Science.gov

Sample records for cancer patient communication

  1. Communicating with terminal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Anderson, J L

    Communication between doctors and terminal cancer patients has been identified as a problem area in medical care. There have been attempts to overcome this problem by establishing new teaching programs; however, the most effective teaching methods are costly. A model is described that requires minimal staff involvement in teaching about communicating with terminal cancer patients.

  2. Communication in Cancer Care (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about communicating with the cancer patient and his or her family, including unique aspects of communication with cancer patients, factors affecting communication, and training in communication skills.

  3. Reactions to cancer: communicating with patients, family and carers.

    PubMed

    Newton, J Tim

    2010-06-01

    Effective communication has benefits for both patients and members of the health care team. Five main communication tasks in head and neck cancer are identified: Screening for head and neck cancer and communicating risk; Communicating the diagnosis of head and neck cancer; Providing information about treatment and pre-treatment; Communicating following treatment and dealing with fear of recurrence; Discussing the end of life. For each specific aspects of the communication situation are discussed. Underpinning each is the use of core communication skills.

  4. The communication goals and needs of cancer patients: a review.

    PubMed

    Hack, Thomas F; Degner, Lesley F; Parker, Patricia A

    2005-10-01

    The aim of this review paper is to critique the empirical literature pertaining to the communication needs and goals of cancer patients, and to provide direction for research in this area. According to the conceptual framework of Feldman-Stewart et al., patient-physician communication occurs for the fundamental purpose of addressing each participant's goal(s). This review is divided into two categories of goals: (a) optimal medical management of the cancer, and (b) optimal attention to the patient's psychosocial response to cancer. Optimal medical management includes discussions about disease status and the treatment plan, and the effectiveness of these discussions is frequently determined by assessing patient understanding, satisfaction, and well-being. The literature suggests that cancer patients continue to have unmet communication needs, and communication outcomes are enhanced when physicians attend to the emotional needs of patients. Research gaps in communication research are highlighted, including the need for additional study of several external factors affecting the patient and provider.

  5. Palliative communications: addressing chemotherapy in patients with advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Kadakia, K C; Moynihan, T J; Smith, T J; Loprinzi, C L

    2012-04-01

    Patients with advanced cancers often endure chemotherapy late in their disease course leading to unnecessary adverse effects, loss of quality of life, and delay in hospice referral. Compassionate and honest communication about the use of chemotherapy can facilitate better patient care. This manuscript will explore communication issues regarding palliative-intent chemotherapy.

  6. [Pitfalls within the cancer-related doctor-patient communication].

    PubMed

    Muszbek, Katalin; Gaal, Ilona

    2016-04-24

    There is a "confusion of tongues" in the communication between patient and physician that hinders mutual understanding. Cancer - because of its malignant and often chronic nature - accentuates the communication problems and emphasizes the importance of human relationship. The confusion of tongues can only be resolved through understanding of the situation and motivations of the other person. Thus our aim is to help medical doctors to recognize and understand the most important communication characteristics of the doctor-patient interactions that are strained by the burden of cancer. Interviews with directly concerned professionals and non-professionals were recorded in order to reveal the most common communication disturbances. The majority of the "communication vacuum" arose when bad news should be disclosed for the patient, as bad news is bad for the physician as well. It is emotionally burdening to perceive bad news, and a big challenge for the physician to break it gently, to be tactful, while he/she has no possibility to pay attention with regard to his/her own emotional stability. Medical doctors can cope with this challenge if they are acquainted with the psychological difficulties of the patients that block the effective medical communication.

  7. Communication Needs of Patients with Breast Cancer: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Khoshnazar, Tahereh Alsadat Khoubbin; Rassouli, Mrayam; Akbari, Mohammad Esmaeil; Lotfi-Kashani, Farah; Momenzadeh, Syrus; Rejeh, Nahid; Mohseny, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Since communication is considered to be one of the central concepts in caregiving practices, this study aims to examine the perception of women with breast cancer in terms of their communication needs. Methods: In this qualitative study, 20 participants (9 women with breast cancer, 10 of health-care professionals, and one family caregiver) were selected through purposive sampling, and a face-to-face semi-structured interview was conducted with each of them. After data collection, all interviews were transcribed and reviewed, and categories were extracted. The data were analyzed with Conventional Content Analysis of Landman and Graneheim using MAXQDA10 software. Results: The analysis resulted in two extracted categories: “therapeutic communication” and “facilitating empathy”, and five subcategories: “trust-building therapist”, “crying out to be heard,” “seeking a soothing presence,” “sharing knowledge,” and “supportive peers”. Conclusion: Identifying and promoting the communicative needs of patients could lead to a considerably better care of patients under treatment. Therefore, therapeutic communication, as an integral part, should be incorporated into the care plan for patients with breast cancer and their families in the Oncology and Palliative Care wards. PMID:27803561

  8. Considering Culture in Physician– Patient Communication During Colorectal Cancer Screening

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ge; Burke, Nancy; Somkin, Carol P.; Pasick, Rena

    2010-01-01

    Racial and ethnic disparities exist in both incidence and stage detection of colorectal cancer (CRC). We hypothesized that cultural practices (i.e., communication norms and expectations) influence patients’ and their physicians’ understanding and talk about CRC screening. We examined 44 videotaped observations of clinic visits that included a CRC screening recommendation and transcripts from semistructured interviews that doctors and patients separately completed following the visit. We found that interpersonal relationship themes such as power distance, trust, directness/indirectness, and an ability to listen, as well as personal health beliefs, emerged as affecting patients’ definitions of provider–patient effective communication. In addition, we found that in discordant physician–patient interactions (when each is from a different ethnic group), physicians did not solicit or address cultural barriers to CRC screening and patients did not volunteer culture-related concerns regarding CRC screening. PMID:19363141

  9. The Association of Perceived Provider-Patient Communication and Relationship Quality with Colorectal Cancer Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underhill, Meghan L.; Kiviniemi, Marc T.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Two-thirds of adults aged 50 years and older are adherent to recommendations for colorectal cancer screening. Provider-patient communication and characteristics of the patient-provider relationship may relate to screening behavior. Methods: The association of provider communication quality, relationship, and colorectal cancer screening…

  10. Medication risk communication with cancer patients in a Middle East cancer care setting

    PubMed Central

    Wilbur, Kerry; Al-Okka, Maha; Jumaat, Ebaa; Eissa, Nesma; Elbashir, Merwa; Al-Yafei, Sumaya M Al Saadi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Cancer treatments are frequently associated with adverse effects, but there may be a cultural reluctance by care providers to be forthcoming with patients regarding these risks for fear of promoting nonadherence. Conversely, research in a number of countries indicates high levels of patient desire for this information. We sought to explore cancer patient experiences, satisfaction, and preferences for medication risk communication in a Middle East care setting. Methods We developed and administered a ten-item questionnaire (Arabic and English) to a convenience sample of consenting adult patients receiving treatment at the National Center for Cancer Care and Research in Qatar. Results One hundred and forty-three patients were interviewed. Most (88%) stated that the level of side effect information they received was sufficient, with physicians (86%) followed by pharmacists (39%) as the preferred sources. The majority (97%) agreed that knowing about possible side effects would help them recognize and manage the reaction, and 92% agreed that it would help them understand how to minimize or prevent the risks. Eighteen percent indicated that this information would make them not want to take treatment. Two-thirds (65%) had previously experienced intolerance to their cancer treatment regimen. Conclusion Most patients surveyed expressed preference for the details of possible side effects they may encounter in their treatment. However, one in five considered such information a factor for nonadherence, indicating the need for patient-specific approaches when communicating medication risks. PMID:27175061

  11. "You are not at all bothersome" - nurses' online communication with testicular cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Wibe, Torunn; Ekstedt, Mirjam; Hellesø, Ragnhild; Varsi, Cecilie; Ruland, Cornelia

    2012-01-01

    To some extent, electronic communication has supplemented nurses' face-to-face contact with patients over the last few years. In this paper, we report findings from a study in which we examined cancer nurses' answers to messages from testicular cancer patients in a nurse-managed online patient-provider communication service. The aim of the study was to investigate how nurses manage to meet patients' different questions and concerns, and what aspects of expert nursing care are demonstrated when they communicate with patients online. The content of the messages formed a continuum from practical to existential issues. In their answers, the nurses demonstrated an ability to make reflected choices between both support modalities and means of communication. The professional knowledge and care of expert cancer nurses were clearly exposed in the nurses' answers, although they were good at adapting their professional language so that it would be understandable to the patients.

  12. All eyes on the patient: the influence of oncologists' nonverbal communication on breast cancer patients' trust.

    PubMed

    Hillen, Marij A; de Haes, Hanneke C J M; van Tienhoven, Geertjan; Bijker, Nina; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W M; Vermeulen, Daniëlle M; Smets, Ellen M A

    2015-08-01

    Trust in the oncologist is crucial for breast cancer patients. It reduces worry, enhances decision making, and stimulates adherence. Optimal nonverbal communication by the oncologist, particularly eye contact, body posture, and smiling, presumably benefits patients' trust. We were the first to experimentally examine (1) how the oncologist's nonverbal behavior influences trust, and (2) individual differences in breast cancer patients' trust. Analogue patients (APs) viewed one out of eight versions of a video vignette displaying a consultation about chemotherapy treatment. All eight versions varied only in the oncologist's amount of eye contact (consistent vs. inconsistent), body posture (forward leaning vs. varying), and smiling (occasional smiling vs. no smiling). Primary outcome was trust in the observed oncologist (Trust in Oncologist Scale). 214 APs participated. Consistent eye contact led to stronger trust (β = -.13, p = .04). This effect was largely explained by lower educated patients, for whom the effect of consistent eye contact was stronger than for higher educated patients (β = .18, p = .01). A forward leaning body posture did not influence trust, nor did smiling. However, if the oncologist smiled more, he was perceived as more friendly (rs = .31, p < .001) and caring (rs = .18, p = .01). Older (β = .17, p = .01) and lower educated APs (β = -.25, p < .001) were more trusting. Trust was weaker for more avoidantly attached APs (β = -.16, p = .03). We experimentally demonstrated the importance of maintaining consistent eye contact for breast cancer patients' trust, especially among lower educated patients. These findings need to be translated into training for oncologists in how to optimize their nonverbal communication with breast cancer patients while simultaneously managing increased time pressure and computer use during the consultation. PMID:26227472

  13. Health literacy, communication, and treatment decision-making in older cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Amalraj, Sunil; Starkweather, Chelsea; Nguyen, Christopher; Naeim, Arash

    2009-04-15

    Inadequate health literacy and physician-patient communication are associated with poor health outcomes and appear to limit quality of medical decision-making. This review presents and consolidates data concerning health literacy, physician-patient communication, and their impact on medical treatment decisions in elderly cancer patients. This population faces increasingly complex management options, cognitive and sensory deficits, and intergenerational barriers. As a result of these and other factors, older cancer patients have among the lowest health literacy and numeracy rates and often suffer from suboptimal physician-patient communication. These deficiencies impair elderly cancer patients' ability to understand, recall, and act upon information concerning treatment risk and benefit. This situation also makes it difficult for patients to have self-confidence in communicating with their provider and sharing in the decision-making. Moreover, since older cancer patients usually bring a companion to medical appointments, the positive and negative role of a companion in the context of communication and decision-making needs to be considered. Future research should center on developing ways to identify and overcome health communication barriers to improve geriatric cancer care.

  14. Association of Patient-Provider Communication Domains with Lung Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jenny J.; Lake, Jessica; Wall, Melanie M.; Berman, Andrew R.; Salazar-Schicchi, John; Powell, Charles; Keller, Steven M.; Halm, Ethan A.; Leventhal, Howard; Wisnivesky, Juan P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Patient-physician communication is critical for helping patients understand and complete the complex steps needed to diagnose stage and treat lung cancer. We assessed which domains of patient-physician communication about lung cancer and its treatment are associated with receipt of disease-directed, stage-appropriate treatment. Methods Patients with recently-diagnosed lung cancer were recruited from four medical centers in New York City from 2008 to 2011. Participants were surveyed about discussions with physicians regarding treatment, symptoms and needs. Multiple regression analysis and structural equation modeling were used to assess which communication factors were associated with disease treatment. Results Of the 352 participants, 191 (54%) received disease-directed, stage-appropriate treatment. Unadjusted associations between communication items and treatment found that participants who felt that their physicians explained the risks and disadvantages of lung cancer treatment (P<0.01), discussed their chances of cure (P=0.02), discussed goals of treatment (P<0.01) or who were warm and friendly (P=0.04) were more likely to undergo treatment. Three communication domains were identified: treatment information, physician support, and patient symptoms/needs. After adjusting for known determinants of lung cancer treatment, increased treatment information was associated with higher probability of cancer-directed treatment (P=0.003). Other communication domains (physician support or patient symptoms/needs) were not independent predictors of treatment (P>0.05 for both comparisons). Conclusions These data suggest that treatment information is particularly important for increasing the probability of cancer-directed therapy among lung cancer patients. Clinicians should ensure that they clearly discuss treatment goals and options with patients while maintaining empathy, supporting patient needs, and addressing symptoms. PMID:25122421

  15. Patients' cultural beliefs in patient-provider communication with African American women and Latinas diagnosed with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Mott-Coles, Susan

    2014-08-01

    African American women and Latinas often experience suboptimal breast cancer care. This article describes providers' self-rated skills in communication practices when working with African American women and Latinas diagnosed with breast cancer. Current literature reveals how providers are lacking in the ability to communicate with these patients and often fail to incorporate cultural beliefs into breast cancer care and treatment. This poor communication and failure to acknowledge cultural beliefs can be correlated with poor patient outcomes. In a study of providers' perceptions of how they address the cultural beliefs of African American women and Latinas diagnosed with breast cancer, interviews with physicians, inpatient nurses, cancer clinic nurses, mammography technicians, and ultrasound technicians showed that they used the same approach for all patients, regardless of race, ethnicity, or culture but felt they practiced culturally sensitive care. Increased and improved cultural competence education is recommended for providers at all levels as a first step toward increasing culturally competent communications.

  16. Patients’ and Family Members’ Views on Patient-Centered Communication During Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Mazor, Kathleen M.; Beard, Renee L.; Alexander, Gwen L.; Arora, Neeraj K.; Firneno, Cassandra; Gaglio, Bridget; Greene, Sarah M.; Lemay, Celeste A.; Robinson, Brandi E.; Roblin, Douglas W.; Walsh, Kathleen; Street, Richard L.; Gallagher, Thomas H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To explore patients’ and family members’ views on communication during cancer care, and to identify those aspects of clinician-patient communication which were most important to patients and family members. Methods We conducted a secondary data analysis of qualitative data from 137 patients with cancer and family members of patients with cancer. We used a modified version of the constant comparative method and coding paradigm of grounded theory. Results Patients want sensitive, caring clinicians who provide information that they need, when they need it, in a way that they can understand; who listen and respond to questions and concerns, and who attempt to understand the patient’s experience. Effective information exchange and a positive interpersonal relationship with the clinician were of fundamental importance to patients and family members. These were interrelated; for instance, failure to provide information a patient needed could damage the relationship, while excellent listening could foster the relationship. Information exchange and relationship were also integral to decision making, managing uncertainty, responding to emotions, and self-management. Clinicians who were responsive to patients’ needs beyond the immediate medical encounter were valued. Conclusions The complexity of cancer care today suggest that efforts to improve communication must be multi-level, acknowledging and addressing patient, clinician, organizational and policy barriers and facilitators. Measurement tools are needed to assess cancer patients’ and family members’ experiences with communication over the course of cancer care in order to provide meaningful, actionable feedback to those seeking to optimize their effectiveness in communicating with patients with cancer. PMID:23780672

  17. Evaluation of a Pilot Communication Skills Training Intervention for Minority Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bylund, Carma L.; Goytia, Elliott J.; D'Agostino, Thomas A.; Bulone, Linda; Horner, Jennifer; Li, Yuelin; Kemeny, Margaret; Ostroff, Jamie S.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to pilot test in a minority cancer patient population a communication workshop to improve doctor-patient communication skills. Thirty-two patients participated. Eighteen evaluated a face-to-face workshop, while 14 completed surveys only. Participants in the workshop group completed the Patient Report of Communication Behavior (PRCB) before and after the workshop and a course evaluation. Participants did not differ on baseline PRCB scores. Post-test scores were significantly higher than pre-test scores (p<.01). All participants agreed or strongly agreed that they would use the communication skills; 93% agreed or strongly agreed that the skills would improve their healthcare. PMID:21966720

  18. Patient Engagement in a Rapidly Changing Communication Environment: Reflections of a Cancer Survivor

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The shared decision-making paradigm calls for patients to become as knowledgeable as they can about their illnesses and treatment options. To foster their engagement, patients today have unprecedented access to an array of health information and communication applications facilitated by the Internet revolution. In this commentary, the author, a long-term cancer survivor, reflects on his recent experiences with heart disease and discusses how he has benefited from advances in communication technologies in his quest to become an informed patient, at the same time reminding the reader about the ever-enduring salience of the patient–clinician relationship. PMID:24395997

  19. Communication in Cancer Care (PDQ)

    MedlinePlus

    ... help, they can give the patient better care. Language and culture can affect communication. Communication can be ... You Love Has Advanced Cancer: Support for Caregivers Current Clinical Trials Check the list of NCI-supported ...

  20. Use of complimentary and alternative medicine by breast cancer patients: prevalence, patterns and communication with physicians.

    PubMed

    Ashikaga, Taka; Bosompra, Kwadwo; O'Brien, Patricia; Nelson, Lee

    2002-10-01

    This study examined the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies by breast cancer patients and the communication of their CAM use to their physicians relative to lymphedema symptoms and other factors. Breast cancer patients ( N = 148) in the State of Vermont were interviewed 2-3 years after their primary surgery using computer-aided telephone interviewing methods. Questionnaire items included demographic information, treatment, CAM use, lymphedema symptoms, and other measures. A large proportion (72.3%) reported using at least one CAM treatment after surgery. The most frequently used treatments were vitamins and nonfood supplements (72.3%), with herbal treatments, meditation, and traditional massage each being reported by about one-fifth of the women. Age, education, adjuvant chemotherapy, and extremity swelling were associated with use of more CAM treatments in a regression model. A large proportion (73.8%) of CAM users reported their CAM use to their physicians. Correlations between patients' income, adjuvant radiation therapy, and adjuvant tamoxifen use with communication of CAM use to their physicians were sought in a logistic regression model. CAM use is high among breast cancer patients in Vermont, and the number of CAM therapies used is related to demographic factors, adjuvant treatment, and lymphedema symptoms. Communication of CAM use to physicians appears to be multifaceted.

  1. Use of complimentary and alternative medicine by breast cancer patients: prevalence, patterns and communication with physicians.

    PubMed

    Ashikaga, Taka; Bosompra, Kwadwo; O'Brien, Patricia; Nelson, Lee

    2002-10-01

    This study examined the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies by breast cancer patients and the communication of their CAM use to their physicians relative to lymphedema symptoms and other factors. Breast cancer patients ( N = 148) in the State of Vermont were interviewed 2-3 years after their primary surgery using computer-aided telephone interviewing methods. Questionnaire items included demographic information, treatment, CAM use, lymphedema symptoms, and other measures. A large proportion (72.3%) reported using at least one CAM treatment after surgery. The most frequently used treatments were vitamins and nonfood supplements (72.3%), with herbal treatments, meditation, and traditional massage each being reported by about one-fifth of the women. Age, education, adjuvant chemotherapy, and extremity swelling were associated with use of more CAM treatments in a regression model. A large proportion (73.8%) of CAM users reported their CAM use to their physicians. Correlations between patients' income, adjuvant radiation therapy, and adjuvant tamoxifen use with communication of CAM use to their physicians were sought in a logistic regression model. CAM use is high among breast cancer patients in Vermont, and the number of CAM therapies used is related to demographic factors, adjuvant treatment, and lymphedema symptoms. Communication of CAM use to physicians appears to be multifaceted. PMID:12324809

  2. Racial/Ethnic Differences in Breast Cancer Outcomes among Older Patients: Effects of Physician Communication and Patient Empowerment

    PubMed Central

    Maly, Rose C.; Stein, Judith A.; Umezawa, Yoshiko; Leake, Barbara; Douglas Anglin, M.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To examine racial/ethnic disparities in older women’s health-related quality of life (QOL) and type of breast cancer treatment as mediated by physician level and individual level variables. Methods A cross-sectional survey of a population-based, consecutive sample identified through the Los Angeles Cancer Surveillance Program of Latina (n = 99), African-American (n = 66), and White (n = 92) women aged 55 years or older (N = 257) between 3 and 9 months after primary breast cancer diagnosis and at least one month post treatment. An exploratory, empirically-developed latent variable model tested the relationships among demographic and physician-related variables, patient attitudes, and health-related outcomes. Health-related outcomes included QOL measures and receipt of breast conserving surgery (BCS). Results Latinas reported less BCS and poorer QOL compared to Whites. Physician communication that can empower patients, in terms of patient efficacy in patient-physician interactions and breast cancer knowledge, mitigated racial/ethnic disparities in receipt of BCS. Physician emotional support was not related to patient cognitive empowerment and treatment outcomes. Medical mistrust in minority women was related to less self-efficacy and less positive coping, as well as, both directly and indirectly, to reduced QOL. Latinas reported poorer QOL in the tested model. Conclusions Physician communication style, specifically information-giving and participatory decision-making, may empower older women with breast cancer and help mitigate racial/ethnic disparities in surgical treatment received. PMID:19025268

  3. Innovative patient-centered skills training addressing challenging issues in cancer communications: Using patient's stories that teach.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Thomas W; Gorniewicz, James; Floyd, Michael; Tudiver, Fred; Odom, Amy; Zoppi, Kathy

    2016-05-01

    This workshop demonstrated the utility of a patient-centered web-based/digital Breaking Bad News communication training module designed to educate learners of various levels and disciplines. This training module is designed for independent, self-directed learning as well as group instruction. These interactive educational interventions are based upon video-recorded patient stories. Curriculum development was the result of an interdisciplinary, collaborative effort involving faculty from the East Tennessee State University (ETSU) Graduate Storytelling Program and the departments of Family and Internal Medicine at the James H. Quillen College of Medicine. The specific goals of the BBN training module are to assist learners in: (1) understanding a five-step patient-centered model that is based upon needs, preferences, and expectations of patients with cancer and (2) individualizing communication that is consistent with patient preferences in discussing emotions, informational detail, prognosis and timeline, and whether or not to discuss end-of-life issues. The pedagogical approach to the training module is to cycle through Emotional Engagement, Data, Modeled Practices, Adaptation Opportunities, and Feedback. The communication skills addressed are rooted in concepts found within the Reaching Common Ground communication training. A randomized control study investigating the effectiveness of the Breaking Bad News module found that medical students as well as resident physicians improved their communication skills as measured by an Objective Structured Clinical Examination. Four other similarly designed modules were also created: Living Through Treatment, Transitions: From Curable to Treatable/From Treatable to End-of-Life, Spirituality, and Family.

  4. Physician-patient communication about breast cancer. A challenge for the 1990s.

    PubMed

    Schain, W S

    1990-08-01

    Rose Kushner, a well-known breast cancer patient advocate and medical journalist who contributed immeasurably to the changes that have taken place in breast cancer management today, summed up the communication dilemma succinctly. She stressed the importance of communication from physician to patient and from patient to physician. "In order for it to work [well]," she said, "it has to go both ways." The essence of a mutually cooperative endeavor in health care assumes that reactions from both parties affect the nature and outcome of the interaction. Therefore, it is mandatory to examine the reciprocal flow of factors that shape the physician-patient interaction. Although public testimony often conveys the conviction that physician communications are limited or altered in an attempt to protect patients from emotional upset and that withholding information is in their best interest, a literature review demonstrated that this was not so. Interestingly, today, a contrary trend may be emerging, where some physicians are so forthright and blunt in their disclosure that the impact of a guarded prognosis is felt as an assault and carries with it a connotation of certainty for disaster. As was stated earlier in this article, a most useful beacon to guide the physician in this dimly lit path is the notion that "congruence not candor" direct the disclosure. The physician-patient interaction is a unique and somewhat fragile connection that must be viewed as more than an implicit service contract. It is a special collaborative effort that requires continuous monitoring and assessment in order to maximize gratification for both parties. Individuals on both sides of the stethoscope have feelings and needs that can operate to enhance or sabotage optimal physician-patient relations.

  5. Communication in Cancer Care (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about communicating with the cancer patient and his or her family, including unique aspects of communication with cancer patients, factors affecting communication, and training in communication skills.

  6. Risk communication with Arab patients with cancer: a qualitative study of nurses and pharmacists

    PubMed Central

    Wilbur, Kerry; Babiker, Alya; Al-Okka, Maha; Jumaat, Ebaa; Al-Yafei, Sumaya M Al Saadi; Nashwan, Abdulqadir J

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To explore pharmacist and nurse views and experiences in educating patients regarding their treatment safety and tolerability as well as the roles of other professions in this regard. Design In this qualitative study, six focus group discussions were conducted. Setting The National Center for Cancer Care and Research in Qatar. Participants Eleven pharmacists and 22 nurses providing direct patient care. Results Concepts related to three key themes were drawn from the seeding questions and included factors for determining the level of risk they communicated: the specific treatment regimen in question; the patient; and their assessment of the patient. Patient-related considerations arose from additional subthemes; both nurses and pharmacists described aspects related to the perceived psychological health status of the patient, as well as anticipated comprehension, as ascertained by demonstrated education and language abilities. In all discussions, it was noted that physician and family non-disclosure of cancer diagnosis to the patient profoundly influenced the nature of information they provided. While a high level of cohesion in safety communication prioritisation among these two health disciplines was found, a number of pharmacists asserted a more formal role compared to informal and repeated teaching by nurses. Conclusions Nurses and pharmacists in this Middle East healthcare environment were not reluctant to discuss treatment side effects with patients and draw on similar professional judgements in prioritising treatment risk information. We found that they did not always recognise each other's informal educational encounters and that there are opportunities to explore increased collaboration in this regard to enhance the patient care experience. PMID:25833667

  7. Does the number of cancer patients' close social ties affect cancer-related information seeking through communication efficacy? Testing a mediation model.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Nehama; Martinez, Lourdes S

    2014-09-01

    This study addresses whether having a broad social network of close friends equips cancer patients with increased efficacy to engage in communication about their cancer, which then leads to an increased likelihood of patients actively seeking cancer-related information. Guided by the theory of motivated information management, the study also tests whether the effect of the number of close social ties on information seeking is mediated, in part, by communication efficacy. Results are based on data collected from a randomly drawn sample from the Pennsylvania Cancer Registry of 2,013 cancer patients who completed mail surveys in the Fall of 2006. Results are consistent with a cross-sectional mediation effect in which the number of close social ties in one's social network is positively associated with communication efficacy (b = .17, p = .001), which, in turn, is positively associated with cancer-related information seeking (b = .13, p < .001).

  8. Recruiting diverse patients to a breast cancer risk communication trial--waiting rooms can improve access.

    PubMed Central

    Bodurtha, Joann N.; Quillin, John M.; Tracy, Kelly A.; Borzelleca, Joseph; McClish, Donna; Wilson, Diane Baer; Jones, Resa M.; Quillin, Julie; Bowen, Deborah

    2007-01-01

    Low participation among underserved populations in health research constrains progress in public health practices. From 2003 to 2005, Women's Health Clinic patients at the VCU Health System were recruited to a trial investigating breast cancer risk communication. In secondary analyses, we examined dimensions of the recruitment of these diverse women. The sample characteristics (age, insurance, race and previous mammograms) were compared to the overall clinic. Of recruitment attempts for eligible women, 45% consented; of those who declined, the top cited reasons were lack of time (40%) and lack of interest (18%). Of 899 participants, 35% qualified for the indigent care program, compared to 31% of the overall clinic (P<0.001). Forty-five percent of participants were African American, compared to 54% of overall clinic patients (P<0.001). Participants were younger (50 vs. 53 years, P<0.001) than the overall clinic population. Nonrepresentative enrollment of patients in clinical trials is common and could lead to suboptimal applicability of findings. Although there were statistically significant race and age differences between the study sample and the overall population, we demonstrate that waiting room recruitment can engage diverse women in a clinical trial and cancer risk communication. PMID:17722671

  9. Identifying barriers and improving communication between cancer service providers and Aboriginal patients and their families: the perspective of service providers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Aboriginal Australians experience poorer outcomes from cancer compared to the non-Aboriginal population. Some progress has been made in understanding Aboriginal Australians’ perspectives about cancer and their experiences with cancer services. However, little is known of cancer service providers’ (CSPs) thoughts and perceptions regarding Aboriginal patients and their experiences providing optimal cancer care to Aboriginal people. Communication between Aboriginal patients and non-Aboriginal health service providers has been identified as an impediment to good Aboriginal health outcomes. This paper reports on CSPs’ views about the factors impairing communication and offers practical strategies for promoting effective communication with Aboriginal patients in Western Australia (WA). Methods A qualitative study involving in-depth interviews with 62 Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal CSPs from across WA was conducted between March 2006 - September 2007 and April-October 2011. CSPs were asked to share their experiences with Aboriginal patients and families experiencing cancer. Thematic analysis was carried out. Our analysis was primarily underpinned by the socio-ecological model, but concepts of Whiteness and privilege, and cultural security also guided our analysis. Results CSPs’ lack of knowledge about the needs of Aboriginal people with cancer and Aboriginal patients’ limited understanding of the Western medical system were identified as the two major impediments to communication. For effective patient–provider communication, attention is needed to language, communication style, knowledge and use of medical terminology and cross-cultural differences in the concept of time. Aboriginal marginalization within mainstream society and Aboriginal people’s distrust of the health system were also key issues impacting on communication. Potential solutions to effective Aboriginal patient-provider communication included recruiting more Aboriginal staff

  10. Consultations Between Patients With Breast Cancer and Surgeons: A Pathway From Patient-Centered Communication to Reduced Hopelessness

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Jeffrey D.; Hoover, Donald R.; Venetis, Maria K.; Kearney, Thomas J.; Street, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Patient-centered communication (PCC) affects psychosocial health outcomes of patients. However, these effects are rarely direct, and our understanding of such effects are largely based on self-report (v observational) data. More information is needed on the pathways by which concrete PCC behaviors affect specific psychosocial outcomes in cancer care. We hypothesized that PCC behaviors increase the satisfaction of patients with surgeons, which, in turn, reduces the postconsultation hopelessness of patients. Patients and Methods In Portland, OR, we videotaped consultations between 147 women newly diagnosed with breast cancer and nine surgeons and administered surveys to participants immediately preconsultation and postconsultation. Consultations were coded for PCC behaviors. Multivariate regression models analyzed the association between PCC and the satisfaction of patients and between satisfaction and hopelessness. Results Levels of hopelessness of patients significantly decreased from preconsultation to postconsultation (P < .001). Two PCC behaviors (ie, patient asserting treatment preference [odds ratio {OR}, 1.50/log unit; 95% CI, 1.01 to 2.23/log unit; P = .042] and surgeon providing good/hopeful news [OR, 1.62/log unit; 95% CI, 1.01 to 2.60/log unit; P = .047]) were independently significantly associated with the satisfaction of patients with surgeons, which, in turn, independently predicted reduced levels of postconsultation hopelessness (linear change, −0.78; 95% CI, 1.44 to −0.12; P = .02). Conclusion Although additional research is needed with larger and more-diverse data sets, these findings suggest the possibility that concrete and trainable PCC behaviors can lower the hopelessness of patients with breast cancer indirectly through their effects on patient satisfaction with care. PMID:23233706

  11. Innovative patient-centered skills training addressing challenging issues in cancer communications: Using patient's stories that teach.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Thomas W; Gorniewicz, James; Floyd, Michael; Tudiver, Fred; Odom, Amy; Zoppi, Kathy

    2016-05-01

    This workshop demonstrated the utility of a patient-centered web-based/digital Breaking Bad News communication training module designed to educate learners of various levels and disciplines. This training module is designed for independent, self-directed learning as well as group instruction. These interactive educational interventions are based upon video-recorded patient stories. Curriculum development was the result of an interdisciplinary, collaborative effort involving faculty from the East Tennessee State University (ETSU) Graduate Storytelling Program and the departments of Family and Internal Medicine at the James H. Quillen College of Medicine. The specific goals of the BBN training module are to assist learners in: (1) understanding a five-step patient-centered model that is based upon needs, preferences, and expectations of patients with cancer and (2) individualizing communication that is consistent with patient preferences in discussing emotions, informational detail, prognosis and timeline, and whether or not to discuss end-of-life issues. The pedagogical approach to the training module is to cycle through Emotional Engagement, Data, Modeled Practices, Adaptation Opportunities, and Feedback. The communication skills addressed are rooted in concepts found within the Reaching Common Ground communication training. A randomized control study investigating the effectiveness of the Breaking Bad News module found that medical students as well as resident physicians improved their communication skills as measured by an Objective Structured Clinical Examination. Four other similarly designed modules were also created: Living Through Treatment, Transitions: From Curable to Treatable/From Treatable to End-of-Life, Spirituality, and Family. PMID:27497456

  12. Communication Between Breast Cancer Patients Who Received Inconclusive Genetic Test Results and Their Daughters and Sisters Years After Testing.

    PubMed

    Baars, Jessica E; Ausems, Margreet G E M; van Riel, Els; Kars, Marijke C; Bleiker, Eveline M A

    2016-06-01

    Inconclusive genetic test results including screening recommendations for the breast cancer patients and their first-degree relatives are the most common outcomes of BRCA 1/2 testing. Patients themselves should communicate these results to their relatives. Our aim was to explore communication of breast cancer genetic counseling results with daughters and sisters over a long period of time. Breast cancer patients, who had received an inconclusive DNA test result 7-14 years earlier, completed a self-report questionnaire. Additionally, in-depth interviews were conducted and analysed thematically. Of the 93 respondents, 85 (91 %) considered themselves responsible for communicating genetic test results to relatives. In-depth interviews (n = 14) showed, that counselees wanted 'to hand over' their responsibilities to communicate the test results and screening recommendations to their sisters. Although most patients had informed their daughters and sisters about the genetic test results, usually little is spoken about genetic test results and screening recommendations once the duty of informing is completed. We recommend that, similar to the procedure for BRCA1/2-mutation carriers, a separate letter for first-degree relatives of patients with an inconclusive test result should be provided. In this way information about risks and screening recommendations can be verified by family members years after genetic testing has been completed.

  13. How Does an Online Patient-Nurse Communication Service Meet the Information Needs of Men with Recently Diagnosed Testicular Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Wibe, Torunn; Hellesø, Ragnhild; Varsi, Cecilie; Ruland, Cornelia; Ekstedt, Mirjam

    2012-01-01

    Online communication has become a potential means of communication between patients and health care providers, but so far few studies are published about online communication as part of nursing care. The aim of this study was to explore how an online patient-nurse communication (OPNC) service meets the information needs of men with newly diagnosed testicular cancer. We applied a qualitative approach by examining the content of online messages sent by patients to nurses in a specialist cancer unit. In addition, individual interviews were conducted with patients who had used the OPNC service. Four themes became distinct through a synthesis of the material from the interviews and the messages: “a means for managing illness-related concerns at home,” “a means for ensuring information flow,” “a means for strategic information seeking,” and “not yet available when needed most.” Individualized information provided by nurses with access to their medical record was shown to be important to these patients. The findings of this study indicate that not only may access to an OPNC service help patients fulfill their otherwise unmet information needs, but also it may prevent delays and discontinuity in care due to informational gaps and lead to improved patient safety. PMID:23251816

  14. Psychosocial Interventions for Patients and Caregivers in the Age of New Communication Technologies: Opportunities and Challenges in Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    BADR, HODA; CARMACK, CINDY L.; DIEFENBACH, MICHAEL A.

    2014-01-01

    Interactive health communication technologies (IHCTs) present a new opportunity and challenge for cancer control researchers who focus on couple and family-based psychosocial interventions. In this article we first present findings from a systematic review of eight studies that utilized IHCTs in psychosocial interventions with cancer patients and their caregivers. Although this research area is still in its infancy, studies suggest that it is feasible to incorporate IHCTs in such interventions, that IHCTs are generally well-accepted by patients and caregivers, and that the choice of technology is largely dependent on intervention target (i.e., patient, caregiver, or both) and outcomes (e.g., decision-making, symptom management, lifestyle behaviors). A major research gap has been the lack of integration of Web 2.0 technologies (e.g., social media), despite the fact that social support and communication are frequently targeted components of interventions that involve cancer patients and their caregivers. Given this, we next present findings from a qualitative study that we conducted to describe the different needs and preferences of 13 cancer survivors and 12 caregivers with regard to social media use. Finally, we discuss some of the opportunities and challenges of using IHCTs in psychosocial interventions for cancer patients and their caregivers and propose directions for future research. PMID:25629218

  15. Fear of death, mortality communication, and psychological distress among secular and religiously observant family caregivers of terminal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Bachner, Yaacov G; O'Rourke, Norm; Carmel, Sara

    2011-02-01

    Previous research suggests that caregivers and terminally ill patients face substantial difficulties discussing illness and death. Existing research, however, has focused primarily on the experience of patients. The current study compared responses as well as the relative strength of association between mortality comunication, fear of death, and psychological distress (i.e., depressive symptomatology, emotional exhaustion) among secular and religiously observant family caregivers of terminally ill cancer patients. A total of 236 participants were recruited over 18 months within the first year of caregiver bereavement. Retrospectively reported mortality communication was statistically greater among secular caregivers; in contrast, both fear of death and depressive symptoms were greater among the religiously observant. Path analyses subsequently revealed notable differences between groups. Among secular caregivers, a significant inverse relationship between mortality communication and the two indices of caregiver distress emerged. In contrast, the association between mortality communication and psychological distress among the religious was moderated by these caregivers' fear of death. The results of this study suggest that fear of death is a significant predictor of psychological distress among religiously observant caregivers of terminal cancer patients (i.e., fear of their own death as elicited by the caregiving role). Fostering morality communication between secular caregivers and patients would appear to be one means of reducing the likelihood of clinically significant psychological distress. This may be insufficient among religiously observant caregivers, however, for whom fear of death may first need to be redressed.

  16. Breast cancer patients' narrative experiences about communication during the oncology care process: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Abt Sacks, A; Perestelo-Perez, L; Rodriguez-Martin, B; Cuellar-Pompa, L; Algara López, M; González Hernández, N; Serrano-Aguilar, P

    2016-09-01

    To analyse the perception about the information and communication received to evaluate oncologic care of breast cancer patients in Spain. Qualitative study based on conducting in-depth interviews. An inductive thematic analysis of the illness narratives was performed. Intentional theoretical sampling of 41 people diagnosed with breast cancer. The information provided during care process is assessed as appropriate, as it includes personalised skills focused on communication and considers organisational and contextual issues. In some cases, the information was considered partial, heterogeneous and at times contradictory, which revealed a lack of continuity. To provide and adequately cover information needs from the patient perspective, it is necessary to ensure access, both in its physical (material) and intellectual (comprehension) dimension, keeping in mind elements of social capital (social networks) and cultural capital (values, beliefs, non-verbal language) that facilitate or hinder access. The current state of transition to a horizontal model in the doctor-patient relationship, could account for the difficulties, deficits and contradictions in communication and information that breast cancer patients perceive in many contexts.

  17. Breast cancer patients' narrative experiences about communication during the oncology care process: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Abt Sacks, A; Perestelo-Perez, L; Rodriguez-Martin, B; Cuellar-Pompa, L; Algara López, M; González Hernández, N; Serrano-Aguilar, P

    2016-09-01

    To analyse the perception about the information and communication received to evaluate oncologic care of breast cancer patients in Spain. Qualitative study based on conducting in-depth interviews. An inductive thematic analysis of the illness narratives was performed. Intentional theoretical sampling of 41 people diagnosed with breast cancer. The information provided during care process is assessed as appropriate, as it includes personalised skills focused on communication and considers organisational and contextual issues. In some cases, the information was considered partial, heterogeneous and at times contradictory, which revealed a lack of continuity. To provide and adequately cover information needs from the patient perspective, it is necessary to ensure access, both in its physical (material) and intellectual (comprehension) dimension, keeping in mind elements of social capital (social networks) and cultural capital (values, beliefs, non-verbal language) that facilitate or hinder access. The current state of transition to a horizontal model in the doctor-patient relationship, could account for the difficulties, deficits and contradictions in communication and information that breast cancer patients perceive in many contexts. PMID:26412025

  18. Adherence to Adjuvant Hormone Therapy in Low-income Women with Breast Cancer: The Role of Provider-Patient Communication

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yihang; Malin, Jennifer L.; Diamant, Allison L; Thind, Amardeep; Maly, Rose C

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To assess the impact of patient-provider communication on adherence to tamoxifen (TAM) and aromatase inhibitors (AI) 36 months after breast cancer (BC) diagnosis in a low-income population of women. Methods California statewide surveys were conducted among 921 low-income women with BC at 6-, 18-, and 36-months after BC diagnosis. A subset of 303 women with stage I–III BC who initiated hormone treatment after diagnosis was identified. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed, and adjusted adherence rates were calculated. The main outcome measure was self-reported hormone use at 36 months after BC diagnosis and the chief independent variables were patient-centered communication after diagnosis by patient report as measured by the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CAHPS) and patients’ self-efficacy in patient-physician interactions (PEPPI). Results Overall adherence to TAM/AI was relatively high (88%). Adjusted rates of adherence were 59% and 94% for patients with the lowest vs. highest scores on the CAHPS communication scale (AOR=1.22, P=0.006) and 72% vs. 91% for patients with the lowest and highest rating of PEPPI (AOR=1.04, P=0.04). Having at least one comorbid condition also increased the odds of adherence to hormonal therapy (AOR=3.14, P=0.03). Having no health insurance and experiencing side-effects from hormone treatment were barriers for adherence (AOR=0.12, P=0.001; AOR=0.26, P=0.003, respectively). Conclusions Patient-centered communication and perceived self-efficacy in patient-physician interaction were significantly associated with patient adherence to ongoing TAM/AI therapy among low-income women with BC. Interventions on patient-provider communication may provide opportunities to improve patient outcomes in this vulnerable population. PMID:23263740

  19. Values and options in cancer care (VOICE): study design and rationale for a patient-centered communication and decision-making intervention for physicians, patients with advanced cancer, and their caregivers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Communication about prognosis and treatment choices is essential for informed decision making in advanced cancer. This article describes an investigation designed to facilitate communication and decision making among oncologists, patients with advanced cancer, and their caregivers. Methods/design The Values and Options in Cancer Care (VOICE) Study is a National Cancer Institute sponsored randomized controlled trial conducted in the Rochester/Buffalo, NY and Sacramento, CA regions. A total of 40 oncologists, approximately 400 patients with advanced cancer, and their family/friend caregivers (one per patient, when available) are expected to enroll in the study. Drawing upon ecological theory, the intervention uses a two-pronged approach: oncologists complete a multifaceted tailored educational intervention involving standardized patient instructors (SPIs), and patients and caregivers complete a coaching intervention to facilitate prioritizing and discussing questions and concerns. Follow-up data will be collected approximately quarterly for up to three years. Discussion The intervention is hypothesized to enhance patient-centered communication, quality of care, and patient outcomes. Analyses will examine the effects of the intervention on key elements of physician-patient-caregiver communication (primary outcomes), the physician-patient relationship, shared understanding of prognosis, patient well-being, and health service utilization (secondary outcomes). Trial registration Clinical Trials Identifier: NCT01485627 PMID:23570278

  20. Treatment-related symptoms among underserved women with breast cancer: the impact of physician–patient communication

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yihang; Leake, Barbara; Thind, Amardeep; Diamant, Allison L.

    2011-01-01

    Low-income, minority women are more likely to be undertreated for breast cancer (BC) treatment-related symptoms than whites. This study assessed the impact of patient–physician communication on symptom resolution. A cross-sectional, California statewide survey was conducted among 921 low-income women with BC. Ethnic/racial differences in BC treatment-related symptoms (pain, nausea/vomiting, depression) reporting and physician’ awareness of these symptoms were assessed by patient report. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to investigate the impact of patient–physician communication on symptom resolution. Depression was the most common symptom reported by patients (66%), yet physicians were the least aware of it (26.3%), especially among less-acculturated Latinas (18.9%) and Asian/Pacific Islanders (14%; P < 0.001). Greater patient-perceived self-efficacy in communication with physicians and greater physician awareness of the symptom positively predicted pain resolution, controlling for sociodemographic variables, comorbidity, and treatment received (AOR = 1.05, P < 0.0001; AOR = 6.12, P < 0.001). Physician awareness was a significant determinant of depression resolution (AOR = 13.46, P < 0.001). Yet patient-perceived self-efficacy played a much more important role than physicians’ awareness in nausea resolution (AOR = 1.04, P = 0.0002). Less-acculturated Latinas tended to achieve less symptom resolution than whites, while this negative impact disappeared or was moderated after patient–physician communication was considered. This study suggests that physicians under-recognized depression, especially among Latinas. The resolution of BC treatment-related symptoms can be addressed by appropriate educational interventions targeted at patient–physician communication. Effective patient–physician communication can moderate disparities in symptom resolution among Latinas, regardless of language acculturation. PMID:19449101

  1. Anxiety in cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Stark, D P H; House, A

    2000-01-01

    Anxiety is common in cancer patient populations, and must often initially be recognized and managed by cancer care professionals. This article reviews the recent oncology and mental health literature on anxiety. The aim is to help those involved in cancer patient care who are not specialists in mental health to understand the nature of anxiety, and discriminate morbid from normal anxiety. We review recent research into the association of anxiety with events during diagnosis and management of cancer, highlighting the importance of the meaning of events to an individual as an important factor in making people anxious. Lastly we review management strategies which might be used by cancer care professionals, in particular the importance of an awareness of specific patterns of communication which may alleviate or maintain anxiety for some cancer patients. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:11044347

  2. Adherence to adjuvant hormone therapy in low-income women with breast cancer: the role of provider-patient communication.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yihang; Malin, Jennifer L; Diamant, Allison L; Thind, Amardeep; Maly, Rose C

    2013-02-01

    To assess the impact of patient-provider communication on adherence to tamoxifen (TAM) and aromatase inhibitors (AIs) 36 months after breast cancer (BC) diagnosis in a low-income population of women. California statewide surveys were conducted among 921 low-income women with BC at 6, 18, and 36 months after BC diagnosis. A subset of 303 women with stage I-III BC who initiated hormone treatment after diagnosis was identified. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed, and adjusted adherence rates were calculated. The main outcome measure was self-reported hormone use at 36 months after BC diagnosis and the chief independent variables were patient-centered communication after diagnosis by patient report as measured by the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CAHPS) and patients' self-efficacy in patient-physician interactions (PEPPI). Overall adherence to TAM/AI was relatively high (88 %). Adjusted rates of adherence were 59 and 94 % for patients with the lowest versus highest scores on the CAHPS communication scale (AOR = 1.22, P = 0.006) and 72 versus 91 % for patients with the lowest and highest rating of PEPPI (AOR = 1.04, P = 0.04). Having at least one comorbid condition also increased the odds of adherence to hormonal therapy (AOR = 3.14, P = 0.03). Having no health insurance and experiencing side-effects from hormone treatment were barriers for adherence (AOR = 0.12, P = 0.001; AOR = 0.26, P = 0.003, respectively). Patient-centered communication and perceived self-efficacy in patient-physician interaction were significantly associated with patient adherence to ongoing TAM/AI therapy among low-income women with BC. Interventions on patient-provider communication may provide opportunities to improve patient outcomes in this vulnerable population.

  3. Barriers and Facilitators to Patient-Provider Communication When Discussing Breast Cancer Risk to Aid in the Development of Decision Support Tools.

    PubMed

    Yi, Haeseung; Xiao, Tong; Thomas, Parijatham S; Aguirre, Alejandra N; Smalletz, Cindy; Dimond, Jill; Finkelstein, Joseph; Infante, Katherine; Trivedi, Meghna; David, Raven; Vargas, Jennifer; Crew, Katherine D; Kukafka, Rita

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify barriers and facilitators to patient-provider communication when discussing breast cancer risk to aid in the development of decision support tools. Four patient focus groups (N=34) and eight provider focus groups (N=10) took place in Northern Manhattan. A qualitative analysis was conducted using Atlas.ti software. The coding yielded 62.3%-94.5% agreement. The results showed that 1) barriers are time constraints, lack of knowledge, low health literacy, and language barriers, and 2) facilitators are information needs, desire for personalization, and autonomy when communicating risk in patient-provider encounters. These results will inform the development of a patient-centered decision aid (RealRisks) and a provider-facing breast cancer risk navigation (BNAV) tool, which are designed to facilitate patient-provider risk communication and shared decision-making about breast cancer prevention strategies, such as chemoprevention.

  4. Barriers and Facilitators to Patient-Provider Communication When Discussing Breast Cancer Risk to Aid in the Development of Decision Support Tools

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Haeseung; Xiao, Tong; Thomas, Parijatham S.; Aguirre, Alejandra N.; Smalletz, Cindy; Dimond, Jill; Finkelstein, Joseph; Infante, Katherine; Trivedi, Meghna; David, Raven; Vargas, Jennifer; Crew, Katherine D.; Kukafka, Rita

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify barriers and facilitators to patient-provider communication when discussing breast cancer risk to aid in the development of decision support tools. Four patient focus groups (N=34) and eight provider focus groups (N=10) took place in Northern Manhattan. A qualitative analysis was conducted using Atlas.ti software. The coding yielded 62.3%–94.5% agreement. The results showed that 1) barriers are time constraints, lack of knowledge, low health literacy, and language barriers, and 2) facilitators are information needs, desire for personalization, and autonomy when communicating risk in patient-provider encounters. These results will inform the development of a patient-centered decision aid (RealRisks) and a provider-facing breast cancer risk navigation (BNAV) tool, which are designed to facilitate patient-provider risk communication and shared decision-making about breast cancer prevention strategies, such as chemoprevention. PMID:26958276

  5. Communicating with patients.

    PubMed

    Kaplowitz, G J

    1999-01-01

    Dental care providers need to be able to communicate effectively with their patients in order to build rapport and trust. Highly developed communication skills also enable the dental care provider to extract more accurate diagnostic information and to more effectively present treatment options to the patient. Neurolinguistic programming techniques can be employed to accomplish these as well as other objectives.

  6. Communicating with patients.

    PubMed

    Kaplowitz, G J

    1999-01-01

    Dental care providers need to be able to communicate effectively with their patients in order to build rapport and trust. Highly developed communication skills also enable the dental care provider to extract more accurate diagnostic information and to more effectively present treatment options to the patient. Neurolinguistic programming techniques can be employed to accomplish these as well as other objectives. PMID:10687469

  7. Communicating with mammography patients.

    PubMed

    Kamm, B L

    2000-01-01

    This article examines the barriers that prevent many women from undergoing mammography and strategies that can help them overcome those barriers. It also describes techniques for effective, individualized patient communication and education. Mammographers will learn how to ask the right questions, listen effectively for stated and unstated messages and determine which methods to use when communicating with different patients.

  8. Educational Counseling in Improving Communication and Quality of Life in Spouses and Breast Cancer Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-29

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Psychosocial Effects of Cancer and Its Treatment; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  9. Patient-doctor communication.

    PubMed

    Teutsch, Carol

    2003-09-01

    Communication is an important component of patient care. Traditionally, communication in medical school curricula was incorporated informally as part of rounds and faculty feedback, but without a specific or intense focus on skills of communicating per se. The reliability and consistency of this teaching method left gaps, which are currently getting increased attention from medical schools and accreditation organizations. There is also increased interest in researching patient-doctor communication and recognizing the need to teach and measure this specific clinical skill. In 1999, the Accreditation of Council for Graduate Medical Education implemented a requirement for accreditation for residency programs that focuses on "interpersonal and communications skills that result in effective information exchange and teaming with patients, their families, and other health professionals." The National Board of Medical Examiners, Federation of State Medical Boards. and the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates have proposed an examination between the. third and fourth year of medical school that "requires students to demonstrate they can gather information from patients, perform a physical examination, and communicate their findings to patients and colleagues" using standardized patients. One's efficiency and effectiveness in communication can be improved through training, but it is unlikely that any future advances will negate the need and value of compassionate and empathetic two-way communication between clinician and patient. The published literature also expresses belief in the essential role of communication. "It has long been recognized that difficulties in the effective delivery of health care can arise from problems in communication between patient and provider rather than from any failing in the technical aspects of medical care. Improvements in provider-patient communication can have beneficial effects on health outcomes". A systematic review of

  10. Promoting Chinese-speaking primary care physicians' communication with immigrant patients about colorectal cancer screening: a cluster randomized trial design.

    PubMed

    Wang, Judy Huei-yu; Liang, Wenchi; Ma, Grace X; Gehan, Edmund; Wang, Haoying Echo; Ji, Cheng-Shuang; Tu, Shin-Ping; Vernon, Sally W; Mandelblatt, Jeanne S

    2014-08-01

    Chinese Americans underutilize colorectal cancer screening. This study evaluated a physician-based intervention guided by social cognitive theory (SCT) to inform future research involving minority physicians and patients. Twenty-five Chinese-speaking primary care physicians were randomized into intervention or usual care arms. The intervention included two 45-minute in-office training sessions paired with a dual-language communication guide detailing strategies in addressing Chinese patients' screening barriers. Physicians' feedback on the intervention, their performance data during training, and pre-post intervention survey data were collected and analyzed. Most physicians (~85%) liked the intervention materials but ~84% spent less than 20 minutes reading the guide and only 46% found the length of time for in-office training acceptable. Despite this, the intervention increased physicians' perceived communication self-efficacy with patients (p<.01). This study demonstrated the feasibility of enrolling and intervening with minority physicians. Time constraints in primary care practice should be considered in the design and implementation of interventions.

  11. Exploring the Cervical Cancer Screening Experiences of Black Lesbian, Bisexual, and Queer Women: The Role of Patient-Provider Communication.

    PubMed

    Agénor, Madina; Bailey, Zinzi; Krieger, Nancy; Austin, S Bryn; Gottlieb, Barbara R

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have focused on the health and health care of U.S. black lesbian, bisexual, and queer (LBQ) women. To understand the facilitators of and barriers to cervical cancer screening in this population, focus group discussions were conducted in Boston and Cambridge, Massachusetts between November and December 2012. Using purposive sampling methods, the authors enrolled 18 black LBQ women who participated in one of four focus groups. Using thematic analysis, patient-provider communication was identified, which consisted of four sub-themes--health care provider communication style and demeanor; heteronormative provider assumptions; heterosexism, racism, and classism; and provider professional and sociodemographic background--as the most salient theme. Participants reported fears and experiences of multiple forms of discrimination and preferred receiving care from providers who were knowledgeable about same-sex sexual health and shared their life experiences at the intersection of gender, race/ethnicity, and sexual orientation. The cervical cancer screening experiences of black LBQ women would be improved by training all health care providers in same-sex sexual health, offering opportunities for clinicians to learn about the effects of various forms of discrimination on women's health care, and increasing the presence of LBQ women of color in health care settings.

  12. Testing a Mediational Model of Communication Among Medical Staff and Families of Cancer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gionta, Dana A.; Harlow, Lisa L.; Loitman, Jane E.; Leeman, Joanne M.

    2005-01-01

    Three structural equation models of communication between family members and medical staff were examined to understand relations among staff accessibility, inhibitory family attitudes, getting communication needs met, perceived stress, and satisfaction with communication. Compared to full and direct models, a mediational model fit best in which…

  13. “What am I Going to Say Here?” The Experiences of Doctors and Nurses Communicating with Patients in a Cancer Unit

    PubMed Central

    McLean, Margaret; Cleland, Jennifer A.; Worrell, Marcia; Vögele, Claus

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a study investigating the provider–patient communication perceptions, experiences, needs, and strategies of doctors and nurses working together in a UK cancer setting. This was a qualitative study using individual interviews and focus group discussions. Interpretative phenomenological analysis was used to underpin data collection and analysis. Twenty-six staff participated in the project (18 nurses and 8 doctors). Both professional groups identified an inherent emotional strain in their daily interactions with patients. The strategies they adopted to reduce this strain fell into two main categories: (1) Handling or managing the patient to keep negative emotion at bay; and (2) Managing self to keep negative emotion at bay. These strategies allowed staff to maintain a sense of control in an emotionally stressful environment. Most believed that their communication skills were sufficient. In conclusion, communicating with and caring for cancer patients causes considerable psychosocial burden for doctors and nurses. Managing this burden influences their communication with patients. Without recognition of the need for staff to protect their own emotional well-being, communication skills training programs, emphasized in current UK cancer care guidelines, may have little impact on practice. PMID:22144970

  14. Cancer: communicating in the team game.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Frances M; Robinson, Emma; Heinrich, Paul; Dunn, Stewart M

    2004-06-01

    There is increasing evidence that effective communication is a critical means by which surgeons can assist their patients to achieve the best outcomes. This paper examines the processes and outcomes of effective communication by surgeons in cancer teams, and includes: (i). strategies that promote collaborative relationships with patients and lead to more effective treatment; (ii). strategies to improve multidisciplinary team performance; and (iii). methods to minimize the risk of error and litigation. The experience of a cancer diagnosis involves radical changes in patients' lives, somewhat akin to suddenly finding yourself in the middle of a rugby scrum for the first time. The analogy of rugby throws fresh light on such critical factors in communication as prematch preparation, orientation to the game and the team, a good kick off, sizing up the opposition, creative plays and optimizing teamwork to promote quality of life and survival. PMID:15191487

  15. Communication and care in an acute cancer center: the effects of patients' willingness to communicate about health, health-care environment perceptions, and health status on information seeking, participation in care practices, and satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Wright, Kevin B; Frey, Lawrence R

    2008-07-01

    This study investigated the role of willingness to communicate about health (WTCH) among older patients in a state-of-the-art cancer center. Specifically, relationships were examined between patients' WTCH and their information seeking, perceptions of coping activities the center offered, and satisfaction with the center. The study also explored how those relationships may be mediated by patients' perceptions of the health-care environment and their health status. The results indicated that WTCH may play an important role in predicting information-seeking behaviors, perceived helpfulness of center-sponsored activities, and overall satisfaction with care received at the center. Evidence also was found that perceptions of the health-care environment mediated cancer patients' WTCH. The implications of these findings for communication theory and application, as well as limitations and future directions for research, are discussed.

  16. Fear of Death, Mortality Communication, and Psychological Distress among Secular and Religiously Observant Family Caregivers of Terminal Cancer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bachner, Yaacov G.; O'Rourke, Norm; Carmel, Sara

    2011-01-01

    Previous research suggests that caregivers and terminally ill patients face substantial difficulties discussing illness and death. Existing research, however, has focused primarily on the experience of patients. The current study compared responses as well as the relative strength of association between mortality communication, fear of death, and…

  17. Communicating Bad News to Patients

    PubMed Central

    Premi, J. N.

    1981-01-01

    This article reviews the literature on doctor/patient communication, emphasizing the communication of bad news. Available information supports the view that patients want more information than they generally receive and that, contrary to popular belief, patients who are better informed benefit from the information they receive. Physicians are seen as taking a less professional approach to communication activities than to clinical problem solving. Some strategies for approaching the problems identified are outlined. PMID:11650449

  18. Development of an Educational Video to Improve Patient Knowledge and Communication with Their Healthcare Providers about Colorectal Cancer Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Mira L.; Heaner, Sarah; Reiter, Paul; van Putten, Julie; Murray, Lee; McDougle, Leon; Cegala, Donald J.; Post, Douglas; David, Prabu; Slater, Michael; Paskett, Electra D.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Low rates of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening persist due to individual, provider, and system level barriers. Purpose: To develop and obtain initial feedback about a CRC screening educational video from community members and medical professionals. Methods: Focus groups of patients were conducted prior to the development of the CRC…

  19. Enhancing Patient-Provider Communication With the Electronic Self-Report Assessment for Cancer: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Donna L.; Blumenstein, Brent A.; Halpenny, Barbara; Wolpin, Seth; Fann, Jesse R.; Austin-Seymour, Mary; Bush, Nigel; Karras, Bryant T.; Lober, William B.; McCorkle, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Although patient-reported cancer symptoms and quality-of-life issues (SQLIs) have been promoted as essential to a comprehensive assessment, efficient and efficacious methods have not been widely tested in clinical settings. The purpose of this trial was to determine the effect of the Electronic Self-Report Assessment–Cancer (ESRA-C) on the likelihood of SQLIs discussed between clinicians and patients with cancer in ambulatory clinic visits. Secondary objectives included comparison of visit duration between groups and usefulness of the ESRA-C as reported by clinicians. Patients and Methods This randomized controlled trial was conducted in 660 patients with various cancer diagnoses and stages at two institutions of a comprehensive cancer center. Patient-reported SQLIs were automatically displayed on a graphical summary and provided to the clinical team before an on-treatment visit (n = 327); in the control group, no summary was provided (n = 333). SQLIs were scored for level of severity or distress. One on-treatment clinic visit was audio recorded for each participant and then scored for discussion of each SQLI. We hypothesized that problematic SQLIs would be discussed more often when the intervention was delivered to the clinicians. Results The likelihood of SQLIs being discussed differed by randomized group and depended on whether an SQLI was first reported as problematic (P = .032). Clinic visits were similar with regard to duration between groups, and clinicians reported the summary as useful. Conclusion The ESRA-C is the first electronic self-report application to increase discussion of SQLIs in a US randomized clinical trial. PMID:21282548

  20. Nutritional Online Information for Cancer Patients: a Randomized Trial of an Internet Communication Plus Social Media Intervention.

    PubMed

    Gnagnarella, Patrizia; Misotti, Alessandro Maria; Santoro, Luigi; Akoumianakis, Demosthenes; Del Campo, Laura; De Lorenzo, Francesco; Lombardo, Claudio; Milolidakis, Giannis; Sullivan, Richard; McVie, John Gordon

    2016-09-01

    We hypothesized that cancer patients using an Internet website would show an improvement in the knowledge about healthy eating habits, and this might be enhanced by social media interaction. A 6-month randomized intervention was set up. Eligible subjects were allocated in intervention (IG) and control groups (CG). IG had access to the website, and CG was provided with printed versions. All enrolled participants filled in Nutrition Questionnaire (NQ), Quality of Life Questionnaire (QoL) and Psychological Distress Inventory (PDI), at baseline and after 6 months. The difference between post- vs pre-questionnaires was calculated. Seventy-four subjects (CG 39; IG 35) completed the study. There was an increase in the score after the intervention in both groups for the NQ, even if not statistically significant. Dividing the IG into three categories, no (NI), low (LI) and high interactions (HI), we found a decreased score (improvement) in the CG (-0.2) and in the HI (-1.7), and an increased score (worsening) in the NI (+3.3) (p = NS) analysing the PDI. We found an increased score in the QoL both in CG and IG (adjusted LSMeans +3.5 and +2.8 points, respectively; p = NS). This study represents an example for support cancer patients. Despite the lack of significant effects, critical points and problems encountered may be of interest to researchers and organization working in the cancer setting. Intervention strategies to support patients during the care process are needed in order to attain the full potential of patient-centred care on cancer outcomes.

