a significantly better prognosis than their HPV-negative counterparts and head and neck cancer (HNSCC) in general. HPV has recently also been implicated in cancer of unknown primary (CUP) in the head and neck region, where a primary tumour is not found despite extensive workup. Using fine-needle aspiration cytology to determine CUP HPV status in cervical lymph nodes could be of advantage, since it is minimally invasive and it is assumed that an HPV-positive lymph node metastasis likely has an HPV-positive otopharyngeal SCC origin. We review the current knowledge of HPV in HNSCC, with an emphasis on CUP of the head and neck region, its relation to oropharyngeal, tonsillar and base of tongue SCC and implications of HPV status for diagnosis, prognosis and treatment.

  3. Linkage to markers for the chromosome region 17q12-q21 in 13 Dutch breast cancer kindreds

    SciTech Connect

    Devilee, P.; Cornelis, R.S.; Bardoel, A.; Vliet, M. van; Leeuwen, I. van; Cleton, F.J.; Vasen, H.F.A.; Cornelisse, C.J.; Meera Khan, P. ); Bootsma, A.; Klein, A. de; Lindhout, D. )

    1993-04-01

    The authors have performed linkage analysis with five markers for the chromosome region 17q12-q21 in 13 Dutch breast cancer kindreds in order to find support for the claim by Hall et al. that a gene in this region, termed [open quotes]BRCA1,[close quotes] is associated with predisposition to early-onset familial breast cancer. This work is part of a collaborative study, the results of which are published elsewhere in this issue. Best evidence for linkage was observed with the marker CMM86 (D17S74) in pedigrees with an average age at onset of [le]47 years (LOD score = 1.77 at 1% recombination). In one breast-ovarian cancer family with a high probability of being linked to 17q, they observed one putative recombinant between D17S250 and D17S579, which suggests that BRCA1 is proximal to D17S579. 32 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Association between a single nucleotide polymorphism in the TP53 region and risk of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Xi, Yanni; Liu, Congrong; Xin, Xiaoyan

    2014-12-01

    TP53 is known as a tumor suppressor gene involved in cell cycle regulation. Many previous epidemiological and clinical studies have evaluated the effects of rs1042522 polymorphism on risk of ovarian cancer. But the results are conflicting and heterogeneous. The primary objective of this study was to examine whether rs1042522 polymorphism is associated with ovarian cancer risk. We performed a comprehensive meta-analysis of 19 case-control studies that analyzed rs1042522 polymorphism in ovarian cancer risk. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated using distinct genetic models. Heterogeneity between studies was detected by the χ(2)-based Q test. Additional analyses such as sensitivity analyses and publication bias were also performed. The rs1042522 polymorphism was not overall associated with ovarian cancer risk. But there was a borderline association in the heterozygote model (OR = 1.09, 95 % CI 0.99-1.21). Similar effects were observed in the subgroup of Caucasian population (the heterozygote model: OR = 1.11, 95 % CI 1.00-1.24). No significant heterogeneity and publication bias were revealed in this meta-analysis. This study provides statistical evidence that TP53 rs1042522 polymorphism may play a role in modulating risk of ovarian cancer. This observation requires further analysis of a larger study size.

  5. USING SOCIAL NETWORK ANALYSIS TO EVALUATE COMMUNITY CAPACITY BUILDING OF A REGIONAL COMMUNITY CANCER NETWORK

    PubMed Central

    Luque, John; Tyson, Dinorah Martinez; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Gwede, Clement; Vadaparampil, Susan; Noel-Thomas, Shalewa; Meade, Cathy

    2013-01-01

    The Tampa Bay Community Cancer Network (TBCCN) is one of 25 Community Network Programs funded by the National Cancer Institute’s (NCI’s) Center to Reduce Cancer Health Disparities with the objectives to create a collaborative infrastructure of academic and community based organizations and to develop effective and sustainable interventions to reduce cancer health disparities. In order to describe the network characteristics of the TBCCN as part of our ongoing evaluation efforts, we conducted social network analysis surveys with our community partners in 2007 and 2008. One key finding showed that the mean trust value for the 20 community partners in the study increased from 1.8 to 2.1 (p<0.01), suggesting a trend toward increased trust in the network. These preliminary results suggest that TBCCN has led to greater collaboration among the community partners that were formed through its capacity-building and evidence-based dissemination activities for impacting cancer health disparities at the community level. PMID:24049217

  6. Specific cancer-associated mutations in the switch III region of Ras increase tumorigenicity by nanocluster augmentation

    PubMed Central

    Šolman, Maja; Ligabue, Alessio; Blaževitš, Olga; Jaiswal, Alok; Zhou, Yong; Liang, Hong; Lectez, Benoit; Kopra, Kari; Guzmán, Camilo; Härmä, Harri; Hancock, John F; Aittokallio, Tero; Abankwa, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Hotspot mutations of Ras drive cell transformation and tumorigenesis. Less frequent mutations in Ras are poorly characterized for their oncogenic potential. Yet insight into their mechanism of action may point to novel opportunities to target Ras. Here, we show that several cancer-associated mutations in the switch III region moderately increase Ras activity in all isoforms. Mutants are biochemically inconspicuous, while their clustering into nanoscale signaling complexes on the plasma membrane, termed nanocluster, is augmented. Nanoclustering dictates downstream effector recruitment, MAPK-activity, and tumorigenic cell proliferation. Our results describe an unprecedented mechanism of signaling protein activation in cancer. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08905.001 PMID:26274561

  7. Fine mapping of chromosome 10q deletions in mycosis fungoides and sezary syndrome: identification of two discrete regions of deletion at 10q23.33-24.1 and 10q24.33-25.1.

    PubMed

    Wain, E Mary; Mitchell, Tracey J; Russell-Jones, Robin; Whittaker, Sean J

    2005-02-01

    Previous cytogenetic studies in mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sezary syndrome (SS) have identified a large and poorly defined area of chromosomal deletion on chromosome 10q. We report an extensive fine-mapping allelotyping study using 19 microsatellite markers in the region 10q22.3-10q26.13. Allelic loss was identified by loss of heterozygosity analysis in 26 of 60 (43%) cases: 15 of 45 (33%) with MF and 11 of 15 (73%) with SS. MF and SS samples showed similar patterns of allelic loss with the identification of two discrete regions of deletion which were mutually exclusive in all but two cases. Within the first region of deletion at 10q23.33-10q24.1, around microsatellite marker D10S185 (2.77 Mb), 23 genes were identified, including three (KIF11, HHEX, and HELLS) with functions that, if dysregulated, could be critical in MF and SS. The second region of deletion, 10q24.33-10q25.1, around microsatellite marker D10S530 (3.92 Mb), encodes 11 genes, the majority of which have poorly identified functions. This extensive allelotyping study provides the basis for future highly selective candidate gene analyses.

  8. Characterization of Dielectric Responses of Human Cancer Cells in the Terahertz Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraga, Keiichiro; Ogawa, Yuichi; Suzuki, Tetsuhito; Kondo, Naoshi; Irisawa, Akiyoshi; Imamura, Motoki

    2014-05-01

    Terahertz time-domain attenuated total reflection spectroscopy, in combination with a two-interface model, is used to determine the complex dielectric constants of cultured human cancer cells (DLD-1, HEK293 and HeLa). Picosecond and sub-picosecond water dynamics are dominant in the measured complex dielectric constants of these cells. We demonstrate that dielectric responses below 1.0 THz best characterize the particular water dynamics of cancer cells when compared with extracellular water. Debye-Lorentz fitting revealed that this is due to a significantly attenuated slow relaxation mode and enhanced fast relaxation mode of the water in these cancer cells. These findings could lead to a new procedure to digitally evaluate cellular activities or functions, in terms of intracellular water dynamics, and remove the veil from the mysterious intracellular milieu.

  9. Prognostic impact of c-MET polymorphism on clinical outcome in loco-regional gastric cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Sunakawa, Yu; Wakatsuki, Takeru; Yang, Dongyun; Zhang, Wu; Ning, Yan; Stintzing, Sebastian; Stremitzer, Stefan; Yamauchi, Shinichi; Sebio, Ana; El-khoueiry, Rita; Iqbal, Syma; Afsaneh, Barzi; Gerger, Armin; Stotz, Michael; Azuma, Mizutomo; Watanabe, Masahiko; Koizumi, Wasaburo; Lenz, Heinz-Josef

    2014-01-01

    Objective Dysregulation of c-MET signaling pathway results from various molecular mechanisms including mutations, amplification, and overexpression. Overexpression and amplification of c-MET have been correlated with poor clinical outcome in gastric cancer, whereas the associations between c-MET polymorphisms and prognosis have not been well defined. We examined the prognostic impact of functional polymorphisms of MET gene on clinical outcome in gastric cancer. Methods Candidate polymorphisms of MET gene were analyzed by PCR-based direct sequencing for the associations with clinical outcome across three independent cohorts, including 161 Japanese, 101 U.S. and 63 Austrian patients, with loco-regional gastric cancer treated with surgery. Results The univariable analysis showed patients with any G (A/G or G/G genotype) allele of MET rs40239 had significantly longer disease-free survival and overall survival compared to those with the AA genotype in the Japanese cohort (HR: 0.43; P=0.001, HR: 0.47; P=0.006, respectively); this remained significant upon multivariable analysis adjusted for age, sex, stage, and type of adjuvant therapy (HR: 0.48; P=0.009, HR: 0.50; P=0.017, respectively). However, there was no significant association of the polymorphism with clinical outcome in the U.S. and Austrian cohort. When stratified by gender in the Japanese cohort, males, but not females, with the G allele maintained a clinical outcome benefit in both univariable and multivariable analysis. Conclusions The MET rs40239 may serve as a prognostic biomarker in loco-regional gastric cancer. These data also suggest that genetic variants of the c-MET may have a gender-related difference in the impact on clinical outcome. PMID:25203738

  10. Relationships among Internet health information use, patient behavior and self efficacy in newly diagnosed cancer patients who contact the National Cancer Institute's NCI Atlantic Region Cancer Information Service (CIS).

    PubMed Central

    Fleisher, Linda; Bass, Sarah; Ruzek, Sheryl Burt; McKeown-Conn, Nancy

    2002-01-01

    This NCI funded study examined the relationship between the use of Internet health information by people newly diagnosed with cancer (N=500), with patient task behavior and perceived self efficacy. Study variables were compared among Direct users of Internet health information (people using the Internet themselves), Indirect users of Internet health information (people receiving Internet health information from friends or family members), and Non-users of Internet health information (people not using the Internet or receiving health information from the Internet). The subjects were recruited from persons who called the Atlantic Region of the NCI's Cancer Information Service (CIS), located at Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia, PA. Follow up phone interviews were done with participants six weeks after initial contact to assess impact of the use of the Internet on perceived patient task behavior and self efficacy. Results show significant relationships between Internet use and all study variables. PMID:12463827

  11. Sparing the region of the salivary gland containing stem cells preserves saliva production after radiotherapy for head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    van Luijk, Peter; Pringle, Sarah; Deasy, Joseph O; Moiseenko, Vitali V; Faber, Hette; Hovan, Allan; Baanstra, Mirjam; van der Laan, Hans P; Kierkels, Roel G J; van der Schaaf, Arjen; Witjes, Max J; Schippers, Jacobus M; Brandenburg, Sytze; Langendijk, Johannes A; Wu, Jonn; Coppes, Robert P

    2015-09-16

    Each year, 500,000 patients are treated with radiotherapy for head and neck cancer, resulting in relatively high survival rates. However, in 40% of patients, quality of life is severely compromised because of radiation-induced impairment of salivary gland function and consequent xerostomia (dry mouth). New radiation treatment technologies enable sparing of parts of the salivary glands. We have determined the parts of the major salivary gland, the parotid gland, that need to be spared to ensure that the gland continues to produce saliva after irradiation treatment. In mice, rats, and humans, we showed that stem and progenitor cells reside in the region of the parotid gland containing the major ducts. We demonstrated in rats that inclusion of the ducts in the radiation field led to loss of regenerative capacity, resulting in long-term gland dysfunction with reduced saliva production. Then we showed in a cohort of patients with head and neck cancer that the radiation dose to the region of the salivary gland containing the stem/progenitor cells predicted the function of the salivary glands one year after radiotherapy. Finally, we showed that this region of the salivary gland could be spared during radiotherapy, thus reducing the risk of post-radiotherapy xerostomia.

  12. Sparing the region of the salivary gland containing stem cells preserves saliva production after radiotherapy for head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    van Luijk, Peter; Pringle, Sarah; Deasy, Joseph O; Moiseenko, Vitali V; Faber, Hette; Hovan, Allan; Baanstra, Mirjam; van der Laan, Hans P; Kierkels, Roel G J; van der Schaaf, Arjen; Witjes, Max J; Schippers, Jacobus M; Brandenburg, Sytze; Langendijk, Johannes A; Wu, Jonn; Coppes, Robert P

    2015-09-16

    Each year, 500,000 patients are treated with radiotherapy for head and neck cancer, resulting in relatively high survival rates. However, in 40% of patients, quality of life is severely compromised because of radiation-induced impairment of salivary gland function and consequent xerostomia (dry mouth). New radiation treatment technologies enable sparing of parts of the salivary glands. We have determined the parts of the major salivary gland, the parotid gland, that need to be spared to ensure that the gland continues to produce saliva after irradiation treatment. In mice, rats, and humans, we showed that stem and progenitor cells reside in the region of the parotid gland containing the major ducts. We demonstrated in rats that inclusion of the ducts in the radiation field led to loss of regenerative capacity, resulting in long-term gland dysfunction with reduced saliva production. Then we showed in a cohort of patients with head and neck cancer that the radiation dose to the region of the salivary gland containing the stem/progenitor cells predicted the function of the salivary glands one year after radiotherapy. Finally, we showed that this region of the salivary gland could be spared during radiotherapy, thus reducing the risk of post-radiotherapy xerostomia. PMID:26378247

  13. Sparing the region of the salivary gland containing stem cells preserves saliva production after radiotherapy for head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    van Luijk, Peter; Pringle, Sarah; Deasy, Joseph O.; Moiseenko, Vitali V.; Faber, Hette; Hovan, Allan; Baanstra, Mirjam; van der Laan, Hans P.; Kierkels, Roel G. J.; van der Schaaf, Arjen; Witjes, Max J.; Schippers, Jacobus M.; Brandenburg, Sytze; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Wu, Jonn; Coppes, Robert P.

    2016-01-01

    Each year, 500,000 patients are treated with radiotherapy for head and neck cancer, resulting in relatively high survival rates. However, in 40% of patients, quality of life is severely compromised because of radiation-induced impairment of salivary gland function and consequent xerostomia (dry mouth). New radiation treatment technologies enable sparing of parts of the salivary glands. We have determined the parts of the major salivary gland, the parotid gland, that need to be spared to ensure that the gland continues to produce saliva after irradiation treatment. In mice, rats, and humans, we showed that stem and progenitor cells reside in the region of the parotid gland containing the major ducts. We demonstrated in rats that inclusion of the ducts in the radiation field led to loss of regenerative capacity, resulting in long-term gland dysfunction with reduced saliva production. Then we showed in a cohort of patients with head and neck cancer that the radiation dose to the region of the salivary gland containing the stem/progenitor cells predicted the function of the salivary glands one year after radiotherapy. Finally, we showed that this region of the salivary gland could be spared during radiotherapy, thus reducing the risk of post-radiotherapy xerostomia. PMID:26378247

  14. Imaging of primary and regionally metastatic lung cancer with Tc-99m SESTAMIBI

    SciTech Connect

    Akansel, G.; Liu, Y.; Uygur, G.A.

    1994-05-01

    The significance of pulmonary, hilar, and mediastinal uptake of Tc-99m SESTAMIBI in patients undergoing myocardial perfusion imaging was retrospectively investigated. SPECT myocardial perfusion images for 34 adult patients (ages: 52-to-82 years) with known lung cancer undergoing preoperative assessment of cardiac status and 29 {open_quotes}control{close_quotes} patients with normal chest radiographs and no history of lung cancer were reviewed. For the 29 patients without lung cancer there was no abnormal pulmonary, hilar, or mediastinal uptake of Tc-99m SESTAMIBI. For the 34 patients with histologically proven lung cancer, Tc-99m SESTAMIBI uptake was detected in 27 of 34 primary pulmonary lesions (79% sensitivity), 2 of 4 surgically proven hilar metastases, and 1 of 4 mediastinal metastases. The smallest lesion detected was 1.0 cm in diameter and the largest lesion not detected was 5.5 cm in diameter. For squamous cell carcinoma, 20 of 22 primary lesions were detected (91% sensitivity). Tc-99m SESTAMIBI detected 5 of 34 primary pulmonary lesions, 2 of 4 hilar metasteses, and 1 of 4 mediastinal metastases not identified by conventional chest radiographs. CT was superior to Tc-99m SESTAMIBI for detection of primary pulmonary lesions and was similar to Tc-99m SESTAMIBI in the limited number of cases with hilar and mediastinal metastatic involvement. We conclude that abnormal pulmonary, hilar, or mediastinal uptake of Tc-99m SESTAMIBI may be a clinically significant finding which should be correlated with chest radiography or CT.

  15. Genetics and Genetic Biomarkers in Sporadic Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Carethers, John M.; Jung, Barbara H.

    2015-01-01

    Sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC) is a somatic genetic disease in which pathogenesis is influenced by the local colonic environment and the patient’s genetic background. Consolidating the knowledge of genetic and epigenetic events that occur with initiation, progression, and metastasis of sporadic CRC has identified some biomarkers that might be utilized to predict behavior and prognosis beyond staging, and inform treatment approaches. Modern next generation sequencing of sporadic CRCs has confirmed prior identified genetic alterations, and has classified new alterations. Each patient’s CRC is genetically unique, propelled by 2 to 8 driver gene alterations that have accumulated within the CRC since initiation. Commonly observed alterations across sporadic CRCs have allowed classification into a: (1) hypermutated group that includes defective DNA mismatch repair with microsatellite instability (MSI) and POLE mutations in ~15%, containing multiple frameshifted genes and BRAFV600E; (2) non-hypermutated group with multiple somatic copy number alterations and aneuploidy in ~85%, containing oncogenic activation of KRAS and PIK3CA and mutation and loss of heterozygosity of tumor suppressor genes such as APC and TP53; (3) CpG Island Methylator Phenotype CRCs in ~20% that overlap greatly with MSI CRCs and some non-hypermutated CRCs; and (4) elevated microsatellite alterations at selected tetranucleotide repeats (EMAST) in ~60% that associates with metastatic behavior in both hypermutated and non-hypermutated groups. Components from these classifications are now used as diagnostic, prognostic and treatment biomarkers. Additional common biomarkers may come from genome-wide association studies and microRNAs among other sources, as well as from the unique alteration profile of an individual CRC to apply a precision medicine approach to care. PMID:26216840

  16. The prevalence of BRCA1/2 mutations of triple-negative breast cancer patients in Xinjiang multiple ethnic region of China

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The screening of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations is now an established component of risk evaluation and management of familial breast cancer, early-onset breast cancer and bilateral breast cancer patients. There is still some controversy about whether this screening should be done in triple-negative breast cancers. Therefore, we evaluated the BRCA mutation prevalence in patients with triple-negative breast cancer in a multi-ethnic region of China. Methods A total 96 women who were diagnosed with triple-negative breast cancer in the Xinjiang region of China were enrolled in this study. BRCA1 and BRCA2 screening was performed by polymerase chain reaction-denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (PCR-DHPLC) sequencing analysis. All mutations were confirmed with direct sequencing. Results The prevalence of a BRCA1/2 germline mutation was about 25% (24/96) in the Xinjiang region of China. Among 35 selected cases with a family history and/or bilateral breast cancers, the BRCA1/2 mutation prevalence was 25.7% (9/35). Of the remaining 61 patients with unselected triple-negative breast cancer, the BRCA1/2 mutation prevalence was 24.6% (15/61), and all 15 individuals with these mutations were premenopausal patients. Conclusions These results suggest that premenopausal women with triple-negative breast cancer may be candidates for genetic testing for BRCA1/2 in the Xinjiang region of China, even in the absence of a family history or bilateral breast cancer. PMID:24961674

  17. Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms ... be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors ...

