Science.gov

Sample records for cancer patients experience

  1. African American cancer patients' pain experience.

    PubMed

    Im, Eun-Ok; Lim, Hyun-Ju; Clark, Maresha; Chee, Wonshik

    2008-01-01

    Although very little is known about African American cancer patients' pain experience, a few studies have indicated that their cancer pain experience is unique and somewhat different from that of other ethnic groups. The purpose of the study reported in this article was to explore African American cancer patients' pain experience using an online forum. This study was a qualitative online forum designed from a feminist perspective and conducted among 11 African American cancer patients who were recruited through both Internet and real settings. Nine online forum topics were used to administer the 6-month online forum, and the data were analyzed using thematic analysis. Four themes emerged through the data analysis process. First, participants viewed cancer as a challenge in life that they should fight against. Second, cancer pain was differentiated from ordinary pain because cancer was stigmatized in their culture. Third, participants viewed that African Americans, especially women, were culturally raised to be strong, and this African American cultural heritage inhibited cancer patients from expressing pain and seeking help for pain management. Finally, the findings indicated certain changes in perspectives among African American cancer patients during the disease process, which might make them tolerate pain through praying to God and reading the Bible. Based on the findings, we suggest further studies among diverse groups of African American cancer patients, with a focus on cultural attitudes toward cancer pain and influences of family on cancer pain experience.

  2. Researching the experience of kidney cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Taylor, K

    2002-09-01

    The author's personal experience as a kidney cancer patient, researcher and founder of a kidney cancer support group forms the basis for consideration of the challenges involved in researching patients' experiences. The researcher needs to understand the variability of those experiences in both clinical and psychological-emotional terms, and in relation to the personal, familial and social contexts of the patient. It is also essential to define the purpose of the research and to show how an understanding of personal experiences of cancer can be used to enhance the quality of care for cancer patients. The research encounter with a patient is also in some respects a therapeutic encounter requiring a considerable degree of sensitivity on the part of the researcher. The person-centred approach of Carl Rogers is of value in supporting such an encounter.

  3. Living Alone During Cancer Treatment: An Exploration of Patients' Experiences.

    PubMed

    Benoot, Charlotte; Bilsen, Johan; Grypdonck, Maria; Deschepper, Reginald

    2014-08-01

    The social environment is an important determinant in the overall experience of having cancer. The purpose of this article is to identify how patients experience living alone during their cancer treatment. Using qualitative methods based on grounded theory techniques, we interviewed a sample of 32 cancer patients. Living alone was an ambiguous experience during cancer treatment: patients experienced both a lack of support as well a gain in privacy, freedom, and know-how. Living alone was also seen as a constitutive element of the patients' identity. Consequently, patients saw living alone as either a threat or as a resource for their adjustment to cancer treatment. These divergent meanings of living alone did share one common attribute, which was that staying independent was their key goal during cancer treatment. Health care providers should be attentive to the heterogeneous aspects of the experience of living alone when critically appraising the independence of patients.

  4. Minority ethnicity patient satisfaction and experience: results of the National Cancer Patient Experience Survey in England

    PubMed Central

    Pinder, Richard J; Ferguson, Jamie; Møller, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to explore the differential patient satisfaction reported by patients with cancer who are from ethnic minority backgrounds, examining patient-reported experience of interacting with medical and nursing staff. Setting As a secondary analysis, we collated data collected over two consecutive annual rounds of the National Cancer Patient Experience Survey (NCPES) from September 2012 to November 2013. Participants There were 138 878 responses from 155 hospital trusts across the National Health Service in England, representing a response rate of 63.9% based on the total identified cohort of patients receiving cancer care over those 2 years. Outcomes We used the results of the annual survey, which sought to assess overall patient satisfaction along with patient experience of interacting with clinical nurse specialists, hospital doctors and ward nurses. Results Ethnic minority patients reported lower satisfaction and less positive experiences of care overall. While some of this difference appeared related to demographic and socioeconomic variation, ethnic minority patients remained less positive than those in the White British group, after statistical adjustment. Ethnic minority patients also reported lower confidence in, and less understanding of, healthcare professionals, including clinical nurse specialists, doctors and ward nurses. Conclusions Given the diversity of the British population, as well as the clustering of ethnic minority patients in certain urban areas, a better understanding of the expectations and additional needs of ethnic minority patients is required to improve their experience of and satisfaction with cancer care. PMID:27354083

  5. Some experiences with treating thyroid cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Achey, B; Miller, K L; Erdman, M; King, S

    2001-05-01

    U.S. NRC Regulatory Guide 8.39 provides for the release of patients treated with 131I provided that predetermined calculations indicate that no member of the public will receive a total dose equivalent in excess of 5 mSv (500 mrem). When this condition cannot be met or there are other reasons for keeping the patient hospitalized after treatment, control of contamination and exposure from the patient must be taken into consideration. If the patients are hospitalized following treatment, decontaminating the patient's room after discharge and controlling the exposure potential from the patient are considerations for the hospital radiation safety staff. This paper reviews the experiences from fifty patients treated as inpatients over the past two years.

  6. Inequalities in reported cancer patient experience by socio-demographic characteristic and cancer site: evidence from respondents to the English Cancer Patient Experience Survey

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, CL; Abel, GA; Lyratzopoulos, G

    2015-01-01

    Patient experience is a critical dimension of cancer care quality. Understanding variation in experience among patients with different cancers and characteristics is an important first step for designing targeted improvement interventions. We analysed data from the 2011/2012 English Cancer Patient Experience Survey (n = 69 086) using logistic regression to explore inequalities in care experience across 64 survey questions. We additionally calculated a summary measure of variation in patient experience by cancer, and explored inequalities between patients with cancers treated by the same specialist teams. We found that younger and very old, ethnic minority patients and women consistently reported worse experiences across questions. Patients with small intestine/rarer lower gastrointestinal, multiple myeloma and hepatobiliary cancers were most likely to report negative experiences whereas patients with breast, melanoma and testicular cancer were least likely (top-to-bottom odds ratio = 1.91, P < 0.0001). There were also inequalities in experience among patients with cancers treated by the same specialty for five of nine services (P < 0.0001). Specifically, patients with ovarian, multiple myeloma, anal, hepatobiliary and renal cancer reported notably worse experiences than patients with other gynaecological, haematological, gastrointestinal and urological malignancies respectively. Initiatives to improve cancer patient experience across oncology services may be suitably targeted on patients at higher risk of poorer experience. PMID:25327713

  7. Experiences of cancer patients in Poland throughout diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Godlewski, D; Adamczak, M; Wojtyś, P

    2017-03-01

    Previous studies have failed to explain why the mortality rate of cancer patients is higher in Poland than other countries in the European Union. We aimed to evaluate the health care system in Poland during the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. In this multicentre study, 125 cancer patients treated at 15 centres across Poland participated in focus group interviews in 2014. We identified and assessed crucial elements that affect a patients' experience from the early onset of symptoms, through to diagnosis and treatment. We found that the majority of patients were dissatisfied with the length of time taken to diagnose cancer. Throughout diagnosis, treatment and follow-up, patients reported a lack of communication from health care professionals. While dealings with oncologists and medical staff were viewed favourably, patients felt the cancer centres were not well organised. Patients recommended that having one doctor in charge of an individual's treatment and follow-up would improve patient care and well-being. A late cancer diagnosis may be contributing to the high mortality rate observed in Poland. In the future, new policies should be developed to reduce the time to cancer diagnosis, increase communication with health care professionals and improve the organisation of cancer care for patients.

  8. The camp experience for siblings of pediatric cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Lauren

    2011-01-01

    Siblings of pediatric cancer patients experience difficulties coping and adapting to the experience of a cancer diagnosis. A variety of emotional and behavioral changes as well as somatic complaints have been reported. Children describe many negative changes after their sibling is diagnosed with cancer. Many social supports and therapeutic interventions have been proposed for siblings, one of which is a camp experience. The literature has demonstrated that camps have a positive impact and offer siblings of children with cancer a supportive peer environment. Camp encourages discussion with peers and health care providers and facilitates participation in activities that improve knowledge, social confidence, and self-esteem. Nurses can help siblings by recommending camp experiences, volunteering at camps, and adding a camp experiences to existing sibling support programs.

  9. Cancer patients' experiences of using complementary therapies: polarization and integration.

    PubMed

    Smithson, Janet; Paterson, Charlotte; Britten, Nicky; Evans, Maggie; Lewith, George

    2010-04-01

    The use of complementary therapies by people with cancer is commonplace. In a recent synthesis of 26 qualitative studies of patients' experiences of complementary therapy use after a diagnosis of cancer, the emergent theme of 'polarization' was the most notable barrier to a positive experience of complementary therapies. In this paper, we explore the two synthesis concepts of 'polarization' and 'integration', and their relationship to health service policies and guidelines on integrated services. A systematic literature search and a meta-ethnography to synthesize key concepts. The majority of patients who used complementary therapies after a diagnosis of cancer wanted to be certain that the therapies were not interfering with their conventional cancer treatment. They valued the therapies in wider terms including: taking 'a niche of control', relieving symptoms, improving wellbeing, and promoting reconnection and social interaction. The emergent theme of 'polarization' suggested that conventional physicians who are perceived to be poorly informed or negative about complementary approaches induce patient anxiety, safety concerns, and difficulties in access. They may compromise their therapeutic relationship and, rarely, they may trigger patients to abandon conventional medicine altogether. In contrast, integrated advice and/or services were highly valued by patients, although some patients preferred their complementary health care to be provided in a non-medicalized environment. Our findings suggest that the current polarized situation is unhelpful to patients, detrimental to therapeutic relationships and may occasionally be dangerous. They indicate that complementary therapies, in a supportive role, should be integrated into mainstream cancer care.

  10. District nurses' experiences and perceptions of cancer patient referrals.

    PubMed

    McHugh, Gretl; Pateman, Brian; Luker, Karen

    2003-02-01

    Traditionally palliative care of cancer patients has been seen as an important and defining aspect of district nursing. Care of the dying patient has been used to describe the ability and scope of the district nursing service to holistically provide for patient need. However health and social service changes in the last decade have refocused the district nurse's role away from holistic delivery to more specialized care. There is also research evidence that there are several contradictions in referral processes to the district nursing service. We conducted a study to explore district nurses' perceptions and experiences of referral of cancer patients to gain insight into these referral processes. We interviewed 20 nurses from three primary care trusts to explore the referral process of cancer patients to the district nursing service from the district nurses' point of view. The nurses expressed concerns regarding completeness, accuracy and appropriateness of referral and suggested improvements that could be made.

  11. Defining chronic cancer: patient experiences and self-management needs.

    PubMed

    Harley, Clare; Pini, Simon; Bartlett, Yvonne Kiera; Velikova, Galina

    2012-09-01

    Chronic cancer is poorly defined and strategies for supporting patients during this disease phase are lacking. This research defines chronic cancer, explores patient experiences and reviews patients' support needs against those described in the 2007 Department of Health Generic Choice Model for Long-term Conditions (DoH-GCM). Semistructured interviews were audio recorded, transcribed and data explored for emergent themes. The a priori themes from DoH-GCM were applied: clinical support; self-care and self-management; supporting independence; psychological support; and social and economic factors. 56 patients >12 months postdiagnosis of advanced cancer were recruited from five clinics at a Yorkshire cancer centre: breast (n=11); renal (n=11); colorectal/gastrointestinal (n=12); gynaecological (n=12); and prostate (n=10). Most patients aspired to living normal lives. Challenges included frequent and lengthy hospital appointments, long-term symptom control and uncertainty. Only renal and prostate patients reported routine access to specialist nursing. Uptake of support services was varied and there was generally poor understanding of support pathways for non-medical problems and issues occurring when patients were not receiving active treatment. There was variation in coping strategies and ability of patients to attain a positive outlook on life. For patients to do well in this cancer phase requires good self-management of symptoms plus taking an active role in accessing appropriate services as needed. Care planning at the point of transition to the chronic phase of cancer should focus on evaluating patients' needs, clarifying support pathways, increasing the profile and involvement of community services and organisations, and supporting patients and families develop effective self-management skills.

  12. Defining chronic cancer: patient experiences and self-management needs.

    PubMed

    Harley, Clare; Pini, Simon; Bartlett, Yvonne Kiera; Velikova, Galina

    2015-12-01

    Chronic cancer is poorly defined and strategies for supporting patients during this disease phase are lacking. This research defines chronic cancer, explores patient experiences and reviews patients' support needs against those described in the 2007 Department of Health Generic Choice Model for Long-term Conditions (DoH-GCM). Semistructured interviews were audio recorded, transcribed and data explored for emergent themes. The a priori themes from DoH-GCM were applied: clinical support; self-care and self-management; supporting independence; psychological support; and social and economic factors. 56 patients >12 months postdiagnosis of advanced cancer were recruited from five clinics at a Yorkshire cancer centre: breast (n=11); renal (n=11); colorectal/gastrointestinal (n=12); gynaecological (n=12); and prostate (n=10). Most patients aspired to living normal lives. Challenges included frequent and lengthy hospital appointments, long-term symptom control and uncertainty. Only renal and prostate patients reported routine access to specialist nursing. Uptake of support services was varied and there was generally poor understanding of support pathways for non-medical problems and issues occurring when patients were not receiving active treatment. There was variation in coping strategies and ability of patients to attain a positive outlook on life. For patients to do well in this cancer phase requires good self-management of symptoms plus taking an active role in accessing appropriate services as needed. Care planning at the point of transition to the chronic phase of cancer should focus on evaluating patients' needs, clarifying support pathways, increasing the profile and involvement of community services and organisations, and supporting patients and families develop effective self-management skills. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  13. The experience of cough in patients diagnosed with lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Molassiotis, Alex; Lowe, Matthew; Ellis, Jacqueline; Wagland, Richard; Bailey, Chris; Lloyd-Williams, Mari; Tishelman, Carol; Smith, Jaclyn

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the patient experience of cough in a population of patients with lung cancer. A qualitative exploratory study design was developed and elicited the views of 26 patients with lung cancer who had current or past experience with cough. The data's four themes highlight the complex and distressing nature of cough, including its interaction with other symptoms, such as breathlessness, fatigue and sleep disturbance. A theme around descriptions of cough suggests typically a dry tickly cough and highlights mechanical and environmental triggers for cough. The theme around the effects of cough in daily life shows the impact of cough in socialising, the embarrassment from cough and the psychological effects experienced by patients. The last theme focuses on strategies for coping with and managing cough, showing the perceived ineffectiveness of current antitussives and the patients' use of a variety of approaches on an ad hoc basis to try to manage their cough often unsuccessfully. Cough has not received the same attention as other cancer symptoms, which means that patients' experience of a distressing and difficult symptom is often unnoticed by health care professionals. More clinical and research attention in this debilitating symptom is necessary.

  14. Symptom experience of family caregivers of patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Swore Fletcher, Barbara A; Dodd, Marylin J; Schumacher, Karen L; Miaskowski, Christine

    2008-03-01

    To review the literature on depression, anxiety,sleep disturbance, fatigue, and pain in family caregivers of patients with cancer in the context of the Symptom Management Model (SMM)developed at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). Published research studies and systematic reviews from 1990-2007. Studies of depressive symptoms in caregivers of patients with cancer were the most numerous. A limited number of studies examined anxiety, fatigue, sleep disturbance, and pain. Most studies focused on the symptom experience dimension of the UCSF SMM. Based on the small sample sizes, cross-sectional nature of the studies, and lack of comparison groups, little is known about the prevalence and effects of symptoms in caregivers of patients with cancer. Additional research is needed to determine the prevalence, severity, and effects of symptoms on caregivers. Better descriptive, correlational studies will lead to the development of interventions to improve symptom management for this group of caregivers.

  15. Family Perspectives on Hospice Care Experiences of Patients with Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pallavi; Wright, Alexi A; Hatfield, Laura A; Temel, Jennifer S; Keating, Nancy L

    2017-02-01

    Purpose To determine whether hospice use by patients with cancer is associated with their families' perceptions of patients' symptoms, goal attainment, and quality of end-of-life (EOL) care. Methods We interviewed 2,307 families of deceased patients with advanced lung or colorectal cancer who were enrolled in the Cancer Care Outcomes Research and Surveillance study (a multiregional, prospective, observational study) and died by 2011. We used propensity-score matching to compare family-reported outcomes for patients who did and did not receive hospice care, including the presence and relief of common symptoms (ie, pain, dyspnea), concordance with patients' wishes for EOL care and place of death, and quality of EOL care. We also examined associations between hospice length of stay and these outcomes among hospice enrollees. Results In a propensity-score-matched sample of 1,970 individuals, families of patients enrolled in hospice reported more pain in their patient compared with those not enrolled in hospice. However, families of patients enrolled in hospice more often reported that patients received "just the right amount" of pain medicine (80% v 73%; adjusted difference, 7 percentage points; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1 to 12 percentage points) and help with dyspnea (78% v 70%; adjusted difference, 8 percentage points; 95% CI, 2 to 13 percentage points). Families of patients enrolled in hospice also more often reported that patients' EOL wishes were followed (80% v 74%; adjusted difference, 6 percentage points; 95% CI, 2 to 11 percentage points) and "excellent" quality EOL care (57% v 42%; adjusted difference, 15 percentage points; 95% CI, 11 to 20). Families of patients who received > 30 days of hospice care reported the highest quality EOL outcomes. Conclusion Hospice care is associated with better symptom relief, patient-goal attainment, and quality of EOL care. Encouraging earlier and increased hospice enrollment may improve EOL experiences for patients with

  16. Assessing patients' experiences with communication across the cancer care continuum.

    PubMed

    Mazor, Kathleen M; Street, Richard L; Sue, Valerie M; Williams, Andrew E; Rabin, Borsika A; Arora, Neeraj K

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate the relevance, performance and potential usefulness of the Patient Assessment of cancer Communication Experiences (PACE) items. Items focusing on specific communication goals related to exchanging information, fostering healing relationships, responding to emotions, making decisions, enabling self-management, and managing uncertainty were tested via a retrospective, cross-sectional survey of adults who had been diagnosed with cancer. Analyses examined response frequencies, inter-item correlations, and coefficient alpha. A total of 366 adults were included in the analyses. Relatively few selected Does Not Apply, suggesting that items tap relevant communication experiences. Ratings of whether specific communication goals were achieved were strongly correlated with overall ratings of communication, suggesting item content reflects important aspects of communication. Coefficient alpha was ≥.90 for each item set, indicating excellent reliability. Variations in the percentage of respondents selecting the most positive response across items suggest results can identify strengths and weaknesses. The PACE items tap relevant, important aspects of communication during cancer care, and may be useful to cancer care teams desiring detailed feedback. The PACE is a new tool for eliciting patients' perspectives on communication during cancer care. It is freely available online for practitioners, researchers and others. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Using Experience-Based Design to Improve the Care Experience for Patients With Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hagensen, Ann; London, Amy E; Phillips, Jennifer J; Helton, W Scott; Picozzi, Vincent J; Blackmore, C Craig

    2016-12-01

    Despite the importance of the patient care experience to quality and outcome, the literature detailing the care experience in patients with pancreatic cancer is limited. To elicit the experience of patients with pancreatic cancer for care redesign, we deployed experience-based design, an emerging methodology based on identification of events of high emotional content, known as touch points, to delineate qualitatively what matters most to patients and families. We defined touch points through direct observations, interviews, and a focus group. We then used experience questionnaires to measure emotional content and develop an experience map to graphically display the fluctuating emotional journey through the care processes. Study subjects were patients with pancreatic cancer who were cared for at Virginia Mason Medical Center, family caregivers, and staff. Redesign was initiated through an all-day improvement event in September 2013. During 2013 and 2014, we cared for 485 new patients with pancreatic cancer, the majority of whom had local disease at diagnosis. The response rate for the experience questionnaire was 23% (117 of 500 questionnaires distributed). The experience-based design results were often contrary to staff preconceptions of the care experience for patients with pancreatic cancer, and contributed to redesign in three key areas: understanding and documenting patient goals and values, providing better resources for caregivers/families, and improving care coordination and support services. Experience-based design enabled us to understand the care experience and associated emotional content for patients with pancreatic cancer and their caregivers. This knowledge then supported care redesign targeted at areas of high negative emotional content.

  18. The Experience of Cancer Stigma in Taiwan: A Qualitative Study of Female Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Tang, Pei-Ling; Mayer, Deborah K; Chou, Fan-Hao; Hsiao, Kuan-Yin

    2016-04-01

    Cancer is the leading cause of death in Taiwan. Because the causes of cancer are often difficult to identify, a diagnosis of cancer is occasionally attributed to karma and the concept of stigma. These feelings lead to a life predicament, and stigma influences these perceptions. This study intended to understand how stigma is formed in the disease-related experiences of women with cancer. Ten participants were interviewed at the time of a confirmed diagnosis of advanced cancer and completed cancer treatment with regular follow-up after treatment, and all subjects underwent 2-3 interviews. The number of interviews conducted was determined by data saturation. A content analysis method was used. The stigma of cancer includes the concepts of "cancer equals death", including the feeling of death approaching and an awareness of disease severity. "Cancer equals menace to social life" suggests that social life is affected and includes other individuals' uncomfortable attitudes toward cancer (shame, sympathy, pity, suffering, and over-cautiousness) and external physical changes. "Cancer equals cancer-ridden life" includes being sensitive to the topics of death and calculating the number of remaining survival days. The process from early diagnosis to the decision to receive treatment is complicated for patients with cancer. After the diagnosis is confirmed, the stigma of diagnosis significantly affects patients. Regarding social stereotypes, educating the public to resolve individuals' negative responses to cancer and further convey social and public information to women in society is necessary. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. How patients with gynecological cancer experience the information process.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, M E; Strang, P M

    1998-12-01

    This qualitative study was designed to explore the kind of experiences women with a diagnosis of gynecological cancer have with regard to information given during their illness and how it could be improved. Data were collected through a semistructured interview which focused on the 24 women's experiences of the information given. The interviews were tape-recorded and transcribed verbatim for each participant, and analysed using a content analysis. Two main themes were revealed: to actively address questions, and the right to receive honest information. The results also include a short description on how information was offered, the patients' opinion of it and how the patients had sought information for themselves. When patients address questions they want honest answers. Some effort should also be made to identify patients who do not want information. If it is in accordance with the patient's and next-of-kin's wishes, efforts should be made to provide information at times when both can participate. Information given jointly to the patient and her family lessens the burden for the patient. In Sweden today, as a result of recent political decisions, caregivers must also consider the need to discuss economic issues.

  20. What explains worse patient experience in London? Evidence from secondary analysis of the Cancer Patient Experience Survey

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Catherine L; Abel, Gary A; Lyratzopoulos, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore why patients with cancer treated by London hospitals report worse experiences of care compared with those treated in other English regions. Design Secondary analysis of the 2011/2012 National Cancer Patient Experience Survey (n=69 086). Setting and participants Patients with cancer treated by the English National Health Service (NHS) hospitals. Main outcome measures 64 patient experience measures covering all aspects of cancer care (pre-diagnosis to discharge). Methods Using mixed effects logistic regression, we explored whether poorer scores in London hospitals could be explained by patient case-mix (age, gender, ethnicity and cancer type). Because patients referred to tertiary centres and/or with complex medical problems may report more critical experiences, we also explored whether the experiences reported in London may reflect higher concentration of teaching hospitals in the capital. Finally, using the data from the (general) Adult Inpatients Survey, we explored whether the extent of poorer experience reported by London patients was similar for respondents to either survey. Results For 52/64 questions, there was evidence of poorer experience in London, with the percentage of patients reporting a positive experience being lower compared with the rest of England by a median of 3.7% (IQR 2.5–5.4%). After case-mix adjustment there was still evidence for worse experience in London for 44/64 questions. In addition, adjusting for teaching hospital status made trivial difference to the case-mix-adjusted findings. There was evidence that London versus rest-of-England differences were greater for patients with cancer compared with (general) hospital inpatients for 10 of 16 questions in both the Cancer Patient Experience and the Adult Inpatients Surveys. Conclusions Patients with cancer treated by London hospitals report worse care experiences and by and large these differences are not explained by patient case-mix or teaching hospital status

  1. Pre-referral general practitioner consultations and subsequent experience of cancer care: evidence from the English Cancer Patient Experience Survey.

    PubMed

    Mendonca, S C; Abel, G A; Saunders, C L; Wardle, J; Lyratzopoulos, G

    2016-05-01

    Prolonged diagnostic intervals may negatively affect the patient experience of subsequent cancer care, but evidence about this assertion is sparse. We analysed data from 73 462 respondents to two English Cancer Patient Experience Surveys to examine whether patients with three or more (3+) pre-referral consultations were more likely to report negative experiences of subsequent care compared with patients with one or two consultations in respect of 12 a priori selected survey questions. For each of 12 experience items, logistic regression models were used, adjusting for prior consultation category, cancer site, socio-demographic case-mix and response tendency (to capture potential variation in critical response tendencies between individuals). There was strong evidence (P < 0.01 for all) that patients with 3+ pre-referral consultations reported worse care experience for 10/12 questions, with adjusted odds ratios compared with patients with 1-2 consultations ranging from 1.10 (95% confidence intervals 1.03-1.17) to 1.68 (1.60-1.77), or between +1.8% and +10.6% greater percentage reporting a negative experience. Associations were stronger for processes involving primary as opposed to hospital care; and for evaluation than report items. Considering 1, 2, 3-4 and '5+' pre-referral consultations separately a 'dose-response' relationship was apparent. We conclude that there is a negative association between multiple pre-diagnostic consultations with a general practitioner and the experience of subsequent cancer care. © 2015 The Authors. European Journal of Cancer Care Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Implementing patient-centred cancer care: using experience-based co-design to improve patient experience in breast and lung cancer services.

    PubMed

    Tsianakas, Vicki; Robert, Glenn; Maben, Jill; Richardson, Alison; Dale, Catherine; Griffin, Mairead; Wiseman, Theresa

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this paper was to briefly describe how the experience-based co-design (EBCD) approach was used to identify and implement improvements in the experiences of breast and lung cancer patients before (1) comparing the issues identified as shaping patient experiences in the different tumour groups and (2) exploring participants' reflections on the value and key characteristics of this approach to improving patient experiences. Fieldwork involved 36 filmed narrative patient interviews, 219 h of ethnographic observation, 63 staff interviews and a facilitated co-design change process involving patient and staff interviewees over a 12-month period. Four of the staff and five patients were interviewed about their views on the value of the approach and its key characteristics. The project setting was a large, inner-city cancer centre in England. Patients from both tumour groups generally identified similar issues (or 'touchpoints') that shaped their experience of care, although breast cancer patients identified a need for better information about side effects of treatment and end of treatment whereas lung cancer patients expressed a need for more information post-surgery. Although the issues were broadly similar, the particular improvement priorities patients and staff chose to work on together were tumour specific. Interviewees highlighted four characteristics of the EBCD approach as being key to its successful implementation: patient involvement, patient responsibility and empowerment, a sense of community, and a close connection between their experiences and the subsequent improvement priorities. EBCD positions patients as active partners with staff in quality improvement. Breast and lung cancer patients identified similar touchpoints in their experiences, but these were translated into different improvement priorities for each tumour type. This is an important consideration when developing patient-centred cancer services across different tumour types.

  3. Implantable port thrombosis in cancer patients: a monocentric experience

    PubMed Central

    Dridi, Manel; Mejri, Nesrine; Labidi, Soumaya; Afrit, Mehdi; Benna, Houda El; Miled, Khaoula Ben; Boussen, Hamouda

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Implantable port thrombosis (IPT) in cancer patients is a relatively rare but severe complication. Several factors are reportedly associated with the occurrence of thrombosis. We aimed to describe the prevalence and the anatomoclinical features of IPT observed in cancer patients who were treated in a medical oncology department in Tunisia. Methods: A total of 600 cancer patients who had port implantation from January 2013 to December 2015 were retrospectively identified. Cases with symptomatic/incidental IPT (radiologically confirmed) were further identified. Epidemiological and anatomoclinical features were collected from patient records and the department database. Results: We observed that 33 of the 600 patients had IPT; thus, the prevalence was 5.5%. The median age was 57 years, and the gender ratio was 0.43. Overweight or obesity was observed in 73% of the patients. IPT occurred mainly in patients with breast (36.4%) and colorectal (33.3%) cancers, which were mostly nonmetastatic (79%). At least one identified classical thromboembolic risk factor was found in 13 patients (smoking in 9, tamoxifen in 2). IPT was symptomatic in 93% of the cases, occurring within an average time of 56 days. Implantable ports were removed because of infection in 2 cases and nonfunctionality in 3 cases. IPT treatment was based on low-molecular-weight heparins (94%) and antivitamin K (6%) for an average of 130 days. Four patients had post-therapy complications: one thrombosis recurrence and three infections. Conclusions: IPT cases in the 600 patients were observed to occur in obese nonmetastatic cancer patients within the first 3 months after IP implantation. PMID:27807505

  4. Patient Education vs. Patient Experiences of Self-advocacy: Changing the Discourse to Support Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Hagan, Teresa L; Medberry, Elizabeth

    2016-06-01

    A growing emphasis on patient self-advocacy has emerged in the public discourse on cancer survivorship. This discourse shapes patients' conceptualizations about self-advocacy and in turn influences their health care attitudes and behaviors. The purpose of this discourse analysis is to explore the language of self-advocacy by comparing a published self-advocacy guide with the lived experiences of women with ovarian cancer. Data sources include (1) a self-advocacy patient education guide published by the National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship and (2) transcripts of focus groups conducted with ovarian cancer survivors. Discourse analysis techniques were used to take a close look at the language used by both to uncover the meaning each group ascribed to self-advocacy. Challenges and inconsistencies were noted between the patient education guide and transcripts including viewing self-advocacy as a skill set to assert one's needs as opposed to a means by which to preserve a positive attitude and maintain a trusting relationship with health care providers, respectively. Some women saw themselves as self-advocates yet struggled to locate relevant health information and hesitated to upset their relationship with their health care providers. This analysis highlights tensions between the discourses and points to ways in which patient education materials can be adjusted to support cancer survivors in advocating for their needs according to their unique situations and preferences.

  5. "They paid no mind to my state of mind": African American breast cancer patients' experiences of cancer care delivery.

    PubMed

    Davey, Maureen P; Kissil, Karni; Niño, Alba; Tubbs, Carolyn Y

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study describes experiences of cancer care delivery for nine African-American breast cancer patients. Three focus groups captured participants' experiences with the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer and parenting their children. Spontaneous accounts describing their interactions with oncology staff were reported by all breast cancer patients. Content analysis revealed five themes: interaction with physicians, power and authority of physicians, collaboration between physicians and mental health professionals, navigating the system, and involvement of the family in the treatment process. These themes may help in developing culturally sensitive training programs for oncology providers to improve the quality of cancer care.

  6. Patient Education vs. Patient Experiences of Self-advocacy: Changing the Discourse to Support Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Hagan, Teresa L.; Baldys, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    A growing emphasis on patient self-advocacy has emerged in the public discourse on cancer survivorship. This discourse shapes patients’ conceptualizations about self-advocacy and in turn influences their health care attitudes and behaviors. The purpose of this discourse analysis is to explore the language of self-advocacy by comparing a published self-advocacy guide with the lived experiences of women with ovarian cancer. Data sources include 1) a self-advocacy patient education guide published by the National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship and 2) transcripts of focus groups conducted with ovarian cancer survivors. Discourse analysis techniques were used to take a close look at the language used by both to uncover the meaning each group ascribed to self-advocacy. Challenges and inconsistencies were noted between the patient education guide and transcripts including viewing self-advocacy as a skillset to assert one’s needs as opposed to a means by which to preserve a positive attitude and maintain a trusting relationship with health care providers, respectively. Some women saw themselves as self-advocates yet struggled to locate relevant health information and hesitated to upset their relationship with their health care providers. This analysis highlights tensions between the discourses and points to ways in which patient education materials can be adjusted to support cancer survivors in advocating for their needs according to their unique situations and preferences. PMID:25846573

  7. A review of the literature on the pain experience of Chinese patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Edrington, Janet; Miaskowski, Christine; Dodd, Marylin; Wong, Candice; Padilla, Geraldine

    2007-01-01

    Over 2 million new cases of cancer are diagnosed annually in China. In addition, cancer is the leading cause of death in China. Because cancer is often diagnosed in more advanced stages in China, a higher percentage of patients will experience pain related to their disease or treatment. This article presents a review and critique of the studies that examined the experience of pain in Chinese cancer patients. Because pain is a subjective experience with multiple dimensions, this review used the multiple dimensions of cancer pain to describe the pain experience in adult Chinese patients with cancer. The results from 24 studies of cancer pain in Chinese patients are summarized. Most of these descriptive correlational studies evaluated the physiologic and sensory dimensions of the pain experience. Most of the patients reported moderate to severe pain and that pain interfered with their normal activities and mood. In contrast, little information is available about the impact of cancer pain on the cognitive and sociocultural dimensions of the pain experience for Chinese patients.

  8. 'It's whanaungatanga and all that kind of stuff': Maori cancer patients' experiences of health services.

    PubMed

    Slater, Tania; Matheson, Anna; Davies, Cheryl; Tavite, Huia; Ruhe, Triny; Holdaway, Maureen; Ellison-Loschmann, Lis

    2013-12-01

    There are unacceptable ethnic differences in cancer survival in Aotearoa/New Zealand. For people with cancer, quality of life and survival are shaped by access to care, but research on Maori access to, and through, cancer care is limited. Internationally, research has shown that primary care plays an important role in providing patient-centred, holistic care and information throughout the cancer care journey. Additionally, Maori health providers provide practical support and facilitate access to all levels of health care. Here we describe the cancer journeys of Maori patients and whanau and identify factors that may facilitate or inhibit access to and through cancer care services. Twelve Maori patients affected by cancer and their whanau (family) in the lower North Island took part in face-to-face semi-structured interviews exploring their experiences of cancer screening, diagnosis, treatment, survival and palliative care. Three key areas were identified that impacted upon the cancer care journey: the experience of support; continuity of care; and the impact of financial and geographic determinants. Primary care plays a key role in support and continuity of care across the cancer journey. Alongside interpersonal rapport, a long-term relationship with a primary health provider facilitated a more positive experience of the cancer care journey, suggesting that patients with a 'medical home' are happier with their care and report less problems with coordination between services. Positive, longstanding relationships with general practitioners and Maori health providers assisted patients and whanau with the provision and understanding of information, alongside practical support.

  9. Post-sampling mortality and non-response patterns in the English Cancer Patient Experience Survey: Implications for epidemiological studies based on surveys of cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Abel, Gary A; Saunders, Catherine L; Lyratzopoulos, Georgios

    2016-04-01

    Surveys of the experience of cancer patients are increasingly being introduced in different countries and used in cancer epidemiology research. Sampling processes, post-sampling mortality and survey non-response can influence the representativeness of cancer patient surveys. We examined predictors of post-sampling mortality and non-response among patients initially included in the sampling frame of the English Cancer Patient Experience Survey. We also compared the respondents' diagnostic case-mix to other relevant populations of cancer patients, including incident and prevalent cases. Of 109,477 initially sampled cancer patients, 6273 (5.7%) died between sampling and survey mail-out. Older age and diagnosis of brain, lung and pancreatic cancer were associated with higher risk of post-sampling mortality. The overall response rate was 67% (67,713 respondents), being >70% for the most affluent patients and those diagnosed with colon or breast cancer and <50% for Asian or Black patients, those under 35 and those diagnosed with brain cancer. The diagnostic case-mix of respondents varied substantially from incident or prevalent cancer cases. Respondents to the English Cancer Patient Experience Survey represent a population of recently treated cancer survivors. Although patient survey data can provide unique insights for improving cancer care quality, features of survey populations need to be acknowledged when analysing and interpreting findings from studies using such data. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. The Patient Dignity Inventory: Just another evaluation tool? Experiences with advanced cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Rullán, María; Arantzamendi, María; Carvajal, Ana; Martínez, Marina; Saenz de Ormijana, Amaia; Centeno, Carlos

    2017-06-21

    The Patient Dignity Inventory (PDI) evaluates sources of distress related to the feeling of loss of dignity and was designed for patients at the end of life. The aim of the present work was to generate a better understanding of the experiences of healthcare staff when using the PDI. An exploratory qualitative study is presented about the experience of 4 professionals who applied the PDI to 124 advanced-cancer patients. Our study consisted of an analysis of their experiences, taken from information generated in a focus group. A thematic analysis was performed on the information generated at that meeting by two researchers working independently. The initial experiences with the PDI on the part of the professionals led them to systematically administer the questionnaire as part of an interview instead of having patients fill it out themselves in written form. What started out as an evaluation very often led to a profound conversation on the meaning of life, dignity, and other sensitive, key issues related to the process of the illness. The PDI has intrinsic therapeutic value and is useful in clinical practice, and it is also a way of examining issues related to dignity and the meaning of life within the context of advanced-stage illness. There is a need for studies that examine patient experiences through a PDI-based interview.

  11. Hospitalists caring for patients with advanced cancer: An experience-based guide

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Douglas J.; Tonorezos, Emily S.; Kumar, Chhavi B.; Goring, Tabitha N.; Salvit, Cori; Egan, Barbara C.

    2016-01-01

    Every year, nearly five million adults with cancer are hospitalized. Limited evidence suggests that hospitalization of the cancer patient is associated with adverse morbidity and mortality. Hospitalization of the patient with advanced cancer allows for an intense examination of health status in the face of terminal illness and an opportunity for defining goals of care. This experience-based guide reports what is currently known about the topic and outlines a systematic approach to maximizing opportunities, improving quality, and enhancing the well-being of the hospitalized patient with advanced cancer. PMID:26588430

  12. Cancer patient experience with navigation service in an urban hospital setting: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Gotlib Conn, L; Hammond Mobilio, M; Rotstein, O D; Blacker, S

    2016-01-01

    Cancer patient navigators are increasingly present on the oncology health care team. The positive impact of navigation on cancer care is recognised, yet a clear understanding of what the patient navigator does and how he/she executes the role continues to emerge. This study aimed to understand cancer patients' perceptions of, and experiences with patient navigation, exploring how navigation may enhance the patient experience in an urban hospital setting where patients with varying needs are treated. A qualitative study using a constructionist approach was conducted. Fifteen colorectal cancer patients participated in semi-structured telephone interviews. Data were analyzed inductively and iteratively. Findings provide insight into two central aspects of cancer navigation: navigation as patient-centred coordination and explanation of clinical care, and navigation as individualised, holistic support. Within these themes, the key benefits of navigation from the patients' perspective were demystifying the system; ensuring comprehension, managing expectations; and, delivering patient-centred care. The navigator provided individualised and extended family support; a holistic approach; and, addressed emotional and psychological needs. These findings provide a means to operationalise and validate an emerging role description and competency framework for the cancer navigator who must identify and adapt to patients' varying needs throughout the cancer care continuum.

  13. Self-Directed Learning and Prostate Cancer: A Thematic Analysis of the Experiences of Twelve Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rager, Kathleen B.

    2006-01-01

    Although self-directed learning is a common response for many of the 232,090 US men who are diagnosed with prostate cancer each year, very little is known about the nature of the experience for them. Four themes emerged from interviews with 12 prostate cancer patients describing their self-education efforts in regard to their disease. A…

  14. Self-Directed Learning and Prostate Cancer: A Thematic Analysis of the Experiences of Twelve Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rager, Kathleen B.

    2006-01-01

    Although self-directed learning is a common response for many of the 232,090 US men who are diagnosed with prostate cancer each year, very little is known about the nature of the experience for them. Four themes emerged from interviews with 12 prostate cancer patients describing their self-education efforts in regard to their disease. A…

  15. A Thematic Analysis of the Self-Directed Learning Experiences of 13 Breast Cancer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rager, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    Although self-directed learning is a common response for many of the 183000 American women who are diagnosed with breast cancer each year, very little is known about the nature of the experience for them. Four themes emerged from interviews with 13 breast cancer patients describing their self-education efforts in regard to their disease. A…

  16. Yoga in adult cancer: an exploratory, qualitative analysis of the patient experience.

    PubMed

    McCall, Marcy; Thorne, Sally; Ward, Alison; Heneghan, Carl

    2015-07-22

    Some patients receiving treatment in conventional health care systems access therapeutic yoga outside their mainstream care to improve cancer symptoms. Given the current knowledge gap around patient preferences and documented experiences of yoga in adult cancer, this study aimed to describe patient-reported benefits, barriers and characteristics of programming for yoga practice during conventional treatment. In depth semi-structured interviews (n=10) were conducted in men and women recruited from cancer care clinics in Vancouver, Canada using a purposive sampling technique. The exploratory interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and analyzed using Interpretive Description methodology and constant comparative analysis methods. Four themes emerged from the data to address our research objectives: patient-perceived benefits of yoga, reasons and motivations for practising yoga, hurdles and barriers to practising yoga, and advice for effective yoga program delivery in adult cancer. Several patients reported yoga reduced stress and other symptoms associated with cancer treatment. Thematic analysis found the social dimension of group yoga was important, as well as yoga's ability to encourage personal empowerment and awareness of physical body and self. Barriers to yoga adherence from the patient perspective included lack of time, scheduling conflicts and worries about financial burden. This small, diverse sample of patients reported positive experiences and no adverse effects following yoga practice for management of cancer and its symptoms. Results of this qualitative study identified patient-reported preferences, barriers and characteristics of yoga intervention optimal during adult cancer treatment.

  17. Treatment-related experiences and preferences of patients with lung cancer: a qualitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Aumann, Ines; Kreis, Kristine; Damm, Kathrin; Golpon, Heiko; Welte, Tobias; Graf von der Schulenburg, J Matthias

    2016-12-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most common types of cancer worldwide, and it causes significant challenges for patients due to the poor survival rate and treatment-related side-effects. Because of lung cancer's great burden, identification and use of the patients' preferences can help to improve patients' quality of life. Interviews with patients who have lung cancer were used to ascertain a range of experiences and to make recommendations regarding the improvement of treatment based on these patients' preferences. Because chemotherapy is the common treatment option for lung cancer, we focused on this treatment. The interviews were audio-taped, verbally transcribed and evaluated via content analysis. A total of 18 participants (11 men and 7 women) with small or non-small-cell lung cancer who were receiving chemotherapy in one clinic were interviewed between June and July 2013. Two main aspects with different subthemes were identified during the interviews. One main aspect focused on organizational context, such as the treatment day process, or experiences with different stakeholders, such as with the health insurance company or physicians. The other category referred to experiences that influenced psychosocial factors, including physical and mental experiences. Patients reported different experiences concerning physical, psychological and organizational areas during chemotherapy. Nevertheless, some potential areas for improving care, and therefore the quality of life of patients with lung cancer, could be identified. These improvement measures highlighted that with small, non-time-consuming and inexpensive changes, the treatment for patients with lung cancer can be improved. © 2015 The Authors. Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. It's all good on the surface: care coordination experiences of migrant cancer patients in Australia.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Joanne M; Shepherd, Heather L; Durcinoska, Ivana; Butow, Phyllis N; Liauw, Winston; Goldstein, David; Young, Jane M

    2016-06-01

    Migrants diagnosed with cancer in Australia have high unmet need and poorer psychosocial outcomes than comparable Australian-born patients. It is possible that migrants also experience worse coordination of their cancer care. The purpose of this study was to describe migrant patients' experience of care coordination to inform the development of items for inclusion in a cancer care coordination questionnaire sensitive to the specific cultural needs of these patients. Eighteen Chinese (Mandarin and Cantonese), Arabic and Macedonian patients and carers from two metropolitan cancer centres in Sydney, Australia, were recruited. Two focus groups and 11 telephone interviews were conducted in the participants' own language. A semi-structured interview format was utilised to qualitatively explore participants' experiences of cancer care coordination during treatment. Themes were identified using a thematic analysis. Cancer care was generally perceived to be well coordinated. Four themes were identified that impacted on the quality of care coordination as a direct result of a patient's migrant status: (1) the impact of language on understanding and information access, (2) the role of interpreters and (3) access to services and (4) understanding the roles and responsibilities of the team. Despite their care generally being well coordinated, migrants require additional assistance such as information in a form appropriate to their language proficiency and understanding of the new health system. Development of a culturally specific measure of cancer care coordination will enable evaluation of future strategies to improve care.

  19. Incidental pulmonary embolism in cancer patients: clinical characteristics and outcome – a comprehensive cancer center experience

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Razeq, Hikmat N; Mansour, Asem H; Ismael, Yousef M

    2011-01-01

    Background and objectives: Cancer patients undergo routine imaging studies much more than others. The widespread use of the recently introduced multi-detector CT scanners has resulted in an increasing number of incidentally diagnosed pulmonary embolism (PE) in asymptomatic cancer patients. The significance and clinical outcome of such incidental PE is described. Methods: Both radiology department and hospital databases were searched for all cancer patients with a diagnosis of incidental PE. CT scans were performed using a 64-slice scanner with a 5.0 mm slice thickness. Results: During the study period, 34 patients with incidental PE were identified. The mean age (±SD) was 57.7 (±12.4) years. All patients had active cancer, gastric, lung, colorectal, and lymphomas being the most frequent. Most patients had advanced-stage disease at the time of PE diagnosis; 26 (77%) patients had stage IV, whereas only 3 patients had stages I or II disease. Twenty-seven (79%) patients had their PE while undergoing active treatment with chemotherapy (68%) or radiotherapy (12%); none, however, were on hormonal therapy. Most (74%) patients had their PE diagnosed without history of recent hospital admission. Except for 5 (15%), all other patients were anticoagulated. With follow-up, 2 patients developed recurrent PE, 2 others had clinical and echocardiographic evidence of pulmonary hypertension, and 9 (26%) died suddenly within 30 days of the diagnosis of incidental PE; 2 of these where among the 5 patients who were not anticoagulated. Conclusion: Incidental PE in cancer patients is increasingly encountered. Similar to symptomatic PE, many were diagnosed in patients with advanced stage disease and while undergoing active anti-cancer therapy. A significant percentage of patients had recurrent emboli, pulmonary hypertension, and sudden death. PMID:21468175

  20. Cancer patients' experiences with and perceived outcomes of yoga: results from focus groups.

    PubMed

    van Uden-Kraan, C F; Chinapaw, M J M; Drossaert, C H C; Verdonck-de Leeuw, I M; Buffart, L M

    2013-07-01

    Yoga is a "mind-body" exercise, a combination of physical poses with breathing and meditation, and may have beneficial effects on physical and psychosocial symptoms. We aimed to explore cancer patients' motives for practicing yoga, experiences of practicing yoga, and perceived physical and psychosocial outcomes. Participants (n = 45) following yoga classes for cancer patients were asked to participate in focus group interviews, of whom 29 participated. The focus groups (n = 5) were audio taped with prior consent and transcribed verbatim. Data were analyzed by two coders and independently coded into key issues and themes. Mean age of the participants was 53.8 (SD 10.8) years, of whom 25 were women, and 18 were diagnosed with breast cancer. Motives for participation in yoga were relaxation, the will to be physically active, the wish to pay more attention to one's body, coping with psychosocial symptoms, contributing to their cancer rehabilitation process, and combing physical and mental processes. Main physical and psychosocial experiences of yoga mentioned by patients were regaining body awareness, raising attention to the inner self, learning how to relax, enjoyment, and finding recognition and understanding. Increased physical fitness and function, mental strength and resilience, increased coping, being more relaxed, and happiness were frequently mentioned experiences of patients. Patients with different types of cancer perceived several benefits on physical and psychosocial outcomes by practicing yoga. Therefore, yoga can be a valuable form of supportive care for cancer patients.

  1. Caring for Patients with Advanced Breast Cancer: The Experiences of Zambian Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Maree, Johanna Elizabeth; Mulonda, Jennipher Kombe

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to describe the experiences of Zambian nurses caring for women with advanced breast cancer. Methods: We used a qualitative descriptive design and purposive sampling. Seventeen in-depth interviews were conducted with registered nurses practicing in the Cancer Diseases Hospital and the University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka, Zambia, and analyzed using thematic analyses. Results: Two themes emerged from the data - caring for women with advanced breast cancer is challenging and the good outweighs the bad. The majority of the participants agreed that caring for women with advanced breast cancer and witnessing their suffering were challenging. Not having formal education and training in oncology nursing was disempowering, and one of the various frustrations participants experienced. The work environment, learning opportunities, positive patient outcomes, and the opportunity to establish good nurse–patient experiences were positive experiences. Conclusions: Although negative experiences seemed to be overwhelming, participants reported some meaningful experiences while caring for women with advanced breast cancer. The lack of formal oncology nursing education and training was a major factor contributing to their negative experiences and perceived as the key to rendering the quality of care patients deserved. Ways to fulfill the educational needs of nurses should be explored and instituted, and nurses should be remunerated according to their levels of practice. PMID:28217726

  2. Cancer patients' experiences and evaluations of aromatherapy massage in palliative care.

    PubMed

    Dunwoody, Lynn; Smyth, Angus; Davidson, Robin

    2002-10-01

    Many patients suffering from cancer make use of complementary therapies, with aromatherapy being a popular choice. Quantitative studies, using questionnaire data, have shown that aromatherapy may reduce psychological distress and enhance symptom control in cancer patients. However, little is known about the personal meanings patients associate with the therapy. This study explored the patients' experiences of aromatherapy using of a focus group interview. Eight themes emerged from the analysis, six of which have been acknowledged to some extent by previous authors: de-stressing effects of aromatherapy, the counselling role of the aromatherapist, aromatherapy as a reward, patient empowerment, communication through touch, and negative aspects of the service. Two apparently new themes emerged concerned with security of context (where the aromatherapy took place) and preconceived perceptions of the value of aromatherapy as a treatment of cancer patients. The implications of the findings are discussed in relation to the perceived role of counselling, collaborative practice and training in complementary therapies.

  3. Living with Lung Cancer--Patients' Experiences as Input to eHealth Service Design.

    PubMed

    Hägglund, Maria; Bolin, Peter; Koch, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study is to describe the lung cancer care process as experienced by patients, as well as to perform a qualitative analysis of problems they encounter throughout the patient journey. A user-centered design approach was used and data collected through two focus group meetings with patients. We present the results in the form of a patient journey model, descriptions of problems related to the journey as expressed by patients and proposed eHealth services discussed by patients in the focus groups. The results indicate that not only is the patient journey fragmented and different for each patient going through it depending upon their specific type of lung cancer and treatment options, but their experiences are also highly individual and dependent on their personal needs and interpretations of the process. Designing eHealth to improve the patient journey will therefore require flexibility and adaptability to the individual's needs.

  4. Patient experiences at diagnosis and psychological well-being in prostate cancer: A Finnish national survey.

    PubMed

    Lehto, Ulla-Sisko; Helander, Sanni; Taari, Kimmo; Aromaa, Arpo

    2015-06-01

    Most cases of prostate cancer are diagnosed at an early stage, and men live for many years after diagnosis. Thus, their well-being and quality of life are of great importance. This study investigated patient experiences and psychological well-being in a Finnish national sample of prostate cancer patients who received various types of treatment. In a national sample (50%) of prostate cancer patients diagnosed in Finland in 2004, information was collected on the patients' experiences at diagnosis and choice of treatment (e.g. treatment selection, patient satisfaction with care and information, psychological reactions). In 2009, participants were asked about their experiences, and psychological well-being (psychological symptoms, satisfaction with life) was measured. In total, 1239 completed questionnaires (73%) were accepted for the study. Differences between treatments and predictors of psychological well-being were investigated using descriptive statistics and regression analysis. Half of the respondents were satisfied with the care and information they received about the cancer and side effects of treatment. Experiences and psychological well-being were most positive among patients who received brachytherapy and poorest among patients who received hormonal therapy. Patients who underwent prostatectomy or brachytherapy were most likely to have been involved in treatment selection. Negative experiences, such as learning of the diagnosis in an impersonal way and dissatisfaction with the information and care received, were predictive of poorer well-being. Unmet supportive care and informational needs were common. Experiences and well-being varied between treatments. Patients tended to prefer prostatectomy and brachytherapy. Unmet needs, which would probably be reduced by improvements in care, appear to have a long-lasting impact on patients' psychological well-being. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A qualitative exploration of the experiences of lesbian and heterosexual patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Alicia K; Peterman, Amy H; Delaney, Patty; Menard, Lyssa; Brandenburg, Dana

    2002-01-01

    To explore similarities and differences between lesbian and heterosexual survivors of breast cancer regarding cancer experiences, medical interactions related to cancer treatment, and quality of life (QOL). Qualitative study using focus groups. Urban, community-based health center. A convenience sample of lesbians (n = 13) and heterosexual women (n = 28) with a diagnosis of breast cancer within the past five years. Participants were recruited via posted advertisements. Focus groups were conducted as part of a larger study exploring coping and adjustment in lesbian survivors of breast cancer. Transcribed focus group data were analyzed through thematic and representative case study methods. Broad aspects of medical interactions and the patient-provider relationship that may be associated with improved QOL of lesbian and heterosexual patients with cancer. Data suggested similarities between lesbians and heterosexual women in their overall QOL. However, differences did emerge between the groups. Lesbians reported higher stress associated with diagnosis, lower satisfaction with care received from physicians, and a trend toward lower satisfaction with the availability of emotional support. Study findings have important implications for future research on adjustment and coping among lesbian patients with breast cancer and for the improvement of their mental and physical healthcare services. Study findings may help improve healthcare services for lesbians with cancer.

  6. Incidence of Atypical Femur Fractures in Cancer Patients: The MD Anderson Cancer Center Experience.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Beatrice J; Sun, Ming; West, Dennis P; Guindani, Michele; Lin, Yan Heather; Lu, Huifang; Hu, Mimi; Barcenas, Carlos; Bird, Justin; Feng, Chun; Saraykar, Smita; Tripathy, Debasish; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N; Gagel, Robert; Murphy, William A

    2016-08-01

    Atypical femoral fractures (AFFs) are rare adverse events attributed to bisphosphonate (BP) use. Few cases of AFF in cancer have been described; the aim of this study is to identify the incidence and risk factors for AFF in a large cancer center. This retrospective study was conducted at the MD Anderson Cancer Center. The incidence rate of AFF among BP users was calculated from January 1, 2004 through December 31, 2013. The control group (n = 51) included 2 or 3 patients on BPs matched for age (≤1 year) and gender. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess the relationship between clinical characteristics and AFF. Twenty-three AFF cases were identified radiographically among 10,587 BP users, the total BP exposure was 53,789 months (4482 years), and the incidence of AFF in BP users was 0.05 cases per 100,000 person-years. Meanwhile, among 300,553 patients who did not receive BPs there were 2 cases of AFF as compared with the 23 cases noted above. The odds ratio (OR) of having AFF in BP users was 355.58 times higher (95% CI, 84.1 to 1501.4, p < 0.0001) than the risk in non-BP users. The OR of having AFF in alendronate users was 5.54 times greater (OR 5.54 [95% CI, 1.60 to 19.112, p = 0.007]) than the odds of having AFF among other BP users. Patients who were on zoledronic acid (ZOL) had smaller odds of developing AFF compared with other BP users in this matched case control sample. AFFs are rare, serious adverse events that occur in patients with cancer who receive BP therapy. Patients with cancer who receive BPs for prior osteoporosis therapy or for metastatic cancer are at higher risk of AFF. © 2016 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  7. Cancer Patients' Experiences of Using Mistletoe (Viscum album): A Qualitative Systematic Review and Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Evans, Maggie; Bryant, Susan; Huntley, Alyson L; Feder, Gene

    2016-02-01

    Systematic reviews of mistletoe therapy (MT) trials in cancer show promising results in improvement of patients' quality of life during chemotherapy and reduction of fatigue. However, patients' experiences of side effects and the acceptability, tolerability, and perceived benefits of MT have not been systematically reviewed. The aim of this study was to systematically review and synthesise the results of qualitative studies of cancer patients' experiences of using MT. A systematic search was conducted in MEDLINE, Embase, PsychLIT, CINAHL, and AMED to identify qualitative studies of MT. Articles were screened independently by two reviewers and critically appraised using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme tool. A thematic synthesis of the findings was carried out. One hundred and seventy-three papers were identified; 156 were excluded at initial screening. Seventeen papers were read in full, 14 of which were excluded. Three articles about patients' experiences of MT alongside conventional treatment were included in the synthesis, either as a monotherapy (two articles) or as part of a package of anthroposophic treatment (one article). Patients reported demonstrable changes to their physical, emotional, and psychosocial well-being following MT, as well as a reduction in chemotherapy side effects. Self-reported side effects from MT were few, and the studies suggest good adherence to the therapy. Self-injection gave patients a sense of empowerment through involvement in their own treatment. A systematic search revealed a small number of qualitative studies of MT in cancer. These were effectively combined to provide a detailed overview of patients' experiences in order to complement the developing evidence base from trials. Given the variation in context of MT delivery across the articles, it is not possible to ascribe changes in patients' quality of life specifically to MT. The results of this review will help in the design of outcome measures that more fully

  8. Fertility sparing treatments in young patients with gynecological cancers: Iranian experience and literature review.

    PubMed

    Karimi Zarchi, Mojgan; Mousavi, Azamsadat; Gilani, Mitra Modares; Barooti, Esmat; Amini Rad, Omid; Ghaemmaghami, Fatemeh; Teimoori, Soraya; Behtas, Nadereh

    2011-01-01

    With increase in the marriage age some women experience gynecological cancers before giving birth. Thus fertility sparing in these patients is an important point and much work has been done on conservative management. We here report our experience on fertility sparing with cervical, endometrial and ovarian cancers and include a review of the literature. With cervical cancer, radical trachelectomy with para-aortic and pelvic lymphadenectomy can be performed in patients with early stage IA1-IB cancers, because they have low recurrence rates. The complications are fewer than with radical hysterectomy. For endometrial cancer, the accepted treatment is total abdominal hysterectomy+bilateral salpango-oopherectomy (TAH+BSO), but in young patients with early stage 1 lesions, we can suggest use of hormonal therapy in place of radical surgery if we evaluate with MRI and the result is early stage disease without the other site involvement and the grade of tumor is well differentiated. GNRH analog, oral medroxyprogestrone acetate (MPA), 100-800 mg/day, megestrol acetate 40-160 mg/day and combination of tamoxifen and a progestin have been applied, but we must remember, they should underwent repeated curettage for investigating medical outcome after 3 months. With normal pathology we follow medical therapy for 3 months and can evaluate for infertility treatment. The best option for patients who treated by medical therapy is TAH+BSO after normal term pregnancy. With ovarian cancer, there is much experience on fertility sparing surgery and in Iran conservative surgical management in young patients with stage I (grade 1,2) of epithelial ovarian tumor and sex cord-stromal tumor and patients with borderline and germ cell ovarian tumors is being successfully performed.

  9. Experiences of a mindfulness-based stress-reduction intervention among patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Kvillemo, Pia; Bränström, Richard

    2011-01-01

    There is increasing recognition of mindfulness and mindfulness training as a way to decrease stress and increase psychological functioning. The aim of this study was to examine the perceived effects and experiences of mindfulness stress-reduction training as described by patients with cancer participating in a mindfulness-based stress-reduction training program. The study is based on analysis of data collected in semistructured interviews of the participants (n = 18) after the completion of a mindfulness-meditation training program. The intervention consisted of an 8-week mindfulness-training course. Most participants expressed a number of perceived positive effects of participating in the mindfulness program including increased calm, enhanced sleep quality, more energy, less physical pain, and increased well-being. However, a few participants experienced no effect. Both negative and positive views of the specific meditation and yoga exercises included in the program were expressed. Components that were described as of particular importance, regarding the experience of participating in the program, were the nonjudgmental and accepting approach guiding the program and the instructors, the influence of the group process and sharing experiences with patients with similar experiences, and the emphasis on increased awareness of the present moment. This study gives support for the use of mindfulness programs in reducing stress-related complaints among some patients with a cancer diagnosis. The positive experiences of mindfulness training reported by patients with cancer call for further studies examining the possibilities and requirements for implementation of mindfulness programs in clinical practice.

  10. The Pain Experience of Hispanic Patients With Cancer in the U.S.

    PubMed Central

    Im, Eun-Ok; Guevara, Enrique; Chee, Wonshik

    2008-01-01

    Background: Several plausible reasons for inadequate cancer pain management among Hispanic patients with cancer in the U.S. have been postulated; however, this issue is understudied. Purpose: The purpose of the study was to explore Hispanic patients' cancer pain experience from a feminist perspective in order to find explanations for inadequate pain management for Hispanic patients with cancer. Design: A qualitative online forum study. Setting: Both Internet and community settings. Participants: 15 Hispanic patients with cancer recruited using a convenience sampling method. Methods: A 6-month online forum was conducted using nine discussion topics, and the data were processed using a thematic analysis. Phenomenon of Interest: Cancer Pain Experience Findings: Four major themes emerged: lack of communication with health care providers regarding undermedication; because of traditional gender roles guiding their behaviors, both women and men were enduring pain; participants placed the highest priority on family during the diagnosis and treatment process, thus setting aside their needs for pain management; finally, participants were enduring inconvenience and unfair treatment in the U.S. health care system while simultaneously appreciating what treatment they had been given. Conclusions: Because of cultural factors and marginalized status in the U.S. as Hispanics and as immigrants, most of the participants could not adequately describe and manage their pain. Implications: Findings suggest a need for further investigation of the influences of multiple factors, including financial issues, cultural norms, and gender stereotypes, on cancer pain experience among diverse subgroups of Hispanic patients with cancer. Key Points: Because of their Hispanic identity or immigrant status in the U.S., financial difficulties, language barriers, and cultural values placing family as the highest priority, most of the Hispanic participants of this study could not adequately describe and

  11. Does age influence the symptom experience of lung cancer patients prior to surgery?

    PubMed

    Oksholm, Trine; Miaskowski, Christine; Kongerud, Johny Steinar; Cooper, Bruce; Paul, Steven M; Laerum, Line; Rustoen, Tone

    2013-10-01

    Older patients with lung cancer are less likely to be offered surgery then younger patients. Although higher preoperative symptom burden is associated with poorer postoperative outcomes, few studies have examined age-related differences in symptom experience of lung cancer patients prior to surgery. This study evaluated for differences in symptom occurrence, severity, and distress between older (≥65 years) and younger (<65 years) patients prior to surgery. Data were collected through chart review and a symptom assessment scale (i.e., Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale (MSAS)) that evaluated multiple dimensions of 32 symptoms. Descriptive statistics were used to present demographic and clinical characteristics of the sample. Logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate for age-related differences in each dimension of the symptom experience. A total of 270 patients completed the MSAS prior to surgery (113 younger and 157 older patients). Few age-related differences were found. When age differences were identified, older patients reported lower occurrence rates and lower severity and distress ratings. Cough, lack of energy, feeling drowsy and worrying was the four most common symptoms in both age groups. In the younger patients, feeling nervous was ranked fourth. Shortness of breath was ranked third by the older patients. The study confirmed the high occurrence rates for cough, pain, fatigue, shortness of breath, and sleep disturbance found in previous studies. However, "new" symptoms were identified including feeling nervous, worrying, sweats, feeling bloated, and problems with sexual interest. These "new" symptoms were reported by over 40% of the patients. Measurement of symptoms in lung cancer patients before surgery is important, because patients reported an average of 10 symptoms. Few age-related differences in the patients' symptom experience were identified. Psychological symptoms were common and warrant consideration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland

  12. "It's not if I get cancer, it's when I get cancer": BRCA-positive patients' (un)certain health experiences regarding hereditary breast and ovarian cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Dean, Marleah

    2016-08-01

    Women with a harmful mutation in the BReast CAncer (BRCA) gene are at significantly increased risk of developing hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) during their lifetime, compared to those without. Such patients-with a genetic predisposition to develop cancer but who have not yet been diagnosed with cancer-live in a constant state of uncertainty and wonder not if they might get cancer but when. Framed by uncertainty management theory, the purpose of this study was to explore BRCA-positive patients' health experiences after testing positive for the BRCA genetic mutation, specifically identifying their sources of uncertainty. Thirty-four, qualitative interviews were conducted with female patients. Participants responded to online research postings on the non-profit organization Facing Our Risk of Cancer Empowered's (FORCE) message board and social media pages as well as HBOC-specific Facebook groups. The interview data were coded using the constant comparison method. Two major themes representing BRCA-positive patients' sources of uncertainty regarding their genetic predisposition and health experiences emerged from the data. Medical uncertainty included the following three subthemes: the unknown future, medical appointments, and personal cancer scares. Familial uncertainty encompassed the subthemes traumatic family cancer memories and motherhood. Overall, the study supports and extends existing research on uncertainty-revealing uncertainty is inherent in BRCA-positive patients' health experiences-and offers new insight regarding uncertainty management and HBOC risk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Insights into the experiences of patients with cancer in London: framework analysis of free-text data from the National Cancer Patient Experience Survey 2012/2013 from the two London Integrated Cancer Systems

    PubMed Central

    Wiseman, Theresa; Lucas, Grace; Sangha, Amrit; Randolph, Anuska; Stapleton, Sarah; Pattison, Natalie; O'Gara, Geraldine; Harris, Katherine; Pritchard-Jones, Kathy; Dolan, Shelley

    2015-01-01

    Objective To shed light on experiences of patients with cancer in London National Health Service (NHS) trusts that may not be fully captured in national survey data, to inform improvement action plans by these trusts. Design Framework analysis of free-text data from 2012/2013 National Cancer Patient Experience Survey (NCPES) from the 2 London Integrated Cancer Systems. Setting and participants Patients with a cancer diagnosis treated by the NHS across 27 trusts in London. Main outcome measures Free-text data received from patients categorised into what patients found good about their cancer care and what could be improved. Methods Using Framework analysis, a thematic framework was created for 15 403 comments from over 6500 patients. Themes were identified across the London data set, by tumour group and by trust. Results Two-thirds of free-text comments from patients in London were positive and one-third of those related to the good quality of care those patients received. However, the majority of comments for improvement related to quality of care, with a focus on poor care, poor communication and waiting times in outpatient departments. Additionally, 577 patients (9% of those who returned free-text data in London) commented on issues pertaining to the questionnaire itself. Some patients who experienced care from multiple trusts were unclear on how to complete the questionnaire for the single trust whose care they were asked to comment on, others said the questions did not fit their experiences. Conclusions NCPES free-text analysis can shed light on the experiences of patients that closed questions might not reveal. It further indicates that there are issues with the survey itself, in terms of ambiguities in the questionnaire and difficulties in identifying patients within specific trusts. Both of these issues have the potential to contribute to knowledge and understanding of the uses and limitations of free-text data in improving cancer services. PMID:26482767

  14. Cancer patients' attitudes and experiences of online access to their electronic medical records: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Rexhepi, Hanife; Åhlfeldt, Rose-Mharie; Cajander, Åsa; Huvila, Isto

    2016-07-19

    Patients' access to their online medical records serves as one of the cornerstones in the efforts to increase patient engagement and improve healthcare outcomes. The aim of this article is to provide in-depth understanding of cancer patients' attitudes and experiences of online medical records, as well as an increased understanding of the complexities of developing and launching e-Health services. The study result confirms that online access can help patients prepare for doctor visits and to understand their medical issues. In contrast to the fears of many physicians, the study shows that online access to medical records did not generate substantial anxiety, concerns or increased phone calls to the hospital.

  15. Patient experiences and outcomes following facial skin cancer surgery: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Erica H; Klassen, Anne F; Lawson, Jessica L; Cano, Stefan J; Scott, Amie M; Pusic, Andrea L

    2016-08-01

    Early melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer of the facial area are primarily treated with surgery. Little is known about the outcomes of treatment for facial skin cancer patients. The objective of the study was to identify concerns about aesthetics, procedures and health from the patients' perspective after facial skin surgery. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with 15 participants. Line-by-line coding was used to establish categories and develop themes. We identified five major themes on the impact of skin cancer surgery: appearance-related concerns; psychological (e.g., fear of new cancers or recurrence); social (e.g. impact on social activities and interaction); physical (e.g. pain and swelling) concerns and satisfaction with the experience of care (e.g., satisfaction with surgeon). The priority of participants was the removal of the facial skin cancer, as this reduced their overall worry. The aesthetic outcome was secondary but important, as it had important implications on the participants' social and psychological functioning. The participants' experience with the care provided by the surgeon and staff also contributed to their satisfaction with their treatment. This conceptual framework provides the basis for the development of a new patient-reported outcome instrument. © 2015 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  16. Differences between Proxy and Patient Assessments of Cancer Care Experiences and Quality Ratings.