  1. Cultural aspects of communication in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Surbone, Antonella

    2008-03-01

    Cultural competence in oncology requires the acquisition of specific knowledge, clinical skills, and attitudes that facilitate effective cross-cultural negotiation in the clinical setting, thus, leading to improved therapeutic outcomes and decreased disparities in cancer care. Cultural competence in oncology entails a basic knowledge of different cultural attitudes and practices of communication of the truth and of decision-making styles throughout the world. Cultural competence always presupposes oncology professionals' awareness of their own cultural beliefs and values. To be able to communicate with cancer patients in culturally sensitive ways, oncologists should have knowledge of the concept of culture in its complexity and of the risks of racism, classism, sexism, ageism, and stereotyping that must be avoided in clinical practice. Oncologists should develop a sense of appreciation for differences in health care values, based on the recognition that no culture can claim hegemony over others and that cultures are evolving under their reciprocal influence on each other. Medical schools and oncology training can teach communication skills and cultural competence, while fostering in all students and young doctors those attitudes of humility, empathy, curiosity, respect, sensitivity, and awareness that are needed to deliver effective and culturally sensitive cancer care.

  2. Discussing Cancer: Communication with African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Caito, Nikki; Hood, Sula; Thompson, Vetta L. Sanders

    2015-01-01

    Regular screening for colorectal cancer (CRC) facilitates earlier detection, lowers mortality, and may reduce incidence through detection and removal of pre-cancerous polyps. Optimizing health professional delivery of CRC screening information and recommendations can assist in reducing CRC disparity in the African American community. This paper presents qualitative data on African Americans’ attitudes about health professional CRC communications based on the analysis of focus groups (N=79). Using a social-ecological framework, colorectal cancer and professional communication themes are examined to offer four general and nine cancer specific theoretically based and culturally appropriate strategies for improving health professional cancer communication with African Americans. PMID:25050658

  3. Communication and the Elderly Patient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gasek, George

    Successful management of the elderly patient is related in part to how effectively he and members of the health care team can communicate with each other. If comprehension and/or expressive abilities are impaired, as they frequently are in the geriatric population, then efficient patient management becomes difficult. Unfortunately, this difficulty…

  4. Quality of Life over 5 years after Breast Cancer Diagnosis among Low-Income Women: Effects of Race/Ethnicity and Patient-Physician Communication

    PubMed Central

    Maly, Rose C.; Liu, Yihang; Liang, Li-Jung; Ganz, Patricia A.

    2014-01-01

    Background To identify risk factors for lower quality of life (QOL) among low-income women with breast cancer (BC), with an emphasis on the impact of patient-physician communication. In addition, we examined ethnic/racial group differences in QOL change over time. Methods A longitudinal study was conducted among 921 low-income women with BC. Patients were interviewed at 6-, 18-, 36- and 60- months after BC diagnosis. Mixed-effect regression models were performed to investigate predictors for and time effects on QOL. The main outcomes included the Medical Outcomes Study Health Survey Short Form 36 Mental Component Summary score (SF-36 MCS), SF-36 Physical Component Summary score (SF-36 PCS) and the Ladder of Life scale. Chief independent variables included physician information-giving and patient self-efficacy in interacting with physicians. Results There were no significant changes over time in QOL except for physical functioning, with survivors reporting a significant decrease over time (P<0.0001). Mean SF-36 MCS and PCS scores were lower than national general population norms at all time points. Both patient self-efficacy in interacting with physicians and physician information-giving were positively associated with SF-36 MCS (P=0.03, P=0.02, respectively) and Ladder of Life (P=0.01, P=0.03, respectively). Less acculturated Latinas reported higher SF-36 MCS and PCS scores (P<0.0001, P=0.01, respectively) and better global QOL (P<0.0001) than whites. Conclusion Low-income women with BC experienced poor physical and mental health. The results suggest that QOL among low-income women with BC would be enhanced by interventions aimed at empowering patients in communicating with physicians and increasing physician information giving. PMID:25411008

  5. Oncology nurse communication barriers to patient-centered care.

    PubMed

    Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine; Goldsmith, Joy; Ferrell, Betty

    2013-04-01

    Although quality communication has been identified as a necessary component to cancer care, communication skills training programs have yet to focus on the unique role of nurses. This study explored communication barriers as reported by seven nurse managers to better identify communication skills needed for oncology nurses to practice patient-centered care. Thematic analysis of transcripts was used to identify barriers to patient and family communication and desirable patient-centered nursing communication skills. Overall, the nurse managers reported that nurses experience patient and family communication difficulties as a result of inconsistent messages to patients and family from other healthcare staff. Physician assumptions about nursing left nurses feeling uncomfortable asking for clarification, creating a barrier to team communication processes. Patient-centered communication and care cannot be actualized for nurses unless team roles are clarified and nurses receive training in how to communicate with physicians, patients, and family. Therefore, the authors of this article created the COMFORT communication training protocol, and key concepts and resources for nurse communication training through COMFORT are detailed in this article.

  6. Enhancing nurse-patient communication: a critical reflection.

    PubMed

    Farrington, Naomi; Townsend, Kay

    Patients with cancer can easily become overloaded with information about diagnosis, prognosis, treatments and side effects. One of a nurse's most important roles is to help patients and their families make sense of this, providing support and information through their cancer journey. However, many barriers exist, including the nurse's own knowledge limitations, time constraints and the patient's engagement with the nurse. This paper uses critical reflection to evaluate an incident from clinical practice involving a patient with prostate cancer suffering from a distressing side effect of treatment: urinary incontinence following a transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). The paper examines nurse-patient communication, and evaluates how nurses can use communication strategies to minimise patient distress. Practical approaches to managing urinary incontinence are also discussed. This paper demonstrates that critical reflection is a valuable learning process that can alter clinical nursing practice to provide the best care for people with cancer.

  7. Patient-Centered Communication for Discussing Oncotype DX Testing.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Megan C; Bryson, Amy; Weinberger, Morris; Dusetzina, Stacie B; Dinan, Michaela A; Reeder-Hayes, Katherine E; Wheeler, Stephanie B

    2016-05-27

    Oncotype DX testing (ODX), a tumor gene expression test, may improve breast cancer care, however, communicating results remains challenging. We identified patient-centered communication strategies/gaps for discussing ODX results. We applied a patient-centered communication framework to analyze qualitative interviews with oncologists about how they communicate about ODX with patients, using template analysis in Atlas.ti. Overall, providers discussed four patient-centered communication domains: exchanging information, assessing uncertainty, making decisions and cross-cutting themes. Providers did not report discussing emotional aspects of managing uncertainty, assessing decision-making preferences, and evaluating decisions. A patient-centered approach may be a model for communicating about tumor gene expression tests. PMID:27124287

  8. [Nutrition and cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Katsuramaki, T; Hirata, K; Isobe, M

    1998-03-01

    Nutritional therapy for cancer patients includes various objectives such as improvement of cachexia, elucidation of the mechanism of malnutrition, development of therapy for anorexia, nutrition support during chemotherapy or radiotherapy, and inhibition of tumor growth under controlled caloric intake. This review describes recent remarkable developments in nutritional therapy for cancer patients. Cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor which induce proteolysis and lipolysis are involved in the cause of malnutrition and cachexia in cancer patients. IL-1 also plays a significant role in the development of cancer anorexia via direct action in the brain. For anorexia therapy, progestogens have been shown to improve appetite and food intake in cancer patients. Moreover, glutamine supplementation improves the host protein metabolism without enhancement of tumor growth during chemotherapy. Among the effects of caloric intake on anticancer therapy, AO-90, a methionine-free intravenous amino acid solution, has been shown to increase the antitumor effect of 5-fluorouracil in clinical studies. From these observations, recent progress in nutritional therapy for cancer patients has been remarkable. Further study of nutritional therapy is required in order to maintain or improve the quality of life of cancer patients in the future.

  9. Effective communication skills are the key to good cancer care.

    PubMed

    Fallowfield, L; Jenkins, V

    1999-10-01

    Communication within oncology is a core clinical skill but one in which few oncologists or specialist cancer nurses have received much formal training. Inadequate communication may cause much distress for patients and their families, who often want considerably more information than is usually provided. Many patients leave consultations unsure about the diagnosis and prognosis, confused about the meaning of--and need for--further diagnostic tests, unclear about the management plan and uncertain about the true therapeutic intent of treatment. Additionally, communication difficulties may impede the recruitment of patients to clinical trials, delaying the introduction of efficacious new treatments into clinics. Lack of effective communication between specialists and departments can also cause confusion and a loss of confidence amongst the team. Oncologists themselves acknowledge that insufficient training in communication and management skills is a major factor contributing to their own stress, lack of job satisfaction and emotional burnout. Consequently, over the past few years there have been several initiatives aimed at improving basic communication skills training for healthcare professionals in the cancer field. In this paper, some of the issues that influence communication within an oncology setting, and ultimately affect patient care, are discussed. PMID:10673967

  10. Public Communication Programs for Cancer Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler-Paisley, Matilda; And Others

    For many years several organizations and agencies at the national, regional, and local level have sought to reduce the incidence of cancer by publicizing facts on prevention, screening/detection, and treatment. This report reviews 41 public communication programs on cancer. Fifteen of these are presented as detailed case studies, each having…

  11. Comparing Effects in Regular Practice of E-Communication and Web-Based Self-Management Support Among Breast Cancer Patients: Preliminary Results From a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Børøsund, Elin; Cvancarova, Milada; Moore, Shirley M; Ekstedt, Mirjam

    2014-01-01

    Background While Web-based interventions have been shown to assist a wide range of patients successfully in managing their illness, few studies have examined the relative contribution of different Web-based components to improve outcomes. Further efficacy trials are needed to test the effects of Web support when offered as a part of routine care. Objective Our aim was to compare in regular care the effects of (1) an Internet-based patient provider communication service (IPPC), (2) WebChoice, a Web-based illness management system for breast cancer patients (IPPC included), and (3) usual care on symptom distress, anxiety, depression, (primary outcomes), and self-efficacy (secondary outcome). This study reports preliminary findings from 6 months’ follow-up data in a 12-month trial. Methods We recruited 167 patients recently diagnosed with breast cancer and undergoing treatment from three Norwegian hospitals. The nurse-administered IPPC allowed patients to send secure e-messages to and receive e-messages from health care personnel at the hospital where they were treated. In addition to the IPPC, WebChoice contains components for symptom monitoring, tailored information and self-management support, a diary, and communication with other patients. A total of 20 care providers (11 nurses, 6 physicians, and 3 social workers) were trained to answer questions from patients. Outcomes were measured with questionnaires at study entry and at study months 2, 4, and 6. Linear mixed models for repeated measures were fitted to compare effects on outcomes over time. Results Patients were randomly assigned to the WebChoice group (n=64), the IPPC group (n=45), or the usual care group (n=58). Response rates to questionnaires were 73.7% (123/167) at 2 months, 65.9 (110/167) at 4 months, and 62.3% (104/167) at 6 months. Attrition was similar in all study groups. Among those with access to WebChoice, 64% (41/64) logged on more than once and 39% (25/64) sent e-messages to care providers

  12. The application of cure models in the presence of competing risks: a tool for improved risk communication in population-based cancer patient survival.

    PubMed

    Eloranta, Sandra; Lambert, Paul C; Andersson, Therese M-L; Björkholm, Magnus; Dickman, Paul W

    2014-09-01

    Quantifying cancer patient survival from the perspective of cure is clinically relevant. However, most cure models estimate cure assuming no competing causes of death. We use a relative survival framework to demonstrate how flexible parametric cure models can be used in combination with competing-risks theory to incorporate noncancer deaths. Under a model that incorporates statistical cure, we present the probabilities that cancer patients (1) have died from their cancer, (2) have died from other causes, (3) will eventually die from their cancer, or (4) will eventually die from other causes, all as a function of time since diagnosis. We further demonstrate how conditional probabilities can be used to update the prognosis among survivors (eg, at 1 or 5 years after diagnosis) by summarizing the proportion of patients who will not die from their cancer. The proposed method is applied to Swedish population-based data for persons diagnosed with melanoma, colon cancer, or acute myeloid leukemia between 1973 and 2007.

  13. [COMMUNICATION WITH TERMINALLY ILL PATIENT].

    PubMed

    2014-12-01

    The communication is a essential therapeutic instrument in every process of relationship in the team patient-family, and mainly in the transmission of bad news. The communication is not just a simple transmission of information. It is a process whose goal is to enable the adaptation of the patient and family to their actual situation and where the "what", "how" and "how much do you want to know", are belonged to the own patient. Along this article, we will expose some thoughts that the team has to take into account when informing the patient. We are going to explain the SPIKES protocol, or its Spanish version EPICEE. 6-step protocol, based on those recommended by the experts to deliver bad news procedures. And finally we'll talk about the conspiracy of silence, one of the most common and difficult situations to handle in day to day due to paternalism by professionals and families, in which they prefer to hide the situation to the patient, thinking it's the best for him. PMID:26121886

  14. Sarcopenia in Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Chindapasirt, Jarin

    2015-01-01

    Sarcopenia, characterized by a decline of skeletal muscle plus low muscle strength and/or physical performance, has emerged to be an important prognostic factor for advanced cancer patients. It is associated with poor performance status, toxicity from chemotherapy, and shorter time of tumor control. There is limited data about sarcopenia in cancer patients and associated factors. Moreover, the knowledge about the changes of muscle mass during chemotherapy and its impact to response and toxicity to chemotherapy is still lacking. This review aimed to provide understanding about sarcopenia and to emphasize its importance to cancer treatment.

  15. Media Use and the Cancer Communication Strategies of Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Heesoo; Sohn, Minsung; Jung, Minsoo

    2016-01-01

    Communication related to health not only substantially affects perceptions and behaviors related to health but is also positively associated with the extent of health-information seeking and the practice of preventive behavior. Despite the fact that the number of cancer survivors has increased dramatically, there are few studies of the lack of health information, factors which act as barriers, and the difficulties in follow-up care experienced by cancer survivors. Therefore, we reviewed media utilization and the types of media used by cancer survivors with regard to risk communication and suggested appropriate strategies for cancer communication. According to the results, health communication contributed to health promotion by providing health-related information, consolidating social support factors such as social solidarity and trust, and reducing anxiety. In particular, participatory health communication may establish preventive programs which reflect the needs of communities, expand accessibility to better quality healthcare, and intensify healthy living by reducing health inequalities. Therefore, when people do not have an intention to obtain cancer screening, we need to intervene to change their behavior, norms, and degrees of self-efficacy. The findings of this study may help those involved in building partnerships by assisting in their efforts to understand and communicate with the public. PMID:27722138

  16. [Physiotherapy of cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Gomez, Izabella; Szekanecz, Éva; Szekanecz, Zoltán; Bender, Tamás

    2016-07-01

    Physiotherapy of cancer patients is one of the most controversial issues in our country. Malignant diseases are firstly mentioned as a contraindication of physiotherapy. Until now, physiotherapy was not suggested (or only in limited accessibility) for those patients who had malignant disease in medical history. International medical practice was less restrictive in managing this topic. The development of imaging techniques put this question in a new light. On the basis of evidence, the majority of articles have reported beneficial effects of physiotherapy in cancer patients, and only few articles mentioned it as harmful. Of course, each patient requires an individual assessment, however, if we exclude the possibility of tumor recurrence and metastasis, most of physiotherapy procedures can be used safely. One of the aims of this review is to support the physicians' decisions when to prescribe treatments, in such a way, that more patients could receive physiotherapy. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(31), 1224-1231.

  17. [Physiotherapy of cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Gomez, Izabella; Szekanecz, Éva; Szekanecz, Zoltán; Bender, Tamás

    2016-07-01

    Physiotherapy of cancer patients is one of the most controversial issues in our country. Malignant diseases are firstly mentioned as a contraindication of physiotherapy. Until now, physiotherapy was not suggested (or only in limited accessibility) for those patients who had malignant disease in medical history. International medical practice was less restrictive in managing this topic. The development of imaging techniques put this question in a new light. On the basis of evidence, the majority of articles have reported beneficial effects of physiotherapy in cancer patients, and only few articles mentioned it as harmful. Of course, each patient requires an individual assessment, however, if we exclude the possibility of tumor recurrence and metastasis, most of physiotherapy procedures can be used safely. One of the aims of this review is to support the physicians' decisions when to prescribe treatments, in such a way, that more patients could receive physiotherapy. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(31), 1224-1231. PMID:27476518

  18. An electronic patient risk communication board.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Kumiko; Caligtan, Christine A; Benoit, Angela N; Breydo, Eugene M; Carroll, Diane L; Keohane, Carol A; Bates, David W; Dykes, John S; Dykes, Patricia C

    2012-01-01

    Communication failures have been identified as the root cause of the majority of medical malpractice claims and patient safety violations. We believe it is essential to share key patient risk information with healthcare team members at the patient's bedside. In this study, we developed an electronic Patient Risk Communication Board (ePRCB) to assist in bridging the communication gap between all health care team members. The goal of the ePRCB is to effectively communicate the patient's key risk factors, such as a fall risk or risk of aspiration, to the healthcare team and to reduce adverse events caused by communication failures. The ePRCB will transmit patient risk information and tailored interventions with easy-to-understand icons on an LCD screen at the point of care. A set of patient risk reminder icons was developed and validated by focus groups. We used the results of the evaluation to refine the icons for the ePRCB.

  19. Communication and technology in genetic counseling for familial cancer.

    PubMed

    Lynch, H T; Snyder, C; Stacey, M; Olson, B; Peterson, S K; Buxbaum, S; Shaw, T; Lynch, P M

    2014-03-01

    When a cancer predisposing germline mutation is detected in an index case, the presence of the underlying syndrome is confirmed and the potential for predictive testing of at-risk relatives is established. However, the reporting of a positive family history does not routinely lead to communication of information about risk to close, much less distant relatives. This review summarizes information technology utilized to address penetration or 'reach' of knowledge of risk within extended families, including the use of telephone and video counseling to reach distant patients, and anticipate novel internet-based processes for communication between investigators and relatives.

  20. Communication and Technology in Genetic Counseling for Familial Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Henry T.; Snyder, Carrie; Stacey, Mark; Olson, Brooke; Peterson, Susan; Buxbaum, Sarah; Shaw, Trudy; Lynch, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    When a cancer predisposing germline mutation is detected in an index case, the presence of the underlying syndrome is confirmed and the potential for predictive testing of at-risk relatives is established. However, the reporting of a positive family history does not routinely lead to communication of information about risk to close, much less distant relatives. This review summarizes information technology utilized to address penetration or “reach” of knowledge of risk within extended families, including the use of telephone and video counseling to reach distant patients, and anticipate novel internet-based processes for communication between investigators and relatives. PMID:24355094

  1. Communication with patients suffering from serious physical illness.

    PubMed

    Grassi, Luigi; Caruso, Rosangela; Costantini, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Communication is the corner stone of the relationship with the patient in all medical settings with the main aims of creating a good inter-personal relationship, exchanging information, and making treatment-related decisions. In a rapidly changing cultural and social context, the paternalistic approach of doctors knowing the best and deciding what should be done for a patient has been replaced by a shared decision-making approach, with patients being advised to educate themselves, ask questions and influence the course of the discussion with their doctors. Thus, a need for an improvement in the communication skills of physicians is extremely important for patients affected by serious physical illness (e.g. cancer, HIV infection, multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis). Certain attitudes, behaviour and skills (e.g. capacity to impart confidence, being empathetic, providing a 'human touch', relating on a personal level, being forthright, being respectful, and being thorough) are part of effective communication. However, some specific aspects influencing doctor-patient communication and relationships, such as personality variables, coping and attachment styles, as well as cultural factors, should also be taken in to account. The development of training curricula to help doctors acquire proper skills in communication is mandatory, since research has shown that training in communication may facilitate the effectiveness of a doctor-patient relationship and the patient's satisfaction with care and give a general sense of humanity, which is easily lost in a biotechnologically oriented medicine.

  2. Doctor-Patient Communication: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Jennifer Fong; Longnecker, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    Effective doctor-patient communication is a central clinical function in building a therapeutic doctor-patient relationship, which is the heart and art of medicine. This is important in the delivery of high-quality health care. Much patient dissatisfaction and many complaints are due to breakdown in the doctor-patient relationship. However, many doctors tend to overestimate their ability in communication. Over the years, much has been published in the literature on this important topic. We review the literature on doctor-patient communication. PMID:21603354

  3. Patients' communication with doctors: a randomized control study of a brief patient communication intervention.

    PubMed

    Talen, Mary R; Muller-Held, Christine F; Eshleman, Kate Grampp; Stephens, Lorraine

    2011-09-01

    In research on doctor-patient communication, the patient role in the communication process has received little attention. The dynamic interactions of shared decision making and partnership styles which involve active patient communication are becoming a growing area of focus in doctor-patient communication. However, patients rarely know what makes "good communication" with medical providers and even fewer have received coaching in this type of communication. In this study, 180 patients were randomly assigned to either an intervention group using a written communication tool to facilitate doctor-patient communication or to standard care. The goal of this intervention was to assist patients in becoming more effective communicators with their physicians. The physicians and patients both rated the quality of the communication after the office visit based on the patients' knowledge of their health concerns, organizational skills and questions, and attitudes of ownership and partnership. The results supported that patients in the intervention group had significantly better communication with their doctors than patients in the standard care condition. Physicians also rated patients who were in the intervention group as having better overall communication and organizational skills, and a more positive attitude during the office visit. This study supports that helping patients structure their communication using a written format can facilitate doctor-patient communication. Patients can become more adept at describing their health concerns, organizing their needs and questions, and being proactive, which can have a positive effect on the quality of the doctor-patient communication during outpatient office visits. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:21787080

  4. Pain in the cancer patient.

    PubMed

    Ho, R C

    1994-01-01

    In summary, the ACS has acknowledged the magnitude and severity of the cancer pain problem nationally and recognized that cancer pain can be relieved. It has identified cancer pain control as a priority and has devised programs that emphasize the importance of pain assessment, recognize the availability of pain relief programs, and encourage treatment to achieve optimum pain relief for the cancer patient.

  5. Cancer patients caregivers comfort.

    PubMed

    de Araújo Lamino, Daniela; Turrini, Ruth Natalia Teresa; Kolcaba, Katharine

    2014-04-01

    Cross-sectional study, carried out at the outpatient clinic of an oncology hospital. Data were collected from 88 caregivers of cancer patients using the Caregiver General Comfort Questionnaire (GCQ) to assess the caregivers' comfort. The caregivers' GCQ score mean was 203.9; better comfort scores was associated with age, care time and current occupation; positive aspects of comfort were related to the fact that caregivers felt loved, to patients' physical and environmental comfort and to caregivers' spirituality. 203.9; better comfort scores were associated with age of the caregiver and current occupation; positive aspects of comfort were related to the fact that caregivers felt loved, to patients' physical and environmental comfort and to caregivers' spirituality. Caregivers, who didn't have a paid job or leisure's activities showed a worse GCQ. The GCQ scale can help to identify factors that interfere in caregivers' comfort, as well as needs that can be modified through health professionals' interventions.

  6. Second, Unrelated Cancers Strike 1 in 12 Cancer Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... said. Chamie's team found that patients diagnosed with bladder cancer were the most at risk for developing a second cancer. Thirty-four percent of bladder cancer patients were diagnosed with a second cancer during ...

  7. The Child with Cancer: Patterns of Communication and Denial.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spinetta, John J.; Maloney, Lorrie J.

    1978-01-01

    Examines the role of communication and denial in coping efforts of children with cancer. Results indicate level of family communication about cancer expressed by mother's communication is correlated with hypothesized responses in child. Usefulness of three instruments as effective tools in measuring child's reactions is demonstrated. (Author/BEF)

  8. Physician-patient communication: a lost art?

    PubMed

    Frymoyer, John W; Frymoyer, Nan P

    2002-01-01

    In the face of rapid advances in technology, there has been a progressive deterioration of effective physician-patient communication. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons has identified that patients rate the orthopaedic profession as high in technical and low in communication skills. Poor communication, especially patient-interviewing skills, has been identified in medical students as well as in practicing physicians. Effective communication is associated with improved patient and physician satisfaction, better patient compliance, improved health outcomes, better-informed medical decisions, and reduced malpractice suits, and it likely contributes to reduced costs of care. Recognition of the importance of communication has influenced medical schools to revise curricula and to teach communication skills in residency training and continuing medical education programs. National certifying examinations also are being designed to incorporate these skills. Although written material is useful in increasing awareness of the importance of good physician-patient communication, behavioral change is more likely to occur in a workshop environment. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons is taking leadership in designing and implementing such an approach for its membership. PMID:11929204

  9. Communication and Cancer: The Role of Health Communication Specialists in Achieving National Health Goals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cline, Rebecca J.

    Proceeding from the implicit message promoted by the National Cancer Institute to the communication profession--expertise in health communication is central to the effort to alleviate the costs of the national burden placed on the economy because of cancer--this paper proposes the development of health communication as a career. Specifically, the…

  10. Cancer Patients and Fungal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... mould-related diseases in immunocompromised patients. Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy 2011;66:i5-i14. Ribaud P. Fungal ... al. Clinical Practice Guideline for the Use of Antimicrobial Agents in Neutropenic Patients with Cancer: 2010 Update ...

  11. Nutritional Considerations for Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Angela

    1985-01-01

    Although weight loss is a frequent, though not invariable, component of the cancer syndrome, the associated malnutrition is a poor prognostic sign among both children and adults. This article describes the possible mechanisms of cancer cachexia; reviews the present state of nutritional support in cancer patients; identifies nutritional problems and workable approaches during the pre- and post-treatment periods; discusses the unconventional nutritional practices commonly encountered and lists resource materials for patients and families. PMID:21274086

  12. [Palliative Care for Non-cancer Patients].

    PubMed

    Ikegaki, Junichi

    2016-03-01

    Although palliative care has been developed and implemented as care for cancer pain, it is holistic care for suffering that includes physical, psychosocial and spiritual pain of life-threatening illness. It turned out that non-cancer patients in the end-stage are also suffering from various pain that should be treated as cancer patients. Trajectories of illness in non-cancer patients are with more gradual decline than those of cancer patients with steady progression and it is often difficult to make decision about end-of-life. The purpose of advance care planning was originally to help describe legal documents. This process is proved to contribute to improving QOL of patients and their families to discuss preference, hope, economic problems, spiritual question as well as medical treatment In Japan guideline of decision making process in end-of-life stage has been established. A program of communication training in end-of-life discussion has been made. Under current situation some comments on the role of anesthesiologists are also mentioned. PMID:27097506

  13. Communication challenges for chronic metastatic cancer in an era of novel therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Thorne, Sally E; Oliffe, John L; Oglov, Valerie; Gelmon, Karen

    2013-07-01

    Advances in the production of novel therapies for cancer management are creating new challenges for the support of increasing numbers of persons surviving for extended periods with advanced disease. Despite incurable and life-limiting metastatic conditions, these patients are living longer with serious disease, pushing the boundaries of what science explains and clinicians can confidently interpret using available evidence. Here we report findings from an early subset of such individuals within a longitudinal qualitative cancer cohort study on clinician-patient communication across the cancer trajectory. In these findings, we contextualize experiential accounts of communication in a changing environment of the costs and uncertainties of personalized medicine, and examine the complex psychosocial circumstances of this rapidly growing patient population. Interpretation of these findings illustrates how emerging issues in cancer treatment influence the experience of these patients, their social and support networks, their cancer care specialists, and the multidisciplinary teams charged with coordinating their care.

  14. Cost trajectories for cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Wodchis, W.P.; Arthurs, E.; Khan, A.I.; Gandhi, S.; MacKinnon, M.; Sussman, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Health care spending is known to be highly skewed, with a small subset of the population consuming a disproportionate amount of health care resources. Patients with cancer are high-cost users because of high incremental health care costs for treatment and the growing prevalence of cancer. The objectives of the present study included characterizing cancer-patient trajectories by cost, and identifying the patient and health system characteristics associated with high health system costs after cancer treatment. Methods This retrospective cohort study identified Ontario adults newly diagnosed with cancer between 1 April 2009 and 30 September 2010. Costs of health care use before, during, and after cancer episodes were used to develop trajectories of care. Descriptive analyses examined differences between the trajectories in terms of clinical and health system characteristics, and a logistic regression approach identified predictors of being a high-cost user after a cancer episode. Results Ten trajectories were developed based on whether patients were high- or low-cost users before and after their cancer episode. The most common trajectory represented patients who were low-cost in the year before cancer, survived treatment, and continued to be low-cost in the year after cancer (31.4%); stage ii cancer of the male genital system was the most common diagnosis within that trajectory. Regression analyses identified increases in age and in multimorbidity and low continuity of care as the strongest predictors of high-cost status after cancer. Conclusions Findings highlight an opportunity to proactively identify patients who might transition to high-cost status after cancer treatment and to remediate that transition. PMID:26985150

  15. [Meaningful words? Cancer screening communication in Italy].

    PubMed

    Cogo, Carla; Petrella, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Over the last ten years, Italian work groups of communication within The National Centre for Screening Monitoring have been working on various aspects of communication in screening: quality surveys, information materials, guidelines, websites, and training. This has been done taking into account that good quality information must be clear, accessible, up to date, evidence based, clear about its limitations and capable of indicating further sources of information. Whenever possible, information has been developed in collaboration with the target groups: citizens but also health professionals. However, if good quality information must be clear about benefits and harms, the communication of quantitative information is particularly complex in cancer screening. Moreover, receiving more information on risks and benefits does not seem to modify participation. In addition, more balanced information does not entail that a person will include it in the decision process.Throughout several focus groups, citizens have made it clear that the information received from the programmes was only a part of the decisional process in which other elements were just as, if not more, important: trust in doctors, family and friends, perception of health authority efficiency, personal experiences, inconsistencies in information or public disagreements with other credible sources. Such elements can be seen as an opportunity to strengthen partnerships with professional and advocacy groups and to cooperate more efficiently with media and specialists from different fields.

  16. The Effectiveness of a Patient Communication Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsden, Harue J.

    2000-01-01

    Reports data from three consecutive classes of first- year optometry students at the Southern California College of Optometry, who were tested preceding and following completion of a patient communication course. Findings indicated that students improved their ability to respond to patients and were better able to discriminate among various levels…

  17. Cultural aspects of communication in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Surbone, A

    2006-01-01

    Cancer is increasing in incidence and prevalence worldwide, and the WHO has recently included cancer and its treatments as a health priority in developed and developing countries. The cultural diversity of oncology patients is bound to increase, and cultural sensitivity and competence are now required of all oncology professionals. A culturally competent cancer care leads to improved therapeutic outcome and it may decrease disparities in medical care. Cultural competence in medicine is a complex multilayered accomplishment, requiring knowledge, skills and attitudes whose acquisition is needed for effective cross-cultural negotiation in the clinical setting. Effective cultural competence is based on knowledge of the notion of culture; on awareness of possible biases and prejudices related to stereotyping, racism, classism, sexism; on nurturing appreciation for differences in health care values; and on fostering the attitudes of humility, empathy, curiosity, respect, sensitivity and awareness. Cultural competence in healthcare relates to individual professionals, but also to organizations and systems. A culturally competent healthcare system must consider in their separateness and yet in there reciprocal influences social, racial and cultural factors. By providing a framework of reference to interpret the external world and relate to it, culture affects patients' perceptions of disease, disability and suffering; degrees and expressions of concern about them; their responses to treatments and their relationship to individual physicians and to the healthcare system. Culture also influences the interpretation of ethical norms and principles, and especially of individual autonomy, which can be perceived either as synonymous with freedom or with isolation depending on the cultural context. This, in turn, determines the variability of truth-telling attitudes and practices worldwide as well as the different roles of family in the information and decision-making process of

  18. Survival of Sami cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Soininen, Leena; Pokhrel, Arun; Dyba, Tadek; Pukkala, Eero; Hakulinen, Timo

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The incidence of cancer among the indigenous Sami people of Northern Finland is lower than among the Finnish general population. The survival of Sami cancer patients is not known, and therefore it is the object of this study. Study design The cohort consisted of 2,091 Sami and 4,161 non-Sami who lived on 31 December 1978 in the two Sami municipalities of Inari and Utsjoki, which are located in Northern Finland and are 300–500 km away from the nearest central hospital. The survival experience of Sami and non-Sami cancer patients diagnosed in this cohort during 1979–2009 was compared with that of the Finnish patients outside the cohort. Methods The Sami and non-Sami cancer patients were matched to other Finnish cancer patients for gender, age and year of diagnosis and for the site of cancer. An additional matching was done for the stage at diagnosis. Cancer-specific survival analyses were made using the Kaplan–Meier method and Cox regression modelling. Results There were 204 Sami and 391 non-Sami cancer cases in the cohort, 20,181 matched controls without matching with stage, and 7,874 stage-matched controls. In the cancer-specific analysis without stage variable, the hazard ratio for Sami was 1.05 (95% confidence interval 0.85–1.30) and for non-Sami 1.02 (0.86–1.20), indicating no difference between the survival of those groups and other patients in Finland. Likewise, when the same was done by also matching the stage, there was no difference in cancer survival. Conclusion Long distances to medical care or Sami ethnicity have no influence on the cancer patient survival in Northern Finland. PMID:22765936

  19. A Better Patient Experience Through Better Communication

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Elvira V.

    2012-01-01

    The transformation of healthcare from a seller’s market to a consumer’s market has pushed the element of patient satisfaction into the forefront of various medical facility evaluation tools, including those used by Medicare when weighing reimbursement to hospitals for patient care. Research has identified good communication skills to be a key factor in ensuring better patient outcomes, and nurturing patient satisfaction. Because of the growing amount of money at stake for patients’ satisfaction with a facility, the communication skills of individual healthcare providers are bound to impact their employees' reimbursement, bonuses, and promotion options. Although the dangers of “poor communication,” are evident: “poor communication” is a primary reason for filing a law suit in >80% of cases (Avery, 1985). Identifying the characteristics of “good communication” has been difficult. One factor that adds to the confusion is that research has found some long accepted codes of professional communication protocol to actually be counterproductive. Another factor that adds to the uncertainty is that accurate interpretations of some communication events are counterintuitive. Fortunately it has been possible to extract observable, proven, and teachable “good communication” behaviors from large-scale trials in the radiology department. The resultant Comfort Talk™ approach to communication includes rapid rapport techniques, patient-centered talking styles, and use of hypnotic language. This article overviews some of the Comfort Talk™ approaches to patients interaction and provides operational summaries of a sampling of specific Comfort Talk™ communication techniques, which nurses, technologists, and other healthcare workers can implement in their own practices. PMID:23471099

  20. An Electronic Patient Risk Communication Board

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Kumiko; Caligtan, Christine A.; Benoit, Angela N.; Breydo, Eugene M.; Carroll, Diane L.; Keohane, Carol A.; Bates, David W.; Dykes, John S.; Dykes, Patricia C.

    2012-01-01

    Communication failures have been identified as the root cause of the majority of medical malpractice claims and patient safety violations. We believe it is essential to share key patient risk information with healthcare team members at the patient’s bedside. In this study, we developed an electronic Patient Risk Communication Board (ePRCB) to assist in bridging the communication gap between all health care team members. The goal of the ePRCB is to effectively communicate the patient’s key risk factors, such as a fall risk or risk of aspiration, to the healthcare team and to reduce adverse events caused by communication failures. The ePRCB will transmit patient risk information and tailored interventions with easy-to-understand icons on an LCD screen at the point of care. A set of patient risk reminder icons was developed and validated by focus groups. We used the results of the evaluation to refine the icons for the ePRCB. PMID:24199109

  1. Communicating with patients who have dementia.

    PubMed

    Bush, Tony

    It was not until the 1980s that significant research was carried out on brain disorders. Lack of understanding of dementia has perhaps been the reason for the over-emphasis on physical care, and a failure to see these patients as people with feelings, beliefs and values. Three therapeutic techniques to help practitioners increase and improve communication with people who have dementia are described. It may be that communication is the key to understanding and resolving behaviour disturbances. PMID:14705549

  2. Communicating Cancer Risk Information: The Challenges of Uncertainty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bottorff, Joan L.; Ratner, Pamela A.; Johnson, Joy L.; Lovato, Chris Y.; Joab, S. Amanda

    1998-01-01

    Accurate and sensitive communication of cancer-risk information is important. Based on a literature review of 75 research reports, expert opinion papers, and clinical protocols, a synthesis of what is known about the communication of cancer-risk information is presented. Relevance of information to those not tested is discussed. (Author/EMK)

  3. [Sexy cancer--sexuality for cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Peleg-Nesher, Sharon; Yachini, Brurya; Inbar, Moshe

    2009-09-01

    Sexuality is a basic need for every human being as long as he or she is alive, irrespective of age or health status. Approximately 23,500 individuals are diagnosed with cancer each year in Israel and join the 120,000 cancer patients currently living in Israel. The results of cancer treatments are traditionally assessed and based on the outcome regarding mortality versus survival. An equally important aspect to be addressed in this assessment must relate to quality of life. One of the more painful insults to the quality of life of cancer patients relates to the deleterious effects on sexuality. This article aims to present physicians with the spectrum of sexuality-related issues which are encountered by cancer patients and their partners, starting from the moment of diagnosis, throughout the various stages of treatment and to provide basic knowledge. Many individuals contracting cancer have difficulty dealing with the issue of sexuality. They are typically embarrassed and feel uneasy when asking health care providers about such a non-life threatening issue. Partners similarly feel both shame and guilt. In many cases sexuality, intimacy and emotional attachment are important aspects and may be essential for survival. Addressing these issues during treatment can provide patients with a sense of security, avoiding embarrassment and further exacerbation of such problems. Unfortunately, little has been done to develop an optimal interventional program, although standard sexual treatments have often been applied. Prospective clinical research and outcomes are missing. The physician can use the well-known PLISSIT model (1978): to provide sexuality involvement on different levels. The very new BETTER model (2004) can help emphasize that cancer treatment and the disease have an influence on intimacy and sexuality.

  4. [Sexy cancer--sexuality for cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Peleg-Nesher, Sharon; Yachini, Brurya; Inbar, Moshe

    2009-09-01

    Sexuality is a basic need for every human being as long as he or she is alive, irrespective of age or health status. Approximately 23,500 individuals are diagnosed with cancer each year in Israel and join the 120,000 cancer patients currently living in Israel. The results of cancer treatments are traditionally assessed and based on the outcome regarding mortality versus survival. An equally important aspect to be addressed in this assessment must relate to quality of life. One of the more painful insults to the quality of life of cancer patients relates to the deleterious effects on sexuality. This article aims to present physicians with the spectrum of sexuality-related issues which are encountered by cancer patients and their partners, starting from the moment of diagnosis, throughout the various stages of treatment and to provide basic knowledge. Many individuals contracting cancer have difficulty dealing with the issue of sexuality. They are typically embarrassed and feel uneasy when asking health care providers about such a non-life threatening issue. Partners similarly feel both shame and guilt. In many cases sexuality, intimacy and emotional attachment are important aspects and may be essential for survival. Addressing these issues during treatment can provide patients with a sense of security, avoiding embarrassment and further exacerbation of such problems. Unfortunately, little has been done to develop an optimal interventional program, although standard sexual treatments have often been applied. Prospective clinical research and outcomes are missing. The physician can use the well-known PLISSIT model (1978): to provide sexuality involvement on different levels. The very new BETTER model (2004) can help emphasize that cancer treatment and the disease have an influence on intimacy and sexuality. PMID:20070056

  5. Communication Barriers Perceived by Nurses and Patients.

    PubMed

    Norouzinia, Roohangiz; Aghabarari, Maryam; Shiri, Maryam; Karimi, Mehrdad; Samami, Elham

    2015-09-28

    Communication, as a key element in providing high-quality health care services, leads to patient satisfaction and health. The present Cross sectional, descriptive analytic study was conducted on 70 nurses and 50 patients in two hospitals affiliated to Alborz University of Medical Sciences, in 2012. Two separate questionnaires were used for nurses and patients, and the reliability and validity of the questionnaires were assessed. In both groups of nurses and patients, nurse-related factors (mean scores of 2.45 and 2.15, respectively) and common factors between nurses and patients (mean scores of 1.85 and 1.96, respectively) were considered the most and least significant factors, respectively. Also, a significant difference was observed between the mean scores of nurses and patients regarding patient-related (p=0.001), nurse-related (p=0.012), and environmental factors (p=0.019). Despite the attention of nurses and patients to communication, there are some barriers, which can be removed through raising the awareness of nurses and patients along with creating a desirable environment. We recommend that nurses be effectively trained in communication skills and be encouraged by constant monitoring of the obtained skills.

  6. Communication Barriers Perceived by Nurses and Patients

    PubMed Central

    Norouzinia, Roohangiz; Aghabarari, Maryam; Shiri, Maryam; Karimi, Mehrdad; Samami, Elham

    2016-01-01

    Communication, as a key element in providing high-quality health care services, leads to patient satisfaction and health. The present Cross sectional, descriptive analytic study was conducted on 70 nurses and 50 patients in two hospitals affiliated to Alborz University of Medical Sciences, in 2012. Two separate questionnaires were used for nurses and patients, and the reliability and validity of the questionnaires were assessed. In both groups of nurses and patients, nurse-related factors (mean scores of 2.45 and 2.15, respectively) and common factors between nurses and patients (mean scores of 1.85 and 1.96, respectively) were considered the most and least significant factors, respectively. Also, a significant difference was observed between the mean scores of nurses and patients regarding patient-related (p=0.001), nurse-related (p=0.012), and environmental factors (p=0.019). Despite the attention of nurses and patients to communication, there are some barriers, which can be removed through raising the awareness of nurses and patients along with creating a desirable environment. We recommend that nurses be effectively trained in communication skills and be encouraged by constant monitoring of the obtained skills. PMID:26755475

  7. Physician-Patient Communication and Patient Compliance: A Theoretical Orientation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clampitt, Phillip G.; Williams, M. Lee

    This paper synthesizes much of the literature concerning physician/patient communication as it relates to patient compliance. Using the theoretical perspective that deals with belief, attitude, intention, and behavior (a perspective generated by Martin Fishbein and Icek Ajzen), a new theoretical orientation for predicting patient compliance is…

  8. [Neurological complications in cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Hundsberger, Thomas; Roth, Patrick; Roelcke, Ulrich

    2014-08-20

    Neurological symptoms in cancer patients have a great impact on quality of life and need an interdisciplinary approach. They lead to significant impairment in activities of daily living (gait disorders, dizziness), a loss of patients independency (vegetative disturbances, wheel-chair dependency) and interfere with social activities (ban of driving in case of epilepsy). In this article we describe three main and serious neurological problems in the context of oncological patients. These are chemotherapy-induced polyneuropathy, malignant spinal cord compression and epileptic seizures. Our aim is to increase the awareness of neurological complications in cancer patients to improve patients care.

  9. Patient-Physician Communication in Breast Reconstructive Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Maly, Rose C; Liu, Yihang; Kwong, Elaine; Thind, Amardeep; Diamant, Allison L

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Breast reconstructive surgery (BRS) can improve mastectomy patients’ emotional relationships and social functioning, but it may be underutilized in low-income, medically underserved women. This study assessed the impact of patient-physician communication on rates of BRS in low-income breast cancer (BC) women receiving mastectomy. Methods A cross-sectional, California statewide survey was conducted of women with income less than 200% of the Federal Poverty Level and receiving BC treatment through the Medicaid Breast and Cervical Cancer Treatment Program. A subset of 327 women with non-metastatic disease who underwent mastectomy was identified. Logistic regression was used for data analysis. The chief dependent variable was receipt of or planned BRS by patient report at 6 months after diagnosis; chief independent variables were physician interactive information-giving and patient perceived self-efficacy in interacting with physicians. Results Greater physician information-giving about BC and its treatment and greater patient perceived self-efficacy positively predicted BRS (OR=1.12, P=0.04; OR=1.03, P=0.01, respectively). The observed negative effects of language barriers and less acculturation among Latinas and lower education at the bivariate level were mitigated in multivariate modeling with the addition of the patient-physician communication and self-efficacy variables. Conclusion Empowering aspects of patient-physician communication and self-efficacy may overcome the negative effects of language barriers and less acculturation for Latinas, as well as of lower education generally, on receipt of or planned BRS among low-income women with BC. Intervening with these aspects of communication could result in BRS rates more consistent with the general population and in improved quality of life among this disadvantaged group. PMID:19626696

  10. Cancer Patient Preferences for Quality and Length of Life

    PubMed Central

    Meropol, Neal J.; Egleston, Brian L.; Buzaglo, Joanne S.; Benson, Al B.; Cegala, Donald J.; Diefenbach, Michael A.; Fleisher, Linda; Miller, Suzanne M.; Sulmasy, Daniel P.; Weinfurt, Kevin P.

    2008-01-01

    Background Optimal patient decision making requires integration of patient values, goals, and preferences with information received from the physician. In the case of life-threatening illness such as cancer, the weights placed on quality of life (QOL) and length of life (LOL) represent critical values. The objective of this study is to describe cancer patient values regarding QOL and LOL, and explore associations with communication preferences. Methods Patients with advanced cancer completed a computer-based survey prior to the initial consultation with a medical oncologist. Assessments included sociodemographics, physical and mental health state, values regarding quality and length of life, communication preferences and cancer-related distress. Results Seven hundred forty three advanced cancer patients were enrolled. Among 459 advanced cancer patients, fifty-five percent of patients equally valued QOL and LOL, 27% preferred QOL, and 18% preferred LOL. Patients with a QOL preference had lower levels of cancer-related distress (p < 0.001). QOL preference was associated with older age (p = 0.001), male gender (p = 0.003), and higher education (p = 0.062). Patients who preferred LOL over QOL desired a more supportive and less pessimistic communication style from their oncologists. Conclusions These data indicate that a values preference for length vs. quality of life may be simply measured, and is associated with wishes regarding the nature of oncologist communication. Awareness of these values during the clinical encounter could improve decision making by influencing the style and content of the communication between oncologists and their patients. PMID:18988231

  11. Effective Communication About the Use of Complementary and Integrative Medicine in Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Complementary and integrative medicine (CIM) is becoming an increasingly popular and visible component of oncology care. Many patients affected by cancer and their family members are looking for informed advice and desire communication with their physicians about CIM use. Patients affected by cancer come to discuss CIM use with intense emotions and are experiencing an existential crisis that cannot be ignored. Effective communication is crucial in establishing trust with these patients and their families. Communication is now recognized as a core clinical skill in medicine, including cancer care, and is important to the delivery of high-quality care. The quality of communication affects patient satisfaction, decision-making, patient distress and well-being, compliance, and even malpractice litigation. The communication process about CIM use requires a very sensitive approach that depends on effective communication skills, such as experience in listening, encouraging hope, and ability to convey empathy and compassion. This process can be divided into two parts: the “how” and the “what”. The “how” relates to the change in clinician attitude, the process of gathering information, addressing patients' unmet needs and emotions, and dealing with uncertainty. The “what” relates to the process of information exchange while assisting patients in decisions about CIM use by using reliable information sources, leading to informed decision-making. PMID:23863085

  12. [Psychological aspects of cancer Information dedicated to patients and relatives].

    PubMed

    Machavoine, Jean-Luc; Bonnet, Valérie; Leichtnam-Dugarin, Line; Dolbeault, Sylvie; Marx, Eliane; Dauchy, Sarah; Flahault, Cécile; Bendrihen, Nicolas; Pelicier, Nicole; Syp, Laurence; Pérennec, Marie-Estelle; Dilhuydy, Jean-Marie; Marx, Gilles; Chaussumier, Caroline; Brusco, Sylvie; Carretier, Julien; Delavigne, Valérie; Fervers, Béatrice; Philip, Thierry

    2007-02-01

    In response to the evolution of the information-seeking behaviour of patients and concerns from health professionals regarding cancer patient information, the French National Federation of Comprehensive Cancer Centres (FNCLCC) introduced, in 1998, an information and education program dedicated to patients and relatives, the SOR SAVOIR PATIENT program (SSP). The methodology of this program adheres to established quality criteria regarding the elaboration of patient information. Cancer patient information, developed in this program, is based on clinical practice guidelines produced by the FNCLCC and the twenty French cancer centres, the National League against Cancer, The National Cancer Institute, the French Hospital Federation, the National Oncology Federation of Regional and University Hospitals, the French Oncology Federation of General Hospitals, many learned societies, as well as an active participation of patients, former patients and caregivers. The information and dialogue handbook SOR SAVOIR PATIENT Vivre pendant et après un cancer reporting on the psychological aspects of cancer was worked out and published on the Web in 2005. The guide aims to provide cancer patients with support and advice about the psychological impact of the disease. It provides information on the possible personal consequences of the disease and treatments, in every domain: psychological, emotional, interpersonal, familial or professional. Patients are also advised of the emotional challenges associated with cancer, of the support they may expect at every stage of the disease, from diagnosis to treatment, and of psychological outcome after the disease is over. The document also provides healthcare professionals with a valuable, concise source of validated information on the psychological aspects of cancer, thus facilitating communication between carers and patients. Information provided in the present article has been selected from the information and dialogue handbook SOR SAVOIR

  13. Perioperative nutrition in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Daly, J M; Redmond, H P; Gallagher, H

    1992-01-01

    Cancer patients have the highest incidence of protein-calorie malnutrition seen in hospitalized patients, with significant malnutrition occurring in more than 30% of cancer patients undergoing major upper gastrointestinal procedures. Clinically significant malnutrition occurs as a result of diminished nutrient intake, increased nutrient losses, and tumor-induced derangements in host metabolism. In the absence of adequate exogenous nutrients, the body utilizes endogenous substrates to satisfy the ongoing requirements of both host and tumor for energy and protein. In those patients with malignant obstruction of the gastrointestinal tract, the tumor itself may induce diminished nutrient intake. Present day treatment modalities including gastrointestinal resection, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy compound these metabolic derangements, further increasing the risk of postoperative morbidity and death. The presence of malnutrition in cancer patients has prognostic importance. In a review of more than 3000 cancer patients, DeWys and colleagues identified significantly improved survival in those patients without weight loss compared with those had lost 6% of their body weight (Am J Med 69:491-497, 1980). Other investigators have noted increased postoperative morbidity and mortality associated with malnutrition. Early hypotheses suggested that reversal of weight loss would improve survival. The development and refinements of enteral and parenteral nutrition have provided the opportunity for studying the relationship between nutritional supplementation and postoperative prognosis. Nutrition support is therefore often instituted to improve nutritional status and thereby reduce the risks of postoperative complications. This article addresses the beneficial role of preoperative nutrition therapy in cancer patients.

  14. [Communication with ALS patients: neurosurgical approach].

    PubMed

    Yoshimine, Toshiki; Yanagisawa, Takufumi; Sawada, Jin-Ichi; Hazama, Takanori; Mochizuki, Hideki; Hirata, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    By progression of the disease, motor neurons degenerate in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) eventually lose nearly all voluntary muscles in the body. They are awake and aware but cannot move or communicate (locked-in state). Since the function of the brain is preserved, one possible measure to support their communication is to interpret their motor intention by decoding (deciphering) brain signals and present it with external devices. This technology called "brain-machine interface (BMI)" is now close to clinical use in Japan and USA.In our system, we record electrocorticogram (ECoG) obtained with subudural electrodes during their motor imagery, decode it and determine the movement they intended. So far, one patient of ALS with severe paralysis, implanted with this electrodes, successfully operated the PC communication tool only by thinking.

  15. Cancer Screening in Older Patients.

    PubMed

    Salzman, Brooke; Beldowski, Kathryn; de la Paz, Amanda

    2016-04-15

    Although cancer is the second leading cause of death among persons 65 years and older, there is a paucity of clinical trial data about the effectiveness and harms of cancer screening in this population. Given the heterogeneous nature of the older population, cancer screening in these patients should not be based on age alone. Studies suggest that a life expectancy of at least 10 years is necessary to derive a survival benefit from screening for breast and colorectal cancers; therefore, screening for these cancers is not recommended in those with a life expectancy of less than 10 years. Prostate cancer screening, if performed at all, should not be performed after 69 years of age. Cervical cancer screening may be stopped after 65 years of age if the patient has an adequate history of negative screening results. An individualized approach to cancer screening decisions involves estimating life expectancy, determining the potential benefits and harms of screenings, and weighing those benefits and harms in relation to the patient's values and preferences.

  16. Informal caregiving for cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Romito, Francesca; Goldzweig, Gil; Cormio, Claudia; Hagedoorn, Mariët; Andersen, Barbara L

    2013-06-01

    According to the recent worldwide estimation by the GLOBOCAN project, in total, 12.7 million new cancer cases and 7.6 million cancer deaths occurred in 2008. The worldwide number of cancer survivors within 5 years of diagnosis has been estimated at be almost 28.8 million. Informal caregivers, such as family members and close friends, provide essential support to cancer patients. The authors of this report provide an overview of issues in the study of informal caregivers for cancer patients and long-term survivors in the United States and Europe, characterizing the caregivers commonly studied; the resources currently available to them; and their unmet needs, their psychosocial outcomes, and the psychosocial interventions tailored to their special circumstances. A broad overview of the state of research and knowledge, both in Europe and the United States, and observations on the directions for future research are provided.

  17. Informal Caregiving for Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Romito, Francesca; Goldzweig, Gil; Cormio, Claudia; Hagedoorn, Mariët; Andersen, Barbara L.

    2013-01-01

    According to the recent worldwide estimation by the GLOBOCAN project, in total, 12.7 million new cancer cases and 7.6 million cancer deaths occurred in 2008. The worldwide number of cancer survivors within 5 years of diagnosis has been estimated at be almost 28.8 million. Informal caregivers, such as family members and close friends, provide essential support to cancer patients. The authors of this report provide an overview of issues in the study of informal caregivers for cancer patients and long-term survivors in the United States and Europe, characterizing the caregivers commonly studied; the resources currently available to them; and their unmet needs, their psychosocial outcomes, and the psychosocial interventions tailored to their special circumstances. A broad overview of the state of research and knowledge, both in Europe and the United States, and observations on the directions for future research are provided. PMID:23695928

  18. Communicating with patients who have hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Herring, R; Hock, I

    2000-02-01

    Access to health care services is of paramount interest to all New Jerseyans. For people with varying degrees of hearing loss, affordable health insurance, while important, is not the only barrier to quality health care. Doctors are required by law to ensure effective communication between themselves and their deaf or hard-of-hearing patients. PMID:10697387

  19. Advanced nurse-patient communication system.

    PubMed

    Unluturk, Mehmet S

    2012-08-01

    Effective communication is the most important part of any healthcare organization. For many years, hospital nurse call solutions had been stand-alone systems with occasional integration to pocket paging for outputting patient call alerts to mobile staff. In the late 1990's, technology enabled in-building wireless phones to supplement or replace paging systems as a means of not only sending alerts, but also enabling voice communication between mobile staff and patients. Today's nurse call market requires integration of additional information from location and ADT (admit, discharge, transfer) systems into what have traditionally been nurse call applications. This system information is required not only at the nursing station, pagers, and phones, but also at PC's placed on each patient care floor in hallways, nurse stations, and offices, and at areas away from the patients, including administrator and clinical engineering offices. It is crucial that nurses have the latest patient information in their hand wherever they go in the hospital. In this paper, MatchMaker.NET has been developed to integrate all these technologies into the hospital's LAN to improve nurse-patient communication. PMID:21541690

  20. Sleep Disturbances in Acutely Ill Patients with Cancer.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Ellyn E; Tanner, J Mark; Dumont, Natalie A

    2016-06-01

    Intensive care units may place acutely ill patients with cancer at additional risk for sleep loss and associated negative effects. Research suggests that communication about sleep in patients with cancer is suboptimal and sleep problems are not regularly assessed or adequately treated throughout the cancer trajectory. However, many sleep problems and fatigue can be managed effectively. This article synthesizes the current literature regarding the prevalence, cause, and risk factors that contribute to sleep disturbance in the context of acute cancer care. It describes the consequences of poor sleep and discusses appropriate assessment and treatment options. PMID:27215362

  1. To know or not to know? Not the only question in familial breast cancer risk communication

    PubMed Central

    Maddock, C; Schrijvers, D; Turco, MRD; Marotti, L; Sullivan, R

    2011-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer and the leading cause of cancer death in females, 5–10% of these breast cancers occur in women because of an inherited mutation. The term ‘risk’ in relation to familial cancer can have multiple meanings for both clinicians and patients. Failing to identify and address this may impair effective communication and informed decision making and adversely affect the quality of patient care. The aim of this research for the Eurocancercoms project was to explore patients' experience of risk communication in breast cancer and to investigate a mechanism for sharing these experiences using a filmed round-table discussion (RTD). Methods A filmed RTD with six women who had experience of, or some connection with familial breast cancer was conducted. Criteria for inclusion included a willingness and ability to participate in the discussion in English and to be prepared for the discussion to be hosted online with opportunities for others to view and comment. Results The main findings are presented as key themes and issues arising from the RTD. There was consistency in the group on the need for improvements to the risk communication process as a whole and in particular around onward diffusion of information i.e. ‘Telling the family’. There were differences regarding ‘wanting to know’ their genetic status. Conclusions The perception of cancer risk in the narratives stems not only from the way risks are stated, but from family history, personal experiences, cultural norms and beliefs and therefore a multifaceted approach to risk communication addressing these issues is necessary to ensure the patient fully understands the potential risks. There is a balance when attending to patient's information needs, as to what level and amount of information is required by the individual at a particular time and communicators need to be able to tailor information accordingly. PMID:22276070

  2. Cancer Genetic Counselor Information Needs for Risk Communication: A Qualitative Evaluation of Interview Transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Overby, Casey Lynnette; Chung, Wendy K.; Hripcsak, George; Kukafka, Rita

    2013-01-01

    Personalized medicine is a model of healthcare that is predictive, personalized, preventive and participatory (“P4 Medicine”). Genetic counselors are an ideal group to study when designing tools to support cancer P4 Medicine activities more broadly. The goal for this work was to gain a better understanding of the information cancer genetic counselors seek from their patients to facilitate effective information exchange for discussing risk. This was an analysis of a qualitative data set from interviews of eight cancer genetic counselors, recruited from three institutions. Genetic counselors at each site were interviewed using a semi-structured, open-ended questionnaire. A selective coding approach was used to determine major themes associated with genetic counseling information needs for communicating risk. We generated a model for understanding categories of genetic counseling information needs to support risk communication activities. Common activities for risk communication included risk assessment and tailoring communication. Categories of information needs included: (a) clinical patient characteristics, (b) social and cognitive patient characteristics and (c) patient motivation and goals for the genetic counseling session. A logical next step is for this model to inform the design of software systems for pre-visit patient planning and delivering just-in-time educational information to facilitate cancer risk communication activities. PMID:24358447

  3. Overprotective caregivers of elderly cancer patients: a case report.

    PubMed

    Basso, Umberto; Brunello, Antonella; Magro, Cristina; Favaretto, Adolfo; Monfardini, Silvio

    2006-01-01

    The essential role of the caregiver in the management of elderly cancer patients is still poorly documented. This case report concerns a woman with metastatic lung carcinoma who was sincerely informed and successfully treated with chemotherapy and gefitinib only after gaining the trust of her overprotective daughter. Devoting time to the relatives represents a key element to create a communicative and efficient relationship with older cancer patients. PMID:17036533

  4. Communication in the physician-patient relationship.

    PubMed Central

    Rees, A M

    1993-01-01

    Political, legal, ethical, social, economic, and technological changes in the twentieth century have produced a profound effect on the health care and health status of Americans and the way in which physicians and patients communicate. In the latter half of this century, the responsibility for individual health care has shifted from a physician-oriented, paternalistic approach to a patient-centered one. Patients now assume two identities: health consumers and active participants in the medical decision-making process. This phenomenon has created an environment where consumer demand for information has shifted from a single focus on symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases to an increasing preoccupation with cost, quality, and access to health care. This shift emphasizes the critical role played by medical librarians in the dissemination of needed information, and it challenges librarians to take a leadership role in opening newer channels of communication between physicians and patients. The 1992 Janet Doe Lecture analyzes the evolutionary change in the physician-patient relationship and its modes of communication, projects future roles for medical librarians, and provides an extensive list of references for further reading. PMID:8428183

  5. Communicating with older ethnic minority patients.

    PubMed

    Likupe, Gloria

    2014-06-10

    In a time of increasing cultural diversity, it is essential that healthcare professionals respond by providing culturally competent care. Healthcare professionals must recognise the diverse needs of people from ethnic minority communities to ensure that they receive equal standards of care. This is particularly pertinent when providing care for older ethnic minority patients who may not be fluent in English. This article focuses on the need to communicate effectively with this group of patients to meet their health and social care needs, with the ultimate aim of improving patient outcomes. PMID:24894254

  6. Contributions to Cancer Research: Finding a Niche in Communication | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    This past July, I started a journey into the fields of communications and cancer research when I joined the Office of Cancer Genomics (OCG) as a fellow in the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Health Communications Internship Program (HCIP). Cancer genomics and working in an office were new and uncharted territory for me: before I came to OCG, I was finishing a Ph.D. in cell biology at Vanderbilt University in Dr. Matthew Tyska’s laboratory.

  7. Thromboembolism in Patients with Cancer.

    PubMed

    Büyükçelik, Abdullah; Akbulut, Hakan

    2004-03-01

    One hundred and forty years ago, Armand Trousseau described phlegmasia alba dolens as a sign of internal malignancy. Nowadays, it is commonly believed that the presence malignant tumaor increases the risk of venous thromboembolism (i.e deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism) However, cancer is usually associated with other factors such as old age, extensive surgery,immobility, etc., which may predispose to thromboembolism. The majority of thrombotic events occur in the venous system; the incidence of arterial thrombosis is much lower.Recurrent thromboembolism in cancer patients frequently and diminishes the quality of life of the patients.Furthermore, if the thromboembolism is massive, destipte of early and aggressive treatment, it may result in death. In this article, we review thromboembolic complications in cancer patients.

  8. Hypertension in Patients with Cancer

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Vinicius Barbosa; Silva, Eduardo Nani; Ribeiro, Mario Luiz; Martins, Wolney de Andrade

    2015-01-01

    There is a known association between chemotherapy and radiotherapy for treatment of cancer patients and development or worsening of hypertension. The aim of this article is to review this association. A literature search was conducted for articles reporting this association on the databases PubMed, SciELO and LILACS between 1993 and 2013. There was a high coprevalence of hypertension and cancer, since both diseases share the same risk factors, such as sedentary lifestyle, obesity, smoking, unhealthy diet and alcohol abuse. The use of chemotherapy and adjuvant drugs effective in the treatment of cancer increased the survival rate of these patients and, consequently, increased the incidence of hypertension. We described the association between the use of angiogenesis inhibitors (bevacizumab, sorafenib and sunitinib), corticosteroids, erythropoietin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with the development of hypertension. We also described the relationship between hypertension and carotid baroreceptor injury secondary to cervical radiotherapy. Morbidity and mortality increased in patients with cancer and hypertension without proper antihypertensive treatment. We concluded that there is need for early diagnosis, effective monitoring and treatment strategies for hypertension in cancer patients in order to reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:25742420

  9. Mycobacterium arupense in Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Al Hamal, Zainab; Jordan, Mary; Hachem, Ray Y.; Alawami, Hussain M.; Alburki, Abdussalam M.; Yousif, Ammar; Deshmukh, Poonam; Jiang, Ying; Chaftari, Ann-Marie; Raad, Issam I.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Mycobacterium arupense is a slow-growing, nonchromogenic, acid-fast bacillus. Its clinical spectrum, epidemiology, and frequency of colonization versus true infection remain unknown. We evaluated the clinical significance of M arupense and positive cultures from cancer patients. We retrospectively reviewed records of all cancer patients treated at our institution between 2007 and 2014 to identify those who had positive cultures for M arupense. Mycobacterium arupense was identified by sequencing the 16S rRNA and hsp65 genes. A total of 53patients had positive cultures, 100% of which were isolated from respiratory specimens. Of these, 7 patients met the American Thoracic Society/Infectious Diseases Society of America criteria for a definitive diagnosis of M arupense infection, 14 cases were considered to be probable infections, and 29 cases were considered to be possible infections. Of the included patients, 13 received therapy for M arupense infection and 40 did not. The outcomes of treated and untreated patients did not differ significantly. No relapses of M arupense infection. In addition, there were no M arupense-related deaths in either group. In cancer patients, M arupense appears to be mostly a commensal organism rather than a pathogen. Patients who did or did not receive treatment had similar outcomes. Validation of these findings in a larger prospective trial is warranted. PMID:27057825

  10. [Weight loss in cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Lordick, Florian; Hacker, Ulrich

    2016-02-01

    Cancer patients are regularly affected by malnutrition which often leads to a worsened quality of life and activity in daily living, more side effects and complications during anticancer treatment and shorter survival times. The early diagnosis and treatment of malnutrition are therefore relevant components of oncological treatment. The assessment of the nutritional status and determination of the body-mass-index should be done in every patient with cancer. The clinical examination delivers important findings and indications for malnutrition. Bioimpedance analysis can deliver additional objective information. The treatment of malnutrition should start early and follows a step-wise escalation reaching from nutritional counseling to enteral nutritional support to parenteral nutrition.