  18. DNA Methylome of Familial Breast Cancer Identifies Distinct Profiles Defined by Mutation Status

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan, James M.; Cocciardi, Sibylle; Waddell, Nic; Johnstone, Cameron N.; Marsh, Anna; Henderson, Stephen; Simpson, Peter; da Silva, Leonard; Khanna, Kumkum; Lakhani, Sunil; Boshoff, Chris; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2010-01-01

    It is now understood that epigenetic alterations occur frequently in sporadic breast carcinogenesis, but little is known about the epigenetic alterations associated with familial breast tumors. We performed genome-wide DNA-methylation profiling on familial breast cancers (n = 33) to identify patterns of methylation specific to the different mutation groups (BRCA1, BRCA2, and BRCAx) or intrinsic subtypes of breast cancer (basal, luminal A, luminal B, HER2-amplified, and normal-like). We used methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP) on Affymetrix promoter chips to interrogate methylation profiles across 25,500 distinct transcripts. Using a support vector machine classification algorithm, we demonstrated that genome-wide methylation profiles predicted tumor mutation status with estimated error rates of 19% (BRCA1), 31% (BRCA2), and 36% (BRCAx) but did not accurately predict the intrinsic subtypes defined by gene expression. Furthermore, using unsupervised hierarchical clustering, we identified a distinct subgroup of BRCAx tumors defined by methylation profiles. We validated these findings in the 33 tumors in the test set, as well as in an independent validation set of 47 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded familial breast tumors, by pyrosequencing and Epityper. Finally, gene-expression profiling and SNP CGH array previously performed on the same samples allowed full integration of methylation, gene-expression, and copy-number data sets, revealing frequent hypermethylation of genes that also displayed loss of heterozygosity, as well as of genes that show copy-number gains, providing a potential mechanism for expression dosage compensation. Together, these data show that methylation profiles for familial breast cancers are defined by the mutation status and are distinct from the intrinsic subtypes. PMID:20206335

  19. A Mouse Model That Reproduces the Developmental Pathways and Site Specificity of the Cancers Associated With the Human BRCA1 Mutation Carrier State

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Yen, Hai-Yun; Austria, Theresa; Pettersson, Jonas; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Maxson, Robert; Widschwendter, Martin; Dubeau, Louis

    2015-01-01

    Predisposition to breast and extrauterine Müllerian carcinomas in BRCA1 mutation carriers is due to a combination of cell-autonomous consequences of BRCA1 inactivation on cell cycle homeostasis superimposed on cell-nonautonomous hormonal factors magnified by the effects of BRCA1 mutations on hormonal changes associated with the menstrual cycle. We used the Müllerian inhibiting substance type 2 receptor (Mis2r) promoter and a truncated form of the Follicle stimulating hormone receptor (Fshr) promoter to introduce conditional knockouts of Brca1 and p53 not only in mouse mammary and Müllerian epithelia, but also in organs that control the estrous cycle. Sixty percent of the double mutant mice developed invasive Müllerian and mammary carcinomas. Mice carrying heterozygous mutations in Brca1 and p53 also developed invasive tumors, albeit at a lesser (30%) rate, in which the wild type alleles were no longer present due to loss of heterozygosity. While mice carrying heterozygous mutations in both genes developed mammary tumors, none of the mice carrying only a heterozygous p53 mutation developed such tumors (P < 0.0001), attesting to a role for Brca1 mutations in tumor development. This mouse model is attractive to investigate cell-nonautonomous mechanisms associated with cancer predisposition in BRCA1 mutation carriers and to investigate the merit of chemo-preventive drugs targeting such mechanisms. PMID:26629527

  20. Molecular characterization, homology modeling and docking studies of the R2787H missense variation in BRCA2 gene: Association with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Riahi, Aouatef; Messaoudi, Abdelmonem; Mrad, Ridha; Fourati, Asma; Chabouni-Bouhamed, Habiba; Kharrat, Maher

    2016-08-21

    The significance of many BRCA unclassified variants (UVs) has not been evaluated. Classification of these variations as neutral or pathogenic presents a significant challenge and has important implications for breast and ovarian cancer genetic counseling. Here we report a combined molecular and computational approach to classify BRCA UVs missense variations. By using the LOH (Loss of heterozygosity) analysis at the BRCA1/BRCA2 loci, five bioinformatics approaches namely fathmm, PhD-SNP, SNAP, MutationTaster and Human Splicing Finder and the association with the clinico-pathological characteristics related to BRCA tumors, we were able to classify the R2787H (in BRCA2 gene) variant as pathogenic. Then, to investigate the functional role of the R2787H variation in altering BRCA2 structure, the homology model of this variant was constructed using the Rattus norvegicus BRCA2 (PDB ID: 1IYJ) as a template. The predicted model was then assessed for stereochemical quality and side chain environment. Furthermore, docking and binding free energy simulations were performed to investigate the ssDNA-BRCA2 complex interaction. Binding energy value calculation proves that this substitution affects the complex stability. Moreover, this alteration was not found in one hundred healthy controls. These findings suggest that R2787H variant could have potential functional impact. Our approach might be useful for evaluation of BRCA unclassified variants. However additional functional analyzes may provide appropriate assessment to classify such variants. PMID:27211102

  1. A Mouse Model That Reproduces the Developmental Pathways and Site Specificity of the Cancers Associated With the Human BRCA1 Mutation Carrier State.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Yen, Hai-Yun; Austria, Theresa; Pettersson, Jonas; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Maxson, Robert; Widschwendter, Martin; Dubeau, Louis

    2015-10-01

    Predisposition to breast and extrauterine Müllerian carcinomas in BRCA1 mutation carriers is due to a combination of cell-autonomous consequences of BRCA1 inactivation on cell cycle homeostasis superimposed on cell-nonautonomous hormonal factors magnified by the effects of BRCA1 mutations on hormonal changes associated with the menstrual cycle. We used the Müllerian inhibiting substance type 2 receptor (Mis2r) promoter and a truncated form of the Follicle stimulating hormone receptor (Fshr) promoter to introduce conditional knockouts of Brca1 and p53 not only in mouse mammary and Müllerian epithelia, but also in organs that control the estrous cycle. Sixty percent of the double mutant mice developed invasive Müllerian and mammary carcinomas. Mice carrying heterozygous mutations in Brca1 and p53 also developed invasive tumors, albeit at a lesser (30%) rate, in which the wild type alleles were no longer present due to loss of heterozygosity. While mice carrying heterozygous mutations in both genes developed mammary tumors, none of the mice carrying only a heterozygous p53 mutation developed such tumors (P < 0.0001), attesting to a role for Brca1 mutations in tumor development. This mouse model is attractive to investigate cell-nonautonomous mechanisms associated with cancer predisposition in BRCA1 mutation carriers and to investigate the merit of chemo-preventive drugs targeting such mechanisms.

  2. Factors Influencing Compliance to Radical Treatment of Middle Thoracic Esophageal Cancer: An Audit from a Regional Cancer Centre

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Rakesh; Bansal, Anshuma; Kumar, Shikhar; Miriyala, Ravi Teja

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study is to identify the factors responsible for interruption of planned treatment in patients of carcinoma mid-thoracic esophagus and also discuss the strategies for improving treatment completion rates. Materials and Methods: Patients with nonmetastatic mid-thoracic esophageal cancer who received treatment by multimodality approach using chemotherapy, radiation, and/or surgery were retrospectively analyzed. Factors influencing compliance with planned treatment completion were evaluated, and their significance was determined using multivariate Cox regression analysis. Results: Ninety-one patients were reviewed. Median follow-up period was 11 months. Of 15 patients planned with neoadjuvant chemoradiation followed by surgery (Group 1), only 6 (40%) could complete the treatment. Similarly, only 19 out of 36 patients (52.8%) completed the planned definitive chemoradiation (Group 2). Furthermore, of forty patients planned with definitive radiotherapy (Group 3), 29 patients only (72.5%) completed this schedule. The rate of completion of therapy was worst in Group 1. The most common reason for noncompletion of planned treatment was nutritional inadequacy and excessive weight loss in all groups. In addition, chemotherapy-induced myelosuppression (P = 0.05) was the factor leading to treatment interruption in Group 2 and radiation-induced acute mucositis (P = 0.02) and lost to follow-up (P = 0.02) were the factors in Group 3. Conclusions: Rate of treatment completion significantly impacts survival rates. Nutritional inadequacy was the most common factor for noncompletion of planned treatment. A well-trained management team consisting of oncologist, dietitian, and psychotherapist can help overcome these factors and thereby improve the treatment completion rates. PMID:27559257

  3. Detection of isolated ipsilateral regional lymph node recurrences by F18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-CT in follow-up of postoperative breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Ohsumi, Shozo; Inoue, Takeshi; Kiyoto, Sachiko; Hara, Fumikata; Takahashi, Mina; Takabatake, Daisuke; Takashima, Seiki; Aogi, Kenjiro; Takashima, Shigemitsu

    2011-11-01

    Imaging diagnostic methods except for mammograms are not recommended for follow-up of postoperative breast cancer patients in order to detect small recurrences because of the poor survival improvement in earlier randomized trials. However, the use of new imaging modalities may improve survival by detection of small isolated regional lymph node recurrences which are potentially curable. Between April 2006 and December 2008, we used PET-CT to find small recurrences in follow-up of 1,907 postoperative breast cancer patients. A total of 3,280 PET-CT imagings were performed. The median age at PET-CT imaging was 58 years, with a median 48-month interval from definitive surgery to the PET-CT imaging. Twenty-two patients were found to have isolated ipsilateral regional recurrences only by PET-CT (axillary node recurrences in 6, infraclavicular node recurrences in 5, supraclavicular node recurrences in 6, and parasternal node recurrences in 5). All of those recurrences were missed by palpation or were nonpalpable. The pathological lymph node status at the definitive surgery for the primary breast cancer of 22 patients with the isolated ipsilateral regional lymph node recurrences was positive in 17 patients. If patients are limited to those who had pathologically positive node(s) at definitive surgery, the incidence of patients with isolated regional lymph node recurrences found only by PET-CT would be 2.6% (17/663 patients). Seventeen other asymptomatic cancers including contralateral breast cancers were found only by PET-CT. Early detection of isolated loco-regional recurrences of breast cancer is suggested to result in improved survival. Therefore, the use of PET-CT in follow-up of postoperative node-positive breast cancer patients may improve their survival because of early detection of isolated regional lymph node recurrences which are still potentially curable, and screening of other asymptomatic cancers. PMID:21590272

  4. Polymorphisms in regulatory regions of Cyclooxygenase-2 gene and breast cancer risk in Brazilians: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is up-regulated in several types of cancer, and it is hypothesized that COX-2 expression may be genetically influenced. Here, we evaluate the association between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the COX-2 gene (PTGS2) and the occurrence of breast cancer among Brazilian women. Methods The study was conducted prospectively in two steps: First, we screened the promoter region and three fragments of the 3'-untranslated region of PTGS2 from 67 healthy Brazilians to identify SNPs and to select those with a minor allele frequency (MAF) of at least 0.10. The MAF of these selected SNPs was further characterized in 402 healthy volunteers to evaluate potential differences related to heterogeneous racial admixture and to estimate the existence of linkage disequilibrium among the SNPs. The second step was a case-control study with 318 patients and 273 controls designed to evaluate PTGS2 genotype- or haplotype-associated risk of breast cancer. Results The screening analysis indicated nine SNPs with the following MAFs: rs689465 (0.22), rs689466 (0.15), rs20415 (0.007), rs20417 (0.32), rs20419 (0.015), rs5270 (0.02), rs20424 (0.007), rs5275 (0.22) and rs4648298 (0.01). The SNPs rs689465, rs689466, rs20417 and rs5275 were further studied: Their genotypic distributions followed Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and the MAFs were not affected by gender or skin color. Strong linkage disequilibrium was detected for rs689465, rs20417 and rs5275 in the three possible pairwise combinations. In the case-control study, there was a significant increase of rs5275TC heterozygotes in cases compared to controls (OR = 1.44, 95% CI = 1.01-2.06; P = 0.043), and the haplotype formed by rs689465G, rs689466A, rs20417G and rs5275C was only detected in cases. The apparent association with breast cancer was not confirmed for rs5275CC homozygotes or for the most frequent rs5275C-containing haplotypes. Conclusions Our results indicate no strong association between the

  5. Nanoparticle-Enhanced MRI to Evaluate Radiation Delivery to the Regional Lymphatics for Patients With Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, Shannon M.; Harisinghani, Mukesh G.; Katkar, Amol; Napolitano, Brian; Wolfgang, John; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: At present, radiation (RT) fields are based largely, and often solely, on bony anatomy. Recent efforts have been taken to better define lymphatic regions for RT planning. Lymphotrophic nanoparticle-enhanced MRI (LN-MRI) allows for accurate identification of malignant and benign lymph nodes. We sought to evaluate RT delivery to lymphatics for breast cancer using LN-MRI. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three patients with breast cancer underwent LN-MRI. MRIs were anatomically registered to a reference CT; benign and malignant lymph nodes were contoured. Standard RT fields were planned and dose calculated to prescribe 45-50 Gy. Lymphatic regions were contoured on CT. Coverage of LN-MRI lymph nodes by RT fields and contoured lymphatics were assessed. Results: Eighty-one percent of all lymph nodes defined by LN-MRI were covered by the 45-Gy isodose line; 82% of malignant and 79% of benign. The 50-Gy isodose line only encompassed 60% of LN-MRI defined lymph nodes-64% of malignant and 59% of benign. For nodal volumes contoured in the absence of a margin, 86% of actual lymph nodes were within contoured volumes. When a 5-mm expansion was added, 99% were included. Conclusions: LN-MRI is a useful tool to delineate the location of breast regional lymphatics. These results suggest less than desired coverage of lymph nodes using standard RT fields and that a margin may be advisable when defining nodal volumes by CT. The use of IMRT and RT in lieu of surgery makes accurate definition of the location of breast regional lymphatics of paramount importance.

  6. Reduced aflatoxin exposure presages decline in liver cancer mortality in an endemic region of China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian-Guo; Egner, Patricia A; Ng, Derek; Jacobson, Lisa P; Muñoz, Alvaro; Zhu, Yuan-Rong; Qian, Geng-Sun; Wu, Felicia; Yuan, Jian-Min; Groopman, John D; Kensler, Thomas W

    2013-10-01

    Primary liver cancer (PLC) is the third leading cause of cancer mortality globally. In endemic areas of sub-Saharan Africa and Asia, PLC largely arises from chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) and ingestion of aflatoxins. Although synergistic interactions between these two risk factors have been observed in cohort studies in China, here we determined the impact of agricultural reforms in the 1980s leading to diminished maize consumption and implementation of subsidized universal vaccination against HBV in the 2000s on PLC primary prevention. A population-based cancer registry was used to track PLC mortality in Qidong, China and was compared with the timeline of HBV immunization. Randomly selected serum samples from archived cohort collections from the 1980s to present were analyzed for aflatoxin biomarkers. More than 50% reductions in PLC mortality rates occurred across birth cohorts from the 1960s to the 1980s for Qidongese less than 35 years of age although all were born before universal vaccination of newborns. Median levels of the aflatoxin biomarker decreased from 19.3 pg/mg albumin in 1989 to undetectable (<0.5 pg/mg) by 2009. A population attributable benefit of 65% for reduced PLC mortality was estimated from a government-facilitated switch of dietary staple from maize to rice; 83% of this benefit was in those infected with HBV. Food policy reforms in China resulted in a dramatic decrease in aflatoxin exposure, which, independent of HBV vaccination, reduced liver cancer risk. The extensive HBV vaccine coverage now in place augurs even greater risk reductions in the future.

  7. Physical mapping of chromosome 17p13.3 in the region of a putative tumor suppressor gene important in medulloblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, J.D.; Daneshvar, L.; Willert, J.R.

    1994-09-01

    Deletion mapping of a medulloblastoma tumor panel revealed loss of distal chromosome 17p13.3 sequences in tumors from 14 of 32 patients (44%). Of the 14 tumors showing loss of heterozygosity by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, 14 of 14 (100%) displayed loss of the telomeric marker p144-D6 (D17S34), while a probe for the ABR gene on 17p13.3 was lost in 7 of 8 (88%) informative cases. Using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, we localized the polymorphic marker (VNTR-A) of the ABR gene locus to within 220 kb of the p144-D6 locus. A cosmid contig constructed in this region was used to demonstrate by fluorescence in situ hybridization that the ABR gene is oriented transcriptionally 5{prime} to 3{prime} toward the telomere. This report provides new physical mapping data for the ABR gene, which has not been previously shown to be deleted in medulloblastoma. These results provide further evidence for the existence of a second tumor suppressor gene distinct from p53 on distal chromosome 17p. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Cutaneous leishmaniasis predisposing to human skin cancer: forty years local and regional studies.

    PubMed

    Morsy, Tosson A

    2013-12-01

    Different types of association between leishmaniasis and cancer were established: leishmaniasis mimicking a malignant disorder, such as lymphoma; leishmaniasis arising as a difficult to diagnose and treat infection among patients receiving chemotherapy for various malignant disorders; simultaneous diagnosis of leishmaniasis and a neoplastic disorder in the same tissue samples of immunocompromised patients; and direct involvement of Leishmania spp. in pathogenesis/occurrence of malignant lesions, especially of the skin and mucous membranes. Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is a protozoan skin disease occurring in all the Middle East countries. Only the cutaneous form is a self-curing, which may develop a certain degree of immunity against the parasite, resulting in healing of the lesion(s). However, the parasites probably never disappear completely, since in situations where immune system is compromised, as in AIDS, or suppressed by cancer chemotherapy or in organ transplantation, Leishmania spp. may suddenly reappear. The cell-mediated immunity is responsible for skin lesion healing but humeral response plays a protective role against the disease. Skin biopsies from 65 parasitological proven cutaneous leishmaniasis patients from Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Jordan and Libya were histopathologically studied. The results showed that cutaneous leishmaniasis especially in hot areas pave the way to the mutation and development of skin cancer. PMID:24640863

  9. Advances in dynamic modeling of colorectal cancer signaling-network regions, a path toward targeted therapies

    PubMed Central

    Kolch, Walter; Kholodenko, Boris N.; Ambrosi, Cristina De; Barla, Annalisa; Biganzoli, Elia M.; Nencioni, Alessio; Patrone, Franco; Ballestrero, Alberto; Zoppoli, Gabriele; Verri, Alessandro; Parodi, Silvio

    2015-01-01

    The interconnected network of pathways downstream of the TGFβ, WNT and EGF-families of receptor ligands play an important role in colorectal cancer pathogenesis. We studied and implemented dynamic simulations of multiple downstream pathways and described the section of the signaling network considered as a Molecular Interaction Map (MIM). Our simulations used Ordinary Differential Equations (ODEs), which involved 447 reactants and their interactions. Starting from an initial “physiologic condition”, the model can be adapted to simulate individual pathologic cancer conditions implementing alterations/mutations in relevant onco-proteins. We verified some salient model predictions using the mutated colorectal cancer lines HCT116 and HT29. We measured the amount of MYC and CCND1 mRNAs and AKT and ERK phosphorylated proteins, in response to individual or combination onco-protein inhibitor treatments. Experimental and simulation results were well correlated. Recent independently published results were also predicted by our model. Even in the presence of an approximate and incomplete signaling network information, a predictive dynamic modeling seems already possible. An important long term road seems to be open and can be pursued further, by incremental steps, toward even larger and better parameterized MIMs. Personalized treatment strategies with rational associations of signaling-proteins inhibitors, could become a realistic goal. PMID:25671297

  10. [Which organization for the management of thoracic cancer? Results from a French survey in Rhône-Alpes region].