    PubMed

    Roydhouse, Jessica K; Gutman, Roee; Keating, Nancy L; Mor, Vincent; Wilson, Ira B

    2017-03-02

    To assess the impact of proxy survey responses on cancer care experience reports and quality ratings. Secondary analysis of data from Cancer Care Outcomes Research and Surveillance (CanCORS). Recruitment occurred from 2003 to 2005. The study was a cross-sectional observational study. The respondents were patients with incident colorectal or lung cancer or their proxies. Analyses used linear regression models with an independent variable for proxy versus patient responses as well as study site and clinical covariates. The outcomes were experiences with medical care, nursing care, care coordination, and care quality rating. Multiple imputation was used for missing data. Among 6,471 respondents, 1,011 (16 percent) were proxies. The proportion of proxy respondents varied from 6 percent to 28 percent across study sites. Adjusted proxy scores were modestly higher for medical care experiences (+1.28 points [95 percent CI:+ 0.05 to +2.51]), but lower for nursing care (-2.81 [95 percent CI: -4.11 to -1.50]) and care coordination experiences (-2.98 [95 percent CI: -4.15 to -1.81]). There were no significant differences between adjusted patient and proxy ratings of quality. Proxy responses have small but statistically significant differences from patient responses. However, if ratings of care are used for financial incentives, such differences could be exaggerated across practices or areas if proxy use varies. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  17. The Experience of Caregivers Living with Cancer Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    LeSeure, Peeranuch; Chongkham-ang, Supaporn

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this meta-synthesis were to: (1) explore the experience of caregivers who were caring for cancer patients, including their perceptions and responses to the situation; and (2) describe the context and the phenomena relevant to the experience. Five databases were used: CINAHL, MEDLINE, Academic Search, Science Direct, and a Thai database known as the Thai Library Integrated System (ThaiLIS). Three sets of the context of the experience and the phenomena relevant to the experience were described. The contexts were (1) having a hard time dealing with emotional devastation; (2) knowing that the caregiving job was laborious; and (3) knowing that I was not alone. The phenomenon showed the progress of the caregivers’ thoughts and actions. A general phenomenon of the experience—balancing my emotion—applied to most of the caregivers; whereas, more specific phenomenon—keeping life as normal as possible and lifting life above the illness—were experienced by a lesser number of the caregivers. This review added a more thorough explanation of the issues involved in caregiving for cancer patients. A more comprehensive description of the experience of caregiving was described. The findings of this review can be used to guide clinical practice and policy formation in cancer patient care. PMID:26610573

  18. Cancer-associated thrombosis, low-molecular-weight heparin, and the patient experience: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Seaman, Siwan; Nelson, Annmarie; Noble, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Background Venous thromboembolism is a common complication of cancer and its treatments. Treatment of cancer-associated thrombosis (CAT) differs from treatment of thrombosis in noncancer patients, requiring a daily injection of low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) for 6 months instead of an oral anticoagulant. Previous research suggested LMWH is an acceptable intervention in the treatment of CAT, yet clinical practice and therapeutic opportunities have changed in the decade since the study was conducted. Furthermore, in the previous study there was acknowledged selection bias in participant recruitment. There is increasing clinical use of the novel oral anticoagulants, although their efficacy and safety is yet to be demonstrated within the cancer population. The experience of patients receiving anticoagulation for CAT will inform future practice with respect to quality of life and adherence to anticoagulation therapy. Aim To explore the acceptability of long-term LMWH for the treatment of CAT in the contexts of living with cancer and quality of life. Design Qualitative study of cancer patients who had been receiving LMWH for at least 3 months for CAT was undertaken. Audiotaped semistructured interviews were conducted and transcribed. Thematic analysis was undertaken until theoretical saturation. Setting/participants Fourteen patients attending a palliative care or CAT clinic were interviewed. Participants had been receiving LMWH for a median 6 months. Results Participants reported distressing symptoms associated with symptomatic CAT, which they rated as worse than their cancer experiences. LMWH was considered an acceptable intervention despite challenges of long-term injections. Several adaptive techniques were reported to optimize ongoing injections. Participants would only favor a novel oral anticoagulant if it was equivalent to LMWH in efficacy and safety. Conclusion Although LMWH remains an acceptable intervention for the treatment of CAT, its long-term use is

  19. Caring for patients with cancer in non-specialist wards: the nurse experience.

    PubMed

    Mohan, S; Wilkes, L M; Ogunsiji, O; Walker, A

    2005-07-01

    This study aims to describe the experiences of nurses caring for cancer patients in non-specialist wards. The study was conducted in a large (420 beds) and small (32 beds) hospital in an area health service with urban and rural populations in the west of Sydney. A qualitative descriptive approach was utilized to collect data from the nurses. Data were collected using a survey and in-depth interviews of nurses working in non-specialist cancer wards. Transcribed data were managed with Nudist Vivo software and analysed for common themes using process of constant comparison and contrast. Twenty-five surveys were returned and five nurses volunteered to be interviewed. The six major themes that emerged from analysis of data were: emotional nature of care, lack of time, lack of knowledge of cancer treatment, family support, environment not conducive to proper care and dealing with patient's non-acceptance of cancer diagnosis. The nurses in this study wished to provide quality supportive care for cancer patients and their families but the inconducive environment and inadequate relevant training hindered the nurses' efforts. This then presents further need of relevant training for nurses in cancer care and time management, to meet up with these challenges.

  20. Treatment decision making experiences of migrant cancer patients and their families in Australia.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Joanne; Zou, Xian; Butow, Phyllis

    2015-06-01

    To explore treatment decision-making experiences of Australian migrants with cancer from Arabic, Chinese, or Greek backgrounds and their relatives. 73 patients and 18 caregivers from cancer support groups and oncology clinics participated in either a focus group (n=14) or semi-structured interview (n=21) conducted in the participant's own language. Participant treatment decision-making preferences were discussed as part of patients' overall treatment experience and a thematic analysis conducted. Four main themes emerged from the data: (1) perceived role of the patient in decision-making; (2) access to information and the impact of language; (3) cultural influences (4) family involvement. The majority of participants experienced passive involvement during treatment consultations, but expressed a desire for greater involvement. Language rather than culture was a greater obstacle to active participation. Difficulty communicating effectively in English was the most significant barrier to participation in treatment decisions. To overcome language challenges, participants actively sought information from alternative sources. This study provides new insights into the influence of language and culture on the treatment decision-making experiences of migrants with cancer and their families within the Australian cancer care system. To reduce health disparities doctors need to address language difficulties and be aware of cultural differences. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  1. Coping with stigma: the experiences of Chinese patients living with lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huaxia; Yang, Qianqian; Narsavage, Georgia L; Yang, Chunling; Chen, Yue; Xu, Guiying; Wu, Xia

    2016-01-01

    To describe the experiences of stigma and coping strategies among patients with lung cancer in China. Qualitative. The oncology department at Liaocheng Peoples Hospital. A purposive sample of 17 patients experiencing stigma related to lung cancer voluntarily participated in data collection. Individual, semistructured qualitative interviews were chosen. Participants completed about a 30-min focused interview. Exploratory qualitative approach guided data analysis. Three main thematic elements emerged from the interview data:(1) sources of stigma, such as smoking, decreased ability to work, difficulties caring for self and family, damage to self-image, and cough and expectoration; (2) experiences of stigma, including feelings of stigma, remorse, loss of dignity, uselessness, social isolation, perceived exclusion, rejection, and discrimination; and (3) coping strategies, such as concealing the fact of sickness, reducing social activities, seeking medical assistance, adhering to treatment, and disclosing dissatisfaction. Our results indicate the presence of perceived stigma among patients with lung cancer. Future work should address the stigma associated with lung cancer and its related factors. As point-of-care providers, staff nurses are well positioned to develop effective interventions to help patients deal with stigma and to accomplish the goal of providing holistic nursing care.

  2. Sunitinib treatment in patients with advanced renal cell cancer: the Brazilian National Cancer Institute (INCA) experience

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Rafael Corrêa; Reinert, Tomás; Campos, Franz; Peixoto, Fábio Affonso; de Andrade, Carlos Augusto; Castro, Thalita; Herchenhorn, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the impact of sunitinib treatment in a non-screened group of patients with metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC) treated by the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS) at a single reference institution. Material and Methods: Retrospective cohort study, which evaluated patients with mRCC who received sunitinib between May 2010 and December 2013. Results: Fifty-eight patients were eligible. Most patients were male 41 (71%), with a median age of 58 years. Nephrectomy was performed in 41 (71%) patients with a median interval of 16 months between the surgery and initiation of sunitinib. The most prevalent histological subtype was clear cell carcinoma, present in 52 (91.2%) patients. In 50 patients (86%), sunitinib was the first line of systemic treatment. The main adverse effects were fatigue (57%), hypothyroidism (43%), mucositis (33%) and diarrhea (29%). Grade 3 and 4 adverse effects were infrequent: fatigue (12%), hypertension (12%), thrombocytopenia (7%), neutropenia (5%) and hand-foot syndrome (5%). Forty percent of patients achieved a partial response and 35% stable disease, with a disease control rate of 75%. Median progression free survival was 7.6 months and median overall survival was 14.1 months. Conclusion: Sunitinib treatment was active in the majority of patients, especially those with low and intermediate risk by MSKCC score, with manageable toxicity. Survival rates were inferior in this non-screened population with mRCC treated in the SUS. PMID:27564279

  3. Sunitinib treatment in patients with advanced renal cell cancer: the Brazilian National Cancer Institute (INCA) experience.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Rafael Corrêa; Reinert, Tomás; Campos, Franz; Peixoto, Fábio Affonso; de Andrade, Carlos Augusto; Castro, Thalita; Herchenhorn, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of sunitinib treatment in a non-screened group of patients with metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC) treated by the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS) at a single reference institution. Retrospective cohort study, which evaluated patients with mRCC who received sunitinib between May 2010 and December 2013. Fifty-eight patients were eligible. Most patients were male 41 (71%), with a median age of 58 years. Nephrectomy was performed in 41 (71%) patients with a median interval of 16 months between the surgery and initiation of sunitinib. The most prevalent histological subtype was clear cell carcinoma, present in 52 (91.2%) patients. In 50 patients (86%), sunitinib was the first line of systemic treatment. The main adverse effects were fatigue (57%), hypothyroidism (43%), mucositis (33%) and diarrhea (29%). Grade 3 and 4 adverse effects were infrequent: fatigue (12%), hypertension (12%), thrombocytopenia (7%), neutropenia (5%) and hand-foot syndrome (5%). Forty percent of patients achieved a partial response and 35% stable disease, with a disease control rate of 75%. Median progression free survival was 7.6 months and median overall survival was 14.1 months. Sunitinib treatment was active in the majority of patients, especially those with low and intermediate risk by MSKCC score, with manageable toxicity. Survival rates were inferior in this non-screened population with mRCC treated in the SUS. Copyright© by the International Brazilian Journal of Urology.

  4. Adolescent cancer patients' perspectives on their educational experiences: Ten case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Searle, Nancy Smith

    The goal of this study was to explore the educational experiences of adolescent cancer patients in treatment for cancer and enrolled in hospital, homebound, or community schools. The incidence of students who have or had cancer is becoming more prevalent in schools today because of increases in the population, the incidence rate of cancer, and the survival rate of cancer. The number of students surviving cancer has increased over 41% in the past ten years and underscores the importance of assuring an excellent education to children and adolescents with cancer so that they may enjoy a good quality of life as long-term survivors. This study explored the educational experiences of students who were adolescent cancer patients and identified educational and psychosocial issues important to their success. The goal of this research effort was to provide educators and medical staff with a deeper understanding of the unique psychoeducational needs of this population and to provide a foundation for developing ideas for improving the educational programs and support available to students who continue their middle and high school education while undergoing treatment for cancer. Participants included ten cancer patient whose mean age at onset of disease was 13.8 +/- 1.7 years, and mean age at interview was 15.2 +/- 1.8 years. The researcher conducted individual, in-depth, ethnographic interviews of students, and one parent and one teacher of each student. Case studies of the students included extensive dialogue of each of the contributing participants. An analysis of the case studies was conducted by coding emerging themes so that topics could be fully explored and compared between individuals, groups of individuals, and educational settings to identify the meaning that these students placed on the educational and psychosocial issues that they voiced as important. Advantages and disadvantages of each educational situation, homebound, hospital school, and community school, were

  5. An innovative off-campus infusion suite designed to improve experiences of patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Jeanine; Gruber, Marcia

    2012-08-01

    The Brooklyn Infusion Center of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center was established in 2010 to better meet the needs of patients with cancer living in the Brooklyn neighborhood and surrounding areas. A multidisciplinary team comprising clinical, administrative, planning, and other representatives were charged to identify and develop a location that would provide oncology care for patients closer to home and improve the patients' experience. The primary objectives were to provide patient-centered care that accommodates the patients' preference to receive treatment closer to home and to take advantage of technology to establish processes that will provide safe, efficient, convenient, and high-quality care in a cost-effective manner. To achieve these objectives, no laboratory processing or pharmacy services were included in the plan for the Brooklyn location. This allowed the elimination of most of the challenges involved with same-day blood draws and chemotherapy orders. In addition, computer technology is used for teledermatology and other medical visits to maintain the continuity of the patients' care with their multidisciplinary teams at the Manhattan, NY, location. The data presented will illustrate how these processes have improved patients' experiences by reducing wait times for treatment, providing treatment closer to home, and implementing a truly patient-centered nursing care model.

  6. Effects of interdisciplinary teamwork on patient-reported experience of cancer care.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Dominique; Roberge, Danièle; Touati, Nassera; Maunsell, Elizabeth; Berbiche, Djamal

    2017-03-20

    Interdisciplinary teamwork (ITW) is deemed necessary for quality cancer care practices. Nevertheless, variation in ITW intensity among cancer teams is understudied, and quantitative evidence of the effect of different ITW intensities among cancer teams on patients' perceived experience of care is limited. This study aims to compare patient-reported experience measures (PREMs) of cancer outpatients followed by teams characterized by high vs. low ITW intensity. The study is designed as an ex post facto quasi-experimental study. Participants (n = 1379) were recruited in nine outpatient oncology clinics characterized by different ITW intensities. ITW intensities were evaluated using the characteristics of structure (team composition and size) and process (interactions among team members), as per West's seminal work on team effectiveness. ITW intensity was dichotomized (high vs. low ITW intensity). PREMs were classified and measured using validated scales corresponding to six dimensions: Prompt access to care, Person-centred response, Quality of patient-professional communication, Quality of the care environment, Continuity of care, and Results of care. Dichotomous variables were created for each dimension (positive vs. less positive experience). Multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the association between ITW intensities and the six PREMs dimensions, while controlling for patient and organizational characteristics. PROC GENMOD was used to fit logistic models for categorical variables. Outpatients treated by teams characterized by high ITW intensity reported almost four times more positive perceptions of Prompt access to care compared to patients treated by low ITW intensity teams (OR = 3.99; CI = 1.89-8.41). High ITW intensity also positively affected patients' perceptions of Quality of patient-professional communication (OR = 2.37; CI = 1.25-4.51), Person-centred response (OR = 2.11; CI = 1.05-4.24], and Continuity

  7. Postchemotherapy Retroperitoneal Lymph Node Dissection in Patients With Nonseminomatous Testicular Cancer: A Single Center Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Nowroozi, Mohamadreza; Ayati, Mohsen; Arbab, Amir; Jamshidian, Hassan; Ghorbani, Hamidreza; Niroomand, Hassan; Taheri Mahmoodi, Mohsen; Amini, Erfan; Salehi, Sohrab; Hakima, Hamid; Fazeli, Farid; Haghdani, Saeid; Ghadian, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Testicular cancer accounts for about 1 - 1.5% of all malignancies in men. Radical orchiectomy is curative in 75% of patients with stage I disease, but advance stage with retroperitoneal lymph node involvement needs chemotherapy. All patients who have residual masses ≥ 1 cm after chemotherapy should undergo postchemotherapy retroperitoneal lymph node dissection (PC-RPLND). Objectives: Treatment of advanced nonseminomatous testicular cancer is usually a combination of chemotherapy and surgery. We described our experience about postchemotherapy retroperitoneal lymph node dissection (PC-RPLND) in our center. Patients and Methods: In a retrospective cross-sectional study between 2006 and 2011, patients with a history of postchemotherapy retroperitoneal lymph node dissection (PC-RPLND) in Imam Khomeini hospital were evaluated. All patients had normal postchemotherapy serum tumor markers and primary nonseminomatous cancer. We reviewed retrospectively clinical, pathological, and surgical parameters associated with PC-RPLND in our center. Results: Twenty-one patients underwent bilateral PC-RPLND. Mean age was 26.3 years (ranged 16 - 47). Mean size of retroperitoneal mass after chemotherapy was 7.6 cm. Mean operative time was 198 minutes (120 - 246 minutes). Mean follow-up time was 38.6 months. Pathologic review showed presence of fibrosis/necrosis, viable germ cell tumor and teratoma in 8 (38.1%), 10 (47.6%) and 3 (14.28%) patients, respectively. One patient in postoperative period of surgery and three patients in two first years after surgery were expired. Of 17 alive patients, only two (11.8%) had not retrograde ejaculation. Conclusions: PC-RPLND is one the major operations in the field of urology, which is associated with significant adjunctive surgeries. In appropriate cases, PC-RPLND was associated with good cancer specific survival in tertiary oncology center. PMID:26539420

  8. Chemotherapy decisions and patient experience with the recurrence score assay for early-stage breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Friese, Christopher R; Li, Yun; Bondarenko, Irina; Hofer, Timothy P; Ward, Kevin C; Hamilton, Ann S; Deapen, Dennis; Kurian, Allison W; Katz, Steven J

    2017-01-01

    The 21-gene recurrence score (RS) assay stratifies early-stage, estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer by recurrence risk. Few studies have examined the ways in which physicians use the RS to recommend adjuvant systemic chemotherapy or patients' experiences with testing and decision making. This study surveyed 3880 women treated for breast cancer in 2013-2014; they were identified from the Los Angeles County and Georgia Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registries (response rate, 71%). Women reported chemotherapy recommendations, the receipt of chemotherapy, testing experiences, and decision satisfaction. Registries linked the tumor data, RS, and surveys. Regression models examined factors associated with chemotherapy recommendations and receipt by the RS and subgroups. There were 1527 patients with stage I/II, estrogen receptor/progesterone receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor 2-negative disease: 778 received an RS (62.6% of patients with node-negative, favorable disease, 24.3% of patients with node-negative, unfavorable disease, and 13.0% of patients with node-positive disease; P < .001). Overall, 47.2% of the patients received a recommendation against chemotherapy, and 40.5% received a recommendation for it. RS results correlated with recommendations: nearly all patients with high scores (31-100) received a chemotherapy recommendation (86.9%-96.5% across clinical subgroups), whereas the majority of the patients with low-risk results (0-18) received a recommendation against it (65.9%-78.2% across subgroups). Most patients with high RSs received chemotherapy (87.0%, 91.1%, and 100% across subgroups), whereas few patients with low scores received it (2.9%, 9.5%, and 26.6% across subgroups). There were no substantial racial/ethnic differences in testing or treatment. Women were largely satisfied with the RS and chemotherapy decisions. Oncologists use the RS to personalize treatment, even for those with node-positive disease. High

  9. Truth telling in Taiwanese cancer care: patients' and families' preferences and their experiences of doctors' practices.

    PubMed

    Tang, Woung-Ru; Hong, Ji-Hong; Rau, Kun-Ming; Wang, Cheng-Hsu; Juang, Yeong-Yuh; Lai, Chien-Hong; Fujimori, Maiko; Fang, Chun-Kai

    2017-07-01

    Despite the significant role played by cancer patients' families in medical decision-making in Asian countries, inconsistencies have hitherto not been evaluated between patients' and families' preferences and doctors' actual practices with regard to cancer truth telling. For this quantitative comparative study of cancer patients' and families' truth-telling preferences and their experiences of doctors' practices, 532 patients, 551 family members, and 127 doctors (N = 1 210) were enrolled from five hospitals across Taiwan over 2 years. Truth telling was assessed using the Taiwanese version of a modified Japanese truth-telling scale. Patients' truth-telling preferences and their experiences of doctors' truth-telling practices differed significantly in scores on the overall truth-telling scale and each subscale, including method of disclosure, emotional support, additional information, and setting (P < .001). Similar findings were obtained for families' preferences and doctors' actual practices (P < .001). Patients' and families' truth-telling preference scores were higher than doctors' actual practice scores. Multiple regression analysis revealed a dose-dependent effect of doctors' monthly truth-telling frequency on their truth-telling preferences, but this effect was only borderline significant (P = .08). This multiple regression model explained 30% of the total variance in doctors' truth-telling preferences (F = 1.38, P = .22). Taiwanese medical educational policies need to be revised to better equip doctors to practice truth telling in accordance with the preferences of cancer patients and families. Communication skills training should be prioritized for doctors who refrain from truth telling in actual practice. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. [Spiritual care of a terminal liver cancer patient: a nursing experience].

    PubMed

    Chien, Hui-Chi

    2010-04-01

    Death, an unavoidable event in the human experience, causes physical as well as mental and spiritual suffering. This paper reports on a nursing experience giving spiritual care to a terminal liver cancer patient between January 17 and February 9, 2009. Eleven nursing logs were used as the source of data for daily information. During the care period, patient religious needs featured prominently, including his desire to become a Christian and his eagerness to know about and help in the arrangement of his funeral. Taking the initiative, the nurse helped link him with religious resources, arranged a minister for his baptism ceremony, had the priest explain funeral proceedings, and assisted with the completion of his entrusted plans. The function of this nursing care intervention was to provide a personal touch to a patient who was in desperate need of warm spiritual care. It is hoped that this report can help caregivers increase their sensitivity toward patient spiritual needs and enhance routine nursing care quality.

  11. The experience of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy in adult cancer patients: a qualitative thematic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Tanay, M A L; Armes, J; Ream, E

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this review was to systematically identify, appraise and synthesise qualitative research evidence on the experience of adult cancer patients living with chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN). A systematic search of the literature was performed in September 2015. Qualitative studies were included if they investigated CIPN and patient experience. Quality of the articles was appraised using an adapted version of the Critical Appraisal Skill Programme Checklist for Qualitative Research (CASP 2014). Themes were identified using the thematic synthesis approach proposed by Thomas and Harden [BMC Medical Research Methodology 8 (2008) 45]. Five articles presented findings generated by 88 patients who had all received neurotoxic chemotherapy. Sample sizes from included studies varied from 1 to 28 patients; all studies originated from America and were published between 2005 and 2015. Four analytical themes emerged: (1) CIPN is an unclear experience, (2) a less important risk, (3) impact on quality of life and (4) a feature of cancer survivorship. In conducting this synthesis, the lack of qualitative evidence in this specific condition is evident. Further studies are needed outside of America, to focus on CIPN risk communication approaches by healthcare professionals, patient understanding and perception of CIPN risk and interventions to promote early detection of CIPN including effective reporting and assessment. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Family caregiver perspective-taking and accuracy in estimating cancer patient symptom experiences.

    PubMed

    Lobchuk, Michelle M; Vorauer, Jacquie D

    2003-12-01

    As family caregivers assume more prominent roles in the provision of home care to persons with serious illness, investigators must test the effectiveness of novel interventions to facilitate family caring for cancer patients. This article is based on results derived from a larger study carried out in Canada that was designed to compare 98 advanced cancer patient and family caregiver perceptions of 32 patient symptom experiences as captured by the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale. We examined two main questions: (1) whether "natural" family caregivers' perceptions of patient lack of energy and worrying are more closely related to a self- or patient-oriented viewpoint and (2) whether induced "imagine-patient" perspective-taking can assist caregivers to achieve better perceptual accuracy. The caregiver's natural responses to neutral instructions that neither encouraged nor discouraged perspective-taking served as the baseline comparison with three other instructional sets, in which caregivers were prompted to: (1) provide a self-report on their own symptom experiences, (2) imagine how they would feel in the patient's situation (imagine-self), or (3) imagine how the patient would respond to his or her symptom situation (imagine-patient). Findings suggested that the family caregivers' natural judgments correspond most closely to what they do under an imagine-patient set than to what they do under any other set. Findings with respect to accuracy indicated that instructions to imagine the patient's perspective helped to prompt adjustments down from a self-oriented viewpoint, although definitive conclusions were precluded by difficulties with order effects.

  13. Experiences of truth disclosure in terminally ill cancer patients in palliative home care.

    PubMed

    Friedrichsen, Maria; Lindholm, Ann; Milberg, Anna

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the experiences and preferences of terminally ill cancer patients regarding truth telling in the communication of poor prognoses. We recorded and transcribed interviews with 45 patients who knew their cancer was terminal, and analyzed their responses hermeneutically. Patients identified three different modes of truth: (1) the absolute objective truth that they are dying; (2) the partial truth about their condition including some facts but not all of the details; and (3) the desired truth, originating in the patient's own beliefs about a healthy or better life. Coping strategies were related to patients' preferred mode of truth: (1) facing the truth in order to take action; (2) facing some parts of the truth in order to maintain hope; and (3) hovering between facing and avoiding the truth. In their struggle for existential survival, patients used different coping strategies, changing from one to another depending upon the circumstances. Varying use of different coping strategies impacts on patient preferences concerning communication about bad news with their doctors. Truth-telling entails more than merely providing information related to the forthcoming death. It also concerns how physicians or other healthcare staff can support the patient's existential survival by fine-tuning the communication of "truth" according to the individuals' preferences.

  14. Weight Changes In Patients With Hodgkin Lymphoma Following Treatment: Experience From A Cancer Hospital.

    PubMed

    Ali, Jamshed; Siddiqui, Neelam; Hameed, Abdul

    2016-01-01

    Some recent studies have suggested that patients with Hodgkin lymphoma who undergo remission following treatment are likely to experience significant weight gain and may become overweight or obese. The association between treatment for Hodgkin lymphoma and subsequent weight gain has not been explored in Pakistan. We undertook a review of weight changes in adult Hodgkin lymphoma patients who received treatment at Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital and Research Centre, Lahore. In this longitudinal study, we collected and analysed secondary data including adult patients who received treatment for Hodgkin lymphoma at our institute from January 2010 till December 2013. We retrospectively noted baseline demographic, clinical characteristics, details about treatment received and change in weight from baseline at start of treatment to 6, 12, and 18 months after start of treatment. A total of 470 patients registered for Hodgkin lymphoma at our centre. Data were available for 402 patients who were included in this study. Progressive increase in weight was observed in patients after treatment. The mean weight gain from the start of treatment to 6, 12, and 18 months was 3.1 kg, 7.1 kg, and 9.5 kg, respectively. Weight gain was not significantly associated with age or sex of patients. Weight gain was significantly associated with higher stages of cancer, response to treatment and B symptoms. The evaluation of Hodgkin lymphoma patients after treatment demonstrated considerable tendency for weight gain. Further work is warranted to explore this association and its impact on HL survivors.

  15. Extraperitoneal versus transperitoneal laparoscopic radical cystectomy for selected elderly bladder cancer patients: a single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Lang; Song, Jian; Wu, Menghua; Tian, Ye; Zhang, Daoxin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: This study reports the initial experience of extraperitoneal laparoscopic radical cystectomy (ELRC) and compared with transperitoneal laparoscopic radical cystectomy (TLRC) in the treatment of selected elderly bladder cancer patients. Patients and Methods: A total of forty male bladder cancer patients who underwent ELRC (n=19) or TLRC (n=21) with ureterocutaneostomy were investigated. Demographic parameters, perioperative variables, oncological outcomes and follow-up data were retrospectively analyzed. Results: A significantly shorter time to exsufflation (1.5±0.7 vs 2.1±1.1 d; p=0.026) and liquid intake (1.8±0.9 vs 2.8±1.9 d; p=0.035) were observed in the ELRC group compared with the TLRC group. The incidence of postoperative ileus in the ELRC group was lower than the TLRC group (0 vs 9.5%). However, the difference had no statistical significance (p>0.05). The removed lymph node number in the ELRC group was significantly lower than the TLRC group (p<0.001). No significant differences were observed between the two groups in the overall and cancer-free survival rates (p>0.05). Conclusions: ELRC seems to be a safe and feasible surgical strategy for the selected elderly bladder cancer patients with ≤ T2 disease. The surgical and oncological efficacy of the ELRC is similar to that of the TLRC, but with faster intestinal function recovery. Further studies with a large series including different urinary diversions are needed to confirm our results and to better evaluate the benefit of ELRC in bladder cancer patients. PMID:27564274

  16. Supporting the transformative process: experiences of cancer patients receiving integrative care.

    PubMed

    Mulkins, Andrea L; Verhoef, Marja J

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the essential features of the transformative experience among people living with cancer who are seeking integrative care and to identify factors supporting this process. It is hoped that after establishing the nature and meaning of this change or shift, one will better understand what is most meaningful in terms of providing appropriate care and support to patients seeking integrative care. An interpretational, qualitative approach guided sampling, data collection, and analysis with 11 individuals. A purposeful sample was drawn from selected integrative care facilities according to sociodemographics and type of cancer. Due to the complexity of this subject, second interviews were conducted with 5 participants to enhance the richness and validity of the data. The experience of transformation is a dynamic 4-stage process in which participants learned about themselves and became more aware of who they are and how they relate to the world. Participants found that 4 dimensions of integrative medicine played a fundamental role in supporting this process. These dimensions include (1) having access to a range of appropriate therapies to support individual journeys, (2) care that focuses on one's overall well-being, (3) control over cancer management, and (4) developing healing relationships with care providers. Although practitioners may not be able to create transformative experiences for patients, they may be able to establish and maintain conditions that support this process.

  17. Experiences of aromatherapy massage among adult female cancer patients: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Ho, Simone S M; Kwong, Alice N L; Wan, Karen W S; Ho, Rosita M L; Chow, Ka Ming

    2017-03-02

    To explore the experiences towards aromatherapy massage use, and to examine the perceived benefits and adverse effects of aromatherapy massage among adult female cancer patients. A qualitative research design was used. Fifteen women with cancer were recruited for semi-structured interviews. Sample recruitment was undertaken through cancer self-help groups and referrals of a private aromatherapy clinic by convenience sampling. The interview data were analysed by thematic analysis. All participants had a positive experience towards aromatherapy massage. The perceived benefits of aromatherapy massage included physical and psychological dimensions: overall comfort, relaxation, reduced pain, muscular tension, lymphoedema and numbness, improved sleep, energy level, appetite and mood. Interestingly, a few participants reported that aromatherapy massage helped to enhance self-acceptance and coping with their altered torso. No adverse effects were reported. The findings focused on four main themes that emerged: (i) an immediate effect that brings all-round comfort and reconnection to daily life; (ii) a pleasurable moment to forget the disease with aroma as a booster; (iii) a pampering experience of being cared for with a sense of dignity preserved; and (iv) communicating with the failing body. This study contributed by providing a better understanding in aromatherapy massage from female cancer patients' perspective which adds to the existing body of knowledge. The implications for nursing practice, education and future research were suggested. Aromatherapy massage seems to have both physical and psychological benefits for women with cancer. The findings elucidated a wide range of benefits that are perceived in such complex intervention, and the contextual factors that may influence these perceived benefits. This will inform future nurse-led quantitative research in the clinical setting. The study highlights the importance of touch towards a caring relationship and the

  18. Experiences of gynecological cancer patients receiving care from specialist nurses: a qualitative systematic review.

    PubMed

    Cook, Olivia; McIntyre, Meredith; Recoche, Katrina; Lee, Susan

    2017-08-01

    The care needs of women with gynecological cancer are complex and change over the course of their cancer journey. Specialist nurses are well positioned to play a role in meeting the needs of women with gynecological cancer although their role and scope of practice have not been well defined. As patients are a key stakeholder, understanding their experience of care is an important step in better defining the role and scope of practice of specialist nurses in gynecological oncology in Australia and New Zealand. This review sought to consider gynecological cancer patients' experiences of specialist nursing care. Exploring the patient's experience of care by a specialist nurse is one step in the process of better defining the role and scope of practice of specialist gynecological-oncology nurses in Australia and New Zealand. This review included studies with a focus on women with gynecological cancer who had been cared for by a specialist nurse. Studies of women with gynecological cancer at any point on the continuum of care from pre-diagnosis to survivorship or end of life, including those with a recurrence of the disease, were included, with no limit to the duration of care received for inclusion in the review. Studies that explored how women with gynecological cancer experience the care and interventions of specialist nurses were included. Qualitative studies including, but not limited to, designs such as phenomenology, grounded theory, ethnography, action research and feminist research were considered for review. This review also considered the qualitative components of mixed method studies. Research conducted in any country was considered for inclusion in this review providing that the study was reported in English. Studies conducted in any setting including, but not limited to, acute hospitals, outpatient/ambulatory clinics, chemotherapy or radiotherapy units, support groups, palliative care units or the patient's home were included. A three-step search strategy

  19. Palliative care experiences of adult cancer patients from ethnocultural groups: a qualitative systematic review protocol.

    PubMed

    Busolo, David; Woodgate, Roberta

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this review is to synthesize the best available evidence on palliative care experiences of adult cancer patients from ethnocultural groups.More specifically, this systematic review seeks to answer the following questions:1. What are the palliative care experiences of adult cancer patients from diverse ethnocultural groups?2. What meanings do adult patients with cancer from diverse ethnocultural groups assign to their experiences with palliative care? Globally, over 20.4 million people need palliative care services annually. The majority of these people (19 million) are adults, with 34% of them being patients diagnosed with cancer. With the current increase in the aging population, especially in developed countries, the number of adults requiring palliative care is expected to rise. Furthermore, how palliative care is offered and received continues to be shaped by culture and ethnicity. Likewise, culture and ethnicity influence how palliative care patients experience diseases like cancer, and seek and utilize palliative care services. Also, healthcare providers sometimes find it challenging to address the palliative care needs of patients from different ethnocultural groups. Sometimes these challenges are believed to be due to cultural incompetence of the care provider. When palliative care patients and their providers differ in their perception of care needs and how to address them, negative palliative care experiences are likely to ensue. Therefore, as the demand for palliative care increases, and ethnocultural factors continue to affect palliation, it is important to gain a better understanding of palliative care experiences of patients from different ethnocultural groups.The terms culture and ethnicity have been defined and used differently in literature which sometimes lead to confusion. Ethnicity has been defined as distinctive shared origins or social backgrounds and traditions of a group of people that are maintained between generations and

  20. Concerns About Cancer Risk and Experiences With Genetic Testing in a Diverse Population of Patients With Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jagsi, Reshma; Griffith, Kent A.; Kurian, Allison W.; Morrow, Monica; Hamilton, Ann S.; Graff, John J.; Katz, Steven J.; Hawley, Sarah T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate preferences for and experiences with genetic testing in a diverse cohort of patients with breast cancer identified through population-based registries, with attention to differences by race/ethnicity. Methods We surveyed women diagnosed with nonmetastatic breast cancer from 2005 to 2007, as reported to the SEER registries of metropolitan Los Angeles and Detroit, about experiences with hereditary risk evaluation. Multivariable models evaluated correlates of a strong desire for genetic testing, unmet need for discussion with a health care professional, and receipt of testing. Results Among 1,536 patients who completed the survey, 35% expressed strong desire for genetic testing, 28% reported discussing testing with a health care professional, and 19% reported test receipt. Strong desire for testing was more common in younger women, Latinas, and those with family history. Minority patients were significantly more likely to have unmet need for discussion (failure to discuss genetic testing with a health professional when they had a strong desire for testing): odds ratios of 1.68, 2.44, and 7.39 for blacks, English-speaking Latinas, and Spanish-speaking Latinas compared with whites, respectively. Worry in the long-term survivorship period was higher among those with unmet need for discussion (48.7% v 24.9%; P <.001). Patients who received genetic testing were younger, less likely to be black, and more likely to have a family cancer history. Conclusion Many patients, especially minorities, express a strong desire for genetic testing and may benefit from discussion to clarify risks. Clinicians should discuss genetic risk even with patients they perceive to be at low risk, as this may reduce worry. PMID:25847940

  1. [An experience providing terminal care based on Watson's theory to a cancer patient who lived alone].

    PubMed

    Huang, Mei-Tuan; Juang, Chueg-Mih; Yai, Ching-Yi; Chiou, Yen-Gan

    2007-04-01

    This article presents the case of a terminal stage cancer patient who lived alone and had a detached relationship with his family, and negative behaviors such as: depression, passivity, silence, refusal of treatment, and inability to trust others because of lack of family care during hospitalization. We cared for the patient with direct personal nursing care, using skillful physical evaluation, conversation and close observation from June 11, 2004, to July 11, 2004. Using Watson's theory, we successfully instilled trust in the patient and developed a positive relationship with him. We took care of his needs in a timely manner, used physical care to make him feel comfortable, showed concern about what he was really feeling, provided him with medical information, and helped him to manage his physiological, psychological, social, and spiritual problems. We enabled the patient to face his disease, in the hope that he would experience the end of his life peacefully under our warm and professional nursing care.

  2. The experiences of patients with ascites secondary to cancer: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Day, Rebecca; Mitchell, Theresa; Keen, Alison; Perkins, Paul

    2013-09-01

    Ascites secondary to cancer has a dramatic effect on all aspects of patients' lives. Healthcare professional surveys have shown that there is considerable variation in the management of ascites. To explore patients' experiences of living with ascites and its management. Qualitative research study using digitally recorded semi-structured interviews. Twelve adult patients with ascites who, between them, had undergone 47 paracentesis procedures in hospitals and/or specialist palliative care units in Southern England. Symptoms were pain, discomfort and effects on appetite, digestion, breathing and mobility. All participants had experienced paracentesis in hospital or a specialist palliative care unit, and these experiences differed. They had views on what constituted a good procedure: setting, competence and pain control. They reported rapid improvement of symptoms after paracentesis. While some did not like the idea of a semi-permanent drain, those with them appreciated the convenience and not having to wait for repeated admissions or the recurrence of symptoms. The interval between ascitic taps was seen as a useful guide as to when a semi-permanent drain should be offered. Participants had mixed views on participation in a hypothetical randomised controlled trial of repeated ascitic taps versus semi-permanent drains. Patients' experiences of ascites management are variable and could be improved. These experiences can inform healthcare professionals. They have views on when semi-permanent drains should be offered and future research.

  3. Primary care patient experience and cancer screening uptake among women: an exploratory cross-sectional study in a Japanese population.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Takuya; Inoue, Machiko

    2017-01-01

    Patient experience and clinical quality, which are represented by preventive care measures such as cancer screening, are both widely used for the evaluation of primary care quality. The aim of this study was to examine the association between patient experience and cancer screening uptake among women in a Japanese population. We conducted a cross-sectional mail survey. The questionnaire was sent to 1000 adult female residents randomly selected from a basic resident register in Yugawara town, Kanagawa, Japan. We assessed patient experience of primary care using a Japanese version of Primary Care Assessment Tool (JPCAT) and uptake of breast and cervical cancer screening. The overall response rate was 46.5%. Data were analyzed for 190 female participants aged 21-74 years who had a usual source of primary care. Multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed that the JPCAT total score was significantly associated with uptake of breast cancer screening [odds ratio (OR) per 1 standard deviation increase = 1.63; 95% CI 1.11-2.41], but not with uptake of cervical cancer screening (OR per 1 standard deviation increase = 1.47; 95% CI 0.97-2.24). Patient experience of primary care was associated with uptake of breast cancer screening among Japanese women. The results of our study might support the argument that patient experience of primary care and the clinical process of preventive care, such as breast cancer screening, are linked.

  4. Treatment of rectal cancer by transanal endoscopic microsurgery: Experience with 425 patients

    PubMed Central

    Guerrieri, Mario; Gesuita, Rosaria; Ghiselli, Roberto; Lezoche, Giovanni; Budassi, Andrea; Baldarelli, Maddalena

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To describe our experience in treating rectal cancer by transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM), report morbidity and mortality and oncological outcome. METHODS: A total of 425 patients with rectal cancer (120 T1, 185 T2, 120 T3 lesions) were staged by digital rectal examination, rectoscopy, transanal endosonography, magnetic resonance imaging and/or computed tomography. Patients with T1-N0 lesions and favourable histological features underwent TEM immediately. Patients with preoperative stage T2-T3-N0 underwent preoperative high-dose radiotherapy; from 1997 those aged less than 70 years and in good general health also underwent preoperative chemotherapy. Patients with T2-T3-N0 lesions were restaged 30 d after radiotherapy and were then operated on 40-50 d after neoadjuvant therapy. The instrumentation designed by Buess was used for all procedures. RESULTS: There were neither perioperative mortality nor intraoperative complications. Conversion to other surgical procedures was never required. Major complications (urethral lesions, perianal or retroperitoneal phlegmon and rectovaginal fistula) occurred in six (1.4%) patients and minor complications (partial suture line dehiscence, stool incontinence and rectal haemorrhage) in 42 (9.9%). Postoperative pain was minimal. Definitive histological examination of the 425 malignant lesions showed 80 (18.8%) pT0, 153 (36%) pT1, 151 (35.5%) pT2, and 41 (9.6%) pT3 lesions. Eighteen (4.2%) patients (ten pT2 and eight pT3) had a local recurrence and 16 (3.8%) had distant metastasis. Cancer-specific survival rates at the end of follow-up were 100% for pT1 patients (253 mo), 93% for pT2 patients (255 mo) and 89% for pT3 patients (239 mo). CONCLUSION: TEM is a safe and effective procedure to treat rectal cancer in selected patients without evidence of nodal involvement. T2-T3 lesions require preoperative neoadjuvant therapy. PMID:25071352

  5. Experience with prognostic disclosure of families of Japanese patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Saran; Hirai, Kei; Morita, Tatsuya; Shiozaki, Mariko; Miyashita, Mitsunori; Sato, Kazuki; Tsuneto, Satoru; Shima, Yasuo

    2011-03-01

    Prognosis is difficult to discuss with patients who have advanced cancer and their families. This study aimed to explore the experiences of families of patients with cancer in Japan in receiving prognostic disclosure, explore family perception of the way the prognosis was communicated, and investigate relevant factors of family-perceived need for improvement. A multicenter questionnaire survey was conducted with 666 bereaved family members of patients with cancer who were admitted to palliative care units in Japan. In total, 86.3% of the families received prognostic disclosure. The overall evaluation revealed that 60.1% of the participants felt that the method of prognostic disclosure needed some, considerable, or much improvement. The parameter with the highest value explaining the necessity for improvement was the family perception that the amount of information provided by the physician was insufficient (beta=0.39, P<0.001). Furthermore, the family perception that they had lost hope and that health care providers failed to facilitate preparation for the patient's death had significant direct effects on the necessity for improvement (beta=0.21, P<0.001; and beta=0.18, P<0.001, respectively). The feelings for the necessity for improvement also were affected significantly by seven communication strategies (i.e., not saying "I can do nothing for the patient any longer," pacing explanation with the state of the patient's and family's preparation, saying "We will respect the patient's wishes," making an effort to understand the family's distress, being knowledgeable about the most advanced treatments, assuring continuing responsibility as the physician for medical care, and respecting the family's values). This model suggests that strategies for care providers to improve family perception about prognostic disclosure should include 1) providing as much prognostic information as families want; 2) supporting families' hopes by keeping up with up-to-date treatments and by

  6. Cancer-related pain in older adults receiving palliative care: Patient and family caregiver perspectives on the experience of pain

    PubMed Central

    McPherson, Christine J; Hadjistavropoulos, Thomas; Lobchuk, Michelle M; Kilgour, Kelly N

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite an emphasis on pain management in palliative care, pain continues to be a common problem for individuals with advanced cancer. Many of those affected are older due to the disproportionate incidence of cancer in this age group. There remains little understanding of how older patients and their family caregivers perceive patients’ cancer-related pain, despite its significance for pain management in the home setting. OBJECTIVES: To explore and describe the cancer pain perceptions and experiences of older adults with advanced cancer and their family caregivers. METHODS: A qualitative descriptive approach was used to describe and interpret data collected from semistructured interviews with 18 patients (≥65 years of age) with advanced cancer receiving palliative care at home and their family caregivers. RESULTS: The main category ‘Experiencing cancer pain’ incorporated three themes. The theme ‘Feeling cancer pain’ included the sensory aspects of the pain, its origin and meanings attributed to the pain. A second theme, ‘Reacting to cancer pain’, included patients’ and family caregivers’ behavioural, cognitive (ie, attitudes, beliefs and control) and emotional responses to the pain. A third theme, ‘Living with cancer pain’ incorporated individual and social-relational changes that resulted from living with cancer pain. CONCLUSIONS: The findings provide an awareness of cancer pain experienced by older patients and their family caregivers within the wider context of ongoing relationships, increased patient morbidity and other losses common in the aged. PMID:23957019

  7. Pregnancy in cancer patients and survivors; experience of a university hospital in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Alıcı Davutoğlu, Ebru; Madazlı, Riza; Yılmaz, Nevin; Ozel, Ayşegül; Uludag, Sezin; Sozen, Işık

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the obstetrical and neonatal outcomes of pregnancies in cancer patients and survivors. A retrospective analysis of 68 pregnancies with a history of cancer and 31 newly diagnosed pregnant cancer patients were included in the study. The mean birth weight and the mean gestational age at delivery were significantly lower in the pregnant cancer patients (p < .001). The incidences of delivery less than 34 weeks were 8.8% and 29.1% in the cancer survivors and cancer diagnosed during pregnancy groups respectively (p < .01). In 23 (76.4%) pregnant cancer patients, a single or a combination of treatment modalities was initiated. There were four (12.9%) maternal deaths in pregnant cancer patients. There were no early neonatal death and any congenital anomaly detected in the newborns. Pregnancy in cancer patients and cancer survivors has completely different clinical outcome. Pregnancy in cancer patients has increased the risk of pregnancy complication.

  8. Exploring experiences of cancer care in Wales: a thematic analysis of free-text responses to the 2013 Wales Cancer Patient Experience Survey (WCPES).

    PubMed

    Bracher, Michael; Corner, Dame Jessica; Wagland, Richard

    2016-09-02

    To provide the first systematic analysis of a national (Wales) sample of free-text comments from patients with cancer, to determine emerging themes and insights regarding experiences of cancer care in Wales. Thematic analysis of free-text data from a population-based survey. Adult patients with a confirmed cancer diagnosis treated within a 3-month period during 2012 in the 7 health boards and 1 trust providing cancer care in Wales. Free-text categorised by theme, coded as positive or negative, with ratios. Overarching themes are identified incorporating comment categories. 4672 respondents (of n=7352 survey respondents) provided free-text comments. Data were coded using a multistage approach: (1) coding of comments into general categories (eg, nursing, surgery, etc), (2) coding of subcategories within main categories (eg, nursing care, nursing communication, etc), (3) cross-sectional analysis to identify themes cutting across categories, (4) mapping of categories/subcategories to corresponding closed questions in the Wales Cancer Patient Experience Survey (WCPES) data for comparison. Most free-text respondents (82%, n 3818) provided positive comments about their cancer care, with 49% (n=2313) giving a negative comment (ratio 0.6:1, negative-to-positive). 3172 respondents (67.9% of free-text respondents) provided a comment mapping to 1 of 4 overarching themes: communication (n=1673, 35.8% free-text respondents, a ratio of 1.0:1); waiting during the treatment and/or post-treatment phase (n=923, 19.8%, ratio 1.5:1); staffing and resource levels (n=671, 14.4% ratio 5.3:1); speed and quality of diagnostic care (n=374, 8.0%, ratio 1.5:1). Within these areas, constituent subthemes are discussed. This study presents specific areas of concern for patients with cancer, and reveals a number of themes present across the cancer journey. While the majority of comments were positive, analysis reveals concerns shared by significant numbers of respondents. Timely communication can

  9. Exploring experiences of cancer care in Wales: a thematic analysis of free-text responses to the 2013 Wales Cancer Patient Experience Survey (WCPES)

    PubMed Central

    Bracher, Michael; Corner, Dame Jessica; Wagland, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To provide the first systematic analysis of a national (Wales) sample of free-text comments from patients with cancer, to determine emerging themes and insights regarding experiences of cancer care in Wales. Design Thematic analysis of free-text data from a population-based survey. Setting and participants Adult patients with a confirmed cancer diagnosis treated within a 3-month period during 2012 in the 7 health boards and 1 trust providing cancer care in Wales. Main outcome measures Free-text categorised by theme, coded as positive or negative, with ratios. Overarching themes are identified incorporating comment categories. Methods 4672 respondents (of n=7352 survey respondents) provided free-text comments. Data were coded using a multistage approach: (1) coding of comments into general categories (eg, nursing, surgery, etc), (2) coding of subcategories within main categories (eg, nursing care, nursing communication, etc), (3) cross-sectional analysis to identify themes cutting across categories, (4) mapping of categories/subcategories to corresponding closed questions in the Wales Cancer Patient Experience Survey (WCPES) data for comparison. Results Most free-text respondents (82%, n 3818) provided positive comments about their cancer care, with 49% (n=2313) giving a negative comment (ratio 0.6:1, negative-to-positive). 3172 respondents (67.9% of free-text respondents) provided a comment mapping to 1 of 4 overarching themes: communication (n=1673, 35.8% free-text respondents, a ratio of 1.0:1); waiting during the treatment and/or post-treatment phase (n=923, 19.8%, ratio 1.5:1); staffing and resource levels (n=671, 14.4% ratio 5.3:1); speed and quality of diagnostic care (n=374, 8.0%, ratio 1.5:1). Within these areas, constituent subthemes are discussed. Conclusions This study presents specific areas of concern for patients with cancer, and reveals a number of themes present across the cancer journey. While the majority of comments were positive

  10. Patient experience in the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: state of the science

    PubMed Central

    Nussbaum, N; George, D J; Abernethy, A P; Dolan, C M; Oestreicher, N; Flanders, S; Dorff, T B

    2016-01-01

    Background: Contemporary therapies for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) have shown survival improvements, which do not account for patient experience and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Methods: This literature review included a search of MEDLINE for randomized clinical trials enrolling ⩾50 patients with mCRPC and reporting on patient-reported outcomes (PROs) since 2010. Results: Nineteen of 25 publications describing seven treatment regimens (10 clinical trials and nine associated secondary analyses) met the inclusion criteria and were critically appraised. The most commonly used measures were the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Prostate (n=5 trials) and Brief Pain Inventory Short Form (n=4 trials) questionnaires. The published data indicated that HRQoL and pain status augmented the clinical efficacy data by providing a better understanding of treatment impact in mCRPC. Abiraterone acetate and prednisone, enzalutamide, radium-223 dichloride and sipuleucel-T offered varying levels of HRQoL benefit and/or pain mitigation versus their respective comparators, whereas three treatments (mitoxantrone, estramustine phosphate and docetaxel, and cabazitaxel) had no meaningful impact on HRQoL or pain. The main limitation of the data were that the PROs utilized were not developed for use in mCRPC patients and hence may not have comprehensively captured symptoms important to this population. Conclusions: Recently published randomized clinical trials of new agents for mCRPC have captured elements of the patient experience while on treatment. Further research is required to standardize methods for measuring, quantifying and reporting on HRQoL and pain in patients with mCRPC in the clinical practice setting. PMID:26832363

  11. Early clinical experience with volumetric modulated arc therapy in head and neck cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To report about early clinical experience in radiation treatment of head and neck cancer of different sites and histology by volumetric modulated arcs with the RapidArc technology. Methods During 2009, 45 patients were treated at Istituto Clinico Humanitas with RapidArc (28 males and 17 females, median age 65 years). Of these, 78% received concomitant chemotherapy. Thirty-six patients were treated as exclusive curative intent (group A), three as postoperative curative intent (group B) and six with sinonasal tumours (group C). Dose prescription was at Planning Target Volumes (PTV) with simultaneous integrated boost: 54.45Gy and 69.96Gy in 33 fractions (group A); 54.45Gy and 66Gy in 33 fractions (group B) and 55Gy in 25 fractions (group C). Results Concerning planning optimization strategies and constraints, as per PTV coverage, for all groups, D98% > 95% and V95% > 99%. As regards organs at risk, all planning objectives were respected, and this was correlated with observed acute toxicity rates. Only 28% of patients experienced G3 mucositis, 14% G3 dermitis 44% had G2 dysphagia. Nobody required feeding tubes to be placed during treatment. Acute toxicity is also related to chemotherapy. Two patients interrupted the course of radiotherapy because of a quick worsening of general clinical condition. Conclusions These preliminary results stated that volumetric modulated arc therapy in locally advanced head and neck cancers is feasible and effective, with acceptable toxicities. PMID:20950429

  12. Undergraduate nursing students caring for cancer patients: hermeneutic phenomenological insights of their experiences.

    PubMed

    Charalambous, Andreas; Kaite, Charis

    2013-02-15

    The care of patients suffering from cancer and especially those facing the death trajectory appears to be complex and demanding not only for student nurses but for professional nurses as well. The educational models often used in nursing require students to face challenging care scenarios, sometimes with minimal or no supervision and guidance. These "worst case scenarios" can be traumatic experiences that can leave the student hopeless and disappointed of themselves and in many cases can "scar" their subsequent professional career. The literature demonstrates that this can be the result of the students' ill-preparation to care for cancer patients and deal with death and dying. The purpose of this study was to interpret the students' experiences of coming face-to-face with cancer care during their clinical placements. This is a hermeneutic phenomenological study influenced by the ideas of the French Philosopher Paul Ricoeur. Based on this philosophical enquiry the interpretation process included three stages: 1) naïve reading, 2) structural analysis and 3) comprehensive understanding. Data were collected through reflective/narrative diaries from the 4th grade undergraduate (pre-registration) nursing students practicing at oncology, hematology, pediatric oncology departments and hospices. Diaries of twelve students met the inclusion criteria and were included in the interpretation process. The study took place during January and May 2011. The interpretation yielded the following themes: a) Being part of the center's life, b) Being sympathetic, c) Being confronted by others, d) Being self-reflective, e) Being trapped in the system, f) Being caring towards the family and g) Being better in clinical practice. The students emphasized the need for appropriate preparation both at a theoretical and at a clinical level, as to better confront situations involving death and dying as well as learning techniques for crisis management. The students perceived the importance of

  13. 75 FR 9913 - Request for Measures of Patient Experiences of Cancer Care

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-04

    ... Cancer Care AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, HHS. ACTION: Notice of request. SUMMARY... respondents to assess the care delivered by cancer care providers. AHRQ is seeking these items and measures from researchers, survey firms, cancer care providers, patient advocacy groups, individual...

  14. Experience of nursing support from the perspective of patients with cancer in mainland China.

    PubMed

    Song, Yongxia; Lv, Xiaoqing; Liu, Jingjing; Huang, Dan; Hong, Jingfang; Wang, Weili; Wang, Wenru

    2016-12-01

    This study was conducted to understand patients' experiences of nursing support, to identify gaps between patients' expected needs and the nursing support they received, and to explore reasons for such disparity. A qualitative study with a phenomenological approach was used. A purposive sample of 22 patients with different types of cancer was recruited and interviewed using semistructured guidelines. The data were analyzed using phenomenological analytic methods. Several needs regarding nursing support were expressed, including informational, psychological, clinical, care coordination and communication needs, and there were some unmet or partially-met needs. Reasons for the disparities covered both patient- and nurse-related factors, including patients' lack of awareness regarding how to acquire professional assistance and reluctance to express their needs, and nurses' lack of active communication with patients, inability to provide specific support, and limited resources for coordination. The expectations of nursing support did not always correspond with the actual delivery of nursing care. A tailored intervention is warranted to meet patients' expectations, which might contribute to quality-of-care improvements.

  15. Treatment outcome of nimotuzumab plus chemotherapy in advanced cancer patients: a single institute experience.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shuping; Ramos-Suzarte, Mayra; Bai, Xianhong; Xu, Binghe

    2016-05-31

    Nimotuzumab is a humanized anti-EGFR IgG1 monoclonal antibody and demonstrates a better safety profile than other anti-EGFR antibodies due to its intermediate affinity. Since it was approved in China for the treatment of nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC), it has been widely used in NPC and in many clinical trials for other cancer types. However, the optimal dose and administration frequency of nimotuzumab that should be used and which kind of cancer patients will be more benefited from nimotuzumab is still unknown. In this retrospective study, 205 advanced cancer patients with colorectal cancer, esophageal cancer, head and neck cancer, gastric cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, or other cancers from mainland China, treated with nimotuzumab in combination with chemotherapy, were enrolled. Over 60% of these patients received nimotuzumab > 6 doses and ≥ 400 mg/week as maintenance therapy. It was well tolerated in real-life patients. This report demonstrates that age, sex and previous treatment might be potential predictive factors for survival, and patients received nimotuzumab > 6 doses and > 200 mg/week might benefit more from nimotuzumab therapy. Using these factors for stratification analysis may form a predictive differential clinical strategy for nimotuzumab to maximize the benefit in patients with different epithelial tumors.

  16. Treatment outcome of nimotuzumab plus chemotherapy in advanced cancer patients: a single institute experience

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shuping; Ramos-Suzarte, Mayra; Bai, Xianhong; Xu, Binghe

    2016-01-01

    Nimotuzumab is a humanized anti-EGFR IgG1 monoclonal antibody and demonstrates a better safety profile than other anti-EGFR antibodies due to its intermediate affinity. Since it was approved in China for the treatment of nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC), it has been widely used in NPC and in many clinical trials for other cancer types. However, the optimal dose and administration frequency of nimotuzumab that should be used and which kind of cancer patients will be more benefited from nimotuzumab is still unknown. In this retrospective study, 205 advanced cancer patients with colorectal cancer, esophageal cancer, head and neck cancer, gastric cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, or other cancers from mainland China, treated with nimotuzumab in combination with chemotherapy, were enrolled. Over 60% of these patients received nimotuzumab > 6 doses and ≥ 400 mg/week as maintenance therapy. It was well tolerated in real-life patients. This report demonstrates that age, sex and previous treatment might be potential predictive factors for survival, and patients received nimotuzumab > 6 doses and > 200 mg/week might benefit more from nimotuzumab therapy. Using these factors for stratification analysis may form a predictive differential clinical strategy for nimotuzumab to maximize the benefit in patients with different epithelial tumors. PMID:27050148

  17. The experience of a sore mouth and associated symptoms in patients with cancer receiving outpatient chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Brown, Carlton G; McGuire, Deborah B; Peterson, Douglas E; Beck, Susan L; Dudley, William N; Mooney, Kathleen H

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to describe sore mouth (SM) severity and distress, associated symptoms, and consequences in cancer chemotherapy outpatients. Secondary analysis was used in this study. A total of 223 patients in 4 treatment centers participated in the study. Data from an intervention study using a computer-based telephone communication system to assess patients' daily symptom experience were analyzed to obtain highest, average, and lowest ratings of severity and distress for SM, fatigue, trouble sleeping, feeling down/blue, and feeling anxious. Consequence data included oral intake, time spent lying down, ability to work, and daily activity. Approximately 51% reported SM, with a mean highest, average, and lowest severity score of 3.1 in cycle 2 and 3.09 in cycle 3. Sore mouth severity was correlated with severity of fatigue, feeling down/blue, feeling anxious, and trouble sleeping. Sore mouth distress was correlated with the same symptoms. Sore mouth severity was correlated with the number of 8-oz glasses of liquid consumed, effect on daily activity, time spent lying down, but not with ability to work. Half of patients experienced SM, which was associated with several other symptoms and led to specific consequences. Understanding the complex symptom experience of patients with SM, including consequences, will assist nurses in developing more comprehensive clinical assessments and interventions. In addition, the association of multiple symptoms with SM will provide a foundation for further research investigation in oral mucositis.

  18. Living with cancer: a qualitative report of the experiences of leukaemia patients in Lagos, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Adejoh, Samuel Ojima; Temilola, Olusegun Moses; Olayiwola, Bolutife

    2013-12-01

    The study examined the qualitative, cognitive and psychosocial experiences of those living with leukaemia undergoing treatment at a teaching hospital. Twenty respondents who consented to participate were purposively selected from the cancer patients with leukaemia receiving treatment in the said teaching hospital. The in-depth interview method was used to collect data. The data was analysed using manual content analysis. Data showed that patients lack basic knowledge about leukaemia and had no beliefs regarding leukaemia. Some patients believed in God and a medical breakthrough for a cure, while for some, the hope of living was not certain. The ill-health condition had brought about financial predicament to both patients and family members and has limited their productivity in terms of income-generating activities. Good interpersonal relationships and support from their care providers aided their compliance to treatment regime and provided hope for living positively with their condition. The study concludes that there is a need to educate the patients on the causes of their condition. Financial supports should be rendered to those living with leukaemia, while health care providers should be encouraged to continue to maintain good interpersonal relationships with their patients.

  19. Experience with perioperative pirfenidone for lung cancer surgery in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Takekazu; Yoshida, Shigetoshi; Nagato, Kaoru; Nakajima, Takahiro; Suzuki, Hidemi; Tagawa, Tetsuzo; Mizobuchi, Teruaki; Ota, Satoshi; Nakatani, Yukio; Yoshino, Ichiro

    2015-10-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive diffuse lung disease associated with an increased risk of lung cancer. Patients with IPF sometimes develop a life-threatening acute exacerbation of IPF (AE-IPF) after lung cancer surgery. In this retrospective study, pirfenidone, an antifibrotic agent, was perioperatively administered to IPF patients with lung cancer with the aim of preventing postoperative AE-IPF, and the feasibility and clinical outcomes were investigated. Twelve IPF patients with concomitant lung cancer who received perioperative pirfenidone treatment (PPT) for lung cancer surgery were retrospectively investigated. Sixteen IPF patients undergoing lung cancer surgery without PPT were analyzed as historical controls. Compared to the controls, the PPT patients had a more severely impaired preoperative pulmonary function and a larger number of limited pulmonary resections. There was a significant preoperative decrease in the serum KL-6 levels of the PPT patients. No severe pirfenidone-related complications or IPF-related events occurred in the PPT patients, while six control patients developed AE-IPF (P = 0.0167). A quantitative histopathological evaluation of resected lung specimens found that tissue changes associated with IPF were significantly fewer in the PPT patients (P = 0.021). PPT is a feasible perioperative treatment for IPF patients with lung cancer. Its effectiveness in preventing postoperative AE-IPF thus warrants prospective verification.

  20. Family Physician Involvement in Cancer Care Follow-up: The Experience of a Cohort of Patients With Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aubin, Michèle; Vézina, Lucie; Verreault, René; Fillion, Lise; Hudon, Éveline; Lehmann, François; Leduc, Yvan; Bergeron, Rénald; Reinharz, Daniel; Morin, Diane

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE There has been little research describing the involvement of family physicians in the follow-up of patients with cancer, especially during the primary treatment phase. We undertook a prospective longitudinal study of patients with lung cancer to assess their family physician’s involvement in their follow-up at the different phases of cancer. METHODS In 5 hospitals in the province of Quebec, Canada, patients with a recent diagnosis of lung cancer were surveyed every 3 to 6 months, whether they had metastasis or not, for a maximum of 18 months, to assess aspects of their family physician’s involvement in cancer care. RESULTS Of the 395 participating patients, 92% had a regular family physician but only 60% had been referred to a specialist by him/her or a colleague for the diagnosis of their lung cancer. A majority of patients identified the oncology team or oncologists as mainly responsible for their cancer care throughout their cancer journey, except at the advanced phase, where a majority attributed this role to their family physician. At baseline, only 16% of patients perceived a shared care pattern between their family physician and oncologists, but this proportion increased with cancer progression. Most patients would have liked their family physician to be more involved in all aspects of cancer care. CONCLUSIONS Although patients perceive that the oncology team is the main party responsible for the follow-up of their lung cancer, they also wish their family physicians to be involved. Better communication and collaboration between family physicians and the oncology team are needed to facilitate shared care in cancer follow-up. PMID:21060123

  1. Experiences of patients requiring strong opioid drugs for chronic non-cancer pain: a patient-initiated study

    PubMed Central

    Blake, Sue; Ruel, Brian; Seamark, Clare; Seamark, David

    2007-01-01

    Background Chronic non-cancer pain is an increasing problem in health care. This study was initiated by a patient wanting to discover more about the experiences of other patients requiring strong opioid analgesia for such pain. Aim To determine the attitudes and experiences of patients receiving long-term strong opioid medication for chronic non-cancer pain in primary care. Design of study Qualitative study using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Setting A semi-rural general practice in southwest England. Method The study data came from a focus group and 10 individual patient interviews. A patient researcher was involved in the design, conduct, and analysis of the project. Results The impact of pain affected participants in every aspect of their daily lives. Attitudes to strong opioid medication were both positive and negative. Concerns about starting medication usually centred on fears of addiction, being seen as an addict, or that the patients may have a more serious condition than they had previously thought. However, these fears were tempered by an appreciation of the benefits that strong opioids brought in terms of pain relief and consequent gains in a nearer-to-normal existence. The data did not produce any evidence of addictive behaviour or of tolerance despite these initial fears. Patients adopted a trade off approach, balancing pain relief with medication side effects, accepting more pain for a reduction in sedation and nausea. All patients described coping strategies they developed themselves and learned from outside influences, such as pain clinic courses and support from the GP. There was realism that total pain relief was not possible, but that a balance could be struck. Conclusion Chronic non-cancer pain is associated with high levels of distress and psychosocial impairment. Patients in this study appreciated the benefits of strong opioid medication, having come to terms with fears of addiction and learned coping strategies. These findings

  2. Gender as a Context for Interpreting the Self-Directed Learning Experiences of Prostate and Breast Cancer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rager, Kathleen B.

    2007-01-01

    This article reports the findings from a secondary analysis of the data from two qualitative studies conducted by the researcher regarding the self-directed learning experiences of prostate and breast cancer patients. Of interest were possible differences in the descriptions of the participants' experiences that appear to relate to gender.…

  3. Gender as a Context for Interpreting the Self-Directed Learning Experiences of Prostate and Breast Cancer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rager, Kathleen B.

    2007-01-01

    This article reports the findings from a secondary analysis of the data from two qualitative studies conducted by the researcher regarding the self-directed learning experiences of prostate and breast cancer patients. Of interest were possible differences in the descriptions of the participants' experiences that appear to relate to gender.…

  4. Exploring the experience of an enhanced recovery programme for gynaecological cancer patients: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Perioperative enhanced recovery programmes (ERPs), identified as initiatives that improve care and save money, have been adopted by NHS Improvement and are currently being rolled out across many surgical departments within the NHS. To date, five papers have specifically explored patients’ experiences of ERPs; none, however, has explored the gynaecological cancer patient experience. Methods In total, 14 women (mean age, 66 years) participated in an audio-recorded face-to-face or telephone interview in which they discussed their experience of taking part in an ERP. The resulting data were transcribed verbatim and analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Results Two main themes emerged from the analysis. The first, ‘Taking part in the programme’, highlights two important aspects of the ERP: being given an opportunity to receive information and, following this, to build knowledge about the programme. The theme also explores the challenges associated with the programme, particularly around getting mobile and complying with its demands - the women report experiencing a constant battle between intuition and instruction. The second theme, ‘Home’, focuses on the role home plays in motivating the patients to aim for an early discharge from hospital. Patients describe their need to return to a suitable home and the need for support from others. They also discuss the importance of the follow-up phone call. Conclusion Overall, the patients in this study positively assessed the individual aspects of the ERP, in particular, information resources, the availability of the physiotherapist and the delivery of follow-up phone calls. These findings highlight the importance of developing and maintaining individual aspects of ERPs over time, to ensure their sensitivity and responsiveness to patient needs. PMID:24708824

  5. Lessons Learned from the Initial 100 Patient Experience with Sentinel Lymph Node Mapping in the Evaluation of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fuhrman, George M.; Burch, Ernest G.; Farr, Gist H.; King, Tari A.; Farkas, Emily; Bolton, John S.