  11. Could patients' coughing have communicative significance?

    PubMed

    Bailey, Julia V

    2008-01-01

    Medical discourse positions patients with coughs and colds negatively, so consulting health services with 'minor' respiratory illness is therefore more accountable than for other medical problems. Patients face dilemmas since they must persuade doctors of the doctorability of their illness without being seen as hypochondriacal, and they risk losing face if doctors decide that there is nothing much wrong. It is known that the placement of non-lexical features of talk such as laughing or crying can have interactional meaning. Using a data set of video-recorded doctor-patient cough and cold consultations, this study explores whether patients' coughing could have communicative significance. The study is a qualitative analysis of 33 consultations drawing on a constructionist, sociolinguistic analytic approach. Coughing is co-ordinated with talk rather than occurring randomly. Coughing helps patients to demonstrate the doctorability of their symptoms and to legitimize their claims for medical attention. Coughing is also associated with resistance to 'no problem' diagnoses, resulting in changes in the trajectory of talk (for example, soliciting more explanation from doctors and/or re-negotiation of doctors' investigation or treatment plans). Coughing is undoubtedly a manifestation of respiratory illness, but also has communicative significance in consultations for coughs and colds.

  12. Communicating with Patients with Special Health Care Needs.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Kimberly M; Heaton, Lisa J

    2016-07-01

    People with special health care needs (PSHCN) often have difficulty communicating with providers in health care settings, including dental practices. This difficulty can affect access to care as well as the quality of care received. This article provides practical tips and tools dental professionals can use to facilitate communication for a diverse population of PSHCNs. The article discusses communication needs of patients with communication disorders; augmentative and alternative communication; and communication for patients with intellectual disability, psychiatric conditions; and dental fears. Examples are given of communication breakdowns, and descriptions of how communication challenges can be resolved. PMID:27264858

  13. An Ecological Framework for Cancer Communication: Implications for Research

    PubMed Central

    Intille, Stephen S; Zabinski, Marion F

    2005-01-01

    The field of cancer communication has undergone a major revolution as a result of the Internet. As recently as the early 1990s, face-to-face, print, and the telephone were the dominant methods of communication between health professionals and individuals in support of the prevention and treatment of cancer. Computer-supported interactive media existed, but this usually required sophisticated computer and video platforms that limited availability. The introduction of point-and-click interfaces for the Internet dramatically improved the ability of non-expert computer users to obtain and publish information electronically on the Web. Demand for Web access has driven computer sales for the home setting and improved the availability, capability, and affordability of desktop computers. New advances in information and computing technologies will lead to similarly dramatic changes in the affordability and accessibility of computers. Computers will move from the desktop into the environment and onto the body. Computers are becoming smaller, faster, more sophisticated, more responsive, less expensive, and—essentially—ubiquitous. Computers are evolving into much more than desktop communication devices. New computers include sensing, monitoring, geospatial tracking, just-in-time knowledge presentation, and a host of other information processes. The challenge for cancer communication researchers is to acknowledge the expanded capability of the Web and to move beyond the approaches to health promotion, behavior change, and communication that emerged during an era when language- and image-based interpersonal and mass communication strategies predominated. Ecological theory has been advanced since the early 1900s to explain the highly complex relationships among individuals, society, organizations, the built and natural environments, and personal and population health and well-being. This paper provides background on ecological theory, advances an Ecological Model of Internet

  14. Latinos and Cancer Information: Perspectives of Patients, Health Professionals and Telephone Cancer Information Specialists

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Celia P.; Nápoles, Anna; Davis, Sharon; Lopez, Monica; Pasick, Rena J.; Livaudais-Toman, Jennifer; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J.

    2016-01-01

    Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 16 Latino cancer patients diagnosed in California; 10 health professionals from the San Francisco Bay Area and Fresno, California; and 10 Cancer Information Services (CIS) information specialists from the regional offices handling calls from Spanish-speakers. Interview guides were designed by the investigators to answer three main research questions: 1) How do Latinos obtain information about cancer and what types of information do they access?; 2) What sources of cancer information do they seek out and find credible?; and 3) What are the barriers and facilitators to Latinos obtaining cancer information? Stakeholders generally viewed health professionals as the most credible source of cancer information. All groups regarded family and friends as important sources of information. Patients and health professionals tended to differ on the value of print materials. Although patients found them generally useful, health professionals tended to view them as inadequate for meeting the informational needs of their Latino patients due to the challenge of low health literacy. Health professionals also tended to undervalue Internet resources compared to patients and CIS specialists. All stakeholders viewed language, ethnic discordance and the impact on patients of the initial diagnosis as barriers to effective communication of cancer information. Health professionals and CIS specialists, but not patients, mentioned low literacy as a barrier. Our findings underscore the importance of the physician-patient relationship as a point of intervention to address the unmet informational and psychosocial needs of Latino cancer patients.

  15. Latinos and Cancer Information: Perspectives of Patients, Health Professionals and Telephone Cancer Information Specialists

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Celia P.; Nápoles, Anna; Davis, Sharon; Lopez, Monica; Pasick, Rena J.; Livaudais-Toman, Jennifer; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J.

    2016-01-01

    Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 16 Latino cancer patients diagnosed in California; 10 health professionals from the San Francisco Bay Area and Fresno, California; and 10 Cancer Information Services (CIS) information specialists from the regional offices handling calls from Spanish-speakers. Interview guides were designed by the investigators to answer three main research questions: 1) How do Latinos obtain information about cancer and what types of information do they access?; 2) What sources of cancer information do they seek out and find credible?; and 3) What are the barriers and facilitators to Latinos obtaining cancer information? Stakeholders generally viewed health professionals as the most credible source of cancer information. All groups regarded family and friends as important sources of information. Patients and health professionals tended to differ on the value of print materials. Although patients found them generally useful, health professionals tended to view them as inadequate for meeting the informational needs of their Latino patients due to the challenge of low health literacy. Health professionals also tended to undervalue Internet resources compared to patients and CIS specialists. All stakeholders viewed language, ethnic discordance and the impact on patients of the initial diagnosis as barriers to effective communication of cancer information. Health professionals and CIS specialists, but not patients, mentioned low literacy as a barrier. Our findings underscore the importance of the physician-patient relationship as a point of intervention to address the unmet informational and psychosocial needs of Latino cancer patients. PMID:27642542

  16. Young patients', parents', and survivors' communication preferences in paediatric oncology: Results of online focus groups

    PubMed Central

    Zwaanswijk, Marieke; Tates, Kiek; van Dulmen, Sandra; Hoogerbrugge, Peter M; Kamps, Willem A; Bensing, Jozien M

    2007-01-01

    Background Guidelines in paediatric oncology encourage health care providers to share relevant information with young patients and parents to enable their active participation in decision making. It is not clear to what extent this mirrors patients' and parents' preferences. This study investigated communication preferences of childhood cancer patients, parents, and survivors of childhood cancer. Methods Communication preferences were examined by means of online focus groups. Seven patients (aged 8–17), 11 parents, and 18 survivors (aged 8–17 at diagnosis) participated. Recruitment took place by consecutive inclusion in two Dutch university oncological wards. Questions concerned preferences regarding interpersonal relationships, information exchange and participation in decision making. Results Participants expressed detailed and multi-faceted views regarding their needs and preferences in communication in paediatric oncology. They agreed on the importance of several interpersonal and informational aspects of communication, such as honesty, support, and the need to be fully informed. Participants generally preferred a collaborative role in medical decision making. Differences in views were found regarding the desirability of the patient's presence during consultations. Patients differed in their satisfaction with their parents' role as managers of the communication. Conclusion Young patients' preferences mainly concur with current guidelines of providing them with medical information and enabling their participation in medical decision making. Still, some variation in preferences was found, which faces health care providers with the task of balancing between the sometimes conflicting preferences of young cancer patients and their parents. PMID:17996108

  17. Traditional Chinese medicine use among Chinese immigrant cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Leng, Jennifer C F; Gany, Francesca

    2014-03-01

    Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) includes both herbal remedies and non-herbal practices. Chinese cancer patients are particularly at high risk for herb-drug interactions. Providers, both primary care physicians and oncologists, frequently do not ask patients about TCM use, which has potentially dangerous consequences. This study describes an assessment of TCM use while undergoing conventional cancer treatment, among a cohort of Chinese immigrant cancer patients in New York City. The Immigrant Health and Cancer Disparities Service at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center assists underserved cancer patients through a patient navigation program, the Cancer Portal Project. Six questions related to TCM are included in the existing Portal Needs Assessment Intake. Mandarin- or Cantonese-speaking Portal patients enrolled between January 2010 and May 2012 were surveyed. One hundred nine Chinese-speaking patients were enrolled in the Portal Project during the study period. Forty-six completed the TCM questions. Ninety-six percent preferred to speak Mandarin, Cantonese, or Fujianese in the healthcare setting. Thirty-nine percent (n = 18) of the 46 participants reported using TCM since being diagnosed with cancer. Nearly all (n = 16) who used TCM reported using herbal medicines. Ten TCM users did not describe sharing their use with Western doctors. Eight (44%) of TCM users reported concurrently using TCM and conventional cancer treatment. Larger scale studies should further explore the concurrent use of TCM and conventional cancer treatment in this unique population. Future research should also address patient-provider communication related to the concurrent use of TCM and cancer treatment. This is also an important area of education for both patients and providers.

  18. Identifying Gender-Preferred Communication Styles within Online Cancer Communities: A Retrospective, Longitudinal Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Durant, Kathleen T.; McCray, Alexa T.; Safran, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Background The goal of this research is to determine if different gender-preferred social styles can be observed within the user interactions at an online cancer community. To achieve this goal, we identify and measure variables that pertain to each gender-specific social style. Methods and Findings We perform social network and statistical analysis on the communication flow of 8,388 members at six different cancer forums over eight years. Kruskal-Wallis tests were conducted to measure the difference between the number of intimate (and highly intimate) dyads, relationship length, and number of communications. We determine that two patients are more likely to form an intimate bond on a gender-specific cancer forum (ovarian P = <0.0001, breast P = 0.0089, prostate P = 0.0021). Two female patients are more likely to form a highly intimate bond on a female-specific cancer forum (Ovarian P<0.0001, Breast P<0.01). Typically a male patient communicates with more members than a female patient (Ovarian forum P = 0.0406, Breast forum P = 0.0013). A relationship between two patients is longer on the gender-specific cancer forums than a connection between two members not identified as patients (ovarian forum P = 0.00406, breast forum P = 0.00013, prostate forum P = .0.0003). Conclusion The high level of interconnectedness among the prostate patients supports the hypothesis that men prefer to socialize in large, interconnected, less-intimate groups. A female patient is more likely to form a highly intimate connection with another female patient; this finding is consistent with the hypothesis that woman prefer fewer, more intimate connections. The relationships of same-gender cancer patients last longer than other relationships; this finding demonstrates homophily within these online communities. Our findings regarding online communication preferences are in agreement with research findings from person-to-person communication preference studies

  19. Serious game scores as health condition indicator for cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Peters, Konrad; Kayali, Fares; Reithofer, Andrea; Wölfle, Rebecca; Mateus-Berr, Ruth; Kuczwara, Jens; Lehner, Zsuzsanna; Lawitschka, Anita; Brunmaier, Barbara; Martinek, Daniel; Silbernagl, Marisa; Hlavacs, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present INTERACCT (Integrating Entertainment and Reaction Assessment into Child Cancer Therapy), a multidisciplinary research project aiming at creating a communication tool for pediatric patients after cancer treatment with HSCT (hematopoietic stem cell transplantation) in after care. The communication platform should foster communication between patients and clinicians, but also increase motivation for treatment compliance by using appropriate designs and gamification elements. A state of the art web interface enables the physicians to evaluate data submitted by the patients, joining data from various sources (lab data, survey data, physiotherapy performance) using HL7 and visualizing imporant changes. This contribution outlines the challenges of designing such a system and presents a solution for the medical data interface and evaluation. PMID:25991284

  20. [Nonverbal communication by the presurgical patient].

    PubMed

    Freixa García, J; Marcos Sáiz, M

    1999-02-01

    Throughout human history, besides oral language, man has used other forms of communication which are known as non-verbal. From the three components of the basic structure of human communication, language, paralanguage and kinesthesia, we have chosen the last one, kinesthesia, to develop our project. Kinesthesia studies the gestures, mannerisms and postures, or in other words all body movements and positions which occur as part of our speech or independent to it. This project proposes to analyze presurgical patients' kinesthetic manifestations. We have observed that some patients do not verbally express their fears, anxieties, nervousness, etc; nonetheless, bodies do respond with similar gestures and movements in persons of varying age, sex, socio-cultural level and pathology. It is difficult to be certain what another human being feels at any given moment. One may ask a person, but he/she can refuse to answer, he/she can lie or maybe he/she does not even know what his/her feeling is. In spite of the fact that the level of information a patient possesses is higher all the time, since this is one of the primary objectives all health professionals have, one doubt remains: Will a person who has all the possible information regarding his/her surgery at his/her disposition feel the same degree of anxiety as the person who does not have such complete information available to him/her? PMID:10446605

  1. Utilization of Communication Robot in Patient Education.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Keitaro; Majima, Yukie

    2016-01-01

    In Japan, the population is expected to decrease. Moreover, the proportion of elderly people living alone among the elderly population is expected to increase for both men and women. Therefore, the demand for elderly care is increasing year by year. In this paper, we aim at making environment in which elderly people can receive interactive guidance, and reducing the burden on medical staff such as caregivers and nurses. So, we design a patient education by ARCS model which classifies concepts related to learning motivation, and consider to utilize a communication robot "Pepper". PMID:27332406

  2. I wanted you to know: Breast cancer survivors' control of workplace communication about cancer.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Lynne; Kocum, Lucie; Loughlin, Catherine; Bryson, Lindsay; Dimoff, Jennifer K

    2015-10-01

    Of working women diagnosed with cancer, approximately one-third will have breast cancer. Communicating about their cancer plays an important role in their workplace experience. It is challenging but helpful in eliciting needed social support and accommodations. Fully understanding such communication experiences is important in order to facilitate the well-being and success of such women in their workplaces. A qualitative study permits a richer account of the details of these workplace communications, and a deeper understanding of how women manage the complex and multifaceted communication process. This study used thematic analysis of semistructured interviews from 19 women working full time at the time of their breast cancer diagnosis. We found 3 themes that encapsulated unfolding individual experiences, representing a complex interplay of challenges to maintaining a sense of personal control in workplace responses: challenges to control posed by the experience of sharing information in the workplace about the woman's cancer, women's very individual attempts to control how information about their cancer was shared, and the mixed responses of those who were told. The result was unique individual trajectories in which empathic responses tailored to the individual's needs and preferences were most helpful. These findings can provide guidance on managing cancer communication for survivors, and on how to best support and accommodate women workers with breast cancer, facilitating their ability to control how their cancer impacts their work experience. Our website (http://www.iwantedyoutoknow.ca/) provides a video, tip sheet, and other resources for facilitating supportive communication in the workplace.

  3. [Psychological care of patients with head and neck cancer].

    PubMed

    Moya, Mélanie

    2015-09-01

    Treatments for head and neck cancers are generally complex and debilitating. Surgery, often mutilating, profoundly affects the relationship between oneself and others and causes verbal communication, breathing and swallowing difficulties. The functional and aesthetic sequelae are a constant reminder to the patient of the disease and make them conscious of their appearance.

  4. Using SBAR communications in efforts to prevent patient rehospitalizations.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Mary Curry

    2013-10-01

    Situation-Background-Assessment-Recommendation (SBAR) communication has become the standard for communicating across disciplines. It has demonstrated its effectiveness at improving patient outcomes, enhancing patient and clinician satisfaction, and helping to control healthcare costs. It can help home healthcare clinicians with efforts to prevent avoidable hospitalizations. But how often and how well do home health clinicians use this method of shared communications with physicians? This article explores why communication between physicians and home health clinicians can be so problematic. It introduces the SBAR communication method, its origins, its features, and some of the published evidence that it provides effective and efficient communication, thereby promoting better patient outcomes. PMID:24081133

  5. Fever of unknown origin in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Loizidou, A; Aoun, M; Klastersky, J

    2016-05-01

    Fever of unknown origin (FUO) remains a challenging clinical problem, namely in patients with cancer. In cancer patients, FUO may be due to the cancer itself, as it is the case of hematological malignancies; digestive tumors (colon cancer, liver metastases) are significantly associated with FUO and infection can be demonstrated in some cases. Prevention with G-CSF and empirical antimicrobial therapy are essential approaches for the management of FUO in cancer patients. New diagnostic approaches, such as PET imaging, should be further evaluated in cancer patients with FUO. PMID:26995082

  6. Improving Physician-Patient Communication through Coaching of Simulated Encounters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravitz, Paula; Lancee, William J.; Lawson, Andrea; Maunder, Robert; Hunter, Jonathan J.; Leszcz, Molyn; McNaughton, Nancy; Pain, Clare

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Effective communication between physicians and their patients is important in optimizing patient care. This project tested a brief, intensive, interactive medical education intervention using coaching and standardized psychiatric patients to teach physician-patient communication to family medicine trainees. Methods: Twenty-six family…

  7. Nurse-patient/visitor communication in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Pytel, Constance; Fielden, Nina M; Meyer, Kate H; Albert, Nancy

    2009-09-01

    Patients and visitors need to be encouraged to express their needs and be provided with enough relevant information so that treatment and recovery from illness are optimized. In the emergency department, it is important for nurses to create an environment of trust, respect, and acceptance. Using a survey design, a convenience sample of nurses and patients/visitors described patient/visitor communication needs and determined if needs were met during the ED encounter. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Mantel Haenszel chi(2) tests were used to determine associations between patient-rated importance of nurse communication needs and nursing communication performance. Sixty-four nurses and 123 patients/visitors completed a communication needs survey. More than 80% of patients answered "excellent" or "very good" to 6 of the top 10 important communication needs. Patient and nurse importance differed significantly on only 2 communication needs: calm voice and social status (nurses rated these needs of higher importance than patients; P = .01, P = .006). Patient-ranked importance was positively associated with patient opinion of how well needs were met in 6 of 19 patient/visitor communication needs; that is, not making assumptions about social status (P = .0006), offering reassurance to calm fears (P = .004), and teaching about primary medical concerns/conditions (P = .01). Nurse and patient/visitor perceptions of important communication are similar. Educating nurses about patient/visitor communication needs is the first step in enhancing how well nurses meet those needs.

  8. Oral complications in cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Carl, W.

    1983-02-01

    Ionizing radiation used in treating the head and neck area produces oral side effects such as mucositis, salivary changes, trismus and radiation caries. Sequelae of cancer chemotherapy often include oral stomatitis, myelosuppression and immunosuppression. Infections of dental origin in compromised patients are potentially lethal. Specific programs to eliminate dental pathology before radiation and chemotherapy, and to maintain oral hygiene during and after therapy, will minimize these complications.

  9. Assessing Decision-Making Capacity in Patients with Communication Impairments.

    PubMed

    Cairncross, Molly; Peterson, Andrew; Lazosky, Andrea; Gofton, Teneille; Weijer, Charles

    2016-10-01

    The ethical principle of autonomy requires physicians to respect patient autonomy when present, and to protect the patient who lacks autonomy. Fulfilling this ethical obligation when a patient has a communication impairment presents considerable challenges. Standard methods for evaluating decision-making capacity require a semistructured interview. Some patients with communication impairments are unable to engage in a semistructured interview and are at risk of the wrongful loss of autonomy. In this article, we present a general strategy for assessing decision-making capacity in patients with communication impairments. We derive this strategy by reflecting on a particular case. The strategy involves three steps: (1) determining the reliability of communication, (2) widening the bandwidth of communication, and (3) using compensatory measures of decision-making capacity. We argue that this strategy may be useful for assessing decision-making capacity and preserving autonomy in some patients with communication impairments.

  10. Assessing Decision-Making Capacity in Patients with Communication Impairments.

    PubMed

    Cairncross, Molly; Peterson, Andrew; Lazosky, Andrea; Gofton, Teneille; Weijer, Charles

    2016-10-01

    The ethical principle of autonomy requires physicians to respect patient autonomy when present, and to protect the patient who lacks autonomy. Fulfilling this ethical obligation when a patient has a communication impairment presents considerable challenges. Standard methods for evaluating decision-making capacity require a semistructured interview. Some patients with communication impairments are unable to engage in a semistructured interview and are at risk of the wrongful loss of autonomy. In this article, we present a general strategy for assessing decision-making capacity in patients with communication impairments. We derive this strategy by reflecting on a particular case. The strategy involves three steps: (1) determining the reliability of communication, (2) widening the bandwidth of communication, and (3) using compensatory measures of decision-making capacity. We argue that this strategy may be useful for assessing decision-making capacity and preserving autonomy in some patients with communication impairments. PMID:27634720

  11. Practice improvement, part II: update on patient communication technologies.

    PubMed

    Roett, Michelle A; Coleman, Mary Thoesen

    2013-11-01

    Patient portals (ie, secure web-based services for patient health record access) and secure messaging to health care professionals are gaining popularity slowly. Advantages of web portals include timely communication and instruction, access to appointments and other services, and high patient satisfaction. Limitations include inappropriate use, security considerations, organizational costs, and exclusion of patients who are uncomfortable with or unable to use computers. Attention to the organization's strategic plan and office policies, patient and staff expectations, workflow and communication integration, training, marketing, and enrollment can facilitate optimal use of this technology. Other communication technologies that can enhance patient care include automated voice or text reminders and brief electronic communications. Social media provide another method of patient outreach, but privacy and access are concerns. Incorporating telehealthcare (health care provided via telephone or Internet), providing health coaching, and using interactive health communication applications can improve patient knowledge and clinical outcomes and provide social support. PMID:24261435

  12. Improving communication among nurses and patients.

    PubMed

    Unluturk, Mehmet S; Ozcanhan, Mehmet H; Dalkilic, Gokhan

    2015-07-01

    Patients use nurse call systems to signal nurses for medical help. Traditional push button-flashing lamp call systems are not integrated with other hospital automation systems. Therefore, nurse response time becomes a matter of personal discretion. The improvement obtained by integrating a pager system into the nurse call systems does not increase care efficiency, because unnecessary visits are still not eliminated. To obtain an immediate response and a purposeful visit by a nurse; regardless of the location of nurse in hospital, traditional systems have to be improved by intelligent telephone system integration. The results of the developed Nurse Call System Software (NCSS), the Wireless Phone System Software (WPSS), the Location System Software (LSS) and the communication protocol are provided, together with detailed XML message structures. The benefits of the proposed system are also discussed and the direction of future work is presented.

  13. Improving communication among nurses and patients.

    PubMed

    Unluturk, Mehmet S; Ozcanhan, Mehmet H; Dalkilic, Gokhan

    2015-07-01

    Patients use nurse call systems to signal nurses for medical help. Traditional push button-flashing lamp call systems are not integrated with other hospital automation systems. Therefore, nurse response time becomes a matter of personal discretion. The improvement obtained by integrating a pager system into the nurse call systems does not increase care efficiency, because unnecessary visits are still not eliminated. To obtain an immediate response and a purposeful visit by a nurse; regardless of the location of nurse in hospital, traditional systems have to be improved by intelligent telephone system integration. The results of the developed Nurse Call System Software (NCSS), the Wireless Phone System Software (WPSS), the Location System Software (LSS) and the communication protocol are provided, together with detailed XML message structures. The benefits of the proposed system are also discussed and the direction of future work is presented. PMID:25935361

  14. Depression in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Cvetković, Jovana; Nenadović, Milutin

    2016-06-30

    Breast cancer is the third most common illness in the world and the most frequent malignant disease with women. Cytotoxic therapy is connected to significant psychiatric adverse effects, and the appearance of depressive symptoms is the most common. The main goal is determining the degree of depression with breast cancer patients in the oncology ward of the University Clinical Hospital in Niš and its connection to their marital status, age, level of education, economic status and the number of therapy cycles. This research is a prospective study. The statistical data analysis included measures of descriptive and analytical statistics. The presence of depressive symptoms of different intensity was showed in 76.00% of the interviewees in group I, and the second included 77.4%. The frequency distributions show that 27.084% interviewees from the first group showed signs of depressive symptoms, while the second included 25%. The intensity of these symptoms categorizes them into the group of moderate to significantly expressed depressive states, so they require therapeutic treatment. Depression is significantly more often recorded with cancer patients receiving cytotoxic therapy; mild depression is the most common, followed by moderate and severe depression. PMID:27138829

  15. Prevention of cancer and non-communicable diseases.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Geoffrey; Gupta, Prakash; Gomes, Fabio; Kerner, Jon; Parra, William; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Kim, Jeongseon; Moore, Malcolm; Sutcliffe, Catherine; Sutcliffe, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide, accounting for approximately 7.6 million deaths (13% of all deaths) in 2008. Cancer mortality is projected to increase to 11 million deaths in 2030, with the majority occurring in regions of the world with the least capacity to respond. However, cancer is not only a personal, societal and economic burden but also a potential societal opportunity in the context of functional life - the years gained through effective prevention and treatment, and strategies to enhance survivorship. The United Nations General Assembly Special Session in 2011 has served to focus attention on key aspects of cancer prevention and control. Firstly, cancer is largely preventable, by feasible means. Secondly, cancer is one of a number of chronic, non- communicable diseases that share common risk factors whose prevention and control would benefit a majority of the world's population. Thirdly, a proportion of cancers can be attributed to infectious, communicable causal factors (e.g., HPV, HBV, H.pylori, parasites, flukes) and that strategies to control the burden of infectious diseases have relevance to the control of cancer. Fourthly, that the natural history of non-communicable diseases, including cancer, from primary prevention through diagnosis, treatment and care, is underwritten by the impact of social, economic and environmental determinants of health (e.g., poverty, illiteracy, gender inequality, social isolation, stigma, socio-economic status). Session 1 of the 4th International Cancer Control Congress (ICCC-4) focused on the social, economic and environmental, as well as biological and behavioural, modifiers of the risk of cancer through one plenary presentation and four interactive workshop discussions. The workshop sessions concerned 1) the Global Adult Tobacco Survey and social determinants of tobacco use in high burden low- and middle-income countries; 2) the role of diet, including alcohol, and physical activity in modifying the

  16. Patient Care, Communication, and Safety in the Mammography Suite.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Leisa

    2016-09-01

    Producing high-quality mammograms requires excellent technical skills along with exemplary communication. Mammographers must be able to address differences in patients' mental states, body habitus, and physical ability to obtain an optimal examination. In addition, every mammographer must practice consistently with patient safety, care, and satisfaction in mind. This article discusses verbal and nonverbal communication strategies, barriers to communication, and the care and safety of patients in the mammography suite who present special challenges. PMID:27601710

  17. Science and society: the communications revolution and cancer control.

    PubMed

    Viswanath, K

    2005-10-01

    Advances in communications technology, particularly with regards to computer-based media, have opened up exciting possibilities to intervene and influence the trajectory of cancer control, from disease prevention to survivorship, and to reduce the cancer burden. The resulting explosion in cancer information in the mass media and on the Internet, however, also offers challenges in terms of equality in access to information and the ability to act on it, as well as in making sure that it is accurate, readily available and easy to use. PMID:16195753

  18. Communicating the results of randomized clinical trials: do patients understand multidimensional patient-reported outcomes?

    PubMed

    McNair, Angus G K; Brookes, Sara T; Davis, Christopher R; Argyropoulos, Miltiadis; Blazeby, Jane M

    2010-02-10

    PURPOSE Evidence suggests that patient-reported outcomes (PROs) from randomized trials in oncology may not influence clinical decision making and patient choice. Reasons for this are currently unclear and little is known about patients' interpretation of PROs. This study assessed patients' understanding of multidimensional PROs in a graphical format. PATIENTS AND METHODS Semistructured interviews in which patients interpreted a series of graphs depicting simple, then multiple different hypothetical PROs associated with two treatments with identical chances of survival were audio recorded. The interviewer and a blinded observer (listening to audio recordings) scored patients' understanding of the graphs. Logistic regression examined the associations between patient understanding of the graphs and clinical and sociodemographic details. Results One hundred thirty-two patients with esophageal and gastric cancer were interviewed and 115 understood the first two graphs depicting different PROs of two treatments (87%; 95% CI,81 to 93). Simultaneous interpretation of adverse and beneficial treatment effects was achieved by 74 (66%; 95% CI, 57 to 75). Graphs showing complex, longitudinal data were correctly interpreted by 97 (73%; 95% CI, 66 to 81) and 108 (81%; 95% CI, 75 to 88), respectively. Univariable analyses demonstrated associations between patient understanding and patient age, educational level, and cancer site (P < or = .02 for all); however, in a multivariable model each of these associations was attenuated. CONCLUSION Most patients understand graphical multidimensional PROs, although a smaller majority were able to interpret more complex, or simultaneous, presentations. Additional work is needed to define methods for communicating clinical and PRO data from trials to allow patients to make informed treatment choices. PMID:20065187

  19. Information and communication technology (ICT) in oncology. Patients' and relatives' experiences and suggestions.

    PubMed

    Norum, Jan; Grev, Anne; Moen, Mari-Ann; Balteskard, Lise; Holthe, Kari

    2003-05-01

    Cancer patients and relatives worldwide are turning more and more to the internet to obtain health information. The goal of this survey was to clarify their experiences and suggestions on the implementation of information and communication technology (ICT) in oncology. A total of 127 patients and 60 relatives visiting the outpatient clinic at the Department of Oncology, University of North Norway (UNN), the regional office of the Norwegian Cancer Union (NCU) and the Montebello Centre were included in a questionnaire-based study. Participants were recruited during the period September 2001 to February 2002. There were 92 women and 95 men. We revealed that hospital doctors, followed by nurses and friends, were the most important informants. Two-thirds of patients and relatives had access to the internet, but fewer than one-third had searched the internet for medical information and only one-fifth had discussed information accessed with their doctor. Only one-tenth had visited a hospital website. Internet access was correlated with young age. Almost two-thirds suggested that e-mail and/or WAP (wireless application protocol) communication should be included in hospital-patient communication. Concerning hospital websites, waiting time, treatment offer and addresses were considered the top three topics of interest. In conclusion, the majority of cancer patients and relatives have access to the internet. They recommend ICT employed in patient-hospital communication and suggest waiting time, treatment offers and addresses the three most important topics on hospital websites.

  20. Upward Communication About Cancer Screening—Adolescent Daughter to Mother

    PubMed Central

    MOSAVEL, MAGHBOEBA; PORTS, KATIE A.

    2015-01-01

    Substantial breast and cervical cancer disparities exist in the United States, particularly among African American women with low social economic status. There is considerable potential for discussions about cancer prevention between mothers and daughters. However, upward communication, from child to parent, remains a relatively novel research area, and it remains unclear how receptive mothers would be to messages from their daughter about cancer, a topic that may be considered culturally inappropriate for daughters to initiate. In this study, we simulated cancer message delivery to daughters and then conducted direct observation of daughters as they recalled and shared the message with their mother or female elder. We found that daughters were able to successfully recall and deliver a cancer appeal to their mother and mothers were generally receptive to this message. Not only did mothers listen to their daughters’ appeals, but also daughters’ knowledge of cancer was considerably improved by the opportunity to educate her female elder. Moreover, daughters’ nonverbal communication suggested a surprisingly relaxed demeanor. The potential of young people to impact the screening behavior of their female elders is very promising in terms of reducing cancer disparities. PMID:25848895

  1. Communicating to Farmers about Skin Cancer: The Behavior Adaptation Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrott, Roxanne; Monahan, Jennifer; Ainsworth, Stuart; Steiner, Carol

    1998-01-01

    States health campaign messages designed to encourage behavior adaptation have greater likelihood of success than campaigns promoting avoidance of at-risk behaviors that cannot be avoided. Tests a model of health risk behavior using four different behaviors in a communication campaign aimed at reducing farmers' risk for skin cancer--questions…

  2. Patient advocacy in the USA: key communication role functions.

    PubMed

    Martin, Donald R; Tipton, Bryan K

    2007-09-01

    Researchers have long documented the importance of patient advocacy programs as a means of providing customer service in health-care organizations. Yet, while effective communication is often acknowledged as key to effective patient advocacy, knowledge of the specific communication role functions enacted by patient advocates remains limited, as does our understanding of the function of patient advocacy at the organizational level. This qualitative investigation not only provides a typology of communication roles enacted by patient advocates while solving problems on behalf of patients and their family members, but also integrates scholarly research on "boundary-spanning" as a means of theoretically contextualizing the advocacy role at the organizational level. PMID:17688476

  3. Access to Cancer Services for Rural Colorectal Cancer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Laura-Mae; Cai, Yong; Larson, Eric H.; Dobie, Sharon A.; Wright, George E.; Goodman, David C.; Matthews, Barbara; Hart, L. Gary

    2008-01-01

    Context: Cancer care requires specialty surgical and medical resources that are less likely to be found in rural areas. Purpose: To examine the travel patterns and distances of rural and urban colorectal cancer (CRC) patients to 3 types of specialty cancer care services--surgery, medical oncology consultation, and radiation oncology consultation.…

  4. Development and Testing of Emergency Department Patient Transfer Communication Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klingner, Jill; Moscovice, Ira

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Communication problems are a major contributing factor to adverse events in hospitals. The contextual environment in small rural hospitals increases the importance of emergency department (ED) patient transfer communication quality. This study addresses the communication problems through the development and testing of ED quality…

  5. Delirium in patients with advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Lawlor, Peter G; Bruera, Eduardo D

    2002-06-01

    Managing delirium is of major importance in end-of-life care and frequently gives rise to controversies and to clinical and ethical dilemmas. These problems arise from a number of causes, including the sometimes-poor recognition or misdiagnosis of delirium despite its frequent occurrence. Delirium generates major symptomatic of distress for the patient, consequent stress for the patient's family, the potential to misinterpret delirium symptomatology, and behavioral management challenges for health care professionals. Paradoxically, delirium is potentially reversible in some episodes, but in many patients delirium presents a nonreversible terminal episode. Greater educational efforts are required to improve the recognition of delirium and lead to a better understanding of its impact in end-of-life care. Future research might focus on phenomenology, the development of low-burden instruments for assessment, communication strategies, and the family education regarding the manifestations of delirium. Further research is needed among patients with advanced cancer to establish a predictive model for reversibility that recognizes both baseline vulnerability factors and superimposed precipitating factors. Evidence-based guidelines should be developed to assist physicians in more appropriate use of sedation in the symptomatic management of delirium.

  6. Ethereal embodiment of cancer patients.

    PubMed

    van der Riet, P

    1999-10-01

    Ethereal embodiment is the attending and focusing on the body through discourses such as meditation, visualisation and massage, and the experiencing a new sense of the embodied being as balanced, connected, centred and of being made whole. This paper continues a previous article titled 'Massaged embodiment of cancer patients'. Data from my doctoral studies are analysed utilising crucial concepts of poststructuralism such as subjectivity, discourse, power and history to examine ethereal embodiment. This paper will address the advantages of visualisation and discusses the link between spirituality, embodiment, and memory.

  7. Second primary cancers in patients with urothelial cancers

    PubMed Central

    Altok, Muammer; Akdeniz, Fırat; Yıldız, Güner; Divrik, Rauf Taner

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the second primary cancers (SPCs) in patients with urothelial cancer (UC). Materials and Methods The records of 2,339 patients whose UC was diagnosed between January 1974 and December 2012 were reviewed. All data about characteristics of patients, of UC and, of SPC was, recorded digitally. We investigated the prevalence and the type of second or higher order cancers, and the factors associated with SPC. Results Total 260 patients (11.1%) had SPC, 14 had a third primary cancer and one had a fourth primary cancer. The most common SPC with UC was lung cancer (29.6%). Of all 260 with SPC, 64 (24.6%) had synchronous (within the 6 months) SPC, 120 (46.2%) had subsequent SPC and, 76 (29.2%) had antecedent SPC. The mean duration of SPC was 56 months in patients with subsequent SPC and 75.8 months in patients with antecedent SPC. The mean age at the time of diagnosis of UC was higher in patients with SPC. The ratio of male gender, body mass index, blood type, status of smoking and, occupational risk was similar in both groups. Total amount of smoking and the mean follow-up were higher in patients with SPC. Conclusions The majority of the patients with UC have long life expectancy. In patients with UC, the risk of having another cancer is quite higher than normal population. The physicians managing patients with UC should look for SPC. PMID:27617314

  8. Second primary cancers in patients with urothelial cancers

    PubMed Central

    Altok, Muammer; Akdeniz, Fırat; Yıldız, Güner; Divrik, Rauf Taner

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the second primary cancers (SPCs) in patients with urothelial cancer (UC). Materials and Methods The records of 2,339 patients whose UC was diagnosed between January 1974 and December 2012 were reviewed. All data about characteristics of patients, of UC and, of SPC was, recorded digitally. We investigated the prevalence and the type of second or higher order cancers, and the factors associated with SPC. Results Total 260 patients (11.1%) had SPC, 14 had a third primary cancer and one had a fourth primary cancer. The most common SPC with UC was lung cancer (29.6%). Of all 260 with SPC, 64 (24.6%) had synchronous (within the 6 months) SPC, 120 (46.2%) had subsequent SPC and, 76 (29.2%) had antecedent SPC. The mean duration of SPC was 56 months in patients with subsequent SPC and 75.8 months in patients with antecedent SPC. The mean age at the time of diagnosis of UC was higher in patients with SPC. The ratio of male gender, body mass index, blood type, status of smoking and, occupational risk was similar in both groups. Total amount of smoking and the mean follow-up were higher in patients with SPC. Conclusions The majority of the patients with UC have long life expectancy. In patients with UC, the risk of having another cancer is quite higher than normal population. The physicians managing patients with UC should look for SPC.

  9. Electronic communication channel within the patient data management system improves internal communication in the ICU.

    PubMed

    Väisänen, Paula; Holopainen, Jaana

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to improve the internal communication within the intensive care unit of the Kuopio University Hospital. We developed an intranet based internal communication channel within the patient data management system and studied the effectiveness of this system in improving communication in the ICU. The hypothesis was that the communication difficulties caused by the structure of the unit, large personnel and work schedule (three separate shifts) could be reduced by supplementing oral communication by this intranet based system. The results clearly indicate that this type of system can significantly improve communication within our unit. PMID:17102442

  10. Quality of Doctor-Patient Communication through the Eyes of the Patient: Variation According to the Patient's Educational Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aelbrecht, Karolien; Rimondini, Michela; Bensing, Jozien; Moretti, Francesca; Willems, Sara; Mazzi, Mariangela; Fletcher, Ian; Deveugele, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    Good doctor-patient communication may lead to better compliance, higher patient satisfaction, and finally, better health. Although the social variance in how physicians and patients communicate is clearly demonstrated, little is known about what patients with different educational attainments actually prefer in doctor-patient communication. In…

  11. Improving the care of cancer patients: holistic needs assessment.

    PubMed

    Young, Jenny; Cund, Audrey; Renshaw, Marian; Quigley, Angela; Snowden, Austyn

    This discussion paper presents a review of holistic needs assessments (HNAs) in the care of patients with cancer. HNAs entail a structured review of patient needs as articulated by the patient. This discussion then leads to a care plan grounded in issues pertinent to that patient. Despite policy guidance advocating its use, there are barriers to overcome in order to integrate HNAs into routine care. This article discusses what role communication skills and clinician confidence may have on the use of HNAs in practice, and suggests a strategy to support HNAs becoming the norm. PMID:25723367

  12. Improving the care of cancer patients: holistic needs assessment.

    PubMed

    Young, Jenny; Cund, Audrey; Renshaw, Marian; Quigley, Angela; Snowden, Austyn

    This discussion paper presents a review of holistic needs assessments (HNAs) in the care of patients with cancer. HNAs entail a structured review of patient needs as articulated by the patient. This discussion then leads to a care plan grounded in issues pertinent to that patient. Despite policy guidance advocating its use, there are barriers to overcome in order to integrate HNAs into routine care. This article discusses what role communication skills and clinician confidence may have on the use of HNAs in practice, and suggests a strategy to support HNAs becoming the norm.

  13. Familial cancer among consecutive uterine cancer patients in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Uterine cancer (UC) represents 5.1% of all female malignancies in Sweden. Accumulation of UC in families occurs in around 5% of cases. We wanted to identify any familial association between UC and other selected cancers and to study the frequency of Lynch,Cowden and cancer syndromes among consecutive UC patients in Sweden. Methods 481 UC patients were included. Information on the cancer diagnoses of their relatives (first- (FDRs) and second-degree (SDRs) relatives and first cousins) was obtained. The relative frequencies of different cancers among relatives were compared to those in the Swedish general cancer population in 1970 and 2010. Families that fulfilled the criteria for hereditary cancer syndromes were tested for mutations in the causative genes. Families with at least one case of UC in addition to the index patient were compared to families with no additional cases to investigate possible characteristics of putative hereditary cancer syndromes. Results There was an increased prevalence of UC in our study population compared to the Swedish general cancer population in 1970 and 2010 (6% vs. 4% and 3%, respectively). Seven families had Lynch Syndrome according to the Amsterdam II criteria. No families fulfilled the criteria for Cowden syndrome. In total 13% of index patients had at least one relative with UC and these families tended to have more cases of early onset cancer among family members. In addition, 16% of index patients were diagnosed with at least one other cancer. No families fulfilled the criteria for Cowden syndrome. Conclusion We showed a familial clustering of UC among relatives of our index patients. Of the seven families with mutation-verified Lynch Syndrome, only one had been previously diagnosed, highlighting the need to increase gynecologists’ awareness of the importance of taking family history. Our data on multiple cancers and young age of onset in families with uterine cancer is compatible with the existence of additional

  14. Students meeting with caregivers of cancer patient: results of an experience-based learning project.

    PubMed

    Atasoy, Beste M; Sarikaya, Ozlem; Kuscu, M Kemal; Yondem, Merve; Buyukkara, Elif; Eken, E Gokcen; Kahyaoglu, Figen

    2012-12-01

    The communication between medical students and cancer caregivers, and the problems they have experienced as well as the outcomes for their professional development before starting clinical practice was assessed in the context of a student research project. Data were collected by questionnaires or by 20 to 40-min long interviews with cancer caregivers. Their communications with physicians, hearing the bad news, and health service satisfaction were questioned. Therefore, the caregivers trusted the professional approach of their physician. However, they expected more empathic communication in the process of diagnosis and therapy. Development of empathy and trust-based communication between patients and physicians and enhancement of the quality of devoted time to cancer patients and caregivers may have an effect on the course of disease. Interviewer students mentioned that they developed communication skills about difficult clinical tasks and in delivering bad news face to face to cancer caregivers before starting their clinical education. PMID:22733617

  15. Effective communication and teamwork promotes patient safety.

    PubMed

    Gluyas, Heather

    2015-08-01

    Teamwork requires co-operation, co-ordination and communication between members of a team to achieve desired outcomes. In industries with a high degree of risk, such as health care, effective teamwork has been shown to achieve team goals successfully and efficiently, with fewer errors. This article introduces behaviours that support communication, co-operation and co-ordination in teams. The central role of communication in enabling co-operation and co-ordination is explored. A human factors perspective is used to examine tools to improve communication and identify barriers to effective team communication in health care.

  16. Partnering against cancer today: a blueprint for coordinating efforts through communication science.

    PubMed

    Hesse, Bradford W; Cole, Galen E; Powe, Barbara D

    2013-12-01

    One of the hallmarks of the communication revolution over the past decade has been its support for participation, whether that be in the active engagement of patients searching the Web for answers to vital health questions, or in the collective energies of self-organizing communities through social media. At the same time, some of the major obstacles to achieving a full and equitable reach of evidence-based cancer control knowledge have been traced back to discontinuities in communication either within clinical care or the broader public awareness system. Communication scientists from the National Cancer Institute, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the American Cancer Society joined forces in 2010 to investigate ways in which communication science can be used to improve coordination and enhance participation in cancer control for the nation. From 2010 to 2013, the three organizations worked together in 1) convening two meetings designed to assess the status of funded research in communication science, 2) completing a systematic review of literature published over the previous 10 years, and 3) authoring a blueprint for coordinated efforts using the implications of communication science. The blueprint consists of three major goals: first, to identify high-yield targets of opportunity using the health impact pyramid articulated by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director, Thomas Frieden; second, to leverage opportunities within the new communication environment, including the opportunities catalyzed by national efforts to create an infrastructure for evidence implementation through health information technology; and third, to assist in coordinating efforts across collaborative entities through participative media. PMID:24395998

  17. Partnering Against Cancer Today: A Blueprint for Coordinating Efforts Through Communication Science

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of the communication revolution over the past decade has been its support for participation, whether that be in the active engagement of patients searching the Web for answers to vital health questions, or in the collective energies of self-organizing communities through social media. At the same time, some of the major obstacles to achieving a full and equitable reach of evidence-based cancer control knowledge have been traced back to discontinuities in communication either within clinical care or the broader public awareness system. Communication scientists from the National Cancer Institute, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the American Cancer Society joined forces in 2010 to investigate ways in which communication science can be used to improve coordination and enhance participation in cancer control for the nation. From 2010 to 2013, the three organizations worked together in 1) convening two meetings designed to assess the status of funded research in communication science, 2) completing a systematic review of literature published over the previous 10 years, and 3) authoring a blueprint for coordinated efforts using the implications of communication science. The blueprint consists of three major goals: first, to identify high-yield targets of opportunity using the health impact pyramid articulated by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director, Thomas Frieden; second, to leverage opportunities within the new communication environment, including the opportunities catalyzed by national efforts to create an infrastructure for evidence implementation through health information technology; and third, to assist in coordinating efforts across collaborative entities through participative media. PMID:24395998

  18. Effective Nurse Communication With Type 2 Diabetes Patients: A Review.

    PubMed

    Mulder, Bob C; Lokhorst, Anne Marike; Rutten, Guy E H M; van Woerkum, Cees M J

    2015-08-01

    Many type 2 diabetes mellitus patients have difficulties reaching optimal blood glucose control. With patients treated in primary care by nurses, nurse communication plays a pivotal role in supporting patient health. The twofold aim of the present review is to categorize common barriers to nurse-patient communication and to review potentially effective communication methods. Important communication barriers are lack of skills and self-efficacy, possibly because nurses work in a context where they have to perform biomedical examinations and then perform patient-centered counseling from a biopsychosocial approach. Training in patient-centered counseling does not seem helpful in overcoming this paradox. Rather, patient-centeredness should be regarded as a basic condition for counseling, whereby nurses and patients seek to cooperate and share responsibility based on trust. Nurses may be more successful when incorporating behavior change counseling based on psychological principles of self-regulation, for example, goal setting, incremental performance accomplishments, and action planning.

  19. [How to communicate with patients suffering from dementia].

    PubMed

    Füeßl, Hermann Sebastian

    2015-04-01

    The prevalence of patients with cognitive impairment will inevitably increase in general hospitals. Communication with these patients is difficult. However, it can be improved by implementing organisational measures and behaviour changes of the hospital staff. PMID:25945913

  20. [How to communicate with patients suffering from dementia].

    PubMed

    Füeßl, Hermann Sebastian

    2015-04-01

    The prevalence of patients with cognitive impairment will inevitably increase in general hospitals. Communication with these patients is difficult. However, it can be improved by implementing organisational measures and behaviour changes of the hospital staff.

  1. Health literacy, health communication challenges, and cancer screening among rural native Hawaiian and Filipino women.

    PubMed

    Sentell, Tetine; Dela Cruz, May Rose; Heo, Hyun-Hee; Braun, Kathryn L

    2013-06-01

    Native Hawaiians and Filipinos are disproportionately impacted by cancer and are less likely to participate in cancer screening than whites. Limited information exists about health information pathways and health communication challenges as they relate to cancer screening in these groups. Six focus groups (n=77) of Native Hawaiian and Filipino women age 40+years were conducted to investigate these research gaps. Participants noted many health information challenges. Challenges were both practical and interpersonal and included both written and oral health communication. Practical challenges included "big" words, complexity of terms, and lack of plain English. Interpersonal issues included doctors rushing, doctors not assessing comprehension, and doctors treating respondents as patients not people. Women noted that they would often not ask questions even when they knew they did not understand because they did not want the provider to think negatively of them. Overarching themes to improve cancer communication gaps included: (1) the importance of family and community in health information dissemination, (2) the key role women play in interpreting health information for others, (3) the importance of personal experience and relationships to the salience of health information, and (4) the desire for local cultural relevance in health communication. Findings are discussed in light of the 2010 National Action Plan for Health Literacy. PMID:23536194

  2. Health literacy, health communication challenges, and cancer screening among rural Native Hawaiian and Filipino Women

    PubMed Central

    Sentell, Tetine; Cruz, May Rose Dela; Heo, Hyun Hee; Braun, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    Native Hawaiians and Filipinos are disproportionately impacted by cancer, and are less likely to participate in cancer screening than whites. Limited information exists about health information pathways and health communication challenges as they relate to cancer screening in these groups. Six focus groups (n=77) of Native Hawaiian and Filipino women age 40+ years were conducted to investigate these research gaps. Participants noted many health information challenges. Challenges were both practical and interpersonal and included both written and oral health communication. Practical challenges included “big” words, complexity of terms, and lack of plain English. Interpersonal issues included doctors rushing, doctors not assessing comprehension, and doctors treating respondents as patients not people. Women noted that they would often not ask questions even when they knew they did not understand because they did not want the provider to think negatively of them. Overarching themes to improve cancer communication gaps included: (1) the importance of family and community in health information dissemination; (2) the key role women play in interpreting health information for others; (3) the importance of personal experience and relationships to the salience of health information; and (4) the desire for local cultural relevance in health communication. Findings are discussed in light of the 2010 National Action Plan for Health Literacy. PMID:23536194

  3. Using communication to manage uncertainty about cervical cancer screening guideline adherence among Appalachian women

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Elisia L.; Gordon, Allison Scott; Record, Rachael; Shaunfield, Sara; Jones, Grace M.; Collins, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Changes to the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendations for cervical cancer preventive services have led to patient confusion, especially in medically underserved populations. We investigated how patient uncertainty concerning cervical cancer screening guidelines is appraised and managed through communication with healthcare providers by conducting in-depth, face-to-face interviews with 24 adult women between the ages of 24 and 65 (m = 41, SD = 14) living in Appalachia Kentucky. In general, participants expressed a high degree of uncertainty about the updated cervical cancer screening guidelines and appraised this uncertainty as both a danger and an opportunity. Communication with healthcare providers served both to exacerbate and to mitigate patient uncertainty. The study identifies how health care providers may use the change in USPSTF guidelines as a ‘teachable moment’ to productively counsel patients on the importance of timely screening, the typical progression of certain types of high-risk HPV infection to cervical cancer, and the importance of follow-up care. PMID:26949274

  4. Tailoring communication in consultations with women from high risk breast cancer families

    PubMed Central

    Lobb, E A; Butow, P N; Meiser, B; Barratt, A; Gaff, C; Young, M A; Kirk, J; Suthers, G K; Tucker, K

    2002-01-01

    This multicentre study examined the influence of patient demographic, disease status and psychological variables on clinical geneticists/genetic counsellors (consultants) behaviours in initial consultations with women from high-risk breast cancer families. One hundred and fifty-eight women completed a pre-clinic self-report questionnaire. The consultations were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim and coded. Consultants did not vary their behaviour according to women's expectations. However, significantly more aspects of genetic testing were discussed with women who were affected with breast cancer (P<0.001), screening and management with unaffected women (P=0.01) and breast cancer prevention with younger women (P=0.01). Prophylactic mastectomy was discussed more frequently with women with medical and allied health training (P=0.02), and prophylactic oophorectomy with women affected with breast cancer (P=0.03), those in non-professional occupations (P=0.04) and with a family history of breast and ovarian cancer (P<0.001). Consultants used significantly more behaviours to facilitate understanding with women who were in non-professional occupations (P=0.04); facilitated active patient involvement more with women affected with breast cancer (P<0.001) and used more supportive and counselling behaviours with affected women (P=0.02). This study showed that patient demographics were more likely to predict consultants' communication behaviours than the woman's psychological status. Methods to facilitate assessment of psychological morbidity are needed to allow more tailored communication. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 87, 502–508. doi:10.1038/sj.bjc.6600484 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:12189544

  5. Doctor-Patient Communication in Southeast Asia: A Different Culture?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claramita, Mora; Nugraheni, Mubarika D. F.; van Dalen, Jan; van der Vleuten, Cees

    2013-01-01

    Studies of doctor-patient communication generally advocate a partnership communication style. However, in Southeast Asian settings, we often see a more one-way style with little input from the patient. We investigated factors underlying the use of a one-way consultation style by doctors in a Southeast Asian setting. We conducted a qualitative…

  6. Development of a Communication Protocol for Telephone Disclosure of Genetic Test Results for Cancer Predisposition

    PubMed Central

    Egleston, Brian L; Fetzer, Dominique; Forman, Andrea; Bealin, Lisa; Rybak, Christina; Peterson, Candace; Corbman, Melanie; Albarracin, Julio; Stevens, Evelyn; Daly, Mary B; Bradbury, Angela R

    2014-01-01

    Background Dissemination of genetic testing for disease susceptibility, one application of “personalized medicine”, holds the potential to empower patients and providers through informed risk reduction and prevention recommendations. Genetic testing has become a standard practice in cancer prevention for high-risk populations. Heightened consumer awareness of “cancer genes” and genes for other diseases (eg, cardiovascular and Alzheimer’s disease), as well as the burgeoning availability of increasingly complex genomic tests (ie, multi-gene, whole-exome and -genome sequencing), has escalated interest in and demand for genetic risk assessment and the specialists who provide it. Increasing demand is expected to surpass access to genetic specialists. Thus, there is urgent need to develop effective and efficient models of delivery of genetic information that comparably balance the risks and benefits to the current standard of in-person communication. Objective The aim of this pilot study was to develop and evaluate a theoretically grounded and rigorously developed protocol for telephone communication of BRCA1/2 (breast cancer) test results that might be generalizable to genetic testing for other hereditary cancer and noncancer syndromes. Methods Stakeholder data, health communication literature, and our theoretical model grounded in Self-Regulation Theory of Health Behavior were used to develop a telephone communication protocol for the communication of BRCA1/2 genetic test results. Framework analysis of selected audiotapes of disclosure sessions and stakeholders’ feedback were utilized to evaluate the efficacy and inform refinements to this protocol. Results Stakeholder feedback (n=86) and audiotapes (38%, 33/86) of telephone disclosures revealed perceived disadvantages and challenges including environmental factors (eg, non-private environment), patient-related factors (eg, low health literacy), testing-related factors (eg, additional testing needed), and

  7. Communication problems for patients hospitalized with chest pain.

    PubMed

    Simon, S R; Lee, T H; Goldman, L; McDonough, A L; Pearson, S D

    1998-12-01

    In many settings, primary care physicians have begun to delegate inpatient care to hospitalists, but the impact of this change on patients' hospital experience is unknown. To determine the effect on physician-patient communication of having the regular outpatient physician (continuity physician) continue involvement in hospital care, we surveyed 1,059 consecutive patients hospitalized with chest pain. Patients whose continuity physicians remained involved in their hospital care were less likely to report communication problems regarding tests (20% vs 31%, p =.03), activity after discharge (42% vs 51%, p =.02), and health habits (31% vs 38%, p =. 07). In a setting without a designated hospitalist system, communication problems were less frequent among patients whose continuity physicians were involved in their hospital care. New models of inpatient care delivery can maintain patient satisfaction but to do so must focus attention on improving physician-patient communication.

  8. CANCER IN OTHER WORDS? THE ROLE OF METAPHOR IN EMOTION DISCLOSURE IN CANCER PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Lanceley, Anne; Clark, Jill Macleod

    2013-01-01

    Despite evidence that nurses may play a crucial part in the wellbeing and recovery of cancer patients by facilitating their expression of feelings, research is lacking into the emotional content of nurse–patient talk and patients' use of language in emotion disclosure. In this study, 23 participating nurses in a variety of cancer care settings were asked to tape-record their conversations with patients during daily care. A data set of 60 nurse–patient conversations was collected. Individual expression of emotion by patients was identified through interpretive literary analysis within a framework of psychodynamic theory. Overall the picture of emotion disclosure was intense. In particular, patients' use of metaphor and figurative language to express their distress was powerful and pervasive. Participating nurses demonstrated responsive skills but their responses to figurative expression were often problematic. The study provides evidence of unconscious processes in nurses' work and advocates career-long psychoanalytically informed supervision for nurses to better support them in challenging dialogue with cancer patients. Research is needed to evaluate the impact of supervision on communications with cancer patients to ensure patients have access to appropriate emotional supportive and care. PMID:24748706

  9. Thromboprophylaxis in non-surgical cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Alexander T; Gurwith, Meredith M P; Dobromirski, Mark

    2012-04-01

    Acutely ill medical patients with cancer and cancer patients requiring non-surgical therapy are considered as non-surgical cancer patients and are at moderate to high risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE): approximately 10-30% of these patients may develop asymptomatic or symptomatic deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) or pulmonary embolism (PE), and the latter is a leading contributor to deaths in hospital. Other medical conditions associated with a high risk of VTE include cardiac disease, respiratory disease, inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatological and infectious diseases. Pre-disposing risk factors in non-surgical cancer patients include a history of VTE, immobilisation, history of metastatic malignancy, complicating infections, increasing age, obesity hormonal or antiangiogenic therapies, thalidomide and lenalidomide therapy. Heparins, both unfractionated (UFH) and low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) and fondaparinux have been shown to be effective agents in prevention of VTE in the medical setting with patients having a history of cancer. UFH and LMWH along with semuloparin also have a role in outpatients with cancer receiving chemotherapy. However, it has not yet been possible to demonstrate a significant effect on mortality rates in this population. UFH has a higher rate of bleeding complications than LMWH. Thromboprophylaxis has been shown to be effective in medical patients with cancer and may have an effect on cancer outcomes. Thromboprophylaxis in patients receiving chemotherapy remains controversial and requires further investigation. There is no evidence for the use of aspirin, warfarin or mechanical methods. We recommend either LMWH, or fondaparinux for the prevention of VTE in cancer patients with acute medical illnesses and UFH for those with significant severe renal impairment. For ambulatory cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy we recommend LMWH or semuloparin. These are safe and effective agents in the thromboprophylaxis of non-surgical cancer

  10. The evolving concept of "patient-centeredness" in patient-physician communication research.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Hirono; Hashimoto, Hideki; Kiuchi, Takahiro

    2013-11-01

    Over the past few decades, the concept of "patient-centeredness" has been intensively studied in health communication research on patient-physician interaction. Despite its popularity, this concept has often been criticized for lacking a unified definition and operationalized measurement. This article reviews how health communication research on patient-physician interaction has conceptualized and operationalized patient-centered communication based on four major theoretical perspectives in sociology (i.e., functionalism, conflict theory, utilitarianism, and social constructionism), and discusses the agenda for future research in this field. Each theory addresses different aspects of the patient-physician relationship and communication from different theoretical viewpoints. Patient-centeredness is a multifaceted construct with no single theory that can sufficiently define the whole concept. Different theoretical perspectives of patient-centered communication can be selectively adopted according to the context and nature of problems in the patient-physician relationship that a particular study aims to explore. The present study may provide a useful framework: it offers an overview of the differing models of patient-centered communication and the expected roles and goals in each model; it does so toward identifying a communication model that fits the patient and the context and toward theoretically reconstructing existing measures of patient-centered communication. Furthermore, although patient-centered communication has been defined mainly from the viewpoint of physician's behaviors aimed at achieving patient-centered care, patient competence is also required for patient-centered communication. This needs to be examined in current medical practice.

  11. The social gradient in doctor-patient communication

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Objective In recent years, the importance of social differences in the physician-patient relationship has frequently been the subject of research. A 2002 review synthesised the evidence on this topic. Considering the increasing importance of social inequalities in health care, an actualization of this review seemed appropriate. Methods A systematic search of literature published between 1965 and 2011 on the social gradient in doctor-patient communication. In this review social class was determined by patient's income, education or occupation. Results Twenty original research papers and meta-analyses were included. Social differences in doctor-patient communication were described according to the following classification: verbal behaviour including instrumental and affective behaviour, non-verbal behaviour and patient-centred behaviour. Conclusion This review indicates that the literature on the social gradient in doctor-patient communication that was published in the last decade, addresses new issues and themes. Firstly, most of the found studies emphasize the importance of the reciprocity of communication. Secondly, there seems to be a growing interest in patient's perception of doctor-patient communication. Practice implications By increasing the doctors' awareness of the communicative differences and by empowering patients to express concerns and preferences, a more effective communication could be established. PMID:22409902

  12. The Communications Revolution and Health Inequalities in the 21st Century: Implications for Cancer Control

    PubMed Central

    Viswanath, K.; Nagler, Rebekah; Bigman-Galimore, Cabral; McCauley, Michael; Jung, Minsoo; Ramanadhan, Shoba

    2012-01-01

    The radical and transformative developments in information and communication technologies (ICTs) offer unprecedented opportunities to promote cancer control and enhance population and individual health. However, the current context in which these technologies are being deployed—where cancer incidence and mortality and communication are characterized by inequalities among different racial/ethnic and socioeconomic status groups—raises important questions for cancer communication research, policy, and practice. Drawing on illustrative data, this essay characterizes the communications revolution and elucidates on its implications for cancer control, with a particular focus on communication inequalities and cancer disparities. PMID:23045545

  13. The communications revolution and health inequalities in the 21st century: implications for cancer control.

    PubMed

    Viswanath, K; Nagler, Rebekah H; Bigman-Galimore, Cabral A; McCauley, Michael P; Jung, Minsoo; Ramanadhan, Shoba

    2012-10-01

    The radical and transformative developments in information and communication technologies (ICT) offer unprecedented opportunities to promote cancer control and enhance population and individual health. However, the current context in which these technologies are being deployed--where cancer incidence and mortality and communication are characterized by inequalities among different racial/ethnic and socioeconomic status groups--raises important questions for cancer communication research, policy, and practice. Drawing on illustrative data, this essay characterizes the communications revolution and elucidates its implications for cancer control, with a particular focus on communication inequalities and cancer disparities.

  14. A metasynthesis of patient-provider communication in hospital for patients with severe communication disabilities: informing new translational research.