    PubMed

    Couraud, S; Fournel, P; Moro-Sibilot, D; Pérol, M; Souquet, P-J

    2012-02-01

    This survey, conducted in Rhône-Alpes region (France), aims to better understand the actual conditions of practice in thoracic oncology. A questionnaire was distributed to all oncologists, pulmonologists, radiotherapy physicians and thoracic surgeons in the region. Of 401 questionnaires, the response rate was 56%. Among the responders 46% reported exercising the Thoracic Oncology (TO). Most physicians practicing TO are pulmonologists (62%). The majority (45%) are engaged in secondary hospital or university hospital (27%). However, practitioners with the most important activity exerts in university hospitals and cancer centre (71% of physicians practicing in secondary hospitals and 75% of those in private practice reported to manage fewer than 80 new NSCLC cases per year in structure). Furthermore, 91% are regularly involved in a multidisciplinary team. Radiation oncologist, pulmonologists and thoracic surgeons are assiduous to these meeting; however radiologists and, to a lesser extent, pathologists are less attentive. Moreover, 92% of practitioners belong to cancer networks. Similarly, over one third of working together in a cooperative clinical research institution and nearly half are involved in clinical trials (with nearly half in secondary hospital). These results highlight the reality of practice in Rhône-Alpes and will serve as the basis for coordinating authorities to correct dysfunctions or monitor certain activities of interest (clinical trials).

  11. Comparing the Metal Concentration in the Hair of Cancer Patients and Healthy People Living in the Malwa Region of Punjab, India

    PubMed Central

    Blaurock-Busch, Eleonore; Busch, Yvette M.; Friedle, Albrecht; Buerner, Holger; Parkash, Chander; Kaur, Anudeep

    2014-01-01

    The cancer prevalence in the Malwa region of Punjab (1089/million/year) is much higher than the national average cancer prevalence in India (800/million/year). The participants in the present study were 50 healthy individuals and 49 cancer patients all living in the Malwa region of Punjab, with the healthy people being selected from the same household as the cancer patients. High concentrations of several potentially toxic elements were found in hair samples from people living in Punjab. Compared to standard reference ranges, the metals in excess in both the control and patient groups were aluminium (Al), barium (Ba), manganese (Mn), strontium (Sr) and uranium (U). The most significant findings were high lead (Pb), U and Ba concentrations. The maximum values for Ba, Mn, Pb and U were found in hair from breast cancer patients. The mean concentration of U in hair from the breast cancer patients was 0.63 μg U/g, which is more than double the value found in the control group and over six times higher than the reference range of 0.1 μg U/g. Water, soil, and phosphate fertilizers all seem to play a potential role, causing an increased metal burden in Punjabi people living in the Malwa region. The present study indicates that metals, and especially U, may be a factor in the development of breast cancer among Punjabi women. PMID:24453505

  12. Comparative study on cancer incidence in neighboring regions of Hungary, Austria, Yugoslavia and Czechoslovakia in 1969-1980. Pannonian Tumor Epidemiology Study Group.

    PubMed

    1989-01-01

    The present collaborative study was performed in four confined, neighboring regions of Austria, Hungary, Yugoslavia and Czechoslovakia with different demographic and occupational characteristics of their respective populations, various structures of medical facilities, and cancer registration systems. Crude and age-standardized incidence rates and trends of six major cancer sites (stomach, colorectum and lung in both sexes as well as breast, uterine cervix and uterine body in women) in three 4-year periods (1969-1972, 1973-1976, 1977-1980) were computed and mutually compared in the mentioned regions. Relatively high, different but more or less decreasing incidence rates of stomach, and varying but mainly increasing rates and trends of colorectal cancer were observed, while lung cancer incidence rates and tendencies showed great variations in both sexes. For women, besides continuous increase, the tendencies towards culmination and stabilization were found in regions with the highest incidence rates of breast and uterine body cancer in comparison with the more or less declining rates of uterine cervix cancer over the period studied. The observed different incidence rates and trends of these and obviously of other cancer sites require further investigations using more sophisticated epidemiological methods and approaches.

  13. Income level and regional policies, underlying factors associated with unwarranted variations in conservative breast cancer surgery in Spain

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Geographical variations in medical practice are expected to be small when the evidence about the effectiveness and safety of a particular technology is abundant. This would be the case of the prescription of conservative surgery in breast cancer patients. In these cases, when variation is larger than expected by need, socioeconomic factors have been argued as an explanation. Objectives: Using an ecologic design, our study aims at describing the variability in the use of surgical conservative versus non-conservative treatment. Additionally, it seeks to establish whether the socioeconomic status of the healthcare area influences the use of one or the other technique. Methods 81,868 mastectomies performed between 2002 and 2006 in 180 healthcare areas were studied. Standardized utilization rates of breast cancer conservative (CS) and non-conservative (NCS) procedures were estimated as well as the variation among areas, using small area statistics. Concentration curves and dominance tests were estimated to determine the impact of income and instruction levels in the healthcare area on surgery rates. Multilevel analyses were performed to determine the influence of regional policies. Results Variation in the use of CS was massive (4-fold factor between the highest and the lowest rate) and larger than in the case of NCS (2-fold), whichever the age group. Healthcare areas with higher economic and instruction levels showed highest rates of CS, regardless of the age group, while areas with lower economic and educational levels yielded higher rates of NCS interventions. Living in a particular Autonomous Community (AC), explained a substantial part of the CS residual variance (up to a 60.5% in women 50 to 70). Conclusion The place where a woman lives -income level and regional policies- explain the unexpectedly high variation found in utilization rates of conservative breast cancer surgery. PMID:21504577

  14. Amplifications of chromosomal region 20q13 as a prognostic indicator breast cancer

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Collins, Colin; Pinkel, Daniel; Kallioniemi, Olli-Pekka; Tanner, Minna M.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention relates to in situ hybridization methods for the identification of new chromosomal abnormalities associated with various diseases. In particular, it provides probes which are specific to a region of amplification in chromosome 20.

  15. Amplifications of chromosomal region 20q13 as a prognostic indicator in breast cancer

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Collins, Colin; Pinkel, Daniel; Kallioniemi, Olli-Pekka; Tanner, Minna M.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates to in situ hybridization methods for the identification of new chromosomal abnormalities associated with various diseases. In particular, it provides probes which are specific to a region of amplification in chromosome 20.

  16. [Cancer].

    PubMed

    de la Peña-López, Roberto; Remolina-Bonilla, Yuly Andrea

    2016-09-01

    Cancer is a group of diseases which represents a significant public health problem in Mexico and worldwide. In Mexico neoplasms are the second leading cause of death. An increased morbidity and mortality are expected in the next decades. Several preventable risk factors for cancer development have been identified, the most relevant including tobacco use, which accounts for 30% of the cancer cases; and obesity, associated to another 30%. These factors, in turn, are related to sedentarism, alcohol abuse and imbalanced diets. Some agents are well knokn to cause cancer such as ionizing radiation, viruses such as the papilloma virus (HPV) and hepatitis virus (B and C), and more recently environmental pollution exposure and red meat consumption have been pointed out as carcinogens by the International Agency for Research in Cancer (IARC). The scientific evidence currently available is insufficient to consider milk either as a risk factor or protective factor against different types of cancer. PMID:27603890

  17. Brain cancer mortality in an agricultural and a metropolitan region of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: a population-based, age-period-cohort study, 1996–2010

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Individuals who live in rural areas are at greater risk for brain cancer, and pesticide exposure may contribute to this increased risk. The aims of this research were to analyze the mortality trends and to estimate the age-period-cohort effects on mortality rates from brain cancer in two regions in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Methods This descriptive study examined brain cancer mortality patterns in individuals of both sexes, >19 years of age, who died between 1996 and 2010. They were residents of a rural (Serrana) or a non-rural (Metropolitan) area of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. We estimated mortality trends using Joinpoint Regression analysis. Age-period-cohort models were estimated using Poisson regression analysis. Results The estimated annual percentage change in mortality caused by brain cancer was 3.8% in the Serrana Region (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.8–5.6) and -0.2% (95% CI: -1.2–0.7) in the Metropolitan Region. The results indicated that the relative risk was higher in the rural region for the more recent birth cohorts (1954 and later). Compared with the reference birth cohort (1945–49, Serrana Region), the relative risk was four times higher for individuals born between 1985 and 1989. Conclusions The results of this study indicate that there is an increasing trend in brain cancer mortality rates in the rural Serrana Region in Brazil. A cohort effect occurred in the birth cohorts born in this rural area after 1954. At the ecological level, different environmental factors, especially the use of pesticides, may explain regional disparities in the mortality patterns from brain cancers. PMID:24884498

  18. Model of genetic progression in ovarian cancer with comparative genomic hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Iwabuchi, H.; Sakamoto, M.; Sakunaga, H.

    1994-09-01

    We have performed comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and analysis of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) using DNA obtained from 44 common epithelial ovarian tumors (benign 8, borderline 3, low grade 11, high grade 22) with the goal of developing a model for genetic progression in common epithelial ovarian cancer. Five general features are apparent from these studies: (1) There is a high concordance (0.85) between LOH and reduced copy number measured by CGH suggesting that most LOH is caused by physical deletion. (2) The total number of aberrations/tumor increased with histologic grade (Kurskal-Wallis, p<0.01). (3) Gene dosage abnormalities 17p-, 17q- and 3q+ occur at highest frequency, f, (f>0.3) and in both low grade and high grade tumors; abnormalities 9q-, 22q-, and Xp- occur at intermediate frequencies (0.2cancer specific aberrations usually carry many more aberrations per tumor (>15/tumor) than tumors that do not (<5/tumor). (5) Many of the genetic abnormalities are correlated. Specifically, strong correlations (Fischer, p<0.01) were observed for the aberration pairs: 16q-:8p-; 17q-:9q; 8p-:8q+; 17p-:17q-; 22q-:9q-; Xp-:9q; 3q+:6p+; and 3q+:Xp-. Taken together, these observations suggest a parallel pathway model for genetic progression in which 17p-, 17q- and 3q+ are independent initial genetic events; 9q-, 22q- and Xp- are intermediate events and 6p+, 8p- and 8q+ are late events.

  19. Differential Patterns of Allelic Loss in Estrogen Receptor-Positive Infiltrating Lobular and Ductal Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Loo, L.W.M.; Ton, C.; Wang, Y.-W.; Grove, D.I.; Bouzek, H.; Vartanian, N.; Lin, M.-G.; Yuan, X.; Lawton, T.L.; Daling, J.R.; Malone, K.E.; Li, C.I.; Hsu, L.; Porter, P.L.

    2009-01-01

    The two main histological types of infiltrating breast cancer, lobular (ILC) and the more common ductal (IDC) carcinoma are morphologically and clinically distinct. To assess the molecular alterations associated with these breast cancer subtypes, we conducted a whole-genome study of 166 archival estrogen receptor (ER)-positive tumors (89 IDC and 77 ILC) using the Affymetrix GeneChip® Mapping 10K Array to identify sites of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) that either distinguished, or were shared by, the two phenotypes. We found single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of high-frequency LOH (>50%) common to both ILC and IDC tumors predominately in 11q, 16q, and 17p. Overall, IDC had a slightly higher frequency of LOH events across the genome than ILC (fractional allelic loss = 0.186 and 0.156). By comparing the average frequency of LOH by chromosomal arm, we found IDC tumors with significantly (P < 0.05) higher frequency of LOH on 3p, 5q, 8p, 9p, 20p, and 20q than ILC tumors. We identified additional chromosomal arms differentiating the subtypes when tumors were stratified by tumor size, mitotic rate, or DNA content. Of 5,754 informative SNPs (>25% informativity), we identified 78 and 466 individual SNPs with a higher frequency of LOH (P < 0.05) in ILC and IDC tumors, respectively. Hierarchical clustering of these 544 SNPs grouped tumors into four major groups based on their patterns of LOH and retention of heterozygosity. LOH in chromosomal arms 8p and 5q was common in higher grade IDC tumors, whereas ILC and low-grade IDC grouped together by virtue of LOH in 16q. PMID:18720524

  20. Multiple regions-of-interest analysis of setup uncertainties for head-and-neck cancer radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Lifei; Garden, Adam S.; Lo, Justin; Ang, K. Kian; Ahamad, Anesa; Morrison, William H.; Rosenthal, David I.; Chambers, Mark S.; Zhu, X. Ronald; Mohan, Radhe; Dong Lei . E-mail: ldong@mdanderson.org

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: To analyze three-dimensional setup uncertainties for multiple regions of interest (ROIs) in head-and-neck region. Methods and Materials: In-room computed tomography (CT) scans were acquired using a CT-on-rails system for 14 patients. Three separate bony ROIs were defined: C2 and C6 vertebral bodies and the palatine process of the maxilla. Translational shifts of 3 ROIs were calculated relative to the marked isocenter on the immobilization mask. Results: The shifts for all 3 ROIs were highly correlated. However, noticeable differences on the order of 2-6 mm existed between any 2 ROIs, indicating the flexibility and/or rotational effect in the head-and-neck region. The palatine process of the maxilla had the smallest right-left shifts because of the tight lateral fit in the face mask, but the largest superior-inferior movement because of in-plane rotation and variations in jaw positions. The neck region (C6) had the largest right-left shifts. The positioning mouthpiece was found effective in reducing variations in the superior-inferior direction. There was no statistically significant improvement for using the S-board (8 out of 14 patients) vs. the short face mask. Conclusions: We found variability in setup corrections for different regions of head-and-neck anatomy. These relative positional variations should be considered when making setup corrections or designing treatment margins.

  1. High prevalence of breast cancer in light polluted areas in urban and rural regions of South Korea: An ecologic study on the treatment prevalence of female cancers based on National Health Insurance data.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yun Jeong; Lee, Eunil; Lee, Hyo Sun; Kim, Mari; Park, Man Sik

    2015-06-01

    It has been reported that excessive artificial light at night (ALAN) could harm human health since it disturbs the natural bio-rhythm and sleep. Such conditions can lead to various diseases, including cancer. In this study, we have evaluated the association between ALAN and prevalence rates of cancer in females on a regional basis, after adjusting for other risk factors, including obesity, smoking, alcohol consumption rates and PM10 levels. The prevalence rates for breast cancer were found to be significantly associated with ALAN in urban and rural areas. Furthermore, no association was found with ALAN in female lung, liver, cervical, gastric and colon cancer. Despite the limitations of performing ecological studies, this report suggests that ALAN might be a risk factor for breast cancer, even in rural areas.

  2. High prevalence of breast cancer in light polluted areas in urban and rural regions of South Korea: An ecologic study on the treatment prevalence of female cancers based on National Health Insurance data.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yun Jeong; Lee, Eunil; Lee, Hyo Sun; Kim, Mari; Park, Man Sik

    2015-06-01

    It has been reported that excessive artificial light at night (ALAN) could harm human health since it disturbs the natural bio-rhythm and sleep. Such conditions can lead to various diseases, including cancer. In this study, we have evaluated the association between ALAN and prevalence rates of cancer in females on a regional basis, after adjusting for other risk factors, including obesity, smoking, alcohol consumption rates and PM10 levels. The prevalence rates for breast cancer were found to be significantly associated with ALAN in urban and rural areas. Furthermore, no association was found with ALAN in female lung, liver, cervical, gastric and colon cancer. Despite the limitations of performing ecological studies, this report suggests that ALAN might be a risk factor for breast cancer, even in rural areas. PMID:25955405

  3. Localized mucosal leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania infantum mimicking cancer in the rhinolaryngeal region.

    PubMed

    Cobo, Fernando; Rodríguez-Granger, Javier; Gómez-Camarasa, Cristina; Sampedro, Antonio; Aliaga-Martínez, Luis; Navarro, José María; Fernández, José Gutiérrez

    2016-09-01

    The clinical, microbiological, and histopathological findings of six patients with mucosal leishmaniasis are reported. Five of these patients were Spanish with no history of travel abroad, while the other was from Bolivia but had lived in Spain for more than 5 years. Two patients had no underlying disease, while the other four had several other medical conditions. Lesions were located in the nose in three patients and in the larynx in the other three. Symptoms included difficulty in swallowing, nasal obstruction, dysphonia, and polypoid lesions mimicking cancer. The diagnosis was based on the identification of parasites, or on PCR assay or culture. Five patients were treated with liposomal amphotericin B and the other with antimonial compounds. PMID:27515498

  4. Figure 1 from Integrative Genomics Viewer: Visualizing Big Data | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    A screenshot of the IGV user interface at the chromosome view. IGV user interface showing five data types (copy number, methylation, gene expression, and loss of heterozygosity; mutations are overlaid with black boxes) from approximately 80 glioblastoma multiforme samples. Adapted from Figure S1; Robinson et al. 2011

  5. A functional variant in miR-155 regulation region contributes to lung cancer risk and survival.

    PubMed

    Xie, Kaipeng; Ma, Hongxia; Liang, Cheng; Wang, Cheng; Qin, Na; Shen, Wei; Gu, Yayun; Yan, Caiwang; Zhang, Kai; Dai, Ningbin; Zhu, Meng; Wu, Shuangshuang; Wang, Hui; Dai, Juncheng; Jin, Guangfu; Shen, Hongbing; Hu, Zhibin

    2015-12-15

    Emerging evidence suggested that upregulation of miR-155 could serve as a promising marker for the diagnosis and prognosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In the present study, we genotyped rs767649 (A > T) located in miR-155 regulation region in 1341 cases and 1982 controls, and analyzed the associations of rs767649 with NSCLC risk and survival. Consequently, rs767649 exhibited the significant associations with the risk (adjusted OR = 1.12, 95% CI = 1.01-1.24, P = 0.031) and prognosis of NSCLC (adjusted HR = 1.17, 95% CI = 1.03-1.32, P = 0.014). Meanwhile, rs767649 specifically interacted with radio-chemotherapy (P(int) = 0.013), and patients with both the rs767649-TT genotype and radio-chemotherapy had the highest hazard ratio (adjusted HR = 1.65, 95% CI = 1.26-2.16, P < 0.001). Furthermore, using functional assays and The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Lung Adenocarcinoma (LUAD) dataset, we found that rs767649 variant allele could increase the transcriptional activity of miR-155, which in turn facilitated tumor growth and metastasis by inhibiting HBP1, TJP1, SMAD5 and PRKAR1A expression. Our findings suggested that rs767649 A > T might contribute to the increased risk and poor prognosis of NSCLC, highlighting the importance of rs767649 in the prevention and therapy of NSCLC. PMID:26543233

  6. A functional variant in miR-155 regulation region contributes to lung cancer risk and survival

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cheng; Qin, Na; Shen, Wei; Gu, Yayun; Yan, Caiwang; Zhang, Kai; Dai, Ningbin; Zhu, Meng; Wu, Shuangshuang; Wang, Hui; Dai, Juncheng; Jin, Guangfu; Shen, Hongbing; Hu, Zhibin

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggested that upregulation of miR-155 could serve as a promising marker for the diagnosis and prognosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In the present study, we genotyped rs767649 (A > T) located in miR-155 regulation region in 1341 cases and 1982 controls, and analyzed the associations of rs767649 with NSCLC risk and survival. Consequently, rs767649 exhibited the significant associations with the risk (adjusted OR = 1.12, 95% CI = 1.01–1.24, P = 0.031) and prognosis of NSCLC (adjusted HR = 1.17, 95% CI = 1.03–1.32, P = 0.014). Meanwhile, rs767649 specifically interacted with radio-chemotherapy (Pint = 0.013), and patients with both the rs767649-TT genotype and radio-chemotherapy had the highest hazard ratio (adjusted HR = 1.65, 95% CI = 1.26–2.16, P < 0.001). Furthermore, using functional assays and The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Lung Adenocarcinoma (LUAD) dataset, we found that rs767649 variant allele could increase the transcriptional activity of miR-155, which in turn facilitated tumor growth and metastasis by inhibiting HBP1, TJP1, SMAD5 and PRKAR1A expression. Our findings suggested that rs767649 A > T might contribute to the increased risk and poor prognosis of NSCLC, highlighting the importance of rs767649 in the prevention and therapy of NSCLC. PMID:26543233

  7. Effect of Radiotherapy Interruptions on Survival in Medicare Enrollees With Local and Regional Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fesinmeyer, Megan Dann; Mehta, Vivek; Blough, David; Tock, Lauri; Ramsey, Scott D.

