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  1. A Personal Reflection on the History of Radiation Oncology at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Florence C.H.

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To provide a historical and personal narrative of the development of radiation oncology at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC), from its founding more than 100 years ago to the present day. Methods and Materials: Historical sources include the Archives of MSKCC, publications by members of MSKCC, the author's personal records and recollections, and her communications with former colleagues, particularly Dr. Basil Hilaris, Dr. Zvi Fuks, and Dr. Beryl McCormick. Conclusions: The author, who spent 38 years at MSKCC, presents the challenges and triumphs of MSKCC's Radiation Oncology Department and details MSKCC's breakthroughs in radiation oncology. She also describes MSKCC's involvement in the founding of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology.

  2. Integrative cancer care in a US academic cancer centre: The Memorial Sloan-Kettering Experience.

    PubMed

    Deng, G

    2008-08-01

    Various surveys show that interest in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is high among cancer patients. Patients want to explore all options that may help their treatment. Many CAM modalities offer patients an active role in their self-care, and the resulting sense of empowerment is very appealing. On the other hand, many unscrupulous marketeers promote alternative cancer "cures," targeting cancer patients who are particularly vulnerable. Some alternative therapies can hurt patients by delaying effective treatment or by causing adverse effects or detrimental interactions with other medications. It is not in the best interest of cancer patients if they cannot get appropriate guidance on the use of CAM from the health care professionals who are part of their cancer care team. The Integrative Medicine Service at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York was established in 1999 to address patient interest in cam, to incorporate helpful complementary therapies into each patient's overall treatment management, to guide patients in avoiding harmful alternative therapies, and to develop prospective research to evaluate the efficacy of CAM modalities.

  3. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy for the treatment of oropharyngeal carcinoma: The Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center experience

    SciTech Connect

    Arruda, Fernando F. de; Puri, Dev R.; Zhung, Joanne; Narayana, Ashwatha; Wolden, Suzanne; Hunt, Margie; Stambuk, Hilda; Pfister, David; Kraus, Dennis; Shaha, Ashok; Shah, Jatin; Lee, Nancy Y. . E-mail: leen2@mskcc.org

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: To review the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center's experience in using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between September 1998 and June 2004, 50 patients with histologically confirmed cancer of the oropharynx underwent IMRT at our institution. There were 40 men and 10 women with a median age of 56 years (range, 28-78 years). The disease was Stage I in 1 patient (2%), Stage II in 3 patients (6%), Stage III in 7 (14%), and Stage IV in 39 (78%). Forty-eight patients (96%) received definitive treatment, and 2 (4%) were treated in the postoperative adjuvant setting. Concurrent chemotherapy was used in 43 patients (86%). Patients were treated using three different IMRT approaches: 76% dose painting, 18% concomitant boost with IMRT in both am and pm deliveries, and 6% concomitant boost with IMRT only in pm delivery. Regardless of the approach, the average prescription dose to the gross tumor planning target volume was 70 Gy, while the average dose delivered to the subclinical volume was 59.4 Gy in the dose painting group and 54 Gy in the concomitant boost group. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy feeding tubes (PEGs) were placed before the beginning of treatment in 84% of the patients. Acute and late toxicity were graded according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) radiation morbidity scoring criteria. Toxicity was also evaluated using subjective criteria such as the presence of esophageal stricture, and the need for PEG usage. The local progression-free, regional progression-free, and distant metastases-free rates, and overall survival were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Three patients had persistent locoregional disease after treatment. The 2-year estimates of local progression-free, regional progression-free, distant metastases-free, and overall survival were 98%, 88%, 84%, and 98%, respectively. The worst acute mucositis experienced was Grade 1

  4. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Oropharyngeal Cancer: An Update of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Setton, Jeremy; Caria, Nicola; Romanyshyn, Jonathan; Koutcher, Lawrence; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Rowan, Nicholas; Sherman, Eric J.; Fury, Matthew G.; Pfister, David G.; Wong, Richard J.; Shah, Jatin P.; Kraus, Dennis H.; Shi Weiji; Zhang Zhigang; Schupak, Karen D.; Gelblum, Daphna Y.; Rao, Shyam D.; Lee, Nancy Y.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To update the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center's experience with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). Methods and Materials: Between September 1998 and April 2009, 442 patients with histologically confirmed OPC underwent IMRT at our center. There were 379 men and 63 women with a median age of 57 years (range, 27-91). The disease was Stage I in 2%, Stage II in 4%, Stage III in 21%, and Stage IV in 73% of patients. The primary tumor subsite was tonsil in 50%, base of tongue in 46%, pharyngeal wall in 3%, and soft palate in 2%. The median prescription dose to the planning target volume of the gross tumor was 70 Gy for definitive (n = 412) cases and 66 Gy for postoperative cases (n = 30). A total 404 patients (91%) received chemotherapy, including 389 (88%) who received concurrent chemotherapy, the majority of which was platinum-based. Results: Median follow-up among surviving patients was 36.8 months (range, 3-135). The 3-year cumulative incidence of local failure, regional failure, and distant metastasis was 5.4%, 5.6%, and 12.5%, respectively. The 3-year OS rate was 84.9%. The incidence of late dysphagia and late xerostomia {>=}Grade 2 was 11% and 29%, respectively. Conclusions: Our results confirm the feasibility of IMRT in achieving excellent locoregional control and low rates of xerostomia. According to our knowledge, this study is the largest report of patients treated with IMRT for OPC.

  5. Treatment of Advanced or Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma with Doxorubicin in Patients Progressing after Paclitaxel/Carboplatin: Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) Experience from 1995-2009

    PubMed Central

    Makker, Vicky; Hensley, Martee L.; Zhou, Qin; Iasonos, Alexia; Aghajanian, Carol. A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Long-term survival for patients with advanced endometrial carcinoma is poor, and limited options exist for the management of recurrent disease. Our goal was to investigate the activity of doxorubicin in the second-line setting in patients who progressed after paclitaxel/carboplatin adjuvant treatment. Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of patients with recurrent endometrial carcinoma who were treated at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center from 1995-2009, and who received paclitaxel/carboplatin adjuvant chemotherapy followed by second-line doxorubicin therapy at time of recurrence. The median PFS and OS times following paclitaxel/carboplatin and following second-line doxorubicin therapy were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Toxicity was assessed by the treating physician at each visit and graded using version 4.0 of Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE). Patient presentation, treatment, patterns of recurrence, and patient outcomes were summarized. Results Seventeen patients were included in study analyses. The median PFS from completion of paclitaxel/carboplatin was 8.0 months (95% CI: 4.5-13.6 months). At the time of recurrence, all 17 patients were treated with doxorubicin as second-line therapy. No patient achieved objective response of stable disease. The median PFS of this cohort following doxorubicin treatment was 2.1 months (95% CI: 0.95-2.7) months. Median OS was 5.8 months (95% CI: 1.0-15.0 months). There is only one patient still alive; her median follow-up time is 49.4 months. Predominant doxorubicin-related grade 2 toxicities included nausea/vomiting (18.8%), fatigue (18.8%), and neutropenia (12.5%). No grade 3 or 4 toxicities occurred. Conclusions Among patients with advanced endometrial carcinoma who had received adjuvant paclitaxel/carboplatin, treatment with doxorubicin at time of disease recurrence failed to achieve any objective responses and was associated with a very short (2 months) time to

  6. Randomized controlled trials of the efficacy of lung cancer screening by sputum cytology revisited: a combined mortality analysis from the Johns Hopkins Lung Project and the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Lung Study

    PubMed Central

    Doria-Rose, V. Paul; Marcus, Pamela M.; Szabo, Eva; Tockman, Melvyn S.; Melamed, Myron R.; Prorok, Philip C.

    2009-01-01

    Background Two randomized controlled trials of lung cancer screening initiated in the 1970's, the Johns Hopkins Lung Project and the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Lung Study, compared one arm which received annual chest x-ray and four-monthly sputum cytology (dual-screen) to a second arm which received annual chest x-ray only. Previous publications from these trials reported similar lung cancer mortality between the two groups. However, these findings were based on incomplete follow-up, and each trial on its own was underpowered to detect a modest mortality benefit. Methods We estimated the efficacy of lung cancer screening with sputum cytology in an intention-to-screen analysis of lung cancer mortality, using combined data from these trials (n=20,426). Results Over one-half of squamous cell lung cancers diagnosed in the dual-screen group were identified by cytology; these cancers tended to be more localized than squamous cancers diagnosed in the x-ray only arm. After nine years of follow-up, lung cancer mortality was slightly lower in the dual-screen than in the x-ray only arm (rate ratio (RR) 0.88, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.74-1.05). Reductions were seen for squamous cell cancer deaths (RR 0.79, 95% CI 0.54-1.14) and in the heaviest smokers (RR 0.81, 95% CI 0.67-1.00). There were also fewer deaths from large cell carcinoma in the dual-screen group, though the reason for this is unclear. Conclusions These data are suggestive of a modest benefit of sputum cytology screening, though we cannot rule out chance as an explanation for these findings. PMID:19637354

  7. Role of External Beam Radiotherapy in Patients With Advanced or Recurrent Nonanaplastic Thyroid Cancer: Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Terezakis, Stephanie A. Lee, Kyungmouk S.; Ghossein, Ronald A.; Rivera, Michael; Tuttle, Robert M.; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Wong, Richard J.; Patel, Snehal G.; Pfister, David G.; Shaha, Ashok R.; Lee, Nancy Y.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) plays a controversial role in the management of nonanaplastic thyroid cancer. We reviewed our institution's outcomes in patients treated with EBRT for advanced or recurrent nonanaplastic thyroid cancer. Methods and Materials: Between April 1989 and April 2006, 76 patients with nonanaplastic thyroid cancer were treated with EBRT. The median follow-up for the surviving patients was 35.3 months (range, 4.2-178.4). The lesions were primarily advanced and included Stage T2 in 5 (7%), T3 in 5 (7%), and T4 in 64 (84%) patients. Stage N1 disease was present in 60 patients (79%). Distant metastases before EBRT were identified in 27 patients (36%). The median total EBRT dose delivered was 6,300 cGy. The histologic features examined included medullary in 12 patients (16%) and nonmedullary in 64 (84%). Of the 76 patients, 71 (93%) had undergone surgery before RT, and radioactive iodine treatment was used in 56 patients (74%). Results: The 2- and 4-year overall locoregional control rate for all histologic types was 86% and 72%, respectively, and the 2- and 4-year overall survival rate for all patients was 74% and 55%, respectively. No significant differences were found in locoregional control, overall survival, or distant metastases-free survival for patients with complete resection, microscopic residual disease, or gross residual disease. Grade 3 acute mucositis and dysphagia occurred in 14 (18%) and 24 (32%) patients, respectively. Late adverse toxicity was notable for percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube use in 4 patients (5%). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that EBRT is effective for locoregional control of selected locally advanced or recurrent nonanaplastic thyroid malignancies, with acceptable acute toxicity.

  8. Differential role of Sloan-Kettering Institute (Ski) protein in Nodal and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β)-induced Smad signaling in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Vo, BaoHan T; Cody, Bianca; Cao, Yang; Khan, Shafiq A

    2012-11-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signaling pathways contain both tumor suppressor and tumor promoting activities. We have demonstrated that Nodal, another member of the TGF-β superfamily, and its receptors are expressed in prostate cancer cells. Nodal and TGF-β exerted similar biological effects on prostate cells; both inhibited proliferation in WPE, RWPE1 and DU145 cells, whereas neither had any effect on the proliferation of LNCaP or PC3 cells. Interestingly, Nodal and TGF-β induced migration in PC3 cells, but not in DU145 cells. TGF-β induced predominantly phosphorylation of Smad3, whereas Nodal induced phosphorylation of only Smad2. We also determined the expression and differential role of Ski, a corepressor of Smad2/3, in Nodal and TGF-β signaling in prostate cancer cells. Similar levels of Ski mRNA were found in several established prostate cell lines; however, high levels of Ski protein were only detected in prostate cancer cells and prostate cancer tissue samples. Exogenous Nodal and TGF-β had no effects on Ski mRNA levels. On the other hand, TGF-β induced a rapid degradation of Ski protein mediated by the proteasomal pathway, whereas Nodal had no effect on Ski protein. Reduced Ski levels correlated with increased basal and TGF-β-induced Smad2/3 phosphorylation. Knockdown of endogenous Ski reduced proliferation in DU145 cells and enhanced migration of PC3 cells. We conclude that high levels of Ski expression in prostate cancer cells may be responsible for repression of TGF-β and Smad3 signaling, but Ski protein levels do not influence Nodal and Smad2 signaling.

  9. Post-Doctoral Training Program in Bio-Behavioral Breast Cancer Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    Stress Disorder: A Brief History of Diagnostic, Epidemiological and Treatment Issues;" "* Dr. Karen Hurley, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center...with exposure to recent developments in Biobehavioral Medicine, as well as related disciplines, for example: "* Dr. William Breitbart, Memorial Sloan...Medicine, MSSM---"Diet and Cancer, does your neighborhood matter?" "* Dr. Bruce Rapkin, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center--"The ACCESS Cancer

  10. Radical cystectomy with or without prior irradiation in the treatment of bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Whitmore, W F; Batata, M A; Ghoneim, M A; Grabstald, H; Unal, A

    1977-01-01

    This is a summary presentation on certain aspects of an experience with the use of radical cystectomy with or without prior irradiation in the treatment of selected patients with bladder cancer at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center.

  11. Use of positron emission tomography scan response to guide treatment change for locally advanced gastric cancer: the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center experience

    PubMed Central

    Won, Elizabeth; Shah, Manish A.; Schöder, Heiko; Strong, Vivian E.; Coit, Daniel G.; Brennan, Murray F.; Kelsen, David P.; Janjigian, Yelena Y.; Tang, Laura H.; Capanu, Marinela; Rizk, Nabil P.; Allen, Peter J.; Bains, Manjit S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Early metabolic response on 18-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) during neoadjuvant chemotherapy is PET non-responders have poor outcomes whether continuing chemotherapy or proceeding directly to surgery. Use of PET may identify early treatment failure, sparing patients from inactive therapy and allowing for crossover to alternative therapies. We examined the effectiveness of PET directed switching to salvage chemotherapy in the PET non-responders. Methods Patients with locally advanced resectable FDG-avid gastric or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) adenocarcinoma received bevacizumab 15 mg/kg, epirubicin 50 mg/m2, cisplatin 60 mg/m2 day 1, and capecitabine 625 mg/m2 bid (ECX) every 21 days. PET scan was obtained at baseline and after cycle 1. PET responders, (i.e., ≥35% reduction in FDG uptake at the primary tumor) continued ECX + bev. Non-responders switched to docetaxel 30 mg/m2, irinotecan 50 mg/mg2 day 1 and 8 plus bevacizumab every 21 days for 2 cycles. Patients then underwent surgery. The primary objective was to improve the 2-year disease free survival (DFS) from 30% (historical control) to 53% in the non-responders. Results Twenty evaluable patients enrolled before the study closed for poor accrual. Eleven were PET responders and the 9 non-responders switched to the salvage regimen. With a median follow-up of 38.2 months, the 2-year DFS was 55% [95% confidence interval (CI), 30–85%] in responders compared with 56% in the non-responder group (95% CI, 20–80%, P=0.93). Conclusions The results suggest that changing chemotherapy regimens in PET non-responding patients may improve outcomes. Results from this pilot trial are hypothesis generating and suggest that PET directed neoadjuvant therapy merits evaluation in a larger trial. PMID:27563439

  12. NCI's Dr. Barry Kramer on PBS NewsHour | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Talking about New Cancer Definitions to Avoid Unnecessary Treatments. A panel of doctors and scientists proposed a change to the definition of cancer, in hopes of shifting the way we think about and treat the disease. Gwen Ifill discusses the recommendation with Dr. Barnett Kramer of the National Cancer Institute and Dr. Larry Norton of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center... |

  13. Genetic Factors in Breast Cancer: Center for Interdisciplinary Biobehavioral Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    Hypnosis Intervention, Dr. Guy Montgomery, Associate Professor, Oncological Sciences 12/14/2005 Patient Navigation for CRC Screening with Low Income...Attending Psychologist Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center 4/20/2006 "It’s all in your head: The use of MRI in

  14. Radiation therapy for Ewing's sarcoma: Results from Memorial Sloan-Kettering in the modern era

    SciTech Connect

    La, Trang H.; Meyers, Paul A.; Wexler, Leonard H.; Alektiar, Kaled M.; Healey, John H.; Laquaglia, Michael P.; Boland, Patrick J.; Wolden, Suzanne L. . E-mail: woldens@mskcc.org

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes of patients with Ewing's sarcoma family of tumors (ESFT) treated with modern radiotherapy techniques with MRI along with optimal chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: The records of all 60 patients with ESFT who received radiation to the primary site between 1990 and 2004 were reviewed. All patients received chemotherapy, including vincristine, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, and etoposide. Radiation was used as the sole modality for local control in 31 patients and was given either before (n = 3) or after surgical resection (n = 26) in the remainder. All patients had MRI and CT scan-based treatment planning, and 43% received intensity-modulated radiation therapy. Radiation doses ranged from 30 Gy to 60 Gy (median, 51 Gy), and 35% received hyperfractionated radiotherapy. Results: Median age was 16 years (range, 2-40 years). Because of selection bias for radiotherapy, the majority of primary tumors were centrally located (72%): spine (n = 18), pelvis (n = 15), extremities (n 12), chest wall (n = 5), head and neck (n = 5), and other (n = 5). Thirty-eight percent of patients presented with metastatic disease, and 52% of primary tumors were {>=}8 cm. Actuarial 3-year local control was 77%. The presence of metastases at diagnosis was an adverse prognostic factor for local control (84% vs. 61%, p = 0.036). No other predictive factors for local failure were identified. In patients without metastatic disease, 3-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 70% and 86%, respectively, whereas in patients with metastases they were both 21%. Follow-up of surviving patients was 6-178 months (median, 41 months). Conclusion: In this unfavorable cohort of ESFT patients, radiation therapy was an effective modality for local control, especially for patients without metastases. The presence of metastases at diagnosis is a predictive factor not only for death but also for local failure.

  15. Clonal Evaluation of Prostate Cancer by ERG/SPINK1 Status to Improve Prognosis Prediction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    impact on prognostic parameters. Herein we confirm multiclonality in key diagnostic scenarios, such as discontinuous involvement of a single biopsy core... single tumor. 13 UPDATED ACTIVE OTHER SUPPORT: TOMLINS, SCOTT ACTIVE NEW: PC141474 (PI: Tomlins and Schaeffer) 09/30/15 – 09/29/18 1.2 cal mos...amedd.army.mil Parent Institution: Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center; Award Administrator: Michael McGregor, mcgregom@mskcc.org 21 P01 CA163227 (Balk) 5/1

  16. Preoperative irradiation and cystectomy for bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Smith, J A; Batata, M; Grabstald, H; Sogani, P C; Herr, H; Whitmore, W F

    1982-03-01

    Between 1971 and 1974, 101 patients at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center underwent planned integrated treatment for bladder cancer with 2000 rads by megavoltage delivered to the whole pelvis over five consecutive days followed by radical cystectomy within a week. The overall five-year survival rate was 39%; the hospital mortality rate was 2%. In the pelvis alone tumor recurred in 9% of the patients. These results support other studies demonstrating the efficacy of this and other regimens of preoperative irradiation and cystectomy.

  17. Report From the Jerusalem Workshop on Lynch Syndrome-Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Boland, C. Richard; Shike, Moshe

    2011-01-01

    A Workshop was held in Jerusalem, Israel, on October 26 and 27, 2009 to discuss the management of Lynch syndrome-hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (CRC), with the primary goal to develop consensus for the optimal management of this disease. A second goal was to identify areas of research with the potential to advance the clinical management of Lynch syndrome. The perspectives and recommendations from the workshop are meant to be a platform for discussion and deliberation. The Workshop was organized by Moshe Shike (Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York) and sponsored by The Colon Cancer Foundation. More details of each presentation are available in an on-line supplement. PMID:20416305

  18. [Means and methods of alternative therapy for cancer: acupuncture--the effects and mechanisms of action].

    PubMed

    Korman, D B

    2014-01-01

    Among means of alternative and complementary therapy for cancer, acupuncture holds a special place. This is because, unlike the most other methods of alternative and complementary therapy for cancer, efficacy and safety of acupuncture in the symptomatic treatment for cancer patients is considered as proven. Not accidentally such leading cancer centers in the USA as the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York, the M.D.Anderson Cancer Center in Houston integrated acupuncture in accepted in these centers treatment standards and are staffed by licensed professionals on acupuncture. Particular attention is drawn to the use of acupuncture in hospices. It is stressed that it is the most effective and safe in the performance by qualified licensed professionals

  19. Back to the Future: Are Tumor-Targeting Bacteria the Next-Generation Cancer Therapy?

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    Cancer patients infected with various bacteria were reported, for at least two centuries, to have spontaneous remission. W.B. Coley, of what is now the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, pioneered bacterial therapy of cancer in the clinic with considerable success beginning in the late nineteenth century. After Coley died in 1936, bacterial therapy of cancer essentially ended. Currently there is much excitement in developing bacterial therapy for treating cancer using either obligate or facultative anaerobic bacteria. This chapter will demonstrate the potential and strategy of Salmonella typhimurium A1-R, an engineered tumor-targeting variant for the systemic treatment of metastatic cancer. A new concept using Salmonella typhimurium A1-R for cell cycle "decoy" chemotherapy of metastatic cancer is also described.

  20. Future of Bacterial Therapy of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Robert M

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial therapy of cancer has a centuries-long history and was first-line therapy at the hospital in New York City that would become Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, under Dr. William B. Coley. However, after Coley's death in 1936, bacterial therapy of cancer ceased in the clinic until the present century. Clinical trials have been recently carried out for strains of the obligate anaerobe Clostridium novyi with the toxin gene deleted, and on an attenuated strain of Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium), which is a facultative anaerobe that can grow in viable, as well as necrotic, areas of tumors, unlike Clostridium, which can only grow in the hypoxic areas. Our laboratory has developed the novel strain S. typhimurium A1-R that is effective against all tumor types in clinically-relevant mouse models, including patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) mouse models. This chapter suggests future clinical applications for S. typhimurium A1-R.

  1. Exploring cell apoptosis and senescence to understand and treat cancer: an interview with Scott Lowe.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Scott; Cifra, Alessandra

    2015-11-01

    Scott W. Lowe is currently principal investigator at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. After beginning his studies in chemical engineering, he decided to take another path and became fascinated by biochemistry, genetics and molecular biology, which ultimately led to an interest in human disease, particularly cancer. During his PhD at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Scott had the opportunity to benefit from the exceptional mentorship of Earl Ruley, David Housman and Tyler Jacks, and contributed to elucidating how the p53 (TP53) tumor suppressor gene limits oncogenic transformation and modulates the cytotoxic response to conventional chemotherapy. This important work earned him a fellowship from the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, which helped to launch his independent career. Scott is now a leading scientist in the cancer field and his work has helped to shed light on mechanisms of cell apoptosis and senescence to better understand and treat cancer. In this interview, he talks about this incredible scientific journey.

  2. The handling of antineoplastic drugs in a major cancer center.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, D M

    1980-06-01

    It has long been known that many commonly used antineoplastic agents are carcinogenic. Yet most health care professionals take few precautions, if any, when handling these drugs. Recent findings suggest a possible hazard to personnel as evidenced by increased mutagenicity of urine of nurses exposed to anticancer drugs during preparation and administration of doses. Although more study is needed to determine the significance of these data, it would seem prudent to take measures to prevent any unnecessary exposure to these drugs by those preparing and administering them. The policies and procedures at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center require that chemotherapeutic drugs be prepared in a vertical laminar flow containment hood by personnel wearing sterile disposable gloves. Chemotherapeutic agents are specially labeled to ensure segregated disposal of waste, which is subsequently incinerated.

  3. Putting TCGA Data to Work - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    Neurosurgeon Cameron Brennan of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center used TCGA data to define subgroups of patients with a deadly brain cancer called glioblastoma multiforme. Learn more about his research in this TCGA in Action case study.

  4. Imaging Prostate Cancer (PCa) Phenotype and Evolution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0386 TITLE: Imaging Prostate Cancer (PCa) Phenotype and Evolution PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jason A. Koutcher...CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Sloan Kettering Institute for Cancer Research New York, NY 10065 REPORT DATE: October 2015 TYPE OF REPORT: Annual Report...time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing this

  5. Modulation of Stat3 Alternative Splicing in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author(s) and should not be construed as an...Stat3 Alternative Splicing in Breast Cancer Dr. Luca Cartegni Sloan-Kettering Institute New York, NY 10021 Stat3 is a transcription factor...constitutively active in a large number of breast cancers and other tumors, where it works as a central player in the activation of multiple oncogenic pathways

  6. Quarterly Performance/Technical Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-30

    Washington 6. Durham, NC-Duke University Medical Center 7. Philadelphia, PA-University of Pennsylvania Medical Center 8. NY, NY-Memorial Sloan -Kettering...Minnesota BMT Program 12. Denver, CO-Presbyterian/St. Lukes Medical Center The NMDP continues to work with the remaining three centers that have not...for this trial is Dr. Juliet Barker of Sloan -Kettering Cancer Center. A protocol team was established with bi-monthly conference calls to develop the

  7. hsa-miR-135a-1 inhibits prostate cancer cell growth and migration by targeting EGFR.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bin; Tao, Tao; Wang, Yiduo; Fang, Fang; Huang, Yeqing; Chen, Shuqiu; Zhu, Weidong; Chen, Ming

    2016-10-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the leading causes of death in men worldwide. Differentially expressed microRNAs (miRNAs) are associated with metastatic prostate cancer. However, their potential roles for affecting prostate cancer initiation and progression remain largely unknown. Here, we examined the aberrant expression profiles of miRNAs in human metastatic prostate cancer tissues. We further validated our miRNA expression data using two large, independent clinical prostate cancer datasets from the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) and The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Our data support a model in which hsa-miR-135-1 acts as a potential tumor suppressor in metastatic prostate cancer. First, its downregulation was positively correlated with late TNM stage, high Gleason score, and adverse prognosis. Second, cell growth, cell cycle progression, cell migration and invasion, and xenograft tumor formation were dramatically inhibited by miR-135a overexpression. Third, in the microarray gene expression data analysis using Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA), Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID) analysis, Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA), and Oncomine concept analysis, we showed that miR-135a targets multiple oncogenic pathways including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which we verified using functional experimental assays. These results help advance our understanding of the function of miRNAs in metastatic prostate cancer and provide a basis for further clinical investigation.

  8. Molecular classification of prostate cancer using curated expression signatures.

    PubMed

    Markert, Elke K; Mizuno, Hideaki; Vazquez, Alexei; Levine, Arnold J

    2011-12-27

    High Gleason score is currently the best prognostic indicator for poor prognosis in prostate cancer. However, a significant number of patients with low Gleason scores develop aggressive disease as well. In an effort to understand molecular signatures associated with poor outcome in prostate cancer, we analyzed a microarray dataset characterizing 281 prostate cancers from a Swedish watchful-waiting cohort. Patients were classified on the basis of their mRNA microarray signature profiles indicating embryonic stem cell expression patterns (stemness), inactivation of the tumor suppressors p53 and PTEN, activation of several oncogenic pathways, and the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion. Unsupervised clustering identified a subset of tumors manifesting stem-like signatures together with p53 and PTEN inactivation, which had very poor survival outcome, a second group with intermediate survival outcome, characterized by the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion, and three groups with benign outcome. The stratification was validated on a second independent dataset of 150 tumor and metastatic samples from a clinical cohort at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. This classification is independent of Gleason score and therefore provides useful unique molecular profiles for prostate cancer prognosis, helping to predict poor outcome in patients with low or average Gleason scores.

  9. Discovery of Prostate Cancer Tumor Suppressors and Mediators of MDV3100 Resistance Through in Vivo RNA Interference Screen

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    RNA Interference Screen PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Kamlesh K Yadav CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Sloan Kettering Institute for Cancer Research New...Suppressors and Mediators of MDV3100 Resistance through in Vivo RNA Interference Screen 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0084 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6... rna interference screens, STARR consortium retreat, CSHL, NY 8 o Website(s) or other Internet site(s) o Technologies or techniques o

  10. Radiation therapy before cystectomy in the management of patients with bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Batata, M A; Chu, F C; Hilaris, B S; Kim, Y; Lee, M; Chang, B; Whitmore, W F

    1982-01-01

    During the preceding two decades, 309 patients with bladder cancer were treated by irradiation before cystectomy at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. A radical tumour dose averaging 6000 cGy (rad) in six weeks was given to 104 patients who underwent radical cystectomy +/- one year later for persistent or recurrent cancer. Pre-operative pelvic irradiation was planned in 205 patients who received either 4000 cGy in four weeks (119) or 2000 cGy in one week (86) and underwent radical cystectomy after +/- six weeks and two days, respectively. The determinate five-year survival rates (41-43%) were similar with the three irradiation regimes; mortality under five years was mainly due to cancer recurrence locally and/or distally. Incidence of recurrence with radiation-induced stage reduction (21%) was lower, especially within the pelvis, than with no stage reduction (51%). Treatment results with planned pre-operative irradiation, especially in high stage tumours, were more favourable with the shorter 2000 cGy regimen of high fractional doses than with the conventionally fractionated 4000 cGy regimen.

  11. Performance of a Nomogram Predicting Disease-Specific Survival After an R0 Resection for Gastric Cancer in Patients Receiving Postoperative Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dikken, Johan L.; Coit, Daniel G.; Baser, Raymond E.; Gönen, Mithat; Goodman, Karyn A.; Brennan, Murray F.; Jansen, Edwin P.M.; Boot, Henk; Velde, Cornelis J.H. van de; Cats, Annemieke; Verheij, Marcel

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: The internationally validated Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) gastric carcinoma nomogram was based on patients who underwent curative (R0) gastrectomy, without any other therapy. The purpose of the current study was to assess the performance of this gastric cancer nomogram in patients who received chemoradiation therapy after an R0 resection for gastric cancer. Methods and Materials: In a combined dataset of 76 patients from the Netherlands Cancer Institute (NKI), and 63 patients from MSKCC, who received postoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) after an R0 gastrectomy, the nomogram was validated by means of the concordance index (CI) and a calibration plot. Results: The concordance index for the nomogram was 0.64, which was lower than the CI of the nomogram for patients who received no adjuvant therapy (0.80). In the calibration plot, observed survival was approximately 20% higher than the nomogram-predicted survival for patients receiving postoperative CRT. Conclusions: The MSKCC gastric carcinoma nomogram significantly underpredicted survival for patients in the current study, suggesting an impact of postoperative CRT on survival in patients who underwent an R0 resection for gastric cancer, which has been demonstrated by randomized controlled trials. This analysis stresses the need for updating nomograms with the incorporation of multimodal strategies.

  12. Osteonecrosis of the maxilla and mandible in patients with advanced cancer treated with bisphosphonate therapy.

    PubMed

    Estilo, Cherry L; Van Poznak, Catherine H; Wiliams, Tijaana; Bohle, George C; Lwin, Phyu T; Zhou, Qin; Riedel, Elyn R; Carlson, Diane L; Schoder, Heiko; Farooki, Azeez; Fornier, Monica; Halpern, Jerry L; Tunick, Steven J; Huryn, Joseph M

    2008-08-01

    Cases of osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) have been reported with an increasing frequency over the past 5 years. ONJ is most often identified in patients with cancer who are receiving intravenous bisphosphonate (IVBP) therapy, but it has also been diagnosed in patients receiving oral bisphosphonates for nonmalignant conditions. To further categorize risk factors associated with ONJ and potential clinical outcomes of this condition, we performed a retrospective study of patients with metastatic bone disease treated with intravenous bisphosphonates who have been evaluated by the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center Dental Service between January 1, 1996 and January 31, 2006. We identified 310 patients who met these criteria. Twenty-eight patients were identified as having ONJ at presentation to the Dental Service and an additional 7 patients were subsequently diagnosed with ONJ. Statistically significant factors associated with increased likelihood of ONJ included type of cancer, duration of bisphosphonate therapy, sequential IVBP treatment with pamidronate followed by zoledronic acid, comorbid osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis, and benign hematologic conditions. Our data do not support corticosteroid use or oral health as a predictor of risk for ONJ. Clinical outcomes of patients with ONJ were variable with 11 patients demonstrating improvement or healing with conservative management. Our ONJ experience is presented here.

  13. Acute Skin Toxicity Following Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Who's at Risk?

    SciTech Connect

    Hoppe, Bradford S.; Laser, Benjamin; Kowalski, Alex V.; Fontenla, Sandra C.; Pena-Greenberg, Elizabeth; Yorke, Ellen D.; Lovelock, D. Michael; Hunt, Margie A.; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E.

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: We examined the rate of acute skin toxicity within a prospectively managed database of patients treated for early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and investigated factors that might predict skin toxicity. Methods: From May 2006 through January 2008, 50 patients with Stage I NSCLC were treated at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center with 60 Gy in three fractions or 44-48 Gy in four fractions. Patients were treated with multiple coplanar beams (3-7, median 4) with a 6 MV linac using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and dynamic multileaf collimation. Toxicity grading was performed and based on the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Effects. Factors associated with Grade 2 or higher acute skin reactions were calculated by Fisher's exact test. Results: After a minimum 3 months of follow-up, 19 patients (38%) developed Grade 1, 4 patients (8%) Grade 2, 2 patients (4%) Grade 3, and 1 patient Grade 4 acute skin toxicity. Factors associated with Grade 2 or higher acute skin toxicity included using only 3 beams (p = 0.0007), distance from the tumor to the posterior chest wall skin of less than 5 cm (p = 0.006), and a maximum skin dose of 50% or higher of the prescribed dose (p = 0.02). Conclusions: SBRT can be associated with significant skin toxicity. One must consider the skin dose when evaluating the treatment plan and consider the bolus effect of immobilization devices.

  14. Low-dose-rate brachytherapy for patients with transurethral resection before implantation in prostate cancer. Long-term results

    PubMed Central

    Prada, Pedro J.; Anchuelo, Javier; Blanco, Ana García; Payá, Gema; Cardenal, Juan; Acuña, Enrique; Ferri, María; Vázquez, Andrés; Pacheco, Maite; Sanchez, Jesica

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives We analyzed the long-term oncologic outcome for patients with prostate cancer and transurethral resection who were treated using low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials From January 2001 to December 2005, 57 consecutive patients were treated with clinically localized prostate cancer. No patients received external beam radiation. All of them underwent LDR prostate brachytherapy. Biochemical failure was defined according to the “Phoenix consensus”. Patients were stratified as low and intermediate risk based on The Memorial Sloan Kettering group definition. Results The median follow-up time for these 57 patients was 104 months. The overall survival according to Kaplan-Meier estimates was 88% (±6%) at 5 years and 77% (±6%) at 12 years. The 5 and 10 years for failure in tumour-free survival (TFS) was 96% and respectively (±2%), whereas for biochemical control was 94% and respectively (±3%) at 5 and 10 years, 98% (±1%) of patients being free of local recurrence. A patient reported incontinence after treatment (1.7%). The chronic genitourinary complains grade I were 7% and grade II, 10%. At six months 94% of patients reported no change in bowel function. Conclusions The excellent long-term results and low morbidity presented, as well as the many advantages of prostate brachytherapy over other treatments, demonstrates that brachytherapy is an effective treatment for patients with transurethral resection and clinical organ-confined prostate cancer. PMID:27136466

  15. An innovative off-campus infusion suite designed to improve experiences of patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Jeanine; Gruber, Marcia

    2012-08-01

    The Brooklyn Infusion Center of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center was established in 2010 to better meet the needs of patients with cancer living in the Brooklyn neighborhood and surrounding areas. A multidisciplinary team comprising clinical, administrative, planning, and other representatives were charged to identify and develop a location that would provide oncology care for patients closer to home and improve the patients' experience. The primary objectives were to provide patient-centered care that accommodates the patients' preference to receive treatment closer to home and to take advantage of technology to establish processes that will provide safe, efficient, convenient, and high-quality care in a cost-effective manner. To achieve these objectives, no laboratory processing or pharmacy services were included in the plan for the Brooklyn location. This allowed the elimination of most of the challenges involved with same-day blood draws and chemotherapy orders. In addition, computer technology is used for teledermatology and other medical visits to maintain the continuity of the patients' care with their multidisciplinary teams at the Manhattan, NY, location. The data presented will illustrate how these processes have improved patients' experiences by reducing wait times for treatment, providing treatment closer to home, and implementing a truly patient-centered nursing care model.

  16. Prognostic relevance of sunitinib toxicities and comparison of continuous vs. intermittent sunitinib dosing schedule in metastatic renal cell cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Pilanci, Kezban N.; Avcı, Nilüfer; Yıldız, İbrahim; Alço, Gül; Demirhan, Özkan; Köksal, Ülkühan I.; Elbüken, Filiz; Tecimer, Coskun; Demir, Gökhan

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study Sunitinib-related side effects may develop as a result of the pharmacokinetic pathway affects the of the drug. Material and methods Data on mRCC patients were obtained from the hospital archives. Outcomes of patients were evaluated in terms of related prognostic factors, sunitinib adverse events during the treatment, and two different sunitinib dosing schedules. Results Seventy patients diagnosed with mRCC and treated with sunitinib were analyzed for prognostic factors and survival rates. During the mean follow-up of 33.5 months, 38 (54%) patients were alive and 32 (46%) patients died. The median time of overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) was 27 months (12–61) and 19 months (5–45), respectively. In univariate analysis, good prognostic risk group according to the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC), hypothyroidism as sunitinib toxicity and patients on sunitinib treatment more than 1 year were favorable prognostic factors for OS. Leukopenia and fatigue as sunitinib toxicity were poor prognostic factors for OS. PFS and OS of the patients were not significantly different when we compared intermittent (4/2) vs. continuous treatment dosing schedules. Conclusions As a result of this trial, having hypothyroidism as an adverse effect of sunitinib was a favorable prognostic factor for OS and PFS in mRCC patients. It was also found that 4/2 and continuous dosing schedules of sunitinib did not give rise to different outcomes in mRCC patients. PMID:27358594

  17. Use and limitations of a nomogram predicting the likelihood of non-sentinel node involvement after a positive sentinel node biopsy in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kocsis, Lajos; Svébis, Mihály; Boross, Gábor; Sinkó, Mária; Maráz, Róbert; Rajtár, Mária; Cserni, Gábor

    2004-11-01

    After a positive sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy, some patients may be considered to have a very low risk of non-SLN involvement and could be candidates for axillary sparing. The aim of this study was to validate the nomogram created at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) for the prediction of non-SLN involvement in an independent set of 140 patients with both positive SLNs and axillary dissection. The predicted proportions of positive non-SLNs were compared with the observed percentages of non-SLN metastasis. Although the SLN metastasis size and tumor size did influence the risk of non-SLN involvement, the correlation between the predicted and observed proportions was weaker for our patients (R: 0.84) than for the patients assessed at the MSKCC (R: 0.97). Differences were noted in the intraoperative assessment and in the final histology of the SLNs (imprints vs frozen sections and more detailed vs less detailed, respectively), and these could partly explain the lower level of the correlation. The nomogram could not be validated and was found to be of only limited use for the prediction of non-SLN involvement in patients operated on under similar, though not fully identical conditions. We therefore warn against the unvalidated use of this prediction tool.

  18. Comparison of the Luminex xTAG RVP Fast assay and the Idaho Technology FilmArray RP assay for detection of respiratory viruses in pediatric patients at a cancer hospital.

    PubMed

    Babady, N Esther; Mead, Peter; Stiles, Jeffrey; Brennan, Carrie; Li, Haijing; Shuptar, Susan; Stratton, Charles W; Tang, Yi-Wei; Kamboj, Mini

    2012-07-01

    Respiratory viruses are increasingly recognized as serious causes of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. The rapid and sensitive detection of respiratory viruses is essential for the early diagnosis and administration of appropriate antiviral therapy, as well as for the effective implementation of infection control measures. We compared the performance of two commercial assays, xTAG RVP Fast (Luminex Diagnostics, Toronto, Canada) and FilmArray RVP (FA RVP; Idaho Technology, Salt Lake City, UT), in pediatric patients at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. These assays detect the following viruses: respiratory syncytial virus; influenza A and B viruses; parainfluenza viruses 1, 2, 3, and 4; human metapneumovirus; adenovirus; enterovirus-rhinovirus; coronaviruses NL63, HKU1, 229E, and OC43; and bocavirus. We tested a total of 358 respiratory specimens from 173 pediatric patients previously tested by direct fluorescence assay (DFA) and viral culture. The overall detection rate (number of positive specimens/total specimens) for viruses tested by all methods was 24% for DFA/culture, 45% for xTAG RVP Fast, and 51% for FA RVP. The agreement between the two multiplex assays was 84.5%, and the difference in detection rate was statistically significant (P < 0.0001). Overall, the FA RVP assay was more sensitive than the xTAG RVP Fast assay and had a turnaround time of approximately 1 h. The sensitivity, simplicity, and random-access platform make FA RVP an excellent choice for laboratory on-demand service with low to medium volume.

  19. Physical and psychologic readjustment after mastectomy: an evaluation of Memorial Hospitals' PMRG program.

    PubMed

    Winick, L; Robbins, G F

    1977-02-01

    Memorial Hospital in New York City, the clinical section of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, has developed a Post-Mastectomy Rehabilitation Group (PMRG) Program. The PMRG Program is comprised of a series of structured exercise, information, discussion, and group therapy sessions conducted by a social worker, nurse, physical therapist, and a volunteer from Reach to Recovery. The specific purposes of the program are to help a patient to begin to regain functional use of her arm and shoulder on the affected side, and to adapt functionally, psychologically, and emotionally to the loss of her breast and to the diagnosis of cancer in the shortest time possible. Approximately 1,700 women who underwent mastectomy participated in the program between 1970 and 1974. Some results and conclusions are: the patient's age and type of operation are related to physical recovery, resumption of normal activities, return to work, and emotional stress; 84% (661 of 790 patients) resumed normal activities within the four-month postoperative period; 74% (237 of 317 patients) returned to work (full time) within three months of their mastectomies; 13% (52 of 406 patients) experienced moderate or severe emotional stress; activity per se (any activity, doing something, keeping busy) affects readjustment; the apparent disadvantage of greater trauma with more extensive surgery may be more than compensated for by the relatively young age of that population, and the relatively less physical trauma and injury, resulting from simple mastectomies may be overshadowed by the patient's age and general physical condition; 98% (284 of 291 patients) reported the PMRG program helpful.

  20. The chronology of distress, anxiety, and depression in older prostate cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Christian J.; Weinberger, Mark I.; Balk, Eliana; Holland, Jimmie; Breitbart, William; Roth, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Current research suggests that older cancer patients report less distress compared to younger cancer patients. However, this research has generally not teased apart the differences between general distress, anxiety, and depression. Methods We conducted a secondary analysis of merged datasets using cross-sectional data on 736 men with prostate cancer (Mean Age 68±10 years of age, range 50 to 93). Approximately half the participants were recruited from doctors’ offices throughout the United States and the other half from Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (New York, NY). Participants were asked to complete the Distress Thermometer, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), the FACT-P Quality of Life questionnaire, and a demographic questionnaire. Results Aging was related to reduced distress (r=−0.14), less anxiety (r=−0.22), and increased emotional quality of life (r= 0.16). In contrast, aging was associated with greater depressive symptoms in these cancer patients (r= 0.18). The mean depression scores of 5-year cohorts consistently trended upward. The significant association between age and depression remained after controlling for stage of disease, hormone therapy use, time since diagnosis, and social, physical and functional well-being. Conclusions Despite theoretical and empirical evidence that older cancer patients may cope more effectively than younger cancer patients, depressive symptoms remain an important concern for aging cancer patients and greater attention to this area is warranted. The increase in depression is in contrast to some findings in the general aging literature, raising the possibility that this trend is unique to older cancer patients. PMID:19738000

  1. History of International Workshop on Mini-Micro- and Nano- Dosimetry (MMND) and Innovation Technologies in Radiation Oncology (ITRO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenfeld, Anatoly B.; Zaider, Marco; Yamada, Josh; Zelefsky, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    The biannual MMND (former MMD) - IPCT workshops was founded in collaboration between the Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong and the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) in 2001 and has become an important international multidisciplinary forum for the discussion of advanced quality assurance (QA) dosimetry technology for radiation therapy and space science, as well as advanced technologies for clinical cancer treatment.

  2. Bringing Precision Medicine to Community Oncologists.

    PubMed

    2017-01-01

    Quest Diagnostics has teamed up with Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and IBM Watson Health to offer IBM Watson Genomics to its network of community cancer centers and hospitals. This new service aims to advance precision medicine by combining genomic tumor sequencing with the power of cognitive computing.

  3. AACR precision medicine series: Highlights of the integrating clinical genomics and cancer therapy meeting.

    PubMed

    Maggi, Elaine; Montagna, Cristina

    2015-12-01

    The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Precision Medicine Series "Integrating Clinical Genomics and Cancer Therapy" took place June 13-16, 2015 in Salt Lake City, Utah. The conference was co-chaired by Charles L. Sawyers form Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York, Elaine R. Mardis form Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, and Arul M. Chinnaiyan from University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. About 500 clinicians, basic science investigators, bioinformaticians, and postdoctoral fellows joined together to discuss the current state of Clinical Genomics and the advances and challenges of integrating Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies into clinical practice. The plenary sessions and panel discussions covered current platforms and sequencing approaches adopted for NGS assays of cancer genome at several national and international institutions, different approaches used to map and classify targetable sequence variants, and how information acquired with the sequencing of the cancer genome is used to guide treatment options. While challenges still exist from a technological perspective, it emerged that there exists considerable need for the development of tools to aid the identification of the therapy most suitable based on the mutational profile of the somatic cancer genome. The process to match patients to ongoing clinical trials is still complex. In addition, the need for centralized data repositories, preferably linked to well annotated clinical records, that aid sharing of sequencing information is central to begin understanding the contribution of variants of unknown significance to tumor etiology and response to therapy. Here we summarize the highlights of this stimulating four-day conference with a major emphasis on the open problems that the clinical genomics community is currently facing and the tools most needed for advancing this field.

  4. Expression and functional role of orphan receptor GPR158 in prostate cancer growth and progression.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nitin; Itakura, Tatsuo; Jeong, Shinwu; Liao, Chun-Peng; Roy-Burman, Pradip; Zandi, Ebrahim; Groshen, Susan; Pinski, Jacek; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Gross, Mitchell E; Fini, M Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second-leading cause of cancer-related mortality, after lung cancer, in men from developed countries. In its early stages, primary tumor growth is dependent on androgens, thus generally can be controlled by androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Eventually however, the disease progresses to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), a lethal form in need of more effective treatments. G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) comprise a large clan of cell surface proteins that have been implicated as therapeutic targets in PCa growth and progression. The findings reported here provide intriguing evidence of a role for the newly characterized glutamate family member GPR158 in PCa growth and progression. We found that GPR158 promotes PCa cell proliferation independent of androgen receptor (AR) functionality and that this requires its localization in the nucleus of the cell. This suggests that GPR158 acts by mechanisms different from other GPCRs. GPR158 expression is stimulated by androgens and GPR158 stimulates AR expression, implying a potential to sensitize tumors to low androgen conditions during ADT via a positive feedback loop. Further, we found GPR158 expression correlates with a neuroendocrine (NE) differentiation phenotype and promotes anchorage-independent colony formation implying a role for GPR158 in therapeutic progression and tumor formation. GPR158 expression was increased at the invading front of prostate tumors that formed in the genetically defined conditional Pten knockout mouse model, and co-localized with elevated AR expression in the cell nucleus. Kaplan-Meier analysis on a dataset from the Memorial Sloan Kettering cancer genome portal showed that increased GPR158 expression in tumors is associated with lower disease-free survival. Our findings strongly suggest that pharmaceuticals targeting GPR158 activities could represent a novel and innovative approach to the prevention and management of CRPC.

  5. Final Report - DOE Center for Laser Imaging and Cancer Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Alfano, Robert R.; Koutcher, Jason A.

    2002-10-31

    This Final Report summarizes the significant progress made by the researchers, students and staff of the Center for Laser Imaging and Cancer Diagnostics (CLICD) from January 1998 through May 2002. During this period, the Center supported several projects. Most projects were proposed initially, some were added subsequently as their relevance and importance to the DOE mission became evident. DOE support has been leveraged to obtain continuing funding for some projects. Leveraged funds come from various sources, including NIH, Army, NSF and the Air Force. The goal of the Center was to develop laser-based instruments for use in the detection and diagnosis of major diseases, with an emphasis on detection and diagnosis of various cancers. Each of the supported projects is a collaborative effort between physicists and laser scientists and the City College of New York and noted physicians, surgeons, pathologists, and biologists located at medical centers in the Metropolitan area. The participating institutions were: City College of New York Institute for Ultrafast Lasers and Spectroscopy, Hackensack University Medical Center, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, and New York Eye and Ear Institute. Each of the projects funded by the Center is grouped into one of four research categories: a) Disease Detection, b) Non-Disease Applications, c) New Diagnostic Tools, and, d) Education, Training, Outreach and Dissemination. The progress achieved by the multidisciplinary teams was reported in 51 publications and 32 presentations at major national conferences. Also, one U.S. patent was obtained and six U.S. patent applications have been filed for innovations resulting from the projects sponsored by the Center.

  6. Outcomes of chemotherapies and HER2 directed therapies in advanced HER2-mutant lung cancers.

    PubMed

    Eng, Juliana; Hsu, Meier; Chaft, Jamie E; Kris, Mark G; Arcila, Maria E; Li, Bob T

    2016-09-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2, ERBB2) mutations occur in 3% of lung adenocarcinomas. While case reports and series have shown activity of HER2 targeted agents in these patients, little is known about outcomes of chemotherapies. Patients with stage IV HER2-mutant lung cancers at Memorial Sloan Kettering were reviewed. Patient demographics, types of HER2 mutations, duration of systemic treatments and survival were analyzed. We identified 38 patients with HER2-mutant lung cancers: median age 62; majority were women (n=24), never smokers (n=22), and all had adenocarcinomas. A 12 base pair in-frame insertion YVMA in exon 20 (p.A775_G776insYVMA) was present in 24 (63%, 95% CI 46-78%) patients. In addition, there were four 9 base pair insertions, one 6 base pair insertion, and five 3 base pair insertions in exon 20, and four single bp substitutions (exon 20 L755F, V777L, D769H, exon 8 S310F). The median overall survival from date of diagnosis of stage IV disease was 2.3 years (95% CI 1.2-2.6). The median duration of chemotherapy was 4.3 months (68 treatments, range 0-21 months): 6.2 months for pemetrexed ±platinum/bevacizumab, 4 months for taxane ±platinum/bevacizumab, 2.6 months for gemcitabine, 3.5 months for vinorelbine. The median duration of HER2 tyrosine kinase inhibitors was 2.2 months (28 treatments, range 0.3-16.3 months). As we search for better targeted therapies for patients with HER2-mutant lung cancers, chemotherapy remains an important component of care.

  7. Intraoperative Radiotherapy During Radical Prostatectomy for Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer: Technical and Dosimetric Aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Krengli, Marco; Terrone, Carlo; Ballare, Andrea; Loi, Gianfranco; Tarabuzzi, Roberto; Marchioro, Giansilvio; Beldi, Debora; Mones, Eleonora; Bolchini, Cesare R.T.; Volpe, Alessandro; Frea, Bruno

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To analyze the feasibility of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) in patients with high-risk prostate cancer and candidates for radical prostatectomy. Methods and Materials: A total of 38 patients with locally advanced prostate cancer were enrolled. No patients had evidence of lymph node or distant metastases, probability of organ-confined disease >25%, or risk of lymph node involvement >15% according to the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center Nomogram. The IORT was delivered after exposure of the prostate by a dedicated linear accelerator with beveled collimators using electrons of 9 to 12 MeV to a total dose of 10-12 Gy. Rectal dose was measured in vivo by radiochromic films placed on a rectal probe. Administration of IORT was followed by completion of radical prostatectomy and regional lymph node dissection. All cases with extracapsular extension and/or positive margins were scheduled for postoperative radiotherapy. Patients with pT3 to pT4 disease or positive nodes received adjuvant hormonal therapy. Results: Mean dose detected by radiochromic films was 3.9 Gy (range, 0.4-8.9 Gy) to the anterior rectal wall. The IORT procedure lasted 31 min on average (range, 15-45 min). No major intra- or postoperative complications occurred. Minor complications were observed in 10/33 (30%) of cases. Of the 27/31 patients who completed the postoperative external beam radiotherapy, 3/27 experienced Grade 2 rectal toxicity and 1/27 experienced Grade 2 urinary toxicity. Conclusions: Use of IORT during radical prostatectomy is feasible and allows safe delivery of postoperative external beam radiotherapy to the tumor bed without relevant acute rectal toxicity.

  8. Bladder cancer in men and women treated by radiation therapy and/or radical cystectomy.

    PubMed

    Batata, M A; Chu, F C; Hilaris, B S; Whitmore, W F; Kim, Y S; Lee, M Z

    1981-07-01

    Four-hundred fifty-one patients with bladder cancer, 348 men and 103 women, were treated by radiation therapy and/or radical cystectomy during the last two decades at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Radical cystectomy alone was the treatment in 98 men and 39 women. Radical radiation therapy to an average tumor dose of 6,000 rad in six weeks was given to 79 men and 30 women +/- one year before salvage cystectomy was done for recurrent or persistent tumors. Planned preoperative irradiation was delivered to the true pelvis either 4,000 rad in four weeks in 95 men and 24 women or 2,000 rad in one week in 76 men and 10 women +/- six weeks and two days, respectively, before radical cystectomy. Over-all survival and recurrence results in both sexes were similar, 40 per cent of men and 36 per cent of women were alive at five years without recurrence, 45 per cent of men and 48 per cent of women died in five or more years with local and/or distant recurrences, and 21 per cent of men and 15 per cent of women died before five years from causes other than cancer recurrence. Higher five-year survival for high clinical stage B2 to D1 tumors was noted similarly in the irradiated men (30 per cent) and women (37 per cent) than in the cystectomy alone patients (19 per cent in men and 4 per cent in women). Similar survival rates (52 to 57 per cent) were observed in men and women with low clinical stage O to B1 tumors treated with or without irradiation.

  9. Patterns of Utilization of Adjuvant Radiotherapy and Outcomes in Black Women After Breast Conservation at a Large Multidisciplinary Cancer Center;Black women; Breast cancer; Radiotherapy; RT; Breast conservation

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards-Bennett, Sophia M.; Jacks, Lindsay M.; McCormick, Beryl; Zhang, Zhigang; Azu, Michelle; Ho, Alice; Powell, Simon; Brown, Carol

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Population-based studies have reported that as many of 35% of black women do not undergo radiotherapy (RT) after breast conservation surgery (BCS). The objective of the present study was to determine whether this trend persisted at a large multidisciplinary cancer center, and to identify the factors that predict for noncompliance with RT and determine the outcomes for this subset of patients. Methods and Materials: Between January 2002 and December 2007, 83 black women underwent BCS at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and were therefore eligible for the present study. Of the 83 women, 38 (46%) had Stage I, 38 (46%) Stage II, and 7 (8%) Stage III disease. Of the study cohort, 31 (37%) had triple hormone receptor-negative tumors. RT was recommended for 81 (98%) of the 83 patients (median dose, 60 Gy). Results: Of the 81 women, 12 (15%) did not receive the recommended adjuvant breast RT. Nonreceipt of chemotherapy (p = .003) and older age (p = .009) were associated with nonreceipt of RT. With a median follow-up of 70 months, the 3-year local control, locoregional control, recurrence-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival rate was 99% (actuarial 5-year rate, 97%), 96% (actuarial 5-year rate, 93%), 95% (actuarial 5-year rate, 92%), 92% (actuarial 5-year rate, 89%), and 95% (actuarial 5-year rate, 91%), respectively. Conclusion: We found a greater rate of utilization adjuvant breast RT (85%) among black women after BCS than has been reported in recent studies, indicating that excellent outcomes are attainable for black women after BCS when care is administered in a multidisciplinary cancer center.