    PubMed

    Hemsley, Bronwyn; Balandin, Susan

    2014-12-01

    Poor patient-provider communication in hospital continues to be cited as a possible causal factor in preventable adverse events for patients with severe communication disabilities. Yet to date there are no reports of empirical interventions that investigate or demonstrate an improvement in communication in hospital for these patients. The aim of this review was to synthesize the findings of research into communication in hospital for people with severe communication disabilities arising from lifelong and acquired stable conditions including cerebral palsy, autism, intellectual disability, aphasia following stroke, but excluding progressive conditions and those solely related to sensory impairments of hearing or vision. Results revealed six core strategies suggested to improve communication in hospital: (a) develop services, systems, and policies that support improved communication, (b) devote enough time to communication, (c) ensure adequate access to communication tools (nurse call systems and communication aids), (d) access personally held written health information, (e) collaborate effectively with carers, spouses, and parents, and (f) increase the communicative competence of hospital staff. Currently there are no reports that trial or validate any of these strategies specifically in hospital settings. Observational and evaluative research is needed to investigate the ecological validity of strategies proposed to improve communication.

  15. Nanomechanical analysis of cells from cancer patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Sarah E.; Jin, Yu-Sheng; Rao, Jianyu; Gimzewski, James K.

    2007-12-01

    Change in cell stiffness is a new characteristic of cancer cells that affects the way they spread. Despite several studies on architectural changes in cultured cell lines, no ex vivo mechanical analyses of cancer cells obtained from patients have been reported. Using atomic force microscopy, we report the stiffness of live metastatic cancer cells taken from the body (pleural) fluids of patients with suspected lung, breast and pancreas cancer. Within the same sample, we find that the cell stiffness of metastatic cancer cells is more than 70% softer, with a standard deviation over five times narrower, than the benign cells that line the body cavity. Different cancer types were found to display a common stiffness. Our work shows that mechanical analysis can distinguish cancerous cells from normal ones even when they show similar shapes. These results show that nanomechanical analysis correlates well with immunohistochemical testing currently used for detecting cancer.

  16. Communication between the obese patient and bariatric surgeon.

    PubMed

    Ruiz de Angulo, David; Munitiz, Vicente; Ortiz, M Ángeles; Martínez de Haro, Luisa F; Frutos, M Dolores; Hernández, Antonio; Parrilla, Pascual

    2015-10-01

    Communication between the bariatric surgeon and the obese patient is very important as it influences the expectations of patients with regard to surgery, aim of the surgery and the understanding of the mechanisms of failure of surgery. Furthermore, the incidence of certain psychopathology in these patients makes it necessary for the surgeon to have the ability to communicate to the patient the need for motivation and the maintenance of healthy life habits. Although the topic is subjective, in this article we review several useful recommendations to optimize communication before and after surgery. Finally, we emphasize the need to create workshops to train the bariatric surgeon in these issues that we consider so important.

  17. A Study of the Frequency and Social Determinants of Exposure to Cancer-Related Direct-to-Consumer Advertising Among Breast, Prostate, and Colorectal Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Tan, Andy S L

    2015-01-01

    Cancer-related direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) is controversial because cancer treatment is complex and entails more risks and costs than typical treatments that are advertised for other conditions. Drawing from the Structural Influence Model of Communication, this study explores communication inequalities in DTCA exposure across social determinants among a population-based sample of 2013 patients diagnosed with breast, prostate, or colorectal cancers. Three survey items assessed patients' frequency of encountering ads concerning treatment alternatives for cancer, dealing with side effects of treatment, and doctors or hospitals offering services for cancer following their diagnosis. The analysis showed that overall exposure to DTCA in this study population was modest (median was once per week). Breast cancer patients reported significantly higher exposure to all three ad categories and overall DTCA exposure than prostate and colorectal cancer patients. Older patients consistently reported lower overall exposure to DTCA across the three cancer types. Other significant correlates included ethnicity (higher exposures among African American prostate cancer patients vs. White; lower exposures in Hispanic colorectal cancer patients vs. White) and cancer stage (higher exposures in Stage IV prostate cancer patients vs. Stages 0-II). Education level did not predict patients' DTCA exposure. The implications of these observed inequalities in DTCA exposure on cancer outcomes are discussed. PMID:25357119

  18. A Study of the Frequency and Social Determinants of Exposure to Cancer-Related Direct-to-Consumer Advertising Among Breast, Prostate, and Colorectal Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Tan, Andy S L

    2015-01-01

    Cancer-related direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) is controversial because cancer treatment is complex and entails more risks and costs than typical treatments that are advertised for other conditions. Drawing from the Structural Influence Model of Communication, this study explores communication inequalities in DTCA exposure across social determinants among a population-based sample of 2013 patients diagnosed with breast, prostate, or colorectal cancers. Three survey items assessed patients' frequency of encountering ads concerning treatment alternatives for cancer, dealing with side effects of treatment, and doctors or hospitals offering services for cancer following their diagnosis. The analysis showed that overall exposure to DTCA in this study population was modest (median was once per week). Breast cancer patients reported significantly higher exposure to all three ad categories and overall DTCA exposure than prostate and colorectal cancer patients. Older patients consistently reported lower overall exposure to DTCA across the three cancer types. Other significant correlates included ethnicity (higher exposures among African American prostate cancer patients vs. White; lower exposures in Hispanic colorectal cancer patients vs. White) and cancer stage (higher exposures in Stage IV prostate cancer patients vs. Stages 0-II). Education level did not predict patients' DTCA exposure. The implications of these observed inequalities in DTCA exposure on cancer outcomes are discussed.

  19. Older patient satisfaction with communication during an initial medical encounter.

    PubMed

    Greene, M G; Adelman, R D; Friedmann, E; Charon, R

    1994-05-01

    There has been extensive research on the factors associated with patient satisfaction with communication during medical encounters, however, little attention has been paid to satisfaction among subgroups of patients, including the elderly. It is inappropriate to assume that all patients have the same physician-patient relationship needs, and thus, they will all be satisfied with the same communication approaches during medical visits. In this study, we examine the interactional correlates of older patient satisfaction with an initial visit with a general internist. A multidisciplinary team composed of social scientists and physicians used the Multi-dimensional Interaction Analysis system to code audiotapes. Patients and physicians completed post-visit satisfaction questionnaires. Older patient satisfaction was positively correlated with the following variables: physician questioning and supportiveness on patient-raised topics; patient information-giving on patient-raised topics; the length of the visit; the physician's use of questions worded in the negative; shared laughter between the physician and the patient; and physician satisfaction. These findings suggest that older patients prefer encounters in which: (1) there is physician supportiveness and shared laughter; (2) they are questioned about and given an opportunity to provide information on their own agenda items; and (3) physicians provide some structure for the first meeting through their use of questions worded in the negative. The authors caution that although this sample of older patients appears to be satisfied with a communication style usually considered characteristic of the traditional model of the physician-patient relationship (i.e. a warm interpersonal style and physician-generated structure for the visit), older patients in other settings and future cohorts of elderly patients may prefer other communication approaches. It is also suggested that aspects of communication which provide

  20. Patient-Physician Communication About Complementary and Alternative Medicine in a Radiation Oncology Setting

    SciTech Connect

    Ge Jin; Fishman, Jessica; Vapiwala, Neha; Li, Susan Q.; Desai, Krupali; Xie, Sharon X.; Mao, Jun J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Despite the extensive use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among cancer patients, patient-physician communication regarding CAM therapies remains limited. This study quantified the extent of patient-physician communication about CAM and identified factors associated with its discussion in radiation therapy (RT) settings. Methods and Materials: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 305 RT patients at an urban academic cancer center. Patients with different cancer types were recruited in their last week of RT. Participants self-reported their demographic characteristics, health status, CAM use, patient-physician communication regarding CAM, and rationale for/against discussing CAM therapies with physicians. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify relationships between demographic/clinical variables and patients' discussion of CAM with radiation oncologists. Results: Among the 305 participants, 133 (43.6%) reported using CAM, and only 37 (12.1%) reported discussing CAM therapies with their radiation oncologists. In multivariate analyses, female patients (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.45, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.21-0.98) and patients with full-time employment (AOR 0.32, 95% CI 0.12-0.81) were less likely to discuss CAM with their radiation oncologists. CAM users (AOR 4.28, 95% CI 1.93-9.53) were more likely to discuss CAM with their radiation oncologists than were non-CAM users. Conclusions: Despite the common use of CAM among oncology patients, discussions regarding these treatments occur rarely in the RT setting, particularly among female and full-time employed patients. Clinicians and patients should incorporate discussions of CAM to guide its appropriate use and to maximize possible benefit while minimizing potential harm.

  1. A Metasynthesis of Patient-Provider Communication in Hospital for Patients with Severe Communication Disabilities: Informing New Translational Research

    PubMed Central

    Balandin, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Poor patient–provider communication in hospital continues to be cited as a possible causal factor in preventable adverse events for patients with severe communication disabilities. Yet to date there are no reports of empirical interventions that investigate or demonstrate an improvement in communication in hospital for these patients. The aim of this review was to synthesize the findings of research into communication in hospital for people with severe communication disabilities arising from lifelong and acquired stable conditions including cerebral palsy, autism, intellectual disability, aphasia following stroke, but excluding progressive conditions and those solely related to sensory impairments of hearing or vision. Results revealed six core strategies suggested to improve communication in hospital: (a) develop services, systems, and policies that support improved communication, (b) devote enough time to communication, (c) ensure adequate access to communication tools (nurse call systems and communication aids), (d) access personally held written health information, (e) collaborate effectively with carers, spouses, and parents, and (f) increase the communicative competence of hospital staff. Currently there are no reports that trial or validate any of these strategies specifically in hospital settings. Observational and evaluative research is needed to investigate the ecological validity of strategies proposed to improve communication. PMID:25229213

  2. Communicating about cancer through Facebook: a qualitative analysis of a breast cancer awareness page.

    PubMed

    Abramson, Karley; Keefe, Brian; Chou, Wen-Ying Sylvia

    2015-01-01

    Social media channels are increasingly being used for health communication and promotion. Social networking sites such as Facebook have become popular platforms for organizations to communicate health messages and encourage user participation around health topics. While the evaluation of social media's effectiveness in health promotion is beginning to emerge in the literature, few studies have examined actual interactions and user behaviors on Facebook Pages hosted by health organizations. The authors present a qualitative case study of a popular Facebook Page from a nonprofit organization devoted to raising awareness about breast cancer. With the goal of identifying the functions and uses of the Page, our study analyzes the content of Wall posts during Breast Cancer Awareness Month, October 2010. Common themes and characteristics are identified, including open mic communication, scarcity of health information, the commodification of breast cancer, unpredictable locations of conversation, and the use of gendered images and language. The findings have potential implications for health promotion efforts using social media platforms.

  3. Creating a continuum of care: integrating obstetricians and gynecologists in the care of young cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Betty Y.; Skory, Robin M.; Woodruff, Teresa K.

    2011-01-01

    Cancer therapy can be lifesaving but significantly diminish female reproductive potential. This review provides an overview of the deleterious effects of cancer treatments on reproductive function, the fertility preservation options currently available for young women and the outcomes of pregnancy after cancer treatment. In addition, special considerations for women who are diagnosed with cancer during pregnancy are discussed. To optimize the continuum of care for the patient, new corridors of communication between obstetricians, gynecologists and oncology specialists must be developed to ensure the best outcomes for the patient, both in terms of cancer treatment and fertility preservation. PMID:22031251

  4. DOCTOR-PATIENT COMMUNICATION: A SKILL NEEDED IN SAUDI ARABIA

    PubMed Central

    Elzubier, Ahmed G.

    2002-01-01

    Doctor-patient communication is a skill essential for the satisfaction of the patients’ needs and expectations. It involves an art that every practicing physician should have. The situations in health care delivery that demands good doctor-patient communication are many. Diabetes care, the management of hypertension, explaining serious disease diagnoses, prognosis, and investigative procedures are some of the common situations where good doctor-patient communication is very essential. Doctor-patient communication assumes a special status in Saudi Arabia where as a result of mixed ethnicity of the manpower in the health service and the expatriate community, there is a vast diversity of languages, health traditions and beliefs. The skill of doctor-patient communication can be developed and improved by the application of the principles of the patient-centered approach, the utilization of patient-oriented evidence that matters, and its inclusion in the undergraduate curriculum in the first few years of medical school. There should be continuous medical education programs for practicing doctors on the skills of doctor-patient communication through seminars and workshops. This would be a further step towards the improvement of the consumer's well-being. PMID:23008663

  5. Multi-professional communication during a patient handoff.

    PubMed

    Benham-Hutchins, Marge; Effken, Judith A

    2008-11-06

    Little is known about the communication principles necessary for successful design and implementation of information technology that supports the needs of healthcare providers from multiple professions. New methods are needed to understand the influence of technology on existing workflow and communication patterns in the complex patient care environment. Social Network Analysis is an approach that examines how the interactions between individual providers and environmental constraints, such as health information technology, influence individual communication behavior.

  6. Supportive Communication to Facilitate Chinese Patients' Adaptation to a Permanent Colostomy: A Qualitative Case Study Approach.

    PubMed

    Tao, Hui; Songwathana, Praneed; Isaramalai, Sang-Arun; Wang, Qingxi

    2016-01-01

    This study, which is a part of action research, aims to explore how supportive communication can impact individuals' adaptation to a permanent colostomy in a Chinese cultural context. Two Chinese rectal cancer patients with complexity and difficulty in living with a permanent colostomy were selected using a qualitative case study approach. The researcher (H.T.) interacted with the participants along their journey from the preoperative period until the third postoperative month after discharge via face-to-face or telephone interviews. Content analysis was applied. Supportive communication was characterized by "communication as a supportive tool," which consisted of 4 elements: respect, description, empathy, and empowerment. The nursing strategies included (1) developing a collaborative relationship with patients and families; (2) understanding patients' concerns and problems; (3) discussing potential solutions; (4) encouraging patients to take action; (5) bringing out emotional expression; (6) normalizing negative emotions; and (7) protecting hope. The findings of this study informed that supportive communication is a valuable tool for nurses to provide informational and emotional support to Chinese patients in order to enhance their adaptation to living with a permanent colostomy. Developing an operational manual to enhance supportive communication for patients with colostomy is suggested. PMID:27684635

  7. Cancer surveillance of patients from familial pancreatic cancer kindreds.

    PubMed

    Brentnall, T A

    2000-05-01

    The family history can be used to determine which family members warrant surveillance and when to start it. Surveillance should be started at least 1 decade before the earliest age of pancreatic cancer in the family. EUS is the basic, least-invasive surveillance tool; however, findings are similar to those seen in chronic pancreatitis. All patients who have a positive EUS or who have symptoms warrant ERCP. Changes on ERCP of ductal stricturing and clubbed or saccular side branches are suggestive of patients who may need pancreatectomy in the setting of hereditary pancreatic cancer. The goal for surveillance of familial pancreatic cancer patients is to diagnose them before the development of cancer, when they have dysplasia or carcinoma in situ, and to perform a complete pancreatectomy. Timing is crucial for determining when a patient warrants surgery; if performed too early, the patient is put at risk for the morbidity and mortality of a total pancreatectomy, which is not inconsequential. If the patient survives the operation, he or she is often left a brittle diabetic. The alternative of diagnosing too late is more worrisome because the patient dies of pancreatic cancer. An essential ingredient to a good patient outcome is a team approach to these patients, using gastroenterologists, surgeons, and pathologists who have expertise and interest in pancreatic disease.

  8. Psychiatric aspects of pain in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Ozkan, Sedat

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this review is to discuss the psychiatric aspects of pain in cancer patients from a biopsychosocial approach. Pain in cancer patients is considered as a complex reaction causing severe suffering and involves many psychological aspects. It has many dimensions such as personality, affect, cognition and social relations. The pain experience may also be influenced by some psychological factors such as anxiety, depression and the meaning of pain. Therefore, a successful management of cancer pain requires a multidisciplinary approach. Since cancer pain is generally treated medically, the psychological impact of pain is often underestimated. However, cancer pain is usually related to high levels of psychological distress. Culture, as an important factor affecting cancer pain, will also be discussed during this review. It is crucial to understand cultural diversity in the treatment of cancer patients with pain. Research shows that a minority patients of various ethnicities have less control of their pain because of the miscommunication problem within the medical setting. By paying attention to patients' cultural diversities, problems such as miscommunication causing inadequate control of pain can be eliminated. In order to manage pain in cancer patients, cognitive-behavioral interventions may be integrated with pharmacotherapy. The main goal of these strategies is to provide a sense of control and better coping skills to deal with cancer. Patients' maladaptive thoughts or behaviors may cause physical and emotional stress. Main behavioral strategies include biofeedback, relaxation training, and hypnosis. Cognitive strategies include guided imagery, distraction, thought monitoring and problem solving. By discussing all of these aspects of cancer pain, the multidimensional characteristic of pain and the relation between cancer pain and psychiatric factors will be clarified. PMID:20590361

  9. Public figure announcements about cancer and opportunities for cancer communication: a review and research agenda.

    PubMed

    Noar, Seth M; Willoughby, Jessica Fitts; Myrick, Jessica Gall; Brown, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Announcements by public figures and celebrities about cancer diagnosis or death represent significant events in public life. But what are the substantive effects of such events, if any? The purpose of this article is to systematically review studies that examined the impact of public figure cancer announcements on cancer-oriented outcomes. Using comprehensive search procedures, we identified k = 19 studies that examined 11 distinct public figures. The most commonly studied public figures were Jade Goody, Kylie Minogue, Nancy Reagan, and Steve Jobs, with the most common cancers studied being breast (53%), cervical (21%), and pancreatic (21%) cancer. Most studies assessed multiple outcome variables, including behavioral outcomes (k = 15), media coverage (k = 10), information seeking (k = 8), cancer incidence (k = 3), and interpersonal communication (k = 2). Results fairly consistently indicated that cancer announcements from public figures had meaningful effects on many, if not most, of these outcome variables. While such events essentially act as naturally occurring interventions, the effects tend to be relatively short term. Gaps in this literature include few contemporary studies of high-profile public figures in the United States and a general lack of theory-based research. Directions for future research as well as implications for cancer communication and prevention are discussed.

  10. Public figure announcements about cancer and opportunities for cancer communication: a review and research agenda.

    PubMed

    Noar, Seth M; Willoughby, Jessica Fitts; Myrick, Jessica Gall; Brown, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Announcements by public figures and celebrities about cancer diagnosis or death represent significant events in public life. But what are the substantive effects of such events, if any? The purpose of this article is to systematically review studies that examined the impact of public figure cancer announcements on cancer-oriented outcomes. Using comprehensive search procedures, we identified k = 19 studies that examined 11 distinct public figures. The most commonly studied public figures were Jade Goody, Kylie Minogue, Nancy Reagan, and Steve Jobs, with the most common cancers studied being breast (53%), cervical (21%), and pancreatic (21%) cancer. Most studies assessed multiple outcome variables, including behavioral outcomes (k = 15), media coverage (k = 10), information seeking (k = 8), cancer incidence (k = 3), and interpersonal communication (k = 2). Results fairly consistently indicated that cancer announcements from public figures had meaningful effects on many, if not most, of these outcome variables. While such events essentially act as naturally occurring interventions, the effects tend to be relatively short term. Gaps in this literature include few contemporary studies of high-profile public figures in the United States and a general lack of theory-based research. Directions for future research as well as implications for cancer communication and prevention are discussed. PMID:23845155

  11. Patient Communication: A Multidisciplinary Approach Using Animated Cartoons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leiner, Marie; Handal, Gilbert; Williams, Darryl

    2004-01-01

    Communication is a major problem in the management of patients. Miscommunication occurs frequently in populations with low reading skills, illiteracy does not completely account for the observed low rates of recall of communicated information. Transmission of the message also plays an important role. Successful strategies to improve communication…

  12. Assessment of dental students’ communication skills with patients

    PubMed Central

    MEMARPOUR, MAHTAB; BAZRAFKAN, LEILA; ZAREI, ZAHRA

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Establishment of effective communication between the clinician and patient is essential in order to increase the effectiveness of treatment. These skills have been less investigated among dental students. This study aimed to evaluate communication skills of dental students in Shiraz with patients through direct observation, patients' perspectives and students' self-assessments. Methods This cross-sectional study enrolled the fifth and sixth year dental students and one of each student’s patients who was chosen using simple random sampling method. We used a checklist for data collection. Students’ communication skills were assessed at three steps of the student-patient interview – at the beginning of the interview, during the interview, and at the end of the interview. The checklist was completed by three groups: 1) an observer, 2) the patient and 3) the student, as self-assessment. The validity of the checklist was confirmed by clinical professors and the reliability was determined by Cronbach's alpha test. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and Student’s t test. A repeated measure MANOVA was used to compare the mean communication skills in the researcher, patients, and students at each step of the patient interviews. Results There were 110 students (mean age: 22.3±8.4 years) and 110 patients (mean age: 32±8.8 years) who completed the checklists. Overall, the communication skills of dental students were rated as good according to the patients. However, the observer and student participants rated the skills at the moderate level. We observed significant differences between communication skills in all three groups and in the three steps of the patient interviews (p<0.001). According to patients' beliefs and students' self assessments, there were no differences between male and female students in communication skills in the three steps of the patient interviews (all p>0.05). However from the observer’s viewpoint, female students

  13. Communication and Information Barriers to Health Assistance for Deaf Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pereira, Patricia Cristina Andrade; Fortes, Paulo Antonio de Carvalho

    2010-01-01

    In Brazil, recent regulations require changes in private and public health systems to make special services available to deaf patients. In the present article, the researchers analyze the perceptions of 25 sign language-using patients regarding this assistance. The researchers found communication difficulties between these patients and health…

  14. Practical aspects of telehealth: doctor-patient relationship and communication.

    PubMed

    Sabesan, S; Allen, D; Caldwell, P; Loh, P K; Mozer, R; Komesaroff, P A; Talman, P; Williams, M; Shaheen, N; Grabinski, O

    2014-01-01

    The fourth in a series of articles about the practical aspects of telehealth, this paper provides advice and information for specialists to communicate effectively with patients during a telehealth video consultation. PMID:24450527

  15. Researching the experience of kidney cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Taylor, K

    2002-09-01

    The author's personal experience as a kidney cancer patient, researcher and founder of a kidney cancer support group forms the basis for consideration of the challenges involved in researching patients' experiences. The researcher needs to understand the variability of those experiences in both clinical and psychological-emotional terms, and in relation to the personal, familial and social contexts of the patient. It is also essential to define the purpose of the research and to show how an understanding of personal experiences of cancer can be used to enhance the quality of care for cancer patients. The research encounter with a patient is also in some respects a therapeutic encounter requiring a considerable degree of sensitivity on the part of the researcher. The person-centred approach of Carl Rogers is of value in supporting such an encounter.

  16. Researching the experience of kidney cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Taylor, K

    2002-09-01

    The author's personal experience as a kidney cancer patient, researcher and founder of a kidney cancer support group forms the basis for consideration of the challenges involved in researching patients' experiences. The researcher needs to understand the variability of those experiences in both clinical and psychological-emotional terms, and in relation to the personal, familial and social contexts of the patient. It is also essential to define the purpose of the research and to show how an understanding of personal experiences of cancer can be used to enhance the quality of care for cancer patients. The research encounter with a patient is also in some respects a therapeutic encounter requiring a considerable degree of sensitivity on the part of the researcher. The person-centred approach of Carl Rogers is of value in supporting such an encounter. PMID:12296838

  17. Communication accommodation and managing musculoskeletal disorders: doctors' and patients' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Baker, Susan C; Gallois, Cindy; Driedger, S Michelle; Santesso, Nancy

    2011-06-01

    This study examined the ways in which health care providers (general practitioners and specialists) and patients communicate with each other about managing musculoskeletal (MSK) disorders, a major cause of long-term pain and physical disability. In managing their illness, patients must interact closely with health care providers, who play a large role in transferring knowledge to them. In-depth interviews with patients, general practitioners, and specialist rheumatologists in Australia and Canada were analyzed using Leximancer (a text-mining tool). Results indicated that, in their communication, doctors subtly emphasized accepting and adjusting to the illness ("new normal"), whereas patients emphasized pain relief and getting "back to normal." These results suggest that doctors and patients should accommodate in their communication across subtle and often unexpressed differences in the priorities of provider and patient, or they are likely to be at cross purposes and thus less effective. PMID:21424965

  18. Cancer in Patients With Gabapentin (GPRD)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-02-02

    Pain, Neuropathic; Epilepsy; Renal Pelvis Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Breast Cancer; Nervous System Cancer; Chronic Pancreatitis; Stomach Cancer; Renal Cell Carcinoma; Diabetes; Bladder Cancer; Bone and Joint Cancer; Penis Cancer; Anal Cancer; Cancer; Renal Cancer

  19. [Pharmacotherapeutic Treatment of Elderly Cancer Patients].

    PubMed

    Yokode, Masayuki

    2016-08-01

    Age-specific analyses of mortality rates in Japan show that cancer was the leading cause of death for the age group 40-89 years in the year 2013. Although the crude mortality rate from cancer has recently increased, the age-adjusted cancer mortality rate has shown a decreasing trend. This suggests that the increases in the crude mortality rate may have been caused by the aging of the population. Cancer patients who are old present many comorbidities and newly diagnosed geriatric problems. Several tools provide determinants of survival in cancer patients who are old (including the comprehensive geriatric assessment [CGA]) in order to improve the quality of cancer care in this population. PMID:27539034

  20. Understanding Fertility in Young Female Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Waimey, Kate E.; Smith, Brigid M.; Confino, Rafael; Jeruss, Jacqueline S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Young women diagnosed with cancer today have a greater chance of long-term survival than ever before. Successful survivorship for this group of patients includes maintaining a high quality of life after a cancer diagnosis and treatment; however, lifesaving treatments such as chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery can impact survivors by impairing reproductive and endocrine health. Studies demonstrate that future fertility is a concern for many women diagnosed with cancer, but physician knowledge and attitudinal barriers can still prevent females from receiving care. Today, fertility preservation is an option for girls and women facing a cancer diagnosis, and emerging research is providing clinicians with an increasing number of reproductive and hormonal management tools. Physicians can play an important role in fertility by working closely with oncologists, providing patients with information about fertility preservation options prior to the start of cancer treatment, monitoring reproductive capacity after treatment, and working with cancer survivors to explore potential avenues to parenthood. PMID:26075731

  1. Prioritizing the Preferences of Iranian Cancer Patients Regarding Acquisition of Health Information: Strategy for Patient Education.

    PubMed

    Zadeh, Jamileh Mahdi; Fard, Farahnaz Ghahreman; Madani, Raihaneh; Iravani, Homa; Kahouei, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Recognizing cancer patients' preferences to obtain health information can help improve and reform the methods of communicating and providing proper services and consequently lead to effective patient education. The present cross-sectional study to prioritize the preferences of cancer patients regarding the acquisition of health informationwas conducted on cancer patients referred to hospitals affiliated to Semnan University of Medical Sciences in 2015. An anonymous self-administered questionnaire was developed. In the field of side effects of medications, 50 (46.7%) reported knowing about weight change, in the area of achieving relative health, 62(57.9%) announced awareness about diet, and 45 (42.1%) reported physical complications as a first regarding information needs. In the area of obtaining information, 50 (46.7%) tended to take their information through means outside of the hospital setting. These results can help with design of clinical information systems, as they inform the most relevant and useful coverage designed for cancer patients. Providing useful information through healthcare providers, the media and clinical information systems can act as a major source of social support for cancer patients. PMID:27356722

  2. Persuasive email messages for patient communication.

    PubMed

    Walji, Muhammad; Johnson-Throop, Kathy; Johnson, Todd; Bernstam, Elmer; Zhang, Jiajie

    2005-01-01

    To improve health and reduce costs, we need to encourage patients to make better health care decisions. Since email is widely available, it may be useful for patient-directed interventions. However, we know little about how the contents of an email message can influence a health-related decision. We propose a model to understand how patients may process persuasive email messages.

  3. Cancer Risk in Patients With Empyema

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Chung-Jen; Hu, Yu-Wen; Yeh, Chiu-Mei; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Liu, Chia-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to evaluate cancer risk and possible risk factors in patients diagnosed with empyema. A total of 31,636 patients with newly diagnosed empyema between January 1, 1999 and December 31, 2010 were included in this study. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated to compare the cancer incidence in these empyema patients to that in the general population. Adjusted hazard ratios were also calculated to investigate whether characteristics increased cancer risk. During the 12-year study period, 2,654 cancers occurred in 31,636 patients with empyema, yielding an SIR of 2.67 (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.57–2.78). We excluded cancer that occurred within 1 year to avoid surveillance bias. The cancer risk remained significantly increased (SIR 1.50, 95% CI 1.41–1.58). Specifically, patients with empyema had higher SIR of cancers of the head and neck (1.50, 95% CI 1.41–1.58), esophagus (2.56, 95% CI 1.92–3.33), stomach (1.49, 95% CI 1.16–1.89), liver and biliary tract (2.18, 95% CI 1.93–2.45), and lung and mediastinum (1.62, 95% CI 1.39–1.86). Age ≥ 60, male sex, diabetes mellitus, and liver cirrhosis were independent risk factors for cancer development. Our study demonstrates an increased incidence of cancer development in patients with empyema, and patients’ age ≥ 60, men, and those with diabetes mellitus and liver cirrhosis showed a higher incidence of developing cancer compared to the general population. The association between such kind of infection and secondary malignancy may be elucidated by further study. PMID:26945399

  4. Patients tell the story: interrelationships among patient satisfaction, communications with providers, and emergency department care.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Carol Lynn; Macchiaroli, Julia M; Witter, Jacqueline; DeGoias, Elsa; Morote, Elsa-Sophia

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between four variables and patient satisfaction in an emergency department setting in a small community hospital in Suffolk County New York. Patients were assessed utilizing four variables: communications with doctors, communications with nurses, communications with ancillary staff, and environment of ED care. The study adds to the literature on which factors have the greatest influence on patient satisfaction in an emergency department setting. The purpose of the present study was to explore how ED patient satisfaction was influenced by their communications with physicians, nurses, and ancillary staff. Pearson correlation coefficients resulted in a statistically significant correlation between all variables and patient satisfaction. Path analysis showed the interrelationship between the four variables and patient satisfaction. Regression analysis predicted the extent to which each variable influenced patient satisfaction. The strongest predictor of patient satisfaction was communications with ancillary staff.

  5. Travelling for radiation cancer treatment: patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Fitch, Margaret I; Gray, Ross E; Mcgowan, Tom; Brunskill, Ian; Steggles, Shawn; Sellick, Scott; Bezjak, Andrea; McLeese, Donna

    2005-01-01

    This study was conducted for the purpose of describing cancer patients' satisfaction with their care when they had to travel unexpectedly away from home for treatment. Ontario initiated a rereferral program for cancer patients who needed radiation therapy when the waiting lists in southern Ontario became lengthy. Patients travelled to the United States or northern Ontario for their care. A standardized survey containing 25 items with five-point Likert scale responses was mailed to all patients who participated in the rereferral program, following completion of their treatment. Items covered patient experiences before leaving home, in preparing for travel, and staying at the cancer facilities away from home. A total of 466 (55.8%) patients returned the survey. Overall, patients were satisfied with their care. However, there were a number of areas identified by patients where improvements could be made. These areas included access to support prior to leaving home, access to information about supportive care services while away from home, and sensitivity to personal needs in making arrangements for travel. Provision of information and support are important to cancer patients having to travel for cancer treatment. PMID:15969333

  6. Long-term Toxicity of Cancer Treatment in Older Patients.

    PubMed

    Shahrokni, Armin; Wu, Abraham J; Carter, Jeanne; Lichtman, Stuart M

    2016-02-01

    With earlier cancer diagnosis among older patients with cancer, the possibility of curing cancer increases. However, cancer treatment may have a long-lasting impact on older cancer survivors. It is vital to screen, diagnose, and properly manage the long-term toxicities of cancer treatment in order to maintain the quality of life of older cancer survivors. PMID:26614861

  7. Utilizing Data from Cancer Patient & Survivor Studies

    Cancer.gov

    Utilizing Data from Cancer Patient & Survivor Studies and Understanding the Current State of Knowledge and Developing Future Research Priorities, a 2011 workshop sponsored by the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program.

  8. Teamwork and communication: an effective approach to patient safety.

    PubMed

    Mujumdar, Sandhya; Santos, Diana

    2014-01-01

    Teamwork and communication failures are leading causes of patient safety incidents in health care. Though health care providers must work in teams, they are not well-trained in teamwork and communication skills. Health care faces the problems of differences in communication styles, communication failures and poor teamwork. There is enough evidence in the literature to show that communication failure is detrimental to patient safety. It is estimated that 80% of serious medical errors worldwide take place because of miscommunication between medical providers. NUH recognizes that effective communication and teamwork are essential in the delivery of high quality safe patient care, especially in a complex organization. NUH is a good example, where there is a rich mix of nationalities and races, in staff and in patients, and there is a rapidly expanding care environment. NUH had to overcome these challenges by adopting a multi-pronged approach. The trials and tribulations of NUH in this journey were worthwhile as the patient safety climate survey scores improved over the years.

  9. More Breast Cancer Patients Should Consider Radiation, New Guidelines Say

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161083.html More Breast Cancer Patients Should Consider Radiation, New Guidelines Say Mastectomy ... by three leading cancer organizations suggest that more breast cancer patients should consider radiation therapy after a mastectomy. ...

  10. Ovarian stimulation in patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Elkin; González, Naira; Muñoz, Luis; Aguilar, Jesús; Velasco, Juan A García

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent malignancy among women under 50. Improvements in diagnosis and treatment have yielded an important decrease in mortality in the last 20 years. In many cases, chemotherapy and radiotherapy develop side effects on the reproductive function. Therefore, before the anti-cancer treatment impairs fertility, clinicians should offer some techniques for fertility preservation for women planning motherhood in the future. In order to obtain more available oocytes for IVF, the ovary must be stimulated. New protocols which prevent exposure to increased estrogen during gonadotropin stimulation, measurements to avoid the delay in starting anti-cancer treatment or the outcome of ovarian stimulation have been addressed in this review. There is no evidence of association between ovarian stimulation and breast cancer. It seems that there are more relevant other confluent factors than ovarian stimulation. Factors that can modify the risk of breast cancer include: parity, age at full-term birth, age of menarche, and family history. There is an association between breast cancer and exogenous estrogen. Therefore, specific protocols to stimulate patients with breast cancer include anti-estrogen agents such as letrozole. By using letrozole plus recombinant follicular stimulating hormone, patients develop a multifollicular growth with only a mild increase in estradiol serum levels. Controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) takes around 10 days, and we discuss new strategies to start COS as soon as possible. Protocols starting during the luteal phase or after inducing the menses currently prevent a delay in starting ovarian stimulation. Patients with breast cancer have a poorer response to COS compared with patients without cancer who are stimulated with conventional protocols of gonadotropins. Although many centres offer fertility preservation and many patients undergo ovarian stimulation, there are not enough studies to evaluate the recurrence, breast cancer

  11. Optimizing Communication in Mechanically Ventilated Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pandian, Vinciya; Smith, Christine P.; Cole, Therese Kling; Bhatti, Nasir I.; Mirski, Marek A.; Yarmus, Lonny B.; Feller-Kopman, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To describe the types of talking tracheostomy tubes available, present four case studies of critically ill patients who used a specialized tracheostomy tube to improve speech, discuss their advantages and disadvantages, propose patient selection criteria, and provide practical recommendations for medical care providers. Methods Retrospective chart review of patients who underwent tracheostomy in 2010. Results Of the 220 patients who received a tracheostomy in 2010, 164 (74.55%) received a percutaneous tracheostomy and 56 (25.45%) received an open tracheostomy. Among the percutaneous tracheostomy patients, speech-language pathologists were consulted on 113 patients, 74 of whom were on a ventilator. Four of these 74 patients received a talking tracheostomy tube, and all four were able to speak successfully while on the mechanical ventilator even though they were unable to tolerate cuff deflation. Conclusions Talking tracheostomy tubes allow patients who are unable to tolerate-cuff deflation to achieve phonation. Our experience with talking tracheostomy tubes suggests that clinicians should consider their use for patients who cannot tolerate cuff deflation. PMID:25429193

  12. A Week of Excitement and Hope: Communicating the Story of Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Peter Garrett, acting director of NCI's communications office, discusses the Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer and activities surrounding the broadcast of the documentary film, Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies.

  13. Problems in Communications with Patients in General Surgery Outpatient Practice

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Tonguc Utku; Gumus, Enes; Salman, Bulent

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Communication between the patient and physician is central to medical care. However communication skills in Turkey haven’t been gained so much concern. This situation effect the national quality of health care. Here, we tried to perform some basic communication skills and to find the problems with the possible solution suggestions. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted for a month in general surgery outpatient department located in the slum part of Ankara with low socio-economic population. Basic communication skills were performed. The age, sex, education levels of the patients were obtained. Total symptom expression and interview time were recorded. Previous medical histories were asked. Interruptions including telephone, door knocking were noted. The questions of the patients at the end of the interview classified as hospital setting, nutrition and treatment. Results: Total 410 interviews were analysed. Mean symptom expression and interview times were 22.9 sec and 7.05 min, respectively. Educated patients, males and young patients expressed symptoms longer than the others (p<0.05). There were 174 interruptions in which total interview time signifantly increased than the non interrupted ones (p<0.05). Final questions about hospital setting were signifantly higher in illiterate patients than the educated ones (p<0.05). Awareness of medical history is higher in educated and young patients. Conclusion: Basic communications skills can be performed whether in rural regions. Much more concern should be given to the education of communication skills. The obstacles in communication in medicine are low education levels, and unorganised health system. PMID:26644767

  14. Treating venous thromboembolism in patients with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Piatek, Caroline; O’Connell, Casey L; Liebman, Howard A

    2015-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among patients with cancer. Although much is known about the factors that contribute to VTE risk, pre-emptive therapy in high-risk populations is clearly indicated in only a few clinical situations. Low-molecular-weight heparin is still the recommended class of anticoagulants for cancer-associated VTE. Management of VTE in patients with renal failure, hemorrhagic brain metastases, thrombocytopenia and coagulopathy remains challenging with few safe and effective alternatives. Novel oral agents are currently being investigated and may play a role in the future in the treatment of cancer-associated VTE. PMID:22475288

  15. Health Care Communication with Low Literate Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKeon, Christine A.

    Low literate patients face difficulties when they read health care information. The complex process of reading can be summarized in five steps: input, decoding, encoding, output, and feedback. Each occurs automatically for the fluent reader; the low literate reader might encounter stumbling blocks in one or more of the steps. Once the patient has…

  16. Disparities in physician-patient communication by obesity status.

    PubMed

    Richard, Patrick; Ferguson, Christine; Lara, Anthony S; Leonard, Jennifer; Younis, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to examine variations in patient-physician communication by obesity status. We pooled data from the 2005-2007 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS),_included only individuals who completed the self-administered questionnaire themselves, and restricted the sample to patients who received care from primary care physicians. We included a total of 6,628 unique individuals between the ages of 18 and 65 who had at least one office or hospital outpatient visit during the past 12 months. There are six outcomes of interest in this study. The patient-physician communication composite score is based on five questions that the MEPS adapted from the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems Survey. The other five variables were: respect from providers, providers' listening skills, explanations from providers, time spent with patients, and patient involvement in treatment decisions. The key independent variable was obesity. Bivariate and multivariate models such as ordinary least squares (OLS) and logistic regression were used to examine the relationship between patient-physician communication and obesity status. Multivariate models showed that obese patients had a reduced physician-patient communication composite score of 0.19 (95% CI 0.03-0.34, p=0.02), physicians' show of respect OR 0.77 (95% CI 0.61-0.98, p=0.04), listening ability OR 0.82 (95% CI 0.65-1.02, p=0.07), and spending enough time OR 0.80 (95% CI 0.62-0.99, p=0.04) compared to non-obese patients. We found a negative association between physician-patient communication and patients' obesity status. These findings may inform public health practitioners in the design of effective initiatives that account for the needs and circumstances of obese individuals.

  17. Communication Needs of Critical Care Patients Who Are Voiceless.

    PubMed

    Koszalinski, Rebecca S; Tappen, Ruth M; Hickman, Candice; Melhuish, Tracey

    2016-08-01

    Voice is crucial for communication in all healthcare settings. Evidence-based care highlights the need for clear communication. Clear communication methods must be applied when caring for special populations in order to assess pain effectively. Communication efforts also should be offered to patients who are in end-of-life care and would like to make independent decisions. A computer communication application was offered to patients in intensive care/critical care units in three hospitals in South Florida. Inclusion criteria included the age of 18 years or older, Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale between -1 and +1, ability to read and write English, and willingness to use the computer application. Exclusion criteria included inability to read and write English, agitation as defined by the Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale, and any patient on infection isolation protocol. Four qualitative themes were revealed, which directly relate to two published evidence-based guidelines. These are the End of Life Care and Decision Making Evidence-Based Care Guidelines and the Pain Assessment in Special Populations Guidelines. This knowledge is important for developing effective patient-healthcare provider communication. PMID:27315366

  18. Communication between the obese patient and bariatric surgeon.

    PubMed

    Ruiz de Angulo, David; Munitiz, Vicente; Ortiz, M Ángeles; Martínez de Haro, Luisa F; Frutos, M Dolores; Hernández, Antonio; Parrilla, Pascual

    2015-10-01

    Communication between the bariatric surgeon and the obese patient is very important as it influences the expectations of patients with regard to surgery, aim of the surgery and the understanding of the mechanisms of failure of surgery. Furthermore, the incidence of certain psychopathology in these patients makes it necessary for the surgeon to have the ability to communicate to the patient the need for motivation and the maintenance of healthy life habits. Although the topic is subjective, in this article we review several useful recommendations to optimize communication before and after surgery. Finally, we emphasize the need to create workshops to train the bariatric surgeon in these issues that we consider so important. PMID:25912163

  19. Marital communication in eating disorder patients: a controlled observational study.

    PubMed

    Van den Broucke, S; Vandereycken, W; Vertommen, H

    1995-01-01

    In order to investigate the communication between 21 eating disorder (ED) patients and their husbands, an observational study was carried out using two matched control groups of 21 maritally distressed (MD) and 21 nondistressed (ND) couples. During some discussion tasks the interaction was videotaped and the (verbal and nonverbal) communication skills were rated afterwards according to the Kategoriensystem für Partnerschaftliche Interaktion (KPI) coding system. Unexpectedly, compared with the control groups ED couples do not show a greater disequilibrium (between patient and husband) in the emission rate of positive and negative messages. Also striking is the generally higher degree of self-disclosure in ED couples than in ND couples, but this may reflect their experience of distress. Overall and most importantly, ED couples appear to lack some of the ND couples' skills of constructive communication, but manage to avoid the destructive communication style of MD couples.

  20. [Supervised administration of Alzheimer's patients using information communication technology].

    PubMed

    Noda, Yasuha; Sakata, Yoshifumi; Kubota, Masakazu; Uemura, Kengo; Kihara, Takeshi; Kimura, Toru; Ino, Masashi; Tsuji, Teruyuki; Hayashi, Michiyuki; Kinoshita, Ayae

    2014-12-01

    Drug adherence is central to the treatment of dementia, which might reduce compliance due to memory loss, particularly among home-based patients with dementia. In order to improve drug adherence, we suggest the efficient and effective supervised administration by use of information communication technology(ICT). ICT makes face-to-face real-time communication possible, and it also enables picture sharing. Therefore, it might be useful to apply ICT to controlling and supervising medication for patients with dementia to improve drug adherence. Accordingly, we enrolled patients who were supposed to take a newly prescribed anti-dementia patch containing the choline esterase inhibitor rivastigmine(Rivastach®)and investigated the effect of ICT-based intervention for drug adherence, emotional change, and cognitive change, utilizing Skype, a free communication software program. Scheduled Skype interventions increased drug adherence ratio, levels of subjective satisfaction, and instrumental activities of daily living(IADL). Furthermore, we can provide patients and their caregivers with a feeling of safety through regular bidirectional communication, as patients can easily consult medical staff regarding the adverse effects of newly prescribed drugs. Instead of frequent visits to their primary physicians, ICT-based communications can be used as a substitute for supervision of medication, given the availability of the telecommunication system. By directly connecting the medical institution to the home, we expect that this ICT-based system will expand into the geriatric care field, including the care of elderly individuals living alone. PMID:25595075

  1. Does cancer survival differ for older patients?

    PubMed

    Kant, A K; Glover, C; Horm, J; Schatzkin, A; Harris, T B

    1992-12-01

    The relation of age to 5-year relative survival rates was examined for leading sites of cancer resulting in death among 127,554 patients; data from 1978 to 1982 were studied for four areas of the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results program of the National Cancer Institute. Overall and stage-stratified relative survival rates declined with advancing patient age for cancer of the lung, prostate, pancreas, bladder, oral cavity, uterus, cervix, ovary, and large bowel (women only). In men, this trend was not explained by age differences in stage of diagnosis, whereas, among women, age was associated with more advanced disease for most sites examined. Although overall survival rates were lower in black patients compared with white patients, the age-survival and age-stage trends were similar in the two racial groups.

  2. Nutritional status assessment in colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Joana Pedro; de Castro Cardoso Pereira, Paula Manuela; dos Reis Baltazar Vicente, Ana Filipa; Bernardo, Alexandra; de Mesquita, María Fernanda

    2013-01-01

    The present study intended to evaluate the nutritional status of Portuguese colorectal patients and associated it with surgery type as well as quality of life outcomes. Malnutrition can affect up to 85% of cancer patients and specifically 30-60% in colorectal cancer and can significantly influence health outcomes. A sample of 50 colorectal cancer patients was evaluated in what refers to several anthropometric measures, food intake, clinical history, complications rate before and after surgery procedure. The sample was divided between convention and fast-track procedures. Most of the individuals were overweight or obese but had lost weight on the past six months. Despite mild, there were signs of malnutrition in this sample with high losses of fat free mass, weight and also fat mass during the hospitalization period. These results reinforce the importance of malnutrition assessment in colorectal patients as well as consider weight loss on the past months and body composition in order to complement nutritional status evaluation.

  3. Myofacial Trigger Points in Advanced Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hasuo, Hideaki; Ishihara, Tatsuhiko; Kanbara, Kenji; Fukunaga, Mikihiko

    2016-01-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome is started to be recognized as one of important factors of pain in cancer patients. However, no reports on features of myofascial trigger points were found in terminally-ill cancer populations. This time, we encountered 5 patients with myofascial pain syndrome and terminal cancer in whom delirium developed due to increased doses of opioid without a diagnosis of myofascial pain syndrome on initial presentation. The delirium subsided with dose reductions of opioid and treatment of myofascial pain syndrome. The common reason for a delayed diagnosis among the patients included an incomplete palpation of the painful sites, which led to unsuccessful myofascial trigger points identification. The features of myofascial trigger points included single onset in the cancer pain management site with opioid and the contralateral abdominal side muscles of the non-common sites. Withdrawal reflexes associated with cancer pain in the supine position, which are increasingly seen in the terminal cancer patients, were considered to have contributed to this siuation. We consider that careful palpation of the painful site is important, in order to obtain greater knowledge and understanding of the features of myofascial trigger points. PMID:26962285

  4. CCC meets ICU: Redefining the role of critical care of cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Currently the majority of cancer patients are considered ineligible for intensive care treatment and oncologists are struggling to get their patients admitted to intensive care units. Critical care and oncology are frequently two separate worlds that communicate rarely and thus do not share novel developments in their fields. However, cancer medicine is rapidly improving and cancer is eventually becoming a chronic disease. Oncology is therefore characterized by a growing number of older and medically unfit patients that receive numerous novel drug classes with unexpected side effects. Discussion All of these changes will generate more medically challenging patients in acute distress that need to be considered for intensive care. An intense exchange between intensivists, oncologists, psychologists and palliative care specialists is warranted to communicate the developments in each field in order to improve triage and patient treatment. Here, we argue that "critical care of cancer patients" needs to be recognized as a medical subspecialty and that there is an urgent need to develop it systematically. Conclusion As prognosis of cancer improves, novel therapeutic concepts are being introduced and more and more older cancer patients receive full treatment the number of acutely ill patients is growing significantly. This development a major challenge to current concepts of intensive care and it needs to be redefined who of these patients should be treated, for how long and how intensively. PMID:21059210

  5. Complementary therapy use by cancer patients. Physicians' perceptions, attitudes, and ideas.

    PubMed Central

    O'Beirne, Maeve; Verhoef, Marja; Paluck, Elan; Herbert, Carol

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore family physicians' perceptions of their cancer patients' use of complementary therapy. DESIGN: Qualitative pilot study. SETTING: British Columbia and Alberta. PARTICIPANTS: Rural and urban family physicians. METHOD: Five focus groups were conducted with a total of 28 participants. Content analysis of focus group transcripts. MAIN FINDINGS: Eight themes were identified: definition of complementary therapies, importance of holistic health, role of evidence, attitudes toward complementary therapies, perceptions of cancer patients' use of complementary therapies, patient-physician communication, perceptions of family physicians' role with respect to complementary therapies, and concerns about complementary therapies. Family physicians believed that many of their patients were using complementary therapies and that patients and physicians needed to communicate about this practice. CONCLUSION: The study increased understanding of physicians'perspectives on communication about complementary therapies and exposed issues that need to be addressed through education and research. PMID:15233371

  6. Delirium Common in Cancer Patients Seen in ER

    MedlinePlus

    ... often missed, in advanced cancer patients who visit emergency departments, a new study says. Delirium is a serious ... in 243 advanced cancer patients seen at an emergency department. The patients were between the ages of 19 ...

  7. Promoting Patient Safety With Perioperative Hand-off Communication.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Nancy Leighton

    2016-06-01

    Effective perioperative hand-off communication is essential for patient safety. The purpose of this quality improvement project was to demonstrate how a structured hand-off tool and standardized process could increase effective perioperative communication of essential elements of care and assist in the timely recognition of patients at risk for clinical deterioration in the initial postoperative period. A team-based pilot project used the Iowa Model of Evidence-Based Practice and the principles of Lean Six Sigma to implement Perioperative PEARLS, a perioperative specific hand-off communication tool and a standardized framework for hand-off communication. The implementation of a structured hand-off tool and standardized process supports compliance with regulatory standards of care and eliminates waste from the hand-off process. A review of pre-implementation and post-implementation data revealed evidence of safer patient care. Evidence-based perioperative hand-off communication facilitates expedited patient evaluation, rapid interventions, reduction in adverse events, and a safer perioperative environment.

  8. Promoting Patient Safety With Perioperative Hand-off Communication.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Nancy Leighton

    2016-06-01

    Effective perioperative hand-off communication is essential for patient safety. The purpose of this quality improvement project was to demonstrate how a structured hand-off tool and standardized process could increase effective perioperative communication of essential elements of care and assist in the timely recognition of patients at risk for clinical deterioration in the initial postoperative period. A team-based pilot project used the Iowa Model of Evidence-Based Practice and the principles of Lean Six Sigma to implement Perioperative PEARLS, a perioperative specific hand-off communication tool and a standardized framework for hand-off communication. The implementation of a structured hand-off tool and standardized process supports compliance with regulatory standards of care and eliminates waste from the hand-off process. A review of pre-implementation and post-implementation data revealed evidence of safer patient care. Evidence-based perioperative hand-off communication facilitates expedited patient evaluation, rapid interventions, reduction in adverse events, and a safer perioperative environment. PMID:27235961

  9. Parenteral nutrition in esophageal cancer patients.

    PubMed Central

    Daly, J M; Massar, E; Giacco, G; Frazier, O H; Mountain, C F; Dudrick, S J; Copeland, E M

    1982-01-01

    A review of operative therapy in 244 patients with esophageal cancer from 1960 to 1980 was done to evaluate the impact of TPN in 72 patients treated from 1973 to 1980 with 43 non-TPN patients treated during the same period and to 129 patients operated upon before 1973. Mean age, sex distribution, site, stage, and treatment of the disease were similar for the two study groups. The TPN group lost less weight during treatment (3 lbs vs. 11 lbs) and had fewer overall complications postoperatively (24% vs. 41%). Significant reductions in major wound, infectious, and postoperative complications were noted in these patients who received at least 5 days of preoperative TPN compared with postoperative TPN or the non-TPN groups (4% vs. 24% and 23%). Malnourished esophageal cancer patients can more safely undergo aggressive operative therapy and radiation treatment when adequate perioperative nutritional support is added to the treatment armamentarium. PMID:6807225

  10. [Guidelines for psychosocial care of cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Caminiti, Caterina

    2013-01-01

    Guidelines for psychosocial care of cancer patients. The Italian Association of Medical Oncologists published in 2013 the update of the first edition of the Psychosocial Guidelines for the care of cancer patients. The guidelines, produced by a multidisciplinary group (medical doctors, nurses, oncologists, psychologists and patients) aim at recognizing the importance of psychosocial care in helping the patients and their relatives to overcome the effects of the diagnosis and the treatments on mental health and emotional wellbeing. In some cases the evidences available are not as hard as those supporting drug treatments: many outcomes such as the effectiveness of educational interventions, the patients' wellbeing, thrust, perception of support, for their nature and complexity require both quantitative and qualitative measurements. Lack of robust evidences such as those obtained from clinical trials, does not necessarily correspond to lack of effectiveness of the intervention nor should make us forget that patients' rights (to good care, information and support) should be guaranteed. PMID:24441468

  11. Quality of doctor-patient communication through the eyes of the patient: variation according to the patient's educational level.

    PubMed

    Aelbrecht, Karolien; Rimondini, Michela; Bensing, Jozien; Moretti, Francesca; Willems, Sara; Mazzi, Mariangela; Fletcher, Ian; Deveugele, Myriam

    2015-10-01

    Good doctor-patient communication may lead to better compliance, higher patient satisfaction, and finally, better health. Although the social variance in how physicians and patients communicate is clearly demonstrated, little is known about what patients with different educational attainments actually prefer in doctor-patient communication. In this study we describe patients' perspective in doctor-patient communication according to their educational level, and to what extent these perspectives lean towards the expert opinion on doctor-patient communication. In a multi-center study (Belgium, The Netherlands, UK and Italy), focus group discussions were organised using videotaped medical consultations. A mixed methods approach was used to analyse the data. Firstly, a difference in perspective in communication style was found between the lower educated participants versus the middle and higher educated participants. Secondly, lower educated participants referred positively most to aspects related to the affective/emotional area of the medical consultation, followed by the task-oriented/problem-focused area. Middle and higher educated participants positively referred most to the task-oriented/problem-focused area. The competency of the physician was an important category of communication for all participants, independent of social background. The results indicate that the preferences of lower educated participants lean more towards the expert opinion in doctor-patient communication than the middle and higher educated participants. Patients' educational level seems to influence their perspective on communication style and should be taken into account by physicians. Further quantitative research is needed to confirm these results.

  12. Brain-computer interfaces for communication with nonresponsive patients.

    PubMed

    Naci, Lorina; Monti, Martin M; Cruse, Damian; Kübler, Andrea; Sorger, Bettina; Goebel, Rainer; Kotchoubey, Boris; Owen, Adrian M

    2012-09-01

    A substantial number of patients who survive severe brain injury progress to a nonresponsive state of wakeful unawareness, referred to as a vegetative state (VS). They appear to be awake, but show no signs of awareness of themselves, or of their environment in repeated clinical examinations. However, recent neuroimaging research demonstrates that some VS patients can respond to commands by willfully modulating their brain activity according to instruction. Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) may allow such patients to circumvent the barriers imposed by their behavioral limitations and communicate with the outside world. However, although such devices would undoubtedly improve the quality of life for some patients and their families, developing BCI systems for behaviorally nonresponsive patients presents substantial technical and clinical challenges. Here we review the state of the art of BCI research across noninvasive neuroimaging technologies, and propose how such systems should be developed further to provide fully fledged communication systems for behaviorally nonresponsive populations.

  13. Clinician-patient E-mail communication: challenges for reimbursement.

    PubMed

    Komives, Eugenie M

    2005-01-01

    Clinicians are rapidly gaining experience with online clinician-patient consultation, and more tools are becoming available to support these efforts. In addition, we now have evidence that using electronic communication is cost-effective to payers and appealing to patients and providers. At present, there appear to be few barriers to the adoption of these solutions for practices that use other online services. Security concerns can easily be overcome by using programs described in this commentary. Larger and longer studies that evaluate the benefits and cost savings in more detail may help convince other payers and providers of the utility of the Web-based programs. More studies are needed to understand the effect of dinician-patient electronic communication on the costs of caring for chronic illness. When these solutions also include support tools, such as electronic prescribing, which could improve patient safety and quality of care, they should be encouraged. In their article entitled, "Electrons in Flight-Email between Doctors and Patients," Delbanco and Sands postulate that the future of e-communication in medicine will be integrated with a patient-controlled health record and will include secure synchronous and asynchronous communication, video conferencing and messaging, instant transcription into the written record, full-patient access to the record, translation into different languages, connectivity to multiple data sources, incorporation of multi-media educational materials. It-will also allow data from home-based diagnostic technology to be sent to clinicians. "Electronic communication will move medicine inexorably toward such transparency, enabling doctors and patients to share knowledge, responsibility, and decision-making more equally. We need to explore rapidly how this change will affect the quality of care for patients and the quality of life for doctors." The widespread dependence on Internet-based electronic communication to support a variety of

  14. Arterial and Venous Thrombosis in Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Blann, Andrew D.; Dunmore, Simon

    2011-01-01

    The most frequent ultimate cause of death is myocardial arrest. In many cases this is due to myocardial hypoxia, generally arising from failure of the coronary macro- and microcirculation to deliver enough oxygenated red cells to the cardiomyocytes. The principle reason for this is occlusive thrombosis, either by isolated circulating thrombi, or by rupture of upstream plaque. However, an additionally serious pathology causing potentially fatal stress to the heart is extra-cardiac disease, such as pulmonary hypertension. A primary cause of the latter is pulmonary embolus, considered to be a venous thromboembolism. Whilst the thrombotic scenario has for decades been the dominating paradigm in cardiovascular disease, these issues have, until recently, been infrequently considered in cancer. However, there is now a developing view that cancer is also a thrombotic disease, and notably a disease predominantly of the venous circulation, manifesting as deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Indeed, for many, a venous thromboembolism is one of the first symptoms of a developing cancer. Furthermore, many of the standard chemotherapies in cancer are prothrombotic. Accordingly, thromboprophylaxis in cancer with heparins or oral anticoagulation (such as Warfarin), especially in high risk groups (such as those who are immobile and on high dose chemotherapy), may be an important therapy. The objective of this communication is to summarise current views on the epidemiology and pathophysiology of arterial and venous thrombosis in cancer. PMID:21403876

  15. Communicating breast cancer on-line: support and empowerment on the Internet.

    PubMed

    Sharf, B F

    1997-01-01

    Using participant-observation and discourse analysis, this study explores the communication occurring on the Breast Cancer List, an on-line discussion group which continues to grow in membership and activity. Issues discussed include the evolution of the List, who participates, what topics are discussed. Three major dimensions are identified: exchange of information, social support, and personal empowerment. Social support via computer is compared with face-to-face groups. Empowerment centers on enhanced decision-making and preparation for new illness-related experiences. The influence of gender is considered in terms of communicative style and limitations of access. It is concluded that the List fulfills the functions of a community, with future concerns about information control and the potential to enhance patient-provider understanding.

  16. Coping with cancer: what do patients do.

    PubMed

    Zaza, Christine; Sellick, Scott M; Hillier, Loretta M

    2005-01-01

    Although psychosocial coping techniques and supportive care services have been shown to improve cancer patients' quality of life, there is evidence that many of these strategies have not been widely integrated into the routine care of cancer patients. This study examined: (1) the extent to which cancer patients use certain coping strategies; (2) reasons for non-use; (3) perceived effectiveness of the coping strategies; (4) participants' interest in trying the strategies; and (5) if the strategies were recommended to participants. At the Northwestern Ontario Regional Cancer Centre in Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada, 292 outpatients (98% response rate) completed an in-person interview with a research assistant concerning seven individual coping strategies (music, breathing exercises, meditation, prayer, muscle relaxation, visualization/imagery, hypnosis/self-hypnosis) and four coping strategies offered through supportive care services (individual counselling, family counselling, support groups, religious support). Of all the coping strategies presented, prayer was used by the highest number (n = 186) of participants (64%). Music was the next most commonly used strategy, used by 43% (n = 124) of participants, and all other strategies were used by less than 30%of participants. The individualized approaches that are used for disseminating disease and treatment information to cancer patients should also be used to provide them with information on effective coping strategies.

  17. [Cancer treatment for patients with dementia].

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Asao

    2014-09-01

    Cancer is a disease associated with aging. In Japan, the rate of aging is estimated to be over 25%. Further, the prevalence of dementia also increases with age, and cancer patients with dementia are becoming more common. Dementia is a progressive condition characterized by impairment in memory and at least one other cognitive domain(language, praxis, gnosis, or executive function), as well as a compromised ability to perform daily functions. Impairment of short-term memory and executive function in particular are associated with an increased risk for functional decline and mortality. Assessment of cognitive function is necessary to ensure that cancer patients can provide informed consent and understand the risks, benefits, and alternatives of therapeutic treatment. The health care team needs to ascertain whether patients have the mental capacity for cancer treatment, will comply with the treatment schedule, and will understand when to seek help. Elderly cancer patients undergoing treatment need to be assessed for vulnerability with the comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA). PMID:25248886

  18. Circulating Tumor Cells in Breast Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Hall, Carolyn; Valad, Lily; Lucci, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among women, resulting in an estimated 40,000 deaths in 2014.1 Metastasis, a complex, multi-step process, remains the primary cause of death for these patients. Although the mechanisms involved in metastasis have not been fully elucidated, considerable evidence suggests that metastatic spread is mediated by rare cells within the heterogeneous primary tumor that acquire the ability to invade into the bloodstream. In the bloodstream, they can travel to distant sites, sometimes remaining undetected and in a quiescent state for an extended period of time before they establish distant metastases in the bone, lung, liver, or brain. These occult micrometastatic cells (circulating tumor cells, CTCs) are rare, yet their prognostic significance has been demonstrated in both metastatic and non-metastatic breast cancer patients. Because repeated tumor tissue collection is typically not feasible and peripheral blood draws are minimally invasive, serial CTC enumeration might provide "real-time liquid biopsy" snapshots that could be used to identify early-stage breast cancer patients with micrometastatic disease who are at risk for disease progression and monitor treatment response in patients with advanced disease. In addition, characterizing CTCs might aid in the development of novel, personalized therapies aimed at eliminating micrometastases. This review describes current CTC isolation, detection, and characterization strategies in operable breast cancer. PMID:27481009

  19. The patients' written word: a simple communication aid.

    PubMed

    Wells, Thomas; Falk, Stephen; Dieppe, Paul

    2004-08-01

    Effective doctor-patient communication is an essential part of good medical practice. Question asking is one way for patients to have greater participation. In this feasibility study, patients were given the opportunity to list questions or discussion topics on a proforma before seeing the doctor in an oncology outpatient clinic. The items listed were reviewed by the clinic doctor. Eighty-eight of 100 patients approached agreed to participate. Biomedical questions (mean 2.0 per patient) predominated over psychosocial ones (mean 0.1 per patient). Possible reasons for this are the study researcher being a doctor, patients attending for test results or that patients consider the format of listing questions on a proforma inappropriate for psychosocial issues. The listing of questions and discussion topics by patients gave the doctor valuable information about the patients' understanding and use of language. While the importance of doctors being adequately trained in communication skills should not be ignored, this simple intervention has potential for improving the outcome of clinic consultations. PMID:15288914

  20. Effective Patient-Physician Communication Based on Osteopathic Philosophy in Caring for Elderly Patients.

    PubMed

    Noll, Donald R; Ginsberg, Terrie; Elahi, Abdul; Cavalieri, Thomas A

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this article is to discuss effective communication strategies between elderly patients and their physicians from the perspective of osteopathic heritage. The patient-physician communication styles of Andrew Taylor Still, MD, DO, and early osteopathic physicians (ie, DOs) may have influenced how DOs today communicate with their patients. Historical literature describes how Still would discuss with his patients the causes of their health problems using analogies and language they would understand, and how, when caring for a patient at the end of life, he empathically provided emotional support for both patients and their families. Early DOs advocated setting clear expectations for patients regarding clinical outcomes and carefully listening to patients to build trust. The Osteopathic Oath, which calls for the DO to view the patient as a friend, may also affect patient-physician communication. Early osteopathic philosophy and culture, as modeled by Dr Still in his approach to elderly patients, should inspire today's DOs in their communication with their elderly patients. PMID:26745563

  1. [Counseling: a tool for enhancing the communication with the patient].