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether interruptions in radiotherapy are associated with decreased survival in a population-based sample of head-and-neck cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare linked database we identified Medicare beneficiaries aged 66 years and older diagnosed with local-regional head-and-neck cancer during the period 1997-2003. We examined claims records of 3864 patients completing radiotherapy for the presence of one or more 5-30-day interruption(s) in therapy. We then performed Cox regression analyses to estimate the association between therapy interruptions and survival. Results: Patients with laryngeal tumors who experienced an interruption in radiotherapy had a 68% (95% confidence interval, 41-200%) increased risk of death, compared with patients with no interruptions. Patients with nasal cavity, nasopharynx, oral, salivary gland, and sinus tumors had similar associations between interruptions and increased risk of death, but these did not reach statistical significance because of small sample sizes. Conclusions: Treatment interruptions seem to influence survival time among patients with laryngeal tumors completing a full course of radiotherapy. At all head-and-neck sites, the association between interruptions and survival is sensitive to confounding by stage and other treatments. Further research is needed to develop methods to identify patients most susceptible to interruption-induced mortality.

  8. [Optimizing good use and costs of anticancer drugs: A French inter regional study of the Observatory of Cancer].

    PubMed

    Grudé, Françoise; Bessard, Réjane; Bourgeois, Hugues; Douillard, Jean-Yves; Gamelin, Erik; Metges, Jean-Philippe; Riché, Christian; Vidal, Anne-Marie

    2013-03-01

    Optimizing the care management of patients is a major issue for our society. In Brittany-Pays-de-la-Loire (almost 10% of French population), an observatory of cancer has been created in 2003. Its main objective was the follow-up of expensive drugs. The knowledge of the use of these drugs in clinical practice has led to development of a thesaurus of good use. Thus, regular exchanges between clinicians have almost totally reduced not medically justified prescriptions by the thesaurus after and before administration to patient. The thesaurus has given away to national guidelines from 2007. For example, in these two regions, optimization of the use of gemcitabine and bevacizumab has allowed to save respectively 2.5 millions euros between 2005 and 2008 and 3 millions euros between 2009 and 2010 (breast cancer only). Optimizing the use of anticancer drugs has allowed a real health economy without any bad impact on patient management. Respecting medical ethics, the main objective remains to optimize health care. This highly participation of clinicians currently allows to reflect together on the relevance of the last chemotherapy.

  9. Colorectal cancer prevention: Perspectives of key players from social networks in a low-income rural US region

    PubMed Central

    Schoenberg, Nancy E.; Eddens, Kathryn; Jonas, Adam; Snell-Rood, Claire; Studts, Christina R.; Broder-Oldach, Benjamin; Katz, Mira L.

    2016-01-01

    Social networks influence health behavior and health status. Within social networks, “key players” often influence those around them, particularly in traditionally underserved areas like the Appalachian region in the USA. From a total sample of 787 Appalachian residents, we identified and interviewed 10 key players in complex networks, asking them what comprises a key player, their role in their network and community, and ideas to overcome and increase colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. Key players emphasized their communication skills, resourcefulness, and special occupational and educational status in the community. Barriers to CRC screening included negative perceptions of the colonoscopy screening procedure, discomfort with the medical system, and misinformed perspectives on screening. Ideas to improve screening focused on increasing awareness of women's susceptibility to CRC, providing information on different screening tests, improving access, and the key role of health-care providers and key players themselves. We provide recommendations to leverage these vital community resources. PMID:26905402

  10. Colorectal cancer prevention: Perspectives of key players from social networks in a low-income rural US region.

    PubMed

    Schoenberg, Nancy E; Eddens, Kathryn; Jonas, Adam; Snell-Rood, Claire; Studts, Christina R; Broder-Oldach, Benjamin; Katz, Mira L

    2016-01-01

    Social networks influence health behavior and health status. Within social networks, "key players" often influence those around them, particularly in traditionally underserved areas like the Appalachian region in the USA. From a total sample of 787 Appalachian residents, we identified and interviewed 10 key players in complex networks, asking them what comprises a key player, their role in their network and community, and ideas to overcome and increase colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. Key players emphasized their communication skills, resourcefulness, and special occupational and educational status in the community. Barriers to CRC screening included negative perceptions of the colonoscopy screening procedure, discomfort with the medical system, and misinformed perspectives on screening. Ideas to improve screening focused on increasing awareness of women's susceptibility to CRC, providing information on different screening tests, improving access, and the key role of health-care providers and key players themselves. We provide recommendations to leverage these vital community resources.

  11. Colorectal cancer prevention: Perspectives of key players from social networks in a low-income rural US region.

    PubMed

    Schoenberg, Nancy E; Eddens, Kathryn; Jonas, Adam; Snell-Rood, Claire; Studts, Christina R; Broder-Oldach, Benjamin; Katz, Mira L

    2016-01-01

    Social networks influence health behavior and health status. Within social networks, "key players" often influence those around them, particularly in traditionally underserved areas like the Appalachian region in the USA. From a total sample of 787 Appalachian residents, we identified and interviewed 10 key players in complex networks, asking them what comprises a key player, their role in their network and community, and ideas to overcome and increase colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. Key players emphasized their communication skills, resourcefulness, and special occupational and educational status in the community. Barriers to CRC screening included negative perceptions of the colonoscopy screening procedure, discomfort with the medical system, and misinformed perspectives on screening. Ideas to improve screening focused on increasing awareness of women's susceptibility to CRC, providing information on different screening tests, improving access, and the key role of health-care providers and key players themselves. We provide recommendations to leverage these vital community resources. PMID:26905402

  12. Impact of High-Dose Chemotherapy on The Ability to Deliver Subsequent Local–Regional Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer: Analysis of Cancer and Leukemia Group B Protocol 9082

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Lawrence B.; Cirrincione, Constance; Fitzgerald, Thomas J.; Laurie, Frances; Glicksman, Arvin S.; Vredenburgh, James; Prosnitz, Leonard R.; Shpall, Elizabeth J.; Crump, Michael; Richardson, Paul G.; Schuster, Michael W.; Ma, Jinli; Peterson, Bercedis L.; Norton, Larry; Seagren, Steven; Henderson, I. Craig; Hurd, David D.; Peters, William P.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To report, from Cancer and Leukemia Group B Protocol 9082, the impact of high-dose cyclophosphamide, cisplatin, and BCNU (HD-CPB) vs. intermediate-dose CPB (ID-CPB) on the ability to start and complete the planned course of local–regional radiotherapy (RT) for women with breast cancer involving ≥10 axillary nodes. Methods and Materials From 1991 to 1998, 785 patients were randomized. The HD-CPB and ID-CPB arms were balanced regarding patient characteristics. The HD-CPB and ID-CPB arms were compared on the probability of RT initiation, interruption, modification, or incompleteness. The impact of clinical variables and interactions between variables were also assessed. Results Radiotherapy was initiated in 82% (325 of 394) of HD-CPB vs. 92% (360 of 391) of ID-CPB patients (p = 0.001). On multivariate analyses, RT was less likely given to patients who were randomized to HD treatment (odds ratio [OR] = 0 .38, p < 0.001), older (p = 0.005), African American (p = 0.003), postmastectomy (p = 0.02), or estrogen receptor positive (p = 0.03). High-dose treatment had a higher rate of RT interruption (21% vs. 12%, p = 0.001, OR = 2.05), modification (29% vs. 14%, p = 0.001, OR = 2.46), and early termination of RT (9% vs. 2%, p = 0.0001, OR = 5.35), compared with ID. Conclusion Treatment arm significantly related to initiation, interruption, modification, and early termination of RT. Patients randomized to HD-CPB were less likely to initiate RT, and of those who did, they were more likely to have RT interrupted, modified, and terminated earlier than those randomized to ID-CPB. The observed lower incidence of RT usage in African Americans vs. non–African Americans warrants further study. PMID:19747781

  13. Impact of High-Dose Chemotherapy on the Ability to Deliver Subsequent Local-Regional Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer: Analysis of Cancer and Leukemia Group B Protocol 9082

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, Lawrence B.; Cirrincione, Constance M.S.; Fitzgerald, Thomas J.; Laurie, Frances; Glicksman, Arvin S.; Vredenburgh, James; Prosnitz, Leonard R.; Shpall, Elizabeth J.; Crump, Michael; Richardson, Paul G.; Schuster, Michael W.; Ma Jinli; Peterson, Bercedis L.; Norton, Larry; Seagren, Steven

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To report, from Cancer and Leukemia Group B Protocol 9082, the impact of high-dose cyclophosphamide, cisplatin, and BCNU (HD-CPB) vs. intermediate-dose CPB (ID-CPB) on the ability to start and complete the planned course of local-regional radiotherapy (RT) for women with breast cancer involving >=10 axillary nodes. Methods and Materials: From 1991 to 1998, 785 patients were randomized. The HD-CPB and ID-CPB arms were balanced regarding patient characteristics. The HD-CPB and ID-CPB arms were compared on the probability of RT initiation, interruption, modification, or incompleteness. The impact of clinical variables and interactions between variables were also assessed. Results: Radiotherapy was initiated in 82% (325 of 394) of HD-CPB vs. 92% (360 of 391) of ID-CPB patients (p = 0.001). On multivariate analyses, RT was less likely given to patients who were randomized to HD treatment (odds ratio [OR] = 0 .38, p < 0.001), older (p = 0.005), African American (p = 0.003), postmastectomy (p = 0.02), or estrogen receptor positive (p = 0.03). High-dose treatment had a higher rate of RT interruption (21% vs. 12%, p = 0.001, OR = 2.05), modification (29% vs. 14%, p = 0.001, OR = 2.46), and early termination of RT (9% vs. 2%, p = 0.0001, OR = 5.35), compared with ID. Conclusion: Treatment arm significantly related to initiation, interruption, modification, and early termination of RT. Patients randomized to HD-CPB were less likely to initiate RT, and of those who did, they were more likely to have RT interrupted, modified, and terminated earlier than those randomized to ID-CPB. The observed lower incidence of RT usage in African Americans vs. non-African Americans warrants further study.

  14. Prognostic index score and clinical prediction model of local regional recurrence after mastectomy in breast cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Skye Hongiun . E-mail: skye@mail.kfcc.org.tw; Horng, C.-F.; Clarke, Jennifer L.; Tsou, M.-H.; Tsai, Stella Y.; Chen, C.-M.; Jian, James J.; Liu, M.-C.; West, Mike; Huang, Andrew T.; Prosnitz, Leonard R.

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: To develop clinical prediction models for local regional recurrence (Lr) of breast carcinoma after mastectomy that will be superior to the conventional measures of tumor size and nodal status. Methods and Materials: Clinical information from 1,010 invasive breast cancer patients who had primary modified radical mastectomy formed the database of the training and testing of clinical prognostic and prediction models of LRR. Cox proportional hazards analysis and Bayesian tree analysis were the core methodologies from which these models were built. To generate a prognostic index model, 15 clinical variables were examined for their impact on LRR. Patients were stratified by lymph node involvement (<4 vs. {>=}4) and local regional status (recurrent vs. control) and then, within strata, randomly split into training and test data sets of equal size. To establish prediction tree models, 255 patients were selected by the criteria of having had LRR (53 patients) or no evidence of LRR without postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) (202 patients). Results: With these models, patients can be divided into low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups on the basis of axillary nodal status, estrogen receptor status, lymphovascular invasion, and age at diagnosis. In the low-risk group, there is no influence of PMRT on either LRR or survival. For intermediate-risk patients, PMRT improves LR control but not metastases-free or overall survival. For the high-risk patients, however, PMRT improves both LR control and metastasis-free and overall survival. Conclusion: The prognostic score and predictive index are useful methods to estimate the risk of LRR in breast cancer patients after mastectomy and for estimating the potential benefits of PMRT. These models provide additional information criteria for selection of patients for PMRT, compared with the traditional selection criteria of nodal status and tumor size.

  15. Setup Uncertainties of Anatomical Sub-Regions in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients After Offline CBCT Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Kranen, Simon van; Beek, Suzanne van; Rasch, Coen; Herk, Marcel van; Sonke, Jan-Jakob

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To quantify local geometrical uncertainties in anatomical sub-regions during radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Local setup accuracy was analyzed for 38 patients, who had received intensity-modulated radiotherapy and were regularly scanned during treatment with cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for offline patient setup correction. In addition to the clinically used large region of interest (ROI), we defined eight ROIs in the planning CT that contained rigid bony structures: the mandible, larynx, jugular notch, occiput bone, vertebrae C1-C3, C3-C5, and C5-C7, and the vertebrae caudal of C7. By local rigid registration to successive CBCT scans, the local setup accuracy of each ROI was determined and compared with the overall setup error assessed with the large ROI. Deformations were distinguished from rigid body movements by expressing movement relative to a reference ROI (vertebrae C1-C3). Results: The offline patient setup correction protocol using the large ROI resulted in residual systematic errors (1 SD) within 1.2 mm and random errors within 1.5 mm for each direction. Local setup errors were larger, ranging from 1.1 to 3.4 mm (systematic) and 1.3 to 2.5 mm (random). Systematic deformations ranged from 0.4 mm near the reference C1-C3 to 3.8 mm for the larynx. Random deformations ranged from 0.5 to 3.6 mm. Conclusion: Head-and-neck cancer patients show considerable local setup variations, exceeding residual global patient setup uncertainty in an offline correction protocol. Current planning target volume margins may be inadequate to account for these uncertainties. We propose registration of multiple ROIs to drive correction protocols and adaptive radiotherapy to reduce the impact of local setup variations.

  16. Brain Metastases from Lung Cancer Show Increased Expression of DVL1, DVL3 and Beta-Catenin and Down-Regulation of E-Cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Kafka, Anja; Tomas, Davor; Beroš, Vili; Pećina, Hrvoje Ivan; Zeljko, Martina; Pećina-Šlaus, Nives

    2014-01-01

    The susceptibility of brain to secondary formation from lung cancer primaries is a well-known phenomenon. In contrast, the molecular basis for invasion and metastasis to the brain is largely unknown. In the present study, 31 brain metastases that originated from primary lung carcinomas were analyzed regarding over expression of Dishevelled-1 (DVL1), Dishevelled-3 (DVL3), E-cadherin (CDH1) and beta-catenin (CTNNB1). Protein expressions and localizations were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Genetic alterations of E-cadherin were tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)/loss of heterozygosity (LOH). Heteroduplex was used to investigate mutations in beta-catenin. DVL1 and DVL3 showed over expression in brain metastasis in 87.1% and 90.3% of samples respectively. Nuclear staining was observed in 54.8% of cases for DVL1 and 53.3% for DVL3. The main effector of the Wnt signaling, beta-catenin, was up-regulated in 56%, and transferred to the nucleus in 36% of metastases. When DVL1 and DVL3 were up-regulated the number of cases with nuclear beta-catenin significantly increased (p = 0.0001). Down-regulation of E-cadherin was observed in 80% of samples. Genetic analysis showed 36% of samples with LOH of the CDH1. In comparison to other lung cancer pathologies, the diagnoses adenocarcinoma and small cell lung cancer (SCLC) were significantly associated to CDH1 LOH (p = 0.001). Microsatellite instability was detected in one metastasis from adenocarcinoma. Exon 3 of beta-catenin was not targeted. Altered expression of Dishevelled-1, Dishevelled-3, E-cadherin and beta-catenin were present in brain metastases which indicates that Wnt signaling is important and may contribute to better understanding of genetic profile conditioning lung cancer metastasis to the brain. PMID:24933634

  17. Brain metastases from lung cancer show increased expression of DVL1, DVL3 and beta-catenin and down-regulation of E-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Kafka, Anja; Tomas, Davor; Beroš, Vili; Pećina, Hrvoje Ivan; Zeljko, Martina; Pećina-Šlaus, Nives

    2014-06-13

    The susceptibility of brain to secondary formation from lung cancer primaries is a well-known phenomenon. In contrast, the molecular basis for invasion and metastasis to the brain is largely unknown. In the present study, 31 brain metastases that originated from primary lung carcinomas were analyzed regarding over expression of Dishevelled-1 (DVL1), Dishevelled-3 (DVL3), E-cadherin (CDH1) and beta-catenin (CTNNB1). Protein expressions and localizations were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Genetic alterations of E-cadherin were tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)/loss of heterozygosity (LOH). Heteroduplex was used to investigate mutations in beta-catenin. DVL1 and DVL3 showed over expression in brain metastasis in 87.1% and 90.3% of samples respectively. Nuclear staining was observed in 54.8% of cases for DVL1 and 53.3% for DVL3. The main effector of the Wnt signaling, beta-catenin, was up-regulated in 56%, and transferred to the nucleus in 36% of metastases. When DVL1 and DVL3 were up-regulated the number of cases with nuclear beta-catenin significantly increased (p=0.0001). Down-regulation of E-cadherin was observed in 80% of samples. Genetic analysis showed 36% of samples with LOH of the CDH1. In comparison to other lung cancer pathologies, the diagnoses adenocarcinoma and small cell lung cancer (SCLC) were significantly associated to CDH1 LOH (p=0.001). Microsatellite instability was detected in one metastasis from adenocarcinoma. Exon 3 of beta-catenin was not targeted. Altered expression of Dishevelled-1, Dishevelled-3, E-cadherin and beta-catenin were present in brain metastases which indicates that Wnt signaling is important and may contribute to better understanding of genetic profile conditioning lung cancer metastasis to the brain.

  18. Inflammatory Bowel Disease-related Colorectal Cancer in the Asia-Pacific Region: Past, Present, and Future.

    PubMed

    Zhiqin, Wong; Palaniappan, Shanthi; Raja Ali, Raja Affendi

    2014-07-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are at an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC), and key contributing factors include chronic colonic inflammation and the extent and duration of disease. This increase in risk is more likely to result from chronic inflammation of the colonic mucosa than from any clearly defined genetic predisposition. However, globally, the true magnitude of this risk is debatable, since results from different studies are heterogeneous in terms of geographical and methodological variables. The prevalence of IBD-related CRC in the Asia-Pacific region ranges from 0.3% to 1.8% and a recent study found that the cumulative incidence of IBD-related CRC is comparable to that in Western countries. However, the CRC mortality rate in the Asia-Pacific region is on the rise compared with that in Western countries, and a few Asian countries show particularly rapid upward trends in CRC incidence. Although our understanding of the molecular and clinical basis for IBD-related CRC has improved substantially, our means of prevention, endoscopic surveillance, chemoprevention, and prophylactic surgery remain modest at best. Furthermore, published data on IBD-related CRC in the Asia-Pacific region is lacking, and this review addresses many aspects including epidemiology, natural history, etiopathogenesis, morphology, and biological behaviors of IBD-related CRC and sporadic CRC in the Asia-Pacific region. In this review, we will also discuss the risk factors for CRC in IBD patients, endoscopic technology screening, and surveillance programs and management strategies for IBD-related CRC.

