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Sample records for cancer patients impact

  1. Psychosocial impact of cancer on adult patients.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Yasmin Abdul; Ghafoor, Zahra Abdul; Masood, Nehal; Mehmood, Talha; Awan, Safia; Ansar, Tooba; Mirza, Murtaza; Rashid, Uzma Abdul

    2012-09-01

    To explore the effects of cancer on psychosocial aspects of Pakistani patients and their families, assessing the need for interventions to improve their quality of life. A prospective, Cross-sectional study was performed on 200 patients visiting the oncology outpatient facility of AKUH from December 2010 to May 2011 through an interview. Responses were recorded on pre-designed questionnaires including FACT-G QOL (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General Quality Of Life) component. Out of the 200 patients 52 (26%) were males and 148 (74%) were females. Mean age was 51.8 +/- 14.2 years. Breast cancer accounted for the commonest cancer in females 116 (58%) and lung in males 30 (15%), 100 (50%) patients were currently undergoing chemotherapy. In all 148 (74%) patients were well aware of their diagnosis and were able to cope better and 142 (71%) were well supported by families (majority being financially stable). Major financial impact was found in 42 (21%) cases. Religious/spiritual help was sought by 138 (69%) patients predominantly females- 113 (76%) and 22 (11%) patients consulted a psychiatrist; 20 (94%) subjects of this group felt this intervention was helpful. Responses regarding effect on the patient's sexual life were poor and 126 (63%) denied answering the question. In our study one third of cancer patients were found to be depressed mainly affecting those who were receiving multimodality treatment or facing financial issues. Religious help was the main coping strategy for them.

  2. The impact of patient comorbidity on cancer stage at diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Gurney, Jason; Sarfati, Diana; Stanley, James

    2015-01-01

    Background: It is known that cancer stage is affected by comorbidity, but the evidence regarding the magnitude and even direction of this effect is highly inconsistent and poorly understood. The aims of this study were to establish the impact of comorbidity on cancer stage at diagnosis, using both specific individual comorbid conditions and a global measure of comorbidity; and to assess whether this impact varied by cancer site, level of comorbidity burden and individual comorbidity type. Methods: We examined comorbidity among 14 096 patients with breast, colon, rectal, liver, stomach, ovarian, uterine, bladder or kidney cancer. Patients were identified from cancer registry data, and then linked to hospitalisation data to determine the presence of comorbidity in the 5 years preceding cancer diagnosis. Individual comorbid conditions were identified using ICD-10 codes, and overall burden of comorbidity attributed using a cancer-specific measure of comorbidity (C3 Index). Results: We observed that the presence of patient comorbidity (a) increases the odds of being diagnosed with distant metastases, (b) does not lead to earlier diagnosis and (c) increases the likelihood of a patient receiving no stage of disease at diagnosis. Conclusions: Patient comorbidity has a substantial impact on cancer stage at diagnosis; however, this impact varies considerably by cancer type, individual comorbid condition and overall comorbidity burden. PMID:26461060

  3. Recurrence season impacts the survival of epithelial ovarian cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Hui; Man, Ya-Nan; Wu, Xiong-Zhi

    2014-01-01

    Several studies indicated that the diagnosis season affects the prognosis of some cancers, such as examples in the prostate, colon and breast This retrospective study aimed to investigate whether the diagnosis and recurrent season impacts the prognosis of epithelial ovarian cancer patients. From January 2005 to August 2010, 161 epithelial ovarian cancer patients were analyzed and followed up until August 2013. Kaplan- Meier survival curves and the log-rank test were used to make the survival analysis. Multivariate analysis was conducted to identify independent prognostic factors. The prognostic factors of overall survival in epithelial ovarian cancer patients included age, clinical stage, pathological type, histological grade, residual disease after primary surgery, recurrent season and adjuvant chemotherapy cycles. Moreover, clinical stage, histological grade, residual disease after primary surgery, recurrent season and adjuvant chemotherapy cycles also impacted the progression-free survival of epithelial ovarian cancer patients. The diagnosis season did not have a significantly relationship with the survival of operable epithelial ovarian cancer patients. Median overall survival of patients with recurrent month from April to November was 47 months, which was longer (P < 0.001) than that of patients with recurrence month from December to March (19 months). Median progression-free survival of patients with recurrence month from April to November and December to March was 20 and 8 months, respectively (P < 0.001). The recurrence season impacts the survival of epithelial ovarian cancer patients. However, the diagnosed season does not appear to exert a significant influence.

  4. Impact of health care reform on the cancer patient: a view from cancer executives.

    PubMed

    Ferris, Linda W; Farber, Matthew; Guidi, Teri Ursin; Laffey, William J

    2010-01-01

    Cancer leaders assess the impact on the cancer patient of the historic passage of Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (HR 3590) (PPACA). The Association of Cancer Executives, a national organization for leadership development of oncology executives and improvements in patient care delivery, and the Association of Community Cancer Centers, a leading education and advocacy organization for the cancer team, weigh in on the impact of PPACA. Oncology leaders assess the impact of PPACA on cancer patients and families, cancer programs in the United States, and provider relations. The provisions of PPACA most impacting cancer patients are reviewed, including reimbursement changes, expansion of prevention and screening services, the development of accountable care organizations, physician relations, and the implementation of integrated electronic health records. Cancer executives prepare their programs for PPACA by changing the care delivery model to ensure the economic survival of private practices and hospital-based programs.

  5. Impact of Diabetes on Oncologic Outcome of Colorectal Cancer Patients: Colon vs. Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Min Geun; Lee, Ji-Won; Chu, Sang Hui; Park, Ji-Hye; Lee, Mi Kyung; Sato, Kaori; Ligibel, Jennifer A.; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A.; Kim, Nam Kyu

    2013-01-01

    Background To evaluate the impact of diabetes on outcomes in colorectal cancer patients and to examine whether this association varies by the location of tumor (colon vs. rectum). Patients and methods This study includes 4,131 stage I-III colorectal cancer patients, treated between 1995 and 2007 (12.5% diabetic, 53% colon, 47% rectal) in South Korea. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to determine the prognostic influence of DM on survival endpoints. Results Colorectal cancer patients with DM had significantly worse disease-free survival (DFS) [hazard ratio (HR) 1.17, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.00–1.37] compared with patients without DM. When considering colon and rectal cancer independently, DM was significantly associated with worse overall survival (OS) (HR: 1.46, 95% CI: 1.11–1.92), DFS (HR: 1.45, 95% CI: 1.15–1.84) and recurrence-free survival (RFS) (HR: 1.32, 95% CI: 0.98–1.76) in colon cancer patients. No association for OS, DFS or RFS was observed in rectal cancer patients. There was significant interaction of location of tumor (colon vs. rectal cancer) with DM on OS (P = 0.009) and DFS (P = 0.007). Conclusions This study suggests that DM negatively impacts survival outcomes of patients with colon cancer but not rectal cancer. PMID:23405123

  6. Prognostic impact of microscopic positive margin in gastric cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Tomoyuki; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Komatsu, Shuhei; Inoue, Koji; Shiozaki, Atsushi; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Okamoto, Kazuma; Sakakura, Chohei; Otsuji, Eigo

    2011-11-01

    Complete resection with negative surgical margins has been a long-held surgical philosophy based on the concept that even minimal remaining cancer cells will develop recurrences. This study investigated the clinical significance of microscopic positive margin on the outcome of patients with gastric cancers. The relationships between the margin status and other clinicopathologic factors were examined in gastric cancer patients undergoing gastrectomy, and then the prognostic impact of the margin status was evaluated by univariate and multivariate analysis. The microscopic positive margin was identified in 23 patients (2.8%) by standard H&E staining. The positive margin showed a strong correlation significantly with tumor size (P < 0.05). Microscopic positive margin was found to be a significant prognostic factor on univariate analysis (5-year survival rate 51.9% vs. 82.2%, P < 0.0001), as well as multivariate analysis (risk ratio 3.24, 95% CI: 1.24-6.50, P < 0.01). Detailed analysis of margin status demonstrated that patients with positive margin in a deep site and/or in multiple layers showed poor survival. Microscopic positive margin was found to be an independent prognostic factor in gastric cancer patients. The status of the surgical margin might provide useful information for selecting additional treatments and performing intensive follow-up. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. The impact of cancer on family relationships among Chinese patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joyce; Bell, Kirsten

    2011-07-01

    This study examines the impact of cancer on family relationships among members of a Chinese cancer support group. A qualitative research design was used, including participant observation of 96 participants at group meetings over an 8-month period and in-depth interviews with seven group members. Findings indicated that family members were integral to the support group, constituting almost 40% of the participants. Patients in the group expressed concerns about family, with family members identified as having "equal suffering" when caring for patients. Notably, among both patients and family members, there was a strong emphasis on the need to conceal emotion, coupled with a focus on instrumental support in caregiving. Furthermore, patients' anxiety about "burdening" their family appeared to inflate their own experience of distress, as patients and their family carers both sought to maintain a positive front. The findings highlight the need for practitioners to focus on the entire family when designing interventions to help patients cope with cancer. More important, interventions need to be culturally sensitive that will empower patients and family members in living with the illness.

  8. Impact of sarcopenia in the management of urological cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Hiroshi; Koga, Fumitaka

    2017-05-01

    Sarcopenia, the degenerative and systemic loss of skeletal muscle mass, develops as a consequence of the progression of cancer cachexia. Recent studies suggest that sarcopenia may be used as a biomarker in the management of patients with several cancers. Areas covered: In this article, the authors review 1) the methods to simply and optimally evaluate and define sarcopenia using computed tomography images in daily clinical practice and 2) the impact of sarcopenia in the management of urological cancers, specifically focusing on the usefulness in predicting treatment-related complications and prognosis. The authors also discuss the prognostic importance of changes in skeletal muscle mass in the course of treatment and the potential roles of nutritional support and exercise to prevent progression of sarcopenia. Expert commentary: Sarcopenia is associated with treatment-related complications and unfavorable prognosis in urological cancer patients. Nutritional support and exercise might be helpful in improving sarcopenia. The impact of these interventions on clinical outcomes would be elucidated by ongoing or future clinical studies.

  9. Cancer Impact, Complementary/Alternative Medicine Beliefs, and Quality of Life in Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Ya-Hui; Tsay, Shiow-Luan; Chang, Chun-Chi; Liao, Yen-Chi; Tung, Heng-Hsin

    2017-09-06

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships among cancer impact, belief in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), CAM use, and quality of life (QOL). The study used a cross-sectional, descriptive correlational design with convenience sampling. A total of 122 cancer patients participated. Data were collected at a medical center in Chunghua, Taiwan. The questionnaires included the Chinese version of the Cancer Problem in Living Scale (CPILS), Complementary and Alternative Medicine Belief Inventory (CAMBI), Complementary and Alternative Medicine scale, and Chinese versions of QOL scales, including the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General (FACT-G). The mean age was 56.5 years, and most participants were male (n = 69, 56.6%), had completed high school or above (n = 56, 45.9%), and were married (n = 109, 89.3%). The most common type of cancer was oral (n = 17, 13.9%), followed by esophageal (n = 15, 12.3%) and colorectal (n = 13, 10.7%). Cancer patients, on average, use one or two types of CAM. The impact of cancer is significantly related to age (F = 7.12, p < 0.05), and income is related to QOL (F = 3.61, p < 0.05). Pearson correlations showed that the use of CAM was positively associated with belief in CAM (CAMBI) (r = 0.26, p = 0.01), and the impact of cancer was highly negatively associated with QOL (r = -0.71, p = 0.001). The predictors of QOL were the impact of cancer and use of CAM, and the impact of cancer accounted for 51% of the variance in QOL. This study supports research on the impact of cancer, belief in CAM, and use of CAM as related to QOL in cancer patients. These results can be used to provide options to clinicians and cancer patients.

  10. Acute bacterial infection negatively impacts cancer specific survival of colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Attiê, Regina; Chinen, Ludmilla Thomé Domingos; Yoshioka, Eliane Muta; Silva, Michele Cristina F; de Lima, Vladmir Cláudio Cordeiro

    2014-10-14

    To assess the impact of bacterial infections on cancer-specific survival in patients with colorectal cancer. This was a retrospective cohort study of colorectal cancer patients treated at the A.C. Camargo Cancer Center between January 2006 and April 2010. The presence of bacterial infection during cancer treatment, or up to one year after, was confirmed by laboratory tests or by the physician. Infections of the urinary, respiratory or digestive tracts, bloodstream, skin or surgical site were defined by testing within a single laboratory. Criteria for exclusion from the study were: chronically immunosuppressed patients; transplant patients (due to chronic immunosuppression); human immunodeficiency virus carriers; chronic use of corticosteroids or other immunosuppressive drugs; patients with autoimmune disease or primary immunodeficiency; known viral or parasitic infections. Patients with infections that did not require hospitalization were not included in the study because of the difficulty of collecting and tracking data related to infectious processes. In addition, patients hospitalized for pulmonary thromboembolism, stroke, acute myocardial infarction, uncontrolled diabetes, malignant hypercalcemia or other serious non-infectious complications not directly related to infection were also excluded. Survival curves were plotted using the Kaplan-Meier method, and log-rank tests (univariate analysis) and a Cox test assuming a proportional hazards model (multivariate analysis) were performed to examine associations between clinical history and characteristics of infection with cancer-specific survival. One-hundred and six patients with colorectal cancer were divided into two groups based on the presence or absence of bacterial infection. Patient ages ranged from 23 to 91 years, with a median of 55 years. The majority of patients were male (57/106, 53.77%) with stage III colorectal cancer (45/106, 44.11%). A total of 86 bacteriologic events were recorded. Results

  11. Clinical impact of extensive molecular profiling in advanced cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Cousin, Sophie; Grellety, Thomas; Toulmonde, Maud; Auzanneau, Céline; Khalifa, Emmanuel; Laizet, Yec'han; Tran, Kevin; Le Moulec, Sylvestre; Floquet, Anne; Garbay, Delphine; Robert, Jacques; Hostein, Isabelle; Soubeyran, Isabelle; Italiano, Antoine

    2017-02-08

    Previous precision medicine studies have investigated conventional molecular techniques and/or limited sets of gene alterations. The aim of this study was to describe the impact of the next-generation sequencing of the largest panel of genes used to date in tumour tissue and blood in the context of institutional molecular screening programmes. DNA analysis was performed by next-generation sequencing using a panel of 426 cancer-related genes and by comparative genomic hybridization from formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded archived tumour samples when available or from fresh tumour samples. Five hundred sixty-eight patients were enrolled. The median number of prior lines of treatment was 2 (range 0-9). The most common primary tumour types were lung (16.9%), colorectal (14.4%), breast (10.6%), ovarian (10.2%) and sarcoma (10.2%). The median patient age was 63 years (range 19-88). A total of 292 patients (51.4%) presented with at least one actionable genetic alteration. The 20 genes most frequently altered were TP53, CDKN2A, KRAS, PTEN, PI3KCA, RB1, APC, ERBB2, MYC, EGFR, CDKN2B, ARID1A, SMAD4, FGFR1, MDM2, BRAF, ATM, CCNE1, FGFR3 and FRS2. One hundred fifty-nine patients (28%) were included in early phase trials. The treatment was matched with a tumour profile in 86 cases (15%). The two main reasons for non-inclusion were non-progressive disease (31.5%) and general status deterioration (25%). Twenty-eight percent of patients presented with a growth modulation index (time to progression under the early phase trial treatment/time to progression of the previous line of treatment) >1.3.Extensive molecular profiling using high-throughput techniques allows for the identification of actionable mutations in the majority of cases and is associated with substantial clinical benefit in up to one in four patients.

  12. Perceptions of lung cancer and potential impacts on funding and patient care: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Tran, Kim; Delicaet, Kendra; Tang, Theresa; Ashley, Leslie Beard; Morra, Dante; Abrams, Howard

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to explore health-care professionals', health administrators', and not-for-profit cancer organization representatives' perceptions of lung cancer-related stigma and nihilism and the perceived impacts on funding and patient care. This is a qualitative descriptive study using semi-structured interviews, which was conducted in Ontario, Canada. Seventy-four individuals from medical oncology, radiation oncology, thoracic surgery, respirology, pathology, radiology, primary care, palliative care, nursing, pharmacy, social work, genetics, health administration, and not-for-profit cancer organizations participated in this study. Participants described lung cancer-related stigma and nihilism and its negative impact on patients' psychological health, lung cancer funding, and patient care. The feeling of guilt and shame experienced by lung cancer patients as a result of the stigma associated with the disease was described. In terms of lung cancer funding, stigma was described as a reason lung cancer receives significantly less research funding compared to other cancers. In terms of patient care, lung cancer-related nihilism was credited with negatively impacting physician referral patterns with the belief that lung cancer patients were less likely to receive referrals for medical treatment. Health-care professionals, health administrators, and not-for-profit cancer organization representatives described lung cancer-related stigma and nihilism with far-reaching consequences. Further work is needed to increase education and awareness about lung cancer to reduce the stigma and nihilism associated with the disease.

  13. History of Depression in Lung Cancer Patients: Impact of Delay.

    PubMed

    Iachina, M; Brønserud, M M; Jakobsen, E; Trosko, O; Green, A

    2017-09-01

    To examine the influence of a history of depression in the process of diagnostic evaluation and the choice of treatment in lung cancer. The analysis was based on all patients with non-small cell lung cancer who were registered in 2008-2014; in total, 27 234 patients. To estimate the effect of depression on the diagnostic process and the choice of treatment in lung cancer we fitted a logistic regression model and a Cox regression model adjusting for age, gender, resection and stage. Depression in a patient's anamnesis had no significant effect on the delay in diagnostic evaluation (hazard ratio = 0.99 with 95% confidence interval 0.90; 1.09). Patients with a history of periodic depression had a 33% lower treatment rate (odds ratio = 0.66 with 95% confidence interval 0.51; 0.85) than patients without a history of depression. Our study shows that patients with a history of periodic depression need special attention when diagnosed with lung cancer. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Pathophysiologic Impact of Doxorubicin and Radiation Therapy on the Heart of Patients Treated for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-07-01

    Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA 3 Key Words: Breast neoplasm , Cardiac, Radiation ŕ Abstract: Purpose: To...Pathophysiologic Impact of Doxorubicin and Radiation Therapy on the Heart of Patients Treated for Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Patricia H. Hardenbergh...Therapy on the Heart of DAMD17-98-1-8071 Patients Treated for Breast Cancer (97Breast) 6. AUTHOR(S) Patricia H. Hardenberg, M.D. 7. PERFORMING

  15. Anticipating the Impact of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act for Patients with Urological Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ellimoottil, Chandy; Miller, David C.

    2014-01-01

    The Affordable Care Act seeks to overhaul the US healthcare system by providing insurance for more Americans, improving the quality of healthcare delivery, and reducing healthcare expenditures. While the law’s intent is clear, its implementation and effect on patient care remains largely undefined. Herein, we discuss major components of the ACA, including the proposed insurance expansion, payment and delivery system reforms (e.g. bundled payments and Accountable Care Organizations) and other reforms relevant to the field of urologic oncology. We also discuss how these proposed reforms may impact patients with urological cancers. PMID:24588021

  16. Impacts of Exercise on Prognostic Biomarkers in Lung Cancer Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-18

    Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Healthy, no Evidence of Disease; Limited Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  17. Body image in head and neck cancer patients treated with radiotherapy: the impact of surgical procedures.