    2000-01-01

    The initial reports of sentinel lymph node mapping for breast cancer currently appearing in the surgical literature are demonstrating the practicality and accuracy of the technique to evaluate patients for axillary nodal disease. We reviewed our initial 100 patient experience with sentinel node mapping to evaluate our ability to employ this technique in breast cancer patients. We combined a peritumoral injection of a radioactive substance and blue dye. Each sentinel node was evaluated with frozen section analysis, hematoxylin and eosin staining, and, if still negative, five re-cuts were taken from deeper levels of the node and evaluated for immunohistochemical evidence of cytokeratin staining. Sentinel node(s) were identified in all but two patients with 51% demonstrating metastasis. We have demonstrated the ability to accurately perform sentinel node mapping in the evaluation of our breast cancer patients. This exciting advance should become a standard part of breast cancer surgery. PMID:21765657

  6. Integrating cancer survivors' experiences into UK cancer registries: design and development of the ePOCS system (electronic Patient-reported Outcomes from Cancer Survivors)

    PubMed Central

    Ashley, L; Jones, H; Thomas, J; Forman, D; Newsham, A; Morris, E; Johnson, O; Velikova, G; Wright, P

    2011-01-01

    Background: Understanding the psychosocial challenges of cancer survivorship, and identifying which patients experience ongoing difficulties, is a key priority. The ePOCS (electronic patient-reported outcomes from cancer survivors) project aims to develop and evaluate a cost-efficient, UK-scalable electronic system for collecting patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs), at regular post-diagnostic timepoints, and linking these with clinical data in cancer registries. Methods: A multidisciplinary team developed the system using agile methods. Design entailed process mapping the system's constituent parts, data flows and involved human activities, and undertaking usability testing. Informatics specialists built new technical components, including a web-based questionnaire tool and tracking database, and established component-connecting data flows. Development challenges were overcome, including patient usability and data linkage and security. Results: We have developed a system in which PROMs are completed online, using a secure questionnaire administration tool, accessed via a public-facing website, and the responses are linked and stored with clinical registry data. Patient monitoring and communications are semiautomated via a tracker database, and patient correspondence is primarily Email-based. The system is currently honed for clinician-led hospital-based patient recruitment. Conclusions: A feasibility test study is underway. Although there are possible challenges to sustaining and scaling up ePOCS, the system has potential to support UK epidemiological PROMs collection and clinical data linkage. PMID:22048035

  7. "What Made Me Unhappy". Experiences of, and Responses to, Lifestyle Changes in Breast Cancer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bitsika, Vicki; Sharpley, Christopher F.; Christie, David R. H.

    2010-01-01

    Sixteen breast cancer patients were interviewed about any lifestyle changes they had experienced and their reactions to those changes. Data were collected and analysed via content analysis and then summary tabulations of patient responses until replication of responses was verified across patients. Results indicated that most patients suffered a…

  8. "What Made Me Unhappy". Experiences of, and Responses to, Lifestyle Changes in Breast Cancer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bitsika, Vicki; Sharpley, Christopher F.; Christie, David R. H.

    2010-01-01

    Sixteen breast cancer patients were interviewed about any lifestyle changes they had experienced and their reactions to those changes. Data were collected and analysed via content analysis and then summary tabulations of patient responses until replication of responses was verified across patients. Results indicated that most patients suffered a…

  9. Parental Experiences with Chemotherapy-Induced Alopecia among Childhood Cancer Patients in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Gunawan, Stefanus; Broeke, Chloe Ten; Ven, Peter van de; Arnoldussen, Marijn; Kaspers, Gertjan; Mostert, Saskia

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed parental experiences with chemotherapy-induced alopecia among children with cancer treated at an Indonesian academic hospital. Fifty parents of childhood cancer patients were interviewed using semi-structured questionnaires. The moment that hair fell out was the moment that parents (84%) had to admit their child had cancer. Alopecia was a traumatizing painful experience (46%). Active strategies to hide alopecia, mainly hats, were used by 66% of children, while 34% never covered their bald head. If money had not been an issue, 40% would use another strategy. Alopecia made children limit outdoor daily activities (78%) and engagement with others (60%). Significantly more children from high-educated (95%) than low-educated (60%) parents received sympathy from other people (P=0.012). Significantly more Christian (29%) than Muslim (0%) families confirmed that alopecia lowered the quality of life (P=0.046). Most parents (82%) had no prior plans about alopecia management, yet for significantly more girls (26%) than boys (0%) such plans existed (P=0.044). Parents received most information about alopecia from other parents (66%). Parents (92%) needed more alopecia education from doctors. Of all school-attending children, 53% were bullied and 47% did not want to attend school due to alopecia. Significantly more high-educated than low-educated families received pity from teachers and pupils (94% vs. 0%, P=0.004), and acceptance by pupils (81% vs. 0%, P=0.021). Alopecia is a severe, far-stretching side-effect of chemotherapy with physical, psychological and social consequences for children and parents. Parents should be better informed about occurrence and impact of alopecia. Extra attention is required to facilitate children's return to school. Health- care providers should facilitate optimal supportive care through open dialogue and provision of educational materials for parents, children and their community.

  10. How the internet affects patients' experience of cancer: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Ziebland, Sue; Chapple, Alison; Dumelow, Carol; Evans, Julie; Prinjha, Suman; Rozmovits, Linda

    2004-03-06

    To explore how men and women with cancer talk about using the internet. Qualitative study using semistructured interviews collected by maximum variation sampling. Respondents recruited throughout the United Kingdom during 2001-2. 175 men and women aged 19-83 years, with one of five cancers (prostate, testicular, breast, cervical, or bowel) diagnosed since 1992 and selected to include different stages of treatment and follow up. Internet use, either directly or via friend or family, was widespread and reported by patients at all stages of cancer care, from early investigations to follow up after treatment. Patients used the internet to find second opinions, seek support and experiential information from other patients, interpret symptoms, seek information about tests and treatments, help interpret consultations, identify questions for doctors, make anonymous private inquiries, and raise awareness of the cancer. Patients also used it to check their doctors' advice covertly and to develop an expertise in their cancer. This expertise, reflecting familiarity with computer technology and medical terms, enabled patients to present a new type of "social fitness." Cancer patients used the internet for a wide range of information and support needs, many of which are unlikely to be met through conventional health care. Serious illness often undermines people's self image as a competent member of society. Cancer patients may use the internet to acquire expertise to display competence in the face of serious illness.

  11. Young adults’ experiences with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Miedema, Baukje (Bo); Easley, Julie; Hamilton, Ryan

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the experiences with cancer of adults diagnosed when between 20 and 35 years old. DESIGN Qualitative study using semistructured interviews. SETTING Largest health care region in the province of New Brunswick. PARTICIPANTS Six men and 9 women cancer patients and survivors. METHOD Fifteen adults interviewed when between the ages of 20 and 43 representing a variety of cancers and stages of disease were recruited for this study. Interviews were guided by a set of open-ended questions and explored participants’ experiences with cancer from initial presentation of symptoms through to survivorship issues. MAIN FINDINGS The most important clinical issue that emerged from the analysis was that participants’ youth appeared to contribute to delays in diagnosis of cancer. These delays were attributed to either patients’ or physicians’ inaction. Some patients attributed their initial cancer symptoms to the adverse effects of alcohol or excessive partying; others feared a bad diagnosis and delayed seeking help. Family physicians frequently interpreted nonspecific symptoms as resulting from patients’ lifestyle choices and were reluctant to consider a diagnosis of cancer. Several family physicians reportedly believed that persistent symptoms could not be the result of cancer because patients were too young. CONCLUSION Although cancer is relatively rare in young adults, family physicians need to include it in differential diagnoses. Both patients and physicians tend to minimize cancer symptoms in young adults. Delays in diagnosis might not affect health outcomes, but can cause distress to young adults with cancer. PMID:17279205

  12. Cancer patients' experiences of the early phase of individual counseling in an outpatient psycho-oncology setting.

    PubMed

    Nekolaichuk, Cheryl L; Turner, Jill; Collie, Kate; Cumming, Ceinwen; Stevenson, Audrey

    2013-05-01

    Distress is a common and substantive problem associated with the invasive nature of cancer. Psychosocial interventions can alleviate distress and enhance quality of life, with a wealth of research demonstrating benefits of group interventions. Less is known, however, about the value of individual psychological counseling for cancer patients. The goal of our study was to understand patients' experiences of attending an individual psycho-oncology counseling service in a comprehensive cancer center in Canada. We conducted six focus groups to ask patients about their perceived benefits of the early phase of counseling. The 23 participants were predominantly women living in urban areas who sought counseling for emotional and coping difficulties. Using inductive analysis, we identified four interrelated themes: distress and need for support, challenges to service access, service benefits, and the therapeutic encounter. The therapeutic encounter formed a core component of patients' experiences, highlighting the benefits of specific therapeutic interventions and processes.

  13. [Efectiveness of topical therapies in patients with breast cancer that experience radiodermatitis. A systematic review].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Castro, Mercedes; Martín-Gil, Belén

    2015-01-01

    After radiation therapy most patients experience acute skin toxicity to some degree. The purpose of this systematic review is to assess the available evidence concerning the effectivity of topical therapies on patients with breast cancer that experience radiodermatitis after radiotherapy. The review included clinical trials aimed to evaluate topical therapies for prevention or treatment of acute radiodermatitis in women with breast cancer, which were published between 2009 and 2014. The bibliographic search was carried out in the following databases: PubMed, Cinahl, Cochrane Plus, IBECS and LILACS. The studies were selected independently by peer reviewers using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme in its Spanish version. 86 bibliographical references were identified. Twenty full-text articles of clinical trials were assessed and two were excluded because they were not completed; 12 of clinical trials evaluated topical treatment with creams and ointments, three with corticosteroid creams and other three with dressings. The effectivity of human epidermal growth factor cream, linoleic acid emulsion, topical silver sulfadiazine, corticosteroids creams and polyurethane dressings has been shown in these clinical trials. Given that radiodermatitis is a dynamic process, these topical agents were effective in different stages of skin toxicity. Some of them delayed the onset, others decreased the development and severity of acute skin toxicity degree and others improved the subjective symptoms (itching, pain, burning). Only polyurethane dressings suggest effectiveness in all stages of skin toxicity, in prevention, management of the different skin toxicity degrees and improvement of wellbeing. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  14. Undergraduate nursing students caring for cancer patients: hermeneutic phenomenological insights of their experiences

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The care of patients suffering from cancer and especially those facing the death trajectory appears to be complex and demanding not only for student nurses but for professional nurses as well. The educational models often used in nursing require students to face challenging care scenarios, sometimes with minimal or no supervision and guidance. These “worst case scenarios” can be traumatic experiences that can leave the student hopeless and disappointed of themselves and in many cases can “scar” their subsequent professional career. The literature demonstrates that this can be the result of the students’ ill-preparation to care for cancer patients and deal with death and dying. The purpose of this study was to interpret the students’ experiences of coming face-to-face with cancer care during their clinical placements. Methods This is a hermeneutic phenomenological study influenced by the ideas of the French Philosopher Paul Ricoeur. Based on this philosophical enquiry the interpretation process included three stages: 1) naïve reading, 2) structural analysis and 3) comprehensive understanding. Data were collected through reflective/narrative diaries from the 4th grade undergraduate (pre-registration) nursing students practicing at oncology, hematology, pediatric oncology departments and hospices. Diaries of twelve students met the inclusion criteria and were included in the interpretation process. The study took place during January and May 2011. Results The interpretation yielded the following themes: a) Being part of the center’s life, b) Being sympathetic, c) Being confronted by others, d) Being self-reflective, e) Being trapped in the system, f) Being caring towards the family and g) Being better in clinical practice. Conclusions The students emphasized the need for appropriate preparation both at a theoretical and at a clinical level, as to better confront situations involving death and dying as well as learning techniques for crisis

  15. Exploring the views and experiences of HIV positive patients treated for cancer: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Hainsworth, Emma G; Shahmanesh, Maryam; Stevenson, Fiona

    2017-10-04

    A systematic review of the literature was conducted to find out what is known about patients' experiences of a dual diagnosis of HIV and cancer. We systematically searched the following databases; MEDLINE (Ovid Version); CINAHL Plus; PsycINFO and EMBASE from inception to June 2016 for studies that included patients with a dual diagnosis of cancer and HIV and focused on patient experiences. Studies with a focus on one illness rather than a dual diagnosis, those that focused on treatment strategies and medical management, epidemiology and pathology studies and comparison studies were all excluded. The full text of the included studies were reviewed. Information on location, sample size, study design and a narrative summary of findings were extracted using a standardised format. Studies were combined thematically. 1777 records were screened by title and abstract using the selection criteria described in the methods. Eight records were reviewed in depth in full text and seven selected as eligible. The selected studies suggest that a dual diagnosis of HIV and cancer has a powerful impact on individuals' behaviour. The experience of stigma was a consistent factor in all patient accounts and the strategy of selective disclosure to access support reveals how patient agency can interplay with stigma. This is an area largely unexplored in the published literature; further research into patients' experiences of a dual diagnosis of HIV and cancer will provide relevant knowledge in order to tailor and improve services.

  16. Own Experience in Treatment of Patients with Penile Cancer Using Photodynamic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Filonenko, Elena; Kaprin, Andrey; Alekseev, Boris; Urlova, Antonina

    2015-01-01

    Penile cancer is a rare pathology. For penile cancer surgical treatment, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and combined modality treatment are available. Because of great importance of this organ for mental condition of patient, the development of organ-preserving methods allowing to minimize impact on patient's quality of life without compromising of oncological results is desirable. In the Center of Laser and Photodynamic diagnosis and treatment of tumors in P.A. Herzen Moscow Cancer Research Institute the methods of photodynamic therapy in patients with penile cancer have been developed. From 2011 to 2013 the treatment was conducted in 11 patients with precancer and cancer of penile. The average age was 56.6. According to morphological diagnosis photodynamic therapy (PDT) was performed using two methods. One method included topical application of agent for PDT and the second intravenous administration of photosensitizer. For topical application alasens was used and for intravenous injection we applied radachlorine. All patients had no complications. Complete regression was achieved in 9 patients, and partial regression in 2. Thus, the results showed that photodynamic therapy for penile cancer stage Tis-1N0M0 permits performing organ-preserving treatment with satisfactory oncological results and no impairment of patient's quality of life. PMID:25834812

  17. Development and validation of the BRIGHTLIGHT Survey, a patient-reported experience measure for young people with cancer.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Rachel M; Fern, Lorna A; Solanki, Anita; Hooker, Louise; Carluccio, Anna; Pye, Julia; Jeans, David; Frere-Smith, Tom; Gibson, Faith; Barber, Julie; Raine, Rosalind; Stark, Dan; Feltbower, Richard; Pearce, Susie; Whelan, Jeremy S

    2015-07-28

    Patient experience is increasingly used as an indicator of high quality care in addition to more traditional clinical end-points. Surveys are generally accepted as appropriate methodology to capture patient experience. No validated patient experience surveys exist specifically for adolescents and young adults (AYA) aged 13-24 years at diagnosis with cancer. This paper describes early work undertaken to develop and validate a descriptive patient experience survey for AYA with cancer that encompasses both their cancer experience and age-related issues. We aimed to develop, with young people, an experience survey meaningful and relevant to AYA to be used in a longitudinal cohort study (BRIGHTLIGHT), ensuring high levels of acceptability to maximise study retention. A three-stage approach was employed: Stage 1 involved developing a conceptual framework, conducting literature/Internet searches and establishing content validity of the survey; Stage 2 confirmed the acceptability of methods of administration and consisted of four focus groups involving 11 young people (14-25 years), three parents and two siblings; and Stage 3 established survey comprehension through telephone-administered cognitive interviews with a convenience sample of 23 young people aged 14-24 years. Stage 1: Two-hundred and thirty eight questions were developed from qualitative reports of young people's cancer and treatment-related experience. Stage 2: The focus groups identified three core themes: (i) issues directly affecting young people, e.g. impact of treatment-related fatigue on ability to complete survey; (ii) issues relevant to the actual survey, e.g. ability to answer questions anonymously; (iii) administration issues, e.g. confusing format in some supporting documents. Stage 3: Cognitive interviews indicated high levels of comprehension requiring minor survey amendments. Collaborating with young people with cancer has enabled a survey of to be developed that is both meaningful to young

  18. The application of clinical variables and models to predict pulmonary embolism in cancer patients: a comprehensive single cancer center experience

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Asem; Ismael, Yousef; Abunasser, Mahmoud; Hammode, Emad; Turfa, Rim; Abdel-Razeq, Hikmat

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Prompt diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary embolism (PE) can help reduce its associated morbidity and mortality. Computed tomography chest angiography (CTA) scanning is the most widely used diagnostic modality. In noncancer patients, only 10% of such studies are positive for PE. Clinical variables, individual or in combination, that can predict test positivity are highly needed. Materials and methods All CTAs requested to confirm or exclude a diagnosis of PE in a single comprehensive cancer center were reviewed. In addition to the Wells score, other clinical variables known to increase the risk of PE were analyzed. Results A total of 778 adult cancer patients were treated at King Hussein Cancer Center (Amman, Jordan) and were included in this study; the majority of patients (64.2%) had stage 4 disease. Overall, 129 (16.6%) patients had positive scans for PE, while alternative diagnoses were made in 308 (39.6%) patients. Cancer stage and anticancer treatment had no impact on positive PE rates. However, Wells criteria classified patients into three risk groups with PE rates of 10.2%, 16.1%, and 62.5% among the patients with low, moderate, and high risk, respectively (P < 0.0001). Duration of cancer diagnosis (<12 months versus >12 months) had a significant impact on positive PE studies (22.0% versus 12.4%, respectively, P = 0.007). Conclusion The rate of positive PE studies in cancer patients is higher than previously reported in noncancer patients. Positivity for PE was higher during the first 12 months of cancer diagnosis and in those with high probability score according to the Wells criteria. Factors like primary tumor stage and anticancer therapy had no significant impact on PE-positive studies. PMID:24187488

  19. Surgical treatment of organising pneumonia mimicking lung cancer: experience of 27 patients.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chen-Tu; Chang, Yih-Leong; Chen, Wei-Chou; Lee, Yung-Chie

    2010-04-01

    Organising pneumonia as a localised process has sometimes been managed by surgery. This poorly defined entity has been mistaken clinically, roentgenographically and usually at exploratory thoracotomy for lung cancer. This series details our experiences with surgical resections in 27 patients during the past 13 years. Surgical lung resection was performed through wedge resection or lobectomy with or without video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery. Resected specimens were swabbed for aerobic and anaerobic bacterial, fungal and mycobacterial cultures. Clinical presentation, roentgenological examination, location and size of the tumourous lesions, pathological finding and treatment were investigated. The patients were between 41 and 80 years of age. Most of the patients (81.5%) presented with cough, haemoptysis and weight loss. The common radiographic findings were round or oval mass with occasionally air bronchogram. Thirteen patients underwent non-invasive biopsy without conclusive diagnosis. The tumour size ranged from 1.5 cm to 8.5 cm. The typically grossly involved area was sharply outlined, firm and extended to the pleura, which was invariably thickened. The microscopic pattern was also rather similar, with inflammation in various degrees of organisation, sometimes accompanied by necrotising changes in the bronchi. Viridans Streptococci and Neisseria spp. were identified as the aetiologic agents in 15 cases (55.6%). All patients had an excellent outcome. The usual investigative procedures for pulmonary mass were of little aid in establishing the differential diagnosis of organising pneumonia from neoplasm. Surgical resection should be considered in the absence of a positive diagnosis of a persistent pulmonary mass. Copyright (c) 2009 European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Patients' bowel symptom experiences and self-care strategies following sphincter-saving surgery for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Landers, Margaret; McCarthy, Geraldine; Livingstone, Vicki; Savage, Eileen

    2014-08-01

    To investigate patients' bowel symptom experiences and self-care strategies following sphincter-saving surgery for rectal cancer and the relationship between bowel symptom experiences and the self-care strategies used. Earlier diagnosis of rectal cancer allows for less invasive surgical treatments such as sphincter-saving procedures to be performed. Although a permanent stoma is generally not required, patients experience changes in bowel function following this surgery. However, limited research exists on patients' bowel symptom experiences and the self-care strategies used to manage symptoms following sphincter-saving surgery of rectal cancer. Quantitative descriptive correlational. A convenience sample of 143 patients aged 30 to over 70 years was used. Data were collected (April 2010-December 2010) using the Illness Perception Questionnaires, the Difficulties of Life Scale and a researcher developed Self-care Strategy Measure. The research was underpinned by the Symptom Management Theory. Relating to the four most effective self-care strategies used respondents reporting more bowel symptom were more likely to use the self-care strategy proximity/knowing the location of a toilet at all times. Females, respondents with high timeline cyclical scores and respondents with high physiological responses scores were more likely to use protective clothing. Respondents reporting more bowel symptom and with high social responses scores were more likely to use bowel medication. Females were more likely to wear incontinence pads. This research provides insights into the daily bowel symptom experiences of patients following sphincter-saving surgery for rectal cancer. It demonstrates the range of self-care strategies that individuals use to manage their bowel symptoms and the self-care-strategies that were most effective for them. Patients should be encouraged to report on-going bowel problems following sphincter-saving surgery for rectal cancer. Supportive care for patients

  1. Clinicopathologic Findings and Treatment Outcome of Laryngectomized Patients with Laryngeal Cancer and Hypopharyngeal Cancer: An Experience in Thailand

    PubMed

    Larbcharoensub, Noppadol; Wattanatranon, Duangkamon; Leopairut, Juvady; Suntisuktana, Suwimon; Roongpupaht, Boonsam; Chintrakarn, Chalermchai; Tungkeeratichai, Jumroon; Praneetvatakul, Phurich; Bhongmakapat, Thongchai; Cheewaruangroj, Wichit; Prakunhungsit, Supawadee

    2017-08-27

    Objective: To evaluate the clinicopathologic findings and treatment outcome in laryngectomized patients with laryngeal cancer and hypopharyngeal cancer. Materials and Methods: The authors retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 212 patients who had been newly diagnosed and treated with laryngectomy between January 2000 and December 2010. The age, gender, clinical manifestations, associated predisposing condition, tumor WHO grade, AJCC tumor stage, maximum tumor size, anatomical involvement, type of surgery, postoperative sequelae, treatment and therapeutic outcome were analyzed. Results: The present study included laryngeal cancer (n = 155) and hypopharyngeal cancer (n = 57). The patients’ age ranged from 38 to 84 years, with the mean age of 62.08±9.67 years. The common clinical presentations were hoarseness (73.6%), cervical lymphadenopathy (35.8%), sorethroat (22.2%), and odynophagia (14.6%). The laryngeal cancer commonly involves true vocal cord (86.5%), anterior commissure (65.8%), false vocal cord (56.8%), laryngeal ventricle (53.5%), subglottis (47.1%), and paraglotic space (35.5%), respectively. Fifty-three percent of cases had stage IV cancer. The most common postoperative surgical sequela was hypothyroidism (77.8%). The overall 5-year survivals for laryngeal cancer and hypopharyngeal cancer were 55% and 9%, respectively. The 5-year survival for node-negative cases was 61.8% versus 17% for node-positive cases (p< 0.001). AJCC stage of laryngeal cancer and hypopharyngeal cancer was a significant predictor of 5-year survival (p< 0.001 and p = 0.004, respectively). Conclusions: The advanced AJCC stage, advanced T stage, advanced N stage, extracapsular tumor spread, and tumor invasion of false vocal cord, epiglottis, preepiglottic space, paraglottic space, thyroid cartilage, cricothyroid membrane were found to significantly augment the decrease of 5-year survival in laryngeal cancer. Only advanced AJCC stage was significantly associated with 5-year

  2. Health care professionals' perspectives of the experiences of family caregivers during in-patient cancer care.

    PubMed

    Ekstedt, Mirjam; Stenberg, Una; Olsson, Mariann; Ruland, Cornelia M

    2014-11-01

    Being a family member of a patient who is being treated in an acute care setting for cancer often involves a number of challenges. Our study describes Norwegian cancer care health professionals' perceptions of family members who served as family caregivers (FCs) and their need for support during the in-hospital cancer treatment of their ill family member. Focus group discussions were conducted with a multidisciplinary team of 24 experienced social workers, physicians, and nurses who were closely involved in the patients' in-hospital cancer treatment and care. Drawing on qualitative hermeneutic analysis, four main themes describe health professionals' perceptions of FCs during the patient's in-hospital cancer care: an asset and additional burden, infinitely strong and struggling with helplessness, being an outsider in the center of care, and being in different temporalities. We conclude that it is a challenge for health care professionals to support the family and create room for FC's needs in acute cancer care. System changes are needed in health care, so that the patient/FC dyad is viewed as a unit of care in a dual process of caregiving, which would enable FCs to be given space and inclusion in care, with their own needs simultaneously considered alongside those of the patient.

  3. Experiences in the realisation of a research project on anthroposophical medicine in patients with advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    von Rohr, E; Pampallona, S; van Wegberg, B; Hürny, C; Bernhard, J; Heusser, P; Cerny, T

    2000-08-26

    To date most of the published studies on the effectiveness of complementary therapies in cancer patients have yielded controversial results because of questionable methodology. Research strategies and methodologies acceptable to both conventional and unconventional medicine are difficult to find due to different belief systems. In this publication we describe the development and implementation of a project conducted as part of National Research Programme 34 (NFP 34). Detailed analysis of our experiences might provide some information on how to deal with practical difficulties in the planning and conduct of further research projects in this field. The project involved the anthroposophical Lukas Clinic in Arlesheim and the Institute of Medical Oncology of the University Hospital, Berne. This interdisciplinary research project was devised to study the relative merits of these two schools of medicine in the care of advanced cancer patients. The project was made up of three components: (1) a registration study aimed at comparing the case mix at the two institutions; (2) a three armed randomised study on the effectiveness of supportive therapy, comparing anthroposophy to psychosocial group therapy, and (3) a longitudinal study to monitor the evaluation of quality of life of patients at the anthroposophical clinic. After a brief review of the study protocol, which presents the theoretical framework of the project, problems of its implementation are described. Aspects of accrual, acceptance of randomisation and data availability are presented using simple descriptive statistics and logistic regression. The registration study was duly completed with a total of 567 patients. For several reasons (not meeting inclusion requirements, high refusal rate) the accrual into the randomised study was slower than expected and required modification of the original design specifications with regard to inclusion criteria and data collection schedule. Additionally, a high dropout rate

  4. Mapping patients' experiences from initial change in health to cancer diagnosis: a qualitative exploration of patient and system factors mediating this process.

    PubMed

    Molassiotis, A; Wilson, B; Brunton, L; Chandler, C

    2010-01-01

    Delays in the diagnosis of cancer are common, and they are attributed to both patient and healthcare system factors. Minimizing such delays and improving early detection rates is a key goal of the new cancer reform strategy in England, in light of recent data showing that survival rates in the UK are low. The aim of this study was to explore the pathway from initial persistent change in health to diagnosis of cancer in a sample of patients from seven diagnostic groups in the UK and the factors mediating this process. Qualitative interviews with patients diagnosed with cancer were carried out. Seventy-five cancer patients discussed their pre-diagnosis experience as part of a broader exploration of their symptom experience for a larger study. Data were analysed by using content analysis and chart events. A broader range of mediating factors affecting and extending the patient pathway to diagnosis were reported in relation to lung, gastrointestinal and head and neck cancers and lymphoma, compared with breast, gynaecological and brain cancer patients. Many of the mediating factors were patient-related (e.g. misattribution of symptoms to common ailments, underestimation of the seriousness of the symptoms, self-medication or monitoring of symptoms, etc.). Primary care practitioner-factors were also prominent, including the exploration of firstly more common possibilities for treating the presenting symptoms without follow-up of persisting symptoms. Public health education about common cancer signs and symptoms, educational approaches in primary care to improve early diagnoses of cancer and updated guidelines for referral of suspected cancers should be enhanced before we can see any improvements in survival rates from cancer in the UK.

  5. Neuro-Oncology Branch patient experience and expertise | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Experience and Expertise We have more than 20 years of experience working with patients and their physicians to offer a comprehensive approach to patient care. Patients travel from all over the world to be evaluated and treated by our clinical team. The Brain Tumor Clinic sees hundreds of new patients and 2,000–3,000 follow-up patients each year. 

  6. Patterns of use of medical cannabis among Israeli cancer patients: a single institution experience.

    PubMed

    Waissengrin, Barliz; Urban, Damien; Leshem, Yasmin; Garty, Meital; Wolf, Ido

    2015-02-01

    The use of the cannabis plant (Cannabis sativa L.) for the palliative treatment of cancer patients has been legalized in multiple jurisdictions including Israel. Yet, not much is currently known regarding the efficacy and patterns of use of cannabis in this setting. To analyze the indications for the administration of cannabis among adult Israeli cancer patients and evaluate its efficacy. Efficacy and patterns of use of cannabis were evaluated using physician-completed application forms, medical files, and a detailed questionnaire in adult cancer patients treated at a single institution. Of approximately 17,000 cancer patients seen, 279 (<1.7%) received a permit for cannabis from an authorized institutional oncologist. The median age of cannabis users was 60 years (range 19-93 years), 160 (57%) were female, and 234 (84%) had metastatic disease. Of 151 (54%) patients alive at six months, 70 (46%) renewed their cannabis permit. Renewal was more common among younger patients and those with metastatic disease. Of 113 patients alive and using cannabis at one month, 69 (61%) responded to the detailed questionnaire. Improvement in pain, general well-being, appetite, and nausea were reported by 70%, 70%, 60%, and 50%, respectively. Side effects were mild and consisted mostly of fatigue and dizziness. Cannabis use is perceived as highly effective by some patients with advanced cancer and its administration can be regulated, even by local authorities. Additional studies are required to evaluate the efficacy of cannabis as part of the palliative treatment of cancer patients. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Using logotherapy to relieve death anxiety in a patient with recurrent cancer: a nursing experience].

    PubMed

    Tang, Pei-Ling; Chen, Wen-Ling; Cheng, Su-Fen

    2013-08-01

    We used logotherapy concepts to manage the mental impact of recurrent cancer on a patient. The patient had received radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma approximately one year prior to the March 9th - April 21st, 2011 nursing care period. The authors interacted with the patient during the care period via personal observation and telephone interview. Patient data was also collected from medical staff. Integral nursing assessment disclosed that the patient faced several major nursing issues, including death anxiety, pain, and sleep disturbance. This report describes how logotherapy was utilized to enable the patient better understand his condition and ultimately allow him to identify and pursue renewed meaning and happiness in life. Logotherapy helped alleviate the death anxiety caused by recurrent cancer and helped the patient self-reconfirm the meaning of life.

  8. A protocol for a discrete choice experiment: understanding preferences of patients with cancer towards their cancer care across metropolitan and rural regions in Australia.

    PubMed

    Wong, Shu Fen; Norman, Richard; Dunning, Trisha L; Ashley, David M; Lorgelly, Paula K

    2014-10-24

    Medical decision-making in oncology is a complicated process and to date there are few studies examining how patients with cancer make choices with respect to different features of their care. It is also unknown whether patient choices vary by geographical location and how location could account for observed rural and metropolitan cancer differences. This paper describes an ongoing study that aims to (1) examine patient and healthcare-related factors that influence choices of patients with cancer; (2) measure and quantify preferences of patients with cancer towards cancer care using a discrete choice experiment (DCE) and (3) explore preference heterogeneity between metropolitan and rural locations. A DCE is being conducted to understand how patients with cancer choose between two clinical scenarios accounting for different patient and healthcare-related factors (and levels). Preliminary qualitative research was undertaken to guide the development of an appropriate DCE design including characteristics that are important and relevant to patients with cancer. A fractional factorial design using the D-efficiency criteria was used to estimate interactions among attributes. Multinomial logistic regression will be used for the primary DCE analysis and to control for sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. The Barwon Health Human Research Ethics Committee approved the study. Findings from the study will be presented in national/international conferences and peer-reviewed journals. Our results will form the basis of a feasibility study to inform the development of a larger scale study into preferences of patients with cancer and their association with cancer outcomes. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  9. Outcomes, cost comparison, and patient satisfaction during long-term central venous access in cancer patients: Experience from a Tertiary Care Cancer Institute in South India

    PubMed Central

    Babu, K. Govind; Suresh Babu, M. C.; Lokanatha, D.; Bhat, Gita R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Prolonged treatment, frequent administration of chemotherapy, antibiotics and blood products in cancer patients requires long term venous access. Central venous catheters (CVC) inserted into the subclavian vein or internal jugular vein, peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICC) and chemoport (CP) are the commonly used central venous access devices (CVAD). Aim: This study was envisaged to review our experience of CVADs over a one year period and analyze the outcome with regard to catheter life, reasons for removal, complications, patient satisfaction and cost comparison between the CVAD types in the Indian setting. Settings and Design: This was a prospective, observational study carried out in a tertiary care cancer institute. Materials and Methods: 180 CVADs placed in patients with hematological malignancies and solid tumors from January 2014 to December 2014 were included. Statistical Analysis Used: Data was analyzed using descriptive statistics, Mann Whitney U test. P <0.05 was taken as statistically significant. Results: 180 CVADs were placed in 160 patients. The median catheter indwelling period was 76 days (16 days to 313 days) for CVC, 59 days (20days – 313 days) for PICC and 137 days (70 days – 258 days) for CP. 66 out of 160 patients developed complications (41.2%). 108 complication events were noted in 66 patients. There were 40 episodes of CRBSI. Out of the 68 mechanical complications, 37 were encountered during insertion of the CVAD and 31 were during the catheter indwelling period. Out of 160 patients, 138 (86.25%) were satisfied with the CVAD. The cost incurred for CVC/PICC (INR 4,480) was lower than that for CP (INR 24,150) and it was statistically significant (P < 0.0001). Our patients were highly satisfied with the CVAD. Conclusion: Use of CVC and PICC is a safe, reliable and cost saving way of administration of chemotherapy in developing countries. The incidence of complications and catheter loss was acceptable. Our

  10. Are patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer getting appropriate DEXA scans? A District General Hospital experience.

    PubMed

    Dong, Huan; Dayananda, Pete; Preece, Shay-Anne; Carmichael, Amtul

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer patients are often at high risk of fragility fractures partly due to adjuvant endocrine therapy such as aromatase inhibitors and chemotherapy. Baseline dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scanning is recommended as a standard of care in identifying patients who are at risk so they can be commenced on bone protective therapy. NICE guideline 80 - "Early and locally advanced breast cancer"[1] states that patients with early invasive breast cancer should have a baseline DEXA scan to assess BMD before the commencement of aromatase inhibitor treatment; if patients have treatment-induced menopause or are starting ovarian ablation/suppression therapy. We have audited the performance of a DGH against these guidelines with a target of 100% concordance. During a one year period (April 2012-April 2013), 100 patients with a new diagnosis of breast cancer were selected at random from the hospital coding database. 100 patients were chosen as this was a convenient sample size. We gathered information for these patients using electronic records, letters, and imaging. This showed a poor compliance of 38% against NICE guidelines. This in turn means that patients with low BMD at diagnosis of breast cancer are being under diagnosed and under treated, resulting in increased potential morbidity associated with fragility fractures. The interventions that resulted from this audit were: dissemination of these results to surgical and oncology departments, posters summarising the guidelines put up in breast clinics, and breast MDTs to discuss the need for DEXA scans for patients with breast cancer. A re-audit was performed for patients diagnosed with early, invasive breast cancer in January 2014 where a compliance of 90% was achieved. This represents a huge improvement in compliance from the baseline measure of 38%. In order to show that this improvement could be sustained, two further cycles were performed in February and March 2014, where the compliance was 92% and 100

  11. Students meeting with caregivers of cancer patient: results of an experience-based learning project.

    PubMed

    Atasoy, Beste M; Sarikaya, Ozlem; Kuscu, M Kemal; Yondem, Merve; Buyukkara, Elif; Eken, E Gokcen; Kahyaoglu, Figen

    2012-12-01

    The communication between medical students and cancer caregivers, and the problems they have experienced as well as the outcomes for their professional development before starting clinical practice was assessed in the context of a student research project. Data were collected by questionnaires or by 20 to 40-min long interviews with cancer caregivers. Their communications with physicians, hearing the bad news, and health service satisfaction were questioned. Therefore, the caregivers trusted the professional approach of their physician. However, they expected more empathic communication in the process of diagnosis and therapy. Development of empathy and trust-based communication between patients and physicians and enhancement of the quality of devoted time to cancer patients and caregivers may have an effect on the course of disease. Interviewer students mentioned that they developed communication skills about difficult clinical tasks and in delivering bad news face to face to cancer caregivers before starting their clinical education.

  12. Patients' experiences and perspectives of multiple concurrent symptoms in advanced cancer: a semi-structured interview study.

    PubMed

    Dong, Skye T; Butow, Phyllis N; Tong, Allison; Agar, Meera; Boyle, Frances; Forster, Benjamin C; Stockler, Martin; Lovell, Melanie R

    2016-03-01

    Patients with advanced cancer typically experience multiple concurrent symptoms, which have a detrimental impact on patient outcomes. No studies to date have qualitatively explored advanced cancer patients' perceptions of multiple symptoms in oncology and palliative care settings. Understanding the experience of multiple symptoms can inform integrated clinical pathways for treating, assessing and reducing symptom burden. This study aims to describe the beliefs, attitudes and experiences of patients with multiple symptoms in advanced cancer. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 58 advanced cancer patients (23 inpatients and 35 outpatients), recruited purposively from two palliative care centres and two hospital-based oncology departments in Sydney, Australia. Transcripts were analysed thematically. Six major themes were identified: imminence of death and deterioration (impending death, anticipatory fear); overwhelming loss of control (symptom volatility, debilitating exhaustion, demoralisation, isolation); impinging on autonomy and identity (losing independence, refusal to a diminished self, self-advocacy, reluctance to burden others); psychological adaptation (accepting the impossibility of recovery, seeking distractions, maintaining hope, mindfulness, accommodating self-limitations), burden of self-management responsibility (perpetual self-monitoring, ambiguity in self-report, urgency of decision making, optimising management); and valuing security and empowerment (safety in coordinated care, compassionate care, fear of medical abandonment, dependence on social support). Patients transitioning from oncology to palliative care settings were more vulnerable to self-management burden. Multiple symptoms have a profound impact on patients' autonomy, function and psychological state. Multiple symptom management and integrated care is needed to empower advanced cancer patients and reduce their struggles with self-management burden, hopelessness, isolation, fear

  13. Skin and nipple-areola complex sparing mastectomy in breast cancer patients: 15-year experience.

    PubMed

    Stanec, Zdenko; Žic, Rado; Budi, Srećko; Stanec, Sanda; Milanović, Rudolf; Vlajčić, Zlatko; Roje, Zeljka; Rudman, Franjo; Martić, Krešimir; Held, Rebeka; Božo, Gorjanc

    2014-11-01

    Skin and nipple-areola complex sparing mastectomy (SNSM) and primary reconstruction have been popular for breast cancer treatment in the last decade. An advantage of the SNSM technique is the removal of all breast tissue as a radical surgical procedure while preserving native breast integrity, nipple-areola complex (NAC), and submammary fold. This retrospective 15-year clinical study analyzes medical records from our breast surgery database collected at our department between 1997 and 2012. A total number of 3757 patients were treated for breast cancer; 411 (10.9%) patients had a skin-sparing mastectomy with the median (range) length follow-up of 63 months. This is the longest follow-up for SNSM in breast cancer patients; 3.7% of patients who underwent SNSM developed disease local recurrence, whereas occult NAC involvement with cancer occurred in 7.7% and local recurrence in the NAC in 1.2%. Partial necrosis of the NAC developed in 9.4% and total necrosis in 0.7% of operated breasts. All disease recurrences occurred in the first 10 years of the follow-up period. Local recurrence developed as first recurrence event has longer median cancer-specific survival time of 70 months than those with only distant metastases with 50 months and locoregional plus distant metastases with 35.5 months. The "Omega" pattern incision combines an oncological radical procedure with a lower incidence of skin flap necrosis. Patients reconstructed with autologous tissue were the group most satisfied. SNSM is an oncological safe procedure for breast cancer treatment with low recurrence in properly selected patients.

  14. Brain metastases in patients diagnosed with a solid primary cancer during childhood: experience from a single referral cancer center.

    PubMed

    Suki, Dima; Khoury Abdulla, Rami; Ding, Minming; Khatua, Soumen; Sawaya, Raymond

    2014-10-01

    Metastasis to the brain is frequent in adult cancer patients but rare among children. Advances in primary tumor treatment and the associated prolonged survival are said to have increased the frequency of brain metastasis in children. The authors present a series of cases of brain metastases in children diagnosed with a solid primary cancer, evaluate brain metastasis trends, and describe tumor type, patterns of occurrence, and prognosis. Patients with brain metastases whose primary cancer was diagnosed during childhood were identified in the 1990-2012 Tumor Registry at The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. A review of their hospital records provided demographic data, history, and clinical data, including primary cancer sites, number and location of brain metastases, sites of extracranial metastases, treatments, and outcomes. Fifty-four pediatric patients (1.4%) had a brain metastasis from a solid primary tumor. Sarcomas were the most common (54%), followed by melanoma (15%). The patients' median ages at diagnosis of the primary cancer and the brain metastasis were 11.37 years and 15.03 years, respectively. The primary cancer was localized at diagnosis in 48% of patients and disseminated regionally in only 14%. The primary tumor and brain metastasis presented synchronously in 15% of patients, and other extracranial metastases were present when the primary cancer was diagnosed. The remaining patients were diagnosed with brain metastasis after initiation of primary cancer treatment, with a median presentation interval of 17 months after primary cancer diagnosis (range 2-77 months). At the time of diagnosis, the brain metastasis was the first site of systemic metastasis in only 4 (8%) of the 51 patients for whom data were available. Up to 70% of patients had lung metastases when brain metastases were found. Symptoms led to the brain metastasis diagnosis in 65% of cases. Brain metastases were single in 60% of cases and multiple in 35%; 6% had only

  15. [Malnutrition and weight loss - nurse assessment of nutritional status and counselling: experiences of patients with newly diagnosed or relapsed cancer].

    PubMed

    Kröner, A; Stoll, H; Spichiger, E

    2012-04-01

    Due to the anorexia-cachexia syndrome, cancer patients are already suffering from nutritional problems and weight loss by the time they receive their diagnosis and start chemotherapy. In the oncology outpatient clinic of a Swiss university hospital, patients currently undergo a nutritional assessment and receive individual counselling at the beginning of cancer treatment. This qualitative study explored cancer patients' experiences with weight loss and nutritional problems as well as how they experienced the assessment and the consecutive counselling by nurses. Interviews were conducted with 12 patients and qualitative content analysis was used for data analysis. Results showed that patients barely registered the weight loss and did not interpret it as an early warning signal. Nevertheless, they attempted to improve their nutritional habits soon after diagnosis, prior to receiving any counselling. The patients did not experience the assessment as troublesome. They appreciated the nurses' advice and implemented the suggestions they found appropriate. This study highlights the importance of patient education regarding weight loss and nutritional problems early in the course of an illness. Patients may not be aware of nutritional problems at this early stage and may lack the necessary specialised knowledge. Assessment and counselling provided by nurses offer targeted measures for prevention of malnutrition and weight loss.

  16. Phase I Clinical Trials in 85 Patients with Gynecologic Cancer: The M. D. Anderson Cancer Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Moroney, John; Wheler, Jennifer; Hong, David; Naing, Aung; Falchook, Gerald; Bodurka, Diane; Coleman, Robert; Lu, Karen; Xiao, Lianchun; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2010-01-01

    Objective Disseminated gynecologic cancers are usually fatal due to chemoresistance. Recently, rationally-developed, targeted agents are entering the early clinical trials setting. We assessed patients with metastatic gynecologic cancers in a dedicated Phase I clinical trials clinic in order to determine their outcome. Methods We reviewed records for 89 consecutive patients with gynecologic cancers referred to the Phase I Clinical Trials Program, 85 (96%) of whom were treated on ≥1 trial. Results Cancer diagnoses were: ovarian (N = 43), uterine (N = 19), cervix (N = 17), and other. Median age was 58 years; median number of prior cytotoxic regimens, five. Two patients (2.4%) achieved a CR, four (4.7%), a PR, and eight (9.4%), SD ≥ six months (total CR/PR/SD ≥ six months = 16.5%) for the first phase I trial. Twenty-five patients enrolled on a second trial and three on a third (N = 113 trials total). Combining response data for all trials, of the 85 patients, two achieved CR (2.4%), nine achieved PR (10.6%), and 12 (14%) had SD for ≥ six months. One-year survival was 30% (95% C.I., 21% to 44%). There was no difference in time-to-treatment failure (TTF) on Phase I versus the patient's last standard treatment. Conclusion Twenty-three of 85 patients (27%) with advanced, heavily-pretreated, gynecologic cancers achieved CR/PR/SD ≥ six months on a phase I trial, and overall TTF on phase I was comparable to that of last conventional therapy, suggesting that participation in a phase I trial is a reasonable option for these patients. PMID:20347123

  17. Phase I clinical trials in 85 patients with gynecologic cancer: the M. D. Anderson Cancer Center experience.

    PubMed

    Moroney, John; Wheler, Jennifer; Hong, David; Naing, Aung; Falchook, Gerald; Bodurka, Diane; Coleman, Robert; Lu, Karen; Xiao, Lianchun; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2010-06-01

    Disseminated gynecologic cancers are usually fatal due to chemoresistance. Recently, rationally developed, targeted agents are entering the early clinical trials setting. We assessed patients with metastatic gynecologic cancers in a dedicated phase I clinical trials clinic in order to determine their outcome. We reviewed records for 89 consecutive patients with gynecologic cancers referred to the Phase I Clinical Trials Program, 85 (96%) of whom were treated on > or = 1 trial. Cancer diagnoses were ovarian (N=43), uterine (N=19), cervix (N=17), and other. Median age was 58 years; median number of prior cytotoxic regimens, five. Two patients (2.4%) achieved a CR; four (4.7%), a PR; and eight (9.4%), SD > or = 6 months (total CR/PR/SD > or = 6 months=16.5%) for the first phase I trial. Twenty-five patients enrolled on a second trial and three, on a third (N=113 trials total). Combining response data for all trials, of the 85 patients, two achieved CR (2.4%), nine achieved PR (10.6%), and 12 (14%) had SD for > or = 6 months. One-year survival was 30% (95% CI, 21% to 44%). There was no difference in time-to-treatment failure (TTF) on phase I versus the patient's last standard treatment. Twenty-three of 85 patients (27%) with advanced, heavily pretreated, gynecologic cancers achieved CR/PR/SD > or = 6 months on a phase I trial, and overall TTF on phase I was comparable to that of last conventional therapy, suggesting that participation in a phase I trial is a reasonable option for these patients. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Colorectal cancer in patients under 50 years of age: A retrospective analysis of two institutions' experience

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Elizabeth A; Feingold, Daniel L; Forde, Kenneth A; Arnell, Tracey; Jang, Joon Ho; Whelan, Richard L

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the epidemiological characteristics of colorectal cancer (CRC) in patients under 50 years of age across two institutions. METHODS: Records of patients under age 50 years of age who had CRC surgery over a 16 year period were assessed at two institutions. The following documents where reviewed: admission notes, operative notes, and discharge summaries. The main study variables included: age, presenting symptoms, family history, tumor location, operation, stage/differentiation of disease, and post operative complications. Stage of disease was classified according to the American Joint Committee on Cancer TNM staging system: tumor depth; node status; and metastases. RESULTS: CRC was found in 180 patients under age 50 years (87 females, 93 males; mean age 41.4 ± 6.2 years). Young patients accounted for 11.2% of cases during a 6 year period for which the full data set was available. Eight percent had a 1st degree and 12% a 2nd degree family CRC history. Almost all patients (94%) were symptomatic at diagnosis; common symptoms included: bleeding (59%), obstruction (9%), and abdominal/rectal pain (35%). Evaluation was often delayed and bleeding frequently attributed to hemorrhoids. Advanced stage CRC (Stage 3 or 4) was noted in 53% of patients. Most tumors were distal to the splenic flexure (77%) and 39% involved the rectum. Most patients (95%) had segmental resections; 6 patients had subtotal/total colectomy. Poorly differentiated tumors were noted in 12% and mucinous lesions in 19% of patients of which most had Stage 3 or 4 disease. Twenty-two patients (13%) developed recurrence and/or progression of disease to date. Three patients (ages 42, 42 and 49 years) went on to develop metachronous primary colon cancers within 3 to 4 years of their initial resection. CONCLUSION: CRC was common in young patients with no family history. Young patients with symptoms merit a timely evaluation to avoid presentation with late stage CRC. PMID:24039357

  19. Colorectal cancer in patients under 50 years of age: a retrospective analysis of two institutions' experience.

    PubMed

    Myers, Elizabeth A; Feingold, Daniel L; Forde, Kenneth A; Arnell, Tracey; Jang, Joon Ho; Whelan, Richard L

    2013-09-14

    To investigate the epidemiological characteristics of colorectal cancer (CRC) in patients under 50 years of age across two institutions. Records of patients under age 50 years of age who had CRC surgery over a 16 year period were assessed at two institutions. The following documents where reviewed: admission notes, operative notes, and discharge summaries. The main study variables included: age, presenting symptoms, family history, tumor location, operation, stage/differentiation of disease, and post operative complications. Stage of disease was classified according to the American Joint Committee on Cancer TNM staging system: tumor depth; node status; and metastases. CRC was found in 180 patients under age 50 years (87 females, 93 males; mean age 41.4 ± 6.2 years). Young patients accounted for 11.2% of cases during a 6 year period for which the full data set was available. Eight percent had a 1(st) degree and 12% a 2(nd) degree family CRC history. Almost all patients (94%) were symptomatic at diagnosis; common symptoms included: bleeding (59%), obstruction (9%), and abdominal/rectal pain (35%). Evaluation was often delayed and bleeding frequently attributed to hemorrhoids. Advanced stage CRC (Stage 3 or 4) was noted in 53% of patients. Most tumors were distal to the splenic flexure (77%) and 39% involved the rectum. Most patients (95%) had segmental resections; 6 patients had subtotal/total colectomy. Poorly differentiated tumors were noted in 12% and mucinous lesions in 19% of patients of which most had Stage 3 or 4 disease. Twenty-two patients (13%) developed recurrence and/or progression of disease to date. Three patients (ages 42, 42 and 49 years) went on to develop metachronous primary colon cancers within 3 to 4 years of their initial resection. CRC was common in young patients with no family history. Young patients with symptoms merit a timely evaluation to avoid presentation with late stage CRC.

  20. Quality of Life and Symptom Experience of Breast Cancer Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Şahin, Zümrüt Akgün; Tan, Mehtap

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of educational interventions on breast cancer patients during chemotherapy, with a secondary aim of focusing on describing symptoms in patients during chemotherapy and their effects on the quality of life of patients with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy. The study was quasi-experimental. A sample of 120 patients participated, of which 60 were in the experimental group and 60 were in the control group. Pre/posttest quality-of-life subgroups were compared in terms of their mean scores. In the posttest in the experimental group, mean scores of the Family subscale, Health and Functioning subscale, Psychological/Spiritual subscale, and Social and Economic subscale correlated negatively and the difference was statistically significant (P < .05).

  1. Fertility of testicular cancer patients after anticancer treatment--experience of 11 years.

    PubMed

    Molnár, Z; Berta, E; Benyó, M; Póka, R; Kassai, Z; Flaskó, T; Jakab, A; Bodor, M

    2014-06-01

    Testicular cancer affects men mostly in their reproductive age with a cure rate over 90%. Preserved fertility is one of the main concerns of the survivors. To further elucidate the question of fertility after anticancer treatment for testicular cancer, we performed a survey among patients who underwent sperm cryopreservation procedure in our department. A structured questionnaire was designed to collect data on demography, anticancer treatment, histological type of cancer, family planning intentions and fertility prior to and after treatment. During a period of 11 years 86 men underwent semen cryopreservation before starting chemo-or radiotherapy. Fifty-nine of them consented to participate in the study. The average length of follow up was 4.6 +/- 3.8 years. In case of 11.9% of the patients their banked sperm was used, which led to live birth in 57% of the couples. The partners of 6 patients became pregnant after in vitro fertilization (IVF) resulting in 4 live births and 2 miscarriages. The spontaneous pregnancy rate was 22%. Spontaneous pregnancy occurred in 13 partners resulting in 18 pregnancies followed by 12 live births, 2 artificial abortions and 4 miscarriages. We could not prove any association between preserved fertility and anticancer treatment or the histological type of the cancer. In conclusion, although spontaneous pregnancy rate is remarkably high after anticancer treatment for testicular cancer, the risk of infertility after receiving gonadotoxic treatment cannot be predicted. Cryopreservation is a safe and effective method to preserve fertility in these cases. As a result we strongly recommend discussing the advantages of semen cryopreservation with all patients awaiting treatment for testicular cancer.

  2. Attitudes and experiences of family involvement in cancer consultations: a qualitative exploration of patient and family member perspectives.

    PubMed

    Laidsaar-Powell, Rebekah; Butow, Phyllis; Bu, Stella; Fisher, Alana; Juraskova, Ilona

    2016-10-01

    Family members (FMs) often provide support to patients, regularly attend cancer consultations and are often involved in medical decision-making. Limited research has been conducted to date to understand patients' and FMs' perceptions about family involvement in cancer consultations. Therefore, this study aimed to qualitatively explore the attitudes and experiences of Australian cancer patients and FMs regarding (1) family attendance at consultations, (2) family roles in consultations and (3) the challenges of family involvement. Thirty patients and 33 FMs, recruited through either a tertiary metropolitan oncology clinic or national cancer patient advocacy group, participated in semi-structured interviews. Interviews were transcribed and qualitatively analysed using Framework analysis methods. Four relevant themes were identified: (1) negotiating family involvement, (2) attitudes towards the roles FMs assume, (3) challenges of family involvement and (4) family-clinician interactions. Overall, patients appreciated family involvement and valued FMs' provision of emotional and informational support, and FMs also found benefit from participating in consultations. Some patients appreciated their FM assuming the role of 'messenger' between the consultation and extended family. However, a number of challenges were also reported by patients (e.g. maintaining privacy, mismatched patient-family information needs) and FMs (e.g. emotional toll of supportive roles, negative behaviours of clinicians towards FMs). FMs appear to make valuable contributions to cancer consultations, and their presence can benefit both the patient and the FM themselves in many ways. However, for some FMs, attending consultations can be challenging. Study findings point to the need for psychosocial support addressing FMs' needs and the development of communication strategies for oncology clinicians to positively engage with FMs. Further research is needed in these areas.

  3. Promoting sleep for hospitalized patients with advanced cancer with relaxation therapy: experience of a randomized study.

    PubMed

    Ducloux, Dominique; Guisado, Huguette; Pautex, Sophie

    2013-09-01

    Sleep disorders are frequent in patients with advanced cancer receiving palliative care. The objective of this study was to demonstrate whether relaxation therapy can improve their satisfaction with sleep. Few studies have investigated the effectiveness of relaxation in patients hospitalized with an advanced chronic disease. Prospective randomized study with an immediate intervention group (IIG; relaxation days 3-6) and a delayed intervention group (DIG; relaxation days 6-9). The main measure was the overall satisfaction of sleep measured on a Numerical Rating Scale of Satisfaction of Sleep (NRSSS) between 0 and 10. Totally 18 (IIG: 9; DIG: 9) patients were included in this study (mean age 66 ± 10.7). The NRSSS improved in both the groups (almost statistically significant) between the day of inclusion and day 2. Because of the dropout of the patients during the last days of the study, we analyzed the improvement in sleep satisfaction only between day 2 and 5. The NRSSS D5 for the immediate and delayed groups were 4.0 ± 23 and 3.8 ± 2.3, respectively. There was no significant improvement in both the groups. The results demonstrated the difficulty to include patients with advanced cancer in a randomized study with a DIG. We were not able to demonstrate the effectiveness of relaxation therapy on sleep satisfaction. Techniques that can be easily used to improve sleep in patients with an advanced cancer should be developed and used already early in the disease.

  4. Caring for patients with surgically resectable cancers: experience from a specialised centre in rural Rwanda.

    PubMed

    Mubiligi, J M; Hedt-Gauthier, B; Mpunga, T; Tapela, N; Okao, P; Harries, A D; Edginton, M E; Driscoll, C; Mugabo, L; Riviello, R; Shulman, L N

    2014-06-21

    Contexte : Centre anticancéreux d'excellence de Butaro (BCCOE), District de Butera, Rwanda.Objectifs : Décrire les caractéristiques, la prise en charge et les résultats à 6 mois de patients adultes se présentant avec des cancers potentiellement extirpables par chirurgie.Schema : Etude rétrospective de cohorte des patients admis entre le 1er juillet et le 31 décembre 2012.Resultats : Sur 278 patients, 76,6% étaient des femmes, 51,4% étaient âgés entre 50 et 74 ans et 75% étaient référés d'un autre district ou d'un hôpital tertiaire du Rwanda. Parmi les 250 patients dont les traitements étaient connus, 115 (46%) ont bénéficié d'une intervention chirurgicale avec ou sans chimiothérapie/radiothérapie. Le temps médian écoulé entre l'admission et la chirurgie était de 21 jours (IQR 2 à 91). Le cancer du sein était le plus fréquent des cancers traités au BCCOE, tandis que les autres cancers (col utérin, colorectal et tumeur cérébrale ou cervicale) étaient généralement opérés dans des hôpitaux tertiaires. Quatre-vingt-dix-neuf patients n'ont eu aucun traitement ; 52% ont été référés à l'extérieur dans les 6 mois, généralement pour un traitement palliatif. A 6 mois, 6,8% étaient décédés ou perdus de vue.Conclusion : De nombreux patients référés au BCCOE pour cancer ont bénéficié d'une intervention chirurgicale. Cependant la prise en charge de tous les cas est confrontée à la limite de capacité chirurgicale et au problème des patients admis tardivement avec un cancer avancé et non extirpable. Cette étude met en lumière les opportunités et les défis de la prise en charge des cancers pour les hôpitaux situés en zone rurale.

  5. Surgery in asymptomatic patients with colorectal cancer and unresectable liver metastases: the authors’ experience

    PubMed Central

    Boselli, Carlo; Renzi, Claudio; Gemini, Alessandro; Castellani, Elisa; Trastulli, Stefano; Desiderio, Jacopo; Corsi, Alessia; Barberini, Francesco; Cirocchi, Roberto; Santoro, Alberto; Parisi, Amilcare; Redler, Adriano; Noya, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Purpose In asymptomatic patients with Stage IV colorectal cancer, the debate continues over the efficacy of primary resection compared to chemotherapy alone. The aim of this study was to define the optimal management for asymptomatic patients with colorectal cancer and unresectable liver metastases. Patients and methods Patients receiving elective surgery (n = 17) were compared to patients receiving chemotherapy only (n = 31). Data concerning patients’ demographics, location of primary tumor, comorbidities, performance status, Child–Pugh score, extension of liver metastases, size of primary, and other secondary locations were collected. Results Thirty-day mortality after chemotherapy was lower than that after surgical resection (19.3% versus 29.4%; not significant). In patients with >75% hepatic involvement, mortality at 1 month was higher after receiving surgical treatment than after chemotherapy alone (50% versus 25%). In patients with <75% hepatic involvement, 30-day mortality was similar in both groups (not significant). Thirty-day mortality in patients with Stage T3 was lower in those receiving chemotherapy (16.7% versus 30%; not significant). Overall survival was similar in both groups. The risk of all-cause death after elective surgery (2.1) was significantly higher than in patients receiving chemotherapy only (P = 0.035). Conclusion This study demonstrated that in palliative treatment of asymptomatic unresectable Stage IV colorectal cancer, the overall risk of death was significantly higher after elective surgery compared to patients receiving chemotherapy alone. However, in the literature, there is no substantial difference between these treatments. New studies are required to better evaluate outcomes. PMID:23569390

  6. Denosumab treatment in the management of patients with advanced prostate cancer: clinical evidence and experience

    PubMed Central

    Hegemann, Miriam; Bedke, Jens; Stenzl, Arnulf; Todenhöfer, Tilman

    2017-01-01

    Osteoprotective therapies have become an essential component in the management of advanced prostate cancer (PC) patients as bone metastases (BMs) have a major impact on morbidity and mortality. Denosumab is a fully humanized antibody targeting the receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL), which has been approved by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) in Europe and the United States (US) Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the US for prevention of skeletal-related events (SREs) in patients with solid tumors and BMs, including PC. The clinical settings in which PC patients should be treated with denosumab are still discussed controversially. In a phase III study, denosumab significantly delayed SREs compared with zoledronic acid (ZA) in patients with metastatic castration-resistant PC (CRPC). In addition, denosumab showed superior effects on pain and health-related quality of life (QoL) in these patients. In patients with nonmetastatic CRPC, denosumab has been proven to significantly increase bone metastases-free survival. However, no significant benefits on cancer-specific and overall survival were observed and denosumab was not approved by the US FDA and EMA in this context. The effectiveness of denosumab in patients with castration-sensitive PC (CSPC) and BMs is also under discussion, as clinical trials with ZA in these patients have not shown significant benefits. Clinical data on the use of denosumab in CSPC are urgently needed. PMID:28392837

  7. Clinician perspectives on symptom and quality of life experiences of patients during cancer therapies: Implications for eHealth.

    PubMed

    Berry, Donna L; Nayak, Manan M; Abrahm, Janet L; Braun, Ilana; Rabin, Michael S; Cooley, Mary E

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore clinician experiences with cancer symptom and quality of life (SQL) management from diagnosis throughout therapy in the ambulatory setting, plus identify preferences for a future SQL decision support system. Eligible clinicians worked in ambulatory cancer care with responsibility for direct patient care. Focus groups were conducted to discuss symptom management throughout the treatment experience and features desired in a future decision support system. Each group was audio-recorded, transcribed, de-identified, and entered into NVivo 9 for analysis. Open and axial coding was completed, grouping common concepts into nodes; large constructs among the nodes were identified and main messages were synthesized. A total of 118 clinicians were contacted by email resulting in a final sample of 51 attending 1 of 9 focus groups. Clinicians described a standard face-to-face approach to assessment of SQL, before and throughout therapy. Preparing patients for expected symptoms and approaches to management included paper-based patient education materials and referrals. Communicating with patients between visits was covered in detail, notably use of telephone and email. Future system features desired by the clinicians included an electronic, Web-based system with real-time, trended data, reasonable alerts, and tailored information for patients. Cancer care specialists reported strategies to assess and manage cancer SQL in ambulatory care including patient-reported outcome measures, contact communication modes, face-to-face interviews, and paper-based patient education materials. Future system features desired by clinicians included an electronic, Web-based system with real-time, trended data, reasonable alerts, and tailored information for patients. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Patients' Preferences for Outcome, Process and Cost Attributes in Cancer Treatment: A Systematic Review of Discrete Choice Experiments.

    PubMed

    Bien, Daniela R; Danner, Marion; Vennedey, Vera; Civello, Daniele; Evers, Silvia M; Hiligsmann, Mickaël

    2017-03-31

    As several studies have been conducted to elicit patients' preferences for cancer treatment, it is important to provide an overview and synthesis of these studies. This study aimed to systematically review discrete choice experiments (DCEs) about patients' preferences for cancer treatment and assessed the relative importance of outcome, process and cost attributes. A systematic literature review was conducted using PubMed and EMBASE to identify all DCEs investigating patients' preferences for cancer treatment between January 2010 and April 2016. Data were extracted using a predefined extraction sheet, and a reporting quality assessment was applied to all studies. Attributes were classified into outcome, process and cost attributes, and their relative importance was assessed. A total of 28 DCEs were identified. More than half of the studies (56%) received an aggregate score lower than 4 on the PREFS (Purpose, Respondents, Explanation, Findings, Significance) 5-point scale. Most attributes were related to outcome (70%), followed by process (25%) and cost (5%). Outcome attributes were most often significant (81%), followed by process (73%) and cost (67%). The relative importance of outcome attributes was ranked highest in 82% of the cases where it was included, followed by cost (43%) and process (12%). This systematic review suggests that attributes related to cancer treatment outcomes are the most important for patients. Process and cost attributes were less often included in studies but were still (but less) important to patients in most studies. Clinicians and decision makers should be aware that attribute importance might be influenced by level selection for that attribute.

  9. The Good Pain Management (GPM) Ward Program in China and its impact on Chinese cancer patients: the SYSUCC experience

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yun-Peng; Ma, Yu-Xiang; Huang, Yan; Zhao, Yuan-Yuan; Xu, Fei; Tian, Ying; Zou, Ben-Yan; Gao, Rui-Zhen; Zhang, Li

    2014-01-01

    To improve cancer pain management, the Medical Oncology Department of Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center (SYSUCC) launched the Good Pain Management (GPM) Ward Program, which has been recognized by the Chinese Ministry of Health and promoted throughout the nation. This retrospective case-control study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of the program. Patients diagnosed with malignant solid tumors with bone metastasis were eligible. Patients who were admitted 6 months before the initiation of the GPM program were used as the control group, and patients admitted 6 months after the initiation of the program were used as the GPM group. The pain-reporting rate and pain management index (PMI) were calculated. The pain levels before and after pain management were compared. A total of 475 patients (244 in the control group and 231 in the GPM group) were analyzed. The pain-reporting rate of the GPM group was significantly higher than that of the control group (62.8% vs. 37.7%, P < 0.001). The PMI of the GPM group was significantly higher than that of the control group (0.083 vs. -0.261, P < 0.001). Therefore, the GPM Ward Program improved the pain management of cancer patients and provided experience for improving cancer pain management in the future. PMID:24874643

  10. Venous thromboembolism and port-related thrombosis in metastatic colorectal cancer patients: a monocenter experience.

    PubMed

    Nobili, Elisabetta; Di Cicilia, Roberto; Di Battista, Monica; Morselli-Labate, Antonio Maria; Paragona, Marco; Corbelli, Jody; Macchini, Marina; Prandoni, Paolo; Biasco, Guido; Brandi, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) may occur during the natural history of neoplastic disease and is a common cause of mortality and morbidity in cancer patients. Major risk factors for VTE in cancer patients include surgery, immobilization, hospitalization, and the administration of granulopoietic and/or erythropoietic (stimulatory) agents. Chemotherapy is a supplementary independent risk factor for VTE and the use of central venous catheters (CVC) in clinical practice has increased the risk of thromboembolic events. We conducted a retrospective study to evaluate CVC-related thrombosis and the VTE rate in 145 consecutive metastatic colorectal cancer patients. We observed only 2 cases of symptomatic CVC- related thrombotic events (1.38%) and 10 cases of thromboembolic events (6.9%) in our series. Only surgery for metastases was found to be significantly related to the development of VTE, with an incidence of 16.1% vs. 4.4 in patients who did not undergo surgery (p = 0.037). In addition, a history of VTE seems to be a supplementary risk factor for CVC-related thrombosis (p = 0.055).

  11. Leptomeningeal metastases presenting exclusively with ocular disturbance in 34 patients: A tertiary care cancer hospital experience.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Rory Richard; Frankfort, Benjamin Jay; Strickland, Ben A; Debnam, James Matthew; McCutcheon, Ian E; Groves, Morris D; Weinberg, Jeffrey S

    2017-05-01

    Leptomeningeal disease (LMD) represents disseminated intracranial metastatic disease that requires early detection and initiation of therapy. Patients with LMD typically present with a variety of neurologic problems, including ocular disturbances. However, little is reported on LMD presenting exclusively with ocular-related disturbances in the absence of any other central nervous system (CNS) dysfunction. Our goal was to describe the workup for ocular disturbances in the setting of known cancer diagnosis. Retrospective case study utilizing prospectively collected database at a tertiary cancer care center for all patients with diagnosis of LMD between 2001 and 2009. Main outcome was descriptive analysis of ocular findings by primary or admitting service with or without formal ophthalmology exam in workup for LMD. 34 patients demonstrated ocular disturbances without any other CNS manifestations. Our findings demonstrate that 71% of ocular disturbances were detected by the primary admitting services. Formal consultation with ophthalmology resulted in the detection of the remaining cases. The most common findings were cranial nerve deficits, papilledema, and optic disc or retinal infiltration by tumor. These findings supported a further work-up for CNS disease. Therefore, it is appropriate to refer cancer patients with visual complaints or findings on exam to ophthalmology to evaluate for evidence suggestive of LMD that may support a further work-up. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Patients' Preferences for the Treatment of Metastatic Castrate-resistant Prostate Cancer: A Discrete Choice Experiment.