  19. Region-specific differences in colorectal cancer: Slovakia and Hungary have highest incidence in Europe.

    PubMed

    Simko, V; Ginter, E

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological data on colorectal cancer (CRC) exhibit high incidence in Central East Europe. Hungary, Slovakia and Croatia represent the lead. For decades it was the Czech Republic but it attained the fourth rank after the mid-2000. Remarkably, the Ashkenazi Jews who imigrated to the USA from Central Europe have the highest incidence of CRC among US minorities. They also have high incidence of inflammatory bowel disease, a risk for CRC. Notably, countries surrounding the Central European focus of CRC, Austria, Germany, Poland, Romania, Ukraine and Russia have substantially lower incidence. CRC in Central Europe has higher incidence than CRC among the highest at-risk cohort in the USA, the elderly blacks. Research and the genome wide screening identified genetic mutations associated with CRC in Ashkenazis from Central Europe. Some risk factors for CRC are non genotypic as evidenced by wide variation in CRC incidence in the course of only a few decades. Recent trends offer hope that identification of the non-innate pathogenic mechanisms would potentially reduce the burden of this third most lethal malignancy (Tab. 1, Fig. 4, Ref. 40).

  20. Regional cancer centre demonstrates voluntary conformity with the national Radiation Oncology Practice Standards.

    PubMed

    Manley, Stephen; Last, Andrew; Fu, Kenneth; Greenham, Stuart; Kovendy, Andrew; Shakespeare, Thomas P

    2015-06-01

    Radiation Oncology Practice Standards have been developed over the last 10 years and were published for use in Australia in 2011. Although the majority of the radiation oncology community supports the implementation of the standards, there has been no mechanism for uniform assessment or governance. North Coast Cancer Institute's public radiation oncology service is provided across three main service centres on the north coast of NSW. With a strong focus on quality management, we embraced the opportunity to demonstrate conformity with the Radiation Oncology Practice Standards. The Local Health District's Clinical Governance units were engaged to perform assessments of our conformity with the standards and this was signed off as complete on 16 December 2013. The process of demonstrating conformity with the Radiation Oncology Practice Standards has enhanced the culture of quality in our centres. We have demonstrated that self-assessment utilising trained auditors is a viable method for centres to demonstrate conformity. National implementation of the Radiation Oncology Practice Standards will benefit individual centres and the broader radiation oncology community to improve the service delivered to our patients.

  1. Regional cancer centre demonstrates voluntary conformity with the national Radiation Oncology Practice Standards

    SciTech Connect

    Manley, Stephen Last, Andrew; Fu, Kenneth; Greenham, Stuart; Kovendy, Andrew; Shakespeare, Thomas P

    2015-06-15

    Radiation Oncology Practice Standards have been developed over the last 10 years and were published for use in Australia in 2011. Although the majority of the radiation oncology community supports the implementation of the standards, there has been no mechanism for uniform assessment or governance. North Coast Cancer Institute's public radiation oncology service is provided across three main service centres on the north coast of NSW. With a strong focus on quality management, we embraced the opportunity to demonstrate conformity with the Radiation Oncology Practice Standards. The Local Health District's Clinical Governance units were engaged to perform assessments of our conformity with the standards and this was signed off as complete on 16 December 2013. The process of demonstrating conformity with the Radiation Oncology Practice Standards has enhanced the culture of quality in our centres. We have demonstrated that self-assessment utilising trained auditors is a viable method for centres to demonstrate conformity. National implementation of the Radiation Oncology Practice Standards will benefit individual centres and the broader radiation oncology community to improve the service delivered to our patients.

  2. Regional cancer centre demonstrates voluntary conformity with the national Radiation Oncology Practice Standards

    PubMed Central

    Manley, Stephen; Last, Andrew; Fu, Kenneth; Greenham, Stuart; Kovendy, Andrew; Shakespeare, Thomas P

    2015-01-01

    Radiation Oncology Practice Standards have been developed over the last 10 years and were published for use in Australia in 2011. Although the majority of the radiation oncology community supports the implementation of the standards, there has been no mechanism for uniform assessment or governance. North Coast Cancer Institute's public radiation oncology service is provided across three main service centres on the north coast of NSW. With a strong focus on quality management, we embraced the opportunity to demonstrate conformity with the Radiation Oncology Practice Standards. The Local Health District's Clinical Governance units were engaged to perform assessments of our conformity with the standards and this was signed off as complete on 16 December 2013. The process of demonstrating conformity with the Radiation Oncology Practice Standards has enhanced the culture of quality in our centres. We have demonstrated that self-assessment utilising trained auditors is a viable method for centres to demonstrate conformity. National implementation of the Radiation Oncology Practice Standards will benefit individual centres and the broader radiation oncology community to improve the service delivered to our patients. PMID:26229680

  3. Study of Genes and Environment in Patients With Cancer in East Anglia, Trent, or West Midlands Regions of the United Kingdom

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-08-23

    Bladder Cancer; Brain and Central Nervous System Tumors; Esophageal Cancer; Intraocular Melanoma; Kidney Cancer; Lymphoma; Melanoma (Skin); Pancreatic Cancer; Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter

  4. Medical physics aspects of cancer care in the Asia Pacific region: 2011 survey results

    PubMed Central

    Kron, T; Azhari, HA; Voon, EO; Cheung, KY; Ravindran, P; Soejoko, D; Inamura, K; Han, Y; Ung, NM; Bold, L; Win, UM; Srivastava, R; Meyer, J; Farrukh, S; Rodriguez, L; Kuo, M; Lee, JCL; Kumara, A; Lee, CC; Krisanachinda, A; Nguyen, XC; Ng, KH

    2012-01-01

    Background: Medical physicists are essential members of the radiation oncology team. Given the increasing complexity of radiotherapy delivery, it is important to ensure adequate training and staffing. The aim of the present study was to update a similar survey from 2008 and assess the situation of medical physicists in the large and diverse Asia Pacific region. Methods: Between March and July 2011, a survey on profession and practice of radiation oncology medical physicists (ROMPs) in the Asia Pacific region was performed. The survey was sent to senior physicists in 22 countries. Replies were received from countries that collectively represent more than half of the world’s population. The survey questions explored five areas: education, staffing, work patterns including research and teaching, resources available, and job satisfaction. Results and discussion: Compared to a data from a similar survey conducted three years ago, the number of medical physicists in participating countries increased by 29% on average. This increase is similar to the increase in the number of linear accelerators, showing that previously identified staff shortages have yet to be substantially addressed. This is also highlighted by the fact that most ROMPs are expected to work overtime often and without adequate compensation. While job satisfaction has stayed similar compared to the previous survey, expectations for education and training have increased somewhat. This is in line with a trend towards certification of ROMPs. Conclusion: As organisations such as the International Labour Organization (ILO) start to recognise medical physics as a profession, it is evident that despite some encouraging signs there is still a lot of work required towards establishing an adequately trained and resourced medical physics workforce in the Asia Pacific region. PMID:22970066

  5. Lack of association between -174G>C and -634C>G polymorphisms in interleukin-6 promoter region and lung cancer risk: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Fanglei; Xu, Daoying; Li, Qinchuan; Liu, Gang; Liu, Huiyun; Ren, Tao

    2014-05-01

    Evidence suggested that the -174G>C and -634C>G polymorphisms in interleukin-6 (IL6) promoter region may modulate risk of lung cancer; however, the conclusion was still inconclusive. Therefore, we performed this meta-analysis to determine the association between IL6 -174G>C and -634C>G polymorphisms and lung cancer risk. The association strength was measured by odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Egger's test and Begg's test were performed to detect potential publication bias. By searching PubMed, EMBASE and China National Knowledge Infrastructure, we included 16 eligible studies in this meta-analysis, involving 6,202 lung cancer cases and 7,067 controls. Five studies about -174G>C polymorphism and 11 studies about -634C>G polymorphism were analyzed. By pooling eligible studies, we found no significant association of -174G>C with lung cancer risk (C vs. G: OR = 1.029; 95% CI, 0.957-1.106; heterogeneity, P = 0.478) and no statistic association of -634C > G with lung cancer susceptibility (G vs. C: OR = 1.050; 95% CI, 0.893-1.235; Heterogeneity, P < 0.001). No significant publication bias was observed. In conclusion, we found that -634C>G and -174G>C polymorphisms in IL6 promoter region were not associated with lung cancer risk.

  6. Geostatistical analysis of the relationship between heavy metals in drinking water and cancer incidence in residential areas in the Black Sea region of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Colak, Ebru Husniye; Yomralioglu, Tahsin; Nisanci, Recep; Yildirim, Volkan; Duran, Celal

    2015-01-01

    In the study described in this article, the authors examined the relationship between heavy metals in the drinking water and cancer densities in residential areas. The Turkish cities of Trabzon, Rize, and Giresun in the eastern Black Sea region were chosen as the study areas. Cancer registry data, population information, heavy metal chemical analysis results for drinking water, and other spatial information for the region were collected in a database designed in GIS. Information on a total of 13,012 registered cancer cases from the years 2000-2007 was obtained from a cancer record center and depicted spatially on a map. The incidence values explaining cancer density in residential units were calculated. Chemical analyses were then conducted to determine the presence of 17 different heavy metals by collecting a total of 541 drinking water samples. It was determined that among the 17 analyzed heavy metals, beryllium, nickel, antimony, and molybdenum had a significant relationship with cancer incidence values in the residential units. PMID:25619041

  7. Geostatistical analysis of the relationship between heavy metals in drinking water and cancer incidence in residential areas in the Black Sea region of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Colak, Ebru Husniye; Yomralioglu, Tahsin; Nisanci, Recep; Yildirim, Volkan; Duran, Celal

    2015-01-01

    In the study described in this article, the authors examined the relationship between heavy metals in the drinking water and cancer densities in residential areas. The Turkish cities of Trabzon, Rize, and Giresun in the eastern Black Sea region were chosen as the study areas. Cancer registry data, population information, heavy metal chemical analysis results for drinking water, and other spatial information for the region were collected in a database designed in GIS. Information on a total of 13,012 registered cancer cases from the years 2000-2007 was obtained from a cancer record center and depicted spatially on a map. The incidence values explaining cancer density in residential units were calculated. Chemical analyses were then conducted to determine the presence of 17 different heavy metals by collecting a total of 541 drinking water samples. It was determined that among the 17 analyzed heavy metals, beryllium, nickel, antimony, and molybdenum had a significant relationship with cancer incidence values in the residential units.

  8. Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... weight Minimizing your exposure to radiation and toxic chemicals Not smoking or chewing tobacco Reducing sun exposure, especially if you burn easily Cancer screenings, such as mammography and breast ...

  9. A region growing method for tumor volume segmentation on PET images for rectal and anal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Day, Ellen; Betler, James; Parda, David; Reitz, Bodo; Kirichenko, Alexander; Mohammadi, Seyed; Miften, Moyed

    2009-10-01

    The application of automated segmentation methods for tumor delineation on 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) images presents an opportunity to reduce the interobserver variability in radiotherapy (RT) treatment planning. In this work, three segmentation methods were evaluated and compared for rectal and anal cancer patients: (i) Percentage of the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV% max), (ii) fixed SUV cutoff of 2.5 (SUV2.5), and (iii) mathematical technique based on a confidence connected region growing (CCRG) method. A phantom study was performed to determine the SUV% max threshold value and found to be 43%, SUV43% max. The CCRG method is an iterative scheme that relies on the use of statistics from a specified region in the tumor. The scheme is initialized by a subregion of pixels surrounding the maximum intensity pixel. The mean and standard deviation of this region are measured and the pixels connected to the region are included or not based on the criterion that they are greater than a value derived from the mean and standard deviation. The mean and standard deviation of this new region are then measured and the process repeats. FDG-PET-CT imaging studies for 18 patients who received RT were used to evaluate the segmentation methods. A PET avid (PETavid) region was manually segmented for each patient and the volume was then used to compare the calculated volumes along with the absolute mean difference and range for all methods. For the SUV43% max method, the volumes were always smaller than the PETavid volume by a mean of 56% and a range of 21%-79%. The volumes from the SUV2.5 method were either smaller or larger than the PETavid volume by a mean of 37% and a range of 2%-130%. The CCRG approach provided the best results with a mean difference of 9% and a range of 1%-27%. Results show that the CCRG technique can be used in the segmentation of tumor volumes on FDG-PET images, thus providing treatment planners with a clinically

  10. Age, Race and Regional Disparities in Colorectal Cancer Incidence Rates in Georgia between 2000 and 2012

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Wonsuk; De, Subhendu; Wilkins, Thad; Smith, Selina A.; Blumenthal, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence rates and mortality have been decreasing in the United States. Currently, states in the South have the smallest reduction in CRC mortality. The trends of CRC incidence rates in Georgia in comparison to the United States have not been investigated. We analyzed age-adjusted incidence rates of CRC in Georgia and the United States from 2000 to 2012 using data from SEER 18 registries. Age-adjusted incidence rates (95% CI) were calculated as cases per 100,000 to the 2000 US Standard population. CRC incidence rates were calculated for groupings based on age at time of diagnosis, race, sex, and geographic location within Georgia. Incidence rates were higher in males compared to females in Georgia. In Georgians age 50–64, incidence rates were higher compared to the US, while those ages 65+ displayed lower incidence rates. Black Georgians age 50–64 generally exhibited higher incidence rates of CRC and lower rates of decrease in incidence compared to other races in Georgia. Asian/Pacific Islander females age 50–64 in Georgia exhibited an increasing trend in incidence rate. Whites and blacks Georgians age 50–64 displayed higher incidence rates compared to the US, while Asian/Pacific Islanders displayed lower incidence rates. Greater incidence rates of CRC in rural and Greater Georgia were seen across all races when compared to overall rates in Georgia. Efforts should be made to address disparities in Georgia based on race and geographic location. Increased screening by colonoscopy or fecal occult blood testing, reduction of risk factors and promotion of healthy lifestyles can reduce CRC incidence rates. PMID:27042701

  11. Medical physics aspects of cancer care in the Asia Pacific region: 2014 survey results.

    PubMed

    Kron, Tomas; Azhari, H A; Voon, E O; Cheung, K Y; Ravindran, P; Soejoko, D; Inamura, K; Han, Y; Ung, N M; TsedenIsh, Bolortuya; Win, U M; Srivastava, R; Marsh, S; Farrukh, S; Rodriguez, L; Kuo, Men; Baggarley, S; DilipKumara, A H; Lee, C C; Krisanachinda, A; Nguyen, X C; Ng, K H

    2015-09-01

    It was the aim of this work to assess and track the workload, working conditions and professional recognition of radiation oncology medical physicists (ROMPs) in the Asia Pacific region over time. In this third survey since 2008, a structured questionnaire was mailed in 2014 to 22 senior medical physicists representing 23 countries. As in previous surveys the questionnaire covered seven themes: 1 education, training and professional certification, 2 staffing, 3 typical tasks, 4 professional organisations, 5 resources, 6 research and teaching, and 7 job satisfaction. The response rate of 100% is a result of performing a survey through a network, which allows easy follow-up. The replies cover 4841 ROMPs in 23 countries. Compared to 2008, the number of medical physicists in many countries has doubled. However, the number of experienced ROMPs compared to the overall workforce is still small, especially in low and middle income countries. The increase in staff is matched by a similar increase in the number of treatment units over the years. Furthermore, the number of countries using complex techniques (IMRT, IGRT) or installing high end equipment (tomotherapy, robotic linear accelerators) is increasing. Overall, ROMPs still feel generally overworked and the professional recognition, while varying widely, appears to be improving only slightly. Radiation oncology medical physics practice has not changed significantly over the last 6 years in the Asia Pacific Region even if the number of physicists and the number and complexity of treatment techniques and technologies have increased dramatically.

  12. Utility of Clinical Breast Exams in Detecting Local-Regional Breast Events after Breast-Conservation in Women with a Personal History of High-risk Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Heather B.; Schumacher, Jessica R.; Francescatti, Amanda B.; Adesoye, Taiwo; SB, Edge; ES, Burnside; DJ, Vanness; M, Yu; Y, Si; D, McKellar; DP, Winchester; Greenberg, Caprice C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although breast cancer follow-up guidelines emphasize the importance of clinical exams, prior studies suggest a small fraction of local-regional events occurring after breast conservation are detected by exam alone. Our objective was to examine how local-regional events are detected in a contemporary, national cohort of high-risk breast cancer survivors. Methods A stage-stratified sample of stage II/III breast cancer patients diagnosed in 2006-2007 (n=11,099) were identified from 1,217 facilities within the National Cancer Data Base. Additional data on local-regional and distant breast events, method of event detection, imaging received, and mortality was collected. We further limited the cohort to patients with breast conservation (n=4,854). Summary statistics describe local-regional event rates and detection method. Results Local-regional events were detected in 5.5% (n=265). 83% were ipsilateral or contralateral in-breast events, and 17% within ipsilateral lymph nodes. 48% of local-regional events were detected on asymptomatic breast imaging, 29% by patients, and 10% on clinical exam. Overall, 0.5% of the 4,854 patients had a local-regional event detected on exam. Exams detected a higher proportion of lymph node (8/45) compared to in-breast events (18/220). No factors were associated with method of event detection. Discussion Clinical exams, as an adjunct to screening mammography, have a modest effect on local-regional event detection. This contradicts current belief that exams are a critical adjunct to mammographic screening. These findings can help to streamline follow-up care, potentially improving follow-up efficiency and quality. PMID:27491784

  13. Characterisation of the Nevoid basal cell carcinoma (Gorlin`s) syndrome (NBCCS) gene region on chromosome 9q22-q31

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, D.J.; Digweed, M.; Sperling, K.

    1994-09-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) is an autosomal dominantly inherited malignancy-associated disease of unknown etiology. The gene has been mapped to chromosome 9q22-q31 by us and other groups, using linkage analysis and loss of heterozygosity studies. Subsequent linkage and haplotype analyses from 133 meioses in NBCCS families has refined the position of the gene between D9S12 and D9S287. Since the gene for Fanconi`s Anaemia type C (FAAC) has been assigned to the same 9q region, we have performed linkage analysis between FACC and NBCCCS in NBCCS families. No recombination has been observed between NBCCS and FACC and maximum lod scores of 34.98 and 11.94 occur for both diseases at the markers D9S196/D9S197. Southern blot analysis using an FACC cDNA probe has revealed no detectable rearrangements in our NBCCS patients. We have established a YAC contig spanning the region from D9S12 to D9S176 and STS content mapping in 22 YACs has allowed the ordering of 12 loci in the region, including the xeroderma pigmentosum type A (XPAC) gene, as follows: D9S151/D9S12P1 - D9S12P2 - D9S197 - D9S196 - D9S280 - FACC - D9S287/XPAC - D9S180 - D9S6 - D9S176. Using the contig we have been able to eliminate the {alpha}1 type XV collagen gene and the markers D9S119 and D9S297 from the NBCCS candidate region. Twelve YACs have been used to screen a chromosome 9 cosmid library and more than 1000 cosmids from the region have been identified to be used for the construction of a cosmid contig. A selection of these cosmids will be used for the isolation of coding sequencing from the region.