    PubMed

    Hung, Tsung-Min; Lin, Ching-Rong; Chi, Yu-Chun; Lin, Chien-Yu; Chen, Eric Yen-Chao; Kang, Chung-Jan; Huang, Shiang-Fu; Juang, Yeong-Yuh; Huang, Chun-Yu; Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh

    2017-08-23

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the impact of surgical procedures on the body image of head and neck cancer patients treated with radiotherapy and with or without radical surgery. A cross-sectional survey of 150 patients with head and neck cancer was conducted. Sixty patients had nasopharyngeal cancer treated with definitive radiotherapy without surgery, and 90 patients had oral cavity cancer treated with radical surgery plus adjuvant radiotherapy. All participants completed a 10-item Body Image Scale (BIS) questionnaire to assess body image dissatisfaction. Among all patients, the socio-demographic and clinical variables were age, gender, partnership, education, employment, and radical surgery. In surgically-treated patients, the clinical variables were facial skin sacrificed, mouth angle sacrificed, glossectomy, maxillectomy, and mandibulectomy. ANOVAs, t-tests, and multiple regressions were used to evaluate the relationships between these variables and BIS results. In all patients, radical surgery was the strongest independent predictor of BIS scores. Surgically-treated patients had significantly worse BIS scores than the patients without surgery. In surgically-treated patients, facial skin sacrificed, mouth angle sacrificed, maxillectomy, and mandibulectomy were significantly associated with body image. According to multivariable analyses, inferior maxillectomy and segmental mandibulectomy were independent prognosticators of a poor BIS score in surgically-treated patients. Radical surgery for head and neck cancer patients has a significant impact on their body image, especially for those undergoing facial bone destructive surgery.

  18. Symptoms of patients with incurable head and neck cancer: prevalence and impact on daily functioning.

    PubMed

    Lokker, Martine E; Offerman, Marinella P J; van der Velden, Lilly-Ann; de Boer, Maarten F; Pruyn, Jean F A; Teunissen, Saskia C C M

    2013-06-01

    There is lack of research on symptoms in patients with head and neck cancer in the palliative phase. The aim of this study was to explore symptom prevalence and the impact of these symptoms on daily functioning in patients with incurable head and neck cancer. Also, discrepancies between patients and family caregivers are described. Questionnaires were used to collect data about symptom prevalence (n = 124) and symptom impact (n = 24). We discovered that the symptoms with a high prevalence were fatigue, pain, weakness, trouble with short walks outside, and dysphagia. The symptoms with the greatest impact on daily functioning were dyspnea, voice changes, trouble with short walks outside, anger, and weakness. Patients with incurable head and neck cancer experience a great number of different symptoms. Focus on these symptoms by health care professionals could further optimize symptom management. In future research, we recommend further validation of the used questionnaires. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Clinical and economic impact of malnutrition per se on the postoperative course of colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Melchior, Jean-Claude; Jean-Claude, Melchior; Préaud, Emmanuelle; Emmanuelle, Préaud; Carles, Juliette; Juliette, Heurtebis; Brami, Michèle; Michèle, Brami; Duru, Gérard; Gérard, Duru; Fontaine, Eric; Eric, Fontaine; Hébuterne, Xavier; Xavier, Hébuterne; Lukacs, Bertrand; Bertrand, Lukacs; Zazzo, Jean-Fabien; Jean-Fabien, Zazzo; Panis, Yves; Yves, Panis; Nitenberg, Gérard; Gérard, Nitenberg

    2012-12-01

    To assess the medico-economic impact of malnutrition in patients who underwent surgery for colorectal cancer. We performed post-hoc analyses of data from the Alves et al. prospective study. Using standard criteria of malnutrition, 2 groups were created a posteriori: Well-nourished (WN) and Mal-nourished (MN) patients. The 2 groups were statistically adjusted for age, cancer status, and scheduled surgery. Individual costs were valued using the French National Cost Study. Postoperative morbidity, mortality, hospital length-of-stay (LOS), and discharge setting were compared. We defined 3 scenarios, the most accurate estimate and its upper and lower limits, to assess the economic impact of malnutrition. 453 patients were included in the analyses. Complication and mortality rates were not significantly different between the 2 groups. MN patients had a mean LOS 3.41 days significantly longer than WN patients (p = 0.017). In MN patients, the cost of hospital stay was increased by around 3360 €, creating an annual impact of 10,159,436 € for French non-profit hospitals. Malnutrition in colorectal cancer surgical patients is associated with an increased LOS resulting in significant budget impact. Further studies are needed to investigate this impact and the related cost-benefit of perioperative specialized nutritional support and implementation of the ERAS protocol in this homogeneous category of patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  20. Quality of life and disease understanding: impact of attending a patient-centered cancer symposium.

    PubMed

    Padrnos, Leslie; Dueck, Amylou C; Scherber, Robyn; Glassley, Pamela; Stigge, Rachel; Northfelt, Donald; Mikhael, Joseph; Aguirre, Annette; Bennett, Robert M; Mesa, Ruben A

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the impact of a patient-centered symposium as an educational intervention on a broad population of cancer patients. We developed a comprehensive patient symposium. Through voluntary questionnaires, we studied the impact of this cancer symposium on quality of life, cancer-specific knowledge, and symptom management among cancer patients. Symposium attendees were provided surveys prior to and 3 months following the educational intervention. Surveys included (1) EORTC-QLQ-C30; (2) disease understanding tool developed for this conference; (3) validated disease-specific questionnaires. Changes over time were assessed using McNemar's tests and paired t-tests for categorical and continuous variables, respectively. A total of 158 attendees completed the pre-convention survey. Most respondents reported at least "quite a bit" of understanding regarding treatment options, screening modalities, symptomatology, and cancer-related side effects. Attendees endorsed the least understanding of disease-related stress, risk factors, fatigue management, and legal issues related to disease/treatment. At 3 months, there was improvement in understanding (12 of 14 areas of self-reported knowledge especially regarding nutrition, and stress/fatigue management). However, no significant change was seen in QLQ-C30 functioning, fatigue, pain, or insomnia. A patient symposium, as an educational intervention improves a solid knowledge base amongst attendees regarding their disease, increases knowledge in symptom management, but may be insufficient to impact QoL as a single intervention.

  1. Prognostic impact of EGFR mutation in non-small-cell lung cancer patients with family history of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Soo; Cho, Min Seong; Nam, Jong Hyeon; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Choi, Kyeng-Won; Ryu, Jeong-Seon

    2017-01-01

    A family history can be a valuable tool in the era of precision medicine. Although a few studies have described an association of family history of lung cancer with EGFR activating mutation, their impact on survival of lung cancer patients is unclear. The study included consecutive 829 non-small-cell lung cancer patients who received analysis of EGFR mutation in a prospective lung cancer cohort. Family history of lung cancer was obtained by face-to-face interviews at the time of diagnosis. An association of EGFR activating mutation with a family history of lung cancer in first-degree relatives was evaluated with multivariate logistic regression analysis, and its association with survival was estimated with Cox's proportional hazards model. Seventy five (9.0%) patients had family history of lung cancer. The EGFR mutation was commonly observed in patients with positive family history compared to those with no family history (46.7% v 31.3%, χ2 p = 0.007). The family history was significantly associated with the EGFR mutation (aOR and 95% CI: 2.01 and 1.18-3.60, p = 0.011). Patients with the positive family history survived longer compared to those without (MST, 17.9 v 13.0 months, log-rank p = 0.037). The presence of the EGFR mutation was associated with better survival in patients without the family history (aHR and 95% CI: 0.72 and 0.57-0.90, p = 0.005). However, this prognostic impact was not observed in patients with the positive family history (aHR and 95% CI: 1.01 and 0.50-2.36, p = 0.832). In comparison to patients without the family history, EGFR activating mutation was common, and it did not affect prognosis in patients with positive family history.

  2. Impact of Diabetes Status and Medication on Presentation, Treatment, and Outcome of Stage II Colon Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Susie; Wong, Hui-Li; Tie, Jeanne; Desai, Jayesh; Field, Kathryn; Kosmider, Suzanne; Fourlanos, Spiros; Jones, Ian; Skinner, Iain; Gibbs, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a risk factor for colorectal cancer and several reports suggest worse cancer-specific outcomes in diabetes patients. Recent studies in multiple tumour types indicate metformin may positively impact on cancer-specific and overall survival. A population-based series of stage II colorectal cancer patients treated and followed from 2000 to 2013 were analysed for baseline characteristics, treatment, and outcomes. 1116 patients with stage II colon cancer were identified, 55.5% were male and median age was 70.9 years (range 20.5–101.2). The diabetes patients (21.6%, n = 241) were older than nondiabetes patients (median 74.0 versus 69.6, p = 0.0001). There was no impact of diabetes on cancer presentation or pathology. Diabetes patients were less likely to receive adjuvant treatment (13.7 versus 24.8%, p = 0.002) but were equally likely to complete treatment (69.7 versus 67.7%, p = 1.00). Diabetes did not significantly impact cancer recurrence (HR = 1.07, 95% CI 0.71–1.63) or overall survival (HR = 1.23, 95% CI 0.88–1.72), adjusted for age. Diabetes medication did not impact cancer recurrence or survival. Cancer presentation and outcomes in diabetes patients are comparable to those of nondiabetes patients in those with stage II colon cancer. The effect of metformin merits further evaluation in patients with colon cancer. PMID:26074965

  3. History of oral contraceptive use in breast cancer patients: impact on prognosis and endocrine treatment response.

    PubMed

    Huzell, Louise; Persson, Mia; Simonsson, Maria; Markkula, Andrea; Ingvar, Christian; Rose, Carsten; Jernström, Helena

    2015-01-01

    The purpose was to study oral contraceptive (OC) use in relation to breast cancer events and endocrine treatment response in a prospective population-based cohort, because it is unclear whether history of OC use impacts on prognosis in breast cancer patients. Between 2002 and 2011, 994 primary breast cancer patients without preoperative treatment were enrolled in Lund, Sweden and followed until December 2012. History of OC use was obtained from preoperative questionnaires. Tumor characteristics, clinical data, and date of death were obtained from pathology reports, patient charts, and population registries. Among the 948 patients with invasive cancer and no metastasis detected on the post-operative screen, 74 % had ever used OCs. Patients were followed for up to nine years (median follow-up 3 years), and 100 breast cancer events were recorded. Ever OC use was not associated with prognosis, irrespective of duration. However, any OC use before age 20 was associated with a threefold increased risk for breast cancer events in patients <50 years but not in patients ≥50 years (P interaction = 0.009). In patients ≥50 years with estrogen receptor positive tumors, previous OC use at any age was associated with a significantly decreased risk of breast cancer events among patients who received aromatase inhibitors compared to patients who never used OCs (adjusted HR 0.37: 95 % CI 0.15-0.87). OC use was not associated with tamoxifen-response. If confirmed, history of OC use may yield valuable prognostic and treatment predictive information in addition to currently used criteria.

  4. Impact of Surgery Type on Quality of Life in Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Akça, Mustafa; Ata, Alper; Nayır, Erdinç; Erdoğdu, Süleyman; Arıcan, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Objective Breast cancer can lead to alterations in quality of life of the patients. The aim of this study is to evaluate the changes in quality of life of the female patients who had undergone surgical treatment for breast cancer. Materials and Methods A total of 250 female patients (breast-preserving surgery (BPS), n=27, 11%; modified radical mastectomy (MRM), n=194, 77%, and simple mastectomy (SM), n=29; 11%) aged between 28–55 years (47.4±6.4 yrs) were included in the study. Patient information, demographic characteristics, income, and treatment modalities applied were recorded. Validated Turkish versions of EORTC QLQ-C30, and EORTC–BR23 questionnaires were used for all patients. Results Breast-preserving surgery has a more favorable impact on general well-being, physical role, cognitive, psychological, and social functions, and symptom scale scores. When the identical parameters were taken into consideration, relatively favorable outcomes of BPS on the patients were observed relative to mastectomized patients. Besides, though not statistically significant, BPS has more patient-friendly effects on sexual function and sexual satisfaction in comparison with mastectomy. Patients with advanced stage disease and elder patients had more unfavorable health related quality of life (HRQoL) scores than younger patients, and those in their early stages of breast cancer. Conclusion Quality of life of BPS patients is less adversely affected relative to mastectomized patients. In the decision-making process, quality of life should be taken into consideration. PMID:28331675

  5. Prognostic Impact of Immunonutritional Status Changes During Preoperative Chemoradiation in Patients With Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong Joon; Kim, Woo Ram; Han, Jeonghee; Han, Yoon Dae; Cho, Min Soo; Hur, Hyuk; Lee, Kang Young; Kim, Nam Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Previous studies have demonstrated the prognostic impact of the prognostic nutritional index (PNI), a proposed indicator of immunonutritional statuses of surgical patients, on patients with various gastrointestinal cancers. Although the prognostic impact of the PNI on patients with colorectal cancer has been well established, its value has not been studied in patients treated with preoperative chemoradiation (pCRT). This study aimed to evaluate the prognostic impact of PNI on patients receiving pCRT for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Methods Patients with LARC who underwent curative pCRT followed by surgical resection were enrolled. The PNI was measured in all patients before and after pCRT, and the difference in values was calculated as the PNI difference (dPNI). Patients were classified according to dPNI (<5, 5–10, and >10). Clinicopathologic parameters and long-term oncologic outcomes were assessed according to dPNI classification. Results No significant intergroup differences were observed in clinicopathologic parameters such as age, histologic grade, tumor location, tumor-node-metastasis stage, and postoperative complications. Approximately 53% of the patients had a mild dPNI (<5); only 15% had a high dPNI (>10). Univariate and multivariate analyses identified the dPNI as an independent prognostic factor for disease-free status (P < 0.01; hazard ratio [HR], 2.792; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.577–4.942) and for cancer-specific survival (P = 0.012; HR, 2.469; 95%CI, 1.225–4.978). Conclusion The dPNI is predictive of long-term outcomes in pCRT-treated patients with LARC. Further prospective studies should investigate whether immune-nutritional status correction during pCRT would improve oncologic outcomes. PMID:28119863

  6. Impact of Diabetes and Hyperglycemia on Survival in Advanced Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal-Garza, Cynthia; Shaw-Dulin, Robin; Lara-Medina, Fernando; Bacon, Ludwing; Rivera, Daniel; Urzua, Lorena; Aguila, Christian; Ramirez-Morales, Rebeca; Santamaria, Julieta; Bargallo, Enrique; Mohar, Alejandro; Herrera, Luis A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. We examined the impact of diabetes and hyperglycemia on cancer-specific survival of patients with metastatic or recurrent breast cancer (BC). Methods. We performed a retrospective analysis of 265 patients with advanced BC receiving palliative chemotherapy. BC-specific mortality was compared for diabetic and nondiabetic patients as well as for patients that presented hyperglycemia during treatment. Results. No difference was observed between the diabetic and nondiabetic patients in terms of overall survival (OS). A difference in OS was observed between nondiabetic patients and diabetic patients who had hyperglycemia. The OS was greater in diabetic patients with proper metabolic control than diabetic patients with hyperglycemia. The risk of death was higher in patients with mean glucose levels >130 mg/dL during treatment. Several factors were associated with poor OS: tumor stage, hormone-receptor-negative tumors, HER2 negative disease, multiple metastatic sites, presence of visceral metastases, and mean glucose >130 mg/dL. Conclusion. Elevated glucose levels are associated with a poor outcome in diabetic and nondiabetic patients in contrast to patients with normoglycemic levels, conferring an elevated risk of death. According to these results, clinicians should monitor glucose levels during treatment for advanced breast cancer disease and take action to maintain normal glucose levels. PMID:22919369

  7. Psychological impact of revealing a diagnosis of lung cancer to patients in China

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Huimin

    2016-01-01

    Background In conventional Chinese culture, awareness of a malignant disease is believed to increase a patient’s psychological pressure, leading to anxiety or depression. But this notion is in conflict with the patient’s right to receive information about their own disease. Methods This study is to investigate whether disclosure of diagnosis increases the level of anxiety or depression in patients diagnosed with lung cancer. Seventy patients who underwent lung resection and diagnosed with lung cancer postoperatively were divided into two groups—the disclosed group (n=35) and the undisclosed group (n=35), depending on the awareness of their diagnosis, as decided by their consigned family members. All patients were asked to fill in a form to evaluate their level of anxiety and depression before discharge. Results Disclosure of diagnosis did not affect the degree of anxiety or depression in patients with lung cancer (P>0.05). Age ≤50, relatively more advanced stage (stage II as compared with stage I) of disease, extensive surgery and major postoperative complication were risk factors of anxiety (P<0.05). Major postoperative complication was the only risk factor of depression (P<0.05). Conclusions Disclosure of diagnosis to patients with lung cancer does not induce or aggravate anxiety or depression in modern Chinese population. Factors such as complications, age, stage of disease and extent of surgery do have psychological impacts on patient with lung cancer. PMID:27867564

  8. Impact of functional support on health-related quality of life in patients with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Sultan, Shahnaz; Fisher, Deborah A; Voils, Corrine I; Kinney, Anita Y; Sandler, Robert S; Provenzale, Dawn

    2004-12-15

    It has been shown that social integration and the availability of social support influence quality of life. However, little is known about the relation between social support and mental and physical health in patients with colorectal cancer. In the current study, the authors examined the effects of social network size, as well as emotional and instrumental support, on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients with colorectal cancer. Six hundred thirty-six veterans with colorectal cancer were asked to complete a telephone interview, which included a measure of social support (the Berkman-Syme Index) and the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 12-Item Survey. Mean physical composite scale (PCS) and mental composite scale (MCS) scores were compared across groups. No difference in mean PCS or MCS scores was found between patients who had larger social networks and patients who had smaller social networks. The availability of emotional and instrumental support was associated with higher MCS scores, whereas the availability of instrumental support was associated with lower PCS scores. Irrespective of network size, the availability of emotional support and instrumental support had an impact on HRQOL in patients with colorectal cancer. More emphasis needs to be placed on understanding how various types of social support, individually and collectively, influence physical and mental health in patients with colorectal cancer.