    PubMed

    Martí-Gil, C; Barreda-Hernández, D; Marcos-Pérez, G; Barreira-Hernández, D

    2013-01-01

    Counseling is a technique used in psychology that has shown a major impact on health: in deep, it is the methodology recommended by the Worl Health Organization to help HIV-infected patients. Although it has been translated to spanish by assisted counseling or helping relationship, counseling covers a broader concept. It is defined as an interactive process based on communication in which the clinician helps the patients to think about their own health and to take appropiate decisions based on their values and interests. In short, counseling is a tool to enhance communication with the patient, resulting very useful during clinical interview in pharmaceutical care programs in order to improve pharmacotherapy and patient safety.

  2. Gamma-N activation of cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Wielopolski, L.; Meek, A.G.; Moskowitz, M.; Cohn, S.H.

    1986-01-01

    High energy gamma radiation (8 to 30 MeV) is gaining acceptance for radiation therapy of patients with deep cancers. This radiation is of sufficient energy to induce photonuclear activation of the elements in the human body. Our results of measurements of nitrogen and phosphorus in an anthropomorphic phantom, a cadaver, and a cancer patient with bremsstrahlung radiation from 15 MeV electrons demonstrate the feasibility of a method to monitor these two elements in the human body in vivo by measuring the radioactivity induced in these targets by photonuclear reactions. 14 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. ["Mercy lie" for the patient with cancer].

    PubMed

    Chacon, J P; Kobata, C M; Liberman, S P

    1995-01-01

    The authors discussed the problem of whether or not to be completely frank with cancer patients about their diagnosis. They analysed the results of a survey of 79 doctors (Phase 1) in which they tried to find out how the doctors behaved towards the patients, their families and with themselves in the different situations caused by the illness. In the second stage (Phase 2), they also put the following question to 118 adults: If it was diagnosed that you had cancer would you like your doctor to tell you? PMID:8731608

  4. Communication Tools for the Modern Doctor Bag. Physician Patient Communication Part 1: Beginning of a medical interview

    PubMed Central

    Kuehl, Sapna Patel

    2011-01-01

    Effective physician patient communication is essential to best practice in medicine. Good communication with patients is critical in making the right diagnosis, improving compliance and overall outcomes for our patients (as well as improving physician satisfaction.) Communication skills can be learned and need to be taught, practiced and given the same emphasis as other core competencies in medicine. The focus of this article is on the Calgary-Cambridge Model for physician patient communication in the context of a medical interview. The beginning of a patient encounter is discussed, with emphasis on appropriate introductions and attentive active listening. PMID:23882333

  5. An analysis of communication in conversation in patients with dementia.

    PubMed

    Rousseaux, Marc; Sève, Amandine; Vallet, Marion; Pasquier, Florence; Mackowiak-Cordoliani, Marie Anne

    2010-11-01

    Patients with degenerative dementia often show language disorders, but little is known about their verbal (VC) and non-verbal communication (NVC). Our aim was to analyse VC and NVC in patients with standard criteria of mild-moderately severe dementia (MMSE ≥14/30) resulting from Alzheimer's disease (AD; 29 cases), behavioural variant of frontotemporal dementia (FTD; 16), or dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB; 13). We used the Lille Communication Test, which addresses three domains: participation in communication (PC: greeting, attention, participation), VC (verbal comprehension, speech outflow, intelligibility, word production, syntax, verbal pragmatics and verbal feedback), and NVC (understanding gestures, affective expressivity, producing gestures, pragmatics and feedback). Patients were compared with 47 matching control subjects. AD patients were partially impaired (p≤0.01) in PC (greeting), and more definitely in VC, especially by verbal comprehension and word finding difficulties and to a much lesser degree in verbal pragmatics (responding to open questions, presenting new information), while NVC was mostly preserved. FTD patients were severely impaired in PC. VC difficulties were related to lexical-semantic, syntactic and more specifically pragmatic problems. NVC was impaired by difficulties in affective expressivity, pragmatics and feedback management. DLB patients showed modest difficulties with VC. PC, VC and NVC strongly correlated with performance in the dementia rating scale. In conclusion, the profile of communication difficulties was quite different between groups. FTD patients showed most severe difficulties in PC and verbal and non-verbal pragmatics, in relation to their frontal lesions. AD patients had prominent impairment of lexical-semantic operations.

  6. Strengthening student communication through pediatric simulated patient encounters.

    PubMed

    Whitt, Ryan; Toussaint, Gregory; Bruce Binder, S; Borges, Nicole J

    2014-01-01

    As medical students enter the role of physician, clinical outcomes not only rely on their mastery of clinical knowledge, but also on the effectiveness in which they can communicate with patients and family members. While students typically have numerous opportunities to practice clinical communication with adult patients, such practice in pediatric settings is limited. This study examines if simulated patient (SP) encounters strengthen third-year medical students' communication skills during the pediatrics clerkship. During 2011-2013, three SP encounters (comprising 3 pediatric scenarios) were incorporated into a pediatrics clerkship at one United States medical school to give students a safe venue to practice advanced communication with observation and direct feedback. Third-year medical students engaged in the scenarios and received both written and oral feedback from an evaluator observing the encounter. With IRB approval, students' self-perceived confidence and abilities at performing the advanced communication skills were measured using an eightitem, Likert scale questionnaire administered pre and post the SP encounter. Pre- and post-questionnaires (n=215; response rate, 96%) analyzed using a Wilcoxon-matched pairs signed-rank test demonstrated statistically significant increases in students' perception of their confidence and abilities regarding their performance (P<0.05; Bonferroni correction, P<0.006). There was an increases in student confidence and self-perceived ability in: first, communicating with children and family members of young patients; second, managing confrontational situations involving parents; third, performing a thorough psychosocial history with an adolescent; and fourth, using Evidence Based Medicine to motivate parents. PMID:25112449

  7. Fertility counseling of young breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Anserini, Paola; Levaggi, Alessia; Poggio, Francesca; Del Mastro, Lucia

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 6% of women with breast cancer are diagnosed before the age of 40. Young age is an independent predictor of adverse outcome and most young breast cancer patients receive systemic treatment with chemotherapy, hormonal therapy or both. The loss or impairment of fertility is a potential side effect of antineoplastic treatments. Due to the rising trend to delaying pregnancy in life, an increasing proportion of young cancer patients who are yet to have a pregnancy will face the problem of iatrogenic menopause in the future. The incidence of anticancer-treatment-related ovarian failure depends on the type of chemotherapy regimen administered, the use of tamoxifen and the age of patients. It rises with increasing age, in the range of 22-61% and 61-97% in women aged <40 years and >40 years respectively. Although there is a clear trend to increasing incidence of ovarian failure with the rise in aging, there may be a small proportion of patients who became amenorrhoeic despite the very young age, thus indicating that also individual factors still unknown may affect the probability of treatment-related ovarian failure. A prompt referral of patients to reproductive counseling and a multidisciplinary team including Oncology and Reproductive Units are essential to face the management of fertility issues in cancer patients. Fertility counseling should include a detailed description of all the available techniques to preserve fertility. The main available fertility preservation techniques, standard and experimental, for young breast cancer patients include: temporary ovarian suppression during chemotherapy with gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogues, embryo cryopreservation, cryopreservation of oocytes and cryopreservation of ovarian tissue. Research efforts are still necessary to improve the efficacy and safety of the available fertility preservation strategies as well as an efficient collaboration between oncologists and gynecologists is necessary to improve

  8. Physicians' influence on breast cancer patient compliance.

    PubMed

    Kostev, Karel; Waehlert, Lilia; Jockwig, Achim; Jockwig, Barbara; Hadji, Peyman

    2014-01-01

    In recent years there have been major advances in the treatment of breast cancer. However, taking the prescribed medication for a sufficient period of time is crucial to the success of any therapy. Thus far, no database-based studies have been published in German-speaking countries empirically examining the influence of the physician on the compliance of patients. The aim of this study is to investigate, quantify, and critically discuss the effect treating physicians have on the compliance of their breast cancer patients. Patients with a confirmed breast cancer diagnosis who started therapy (tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors) between January 2001 and December 2011 were selected from the representative IMS Disease Analyzer database and analyzed with regard to their compliance. Practices were grouped into two categories concerning the compliance of all treated patients. A regression model showed that a breast cancer patient who is treated in a practice with a trend toward poor compliance has a nearly 60% higher risk for treatment discontinuation than would be the case in a practice with good compliance. It shows how important it is to motivate physicians to strive toward good compliance rates.

  9. Cachexia in patients with oesophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Anandavadivelan, Poorna; Lagergren, Pernilla

    2016-03-01

    Oesophageal cancer is a debilitating disease with a poor prognosis, and weight loss owing to malnutrition prevails in the majority of patients. Cachexia, a multifactorial syndrome characterized by the loss of fat and skeletal muscle mass and systemic inflammation arising from complex host-tumour interactions is a major contributor to malnutrition, which is a determinant of tolerance to treatment and survival. In patients with oesophageal cancer, cachexia is further compounded by eating difficulties owing to the stage and location of the tumour, and the effects of neoadjuvant therapy. Treatment with curative intent involves exceptionally extensive and invasive surgery, and the subsequent anatomical changes often lead to eating difficulties and severe postoperative malnutrition. Thus, screening for cachexia by means of percentage weight loss and BMI during the cancer trajectory and survivorship periods is imperative. Additionally, markers of inflammation (such as C-reactive protein), dysphagia and appetite loss should be assessed at diagnosis. Routine assessments of body composition are also necessary in patients with oesophageal cancer to enable assessment of skeletal muscle loss, which might be masked by sarcopenic obesity in these patients. A need exists for clinical trials examining the effectiveness of therapeutic and physical-activity-based interventions in mitigating muscle loss and counteracting cachexia in these patients. PMID:26573424

  10. Renal cancer in kidney transplanted patients.

    PubMed

    Frascà, Giovanni M; Sandrini, Silvio; Cosmai, Laura; Porta, Camillo; Asch, William; Santoni, Matteo; Salviani, Chiara; D'Errico, Antonia; Malvi, Deborah; Balestra, Emilio; Gallieni, Maurizio

    2015-12-01

    Renal cancer occurs more frequently in renal transplanted patients than in the general population, affecting native kidneys in 90% of cases and the graft in 10 %. In addition to general risk factors, malignancy susceptibility may be influenced by immunosuppressive therapy, the use of calcineurin inhibitors (CNI) as compared with mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors, and the length of dialysis treatment. Acquired cystic kidney disease may increase the risk for renal cancer after transplantation, while autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease does not seem to predispose to cancer development. Annual ultrasound evaluation seems appropriate in patients with congenital or acquired cystic disease or even a single cyst in native kidneys, and every 2 years in patients older than 60 years if they were on dialysis for more than 5 years before transplantation. Immunosuppression should be lowered in patients who develop renal cancer, by reduction or withdrawal of CNI. Although more evidence is still needed, it seems reasonable to shift patients from CNI to everolimus or sirolimus if not already treated with one of these drugs, with due caution in subjects with chronic allograft nephropathy.

  11. Smog May Shorten Lives of Lung Cancer Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... 5, 2016 FRIDAY, Aug. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Air pollution may shorten the lives of lung cancer patients, ... the International Agency for Research on Cancer classifies air pollution as a cancer-causing agent. "This study, along ...

  12. [Telling the patient the diagnosis of cancer].

    PubMed

    Doi, T

    1989-04-01

    Four cases are presented for discussion. In the first case, the patient believed the doctor for a while when his suspicion of cancer was forcibly denied. But when radiotherapy followed the operation, he became convinced that he had been deceived and confronted the doctor aggressively to force him into a confession. In the second case, the patient, a resident of the U.S. for many years, was told on completion of tests the true diagnosis even before his American wife learned of it. He became very depressed, while his wife kept urging him to fight the cancer. In the third case, the doctor thought better of the earlier decision by another doctor not to tell the truth. The doctor called the patient's relatives to discuss the advisability of telling the truth and when he secured their confidence, he visited the patient with them and told him the true diagnosis. The patient recovered from the initial shock and lived peacefully for several months enjoying the new union he felt with his wife. In the fourth case, it is as if there were a kind of silent conspiracy between the doctor and the patient's relatives who kept her in the dark about her condition. When her illness went downhill, she became completely withdrawn, though she accepted religious ministering to the end. It is cruel to deceive the patient with false hopes. But to tell the patient the truth needs tact. The doctor in the third case gives a very good model of it. First, he assesses the patient's personality. Second, he convinces the patient's relatives of the advisability of truth-telling. Third, he assures the patient that he is in charge no matter what happens to him. Perhaps it was easier to tell the patient the diagnosis of cancer or its poor prognosis in bygone days than nowadays, when the wonders of modern medicine are too much publicized. PMID:2730005

  13. Anemia, tumor hypoxemia, and the cancer patient

    SciTech Connect

    Varlotto, John . E-mail: jvarlott@bidmc.harvard.edu; Stevenson, Mary Ann

    2005-09-01

    Purpose: To review the impact of anemia/tumor hypoxemia on the quality of life and survival in cancer patients, and to assess the problems associated with the correction of this difficulty. Methods: MEDLINE searches were performed to find relevant literature regarding anemia and/or tumor hypoxia in cancer patients. Articles were evaluated in order to assess the epidemiology, adverse patient effects, anemia correction guidelines, and mechanisms of hypoxia-induced cancer cell growth and/or therapeutic resistance. Past and current clinical studies of radiosensitization via tumor oxygenation/hypoxic cell sensitization were reviewed. All clinical studies using multi-variate analysis were analyzed to show whether or not anemia and/or tumor hypoxemia affected tumor control and patient survival. Articles dealing with the correction of anemia via transfusion and/or erythropoietin were reviewed in order to show the impact of the rectification on the quality of life and survival of cancer patients. Results: Approximately 40-64% of patients presenting for cancer therapy are anemic. The rate of anemia rises with the use of chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hormonal therapy for prostate cancer. Anemia is associated with reductions both in quality of life and survival. Tumor hypoxemia has been hypothesized to lead to tumor growth and resistance to therapy because it leads to angiogenesis, genetic mutations, resistance to apoptosis, and a resistance to free radicals from chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Nineteen clinical studies of anemia and eight clinical studies of tumor hypoxemia were found that used multi-variate analysis to determine the effect of these conditions on the local control and/or survival of cancer patients. Despite differing definitions of anemia and hypoxemia, all studies have shown a correlation between low hemoglobin levels and/or higher amounts of tumor hypoxia with poorer prognosis. Radiosensitization through improvements in tumor oxygenation/hypoxic cell

  14. National Cancer Information Service in Italy: an information points network as a new model for providing information for cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Truccolo, Ivana; Bufalino, Rosaria; Annunziata, Maria Antonietta; Caruso, Anita; Costantini, Anna; Cognetti, Gaetana; Florita, Antonio; Pero, Dina; Pugliese, Patrizia; Tancredi, Roberta; De Lorenzo, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    The international literature data report that good information and communication are fundamental components of a therapeutic process. They contribute to improve the patient-health care professional relationship, to facilitate doctor-patient relationships, therapeutic compliance and adherence, and to the informed consent in innovative clinical trials. We report the results of a multicentric national initiative that developed a 17-information-structure network: 16 Information Points located in the major state-funded certified cancer centers and general hospitals across Italy and a national Help-line at the nonprofit organization AIMaC (the Italian oncologic patients, families and friends association), and updated the already existing services with the aim to create the National Cancer Information Service (SION). The project is the result of a series of pilot and research projects funded by the Italian Ministry of Health. The Information Service model proposed is based on some fundamental elements: 1) human interaction with experienced operators, adequately trained in communication and information, complemented with 2) virtual interaction (Help line, Internet, blog, forum and social network); 3) informative material adequate for both scientific accuracy and communicative style; 4) adequate locations for appropriate positioning and privacy (adequate visibility); 5) appropriate advertising. First results coming from these initiatives contributed to introduce issues related to "Communication and Information to patients" as a "Public Health Instrument" to the National Cancer Plan approved by the Ministry of Health for the years 2010-2012.

  15. Which screening method is appropriate for older cancer patients at risk for malnutrition?

    PubMed

    Isenring, Elizabeth; Elia, Marinos

    2015-04-01

    The risk for malnutrition increases with age and presence of cancer, and it is particularly common in older cancer patients. A range of simple and validated nutrition screening tools can be used to identify malnutrition risk in cancer patients (e.g., Malnutrition Screening Tool, Mini Nutritional Assessment Short Form Revised, Nutrition Risk Screening, and the Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool). Unintentional weight loss and current body mass index are common components of screening tools. Patients with cancer should be screened at diagnosis, on admission to hospitals or care homes, and during follow-up at outpatient or general practitioner clinics, at regular intervals depending on clinical status. Nutritional assessment is a comprehensive assessment of dietary intake, anthropometrics, and physical examination often conducted by dietitians or geriatricians after simple screening has identified at-risk patients. The result of nutritional screening, assessment and the associated care plans should be documented, and communicated, within and between care settings for best patient outcomes.

  16. Travelling for radiation cancer treatment: patient perspectives.

    PubMed

    Fitch, Margaret I; Gray, Ross E; McGowan, Tom; Brunskill, Ian; Steggles, Shawn; Sellick, Scott; Bezjak, Andrea; McLeese, Donna

    2003-01-01

    Radiation treatment for cancer requires patients to receive frequent administrations and attend the treatment facility on a daily basis for several weeks. Travelling for radiation treatment has the potential to add to the distress an individual may be feeling. This study utilized in-depth interviews to capture 118 patients' perspectives about travelling for cancer treatment. Four themes emerged during the analysis of the data: (1) waiting was the most difficult part of the experience; (2) the idea of travelling for treatment was distressing; (3) travelling for treatment was tiring and posed difficulties for patients; and (4) being away from home had both benefits and drawbacks. Given the inevitability of travelling for radiation treatment, and the issues that arises for patients, supportive strategies need to be designed and implemented. PMID:14502591

  17. Lung cancer in HIV-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Palacios, R; Lebrón, J; Guerrero-León, M; Del Arco, A; Colmenero, J; Márquez, M; Santos, J

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Several studies have shown that HIV patients are at higher risk of lung cancer. Our aim is to analyse the prevalence and features of lung cancer in HIV-infected patients. Methods The clinical charts of 4,721 HIV-infected patients seen in three hospitals of southeast Spain (study period 1992–2012) were reviewed, and all patients with a lung cancer were analysed. Results There were 61 lung cancers, giving a prevalence of 1.2%. There was a predominance of men (82.0%), and smokers (96.6%; mean pack-years 35.2), with a median age of 48.0 (41.7–52.9) years, and their distribution according to risk group for HIV was: intravenous drug use 58.3%, homosexual 20.0%, and heterosexual 16.7%. Thirty-four (56.7%) patients were Aids cases, and 29 (47.5%) had prior pulmonar events: tuberculosis 16, bacterial pneumonia 9, and P. jiroveci pneumonia 4. The median nadir CD4 count was 149/mm3 (42–232), the median CD4 count at the time of diagnosis of the lung cancer was 237/mm3 (85–397), and 66.1%<350/mm3. 66.7% were on ART, and 70% of them had undetectable HIV viral load. The most common histological types of lung cancer were adenocarcinoma and epidermoid, with 24 (40.0%) and 23 (38.3%) cases, respectively. There were 49 (80.3%) cases with advanced stages (III and IV) at diagnosis. The distribution of treatments was: only palliative 23 (39.7%), chemotherapy 14 (24.1%), surgery and chemotherapy 8 (13.8%), radiotherapy 7 (12.1%), surgery 4 (6.9%), and other combined treatments 2 (3.4%). Forty-six (76.7%) patients died, with a median survival time of 3 months. The Kaplan-Meier survival rate at 6 months was 42.7% (at 12 months 28.5%). Conclusions The prevalence of lung cancer in this cohort of HIV-patients is high. People affected are mainly men, smokers, with transmission of HIV by intravenous drug use, and around half of them with prior opportunistic pulmonary events. Most patients had low nadir CD4 count, and were immunosuppressed at the time of diagnosis. Adenocarcinoma

  18. Energy expenditure in malnourished cancer patients.

    PubMed Central

    Knox, L S; Crosby, L O; Feurer, I D; Buzby, G P; Miller, C L; Mullen, J L

    1983-01-01

    It is widely believed that the presence of a malignancy causes increased energy expenditure in the cancer patient. To test this hypothesis, resting energy expenditure (REE) was measured by bedside indirect calorimetry in 200 heterogeneous hospitalized cancer patients. Measured resting energy expenditure (REE-M) was compared with expected energy expenditure (REE-P) as defined by the Harris-Benedict formula. The study population consisted of 77 males and 123 females with a variety of tumor types: 44% with gastrointestinal malignancy, 29% with gynecologic malignancy, and 19% with a malignancy of genitourinary origin. Patients were classified as hypometabolic (REE less than 90% of predicted), normometabolic (90-110% of predicted) or hypermetabolic (greater than 110% of predicted). Fifty-nine per cent of patients exhibited aberrant energy expenditure outside the normal range. Thirty-three per cent were hypometabolic (79.2% REE-P), 41% were normometabolic (99.5% REE-P), and 26% were hypermetabolic (121.9% REE-P) (p less than 0.001). Aberrations in REE were not due to age, height, weight, sex, nutritional status (% weight loss, visceral protein status), tumor burden (no gross tumor, local, or disseminated disease), or presence of liver metastasis. Hypermetabolic patients had significantly longer duration of disease (p less than 0.04) than normometabolic patients (32.8 vs. 12.8 months), indicating that the duration of a malignancy may have a major impact upon energy metabolism. Cancer patients exhibit major aberrations in energy metabolism, but are not uniformly hypermetabolic. Energy expenditure cannot be accurately predicted in cancer patients using standard predictive formulae. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:6824369

  19. Palliative care in patients with lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Farbicka, Paulina

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer accounts for 12% of all cancers and has the highest annual rate of mortality in men and women. The overall aim is cure or prolongation of life without evidence of disease. Almost 60% of patients at the moment of diagnosis are not eligible for radical treatment. Therefore soothing and supportive treatment is the only treatment of choice. Patients with lung cancer who have symptoms of dyspnea, chronic cough, severe pain, exhaustion and cachexia syndrome, fear and depression and significantly reduced physical and intellectual activities are qualified for inpatient or home palliative care. Knowledge about various methods used in palliative treatment allows one to alleviate symptoms that occur in an advanced stage of disease with an expected short survival period. Methods of oncological treatment that are often used in patients with advanced lung cancer include radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Drawing attention to the earlier implementation of palliative care is an objective of research carried out during recent years. Advances in surgical and conservative treatment of these patients have contributed to better outcomes and longer survival time. PMID:24596508

  20. Communication in dental medicine: importance in motivating elderly dental patients.

    PubMed

    Scutariu, Mihaela Monica; Forna, Norina

    2013-01-01

    Dental services for elderly patients are characterized by a series of particularities related to the vulnerability of this age group, which is affected by various co morbidities, and the diminished physical, cognitive and financial capacities. Finding ways to keep elderly patients coming to a dental office is possible by improving the dentist-patient relationship and implicitly the quality of care by increasing the self-esteem of the elderly and their place in society, by increasing the role of oral health in the quality of life, and here we refer to the pleasure of eating, the pleasant physical aspect and normal diction. The present paper presents the psychological aspects that interfere in the communication process between the dentist and the elderly patient and the changes motivation undergoes when people are in pain. These data can sometimes change the reticent attitude of the dentist towards the elderly patient which is often considered to be a risk patient. PMID:24502052

  1. Rehabilitation of the head and neck cancer patient: Psychosocial aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Blitzer, A.; Baredes, S.; Kutscher, A.; Seeland, I.B.; Barrett, V.W.; Mossman, K.L.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 42 chapters divided among six sections. Some of the chapter titles are: The Challenge of Cancer; Communicaton Needs of Head and Neck Cancer Patients; Normal Tissue Effects of the Radiotherapy of Head and Neck Cancer; Chemotherapy in the Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer; and Thyroid Cancer.

  2. Giving and Receiving Emotional Support Online: Communication Competence as a Moderator of Psychosocial Benefits for Women with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Woohyun; Namkoong, Kang; Choi, Mina; Shah, Dhavan V.; Tsang, Stephanie; Hong, Yangsun; Aguilar, Michael; Gustafson, David H.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the moderating role of emotional communication competence in the relationship between computer-mediated social support (CMSS) group participation, specifically giving and receiving emotional support, and psychological health outcomes. Data were collected as part of randomized clinical trials for women diagnosed with breast cancer within the last 2 months. Expression and reception of emotional support was assessed by tracking and coding the 18,064 messages that 236 patients posted and read in CMSS groups. The final data used in the analysis was created by merging (a) computer-aided content analysis of discussion posts, (b) action log data analysis of system usage, and (c) baseline and six-month surveys collected to assess change. Results of this study demonstrate that emotional communication competence moderates the effects of expression and reception of emotional support on psychological quality of life and breast cancer-related concerns in both desired and undesired ways. Giving and receiving emotional support in CMSS groups has positive effects on emotional well-being for breast cancer patients with higher emotional communication, while the same exchanges have detrimental impacts on emotional well-being for those with lower emotional communication competence. The theoretical and practical implications for future research are discussed. PMID:24058261

  3. Giving and Receiving Emotional Support Online: Communication Competence as a Moderator of Psychosocial Benefits for Women with Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Woohyun; Namkoong, Kang; Choi, Mina; Shah, Dhavan V; Tsang, Stephanie; Hong, Yangsun; Aguilar, Michael; Gustafson, David H

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the moderating role of emotional communication competence in the relationship between computer-mediated social support (CMSS) group participation, specifically giving and receiving emotional support, and psychological health outcomes. Data were collected as part of randomized clinical trials for women diagnosed with breast cancer within the last 2 months. Expression and reception of emotional support was assessed by tracking and coding the 18,064 messages that 236 patients posted and read in CMSS groups. The final data used in the analysis was created by merging (a) computer-aided content analysis of discussion posts, (b) action log data analysis of system usage, and (c) baseline and six-month surveys collected to assess change. Results of this study demonstrate that emotional communication competence moderates the effects of expression and reception of emotional support on psychological quality of life and breast cancer-related concerns in both desired and undesired ways. Giving and receiving emotional support in CMSS groups has positive effects on emotional well-being for breast cancer patients with higher emotional communication, while the same exchanges have detrimental impacts on emotional well-being for those with lower emotional communication competence. The theoretical and practical implications for future research are discussed. PMID:24058261

  4. [Impaired communication between nurses and patients' family members].

    PubMed

    de Paula, A A; Furegato, A R; Scatena, M C

    2000-08-01

    This study aims at presenting the analysis of an interaction between a nurse and a patient's family member in which impaired communication was observed. The interpersonal-relationship theoretical framework was used. The patient was young, 20 years old, bore a dead fetus and presented various complications. The interaction took place with her aunt (stepmother) and as to the structure, it was diagnostic, therapeutic and made it possible to establish a proposal of continuous assistance. As to content, it was possible to find the points of support given by family members and identify new facts so that the nursing team could improve the assistance given to the patient.

  5. African American Women’s Perspectives on Breast Cancer: Implications for Communicating Risk of Basal-like Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Allicock, Marlyn; Graves, Neasha; Gray, Kathleen; Troester, Melissa A.

    2013-01-01

    African American women suffer a higher burden of basal-like breast cancer, an aggressive subtype that has no targeted therapy. While epidemiologic research has identified key prevention strategies, little is known about how best to communicate risk to this population. This study explored women’s knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes about breast cancer to learn about risk perceptions. Six focus groups with 57 women (ages 18–49) women were conducted in North Carolina. Findings revealed that age, race (especially perceptions of cancer as a “White disease”), and lack of family history of breast cancer contributed to women’s perceptions of low breastcancer susceptibility. Perceptions of low risk were also attributed to conflicting risk information from family, media, and health providers. Women had little knowledge about breast cancer subtypes, but emphasized that health communications should be personally relevant, culturally appropriate, and convenient. These study findings will assist in developing health communication tools that encourage prevention. PMID:23728042

  6. Symptom control in the pregnant cancer patient.

    PubMed

    MacDougall, M K; LeGrand, S B; Walsh, D

    2000-12-01

    While much attention has been devoted to cytotoxic drugs and radiation therapy in the pregnant cancer patient, the drugs used for management of symptoms and complications related to cancer during pregnancy have been overlooked. There is substantial overlap between the symptoms of cancer and cancer management and the symptoms related to pregnancy. The mainstay of symptom management is drug therapy and the potential for a drug to be embryotoxic or teratogenic depends on when it is given. In general, drugs not proven safe in pregnancy should be withheld, especially during the first trimester. The few drugs that have been proven to be teratogenic are alcohol, thalidomide, the folic acid antagonists (which includes methotrexate), diethylstilbestrol, and the vitamin A isomers, but there is a good deal of uncertainty about many other therapeutic agents. Placental transport of drugs from mother to fetus must be taken into consideration from the fifth week of gestation to parturition. Although the first trimester is the time of most organ development in the fetus, the brain continues to develop throughout pregnancy and may be damaged later in pregnancy, resulting in diminished intelligence or behavioral problems. This review will focus on the treatment of the most common symptoms of cancer in a pregnant patient and the potential for fetal damage. PMID:11130478

  7. Fertility preservation in young patients with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suhag, Virender; Sunita, B. S.; Sarin, Arti; Singh, A. K.; Dashottar, S.

    2015-01-01

    Infertility can arise as a consequence of treatment of oncological conditions. The parallel and continued improvement in both the management of oncology and fertility cases in recent times has brought to the forefront the potential for fertility preservation in patients being treated for cancer. Many survivors will maintain their reproductive potential after the successful completion of treatment for cancer. However total body irradiation, radiation to the gonads, and certain high dose chemotherapy regimens can place women at risk for acute ovarian failure or premature menopause and men at risk for temporary or permanent azoospermia. Providing information about risk of infertility and possible interventions to maintain reproductive potential are critical for the adolescent and young adult population at the time of diagnosis. There are established means of preserving fertility before cancer treatment; specifically, sperm cryopreservation for men and in vitro fertilization and embryo cryopreservation for women. Several innovative techniques are being actively investigated, including oocyte and ovarian follicle cryopreservation, ovarian tissue transplantation, and in vitro follicle maturation, which may expand the number of fertility preservation choices for young cancer patients. Fertility preservation may also require some modification of cancer therapy; thus, patients’ wishes regarding future fertility and available fertility preservation alternatives should be discussed before initiation of therapy. PMID:26942145

  8. Family Ties: The Role of Family Context in Family Health History Communication About Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Vivian M; Corona, Rosalie; Bodurtha, Joann N; Quillin, John M

    2016-01-01

    Family health history about cancer is an important prevention and health promotion tool. Yet few studies have identified family context factors that promote such discussions. We explored relations among family context (cohesion, flexibility, and openness), self-efficacy, and cancer communication (gathering family history, sharing cancer risk information, and frequency) in a diverse group of women enrolled in a randomized control trial. Baseline survey data for 472 women were analyzed. The women's average age was 34 years, 59% identified as Black, 31% had graduated high school, and 75% reported a family history of any cancer. Results showed that greater family cohesion and flexibility were related to higher communication frequency and sharing cancer information. Women who reported greater self-efficacy were more likely to have gathered family history, shared cancer risk information, and communicated more frequently with relatives. Openness was not associated with communication but was related to greater family cohesion and flexibility. Adjusting for demographic variables, self-efficacy, and family cohesion significantly predicted communication frequency. Women with higher self-efficacy were also more likely to have gathered family health history about cancer and shared cancer risk information. Future research may benefit from considering family organization and self-efficacy when developing psychosocial theories that in turn inform cancer prevention interventions.

  9. Circulating tumor cells in colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Torino, Francesco; Bonmassar, Enzo; Bonmassar, Laura; De Vecchis, Liana; Barnabei, Agnese; Zuppi, Cecilia; Capoluongo, Ettore; Aquino, Angelo

    2013-11-01

    The availability of sensitive methods has allowed the detailed study of circulating tumor cells only recently. Evolving evidence support the prognostic and predictive role of these cells in patients affected by several solid tumors, including colorectal cancer. Ongoing studies are aimed at confirming that the molecular characterization of circulating tumor cells in peripheral blood and in bone marrow of patients is a powerful tool to improve the patient risk-stratification, to monitor activity of the drugs, to develop more appropriate targeted therapies and tailored treatments. In parallel, results from these correlative studies promise to gain a better biological understanding of the metastatic process. The clinical utility of the detection of circulating tumor cells in patients affected by colorectal cancer is still hampered by a number of specific hurdles. Improvement in sensitivity and specificity of the available methods of detection, standardization of these methods and functional characterization of circulating tumor cells in well designed and statistically well powered studies are the key steps to reach these ambitious objectives in colorectal cancer patients as well.

  10. Informational needs of recently diagnosed cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Derdiarian, A K

    1986-01-01

    Informational needs of 60 recently diagnosed cancer patients were assessed in relation to their disease, personal, family, and social concerns. The theoretical framework underlying the study was constructed from theories of coping, appraisal, information seeking, needs, and hierarchy of needs. Categories of analysis were derived from these theories and from findings of previous research. The Derdiarian Informational Needs Assessment was used to gather data. Patients' informational needs were described in relation to harms, threats, and resources and to their importance values associated with the major categories of disease, personal, family, and social concerns. Comparisons of informational needs and their importance values among patients stratified by person- or situation-related variables indicated few differences by gender, age, and stage of cancer. The findings imply that informational needs may be universal and warrant research on their relationship to these variables. PMID:3638607

  11. Cancer patient education in Iran: a descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Montazeri, Ali; Vahdani, Mariam; Haji-Mahmoodi, Mehregan; Jarvandi, Soghra; Ebrahimi, Mandana

    2002-03-01

    Abstract. This study was carried out to examine the status of cancer patient education in Iran. Using the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer's (MASCC) patient education questionnaire, 310 individuals - a sample of heterogeneous cancer patients ( n=167) and their relatives ( n=143) - were enrolled in the study. The pooled results indicated that only 15% of respondents believed more than 80% of cancer patients were told of their diagnosis. In contrast, 30% of respondents thought less than 20% of patients knew their cancer diagnosis. When asked, "Were you given written materials about (i) cancer, (ii) treatment, and (iii) symptom management", the vast majority of respondents said "No" (91%, 87%, and 87%, respectively). When respondents were asked, "Would you like to learn more about cancer and treatments", 97% said "Yes". Most respondents indicated the need for information on the treatments available (27%) and general information about cancer (20%); most had sought information from health professionals (31%), other cancer patients and friends (29%), and television (22%). Finally, it was found that concern about patients' depression (17%), lack of printed materials (13%), the idea that it was better for patients not to know (12%), and families' requests not to tell the patient (11%) were the most frequently stated barriers to or reasons for restricted cancer patient education. The findings of the study suggest that cancer patient education in Iran is very poor and there is an urgent need to develop policy guidelines on disclosure of cancer diagnoses and patient education.

  12. Intricate Macrophage-Colorectal Cancer Cell Communication in Response to Radiation.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Ana T; Pinto, Marta L; Velho, Sérgia; Pinto, Marta T; Cardoso, Ana P; Figueira, Rita; Monteiro, Armanda; Marques, Margarida; Seruca, Raquel; Barbosa, Mário A; Mareel, Marc; Oliveira, Maria J; Rocha, Sónia

    2016-01-01

    Both cancer and tumour-associated host cells are exposed to ionizing radiation when a tumour is subjected to radiotherapy. Macrophages frequently constitute the most abundant tumour-associated immune population, playing a role in tumour progression and response to therapy. The present work aimed to evaluate the importance of macrophage-cancer cell communication in the cellular response to radiation. To address this question, we established monocultures and indirect co-cultures of human monocyte-derived macrophages with RKO or SW1463 colorectal cancer cells, which exhibit higher and lower radiation sensitivity, respectively. Mono- and co-cultures were then irradiated with 5 cumulative doses, in a similar fractionated scheme to that used during cancer patients' treatment (2 Gy/fraction/day). Our results demonstrated that macrophages sensitize RKO to radiation-induced apoptosis, while protecting SW1463 cells. Additionally, the co-culture with macrophages increased the mRNA expression of metabolism- and survival-related genes more in SW1463 than in RKO. The presence of macrophages also upregulated glucose transporter 1 expression in irradiated SW1463, but not in RKO cells. In addition, the influence of cancer cells on the expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory macrophage markers, upon radiation exposure, was also evaluated. In the presence of RKO or SW1463, irradiated macrophages exhibit higher levels of pro-inflammatory TNF, IL6, CCL2 and CCR7, and of anti-inflammatory CCL18. However, RKO cells induce an increase of macrophage pro-inflammatory IL1B, while SW1463 cells promote higher pro-inflammatory CXCL8 and CD80, and also anti-inflammatory VCAN and IL10 levels. Thus, our data demonstrated that macrophages and cancer cells mutually influence their response to radiation. Notably, conditioned medium from irradiated co-cultures increased non-irradiated RKO cell migration and invasion and did not impact on angiogenesis in a chicken embryo chorioallantoic membrane assay

  13. Control of pain in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Belgrade, M J

    1989-03-01

    Almost three quarters of patients with cancer have severe pain, from invasion of the cancer itself, from effects of therapy, or from causes unrelated to the cancer (but often exacerbated by it). With the proper pain-management strategy, however, pain can be controlled in most patients. The analgesic ladder for pain control, promoted by the World Health Organization, begins with a nonnarcotic agent, progresses to a weak narcotic plus a nonnarcotic, and finally reaches a strong narcotic. Adjuvant agents, which increase the analgesic potency of the drug being used, may be added at any level. The most common reasons for inadequate pain control in cancer patients are incorrect narcotic dosing and incorrect switching from one narcotic to another and from one route of administration to another. Factors that influence pain management (eg, fear, anxiety, sleep disturbance) should be treated as well with appropriate medications, behavioral therapy, counseling, hypnosis, and other supportive techniques. These points are illustrated in the case report (see box, page 328).

  14. Predictors of communication preferences in patients with chronic low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Farin, Erik; Gramm, Lukas; Schmidt, Erika

    2013-01-01

    Background The objective of this exploratory study was to identify patient-related predictors of communication preferences in patients with chronic low back pain for various dimensions of patient-physician communication (patient participation and orientation, effective and open communication, emotionally supportive communication, communication about personal circumstances). Methods Eleven rehabilitation centers from various parts of Germany participated in collection of data between 2009 and 2011. A total of 701 patients with chronic low back pain were surveyed at the start of rehabilitation. The patient questionnaire captured communication preferences, pain impact, pain intensity, and psychologic variables (fear avoidance beliefs, illness coherence, control beliefs, communication self-efficacy, and personality characteristics). The rehabilitation physicians filled out a documentation sheet containing information on diagnosis, inability to work, duration of the illness, and comorbidity at the beginning and end of rehabilitation. Hierarchical regression analyses were performed. Results On average, effective, open, and patient-centered communication was very important for patients with back pain, emotionally supportive communication was important, and communication about personal circumstances was somewhat important. The variance in communication preferences explained by the predictors studied here was 8%–19%. Older patients showed a lower preference for patient-centered and open communication, but a higher preference for communication about personal circumstances. Patients with psychologic risk factors (eg, fear avoidance beliefs), extroverted patients, and patients with high self-efficacy in patient-physician interaction generally had higher expectations of the physician’s communicative behavior. Conclusion Providers should take into consideration the fact that patients with back pain have a strong need for effective, open, and patient-centered communication. A

  15. [Vital prognosis in advanced cancer patients: a systematic literature review].

    PubMed

    Tavares, Teresa; Gonçalves, Edna

    2013-01-01

    Prognostication is a critical medical task for the adequacy of treatment and management of priorities and expectations of patients and families. In 2005, the European Association of Palliative Care (EAPC) published recommendations on the formulation of vital prognosis in advanced cancer patients. The aim of this study is to analyze the literature subsequent to this review and to update the presented recommendations. Using the same strategy of the EAPC group, we performed a systematic literature search in the electronic databases PubMed and Scopus, which included original studies in adults with advanced cancer, without tumor-directed treatment, with a median survival of less than 90 days. The articles were analyzed and classified according to the level of evidence by two independent reviewers. The 41 articles analyzed allowed to keep grade A recommendations for clinical estimation of survival and Palliative Prognostic score and now also for Palliative Prognostic Index, performance status, dyspnea, lymphopenia and lactate dehydrogenase. Recommendations regarding the use of C-reactive protein, leukocytosis, azotemia, hypoalbuminemia and male gender as predictors reached grade B. To formulate the vital prognosis and to communicate it properly to the patient and family are core competencies of physicians, particularly of those who deal with end of life patients. The clinical impression combined with scientific evidence allows us to estimate more accurately the survival, allowing prioritizing and managing more appropriately the existing resources.

  16. Maximize Life Global Cancer Awareness Campaign: improving the lives of cancer patients while increasing global awareness of their needs.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Gonzalez, Pat; Schwartz, Erin L

    2012-01-01

    In October 2010 The Max Foundation, in partnership with 30 cancer patient associations in emerging countries, organized a global cancer awareness campaign. The aims of the campaign were: (i) to increase awareness of the needs of people living with cancer in developing countries; (ii) to increase local visibility of patient associations in their countries; (iii) to collect more than 10,000 signatures to the World Cancer Declaration (WCD); and (iv) to improve the lives of cancer survivors by providing them with an opportunity to express their feelings about the disease. The campaign was developed as a global effort, to be implemented by local patient associations through their volunteer survivors and caregivers. The methodology at the global level included developing the framework, branding, and communication tools, while making available limited funding and heavy logistical support. Local patient associations were encouraged to adapt the initiative to a culturally accepted format. Key elements of the campaign were the mix of low tech and high tech elements to allow low tech populations to participate while promoting the initiative using social media and high tech tools. Additionally, the participation of survivors and caregivers ensured the campaign provided immediate benefit to cancer patients. Finally, the addition of the World Cancer Declaration provided a strong unifying component. More than 60 events were held in 31 countries around the world, collecting more than 13,000 signatures to the World Cancer Declaration and a similar number of support messages to cancer survivors representing 84 countries. Local events gained local media visibility in many countries, and the campaign was promoted in multiple international forums and Web sites. This initiative involving mobilization of volunteers and the development of a global initiative as a grassroots movement taught important lessons on media outreach and selection of leaders for a cancer awareness campaign. PMID

  17. Perceptions, Expectations, and Attitudes about Communication with Physicians among Chinese American and non-Hispanic White Women with Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Judy Huei-yu; Adams, Inez F.; Pasick, Rena J.; Gomez, Scarlett L.; Allen, Laura; Ma, Grace X.; Lee, Michael X.; Huang, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Asian Americans have consistently reported poorer communication with physicians compared with non-Hispanic Whites (NHW). This qualitative study sought to elucidate the similarities and differences in communication with physicians between Chinese and NHW breast cancer survivors. Methods Forty-four Chinese and 28 NHW women with early-stage breast cancer (stage 0-IIa) from the Greater Bay Area Cancer Registry participated in focus group discussions or individual interviews. We oversampled Chinese women because little is known about their cancer care experiences. In both interview formats, questions explored patients’ experiences and feelings when communicating with physicians about their diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up care. Results Physician empathy at the time of diagnosis was important to both ethnic groups; however, during treatment and follow-up care, physicians’ ability to treat cancer and alleviate physical symptoms was a higher priority. NHW and US-born Chinese survivors were more likely to assert their needs, whereas Chinese immigrants accepted physician advice even when it did not alleviate physical problems (e.g., pain). Patients viewed all physicians as the primary source for information about cancer care. Many Chinese immigrants sought additional information from primary care physicians and stressed optimal communication over language concordance. Conclusions Physician empathy and precise information were important for cancer patients. Cultural differences such as the Western emphasis on individual autonomy vs. Chinese emphasis on respect and hierarchy can be the basis for the varied approaches to physician communication we observed. Interventions based on cultural understanding can foster more effective communication between immigrant patients and physicians ultimately improving patient outcomes. PMID:23903797

  18. Metastatic breast cancer in patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    MEYER, AARON A.; HWANG, M.; FARASATPOUR, M.; JANARDHAN, R.; MARGENTHALER, J.A.; VIRGO, K.S.; JOHNSON, FRANK E.

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is a major health problem worldwide. The median survival duration for patients with metastatic breast cancer is two to three years. Approximately 1% of populations worldwide have schizophrenia. The manner in which schizophrenic patients fare when diagnosed with metastatic breast carcinoma (MBC) was evaluated. We queried the National Department of Veterans Affairs (DVA) datasets using computer codes for a pre-existing diagnosis of schizophrenia and a later diagnosis of breast carcinoma. Chart-based data concerning the identified subjects were then requested. Previously determined inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied to select evaluable patients from the medical records, prior to extracting demographic details and data concerning the treatment course in each subject. Ten patients had distant metastases at initial diagnosis, while seven developed MBC following prior curative-intent treatment. Two patients refused therapy. Ten did not comply with recommended management. Five harmed or threatened physicians, other caregivers or themselves. Schizophrenic patients with MBC often fail to understand the nature of their illnesses. Often they do not accept palliative treatment, while a number of them do not comply with therapy, once initiated. They often exhibit behaviors that are detrimental to themselves or others. Formal psychiatric consultation is therefore necessary in patients. Several detrimental behaviors may be predicted reliably by history alone. PMID:24649175

  19. Public reaction to the death of Steve Jobs: implications for cancer communication.

    PubMed

    Myrick, Jessica Gall; Noar, Seth M; Willoughby, Jessica Fitts; Brown, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to examine the public reaction to the death of Steve Jobs, focusing on general and cancer-specific information seeking and interpersonal communication. Shortly after Jobs's death, employees from a large university in the Southeastern United States (N = 1,398) completed a web-based survey. Every employee had heard about Steve Jobs's death, and 97% correctly identified pancreatic cancer as the cause of his death. General (50%) and pancreatic cancer-specific (7%) information seeking, as well as general (74%) and pancreatic cancer-specific (17%) interpersonal communication, took place in response to Steve Jobs's death. In multivariate logistic regression analyses controlling for demographics and several cancer-oriented variables, both identification with Steve Jobs and cancer worry in response to Steve Jobs's death significantly (p < .05) predicted pancreatic cancer information seeking as well as interpersonal communication about pancreatic cancer. Additional analyses revealed that cancer worry partially mediated the effects of identification on these outcome variables. Implications of these results for future research as well as cancer prevention and communication efforts are discussed.

  20. Public reaction to the death of Steve Jobs: implications for cancer communication.

    PubMed

    Myrick, Jessica Gall; Noar, Seth M; Willoughby, Jessica Fitts; Brown, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to examine the public reaction to the death of Steve Jobs, focusing on general and cancer-specific information seeking and interpersonal communication. Shortly after Jobs's death, employees from a large university in the Southeastern United States (N = 1,398) completed a web-based survey. Every employee had heard about Steve Jobs's death, and 97% correctly identified pancreatic cancer as the cause of his death. General (50%) and pancreatic cancer-specific (7%) information seeking, as well as general (74%) and pancreatic cancer-specific (17%) interpersonal communication, took place in response to Steve Jobs's death. In multivariate logistic regression analyses controlling for demographics and several cancer-oriented variables, both identification with Steve Jobs and cancer worry in response to Steve Jobs's death significantly (p < .05) predicted pancreatic cancer information seeking as well as interpersonal communication about pancreatic cancer. Additional analyses revealed that cancer worry partially mediated the effects of identification on these outcome variables. Implications of these results for future research as well as cancer prevention and communication efforts are discussed. PMID:24716627

  1. Using Technology to Give Patients a Voice After Surgery for Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Theresa H; Kristyn DiFortuna, Kristyn DiFortuna; Michael LeTang, Michael LeTang; Murphy, Jane; Stemplewicz, Kara; Magda Kovacs, Magda Kovacs; DeRosa, Antonio P P; Gibson, Donna S; Ginex, Pamela K

    2016-10-01

    For patients with head and neck cancer, altered communication is a frequently occurring and highly upsetting issue that has been associated with psychological distress, fear, and anger among those with temporary or permanent speech impairment postsurgery. Many postoperative patients express that the most terrifying situation is to wake up from surgery and not be able to speak. Mobile devices have become part of everyday life, and augmentative and alternative communication mobile applications have the potential to enhance the healthcare journey of the patient and provider.


  2. Chemotherapy in Elderly Patients with Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyeong Su; Kim, Jung Han; Kim, Ji Won; Kim, Byung Chun

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is one of the most frequent malignant diseases in the elderly. Systemic chemotherapy showed an improvement of quality of life and survival benefit compared to supportive care alone in patients with advanced GC. Because comorbidities or age-related changes in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics may lead to higher toxicity, however, many oncologists hesitate to recommend elderly patients to receive chemotherapy. Available data suggest that elderly patients with GC are able to tolerate and benefit from systemic chemotherapy to the same extent as younger patients. The age alone should not be the only criteria to preclude effective chemotherapy. However, proper patient selection is extremely important to deliver effective treatment safely. A comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) is a useful method to assess life expectancy and risk of morbidity in older patients and to guide providing optimal treatment. Treatment should be personalized based on the nature of the disease, the life expectancy, the risk of complication, and the patient's preference. Combination chemotherapy can be considered for older patients with metastatic GC who are classified as non-frail patients by CGA. For frail or vulnerable patients, however, monotherapy or only symptomatic treatment may be desirable. Targeted agents seem to be promising treatment options for elderly patients with GC considering their better efficacy and less toxicity. PMID:26722364

  3. Telephone communication when the patient is deaf or hard-of-hearing.

    PubMed

    Mann, W J

    1994-06-01

    Newly developed technology and specially trained operators offer physicians and deaf or hard-of-hearing patients several options for communicating by telephone. This article discusses communication equipment, implications and benefits of direct physician/patient communication, removal of communication barriers, and confidentiality. PMID:8072394

  4. The Effects of Expressing Religious Support Online for Breast Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Mclaughlin, Bryan; Yang, JungHwan; Yoo, Woohyun; Shaw, Bret; Kim, Soo Yun; Shah, Dhavan; Gustafson, David

    2016-01-01

    The growth of online support groups has led to an expression effects paradigm within the health communication literature. Although religious support expression is characterized as a typical subdimension of emotional support, we argue that in the context of a life-threatening illness, the inclusion of a religious component creates a unique communication process. Using data from an online group for women with breast cancer, we test a theoretical expression effects model. Results demonstrate that for breast cancer patients, religious support expression has distinct effects from general emotional support messages, which highlights the need to further theorize expression effects along these lines. PMID:26643027

  5. Prostate cancer in the elderly patient.

    PubMed

    Fung, Chunkit; Dale, William; Mohile, Supriya Gupta

    2014-08-20

    Treatment for prostate cancer (PCa) has evolved significantly over the last decade. PCa is the most prevalent non-skin cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death in men, and it has an increased incidence and prevalence in older men. As a result, physicians and patients are faced with the challenge of identifying optimal treatment strategies for localized, biochemical recurrent, and advanced PCa in the older population. When older patients are appropriately selected, treatment for PCa results in survival benefits and toxicity profiles similar to those experienced in younger patients. However, underlying health status and age-related changes can have an impact on tolerance of hormonal therapy and chemotherapy in men with advanced disease. Therefore, the heterogeneity of the elderly population necessitates a multidimensional assessment to maximize the benefit of medical and/or surgical options. Providing clinicians with the requisite health status data on which to base treatment decisions would help ensure that older patients with PCa receive optimal therapy if it will benefit them and/or active surveillance or best supportive care if it will not. We provide a review of the existing evidence to date on the management of PCa in the older population. PMID:25071137

  6. Bladder Cancer Patient Advocacy: A Global Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Quale, Diane Zipursky; Bangs, Rick; Smith, Monica; Guttman, David; Northam, Tammy; Winterbottom, Andrew; Necchi, Andrea; Fiorini, Edoardo; Demkiw, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Over the past 20 years, cancer patient advocacy groups have demonstrated that patient engagement in cancer care is essential to improving patient quality of life and outcomes. Bladder cancer patient advocacy only began 10 years ago in the United States, but is now expanding around the globe with non-profit organizations established in Canada, the United Kingdom and Italy, and efforts underway in Australia. These organizations, at different levels of maturity, are raising awareness of bladder cancer and providing essential information and resources to bladder cancer patients and their families. The patient advocacy organizations are also helping to advance research efforts by funding research proposals and facilitating research collaborations. Strong partnerships between these patient advocates and the bladder cancer medical community are essential to ensuringsustainability for these advocacy organizations, increasing funding to support advances in bladder cancer treatment, and improving patient outcomes. PMID:27398397

  7. Patient Centered Communication During Primary Care Visits for Depressive Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Benjamin P.; Duberstein, Paul R.; Epstein, Ron; Fiscella, Kevin; Kravitz, Richard L.

    2009-01-01

    Background Patient Centered Communication (PCC) is associated with more appropriate treatment of depression in primary care. In part a function of patient presentation, little is known about other influences on PCC. We investigated whether PCC was also influenced by personality dispositions of primary care providers (PCPs), independent of patient presentation. Methods 46 PCPs completed personality scales from the NEO-Personality Inventory, Revised and provided care to 88 Standardized Patients (SPs) presenting with either major depression or adjustment disorder with comorbid musculoskeletal symptoms, either making or not making a medication request. Coders scored each visit using the Measure of Patient Centered Communication, assessing physicians’ ability to explore the patient’s illness experience (component 1), understand the patient’s psychosocial context (component 2), and involve the patient in collaborative discussions of treatment (component 3). Results Adjusting for physician demographics, training, and patient presentation, physicians who were more open to feelings explored the patient’s experience of illness more (p = .05). More dutiful, or rule-bound physicians engaged in greater exploration of the patient’s psychosocial and life circumstances (p = .04), but involved the patient less in treatment discussions (p = .03), as did physicians reporting more anxious vulnerability (p = .03). Physician demographics, training, and patient presentation explained 4-7% of variance in MPCC components, with personality explaining an additional 4-7% of the variance. Conclusion Understanding of personality dispositions which promote or detract from PCC may help medical educators better identify trainees of varying aptitude, addressing individual training needs in a tailored fashion. PMID:18665060

  8. Retaining Low-Income Minority Cancer Patients in a Depression Treatment Intervention Trial: Lessons Learned.

    PubMed

    Wells, Anjanette A; Palinkas, Lawrence A; Williams, Sha-Lai L; Ell, Kathleen

    2015-08-01

    Previously published work finds significant benefit from medical and behavioral health team care among safety-net patients with major depression. This qualitative study assessed clinical social worker, psychiatrist and patient navigator strategies to increase depression treatment among low-income minority cancer patients participating in the ADAPt-C clinical depression trial. Patient care retention strategies were elicited through in-depth, semi-structured interviews with nine behavioral health providers. Using grounded theory, concepts from the literature and dropout barriers identified by patients, guided interview prompts. Retention strategies clustered around five dropout barriers: (1) informational, (2) instrumental, (3) provider-patient therapeutic alliance, (4) clinic setting, and (5) depression treatment. All strategies emphasized the importance of communication between providers and patients. Findings suggest that strong therapeutic alliance and telephone facilitates collaborative team provider communication and depression treatment retention among patients in safety-net oncology care systems.

  9. Chemotherapy-related cognitive impairment in older patients with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Loh, Kah Poh; Janelsins, Michelle C.; Mohile, Supriya G.; Holmes, Holly M.; Hsu, Tina; Inouye, Sharon K.; Karuturi, Meghan S.; Kimmick, Gretchen G.; Lichtman, Stuart M.; Magnuson, Allison; Whitehead, Mary I.; Wong, Melisa L.; Ahles, Tim A.

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy-related cognitive impairment (CRCI) can occur during or after chemotherapy and represents a concern for many patients with cancer. Among older patients with cancer, in whom there is little clinical trial evidence examining side effects like CRCI, many unanswered questions remain regarding risk for and resulting adverse outcomes from CRCI. Given the rising incidence of cancer with age, CRCI is of particular concern for older patients with cancer who receive treatment. Therefore, research related to CRCI in older patients with cancers is a high priority. In this manuscript, we discuss current gaps in research highlighting the lack of clinical studies of CRCI in older adults, the complex mechanisms of CRCI, and the challenges in measuring cognitive impairment in older patients with cancer. Although we focus on CRCI, we also discuss cognitive impairment related to cancer itself and other treatment modalities. We highlight several research priorities to improve the study of CRCI in older patients with cancer. PMID:27197918

  10. Blood Genome-Wide Transcriptional Profiles of HER2 Negative Breast Cancers Patients

    PubMed Central

    Balacescu, Ovidiu; Balacescu, Loredana; Gherman, Claudia; Drigla, Flaviu; Pop, Laura; Bolba-Morar, Gabriela; Tudoran, Oana; Berindan-Neagoe, Ioana

    2016-01-01

    Tumors act systemically to sustain cancer progression, affecting the physiological processes in the host and triggering responses in the blood circulating cells. In this study, we explored blood transcriptional patterns of patients with two subtypes of HER2 negative breast cancers, with different prognosis and therapeutic outcome. Peripheral blood samples from seven healthy female donors and 29 women with breast cancer including 14 triple-negative breast cancers and 15 hormone-dependent breast cancers were evaluated by microarray. We also evaluated the stroma in primary tumors. Transcriptional analysis revealed distinct molecular signatures in the blood of HER2− breast cancer patients according to ER/PR status. Our data showed the implication of immune signaling in both breast cancer subtypes with an enrichment of these processes in the blood of TNBC patients. We observed a significant alteration of “chemokine signaling,” “IL-8 signaling,” and “communication between innate and adaptive immune cells” pathways in the blood of TNBC patients correlated with an increased inflammation and necrosis in their primary tumors. Overall, our data indicate that the presence of triple-negative breast cancer is associated with an enrichment of altered systemic immune-related pathways, suggesting that immunotherapy could possibly be synergistic to the chemotherapy, to improve the clinical outcome of these patients. PMID:26884644

  11. The art and science of cancer education and evaluation: toward facilitating improved patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Lenora; Ousley, Anita; Swarz, Jeffrey; Bingham, Raymond J; Erickson, J Bianca; Ellis, Steven; Moody, Terra

    2011-03-01

    Cancer education is a constantly evolving field, as science continues to advance both our understanding of cancer and its effects on patients, families, and communities. Moving discoveries to practice expeditiously is paramount to impacting cancer outcomes. The continuing education of cancer care professionals throughout their practice life is vital to facilitating the adoption of therapeutic innovations. Meanwhile, more general educational programs serve to keep cancer patients, their families, and the public informed of the latest findings in cancer research. The National Cancer Institute conducted an assessment of the current knowledge base for cancer education which involved two literature reviews, one of the general literature of the evaluation of medical and health education efforts, and the other of the preceding 5 years of the Journal of Cancer Education (JCE). These reviews explored a wide range of educational models and methodologies. In general, those that were most effective used multiple methodologies, interactive techniques, and multiple exposures over time. Less than one third of the articles in the JCE reported on a cancer education or communication product, and of these, only 70% had been evaluated for effectiveness. Recommendations to improve the evaluation of cancer education and the educational focus of the JCE are provided.

  12. [Lung cancer in elderly patients: lung cancer and lung function].

    PubMed

    Tanita, Tatsuo

    2005-07-01

    The incidence of bronchogenic carcinoma is increasing as life expectancy rises. With increase in the aged population in Japan, the number of patients suffering from lung cancer and candidates for lung resections are increasing. In this paper, the author lists up indispensable procedures for diagnosis, namely, lung function tests, unilateral pulmonary arterial occlusion test and exercise tolerance test. The cut-offs for identifying candidates for elderly patients for lung resections can be applied the same cut-offs for younger patients. Also the author indicates the importance of postoperative management for lung lobe resections. In order to prevent postoperative problems such as congestive heart failure that might be a fetal complication, the most useful check values after the lung surgery for elderly patients are rate of transfusion and urine volume. In conclusion, when elderly patients assert their rights to undergo lung surgery, we, the thoracic surgeons, should reply their requests under the equal quality of safe surgery as that for younger patients. Besides, it is desirable that even elderly patients, over 80 years old, who undergo lung surgery should guarantee their quality of daily life after surgery.