    PubMed

    Eliasson, Lina; de Freitas, Hayley M; Dearden, Lindsay; Calimlim, Brian; Lloyd, Andrew J

    2017-04-01

    Patient treatment preferences are increasingly being used to inform health care decision making. This discrete choice experiment assessed how men perceive the risks and benefits of hypothetical treatment options for metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Treatment attributes for inclusion were identified through a review of the literature and product labels. Expert interviews confirmed clinical appropriateness and patient relevance of the attributes, which included effectiveness (delay in months before chemotherapy), steroid use, possible drug interactions (additional hospital visits for monitoring), fogginess (effects on cognition and memory), fatigue (extreme tiredness), food restrictions, and bone pain. Following a pilot, the final discrete choice experiment included 18 choice sets presenting treatments for mCRPC and was completed by men with mCRPC in France, Germany, and the United Kingdom. Data were analyzed using a conditional logit model, with odds ratios (ORs) used to indicate preference for attributes, and tradeoff measures (TOM) were estimated using the ratio of coefficients. Within each attribute category and with all other factors being equal, participants (N = 285) indicated a strong preference for treatments that fully control bone pain (OR = 12.069 [95% CI, 10.555-13.800]) and for treatments that delay chemotherapy (OR, 1.727 [95% CI, 1.548-1.927]). They also preferred treatments that were associated with the lowest risk of fogginess (OR, 2.115 [95% CI, 1.849-2.420]), a lower risk of fatigue (OR, 1.365 [95% CI 1.219-1.528]), and fewer additional hospital visits (OR, 1.245 [95% CI 1.111-1.397]) than the respective reference categories. Participants preferred to use steroids under advice from a physician (OR, 1.275 [95% CI 1.132-1.437]). Food restrictions related to taking medication were not a significant concern for participants. TOM results indicated that large tradeoffs in effectiveness, fogginess, and fatigue are required for

  13. Survival Outcomes and Predictive Factors for Female Urethral Cancer: Long-term Experience with Korean Patients.

    PubMed

    Kang, Minyong; Jeong, Chang Wook; Kwak, Cheol; Kim, Hyeon Hoe; Ku, Ja Hyeon

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate female urethral cancer (UCa) patients treated and followed-up during a time period spanning more than 20 yr at single institution in Korea. We reviewed medical records of 21 consecutive patients diagnosed with female UCa at our institution between 1991 and 2012. After exclusion of two patients due to undefined histology, we examined clinicopathological variables, as well as survival outcomes of 19 patients with female UCa. A Cox proportional hazards ratio model was used to identify significant predictors of prognosis according to variables. The median age at diagnosis was 59 yr, and the median follow-up duration was 87.0 months. The most common initial symptoms were voiding symptoms and blood spotting. The median tumor size was 3.4 cm, and 55% of patients had lesions involving the entire urethra. The most common histologic type was adenocarcinoma, and the second most common type was urothelial carcinoma. Fourteen patients underwent surgery, and 7 of these patients received adjuvant radiation or systemic chemotherapy. Eleven patients experienced tumor recurrence after primary therapy. Patients with high stage disease, advanced T stage (≥T3), and positive lymph nodes had worse survival outcomes compared to their counterparts. Particularly, lymph node positivity and advanced T stage were significant predictive factors for all survival outcomes. Tumor location was the only significant predictor for recurrence-free survival. Although our study included a small number of patients, it conveys valuable information about this rare female urologic malignancy in a Korean population.

  14. [Home parenteral nutrition in patients with advanced cancer: experience of a single centre over ten years].

    PubMed

    Moreno Villares, J M; Gomis Muñoz, P; Valero Zanuy, Ma A; León Sanz, M

    2004-01-01

    The use of Home Parenteral Nutrition (HPN) in patients with advanced cancer without the possibility of curative treatment continues to be a controversial subject entailing a considerable emotional burden. Nonetheless, this group of patients constitutes the main indication for HPN in many programmes. To present the characteristics of a series of patients included on an HPN programme over the last ten years. Retrospective study of the case histories of the 11 patients who received HPN over this period. The demographic and clinical details were noted along with their complications and evolution for comparison with those of a control group of patients with benign disease receiving HPN over the same period. For the comparisons, Student's t test and the chi-squared test were used as and when indicated. Results were considered statistically significant if p < 0.05. Eleven patients received HPN, nine of them because of an irresoluble intestinal obstruction and two because of a high flow fistula. The mean age at the start of HPN was 50.8 +/- 12.7 years versus 37.3 +/- 17.2 years for the group with benign disease (p < 0.05). The mean duration of HPN was 71.05 +/- 217 days in the first group, notably less than the second (387.15 +/- 995.85; p < 0.05), with a range between 5 and 760 days. The patients received the infusion through a previously implanted subcutaneous reservoir (n = 9) and on two occasions, electively, through a tunnelled catheter. The infection rate was higher in the group with cancer (0.34 episodes per patient and 1,000 days on HPN) than in the group with benign disease (0.08 episodes; p < 0.05). HPN was suspended in only one of the patients more than 5 days prior to death due to clinical deterioration. Two patients required admission due to a complication associated with the technique. In both cases, a fungal infection of the blood made it necessary to withdraw the catheter. The quality of life, measured by means of an activity scale, was similar at the start

  15. Factors influencing response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation and outcomes in rectal cancer patients: tertiary Indian cancer hospital experience.

    PubMed

    Engineer, Reena; Basu, Trinanjan; Chopra, Supriya; Arya, Supreeta; Patil, Prachi; Mehta, Shaesta; Ramadwar, Mukta; Deodhar, Kedar; Shrivastava, Shyam Kishore

    2015-04-01

    In the treatment of rectal cancers several randomized trials have demonstrated benefits of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (NACRT) in downstaging as well as survival among these patients. We investigated the patient and tumor related variables dictating the outcomes in these patients. Biopsy proven treatment naive 182 rectal cancer patients underwent NACRT from June 2006 to December 2010. The entire patients received long course conventionally fractionated external beam radiotherapy with concurrent oral Capecitabine. At 6 weeks from completion of NACRT clinico-radiological assessment was carried out for surgical feasibility. All patients were given postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy either single agent or multi drug regimen depending upon biopsy report. Among 182 patients, 131 (72%) underwent surgery and initial T stage and signet ring cell morphology were major determinant of operability. Among the 131 operated patients at median follow up of 36 months, 94 (72%) are alive and disease free. With a median follow up of 42 months the 5-year disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) was 60% and 77%. The majority of the failures were distal but with more advanced disease at presentation both local and distal failures were similar. While assessing survival by multivariate analysis patients having positive nodes post-surgery had a significantly poorer DFS (P=0.001), while signet ring cell morphology and pre-treatment carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA) levels strongly influenced OS (P=0.03). The outcome of our patients were similar to World Literature and signet ring cell morphology, pre-treatment CEA level, and pathological nodal staging all were influential in determining survival. Besides this, the study also highlights the fact that tumours with signet ring cell morphology appearing in younger population with poor survival needs prospective evaluation for more intense CRT regimen and aggressive surgical resections.

  16. Factors influencing response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation and outcomes in rectal cancer patients: tertiary Indian cancer hospital experience

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Trinanjan; Chopra, Supriya; Arya, Supreeta; Patil, Prachi; Mehta, Shaesta; Ramadwar, Mukta; Deodhar, Kedar; Shrivastava, Shyam Kishore

    2015-01-01

    Background In the treatment of rectal cancers several randomized trials have demonstrated benefits of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (NACRT) in downstaging as well as survival among these patients. We investigated the patient and tumor related variables dictating the outcomes in these patients. Methods Biopsy proven treatment naive 182 rectal cancer patients underwent NACRT from June 2006 to December 2010. The entire patients received long course conventionally fractionated external beam radiotherapy with concurrent oral Capecitabine. At 6 weeks from completion of NACRT clinico-radiological assessment was carried out for surgical feasibility. All patients were given postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy either single agent or multi drug regimen depending upon biopsy report. Results Among 182 patients, 131 (72%) underwent surgery and initial T stage and signet ring cell morphology were major determinant of operability. Among the 131 operated patients at median follow up of 36 months, 94 (72%) are alive and disease free. With a median follow up of 42 months the 5-year disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) was 60% and 77%. The majority of the failures were distal but with more advanced disease at presentation both local and distal failures were similar. While assessing survival by multivariate analysis patients having positive nodes post-surgery had a significantly poorer DFS (P=0.001), while signet ring cell morphology and pre-treatment carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA) levels strongly influenced OS (P=0.03). Conclusions The outcome of our patients were similar to World Literature and signet ring cell morphology, pre-treatment CEA level, and pathological nodal staging all were influential in determining survival. Besides this, the study also highlights the fact that tumours with signet ring cell morphology appearing in younger population with poor survival needs prospective evaluation for more intense CRT regimen and aggressive surgical resections. PMID

  17. Self-reported health-related quality-of-life issues for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients with experience of cancer in Australia: a review of literature.

    PubMed

    Micklem, Jasmine M

    2015-12-01

    Aboriginal peoples and Torres Strait Islander peoples (who comprise the indigenous people or the original inhabitants of Australia before colonization) are more likely to experience cancers with poorer prognoses, are more likely to be diagnosed with cancer at a later stage of disease progression, are less likely to receive adequate cancer treatment and are more likely to pass away due to cancer, compared with other Australians. Cancer and biomedical therapies for cancer often have significant, ongoing effects on patient health-related quality of life (HRQL). Therefore, consideration of HRQL for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples with experience of cancer in Australia is imperative. This article examines the literature for HRQL issues self-reported by Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people with experience of cancer in Australia. A search of peer-reviewed journal articles, government reports, and other literature was undertaken using electronic databases and citation snowballing. Self-reports from Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people with experience of cancer were examined. HRQL issues were determined utilizing the Australian Psycho-Oncology Co-operative Research Group's definition of HRQL. Fifty-two documents were found with original data from Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people who self-reported their experiences of cancer. No published reports were found that specifically examined self-reports from Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people on the impact of cancer and biomedical treatment on their HRQL. Previous literature suggests that there is urgency for improved communication and cultural competency in cancer care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients in Australia, with a stronger focus on meeting patient needs and improving HRQL. This review has provided insight into HRQL issues for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients with cancer in Australia. Further work using patient-reported outcomes

  18. Initial Experience with Nab-Paclitaxel for Patients with Advanced Gastric Cancer: Safety and Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Yoshikazu; Fujita, Itsuo; Kakinuma, Diasuke; Arai, Hiroki; Matsuno, Kunihiko; Shimoda, Tomohiro; Ko, Kazuhide; Kato, Shunji; Uchida, Eiji

    2017-05-01

    Taxane-based chemotherapy is useful for peritoneal dissemination control in advanced/recurrent gastric cancer; however, insufficient relative dose intensity (RDI) may preclude disease control achievement. Nab-paclitaxel, with high tumour permeability, is a promising second- or later-line treatment. We retrospectively evaluated the clinical safety and efficacy of nab-paclitaxel for advanced/recurrent gastric cancer patients treated between April 2013 and December 2015. The response rate, RDI and survival outcomes were assessed. Of 14 evaluated patients, 4 achieved partial response. Overall response and the disease control rates were 28.5% and 64.2%, respectively. Nine patients developed peritoneal metastasis; their overall response and disease control rate were 22.2% and 66.6%. Patients with high RDI (≥80%) showed longer progression-free and overall survival than those with low RDI (≤80%) (11.8 vs. 4.0 months, p=0.02; and 14.3 vs. 8.2 months, p=0.03, respectively). Nab-paclitaxel, at an RDI ≥80%, was safe and beneficial for these patients. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  19. Cancer of the Throat: A Physician’s Experience as a Patient

    PubMed Central

    Brook, Itzhak

    2016-01-01

    The author, a practicing physician, was diagnosed with throat cancer and lost his vocal cords. He endured the side effects of radiation, repeated surgeries, and the effects of prolonged hospitalizations; confronted medical mistakes and discrimination after losing his vocal cords; and struggled to regain his speech and find new meaning and purpose for his life. Facing the hardship and trials of becoming a laryngectomee illustrated to him how dependent and helpless a patient can become. Being unable to speak, eat, and breathe normally, while dealing with a potentially terminal illness, makes the patient very vulnerable, both physically and emotionally. A skillful, competent, error-free, empathetic, and caring approach that recognizes what the patient is experiencing can expedite recovery and well-being and help the patient return to a productive and meaningful life. PMID:27487313

  20. Screening for Squamous Cell Anal Cancer in HIV Positive Patients: A Five-Year Experience.

    PubMed

    Santorelli, Chiara; Leo, Cosimo Alex; Hodgkinson, Jonathan D; Baldelli, Franco; Cantarella, Francesco; Cavazzoni, Emanuel

    2017-06-23

    Potential screening modalities for early diagnosis of squamous cell anal cancer (SCC) in HIV patients include digital anorectal examination (DARE), anal Papanicolaou testing (Pap test), human papilloma virus (HPV) co-testing, and high-resolution anoscopy. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the results of a five-year screening program for SCC in HIV patients. We conducted a retrospective study on 204 HIV patients who underwent a screening program for SCC from October 2010 to January 2015. All patients were screened by DARE, anal Pap test, including HPV test and cytology, and high-resolution video-proctoscopy (HR-VPS) with and without acetic acid 3%. Depending on macroscopic appearance and biopsies, patients underwent observation or treatment. Median follow-up was 36 months. Cytologic abnormalities (Cyt+) for high-risk HPV genotypes were recorded in 34% of patients. HR-VPS was positive in 59 patients (29%), of whom 13 patients (22%) were positive for warts; the rest have typical features of anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN). Sixteen (8%) patients had AIN (AIN I-III) and underwent wide local excision, ablation, or imiquimod. Absence of progression was recorded. Fourteen patients (7%) had SCC: eight (57%) with no evidence of recurrence, two (14%) had recurrence, and four (29%) died from metastatic disease. Our data demonstrated a successful screening program in preventing SCC in HIV patients. We demonstrate the advantages of progression towards SCC. Moreover, we used a new screening tool, the HR-VPS, a low-cost and manageable instrument to collect patients' long-term data.

  1. Review of Immune-Related Adverse Events in Prostate Cancer Patients Treated with Ipilimumab: MD Anderson Experience

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jianjun; He, Qiuming; Subudhi, Sumit; Aparicio, Ana; Zurita-Saavedra, Amado; Lee, Da Hyun; Jimenez, Camilo; Suarez-Almazor, Maria; Sharma, Padmanee

    2014-01-01

    Targeting a T cell inhibitory checkpoint with the anti-CTLA-4 monoclonal antibody, ipilimumab, represents a scientific breakthrough in immunotherapy for the treatment of cancer. However, ipilimumab therapy is also associated with unique side effects, known as immune-related adverse events (irAEs), which need to be recognized and managed with immunosuppressive agents. To date, the majority of our knowledge regarding ipilimumab-associated side effects is based upon clinical studies in melanoma. Here, we provide a review of ipilimumab-induced irAEs and our experience in a cohort of 44 patients with prostate cancer who were treated at M. D. Anderson Cancer Center on two different clinical trial protocols. PMID:25659583

  2. Interstitial HDR brachytherapy (HDR-BT) in early stage mobile tongue cancers in young patients – Gliwice experience

    PubMed Central

    Białas, Brygida; Fijałkowski, Marek; Składowski, Krzysztof; Szlag, Marta; Cholewka, Agnieszka

    2010-01-01

    Purpose In early stage mobile tongue cancer radical radiotherapy offers good local control and organ preservation, which is especially important in the group of young patients. In our department, for many years HDR-BT has been performed in mobile tongue cancers as a sole treatment or as a “boost” with EBRT. The aim of the study was to show our experience with HDR-BT in early stage mobile tongue cancers among young patients. Material and methods From 2001 to 2006 in Maria Skłodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Centre and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice Branch, five patients under 45 years with mobile tongue cancer were treated with HDR brachytherapy (T1N0M0 – 3/5 and T2N0M0 – 2/5); 4 with HDR brachytherapy “boost” and 1 as a sole treatment. One woman was previously treated with tumour resection, but because of positive surgical margins was referred for radiotherapy. All patients had clinically negative lymph nodes, without dissection. They were treated with interstitial HDR-BT (3-8 catheters). In 4 patients treated with HDR-BT as a “boost”, total doses ranged from 18 to 21 Gy given in 6-7 fractions (twice a day, 3 Gy per fraction). Total doses in EBRT (to local lymph nodes and tumour bed) ranged from 50 to 60 Gy (1.8-2 Gy per fraction 5 days/week). One patient, treated with radical HDR brachytherapy, received 45 Gy in 10 fractions and 50 Gy in EBRT to regional lymph nodes. Results We did not notice local recurrences or distant metastases in our group of patients. Median follow-up was 67 months (range 47-79 months). All patients preserved normal tongue function. A severe late complication occurred in 1 patient – fracture of the mandible. Conclusions In the analysed group of young patients with mobile tongue cancer interstitial HDR brachytherapy in combination with EBRT was an effective and well tolerated treatment modality which allowed preservation of the tongue and its function. PMID:27829846

  3. Interstitial HDR brachytherapy (HDR-BT) in early stage mobile tongue cancers in young patients - Gliwice experience.

    PubMed

    Kellas-Ślęczka, Sylwia; Białas, Brygida; Fijałkowski, Marek; Składowski, Krzysztof; Szlag, Marta; Cholewka, Agnieszka

    2010-06-01

    In early stage mobile tongue cancer radical radiotherapy offers good local control and organ preservation, which is especially important in the group of young patients. In our department, for many years HDR-BT has been performed in mobile tongue cancers as a sole treatment or as a "boost" with EBRT. The aim of the study was to show our experience with HDR-BT in early stage mobile tongue cancers among young patients. From 2001 to 2006 in Maria Skłodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Centre and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice Branch, five patients under 45 years with mobile tongue cancer were treated with HDR brachytherapy (T1N0M0 - 3/5 and T2N0M0 - 2/5); 4 with HDR brachytherapy "boost" and 1 as a sole treatment. One woman was previously treated with tumour resection, but because of positive surgical margins was referred for radiotherapy. All patients had clinically negative lymph nodes, without dissection. They were treated with interstitial HDR-BT (3-8 catheters). In 4 patients treated with HDR-BT as a "boost", total doses ranged from 18 to 21 Gy given in 6-7 fractions (twice a day, 3 Gy per fraction). Total doses in EBRT (to local lymph nodes and tumour bed) ranged from 50 to 60 Gy (1.8-2 Gy per fraction 5 days/week). One patient, treated with radical HDR brachytherapy, received 45 Gy in 10 fractions and 50 Gy in EBRT to regional lymph nodes. We did not notice local recurrences or distant metastases in our group of patients. Median follow-up was 67 months (range 47-79 months). All patients preserved normal tongue function. A severe late complication occurred in 1 patient - fracture of the mandible. In the analysed group of young patients with mobile tongue cancer interstitial HDR brachytherapy in combination with EBRT was an effective and well tolerated treatment modality which allowed preservation of the tongue and its function.

  4. Asian gastric cancer patients show superior survival: the experiences of a single Australian center.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yufei; Haveman, Jan Willem; Apostolou, Christos; Chang, David K; Merrett, Neil D

    2015-04-01

    Survival after curative gastrectomy for gastric cancer varies depending on region. The 5-year survival rates in Western trials reach 36-47% compared with 40-60% in Japanese studies. We analyzed the outcomes of Asian and non-Asian patients at a single Australian institution. We analyzed a prospectively kept database of patients following gastric resection between 1994 and 2010 at a tertiary Australian hospital. Overall survival was the primary endpoint. A total of 160 patients underwent a R0 gastrectomy with curative intent, of whom 26 (16%) were of Asian descent. Asian patients had a significantly younger age at diagnosis (60 ± 16 vs. 70 ± 11, p < 0.05) and longer overall survival (log-rank p = 0.018). Poor prognostic factors common to both groups included increased tumor length, higher T-score, higher LN ratio, poor tumor differentiation, and the presence of perineural or perivascular invasion. Multivariate analysis showed that non-Asian patients, higher T-score, higher N-score, and perivascular involvement were all independent predictors of poorer outcome. This study shows superior overall survival in Asian patients despite similar clinicopathological and treatment data. The younger age at diagnosis in Asian patients may suggest a different disease process between ethnicities. Targeted therapies based on population-specific tumor biology may potentially be beneficial.

  5. The Influence of Serum Cortisol Level Onto Perceptive Experience of Optimism in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Cancer.

    PubMed

    Vukojevic, Mladenka; Dodaj, Arta; Galic, Kristina; Marijanovic, Inga

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the correlation between the morning level of serum cortisol and perceptive experience of optimism in a selected group of 60 patients with newly diagnosed cancer who were treated at Mostar University Clinical Hospital during a one-month period. The morning level of serum cortisol was measured in all patients following the verification of oncological disease. The patients also filled out a questionnaire of socio-demographic data, as well as the scales for optimism/pessimism assessment. The average morning serum cortisol level was within the reference values in the majority of patients, independently of their perceptive experience of optimism/pessimism. There was no significant difference in the morning level of serum cortisol among the subgroups of patients high and low on the scale of optimism, as well as the scale of pessimism. No correlation existed between the serum cortisol morning level and expressed optimism/pessimism, as well. The great majority of respondents had secondary and lower education, was retired or unemployed, and suffered lower socio-economic conditions of life. Therefore, their access to medical information and their knowledge of cancer modern treatment options and possibilities were restricted, what may also have an influence onto perceptive experience of optimism/pessimism. The results concerned with the perceptive experience of optimism/pessimism assessment were not a consequence of stress reaction but they were more correlated to general personal characteristics, the level of education, and socio-economic status of patients. The results do not confirm the impact of morning serum cortisol level onto physiological reactions to stressful conditions and situations in selected group of patients with de novo carcinoma.

  6. The Experiences of Patients With Advanced Head and Neck Cancer With a Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy Tube: A Qualitative Descriptive Study.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Janna P Y; Stokes, Edith J; Posluns, Elaine C; Fitch, Margaret I; McAndrew, Alison; Vandenbussche, Katherine A

    2014-08-01

    Background: While the percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube has become an established part of the management regimen for patients with head and neck cancer (HNCA) with impaired nutrition and functional status, limited research has explored the impact and experiences of living with a PEG tube from the patient's perspective. This qualitative study serves as a follow-up investigation undertaken to describe the experiences of patients with advanced HNCA living with a PEG tube. Materials and Methods: Eligible patients from convenience sampling were invited to participate until data saturation was reached. In-depth interviews were conducted with consenting participants. Qualitative descriptive design guided the content analysis of the interview transcripts. Results: Of the 49 patients invited, a total of 15 participants' interviews were transcribed and analyzed. Each interview was 15-90 minutes in length. Four of 22 content codes were chosen to describe the overarching ideas of the progressive experience of a patient's journey from the initial decision-making process around tube insertion through to its removal. Difficulty swallowing and weight loss emerged as primary factors for PEG tube insertion, and all participants became accustomed to living with the tube. Resuming a complete oral diet was a gradual transition. All participants recognized the value of the tube, and most acknowledged its necessity for their survival. Conclusions: Results describe the overall PEG tube experience as a dichotomy. While there were issues with the PEG tube, all participants found the tube to be beneficial. This study provides invaluable insight from a practice perspective.

  7. The Outcome of Patients with Triple Negative Breast Cancer: The Turkish Oncology Group Experience

    PubMed Central

    Eralp, Yeşim; Kılıç, Leyla; Alço, Gül; Başaran, Gül; Doğan, Mutlu; Dinçol, Dilek; Demirci, Senem; İçli, Fikri; Onur, Handan; Saip, Pınar; Haydaroğlu, Ayfer

    2014-01-01

    Objective Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is generally considered as a poorer prognostic subgroup, with propensity for earlier relapse and visceral involvement. The aim of this study is to evaluate the outcome of non-metastatic TNBC patients from different centers in Turkey and identify clinical and pathologic variables that may effect survival. Materials and Methods Between 1993–2007, from five different centers in Turkey, 316 nonmetastatic triple negative breast cancer patients were identified with follow-up of at least 12 months. The data was collected retrospectively from patient charts. The prognostic impact of several clinical variables were evaluated by the Kaplan-Meier and Cox multivariate anayses. Results Mean age at diagnosis was 49 years (range: 24–82). The majority of the patient group had invasive ductal carcinoma (n: 260, 82.3%) and stage II disease (n: 164; 51.9%). Majority of the patients (87.7%) received adjuvant chemotherapy. 5 year overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) rates were 84.6% and 71.6%, respectively. Univariate analysis revealed locally advanced disease (p: 0.001), advanced pathological stage (p: 0.021), larger tumor size (T1&T2 vs T3&T4) (p<0.001), nodal positivity (p: 0.006), and extensive nodal involvement (p<0.001) as significant factors for DFS; whereas, advanced pathological stage (p: 0.017), extensive nodal involvement (p<0.001) and larger tumor size (p: 0,001) and presence of breast cancer-affected member in the family (p=0.05) were identified as prognostic factors with an impact on OS. Multivariate analysis revealed larger tumor size (T3&T4 vs T1&T2) and presence of lymph node metastases (node-positive vs node-negative) as significant independent prognostic factors for DFS (Hazard ratio (HR): 3.03, 95% CI: 1.71–5.35, p<0.001 and HR: 1.77, 95% CI: 1.05–3.0, p=0.03, respectively). Higher tumor stage was the only independent factor affecting overall survival (HR: 2.81; 95% CI, 1.27–6.22, p=0

  8. Noncutaneous head and neck cancer in solid organ transplant patients: single center experience.

    PubMed

    Nelissen, Charlotte; Lambrecht, Maarten; Nevens, Frederik; Van Raemdonck, Dirk; Vanhaecke, Johan; Kuypers, Dirk; Pirenne, Jacques; Nuyts, Sandra

    2014-04-01

    We investigated the incidence and survival of non-cutaneous head and neck cancer (HNC) after solid organ transplantation and identified prognostic factors impacting the outcome after treatment. A retrospective analysis of patients who underwent solid organ transplantation in our institution between 1987 and 2012. Of 5255 organ transplant patients, 48 recipients (0.9%) developed HNC in the posttransplant follow-up period. Liver transplant recipients showed the highest risk. Median follow-up of cancer patients was 46.7 months (range 2.9-256.2 months). Three-year overall survival and disease free survival (DFS) were 70% and 53%. Locoregional control was 67% and 48% at 3 and 5 years, respectively. Smoking and initial AJCC stage were two significant prognostic factors influencing DFS. Non-cutaneous HNC is rare in transplant recipients, but slightly more common after liver transplantation. Outcome after treatment is poor with locoregional recurrence being the main problem. Screening of high risk groups might be relevant. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The experience of imagery as a post-treatment intervention in patients with breast cancer: program, process, and patient recommendations.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Lyn; Cohen, Lorenzo; Stewart, Mary; White, Rebecca; Link, Judith; Palmer, J Lynn; Welton, Derek; McBride, Lisa; Hild, Carl M

    2008-11-01

    To better understand the common themes of women participating in an imagery program designed to improve quality of life (QOL). Qualitative. Classroom setting at Alaska Regional Hospital in Anchorage. 10 women with a confirmed diagnosis of breast cancer who had completed conventional care participated in a six-class, eight-week-long imagery program titled Envision the Rhythms of Life (ERL). Focus group audio recordings and notes were interpreted with the Krueger focus group method and confirmed by an outside evaluator. Breast cancer survivors' descriptions of imagery practice and experience as they created passive, active, and targeted imagery. Participants reported the importance of engaging passive and active imagery, letting targeted imagery take on a life of its own, performing homework, understanding the science, practicing, hearing imagery stories, engaging all the senses, trusting imagery, and group interaction. Imagery practice improved mood state. When delivered by expert imagery trainers in collaboration with oncology nurses, ERL can improve breast cancer survivors' QOL. The present study is one of few reports that evaluated survivors' imagery experiences from a clinical trial and produced significant QOL improvements. The present study provides oncology nurses understanding of the psychological risks faced by breast cancer survivors after completion of primary care and explains the critical need for post-treatment programs for survivors dealing with post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, anxiety, or high levels of stress.

  10. Overexpression of Rad51 Predicts Poor Prognosis in Colorectal Cancer: Our Experience with 54 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Feng; Liao, Dian-ying; Xie, Li; Wang, Jin; Luo, Feng

    2017-01-01

    Background Aberrant Rad51 expression is implicated in the progression of human malignancies. However, the role of Rad51 in colorectal cancer (CRC) remains undefined. This study aimed to establish a relationship between Rad51 and clinicopathologic features of CRC. Methods We retrospectively examined the paraffin-embedded tissue samples obtained from 54 patients with CRC who had received surgical therapies at our institution during 2006–2008. Rad51 expression in adenocarcinoma, paracancerous tissue, and normal colonic tissue was determined by immunohistochemistry. The correlation between Rad51 immunoreactivity and clinicopathologic features of these patients was evaluated. Results Rad51 immunoreactivity was detected in 67% of adenocarcinoma, 48% of paracancerous tissue, and 27% of normal colonic mucosa. Rad51 expression in adenocarcinoma was significantly higher than normal colonic tissue (p < 0.05). Rad51 was also overexpressed in poorly differentiated tumors and tumor samples from patients with lymph node metastasis (p < 0.05). Patients with Rad51 overexpression had a 69% two-year survival, 49% three-year survival, and 16% five-year survival, considerably worse than patients with negative Rad51 expression (p < 0.05). Conclusion Our data suggest that Rad51 overexpression is correlated with malignant phenotypes of CRC and may predict poor prognosis for these patients. PMID:28099437

  11. Complementary and conventional providers in cancer care: experience of communication with patients and steps to improve communication with other providers.

    PubMed

    Stub, Trine; Quandt, Sara A; Arcury, Thomas A; Sandberg, Joanne C; Kristoffersen, Agnete E

    2017-06-08

    Effective interdisciplinary communication is important to achieve better quality in health care. The aims of this study were to compare conventional and complementary providers' experience of communication about complementary therapies and conventional medicine with their cancer patients, and to investigate how they experience interdisciplinary communication and cooperation. This study analyzed data from a self-administrated questionnaire. A total of 606 different health care providers, from four counties in Norway, completed the questionnaire. The survey was developed to describe aspects of the communication pattern among oncology doctors, nurses, family physicians and complementary therapists (acupuncturists, massage therapists and reflexologists/zone-therapists). Between-group differences were analyzed using chi-square, ANOVA and Fisher's exact tests. Significance level was defined as p < 0.05 without adjustment for multiple comparisons. Conventional providers and complementary therapists had different patterns of communication with their cancer patients regarding complementary therapies. While complementary therapists advised their patients to apply both complementary and conventional modalities, medical doctors were less supportive of their patients' use of complementary therapies. Of conventional providers, nurses expressed more positive attitudes toward complementary therapies. Opportunities to improve communication between conventional and complementary providers were most strongly supported by complementary providers and nurses; medical doctors were less supportive of such attempts. A number of doctors showed lack of respect for complementary therapists, but asked for more research, guidelines for complementary modalities and training in conventional medicine for complementary therapists. For better quality of care, greater communication about complementary therapy use is needed between cancer patients and their conventional and complementary providers

  12. Characteristics of breast cancer patients with central nervous system metastases: a single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Harputluoglu, Hakan; Dizdar, Omer; Aksoy, Sercan; Kilickap, Saadettin; Dede, Didem S; Ozisik, Yavuz; Guler, Nilufer; Barista, Ibrahim; Gullu, Ibrahim; Hayran, Mutlu; Selek, Ugur; Cengiz, Mustafa; Zorlu, Faruk; Tekuzman, Gulten; Altundag, Kadri

    2008-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the characteristics of breast cancer patients with central nervous system (CNS) metastases and factors associated with survival after development of CNS metastasis. One-hundred-forty-four patients with brain metastases were retrospectively analyzed. Median age at the time of brain metastasis diagnosis was 48.9. Median time between initial diagnosis and development of brain metastasis was 36 months. Fourteen cases had leptomeningeal involvement. Twenty-two patients (15.3%) had single metastasis. Ten percent of the patients had surgery, 94% had radiotherapy and 63% had chemotherapy. Median survival after development of brain metastasis was 7.4 months. Survival of patients with single metastasis was significantly longer than those with multiple metastases (33.5 vs. 6.5 months, p = 0.0006). Survival of patients who received chemotherapy was significantly longer than those who received radiotherapy alone (9.9 vs. 2 months, p < 0.0001). In multivariate Cox regression analyses, presence of single metastasis and application of chemotherapy were the only significant factors associated with better survival (p = 0.047 and p < 0.0001, respectively). Age at initial diagnosis or at the time of brain metastasis, time from initial diagnosis to development of brain metastasis, menopausal status, tumor stage, grade, hormone receptor or HER2 status individually were not associated with survival. In this study, survival after the diagnosis of CNS metastases appeared to be affected by patient characteristics rather than biologic characteristics of the tumor. This is probably secondary to the lack of effective treatment options in these patients and overall poor prognosis.

  13. Experience with carboplatin and etoposide maintenance chemotherapy in patients with extensive stage small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqi, Amaan; Bahrain, Huzefa; Auerbach, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether maintenance therapy with carboplatin and etoposide improves progression-free and overall survival in patients with extensive stage small cell lung cancer, compared to the standard four to six cycles of cisplatin and etoposide. Methods Forty-two patient records (25 males and 17 females) were retrospectively reviewed in a single community practice. All patients were over the age of 18, with pathologically and radiographically proven extensive stage small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC). The starting doses of chemotherapy were carboplatin, AUC (area under the curve) of 6 IV day 1, and etoposide, 100 mg/m2 IV days 1–3. The regimen was administered every 3 weeks and increased to every 4 to 5 weeks as tolerated or until documented progression occurred. Varying second-line chemotherapies were used. Results Median overall survival was 17 months from diagnosis, with a progression-free survival of 15 months. Seventy-nine percent of the patients survived more than 10 months. The 1- and 2-year overall survival (OAS) rates were 0.74 (31 patients) and 0.31 (13 patients), respectively. The 1- and 2-year progression free survival (PFS) rates were 0.50 (21 patients) and 0.21 (9 patients), respectively. Conclusion The improved overall and progression-free survival compared to the current standard in this small single center cohort suggests that maintenance therapy with carboplatin and etoposide to progression may be a prudent area for further investigation in a properly powered randomized, controlled trial. PMID:28210117

  14. Trends in cancer survivors' experience of patient-centered communication: results from the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS).

    PubMed

    Blanch-Hartigan, Danielle; Chawla, Neetu; Moser, Richard P; Finney Rutten, Lila J; Hesse, Bradford W; Arora, Neeraj K

    2016-12-01

    Two Institute of Medicine reports almost a decade apart suggest that cancer survivors often feel "lost in transition" and experience suboptimal quality of care. The six core functions of patient-centered communication: managing uncertainty, responding to emotions, making decisions, fostering healing relationships, enabling self-management, and exchanging information, represent a central aspect of survivors' care experience that has not been systematically investigated. Nationally representative data from four administrations of the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) was merged with combined replicate weights using the jackknife replication method. Linear and logistic regression models were used to assess (1) characteristics of cancer survivors (N = 1794) who report suboptimal patient-centered communication and (2) whether survivors' patient-centered communication experience changed from 2007 to 2013. One third to one half of survivors report suboptimal patient-centered communication, particularly on core functions of providers helping manage uncertainty (48 %) and responding to emotions (49 %). In a fully adjusted linear regression model, survivors with more education (Wald F = 2.84, p = .04), without a usual source of care (Wald F = 11.59, p < .001), and in poorer health (Wald F = 9.08, p < .001) were more likely to report less patient-centered communication. Although ratings of patient-centered communication improved over time (p trend = .04), this trend did not remain significant in fully adjusted models. Despite increased attention to survivorship, many survivors continue to report suboptimal communication with their health care providers. Survivorship communication should include managing uncertainty about future risk and address survivors' emotional needs. Efforts to improve patient-centered communication should focus on survivors without a usual source of care and in poorer health.

  15. A guided self-help intervention targeting psychological distress among head and neck cancer and lung cancer patients: motivation to start, experiences and perceived outcomes.

    PubMed

    Krebber, Anne-Marie H; van Uden-Kraan, Cornelia F; Melissant, Heleen C; Cuijpers, Pim; van Straten, Annemieke; Becker-Commissaris, Annemarie; Leemans, C René; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M

    2017-01-01

    Recent results of a randomized clinical trial showed that a guided self-help intervention (based on problem-solving therapy) targeting psychological distress among head and neck cancer and lung cancer patients is effective. This study qualitatively explored motivation to start, experiences with and perceived outcomes of this intervention. Data were collected from semi-structured interviews of 16 patients. All interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data were analyzed individually by two coders and coded into key issues and themes. Patients participated in the intervention for intrinsic (e.g. to help oneself) and for extrinsic reasons (e.g. being asked by a care professional or to help improve health care). Participants indicated positive and negative experiences with the intervention. Several participants appreciated participating as being a pleasant way to work on oneself, while others described participating as too confrontational. Some expressed their disappointment as they felt the intervention had brought them nothing or indicated that they felt worse temporarily, but most participants perceived positive outcomes of the intervention (e.g. feeling less distressed and having learned what matters in life). Cancer patients have various reasons to start a guided self-help intervention. Participants appreciated the guided self-help as intervention to address psychological distress, but there were also concerns. Most participants reported the intervention to be beneficial. The results suggest the need to identify patients who might benefit most from guided self-help targeting psychological distress and that interventions should be further tailored to individual cancer patients' requirements.

  16. Radiotherapy Timing in 4,820 Patients With Breast Cancer: University of Florence Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Livi, Lorenzo Borghesi, Simona; Saieva, Calogero; Meattini, Icro; Rampini, Andrea; Petrucci, Alessia; Detti, Beatrice; Bruni, Alessio; Paiar, Fabiola; Mangoni, Monica; Marrazzo, Livia; Agresti, Benedetta; Cataliotti, Luigi; Bianchi, Simonetta; Biti, Giampaolo

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: To analyze the relationship between a delay in radiotherapy (RT) after breast-conserving surgery and ipsilateral breast recurrence (BR). Methods and Materials: We included in our analysis 4,820 breast cancer patients who had undergone postoperative RT at University of Florence. The patients were categorized into four groups according to the interval between surgery and RT (T1, <60 days; T2, 61-120 days; T3, 121-180 days; and T4, >180 days). Results: On multivariate analysis, the timing of RT did not reach statistical significance in patients who received only postoperative RT (n = 1,935) or RT and hormonal therapy (HT) (n = 1,684) or RT, chemotherapy (CHT), and HT (n = 529). In the postoperative RT-only group, age at presentation, surgical margin status, and a boost to the tumor bed were independent prognostic factors for BR. In the RT plus HT group, age at presentation and boost emerged as independent prognostic factors for BR (p = 0.006 and p = 0.049, respectively). Finally, in the RT, CHT, and HT group, only multifocality was an independent BR predictor (p = 0.01). Only in the group of patients treated with RT and CHT (n = 672) did multivariate analysis with stepwise selection show RT timing as an independent prognostic factor (hazard ratio, 1.59; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-2.52; p = 0.045). Analyzing this group of patients, we found that most patients included had worse prognostic factors and had received CHT consisting of cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and 5-fluorouracil before undergoing RT. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that the timing of RT itself does not affect local recurrence, which is mainly related to prognostic factors. Thus, the 'waiting list' should be thought of as a 'programming list,' with patients scheduled for RT according to their prognostic factors.

  17. Experiences With a Self-Reported Mobile Phone-Based System Among Patients With Colorectal Cancer: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background In cancer care, mobile phone-based systems are becoming more widely used in the assessment, monitoring, and management of side effects. Objective To explore the experiences of patients with colorectal cancer on using a mobile phone-based system for reporting neurotoxic side effects. Methods Eleven patients were interviewed (ages 44-68 years). A semistructured interview guide was used to perform telephone interviews. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed with qualitative content analysis. Results The patients' experiences of using a mobile phone-based system were identified and constructed as: “being involved,” “pacing oneself,” and “managing the questions.” “Being involved” refers to their individual feelings. Patients were participating in their own care by being observant of the side effects they were experiencing. They were aware that the answers they gave were monitored in real time and taken into account by health care professionals when planning further treatment. “Pacing oneself” describes how the patients can have an impact on the time and place they choose to answer the questions. Answering the questionnaire was easy, and despite the substantial number of questions, it was quickly completed. “Managing the questions” pointed out that the patients needed to be observant because of the construction of the questions. They could not routinely answer all the questions. Patients understood that side effects can vary during the cycles of treatment and need to be assessed repeatedly during treatment. Conclusions This mobile phone-based system reinforced the patients’ feeling of involvement in their own care. The patients were comfortable with the technology and appreciated that the system was not time consuming. PMID:27282257

  18. Older Cancer Patients' User Experiences With Web-Based Health Information Tools: A Think-Aloud Study.

    PubMed

    Bolle, Sifra; Romijn, Geke; Smets, Ellen M A; Loos, Eugene F; Kunneman, Marleen; van Weert, Julia C M

    2016-07-25

    Health information is increasingly presented on the Internet. Several Web design guidelines for older Web users have been proposed; however, these guidelines are often not applied in website development. Furthermore, although we know that older individuals use the Internet to search for health information, we lack knowledge on how they use and evaluate Web-based health information. This study evaluates user experiences with existing Web-based health information tools among older (≥ 65 years) cancer patients and survivors and their partners. The aim was to gain insight into usability issues and the perceived usefulness of cancer-related Web-based health information tools. We conducted video-recorded think-aloud observations for 7 Web-based health information tools, specifically 3 websites providing cancer-related information, 3 Web-based question prompt lists (QPLs), and 1 values clarification tool, with colorectal cancer patients or survivors (n=15) and their partners (n=8) (median age: 73; interquartile range 70-79). Participants were asked to think aloud while performing search, evaluation, and application tasks using the Web-based health information tools. Overall, participants perceived Web-based health information tools as highly useful and indicated a willingness to use such tools. However, they experienced problems in terms of usability and perceived usefulness due to difficulties in using navigational elements, shortcomings in the layout, a lack of instructions on how to use the tools, difficulties with comprehensibility, and a large amount of variety in terms of the preferred amount of information. Although participants frequently commented that it was easy for them to find requested information, we observed that the large majority of the participants were not able to find it. Overall, older cancer patients appreciate and are able to use cancer information websites. However, this study shows the importance of maintaining awareness of age-related problems

  19. Family involvement in cancer treatment decision-making: A qualitative study of patient, family, and clinician attitudes and experiences.

    PubMed

    Laidsaar-Powell, Rebekah; Butow, Phyllis; Bu, Stella; Charles, Cathy; Gafni, Amiram; Fisher, Alana; Juraskova, Ilona

    2016-07-01

    Little is known about how family are involved in cancer treatment decision-making. This study aimed to qualitatively explore Australian oncology clinicians', patients', and family members' attitudes towards, and experiences of, family involvement in decision-making. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 30 cancer patients, 33 family members, 10 oncology nurses and 11 oncologists. Framework analysis methods were used. Three main themes were uncovered: (i) how family are involved in the decision-making process: specific behaviours of family across 5 (extended) decision-making stages; (ii) attitudes towards family involvement in the decision-making process: balancing patient authority with the rights of the family; and (iii) factors influencing family involvement: patient, family, cultural, relationship, and decision. This study highlighted many specific behaviours of family throughout the decision-making process, the complex participant attitudes toward retaining patient authority whilst including the family, and insight into influencing factors. These findings will inform a conceptual framework describing family involvement in decision-making. Clinicians could ascertain participant preferences and remain open to the varying forms of family involvement in decision-making. Given the important role of family in the decision-making process, family inclusive consultation strategies are needed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Radiotherapy of early breast cancer in scleroderma patients: our experience with four cases and a short review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Kyrgias, George; Theodorou, Kiki; Zygogianni, Anna; Tsanadis, Konstantinos; Zervoudis, Stefanos; Tzitzikas, John; Koukourakis, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Connective vascular diseases (CVD), including scleroderma, are reported to represent for some researchers a relative contraindication and for others absolute contraindication for radiotherapy. The purpose of our study is to add four new cases to the existing body of international literature and to determine whether women with pre-existing scleroderma who have been surgically treated for early breast cancer could undergo postsurgical radiotherapy without serious early and late complications. Patients and methods From May 1998 to November 2010, we irradiated for early breast cancer four patients suffering from pre-existing scleroderma; after conservative surgery, we performed whole breast postoperative radiotherapy of 50.4 Gy total dose to the whole breast plus a 9 Gy boost to the tumor bed. We reviewed the records of all four patients and evaluated the early and late reactions using acute radiation morbidity scoring criteria (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group [RTOG], American College of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA) and late radiation morbidity scoring scheme (European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer [EORTC], Brussels, Belgium and RTOG). Results After a median follow-up of 105 months (range 12–155 months) the early and late toxicity concerning the skin, the subcutaneous tissues, the lungs, and the heart have been acceptable and are in full accordance with what have been reported in international literature. Conclusion This study matches global experience, which shows that patients with scleroderma and breast cancer must be discussed by the multidisciplinary tumor board in order for a personalized treatment strategy to be formulated. Radiation therapy can be proposed as a postsurgical therapeutic option in selected cases. PMID:24367188

  1. Single-Institution Experience with Irreversible Electroporation for T4 Pancreatic Cancer: First 50 Patients.

    PubMed

    Kluger, Michael D; Epelboym, Irene; Schrope, Beth A; Mahendraraj, Krishnaraj; Hecht, Elizabeth M; Susman, Jonathan; Weintraub, Joshua L; Chabot, John A

    2016-05-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) for treatment of locally advanced pancreatic tumors is garnering increasing attention. This study was conducted to determine perioperative morbidity and mortality for locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Prospective data of 50 consecutive patients receiving IRE for T4 lesions at a single tertiary center were analyzed. The primary end point was Clavien-Dindo complications at 90 days, and the secondary outcomes were survival and recurrence. A total of 50 patients underwent 53 IRE procedures for primary treatment (n = 29) or margin extension (n = 24), and 47 patients had adenocarcinoma. Six patients died within 90 days after the procedure (5 in the primary control group). Mortality occurred a median of 26 days (range, 8-42 days) after the procedure. Five patients in both the margin-extension and primary control groups experienced grade 3 or 4 morbidity (p = 0.739). The incidences of grades 3 to 5 complications did not differ significantly based on the adjustable parameters of IRE, tumor size, or primary treatment versus margin extension. After a median follow-up period of 8.69 months [interquartile range (IQR), 0.26-16.26 months], the median overall survival period for the primary control group was 7.71 months [95 % confidence interval (CI), 6.03-12.0 months) and was not reached in the margin-extension group (p = 0.01, log-rank). At the authors' center, the mortality rate after IRE was higher than reported in other series, with the majority occurring in the primary control group. Major morbidity trended around upper gastrointestinal bleeding, visceral ulcerations/perforations, and portal vein thromboses. This favors further investigation of the safety and efficacy of IRE.

  2. Development and testing of a text-mining approach to analyse patients' comments on their experiences of colorectal cancer care.

    PubMed

    Wagland, Richard; Recio-Saucedo, Alejandra; Simon, Michael; Bracher, Michael; Hunt, Katherine; Foster, Claire; Downing, Amy; Glaser, Adam; Corner, Jessica

    2016-08-01

    Quality of cancer care may greatly impact on patients' health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Free-text responses to patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) provide rich data but analysis is time and resource-intensive. This study developed and tested a learning-based text-mining approach to facilitate analysis of patients' experiences of care and develop an explanatory model illustrating impact on HRQoL. Respondents to a population-based survey of colorectal cancer survivors provided free-text comments regarding their experience of living with and beyond cancer. An existing coding framework was tested and adapted, which informed learning-based text mining of the data. Machine-learning algorithms were trained to identify comments relating to patients' specific experiences of service quality, which were verified by manual qualitative analysis. Comparisons between coded retrieved comments and a HRQoL measure (EQ5D) were explored. The survey response rate was 63.3% (21 802/34 467), of which 25.8% (n=5634) participants provided free-text comments. Of retrieved comments on experiences of care (n=1688), over half (n=1045, 62%) described positive care experiences. Most negative experiences concerned a lack of post-treatment care (n=191, 11% of retrieved comments) and insufficient information concerning self-management strategies (n=135, 8%) or treatment side effects (n=160, 9%). Associations existed between HRQoL scores and coded algorithm-retrieved comments. Analysis indicated that the mechanism by which service quality impacted on HRQoL was the extent to which services prevented or alleviated challenges associated with disease and treatment burdens. Learning-based text mining techniques were found useful and practical tools to identify specific free-text comments within a large dataset, facilitating resource-efficient qualitative analysis. This method should be considered for future PROM analysis to inform policy and practice. Study findings indicated that

  3. Familiarity, opinions, experiences and knowledge about scalp cooling: a Dutch survey among breast cancer patients and oncological professionals

    PubMed Central

    Peerbooms, Mijke; van den Hurk, Corina JG; Breed, Wim PM

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Scalp cooling (SC) is applied to reduce chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA). The aim of this study was to investigate patients’ familiarity and opinions and oncological professionals’ attitude and knowledge about SC in the Netherlands. Methods: Ex breast cancer patients, nurses and medical oncologists (MDs) from SC and non-SC hospitals filled out questionnaires. Results: The majority of MDs and nurses were satisfied with the results of SC, as were SC patients. Over 33% of MDs and nurses perceived their knowledge level insufficient to inform patients about effectiveness, which was over 43% for information about safety. MDs main reason to not apply SC was doubt about effectiveness and safety. Nurses generally offered SC to a minority of eligible patients. Patients were frequently unfamiliar with SC before diagnosis. Seventy percent of SC patients with insufficient results (20/52) reported to mind it very much. With expected success rates of 35% and 50%, respectively, 36% and 54% of patients would use SC again. Conclusion: Room for improvement has been shown for both patients’ familiarity and oncological professionals’ knowledge about SC. Sharing knowledge about results, safety and patients’ experiences will improve patient counseling and SC availability. The results of this survey led to the development of a national standard on CIA and SC. PMID:27981090

  4. Lived experiences of everyday life during curative radiotherapy in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer: A phenomenological study.

    PubMed

    Petri, Suzanne; Berthelsen, Connie B

    2015-01-01

    To explore and describe the essential meaning of lived experiences of the phenomenon: Everyday life during curative radiotherapy in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Radiotherapy treatment in patients with NSCLC is associated with severe side effects such as fatigue, anxiety, and reduced quality of life. However, little is known about the patients' experience of everyday life during the care trajectory. This study takes a reflective lifeworld approach using an empirical application of phenomenological philosophy described by Dahlberg and colleagues. A sample of three patients treated with curative radiotherapy for NSCLC was interviewed 3 weeks after the end of radiotherapy treatment about their experiences of everyday life during their treatment. Data were collected in 2014 and interviews and analysis were conducted within the descriptive phenomenological framework. The essential meaning structure of the phenomenon studied was described as "Hope for recovery serving as a compass in a changed everyday life," which was a guide for the patients through the radiotherapy treatment to support their efforts in coping with side effects. The constituents of the structure were: Radiotherapy as a life priority, A struggle for acceptance of an altered everyday life, Interpersonal relationships for better or worse, and Meeting the health care system. The meaning of hope was essential during radiotherapy treatment and our results suggest that interpersonal relationships can be a prerequisite to the experience of hope. "Hope for recovery serving as a compass in a changed everyday life," furthermore identifies the essentials in the patients' assertive approach to believing in recovery and thereby enabling hope in a serious situation.

  5. Malposition of peripherally inserted central catheter: experience from 3012 cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Song, Linping; Li, Xiaosong; Guo, Yanyan; Ye, Min; Ma, Yanlan; Guo, Mei; Du, Nan; Li, Hui

    2014-08-01

    The objectives of the study are to observe and analyze the causes of 237 patients' malposition peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) from 3012 patients in clinical practice and to further explore the methods of its prevention and remedies, which can help to improve the skills of placing tubes, to efficiently avoid and reduce the occurrence of complications, and to alleviate the pains and cost of patients. From August 2000 to March 2012, 3012 cases receiving PICC were reviewed. The locations of the tube tips were recorded by chest X ray and summarized for analysis. Malposition was observed in 237 cases (7.87%). The most frequently occurring site was in the jugular vein followed by the axillary vein. By taking different remedies, all the malpositioned PICCs were relocated in the superior vena cava or subclavian vein. In order to secure the safety usage of PICC, the strict rules of handling, the skill and experience of operator, and cooperation patients are necessary. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  6. The health care experience of patients with cancer during the last year of life: Analysis of the SEER-CAHPS data set.

    PubMed

    Halpern, Michael T; Urato, Matthew P; Kent, Erin E

    2017-01-01

    Providing high-quality medical care for individuals with cancer during their last year of life involves a range of challenges. An important component of high-quality care during this critical period is ensuring optimal patient satisfaction. The objective of the current study was to assess factors influencing health care ratings among individuals with cancer within 1 year before death. The current study used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CAHPS) data set, a new data resource linking patient-reported information from the CAHPS Medicare Survey with clinical information from the National Cancer Institute's SEER program. The study included 5102 Medicare beneficiaries diagnosed with cancer who completed CAHPS between 1998 and 2011 within 1 year before their death. Multivariable logistic regression analyses examined associations between patient demographic and insurance characteristics with 9 measures of health care experience. Patients with higher general or mental health status were significantly more likely to indicate excellent experience with nearly all measures examined. Sex, race/ethnicity, and education also were found to be significant predictors for certain ratings. Greater time before death predicted an increased likelihood of higher ratings for health plan and specialist physician. Clinical characteristics were found to have few significant associations with experience of care. Individuals in fee-for-service Medicare plans (vs Medicare Advantage) had a greater likelihood of excellent experience with health plans, getting care quickly, and getting needed care. Among patients with cancer within 1 year before death, experience with health plans, physicians, and medical care were found to be associated with sociodemographic, insurance, and clinical characteristics. These findings provide guidance for the development of programs to improve the experience of care among individuals with

  7. A Qualitative Inquiry of the Lived Experiences of Music Therapists Who Have Survived Cancer Who Are Working with Medical and Hospice Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Hyung

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a debilitating illness that affects more than one in every three Americans at sometime in their life time regardless of their social, cultural, ethnic, religious, or economic status. A few studies in the psychotherapy literature have investigated the impact of cancer on the personal and professional lives of psychotherapists. However, such investigations are yet unknown in medical or music therapy literature. In this descriptive phenomenological study, the researcher interviewed five American music therapists who have survived cancer and also work with patients in medical hospitals or hospice settings. The purpose of this study was to fully describe their lived experience of surviving cancer and examine how the cancer experience affected their clinical work thereafter. The data was analyzed using an open coding method from grounded theory which identified four major themes: (a) personal significance; (b) relational significance; (c) musical significance and (d) professional significance. The descriptions provided by these participants of their cancer experience as patients, survivors, and cancer surviving therapists, have revealed various psychosocial and physical issues encountered, and numerous coping methods they employed, and poignantly explained how their clinical approach evolved and expanded due to the personal experience of cancer. Specific issues in relation to countertransference, self-disclosure, and ways of developing empathic approaches without having such personal experience were discussed in addition to suggestions for future research. PMID:27917147

  8. Exploring the Cervical Cancer Screening Experiences of Black Lesbian, Bisexual, and Queer Women: The Role of Patient-Provider Communication.

    PubMed

    Agénor, Madina; Bailey, Zinzi; Krieger, Nancy; Austin, S Bryn; Gottlieb, Barbara R

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have focused on the health and health care of U.S. black lesbian, bisexual, and queer (LBQ) women. To understand the facilitators of and barriers to cervical cancer screening in this population, focus group discussions were conducted in Boston and Cambridge, Massachusetts between November and December 2012. Using purposive sampling methods, the authors enrolled 18 black LBQ women who participated in one of four focus groups. Using thematic analysis, patient-provider communication was identified, which consisted of four sub-themes--health care provider communication style and demeanor; heteronormative provider assumptions; heterosexism, racism, and classism; and provider professional and sociodemographic background--as the most salient theme. Participants reported fears and experiences of multiple forms of discrimination and preferred receiving care from providers who were knowledgeable about same-sex sexual health and shared their life experiences at the intersection of gender, race/ethnicity, and sexual orientation. The cervical cancer screening experiences of black LBQ women would be improved by training all health care providers in same-sex sexual health, offering opportunities for clinicians to learn about the effects of various forms of discrimination on women's health care, and increasing the presence of LBQ women of color in health care settings.

  9. [Experience with everolimus therapy for patients with metastatic renal cancer in Hungary].

    PubMed

    Maráz, Anikó; Bodoky, György; Dank, Magdolna; Géczi, Lajos; Kahán, Zsuzsanna; Mangel, László; Révész, János; Szűcs, Miklós

    2014-03-01

    Everolimus is indicated for the therapy of adults with advanced renal cell carcinoma after failure of treatment with vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI). The aim of the study was a multicenter evaluation of efficiency and toxicity of everolimus in patients with metastatic renal carcinoma who received one line of VEGFR-TKI therapy. Data of one hundred and one patients were analyzed retrospectively. Patients received everolimus therapy between January 2010 and July 2013. Data were collected in 7 different oncology institutes in Hungary. Starting daily dose of everolimus was 10 mg in 28-day cycles. Physical and laboratory examinations were done monthly. Imaging tests were performed every 3 months. Tumor response and toxicity were evaluated according to RECIST 1.0 and NCI CTCAE 3.0, respectively. Statistical analysis was performed with SPPS version 20.0 for Windows. Currently 26 (27%) patients are being treated, 52 (54.1%) patients are alive. Median progression-free survival (PFS) was 5.7 months (95% CI 4.07-7.33). Partial remission, stable disease and progression occurred in 6 (6%), 71 (74%) and 19 (20%) patients, respectively. Median overall survival (OS) was 14.3 months (95% CI 6.99-19.81). PFS and OS results were more favorable in patients with ECOG 0-1. Survival was poorer in case of anemia, while better if PFS was longer than 12 months. In anemic patients with ECOG 0-1 and ECOG 2-3 OS was 30.9 and 7.7 months, respectively (p=0.031). Dose reduction and treatment delay happened in 8 (7.9%) and 12 (11.9%) cases, respectively. The most common side effects were the following: exanthema, edema, stomatitis, pneumonitis, anemia and abnormal kidney-, liver functions, blood sugar and cholesterol levels. According to the Hungarian experience, everolimus can safely be administered. PFS and OS results representing the centers' everyday practice, are similar to the results of the respective subgroups in the registration study.

  10. Efficacy and acceptability of antidepressants on the continuum of depressive experiences in patients with cancer: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ostuzzi, Giovanni; Benda, Laura; Costa, Enrico; Barbui, Corrado

    2015-09-01

    Patients with cancer are particularly vulnerable to depressive experiences, ranging from severe emotional reactions to proper depressive syndromes, including major depression. These experiences may deeply affect the course and outcome of the disease. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy acceptability of antidepressants on the continuum of depressive experiences in patients suffering from cancer. MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CENTRAL, as well as websites of regulatory agencies, clinical trial repositories and pharmaceutical companies, were systematically searched for published and unpublished randomised trials assessing the efficacy of antidepressants versus placebo in patients with cancer. Efficacy of antidepressants at the end of the study was the primary outcome. The review protocol was registered with PROSPERO (CRD42014013440). A total of 19 studies contributed to the analysis. Antidepressants (particularly the selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors and mianserin) were more effective than placebo in relieving depressive experiences in both patients with major depression or depressive symptoms (standardised mean difference -0.596, 95% confidence interval -1.041 to -0.150), as well as in patients with other cancer-related distressing symptoms (standardised mean difference -0.229, 95% confidence interval -0.419 to -0.039). We found evidence that efficacy was positively associated with length of treatment. No differences between antidepressants and placebo were found in terms of overall acceptability. Antidepressants should be considered as one treatment option for relieving the burden of depressive experiences in patients with cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. One-Year Postapproval Clinical Experience with Radium-223 Dichloride in Patients with Metastatic Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Challa, Sudha; Quinn, David I.; Conti, Peter S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: We report our 1-year postapproval clinical experience with Radium-223 dichloride for treatment of castrate-resistant prostate cancer with bone metastases. Methods: The clinical courses of the first 25 patients treated were reviewed retrospectively. Incidence of hematologic, gastrointestinal, and other adverse events were identified, including those events that led to cessation or delay in treatment. Alterations in bone pain and serum alkaline phosphatase and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels were evaluated. Results: Six patients received all 6 scheduled doses of Radium-223 dichloride, 2 completed 5 doses, 6 received 4 doses, 2 completed 3 doses, 6 patients had 2 doses, and 3 patients received one dose, for a total of 91 doses administered. Nine patients discontinued treatment after receiving at least one dose due to progressive disease, 5 required blood transfusions, 5 developed gastrointestinal symptoms, 4 reported worsening bone pain, and 1 developed dermatitis. Downward trends in serum alkaline phosphatase and PSA were seen in 11 and 5 patients, respectively. Conclusions: About one-quarter of cohort completed the entire six-dose treatment. Advancing soft tissue disease was the primary reason for cessation of therapy. The adverse events were mild and manageable. A decline in serum alkaline phosphatase was more common than a decline in PSA. PMID:25746633

  12. One-Year Postapproval Clinical Experience with Radium-223 Dichloride in Patients with Metastatic Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jadvar, Hossein; Challa, Sudha; Quinn, David I; Conti, Peter S

    2015-06-01

    We report our 1-year postapproval clinical experience with Radium-223 dichloride for treatment of castrate-resistant prostate cancer with bone metastases. The clinical courses of the first 25 patients treated were reviewed retrospectively. Incidence of hematologic, gastrointestinal, and other adverse events were identified, including those events that led to cessation or delay in treatment. Alterations in bone pain and serum alkaline phosphatase and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels were evaluated. Six patients received all 6 scheduled doses of Radium-223 dichloride, 2 completed 5 doses, 6 received 4 doses, 2 completed 3 doses, 6 patients had 2 doses, and 3 patients received one dose, for a total of 91 doses administered. Nine patients discontinued treatment after receiving at least one dose due to progressive disease, 5 required blood transfusions, 5 developed gastrointestinal symptoms, 4 reported worsening bone pain, and 1 developed dermatitis. Downward trends in serum alkaline phosphatase and PSA were seen in 11 and 5 patients, respectively. About one-quarter of cohort completed the entire six-dose treatment. Advancing soft tissue disease was the primary reason for cessation of therapy. The adverse events were mild and manageable. A decline in serum alkaline phosphatase was more common than a decline in PSA.

  13. [Psycho-social and religious impact of cancer diagnosis on Moroccan patients: experience from the National Oncology Center of Rabat].

    PubMed

    Errihani, H; Mrabti, H; Sbitti, Y; Kaikani, W; El Ghissassi, I; Afqir, S; Boutayeb, S; Farik, M; Riadi, A; Hammoudi, M; Chergui, H

    2010-04-01

    The impact cancer occurrence is variable according to the sociocultural issue, specific to each context and each area. In order to determine the psychosocial profile of Moroccan patients that have developed cancers, four studies were performed at the National institute of oncology (INO) in Rabat. These studies were prospective, included between 125 and 1,600 patients and were based on questionnaires developed by a medical oncologist, a psychologist and a sociologist. These studies were focused on the psychosocial characteristics of the Moroccan cancer occurrence on patients, the impact of cancer on the religious practice as well as the impact of cancer and its treatments on patients' sexuality. In this article, we will develop the particular characteristics of moroccan patients that were specific to their sociocultural context.

  14. Lived experiences of everyday life during curative radiotherapy in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer: A phenomenological study

    PubMed Central

    Petri, Suzanne; Berthelsen, Connie B.

    2015-01-01

    Aim To explore and describe the essential meaning of lived experiences of the phenomenon: Everyday life during curative radiotherapy in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Background Radiotherapy treatment in patients with NSCLC is associated with severe side effects such as fatigue, anxiety, and reduced quality of life. However, little is known about the patients’ experience of everyday life during the care trajectory. Design This study takes a reflective lifeworld approach using an empirical application of phenomenological philosophy described by Dahlberg and colleagues. Method A sample of three patients treated with curative radiotherapy for NSCLC was interviewed 3 weeks after the end of radiotherapy treatment about their experiences of everyday life during their treatment. Data were collected in 2014 and interviews and analysis were conducted within the descriptive phenomenological framework. Findings The essential meaning structure of the phenomenon studied was described as “Hope for recovery serving as a compass in a changed everyday life,” which was a guide for the patients through the radiotherapy treatment to support their efforts in coping with side effects. The constituents of the structure were: Radiotherapy as a life priority, A struggle for acceptance of an altered everyday life, Interpersonal relationships for better or worse, and Meeting the health care system. Conclusion The meaning of hope was essential during radiotherapy treatment and our results suggest that interpersonal relationships can be a prerequisite to the experience of hope. “Hope for recovery serving as a compass in a changed everyday life,” furthermore identifies the essentials in the patients’ assertive approach to believing in recovery and thereby enabling hope in a serious situation. PMID:26610116

  15. Experiential group work for cancer patients shaped by experiences of participants during group intervention.

    PubMed

    Khng, Joan Nee Wey; Woo, Ivan Mun Hong; Fan, Gilbert

    2016-12-01

    Cancer tends to have an impact on a person's psychological and social well-being. Group work is one approach that can help manage the psychosocial impact of cancer. Group interventions for people living with cancer have existed for a number of decades with a majority of them adopting the cognitive-behavioral approach. While this approach has been found to be efficacious, it may be limited for people who prefer acts of service and metaphors. This article describes an experiential approach to group intervention, an alternative to cognitive-behavioral groups. The group intervention featured is designed for participants of Enreach Retreat, a retreat for people living with cancer and their caregivers, by the Department of Psychosocial Oncology, National Cancer Centre Singapore.

  16. Importance of Radiation Oncologist Experience Among Patients With Head-and-Neck Cancer Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Boero, Isabel J.; Paravati, Anthony J.; Xu, Beibei; Cohen, Ezra E.W.; Mell, Loren K.; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Over the past decade, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has replaced conventional radiation techniques in the management of head-and-neck cancers (HNCs). We conducted this population-based study to evaluate the influence of radiation oncologist experience on outcomes in patients with HNC treated with IMRT compared with patients with HNC treated with conventional radiation therapy. Methods We identified radiation providers from Medicare claims of 6,212 Medicare beneficiaries with HNC treated between 2000 and 2009. We analyzed the impact of provider volume on all-cause mortality, HNC mortality, and toxicity end points after treatment with either conventional radiation therapy or IMRT. All analyses were performed by using either multivariable Cox proportional hazards or Fine-Gray regression models controlling for potential confounding variables. Results Among patients treated with conventional radiation, we found no significant relationship between provider volume and patient survival or any toxicity end point. Among patients receiving IMRT, those treated by higher-volume radiation oncologists had improved survival compared with those treated by low-volume providers. The risk of all-cause mortality decreased by 21% for every additional five patients treated per provider per year (hazard ratio [HR], 0.79; 95% CI, 0.67 to 0.94). Patients treated with IMRT by higher-volume providers had decreased HNC-specific mortality (subdistribution HR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.50 to 0.91) and decreased risk of aspiration pneumonia (subdistribution HR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.52 to 0.99). Conclusion Patients receiving IMRT for HNC had improved outcomes when treated by higher-volume providers. These findings will better inform patients and providers when making decisions about treatment, and emphasize the critical importance of high-quality radiation therapy for optimal treatment of HNC. PMID:26729432

  17. Initial Experience of Head and Neck Cancer Patients Treated in an Oncologist Led Palliative Cancer Care Clinic at a Tertiary Cancer Care Center in Uttar Pradesh: Is the Initiative of a Full-fledged Palliative Care for Cancer Patients Justified

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Punita; Verma, Mranalini; Kumar, Gaurav; Shrivastava, Resham; Kumar, Shaleen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Poor socioeconomic status and illiteracy attribute to the advanced presentation of head and neck cancer (HNC) patients in India and are candidates for palliation in our setup. We set up a palliative cancer care clinic (PCCC), and an audit of initial 153 HNC patients is presented. Aims and Objectives: To assess the impact of palliative cancer care services. Methodology: Data of advanced HNC patients suited for palliation were collected to document demography, symptomatology, cancer treatment, and supportive care. Results: One hundred and fifty-three patients were seen during January 2013 to March 2015 in the PCCC. Seventy-two (47%) referral cases were due to disease progression and 81 (53%) due to de novo advanced cases. Median follow-up for this group was 5.3 months. Ninety (59%) cases needed some degree of assistance for their normal activities. Sixty-seven (44%) patients belonged to poor socioeconomic status and 65 (43%) were educated up to equivalent of high school. One hundred and thirty-five (88%) patients had an adequate family support. Pain was the most common presenting symptom in 134 (87%) cases with adequate relief in 112 (84%) patients with another 13 (09%) could not be assessed. Overall median duration of symptoms was 6 months. Cancer-directed therapy was used in 143 (93%) patients. Near the end of life in 47 (73%) out of 63 documented cases, caregivers were psychologically prepared for the inevitable. Conclusion: The role of palliative care team in alleviating physical, psychosocial, and emotional issues of patient and family members was significant. PCCC seems to be a feasible working model in our setup. PMID:27803571

  18. Discrete choice experiment produced estimates of acceptable risks of therapeutic options in cancer patients with febrile neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Sung, Lillian; Alibhai, Shabbir M; Ethier, Marie-Chantal; Teuffel, Oliver; Cheng, Sylvia; Fisman, David; Regier, Dean A

    2012-06-01

    To use a discrete choice experiment (DCE) to describe patient/proxy tolerance for the number of clinic visits, and chances of readmission, intensive care unit admission, and mortality to accept oral outpatient management of low-risk febrile neutropenia. Adults and children aged 12-18 years with cancer and parents of pediatric cancer patients were asked to choose between outpatient oral and inpatient intravenous management of low-risk febrile neutropenia. Using a DCE, we varied the attribute levels with the outpatient option and kept them constant for the inpatient option. Seventy-eight adults, 153 parents, and 43 children provided responses. All four attributes significantly affected choices. The mean tolerance (95% confidence interval) for the number of clinic visits per week was 3.6 (2.2-4.8), 2.1 (1.1-3.2), and 4.3 (2.5-6.0) to accept outpatient management among adults, parents, and children, respectively. With thrice weekly clinic visits and 7.5% chance of readmission, probabilities of accepting the outpatient strategy were 50% (44-54%) for adults, 43% (39-48%) for parents, and 53% (46-59%) for children. Using a DCE, we determined that a 7.5% chance of readmission and clinic visits more frequently than thrice weekly are unlikely to be acceptable. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Cognitive reactions of nurses exposed to cancer patients' traumatic experiences: A qualitative study to identify triggers of the onset of compassion fatigue.