  9. Impact of Panel Gene Testing for Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer on Patients.

    PubMed

    Lumish, Heidi S; Steinfeld, Hallie; Koval, Carrie; Russo, Donna; Levinson, Elana; Wynn, Julia; Duong, James; Chung, Wendy K

    2017-03-29

    Recent advances in next generation sequencing have enabled panel gene testing, or simultaneous testing for mutations in multiple genes for a clinical condition. With more extensive and widespread genetic testing, there will be increased detection of genes with moderate penetrance without established clinical guidelines and of variants of uncertain significance (VUS), or genetic variants unknown to either be disease-causing or benign. This study surveyed 232 patients who underwent genetic counseling for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer to examine the impact of panel gene testing on psychological outcomes, patient understanding, and utilization of genetic information. The survey used standardized instruments including the Impact of Event Scale (IES), Multidimensional Impact of Cancer Risk Assessment (MICRA), Satisfaction with Decision Instrument (SWD), Ambiguity Tolerance Scale (AT-20), genetics knowledge, and utilization of genetic test results. Study results suggested that unaffected individuals with a family history of breast or ovarian cancer who received positive results were most significantly impacted by intrusive thoughts, avoidance, and distress. However, scores were also modestly elevated among unaffected patients with a family history of breast and ovarian cancer who received VUS, highlighting the impact of ambiguous results that are frequent among patients undergoing genetic testing with large panels of genes. Potential risk factors for increased genetic testing-specific distress in this study included younger age, black or African American race, Hispanic origin, lower education level, and lower genetic knowledge and highlight the need for developing strategies to provide effective counseling and education to these communities, particularly when genetic testing utilizes gene panels that more commonly return VUS. More detailed pre-test education and counseling may help patients appreciate the probability of various types of test results and how results

  10. Prognostic Impact of ABO Blood Group on the Survival in Patients with Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Juan; Yang, Li-Chao; He, Zhen-Yu; Li, Fang-Yan; Wu, San-Gang; Sun, Jia-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The impact of ABO blood group on the survival of patients with ovarian cancer remains uncertain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of the ABO blood group in ovarian cancer patients. Methods: 256 ovarian cancer patients who received a cytoreductive surgery were retrospectively reviewed. The prognostic impact of the ABO blood group with respect to overall survival (OS) was analyzed. Results: The median follow-up time was 57 months and the 5-year OS was 70.1%. The 5-year OS were 55.0%, 83.3%, 82.5%, and 70.0% in patients with A, B, AB, and O blood type, respectively (p = 0.003). Patients with blood type A had a poorer 5-year OS than patients with blood type non-A (55.0% vs. 75.0%, p = 0.001), especially in patients with age > 50 years (40.0% vs. 62.5%, p = 0.004). Univariate Cox analyses showed that blood type A was significantly associated with OS than those with non-A types (hazard ratio (HR) 2.210, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.373-3.557, p = 0.001). Blood type A remained an independent prognostic factor for OS than those with non-A blood types in multivariate analyses (HR 2.235, 95% CI 1.360-3.674, p = 0.002). Conclusion: ABO blood group is associated with survival in patients with ovarian cancer, patients with blood type A had a significantly worse OS than patients with non-A blood types, especially in patients with age > 50 years. PMID:26316893

  11. Impact of Acetylsalicylic Acid on the Clinicopathological Characteristics and Prognosis of Patients with Invasive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sendur, Mehmet A.N.; Aksoy, Sercan; Ozdemir, Nuriye Y.; Zengin, Nurullah; Altundag, Kadri

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background The impact of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) on the clinicopathological characteristics of breast cancer has not yet been elucidated in detail; we therefore aimed to investigate the effects of ASA on the clinicopathological characteristics of patients with breast cancer. Patients and Methods Patients diagnosed with breast cancer were retrospectively analyzed. Breast cancer patients who were taking ASA at the time of breast cancer diagnosis were enrolled as ASA users (n = 84); matching patients with the same age who were not taking ASA were included as control group (n = 890). Results The median age was 56 (range 34–82) years in both groups. ASA users had a significantly lower incidence of grade II–III tumors compared to non-users (P = 0.02). The other clinicopathological characteristics and treatment histories were similar in both groups. In patients using ASA, the disease-free survival (DFS) rate was 97.3%, 89.4%, and 79.9% and in non-users it was 94.1%, 81.8%, and 70.9% in the 1rst, 3rd, and 5th year, respectively (P = 0.01). In aspirin users, the overall survival rate was 95.0%, 90.6%, and 87.6% and in non-users it was 98.1%, 91.2%, and 85.5% in the 1rst, 3rd, and 5th year, respectively (P = 0.50). Conclusion Using ASA at the time of breast cancer diagnosis was associated with significantly improved DFS in breast cancer patients. PMID:25404885

  12. [Clinical impact of FDG-PET in patients with suspected recurrent ovarian cancer].

    PubMed

    Cuenca Cuenca, J I; Borrego Dorado, I; Vázquez Albertino, R; Gómez Camarero, P; Sanz Viedma, S; Fernández López, R

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and clinical impact of FDG-PET in patients with suspected recurrent ovarian cancer. Between October 2001 and October 2006, we retrospectively studied 49 FDG-PET performed in 40 women (age: 52.4 +/- 12.2 years) with ovarian cancer, who had suspicion of recurrent disease by positive morphologic imaging tests (MIT) or increased tumour markers and negative MIT. All patients underwent whole body FDG-PET after the injection of 370-434 MBq of (18)FDG. The results were confirmed by histology in 31 cases, and by clinical-radiological follow-up in 18. Prevalence of disease was 79.6 %. We obtained a global sensitivity and positive predictive value of 87.2 % and 87.2 %, and an accuracy of 79.6 %. Results led to a change in the patient's management in 25 cases (51 %). Subgroup results were: Sensitivity of 81.8 % in patients with increased tumour markers and negative MIT, and 89.3 % in patients with operable malignant lesions. FDG-PET has high sensitivity and clinical impact in patients with suspicion of recurrent ovarian cancer. Better results were obtained in patients with increased tumour markers and negative MIT.

  13. The Impact of Cancer and its Treatment on the Growth and Development of the Pediatric Patient.

    PubMed

    Brand, Sarah; Wolfe, Joanne; Samsel, Chase

    2017-01-01

    Cancer treatment can have profound effects on the growth and development of pediatric patients. Different models of psychosocial development and behavioral treatment approaches aid children receiving medical treatment. Providing education, anticipatory guidance, and individualized support to child and their families is a psychosocial standard. Clarify the different models of psychosocial development and applicable psychosocial interventions to better prepare and tailor cancer treatment to pediatric patients. Authors reviewed existing evidenced-based literature in oncology, psychology, developmental, and psychiatric while drawing on case examples and expert knowledge to illustrate the impact of cancer treatment on pediatric patients, analyze developmentally individualized needs, and describe facilitative interventions. Pediatric patients of all ages cope and adjust better to all phases of treatment when their care is delivered in a developmentally-informed and psychosocially thoughtful way. Providers can comprehensively prepare their patients and families for treatment better by utilizing a psychosocially- and developmentally-informed framework while meeting individualized unique needs of patients. An integrated multidisciplinary psychosocial support team is facilitative in anticipating and meeting the needs of pediatric cancer patients and has recently become a psychosocial standard of care. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  14. Appetite disorders in cancer patients: Impact on nutritional status and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Barajas Galindo, David E; Vidal-Casariego, Alfonso; Calleja-Fernández, Alicia; Hernández-Moreno, Ana; Pintor de la Maza, Begoña; Pedraza-Lorenzo, Manuela; Rodríguez-García, María Asunción; Ávila-Turcios, Dalia María; Alejo-Ramos, Miran; Villar-Taibo, Rocío; Urioste-Fondo, Ana; Cano-Rodríguez, Isidoro; Ballesteros-Pomar, María D

    2017-07-01

    Cancer patients are at high risk of malnutrition due to several symptoms such as lack of appetite. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of different appetite disorders in cancer patients and their influence on dietary intake, nutritional status, and quality of life. We conducted a cross-sectional study of cancer patients at risk of malnutrition. Nutritional status was studied using Subjective Global Assessment, anthropometry, and grip strength. Dietary intake was evaluated with a 24-h recall, and patients were questioned about the presence of changes in appetite (none, anorexia, early satiety, or both). Quality of life was measured using EORTC-QLQ-C30. Multivariate analysis was performed using linear regression. 128 patients were evaluated. 61.7% experienced changes in appetite: 31% anorexia, 13.3% early satiety, and 17.2% both. Appetite disorders were more common in women and with the presence of cachexia. The combination of anorexia and satiety resulted in a lower weight and BMI. However, there were no significant effects on energy or macronutrient intake among different appetite alterations. Patients with a combination of anorexia and early satiety had worse overall health perception, role function, and fatigue. Appetite disorders are highly prevalent among cancer patients at risk of malnutrition. They have a significant impact on nutritional status and quality of life, especially when anorexia and early satiety are combined. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Impact of cancer, type, site, stage and treatment on the nutritional status of patients

    SciTech Connect

    Bozzeti, F.

    1982-08-01

    This study analyzed the nutritional status of cancer patients in relation to type and site of origin of the tumor, stage of disease, and previous chemical or radiation therapy. The analysis was performed on 321 patients (280 with cancer and 41 controls). The nutritional parameters included per cent of weight loss, anthropometric indices (arm circumference, triceps skinfold, arm muscle circumference), creatinine-height index, serum protein, albumin, total iron binding capacity and cholinesterase, C/sub 3/ and C/sub 4/ components of complement, total peripheral lymphocytes, and skin tests. The statistical comparison between patients with different tumors and controls, between patients treated with or without previous chemical or radiation therapy led to the following conclusions: (1) malnutrition is mainly related to the type and site of origin of the tumor and, in the early stages of disease, is more pronounced in patients with cancer of the esophagus and stomach; (2) except in patients with breast and cervix cancer, malnutrition gets more severe as the disease becomes advanced; (3) chemical or radiation therapy has a variable impact on the nutritional status, but in selected patients it causes a drop in body weight, arm circumference, arm muscle circumference, and peripheral lymphocytes; (4) body weight, cutaneous delayed hypersensitivity and serum albumin are the most commonly altered parameters.

  16. Impact of molecular subtypes on metastatic breast cancer patients: a SEER population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yue; Liu, Yi-Rong; Ji, Peng; Hu, Xin; Shao, Zhi-Ming

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the significance and impact of molecular subtyping stratification on metastatic breast cancer patients, we identified 159,344 female breast cancer patients in the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database with known hormone receptor (HoR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status. 4.8% of patients were identified as having stage IV disease, and were more likely to be HER2+/HoR−, HER2+/HoR+, or HER2−/HoR−. Stage IV breast cancer patients with a HER2+/HoR+ status exhibited the highest median overall survival (OS) (44.0 months) and those with a HER2−/HoR− status exhibited the lowest median OS (13.0 months). Patients with a HER2−/HoR+ status had more bone metastasis, whereas patients with a HER2+/HoR− status had an increased incidence of liver metastasis. Brain and lung metastasis were more likely to occur in women with a HER2−/HoR− status. The multivariable analysis revealed a significant interaction between single metastasis and molecular subtype. No matter which molecular subtype, women who did not undergo primary tumour surgery had worse survival than those who experienced primary tumour surgery. Collectively, our findings advanced the understanding that molecular subtype might lead to more tailored and effective therapies in metastatic breast cancer patients. PMID:28345619

  17. Impact of sarcopenia on outcome in patients with esophageal resection following neoadjuvant chemotherapy for esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Paireder, M; Asari, R; Kristo, I; Rieder, E; Tamandl, D; Ba-Ssalamah, A; Schoppmann, S F

    2017-02-01

    Nutritional status and body composition parameters such as sarcopenia are important risk factors for impaired outcome in patients with esophageal cancer. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of sarcopenia on long-term outcome after esophageal resection following neoadjuvant treatment. Skeletal muscle index (SMI) and body composition parameters were measured in patients receiving neoadjuvant treatment for locally advanced esophageal cancer. Endpoints included relapse-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS). The study included 130 patients. Sarcopenia was found in 80 patients (61.5%). Patients with squamous-cell cancer (SCC) showed a decreased median SMI of 48 (range 28.4-60.8) cm/m(2) compared with that of patients with adenocarcinoma (AC) of 52 (range 34.4-74.2) cm/m(2), P < 0.001. The presence of sarcopenia had a significant impact on patient outcome: HR 1.69 (1.04-2.75), P = 0.036. Median OS was 20.5 (7.36-33.64) versus 52.1 (13.55-90.65) months in sarcopenic and non-sarcopenic patients, respectively. Sarcopenia was identified as an independent risk factor: HR 1.72 (1.049-2.83), P = 0.032. Our data provide evidence that sarcopenia impacts long-term outcome after esophageal resection in patients who have undergone neoadjuvant therapy. Assessment of the body composition parameter can be a reasonable part of patient selection and may influence treatment methods. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ The Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  18. Impact of age at diagnosis on racial disparities in endometrial cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Tarney, Christopher M; Tian, Chunqiao; Wang, Guisong; Dubil, Elizabeth A; Bateman, Nicholas W; Chan, John K; Elshaikh, Mohamed A; Cote, Michele L; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Shriver, Craig D; Conrads, Thomas P; Hamilton, Chad A; Maxwell, G Larry; Darcy, Kathleen M

    2017-08-08

    Although black patients with endometrial cancer (EC) have worse survival compared with white patients, the interaction between age/race has not been examined. The primary objective was to evaluate the impact of age at diagnosis on racial disparities in disease presentation and outcome in EC. We evaluated women diagnosed with EC between 1991 and 2010 from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results. Mutation status for TP53 or PTEN, or with the aggressive integrative, transcript-based, or somatic copy number alteration-based molecular subtype were acquired from the Cancer Genome Atlas. Logistic regression model was used to estimate the interaction between age and race on histology. Cox regression model was used to estimate the interaction between age and race on survival. 78,184 white and 8518 black patients with EC were analyzed. Median age at diagnosis was 3-years younger for black vs. white patients with serous cancer and carcinosarcoma (P<0.0001). The increased presentation of non-endometrioid histology with age was larger in black vs. white patients (P<0.0001). The racial disparity in survival and cancer-related mortality was more prevalent in black vs. white patients, and in younger vs. older patients (P<0.0001). Mutations in TP53, PTEN and the three aggressive molecular subtypes each varied by race, age and histology. Aggressive histology and molecular features were more common in black patients and older age, with greater impact of age on poor tumor characteristics in black vs. white patients. Racial disparities in outcome were larger in younger patients. Intervention at early ages may mitigate racial disparities in EC. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. [Nutritional status in head and neck cancer patients: the impact on the prognoses].

    PubMed

    Martín Villares, C; San Román Carbajo, J; Fernández Pello, M E; Tapia Risueño, M; Domínguez Calvo, J

    2003-01-01

    Malnutrition is reported to affect 30-50% of all patients with head and neck cancer. The impact of malnutrition on surgical outcome is not clearly understood. The purpose of this study is to determine if nutritional status is related to postoperative complications (pharyngostoma) or tumor recurrence. Fifty patients with T2-4 head and neck carcinomas underwent surgery were studied prospectively. Nutritional status was related to postoperative complications and 2-year survival. Twenty-seven patients present malnutrition (54%). We had 15 patients with pharyngostoma and 11 tumor recurrences. We did not find any correlation between the pharyngostoma and malnutrition, but we we found correlation between malnutrition and tumor recurrence (p < .05). Malnutrition has negative impact on outcome of patients with head and neck carcinomas.

  20. Impact of autoimmune diseases on outcome of patients with early breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Criscitiello, Carmen; Bagnardi, Vincenzo; Esposito, Angela; Gelao, Lucia; Santillo, Barbara; Viale, Giulia; Rotmensz, Nicole; Goldhirsch, Aron; Curigliano, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Our aim was to analyze the impact of a concurrent autoimmune disease on outcome of patients with early breast cancer. We reviewed medical charts of patients with a diagnosis of autoimmune diseases (AD) among a population of 17.153 cases. We categorized ADs as endocrine, rheumatic, systemic, neurological diseases and vasculitis. For each patient in the study group, we matched 2 patients. The events to determine overall survival (OS) and disease free survival (DFS) were identified from follow-up data. We identified 279 (1.62%) patients with early breast cancer and concurrent ADs. The median follow-up was 7.0 years. The 10-year OS rate was 86% (95% CI, 80% to 91%) in the study group and 90% (95% CI, 86% to 93%) for the control group (p = 0.011). In patients with ER positive/HER2 negative subtype a worse OS was observed in the study group when compared to the control group (p = 0.0046); this difference remained statistically significant when the analysis was restricted to breast cancer mortality (p = 0.045). The 10-year DFS rate was 69% (95% CI, 61% to 76%) in the study group and 72% (95% CI, 66% to 77%) for the control group (p = 0.22). Autoimmunity at diagnosis of early breast cancer is associated with worse survival. PMID:27323400

  1. Impact of robotics on the outcome of elderly patients with endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Lavoue, Vincent; Zeng, Xing; Lau, Susie; Press, Joshua Z; Abitbol, Jeremie; Gotlieb, Raphael; How, Jeffrey; Wang, Yifan; Gotlieb, Walter H

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate the impact of introducing a robotics program on clinical outcome of elderly patients with endometrial cancer. Evaluation and comparison of peri-operative morbidity and disease-free interval in 163 consecutive elderly patients (≥70years) with endometrial cancer undergoing staging procedure with traditional open surgery compared to robotic surgery. All consecutive patients ≥70years of age with endometrial cancer who underwent robotic surgery (n=113) were compared with all consecutive patients ≥70years of age (n=50) before the introduction of a robotic program in December 2007. Baseline patient characteristics were similar in both eras. Patients undergoing robotic surgery had longer mean operating times (244 compared with 217minutes, p=0.009) but fewer minor adverse events (17% compared with 60%, p<0.001). The robotics cohort had less estimated mean blood loss (75 vs 334mL, p<0.0001) and shorter mean hospital stay (3 vs 6days, p<0.0001). There was no difference in disease-free survival (p=0.61) during the mean follow-up time of 2years. Transitioning from open surgery to a robotics program for the treatment of endometrial cancer in the elderly has significant benefits, including lower minor complication rate, less operative blood loss and shorter hospitalization without compromising 2-year disease-free survival. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Impact of sarcopenia on the prognosis and treatment toxicities in patients diagnosed with cancer.

    PubMed

    Antoun, Sami; Borget, Isabelle; Lanoy, Emilie

    2013-12-01

    High-resolution computed tomography (CT) imaging routinely performed for cancer follow-up provides valuable information on body composition. The influence of body composition on outcomes and the occurrence of toxicities can therefore be explored in cancer patients. This review describes recent findings regarding the prognostic impact of skeletal muscle mass (SMM) on chemotherapy toxicity. The higher risk of toxicity associated with low SMM (i.e. sarcopenia) was first described for 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy toxicity in colon cancer patients before being increasingly studied, not only in the case of body surface area-adapted chemotherapy in breast cancer but also in various cancers treated with targeted therapies. The underlying mechanisms are still being debated; sarcopenia could act on pharmacokinetic parameters and/or sarcopenic patients could be more susceptible to adverse medical events including chemotherapy toxicity. Evidence for a strong link between sarcopenia and chemotherapy toxicity is increasing. SMM may not be the only body composition parameter involved. Muscle function assessed by measuring muscle density and the BMI could be of interest. The ultimate purpose is to better identify patients at higher risk of toxicity and to reduce toxicity through body composition-based dosing.