  10. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy first, followed by chemoradiation and then surgery, in the management of locally advanced rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Cercek, Andrea; Goodman, Karyn A; Hajj, Carla; Weisberger, Emily; Segal, Neil H; Reidy-Lagunes, Diane L; Stadler, Zsofia K; Wu, Abraham J; Weiser, Martin R; Paty, Philip B; Guillem, Jose G; Nash, Garrett M; Temple, Larissa K; Garcia-Aguilar, Julio; Saltz, Leonard B

    2014-04-01

    Standard therapy for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) is preoperative chemoradiotherapy and postoperative chemotherapy. At Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) the authors began offering FOLFOX (5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin) as initial treatment for patients with high-risk LARC to target micrometastases while treating the primary tumor. The purpose of this study is to report the safety and efficacy of initial FOLFOX given before chemoradiotherapy on tumor downsizing and pathologic complete response (pathCR) in LARC. The records of patients with stage II/III rectal cancer treated at MSKCC between 2007 and 2012 were reviewed. Of approximately 300 patients with LARC treated at MSKCC, 61 received FOLFOX as initial therapy. Of these 61 patients, 57 received induction FOLFOX (median 7 cycles) followed by chemoradiation, and 4 experienced an excellent response, declined chemoradiation, and underwent total mesorectal excision (TME). Twelve of the 61 patients did not undergo TME: 9 had a complete clinical response (CCR), 1 declined despite persistent tumor, 1 declined because of comorbidities, and 1 developed metastatic disease. Among the 61 patients receiving initial FOLFOX, 22 (36%) had either a pathCR (n=13) or a CCR (n=9). Of the 49 patients who underwent TME, all had R0 resections and 23 (47%) had tumor response greater than 90%, including 13 (27%) who experienced a pathCR. Of the 28 patients who received all 8 cycles of FOLFOX, 8 experienced a pathCR (29%) and 3 a CCR (11%). No serious adverse events occurred that required a delay in treatment during FOLFOX or chemoradiation. FOLFOX and chemoradiation before planned TME results in tumor regression, a high rate of delivery of planned therapy, and a substantial rate of pathCRs, and offers a good platform for nonoperative management in select patients.

  11. Pattern of neck recurrence after lateral neck dissection for cervical metastases in papillary thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, William F.; Wang, Laura Y.; Palmer, Frank L.; Nixon, Iain J.; Shah, Jatin P.; Patel, Snehal G.; Ganly, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to determine the rate and pattern of nodal recurrence in patients who underwent a therapeutic, lateral neck dissection (LND) for papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) with clinically evident cervical metastases and to determine if there was any correlation between the extent of initial dissection and the rate and pattern of neck recurrence. Methods A total of 3,664 patients with PTC treated between 1986 and 2010 at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center were identified from our institutional database. Tumor factors, patient demographics, extent of initial LND, and adjuvant therapy were recorded. Patterns of recurrent lateral neck metastases by level involvement were recorded and outcomes calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results A total of 484 patients had an LND for cervical metastases; 364 (75%) had a comprehensive LND (CLND) and 120 (25%) had a selective neck dissection (SND). The median duration of follow-up was 63.5 months. As expected, patients with CLND had a greater number of nodes removed as well as a greater number of positive nodes (P < .001). There was no difference in overall lateral neck recurrence-free status (CLND 94.4% vs SND 89.4%, P = .158), but in the dissected neck, the ipsilateral lateral neck recurrence-free status was superior in the CLND patients (97.7% vs 89.4%, P < .001). Conclusion Patients with clinically evident neck metastases from PTC managed by CLND have lesser rates of recurrence in the dissected neck compared with patients managed by SND. SND should only be done in highly selected cases with small volume disease. PMID:26994486

  12. Reliability and Validity of a Survey to Measure Bowel Function and Quality of Life in Long-term Rectal Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Wendel, Christopher S.; Grant, Marcia; Herrinton, Lisa; Temple, Larissa K. F.; Hornbrook, Mark C.; McMullen, Carmit K.; Bulkley, Joanna E.; Altschuler, Andrea; Krouse, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Examine reliability and validity of a specialized health-related quality of life questionnaire for rectal cancer (RC) survivors (≥5 years post diagnosis). Methods We mailed 1,063 Kaiser Permanente (KP) RC survivors (313 ostomy, 750 anastomosis) a questionnaire containing the Modified City of Hope Quality of Life-Ostomy (mCOH-QOL-O), SF-12v2, Duke–UNC Functional Social Support Questionnaire (FSSQ), and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center Bowel Function Index (BFI). We adapted certain BFI items for use by subjects with intestinal ostomies. We evaluated reliability for all instruments with inter-item correlations and Cronbach’s alpha. We assessed construct validity only for the BFI in the ostomy group, because such use has not been reported. Results The overall response rate was 60.5% (577 respondents/953 eligible). Compared to nonresponders, participants were on average 2 years younger and more likely non-Hispanic white, resided in educationally nondeprived areas, and had KP membership through a group. The mCOH-QOL-O, SF-12, and FSSQ were found to be highly reliable for RC survivors. In the ostomy group, BFI Urgency/Soilage and Dietary subscales were found to be reliable, but Frequency was not. Factor analysis supported the construct of Urgency/Soilage and Dietary subscales in the ostomy group, although one item had a moderate correlation with all three factors. The BFI also demonstrated good concurrent validity with other instruments in the ostomy group. Conclusions With possible exception of the BFI Frequency subscale in populations with ostomies, components of our survey can be used for the entire population of RC survivors, no matter whether they received anastomosis or ostomy. PMID:24890826

  13. Efficacy of concurrent cetuximab vs. 5-fluorouracil/carboplatin or high-dose cisplatin with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for locally-advanced head and neck cancer (LAHNSCC)

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Lauren Q.; Sherman, Eric J.; Riaz, Nadeem; Setton, Jeremy; Koutcher, Lawrence; Zhang, Zhigang; Shi, Weiji; Fury, Matthew G.; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Pfister, David G.; Morris, Luc; Lee, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objectives We previously reported inferior outcomes for locally-advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (LAHNSCC) patients treated with concurrent cetuximab vs. high-dose cisplatin with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Prior to FDA approval of cetuximab for LAHNSCC, non-cisplatin eligible patients at our institution received 5-fluorouracil (5FU)/carboplatin. We sought to compare concurrent cetuximab vs. 5FU/carboplatin vs. high-dose cisplatin with IMRT for LAHNSCC. Materials and methods Retrospective review was performed for LAHNSCC patients treated at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center from 11/02 to 04/08 with concurrent cetuximab (n = 49), 5FU/carboplatin (n = 52), or cisplatin (n = 259) and IMRT. Overall survival (OS), locoregional failure (LRF), distant metastasis-free survival, and late toxicity were analyzed using univariate and multivariate analyses. OS analysis was confirmed by propensity score adjustment. Results Treatment groups were similar with regard to primary tumor site, overall stage, and alcohol and tobacco history. Cetuximab and 5FU/carboplatin patients were older, with lower performance status, more comorbidities, higher T classification, and worse renal function. On multivariate analysis, compared with cisplatin and 5FU/carboplatin, cetuximab was associated with inferior 4-year OS (86.9% vs. 70.2% vs. 40.9%; P < .0001) and 4-year LRF (6.3% vs. 9.7% vs. 40.2%; P < .0001). Late toxicity was highest with 5FU/carboplatin (25.0%) vs. cisplatin (8.0%) vs. cetuximab (7.7%). Conclusions Although 5FU/carboplatin patients were sicker and experienced greater toxicity than cisplatin patients, no significant difference was found in all endpoints. In contrast, despite similar pretreatment characteristics, outcomes for cetuximab vs. 5FU/carboplatin were significantly worse. We feel that caution should be used with routine use of cetuximab in the management of LAHNSCC. PMID:25132089

  14. Progress and challenges in psychosocial and behavioral research in cancer in the twentieth century.

    PubMed

    Holland, J C

    1991-02-01

    Research in the psychosocial and behavioral aspects of cancer has shown steady growth since the 1950s, and its course of development has paralleled the history of medical techniques in treating cancer. Table 1 outlines this parallel evolution from the 1850s to the 1960s. The roles of the American Cancer Society and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in spearheading and nurturing research in this area are documented. Interest in psychooncologic questions can be traced back for centuries to the search for etiologic factors and psychologic variables that would explain individual vulnerability to cancer. The first psychologic studies of cancer patients were reported in 1951 and 1952 from the Massachusetts General Hospital and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, respectively. The 1970s saw new interest in psychosocial and behavioral research with many issues being addressed for the first time: better care of the terminally ill through more humanistic approaches including better means of pain control; ethical concerns related to patient rights and their status as subjects in experimental protocols; trying to measure quality of life for cancer patients on protocols; seeing the need for multidisciplinary collaborative groups to make up for the absence of formal training in this area; and the need to design valid, accurate measuring scales specific to the symptomology of patients with cancer. Table 4 outlines how the 1980s gave increasing recognition and support to the psychosocial dimensions of cancer. This period produced a series of key conferences that examined a broad research and education perspective and produced recommendations that remain a benchmark in regard to instrumentation, conceptual models, pitfalls of psychosocial research, training, and education, and the organization of research efforts. New precision has been added to the field in the past 6 years: studies measuring concurrent psychologic, endocrine, and immune function; use of statistical modeling

  15. Targeted therapy in renal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dorff, Tanya B.; Goldkorn, Amir; Quinn, David I.

    2009-01-01

    Renal cell cancer (RCC) has an increasing incidence internationally and is a disease for which there have been limited therapeutic options until recently. The last decade has seen a vastly improved understanding of the biological and clinical factors that predict the outcome of this disease. We now understand some of the different molecular underpinnings of renal clear cell carcinoma by mutation or silencing of the von Hippel Lindau (VHL) gene and subsequent deregulated proliferation and angiogenesis. Survival in advanced disease is predicted by factors (performance status, anemia, hypercalcemia, and serum lactate dehydrogenase, time from diagnosis to recurrence) incorporated into the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) criteria (also referred to as ‘Motzer’ criteria). These criteria allow classification of patients with RCC into good, intermediate and poor risk categories with median overall survivals of 22 months, 12 months and 5.4 months, respectively. Predicated upon these advances, six new targeted drugs (sorafenib, sunitinib, temsirolimus, everolimus, bevacizumab and pazopanib) have been tested in well-designed phase III trials, selected or stratified for MSKCC risk criteria, with positive results. All of these new drugs act at least in part through vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mediated pathways with other potential therapeutic impact on platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), raf kinase and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathways. Importantly, data from each of these trials show a consistent doubling of progression-free survival (PFS) over prior standard of care treatments. In addition, sorafenib, sunitinib and temsirolimus, have demonstrated significant overall survival (OS) benefits as well; further follow-up is required to determine whether the disease control exhibited by everolimus and pazopanib will translate into a survival advantage. These drugs are generally well tolerated, as demonstrated by quality

  16. SU-E-J-115: Using Markov Chain Modeling to Elucidate Patterns in Breast Cancer Metastasis Over Time and Space

    SciTech Connect

    Comen, E; Mason, J; Kuhn, P; Nieva, J; Newton, P; Norton, L; Venkatappa, N; Jochelson, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Traditionally, breast cancer metastasis is described as a process wherein cancer cells spread from the breast to multiple organ systems via hematogenous and lymphatic routes. Mapping organ specific patterns of cancer spread over time is essential to understanding metastatic progression. In order to better predict sites of metastases, here we demonstrate modeling of the patterned migration of metastasis. Methods: We reviewed the clinical history of 453 breast cancer patients from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center who were non-metastatic at diagnosis but developed metastasis over time. We used the variables of organ site of metastases as well as time to create a Markov chain model of metastasis. We illustrate the probabilities of metastasis occurring at a given anatomic site together with the probability of spread to additional sites. Results: Based on the clinical histories of 453 breast cancer patients who developed metastasis, we have learned (i) how to create the Markov transition matrix governing the probabilities of cancer progression from site to site; (ii) how to create a systemic network diagram governing disease progression modeled as a random walk on a directed graph; (iii) how to classify metastatic sites as ‘sponges’ that tend to only receive cancer cells or ‘spreaders’ that receive and release them; (iv) how to model the time-scales of disease progression as a Weibull probability distribution function; (v) how to perform Monte Carlo simulations of disease progression; and (vi) how to interpret disease progression as an entropy-increasing stochastic process. Conclusion: Based on our modeling, metastatic spread may follow predictable pathways. Mapping metastasis not simply by organ site, but by function as either a ‘spreader’ or ‘sponge’ fundamentally reframes our understanding of metastatic processes. This model serves as a novel platform from which we may integrate the evolving genomic landscape that drives cancer

  17. Targeting the Prometastatic Microenvironment of the Involuting Mammary Gland

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    express elevated LTBP1 expression compared to parental lines; 3) that high LTBP1S expression occurs in mesenchymal-like triple negative breast cancer...and brain (231-AdM) metastasis compared to the parental line. The brain metastatic line was recently re-assigned as an adrenal metastasis line...These lines together with their parental cell line were purchased from Dr. Juan Massague (Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center) and analyzed by qPCR

  18. Genomic and transcriptomic hallmarks of poorly differentiated and anaplastic thyroid cancers

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahimpasic, Tihana; Boucai, Laura; Shah, Ronak H.; Dogan, Snjezana; Ricarte-Filho, Julio C.; Krishnamoorthy, Gnana P.; Schultz, Nikolaus; Berger, Michael F.; Sander, Chris; Taylor, Barry S.; Ghossein, Ronald; Ganly, Ian; Fagin, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Foundation; the Society of Memorial Sloan Kettering; the Byrne fund; and Cycle for Survival. PMID:26878173

  19. TRASH TO TREASURE: CONVERTING COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE INTO WEAPONS AGAINST CANCER

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas, R.G.; Lacy, N.H.; Butz, T.R.; Brandon, N.E.

    2004-10-06

    As part of its commitment to clean up Cold War legacy sites, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated an exciting and unique project to dispose of its inventory of uranium-233 (233U) stored at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and extract isotopes that show great promise in the treatment of deadly cancers. In addition to increasing the supply of potentially useful medical isotopes, the project will rid DOE of a nuclear concern and cut surveillance and security costs. For more than 30 years, DOE's ORNL has stored over 1,200 containers of fissile 233U, originally produced for several defense-related projects, including a pilot study that looked at using 233U as a commercial reactor fuel. This uranium, designated as special nuclear material, requires expensive security, safety, and environmental controls. It has been stored at an ORNL facility, Building 3019A, that dates back to the Manhattan Project. Down-blending the material to a safer form, rather than continuing to store it, will eliminate a $15 million a year financial liability for the DOE and increase the supply of medical isotopes by 5,700 percent. During the down-blending process, thorium-229 (229Th) will be extracted. The thorium will then be used to extract actinium-225 (225Ac), which will ultimately supply its progeny, bismuth-213 (213Bi), for on-going cancer research. The research includes Phase II clinical trials for the treatment of acute myelogenous leukemia at Sloan-Kettering Memorial Cancer Center in New York, as well as other serious cancers of the lungs, pancreas, and kidneys using a technique known as alpha-particle radioimmunotherapy. Alpha-particle radioimmunotherapy is based on the emission of alpha particles by radionuclides. 213Bi is attached to a monoclonal antibody that targets specific cells. The bismuth then delivers a high-powered but short-range radiation dose, effectively killing the cancerous cells but sparing the surrounding tissue. Production of the actinium and

  20. Poorly differentiated (anaplastic) seminoma of the testis.

    PubMed

    Cockburn, A G; Vugrin, D; Batata, M; Hajdu, S; Whitmore, W F

    1984-05-01

    Anaplastic seminoma constitutes approximately 17% of total experience with seminoma at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Among 25 previously untreated patients, 11 (44%) were clinical Stage I, and 14 (56%) were clinical Stage II or III. Treatment of these 25 patients with the same regimens employed for classical seminoma yielded an overall 80% 5-year apparent cure rate. Survival rates were poor in eight previously treated patients referred with recurrence.

  1. Evaluation of the Probability of Non-sentinel Lymph Node Metastasis in Breast Cancer Patients with Sentinel Lymph Node Metastasis using Two Different Methods

    PubMed Central

    Başoğlu, İrfan; Çelik, Muhammet Ferhat; Dural, Ahmet Cem; Ünsal, Mustafa Gökhan; Akarsu, Cevher; Baytekin, Halil Fırat; Kapan, Selin; Alış, Halil

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this retrospective clinical study was to evaluate the accuracy and feasibility of two different clinical scales, namely the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) nomogram and Tenon’s axillary scoring system, which were developed for predicting the non-sentinel lymph node (NSLN) status in our breast cancer patients. Material and Methods The medical records of patients who were diagnosed with breast cancer between January 2010 and November 2013 were reviewed. Those who underwent sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) for axillary staging were recruited for the study, and patients who were found to have positive SLNB and thus were subsequently subjected to axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) were also included. Patients who had neoadjuvant therapy, who had clinically positive axilla, and who had stage 4 disease were excluded. Patients were divided into two groups. Group 1 included those who had negative NSLNs, whereas Group 2 included those who had positive NSLNs. The following data were collected: age, tumor size, histopathological characteristics of the tumor, presence of lymphovascular invasion, presence of multifocality, number of negative and positive NSLNs, size of metastases, histopathological method used to define metastases, and receptor status of the tumor. The score of each patient was calculated according to the MSKCC nomogram and Tenon’s axillary scoring system. Statistical analysis was conducted to investigate the correlation between the scores and the involvement of NSLNs. Results The medical records of patients who were diagnosed with breast cancer and found to have SLNB for axillary staging was reviewed. Finally, 50 patients who had positive SLNB and thus were subsequently subjected to ALND were included in the study. There were 17 and 33 patients in Groups 1 and 2, respectively. Both the MSKCC nomogram and Tenon’s axillary scoring system were demonstrated to be significantly accurate in the prediction of the

  2. TU-F-12A-01: Quantitative Non-Linear Compartment Modeling of 89Zr- and 124I- Labeled J591 Monoclonal Antibody Kinetics Using Serial Non-Invasive Positron Emission Tomography Imaging in a Pre-Clinical Human Prostate Cancer Mouse Model

    SciTech Connect

    Fung, EK; Cheal, SM; Chalasani, S; Fareedy, SB; Punzalan, B; Humm, JL; Osborne, JR; Larson, SM; Zanzonico, PB; Otto, B; Bander, NH

    2014-06-15

    -drug conjugates. Further exploration using the model will examine binding and radioisotope residence as antibody dose is increased to antigen saturation. The Center for Targeted Radioimmunotherapy and Theranostics, Ludwig Center for Cancer Immunotherapy, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSK), NIH (R25-CA096945). Technical services provided by the MSK Small-Animal Imaging Core Facility were supported by the NIH (R24-CA83084, P30-CA08748, and P50-CA92629; Zanzonico). NCI, Center to Reduce Cancer Health Disparity (R21 CA153177-03; Osborne)

  3. Using Generalized Equivalent Uniform Dose Atlases to Combine and Analyze Prospective Dosimetric and Radiation Pneumonitis Data From 2 Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Dose Escalation Protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Fan; Yorke, Ellen D.; Belderbos, Jose S.A.; Borst, Gerben R.; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E.; Lebesque, Joos V.; Jackson, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the use of generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) atlas for data pooling in radiation pneumonitis (RP) modeling, to determine the dependence of RP on gEUD, to study the consistency between data sets, and to verify the increased statistical power of the combination. Methods and Materials: Patients enrolled in prospective phase I/II dose escalation studies of radiation therapy of non-small cell lung cancer at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) (78 pts) and the Netherlands Cancer Institute (NKI) (86 pts) were included; 10 (13%) and 14 (17%) experienced RP requiring steroids (RPS) within 6 months after treatment. gEUD was calculated from dose-volume histograms. Atlases for each data set were created using 1-Gy steps from exact gEUDs and RPS data. The Lyman-Kutcher-Burman model was fit to the atlas and exact gEUD data. Heterogeneity and inconsistency statistics for the fitted parameters were computed. gEUD maps of the probability of RPS rate {>=}20% were plotted. Results: The 2 data sets were homogeneous and consistent. The best fit values of the volume effect parameter a were small, with upper 95% confidence limit around 1.0 in the joint data. The likelihood profiles around the best fit a values were flat in all cases, making determination of the best fit a weak. All confidence intervals (CIs) were narrower in the joint than in the individual data sets. The minimum P value for correlations of gEUD with RPS in the joint data was .002, compared with P=.01 and .05 for MSKCC and NKI data sets, respectively. gEUD maps showed that at small a, RPS risk increases with gEUD. Conclusions: The atlas can be used to combine gEUD and RPS information from different institutions and model gEUD dependence of RPS. RPS has a large volume effect with the mean dose model barely included in the 95% CI. Data pooling increased statistical power.

  4. The early diagnosis of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Petty, T L

    2001-06-01

    Lung cancer is the most common fatal malignancy in both men and women, both in the United States and elsewhere in the world. Today, lung cancer is most often diagnosed on the basis of symptoms of advanced disease or when chest x-rays are taken for a variety of purposes unrelated to lung cancer detection. Unfortunately, in the United States no society or governmental agency recommends screening, even for patients with high risks, such as smokers with airflow obstruction or people with occupational exposures, including asbestos. The origins of this negative attitude toward lung cancer screening are found in 3 studies sponsored by the National Cancer Institute in the mid-1970s and conducted at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, the Mayo Clinic, and the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Center. These studies concluded that early identification of lung cancer through chest x-rays and cytologic diagnosis of sputum did not alter disease-specific mortality. However, patients with earlier stage disease were found through screening, which resulted in a higher resectability rate and improved survival in the screening group compared with a control group of patients receiving ordinary care. Patients in the control group often received annual chest x-rays during the course of this study, which was the standard of care at the time. Thus no true nonscreening control group resulted. The patients at highest risk were not enrolled in this study. No specific amount of pack-years of smoking intensity was required. Only men were screened. The studies were inadequately powered to show an improvement in mortality rate of less than 50%. Ninety percent of lung cancer occurs in smokers. The prevalence of lung cancer is 4 to 6 times greater when smokers have airflow obstruction than with normal airflow, when all other background factors, including smoking history, occupational risk, and family history, are the same. Screening heavy smokers (ie, > or = 30 pack-years) with airflow obstruction

  5. Translational Bioinformatics and Clinical Research (Biomedical) Informatics.

    PubMed

    Sirintrapun, S Joseph; Zehir, Ahmet; Syed, Aijazuddin; Gao, JianJiong; Schultz, Nikolaus; Cheng, Donavan T

    2016-03-01

    Translational bioinformatics and clinical research (biomedical) informatics are the primary domains related to informatics activities that support translational research. Translational bioinformatics focuses on computational techniques in genetics, molecular biology, and systems biology. Clinical research (biomedical) informatics involves the use of informatics in discovery and management of new knowledge relating to health and disease. This article details 3 projects that are hybrid applications of translational bioinformatics and clinical research (biomedical) informatics: The Cancer Genome Atlas, the cBioPortal for Cancer Genomics, and the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center clinical variants and results database, all designed to facilitate insights into cancer biology and clinical/therapeutic correlations.

  6. Translational Bioinformatics and Clinical Research (Biomedical) Informatics.

    PubMed

    Sirintrapun, S Joseph; Zehir, Ahmet; Syed, Aijazuddin; Gao, JianJiong; Schultz, Nikolaus; Cheng, Donavan T

    2015-06-01

    Translational bioinformatics and clinical research (biomedical) informatics are the primary domains related to informatics activities that support translational research. Translational bioinformatics focuses on computational techniques in genetics, molecular biology, and systems biology. Clinical research (biomedical) informatics involves the use of informatics in discovery and management of new knowledge relating to health and disease. This article details 3 projects that are hybrid applications of translational bioinformatics and clinical research (biomedical) informatics: The Cancer Genome Atlas, the cBioPortal for Cancer Genomics, and the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center clinical variants and results database, all designed to facilitate insights into cancer biology and clinical/therapeutic correlations.

  7. A novel PACU design for noise reduction.

    PubMed

    Smykowski, Lenore

    2008-08-01

    As redesign and renovation of patient care units occur, health care providers are looking to the literature and finding evidence for the importance of lowering environmental stressors. In the PACU at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, patients historically expressed dissatisfaction with excessive noise levels and frequently cited overhearing staff conversations as most troubling. Nurses found the noise stressful and wearing. When the time approached to design the new PACU, we took the opportunity to explore a unique floor plan to minimize noise and improve privacy.

  8. Design of multifunctional magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles/mitoxantrone-loaded liposomes for both magnetic resonance imaging and targeted cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    He, Yingna; Zhang, Linhua; Zhu, Dunwan; Song, Cunxian

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-targeting multifunctional liposomes simultaneously loaded with magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MIONs) as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent and anticancer drug, mitoxantrone (Mit), were developed for targeted cancer therapy and ultrasensitive MRI. The gonadorelin-functionalized MION/Mit-loaded liposome (Mit-GML) showed significantly increased uptake in luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptor overexpressing MCF-7 (Michigan Cancer Foundation-7) breast cancer cells over a gonadorelin-free MION/Mit-loaded liposome (Mit-ML) control, as well as in an LHRH receptor low-expressing Sloan-Kettering HER2 3+ Ovarian Cancer (SK-OV-3) cell control, thereby leading to high cytotoxicity against the MCF-7 human breast tumor cell line. The Mit-GML formulation was more effective and less toxic than equimolar doses of free Mit or Mit-ML in the treatment of LHRH receptors overexpressing MCF-7 breast cancer xenografts in mice. Furthermore, the Mit-GML demonstrated much higher T2 enhancement than did Mit-ML controls in vivo. Collectively, the study indicates that the integrated diagnostic and therapeutic design of Mit-GML nanomedicine potentially allows for the image-guided, target-specific treatment of cancer.

  9. Is cancer a metabolic rebellion against host aging? In the quest for immortality, tumor cells try to save themselves by boosting mitochondrial metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ertel, Adam; Tsirigos, Aristotelis; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Birbe, Ruth C; Pavlides, Stephanos; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Pestell, Richard G; Howell, Anthony; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P

    2012-01-15

    Aging drives large systemic reductions in oxidative mitochondrial function, shifting the entire body metabolically towards aerobic glycolysis, a.k.a, the Warburg effect. Aging is also one of the most significant risk factors for the development of human cancers, including breast tumors. How are these two findings connected? One simplistic idea is that cancer cells rebel against the aging process by increasing their capacity for oxidative mitochondrial metabolism (OXPHOS). Then, local and systemic aerobic glycolysis in the aging host would provide energy-rich mitochondrial fuels (such as L-lactate and ketones) to directly "fuel" tumor cell growth and metastasis. This would establish a type of parasite-host relationship or "two-compartment tumor metabolism", with glycolytic/oxidative metabolic-coupling. The cancer cells ("the seeds") would flourish in this nutrient-rich microenvironment ("the soil"), which has been fertilized by host aging. In this scenario, cancer cells are only trying to save themselves from the consequences of aging, by engineering a metabolic mutiny, through the amplification of mitochondrial metabolism. We discuss the recent findings of Drs. Ron DePinho (MD Anderson) and Craig Thomspson (Sloan-Kettering) that are also consistent with this new hypothesis, linking cancer progression with metabolic aging. Using data mining and bioinformatics approaches, we also provide key evidence of a role for PGC1a/NRF1 signaling in the pathogenesis of (1) two-compartment tumor metabolism, and (2) mitochondrial biogenesis in human breast cancer cells.

  10. WE-A-207-01: Memorial Lecturer

    SciTech Connect

    Muller-Runkel, R

    2015-06-15

    The Medical Physics community lost one of its early pioneers in radiation oncology physics, Jacques Ovadia, who passed away in April of 2014 at the age of 90. Jacques received his Ph.D. in Nuclear Physics from the University of Illinois at Urbana in 1951. Subsequently, under the guidance of John Laughlin, he was introduced to the field of Medical Physics. When John moved to Memorial Sloan Kettering, Jacques followed him. There he gained clinical experience and expertise in the then cutting-edge field of high energy electron beam therapy. In 1956, Jacques joined Dr. Erich Uhlmann at Michael Reese Hospital in Chicago where one of the country’s first high energy medical linear accelerators had just been installed. During his 35 year tenure, Dr. Ovadia built a strong Medical Physics department that merged in 1984 with that of the University of Chicago. Jacques pioneered the use of high energy electron beams to treat deep seated tumors, multiple-field chest wall irradiation with variable electron energies, and even anticipated the current interest in high energy electron beam grid-therapy. At an early stage, he introduced a simulator, computerized treatment planning and in-house developed record and verify software. He retired in 1990 as Professor emeritus in Radiation and Cellular Biology at the University of Chicago. Dr. Ovadia was an early and strong supporter of AAPM. He was present at the Chicago ROMPS meeting where the decision was made to form an independent professional society for medical physics. He served as AAPM president in 1976. Jacques Ovadia is survived by his wife of 58 years, Florence, their daughter Corinne Graefe and son Marc Ovadia, MD, as well as four grandchildren and one great-grandchild. Jacques’ dynamic and ever enthusiastic personality inspired all who collaborated with him. He will be greatly missed.

  11. Evolving technologies drive the new roles of Biomedical Engineering.

    PubMed

    Frisch, P H; St Germain, J; Lui, W

    2008-01-01

    Rapidly changing technology coupled with the financial impact of organized health care, has required hospital Biomedical Engineering organizations to augment their traditional operational and business models to increase their role in developing enhanced clinical applications utilizing new and evolving technologies. The deployment of these technology based applications has required Biomedical Engineering organizations to re-organize to optimize the manner in which they provide and manage services. Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center has implemented a strategy to explore evolving technologies integrating them into enhanced clinical applications while optimally utilizing the expertise of the traditional Biomedical Engineering component (Clinical Engineering) to provide expanded support in technology / equipment management, device repair, preventive maintenance and integration with legacy clinical systems. Specifically, Biomedical Engineering is an integral component of the Medical Physics Department which provides comprehensive and integrated support to the Center in advanced physical, technical and engineering technology. This organizational structure emphasizes the integration and collaboration between a spectrum of technical expertise for clinical support and equipment management roles. The high cost of clinical equipment purchases coupled with the increasing cost of service has driven equipment management responsibilities to include significant business and financial aspects to provide a cost effective service model. This case study details the dynamics of these expanded roles, future initiatives and benefits for Biomedical Engineering and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

  12. Is cancer a metabolic rebellion against host aging?

    PubMed Central

    Ertel, Adam; Tsirigos, Aristotelis; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Birbe, Ruth C; Pavlides, Stephanos; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Pestell, Richard G; Howell, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Aging drives large systemic reductions in oxidative mitochondrial function, shifting the entire body metabolically toward aerobic glycolysis, a.k.a, the Warburg effect. Aging is also one of the most significant risk factors for the development of human cancers, including breast tumors. How are these two findings connected? One simplistic idea is that cancer cells rebel against the aging process by increasing their capacity for oxidative mitochondrial metabolism (OXPHOS). Then, local and systemic aerobic glycolysis in the aging host would provide energy-rich mitochondrial fuels (such as L-lactate and ketones) to directly “fuel” tumor cell growth and metastasis. This would establish a type of parasite-host relationship or “two-compartment tumor metabolism,” with glycolytic/oxidative metabolic coupling. The cancer cells (“the seeds”) would flourish in this nutrient-rich microenvironment (“the soil”), which has been fertilized by host aging. In this scenario, cancer cells are only trying to save themselves from the consequences of aging by engineering a metabolic mutiny, through the amplification of mitochondrial metabolism. We discuss the recent findings of Drs. Ron DePinho (MD Anderson) and Craig Thomspson (Sloan-Kettering) that are also consistent with this new hypothesis, linking cancer progression with metabolic aging. Using data mining and bioinformatics approaches, we also provide key evidence of a role for PGC1a/NRF1 signaling in the pathogenesis of (1) two-compartment tumor metabolism and (2) mitochondrial biogenesis in human breast cancer cells. PMID:22234241

  13. A Prospective Study of Autobiographical Memory and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Following Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kangas, Maria; Henry, Jane L.; Bryant, Richard A.

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the authors investigated the relationship between autobiographical memory and the onset and maintenance of distressing memories following cancer. In Study 1, participants recently diagnosed with head, neck, or lung cancer were assessed for acute stress disorder (ASD). Participants with ASD reported fewer specific memories than did…

  14. In situ vaccine, immunological memory and cancer cure.

    PubMed

    Tsung, Kangla; Norton, Jeffrey A

    2016-01-01

    As surgery is able to remove primary tumors and limit metastases, the major challenge in cancer management is the prevention of post-resection recurrence and metastases. From the immune point of view, tumor resection removes the supply of tumor antigens that maintain an active concomitant antitumor immunity elicited by the primary tumor, and may also signal for deposition of immunological memory against future metastases. However, the natural course of this antitumor immunity in many cancer patients following complete tumor resection may not be favorable because protection is often lost after 1-3 years. Recent studies suggest that chemotherapy is able to activate this pre-existing antitumor immunity, and tumor resection following immune activation may lead to higher levels of immunological memory against future tumor antigens (in the form of metastases). Interleukin-12 added to chemotherapy mimics the function of a vaccine adjuvant in that it helps to enhance the antitumor immunity activated by chemotherapy and leaves a much stronger antitumor immune memory. This finding, when applied to cancer management, may help to maintain a strong and long lasting antitumor immunity following complete tumor resection, thus eliminating post-surgery recurrence and metastases.

  15. Ski regulates Hippo and TAZ signaling to suppress breast cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Rashidian, Juliet; Le Scolan, Erwan; Ji, Xiaodan; Zhu, Qingwei; Mulvihill, Melinda M; Nomura, Daniel; Luo, Kunxin

    2015-02-10

    Ski, the transforming protein of the avian Sloan-Kettering retrovirus, inhibits transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)/Smad signaling and displays both pro-oncogenic and anti-oncogenic activities in human cancer. Inhibition of TGF-β signaling is likely responsible for the pro-oncogenic activity of Ski. We investigated the mechanism(s) underlying the tumor suppressor activity of Ski and found that Ski suppressed the activity of the Hippo signaling effectors TAZ and YAP to inhibit breast cancer progression. TAZ and YAP are transcriptional coactivators that can contribute to cancer by promoting proliferation, tumorigenesis, and cancer stem cell expansion. Hippo signaling activates the the Lats family of kinases, which phosphorylate TAZ and YAP, resulting in cytoplasmic retention and degradation and inhibition of their transcriptional activity. We showed that Ski interacted with multiple components of the Hippo pathway to facilitate activation of Lats2, resulting in increased phosphorylation and subsequent degradation of TAZ. Ski also promoted the degradation of a constitutively active TAZ mutant that is not phosphorylated by Lats, suggesting the existence of a Lats2-independent degradation pathway. Finally, we showed that Ski repressed the transcriptional activity of TAZ by binding to the TAZ partner TEAD and recruiting the transcriptional co-repressor NCoR1 to the TEAD-TAZ complex. Ski effectively reversed transformation and epithelial-to-mesenchyme transition in cultured breast cancer cells and metastasis in TAZ-expressing xenografted tumors. Thus, Ski inhibited the function of TAZ through multiple mechanisms in human cancer cells.

  16. 125I implantation for carcinoma of prostate. Further follow-up of first 100 cases.

    PubMed

    Grossman, H B; Batata, M; Hilaris, B; Whitmore, W F

    1982-12-01

    Analysis of the first 100 patients at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center with Stage B or C prostatic cancer treated by pelvic lymph node dissection and Iodine-125 implantation and endocrine therapy when specifically indicated revealed five-year survival rates of 87 and 77 per cent, respectively. Tumor stage, tumor grade, and lymph node metastasis each correlated with survival, but the latter was the most significant factor. Although routine follow-up biopsies were not performed, local tumor control as judged by serial digital rectal examination defined a prognostically favored group of patients. In the absence of controls, however, whether the latter response indicates a salutary effect of the treatment which produces an improved survival or merely identifies a group of patients who were predetermined to have a more favorable survival is undetermined.

  17. Memory

    MedlinePlus

    ... it has to decide what is worth remembering. Memory is the process of storing and then remembering this information. There are different types of memory. Short-term memory stores information for a few ...

  18. Fabrication of a provisional nasal prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Evan B; Golden, Marjorie; Huryn, Joseph M

    2014-11-01

    A technique for making a provisional nasal prosthesis for interim use after the ablation of a midface tumor is described. The technique is especially useful for the re-creation of a nasal form in an expedient and cost-effective manner. A preoperative definitive cast, or moulage, of the patient that includes a nasal form is used to fabricate a vacuum form of the midface. The vacuum form is evaluated on the patient, the extension is adjusted, and an external adhesive knit liner is applied to give the appearance of a contoured nasal bandage. The provisional nasal prosthesis is attached with medical adhesive tape and removed daily by the patient. The prosthesis is easily replaced during the course of treatment and has been found to be functional and esthetically acceptable to those patients receiving care from the Dental Service at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

  19. Improved Yields of Iodine-124 from the Enriched Tellurium-124 Dioxide/Aluminum Oxide Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, R. D.; Qiao, J.; Nacca, A.; Sheh, Y.; Lom, C.; Balatoni, J.; Cai, S.; Bornmann, W.; Pentlow, K.

    2003-08-01

    The escalating clinical application of Positron Emission Tomography results from the novel radiotracers which are available to monitor specific biochemical or physiologic processes. Future developments of the technique will require an increasing availability of additional unique radioligands and radionuclides. Iodine-124, a radionuclide whose potential for both diagnostic and therapeutic applications is widely recognized, has been prepared at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center on a weekly basis for several years (1). With its characteristic 4.18 day half life and complex decay scheme (2) which includes positron emission (22.0 ± 0.5%) and electron capture (78 ± 0.5%), this radionuclide has been shown to be appropriate for radiotracers describing slow physiologic processes with the clearance of non-specific radioactivity. The refinements and modifications being engineered into the cyclotron target system to increase the absolute yield of recoverable radioactivity from each irradiation and its chemical processing of the reusable solid target matrix are described..

  20. Cyclotron production and potential clinical application of Iodine-124 labeled radiotracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, R.; Balatoni, J.; Kothari, P.; Pentlow, K.; Sheh, Y.; Lom, C.; Dahl, J.; Eckelman, W.; Plascjak, P.; Adams, H. R.; Larson, S. M.

    2001-07-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a dynamic molecular imaging technique applicable to clinical research, drug development as well as clinical diagnoses. The potential for PET is derived from specificity of the radiotracers and radioligands that are synthesized to monitor the biochemical or physiological processes. Further developments will depend on an increasing availability of unique radiotracers. Iodine-124, a radionuclide that has potential for both diagnostic and therapeutic applications, possesses a half-life of 4.18 days and decays by positron emission (23.3%) and electron capture (76.7%). The preparation of this radionuclide via the 124Te(p,n)124I nuclear reaction is described as well as chemistry associated with the preparation of specific radiotracers and radiopharmaceuticals incorporating iodine-124 at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center.

  1. Electroplated targets for production of unique PET radionuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bui, V.; Sheh, Y.; Finn, R.; Francesconi, L.; Cai, S.; Schlyer, D.; Wieland, B.

    1995-12-01

    The past decade has witnessed the applications of positron emission tomography (PET) evolving from a purely research endeavor to a procedure which has specific clinical applications in the areas of cardiology, neurology and oncology. The growth of PET has been facilitated by developments in both medical instrumentation and radiopharmaceutical chemistry efforts. Included in this latter effort has been the low energy accelerator production and processing of unique PET radionuclides appropriate for the radiolabeling of biomolecules, i.e. monoclonal antibodies and peptides. The development and application of electroplated targets of antimony and copper for the production of iodine-124 and gallium-66 respectively, utilizing the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) cyclotron are examples of target design and development applicable to many medical accelerators.

  2. Production and quality assurance of cyclotron produced iodine-124 from enriched tellurium targets

    SciTech Connect

    Balatoni, J.; Finn, R.; Blasberg, R.; Tjuvajev, J.; Larson, S.

    1999-06-01

    The production of iodine-124 and the formulation of specific radiopharmaceuticals are an important component of the Positron Emission Tomography Program at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Preparation of iodine-124 using the CS-15 cyclotron employing the (p, n) nuclear reaction on an enriched {sup 124}TeO{sub 2} solid target has been initiated. The radioiodine is isolated by a dry distillation technique from the target matrix. The mass and oxidation states of iodine species isolated from the processing were analyzed using high pressure liquid chromatography. Employing a C-8 reverse-phase column (1) and isocratic elution conditions, the chemical purity and specific activity of the various radioiodine species was determined. The method provides a routine means for evaluation of the purity of the radioiodide prior to and post radiolabeling essential for the efficient utilization and recovery of this important radionuclide. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Production and quality assurance of cyclotron produced iodine-124 from enriched tellurium targets

    SciTech Connect

    Balatoni, J.; Finn, R.; Blasberg, R.; Tjuvajev, J.; Larson, S.

    1999-06-10

    The production of iodine-124 and the formulation of specific radiopharmaceuticals are an important component of the Positron Emission Tomography Program at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Preparation of iodine-124 using the CS-15 cyclotron employing the (p, n) nuclear reaction on an enriched {sup 124}TeO{sub 2} solid target has been initiated. The radioiodine is isolated by a dry distillation technique from the target matrix. The mass and oxidation states of iodine species isolated from the processing were analyzed using high pressure liquid chromatography. Employing a C-8 reverse-phase column (1) and isocratic elution conditions, the chemical purity and specific activity of the various radioiodine species was determined. The method provides a routine means for evaluation of the purity of the radioiodide prior to and post radiolabeling essential for the efficient utilization and recovery of this important radionuclide.

  4. Electroplating targets for production of unique PET radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Bui, V.; Sheh, Y.; Finn, R.

    1994-12-31

    The past decade has witnessed the applications of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) evolving from a purely research endeavour to a procedure which has specific clinical applications in the areas of cardiology, neurology and oncology. The growth of PET has been facilitated by developments in medical instrumentation and radiopharmaceutical chemistry efforts. Included in this latter effort has been the low energy accelerator production and processing of unique PET radionuclides appropriate for the radiolabeling of biomolecules i.e. monoclonal antibodies and pepetides. The development and application of electroplated targets of antimony and copper for the production of iodine-124 and gallium-66 respectively, utilizing the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center cyclotron are examples of target design and development applicable to many medical accelerators.

  5. Improved Yields of Iodine-124 from the Enriched Tellurium-124 Dioxide/Aluminum Oxide Target

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, R.D.; Qiao, J.; Nacca, A.; Sheh, Y.; Lom, C.; Balatoni, J.; Cai, S.; Bornmann, W.; Pentlow, K.

    2003-08-26

    The escalating clinical application of Positron Emission Tomography results from the novel radiotracers which are available to monitor specific biochemical or physiologic processes. Future developments of the technique will require an increasing availability of additional unique radioligands and radionuclides. Iodine-124, a radionuclide whose potential for both diagnostic and therapeutic applications is widely recognized, has been prepared at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center on a weekly basis for several years (1). With its characteristic 4.18 day half life and complex decay scheme (2) which includes positron emission (22.0 {+-} 0.5%) and electron capture (78 {+-} 0.5%), this radionuclide has been shown to be appropriate for radiotracers describing slow physiologic processes with the clearance of non-specific radioactivity. The refinements and modifications being engineered into the cyclotron target system to increase the absolute yield of recoverable radioactivity from each irradiation and its chemical processing of the reusable solid target matrix are described.

  6. Production and quality assurance of cyclotron produced iodine-124 from enriched tellurium targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balatoni, J.; Finn, R.; Blasberg, R.; Tjuvajev, J.; Larson, S.

    1999-06-01

    The production of iodine-124 and the formulation of specific radiopharmaceuticals are an important component of the Positron Emission Tomography Program at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Preparation of iodine-124 using the CS-15 cyclotron employing the (p, n) nuclear reaction on an enriched 124TeO2 solid target has been initiated. The radioiodine is isolated by a dry distillation technique from the target matrix. The mass and oxidation states of iodine species isolated from the processing were analyzed using high pressure liquid chromatography. Employing a C-8 reverse-phase column (1) and isocratic elution conditions, the chemical purity and specific activity of the various radioiodine species was determined. The method provides a routine means for evaluation of the purity of the radioiodide prior to and post radiolabeling essential for the efficient utilization and recovery of this important radionuclide.

  7. Bone sarcomas in Paget disease: a study of 85 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.; Botet, J.F.; Yeh, S.D.J.

    1984-09-01

    This is a comprehensive review of 85 patients who had bone sarcoma associated with Paget disease and who were seen at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center between 1927 and 1982. There was an almost equal distribution of tumors in the axial and the appendicular skeletons. The pelvis, humerus, femur, and skull were the tumor sites in 80% of cases. The tumors were bulky large soft tissue masses. Lytic lesions were more common than sclerotic lesions. Methylene diphosphonate scans of the bone often showed a cold area that was associated with marked increase in uptake on the gallium scan. Angiography, which was performed in 13 patients, was useful, but CT was much more helpful in showing the soft tissue mass as well as the extent of bony disease. Only three patients in this study survived for five years.

  8. Integrative Cancer Care in a US Academic Cancer Centre: The Memorial Sloan–Kettering Experience

    PubMed Central

    Deng, G.

    2008-01-01

    Various surveys show that interest in complementary and alternative medicine (cam) is high among cancer patients. Patients want to explore all options that may help their treatment. Many cam modalities offer patients an active role in their self-care, and the resulting sense of empowerment is very appealing. On the other hand, many unscrupulous marketeers promote alternative cancer “cures,” targeting cancer patients who are particularly vulnerable. Some alternative therapies can hurt patients by delaying effective treatment or by causing adverse effects or detrimental interactions with other medications. It is not in the best interest of cancer patients if they cannot get appropriate guidance on the use of cam from the health care professionals who are part of their cancer care team. The Integrative Medicine Service at Memorial Sloan–Kettering Cancer Center in New York was established in 1999 to address patient interest in cam, to incorporate helpful complementary therapies into each patient’s overall treatment management, to guide patients in avoiding harmful alternative therapies, and to develop prospective research to evaluate the efficacy of cam modalities. PMID:18769574

  9. Memory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKean, Kevin

    1983-01-01

    Discusses current research (including that involving amnesiacs and snails) into the nature of the memory process, differentiating between and providing examples of "fact" memory and "skill" memory. Suggests that three brain parts (thalamus, fornix, mammilary body) are involved in the memory process. (JN)

  10. Risk factors and classifications of hilar cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Suarez-Munoz, Miguel Angel; Fernandez-Aguilar, Jose Luis; Sanchez-Perez, Belinda; Perez-Daga, Jose Antonio; Garcia-Albiach, Beatriz; Pulido-Roa, Ysabel; Marin-Camero, Naiara; Santoyo-Santoyo, Julio

    2013-07-15

    Cholangiocarcinoma is the second most common primary malignant tumor of the liver. Perihilar cholangiocarcinoma or Klatskin tumor represents more than 50% of all biliary tract cholangiocarcinomas. A wide range of risk factors have been identified among patients with Perihilar cholangiocarcinoma including advanced age, male gender, primary sclerosing cholangitis, choledochal cysts, cholelithiasis, cholecystitis, parasitic infection (Opisthorchis viverrini and Clonorchis sinensis), inflammatory bowel disease, alcoholic cirrhosis, nonalcoholic cirrhosis, chronic pancreatitis and metabolic syndrome. Various classifications have been used to describe the pathologic and radiologic appearance of cholangiocarcinoma. The three systems most commonly used to evaluate Perihilar cholangiocarcinoma are the Bismuth-Corlette (BC) system, the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and the TNM classification. The BC classification provides preoperative assessment of local spread. The Memorial Sloan-Kettering cancer center proposes a staging system according to three factors related to local tumor extent: the location and extent of bile duct involvement, the presence or absence of portal venous invasion, and the presence or absence of hepatic lobar atrophy. The TNM classification, besides the usual descriptors, tumor, node and metastases, provides additional information concerning the possibility for the residual tumor (R) and the histological grade (G). Recently, in 2011, a new consensus classification for the Perihilar cholangiocarcinoma had been published. The consensus was organised by the European Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association which identified the need for a new staging system for this type of tumors. The classification includes information concerning biliary or vascular (portal or arterial) involvement, lymph node status or metastases, but also other essential aspects related to the surgical risk, such as remnant hepatic volume or the possibility of underlying disease.

  11. Learning and memory performance in a cohort of clinically referred breast cancer survivors: the role of attention versus forgetting in patient-reported memory complaints

    PubMed Central

    Root, James C.; Ryan, Elizabeth; Barnett, Gregory; Andreotti, Charissa; Bolutayo, Kemi; Ahles, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Objective While forgetfulness is widely reported by breast cancer survivors, studies documenting objective memory performance yield mixed, largely inconsistent, results. Failure to find consistent, objective memory issues may be due to the possibility that cancer survivors misattribute their experience of forgetfulness to primary memory issues rather than to difficulties in attention at the time of learning. Methods To clarify potential attention issues, factor scores for Attention Span, Learning Efficiency, Delayed Memory, and Inaccurate Memory were analyzed for the CVLT-II in 64 clinically-referred breast cancer survivors with self-reported cognitive complaints; item analysis was conducted to clarify specific contributors to observed effects and contrasts between learning and recall trials were compared to normative data. Performance on broader cognitive domains is also reported. Results The Attention Span factor, but not Learning Efficiency, Delayed Memory, or Inaccurate Memory factors, was significantly affected in this clinical sample. Contrasts between trials were consistent with normative data and did not indicate greater loss of information over time than in the normative sample. Conclusions Results of this analysis suggest attentional dysfunction may contribute to subjective and objective memory complaints in breast cancer survivors. These results are discussed in the context of broader cognitive effects following treatment for clinicians who may see cancer survivors for assessment. PMID:25044928

  12. Chemotherapy-induced prospective memory impairment in breast cancer patients with different hormone receptor expression

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wen; Gan, Chen; Lv, Yue; Wang, Shanghu; Cheng, Huaidong

    2017-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to investigate prospective memory impairment in patients with breast cancer with different expression of hormone receptors, including the estrogen receptor (ER) and the progesterone receptor (PR). A total of 120 patients with breast cancer who underwent chemotherapy following surgery were divided into 2 groups. The A group included 60 patients with ER−/PR− status, and the B group included 60 patients with ER+/PR+ status. After 6 cycles of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy, all patients were administered neuropsychological and prospective memory tests, such as the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), verbal fluency test (VFT), and digit span test (DST), as well as examination of event-based prospective memory (EBPM) and time-based prospective memory (TBPM). As the neuropsychological background test results showed, there were no significant differences in MMSE, DST, and TBPM scores (∗:P > 0.05) between patients with breast cancer in the ER−/PR− and ER+/PR+ groups, while the VFT and EBPM scores were significantly greater in patients with breast cancer with ER+/PR+ status than in those with ER−/PR− status (∗∗: P < 0.01), indicating that patients with ER−/PR− status have significant impairment in EBPM, although not in TBPM. The results of the present study indicate that different hormone receptor expression in patients with breast cancer may be associated with heterogeneity of chemotherapy-induced prospective memory impairment. PMID:28353608

  13. Children's Memories for Painful Cancer Treatment Procedures: Implications for Distress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Edith; Zeltzer, Lonnie K.; Craske, Michelle G.; Katz, Ernest R.

    2000-01-01

    Examined memory of 3- to 18-year-olds with leukemia regarding lumbar punctures (LP). Found that children displayed considerable accuracy for event details, with accuracy increasing with age. Use of Versed (anxiolytic medication described as a "memory blocker") was not related to recall. Higher distress predicted greater exaggerations in…

  14. Attention and memory deficits in breast cancer survivors: implications for nursing practice and research.

    PubMed

    Frank, Jennifer Sandson; Vance, David E; Jukkala, Angela; Meneses, Karen M

    2014-10-01

    Breast cancer survivors (BCSs) commonly report deficits in attention and memory, cognitive functions crucial for daily optimal functioning. Perceived deficits are reported before, during, and after adjuvant therapy and affect quality of life throughout survivorship. Deficits of attention and memory are particularly disruptive for BCSs working or attending school who report that subtle impairment diminishes their confidence and their performance at all levels of occupation. Chemotherapy and endocrine therapy contribute to attention and memory deficits, but research findings have not fully established the extent or timing of that influence. Fortunately, potential interventions for attention and memory deficits in BCSs are promising. These include cognitive remediation therapies aimed at training for specific areas of deficit, cognitive behavioral therapies aimed at developing compensatory strategies for areas of deficit, complementary therapies, and pharmacologic therapies.

  15. Recall in Older Cancer Patients: Measuring Memory for Medical Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jansen, Jesse; van Weert, Julia; van der Meulen, Nienke; van Dulmen, Sandra; Heeren, Thea; Bensing, Jozien

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Remembering medical treatment information may be particularly taxing for older cancer patients, but to our knowledge this ability has never been assessed in this specific age group only. Our purpose in this study was to investigate older cancer patients' recall of information after patient education preceding chemotherapy. Design and…

  16. Chromatin Memory in the Development of Human Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yixin; Des Marais, Thomas L; Costa, Max

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a complex disease with acquired genomic and epigenomic alterations that affect cell proliferation, viability and invasiveness. Almost all the epigenetic mechanisms including cytosine methylation and hydroxymethylation, chromatin remodeling and non-coding RNAs have been found associate with carcinogenesis and cancer specific expression profile. Altered histone modification as an epigenetic hallmark is frequently found in tumors. Understanding the epigenetic alterations induced by carcinogens or infectious agents may help us understand early epigenetic changes prior to the development of cancer. In this review, we focus on chromatin remodeling and the associated histone modifiers in the development of cancer; the application of these modifiers as a cancer therapy target in different clinical trial phases is also discussed. PMID:25606572

  17. Memories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Judith, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This theme issue of the journal "Exploring" covers the topic of "memories" and describes an exhibition at San Francisco's Exploratorium that ran from May 22, 1998 through January 1999 and that contained over 40 hands-on exhibits, demonstrations, artworks, images, sounds, smells, and tastes that demonstrated and depicted the biological,…

  18. Heteroclitic XBP1 peptides evoke tumor-specific memory cytotoxic T lymphocytes against breast cancer, colon cancer, and pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jooeun; Samur, Mehmet; Munshi, Aditya; Hideshima, Teru; Keskin, Derin; Kimmelman, Alec; Lee, Ann-Hwee; Dranoff, Glen; Anderson, Kenneth C; Munshi, Nikhil C

    2015-01-01

    XBP1 is a critical transcriptional activator of the unfolded protein response (UPR), which increases tumor cell survival under prolonged endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and hypoxic conditions.This study was designed to evaluate the immunogenicity of heteroclitic XBP1 unspliced (US)184–192 (YISPWILAV) and heteroclictic XBP1 spliced (SP)367–375 (YLFPQLISV) HLA-A2 peptides, and to characterize the specific activities of XBP1 peptides-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (XBP1-CTL) against breast cancer, colon cancer, and pancreatic cancer cells.The XBP1-CTL had upregulated expression of critical T cell markers and displayed HLA-A2-restricted and antigen-specific activities against breast cancer, colon cancer and pancreatic cancer cells. XBP1-CTL were enriched withCD45RO+ memory CTL, which showed high expression of critical T cell markers (CD28, ICOS, CD69, CD40L), cell proliferation and antitumor activities as compared to CD45RO− non-memory CTL. The effector memory (EM: CD45RO+CCR7−) subset had the highest level of cell proliferation while the central memory (CM: CD45RO+CCR7+) subset demonstrated enhanced functional activities (CD107a degranulation, IFNγ/IL-2 production) upon recognition of the respective tumor cells. Furthermore, both the EM and CM XBP1-CTL subsets expressed high levels of Th1 transcription regulators Tbet and Eomes. The highest frequencies of IFNγ or granzyme B producing cells were detected within CM XBP1-CTL subset that were either Tbet+ or Eomes+ in responding to the tumor cells.These results demonstrate the immunotherapeutic potential of a cocktail of immunogenic HLA-A2 specific heteroclitic XBP1 US184–192 and heteroclictic XBP1 SP367–375 peptides to induce CD3+CD8+ CTL enriched for CM and EM cells with specific antitumor activities against a variety of solid tumors. PMID:25941601

  19. Delivering Coordinated Cancer Care by Building Transactive Memory in a Team of Teams.

    PubMed

    Henry, Elizabeth; Silva, Abigail; Tarlov, Elizabeth; Czerlanis, Cheryl; Bernard, Margie; Chauhan, Cynthia; Schalk, Denise; Stewart, Greg

    2016-11-01

    Cancer care delivery is highly complex. Treatment involves coordination within oncology health-care teams and across other teams of referring primary and specialty providers (a team of teams). Each team interfaces with patients and caregivers to offer component parts of comprehensive care. Because patients frequently obtain specialty care from divergent health-care systems resulting in cross-system health-care use, oncology teams need mechanisms to coordinate and collaborate within and across health-care systems to optimize clinical outcomes for all cancer patients. Transactive memory is one potential strategy that can help improve comprehensive patient care delivery. Transactive memory is a process by which two or more team professionals develop a shared system for encoding, storing, and retrieving information. Each professional is responsible for retaining only part of the total information. Applying this concept to a team of teams results in system benefits wherein all teams share an understanding of specialized knowledge held by each component team. The patient's role as the unifying member of the team of teams is central to successful treatment delivery. This clinical case presents a patient who is receiving oral treatment for advanced prostate cancer within two health systems. The case emphasizes the potential for error when multiple teams function without a point team (the team coordinating efforts of all other primary and specialty teams) and when the specialty knowledge of providers and patients is not well integrated into all phases of the care delivery process.