  13. Effects of Tailored Risk Communications for Skin Cancer Prevention and Detection: The PennSCAPE Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Glanz, Karen; Volpicelli, Kathryn; Jepson, Christopher; Ming, Michael E.; Schuchter, Lynn M.; Armstrong, Katrina

    2014-01-01

    Background Prevention and early detection measures for melanoma, such as sun avoidance and skin examinations, are important, but are practiced inconsistently. In this replication of the Project SCAPE trial, we sought to determine whether tailored print materials were more effective at improving adherence than generic print materials for patients at increased-risk of skin cancer. Methods Participants were randomized to receive personalized mailed communications about their skin cancer risk and recommended sun protection, or generic mailings. Participants were Caucasian adults, at moderate or high risk for skin cancer, recruited in outpatient primary care. The main outcomes were overall sun protection behaviors and specific protective behaviors including use of sunscreen, shirt, hat, sunglasses, shade and sun avoidance; recent sunburns; and skin self-examination and provider skin examination. Results One hundred ninety-two (93.2%) subjects completed the study. Six outcome variables showed significant intervention condition effects in mixed effects models: overall sun protection behavior (p = .025); sunscreen use (p = .026); use of sunglasses (p = .011); sunburns in the past three months (p = .033); recency of last skin self-exam (p = .017); and frequency of skin exams by health care provider (p = .016). Conclusions Relative to generic communications, tailored risk communications resulted in improved adherence to six skin cancer protective behaviors, including a composite sun protection behavior measure, sunburns, and health care provider skin examinations. Impact Tailored interventions can be more effective in improving patient prevention behaviors than non-tailored, generic information for patients at moderate to high risk of skin cancer. PMID:25432953

  14. Fertility preservation in young patients' with cancer.

    PubMed

    Dudani, Sharmila; Gupta, Apurva

    2014-10-01

    Preservation of fertility is an important issue in the management of young cancer patients. Though embryo cryostorage is a well-established procedure, it can only be availed by couples. Recent studies have indicated increasing success rates with mature and immature oocyte cryopreservation. Cryostorage induces injuries on the human oocytes which can be minimized by slow freezing and vitrification. Selection of candiidates is crucial so that the most suitable technique can be offered without any delay in initiation of cancer therapy. Factors affecting suitability are age of patient, assessment of ovarian reserve, hormonal status and type and stage of neoplastic disease. Encouraging results have been obtained with oocyte in vitro maturation (IVM) followed by vitrification for cryostorage. Data on the use of vitrified eggs in routine in vitro fertilization (IVF) show that pregnancy rates can be comparable to those achieved with fresh oocytes. PMID:25540565

  15. Why Breast Cancer Patients Seek Traditional Healers

    PubMed Central

    Muhamad, Mazanah; Merriam, Sharan; Suhami, Norhasmilia

    2012-01-01

    Traditional healing is a common practice in low and middle income countries such as Malaysia. Eighty percent of Malaysians consult traditional healers or “bomoh” at some time in their life for health-related issues. The purpose of our study was to explore why breast cancer patients visit traditional healers. This is a qualitative study utilizing in-depth interviews with 11 cancer survivors who sought both traditional and Western medicine. The findings revealed the following reasons for which patients seek traditional healers: (1) recommendation from family and friends, (2) sanction from family, (3) perceived benefit and compatibility, (4) healer credibility, and (5) reservation with Western medicine and system delay. These factors work together and are strongly influenced by the Malaysian cultural context. The issue with the Western health system is common in a developing country with limited health facilities. PMID:22295249

  16. The Doctor-Patient Relationship in the Adolescent Cancer Setting: A Developmentally Focused Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Siembida, Elizabeth J; Bellizzi, Keith M

    2015-09-01

    Several national reports and many individuals in the clinical oncology community have defined the adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer population as individuals diagnosed between the ages of 15 and 39. However, neuroscience and developmental research have identified important decision-making skills (e.g., information processing, reasoning, emotion regulation) that are not fully developed during adolescence, making general, AYA-focused doctor-patient interaction guidelines potentially questionable for the adolescent cancer population. Most studies include adolescents in samples of pediatric cancer patients or include adolescents in samples of young adult cancer patients, but studies rarely consider adolescent cancer patients as a distinct, developmentally unique group. A systematic literature review was undertaken in October 2014 to begin to understand what is known about the doctor-patient relationship and communication preferences within adolescent oncology. From the 25 included studies, three important conclusions emerged: (1) discrepancies among adolescent patients, parents, and providers about the desired extent of involvement in treatment-related decisions; (2) patient desire for developmentally and culturally appropriate information provision; and (3) the desire and preference for how information is delivered, with recognition that these preferences may change with age. There was some variation in themes by study design, with studies directly observing medical consultations reporting less adolescent involvement in discussions than studies that surveyed doctors. The results of this review support the need for developmentally focused research and clinical guidelines that emphasize the experience of adolescent cancer patients separate from their older and younger counterparts.

  17. Informing the cancer patient and family.

    PubMed

    Kallergis, G

    2009-01-01

    One of the questions the therapist poses himself while informing a patient is: whom shall I inform about the diagnosis, treatment and prognosis? If we unconditionally accepted the view that information belongs to the patient from an ethical and legal standpoint, we would automatically exclude the partner and the family. Therefore, the therapist should raise another question: what is the benefit to the patient? To answer the question and the resulting dilemma, we have to leverage the long experience of family therapy and tailor it to the cases we are dealing with. It should be taken into consideration that patient and family are a dynamic system which was balanced before the onset of the disease, but is now disrupted, entering into crisis. Therefore, denial mechanism and personality characteristics we have previously elaborated on, and communication among members play a crucial role in determining the information strategy and the way family should be approached. The steps to approach the patient - family are: 1) Firstly, we evaluate the patient's degree of denial and personality characteristics. Then we receive information about the patient's family so that we can have a rough idea about intrafamily dynamics. 2) Then we gather information from the nurses about the family atmosphere: simple information about the patient's and relatives' relationship like who comes to the hospital, who shows interest in the patient, whether someone is being quarrelsome or not are crucial to assess the dynamics of their relationships. 3) We summon patient and family members in our office. 4) We decide on the steps to inform the patient, and we apply them. Involving family members with the patient seems to improve the results of information and forge concession and therapeutic alliance, which are necessary parameters in the therapeutic follow-up. Usually, doctors and nurses approach patient and family using their experience. Therefore, we need a training that will equip health

  18. Total parenteral nutrition in the cancer patient.

    PubMed

    Mahaffey, S M; Copeland, E M

    1987-01-01

    Malnutrition is a common accompaniment of malignant disease and clearly places the cancer patient at increased risk. Adequate nutritional rehabilitation of the malnourished cancer patient can correct abnormal nutritional indices. In the surgical patient, this has been shown to decrease perioperative morbidity and mortality. Nutritionally repleted patients undergoing radiation or chemotherapy may be more tolerant and, therefore, more likely to respond to treatment although, thus far, a favorable effect on outcome has not been demonstrated conclusively. Patients who are to receive multimodal treatment with chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and surgery are at a particularly high risk for the development of malnutrition, and the institution of one treatment may be predicated on recovery from the previous therapy. When a major abdominal surgical procedure is part of the treatment plan, TPN may be required to prevent malnutrition in an otherwise nutritionally intact patient at the outset of therapy. For patients in whom TPN is indicated, adequate nutritional restoration is of paramount importance. Calories and nitrogen in excess of amounts predicted for noncancer patients may be required. Sequential nutritional assessment is a must to assure the adequacy of nutritional repletion. Considerations of cost and simplicity make the enteral route the preferred avenue for nutritional repletion if the gut is available for use. Certainly, when indicated, however, the risk and expense of parenteral nutrition is justified, particularly in the surgical patient. At present there are no data to justify the use of one particular amino acid formulation or energy source over another. A balanced amino acid solution with glucose as the primary energy source seems equally as efficacious as specialized amino acid formulas and lipid as the primary calorie source.

  19. Decision making by elderly patients with cancer and their caregivers.

    PubMed

    Lewis, M; Pearson, V; Corcoran-Perry, S; Narayan, S

    1997-12-01

    This study explored the scope of decisions encountered by elderly cancer patients and/or their family caregivers, and the types of decision-making assistance requested and required within one practice setting. Semistructured interviews were conducted with five cancer center nurse coordinators (CCNCs). The CCNCs were interviewed weekly for 16 weeks to identify decision-making topics addressed, assistance requested, and perceptions of assistance required during telephone conversations. The CCNCs' reports of 41 telephone conversations revealed 44 specific decision-making topics. Content analysis uncovered 11 categories: symptom management, use of chemotherapy, ancillary choices selection of a medical provider, planning for end-of-life care, alternative therapy, vacation planning, weekend-pass planning, discharge planning, family survivor issues, and involvement of adult children in the elder's care. Elderly patients and/or their family caregivers requested information and assistance with making decisions. CCNCs perceived that callers also needed information clarification, reassurance about their decisions, a listener, permission to change the treatment regimen, and help with communication among health professionals, the elderly patient, and the family.

  20. Hazard function for cancer patients and cancer cell dynamics.

    PubMed

    Horová, Ivana; Pospísil, Zdenek; Zelinka, Jirí

    2009-06-01

    The aim of the paper is to develop a procedure for an estimate of an analytical form of a hazard function for cancer patients. Although a deterministic approach based on cancer cell population dynamics yields the analytical expression, it depends on several parameters which should be estimated. On the other hand, a kernel estimate is an effective nonparametric method for estimating hazard functions. This method provides the pointwise estimate of the hazard function. Our procedure consists of two steps: in the first step we find the kernel estimate of the hazard function and in the second step the parameters in the deterministic model are obtained by the least squares method. A simulation study with different types of censorship is carried out and the developed procedure is applied to real data. PMID:18634801

  1. Hazard function for cancer patients and cancer cell dynamics.

    PubMed

    Horová, Ivana; Pospísil, Zdenek; Zelinka, Jirí

    2009-06-01

    The aim of the paper is to develop a procedure for an estimate of an analytical form of a hazard function for cancer patients. Although a deterministic approach based on cancer cell population dynamics yields the analytical expression, it depends on several parameters which should be estimated. On the other hand, a kernel estimate is an effective nonparametric method for estimating hazard functions. This method provides the pointwise estimate of the hazard function. Our procedure consists of two steps: in the first step we find the kernel estimate of the hazard function and in the second step the parameters in the deterministic model are obtained by the least squares method. A simulation study with different types of censorship is carried out and the developed procedure is applied to real data.

  2. The Relationship between Communication and Health-related Quality of Life in Survivorship Care for Chinese- and Korean-American Breast Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jung-won; Paek, Min-so

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was (1) to compare family communication, decision support (i.e., supporting the patient in making decisions), self-efficacy in patient-physician communication (i.e., patients’ confidence level in communicating with physicians), and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) between Chinese- and Korean-American breast cancer survivors (BCS), and (2) to investigate how family communication, decision support, and self-efficacy in patient-physician communication influences HRQOL for Chinese- and Korean-American BCS. Methods A cross-sectional design was used. A total of 157 Chinese- (n=86) and Korean-American (n=71) BCS were recruited from the California Cancer Surveillance Program and area hospitals in Los Angeles County. The Chronic Care Model was utilized. Results Chinese- and Korean-Americans showed a significant difference in the decision support only. Self-efficacy in patient-physician communication was directly associated with HRQOL for Chinese-Americans, whereas for Korean-Americans, family communication was related to HRQOL. The mediating effects of decision support and self-efficacy in physician-patient communication in the relationship between family communication and HRQOL were observed for Chinese-Americans only. Multiple group analysis demonstrated that the structural paths varied between Chinese- and Korean-American BCS. Conclusions Our results provide insight into the survivorship care of Chinese- and Korean-American BCS, allowing a better understanding of communication among survivors, family, and healthcare providers. Communication skills to manage conflict and attain consensus among them under the cultural contexts are essential to improve HRQOL for BCS. PMID:23111944

  3. [Breast cancer: patient care, rehabilitation, psychooncology].

    PubMed

    Kahán, Zsuzsanna; Szántó, István; Molnár, Mária; Rohánszky, Magda; Koncz, Zsuzsa; Mailáth, Mónika; Kapitány, Zsuzsanna; Dudás, Rita

    2016-09-01

    The development of a recommendation was intended for the follow-up of breast cancer patients treated with curative intent in Hungary. Follow-up includes the permanent contact with and health education of the patient, the surveillance and control of the adverse effects of oncological therapies or radiotherapy, the screening of metachron cancers, and the comprehensive (physical, psychological and social) rehabilitation of the patient. The early detection of local/regional tumor relapse is essential with careful follow-up, but there is no need for screening of distant metastases by means of imaging studies or tumor marker tests. If adjuvant endocrine therapy is needed, optimal adherence should be ensured with supportive therapy. In rare cases, special issues such as breast cancer risk/genetic mutation, pregnancy are raised, which should be thoughtfully discussed in view of recent advances in oncology. Follow-up is generally practised by the oncologist, however, in some cases the social worker, the physiotherapist, the psychooncologist, or in special cases, the lymphoedema expert is to be involved. The follow-up approach should be comprehensive and holistic. PMID:27579724

  4. Appropriateness of Parenteral Nutrition Usage in Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yu-Lin; Lee, Chun-Sung; Chiu, Chong-Chi; Chao, Chien-Ming; Lai, Chih-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    This study is to investigate the indication appropriateness of parenteral nutrition (PN) administration in cancer patients. Between December 2013 and August 2014, all cancer patients who received PN (including total PN and Kabiven) in a regional hospital of Southern Taiwan were included in this retrospective study. A total of 107 cancer patients received PN. Among them, colorectal cancer was the most common type of cancer (n = 45, 42.1%), followed by gastric cancer, head and neck cancer, and esophageal cancer. After evaluation of the appropriateness of PN administration, 88 (82.2%) PN episodes were considered appropriate and unavoidable, 4 (3.7%) as appropriate and avoidable but 15 (14.1%) as inappropriate. In conclusion, PN could be inappropriately used by some oncologic physicians. Physicians and nutrition support team specialists should carefully evaluate the indication of PN administration for cancer patients to obey the generally acknowledged usage rule.

  5. Cancer patients' needs during hospitalisation: a quantitative and qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Tamburini, Marcello; Gangeri, Laura; Brunelli, Cinzia; Boeri, Paolo; Borreani, Claudia; Bosisio, Marco; Karmann, Claude Fusco; Greco, Margherita; Miccinesi, Guido; Murru, Luciana; Trimigno, Patrizia

    2003-01-01

    Background The evaluation of cancer patients needs, especially during that delicate period when they are hospitalized, allows the identification of those areas of care that require to be improved. Aims of the study were to evaluate the needs in cancer inpatients and to improve the understanding of the meanings of the needs expressed. Methods The study was conducted during a "sample day", with all the cancer patients involved having been hospitalized at the Istituto Nazionale Tumori of Milan (INT) for at least 48 hours beforehand. The study was carried out using quantitative and qualitative methodologies. The quantitative part of the study consisted in making use of the Needs Evaluation Questionnaire (NEQ), a standardized questionnaire administered by the INT Psychology Unit members, supported by a group of volunteers from the Milan section of the Italian League Against Cancer. The aim of the qualitative part of the study, by semi-structured interviews conducted with a small sample of 8 hospitalized patients, was to improve our understanding of the meanings, implications of the needs directly described from the point of view of the patients. Such an approach determines the reasons and conditions of the dissatisfaction in the patient, and provides additional information for the planning of improvement interventions. Results Of the 224 eligible patients, 182 (81%) completed the questionnaire. Four of the top five needs expressed by 40% or more of the responders concerned information needs (diagnosis, future conditions, dialogue with doctors, economic-insurance solutions related to the disease). Only one of the 5 was concerned with improved "hotel" services (bathrooms, meals, cleanliness). Qualitative analysis showed that the most expressed need (to receive more information on their future conditions) has the meaning to know how their future life will be affected more than to know his/her actual prognosis. Conclusions Some of the needs which emerged from this

  6. Communication and pragmatic breakdowns in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Bambini, Valentina; Arcara, Giorgio; Martinelli, Ilaria; Bernini, Sara; Alvisi, Elena; Moro, Andrea; Cappa, Stefano F; Ceroni, Mauro

    2016-02-01

    While there is increasing attention toward cognitive changes in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), the domain of pragmatics, defined as the ability to integrate language and context to engage in successful communication, remains unexplored. Here we tested pragmatic abilities in 33 non-demented ALS patients and 33 healthy controls matched for age and education through 6 different tasks, ranging from discourse organization to the comprehension of figurative language, further grouped in three composite measures for pragmatic production, pragmatic comprehension and global pragmatic abilities. For a subgroup of patients, assessment included executive functions and social cognition skills. ALS patients were impaired on all pragmatic tasks relative to controls, with 45% of the patients performing below cut-off in at least one pragmatic task, and 36% impaired on the global pragmatic score. Pragmatic breakdowns were more common than executive deficit as defined by the consensus criteria, and approximately as prevalent as deficits in social cognition. Multiple regression analyses support the idea of an interplay of executive and social cognition abilities in determining the pragmatic performance, although all these domains show some degree of independence. These findings shed light on pragmatic impairment as a relevant dimension of ALS, which deserves further consideration in defining the cognitive profile of the disease, given its vital role for communication and social interaction in daily life. PMID:26799425

  7. Communication and pragmatic breakdowns in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Bambini, Valentina; Arcara, Giorgio; Martinelli, Ilaria; Bernini, Sara; Alvisi, Elena; Moro, Andrea; Cappa, Stefano F; Ceroni, Mauro

    2016-02-01

    While there is increasing attention toward cognitive changes in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), the domain of pragmatics, defined as the ability to integrate language and context to engage in successful communication, remains unexplored. Here we tested pragmatic abilities in 33 non-demented ALS patients and 33 healthy controls matched for age and education through 6 different tasks, ranging from discourse organization to the comprehension of figurative language, further grouped in three composite measures for pragmatic production, pragmatic comprehension and global pragmatic abilities. For a subgroup of patients, assessment included executive functions and social cognition skills. ALS patients were impaired on all pragmatic tasks relative to controls, with 45% of the patients performing below cut-off in at least one pragmatic task, and 36% impaired on the global pragmatic score. Pragmatic breakdowns were more common than executive deficit as defined by the consensus criteria, and approximately as prevalent as deficits in social cognition. Multiple regression analyses support the idea of an interplay of executive and social cognition abilities in determining the pragmatic performance, although all these domains show some degree of independence. These findings shed light on pragmatic impairment as a relevant dimension of ALS, which deserves further consideration in defining the cognitive profile of the disease, given its vital role for communication and social interaction in daily life.

  8. Communication of ALS Patients by Detecting Event-Related Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanou, Naoyuki; Sakuma, Kenji; Nakashima, Kenji

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis(ALS) patients are unable to successfully communicate their desires, although their mental capacity is the same as non-affected persons. Therefore, the authors put emphasis on Event-Related Potential(ERP) which elicits the highest outcome for the target visual and hearing stimuli. P300 is one component of ERP. It is positive potential that is elicited when the subject focuses attention on stimuli that appears infrequently. In this paper, the authors focused on P200 and N200 components, in addition to P300, for their great improvement in the rate of correct judgment in the target word-specific experiment. Hence the authors propose the algorithm that specifies target words by detecting these three components. Ten healthy subjects and ALS patient underwent the experiment in which a target word out of five words, was specified by this algorithm. The rates of correct judgment in nine of ten healthy subjects were more than 90.0%. The highest rate was 99.7%. The highest rate of ALS patient was 100.0%. Through these results, the authors found the possibility that ALS patients could communicate with surrounding persons by detecting ERP(P200, N200 and P300) as their desire.

  9. Do Dutch doctors communicate differently with immigrant patients than with Dutch patients?

    PubMed

    Meeuwesen, Ludwien; Harmsen, Johannes A M; Bernsen, Roos M D; Bruijnzeels, Marc A

    2006-11-01

    The aim of this study was to gain deeper insight into relational aspects of the medical communication pattern in intercultural consultations at GP practices in the Netherlands. We ask whether there are differences in the verbal interaction of Dutch GPs with immigrant and Dutch patients. Data were drawn from 144 adult patient interviews and video observations of consultations between the patients and 31 Dutch GPs. The patient group consisted of 61 non-Western immigrants (Turkish, Moroccan, Surinamese, Antillean, Cape Verdian) and 83 Dutch participants. Affective and instrumental aspects of verbal communication were assessed using Roter's Interaction Analysis System (RIAS). Patients' cultural background was assessed by ethnicity, language proficiency, level of education, religiosity and cultural views (in terms of being more traditional or more modern). Consultations with the non-Western immigrant patients (especially those from Turkey and Morocco) were well over 2 min shorter, and the power distance between GPs and these patients was greater when compared to the Dutch patients. Major differences in verbal interaction were observed on the affective behavior dimensions, but not on the instrumental dimensions. Doctors invested more in trying to understand the immigrant patients, while in the case of Dutch patients they showed more involvement and empathy. Dutch patients seemed to be more assertive in the medical conversation. The differences are discussed in terms of patients' ethnic background, cultural views (e.g. practicing a religion) and linguistic barriers. It is concluded that attention to cultural diversity does matter, as this leads to different medical communication patterns. A two-way strategy is recommended for improving medical communication, with implications for both doctor and patient behavior. PMID:16928417

  10. Distress in cancer patients and primary nurses' empathy skills.

    PubMed

    Reid-Ponte, P

    1992-08-01

    This descriptive, correlational study was designed to explore the relationship between the empathy skills of primary nurses and the distress level of their primary patients. Data on empathy skills were generated from the La Monica Empathy Profile. Data on patient distress were generated from the Profile of Mood State Inventory and a Visual Analogue Scale. A nonprobability convenience sample of 65 primary nurses employed on surgical primary nursing care units of a large teaching hospital participated in the study. Sixty-five cancer patients assigned to the participating primary nurses also took part in the study. Descriptive statistics of each variable were examined. Pearson product-moment correlations were used to examine the hypothesis and the demographic variables for nurses and patients. Analysis of variance was used to assess relationships among many of the demographic variables. A significant correlation (but not in the expected direction) was found between the perceiving/feeling/listening empathy skill and patient distress. Nurses' age, years of experience, and education were significantly correlated with some empathy skills. Distress levels of female patients were higher than those of male patients. In general, nurses scored low in the use of empathy skills, and patients scored low in distress. The complex nature of defining and measuring communication skills and relating these skills to outcomes in patient care, such as distress, requires more study. Research questions exploring how and why nurses' interpersonal skills make a difference to patients and their health care outcomes must be generated by nurse administrators, nurse educators, nurse researchers, and practicing nurses.

  11. Survival of breast cancer patients. Our experience.

    PubMed

    Marrazzoa, Antonio; Taormina, Pietra; David, Massimo; Riili, Ignazio; Casà, Luigi; Catalano, Filippo; Lo Gerfo, Domenico; Noto, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Life expectancy for patients with breast carcinoma has changed in Europe over the last two decades. In Italy, the overall survival rate is about 77% at 5 years. When considering the situation in Sicily, the EUROCARE 2 study examined survival data from the Ragusa Cancer Registry, showing that the curves are worse than in other regions of Italy. Starting from these considerations we decide to evaluate whether these data from the Ragusa Cancer Registry corresponded to Palermo data. So we analysed data from 575 consecutive patients with breast cancer, treated in our Breast Unit from 1990 to 2003 according to the St. Gallen Recommendations and followed for a median period of 5 years. The prognostic role of age, tumour size, nodal status, TNM, stage, grading and hormonal receptors (OR, PR) were analysed and survival curves at 5 and 10 years were produced using the actuarial survival methods. All causes of death were considered. The median follow-up was 33 months. The Log rank test and univariate cox proportional model were used to demonstrate the association between prognostic factors and outcome. When considering T and N status, the curves showed an inverse correlation between survival and increases in these parameters. Overall survival was 92.9% at 5 years and 81.4% at 10 years for T1, 78.4% at 5 years and 61.4% at 10 years for T2 and 40.8% for T3-T4 at 5 and 10 years. Overall survival for NO was 92.1% and 78.2%, respectively, at 5 and 10 years, but decreased to 72.0% and 59.9% at 5 and 10 years for N1. In N2 patients we found that only about 50% of patients were still alive at 5 and 10 years, while for N3 patients the figures were 57.2% and 40%, respectively. PMID:17663369

  12. Nurse-patient communication: language mastery and concept possession.

    PubMed

    Nordby, Halvor

    2006-03-01

    Influential holistic analyses of patient perspectives assume that the concepts that patients associate with medical terms are formed by their total social and cultural contexts. Holistic analyses presuppose conceptual role semantics in the sense that they imply that a medical term must have the same role for a nurse and a patient in order for them to associate the same concept with the term. In recent philosophy of mind, social externalism has emerged as a non-holistic alternative to conceptual role theories. According to social externalism, a nurse and a patient express the same concept by a term if they both have a minimal or better understanding of the term. Three arguments in favour of social externalism are presented in connection with nurse-patient interaction. The first concerns successful communication, the second focuses on belief reports made by patients and the third centres on the need for including medical terms in medical discourse. Finally, the practical implications of the arguments are clarified. The most important of these is that, in cases of misunderstanding, a nurse should not conform to a patient's idiosyncratic understanding, but instead correct the mistaken applications of the term in question.

  13. The same but different: clinician-patient communication with gay and lesbian patients.

    PubMed

    Bonvicini, Kathleen A; Perlin, Michael J

    2003-10-01

    Surveys estimate that 3-6% of the patients seen by physicians are gay or lesbian. There are unique health risks of gays and lesbians that are important to the clinician in determining an accurate diagnosis, providing patient education, and arriving at an appropriate treatment plan. One of the most significant medical risks of these populations includes avoidance of routine health care and dissatisfaction with healthcare. Many of these healthcare risks are not addressed because of lack of communication based on a number of common assumptions including the assumption that the patient is heterosexual. This article includes a summary of the medical literature through computerized searches to March 2002 in MEDLINE, PsychInfo, HEALTHSTAR, and bibliographies in articles on health care with gay and lesbian patients. The search strategy included health care of gays and lesbians and clinician-patient communication, partner and family issues. Secondly, it will examine common communication barriers and provide strategies for enhancing communication with patients in a gender-neutral, non-judgmental manner including suggestions for enlisting the inclusion of patients' families.

  14. Proposal for a Group Counseling Experience for Cancer Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Linda S.

    A model for using group counseling with cancer patients is proposed in this document. The literature on the psychological effects of cancer and the effects of social support are summarized. It is concluded that the literature shows cancer patients are subjected to intense psychological distress and that at the same time their social supports may…

  15. Coping and Communication-Enhancing Intervention versus Supportive Counseling for Women Diagnosed with Gynecological Cancers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manne, Sharon L.; Rubin, Stephen; Edelson, Mitchell; Rosenblum, Norman; Bergman, Cynthia; Hernandez, Enrique; Carlson, John; Rocereto, Thomas; Winkel, Gary

    2007-01-01

    This study compared the efficacy of 2 psychological interventions, a coping and communication-enhancing intervention (CCI) and supportive counseling (SC), in reducing depressive symptoms and cancer-specific distress of women diagnosed with gynecological cancer. Demographic, medical, and psychological moderators of intervention effects were…

  16. Motives of cancer patients for using the Internet to seek social support.

    PubMed

    Yli-Uotila, T; Rantanen, A; Suominen, T

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to describe why Finnish cancer patients choose the internet as a source of social support. The data were collected in May 2010, using an online questionnaire with open-ended questions, through four discussion forums on the websites of the non-profit Cancer Society of Finland. Seventy-four adult patients with cancer participated. The data were analysed using inductive content analysis. The mean age of the participants was 53 years and they were predominantly women. The most common cancer was breast cancer and more than three quarters of the participants had suffered from cancer for less than 5 years. The initial stimuli to use the internet as a source of social support were the ease of communication and access to information as well as the need for emotional and informational support. The actual motives that drove the use of the internet as a source of social support were the requirements for information and peer support, internet technology, a lack of support outside the internet and the negative experiences caused by the illness. The fact that there is an enormous need for information as well as for emotional support and that cancer treatment in Finland is concentrated in major hospitals, to which cancer patients may travel a considerable distance, suggests that nurses should learn to make more frequent virtual contact with their patients. PMID:23320398

  17. Intercultural communication between patients and health care providers: an exploration of intercultural communication effectiveness, cultural sensitivity, stress, and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Ulrey, K L; Amason, P

    2001-01-01

    Cultural diversity is becoming increasingly more important in the workplace. This is particularly true in health care organizations facing demographic shifts in the patients served and their families. This study serves to aid the development of intercultural communication training programs for health care providers by examining how cultural sensitivity and effective intercultural communication, besides helping patients, personally benefit health care providers by reducing their stress. Effective intercultural communication and cultural sensitivity were found to be related. Health care providers' levels of intercultural anxiety also were found to correlate with effective intercultural communication. PMID:11771806

  18. Acupressure and Anxiety in Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Beikmoradi, Ali; Najafi, Fatemeh; Roshanaei, Ghodratallah; Pour Esmaeil, Zahra; Khatibian, Mahnaz; Ahmadi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Anxiety has negative effects on mental and physical performance, quality of life, duration of hospitalization, and even on the treatment of patients with cancer. Objectives: Today acupressure is widely used to treat anxiety. Thus, the present study aimed to investigate the effects of acupressure on anxiety in patients with cancer. Patients and Methods: A double-blind randomized clinical trial was conducted on 85 patients hospitalized with 3 groups including acupressure group (n = 27), sham group (n = 28), and control group (n = 30) in the hematologic ward of Shahid Beheshti Hospital of Hamadan, Iran, in 2013. The sampling permuted-block randomization with triple block was used. The anxiety of the patients in the experimental, sham, and control groups were measured with Spielberger’s State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). Then, real acupressure was performed in the experimental group and fake acupressure in the sham group, and only routine care was provided for the control group. Anxiety of the patients was also assessed at 5 and 10 days after the intervention. Statistical analysis of the data was performed by SPSS software using repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post hoc least significant difference (LSD) test. Results: According to the findings, the mean level of anxiety before the intervention between groups were matched (P > 0.05). Acupressure had a significant influence on the anxiety in the experimental group at 5 (45.30 ± 7.14) and 10 days (43.48 ± 6.82) after the intervention (P < 0.05). However, it did not have a significant impact on their covert anxiety (45.48 ± 7.92 at 5th day vs 45.63 ± 8.08 at 10th day, P > 0.05). No significant differences were observed in the fake points regarding overt and covert anxiety of patients in the sham group (overt anxiety; 47.57 ± 7.85 at 5th day vs. 46.71 ± 7.32 at 10th day, P > 0.05) (covert anxiety; 47.96 ± 6.33 at 5th day vs. 46.89 ± 6.94 at 10th day, P > 0.05). Moreover, the

  19. Midwifery care and patient-provider communication in maternity decisions

    PubMed Central

    Kozhimannil, Katy B.; Attanasio, Laura B.; Yang, Tony; Avery, Melissa; Declercq, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    Objective To characterize reasons women chose midwives as prenatal care providers and to measure the relationship between midwifery care and patient-provider communication in the U.S. context. Methods Retrospective analysis of data from a nationally-representative survey of women who gave birth in 2011–2012 to a single newborn in a U.S. hospital (n=2400). We used multivariate logistic regression models to characterize women who received prenatal care from a midwife, to describe the reasons for this choice, and to examine the association between midwife-led prenatal care and women’s reports about communication. Results Preference for a female clinician and having a particular clinician assigned was associated with higher odds of midwifery care (AOR=2.65, 95% CI=1.70, 4.14 and AOR=1.63, 95% CI=1.04, 2.58). A woman with midwifery care had lower odds of reporting that she held back questions because her preference for care was different from her provider’s recommendation (AOR=0.46, 95% CI=0.23, 0.89) or because she did not want to be perceived as difficult (AOR=0.48, 95% CI=0.28, 0.81). Women receiving midwifery care also had lower odds of reporting that the provider used medical words were hard for them to understand (AOR=0.58, 95% CI=0.37, 0.91) and not feeling encouraged to discuss all their concerns (AOR=0.54, 95% CI=0.34, 0.89). Conclusions Women whose prenatal care was provided by midwives report better communication compared with those cared for by other types of clinicians. Systems-level interventions, such as assigning a clinician, may improve access to midwifery care and the associated improvements in patient-provider communication in maternity care. PMID:25874874

  20. Challenges in ductal carcinoma in situ risk communication and decision-making: report from an American Cancer Society and National Cancer Institute workshop.

    PubMed

    Partridge, Ann H; Elmore, Joann G; Saslow, Debbie; McCaskill-Stevens, Worta; Schnitt, Stuart J

    2012-01-01

    In September 2010, the American Cancer Society and National Cancer Institute convened a conference to review current issues in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) risk communication and decision-making and to identify directions for future research. Specific topics included patient and health care provider knowledge and attitudes about DCIS and its treatment, how to explain DCIS to patients given the heterogeneity of the disease, consideration of nomenclature changes, and the usefulness of decision tools/aids. This report describes the proceedings of the workshop in the context of the current literature and discusses future directions. Evidence suggests that there is a lack of clarity about the implications and risks of a diagnosis of DCIS among patients, providers, and researchers. Research is needed to understand better the biology and mechanisms of the progression of DCIS to invasive breast cancer and the factors that predict those subtypes of DCIS that do not progress, as well as efforts to improve the communication and informed decision-making surrounding DCIS.

  1. Prevalence of pulmonary embolism at necropsy in patients with cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Svendsen, E; Karwinski, B

    1989-01-01

    The series studied comprised 6197 patients who had died of or who had cancer at death and represents all patients with cancer from 21,530 necropsies performed at this department from 1960-84. Pulmonary embolism was significantly more common among cancer patients than in those with non-neoplastic diseases. Among those palliatively treated, patients with ovarian cancer, cancer of the extrahepatic bile duct system, and cancer of the stomach had the highest prevalence of pulmonary embolism (34.6%, 31.7%, and 15.2%, respectively). Necropsy patients with cancer of the oesophagus and larynx, together with leukaemia, myelomatosis, and malignant lymphoma had the lowest prevalence (0-5.6%). Palliatively treated cancers in organs of the peritoneal cavity had a significantly higher incidence than all other cancers combined. Cancer of the peritoneal cavity may impede venous drainage from the lower limbs and thus be an important factor in the onset of deep calf vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. It is concluded that cancer represents an increased risk factor for onset of pulmonary embolism, in particular in patients with ovarian cancer and cancer of the extrahepatic bile duct system. PMID:2475526

  2. Diagnosis, disease stage, and distress of Chinese cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Boyan; Chen, Huiping; Deng, Yaotiao; Yi, Tingwu; Wang, Yuqing

    2016-01-01

    Background The objective is to assess how cancer patients know about their diagnosis what they know about their real stage, and the relationship between cancer stage and psychological distress. Methods A questionnaire including the Distress Thermometer was delivered to 422 cancer inpatients. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results Most of patients (68.7%) knew the bad news immediately after diagnosis. Half of patients knew their diagnosis directly from medical reports. Nearly one third of patients were informed by doctors. Cancer stages, which patients believed, differed significantly from their real disease stages (P<0.001). Over half of patients did not know their real disease stages. Patients with stage I–III cancer were more likely to know their real disease stage than patients with stage IV cancer (P<0.001). Distress scores of cancer patients were determined by the real cancer stage (P=0.012), not the stage which patients believed. Conclusions Although most of participants knew the bad news immediately after diagnosis, less than half of them knew their real disease stage. Patient with stage I–III cancer was more likely to know the real disease stage and had a DT score <4 than patient with stage IV disease. PMID:27004220

  3. Cancer survivorship: cardiotoxic therapy in the adult cancer patient; cardiac outcomes with recommendations for patient management.

    PubMed

    Steingart, Richard M; Yadav, Nandini; Manrique, Carlos; Carver, Joseph R; Liu, Jennifer

    2013-12-01

    Many types of cancer are now curable or, if not cured, becoming a chronic illness. In 2012, it was estimated that there were more than 13,500,000 cancer survivors in the United States. Late outcomes of these survivors are increasingly related to cardiovascular disease, either as a consequence of the direct effects of cancer therapy or its adverse effects on traditional cardiac risk factors (eg, obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and diabetes mellitus). This article describes the therapies that have led to advances in cancer survival and the acute and chronic cardiovascular toxicities associated with these therapies. Recommendations are made for the surveillance and management of cancer survivors. Published guidelines on the subject of cardio-oncology are reviewed in light of clinical experience caring for these patients. To supplement this cancer-related knowledge base, appropriateness criteria and guidelines for cardiac care in the general population were extrapolated to cancer survivors. The result is a series of recommendations for surveillance and management of cardiovascular disease in cancer survivors. PMID:24331191

  4. Managing communication with young people who have a potentially life threatening chronic illness: qualitative study of patients and parents

    PubMed Central

    Young, Bridget; Dixon-Woods, Mary; Windridge, Kate C; Heney, David

    2003-01-01

    Objectives To examine young people's and parents' accounts of communication about cancer in childhood. Design Semistructured interviews analysed using the constant comparative method. Setting Paediatric oncology unit. Participants 13 families, comprising 19 parents (13 mothers, six fathers) and 13 patients aged 8-17 years, recruited from one paediatric oncology unit. The patients had cancer or brain tumour. Results Most parents described acting in an executive-like capacity, managing what and how their children were told about their illness, particularly at the time of diagnosis. Their accounts were shaped by concerns to manage their identity as strong and optimistic parents and to protect their child's wellbeing. The patients identified elements of their parents' role that both facilitated and constrained their communication, and while they welcomed their parents' involvement, some expressed unease with the constraining aspects of their parents' role. Some young people described feeling marginalised in consultations and pointed to difficulties they experienced in encounters with some doctors. Conclusions There are difficulties in managing communication with young people who have a chronic, life threatening illness. Health professionals need to be aware of how the social positioning of young people (relative to adults) and the executive role of parents can contribute to the marginalisation of young people and hamper the development of successful relationships between themselves and young patients. What is already known on this topicThe BMA has supported the principle of open communication with young patientsYoung people are sometimes excluded from participating in consultations and parents are reluctant to communicate openly with their seriously ill childrenWhat this study addsParents take on an executive-like role, managing what and how their children are told about their illnessesThis role both facilitates and constrains communication with young peopleSome young

  5. Management of bleeding complications in patients with cancer on DOACs.

    PubMed

    Schulman, Sam; Shrum, Jeffrey; Majeed, Ammar

    2016-04-01

    There has been a concern that major bleeding events (MBE) on direct-acting oral anticoagulants (DOACs) will be more difficult to manage than on vitamin K antagonists. Patients with cancer and DOAC-associated bleeding may be even more of a challenge to manage. We therefore reviewed the literature on bleeding in patients with cancer on DOACs. In addition, we performed an analysis of individual patient data from 5 phase III trials on treatment with dabigatran with focus on those with cancer. In 6 randomized trials the risk of MBE in patients with cancer was similar on treatment with DOACs compared to vitamin K antagonists. Bleeding was in the majority of patients managed with supportive therapy alone. In the individual patient data analysis there were no significant differences in use of hemostatic products, transfusion of red cells, effectiveness of management, bleeding-related mortality or 30-day all-cause mortality between patients with cancer treated with dabigatran or with warfarin. Local hemostatic therapy, including resection of the cancer site was more common in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding with cancer than among those without cancer. We conclude that management of bleeding in patients with cancer and on a DOAC does not pose a greater challenge than management of bleeding in patients without cancer. PMID:27067968

  6. Cancer procoagulant in patients with adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Kaźmierczak, Maciej; Lewandowski, Krzysztof; Wojtukiewicz, Marek Z; Turowiecka, Zofia; Kołacz, Edyta; Lojko, Anna; Skrzydlewska, Elzbieta; Zawilska, Krystyna; Komarnicki, Mieczysław

    2005-11-01

    Cancer procoagulant (CP) is a cysteine proteinase that may be produced by malignant and foetal tissue. The possible role of CP in the pathogenesis of cancer-related thrombosis has been suggested recently. The purpose of the study was to evaluate coagulation prothrombotic markers and their relation to CP concentration in the blood of patients with gastrointestinal adenocarcinomas (GIAC). The study group consisted of 45 patients with confirmed diagnosis of adenocarcinoma (stomach, 18 patients; colon, 27 patients) and without evident metastatic disease. In 24 patients further observation showed metastases. The control group for CP was composed of 10 healthy subjects. Blood samples were drawn on the admission day, before any treatment. Among 45 patients with GIAC, deep venous thrombosis was observed in two (4.4%). In all patients the CP activity in the serum was found, and the mean CP activity shortened the coagulation time almost three times compared with the healthy control group. Also, the mean thrombin-antithrombin complex concentration was above the normal range. A significant elevation of the mean prothrombin fragment 1+2 plasma content in this group of patients was noticed. Despite these observations, CP remained within the normal range and did not correlate with thrombin-antithrombin complex or prothrombin fragment 1+2 plasma concentrations. A positive correlation was observed between serum CP and fibrinogen concentration, and a negative correlation between CP and free protein S plasma content (P = 0.04 and P = 0.025, respectively). A negative correlation between activated protein C resistance ratio and protein C activity in the plasma was confirmed. Protein C activity in the plasma showed a correlation with free protein S plasma content. Analysis of factors influencing the activated partial thromboplastin time revealed the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies in seven persons from the study group (in three cases of IgG and in four cases of IgM class). Our

  7. Strategic use of communication to market cancer prevention and control to vulnerable populations.

    PubMed

    Kreps, Gary L

    2008-01-01

    There are significant challenges to communicating relevant cancer prevention and control information to health care consumers due both to the complexities of the health information to be communicated and the complexities of health communication, especially with vulnerable populations. The need for effective communication about cancer risks, early detection, prevention, care, and survivorship is particularly acute, yet also tremendously complex, for reaching vulnerable populations, those groups of people who are most likely to suffer significantly higher levels of morbidity and mortality from cancers than other segments of the population. These vulnerable populations, typically the poorest, lowest educated, and most disenfranchised members of modern society, are heir to serious cancer-related health disparities. Vulnerable populations often have health literacy difficulties, cultural barriers, and economic challenges to accessing and making sense of relevant health information. This paper examines these challenges to communicating relevant information to vulnerable populations and suggests strategies for effectively using different communication media for marketing cancer prevention and control to reduce health disparities and promote public health.

  8. Tamoxifen OK for Breast Cancer Patients without Uterine Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_161118.html Tamoxifen OK for Breast Cancer Patients Without Uterine Abnormalities: Study Pretreatment ultrasounds may ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For most women, taking the breast cancer drug tamoxifen doesn't increase their risk of ...

  9. Rational Suicide and the Terminally Ill Cancer Patient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Karolynn; Tuckel, Peter

    1985-01-01

    Reviews research concerning the nature of the relationship between cancer and suicide and considers its implications on the rational suicide movement. Findings do not indicate a higher incidence of suicide among cancer patients, questioning the rational suicide position. (JAC)

  10. Chemotherapy Regimen Extends Survival in Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Patients

    Cancer.gov

    A four-drug chemotherapy regimen has produced the longest improvement in survival ever seen in a phase III clinical trial of patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer, one of the deadliest types of cancer.

  11. Facilitating the Pediatric Cancer Patient's Return to School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Judith W.; Scarvalone, Susan A.

    1982-01-01

    Describes the educational needs of the pediatric cancer patient in returning to school. Discusses attitudes of parents and school personnel. Presents a seminar for teachers and school nurses of elementary pupils treated at a cancer center. (RC)

  12. Patient attitudes, behaviours, and other factors considered by doctors when estimating cancer patients' anxiety and desire for information.

    PubMed

    Fröjd, Camilla; Lampic, Claudia; Larsson, Gunnel; Birgegård, Gunnar; von Essen, Louise

    2007-12-01

    The aim was to describe the patient attitudes, behaviours, and other factors, considered by doctors when estimating cancer patients' worry about how the disease may develop and the desire for information about the disease and its treatment. Data was gathered through semi-structured interviews with 19 doctors regarding 29 patients within endocrine oncology and haematology care, and the data were analysed by content analysis. The doctors considered the patients' verbal expressions, verbal behaviours, questions, body language, and facial expressions together with their own professional knowledge and experience, when estimating the patients' worry and desire for information. The doctors also considered contextual factors, patients' demographical factors, and medical situation when estimating the patients' worry, and also when estimating the patients' desire for information. The findings illustrate that estimating patients' worry and desire for information is a multifaceted and complex task, and that doctors consider not only the patients' verbal and nonverbal cues, but also factors, such as their own professional knowledge and experience, contextual factors, and patients' demographical variables. The findings should be communicated to doctors who meet cancer patients in medical consultations in order to illuminate the complexity of the medical consultation. The awareness of potentially important patient cues and other factors may aid doctors in their efforts to gain insight about their patients' emotions and informational needs. PMID:18036016

  13. Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strauss, Andre

    The following essays on communication are presented: communication as a condition of survival, communication for special purposes, the means of transmission of communication, communication within social and economic structures, the teaching of communication through the press, the teaching of modern languages, communication as a point of departure,…

  14. Lymphedema After Surgery in Patients With Endometrial Cancer, Cervical Cancer, or Vulvar Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-23

    Lymphedema; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IB Vulvar Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIB Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIC Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVB Vulvar Cancer

  15. Nononcologic Disease in Patients with Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lowitz, Barry B.; Benjamin, Robert S.

    1977-01-01

    Nononcologic medical problems are common in patients with cancer. Failure to evaluate and treat these problems leads to considerable morbidity and mortality in people who often have potential for both comfortable and productive lives. While a physician is sometimes powerless to prevent the progression of underlying cancer, he must not allow a diagnostic category to color his approach. By seeing only an end point which is inevitable for all people, one could be inclined not to treat what is treatable. With clinical judgment, information and the eternal question of diagnosticians, “What else could this be?”, a physician can focus not on the inevitability of death but on the quality of life. PMID:878475

  16. Complementary and Integrative Health Practices Among Hispanics Diagnosed with Colorectal Cancer: Utilization and Communication with Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Black, David S.; Lam, Chun Nok; Nguyen, Nathalie T.; Ihenacho, Ugonna

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Complementary and integrative health (CIH) use among Hispanic adults with colorectal cancer (CRC) diagnosis is not well documented. Understanding the prevalence and patterns of CIH use among Hispanics offers insights to uncover potential needs for clinical services. Design: Participants were age 21 years or older with a first-time diagnosis of CRC from population-based cancer registries in California. In-person and/or telephone-based interviews were administered to collect data on CIH use. Demographic and clinical diagnosis data were abstracted from medical records. Descriptive statistical and logistic regression was used to analyze the frequencies and associations between selected patient characteristics and CIH use. Results: Among 631 Hispanic patients, 40.1% reported ever using CIH. Herbal products/dietary supplements were used most often (35.3%), followed by bodywork (16.5%), mind–body practices (7.8%), and homeopathy (6.7%). About 60% of participants reported CIH use to address specific health conditions; however, most patients did not discuss CIH use with their physicians (76.3%). Women reported higher CIH use than did men (45.1% versus 35.9%; odds ratio, 1.49 [95% confidence interval, 1.07–2.08]; p = 0.02). CIH use did not differ by clinical stage, time since diagnosis, or preferred language. Conclusions: CIH use is prevalent among Hispanic patients with CRC, especially women. Little communication about CIH use occurs between participants and their healthcare providers. Efforts aimed at improving integrative oncology services provide an opportunity to address such gaps in healthcare service. PMID:27163178

  17. Meeting the needs of cancer patients: is there a need for an organizational change?

    PubMed

    Foà, Chiara; Mancini, Tiziana; Prandi, Rossella; Ghirardi, Linda; De Vincenzi, Franca; Cornelli, Maria Cristina; Copelli, Patrizia; Artioli, Giovanna

    2015-01-01

    As stated in the literature the most important needs of cancer patients are not adequately meet. Improving information, communication and education provided have not led to incisive changes in the organizational model of the oncology departments. The study contributes to this direction, by planning an "Integrated Operating Point" (I.O.P.) dedicated to cancer patients and their relatives in Italy. 42 Some professionals, patients and relatives were involved and 42 of them participated in focus group/or interviews. Results of thematic content analysis allow us to sketch out some key elements that I.O.P. should have in order to support cancer patients and their families. Integration of services, continuity of care, and cooperation between professionals involved are key elements that might qualify such organizational development.

  18. Locating relationship and communication issues among stressors associated with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Weber, Kirsten M; Solomon, Denise Haunani

    2008-11-01

    This article clarifies how the social contexts in which breast cancer survivors live can contribute to the stress they experience because of the disease. Guided by Solomon and Knobloch's (2004) relational turbulence model and Petronio's (2002) communication privacy management theory, this study explores personal relationship and communication boundary issues within stressors that are associated with the diagnosis, treatment, and early survivorship of breast cancer. A qualitative analysis of discourse posted on breast cancer discussion boards and weblogs using the constant comparative method and open-coding techniques revealed 12 sources of stress. Using axial coding methods and probing these topics for underlying relationship and communication issues yielded 5 themes. The discussion highlights the implications of the findings for the theories that guided this investigation and for breast cancer survivorship more generally.

  19. Communication in cancer care: psycho-social, interactional, and cultural issues. A general overview and the example of India.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Santosh K; Strohschein, Fay J; Saraf, Gayatri; Loiselle, Carmen G

    2014-01-01

    Communication is a core aspect of psycho-oncology care. This article examines key psychosocial, cultural, and technological factors that affect this communication. Drawing from advances in clinical work and accumulating bodies of empirical evidence, the authors identify determining factors for high quality, efficient, and sensitive communication and support for those affected by cancer. Cancer care in India is highlighted as a salient example. Cultural factors affecting cancer communication in India include beliefs about health and illness, societal values, integration of spiritual care, family roles, and expectations concerning disclosure of cancer information, and rituals around death and dying. The rapidly emerging area of e-health significantly impacts cancer communication and support globally. In view of current globalization, understanding these multidimensional psychosocial, and cultural factors that shape communication are essential for providing comprehensive, appropriate, and sensitive cancer care.

  20. Qualitative analysis of cancer patients' experiences using donated human milk.

    PubMed

    Rough, Susanne M; Sakamoto, Pauline; Fee, Caroline H; Hollenbeck, Clarie B

    2009-05-01

    This represents the first published account from the patient's perspective of the use of human milk as cancer therapy. Purposive sampling was used to select a sample of 10 participants. Five were patients and 5 were family proxies. Individual interviews were conducted using confirmatory interviewing technique to obtain individual perspectives on the motivation for cancer patients to take donated human milk. Human milk therapy improved the quality of life (QOL) measures in the physical, psychological, and spiritual domains for most patients interviewed. The patients continued their use of human milk despite cost, taste, and discouragement from the conventional medical community. The study results support the theory that QOL may be more important to cancer patients than cancer outcomes and may improve patient medical care overall. These interviews offer information to cancer patients, their practitioners, and donor milk banks on outcomes and symptom relief from this therapy.

  1. Establishing an internet-based paediatric cancer registration and communication system for the Hungarian paediatric oncology network.

    PubMed

    Borgulya, Gábor; Jakab, Zsuzsanna; Schuler, Dezso; Garami, Miklós

    2004-01-01

    Cancer registration has developed in Europe over the last 50 years, and in the last decade intensive joint activities between the European Cancer Registries, in response to the need of pan-European harmonization of registration practices, have taken place. The Hungarian Paediatric Cancer Registry has been functioning as the database of the Hungarian Paediatric Oncology Network since 1971, aiming to follow the incidence and the treatment efficacy of malignant diseases. The goals of this globally unique open source information system are the following: 1) to raise the quality of the registration system to the European level by developing an Internet-based registration and communication system, modernizing the database, establishing automatic statistical analyses and adding an Internet website, 2) to support clinical epidemiological studies that we conduct with international collaborators on detailed analyses of the characteristics of patients and their diseases, evaluation of new diagnostic and therapeutic methods, prevention programs, and long-term quality of life and side effects. The benefits of the development of the Internet-based registration and communication system are as follows: a) introduction of an Internet-based case reporting system, b) modernization of the registry database according to international recommendations, c) automatic statistical summaries, encrypted mail systems, document repository, d) application of data security and privacy standards, e) establishment of a website and compilation of educational materials. The overall objective of this scientific project is to contribute towards the improvement of cancer prevention and cancer care for the benefit of the public in general and of cancer patients in particular. PMID:15718593

  2. Recall in Older Cancer Patients: Measuring Memory for Medical Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jansen, Jesse; van Weert, Julia; van der Meulen, Nienke; van Dulmen, Sandra; Heeren, Thea; Bensing, Jozien

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Remembering medical treatment information may be particularly taxing for older cancer patients, but to our knowledge this ability has never been assessed in this specific age group only. Our purpose in this study was to investigate older cancer patients' recall of information after patient education preceding chemotherapy. Design and…

  3. A web-based interactive tool to improve breast cancer patient centredness.

    PubMed

    Gorini, Alessandra; Mazzocco, Ketti; Kondylakis, Haridimos; McVie, Gordon; Pravettoni, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    The uniqueness of a patient as determined by the integration of clinical data and psychological aspects should be the aspired aim of a personalized medicine approach. Nevertheless, given the time constraints usually imposed by the clinical setting, it is not easy for physicians to collect information about the patient's unique mental dimensions and needs related to her illness. Such information may be useful in tailoring patient-physician communication, improving the patient's understanding of provided information, her involvement in the treatment process, and in general her empowerment during and after the therapeutic journey. The primary objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of an interactive empowerment tool (IEm) on enhancing the breast cancer patient-physician experience, in terms of increasing empowerment, i.e. by providing physicians with a personalised patient's profile, accompanied by specific recommendations to advise them how to interact with each individual patient on the basis of her personal profile. The study will be implemented as a two-arm randomised controlled trial with 100 adult breast cancer patients who fill in the ALGA-BC questionnaire, a computerised validated instrument to evaluate the patient's physical and psychological characteristics following a breast cancer diagnosis. The IEm tool will collect and analyse the patient's answers in real time and send them, together with specific recommendations to the physician's computer immediately before physician's first encounter with the patient. Patients will be randomised to either the intervention group using the IEm tool or to a control group who will only fill in the questionnaire without taking advantage of the tool (physicians will not receive the patient's profile). The proposed approach is supposed to improve the patient-physician communication leading to increased patient participation in the therapeutic process as a consequence leading to improvement in patient empowerment

  4. [COMORBIDITIES IN PATIENTS WITH ONCOGYNECOLOGICAL CANCER].

    PubMed

    Tzoneva, K; Chakalova, G

    2016-01-01

    Comorbidities may directly affect the prognosis of the disease of interest or may indirectly affect the prognosis by affecting the choice of treatment. The aim of this study is to determine comorbidities in pacients with gynecological cancer. The study included 100 consecutive pacients for the period 01.01.2014-08.-5.2014 in Gynecological department of Specialized Hospital for ActivTratament in Oncology. The most common disease are arterial hipertony diabetes and obesity. In most patients, establish one or more accompanying illnesses that increase with age. PMID:27514167

  5. The importance of patient-provider communication in end-of-life care.

    PubMed

    Rice, Timothy R; Dobry, Yuriy; Novakovic, Vladan; Appel, Jacob M

    2012-12-01

    Successful formulation and implementation of end-of-life care requires ongoing communication with the patient. When patients, for reasons of general medical or psychiatric illness, fail to verbally communicate, providers must be receptive to messages conveyed through alternate avenues of communication. We present the narrative of a man with schizophrenia who wished to forgo hemodialysis as a study in the ethical importance of attention to nonverbal communication. A multilayered understanding of the patient, as may be provided by both behavioral and motivational models, can inform the provider's ability to receive, process, and represent communicated content to the patient or his or her surrogate decision-maker.

  6. Communication strategies employed by rare disease patient organizations in Spain.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Esparcia, Antonio; López-Villafranca, Paloma

    2016-08-01

    The current study focuses on communication strategies employed by rare disease patient organizations. The aims of these organizations are: educate and inform the public about rare diseases, raise awareness of the problems related to rare diseases, and achieve social legitimacy in order give visibility to their demands. We analyzed the portrayal of rare disease and patient organizations by Spain's major media organizations in terms of circulation and viewership - the press (El País, El Mundo, La Vanguardia,ABC and El Periódico), radio (CadenaSer, Onda Cero, Cope and RNE), and television (Telecinco, Antena 3, La 1, La Sexta, Cuatro) -between 2012 and 2014.We then carried out a descriptive analysis of communication activities performed via the World Wide Web and social networks by 143 national organizations. Finally, we conducted a telephone questionnaire of a representative sample of 90 organizations in order to explore the association between media presence and funding and public image. The triangulation of quantitative and qualitative methods allowed us to meet the study's objectives. Increased visibility of the organizations afforded by an increase in the coverage of the topic by the medialed to an increase in membership - but not in donations - and increased awareness of these diseases. PMID:27557016

  7. Communication strategies employed by rare disease patient organizations in Spain.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Esparcia, Antonio; López-Villafranca, Paloma

    2016-08-01

    The current study focuses on communication strategies employed by rare disease patient organizations. The aims of these organizations are: educate and inform the public about rare diseases, raise awareness of the problems related to rare diseases, and achieve social legitimacy in order give visibility to their demands. We analyzed the portrayal of rare disease and patient organizations by Spain's major media organizations in terms of circulation and viewership - the press (El País, El Mundo, La Vanguardia,ABC and El Periódico), radio (CadenaSer, Onda Cero, Cope and RNE), and television (Telecinco, Antena 3, La 1, La Sexta, Cuatro) -between 2012 and 2014.We then carried out a descriptive analysis of communication activities performed via the World Wide Web and social networks by 143 national organizations. Finally, we conducted a telephone questionnaire of a representative sample of 90 organizations in order to explore the association between media presence and funding and public image. The triangulation of quantitative and qualitative methods allowed us to meet the study's objectives. Increased visibility of the organizations afforded by an increase in the coverage of the topic by the medialed to an increase in membership - but not in donations - and increased awareness of these diseases.

  8. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use Among Cancer Patients and Determination of Affecting Factors: A Questionnaire Study.

    PubMed

    Üstündağ, Sema; Demir Zencirci, Ayten

    2015-01-01

    This descriptive and cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the use and effects of complementary and alternative medicine on cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. The research was conducted in Daytime Chemotherapy Unit of the College District Outpatients in the Ankara Numune Education and Research Hospital and comprised 397 patients in the oncology outpatients. Written informed consents were obtained from all participants. Among the participants, 52.6% were women, 85.1% married, 10.6% illiterate, 41.1% housewife, and 8.8% civil servants. Among the patients participated in the study, 27.7% had cancer in the family, 22.6% had gastrointestinal cancer, and 22.1% had breast cancer. Most of the patients (92.2%) resorted to religious and cultural approaches, and some patients (33.8%) used nutritional and herbal products besides medical treatment. The nutritional and herbal products used as remedy included stinging nettle (22.3%), fennel flower (20.1%), and herbal products that were advertised by herbalists in media (9.7%). It was determined that most of the patients resorting to complementary or alternative medicine were women (52.6%), housewife (51.5%), and patients with a history of cancer in the family (37.7%). Complementary and alternative medicine use as a remedy for cure is common among patients in Turkey. But when it is considered that many of these products had the potential to negatively affect cancer therapy, it is crucial that nurses providing care to cancer patients should be well informed about complementary therapies, be aware of the potential risks and benefits, and communicate openly with patients on their health care choices. PMID:26465625

  9. Patient preferences in early glottic cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    McNeil, Michael L; Wilke, Derek R; Taylor, S Mark

    2016-07-01

    Patients with early-stage glottic cancer are primarily treated with one of three options: endoscopic laser excision, external-beam radiation, or open conservation surgery. We sought to determine patient preferences for treatment when presented with a choice between CO2 laser resection and radiation (open conservation surgery was not offered because the endoscopic approach is preferred at our institution). This prospective cohort study was conducted at the Dalhousie University Faculty of Medicine in Halifax, Canada. Our patient population was made up of 54 men and 10 women, aged 30 to 84 years (mean: 65.0 ± 11.2). Their disease were staged as follows: carcinoma in situ, n = 11; T1a = 21; T1b = 6; and T2 = 26. Patients were quoted identical cure rates for the two treatment modalities. The controversial issue of voice outcomes was discussed, but no leading information was given to the study cohort. All 64 patients chose CO2 laser resection as opposed to radiation therapy for definitive treatment. PMID:27434477

  10. Cancer patients’ experiences of using an Interactive Health Communication Application (IHCA)

    PubMed Central

    Grimsbø, Gro H.; Engelsrud, Gunn H.; Ruland, Cornelia M.

    2012-01-01

    Interactive Health Communication Applications (IHCAs) are increasingly used in health care. Studies document that IHCAs provide patients with knowledge and social support, enhance self- efficacy and can improve behavioural and clinical outcomes. However, research exploring patients’ experiences of using IHCAs has been scarce. The aim of this study was to explore cancer patients’ perspectives and experiences related to the use of an IHCA called WebChoice in their homes. Qualitative interviews were conducted with infrequent, medium and frequent IHCA users—six women and four men with breast and prostate cancer. The interviews were transcribed and analyzed inspired by interactionistic perspectives. We found that some patients’ perceived WebChoice as a “friend,” others as a “stranger.” Access to WebChoice stimulated particularly high frequency users to position themselves as “information seeking agents,” assuming an active patient role. However, to position oneself as an “active patient” was ambiguous and emotional. Feelings of “calmness”, “normalization of symptoms”, feelings of “being part of a community”, feeling “upset” and “vulnerable”, as well as “feeling supported” were identified. Interaction with WebChoice implied for some users an increased focus on illness. Our findings indicate that the interaction between patients and an IHCA such as WebChoice occurs in a variety of ways, some of which are ambivalent or conflicting. Particularly for frequent and medium frequency users, it offers support, but may at the same time reinforce an element of uncertainty in their life. Such insights should be taken into consideration in the future development of IHCAs in healthcare in general and in particular for implementation into patients’ private sphere. PMID:22582085

  11. Can we deconstruct cancer, one patient at a time?

    PubMed Central

    Blau, C. Anthony; Liakopoulou, Effie

    2014-01-01

    Patients with cancer face an ever-widening gap between the exponential rate at which technology improves and the linear rate at which these advances are translated into clinical practice. Closing this gap will require the establishment of learning loops that intimately link lab and clinic and enable the immediate transfer of knowledge, thereby engaging highly motivated patients with cancer as true partners in research. Here, we discuss the goal of creating a distributed network that aims to place world-class resources at the disposal of select patients with cancer and their oncologists, and then use these intensively monitored individual patient experiences to improve collective understanding of how cancer works. PMID:23102584

  12. Peculiarities of Anxiety Score Distribution in Adult Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Blank, Mikhail; Blank, Olga; Myasnikova, Ekaterina; Denisova, Daria

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the present research is to investigate and analyze possible peculiarities of the psychological state of cancer patients undergoing treatment. Scores characterizing the trait and state anxiety were acquired using the Integrative Anxiety Test from four groups: adults with no appreciable disease, pregnant women, cancer patients examined during the specific antitumor treatment, and cancer patients brought into lasting clinical remission. Statistical analysis of the testing results revealed the bimodal type of the distribution of scores. The only statistically significant exception was the distribution of the state anxiety scores in cancer patients undergoing treatment that was clearly unimodal. PMID:26176239

  13. Teaching and Assessing Doctor-Patient Communication Using Remote Standardized Patients and SKYPE: Feedback from Medical Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horber, Dot; Langenau, Erik E.; Kachur, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Teaching and assessing doctor-patient communication has become a priority in medical education. This pilot study evaluated resident physicians' perceptions of teaching and assessing doctor-patient communication skills related to pain management using a web-based format. Fifty-nine resident physicians completed four doctor-patient clinical…

  14. Exosomal transfer of functional small RNAs mediates cancer-stroma communication in human endometrium.

    PubMed

    Maida, Yoshiko; Takakura, Masahiro; Nishiuchi, Takumi; Yoshimoto, Tanihiro; Kyo, Satoru

    2016-02-01

    Exosomes are small membrane vesicles secreted from a variety of cell types. Recent evidence indicates that human cells communicate with each other by exchanging exosomes. Cancer cells closely interact with neighboring stromal cells, and together they cooperatively promote disease via bidirectional communication. Here, we investigated whether exosomes can play roles in intercellular communication between cancer cells and neighboring fibroblasts. Endometrial fibroblasts were isolated from normal endometrial tissues and from endometrial cancer tissues, and cell-to-cell transfer of endometrial cancer cell line Ishikawa-derived exosomes was examined. The isolated fibroblasts were cultured in conditioned media from CD63-GFP-expressing Ishikawa cells, and we found that GFP-positive exosomes were transferred from Ishikawa cells to the fibroblasts. Next, we introduced a shRNA for a luciferase gene into Ishikawa cells. This shRNA was encapsulated into exosomes, was transferred to the fibroblasts, and then downregulated luciferase expression in the fibroblasts. The mature microRNAs naturally expressed in Ishikawa-derived exosomes were also transported into the endometrial fibroblasts, and they altered the microRNA expression profiles of the fibroblasts. These results indicated that endometrial cancer cells could transmit small regulatory RNAs to endometrial fibroblasts via exosomes. Our findings document a previously unknown mode of intercellular communication between cancer cells and related fibroblasts in human endometrium. PMID:26700550

  15. Exosomal transfer of functional small RNAs mediates cancer-stroma communication in human endometrium.

    PubMed

    Maida, Yoshiko; Takakura, Masahiro; Nishiuchi, Takumi; Yoshimoto, Tanihiro; Kyo, Satoru

    2016-02-01

    Exosomes are small membrane vesicles secreted from a variety of cell types. Recent evidence indicates that human cells communicate with each other by exchanging exosomes. Cancer cells closely interact with neighboring stromal cells, and together they cooperatively promote disease via bidirectional communication. Here, we investigated whether exosomes can play roles in intercellular communication between cancer cells and neighboring fibroblasts. Endometrial fibroblasts were isolated from normal endometrial tissues and from endometrial cancer tissues, and cell-to-cell transfer of endometrial cancer cell line Ishikawa-derived exosomes was examined. The isolated fibroblasts were cultured in conditioned media from CD63-GFP-expressing Ishikawa cells, and we found that GFP-positive exosomes were transferred from Ishikawa cells to the fibroblasts. Next, we introduced a shRNA for a luciferase gene into Ishikawa cells. This shRNA was encapsulated into exosomes, was transferred to the fibroblasts, and then downregulated luciferase expression in the fibroblasts. The mature microRNAs naturally expressed in Ishikawa-derived exosomes were also transported into the endometrial fibroblasts, and they altered the microRNA expression profiles of the fibroblasts. These results indicated that endometrial cancer cells could transmit small regulatory RNAs to endometrial fibroblasts via exosomes. Our findings document a previously unknown mode of intercellular communication between cancer cells and related fibroblasts in human endometrium.