  3. Clinical impact of selective and nonselective beta-blockers on survival in patients with ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Jack L; Thaker, Premal H; Nick, Alpa M; Ramondetta, Lois M; Kumar, Sanjeev; Urbauer, Diana L; Matsuo, Koji; Squires, Kathryn C; Coleman, Robert L; Lutgendorf, Susan K; Ramirez, Pedro T; Sood, Anil K

    2015-10-01

    Preclinical evidence has suggested that sustained adrenergic activation can promote ovarian cancer growth and metastasis. The authors examined the impact of beta-adrenergic blockade on the clinical outcome of women with epithelial ovarian, primary peritoneal, or fallopian tube cancers (collectively, epithelial ovarian cancer [EOC]). A multicenter review of 1425 women with histopathologically confirmed EOC was performed. Comparisons were made between patients with documented beta-blocker use during chemotherapy and those without beta-blocker use. The median age of patients in the current study was 63 years (range, 21-93 years). The sample included 269 patients who received beta-blockers. Of those, 193 (71.7%) were receiving beta-1-adrenergic receptor selective agents, and the remaining patients were receiving nonselective beta antagonists. The primary indication for beta-blocker use was hypertension but also included arrhythmia and postmyocardial infarction management. For patients receiving any beta-blocker, the median overall survival (OS) was 47.8 months versus 42 months for nonusers (P =.04). The median OS based on beta-blocker receptor selectivity was 94.9 months for those receiving nonselective beta-blockers versus 38 months for those receiving beta-1-adrenergic receptor selective agents (P<.001). Hypertension was associated with decreased OS compared with no hypertension across all groups. However, even among patients with hypertension, a longer median OS was observed among users of a nonselective beta-blocker compared with nonusers (38.2 months vs 90 months; P<.001). Use of nonselective beta-blockers in patients with EOC was associated with longer OS. These findings may have implications for new therapeutic approaches. Cancer 2015;121:3435-43. © 2015 American Cancer Society. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  4. [Psycho-social and religious impact of cancer diagnosis on Moroccan patients: experience from the National Oncology Center of Rabat].

    PubMed

    Errihani, H; Mrabti, H; Sbitti, Y; Kaikani, W; El Ghissassi, I; Afqir, S; Boutayeb, S; Farik, M; Riadi, A; Hammoudi, M; Chergui, H

    2010-04-01

    The impact cancer occurrence is variable according to the sociocultural issue, specific to each context and each area. In order to determine the psychosocial profile of Moroccan patients that have developed cancers, four studies were performed at the National institute of oncology (INO) in Rabat. These studies were prospective, included between 125 and 1,600 patients and were based on questionnaires developed by a medical oncologist, a psychologist and a sociologist. These studies were focused on the psychosocial characteristics of the Moroccan cancer occurrence on patients, the impact of cancer on the religious practice as well as the impact of cancer and its treatments on patients' sexuality. In this article, we will develop the particular characteristics of moroccan patients that were specific to their sociocultural context.

  5. Does diabetes mellitus have an impact on the prognosis for patients with cervical cancer?

    PubMed

    In Choi, Jeong; Chang, Ha Kyun; Lee, Dae Woo; Lee, Keun Ho; Park, Jong Sup; Lee, Hae Nam

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the impact of comorbid diabetes mellitus (DM) on prognoses among patients with cervical cancer. We analyzed cervical cancer outcomes in patients who treated in two hospitals retrospectively. Patients were divided into those with DM and those without. Clinicopathologic parameters, disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) rates were evaluated. Of the 494 patients, 50 had DM. These were more likely to be older than those in the non-DM group and their body mass index (BMI) was higher. They showed higher levels of tumor markers and had more combined diseases. They were less likely to have had surgical treatment. Among these patients, 12 (24%) experienced a recurrence (hazard ratio, HR, 1.484; 95% confidence interval, CI, 0.746-2.951). Differences in DFS did not show statistical significance. In the OS analysis, 11 (22%) in the DM group and 62 (14%) in the non-DM group died (HR, 1.239; 95% CI, 0.606-2.533). No statistically significant differences were also observed for cancer-specific death (HR, 1.246; 95% CI, 0.567-2.737). Those with DM and an adenocarcinoma tended to have an increased risk of dying compared with the non-DM patients with an adenocarcinoma (HR, 3.673; 95% CI, 0.990-13.625), but this difference was not statistically significant (p=0.0518). Diabetes mellitus did not have an impact on the prognosis for patients with cervical cancers. In those with an adenocarcinoma, patients with diabetes tended to have an increased risk of dying compared with the non-DM group, but this difference was not statistically significant. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The Impact of Obesity on Patient Reported Outcomes Following Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cyr, Robyn; Feng, Li Rebekah; Bae, Edward; Danner, Malika T; Ayoob, Marilyn; Yung, Thomas M; Lei, Siyuan; Collins, Brian T; Saligan, Leorey; Simeng, Suy; Kumar, Deepak; Collins, Sean P

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The relationship between obesity (Body Mass Index ­>30 kg/m2) and quality of life (QoL) following prostate cancer (PCa) radiation therapy (RT) is unknown. Excess abdominal fat may compromise the precise delivery of radiation, putting surrounding organs at risk for greater radiation exposure. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) utilizes a real-time tracking system that provides updated prostate position information and allows for correction of the therapeutic beam during treatment with high accuracy. In this study, we evaluate the impact of obesity on patient reported outcomes following SBRT for prostate cancer. Materials and methods Between February 2008 and April 2012, 88 obese and 178 non-obese patients with PCa were treated with SBRT at Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, DC. Health-related quality of life (HRQol) was assessed via the expanded prostate cancer index composite (EPIC)-26 at baseline, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after 5-fraction delivery of 35-36.25 Gy with the CyberKnife. Patients who received androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) were excluded from this analysis due to its known negative impact on HRQoL. Results Pretreatment characteristics of obese and non-obese patient groups were similar except that obese patients had lower total testosterone levels. Urinary and bowel function and bother scores between the two patient cohorts were comparable at baseline and subsequent follow-ups. Sexual function and bother were also similar at baseline between both groups. Bother was defined by displeasure patients may experience from functional decline. At 24 months post-SBRT, obese men experienced borderline clinically significant decrease in sexual function and greater sexual bother compared to non-obese patients. Fatigue was significantly higher in obese patients compared to non-obese patients at 18 months post-SBRT. Conclusions Prostate SBRT affects obese and non-obese patients similarly in total HRQoL scores and majority of its

  7. The Impact of Obesity on Patient Reported Outcomes Following Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Koneru, Harsha; Cyr, Robyn; Feng, Li Rebekah; Bae, Edward; Danner, Malika T; Ayoob, Marilyn; Yung, Thomas M; Lei, Siyuan; Collins, Brian T; Saligan, Leorey; Simeng, Suy; Kumar, Deepak; Collins, Sean P

    2016-07-05

    The relationship between obesity (Body Mass Index ->30 kg/m(2)) and quality of life (QoL) following prostate cancer (PCa) radiation therapy (RT) is unknown. Excess abdominal fat may compromise the precise delivery of radiation, putting surrounding organs at risk for greater radiation exposure. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) utilizes a real-time tracking system that provides updated prostate position information and allows for correction of the therapeutic beam during treatment with high accuracy. In this study, we evaluate the impact of obesity on patient reported outcomes following SBRT for prostate cancer. Between February 2008 and April 2012, 88 obese and 178 non-obese patients with PCa were treated with SBRT at Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, DC. Health-related quality of life (HRQol) was assessed via the expanded prostate cancer index composite (EPIC)-26 at baseline, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after 5-fraction delivery of 35-36.25 Gy with the CyberKnife. Patients who received androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) were excluded from this analysis due to its known negative impact on HRQoL. Pretreatment characteristics of obese and non-obese patient groups were similar except that obese patients had lower total testosterone levels. Urinary and bowel function and bother scores between the two patient cohorts were comparable at baseline and subsequent follow-ups. Sexual function and bother were also similar at baseline between both groups. Bother was defined by displeasure patients may experience from functional decline. At 24 months post-SBRT, obese men experienced borderline clinically significant decrease in sexual function and greater sexual bother compared to non-obese patients. Fatigue was significantly higher in obese patients compared to non-obese patients at 18 months post-SBRT. Prostate SBRT affects obese and non-obese patients similarly in total HRQoL scores and majority of its domains. Obesity has been associated with cancer

  8. The impact of an ostomy on older colorectal cancer patients: a cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Verweij, N M; Hamaker, M E; Zimmerman, D D E; van Loon, Y T; van den Bos, F; Pronk, A; Borel Rinkes, I H M; Schiphorst, A H W

    2017-01-01

    Ostomies are being placed in 35 % of patients after colorectal cancer surgery. As decision-making regarding colorectal surgery is challenging in the older patients, it is important to have insight in the potential impact due to ostomies. An internet-based survey was sent to all members with registered email addresses of the Dutch Ostomy Patient Association. The response rate was 49 %; 932 cases were included of whom 526 were aged <70 years old ("younger respondents"), 301 were aged between 70 and 79 years old ("the elderly"), and 105 were aged ≥80 years old ("oldest old"). Ostomy-related limitations were similar in the different age groups, just as uncertainty (8-10 %) and dependency (18-22 %) due to the ostomy. A reduced quality of life was experienced least in the oldest old group (24 % vs 37 % of the elderly and 46 % of the younger respondents, p < 0.001). Over time, a decrease of limitations and impact due to the ostomy was observed. Older ostomates do not experience more limitations or psychosocial impact due to the ostomy compared to their younger counterparts. Over the years, impact becomes less distinct. Treatment decision-making is challenging in the older colorectal cancer patients but ostomy placement should not be withheld based on age alone.

  9. [Survey of cachexia in digestive system cancer patients and its impact on clinical outcomes].

    PubMed

    Sun, Yandong; Zhang, Bo; Han, Yusong; Jiang, Yi; Zhuang, Qiulin; Gong, Yuda; Wu, Guohao

    2014-10-01

    To investigate cachexia in hospitalized patients with digestive system cancer and evaluate its impact on clinical outcomes. By analyzing the clinical data of 5118 hospitalized patients with digestive system cancer in Zhongshan Hospital of Fudan University from January 2012 to December 2013, cachexia was investigated and clinical outcomes between cachexia patients and non-cachexia patients was compared. The total cachexia rate of hospitalized patients with digestive system cancer was 15.7%(803/5118). The highest rate of cachexia was 34.0%(89/262) in patients with pancreatic cancer followed by gastric cancer 22.4%(261/1164), colon cancer 21.7%(146/672), and rectal cancer 20.1%(117/581). In cachexia group and non-cachexia group, the overall completion rate of radical resection was 67.1%(539/803) and 74.5%(3214/4315) respectively(P<0.05). Compared to the non-cachexia group, the cachexia group was associated with longer postoperative hospital stay [(11.5±6.2) d vs. (9.4±4.9) d, P<0.05], slower postoperative recovery of bowel function [(3.4±0.9) d vs. (3.2±0.8) d, P<0.05], longer postoperative time to intake of semifluid [(4.4±1.5) d vs. (3.9±1.1) d, P<0.05], and more postoperative complications within 28 days after radical surgery [8.9%(48/539) vs. 5.8%(186/3214), P<0.05]. After radical surgery, the ICU admission rate of the cachexia group [24.3%(131/539)] was higher than that of the non-cachexia group [20.1%(646/3214)] with significant difference(P<0.05). Compared to non-cachexia group, the reoperation rate [3.2%(17/539) vs. 1.5%(48/3214), P<0.05], ventilator support rate [8.0%(43/539)vs. 5.7%(184/3214), P<0.05] and mortality [2.4%(13/539) vs. 1.1%(35/3214), P<0.05] in the cachexia group were all significantly higher(all P<0.05). Cachexia is commen in patients with digestive system cancer. Cachexia has significant adverse effects on clinical outcomes in hospitalized patients with digestive system cancer.

  10. Impact of Hyperglycemia on Outcomes among Patients Receiving Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Bulky Early Stage Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Huai-wu; Zhang, Bing-zhong; Wang, Li-juan; Lin, Zhong-qiu

    2016-01-01

    Background The impact of hyperglycemia on survival of patients undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) for bulky early stage cervical cancer (BESCC) has not been explored. Method Records of patients who received NACT and radical hysterectomy in our institution between January 2005 and June 2010 were reviewed. Results In total, 347 patients were included. The median follow-up time was 37 months (range: 4–65). Patients with hyperglycemia (fasting blood glucose ≥ 100 mg/dl) had shorter recurrence-free survival (RFS) (univariate hazard ratio [HR] = 1.95, 95% confidence interval [CI] [1.16, 3.28], P = 0.010) and cancer-specific survival (CSS) (univariate HR = 2.24, 95% CI [1.33, 3.78], P = 0.002) compared with those with euglycemia (fasting blood glucose <100 mg/dl). In multivariate analysis, positive surgical margins, parametrium invasion, node metastasis, hyperglycemia and complete response to NACT independently predicted recurrence and cancer-specific death. To further validate the prognostic value of hyperglycemia, we conducted a subgroup analysis based on patient baseline characteristics and prognostic effect of hyperglycemia remained significant in all subgroups. On multivariable logistic regression analysis, euglycemia before NACT, squamous cell tumor and pre-treatment squamous cell carcinoma antigen levels < 3.5 ng/ml were identified as independent predictors of complete response after NACT. Conclusions FBG ≥100 mg/dl is a negative prognostic predictor for cervical cancer patients receiving NACT for BESCC. Patients with hyperglycemia are less likely to achieve complete response after NACT. Our findings underscore the clinical utility of hyperglycemia screening of for cervical cancer patients. PMID:27851819

  11. Impact of prognostic nutritional index on long-term outcomes in patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Mohri, Tomomi; Mohri, Yasuhiko; Shigemori, Tsunehiko; Takeuchi, Kenji; Itoh, Yoshiyuki; Kato, Toshio

    2016-06-27

    Prognostic nutritional index has been shown to be a prognostic marker for various solid tumors. However, few studies have investigated the impact of the prognostic nutritional index on survival of patients with breast cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of the prognostic nutritional index on the long-term outcomes in patients with breast cancer. This study reviewed the medical records of 212 patients with breast cancer who underwent mastectomy. The prognostic nutritional index was calculated as 10 × serum albumin (g/dl) + 0.005 × total lymphocyte count (per mm(3)). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was performed to determine the cutoff value of the prognostic nutritional index. The survival curves were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Differences between the curves were analyzed by the log-rank test. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard model was used to evaluate the prognostic significance of prognostic nutritional index in patients with breast cancer. The mean prognostic nutritional index just before the operation was 51.9, and the median follow-up after surgery was 47.7 months. The optimal cutoff value of the prognostic nutritional index for predicting the overall survival was 52.8 from the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. The 5-year overall survival rate was 98.3 % in the prognostic nutritional index >52.8 and 92.0 % in the prognostic nutritional index <52.8 (P = 0.013). In the multivariate analysis, a low prognostic nutritional index was an independent predictor for poor overall survival (HR, 5.88; 95 % CI, 1.13-108.01; P = 0.033). The prognostic nutritional index is a simple and useful marker for predicting the long-term outcomes of breast cancer patients, independent of the tumor stage.

  12. Impact of counselling on quality of life and sleep in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Michael; Hughes, Caroline; Rogers, Katherine M A

    It has been acknowledged that poor quality of sleep significantly correlates with poor quality of life; evidence suggests that counselling has a positive impact not only on the cancer patient's quality of life, but also on family members and friends. The aim of this service evaluation was to determine if there was an improvement in clients' quality of life and sleep patterns following counselling as offered by a local cancer charity. A total of 60 matched pre- and post-counselling questionnaires were completed and subjected to statistical analysis. When considering quality of life, in the domains of Role Emotional, Mental Health and Mental Component Summary Score, it can be concluded that counselling has a positive effect on emotional health and mental wellbeing. The mean total number of hours sleep per night significantly increased from 6 hours sleep per night at baseline to 6.8 hours sleep per night at the completion of counselling (p=0.005) showing clients gained an extra 48 minutes sleep per night. The improved emotional and mental wellbeing alongside the extra 48 minutes sleep per night provides evidence that there is a positive outcome for those patients and families who use counselling services. Nurses and other members of the multidisciplinary team should be encouraged to discuss supportive therapies with patients and those affected by cancer at all stages of the cancer trajectory, regardless of social status, gender or cancer type.

  13. Clinical and economic impact of infusion reactions in patients with colorectal cancer treated with cetuximab

    PubMed Central

    Foley, K. A.; Wang, P. F.; Barber, B. L.; Long, S. R.; Bagalman, J. E.; Wagner, V.; Song, X.; Zhao, Z.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Systemic agents in cancer treatment were often associated with possible infusion reactions (IRs). This study estimated the incidence of IRs requiring medical intervention and assessed the clinical and economic impacts of IRs in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) treated with cetuximab. Patients and methods: Details on patients with CRC receiving cetuximab in 2004–2006 were extracted from a large USA administrative claims database. IRs were identified based on the occurrence of outpatient treatment, emergency room (ER) visit, and/or hospitalization for hypersensitivity and allergic reactions. Multivariate regressions were used to examine potential risk factors and quantify the economic impact of IRs. Results: A total of 1122 CRC patients receiving cetuximab were identified. The incidence of IRs requiring medical intervention was 8.4%. Sixty-eight percent of the patients had treatment disruptions and 34% discontinued cetuximab treatment. Mean adjusted costs were $13 863 for cetuximab administrations with an IR requiring ER visit or hospitalization and $6280 for those with an IR requiring outpatient treatment, compared with $4555 for those without an IR. Conclusions: The incidence rate of cetuximab-related IRs requiring medical intervention in clinical practice was found to be higher than rates reported in the product label and clinical trials. The clinical and economic impacts of these IRs are substantial. PMID:20100773

  14. Long-term prognostic impact of circulating tumour cells in gastric cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Hiroaki; Sato, Jun; Tsujino, Yukio; Yamaguchi, Noriko; Kimura, Satoshi; Gohda, Keigo; Murakami, Katsuhiro; Onimaru, Manabu; Ohmori, Tohru; Ishikawa, Fumihiro; Inoue, Haruhiro

    2016-01-01

    AIM To analyse the long-term prognostic impact of circulating tumour cells (CTCs) in gastric cancer patients who underwent surgery. METHODS A 7.5-mL peripheral vein blood sample was obtained from each patient with treatment-negative gastric adenocarcinoma before surgery. OBP-401, a telomerase-specific, replication-selective, oncolytic adenoviral agent carrying the green fluorescent protein gene, was used to label CTCs. Correlations between the number of CTCs and clinical end points were evaluated. RESULTS The median follow-up period of the surviving patients with gastric cancer was 60 mo. The CTC number tended to increase concomitantly with disease progression. The overall survival of patients with more than five CTCs in 7.5-mL of peripheral blood was lower than that of patients with five or less CTCs, although the difference was not significant (P = 0.183). A significant difference in relapse-free survival was found between patients with more than five and those with five or less CTCs (P = 0.034). CONCLUSION A lower number of CTCs was correlated with higher relapse-free survival rates in patients. Detection of CTCs using OBP-401 may be useful for predicting prognosis in gastric cancer. PMID:28028372