  20. Pneumonitis in Patients Treated With Anti-Programmed Death-1/Programmed Death Ligand 1 Therapy.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, Jarushka; Wang, Xuan; Woo, Kaitlin M; Iyriboz, Tunc; Halpenny, Darragh; Cunningham, Jane; Chaft, Jamie E; Segal, Neil H; Callahan, Margaret K; Lesokhin, Alexander M; Rosenberg, Jonathan; Voss, Martin H; Rudin, Charles M; Rizvi, Hira; Hou, Xue; Rodriguez, Katherine; Albano, Melanie; Gordon, Ruth-Ann; Leduc, Charles; Rekhtman, Natasha; Harris, Bianca; Menzies, Alexander M; Guminski, Alexander D; Carlino, Matteo S; Kong, Benjamin Y; Wolchok, Jedd D; Postow, Michael A; Long, Georgina V; Hellmann, Matthew D

    2017-03-01

    Purpose Pneumonitis is an uncommon but potentially fatal toxicity of anti-programmed death-1 (PD-1)/programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Clinical, radiologic, and pathologic features are poorly described. Methods Patients who received anti-PD-1/PD-L1 monotherapy or in combination with anti-cytotoxic T-cell lymphocyte-4 mAb were identified at two institutions (Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center: advanced solid cancers, 2009 to 2014, and Melanoma Institute of Australia: melanomas only, 2013 to 2015). Pneumonitis was diagnosed by the treating investigator; cases with confirmed malignant lung infiltration or infection were excluded. Clinical, radiologic, and pathologic features of pneumonitis were collected. Associations among pneumonitis incidence, therapy received, and underlying malignancy were examined with Fisher's exact test as were associations between pneumonitis features and outcomes. Results Of 915 patients who received anti-PD-1/PD-L1 mAbs, pneumonitis developed in 43 (5%; 95% CI, 3% to 6%; Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 27 of 578 [5%]; Melanoma Institute of Australia, 16 of 337 [5%]). Time to onset of pneumonitis ranged from 9 days to 19.2 months. The incidence of pneumonitis was higher with combination immunotherapy versus monotherapy (19 of 199 [10%] v 24 of 716 [3%]; P < .01). Incidence was similar in patients with melanoma and non-small-cell lung cancer (overall, 26 of 532 [5%] v nine of 209 [4%]; monotherapy, 15 of 417 v five of 152 [ P = 1.0]; combination, 11 of 115 v four of 57 [ P = .78]). Seventy-two percent (31 of 43) of cases were grade 1 to 2, and 86% (37 of 43) improved/resolved with drug holding/immunosuppression. Five patients worsened clinically and died during the course of pneumonitis treatment; proximal cause of death was pneumonitis (n = 1), infection related to immunosuppression (n = 3), or progressive cancer (n = 1). Radiologic and pathologic features of pneumonitis were diverse. Conclusion

  1. Altered resting-state hippocampal functional networks associated with chemotherapy-induced prospective memory impairment in breast cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Huaidong; Li, Wen; Gong, Liang; Xuan, Han; Huang, Zhonglian; Zhao, Hong; Wang, Long Sheng; Wang, Kai

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the intrinsic hippocampal functional connectivity (FC) network and its relationship with prospective memory in patients with breast cancer suffering from chemotherapy-induced cognitive impairment (CICI). Thirty-four breast cancer patients before and after adjuvant chemotherapy (CB and CC, respectively) and 31 age- and education-matched cognitively normal (CN) women were recruited and subjected to a prospective memory task and a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scan. Seed-based functional connectivity analysis was used to compare the hippocampal FC networks between CC and CN groups. Partial correction analysis was used to examine the association between the hippocampal FC network and prospective memory in the CC group. The cancer group that underwent chemotherapy obtained significantly poorer scores than the CN group on mini-mental state examination, verbal fluency test, digit span, and prospective memory examination. Compared to the CN group, CC group showed increased hippocampal connectivity in the frontal and parietal cortex, precuneus, posterior cingulate cortex, and the cerebellum. In addition, the increasing hippocampal FC networks were negatively correlated with prospective memory performance in the CC group. These findings suggest maladaptive hippocampal functioning as a mechanism underlying the impairment of prospective memory in patients experiencing CICI. PMID:28327626

  2. Altered resting-state hippocampal functional networks associated with chemotherapy-induced prospective memory impairment in breast cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Huaidong; Li, Wen; Gong, Liang; Xuan, Han; Huang, Zhonglian; Zhao, Hong; Wang, Long Sheng; Wang, Kai

    2017-03-22

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the intrinsic hippocampal functional connectivity (FC) network and its relationship with prospective memory in patients with breast cancer suffering from chemotherapy-induced cognitive impairment (CICI). Thirty-four breast cancer patients before and after adjuvant chemotherapy (CB and CC, respectively) and 31 age- and education-matched cognitively normal (CN) women were recruited and subjected to a prospective memory task and a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scan. Seed-based functional connectivity analysis was used to compare the hippocampal FC networks between CC and CN groups. Partial correction analysis was used to examine the association between the hippocampal FC network and prospective memory in the CC group. The cancer group that underwent chemotherapy obtained significantly poorer scores than the CN group on mini-mental state examination, verbal fluency test, digit span, and prospective memory examination. Compared to the CN group, CC group showed increased hippocampal connectivity in the frontal and parietal cortex, precuneus, posterior cingulate cortex, and the cerebellum. In addition, the increasing hippocampal FC networks were negatively correlated with prospective memory performance in the CC group. These findings suggest maladaptive hippocampal functioning as a mechanism underlying the impairment of prospective memory in patients experiencing CICI.

  3. Discovery of chemotherapy-associated ovarian cancer antigens by interrogating memory T cells.

    PubMed

    Paroli, Marino; Bellati, Filippo; Videtta, Melissa; Focaccetti, Chiara; Mancone, Carmine; Donato, Tiziana; Antonilli, Morena; Perniola, Giorgia; Accapezzato, Daniele; Napoletano, Chiara; Nuti, Marianna; Bartolazzi, Armando; Panici, Pierluigi Benedetti; Tripodi, Marco; Palombo, Fabio; Barnaba, Vincenzo

    2014-04-15

    According to the immunogenic cell death hypothesis, clinical chemotherapy treatments may result in CD8(+) and CD4(+) T-cell responses against tumor cells. To discover chemotherapy-associated antigens (CAAs), T cells derived from ovarian cancer (OC) patients (who had been treated with appropriate chemotherapy protocols) were interrogated with proteins isolated from primary OC cells. We screened for immunogenicity using two-dimensional electrophoresis gel-eluted OC proteins. Only the selected immunogenic antigens were molecularly characterized by mass-spectrometry-based analysis. Memory T cells that recognized antigens associated with apoptotic (but not live) OC cells were correlated with prolonged survival in response to chemotherapy, supporting the model of chemotherapy-induced apoptosis as an adjuvant of anti-tumor immunity. The strength of both memory CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells producing either IFN-γ or IL-17 in response to apoptotic OC antigens was also significantly greater in Responders to chemotherapy than in nonresponders. Immunogenicity of some of these antigens was confirmed using recombinant proteins in an independent set of patients. The T-cell interrogation system represents a strategy of reverse tumor immunology that proposes to identify CAAs, which may then be validated as possible prognostic tumor biomarkers or cancer vaccines.

  4. Associations Between Physical Fitness Indices and Working Memory in Breast Cancer Survivors and Age-Matched Controls

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie, Michael J.; Zuniga, Krystle E.; Raine, Lauren B.; Awick, Elizabeth A.; Hillman, Charles H.; Kramer, Arthur F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: This study examined the effects of cardiorespiratory fitness, heart rate recovery, and physical activity on working memory in breast cancer survivors and age-matched controls. Method: Using a case-control design, 32 women who had received a breast cancer diagnosis and completed primary treatment within the past 36-months (11 radiation only; 21 chemotherapy) and 30 age-matched women with no previous cancer diagnosis completed a n-back continuous performance task commonly used as an assessment of working memory. In addition, cardiorespiratory fitness and heart rate recovery were measured during a submaximal graded exercise test and physical activity was measured using 7-days of accelerometer monitoring. Results: Breast cancer survivors who had received chemotherapy had poorer heart rate recovery (p = .010) and engaged in less physical activity than women who had received radiation only (p = .004) or non-cancer controls (p = .029). Cancer treatment (radiation; chemotherapy) predicted differences in reaction times on the 1-back working memory task (p = .029). However, more rapid heart rate recovery predicted shorter reaction times on the 1-back task in the age-matched control group (p = .002). All participants with greater cardiorespiratory fitness displayed greater accuracy independent of disease status on the 1-back task (p = .017). No significant group differences in reaction times were observed for 2-back target trials between breast cancer survivors and controls. However, greater total physical activity predicted shorter reaction times in breast cancer survivors (radiation, chemotherapy) on the 2-back task (p = .014). In addition, all participants who exhibited more rapid heart rate recovery demonstrated better greater accuracy regardless of disease status (p = .013). Conclusion: These findings support differences in physical activty participation, heart rate recovery, and 1- and 2-back working memory reaction

  5. The Public Health Impact of Herbs and Nutritional Supplements

    PubMed Central

    Cassileth, Barrie R.; Heitzer, Marjet; Wesa, Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    Dietary supplement use has increased exponentially in recent years despite the lack of regulatory oversight and in the face of growing safety concerns. This paper provides an overview of the public health implications and safety concerns associated with dietary supplement use, especially by cancer patients. Botanical research is actively pursued at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) Integrative Medicine department. Work of the MSKCC Center for the Study of Botanical Immunomodulators is described, and guidelines for cancer patients’ use of dietary supplements outlined. Herbs and other botanicals are complex, physiologically active agents, but little is known about most of the popular, widely available dietary supplements. Herb-drug interactions, a major concern, are exacerbated in the cancer setting. Biologically active agents may interfere with chemotherapy and other prescription medications. They may exert anti-coagulant activity at rather inconvenient times such as during surgery, and create other serious problems. Research on the bioavailability, effective dosage, safety and benefits of these complex agents is sorely needed. Oncology professionals and other healthcare providers should educate themselves and their patients about these issues. Probably the largest, continuously-updated free information resource is MSKCC’s AboutHerbs website (www.mskcc.org/AboutHerbs). PMID:19890479

  6. Tumor Mutational Load and Immune Parameters across Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Risk Groups.

    PubMed

    de Velasco, Guillermo; Miao, Diana; Voss, Martin H; Hakimi, A Ari; Hsieh, James J; Tannir, Nizar M; Tamboli, Pheroze; Appleman, Leonard J; Rathmell, W Kimryn; Van Allen, Eliezer M; Choueiri, Toni K

    2016-10-01

    Patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) have better overall survival when treated with nivolumab, a cancer immunotherapy that targets the immune checkpoint inhibitor programmed cell death 1 (PD-1), rather than everolimus (a chemical inhibitor of mTOR and immunosuppressant). Poor-risk mRCC patients treated with nivolumab seemed to experience the greatest overall survival benefit, compared with patients with favorable or intermediate risk, in an analysis of the CheckMate-025 trial subgroup of the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) prognostic risk groups. Here, we explore whether tumor mutational load and RNA expression of specific immune parameters could be segregated by prognostic MSKCC risk strata and explain the survival seen in the poor-risk group. We queried whole-exome transcriptome data in renal cell carcinoma patients (n = 54) included in The Cancer Genome Atlas who ultimately developed metastatic disease or were diagnosed with metastatic disease at presentation and did not receive immune checkpoint inhibitors. Nonsynonymous mutational load did not differ significantly by the MSKCC risk group, nor was the expression of cytolytic genes-granzyme A and perforin-or selected immune checkpoint molecules different across MSKCC risk groups. In conclusion, this analysis revealed that mutational load and expression of markers of an active tumor microenvironment did not correlate with MSKCC risk prognostic classification in mRCC. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(10); 820-2. ©2016 AACR.

  7. Interstitial radiation: short-term palliation or curative therapy?

    PubMed

    Whitmore, W F; Hilaris, B; Batata, M; Sogani, P; Herr, H; Morse, M

    1985-02-01

    The management of clinically localized prostatic cancer by interstitial implantation of 125I seeds has been under exploration at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center for thirteen years. This investigation was prompted by clinical evidence of the radioresponsiveness of some prostatic cancers, the limited applicability of surgical excision, and the possibility that interstitial therapy would have less of an adverse effect on the quality of life than would alternative treatments. Cumulative experience indicates that the technique is associated with low morbidity and mortality and high functional preservation rates; local control rates (routine biopsies were not done), within the constraints of still-limited follow-up intervals, are in the 80 per cent to 90 per cent range; and actuarial survival rates at nine years (including patients who received endocrine therapy for metastatic or intractable local disease) are approximately 90 per cent for T1, 60 per cent for T2, and 45 per cent for T3 lesions. Approximate actuarial nine-year survival rates are 80 per cent for all patients with negative nodes and 50 per cent for all patients with positive nodes. Taking into account limitations of the data and the hazards of comparing this therapy with other uncontrolled treatments, 125I appears to be a therapeutic option for the control of clinically localized prostatic cancer.

  8. Reactivation of CDX2 in Gastric Cancer as Mark for Gene Silencing Memory

    PubMed Central

    Kameoka, Yuri; Kitazawa, Riko; Ariasu, Kanazu; Tachibana, Ryosuke; Mizuno, Yosuke; Haraguchi, Ryuma; Kitazawa, Sohei

    2015-01-01

    To explore the epigenetic mechanism that reactivates CDX2 (a homeobox transcription factor that serves as a tumor-suppressor gene) in intestinal-type gastric cancer during cancer progression, we examined the methylation status of the CDX2 gene promoter and the expression pattern of methyl-CpG binding protein-2 (MeCP2). From archives of the pathology records of surgically excised advanced stomach cancer cases in the Department of Molecular Pathology, Ehime University in a past decate (n=265), 10 cases of intestinal-type tubular adenocarcinoma, well-differentiated type (wel) with minor poorly-differentiated adenocarcinoma (por) components were selected. The expression pattern of CDX2, MUC2 and MeCP2 in these 10 cases was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. The cancerous and non-cancerous areas were selectively obtained by microdissection, and the methylation status of the CDX2 promoter of each area was assessed by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP). In all 10 cases, CDX2 expression was clearly observed in the nucleus of the non-cancerous background of the intestinal metaplasic area, where the unmethylation pattern of the CDX2 gene promoter prevailed with reduced MeCP2 expression. In this metaplastic area, CDX2 expression was co-localized with its target gene, MUC2. CDX2 expression then disappeared from the deep invasive wel area. Reflecting the reduced CDX2 expression, microdissected samples from all the wel areas showed hypermethylation of the CDX2 gene promoter by MSP, with prominent MeCP2 expression. Interestingly, while hypermethylation of the CDX2 gene promoter was maintained in the por area in 8 of the 10 cases, CDX2 expression was restored in por areas where MeCP2 expression was markedly and selectively reduced. The other two cases, however, showed a constant MeCP2 expression level comparable to the surrounding deep invasive wel area with negative CDX2 expression. Therefore, gene silencing by hypermethylation may be overcome by the reduction of

  9. A Pilot Study of Website Information Regarding Aromatase Inhibitors: Dietary Supplement Interactions

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Cara L.; Hsieh, Angela A.; Sweet, Erin S.; Tippens, Kimberly M.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objectives Patients who have hormone receptor–positive breast cancer and who are taking aromatase inhibitors (AIs) should understand the benefits and risks of concomitant dietary supplement (DS) use. The International Society for Integrative Oncology (SIO) encourages patients to discuss DS use with their health care practitioners. The objective was to conduct a pilot study rating Internet websites from the perspective of health care practitioners for information about AI–DS interactions. Design Five (5) Internet websites suggested by SIO were evaluated using the DISCERN instrument rating tool. The available AI–DS information on these websites was rated by 4 evaluators: 2 naturopathic doctors, 1 oncology pharmacy resident, and a pharmacy student. Results The overall rankings ranged from 1.6 to 3.9, with considerable variability in the type of information available from the websites. The interevaluator rankings of the websites ranged from 0.44 to 0.89. The evaluators consistently found the most reliable, unbiased, and comprehensive information on AI–DS interactions at the Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center websites. However, more than one database was needed for provision of optimal patient information on AI–DS interactions. Conclusions In order to effectively advise patients regarding AI–DS interactions, more than one website should be evaluated to assess the potential efficacy and safety of DS in women whose breast cancer is being treated with an AI. PMID:22087614

  10. Pre-Chemotherapy Differences in Visuospatial Working Memory in Breast Cancer Patients Compared to Controls: An fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Scherling, Carole; Collins, Barbara; MacKenzie, Joyce; Bielajew, Catherine; Smith, Andra

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Cognitive deficits are a side-effect of chemotherapy, however pre-treatment research is limited. This study examines neurofunctional differences during working memory between breast cancer (BC) patients and controls, prior to chemotherapy. Methods: Early stage BC females (23), scanned after surgery but before chemotherapy, were individually matched to non-cancer controls. Participants underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while performing a Visuospatial N-back task and data was analyzed by multiple group comparisons. fMRI task performance, neuropsychological tests, hospital records, and salivary biomarkers were also collected. Results: There were no significant group differences on neuropsychological tests, estrogen, or cortisol. Patients made significantly fewer commission errors but had less overall correct responses and were slower than controls during the task. Significant group differences were observed for the fMRI data, yet results depended on the type of analysis. BC patients presented with increased activations during working memory compared to controls in areas such as the inferior frontal gyrus, insula, thalamus, and midbrain. Individual group regressions revealed a reverse relationship between brain activity and commission errors. Conclusion: This is the first fMRI investigation to reveal neurophysiological differences during visuospatial working memory between BC patients pre-chemotherapy and controls. These results also increase the knowledge about the effects of BC and related factors on the working memory network. Significance: This highlights the need to better understand the pre-chemotherapy BC patient and the effects of associated confounding variables. PMID:22053153

  11. Subtle hippocampal deformities in breast cancer survivors with reduced episodic memory and self-reported cognitive concerns.

    PubMed

    Apple, Alexandra C; Ryals, Anthony J; Alpert, Kathryn I; Wagner, Lynne I; Shih, Pei-An; Dokucu, Mehmet; Cella, David; Penedo, Frank J; Voss, Joel L; Wang, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Cancer survivors have lingering cognitive problems, however the anatomical basis for these problems has yet to be fully elucidated. Clinical studies as well as animal models of chemotherapy have pinpointed cell and volume loss to the hippocampus, however, few studies have performed shape analysis of the hippocampus on cancer survivors. This study used high-dimensional deformation mapping analysis to test whether localized hippocampal deformation differs in breast cancer survivors who received adjuvant chemotherapy coupled with hormone blockade therapy, and if deformation was related to subjective self-reported concerns and cognitive performance. 3 T MRI images were acquired from 16 pre-menopausal breast cancer survivors and 18 healthy controls without a history of cancer. Breast cancer survivors had undergone chemotherapy within the eighteen months prior to the study, and were receiving estrogen-blockade therapy at the time of the study. Automated high-dimensional deformation mapping was used to compare localized hippocampal deformation differences between groups. Self-reported subjective concerns were assessed using Neuro-QOL Cognitive Function assessment, whereas cognitive performance was evaluated using the NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery. Relative to healthy controls, cancer survivors showed significantly more inward hippocampal deformation, worse self-reported cognitive functioning, and inferior episodic memory test score. This study is the first of its kind to examine the relationship between hippocampal deformity and cognitive impairment in cancer survivors.

  12. Next-Generation Assessment of Human Growth Factor Receptor 2 (ERBB2) Amplification Status: Clinical Validation in the Context of a Hybrid Capture-Based, Comprehensive Solid Tumor Genomic Profiling Assay.

    PubMed

    Ross, Dara S; Zehir, Ahmet; Cheng, Donavan T; Benayed, Ryma; Nafa, Khedoudja; Hechtman, Jaclyn F; Janjigian, Yelena Y; Weigelt, Britta; Razavi, Pedram; Hyman, David M; Baselga, José; Berger, Michael F; Ladanyi, Marc; Arcila, Maria E

    2017-03-01

    Establishing ERBB2 [human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)] amplification status in breast and gastric carcinomas is essential to treatment selection. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) constitute the current standard for assessment. With further advancements in genomic medicine, new clinically relevant biomarkers are rapidly emerging and options for targeted therapy are increasing in patients with advanced disease, driving the need for comprehensive molecular profiling. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is an attractive approach for up-front comprehensive assessment, including ERBB2 status, but the concordance with traditional methods of HER2 assessment is not well established. The Memorial Sloan Kettering-Integrated Mutation Profiling of Actionable Cancer Targets (MSK-IMPACT) assay, a hybrid capture-based NGS assay interrogating the coding regions of 410 cancer-related genes, was performed on manually macrodissected unstained sections from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded breast (n = 213) and gastroesophageal (n = 39) tumors submitted for clinical mutation profiling. ERBB2 status was assessed using a custom bioinformatics pipeline, and NGS results were compared to IHC and FISH. NGS ERBB2 amplification calls had an overall concordance of 98.4% (248/252) with the combined IHC/FISH results in this validation set. Discrepancies occurred in the context of low tumor content and HER2 heterogeneity. ERBB2 amplification status can be reliably determined by hybridization capture-based NGS methods, allowing efficient concurrent testing for other potentially actionable genomic alterations, particularly in limited material.

  13. Late effects in patients with Fanconi anemia following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from alternative donors

    PubMed Central

    Anur, Praveen; Friedman, Danielle N; Sklar, Charles; Oeffinger, Kevin; Castiel, Mercedes; Kearney, Julia; Singh, Bhuvanesh; Prockop, Susan E; Kernan, Nancy A; Scaradavou, Andromachi; Kobos, Rachel; Curran, Kevin; Ruggiero, Julianne; Zakak, Nicole; O’Reilly, Richard J; Boulad, Farid

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is curative for hematological manifestations of Fanconi anemia (FA). We performed a retrospective analysis of 22 patients with FA and aplastic anemia, myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myelogenous leukemia who underwent a HSCT at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and survived at least one year post-HSCT. Patients underwent either a total body irradiation (TBI) (N=18) or busulfan (N=4) based cytoreduction followed by T-cell depleted transplants from alternative donors. Twenty patients were alive at time of study with a 5 and 10 year overall survival of 100% and 84% and no evidence of chronic GVHD. Among the 18 patients receiving a TBI-based regimen, 11 (61%) had persistent hemochromatosis, four (22%) developed hypothyroidism, seven (39%) had insulin resistance and five (27%) developed hypertriglyceridemia after transplant. Eleven of 16 evaluable patients (68%), receiving TBI, developed gonadal dysfunction. Two patients who received a TBI-based regimen died of squamous cell carcinoma. One patient developed hemochromatosis, hypothyroidism, and gonadal dysfunction after Busulfan-based cytoreduction. TBI appears to be a risk factor for malignant and endocrine late effects in the FA host. Multidisciplinary follow-up of patients with FA (including cancer screening) is essential for early detection and management of late complications, and improving long-term outcomes. PMID:26999465

  14. Laparoscopy in the management of gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Burke, E C; Karpeh, M S; Conlon, K C; Brennan, M F

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors determined the accuracy of laparoscopy in detecting metastatic disease in patients with gastric adenocarcinoma. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The majority of patients with gastric adenocarcinoma in the United States present with advanced disease. They are at high risk for intraabdominal metastatic spread. METHODS: One hundred eleven patients with gastric adenocarcinoma underwent laparoscopy at Memorial-Sloan Kettering Cancer Center from December 1991 to December 1995. All were judged to be free of intra-abdominal metastatic disease on preoperative computed tomographic scan imaging. RESULTS: Laparoscopic exploration was successful in 110 of 111 patients and accurately staged 94% of the patients with respect to metastatic disease with a sensitivity of 84% and a specificity of 100%. The prevalence rate of metastatic disease was 37%. Twenty-four patients underwent laparoscopy only and were discharged in an average 1.4 days versus 6.5 days in patients undergoing exploratory laparotomy without resection (p < 0.05). No patients undergoing laparoscopy only have returned for palliative surgery. CONCLUSIONS: Laparoscopy should be performed in nonobstructed, nonbleeding patients with advanced gastric cancer in the United States. More than one third of these patients have unsuspected metastatic disease at time of operation. Laparoscopy is highly accurate in detecting occult metastases and identifies a unique population of stage IV patients who may benefit from newer induction chemotherapeutic approaches while avoiding unnecessary laparotomy. Images Figure 4. PMID:9060581

  15. EPA Recognized for Research on Reducing Risks to Drinking ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Technical Brief Threat Ensemble Vulnerability Assessment (TEVA) among finalists for Edelman Award On February 7, 2008, the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS ® of Hanover, MD) announced that a TEVA Research project is one of six finalists vying for this year’s prestigious Franz Edelman Award. The project is called “Reducing Security Risks in American Drinking Water Systems.” Edelman Award Information This is the thirty-seventh year of the Edelman competition. Every year, the competition recognizes outstanding operations research-based projects that transform companies, entire industries, and people’s lives. Operations research uses advanced analytical methods to make optimal decisions in order to solve complex problems. The winner of the award will be announced in mid-April 2008. Past Edelman Award finalists include Travelocity; IBM; Merrill Lynch; the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center; and Georgia Tech. The winning team for 2007 reduced both patient suffering and health care costs from the treatment of prostate and breast cancer. The Edelman competition attests to the contributions of operations research in the profit and nonprofit sectors. It is estimated that the cumulative dollar benefits from Edelman finalist projects between 1984 and 2006 reached the $100 billion mark. TEVA Research Program The TEVA research program has focused on reducing the security risks to drinking water systems. Ad

  16. Experience with interstitial implantation of iodine 125 in the treatment of prostatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sogani, P C; Whitmore, W F; Hilaris, B S; Batata, M A

    1980-01-01

    Between February 1970 and April 1977 300 patients with localized prostatic carcinoma were treated with I-125 implantation and bilateral pelvic lymphadenectomy at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC). 68% had clinical Stage B (T-1 and T-2) and 32% had Stage C (T-3) neoplasms. Pelvic lymph nodes were histologically positive in 38% of the patients. Five-year survival for all patients was 73%. Five-year survival for Stage B disease was 100% and Stage C 65%. Lymph node metastases implied a poor prognosis. While 92% of patients with negative nodes survived five years, only 46% of the patients with positive nodes did so. Supplemental external radiation to pelvic and periaortic region in 28 patients with positive nodes did not improve survival or disease free interval or reduce distal or local recurrence but rather increased the incidence of radiation morbidity. The complications and morbidity as a consequence of I-125 implantation are minimal. The ultimate role of I-125 implantation in the management of localized prostatic cancer is yet to be determined. The early experience with this technique, however, suggests that it may be as effective as alternative modalities for comparable stages in terms of patient survival and may prove superior in terms of the quality of survival.

  17. Basal cell carcinoma and breast carcinoma following repeated fluoroscopic examinations of the chest

    SciTech Connect

    Myskowski, P.L.; Gumpertz, E.; Safai, B.

    1985-03-01

    A 69-year-old white Italian woman was first seen at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in 1981 concerning several skin growths on her back. The patient had had several basal cell carcinomas surgically removed from her back during the preceding 5 years. There was no history of arsenic ingestion or prolonged sun exposure and her family history was negative for skin cancer. The patient had developed pulmonary tuberculosis in 1938 and was treated with pneumothorax therapy. She had had more than 50 fluoroscopic examinations of the chest following this therapy, as well as multiple diagnostic x-ray films since that time. On the back, clustered in the interscapular region, were multiple scars and nine erythematous nodules with pearly borders, telangiectasia, and translucent surfaces. Within several nodules there were areas of light and dark brown pigmentation. Biopsy of all lesions revealed basal cell carcinoma, some of which were pigmented, without evidence of chronic radiodermatitis. All lesions were treated with curettage and electrodesiccation three times with good cosmetic results.

  18. Cancer-reactive memory T cells from bone marrow: Spontaneous induction and therapeutic potential (Review).

    PubMed

    Schirrmacher, Volker

    2015-12-01

    Cognate interactions between naïve tumor antigen (TA)-specific T cells and TA-presenting dendritic cells (DCs) are facilitated by secondary lymphoid organs such as lymph nodes or the spleen. These can result either in TA-specific tolerance or, depending on environmental costimulatory signals, in TA-specific immune responses. In the present review, we describe such events for the bone marrow (BM) when blood-borne TA, released from the primary tumor or expressed by blood circulating tumor cells or DCs enters the BM stroma and parenchyma. We argue that cognate T-DC interactions in the BM result in immune responses and generation of memory T cells (MTCs) rather than tolerance because T cells in the BM show an increased level of pre-activation. The review starts with the spontaneous induction of cancer-reactive MTCs in the BM and the involvement of such MTCs in the control of tumor dormancy. The main part deals with the therapeutic potency of BM MTCs. This is a new area of research in which the authors research group has performed pioneering studies which are summarized. These include studies in animal tumor models, studies with human cells in tumor xenotransplant models and clinical studies. Based on observations of an enormous expansion capacity, longevity and therapeutic capacity of BM MTCs, a hypothesis is presented which suggests the involvement of stem-like MTCs.

  19. A weekly regimen with dose escalation of doxorubicin for patients with advanced Hodgkin's lymphoma: results of a phase II study of the Groupe d'Etudes des Lymphomes de l'Adulte (GELA).

    PubMed

    Fermé, Christophe; Brice, Pauline; Michallet, Anne-Sophie; Lederlin, Pierre; Diviné, Marine; Casasnovas, Olivier; Devidas, Alain; Anglaret, Bruno; Cazals-Hatem, Dominique; Mounier, Nicolas

    2007-04-01

    This multicenter phase II study assessed the feasibility and efficacy of a weekly chemotherapy regimen with a moderately escalated dose of doxorubicin administered over 16 weeks, followed by radiation therapy (RT) to bulky sites. From July 1996 to February 1998, 44 untreated patients with stage IIIB-IV Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL), and 0 - 2 risk factors described by the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, were treated. Chemotherapy was a combination of increased-dose doxorubicin with conventional doses of cyclophosphamide, vinblastine, prednisone, vindesine, bleomycin, and etoposide. Patients received four cycles of the weekly regimen for 16 weeks. Forty-one patients received the planned four cycles of chemotherapy, and RT was delivered to 36 patients. The incidence of WHO grade 3 - 4 neutropenia was 90%. A total of 39 patients achieved a complete remission (88.6%). The median follow-up was 95 months. The 7-years freedom from treatment failure and overall survival estimates were 57% (95% confidence interval (CI), 41% - 70%), and 93% (95% CI, 80 - 98%), respectively. The relapse rate was related to the short duration of chemotherapy, and the failure to prevent relapses with consolidation RT. In this study population the 16-week regimen and RT to bulky sites were not sufficient for disease control.

  20. Post-operative hemimaxillectomy rehabilitation using prostheses supported by zygoma implants and remaining natural teeth

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Xing Zhou; Wang, Ming Yi; Ong, Hui Shan; Zhang, Chen Ping

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to evaluate the stability of prostheses supported by zygoma implants and remaining teeth for subjects who had undergone hemi-maxillectomy. METHODS: Ten patients were included in the study. Oral rehabilitation was performed using a temporary prosthesis that was supported by remaining teeth for the first three months. Then, a zygoma implant was placed to provide support for a final prosthesis in addition to the remaining teeth. Each prosthesis was tailor-made according to biomechanical three-dimensional finite element analysis results. The patients were assessed using the prosthesis functioning scale of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. In addition, retention and bite force were recorded for both the temporary prosthesis and the final prosthesis. RESULTS: The mean bite force of the prosthetic first molar was increased to 69.2 N. The mean retentive force increased to 13.5 N after zygoma implant insertion. The bite force on the prosthetic first molar was improved to 229.3 N. CONCLUSION: Bite force increased significantly with the support of a zygoma implant. The use of zygoma implants in the restoration of maxillary defects improved functional outcome and patient satisfaction. PMID:27759845

  1. Adult Rhabdomyosarcoma Survival Improved With Treatment on Multimodality Protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, Naamit Kurshan; Wexler, Leonard H.; Singer, Samuel; Alektiar, Kaled M.; Keohan, Mary Louise; Shi, Weiji; Zhang, Zhigang; Wolden, Suzanne

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is a pediatric sarcoma rarely occurring in adults. For unknown reasons, adults with RMS have worse outcomes than do children. Methods and Materials: We analyzed data from all patients who presented to Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center between 1990 and 2011 with RMS diagnosed at age 16 or older. One hundred forty-eight patients met the study criteria. Ten were excluded for lack of adequate data. Results: The median age was 28 years. The histologic diagnoses were as follows: embryonal 54%, alveolar 33%, pleomorphic 12%, and not otherwise specified 2%. The tumor site was unfavorable in 67% of patients. Thirty-three patients (24%) were at low risk, 61 (44%) at intermediate risk, and 44 (32%) at high risk. Forty-six percent were treated on or according to a prospective RMS protocol. The 5-year rate of overall survival (OS) was 45% for patients with nonmetastatic disease. The failure rates at 5 years for patients with nonmetastatic disease were 34% for local failure and 42% for distant failure. Among patients with nonmetastatic disease (n=94), significant factors associated with OS were histologic diagnosis, site, risk group, age, and protocol treatment. On multivariate analysis, risk group and protocol treatment were significant after adjustment for age. The 5-year OS was 54% for protocol patients versus 36% for nonprotocol patients. Conclusions: Survival in adult patients with nonmetastatic disease was significantly improved for those treated on RMS protocols, most of which are now open to adults.

  2. An interview with Hakim Djaballah, Ph.D. Interview by Vicki Glaser.

    PubMed

    Djaballah, Hakim

    2010-10-01

    Dr. Hakim Djaballah is Director of the High-Throughput Screening (HTS) Core Facility at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC), in New York City. He has several years of industrial experience in preclinical drug discovery, working in both pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies. He has been involved in developing and screening antibacterials, antivirals, and antifungals, as well as identifying targets in various therapeutic areas, including diabetes, central nervous system, cardiovascular system, oncology, and inflammation. He obtained his B.S. in biochemistry with biotechnology from the University of Birmingham and completed his Ph.D. in biochemistry at the University of Leicester, both in England. He was recruited to MSKCC in 2003 to set up and direct the HTS Core Facility, a drug discovery laboratory involved in both chemical and RNAi screening. Dr. Djaballah was the recipient of the 2007 Robots and Vision User Recognition Award. Sponsored by the Robotic Industries Association and the Automated Imaging Association, the award is presented every 2 years to individuals in institutions that have successfully implemented robots in their work.

  3. Meeting report: fourth international congress of the Society for Melanoma Research.

    PubMed

    Fisher, David E; Medrano, Estela E; McMahon, Martin; Soengas, Marisol S; Schuchter, Lynn; Wolchok, Jedd D; Merlino, Glenn

    2008-02-01

    The 4th international melanoma congress of the Society for Melanoma Research (SMR), organized by Marianne Berwick (University of New Mexico), Paul Chapman (Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center), Rene Gonzalez (University of Colorado) and Ze'ev Ronai (Burnham Institute), was held at the Marriott Hotel in downtown New York on November 2007. The congress was attended by a record high number of attendees (over 500 delegates) who joined to discuss recent advances in melanoma biology and therapy. About 40% of the participants arrived from 39 countries, a testament to the high impact of this annual gathering on the international melanoma community. Over 120 of the participants were students or postdoctoral fellows, representing a most impressive fraction of young scientists engaged in melanoma research. The meeting consisted of more than 50 plenary and minisymposia presentations, stimulating the exchange of unpublished data and novel ideas, and helping to forge new collaborations that are anticipated to facilitate significant advances in basic, translational and clinical melanoma research. Another major focus of this meeting was over 160 posters, which were heavily attended and provided an effective forum for extensive informal discussions. This report will highlight the major scientific themes and advances of this most successful meeting, and provide a useful perspective on the current state of melanoma research, as well as where the field should be heading.

  4. NOTE: Optimal needle arrangement for intraoperative planning in permanent I-125 prostate implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, S. A.; Fung, A. Y. C.; Zaider, M.

    2002-08-01

    One limitation of intraoperative planning of permanent prostate implants is that needles must already be in the gland before planning images are acquired. Improperly placed needles often restrict the capability of generating optimal seed placement. We developed guiding principles for the proper layout of needles within the treatment volume. The Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center planning system employs a genetic algorithm to find the optimal seed implantation pattern consistent with pre-assigned constraints (needle geometry, uniformity, conformity and the avoidance of high doses to urethra and rectum). Ultrasound volumes for twelve patients with I-125 implants were used to generate six plans per patient (total 72 plans) with different needle arrangements. The plans were evaluated in terms of V100 (percentage prostate volume receiving at least the prescription dose), U135 (percentage urethra volume receiving at least 135% of prescription dose), and CI (conformity index, the ratio of treatment volume to prescription dose volume.) The method termed POSTCTR, in which needles were placed on the periphery of the largest ultrasound slice and posterior central needles were placed as needed, consistently gave superior results for all prostate sizes. Another arrangement, labelled POSTLAT, where the needles were placed peripherally with additional needles in the posterior lateral lobes, also gave satisfactory results. We advocate two needle arrangements, POSTCTR and POSTLAT, with the former giving better results.

  5. Primary Ewing Family of Tumors of the Jaw has a better Prognosis compared to Tumors of Extragnathic sites

    PubMed Central

    Owosho, Adepitan A.; Ko, Eugene; Rosenberg, Haley I.; Yom, SaeHee K.; Antonescu, Cristina R.; Huryn, Joseph M.; Estilo, Cherry L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Primary Ewing sarcoma of the jaw is rare. The aim of this study was to describe new cases of primary Ewing sarcoma of the jaw and investigate reported prognostic factors of Ewing sarcoma in this series and treatment outcome. Materials and Methods Six patients with primary Ewing sarcoma of the jaw were treated at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) from 1992 through 2013. Clinical data, pathology reports, treatment prescribed, treatment regimens, outcome, and follow-up information were reviewed. Results Five of 6 patients were female and 5 cases were in the mandible. No patient presented with metastatic disease at diagnosis. All cases were positive for CD99, and 3 patients with genetic confirmation were positive for EWS-FLI1 fusion or EWSR1 gene rearrangement. All patients received induction multiagent chemotherapy and surgical resection and 2 patients received adjuvant radiotherapy. Total (grade IV) or nearly total (grade III) tumor necrosis in 3 of 5 patients (60%) assessed for histologic response to chemotherapy indicated intense sensitivity. All patients were alive and free of disease, with no history of local recurrence, at a median follow-up period of 6.5 years. Conclusion Patients with primary Ewing sarcoma of the jaw have a good prognosis and metastasis is an uncommon occurrence at initial presentation. PMID:26679553

  6. Approaches to Manufacturing Alpha Emitters For Radioimmunotherapeutic Drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Gaylord King, A.; Givens, Kenneth R.; Miller, William H.; Glascock, Mike; Rangaraj, Dharanipathy; Bond, Andrew; Horwitz, E. Philip; McAlister, Daniel R.

    2003-08-26

    Several alpha emitting isotopes have been proposed for radioimmunotherapy. To produce these nuclides reliably and in quantities needed, unique manufacturing approaches will be required. This paper describes the approaches that are being developed for the manufacture of 225Actinium (225 Ac) that decays to 213Bismuth (213 Bi) and the commercial manufacturing approaches. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) currently supplies the actinium used for research and medical use. Today the ORNL 233U stockpiles only provide sufficient material for research quantities of 213 Bi. At the Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), in Karlsruhe, researchers have also developed a method of irradiating radium-226 with protons in a cyclotron to produce actinium- 225 through the reaction 226Ra (p, 2n) 225Ac. Researchers from the Missouri University (MU), the Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR), MedActinium, Inc. and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are working on a collaborative effort to benchmark and optimize the production of 213Bi via neutron bombardment of 226Ra. MedActinium, Inc., in collaboration with commercial and institutional investigators at PG Research Foundation (PGRF) and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC), is developing commercial approaches to manufacturing these unique radioimmunotherapeutic drugs.

  7. Intraluminal radiation therapy in the management of malignant biliary obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Molt, P.; Hopfan, S.; Watson, R.C.; Botet, J.F.; Brennan, M.F.

    1986-02-01

    Fifteen patients with malignant biliary obstruction from carcinoma of the bile ducts, gallbladder, and pancreas (Group I) or metastatic disease (Group II) were treated with intraluminal radiation therapy (ILRT) at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. In 11 cases ILRT was used as a central boost in combination with 3000 cGy external beam radiation therapy (ERT). No significant treatment toxicity was observed. Cholangiographic response was observed in 2 of 12 evaluable patients. In no patient was long-term relief of jaundice without indwelling biliary stent achieved. Survival from treatment in eight Group I patients treated with ILRT +/- ERT was 3 to 13 months (median, 4.5). Survival in seven similarly treated Group II patients was 0.5 to 8 months (median, 4.0). Additional data for ten similar patients referred for ILRT but treated with ERT alone are presented. Analysis of this and other reports indicate the need for prospective controlled trials of the role of this regimen in the management of malignant biliary obstruction before wider application can be recommended.

  8. Patterns of persistent DNA damage associated with sun exposure and the glutathione S-transferase M1 genotype in melanoma patients.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Mark L; Hubbard, Karen; Utti, Charles; Clas, Brian; Hwang, Bor-Jang; Hill, Helene Z; Orlow, Irene

    2009-01-01

    Solar radiation can lead to changes affecting DNA metabolism resulting in loss of DNA integrity. Skin specimens obtained from melanoma patients treated at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center were used to study patterns of DNA fragmentation using the comet assay and levels of deletions in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) using real-time PCR. Skin specimens were classified according to the glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1) genotype (either wild type [WT] or null) and patient sunburn history. GSTM1 null individuals with a sunburn history showed increased levels of both DNA fragmentation by comet assays and mtDNA deletions relative to GSTM1 WT patients with little or no sunburn history. Microarray analyses identified a number of genes whose expression was upregulated >or=5-fold in cells from GSTM1-null patients or from those reporting histories of sunburn. These genes encoded small molecule transporters, various growth factor/chemokine receptors, transcription factors and tumor suppressors. Of 17 genes directly involved in DNA repair, three DNA ligases were highly upregulated while the RAD23 UV excision repair gene and the Growth Arrest and DNA Damage gene (GADD45) were downregulated. These findings support the idea that exposure to solar radiation early in life may induce long-term cellular changes that lead to persistent DNA damage and altered patterns of gene expression.

  9. An Associative Memory Model for Integration of Fragmented Research Data and Identification of Treatment Correlations in Breast Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Ashis Gopal; Khan, Mridul; Higgins, John; Giani, Annarita; Das, Amar K.

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge in advancing scientific discoveries using data-driven clinical research is the fragmentation of relevant data among multiple information systems. This fragmentation requires significant data-engineering work before correlations can be found among data attributes in multiple systems. In this paper, we focus on integrating information on breast cancer care, and present a novel computational approach to identify correlations between administered drugs captured in an electronic medical records and biological factors obtained from a tumor registry through rapid data aggregation and analysis. We use an associative memory (AM) model to encode all existing associations among the data attributes from both systems in a high-dimensional vector space. The AM model stores highly associated data items in neighboring memory locations to enable efficient querying operations. The results of applying AM to a set of integrated data on tumor markers and drug administrations discovered anomalies between clinical recommendations and derived associations. PMID:26958161

  10. A pilot study to compare the effect of memory training and health training interventions on affective and cognitive function with a group of cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    McDougall, Graham J.; Becker, Heather; Acee, Taylor W.; Vaughan, Phillip W.; Delville, Carol L.

    2010-01-01

    Cancer survivors over 65 years of age experience treatment-induced memory impairments. However, clinicians are often at a loss on how to intervene for these cognitive problems. This paper describes the findings from a pilot study of a memory vs. health training intervention and its adaptability for cancer survivors. Design and Methods A convenience sample of older adults was enrolled in a longitudinal study of a memory and health training intervention and tested on five occasions for 2 years post-intervention. The memory training was designed to reduce anxiety, decrease negative attributions, promote health, and increase self-efficacy. In this analysis we included change over time for the first four of the five data collection points. We calculated means and standard deviations on the memory measures for cancer survivors in the intervention (n=8) and comparison (n=14) groups. The analysis consisted of a mixed design ANOVA comparing the two intervention groups across 4 time periods for twelve months. Results The typical cancer survivor in the sample was a 74-year old Caucasian female; 14% were minorities. Because of the small sample, some of the effects were not statistically significant. Moderate to large effects were revealed in everyday and verbal memory performance scores, memory self-efficacy, strategy use, and memory complaints. There were also moderate effects for group by time interactions on the visual memory performance measure, the memory self-efficacy measure, the depression, the trait anxiety measure, and the complaints subscale. The memory intervention group tended to improve more than the health training group, although this was not always consistent. The results suggested that the participants benefited from the memory training intervention. Implications Clinicians are often at a loss on how to intervene with cancer survivors who are experiencing cognitive problems following chemotherapy treatment. Evidenced-based interventions for this aspect of

  11. Impact of increasing physical activity on cognitive functioning in breast cancer survivors: Rationale and study design of Memory & Motion

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Sheri J.; Natarajan, Loki; Palmer, Barton W.; Parker, Barbara; Patterson, Ruth E.; Sears, Dorothy D.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Many breast cancer survivors experiences problems with cognitive functioning that can persist years after treatment. Increasing physical activity has been shown to improve cognitive functioning in healthy and cognitively impaired adults, but has not yet been tested in cancer survivors. The primary aim of this randomized controlled trial is to examine the effects of a 3-month physical activity intervention compared to a waitlist control arm on neuropsychological outcomes and subjective cognitive concerns in breast cancer survivors. Methods Eighty sedentary breast cancer survivors, self-reporting difficulties with cognition, will be randomized into an Exercise arm or Control arm. The Exercise arm includes an activity tracker (i.e., a Fitbit), phone calls, plus tailored and non-tailored email content. The Control arm will receive emails on women’s health topics on the same schedule as the Exercise arm. Assessments conducted at baseline and 3 months include: neuropsychological testing, cognitive concerns and other aspects of quality of life, and 7 days of a hip-worn accelerometer. Participants will also provide fasting blood draws to assess brain-derived neurotropic factor, Insulin-like growth factor 1, insulin resistance, and C-reactive protein. Primary and secondary outcomes are changes in neuropsychological testing and cognitive concerns. Biomarkers will be examined to further understand the underlying relationship between physical activity and cognition. Conclusion The Memory & Motion study is designed to test whether increasing physical activity can improve cognitive functioning in breast cancer survivors. Results from this study could be used to guide development of interventions to improve cognitive functioning in breast cancer survivors. PMID:26427563

  12. A conversation with Susan Band Horwitz.

    PubMed

    Horwitz, Susan Band; Goldman, I David

    2015-01-01

    Susan Band Horwitz is a Distinguished Professor and holds the Falkenstein Chair in Cancer Research at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York. She is co-chair of the Department of Molecular Pharmacology and associate director for therapeutics at the Albert Einstein Cancer Center. After graduating from Bryn Mawr College, Dr. Horwitz received her PhD in biochemistry from Brandeis University. She has had a continuing interest in natural products as a source of new drugs for the treatment of cancer. Her most seminal research contribution has been in the development of Taxol(®). Dr. Horwitz and her colleagues made the discovery that Taxol had a unique mechanism of action and suggested that it was a prototype for a new class of antitumor drugs. Although Taxol was an antimitotic agent blocking cells in the metaphase stage of the cell cycle, Dr. Horwitz recognized that Taxol was blocking mitosis in a way different from that of other known agents. Her group demonstrated that the binding site for Taxol was on the β-tubulin subunit. The interaction of Taxol with the β-tubulin subunit resulted in stabilized microtubules, essentially paralyzing the cytoskeleton, thereby preventing cell division. Dr. Horwitz served as president (2002-2003) of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR). She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the Institute of Medicine, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Philosophical Society. She has received numerous honors and awards, including the C. Chester Stock Award from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, the Warren Alpert Foundation Prize from Harvard Medical School, the Bristol-Myers Squibb Award for Distinguished Achievement in Cancer Research, the American Cancer Society's Medal of Honor, and the AACR Award for Lifetime Achievement in Cancer Research. The following interview was conducted on January 23, 2014.

  13. The Hospital for the Ruptured and Crippled: William Bradley Coley, Third Surgeon-in-Chief 1925–1933

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    In January 1925, the Board of Managers of the New York Society for the Relief of the Ruptured and Crippled appointed William Bradley Coley, M.D., age 63, Surgeon-in-Chief of the Hospital for the Ruptured and Crippled (R & C) to succeed Virgil P. Gibney who submitted his resignation the month before. It would be the first time a general surgeon held that position at the oldest orthopedic hospital in the nation, now known as Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS). Coley had been on staff for 36 years and was world famous for introducing use of toxins to treat malignant tumors, particularly sarcomas. A graduate of Yale College and Harvard Medical College, Coley interned at New York Hospital and was appointed, soon after, to the staff of the New York Cancer Hospital (now Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center) located at that time at 106th Street on the West Side of New York. With his mentor Dr. William Bull, Coley perfected the surgical treatment of hernias at R & C. He was instrumental in raising funds for his alma maters, Yale, Harvard and Memorial Hospital. His crusade in immunology as a method of treatment for malignant tumors later fell out of acceptance in the medical establishment. After his death in 1936, an attempt to revive interest in use of immunotherapy for inoperable malignancies was carried out by his daughter, Helen Coley Nauts, who pursued this objective until her death at age 93 in 2000. Coley’s health deteriorated in his later years, and in 1933, he resigned as chief of Bone Tumors at Memorial Hospital and Surgeon-in-Chief at R & C, being succeeded at Ruptured and Crippled as Surgeon-in-Chief by Dr. Eugene H. Pool. William Bradley Coley died of intestinal infarction in 1936 and was buried in Sharon, Connecticut. PMID:18751855

  14. Cancer immunology: the search for specificity--G. H. A. Clowes Memorial lecture.

    PubMed

    Old, L J

    1981-02-01

    The major focus of cancer immunology has shifted away from arguments about the validity of the immunosurveillance theory of cancer to the more basic question of tumor-specific antigens. Despite vast effort aimed at demonstrating such antigens, their existence in the generality of cancer remains unproven. Serological analysis of three tumor types, mouse leukemia, mouse sarcoma, and human malignant melanoma, has received most attention, and a rudimentary classification of the surface antigens expressed by these tumors has begun to emerge. The prime candidates for antigens that can be considered tumor specific are the few instances of Class 1 antigens that have now been serologically defined on mouse and human tumors. These antigens show an absolute restriction to individual tumors, not being demonstrable on any other normal or malignant cell type. Biochemical and genetic characterization of Class 1 antigens represents an essential next step in evaluating the significance of these antigens. The surprising features of the Thymus Leukemia (TL) antigens of the mouse provide insight into the genetic origin of another key class of tumor antigens, in this case antigens with characteristic properties of both differentiation antigens and tumor-specific antigens. In normal mice, TL antigens are restricted to cells in the thymus, and strains differ with regard to expression versus nonexpression of TL antigens. Genetic information for TL is universal in the mouse, however, as leukemias developing in mice that normally lack TL are found to express TL. What is clear from the past two decades of research in cancer immunology is that a far more detailed knowledge of surface antigens of tumor cells will be necessary before we can begin to assess the possibility of immunological control of cancer.

  15. Extending the validity of the Memorial Anxiety Scale for Prostate Cancer (MAX-PC) at the time of prostate biopsy in a racially-mixed population.

    PubMed

    Dale, William; Hemmerich, Joshua; Meltzer, David

    2007-05-01

    The Memorial Anxiety Scale for Prostate Cancer (MAX-PC) has been validated for assessing men with prostate cancer for cancer-specific anxiety. It was originally validated in a predominantly white population. The MAX-PC Prostate Cancer Anxiety Subscale (MAX-PC-PCAS) may be relevant for measuring cancer-specific anxiety in undiagnosed men at risk for prostate cancer. We assess the validity of the MAX-PC-PCAS at the time of prostate biopsy (n = 178). Questions assessed socio-demographic information, health status, patient-estimated risk of cancer, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale--Anxiety Subscale (HADS-A), and the MAX-PC-PCAS. The patients' most recent PSA was recorded. Cronbach's alpha, inter-item correlations, and Pearson correlations with both the HADS-A and clinical variables were compared with the original validation sample. Our sample was younger (63.1 vs 71.1 years), had a larger fraction of African-Americans (43 vs 10%), and had higher PSAs. Cronbach's alpha was equivalent (0.91 vs 0.90), median inter-item correlation was equivalent (0.63 vs 0.61), and Pearson correlation with HADS-A was higher (0.71 vs 0.57). Anxiety levels were not correlated with PSA levels, and there were minor differences in the validation findings by race. The validity of the MAX-PC-PCAS extends to men without cancer undergoing biopsy and to African-Americans.

  16. Ovarian cancer: contribution of radiation therapy to patient management: Erskine Memorial Lecture, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, R.S.

    1984-10-01

    Ovarian cancer may be treated with radiation therapy, surgery, chemotherapy, or a combination. To evaluate the contribution of radiation therapy to patient management the cure rate must be estimated; data are presented suggesting that the 5-year survival rate provides a reasonable estimate of the cure rate. A study of patients treated since 1971 showed that stage and postoperative residuum could be used to divide patients into two subgroups, a poor prognosis group and a good prognosis group; a multifactorial grouping of patients in the good prognosis group who were treated postoperatively with radiation therapy only was further able to divide patients into low-risk, intermediate-risk, and high-risk groups. Studies of radiation therapy for different subgroups are discussed; abdominopelvic irradiation has been shown to improve survival for approximately one-third of patients with cancer of the ovary.

  17. Bivalent domains enforce transcriptional memory of DNA methylated genes in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Jairo; Muñoz, Mar; Vives, Laura; Frangou, Costas G; Groudine, Mark; Peinado, Miguel A

    2008-12-16

    Silencing of multiple cancer-related genes is associated with de novo methylation of linked CpG islands. Additionally, bivalent histone modification profiles characterized by the juxtaposition of active and inactive histone marks have been observed in genes that become hypermethylated in cancer. It is unknown how these ambiguous epigenetic states are maintained and how they interrelate with adjacent genomic regions with different epigenetic landscapes. Here, we present the analysis of a set of neighboring genes, including many frequently silenced in colon cancer cells, in a chromosomal region at 5q35.2 spanning 1.25 Mb. Promoter DNA methylation occurs only at genes maintained at a low transcriptional state and is characterized by the presence of bivalent histone marks, namely trimethylation of lysines 4 and 27 in histone 3. Chemically induced hyperacetylation and DNA demethylation lead to up-regulation of silenced genes in this locus yet do not resolve bivalent domains into a domain-wide active chromatin conformation. In contrast, active genes in the region become down-regulated after drug treatment, accompanied by a partial loss of chromatin domain boundaries and spreading of the inactive histone mark trimethylated lysine 27 in histone 3. Our results demonstrate that bivalent domains mark the promoters of genes that will become DNA methylated in adult tumor cells to enforce transcriptional silence. These bivalent domains not only remain upon drug induced gene reactivation, but also spread over adjacent CpG islands. These results may have important implications in understanding and managing epigenetic therapies of cancer.

  18. Robert R. Shaw, MD: thoracic surgical hero, Afghanistan medical pioneer, champion for the patient, never a surgical society president.

    PubMed

    Urschel, Harold C; Urschel, Betsey Bradley

    2012-06-01

    Dr Robert R. Shaw arrived in Dallas to practice Thoracic Surgery in 1937, as John Alexander's 7th Thoracic Surgical Resident from Michigan University Medical Center. Dr Shaw's modus operandi was, "You can accomplish almost anything, if you don't care who gets the credit." He was a remarkable individual who cared the most about the patient and very little about getting credit for himself. From 1937 to 1970, Dr Shaw established one of the largest lung cancer surgical centers in the world in Dallas, Texas. It was larger than M.D. Anderson and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Hospitals put together regarding the surgical treatment of lung cancer patients. To accomplish this, he had the help of Dr Donald L. Paulson, who trained at the Mayo Clinic and served as Chief of Thoracic Surgery at Brook Army Hospital during the Second World War. Following the War, because of his love for Texas, he ended up as a partner of Dr Shaw in Dallas. Together, they pursued the development of this very large surgical lung cancer center. Dr Shaw and his wife Ruth went to Afghanistan with Medico multiple times to teach men modern cardiac and thoracic surgery. They also served as consultants on Medico's Ship of Hope in Africa. Dr Shaw initiated multiple new operations including: 1) resection of Pancoast's cancer of the lung after preoperative irradiation; 2) upper lobe of the lung bronchoplasty, reattaching (and saving) the lower lobe to prevent the "disabling" pneumonectomy; and 3) resections of pulmonary mucoid impaction of the lung in asthmatics. Because of his humility and giving "the credit to others," Dr Shaw was never President of a major medical or surgical association.