  16. Variability in the Practice of Fertility Preservation for Patients with Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Kasey A.; Grindler, Natalia M.; Rhee, Julie S.; Cooper, Amber R.; Ratts, Valerie S.; Carson, Kenneth R.; Jungheim, Emily S.

    2015-01-01

    Fertility is important to women and men with cancer. While options for fertility preservation (FP) are available, knowledge regarding the medical application of FP is lacking. Therefore we examined FP practices for cancer patients among reproductive endocrinologists (REs). A 36 item survey was sent to board-certified REs. 98% of respondents reported counseling women with cancer about FP options. Oocyte and embryo cryopreservation were universally offered by these providers, but variability was noted in reported management of these cases—particularly for women with breast cancer. 86% of the respondents reported using letrozole during controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) in patients with estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer to minimize patient exposure to estrogen. 49% of respondents who reported using letrozole in COS for patients with ER+ breast cancer reported that they would also use letrozole in COS for women with ER negative breast cancer. Variability was also noted in the management of FP for men with cancer. 83% of participants reported counseling men about sperm banking with 22% recommending against banking for men previously exposed to chemotherapy. Overall, 79% of respondents reported knowledge of American Society for Clinical Oncology FP guidelines—knowledge that was associated with providers offering gonadal tissue cryopreservation (RR 1.82, 95% CI 1.14–2.90). These findings demonstrate that RE management of FP in cancer patients varies. Although some variability may be dictated by local resources, standardization of FP practices and communication with treating oncologists may help ensure consistent recommendations and outcomes for patients seeking FP. PMID:26010087

  17. Fertility preservation options in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kasum, Miro; von Wolff, Michael; Franulić, Daniela; Čehić, Ermin; Klepac-Pulanić, Tajana; Orešković, Slavko; Juras, Josip

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to analyse current options for fertility preservation in young women with breast cancer (BC). Considering an increasing number of BC survivors, owing to improvements in cancer treatment and delaying of childbearing, fertility preservation appears to be an important issue. Current fertility preservation options in BC survivors range from well-established standard techniques to experimental or investigational interventions. Among the standard options, random-start ovarian stimulation protocol represents a new technique, which significantly decreases the total time of the in vitro fertilisation cycle. However, in patients with oestrogen-sensitive tumours, stimulation protocols using aromatase inhibitors are currently preferred over tamoxifen regimens. Cryopreservation of embryos and oocytes are nowadays deemed the most successful techniques for fertility preservation in BC patients. GnRH agonists during chemotherapy represent an experimental method for fertility preservation due to conflicting long-term outcome results regarding its safety and efficacy. Cryopreservation of ovarian tissue, in vitro maturation of immature oocytes and other strategies are considered experimental and should only be offered within the context of a clinical trial. An early pretreatment referral to reproductive endocrinologists and oncologists should be suggested to young BC women at risk of infertility, concerning the risks and benefits of fertility preservation options.

  18. Treatment of small cell lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Zöchbauer-Müller, S; Pirker, R; Huber, H

    1999-01-01

    Small cell lung cancers, comprising approximately 20% of lung cancers, are rapidly growing and disseminating carcinomas which are initially chemosensitive but acquire drug resistance during the course of disease. Thus, outcome is poor with median survival of 10-16 months for patients with limited and 7-11 months for patients with extensive disease. Polychemotherapy with established drugs (platins, etoposide, anthracyclines, cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide and Vinca alkaloids) plays the major role in the treatment of this disease and results in overall response rates between 80%-95% for limited disease and 60%-80% for extensive disease. Dose-intensified chemotherapy and high-dose chemotherapy with peripheral blood progenitor cell support were tested in several trials but their exact impact on outcome remains to be determined. New drugs including the taxanes (paclitaxel, docetaxel), the topoisomerase I inhibitors (topotecan, irinotecan), vinorelbine and gemcitabine are currently evaluated in clinical trials. In limited disease, thoracic radiotherapy improves survival and prophylactic cranial irradiation should be administered to those with a reasonable chance of cure. PMID:10676558

  19. An Association of Cancer Physicians’ strategy for improving services and outcomes for cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Baird, Richard; Banks, Ian; Cameron, David; Chester, John; Earl, Helena; Flannagan, Mark; Januszewski, Adam; Kennedy, Richard; Payne, Sarah; Samuel, Emlyn; Taylor, Hannah; Agarwal, Roshan; Ahmed, Samreen; Archer, Caroline; Board, Ruth; Carser, Judith; Copson, Ellen; Cunningham, David; Coleman, Rob; Dangoor, Adam; Dark, Graham; Eccles, Diana; Gallagher, Chris; Glaser, Adam; Griffiths, Richard; Hall, Geoff; Hall, Marcia; Harari, Danielle; Hawkins, Michael; Hill, Mark; Johnson, Peter; Jones, Alison; Kalsi, Tania; Karapanagiotou, Eleni; Kemp, Zoe; Mansi, Janine; Marshall, Ernie; Mitchell, Alex; Moe, Maung; Michie, Caroline; Neal, Richard; Newsom-Davis, Tom; Norton, Alison; Osborne, Richard; Patel, Gargi; Radford, John; Ring, Alistair; Shaw, Emily; Skinner, Rod; Stark, Dan; Turnbull, Sam; Velikova, Galina; White, Jeff; Young, Alison; Joffe, Johnathan; Selby, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The Association of Cancer Physicians in the United Kingdom has developed a strategy to improve outcomes for cancer patients and identified the goals and commitments of the Association and its members. PMID:26913066

  20. An Association of Cancer Physicians' strategy for improving services and outcomes for cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Baird, Richard; Banks, Ian; Cameron, David; Chester, John; Earl, Helena; Flannagan, Mark; Januszewski, Adam; Kennedy, Richard; Payne, Sarah; Samuel, Emlyn; Taylor, Hannah; Agarwal, Roshan; Ahmed, Samreen; Archer, Caroline; Board, Ruth; Carser, Judith; Copson, Ellen; Cunningham, David; Coleman, Rob; Dangoor, Adam; Dark, Graham; Eccles, Diana; Gallagher, Chris; Glaser, Adam; Griffiths, Richard; Hall, Geoff; Hall, Marcia; Harari, Danielle; Hawkins, Michael; Hill, Mark; Johnson, Peter; Jones, Alison; Kalsi, Tania; Karapanagiotou, Eleni; Kemp, Zoe; Mansi, Janine; Marshall, Ernie; Mitchell, Alex; Moe, Maung; Michie, Caroline; Neal, Richard; Newsom-Davis, Tom; Norton, Alison; Osborne, Richard; Patel, Gargi; Radford, John; Ring, Alistair; Shaw, Emily; Skinner, Rod; Stark, Dan; Turnbull, Sam; Velikova, Galina; White, Jeff; Young, Alison; Joffe, Johnathan; Selby, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The Association of Cancer Physicians in the United Kingdom has developed a strategy to improve outcomes for cancer patients and identified the goals and commitments of the Association and its members. PMID:26913066

  1. Insights into the experiences of patients with cancer in London: framework analysis of free-text data from the National Cancer Patient Experience Survey 2012/2013 from the two London Integrated Cancer Systems

    PubMed Central

    Wiseman, Theresa; Lucas, Grace; Sangha, Amrit; Randolph, Anuska; Stapleton, Sarah; Pattison, Natalie; O'Gara, Geraldine; Harris, Katherine; Pritchard-Jones, Kathy; Dolan, Shelley

    2015-01-01

    Objective To shed light on experiences of patients with cancer in London National Health Service (NHS) trusts that may not be fully captured in national survey data, to inform improvement action plans by these trusts. Design Framework analysis of free-text data from 2012/2013 National Cancer Patient Experience Survey (NCPES) from the 2 London Integrated Cancer Systems. Setting and participants Patients with a cancer diagnosis treated by the NHS across 27 trusts in London. Main outcome measures Free-text data received from patients categorised into what patients found good about their cancer care and what could be improved. Methods Using Framework analysis, a thematic framework was created for 15 403 comments from over 6500 patients. Themes were identified across the London data set, by tumour group and by trust. Results Two-thirds of free-text comments from patients in London were positive and one-third of those related to the good quality of care those patients received. However, the majority of comments for improvement related to quality of care, with a focus on poor care, poor communication and waiting times in outpatient departments. Additionally, 577 patients (9% of those who returned free-text data in London) commented on issues pertaining to the questionnaire itself. Some patients who experienced care from multiple trusts were unclear on how to complete the questionnaire for the single trust whose care they were asked to comment on, others said the questions did not fit their experiences. Conclusions NCPES free-text analysis can shed light on the experiences of patients that closed questions might not reveal. It further indicates that there are issues with the survey itself, in terms of ambiguities in the questionnaire and difficulties in identifying patients within specific trusts. Both of these issues have the potential to contribute to knowledge and understanding of the uses and limitations of free-text data in improving cancer services. PMID:26482767

  2. The oxidation of body fuel stores in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Hansell, D T; Davies, J W; Shenkin, A; Burns, H J

    1986-12-01

    In an attempt to define the mechanism of weight loss in cancer patients, fat and carbohydrate oxidation rates were calculated in 93 patients. Seventy patients with colorectal or gastric cancer were compared with a control group of 23 patients with nonmalignant illness. Twenty-seven patients with cancer and 13 control patients had lost more than 10% of their pre-illness body weight. Fat and carbohydrate oxidation rates were derived from measurements of oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, and urinary nitrogen excretion. Patients with cancer had significantly higher fat oxidation rates (p less than 0.01) and significantly lower carbohydrate oxidation rates (p less than 0.05) when compared with controls. Weight-losing cancer patients had significantly higher fat oxidation rates when compared with weight-stable cancer patients (p less than 0.02), weight-stable controls (p less than 0.01), and weight-losing controls (p less than 0.02). Cancer patients with liver metastases (N = 14) had significantly higher fat oxidation rates (p less than 0.01) and significantly lower carbohydrate oxidation rates (p less than 0.01) compared with cancer patients who had localized disease. There were no significant differences among the groups with respect to resting energy expenditure when expressed as kilocalorie per kilogram lean body mass per day. The presence of cancer appears to be associated with abnormal fat and carbohydrate metabolism. The increased rate of fat oxidation seen in patients with cancer, especially those with weight loss or liver metastases, may be a significant factor in the development of cancer cachexia. PMID:3789835

  3. Life Priorities in Head and Neck Cancer Patients Between Ages of 45 to 65.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Hasan Huseyin; Ahmadov, Asif; Cebeci, Suleyman; Binar, Murat; Karahatay, Serdar

    2016-06-01

    Diseases in head and neck cancer patients and applied therapies according to former affect life quality to a higher extent. In this paper, life priorities in 49 patients with head and neck cancer who referred to Gulhane Military Medical Academy for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes and the relationship between these priorities and sociodemographic properties have been studied. Following life priorities have been observed more important for the patients: to communicate with people in social places, to eat without any help by themselves, external appearance, taste and odor sense, continuing sexual life. Other priorities have been observed less important for the patients: attending social activities like cinema and theater, swimming pool and sea sports, money required for check-ups, necessities like time. Besides, these necessities do not show dissimilarities to any significant extent according to sociodemographic properties of the patients. PMID:27244211

  4. Re-analysis of survival data of cancer patients utilizing additive homeopathy.

    PubMed

    Gleiss, Andreas; Frass, Michael; Gaertner, Katharina

    2016-08-01

    In this short communication we present a re-analysis of homeopathic patient data in comparison to control patient data from the same Outpatient´s Unit "Homeopathy in malignant diseases" of the Medical University of Vienna. In this analysis we took account of a probable immortal time bias. For patients suffering from advanced stages of cancer and surviving the first 6 or 12 months after diagnosis, respectively, the results show that utilizing homeopathy gives a statistically significant (p<0.001) advantage over control patients regarding survival time. In conclusion, bearing in mind all limitations, the results of this retrospective study suggest that patients with advanced stages of cancer might benefit from additional homeopathic treatment until a survival time of up to 12 months after diagnosis. PMID:27515878

  5. Improving Rural Cancer Patients' Outcomes: A Group-Randomized Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Thomas E.; Elliott, Barbara A.; Regal, Ronald R.; Renier, Colleen M.; Haller, Irina V.; Crouse, Byron J.; Witrak, Martha T.; Jensen, Patricia B.

    2004-01-01

    Significant barriers exist in the delivery of state-of-the-art cancer care to rural populations. Rural providers' knowledge and practices, their rural health care delivery systems, and linkages to cancer specialists are not optimal; therefore, rural cancer patient outcomes are less than achievable. Purpose: To test the effects of a strategy…

  6. Patients who use e-mediated communication with their doctor: new constructions of trust in the patient-doctor relationship.

    PubMed

    Andreassen, Hege K; Trondsen, Marianne; Kummervold, Per Egil; Gammon, Deede; Hjortdahl, Per

    2006-02-01

    The introduction of information and communication technology (ICT) into the patient-doctor relationship represents a significant change in modern health care. Communication via computers-e-mediated communication-is affecting the context of patient-doctor interaction, touching core elements of the relationship. Based on data from a qualitative study conducted among Norwegian patients who had used ICT to communicate with their doctors, the authors argue that patients' use of ICT and the element of trust in the patient-doctor relationship influence each other. Furthermore, they contend that patients' constructions of trust in this relationship can be understood in light of basic mechanisms in modern society. The study sheds light on some potential concerns and benefits as communication technology increasingly is integrated into the patient-doctor relationship.

  7. Understanding Your Cancer Prognosis Video

    Cancer.gov

    Understanding Your Cancer Prognosis is the main video in the NCI Prognosis Video Series, which offers the perspectives of three cancer patients and their doctor, an oncologist who is also a national expert in doctor-patient communication.

  8. Infrared-Guided Patient Setup for Lung Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Lyatskaya, Yulia; James, Steven; Killoran, Joseph H.; Soto, Ricardo; Mamon, Harvey J.; Chin, Lee

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the utility of an infrared-guided patient setup (iGPS) system to reduce the uncertainties in the setup of lung cancer patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 15 patients were setup for lung irradiation using skin tattoos and lateral leveling marks. Daily electronic portal device images and iGPS marker locations were acquired and retrospectively reviewed. The iGPS-based shifts were compared with the daily electronic portal device image shifts using both the central axis iGPS marker and all five iGPS markers. For shift calculation using the five markers, rotational misalignment was included. The level of agreement between the iGPS and portal imaging to evaluate the setup was evaluated as the frequency of the shift difference in the range of 0-5 mm, 5-10 mm, and >10 mm. Results: Data were obtained for 450 treatment sessions for 15 patients. The difference in the isocenter shifts between the weekly vs. daily images was 0-5 mm in 42%, 5-10 mm in 30%, and >10 mm in 10% of the images. The shifts seen using the iGPS data were 0-5 mm in 81%, 5-10 mm in 14%, and >10 mm in 5%. Using only the central axis iGPS marker, the difference between the iGPS and portal images was <5 mm in 77%, 5-10 mm in 16%, and >10 mm in 7% in the left-right direction and 73%, 18%, and 9% in the superoinferior direction, respectively. When all five iGPS markers were used, the disagreements between the iGPS and portal image shifts >10 mm were reduced from 7% to 2% in the left-right direction and 9% to 3% in the superoinferior direction. Larger reductions were also seen (e.g., a reduction from 50% to 0% in 1 patient). Conclusion: The daily iGPS-based shifts correlated well with the daily electronic portal device-based shifts. When patient movement has nonlinear rotational components, a combination of surface markers and portal images might be particularly beneficial to improve the setup for lung cancer patients.

  9. Revealing a cancer diagnosis to patients: attitudes of patients, families, friends, nurses, and physicians in Lebanon—results of a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Farhat, F.; Othman, A.; el Baba, G.; Kattan, J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Disclosure of a cancer diagnosis to patients is a major problem for physicians in Lebanon. Our survey aimed to identify the attitudes of patients, families and friends, nurses, and physicians regarding disclosure of a cancer diagnosis. Methods Study participants included 343 physicians, nurses, cancer patients, families, and friends from clinics in two major hospitals in Lebanon. All completed a 29-item questionnaire that assessed, by demographic group, the information provided about cancer, opinions about the disclosure of the diagnosis to cancer patients, perceived consequences to patients, and the roles of family, friends, and religion. Results Overall, 7.8% of the patients were convinced that cancer is incurable. Nearly 82% preferred to be informed about their diagnosis. Similarly, 83% of physicians were in favour of disclosing a cancer diagnosis to their patients. However, only 14% of the physicians said that they revealed the truth to the patients themselves, with only 9% doing so immediately after confirmation of the diagnosis. Disclosure of a cancer diagnosis was preferred before the start of the treatment by 59% of the patients and immediately after confirmation of the diagnosis by 72% of the physicians. Overall, 86% of physicians, 51% of nurses, and 69% of patients and their families believed that religion helped with the acceptance of a cancer diagnosis. A role for family in accepting the diagnosis was reported by 74% of the patients, 56% of the nurses, and 88% of the physicians. All participants considered that fear was the most difficult feeling (63%) experienced by cancer patients, followed by pain (29%), pity (8%), and death (1%), with no statistically significant difference between the answers given by the participant groups. Conclusions The social background in Lebanese society is the main obstacle to revealing the truth to cancer patients. Lebanese patients seem to prefer direct communication of the truth, but families take the opposite

  10. Quality of Life in Patients Undergoing Radiation Therapy for Primary Lung Cancer, Head and Neck Cancer, or Gastrointestinal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-19

    Anal Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Esophageal Cancer; Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Gallbladder Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Liver Cancer; Lung Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Small Intestine Cancer

  11. The Utility of Exercise Testing in Patients with Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ha, Duc; Mazzone, Peter J; Ries, Andrew L; Malhotra, Atul; Fuster, Mark

    2016-09-01

    The harm associated with lung cancer treatment include perioperative morbidity and mortality and therapy-induced toxicities in various organs, including the heart and lungs. Optimal treatment therefore entails a need for risk assessment to weigh the probabilities of benefits versus harm. Exercise testing offers an opportunity to evaluate a patient's physical fitness/exercise capacity objectively. In lung cancer, it is most often used to risk-stratify patients undergoing evaluation for lung cancer resection. In recent years, its use outside this context has been described, including in nonsurgical candidates and lung cancer survivors. In this article we review the physiology of exercise testing and lung cancer. Then, we assess the utility of exercise testing in patients with lung cancer in four contexts (preoperative evaluation for lung cancer resection, after lung cancer resection, lung cancer prognosis, and assessment of efficiency of exercise training programs) after systematically identifying original studies involving the most common forms of exercise tests in this patient population: laboratory cardiopulmonary exercise testing and simple field testing with the 6-minute walk test, shuttle walk test, and/or stair-climbing test. Lastly, we propose a conceptual framework for risk assessment of patients with lung cancer who are being considered for therapy and identify areas for further studies in this patient population. PMID:27156441

  12. Using Community-Based Research Methods to Design Cancer Patient Navigation Training

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Kathryn L.; Allison, Amanda; Tsark, JoAnn U.

    2008-01-01

    Background Cancer mortality continues to be higher in Native Hawaiians than Whites, and research has identified numerous barriers to good cancer care. Cancer navigator programs provide individualized assistance to patients and family members to overcome barriers, promoting early diagnosis and timely and complete treatment. Objectives Our purpose was to design a training curriculum to provide community-based outreach workers serving Native Hawaiians with cancer patient navigator skills. Methods The Ho`okele i ke Ola (Navigating to Health) curriculum was informed by data gathered from Native Hawaiian cancer patients and their family members, outreach workers in Native Hawaiian communities, and cancer care providers. Based on findings, the 48-hour curriculum focused on cancer knowledge, cancer resources, and cancer communications. Three versions were developed: 1) 6 days of training and on-site tours in urban Honolulu; 2) 4 days of training on a neighbor island, with 2 days of on-site tours in Honolulu; and 3) a 3-credit community college independent study course. Graduates were interviewed after each session and 3 months after graduation about application of navigation skills. Results In 18 months, 62 health workers from community-based, clinical and community college settings were trained—31 in Honolulu-based trainings, 29 in neighbor island trainings where earlier graduates served as co-faculty, and 2 through Maui Community College. Follow-up data suggest increased knowledge, skills, capacity, and feelings of competence among trainees. Conclusions All three versions of the Ho`okele i ke Ola curriculum, developed with community input, have proven successful in increasing cancer patient navigation skills of trainees. PMID:20208313

  13. Adaptation of Individual Meaning-Centered Psychotherapy for Chinese Immigrant Cancer Patients | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The purpose of the study is to modify a type of counseling called "Individual Meaning Centered Psychotherapy" to meet the needs of Chinese cancer patients. Many cancer patients use counseling or other resources to help cope with the emotional burden of their illnesses. Counseling often helps them cope with cancer by giving them a place to express their feelings. "Meaning-Centered" counseling aims to teach cancer patients how to maintain or even increase a sense of meaning and purpose in their lives, despite cancer. |

  14. Protective mechanism against cancer found in progeria patient cells

    Cancer.gov

    NCI scientists have studied cells of patients with an extremely rare genetic disease that is characterized by drastic premature aging and discovered a new protective cellular mechanism against cancer. They found that cells from patients with Hutchinson Gi

  15. Bevacizumab improves survival for patients with advanced cervical cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Patients with advanced, recurrent, or persistent cervical cancer that was not curable with standard treatment who received the drug bevacizumab (Avastin) lived 3.7 months longer than patients who did not receive the drug, according to an interim analysis

  16. Spontaneous Hepatic Infarction in a Patient with Gallbladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang Min; Joung, Hannah; Heo, Jung Won; Woo, Seo Kyung; Woo, In Sook; Jung, Yun Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic infarction is known as a rare disease entity in nontransplant patients. Although a few cases of hepatic infarction have been reported to be linked with invasive procedures, trauma, and hypercoagulability, a case of spontaneous hepatic infarction in a nontransplanted patient has hardly ever been reported. However, many clinical situations of patients with cancer, in particular biliary cancer, can predispose nontransplant patients to hepatic infarction. Besides, the clinical outcome of hepatic infarction in patients with cancer can be worse than in patients with other etiologies. As for treatment, anticoagulation treatment is usually recommended. However, because of its multifactorial etiology and combined complications, treatment of hepatic infarction is difficult and not simple. Herein, we report a case of fatal hepatic infarction that occurred spontaneously during the course of treatment in a patient with gallbladder cancer. Hepatic infarction should be considered as a possible fatal complication in patients during treatment of biliary malignancies. PMID:27462232

  17. Serum copper levels in patients with lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Huhti, E; Poukkula, A; Uksila, E

    1980-01-01

    An increased mean serum copper level was found in 149 patients with lung cancer when compared with 19 healthy people and 23 patients with non-malignant lung diseases. The level seemed to reflect the stage of disease, with asymptomatic patients showing the lowest values, and patients with metastatic symptoms the highest. In spite of significant differences between the groups of subjects the scatter in the values was large. Hence serum copper determinations can be of only limited importance for differential diagnosis or in assessing the clinical stage of cancer. No differences in copper levels were found between the groups of patients with different histological types of lung cancer.

  18. Doctor-Patient Communication in a Southeast Asian Setting: The Conflict between Ideal and Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claramita, Mora; Utarini, Adi; Soebono, Hardyanto; Van Dalen, Jan; Van der Vleuten, Cees

    2011-01-01

    Doctor-patient communication has been extensively studied in non-Western contexts and in relation to patients' cultural and education backgrounds. This study explores the perceived ideal communication style for doctor-patient consultations and the reality of actual practice in a Southeast Asian context. We conducted the study in a teaching…

  19. The quality of life of patients following treatment for laryngeal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Harwood, A.R.; Rawlinson, E.

    1983-03-01

    One hundred and twenty-nine patients have been interviewed 9 to 15 months following treatment for laryngeal cancer to determine the post treatment quality of voice and life. The patients were subdivided into 3 groups, successfully irradiated T1 and T2 patients, (89 patients), successfully irradiated T3 and T4 patients (24 patients) and those treated by surgery (16 patients). Ninety-three percent of T1 and T2 patients and 79% of T3 and T4 patients were working following treatment as compared to 44% of the surgery patients. Ninety-eight percent of the T1 and T2 and 87.5% of the T3 and T4 patients were able to use the telephone normally as compared to 12% of the surgery patients. Similarly major differences between the successfully irradiated patients and the surgically treated patients in terms of ability to live a normal social life have been noted. The patients also rated their voice in terms of volume, pitch, ability to communicate, quality, rate of speech, flow of speech and dry throat. In every parameter of rating of the voice, with the exception of dryness of the throat, the successfully irradiated patients in all stage groupings had better ratings than the surgery group. Since, in Toronto, survival in advanced glottic and supraglottic cancer is the same using radical radiation with surgery in reserve as survival with primary surgery, it is concluded in view of the superior quality of voice and life in the successfully irradiated patients that irradiation with surgery in reserve is the optimal treatment for these patients. We also concluded that the measurement of quality of life in patients with cancer of the larynx is of vital importance in determining optimal treatment and that further studies in this area are indicated.

  20. Gynecologic cancer screening and communication with health care providers in women with Lynch syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Burton-Chase, AM; Hovick, SR; Sun, CC; Boyd-Rogers, S; Lynch, PM; Lu, KH; Peterson, SK

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated knowledge of gynecologic cancer screening recommendations, screening behaviors, and communication with providers among women with Lynch syndrome (LS). Women aged ≥25 years who were at risk for LS-associated cancers completed a semi-structured interview and a questionnaire. Of 74 participants (mean age 40 years), 61% knew the appropriate age to begin screening, 75–80% correctly identified the recommended screening frequency, and 84% reported no previous screening endometrial biopsy. Women initiated discussions with their providers about their LS cancer risks, but many used nonspecific terms or relied on family history. Most were not offered high-risk screening options. While many women were aware of risk-appropriate LS screening guidelines, adherence was suboptimal. Improving communication between women and their providers regarding LS-related gynecologic cancer risk and screening options may help improve adherence. PMID:23906188

  1. Improving breast cancer survivors’ knowledge using a patient-centered intervention

    PubMed Central

    Ulloa, Jesus G.; Hemmelgarn, Marian; Viveros, Lori; Odele, Patience; Feldman, Nancy R.; Ganz, Patricia A.; Maggard-Gibbons, Melinda

    2016-01-01

    Background Low-income, minority women with breast cancer experience a range of barriers to receiving survivorship information. Our objective was to test a novel, patient-centered intervention aimed at improving communication about survivorship care. Methods We developed a wallet card to provide oncologic and follow-up care survivorship information to breast cancer patients. We used a prospective, pre–post design to assess the intervention at a safety net hospital. The intervention was given by a patient navigator or community health worker. Results Patient knowledge (n = 130) of personal cancer history improved from baseline pretest to 1 week after the intervention for stage (66–93%; P < .05), treatment (79–92%; P < .05), and symptoms of recurrence (48–89%; P <.05), which was retained at 3 months. The intervention reduced the number of patients who were unsure when their mammogram was due (15–5% at 1 week and 6%at 3 months; P <.05). Nearly 90% reported they would be likely to share their survivorship card with their providers. Conclusion A patient-centered survivorship card improved short-term recall of key survivorship care knowledge and seems to be effective at reducing communication barriers for this population. Further studies are warranted to assess long-term retention and the impact on receipt of appropriate survivorship follow-up care. PMID:26032819

  2. Dying cancer patients talk about euthanasia.

    PubMed

    Eliott, Jaklin A; Olver, Ian N

    2008-08-01

    Within developed nations, there is increasing public debate about and apparent endorsement of the appropriateness of euthanasia as an autonomous choice to die in the face of intolerable suffering. Surveys report socio-demographic differences in rates of acceptance of euthanasia, but there is little in-depth analysis of how euthanasia is understood and positioned within the social and moral lives of individuals, particularly those who might be considered suitable candidates-for example, terminally-ill cancer patients. During discussions with 28 such patients in Australia regarding medical decisions at the end of life, euthanasia was raised by 13 patients, with the others specifically asked about it. Twenty-four patients spoke positively of euthanasia, 19 of these voicing some concerns. None identified euthanasia as a currently favoured option. Four were completely against it. Endorsement for euthanasia was in the context of a hypothetical future or for a hypothetical other person, or temporally associated with acute pain. Arguments supporting euthanasia framed the issue as a matter of freedom of choice, as preserving dignity in death, and as curbing intolerable pain and suffering, both of the patient and of those around them. A common analogy featured was that of euthanising a dog. These arguments were typically presented as self-evident justification for euthanasia, construed as an appropriate choice to die, with opposers positioned as morally inferior or ignorant. The difficulties of ensuring 'choice' and the moral connotations of 'choosing to die,' however, worked to problematise the appropriateness of euthanising specific individuals. We recommend further empirical investigation of the moral and social meanings associated with euthanasia.

  3. Preferences for pharmacist counselling in patients with breast cancer: a discrete choice experiment.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Takashi; Azuma, Kanako; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro; Iwase, Satoru; Matsunaga, Tadaharu; Yamada, Kimito; Miyamatsu, Hironobu; Takeuchi, Hironori; Kohno, Norio; Akashi, Takao; Unezaki, Sakae

    2014-01-01

    With the shift of a large proportion of cancer chemotherapy recipients to ambulatory care, the role of hospital pharmacists has changed, and their provision of information is essential care for cancer patients. There is little research on pharmacist-patient relations, particularly about pharmacist counselling, in Japan. To meet patients' needs, pharmacist counselling should be optimized. Here, breast cancer patients' preferences for pharmacist counselling were assessed using a discrete choice experiment. Bayesian nonlinear optimal methodology was employed to obtain six attributes (attitude of pharmacist, quality of information, explanation of side effects, frequency of pharmacist counselling before starting chemotherapy, cost of pharmacist counselling, and follow-up with the pharmacist after starting chemotherapy) of two to three levels each. The attributes and levels were used to create 12 hypothetical scenarios that were divided into two questionnaires of six choice sets each. Two hundred eighty participants were randomly assigned to complete one of these questionnaires (blocks). Attributes were analyzed by conditional logit model to determine significant predictors of patient preferences. The responses of 278 patients to 1667 scenarios were analyzed. Attitude of pharmacist, quality of information, cost of pharmacist counselling, and follow-up with the pharmacist after starting chemotherapy were significant predictors of patient preferences, with quality of information receiving the highest priority. Thus patients receiving pharmacist counselling before starting chemotherapy prefer to interact with a pharmacist with a friendly, interested attitude who provides individualized information. Further research is needed to elucidate the information that Japanese patients consider most important and to enhance pharmacist-patient communication.

  4. DO CANCER CLINICAL TRIAL POPULATIONS TRULY REPRESENT CANCER PATIENTS? A COMPARISON OF OPEN CLINICAL TRIALS TO THE CANCER GENOME ATLAS.

    PubMed

    Geifman, Nophar; Butte, Atul J

    2016-01-01

    Open clinical trial data offer many opportunities for the scientific community to independently verify published results, evaluate new hypotheses and conduct meta-analyses. These data provide a springboard for scientific advances in precision medicine but the question arises as to how representative clinical trials data are of cancer patients overall. Here we present the integrative analysis of data from several cancer clinical trials and compare these to patient-level data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Comparison of cancer type-specific survival rates reveals that these are overall lower in trial subjects. This effect, at least to some extent, can be explained by the more advanced stages of cancer of trial subjects. This analysis also reveals that for stage IV cancer, colorectal cancer patients have a better chance of survival than breast cancer patients. On the other hand, for all other stages, breast cancer patients have better survival than colorectal cancer patients. Comparison of survival in different stages of disease between the two datasets reveals that subjects with stage IV cancer from the trials dataset have a lower chance of survival than matching stage IV subjects from TCGA. One likely explanation for this observation is that stage IV trial subjects have lower survival rates since their cancer is less likely to respond to treatment. To conclude, we present here a newly available clinical trials dataset which allowed for the integration of patient-level data from many cancer clinical trials. Our comprehensive analysis reveals that cancer-related clinical trials are not representative of general cancer patient populations, mostly due to their focus on the more advanced stages of the disease. These and other limitations of clinical trials data should, perhaps, be taken into consideration in medical research and in the field of precision medicine.

  5. Quebec public funding facilitates fertility preservation for male cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Herrero, M.B.; García, A.; Buckett, W.; Tulandi, T.; Chan, P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Sperm cryopreservation remains the only clinically feasible option to preserve male fertility. The quality of counselling provided by the treating physicians and the cost of sperm cryopreservation can both influence a patient’s decision about whether to preserve sperm. On 5 August 2010, the Quebec government introduced provincial coverage of assisted reproductive technologies, with sperm cryopreservation included as a covered service. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether and how such a program affects the behaviour of cancer patients with respect to sperm cryopreservation. Methods We analyzed the database derived from male patients undergoing sperm cryopreservation from August 2008 to August 2012 at our centre. The retrieved data included patient age, male infertility or oncologic diagnosis, sperm quality parameters, and details about the number of visits for sperm cryopreservation. Results The number of cancer patients who cryopreserved sperm before and after the policy change did not differ significantly, but a marked increase in the number of non-cancer patients was observed. Further analysis revealed that, after implementation of the public funding program, the total number of sperm cryopreservation sessions per patient increased significantly in cancer patients but not in non-cancer patients. Conclusions It appears that cancer patients who are willing to freeze sperm are keen to return for more sessions of sperm banking when no fees are associated with the service. Those findings suggest that cost reduction is an important factor for improving delivery of fertility preservation services to male cancer patients. PMID:26966400

  6. MTDH genetic variants in colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Gnosa, Sebastian; Ticha, Ivana; Haapaniemi, Staffan; Sun, Xiao-Feng

    2016-01-01

    The colorectal carcinogenesis is a complex process encompassing genetic alterations. The oncoprotein AEG-1, encoded by the MTDH gene, was shown previously to be involved in colorectal cancer (CRC). The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and the spectrum of MTDH variants in tumor tissue, and their relationship to clinicopathological variables in CRC patients. The study included tumors from 356 unselected CRC patients. Mutation analysis of the MTDH gene, including coding region and adjacent intronic sequences, was performed by direct DNA sequencing. The corresponding normal colorectal tissue was analyzed in the carriers of exonic variant to confirm germline or somatic origin. We detected 42 intronic variants, where 25 were novel. Furthermore, we found 8 exonic variants of which four, one missense (c.977C > G-germline) and three frameshift mutations (c.533delA-somatic, c.1340dupA-unknown origin, c.1731delA-unknown origin), were novel. In silico prediction analyses suggested four deleterious variants (c.232G > T, c.533delA, c.1340dupA, and c.1731delA). There were no correlations between the MTDH variants and tumor stage, differentiation or patient survival. We described several novel exonic and intronic variants of the MTDH gene. The detection of likely pathogenic truncating mutations and alterations in functional protein domains indicate their clinical significance, although none of the variants had prognostic potential. PMID:26983693

  7. New registry: National Cancer Patient Registry--Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wendy, L; Radzi, M

    2008-09-01

    Colorectal cancer is emerging as one of the commonest cancers in Malaysia. Data on colorectal cancer from the National Cancer Registry is very limited. Comprehensive information on all aspects of colorectal cancer, including demographic details, pathology and treatment outcome are needed as the management of colorectal cancer has evolved rapidly over the years involving several disciplines including gastroenterology, surgery, radiology, pathology and oncology. This registry will be an important source of information that can help the development of guidelines to improve colorectal cancer care relevant to this country. The database will initially recruit all colorectal cancer cases from eight hospitals. The data will be stored on a customized web-based case report form. The database has begun collecting data from 1 October 2007 and will report on its first year findings at the end of 2008. PMID:19230248

  8. New registry: National Cancer Patient Registry--Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wendy, L; Radzi, M

    2008-09-01

    Colorectal cancer is emerging as one of the commonest cancers in Malaysia. Data on colorectal cancer from the National Cancer Registry is very limited. Comprehensive information on all aspects of colorectal cancer, including demographic details, pathology and treatment outcome are needed as the management of colorectal cancer has evolved rapidly over the years involving several disciplines including gastroenterology, surgery, radiology, pathology and oncology. This registry will be an important source of information that can help the development of guidelines to improve colorectal cancer care relevant to this country. The database will initially recruit all colorectal cancer cases from eight hospitals. The data will be stored on a customized web-based case report form. The database has begun collecting data from 1 October 2007 and will report on its first year findings at the end of 2008.

  9. Raoultella ornithinolytica bacteremia in cancer patients: report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Hadano, Yoshiro; Tsukahara, Mika; Ito, Kenta; Suzuki, Jun; Kawamura, Ichiro; Kurai, Hanako

    2012-01-01

    Raoultella ornithinolytica is a Gram-negative aerobic bacillus reclassified in the new genus from the Klebsiella species based on new genetic approaches; however, human infections caused by R. ornithinolytica are rare. We herein report three cases of R. ornithinolytica bacteremia associated with biliary tract infections in cancer patients. R. ornithinolytica can be a causative pathogen of biliary tract infection in cancer patients.

  10. New strategies of VTE prevention in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Verso, Melina; Agnelli, Giancarlo

    2014-05-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common complication in patients with cancer. VTE is a main cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cancer and has a significant impact on their quality of life. Preventing VTE in cancer patients reduces both morbidity and mortality. The level of evidence for antithrombotic prophylaxis of VTE in patients with cancer varies for hospitalized and ambulatory patients. Hospitalized patients with active cancer (for both medical or surgical indication) and reduced mobility should receive thromboprophylaxis throughout hospital stay. Prophylaxis of VTE is not routinely recommended for outpatients with cancer on chemotherapy. For these patients, current guidelines suggest that clinicians should consider antithrombotic prophylaxis on a case-by-case basis in highly selected outpatients. Different strategies for identification of high-risk outpatients with cancer who could benefit of thromboprophylaxis are under consideration. The new oral anticoagulants could have a role for VTE prevention in ambulatory patients with cancer who are on chemotherapy, as they are administered at a fixed dose without routine laboratory monitoring and may have fewer drug interactions with anticancer agents.

  11. Navigating the cancer journey: a review of patient navigator programs for Indigenous cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Whop, Lisa J; Valery, Patricia C; Beesley, Vanessa L; Moore, Suzanne P; Lokuge, Kamalini; Jacka, Catherine; Garvey, Gail

    2012-12-01

    Patient navigator programs have evolved to facilitate access to care and improve outcomes for Indigenous cancer patients. We reviewed the scientific literature on patient navigator programs in Indigenous people with cancer. We conducted a review of the published literature up to 13 April 2011. PubMed, MEDLINE and CINAHL databases were searched for original articles on Indigenous patient navigation programs. The review produced eight relevant articles covering two specific programs, the Native Sisters Program and the Walking Forward Program. Program descriptions, patient navigator's roles, cultural aspects and the impact of the programs were described. Patient navigators' roles in the programs varied, as did their qualifications, but importantly, all were Indigenous. Both programs aimed to increase participation in screening, remove barriers to treatment and decrease mortality. The Native Sisters Program documented an increase in adherence to breast screening among navigated American Indian participants, although there were substantial differences in the baseline screening adherence between navigated and non-navigated participants. The Walking Forward Program yielded on average 3 fewer days of treatment delays for navigated American Indians than for non-navigated American Indians. However, adjustments for socioeconomic characteristics and disease characteristics were not described. Although preliminary outcomes are seemingly positive, further rigorous evaluation of quantitative impacts are needed.

  12. Dietary intake of advanced cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Walsh, T D; Bowman, K B; Jackson, G P

    1983-02-01

    A state registered dietitian assessed the voluntary dietary intake of 13 advanced cancer inpatients on one ward of St. Christopher's Hospice for five consecutive days. There were 11 females, two males; median age 74 years (range 56 to 83). Two patients died on the fourth day of the study. A partially individualised weighed technique was used. Standard sized scoops and spoons were used to serve the food in small, medium or large standard portions (depending on appetite) and were weighed as served. Individual plate waste (by weight) was subtracted to give estimated individual intake. Foods provided by visitors was not included. The median and range of individual mean daily intakes (estimated) were: energy 5760 (938-8945) kJ, 1376 (224-2137) kcal; protein 44 (11-86) g; fat 52 (9-93) g; carbohydrate 169 (21-194) g; calcium 748 (268-1457) mg; iron 4.8 (0.5-21.0) mg; dietary fibre 5.0 (0.5-21.0) g. Compared to recommended amounts, energy, iron and dietary fibre intakes were low; calcium intake was high. Nutritional status may affect prognosis and/or subjective well-being in advanced cancer. The value of nutritional supplementation and the role of appetite stimulants in improving nutritional status needs investigation.

  13. Dietary intake of advanced cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Walsh, T D; Bowman, K B; Jackson, G P

    1983-02-01

    A state registered dietitian assessed the voluntary dietary intake of 13 advanced cancer inpatients on one ward of St. Christopher's Hospice for five consecutive days. There were 11 females, two males; median age 74 years (range 56 to 83). Two patients died on the fourth day of the study. A partially individualised weighed technique was used. Standard sized scoops and spoons were used to serve the food in small, medium or large standard portions (depending on appetite) and were weighed as served. Individual plate waste (by weight) was subtracted to give estimated individual intake. Foods provided by visitors was not included. The median and range of individual mean daily intakes (estimated) were: energy 5760 (938-8945) kJ, 1376 (224-2137) kcal; protein 44 (11-86) g; fat 52 (9-93) g; carbohydrate 169 (21-194) g; calcium 748 (268-1457) mg; iron 4.8 (0.5-21.0) mg; dietary fibre 5.0 (0.5-21.0) g. Compared to recommended amounts, energy, iron and dietary fibre intakes were low; calcium intake was high. Nutritional status may affect prognosis and/or subjective well-being in advanced cancer. The value of nutritional supplementation and the role of appetite stimulants in improving nutritional status needs investigation. PMID:6841131

  14. Outcomes of cancer patients undergoing percutaneous pericardiocentesis for pericardial effusion

    PubMed Central

    El Haddad, Danielle; Iliescu, Cezar; Yusuf, Syed Wamique; William, William Nassib; Khair, Tarif H.; Song, Juhee; Mouhayar, Elie N.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pericardial effusion (PE) is common in cancer patients but the optimal therapeutic approach is not well defined. Percutaneous pericardiocentesis is less invasive than surgery, but its long-term effectiveness and safety are not well documented. OBJECTIVES We evaluated outcomes of cancer patients undergoing percutaneous pericardiocentesis for PE and assessed the procedure’s safety in patients with thrombocytopenia. METHODS Cancer patients who underwent percutaneous pericardiocentesis for PE between November 2009 and October 2014 at MD Anderson Cancer Center were included. Procedure-related complications, effusion recurrence rate, and overall survival were analyzed. RESULTS Of 1,645 cancer patients referred for PE, 212 (13%) underwent percutaneous pericardiocentesis. The procedure was successful in 99% of the cases with no procedure-related deaths. Four patients had major procedure-related bleeding that did not vary by platelet count <50,000/µl or ≥50,000/µl (p = 0.1281). Patients with catheter drainage for 3 to 5 days had the lowest recurrence rate (10%). Median overall survival was 143 days with age >65 years, lung cancer, platelet count <20,000/µl, and malignant pericardial fluid independently associated with poor prognosis. Lung cancer patients with proven malignant effusions had a significantly shorter median 1-year survival compared to those with nonmalignant effusions (16.2% vs. 49.0%, respectively; log-rank test p value = 0.0101). A similar difference in 1-year survival was not observed in breast cancer patients (40.2% vs. 40.0%, respectively; log-rank test p = 0.4170). CONCLUSION Percutaneous pericardiocentesis with extended catheter drainage, as primary treatment for PE in cancer patients, is safe and effective, including in those with thrombocytopenia. Malignant PE significantly shortens the survival outcome of lung, but not breast, cancer patients. PMID:26337990

  15. Integrating cancer survivors' experiences into UK cancer registries: design and development of the ePOCS system (electronic Patient-reported Outcomes from Cancer Survivors)

    PubMed Central

    Ashley, L; Jones, H; Thomas, J; Forman, D; Newsham, A; Morris, E; Johnson, O; Velikova, G; Wright, P

    2011-01-01

    Background: Understanding the psychosocial challenges of cancer survivorship, and identifying which patients experience ongoing difficulties, is a key priority. The ePOCS (electronic patient-reported outcomes from cancer survivors) project aims to develop and evaluate a cost-efficient, UK-scalable electronic system for collecting patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs), at regular post-diagnostic timepoints, and linking these with clinical data in cancer registries. Methods: A multidisciplinary team developed the system using agile methods. Design entailed process mapping the system's constituent parts, data flows and involved human activities, and undertaking usability testing. Informatics specialists built new technical components, including a web-based questionnaire tool and tracking database, and established component-connecting data flows. Development challenges were overcome, including patient usability and data linkage and security. Results: We have developed a system in which PROMs are completed online, using a secure questionnaire administration tool, accessed via a public-facing website, and the responses are linked and stored with clinical registry data. Patient monitoring and communications are semiautomated via a tracker database, and patient correspondence is primarily Email-based. The system is currently honed for clinician-led hospital-based patient recruitment. Conclusions: A feasibility test study is underway. Although there are possible challenges to sustaining and scaling up ePOCS, the system has potential to support UK epidemiological PROMs collection and clinical data linkage. PMID:22048035

  16. Factors influencing medical information seeking among African American cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Alicia K; Sellergren, Sarah A; Manfredi, Clara; Williams, Maryann

    2002-01-01

    Qualitative research methods were used to explore factors that may affect medical information seeking, treatment engagement, and emotional adjustment among African American cancer patients. Focus group findings suggest that an array of cultural and socioeconomic factors plays important roles in the behavior of African American cancer patients. Participants described a number of important barriers and facilitators of medical information seeking and treatment participation. Factors linked to the health care-related behaviors and adjustment of African American cancer patients included limited knowledge and misinformation about cancer, mistrust of the medical community, concerns about privacy, lack of insurance, religious beliefs, and emotional issues such as fear and stigma associated with seeking emotional support. Recommendations are made that may assist mental and physical health providers in improving patient information and mental and physical health outcomes of African American cancer patients.

  17. Clinical characteristics and awareness of skin cancer in Hispanic patients.

    PubMed

    Javed, Saba; Javed, Syed A; Mays, Rana M; Tyring, Stephen K

    2013-09-01

    Skin cancer in darker skin is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. We sought to assess the clinical characteristics of cutaneous malignancy amongst Hispanic skin cancer patients and compare them to age-matched non-Hispanic Caucasians. In this retrospective study, 150 Hispanic skin cancer patients were identified from electronic medical records and age-matched to 150 non-Hispanic Caucasian controls with skin cancer. The incidence of actinic keratoses (AKs) in Hispanic skin cancer patients (34.0%) was statistically lower than age-matched non-Hispanic Caucasian skin cancer controls (61.3%, P <0.001; odds ratio, 3.08; 95% confidence interval, 1.92 - 4.93). Moreover, non-Hispanic Caucasian SCC (squamous cell cancer) controls were much more likely to report AKs (36.1%, P = 0.003) than Hispanic SCC patients (25.0%, P = 0.19). This study illustrates a lower incidence of AKs in Hispanic skin cancer patients as compared to their age-matched non-Hispanic Caucasians. The Hispanic skin malignancies present at a more advanced state and there is usually a lack of awareness in such cases. Therefore, patient knowledge and education is crucial for early detection and prevention of skin cancer in the Hispanic population.

  18. Cultural perceptions in cancer care among African-American and Caucasian patients.

    PubMed Central

    Matsuyama, Robin K.; Grange, Christina; Lyckholm, Laurie J.; Utsey, Shawn O.; Smith, Thomas J.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: This exploratory study examined perceptions and beliefs of African Americans and Caucasians related to cancer care. Understanding belief systems and cultures optimizes cancer treatment and care delivery to ethnic minority individuals. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Focus groups were conducted with 39 African-American and Caucasian cancer patients. Data analysis included whole group analysis with a team of five researchers. RESULTS: Regardless of ethnicity, cancer patients share many of the same emotions and experiences, and want complete information and quality care. Differences were also apparent. African-American participants were more likely to report increased religious behaviors, believe that healthcare providers demonstrate care with simple actions and provision of practical assistance, and use church and community information sources. Caucasian participants were more likely to report spiritual but not overtly religious changes, and depend on healthcare providers for information. CONCLUSION: Understanding how culture colors perceptions, communication and information requirements is critical to providing effective care to ethnically diverse cancer patients. Findings have implications for professionals understanding ways patients seek information, the role of spirituality and religion in care, and ways healthcare providers demonstrate care. PMID:17987914

  19. Coagulation tests show significant differences in patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Tas, Faruk; Kilic, Leyla; Duranyildiz, Derya

    2014-06-01

    Activated coagulation and fibrinolytic system in cancer patients is associated with tumor stroma formation and metastasis in different cancer types. The aim of this study is to explore the correlation of blood coagulation assays for various clinicopathologic factors in breast cancer patients. A total of 123 female breast cancer patients were enrolled into the study. All the patients were treatment naïve. Pretreatment blood coagulation tests including PT, APTT, PTA, INR, D-dimer, fibrinogen levels, and platelet counts were evaluated. Median age of diagnosis was 51 years old (range 26-82). Twenty-two percent of the group consisted of metastatic breast cancer patients. The plasma level of all coagulation tests revealed statistically significant difference between patient and control group except for PT (p<0.001 for all variables except for PT; p=0.08). Elderly age (>50 years) was associated with higher D-dimer levels (p=0.003). Metastatic patients exhibited significantly higher D-dimer values when compared with early breast cancer patients (p=0.049). Advanced tumor stage (T3 and T4) was associated with higher INR (p=0.05) and lower PTA (p=0.025). In conclusion, coagulation tests show significant differences in patients with breast cancer.

  20. End of Life Planning and its Relevance for Patients and Oncologists’ Decisions in Choosing Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Saraiya, Biren; Bodnar-Deren, Susan; Leventhal, Elaine; Leventhal, Howard

    2008-01-01

    The goal of end of life (EoL) planning is to provide individuals with tools to control their financial and health care decisions when they are incapacitated. When an elderly patient is diagnosed with advanced cancer, the possible treatment options are: palliative care with curative intent or prolongation of life or palliative care only. Treatment of cancer in elderly patients creates a significant array of monetary and symptom burdens. The question is whether advance care planning (ACP), part of EoL planning, allows patients families and communities to control and reduce these burdens. Although the number of patients completing advance directives has increased in recent years, there are multiple barriers to the implementation of patients’ wishes such as limited knowledge of patient wishes by proxy and physician and inadequate communication regarding prognosis. We propose that improvements in patient decision making and clinical practice can reduce the burden of symptoms for patients if clinicians better understood patients’ models and expectations respecting the longer term consequences of diagnosis and treatment. This understanding can arise from improved information exchange and constant updating of the information as the disease and treatment evolves. Clinicians also need better prognostication tools and better training in effective communication skills to elicit patient goals and make appropriate recommendations. PMID:19058149

  1. Doctor-patient communication in a Southeast Asian setting: the conflict between ideal and reality.

    PubMed

    Claramita, Mora; Utarini, Adi; Soebono, Hardyanto; Van Dalen, Jan; Van der Vleuten, Cees

    2011-03-01

    Doctor-patient communication has been extensively studied in non-Western contexts and in relation to patients' cultural and education backgrounds. This study explores the perceived ideal communication style for doctor-patient consultations and the reality of actual practice in a Southeast Asian context. We conducted the study in a teaching hospital in Indonesia, using a qualitative and a quantitative design. In-depth interviews were conducted with ten internal medicine specialists, ten internal medicine residents, 16 patients in two groups based on education level and ten most senior medical students. The contributions of doctors and patients to the communication during consultations were observed and rated quantitatively by thirty internal medicine residents, 393 patients with different educational backgrounds and ten senior medical students. The 'informed and shared decision making' is the central observation in this quantitative study. The results of the interviews showed that Southeast Asian stakeholders are in favor of a partnership style of communication and revealed barriers to achieving this: doctors and patients are not prepared for a participatory style and high patient load due to an inefficient health care system does not allow sufficient time for this type of communication. The results of the quantitative study showed a sharp contrast between observed and ideal communication styles. A paternalistic style seems to prevail, irrespective of patients' educational background. We found a sharp conflict between ideal and reality concerning doctor-patient communication in a Southeast Asian context. Further studies should examine ways to change the prevailing communication style in the desired direction.

  2. Communicating information to patients. Patient satisfaction and adherence as associated with resident skill.

    PubMed

    Falvo, D; Tippy, P

    1988-06-01

    A study investigated the degree to which residents' communication of specific information about medications and follow-up appointments had an impact on patient recall, satisfaction, and adherence. Twenty-nine interactions between patients and residents were taped and analyzed by two trained observers. Patients were interviewed immediately after their interactions with residents to assess their ability to recall instructions and to assess their levels of satisfaction with the visit. Patients' overall global satisfaction with their interactions was highly correlated with their ratings of resident information giving (Pearson r = .90, P less than .001). Patients who expressed higher levels of satisfaction also had higher recall rates (Pearson r = .39, P less than .01), although overall patient recall rate was only slightly above 50 percent. Observers' analysis of residents giving information reveals a mean performance rating of 40 percent. Only 31 percent of patients returned for their follow-up appointments. The study suggests that information itself may not be so important in determining patient satisfaction as are patients' perceptions that physicians attempt to give them information. Such information may, however, have greater impact on patient adherence with physician recommendations.

  3. Nutrition and orthomolecular supplementation in lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Campos, Diana; Austerlitz, Carlos; Allison, Ron R; Póvoa, Helion; Sibata, Claudio

    2009-12-01

    This article reviews updates and provides some data related to nutritional and orthomolecular supplementation in oncology patients with an emphasis on lung cancer, a commonly diagnosed tumor with significant nutritional disturbances. Cancer and its treatment play a significant role in nutritional imbalance which likely has negative impact on the patient both in terms of quality and quantity of life. Nutritional supplementation may correct these imbalances with significant clinical benefit both physiologically and psychologically. This review will help assist in providing clinically useful data to assess the cancer patient's nutritional status and to guide nutritional intervention to assist these patients' recovery. PMID:20042413

  4. Use of deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis in hospitalized cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Awar, Zeina; Sheikh-Taha, Marwan

    2009-10-01

    Venous thromboembolism is a common complication and a major cause of morbidity and mortality in cancer patients. Patients with malignancies have a four-fold greater risk of venous thromboembolism compared with patients without malignancies. Underuse of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) prophylaxis persists, despite guidelines supporting its use in hospitalized cancer patients. This study was conducted to evaluate the use of DVT prophylaxis and its appropriateness in hospitalized cancer patients. This retrospective study included cancer patients admitted to Rafik Hariri University Hospital, a tertiary referral center in Beirut, Lebanon, over 2-month period, who were hospitalized for at least 2 days. We evaluated the use of anticoagulants for DVT prophylaxis in the absence of contraindications for their use. The risk factor profiles of the patients were reported in addition to the choice of the anticoagulant and the use of mechanical prophylaxis in patients with contraindications to anticoagulation. One hundred and thirty patients were studied out of which 34 (26.2%) had contraindications to anticoagulation use. In addition, 21 patients out of 95 (22.1%) who qualified for DVT prophylaxis received pharmacologic DVT prophylaxis. Enoxaparin was the most frequently prescribed anticoagulant (76.2% of the patients). Of those who received anticoagulation, only 47.6% received appropriate agent and dose. Among patients with contraindications to anticoagulation, only three (8.8%) received mechanical devices as nonpharmacologic DVT prophylaxis. DVT prophylaxis in hospitalized cancer patients is significantly underutilized. Several options are available to increase physicians' awareness of the problem.

  5. Measurement of cancer health literacy and identification of patients with limited cancer health literacy.

    PubMed

    Dumenci, Levent; Matsuyama, Robin; Riddle, Daniel L; Cartwright, Laura A; Perera, Robert A; Chung, Harold; Siminoff, Laura A

    2014-01-01

    Health literacy is related to a broad range of health outcomes. This study was designed to develop a psychometrically sound instrument designed to measure cancer health literacy along a continuum (CHLT-30), to develop another instrument designed to determine whether a patient has limited cancer health literacy (CHLT-6), and to estimate the prevalence of limited cancer health literacy. The Cancer Health Literacy Study involving 1,306 Black and White cancer patients was conducted between April 2011 and April 2013 in the Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center and surrounding oncology clinics. A continuous latent variable modeling framework was adopted to dimensionally represent cancer health literacy, whereas discrete latent variable modeling was used to estimate the prevalence rates of limited cancer health literacy. Self confidence about engaging in health decisions was used as the primary outcome in external validation of new instruments. Results from a comprehensive analysis strongly supported the construct validity and reliability of the CHLT-30 and CHLT-6. For both instruments, measurement invariance tests ruled out item/test bias to explain gender and race/ethnicity differences in test scores. The limited cancer health literacy rate was 18%, a subpopulation consisting of overrepresented Black, undereducated, and low-income cancer patients. Overall, the results supported the conclusion that the CHLT-30 accurately measures cancer health literacy along a continuum and that the CHLT-6 efficiently identifies patients with limited cancer health literacy with high accuracy. PMID:25315594

  6. Epidemiology and Prognostic Factors of Candidemia in Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hung-Jen; Liu, Wei-Lun; Lin, Hsin-Lan; Lai, Chih-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Aim The study of candidemia in cancer patients has been limited. This retrospective study aims to investigate the epidemiologic characteristics and prognostic factors of candidemia among cancer patients. Materials and Methods From 2009 to 2012, cancer patients with candidemia were identified at a hospital in Taiwan. The medical records of all patients with bloodstream infections due to Candida species were retrospectively reviewed. Results During the four-year period, a total of 242 episodes of candidemia were identified among cancer patients. Half of these patients were classified as elderly (≥65 years old), and more than 95% of the candidemia episodes were classified as healthcare-associated infections. Among the 242 cancer patients with candidemia, head and neck cancer was the most common, followed by gastrointestinal tract and lung cancer. Additionally, most of the patients had variable underlying conditions, such as the presence of CVC (99%) or prior exposure to broad-spectrum antibiotics (93%) and were receiving an immunosuppressant (86%). Overall, C. albicans (n = 132, 54.5%) was the most common pathogen, followed by C. tropicalis (n = 52, 21.5%), C. parapsilosis (n = 38, 15.7%), and C. glabrata (n = 29, 12.0%). Seventeen patients had polycandidal candidemia, and 77 patients had concomitant bacteremia. Approximately one-third of the patients required admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) or mechanical ventilation, and the overall in-hospital mortality was 50.8%. Multivariable analysis showed that the in-hospital mortality was significantly associated with only the non-use of antifungal agents and acute respiratory failure (P<.001). Conclusions Candidemia can develop in patients with both solid cancer and hematological malignancy, especially for patients with underlying conditions. Overall, the associated morbidity and mortality due to Candidemia remain high. It was also determined that the non-use of antifungal agents and acute

  7. Cancer pharmacogenomics, challenges in implementation, and patient-focused perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Jai N

    2016-01-01

    Cancer pharmacogenomics is an evolving landscape and has the potential to significantly impact cancer care and precision medicine. Harnessing and understanding the genetic code of both the patient (germline) and the tumor (somatic) provides the opportunity for personalized dose and therapy selection for cancer patients. While germline DNA is useful in understanding the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic disposition of a drug, somatic DNA is particularly useful in identifying drug targets and predicting drug response. Molecular profiling of somatic DNA has resulted in the current breadth of targeted therapies available, expanding the armamentarium to battle cancer. This review provides an update on cancer pharmacogenomics and genomics-based medicine, challenges in applying pharmacogenomics to the clinical setting, and patient perspectives on the use of pharmacogenomics to personalize cancer therapy. PMID:27471406

  8. The effect of computer-mediated social support in online communities on patient empowerment and doctor-patient communication.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hyun Jung; Lee, Byoungkwan

    2012-01-01

    In the context of diabetes, this study tested a mechanism through which Korean diabetes patients' exchange of computer-mediated social support (CMSS) in diabetes online communities influences their sense of empowerment and intention to actively communicate with the doctor. Analysis of data from 464 Korean diabetes patients indicates significant relationships among diabetes patients' online community activities, perceived CMSS, sense of empowerment, and their intention to actively communicate with the doctor. Diabetes patients who have engaged more in online community activities perceived greater social support from other members of the community. Perceived CMSS significantly predicted their intention to actively communicate with the doctor through sense of empowerment. Sense of empowerment was a valid underlying mechanism that explains how patients' perceived CMSS influences their intention to actively communicate with the doctor. The implications for health communication research and practice are discussed.

  9. The effect of computer-mediated social support in online communities on patient empowerment and doctor-patient communication.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hyun Jung; Lee, Byoungkwan

    2012-01-01

    In the context of diabetes, this study tested a mechanism through which Korean diabetes patients' exchange of computer-mediated social support (CMSS) in diabetes online communities influences their sense of empowerment and intention to actively communicate with the doctor. Analysis of data from 464 Korean diabetes patients indicates significant relationships among diabetes patients' online community activities, perceived CMSS, sense of empowerment, and their intention to actively communicate with the doctor. Diabetes patients who have engaged more in online community activities perceived greater social support from other members of the community. Perceived CMSS significantly predicted their intention to actively communicate with the doctor through sense of empowerment. Sense of empowerment was a valid underlying mechanism that explains how patients' perceived CMSS influences their intention to actively communicate with the doctor. The implications for health communication research and practice are discussed. PMID:21797714

  10. Sex differences in health care provider communication during genital herpes care and patients' health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Ports, Katie A; Reddy, Diane M; Barnack-Tavlaris, Jessica L

    2013-01-01

    Research in primary care medicine demonstrates that health care providers' communication varies depending on their sex, and that these sex differences in communication can influence patients' health outcomes. The present study aimed to examine the extent to which sex differences in primary care providers' communication extend to the sensitive context of gynecological care for genital herpes and whether these potential sex differences in communication influence patients' herpes transmission prevention behaviors and herpes-related quality of life. Women (N = 123) from the United States recently diagnosed with genital herpes anonymously completed established measures in which they rated (a) their health care providers' communication, (b) their herpes transmission prevention behaviors, and (c) their herpes-related quality of life. The authors found significant sex differences in health care providers' communication; this finding supports that sex differences in primary care providers' communication extend to gynecological care for herpes. Specifically, patients with female health care providers indicated that their providers engaged in more patient-centered communication and were more satisfied with their providers' communication. However, health care providers' sex did not predict women's quality of life, a finding that suggests that health care providers' sex alone is of little importance in patients' health outcomes. Patient-centered communication was significantly associated with greater quality-of-life scores and may provide a promising avenue for intervention.