  15. Review at a multidisciplinary tumor board impacts critical management decisions of pediatric patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Thenappan, Arun; Halaweish, Ihab; Mody, Rajen J; Smith, Ethan A; Geiger, James D; Ehrlich, Peter F; Jasty Rao, Rama; Hutchinson, Raymond; Yanik, Gregory; Rabah, Raja M; Heider, Amer; Stoll, Tammy; Newman, Erika A

    2017-02-01

    Optimal cancer care requires a multidisciplinary approach. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the impact of a multidisciplinary tumor board on the treatment plans of children with solid tumors. The records of 158 consecutive patients discussed at a formal multidisciplinary pediatric tumor board between July 2012 and April 2014 were reviewed. Treatment plans were based on clinical practice guidelines and on current Children's Oncology Group protocols. Alterations in radiologic, pathologic, surgical, and medical interpretations were analyzed to determine the impact on changes in recommendations for clinical management. Overall, 55 of 158 children (35%) had alterations in radiologic, pathologic, medical, or surgical interpretation of clinical data following multidisciplinary discussion. Of these, 64% had changes to the initial recommendation for clinical management. Review of imaging studies resulted in interpretation changes in 30 of 158 patients studied (19%), with 12 clinical management changes. Six of 158 patients (3.9%) had changes in pathologic interpretation, with four patients (2.5%) requiring treatment changes. In eight patients (5%), a change in medical management was recommended, while in 11 patients (7%) there were changes in surgical management that were based solely on discussion and not on interpretation of imaging or pathology. Formal multidisciplinary review led to alterations in interpretation of clinical data in 35% of patients, and the majority led to changes in recommendations for treatment. Comprehensive multidisciplinary tumor board incorporated into the care of children with cancer provides additional perspectives for families and care providers when delineating optimal treatment plans. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Breast cancer patients' trust in physicians: the impact of patients' perception of physicians' communication behaviors and hospital organizational climate.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Christoph; Nitzsche, Anika; Scheibler, Fueloep; Steffen, Petra; Albert, Ute-Susann; Pfaff, Holger

    2009-12-01

    To examine whether patients' perception of a hospital's organizational climate has an impact on their trust in physicians after accounting for physicians' communication behaviors as perceived by the patients and patient characteristics. Patients undergoing treatment in breast centers in the German state of North Rhein-Westphalia in 2006 were asked to complete a standardized postal questionnaire. Disease characteristics were then added by the medical personnel. Multiple linear regressions were performed. 80.5% of the patients responded to the survey. 37% of the variance in patients' trust in physicians can be explained by the variables included in our final model (N=2226; R(2) adj.=0.372; p<0.001). Breast cancer patients' trust in their physicians is strongly associated with their perception of a hospital's organizational climate. The impact of their perception of physicians' communication behaviors persists after introducing hospital organizational characteristics. Perceived physician accessibility shows the strongest association with trust. A trusting physician-patient relationship among breast cancer patients is associated with both the perceived quality of the hospital organizational climate and perceived physicians' communication behaviors. With regard to clinical organization, efforts should be put into improving the organizational climate and making physicians more accessible to patients.

  17. Development of a Fatigue and Functional Impact Scale (FFIS) in Anemic Cancer Patients Receiving Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Cella, David; Viswanathan, Hema N.; Hays, Ron D.; Mendoza, Tito R.; Stein, Kevin D.; Pasta, David J.; Foreman, Aimee J.; Vadhan-Raj, Saroj; Kallich, Joel D.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To develop a brief measure of fatigue and functional impact in cancer patients with anemia. Patients and Methods Data were obtained from a multi-site, phase 2 study of darbepoetin alfa (n = 1,558). Eligible patients were ≥ 18 years with nonmyeloid malignancies and anemia (hemoglobin ≤11 g/dL) receiving chemotherapy. Items from the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Fatigue (FACT-F), Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI), Fatigue Symptom Inventory (FSI) and items adapted from the Medical Outcomes Study SF-36 physical functioning scale were evaluated for inclusion in the measure. Items were selected by identifying the best predictors of total FACT-F scores, hemoglobin, and adjusted VO2Max in regression models. Correlations were examined between scale scores and adjusted VO2Max, hemoglobin, performance, self-reported energy, and productivity. Results Data from 401 patients with complete data were used to identify eight items for the Fatigue and Functional Impact Scale (FFIS), which was then evaluated using 1,355 of the 1,558 patients. The FFIS had an estimated internal consistency reliability of 0.90. The FFIS had large correlations with the FACT-F (r = 0.94), FSI (r = 0.80) and BFI (r = 0.86) from which it was derived. The FFIS also correlated substantially with single item measures of energy (r = 0.75) and productivity (r = 0.72). Conclusion The FFIS is a reliable, brief, and practical tool potentially suitable for identifying fatigue and functional impact in cancer patients. PMID:18642348

  18. Impact of postthyroidectomy scar on the quality of life of thyroid cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yuri; Lee, Ji Hye; Kim, Yeon Hee; Lee, Yong Sang; Chang, Hang-Seok; Park, Cheong Soo; Roh, Mi Ryung

    2014-12-01

    Surgical scars are crucial cosmetic problem, especially when in exposed areas such as the anterior neck following thyroidectomy. To evaluate the impact of post-thyroidectomy scars on quality of life (QoL) of thyroid cancer patients and identify the relationship between scar characteristics and QoL. Patients with post-thyroidectomy scars on the neck were recruited. QoL was measured using the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI). Scar characteristics were graded according to Vancouver scar scale (VSS) score. Ninety-seven patients completed a battery of questions at the time of enrollment. Post-thyroidectomy scars were classified according to morphology as linear flat scars, linear bulging scars, hypertrophic scars or adhesive scars. There were 32 patients (33.0%), 9 patients (9.3%), 41 patients (42.3%) and 15 patients (15.5%), respectively, in each group. The mean total DLQI score was 9.02. Domain 2 (daily activities, 2.87 points), which includes questions about clothing, was the most greatly impacted among patients. The total DLQI scores of patients who have experienced scar-related symptoms were significantly higher than those of patients without symptoms (p<0.05). The VSS scores were 3.09 for linear flat scars, 6.89 for linear bulging scars, 6.29 for hypertrophic scars and 5.60 for adhesive scars. However, the DLQI scores did not significantly differ among scar types or VSS scores. Post-thyroidectomy scars on the neck affect the QoL of thyroid cancer patients regardless of scar type. Therefore, clinicians should pay attention to the psychological effects of scars on patients and take care to minimize post-thyroidectomy scar.

  19. The economic impact of surgical care for morbidly obese endometrial cancer patients: a nationwide study.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Rebecca A; Blansit, Kevin; Young-Lin, Nichole; Usach, Irina; Chen, Lee May; Yu, Xinhua; Kapp, Daniel S; Chan, John K

    2016-04-01

    Obesity significantly impacts the cost of cancer treatment, yet the impact of morbid obesity on inpatient hospital charges related to endometrial cancer treatment is not well-defined. The purpose of this study was to determine the charges that are associated with inpatient surgery, hospitalization, and postoperative care of morbidly obese patients with endometrial cancer. Data were obtained from the National Inpatient Sample from 2010. Chi-square test, t-test, and linear regression were used for statistical analyses. Six thousand five hundred sixty patients who underwent hysterectomy for endometrial cancer were identified. Mean age was 62 years (range, 22-99 years). The majority were white (78%), and the remainder were black (10%), Hispanic, (8%), Asian (3%), and Native American (1%). Insurance types were private (45%), Medicare (45%), Medicaid (5%), and uninsured (7%). One thousand eighty-eight of these patients (17%) were coded as morbidly obese. The mean postoperative stay for the morbidly obese was 4.0 days (range, 0-46 days) compared with 3.5 days (range, 0-81 days) for the non-morbidly obese patients (P < .01). Morbidly obese patients required more intensive care with mechanical ventilation (5.5% vs 1.6%; P < .01). The median hospital charges were higher for morbidly obese patients compared with their counterparts ($46,654 vs $41,164; P < .01). After adjustment for charges that were associated with insurance type, hospital type, and the surgery that was performed, the incremental increase in hospital charges that were associated with treating the morbidly obese patient was $5096 per patient (95% confidence interval, $2593-$7598; P < .01). In this economic analysis, the health care charges that were associated with inpatient endometrial cancer treatment in the morbidly obese patient was significantly higher compared the non-morbidly obese patient. Resources are needed to support the needs of this population, and programs to encourage weight loss and

  20. Impact of the year 2000 Medicare policy change on older patient enrollment to cancer clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Unger, Joseph M; Coltman, Charles A; Crowley, John J; Hutchins, Laura F; Martino, Silvana; Livingston, Robert B; Macdonald, John S; Blanke, Charles D; Gandara, David R; Crawford, E David; Albain, Kathy S

    2006-01-01

    A prior analysis by the Southwest Oncology Group (SWOG) showed that women and African American patients were adequately represented on cancer clinical treatment trials but that older patients were substantially underrepresented. Twenty-five percent of patients > or = 65 years old were enrolled onto SWOG trials from 1993 to 1996, whereas 63% of all patients with cancer were > or = 65 years old. Recognition of this under-representation led to a change in Medicare policy in 2000 to include coverage of routine patient care costs of clinical trials. We conducted an updated analysis of accrual trends. The proportions of enrollment onto SWOG treatment trials by sex, race/ethnicity, and age (> or = 65 years) were computed for the years 1997 to 2000; corresponding rates in the United States were derived from US Census and National Cancer Institute Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End results data. Additionally, method of payment data were analyzed over time (1993 to 2003) to assess whether patterns in method of payment changed with the new Year 2000 Medicare policy on clinical trials coverage. The results showed continued adequate representation by sex and race/ethnicity. Older patient accrual on SWOG trials increased significantly since 2000, with 31% of patients > or = 65 years old enrolled from 1997 to 2000 and 38% enrolled from 2001 to 2003 (v 25% from 1993 to 1996). The percentage of patients using Medicare plus supplemental insurance also increased beginning in 2000, whereas the percentage of patients using Medicare alone remained the same. Method of payment analyses provided evidence that the Year 2000 Medicare policy change had a positive impact, but only for those patients with supplemental private coverage of coinsurance costs. Improvements in the Medicare payment structure could further increase older patient participation in clinical trials.

  1. Impact of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease on patients undergoing laryngectomy for laryngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Sylvester, Michael J; Marchiano, Emily; Park, Richard Chan Woo; Baredes, Soly; Eloy, Jean Anderson

    2017-02-01

    Although chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common comorbidity in patients undergoing laryngeal cancer surgery, the impact of this comorbidity in this setting is not well established. In this analysis, we used the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) to elucidate the impact of COPD on outcomes after laryngectomy for laryngeal cancer. The NIS was queried for patients admitted from 1998 to 2010 with laryngeal cancer who underwent total or partial laryngectomy. Patient demographics, type of admission, length of stay, hospital charges, and concomitant diagnoses were analyzed. Our inclusion criteria yielded a cohort of 40,441 patients: 3,051 with COPD and 37,390 without. On average, COPD was associated with an additional $12,500 (P < 0.001) in hospital charges and an additional 1.4 days (P < 0.001) of hospital stay. There was no significant difference in incidence of in-hospital mortality between the COPD and non-COPD groups after total laryngectomy (1.1% in COPD vs. 1.0% in non-COPD; P = 0.776); however, there was an increased incidence of in-hospital mortality in the COPD group compared to the non-COPD group after partial laryngectomy (3.4% in COPD vs. 0.4% in non-COPD; P < 0.001). Multivariate adjusted logistic regression revealed that COPD was associated with greater odds of pulmonary complications after both partial laryngectomy (odds ratio [OR] = 3.198; P < 0.001) and total laryngectomy (OR = 1.575; P < 0.001). Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease appears to be associated with greater hospital charges, length of stay, and postoperative pulmonary complications in patients undergoing laryngectomy for laryngeal cancer. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease after partial, but not total, laryngectomy appears to be associated with increased risk of in-hospital mortality. 2C. Laryngoscope, 2016 127:417-423, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  2. Impact of the lung oncology multidisciplinary team meetings on the management of patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Ung, Kim Ann; Campbell, Belinda A; Duplan, Danny; Ball, David; David, Steven

    2016-06-01

    Multidisciplinary team (MDT) meetings are increasingly regarded as a component of multidisciplinary cancer care. We aimed to prospectively measure the impact of MDT meetings on clinicians' management plans for lung oncology patients, and the implementation rate of the meeting recommendations. Consecutive patient cases presented at the weekly lung oncology MDT meetings were prospectively enrolled. Investigators compared the clinicians' management plans pre-meeting with the consensus plans post-meeting. The meeting was considered to have an impact on management plans if ≥1 of the following changes were detected: tumor stage, histology, treatment intent or treatment modality, or if additional investigations were recommended. Investigators reviewed hospital patient records at 4 months to determine if the meeting recommendations were implemented. Reasons for non-implementation were also recorded. Of the 55 eligible cases, the MDT meeting changed management plans in 58% (CI 45-71%; P < 0.005). These changes included: additional investigations (59%), or changes in treatment modality (19%), treatment intent (9%), histology (6%) or tumor stage (6%). The meeting recommendations were implemented in 72% of cases. Reasons for non-implementation included deteriorating patient performance status, clinician's preference, the influence of new clinical information obtained after the meeting or patient decision. MDT meetings significantly impact on the management plans for lung oncology patients. The majority of MDT recommendations (72%) were implemented into patient care. These findings provide further evidence to support the role of MDT meetings as an essential part of the decision-making process for the optimal multidisciplinary management of patients with cancer. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  3. Impact of endoscopic ultrasonography and physician specialty on the management of patients with esophagus cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gines, A.; Cassivi, S. D.; Martenson, J. A.; Schleck, C.; Deschamps, C.; Sinicrope, F. A.; Alberts, S. R.; Murray, J. A.; Zinsmeister, Alan R.; Vazquez-Sequeiros, Enrique; Nichols, F. C.; Miller, R. C.; Quevedo, J. F.; Allen, M. S.; Alexander, J. A.; Zais, T.; Haddock, M. G.; Romero, Y.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY While endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) and EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) are the most accurate techniques for locoregional staging of esophageal cancer, little evidence exists that these innovations impact on clinical care. The objective on this study was to determine the frequency with which EUS and EUS-FNA alter the management of patients with localized esophageal cancer, and assess practice variation among specialists at a tertiary care center. Three gastroenterologists, three medical oncologists, three radiation oncologists and four thoracic surgeons were asked to independently report their management recommendations as the anonymized staging information of 50 prospectively enrolled patients from another study were sequentially disclosed on-line. Compared to initial management recommendations, that were based upon history, physical examination, upper endoscopy and CT scan results, EUS prompted a change in management 24% (95% CI: 12–36%) of the time; usually to a more resource-intensive approach (71%), for example from recommending palliation to recommending neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy. EUS-FNA plus cytology results altered management an additional 8% (95% CI: 6–15%) of the time. Agreement between specialists ranged from fair (intraclass correlation [ICC = 0.32) to substantial (ICC = 0.65); improving with additional information. Among specialists, agreement was greatest for patients with stage I disease. EUS and EUS-FNA changed patient management the most for patients with stages IIA, IIB or III disease. EUS, with or without FNA, significantly impacts the management of patients with localized esophageal cancer. With respect to the optimal treatment for each patient, agreement among physicians incrementally increases with endoscopic ultrasound results. Specialty training appears to influence therapeutic decision-making behavior. PMID:18430106

  4. Impact of endoscopic ultrasonography and physician specialty on the management of patients with esophagus cancer.

    PubMed

    Gines, A; Cassivi, S D; Martenson, J A; Schleck, C; Deschamps, C; Sinicrope, F A; Alberts, S R; Murray, J A; Zinsmeister, Alan R; Vazquez-Sequeiros, Enrique; Nichols, F C; Miller, R C; Quevedo, J F; Allen, M S; Alexander, J A; Zais, T; Haddock, M G; Romero, Y

    2008-01-01

    While endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) and EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) are the most accurate techniques for locoregional staging of esophageal cancer, little evidence exists that these innovations impact on clinical care. The objective on this study was to determine the frequency with which EUS and EUS-FNA alter the management of patients with localized esophageal cancer, and assess practice variation among specialists at a tertiary care center. Three gastroenterologists, three medical oncologists, three radiation oncologists and four thoracic surgeons were asked to independently report their management recommendations as the anonymized staging information of 50 prospectively enrolled patients from another study were sequentially disclosed on-line. Compared to initial management recommendations, that were based upon history, physical examination, upper endoscopy and CT scan results, EUS prompted a change in management 24% (95% CI: 12-36%) of the time; usually to a more resource-intensive approach (71%), for example from recommending palliation to recommending neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy. EUS-FNA plus cytology results altered management an additional 8% (95% CI: 6-15%) of the time. Agreement between specialists ranged from fair (intraclass correlation [ICC=0.32) to substantial (ICC=0.65); improving with additional information. Among specialists, agreement was greatest for patients with stage I disease. EUS and EUS-FNA changed patient management the most for patients with stages IIA, IIB or III disease. EUS, with or without FNA, significantly impacts the management of patients with localized esophageal cancer. With respect to the optimal treatment for each patient, agreement among physicians incrementally increases with endoscopic ultrasound results. Specialty training appears to influence therapeutic decision-making behavior.

  5. Consumer impact of an interactive decision aid for rectal cancer patients offered adjuvant therapy.

    PubMed

    Butow, P N; Solomon, M; Young, J M; Whelan, T; Salkeld, G; Wilson, K; Harrison, J D; Hruby, G; Mansour, O; Kennedy, N; Tattersall, M H N

    2006-10-01

    There is increasing interest in the use of decision aids (DAs) to facilitate patient involvement in clinical decisions. This study explored the views of patients with colorectal cancer and participants in a community bowel screening service regarding an interactive DA concerning adjuvant treatment for rectal cancer, and the impact of the aid on knowledge, anxiety, attitudes and preferences for treatment options. Fourteen patients with colorectal cancer participated in four focus groups. Eighty-nine participants in a community bowel screening service completed a questionnaire before and 1 week after viewing the DA. Thirty were randomly selected to participate in a telephone interview to obtain qualitative feedback about the DA. Focus group participants reported using information to evaluate their doctor's care and expertise, or to prepare themselves for future symptoms and side-effects. Most supported the use of a DA and preferred pie charts to convey risk information. Within the community sample, anxiety remained stable and knowledge increased after exposure to the DA. Almost all participants found the DA useful and easy to understand, and felt it would make the process of decision making easier. A DA regarding adjuvant therapy for rectal cancer appears to be valued and to produce positive outcomes. A randomized controlled trial of this intervention is now required.