  19. Delineation of antigen-specific and antigen-nonspecific CD8+ memory T-cell responses after cytokine-based cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Tietze, Julia K.; Wilkins, Danice E. C.; Sckisel, Gail D.; Bouchlaka, Myriam N.; Alderson, Kory L.; Weiss, Jonathan M.; Ames, Erik; Bruhn, Kevin W.; Craft, Noah; Wiltrout, Robert H.; Longo, Dan L.; Lanier, Lewis L.; Blazar, Bruce R.; Redelman, Doug

    2012-01-01

    Memory T cells exhibit tremendous antigen specificity within the immune system and accumulate with age. Our studies reveal an antigen-independent expansion of memory, but not naive, CD8+ T cells after several immunotherapeutic regimens for cancer resulting in a distinctive phenotype. Signaling through T-cell receptors (TCRs) or CD3 in both mouse and human memory CD8+ T cells markedly up-regulated programmed death-1 (PD-1) and CD25 (IL-2 receptor α chain), and led to antigen-specific tumor cell killing. In contrast, exposure to cytokine alone in vitro or with immunotherapy in vivo did not up-regulate these markers but resulted in expanded memory CD8+ T cells expressing NKG2D, granzyme B, and possessing broadly lytic capabilities. Blockade of NKG2D in mice also resulted in significantly diminished antitumor effects after immunotherapy. Treatment of TCR-transgenic mice bearing nonantigen expressing tumors with immunotherapy still resulted in significant antitumor effects. Human melanoma tissue biopsies obtained from patients after topically applied immunodulatory treatment resulted in increased numbers of these CD8+ CD25− cells within the tumor site. These findings demonstrate that memory CD8+ T cells can express differential phenotypes indicative of adaptive or innate effectors based on the nature of the stimuli in a process conserved across species. PMID:22251483

  20. Parallel Profiles of Inflammatory and Effector Memory T Cells in Visceral Fat and Liver of Obesity-Associated Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Conroy, Melissa J; Galvin, Karen C; Doyle, Suzanne L; Kavanagh, Maria E; Mongan, Ann-Marie; Cannon, Aoife; Moore, Gillian Y; Reynolds, John V; Lysaght, Joanne

    2016-10-01

    In the midst of a worsening obesity epidemic, the incidence of obesity-associated morbidities, including cancer, diabetes, cardiac and liver disease is increasing. Insights into mechanisms underlying pathological obesity-associated inflammation are lacking. Both the omentum, the principal component of visceral fat, and liver of obese individuals are sites of excessive inflammation, but to date the T cell profiles of both compartments have not been assessed or compared in a patient cohort with obesity-associated disease. We have previously identified that omentum is enriched with inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and T cells. Here, we compared the inflammatory profile of T cells in the omentum and liver of patients with the obesity-associated malignancy oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC). Furthermore, we assessed the secreted cytokine profile in OAC patient serum, omentum and liver to assess systemic and local inflammation. We observed parallel T cell cytokine profiles and phenotypes in the omentum and liver of OAC patients, in particular CD69(+) and inflammatory effector memory T cells. This study reflects similar processes of inflammation and T cell activation in the omentum and liver, and may suggest common targets to modulate pathological inflammation at these sites.

  1. Efficacy and safety of sorafenib versus sunitinib as first-line treatment in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma: largest single-center retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Chuanliang; Si, Lu; Li, Siming; Tang, Bixia; Mao, Lili; Lian, Bin; Wang, Xuan; Yan, Xieqiao; Guo, Jun

    2016-01-01

    We conducted this largest, single-center, retrospective study to determine the efficacy of sorafenib versus sunitinib as first-line therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) in Chinese patients to validate the potential data on direct comparison of the efficacy of first-line treatment with sorafenib and sunitinib in the treatment of mRCC. From November 2006 to March 2015, we reviewed medical records from Peking University Cancer Hospital and found 169 patients receiving sorafenib (400 mg orally BID continuously in a 4-week cycle) and 165 patients receiving sunitinib (50 mg orally daily in a 6-week cycle; 4/2 schedule) as the first-line targeted therapy. Median follow-up was 23.0 months. In sorafenib and sunitinib groups, there is no significant difference in progression-free survival (PFS) (9.0 months [95%CI:8.00-12.00] vs 11.0 months [95%CI:9.00-14.00], respectively; P=0.6289) and overall survival (OS) (28.0 months [95%CI:24.00-34.00] vs 28.0 months [95% CI:19.00-33.00], respectively; P=0.979). Subgroup analysis based on Karnofsky performance status (KPS), pathological type, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center score, and metastasis was also conducted. Multivariate analysis revealed that sorafenib treated patients had superior efficacy in patients with a KPS of <90 and significantly better PFS (hazard ratio: 0.460 [95% CI:0.222-0.954]). Most common adverse events were hand-foot skin reaction and thrombocytopenia which were manageable. Overall, no significant differences were seen between sorafenib and sunitinib in the treatment of advanced renal cancer. However, fewer toxicities associated with sorafenib and superior efficacy in subgroups (non-clear cell carcinoma and KPS <90) indicates sorafenib as an effective first-line treatment agent in patients with mRCC. PMID:26894858

  2. Normal development, oncogenesis and programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Liebermann, D A

    1998-09-10

    Meeting's Report -- June 2, 1998, Sugarload Estate Conference Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. A symposium on Normal Development, Oncogenesis and Programmed Cell Death, was held at the Sugarload Estate Conference Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA sponsored by the Fels Cancer Institute, Temple University School of Medicine, with the support of the Alliance Pharmaceutical Corporation. The symposium was organized by Drs Dan A Liebermann and Barbara Hoffman at the Fels. Invited speakers included: Dr Andrei V Gudkov (University of Illinois) who started the symposium talking about 'New cellular factors modulating the tumor suppressor function of p53'; Dr Yuri Lazebnik (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratories) spoke about 'Caspases considered as enemies within'; Dr E Premkumar Reddy (Fels Institute, Temple University) talked about recent exciting findings in his laboratory regarding 'JAK-STATs dedicated signaling pathways'; Dr Michael Greenberg (Harvard University) spoke about 'Signal transduction pathways that regulate differentiation and survival in the developing nervous system'; Dr Richard Kolesnick's (Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center) talk has been focused at 'Stress signals for apoptosis, including Ceramide and c-Jun Kinase/Stress-activated Protein Kinase'; Dr Barbara Hoffman (Fels Institute, Temple University) described research, conducted in collaboration with Dr Dan A Liebermann, aimed at deciphering the roles of 'myc, myb, and E2F as negative regulators of terminal differentiation', using hematopoietic cells as model system. Dr Daniel G Tenen (Harvard Medical School), described studies aimed at understanding the 'Regulation of hematopoietic cell development by lineage specific transcription regulators'. Dr George C Prendergast (The Wistar Institute) talked about the 'Myc-Bin1 signaling pathway in cell death and differentiation. Dr Ruth J Muschel (University of Pennsylvania) spoke about work, conducted in collaboration with Dr WG McKenna, aimed at

  3. Chemical & RNAi screening at MSKCC: a collaborative platform to discover & repurpose drugs to fight disease

    PubMed Central

    Bhinder, Bhavneet; Antczak, Christophe; Shum, David; Radu, Constantin; Mahida, Jeni P.; Liu-Sullivan, Nancy; Ibáñez, Glorymar; Raja, Balajee Somalinga; Calder, Paul A.; Djaballah, Hakim

    2014-01-01

    Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) has implemented the creation of a full service state-of-the-art High-throughput Screening Core Facility (HTSCF) equipped with modern robotics and custom-built screening data management resources to rapidly store and query chemical and RNAi screening data outputs. The mission of the facility is to provide oncology clinicians and researchers alike with access to cost-effective HTS solutions for both chemical and RNAi screening, with an ultimate goal of novel target identification and drug discovery. HTSCF was established in 2003 to support the institution’s commitment to growth in molecular pharmacology and in the realm of therapeutic agents to fight chronic diseases such as cancer. This endeavor required broad range of expertise in technology development to establish robust and innovative assays, large collections of diverse chemical and RNAi duplexes to probe specific cellular events, sophisticated compound and data handling capabilities, and a profound knowledge in assay development, hit validation, and characterization. Our goal has been to strive for constant innovation, and we strongly believe in shifting the paradigm from traditional drug discovery towards translational research now, making allowance for unmet clinical needs in patients. Our efforts towards repurposing FDA-approved drugs fructified when digoxin, identified through primary HTS, was administered in the clinic for treatment of stage Vb retinoblastoma. In summary, the overall aim of our facility is to identify novel chemical probes, to study cellular processes relevant to investigator’s research interest in chemical biology and functional genomics, and to be instrumental in accelerating the process of drug discovery in academia. PMID:24661215

  4. New roles & responsibilities of hospital biomedical engineering.

    PubMed

    Frisch, P H; Stone, B; Booth, P; Lui, W

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade the changing healthcare environment has required hospitals and specifically Biomedical Engineering to critically evaluate, optimize and adapt their operations. The focus is now on new technologies, changes to the environment of care, support requirements and financial constraints. Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC), an NIH-designated comprehensive cancer center, has been transitioning to an increasing outpatient care environment. This transition is driving an increase in-patient acuity coupled with the need for added urgency of support and response time. New technologies, regulatory requirements and financial constraints have impacted operating budgets and in some cases, resulted in a reduction in staffing. Specific initiatives, such as the Joint Commission's National Patient Safety Goals, requirements for an electronic medical record, meaningful use and ICD10 have caused institutions to reevaluate their operations and processes including requiring Biomedical Engineering to manage new technologies, integrations and changes in the electromagnetic environment, while optimizing operational workflow and resource utilization. This paper addresses the new and expanding responsibilities and approach of Biomedical Engineering organizations, specifically at MSKCC. It is suggested that our experience may be a template for other organizations facing similar problems. Increasing support is necessary for Medical Software - Medical Device Data Systems in the evolving wireless environment, including RTLS and RFID. It will be necessary to evaluate the potential impact on the growing electromagnetic environment, on connectivity resulting in the need for dynamic and interactive testing and the growing demand to establish new and needed operational synergies with Information Technology operations and other operational groups within the institution, such as nursing, facilities management, central supply, and the user departments.

  5. Mammary analog secretory carcinoma of the thyroid gland: A primary thyroid adenocarcinoma harboring ETV6–NTRK3 fusion

    PubMed Central

    Dogan, Snjezana; Wang, Lu; Ptashkin, Ryan N; Dawson, Robert R; Shah, Jatin P; Sherman, Eric J; Tuttle, R Michael; Fagin, James A; Klimstra, David S; Katabi, Nora; Ghossein, Ronald A

    2016-01-01

    ETV6–NTRK3 fusion was identified in several cancers including the recently described mammary analog secretory carcinoma (MASC) of the salivary glands and a minority of papillary thyroid carcinomas. We describe three cases of primary MASC of the thyroid gland and provide a detailed clinical and pathological characterization of the tumor morphology, immunoprofile, and genetic background. Immunohistochemistry for PAX8, TTF-1, thyroglobulin, mammaglobin, GCDFP-15, S-100 protein, and p63 was used to define the tumor immunophenotype. Fluorescence in situ hybridization for ETV6 rearrangement was performed in three, and the next-generation sequencing assay MSK-IMPACT™ (Memorial Sloan Kettering-Integrated Mutation Profiling of Actionable Cancer Targets) was performed in two cases. Primary MASC of the thyroid occurred in two women and one man, age 47–72 years. All patients presented with high T stage, infiltrative, locally aggressive tumors with extrathyroidal extension. Two cases were associated with well-differentiated papillary thyroid carcinoma. Histologically, they appeared as low-grade tumors, resembling MASC of the salivary glands and labeled positive for mammaglobin, GCDFP-15, S-100 protein, p63, weakly positive for PAX8, and negative for TTF-1 and thyroglobulin. Fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed ETV6 rearrangement in all cases. In two tested cases MSK-IMPACT™ confirmed the presence of ETV6–NTRK3 gene fusion. Two patients had at least two local recurrences, one was alive with disease, and one was alive and free of disease after 14 and 17 years, respectively. The third patient was alive and free of disease after 2 years. MASC of the thyroid is histologically, immunophenotypically, and genetically similar to its salivary gland counterpart. Thyroid MASC can be associated with a well-differentiated papillary thyroid carcinoma component, supporting follicular cell origin. Clinically, these carcinomas may show frequent recurrences but are associated

  6. ORNL production of the experimental alpha emitters bismuth-213 and actinium-225 for medical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, O.F.; Krichinsky, A.M.; Yong, L.K.

    1998-09-01

    Due to their short range in tissue (50 to 80 {micro}m), alpha emitters are of considerable interest for certain radioimmunotherapy applications. These applications require the destruction of single cells or small clusters of cells. The radioisotope {sup 213}Bi, which is milked from {sup 225}Ac, is an alpha emitter that is currently being used in phase-1 human leukemia trials at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. The most readily achievable route for producing {sup 225}Ac generators involves separating ingrown {sup 229}Th daughters from the {sup 233}U parent. Thorium-229 is then used as a parent generator for {sup 225}Ac. Thorium-229 is easier to handle than {sup 233}U, which is fissile and typically contains trace concentrations of {sup 232}U. Uranium-232 has a radioactive daughter, {sup 208}Tl, which emits a high-energy (2.6-MeV) photon when it decays. An alternative method for producing {sup 229}Th is through neutron irradiation of {sup 227}Ra. However, this method is less desirable due to the production of very high levels of {sup 228}Th. Thorium-229 accumulates in stored {sup 233}U oxides by natural decay. The current ORNL process for extracting {sup 229}Th from stored {sup 233}U oxides includes dissolution, strong-acid anion exchange, and calcination of the uranium. This ORNL process has provided high-purity {sup 225}Ac generators to medical researchers. Bismuth-213 has been extracted and used in initial human trials and already has demonstrated a potency and specificity for attacking cancerous cells.

  7. Next-Generation Sequencing of Pulmonary Large Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma Reveals Small Cell Carcinoma–like and Non–Small Cell Carcinoma–like Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Rekhtman, Natasha; Pietanza, Maria C.; Hellmann, Matthew D.; Naidoo, Jarushka; Arora, Arshi; Won, Helen; Halpenny, Darragh F.; Wang, Hangjun; Tian, Shaozhou K.; Litvak, Anya M.; Paik, Paul K.; Drilon, Alexander E.; Socci, Nicholas; Poirier, John T.; Shen, Ronglai; Berger, Michael F.; Moreira, Andre L.; Travis, William D.; Rudin, Charles M.; Ladanyi, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Pulmonary large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (LCNEC) is a highly aggressive neoplasm, whose biologic relationship to small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) versus non-SCLC (NSCLC) remains unclear, contributing to uncertainty regarding optimal clinical management. To clarify these relationships, we analyzed genomic alterations in LCNEC compared with other major lung carcinoma types. Experimental Design LCNEC (n = 45) tumor/normal pairs underwent targeted next-generation sequencing of 241 cancer genes by Memorial Sloan Kettering-Integrated Mutation Profiling of Actionable Cancer Targets (MSK-IMPACT) platform and comprehensive histologic, immunohistochemical, and clinical analysis. Genomic data were compared with MSK-IMPACT analysis of other lung carcinoma histologies (n = 242). Results Commonly altered genes in LCNEC included TP53 (78%), RB1 (38%), STK11 (33%), KEAP1 (31%), and KRAS (22%). Genomic profiles segregated LCNEC into 2 major and 1 minor subsets: SCLC-like (n = 18), characterized by TP53+RB1 co-mutation/loss and other SCLC-type alterations, including MYCL amplification; NSCLC-like (n = 25), characterized by the lack of coaltered TP53+RB1 and nearly universal occurrence of NSCLC-type mutations (STK11, KRAS, and KEAP1); and carcinoid-like (n = 2), characterized by MEN1 mutations and low mutation burden. SCLC-like and NSCLC-like subsets revealed several clinicopathologic differences, including higher proliferative activity in SCLC-like tumors (P < 0.0001) and exclusive adenocarcinoma-type differentiation marker expression in NSCLC-like tumors (P = 0.005). While exhibiting predominant similarity with lung adenocarcinoma, NSCLC-like LCNEC harbored several distinctive genomic alterations, including more frequent mutations in NOTCH family genes (28%), implicated as key regulators of neuroendocrine differentiation. Conclusions LCNEC is a biologically heterogeneous group of tumors, comprising distinct subsets with genomic signatures of SCLC, NSCLC (predominantly

  8. Clinical Application of Picodroplet Digital PCR Technology for Rapid Detection of EGFR T790M in Next-Generation Sequencing Libraries and DNA from Limited Tumor Samples.

    PubMed

    Borsu, Laetitia; Intrieri, Julie; Thampi, Linta; Yu, Helena; Riely, Gregory; Nafa, Khedoudja; Chandramohan, Raghu; Ladanyi, Marc; Arcila, Maria E

    2016-11-01

    Although next-generation sequencing (NGS) is a robust technology for comprehensive assessment of EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinomas with acquired resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors, it may not provide sufficiently rapid and sensitive detection of the EGFR T790M mutation, the most clinically relevant resistance biomarker. Here, we describe a digital PCR (dPCR) assay for rapid T790M detection on aliquots of NGS libraries prepared for comprehensive profiling, fully maximizing broad genomic analysis on limited samples. Tumor DNAs from patients with EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinomas and acquired resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors were prepared for Memorial Sloan-Kettering-Integrated Mutation Profiling of Actionable Cancer Targets sequencing, a hybrid capture-based assay interrogating 410 cancer-related genes. Precapture library aliquots were used for rapid EGFR T790M testing by dPCR, and results were compared with NGS and locked nucleic acid-PCR Sanger sequencing (reference high sensitivity method). Seventy resistance samples showed 99% concordance with the reference high sensitivity method in accuracy studies. Input as low as 2.5 ng provided a sensitivity of 1% and improved further with increasing DNA input. dPCR on libraries required less DNA and showed better performance than direct genomic DNA. dPCR on NGS libraries is a robust and rapid approach to EGFR T790M testing, allowing most economical utilization of limited material for comprehensive assessment. The same assay can also be performed directly on any limited DNA source and cell-free DNA.

  9. Educational and Psychosocial Support Needs in Lynch Syndrome: Implementation and Assessment of an Educational Workshop and Support Group.

    PubMed

    Corines, Marina J; Hamilton, Jada G; Glogowski, Emily; Anrig, Chris A; Goldberg, Rachael; Niehaus, Kate; Salo-Mullen, Erin; Harlan, Megan; Sheehan, Margaret R; Trottier, Magan; Ahsraf, Asad; Tran, Christina; Jacobs, Lauren; Rau-Murthy, Rohini; Lincoln, Anne G; Robson, Mark E; Guillem, Jose G; Markowitz, Arnold J; Offit, Kenneth; Stadler, Zsofia K

    2017-04-01

    Few reports of educational and counseling support resources exist for Lynch syndrome (LS), a disorder requiring multi-organ cancer screening and specialized medical care throughout adult life. Here we describe the development and efficacy of two resources designed to address this need, the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center Clinical Genetics Service annual Lynch Syndrome Educational Workshop (LSEW), and a quarterly Lynch Syndrome Patient Advocacy Network (LSPAN) support group. The LSEW and LSPAN were implemented beginning in 2012. Participant survey data evaluating satisfaction, clarity, and unmet needs for each event were retrospectively analyzed and summarized using descriptive statistics. Annual LSEW attendance ranged from 53 to 75 total participants. LSEW year 1 participants indicated a need for a support group, and preferred in-person meetings at a frequency of every 3-6 months. For LSEW year 2-5 participants, >96 % reported satisfaction with the LSEW, and >82 % expressed interest in secure online support. Common themes for improvement included increased time for question and answer sessions and additional introductory genetics education. Responding LSPAN participants (n = 57 total survey responses in 11 meetings) found the meetings helpful (100 %), information clear (91 %), and presence of a genetic counselor useful (67 %). Desired discussion topics included coping with stress and anxiety, development of a support network, family communication about LS, genetic testing decisions, and bereavement. Following genetic counseling, a need exists for ongoing educational and emotional support in LS. Implementation of resources such as the LSEW and LSPAN is feasible and perceived as helpful by participants.

  10. Mechanical memory

    DOEpatents

    Gilkey, Jeffrey C.; Duesterhaus, Michelle A.; Peter, Frank J.; Renn, Rosemarie A.; Baker, Michael S.

    2006-08-15

    A first-in-first-out (FIFO) microelectromechanical memory apparatus (also termed a mechanical memory) is disclosed. The mechanical memory utilizes a plurality of memory cells, with each memory cell having a beam which can be bowed in either of two directions of curvature to indicate two different logic states for that memory cell. The memory cells can be arranged around a wheel which operates as a clocking actuator to serially shift data from one memory cell to the next. The mechanical memory can be formed using conventional surface micromachining, and can be formed as either a nonvolatile memory or as a volatile memory.

  11. Mechanical memory

    DOEpatents

    Gilkey, Jeffrey C.; Duesterhaus, Michelle A.; Peter, Frank J.; Renn, Rosemarie A.; Baker, Michael S.

    2006-05-16

    A first-in-first-out (FIFO) microelectromechanical memory apparatus (also termed a mechanical memory) is disclosed. The mechanical memory utilizes a plurality of memory cells, with each memory cell having a beam which can be bowed in either of two directions of curvature to indicate two different logic states for that memory cell. The memory cells can be arranged around a wheel which operates as a clocking actuator to serially shift data from one memory cell to the next. The mechanical memory can be formed using conventional surface micromachining, and can be formed as either a nonvolatile memory or as a volatile memory.

  12. Memorial symptom assessment scale.

    PubMed

    Chang, Victor T; Hwang, Shirley S; Thaler, Howard T; Kasimis, Basil S; Portenoy, Russell K

    2004-04-01

    Patients with advanced illnesses often have multiple symptoms. As interest in palliative care and interventions for symptom control increase, the ability to assess multiple symptoms has become more important. A number of instruments have been developed to meet this need in cancer patients. This article reviews the development and applications of a multidimensional instrument, the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale. The Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale has 32 symptoms and three dimensions of frequency, severity, and distress. Shorter versions - The Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale Short Form (32 symptoms with one dimension) and the Condensed Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale (14 symptoms with one dimension), and a version for children aged 7-12 years, have also been developed. A distinctive feature is the summary subscales for physical distress, psychological distress, and The Global Distress Index. The Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale has proven useful in description of symptom epidemiology, the role of symptoms in pain, fatigue, and spirituality; as a predictor of survival, and in proxy assessments of pain. The Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale has been used in studies of cancer and AIDS patients, and patients with advanced medical illnesses. Possible future roles of instruments such as the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale include use in clinical trials, for pharmacoeconomic analyses, definition of symptom clusters and symptom burden, the development of symptom outcome measures, symptom monitoring, and improving care for patients. Continued research is needed for the versions of the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale and other symptom instruments in different populations and applications.

  13. p40 (ΔNp63) is superior to p63 for the diagnosis of pulmonary squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Justin A; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Westra, William H; Pelosi, Giuseppe; Travis, William D; Rekhtman, Natasha

    2012-03-01

    Immunohistochemistry has recently emerged as a powerful ancillary tool for differentiating lung adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma-a distinction with important therapeutic implications. Although the most frequently recommended squamous marker p63 is extremely sensitive, it suffers from low specificity due to its reactivity in a substantial proportion of lung adenocarcinomas and other tumor types, particularly lymphomas. p40 is a relatively unknown antibody that recognizes ΔNp63-a p63 isoform suggested to be highly specific for squamous/basal cells. Here we compared the standard p63 antibody (4A4) and p40 in a series of 470 tumors from the archives of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and The Johns Hopkins Hospital, which included lung squamous cell carcinomas (n=81), adenocarcinomas (n=237), and large cell lymphomas (n=152). The p63 was positive in 100% of squamous cell carcinomas, 31% of adenocarcinomas, and 54% of large cell lymphomas (sensitivity 100%, specificity 60%). In contrast, although p40 was also positive in 100% of squamous cell carcinomas, only 3% of adenocarcinomas, and none of large cell lymphomas had p40 labeling (sensitivity 100%, specificity 98%). The mean percentage of p63 versus p40-immunoreactive cells in squamous cell carcinomas was equivalent (97 vs 96%, respectively, P=0.73). Rare adenocarcinomas with p40 labeling had reactivity in no more than 5% of tumor cells, whereas the mean (range) of p63-positive cells in adenocarcinomas and lymphomas was 26% (1-90%) and 48% (2-100%), respectively. In summary, p40 is equivalent to p63 in sensitivity for squamous cell carcinoma, but it is markedly superior to p63 in specificity, which eliminates a potential pitfall of misinterpreting a p63-positive adenocarcinoma or unsuspected lymphoma as squamous cell carcinoma. These findings strongly support the routine use of p40 in place of p63 for the diagnosis of pulmonary squamous cell carcinoma.

  14. Central nervous system involvement in T-cell lymphoma: A single center experience.

    PubMed

    Gurion, Ronit; Mehta, Neha; Migliacci, Jocelyn C; Zelenetz, Andrew; Moskowitz, Alison; Lunning, Matthew; Moskowitz, Craig; Hamlin, Paul; Horwitz, Steven

    2016-05-01

    Background We characterized the incidence of central nervous system (CNS) involvement, risk factors and outcome in a large single institution dataset of peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL). Methods Retrospective review of the PTCL database at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. We identified 231 patients with any subtype of PTCL between 1994-2011 with a minimum six months of follow-up or an event defined as relapse or death. Results Histologies included peripheral T-cell lymphoma-not otherwise specified (PTCL-NOS) (31.6%), angioimmunoblastic (16.9%), anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL), ALK- (12.1%), ALCL, ALK + (6.1%), extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma (7.4%), adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) (7.4%), and transformed mycosis fungoides (8.7%). Seventeen patients had CNS disease (7%). Fifteen had CNS involvement with PTCL and two had diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and glioblastoma. Median time to CNS involvement was 3.44 months (0.16-103.1). CNS prophylaxis was given to 24 patients (primarily intrathecal methotrexate). Rates of CNS involvement were not different in patients who received prophylaxis. Univariate analysis identified stage III-IV, bone marrow involvement, >1 extranodal site and ATLL as risk factors for CNS disease. On multivariate analysis, >1 extranodal site and international prognostic index (IPI) ≥ 3 were predictive for CNS involvement. The median survival of patients with CNS involvement was 2.63 months (0.10-75). Conclusions Despite high relapse rates, PTCL, except ATLL, carries a low risk of CNS involvement. Prognosis with CNS involvement is poor and risk factors include: >1 extra nodal site and IPI ≥3.

  15. Everolimus in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma previously treated with bevacizumab: a prospective multicenter study CRAD001LRU02T.

    PubMed

    Tsimafeyeu, Ilya; Snegovoy, Anton; Varlamov, Sergei; Safina, Sufia; Varlamov, Ilya; Gurina, Ludmila; Manzuk, Ludmila

    2015-09-01

    Everolimus is an orally administered inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) recommended for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) who progressed on previous vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy. Efficacy of everolimus in patients who progressed on anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody bevacizumab is unknown. We did a multicenter prospective trial of everolimus in patients with mRCC whose disease had progressed on bevacizumab ± interferon alpha (IFN). Patients with clear-cell mRCC which had progressed on bevacizumab ± IFN received everolimus 10 mg once daily. The primary end point was the proportion of patients remaining progression-free for 56 days, and a two-stage Simon design was used, with 80% power and an alpha risk of 5%. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02056587. From December 2011 to October 2013, a total of 37 patients (28 M, 9 F) were enrolled. Median age was 60.5 years (range 41-66), 1% had Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Performance Status (ECOG PS) >2, and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) favorable/intermediate risk was 38/62%. Five (14%) patients had a confirmed partial response and 26 (70%) patients had a stable disease. Median progression-free survival was 11.5 months (95% CI, 8.8-14.2). Median overall survival was not reached. No grade 3 or 4 treatment-related toxicities were observed. The most common grade 2 adverse events were fatigue (19%) and pneumonitis (8%). Everolimus demonstrated a favorable toxicity profile and promising anti-tumor activity as a second-line therapy in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients previously treated with bevacizumab ± IFN.

  16. Development of a Metabolomic Radiation Signature in Urine from Patients Undergoing Total Body Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Laiakis, Evagelia C.; Mak, Tytus D.; Anizan, Sebastien; Amundson, Sally A.; Barker, Christopher A.; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Brenner, David J.; Fornace, Albert J.

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of the threat of radiological terrorism and other radiological incidents has led to the need for development of fast, accurate and noninvasive methods for detection of radiation exposure. The purpose of this study was to extend radiation metabolomic biomarker discovery to humans, as previous studies have focused on mice. Urine was collected from patients undergoing total body irradiation at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center prior to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation at 4–6 h postirradiation (a single dose of 1.25 Gy) and 24 h (three fractions of 1.25 Gy each). Global metabolomic profiling was obtained through analysis with ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS). Prior to further analyses, each sample was normalized to its respective creatinine level. Statistical analysis was conducted by the nonparametric Kolmogorov-Smirnov test and the Fisher’s exact test and markers were validated against pure standards. Seven markers showed distinct differences between pre- and post-exposure samples. Of those, trimethyl-l-lysine and the carnitine conjugates acetylcarnitine, decanoylcarnitine and octanoylcarnitine play an important role in the transportation of fatty acids across mitochondria for subsequent fatty acid β-oxidation. The remaining metabolites, hypoxanthine, xanthine and uric acid are the final products of the purine catabolism pathway, and high levels of excretion have been associated with increased oxidative stress and radiation induced DNA damage. Further analysis revealed sex differences in the patterns of excretion of the markers, demonstrating that generation of a sex-specific metabolomic signature will be informative and can provide a quick and reliable assessment of individuals in a radiological scenario. This is the first radiation metabolomics study in human urine laying the foundation for the use of metabolomics in biodosimetry and providing confidence in biomarker

  17. SU-E-T-502: Initial Results of a Comparison of Treatment Plans Produced From Automated Prioritized Planning Method and a Commercial Treatment Planning System

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, P; Chen, Y; Hong, L; Apte, A; Yang, J; Mechalakos, J; Mageras, G; Hunt, M; Deasy, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose We developed an automated treatment planning system based on a hierarchical goal programming approach. To demonstrate the feasibility of our method, we report the comparison of prostate treatment plans produced from the automated treatment planning system with those produced by a commercial treatment planning system. Methods In our approach, we prioritized the goals of the optimization, and solved one goal at a time. The purpose of prioritization is to ensure that higher priority dose-volume planning goals are not sacrificed to improve lower priority goals. The algorithm has four steps. The first step optimizes dose to the target structures, while sparing key sensitive organs from radiation. In the second step, the algorithm finds the best beamlet weight to reduce toxicity risks to normal tissue while holding the objective function achieved in the first step as a constraint, with a small amount of allowed slip. Likewise, the third and fourth steps introduce lower priority normal tissue goals and beam smoothing. We compared with prostate treatment plans from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center developed using Eclipse, with a prescription dose of 72 Gy. A combination of liear, quadratic, and gEUD objective functions were used with a modified open source solver code (IPOPT). Results Initial plan results on 3 different cases show that the automated planning system is capable of competing or improving on expert-driven eclipse plans. Compared to the Eclipse planning system, the automated system produced up to 26% less mean dose to rectum and 24% less mean dose to bladder while having the same D95 (after matching) to the target. Conclusion We have demonstrated that Pareto optimal treatment plans can be generated automatically without a trial-and-error process. The solver finds an optimal plan for the given patient, as opposed to database-driven approaches that set parameters based on geometry and population modeling.

  18. Psychosocial and Sexual Well-Being Following Nipple-Sparing Mastectomy and Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Cindy H.; Scott, Amie M.; Price, Alison N.; Miller, H. Catherine; Klassen, Anne F.; Jhanwar, Sabrina M.; Mehrara, Babak J.; Disa, Joseph J.; McCarthy, Colleen; Matros, Evan; Cordeiro, Peter G.; Sacchini, Virgilio; Pusic, Andrea L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM) is considered an oncologically safe option for select patients. As many patients are candidates for nipple-sparing or skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM), reliable patient-reported outcome data are crucial for decision-making. The objective of this study was to determine whether patient satisfaction and/or health-related quality of life (HRQOL) were improved by preservation of the nipple with NSM compared to SSM and nipple reconstruction. Methods Subjects were identified from a prospectively maintained database of patients who completed the BREAST-Q following mastectomy and breast reconstruction between March and October 2011 at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. Fifty-two patients underwent NSM followed by immediate expander-implant reconstruction. A comparison group consisted of 202 patients who underwent SSM followed by immediate expander-implant reconstruction and later nipple reconstruction. HRQOL and satisfaction domains as measured by BREAST-Q scores were compared in multivariate linear regression analyses that controlled for potential confounding factors. Results NSM patients reported significantly higher scores in the psychosocial (p=0.01) and sexual well-being (p=0.02) domains compared to SSM patients. There was no significant difference in the BREAST-Q physical well-being, satisfaction with breast, or satisfaction with outcome domains between the NSM and SSM groups. Conclusions NSM is associated with higher psychosocial and sexual well-being compared to SSM and nipple reconstruction. Preoperative discussion of such HRQOL outcomes with patients may facilitate informed decision-making and realistic postoperative expectations. PMID:26782950

  19. Whole Neuraxis Irradiation to Address Central Nervous System Relapse in High-Risk Neuroblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Croog, Victoria J.; Kramer, Kim; Cheung, Nai-Kong V.; Kushner, Brian H.; Modak, Shakeel; Souweidane, Mark M.; Wolden, Suzanne L.

    2010-11-01

    Background: As systemic control of high-risk neuroblastoma (NB) has improved, relapse in the central nervous system (CNS) is an increasingly recognized entity that carries a grim prognosis. This study describes the use of craniospinal irradiation (CSI) for CNS relapse and compares outcomes to patients who received focal radiotherapy (RT). Methods: A retrospective query identified 29 children with NB treated at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center since 1987 who received RT for CNS relapse. At CNS relapse, 16 patients received CSI (median dose, 2160cGy), and 13 received focal RT. Of those who underwent CSI, 14 (88%) received intra-Ommaya (IO) radioimmunotherapy (RIT); one patient in the non-CSI cohort received IO-RIT. Results: Patient characteristics were similar between the groups. Time to CNS relapse was 20 and 17 months for the CSI and non-CSI cohorts, respectively. At a median follow-up of 28 months, 12 patients (75%) in the CSI group are alive without CNS disease, including two patients with isolated skeletal relapse. Another patient is alive without disease after a brain relapse was retreated with RT. Three patients died-one with no NB at autopsy, one of CNS disease, and one of systemic disease. The two patients who died of NB did not receive IO-RIT. All 13 patients in the non-CSI cohort died at a median of 8.8 months. Conclusions: Low-dose CSI together with IO-RIT provides durable CNS remissions and improved survival compared with focal RT and conventional therapies. Further evaluation of long-term NB survivors after CSI is warranted to determine the treatment consequences for this cohort.

  20. Predicting Outcome in Patients with Rhabdomyosarcoma: Role of [{sup 18}F]Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, Dana L.; Wexler, Leonard H.; Fox, Josef J.; Dharmarajan, Kavita V.; Schoder, Heiko; Price, Alison N.; Wolden, Suzanne L.

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) response of the primary tumor after induction chemotherapy predicts outcomes in rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS). Methods and Materials: After excluding those with initial tumor resection, 107 patients who underwent FDG-PET after induction chemotherapy at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center from 2002 to 2013 were reviewed. Local control (LC), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) were calculated according to FDG-PET response and maximum standardized uptake value (SUV) at baseline (PET1/SUV1), after induction chemotherapy (PET2/SUV2), and after local therapy (PET3/SUV3). Receiver operator characteristic curves were used to determine the optimal cutoff for dichotomization of SUV1 and SUV2 values. Results: The SUV1 (<9.5 vs ≥9.5) was predictive of PFS (P=.02) and OS (P=.02), but not LC. After 12 weeks (median) of induction chemotherapy, 45 patients had negative PET2 scans and 62 had positive scans: 3-year PFS was 72% versus 44%, respectively (P=.01). The SUV2 (<1.5 vs ≥1.5) was similarly predictive of PFS (P=.005) and was associated with LC (P=.02) and OS (P=.03). A positive PET3 scan was predictive of worse PFS (P=.0009), LC (P=.05), and OS (P=.03). Conclusions: [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography is an early indicator of outcomes in patients with RMS. Future prospective trials may incorporate FDG-PET response data for risk-adapted therapy and early assessment of new treatment regimens.

  1. Outcomes and Prognostic Variables in Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Head and Neck: A Recent Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, Daniel R. Hoppe, Bradford S.; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Zhung, Joanne E.; Patel, Snehal G.; Kraus, Dennis H.; Shah, Jatin P.; Ghossein, Ronald A.; Lee, Nancy Y.

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: To analyze the recent experience of patients with adenoid cystic carcinoma treated with radiation therapy at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Methods and Materials: From 1990 to 2004, a total of 59 patients with a diagnosis of primary adenoid cystic carcinoma of the head and neck received radiation therapy at our institution. The subsite distribution was oral cavity, 28% (n = 17); paranasal sinuses, 22% (n = 13); parotid, 14% (n = 8); submandibular, 14% (n = 8); oropharynx, 10% (n = 6); sublingual, 3% (n = 2); nasopharynx, 3% (n = 2); and other, 5% (n = 3). T Stage distribution was T1, 34% (n = 20); T2, 19% (n = 11); T3, 14% (n = 8); and T4, 34% (n = 20). Twenty-nine percent of patients (n = 17) were treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy; 25% (n =15), with three-dimensional conformal therapy, and the remainder, with conventional techniques. Ninety percent (n = 53) of patients received treatment including the base of skull. Results: Median follow-up for surviving patients was 5.9 years. Five-year and 10-year rates of local control and distant metastases-free survival were 91%/81% and 81%/49%, respectively. Five-year and 10-year rates of disease-free and overall survival were 76%/40% and 87%/65%, respectively. On univariate analysis, stage T4 (p = 0.004) and gross/clinical nerve involvement (p = 0.002) were associated with decreased progression free survival, whereas stage T4 and lymph node involvement were associated with decreased overall survival (p = 0.046 and p < 0.001, respectively). Conclusions: Radiation therapy in combination with surgery produces excellent rates of local control, although distant metastases account for a high proportion of failures. Routine treatment to the base of skull reduces the significance of histologic perineural invasion, but major nerve involvement remains an adverse prognostic factor.

  2. Treatment of primary unresectable carcinoma of the pancreas with I-125 implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Peretz, T.; Nori, D.; Hilaris, B.; Manolatos, S.; Linares, L.; Harrison, L.; Anderson, L.L.; Fuks, Z.; Brennan, M.F. )

    1989-11-01

    Between January 1 1974 and October 31 1987, 98 patients with biopsy proven unresectable adenocarcinoma of the pancreas were treated with I-125 implants during laparotomy. Presenting symptoms were pain, jaundice, and weight loss. All patients underwent laparotomy and surgical staging. Thirty patients had T1NoMo disease, 47 patients had T2-3NoMo disease, and 21 patients had significant regional lymph node involvement (T1-3N1Mo). The surgical procedure performed was biopsy only (16 patients), gastric bypass, biliary bypass, and partial or total pancreatectomy with incomplete resection. The total activity and the number of seeds used were determined from the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) nomogram. Stereoshift localization X ray films were taken 3-6 days after operation. The mean activity, minimal peripheral dose (MPD), and volume of the implants were 35 mCi, 13,660 cGy, and 53 cm3, respectively. In addition, 27 patients received postoperative external irradiation and 27 patients received chemotherapy. Postoperative complications were observed in 19 patients. These included post-operative death (1 patient), biliary fistula (4), intraabdominal abscess (4), GI bleeding (3), gastric or small bowel obstruction (6), sepsis (5), and deep vein thrombophlebitis (4). Pain relief was obtained in 37/57 patients (65%) presenting with pain. A multivariate analysis showed that four factors significantly affected survival: T stage, N stage, administration of chemotherapy, and more than 30% reduction in the size of the implant on follow-up films. The median survival for the entire group was 7 months. A subgroup of patients with T1No stage disease who received chemotherapy survived 18.5 months. The indications for I-125 seed implantation in unresectable carcinoma of the pancreas are discussed.

  3. Impact of baseline visceral fat accumulation on prognosis in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma treated with systemic therapy.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Ryuichi; Miyajima, Akira; Hibi, Taizo; Masuda, Aya; Shinojima, Toshiaki; Kikuchi, Eiji; Jinzaki, Masahiro; Oya, Mototsugu

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical significance of visceral fat accumulation as a prognostic factor in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) treated with systemic therapies. A total of 114 patients were retrospectively reviewed. All patients received systemic therapy for mRCC at Keio University hospital in Japan. The intra-abdominal visceral fat area was determined by computed tomography at the umbilical level. The visceral fat accumulation was defined as ≥100 cm(2). The mean visceral fat area was 107.4 ± 62.8 cm(2). In the whole cohort, the median follow-up was 29 months. According to the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) classification, 27.2% patients were favorable risk, 53.5% were intermediate risk, and 19.3% were poor risk. Visceral fat accumulation correlated with improved progression-free (P = 0.0070) and overall survival (P = 0.0001). On multivariate analysis, visceral fat accumulation (P = 0.0290) and MSKCC classification (P = 0.0085) were independent indices to predict progression-free survival in first-line treatment. In addition, visceral fat accumulation (P = 0.0007) and MSKCC classification (P = 0.0005) independently predicted overall survival. Prognostic grouping using visceral fat accumulation was identified as an independent prognostic marker in patients with mRCC. The addition of visceral fat accumulation improved the prognostic value of MSKCC classification alone in predicting overall survival in patients treated with systemic therapy for mRCC.

  4. Microbiota Disruption Induced by Early Use of Broad-Spectrum Antibiotics Is an Independent Risk Factor of Outcome after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Weber, Daniela; Jenq, Robert R; Peled, Jonathan U; Taur, Ying; Hiergeist, Andreas; Koestler, Josef; Dettmer, Katja; Weber, Markus; Wolff, Daniel; Hahn, Joachim; Pamer, Eric G; Herr, Wolfgang; Gessner, André; Oefner, Peter J; van den Brink, Marcel R M; Holler, Ernst

    2017-02-14

    In allogeneic stem cell transplantation (ASCT), systemic broad-spectrum antibiotics are frequently used for treatment of infectious complications, but their effect on microbiota composition is still poorly understood. This retrospective analysis of 621 patients who underwent ASCT at the University Medical Center of Regensburg and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York assessed the impact of timing of peritransplant antibiotic treatment on intestinal microbiota composition as well as transplant-related mortality (TRM) and overall survival. Early exposure to antibiotics was associated with lower urinary 3-indoxyl sulfate levels (P < .001) and a decrease in fecal abundance of commensal Clostridiales (P = .03) compared with late antibiotic treatment, which was particularly significant (P = .005) for Clostridium cluster XIVa in the Regensburg group. Earlier antibiotic treatment before ASCT was further associated with a higher TRM (34%, 79/236) compared with post-ASCT (21%, 62/297, P = .001) or no antibiotics (7%, 6/88, P < .001). Timing of antibiotic treatment was the dominant independent risk factor for TRM (HR, 2.0; P ≤ .001) in multivariate analysis besides increase age (HR, 2.15; P = .004), reduced Karnofsky performance status (HR, 1.47; P = .03), and female donor-male recipient sex combination (HR, 1.56; P = .02) A competing risk analysis revealed the independent effect of early initiation of antibiotics on graft-versus-host disease-related TRM (P = .004) in contrast to infection-related TRM and relapse (not significant). The poor outcome associated with early administration of antibiotic therapy that is active against commensal organisms, and specifically the possibly protective Clostridiales, calls for the use of Clostridiales-sparing antibiotics and rapid restoration of microbiota diversity after cessation of antibiotic treatment.

  5. CD20+ T cells have a predominantly Tc1 effector memory phenotype and are expanded in the ascites of patients with ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    de Bruyn, Marco; Wiersma, Valerie R; Wouters, Maartje C A; Samplonius, Douwe F; Klip, Harry G; Helfrich, Wijnand; Nijman, Hans W; Eggleton, Paul; Bremer, Edwin

    2015-01-01

    Recently, a small subset of T cells that expresses the B cell marker CD20 has been identified in healthy volunteers and in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. The origin of these CD20-positive T cells as well as their relevance in human disease remains unclear. Here, we identified that after functional B cell/T cell interaction CD20 molecules are transferred to the cell surface of T cells by trogocytosis together with the established trogocytosis marker HLA-DR. Further, the presence of CD20 on isolated CD20+ T cells remained stable for up to 48h of ex vivo culture. These CD20+ T cells almost exclusively produced IFNγ (∼70% vs. ∼20% in the CD20− T cell population) and were predominantly (CD8+) effector memory T cells (∼60–70%). This IFNγ producing and effector memory phenotype was also determined for CD20+ T cells as detected in the peripheral blood and ascitic fluids of ovarian cancer (OC) patients. In the latter, the percentage of CD20+ T cells was further strongly increased (from ∼6% in peripheral blood to 23% in ascitic fluid). Taken together, the data presented here indicate that CD20 is transferred to T cells upon intimate T cell/B cell interaction. Further, CD20+ T cells are of memory and IFNγ producing phenotype and are present in increased amounts in ascitic fluid of OC patients. PMID:26137418

  6. Moderate Physical Activity Mediates the Association between White Matter Lesion Volume and Memory Recall in Breast Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, Gillian E.; Wetter, Nathan C.; Banducci, Sarah E.; Mackenzie, Michael J.; Zuniga, Krystle E.; Awick, Elizabeth A.; Roberts, Sarah A.; Sutton, Brad P.; McAuley, Edward; Kramer, Arthur F.

    2016-01-01

    Increased survival rates among breast cancer patients have drawn significant attention to consequences of both the presence of cancer, and the subsequent treatment-related impact on the brain. The incidence of breast cancer and the effects of treatment often result in alterations in the microstructure of white matter and impaired cognitive functioning. However, physical activity is proving to be a successful modifiable lifestyle factor in many studies that could prove beneficial to breast cancer survivors. This study investigates the link between white matter lesion volume, moderate physical activity, and cognition in breast cancer survivors following treatment compared to non-cancer age-matched controls. Results revealed that brain structure significantly predicted cognitive function via mediation of physical activity in breast cancer survivors. Overall, the study provided preliminary evidence suggesting moderate physical activity may help reduce the treatment related risks associated with breast cancer, including changes to WM integrity and cognitive impairment. PMID:26915025

  7. Moderate Physical Activity Mediates the Association between White Matter Lesion Volume and Memory Recall in Breast Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Gillian E; Wetter, Nathan C; Banducci, Sarah E; Mackenzie, Michael J; Zuniga, Krystle E; Awick, Elizabeth A; Roberts, Sarah A; Sutton, Brad P; McAuley, Edward; Kramer, Arthur F

    2016-01-01

    Increased survival rates among breast cancer patients have drawn significant attention to consequences of both the presence of cancer, and the subsequent treatment-related impact on the brain. The incidence of breast cancer and the effects of treatment often result in alterations in the microstructure of white matter and impaired cognitive functioning. However, physical activity is proving to be a successful modifiable lifestyle factor in many studies that could prove beneficial to breast cancer survivors. This study investigates the link between white matter lesion volume, moderate physical activity, and cognition in breast cancer survivors following treatment compared to non-cancer age-matched controls. Results revealed that brain structure significantly predicted cognitive function via mediation of physical activity in breast cancer survivors. Overall, the study provided preliminary evidence suggesting moderate physical activity may help reduce the treatment related risks associated with breast cancer, including changes to WM integrity and cognitive impairment.

  8. Memory Matters

    MedlinePlus

    ... different parts. Some of them are important for memory. The hippocampus (say: hih-puh-KAM-pus) is one of the more important parts of the brain that processes memories. Old information and new information, or memories, are ...

  9. Memory Matters

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood vessel (which carries the blood) bursts. continue Brain Injuries Affect Memory At any age, an injury to ... with somebody's memory. Some people who recover from brain injuries need to learn old things all over again, ...

  10. Gregorius Agricola memorial lecture: Lung cancer-A work-related disease for 500 years, as predicted by Agricola.

    PubMed

    Langård, Sverre

    2015-01-01

    In the early 16th century Gregorius Agricola reported on Bergsucht (miner's consumption) in mine workers in the Erzgebirge. About 350 years later, Härting and Hesse reported on large numbers of lung cancers among the mine-workers in the same mine district, thus confirming that Bergsucht primarily was lung cancer, but could also have been pnumoconiosis or tuberculosis or a combination of both. Mining for bismuth continued another 75 years--through World War II. Bismuth mining was replaced by large scale uranium mining from the late 1940 through 1989, employing some 400-450,000 workers, resulting in the major local epidemic of work-related cancer larger than anywhere in the world, so far amounting to ± 14-15,000 cases. Had the mine developers listened to the warnings by Agricola and Härting and Hesse, the epidemic could have been prevented.

  11. Memory Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Brandy R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review: This article highlights the dissociable human memory systems of episodic, semantic, and procedural memory in the context of neurologic illnesses known to adversely affect specific neuroanatomic structures relevant to each memory system. Recent Findings: Advances in functional neuroimaging and refinement of neuropsychological and bedside assessment tools continue to support a model of multiple memory systems that are distinct yet complementary and to support the potential for one system to be engaged as a compensatory strategy when a counterpart system fails. Summary: Episodic memory, the ability to recall personal episodes, is the subtype of memory most often perceived as dysfunctional by patients and informants. Medial temporal lobe structures, especially the hippocampal formation and associated cortical and subcortical structures, are most often associated with episodic memory loss. Episodic memory dysfunction may present acutely, as in concussion; transiently, as in transient global amnesia (TGA); subacutely, as in thiamine deficiency; or chronically, as in Alzheimer disease. Semantic memory refers to acquired knowledge about the world. Anterior and inferior temporal lobe structures are most often associated with semantic memory loss. The semantic variant of primary progressive aphasia (svPPA) is the paradigmatic disorder resulting in predominant semantic memory dysfunction. Working memory, associated with frontal lobe function, is the active maintenance of information in the mind that can be potentially manipulated to complete goal-directed tasks. Procedural memory, the ability to learn skills that become automatic, involves the basal ganglia, cerebellum, and supplementary motor cortex. Parkinson disease and related disorders result in procedural memory deficits. Most memory concerns warrant bedside cognitive or neuropsychological evaluation and neuroimaging to assess for specific neuropathologies and guide treatment. PMID:26039844

  12. Memory protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denning, Peter J.

    1988-01-01

    Accidental overwriting of files or of memory regions belonging to other programs, browsing of personal files by superusers, Trojan horses, and viruses are examples of breakdowns in workstations and personal computers that would be significantly reduced by memory protection. Memory protection is the capability of an operating system and supporting hardware to delimit segments of memory, to control whether segments can be read from or written into, and to confine accesses of a program to its segments alone. The absence of memory protection in many operating systems today is the result of a bias toward a narrow definition of performance as maximum instruction-execution rate. A broader definition, including the time to get the job done, makes clear that cost of recovery from memory interference errors reduces expected performance. The mechanisms of memory protection are well understood, powerful, efficient, and elegant. They add to performance in the broad sense without reducing instruction execution rate.

  13. Molecular cytogenetics: Rosetta Stone for understanding cancer - Twenty-ninth G. H. A. Clowes Memorial Award lecture

    SciTech Connect

    Rowley, J.D. )

    1990-07-01

    This article reviews the progress in the genetic changes that occur within the cancer that are critically involved in the transformation of a normal to a malignant cell. Clearly, to concentrate on genes to the exclusion of cell biology would be too narrow and short-sighted an approach. Nonetheless, the author is convinced that until the genes have isolated that are centrally involved in at least some of the malignant processes in different cell types, one will be unable to answer the fundamental questions about malignant transformation. More importantly, one will be unable to answer the questions with precision. The author limits consideration to those changes that have been detected by analyzing the karyotypic pattern of human cancer cells using chromosome banding, and in particular to those found in leukemia.

  14. CD45RO+ Memory T Lymphocytes — a Candidate Marker for TNM-Immunoscore in Squamous Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer1

    PubMed Central

    Paulsen, Erna-Elise; Kilvaer, Thomas; Khanehkenari, Mehrdad Rakaee; Maurseth, Ramona Johansen; Al-Saad, Samer; Hald, Sigurd M.; Al-Shibli, Khalid; Andersen, Sigve; Richardsen, Elin; Busund, Lill-Tove; Bremnes, Roy; Donnem, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) are vital in limiting cancer progression and may supplement the TNM classification. CD45RO+ memory TILs show major prognostic impact in various malignancies but have not been extensively explored in non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In this study, we aimed to evaluate their potential in a NSCLC TNM-Immunoscore. Tissue microarrays were constructed from tumor tissue samples from two cohorts including in total 536 patients (University Hospital of North Norway, n = 285; Nordland Hospital, n = 251) with primary resected stage I to IIIA NSCLC. The density of CD45RO+ and CD8+ TILs in tumor epithelial and stromal compartments of the tumors was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. In univariate analyses, intraepithelial CD45RO+ TIL density (T-CD45RO) was a significant prognostic factor for disease-specific survival (P = .007), limited to the squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) histology subgroup (P < .001), where it was significant in both cohorts (University Hospital of North Norway, P = .003; Nordland Hospital, P = .022). Combining T-CD45RO and stromal CD8+ TIL density (S-CD8) increased the prognostic impact in SCC (P < .001) and showed a significant impact within all pathological stages (I, P = .025; II, P < .001; III, P = .001). In the multivariate analysis, T-CD45RO was an independent positive prognostic factor for SCC (hazard ratio 2.65, 95% confidence interval 1.64-4.28, P < .001), and in combination with S-CD8, the prognostic impact increased vastly (high + high versus low + low: hazard ratio 6.50, 95% confidence interval 3.54-11.91, P < .001). In conclusion, T-CD45RO was an independent prognostic factor for SCC NSCLC. When combined with S-CD8, the prognostic impact increased and was significant within each pathological stage. We propose CD45RO as a candidate marker for TNM-Immunoscore in SCC NSCLC. PMID:26678911

  15. Flashbulb Memories

    PubMed Central

    Hirst, William; Phelps, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    We review and analyze the key theories, debates, findings, and omissions of the existing literature on flashbulb memories (FBMs), including what factors affect their formation, retention, and degree of confidence. We argue that FBMs do not require special memory mechanisms and are best characterized as involving both forgetting and mnemonic distortions, despite a high level of confidence. Factual memories for FBM-inducing events generally follow a similar pattern. Although no necessary and sufficient factors straightforwardly account for FBM retention, media attention particularly shapes memory for the events themselves. FBMs are best characterized in term of repetitions, even of mnemonic distortions, whereas event memories evidence corrections. The bearing of this literature on social identity and traumatic memories is also discussed. PMID:26997762

  16. Micro-Mini & Nano-Dosimetry & Innovative Technologies in Radiation Therapy (MMND&ITRO2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2017-01-01

    The biennial MMND (formerly MMD) - IPCT workshops, founded in collaboration with Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) in 2001, has become an important international multidisciplinary forum for the discussion of advanced dosimetric technology for radiation therapy quality assurance (QA) and space science, as well as advanced technologies for prostate cancer treatment. In more recent years, the interests of participants and the scope of the workshops have extended far beyond prostate cancer treatment alone to include all aspects of radiation therapy, radiation science and technology. We therefore decided to change the name in 2016 to Innovative Technologies in Radiation Oncology (ITRO). MMND ITRO 2016 was held on 26-31 January, 2016 at the beautiful Wrest Point Hotel in Hobart, Tasmania and attracted an outstanding international faculty and nearly 200 delegates from 18 countries (http://mmnditro2016.com/) The MMND 2016 program continued to cover advanced medical physics aspects of IMRT, IGRT, VMAT, SBRT, MRI LINAC, innovative brachytherapy, and synchrotron MRT. The demand for sophisticated real time and high temporal and spatial resolution (down to the submillimetre scale) dosimetry methods and instrumentation for end–to-end QA for these radiotherapy technologies is increasing. Special attention was paid to the contribution of advanced imaging and the application of nanoscience to the recent improvements in imaging and radiotherapy. The last decade has seen great progress in charged particle therapy technology which has spread throughout the world and attracted strong current interest in Australia. This demands a better understanding of the fundamental aspects of ion interactions with biological tissue and the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of protons and heavy ions. The further development of computational and experimental micro-and nano-dosimetry for ions has important application in radiobiology based treatment planning and space radiation

  17. The significance of nipple discharge of the male breast.

    PubMed

    Morrogh, Mary; King, Tari A

    2009-01-01

    Although male breast cancer typically presents as a palpable mass, failure to recognize the significance of other symptoms may lead to a delay in diagnosis. Here we present our experience with male patients presenting with a chief complaint of nipple discharge (ND). Using the ICD-9 code for "breast symptoms," we identified 2,319 patients without a current cancer diagnosis who presented to Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center for evaluation; 24 (1%) patients were male (1995-2005). Data were collected by retrospective review. Among 24 male patients presenting for evaluation, 14 (58%) presented with a chief complaint of ND, while the remaining 10 (42%) presented for evaluation of a palpable mass in the absence of ND. Among 14 patients presenting with ND, subsequent clinical breast examination identified a breast mass +/- nipple changes in 7 of 14 patients. In total, 8 of 14 (57%) patients had an underlying malignancy; two of seven patients with ND alone had DCIS (median interval from onset of ND to presentation 3 weeks, range 2-4 weeks), and six of seven patients with ND and a palpable mass had invasive disease (median interval between onset of ND and presentation 16 weeks, range 2-52). The remaining 10/24 patients presented with a painless palpable mass of whom 8 (80%) were found to have underlying invasive disease (median interval between onset of mass, and presentation was 4 weeks, range 2-20 weeks). All patients with invasive disease were node-positive. At 23.7 months median follow-up (range, 7.7-88.3 months), 14 of 16 cancer patients remain free of disease and two have died as a direct result of metastatic disease. The incidence of cancer among males presenting with ND was 57%. In the absence of additional clinical findings, ND may be a herald for early, non-invasive disease. Increased awareness of subtle features of malignancy may represent a window of opportunity for early diagnosis and improved outcomes for male breast cancer patients.