  14. Risk Factors Associated with Loco-Regional Failure after Surgical Resection in Patients with Resectable Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Ju; Lee, Woo Jung; Kang, Chang Moo; Hwang, Ho Kyoung; Bang, Seung Min; Song, Si Young; Seong, Jinsil

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the risk factors associated with loco-regional failure after surgical resection and to identify the subgroup that can obtain benefits from adjuvant radiotherapy (RT). Materials and Methods We identified patients treated with surgical resection for resectable pancreatic cancer at Severance hospital between January 1993 and December 2014. Patients who received any neoadjuvant or adjuvant RT were excluded. A total of 175 patients were included. Adjuvant chemotherapy was performed in 107 patients with either a gemcitabine-based regimen (65.4%) or 5-FU based one (34.9%). Results The median loco-regional failure-free survival (LRFFS) and overall survival (OS) were 23.9 and 33.6 months, respectively. A recurrence developed in 108 of 175 patients (61.7%). The predominant pattern of the first failure was distant (42.4%) and 47 patients (26.9%) developed local failure as the first site of recurrence. Multivariate analysis identified initial CA 19–9 ≥ 200 U/mL, N1 stage, perineural invasion (PNI), and resection margin as significant independent risk factors for LRFFS. Patients were divided into four groups according to the number of risk factors, including initial CA 19–9, N stage, and PNI. Patients exhibiting two risk factors had 3.2-fold higher loco-regional failure (P < 0.001) and patients with all risk factors showed a 6.5-fold increase (P < 0.001) compared with those with no risk factors. In the analysis for OS, patients with more than two risk factors also had 3.3- to 6-fold higher risk of death with statistical significance. Conclusion The results suggest that patients who exhibit more than two risk factors have a higher risk of locoregional failure and death. This subgroup could be benefited by the effective local adjuvant treatment. PMID:27332708

  15. Multi-exposure cancer and non-cancer risk assessment of trihalomethanes in drinking water supplies - A case study of Eastern region of India.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Minashree; Gupta, S K; Mishra, B K

    2015-03-01

    The lifetime cancer risk and the hazard index of trihalomethanes (THMs) through oral ingestion, dermal absorption, and inhalation exposure from supply water of five WTPs were analysed. THMs concentration varied from plant to plant and was found to be in the range of 274-511µg/l, which is much higher than the prescribed USEPA standards of 80µg/l. Chloroform was the most dominant THM followed by bromodichloromethane (BDCM), and dibromochloromethane (DBCM). Cancer risk analysis through multi-pathways exposure reveals that residents had a higher cancer risk through oral ingestion than other two routes of exposure. The lifetime cancer risks of THMs from supply water were 100 times higher than prescribed USEPA guidelines. The higher cancer risk found for Indian context than those reported for other countries like USA, UK, Japan, Australia, is mainly due to the higher concentration level of THMs, water intake and average body weight. The study also revealed that amongst different THMs, chloroform is the major THMs causing cancer risk through both oral and dermal route of exposure whereas in case of inhalation it was mainly because of BDCM. Average lifetime cancer risk analysis indicated that females are more prone to cancer risk than males. Oral ingestion is a major route indicating the potential impact of non-cancer risk while it was insignificant through dermal exposure. Sensitivity analysis of THMs revealed that chloroform is the predominant parameter followed by body weight and exposure duration influencing cancer risk.

  16. Undergraduate Education in Cancer in the European Region. Report on a UICC/WHO Meeting (Geneva, Switzerland, April 6-8, 1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe.

    The progress of undergraduate education in cancer in European countries was assessed, and recommendations were offered for further development according to the EURO program. Based on a survey of undergraduate education in medical schools of the European region, the following areas were evaluated: goals and objectives of teaching, tasks a general…

  17. Prognostic value of replication errors on chromosomes 2p and 3p in non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Pifarré, A.; Rosell, R.; Monzó, M.; De Anta, J. M.; Moreno, I.; Sánchez, J. J.; Ariza, A.; Mate, J. L.; Martińez, E.; Sánchez, M.

    1997-01-01

    As chromosomes 2p and 3p are frequent targets for genomic instability in lung cancer, we have addressed whether alterations of simple (CA)n DNA repeats occur in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) at early stages. We have analysed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay replication errors (RER) and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at microsatellites mapped on chromosomes 2p and 3p in 64 paired tumour-normal DNA samples from consecutively resected stage I, II or IIIA NSCLC. DNA samples were also examined for K-ras and p53 gene mutations by PCR-single-stranded conformational polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) analysis and cyclic sequencing, as well as their relationship with clinical outcome. Forty-two of the 64 (66%) NSCLC patients showed RER at single or multiple loci. LOH was detected in 23 tumours (36%). Among patients with stage I disease, the 5-year survival rate was 80% in those whose tumours had no evidence of RER and 26% in those with RER (P = 0.005). No correlation was established between RER phenotype and LOH, K-ras or p53 mutations. RER remained a strong predictive factor (hazard ratio for death, 2.89; 95% confidence interval, 2.23-3.79; P = 0.002) after adjustment for all other evaluated factors, including p53, K-ras, LOH, histological type, tumour differentiation and TNM stage, suggesting that microsatellite instability on chromosomes 2p and 3p may play a role in NSCLC progression through a different pathway from the traditional tumour mechanisms of oncogene activation and/or tumour-suppressor gene inactivation. Images Figure 1 PMID:9010024

  18. Pathogenicity evaluation of BRCA1 and BRCA2 unclassified variants identified in Portuguese breast/ovarian cancer families.

    PubMed

    Santos, Catarina; Peixoto, Ana; Rocha, Patrícia; Pinto, Pedro; Bizarro, Susana; Pinheiro, Manuela; Pinto, Carla; Henrique, Rui; Teixeira, Manuel R

    2014-05-01

    Hereditary breast/ovarian cancer syndrome is caused by germline deleterious mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2. A major problem of genetic testing and counseling is the finding of variants of uncertain significance (VUS). We sought to ascertain the pathogenicity of 25 BRCA1 and BRCA2 VUS identified in Portuguese families during genetic testing. We performed cosegregation analysis of VUS with cancer in families, evaluated their frequency in unaffected controls, and looked for loss of heterozygosity in tumors. In addition, three different bioinformatic algorithms were used (Interactive Biosoftware, ESEfinder, and PolyPhen). Finally, six VUS located in exon-intron boundaries were analyzed by RT-PCR. We found that seven variants segregated with the disease, six variants co-occurred with a pathogenic mutation in the same gene, and four variants co-occurred with a deleterious mutation in the other BRCA gene. By RT-PCR, we observed that four variants (BRCA1 c.4484G>T, BRCA2 c.682-2A>C, BRCA2 c.8488-1G>A, and BRCA2 c.8954-5A>G) disrupted splicing. After the combined analysis, we were able to classify 4 splicing variants as pathogenic mutations, 16 variants as neutral, and 3 variants as polymorphisms; only 2 variants remained classified as VUS. This work highlights the contribution of DNA, RNA, and in silico data to assess the pathogenicity of BRCA1/2 VUS, which, in turn, allows more accurate genetic counseling and clinical management of the families carrying them. PMID:24607278

  19. Indicators of breast cancer severity and appropriateness of surgery based on hospital administrative data in the Lazio Region, Italy

    PubMed Central

    Schifano, Patrizia; Papini, Paolo; Agabiti, Nera; Scarinci, Marina; Borgia, Piero; Perucci, Carlo A

    2006-01-01

    Background Administrative data can serve as an easily available source for epidemiological and evaluation studies. The aim of this study is to evaluate the use of hospital administrative data to determine breast cancer severity and the appropriateness of surgical treatment. Methods the study population consisted of 398 patients randomly selected from a cohort of women hospitalized for first-time breast cancer surgery in the Lazio Region, Italy. Tumor severity was defined in three different ways: 1) tumor size; 2) clinical stage (TNM); 3) severity indicator based on HIS data (SI). Sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value (PPV) of the severity indicator in evaluating appropriateness of surgery were calculated. The accuracy of HIS data was measured using Kappa statistic. Results Most of 387 cases were classified as T1 and T2 (tumor size), more than 70% were in stage I or II and the SI classified 60% of cases in medium-low category. Variation from guidelines indications identified under and over treatments. The accuracy of the SI to predict under-treatment was relatively good (58% of all procedures classified as under-treatment using pT where also classified as such using SI), and even greater predicting over-treatment (88.2% of all procedures classified as over treatment using pT where also classified as such using SI). Agreement between clinical chart and hospital discharge reports was K = 0.35. Conclusion Our findings suggest that administrative data need to be used with caution when evaluating surgical appropriateness, mainly because of the limited ability of SI to predict tumor size and the questionable quality of HIS data as observed in other studies. PMID:16464258

  20. Prediction of response to chemoradiation in rectal cancer by a gene polymorphism in the epidermal growth factor receptor promoter region

    SciTech Connect

    Spindler, Karen-Lise Garm . E-mail: kalgsp@vgs.vejleamt.dk; Nielsen, Jens Nederby; Lindebjerg, Jan; Brandslund, Ivan; Jakobsen, Anders

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been associated with radioresistance in solid tumors. Recently a polymorphism in the Sp1 recognition site of the EGFR promoter region was identified. The present study investigated the predictive value of this polymorphism for the outcome of chemoradiation in locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: The study included 77 patients with locally advanced T3 rectal tumors. Treatment consisted of preoperative radiation therapy at a total tumor dose of 65 Gy and concomitant chemotherapy with Uftoral. Blood samples from 63 patients were evaluated for Sp1 -216 G/T polymorphism by polymerase chain reaction analysis. Forty-eight primary tumor biopsies were available for EGFR immunostaining. Patients underwent surgery 8 weeks after treatment. Pathologic response evaluation was performed according to the tumor regression grade (TRG) system. Results: Forty-nine percent had major response (TRG1-2) and 51% moderate response (TRG 3-4) to chemoradiation. The rates of major response were 34% (10/29) in GG homozygote patients compared with 65% (22/34) in patients with T containing variants (p = 0.023). Fifty-eight percent of biopsies were positive for EGFR expression (28/48). The major response rates with regard to EGFR immunostaining were not significantly different. EGFR-positive tumors were found in 83% of the GG homozygote patients compared with 38% of patients with TT or GT variants (p = 0.008). Conclusions: There was a significant correlation between EGFR Sp1 -216 G/T polymorphism and treatment response to chemoradiation in locally advanced rectal cancer. Further investigations of a second set of patient and other treatment schedules are warranted.

  1. [COMPARATIVE ASSESSMENT OF THE MULTIMEDIA CANCER HEALTH RISKS CAUSED BY CONTAMINATION OF THE KRASNOIARSK KRAĬ REGIONS' ENVIRONMENT].

    PubMed

    Novikov, S M; Shashina, T A; Dodina, N S; Kislitsin, V A; Vorobieva, L M; Goriaev, D V; Tikhonova, I V; Kurkatov, S V

    2015-01-01

    Krasnoyarsk Krai is a region with developed mining and processing industries, notoriously known industries, as sources of carcinogenic emission. For 55 administrative units of the Krai 303 large enterprises' industrial emissions were preliminary prioritized and their location was designated. Only 52% out of the carcinogens emitted into the ambient air by industries were controlled, in other environments the figures ranged from 20% (soil, food) to 48% (drinking water), 10 carcinogens were not controlled in the environment at all. Based on the results of ranking carcinogenic emission and analysis of the carcinogens monitoring in the environment in 2007-2011 31 substances were selected. A comparative analysis of multiple environmental carcinogenic risks showed that 78% of the areas, based on the receipt ofcarcinogensfrom two media, and 80% ofthe areas taking into account the receipt ofcarcinogens from three media attributed to the alarming level of risk for population, that requires continuous monitoring and routine health interventions for its mitigation. The maximal multiple environmental risk values that took into account inputs from all sources were close to the upper boundary alarming level of risk, in Divnogorsk (7,80E-04), Norilsk (7,97 E-04), Krasnoyarsk (8,84E-04) and Achinsk (9,4 E-04). The greatest inputs to total individual cancer risk from polluted ambient air were made by benzene, chromium VI, formaldehyde and nickel, from drinking water--by arsenic, aldrin and heptachlor from soil--by arsenic and lead. The ambient air input into total multiple environmental carcinogenic risk ranged from 31.5 to 99.5%, drinking water input--from 0.5 to 68.5%, soil--up to 0.1%. Areas with maximum levels of total carcinogenic risk are characterized by the highest levels of average long-term indices of cancer development. The study discussed in this article has screening nature. Further in-depth researches for carcinogenic and toxic multimedia risks are required.

  2. The region-of-interest size impacts on Ki67 quantification by computer-assisted image analysis in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Christgen, Matthias; von Ahsen, Sabrina; Christgen, Henriette; Länger, Florian; Kreipe, Hans

    2015-09-01

    Therapeutic decision-making in breast cancer depends on histopathologic biomarkers and is influenced by the Ki67 proliferation index. Computer-assisted image analysis (CAIA) promises to improve Ki67 quantification. Several commercial applications have been developed for semiautomated CAIA-based Ki67 quantification, many of which rely on measurements in user-defined regions of interest (ROIs). Because of intratumoral proliferative heterogeneity, definition of the ROI is an important step in the analytical procedure. This study explores the ROI size impacts on Ki67 quantification. Whole-slide sections of 100 breast cancers were immunostained with the anti-Ki67 antibody 30-9 and were analyzed on the iScan Coreo digital pathology platform using a Food and Drug Administration-cleared Ki67 quantification software version v5.3 (Virtuoso; Ventana, Tucson, TX). For each case, the Ki67 labeling index (LI) was determined in multiple ROIs of gradually increasing size centered around a high-proliferation area. The spatial Ki67 decline was modeled with nonlinear regression. Depending on the ROI size, the median Ki67 LI varied between 55% and 15%. The proportion of tumors classified as Ki67 low according to the St Gallen 2013/2015 cutoff increased from 2% to 56%, as the ROI size increased from 50 to 10,000 cells captured. The interrater reliability of conventional Ki67 assessment versus CAIA-based Ki67 quantification was also dependent on the ROI size and varied between slight and almost perfect agreement (Cohen κ = 0.06-0.85). In conclusion, the ROI size is a critically important parameter for semiautomated Ki67 quantification by CAIA. Ki67 LIs determined on platforms like iScan Coreo/Virtuoso require an ROI size adjustment, for which we offer a downloadable data transformation tool.

  3. The region-of-interest size impacts on Ki67 quantification by computer-assisted image analysis in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Christgen, Matthias; von Ahsen, Sabrina; Christgen, Henriette; Länger, Florian; Kreipe, Hans

    2015-09-01

    Therapeutic decision-making in breast cancer depends on histopathologic biomarkers and is influenced by the Ki67 proliferation index. Computer-assisted image analysis (CAIA) promises to improve Ki67 quantification. Several commercial applications have been developed for semiautomated CAIA-based Ki67 quantification, many of which rely on measurements in user-defined regions of interest (ROIs). Because of intratumoral proliferative heterogeneity, definition of the ROI is an important step in the analytical procedure. This study explores the ROI size impacts on Ki67 quantification. Whole-slide sections of 100 breast cancers were immunostained with the anti-Ki67 antibody 30-9 and were analyzed on the iScan Coreo digital pathology platform using a Food and Drug Administration-cleared Ki67 quantification software version v5.3 (Virtuoso; Ventana, Tucson, TX). For each case, the Ki67 labeling index (LI) was determined in multiple ROIs of gradually increasing size centered around a high-proliferation area. The spatial Ki67 decline was modeled with nonlinear regression. Depending on the ROI size, the median Ki67 LI varied between 55% and 15%. The proportion of tumors classified as Ki67 low according to the St Gallen 2013/2015 cutoff increased from 2% to 56%, as the ROI size increased from 50 to 10,000 cells captured. The interrater reliability of conventional Ki67 assessment versus CAIA-based Ki67 quantification was also dependent on the ROI size and varied between slight and almost perfect agreement (Cohen κ = 0.06-0.85). In conclusion, the ROI size is a critically important parameter for semiautomated Ki67 quantification by CAIA. Ki67 LIs determined on platforms like iScan Coreo/Virtuoso require an ROI size adjustment, for which we offer a downloadable data transformation tool. PMID:26206765

  4. Pesticide exposure and lymphohaematopoietic cancers: a case-control study in an agricultural region (Larissa, Thessaly, Greece)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The causality of lymphohaematopoietic cancers (LHC) is multifactorial and studies investigating the association between chemical exposure and LHC have produced variable results. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between exposure to pesticides and LHC in an agricultural region of Greece. Methods A structured questionnaire was employed in a hospital-based case control study to gather information on demographics, occupation, exposure to pesticides, agricultural practices, family and medical history and smoking. To control for confounders, backward conditional and multinomial logistic regression analyses were used. To assess the dose-response relationship between exposure and disease, the chi-square test for trend was used. Results Three hundred and fifty-four (354) histologically confirmed LHC cases diagnosed from 2004 to 2006 and 455 sex- and age-matched controls were included in the study. Pesticide exposure was associated with total LHC cases (OR 1.46, 95% CI 1.05-2.04), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) (OR 1.87, 95% CI 1.00-3.51) and leukaemia (OR 2.14, 95% CI 1.09-4.20). A dose-response pattern was observed for total LHC cases (P = 0.004), MDS (P = 0.024) and leukaemia (P = 0.002). Pesticide exposure was independently associated with total LHC cases (OR 1.41, 95% CI 1.00 - 2.00) and leukaemia (OR 2.05, 95% CI 1.02-4.12) after controlling for age, smoking and family history (cancers, LHC and immunological disorders). Smoking during application of pesticides was strongly associated with total LHC cases (OR 3.29, 95% CI 1.81-5.98), MDS (OR 3.67, 95% CI 1.18-12.11), leukaemia (OR 10.15, 95% CI 2.15-65.69) and lymphoma (OR 2.72, 95% CI 1.02-8.00). This association was even stronger for total LHC cases (OR 18.18, 95% CI 2.38-381.17) when eating simultaneously with pesticide application. Conclusions Lymphohaematopoietic cancers were associated with pesticide exposure after controlling for confounders. Smoking and eating during pesticide

  5. BRAF Mutations in an Italian Regional Population: Implications for the Therapy of Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Monti, Eleonora; Bovero, Michela; Mortara, Lorenzo; Pera, Giorgia; Zupo, Simonetta; Gugiatti, Elena; Dono, Mariella; Massa, Barbara; Ansaldo, Gian Luca; Massimo, Giusti

    2015-01-01

    Background. Molecular diagnostics has offered new techniques for searching for mutations in thyroid indeterminate lesions. The study's aim was to evaluate the BRAF mutations' incidence in an Italian regional population. Subjects and Methods. 70 Caucasian patients born in Liguria with indeterminate or suspicious cytological diagnoses. Results. A BRAF gene mutation was successfully analyzed in 56/70 patients. The mutation was BRAF V600E in 12/56 cases (21%) and BRAF K601E in 2/56 (4%). Of the BRAF mutated samples on cytological diagnosis (14/56 cases), 2/14 cases (14%) were benign on final histology and 12/14 (86%) were malignant. All BRAF-mutated cases on cytology that were found to be benign on histological examination carried the K601E mutation. Of the nonmutated BRAF cases (42/56, 75%) which were later found to be malignant on definitive histology, 5 cases were follicular carcinomas (36%), 3 cases were incidentally found to be papillary microcarcinomas (22%), 2 were cases papillary carcinomas (14%), 1 was case follicular variant of papillary carcinoma (7%), 1 was case medullary carcinoma (7%), 1 case was Hurtle cell tumor (7%), and 1 case was combined cell carcinoma and papillary oncocytic carcinoma (7%). Conclusions. The presence of the BRAF V600E mutation may suggest a more aggressive surgical approach. BRAF K601E mutation did not correlate with malignancy indexes. PMID:26693224

  6. Werner syndrome as a hereditary risk factor for exocrine pancreatic cancer: potential role of WRN in pancreatic tumorigenesis and patient-tailored therapy.