  6. Impact of obesity on perioperative complications and long-term survival of patients with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Bickenbach, Kai A; Denton, Brian; Gonen, Mithat; Brennan, Murray F; Coit, Daniel G; Strong, Vivian E

    2013-03-01

    The prevalence of obesity is increasing in the United States. Obesity has been associated with worse surgical outcomes, but its impact on long-term outcomes in gastric cancer is unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of being overweight on surgical and long-term outcomes for patients with gastric cancer. Patients who underwent curative intent resection for gastric carcinoma from 1985 to 2007 were identified from a prospectively collected gastric cancer database. Overweight was defined as a body mass index (BMI) of 25 kg/m(2) or higher. Clinical outcomes of overweight and nonoverweight patients were compared. From the total population of 1,853 patients, 1,125 (60.7%) were overweight. Overweight patients tended to have more proximal tumors and a lower T stage. Accurate complication data were available on a subset of patients from 2000 to 2007. A BMI of ≥25 was associated with increased postoperative complications (47.9 vs. 35.8%, p < 0.001). This was mainly due to an increase in the rate of wound infections (8.9 vs. 4.7%, p = 0.02) and anastomotic leaks (11.8 vs. 5.4%, p = 0.002). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that higher BMI, total gastrectomy, and use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy were associated with increased wound infection and anastomotic leak. Overweight patients were less likely to have adequate lymph node staging (73.3 vs. 79.2%, p = 0.047). There was no difference in overall survival or disease-specific survival between the two groups. Increased BMI is a predictor of increased postoperative complications, including anastomotic leak, but it is not a predictor of survival in gastric cancer.

  7. The impact factors on 5-year survival rate in patients operated with oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Geum, Dong-Ho; Roh, Young-Chea; Yoon, Sang-Yong; Kim, Hyo-Geon; Lee, Jung-Han; Song, Jae-Min; Lee, Jae-Yeol; Hwang, Dae-Seok; Kim, Yong-Deok; Shin, Sang-Hun; Chung, In-Kyo

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study is to analyze clinical impact factors on the survival rate, and to acquire basic clinical data for the diagnosis of oral cancer, for a determination of the treatment plan with long-term survival in oral cancer patients. Materials and Methods Through a retrospective review of the medical records, the factors for long-term survival rate were analyzed. Thirty-seven patients, among patient database with oral cancer treated in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery at Pusan National University Hospital within a period from March 1998 to March 2008, were selected within the study criteria and were followed-up for more than 5 years. The analyzed factors were gender, age, drinking, smoking, primary tumor site, type of cancer, TNM stage, recurrence of affected region, and metastasis of cervical lymph node. The 5-year survival rate on the impact factors was calculated statistically using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results By classification of clinical TNM at the 1st visit, there were 11 (29.7%) cases for stage I, 11 (29.7%) cases for stage II, 3 (8.1%) cases for stage III, and 12 (32.5%) cases for stage IV. The 5-year survival rate of total oral cancer patients after the operation were 75.7%, pathological TNM stage related 5-year survival rate were as follows: stage I 90.0%, stage II 81.8%, stage III 100% and stage IV 45.5%; in which the survival rate difference by each stage was significantly observed. The recurrence of cervical lymph node was the significant impact factor for the survival rate, because only 30.0% the survival rate in recurrent cases existed. During the follow-up, there were 15 (40.5%) patients with confirmed recurrence, and the 5-year survival rate of these patients was decreased as 46.7%. Conclusion The classification of clinical and pathological TNM stage, local recurrence after surgery, and metastasis of cervical lymph node after surgery were analyzed as the 3 most significant factors. PMID:24471047

  8. The impact of pulmonary metastasectomy in patients with previously resected colorectal cancer liver metastases

    PubMed Central

    Riegel, Johannes; Wagner, Johanna; Kunzmann, Volker; Baur, Johannes; Walles, Thorsten; Dietz, Ulrich; Loeb, Stefan; Germer, Christoph-Thomas; Steger, Ulrich; Klein, Ingo

    2017-01-01

    Background 40–50% of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) will develop liver metastases (CRLM) during the course of the disease. One third of these patients will additionally develop pulmonary metastases. Methods 137 consecutive patients with CRLM, were analyzed regarding survival data, clinical, histological data and treatment. Results were stratified according to the occurrence of pulmonary metastases and metastases resection. Results 39% of all patients with liver resection due to CRLM developed additional lung metastases. 44% of these patients underwent subsequent pulmonary resection. Patients undergoing pulmonary metastasectomy showed a significantly better five-year survival compared to patients not qualified for curative resection (5-year survival 71.2% vs. 28.0%; p = 0.001). Interestingly, the 5-year survival of these patients was even superior to all patients with CRLM, who did not develop pulmonary metastases (77.5% vs. 63.5%; p = 0.015). Patients, whose pulmonary metastases were not resected, were more likely to redevelop liver metastases (50.0% vs 78.6%; p = 0.034). However, the rate of distant metastases did not differ between both groups (54.5 vs.53.6; p = 0.945). Conclusion The occurrence of colorectal lung metastases after curative liver resection does not impact patient survival if pulmonary metastasectomy is feasible. Those patients clearly benefit from repeated resections of the liver and the lung metastases. PMID:28328956

  9. Symptoms overlooked in hospitalized cancer patients: Impact of concurrent symptoms on oversight [corrected] by nurses.

    PubMed

    Miyajima, Kaya; Fujisawa, Daisuke; Hashiguchi, Saori; Shirahase, Joichiro; Mimura, Masaru; Kashima, Haruo; Takeda, Junzo

    2014-04-01

    Physical and psychological symptoms in cancer patients are frequently overlooked by medical staff. However, little is known regarding the potential impacts of concurrent physical and psychological symptoms on the overlooking of other symptoms. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of concurrent symptoms on the overlooking of other symptoms in cancer inpatients. A total of 255 cancer inpatients in the general wards of one university hospital, who were referred to the palliative care team, were included. On the day of referral, nurses and patients were independently assessed for the presence of the following eight symptoms: pain, fatigue, nausea and vomiting, shortness of breath, lack of appetite, dry mouth, sleep problems, and distressed feelings. The presence of delirium was also separately assessed by nurses and psychiatrists on the team. A total of nine symptoms detected by nurses and those reported by patients or psychiatrists were compared, and logistic regression analysis was performed to identify the variables associated with the overlooking of these symptoms. The most frequently reported symptom was pain (76.5%), followed by distressed feelings (49.8%), sleep problems (34.1%), and delirium (25.1%). The proportion of those overlooked was more than one quarter (25.0-63.6%) for all symptoms except pain (12.8%). Significant associations were found between the overlooking of shortness of breath and concurrent delirium (odds ratio [OR] = 110.9); the overlooking of sleep problems and concurrent lack of appetite (OR = 9.1); and the overlooking of distressed feelings and concurrent dry mouth (OR = 27.7). No patient demographic characteristic was associated with the overlooking of any other symptoms. The presence of some specific concurrent symptoms is likely to lead to the overlooking of other symptoms in cancer inpatients by nurses. Comprehensive assessments of physical and psychological symptoms in daily clinical practice are needed.

  10. Impact of Body Mass Index on Outcomes After Conformal Radiotherapy in Patients With Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Geinitz, Hans; Thamm, Reinhard; Mueller, Tobias; Jess, Kerstin; Zimmermann, Frank B.; Molls, Michael; Nieder, Carsten

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: Several retrospective analyses have suggested that obese men with prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) have outcomes inferior to those of normal-weight men. However, a recently presented analysis for the first time challenged this association between body mass index (BMI) and treatment failure. It is therefore important to provide further data on this issue. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective analysis of 564 men treated with risk-adapted conformal EBRT at a single institution. Low-risk patients received EBRT alone, and the other patients received EBRT plus endocrine treatment. In addition, high-risk patients were treated to higher EBRT doses (74 Gy). A rectal balloon catheter for internal immobilization, which can be identified on portal images, was used in 261 patients (46%). Thus, localization did not rely on bony landmarks alone in these cases. Results: The median BMI was 26, and 15% of patients had BMI {>=}30. Neither univariate nor multivariate analyses detected any significant impact of BMI on biochemical relapse, prostate cancer-specific survival, or overall survival. The 5-year biochemical relapse rate was 21% and prostate cancerspecific survival 96%. Conclusions: The present analysis of a large cohort of consecutively treated patients suggests that efforts to reduce prostate movement and geographic miss might result in comparable outcomes in obese and normal-weight patients.

  11. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act: the impact on urologic cancer care.

    PubMed

    Keegan, Kirk A; Penson, David F

    2013-10-01

    In March 2010, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act as well as its amendments were signed into law. This sweeping legislation was aimed at controlling spiraling healthcare costs and redressing significant disparities in healthcare access and quality. Cancer diagnoses and their treatments constitute a large component of rising healthcare expenditures and, not surprisingly, the legislation will have a significant influence on cancer care in the USA. Because genitourinary malignancies represent an impressive 25% of all cancer diagnoses per year, this legislation could have a profound impact on urologic oncology. To this end, we will present key components of this landmark legislation, including the proposed expansion to Medicaid coverage, the projected role of Accountable Care Organizations, the expected creation of quality reporting systems, the formation of an independent Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, and enhanced regulation on physician-owned practices. We will specifically address the anticipated effect of these changes on urologic cancer care. Briefly, the legal ramifications and current barriers to the statutes will be examined. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act: The Impact on Urologic Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Keegan, Kirk A.; Penson, David F.

    2012-01-01

    In March 2010, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act as well as its amendments were signed into law. This sweeping legislation was aimed at controlling spiraling healthcare costs and redressing significant disparities in healthcare access and quality. Cancer diagnoses and their treatments constitute a large component of rising healthcare expenditures and, not surprisingly, the legislation will have a significant influence on cancer care in the United States. Because genitourinary malignancies represent an impressive 25% of all cancer diagnoses per year, this legislation could have a profound impact on urologic oncology. To this end, we will present key components of this landmark legislation, including the proposed expansion to Medicaid coverage, the projected role of Accountable Care Organizations, the expected creation of quality reporting systems, the formation of an independent Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, and enhanced regulation on physician-owned practices. We will specifically address the anticipated effect of these changes on urological cancer care. Briefly, the legal ramifications and current barriers to the statutes will be examined. PMID:22819697

  13. The Last Days of Life: Symptom Burden and Impact on Nutrition and Hydration in Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hui, David; Dev, Rony; Bruera, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review We will review the symptom burden in cancer patients in the last days of life, its impact on nutrition and hydration, and the role of artificial nutrition and hydration in patients with days of life expectancy. Recent findings In the last days of life, cancer patients often experience progressive functional decline and worsening symptom burden. Many symptoms such as anorexia-cachexia, dysphagia and delirium could impair oral intake. These, coupled with refractory cachexia, contribute to persistent weight loss and decreased quality of life. Furthermore, the inability to eat/drink and body image changes can result in emotional distress for patients and caregivers. Clinicians caring for these individuals need to ensure longitudinal communication about goals of care, education about the natural process of dying, optimization of symptom management, and provide appropriate emotional support for patients and caregivers. There is a lack of evidence to support that artificial nutrition and hydration can improve outcomes in the last days of life. Artificial nutrition is not recommended because of its invasive nature, while artificial hydration may be considered on a case-by-case basis. Summary This review highlights the need to conduct further research on symptom burden, nutrition and hydration in the last days of life. PMID:26509860

  14. Impact of early postoperative enteral nutrition on clinical outcomes in patients with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, B; Liu, H Y; Guo, S H; Sun, P; Gong, F M; Jia, B Q

    2015-06-29

    The impact of early enteral nutrition (EEN) on clinical outcomes of gastric cancer patients was investigated. Three hundred pa-tients undergoing gastric cancer surgery from July 2010 to May 2014 were randomly divided into experimental and control groups (n = 150/group). Experimental group patients received enteral nutrition in water during the early postoperative period. Control group patients received conventional perioperative treatment. Patients' clinical outcomes, post-operative immune function, and nutritional statuses were compared, which revealed that the postoperative fever duration (80.2 ± 6.0 vs 88.1 ± 8.1 h, P < 0.05), anal exhaust time (78.8 ± 9.3 vs 85.3 ± 8.4 h, P < 0.05), and length of hospitalization (7.73 ± 2.13 vs 9.77 ± 1.76 days, P < 0.01) differed significantly. Treatment costs in thousands of dol-lars were 31.24 ± 3.21 for the experimental group and 35.61 ± 2.32 for the control group; this difference was statistically significant (P < 0.01). The incidence of postoperative complications did not significantly differ between the experimental and control groups [14.0% (21/150) vs 17.3% (26/150), P > 0.05]. At postoperative days 3 and 7, the CD3(+), CD4(+), natural killer cell, albumin, and prealbumin levels and CD4(+)/CD8(+) ra-tio were significantly higher in the experimental group than the control group (all P < 0.05). CD8(+) cell counts were significantly lower in the experimental group than the control group (P < 0.05). Postsurgical oral EEN can improve nutritional status and immune function and promote early recovery of intestinal function in patients with gastric cancer.

  15. The Survival Impact of the Intergroup 0116 Trial on Patients With Gastric Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kozak, Kevin R.; Moody, John S.

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: The Intergroup 0116 (INT 0116) trial demonstrated a survival benefit for a broad group of fully resected gastric cancer patients. This study examined the impact on survival of the release of this landmark trial. Methods and Materials: Patients with gastric carcinoma diagnosed between 1995 and 2004 were identified in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. Patients from the overall population as well as those potentially eligible for the INT 0116 trial were classified as having been diagnosed either before (1995-1999) or after (2000-2004) this trial. Both Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox models were used to examine survival trends within these cohorts. Results: For the overall population of 22,982 patients, the use of radiotherapy (RT) significantly changed after the INT 0116 trial (p < 0.0001), with postoperative RT increasing from 6.5% to 13.3%. For the two periods of interest, overall survival significantly improved in recent years (p = 0.00008). A similar improvement was also seen for patients who were potentially eligible for the INT 0116 trial (p = 0.004), with 3-year survival rates improving from 32.2% to 34.5%. On both univariate and multivariate analysis, use of RT was associated with a significant survival improvement (HR, 0.65 [0.48-0.88]; p = 0.005). Conclusion: Use of postoperative RT for gastric cancer has significantly increased after the release of the INT 0116 trial, likely reflecting increased use of adjuvant chemoradiotherapy. This change has been associated with improved survival in gastric cancer patients, suggesting that the improved outcome seen in this trial has been successfully translated to the community.

  16. Impact of Cultural and Linguistic Factors on Symptom Reporting by Patients With Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cleeland, Charles S.; Mendoza, Tito R.; Yun, Young Ho; Wang, Ying; Okuyama, Toru; Johnson, Valen E.

    2010-01-01

    Background Patient reporting of the severity and impact of symptoms is an essential component of cancer symptom management and cancer treatment clinical trials. In multinational clinical trials, cultural and linguistic variations in patient-reported outcomes instruments could confound the interpretation of study results. Methods The severity and interference of multiple symptoms in 1433 cancer patients with mixed diagnoses and treatment status from the United States, China, Japan, Russia, and Korea were measured with psychometrically validated language versions of the M. D. Anderson Symptom Inventory (MDASI). Mixed-effect ordinal probit regression models were fitted to the pooled data to compare the magnitude of the effect of “country” (nation and linguistic factors) with between-subjects effects on symptom reporting, adjusted for patient and clinical factors (age, sex, performance status, and chemotherapy status). Results For the pooled sample, fatigue, disturbed sleep, distress, pain, and lack of appetite were the most severe patient-reported MDASI symptoms. The magnitude of the variance of the country random effects was only one-fourth to one-half of the interpatient variation (σ2 = 0.23–0.46) for all symptoms, except nausea and vomiting. Conclusions Cultural and linguistic variations in symptom reporting among the five language versions of the validated MDASI were limited. Ordinal probit modeling provided a simple mechanism for accounting for cultural and linguistic differences in patient populations. The equivalence among MDASI translations in this study suggests that symptom ratings collected from various cultural and language groups using the MDASI can be interpreted in a similar way in oncology practice, clinical trials, and clinical research. PMID:20348233

  17. Impact of cultural and linguistic factors on symptom reporting by patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin Shelley; Cleeland, Charles S; Mendoza, Tito R; Yun, Young Ho; Wang, Ying; Okuyama, Toru; Johnson, Valen E

    2010-05-19

    Patient reporting of the severity and impact of symptoms is an essential component of cancer symptom management and cancer treatment clinical trials. In multinational clinical trials, cultural and linguistic variations in patient-reported outcomes instruments could confound the interpretation of study results. The severity and interference of multiple symptoms in 1433 cancer patients with mixed diagnoses and treatment status from the United States, China, Japan, Russia, and Korea were measured with psychometrically validated language versions of the M. D. Anderson Symptom Inventory (MDASI). Mixed-effect ordinal probit regression models were fitted to the pooled data to compare the magnitude of the effect of "country" (nation and linguistic factors) with between-subjects effects on symptom reporting, adjusted for patient and clinical factors (age, sex, performance status, and chemotherapy status). For the pooled sample, fatigue, disturbed sleep, distress, pain, and lack of appetite were the most severe patient-reported MDASI symptoms. The magnitude of the variance of the country random effects was only one-fourth to one-half of the interpatient variation (sigma(2) = 0.23-0.46) for all symptoms, except nausea and vomiting. Cultural and linguistic variations in symptom reporting among the five language versions of the validated MDASI were limited. Ordinal probit modeling provided a simple mechanism for accounting for cultural and linguistic differences in patient populations. The equivalence among MDASI translations in this study suggests that symptom ratings collected from various cultural and language groups using the MDASI can be interpreted in a similar way in oncology practice, clinical trials, and clinical research.

  18. Impact of HER2 expression on outcome in gastric cancer patients with liver metastasis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, H; Li, Q; Yu, S; Yu, Y; Wang, Y; Li, W; Cui, Y; Liu, T

    2017-02-01

    We aim to investigate the correlation of HER2 expression with liver metastasis and the impact of HER2 status and trastuzumab therapy on the prognosis of gastric cancer with liver metastasis (GCLM) patients. This prospective observational study was carried out in Shanghai Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, from January 2012 to June 2015. HER2 status and baseline characteristics were collected from the patient record. GCLM patients were divided into three groups according to HER2 status and trastuzumab therapy. A total of 290 patients were included, and94 patients were diagnosed with liver metastasis. The HER2 positivity was 37.2 % (35/94) in GCLM patients and 21 % (61/290) in the overall GC patients. Among 94 GCLM patients, 28 HER2-positive patients received trastuzumab-based therapy (group A), 7 HER2-positive patients received chemotherapy alone (group B) and the other 59 patients were HER2 negative (group C). The median progression-free survival (PFS) for groups A, B and C was 7.83, 6.30 and 5.33 months, respectively (P = 0.007). The median overall survival (OS) for groups A, B and C was 12.00, 10.47 and 8.67 months, respectively (P = 0.056). Further Cox analysis showed that there was no significant difference in OS (P = 0.917) and PFS (P = 0.456) between group B and C. HER2 positivity was higher in GCLM patients. HER2 status itself was not an independent prognostic factor in GCLM patients. Trastuzumab-based therapy could significantly improve survival in HER2-positive GCLM patients.