  18. Virtual memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denning, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    Virtual memory was conceived as a way to automate overlaying of program segments. Modern computers have very large main memories, but need automatic solutions to the relocation and protection problems. Virtual memory serves this need as well and is thus useful in computers of all sizes. The history of the idea is traced, showing how it has become a widespread, little noticed feature of computers today.

  19. Skilled Memory.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-06

    Morse code (Bryan & Harter , 1899). In every case, memory performance of the expert seems to violate the established limits of short- term memory. How is...of immediate memory. Quarterly Journal of Experimental psychology, 1958, 10, 12-21. Bryan, W. L., & Harter N. psychological Review, 1899, 6, 345-375...16, 1980 Page 5 Civil Govt Non Govt Dr. Susan Chipman 1 Dr. John R. Anderson Learning and Development Department of Psychology National Institute of

  20. Protocol for a cluster randomised trial of a communication skills intervention for physicians to facilitate survivorship transition in patients with lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Patricia A; Banerjee, Smita C; Matasar, Matthew J; Bylund, Carma L; Franco, Kara; Li, Yuelin; Levin, Tomer T; Jacobsen, Paul B; Astrow, Alan B; Leventhal, Howard; Horwitz, Steven; Kissane, David W

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Survivors of cancer often describe a sense of abandonment post-treatment, with heightened worry, uncertainty, fear of recurrence and limited understanding of what lies ahead. This study examines the efficacy of a communication skills training (CST) intervention to help physicians address survivorship issues and introduce a new consultation focused on the use of a survivorship care plan for patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Methods and analysis Specifically, this randomised, 4-site trial will test the efficacy of a survivorship planning consultation (physicians receive CST and apply these skills in a new survivorship-focused office visit using a survivorship plan) with patients who have achieved complete remission after completion of first-line therapy versus a control arm in which physicians are trained to subsequently provide a time-controlled, manualised wellness rehabilitation consultation focused only on discussion of healthy nutrition and exercise as rehabilitation postchemotherapy. The primary outcome for physicians will be uptake and usage of communication skills and maintenance of these skills over time. The primary outcome for patients is changes in knowledge about lymphoma and adherence to physicians’ recommendations (eg, pneumococcus and influenza vaccinations); secondary outcomes will include perceptions of the doctor–patient relationship, decreased levels of cancer worry and depression, quality of life changes, satisfaction with care and usage of healthcare. This study will also examine the moderators and mediators of change within our theoretical model derived from Leventhal's Common-Sense Model of health beliefs. Ethics and dissemination This study was approved by the Institutional Review Boards at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Centers and all other participating sites. This work is funded by the National Cancer Institute (R01 CA 151899 awarded to DWK and SH as coprincipal investigators). The

  1. Episodic Memories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conway, Martin A.

    2009-01-01

    An account of episodic memories is developed that focuses on the types of knowledge they represent, their properties, and the functions they might serve. It is proposed that episodic memories consist of "episodic elements," summary records of experience often in the form of visual images, associated to a "conceptual frame" that provides a…

  2. Collaging Memories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallach, Michele

    2011-01-01

    Even middle school students can have memories of their childhoods, of an earlier time. The art of Romare Bearden and the writings of Paul Auster can be used to introduce ideas about time and memory to students and inspire works of their own. Bearden is an exceptional role model for young artists, not only because of his astounding art, but also…

  3. Memory conformity affects inaccurate memories more than accurate memories.

    PubMed

    Wright, Daniel B; Villalba, Daniella K

    2012-01-01

    After controlling for initial confidence, inaccurate memories were shown to be more easily distorted than accurate memories. In two experiments groups of participants viewed 50 stimuli and were then presented with these stimuli plus 50 fillers. During this test phase participants reported their confidence that each stimulus was originally shown. This was followed by computer-generated responses from a bogus participant. After being exposed to this response participants again rated the confidence of their memory. The computer-generated responses systematically distorted participants' responses. Memory distortion depended on initial memory confidence, with uncertain memories being more malleable than confident memories. This effect was moderated by whether the participant's memory was initially accurate or inaccurate. Inaccurate memories were more malleable than accurate memories. The data were consistent with a model describing two types of memory (i.e., recollective and non-recollective memories), which differ in how susceptible these memories are to memory distortion.

  4. Memory loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003257.htm Memory loss To use the sharing features on this ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated: ...

  5. Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms ... be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors ...

  6. Activation-induced cell death of memory CD8+ T cells from pleural effusion of lung cancer patients is mediated by the type II Fas-induced apoptotic pathway.

    PubMed

    Prado-Garcia, Heriberto; Romero-Garcia, Susana; Morales-Fuentes, Jorge; Aguilar-Cazares, Dolores; Lopez-Gonzalez, Jose Sullivan

    2012-07-01

    Lung cancer is the second most common form of cancer and the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Pleural effusions, containing high numbers of mononuclear and tumor cells, are frequent in patients with advanced stages of lung cancer. We reported that in pleural effusions from primary lung cancer, the CD8+ T cell subpopulation, and particularly the terminally differentiated subset, is reduced compared to that of non-malignant effusions. We analyzed the participation of activation-induced cell death (AICD) and extrinsic pathways (type I or II) as mechanisms for the decrease in pleural effusion CD8+ T cell subpopulation. Pleural effusion or peripheral blood CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, from lung cancer patients, were stimulated with anti-CD3 antibody and analyzed for (a) apoptosis by annexin-V-binding and TUNEL assay, (b) transcript levels of Fas ligand (FasL) and TRAIL by real-time RT-PCR, (c) expression of FasL and TRAIL, measured as integrated mean fluorescence intensities (iMFI) by flow cytometry, (d) expression of Bcl-2 and BIM molecules, measured as MFI, and (e) apoptosis inhibition using caspase-8 and -9 inhibitors. Pleural effusion CD8+ T cells, but not CD4+ T cells, from cancer patients underwent AICD. Blocking FasL/Fas pathway protected from AICD. Upregulation of FasL and TRAIL expressions was found in pleural effusion CD8+ T cells, which also showed a subset of Bcl-2 low cells. In memory CD8+ T cells, AICD depended on both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways. Hence, in the pleural space of lung cancer patients, AICD might compromise the antitumor function of CD8+ T cells.

  7. GMK (Progenics Pharmaceuticals).

    PubMed

    Knutson, Keith L

    2002-01-01

    Progenics Pharmaceuticals is developing GMK vaccine (a ganglioside conjugate vaccine coupled to keyhole limpet hemocyanin and formulated with the adjuvant QS-21), licensed from the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, for the potential treatment of melanoma and other cancers [194258], [325284]. It was previously under co-development with Bristol-Myers Squibb, but in May 2001, all rights to the GMK vaccine were returned to Progenics [409168]. It was the first of a new class of ganglioside conjugate vaccine evaluated by Progenics [194258]. GMK vaccination induces antibodies against GM2 ganglioside capable of specifically killing melanoma cells. Melanoma patients with antibodies against GM2 ganglioside have significantly improved disease-free and overall survival compared to antibody-negative subjects. The vaccine is undergoing two phase III trials, the first comparing GMK to high-dose IFNalpha in melanoma patients with more serious disease and at a high risk of relapse, and the second, in collaboration with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, comparing GMK (14 doses of GMK over three years) to no treatment other than close monitoring of malignant melanoma patients at immediate risk of relapse [409168]. In February 1999, Lehman Brothers predicted that the vaccine had a 50% probability of reaching market, with an estimated first launch date in 2002. The analysts predicted potential peak sales in 2008 of $150 million in the US and $100 million in the rest of the world at that time [319225]. In January 2000, Lehman Brothers expected that an NDA filing would take place in 2002, with possible launch of the vaccine in 2003. In addition, Lehman Brothers estimated potential peak sales at $500 million [357788]. In August 2000, Punk, Ziegel & Company predicted that Progenics Pharmaceuticals will become sustainably profitable in 2003 following the launch of GMK and PRO-542 in 2002 [390063]. In July 2001, Ladenburg Thalmann predicted a $257 million

  8. Fear Memory.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, Ivan; Furini, Cristiane R G; Myskiw, Jociane C

    2016-04-01

    Fear memory is the best-studied form of memory. It was thoroughly investigated in the past 60 years mostly using two classical conditioning procedures (contextual fear conditioning and fear conditioning to a tone) and one instrumental procedure (one-trial inhibitory avoidance). Fear memory is formed in the hippocampus (contextual conditioning and inhibitory avoidance), in the basolateral amygdala (inhibitory avoidance), and in the lateral amygdala (conditioning to a tone). The circuitry involves, in addition, the pre- and infralimbic ventromedial prefrontal cortex, the central amygdala subnuclei, and the dentate gyrus. Fear learning models, notably inhibitory avoidance, have also been very useful for the analysis of the biochemical mechanisms of memory consolidation as a whole. These studies have capitalized on in vitro observations on long-term potentiation and other kinds of plasticity. The effect of a very large number of drugs on fear learning has been intensively studied, often as a prelude to the investigation of effects on anxiety. The extinction of fear learning involves to an extent a reversal of the flow of information in the mentioned structures and is used in the therapy of posttraumatic stress disorder and fear memories in general.

  9. Pancreas Adenocarcinoma: Ascites, Clinical Manifestations, and Management Implications

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Angel Mier; Chou, Joanne; Capanu, Marinela; Lowery, Maeve A.; Yu, Kenneth H.; O’Reilly, Eileen M.

    2016-01-01

    This was a cohort analysis evaluating patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma who presented with or developed ascites. Among the 180 patients analyzed, the use of serial paracenteses and indwelling catheters is a common practice to effect symptom palliation. The complication rate was higher in patients with indwelling catheters. Analyzing ascitic fluid and calculating the serum ascites albumin gradient can help attribute the etiology of the ascites and potentially identify which patients may benefit from diuretics or other intervention. Background Ascites develops in a subset of patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PAC) at presentation or as the disease advances. Limited data exist on the prognostic importance of malignant ascites in PAC. Our hypothesis is that this information will provide an understanding of the natural history and facilitate management decisions. Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of 180 patients treated at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center diagnosed between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2014, with PAC and with ascites either at presentation or that developed during the disease course. Results For the 180 patients, the overall survival was 15 months. The time from diagnosis to ascites presentation was 11 months, and the survival time after ascites development was 1.8 months (range, 1.6–2.3 months; 95% confidence interval). Of 62 patients (34%) who had ascitic fluid analyzed, 36 (58%) had positive cytology. Fifty-one (82%) patients had a serum ascites albumin gradient ≥ 1, and 11 (18%) had serum ascites albumin gradient < 1. Sixty-four (36%) patients had their ascites managed solely by serial paracenteses. A total of 116 patients required a catheter; of these, 108 (93%) had a Tenckhoff catheter, 4 (3%) a Pleurx catheter, 4 (3%) a pigtail catheter, and 1 (1%) a Denver catheter. Eight (7%) patients required 2 catheters to be placed, and in 6 (5%), Tenckhoff catheters had to be removed. The main observed complications were

  10. Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Two kinds of lymphocytes can attack and kill cancer cells: T-cells and B-cells. Immunotherapy aims to boost the ability of the T-cell and B-cell lymphocytes to kill cancer. This kind of therapy can also be used ...

  11. Fueling Memories

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Jonathan D.; Pollizzi, Kristen

    2012-01-01

    A hallmark of the adaptive immune response is rapid and robust activation upon rechallenge. In the current issue of Immunity van der Windt et al. (2012) provide an important link between mitochondrial respiratory capacity and the development of CD8+ T cell memory. PMID:22284413

  12. Childhood Memories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soto, Lourdes Diaz

    2001-01-01

    Describes how artwork can be a valuable catalyst for discussions in preservice education classes, allowing students to explore how their work as educators relates to their childhood memories and can be shaped by childhood experiences. Examines an art exhibition in which diverse artists depicted autobiographical text in their paintings. Discusses…

  13. Retracing Memories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, David L.

    2005-01-01

    There are plenty of paths to poetry but few are as accessible as retracing ones own memories. When students are asked to write about something they remember, they are given them the gift of choosing from events that are important enough to recall. They remember because what happened was funny or scary or embarrassing or heartbreaking or silly.…

  14. Hollow memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-04-01

    A hollow-core optical fibre filled with warm caesium atoms can temporarily store the properties of photons. Michael Sprague from the University of Oxford, UK, explains to Nature Photonics how this optical memory could be a useful building block for fibre-based quantum optics.

  15. Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation is Underutilized in Older Patients with Myelodysplastic Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Getta, Bartlomiej M; Kishtagari, Ashwin; Hilden, Patrick; Tallman, Martin S; Maloy, Molly; Gonzales, Patrick; Castro-Malaspina, Hugo; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Giralt, Sergio; Tamari, Roni; Klimek, Virginia

    2017-03-20

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT) is the only curative treatment for myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). The proportion of MDS patients referred for transplant evaluation, those undergoing transplantation and the reasons for not undergoing transplant are unknown. In this retrospective analysis, pre-defined HCT eligibility and indications criteria were applied to 362 unselected patients with newly diagnosed MDS seen by Leukemia faculty between 2008 and 2015 at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. Two hundred ninety four patients (81%) were deemed eligible for transplant and among these, transplant was considered indicated in 244 (83%). Of these, 158/244 (65%) were referred for transplant evaluation at a median of 3.9 months from diagnosis. Overall 120/362 (33%) underwent transplant at a median of 7.7 months from diagnosis. Metastatic solid organ malignancy was the major reason for transplant ineligibility (54%), and death due to MDS, which occurred in 41% of candidates who were not transplanted, was the major reason for not undergoing transplant. Factors associated with a lower likelihood of referral for transplant evaluation included age ≥65 (p<0.001), ≥2 co-morbidities (p=0.008), intermediate-1/low risk MDS (p<0.001), <5% blasts at diagnosis (overall p<0.001), having medicare/medicaid health insurance (p<0.001), not being married (p=0.017) and diagnosis between 2008-2011 (p=0.035). On multivariate analysis adjusting for all of the previous, diagnosis between 2008-2011 (p<0.001), age ≥65 (p=0.001) and <5% blasts at diagnosis (overall p=0.031) were associated with a lower likelihood of referral for transplant evaluation. Factors associated with a lower likelihood of undergoing transplant included age ≥65 (p<0.001), ≥2 co-morbidities (p=0.003), intermediate-1/low risk MDS (p<0.001), <5% blasts (overall p<0.001), very low/low/intermediate risk IPSS-R karyotype (p=0.018) and having medicare/medicaid health insurance (p<0.001). In

  16. Patterns of Failure for Rhabdomyosarcoma of the Perineal and Perianal Region

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, Dana L.; Wexler, Leonard H.; LaQuaglia, Michael P.; Meyers, Paul A.; Wolden, Suzanne L.

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: To analyze prognostic factors and patterns of failure for rhabdomyosarcoma of the perineal and perianal region (PRMS), with an emphasis on radiation therapy for locoregional control. Methods and Materials: Detailed records of all 14 patients treated for PRMS at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center between 1998 and 2012 were reviewed. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to assess the event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS), and a competing-risks analysis was used to assess the cumulative incidence of local, regional, and distant failures. Results: Median age was 15.8 years (range, 1.1-31.9 years). High-risk features were identified: 9 of 14 patients (64%) had group 3 disease and 3 of 14 (21%) had group 4; 11 of 14 tumors (78%) were alveolar; 12 of 14 tumors (86%) were ≥5 cm; and 9 of 14 patients (64%) had involved lymph nodes (N1). Of those aged ≥10 years at diagnosis, 9 of 10 (90%) had alveolar histology, all had tumors ≥5 cm, and 8 of 10 (80%) presented with N1 disease. The rates of local, regional, and distant failure at 5 years were 17%, 31%, and 52%, respectively. Although 3 of the 4 patients with regional failure received nodal irradiation, only one of the nodal failures occurred in the radiation therapy field. The 5-year EFS was 33%, and OS was 39%. Age ≥10 years was associated with poor outcomes: EFS was 13% in patients aged ≥10 years, compared with 75% in those aged <10 years (P=.04); the OS was 13% in patients aged ≥10 years, compared with 100% in those aged <10 years (P=.04). Conclusions: Patients with PRMS, especially those aged ≥10 years, present with poor prognostic features and continue to have poor outcomes. Given the high incidence of regional node recurrence, we recommend prophylactic ilioinguinal lymph node irradiation for all patients aged ≥10 years. For children aged <10 years, nodal evaluation is essential to determine the role for lymph node irradiation.

  17. Intraductal tubular neoplasms of the bile ducts.

    PubMed

    Katabi, Nora; Torres, Javiera; Klimstra, David S

    2012-11-01

    Although most tumors of the bile ducts are predominantly invasive, some have an exophytic pattern within the bile ducts; these intraductal papillary neoplasms usually have well-formed papillae at the microscopic level. In this study, however, we describe a novel type of intraductal neoplasm of the bile ducts with a predominantly tubular growth pattern and other distinctive features. Ten cases of biliary intraductal neoplasms with a predominantly tubular architecture were identified in the files of the Pathology Department at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center from 1983 to 2006. For each of these cases we studied the clinical presentation, histologic and immunohistochemical features (9 cases only), and the clinical follow-up of the patients. Three male and 7 female patients (38 to 78 y) presented with obstructive jaundice or abdominal pain. Eight of the patients underwent a partial hepatectomy; 2 underwent a laparoscopic bile duct excision, followed by a pancreatoduodenectomy in one of them. The tumors range in size from 0.6 to 8.0 cm. The intraductal portions of the tumors (8 intrahepatic, 1 extrahepatic hilar, 1 common bile duct) were densely cellular and composed of back-to-back tubular glands and solid sheets with minimal papillary architecture. The cells were cuboidal to columnar with mild to moderate cytologic atypia. Foci of necrosis were present in the intraductal component in 6 cases. An extraductal invasive carcinoma component was present in 7 cases, composing <25% of the tumor in 4 cases, and >75% in 1 case. It was observed by immunohistochemical analysis that the tumor cells expressed CK19, CA19-9, MUC1, and MUC6 in most cases and that SMAD4 expression was retained. MUC2, MUC5AC, HepPar1, synaptophysin, chromogranin, p53, and CA125 were negative in all cases and most were negative for CEA-M and B72.3. Four patients were free of tumor recurrence after 7 to 85 months (average, 27 mo). Four patients with an invasive carcinoma component suffered

  18. Invasion patterns in stage I endometrioid and mucinous ovarian carcinomas: a clinicopathologic analysis emphasizing favorable outcomes in carcinomas without destructive stromal invasion and the occasional malignant course of carcinomas with limited destructive stromal invasion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shirley; Leitao, Mario M; Tornos, Carmen; Soslow, Robert A

    2005-07-01

    Stage I, low-grade endometrioid and mucinous ovarian carcinomas have an excellent prognosis. Published data have suggested that destructive stromal invasion, a relatively uncommon finding in these tumors, is a poor prognostic factor. We investigated this by studying all FIGO stage I, grades 1 and 2 (of 3) endometrioid and mucinous ovarian carcinomas that were surgically staged at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center from 1980 to 2000. We undertook a careful review of all available slides using current diagnostic criteria and correlated histopathologic indices with clinical outcome data. Cases studied included 13 endometrioid ovarian carcinomas (stage IA, eight; stage IC, five) and six intestinal mucinous ovarian carcinomas (stage IA, three; stage IC, three). All of the tumors contained areas of expansile invasion, greater than that acceptable for microinvasion, and were thus diagnosed as carcinomas instead of borderline tumors. Nevertheless, nearly all demonstrated borderline tumor (noninvasive) components. Six tumors contained at least one focus of destructive stromal invasion (two endometrioid and four mucinous ovarian carcinomas). Four additional cases showed a focus suspicious for but not diagnostic of destructive invasion ('indeterminate for destructive invasion') (two endometrioid and two mucinous ovarian carcinomas). Follow-up data were available for 17 patients. The median follow-up was 81 months (range, 9-161 months). In all, 14 patients were alive with no evidence of disease (expansile invasion alone, eight; destructive stromal invasion, four; and indeterminate for destructive invasion, two). Three patients died of their disease (destructive stromal invasion, two; and indeterminate for destructive invasion, one). The size, number, and nuclear grade of destructive stromal invasion foci did not appear to have an impact on survival in this relatively limited number of patients. Outcome data in patients with stage I, low-grade endometrioid and mucinous

  19. Wnt signaling inhibits CTL memory programming.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhengguo; Sun, Zhifeng; Smyth, Kendra; Li, Lei

    2013-12-01

    Induction of functional CTLs is one of the major goals for vaccine development and cancer therapy. Inflammatory cytokines are critical for memory CTL generation. Wnt signaling is important for CTL priming and memory formation, but its role in cytokine-driven memory CTL programming is unclear. We found that wnt signaling inhibited IL-12-driven CTL activation and memory programming. This impaired memory CTL programming was attributed to up-regulation of eomes and down-regulation of T-bet. Wnt signaling suppressed the mTOR pathway during CTL activation, which was different to its effects on other cell types. Interestingly, the impaired memory CTL programming by wnt was partially rescued by mTOR inhibitor rapamycin. In conclusion, we found that crosstalk between wnt and the IL-12 signaling inhibits T-bet and mTOR pathways and impairs memory programming which can be recovered in part by rapamycin. In addition, direct inhibition of wnt signaling during CTL activation does not affect CTL memory programming. Therefore, wnt signaling may serve as a new tool for CTL manipulation in autoimmune diseases and immune therapy for certain cancers.

  20. The chemotherapeutic agent paclitaxel selectively impairs learning while sparing source memory and spatial memory.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alexandra E; Slivicki, Richard A; Hohmann, Andrea G; Crystal, Jonathon D

    2017-03-01

    Chemotherapeutic agents are widely used to treat patients with systemic cancer. The efficacy of these therapies is undermined by their adverse side-effect profiles such as cognitive deficits that have a negative impact on the quality of life of cancer survivors. Cognitive side effects occur across a variety of domains, including memory, executive function, and processing speed. Such impairments are exacerbated under cognitive challenges and a subgroup of patients experience long-term impairments. Episodic memory in rats can be examined using a source memory task. In the current study, rats received paclitaxel, a taxane-derived chemotherapeutic agent, and learning and memory functioning was examined using the source memory task. Treatment with paclitaxel did not impair spatial and episodic memory, and paclitaxel treated rats were not more susceptible to cognitive challenges. Under conditions in which memory was not impaired, paclitaxel treatment impaired learning of new rules, documenting a decreased sensitivity to changes in experimental contingencies. These findings provide new information on the nature of cancer chemotherapy-induced cognitive impairments, particularly regarding the incongruent vulnerability of episodic memory and new learning following treatment with paclitaxel.

  1. Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... weaken. Talk with family, friends, or a support group about your feelings. Work with your health care providers throughout your treatment. Helping yourself can make you feel more in control. Support Groups The diagnosis and treatment of cancer often causes ...

  2. Modification of Antigen Impacts on Memory Quality after Adenovirus Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Colston, Julia M; Bolinger, Beatrice; Cottingham, Matthew G; Gilbert, Sarah; Klenerman, Paul

    2016-04-15

    The establishment of robust T cell memory is critical for the development of novel vaccines for infections and cancers. Classical memory generated by CD8(+)T cells is characterized by contracted populations homing to lymphoid organs. T cell memory inflation, as seen for example after CMV infection, is the maintenance of expanded, functional, tissue-associated effector memory cell pools. Such memory pools may also be induced after adenovirus vaccination, and we recently defined common transcriptional and phenotypic features of these populations in mice and humans. However, the rules that govern which epitopes drive memory inflation compared with classical memory are not fully defined, and thus it is not currently possible to direct this process. We used our adenoviral model of memory inflation to first investigate the role of the promoter and then the role of the epitope context in determining memory formation. Specifically, we tested the hypothesis that conventional memory could be converted to inflationary memory by simple presentation of the Ag in the form of minigene vectors. When epitopes from LacZ and murine CMV that normally induce classical memory responses were presented as minigenes, they induced clear memory inflation. These data demonstrate that, regardless of the transgene promoter, the polypeptide context of a CD8(+)T cell epitope may determine whether classical or inflating memory responses are induced. The ability to direct this process by the use of minigenes is relevant to the design of vaccines and understanding of immune responses to pathogens.

  3. [Neural correlates of memory].

    PubMed

    Fujii, Toshikatsu

    2013-01-01

    Memory can be divided into several types, although all of them involve three successive processes: encoding, storage, and retrieval. In terms of the duration of retention, neurologists classify memory into immediate, recent, and remote memories, whereas psychologists classify memory into short-term and long-term memories. In terms of the content, episodic, semantic, and procedural memories are considered to be different types of memory. Furthermore, researchers on memory have proposed relatively new concepts of memory, i.e., working memory and prospective memory. This article first provides explanations for these several types of memory. Next, neuropsychological characteristics of amnesic syndrome are briefly outlined. Finally, how several different types of memory are affected (or preserved) in patients with amnesic syndrome is described.

  4. From Memories to Diaries: A Portrait of Hope Captured from the Lens of a Nurse Educator as a Breast Cancer Patient

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Guzman, Allan B.; dela Rosa, Praxedes SM; Catambay, Dexter Jayrald S.; Centeno, Angelica M.; Cheng, Lorenze Anthony A.; Castro, Jonathan Agustin R.

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy affecting women worldwide. While it is true that hope influences how these victims view and live their lives, little is known as to how hope is lived and experienced by a breast cancer patient whose professional background and practice is nursing. This narrative-interpretive study purports to create a…

  5. [Surgical treatment of cancer at the beginning of the third millenium--based on the 2004 Krompecher Memorial Lecture of the Society of Hungarian Oncologists].

    PubMed

    Balogh, Adám

    2010-06-01

    The author presents a historical overview of cancer surgery of the last century. At the last quarter of the century the main characteristic of this process has been the significant extension of surgical radicality. Three new surgical methods appeared and have been routinely used at the Surgical Clinic of the Szeged University School, to increase surgical radicality, to improve survival rate without impairing the postoperative quality of life. 1.) Subtotal colectomy (STC) involves an extended resection of the colon over the splenic flexure. In a period of 8 years a total of 72 STCs were performed for the treatment of large bowel obstructions or symptomatic stenosis caused by cancer of the left colon. STC offers: a) one stage treatment for colonic obstruction in emergency surgery, b.) removal of the tumor with sufficient oncological radicality, c.) primary reconstruction of the digestive tract, with a safe ileocolic anastomosis even in emergency cases. Based on a study about postoperative quality of life of STC operated patients, it proved to be normal. 2.) The author reports a total of 108 middle and low third rectal cancer cases operated on by total mesorectal excision (TME) by the method of Heald. The oncological basis of this procedure is the horizontal regional metastatization of rectal cancer. The author succeeded in 60% of cases to perform an anterior resection with preservation of the anal sphincter, and to decrease the early (within two years after surgery) local recurrence rate from 14.5% to 6.4%, compared to the group of patients operated on by traditional technic. 3.) A total of 154 patients with locally advanced - stage IV - colorectal cancer underwent extended surgery of multivisceral resections as a treatment of cancer process involving adjacent abdominal organs. Surgery was performed to treat advanced cancer of the colon in 112 cases and the one of the rectum in 42 cases. The mortality rate was 7% in the colon cancer group, and 12% in the group of

  6. A Beginner's Guide to Memory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Elizabeth M.

    1981-01-01

    This article is designed to equip the reader with the information needed to deal with questions of computer memory. Discussed are core memory; semiconductor memory; size of memory; expanding memory; charge-coupled device memories; magnetic bubble memory; and read-only and read-mostly memories. (KC)

  7. Memory Retrieval and Interference: Working Memory Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radvansky, Gabriel A.; Copeland, David E.

    2006-01-01

    Working memory capacity has been suggested as a factor that is involved in long-term memory retrieval, particularly when that retrieval involves a need to overcome some sort of interference (Bunting, Conway, & Heitz, 2004; Cantor & Engle, 1993). Previous work has suggested that working memory is related to the acquisition of information during…

  8. Optical memory

    DOEpatents

    Mao, Samuel S; Zhang, Yanfeng

    2013-07-02

    Optical memory comprising: a semiconductor wire, a first electrode, a second electrode, a light source, a means for producing a first voltage at the first electrode, a means for producing a second voltage at the second electrode, and a means for determining the presence of an electrical voltage across the first electrode and the second electrode exceeding a predefined voltage. The first voltage, preferably less than 0 volts, different from said second voltage. The semiconductor wire is optically transparent and has a bandgap less than the energy produced by the light source. The light source is optically connected to the semiconductor wire. The first electrode and the second electrode are electrically insulated from each other and said semiconductor wire.

  9. Order-memory and association-memory.

    PubMed

    Caplan, Jeremy B

    2015-09-01

    Two highly studied memory functions are memory for associations (items presented in pairs, such as SALT-PEPPER) and memory for order (a list of items whose order matters, such as a telephone number). Order- and association-memory are at the root of many forms of behaviour, from wayfinding, to language, to remembering people's names. Most researchers have investigated memory for order separately from memory for associations. Exceptions to this, associative-chaining models build an ordered list from associations between pairs of items, quite literally understanding association- and order-memory together. Alternatively, positional-coding models have been used to explain order-memory as a completely distinct function from association-memory. Both classes of model have found empirical support and both have faced serious challenges. I argue that models that combine both associative chaining and positional coding are needed. One such hybrid model, which relies on brain-activity rhythms, is promising, but remains to be tested rigourously. I consider two relatively understudied memory behaviours that demand a combination of order- and association-information: memory for the order of items within associations (is it William James or James William?) and judgments of relative order (who left the party earlier, Hermann or William?). Findings from these underexplored procedures are already difficult to reconcile with existing association-memory and order-memory models. Further work with such intermediate experimental paradigms has the potential to provide powerful findings to constrain and guide models into the future, with the aim of explaining a large range of memory functions, encompassing both association- and order-memory.

  10. Emotional memory persists longer than event memory.

    PubMed

    Kuriyama, Kenichi; Soshi, Takahiro; Fujii, Takeshi; Kim, Yoshiharu

    2010-03-01

    The interaction between amygdala-driven and hippocampus-driven activities is expected to explain why emotion enhances episodic memory recognition. However, overwhelming behavioral evidence regarding the emotion-induced enhancement of immediate and delayed episodic memory recognition has not been obtained in humans. We found that the recognition performance for event memory differs from that for emotional memory. Although event recognition deteriorated equally for episodes that were or were not emotionally salient, emotional recognition remained high for only stimuli related to emotional episodes. Recognition performance pertaining to delayed emotional memory is an accurate predictor of the context of past episodes.

  11. Memory Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Under contract to NASA during preparations for the space station, Memry Technologies Inc. investigated shape memory effect (SME). SME is a characteristic of certain metal alloys that can change shape in response to temperature variations. In the late 1980s and early 1990s, Memry used its NASA-acquired expertise to produce a line of home and industrial safety products, and refined the technology in the mid-1990s. Among the new products they developed are three MemrySafe units which prevent scalding from faucets. Each system contains a small valve that reacts to temperature, not pressure. When the water reaches dangerous temperatures, the unit reduces the flow to a trickle; when the scalding temperature subsides, the unit restores normal flow. Other products are the FIRECHEK 2 and 4, heat-activated shutoff valves for industrial process lines, which sense excessive heat and cut off pneumatic pressure. The newest of these products is Memry's Demand Management Water Heater which shifts the electricity requirement from peak to off-peak demands, conserving energy and money.

  12. Memory beyond expression.

    PubMed

    Delorenzi, A; Maza, F J; Suárez, L D; Barreiro, K; Molina, V A; Stehberg, J

    2014-01-01

    The idea that memories are not invariable after the consolidation process has led to new perspectives about several mnemonic processes. In this framework, we review our studies on the modulation of memory expression during reconsolidation. We propose that during both memory consolidation and reconsolidation, neuromodulators can determine the probability of the memory trace to guide behavior, i.e. they can either increase or decrease its behavioral expressibility without affecting the potential of persistent memories to be activated and become labile. Our hypothesis is based on the findings that positive modulation of memory expression during reconsolidation occurs even if memories are behaviorally unexpressed. This review discusses the original approach taken in the studies of the crab Neohelice (Chasmagnathus) granulata, which was then successfully applied to test the hypothesis in rodent fear memory. Data presented offers a new way of thinking about both weak trainings and experimental amnesia: memory retrieval can be dissociated from memory expression. Furthermore, the strategy presented here allowed us to show in human declarative memory that the periods in which long-term memory can be activated and become labile during reconsolidation exceeds the periods in which that memory is expressed, providing direct evidence that conscious access to memory is not needed for reconsolidation. Specific controls based on the constraints of reminders to trigger reconsolidation allow us to distinguish between obliterated and unexpressed but activated long-term memories after amnesic treatments, weak trainings and forgetting. In the hypothesis discussed, memory expressibility--the outcome of experience-dependent changes in the potential to behave--is considered as a flexible and modulable attribute of long-term memories. Expression seems to be just one of the possible fates of re-activated memories.

  13. Benzodiazepines and memory

    PubMed Central

    Roth, T.; Roehrs, T.; Wittig, R.; Zorick, F.

    1984-01-01

    1 Benzodiazepines possess anterograde amnesic properties, disrupting both short-term and long-term memory function. 2 The amount of amnesia is systematically related to dose effects and half-life differences among the benzodiazepines. 3 Memory deficits are found for episodic, semantic, and iconic memory function. 4 The deficits in long-term memory are probably the result of a disruption of consolidation of information in memory and not retrieval from memory. The disruption is produced by rapid sleep onset. 5 Thus the long-term amnesia is really a retrograde effect of sleep and not the anterograde effect of the drug. PMID:6151849

  14. Problems of neural memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikaelian, Andrei L.

    2005-01-01

    The paper considers the neural memory of the human brain from the viewpoint of visual information processing. A model that explains the principle of data recording and storing, memory relaxation, associative remembering and other memory functions is offered. The model of associative memory is based on the methods of holography, "wave biochemistry" and autowaves. Brief consideration is given to the associative properties of holographic neural structures and the memory architecture using running chemical reactions. The paper also outlines the problem of developing artificial memory elements for restoring the brain functions and possible interface devices for coupling neurons to electronic systems.

  15. Siblings of Childhood Cancer Survivors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gogan, Janis L.

    This paper reports on a long term follow up study of siblings of childhood cancer survivors. Seventy siblings of childhood cancer survivors in 37 families were interviewed using a semi-structured format which included both forced choice and open ended questions. The children discussed their memories of the sibling's cancer diagnosis and treatment…

  16. Searching for repressed memory.

    PubMed

    McNally, Richard J

    2012-01-01

    This chapter summarizes the work of my research group on adults who report either repressed, recovered, or continuous memories of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) or who report no history of CSA. Adapting paradigms from cognitive psychology, we tested hypotheses inspired by both the "repressed memory" and "false memory" perspectives on recovered memories of CSA. We found some evidence for the false memory perspective, but no evidence for the repressed memory perspective. However, our work also suggests a third perspective on recovered memories that does not require the concept of repression. Some children do not understand their CSA when it occurs, and do not experience terror. Years later, they recall the experience, and understanding it as abuse, suffer intense distress. The memory failed to come to mind for years, partly because the child did not encode it as terrifying (i.e., traumatic), not because the person was unable to recall it.

  17. Emotional Memory Persists Longer than Event Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuriyama, Kenichi; Soshi, Takahiro; Fujii, Takeshi; Kim, Yoshiharu

    2010-01-01

    The interaction between amygdala-driven and hippocampus-driven activities is expected to explain why emotion enhances episodic memory recognition. However, overwhelming behavioral evidence regarding the emotion-induced enhancement of immediate and delayed episodic memory recognition has not been obtained in humans. We found that the recognition…

  18. Memory and the Self

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conway, Martin A.

    2005-01-01

    The Self-Memory System (SMS) is a conceptual framework that emphasizes the interconnectedness of self and memory. Within this framework memory is viewed as the data base of the self. The self is conceived as a complex set of active goals and associated self-images, collectively referred to as the "working self." The relationship between the…

  19. Music, memory and emotion.

    PubMed

    Jäncke, Lutz

    2008-08-08

    Because emotions enhance memory processes and music evokes strong emotions, music could be involved in forming memories, either about pieces of music or about episodes and information associated with particular music. A recent study in BMC Neuroscience has given new insights into the role of emotion in musical memory.

  20. Immunological memory is associative

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.J.; Forrest, S.; Perelson, A.S.

    1996-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to show that immunological memory is an associative and robust memory that belongs to the class of sparse distributed memories. This class of memories derives its associative and robust nature by sparsely sampling the input space and distributing the data among many independent agents. Other members of this class include a model of the cerebellar cortex and Sparse Distributed Memory (SDM). First we present a simplified account of the immune response and immunological memory. Next we present SDM, and then we show the correlations between immunological memory and SDM. Finally, we show how associative recall in the immune response can be both beneficial and detrimental to the fitness of an individual.

  1. Flexible Kernel Memory

    PubMed Central

    Nowicki, Dimitri; Siegelmann, Hava

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces a new model of associative memory, capable of both binary and continuous-valued inputs. Based on kernel theory, the memory model is on one hand a generalization of Radial Basis Function networks and, on the other, is in feature space, analogous to a Hopfield network. Attractors can be added, deleted, and updated on-line simply, without harming existing memories, and the number of attractors is independent of input dimension. Input vectors do not have to adhere to a fixed or bounded dimensionality; they can increase and decrease it without relearning previous memories. A memory consolidation process enables the network to generalize concepts and form clusters of input data, which outperforms many unsupervised clustering techniques; this process is demonstrated on handwritten digits from MNIST. Another process, reminiscent of memory reconsolidation is introduced, in which existing memories are refreshed and tuned with new inputs; this process is demonstrated on series of morphed faces. PMID:20552013

  2. Memory access in shared virtual memory

    SciTech Connect

    Berrendorf, R. )

    1992-01-01

    Shared virtual memory (SVM) is a virtual memory layer with a single address space on top of a distributed real memory on parallel computers. We examine the behavior and performance of SVM running a parallel program with medium-grained, loop-level parallelism on top of it. A simulator for the underlying parallel architecture can be used to examine the behavior of SVM more deeply. The influence of several parameters, such as the number of processors, page size, cold or warm start, and restricted page replication, is studied.

  3. Memory access in shared virtual memory

    SciTech Connect

    Berrendorf, R.

    1992-09-01

    Shared virtual memory (SVM) is a virtual memory layer with a single address space on top of a distributed real memory on parallel computers. We examine the behavior and performance of SVM running a parallel program with medium-grained, loop-level parallelism on top of it. A simulator for the underlying parallel architecture can be used to examine the behavior of SVM more deeply. The influence of several parameters, such as the number of processors, page size, cold or warm start, and restricted page replication, is studied.

  4. Stochastic memory: memory enhancement due to noise.

    PubMed

    Stotland, Alexander; Di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2012-01-01

    There are certain classes of resistors, capacitors, and inductors that, when subject to a periodic input of appropriate frequency, develop hysteresis loops in their characteristic response. Here we show that the hysteresis of such memory elements can also be induced by white noise of appropriate intensity even at very low frequencies of the external driving field. We illustrate this phenomenon using a physical model of memory resistor realized by TiO(2) thin films sandwiched between metallic electrodes and discuss under which conditions this effect can be observed experimentally. We also discuss its implications on existing memory systems described in the literature and the role of colored noise.

  5. Stochastic memory: Memory enhancement due to noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stotland, Alexander; di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2012-01-01

    There are certain classes of resistors, capacitors, and inductors that, when subject to a periodic input of appropriate frequency, develop hysteresis loops in their characteristic response. Here we show that the hysteresis of such memory elements can also be induced by white noise of appropriate intensity even at very low frequencies of the external driving field. We illustrate this phenomenon using a physical model of memory resistor realized by TiO2 thin films sandwiched between metallic electrodes and discuss under which conditions this effect can be observed experimentally. We also discuss its implications on existing memory systems described in the literature and the role of colored noise.

  6. Memory bistable mechanisms of organic memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ching-Ting; Yu, Li-Zhen; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2010-07-01

    To investigate the memory bistable mechanisms of organic memory devices, the structure of [top Au anode/9,10-di(2-naphthyl)anthracene (ADN) active layer/bottom Au cathode] was deposited using a thermal deposition system. The Au atoms migrated into the ADN active layer was observed from the secondary ion mass spectrometry. The density of 9.6×1016 cm-3 and energy level of 0.553 eV of the induced trapping centers caused by the migrated Au atoms in the ADN active layer were calculated. The induced trapping centers did not influence the carrier injection barrier height between Au and ADN active layer. Therefore, the memory bistable behaviors of the organic memory devices were attributed to the induced trapping centers. The energy diagram was established to verify the mechanisms.

  7. Psychophysiology of prospective memory.

    PubMed

    Rothen, Nicolas; Meier, Beat

    2014-01-01

    Prospective memory involves the self-initiated retrieval of an intention upon an appropriate retrieval cue. Cue identification can be considered as an orienting reaction and may thus trigger a psychophysiological response. Here we present two experiments in which skin conductance responses (SCRs) elicited by prospective memory cues were compared to SCRs elicited by aversive stimuli to test whether a single prospective memory cue triggers a similar SCR as an aversive stimulus. In Experiment 2 we also assessed whether cue specificity had a differential influence on prospective memory performance and on SCRs. We found that detecting a single prospective memory cue is as likely to elicit a SCR as an aversive stimulus. Missed prospective memory cues also elicited SCRs. On a behavioural level, specific intentions led to better prospective memory performance. However, on a psychophysiological level specificity had no influence. More generally, the results indicate reliable SCRs for prospective memory cues and point to psychophysiological measures as valuable approach, which offers a new way to study one-off prospective memory tasks. Moreover, the findings are consistent with a theory that posits multiple prospective memory retrieval stages.

  8. Human learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Johnson, M K; Hasher, L

    1987-01-01

    There have been several notable recent trends in the area of learning and memory. Problems with the episodic/semantic distinction have become more apparent, and new efforts have been made (exemplar models, distributed-memory models) to represent general knowledge without assuming a separate semantic system. Less emphasis is being placed on stable, prestored prototypes and more emphasis on a flexible memory system that provides the basis for a multitude of categories or frames of reference, derived on the spot as tasks demand. There is increasing acceptance of the idea that mental models are constructed and stored in memory in addition to, rather than instead of, memorial representations that are more closely tied to perceptions. This gives rise to questions concerning the conditions that permit inferences to be drawn and mental models to be constructed, and to questions concerning the similarities and differences in the nature of the representations in memory of perceived and generated information and in their functions. There has also been a swing from interest in deliberate strategies to interest in automatic, unconscious (even mechanistic!) processes, reflecting an appreciation that certain situations (e.g. recognition, frequency judgements, savings in indirect tasks, aspects of skill acquisition, etc) seem not to depend much on the products of strategic, effortful or reflective processes. There is a lively interest in relations among memory measures and attempts to characterize memory representations and/or processes that could give rise to dissociations among measures. Whether the pattern of results reflects the operation of functional subsystems of memory and, if so, what the "modules" are is far from clear. This issue has been fueled by work with amnesics and has contributed to a revival of interaction between researchers studying learning and memory in humans and those studying learning and memory in animals. Thus, neuroscience rivals computer science as a

  9. Conscious and Unconscious Memory Systems

    PubMed Central

    Squire, Larry R.; Dede, Adam J.O.

    2015-01-01

    The idea that memory is not a single mental faculty has a long and interesting history but became a topic of experimental and biologic inquiry only in the mid-20th century. It is now clear that there are different kinds of memory, which are supported by different brain systems. One major distinction can be drawn between working memory and long-term memory. Long-term memory can be separated into declarative (explicit) memory and a collection of nondeclarative (implicit) forms of memory that include habits, skills, priming, and simple forms of conditioning. These memory systems depend variously on the hippocampus and related structures in the parahippocampal gyrus, as well as on the amygdala, the striatum, cerebellum, and the neocortex. This work recounts the discovery of declarative and nondeclarative memory and then describes the nature of declarative memory, working memory, nondeclarative memory, and the relationship between memory systems. PMID:25731765

  10. A generalized memory test algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milner, E. J.

    1982-01-01

    A general algorithm for testing digital computer memory is presented. The test checks that (1) every bit can be cleared and set in each memory work, and (2) bits are not erroneously cleared and/or set elsewhere in memory at the same time. The algorithm can be applied to any size memory block and any size memory word. It is concise and efficient, requiring the very few cycles through memory. For example, a test of 16-bit-word-size memory requries only 384 cycles through memory. Approximately 15 seconds were required to test a 32K block of such memory, using a microcomputer having a cycle time of 133 nanoseconds.

  11. Regulatory T cell memory

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblum, Michael D.; Way, Sing Sing; Abbas, Abul K.

    2016-01-01

    Memory for antigen is a defining feature of adaptive immunity. Antigen-specific lymphocyte populations show an increase in number and function after antigen encounter and more rapidly re-expand upon subsequent antigen exposure. Studies of immune memory have primarily focused on effector B cells and T cells with microbial specificity, using prime challenge models of infection. However, recent work has also identified persistently expanded populations of antigen-specific regulatory T cells that protect against aberrant immune responses. In this Review, we consider the parallels between memory effector T cells and memory regulatory T cells, along with the functional implications of regulatory memory in autoimmunity, antimicrobial host defence and maternal fetal tolerance. In addition, we discuss emerging evidence for regulatory T cell memory in humans and key unanswered questions in this rapidly evolving field. PMID:26688349

  12. Shape memory polymers

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Thomas S.; Bearinger, Jane P.

    2015-06-09

    New shape memory polymer compositions, methods for synthesizing new shape memory polymers, and apparatus comprising an actuator and a shape memory polymer wherein the shape memory polymer comprises at least a portion of the actuator. A shape memory polymer comprising a polymer composition which physically forms a network structure wherein the polymer composition has shape-memory behavior and can be formed into a permanent primary shape, re-formed into a stable secondary shape, and controllably actuated to recover the permanent primary shape. Polymers have optimal aliphatic network structures due to minimization of dangling chains by using monomers that are symmetrical and that have matching amine and hydroxyl groups providing polymers and polymer foams with clarity, tight (narrow temperature range) single transitions, and high shape recovery and recovery force that are especially useful for implanting in the human body.

  13. Content Addressable Memory Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-01

    The Content Addressable M1-emory Project consists of the development of several experimental software systems on an AMT Distributed Array Processor...searching (database) compiler algorithms memory management other systems software) Linear C is an unlovely hybrid language which imports the CAM...memory from AMT’s operating system for the DAP; how- ever, other than this limitation, the memory management routines work exactly as their C counterparts

  14. Sparse distributed memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanerva, Pentti

    1988-01-01

    Theoretical models of the human brain and proposed neural-network computers are developed analytically. Chapters are devoted to the mathematical foundations, background material from computer science, the theory of idealized neurons, neurons as address decoders, and the search of memory for the best match. Consideration is given to sparse memory, distributed storage, the storage and retrieval of sequences, the construction of distributed memory, and the organization of an autonomous learning system.

  15. Memory Load and Dump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welty, Alan

    2009-07-01

    This proposal is a test and verification of the STIS dump of memory capability.Areas of Control Section {CS} to dump include: EDAC RAM, EEPROM, and CS PROM {with the CS in Operate}. Areas of MIE memory to dump include: MIE RAM and MIE PROM {with the MIE in Operate}. Note that the MIE memory must first be copied to CS buffer RAM as images, which are then dumped.Supports Activity STIS-02

  16. Myrmics Memory Allocator

    SciTech Connect

    Lymperis, S.

    2011-09-23

    MMA is a stand-alone memory management system for MPI clusters. It implements a shared Partitioned Global Address Space, where multiple MPI processes request objects from the allocator and the latter provides them with system-wide unique memory addresses for each object. It provides applications with an intuitive way of managing the memory system in a unified way, thus enabling easier writing of irregular application code.

  17. Memory Golf Clubs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Memory Corporation's investigation of shape memory effect, stemming from Marshall Space Flight Center contracts to study materials for the space station, has aided in the development of Zeemet, a proprietary, high-damping shape memory alloy for the golf industry. The Nicklaus Golf Company has created a new line of golf clubs using Zeemet inserts. Its superelastic and high damping attributes translate into more spin on the ball, greater control, and a solid feel.

  18. Networks of Memories

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    2000). The construction of  autobiographical   memories in the self­memory system. Psychological Review, 107(2), 261­288. Dennis, S., & Chapman, A. (2010...AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2013-0131 Networks of Memories Simon Dennis, Mikhail Belkin Ohio State University March 2013 Final...Back (Rev. 8/98) 1 Networks of  Memories FA9550­09­1­0614 Professor Jay Myung PI: Simon Dennis Ohio State University February 15, 2013 2 Introduction

  19. Hypnosis, memory and amnesia.

    PubMed Central

    Kihlstrom, J F

    1997-01-01

    Hypnotized subjects respond to suggestions from the hypnotist for imaginative experiences involving alterations in perception and memory. Individual differences in hypnotizability are only weakly related to other forms of suggestibility. Neuropsychological speculations about hypnosis focus on the right hemisphere and/or the frontal lobes. Posthypnotic amnesia refers to subjects' difficulty in remembering, after hypnosis, the events and experiences that transpired while they were hypnotized. Posthypnotic amnesia is not an instance of state-dependent memory, but it does seem to involve a disruption of retrieval processes similar to the functional amnesias observed in clinical dissociative disorders. Implicit memory, however, is largely spared, and may underlie subjects' ability to recognize events that they cannot recall. Hypnotic hypermnesia refers to improved memory for past events. However, such improvements are illusory: hypermnesia suggestions increase false recollection, as well as subjects' confidence in both true and false memories. Hypnotic age regression can be subjectively compelling, but does not involve the ablation of adult memory, or the reinstatement of childlike modes of mental functioning, or the revivification of memory. The clinical and forensic use of hypermnesia and age regression to enhance memory in patients, victims and witnesses (e.g. recovered memory therapy for child sexual abuse) should be discouraged. PMID:9415925

  20. New gravitational memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasterski, Sabrina; Strominger, Andrew; Zhiboedov, Alexander

    2016-12-01

    The conventional gravitational memory effect is a relative displacement in the position of two detectors induced by radiative energy flux. We find a new type of gravitational `spin memory' in which beams on clockwise and counterclockwise orbits acquire a relative delay induced by radiative angular momentum flux. It has recently been shown that the displacement memory formula is a Fourier transform in time of Weinberg's soft graviton theorem. Here we see that the spin memory formula is a Fourier transform in time of the recently-discovered subleading soft graviton theorem.

  1. Sparse distributed memory overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raugh, Mike

    1990-01-01

    The Sparse Distributed Memory (SDM) project is investigating the theory and applications of massively parallel computing architecture, called sparse distributed memory, that will support the storage and retrieval of sensory and motor patterns characteristic of autonomous systems. The immediate objectives of the project are centered in studies of the memory itself and in the use of the memory to solve problems in speech, vision, and robotics. Investigation of methods for encoding sensory data is an important part of the research. Examples of NASA missions that may benefit from this work are Space Station, planetary rovers, and solar exploration. Sparse distributed memory offers promising technology for systems that must learn through experience and be capable of adapting to new circumstances, and for operating any large complex system requiring automatic monitoring and control. Sparse distributed memory is a massively parallel architecture motivated by efforts to understand how the human brain works. Sparse distributed memory is an associative memory, able to retrieve information from cues that only partially match patterns stored in the memory. It is able to store long temporal sequences derived from the behavior of a complex system, such as progressive records of the system's sensory data and correlated records of the system's motor controls.

  2. The future of memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinella, M.

    In the not too distant future, the traditional memory and storage hierarchy of may be replaced by a single Storage Class Memory (SCM) device integrated on or near the logic processor. Traditional magnetic hard drives, NAND flash, DRAM, and higher level caches (L2 and up) will be replaced with a single high performance memory device. The Storage Class Memory paradigm will require high speed (< 100 ns read/write), excellent endurance (> 1012), nonvolatility (retention > 10 years), and low switching energies (< 10 pJ per switch). The International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) has recently evaluated several potential candidates SCM technologies, including Resistive (or Redox) RAM, Spin Torque Transfer RAM (STT-MRAM), and phase change memory (PCM). All of these devices show potential well beyond that of current flash technologies and research efforts are underway to improve the endurance, write speeds, and scalabilities to be on-par with DRAM. This progress has interesting implications for space electronics: each of these emerging device technologies show excellent resistance to the types of radiation typically found in space applications. Commercially developed, high density storage class memory-based systems may include a memory that is physically radiation hard, and suitable for space applications without major shielding efforts. This paper reviews the Storage Class Memory concept, emerging memory devices, and possible applicability to radiation hardened electronics for space.

  3. Vaginal cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Vaginal cancer; Cancer - vagina; Tumor - vaginal ... Most vaginal cancers occur when another cancer, such as cervical or endometrial cancer , spreads. This is called secondary vaginal cancer. Cancer ...

  4. Second Annual David Derse Memorial Lecture and Award | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Anne Arthur, Guest Writer The Second Annual David Derse Memorial Lecture and Award presentation was held on November 12, 2013, at the NCI at Frederick Conference Center to honor David Derse’s outstanding research accomplishments and to stimulate the exchange of innovative ideas that Derse was well known for promoting throughout his scientific career. The Annual David Derse Memorial Lecture and Award is sponsored by the HIV Drug Resistance Program, with support from Hye Kyung Chung-Derse, Ph.D., the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and colleagues and friends of Derse who contributed to the memorial fund in his honor.