    PubMed

    Fukumori, Takaki; Miyazaki, Atsuko; Takaba, Chihiro; Taniguchi, Saki; Asai, Mariko

    2017-09-12

    Nurses in cancer care are considered to be at risk for compassion fatigue because they are frequently exposed to patients' traumatic experiences. However, only a few effective empirical studies have been conducted in this field, and cognitive factors in particular have not been sufficiently studied. This study aims to describe the components of nurses' cognitive reactions from their exposure to cancer patients' traumatic experience to the onset of compassion fatigue. In this qualitative study, 30 nurses in cancer care were purposively selected. Data were collected through semistructured interviews and analyzed by using content analysis and the constant comparative method. Forty attributes were identified from 613 statements and classified into 11 categories: sense of professional inadequacy, compassion for patients and their families, desire to support patients and their families, rumination on oneself or one's family, sense of professional mission, dissatisfaction with medical staff, desire to integrate with colleagues, desire to avoid one's duties, conflict between one's belief and reality, reconsideration of the meaning of life, and sense of powerlessness over cancer. This study identified important components of cognitive reactions of nurses who encounter the traumatic experiences of cancer patients in Japan. This information can contribute to the understanding of the onset of compassion fatigue and provide the foundation for nurses in cancer care to avoid and recover from compassion fatigue. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Frequency of 5382insC mutation of BRCA1 gene among breast cancer patients: an experience from Eastern India.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Abhijit; Mukhopadhyay, Ashis; Bhattacharyya, Deboshree; Bose, Chinmoy Kr; Choudhuri, Keya; Mukhopadhyay, Soma; Basak, Jayasri

    2013-09-01

    The incidence of breast cancer in India is on the rise and is rapidly becoming the number one cancer in females pushing the cervical cancer to the second position. The mutations in two breast cancer susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, are frequently associated with familial breast cancer. The main objective of the study was to determine the frequency of the mutation 5382insC in BRCA1 of eastern Indian breast cancer patients and also study the hormonal receptor status and histopathology of the patients. Altogether 92 patients affected with breast cancer were included in this study. ARMS-PCR based amplification was used to detect the presence of mutation. The mutations were considered only after pedigree analysis. Out of 92 patients (age range: 20-77 years) with family history (57 individuals) and without family history (35 individuals) were screened. Fifty controls have been systematically investigated. Seven patients and two family members were found to be carriers of 5382insC mutation in BRCA1 gene. We have found 42.64 % ER(-)/PR(-) cancer and 20.58 % triple negative cancer. Invasive ductal carcinoma is the most common histology among the investigated individuals. The presented data confirm a noticeable contribution of BRCA1 5382insC mutation in BC development in Eastern India, which may justify an extended BRCA1 5382insC testing within this patient population. We found HER-2/neu negativity and BRCA1 positivity associated with familial breast cancer. From the hospital's patient history, it was revealed that the age of menarche plays an important role in development of breast cancer.

  1. [First Hungarian experience with pazopanib therapy for patients with metastatic renal cancer].

    PubMed

    Maráz, Anikó; Bodrogi, István; Csejtei, András; Dank, Magdolna; Géczi, Lajos; Küronya, Zsófia; Mangel, László; Petrányi, Agota; Szûcs, Miklós; Bodoky, György

    2013-09-01

    Pazopanib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is one of the new registered first-line therapeutic options in the treatment of metastatic clear cell renal carcinoma. Our aim was to evaluate the efficiency and toxicity of first-line pazopanib therapy administered for patients with metastatic clear cell renal carcinoma with good- and medium prognosis according to MSKCC criteria. Between January and May, 2011, 24 patients have been treated with pazopanib in 8 oncology centers in Hungary, out of them 21 patients' data were analyzed. The mean age was 65.3 (49-81) years, 10 males and 11 females. According to MSKCC the prognosis was good and medium in 3 and 18 cases, respectively. Daily dose of pazopanib was 800 mg administered continuously in 28 day cycles. Dose reduction was performed according to the instructions of the registration study. Tumor response was evaluated according to RECIST 1.0. Currently 6 (28.6%) patients are on treatment. Dose reduction was necessary in 6 (28.6%) cases with an average duration of 14.55 (7-150) days. Mean±SE daily dose was 692.97±13.67 (400-800) mg. Median PFS was 12.41 months (95% CI 11.52-12.94 months). Complete remission (CR), as the best tumor response occurred in 2 (9.5%) cases. Partial remission (PR), stable disease (SD) and progression was observed in 6 (28.6%), 10 (47.6%) and 3 (14.3%) cases, respectively. Objective tumor response was observed in 8 pts (38%). Median survival could not be statistically analyzed yet due to the insignificant number of fatal outcomes. Median follow-up was 25.22 months (95% CI 2.47-28.1 months). As common side-effect fatigue, weakness and diarrhea occurred in 11 (52.4%), 9 (42.9%) and 8 (38%) cases, respectively. Besides these, worsening of high blood pressure and ALT/AST elevation was observed in 5 (23.8%) and 6 (28.6%) cases, respectively. Based on the initial Hungarian experiences, pazopanib is a well tolerable product and can be administered safely. According to our results its efficiency in terms of

  2. Associations between United States acculturation and the end-of-life experience of caregivers of patients with advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    DeSanto-Madeya, Susan; Nilsson, Matthew; Loggers, Elizabeth Trice; Paulk, Elizabeth; Stieglitz, Heather; Kupersztoch, Yankel M; Prigerson, Holly G

    2009-12-01

    Cultural beliefs and values influence treatment preferences for and experiences with end-of-life (EOL) care among racial and ethnic groups. Within-group variations, however, may exist based on level of acculturation. To examine the extent to which EOL treatment factors (EOL treatment preferences and physician-caregiver communication) and select psychosocial factors (mental health, complementary therapies, and internal and external social support) differ based on the level of acculturation of caregivers of patients with advanced cancer. One hundred sixty-seven primary caregivers of patients with advanced cancer were interviewed as part of the multisite, prospective Coping with Cancer Study. Caregivers who were less acculturated were more positively predisposed to use of a feeding tube at EOL (odds ratio [OR] 0.99 [p = 0.05]), were more likely to perceive that they received too much information from their doctors (OR 0.95 [p = 0.05]), were less likely to use mental health services (OR 1.03 [p = 0.003] and OR 1.02 [p = 0.02]), and desire additional services (OR 1.03 [p = 0.10] to 1.05 [p = 0.009]) than their more acculturated counterparts. Additionally, caregivers who were less acculturated cared for patients who were less likely to report having a living will (OR 1.03 [p = 0.0003]) or durable power of attorney for health care (OR 1.02 [p = 0.007]) than more acculturated caregivers. Caregivers who were less acculturated felt their religious and spiritual needs were supported by both the community (beta -0.28 [p = 0.0003]) and medical system (beta -0.38 [p < 0.0001]), had higher degrees of self-efficacy (beta -0.22 [p = 0.005]), and had stronger family relationships and support (beta -0.27 [p = 0.0004]). The level of acculturation of caregivers of patients with advanced cancer does contribute to differences in EOL preferences and EOL medical decision-making.

  3. The benefit of meeting a stranger: experiences with emotional support provided by nurses among Danish-born and migrant cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kristiansen, M; Tjørnhøj-Thomsen, T; Krasnik, A

    2010-07-01

    Research among cancer patients has shown that emotional support in informal relationships may be difficult to access because of a fear or lack of knowledge about cancer. Consequently, formal relationships with healthcare professionals may be important sources of support. This study explores needs for and experiences with emotional support provided by nurses as well as prerequisites for the provision of support among Danish-born and migrant cancer patients. We conducted narrative interviews with 18 adult Danish-born and migrant cancer patients. Patients were recruited from a variety of places in a purposive strategic sampling process. Analysis was inspired by phenomenological methods and Simmel's theoretical concept of "the stranger". Both Danish-born and migrant patients perceived the support delivered by healthcare professionals as available, empathic and valuable. Prerequisites for providing emotional support were 1) setting aside time for the patient to feel safe and able to verbalise emotional concerns, 2) continuity in relationships with healthcare professionals, and 3) nurses' ability to understand the patient's emotional reactions without creating additional distress. Being positioned as a stranger to the patient gives nurses a unique position from which to provide emotional support during cancer treatment. Thus, formal relationships with healthcare professionals are of great importance for many cancer patients.

  4. Cytokeratin-based assessment of tumour budding in colorectal cancer: analysis in stage II patients and prospective diagnostic experience.

    PubMed

    Koelzer, Viktor H; Assarzadegan, Naziheh; Dawson, Heather; Mitrovic, Bojana; Grin, Andrea; Messenger, David E; Kirsch, Richard; Riddell, Robert H; Lugli, Alessandro; Zlobec, Inti

    2017-07-01

    Tumour budding in colorectal cancer is an important prognostic factor. A recent consensus conference elaborated recommendations and key issues for future studies, among those the use of pan-cytokeratin stains, especially in stage II patients. We report the first prospective diagnostic experience using pan-cytokeratin for tumour budding assessment. Moreover, we evaluate tumour budding using pan-cytokeratin stains and disease-free survival (DFS) in stage II patients. To this end, tumour budding on pan-cytokeratin-stained sections was evaluated by counting the number of tumour buds in 10 high-power fields (0.238 mm(2)), then categorizing counts as low/high-grade at a cut-off of 10 buds, in two cohorts. Cohort 1: prospective setting with 236 unselected primary resected colorectal cancers analysed by 17 pathologists during diagnostic routine. Cohort 2: retrospective cohort of 150 stage II patients with information on DFS. In prospective analysis of cohort 1, tumour budding counts correlated with advanced pT, lymph node metastasis, lymphovascular invasion, perineural invasion (all p < 0.0001), and distant metastasis (p = 0.0128). In cohort 2, tumour budding was an independent predictor of worse DFS using counts [p = 0.037, HR (95% CI): 1.007 (1.0-1.014)] and the low-grade/high-grade scoring approach [p = 0.02; HR (95% CI): 3.04 (1.2-7.77), 90.7 versus 73%, respectively]. In conclusion, tumour budding assessed on pan-cytokeratin slides is feasible in a large pathology institute and leads to expected associations with clinicopathological features. Additionally, it is an independent predictor of poor prognosis in stage II patients and should be considered for risk stratification in future clinical studies.

  5. Cytokeratin‐based assessment of tumour budding in colorectal cancer: analysis in stage II patients and prospective diagnostic experience

    PubMed Central

    Koelzer, Viktor H; Assarzadegan, Naziheh; Dawson, Heather; Mitrovic, Bojana; Grin, Andrea; Messenger, David E; Kirsch, Richard; Riddell, Robert H; Lugli, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Tumour budding in colorectal cancer is an important prognostic factor. A recent consensus conference elaborated recommendations and key issues for future studies, among those the use of pan‐cytokeratin stains, especially in stage II patients. We report the first prospective diagnostic experience using pan‐cytokeratin for tumour budding assessment. Moreover, we evaluate tumour budding using pan‐cytokeratin stains and disease‐free survival (DFS) in stage II patients. To this end, tumour budding on pan‐cytokeratin‐stained sections was evaluated by counting the number of tumour buds in 10 high‐power fields (0.238 mm2), then categorizing counts as low/high‐grade at a cut‐off of 10 buds, in two cohorts. Cohort 1: prospective setting with 236 unselected primary resected colorectal cancers analysed by 17 pathologists during diagnostic routine. Cohort 2: retrospective cohort of 150 stage II patients with information on DFS. In prospective analysis of cohort 1, tumour budding counts correlated with advanced pT, lymph node metastasis, lymphovascular invasion, perineural invasion (all p < 0.0001), and distant metastasis (p = 0.0128). In cohort 2, tumour budding was an independent predictor of worse DFS using counts [p = 0.037, HR (95% CI): 1.007 (1.0–1.014)] and the low‐grade/high‐grade scoring approach [p = 0.02; HR (95% CI): 3.04 (1.2–7.77), 90.7 versus 73%, respectively]. In conclusion, tumour budding assessed on pan‐cytokeratin slides is feasible in a large pathology institute and leads to expected associations with clinicopathological features. Additionally, it is an independent predictor of poor prognosis in stage II patients and should be considered for risk stratification in future clinical studies. PMID:28770101

  6. Decision making and referral from primary care for possible lung and colorectal cancer: a qualitative study of patients' experiences.

    PubMed

    Banks, Jon; Walter, Fiona M; Hall, Nicola; Mills, Katie; Hamilton, William; Turner, Katrina M

    2014-12-01

    The challenge for GPs when assessing whether to refer a patient for cancer investigation is that many cancer symptoms are also caused by benign self-limiting illness. UK National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) referral guidelines emphasise that the patient should be involved in the decision-making process and be informed of the reasons for referral. Research to date, however, has not examined the extent to which these guidelines are borne out in practice. To assess the degree to which patients are involved in the decision to be referred for investigation for symptoms associated with cancer and their understanding of the referral. Qualitative interview study of patients referred to secondary care for symptoms suspicious of lung and colorectal cancer. Patients were recruited from two regions of England using maximum variation sampling. Transcribed interviews were analysed thematically. The analysis was based on 34 patient interviews. Patients in both symptom pathways reported little involvement in the decision to be referred for investigation. This tended to be accompanied by a patient expectation for referral, however, to explain ongoing and un-resolving symptoms. It was also found that reasons for referral tended to be couched in non-specific terms rather than cancer investigation, even when the patient was on a cancer-specific pathway. GPs should consider a more overt discussion with patients when referring them for further investigation of symptoms suspicious of cancer. This would align clinical practice with NICE guidelines and encourage more open discussion between GPs and primary care patients around cancer. © British Journal of General Practice 2014.

  7. Utilising out-of-hours primary care for assistance with cancer pain: a semi-structured interview study of patient and caregiver experiences.

    PubMed

    Adam, Rosalind; Clausen, Maria Giatsi; Hall, Susan; Murchie, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Pain is the most frequent complication of cancer and an important reason for out-of-hours (OOH) primary care contacts by patients with established cancer. Existing quantitative data give little insight into the reason for these contacts. Exploring such encounters of care could highlight ways to improve anticipatory cancer care and communication between daytime and OOH primary care services. To explore the experiences, views, and opinions of patients and their caregivers who have used OOH primary care for help with managing cancer pain. A semi-structured interview study with patients and caregivers who have utilised an OOH primary care service in Grampian, Scotland, because of pain related to cancer. Semi-structured interviews with 11 patients and four caregivers (n = 15), transcribed verbatim and analysed using framework analysis and, to a lesser extent, inductive thematic analysis. Six key themes emerged: making sense of pain and predicting its likely course; beliefs about analgesics; priority daytime access; the importance of continuity of care and communication between all involved; barriers and facilitators to seeking help in the OOH period; and satisfaction/dissatisfaction with OOH care. Three prominent sub-themes were: patient knowledge; the influence of a caregiver on decision-making; and the benefits of having a palliative care summary. Effective daytime and anticipatory care can positively influence OOH care. Interventions that aid patients in understanding cancer pain, communicating about pain, utilising analgesics effectively, and seeking appropriate and timely help may improve cancer pain management. © British Journal of General Practice 2015.

  8. Reconceptualizing Cancer Survivorship Through Veterans' Lived Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Lindsey Ann; Moye, Jennifer; Street, Richard L.; Naik, Aanand D.

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the biopsychosocial impact of cancer on Veteran older adult survivors by garnering their accounts of their illness experiences. A narrative analysis of 73 cancer diagnosis and treatment stories reveals five “paths” Veterans are taking 18 months postdiagnosis. These paths indicate that cancer survivorship cannot be conceptualized as a one-size-fits-all experience but rather is a process of Veterans understanding and making sense of the effects of cancer on their lives. Our future goal is to develop a screening tool to help clinicians identify a patient's “path” to tailor survivorship care to meet specific needs. PMID:24611460

  9. Aspiration in head and neck cancer patients: a single centre experience of clinical profile, bacterial isolates and antibiotic sensitivity pattern.

    PubMed

    Lakshmaiah, K C; Sirsath, Nagesh T; Subramanyam, Jayshree R; Govind, Babu K; Lokanatha, D; Shenoy, Ashok M

    2013-07-01

    Most patients with head and neck cancer have dysphagia and are at increased risk of having aspiration and subsequent pneumonia. It can cause prolonged hospitalization, treatment delay and/or interruption and mortality in cancer patients. The treatment of these infections often relies on empirical antibiotics based on local microbiology and antibiotic sensitivity patterns. The aim of present study is to analyse respiratory tract pathogens isolated by sputum culture in head and neck cancer patients undergoing treatment at a tertiary cancer centre in South India who presented with features of aspiration. The study is carried out to establish empirical antibiotic policy for head and neck cancer patients who present with features of aspiration. This was a retrospective study. The study included sputum samples sent for culture and sensitivity from January 2011 to December 2012. Analysis of microbiologic species isolated in sputum specimen and the antibiotic sensitivity pattern of the bacterial isolates was performed. A detailed study of case files of all patients was done to find out which is the most common site prone for producing aspiration. There were 47 (31.54 %) gram positive isolates and 102 (68.45 %) gram negative isolates. The most common bacterial isolates were Klebsiella pneumoniae (25.50 %), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (16.77 %) and Haemophilus influenzae (15.43 %). Levofloxacin was the most effective antibiotic with excellent activity against both gram positive and gram negative isolates. Most patients with aspiration had laryngeal cancer (34.89 %). Aspiration pneumonia was present in 14 (9.39 %) patients. Gram negative bacteria are common etiologic agents in head and neck cancer patients presenting with features of aspiration. Levofloxacin should be started as empirical antibiotic in these patients while awaiting sputum culture sensitivity report. As aspiration in head and neck cancer is an underreported event such institutional antibiotic sensitivity

  10. Genetic Counseling for Hereditary Cancer: A Pilot Study on Experiences of Patients and Family Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleiker, E. M. A.; Aaronson, N. K.; Menko, F. H.; Hahn, D. E. E.; van Asperen, C. J.; Rutgers, E. J. T.; ten Kate, L. P.; Leschot, N. J.

    1997-01-01

    Individuals who received genetic counseling for cancer (N=36) provided feedback on the quality of services and identified areas for improvement. Reasons for counseling and need for psychosocial support are also considered. Generally high levels of satisfaction with care provided were found. Four areas for improvement are identified and discussed.…

  11. An exploration of the existential experiences of patients following curative treatment for cancer: reflections from a U.K. Sample.

    PubMed

    Lagerdahl, Anna S K; Moynihan, Manus; Stollery, Brian

    2014-01-01

    The existential experiences associated with cancer diagnosis and treatment are well researched, but the posttreatment phase is relatively underexplored. Using semistructured interviews and theory-led thematic analysis this qualitative study investigated the existential experiences of eight cancer survivors who had successfully completed curative treatment. Being in remission had led to deep existential reflections (i.e., death anxiety, freedom, isolation, and meaning making), and some participants faced considerable challenges that affected their emotional well-being. Understanding cancer survivors' existential challenges should enable health care professionals to engage with the emerging shift from the predominantly medically focused posttreatment care to a more holistic approach.

  12. Establishing a population-based patient-reported outcomes study (PROMs) using national cancer registries across two jurisdictions: the Prostate Cancer Treatment, your experience (PiCTure) study

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, F J; Kinnear, H; Donnelly, C; O'Leary, E; O'Brien, K; Burns, R M; Gavin, A; Sharp, L

    2015-01-01

    Objective To establish an international patient-reported outcomes (PROMs) study among prostate cancer survivors, up to 18 years postdiagnosis, in two countries with different healthcare systems and ethical frameworks. Design A cross-sectional, postal survey of prostate cancer survivors sampled and recruited via two population-based cancer registries. Healthcare professionals (HCPs) evaluated patients for eligibility to participate. Questionnaires contained validated instruments to assess health-related quality of life and psychological well-being, including QLQ-C30, QLQ-PR25, EQ-5D-5L, 21-question Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS-21) and the Decisional Regret Scale. Setting Republic of Ireland (RoI) and Northern Ireland (NI). Primary outcome measures Registration completeness, predictors of eligibility and response, data missingness, unweighted and weighted PROMs. Results Prostate cancer registration was 80% (95% CI 75% to 84%) and 91% (95% CI 89% to 93%) complete 2 years postdiagnosis in NI and RoI, respectively. Of 12 322 survivors sampled from registries, 53% (n=6559) were classified as eligible following HCP screening. In the multivariate analysis, significant predictors of eligibility were: being ≤59 years of age at diagnosis (p<0.001), short-term survivor (<5 years postdiagnosis; p<0.001) and from RoI (p<0.001). 3348 completed the questionnaire, yielding a 54% adjusted response rate. 13% of men or their families called the study freephone with queries for assistance with questionnaire completion or to talk about their experience. Significant predictors of response in multivariate analysis were: being ≤59 years at diagnosis (p<0.001) and from RoI (p=0.016). Mean number of missing questions in validated instruments ranged from 0.12 (SD 0.71; EQ-5D-5L) to 3.72 (SD 6.30; QLQ-PR25). Weighted and unweighted mean EQ-5D-5L, QLQ-C30 and QLQ-PR25 scores were similar, as were the weighted and unweighted prevalences of depression, anxiety and

  13. Single-Centre Experience with Percutaneous Cryoablation of Breast Cancer in 23 Consecutive Non-surgical Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Cazzato, Roberto Luigi; Lara, Christine Tunon de; Buy, Xavier Ferron, Stéphane Hurtevent, Gabrielle; Fournier, Marion; Debled, Marc; Palussière, Jean

    2015-10-15

    AimTo present our single-centre prospective experience on the use of cryoablation (CA) applied to treat primary breast cancer (BC) in a cohort of patients unsuitable for surgical treatment.Materials and MethodsTwenty-three consecutive post-menopausal female patients (median age 85 years; range 56–96) underwent percutaneous CA of unifocal, biopsy-proven BC, under ultrasound/computed tomography (US/CT) guidance. Clinical and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) follow-ups were systematically scheduled at 3, 12, 18 and 24 months. Local tumour control was assessed by comparing baseline and follow-up DCE-MRI.ResultsTwenty-three BC (median size 14 mm) were treated under local anaesthesia (78.3 %) or local anaesthesia and conscious sedation (21.7 %). Median number of cryo-probes applied per session was 2.0. A “dual-freezing” protocol was applied for the first ten patients and a more aggressive “triple-freezing” protocol for the remaining 13. Median follow-up was 14.6 months. Five patients recurred during follow-up and two were successfully re-treated with CA. Five patients presented immediate CA-related complications: four hematomas evolved uneventfully at 3-month follow-up and one skin burn resulted in skin inflammation and skin retraction at 3 and 12 months, respectively.ConclusionsPercutaneous CA is safe and well tolerated for non-resected elderly BC patients. Procedures can be proposed under local anaesthesia only. Given the insulation properties of the breast gland, aggressive CA protocols are required. Prospective studies are needed to better understand the potential role of CA in the local treatment of early BC.

  14. Side effects of chemotherapy among cancer patients in a Malaysian General Hospital: experiences, perceptions and informational needs from clinical pharmacists.

    PubMed

    Chan, Huan-Keat; Ismail, Sabrina

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the most common physical side effects experienced by local chemotherapy patients. Their perceptions of these side effects and informational needs from clinical pharmacists were also evaluated. This was a single-center, cross-sectional study. A face-to-face interview guided by a structured questionnaire with cancer patients admitted to receive repeated cycles of chemotherapy was conducted. Information collected included chemotherapy-related side effects after last chemotherapy experience, the most worrisome side effects, the side effects overlooked by healthcare professionals and the preferred method, amount and source of receiving related information. Of 99 patients recruited, 90 participated in this survey (response rate: 90.9%). The majority were in the age range of 45-64 years (73.3%) and female (93.3%). Seventy-five (83.3%) and seventy-one (78.9%) experienced nausea and vomiting, respectively. Both symptoms were selected as two of the most worrisome side effects (16.7% vs. 33.3%). Other common and worrisome side effects were hair loss and loss of appetite. Symptoms caused by peripheral neuropathies were perceived as the major symptoms being overlooked (6.7%). Most patients demanded information about side effects (60.0%) and they would like to receive as much information as possible (86.7%). Oral conversation (83.3%) remained as the preferred method and the clinical pharmacist was preferred by 46.7% of patients as the educator in this aspect. The high prevalence of chemotherapy-related side effects among local patients is of concern. Findings of their perceptions and informational needs may serve as a valuable guide for clinical pharmacists to help in side effect management in Malaysia.

  15. Experiences with a low-iodine diet: A qualitative study of patients with thyroid cancer receiving radioactive iodine therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyem Ju; Chang, Sung Ok; Jung, Kwang Yoon

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to describe hormone interruption experiences related to not only physical problems, but also psychological, social, and spiritual problems, in patients who had undergone total thyroidectomy. In-depth interviews were performed with five participants, four women and one man, aged between 28 and 58. The participants were subjected to high-dose radiation of 100-150 mCi and had experienced abrupt hormonal interruptions after undergoing total thyroidectomy. The analysis was conducted using Giorgi's descriptive phenomenological method. Five essential components emerged as the interviews were dissected: dietary disruption due to discomfort, distress from overall bodily congestion, feelings of isolation as normalcy is lost from their daily routine, spending daily life with unfamiliar functional declines due to the LID, a lethargic state due to the lack of a place to which patients could retreat from the stress of hormone absence. The participants showed insecurity and depression due to an unbalanced diet, limited activities, and an abnormal lifestyle induced by the treatment. This treatment-related information can help healthcare providers readily understand and alleviate symptoms of thyroid cancer patients treated with RAI therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Development and Implementation of the Clinical Decision Support System for Patients With Cancer and Nurses' Experiences Regarding the System.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz, Arzu Akman; Ozdemir, Leyla

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and implement the clinical decision support system (CDSS) for oncology nurses in the care of patients with cancer and to explore the nurses' experiences about the system. The study was conducted using a mixed-methods research design with 14 nurses working at a gynecological oncology clinic at a university hospital in Turkey. The nurses stated that they did not experience any problems during the implementation of the CDSS, and its usage facilitated the assessment of patients' needs and care management. The results indicated that the CDSS supported the nurses' decision-making process about patients' needs and preparation of individual care plans. The CDSS should be developed and implemented by the nurses working with patients with cancer. AMAÇ: Amaç kanser hastalarının bakımına yönelik klinik karar destek sistemi oluşturmak, uygulamak (KKDS) ve sistemi kullanan hemşirelerin deneyimlerini incelemektir. YÖNTEM: Çalışma kalitatif ve kantitatif araştırma yöntemleri kullanılarak Türkiyede'ki bir üniversite hastanesinin jinekolojik onkoloji servisinde çalışan 14 hemşire ile yürütülmüştür. Hemşireler KKDS'ni kullanırken herhangi bir sorun yaşamadıklarını ve sistemin hasta gereksinimlerini değerlendirmeyi ve bakım yönetimini kolaylaştırdığını belirtmişlerdir. SONUÇ: Bulgular hastanın gereksinimlerine karar verme sürecinde ve bireysel bakım planları hazırlamada KKDS'nin hemşireleri desteklediğini göstermektedir. HEMŞIRELIK UYGULAMALARI IÇIN ÖNERILER: Kanserli hastaların bakımına yönelik KKDS geliştirilebilir ve hemşireler tarafından klinikte kullanılabilir. © 2015 NANDA International, Inc.

  17. Breaking bad news: a phenomenological exploration of Irish nurses' experiences of caring for patients when a cancer diagnosis is given in an acute care facility (part 1).

    PubMed

    Tobin, Gerard A

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this article is on the meanings attributed by nurses who worked with patients receiving a cancer diagnosis within acute care settings in Ireland. The aim of this article was to explore the nurses' perceptions of caring for patients who receive bad news in the form of a cancer diagnosis while in an acute care setting. The article focuses on the perceptions of 20 nurses who formed the nurse participant group in a larger phenomenological study exploring giving and receiving a cancer diagnosis. Data were collected using unstructured in-depth interviews. Analysis was conducted using Koch's analytical framework. The nurses' narratives provided 2 emerging themes entitled, "connectedness: journeying as professional within the everyday world" and "connectedness: exclusion of professional within the everyday world." This article focuses on the first emerging theme and highlights the experiences of nurses as they reflect on their interactions with their patients before, during, and after the giving of a cancer diagnosis. This study highlights the importance of professional companionship. It provides insights into the nurse-patient challenges as a result of lack of information. Lack of information and involvement affects the nurse's ability to be authentically present for the recipient and results in a fracture to the nurse-patient relationship. Understanding the experiences of nurses from acute care settings where the cancer diagnosis is often given will inform and enable the nurse working in oncology settings to engage patients in a more meaningful and focused way.

  18. Single-institutional experience of clinicopathological analysis and treatment for lung cancer patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Satoshi; Okuma, Yusuke; Watanabe, Kageaki; Hosomi, Yukio; Imamura, Akifumi; Okamura, Tatsuru; Gemma, Akihiko

    2017-05-01

    The advent of antiretroviral therapy has changed the disease spectrum constitution among patients living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), while the incidence of death due to non-AIDS-defining cancers, particularly lung cancer, continues to increase in the USA and Europe. However, the availability of detailed reports of the clinical characteristics of lung cancer among Asian populations is limited. The present study retrospectively analyzed the clinical characteristics, treatment regimens and outcomes of lung cancer patients with HIV who were treated in a single institution between 1988 and 2013. Of the 20 lung cancer patients living with HIV included in this study, 90% were diagnosed since 1996 in the post-antiretroviral era. The median CD4(+) cell count was 373.5/µl, whereas 65% of the patients were diagnosed with adenocarcinoma and 30% with squamous cell carcinoma. Epidermal growth factor receptor mutations were detected in 3 (27%) of the 11 specimens for which data were available, of which 65% had advanced-stage disease. Of the 20 patients, 9 underwent surgery, 6 received radiotherapy and 5 received chemotherapy as a first-line treatment. Treatment was generally well-tolerated. The median survival period was 35.8 months for all stages and 14.0 months for advanced stages. The treatment outcomes in our institution were favorable in comparison with previous studies from the USA and Europe, although these findings may be due to ethnic differences or the efficacy of treatment for HIV and lung cancer.

  19. Survival of Sami cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Soininen, Leena; Pokhrel, Arun; Dyba, Tadek; Pukkala, Eero; Hakulinen, Timo

    2012-07-02

    The incidence of cancer among the indigenous Sami people of Northern Finland is lower than among the Finnish general population. The survival of Sami cancer patients is not known, and therefore it is the object of this study. The cohort consisted of 2,091 Sami and 4,161 non-Sami who lived on 31 December 1978 in the two Sami municipalities of Inari and Utsjoki, which are located in Northern Finland and are 300-500 km away from the nearest central hospital. The survival experience of Sami and non-Sami cancer patients diagnosed in this cohort during 1979-2009 was compared with that of the Finnish patients outside the cohort. The Sami and non-Sami cancer patients were matched to other Finnish cancer patients for gender, age and year of diagnosis and for the site of cancer. An additional matching was done for the stage at diagnosis. Cancer-specific survival analyses were made using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression modelling. There were 204 Sami and 391 non-Sami cancer cases in the cohort, 20,181 matched controls without matching with stage, and 7,874 stage-matched controls. In the cancer-specific analysis without stage variable, the hazard ratio for Sami was 1.05 (95% confidence interval 0.85-1.30) and for non-Sami 1.02 (0.86-1.20), indicating no difference between the survival of those groups and other patients in Finland. Likewise, when the same was done by also matching the stage, there was no difference in cancer survival. Long distances to medical care or Sami ethnicity have no influence on the cancer patient survival in Northern Finland.

  20. Survival of Sami cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Soininen, Leena; Pokhrel, Arun; Dyba, Tadek; Pukkala, Eero; Hakulinen, Timo

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of cancer among the indigenous Sami people of Northern Finland is lower than among the Finnish general population. The survival of Sami cancer patients is not known, and therefore it is the object of this study. The cohort consisted of 2,091 Sami and 4,161 non-Sami who lived on 31 December 1978 in the two Sami municipalities of Inari and Utsjoki, which are located in Northern Finland and are 300-500 km away from the nearest central hospital. The survival experience of Sami and non-Sami cancer patients diagnosed in this cohort during 1979-2009 was compared with that of the Finnish patients outside the cohort. The Sami and non-Sami cancer patients were matched to other Finnish cancer patients for gender, age and year of diagnosis and for the site of cancer. An additional matching was done for the stage at diagnosis. Cancer-specific survival analyses were made using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression modelling. There were 204 Sami and 391 non-Sami cancer cases in the cohort, 20,181 matched controls without matching with stage, and 7,874 stage-matched controls. In the cancer-specific analysis without stage variable, the hazard ratio for Sami was 1.05 (95% confidence interval 0.85-1.30) and for non-Sami 1.02 (0.86-1.20), indicating no difference between the survival of those groups and other patients in Finland. Likewise, when the same was done by also matching the stage, there was no difference in cancer survival. Long distances to medical care or Sami ethnicity have no influence on the cancer patient survival in Northern Finland.

  1. Do Differential Response Rates to Patient Surveys Between Organizations Lead to Unfair Performance Comparisons?: Evidence From the English Cancer Patient Experience Survey.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Catherine L; Elliott, Marc N; Lyratzopoulos, Georgios; Abel, Gary A

    2016-01-01

    Patient surveys typically have variable response rates between organizations, leading to concerns that such differences may affect the validity of performance comparisons. To explore the size and likely sources of associations between hospital-level survey response rates and patient experience. Cross-sectional mail survey including 60 patient experience items sent to 101,771 cancer survivors recently treated by 158 English NHS hospitals. Age, sex, race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, clinical diagnosis, hospital type, and region were available for respondents and nonrespondents. The overall response rate was 67% (range, 39% to 77% between hospitals). Hospitals with higher response rates had higher scores for all items (Spearman correlation range, 0.03-0.44), particularly questions regarding hospital-level administrative processes, for example, procedure cancellations or medical note availability.From multivariable analysis, associations between individual patient experience and hospital-level response rates were statistically significant (P<0.05) for 53/59 analyzed questions, decreasing to 37/59 after adjusting for case-mix, and 25/59 after further adjusting for hospital-level characteristics.Predicting responses of nonrespondents, and re-estimating hypothetical hospital scores assuming a 100% response rate, we found that currently low performing hospitals would have attained even lower scores. Overall nationwide attainment would have decreased slightly to that currently observed. Higher response rate hospitals have more positive experience scores, and this is only partly explained by patient case-mix. High response rates may be a marker of efficient hospital administration, and higher quality that should not, therefore, be adjusted away in public reporting. Although nonresponse may result in slightly overestimating overall national levels of performance, it does not appear to meaningfully bias comparisons of case-mix-adjusted hospital results.

  2. Long-Term Outcomes and Complications in Patients With Craniopharyngioma: The British Columbia Cancer Agency Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, Andrea C.; Howard, A. Fuchsia; Nichol, Alan; Sidhu, Keerat; Abdulsatar, Farah; Hasan, Haroon; Goddard, Karen

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: We report long-term outcomes and complications of craniopharyngioma patients referred to our institution. Methods and Materials: Between 1971 and 2010, 123 consecutive patients received primary treatment for craniopharyngioma in British Columbia and were referred to our institution. The median age was 30 years (range, 2-80 years). Thirty-nine percent of patients were treated primarily with subtotal resection (STR) and radiation therapy (RT), 28% with STR alone, 15% with gross total resection, 11% with cyst drainage (CD) alone, 5% with CD+RT, and 2% with RT alone. Eight percent of patients received intracystic bleomycin (ICB) therapy. Results: Median follow-up was 8.9 years, and study endpoints were reported at 10 years. Ten-year Kaplan-Meier progression-free survival (PFS) was 46%. Patients treated with STR+RT or CD+RT had the highest PFS (82% and 83%, respectively). There were no significant differences between PFS after adjuvant versus salvage RT (84% vs 74%, respectively; P=.6). Disease-specific survival (DSS) was 88%, and overall survival (OS) was 80%. Primary treatment modality did not affect DSS or OS, while older age was a negative prognostic factor for OS but not DSS. Kaplan-Meier rates for visual deterioration, anterior pituitary hormone deficiency, diabetes insipidus, seizure disorder, and cerebrovascular events (CVE) due to treatment, not tumor progression, were 27%, 76%, 45%, 16%, and 11%, respectively. The CVE rate was 29% in patients who received ICB compared to 10% in those who did not (P=.07). Conclusions: We report favorable PFS in patients with craniopharyngioma, especially in those who received RT after surgery. DSS and OS rates were excellent regardless of primary treatment modality. We observed a high incidence of hypopituitarism, visual deterioration, and seizure disorder. Eleven percent of patients experienced CVEs after treatment. There was a suggestion of increased CVE risk in patients treated with ICB.

  3. Oncologists' experiences of discussing complementary and alternative treatment options with their cancer patients. A qualitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Corina, Güthlin; Christine, Holmberg; Klein, Gudrun

    2016-09-01

    The rising use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) means oncologists are increasingly asked by patients to discuss CAM treatment options. However, no formal training or established standards are available on the subject. The aim of this paper was to investigate real-world discussions of CAM treatments. In particular, we wanted to learn about the values, norms and defining features that characterise oncologist-patient discussions on CAM. Semi-standardised interviews with 17 oncologists were analysed using interpretation pattern analysis combined with thematic analysis. Advice on CAM is seen by oncologists as an important service they provide to their patients, even though their knowledge of the subject is often limited. Many interviewees mentioned an apparent lack of scientific proof, especially when their aim was to warn patients against the use of CAM. Discussions on CAM tend to reflect the idea that CAM belongs 'to another world', and judging by the interviews with oncologists, this notion appears to be shared by patients and oncologists alike. Oncologists require reliable information on CAM and would profit from training in the communication of CAM treatment options to patients. Knowing scientific data on CAM would also lower barriers stemming from the view that CAM belongs 'to another world'. Under- and postgraduate education programmes should include training on how to respond to requests addressing possible CAM options.

  4. Gefitinib (Iressa) in metastatic patients with non-small cell lung cancer: preliminary experience in a Brazilian center.

    PubMed

    del Giglio, Auro; Ito, Cristina

    2004-05-06

    Patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer are deemed incurable, but they may derive some benefit from systemic palliative chemotherapy. Recently, with the introduction of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antagonists such as gefitinib (Iressa), an effective and less toxic option is now available for the treatment of such patients. To assess the activity and toxicity of gefitinib in a group of Brazilian patients. Prospective, open label, non-randomized and non-controlled. Clínica de Oncologia e Hematologia (CLIOH), São Paulo, Brazil. From June 2002 to April 2003 we treated five patients with metastatic previously-treated non-small cell lung cancer (median of two previous chemotherapy regimens), using gefitinib at a dose of 250 mg orally on a daily basis, within a compassionate protocol sponsored by AstraZeneca. The patients' median age was 65 years and two of them were male. Three had a performance status of 1, one of 2 and one of 3, on the ECOG (Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group) scale. We observed skin rash in two patients, diarrhea in three and arthralgia in two. One patient had a partial response and another had stabilization of her disease, as measured via imaging studies (which have lasted for more than 11 and 4 months, respectively), which were accompanied by significant decrease in tumor markers, whereas three patients worsened during treatment. New options of chemotherapy agents with favorable toxicity profiles are urgently needed for the treatment of metastatic non-small lung cancer patients who usually have short life expectancies. In our small series of five patients, we observed stabilization of the disease in two of them and the skin and gastrointestinal reactions often described in the literature in all of them. Two had arthralgia, not reported before. We concluded that gefitinib is an important addition to the therapeutic armamentarium for patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer.

  5. Preventing Infections in Cancer Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... Caregivers Flu Treatment for Cancer Patients and Survivors Flu Publications Stay Informed Cancer Home Information for Patients and Caregivers Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Cancer patients ...

  6. Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) among Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Chemotherapy in Hospital Melaka: Single Centre Experience

    PubMed Central

    Chean, Dang Chee; Zang, Wong Kuo; Lim, Michelle; Zulkefle, Nooraziah

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the impact of chemotherapy on quality of life (QoL) among breast cancer patients and to evaluate the relationship with age, cancer stage and presence of any comorbidity. Methods: A prospective study was conducted among breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy in Hospital Melaka from 1st January 2014 to 31st July 2014. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30) was given to patients to fill in prior chemotherapy (baseline) and after the third cycle of chemotherapy. Socio-demographic and clinical data were collected and analyzed using SPSS version 20. Result: Respondents were 32 female patients [mean age (SD): 49.7(9.93) years]. They reported a significant lower global health status (P < 0.01) and significant higher symptoms of nausea and vomiting (P < 0.01), loss of appetite (P = 0.028) and diarrhea (P = 0.026) after the third cycle of chemotherapy as compared to baseline. Compare to, this study showed significant better emotional functioning (P < 0.01) and social functioning (P < 0.01) than the EORTC QLQ-C30 Reference Values 2008 for breast cancer cases. Under symptom scales higher scores were noted for appetite loss (P = 0.017), nausea and vomiting (P < 0.01). Age, stage and comorbidity had no clear associations with global health status in our patients (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Chemotherapy did reduce the QoL of breast cancer patients. Management of chemotherapy-induced loss of appetite, diarrhea, nausea and vomiting should be improved for a better outcome. PMID:28122444

  7. Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) among Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Chemotherapy in Hospital Melaka: Single Centre Experience

    PubMed

    Chee Chean, Dang; Kuo Zang, Wong; Lim, Michelle; Zulkefle, Nooraziah

    2016-12-01

    Objective: To investigate the impact of chemotherapy on quality of life (QoL) among breast cancer patients and to evaluate the relationship with age, cancer stage and presence of any comorbidity. Methods: A prospective study was conducted among breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy in Hospital Melaka from 1st January 2014 to 31st July 2014. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30) was given to patients to fill in prior chemotherapy (baseline) and after the third cycle of chemotherapy. Socio-demographic and clinical data were collected and analyzed using SPSS version 20. Result: Respondents were 32 female patients [mean age (SD): 49.7(9.93) years]. They reported a significant lower global health status (P < 0.01) and significant higher symptoms of nausea and vomiting (P < 0.01), loss of appetite (P = 0.028) and diarrhea (P = 0.026) after the third cycle of chemotherapy as compared to baseline. Compare to, this study showed significant better emotional functioning (P < 0.01) and social functioning (P < 0.01) than the EORTC QLQ-C30 Reference Values 2008 for breast cancer cases. Under symptom scales higher scores were noted for appetite loss (P = 0.017), nausea and vomiting (P < 0.01). Age, stage and comorbidity had no clear associations with global health status in our patients (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Chemotherapy did reduce the QoL of breast cancer patients. Management of chemotherapy-induced loss of appetite, diarrhea, nausea and vomiting should be improved for a better outcome.

  8. The role of cancer vaccines following autologous stem cell rescue in breast and ovarian cancer patients: experience with the STn-KLH vaccine (Theratope).

    PubMed

    Holmberg, Leona A; Oparin, Dimitri V; Gooley, Ted; Sandmaier, Brenda M

    2003-02-01

    The success of high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous stem-cell rescue as treatment for breast and ovarian cancer is limited by a high incidence of relapse. After autologous transplantation, patients are likely to have a low tumor burden and thus would be more likely to respond immunologically to a cancer vaccine. Sialyl-Tn (STn) is a carbohydrate associated with the MUC1 mucin on breast and ovarian cancer and is an ideal candidate for vaccine immunotherapy. Sialyl-Tn-keyhole limpet hemocyanin (STn-KLH) vaccine (Theratope) incorporates a synthetic STn antigen that mimics the unique tumor-associated STn carbohydrate and is designed to stimulate tumor antigen-specific immune responses in patients with mucin-expressing tumors. Between 1995 and 2000, 70 patients (16 with stage II/III breast cancer, 17 with stage III/IV ovarian cancer, and 37 with stage IV breast cancer) were treated with 2 different formulations of STn-KLH. Toxicity, outcome, and immune response data are reported. STn-KLH was well-tolerated with minimal toxicity. The most common side effects were indurations and erythema at the sites of injections. Humoral and cellular responses were elicited in the majority of patients. Overall, these data indicate that post-autologous transplant patients are able to mount an effective immune response to vaccine immunotherapy with minimal side effects, and that vaccine immunotherapy may be a useful addition to high-dose chemotherapy regimens.

  9. The inherent tensions and ambiguities of hope: towards a post-formal analysis of experiences of advanced-cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Brown, Patrick; de Graaf, Sabine; Hillen, Marij

    2015-03-01

    Sociological and anthropological analyses of hope in health-care contexts have tended to address institutional processes, especially the power dynamics that function through such systems or political economies of hope, which in turn shape interactions through which hopes are managed. This article extends this approach through a more detailed consideration of the experience of hoping itself. Our post-formal analysis denotes the tensions that are intrinsic and defining features of lifeworlds around hope, emphasising the dissonance and fragility of hoping. Drawing upon interview and observational data involving patients with advanced-cancer diagnoses who were taking part in clinical trials, we explore three main tensions which emerged within the analysis: tensions involving time and liminality between future and present; ontological tensions involving the concrete and the possible, the 'realistic' and the positive; and tensions in taken-for-grantedness between the reflective and the mundane, the specific and the ambiguous. Rather than three separate sets of tensions, those involving time, ontology and taken-for-grantedness are very much interwoven. In denoting the influence of social processes in engendering tensions, we bridge sociological and anthropological approaches with a more definition-oriented literature, developing understandings of hoping and its key characteristics in relation to other processes of coping amidst vulnerability and uncertainty.

  10. Do Multidisciplinary Team (MDT) processes influence survival in patients with colorectal cancer? A population-based experience.

    PubMed

    Munro, Alastair; Brown, Mhari; Niblock, Paddy; Steele, Robert; Carey, Frank

    2015-10-13

    MDT (multidisciplinary team) meetings are considered an essential component of care for patients with cancer. However there is remarkably little direct evidence that such meetings improve outcomes. We assessed whether or not MDT (multidisciplinary team) processes influenced survival in a cohort of patients with colorectal cancer. Observational study of a population-based cohort of 586 consecutive patients with colorectal cancer diagnosed in Tayside (Scotland) during 2006 and 2007. Recommendations from MDT meetings were implemented in 411/586 (70.1 %) of patients, the MDT+ group. The remaining175/586 (29.9 %) were either never discussed at an MDT, or recommendations were not implemented, MDT- group. The 5-year cause-specific survival (CSS) rates were 63.1 % (MDT+) and 48.2 % (MDT-), p < 0.0001. In analysis confined to patients who survived >6 weeks after diagnosis, the rates were 63.2 % (MDT+) and 57.7 % (MDT-), p = 0.064. The adjusted hazard rate (HR) for death from colorectal cancer was 0.73 (0.53 to 1.00, p = 0.047) in the MDT+ group compared to the MDT- group, in patients surviving >6 weeks the adjusted HR was 1.00 (0.70 to 1.42, p = 0.987). Any benefit from the MDT process was largely confined to patients with advanced disease: adjusted HR (early) 1.32 (0.69 to 2.49, p = 0.401); adjusted HR(advanced) 0.65 (0.45 to 0.96, p = 0.031). Adequate MDT processes are associated with improved survival for patients with colorectal cancer. However, some of this effect may be more apparent than real - simply reflecting selection bias. The MDT process predominantly benefits the 40 % of patients who present with advanced disease and conveys little demonstrable advantage to patients with early tumours. These results call into question the current belief that all new patients with colorectal cancer should be discussed at an MDT meeting.

  11. Comparison of clinical and pathological tumor, node and metastasis staging of lung cancer: 15-year experience with 530 patients.

    PubMed

    Turk, F; Gursoy, S; Yaldiz, S; Yuncu, G; Yazgan, S; Basok, O

    2011-12-01

    The prognosis of patients with lung cancer depends on early diagnosis and accurate staging. The present staging system for lung cancer is tumor (T), node (N), and metastasis (M) staging (TNM). We compared the accuracy of preoperative (clinical) and postoperative (pathological) TNM staging of lung cancer in this study and emphasized the preoperative mediastinoscopy is useful in selected patients. We performed a retrospective comparison of the clinical and pathological TNM staging of 530 patients with lung cancer treated surgically. The preoperative clinical TNM staging of all patients was based on physical examination, radiological investigations and bronchoscopy. Mediastinoscopy was used routinely for all patients with an indication since 2000. We found the agreement between clinical and pathological TNM staging to be only 46.4%. The comparison between clinical and pathological TNM staging was 6.2-5.3% at stage Ia, 37.9%-36% at stage Ib, 0.7-0.9% at stage IIa, 23-25% at stage IIb, 27.1-16.2% at stage IIIa, and 3.2-14% at stage IIIb respectively. The frequency rates of the different clinical and pathologic stages were 6.2% and 5.3%, for stage Ia, 37.9% and 36% for stage Ib, 0.7% and 0.9% for stage IIa, 23% and 25% for stage IIb, 27.1% and 16.2% for stage IIIa, 3.2% and 14% for stage IIIb respectively. We compared the clinical and pathological staging in patients with non small cell lung cancer submitted to surgical treatment to identify the causes of any discordance. The clinical TNM and staging based on computerized tomography was found to be inaccurate.

  12. Surgical outcomes for colon and rectal cancer over a decade: results from a consecutive monocentric experience in 902 unselected patients

    PubMed Central

    Andreoni, Bruno; Chiappa, Antonio; Bertani, Emilio; Bellomi, Massimo; Orecchia, Roberto; Zampino, MariaGiulia; Fazio, Nicola; Venturino, Marco; Orsi, Franco; Sonzogni, Angelica; Pace, Ugo; Monfardini , Lorenzo

    2007-01-01

    Background This study evaluates the surgical morbidity and long-term outcome of colorectal cancer surgery in an unselected group of patients treated over the period 1994–2003. Methods A consecutive series of 902 primary colorectal cancer patients (489 M, 413 F; mean age: 63 years ± 11 years, range: 24–88 years) was evaluated and prospectively followed in a university hospital (mean follow-up 36 ± 24 months; range: 3–108 months). Perioperative mortality, morbidity, overall survival, curative resection rates, recurrence rates were analysed. Results Of the total, 476 colorectal cancers were localized to the colon (CC, 53%), 406 to the rectum (RC, 45%), 12 (1%) were multicentric, and 8 were identified as part of HNPCC (1%). Combining all tumours, there were 186 cancers (20.6%) defined as UICC stage I, 235 (26.1%) stage II, 270 (29.9%) stage III and 187 (20.6%) stage IV cases. Twenty-four (2.7%) cases were of undetermined stage. Postoperative complications occurred in 38% of the total group (37.8% of CC cases, 37.2% of the RC group, 66.7% of the synchronous cancer patients and 50% of those with HNPCC, p = 0.19) Mortality rate was 0.8%, (1.3% for colon cancer, 0% for rectal cancer; p = 0.023). Multivisceral resection was performed in 14.3% of cases. Disease-free survival in cases resected for cure was 73% at 5-years and 72% at 8 years. The 5- and 8-year overall survival rates were 71% and 61% respectively (total cases). At 5-year analysis, overall survival rates are 97% for stage I disease, 87% for stage II, 73% for stage III and 22% for stage IV respectively (p < 0.0001). The 5-year overall survival rates showed a marked difference in R0, R1+R2 and non resected patients (82%, 35% and 0% respectively, p < 0.0001). On multivariate analysis, resection for cure and stage at presentation but not tumour site (colon vs. rectum) were independent variables for overall survival (p < 0.0001). Conclusion A prospective, uniform follow-up policy used in a single institution

  13. Patient/parent perspectives on genomic tumor profiling of pediatric solid tumors: The Individualized Cancer Therapy (iCat) experience.

    PubMed

    Marron, Jonathan M; DuBois, Steven G; Glade Bender, Julia; Kim, AeRang; Crompton, Brian D; Meyer, Stephanie C; Janeway, Katherine A; Mack, Jennifer W

    2016-11-01

    Genomic tumor profiling (GTP) plays an important role in the care of many adult cancer patients. Its role in pediatric oncology is still evolving, with only a subset of patients currently expected to receive clinically significant results. Little is known about perspectives of pediatric oncology patients/parents on GTP. We surveyed individuals who previously underwent GTP through the iCat (Individualized Cancer Therapy) pilot study of molecular profiling in children with relapsed, refractory, and high-risk solid tumors at four pediatric cancer centers. Following return of profiling results, a cross-sectional survey was offered to the patient, if he or she was 18 years or older at enrollment, or parent, if he or she was under 18 years of age. Forty-five surveys (85% response) were completed. Eighty-nine percent (39/44) of respondents reported hoping participation would help find cures for future patients, while 59% (26/44) hoped it would increase their/their child's chance of cure. Most had few concerns about GTP, but 12% (5/43) worried they would learn their/their child's cancer was less treatable or more aggressive than previously thought. Sixty-four percent (29/45) reported feeling their participation had helped others and 44% (20/45) felt they had helped themselves/their own child, despite only one substudy subject receiving targeted therapy matched to GTP findings. Fifty-four percent (21/39) wished to receive all available profiling data, including findings unrelated to cancer and of unclear significance. Participants in pediatric GTP research perceive benefits of GTP to themselves and others, but expectations of personal benefits of GTP may exceed actual positive impact. These issues warrant consideration during consent discussions about GTP research participation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. "Waiting and the waiting room: how do you experience them?" emotional implications and suggestions from patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Catania, Chiara; De Pas, Tommaso; Minchella, Ida; De Braud, Filippo; Micheli, Daniela; Adamoli, Laura; Spitaleri, Gianluca; Noberasco, Cristina; Milani, Alessandra; Zampino, Maria Giulia; Toffalorio, Francesca; Radice, Davide; Goldhirsch, Aron; Nolè, Franco

    2011-06-01

    Waiting can increase discomfort. The goal of this study was to identify moods and fears of cancer patients while in a waiting room and to capture their concrete suggestions for an anthropocentric transformation of waiting itself. A 15-item questionnaire was given to 355 patients who came to our Out-patient Oncology Clinic. Eighty-three percent of patients felt that waiting has an emotional cost, 35% were upset by talking about their condition with others while waiting, and 26% suffered a major emotional impact seeing other sick people and witnessing their clinical decline. Eighty-nine percent of patients suggested that alternative activities, such as meetings with professionals, doctors, and psychologists, be organized during the waiting period; 65% suggested fun activities (music therapy, drawing courses, library, TV). Most patients asked to have the freedom to leave the waiting room. This option, feasibly by means of IMs/"beepers," would limit their sense of having a lack of freedom or being robbed of their time. This study highlighted the complexity and heterogeneity of emotional implications that waiting causes in patients with cancer and collected many patients' suggestions about how to create a constructive, free, and personalized waiting period, overcoming the boredom, distress, and psychological suffering it causes.

  15. Clinical outcome of Turkish metastatic breast cancer patients with currently available treatment modalities--single center experience.

    PubMed

    Cabuk, Devrim; Basaran, Gul; Teomete, Mehmet; Dane, Faysal; Korkmaz, Taner; Seber, Selcuk; Telli, Ferhat; Yumuk, Perran Fulden; Turhal, Serdar

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer-related death among women in the developed countries. Despite advances in screening, improved local therapies and adjuvant systemic treatments, median survival of metastatic breast cancer patients (MBC) is in the range of 2-3 years at most. We aimed to investigate whether the prognostic factors and therapeutic responses of our Turkish patients are similar to those in the literature. We reviewed the medical records of MBC patients who had been treated in our institution between 1999-2009 and analyzed their clinicopathological features and survival outcomes retrospectively. A hundred and sixty patients were included. Median age was 47 (23-82), median follow up was 24 (2-186) months. At the time of diagnosis 59% of patients were under the age of 50 and 46% were postmenopausal. The majority (37%) had multiple sites of metastases. Forty percent received endocrine therapy and 40% chemotherapy as first line metastatic treatment. Thirty (20%) patients were treated with molecular targeting agents like trastuzumab, lapatinib and sunitinib, frequently combined with a chemotherapy agent. Five-year overall survival (OS) was 32% and median OS was 38 months for the whole group. Five year progression free survival (PFS) was 10% and median PFS was 10 months. Menopausal status, hormone receptor expression and disease free status had a significant impact on overall survival in the multivariate analysis (p 0.018, p 0.018 and p:0.003, respectively). All our patients were treated with the modern oncologic therapies recommended by the international guidelines. From our data, MBC patients live up to 3-4 years, indicating that further improvement beyond that requires development of new treatment modalities. The survival outcomes of our patients were consistent with the data reported in the literature.

  16. Occupational cancer: experience in Ontario.

    PubMed Central

    Chovil, A. C.; McCracken, W. J.; Dowd, E. C.; Stewart, C.; Burton, D. F.; Dyer, D. W.

    1981-01-01

    This paper reviews the experience of the Workmen's Compensation Board of Ontario in identifying cases of cancer that could be attributed to occupational hazards. Worker's claims for compensation are allowed if there is reasonable medical evidence that their cancer was caused by exposure to risk factors associated with their occupation. Details of the types of cancer associated with specific carcinogens or fields of employment are discussed. About 50% of the cases were related to exposure in particular industrial operations that functioned for relatively brief periods. The number of deaths from cancer identified as being caused by occupational factors is compared with the total for cancer from all causes in Ontario during the period 1971 through 1975. Although all workers eligible for compensation may not have been identified, the data suggest that less than 1% of cancer is presently caused by occupational factors. PMID:6460552

  17. Towards a pain free hospital: an in-depth qualitative analysis of the pain experiences of head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Pattison, Natalie; Brown, Matthew RD; Gubbay, Anthony; Peacock, Janet; Ross, Joy R; Chapman, Suzanne; Sauzet, Odile; Williams, John

    2015-01-01

    Background: Treatment for head and neck cancer can frequently be a painful experience with implications for patients in terms of quality of life, nutrition and ultimately treatment outcomes. Pain may arise for a number of reasons in this patient group including the influence of localised tissue damage from radiotherapy, the effects of chemotherapeutic agents as well as the disease process itself. Early identification of cancer pain, through screening and early analgesic and pain management are thought to be the most appropriate approaches to the problem. Aim: To explore in-depth, patients’ views of the experience of pain related to radiotherapy for head and neck cancer, within the context of a randomised controlled trial (RCT) of pain screening and intervention. Sample: A purposive sample of head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy who were participating in a separate RCT of a proactive pain screening intervention. Methods: A qualitative design using one-off, face-to-face, in-depth interviews. Data were inductively analysed for themes using thematic analysis. Data were collected from September 2012 to January 2013. Findings: Eight participants were interviewed. Several issues around pain management arose and the influence of various factors became apparent. Four dominant themes emerged: facets of radiotherapy pain in head and neck cancer, facilitators and barriers to pain management, pain services and finally interdisciplinary working. Conclusion: The specific issues faced by head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy highlight the need for pain relieving interventions delivered by pain specialists, in tandem with the development of robust self-management strategies. An integrated approach to care is optimal, comprising pain screening at each outpatient encounter, and review by specialists as necessary. PMID:27551409

  18. Impact of Clinical Pharmacy Services on KAP and QOL in Cancer Patients: A Single-Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Wu, Huimin; Xu, Feng

    2015-01-01

    This study was to evaluate the efficacy of pharmaceutical intervention (PI) on chemotherapy knowledge-attitude-practice (KAP) and quality of life (QOL) in cancer patients. A prospective, randomized, controlled study was carried out at Oncology Ward in a tertiary hospital affiliated to Southern Medical University, China. Eligible patient was randomly assigned to pharmaceutical intervention (PI) group or control group. Each patient in PI group was given information booklets and was given 30 min face-to-face medication education and psychological counseling by clinical pharmacists, 2 sessions per week for 2 months. Patients in control group only received conventional treatment. All participants were asked to complete a structured Chemotherapy KAP Questionnaire and QOL Questionnaire at pre- and poststudy time. A total of 149 cancer patients (77 in PI group and 72 in control group) completed the study. The baseline scores of KAP and QOL in 2 groups were similar. At the end of study, only knowledge score was significantly increased; meanwhile no difference existed for attitude, practice, and QOL scores in control group; both KAP scores and QOL score were significantly increased in PI group. As for the between-group comparison, both KAP scores and QOL score in PI group were significantly higher than those in control group. In conclusion, pharmaceutical intervention has a positive role in increasing chemotherapy-related knowledge, improving patients' positive emotions, dealing with chemotherapy adverse reactions, and improving the quality of life of patients. PMID:26697487

  19. Breast cancer patients' narrative experiences about communication during the oncology care process: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Abt Sacks, A; Perestelo-Perez, L; Rodriguez-Martin, B; Cuellar-Pompa, L; Algara López, M; González Hernández, N; Serrano-Aguilar, P

    2016-09-01

    To analyse the perception about the information and communication received to evaluate oncologic care of breast cancer patients in Spain. Qualitative study based on conducting in-depth interviews. An inductive thematic analysis of the illness narratives was performed. Intentional theoretical sampling of 41 people diagnosed with breast cancer. The information provided during care process is assessed as appropriate, as it includes personalised skills focused on communication and considers organisational and contextual issues. In some cases, the information was considered partial, heterogeneous and at times contradictory, which revealed a lack of continuity. To provide and adequately cover information needs from the patient perspective, it is necessary to ensure access, both in its physical (material) and intellectual (comprehension) dimension, keeping in mind elements of social capital (social networks) and cultural capital (values, beliefs, non-verbal language) that facilitate or hinder access. The current state of transition to a horizontal model in the doctor-patient relationship, could account for the difficulties, deficits and contradictions in communication and information that breast cancer patients perceive in many contexts. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Role of External Beam Radiotherapy in Patients With Advanced or Recurrent Nonanaplastic Thyroid Cancer: Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Terezakis, Stephanie A. Lee, Kyungmouk S.; Ghossein, Ronald A.; Rivera, Michael; Tuttle, Robert M.; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Wong, Richard J.; Patel, Snehal G.; Pfister, David G.; Shaha, Ashok R.; Lee, Nancy Y.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) plays a controversial role in the management of nonanaplastic thyroid cancer. We reviewed our institution's outcomes in patients treated with EBRT for advanced or recurrent nonanaplastic thyroid cancer. Methods and Materials: Between April 1989 and April 2006, 76 patients with nonanaplastic thyroid cancer were treated with EBRT. The median follow-up for the surviving patients was 35.3 months (range, 4.2-178.4). The lesions were primarily advanced and included Stage T2 in 5 (7%), T3 in 5 (7%), and T4 in 64 (84%) patients. Stage N1 disease was present in 60 patients (79%). Distant metastases before EBRT were identified in 27 patients (36%). The median total EBRT dose delivered was 6,300 cGy. The histologic features examined included medullary in 12 patients (16%) and nonmedullary in 64 (84%). Of the 76 patients, 71 (93%) had undergone surgery before RT, and radioactive iodine treatment was used in 56 patients (74%). Results: The 2- and 4-year overall locoregional control rate for all histologic types was 86% and 72%, respectively, and the 2- and 4-year overall survival rate for all patients was 74% and 55%, respectively. No significant differences were found in locoregional control, overall survival, or distant metastases-free survival for patients with complete resection, microscopic residual disease, or gross residual disease. Grade 3 acute mucositis and dysphagia occurred in 14 (18%) and 24 (32%) patients, respectively. Late adverse toxicity was notable for percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube use in 4 patients (5%). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that EBRT is effective for locoregional control of selected locally advanced or recurrent nonanaplastic thyroid malignancies, with acceptable acute toxicity.

  1. Watchful waiting and active surveillance approach in patients with low risk localized prostatic cancer: an experience of out-patients clinic with 12-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Kravchick, Sergey; Peled, Ronit; Cytron, Shmuel

    2011-12-01

    In this study we evaluated the safety of expectant approach in the patients with low risk prostate cancer in the reality of community based out-patients clinics. 48 men were enrolled into the study. The inclusion criteria were age ranged from 60 to 75 years and the Epstein criteria for low risk prostate cancer. Patients were managed expectantly while curative treatment was offered when indicated. Initial and final Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) and BMI were assessed for all men. Patients' median follow-up was 81.1 ± 29.1 years. During this study 41.7% of the patients chose active forms of treatment. Cancer was found in 20.8% (n-10) of our patients. Two first sessions of re-biopsy diagnosed 92% of T1c upgrading. Six men with CCI ≥2 died from concomitant disease and no one died from PCa. Significant correlation was found between BMI and final CCI ≥2 (p-0.001). Expectant approach can be considered as self alternative to active treatment model in selected group of patients with well differentiated PCa, however 20.8% of these patients are still at risk of having aggressive form of cancer. Expectant approach is particular beneficial for the patients with CCI 1-2 and high BMI.

  2. Hotel-based ambulatory care for complex cancer patients: a review of the University College London Hospital experience.

    PubMed

    Sive, Jonathan; Ardeshna, Kirit M; Cheesman, Simon; le Grange, Franel; Morris, Stephen; Nicholas, Claire; Peggs, Karl; Statham, Paula; Goldstone, Anthony H

    2012-12-01

    Since 2005, University College London Hospital (UCLH) has operated a hotel-based Ambulatory Care Unit (ACU) for hematology and oncology patients requiring intensive chemotherapy regimens and hematopoietic stem cell transplants. Between January 2005 and 2011 there were 1443 patient episodes, totaling 9126 patient days, with increasing use over the 6-year period. These were predominantly for hematological malignancy (82%) and sarcoma (17%). Median length of stay was 5 days (range 1-42), varying according to treatment. Clinical review and treatment was provided in the ACU, with patients staying in a local hotel at the hospital's expense. Admission to the inpatient ward was arranged as required, and there was close liaison with the inpatient team to preempt emergency admissions. Of the 523 unscheduled admissions, 87% occurred during working hours. An ACU/hotel-based treatment model can be safely used for a wide variety of cancers and treatments, expanding hospital treatment capacity, and freeing up inpatient beds for those patients requiring them.

  3. Antibiotic resistance in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Gudiol, Carlota; Carratalà, Jordi

    2014-08-01

    Bacterial infection is one of the most frequent complications in cancer patients and hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. In recent years, the emergence of antimicrobial resistance has become a significant problem worldwide, and cancer patients are among those affected. Treatment of infections due to multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria represents a clinical challenge, especially in the case of Gram-negative bacilli, since the therapeutic options are often very limited. As the antibiotics active against MDR bacteria present several disadvantages (limited clinical experience, higher incidence of adverse effects, and less knowledge of the pharmacokinetics of the drug), a thorough acquaintance with the main characteristics of these drugs is mandatory in order to provide safe treatment to cancer patients with MDR bacterial infections. Nevertheless, the implementation of antibiotic stewardship programs and infection control measures is the cornerstone for controlling the development and spread of these MDR pathogens.