  19. The last days of life: symptom burden and impact on nutrition and hydration in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Hui, David; Dev, Rony; Bruera, Eduardo

    2015-12-01

    To examine the symptom burden in cancer patients during the last days of life, its impact on nutrition and hydration, and the role of artificial nutrition and hydration in the final days. During the last days of life, cancer patients often experience progressive functional decline and worsening symptom burden. Many symptoms such as anorexia-cachexia, dysphagia, and delirium could impair oral intake. These, coupled with refractory cachexia, contribute to persistent weight loss and decreased quality of life. Furthermore, the inability to eat/drink and body image changes can result in emotional distress for patients and caregivers. Clinicians caring for these individuals need to ensure longitudinal communication about goals of care, education about the natural process of dying, optimization of symptom management, and provide appropriate emotional support for patients and caregivers. There is a lack of evidence to support that artificial nutrition and hydration can improve outcomes during the last days of life. Artificial nutrition is not recommended because of its invasive nature, whereas artificial hydration may be considered on a case-by-case basis. This review highlights the need to conduct further research on symptom burden, nutrition, and hydration during the last days of life.

  20. Cachexia in patients with chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer: impact on survival and outcome.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Jeannine; Büchler, Markus W; Friess, Helmut; Martignoni, Marc E

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) and pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) are the most common diseases of the pancreas. Cachexia-weight loss exceeding 10% of stable body weight-is present in up to 80% of patients with PDAC. Because the mechanisms of cachexia are not well known, this provides a possibility to compare clinical courses of benign and malignant cachexia. In this study, 382 patients-242 with a PDAC stage UICC II/ 140 with CP-were documented regarding the prevalence of cachexia and its influence on perioperative morbidity and mortality with a special interest to postoperative weight gain and survival. Cachexia was present in 41.4% of CP and 31% of cancer patients. We could demonstrate more pronounced systemic effects of cachexia in patients with PDAC. Weight loss was faster in PDAC patients, the amount of weight loss did not differ significantly between the groups. Cachexia had a significant impact on survival and the postoperative course in patients with PDAC and tumor resection. The development of cachexia is faster in patients with a malignant disease and the systemic effects are more pronounced. Therefore, tumor cachexia should be considered as a different entity than cachexia in benign diseases.

  1. Impact of Radiotherapy on Fertility, Pregnancy, and Neonatal Outcomes in Female Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Wo, Jennifer Y.; Viswanathan, Akila N.

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: Radiation has many potential long-term effects on cancer survivors. Female cancer patients may experience decreased fertility depending on the site irradiated. Oncologists should be aware of these consequences and discuss options for fertility preservation before initiating therapy. Methods and Materials: A comprehensive review of the existing literature was conducted. Studies reporting the outcomes for female patients treated with cranio-spinal, abdominal, or pelvic radiation reporting fertility, pregnancy, or neonatal-related outcomes were reviewed. Results: Cranio-spinal irradiation elicited significant hormonal changes in women that affected their ability to become pregnant later in life. Women treated with abdomino-pelvic radiation have an increased rate of uterine dysfunction leading to miscarriage, preterm labor, low birth weight, and placental abnormalities. Early menopause results from low-dose ovarian radiation. Ovarian transposition may decrease the rates of ovarian dysfunction. Conclusions: There is a dose-dependent relationship between ovarian radiation therapy (RT) and premature menopause. Patients treated with RT must be aware of the impact of treatment on fertility and explore appropriate options.

  2. [Antineoplastic treatment impact on nutritional status in patients with breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Monroy Cisneros, Karina; Astiazarán García, Humberto; Esparza Romero, Julián; Guevara Torres, Alfonso Genaro; Valencia Juillerat, Mauro E; Méndez Estrada, Rosa Olivia; Tortoledo Ortiz, Orlando; Pacheco Moreno, Bertha Isabel

    2014-10-01

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed malignancy in women in Mexico and also has the highest mortality. Although treatment has improved significantly, it can affect the nutritional status of the recipients. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of the initial phase of antineoplastic therapy on the nutritional status in patients with breast cancer. Forty subjects with primary diagnosed of invasive breast cancer were studied in a before and after intervention (six month apart) using a quasi-experimental design. Basal and six month after intervention measurements included were anthropometry, body composition by dual X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA), diet by 24-hour recall and food frequency questionnaire, as well as serum -carotene and retinol. The therapy effect was analyzed using repeated measurements mixed linear regression. Lean tissue decreased after the studied period (p=0.032). Addicionally, there was an interaction between weight, BMI and body fat parameters with menopausal status, increasing in these variables due to therapy only premenopausal patients (p=0.005, 0.006 and 0.001, respectively). Decreased serum retinol (p=0.049) despite the improvement in -carotene status (p=0.03). In general there was an increase the consumption of vegetables food products whilst a decrease in animal foods. The breast cancer antineoplastic treatment had a negative effect on weight and body fat, especially in young women. Although there were some positive dietary changes, vegetables consumption remained insufficient, which was also reflected in serum biomarkers. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  3. Synthesis maps: visual knowledge translation for the CanIMPACT clinical system and patient cancer journeys

    PubMed Central

    Jones, P.H.; Shakdher, S.; Singh, P.

    2017-01-01

    Salient findings and interpretations from the canimpact clinical cancer research study are visually represented in two synthesis maps for the purpose of communicating an integrated presentation of the study to clinical cancer researchers and policymakers. Synthesis maps integrate evidence and expertise into a visual narrative for knowledge translation and communication. A clinical system synthesis map represents the current Canadian primary care and cancer practice systems, proposed as a visual knowledge translation from the mixed-methods canimpact study to inform Canadian clinical research, policy, and practice discourses. Two synthesis maps, drawn together from multiple canimpact investigations and sources, were required to articulate critical differences between the clinical system and patient perspectives. The synthesis map of Canada-wide clinical cancer systems illustrates the relationships between primary care and the full cancer continuum. A patient-centred map was developed to represent the cancer (and primary care) journeys as experienced by breast and colorectal cancer patients. PMID:28490928

  4. Compliance to radiation therapy of head and neck cancer patients and impact on treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, B C; Sá-Couto, P; Lopes, M C; Khouri, L

    2016-07-01

    The aims of the study were to evaluate head and neck cancer (HNC) patient's compliance to the planned radiation therapy (RT) using the department policy established in 2005 at IPOCFG and to estimate the impact on treatment outcome due to failure in receiving RT as prescribed. 359 HNC patients irradiated from 2007 to 2013 were included in this study. Patient cohort was divided into Group 1: patients receiving RT as prescribed and Group 2: patients that interrupted or suspended RT. Group Tox is the subgroup of patients that interrupted RT due to toxicity or intercurrent disease. Number and causes for treatment interruptions were assessed. The cumulative incidence of locoregional control (LRC), disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival for Groups 1 and 2 was determined. Cox regression was performed to investigate potential hazard factors and logistic regression was made to determine risk factors related to treatment interruptions. Major causes for treatment interruptions were toxicity plus intercurrent disease (41.7 %) and public holidays (30.1 %). 10.3 % of the patients interrupted 3-9 days. Significant differences in survival distributions of the LRC between Groups 1 and 2, of up to 19 %, were found in the subgroup of patients with N2-3 tumours, for post-operative RT and for concomitant RT. Treatment breaks larger than two days had an almost fourfold increased risk of poorer LRC and DFS. Twin accelerators and treating on public holidays are effective measures minimizing RT breaks. For HNC, patient compliance is mostly limited by RT side-effects. Efforts to maintain RT biological effective dose in HNC must be always undertaken.

  5. Prospective Study Evaluating the Impact of Tissue Confirmation of Metastatic Disease in Patients With Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Amir, Eitan; Miller, Naomi; Geddie, William; Freedman, Orit; Kassam, Farrah; Simmons, Christine; Oldfield, Maria; Dranitsaris, George; Tomlinson, George; Laupacis, Andreas; Tannock, Ian F.; Clemons, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Decisions about treatment for women with metastatic breast cancer are usually based on the estrogen (ER), progesterone (PgR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status of the primary tumor. Retrospective data suggest that discordance between primary and metastatic lesions leads to detrimental outcome. This prospective study investigated receptor status of primary tumors and metastases in the same patient and assessed the impact of discordance on patient management and survival. Patients and Methods Biopsies of suspected metastases were analyzed for ER, PgR, and HER2. Primary tumors and metastases were analyzed using similar methodology. The treating oncologist indicated a treatment plan before and after biopsy to determine whether the result influenced management. Patients were followed up for progression or death. Results Of 121 women undergoing biopsy, 80% could be analyzed for receptor status. Discordance in ER, PgR, and HER2 between the primary and the metastasis was 16%, 40%, and 10%, respectively. Biopsy led to a reported change of management in 14% of women (95% CI, 8.4% to 21.5%). Fine-needle aspiration and biopsy of bone led to reduced ability to analyze receptors. After a median follow-up of 12 months, there were no trends for an association between receptor discordance and either time to treatment failure or overall survival. Conclusion Biopsy of metastases is technically feasible. Clinicians alter immediate management in one of seven patients on the basis of results of the biopsy, and discordance is not then associated with detrimental effects on outcome. Tissue confirmation should be considered in women with breast cancer and suspected metastatic recurrence. PMID:22124102

  6. Patient navigation for American Indians undergoing cancer treatment: utilization and impact on care delivery in a regional health care center

    PubMed Central

    Guadagnolo, B. Ashleigh; Boylan, Amy; Sargent, Michelle; Koop, David; Brunette, Deb; Kanekar, Shalini; Shortbull, Vanessa; Molloy, Kevin; Petereit, Daniel G.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To assess patient navigation (PN) utilization and its impact on treatment interruptions and clinical trial enrollment among American Indian (AI) cancer patients. Methods Between February 2004 and September 2009, 332 AI cancer patients received PN services throughout cancer treatment. The PN program provided culturally-competent navigators to assist patients with navigating cancer therapy, obtaining medications, insurance issues, communicating with medical providers, and travel and lodging logistics. Data on utilization and trial enrollment were prospectively collected. Data for a historical control group of 70 AI patients who did not receive PN services were used to compare treatment interruptions among those undergoing PN during curative radiation therapy (subgroup of 123 patients). Results The median number of contacts with a navigator was 12 (range, 1-119). The median time spent with the navigator at first contact was 40 minutes (range 10-250 min.) and 15 min for subsequent contacts. Patients treated with radiation therapy with curative intent who underwent PN had fewer days of treatment interruption (mean, 1.7 days; 95% CI, 1.1-2.2 days) than historical controls who did not receive PN services (mean, 4.9 days; 95% CI, 2.9-6.9 days). Of the 332 patients, 72 (22%; 95% CI, 17-26%) were enrolled on a clinical treatment trial or cancer control protocol. Conclusions PN was associated with fewer treatment interruptions and relatively high rates of clinical trial enrollment among AI cancer patients compared to national reports. PMID:21656754

  7. Impact of depression mood disorder on the adverse drug reaction incidence rate of anticancer drugs in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Zhou, T; Duan, J J; Zhou, G P; Cai, J Y; Huang, Z H; Zeng, Y T; Xu, F

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the impact of depression mood disorder on the incidence of adverse drug reactions of anticancer drugs in cancer patients. The Hamilton Depression Scale 17 was used to evaluate the depression mood disorder level in 73 cancer patients before chemotherapy. Pharmacists monitored adverse drug reactions during the chemotherapy period. The relationship between depression mood disorder level and the incidence of adverse drug reactions was analysed. The frequency and extent of total adverse drug reactions were not related to depression mood disorder level. The frequency and extent of subjectively experienced adverse drug reactions such as anorexia, nausea and fatigue were related to depression mood disorder level. In conclusion, psychological support and intervention should be provided to cancer patients in order to improve patient adherence and cancer chemotherapy effectiveness, and to decrease the incidence of adverse drug reactions.

  8. The impact of pain control on physical and psychiatric functions of cancer patients: a nation-wide survey in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Rau, Kun-Ming; Chen, Jen-Shi; Wu, Hung-Bo; Lin, Sheng-Fung; Lai, Ming-Kuen; Chow, Jyh-Ming; Huang, Ming-Lih; Wang, Cyuan-Jheng; Tai, Cheng-Jeng; Hwang, Wen-Li; Lu, Yin-Che; Chan, Chung-Huang; Hsieh, Ruey Kuen

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the prevalence of pain in cancer patients at different disease statuses, the impact of pain on physical and psychiatric functions of patients and the satisfaction of pain control of patients at outpatient clinic department in Taiwan. Methods Short form of the Brief Pain Inventory was used as the outcome questionnaire. Unselected patients of different cancers and different disease statuses at outpatient clinic department were included. The impacts of their current pain control on physical function, psychiatric function and the satisfaction of doctors were evaluated. Logistic regression analyses were performed to evaluate whether the interference scale performed identically in the different analgesic ladders. The dependent variables were satisfaction toward physician and treatment. Results A total of 14 sites enrolled 2075 patients in the study. One thousand and fifty-one patients reported pain within the last 1 week. In patients whose diseases deteriorated, >60% of them need analgesics for pain control. Pain influenced physical and psychiatric functions of patients, especially in the deteriorated status. More than 80% of patients were satisfied about current pain control, satisfaction rate related to disease status, pain intensities and treatments for pain. Conclusion Our study found that different cancers at different statuses had pain at variable severity. Pain can influence physical and psychological functions significantly. More than 75% of subjects reported satisfaction over physician and pain management in outpatient clinic department patients with cancer pain in Taiwan. PMID:26292698

  9. Papillary and follicular thyroid cancer: impact of treatment in 1578 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, W.J.; Panzarella, T.; Carruthers, J.S.; Gospodarowicz, M.K.; Sutcliffe, S.B.

    1988-06-01

    We report the experience from 13 Canadian radiotherapy centers concerning the treatment and outcome for 1074 papillary and 504 follicular thyroid cancer patients followed for 4-24 years. Surgical resection was carried out in almost all patients; there was no correlation between the type of operation and recurrence or survival. Treatment with external irradiation (201 patients) radioiodine (214 patients), or both (107 patients) was used more often in poor prognosis patients than in those with good prognostic factors, and was effective in reducing local recurrences and improving survival, especially in patients with microscopic residual disease postoperatively. Treatment complications were common but rarely fatal. Thyroid cancer was the cause of death in over half of the papillary cancer deaths and in two-thirds of the follicular cancer deaths.

  10. Impact of smoking status on clinical outcome in oral cavity cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kawakita, Daisuke; Hosono, Satoyo; Ito, Hidemi; Oze, Isao; Watanabe, Miki; Hanai, Nobuhiro; Hasegawa, Yasuhisa; Tajima, Kazuo; Murakami, Shingo; Tanaka, Hideo; Matsuo, Keitaro

    2012-02-01

    The association between smoking status and survival in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients remains unclear. Therefore, we evaluated the association between smoking status before treatment and clinical outcome in OSCC patients. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 222 OSCC patients who were treated at Aichi Cancer Center in Japan. Of these, 82 patients (36.9%) were non-smokers, 65 (29.3%) were light smokers (pack-years smoking (PY) <30), 54 (24.3%) were moderate smokers (30≤PY<60), and 21 (9.5%) were heavy smokers (60≤PY). The survival impact of pre-treatment smoking status was evaluated using multivariate proportional hazard models. Five-year overall survival for non-, light, moderate, and heavy smokers was 72.9% (95% confidence interval CI): (61.4-81.5), 85.5% (74.0-92.2), 59.9% (44.3-72.4) and 69.0% (42.8-85.0). Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for moderate and heavy smokers in comparison with light smokers were 2.44 (1.07-5.57, P=0.034) and 2.66 (0.97-7.33, P=0.058) and the dose-response relationship among smokers was statistically significance (P(trend)=0.024). In addition, adjusted HR for non-smokers relative to light smokers was 2.27 (0.84-6.15, P=0.108). We observed a suggestive heterogeneity in the impact of smoking status by treatment method (P for heterogeneity=0.069). Effect of smoking was evident only among the chemoradiotherapy or radiotherapy group. In this study, we found the significant positive dose-response relationship among smokers on clinical outcome in OSCC patients and that non-smokers were worse prognosis than light smokers. In addition, this effect might differ by treatment method.

  11. The impact of outpatient chemotherapy-related adverse events on the quality of life of breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Tachi, Tomoya; Teramachi, Hitomi; Tanaka, Kazuhide; Asano, Shoko; Osawa, Tomohiro; Kawashima, Azusa; Yasuda, Masahiro; Mizui, Takashi; Nakada, Takumi; Noguchi, Yoshihiro; Tsuchiya, Teruo; Goto, Chitoshi

    2015-01-01

    The objective of our study was to clarify the impact of adverse events associated with the initial course of outpatient chemotherapy on the quality of life of breast cancer patients. We conducted a survey to assess the quality of life in 48 breast cancer patients before and after receiving their first course of outpatient chemotherapy at Gifu Municipal Hospital. Patients completed the European Quality of Life 5 Dimensions and Quality of Life Questionnaire for Cancer Patients Treated with Anticancer Drugs before and after 1 course of outpatient chemotherapy. European Quality of Life 5 Dimensions utility value and Quality of Life Questionnaire for Cancer Patients Treated with Anticancer Drugs total score decreased significantly after chemotherapy (p<0.001 and p = 0.018, respectively). The mean scores for the activity, physical condition, and psychological condition subscales of the Quality of Life Questionnaire for Cancer Patients Treated with Anticancer Drugs decreased significantly after chemotherapy (p = 0.003, p<0.001, and p = 0.032, respectively), whereas the social relationships score increased significantly (p<0.001). Furthermore, in the evaluation of quality of life according to individual adverse events, the decrease in quality of life after chemotherapy in terms of the European Quality of Life 5 Dimensions utility value and the Quality of Life Questionnaire for Cancer Patients Treated with Anticancer Drugs total score was greater in anorexic patients than in non-anorexic patients (p = 0.009 and p<0.001, respectively). This suggests that anorexia greatly reduces quality of life. Our findings reveal that anticancer drug-related adverse events, particularly anorexia, reduce overall quality of life following the first course of outpatient chemotherapy in current breast cancer patients. These findings are extremely useful and important in understanding the impact of anticancer drug-related adverse events on quality of life.