  5. [Memory disorders in schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Danion, J M; Peretti, S; Gras-Vincendon, A; Singer, L

    1992-01-01

    The current interest in memory disorders in schizophrenia results from the way perceptions of schizophrenia--whose organic origin is becoming increasingly evident--and memory--according to which there exist not one, but several memories--have developed. Memory disorders in the schizophrenic cannot be considered in isolation from knowledge accumulated in other areas of the cognitive and neuro-sciences; a more detailed understanding of these disorders requires a comparison of the different cognitive approaches, both with each other and with the neurobiological and clinical approaches, so that they can be integrated. Despite numerous methodological and conceptual difficulties, it now appears to have been established that the schizophrenic's memory deficit should be seen in the context of a wider cognitive deficit, that the memory tasks are not all disturbed and that the memory deficit cannot be identified with one specific form of memory. Thus, iconic formation, short-term memory in the traditionally accepted sense and implicit memory are hardly, if at all, affected; in contrast, the early processing of information, working memory and explicit memory are disturbed, probably to the extent that they require the implementation of strategies to organise the information to be memorized. Finally, in certain tasks, such as those evaluating latent inhibition or negative priming, schizophrenics perform better than normal subjects, suggesting that schizophrenics' cognitive deficit is localised. This profile of memory disorders is compatible with a dysfunction predominating in the frontal and temporo-hippocampal regions. Neuroleptics and anticholinergics have opposite effects on cognitive and mnesic performance, which is improved by the former and aggravated by the latter. The influence of clinical symptoms, positive or negative, institutionalisation of patients and chronic tardive dyskinesia is unclear. Among the theoretical proposals put forward to account for the observed

  6. Dr. Worta McCaskill-Stevens Named Recipient of AACR Minorities in Cancer Research Award | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Worta McCaskill-Stevens, MD, MS, Chief of the Community Oncology and Prevention Trials Research Group, NCI Division of Cancer Prevention, was named the recipient of the 2016 American Association for Cancer Research Jane Cooke Wright Memorial Lectureship. |

  7. Distributed multiport memory architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, W. H. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A multiport memory architecture is diclosed for each of a plurality of task centers connected to a command and data bus. Each task center, includes a memory and a plurality of devices which request direct memory access as needed. The memory includes an internal data bus and an internal address bus to which the devices are connected, and direct timing and control logic comprised of a 10-state ring counter for allocating memory devices by enabling AND gates connected to the request signal lines of the devices. The outputs of AND gates connected to the same device are combined by OR gates to form an acknowledgement signal that enables the devices to address the memory during the next clock period. The length of the ring counter may be effectively lengthened to any multiple of ten to allow for more direct memory access intervals in one repetitive sequence. One device is a network bus adapter which serially shifts onto the command and data bus, a data word (8 bits plus control and parity bits) during the next ten direct memory access intervals after it has been granted access. The NBA is therefore allocated only one access in every ten intervals, which is a predetermined interval for all centers. The ring counters of all centers are periodically synchronized by DMA SYNC signal to assure that all NBAs be able to function in synchronism for data transfer from one center to another.

  8. [Learning and memory].

    PubMed

    Lombroso, Paul

    2004-09-01

    Memory is broadly divided into declarative and nondeclarative forms of memory. The hippocampus is required for the formation of declarative memories, while a number of other brain regions including the striatum, amygdala and nucleus accumbens are involved in the formation of nondeclarative memories. The formation of all memories require morphological changes of synapses: new ones must be formed or old ones strengthened. These changes are thought to reflect the underlying cellular basis for persistent memories. Considerable advances have occurred over the last decade in our understanding of the molecular bases of how these memories are formed. A key regulator of synaptic plasticity is a signaling pathway that includes the mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase. As this pathway is required for normal memory and learning, it is not surprising that mutations in members of this pathway lead to disruptions in learning. Neurofibromatosis, Coffin-Lowry syndrome and Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome are three examples of developmental disorders that have mutations in key components of the MAP kinase signaling pathway.

  9. Memory and Aging

    MedlinePlus

    ... or home environment and you’re not paying attention when your friend gives you directions to her new home, you will not be able to recall how to get there. Memory and Aging Memory Aids Keep “to do” lists Keep “to do” lists and ...

  10. Regret as Autobiographical Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davison, Ian M.; Feeney, Aidan

    2008-01-01

    We apply an autobiographical memory framework to the study of regret. Focusing on the distinction between regrets for specific and general events we argue that the temporal profile of regret, usually explained in terms of the action-inaction distinction, is predicted by models of autobiographical memory. In two studies involving participants in…

  11. Memories of Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sidwell, Amy M.; Walls, Richard T.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to explore college students' autobiographical memories of physical education (PE). Questionnaires were distributed to students enrolled in undergraduate Introduction to PE and Introduction to Communications courses. The 261 participants wrote about memories of PE. These students recalled events from Grades…

  12. Predicting Reasoning from Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heit, Evan; Hayes, Brett K.

    2011-01-01

    In an effort to assess the relations between reasoning and memory, in 8 experiments, the authors examined how well responses on an inductive reasoning task are predicted from responses on a recognition memory task for the same picture stimuli. Across several experimental manipulations, such as varying study time, presentation frequency, and the…

  13. Experimental Optoelectronic Associative Memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin

    1992-01-01

    Optoelectronic associative memory responds to input image by displaying one of M remembered images. Which image to display determined by optoelectronic analog computation of resemblance between input image and each remembered image. Does not rely on precomputation and storage of outer-product synapse matrix. Size of memory needed to store and process images reduced.

  14. Visual Memory at Birth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slater, Alan; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Explored new-born babys' capacity for forming visual memories. Used an habituation procedure that accommodated individual differences by allowing each infant to control the time course of habituation trials. Found significant novelty preference, providing strong evidence that recognition memory can be reliably demonstrated from birth. (Author/JAC)

  15. Human Learning and Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, David A.

    2012-01-01

    This innovative textbook is the first to integrate learning and memory, behaviour, and cognition. It focuses on fascinating human research in both memory and learning (while also bringing in important animal studies) and brings the reader up to date with the latest developments in the subject. Students are encouraged to think critically: key…

  16. Human Memory: The Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Michael E.

    2010-01-01

    The human mind has two types of memory: short-term and long-term. In all types of learning, it is best to use that structure rather than to fight against it. One way to do that is to ensure that learners can fit new information into patterns that can be stored in and more easily retrieved from long-term memory.

  17. Memory Efficient Ranking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moffat, Alistair; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Describes an approximate document ranking process that uses a compact array of in-memory, low-precision approximations for document length. Combined with another rule for reducing the memory required by partial similarity accumulators, the approximation heuristic allows the ranking of large document collections using less than one byte of memory…

  18. Memory technology survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The current status of semiconductor, magnetic, and optical memory technologies is described. Projections based on these research activities planned for the shot term are presented. Conceptual designs of specific memory buffer pplications employing bipola, CMOS, GaAs, and Magnetic Bubble devices are discussed.

  19. An Exceptional Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Ian M. L.

    1977-01-01

    An account is given of the exceptional memory of the late Professor A. C. Aitken who was also a distinguished mathematician and mental calculator. Compared with Shereshevskii, another man with exceptional memory, he shows the scholar's reliance on conceptual mapping rather than the mnemonist's reliance on perceptual chaining. (Editor)

  20. Memory Metals (Marchon Eyewear)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Another commercial application of memory metal technology is found in a "smart" eyeglass frame that remembers its shape and its wearer's fit. A patented "memory encoding process" makes this possible. Heat is not required to return the glasses to shape. A large commercial market is anticipated.

  1. A Space for Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charman, Karen

    2015-01-01

    In this article I examine the possibilities of reparation in an era of privatisation and de-industrialisation. I examine the effect of a recent project Sunshine Memory Space, a space, designed to evoke memories of a de-industrialised urban Melbourne suburb Sunshine. This project offered the opportunity for the effects of industrial change to be…

  2. Animal models of source memory.

    PubMed

    Crystal, Jonathon D

    2016-01-01

    Source memory is the aspect of episodic memory that encodes the origin (i.e., source) of information acquired in the past. Episodic memory (i.e., our memories for unique personal past events) typically involves source memory because those memories focus on the origin of previous events. Source memory is at work when, for example, someone tells a favorite joke to a person while avoiding retelling the joke to the friend who originally shared the joke. Importantly, source memory permits differentiation of one episodic memory from another because source memory includes features that were present when the different memories were formed. This article reviews recent efforts to develop an animal model of source memory using rats. Experiments are reviewed which suggest that source memory is dissociated from other forms of memory. The review highlights strengths and weaknesses of a number of animal models of episodic memory. Animal models of source memory may be used to probe the biological bases of memory. Moreover, these models can be combined with genetic models of Alzheimer's disease to evaluate pharmacotherapies that ultimately have the potential to improve memory.

  3. Is random access memory random?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denning, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    Most software is contructed on the assumption that the programs and data are stored in random access memory (RAM). Physical limitations on the relative speeds of processor and memory elements lead to a variety of memory organizations that match processor addressing rate with memory service rate. These include interleaved and cached memory. A very high fraction of a processor's address requests can be satified from the cache without reference to the main memory. The cache requests information from main memory in blocks that can be transferred at the full memory speed. Programmers who organize algorithms for locality can realize the highest performance from these computers.

  4. Predicting reasoning from memory.

    PubMed

    Heit, Evan; Hayes, Brett K

    2011-02-01

    In an effort to assess the relations between reasoning and memory, in 8 experiments, the authors examined how well responses on an inductive reasoning task are predicted from responses on a recognition memory task for the same picture stimuli. Across several experimental manipulations, such as varying study time, presentation frequency, and the presence of stimuli from other categories, there was a high correlation between reasoning and memory responses (average r = .87), and these manipulations showed similar effects on the 2 tasks. The results point to common mechanisms underlying inductive reasoning and recognition memory abilities. A mathematical model, GEN-EX (generalization from examples), derived from exemplar models of categorization, is presented, which predicts both reasoning and memory responses from pairwise similarities among the stimuli, allowing for additional influences of subtyping and deterministic responding.

  5. Computer memory management system

    DOEpatents

    Kirk, III, Whitson John

    2002-01-01

    A computer memory management system utilizing a memory structure system of "intelligent" pointers in which information related to the use status of the memory structure is designed into the pointer. Through this pointer system, The present invention provides essentially automatic memory management (often referred to as garbage collection) by allowing relationships between objects to have definite memory management behavior by use of coding protocol which describes when relationships should be maintained and when the relationships should be broken. In one aspect, the present invention system allows automatic breaking of strong links to facilitate object garbage collection, coupled with relationship adjectives which define deletion of associated objects. In another aspect, The present invention includes simple-to-use infinite undo/redo functionality in that it has the capability, through a simple function call, to undo all of the changes made to a data model since the previous `valid state` was noted.

  6. Memory B cells.

    PubMed

    Kurosaki, Tomohiro; Kometani, Kohei; Ise, Wataru

    2015-03-01

    The immune system can remember a previously experienced pathogen and can evoke an enhanced response to reinfection that depends on memory lymphocyte populations. Recent advances in tracking antigen-experienced memory B cells have revealed the existence of distinct classes of cells that have considerable functional differences. Some of these differences seem to be determined by the stimulation history during memory cell formation. To induce rapid recall antibody responses, the contributions of other types of cells, such as memory T follicular helper cells, have also now begun to be appreciated. In this Review, we discuss these and other recent advances in our understanding of memory B cells, focusing on the underlying mechanisms that are required for rapid and effective recall antibody responses.

  7. Serotonin transporter and memory.

    PubMed

    Meneses, Alfredo; Perez-Garcia, Georgina; Ponce-Lopez, Teresa; Tellez, Ruth; Castillo, Carlos

    2011-09-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) has been associated to diverse functions and diseases, though seldom to memory. Therefore, we made an attempt to summarize and discuss the available publications implicating the involvement of the SERT in memory, amnesia and anti-amnesic effects. Evidence indicates that Alzheimer's disease and drugs of abuse like d-methamphetamine (METH) and (+/-)3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, "ecstasy") have been associated to decrements in the SERT expression and memory deficits. Several reports have indicated that memory formation and amnesia affected the SERT expression. The SERT expression seems to be a reliable neural marker related to memory mechanisms, its alterations and potential treatment. The pharmacological, neural and molecular mechanisms associated to these changes are of great importance for investigation.

  8. Cosmological memory effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolish, Alexander; Wald, Robert M.

    2016-08-01

    The "memory effect" is the permanent change in the relative separation of test particles resulting from the passage of gravitational radiation. We investigate the memory effect for a general, spatially flat Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) cosmology by considering the radiation associated with emission events involving particle-like sources. We find that if the resulting perturbation is decomposed into scalar, vector, and tensor parts, only the tensor part contributes to memory. Furthermore, the tensor contribution to memory depends only on the cosmological scale factor at the source and observation events, not on the detailed expansion history of the universe. In particular, for sources at the same luminosity distance, the memory effect in a spatially flat FLRW spacetime is enhanced over the Minkowski case by a factor of (1 +z ).

  9. Imaging autobiographical memory.

    PubMed

    Fossati, Philippe

    2013-12-01

    Autobiographical memory (AM) defines the memory systems that encode, consolidate, and retrieve personal events and facts, AM is strongly related to self-perception and self representation. We review here the neural correlates of AM retrieval. AM retrieval encompasses a large neural network including the prefrontal, temporal, and parietal cortex, and limbic structures. All these regions subserve the cognitive processes (episodic remembering, cognitive control, self-processing, and scene construction) at play during memory retrieval. We emphasize the specific role of medial prefrontal cortex and precuneus in self-processing during autobiographical memory retrieval. Overall, these data call for further studies in psychiatric patients, to investigate the neural underpinnings of autobiographical memory and self-representation in mental disorders.

  10. Innate Memory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Jameson, Stephen C.; Lee, You Jeong; Hogquist, Kristin A.

    2015-01-01

    Memory T cells are usually considered to be a feature of a successful immune response against a foreign antigen, and such cells can mediate potent immunity. However, in mice, alternative pathways have been described, through which naïve T cells can acquire the characteristics and functions of memory T cells without encountering specific foreign antigen or the typical signals required for conventional T cell differentiation. Such cells reflect a response to the internal rather the external environment, and hence such cells are called innate memory T cells. In this review, we describe how innate memory subsets were identified, the signals that induce their generation and their functional properties and potential role in the normal immune response. The existence of innate memory T cells in mice raises questions about whether parallel populations exist in humans, and we discuss the evidence for such populations during human T cell development and differentiation. PMID:25727290

  11. In memory of Julio Morales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-01-01

    Conference photograph This volume is dedicated to the memory of Julio Morales who passed away on Saturday July 4, 2009 at the age of 61 after a strenuous battle with cancer. He had devoted most of his intense professional career to the field of underground physics, and contributed in an essential way to the foundation and development of the Canfranc Laboratory. The TAUP Conferences owes him a great debt for a long collaboration with, for the remarkable organization of the TAUP session in 2005 in Zaragoza and his activity as a member of the Steering Committee. In Julio Morales, our community has lost a highly appreciated colleague, a charming person and a great friend. He will be missed by all of his colleagues.

  12. Aging Memories: Differential Decay of Episodic Memory Components

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talamini, Lucia M.; Gorree, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Some memories about events can persist for decades, even a lifetime. However, recent memories incorporate rich sensory information, including knowledge on the spatial and temporal ordering of event features, while old memories typically lack this "filmic" quality. We suggest that this apparent change in the nature of memories may reflect a…

  13. Single-Item Memory, Associative Memory, and the Human Hippocampus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Squire, Larry R.; Gold, Jeffrey J.; Hopkins, Ramona O.

    2006-01-01

    We tested recognition memory for items and associations in memory-impaired patients with bilateral lesions thought to be limited to the hippocampal region. In Experiment 1 (Combined memory test), participants studied words and then took a memory test in which studied words, new words, studied word pairs, and recombined word pairs were presented in…

  14. Memory, language, and ageing.

    PubMed Central

    Burke, D M; Mackay, D G

    1997-01-01

    This overview provides both theoretical and empirical reasons for emphasizing practice and familiar skills as a practical strategy for enhancing cognitive functioning in old age. Our review of empirical research on age-related changes in memory and language reveals a consistent pattern of spared and impaired abilities in normal old age. Relatively preserved in old age is memory performance involving highly practised skills and familiar information, including factual, semantic and autobiographical information. Relatively impaired in old age is memory performance that requires the formation of new connections, for example, recall of recent autobiographical experiences, new facts or the source of newly acquired facts. This pattern of impaired new learning versus preserved old learning cuts across distinctions between semantic memory, episodic memory, explicit memory and perhaps also implicit memory. However, familiar verbal information is not completely preserved when accessed on the output side rather than the input side: aspects of language production, namely word finding and spelling, exhibit significant age-related declines. This emerging pattern of preserved and impaired abilities presents a fundamental challenge for theories of cognitive ageing, which must explain why some aspects of language and memory are more vulnerable to the effects of ageing than others. Information-universal theories, involving mechanisms such as general slowing that are independent of the type or structure of the information being processed, require additional mechanisms to account for this pattern of cognitive aging. Information-specific theories, where the type or structure of the postulated memory units can influence the effects of cognitive ageing, are able to account for this emerging pattern, but in some cases require further development to account for comprehensive cognitive changes such as general slowing. PMID:9460069

  15. Sleep and memory.

    PubMed

    Roth, T; Roehrs, T; Zwyghuizen-Doorenbos, A; Stepanski, E; Wittig, R

    1988-01-01

    Generally sleep is considered a time of amnesia. It is not uncommon for an individual to experience 8 h of sleep and have no memory for events during that time. Similarly, a substantial proportion of the population has no memory for dreams that occurred during the night, despite the fact that the literature on awakening during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep clearly shows that individuals normally have four to six "dream experiences" a night. Research on this issue seems to indicate that the lack of memory cannot be explained by the organisms' inability to perceive stimuli. The data indicate that although perceptual thresholds are elevated, organisms can clearly perceive stimuli, and, in fact, can discriminate between them during sleep. The amnesia also cannot be explained by a defect in long-term memory, as studies have indicated that stimuli put into the memory during wakefulness are more efficiently retrieved after a sleep period than after a comparable period of wakefulness. The most likely explanation for the amnestic property of sleep seems to be the inability of organisms to transfer information from short-term memory to long-term memory during sleep. There are several sources of evidence to support this hypothesis. First, the probability of remembering a stimulus given during wakefulness is related to the proximity of sleep onset to the stimulus. Generally, information put into the system within 5 min of sleep onset is lost from memory. Secondly, disorders of excessive daytime somnolence which cause individuals to have frequent microsleeps are often associated with complains of memory problems.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Plated wire memory subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, K. H.

    1974-01-01

    The design, construction, and test history of a 4096 word by 18 bit random access NDRO Plated Wire Memory for use in conjunction with a spacecraft input/output and central processing unit is reported. A technical and functional description is given along with diagrams illustrating layout and systems operation. Test data is shown on the procedures and results of system level and memory stack testing, and hybrid circuit screening. A comparison of the most significant physical and performance characteristics of the memory unit versus the specified requirements is also included.

  17. Memory Retrieval as Temporal Discrimination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Gordon D. A.; Vousden, Janet I.; McCormack, Teresa

    2009-01-01

    Temporal distinctiveness models of memory retrieval claim that memories are organised partly in terms of their positions along a temporal dimension, and suggest that memory retrieval involves temporal discrimination. According to such models the retrievability of memories should be related to the discriminability of their temporal distances at the…

  18. Reduced False Memory after Sleep

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenn, Kimberly M.; Gallo, David A.; Margoliash, Daniel; Roediger, Henry L., III; Nusbaum, Howard C.

    2009-01-01

    Several studies have shown that sleep contributes to the successful maintenance of previously encoded information. This research has focused exclusively on memory for studied events, as opposed to false memories. Here we report three experiments showing that sleep reduces false memories in the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) memory illusion. False…

  19. Prospective memory: A comparative perspective

    PubMed Central

    Crystal, Jonathon D.; Wilson, A. George

    2014-01-01

    Prospective memory consists of forming a representation of a future action, temporarily storing that representation in memory, and retrieving it at a future time point. Here we review the recent development of animal models of prospective memory. We review experiments using rats that focus on the development of time-based and event-based prospective memory. Next, we review a number of prospective-memory approaches that have been used with a variety of non-human primates. Finally, we review selected approaches from the human literature on prospective memory to identify targets for development of animal models of prospective memory. PMID:25101562

  20. Positive consequences of false memories.

    PubMed

    Howe, Mark L; Garner, Sarah R; Patel, Megan

    2013-01-01

    Previous research is replete with examples of the negative consequences of false memories. In the current research, we provide a different perspective on false memories and their development and demonstrate that false memories can have positive consequences. Specifically, we examined the role false memories play in subsequent problem-solving tasks. Children and adults studied and recalled neutral or survival-relevant lists of associated words. They then solved age-normed compound remote associates, some of whose solutions had been primed by false memories created when studying the previous lists. The results showed that regardless of age: (a) survival-related words were not only better recollected but were also more susceptible than neutral words to false memory illusions; and (b) survival-related false memories were better than neutral false memories as primes for problem-solving. These findings are discussed in the context of recent speculation concerning the positive consequences of false memories, and the adaptive nature of reconstructive memory.

  1. Medications for Memory Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... memory loss, confusion, and problems with thinking and reasoning) of Alzheimer's disease. There is also a medication ... the latest Alzheimer's medications available today, and the clinical trials that may bring us closer to new ...

  2. Memory Circuit Fault Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheldon, Douglas J.; McClure, Tucker

    2013-01-01

    Spacecraft are known to experience significant memory part-related failures and problems, both pre- and postlaunch. These memory parts include both static and dynamic memories (SRAM and DRAM). These failures manifest themselves in a variety of ways, such as pattern-sensitive failures, timingsensitive failures, etc. Because of the mission critical nature memory devices play in spacecraft architecture and operation, understanding their failure modes is vital to successful mission operation. To support this need, a generic simulation tool that can model different data patterns in conjunction with variable write and read conditions was developed. This tool is a mathematical and graphical way to embed pattern, electrical, and physical information to perform what-if analysis as part of a root cause failure analysis effort.

  3. Working Memory and Neurofeedback.

    PubMed

    YuLeung To, Eric; Abbott, Kathy; Foster, Dale S; Helmer, D'Arcy

    2016-01-01

    Impairments in working memory are typically associated with impairments in other cognitive faculties such as attentional processes and short-term memory. This paper briefly introduces neurofeedback as a treatment modality in general, and, more specifically, we review several of the current modalities successfully used in neurofeedback (NF) for the treatment of working memory deficits. Two case studies are presented to illustrate how neurofeedback is applied in treatment. The development of Low Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography (LORETA) and its application in neurofeedback now makes it possible to specifically target deep cortical/subcortical brain structures. Developments in neuroscience concerning neural networks, combined with highly specific yet practical NF technologies, makes neurofeedback of particular interest to neuropsychological practice, including the emergence of specific methodologies for treating very difficult working memory (WM) problems.

  4. Magnetic vortex racetrack memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Liwei D.; Jin, Yongmei M.

    2017-02-01

    We report a new type of racetrack memory based on current-controlled movement of magnetic vortices in magnetic nanowires with rectangular cross-section and weak perpendicular anisotropy. Data are stored through the core polarity of vortices and each vortex carries a data bit. Besides high density, non-volatility, fast data access, and low power as offered by domain wall racetrack memory, magnetic vortex racetrack memory has additional advantages of no need for constrictions to define data bits, changeable information density, adjustable current magnitude for data propagation, and versatile means of ultrafast vortex core switching. By using micromagnetic simulations, current-controlled motion of magnetic vortices in cobalt nanowire is demonstrated for racetrack memory applications.

  5. Serriform Strip Crosstie Memory.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    edge effect of the margin serrations upon magnetization, a form of shape anisotropy, inherently defines memory cell boundaries in the domain walls, thereby giving the crossties and Bloch lines preferred locations and allowing the use of a simplified propagation

  6. Multiresonator quantum memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseev, S. A.; Gubaidullin, F. F.; Kirillov, R. S.; Latypov, R. R.; Perminov, N. S.; Petrovnin, K. V.; Sherstyukov, O. N.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we present universal broadband multiresonator quantum memory based on the spatial-frequency combs of the microresonators coupled with a common waveguide. We find a Bragg-type impedance matching condition for the coupling of the microresonators with a waveguide field that provides an efficient broadband quantum storage. The analytical solution obtained for the microresonator fields enables sustainable parametric control of all the memory characteristics. We also construct an experimental prototype of the studied quantum memory in the microwave spectral range that demonstrates basic properties of the microwave microresonators, their coupling with a common waveguide, and independent control of the microresonator frequencies. Experimentally observed narrow lines of the microresonators confirm the possibility of multiresonator quantum memory implementation.

  7. Memory, Memoir, Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Nancy J.; Giorgis, Cyndi

    2000-01-01

    Offers brief descriptions of 41 good books for children offering a treasury of memory, memoir, and stories. Presents books in the following categories: storytellers, folktales, voices, family, artifacts, and preservation. (SR)

  8. Coping with Memory Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... either using computerized axial tomography (CAT) scans or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) – can help to identify strokes and tumors, which can sometimes cause memory loss. “The goal is to rule out factors ...

  9. Perception and Memory of Pictures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-20

    altogether. His explanation for the efftct is similar to that proposed by Raijmakers and Shiffrin (1981) in the SAM model of memory : Items from...implicit memory , explicit memory , recognition memory , perce ’ptual fluency, priming, RSVP, fragmented pictures, connectionist models , PDP models 19...of implicit and explicit memory . A connectionist model of picture recognition which was developed and tested in collaboration with Elliot Hirshman

  10. Plated wire memory subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, L.; Tweed, H.

    1972-01-01

    The work performed entailed the design, development, construction and testing of a 4000 word by 18 bit random access, NDRO plated wire memory for use in conjunction with a spacecraft imput/output unit and central processing unit. The primary design parameters, in order of importance, were high reliability, low power, volume and weight. A single memory unit, referred to as a qualification model, was delivered.

  11. Epigenetic memory in plants.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Mayumi; Paszkowski, Jerzy

    2014-09-17

    Epigenetics refers to heritable changes in patterns of gene expression that occur without alterations in DNA sequence. The epigenetic mechanisms involve covalent modifications of DNA and histones, which affect transcriptional activity of chromatin. Since chromatin states can be propagated through mitotic and meiotic divisions, epigenetic mechanisms are thought to provide heritable 'cellular memory'. Here, we review selected examples of epigenetic memory in plants and briefly discuss underlying mechanisms.

  12. Emergence of Collective Memories

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sungmin; Ramenzoni, Verónica C.; Holme, Petter

    2010-01-01

    Background We understand the dynamics of the world around us as by associating pairs of events, where one event has some influence on the other. These pairs of events can be aggregated into a web of memories representing our understanding of an episode of history. The events and the associations between them need not be directly experienced—they can also be acquired by communication. In this paper we take a network approach to study the dynamics of memories of history. Methodology/Principal Findings First we investigate the network structure of a data set consisting of reported events by several individuals and how associations connect them. We focus our measurement on degree distributions, degree correlations, cycles (which represent inconsistencies as they would break the time ordering) and community structure. We proceed to model effects of communication using an agent-based model. We investigate the conditions for the memory webs of different individuals to converge to collective memories, how groups where the individuals have similar memories (but different from other groups) can form. Conclusions/Significance Our work outlines how the cognitive representation of memories and social structure can co-evolve as a contagious process. We generate some testable hypotheses including that the number of groups is limited as a function of the total population size. PMID:20824141

  13. Mechanisms of Memory Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Sarah A.

    2012-01-01

    The ongoing quest for memory enhancement is one that grows necessary as the global population increasingly ages. The extraordinary progress that has been made in the past few decades elucidating the underlying mechanisms of how long-term memories are formed has provided insight into how memories might also be enhanced. Capitalizing on this knowledge, it has been postulated that targeting many of the same mechanisms, including CREB activation, AMPA/NMDA receptor trafficking, neuromodulation (e.g. via dopamine, adrenaline, cortisol or acetylcholine) and metabolic processes (e.g. via glucose and insulin) may all lead to the enhancement of memory. These and other mechanisms and/or approaches have been tested via genetic or pharmacological methods in animal models, and several have been investigated in humans as well. In addition, a number of behavioral methods, including exercise and reconsolidation, may also serve to strengthen and enhance memories. By capitalizing on this knowledge and continuing to investigate these promising avenues, memory enhancement may indeed be achieved in the future. PMID:23151999

  14. Music evokes vivid autobiographical memories.

    PubMed

    Belfi, Amy M; Karlan, Brett; Tranel, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    Music is strongly intertwined with memories-for example, hearing a song from the past can transport you back in time, triggering the sights, sounds, and feelings of a specific event. This association between music and vivid autobiographical memory is intuitively apparent, but the idea that music is intimately tied with memories, seemingly more so than other potent memory cues (e.g., familiar faces), has not been empirically tested. Here, we compared memories evoked by music to those evoked by famous faces, predicting that music-evoked autobiographical memories (MEAMs) would be more vivid. Participants listened to 30 songs, viewed 30 faces, and reported on memories that were evoked. Memories were transcribed and coded for vividness as in Levine, B., Svoboda, E., Hay, J. F., Winocur, G., & Moscovitch, M. [2002. Aging and autobiographical memory: Dissociating episodic from semantic retrieval. Psychology and Aging, 17, 677-689]. In support of our hypothesis, MEAMs were more vivid than autobiographical memories evoked by faces. MEAMs contained a greater proportion of internal details and a greater number of perceptual details, while face-evoked memories contained a greater number of external details. Additionally, we identified sex differences in memory vividness: for both stimulus categories, women retrieved more vivid memories than men. The results show that music not only effectively evokes autobiographical memories, but that these memories are more vivid than those evoked by famous faces.

  15. Effects of aging and working memory demands on prospective memory.

    PubMed

    West, Robert; Bowry, Ritvij

    2005-11-01

    The current study used event-related brain potentials (ERPs) to examine the effects of aging, increasing the working memory demands of the ongoing activity, and a prospective memory load on the neural correlates of prospective remembering and target recognition. The behavioral data revealed that the success of prospective memory was sensitive to working memory load in younger, but not older, adults and that a prospective memory load had a greater effect on the performance of older adults than that of younger adults. The ERP data revealed age-related differences in the neural correlates of the detection of prospective cues, post-retrieval processes that support prospective memory, and target recognition. Our results support the hypothesis that there are age-related differences in the ability to recruit preparatory attentional processes that underlie prospective memory, and demonstrate that younger and older adults may recruit somewhat different neural generators to support prospective memory and working memory.

  16. False memories for aggressive acts.

    PubMed

    Laney, Cara; Takarangi, Melanie K T

    2013-06-01

    Can people develop false memories for committing aggressive acts? How does this process compare to developing false memories for victimhood? In the current research we used a simple false feedback procedure to implant false memories for committing aggressive acts (causing a black eye or spreading malicious gossip) or for victimhood (receiving a black eye). We then compared these false memories to other subjects' true memories for equivalent events. False aggressive memories were all too easy to implant, particularly in the minds of individuals with a proclivity towards aggression. Once implanted, the false memories were indistinguishable from true memories for the same events, on several dimensions, including emotional content. Implications for aggression-related memory more generally as well as false confessions are discussed.

  17. What people believe about memory.

    PubMed

    Magnussen, Svein; Andersson, Jan; Cornoldi, Cesare; De Beni, Rossana; Endestad, Tor; Goodman, Gail S; Helstrup, Tore; Koriat, Asher; Larsson, Maria; Melinder, Annika; Nilsson, Lars-Göran; Rönnberg, Jerker; Zimmer, Hubert

    2006-07-01

    Two representative samples of adult Norwegians (n=2000) were asked a set of general and specific questions regarding their beliefs and opinions about human memory. The results indicate that on many questions, such as time of the earliest memories, inhibiting effects of collaboration, and memory for dramatic versus ordinary events, the views of the general public concurred with current research findings, and people in general had realistic views about their own memory performance. On other questions, such as the reliability of olfactory as compared with visual and auditory memory, the memory of small children in comparison with that of adults, the likelihood of repression of adult traumatic memories, and on more general questions such as the possibility of training memory and the capacity limitations of long-term memory, a large proportion of the participants expressed views that are less supported by scientific evidence. Implications of these findings are briefly discussed.

  18. Second Cancers After Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... After Colorectal Cancer Colorectal Cancer After Treatment Second Cancers After Colorectal Cancer Colorectal cancer survivors can be affected by a ... many of these cancers. Follow-up after colorectal cancer treatment After completing treatment for colorectal cancer, you ...

  19. Low energy cyclotron production and separation of yttrium-86 for evaluation of monoclonal antibody pharmacokinetics and dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Shoner, S.; Link, J.; Krohn, K.; Schlyer, D.

    1999-06-01

    Although an excellent radionuclide for application to systemic isotopic therapy when complexed to various monoclonal antibodies, the lack of photon emission from yttrium-90 makes the determination of the pharmacokinetics and dosimetry of the resultant radiopharmaceutical difficult. The introduction of the positron-emitting radionuclide yttrium-86 (T{sub 1/2}=14.7&hthinsp;h,&hthinsp;{beta}{sup +}=33{percent}) provides the non-invasive quantitation for the biodistribution of the chelated complex. The yttrium-86 radionuclide is produced at Memorial Sloan-Kettering using the CS-15 cyclotron via the (p,n) nuclear reaction on an enriched strontium-86 target. The separation is effectively achieved through a combination of solvent extraction and ion exchange chromatography. Once investigational new drug approval has been received, the mixed nuclides, Y-90 and Y-86, are to be used to formulate the HuM195 labeled monoclonal antibody, a radiopharmaceutical under active investigation against hematopoietic progenitor cells. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Neurocognitive architecture of working memory

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Johan; Vogel, Edward K.; Lansner, Anders; Bergström, Fredrik; Nyberg, Lars

    2015-01-01

    The crucial role of working memory for temporary information processing and guidance of complex behavior has been recognized for many decades. There is emerging consensus that working memory maintenance results from the interactions among long-term memory representations and basic processes, including attention, that are instantiated as reentrant loops between frontal and posterior cortical areas, as well as subcortical structures. The nature of such interactions can account for capacity limitations, lifespan changes, and restricted transfer after working-memory training. Recent data and models indicate that working memory may also be based on synaptic plasticity, and that working memory can operate on non-consciously perceived information. PMID:26447571

  1. Memory function and supportive technology

    PubMed Central

    Charness, Neil; Best, Ryan; Souders, Dustin

    2013-01-01

    Episodic and working memory processes show pronounced age-related decline, with other memory processes such as semantic, procedural, and metamemory less affected. Older adults tend to complain the most about prospective and retrospective memory failures. We introduce a framework for deciding how to mitigate memory decline using augmentation and substitution and discuss techniques that change the user, through mnemonics training, and change the tool or environment, by providing environmental support. We provide examples of low-tech and high-tech memory supports and discuss constraints on the utility of high-tech systems including effectiveness of devices, attitudes toward memory aids, and reliability of systems. PMID:24379752

  2. Nanoporous silicon oxide memory.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gunuk; Yang, Yang; Lee, Jae-Hwang; Abramova, Vera; Fei, Huilong; Ruan, Gedeng; Thomas, Edwin L; Tour, James M

    2014-08-13

    Oxide-based two-terminal resistive random access memory (RRAM) is considered one of the most promising candidates for next-generation nonvolatile memory. We introduce here a new RRAM memory structure employing a nanoporous (NP) silicon oxide (SiOx) material which enables unipolar switching through its internal vertical nanogap. Through the control of the stochastic filament formation at low voltage, the NP SiOx memory exhibited an extremely low electroforming voltage (∼ 1.6 V) and outstanding performance metrics. These include multibit storage ability (up to 9-bits), a high ON-OFF ratio (up to 10(7) A), a long high-temperature lifetime (≥ 10(4) s at 100 °C), excellent cycling endurance (≥ 10(5)), sub-50 ns switching speeds, and low power consumption (∼ 6 × 10(-5) W/bit). Also provided is the room temperature processability for versatile fabrication without any compliance current being needed during electroforming or switching operations. Taken together, these metrics in NP SiOx RRAM provide a route toward easily accessed nonvolatile memory applications.

  3. Vertical bloch line memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katti, Romney R. (Inventor); Stadler, Henry L. (Inventor); Wu, Jiin-chuan (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A new read gate design for the vertical Bloch line (VBL) memory is disclosed which offers larger operating margin than the existing read gate designs. In the existing read gate designs, a current is applied to all the stripes. The stripes that contain a VBL pair are chopped, while the stripes that do not contain a VBL pair are not chopped. The information is then detected by inspecting the presence or absence of the bubble. The margin of the chopping current amplitude is very small, and sometimes non-existent. A new method of reading Vertical Bloch Line memory is also disclosed. Instead of using the wall chirality to separate the two binary states, the spatial deflection of the stripe head is used. Also disclosed herein is a compact memory which uses vertical Bloch line (VBL) memory technology for providing data storage. A three-dimensional arrangement in the form of stacks of VBL memory layers is used to achieve high volumetric storage density. High data transfer rate is achieved by operating all the layers in parallel. Using Hall effect sensing, and optical sensing via the Faraday effect to access the data from within the three-dimensional packages, an even higher data transfer rate can be achieved due to parallel operation within each layer.

  4. Memory Loss: 7 Tips to Improve Your Memory

    MedlinePlus

    ... re not alone. Everyone forgets things occasionally. Still, memory loss is nothing to take lightly. Although there are no guarantees when it comes to preventing memory loss or dementia, certain activities might help. Consider ...

  5. MEMORIAL WALK WITH MEMORIALS, TOWARD ENTRANCE GATE. VIEW TO WEST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MEMORIAL WALK WITH MEMORIALS, TOWARD ENTRANCE GATE. VIEW TO WEST. - Rock Island National Cemetery, Rock Island Arsenal, 0.25 mile north of southern tip of Rock Island, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  6. Bergson's "Matter and Memory" and modern selectionist theories of memory.

    PubMed

    McNamara, P

    1996-03-01

    Bergson's reflections (in Matter and Memory, 1896) on memory anticipated development of modern selectionist theories of memory. Selectionist models offer new and potentially useful approaches to a theory of remembering. On the model of natural selection, these selectionist theories require at least two processing components: a device which generates a range of memory representations and a selection process which preserves a subset of those representations. Bergson shows how the subjective experience of remembering might be understood within a selectionist framework.

  7. Emotion and autobiographical memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, Alisha C.; Kensinger, Elizabeth A.

    2010-03-01

    Autobiographical memory encompasses our recollections of specific, personal events. In this article, we review the interactions between emotion and autobiographical memory, focusing on two broad ways in which these interactions occur. First, the emotional content of an experience can influence the way in which the event is remembered. Second, emotions and emotional goals experienced at the time of autobiographical retrieval can influence the information recalled. We discuss the behavioral manifestations of each of these types of interactions and describe the neural mechanisms that may support those interactions. We discuss how findings from the clinical literature (e.g., regarding depression) and the social psychology literature (e.g., on emotion regulation) might inform future investigations of the interplay between the emotions experienced at the time of retrieval and the memories recalled, and we present ideas for future research in this domain.

  8. Echoic memory in pigeons.

    PubMed

    Kretzschmar, Christina; Kalenscher, Tobias; Güntürkün, Onur; Kaernbach, Christian

    2008-10-01

    It is unknown whether birds are able to retain the memory of purely sensory auditory information such as white noise over an extended period of time. In a Pavlovian heart rate conditioning paradigm, four pigeons were trained to associate a mild electric shock with periodic random waveforms, and no shock with aperiodic noise. Periodic waveform detection requires echoic memory, i.e., the online retention of a waveform pattern over a limited time. Starting with 40ms, the waveform period was increased after successful learning until no significant stimulus discrimination could be found. Significant discrimination was achieved at periods of up to 2560ms. This is the first demonstration that echoic memory performance in birds is clearly superior to cats and gerbils, and comparable to naive human performance.

  9. Emotion and Autobiographical Memory

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Alisha C.; Kensinger, Elizabeth A.

    2010-01-01

    Autobiographical memory encompasses our recollections of specific, personal events. In this article, we review the interactions between emotion and autobiographical memory, focusing on two broad ways in which these interactions occur. First, the emotional content of an experience can influence the way in which the event is remembered. Second, emotions and emotional goals experienced at the time of autobiographical retrieval can influence the information recalled. We discuss the behavioral manifestations of each of these types of interactions and describe the neural mechanisms that may support those interactions. We discuss how findings from the clinical literature (e.g., regarding depression) and the social psychology literature (e.g., on emotion regulation) might inform future investigations of the interplay between the emotions experienced at the time of retrieval and the memories recalled, and we present ideas for future research in this domain. PMID:20374933

  10. Occupational Memory Practice and Memory Beliefs with Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huet, Nathalie; Marquie, Jean-Claude; Bacon, Elisabeth

    2010-01-01

    This study examined effects of intensive memory use during one's profession on metamemory beliefs. Fifty-one actors and 60 controls aged from 20 to 73 years were compared with the Metamemory Inventory in Adulthood. Both intensive job-related memory practice and younger age were associated with stronger memory self-efficacy beliefs. Irrespective of…

  11. Negative Affect Impairs Associative Memory but Not Item Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bisby, James A.; Burgess, Neil

    2014-01-01

    The formation of associations between items and their context has been proposed to rely on mechanisms distinct from those supporting memory for a single item. Although emotional experiences can profoundly affect memory, our understanding of how it interacts with different aspects of memory remains unclear. We performed three experiments to examine…

  12. An overview of advanced nonvolatile memory technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Dressendorfer, P.V.

    1991-01-01

    This report is an overview of advanced nonvolatile memory technologies. The memory technologies discussed are: floating gate nonvolatile memory technologies; SNOS nonvolatile technology; ferroelectric technology; and thin film magnetic memories.

  13. Dreams, conscience, and memory.

    PubMed

    Stein, M H

    1991-04-01

    The interpretation of certain dreams, as opposed to the direct examination of behavior, makes it possible to explore the conscience of the dreamer, detect hidden sources of guilt, and interpret them with less likelihood of arousing intractable resistance. Through the recovery of memories and the establishment of an intimate familiarity with one's personal history, it becomes possible to resolve problems of "neurotic" guilt, based ultimately on distortions of repressed childhood memories. The resolution of these conflicts allows a greater role for the operation of "appropriate" guilt, based on genuine transgressions, and the establishment of a more mature ethical structure.

  14. Natural Killer Cell Memory.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Timothy E; Sun, Joseph C; Lanier, Lewis L

    2015-10-20

    Natural killer (NK) cells have historically been considered short-lived cytolytic cells that can rapidly respond against pathogens and tumors in an antigen-independent manner and then undergo cell death. Recently, however, NK cells have been shown to possess traits of adaptive immunity and can acquire immunological memory in a manner similar to that of T and B cells. In this review, we discuss evidence of NK cell memory and the mechanisms involved in the generation and survival of these innate lymphocytes.

  15. Memory and Forgetfulness: NIH Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Memory & Forgetfulness NIH Research Past Issues / Summer 2013 Table ... agency for research on Alzheimer's disease and related memory research. An analysis funded by the NIA finds ...

  16. Mouth Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... is sometimes called oral cancer or oral cavity cancer. Mouth cancer is one of several types of cancer grouped in a category called head and neck cancers. Mouth cancer and other head and neck cancers are ...

  17. Cancer Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer is, how cancer is tracked, and the economic impact of cancer in the United States. Lifetime Risk ... Cancer? Cancer Surveillance Programs in the United States Economic Impact of Cancer Finding Cancer Information Learn how to ...

  18. Cancer - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - cancer ... The following organizations are good resources for information on cancer : American Cancer Society -- www.cancer.org Cancer Care -- www.cancercare.org Cancer.Net -- www.cancer.net/coping- ...

  19. Development of Improved Vaccine Adjuvants Based on the Saponin Natural Product QS-21 through Chemical Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Tejada, Alberto; Tan, Derek S; Gin, David Y

    2016-09-20

    Vaccines based on molecular subunit antigens are increasingly being investigated due to their improved safety and more precise targeting compared to classical whole-pathogen vaccines. However, subunit vaccines are inherently less immunogenic; thus, coadministration of an adjuvant to increase the immunogenicity of the antigen is often necessary to elicit a potent immune response. QS-21, an immunostimulatory saponin natural product, has been used as an adjuvant in conjunction with various vaccines in numerous clinical trials, but suffers from several inherent liabilities, including scarcity, chemical instability, and dose-limiting toxicity. Moreover, little is known about its mechanism of action. Over a decade-long effort, beginning at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and continuing at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC), the group of Prof. David Y. Gin accomplished the total synthesis of QS-21 and developed a practical semisynthetic approach to novel variants that overcome the liabilities of the natural product. First, semisynthetic QS-21 variants were designed with stable amide linkages in the acyl chain domain that exhibited comparable in vivo adjuvant activity and lower toxicity than the natural product. Further modifications in the acyl chain domain and truncation of the linear tetrasaccharide domain led to identification of a trisaccharide variant with a simple carboxylic acid side chain that retained potent adjuvant activity, albeit with reemergence of toxicity. Conversely, an acyl chain analogue terminating in a free amine was inactive but enabled chemoselective functionalization with radiolabeled and fluorescent tags, yielding adjuvant-active saponin probes that, unlike inactive congeners, accumulated in the lymph nodes in vaccinated mice and internalized into dendritic cells. Subtle variations in length, stereochemistry, and conformational flexibility around the central glycosidic linkage provided QS-21 variants with adjuvant

  20. Development of Improved Vaccine Adjuvants Based on the Saponin Natural Product QS-21 through Chemical Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Conspectus Vaccines based on molecular subunit antigens are increasingly being investigated due to their improved safety and more precise targeting compared to classical whole-pathogen vaccines. However, subunit vaccines are inherently less immunogenic; thus, coadministration of an adjuvant to increase the immunogenicity of the antigen is often necessary to elicit a potent immune response. QS-21, an immunostimulatory saponin natural product, has been used as an adjuvant in conjunction with various vaccines in numerous clinical trials, but suffers from several inherent liabilities, including scarcity, chemical instability, and dose-limiting toxicity. Moreover, little is known about its mechanism of action. Over a decade-long effort, beginning at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and continuing at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC), the group of Prof. David Y. Gin accomplished the total synthesis of QS-21 and developed a practical semisynthetic approach to novel variants that overcome the liabilities of the natural product. First, semisynthetic QS-21 variants were designed with stable amide linkages in the acyl chain domain that exhibited comparable in vivo adjuvant activity and lower toxicity than the natural product. Further modifications in the acyl chain domain and truncation of the linear tetrasaccharide domain led to identification of a trisaccharide variant with a simple carboxylic acid side chain that retained potent adjuvant activity, albeit with reemergence of toxicity. Conversely, an acyl chain analogue terminating in a free amine was inactive but enabled chemoselective functionalization with radiolabeled and fluorescent tags, yielding adjuvant-active saponin probes that, unlike inactive congeners, accumulated in the lymph nodes in vaccinated mice and internalized into dendritic cells. Subtle variations in length, stereochemistry, and conformational flexibility around the central glycosidic linkage provided QS-21 variants with

  1. Shape memory polymer medical device

    DOEpatents

    Maitland, Duncan; Benett, William J.; Bearinger, Jane P.; Wilson, Thomas S.; Small, IV, Ward; Schumann, Daniel L.; Jensen, Wayne A.; Ortega, Jason M.; Marion, III, John E.; Loge, Jeffrey M.

    2010-06-29

    A system for removing matter from a conduit. The system includes the steps of passing a transport vehicle and a shape memory polymer material through the conduit, transmitting energy to the shape memory polymer material for moving the shape memory polymer material from a first shape to a second and different shape, and withdrawing the transport vehicle and the shape memory polymer material through the conduit carrying the matter.

  2. Play Memories and Place Identity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandberg, Anette

    2003-01-01

    This retrospective study examined play memories from childhood to adulthood of 478 university students between ages 20 and 62 as exhibited in drawings of play memories and questionnaire responses. The study focused on the role of the physical environment and place identity in play memories and individual identity development. Findings showed that…

  3. Origins of Adolescents' Autobiographical Memories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Elaine; Jack, Fiona; White, Naomi

    2010-01-01

    Adolescents (N = 46; M = 12.46 years) who had previously participated in a longitudinal study of autobiographical memory development narrated their early childhood memories, interpreted life events, and completed a family history questionnaire and language assessment. Three distinct components of adolescent memory emerged: (1) age of earliest…

  4. First Words and First Memories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Catriona M.; Conway, Martin A.

    2010-01-01

    In two experiments autobiographical memories from childhood were recalled to cue words naming common objects, locations, activities and emotions. Participants recalled their earliest specific memory associated with each word and dated their age at the time of the remembered event. A striking and specific finding emerged: age of earliest memory was…

  5. Dual redundant core memory systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, F. E.

    1972-01-01

    Electronic memory system consisting of series redundant drive switch circuits, triple redundant majority voted memory timing functions, and two data registers to provide functional dual redundancy is described. Signal flow through the circuits is illustrated and equence of events which occur within the memory system is explained.

  6. Windows Memory Forensic Data Visualization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-12

    WINDOWS MEMORY FORENSIC DATA VISUALIZATION THESIS J. Brendan Baum, Civilian, USAF AFIT...WINDOWS MEMORY FORENSIC DATA VISUALIZATION THESIS Presented to the Faculty Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Graduate School of...APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED AFIT-ENG-T-14-J-1 WINDOWS MEMORY FORENSIC DATA VISUALIZATION J. Brendan Baum, B.S

  7. Stroke and Episodic Memory Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Chun; Alexander, Michael P.

    2009-01-01

    Memory impairments are common after stroke, and the anatomical basis for impairments may be quite variable. To determine the range of stroke-related memory impairment, we identified all case reports and group studies through the Medline database and the Science Citation Index. There is no hypothesis about memory that is unique to stroke, but there…

  8. Memory Storage and Neural Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alkon, Daniel L.

    1989-01-01

    Investigates memory storage and molecular nature of associative-memory formation by analyzing Pavlovian conditioning in marine snails and rabbits. Presented is the design of a computer-based memory system (neural networks) using the rules acquired in the investigation. Reports that the artificial network recognized patterns well. (YP)

  9. Stress disrupts response memory retrieval.

    PubMed

    Guenzel, Friederike M; Wolf, Oliver T; Schwabe, Lars

    2013-08-01

    Stress effects on memory are well-known. Most studies, however, focused on the impact of stress on hippocampus-dependent 'declarative' memory processes. Less is known about whether stress influences also striatum-based memory processes, such as stimulus-response (S-R) memory. First evidence from rodent experiments shows that glucocorticoid stress hormones may enhance the consolidation of S-R memories. Whether stress affects also S-R memory retrieval remains largely elusive. Therefore, we tested in the present experiment in humans the effect of stress on the retrieval of S-R memories. Healthy men and women were trained to locate three objects in an S-R version of a virtual eight-arm radial maze. One week later, participants underwent a stressor or a control condition before their memory of the S-R task was tested. Our results showed that participants (n=43) who were exposed to the stressor before retention testing made significantly more errors in this test trial, suggesting that stress impaired S-R memory retrieval. Moreover, high cortisol concentrations were associated with reduced S-R memory. These findings indicate that stress may affect memory retrieval processes in humans beyond hippocampal 'declarative' memory.

  10. Memory Processes in Media Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellermann, Kathy

    1985-01-01

    Explores the role of memory in mediating mass communication effects. Examines (1) the nature of memory, (2) issues in retention and recall of media messages, (3) methods of promoting retention and recall of media messages, and (4) implications of memory processes for mass media effects. (PD)

  11. Motor Action and Emotional Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casasanto, Daniel; Dijkstra, Katinka

    2010-01-01

    Can simple motor actions affect how efficiently people retrieve emotional memories, and influence what they choose to remember? In Experiment 1, participants were prompted to retell autobiographical memories with either positive or negative valence, while moving marbles either upward or downward. They retrieved memories faster when the direction…

  12. The contribution of epigenetic memory to immunologic memory.

    PubMed

    Zediak, Valerie P; Wherry, E John; Berger, Shelley L

    2011-04-01

    Memory T lymphocytes are distinct from antigen-inexperienced naïve T cells in that memory T cells can respond more rapidly when they re-encounter a pathogen. Work over the past decade has begun to define the epigenetic underpinnings of the transcriptional component of the memory T cell response. An emerging theme is the persistence of an active chromatin signature at relevant gene loci in resting memory T cells, even when those genes are transcriptionally inactive. This gives strength to the concept of gene poising, and has shown that memory T lymphocytes are an ideal model in which to further define various mechanisms of epigenetic poising.

  13. Judgments of Associative Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maki, William S.

    2007-01-01

    Judgments of associative memory (JAM) were indexed by ratings given to pairs of cue and response words. The normed probabilities, p(response|cue), were obtained from free association norms. The ratings were linearly related to the probabilities. The JAM functions were characterized by high intercepts (approximately 50 on a 100 point scale) and…

  14. When Autobiographical Memory Begins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Mark L.; Courage, Mary L.; Edison, Shannon C.

    2003-01-01

    The authors review competing theories concerning the emergence and early development of autobiographical memory. It is argued that the differences between these accounts, although important, may be more apparent than real. The crux of these disagreements lies not in "what" processes are important, but rather, the role these different processes…

  15. Shape Memory Alloy Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumbick, Robert J. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention discloses and teaches a unique, remote optically controlled micro actuator particularly suitable for aerospace vehicle applications wherein hot gas, or in the alternative optical energy, is employed as the medium by which shape memory alloy elements are activated. In gas turbine powered aircraft the source of the hot gas may be the turbine engine compressor or turbine sections.

  16. Shape Memory Alloy Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumbick, Robert J. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention discloses and teaches a unique, remote optically controlled micro actuator particularly suitable for aerospace vehicle applications wherein hot gas, or in the alternative optical energy, is employed as the medium by which shape memory alloy elements are activated. In gas turbine powered aircraft the source of the hot gas may be the turbine engine compressor or turbine sections.

  17. Dreams Memories & Photography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Photography students spend a considerable amount of time working on technical issues in shooting, composing, editing, and processing prints. Another aspect of their learning should include the conception and communication of their ideas. A student's memories and dreams can serve as motivation to create images in visual art. Some artists claim that…

  18. Antenatal memories and psychopathology

    PubMed Central

    Neighbour, Roger

    1981-01-01

    A case is described of suicidal impulses apparently stemming from the patient's experience before and during his birth. By using a technique of `rebirthing', antenatal memories were relived and their traumatic effects resolved. Theoretical and practical accounts of rebirthing are given, and its significance for general practitioners is discussed. PMID:7338871

  19. Memorials: Art for Remembering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Art to Zoo: Teaching With the Power of Objects, 1995

    1995-01-01

    Throughout history, in all parts of the world, people have struggled with the problem of loss. Moving words have been written and beautiful objects created to preserve the memory of people and their achievements. This theme issue explores the different ways that people have been praised and remembered in works of art. An introduction suggests a…

  20. Memory Mechanisms in Grasping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hesse, Constanze; Franz, Volker H.

    2009-01-01

    The availability of visual information influences the execution of goal-directed movements. This is very prominent in memory conditions, where a delay is introduced between stimulus presentation and execution of the movement. The corresponding effects could be due to a decay of the visual information or to different processing mechanisms used for…

  1. The Grammar of Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Wayne

    2016-01-01

    This essay focuses on two sites of memory in my professional life. One is from my very early years of teaching, the second from about 10 years later. Each is centred on a moment of controversy in English curriculum in New South Wales, Australia, and each is to do with the teaching of writing and the supposed neglect of language study, including…

  2. A Balanced Memory Network

    PubMed Central

    Roudi, Yasser; Latham, Peter E

    2007-01-01

    A fundamental problem in neuroscience is understanding how working memory—the ability to store information at intermediate timescales, like tens of seconds—is implemented in realistic neuronal networks. The most likely candidate mechanism is the attractor network, and a great deal of effort has gone toward investigating it theoretically. Yet, despite almost a quarter century of intense work, attractor networks are not fully understood. In particular, there are still two unanswered questions. First, how is it that attractor networks exhibit irregular firing, as is observed experimentally during working memory tasks? And second, how many memories can be stored under biologically realistic conditions? Here we answer both questions by studying an attractor neural network in which inhibition and excitation balance each other. Using mean-field analysis, we derive a three-variable description of attractor networks. From this description it follows that irregular firing can exist only if the number of neurons involved in a memory is large. The same mean-field analysis also shows that the number of memories that can be stored in a network scales with the number of excitatory connections, a result that has been suggested for simple models but never shown for realistic ones. Both of these predictions are verified using simulations with large networks of spiking neurons. PMID:17845070

  3. Memory Loss and Retrieval

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Underlying the generally oblivious attitude of teachers and learners towards the past is insufficient respect for the role of memory in giving meaning to experience and access to knowledge. We shape our identity by making sense of our past and its relationship to present and future selves, a process that should be intensively cultivated when we…

  4. Radiation Tolerant Embedded Memory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 ...currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1 . REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 27-06-2003 2. REPORT TYPE SBIR...Tolerant Embedded Memory 1 Table of Contents: Table of Contents

  5. Bubble Memory Module.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    104 7-13 Four switch drive hybrid ........................................................................ 104 7-14...operation. Address Ready. - This signal is an output signal to the user which acknowledges that the module is busy. Input address is latched in the...expandable in 6.55 M bit increments. Detector noise is minimized by locating sense circuits, cell select switches , and memory cells on the same board

  6. The role of stress during memory reactivation on intrusive memories.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Jessica; Garber, Benjamin; Bryant, Richard A

    2015-09-01

    Intrusive memories are unwanted recollections that maintain distress in psychological disorders. Increasing evidence suggests that memories that are reactivated through retrieval become temporarily vulnerable to environmental or pharmacological manipulation, including changes in levels of circulating stress hormones. This study investigated the influence of stress during memory reactivation of an emotionally arousing trauma film on subsequent intrusive memories. Three groups of participants (N=63) viewed a trauma film depicting a serious car accident at baseline. Two days later (Time 2), one group received a reactivation induction following a socially evaluated cold pressor test (SECPT; Stress/Reactivation condition), whilst the second group reactivated the memory after a control procedure (Reactivation condition). A third group underwent the SECPT but was not asked to reactivate memory of the trauma film (Stress condition). Two days later (Time 3), all participants received a surprise cued memory recall test and intrusions questionnaire which they completed online. Results showed that those in the Stress/Reactivation group had higher intrusions scores than the other two groups, suggesting that acute stress promotes intrusive memories only when the memory trace is reactivated shortly afterwards. Increased cortisol predicted enhanced intrusive experiences in the Stress/Reactivation condition but not in the other conditions. This pattern of results suggests that acute stress during the reactivation of emotional material impacts on involuntary emotional memories. These findings suggest a possible explanation for the mechanism underlying the maintenance of intrusive memories in clinical disorders.