  4. Patients' and clinicians' experiences of holistic needs assessment using a cancer distress thermometer and problem list: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Biddle, Lucy; Paramasivan, Sangeetha; Harris, Susan; Campbell, Rona; Brennan, James; Hollingworth, William

    2016-08-01

    Psychosocial needs assessment is recommended for patients undergoing cancer treatment, but trials of effectiveness of assessment tools provide mixed results. This qualitative study aimed to understand how such tools are experienced by patients and clinicians in order to optimise use in the future. Qualitative interviews were used in a mixed-methods sequential design following a randomised controlled trial of needs assessment using the Distress Thermometer and Problem List (DT&PL), and explored patients' and clinicians' evaluations of the needs assessment process. Benefits of needs assessment using the DT&PL included the potential to detect hidden distress, allow opportunity for distress to be discussed, and to deliver outcomes to address problems. However, effectiveness and patient willingness to report all forms of distress could be hindered by: clinicians feeling ill-equipped to deal with 'non-physical' distress and patients questioning their appropriateness to do so; time constraints; insufficient support services and referral guidelines; inappropriate timing; and lack of follow-up. The benefits of a holistic needs assessment cannot be realised without matching time and frequency of administration to the dynamic nature of distress during cancer, and making changes to the context of delivery - for instance, providing protected time, increasing referral options and clinician training. Significant investment is needed to optimise potential benefits for patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Relationships with clinical staff after a diagnosis of breast cancer are associated with patients' experience of care and abuse in childhood.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Peter; Holcombe, Christopher; Clark, Louise; Krespi, Rita; Fisher, Jean; Hill, Jonathan

    2007-09-01

    Patients experiencing the crisis of the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer need to form trusting and supportive relationships with clinical staff. However, adverse childhood experiences damage the ability to form supportive relationships as adults. We tested the prediction that women recalling childhood abuse and lack of parental care would experience poorer support from clinical staff caring for them around the time of diagnosis and surgical treatment of breast cancer. Two to 4 days after surgery, women with primary breast cancer (N=355) self-reported: childhood sexual, physical, and emotional abuse and parental care; perceived social support; support experienced from the surgeon and breast and ward nurses; and current emotional distress. Logistic regression analyses and covariance structure modeling tested the dependence of perceived professional support on childhood abuse and care and on current social support, controlling for emotional distress and age. Women who reported feeling fully supported by clinical staff were more likely to recall no abuse and good parental care. The influence of parental care, but not abuse, was explained by its association with experiencing good social support generally, which was itself associated with feeling fully supported by clinical staff. These relationships were independent of current emotional distress. Patients' ability to feel fully supported by clinical staff reflects not only how much support staff make available but also patients' experience of close relationships in childhood. We suggest that, whereas lack of parental care compromises adult supportive relationships in general, abuse specifically reduces support from clinical staff.

  6. Health-related quality of life and healthcare experiences in breast cancer patients in a study of Swedish women.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Jenny; Sandelin, Kerstin; Forsberg, Christina

    2010-01-01

    Nearly 7,000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer in Sweden every year. The primary treatment is surgical and consists mainly of partial or modified radical mastectomy followed by adjuvant treatment. The diagnosis and treatment may cause distress and decreased health-related quality of life. The aim of the present report was to study health-related quality of life and satisfaction with hospital stay. One hundred women were invited to participate in the study, of which 85 accepted. Participants filled in the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey and a study-specific questionnaire, both preoperatively and postoperatively and 6 months after surgery. Women with breast cancer experienced an improved health-related quality of life over time, but they reported poorer health-related quality of life than the norm value after surgery. The lowest scores at all time points were observed on the scales role-physical and role-emotional. Patients were very satisfied with the treatment and care they had received. Three of 4 women felt that the nursing staff had a considerate and conscientious manner, for example, when removing drains. Diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer have impact on the women's health-related quality of life. Measures to meet patients' needs during short hospitalization need to be considered. Nurses must ensure that patient's physical and emotional needs are identified and met and that appropriate counseling is provided.

  7. A targeted approach to genetic counseling in breast cancer patients: the experience of an Italian local project.

    PubMed

    La Verde, Nicla; Corsi, Fabio; Moretti, Anna; Peissel, Bernard; Dalu, Davide; Girelli, Serena; Fasola, Cinzia; Gambaro, Anna; Roversi, Gaia; Azzollini, Jacopo; Radice, Paolo; Pensotti, Valeria; Farina, Gabriella; Manoukian, Siranoush

    2016-01-01

    Patients with hereditary breast cancer (BC) may benefit from genetic counseling and testing for detection of causative mutations, definition of therapeutic and preventive strategies, and identification of at-risk relatives. Italy has few oncogenetic centers and genetic evaluation of all patients with BC is not feasible. Moreover, lack of uniformity in the selection of patients generates inappropriate referral to the geneticist. We designed a model that may represent a reproducible way to select patients at risk for hereditary BC, with the aims of rationalizing access to genetic centers and improving clinical management and surveillance. The genetic unit of a Cancer Center and the Departments of Oncology from 2 public Hospitals in Milan were involved in the project. After training sessions at the genetic unit, operators from the 2 hospitals evaluated all patients with BC attending a first oncologic visit, through a specific interview. Patients considered at risk of hereditary BC attended counseling at the genetic unit. Of 419 patients, 61 (14.5%) were eligible for genetic counseling after the interview. Of these, 46 (10.9%) strictly met testing criteria. Overall, 52 (12.4%) patients underwent genetic counseling and 47 were tested for BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation. After genetic test results, the available options for treatment/surveillance were discussed by a multidisciplinary team, according to the level of genetic risk. It is possible to improve the process of referring patients with suspected hereditary BC for genetic risk assessment. The application of clinical screening reduced the genetics unit's workload and enabled optimization of time and resources.

  8. [The first experience with using high frequency thermo-destruction in patients with metastatic cancer of the liver].

    PubMed

    Iarema, I V; Kolobov, S V; Trandofilov, M M

    2003-01-01

    Thermodestruction of the metastatic cancer of the liver was used in 18 patients. A high frequency induction thermodestructor ELECTROTOM HITT ("Berhtold" Germany) with the working frequency 343 kHz and power 0-60 Wt was used. After the ablation of the main focus the thermodestruction of metastases was performed in the liver. The effects of thermodestruction were estimated by the intraoperative biopsy before and after thermodestruction. The procedure was considered effective if biopsy revealed necrobiotic tissues. A connective tissue scar was formed at the place of thermodestruction. After operation the patients were given polychemotherapy.

  9. Long Term Outcome in Patients with Esophageal Stenting for Cancer Esophagus - Our Experience at a Rural Hospital of Punjab, India

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Abhitesh; Singh, Anantbir; Sharma, Ghansham; Bhatia, Parmod Kumar; Grover, Amarjeet Singh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cancer of the esophagus is among the leading cause of cancer deaths in Punjab, India. Patients generally present with dysphagia as their first symptom and more often they have advanced disease at the time of presentation to a tertiary care centre. Palliative procedures have important roles in this setting. Stenting is the best option to palliate the symptoms of dysphagia, from which patient is suffering the most. Aim To know the success rate, early and long term complications and mortality in esophageal stenting, when it was done in malignant esophageal stricture patients. Materials and Methods One hundred patients, who had undergone esophageal stenting from January 2012 to January 2015, were included in the study. We retrospectively analysed the data for patient characteristics, causes of non-operability, early and long term complications, re-interventions, efficacy and mortality. Results Out of 100 patients, indications for stenting were locally advanced disease not amenable to surgery (52%), metastatic disease (35%), CVA (1%), cardiac and respiratory problem (8%), un-willing for surgery in 5% of patients. Majority of patients (94%) had squamous cell carcinoma, while only 6% had adenocarcinoma. 84% of patients presented with dysphagia with or without chest pain and recurrent cough while 16% had recurrent vomiting. 58% had dysphagia to liquids and solids and 17% had complete dysphagia. After stenting 93% had significant improvement in dysphagia score from median of 3 to 1. Post procedure stay was 3.61±1.0 days. One patient had procedure related major complication in the form of post procedural bleed (after 16 days of stenting) leading to death of that patient. Minor complications were present in 52 patients treated conservatively not affecting the efficacy of procedure. These include pain after stenting (38%), stent obstruction (23%) and stent migration (6%). All the minor complications were treated conservatively except in six patients in whom re

  10. Experiences of Patients With Advanced Lung Cancer: Being Resigned to Sleep-Wake Disturbances While Maintaining Hope for Optimal Treatment Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, Suzanne S; Abbu Sabbah, Eman; Gothard, Sandra; Zeigler, Patricia; Chen, Hongbin; Steinbrenner, Lynn M; Dean, Grace E

    2015-01-01

    Sleep-wake disturbances are prevalent in patients with lung cancer yet are infrequently studied over time. This article reports on the qualitative results of a mixed-methods study of newly diagnosed patients' narratives over 6 months. The objective of this study was to gain an understanding of the treatment and illness trajectory related to sleep-wake disturbances as well as the beliefs and practices of patients while seeking optimal treatment outcomes. Longitudinal interview narratives of 26 patients' experiences with advanced lung cancer diagnosis (at baseline, pre-second and third treatment, and 6 months) were obtained from participants recruited from Veterans Administration Hospital Center and a Comprehensive Cancer Center in Northeast United States. Analysis of illness narratives used interpretive phenomenology based on Heideggarian hermeneutic traditions. At diagnosis, participants described poor sleep such as trouble falling asleep and frequent awakenings. Over time, as the treatment worsened their sleep symptoms, these participants still maintained hope for more time with treatment. This focus enabled them to tolerate the sleep-wake disturbances and treatment adverse effects. As the treatment effectiveness declined, their focus changed to spiritual meanings for the future and to keep living life with a purpose. By explicating lung cancer patients' experiences with sleep-wake disturbances, nurses will gain insight into potential interventions to improve sleep and support effective outcomes as well as open a dialogue about hope. Findings offer insight for oncology nurses to provide opportunities for dialogue about treatment options and techniques to improve sleep, which will facilitate patients living their lives.

  11. Patient preferences for treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer in Japan: a discrete-choice experiment.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Hiroji; Matsubara, Nobuaki; Kimura, Go; Yamaguchi, Akito; Ledesma, Dianne Athene; DiBonaventura, Marco; Mohamed, Ateesha F; Basurto, Enrique; McKinnon, Ian; Wang, Ed; Concialdi, Kristen; Narimatsu, Aya; Aitoku, Yasuko

    2016-11-04

    Up to a fifth of patients diagnosed with prostate cancer (PC) will develop castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), which has been associated with a poor prognosis. The aim of this study was to consider the patient perspective as part of the overall treatment decision-making process for CRPC, given that an alignment between patient preference and prescribing has been shown to benefit patient outcomes. This study examines preferences of patients with CRPC in Japan for treatment features associated with treatments like RA-223, abiraterone, and docetaxel and to examine the extent to which treatment preferences may vary between symptomatic and asymptomatic patients. A two-phase research approach was implemented. In Phase 1, N = 8 patients with CRPC were recruited from a single hospital to complete a qualitative interview to provide feedback on the draft survey. In Phase 2, N = 134 patients with CRPC were recruited from five hospitals to complete a paper survey. The survey included 6 treatment choice questions, each asking patients to choose between two hypothetical treatments for their CRPC. Each treatment alternative was defined by the following attributes: length of overall survival (OS), time to a symptomatic skeletal event (SSE), method of administration, reduction in the risk of bone pain, treatment-associated risk of fatigue and lost work days. A hierarchical Bayesian logistic regression was used to estimate relative preference weights for each attribute level and mean relative importance. A total of N = 133 patients with CRPC completed the survey and were included in the final analysis. Patients had a mean age of 75.4 years (SD = 7.4) and had been diagnosed with PC a mean of 6.5 years prior (SD = 4.4). Over the attribute levels shown, fatigue (relative importance [RI] = 24.9 %, 95 % CI: 24.7 %, 25.1 %) was the most important attribute, followed by reduction in the risk of bone pain (RI = 23.2 %, 95 % CI: 23.0 %, 23.5

  12. [Malnutrition in cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Antoun, Sami; Merad, Mansouriah; Raynard, Bruno; Ruffié, Pierre

    2006-11-30

    Malnutrition is common in cancer patients. Many factors contribute to weight loss: some of them can be related to diminished dietary intake, while others are more associated with metabolic changes induced by systemic inflammatory responses. This is why at a specific phase during the course of development, some cancers will benefit from nutritional support, while in theory, and others will benefit from anti-inflammatory treatment. Parenteral nutrition is indicated for severe malnourished surgical patients and for allogenic stem cell transplant patients. Tube feeding (enteral nutrition) should be considered for patients with a functional gut who are unable to ingest sufficient nutrients orally, for example head and neck cancer patients. The value of dietary counselling and oral nutritional support has not been proven in patients undergoing chemotherapy, which is why it is so difficult to propose recommendations. Some arguments seem to favour parenteral nutrition for patients with bowel obstruction suffering from advanced-stage incurable cancer. As the results of studies following omega-3 fatty acid-enriched oral nutritional support in palliative care patients are inconsistent, these products cannot be recommended.

  13. The impact of language barriers and immigration status on the care experience for Spanish-speaking caregivers of patients with pediatric cancer.

    PubMed

    Zamora, Eduardo R; Kaul, Sapna; Kirchhoff, Anne C; Gwilliam, Vannina; Jimenez, Ornella A; Morreall, Deborah K; Montenegro, Roberto E; Kinney, Anita Y; Fluchel, Mark N

    2016-12-01

    An increasing proportion of pediatric cancer patients in the United States are Latino and many have Spanish-speaking immigrant parents with limited English proficiency (LEP). Little is known about how language or undocumented immigration status impacts their care experience. A cross-sectional survey was administered to English (N = 310) and Spanish-speaking LEP (N = 56) caregivers of pediatric cancer patients. To assess differences in healthcare experiences between the language groups, t-tests and chi-square statistics were used. Multivariable logistic regression evaluated associations between primary language and knowledge of clinical trial status. Spanish-speaking caregivers were more likely to report higher rates of quitting or changing jobs as a direct result of their child's cancer, and their children were more likely to experience a delay in education. Although Spanish-speaking caregivers reported higher satisfaction with care, 32% reported feeling that their child would have received better care if English was their primary language. Spanish-speaking caregivers were more likely to incorrectly identify whether their child was on a clinical trial compared with English-speaking caregivers. The majority of Spanish-speaking caregivers reported at least one undocumented caregiver in the household and 11% of them avoided or delayed medical care for their child due to concerns over their undocumented immigration status. Language barriers and undocumented immigration status may negatively impact the quality of informed decision-making and the care experience for Spanish-speaking LEP caregivers of pediatric cancer patients. These families may benefit from culturally appropriate Spanish language resources to improve communication and open a dialogue regarding undocumented immigration status. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. The dynamic pattern of recurrence in curatively resected non-small cell lung cancer patients: Experiences at a single institution.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Yoshikane; Muley, Thomas; Safi, Seyer; Rieken, Stefan; Bischoff, Helge; Kappes, Jutta; Warth, Arne; Herth, Felix J F; Dienemann, Hendrik; Hoffmann, Hans

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the hazard function of tumor recurrence in patients with completely (R0) resected non-small cell lung cancer. A total of 1374 patients treated between 2003 and 2009 with complete resection and systematic lymph node dissection were studied. The risk of recurrence at a given time after operation was studied utilizing the cause-specific hazard function. Recurrence was categorized as local recurrence or distant recurrence. The risk distribution was assessed using clinical and pathological factors. The hazard function for recurrence presented an early peak at approximately 10 months after surgery and maintained a tapered plateau-like tail extending up to 8 years. A similar risk pattern was detected for both local recurrence and distant recurrence, while the risk of distant recurrence was higher than that of local recurrence. The double-peaked pattern of hazard rate was present in several subgroups, such as p-stage IA patients. A comparison of histology and status of nodal involvement showed that pN1-2 adenocarcinoma patients demonstrated a high hazard rate of distant recurrence and that pN0 adenocarcinoma patients exhibited a small recurrent risk for a longer time. Squamous cell carcinoma patients showed only little difference in risk. The data may be useful to select patients at high risk of recurrence and may provide information for each patient to decide how to manage the postoperative follow-up individually. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Late neurological complications after prophylactic cranial irradiation in patients with small-cell lung cancer: The Toronto experience

    SciTech Connect

    Lishner, M.; Feld, R.; Payne, D.G.; Sagman, U.; Sculier, J.P.; Pringle, J.F.; Yeoh, J.L.; Evans, W.K.; Shepherd, F.A.; Maki, E. )

    1990-02-01

    We retrospectively analyzed the charts of 58 long-term survivors of small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) (greater than 2 years) for neurological complications and their impact on the well-being of these patients. We also attempted to have patients complete a questionnaire regarding any possible neurological problems. This was done in 14 patients. Metastasis to the CNS occurred significantly less often in patients who received prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) in a dose of 20 Gy in five equal fractions (two of 48), compared with patients who did not receive it (four of 10) (P less than .006). Delayed neurological complications occurred in nine of 48 (19%) patients who received PCI. However, in only two patients did PCI appear to be responsible for progressive dementia. In the other seven patients (one with weakness in the arms and legs, one with transient left hemiparesis, two with hearing loss, and three with various visual disturbances), chemotherapeutic agents (mainly cisplatin and vincristine) and underlying diseases probably contributed significantly to the occurrence of these complications. In addition, these neurological disturbances were transient or ran a stable course and did not adversely affect the daily life of these patients. In comparison, among the 10 patients who did not receive PCI one had progressive dementia and another had hemiparesis secondary to probable brain embolism. We conclude that the use of PCI in these doses was effective in reducing the frequency of CNS metastases and had an adverse effect on the daily life and well-being only in a minority of the patients. Until results of controlled randomized studies show otherwise, PCI should continue to be used as a part of the combined modality treatment of completely responding patients with limited SCLC.

  16. Different Experiences and Goals in Different Advanced Diseases: Comparing Serial Interviews With Patients With Cancer, Organ Failure, or Frailty and Their Family and Professional Carers.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Marilyn; Carduff, Emma; Lloyd, Anna; Kimbell, Barbara; Cavers, Debbie; Buckingham, Susan; Boyd, Kirsty; Grant, Liz; Worth, Allison; Pinnock, Hilary; Sheikh, Aziz; Murray, Scott A

    2015-08-01

    Quality care for people living with life-limiting illnesses is a global priority. A detailed understanding of the varied experiences of people living and dying with different conditions and their family and professional caregivers should help policymakers and clinicians design and deliver more appropriate and person-centered care. To understand how patients with different advanced conditions and their family and professional caregivers perceive their deteriorating health and the services they need. We used a narrative framework to synthesize eight methodologically comparable, longitudinal, and multiperspective interview studies. We compared the end-of-life experiences of people dying from cancer (lung, glioma, and colorectal cancer), organ failure (heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and liver failure), and physical frailty and those of their family and professional caregivers in socioeconomically and ethnically diverse populations in Scotland. The data set comprised 828 in-depth interviews with 156 patients, 114 family caregivers, and 170 health professionals. Narratives about cancer typically had a clear beginning, middle, and an anticipated end. Cancer patients gave a well-rehearsed account of their illness, hoping for recovery alongside fear of dying. In contrast, people with organ failure and their family caregivers struggled to pinpoint when their illness began, or to speak openly about death, hoping instead to avoid further deterioration. Frail older people tended to be frustrated by their progressive loss of independence, fearing dementia or nursing home admission more than dying. These contrasting illness narratives affect and shape the experiences, thoughts, and fears of patients and their carers in the last months of life. Palliative care offered by generalists or specialists should be provided more flexibly and equitably, responding to the varied concerns and needs of people with different advanced conditions. Copyright © 2015

  17. How Breast Cancer Patients Want to Search for and Retrieve Information From Stories of Other Patients on the Internet: an Online Randomized Controlled Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Otten, Wilma; de Man, Andries; Toussaint, Pieter; Westenbrink, Judith; Zwetsloot-Schonk, Bertie

    2010-01-01

    Background Other patients’ stories on the Internet can give patients information, support, reassurance, and practical advice. Objectives  We examined which search facility for online stories resulted in patients’ satisfaction and search success. Methods  This study was a randomized controlled experiment with a 2x2 factorial design conducted online. We facilitated access to 170 stories of breast cancer patients in four ways based on two factors: (1) no versus yes search by story topic, and (2) no versus yes search by writer profile. Dutch speaking women with breast cancer were recruited. Women who gave informed consent were randomly assigned to one of four groups. After searching for stories, women were offered a questionnaire relating to satisfaction with the search facility, the stories retrieved, and impact of the stories on coping with breast cancer. Of 353 enrolled women, 182 (51.6%) completed the questionnaire: control group (n = 37), story topics group (n = 49), writer profile group (n = 51), and combination group (n = 45). Results  Questionnaire completers were evenly distributed over the four groups (χ2 3 = 3.7, P = .30). Women who had access to the story topics search facility (yes vs no): were more positive about (mean scores 4.0 vs 3.6, P = .001) and more satisfied with the search facility (mean scores 7.3 vs 6.3, P < .001); were more positive about the number of search options (mean scores 2.3 vs 2.1, P = .04); were better enabled to find desired information (mean scores 3.3 vs 2.8, P = .001); were more likely to recommend the search facility to others or intend to use it themselves (mean scores 4.1 vs 3.5, P < .001); were more positive about how retrieved stories were displayed (mean scores 3.6 vs 3.2, P = .001); retrieved stories that better covered their information needs (mean scores 3.0 vs 2.6, P = .02); were more satisfied with the stories retrieved (mean scores 7.1 vs 6.4, P = .002); and were more likely to report an impact of the

  18. Results of treatment of patients with advanced stomach cancer treated by combination of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) and other methods: ten-year experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, V. A.

    2000-06-01

    In 1988 we started our investigation on the influence of low-level laser on oncologic patient. Now we have an experience of application of LLLT on more than 700 patients with the confirmed diagnosis of cancer at different stage. We used LLLT on 112 with stomach cancer 4th stage before and after operation and on patients without operating interference. LLLT investigations, with a wavelength of 890 nm, have shown that the laser therapy before operation is most effective. Laser therapy activates the immune system by increasing T-active rosette-formed cells and T-helpers and by decreasing T-suppressor cells. Application of LLLT decreases postoperative complications by 11.86 percent after palliative operations; by 9.63 percent after non-radical operations. It also promotes more rapid restorations of the motility and improves general status of patients by 58.69 percent. Investigations of low-level radiation have shown that the life-span of patients with 4th stage stomach cancer who were treated by laser therapy before surgery was increased by 2.03 percent; for those who were treated by LLLT after surgery it was increased by 1.81 times and by 3.03 times in those who took LLLT without surgery.

  19. Postoperative extended-volume external-beam radiation therapy in high-risk esophageal cancer patients: a prospective experience

    PubMed Central

    Yu, E.; Tai, P.; Younus, J.; Malthaner, R.; Truong, P.; Stitt, L.; Rodrigues, G.; Ash, R.; Dar, R.; Yaremko, B.; Tomiak, A.; Dingle, B.; Sanatani, M.; Vincent, M.; Kocha, W.; Fortin, D.; Inculet, R.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose Extended-volume external-beam radiation therapy (rt) following esophagectomy is controversial. The present prospective study evaluates the feasibility of extended-volume rt treatment in high-risk esophagectomy patients with a cervical anastomosis receiving postoperative combined chemoradiation therapy. Patients and Methods From 2001 to 2006, 15 patients with resected esophageal cancer were prospectively accrued to this pilot study to evaluate the adverse effects of extended-volume rt. Postoperative management was carried out at London Regional Cancer Program. Eligibility criteria were pathology-proven esophageal malignancy (T3–4, N0–1), disease amenable to surgical resection, and esophagectomy with or without resection margin involvement. Patients with distant metastases (M1) and patients treated with previous rt were excluded. All 15 study patients received 4 cycles of 5-fluorouracil–based chemotherapy. External-beam rt was conducted using conformal computed tomography planning, with multi-field arrangement tailored to the pathology findings, with coverage of a clinical target volume encompassing the primary tumour bed and the anastomotic site in the neck. The radiation therapy dose was 50.40 Gy at 1.8 Gy per fraction. The rt was delivered concurrently with the third cycle of chemotherapy. The study outcomes—disease-free survival (dfs) and overall survival (os)—were calculated by the Kaplan–Meier method. Treatment-related toxicities were assessed using the U.S. National Cancer Institute’s Common Toxicity Criteria. Results The study accrued 10 men and 5 women of median age 64 years (range: 48–80 years) and TNM stages T3N0 (n = 1), T2N1 (n = 2), T3N1 (n = 11), and T4N1 (n = 1). Histopathology included 5 adenocarcinomas and 10 squamous-cell carcinomas. Resection margins were clear in 10 patients. The median follow-up time was 19 months (range: 3.5–53.4 months). Before radiation therapy commenced, delay in chemotherapy occurred

  20. Computed tomography imaging-guided percutaneous argon-helium cryoablation of muscle-invasive bladder cancer: initial experience in 32 patients.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lijun; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Heliang; Yuan, Jianlin; Liu, Weiying; Yang, Yan

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the initial clinical experience of computed tomography (CT) imaging-guided percutaneous cryotherapy of bladder cancer. This study was approved by the human subjects committee. Written informed consent was obtained from all patients. Thirty-two patients (22 males and 10 females; mean age, 62.7 years) with muscle-invasive bladder cancer were treated with CT imaging-guided percutaneous cryoablation. By using CT imaging system and local anesthesia in patients, a single or multiple 1.47 mm cryoprobes were used to freeze the target bladder tumor (mean tumor size, 2.8 cm; range, 1.3-4.5 cm) with a dual freeze-thaw cycle. Follow-up was performed to assess the clinical and technical outcome of patients treated with cryoablation for a minimum of 6 months (mean, 33 months; range, 6-48 months). Tumors were considered completely ablated if there was no evidence to suggest tumor enhancement at follow-up CT images. Bladder cryoablation was clinically and technically successful in all 32 cases, 30 of which required only one treatment session. Bladder integrity was maintained in all patients. Major complications were not observed in any patient. Our initial experience of a minimally invasive method for ablating bladder tumors with CT imaging-guided percutaneous argon-helium cryoablation appears to be favorable, with acceptable operative and short-term clinical outcomes. The technique is safe and effective for the treatment of patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer; however, long-term follow-up is needed. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Experiences of pretreatment laparoscopic surgical staging in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer: results of a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Myong Cheol; Bae, Jaeman; Park, Jeong-Yoel; Lim, Soyi; Kang, Sokbom; Seo, Sang-Soo; Kim, Joo-Yong; Rho, Ju-Won

    2008-01-01

    Objective To prospectively evaluate the feasibility, safety, and survival of laparoscopic surgical staging in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods From Oct 2001 to Jul 2006, a total of 83 consecutive patients were eligible for inclusion and underwent laparoscopic surgical staging. Results Three patients with intraoperative great vessel injury and 1 patient in whom the colpotomizer was unable to be inserted were excluded. Laparoscopic surgical staging was feasible in 95.2% (79/83). Immediate postoperative complications were noted in 12 (15.2%) patients. Prolonged complications directly related to operative procedures numbered 2 (2.5%), and were trocar site metastases. The mean time from surgery to the start of radiotherapy (RT) or concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) was 11 (5-35) days. All patients tolerated the treatment well and completed scheduled RT or CCRT without disruption of treatment and additional admission. The rate of modification of the radiation field after surgical staging was 8.9% (7/79). Five-year progression-free survival and overall survival (OS) rates were 79% and 89%, respectively. The OS of patients with microscopic lymph node metastases, which were fully resected, were comparable to those of patients without lymph node metastasis. However, the OS of patients with macroscopic lymph node metastases that were fully resected were poorer compared with those of patients without lymph node metastasis. Conclusion Pretreatment laparoscopic surgical staging is a feasible and safe treatment modality. However the survival benefit of debulking lymph nodes or full lymph node dissection is not clear. PMID:19471562

  2. Efficacy and safety of single agent or combination adjuvant chemotherapy in elderly patients with colon cancer: a Canadian cancer institute experience.

    PubMed

    Kim, Christina A K; Spratlin, Jennifer L; Armstrong, Dawn E; Ghosh, Sunita; Mulder, Karen E

    2014-09-01

    The pattern of adjuvant chemotherapy (AC) use, toxicity profile, and survival benefit in elderly patients with colon cancer (CC) is unclear. We sought to (1) determine whether patients ≥ 65 years with stage III CC were offered single-agent or combination AC, (2) evaluate the reason for selecting single-agent versus combination AC, (3) evaluate the toxicity profile of single-agent and combination AC in the elderly, and (4) determine whether a survival benefit exists for elderly patients receiving combination AC. A retrospective analysis of records of patients ≥ 65 years diagnosed with stage III CC from 2004 to 2010 was performed to identify baseline characteristics, AC protocols, toxicity, dose intensity, and survival. Two hundred sixty-eight patients ≥ 65 years were diagnosed and treated with AC from 2004 to 2010. Of these patients, 178 were treated with single-agent AC and 90 were treated with combination AC. The most common reasons for choosing single-agent AC were patient preference, comorbidities, and lack of drug coverage. For each year over 65 years, the odds of receiving combination over single-agent AC decreased by 22%. There were more dose delays, dose reductions, and early chemotherapy discontinuation in the combination AC group because of hematologic toxicity. The 5-year overall survival (OS) was 73% in patients who received single-agent AC compared with 84% in those who received combination AC. There was no difference in cancer-related deaths between the groups. In elderly patients treated with AC for stage III CC, single-agent AC is used more frequently than combination AC, based on age, comorbidities, and patient choice. Toxicity with combination AC in elderly patients is high. No survival benefit was seen with combination AC over single-agent AC. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The delirium experience: delirium recall and delirium-related distress in hospitalized patients with cancer, their spouses/caregivers, and their nurses.

    PubMed

    Breitbart, William; Gibson, Christopher; Tremblay, Annie

    2002-01-01

    We conducted a systematic examination of the experience of delirium in a sample of 154 hospitalized patients with cancer. Patients all met DSM-IV criteria for delirium and were rated with the Memorial Delirium Assessment Scale as a measure of delirium severity, phenomenology, and resolution. Of the 154 patients assessed, 101 had complete resolution of their delirium and were administered the Delirium Experience Questionnaire (DEQ-a face-valid measure that assesses delirium recall and distress related to the delirium episode). Spouse/caregivers and primary nurses were also administered the DEQ to assess distress related to caring for a delirious patient. Fifty-four (53.5%) patients recalled their delirium experience. Logistic-regression analysis demonstrated that short-term memory impairment (odds ratio [OR] = 38.4), delirium severity (OR = 11.3), and the presence of perceptual disturbances (OR = 6.9) were significant predictors of delirium recall. Mean delirium-related distress levels (on a 0-4 numerical rating scale of the DEQ) were 3.2 for patients who recalled delirium, 3.75 for spouses/caregivers, and 3.09 for nurses. Logistic-regression analysis demonstrated that the presence of delusions (OR = 7.9) was the most significant predictor of patient distress. Patients with "hypoactive" delirium were just as distressed as patients with "hyperactive" delirium. Karnofsky Performance Status (OR = 9.1) was the most significant predictor of spouse/caregiver distress. Delirium severity (OR =5.2) and the presence of perceptual disturbances (OR =3.6) were the most significant predictors of nurse distress. In conclusion, a majority of patients with delirium recall their delirium as highly distressing. Delirium is also a highly distressing experience for spouses/caregivers and nurses who are caring for delirious patients. Prompt recognition and treatment of delirium is critically important to reduce suffering and distress.

  4. [First experience of Ho:YAG laser urethrotomy in the treatment of strictures in patients with prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Lebedinets, A A; Shkol'nik, M I; Timofeev, D A

    2014-01-01

    Strictures of vesicourethral anastomosis (VUA), urethral strictures, and bladder neck obliteration are frequent complications occurring after treatment for prostate cancer and dramatically reducing the quality of life of the patients. To date, there is no single standard treatment of urethral strictures. One of the promising methods is laser optical urethrotomy using a solid-state Ho:YAG- laser. Since 2012, we treated 12 patients with strictures of VUA, urethral strictures, and bladder neck obliteration. According urethrography, the maximum length of stricture was 4.5 cm. Treatment efficacy was assessed at 6 months after surgery objectively according urethrography, uroflowmetry, and ultrasound of the bladder with the definition of residual urine; and subjectively--by IPSS questionnaire and QoL questionnaire. After removal of the urethral catheter, all patients had recovered independent urination, decreased IPSS scores by 59.5%, IPSS-QoL score by 45.87%, decreased residual urine volume by 89.92%, and increased maximum urinary flow rate by 78.19%. Intraoperative complications and early postoperative complications were not observed. Ho:YAG laser is a minimally invasive and safe tool for urethrotomy of strictures of VUA, urethral strictures, and bladder neck obliteration arising after treatment for prostate cancer. Definitive conclusions about the effectiveness of this method should be based on long-term results of comparative trials.

  5. [Physiotherapy of cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Gomez, Izabella; Szekanecz, Éva; Szekanecz, Zoltán; Bender, Tamás

    2016-07-01

    Physiotherapy of cancer patients is one of the most controversial issues in our country. Malignant diseases are firstly mentioned as a contraindication of physiotherapy. Until now, physiotherapy was not suggested (or only in limited accessibility) for those patients who had malignant disease in medical history. International medical practice was less restrictive in managing this topic. The development of imaging techniques put this question in a new light. On the basis of evidence, the majority of articles have reported beneficial effects of physiotherapy in cancer patients, and only few articles mentioned it as harmful. Of course, each patient requires an individual assessment, however, if we exclude the possibility of tumor recurrence and metastasis, most of physiotherapy procedures can be used safely. One of the aims of this review is to support the physicians' decisions when to prescribe treatments, in such a way, that more patients could receive physiotherapy. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(31), 1224-1231.

  6. Dissociative symptomatology in cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Civilotti, Cristina; Castelli, Lorys; Binaschi, Luca; Cussino, Martina; Tesio, Valentina; Di Fini, Giulia; Veglia, Fabio; Torta, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The utilization of the post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) diagnostic spectrum is currently being debated to categorize psychological adjustment in cancer patients. The aims of this study were to: (1) evaluate the presence of cancer-related traumatic dissociative symptomatology in a sample of cancer patients; (2) examine the correlation of cancer-related dissociation and sociodemographic and medical variables, anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress symptomatology; (3) investigate the predictors of cancer-related dissociation. Methods: Ninety-two mixed cancer patients (mean age: 58.94, ds = 10.13) recruited from two hospitals in northern Italy were administered a questionnaire on sociodemographic and medical characteristics, the Karnofsky Scale to measure the level of patient activity and medical care requirements, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) to evaluate the presence of anxiety and depression, the Impact of Event Scale Revised (IES-R) to assess the severity of intrusion, avoidance, and hypervigilance, and the Peritraumatic Dissociative Experiences Questionnaire (PDEQ) to quantify the traumatic dissociative symptomatology. Results: 31.5% of participants report a PDEQ score above the cutoff. The results indicated that dissociative symptomatology was positively correlated with HADS scores (HADS-Anxiety: r = 0.476, p < 0.001; HADS-Depression: r = 0.364, p < 0.001) and with IES-R scores (IES-R-Intrusion: r = 0.698, p < 0.001; IES-R-Avoidance: r = 0.619, p < 0.001; IES-R- Hypervigilance: r = 0.681, p < 0.001). A stepwise regression analysis was performed in order to find the predictors of cancer-related traumatic dissociative symptomatology. The results converged on a three predictor model revealing that IES-R-Intrusion, IES-R-Avoidance, and IES-R-Hyperarousal accounted for 53.9% of the explained variance. Conclusion: These findings allow us to hypothesize a specific psychological reaction which may be ascribed to the traumatic

  7. A Q methodology study to investigate the experiences of head and neck cancer patients from diagnosis to 1 year.

    PubMed

    Reid, K J; Swift, A; Mehanna, H

    2017-05-04

    The experiences of disease and treatment for patients diagnosed with head and neck cancer (H&NC) are known to be important indicators of the quality of care but are represented poorly in the literature. Survival is a major outcome measure to which health-related quality of life (HRQoL) adds detail but outcomes are not fully representative of the patients' experiences because quality of care and reality of treatment are overlooked. This study explored the HRQoL, quality of care and reality of treatment themes using a mixed-methods approach, Q Methodology. In total, 18 participants who were at least 12 months post-diagnosis rank-ordered 45 prepared statements to reflect their own experiences of H&NC. After the statements had been sorted, the participants reviewed the order in an interview to clarify experiences. The statements become a way of facilitating the discussion because the participant can explain the position of specific statements that are notable for them. The ranking was factor-analysed case-wise and five factors provided the best conceptual fit: meaning and attachment to illness; overwhelmed by the cancer; surviving or not; change and recovery; and keep control for the greater good of others. The findings suggest there are distinct ways that H&NC patients experience the disease and its treatment. The concept of the experience being different and defined for individuals has practical implications at a clinical level and is a way of ensuring care is truly patient-centred. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes of patients with colorectal cancer who develop brain metastasis: a single institution experience

    PubMed Central

    Fountzilas, Christos; Chang, Katherine; Hernandez, Brian; Michalek, Joel; Crownover, Richard; Floyd, John

    2017-01-01

    Background The development of brain metastasis (BM) in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) is a rare and late event. We sought to investigate the clinical characteristics, disease course and safety using biologic agents in our patients with CRC who develop brain metastases. Methods A retrospective review of patients with CRC with brain metastases treated at our institution from 01/2005–01/2015 was performed. Survival analysis was performed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results Forty patients were included in the analysis. Median age was 55.5 years, 67.5% were males, and 28% had a KRAS mutation. Twenty-four percent were treatment-naive at the time of BM diagnosis. Patients had a median of two brain lesions. Sixty-five percent of the patients were treated with radiotherapy alone, 22.5% had both surgical resection and brain radiotherapy. Median overall survival was 3.2 months after development of BM. Overall survival was longer in patients who received combined modality local therapy compared to patients treated with surgical resection or radiotherapy alone. Patients who received systemic treatment incorporating biologics following development of BM had a median overall survival of 18.6 months. Overall, the administration of biologic agents was safe and well tolerated. Conclusions In summary, BM is an uncommon and late event in the natural history of metastatic CRC. The ability to deliver combined-modality local brain therapy as well as availability of more systemic therapy options appear to lead to improved outcomes. PMID:28280609

  9. Reduction of quality of life in prostate cancer patients: experience among 6200 men in the Nordic countries.

    PubMed

    Fosså, Sophie D; Bengtsson, Thomas; Borre, Michael; Ahlgren, Göran; Rannikko, Antti; Dahl, Alv A

    2016-10-01

    Although many studies have dealt with adverse effects (AEs) and quality of life (QoL) in prostate cancer (PCa) patients, the quantification of the patients' perspective on AE-related reduction in QoL has been less studied. This study describes the impact of self-reported local (erectile, bowel, urinary dysfunction) or systemic (mental distress, fatigue, virility loss) AEs on QoL reduction. Nordic PCa patients completed a questionnaire containing 84 multiple-choice questions. The main outcome variable of the survey was patient-reported PCa-induced QoL reduction, assessed by descriptive and regression analyses. The level of significance was p < 0.05. Among 6200 patients, 39% described their QoL as reduced owing to the PCa trajectory: radical prostatectomy group (RPGroup): 42%, radiotherapy without hormones (RADGroup): 27%, hormones (HormGroup): 47% and no treatment (NoTrtGroup): 19%. Except for the NoTrtGroup, urinary leakage and fatigue doubled the risk of QoL reduction, while virility loss and erectile dysfunction tripled the risk. Significant intergroup differences emerged for the age-adjusted odds of QoL reduction: RPGroup (0.66), RADGroup (0.40), HormGroup (0.95) and NoTrtGroup (0.22). After RP, RAD or hormone treatment of PCa, systemic AEs, in particular loss of virility, significantly reduce PCa patients' QoL similarly to or more than local AEs. The probability of reduced QoL is highest during hormone treatment and lowest in patients without anticancer therapy, and seems lower in patients treated with RAD without hormones than after RP. The treatment-related risk of reduced QoL due to systemic AEs should become a part of the pretreatment counselling of patients.

  10. It's a question of endurance - Patients with head and neck cancer experiences of (18)F-FDG PET/CT in a fixation mask.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Camilla; Röing, Marta; Tiblom Ehrsson, Ylva; Johansson, Birgitta

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to explore how patients with head and neck cancer experienced undergoing an (18)F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose positrons emissions tomography/computed tomography ((18)F-FDG PET/CT) examination in a fixation mask. Interviews were conducted with nine patients with known or suspected head and neck cancer who were scheduled for the examination for the first time. The phenomenological method according to van Manen and his four lifeworld existentials; lived space, lived body, lived time, and lived relation was used to analyse the interviews. The thoughts and feelings of the patients during the PET/CT examination varied, some found it very difficult, while others did not. However, for all the patients, it was an experience that required some form of coping to maintain composure for example distraction. PET/CT examnation in a fixation mask may be strenuous for some patients. Patients need more detailed information, including suggestions for coping behaviours, prior to the examination, as well as higher level of support during and after the examination. The results of this study may be used to improve patient care and optimize the procedure of PET/CT examination in a fixation mask. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The Role of Core Needle Biopsy and Its Impact on Surgical Management in Patients with Medullary Thyroid Cancer: Clinical Experience at 3 Medical Institutions.

    PubMed

    Ha, E J; Baek, J H; Na, D G; Kim, J-h; Kim, J K; Min, H S; Song, D E; Lee, K E; Shong, Y K

    2015-08-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma is an uncommon malignancy that is challenging to diagnose. Our aim was to present our experience using core needle biopsy for the diagnosis of medullary thyroid carcinoma compared with fine-needle aspiration. Between January 2000 and March 2012, 202 thyroid nodules in 191 patients were diagnosed as medullary thyroid cancer by using sonography-guided fine-needle aspiration, core needle biopsy, or surgery. One hundred eighty-three thyroid nodules in 172 patients were included on the basis of the final diagnosis. We evaluated the sensitivity and positive predictive value of fine-needle aspiration and core needle biopsy for the diagnosis of medullary thyroid cancer. We compared the rate of a delayed diagnosis, a diagnostic surgery, and surgery with an incorrect diagnosis for fine-needle aspiration and core needle biopsy and investigated the factors related to the fine-needle aspiration misdiagnosis of medullary thyroid cancer. Fine-needle aspiration showed 43.8% sensitivity and 85.1% positive predictive value for the diagnosis of medullary thyroid cancer; 25.7% (44/171) of patients had a delayed diagnosis, while 18.7% (32/171) underwent an operation for accurate diagnosis, and 20.5% (35/171) underwent an operation with an incorrect diagnosis. Core needle biopsy achieved 100% sensitivity and positive predictive value without a delay in diagnosis (0/22), the need for a diagnostic operation (0/22), or an operation for an incorrect diagnosis (0/22). A calcitonin level of <100 pg/mL was the only significant factor for predicting the fine-needle aspiration misdiagnosis of medullary thyroid cancer (P = .034). Core needle biopsy showed a superior sensitivity and positive predictive value to fine-needle aspiration and could optimize the surgical management in patients with medullary thyroid cancer. Because the ability of fine-needle aspiration to diagnose medullary thyroid cancer significantly decreases in patients with serum calcitonin levels of

  12. Breast cancer in pregnancy: an institutional experience

    PubMed Central

    Blanquisett, Abraham Hernández; Vicent, Carmen Herrero; Gregori, Joaquín Gavilá; Zotano, Ángel Guerrero; Porta, Vicente Guillem; Simón, Amparo Ruiz

    2015-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers diagnosed during pregnancy. Pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC) is defined as breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy or within 12 months of delivery. Nowadays PABC can be safely diagnosed, staged, and treated during pregnancy with good outcomes for both the mother and the fetus. Recent studies suggest that prognosis of women diagnosed during postpartum seems to be worse. In order to gain a better understanding of the PABC, we reviewed our centre’s experience. Patients and methods We assessed the clinicopathological parameters, evolution, and outcome of patients treated in the Fundación Instituto Valenciano de Oncología of Valencia, Spain, from October 1990 to October 2013, and compared the results of patients diagnosed during pregnancy (group ‘A’) and patients diagnosed within one year of delivery (group ‘B’). Of 12,000 cases of breast cancer registered in our database, 35 cases of PABC were identified. We included 11 patients in group ‘A’ and 24 in group ‘B’. Results In our group the median age was 35 years (range 29–42), of which ten (28%) patients had family history (first grade) of breast cancer, four patients were BRCA 1 mutation carriers. Axillary node compromise was found in 19 patients (53.5%), 24 patients were stage II or III at diagnosis (68.5%), 22 (62.8%) were ER positive, and nine (25.7%) were HER-2 positive. In group A (n = 11), five patients diagnosed before 18th week decided that a therapeutic abortion be performed before treatment, two patients were treated during pregnancy, one with chemotherapy without treatment associated complications during delivery. Four women diagnosed after 28th week decided to delay the treatment until delivery. After a follow up of 172 months, the relapse free survival (RFS) was 69% at five years and 45% at ten years. Overall survival (OS) at five years was 90.8% and 74.2% at ten years for all patients. For group ‘A’ OS was higher

  13. Disentangling breast cancer patients' perceptions and experiences with regard to endocrine therapy: nature and relevance for non-adherence.

    PubMed

    Wouters, Hans; van Geffen, Erica C G; Baas-Thijssen, Monique C; Krol-Warmerdam, Elly M; Stiggelbout, Anne M; Belitser, Svetlana; Bouvy, Marcel L; van Dijk, Liset

    2013-10-01

    Adjuvant endocrine therapy effectively prevents recurrence and progression of estrogen-receptor positive breast cancer. However, studies reveal substantial non-adherence. The objective was therefore to identify the nature of the experiences and beliefs of women treated with endocrine therapy in an attempt to find potential determinants of non-adherence. Online Focus Groups (OFGs) and individual interviews were conducted with 37 women who were treated with endocrine therapy. Sixty-three statements derived from the OFGs and 11 belief items from the Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire (BMQ) were used in a Q-sorting task conducted with 14 of the women. The quantitative Q-sorting data were statistically analyzed with Hierarchical Cluster Analysis. A six cluster solution was revealed that included the clusters 'information', 'efficacy', 'tenacity', 'coping', 'side effects' and 'usage'. Women's own experiences and perceptions were not clearly delineated from the beliefs measured with the BMQ. However, women judged their own experiences and perceptions with regard to endocrine therapy as more relevant for adherence than the BMQ beliefs. In order to understand and to improve women's adherence to endocrine therapy, women's own perceptions and experiences about endocrine therapy should be targeted in addition to common beliefs that apply to a wide range of medicines. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Breast cancer in pregnancy: an institutional experience.

    PubMed

    Blanquisett, Abraham Hernández; Vicent, Carmen Herrero; Gregori, Joaquín Gavilá; Zotano, Ángel Guerrero; Porta, Vicente Guillem; Simón, Amparo Ruiz

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers diagnosed during pregnancy. Pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC) is defined as breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy or within 12 months of delivery. Nowadays PABC can be safely diagnosed, staged, and treated during pregnancy with good outcomes for both the mother and the fetus. Recent studies suggest that prognosis of women diagnosed during postpartum seems to be worse. In order to gain a better understanding of the PABC, we reviewed our centre's experience. We assessed the clinicopathological parameters, evolution, and outcome of patients treated in the Fundación Instituto Valenciano de Oncología of Valencia, Spain, from October 1990 to October 2013, and compared the results of patients diagnosed during pregnancy (group 'A') and patients diagnosed within one year of delivery (group 'B'). Of 12,000 cases of breast cancer registered in our database, 35 cases of PABC were identified. We included 11 patients in group 'A' and 24 in group 'B'. In our group the median age was 35 years (range 29-42), of which ten (28%) patients had family history (first grade) of breast cancer, four patients were BRCA 1 mutation carriers. Axillary node compromise was found in 19 patients (53.5%), 24 patients were stage II or III at diagnosis (68.5%), 22 (62.8%) were ER positive, and nine (25.7%) were HER-2 positive. In group A (n = 11), five patients diagnosed before 18th week decided that a therapeutic abortion be performed before treatment, two patients were treated during pregnancy, one with chemotherapy without treatment associated complications during delivery. Four women diagnosed after 28th week decided to delay the treatment until delivery. After a follow up of 172 months, the relapse free survival (RFS) was 69% at five years and 45% at ten years. Overall survival (OS) at five years was 90.8% and 74.2% at ten years for all patients. For group 'A' OS was higher with 90% at five years versus 80% in group 'B'. The differences

  15. Positive experience of intraperitoneal chemotherapy followed by intravenous chemotherapy in heavily pretreated patients with suboptimal residual ovarian cancer and primary peritoneal cancer.

    PubMed

    Nicoletto, Maria Ornella; Dalla Palma, Maurizia; Donach, Martin E; Gusella, Milena; Cappetta, Alessandro; Shams, Malihe; Marchet, Aberto; Nardin, Margherita; Pintacuda, Giovanna; Di Maggio, Antonio; Marchesi, Maddalena; Carli, Paolo; Fiduccia, Pasquale; Artioli, Grazia; Nitti, Donato

    2010-01-01

    To assess feasibility and toxicity of intraperitoneal administration of cisplatin and paclitaxel, followed by intravenous chemotherapy in pretreated patients with suboptimal ovarian cancer (residuum >1 cm) or primary peritoneal tumor, and suffering from ascites and/or intestinal obstruction. Fourteen relapsed ovarian cancer patients, 5 of whom were platinum sensitive (platinum-free interval >6 mo), 7 platinum-resistant (platinum-free interval <6 mo), and 2 platinum-refractory, received one cycle of intraperitoneal cisplatin, 100 mg/m2 on day 1, and two cycles of intraperitoneal paclitaxel, 120 mg/m2 on days 8 and 14. Intravenous chemotherapy was administrated 4 weeks following the last intraperitoneal paclitaxel instillation. Blood and peritoneal fluid samples were harvested at 0, 1, 4 and 24 h after ending paclitaxel delivery to guarantee proper tumor exposure and patient safety. Intraperitoneal cisplatin determined 6 cases of vomiting grade 1-2 (40% of the morbidity). Intraperitoneal paclitaxel was associated with 6 events of grade 1-2 abdominal pain; the only grade 4 toxicity was one case of neutropenia and one of mucositis. Ascites decreased in 11 patients: the median time to first need for paracentesis was 5 months, compared to a median baseline paracentesis of 4 weeks. Three intestinal normalizations were obtained. The median overall survival was 10 months for our cohort of patients. Intraperitoneal paclitaxel clearance was significantly higher in patients with suboptimal tumor and symptomatic disease than in patients with smaller residual masses and without ascites (P = 0.004). Intraperitoneal treatment was feasible, and enhanced response to the following intravenous chemotherapy was seen in these patients.

  16. Prevalence of Hyponatremia in Hypothyroid Patients during Radioactive 131I Ablation for Differentiated Thyroid Cancer: Single Institution Experience

    PubMed Central

    Cunanan, Elaine C.; Kho, Sjoberg A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hyponatremia developing in hypothyroid patients has been encountered in clinical practice; however, its prevalence has not been well established. Methods Thirty patients diagnosed with differentiated thyroid cancer, rendered hypothyroid after surgery and levothyroxine withdrawal, and who are for radioactive iodine (RAI) ablation were included. Serum sodium concentrations were measured twice, at the time of admission for RAI ablation, and before discharge after increased oral fluid intake. The outcome measures were to determine the prevalence of hyponatremia among hypothyroid patients prior to RAI ablation and after oral hydration post-RAI, and to correlate the serum sodium levels pre-RAI and post-RAI with thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) concentration and age. Results Thirty patients were included, with ages from 23 to 65 years old (median, 40). Two patients (6.7%) were hyponatremic prior to RAI ablation, and eight patients (26.7%) had mild hyponatremia (130 to 134 mEq/L) after RAI and hydration. There was no significant correlation between TSH levels and serum sodium levels prior to or after RAI. There was also no significant correlation between pre- and post-RAI sodium concentration and age. Conclusions The prevalence of hyponatremia pre-RAI was 6.7%, and 26.7% post-RAI. No significant correlation was noted between TSH concentration and age on pre- or post-RAI sodium concentrations. Routine measurement of serum sodium post-RAI/isolation is still not advised. Measurement of sodium post-RAI may be considered in patients who are elderly, with comorbid conditions or on medications. PMID:27546873

  17. Safety and efficacy of gefitinib treatment in elderly patients with non-small-cell lung cancer: Okayama Lung Cancer Study Group experience.

    PubMed

    Hotta, Katsuyuki; Ueoka, Hiroshi; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Tabata, Masahiro; Ogino, Atsuko; Umemura, Shigeki; Harita, Shingo; Gemba, Kenichi; Yonei, Toshiro; Bessho, Akihiro; Maeda, Tadashi; Tanimoto, Mitsune

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated the safety and efficacy of gefitinib treatment in elderly patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We retrospectively compared toxicity, response and survival outcomes for gefitinib in patients aged 75 years or older (elderly group) with the same outcomes in patients aged younger than 75 years. In total, 350 patients were eligible for this analysis, of whom 92 were in the elderly group and 258 in the non-elderly group. In the elderly group, adverse events were generally mild to moderate and grade 3-4 adverse events were observed in 8 (9%) patients. The objective response rate (17 vs. 21% for elderly vs. non-elderly, respectively) and median survival time (7.6 vs. 9.3 months) were also similar in the two groups. Multivariate analysis revealed elderly patients with lower Brinkman index tended to be more sensitive to gefitinib (odds ratio: 4.57, 95% confidence interval: 0.91-22.72, p = 0.0642). In this study, treatment with gefitinib appeared to be as safe and effective in elderly patients (aged 75 or older) with NSCLC as in non-elderly patients.

  18. Impact of Intraoperative Re-resection to Achieve R0 Status on Survival in Patients With Pancreatic Cancer: A Single-center Experience With 483 Patients.

    PubMed

    Nitschke, Philipp; Volk, Andreas; Welsch, Thilo; Hackl, Jonas; Reissfelder, Christoph; Rahbari, Mohammad; Distler, Marius; Saeger, Hans-Detlev; Weitz, Jürgen; Rahbari, Nuh N

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that intraoperative frozen section (FS) and re-resection results to achieve R0 status are associated with different long-term outcomes in pancreatic cancer patients. Recent data have challenged the survival benefit of additional resection in patients with pancreatic cancer in case of positive FS to achieve clear pathological section (PS). Patients who underwent surgery for exocrine pancreatic malignancy with curative intent were identified from a prospective database. Data were stratified by resection margin (group I: FS-R0 → PS-R0; group II: FS-R1 → PS-R0; group III: FS-R1 → PS-R1). Associations with survival were analyzed by univariate and multivariate analyses. A total of 483 patients met the inclusion criteria. Of these, 61 patients were excluded due to R2 or Rx status. Three hundred seventeen (75%) patients were allocated to margin group I, 32 (8%) to group II, and 73 (17%) to group III. Median overall survival in group I, II, and III was 29, 36, and 12 months (P < 0.001). There was no significant difference in survival between patients in Group I and II (P = 0.849), whereas patients in group III had significantly poorer outcome than group I (P < 0.001) and II (P = 0.039). The prognostic value of margin group status was confirmed on multivariate analysis (hazard ratio = 1.694, 95% confidence interval 1.175-2.442). FS analysis with intraoperative re-resection should be performed routinely in patients undergoing pancreatic cancer surgery with the aim to achieve a R0 resection.

  19. Jejunal free flap for reconstruction of pharyngeal defects in patients with head and neck cancer-the Birmingham experience.

    PubMed

    Walker, Rachel J; Parmar, Satyesh; Praveen, Prav; Martin, Tim; Pracy, Paul; Jennings, Chris; Simms, Malcolm

    2014-02-01

    We retrospectively audited operative complications, success of flaps, and speech and swallowing outcomes in patients with head and neck cancer who had reconstruction with jejunal free tissue transfer to the pharynx. A total of 104 patients had jejunal free flaps between 1987 and 2009 at University Hospital, Birmingham. Management was by a multidisciplinary team, and the same vascular surgeon did all the anastomoses. We investigated the relations between patients, operative factors, and postoperative complications, and noted the ischaemic time of the flaps and coexisting conditions of the patients. Outcomes measured included initial and final survival rates of flaps, donor and recipient site complications, and speech and swallowing outcomes on discharge and up to 2 years postoperatively. Of the 104 patients, 14 (13%) had initial flap complications but overall flap survival was 97%. A total of 11 (11%) patients developed a fistula at a mean of 15 days postoperatively and 11 (11%) had minor donor site complications. A total of 95 (91%) were able to resume oral diet on discharge. Of the 44 who were followed up on discharge, 32 (73%) were able to maintain oral intake at 2 years and 31 (70%) could use their voice in everyday situations. The jejunal free flap enables the tumour to be removed, and reconstruction and restoration of function to be done in a single operation using tissue that is versatile. The operation is associated with low morbidity at the donor and recipient sites, and results in good speech and swallowing outcomes. The flap can also be used to reconstruct pharyngolaryngeal defects.

  20. Connecting patients, researchers and clinical genetics services: the experiences of participants in the Australian Ovarian Cancer Study (AOCS).

    PubMed

    Crook, Ashley; Plunkett, Loren; Forrest, Laura E; Hallowell, Nina; Wake, Samantha; Alsop, Kathryn; Gleeson, Margaret; Bowtell, David; Mitchell, Gillian; Young, Mary-Anne

    2015-02-01

    Population-based genetic research may produce information that has clinical implications for participants and their family. Researchers notify participants or their next of kin (NoK) about the availability of genetic information via a notification letter; however, many subsequently do not contact a family cancer centre (FCC) to clarify their genetic status. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine research participants' experience of receiving a notification letter and the factors that influenced contact with an FCC. Twenty-five semi-structured interviews were conducted with research participants (n=10) or their NoK (n=15) who had received a notification letter following participation in the Australian Ovarian Cancer Study. There were a number of factors which impacted participants' access to genetic counselling at an FCC. Some participants had unmet information and support needs, which were addressed by their participation in this psychosocial interview study. Recruitment and participation in this study therefore inadvertently increased a number of participants' intention to contact an FCC. For others, participation in this study facilitated access to an FCC. Recommendations are proposed regarding future notification as well as implications for clinical practice. An approach that also provides opportunity to address research participants' support and informational needs before contacting a clinical genetics service as well as practical guidance for accessing genetic services would facilitate timely and smooth access for research participants who are interested in following up clinically relevant genetic test results.

  1. Connecting patients, researchers and clinical genetics services: the experiences of participants in the Australian Ovarian Cancer Study (AOCS)

    PubMed Central

    Crook, Ashley; Plunkett, Loren; Forrest, Laura E; Hallowell, Nina; Wake, Samantha; Alsop, Kathryn; Gleeson, Margaret; Bowtell, David; Mitchell, Gillian; Young, Mary-Anne

    2015-01-01

    Population-based genetic research may produce information that has clinical implications for participants and their family. Researchers notify participants or their next of kin (NoK) about the availability of genetic information via a notification letter; however, many subsequently do not contact a family cancer centre (FCC) to clarify their genetic status. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine research participants' experience of receiving a notification letter and the factors that influenced contact with an FCC. Twenty-five semi-structured interviews were conducted with research participants (n=10) or their NoK (n=15) who had received a notification letter following participation in the Australian Ovarian Cancer Study. There were a number of factors which impacted participants' access to genetic counselling at an FCC. Some participants had unmet information and support needs, which were addressed by their participation in this psychosocial interview study. Recruitment and participation in this study therefore inadvertently increased a number of participants' intention to contact an FCC. For others, participation in this study facilitated access to an FCC. Recommendations are proposed regarding future notification as well as implications for clinical practice. An approach that also provides opportunity to address research participants' support and informational needs before contacting a clinical genetics service as well as practical guidance for accessing genetic services would facilitate timely and smooth access for research participants who are interested in following up clinically relevant genetic test results. PMID:24824132

  2. Rehabilitation of cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Pandey, M; Thomas, B C

    2001-01-01

    With the developments in cancer treatment, more and more patients are surviving their disease. However, very little emphasis is being placed to rehabilitate these cancer survivors. Ignorance, social structure, stigma attached in seeking psychological help, and poor communication skills of oncology staff all contribute to poor rehabilitative efforts. The priority of governmental agencies and health efforts to fight rampant communicable diseases, malnutrition, maternal health, and the frequent natural calamities, puts rehabilitation movements in the back seat. Treatment and prevention of disability and its rehabilitation requires comprehensive and multidisciplinary approach. There is an urgent need to promote physical and psychological rehabilitation.

  3. Experiences in the management of anastomotic leakages and analysis of the factors affecting leakage healing in patients with esophagogastric junction cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ningning; He, Jie; Gao, Shugeng; Zhao, Yue; Yang, Ding; Sun, Kelin; Cheng, Guiyu; Mu, Juwei; Xue, Qi; Wang, Dali; Zhao, Jun; Gao, Yushun; Liu, Xiangyang; Fang, Dekang; Li, Jian; Wang, Yonggang; Huang, Jinfeng; Wang, Bing; Zhang, Liangze

    2017-01-01

    Background It was reported in the literatures that the incidence of anastomotic leakage in patients with esophagogastric junction cancer decreased due to application of staplers and closure devices as well as gastric conduit technique in recent years, however, it increased slightly at our center since widely using the above devices and gastric conduit techniques from 2009. The objective of this study was to summarize our experiences in the management of anastomotic leakages and analyze the factors affecting leakage healing in the patients with esophagogastric junction cancer after surgical resection in recent 6 years. Methods All patients who received surgical resections for esophagogastric junction cancer and diagnosed anastomotic leak at our center between January 2009 and December 2014 were retrospectively analyzed, we also enrolled the patients who had a longer hospital stay (>30 days) as they may develop anastomotic leak. The binary logistic regression in SPSS 16.0 was applied to analyze the factors that may affect leakage healing. Results Of the 1,815 surgically treated esophagogastric junction cancer patients, 91 cases were diagnosed anastomotic leakage postoperatively. The patients were divided into two groups based on the median leakage healing time (40 days) in this series: fast healing group (37 cases) and slowly healing group (54 cases). All factors that may affect the leakage healing were put into analysis by using binary logistic regression. The results of the analysis showed that leakage size (OR =1.073, P=0.004), thoracic drainage (OR =12.937, P=0.037) and smoking index ≤400 (OR =1.001, P=0.04) significantly affected the healing time, while drinking history (P=0.177), duration of fever after anastomotic leak developed (P=0.084), and hypoproteinemia after leak (P=0.169) also apparently but not significantly affect the healing time. Conclusions Though many factors may affect leakage healing in the esophagogastric junction carcinoma patients, leakage

  4. Rapid genetic counseling and testing in newly diagnosed breast cancer: Patients' and health professionals' attitudes, experiences, and evaluation of effects on treatment decision making.

    PubMed

    Wevers, Marijke R; Aaronson, Neil K; Bleiker, Eveline M A; Hahn, Daniela E E; Brouwer, Titia; van Dalen, Thijs; Theunissen, Evert B; van Ooijen, Bart; de Roos, Marnix A; Borgstein, Paul J; Vrouenraets, Bart C; Vriens, Eline; Bouma, Wim H; Rijna, Herman; Vente, Johannes P; Kuenen, Marianne A; van der Sanden-Melis, Jacoline; Witkamp, Arjen J; Rutgers, Emiel J Th; Verhoef, Senno; Ausems, Margreet G E M

    2017-07-13

    Rapid genetic counseling and testing (RGCT) in newly diagnosed high-risk breast cancer (BC) patients may influence surgical treatment decisions. To successfully integrate RGCT in practice, knowledge of professionals', and patients' attitudes toward RGCT is essential. Between 2008 and 2010, we performed a randomized clinical trial evaluating the impact of RGCT. Attitudes toward and experience with RGCT were assessed in 265 patients (at diagnosis, 6- and 12-month follow-up) and 29 medical professionals (before and after the recruitment period). At 6-month follow-up, more patients who had been offered RGCT felt they had been actively involved in treatment decision-making than patients who had been offered usual care (67% vs 48%, P = 0.06). Patients who received DNA-test results before primary surgery reported more often that RGCT influenced treatment decisions than those who received results afterwards (P < 0.01). Eighty-seven percent felt that genetic counseling and testing (GCT) should preferably take place between diagnosis and surgery. Most professionals (72%) agreed that RGCT should be routinely offered to eligible patients. Most patients (74%) and professionals (85%) considered surgeons the most appropriate source for referral. RGCT is viewed as helpful for newly diagnosed high-risk BC patients in choosing their primary surgery and should be offered routinely by surgeons. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. [Fever in Cancer Patients].

    PubMed

    Cornely, Oliver Andreas; Mellinghoff, Sibylle Christiane

    2017-07-01

    Fever in cancer patients is a medical emergency until a severe infection has been ruled out. In case of neutropenia prompt diagnostic work-up should be paralleled by empiric antibiotic treatment. Underlying malignancy as well as treatments may impair immune response and thus pave the way for less virulent pathogens. So the spectrum of infections comprises both pathogens that cause disease in immunocompetent patients and a variety of rarer organisms. After collecting two pairs of blood cultures, broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment should commence within one to two hours. Depending on the individual patient's risk antimicrobial prophylaxis should be considered. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. "You are a number, not a human being": Israeli breast cancer patients' experiences with the medical establishment.

    PubMed

    Sered, S; Tabory, E

    1999-06-01

    In the course of interviews with Israeli women who had recently been treated for breast cancer, we found that our informants tended to offer us "treatment narratives" rather than, or sometimes in addition to, the "illness narratives" made famous by Arthur Kleinman. For the women we interviewed, treatment narratives constitute verbal platforms on which to explore what it means to be human during a period in which one's body, spirit, and social identity are undergoing intense transformations. A central theme in these narratives is the Hebrew word yachas, loosely translated as "attitude," "attention," or "relationship." The women consistently contrasted the good yachas of medical staff who treated them "like humans" or like "real friends" with the bad yachas of staff who treated them like numbers, machines, or strangers. We argue that the women used language (in various contexts) as a means of resisting the medical culture's pattern of treating patients as "nonhumans."

  7. Patients’ experiences with continuity of cancer care in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Easley, Julie; Miedema, Baukje; Carroll, June C.; O’Brien, Mary Ann; Manca, Donna P.; Grunfeld, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore patient perspectives on and experiences with the coordination and continuity of cancer care. Design Qualitative study using semistructured telephone interviews. Setting Canada. Participants Thirty-eight breast and colorectal cancer survivors 1 to 4 years after diagnosis. Methods Using a constructivist grounded theory approach, semistructured telephone interviews were conducted with the participants. The interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed verbatim, and proofread. Transcripts were reviewed to create a focused coding scheme that was used to develop categories for participants’ experiences. Main findings Although this study focused on the continuity of cancer care, patients described their experiences with cancer care in general, concentrating predominantly on their relationships with individual health care providers (HCPs). Based on patients’ experiences, several themes were identified as the core components of providing good continuity and well coordinated care. The most important overarching theme was communication, which overlapped with 4 other themes: patient-HCP relationships, the role of HCPs, lack of access to care, and timely and tailored information. Conclusion Patients believed that good communication between HCPs and patients was key to improving the overall continuity of cancer care. Continuity of care is an important theoretical concept in cancer care, but it is not easily recognized by patients. They perceive the cancer care continuum and continuity of care as cancer care in general, which is typically framed by the individual relationships with their HCPs. Future research and interventions need to focus on finding and testing ways to improve communication to enhance continuity of cancer care. PMID:27737982

  8. Prevalence and clinical outcomes of young breast cancer (YBC) patients according to intrinsic breast cancer subtypes: Single institutional experience in Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Yeon Hee; Lee, Su Jin; Jung, Hyun Ae; Kim, Sung Min; Kim, Moon Jin; Kil, Won Ho; Lee, Jeong Eon; Nam, Seok Jin; Ahn, Jin Seok; Im, Young-Hyuck

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of our study was to investigate and identify comprehensively the clinicopathological features and long-term outcome of young breast cancer (YBC) according to intrinsic subtype. We analyzed clinical and pathological characteristics of 2844 women who were diagnosed with invasive breast cancer from 2000 to 2007 and the treatment outcomes by age at diagnosis. The median age of the patients was 46 years (range, 21-83 years), and we divided them into three age group: ≤35 years (Group 1), 36-50 years (Group 2), and >50 years (Group 3). During a median follow-up of 100 months, the 5-year recurrence-free survival rate (RFSR) and overall survival rate (OSR) were 90.8% and 94.6%, respectively. The 10-year estimated RFSR and OSR were 81.9% and 86.9%, respectively. The prognosis of TN subtype appeared not to be worse than that of other subtypes in Group 1. In Group 1 alone (≤35 years), subtype was not identified as an independent risk factor for distant recurrence-free survival (DRFS) in a Cox-regression multivariate model (hazard ratio, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.68-1.06; p = 0.148). This analysis revealed a very high prevalence of YBC in this cohort. The poor outcomes of YBC patients might result from an increased frequency of triple negative (TN)/HER2 subtypes and the more aggressive clinical behavior of ER-positive tumors compared with older patients. Further research to elucidate the biologic difference of the ER+ tumors of YBC patients is warranted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. [Assessment of the clinical efficacy and safety of fulvestrant in heavily pretreated patients with hormone-receptor positive metastatic breast cancer-a single-institution experience].