    PubMed

    Chun, Stephen G; Yee, Nelson S

    2010-09-01

    Advanced age is considered a risk factor for pancreatic cancer, but this relationship at the molecular and genetic level remains unclear. We present a clinical case series focusing on an association between pancreatic adenocarcinoma and Werner syndrome (WS) that is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder characterized by accelerated aging and cancer predisposition, and is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the WS RecQ helicase gene (WRN). Although pancreatic adenocarcinoma mostly occurs in a sporadic fashion, a minority of cases occurs in the context of susceptible individuals with hereditary syndromes. While WS has not been previously recognized as a risk factor for developing malignant tumors of the exocrine pancreas, the clinicopathologic features of three reported patients suggest a contributory role of WRN deficiency in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Molecular genetic analyses support the role of WRN as a tumor suppressor gene, although recent evidence reveals that WRN can alternatively promote oncogenicity depending on the molecular context. Based upon the clinico-pathologic features of these patients and the role of WRN in experimental models, we propose that its loss-of-function predisposes the development of pancreatic adenocarcinoma through epigenetic silencing or loss-of-heterozygosity of WRN. To test this hypothesis, we are investigating the mechanistic role of WRN in pancreatic cancer models including a pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell line generated from a human with WS. These studies are expected to provide new insight into the relationship between aging and pancreatic tumorigenesis, and facilitate development of novel strategies for patient-tailored interventions in this deadly malignancy.

  7. Increased nucleotide polymorphic changes in the 5′-untranslated region of δ-catenin (CTNND2) gene in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Chen, Yan-Hua; Hong, Heng; Zeng, Yan; Zhang, Jiao; Lu, Jian-Ping; Jeansonne, Beverly; Lu, Qun

    2008-01-01

    Cancer pathogenesis involves multiple genetic and epigenetic alterations, which result in oncogenic changes in gene expression. δ-Catenin (CTNND2) is overexpressed in cancer although the mechanisms of its upregulation are highly variable. Here we report that in prostate cancer the methylation of CpG islands in δ-catenin promoter was not a primary regulatory event. There was also no δ-catenin gene amplification. However, using Single-Strand Conformation Polymorphism analysis, we observed the increased nucleotide changes in the 5′-untranslated region of δ-catenin gene in human prostate cancer. At least one such change (-9 G>A) is a true somatic point mutation associated with a high Gleason score, poorly differentiated prostatic adenocarcinoma. Laser capture microdissection coupled with PCR analyses detected the mutation only in cancerous but not in the adjacent benign prostatic tissues. Using chimeric genes encoding the luciferase reporter, we found that this mutation, but not a random mutation or a mutation that disrupts an upstream open reading frame, resulted in a remarkably higher expression and enzyme activity. This mutation did not affect transcriptional efficiency, suggesting that it promotes δ-catenin translation. This is the first report of δ-catenin gene mutation in cancer and supports the notion that multiple mechanisms contribute to its increased expression in carcinogenesis. PMID:18978817

  8. Recurrence in Region of Spared Parotid Gland After Definitive Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, Donald M.; Lee, Nancy Y.

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: To discuss the implications of three examples of periparotid recurrence after definitive intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head and neck cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: We present 3 patients with HNC who underwent definitive IMRT with concurrent chemotherapy and later had treatment failure in or near a spared parotid gland. Two patients had bilateral multilevel nodal disease, and all had Level II nodal disease ipsilateral to the site of recurrence. The patients were treated using dose-painting IMRT with a dose of 70 Gy to the gross tumor volume and 59.4 Gy or 54 Gy to the high-risk or low-risk clinical tumor volume, respectively. The parotid glands were spared bilaterally. The patients had not undergone any surgical treatment for HNC before radiotherapy. Results: All patients had treatment failure in the region of a spared parotid gland. Failure in the 2 patients with bilateral multilevel nodal involvement occurred in the periparotid lymph nodes. The third patient developed a dermal metastasis near the tail of a spared parotid gland. On pretreatment imaging, the 2 patients with nodal failure had small nonspecific periparotid nodules that showed no hypermetabolic activity on positron emission tomography. Conclusion: For HNC patients receiving definitive IMRT, nonspecific positron emission tomography-negative periparotid nodules on pretreatment imaging should raise the index of suspicion for subclinical disease in the presence of multilevel or Level II nodal metastases. Additional evaluation of such nodules might be indicated before sparing the ipsilateral parotid gland.

  9. Patterns of epidermal growth factor receptor mutation in non-small-cell lung cancers in the Gulf region

    PubMed Central

    JAZIEH, ABDUL RAHMAN; JAAFAR, HASAN; JALOUDI, MOHAMMED; MUSTAFA, RASHA SALEH; RASUL, KAKIL; ZEKRI, JAMAL; BAMEFLEH, HANAA; GASMELSEED, AHMED

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of epidermal growth factor receptor mutations (EGFRmut) in the Gulf region (GR) and its correlation with demographic and clinical characteristics. A multisite retrospective study was conducted, including institutions from Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Qatar. All consecutive patients with non-small-cell lung cancer tested for EGFRmut were eligible. Data collected included demographic information, disease characteristics and EGFR test results. Data on 230 patients were obtained. The median age of the patients was 61 years (range, 26–87 years); 169 patients (69.83%) were male and 204 (88.7%) were Arab. The histological subtype was adenocarcinoma in 191 (83.4%) and squamous cell carcinoma in 21 cases (9.17%). Overall, EGFRmut were detected in 66 patients (28.7%), with a prevalence of 32.46% in adenocarcinoma. No squamous cell carcinomas were found to harbor EGFRmut. The univariate and multivariate analyses revealed that female gender, non-smoking status and adenocarcinoma subtype were significant predictors for EGFRmut. There was no difference between Arabs and non-Arabs. In conclusion, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first multisite study to report the prevalence of EGFRmut in the GR population, which was found to be higher compared with that in Western, but lower compared with that in Far Eastern populations. Studies evaluating the efficacy of targeted therapy in this population are underway. PMID:26807249

  10. Long-term bresults of radiotherapy combined with nedaplatin and 5-fluorouracil for postoperative loco-regional recurrent esophageal cancer: update on a phase II study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In 2006, we reported the effectiveness of chemoradiotherapy for postoperative recurrent esophageal cancer with a median observation period of 18 months. The purpose of the present study was to update the results of radiotherapy combined with nedaplatin and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) for postoperative loco-regional recurrent esophageal cancer. Methods Between 2000 and 2004, we performed a phase II study on treatment of postoperative loco-regional recurrent esophageal cancer with radiotherapy (60 Gy/30 fractions/6 weeks) combined with chemotherapy consisting of two cycles of nedaplatin (70 mg/m2/2 h) and 5-FU (500 mg/m2/24 h for 5 days). The primary endpoint was overall survival rate, and the secondary endpoints were progression-free survival rate, irradiated-field control rate and chronic toxicity. Results A total of 30 patients were enrolled in this study. The regimen was completed in 76.7% of the patients. The median observation period for survivors was 72.0 months. The 5-year overall survival rate was 27.0% with a median survival period of 21.0 months. The 5-year progression-free survival rate and irradiated-field control rate were 25.1% and 71.5%, respectively. Grade 3 or higher late toxicity was observed in only one patient. Two long-term survivors had gastric tube cancer more than 5 years after chemoradiotherapy. Pretreatment performance status, pattern of recurrence (worse for patients with anastomotic recurrence) and number of recurrent lesions (worse for patients with multiple recurrent lesions) were statistically significant prognostic factors for overall survival. Conclusions Radiotherapy combined with nedaplatin and 5-FU is a safe and effective salvage treatment for postoperative loco-regional recurrent esophageal cancer. However, the prognosis of patients with multiple regional recurrence or anastomotic recurrence is very poor. PMID:23171077

  11. A new single nucleotide polymorphism in the insulin-like growth factor I regulatory region associates with colorectal cancer risk in singapore chinese.

    PubMed

    Wong, Hui-Lee; Delellis, Katherine; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Koh, Woon-Puay; Van Den Berg, David; Lee, Hin-Peng; Yu, Mimi C; Ingles, Sue A

    2005-01-01

    Elevated levels of plasma insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) are a potential risk factor for several cancers, including colorectal cancer. Physiologic levels of plasma IGF-I vary greatly; this variation may be in part genetically determined. We identified two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in perfect linkage disequilibrium with each other and in partial linkage disequilibrium with a previously studied cytosine-adenine microsatellite [-969(CA)(n)]. We investigated one of the SNPs, -533T/C,and the 969(CA)(n) in relation to the risk of colorectal cancer in a case-control study nested within a cohort of Singapore Chinese (cases/controls = 290:873). The (CA)(21) allele, rather than the previously implicated (CA)(19) allele, was associated with a reduced risk of colorectal cancer (odds ratio for 21/21 versus all other genotypes, 0.48; 95% confidence interval, 0.28-0.84). For the -533C/T SNP, persons carrying one or more copies of the C allele had a decreased in risk of colorectal cancer compared with noncarriers (odds ratio for CC/CT versus TT, 0.58; 95% confidence interval, 0.41-0.82). This association was specific for colon, as opposed to rectal cancer and was modified by age. We also examined a functional insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP3) promoter SNP, -202 A/C, previously reported to predict serum IGFBP3 levels. Although we were able to confirm this genotype-phenotype association, the -202A/C IGFBP3 SNP was not significantly associated with colorectal cancer risk. In conclusion, we report a novel SNP in the IGF-I regulatory region that is associated with colorectal cancer risk.

  12. Automated selection of regions of interest for intensity-based FRET analysis of transferrin endocytic trafficking in normal vs. cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Talati, Ronak; Vanderpoel, Andrew; Eladdadi, Amina; Anderson, Kate; Abe, Ken; Barroso, Margarida

    2014-03-15

    The overexpression of certain membrane-bound receptors is a hallmark of cancer progression and it has been suggested to affect the organization, activation, recycling and down-regulation of receptor-ligand complexes in human cancer cells. Thus, comparing receptor trafficking pathways in normal vs. cancer cells requires the ability to image cells expressing dramatically different receptor expression levels. Here, we have presented a significant technical advance to the analysis and processing of images collected using intensity based Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) confocal microscopy. An automated Image J macro was developed to select region of interests (ROI) based on intensity and statistical-based thresholds within cellular images with reduced FRET signal. Furthermore, SSMD (strictly standardized mean differences), a statistical signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) evaluation parameter, was used to validate the quality of FRET analysis, in particular of ROI database selection. The Image J ROI selection macro together with SSMD as an evaluation parameter of SNR levels, were used to investigate the endocytic recycling of Tfn-TFR complexes at nanometer range resolution in human normal vs. breast cancer cells expressing significantly different levels of endogenous TFR. Here, the FRET-based assay demonstrates that Tfn-TFR complexes in normal epithelial vs. breast cancer cells show a significantly different E% behavior during their endocytic recycling pathway. Since E% is a relative measure of distance, we propose that these changes in E% levels represent conformational changes in Tfn-TFR complexes during endocytic pathway. Thus, our results indicate that Tfn-TFR complexes undergo different conformational changes in normal vs. cancer cells, indicating that the organization of Tfn-TFR complexes at the nanometer range is significantly altered during the endocytic recycling pathway in cancer cells. In summary, improvements in the automated selection of FRET ROI datasets

  13. Screening of Trace Elements in Hair of the Female Population with Different Types of Cancers in Wielkopolska Region of Poland

    PubMed Central

    Czerny, Bogusław; Krupka, Krzysztof; Ożarowski, Marcin; Seremak-Mrozikiewicz, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    Background. Cancer constitutes a major health problem worldwide. Thus, search for reliable and practical markers of the disease process remains the key issue of the diagnostic process. Objectives. The study aims at linking the trace element status of an organism, assessed by hair analysis, with the occurrence of cancer diseases. Material and Methods. Hair samples were collected from 299 patients with cancer diseases confirmed by a histopathological test and from 100 controls. Cancer patients were divided into three groups, depending on cancer type: hormone-dependent cancer, cancer of the alimentary tract, and cancer with high glycolytic activity. Mineral element analysis of hair was performed using an atomic emission spectrophotometer with inductively coupled plasma (ICP-OES) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Results. Statistically significantly lower concentrations of selenium, zinc, copper, germanium and boron, iron, and magnesium were observed in the three groups of cancer patients. Disturbance in the axis glucose-insulin and changes in concentrations of heavy metals and toxic elements were also noted. Conclusions. It seems safe to conclude that our results confirmed usefulness of hair element analysis in screening tests for the assessment of the biomarker of various cancer diseases in a female population. PMID:25580464

  14. [Evidence-based planning: the case of mass screening for colorectal cancer in the Lazio region of Italy].

    PubMed

    Federici, A; Borgia, P; Guasticchi, G

    2005-01-01

    Several population-based trials have shown the efficacy of colorectal cancer mass-screening based on guaiac faecal blood testing in a generic risk population. SCCR represents a very complex and resource-demanding public health intervention and, for this reason, its planning requires actual efficacy as a main goal. Since evidence of efficacy demonstrated by population-based trials may not actually generate effectiveness, the Regional Government of Latium Region decided to implement some experimental studies before introducing a screening programme, in order to define an evidence-based organisational model of SCCR and a feasibility evaluation of the real needs for screening. The aims of the pilot studies were to define an evidence-based organisational model, to evaluate the necessary resources and the actual quality standard of clinical examination, treatment and surgery. The aim of the feasibility study is to test the organisational model for SCCR for about 300,000 citizens residing in the Latium region. The present article illustrates the scheduling path set out, which is based on the involvement of experts, GP representatives and specialists from scientific societies and it is planned by the following actions: Definition of evidence-based recommendations; identification of further investigations; realization of experimental studies; definition of an evidence-based organisational model. The main research areas have been dealt with using randomised trials, in order to evaluate the efficacy of the involvement of GPs and the kind of test for RSOF Our work has produced evidences which were sometimes in contrast with information in the literature, demonstrating that guaiac RSOF testing is less reproducible and determines lower uptake than immunochemical testing. Our work also shows that the involvement of GPs should be based on their personal skills rather than on their role. Such evidences are fundamental to the definition of the organisational model and confirm the

  15. Radiation Therapy Risk Factors for Development of Lymphedema in Patients Treated With Regional Lymph Node Irradiation for Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, Ravi A.; Miller, Cynthia L.; Skolny, Melissa N.; Warren, Laura E.G.; Horick, Nora; Jammallo, Lauren S.; Sadek, Betro T.; Shenouda, Mina N.; O'Toole, Jean; Specht, Michelle C.; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: We previously evaluated the risk of breast cancer-related lymphedema (LE) with the addition of regional lymph node irradiation (RLNR) and found an increased risk when RLNR is used. Here we analyze the association of technical radiation therapy (RT) factors in RLNR patients with the risk of LE development. Methods and Materials: From 2005 to 2012, we prospectively screened 1476 women for LE who underwent surgery for breast cancer. Among 1507 breasts treated, 172 received RLNR and had complete technical data for analysis. RLNR was delivered as supraclavicular (SC) irradiation (69% [118 of 172 patients]) or SC plus posterior axillary boost (PAB) (31% [54 of 172]). Bilateral arm volume measurements were performed pre- and postoperatively. Patients' RT plans were analyzed for SC field lateral border (relative to the humeral head), total dose to SC, RT fraction size, beam energy, and type of tangent (normal vs wide). Cox proportional hazards models were used to analyze associated risk factors for LE. Results: Median postoperative follow-up was 29.3 months (range: 4.9-74.1 months). The 2-year cumulative incidence of LE was 22% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 15%-32%) for SC and 20% (95% CI: 11%-37%) for SC plus PAB (SC+PAB). None of the analyzed variables was significantly associated with LE risk (extent of humeral head: P=.74 for <1/3 vs >2/3, P=.41 for 1/3 to 2/3 vs >2/3; P=.40 for fraction size of 1.8 Gy vs 2.0 Gy; P=.57 for beam energy 6 MV vs 10 MV; P=.74 for tangent type wide vs regular; P=.66 for SC vs SC+PAB). Only pretreatment body mass index (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.09; 95% CI: 1.04-1.15, P=.0007) and the use of axillary lymph node dissection (HR: 7.08, 95% CI: 0.98-51.40, P=.05) were associated with risk of subsequent LE development. Conclusions: Of the RT parameters tested, none was associated with an increased risk of LE development. This study underscores the need for future work investigating alternative RLNR risk factors for LE.

  16. Descriptive Epidemiology of Human Thyroid Cancer: Experience From a Regional Registry and The “Volcanic Factor”

    PubMed Central

    Malandrino, Pasqualino; Scollo, Claudia; Marturano, Ilenia; Russo, Marco; Tavarelli, Martina; Attard, Marco; Richiusa, Pierina; Violi, Maria Antonia; Dardanoni, Gabriella; Vigneri, Riccardo; Pellegriti, Gabriella

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid cancer (TC), the most common endocrine tumor, has steadily increased worldwide due to the increase of the papillary histotype. The reasons for this spread have not been established. In addition to more sensitive thyroid nodule screening, the effect of environmental factors cannot be excluded. Because high incidences of TC were found in volcanic areas (Hawaii and Iceland), a volcanic environment may play a role in the pathogenesis of TC. In January 2002, the Regional Register for TC was instituted in Sicily. With a population of approximately five million inhabitants with similar genetic and lifestyle features, the coexistence in Sicily of rural, urban, industrial, moderate-to-low iodine intake, and volcanic areas provides a conducive setting for assessing the environmental influences on the etiology of TC. In Sicily, between 2002 and 2004, 1,950 new cases of TC were identified, with an age-standardized rate (world) ASR(w) = 17.8/105 in females and 3.7/105 in males and a high female/male ratio (4.3:1.0). The incidence of TC was heterogeneous within Sicily. There were 2.3 times more cases in the Catania province (where most of the inhabitants live in the volcanic area of Mt. Etna): ASR(w) = 31.7/105 in females and 6.4/105 in males vs. 14.1 in females and 3.0 in males in the rest of Sicily. Multivariate analysis documented that residents in the volcanic area of Mt. Etna had a higher risk of TC, compared to the residents in urban, industrial, and iodine deficient areas of Sicily. An abnormally high concentration of several chemicals was found in the drinking water of the Mt. Etna aquifer, which provides water to most of the residents in the Catania province. Our data suggest that environmental carcinogen(s) of volcanic origin may promote papillary TC. Additional analyses, including cancer biological and molecular features, will allow a better understanding of risk factors and etiopathogenetic mechanisms. PMID:23761783

  17. Glutathione S-transferase T1 and myeloperoxidase −463 G>A genotypes in lung cancer patients of Kumaun region

    PubMed Central

    Bag, Arundhati; Bag, Niladri; Jeena, Lalit Mohan; Jyala, Narayan Singh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Null genetic polymorphism of Glutathione S-transferase T1 (GSTT1) and -463 G>A promoter polymorphism of myeloperoxidase (MPO) were studied for association with lung cancer. Materials and Methods: In a case- control study 26 lung cancer patients and 33 healthy individuals from hilly Kumaun region of northern India were investigated. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood. GSTT1 null polymorphism was detected by duplex PCR, and MPO polymorphism was detected by performing PCR-RFLP. Results: An increased but statistically non- significant risk for lung cancer was found for GSTT1 null genotype. No association for MPO -463G>A genotype was evident. Conclusion: Further study with large sample size may reveal such association in this population. PMID:25097401

  18. BRCA1 mutations in primary breast and ovarian carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Futreal, P.A.; Cochran, C.; Bennett, L.M.; Haugen-Strano, A.; Terry, L.; Barrett, J.C.; Wiseman, R.; Liu, Q.; Shattuck-Eidens, D.; Harshman, K.