  7. The roots of modern oncology: from discovery of new antitumor anthracyclines to their clinical use.

    PubMed

    Cassinelli, Giuseppe

    2016-06-02

    In May 1960, the Farmitalia CEO Dr. Bertini and the director of the Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori of Milan Prof. Bucalossi (talent scout and city's Mayor) signed a research agreement for the discovery and development up to clinical trials of new natural antitumor agents. This agreement can be considered as a pioneering and fruitful example of a translational discovery program with relevant transatlantic connections. Owing to an eclectic Streptomyces, found near Castel del Monte (Apulia), and to the skilled and motivated participants of both institutions, a new natural antitumor drug, daunomycin, was ready for clinical trials within 3 years. Patent interference by the Farmitalia French partner was overcome by the good quality of the Italian drug and by the cooperation between Prof. Di Marco, director of the Istituto Ricerche Farmitalia Research Laboratories for Microbiology and Chemotherapy, and Prof. Karnofsky, head of the Sloan-Kettering Cancer Institute of New York, leading to the first transatlantic clinical trials. The search for daunomycin's sister anthracyclines led to the discovery and development of adriamycin, one of the best drugs born in Milan. This was the second act prologue of the history of Italian antitumor discovery and clinical oncology, which started in July 1969 when Prof. Di Marco sent Prof. Bonadonna the first vials of adriamycin (doxorubicin) to be tested in clinical trials. This article reviews the Milan scene in the 1960s, a city admired and noted for the outstanding scientific achievements of its private and public institutions in drugs and industrial product discovery.

  8. False memories in highly superior autobiographical memory individuals

    PubMed Central

    Patihis, Lawrence; Frenda, Steven J.; LePort, Aurora K. R.; Petersen, Nicole; Nichols, Rebecca M.; Stark, Craig E. L.; McGaugh, James L.; Loftus, Elizabeth F.

    2013-01-01

    The recent identification of highly superior autobiographical memory (HSAM) raised the possibility that there may be individuals who are immune to memory distortions. We measured HSAM participants’ and age- and sex-matched controls’ susceptibility to false memories using several research paradigms. HSAM participants and controls were both susceptible to false recognition of nonpresented critical lure words in an associative word-list task. In a misinformation task, HSAM participants showed higher overall false memory compared with that of controls for details in a photographic slideshow. HSAM participants were equally as likely as controls to mistakenly report they had seen nonexistent footage of a plane crash. Finding false memories in a superior-memory group suggests that malleable reconstructive mechanisms may be fundamental to episodic remembering. Paradoxically, HSAM individuals may retrieve abundant and accurate autobiographical memories using fallible reconstructive processes. PMID:24248358

  9. False memories in highly superior autobiographical memory individuals.

    PubMed

    Patihis, Lawrence; Frenda, Steven J; LePort, Aurora K R; Petersen, Nicole; Nichols, Rebecca M; Stark, Craig E L; McGaugh, James L; Loftus, Elizabeth F

    2013-12-24

    The recent identification of highly superior autobiographical memory (HSAM) raised the possibility that there may be individuals who are immune to memory distortions. We measured HSAM participants' and age- and sex-matched controls' susceptibility to false memories using several research paradigms. HSAM participants and controls were both susceptible to false recognition of nonpresented critical lure words in an associative word-list task. In a misinformation task, HSAM participants showed higher overall false memory compared with that of controls for details in a photographic slideshow. HSAM participants were equally as likely as controls to mistakenly report they had seen nonexistent footage of a plane crash. Finding false memories in a superior-memory group suggests that malleable reconstructive mechanisms may be fundamental to episodic remembering. Paradoxically, HSAM individuals may retrieve abundant and accurate autobiographical memories using fallible reconstructive processes.

  10. Autoimmune effector memory T cells: the bad and the good

    PubMed Central

    Devarajan, Priyadharshini; Chen, Zhibin

    2014-01-01

    Immunological memory is a hallmark of adaptive immunity, a defense mechanism endowed to vertebrates during evolution. However, an autoimmune pathogenic role of memory lymphocytes is also emerging with accumulating evidence, despite reasonable skepticism on their existence in a chronic setting of autoimmune damage. It is conceivable that autoimmune memory would be particularly harmful since memory cells would constantly “remember” and attack the body's healthy tissues. It is even more detrimental given the resistance of memory T cells to immunomodulatory therapies. In this review, we focus on self-antigen-reactive CD4+ effector memory T (TEM) cells, surveying the evidence for the role of the TEM compartment in autoimmune pathogenesis. We will also discuss the role of TEM cells in chronic and acute infectious disease settings and how they compare to their counterparts in autoimmune diseases. With their long-lasting potency, the autoimmune TEM cells could also play a critical role in anti-tumor immunity, which may be largely based on their reactivity to self-antigens. Therefore, although autoimmune TEM cells are “bad” due to their role in relentless perpetration of tissue damage in autoimmune disease settings, they are unlikely a by-product of industrial development along the modern surge of autoimmune disease prevalence. Rather, they may be a product of evolution for their “good” in clearing damaged host cells in chronic infections and malignant cells in cancer settings. PMID:24203440

  11. About Sleep's Role in Memory

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Over more than a century of research has established the fact that sleep benefits the retention of memory. In this review we aim to comprehensively cover the field of “sleep and memory” research by providing a historical perspective on concepts and a discussion of more recent key findings. Whereas initial theories posed a passive role for sleep enhancing memories by protecting them from interfering stimuli, current theories highlight an active role for sleep in which memories undergo a process of system consolidation during sleep. Whereas older research concentrated on the role of rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep, recent work has revealed the importance of slow-wave sleep (SWS) for memory consolidation and also enlightened some of the underlying electrophysiological, neurochemical, and genetic mechanisms, as well as developmental aspects in these processes. Specifically, newer findings characterize sleep as a brain state optimizing memory consolidation, in opposition to the waking brain being optimized for encoding of memories. Consolidation originates from reactivation of recently encoded neuronal memory representations, which occur during SWS and transform respective representations for integration into long-term memory. Ensuing REM sleep may stabilize transformed memories. While elaborated with respect to hippocampus-dependent memories, the concept of an active redistribution of memory representations from networks serving as temporary store into long-term stores might hold also for non-hippocampus-dependent memory, and even for nonneuronal, i.e., immunological memories, giving rise to the idea that the offline consolidation of memory during sleep represents a principle of long-term memory formation established in quite different physiological systems. PMID:23589831

  12. The Relationships of Working Memory, Secondary Memory, and General Fluid Intelligence: Working Memory Is Special

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelton, Jill Talley; Elliott, Emily M.; Matthews, Russell A.; Hill, B. D.; Gouvier, Wm. Drew

    2010-01-01

    Recent efforts have been made to elucidate the commonly observed link between working memory and reasoning ability. The results have been inconsistent, with some work suggesting that the emphasis placed on retrieval from secondary memory by working memory tests is the driving force behind this association (Mogle, Lovett, Stawski, & Sliwinski,…

  13. Acute memory deficits in chemotherapy-treated adults.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Oana C; Mayes, Andrew; McCabe, Martin G; Talmi, Deborah

    2017-03-13

    Data from research on amnesia and epilepsy are equivocal with regards to the dissociation, shown in animal models, between rapid and slow long-term memory consolidation. Cancer treatments have lasting disruptive effects on memory and on brain structures associated with memory, but their acute effects on synaptic consolidation are unknown. We investigated the hypothesis that cancer treatment selectively impairs slow synaptic consolidation. Cancer patients and their matched controls were administered a novel list-learning task modelled on the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test. Learning, forgetting, and retrieval were tested before, and one day after patients' first chemotherapy treatment. Due to difficulties recruiting cancer patients at that sensitive time, we were only able to study 10 patients and their matched controls. Patients exhibited treatment-dependent accelerated forgetting over 24 hours compared to their own pre-treatment performance and to the performance of control participants, in agreement with our hypothesis. The number of intrusions increased after treatment, suggesting retrieval deficits. Future research with larger samples should adapt our methods to distinguish between consolidation and retrieval causes for treatment-dependent accelerated forgetting. The presence of significant accelerated forgetting in our small sample is indicative of a potentially large acute effect of chemotherapy treatment on forgetting, with potentially clinically relevant implications.

  14. Atomic memory access hardware implementations

    DOEpatents

    Ahn, Jung Ho; Erez, Mattan; Dally, William J

    2015-02-17

    Atomic memory access requests are handled using a variety of systems and methods. According to one example method, a data-processing circuit having an address-request generator that issues requests to a common memory implements a method of processing the requests using a memory-access intervention circuit coupled between the generator and the common memory. The method identifies a current atomic-memory access request from a plurality of memory access requests. A data set is stored that corresponds to the current atomic-memory access request in a data storage circuit within the intervention circuit. It is determined whether the current atomic-memory access request corresponds to at least one previously-stored atomic-memory access request. In response to determining correspondence, the current request is implemented by retrieving data from the common memory. The data is modified in response to the current request and at least one other access request in the memory-access intervention circuit.

  15. Sleep deprivation and false memories.

    PubMed

    Frenda, Steven J; Patihis, Lawrence; Loftus, Elizabeth F; Lewis, Holly C; Fenn, Kimberly M

    2014-09-01

    Many studies have investigated factors that affect susceptibility to false memories. However, few have investigated the role of sleep deprivation in the formation of false memories, despite overwhelming evidence that sleep deprivation impairs cognitive function. We examined the relationship between self-reported sleep duration and false memories and the effect of 24 hr of total sleep deprivation on susceptibility to false memories. We found that under certain conditions, sleep deprivation can increase the risk of developing false memories. Specifically, sleep deprivation increased false memories in a misinformation task when participants were sleep deprived during event encoding, but did not have a significant effect when the deprivation occurred after event encoding. These experiments are the first to investigate the effect of sleep deprivation on susceptibility to false memories, which can have dire consequences.

  16. Memory loss in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Jahn, Holger

    2013-12-01

    Loss of memory is among the first symptoms reported by patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease (AD) and by their caretakers. Working memory and long-term declarative memory are affected early during the course of the disease. The individual pattern of impaired memory functions correlates with parameters of structural or functional brain integrity. AD pathology interferes with the formation of memories from the molecular level to the framework of neural networks. The investigation of AD memory loss helps to identify the involved neural structures, such as the default mode network, the influence of epigenetic and genetic factors, such as ApoE4 status, and evolutionary aspects of human cognition. Clinically, the analysis of memory assists the definition of AD subtypes, disease grading, and prognostic predictions. Despite new AD criteria that allow the earlier diagnosis of the disease by inclusion of biomarkers derived from cerebrospinal fluid or hippocampal volume analysis, neuropsychological testing remains at the core of AD diagnosis.

  17. Vector computer memory bank contention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, D. H.

    1985-01-01

    A number of vector supercomputers feature very large memories. Unfortunately the large capacity memory chips that are used in these computers are much slower than the fast central processing unit (CPU) circuitry. As a result, memory bank reservation times (in CPU ticks) are much longer than on previous generations of computers. A consequence of these long reservation times is that memory bank contention is sharply increased, resulting in significantly lowered performance rates. The phenomenon of memory bank contention in vector computers is analyzed using both a Markov chain model and a Monte Carlo simulation program. The results of this analysis indicate that future generations of supercomputers must either employ much faster memory chips or else feature very large numbers of independent memory banks.

  18. Vector computer memory bank contention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, David H.

    1987-01-01

    A number of vector supercomputers feature very large memories. Unfortunately the large capacity memory chips that are used in these computers are much slower than the fast central processing unit (CPU) circuitry. As a result, memory bank reservation times (in CPU ticks) are much longer than on previous generations of computers. A consequence of these long reservation times is that memory bank contention is sharply increased, resulting in significantly lowered performance rates. The phenomenon of memory bank contention in vector computers is analyzed using both a Markov chain model and a Monte Carlo simulation program. The results of this analysis indicate that future generations of supercomputers must either employ much faster memory chips or else feature very large numbers of independent memory banks.

  19. Intracranial recordings and human memory.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Elizabeth L; Knight, Robert T

    2015-04-01

    Recent work involving intracranial recording during human memory performance provides superb spatiotemporal resolution on mnemonic processes. These data demonstrate that the cortical regions identified in neuroimaging studies of memory fall into temporally distinct networks and the hippocampal theta activity reported in animal memory literature also plays a central role in human memory. Memory is linked to activity at multiple interacting frequencies, ranging from 1 to 500Hz. High-frequency responses and coupling between different frequencies suggest that frontal cortex activity is critical to human memory processes, as well as a potential key role for the thalamus in neocortical oscillations. Future research will inform unresolved questions in the neuroscience of human memory and guide creation of stimulation protocols to facilitate function in the damaged brain.

  20. Method and apparatus for faulty memory utilization

    DOEpatents

    Cher, Chen-Yong; Andrade Costa, Carlos H.; Park, Yoonho; Rosenburg, Bryan S.; Ryu, Kyung D.

    2016-04-19

    A method for faulty memory utilization in a memory system includes: obtaining information regarding memory health status of at least one memory page in the memory system; determining an error tolerance of the memory page when the information regarding memory health status indicates that a failure is predicted to occur in an area of the memory system affecting the memory page; initiating a migration of data stored in the memory page when it is determined that the data stored in the memory page is non-error-tolerant; notifying at least one application regarding a predicted operating system failure and/or a predicted application failure when it is determined that data stored in the memory page is non-error-tolerant and cannot be migrated; and notifying at least one application regarding the memory failure predicted to occur when it is determined that data stored in the memory page is error-tolerant.

  1. Content addressable memory project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Josh; Levy, Saul; Smith, D.; Wei, S.; Miyake, K.; Murdocca, M.

    1991-01-01

    The progress on the Rutgers CAM (Content Addressable Memory) Project is described. The overall design of the system is completed at the architectural level and described. The machine is composed of two kinds of cells: (1) the CAM cells which include both memory and processor, and support local processing within each cell; and (2) the tree cells, which have smaller instruction set, and provide global processing over the CAM cells. A parameterized design of the basic CAM cell is completed. Progress was made on the final specification of the CPS. The machine architecture was driven by the design of algorithms whose requirements are reflected in the resulted instruction set(s). A few of these algorithms are described.

  2. Plant electrical memory.

    PubMed

    Volkov, Alexander G; Carrell, Holly; Adesina, Tejumade; Markin, Vladislav S; Jovanov, Emil

    2008-07-01

    Electrical signaling, short-term memory and rapid closure of the carnivorous plant Dionaea muscipula Ellis (Venus flytrap) have been attracting the attention of researchers since the XIX century. We found that the electrical stimulus between a midrib and a lobe closes the Venus flytrap upper leaf without mechanical stimulation of trigger hairs. The closing time of Venus flytrap by electrical stimulation is the same as mechanically induced closing. Transmission of a single electrical charge between a lobe and the midrib causes closure of the trap and induces an electrical signal propagating between both lobes and midrib. The Venus flytrap can accumulate small subthreshold charges, and when the threshold value is reached, the trap closes. Repeated application of smaller charges demonstrates the summation of stimuli. The cumulative character of electrical stimuli points to the existence of short-term electrical memory in the Venus flytrap.

  3. Memory for humorous cartoons.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, S R; Williams, A R

    2001-03-01

    Incidental memory for three types of cartoons was compared: original cartoons, literal translations of the originals, and weird cartoons created by inserting incongruous material into the literal translations. In Experiment 1, the three types of cartoons were mixed together in lists. In Experiment 2, each list contained only two cartoon types. In both experiments, original cartoons were remembered better than the literal and the weird cartoons, whereas the literal and the weird cartoons were equally well remembered. The detection of incongruities, or attempts to resolve those incongruities, cannot adequately explain the observed humor effects. The results were also inconsistent with both rehearsal and distinctiveness interpretations. Rather, humor per se appears to support good memory performance. Perhaps participants elaborated or gave sustained attention to humorous material at the expense of less humorous material.

  4. Place memory in crickets

    PubMed Central

    Wessnitzer, Jan; Mangan, Michael; Webb, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Certain insect species are known to relocate nest or food sites using landmarks, but the generality of this capability among insects, and whether insect place memory can be used in novel task settings, is not known. We tested the ability of crickets to use surrounding visual cues to relocate an invisible target in an analogue of the Morris water maze, a standard paradigm for spatial memory tests on rodents. Adult female Gryllus bimaculatus were released into an arena with a floor heated to an aversive temperature, with one hidden cool spot. Over 10 trials, the time taken to find the cool spot decreased significantly. The best performance was obtained when a natural scene was provided on the arena walls. Animals can relocate the position from novel starting points. When the scene is rotated, they preferentially approach the fictive target position corresponding to the rotation. We note that this navigational capability does not necessarily imply the animal has an internal spatial representation. PMID:18230590

  5. Misaligned feeding impairs memories

    PubMed Central

    Loh, Dawn H; Jami, Shekib A; Flores, Richard E; Truong, Danny; Ghiani, Cristina A; O’Dell, Thomas J; Colwell, Christopher S

    2015-01-01

    Robust sleep/wake rhythms are important for health and cognitive function. Unfortunately, many people are living in an environment where their circadian system is challenged by inappropriate meal- or work-times. Here we scheduled food access to the sleep time and examined the impact on learning and memory in mice. Under these conditions, we demonstrate that the molecular clock in the master pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), is unaltered while the molecular clock in the hippocampus is synchronized by the timing of food availability. This chronic circadian misalignment causes reduced hippocampal long term potentiation and total CREB expression. Importantly this mis-timed feeding resulted in dramatic deficits in hippocampal-dependent learning and memory. Our findings suggest that the timing of meals have far-reaching effects on hippocampal physiology and learned behaviour. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09460.001 PMID:26652002

  6. TED KYCIA MEMORIAL SYMPOSIUM.

    SciTech Connect

    LITTENBERG, L.; RUBINSTEIN, R.; SAMIOS, N.; LI, K.; GIACOMELLI, G.; MOCKETT, P.; CARROLL, A.; JOHNSON, R.; BRYMAN, D.; TIPPENS, B.

    2000-05-19

    On the afternoon of May 19 2000, a Memorial Seminar was held in the BNL physics Large Seminar Room to honor the memory of Ted Kyeia, a prominent particle physicist who had been a member of the BNL staff for 40 years. Although it was understandably a somewhat sad occasion because Ted was no longer with us, nevertheless there was much for his colleagues and friends to celebrate in recalling the outstanding contributions that he had made in those four decades. The Seminar speakers were all people who had worked with Ted during that period; each discussed one aspect of his career, but also included anecdotes and personal reminiscences. This booklet contains the Seminar program, listing the speakers, and also copies of transparencies of the talks (and one paper which was a later expansion of a talk); sadly, not all of the personal remarks appeared on the transparencies.

  7. Mechanisms of epigenetic memory

    PubMed Central

    D’Urso, Agustina; Brickner, Jason H.

    2014-01-01

    Although genetics play an essential role in defining an organism’s development, morphology and physiology, epigenetic mechanisms play an essential role in modulating these properties by regulating gene expression. During development, epigenetic mechanisms establish stable gene expression patterns to ensure proper differentiation. Epigenetic mechanisms also allow organisms to adapt to environmental changes and previous experiences can impact the future responsiveness of an organism to a stimulus over long time scales and even over generations. Here we discuss the concept of epigenetic memory, defined as the stable propagation of a change in gene expression or potentially induced by developmental or environmental stimuli. We highlight three distinct paradigms of epigenetic memory that operate on different time scales. PMID:24780085

  8. Optoelectronic associative memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An associative optical memory including an input spatial light modulator (SLM) in the form of an edge enhanced liquid crystal light valve (LCLV) and a pair of memory SLM's in the form of liquid crystal televisions (LCTV's) forms a matrix array of an input image which is cross correlated with a matrix array of stored images. The correlation product is detected and nonlinearly amplified to illuminate a replica of the stored image array to select the stored image correlating with the input image. The LCLV is edge enhanced by reducing the bias frequency and voltage and rotating its orientation. The edge enhancement and nonlinearity of the photodetection improves the orthogonality of the stored image. The illumination of the replicate stored image provides a clean stored image, uncontaminated by the image comparison process.

  9. Learning, memory, and synesthesia.

    PubMed

    Witthoft, Nathan; Winawer, Jonathan

    2013-03-01

    People with color-grapheme synesthesia experience color when viewing written letters or numerals, usually with a particular color evoked by each grapheme. Here, we report on data from 11 color-grapheme synesthetes who had startlingly similar color-grapheme pairings traceable to childhood toys containing colored letters. These are the first and only data to show learned synesthesia of this kind in more than a single individual. Whereas some researchers have focused on genetic and perceptual aspects of synesthesia, our results indicate that a complete explanation of synesthesia must also incorporate a central role for learning and memory. We argue that these two positions can be reconciled by thinking of synesthesia as the automatic retrieval of highly specific mnemonic associations, in which perceptual contents are brought to mind in a manner akin to mental imagery or the perceptual-reinstatement effects found in memory studies.

  10. Sparse distributed memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denning, Peter J.

    1989-01-01

    Sparse distributed memory was proposed be Pentti Kanerva as a realizable architecture that could store large patterns and retrieve them based on partial matches with patterns representing current sensory inputs. This memory exhibits behaviors, both in theory and in experiment, that resemble those previously unapproached by machines - e.g., rapid recognition of faces or odors, discovery of new connections between seemingly unrelated ideas, continuation of a sequence of events when given a cue from the middle, knowing that one doesn't know, or getting stuck with an answer on the tip of one's tongue. These behaviors are now within reach of machines that can be incorporated into the computing systems of robots capable of seeing, talking, and manipulating. Kanerva's theory is a break with the Western rationalistic tradition, allowing a new interpretation of learning and cognition that respects biology and the mysteries of individual human beings.

  11. Fuzzy associative memories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosko, Bart

    1991-01-01

    Mappings between fuzzy cubes are discussed. This level of abstraction provides a surprising and fruitful alternative to the propositional and predicate-calculas reasoning techniques used in expert systems. It allows one to reason with sets instead of propositions. Discussed here are fuzzy and neural function estimators, neural vs. fuzzy representation of structured knowledge, fuzzy vector-matrix multiplication, and fuzzy associative memory (FAM) system architecture.

  12. Shape memory alloy actuator

    DOEpatents

    Varma, Venugopal K.

    2001-01-01

    An actuator for cycling between first and second positions includes a first shaped memory alloy (SMA) leg, a second SMA leg. At least one heating/cooling device is thermally connected to at least one of the legs, each heating/cooling device capable of simultaneously heating one leg while cooling the other leg. The heating/cooling devices can include thermoelectric and/or thermoionic elements.

  13. Epigenetic memory in plants

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Mayumi; Paszkowski, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetics refers to heritable changes in patterns of gene expression that occur without alterations in DNA sequence. The epigenetic mechanisms involve covalent modifications of DNA and histones, which affect transcriptional activity of chromatin. Since chromatin states can be propagated through mitotic and meiotic divisions, epigenetic mechanisms are thought to provide heritable ‘cellular memory’. Here, we review selected examples of epigenetic memory in plants and briefly discuss underlying mechanisms. PMID:25104823

  14. Shape Memory Actuator System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-07-31

    The advantage in utilizing 15 shape-memory cables made of Nitinol for size reduction of the remote control actuator system is 1 Fi well suited for...a submarine environment because of its non-magnetic and corrosion resistance 17 properties. Use of thermoelastic Nitinol introduces other...problems because of the cooling and 18 resetting properties of Nitinol cables. It is therefore an important object of the present invention 19 on to

  15. Memory metal actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruoff, C. F. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A mechanical actuator can be constructed by employing a plurality of memory metal actuator elements in parallel to control the amount of actuating force. In order to facilitate direct control by digital control signals provided by a computer or the like, the actuating elements may vary in stiffness according to a binary relationship. The cooling or reset time of the actuator elements can be reduced by employing Peltier junction cooling assemblies in the actuator.

  16. Representation in Memory.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-07

    notion of the schema finds its way into modern cognitive psychology from the writings of Bartlett (1932) and from Piaget (1952). Throughout most of its...Anderson. Cognitive algebra: Information integration applied to social attribution. December, 1972. 32. Jean H. Handler and Nancy L. Stein. Recall...knowledge in memory. January, 1976. 56. David E. Rumelhart. Toward an interactive model of reading. March, 1976. 57. Jean M. Handler, Nancy S

  17. [From memories about war].

    PubMed

    Spivak, B A

    2010-04-01

    The article presents publication of memories of a military physician Spivak B.A., finished the First Kiev medical institute in 1941. The author held rank: from August 1941--chief of sanitary service of a separated battalion, April 1942-June 1945--chief of operation-bandaging unit of 246 SMSB SD. After war served in military treatment institutes on ranks of surgical profile, finished the military service in the rank of chief of surgical unit of Kovel garrison hospital in 1964.

  18. KLRG1 restricts memory T cell antitumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Wan, Shanshan; Tao, Kaixiong; Wang, Guobin; Zhao, Ende

    2016-01-01

    Killer cell lectin-like receptor subfamily G member 1 (KLRG1) has been found on human memory T lymphocytes. However, the roles of KLRG1 on human T cells especially in tumor microenvironment have not been fully understood. Our results showed KLRG1 expression on T cells significantly increased in tumor microenvironment. KLRG1+ T cells exhibited poor proliferative capacity with decreased effector cytokine production. Meanwhile, KLRG1+ T cells expressed abundant pro-inflammatory cytokines and demonstrated high level of Foxp3 expression. KLRG1+ T cells showed decreased expression of miRNA-101 and higher expression of CtBP2. Our results indicated KLRG1 might contribute to the impaired antitumor immunity of memory T cells in tumor microenvironment. Thus, repressing KLRG1 on human memory T cells might be a novel therapeutics against cancer. PMID:27557510

  19. Colon cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Colorectal cancer; Cancer - colon; Rectal cancer; Cancer - rectum; Adenocarcinoma - colon; Colon - adenocarcinoma ... In the United States, colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of deaths due to cancer. Early diagnosis can often lead to a complete cure. Almost ...

  20. Cancer Vaccines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  1. Eye Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer > Eye Cancer > Eye Cancer: Overview Request Permissions Eye Cancer: Overview Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial ... trained to treat intraocular cancer. Parts of the eye The eye is the organ that collects light ...

  2. Sleep Loss Produces False Memories

    PubMed Central

    Diekelmann, Susanne; Landolt, Hans-Peter; Lahl, Olaf; Born, Jan; Wagner, Ullrich

    2008-01-01

    People sometimes claim with high confidence to remember events that in fact never happened, typically due to strong semantic associations with actually encoded events. Sleep is known to provide optimal neurobiological conditions for consolidation of memories for long-term storage, whereas sleep deprivation acutely impairs retrieval of stored memories. Here, focusing on the role of sleep-related memory processes, we tested whether false memories can be created (a) as enduring memory representations due to a consolidation-associated reorganization of new memory representations during post-learning sleep and/or (b) as an acute retrieval-related phenomenon induced by sleep deprivation at memory testing. According to the Deese, Roediger, McDermott (DRM) false memory paradigm, subjects learned lists of semantically associated words (e.g., “night”, “dark”, “coal”,…), lacking the strongest common associate or theme word (here: “black”). Subjects either slept or stayed awake immediately after learning, and they were either sleep deprived or not at recognition testing 9, 33, or 44 hours after learning. Sleep deprivation at retrieval, but not sleep following learning, critically enhanced false memories of theme words. This effect was abolished by caffeine administration prior to retrieval, indicating that adenosinergic mechanisms can contribute to the generation of false memories associated with sleep loss. PMID:18946511

  3. Unifying Memory and Database Transactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Ricardo J.; Lourenço, João M.

    Software Transactional Memory is a concurrency control technique gaining increasing popularity, as it provides high-level concurrency control constructs and eases the development of highly multi-threaded applications. But this easiness comes at the expense of restricting the operations that can be executed within a memory transaction, and operations such as terminal and file I/O are either not allowed or incur in serious performance penalties. Database I/O is another example of operations that usually are not allowed within a memory transaction. This paper proposes to combine memory and database transactions in a single unified model, benefiting from the ACID properties of the database transactions and from the speed of main memory data processing. The new unified model covers, without differentiating, both memory and database operations. Thus, the users are allowed to freely intertwine memory and database accesses within the same transaction, knowing that the memory and database contents will always remain consistent and that the transaction will atomically abort or commit the operations in both memory and database. This approach allows to increase the granularity of the in-memory atomic actions and hence, simplifies the reasoning about them.

  4. Sleep loss produces false memories.

    PubMed

    Diekelmann, Susanne; Landolt, Hans-Peter; Lahl, Olaf; Born, Jan; Wagner, Ullrich

    2008-01-01

    People sometimes claim with high confidence to remember events that in fact never happened, typically due to strong semantic associations with actually encoded events. Sleep is known to provide optimal neurobiological conditions for consolidation of memories for long-term storage, whereas sleep deprivation acutely impairs retrieval of stored memories. Here, focusing on the role of sleep-related memory processes, we tested whether false memories can be created (a) as enduring memory representations due to a consolidation-associated reorganization of new memory representations during post-learning sleep and/or (b) as an acute retrieval-related phenomenon induced by sleep deprivation at memory testing. According to the Deese, Roediger, McDermott (DRM) false memory paradigm, subjects learned lists of semantically associated words (e.g., "night", "dark", "coal",...), lacking the strongest common associate or theme word (here: "black"). Subjects either slept or stayed awake immediately after learning, and they were either sleep deprived or not at recognition testing 9, 33, or 44 hours after learning. Sleep deprivation at retrieval, but not sleep following learning, critically enhanced false memories of theme words. This effect was abolished by caffeine administration prior to retrieval, indicating that adenosinergic mechanisms can contribute to the generation of false memories associated with sleep loss.

  5. Predicting confidence in flashbulb memories.

    PubMed

    Day, Martin V; Ross, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Years after a shocking news event many people confidently report details of their flashbulb memories (e.g., what they were doing). People's confidence is a defining feature of their flashbulb memories, but it is not well understood. We tested a model that predicted confidence in flashbulb memories. In particular we examined whether people's social bond with the target of a news event predicts confidence. At a first session shortly after the death of Michael Jackson participants reported their sense of attachment to Michael Jackson, as well as their flashbulb memories and emotional and other reactions to Jackson's death. At a second session approximately 18 months later they reported their flashbulb memories and confidence in those memories. Results supported our proposed model. A stronger sense of attachment to Jackson was related to reports of more initial surprise, emotion, and rehearsal during the first session. Participants' bond with Michael Jackson predicted their confidence but not the consistency of their flashbulb memories 18 months later. We also examined whether participants' initial forecasts regarding the persistence of their flashbulb memories predicted the durability of their memories. Participants' initial forecasts were more strongly related to participants' subsequent confidence than to the actual consistency of their memories.

  6. Dreams are made of memories, but maybe not for memory.

    PubMed

    Blagrove, Mark; Ruby, Perrine; Eichenlaub, Jean-Baptiste

    2013-12-01

    Llewellyn's claim that rapid eye movement (REM) dream imagery may be related to the processes involved in memory consolidation during sleep is plausible. However, whereas there is voluntary and deliberate intention behind the construction of images in the ancient art of memory (AAOM) method, there is a lack of intentionality in producing dream images. The memory for dreams is also fragile, and dependent on encoding once awake.

  7. Investigating Memory Development in Children and Infantile Amnesia in Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazemi Tari, Somayeh

    2008-01-01

    Although many researchers have worked on memory development, still little is known about what develops in memory development. When one reviews the literature about memory, she encounters many types of memories such as short term vs. long term memory, working memory, explicit vs. implicit memory, trans-saccadic memory, autobiographical memory,…

  8. The Nature of Individual Differences in Working Memory Capacity: Active Maintenance in Primary Memory and Controlled Search from Secondary Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unsworth, Nash; Engle, Randall W.

    2007-01-01

    Studies examining individual differences in working memory capacity have suggested that individuals with low working memory capacities demonstrate impaired performance on a variety of attention and memory tasks compared with individuals with high working memory capacities. This working memory limitation can be conceived of as arising from 2…

  9. Sleep enhances false memories depending on general memory performance.

    PubMed

    Diekelmann, Susanne; Born, Jan; Wagner, Ullrich

    2010-04-02

    Memory is subject to dynamic changes, sometimes giving rise to the formation of false memories due to biased processes of consolidation or retrieval. Sleep is known to benefit memory consolidation through an active reorganization of representations whereas acute sleep deprivation impairs retrieval functions. Here, we investigated whether sleep after learning and sleep deprivation at retrieval enhance the generation of false memories in a free recall test. According to the Deese, Roediger, McDermott (DRM) false memory paradigm, subjects learned lists of semantically associated words (e.g., "night", "dark", "coal", etc.), lacking the strongest common associate or theme word (here: "black"). Free recall was tested after 9h following a night of sleep, a night of wakefulness (sleep deprivation) or daytime wakefulness. Compared with memory performance after a retention period of daytime wakefulness, both post-learning nocturnal sleep as well as acute sleep deprivation at retrieval significantly enhanced false recall of theme words. However, these effects were only observed in subjects with low general memory performance. These data point to two different ways in which sleep affects false memory generation through semantic generalization: one acts during consolidation on the memory trace per se, presumably by active reorganization of the trace in the post-learning sleep period. The other is related to the recovery function of sleep and affects cognitive control processes of retrieval. Both effects are unmasked when the material is relatively weakly encoded.

  10. Vulva cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer - perineum; Cancer - vulvar; Genital warts - vulvar cancer; HPV - vulvar cancer ... is rare. Risk factors include: Human papilloma virus (HPV, or genital warts ) infection in women under age ...

  11. Towards Terabit Memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoefflinger, Bernd

    Memories have been the major yardstick for the continuing validity of Moore's law. In single-transistor-per-Bit dynamic random-access memories (DRAM), the number of bits per chip pretty much gives us the number of transistors. For decades, DRAM's have offered the largest storage capacity per chip. However, DRAM does not scale any longer, both in density and voltage, severely limiting its power efficiency to 10 fJ/b. A differential DRAM would gain four-times in density and eight-times in energy. Static CMOS RAM (SRAM) with its six transistors/cell is gaining in reputation because it scales well in cell size and operating voltage so that its fundamental advantage of speed, non-destructive read-out and low-power standby could lead to just 2.5 electrons/bit in standby and to a dynamic power efficiency of 2aJ/b. With a projected 2020 density of 16 Gb/cm², the SRAM would be as dense as normal DRAM and vastly better in power efficiency, which would mean a major change in the architecture and market scenario for DRAM versus SRAM. Non-volatile Flash memory have seen two quantum jumps in density well beyond the roadmap: Multi-Bit storage per transistor and high-density TSV (through-silicon via) technology. The number of electrons required per Bit on the storage gate has been reduced since their first realization in 1996 by more than an order of magnitude to 400 electrons/Bit in 2010 for a complexity of 32Gbit per chip at the 32 nm node. Chip stacking of eight chips with TSV has produced a 32GByte solid-state drive (SSD). A stack of 32 chips with 2 b/cell at the 16 nm node will reach a density of 2.5 Terabit/cm². Non-volatile memory with a density of 10 × 10 nm²/Bit is the target for widespread development. Phase-change memory (PCM) and resistive memory (RRAM) lead in cell density, and they will reach 20 Gb/cm² in 2D and higher with 3D chip stacking. This is still almost an order-of-magnitude less than Flash. However, their read-out speed is ~10-times faster, with as yet

  12. Black phosphorus nonvolatile transistor memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dain; Choi, Yongsuk; Hwang, Euyheon; Kang, Moon Sung; Lee, Seungwoo; Cho, Jeong Ho

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrated nanofloating gate transistor memory devices (NFGTMs) using mechanically-exfoliated few-layered black phosphorus (BP) channels and gold nanoparticle (AuNPs) charge trapping layers. The resulting BP-NFGTMs exhibited excellent memory performances, including the five-level data storage, large memory window (58.2 V), stable retention (104 s), and cyclic endurance (1000 cycles).We demonstrated nanofloating gate transistor memory devices (NFGTMs) using mechanically-exfoliated few-layered black phosphorus (BP) channels and gold nanoparticle (AuNPs) charge trapping layers. The resulting BP-NFGTMs exhibited excellent memory performances, including the five-level data storage, large memory window (58.2 V), stable retention (104 s), and cyclic endurance (1000 cycles). Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr02078j

  13. Memory dynamics in attractor networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Guoqi; Ramanathan, Kiruthika; Ning, Ning; Shi, Luping; Wen, Changyun

    2015-01-01

    As can be represented by neurons and their synaptic connections, attractor networks are widely believed to underlie biological memory systems and have been used extensively in recent years to model the storage and retrieval process of memory. In this paper, we propose a new energy function, which is nonnegative and attains zero values only at the desired memory patterns. An attractor network is designed based on the proposed energy function. It is shown that the desired memory patterns are stored as the stable equilibrium points of the attractor network. To retrieve a memory pattern, an initial stimulus input is presented to the network, and its states converge to one of stable equilibrium points. Consequently, the existence of the spurious points, that is, local maxima, saddle points, or other local minima which are undesired memory patterns, can be avoided. The simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  14. Memory B cells: total recall.

    PubMed

    Phan, Tri Giang; Tangye, Stuart G

    2017-03-28

    Immunological memory is a cornerstone of adaptive immune responses in higher vertebrates. The remarkable ability to generate memory cells following Ag exposure, in the context of natural infection or immunization, provides long-lived protection against infectious diseases, often for the hosts' lifetime. Indeed, the generation of memory B cells and long-lived plasma cells underpins the success of most vaccines. The concept of immunological memory is not new-it was first proposed nearly 2500 years ago. While our understanding of the complexities of humoral and cell-mediated memory continues to evolve, important aspects of this process remain unresolved. Here, we will provide an overview of recent advances in B-cell memory in mice and humans, and in health and disease.

  15. Memory distortion: an adaptive perspective

    PubMed Central

    Schacter, Daniel L.; Guerin, Scott A.; St. Jacques, Peggy L.

    2011-01-01

    Memory is prone to distortions that can have serious consequences in everyday life. Here we integrate emerging evidence that several types of memory distortions – imagination inflation, gist-based and associative memory errors, and post-event misinformation – reflect adaptive cognitive processes that contribute to the efficient functioning of memory, but produce distortions as a consequence of doing so. We consider recent cognitive and neuroimaging studies that link these distortions with adaptive processes, including simulation of future events, semantic and contextual encoding, creativity, and memory updating. We also discuss new evidence concerning factors that can influence the occurrence of memory distortions, such as sleep and retrieval conditions, as well as conceptual issues related to the development of an adaptive perspective. PMID:21908231

  16. Motivated recruitment of autobiographical memories.

    PubMed

    Sanitioso, R; Kunda, Z; Fong, G T

    1990-08-01

    We hypothesized that people motivated to believe that they possess a given trait search for autobiographical memories that reflect that trait, so as to justify their desired self-view. We led subjects to believe that either extraversion or introversion was desirable, and obtained convergent evidence from open-ended memory-listing tasks as well as from reaction-time tasks measuring the speed with which memories could be generated that this manipulation enhanced the accessibility of memories reflecting the desired trait. If people rely on their memories to construct desired self-concepts, motivated changes in self-concepts should be constrained by the content of available memories. Our final study demonstrates such constraints.

  17. Memory Reconsolidation and Computational Learning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    Cooper and H.T. Siegelmann, "Memory Reconsolidation for Natural Language Processing," Cognitive Neurodynamics , 3, 2009: 365-372. M.M. Olsen, N...computerized memories and other state of the art cognitive architectures, our memory system has the ability to process on-line and in real-time as...on both continuous and binary inputs, unlike state of the art methods in case based reasoning and in cognitive architectures, which are bound to

  18. Load and dump onboard memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welty, Alan

    2009-07-01

    This proposal is a test and verification of the ACS dump of memory capability.Areas of Control Section {CS} to dump include: EDAC RAM, EEPROM, and CS PROM {with the CS in Operate}. Areas of MIE memory to dump include: MIE RAM and MIE PROM {with the MIE in Operate}. Note that the MIE memory must first be copied to CS buffer RAM as images, which are then dumped.Supports Activity ACS-01

  19. Memory performance of Prolog architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Tick, E.

    1988-01-01

    Memory Performance of Prolog Architectures addresses these problems and reports dynamic data and instruction referencing characteristics of both sequential and parallel prolog architectures and corresponding uni-processor and multi-processor memory-hierarchy performance tradeoffs. Computer designers and logic programmers will find this work to be a valuable reference with many practical applications. Memory Performance of Prolog Architectures will also serve as an important textbook for graduate level courses in computer architecture and/or performance analysis.

  20. Memory mechanisms supporting syntactic comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Gloria

    2013-01-01

    Efforts to characterize the memory system that supports sentence comprehension have historically drawn extensively on short-term memory as a source of mechanisms that might apply to sentences. The focus of these efforts has changed significantly in the past decade. As a result of changes in models of short-term working memory (ST-WM) and developments in models of sentence comprehension, the effort to relate entire components of an ST-WM system, such as those in the model developed by Baddeley (Nature Reviews Neuroscience 4: 829–839, 2003) to sentence comprehension has largely been replaced by an effort to relate more specific mechanisms found in modern models of ST-WM to memory processes that support one aspect of sentence comprehension—the assignment of syntactic structure (parsing) and its use in determining sentence meaning (interpretation) during sentence comprehension. In this article, we present the historical background to recent studies of the memory mechanisms that support parsing and interpretation and review recent research into this relation. We argue that the results of this research do not converge on a set of mechanisms derived from ST-WM that apply to parsing and interpretation. We argue that the memory mechanisms supporting parsing and interpretation have features that characterize another memory system that has been postulated to account for skilled performance—long-term working memory. We propose a model of the relation of different aspects of parsing and interpretation to ST-WM and long-term working memory. PMID:23319178

  1. Dreaming and offline memory consolidation.

    PubMed

    Wamsley, Erin J

    2014-03-01

    Converging evidence suggests that dreaming is influenced by the consolidation of memory during sleep. Following encoding, recently formed memory traces are gradually stabilized and reorganized into a more permanent form of long-term storage. Sleep provides an optimal neurophysiological state to facilitate this process, allowing memory networks to be repeatedly reactivated in the absence of new sensory input. The process of memory reactivation and consolidation in the sleeping brain appears to influence conscious experience during sleep, contributing to dream content recalled on awakening. This article outlines several lines of evidence in support of this hypothesis, and responds to some common objections.

  2. Dreaming and Offline Memory Consolidation

    PubMed Central

    Wamsley, Erin J.

    2015-01-01

    Converging evidence suggests that dreaming is influenced by the consolidation of memory during sleep. Following encoding, recently formed memory traces are gradually stabilized and reorganized into a more permanent form of long-term storage. Sleep provides an optimal neurophysiological state to facilitate this process, allowing memory networks to be repeatedly reactivated in the absence of new sensory input. The process of memory reactivation and consolidation in the sleeping brain appears to influence conscious experience during sleep, contributing to dream content recalled on awakening. This article outlines several lines of evidence in support of this hypothesis, and responds to some common objections. PMID:24477388

  3. Gender differences in episodic memory.

    PubMed

    Herlitz, A; Nilsson, L G; Bäckman, L

    1997-11-01

    The relationship between gender and memory has been largely neglected by research, despite occasional studies reporting gender differences in episodic memory performance. The present study examined potential gender differences in episodic memory, semantic memory, primary memory, and priming. Five hundred thirty women and 470 men, randomly sampled from the city of Umeå, Sweden, 35-80 years of age, participated in the study. There were no differences between men and women with regard to age or education, or on a measure of global intellectual functioning. As has been demonstrated previously, men out performed women on a visuospatial task and women outperformed men on tests of verbal fluency. In addition, the results demonstrated that women consistently performed at a higher level than did men on the episodic memory tasks, although there were no differences between men and women on the tasks assessing semantic memory, primary memory, or priming. The women's higher level of performance on the episodic memory tasks could not be fully explained by their higher verbal ability.

  4. Pharmacologic Induction of CD8+ T Cell Memory: Better Living Through Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Gattinoni, Luca; Klebanoff, Christopher A.; Restifo, Nicholas P.

    2011-01-01

    The generation of a robust population of memory T cells is critical for effective vaccine and cell-based therapies to prevent and treat infectious diseases and cancer. A series of recent papers have established a new, cell-intrinsic approach in which small molecules target key metabolic and developmental pathways to enhance the formation and maintenance of highly functional CD8+ memory T cells. These findings raise the exciting new possibility of using small molecules, many of which are already approved for human use, for the pharmacologic induction of immunologic memory. PMID:20371454

  5. Porous Shape Memory Polymers.

    PubMed

    Hearon, Keith; Singhal, Pooja; Horn, John; Small, Ward; Olsovsky, Cory; Maitland, Kristen C; Wilson, Thomas S; Maitland, Duncan J

    2013-02-04

    Porous shape memory polymers (SMPs) include foams, scaffolds, meshes, and other polymeric substrates that possess porous three-dimensional macrostructures. Porous SMPs exhibit active structural and volumetric transformations and have driven investigations in fields ranging from biomedical engineering to aerospace engineering to the clothing industry. The present review article examines recent developments in porous SMPs, with focus given to structural and chemical classification, methods of characterization, and applications. We conclude that the current body of literature presents porous SMPs as highly interesting smart materials with potential for industrial use.

  6. Implicit working memory

    PubMed Central

    Hassin, Ran R.; Bargh, John A.; Engell, Andrew D.; McCulloch, Kathleen C.

    2009-01-01

    Working Memory (WM) plays a crucial role in many high-level cognitive processes (e.g., reasoning, decision making, goal pursuit and cognitive control). The prevalent view holds that active components of WM are predominantly intentional and conscious. This conception is oftentimes expressed explicitly, but it is best reflected in the nature of major WM tasks: All of them are blatantly explicit. We developed two new WM paradigms that allow for an examination of the role of conscious awareness in WM. Results from five studies show that WM can operate unintentionally and outside of conscious awareness, thus suggesting that the current view should be expanded to include implicit WM. PMID:19442537

  7. Porous Shape Memory Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Hearon, Keith; Singhal, Pooja; Horn, John; Small, Ward; Olsovsky, Cory; Maitland, Kristen C.; Wilson, Thomas S.; Maitland, Duncan J.

    2013-01-01

    Porous shape memory polymers (SMPs) include foams, scaffolds, meshes, and other polymeric substrates that possess porous three-dimensional macrostructures. Porous SMPs exhibit active structural and volumetric transformations and have driven investigations in fields ranging from biomedical engineering to aerospace engineering to the clothing industry. The present review article examines recent developments in porous SMPs, with focus given to structural and chemical classification, methods of characterization, and applications. We conclude that the current body of literature presents porous SMPs as highly interesting smart materials with potential for industrial use. PMID:23646038

  8. Nanoparticle shuttle memory

    DOEpatents

    Zettl, Alex Karlwalter [Kensington, CA

    2012-03-06

    A device for storing data using nanoparticle shuttle memory having a nanotube. The nanotube has a first end and a second end. A first electrode is electrically connected to the first end of the nanotube. A second electrode is electrically connected to the second end of the nanotube. The nanotube has an enclosed nanoparticle shuttle. A switched voltage source is electrically connected to the first electrode and the second electrode, whereby a voltage may be controllably applied across the nanotube. A resistance meter is also connected to the first electrode and the second electrode, whereby the electrical resistance across the nanotube can be determined.

  9. Vertical bloch line memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katti, R.; Wu, J.; Stadler, H.

    1990-01-01

    Vertical Bloch Line (VBL) memory is a recently conceived, integrated, solid-state, block-access, VLSI memory which offers the potential of 1Gbit/sq cm real storage density, gigabit per second data rates, and sub-millisecond average access times simultaneously at relatively low mass, volume, and power values when compared to alternative technologies. VBL's are micromagnetic structures within magnetic domain walls which can be manipulated using magnetic fields from integrated conductors. The presence or absence of VBL pairs are used to store binary information. At present, efforts are being directed at developing a single-chip memory using 25Mbit/sq cm technology in magnetic garnet material which integrates, at a single operating point, the writing, storage, reading, and amplification functions needed in a memory. This paper describes the current design architecture, functional elements, and supercomputer simulation results which are used to assist the design process. The current design architecture uses three metal layers, two ion implantation steps for modulating the thickness of the magnetic layer, one ion implantation step for assisting propagation in the major line track, one NiFe soft magnetic layer, one CoPt hard magnetic layer, and one reflective Cr layer for facilitating magneto-optic observation of magnetic structure. Data are stored in a series of elongated magnetic domains, called stripes, which serve as storage sites for arrays of VBL pairs. The ends of these stripes are placed near conductors which serve as VBL read/write gates. A major line track is present to provide a source and propagation path for magnetic bubbles. Writing and reading, respectively, are achieved by converting magnetic bubbles to VBL's and vice versa. The output function is effected by stretching a magnetic bubble and detecting it magnetoresistively. Experimental results from the past design cycle created four design goals for the current design cycle. First, the bias field ranges

  10. Nonvolatile Analog Memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacLeod, Todd C. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A nonvolatile analog memory uses pairs of ferroelectric field effect transistors (FFETs). Each pair is defined by a first FFET and a second FFET. When an analog value is to be stored in one of the pairs, the first FFET has a saturation voltage applied thereto, and the second FFET has a storage voltage applied thereto that is indicative of the analog value. The saturation and storage voltages decay over time in accordance with a known decay function that is used to recover the original analog value when the pair of FFETs is read.

  11. Content addressable memory project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, J. Storrs; Levy, Saul; Smith, Donald E.; Miyake, Keith M.

    1992-01-01

    A parameterized version of the tree processor was designed and tested (by simulation). The leaf processor design is 90 percent complete. We expect to complete and test a combination of tree and leaf cell designs in the next period. Work is proceeding on algorithms for the computer aided manufacturing (CAM), and once the design is complete we will begin simulating algorithms for large problems. The following topics are covered: (1) the practical implementation of content addressable memory; (2) design of a LEAF cell for the Rutgers CAM architecture; (3) a circuit design tool user's manual; and (4) design and analysis of efficient hierarchical interconnection networks.

  12. Remaking Memories: Reconsolidation Updates Positively Motivated Spatial Memory in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Bethany; Bukoski, Elizabeth; Nadel, Lynn; Fellous, Jean-Marc

    2012-01-01

    There is strong evidence that reactivation of a memory returns it to a labile state, initiating a restabilization process termed reconsolidation, which allows for updating of the memory. In this study we investigated reactivation-dependent updating using a new positively motivated spatial task in rodents that was designed specifically to model a…

  13. On the susceptibility of adaptive memory to false memory illusions.

    PubMed

    Howe, Mark L; Derbish, Mary H

    2010-05-01

    Previous research has shown that survival-related processing of word lists enhances retention for that material. However, the claim that survival-related memories are more accurate has only been examined when true recall and recognition of neutral material has been measured. In the current experiments, we examined the adaptive memory superiority effect for different types of processing and material, measuring accuracy more directly by comparing true and false recollection rates. Survival-related information and processing was examined using word lists containing backward associates of neutral, negative, and survival-related critical lures and type of processing (pleasantness, moving, survival) was varied using an incidental memory paradigm. Across four experiments, results showed that survival-related words were more susceptible than negative and neutral words to the false memory illusion and that processing information in terms of its relevance to survival independently increased this susceptibility to the false memory illusion. Overall, although survival-related processing and survival-related information resulted in poorer, not more accurate, memory, such inaccuracies may have adaptive significance. These findings are discussed in the context of false memory research and recent theories concerning the importance of survival processing and the nature of adaptive memory.

  14. On the Susceptibility of Adaptive Memory to False Memory Illusions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Mark L.; Derbish, Mary H.

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has shown that survival-related processing of word lists enhances retention for that material. However, the claim that survival-related memories are more accurate has only been examined when true recall and recognition of neutral material has been measured. In the current experiments, we examined the adaptive memory superiority…

  15. Memory for Sentences: Implications for Human Associative Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foss, Donald J.; Harwood, David A.

    1975-01-01

    This paper evaluates associative theories of sentence memory, based on the model of J.R. Anderson and G.H. Bower. A model of Human Associative Memory (HAM) is generalized and defined, and alternative models incorporating configural information are presented. (CK)

  16. Memory in autistic spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Jill; Mayes, Andrew; Bigham, Sally

    2012-05-01

    Behavioral evidence concerning memory in forms of high-functioning autism (HFA) and in moderately low-functioning autism (M-LFA) is reviewed and compared. Findings on M-LFA are sparse. However, it is provisionally concluded that memory profiles in HFA and M-LFA (relative to ability-matched controls) are similar but that declarative memory impairments are more extensive in M-LFA than in HFA. Specifically, both groups have diminished memory for emotion- or person-related stimuli. Regarding memory for nonsocial stimuli, both groups probably have mental-age-appropriate nondeclarative memory, and within declarative memory, both groups have mental-age-appropriate immediate free recall of within-span or supraspan lists of unrelated items, as well as cued recall and paired associate learning. By contrast, recognition is largely unimpaired in HFA but moderately impaired in M-LFA, and free recall of meaningful or structured stimuli is moderately impaired in HFA but more severely impaired in M-LFA. Theoretical explanations of data on declarative memory in HFA identify problems in the integrative processing, or the consolidation and storage, of complex stimuli or a specific problem of recollection. Proposed neural substrates include the following: disconnectivity of primary sensory and association areas; dysfunctions of medial prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, or posterior parietal lobe; or combinations of these associated with neural disconnectivity. Hypothetically, perirhinal dysfunction might explain the more extensive declarative memory impairments in M-LFA. Foreseeable consequences of uneven memory abilities in HFA and M-LFA are outlined, including possible effects on language and learning in M-LFA. Finally, priorities for future research are identified, highlighting the urgent need for research on memory in lower functioning individuals.

  17. Can Laryngeal and Hypopharyngeal Cancers Be Found Early?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lodge® Lodging Rides To Treatment Online Support Communities ACS FUNDRAISERS Making Strides Against Breast Cancer Walks Coaches ... Give Memorial Giving Planned Giving Leadership Giving About ACS Contact Us Local Offices Employment Become a Supplier ...

  18. 76 FR 55209 - National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-07

    ... Health and Human Services have started a campaign to educate women on cancers affecting reproductive... families who join their loved ones in fighting their battle. In the memory of all the brave women who...

  19. What Are the Risk Factors for Gallbladder Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... because both conditions can be related to inflammation). Female gender In the United States, gallbladder cancer occurs ... Car Ways to Give Memorial Giving Planned Giving Leadership Giving About ACS Contact Us Local Offices Employment ...

  20. Working and strategic memory deficits in schizophrenia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, M.; Gabrieli, J. D.; Stebbins, G. T.; Sullivan, E. V.

    1998-01-01

    Working memory and its contribution to performance on strategic memory tests in schizophrenia were studied. Patients (n = 18) and control participants (n = 15), all men, received tests of immediate memory (forward digit span), working memory (listening, computation, and backward digit span), and long-term strategic (free recall, temporal order, and self-ordered pointing) and nonstrategic (recognition) memory. Schizophrenia patients performed worse on all tests. Education, verbal intelligence, and immediate memory capacity did not account for deficits in working memory in schizophrenia patients. Reduced working memory capacity accounted for group differences in strategic memory but not in recognition memory. Working memory impairment may be central to the profile of impaired cognitive performance in schizophrenia and is consistent with hypothesized frontal lobe dysfunction associated with this disease. Additional medial-temporal dysfunction may account for the recognition memory deficit.

  1. Negative affect impairs associative memory but not item memory.

    PubMed

    Bisby, James A; Burgess, Neil

    2013-12-17

    The formation of associations between items and their context has been proposed to rely on mechanisms distinct from those supporting memory for a single item. Although emotional experiences can profoundly affect memory, our understanding of how it interacts with different aspects of memory remains unclear. We performed three experiments to examine the effects of emotion on memory for items and their associations. By presenting neutral and negative items with background contexts, Experiment 1 demonstrated that item memory was facilitated by emotional affect, whereas memory for an associated context was reduced. In Experiment 2, arousal was manipulated independently of the memoranda, by a threat of shock, whereby encoding trials occurred under conditions of threat or safety. Memory for context was equally impaired by the presence of negative affect, whether induced by threat of shock or a negative item, relative to retrieval of the context of a neutral item in safety. In Experiment 3, participants were presented with neutral and negative items as paired associates, including all combinations of neutral and negative items. The results showed both above effects: compared to a neutral item, memory for the associate of a negative item (a second item here, context in Experiments 1 and 2) is impaired, whereas retrieval of the item itself is enhanced. Our findings suggest that negative affect impairs associative memory while recognition of a negative item is enhanced. They support dual-processing models in which negative affect or stress impairs hippocampal-dependent associative memory while the storage of negative sensory/perceptual representations is spared or even strengthened.