    PubMed

    Hattori, Masaya; Horio, Akiyo; Sawaki, Masataka; Kondo, Naoto; Fujita, Takashi; Ushio, Aya; Gondo, Naomi; Idota, Ai; Ichikawa, Mari; Iwata, Hiroji

    2013-12-01

    Fulvestrant, a pure estrogen receptor antagonist with no known agonist effects, was approved in September 2011 for the treatment of hormone-receptor positive metastatic breast cancer(MBC)in postmenopausal women in Japan. Here, we present a retrospective review of data from 73 heavily pretreated patients who received a high-dose regimen of fulvestrant in our hospital. Patients received a median of 3 endocrine therapies(range: 1-7)prior to the fulvestrant regimen. Partial response was observed in 4 patients, and 10 patients experienced stable disease for more than 6 months(objective response rate: 5.5%; clinical benefit rate: 19.2%). The median time to progression was 2.8 months. Fulvestrant was well tolerated; however, Grade 3 neuropathy at the injection site was observed in 2 patients. Of 12 patients, 3 responded to endocrine therapy following fulvestrant treatment. Our clinical experience indicates that fulvestrant can be administered to patients pretreated with several lines of endocrine therapy, although its efficacy as first- or second-line endocrine therapy has been demonstrated in clinical trial settings.

  10. Flexible Bronchoscope Use by Pulmonologists in Collaboration With Gastroenterologists for Placement of Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy Via Transnasal Route in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer: A 10-Year Experience in a Single Cancer Institution.

    PubMed

    Mota, Paulo J L; Dionísio, Jorge; Duro da Costa, José; Faias, Sandra

    2017-09-12

    This study was conducted with the aim of evaluating a 10-year experience in the Pulmonology Department of a cancer center for percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy through transnasal route (TN-PEG) in patients with head and neck cancer whose oral access is precluded. This study was a retrospective analysis of 40 consecutive head and neck cancer patients referred for PEG placement, between 2005 and 2014, using a transnasal route because of the impossibility of intubation through the oral cavity. Demographics, outcome of TN-PEG procedure, indications for bronchoscopic approach (prophylactic/palliative), clinical need for bronchoscopy (trismus, oropharyngeal obstruction), location of cancer, complications, and overall survival were reviewed. In 40 TN-PEG procedures, executed by 1 of 3 pulmonologists, 39 were successfully placed and there were no immediate complications. All except 1 complication were minor, but no surgery or PEG removal was required. There was a rapid learning curve among all operators. A combined TN-PEG placement by a gastroenterologist and a pulmonologist is a safe and useful option for these patients; the learning curve for successfully performing the procedure was short.

  11. The association of chemotherapy versus hormonal therapy and health outcomes among patients with hormone receptor-positive, HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer: experience from the patient perspective.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shaloo; Zhang, Jie; Jerusalem, Guy

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to characterize the impact of metastatic breast cancer (MBC) and cancer treatments on health-related quality of life, treatment satisfaction, and daily productivity from the patient perspective. This was a cross-sectional survey of patients with MBC (USA, n = 200; EU, n = 160). Post-menopausal women aged ≥50 years with hormone receptor positive (HR+), HER2-negative (HER2-) MBC, currently using hormonal therapy (HT) or using chemotherapy (CT) for ≤1 year were recruited. Fifty three percent (n = 191) reported CT and 47% (n = 169) reported HT use. Adjusting for covariates, HT users reported greater health-related quality of life (p < 0.05), greater satisfaction with treatment and better feelings about side-effects (p < 0.001). HT users reported less bother with treatment side-effects (0-5 scale, p < 0.001) and less activity impairment than CT users (p < 0.001). HT was associated with better patient-reported outcomes than CT in first-line MBC management. These findings should be taken into consideration while making treatment decisions for HR+/HER2- MBC.

  12. Patient experience and perceived acceptability of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging for staging colorectal and lung cancer compared with current staging scans: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Stuart; Janes, Sam; Halligan, Steve; Morton, Alison; Navani, Neal; Oliver, Alf; Rockall, Andrea; Teague, Jonathan; Miles, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Objective To describe the experience and acceptability of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (WB-MRI) staging compared with standard scans among patients with highly suspected or known colorectal or lung cancer. Design Qualitative study using one-to-one interviews with thematic analysis. Setting Patients recruited from 10 hospitals in London, East and South East England between March 2013 and July 2014. Participants 51 patients (31 male, age range 40–89 years), with varying levels of social deprivation, were recruited consecutively from two parallel clinical trials comparing the diagnostic accuracy and cost-effectiveness of WB-MRI with standard scans for staging colorectal and lung cancer (‘Streamline-C’ and ‘Streamline-L’). WB-MRI was offered as an additional scan as part of the trials. Results In general WB-MRI presented a greater challenge than standard scans, although all but four patients completed the WB-MRI. Key challenges were enclosed space, noise and scan duration; reduced patient tolerance was associated with claustrophobia, pulmonary symptoms and existing comorbidities. Coping strategies facilitated scan tolerance and were grouped into (1) those intended to help with physical and emotional challenges, and (2) those focused on motivation to complete the scan, for example focusing on health benefit. Our study suggests that good staff communication could reduce anxiety and boost coping strategies. Conclusions Although WB-MRI was perceived as more challenging than standard scans, it was sufficiently acceptable and tolerated by most patients to potentially replace them if appropriate. Trial registration number ISRCTN43958015 and ISRCTN50436483. PMID:28882915

  13. Patient experience and perceived acceptability of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging for staging colorectal and lung cancer compared with current staging scans: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Evans, Ruth; Taylor, Stuart; Janes, Sam; Halligan, Steve; Morton, Alison; Navani, Neal; Oliver, Alf; Rockall, Andrea; Teague, Jonathan; Miles, Anne

    2017-09-06

    To describe the experience and acceptability of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (WB-MRI) staging compared with standard scans among patients with highly suspected or known colorectal or lung cancer. Qualitative study using one-to-one interviews with thematic analysis. Patients recruited from 10 hospitals in London, East and South East England between March 2013 and July 2014. 51 patients (31 male, age range 40-89 years), with varying levels of social deprivation, were recruited consecutively from two parallel clinical trials comparing the diagnostic accuracy and cost-effectiveness of WB-MRI with standard scans for staging colorectal and lung cancer ('Streamline-C' and 'Streamline-L'). WB-MRI was offered as an additional scan as part of the trials. In general WB-MRI presented a greater challenge than standard scans, although all but four patients completed the WB-MRI. Key challenges were enclosed space, noise and scan duration; reduced patient tolerance was associated with claustrophobia, pulmonary symptoms and existing comorbidities. Coping strategies facilitated scan tolerance and were grouped into (1) those intended to help with physical and emotional challenges, and (2) those focused on motivation to complete the scan, for example focusing on health benefit. Our study suggests that good staff communication could reduce anxiety and boost coping strategies. Although WB-MRI was perceived as more challenging than standard scans, it was sufficiently acceptable and tolerated by most patients to potentially replace them if appropriate. ISRCTN43958015 and ISRCTN50436483. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  14. [Spiritual care model for terminal cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ju-Fen; Lin, Ya-Ching; Huang, Pai-Ho; Wei, Chih-Hsin; Sun, Jia-Ling

    2014-12-01

    Providing spiritual care to patients with advanced cancer may improve the quality of life of these patients and help them experience a good death. Cancer patients are eager for additional spiritual care and for a sense of peace at the end of their life. However, spirituality is an abstract concept. The literature on spiritual care focuses primarily on elaborations of spirituality theory. Thus, first-line medical care professionals lack clear guidelines for managing the spiritual needs of terminal cancer patients. The purposes of this article were to: 1) introduce a spiritual care model based on the concept of repair and recovery of relationships that addresses the relationship between the self and God, others, id, and objects and 2) set out a four-step strategy for this model that consists of understanding, empathizing, guiding, and growing. This article provides operational guidelines for the spiritual care of terminal cancer patients.

  15. [Pain and cancer Information dedicated to cancer patients and relatives].

    PubMed

    Krakowski, Ivan; Déchelette, Marie; Arbiol, Evelyne; Chvetzoff, Gisèle; Cullet, Danièle; Delorme, Thierry; Fontaine, Alain; Lavillat, Dominique; Marec-Bérard, Perrine; Torloting, Gérard; Vuillemin, Nicole; Brusco, Sylvie; Carretier, Julien; Delavigne, Valérie; Leichtnam-Dugarin, Line; Fervers, Béatrice; Philip, Thierry

    2008-04-01

    Patient information is a major challenge for public health. It has become part of the patients' rights, in response to their need for information and involvement in medical decision-making. Since 1998, the French National Federation of Comprehensive Cancer Centres (FNCLCC) has developed an information and education program dedicated to patients and relatives: the SOR SAVOIR PATIENT program. The methodology of the program adheres to the quality criteria established for the elaboration of documents containing patient information. The SOR SAVOIR PATIENT guide Pain and Cancer aims to answer patients' questions regarding cancer specific pain and to help them become actively involved in their care. It was elaborated by a multidisciplinary workgroup, which included methodologists, one linguist, pain specialists and twenty patients and relatives. Patients' information needs and personal experience of pain were assessed using focus groups, semi-structured interviews and questionnaires. Through eight chapters, which can be read in an independent way, Pain and cancer provides key information on the causes, the mechanisms, the evaluation, the prevention and the treatment of pain. The guide also presents advices and practical tools to facilitate the assessment of the pain and the communication between patients and professionals. Finally, this guide aims to overcome ideas such as that morphine is synonymous of end of life or drug addiction, that pain is a sign of aggravation of cancer and that nurses know how to detect the pain. Intended first for the patients and their close relations, Pain and Cancer is also a useful tool for health professionals. Indeed, it presents knowledge based on the most recent recommendations developed for clinical practice. Thanks to a wide distribution of the guide to patients, their families and the professionals, we trust that this guide will facilitate dialogue around pain, and ultimately its care. This article is an abstract of the guide. The

  16. Experiences of patients with cancer and their nurses on the conditions of spiritual care and spiritual interventions in oncology units

    PubMed Central

    Rassouli, Maryam; Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Ghahramanian, Akram; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Alavi-Majd, Hamid; Nikanfar, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although nurses acknowledge that spiritual care is part of their role, in reality, it is performed to a lesser extent. The purpose of the present study was to explore nurses’ and patients’ experiences about the conditions of spiritual care and spiritual interventions in the oncology units of Tabriz. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted with a qualitative conventional content analysis approach in the oncology units of hospitals in Tabriz. Data were collected through purposive sampling by conducting unstructured interviews with 10 patients and 7 nurses and analyzed simultaneously. Robustness of data analysis was evaluated by the participants and external control. Results: Three categories emerged from the study: (1) “perceived barriers for providing spiritual care” including “lack of preparation for spiritual care,” “time and space constraints,” “unprofessional view,” and “lack of support”; (2) “communication: A way for Strengthening spirituality despite the limitations” including “manifestation of spirituality in the appearances and communicative behaviors of nurses” and “communication: Transmission of spiritual energy”; and (3) “religion-related spiritual experiences” including “life events as divine will and divine exam,” “death as reincarnation,” “trust in God,” “prayer/recourse to Holy Imams,” and “acceptance of divine providence.” Although nurses had little skills in assessing and responding to the patients’ spiritual needs and did not have the organizational and clergymen's support in dealing with the spiritual distress of patients, they were the source of energy, joy, hope, and power for patients by showing empathy and compassion. The patients and nurses were using religious beliefs mentioned in Islam to strengthen the patients’ spiritual dimension. Conclusions: According to the results, integration of spiritual care in the curriculum of nursing is recommended. Patients and

  17. Cancer Screening Among Patients With Advanced Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sima, Camelia S.; Panageas, Katherine S.; Schrag, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Context Cancer screening has been integrated into routine primary care but does not benefit patients with limited life expectancy. Objective To evaluate the extent to which patients with advanced cancer continue to be screened for new cancers. Design, Setting, and Participants Utilization of cancer screening procedures (mammography, Papanicolaou test, prostate-specific antigen [PSA], and lower gastrointestinal [GI] endoscopy) was assessed in 87 736 fee-for-service Medicare enrollees aged 65 years or older diagnosed with advanced lung, colorectal, pancreatic, gastroesophageal, or breast cancer between 1998 and 2005, and reported to one of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) tumor registries. Participants were followed up until death or December 31, 2007, whichever came first. A group of 87 307 Medicare enrollees without cancer were individually matched by age, sex, race, and SEER registry to patients with cancer and observed over the same period to evaluate screening rates in context. Demographic and clinical characteristics associated with screening were also investigated. Main Outcome Measure For each cancer screening test, utilization rates were defined as the percentage of patients who were screened following the diagnosis of an incurable cancer. Results Among women following advanced cancer diagnosis compared with controls, at least 1 screening mammogram was received by 8.9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 8.6%-9.1%) vs 22.0% (95% CI, 21.7%-22.5%); Papanicolaou test screening was received by 5.8% (95% CI, 5.6%-6.1%) vs 12.5% (95% CI, 12.2%-12.8%). Among men following advanced cancer diagnosis compared with controls, PSA test was received by 15.0% (95% CI, 14.7%-15.3%) vs 27.2% (95% CI, 26.8%-27.6%). For all patients following advanced diagnosis compared with controls, lower GI endoscopy was received by 1.7% (95% CI, 1.6%-1.8%) vs 4.7% (95% CI, 4.6%-4.9%). Screening was more frequent among patients with a recent history of screening (16.2% [95

  18. Treatment and Outcomes in Patients With Primary Cutaneous B-Cell Lymphoma: The BC Cancer Agency Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Sarah N.; Wai, Elaine S.; Tan, King; Alexander, Cheryl; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Connors, Joseph M.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To review the treatment and outcomes of patients with primary cutaneous B-cell lymphoma (CBCL). Methods and Materials: Clinical characteristics, treatment, and outcomes were analyzed for all patients referred to our institution from 1981 through 2011 with primary CBCL without extracutaneous or distant nodal spread at diagnosis (n=136). Hematopathologists classified 99% of cases using the World Health Organization-European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (WHO-EORTC) guidelines. Results: Median age at diagnosis was 62 years. Classification was 18% diffuse large B-cell leg-type (DLBCL-leg), 32% follicle center (FCCL), 45% marginal zone (MZL), and 6% nonclassifiable (OTHER). Of the 111 subjects with indolent lymphoma (FCCL, MZL, OTHER), 79% received radiation alone (RT), 11% surgery alone, 3% chemotherapy alone, 4% chemotherapy followed by RT, and 3% observation. Following treatment, 29% of subjects relapsed. In-field recurrence occurred in 2% treated with RT and in 33% treated with surgery alone. Of the 25 subjects with DLBCL-leg, 52% received chemotherapy followed by RT, 24% chemotherapy, 20% RT, and 4% surgery alone. Seventy-nine percent received CHOP-type chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin or epirubicin, vincristine, prednisone), 47% with rituximab added. Overall and disease-specific survival and time to progression at 5 years were 81%, 92%, and 69% for indolent and 26%, 61%, and 54% for DLBCL-leg, respectively. On Cox regression analysis of indolent subjects, RT was associated with better time to progression (P=.05). RT dose, chemo, age >60 y, and >1 lesion were not significantly associated with time to progression. For DLBCL-leg, disease-specific survival at 5 years was 100% for those receiving rituximab versus 67% for no rituximab (P=.13). Conclusions: This review demonstrates better outcomes for indolent histology compared with DLBCL-leg, validating the prognostic utility of the WHO-EORTC classification. In the indolent group

  19. [Pulmonary Rehabilitation for Cancer Patients].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kazuo; Gemma, Akihiko

    2015-07-01

    Dyspnea occurs in most cancer patients and is often associated with severe pain. Pulmonary rehabilitation has become increasingly important to improve ADL and QOL and to relieve pain that results from dyspnea. Although pulmonary rehabilitation is now provided mainly during the perioperative period, it has been recognized as an effective procedure for patients before, during, or after chemotherapy or radiotherapy. It is also useful for patients with advanced or terminal cancer. However, an evidence-based cancer rehabilitation procedure has to be established.

  20. Concurrent Hyperfractionated Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy in Locally Advanced (Stage III) Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Single Institution Experience With 600 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Jeremic, Branislav; Milicic, Biljana; Milisavljevic, Slobodan

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Our institutional experience with the use of hyperfractionated radiation therapy (RT) alone or concurrently with chemotherapy (RT-CHT) in Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer was reviewed. Methods and Materials: Three phase III and two phase II studies included a total of 600 patients. Hyperfractionated RT alone was given to 127 patients, and hyperfractionated RT-CHT was given to 473 patients. RT doses were 64.8 Gy and 69.6 Gy (using 1.2 Gy twice daily) and 67.6 Gy (using 1.3 Gy twice daily). CHT consisted of concurrent administration of carboplatin and etoposide to 409 patients and concurrent administration of carboplatin and paclitaxel to 64 patients. Results: The median survival times were 19 months, 21 months, and 12 months for all, RT-CHT, and RT-only patients, respectively. The survival difference between the RT-CHT and RT group was significant (p < 0.0001). Four-year rates of local progression-free survival (LPFS) and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) were 29% and 35%, respectively, for the entire group. The RT-CHT group had significantly better LPFS rates than the RT group (31% for the RT-CHT group vs. 16% for the RT group; p = 0.0015) but not DMFS rates (36% for the RT-CHT group vs. 36% for the RT group, p = 0.0571). Acute high-grade esophagitis, pneumonitis, and hematological toxicities were seen most frequently and in 11%, 9%, and 12% of patients, respectively. Late high-grade esophageal and bronchopulmonary toxicity were each seen in 6% of patients. Conclusions: Compared to the majority of existing phase II and III studies, this study reconfirmed the excellent results achieved with concurrent RT-CHT, including low toxicity. Concurrent RT-CHT results in survival benefit primarily by increasing LPFS, not DMFS.

  1. Improving the Prediction of Survival in Cancer Patients by Using Machine Learning Techniques: Experience of Gene Expression Data: A Narrative Review.

    PubMed

    Bashiri, Azadeh; Ghazisaeedi, Marjan; Safdari, Reza; Shahmoradi, Leila; Ehtesham, Hamide

    2017-02-01

    Today, despite the many advances in early detection of diseases, cancer patients have a poor prognosis and the survival rates in them are low. Recently, microarray technologies have been used for gathering thousands data about the gene expression level of cancer cells. These types of data are the main indicators in survival prediction of cancer. This study highlights the improvement of survival prediction based on gene expression data by using machine learning techniques in cancer patients. This review article was conducted by searching articles between 2000 to 2016 in scientific databases and e-Journals. We used keywords such as machine learning, gene expression data, survival and cancer. Studies have shown the high accuracy and effectiveness of gene expression data in comparison with clinical data in survival prediction. Because of bewildering and high volume of such data, studies have highlighted the importance of machine learning algorithms such as Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) to find out the distinctive signatures of gene expression in cancer patients. These algorithms improve the efficiency of probing and analyzing gene expression in cancer profiles for survival prediction of cancer. By attention to the capabilities of machine learning techniques in proteomics and genomics applications, developing clinical decision support systems based on these methods for analyzing gene expression data can prevent potential errors in survival estimation, provide appropriate and individualized treatments to patients and improve the prognosis of cancers.

  2. 'Patient satisfaction' in hospitalized cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Skarstein, Jon; Dahl, Alv A; Laading, Jacob; Fosså, Sophie D

    2002-01-01

    Predictors of 'patient satisfaction' with hospitalization at a specialized cancer hospital in Norway are examined in this study. Two weeks after their last hospitalization, 2021 consecutive cancer patients were invited to rate their satisfaction with hospitalization, quality of life, anxiety and depression. Compliance rate was 72% (n = 1453). Cut-off levels separating dissatisfied from satisfied patients were defined. It was found that 92% of the patients were satisfied with their stay in hospital, independent of cancer type and number of previous admissions. Performance of nurses and physicians, level of information perceived, outcome of health status, reception at the hospital and anxiety independently predicted 'patient satisfaction'. The model explained 35% of the variance with an area under the curve of 0.76 of the Receiver Operator Curve. Cancer patients' satisfaction with their hospital stay was high, and predicted by four independently predictive variables related to the performance of caregivers. These suggest areas for further improvement in the healthcare service.

  3. Pre-counseling education for low literacy women at risk of Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer (HBOC): patient experiences using the Cancer Risk Education Intervention Tool (CREdIT).

    PubMed

    Joseph, Galen; Beattie, Mary S; Lee, Robin; Braithwaite, Dejana; Wilcox, Carolina; Metrikin, Maya; Lamvik, Kate; Luce, Judith

    2010-10-01

    The Cancer Risk Education Intervention Tool (CREdIT) is a computer-based (non-interactive) slide presentation designed to educate low-literacy, and ethnically and racially diverse public hospital patients at risk of Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer (HBOC) about genetics. To qualitatively evaluate participants' experience with and perceptions of a genetic education program as an adjunct to genetic counseling, we conducted direct observations of the intervention, semi-structured in person interviews with 11 women who viewed CREdIT, and post-counseling questionnaires with the two participating genetic counselors. Five themes emerged from the analysis of interviews: (1) genetic counseling and testing for breast/ovarian cancer was a new concept; (2) CREdIT's story format was particularly appealing; (3) changes in participants' perceived risk for breast cancer varied; (4) some misunderstandings about individual risk and heredity persisted after CREdIT and counseling; (5) the context for viewing CREdIT shaped responses to the presentation. Observations demonstrated ways to make the information provided in CREdIT and by genetic counselors more consistent. In a post-session counselor questionnaire, counselors' rating of the patient's preparedness before the session was significantly higher for patients who viewed CREdIT prior to their appointments than for other patients. This novel educational tool fills a gap in HBOC education by tailoring information to women of lower literacy and diverse ethnic/racial backgrounds. The tool was well received by interview participants and counselors alike. Further study is needed to examine the varied effects of CREdIT on risk perception. In addition, the implementation of CREdIT in diverse clinical settings and the cultural adaptation of CREdIT to specific populations reflect important areas for future work.

  4. [Touching cancer: shiatsu as complementary treatment to support cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Argash, Oz; Caspi, Opher

    2008-01-01

    In recent years there has been an increase in the interest of cancer patients in receiving complementary medicine therapies as supportive measures to cure the disease. In response, medical units that combine conventional and complementary medicine (integrative medicine) have been established in leading cancer centers worldwide. In Israel, a special integrative medicine unit that combines mind-body, Chinese medicine, nutrition, herbs, supplements, and manual therapies (such as shiatsu) before, during and after conventional anti-cancer therapies has been established as an integral part of the Davidoff Comprehensive Cancer Center in 2006. Shiatsu represents a group of manual therapeutic techniques, including acupressure. Shiatsu offers cancer patients a non-pharmacologic method to relieve symptoms and improve quality of life throughout the course of illness. Research indicates that acupressure is relatively effective and safe for common cancer-related symptoms such as nausea, vomiting and insomnia. In our experience, shiatsu is also relatively effective and safe for other common symptoms such as fatigue, muscular pain and body image dissatisfaction. Yet, insufficient evidence exists to delineate the best means by which shiatsu and other manual therapies could or should be integrated into routine cancer care. The purpose of the present paper is to describe what is currently known about this topic in order to support decision-making that is based on facts, rather than on myths and misconceptions. We call for more research that examines the effectiveness and safety of shiatsu and other manual therapies in the care of cancer patients.

  5. Madarosis: a qualitative study to assess perceptions and experience of Australian patients with early breast cancer treated with taxane-based chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Smith, K; Winstanley, J; Boyle, F; O'Reilly, A; White, M; Antill, Y C

    2017-08-22

    Eyebrow and eyelash loss (madarosis) is a common and distressing side effect of chemotherapy for which no protective strategies have yet been developed. The purpose of this study was to develop an overview of perceptions and experiences of women undergoing taxane-based treatment for early breast cancer. A total of 25 women with a diagnosis of invasive early breast cancer participated in a focus group (n = 5), ages ranging from 35 to 64 (median 50), all had completed therapy with a taxane-based chemotherapy treatment. This focus group used targeted questions to explore participants' perceptions and experience of madarosis during and following chemotherapy and identified issues associated with impact of madarosis on quality of life (QoL). Thematic analysis was conducted to identify important issues experienced by participants. Seven themes emerged from the data: (1) timing of regrowth and permanent changes, (2) meaning/importance of eyebrow/eyelashes, (3) preparedness/information given, (4) impact of the hair loss of self, (5) impact of hair loss on others, (6) physiological side effects of loss of eyebrows/eyelashes, and (7) management of loss of eyebrows/eyelashes. In addition, participants noted physical symptoms of eye irritation during their treatment that they attributed to madarosis. This study highlights the significant impact of madarosis on patients, providing the first published analysis of patient's attitude and perception of eyelash and eyebrow loss during chemotherapy. Further research in this area is required and will be benefitted from the development of a dedicated instrument/questionnaire that can capture and measure the impact of madarosis on QoL and allow development of clinical trial strategies.

  6. Korean women's breast cancer experience.

    PubMed

    Im, Eun-Ok; Lee, Eun Ok; Park, Young Sook

    2002-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore cultural meanings of breast cancer among Korean women in South Korea. A descriptive longitudinal study using methodological triangulation was conducted, and only qualitative findings are presented in this article. Ten Korean women who were newly diagnosed with a plan of surgery and subsequent chemotherapy, who did have severe fatigue at the time of recruitment, were recruited through Seoul National University Hospital. Data were collected using in-depth, 2-hour interviews and analyzed using thematic analysis. The themes emerged through the analysis process included: (a) "I did wrong," (b) "I cannot ask male physicians." (c) "I don't want to show the operation site to my husband." and (d) "I do household tasks by myself." The overriding theme was marginalization of the women within the context of their patriarchal culture. The findings suggest that culture is an important context circumscribing women's health/illness experience.

  7. Nutritional Considerations for Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Angela

    1985-01-01

    Although weight loss is a frequent, though not invariable, component of the cancer syndrome, the associated malnutrition is a poor prognostic sign among both children and adults. This article describes the possible mechanisms of cancer cachexia; reviews the present state of nutritional support in cancer patients; identifies nutritional problems and workable approaches during the pre- and post-treatment periods; discusses the unconventional nutritional practices commonly encountered and lists resource materials for patients and families. PMID:21274086

  8. [Delirium in patients with cancer].

    PubMed

    Staniszewska, Agnieszka; Kłoszewska, Iwona

    2007-01-01

    Delirium is a frequent complication of cancer. It is the cause of patients' suffering and due to worsening of communication, the impediment to clinical assessment. It lowers the quality of life of family caregivers as well. Instant diagnosis and therapy of delirium are essential in clinical practice. In this review etiology, prevalence, clinical features and management of delirium in cancer patients are described.

  9. Haemoglobin levels may predict toxicities in patients on pelvic chemoradiation for carcinoma of the cervix—experience of a regional cancer centre

    PubMed Central

    Gangopadhyay, Aparna; Das, Joydeep; Nath, Partha; Biswas, Jaydip

    2014-01-01

    Background Haemoglobin levels and tissue oxygenation influence tumour outcome in carcinoma cervix radiotherapy. The clinical impact of haemoglobin levels on acute normal tissue toxicity during radiation and interaction with chemotherapy in carcinoma of the cervix is underexplored. This paper aims to explore this issue. Methods Treatment toxicity among 227 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix stages II B–IV A, receiving pelvic radiotherapy or chemoradiation at our institute, were studied prospectively. The baseline and weekly haemoglobin levels during treatment were recorded. Acute toxicities were recorded using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) acute toxicity and Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) criteria, version 4. For the analysis, patients were divided into two groups, depending on nadir haemoglobin levels. A cut-off value for anaemia was selected at 12 gm/dL. Toxicity was compared between anaemic and non-anaemic groups. Results Patients on chemoradiation and having haemoglobin levels >12 gm/dL suffered significantly higher dermatitis (two-tailed p value = 0.0288) and vaginal mucositis (two-tailed p value = 0.0187) of at least RTOG acute toxicity grade 2, compared with the anaemic group. In contrast patients receiving radiotherapy alone did not experience any significantly greater mucocutaneous toxicity if haemoglobin was >12 gm/dL. Anaemia had significantly greater impact on malaise and neutropenia (two-tailed p value <0.0001) of CTCAE grade 1 and above among chemoradiation patients, as opposed to those receiving radiotherapy alone (two-tailed p values = 0.0012 for neutropenia and 0.0422 for malaise). Conclusion Haemoglobin values >12 gm/dL significantly worsen acute mucocutaneous toxicity in locally advanced cervical cancer patients receiving chemoradiation. Similar effects are not observed in the absence of chemotherapy. PMID:24963348

  10. Hospitalization of hospice patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Cintron, Alexie; Hamel, Mary B; Davis, Roger B; Burns, Risa B; Phillips, Russell S; McCarthy, Ellen P

    2003-10-01

    To identify factors associated with hospitalization of elderly hospice patients with cancer and to describe their hospital experiences. Retrospective analysis of the last year of life. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database. Medicare beneficiaries dying of lung or colorectal cancer between 1988 and 1998 who enrolled in hospice. Hospitalization after hospice entry. For hospitalized patients, we describe admission diagnoses, aggressiveness of care, and in-hospital death. Of the 23608 patients, 1423 (6.0%) were hospitalized after hospice enrollment. Hospitalization declined over time by 7.0% per year of hospice enrollment. Factors associated with higher hospitalization rates were younger age, male gender, black race/ethnicity, local cancer stage at diagnosis, and hospice enrollment within 4 months of cancer diagnosis. The most common reasons for hospital admission were lung cancer, metastatic disease, bone fracture, pneumonia, and volume depletion. Of the 1423 patients hospitalized, 34.6% received aggressive care and 35.8% died in the hospital. The rates of hospitalization for elderly hospice patients with lung or colorectal cancer appear to be declining. However, patients who are hospitalized undergo aggressive care and often die in the hospital rather than at home. This aggressive care may be consistent with changes in patients' care preferences, but could also reflect the current culture of acute care hospitals, which focuses on curative treatment and is ill-equipped to provide palliative care.

  11. Experiences of recruiting to a pilot trial of Cardiac Rehabilitation In patients with Bowel cancer (CRIB) with an embedded process evaluation: lessons learned to improve recruitment.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Gill; Campbell, Anna; Davies, Zoe; Munro, Julie; Ireland, Aileen V; Leslie, Stephen; Watson, Angus Jm; Treweek, Shaun

    2015-01-01

    Recruitment to randomised controlled trials (RCTs) is a perennial problem. Calls have been made for trialists to make recruitment performance publicly available. This article presents our experience of recruiting to a pilot RCT of cardiac rehabilitation for patients with bowel cancer with an embedded process evaluation. Recruitment took place at three UK hospitals. Recruitment figures were based on the following: i) estimated number of patient admissions, ii) number of patients likely to meet inclusion criteria from clinician input and iii) recruitment rates in previous studies. The following recruitment procedure was used:Nurse assessed patients for eligibility.Patients signed a screening form indicating interest in and agreement to be approached by a researcher about the study.An appointment was made at which the patient signed a consent form and was randomised to the intervention or control group. Information about all patients considered for the study and subsequently included or excluded at each stage of the recruitment process and reasons given were recorded. There were variations in the time taken to award Research Management approval to run the study at the three sites (45-359 days). Sixty-two percent of the original recruitment estimate was reached. The main reason for under-recruitment was due to over-estimation of the number of patient admissions; other reasons were i) not assessing all patients for eligibility, ii) not completing a screening form for eligible patients and iii) patients who signed a screening form being lost to the study before consenting and randomisation. Pilot trials should not simply aim to improve recruitment estimates but should also identify factors likely to influence recruitment performance in a future trial and inform the development of that trial's recruitment strategies. Pilot trials are a crucial part of RCT design. Nevertheless, pilot trials are likely to be small scale, involving only a small number of sites, and

  12. Professional identity at stake: a phenomenological analysis of spiritual counselors' experiences working with a structured model to provide care to palliative cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kruizinga, R; Helmich, E; Schilderman, J B A M; Scherer-Rath, M; van Laarhoven, H W M

    2016-07-01

    Good palliative care requires excellent interprofessional collaboration; however, working in interprofessional teams may be challenging and difficult. The aim of the study is to understand the lived experience of spiritual counselors working with a new structured method in offering spiritual care to palliative patients in relation to a multidisciplinary health care team. Interpretive phenomenological analysis of in-depth interviews, was done using template analysis to structure the data. We included nine spiritual counselors who are trained in using the new structured method to provide spiritual care for advanced cancer patients. Although the spiritual counselors were experiencing struggles with structure and iPad, they were immediately willing to work with the new structured method as they expected the visibility and professionalization of their profession to improve. In this process, they experienced a need to adapt to a certain role while working with the new method and described how the identities of the profession were challenged. There is a need to concretize, professionalize, and substantiate the work of spiritual counselors in a health care setting, to enhance visibility for patients and improve interprofessional collaboration with other health care workers. However, introducing new methods to spiritual counselors is not easy, as this may challenge or jeopardize their current professional identities. Therefore, we recommend to engage spiritual counselors early in processes of change to ensure that the core of who they are as professionals remains reflected in their work.

  13. Preferences for end-of-life care among community-dwelling older adults and patients with advanced cancer: A discrete choice experiment.

    PubMed

    Finkelstein, Eric A; Bilger, Marcel; Flynn, Terry N; Malhotra, Chetna

    2015-11-01

    Singapore is in the midst of several healthcare reforms in efforts to finance and deliver health services for a rapidly aging population. The primary focus of these reforms is to make healthcare services, including those at the end of life (EOL), affordable. Given the increasingly high health care costs at the EOL, policy makers need to consider how best to allocate resources. One strategy is to allocate resources based on the preferences of sub-populations most likely to be affected. This paper thus aims to quantify preferences for EOL care both among community dwelling older adults (CDOAs) and among patients with a life-limiting illness. A discrete choice experiment was administered to CDOAs and advanced cancer patients in Singapore and willingness to pay (WTP) for specific EOL improvements was estimated. We find that patients have a higher WTP for nearly all EOL attributes compared with CDOAs. We also show that, for both groups, moderate life extension is not the most important consideration; WTP for one additional life year is lower than common thresholds for cost-effectiveness. Irrespective of whose preference are considered, the results highlight the importance of pain management and supporting home deaths at the EOL, perhaps at the expense of public funding for costly but only marginally effective treatments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Patterns and Prognostic Importance of Hepatic Involvement in Patients with Serous Ovarian Cancer: A Single-Institution Experience with 244 Patients.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Ailbhe C; Somarouthu, Bhanusupriya; Tirumani, Sree Harsha; Braschi-Amirfarzan, Marta; Van den Abbeele, Annick D; Ramaiya, Nikhil H; Shinagare, Atul B

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the frequency, patterns, and prognostic importance of metastatic hepatic involvement in serous ovarian cancer. Materials and Methods This institutional review board-approved retrospective study, with waived informed consent, included 244 patients with pathologically proven serous ovarian cancer (mean age ± standard deviation, 59 years ± 10.7; range 19-93 years). Electronic medical records and all available imaging studies over a median follow-up of 44 months (interquartile range [IQR], 27-70) were reviewed to identify the frequency of liver parenchymal invasion (LPI) from perihepatic peritoneal metastasis and hematogenous liver metastases. The associations and prognostic importance of LPI and hematogenous metastases were studied by using univariate and multivariate Cox proportional analysis. Results Eighty-four of 244 patients (34%) developed perihepatic metastases, of whom 55 (23%) developed LPI after median of 43 months (IQR, 25-63). Hematogenous hepatic metastases developed in 38 of 244 patients (16%) after median of 42 months (IQR, 26-64). At multivariate analysis, age (P = .008; hazard ratio [HR]: 1.03; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.009, 1.07) and suboptimal cytoreduction (P = .03; HR, 2.13; 95% CI: 1.12, 4.07) were associated with LPI. Increasing age (P = .01; HR, 1.04; 95% CI: 1.008, 1.08), high-grade tumor (P = .01; HR, 6.75; 95% CI: 1.44, 120.5), and advanced stage (P = .03; HR, 3.16; 95% CI: 1.94, 4.56) were associated with hematogenous metastases. Overall survival with and without LPI was similar (median, 80 months; IQR, 50-not reached vs 123 months; IQR, 49-279; P = .6). Hematogenous metastases were associated with significantly shorter survival at univariate (median 63 months, IQR 43-139 vs 145 months, IQR 50-not reached; P = .006) and multivariate analyses (P = .03; HR, 1.88; 95% CI: 1.14, 3.28). Conclusion Differentiating hematogenous metastases and LPI is important for radiologists; hematogenous metastases are associated with

  15. Pre-counseling Education for Low Literacy Women at Risk of Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer (HBOC): Patient Experiences Using the Cancer Risk Education Intervention Tool (CREdIT)

    PubMed Central

    Beattie, Mary S.; Lee, Robin; Braithwaite, Dejana; Wilcox, Carolina; Metrikin, Maya; Lamvik, Kate; Luce, Judith

    2010-01-01

    The Cancer Risk Education Intervention Tool (CREdIT) is a computer-based (non-interactive) slide presentation designed to educate low-literacy, and ethnically and racially diverse public hospital patients at risk of Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer (HBOC) about genetics. To qualitatively evaluate participants’ experience with and perceptions of a genetic education program as an adjunct to genetic counseling, we conducted direct observations of the intervention, semi-structured in person interviews with 11 women who viewed CREdIT, and post-counseling questionnaires with the two participating genetic counselors. Five themes emerged from the analysis of interviews: (1) genetic counseling and testing for breast/ovarian cancer was a new concept; (2) CREdIT’s story format was particularly appealing; (3) changes in participants’ perceived risk for breast cancer varied; (4) some misunderstandings about individual risk and heredity persisted after CREdIT and counseling; (5) the context for viewing CREdIT shaped responses to the presentation. Observations demonstrated ways to make the information provided in CREdIT and by genetic counselors more consistent. In a post-session counselor questionnaire, counselors’ rating of the patient’s preparedness before the session was significantly higher for patients who viewed CREdIT prior to their appointments than for other patients. This novel educational tool fills a gap in HBOC education by tailoring information to women of lower literacy and diverse ethnic/racial backgrounds. The tool was well received by interview participants and counselors alike. Further study is needed to examine the varied effects of CREdIT on risk perception. In addition, the implementation of CREdIT in diverse clinical settings and the cultural adaptation of CREdIT to specific populations reflect important areas for future work. PMID:20490636

  16. Development and utilization of complementary communication channels for treatment decision making and survivorship issues among cancer patients: The CIS Research Consortium Experience.

    PubMed

    Fleisher, Linda; Wen, Kuang Yi; Miller, Suzanne M; Diefenbach, Michael; Stanton, Annette L; Ropka, Mary; Morra, Marion; Raich, Peter C

    2015-11-01

    Cancer patients and survivors are assuming active roles in decision-making and digital patient support tools are widely used to facilitate patient engagement. As part of Cancer Information Service Research Consortium's randomized controlled trials focused on the efficacy of eHealth interventions to promote informed treatment decision-making for newly diagnosed prostate and breast cancer patients, and post-treatment breast cancer, we conducted a rigorous process evaluation to examine the actual use of and perceived benefits of two complementary communication channels -- print and eHealth interventions. The three Virtual Cancer Information Service (V-CIS) interventions were developed through a rigorous developmental process, guided by self-regulatory theory, informed decision-making frameworks, and health communications best practices. Control arm participants received NCI print materials; experimental arm participants received the additional V-CIS patient support tool. Actual usage data from the web-based V-CIS was also obtained and reported. Print materials were highly used by all groups. About 60% of the experimental group reported using the V-CIS. Those who did use the V-CIS rated it highly on improvements in knowledge, patient-provider communication and decision-making. The findings show that how patients actually use eHealth interventions either singularly or within the context of other communication channels is complex. Integrating rigorous best practices and theoretical foundations is essential and multiple communication approaches should be considered to support patient preferences.

  17. Development and utilization of complementary communication channels for treatment decision making and survivorship issues among cancer patients: The CIS Research Consortium Experience

    PubMed Central

    Fleisher, Linda; Wen, Kuang Yi; Miller, Suzanne M.; Diefenbach, Michael; Stanton, Annette L.; Ropka, Mary; Morra, Marion; Raich, Peter C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Cancer patients and survivors are assuming active roles in decision-making and digital patient support tools are widely used to facilitate patient engagement. As part of Cancer Information Service Research Consortium’s randomized controlled trials focused on the efficacy of eHealth interventions to promote informed treatment decision-making for newly diagnosed prostate and breast cancer patients, and post-treatment breast cancer, we conducted a rigorous process evaluation to examine the actual use of and perceived benefits of two complementary communication channels -- print and eHealth interventions. Methods The three Virtual Cancer Information Service (V-CIS) interventions were developed through a rigorous developmental process, guided by self-regulatory theory, informed decision-making frameworks, and health communications best practices. Control arm participants received NCI print materials; experimental arm participants received the additional V-CIS patient support tool. Actual usage data from the web-based V-CIS was also obtained and reported. Results Print materials were highly used by all groups. About 60% of the experimental group reported using the V-CIS. Those who did use the V-CIS rated it highly on improvements in knowledge, patient-provider communication and decision-making. Conclusion The findings show that how patients actually use eHealth interventions either singularly or within the context of other communication channels is complex. Practice Implications Integrating rigorous best practices and theoretical foundations is essential and multiple communication approaches should be considered to support patient preferences. PMID:26855885

  18. Initial Experience of (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT Imaging in High-risk Prostate Cancer Patients Prior to Radical Prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Budäus, Lars; Leyh-Bannurah, Sami-Ramzi; Salomon, Georg; Michl, Uwe; Heinzer, Hans; Huland, Hartwig; Graefen, Markus; Steuber, Thomas; Rosenbaum, Clemens

    2016-03-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) overexpression theoretically enables targeting of prostate cancer (PCa) metastases using gallium Ga 68 ((68)Ga)-labeled PSMA ligands for positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging. Promising detection rates have been reported when using this approach for functional imaging of recurrent PCa; however, until now, the diagnostic accuracy of (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT for preoperatively identifying lymph node metastases (LNMs) had not been assessed. We retrospectively compared preoperative (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT lymph node (LN) findings with histologic work-up after radical prostatectomy (RP). Overall, 608 LNs containing 53 LNMs were detected during RP. LNMs were present in 12 of 30 patients (40%). The (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT scans identified 4 patients (33.3%) as LN true positive and 8 patients (66.7%) as false negative. Median size of (68)Ga-PSMA-PET/CT-detected versus undetected LNMs was 13.6 versus 4.3 mm (p<0.05). Overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT for LNM detection were 33.3%, 100%, 100%, and 69.2%, respectively. Per-side analyses revealed corresponding values of 27.3%, 100%, 100%, and 52.9%. Conversely, (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT enabled tumor visualization in the prostate. In 92.9% of patients, the intraprostatic tumor foci were correctly predicted. Overall, (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT is a promising tool for functional imaging; however, our initial experience revealed substantial influence of LNM size on the diagnostic accuracy of (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT. We assessed the diagnostic accuracy of (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT in high-risk prostate cancer patients prior to radical prostatectomy. We found that lymph node metastasis detection rates were substantially influenced by lymph node metastasis size. Copyright © 2015 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Associations among socioeconomic status, patterns of care and outcomes in breast cancer patients in a universal health care system: Ontario's experience.

    PubMed

    Kumachev, Alexander; Trudeau, Maureen E; Chan, Kelvin K W

    2016-03-15

    The Canadian health care system provides equitable access to equivalent standards of care. The authors investigated to determine whether patients with breast cancer who had different socioeconomic status (SES) received different care and had different overall survival (OS) in Ontario, Canada. Women who were diagnosed with breast cancer between 2004 and 2009 were identified from the Ontario Cancer Registry and linked to provincial databases to ascertain patient demographics, screening, diagnosis, treatment patterns, and survival. SES was defined as neighborhood income by postal code and was divided into income quintiles (Q1-Q5; with Q5 the highest SES quintile). Univariable and multivariable analyses were used to examine the associations between: 1) SES and mammogram screening and breast cancer treatments, and 2) SES and OS. In total, 34,776 patients with breast cancer who had information on disease stage available at diagnosis were identified. Seventy-six percent of women were aged >50 years. Patients with higher SES were more likely to be diagnosed at an earlier stage (Q5 [44.3%] vs Q1 [37.7%]; odds ratio [OR], 1.31; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.23-1.41; P < .0001) and also were more likely to receive adjuvant chemotherapy (Q5 vs Q1: OR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.10-1.26; P < .0001) and radiotherapy (Q5 vs Q1: OR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.15-1.33; P < .0001). The 5-year OS rates for Q1 through Q5 were 80%, 81%, 82.2%, 83.9%, and 85.7%, respectively (P < .0001). After adjusting for patient demographics, cancer stage at diagnosis, adjuvant chemotherapy, trastuzumab, radiotherapy and surgery types, higher SES remained associated with better OS (P = .0017). In a universal health care system, higher SES is associated with greater screening and treatments and with better OS after adjusting for screening, cancer stage at diagnosis, and treatments. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  20. Acute neurovascular events in cancer patients receiving anti-vascular endothelial growth factor agents: Clinical experience in Paris University Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Tlemsani, Camille; Mir, Olivier; Psimaras, Dimitri; Vano, Yann-Alexandre; Ducreux, Michel; Escudier, Bernard; Rousseau, Benoit; Loirat, Delphine; Ceccaldi, Bernard; André, Thierry; Goldwasser, François; Ricard, Damien

    2016-10-01

    Despite the increasing and broadening use of agents targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway, little is known on their acute neurovascular toxicities. This retrospective, multi-centre study examined the characteristics of patients with solid tumours who experienced an ischaemic or haemorrhagic stroke, a transient ischaemic accident (TIA) or a posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) while under anti-VEGF and until 8 weeks after termination of treatment and evaluated their management in our institutions from 2004 to 2014. Patients with newly diagnosed or progressive cerebral metastases at the time of the acute neurovascular event were excluded. Thirty-four patients (55.9% men) were identified, and experienced either ischaemic stroke (n = 18), PRES (n = 9), TIA (n = 6) or haemorrhagic stroke (n = 1). At initiation of anti-VEGF agents, 64.7% of patients had previous cardiovascular risk factors, and 52.9% had hypertension. Eight patients (23.5%) had received cerebral radiotherapy, five of which concomitantly to anti-VEGF treatment. Six (17%) patients died in the 8 weeks following the acute neurovascular event, and only 55.9% recovered their initial neurological status. Overall, 1-year and 2-year survival rates after the acute neurovascular event were 67.9% and 50%, respectively. When anti-VEGF agents were reintroduced (n = 6), severe vascular toxicity recurred in two patients. Neurovascular events under VEGF treatments are potentially severe, and the management of comorbid conditions has to be improved. A prospective collection of data and standardised management of such events is therefore being structured in our institutions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Financial Distress in Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Jonas A.; Wong, Yu-Ning

    2013-01-01

    Novel diagnostic and therapeutic options offer hope to cancer patients with both localized and advanced disease. However, many of these treatments are often costly and even well-insured patients can face high out-of-pocket costs. Families may also be at risk of financial distress due to lost wages and other treatment-related expenses. Research is needed to measure and characterize financial distress in cancer patients and understand how it affects their quality of life. In addition, health care providers need to be trained to counsel patients and their families so they can make patient-centered treatment decisions that reflect their preferences and values. PMID:24349677

  2. [Neurological complications in cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Hundsberger, Thomas; Roth, Patrick; Roelcke, Ulrich

    2014-08-20

    Neurological symptoms in cancer patients have a great impact on quality of life and need an interdisciplinary approach. They lead to significant impairment in activities of daily living (gait disorders, dizziness), a loss of patients independency (vegetative disturbances, wheel-chair dependency) and interfere with social activities (ban of driving in case of epilepsy). In this article we describe three main and serious neurological problems in the context of oncological patients. These are chemotherapy-induced polyneuropathy, malignant spinal cord compression and epileptic seizures. Our aim is to increase the awareness of neurological complications in cancer patients to improve patients care.

  3. Supraclavicular Lymph Node Excision Biopsy in Patients with Suspected Supraclavicular Lymph Node Metastasis of Lung Cancer: Experience in a Tertiary Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong Hoon; Yoon, Tae Mi; Lim, Sang Chul

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness and accuracy of supraclavicular lymph node excision biopsy in the diagnosis of suspected supraclavicular lymph node metastasis of lung cancer. A retrospective review was performed to evaluate patients with suspected supraclavicular lymph node metastasis of lung cancer who underwent supraclavicular lymph node excision biopsy from January 2011 to July 2014. Forty-six patients with suspected supraclavicular lymph node metastasis of lung cancer underwent supraclavicular lymph node excision biopsy, which diagnosed benign diseases in 6 patients and malignant diseases in 40 patients. Supraclavicular lymph node excision biopsy was usually performed on patients during their first clinical visit under local anesthesia. For diagnosing suspected lung cancer, supraclavicular lymph node excision biopsy had a diagnostic sensitivity of 100%, specificity of 97.6%, positive-predictive value of 83.3%, negative-predictive value of 100%, and accuracy of 97.8%. No major complication resulted from surgical intervention. Supraclavicular lymph node excision biopsy is a useful and accurate adjunct for the evaluation of suspected supraclavicular lymph node metastasis of lung cancer in a tertiary hospital. PMID:28184341

  4. Supraclavicular Lymph Node Excision Biopsy in Patients with Suspected Supraclavicular Lymph Node Metastasis of Lung Cancer: Experience in a Tertiary Hospital.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Hoon; Yoon, Tae Mi; Lee, Joon Kyoo; Lim, Sang Chul

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness and accuracy of supraclavicular lymph node excision biopsy in the diagnosis of suspected supraclavicular lymph node metastasis of lung cancer. A retrospective review was performed to evaluate patients with suspected supraclavicular lymph node metastasis of lung cancer who underwent supraclavicular lymph node excision biopsy from January 2011 to July 2014. Forty-six patients with suspected supraclavicular lymph node metastasis of lung cancer underwent supraclavicular lymph node excision biopsy, which diagnosed benign diseases in 6 patients and malignant diseases in 40 patients. Supraclavicular lymph node excision biopsy was usually performed on patients during their first clinical visit under local anesthesia. For diagnosing suspected lung cancer, supraclavicular lymph node excision biopsy had a diagnostic sensitivity of 100%, specificity of 97.6%, positive-predictive value of 83.3%, negative-predictive value of 100%, and accuracy of 97.8%. No major complication resulted from surgical intervention. Supraclavicular lymph node excision biopsy is a useful and accurate adjunct for the evaluation of suspected supraclavicular lymph node metastasis of lung cancer in a tertiary hospital.

  5. Urotherapy for patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Eldor, J

    1997-04-01

    Cancer cells release various antigens, some of which appear in the urine. Oral autourotherapy is suggested as a new treatment modality for cancer patients. It will provide the intestinal lymphatic system with the many tumor antigens against which antibodies may be produced. These antibodies may be pierced through the blood stream and attack the tumor and its cells.

  6. Gastric stump carcinoma after distal subtotal gastrectomy for early gastric cancer: experience of 541 patients with long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Morgagni, Paolo; Gardini, Andrea; Marrelli, Daniele; Vittimberga, Giovanni; Marchet, Alberto; de Manzoni, Giovanni; Di Cosmo, Maria Antonietta; Rossi, Gian Maria; Garcea, Domenico; Roviello, Franco

    2015-06-01

    Gastric stump carcinoma (GSC) has been studied after primary gastrectomy for benign disease but few studies have evaluated its correlation with gastric cancer. We assessed 541 patients submitted to subtotal gastrectomy for early gastric cancer at least 15 years ago. GSC was diagnosed in 16 (2.9%) patients, giving a 4% cumulative risk of GSC 20 years after surgery. Diagnosis was made within 5 years of surgery in 10 patients and after 8 years in 6 cases. GSC occurred in 13/470 (2.8%) patients submitted to Billroth 2 reconstruction, 2/30 (6.7%) patients who underwent Billroth 1, and 1/41 (2.4%) patients after Roux-en-Y reconstruction. Significant risk factors observed for GSC were histologic type and sex. Other synchronous or metachronous extragastric tumors were registered in 56 (11.2%) patients. The risk of GSC was low, even 20 years after subtotal gastrectomy for early gastric cancer. Lauren intestinal histotype and male sex were frequently associated with GSC. No correlation was observed between GSC and reconstruction technique or multifocality. Clinically speaking, GSC could be considered a subset of gastric cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Nursing care dependence in the experiences of advanced cancer inpatients.

    PubMed

    Piredda, Michela; Bartiromo, Chiara; Capuzzo, Maria Teresa; Matarese, Maria; De Marinis, Maria Grazia

    2016-02-01

    Increasing burden of cancer in Europe and socio-demographic trends imply that more cancer patients will face high levels of dependency. Care dependency is often perceived as a distressing experience by cancer patients who are concerned about becoming a burden to others. The experience of care dependence has been scarcely investigated in advanced cancer patients, especially in the hospital setting. This study aimed at describing advanced cancer patients' experiences of care dependence in hospital and of the factors perceived by them as contributing to decrease or increase this dependence. The study used a descriptive phenomenological approach based on Husserl's (1913) life world perspective. Data collection and analysis followed Giorgi's (1997) five basic methodological steps. Data were gathered by semi-structured interviews with thirteen advanced cancer adult inpatients of a teaching hospital. The interviews were audio-recorded and the recordings transcribed word for word. Three themes emerged: 'dependency discovers new meanings of life', 'active coping with dependency' and 'the care cures the dependent person'. The essential meaning of care dependency was the possibility to become aware of being a person as both an object and subject of care. Dependence appears as an experience with strong relational connotations, which enable patients to see differently their life, themselves, the world and others. Dependency is revealed as a natural experience, only partly in accordance with previous studies. Deeper insight into the meaning patients attach to care dependency can enable nurses to better meet the patient's needs, e.g. by improving caring relationships with patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Changes in the distribution of lung cancer cell types and patient demography in a developing multiracial Asian country: experience of a university teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Liam, Chong-Kin; Pang, Yong-Kek; Leow, Chai-Hooi; Poosparajah, Shyamala; Menon, Ashoka

    2006-07-01

    A comparison of patients with lung cancer diagnosed at the University of Malaya Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia from October 1991 to September 1999 with another group of lung cancer patients diagnosed at the same hospital during an earlier period of 1967-1976 was undertaken to determine whether there had been a change in the distribution of lung cancer cell types and patient demography. The number of histologically and/or cytologically proven lung cancer cases was 583 from October 1991 to September 1999 and 278 from 1967 to 1976. The mean (S.D.) age of the patients during the period 1991-1999, 60.1 (12.0) years was similar to that of patients during the period 1967-1976, 60.3 (12.2) years. There was no shift of the peak age distribution of lung cancer (i.e., the 7th decade) between the two periods. In the recent period, the percentage of patients with adenocarcinoma had increased significantly to 43.2% from 25.2% while that of large cell carcinoma had decreased to 3.3% from 11.9%. The percentages of patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and small cell lung cancer remained stable. In the period 1967-1976, SCC was the commonest cell type in men and in smokers while adenocarcinoma was the commonest cell type in women and in never smokers. In the period 1991-1999, adenocarcinoma was the commonest cell type in both men and women as well as in smokers and never smokers.

  9. Patients' experiences of the PICC insertion procedure.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Jackie; Davies, Louise

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are a type of central venous access device used to deliver a variety of intravenous therapies, including chemotherapy. PICCs may be placed by interventional radiologists, anaesthetists or, as is increasingly common, by specialist nurses in the hospital setting. However, little is known about how patients feel regarding the PICC insertion procedure. The aim of this study was to interview patients who had undergone a recent PICC insertion in the chemotherapy day unit to identify their experiences. On analysis of the qualitative data obtained from the semi-structured interview, five themes emerged: the context of cancer; expectations; levels of pain and anxiety; coping strategies; and explanation. The findings of this study support some previously described elements of procedural experiences; however, new understanding has provided implications for practice in the areas of expectations, allaying anxiety levels, supporting individual coping strategies and providing explanation. The major limitation of the study was the homogenous sample of oncology patients with a clear link between the patient experience of the PICC insertion and the context of cancer. The main recommendation for further research would be to repeat this study with a broader patient population.

  10. Providing Coordinated Cancer Care-A Qualitative Study of Norwegian Cancer Coordinators' Experiences of Their Role.

    PubMed

    Lie, Nataskja-Elena Kersting; Hauken, May Aasebø; Solvang, Per Koren

    2017-05-23

    There is a growing need for strategies to improve coordinated, tailored services in cancer care to meet the comprehensive needs of cancer patients. In Norway, cancer coordinators (CCs) have been established to improve coordination and patient-centeredness of services. Little is known about how CCs engage to provide patients with the needed services and support throughout the treatment. The aim of this study was to explore how Norwegian CCs experience their role and how they enact it in order to enhance coordinated cancer care. The study encompasses a qualitative, hermeneutic approach, conducting semistructured in-depth interviews of 26 Norwegian CCs. The data were analyzed using thematic analysis and discussed in the light of the salutogenic theory. Cancer coordinators take a holistic approach to patient care, including both patient- and system-level activities. "Providing coordinated cancer care" emerged as an overarching topic for their role. This topic was elaborated by 3 main themes: (1) finding their place and creating their function, (2) meeting the needs of cancer patients and helping them cope, (3) promoting well-functioning cancer care systems. Cancer coordinators evolved diversely, in adaption to the local context and patients' needs. The functions' diversity challenged the implementation and external role recognition. Cancer coordinators seemed to apply a salutogenic, resource-focused orientation in order to support a positive development at both the patient and the system levels. The findings reinforce the call for holistic, patient-centered services in cancer care. Cancer coordinators need appropriate support from the local management to establish the role and local collaborations.

  11. Low rate of positive margins and re-excision after partial mastectomy in highly selected breast cancer patients: A Chinese single-institution experience.

    PubMed

    Wu, Siyu; Zhu, Yanyan; Yang, Zhaozhi; Mo, Miao; Gao, Hongbo; Yang, Wentao; Liu, Guangyu

    2017-02-14

    A recent randomized controlled trial firstly demonstrated that cavity shaving significantly decreased the rate of positive margins and re-excision among partial mastectomy (PM) patients. However, it remains unknown whether cavity shaving should be routinely applied to Chinese breast cancer patients undergoing PM. A total of 408 PM patients undergoing 410 PMs among 1796 surgically treated breast cancer patients at Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Centre from January 2015 to June 2015 were included in our study. Data were analysed with univariate or multivariate analysis. Overall, 11 of 410 cases (2.7%) had positive margins postoperatively. Moreover, only 24.6% of the cases (P<0.05) presented with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), among whom 10.0% obtained positive margins. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, presence of mammographic calcifications was significantly associated with margin positivity (P<0.05, OR=6.06, 95% CI: 1.53-23.91). In conclusion, cavity shaving during PM should not be routinely performed in Chinese breast cancer patients, particularly in highly selected cases with a low prevalence of DCIS. PM patients with preoperative mammographic calcifications were more likely to have positive margins and might benefit more from cavity shaving.

  12. Working with children of cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Slivka, H H; Magill, L

    1993-02-01

    Through the use of verbal and nonverbal techniques, a social worker and music therapist have combined their fields into an integral therapeutic modality to provide patients with cancer and their children opportunities to experience intimacy in a time of crisis. Skilled verbal interventions and the sensitive application of the expressive and less threatening medium of music create a relaxed environment where families and patients may explore deeply and express freely.

  13. Breast cancer patient stories project.

    PubMed

    Tanna, Nuttan; Buijs, Helene; Pitkin, Joan; Reichert, Robert

    2012-12-01

    It is estimated that there are almost half a million women living with or beyond a breast cancer diagnosis in the UK, often referred to as the breast cancer survivor population. We report on the setting up of a dedicated breast cancer and menopause symptoms service (BCMS), and present results from research undertaken with breast cancer survivors with the aim of obtaining their perspectives on the BCMS service. An action-oriented approach incorporating improvement science methodology has been used to help develop and drive changes to support a high standard of NHS patient care delivery for women with breast cancer within the BCMS setting. Evaluation was undertaken of this innovative service using qualitative methodology, and included discussion within a focus group setting, patient consent to record discussion, followed by thematic analysis of transcription. Women who have survived breast cancer identified a need for specialist support to help improve their quality of life, which is also affected by menopause type symptomology. This support can be provided within the BCMS service setting. Our recommendations are that the BCMS service model is incorporated into any regional or national breast cancer patient pathway and service redesign work in place. Breast cancer survivors would support the setting up of a BCMS service, and would actively help raise awareness and market this service.

  14. Cancer Screening in Older Patients.

    PubMed

    Salzman, Brooke; Beldowski, Kathryn; de la Paz, Amanda

    2016-04-15

    Although cancer is the second leading cause of death among persons 65 years and older, there is a paucity of clinical trial data about the effectiveness and harms of cancer screening in this population. Given the heterogeneous nature of the older population, cancer screening in these patients should not be based on age alone. Studies suggest that a life expectancy of at least 10 years is necessary to derive a survival benefit from screening for breast and colorectal cancers; therefore, screening for these cancers is not recommended in those with a life expectancy of less than 10 years. Prostate cancer screening, if performed at all, should not be performed after 69 years of age. Cervical cancer screening may be stopped after 65 years of age if the patient has an adequate history of negative screening results. An individualized approach to cancer screening decisions involves estimating life expectancy, determining the potential benefits and harms of screenings, and weighing those benefits and harms in relation to the patient's values and preferences.

  15. Radioablative therapy with Iodine-131 on a patient with thyroid cancer and chronic renal failure in hemodialysis first experience in Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apaza Veliz, D. G.; Herrera Vera, R. D.; Cardenas Abarca, C. A.; Oporto Gonzales, C. A.; Aguilar Ramírez, C.; Vega Ramírez, J. L.; Urquizo Baldomero, R. M.

    2016-07-01

    The Iodine-131 (I-131) is a radioisotope used as a standard treatment for radioablation of thyroid remnants. Among thyroid cancer patients, the ones undergoing hemodialysis represent a specific group. The dose of I-131 is given orally to these patients, part of it is absorbed by the thyroid remnants and the rest of it, largely not incorporated, is excreted primarily by renal excretion. The use of a high dose of radioactivity in the process, and the inability of excretion, represents a high risk of exposure to the patient, medical staff and hemodialysis equipment. This work describes the procedure applied on the radioablation therapy for thyroid cancer while receiving hemodialysis, minimizing the risks for the patient and the staff involved. This clinical procedure will establish the dosimetric measures, a plan on radiation protection and a treatment protocol for this specific type of patients.

  16. Radioablative therapy with Iodine-131 on a patient with thyroid cancer and chronic renal failure in hemodialysis first experience in Peru

    SciTech Connect

    Apaza Veliz, D. G.; Herrera Vera, R. D.; Cardenas Abarca, C. A.; Oporto Gonzales, C. A.; Aguilar Ramírez, C.; Urquizo Baldomero, R. M.; Vega Ramírez, J. L.

    2016-07-07

    The Iodine-131 (I-131) is a radioisotope used as a standard treatment for radioablation of thyroid remnants. Among thyroid cancer patients, the ones undergoing hemodialysis represent a specific group. The dose of I-131 is given orally to these patients, part of it is absorbed by the thyroid remnants and the rest of it, largely not incorporated, is excreted primarily by renal excretion. The use of a high dose of radioactivity in the process, and the inability of excretion, represents a high risk of exposure to the patient, medical staff and hemodialysis equipment. This work describes the procedure applied on the radioablation therapy for thyroid cancer while receiving hemodialysis, minimizing the risks for the patient and the staff involved. This clinical procedure will establish the dosimetric measures, a plan on radiation protection and a treatment protocol for this specific type of patients.

  17. How long are elderly patients followed up with mammography after the diagnosis of breast cancer? A single-centre experience in a developing country.

    PubMed

    Parag, Yethiksha; Buccimazza, Ines

    2016-06-17

    The effect of breast cancer on elderly South African (SA) patients is not well characterised. The lack of data with regard to disease burden, post-treatment surveillance and breast cancer relapse poses a challenge to providing optimum follow-up care to this group of patients. To assess the effect of breast cancer and adherence to post-treatment surveillance programmes among the local elderly population attending the breast oncology clinics at Addington and Inkosi Albert Luthuli Central hospitals in Durban, KwaZulu-Natal, SA. A retrospective review was undertaken of all patients aged ≥65 years diagnosed with breast cancer during 2007. Hospital records were reviewed for a period of 5 years to ascertain the stage of the disease, treatment received, adherence to post-treatment surveillance mammograms, incidence of new mammographic findings and recurrence, site of recurrence, mode of detection of recurrence, disease-free survival, and overall survival rates at 5 years. In our study, the incidence of breast cancer in the elderly population was 26.7%. A significant percentage of patients (56.3%) were diagnosed at an advanced stage of disease. Of the 46.9% who had received surveillance mammography, only 6.3% received their post-treatment surveillance mammograms on time, in accordance with international recommendations. New mammographic findings were detected in 26.7% of patients during the 5-year follow-up. During the follow-up period, 15.6% of the total number of study patients presented with disease recurrence. Eighty percent of cases of recurrence were detected clinically. The overall survival at 5 years was 65.6%. Our study highlights the significant number of elderly patients with advanced disease at diagnosis, poor compliance with internationally recommended annual post-treatment surveillance mammograms, and the relatively low overall 5-year survival rate compared with that of international studies.

  18. Cost-benefit analysis of laparoscopic surgery versus laparotomy for patients with endometrioid endometrial cancer: experience from an institute in China.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhiying; Yi, Xiaofang; Feng, Weiwei; Ding, Jingxin; Xu, Huan; Zhou, Xianrong; Hua, Keqin

    2012-07-01

    To compare the clinical outcomes and associated costs between laparoscopic and abdominal surgery for patients with endometrioid endometrial cancer. From 2003 to 2008, 115 patients who underwent laparoscopically-assisted surgery for endometrioid endometrial cancers were enrolled in this retrospective study. Another 123 patients who had abdominal surgery for the same histological type of endometrial cancer were included as the control group. The clinico-pathological variables, surgical outcome, costs, death and case recurrence of the two groups were compared. There was no difference in the patients' age, body mass index, FIGO stage, histological grade or surgical types between the two groups. The patients in the laparoscopy group had less blood loss (P = 0.010), a shorter hospital stay (P < 0.001), less postoperative pain (P < 0.001) and lower complication rates (P < 0.001) than those treated by laparotomy. The total costs in the laparoscopy group were higher than that in the laparotomy group ($2073 vs $1638, P < 0.001). Patients in the laparoscopy group returned to usual activity more quickly (P = 0.001) and went back to work earlier (P = 0.013) than those in laparotomy group. With a median follow-up of 42 months for the laparoscopy group and 40 months for the laparotomy group, there was no significant difference in the number of cases with respect to death (P = 1.000) or recurrence (P = 1.000). Laparoscopically-assisted surgery is as effective as the laparotomy approach for the treatment of early-stage and advanced-stage endometrial cancer. The relatively higher cost of the laparoscopic surgery may be compensated by its benefits. In developing countries such as China, laparoscopically-assisted surgery is also an attractive alternative for selected patients with endometrial cancer. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2012 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  19. Internet design preferences of patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Chernecky, Cynthia; Macklin, Denise; Walter, Jennifer

    2006-07-01

    To describe computer experience and preferences for multimedia design. Prospective, descriptive. Physician office and outpatient cancer centers in an urban area in the southeastern United States. Convenience sample of 22 volunteer patients with cancer from four racial groups. A questionnaire on computer experiences was followed by a hands-on computer session with questions regarding preferences for seven interface items. Data termination occurred when sample size was obtained. Design of Internet education site for patients. Variables include preferences, computer, cancer, multimedia, and education. Eighty-two percent had personal computers, 41% used a computer daily, and 95% believed that computers would be a good avenue for learning about cancer care. Preferences included display colors in blue and green hues; colored buttons; easy-to-read text; graphics with a simple design and large, clear pictures; serif font in dark type; light-colored background; and larger photo size in a rectangle shape. Most popular graphic icons as metaphors were 911 for emergency, picture of skull and crossbones for danger, and a picture of a string on an index finger representing reminder. The simple layout most preferred for appearances was one that included text and pictures, read from left to right, and was symmetrical in its placement of pictures and text on the page. Preferences are necessary to maintain interest and support navigation through computer designs to enhance the translation of knowledge to patients. Development of multimedia based on patient preferences will enhance education, learning, and, ultimately, quality patient care.