  11. Development of a Barbershop-Based Cancer Communication Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Cheryl L.; Wynn, Theresa A.; Lewis, Ivey; Litaker, Mark S.; Jeames, Sanford; Huckaby, Francine; Stroud, Leonardo; Southward, Penny L.; Simons, Virgil; Lee, Crystal; Ross, Louis; Mitchell, Theodies

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Prostate and colorectal cancer (CRC) rates are disproportionately high among African-American men. The purpose of this paper is to describe the development of an intervention in which barbers were trained to educate clients about early detection for prostate and CRC. Design/methodology/approach: Working with an advisory panel of local…

  12. The primary health care physician and the cancer patient: tips and strategies for managing sexual health

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Eric S.; Nekhlyudov, Larissa

    2015-01-01

    There is a large and growing population of long-term cancer survivors. Primary care physicians (PCPs) are playing an increasingly greater role in the care of these patients across the continuum of cancer survivorship. In this role, PCPs are faced with the responsibility of managing a range of medical and psychosocial late effects of cancer treatment. In particular, the sexual side effects of treatment which are common and have significant impact on quality of life for the cancer survivor, often go unaddressed. This is an area of clinical care and research that has received increasing attention, highlighted by the presentation of this special issue on Cancer and Sexual Health. The aims of this review are 3-fold. First, we seek to overview common presentations of sexual dysfunction related to major cancer diagnoses in order to give the PCP a sense of the medical issues that the survivor may present with. Barriers to communication about sexual health issues between patient/PCPs in order are also described in order to emphasize the importance of PCPs initiating this important conversation. Next, we provide strategies and resources to help guide the PCP in the management of sexual dysfunction in cancer survivors. Finally, we discuss case examples of survivorship sexual health issues and highlight the role that a PCP can play in each of these case examples. PMID:26816826

  13. Effective Physician-Nurse Communication: A Patient Safety Essential for Labor & Delivery

    PubMed Central

    LYNDON, Audrey; ZLATNIK, Marya G.; WACHTER, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    Effective communication is a hallmark of safe patient care. Challenges to effective interprofessional communication in maternity care include differing professional perspectives on clinical management, steep hierarchies, and lack of administrative support for change. In this paper we review principles of high reliability as they apply to communication in clinical care, and discuss principles of effective communication and conflict management in maternity care. Effective clinical communication is respectful, clear, direct, and explicit. We use a clinical scenario to illustrate a historical style of nurse-physician communication, and then demonstrate how communication can be improved to promote trust and patient safety. Consistent execution of successful communications requires excellent listening skills, superb administrative support, and collective commitment to move past traditional hierarchy and professional stereotyping. PMID:21640970

  14. Cancer of the small intestine in patients with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Daijiro; Futami, Kitaro; Kojima, Daibo; Futatsuki, Ryo; Ishibashi, Yukiko; Maekawa, Takafumi; Yano, Yutaka; Takatsu, Noritaka; Hirai, Fumihito; Matsui, Toshiyuki; Iwashita, Akinori

    2013-07-01

    Due to an increase in the number of long-term cases of Crohn's disease, the risk of combined cancer in these patients has been assessed in numerous articles. Most of these reports have involved patients with cancer of the large intestine, while cases of cancer of the small intestine combined with Crohn's disease are very rare. We experienced two cases of cancer of the small intestine combined with Crohn's disease. In both cases, the patients had suffered from Crohn's disease for over 10 years and a second operation was performed after a long period without treatment following the first operation, which had achieved a favorable outcome. In both cases of combined cancer, the patients experienced ileus; however, it was difficult to discern this from ileus due to the presence of Crohn's disease. Therefore, making a definitive diagnosis of combined cancer was not possible before surgery, and the definitive diagnosis was obtained based on an intraoperative pathological diagnosis. It is thought that tumor markers transition in a manner parallel to the progression of cancer, providing a clue for cancer diagnosis. In patients with Crohn's disease, there is a pressing need to establish a method for diagnosing cancer of the small intestine at an early stage.

  15. Pain management in veterinary patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Fan, Timothy M

    2014-09-01

    Pain is a widespread clinical symptom in companion animals with cancer, and its aggressive management should be a priority. Education and skills can be acquired by health care professionals and caregivers to better understand, recognize, and treat cancer-associated pain. The early and rational institution of multimodality analgesic protocols can be highly effective and maximize the chances of improving quality of life in dogs and cats with cancer. This article describes the pathophysiology of pain in companion animals diagnosed with cancer. The foundational causes of cancer-associated pain and treatment strategies for alleviating discomfort in companion animals with cancer are discussed.

  16. Designing Asynchronous Communication Tools for Optimization of Patient-Clinician Coordination.

    PubMed

    Eschler, Jordan; Liu, Leslie S; Vizer, Lisa M; McClure, Jennifer B; Lozano, Paula; Pratt, Wanda; Ralston, James D

    2015-01-01

    Asynchronous communication outside the clinical setting has both enriched and complicated patient-clinician interactions. Many patients can now interact with a patient portal 24 hours a day, asking questions of their clinicians via secure message, checking lab results, ordering medication refills, or making appointments. However, the mode of communication (asynchronous) and the nature of the interaction (lacking tone or body language) strip valuable information from each side of patient-clinician asynchronous communication. Using interviews with 34 individuals who actively manage a chronic illness of their own, or for a child or partner, we elicited narratives about patients' experiences and expectations for using asynchronous communication to address medical issues with their clinicians. Based on these perspectives, we present opportunities for designing asynchronous communication tools to better facilitate understanding of and coordination around care activities between patients and clinicians.

  17. Patient-Clinician Ethnic Concordance and Communication in Mental Health Intake Visits

    PubMed Central

    Alegría, Margarita; Roter, Debra L.; Valentine, Anne; Chen, Chih-nan; Li, Xinliang; Lin, Julia; Rosen, Daniel; Lapatin, Sheri; Normand, Sharon-Lise; Larson, Susan; Shrout, Patrick E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study examines how communication patterns vary across racial and ethnic patient-clinician dyads in mental health intake sessions and its relation to continuance in treatment, defined as attending the next scheduled appointment. Methods Observational study of communication patterns among ethnically/racially concordant and discordant patient-clinician dyads. Primary analysis included 93 patients with 38 clinicians in race/ethnic concordant and discordant dyads. Communication was coded using the Roter Interaction Analysis System (RIAS) and the Working Alliance Inventory Observer (WAI-O) bond scale; continuance in care was derived from chart reviews. Results Latino concordant dyad patients were more verbally dominant (p<.05), engaged in more patient-centered communication (p<.05) and scored higher on the (WAI-O) bond scale (all p<.05) than other groups. Latino patients had higher continuance rates than other patients in models that adjusted for non-communication variables. When communication, global affect, and therapeutic process variables were adjusted for, differences were reversed and white dyad patients had higher continuance in care rates than other dyad patients. Conclusion Communication patterns seem to explain the role of ethnic concordance for continuance in care. Practice Implications Improve intercultural communication in cross cultural encounters appears significant for retaining minorities in care. PMID:23896127

  18. Cancer patient and survivor research from the cancer information service research consortium: a preview of three large randomized trials and initial lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Alfred C; Diefenbach, Michael A; Stanton, Annette L; Miller, Suzanne M; Fleisher, Linda; Raich, Peter C; Morra, Marion E; Perocchia, Rosemarie Slevin; Tran, Zung Vu; Bright, Mary Anne

    2013-01-01

    The authors describe 3 large randomized trials from the Cancer Information Service Research Consortium. Three web-based multimedia programs are being tested to help newly diagnosed prostate (Project 1) and breast cancer patients (Project 2) make informed treatment decisions and breast cancer patients prepare for life after treatment (Project 3). Project 3 also tests a telephone callback intervention delivered by a cancer information specialist. All participants receive standard print material specific to each project. Preliminary results from the 2-month follow-up interviews are reported for the initial wave of enrolled participants, most of whom were recruited from the Cancer Information Service (1-800-4-CANCER) telephone information program (Project 1: n =208; Project 2: n =340; Project 3: n =792). Self-reported use of the multimedia program was 51%, 52%, and 67% for Projects 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Self-reported use of the print materials (read all, most, or some) was 90%, 85%, and 83% for Projects 1, 2, and 3, respectively. The callback intervention was completed by 92% of Project 3 participants. Among those using the Cancer Information Service Research Consortium interventions, perceived usefulness and benefit was high, and more than 90% reported that they would recommend them to other cancer patients. The authors present 5 initial lessons learned that may help inform future cancer communications research.

  19. Opportunities for Public Health Communication, Intervention, and Future Research on Breast Cancer in Younger Women

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, Natasha; Roland, Katherine B.; Rodriguez, Juan L.; Miller, Jacqueline W.; Fairley, Temeika

    2015-01-01

    Background Approximately 6% of breast cancers in the United States occur in women under the age of 40 years. Compared with women ≥ 40 years of age, younger women are diagnosed at later stages, have higher rates of recurrence and death, and may be predisposed to secondary breast or ovarian cancer. An informal meeting of experts discussed opportunities for research and public health communication related to breast cancer among young (< 40 and/or premenopausal) women. Methods In September 2011, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention hosted 18 experts in oncology, genetics, behavioral science, survivorship and advocacy, public health, communication, ethics, nutrition, physical activity, and environmental health. They (1) reviewed research and programmatic knowledge on risk and preventive factors, early detection, and survivorship; and (2) discussed ideas for research, communication, and programmatic efforts related to young women diagnosed with or at risk for early onset breast cancer. Results Levels of evidence and themes for future research regarding risk and preventive factors, including exposures, were discussed. Early detection strategies, including screening, risk assessment, and genetic counseling, as well as survivorship issues, follow-up care, fertility and reproductive health, and psychosocial care were highlighted. Conclusion Community and academic researchers, providers, advocates, and the federal public health community discussed strategies and opportunities for this unique population. Although the evidence is limited, future research and communication activities may be useful to organize future public health initiatives. PMID:23514347

  20. Designing for Diffusion: How Can We Increase Uptake of Cancer Communication Innovations?

    PubMed Central

    Dearing, James W.; Kreuter, Matthew W.

    2010-01-01

    Objective The best innovations in cancer communication do not necessarily achieve uptake by researchers, public health and clinical practitioners, and policy makers. This paper describes design activities that can be applied and combined for the purpose of spreading effective cancer communication innovations. Methods A previously developed Push-Pull-Infrastructure Model is used to organize and highlight the types of activities that can be deployed during the design phase of innovations. Scientific literature about the diffusion of innovations, knowledge utilization, marketing, public health, and our experiences in working to spread effective practices, programs, and policies are used for this purpose. Results Attempts to broaden the reach, quicken the uptake, and facilitate the use of cancer communication innovations can apply design activities to increase the likelihood of diffusion. Some simple design activities hold considerable promise for improving dissemination and subsequent diffusion. Conclusion Augmenting current dissemination practices with evidence-based concepts from diffusion science, marketing science, and knowledge utilization hold promise for improving results by eliciting greater market pull. Practice Implications Inventors and change agencies seeking to spread cancer communication innovations can experience more success by explicit consideration of design activities that reflect an expanded version of the Push-Pull-Infrastructure Model. PMID:21067884

  1. Focus on Extracellular Vesicles: New Frontiers of Cell-to-Cell Communication in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ciardiello, Chiara; Cavallini, Lorenzo; Spinelli, Cristiana; Yang, Julie; Reis-Sobreiro, Mariana; de Candia, Paola; Minciacchi, Valentina Renè; Di Vizio, Dolores

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular Vesicles (EVs) have received considerable attention in recent years, both as mediators of intercellular communication pathways that lead to tumor progression, and as potential sources for discovery of novel cancer biomarkers. For many years, research on EVs has mainly investigated either the mechanism of biogenesis and cargo selection and incorporation, or the methods of EV isolation from available body fluids for biomarker discovery. Recent studies have highlighted the existence of different populations of cancer-derived EVs, with distinct molecular cargo, thus pointing to the possibility that the various EV populations might play diverse roles in cancer and that this does not happen randomly. However, data attributing cancer specific intercellular functions to given populations of EVs are still limited. A deeper functional, biochemical and molecular characterization of the various EV classes might identify more selective clinical markers, and significantly advance our knowledge of the pathogenesis and disease progression of many cancer types. PMID:26861306

  2. Inaugural Meeting of North American Pancreatic Cancer Organizations: Advancing Collaboration and Communication.

    PubMed

    Kenner, Barbara J; Fleshman, Julie M; Goldberg, Ann E; Rothschild, Laura J

    2015-11-01

    A meeting of North American Pancreatic Cancer Organizations planned by Kenner Family Research Fund and Pancreatic Cancer Action Network was held on July 15-16, 2015, in New York City. The meeting was attended by 32 individuals from 20 nonprofit groups from the United States and Canada. The objectives of this inaugural convening were to share mission goals and initiatives, engage as leaders, cultivate potential partnerships, and increase participation in World Pancreatic Cancer Day. The program was designed to provide opportunities for informal conversations, as well as facilitated discussions to meet the stated objectives. At the conclusion of the meeting, the group agreed that enhancing collaboration and communication will result in a more unified approach within the field and will benefit individuals diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. As a first step, the group will actively collaborate to participate in World Pancreatic Cancer Day, which is planned for November 13, 2015, and seeks to raise the level of visibility about the disease globally.

  3. Lung cancer screening in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Jessica; Marín, Marta; Sánchez-Salcedo, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are two intimately related diseases, with great impact on public health. Annual screening using low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) of the chest significantly reduces mortality due to lung cancer, and several scientific societies now recommend this technique. COPD, defined by the presence of airflow obstruction [forced expiratory volume and forced vital capacity (FVC) ratio less than 0.70], and their clinical phenotypes, namely emphysema and chronic bronchitis, have been associated with increased lung cancer risk. Several epidemiological studies, including lung cancer screening trials, have found a 2- to 4-fold increase in lung cancer risk in patients with COPD when compared to individuals without airflow obstruction. Part of the risk attributed to airflow obstruction appears to be derived from the presence of radiographic emphysema. The latter has proven to be an important lung cancer risk factor in smokers without airflow obstruction and even in never smokers. This evidence supports the idea of including patients with COPD and/or emphysema in lung cancer screening programs. There is evidence that lung cancer screening in this population is effective and can potentially reduce mortality. Specific lung cancer risk scores have been developed for patients with COPD [COPD lung cancer screening score (LUCSS) and COPD-LUCSS-diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO)] to identify those at high risk. A multidisciplinary approach for an adequate patient selection, especially of patients with severe disease, is key to maximize benefits and reduce harms from lung cancer screening in this population. Patients with COPD included in lung cancer screening programs could also benefit from other interventions, such as smoking cessation and adequate treatment. PMID:27195278

  4. Factors affecting acceptability to young cancer patients of a psychoeducational video game about cancer.

    PubMed

    Kato, Pamela M; Beale, Ivan L

    2006-01-01

    This study explored whether an action video game about cancer would be acceptable to adolescent and young adult cancer patients as a tool for learning about cancer and self-care during treatment. Interviews about a proposed video game were conducted with 43 young cancer patients, who also completed questionnaires measuring personality and adaptive style. Data were analyzed to assess the overall acceptability of the proposed video game and to reveal any factors associated with measures of acceptability. Most participants expressed willingness to play the game and a moderate degree of interest in it. Cancer content in the game was not a deterrent for most participants. Game acceptability was not affected by personality variables or adaptive style. It is concluded that an action video game using cancer themes could be useful to nurses as a tool to improve understanding and self care of adolescent and young adult cancer patients.

  5. How to Conduct the Patient Interview. Communicating successfully with patients requires strategy, flexibility and practice.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Mike

    2015-10-01

    As community paramedicine and other nonemergent initiatives become commonplace in EMS, caregivers are going to need communication skills that go beyond SAMPLE checklists. A minimalist approach to dialogue with patients, considered preferred if not essential in what was once almost exclusively a light-and-sirens environment, isn't acceptable when prehospital interventions require a thorough understanding not only of chief complaints, but also how the physical part of illness and injury is framed by the patient's environment. Be considerate, be as thorough as time permits, and pay attention! Next time we'll talk about interviewing prospective employees. PMID:26554214

  6. Scrambler therapy for patients with cancer pain - case series -.

    PubMed

    Park, Hong Sik; Sin, Woo Kyung; Kim, Hye Young; Moon, Jee Youn; Park, Soo Young; Kim, Yong Chul; Lee, Sang Chul

    2013-01-01

    More than 80% of cancer patients experience cancer pain. Among them, more than 50% experience moderate to severe pain. To control cancer pain, a variety of methods have been used, including medications and nerve blocks. In some patients, however, it is impossible to perform nerve blocks due to caner metastasis into the epidural space, while in other patients, opioid dose escalation is impossible due to opioid side effects; thus, cancer pain management is difficult. Scrambler therapy is a novel approach for pain control that uses EKG-like pads, which are applied above and below the site of pain. Scrambler therapy synthesizes 16 different types of nerve action potentials that provide "non-pain" information via cutaneous nerves. The advantages of this treatment are that it is non-invasive and safe and has no significant side effects. In this case series, we report the treatment results of using scrambler therapy in three cancer patients with intractable pain. PMID:23342211

  7. The information needs of cancer patients in the Pretoria and Witwatersrand area.

    PubMed

    McLoughlin, H A; Oosthuizen, B L

    1996-06-01

    methods of communication indicated were firstly personal contact and then a combination of personal contact and booklets. An important conclusion which can be reached is that co-operation between the medical professionals, the information services and the patient and his family is essential if the information needs of the cancer patient are to be met satisfactorily.

  8. Managing the low-socioeconomic-status prostate cancer patient.

    PubMed Central

    Rayford, Walter

    2006-01-01

    Management of patients with low socioeconomic status and/or low literacy who have prostate cancer presents a challenge to healthcare professionals. Improving treatment outcomes for these men requires specific educational programs to provide a better understanding of prostate cancer including careful posttreatment follow-up to ensure they have recovered well, that the cancer is not progressing and that complications are not proving troublesome. Practice nurses and health educators/navigators can play an important role in achieving these objectives. Education and knowledgeable advice can lead to earlier diagnosis of prostate cancer, improved patient participation in the treatment decision-making process and effective management of posttreatment complications. PMID:16623064

  9. Issues of hope and faith in the cancer patient.

    PubMed

    Carni, E

    1988-12-01

    Akira Kurosawa's 1952 film about a man with a terminal gastric cancer introduces a discussion of hope and faith in the oncology patient. A psychodynamic relationship between hope and faith is explored, using Lawrence LeShan's research in cancer psychotherapy and Erik Erikson's lifespan developmental theory. LeShan describes a cancer personality characterized by hopeless despair, while Erikson formulates a psychogenetic framework for the development of hope and despair. Hope and faith are linked through the individual's earliest strivings toward basic trust in the world and his or her own self-efficacy. Accordingly, cancer psychotherapy may aim at restoring adult patients' faith in life and inner creative resources.

  10. Issues of hope and faith in the cancer patient.

    PubMed

    Carni, E

    1988-12-01

    Akira Kurosawa's 1952 film about a man with a terminal gastric cancer introduces a discussion of hope and faith in the oncology patient. A psychodynamic relationship between hope and faith is explored, using Lawrence LeShan's research in cancer psychotherapy and Erik Erikson's lifespan developmental theory. LeShan describes a cancer personality characterized by hopeless despair, while Erikson formulates a psychogenetic framework for the development of hope and despair. Hope and faith are linked through the individual's earliest strivings toward basic trust in the world and his or her own self-efficacy. Accordingly, cancer psychotherapy may aim at restoring adult patients' faith in life and inner creative resources. PMID:24302437

  11. High prevalence of diabetes mellitus and impaired glucose tolerance in liver cancer patients: A hospital based study of 4610 patients with benign tumors or specific cancers

    PubMed Central

    Roujun, Chen; Yanhua, Yi; Bixun, Li

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and impaired fasting glucose (IFG) were hypothesised to be different among different tumor patients. This study aimed to study the association between the prevalence of DM, IGT and IFG and liver cancer, colorectal cancer, breast cancer, cervical cancer, nasopharyngeal cancer and benign tumor. Methods:  A hospital based retrospective study was conducted on 4610 patients admitted to the Internal Medical Department of the Affiliated Tumor Hospital of Guangxi Medical University, China. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between gender, age group, ethnicity , cancer types or benign tumors and prevalence of DM, IFG, IGT. Results: Among 4610 patients, there were 1000 liver cancer patients, 373 breast cancer patients, 415 nasopharyngeal cancer patients, 230 cervical cancer patients, 405 colorectal cancer patients, and 2187 benign tumor patients. The prevalence of DM and IGT in liver cancer patients was 14.7% and 22.1%, respectively. The prevalence of DM and IGT was 13.8% and 20%, respectively, in colorectal cancer patients, significantly higher than that of benign cancers. After adjusting for gender, age group, and ethnicity, the prevalence of DM and IGT in liver cancers patients was 1.29 times (CI :1.12-1.66) and 1.49 times (CI :1.20-1.86) higher than that of benign tumors, respectively. Conclusion: There was a high prevalence of DM and IGT in liver cancer patients.

  12. High prevalence of diabetes mellitus and impaired glucose tolerance in liver cancer patients: A hospital based study of 4610 patients with benign tumors or specific cancers

    PubMed Central

    Roujun, Chen; Yanhua, Yi; Bixun, Li

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and impaired fasting glucose (IFG) were hypothesised to be different among different tumor patients. This study aimed to study the association between the prevalence of DM, IGT and IFG and liver cancer, colorectal cancer, breast cancer, cervical cancer, nasopharyngeal cancer and benign tumor. Methods:  A hospital based retrospective study was conducted on 4610 patients admitted to the Internal Medical Department of the Affiliated Tumor Hospital of Guangxi Medical University, China. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between gender, age group, ethnicity , cancer types or benign tumors and prevalence of DM, IFG, IGT. Results: Among 4610 patients, there were 1000 liver cancer patients, 373 breast cancer patients, 415 nasopharyngeal cancer patients, 230 cervical cancer patients, 405 colorectal cancer patients, and 2187 benign tumor patients. The prevalence of DM and IGT in liver cancer patients was 14.7% and 22.1%, respectively. The prevalence of DM and IGT was 13.8% and 20%, respectively, in colorectal cancer patients, significantly higher than that of benign cancers. After adjusting for gender, age group, and ethnicity, the prevalence of DM and IGT in liver cancers patients was 1.29 times (CI :1.12-1.66) and 1.49 times (CI :1.20-1.86) higher than that of benign tumors, respectively. Conclusion: There was a high prevalence of DM and IGT in liver cancer patients. PMID:27610222

  13. Considerations when communicating with awake patients undergoing image-guided neuro-interventions

    PubMed Central

    Simonetti, Luigi; Di Paola, Francesco; Leonardi, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The authors empirically evaluated the context of intra-procedural physician-patient communication during imaging-guided procedures in a radiology/neuroradiology interventional clinical framework. Different intra-procedural communicative scenarios are reported. They conclude that the quality of intra-procedural physician-patient communication should be considered an important element of individual and team ethical and professional behaviour, able to strongly influence the therapeutic alliance. As for the whole medical communication strategy, an approach which takes into account the psychological and cultural background of the individual patient is preferred. PMID:26261155

  14. Potential microRNA-mediated oncogenic intercellular communication revealed by pan-cancer analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yue; Zhang, Zhaolei

    2014-11-01

    Carcinogenesis consists of oncogenesis and metastasis, and intriguingly microRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in both processes. Although aberrant miRNA activities are prevalent in diverse tumor types, the exact mechanisms for how they regulate cancerous processes are not always clear. To this end, we performed a large-scale pan-cancer analysis via a novel probabilistic approach to infer recurrent miRNA-target interactions implicated in 12 cancer types using data from The Cancer Genome Atlas. We discovered ~20,000 recurrent miRNA regulations, which are enriched for cancer-related miRNAs/genes. Notably, miRNA 200 family (miR-200/141/429) is among the most prominent miRNA regulators, which is known to be involved in metastasis. Importantly, the recurrent miRNA regulatory network is not only enriched for cancer pathways but also for extracellular matrix (ECM) organization and ECM-receptor interactions. The results suggest an intriguing cancer mechanism involving miRNA-mediated cell-to-cell communication, which possibly involves delivery of tumorigenic miRNA messengers to adjacent cells via exosomes. Finally, survival analysis revealed 414 recurrent-prognostic associations, where both gene and miRNA involved in each interaction conferred significant prognostic power in one or more cancer types. Together, our comprehensive pan-cancer analysis provided not only biological insights into metastasis but also brought to bear the clinical relevance of the proposed recurrent miRNA-gene associations.

  15. Exposure to and Intention to Discuss Cancer-Related Internet Information Among Patients With Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bylund, Carma L.; D'Agostino, Thomas A.; Ostroff, Jamie; Heerdt, Alexandra; Li, Yuelin; Dickler, Maura

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Previous studies have reported a significant number of patients with breast cancer seek cancer-related information from the Internet. Most studies have asked whether a patient has ever read Internet information since her diagnosis. The purpose of this study was to assess the frequency with which patients with breast cancer come to physician appointments having recently read and intending to discuss cancer-related information from the Internet. Patients and Methods: We asked 558 patients with breast cancer who were waiting to see their physicians about their experiences reading cancer-related information from the Internet and their intent to discuss the information in their current visit. Results: Fifteen percent reported reading cancer-related Internet information in the past month. Patients who had read such information in the past month were younger, had been diagnosed more recently, and were more likely to be attending a new visit. Of those who had read in the past month, 45% reported intending to discuss what they had read with their physician. Nineteen percent of patients reported having ever read breast cancer–related Internet information since their diagnosis. Conclusion: The proportion of patients with breast cancer planning to discuss Internet information during their current physician visit was relatively small. Few characteristics were associated with recent Internet use or intent to discuss. PMID:22548010

  16. Sulforaphane counteracts aggressiveness of pancreatic cancer driven by dysregulated Cx43-mediated gap junctional intercellular communication

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiyao; Isayev, Orkhan; Heilmann, Katharina; Schoensiegel, Frank; Liu, Li; Nessling, Michelle; Richter, Karsten; Labsch, Sabrina; Nwaeburu, Clifford C.; Mattern, Juergen; Gladkich, Jury; Giese, Nathalia; Werner, Jens; Schemmer, Peter; Gross, Wolfgang; Gebhard, Martha M.; Gerhauser, Clarissa; Schaefer, Michael; Herr, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    The extreme aggressiveness of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) has been associated with blocked gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) and the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs). We examined whether disturbed GJIC is responsible for a CSC phenotype in established and primary cancer cells and patient tissue of PDA using interdisciplinary methods based in physiology, cell and molecular biology, histology and epigenetics. Flux of fluorescent dyes and gemcitabine through gap junctions (GJs) was intact in less aggressive cells but not in highly malignant cells with morphological dysfunctional GJs. Among several connexins, only Cx43 was expressed on the cell surface of less aggressive and GJIC-competent cells, whereas Cx43 surface expression was absent in highly malignant, E-cadherin-negative and GJIC-incompetent cells. The levels of total Cx43 protein and Cx43 phosphorylated at Ser368 and Ser279/282 were high in normal tissue but low to absent in malignant tissue. si-RNA-mediated inhibition of Cx43 expression in GJIC-competent cells prevented GJIC and induced colony formation and the expression of stem cell-related factors. The bioactive substance sulforaphane enhanced Cx43 and E-cadherin levels, inhibited the CSC markers c-Met and CD133, improved the functional morphology of GJs and enhanced GJIC. Sulforaphane altered the phosphorylation of several kinases and their substrates and inhibition of GSK3, JNK and PKC prevented sulforaphane-induced CX43 expression. The sulforaphane-mediated expression of Cx43 was not correlated with enhanced Cx43 RNA expression, acetylated histone binding and Cx43 promoter de-methylation, suggesting that posttranslational phosphorylation is the dominant regulatory mechanism. Together, the absence of Cx43 prevents GJIC and enhances aggressiveness, whereas sulforaphane counteracts this process, and our findings highlight dietary co-treatment as a viable treatment option for PDA. PMID:24742583

  17. Improving Clinical Communication and Promoting Health through Concordance-Based Patient Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bylund, Carma L.; D'Agostino, Thomas A.; Ho, Evelyn Y.; Chewning, Betty A.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, communication education has been used as a means of improving the clinician-patient relationship and promoting health. The focus of these interventions has primarily centered on clinician training. An area that has received less focus, although equally important, is training patients to be good communicators. The purpose of the…

  18. Stroke Patients Communicating Their Healthcare Needs in Hospital: A Study within the ICF Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Halloran, Robyn; Worrall, Linda; Hickson, Louise

    2012-01-01

    Background: Previous research has identified that many patients admitted into acute hospital stroke units have communication-related impairments such as hearing, vision, speech, language and/or cognitive communicative impairment. However, no research has identified how many patients in acute hospital stroke units have difficulty actually…

  19. Cancer stage knowledge and desire for information: mismatch in Latino cancer patients?

    PubMed

    Costas-Muniz, Rosario; Sen, Rohini; Leng, Jennifer; Aragones, Abraham; Ramirez, Julia; Gany, Francesca

    2013-09-01

    Having more health knowledge has a crucial and positive impact on cancer outcomes. Patients' cancer knowledge influences their ability to participate actively in decision-making processes for medical care and in treatment choices. The purpose of this study was to determine the demographic and medical correlates of lack of cancer stage knowledge and desire for information among Latino cancer patients. The sample included 271 underserved Latino cancer patients recruited from four cancer clinics in New York City. Participants completed a needs assessment survey in their preferred language, which included sociodemographic and health-related questions. Close to two-thirds of the sample (65%) had no knowledge of their stage, and 38% were unaware of the metastatic state of their tumor. Only 15% of the patients expressed that they would like additional information about their diagnosis and/or treatment. After controlling for sociodemographic characteristics, being an immigrant with limited English proficiency and monolingual in Spanish were predictors of stage unawareness and less desire/need for cancer information. Patients needing interpretation for health care were less likely to know whether their tumor had metastasized and their cancer stage and to desire information about their cancer diagnosis and/or treatment. This study shows considerably low levels of stage awareness among Latinos diagnosed with cancer. This lack of knowledge might adversely impact their treatment decisions and disease management. Future studies should focus on identifying barriers to acquisition of disease information and other disease-specific informational deficits. PMID:23740509

  20. [Studies on trace elements in cancerous stomach tissue of the patients with stomach cancer].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, M

    1990-05-01

    This study was performed to find out whether copper, zinc, manganese, selenium and iron concentrations in the cancerous and normal stomach tissues of the patients with stomach cancer vary within the malignant stages and Borrmann classification or not, and to investigate the interaction of copper, zinc, manganese, selenium and iron concentrations in blood of these patients. Copper concentration in cancerous tissues was not statistically significant as compared with normal tissues. Plasma and whole blood copper concentration of Stage IV showed a significant higher level than that of stage I. Zinc concentration in cancerous tissues was not statistically significant as compared with normal tissues. Selenium concentration in cancerous tissues showed a statistically significant high level as compared with that in normal tissues. Plasma selenium concentration of Stage III showed a significant lower level than that of stage I. Iron concentration in cancerous tissues showed a significantly lower level than that in normal tissues at stage IV. Whole blood iron concentration was low levels in proportion to the progress of stomach cancer. The correlation of selenium concentration between in cancerous tissues and in whole blood of these patients was significant with the correlation coefficient of 0.340. The correlation of iron concentration between in cancerous tissues and in whole blood of these patients was significant with the correlation coefficient of 0.423. The correlation between iron concentration in cancerous tissues and hemoglobin concentration in whole blood of these patients was significant with the correlation coefficient of 0.361.

  1. The Effects of Hospital-Level Factors on Patients' Ratings of Physician Communication.

    PubMed

    Al-Amin, Mona; Makarem, Suzanne C

    2016-01-01

    The quality of physician-patient communication influences patient health outcomes and satisfaction with healthcare delivery. Yet, little is known about contextual factors that influence physicians' communication with their patients. The main purpose of this article is to examine organizational-level factors that influence patient perceptions of physician communication in inpatient settings. We used the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey and American Hospital Association data to determine patients' ratings of physician communication at the hospital level, and to collect information about hospital-level factors that can potentially influence physician communication. Our sample consisted of 2,756 hospitals. We ran a regression analysis to determine the predictors of poor physician communication, measured as the percentage of patients in a hospital who reported that physicians sometimes or never communicated well. In our sample of hospitals, this percentage ranged between 0% and 21%, with 25% of hospitals receiving poor ratings from more than 6% of patients. Three organizational factors had statistically significant negative associations with physician communication: for-profit ownership, hospital size, and hospitalists providing care in the hospital, On the other hand, the number of full-time-equivalent physicians and dentists per 10,000 inpatient days, physician ownership of the hospital, Medicare share of inpatient days, and public ownership were positively associated with patients' ratings of physician communication. Physician staffing levels are an understudied area in healthcare research. Our findings indicate that physician staffing levels affect the quality of physician communication with patients. Moreover, for-profit and larger hospitals should invest more in physician communication given the role that HCAHPS plays in value-based purchasing.

  2. Designing Asynchronous Communication Tools for Optimization of Patient-Clinician Coordination

    PubMed Central

    Eschler, Jordan; Liu, Leslie S.; Vizer, Lisa M.; McClure, Jennifer B.; Lozano, Paula; Pratt, Wanda; Ralston, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Asynchronous communication outside the clinical setting has both enriched and complicated patient-clinician interactions. Many patients can now interact with a patient portal 24 hours a day, asking questions of their clinicians via secure message, checking lab results, ordering medication refills, or making appointments. However, the mode of communication (asynchronous) and the nature of the interaction (lacking tone or body language) strip valuable information from each side of patient-clinician asynchronous communication. Using interviews with 34 individuals who actively manage a chronic illness of their own, or for a child or partner, we elicited narratives about patients’ experiences and expectations for using asynchronous communication to address medical issues with their clinicians. Based on these perspectives, we present opportunities for designing asynchronous communication tools to better facilitate understanding of and coordination around care activities between patients and clinicians. PMID:26958188

  3. Cancer Patient Perceptions about Biobanking and Preferred Timing of Consent

    PubMed Central

    Tsark, JoAnn U.; Powers, Amy; Croom, Kristen; Kim, Robert; Gachupin, Francine C.; Morris, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about how cancer patients feel about donating their tissue, especially in a multiethnic population. Structured interviews were conducted with 30 patients recently diagnosed with cancer, referred to the study by six cancer surgeons and oncologists and by other patients in the study. The participants reported a variety of cancers, and the sample reflected the racial distribution of Hawai`i, including Caucasians (23%), Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders (27%), Asians (37%), Hispanics (7%), Native Americans (3%), and African Americans (3%). The interview questions and analysis were guided by the Framework Approach, with interview questions based on pre-set aims. Findings suggest that most cancer patients would donate cancer tissue to science, especially if informed that doing so could help researchers find causes of and cures for cancer. Patients varied on when in their cancer journey they would be most receptive to being asked for a donation, however two-thirds thought they would be more receptive if approached after surgery. Only three of the 30 patients said they would want to be re-consented each time their tissue is requested for research. They identified their physician as the preferred messenger regarding tissue donation. No obvious differences were seen by race. Findings confirm those of other researchers who have reported broad support for biobank participation if informed consent and confidentiality could be assured. Given that the physician was seen as the key messenger about biobanking, more education is needed around cancer tissue collection for physicians, as well as for cancer patients. PMID:24749877

  4. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Metastatic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-21

    Breast Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Gallbladder Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Liver Cancer; Lung Cancer; Metastatic Cancer; Ovarian Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor

  5. Understanding minority patients' beliefs about hypertension to reduce gaps in communication between patients and clinicians.

    PubMed

    Kronish, Ian M; Leventhal, Howard; Horowitz, Carol R

    2012-01-01

    The authors' objective was to gain a better understanding of minority patients' beliefs about hypertension and to use this understanding to develop a model to explain gaps in communication between patients and clinicians. Eighty-eight hypertensive black and Latino adults from 4 inner-city primary care clinics participated in focus groups to elucidate views on hypertension. Participants believed that hypertension was a serious illness in need of treatment. Participants' diverged from the medical model in their beliefs about the time-course of hypertension (believed hypertension was intermittent); causes of hypertension (believed stress, racism, pollution, and poverty were the important causes); symptoms of hypertension (believed hypertension was primarily present when symptomatic); and treatments for hypertension (preferred alternative treatments that reduced stress over prescription medications). Participants distrusted clinicians who prioritized medications that did not directly address their understanding of the causes or symptoms of hypertension. Patients' models of understanding chronic asymptomatic illnesses such as hypertension challenge the legitimacy of lifelong, pill-centered treatment. Listening to patients' beliefs about hypertension may increase trust, improve communication, and encourage better self-management of hypertension.

  6. Prognostic Impact of Comorbidity in Patients with Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Megwalu, Ifeanyichukwu I.; Vlahiotis, Anna; Radwan, Mohamed; Piccirillo, Jay F.; Kibel, Adam S.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To determine the impact of comorbidity on survival of bladder cancer patients. Methods The population included 675 patients with newly diagnosed bladder cancer whose medical information was abstracted from a hospital cancer registry. Adult Comorbidity Evaluation-27, a validated instrument, was used to prospectively categorize comorbidity. Independent variables assessed include comorbidity, American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage, grade, age, gender, and race. Outcome measure was overall survival. We analyzed the entire cohort, patients with noninvasive disease, and patients requiring cystectomy. Cox proportional hazards analysis was used to assess impact of independent variables on survival. Results Median age at diagnosis for the entire cohort was 71 yr and median follow-up was 45 mo. Of 675 patients, 446 had at least one comorbid condition and 301 died during follow-up. On multivariable analysis for the entire cohort, comorbidity (p = 0.0001), AJCC stage (p = 0.0001), age (p = 0.0001), and race (p = 0.0045) significantly predicted overall survival. On subset analysis of noninvasive bladder cancer patients, comorbidity (p = 0.0001) and age (p = 0.0001) independently predicted overall survival, whereas stage, grade, race, and gender did not. On subset analysis of cystectomy patients, comorbidity (p = 0.0053), stage (p = 0.0001), and race (p = 0.0449) significantly predicted overall survival. Conclusions Comorbidity is an independent predictor of overall survival in the entire cohort of bladder cancer patients, the subset with noninvasive disease, and the subset treated with cystectomy. PMID:17997024

  7. Association of Family History with Cancer Recurrence and Survival Among Patients with Stage III Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Jennifer A.; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A.; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Hollis, Donna; Saltz, Leonard B.; Mayer, Robert J.; Thomas, James; Schaefer, Paul; Whittom, Renaud; Hantel, Alexander; Goldberg, Richard M.; Warren, Robert S.; Bertagnolli, Monica; Fuchs, Charles S.

    2011-01-01

    Context A family history of colorectal cancer in a first-degree relative increases the risk of developing colorectal cancer. However, the influence of family history on cancer recurrence and survival among patients with established disease remains uncertain. Objective To examine the association of family history of colorectal cancer with cancer recurrence and survival of patients with colon cancer. Design, Setting, and Participants Prospective observational study of 1,087 patients with stage III colon cancer enrolled in a randomized adjuvant chemotherapy trial (CALGB 89803) between April 1999 and May 2001. Patients provided data on family history at baseline and were followed up until March 2007 for disease recurrence and death (median follow-up 5.6 years). In a subset of patients, we assessed microsatellite instability (MSI) and expression of the mismatch repair (MMR) proteins, MLH1 and MSH2, in tumor specimens. Main Outcome Measure Disease-free survival, recurrence-free survival, and overall survival according to the presence or absence of a family history of colorectal cancer. Results Among 1,087 eligible patients, 195 (17.9%) reported a family history of colorectal cancer in a first-degree relative. Cancer recurrence or death occurred in 57/195 patients (29%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 23%-36%) with a family history of colorectal cancer and 343/892 patients (38%; 95% CI, 35%-42%) without a family history. Compared to patients without a family history, the adjusted hazard ratios (HR) among those with ≥1 affected first-degree relatives were 0.72 (95% CI, 0.54-0.96) for disease-free survival (DFS), 0.74 (95% CI, 0.55-0.99) for recurrence-free survival (RFS), and 0.75 (95% CI, 0.54-1.05) for overall survival (OS). This reduction in risk of cancer recurrence or death associated with a family history became stronger with an increasing number of affected first-degree relatives. Compared to participants without a family history of colorectal cancer, those with 1

  8. Variations in GP–patient communication by ethnicity, age, and gender: evidence from a national primary care patient survey

    PubMed Central

    Burt, Jenni; Lloyd, Cathy; Campbell, John; Roland, Martin; Abel, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Background Doctor–patient communication is a key driver of overall satisfaction with primary care. Patients from minority ethnic backgrounds consistently report more negative experiences of doctor–patient communication. However, it is currently unknown whether these ethnic differences are concentrated in one gender or in particular age groups. Aim To determine how reported GP–patient communication varies between patients from different ethnic groups, stratified by age and gender. Design and setting Analysis of data from the English GP Patient Survey from 2012–2013 and 2013–2014, including 1 599 801 responders. Method A composite score was created for doctor–patient communication from five survey items concerned with interpersonal aspects of care. Mixed-effect linear regression models were used to estimate age- and gender-specific differences between white British patients and patients of the same age and gender from each other ethnic group. Results There was strong evidence (P<0.001 for age by gender by ethnicity three-way interaction term) that the effect of ethnicity on reported GP–patient communication varied by both age and gender. The difference in scores between white British and other responders on doctor–patient communication items was largest for older, female Pakistani and Bangladeshi responders, and for younger responders who described their ethnicity as ‘Any other white’. Conclusion The identification of groups with particularly marked differences in experience of GP–patient communication — older, female, Asian patients and younger ‘Any other white’ patients — underlines the need for a renewed focus on quality of care for these groups. PMID:26541182

  9. The health of healthcare, Part II: patient healthcare has cancer.

    PubMed

    Waldman, Deane

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we make the etiologic diagnosis for a sick patient named Healthcare: the cancer of greed. When we explore the two forms of this cancer--corporate and bureaucratic--we find the latter is the greater danger to We the Patients. The "treatments" applied to patient Healthcare by the Congressional "doctors" have consistently made the patient worse, not better. At the core of healthcare's woes is the government's diversion of money from healthcare services to healthcare bureaucracy. As this is the root cause, it is what we must address in order to cure, not sedate or palliate, patient Healthcare. PMID:24236323

  10. Type of Multimorbidity and Patient-Doctor Communication and Trust among Elderly Medicare Beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Chan; Sambamoorthi, Nethra; Kelly, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    Background. Effective communication and high trust with doctor are important to reduce the burden of multimorbidity in the rapidly aging population of the US. However, the association of multimorbidity with patient-doctor communication and trust is unknown. Objective. We examined the relationship between multimorbidity and patient-doctor communication and trust among the elderly. Method. We used the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (2012) to analyze the association between multimorbidity and patient-doctor communication and trust with multivariable logistic regressions that controlled for patient's sociodemographic characteristics, health status, and satisfaction with care. Results. Most elderly beneficiaries reported effective communication (87.5–97.5%) and high trust (95.4–99.1%) with their doctors. The elderly with chronic physical and mental conditions were less likely than those with only physical conditions to report effective communication with their doctor (Adjusted Odds Ratio [95% Confidence Interval] = 0.80 [0.68, 0.96]). Multimorbidity did not have a significant association with patient-doctor trust. Conclusions. Elderly beneficiaries had high trust in their doctors, which was not affected by the presence of multimorbidity. Elderly individuals who had a mental condition in addition to physical conditions were more likely to report ineffective communication. Programs to improve patient-doctor communication with patients having cooccurring chronic physical and mental health conditions may be needed. PMID:27800181

  11. Silent Partners to Cancer Patients: Formal Caregivers and Oncologists.

    PubMed

    Goldzweig, G; Rottenberg, Yakir; Peretz, Tamar; Baider, Lea

    2015-12-01

    Given the worldwide aging of the population, the projected increase of older people diagnosed with cancer, and the changes in the structure of society and family, it is predictable that larger numbers of aged cancer patients will be supported by formal caregivers. This exploratory study attempts to gain insight into and to make recommendations to oncologists based on the comparison of two groups of foreign formal caregivers-those providing care to elderly cancer patients and those providing care to the elderly suffering from other chronic illnesses. Our sample included 108 Filipino formal caregivers to older persons (age 65+) suffering from cancer or other chronic diseases. Participants completed a short questionnaire targeting background information, subjective perception of distress, attachment to the care recipient family, and the Distress Thermometer. Participants reported extreme levels of distress, with only seven (6.48%) scoring less than 5 on the Distress Thermometer. Caregivers to cancer patients reported significantly higher levels of distress and tended to feel less attached to the family of the patient in comparison to caregivers to patients with other chronic illnesses. Cultural differences regarding cancer among the elderly may explain the higher levels of distress reported among Filipino formal caregivers and need to be acknowledged by oncologists. As a precondition for simultaneously improving the caregiver's well-being and the patient's quality of care, it is recommended that oncologists relate directly to formal caregivers, specifically to their extreme distress and apprehension regarding cancer. PMID:25316613

  12. The adverse effects of sorafenib in patients with advanced cancers.

    PubMed

    Li, Ye; Gao, Zu-Hua; Qu, Xian-Jun

    2015-03-01

    Sorafenib is the first multi-kinase inhibitor (TKI) approved for the treatment of advanced hepatocellular cancer (HCC) and metastatic renal cell cancer (RCC) and is increasingly being used to treat patients with well-differentiated radioiodine-resistant thyroid cancer (DTC). Sorafenib demonstrates targeted activity on several families of receptor and non-receptor tyrosine kinases that are involved in angiogenesis, tumour growth and metastatic progression of cancer. Sorafenib treatment results in long-term efficacy and low incidence of life-threatening toxicities. Although sorafenib has demonstrated many benefits in patients, the adverse effects cannot be ignored. The most common treatment-related toxicities include diarrhoea, fatigue, hand-foot skin reaction and hypertension. Most of these toxicities are considered mild to moderate and manageable to varying degrees; however, cardiovascular events might lead to death. In this MiniReview, we summarize the adverse effects of sorafenib that commonly occur in patients with advanced cancers. PMID:25495944

  13. Cancer-Related Direct-to-Consumer Advertising: Awareness, Perceptions, and Reported Impact Among Patients Undergoing Active Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Abel, Gregory A.; Burstein, Harold J.; Hevelone, Nathanael D.; Weeks, Jane C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Although cancer-related direct-to-consumer advertising (CR-DTCA) is prevalent, little is known about cancer patients' experiences with this controversial medium of medical communication. Methods We administered a 41-item, mailed questionnaire to consecutive patients with breast and hematologic malignancies who were undergoing active treatment at our institution. We assessed awareness of CR-DTCA within the prior year, perceptions of CR-DTCA, and CR-DTCA–prompted patient and provider behaviors. Results We received 348 completed questionnaires (response rate, 75.0%). Overall, 86.2% reported being aware of CR-DTCA, most frequently from television (77.7%). Awareness did not vary with clinical or sociodemographic factors except that patients were more likely to be aware of CR-DTCA for products specific to their cancer types (P < .0001). A majority of those aware reported that CR-DTCA made them “aware of treatments they did not know about” (62.2%), provided information in “a balanced manner” (65.2%), and helped them to have “better discussions” with their provider (56.8%). These perceptions were significantly more favorable among those who had not graduated from college (P < .05 for each). Overall, 11.2% reported that CR-DTCA made them “less confident” in their providers' judgment. Of those aware, 17.3% reported talking to their provider about an advertised medication, although less than one fifth of those reported receiving a prescription for the advertised medication. Conclusion The patients in our cohort were highly aware of CR-DTCA. CR-DTCA was found to be accessible and useful; however, it decreased some patients' confidence in their providers' judgment. CR-DTCA prompted a modest amount of patient-provider discussion but infrequent patient-reported changes in therapy. PMID:19652071

  14. A Proposal to Unify the Classification of Breast and Prostate Cancers Based on the Anatomic Site of Cancer Origin and on Long-term Patient Outcome.

    PubMed

    Tabár, László; Dean, Peter B; Yen, Amy M-F; Tarján, Miklós; Chiu, Sherry Y-H; Chen, Sam L-S; Fann, Jean C-Y; Chen, Tony H-H

    2014-01-01

    The similarity between the structure and function of the breast and prostate has been known for a long time, but there are serious discrepancies in the terminology describing breast and prostate cancers. The use of the large, thick-section (3D) histology technique for both organs exposes the irrationality of the breast cancer terminology. Pathologists with expertise in diagnosing prostate cancer take the anatomic site of cancer origin into account when using the terms AAP (acinar adenocarcinoma of the prostate) and DAP (ductal adenocarcinoma of the prostate) to distinguish between the prostate cancers originating primarily from the fluid-producing acinar portion of the organ (AAP) and the tumors originating either purely from the larger ducts (DAP) or from both the acini and the main ducts combined (DAP and AAP). Long-term patient outcome is closely correlated with the terminology, because patients with DAP have a significantly poorer prognosis than patients with AAP. The current breast cancer terminology could be improved by modeling it after the method of classifying prostate cancer to reflect the anatomic site of breast cancer origin and the patient outcome. The long-term survival curves of our consecutive breast cancer cases collected since 1977 clearly show that the non-palpable, screen-detected breast cancers originating from the milk-producing acini have excellent prognosis, irrespective of their histologic malignancy grade or biomarkers. Correspondingly, the breast cancer subtypes of truly ductal origin have a significantly poorer outcome, despite recent improvements in diagnosis and therapy. The mammographic appearance of breast cancers reflects the underlying tissue structure. Addition of these "mammographic tumor features" to the currently used histologic phenotypes makes it possible to distinguish the breast cancer cases of ductal origin with a poor outcome, termed DAB (ductal adenocarcinoma of the breast), from the more easily managed breast cancers of

  15. The Diffusion of Docetaxel in Patients With Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hershman, Dawn L.; Martin, Diane; Etzioni, Ruth B.; Barlow, William E.; LeBlanc, Michael; Ramsey, Scott R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diffusion of new cancer treatments can be both inefficient and incomplete. The uptake of new treatments over time (diffusion) has not been well studied. We analyzed the diffusion of docetaxel in metastatic prostate cancer. Methods: We identified metastatic prostate cancer patients diagnosed from 1995 to 2007 using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program (SEER)–Medicare database. Medicare claims through 2008 were analyzed. We assessed cumulative incidence of docetaxel by socioeconomic, demographic, and comorbidity variables, and compared diffusion patterns to landmark events including release of phase III results and FDA approval dates. We compared docetaxel diffusion patterns in prostate cancer to those in metastatic breast, lung, ovarian, and gastric cancers. To model docetaxel use over time, we used the classic “mixed influence” deterministic diffusion model. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: We identified 6561 metastatic prostate cancer patients; 1350 subsequently received chemotherapy. Among patients who received chemotherapy, docetaxel use was 95% by 2008. Docetaxel uptake was statistically significantly slower (P < .01) for patients older than 65 years, blacks, patients in lower income areas, and those who experienced poverty. Eighty percent of docetaxel diffusion occurred prior to the May, 2004 release of phase III results showing superiority of docetaxel over standard-of-care. The maximum increase in the rate of use of docetaxel occurred nearly simultaneously for prostate cancer as for all other cancers combined (in 2000). Conclusion: Efforts to increase the diffusion of treatments with proven survival benefits among disadvantaged populations could lead to cancer population survival gains. Docetaxel diffusion mostly preceded phase III evidence for its efficacy in castration-resistant prostate cancer, and appeared to be a cancer-wide—rather than a disease-specific—phenomenon. Diffusion prior to definitive

  16. Diagnosis and treatment of accessory breast cancer in 11 patients

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, SHUO; YU, YONG-HUA; QU, WEI; ZHANG, YONG; LI, JIA

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the clinical characteristics, diagnosis and treatment of accessory breast cancer, and contribute valuable information regarding this rare tumour to the current literature, ultimately facilitating the development of improved treatment strategies. The present study reported the cases of 11 patients with accessory breast cancer. The patients with accessory breast cancer were admitted between January 2002 and June 2014, and the patient records were retrospectively analysed. All patients presented with a tumour that was localised in the axilla. Out of these patients, there were 8 patients with invasive ductal carcinoma and 3 patients with invasive lobular carcinoma. The follow-up periods for patients ranged between 4 and 54 months. Out of the 5 patients that experienced neoplasm metastases, 4 patients succumbed to the disease. In total, 6 patients remain alive with no evidence of disease. Accessory breast cancer is a progressive tumour, and long-term follow-up is required. A comprehensive treatment strategy may be an effective treatment option for patients; however, the optimal time at which to commence chemotherapy and the role of combined radiotherapy and endocrine therapy require additional investigation. PMID:26622750

  17. Cancer Patient and Survivor Research from the Cancer Information Service Research Consortium: A Preview of Three Large Randomized Trials and Initial Lessons Learned

    PubMed Central

    MARCUS, ALFRED C.; DIEFENBACH, MICHAEL A.; STANTON, ANNETTE L.; MILLER-HALEGOUA, SUZANNE N.; FLEISHER, LINDA; RAICH, PETER C.; MORRA, MARION E.; PEROCCHIA, ROSEMARIE SLEVIN; TRAN, ZUNG VU; BRIGHT, MARY ANNE

    2014-01-01

    Three large randomized trials are described from the Cancer Information Service Research Consortium (CISRC). Three web-based multimedia programs are being tested to help newly diagnosed prostate (Project 1) and breast cancer patients (Project 2) make informed treatment decisions and breast cancer patients prepare for life after treatment (Project 3). Project 3 is also testing a telephone callback intervention delivered by a cancer information specialist. All participants receive standard print material specific to each project. Preliminary results from the two-month follow-up interviews are reported for the initial wave of enrolled participants, most of whom were recruited from the Cancer Information Service (1-800-4-CANCER) telephone information program (Project 1 = 208, Project 2 = 340, Project 3 = 792). Self-reported use of the multimedia program was 51%, 52% and 67% for Projects 1–3, respectively. Self-reported use of the print materials (read all, most or some) was 90%, 85% and 83% for Projects 1–3, respectively. The callback intervention was completed by 92% of Project 3 participants. Among those using the CISRC interventions, perceived utility and benefit was high, and more than 90% would recommend them to other cancer patients. Five initial lessons learned are presented that may help inform future cancer communications research. PMID:23448232

  18. Tonsillar and other upper aerodigestive tract cancers among cervical cancer patients and their husbands.

    PubMed

    Hemminki, K; Dong, C; Frisch, M

    2000-12-01

    The study aimed at probing the possible role of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in squamous cell carcinomas of the upper aerodigestive tract, with a special reference to tonsillar cancer. We used the Swedish Family Cancer Database to analyse second cancers in the upper aerodigestive tract of women first diagnosed with in-situ or invasive cervical cancer. First cancers of their husbands were also analysed. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for female and male cancers, adjusted for age at diagnosis, period, sex, socio-economic status and residential area. Among women, increases were observed at many sites, but tonsillar cancers were increased only among women aged 50 years or more at diagnosis of in-situ cervical cancer (SIR 2.58). The increases at these sites are probably ascribed to the effects HPV, smoking, alcohol or their interaction. Husbands of cervical cancer patients developed an excess (SIR over 2.00) of both tonsillar cancer (SIR 2.39 when wife with in-situ cancer and SIR 2.72 when wife with invasive cervical cancer) and cancer of the tongue. The excess of tonsillar cancer among husbands of women with HPV-associated neoplastic lesions of the cervix supports the a priori hypothesis that HPV may be involved in tonsillar carcinogenesis.

  19. Increased risk of cancer among relatives of patients with lung cancer in China

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yongtang; Xu, Yingchun; Xu, Ming; Xue, Saoli

    2005-01-01

    Background Genetic factors were considered as one of the risk factors for lung cancer or other cancers. The aim of this work was to determine whether a genetic predisposition accounts for such familial aggregation of cancer among relatives of lung cancer probands. Methods A case-control study was conducted in 800 case families identified by lung cancer patients (probands), and in 800 control families identified by the probands'spouses. The data were analysed with logistic regression analysis model. Results The data revealed a significantly greater overall risk of cancer (OR = 1.82, P < 0.01) in the proband group. The relatives of lung cancer probands maintained an increased risk of non-lung cancer (P < 0.05) after adjusting for confounder factors. The crude odds ratio of a proband family having one family member with cancer was 1.67 compared with control families. Proband families were 2.56 times more likely to have two other family members with cancer. For three cancers and four or more cancers, the risk increased to 3.50 and 5.91, respectively. The most striking differences in cancer prevalence between proband and control families were noted for cancer risk among female relatives. The strongest effects were for not only lung cancer in any female relatives (OR 2.17, 95%CI 1.60–3.64) and mothers (OR 2.78, 95%CI 1.23–5.12) and sisters (OR 2.03, 95%CI 1.26–3.97), but also non-lung cancer in females and mothers (OR 2.00, 95%CI 1.26–3.01, and OR 2.34, 95%CI 1.28–4.40, respectively). Conclusion These data support the hypothesis of a genetic susceptibility to cancer in families with lung cancer, and the female genetic susceptibility to cancer might be greater than male. PMID:16281985

  20. Outcomes in Critically Ill Patients with Cancer-Related Complications

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Viviane B. L.; Vassalo, Juliana; Silva, Ulysses V. A.; Caruso, Pedro; Torelly, André P.; Silva, Eliezer; Teles, José M. M.; Knibel, Marcos; Rezende, Ederlon; Netto, José J. S.; Piras, Claudio; Azevedo, Luciano C. P.; Bozza, Fernando A.; Spector, Nelson; Salluh, Jorge I. F.; Soares, Marcio

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cancer patients are at risk for severe complications related to the underlying malignancy or its treatment and, therefore, usually require admission to intensive care units (ICU). Here, we evaluated the clinical characteristics and outcomes in this subgroup of patients. Materials and Methods Secondary analysis of two prospective cohorts of cancer patients admitted to ICUs. We used multivariable logistic regression to identify variables associated with hospital mortality. Results Out of 2,028 patients, 456 (23%) had cancer-related complications. Compared to those without cancer-related complications, they more frequently had worse performance status (PS) (57% vs 36% with PS≥2), active malignancy (95% vs 58%), need for vasopressors (45% vs 34%), mechanical ventilation (70% vs 51%) and dialysis (12% vs 8%) (P<0.001 for all analyses). ICU (47% vs. 27%) and hospital (63% vs. 38%) mortality rates were also higher in patients with cancer-related complications (P<0.001). Chemo/radiation therapy-induced toxicity (6%), venous thromboembolism (5%), respiratory failure (4%), gastrointestinal involvement (3%) and vena cava syndrome (VCS) (2%) were the most frequent cancer-related complications. In multivariable analysis, the presence of cancer-related complications per se was not associated with mortality [odds ratio (OR) = 1.25 (95% confidence interval, 0.94–1.66), P = 0.131]. However, among the individual cancer-related complications, VCS [OR = 3.79 (1.11–12.92), P = 0.033], gastrointestinal involvement [OR = 3.05 (1.57–5.91), P = <0.001] and respiratory failure [OR = 1.96(1.04–3.71), P = 0.038] were independently associated with in-hospital mortality. Conclusions The prognostic impact of cancer-related complications was variable. Although some complications were associated with worse outcomes, the presence of an acute cancer-related complication per se should not guide decisions to admit a patient to ICU. PMID:27764143

  1. Puppets as a strategy for communication with Brazilian children with cancer.

    PubMed

    Sposito, Amanda Mota Pacciulio; de Montigny, Francine; Sparapani, Valéria de Cássia; Lima, Regina Aparecida Garcia de; Silva-Rodrigues, Fernanda Machado; Pfeifer, Luzia Iara; Nascimento, Lucila Castanheira

    2016-03-01

    Children are considered competent social actors. Although they are able to express their opinions, they may have some difficulties in answering direct verbal questions, requiring researchers and health professionals to enter their world by using auxiliary resources for communication. This study presents the experience of using finger puppets as a playful strategy for improving interaction and communication with hospitalized children with cancer, aged seven to 12. It describes the strategy of making and using puppets as an auxiliary tool to communicate with children with cancer and presents the results and limitations of using puppets in clinical practice. The use of the puppets, creatively and in accordance with the children's motor, cognitive, and emotional development, showed benefits, such as allowing the children to freely express themselves; respecting their autonomy; and minimizing the hierarchical adult-child relationship. The use of puppets is an appropriate strategy to communicate with hospitalized children. This tool can also enrich clinical practice, as it encourages children with cancer to report their experience of being ill and also helps the health team during evaluation and intervention.

  2. Puppets as a strategy for communication with Brazilian children with cancer.

    PubMed

    Sposito, Amanda Mota Pacciulio; de Montigny, Francine; Sparapani, Valéria de Cássia; Lima, Regina Aparecida Garcia de; Silva-Rodrigues, Fernanda Machado; Pfeifer, Luzia Iara; Nascimento, Lucila Castanheira

    2016-03-01

    Children are considered competent social actors. Although they are able to express their opinions, they may have some difficulties in answering direct verbal questions, requiring researchers and health professionals to enter their world by using auxiliary resources for communication. This study presents the experience of using finger puppets as a playful strategy for improving interaction and communication with hospitalized children with cancer, aged seven to 12. It describes the strategy of making and using puppets as an auxiliary tool to communicate with children with cancer and presents the results and limitations of using puppets in clinical practice. The use of the puppets, creatively and in accordance with the children's motor, cognitive, and emotional development, showed benefits, such as allowing the children to freely express themselves; respecting their autonomy; and minimizing the hierarchical adult-child relationship. The use of puppets is an appropriate strategy to communicate with hospitalized children. This tool can also enrich clinical practice, as it encourages children with cancer to report their experience of being ill and also helps the health team during evaluation and intervention. PMID:26177221

  3. Recruiting Ethnically Diverse General Internal Medicine Patients for a Telephone Survey on Physician-Patient Communication

    PubMed Central

    Nápoles-Springer, Anna M; Santoyo, Jasmine; Stewart, Anita L

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND Limited evidence exists on the effectiveness of recruitment methods among diverse populations. OBKECTIVE Describe response rates by recruitment stage, ethnic-language group, and type of initial contact letter (for African-American and Latino patients). DESIGN Tracking of response status by recruitment stage and ethnic-language group and a randomized trial of ethnically tailored initial letters nested within a cross-sectional telephone survey on physician-patient communication. PARTICIPANTS Adult general medicine patients with ≥1 visit during the preceding year, stratified by 4 categories: African-American (N= 1,400), English-speaking Latino (N= 894), Spanish-speaking Latino (N= 965), and non-Latino white (N= 1,400). MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS Ethnically tailored initial letters referred to shortages of African-American (or Latino) physicians and the need to learn about the experiences of African-American (or Latino) patients communicating with physicians. Of 2,482 patients contacted, eligible, and able to participate (identified eligibles), 69.9% completed the survey. Thirty-nine percent of the sampling frame was unable to be contacted, with losses higher among non-Latino whites (46.5%) and African Americans (44.2%) than among English-speaking (32.3%) and Spanish-speaking Latinos (25.1%). For identified eligibles, response rates were highest among Spanish-speaking Latinos (75.2%), lowest for non-Latino whites (66.4%), and intermediate for African Americans (69.7%) and English-speaking Latinos (68.1%). There were no differences in overall response rates between patients receiving ethnically tailored letters (72.2%) and those receiving general letters (70.0%). CONCLUSIONS Household contact and individual response rates differed by ethnic-language group, highlighting the importance of tracking losses by stage and subpopulation. Careful attention to recruitment yielded acceptable response rates among all groups. PMID:15963168

  4. Dopamine depletion affects communicative intentionality in Parkinson's disease patients: Evidence from action kinematics.

    PubMed

    Straulino, Elisa; Scaravilli, Tomaso; Castiello, Umberto<