  2. The memory loophole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanahan, Daniel

    2008-05-01

    The memory loophole supposes that the measurement of an entangled pair is influenced by the measurements of earlier pairs in the same run of measurements. To assert the memory loophole is thus to deny that measurement is intrinsically random. It is argued that measurement might instead involve a process of recovery and equilibrium in the measuring apparatus akin to that described in thermodynamics by Le Chatelier's principle. The predictions of quantum mechanics would then arise from conservation of the measured property in the combined system of apparatus and measured ensemble. Measurement would be consistent with classical laws of conservation, not simply in the classical limit of large numbers, but whatever the size of the ensemble. However variances from quantum mechanical predictions would be self-correcting and centripetal, rather than Markovian and increasing as under the standard theory. Entanglement correlations would persist, not because the entangled particles act in concert (which would entail nonlocality), but because the measurements of the particles were influenced by the one fluctuating state of imbalance in the process of measurement.

  3. Cueing others' memories.

    PubMed

    Tullis, Jonathan G; Benjamin, Aaron S

    2015-05-01

    Many situations require us to generate external cues to support later retrieval from memory. For instance, we create file names in order to cue our memory to a file's contents, and instructors create lecture slides to remember what points to make during classes. We even generate cues for others when we remind friends of shared experiences or send colleagues a computer file that is named in such a way so as to remind them of its contents. Here we explore how and how well learners tailor retrieval cues for different intended recipients. Across three experiments, subjects generated verbal cues for a list of target words for themselves or for others. Learners generated cues for others by increasing the normative cue-to-target associative strength but also by increasing the number of other words their cues point to, relative to cues that they generated for themselves. This strategy was effective: such cues supported higher levels of recall for others than cues generated for oneself. Generating cues for others also required more time than generating cues for oneself. Learners responded to the differential demands of cue generation for others by effortfully excluding personal, episodic knowledge and including knowledge that they estimate to be broadly shared.

  4. Magnetic shape memory fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heczko, Oleg; Straka, Ladislav; Soderberg, Outi; Hannula, Simo-Pekka

    2005-05-01

    Single crystal specimens of having compositions close to Ni2MnGa and exhibiting magnetic shape memory effect (MSME) were tested in a rotating magnetic field at a frequency of 5.7 Hz. The applied magnetic field, about 0.7 T was strong enough to induce the MSME. Test of one specimen was discontinued because of the structural failure of the specimens after 0.5 million cycles. Second specimen was tested up to 37 millions cycles. The evolution of the martensitic morphology and crack propagation were observed by optical microscopy. To characterize the magnetic shape memory behavior the simultaneous measurements of the field-induced strain and magnetization as a function of the magnetic field and external load was used. The full MSM effect, about 6% obtained prior the test, decreased to about 3% during the first million cycles. This value stayed then approximately constant up to 37 millions cycles of rotating magnetic field. The magnetic field needed to initiate the MSME increased. The observed behavior is discussed within the framework of observed martensitic band structure in the specimens and the existence of initial cracks and other obstacles for martensitic twin boundary motion.

  5. Magnonic Holographic Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khitun, Alexander; Kozhevnikov, Alexander; Gertz, Frederick; Filimonov, Yuri

    2015-03-01

    Collective oscillation of spins in magnetic lattice known as spin waves (magnons) possess relatively long coherence length at room temperature, which makes it possible to build sub-micrometer scale holographic devices similar to the devices developed in optics. In this work, we present a prototype 2-bit magnonic holographic memory. The memory consists of the double-cross waveguide structure made of Y3Fe2(FeO4)3 with magnets placed on the top of waveguide junctions. Information is encoded in the orientation of the magnets, while the read-out is accomplished by the spin waves generated by the micro-antennas placed on the edges of the waveguides. The interference pattern produced by multiple spin waves makes it possible to build a unique holographic image of the magnetic structure and recognize the state of the each magnet. The development of magnonic holographic devices opens a new horizon for building scalable holographic devices compatible with conventional electronic devices. This work was supported in part by the FAME Center, one of six centers of STARnet, a Semiconductor Research Corporation program sponsored by MARCO and DARPA and by the National Science Foundation under the NEB2020 Grant ECCS-1124714.

  6. [Memory and synaptic plasticity].

    PubMed

    Maitre, M

    1996-01-01

    Short term memory traces are probably induced by a sustained and specific functional activation of some sensory and/or motor circuits in brain. These modifications, which could concern a large proportion of the brain but especially the limbic areas, are constituted primarily by ionic mechanisms and second messengers cascades induced by the activation of glutamatergic receptors (namely NMDA). In the invertebrate (Drosophilia melanogaster, aplysia), the role of serotonergic receptors seems to be more important. The activated cAMP-dependent and calcium dependent protein kinases target several proteins which are reversibly phosphorylated modifying the synaptic functions which in turn induce potentiated (PLT) or depressed (DLT) post-synaptic responses. These phenomena are at the basis of specific protein neosynthesis which is initiated by several early genes or trancription factor (cfos, zif 268, jun, CREB). Specific mRNA migrate to the potentiated synapse or dendritic spine where activated polyribosomes synthesize trophic factor, adhesion molecules and synaptic constituents. The building of new synaptic contacts and/or the plastic evolution of existing synapses could explain long-term LTP and long-term memory traces.

  7. Characterization of Spatial Memory Reconsolidation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Jaeger, Xavier; Courtey, Julie; Brus, Maïna; Artinian, Julien; Villain, Hélène; Bacquié, Elodie; Roullet, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Reconsolidation is necessary for the restabilization of reactivated memory traces. However, experimental parameters have been suggested as boundary conditions for this process. Here we investigated the role of a spatial memory trace's age, strength, and update on the reconsolidation process in mice. We first found that protein synthesis is…

  8. Modeling the Cray memory scheduler

    SciTech Connect

    Wickham, K.L.; Litteer, G.L.

    1992-04-01

    This report documents the results of a project to evaluate low cost modeling and simulation tools when applied to modeling the Cray memory scheduler. The specific tool used is described and the basics of the memory scheduler are covered. Results of simulations using the model are discussed and a favorable recommendation is made to make more use of this inexpensive technology.

  9. Time, Language, and Autobiographical Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burt, Christopher D. B.

    2008-01-01

    Life themes, general events, and event-specific episodes, together with autobiographical knowledge, form autobiographical memory. Each of these memory structures is described, and research that has investigated the storage and retrieval of temporal information for life events, such as place in time, duration, and order, is examined. The general…

  10. Professional Memory and English Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarpey, Paul

    2009-01-01

    This article concerns the way that research into Professional Memory (PM) in English teaching might re-connect the school subject with constituencies--the individuals, communities and social values--it once served. By PM I mean the collective memories of a generation of English teachers which, when brought into conjunction with existing histories,…

  11. Memory in Autistic Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boucher, Jill; Mayes, Andrew; Bigham, Sally

    2012-01-01

    Behavioral evidence concerning memory in forms of high-functioning autism (HFA) and in moderately low-functioning autism (M-LFA) is reviewed and compared. Findings on M-LFA are sparse. However, it is provisionally concluded that memory profiles in HFA and M-LFA (relative to ability-matched controls) are similar but that declarative memory…

  12. Infants Hierarchically Organize Memory Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Rebecca D.; Feigenson, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Throughout development, working memory is subject to capacity limits that severely constrain short-term storage. However, adults can massively expand the total amount of remembered information by grouping items into "chunks". Although infants also have been shown to chunk objects in memory, little is known regarding the limits of this…

  13. Optimal Foraging in Semantic Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hills, Thomas T.; Jones, Michael N.; Todd, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    Do humans search in memory using dynamic local-to-global search strategies similar to those that animals use to forage between patches in space? If so, do their dynamic memory search policies correspond to optimal foraging strategies seen for spatial foraging? Results from a number of fields suggest these possibilities, including the shared…

  14. Demystifying the Beginnings of Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Mark L.; Courage, Mary L.

    2004-01-01

    A longstanding issue in psychology has been, When does human memory begin? More particularly, when do we begin to remember personal experiences in a way that makes them accessible to recollection later in life? Current popular and scientific thinking would have us believe that memories are possible not only at the time of our birth, but also in…

  15. Exercising Control Over Memory Consolidation.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Edwin M; Takacs, Adam

    2017-03-28

    Exercise can improve human cognition. A mechanistic connection between exercise and cognition has been revealed in several recent studies. Exercise increases cortical excitability and this in turn leads to enhanced memory consolidation. Together these studies dovetail with our growing understanding of memory consolidation and how it is regulated through changes in motor cortical excitability.

  16. Stroke and episodic memory disorders.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chun; Alexander, Michael P

    2009-12-01

    Memory impairments are common after stroke, and the anatomical basis for impairments may be quite variable. To determine the range of stroke-related memory impairment, we identified all case reports and group studies through the Medline database and the Science Citation Index. There is no hypothesis about memory that is unique to stroke, but there are several important facets of memory impairment after stroke: (1) Every node of the limbic system implicated in memory may be damaged by stroke but very rarely in isolation and the combination of amnesia with the associated deficits often illuminates additional aspects of memory functions. (2) Stroke produces amnesia by damage to critical convergence white matter connections of the limbic system, and stroke is the only etiology of amnesia that can delineate the entire pathway of memory and critical convergence points. (3) Stroke also impairs memory, without causing classical amnesia, by damaging brain regions responsible for cognitive processes, some modality specific and some more generally strategic, that are essential for normal learning and recall.

  17. Making Connections with Memory Boxes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whatley, April

    2000-01-01

    Addresses the use of children's literature within the social studies classroom on the topic of memory boxes. Includes discussions of four books: (1) "The Littlest Angel" (Charles Tazewell); (2) "The Hundred Penny Box" (Sharon Bell Mathis); (3) "Wilfrid Gordon McDonald Partridge" (Mem Fox); and (4) "The Memory Box" (Mary Bahr). (CMK)

  18. Adaptive Memory: Thinking about Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Raoul; Röer, Jan P.; Buchner, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Rating the relevance of words for the imagined situation of being stranded in the grasslands without survival material leads to exceptionally good memory for these words. This survival processing effect has received much attention because it promises to elucidate the evolutionary foundations of memory. However, the proximate mechanisms of the…

  19. Shape memory alloy thaw sensors

    DOEpatents

    Shahinpoor, Mohsen; Martinez, David R.

    1998-01-01

    A sensor permanently indicates that it has been exposed to temperatures exceeding a critical temperature for a predetermined time period. An element of the sensor made from shape memory alloy changes shape when exposed, even temporarily, to temperatures above the Austenitic temperature of the shape memory alloy. The shape change of the SMA element causes the sensor to change between two readily distinguishable states.

  20. Memory Strategies for College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reetz, Linda J.

    Seven memory strategies that can be taught to college students with learning disabilities or students who have not learned essential study skills are described: the method of loci, pegwords, keywords, rote rehearsal, chaining, clustering, and first letter mnemonics. To help college faculty provide direct instruction in the memory strategies, the…

  1. Plated wire random access memories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gouldin, L. D.

    1975-01-01

    A program was conducted to construct 4096-work by 18-bit random access, NDRO-plated wire memory units. The memory units were subjected to comprehensive functional and environmental tests at the end-item level to verify comformance with the specified requirements. A technical description of the unit is given, along with acceptance test data sheets.

  2. Using Photographs from American Memory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singleton, Laurel R., Ed.

    2001-01-01

    This publication contains teaching ideas generated by classroom teachers. For grades K-4, elementary teacher Doris Waud and media specialist Gail Petri developed "Celebrate America with Symbols from American Memory," in which students explore the American memory and symbols. For grades 5-8, media specialist Mary Alice Anderson developed…

  3. Output Interference in Recognition Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Criss, Amy H.; Malmberg, Kenneth J.; Shiffrin, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    Dennis and Humphreys (2001) proposed that interference in recognition memory arises solely from the prior contexts of the test word: Interference does not arise from memory traces of other words (from events prior to the study list or on the study list, and regardless of similarity to the test item). We evaluate this model using output…

  4. Global Aspects of Radiation Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winicour, Jeffrey

    2015-04-01

    The gravitational radiation memory effect produces a net displacement of test particles. The proposed sources lead to E mode memory, as characterized by an even parity polarization pattern. Although odd parity, or B mode, radiation memory is mathematically possible, no physically realistic source has been identified. There is an electromagnetic counterpart to radiation memory which produces a net momentum ``kick'' of charged test particles. A global null cone treatment shows that electromagnetic E mode memory requires unbounded charges and no physically realistic source produces B mode memory. A compelling theoretical aspect of E mode gravitational radiation memory is related to the supertranslations in the Bondi-Metzner-Sachs (BMS) asymptotic symmetry group. For a stationary system, supertranslations can be eliminated and the BMS group reduced to the Poincare group, for which angular momentum is well-defined. However, for a stationary to stationary transition, the two Poincare groups obtained at early and late times differ by a supertranslation if the gravitational radiation has nonzero E mode memory. This suggests a distinctly general relativistic mechanism for angular momentum loss and presents a ripe problem for the numerical simulation of high spin black hole binaries. Supported by NSF grant PHY-1201276 to the University of Pittsburgh.

  5. Circadian Rhythms in Human Memory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Folkard, Simon; Monk, Timothy H.

    1980-01-01

    Two experiments are described that examined the influence of time-of-day of presentation on immediate and delayed retention and its potential effects on retrieval from long-term memory. Time of presentation was found to influence both immediate and delayed (28 day) retention, but not retrieval from long-term memory. (Author/SJL)

  6. A Memorial: Gilman Veith

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our colleague and good friend Gilman Veith died August 18th after a long battle with pancreatic cancer. Over his more than 40 year career Gil provided outstanding vision and inspirational leadership at both national and international levels. His efforts have been truly transform...

  7. Oral cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - mouth; Mouth cancer; Head and neck cancer; Squamous cell cancer - mouth; Malignant neoplasm - oral ... Oral cancer most commonly involves the lips or the tongue. It may also occur on the: Cheek lining Floor ...

  8. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Oral Cancer Basic description Cancer can affect any part of the oral cavity, including the lips, tongue, mouth, and throat. There are 2 kinds of oral cancer: oral cavity cancer and oropharyngeal cancer. The most ...

  9. Cancer Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... and the Precision Medicine Initiative® Cancer Moonshot℠ Progress Annual Report to the Nation Cancer Snapshots Milestones in Cancer ... Find research about a specific cancer type Progress Annual Report to the Nation Cancer Portfolio Snapshots Milestones in ...

  10. Long-term cognitive function change among breast cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ying; Luo, Jianfeng; Bao, Pingping; Cai, Hui; Hong, Zhen; Ding, Ding; Jackson, James C; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Dai, Qi

    2014-08-01

    Cognitive decline is a common health problem among breast cancer patients and understanding trajectories of cognitive change following among breast cancer survivors is an important public health goal. We conducted a longitudinal study to investigate the cognitive function changes from 18 month to 3 years after breast cancer diagnosis among participants of the Shanghai Breast cancer survivor study, a population-based cohort study of breast cancer survivors. In our study, we completed cognitive function evaluation for 1,300 breast cancer survivors at the 18th month's survey and 1,059 at 36th month's survey, respectively, using a battery of cognitive function measurements. We found the scores in attention and executive function, immediate memory and delayed memory significantly improved from 18 to 36 months after breast cancer diagnosis. The improvements appeared in breast cancer survivors receiving treatments (i.e., surgery, radiotherapy, tamoxifen, or chemotherapy combined with or without tamoxifen), but not in those who received neither chemotherapy nor tamoxifen treatment. The results indicate that cognitive functions, particularly immediate verbal episodic memory, and delayed memory significantly improved among breast cancer survivors from 18 to 36 months after cancer diagnosis. In general, comorbidity was inversely associated with the improvements.

  11. ANATOMICAL LOCALIZATION OF TARGET LEARNING AND MEMORY.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CEPHALOPODA, *MEMORY(PSYCHOLOGY), MEMORY(PSYCHOLOGY), ANATOMY, BRAIN , STIMULATION (PHYSIOLOGY), ANTIBIOTICS, LABELED SUBSTANCES, LEARNING, UNITED KINGDOM, ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY, ELECTRON MICROSCOPY, PROTEINS, BIOSYNTHESIS.

  12. Ferroelectric memory based on nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In the past decades, ferroelectric materials have attracted wide attention due to their applications in nonvolatile memory devices (NVMDs) rendered by the electrically switchable spontaneous polarizations. Furthermore, the combination of ferroelectric and nanomaterials opens a new route to fabricating a nanoscale memory device with ultrahigh memory integration, which greatly eases the ever increasing scaling and economic challenges encountered in the traditional semiconductor industry. In this review, we summarize the recent development of the nonvolatile ferroelectric field effect transistor (FeFET) memory devices based on nanostructures. The operating principles of FeFET are introduced first, followed by the discussion of the real FeFET memory nanodevices based on oxide nanowires, nanoparticles, semiconductor nanotetrapods, carbon nanotubes, and graphene. Finally, we present the opportunities and challenges in nanomemory devices and our views on the future prospects of NVMDs. PMID:22655750

  13. Aging and memory for dreams.

    PubMed

    Waterman, D

    1991-10-01

    This study investigated the influence of aging on memory for home drams and the extent to which cognitive variables such as visual memory, visuospatial IQ, and verbal IQ could account for possible differences herein. Subjects were 80 men and women of ages 45 to 75 years. Memory for dreams was measured by narrative length and frequency of recall. With respect to both measures no significant age differences were noted. Over-all differences in dream recall seemed best explained by visual memory scores. Partial correlational analyses, however, indicated that the small age differences memory or on any of the other cognitive variables. Dream contents were scored for aggression, friendliness, emotion, activities, and the number of characters and objects. The incidence of emotions among women appeared to be lower beyond the age of 60. Comparisons with previous data for young adults indicated that large reductions in aggression, friendliness, and emotion occur before the age of 45.

  14. A Milestone in Cancer Research and Treatment in India

    Cancer.gov

    Tata Memorial Center is celebrating 75 years of leadership service towards cancer control and research in India. In honor of this anniversary, TMC is hosting A Conference of New Ideas in Cancer – Challenging Dogmas on February 26-28th, 2016 as part of its platinum jubilee events. CGH Director, Dr. Ted Trimble, will give a plenary talk: "Thinking Outside the Box in Cancer Research - Perspectives from the US NCI” in the session titled: Future of Cancer Research: US and European perspectives.

  15. Mass cytometry analysis shows that a novel memory phenotype B cell is expanded in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Hansmann, Leo; Blum, Lisa; Ju, Chia-Hsin; Liedtke, Michaela; Robinson, William H.; Davis, Mark M.

    2015-01-01

    It would be very beneficial if the status of cancers could be determined from a blood specimen. However, peripheral blood leukocytes are very heterogeneous between individuals and thus high resolution technologies are likely required. We used cytometry by time-of-flight (CyTOF) and next generation sequencing to ask whether a plasma cell cancer (multiple myeloma) and related pre-cancerous states had any consistent effect on the peripheral blood mononuclear cell phenotypes of patients. Analysis of peripheral blood samples from 13 cancer patients, 9 pre-cancer patients, and 9 healthy individuals revealed significant differences in the frequencies of the T, B, and natural killer cell compartments. Most strikingly, we identified a novel B-cell population that normally accounts for 4.0±0.7% (mean±SD) of total B cells and is up to 13-fold expanded in multiple myeloma patients with active disease. This population expressed markers previously associated with both memory (CD27+) and naïve (CD24loCD38+) phenotypes. Single-cell immunoglobulin gene sequencing showed polyclonality, indicating that these cells are not precursors to the myeloma, and somatic mutations, a characteristic of memory cells. SYK, ERK, and p38 phosphorylation responses, and the fact that most of these cells expressed isotypes other than IgM or IgD, confirmed the memory character of this population, defining it as a novel type of memory B cells. PMID:25711758

  16. [Extinction and Reconsolidation of Memory].

    PubMed

    Zuzina, A B; Balaban, P M

    2015-01-01

    Retrieval of memory followed by reconsolidation can strengthen a memory, while retrieval followed by extinction results in a decrease of memory performance due to weakening of existing memory or formation of a competing memory. In our study we analyzed the behavior and responses of identified neurons involved in the network underlying aversive learning in terrestrial snail Helix, and made an attempt to describe the conditions in which the retrieval of memory leads either to extinction or reconsolidation. In the network underlying the withdrawal behavior, sensory neurons, premotor interneurons, motor neurons, and modulatory for this network serotonergic neurons are identified and recordings from representatives of these groups were made before and after aversive learning. In the network underlying feeding behavior, the premotor modulatory serotonergic interneurons and motor neurons involved in motor program of feeding are identified. Analysis of changes in neural activity after aversive learning showed that modulatory neurons of feeding behavior do not demonstrate any changes (sometimes a decrease of responses to food was observed), while responses to food in withdrawal behavior premotor interneurons changed qualitatively, from under threshold EPSPs to spike discharges. Using a specific for serotonergic neurons neurotoxin 5,7-DiHT it was shown previously that the serotonergic system is necessary for the aversive learning, but is not necessary for maintenance and retrieval of this memory. These results suggest that the serotonergic neurons that are necessary as part of a reinforcement for developing the associative changes in the network may be not necessary for the retrieval of memory. The hypothesis presented in this review concerns the activity of the "reinforcement" serotonergic neurons that is suggested to be the gate condition for the choice between extinction/reconsolidation triggered by memory retrieval: if these serotonergic neurons do not respond during the

  17. Neural substrates of semantic memory.

    PubMed

    Hart, John; Anand, Raksha; Zoccoli, Sandra; Maguire, Mandy; Gamino, Jacque; Tillman, Gail; King, Richard; Kraut, Michael A

    2007-09-01

    Semantic memory is described as the storage of knowledge, concepts, and information that is common and relatively consistent across individuals (e.g., memory of what is a cup). These memories are stored in multiple sensorimotor modalities and cognitive systems throughout the brain (e.g., how a cup is held and manipulated, the texture of a cup's surface, its shape, its function, that is related to beverages such as coffee, and so on). Our ability to engage in purposeful interactions with our environment is dependent on the ability to understand the meaning and significance of the objects and actions around us that are stored in semantic memory. Theories of the neural basis of the semantic memory of objects have produced sophisticated models that have incorporated to varying degrees the results of cognitive and neural investigations. The models are grouped into those that are (1) cognitive models, where the neural data are used to reveal dissociations in semantic memory after a brain lesion occurs; (2) models that incorporate both cognitive and neuroanatomical information; and (3) models that use cognitive, neuroanatomic, and neurophysiological data. This review highlights the advances and issues that have emerged from these models and points to future directions that provide opportunities to extend these models. The models of object memory generally describe how category and/or feature representations encode for object memory, and the semantic operations engaged in object processing. The incorporation of data derived from multiple modalities of investigation can lead to detailed neural specifications of semantic memory organization. The addition of neurophysiological data can potentially provide further elaboration of models to include semantic neural mechanisms. Future directions should incorporate available and newly developed techniques to better inform the neural underpinning of semantic memory models.

  18. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN CANCER VACCINES1

    PubMed Central

    Palucka, Karolina; Ueno, Hideki; Banchereau, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The adoptive transfer of cancer antigen-specific effector T cells in patients can result in tumor rejection, thereby illustrating the immune system potential for cancer therapy. Ideally, one would like to directly induce efficient tumor-specific effector and memory T cells through vaccination. Therapeutic vaccines have two objectives: priming antigen-specific T cells and reprogramming memory T cells, i.e., a transformation from one type of immunity to another (e.g., regulatory to cytotoxic). Recent successful phase III clinical trials showing benefit to the patients revived cancer vaccines. Dendritic cells (DCs) are essential in generation of immune responses and as such represent targets and vectors for vaccination. We have learned that different DC subsets elicit different T cells. Similarly, different activation methods result in DCs able to elicit distinct T cells. We contend that a careful manipulation of activated DCs will allow cancer immunotherapists to produce the next generation of highly efficient cancer vaccines. PMID:21248270

  19. [Memory traces in EEG].

    PubMed

    Rösler, F; Bajrić, J; Heil, M; Hennighausen, E; Niedeggen, M; Pechmann, T; Röder, B; Rüsseler, J; Streb, J

    1997-01-01

    The paper gives a brief overview of five experimental approaches in which memory processes were studied by means of event-related brain potentials (ERPs). Some of the results were already published in English (Study 1), while others are new and will be reported in greater length as full paper elsewhere (Studies 2, 3, 4, and 5). Study 1 revealed that retrieval of information from episodic long-term memory is accompanied by a systematic slow negative potential. The topography of this slow wave depends on the quality of the reactivated information (spatial vs. verbal), and its amplitude reflects the difficulty of the retrieval process. In experiment 2 ERPs were recorded while subjects acquired either explicit or implicit knowledge about a sequential stimulus-response pattern. The data suggest that explicit learners who posses verbalizable knowledge about sequential dependencies have formed both perceptual and motor representations, while implicit learners have formed motor representations only. In study 3 fact retrieval in mental arithmetic was activated by a verification task. Incongruent solutions evoked an arithmetic N400-effect whose amplitude varied with the associative distance between an expected and an actually perceived solution to a multiplication problem. In study 4 ERPs were recorded during mental rotation tasks. A set of experiments revealed that mental rotation is always accompanied by a systematic negative variation over the parietal cortex. The amplitude of this "rotation specific negativity" increases with an increasing angular disparity between a perceived sign and its normal upright template. It was shown that this negativity is functionally distinct from a P300-complex which is often superimposed on it within the same latency window. Finally, study 5 examined ERPs in a sentence reading task in which grammatically legal but infrequent sentence constructions had to be processed. A left-anterior negativity was observed whenever an explicit case marker

  20. Working memory training improves visual short-term memory capacity.

    PubMed

    Schwarb, Hillary; Nail, Jayde; Schumacher, Eric H

    2016-01-01

    Since antiquity, philosophers, theologians, and scientists have been interested in human memory. However, researchers today are still working to understand the capabilities, boundaries, and architecture. While the storage capabilities of long-term memory are seemingly unlimited (Bahrick, J Exp Psychol 113:1-2, 1984), working memory, or the ability to maintain and manipulate information held in memory, seems to have stringent capacity limits (e.g., Cowan, Behav Brain Sci 24:87-185, 2001). Individual differences, however, do exist and these differences can often predict performance on a wide variety of tasks (cf. Engle What is working-memory capacity? 297-314, 2001). Recently, researchers have promoted the enticing possibility that simple behavioral training can expand the limits of working memory which indeed may also lead to improvements on other cognitive processes as well (cf. Morrison and Chein, Psychol Bull Rev 18:46-60 2011). However, initial investigations across a wide variety of cognitive functions have produced mixed results regarding the transferability of training-related improvements. Across two experiments, the present research focuses on the benefit of working memory training on visual short-term memory capacity-a cognitive process that has received little attention in the training literature. Data reveal training-related improvement of global measures of visual short-term memory as well as of measures of the independent sub-processes that contribute to capacity (Awh et al., Psychol Sci 18(7):622-628, 2007). These results suggest that the ability to inhibit irrelevant information within and between trials is enhanced via n-back training allowing for selective improvement on untrained tasks. Additionally, we highlight a potential limitation of the standard adaptive training procedure and propose a modified design to ensure variability in the training environment.

  1. 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... colon cancer. Photo: AP Photo/Ron Edmonds Colorectal Cancer Cancer of the colon (large intestine) or rectum ( ...

  2. 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... her down. Photo: AP Photo/Brett Flashnick Breast Cancer Breast cancer is a malignant (cancerous) growth that ...

  3. Remembering, imagining, false memories & personal meanings.

    PubMed

    Conway, Martin A; Loveday, Catherine

    2015-05-01

    The Self-Memory System encompasses the working self, autobiographical memory and episodic memory. Specific autobiographical memories are patterns of activation over knowledge structures in autobiographical and episodic memory brought about by the activating effect of cues. The working self can elaborate cues based on the knowledge they initially activate and so control the construction of memories of the past and the future. It is proposed that such construction takes place in the remembering-imagining system - a window of highly accessible recent memories and simulations of near future events. How this malfunctions in various disorders is considered as are the implication of what we term the modern view of human memory for notions of memory accuracy. We show how all memories are to some degree false and that the main role of memories lies in generating personal meanings.

  4. [Epigenetics and memory].

    PubMed

    Gräff, Johannes; Franklin, Tamara B; Mansuy, Isabelle M

    2010-01-01

    The epigenetic marking of chromatin in the brain has recently been recognized as an essential mechanism for brain functions such as learning and memory formation. It allows nerve cells not only to respond to environmental stimuli and modulate their profile of gene expression, but also to establish and maintain their own identity. The epigenetic code is conferred by a set of covalent modifications on the basic elements of chromatin, DNA and histone proteins. These changes are catalyzed by specific enzymes and mechanisms, which include DNA methylation, and post-translational modifications of histone proteins such as acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation and ubiquitination. They are both stable and highly dynamic, and are triggered during stimulation of neuronal circuits but can also persist thereafter. Their study in animal models has demonstrated their importance, and revealed some of their modes of function.

  5. ELECTROSTATIC MEMORY SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Chu, J.C.

    1958-09-23

    An improved electrostatic memory system is de scribed fer a digital computer wherein a plarality of storage tubes are adapted to operate in either of two possible modes. According to the present irvention, duplicate storage tubes are provided fur each denominational order of the several binary digits. A single discriminator system is provided between corresponding duplicate tubes to determine the character of the infurmation stored in each. If either tube produces the selected type signal, corresponding to binazy "1" in the preferred embodiment, a "1" is regenerated in both tubes. In one mode of operation each bit of information is stored in two corresponding tubes, while in the other mode of operation each bit is stored in only one tube in the conventional manner.

  6. Evolution of working memory

    PubMed Central

    Carruthers, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Working memory (WM) is fundamental to many aspects of human life, including learning, speech and text comprehension, prospection and future planning, and explicit “system 2” forms of reasoning, as well as overlapping heavily with fluid general intelligence. WM has been intensively studied for many decades, and there is a growing consensus about its nature, its components, and its signature limits. Remarkably, given its central importance in human life, there has been very little comparative investigation of WM abilities across species. Consequently, much remains unknown about the evolution of this important human capacity. Some questions can be tentatively answered from the existing comparative literature. Even studies that were not intended to do so can nonetheless shed light on the WM capacities of nonhuman animals. However, many questions remain. PMID:23754428

  7. Memories of the holocaust.

    PubMed

    Unger, Samuel

    2006-03-01

    As Alpha Omegans, we are united not only by our profession but also by a mission to educate ourselves, and others, about preserving our Jewish heritage. It was with this mission in mind that the Alpha Omegan invited me to share with my fraters a very personal, and painful, account of my boyhood in Poland, where I survived the Holocaust. Among the many gruesome episodes I encountered during the war, two remain vivid in my memories. Although this is not an easy story for me to tell, it is one that ultimately gives me great strength, especially as I prepare to disclose it among my dear friends and colleagues of Alpha Omega. May we never forget what some of us lost, what we regained and why we have chosen to build our personal and professional lives in ways that honor our history.

  8. The biochemistry of memory.

    PubMed

    Stock, Jeffry B; Zhang, Sherry

    2013-09-09

    Almost fifty years ago, Julius Adler initiated a program of research to gain insights into the basic biochemistry of intelligent behavior by studying the molecular mechanisms that underlie the chemotactic responses of Escherichia coli. All living organisms share elements of a common biochemistry for metabolism, growth and heredity - why not intelligence? Neurobiologists have demonstrated that this is the case for nervous systems in animals ranging from worms to man. Motile unicellular organisms such as E. coli exhibit rudimentary behaviors that can be loosely described in terms of cognitive phenomena such as memory and learning. Adler's initiative at least raised the prospect that, because of the numerous experimental advantages provided by E. coli, it would be the first organism whose behavior could be understood at molecular resolution.

  9. Familiarity in Source Memory

    PubMed Central

    Mollison, Matthew V.; Curran, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Familiarity and recollection are thought to be separate processes underlying recognition memory. Event-related potentials (ERPs) dissociate these processes, with an early (approximately 300–500 ms) frontal effect relating to familiarity (the FN400) and a later (500–800 ms) parietal old/new effect relating to recollection. It has been debated whether source information for a studied item (i.e., contextual associations from when the item was previously encountered) is only accessible through recollection, or whether familiarity can contribute to successful source recognition. It has been shown that familiarity can assist in perceptual source monitoring when the source attribute is an intrinsic property of the item (e.g., an object’s surface color), but few studies have examined its contribution to recognizing extrinsic source associations. Extrinsic source associations were examined in three experiments involving memory judgments for pictures of common objects. In Experiment 1, source information was spatial and results suggested that familiarity contributed to accurate source recognition: the FN400 ERP component showed a source accuracy effect, and source accuracy was above chance for items judged to only feel familiar. Source information in Experiment 2 was an extrinsic color association; source accuracy was at chance for familiar items and the FN400 did not differ between correct and incorrect source judgments. Experiment 3 replicated the results using a within-subjects manipulation of spatial vs. color source. Overall, the results suggest that familiarity’s contribution to extrinsic source monitoring depends on the type of source information being remembered. PMID:22789677

  10. Optical Bidirectional Associative Memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosko, Bart; Guest, Clark

    1987-06-01

    Four optical implementations of bidirectional associative memories (BAMs) are presented. BAMs are heteroassociative content addressable memories (CAMs). A BAM stores the m binary associations (A1, B1), ..., (Am, Bm) , where A is a point in the Boolean n-cube and B is a point in the Boolean p-cube. A is a neural network of n bivalent or continuous neurons ai; B is a network of p bivalent or continuous neurons bi. The fixed synaptic connections between the A and B networks are represented by some n-by-p real matrix M. Bidirectionality, forward and backward information flow, in neural nets produces two-way associative search for the nearest stored pair (Ai, Bi) to an input key. Every matrix is a bidirectionally stable hetero-associative CAM for boh bivalent and continuous networks. This generalizes the well-known unidirectional stability for autoassociative networks with square symmetric M. When the BAM neurons are activated, the network quickly evolves to a stable state of two-pattern reverberation, or pseudo-adaptive resonance. The stable reverberation corresponds to a system energy local minimum. Heteroassociative pairs (Ai, Bi) are encoded in a BAM M by summing bipolar correlation matrices, M = X1T Y1 + ... + XmT Ym , where Xi (Yi) is the bipolar version of Ai (Bi), with -1s replacing Os. the BAM storage capacity for reliable recall is roughly m < min(n, p)--pattern number is bounded by pattern dimensionality. BAM optical implementations are divided into two approaches: matrix vector multipliers and holographic correlators. The four optical BAMs described respectively emphasize a spatial light modulator, laser diodes and high-speed detectors, a reflection hologram, and a transmission hologram.

  11. Flashbulb memories of Paris attacks

    PubMed Central

    El Haj, Mohamad; Gandolphe, Marie-Charlotte; Wawrziczny, Emilie; Antoine, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Flashbulb memories are detailed and vivid memories of attributes of the reception context of surprising and emotionally arousing public events. Patient concerns and diagnosis: This paper offers a fine-grained view of flashbulb memories in a patient with mild Alzheimer's disease (AD). Interventions: The patient underwent a directed interview about the 13 November 2015 attacks in Paris. Outcomes: Unlike her memory about the date and month of the attacks, the patient provided accurate information about the year, time and places they occurred. The patient also provided accurate information about how she first became aware of the attacks, where she was, with whom, what she was doing, and what time it was when she learned about them. As for the affective characteristics of these memories, she tended to have high ratings of vividness and rehearsal. Negative emotional states and great surprise and novelty were also reported. Lessons: By assessing the impact of flashbulb memories in this patient with AD, this paper offers a unique view into how such memories may trigger a considerable recall of context as well much subjective reliving. PMID:27861395

  12. Plant memory: a tentative model.

    PubMed

    Thellier, M; Lüttge, U

    2013-01-01

    All memory functions have molecular bases, namely in signal reception and transduction, and in storage and recall of information. Thus, at all levels of organisation living organisms have some kind of memory. In plants one may distinguish two types. There are linear pathways from reception of signals and propagation of effectors to a type of memory that may be described by terms such as learning, habituation or priming. There is a storage and recall memory based on a complex network of elements with a high degree of integration and feedback. The most important elements envisaged are calcium waves, epigenetic modifications of DNA and histones, and regulation of timing via a biological clock. Experiments are described that document the occurrence of the two sorts of memory and which show how they can be distinguished. A schematic model of plant memory is derived as emergent from integration of the various modules. Possessing the two forms of memory supports the fitness of plants in response to environmental stimuli and stress.

  13. A multilevel nonvolatile magnetoelectric memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jianxin; Cong, Junzhuang; Shang, Dashan; Chai, Yisheng; Shen, Shipeng; Zhai, Kun; Sun, Young

    2016-09-01

    The coexistence and coupling between magnetization and electric polarization in multiferroic materials provide extra degrees of freedom for creating next-generation memory devices. A variety of concepts of multiferroic or magnetoelectric memories have been proposed and explored in the past decade. Here we propose a new principle to realize a multilevel nonvolatile memory based on the multiple states of the magnetoelectric coefficient (α) of multiferroics. Because the states of α depends on the relative orientation between magnetization and polarization, one can reach different levels of α by controlling the ratio of up and down ferroelectric domains with external electric fields. Our experiments in a device made of the PMN-PT/Terfenol-D multiferroic heterostructure confirm that the states of α can be well controlled between positive and negative by applying selective electric fields. Consequently, two-level, four-level, and eight-level nonvolatile memory devices are demonstrated at room temperature. This kind of multilevel magnetoelectric memory retains all the advantages of ferroelectric random access memory but overcomes the drawback of destructive reading of polarization. In contrast, the reading of α is nondestructive and highly efficient in a parallel way, with an independent reading coil shared by all the memory cells.

  14. A multilevel nonvolatile magnetoelectric memory

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jianxin; Cong, Junzhuang; Shang, Dashan; Chai, Yisheng; Shen, Shipeng; Zhai, Kun; Sun, Young

    2016-01-01

    The coexistence and coupling between magnetization and electric polarization in multiferroic materials provide extra degrees of freedom for creating next-generation memory devices. A variety of concepts of multiferroic or magnetoelectric memories have been proposed and explored in the past decade. Here we propose a new principle to realize a multilevel nonvolatile memory based on the multiple states of the magnetoelectric coefficient (α) of multiferroics. Because the states of α depends on the relative orientation between magnetization and polarization, one can reach different levels of α by controlling the ratio of up and down ferroelectric domains with external electric fields. Our experiments in a device made of the PMN-PT/Terfenol-D multiferroic heterostructure confirm that the states of α can be well controlled between positive and negative by applying selective electric fields. Consequently, two-level, four-level, and eight-level nonvolatile memory devices are demonstrated at room temperature. This kind of multilevel magnetoelectric memory retains all the advantages of ferroelectric random access memory but overcomes the drawback of destructive reading of polarization. In contrast, the reading of α is nondestructive and highly efficient in a parallel way, with an independent reading coil shared by all the memory cells. PMID:27681812

  15. Event boundaries and memory improvement.

    PubMed

    Pettijohn, Kyle A; Thompson, Alexis N; Tamplin, Andrea K; Krawietz, Sabine A; Radvansky, Gabriel A

    2016-03-01

    The structure of events can influence later memory for information that is embedded in them, with evidence indicating that event boundaries can both impair and enhance memory. The current study explored whether the presence of event boundaries during encoding can structure information to improve memory. In Experiment 1, memory for a list of words was tested in which event structure was manipulated by having participants walk through a doorway, or not, halfway through the word list. In Experiment 2, memory for lists of words was tested in which event structure was manipulated using computer windows. Finally, in Experiments 3 and 4, event structure was manipulated by having event shifts described in narrative texts. The consistent finding across all of these methods and materials was that memory was better when the information was distributed across two events rather than combined into a single event. Moreover, Experiment 4 demonstrated that increasing the number of event boundaries from one to two increased the memory benefit. These results are interpreted in the context of the Event Horizon Model of event cognition.

  16. Stress, memory, and the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Wingenfeld, Katja; Wolf, Oliver T

    2014-01-01

    Stress hormones, i.e. cortisol in human and cortisone in rodents, influence a wide range of cognitive functions, including hippocampus-based declarative memory performance. Cortisol enhances memory consolidation, but impairs memory retrieval. In this context glucocorticoid receptor sensitivity and hippocampal integrity play an important role. This review integrates findings on the relationships between the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, one of the main coordinators of the stress response, hippocampus, and memory. Findings obtained in healthy participants will be compared with selected mental disorders, including major depressive disorder (MDD), posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and borderline personality disorder (BPD). These disorders are characterized by alterations of the HPA axis and hippocampal dysfunctions. Interestingly, the acute effects of stress hormones on memory in psychiatric patients are different from those found in healthy humans. While cortisol administration has failed to affect memory retrieval in patients with MDD, patients with PTSD and BPD have been found to show enhanced rather than impaired memory retrieval after hydrocortisone. This indicates an altered sensitivity to stress hormones in these mental disorders.

  17. Spatial memory in foraging games.

    PubMed

    Kerster, Bryan E; Rhodes, Theo; Kello, Christopher T

    2016-03-01

    Foraging and foraging-like processes are found in spatial navigation, memory, visual search, and many other search functions in human cognition and behavior. Foraging is commonly theorized using either random or correlated movements based on Lévy walks, or a series of decisions to remain or leave proximal areas known as "patches". Neither class of model makes use of spatial memory, but search performance may be enhanced when information about searched and unsearched locations is encoded. A video game was developed to test the role of human spatial memory in a canonical foraging task. Analyses of search trajectories from over 2000 human players yielded evidence that foraging movements were inherently clustered, and that clustering was facilitated by spatial memory cues and influenced by memory for spatial locations of targets found. A simple foraging model is presented in which spatial memory is used to integrate aspects of Lévy-based and patch-based foraging theories to perform a kind of area-restricted search, and thereby enhance performance as search unfolds. Using only two free parameters, the model accounts for a variety of findings that individually support competing theories, but together they argue for the integration of spatial memory into theories of foraging.

  18. Memorial to Professor Antonio Barone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tafuri, Francesco; Pepe, Giampiero; Vaglio, Ruggero

    2014-04-01

    Antonio Barone prematurely passed away on 4 December 2011 at the age of 72, after a one-year battle with cancer. He left behind his wife Sveva and his two sons, Alberto and Livio. Antonio was Professor Emeritus at the University of Napoli Federico II, where he had been teaching for about 40 years. The initial research activity of Antonio was in the field of nuclear physics. In this context, almost 45 years ago, the Ge 'Lithium drift' semiconductor detectors represented a novelty, due to the high energy resolution enabled by those devices. Superconductors stimulated new approaches to radiation detection and this motivated Antonio's interest towards superconductivity. Following the birth of the Laboratorio di Cibernetica of the CNR in 1967 he was given the opportunity to work on a joint USA-Italy project (University of Wisconsin, Madison and CNR Naples) in the field of superconductivity on the peculiar subject of the superconductive 'Neuristors'. His research activity on Josephson junctions opened up a wide variety of very stimulating subjects in which he was deeply involved, ranging from the soliton propagation in 'long' Josephson structures to fluctuations phenomena, from light-sensitive junctions and proximity effect to the development of innovative superconducting devices. The strong interaction of Antonio with the Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics of the Academy of Sciences in Moscow, characterizes a long period of his research activity with a precious merging of theoretical and experimental aspects. This body of work converged into the famous monograph on the 'Physics and Applications of the Josephson Effect', written in collaboration with Gianfranco Paternò in 1982. This rapidly became the reference text for the Josephson effect, as documented by thousands of citations and the fact that it was translated into Russian, Japanese and Chinese. In 1983 Antonio was awarded the highest academic title of 'Doctor of the Physical-Mathematical Sciences' by the

  19. Does sleep promote false memories?

    PubMed

    Darsaud, Annabelle; Dehon, Hedwige; Lahl, Olaf; Sterpenich, Virginie; Boly, Mélanie; Dang-Vu, Thanh; Desseilles, Martin; Gais, Stephen; Matarazzo, Luca; Peters, Frédéric; Schabus, Manuel; Schmidt, Christina; Tinguely, Gilberte; Vandewalle, Gilles; Luxen, André; Maquet, Pierre; Collette, Fabienne

    2011-01-01

    Memory is constructive in nature so that it may sometimes lead to the retrieval of distorted or illusory information. Sleep facilitates accurate declarative memory consolidation but might also promote such memory distortions. We examined the influence of sleep and lack of sleep on the cerebral correlates of accurate and false recollections using fMRI. After encoding lists of semantically related word associates, half of the participants were allowed to sleep, whereas the others were totally sleep deprived on the first postencoding night. During a subsequent retest fMRI session taking place 3 days later, participants made recognition memory judgments about the previously studied associates, critical theme words (which had not been previously presented during encoding), and new words unrelated to the studied items. Sleep, relative to sleep deprivation, enhanced accurate and false recollections. No significant difference was observed in brain responses to false or illusory recollection between sleep and sleep deprivation conditions. However, after sleep but not after sleep deprivation (exclusive masking), accurate and illusory recollections were both associated with responses in the hippocampus and retrosplenial cortex. The data suggest that sleep does not selectively enhance illusory memories but rather tends to promote systems-level consolidation in hippocampo-neocortical circuits of memories subsequently associated with both accurate and illusory recollections. We further observed that during encoding, hippocampal responses were selectively larger for items subsequently accurately retrieved than for material leading to illusory memories. The data indicate that the early organization of memory during encoding is a major factor influencing subsequent production of accurate or false memories.

  20. Large capacity temporary visual memory

    PubMed Central

    Endress, Ansgar D.; Potter, Mary C.

    2014-01-01

    Visual working memory (WM) capacity is thought to be limited to three or four items. However, many cognitive activities seem to require larger temporary memory stores. Here, we provide evidence for a temporary memory store with much larger capacity than past WM capacity estimates. Further, based on previous WM research, we show that a single factor — proactive interference — is sufficient to bring capacity estimates down to the range of previous WM capacity estimates. Participants saw a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) of 5 to 21 pictures of familiar objects or words presented at rates of 4/s or 8/s, respectively, and thus too fast for strategies such as rehearsal. Recognition memory was tested with a single probe item. When new items were used on all trials, no fixed memory capacities were observed, with estimates of up to 9.1 retained pictures for 21-item lists, and up to 30.0 retained pictures for 100-item lists, and no clear upper bound to how many items could be retained. Further, memory items were not stored in a temporally stable form of memory, but decayed almost completely after a few minutes. In contrast, when, as in most WM experiments, a small set of items was reused across all trials, thus creating proactive interference among items, capacity remained in the range reported in previous WM experiments. These results show that humans have a large-capacity temporary memory store in the absence of proactive interference, and raise the question of whether temporary memory in everyday cognitive processing is severely limited as in WM experiments, or has the much larger capacity found in the present experiments. PMID:23937181

  1. Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Thyroid Cancer Thyroid Cancer This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Thyroid Cancer. Use the menu below to choose the Overview/ ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Thyroid Cancer Introduction Statistics Medical Illustrations Risk Factors Symptoms and ...

  2. Temporomandibular disorders and declarative memory.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dongmei; Ye, Ling

    2011-05-01

    Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) is a somatic manifestation of stress. Previous researches suggested hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis hyperactivity in TMD, through which TMD patients exhibited abnormalities of the stress response hormone - causing additional cortisol release. Increased cortisol, the principal circulating glucocorticoid in humans, would impair memory retrieval of declarative material. This effect on memory retrieval may in particular be due to glucocorticoid receptors (GR) in the hippocampus. The hypothesis we proposed is that TMD might result in declarative memory impairment by increasing the cortisol.

  3. Shared versus distributed memory multiprocessors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Harry F.

    1991-01-01

    The question of whether multiprocessors should have shared or distributed memory has attracted a great deal of attention. Some researchers argue strongly for building distributed memory machines, while others argue just as strongly for programming shared memory multiprocessors. A great deal of research is underway on both types of parallel systems. Special emphasis is placed on systems with a very large number of processors for computation intensive tasks and considers research and implementation trends. It appears that the two types of systems will likely converge to a common form for large scale multiprocessors.

  4. Nanoscale content-addressable memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Bryan (Inventor); Principe, Jose C. (Inventor); Fortes, Jose (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A combined content addressable memory device and memory interface is provided. The combined device and interface includes one or more one molecular wire crossbar memories having spaced-apart key nanowires, spaced-apart value nanowires adjacent to the key nanowires, and configurable switches between the key nanowires and the value nanowires. The combination further includes a key microwire-nanowire grid (key MNG) electrically connected to the spaced-apart key nanowires, and a value microwire-nanowire grid (value MNG) electrically connected to the spaced-apart value nanowires. A key or value MNGs selects multiple nanowires for a given key or value.

  5. Shape memory metals. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Dworak, T.D.

    1993-09-01

    The ability to define a manufacturing process to form, heat-treat, and join parts made of nickel-titanium and/or copper-zinc-aluminum shape memory alloys was investigated. The specific emphasis was to define a process that would produce shape memory alloy parts in the configuration of helical coils emulating the appearance of compression springs. In addition, the mechanical strength of the finished parts along with the development of a electrical lead attachment method using shape memory alloy wire was investigated.

  6. Holographic Read-Only Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mok, F.; Zhou, G.; Psaltis, D.

    The most successful use of optical memories so far has been as read-only memories (ROM). A main reason for this success has been the availability of inexpensive methods to mass-produce copies of recorded disks. This has made it possible to publish data (audio, video, databases, computer games) and distribute it widely through normal retail channels. In this chapter, we show results of a holographic read-only memory (HROM) of which digital data on a master disk can be copied onto replicate disks efficiently.

  7. Special Operations Commemoration: Monuments, Memory & Memorialization Practices of Elite Organizations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    offerings of olives and flowers and a floral wreath was placed at the head of 7 the deceased. The Romans honored the war dead in the annual festival ...called Parentalia. The Druids celebrated their memorial day around the first of November just prior to their festival of thanksgiving to the sun.12...Changed the World( Woodstock : Overlook Press, 2006), 81. 17 Elizabeth Anderson, Memory, Mourning, Landscape (New York: Rodopi, 2010), 22. 33

  8. Does Active Memory Capacity Change with Age?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halford, Graeme S.; And Others

    A series of experiments, which used the primary memory paradigm of Wickens et al. (1981, 1985) with university students, adults, and 8- and 9-year-old children, found an increase in primary memory capacity with age. Primary memory differs from secondary memory in that the latter is susceptible to proactive interference, whereas the former is not.…

  9. Sleep Enhances Explicit Recollection in Recognition Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drosopoulos, Spyridon; Wagner, Ullrich; Born, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Recognition memory is considered to be supported by two different memory processes, i.e., the explicit recollection of information about a previous event and an implicit process of recognition based on a contextual sense of familiarity. Both types of memory supposedly rely on distinct memory systems. Sleep is known to enhance the consolidation of…

  10. Explaining the Development of False Memories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyna, Valerie F.; Holliday, Robyn; Marche, Tammy

    2002-01-01

    Reviews explanatory dimensions of children's false memory relevant to forensic practice: measurement, development, social factors, individual differences, varieties of memories and memory judgments, and varieties of procedures inducing false memories. Asserts that recent studies fail to use techniques that separate acquiescence from memory…

  11. Sharpen Kids' Memory to Raise Test Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Judy

    2005-01-01

    By understanding the different types of memory, the neurophysiology of brain chemical and anatomical changes associated with memory, and the ways to enhance the memory process, teachers can utilize proven technique--and develop their own--to guide students over that bleak terrain of memorization. From simplest recall of awareness, memory skills…

  12. Psychotherapy and Memories of Childhood Sexual Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, D. Stephen

    This conference address examines the question of whether "memory work"--using therapeutic techniques to help clients recover suspected hidden memories of childhood sexual abuse--has led some clients to develop illusory memories or false beliefs. Prospective research on memory for childhood trauma indicates that the gist of traumatic…

  13. Coding and Dynamics of Memory. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wickelgren, Wayne

    This report provides a nontechnical summary of a series of studies from a research project with three major foci: memory storage dynamics, memory retrieval dynamics, and coding in semantic memory. A theory of forgetting was developed, involving time and interference factors. Memory traces have two properties: strength and fragility. Consolidation…

  14. Schematic Knowledge and Memory in Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saarnio, David A.

    1990-01-01

    Describes research on memory in preschool children. Each child was studied for scene and list memory. Domain-specific and general knowledge were not found to be strongly related to memory performance. Object typicality did not have a strong effect on memory, but size did. (GH)

  15. Knowledge Of Memory Aging In Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawley, Karri S.; Cherry, Katie E.; Su, L. Joseph; Chiu, Yu-Wen; Jazwinski, S. Michal

    2006-01-01

    The Knowledge of Memory Aging Questionnaire (KMAQ) measures laypersons' knowledge of memory changes in adulthood for research or educational purposes. Half of the questions pertain to normal memory aging and the other half cover pathological memory deficits due to non-normative factors, such as adult dementia. In this study, we compared memory…

  16. Can Interactive Working Memory Training Improve Learning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alloway, Tracy

    2012-01-01

    Background: Working memory is linked to learning outcomes and there is emerging evidence that training working memory can yield gains in working memory and fluid intelligence. Aims: The aim of the present study was to investigate whether interactive working memory training would transfer to acquired cognitive skills, such as vocabulary and…

  17. Comparing Music Literacy Performance with Memory Functioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danley, William E., Jr.; Tanner, Don R.

    1982-01-01

    Describes the development of a memory assessment instrument, the Perceptual Memory Test (PMT), which allows the nonverbal evaluation of various memory modalities. Compares the PMT with the Iowa Test of Musical Literacy and concludes that memory in a general sense might be important in performance on a musical assessment device. (FL)

  18. A Temporal Ratio Model of Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Gordon D. A.; Neath, Ian; Chater, Nick

    2007-01-01

    A model of memory retrieval is described. The model embodies four main claims: (a) temporal memory--traces of items are represented in memory partly in terms of their temporal distance from the present; (b) scale-similarity--similar mechanisms govern retrieval from memory over many different timescales; (c) local distinctiveness--performance on a…

  19. Memory Reactivation and Consolidation during Sleep

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paller, Ken A.; Voss, Joel L.

    2004-01-01

    Do our memories remain static during sleep, or do they change? We argue here that memory change is not only a natural result of sleep cognition, but further, that such change constitutes a fundamental characteristic of declarative memories. In general, declarative memories change due to retrieval events at various times after initial learning and…

  20. Effector memory and central memory NY-ESO-1-specific re-directed T cells for treatment of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Schuberth, P C; Jakka, G; Jensen, S M; Wadle, A; Gautschi, F; Haley, D; Haile, S; Mischo, A; Held, G; Thiel, M; Tinguely, M; Bifulco, C B; Fox, B A; Renner, C; Petrausch, U

    2013-04-01

    The cancer-testis antigen NY-ESO-1 is a potential target antigen for immune therapy expressed in a subset of patients with multiple myeloma. We generated chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) recognizing the immunodominant NY-ESO-1 peptide 157-165 in the context of HLA-A*02:01 to re-direct autologous CD8(+) T cells towards NY-ESO-1(+) myeloma cells. These re-directed T cells specifically lysed NY-ESO-1(157-165)/HLA-A*02:01-positive cells and secreted IFNγ. A total of 40% of CCR7(-) re-directed T cells had an effector memory phenotype and 5% a central memory phenotype. Based on CCR7 cell sorting, effector and memory CAR-positive T cells were separated and CCR7(+) memory cells demonstrated after antigen-specific re-stimulation downregulation of CCR7 as sign of differentiation towards effector cells accompanied by an increased secretion of memory signature cytokines such as IL-2. To evaluate NY-ESO-1 as potential target antigen, we screened 78 bone marrow biopsies of multiple myeloma patients where NY-ESO-1 protein was found to be expressed by immunohistochemistry in 9.7% of samples. Adoptively transferred NY-ESO-1-specific re-directed T cells protected mice against challenge with endogenously NY-ESO-1-positive myeloma cells in a xenograft model. In conclusion, re-directed effector- and central memory T cells specifically recognized NY-ESO-1(157-165)/ HLA-A*02:01-positive cells resulting in antigen-specific functionality in vitro and in vivo.