  20. Febrile neutropaenia in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Walwyn, M; Nicholson, A; Lee, M G; Wharfe, G; Frankson, M A

    2010-03-01

    Febrile neutropaenia is a common complication of chemotherapy in cancer patients. Empirical antibiotic regimes are based on the epidemiological characteristics of bacterial isolates globally and locally. This study retrospectively reviewed all cases of febrile neutropaenia in patients with confirmed cancer admitted at the University Hospital of the West Indies in the four-year period between, January 1, 2003 and December 31, 2006 and who received chemotherapy. Cases were identified from blood culture records and hospital charts which were reviewed to determine the aetiological agents causing bacteraemia, their antimicrobial susceptibilities and clinicalfeatures. These cases were compared with non-neutropaenic cancer patients admitted with fever. A total of 197 febrile episodes in cancer patients were reviewed. Thirty-seven per cent had febrile neutropaenia while 62% were non-neutropaenic. Acute myeloid leukaemia was the most common haematological malignancy and the most common solid tumour was breast cancer. Twenty-six per cent of patients had a positive blood culture. In febrile neutropaenic patients, Escherichia coli was the most common organism isolated followed by coagulase-negative staphylococci while in non-neutropaenic patients, coagulase-negative staphylococci was most common. Acinetobacter infections was prominent in non-neutropaenic patients but absent in neutropaenic patients. More than one organism was cultured in 9 neutropaenic and 18 non-neutropaenic patients. Mortality was 10.8% in neutropaenic and 24.4% in non-neutropaenic patients. Gram-negative organisms are the predominant isolates in febrile neutropaenic episodes in this cohort of patients. Non-neutropaenic patients had an increased mortality with an increase in Acinetobacter infections and multiple isolates.

  1. The Lived Experience of Gynecologic Cancer Survivors in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Li-Yun; Wang, Kung-Liahng; Liang, Shu-Yuan; Tsai, Jung-Mei; Tsay, Shiow-Luan

    2017-10-12

    Although it is now possible to achieve permanent remission in a large percentage of gynecologic cancer (GC) cases, many GC patients in remission experience side effects or complications that influence their physical function and family relationships. Compared with other types of cancer patients, survivors of GC face greater challenges in terms of physical and psychological adaptations, and many of these do not receive sufficient assistance. An in-depth understanding of the lived experiences and demands of GC survivors is key to constructing comprehensive related healthcare services. The aim of this study was to understand the lived experience of GC survivors in Taiwan to help their return to a healthy life. This was a phenomenological study. Twenty-three survivors of GC participated in semistructured interviews that were held in a private environment. The transcripts were based on synchronous recordings from the interviews. Giorgi's phenomenology analysis was adopted for data analysis. Three themes with six subthemes were extracted from the data, including (a) the inner struggle of living with cancer and recurrence: repeatedly exploring the causes of cancer and treatment and facing a fear of cancer recurrence, (b) the interpretation and adjustment to cancer treatment: filled with fluctuating physical and mental distress and working to adopt a different perspective, and (c) the long passage of finding a desirable lifestyle: adjusting to long-term coexistence with side effects and realizing the strength of society, body, and mind. The journey of rehabilitation for GC survivors is very long. The participants in this study faced different respective challenges during the diagnosis, treatment, and adjustment phases. Conventional disease-oriented medical care cannot satisfy the requirements of cancer patients because of patient-decentralized services. Our results indicate that GC survivors face diverse problems, both physically and mentally. Healthcare professionals

  2. Quality of life in patients with recurrent breast cancer after second breast-conserving therapy in comparison with mastectomy: the German experience.

    PubMed

    Jendrian, Svenja; Steffens, Katharina; Schmalfeldt, Barbara; Laakmann, Elena; Bergelt, Corinna; Witzel, Isabell

    2017-06-01

    Although some studies suggest that breast-conserving therapy (BCT) shows better psychosocial outcomes than mastectomy in patients with primary breast cancer, little is known about the outcomes of these surgical options in recurrent breast cancer. We investigated differences in overall survival and re-recurrence rates as well as psychosocial outcomes among patients who underwent BCT or mastectomy after the diagnosis of recurrent breast cancer in a single-center setting. 124 of 186 eligible patients who underwent surgical treatment for breast cancer recurrence completed the questionnaires on quality of life (EORTC QLQ-C30 and -BR23), fear of progression (PA-F-KF), anxiety and depression (HADS), and body image (BIS). Women after breast-conserving surgery (n = 46) showed significantly better outcomes than women after mastectomy (n = 61) with respect to body image (P < 0.001 in BIS and p < 0.001 in BR23), social functioning (p = 0.016), emotional functioning (p = 0.028), and role functioning (p = 0.043). There were no significant group differences regarding anxiety, depression, and fear of progression as well as re-recurrence and survival rates. Predictors of good quality of life were partnership (OR 2.46), higher monthly family income (OR 3.54), and higher professional qualification (OR 4.3) in our group of patients. Our results indicate that patients treated with breast-conserving therapy after recurrent breast cancer perceive lower impairments in body image and several aspects of quality of life than patients treated with mastectomy.

  3. [Women's experiences and care practices in the cancer treatment process].

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Pricilla Emmanuelly; Guimarães, Sílvia Maria Ferreira

    2015-07-01

    This article seeks to understand the viewpoint of cancer patients about the disease process and the therapeutic procedures that they experience. Cancer treatments provoke a series of physical and emotional consequences in patients. Thus, patients undergo a restructuring of life and establish mechanisms to "take care of themselves." The methodology used was an ethnographic approach through interviews, field notes and participant observation. The ethnographic approach revealed how these women being given conventional treatment in a given hospital create shared care technologies based on sociability.

  4. Prostate cancer: experience with definitive irradiation in the aged

    SciTech Connect

    Green, N.; Bodner, H.; Broth, E.

    1985-03-01

    When considering therapeutic options for localized prostate cancer, stage and grade of disease have been the most important determinants. In the elderly, the nominal age has assumed increasing importance in the final decision. A balanced judgment must be reached between the patient's normal life expectancy and the rapidity with which the cancer may be expected to express its malignant potential. By careful attention to patient selection and the details of treatment, definitive irradiation can improve quality of life and survival. Of 63 patients aged seventy-three to ninety years referred for irradiation, 56 were found medically suitable for definitive treatment. A review of the authors experience is presented.

  5. Tailoring communications to the evolving needs of patients throughout the cancer care trajectory: a qualitative exploration with breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Shim, Eun-Jung; Park, Jee Eun; Yi, Myungsun; Jung, Dooyoung; Lee, Kwang-Min; Hahm, Bong-Jin

    2016-10-18

    Doctor-patient communication is a crucial aspect of patient care. This study explored the communication experience of patients in a cancer consultation over the course of the cancer continuum. In-depth interviews with seven breast cancer patients were carried out. Themes related to communication experiences across the five phases of cancer consultation, from diagnosis to recurrence, were identified. The most salient issue is that patients also perceived cancer as 'a disease of the mind', which is not adequately cared for in consultation. This highlights the notion that cancer care providers should provide appropriate care for the psychological dimensions of the cancer experience with an empathic and sincere attitude during consultations. To this end, non-verbal aspects of communication that convey caring, support, and respect seem important. Furthermore, patients perceived that the consultation time was far shorter then they needed and reported that they felt pressured for time. Moreover, the stance taken by patients and the needs and preferences of patients varied across the phases of the cancer trajectory. As patients progressed through the phases of their treatment, they assumed more active roles in the course of their care and the need for more detailed information and questioning increased. Thus, ensuring that patients have opportunities to ask questions in the consultation is important. Current findings suggest that the efficacy of communication varies depending on which phase patients are in and that effective communication should be tailored to these evolving needs and preferences of breast cancer patients. Also, patients perceived that the consultation did not adequately address their need for information related to their care or their emotional issues associated with the cancer experience. It is therefore important to address their needs by paying particular attention to non-verbal aspects of communication that convey empathy and respect toward patients

  6. Venous Thromboembolism—Incidence of Deep Venous Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer: A Tertiary Care Experience in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Naeem Sultan; Nawaz, Ahmad; Junaid, Montasir; Kazi, Maliha; Akhtar, Shabbir

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Although venous thromboembolism (VTE) is seen with morbidity and mortality in various surgical specialties, scarce data are available in the head and neck surgery domain. Objective We aim to determine the incidence of VTE in patients receiving surgery for head and neck cancer. Methods Four hundred thirteen patients who underwent head and neck surgery procedures between 2005 and 2013 were reviewed retrospectively. All patients with head and neck surgery had received thromboprophylaxis (i.e., compression stockings and subcutaneous heparin). Patient demographics, operating time, and length of hospital stay were analyzed. The incidence of symptomatic deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) during the initial postoperative hospitalization was assessed. Results Twelve patients were identified who developed VTE. Three patients developed DVT, and nine developed PE. The incidence of DVT and PE was 0.72 and 2.17%, respectively. Interestingly, all of these patients had undergone excision of extensive head and neck cancers accompanied by a reconstructive procedure. Patients who developed PE had a longer hospital stay compared with those who only had DVT. There were overall three mortalities in the nine patients who developed PE. Conclusion Although VTE has a low incidence, it is a known complication of extensive head and neck surgeries with life-threatening outcomes. We recommend early mobilization and physiotherapy with the possible aid from appropriate mechanical and pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis. PMID:26157492

  7. Creating the ideal patient experience.

    PubMed

    Purcărea, Th.V

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare industry continues to evolve under conditions of intense competition in approaching health prevention, protection, and promotion. Therefore, healthcare providers are challenged to always ensure better patient experience, winning patients' satisfaction, and loyalty and remain competitive on today's healthcare market. Healthcare markets bring together professionals and their patients into real collaborative relationships, which empower patients to contribute to the healthcare improvement. Within this competitive landscape, which is also characterized by digital health tools boosting patients' awareness and controlling their own health, medical providers need to be perceived as skilled and trustworthy in relying on patients' needs, expectations, and sacrifices are required in order to obtain the promised benefits. Moreover, while constantly providing a holistic assessment of the healthcare services' and experience attributes, acting on feedback and reaching healthcare service excellence, providing a better understanding of all the touch points with their patients and improving the quality and consistency of all these touch points, all these are achieved by employees, who are truly connected to the healthcare business. Today, patients are systematically becoming aware of the diversity of their choices, being increasingly involved in making better healthcare choices, and, so, more and more innovative products are introduced, targeting new patient segments. Findings from the last three years have shown that patients may achieve better outcomes due to the stakeholders' commitment to innovation within the context of the big-data revolution, by building new values.

  8. Can we deconstruct cancer, one patient at a time?

    PubMed Central

    Blau, C. Anthony; Liakopoulou, Effie

    2014-01-01

    Patients with cancer face an ever-widening gap between the exponential rate at which technology improves and the linear rate at which these advances are translated into clinical practice. Closing this gap will require the establishment of learning loops that intimately link lab and clinic and enable the immediate transfer of knowledge, thereby engaging highly motivated patients with cancer as true partners in research. Here, we discuss the goal of creating a distributed network that aims to place world-class resources at the disposal of select patients with cancer and their oncologists, and then use these intensively monitored individual patient experiences to improve collective understanding of how cancer works. PMID:23102584

  9. Palliative care in cancer: managing patients' expectations.

    PubMed

    Ghandourh, Wsam A

    2016-12-01

    Advanced cancer patients commonly have misunderstandings about the intentions of treatment and their overall prognosis. Several studies have shown that large numbers of patients receiving palliative radiation or chemotherapy hold unrealistic hopes of their cancer being cured by such therapies, which can affect their ability to make well-informed decisions about treatment options. This review aimed to explore this discrepancy between patients' and physicians' expectations by investigating three primary issues: (1) the factors associated with patients developing unrealistic expectations; (2) the implications of having unrealistic hopes and the effects of raising patients' awareness about prognosis; and (3) patients' and caregivers' perspective on disclosure and their preferences for communication styles. Relevant studies were identified by searching electronic databases including Pubmed, EMBASE and ScienceDirect using multiple combinations of keywords, which yielded a total of 65 articles meeting the inclusion criteria. The discrepancy between patients' and doctors' expectations was associated with many factors including doctors' reluctance to disclose terminal prognoses and patients' ability to understand or accept such information. The majority of patients and caregivers expressed a desire for detailed prognostic information; however, varied responses have been reported on the preferred style of conveying such information. Communication styles have profound effects on patients' experience and treatment choices. Patients' views on disclosure are influenced by many cultural, psychological and illness-related factors, therefore individuals' needs must be considered when conveying prognostic information. More research is needed to identify communication barriers and the interventions that could be used to increase patients' satisfaction with palliative care.

  10. Adjuvant docetaxel and carboplatin chemotherapy administered alone or with radiotherapy in a "sandwich" protocol in patients with advanced endometrial cancer: a single-institution experience.

    PubMed

    Lan, Chunyan; Huang, Xin; Cao, Xinping; Huang, He; Feng, Yanling; Huang, Yongwen; Liu, Jihong

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate the outcomes of adjuvant chemotherapy administered alone or with radiotherapy in a "sandwich" protocol in patients with advanced endometrial cancer. The authors retrospectively reviewed the clinical records of patients with staged III - IV disease who received adjuvant chemotherapy (docetaxel plus carboplatin) administered alone or interposed with radiotherapy between January 2004 and August 2010. Of the 35 study patients, 10 (28.6%) had stage IIIA disease, 15 (42.9%) had IIIC1 disease, 7 (20.0%) had IIIC2 disease and 3 (8.6%) had IVB disease. Nine (90.0%) of the 10 patients with stage IIIA disease received four to six cycles of adjuvant docetaxel and carboplatin chemotherapy alone. All 25 patients with stage IIIC - IVB disease and 1 patient with stage IIIA disease received radiotherapy sandwiched between chemotherapy cycles (total, three to six cycles). The 3-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were 73.0 and 87.0%, respectively, for all patients. For patients with stage IIIC - IVB disease, the 3-year PFS and OS rates were 62.4 and 81.8%, respectively. Combination chemotherapy with docetaxel and carboplatin interposed with radiotherapy is efficacious and well tolerated for stage IIIC - IVB endometrial cancer. Adjuvant chemotherapy alone with docetaxel and carboplatin might be sufficient for stage IIIA disease.

  11. [The treatment of cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Pretorius, H L; Falkson, G

    1986-04-12

    Advances in the field of medical oncology were spurred by the development of cytostatic drugs, and cancer is today one of the most treatable (and most curable) of the chronic diseases. Because of the diversity of neoplastic diseases, classification, staging and the important individual patient discriminants must be taken into account more than ever before because of the availability of drugs that can cure or palliate many forms of cancer. The results obtained in advanced disease acted as an impetus to start chemotherapy at an earlier stage. In highly malignant neoplasms and especially in children with cancer, drug treatment has become of increasing importance, and when given appropriately complements surgery and radiotherapy.

  12. The oncologic outcome and immediate surgical complications of lipofilling in breast cancer patients: a multicenter study--Milan-Paris-Lyon experience of 646 lipofilling procedures.

    PubMed

    Petit, Jean Yves; Lohsiriwat, Visnu; Clough, Krishna B; Sarfati, Isabelle; Ihrai, Tarik; Rietjens, Mario; Veronesi, Paolo; Rossetto, Fabio; Scevola, Anna; Delay, Emmanuel

    2011-08-01

    Lipofilling is now performed to improve the breast contour, after both breast-conserving surgery and breast reconstruction. However, injection of fat into a previous tumor site may create a new environment for cancer and adjacent cells. There is also no international agreement regarding lipofilling after breast cancer treatment. The authors included three institutions specializing in both breast cancer treatment and breast reconstruction (European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy; Paris Breast Center, Paris, France; and Leon Berard Centre, Lyon, France) for a multicenter study. A collective chart review of all lipofilling procedures after breast cancer treatment was performed. From 2000 to 2010, the authors reviewed 646 lipofilling procedures from 513 patients. There were 370 mastectomy patients and 143 breast-conserving surgery patients. There were 405 patients (78.9 percent) with invasive carcinoma and 108 (21.1 percent) with carcinoma in situ. The average interval between oncologic surgical interventions and lipofilling was 39.7 months. Average follow-up after lipofilling was 19.2 months. The authors observed a complication rate of 2.8 percent (liponecrosis, 2.0 percent). Twelve radiologic images appeared after lipofilling in 119 breast-conserving surgery cases (10.1 percent). The overall oncologic event rate was 5.6 percent (3.6 percent per year). The locoregional event rate was 2.4 percent (1.5 percent per year). Lipofilling after breast cancer treatment leads to a low complication rate and does not affect radiologic follow-up after breast-conserving surgery. A prospective clinical registry including high-volume multicenter data with a long follow-up is warranted to demonstrate the oncologic safety. Until then, lipofilling should be performed in experienced hands, and a cautious oncologic follow-up protocol is advised. Therapeutic, IV [corrected].

  13. [Patients with solid organ transplantation and skin cancer: determination of risk factors with emphasis in photoexposure and immunosuppressive regimen. Experience in a third level hospital].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Acosta, Elva Dalia; Calva-Mercado, Juan José; Alberú-Gómez, Josefina; Vilatoba-Chapa, Mario; Domínguez-Cherit, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most common malignancy in transplant patients. The incidence of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is 10 times greater than in the general population, while squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is 100 times greater. The relationship between the BCC and SCC reverses and increases according to the degree of immunosuppression and sun exposure. One way to predict the risk of NMSC should be based on factors such as: total sun burden factor (TSB). To determine the influence of various risk factors in the development of NMSC and its relation to the type and duration of immunosuppressive treatment, type of transplant, and TSB. We worked with a fledgling historical cohort in which patients with kidney or liver transplant were identified and recorded if they developed some form of skin cancer. To study the factors associated with NMSC, we resorted to the strategy of a case-control study. Dermatological examination was performed and a questionnaire of risk factors made in both groups. Of the 140 patients enrolled, 51 were women and 89 men, 120 were renal transplant recipients and 20 liver transplants. Of patients who developed NMSC, 100% were renal transplant recipients. The median age was 48.5 years. Most cancer patients worked outdoors. A total of 78 lesions were found in 40 NMSC patients, 59 (76%) of them were SCC, and 19 (24%) BCC; 45% of all skin cancer patients had more than one injury. The worst affected areas were those photoexposed: 60% head and neck, trunk and upper extremities 18% 50%. In 30% of patients (12/40) 22 new tumors were identified (SCC 18 and BCC 4). No lesions were identified for melanoma. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, statistically significant features were: type-based immunosuppressive regimen of cyclosporine A, azathioprine and prednisone (OR: 59.7; 95% CI: 10.2-348), TSB > 10 (OR: 19; 95% CI: 3-120) and duration of use of immunosuppressive therapy (OR: 1.06; 95% CI: 0.9-1.1). The mean time from transplantation

  14. Rehabilitation of older cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Balducci, Lodovico; Fossa, Sophia Dorothe

    2013-02-01

    Cancer is a disease of aging. With the aging of the population and the improved survival of cancer patients, rehabilitation of older cancer survival is an increasingly common problem. Age may be constructed as a progressive reduction in functional reserve of multiple organ systems leading to decreased life expectancy and reduced stress tolerance. Physiologic age may be different from chronologic age and is best assessed with a comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA). The goals of cancer treatment in the older aged person include prolongation of active life expectancy that is prevention of functional dependence. Cancer and cancer treatment may accelerate physiologic aging. Rehabilitation is especially necessary in the case of curable malignancies or malignancies for which a prolonged survival is likely. Long-term complications of cancer treatment that may compromise life expectancy and functional independence include fatigue cognitive decline and peripheral neuropathy. This paper reviews the risk factors and the management of these complications. The number of older cancer survivors is expected to increase with the aging of the population. Prevention and management of fatigue, cognitive decline and peripheral neuropathy appear as the most important issue to prolong the active life expectancies of these individuals.

  15. Barriers to advance care planning in cancer, heart failure and dementia patients: a focus group study on general practitioners' views and experiences.

    PubMed

    De Vleminck, Aline; Pardon, Koen; Beernaert, Kim; Deschepper, Reginald; Houttekier, Dirk; Van Audenhove, Chantal; Deliens, Luc; Vander Stichele, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The long-term and often lifelong relationship of general practitioners (GPs) with their patients is considered to make them the ideal initiators of advance care planning (ACP). However, in general the incidence of ACP discussions is low and ACP seems to occur more often for cancer patients than for those with dementia or heart failure. To identify the barriers, from GPs' perspective, to initiating ACP and to gain insight into any differences in barriers between the trajectories of patients with cancer, heart failure and dementia. Five focus groups were held with GPs (n = 36) in Flanders, Belgium. The focus group discussions were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using the method of constant comparative analysis. THREE TYPES OF BARRIERS WERE DISTINGUISHED: barriers relating to the GP, to the patient and family and to the health care system. In cancer patients, a GP's lack of knowledge about treatment options and the lack of structural collaboration between the GP and specialist were expressed as barriers. Barriers that occured more often with heart failure and dementia were the lack of GP familiarity with the terminal phase, the lack of key moments to initiate ACP, the patient's lack of awareness of their diagnosis and prognosis and the fact that patients did not often initiate such discussions themselves. The future lack of decision-making capacity of dementia patients was reported by the GPs as a specific barrier for the initiation of ACP. The results of our study contribute to a better understanding of the factors hindering GPs in initiating ACP. Multiple barriers need to be overcome, of which many can be addressed through the development of practical guidelines and educational interventions.

  16. Pregnancy associated breast cancer: an institutional experience.

    PubMed

    Gogia, A; Deo, S V S; Shukla, N K; Mohanti, B K; Raina, V

    2014-01-01

    Pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC) has been defined as breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy or within 1 year of delivery. There is a paucity of data on PABC from India. The aim of our study was to assess the clinical-pathological parameters and outcome of PABC at Institute Rotary Cancer Hospital, All India Institute of Medical Sciences. We screened approximately 3,750 cases registered from January 2001 to December 2012 and found 26 cases of PABC. Patients' records were obtained from the computer database using International Classification of Diseases code (C-50). The median age was 26 years (range 20-35). The median duration of symptoms was 11.5 months. The American Joint Committee on Cancer stage distribution was Stage I - 1, Stage II - 3, Stage III - 14 and in Stage IV - 8 patients. Median clinical tumor size is 5.5 cm. Four patients were presented with the inflammatory breast cancer. Positive family history was elicited in three patients. Twenty-one patients were diagnosed after delivery, two patients in the first trimester, two patients in the second trimester and three patients in the third trimester. Estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) negativity and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2/neu) positivity was 56% and 38%, respectively. Nearly, 40% of patients had a high-grade tumor and 70% had pathological node positivity. With a median follow-up of 33 months, 3 years relapse free survival and overall survival was 40% and 50% respectively. Bone was the most common site for systemic relapse. PABC constituted 0.7% of all breast cancer patients. It is associated with advanced stage at presentation. Half of them were ER/PR negative and one-third was HER2/neu positive.

  17. [Fertility in testicular cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Shin, Takeshi; Miyata, Akane; Arai, Gaku; Okada, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    Testicular cancer(TC)is the most common and curable cancer affecting men of reproductive age. Successful treatment approaches have resulted in longer life expectancy in TC survivors. The most frequently used treatment for TC is a combination of inguinal orchiectomy, and either radiotherapy or cisplatin-based chemotherapy. In many TC patients, sperm quality is already abnormal and there may even be a lack of viable spermatozoa at the time of diagnosis. Therefore, the effect of cancer treatment on fertility is a potentially significant issue. Fertility preservation in these men has become essential and needs to be discussed prior to the start of cancer treatment. The only currently established fertility preservation method is the cryopreservation of sperm before therapy. For most patients seeking cryopreservation, the semen sample is collected via masturbation. If the patient is unable to ejaculate for any reason, other techniques such as vibratory stimulation and electroejaculation can be performed. In azoospermic or severely oligozoospermic patients, testicular sperm extraction at the time of the inguinal orchiectomy is a useful technique for obtaining spermatozoa before cytotoxic therapy. We herein present an overview of the current topics on fertility in TC patients, including the effects of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy. We also describe the strategy for fertility preservation in these patients.

  18. Cancer patient satisfaction with care.

    PubMed

    Wiggers, J H; Donovan, K O; Redman, S; Sanson-Fisher, R W

    1990-08-01

    A diagnosis of cancer places considerable stress on patients and requires them to make major adjustments in many areas of their lives. As a consequence, considerable demands are placed on health care providers to satisfy the complex care needs of cancer patients. Currently, there is little available information to indicate the extent to which cancer patients are satisfied with the quality of care they receive. The present study assessed the perceptions of 232 ambulatory cancer patients about the importance of and satisfaction with the following aspects of care: doctors technical competence and interpersonal and communication skills, accessibility and continuity of care, hospital and clinic care, nonmedical care, family care, and finances. The results indicate that all 60 questionnaire items used were considered to reflect important aspects of care, but that greater importance was given to the technical quality of medical care, the interpersonal and communication skills of doctors, and the accessibility of care. Most patients were satisfied with the opportunities provided to discuss their needs with doctors, the interpersonal support of doctors, and the technical competence of doctors. However, few patients were satisfied with the provision of information concerning their disease, treatment, and symptom control and the provision of care in the home and to family and friends.

  19. Hypertension in Patients with Cancer

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Vinicius Barbosa; Silva, Eduardo Nani; Ribeiro, Mario Luiz; Martins, Wolney de Andrade

    2015-01-01

    There is a known association between chemotherapy and radiotherapy for treatment of cancer patients and development or worsening of hypertension. The aim of this article is to review this association. A literature search was conducted for articles reporting this association on the databases PubMed, SciELO and LILACS between 1993 and 2013. There was a high coprevalence of hypertension and cancer, since both diseases share the same risk factors, such as sedentary lifestyle, obesity, smoking, unhealthy diet and alcohol abuse. The use of chemotherapy and adjuvant drugs effective in the treatment of cancer increased the survival rate of these patients and, consequently, increased the incidence of hypertension. We described the association between the use of angiogenesis inhibitors (bevacizumab, sorafenib and sunitinib), corticosteroids, erythropoietin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with the development of hypertension. We also described the relationship between hypertension and carotid baroreceptor injury secondary to cervical radiotherapy. Morbidity and mortality increased in patients with cancer and hypertension without proper antihypertensive treatment. We concluded that there is need for early diagnosis, effective monitoring and treatment strategies for hypertension in cancer patients in order to reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:25742420

  20. Effect of the childhood trauma on the adjustment to cancer in the patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Guveli, Hulya; Guveli, Murat Emin; Sen, Fatma; Oflaz, Serap; Gurdal, Necla; Tambas, Makbule; Kucucuk, Seden; Aydıner, Adnan; Ozkan, Mine

    2017-07-01

    Early identification of patients coping poorly is important for compliance with treatment and control of distress. This study aims to investigate the effect of the childhood trauma experience on the type of reaction and adjustment that the person exhibits to the cancer among the patients with breast cancer. This cross-sectional study enrolled 310 patients with breast cancer. The effect of the childhood trauma and the psychological condition on the adjustment to cancer was investigated by assessing the adjustment to cancer, the experiences of childhood trauma and psychological status of the subjects using mental adjustment to cancer scale (MAC), childhood trauma questionnaire (CTQ28), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Beck anxiety inventory (BAI). Majority of the subjects (77.4%) showed positive adjustment to cancer. Fighting spirit (63.9%) was the most commonly seen mechanism of adjustment to cancer. Of the subjects, 54.5% suffered at least one of the childhood trauma types. Among the patients, 47.1% had depression and 58.4% had anxiety. In the multivariate logistic regression analysis, emotional neglect and depression, respectively, have an effect on both positive and negative adjustment to cancer. Our study demonstrated that childhood trauma, especially emotional neglect, affects coping and adjustment among the patients with breast cancer. It is necessary to determine the childhood experiences to ensure the development of psychosocial interventions that will increase the adjustment and quality of life after the diagnosis of the cancer.

  1. Photobiomodulation therapy for the management of radiation-induced dermatitis : A single-institution experience of adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer patients after breast conserving surgery.

    PubMed

    Strouthos, Iosif; Chatzikonstantinou, Georgios; Tselis, Nikolaos; Bon, Dimitra; Karagiannis, Efstratios; Zoga, Eleni; Ferentinos, Konstantinos; Maximenko, Julia; Nikolettou-Fischer, Vassiliki; Zamboglou, Nikolaos

    2017-06-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) comprises a key component in the treatment of breast cancer. Radiation-induced skin toxicity is the major adverse event experienced by patients; however, radiodermatitis (RD) prevention and management remains trivial. It is proven that photobiomodulation (PBM) therapy using light-emitting diode (LED) increases wound healing and depicts an anti-inflammatory effect. This single-institute study evaluates the beneficial role of PBM-LED in preventing/reducing RD during breast cancer RT. Of 70 consecutively treated patients, 25 patients were treated with PBM-LED twice a week prior to adjuvant 3D conformal RT after breast-conserving surgery. RD was reported using Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events Version 4.0 and pain intensity using a visual analog scale (VAS). For comparison, a control group (n = 45) received RT without PBM-LED. In addition, a "matched" group (n = 25) was generated from the control group based on propensity for potentially confounding variables. In the PBM group, 22 patients (88%) presented grade 1 and 3 (12%) grade 2 RD. In the control group, 25 patients (55.6%) developed grade 1 reactions, 18 patients (40%) grade 2, and 2 (4.4%) patients grade 3 RD. Concerning pain intensity, 15 patients (60%) of the PBM treatment arm reported no pain, 5 patients (20%) VAS 2, and 5 (20%) VAS 3. In the control group, 13 patients (28.9%) reported no pain, 2 (4.4%) VAS 1, 7 (15.6%) VAS 2, 9 patients (20%) reported VAS 3, 12 (26.7%) patients VAS 4, and 2 (4.4%) patients VAS 5. PBM-LED therapy applied prior to RT might be effective in decreasing the incidence and sequelae of radiation-induced skin toxicity in breast cancer patients treated with breast-conserving surgery.

  2. The first experience of using 99mTc-Al2O3-based radiopharmaceutical for the detection of sentinel lymph nodes in cervical cancer patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinilkin, I. G.; Chernov, V. I.; Lyapunov, A. Yu.; Medvedeva, A. A.; Zelchan, R. V.; Chernyshova, A. L.; Kolomiets, L. A.

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the feasibility of using 99mTc-Al2O3-based radiopharmaceutical, a novel molecular imaging agent for sentinel lymph node detection in patients with invasive cervical cancer. The study included 23 cervical cancer patients (T1aNxMx-T2bNxMx) treated at the Tomsk Cancer Research Institute. In the 18 hours before surgery, 80 MBq of the 99mTc-Al2O3 in peritumoral injected, followed by single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) of the pelvis and intraoperative SLN identification. Twenty-seven SLNs were detected by SPECT, and 34 SLNs were identified by intraoperative gamma probe. The total number of identified SLNs per patient ranged from 1 to 3 (the mean number of SLNs was 1.4 per patient). The most common site for SLN detection was the external iliac region (57.2%), followed by the internal iliac (14%), obturator (14%), presacral and retrosacral regions (14%), and the parametrial region (1%). Sensitivity in detecting SLNs was 100% for intraoperative SLN identification and 79% for SPECT image.

  3. [Weight loss in cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Lordick, Florian; Hacker, Ulrich

    2016-02-01

    Cancer patients are regularly affected by malnutrition which often leads to a worsened quality of life and activity in daily living, more side effects and complications during anticancer treatment and shorter survival times. The early diagnosis and treatment of malnutrition are therefore relevant components of oncological treatment. The assessment of the nutritional status and determination of the body-mass-index should be done in every patient with cancer. The clinical examination delivers important findings and indications for malnutrition. Bioimpedance analysis can deliver additional objective information. The treatment of malnutrition should start early and follows a step-wise escalation reaching from nutritional counseling to enteral nutritional support to parenteral nutrition.

  4. [The value of time in cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Barone, Carlo

    2015-08-01

    In medicine time is one of the main dimensions used in order to assess the efficacy of a cure. In oncology we measure either the advantage obtained with a treatment or the clinical course of a cancer as time intervals or survival benefit. In the last years we can describe life expectancy in many solid tumors following therapy, not only in terms of median survival, but also in terms of 3-5 years survival. Additional life time, that given by novel drugs, is now a real experience in some solid tumors allowing a reflection on its value and meaning in the personal perception of patients as well in an absolute perspective. The concept of time deformation in physics suggests a metaphorical similarity with rediscovery of the authentic sense of life in an increasing number of patients affected by cancer who experience a significant life prolongation.

  5. The lived experience of people with progressive advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Esteves, Amélia; Roxo, José; Saraiva, Maria da Conceição

    Cancer is a long-term, life-limiting condition, and its end-of-life stage is complex. This study aimed to understand the lived experience of patients with progressive advanced oncological disease. Seven women in an acute hospital in Portugal were interviewed and the results analysed using a phenomenological approach to understand their lived experience. The analysis indicated that lived experience of these patients has six essential constituents: information about one's own health; perception of the disease; emotional reactions; aid strategies by nurses; imitations imposed by the disease; and changes in life perspective. The experience of advanced progressive cancer is very powerful and complex. The authors believe that this study has contributed to the understanding of this situation, particularly in terms of helping to improve palliative care practices.

  6. A novel dynamic field-matching technique for treatment of patients with para-aortic node-positive cervical cancer: Clinical experience

    PubMed Central

    Baden, Craig; Whitley, Alexander; López-Araujo, Javier; Popple, Richard; Duan, Jun; Kim, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Aim To report outcomes for patients with para-aortic lymph node positive cervical cancer treated with a dynamic field-matching technique. Background PET staging of cervical cancer has increased identification of patients with para-aortic lymph node metastasis. IMRT enables dose escalation in this area, but matching IMRT fields with traditional whole pelvis fields presents a challenge. Materials and methods From 2003 to 2012, 20 patients with cervical cancer and para-aortic lymph node metastasis were treated utilizing the dynamic field-matching technique. As opposed to single-isocenter half-beam junction techniques, this technique employs wedge-shaped dose junctions for the abutment of fields. We reviewed the records of all patients who completed treatment with the technique and abstracted treatment, toxicity, and disease-related outcome data for analysis. Results Median prescribed dose to the whole pelvis field was 45 Gy and para-aortic IMRT field 50.4 Gy. All but 3 patients underwent HDR (13 pts) or LDR (4 pts) brachytherapy. All patients developed lower GI toxicity; 10 grade 1, 9 grade 2, and 1 grade 4 (enterovaginal fistula). Median DFS was 12.4 months with 1 and 2-year DFS 60.0% and 38.1%. One-year OS was 83.7% and 2-year OS, 64.4%. A total of 10 patients developed recurrence; none occurred at the matched junction. Conclusions The dynamic field-matching technique provides a means for joining conventional whole pelvis fields and para-aortic IMRT fields that substantially reduces dose deviations at the junction due to field mismatch. Treatment with the dynamic matching technique is simple, effective, and tolerated with no apparent increase in toxicity. PMID:26900356

  7. Family Support and the Cancer Patient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dakof, Gayle A.; And Others

    Research has shown that social support is psychologically beneficial to cancer patients, with support from families being especially important. A survey of the social support needs of 407 cancer patients and an in-depth interview study of 55 of those patients were conducted to examine issues concerning family support and cancer patients. Results…

  8. Efficacy and tolerance of a scalp-cooling system for prevention of hair loss and the experience of breast cancer patients treated by adjuvant chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Protière, Christel; Evans, Katrin; Camerlo, Jacques; d'Ingrado, Marie-Pierre; Macquart-Moulin, Geneviève; Viens, Patrice; Maraninchi, Dominique; Genre, Dominique

    2002-10-01

    The applicability and efficacy of a scalp cooling system were studied in 105 breast cancer patients receiving four cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy with mitoxantrone + cyclophosphamide (NC chemotherapy). Women accepting the scalp-cooling system were compared for alopecia both against those who refused and against a "reference" group of 109 patients similarly treated but without being offered a scalp-cooling system. Hair loss in the 105 study patients was evaluated by nurses using World Health Organization (WHO) criteria at each cycle of chemotherapy. Concomitantly, tolerance and side-effects of the helmet were also recorded in 48 accepting patients. Similarly to reference group patients, a subsample of 27 accepting patients self-assessed hair loss using a specific questionnaire measuring its frequency and severity and the distress associated with this symptom. Nurses' ratings ( n = 105) indicated that hair loss frequency was constantly lower, at each cycle of chemotherapy, in study patients with scalp-cooling system ( n = 77) than in those without ( n = 28). Differences between the two groups were statistically significant at cycles 1 and 3 ( P < 0.05). When compared with those reported by reference group patients ( n = 109), study patients' self-measures of alopecia frequency ( n = 27) provided even more marked results than those achieved by nurses (cycles 1-3: P < 0.01; cycle 4: P < 0.05). Tolerance was generally good and no scalp metastasis was observed among the 77 accepting patients followed up. This study demonstrates that scalp cooling was an effective method of protection against hair loss caused by NC chemotherapy. Its routine use as part of adjuvant chemotherapy, especially in cancers with low prevalences of scalp metastasis, should be seriously considered.

  9. Creating the ideal patient experience

    PubMed Central

    Purcărea, Th.V

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare industry continues to evolve under conditions of intense competition in approaching health prevention, protection, and promotion. Therefore, healthcare providers are challenged to always ensure better patient experience, winning patients’ satisfaction, and loyalty and remain competitive on today’s healthcare market. Healthcare markets bring together professionals and their patients into real collaborative relationships, which empower patients to contribute to the healthcare improvement. Within this competitive landscape, which is also characterized by digital health tools boosting patients’ awareness and controlling their own health, medical providers need to be perceived as skilled and trustworthy in relying on patients’ needs, expectations, and sacrifices are required in order to obtain the promised benefits. Moreover, while constantly providing a holistic assessment of the healthcare services’ and experience attributes, acting on feedback and reaching healthcare service excellence, providing a better understanding of all the touch points with their patients and improving the quality and consistency of all these touch points, all these are achieved by employees, who are truly connected to the healthcare business. Today, patients are systematically becoming aware of the diversity of their choices, being increasingly involved in making better healthcare choices, and, so, more and more innovative products are introduced, targeting new patient segments. Findings from the last three years have shown that patients may achieve better outcomes due to the stakeholders’ commitment to innovation within the context of the big-data revolution, by building new values. PMID:27928442

  10. Evaluation of axillary lymph nodes by diffusion-weighted MRI using ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide in patients with breast cancer: initial clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Go; Matsuki, Mitsuru; Harada, Tomoaki; Tanigawa, Nobuhiko; Yamada, Takashi; Barentsz, Jelle; Narumi, Yoshifumi

    2011-09-01

    To investigate the diagnostic performance and clinical feasibility of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) in the evaluation of axillary lymph nodes (ALNs) in patients with breast cancer. Sixteen patients with known breast cancer underwent 1.5 T MRI. Axial diffusion-weighted images (DWIs) and conventional T1- and T2*-weighted images (CIs) were acquired before and 24-36 hours after intravenous administration of USPIO. Detection of ALNs was evaluated on DWIs in comparison with CIs. The apparent diffusion coefficient values (ADCvs) of the nonmetastatic and metastatic nodes in precontrast DWIs were determined. The diagnostic performance of DWI using USPIO was compared with that of CIs using USPIO with pathological correlation. Out of a total of 286 ALNs, 216/286 (76%) nodes were detected on DWIs and 238/286 (83%) on CIs. The differences in the ADCvs between metastatic and nonmetastatic nodes were not significant (P = 0.06). Sensitivity of CIs and DWIs using USPIO were respectively 70% and 83%, specificity 98% and 98%, and overall accuracy 93% and 95%. Although the detection on DWIs of ALNs in patients with breast cancer was inferior compared to CIs, the sensitivity and accuracy of DWIs using USPIO were superior in the diagnosis of ALNs metastasis. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Selective omission of level V nodal coverage for patients with oropharyngeal cancer: Clinical validation of intensity-modulated radiotherapy experience and dosimetric significance.

    PubMed

    Mohindra, Pranshu; Urban, Erich; Pagan, Jonathan D; Geye, Heather M; Patel, Vatsal B; Bayliss, R Adam A; Bender, Edward T; Harari, Paul M

    2016-04-01

    We sought to validate the consensus recommendation and assess dosimetric significance of selective omission of nodal level V from intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) clinical target volume (CTV) for oropharyngeal cancer. IMRT plans and clinical outcomes for 112 patients with oropharyngeal cancer (nodal classification N0-N2b) were analyzed for coverage of ipsilateral and contralateral nodal level V. Additionally, new IMRT plans were generated in 6 randomly selected patients to assess its dosimetric impact. With median follow-up of 3.4 years, there were no failures identified in nodal level V with or without nodal level V omission. Upon dosimetric evaluation, significant reduction in integral dose, V10 Gy , V20 Gy , V30 Gy , V40 Gy , and V50 Gy was observed by excluding unilateral and bilateral level V from the CTV. We clinically validate the consensus recommendation for selective omission of level V nodal coverage in IMRT planning of patients with oropharyngeal cancer and demonstrate significant dosimetric advantages. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Decreasing Frequency of Osteonecrosis of the Jaw in Cancer and Myeloma Patients Treated with Bisphosphonates: The Experience of the Oncology Network of Piedmont and Aosta Valley (North-Western Italy)

    PubMed Central

    Fusco, Vittorio; Galassi, Claudia; Berruti, Alfredo; Ortega, Cinzia; Ciuffreda, Libero; Scoletta, Matteo; Goia, Franco; Migliario, Mario; Baraldi, Anna; Boccadoro, Mario; Loidoris, Anastasios; Bertetto, Oscar

    2013-01-01

    Background. Data concerning frequency of Osteonecrosis of Jaws (ONJ) are mostly based on single center experiences. Patients and Methods. Since 2005 a multidisciplinary study group collected data of cases of ONJ in patients treated with Bisphosphonates (BP) and observed in oncology and hematology centers of a regional network. Results. By December 2008, 221 cases were registered. We report details of 200 cases, identified after cross-checking reports from centres of medical oncology, haematology, and oral care. Primary neoplasm was breast cancer (39%), myeloma (32%), prostate cancer (16%), and other types of cancer (8%). In about 50% of the cases a history of dental extraction was present. Zoledronic acid was administered (alone or with other BP) to 178 patients (89%). Median time from first infusion to ONJ diagnosis was 21.0 (zoledronic acid only) and 39.0 months (pamidronate only). The number of ONJ cases per year was 3 in 2003, 21 in 2004, 58 in 2005, 60 in 2006, 37 in 2007, and 21 in 2008. Conclusion. The number of new ONJ cases in cancer and myeloma patients increased until 2006 and then reduced. The possible reasons of this trend (introduction of zoledronic acid; increase of ONJ awareness; diffusion of preventive dental measures; late modifications of BP prescription) are herein discussed. PMID:23533811

  13. Association Between Bereaved Families' Sense of Security and Their Experience of Death in Cancer Patients: Cross-Sectional Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Ayumi; Miyashita, Mitsunori; Morita, Tatsuya; Akizuki, Nobuya; Akiyama, Miki; Shirahige, Yutaka; Sato, Kazuki; Yamamoto-Mitani, Noriko; Eguchi, Kenji

    2016-05-01

    The sense of security scale was developed to indicate care quality within the community. Bereaved families have perspective to evaluate the quality of the care system. The aim was to examine associations between end-of-life care and sense of security regarding regional cancer care among bereaved families. A cross-sectional population-based survey was conducted with families of cancer patients who died in regional areas of Japan. A total of 1046 family caregivers of patients responded to surveys (effective response rate of 65%). In multiple regression analyses, the families' higher age (P < 0.001), home death (P = 0.039), better health status of the family at patients' end of life (P = 0.016), lower caregiving burden (P < 0.001), and elements of perceived good patient death, including being free from physical distress (P < 0.001), trusting the physician (P < 0.001), living in calm circumstances (P = 0.042), and feeling that one's life was fulfilling (P = 0.035), were associated with a higher sense of security. Quality of death and lower burden on family caregivers were associated with families' sense of security. This suggests strategies for improving care quality for each patient to improve the sense of security. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Spatial analyses identify the geographic source of patients at a National Cancer Institute Comprehensive Cancer Center.

    PubMed

    Su, Shu-Chih; Kanarek, Norma; Fox, Michael G; Guseynova, Alla; Crow, Shirley; Piantadosi, Steven

    2010-02-01

    We examined the geographic distribution of patients to better understand the service area of the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, a designated National Cancer Institute (NCI) comprehensive cancer center located in an urban center. Like most NCI cancer centers, the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center serves a population beyond city limits. Urban cancer centers are expected to serve their immediate neighborhoods and to address disparities in access to specialty care. Our purpose was to learn the extent and nature of the cancer center service area. Statistical clustering of patient residence in the continental United States was assessed for all patients and by gender, cancer site, and race using SaTScan. Primary clusters detected for all cases and demographically and tumor-defined subpopulations were centered at Baltimore City and consisted of adjacent counties in Delaware, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia, New Jersey and New York, and the District of Columbia. Primary clusters varied in size by race, gender, and cancer site. Spatial analysis can provide insights into the populations served by urban cancer centers, assess centers' performance relative to their communities, and aid in developing a cancer center business plan that recognizes strengths, regional utility, and referral patterns. Today, 62 NCI cancer centers serve a quarter of the U.S. population in their immediate communities. From the Baltimore experience, we might project that the population served by these centers is actually more extensive and varies by patient characteristics, cancer site, and probably cancer center services offered.

  15. Many Terminal Cancer Patients Remain in Denial

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_167297.html Many Terminal Cancer Patients Remain in Denial Not facing reality ... HealthDay News) -- Nearly 10 percent of patients with terminal cancer don't want to know they're ...

  16. Gastric Cancer in Young Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dhobi, Manzoor A.; Wani, Khursheed Alam; Parray, Fazl Qadir; Wani, Rouf A.; Peer, G. Q.; Abdullah, Safiya; Wani, Imtiyaz A.; Wani, Muneer A.; Shah, Mubashir A.; Thakur, Natasha

    2013-01-01

    Aim. The aim of this study was to see the clinical, pathological, and demographic profile of young patients with stomach carcinoma besides association with p53. Patients and Methods. Prospective study of young patients with stomach carcinoma from January 2005 to December 2009. A total of 50 patients with age less than 40 years were studied. Results. Male female ratio was 1 : 1.08 in young patients and 2.5 : 1 in older patients. A positive family history of stomach cancer in the first degree relatives was present in 10% of young patients. Resection was possible only in 50% young patients. 26% young patients underwent only palliative gastrojejunostomy. The most common operation was lower partial gastrectomy in 68%. Amongst the intraoperative findings peritoneal metastasis was seen in 17.4% in young patients. 50% young patients presented in stage IV as per AJCC classification (P value .004; sig.). None of the patients presented as stage 1 disease in young group. Conclusion. Early detection of stomach carcinoma is very important in all patients but in young patients it is of paramount importance. PMID:24381753

  17. User-experiences with a web-based self-help intervention for partners of cancer patients based on acceptance and commitment therapy and self-compassion: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Köhle, Nadine; Drossaert, Constance H C; Jaran, Jasmijn; Schreurs, Karlein M G; Leeuw, Irma M Verdonck-de; Bohlmeijer, Ernst T

    2017-02-28

    Partners of cancer patients are the cornerstone of supportive cancer care. They assume different roles and responsibilities that optimally support the patient. Such support is highly demanding, and many partners report (mental) health problems. However, many of them do not use professional supportive care themselves. Offering a Web-based self-help intervention based on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) and self-compassion could be an important resource to support this group. This qualitative study aimed to examine user-experiences with a Web-based self-help intervention based on ACT and self-compassion among partners of cancer patients. Individual in-depth interviews, about partners' appreciation of the intervention and lessons learned, were conducted with 14 partners of cancer patients who used the Web-based self-help intervention. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analyzed by three independent coders both deductively and inductively. In general, partners appreciated the intervention, however, they also expressed ambivalent feelings towards peer support, the content of the feedback of their counselor, and the 'tunneled' structure of the intervention. The majority of the partners reported being more self-compassionate accepting that they experienced negative thoughts and feelings, they reported that they learned to increase the distance between their thoughts and themselves, they indicated being more aware of their personal values, and they thought that they were better able to commit to those values. They also reported other (non-specific) helpful processes such as insight and acknowledgement, positivity, the possibility to tell their story, time for themselves, and feeling closer and more connected with their partner (the patient). Partners of cancer patients indicated to appreciate the Web-based self-help intervention based on ACT and self-compassion. They felt that the intervention helped them to cope with negative emotions

  18. Treatment experiences of Latinas after diagnosis of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Katz, Steven J; Wallner, Lauren P; Abrahamse, Paul H; Janz, Nancy K; Martinez, Kathryn A; Shumway, Dean A; Hamilton, Ann S; Ward, Kevin C; Resnicow, Kenneth A; Hawley, Sarah T

    2017-08-15

    The authors examined racial/ethnic differences in patient perspectives regarding their breast cancer treatment experiences. A weighted random sample of women newly diagnosed with breast cancer between 2013 and 2015 in Los Angeles County and Georgia were sent surveys 2 months after undergoing surgery (5080 women; 70% response rate). The analytic sample was limited to patients residing in Los Angeles County (2397 women). The pattern of visits with different specialists before surgery was found to be similar across racial/ethnic groups. Low acculturated Latinas (Latinas-LA) were less likely to report high clinician communication quality for both surgeons and medical oncologists (<69% vs >72% for all other groups; P<.05). The percentage of patients who reported high satisfaction regarding how physicians worked together was similar across racial/ethnic groups. Latinas-LA were more likely to have a low autonomy decision style (48% vs 24%-50% for all other groups; P<.001) and were more likely to report receiving too much information versus other ethnic groups (20% vs <16% for other groups; P<.001). Patients who reported a low autonomy decision style were more likely to rate the amount of information they received for the surgery decision as "too much" (16% vs 9%; P<.001). There appears to be moderate disparity in breast cancer treatment communication and decision-making experiences reported by Latinas-LA versus other groups. The approach to treatment decision making by Latinas-LA represents an important challenge to health care providers. Initiatives are needed to improve patient engagement in decision making and increase clinician awareness of these challenges in this patient population. Cancer 2017;123:3022-30. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  19. A novel method for intraoperative sentinel lymph node detection in prostate cancer patients using superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and a handheld magnetometer: the initial clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Winter, Alexander; Woenkhaus, Joachim; Wawroschek, Friedhelm

    2014-12-01

    A sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy using superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) as a tracer instead of radioisotopes was first applied successfully in breast cancer. This study determined the feasibility of this new technique using SPIOs and a handheld magnetometer to detect SLNs in prostate cancer (PC). Enrolled 20 patients with intermediate and high-risk PC (PSA >10 and/or Gleason score >7) in a prospective study (12/2013-1/2014; DRKS00005473), following an ethics committee approval. After transrectal intraprostatic SPIOs injection a day earlier, patients (19/20) underwent magnetometer-guided sentinel lymphadenectomy (sPLND) and extended PLND, followed by radical prostatectomy. One patient was not operated because of an unrelated coagulation disorder. The ex vivo magnetic activity of all lymph nodes (LNs) removed was measured. The detection rate, rate of in vivo detected SLNs, and sensitivity of sPLND was established. No adverse events attributable to SPIOs injection were observed. Identified 126 SLNs (median 7, IQR 4-9) and resected 334 LNs (median 17, IQR 14-19); 37 % (7/19) of the patients had LN metastases (median 1, IQR 1-3.5). The detection rate and rate of in vivo detected SLNs were 90 % (17/19) and 94 % (118/126) respectively. Using sPLND, all LN metastases were detected (15/15, sensitivity 100 %) in all patients identified with SLNs. One LN + patient showed no SLNs following transurethral prostate resection. This is the first study using a magnetic tracer and magnetometer to detect SLNs in PC. Initial data indicate that this simple, radiation-free procedure is safe, feasible, and reliably identifies SLN and LN metastases in most patients.

  20. [Cancer-Related Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms in Patients With Cancer].

    PubMed

    Kao, Chia-Chan; Lin, Yu-Hua

    2016-10-01

    At least half of patients with cancer experience emotional distress (e.g., posttraumatic stress symptoms). Most of the studies on the emotional distress of Taiwanese cancer patients have focused on issues of depression rather than on posttraumatic stress disorder. The scope of the present article covers the definitions of cancer-related posttraumatic stress disorder (CR-PTSD) and cancer-related posttraumatic stress symptoms (CR-PTSS), identifies the differences and similarities between professional interview and self-administered measurement tools and their applications; analyzes the prevalence of CR-PTSD and CR-PTSS; identifies the possible contributing sociodemographic (younger age, female, low education, low socio-economic status), clinical (advanced stage, undergoing chemotherapy, just completed the therapy), and psychosocial (negative psychological traits, poor social support, and insufficient coping strategies) of CR-PTSD and CR-PTSS; and aggregates the effects of cognitive and psychosocial interventions on CR-PTSD and CR-PTSS. Furthermore, recommendations for clinical practice and research are discussed. This article is expected to provide practicing nurses with a basic concept of caring for emotional distress and to inspire researchers to conduct further study of issues related to CR-PTSD and CR-PTSS.

  1. [Nutrition therapy of cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Lövey, József

    2017-09-20

    The majority of cancer patients becomes malnourished during the course of their disease. Malnutrition deteriorates the efficiency of all kinds of oncologic interventions. As a consequence of it, treatment-related toxicity increases, hospital stay is lengthened, chances of cure and survival as well as the quality of life of the patients worsen. Nutritional status therefore influences all aspects of outcome of oncology care. In spite of this the use of nutritional therapy varies across health care providers but its application is far from being sufficient during active oncology interventions as well as rehabilitation and supportive care. It threatens not only the outcome and quality of life of cancer patients but also the success of oncologic treatments which often demand high input of human and financial resources. Meanwhile application of nutritional therapy is legally regulated in Hungary and a very recent update of the European guideline on cancer patient nutrition published in 2017 is available. Moreover, cost effectiveness of nutritional therapy has been proven in a number of studies. In this review we present the basics of nutritional therapy including nutritional screening and evaluation, nutritional plan, the role of nutrition support teams, oral, enteral and parenteral nutrition, the use of different drugs and special nutrients and the follow-up of the patients.

  2. Lung cancer in elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    Diso, Daniele; Onorati, Ilaria; Anile, Marco; Mantovani, Sara; Rendina, Erino A.

    2016-01-01

    There is a worldwide-accepted evidence of a population shift toward older ages. This shift favors an increased risk of developing lung cancer that is primarily a disease of older populations. Decision making is extremely difficult in elderly patients, since this group is under-represented in clinical trials with only 25% of them historically opening to patients older than 65 years. For all these reasons, a “customized” preoperative assessment to identify physiological or pathological frailty should be encouraged since standard tools may be less reliable. The work already done to improve patient selection for lung surgery in the elderly population clearly shows that surgical resection seems the treatment of choice for early stage lung cancer. Further studies are required to improve outcome by reducing postoperative morbidity and mortality. PMID:27942414

  3. Gallbladder cancer: South American experience.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Gerardo F; Gentile, Alberto; Parada, Luis A

    2016-10-01

    Large differences in terms of incidence and mortality due to gallbladder cancer (GBC) have been reported worldwide. Moreover, it seems that GBC has unique characteristics in South America. We surveyed the literature looking for information about the epidemiology, basic and translational research, and clinical trials performed in South America in order to critically analyze the magnitude of this health problem in the region. Compared to other geographic areas, age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR) for GBC in women are very high, particularly in many western areas of South America. Genetic, as well as dietary and environmental factors likely contribute to the pathogenesis of this disease in the area. Compared to other regions the profile of abnormalities of key genes such as KRAS and TP53 in GBC seems to slightly differ in South America, while the clinical behavior appears to be similar with a median overall survival (OS) of 6.5 to 8 months in advanced GBC. In contrast to Europe and USA, prophylactic cholecystectomy is a common practice in western areas of South America. GBC particularly affects women in South America, and represents a significant public health problem. It appears to have peculiarities that pose an urgent need for additional research aimed to discover risk factors, molecular events associated with its development and new treatment options for this lethal disease.

  4. Late events in pediatric patients with Ewing sarcoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumor of bone: the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Children's Hospital experience.

    PubMed

    McLean, T W; Hertel, C; Young, M L; Marcus, K; Schizer, M A; Gebhardt, M; Weinstein, H J; Perez-Atayde, A; Grier, H E

    1999-01-01

    The outcome for 82 pediatric patients with Ewing sarcoma (ES) and primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) of bone is reported; the patients were treated at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI) and Children's Hospital (CH) in Boston, MA (USA) from 1971-1988. The charts of all patients with ES/PNET of bone treated during this period were reviewed for disease status, therapy, sites of relapse, information on second malignancies, and survival status. Eighty-two patients with ES/PNET of bone treated at DFCI/CH were identified. The 10-year event-free survival (EFS) rates were 12% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0, 27%) and 38% (95% CI 26, 51%) for patients with and without metastases, respectively (P = 0.002); the overall survival (OS) rates were 17% (95% CI 1, 33%) and 48% (95% CI 35, 61%) for patients with and without metastases (P = 0.001). Median follow-up for surviving patients is 10.2 years. Primary site in the pelvis also was associated with a poor outcome for patients with no metastatic disease (P = 0.006 OS, P = 0.03 EFS). Thirty-one patients survived in first remission at least 5 years from diagnosis, and of these, five experienced relapse of original disease, and five experienced secondary malignancies. Pediatric patients treated for ES/PNET of bone remain at risk for life-threatening events into the second decade of follow-up. After 5 years, the risk of second malignant neoplasm is at least as high as the risk of late relapse. Prolonged follow-up of patients with ES and PNET of bone is indicated.

  5. 1E10 anti-idiotype vaccine in non-small cell lung cancer: experience in stage IIIb/IV patients.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, Saily; Diaz, Rosa M; de la Torre, Ana; Santiesteban, Eduardo; Aguirre, Frank; Pérez, Kirenia; Rodríguez, José L; Barroso, María del Carmen; Hernández, Ana M; Toledo, Darien; Gabri, Mariano R; Alonso, Daniel F; Viada, Carmen; Gómez, Roberto E; Suárez, Eduardo; Vazquez, Ana M; Perez, Rolando; Macias, Amparo E

    2007-12-01

    Conventional treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has apparently reached a plateau of effectiveness in improving the survival of the patients. For that reason the search for new therapeutic strategies in this type of tumor is justified. 1E10 is an anti-idiotype murine monoclonal antibody (Ab2 MAb) specific to P3 Ab1 MAb, which reacts with NeuGc-containing gangliosides, sulfatides and with antigens expressed in some tumors, including those from the lung. We report the treatment with aluminum hydroxide-precipitated 1E10 MAb of 34 stage IIIb and 37 stage IV NSCLC patients. These patients were treated with the anti-idiotype vaccine, after received standard chemotherapy and radiotherapy, in a compassionate-use basis study. Patients received five bi-weekly injections of 1 mg of 1E10/Alum, other 10 doses at 28-day intervals and later the patients who maintained a good performance status continued to be immunized at this same time interval. No evidence of unexpected or serious adverse effects was reported. The median survival time of the 56 patients who entered the study with partial response or disease stabilization and with a PS 1 after the first line of chemo/radiotherapy, was 11.50 months from starting vaccination. In contrast, the median survival time calculated for patients who started vaccination with progressive disease and/or a PS2 was 6.50 months.

  6. [Laparoscopic distal gastrectomy for gastric cancer: initial experience].

    PubMed

    Berrospi, Francisco; Celis, Juan; Ruíz, Eloy; Payet, Eduardo; Chávez, Iván; Young, Frank

    2008-01-01

    To report the initial experience with the laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy (LADG) with D2 lymphadenectomy for gastric cancer. Between May 2006 and May 2007, 29 consecutive GC patients with gastric cancer underwent LADG with D2 lymphadenectomy. The operation consisted in a laparoscopic time to perform lymphadenectomy and mobilization of the distal stomach, followed by a minilaparotomy for exteriorization of the specimen and construction of a hand sewn anastomosis. Twenty-nine patients underwent LADG with D2 lymphadenectomy for gastric cancer. Mean age was 58.2 years. Mean operative time was 287.4 min. Mean number of lymph nodes resected was 42.6. Twelve patients were early gastric cancer, and seventeen were advanced gastric cancer. Mean proximal and distal resection margin were 5.8 cm and 3.5 cm, respectively. Resection margins were negative in all cases. Mean number of lymph nodes resected was 42.6. Thirty-day morbidity rate was 10.3 %. There were no postoperative deaths.CONCLUSION. The short-term results of our LADG with D2 lymphadenectomy for the treatment of gastric cancer shows that a radical surgery, in terms of resection margins and lymphadenectomy, can be done with low morbidity.

  7. Fever of unknown origin in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Loizidou, A; Aoun, M; Klastersky, J

    2016-05-01

    Fever of unknown origin (FUO) remains a challenging clinical problem, namely in patients with cancer. In cancer patients, FUO may be due to the cancer itself, as it is the case of hematological malignancies; digestive tumors (colon cancer, liver metastases) are significantly associated with FUO and infection can be demonstrated in some cases. Prevention with G-CSF and empirical antimicrobial therapy are essential approaches for the management of FUO in cancer patients. New diagnostic approaches, such as PET imaging, should be further evaluated in cancer patients with FUO. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Malnutrition in Patients With Cancer.

    PubMed

    Gyan, Emmanuel; Raynard, Bruno; Durand, Jean-Philippe; Lacau Saint Guily, Jean; Gouy, Sébastien; Movschin, Marie Lespiau; Khemissa, Faiza; Flori, Nicolas; Oziel-Taieb, Sandrine; Bannier Braticevic, Cécile; Zeanandin, Gilbert; Hebert, Christophe; Savinelli, Francesco; Goldwasser, François; Hébuterne, Xavier

    2017-01-01

    Malnutrition is a critical predictor of toxicity and outcome in patients with cancer and may be perceived differently by patients, relatives, and physicians. To assess the prevalence of malnutrition in oncology departments and to compare it with the perceptions of nutrition status by patients themselves, their closest relatives, and attending physicians. A 1-day multicentric cross-sectional survey on the prevalence of malnutrition was conducted in different oncology departments using patient-, relative-, and physician-specific questionnaires. Malnutrition was defined by a weight loss ≥5% within 1 month or ≥10% within 6 months, a body mass index ≤18.5 kg/m(2) in patients aged <70 years or ≤21 kg/m(2) in patients aged ≥70 years, and/or albuminemia <35 g/L. Questionnaires for assessing medical condition, knowledge of nutrition status, and perceptions of the impact of malnutrition on daily life were distributed to consenting patients, attending physicians, and closest relatives. A total of 2197 patients were included, and 2071 and 976 questionnaires were collected from patients and relatives, respectively. Prevalence of malnutrition was 39%. Physicians overestimated malnutrition (44%), whereas patients and relatives underestimated it (22% and 23%, respectively, P < .001). Conversely, malnutrition-associated symptoms were underestimated by physicians compared with patients and relatives. We found a prevalence of malnutrition of 39%: it was underestimated by patients and relatives and overestimated by physicians.

  9. 103Pd brachytherapy versus radical prostatectomy in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer: a 12-year experience from a single group practice.

    PubMed

    Sharkey, Jerrold; Cantor, Alan; Solc, Zucel; Huff, William; Chovnick, Stanley D; Behar, Raymond J; Perez, Ramon; Otheguy, Juan; Rabinowitz, Richard

    2005-01-01

    In an effort to shed light on the continuing debate over the best treatment options for patients with localized prostate cancer, we present a retrospective review of patients from a single group community urology practice. Data from 1707 patients were reviewed. These patients, with T1 or T2 adenocarcinoma of the prostate, were treated from 1992 to 2004 with either brachytherapy or radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRPP); 81% were aged over 65 years. Patients were classified into risk groups based on initial prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and Gleason score. Time to PSA-indicated recurrence was used as the measure of disease control and cure. Time to PSA-indicated recurrence was used as a measure of efficacy. Brachytherapy with 103Pd exclusively and RRPP were found to provide equivalent control (<0.4 ng/mL for prostatectomy and <3 successive rises in PSA as defined by the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology [ASTRO]) in low-risk groups (89% seeds vs. 94% RRPP). In intermediate (89% seeds vs. 58% RRPP) and high-risk (88% seeds vs. 43% RRPP) groups, brachytherapy patients had better control rates. The addition of external radiation, with or without luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone therapy, improved biochemical control rates in intermediate and high-risk brachytherapy groups. The results failed to show any superiority of prostatectomy over brachytherapy with 103Pd (TheraSeed; Theragenics Corp., Buford, GA) regarding time until relapse as indicated by PSA level increase (>0.4 ng/mL for prostatectomy and >3 successive rises in PSA as defined by ASTRO). We recently reviewed our techniques and improved equipment from 1995 to present and found major gains with both brachytherapy and surgery. Low risk brachytherapy resulted in 99% freedom from PSA failure while surgery showed results of 97%. Brachytherapy and prostatectomy should be offered without bias to all men with stage T1 and T2 organ-confined prostate cancer.

  10. Treatment of stomach cancer, a national experience.

    PubMed

    Valen, B; Viste, A; Haugstvedt, T; Eide, G E; Søreide, O

    1988-07-01

    A total of 1165 patients with stomach cancer were entered into a prospective, observational national study. They represented 54 per cent of all stomach cancer patients reported to the Cancer Registry in Norway during the study period, and data are analysed for three hospital levels (local, county and university hospitals). The median age was 71 years (range 18-96 years). The median pretreatment delay was 113 days, and 46 per cent of patients had a performance status (Karnofsky index) of less than or equal to 80. The diagnosis was confirmed by pre-operative histology in 88 per cent of cases. In all, 88 per cent of patients underwent surgery, the resectability rate was 67 per cent and 50 per cent had a potential curative operation. Total gastrectomy was most commonly performed. Lymph node dissection was performed in 14 per cent of those undergoing a curative resection. The postoperative complication rate was 27 per cent but varied with the type of operation, being highest in proximal resection (55 per cent) and lowest after distal resection (19 per cent). A total of 7 per cent of the patients died postoperatively. Most patients had advanced disease at the time of treatment and only 6 per cent had stage I tumours. There were significant differences in patient and treatment characteristics between the three hospital levels. In conclusion, patient selection bias which will influence results does occur. A fairly aggressive attitude towards local disease was found, but the low proportion of patients undergoing lymph node dissection not only leads to questions regarding the efficacy of this treatment policy, but also casts doubt on the validity of staging of stomach cancer. Morbidity and mortality rates are still high. The consequences of the differences revealed between hospital groups are difficult to interpret. Proponents of both regionalization of treatment and small hospital care may find arguments for their case in the data.

  11. Beyond Intuition: Patient Fever Symptom Experience

    PubMed Central

    Ames, Nancy J.; Peng, Claudia; Powers, John H.; Leidy, Nancy Kline; Miller-Davis, Claiborne; Rosenberg, Alice; VanRaden, Mark; Wallen, Gwenyth R.

    2013-01-01

    Context Fever is an important sign of inflammation recognized by health care practitioners and family caregivers. However, few empirical data obtained directly from patients exist to support many of the long-standing assumptions about the symptoms of fever. Many of the literature-cited symptoms, including chills, diaphoresis, and malaise, have limited scientific bases, yet they often represent a major justification for antipyretic administration. Objectives To describe the patient experience of fever symptoms for the preliminary development of a fever assessment questionnaire. Methods Qualitative interviews were conducted with 28 inpatients, the majority (86%) with cancer diagnoses, who had a recorded temperature of ≥38°C within approximately 12 hours before the interview. A semi-structured interview guide was used to elicit patient fever experiences. Thematic analyses were conducted by three independent research team members, and the data were verified through two rounds of consensus building. Results Eleven themes emerged. The participants reported experiences of feeling cold, weakness, warmth, sweating, nonspecific bodily sensations, gastrointestinal symptoms, headaches, emotional changes, achiness, respiratory symptoms, and vivid dreams/hallucinations. Conclusion Our data not only confirm long-standing symptoms of