    1994-10-07

    Loss of heterozygosity data from familial tumors suggested that BRCA1, a gene that confers susceptibility to ovarian and early-onset breast cancer, encodes a tumor suppressor. The BRCA1 region is also subject to allelic loss in sporadic breast and ovarian cancers, an indication that BRCA1 mutations may occur somatically in these tumors. The BRCA1 coding region was examined for mutations in primary breast and ovarian tumors that show allele loss at the BRCA1 locus. Mutations were detected in 3 of 32 breast and 1 of 12 ovarian carcinomas; all four mutations were germline alterations and occurred in early-onset cancers. These results suggest that mutation of BRCA1 may not be critical in the development of the majority of breast and ovarian cancers that arise in the absence of a mutant germline allele.

  19. ESR1 gene promoter region methylation in free circulating DNA and its correlation with estrogen receptor protein expression in tumor tissue in breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Tumor expression of estrogen receptor (ER) is an important marker of prognosis, and is predictive of response to endocrine therapy in breast cancer. Several studies have observed that epigenetic events, such methylation of cytosines and deacetylation of histones, are involved in the complex mechanisms that regulate promoter transcription. However, the exact interplay of these factors in transcription activity is not well understood. In this study, we explored the relationship between ER expression status in tumor tissue samples and the methylation of the 5′ CpG promoter region of the estrogen receptor gene (ESR1) isolated from free circulating DNA (fcDNA) in plasma samples from breast cancer patients. Methods Patients (n = 110) with non-metastatic breast cancer had analyses performed of ER expression (luminal phenotype in tumor tissue, by immunohistochemistry method), and the ESR1-DNA methylation status (fcDNA in plasma, by quantitative methylation specific PCR technique). Results Our results showed a significant association between presence of methylated ESR1 in patients with breast cancer and ER negative status in the tumor tissue (p = 0.0179). There was a trend towards a higher probability of ESR1-methylation in those phenotypes with poor prognosis i.e. 80% of triple negative patients, 60% of HER2 patients, compared to 28% and 5.9% of patients with better prognosis such as luminal A and luminal B, respectively. Conclusion Silencing, by methylation, of the promoter region of the ESR1 affects the expression of the estrogen receptor protein in tumors of breast cancer patients; high methylation of ESR1-DNA is associated with estrogen receptor negative status which, in turn, may be implicated in the patient’s resistance to hormonal treatment in breast cancer. As such, epigenetic markers in plasma may be of interest as new targets for anticancer therapy, especially with respect to endocrine treatment. PMID:24495356

  20. The burden of cancer risk in Canada’s indigenous population: a comparative study of known risks in a Canadian region

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Brenda; Kliewer, Erich V; Hall, Madelyn; Demers, Alain A; Turner, Donna; Martens, Patricia; Hong, Say P; Hart, Lyna; Chartrand, Caroline; Munro, Garry

    2011-01-01

    Background Canadian First Nations, the largest of the Aboriginal groups in Canada, have had lower cancer incidence and mortality rates than non-Aboriginal populations in the past. This pattern is changing with increased life expectancy, a growing population, and a poor social environment that influences risk behaviors, metabolic conditions, and disparities in screening uptake. These factors alone do not fully explain differences in cancer risk between populations, as genetic susceptibility and environmental factors also have significant influence. However, genetics and environment are difficult to modify. This study compared modifiable behavioral risk factors and metabolic-associated conditions for men and women, and cancer screening practices of women, between First Nations living on-reserve and a non-First Nations Manitoba rural population (Canada). Methods The study used data from the Canadian Community Health Survey and the Manitoba First Nations Regional Longitudinal Health Survey to examine smoking, binge drinking, metabolic conditions, physical activity, fruit/vegetable consumption, and cancer-screening practices. Results First Nations on-reserve had significantly higher rates of smoking (P < 0.001), binge drinking (P < 0.001), obesity (P < 0.001) and diabetes (P < 0.001), and less leisure-time physical activity (P = 0.029), and consumption of fruits and vegetables (P < 0.001). Sex differences were also apparent. In addition, First Nations women reported significantly less uptake of mammography screening (P < 0.001) but similar rates for cervical cancer screening. Conclusions Based on the findings of this retrospective study, the future cancer burden is expected to be high in the First Nations on-reserve population. Interventions, utilizing existing and new health and social authorities, and long-term institutional partnerships, are required to combat cancer risk disparities, while governments address economic disparities. PMID:22069372

  1. The Effect of Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase-1 Gene 3′Untranslated Region Polymorphism in Colorectal Cancer Risk among Saudi Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Alhadheq, Abdullah M.; Purusottapatnam Shaik, Jilani; Alamri, Abdullah; Aljebreen, Abdulrahman M.; Alharbi, Othman; Almadi, Majid A.; Alhadeq, Faten; Azzam, Nahla A.; Alanazi, Mohammad; Bazzi, Mohammad D.

    2016-01-01

    Background. DNA repair systems are essential for each cell to repair and maintain the genome integrity. Base excision repair pathway is one of the crucial pathways to maintain genome integrity and PARP-1 plays a key role in BER pathway. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the association between polymorphisms in PARP-1 3′untranslated region (3′UTR) SNP rs8679 and its expression in colorectal cancer. Methods. Genotyping and gene expression were performed using TaqMan assays. The effects of age, gender, and tumor location were evaluated in cases and controls regarding the genotyping results. Resulting data was analyzed using SPSS software. Results and Conclusions. Genotyping analysis for SNP rs8679 showed decreased susceptibility to colorectal cancer at heterozygous TC allele and at minor allele C. Further this protective association was also observed in younger age patients (≤57), in female patients, and also in patients with tumors located at colon and rectum. PARP-1 expression levels are significantly different in colorectal cancer compared to matched normal tissue. Our findings proved that the upregulation of PARP-1 is associated with tumor progression and poor prognosis in Saudi patients with colorectal cancer, suggesting that PARP-1 can be novel and valuable signatures for predicting the clinical outcome of patients with colorectal cancer. PMID:27746584

  2. Assessing Adverse Events of Postprostatectomy Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer: Evaluation of Outcomes in the Regione Emilia-Romagna, Italy

    SciTech Connect

    Showalter, Timothy N.; Hegarty, Sarah E.; Rabinowitz, Carol; Maio, Vittorio; Hyslop, Terry; Dicker, Adam P.; Louis, Daniel Z.

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Although the likelihood of radiation-related adverse events influences treatment decisions regarding radiation therapy after prostatectomy for eligible patients, the data available to inform decisions are limited. This study was designed to evaluate the genitourinary, gastrointestinal, and sexual adverse events associated with postprostatectomy radiation therapy and to assess the influence of radiation timing on the risk of adverse events. Methods: The Regione Emilia-Romagna Italian Longitudinal Health Care Utilization Database was queried to identify a cohort of men who received radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer during 2003 to 2009, including patients who received postprostatectomy radiation therapy. Patients with prior radiation therapy were excluded. Outcome measures were genitourinary, gastrointestinal, and sexual adverse events after prostatectomy. Rates of adverse events were compared between the cohorts who did and did not receive postoperative radiation therapy. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were developed for each class of adverse events, including models with radiation therapy as a time-varying covariate. Results: A total of 9876 men were included in the analyses: 2176 (22%) who received radiation therapy and 7700 (78%) treated with prostatectomy alone. In multivariable Cox proportional hazards models, the additional exposure to radiation therapy after prostatectomy was associated with increased rates of gastrointestinal (rate ratio [RR] 1.81; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.44-2.27; P<.001) and urinary nonincontinence events (RR 1.83; 95% CI 1.83-2.80; P<.001) but not urinary incontinence events or erectile dysfunction. The addition of the time from prostatectomy to radiation therapy interaction term was not significant for any of the adverse event outcomes (P>.1 for all outcomes). Conclusion: Radiation therapy after prostatectomy is associated with an increase in gastrointestinal and genitourinary adverse events. However

  3. Haplotype frequencies in a sub-region of chromosome 19q13.3, related to risk and prognosis of cancer, differ dramatically between ethnic groups

    PubMed Central

    Schierup, Mikkel H; Mailund, Thomas; Li, Heng; Wang, Jun; Tjønneland, Anne; Vogel, Ulla; Bolund, Lars; Nexø, Bjørn A

    2009-01-01

    Background A small region of about 70 kb on human chromosome 19q13.3 encompasses 4 genes of which 3, ERCC1, ERCC2, and PPP1R13L (aka RAI) are related to DNA repair and cell survival, and one, CD3EAP, aka ASE1, may be related to cell proliferation. The whole region seems related to the cellular response to external damaging agents and markers in it are associated with risk of several cancers. Methods We downloaded the genotypes of all markers typed in the 19q13.3 region in the HapMap populations of European, Asian and African descent and inferred haplotypes. We combined the European HapMap individuals with a Danish breast cancer case-control data set and inferred the association between HapMap haplotypes and disease risk. Results We found that the susceptibility haplotype in our European sample had increased from 2 to 50 percent very recently in the European population, and to almost the same extent in the Asian population. The cause of this increase is unknown. The maximal proportion of overall genetic variation due to differences between groups for Europeans versus Africans and Europeans versus Asians (the Fst value) closely matched the putative location of the susceptibility variant as judged from haplotype-based association mapping. Conclusion The combined observation that a common haplotype causing an increased risk of cancer in Europeans and a high differentiation between human populations is highly unusual and suggests a causal relationship with a recent increase in Europeans caused either by genetic drift overruling selection against the susceptibility variant or a positive selection for the same haplotype. The data does not allow us to distinguish between these two scenarios. The analysis suggests that the region is not involved in cancer risk in Africans and that the susceptibility variants may be more finely mapped in Asian populations. PMID:19257887

  4. STAT3 Expression, Molecular Features, Inflammation Patterns and Prognosis in a Database of 724 Colorectal Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Morikawa, Teppei; Baba, Yoshifumi; Yamauchi, Mai; Kuchiba, Aya; Nosho, Katsuhiko; Shima, Kaori; Tanaka, Noriko; Huttenhower, Curtis; Frank, David A.; Fuchs, Charles S.; Ogino, Shuji

    2010-01-01

    Purpose STAT3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3) is a transcription factor that is constitutively activated in some cancers. STAT3 appears to play crucial roles in cell proliferation and survival, angiogenesis, tumor-promoting inflammation and suppression of anti-tumor host immune response in the tumor microenvironment. Although the STAT3 signaling pathway is a potential drug target, clinical, pathologic, molecular or prognostic features of STAT3-activated colorectal cancer remain uncertain. Experimental Design Utilizing a database of 724 colon and rectal cancer cases, we evaluated phosphorylated STAT3 (p-STAT3) expression by immunohistochemistry. Cox proportional hazards model was used to compute mortality hazard ratio (HR), adjusting for clinical, pathologic and molecular features, including microsatellite instability (MSI), the CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP), LINE-1 methylation, 18q loss of heterozygosity, TP53 (p53), CTNNB1 (β-catenin), JC virus T-antigen, and KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA mutations. Results Among the 724 tumors, 131 (18%) showed high-level p-STAT3 expression (p-STAT3-high), 244 (34%) showed low-level expression (p-STAT3-low), and the remaining 349 (48%) were negative for p-STAT3. p-STAT3 overexpression was associated with significantly higher colorectal cancer-specific mortality [log-rank p=0.0020; univariate HR (p-STAT3-high vs. p-STAT3-negative) 1.85, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.30–2.63, Ptrend =0.0005; multivariate HR, 1.61, 95% CI 1.11–2.34, Ptrend =0.015). p-STAT3 expression was positively associated with peritumoral lymphocytic reaction (multivariate odds ratio 3.23; 95% CI, 1.89–5.53; p<0.0001). p-STAT3 expression was not associated with MSI, CIMP, or LINE-1 hypomethylation. Conclusions STAT3 activation in colorectal cancer is associated with adverse clinical outcome, supporting its potential roles as a prognostic biomarker and a chemoprevention and/or therapeutic target. PMID:21310826

  5. [PROGNOSTIC SIGNIFICANCE OF METASTATIC AFFECTION OF REGIONAL LYMPHATIC NODES AND LEVEL OF A LYMPH NODE DISSECTION IN SURGICAL TREATMENT OF GASTRIC CANCER].

    PubMed

    Levyk, O M; Ryaboshapka, A M

    2016-01-01

    In 142 patients, operated on for resectable gastric cancer, a dependence of the survival indices from clinico-morphological characteristics of tumoral process and peculiarities of surgical interventions was studied. Efficacy of a lymph node dissection (LND) on a D1 -D2 level was investigated. There was established, that regional lymph nodes affection in gastric carcinoma causes deterioration of indices of general and disease-free survival. In patients without regional metastases the operation conduction with LND D1 have promoted improvement of indices of general and a disease-free survival, and expansion of a LND up to the D2 level did not guarantee the treatment results improvement.

  6. Retrospective Study to Determine Diagnostic Utility of 6 Commonly Used Lung Cancer Biomarkers Among Han and Uygur Population in Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region of People's Republic of China

    PubMed Central

    Yang-Chun, Feng; Min, Feng; Di, Zhang; Yan-Chun, Huang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Early diagnosis was the main way to improve the survival rate of lung cancer patients. At present, the methods to diagnose lung cancer were varied, but early diagnosis of lung cancer was still difficult. In experimental and clinical studies, lung cancer related tumor markers were helpful to the early diagnosis of lung cancer. So far, there were many studies about lung cancer related tumor markers in China, but the subjects in these studies were almost the Han population. There were few studies about the Uygur population. Xinjiang was a multi-ethnic region in China, the ratios of Han and Uygur population were 40% and 45%, respectively. Xinjiang also was a high incidence area of lung cancer in China. The purpose of this study was to research the application of 6 tumor markers in Uygur and Han lung cancer patients in XinJiang, China. The study collected 342 cases who were diagnosed as lung cancer in Tumor Hospital Affiliated to XinJiang Medical University from May 2012 to December 2012. Serum concentrations of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), cytokeratin fragment 19 (CYFRA21-1), carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA), carbohydrate antigen 125 (CA125), precursor of gastrin-releasing peptide (Pro-GRP), and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) were tested for every patient before radiation, chemotherapy, or surgery. The serum concentrations of SCC, CYFRA21-1, CEA, CA125, and Pro-GRP were assayed using the micro-particle luminescence analysis testing by the Abbott ARHCITECT i2000SR immunoanalyzer. NSE was assayed by the electrochemical luminescence analysis testing using Roche Cobas E601 electrochemical luminescence analyzer. Serum levels of SCC were different between 2 ethnic populations, smoking should be the influence factor to create the difference. Cluster analysis showed that the NSE and Pro-GRP were helpful to identify small cell lung cancer (SCLC), and CEA, CA125, SCC, CYFRA21-1 were beneficial to diagnose non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The compare of diagnosis

  7. Acute myocardial infarction mortality in comparison with lung and bladder cancer mortality in arsenic-exposed region II of Chile from 1950 to 2000.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yan; Marshall, Guillermo; Ferreccio, Catterina; Steinmaus, Craig; Selvin, Steve; Liaw, Jane; Bates, Michael N; Smith, Allan H

    2007-12-15

    Arsenic in drinking water is known to be a cause of lung, bladder, and skin cancer, and some studies report cardiovascular disease effects. The authors investigated mortality from 1950 to 2000 in the arsenic-exposed region II of Chile (population: 477,000 in 2000) in comparison with the unexposed region V. Increased risks were found for acute myocardial infarction (AMI), with mortality rate ratios of 1.48 for men (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.37, 1.59; p < 0.001) and 1.26 for women (95% CI: 1.14, 1.40; p < 0.001) during the high-exposure period in region II from 1958 to 1970. The highest rate ratios were for young adult men aged 30-49 years who were born during the high-exposure period with probable exposure in utero and in early childhood (rate ratio = 3.23, 95% CI: 2.79, 3.75; p < 0.001). Compared with lung and bladder cancer, AMI mortality was the predominant cause of excess deaths during and immediately after the high-exposure period. Ten years after reduction of exposures, AMI mortality had decreased, and longer latency excess deaths from lung and bladder cancer predominated. With these three causes of death combined, increased mortality peaked in 1991-1995, with estimated excess deaths related to arsenic exposure constituting 10.9% of all deaths among men and 4.0% among women.

  8. Susceptibility to gastric cancer and polymorphisms of insertion/deletion at the intron 3 of the XRCC4 and VNTR at the promoter region of the XRCC5.

    PubMed

    Saadat, Mostafa; Pashaei, Samira; Amerizade, Foroozan

    2015-07-01

    The genes encoding X-ray repair cross-complementing group 4 (XRCC4; OMIM: 194363) and 5 (XRCC5; OMIM: 194364) are involved in repair of DNA double-strand breaks. To investigating the associations between polymorphisms of Insertion/Deletion (I/D, rs28360071) in the intron 3 of the XRCC4 and VNTR in the promoter region of the XRCC5 and risk of gastric cancer, the present study was carried out. We included 159 (56 females, 103 males) with gastric cancer and 242 (75 females, 167 males) healthy blood donors frequency matched for age and gender. Using PCR-based methods, the genotypes of the study polymorphisms were determined. The alleles of VNTR XRCC5 polymorphism divided into two groups: L (0 and 1 repeats) and H (2 and 3 repeats) alleles. For the I/D XRCC4 polymorphism, after stratification of the subjects according to their family history (FH) of cancer, either the ID (OR = 3.19, 95%CI: 1.35-7.50, P = 0.008) or the DD genotypes (OR = 4.62, 95%CI: 1.63-13.0, P = 0.004) among positive FH persons, increased the risk of gastric cancer compared with the reference group (persons who have negative FH and II genotype). For the VNTR XRCC5 polymorphism, the LH + HH genotypes among positive FH persons, increased the risk of gastric cancer compared with the reference group (persons who have negative FH and LL genotype) (OR = 2.88, 95%CI: 1.34-6.18, P = 0.006). Sensitivity analysis showed that the above mentioned associations were not occurred due to the maldistribution of the genotypes among missing data. The present study suggests that both polymorphisms of the XRCC4 and XRCC5 might be risk factors for gastric cancer development especially among persons with positive FH.

  9. A papillomavirus DNA from a cervical carcinoma and its prevalence in cancer biopsy samples from different geographic regions.

    PubMed

    Dürst, M; Gissmann, L; Ikenberg, H; zur Hausen, H

    1983-06-01

    DNA from one biopsy sample of invasive cancer of the cervix contained sequences hybridizing with human papillomavirus (HPV) type 11 DNA only under nonstringent conditions. This DNA was molecularly cloned in lambda phage. Under stringent conditions of hybridization it cross-hybridized to a minor extent (less than 0.1%) with HPV types 10, 14, and 15 and showed no homology with DNA of other human HPV types. We therefore propose to designate it tentatively as HPV 16. HPV 16 DNA was used as a probe to test additional cancer biopsy samples from cervical, vulval, and penile cancer, as well as benign genital warts (condylomata acuminata) and cervical dysplasias for the presence of homologous sequences. In 61.1% (11/18) of cervical cancer samples from German patients sequences were found hybridizing with HPV 16 DNA under conditions of high stringency. In contrast, only 34.8% (8/23) of cancer biopsy samples from Kenya and Brazil revealed this DNA. Vulval and penile cancer biopsy samples hybridized to 28.6% (2/7) or 25% (1/4), respectively. Only 2 out of 33 condylom