  12. Pretreatment axillary ultrasonography and core biopsy in patients with suspected breast cancer: diagnostic accuracy and impact on management.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Ortega, Maria Jose; Benito, Marina Alvarez; Vahamonde, Elena Fuentes; Torres, Pilar Rioja; Velasco, Ana Benitez; Paredes, Maria Martínez

    2011-07-01

    Preoperative diagnosis of axillary metastases in breast cancer patients enables treatment planning. We aimed to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of axillary ultrasonography and percutaneous biopsy, both alone and in combination, in detecting axillary metastases in patients with breast cancer and to assess the impact of these techniques on the patients' management. Retrospective study of consecutive patients with suspected breast cancer examined between October 2006 and December 2008. The diagnosis of a primary tumor was histologically confirmed in all patients. All patients underwent axillary ultrasonography and percutaneous core biopsy (14 G) of suspicious lymph nodes. We evaluated the morphological characteristics of the lymph nodes by ultrasonography. We calculated the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasonography and of core biopsy, and assessed the impact of these techniques on patients' treatment. We evaluated 675 axillary regions and performed 291 core biopsies of axillary lymph nodes in 662 patients. In 650 patients, breast cancer was histologically confirmed and in 12 patients malignant tumors in other locations were confirmed. The sensitivity and specificity of axillary ultrasonography were 63.2% and 88.7%, respectively. The absence of a fatty hilum within the lymph node was the ultrasonographic finding with the highest positive predictive value for malignancy (93.1%). The sensitivity and specificity of axillary core biopsy were 69.1% and 100%, respectively. Sentinel lymph node biopsy was avoided in 33% of initial candidates and immediate breast reconstruction was undertaken in 35.1% of the patients with mastectomy and negative axillary core biopsy. Ultrasonography and axillary core biopsy enable adequate pretreatment staging in patients with breast cancer and has a positive impact on their management. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Impact of pneumonia on hyperactive delirium in end-stage lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hidekazu; Hirashima, Tomonori; Kobayashi, Masashi; Okamoto, Norio; Matsuura, Yuka; Tamiya, Motohiro; Morishita, Naoko; Okafuji, Kohei; Shiroyama, Takayuki; Morimura, Osamu; Morita, Satomu; Kawase, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    Patients with incurable lung cancer often receive palliative care. Hyperactive delirium is a burden not only for the patient's family but also for caregivers. There are no reports describing the risk factors for delirium among lung cancer patients. The present study investigated the frequency of incidence and risk factors for hyperactive delirium among end-stage lung cancer patients. Patients who died of lung cancer in our institute from January 2010 to December 2010 were retrospectively investigated. Information was obtained from medical records, and patients who developed hyperactive delirium (delirium group, group D) were compared with patients who did not (control group, group C) based on clinical and laboratory data. A total of 146 patients (median age, 70 years; 80 % male) died of lung cancer. Thirty-one (21.2 %) patients developed hyperactive delirium. Sex (P = 0.0093) and pneumonia (P = 0.023) were statistically significant variables in univariate analysis. Pneumonia occurred in 27.4 % of all patients. The incidence of pneumonia was 45.2 % in group D and 22 % in group C. Only pneumonia (odds ratio, 2.89; 95 % confidence interval, 1.22-6.85; P = 0.016) was identified as a significant factor for predicting hyperactive delirium in multivariate analysis. Pneumonia was identified as a significant risk factor for the development of hyperactive delirium among end-stage lung cancer patients.

  14. The impact of prior platinum therapy on survival in patients with metastatic urothelial cancer receiving vinflunine

    PubMed Central

    Harshman, L C; Fougeray, R; Choueiri, T K; Schutz, F A; Salhi, Y; Rosenberg, J E; Bellmunt, J

    2013-01-01

    Background: A phase III trial demonstrated an overall survival advantage with the addition of vinflunine to best supportive care (BSC) in platinum-refractory advanced urothelial cancer. We subsequently examined the impact of an additional 2 years of survival follow-up and evaluated the influence of first-line platinum therapy on survival. Methods: The 357 eligible patients from the phase III study were categorised into two cohorts depending on prior cisplatin treatment: cisplatin or non-cisplatin. Survival was calculated using the Kaplan–Meier method. Results: The majority had received prior cisplatin (70.3%). Survival was higher in the cisplatin group (HR: 0.76; CI 95% 0.58–0.99; P=0.04) irrespective of treatment arm. Multivariate analysis including known prognostic factors (liver involvement, haemoglobin, performance status) and prior platinum administration did not show an independent effect of cisplatin. Vinflunine reduced the risk of death by 24% in the cisplatin-group (HR: 0.76; CI 95% 0.58–0.99; P=0.04) and by 35% in non-cisplatin patients (HR: 0.65; CI 95% 0.41–1.04; P=0.07). Interpretation: Differences in prognostic factors between patients who can receive prior cisplatin and those who cannot may explain the survival differences in patients who undergo second line therapy. Prior cisplatin administration did not diminish the subsequent benefit of vinflunine over BSC. PMID:24129239

  15. The impact of treatment on quality of life of patients with head and neck cancer and its association with prognosis.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, J F; Carrillo, L C; Ramirez-Ortega, M C; Ochoa-Carrillo, F J; Oñate-Ocaña, L F

    2016-10-01

    Information is scarce regarding the impact of treatment on Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQL) of patients with Head and Neck (H&N) cancers. We assessed the effect of treatment on HRQL and its association with prognosis in H&N cancer. Patients with H&N cancer in whom HRQL was assessed before and after treatment. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30 and QLQ-H&N35 instruments were used. Association of changes in patients' HRQL after treatment with Loco-Regional Recurrence (LRR) and Overall Survival (OS) was investigated. One hundred sixty patients were included; scales of the baseline assessment of HRQL were moderately associated with LRR and OS, but the impact of treatment on most HRQL scales was strongly associated with OS. By multivariate analysis, baseline assessment of Global Health, Physical, HN Teeth, HN Dry mouth, and HN Cough scales, and impact of treatment on the Physical and Pain scales comprised independent variables associated with LRR. Male gender, positive lymph nodes, baseline assessment of Role, HN Pain, HN Cough, and impact of treatment on Emotion, Pain, Financial, HN Swallowing, HN Social contact, and the interaction of HN Pain-change in Pain scales were associated with OS. Both multivariate models were adjusted by the neoplasm's site of origin. Aside from well-known clinical-pathologic prognostic factors in H&N cancers, HRQL assessment, both prior to and after treatment, provides significant prognostic information and should be measured. Design of therapeutic clinical trials in patients with H&N cancers should consider these novel prognostic factors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ the Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  16. Elucidating pretreatment cognitive impairment in breast cancer patients: the impact of cancer-related post-traumatic stress.

    PubMed

    Hermelink, Kerstin; Voigt, Varinka; Kaste, Judith; Neufeld, Franziska; Wuerstlein, Rachel; Bühner, Markus; Münzel, Karin; Rjosk-Dendorfer, Dorothea; Grandl, Susanne; Braun, Michael; von Koch, Franz Edler; Härtl, Kristin; Hasmüller, Stephan; Bauerfeind, Ingo; Debus, Gerlinde; Herschbach, Peter; Harbeck, Nadia

    2015-07-01

    Pretreatment cognitive impairment in cancer patients is well established but unexplained. Similar cognitive compromise has been observed in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) patients, and PTSD symptoms are a frequent concomitant of cancer diagnosis. We tested the hypothesis that pretreatment cognitive impairment is attributable to cancer-related post-traumatic stress. Women aged 65 years or younger who were diagnosed with breast cancer (case patients) or had undergone negative routine breast imaging (control patients) at one of six participating breast centers underwent traditional and computerized neuropsychological testing, clinician-administered diagnostic assessment of stress disorders, and self-report assessments of cognitive function and depression. To minimize confounding, case patients were evaluated prior to any local or systemic treatment. Cognitive indices of case patients, control patients, and normative samples were compared. The patients' risk of overall cognitive impairment was determined. Linear regression and a mediation model were used to test the study hypothesis. All statistical tests were two-sided. The 166 case patients and 60 well-matched control patients showed near-identical deviations from population norms. Case patients scored worse than control patients on two of 20 cognitive indices (Go/Nogo commission errors, Go/Nogo omission errors). Self-reported cognitive problems were associated with Go/Nogo omission errors and more pronounced in case patients. Only PTSD symptoms (Beta = 0.27, P = .004) and age (Beta = 0.22, P = .04) statistically significantly predicted Go/Nogo errors. The effect of having cancer on Go/Nogo errors was mediated by PTSD symptoms. Case patients did not have an increased risk of overall cognitive impairment. Prior to any treatment, breast cancer patients may show limited cognitive impairment that is apparently largely caused by cancer-related post-traumatic stress. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford

  17. Impact of patient and navigator race and language concordance on care after cancer screening abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Charlot, Marjory; Santana, M Christina; Chen, Clara A; Bak, Sharon; Heeren, Timothy C; Battaglia, Tracy A; Egan, A Patrick; Kalish, Richard; Freund, Karen M

    2015-05-01

    Patient navigation improves the timely diagnosis of cancer among minorities, but little is known about the effects of patient and navigator race and language concordance on health outcomes. The authors investigated the effects of patient and navigator race and language concordance on the time to diagnosis of cancer screening abnormalities among participants in the Boston Patient Navigation Research Program, a clinical effectiveness trial for women who had breast or cervical cancer screening abnormalities identified from January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2008. Hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated using proportional hazards regression adjusting for clinical and demographic factors. In total, 1257 women had breast cancer screening abnormalities (n = 655) or cervical cancer screening abnormalities (n = 602) identified, and 56% were nonwhite. Language concordance was associated with timelier resolution for all patients in the cervical cancer screening abnormalities group during the first 90 days (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.46; 95% confidence interval, 1.18-1.80), and specifically for Spanish speakers during the first 90 days (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.43; 95% confidence interval, 1.10-1.84), but no difference was observed after 90 days for women who had cervical cancer screening abnormalities or at any time for those who had breast cancer screening abnormalities. Race concordance was associated with significant decreases in the time to diagnosis for minority women with breast and cervical cancer screening abnormalities in analyses stratified by race, but no differences were observed in analyses that included all women. Patient navigator race and language concordance improved the timeliness of care in a minority population. Patient navigators who are racially/ethnically diverse and multilingual may help address barriers to care and improve cancer outcomes for low-income minorities. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  18. The Impact of Body Mass Index on the Surgical Outcomes of Patients With Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hai-Ning; Chen, Xin-Zu; Zhang, Wei-Han; Yang, Kun; Chen, Xiao-Long; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Zhi-Xin; Chen, Jia-Ping; Zhou, Zong-Guang; Hu, Jian-Kun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to investigate the impact of body mass index (BMI) on the short-term and long-term results of a large cohort of gastric cancer (GC) patients undergoing gastrectomy. Recently, the “obesity paradox” has been proposed, referring to the paradoxically “better” outcomes of overweight and obese patients compared with nonoverweight patients. The associations between BMI and surgical outcomes among patients with GC remain controversial. A single-institution cohort of 1249 GC patients undergoing gastrectomy between 2000 and 2010 were categorized to low-BMI (<18.49 kg/m2), normal-BMI (18.50–24.99 kg/m2), and high-BMI (≥25.00 kg/m2) groups. The postoperative complications were classified according to the Clavien-Dindo system, and their severity was assessed by using the Comprehensive Complication Index (CCI). The impact of BMI on the postoperative complications and overall survival was analyzed. There were 908, 158, and 182 patients in the normal-BMI, low-BMI, and high-BMI groups, respectively. The overall morbidity in the high-BMI group (24.7%) was higher than that in either the low-BMI or the normal-BMI group (20.9% and 15.5%, respectively; P = 0.006), but the mean CCI in the low-BMI group was significantly higher (8.32 ± 19.97) than the mean CCI in the normal-BMI and high-BMI groups (3.76 ± 11.98 and 5.58 ± 13.07, respectively; P < 0.001). The Kaplan–Meier curve and the log-rank test demonstrated that the low-BMI group exhibited the worst survival outcomes compared with the normal-BMI group, whereas the high-BMI group exhibited the best survival outcomes (P < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, BMI was identified as an independent prognostic factor. In the stage-specific subgroup analysis, a low BMI was associated with poorer survival in the cases of stage III–IV diseases. Low BMI was associated with more severe postoperative complications and poorer prognosis. Despite a higher risk of mild

  19. Impact of initial FDG PET/CT in the management plan of patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Arias, F; Chicata, V; García-Velloso, M J; Asín, G; Uzcanga, M; Eito, C; Quilez, I; Viudez, A; Saenz, J; Hernández, I; Caicedo, C; Errasti, M; Barrado, M; García-Bragado, F

    2015-02-01

    To determine the impact of initial FDG PET/CT staging on clinical stage and the management plan in patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer (LAHNC). We retrospectively reviewed the records of 72 consecutive patients (2007-2010) staged with PET/CT and conventional CT with tumours of hypopharynx/larynx (26 patients, 36 %), oral cavity (17 patients, 24 %), oropharynx (16 patients, 22 %), nasopharynx (12 patients, 17 %), and others (2 %). The impact of PET/CT on management plans was considered high when PET/CT changed the planned treatment modality or treatment intent, and intramodality changes were considered as minor changes with low impact. FDG PET/CT changed the stage in 27 patients and had high impact on the management plan in 12 % of patients (detection of distant metastases in 6 patients and stage II in 2 patients). Intramodality changes were more frequent: FDG PET/CT altered the TNM stage in 18/72 (25 %) of patients, upstaging N stage in 90 % of patients with low impact. Initial FDG PET/CT staging not only improves stage but also affects the management plan in LAHNC patients.

  20. The impact of cancer diagnosis on the lifestyle and habits of patients served at a Veterans Administration Hospital.

    PubMed

    Jazieh, Abdul-Rahman; Foraida, Monammad; Ghouse, Masood; Khalil, Maisaa M; Kopp, Monica; Savidge, Mildred

    2006-01-01

    Cancer diagnosis is associated with many changes in the life of the patients. However, the impact of cancer diagnosis on the lifestyle and habits of veterans has not been reported. We conducted a cross-sectional study of veterans with cancer to evaluate the impact of cancer diagnosis on their lifestyle including diet, habits, and exercise. We correlated habit changes with demographic and disease-related factors. We surveyed 200 patients. Most patients were males (98%), with median age of 68 years (range, 36-87) and with the following types of malignancy: genitourinary (39.5%); lung (19.5%); gastrointestinal (14.5%); hematologic (16%); skin, head, and neck (6.5%); and others (4%). Of the patients, 83.5% were current or former smokers with a median smoking history of 54.4 pack-year (range, 2-198). Less than a quarter of the patients changed behaviors positively (decreased smoking, drinking, and fat consumption; increased exercise and fruit/vegetable consumption). Up to two thirds of the patients did not change any of these habits. Although many veterans may adopt healthier habits after cancer diagnosis, a larger portion of them do not, which highlights the need for further evaluation and implementation of educational interventions.

  1. The impact of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus on patients with advanced cancer and their family members: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, Aoife; Larkin, Philip; O'Sullivan, Niamh

    2016-04-01

    Little is known about the impact of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus on patients with advanced cancer, such as its impact on the quality of life of this vulnerable group. To date, research on meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the palliative care setting has had a quantitative focus. The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of a meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus diagnosis on patients and their carers. This article reports upon a qualitative interview study of nine patients with advanced cancer and meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and nine family members (n = 18). Framework analysis was used to analyse the data. Patients and family members of patients with advanced cancer either admitted to the specialist palliative care unit or receiving palliative care in the hospital setting, who had a laboratory confirmed diagnosis of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonisation, were considered for inclusion in the study. Four themes were identified using framework analysis: reactions to receiving a meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus diagnosis, the need for effective communication of the meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus diagnosis, the enigmatic nature of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and lessons to guide the future care of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus patients. This article indicates that meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus can have a significant impact on advanced cancer patients and their families. This impact may be underestimated, but early and careful face-to-face explanation about meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and its implications can help patients and their families to cope better with it. These findings should be considered when developing policy relating to meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus management and infection control in specialist palliative care settings. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Emerging Impact of Malnutrition on Surgical Patients: Literature Review and Potential Implications for Cystectomy in Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tobert, Conrad M; Hamilton-Reeves, Jill M; Norian, Lyse A; Hung, Chermaine; Brooks, Nathan A; Holzbeierlein, Jeff M; Downs, Tracy M; Robertson, Douglas P; Grossman, Ruth; Nepple, Kenneth G

    2017-09-01

    Malnutrition is emerging as a significant factor in patient outcomes. A contemporary review of malnutrition has not been performed for the urologist. We review the available literature and current standards of care for malnutrition screening, assessment and intervention, focusing on patients with bladder cancer treated with cystectomy. Our multidisciplinary team searched PubMed® for available literature on malnutrition, focusing on definition and significance, importance to urologists, screening, assessment, diagnosis, immunological and economic impacts, and interventions. The prevalence of malnutrition in hospitalized patients is estimated to range from 15% to 60%, reaching upward of 71% in those with cancer. Malnutrition has been shown to increase inflammatory markers, further intensifying catabolism and weight loss. Bladder cancer is catabolic and patients undergoing cystectomy have increased resting energy expenditure postoperatively. Data are emerging on the impact of malnutrition in the cystectomy population. Recent studies have identified poor nutritional status based on low albumin or sarcopenia (loss of muscle) as having an adverse impact on length of hospitalization, complications and survival. The current standard of care malnutrition assessment tool, the 2012 consensus statement of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, has not been evaluated in the urological literature. Perioperative immunonutrition in patients undergoing colorectal surgery has been associated with significant decreases in postoperative complications, and recent pilot work has identified the potential for immunonutrition to positively impact the cystectomy population. Malnutrition has a significant impact on surgical patients, including those with bladder cancer. There are emerging data in the urological literature regarding how best to identify and improve the nutritional status of patients undergoing cystectomy

  3. Lumpectomy cavity shaved margins do not impact re-excision rates in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Coopey, Suzanne B; Buckley, Julliette M; Smith, Barbara L; Hughes, Kevin S; Gadd, Michele A; Specht, Michelle C

    2011-10-01

    The benefits of taking shaved cavity margins (SCM) at the time of lumpectomy are unclear. We sought to determine if taking SCM decreases re-excision rates by increasing the total breast tissue volume excised. We undertook a retrospective review of breast cancer patients who underwent lumpectomy from 2004 to 2006. Patients were divided into three groups. Group 1 had lumpectomy alone, group 2 had lumpectomy plus select (1-3) SCM, and group 3 had lumpectomy plus complete (≥4) SCM. Pathologic findings and surgical outcomes were compared between groups. 773 cancers treated by lumpectomy were included in this study; 197 were in group 1, 130 were in group 2, and 446 were in group 3. The mean total volume of breast tissue excised in group 1 (106.6 cm(3)) was significantly larger than the volume excised in groups 2 (79.3 cm(3)) and 3 (76.3 cm(3)). Rates of re-excision and successful breast-conservation therapy (BCT) were not significantly different between groups. Despite a lower total volume of breast tissue excised in groups 2 and 3, there was no significant increase in locoregional recurrence rates (LRR) at median follow-up of 54 months. Taking additional SCM during lumpectomy resulted in a significantly lower overall volume of breast tissue excised, with no increase in LRR. Contrary to prior studies, we found that SCM did not decrease re-excision rates or impact the success of BCT. Therefore, the main advantage of taking SCM appears to be that less breast tissue is excised, which could potentially improve cosmetic outcomes.

  4. Impact of Emotional Support on Serum Cortisol in Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Sampoornam; Chandrasekaran, Susila; Vijayaragavan, R; Sethu, Gowri

    2016-01-01

    Context: Breast cancer is the most commonly occurring female cancer in the world. Research gap exists regarding emotional support for breast cancer patients. Aim: The main aim of this study was to compare the efficiency of Emotional Support- Focused Nurse directed Intervention on serum cortisol among arm I, II and III in breast cancer patients. Methods: The study was designed to compare the effectiveness of emotional support focused nurse directed intervention in terms of verbal, written and telephone basis on serum cortisol among breast cancer patients in Cancer Centre at Erode. Participants were randomly allocated by using Sequentially Numbered Opaque Sealed Envelope (SNOSE) method. 2 ml of blood samples were collected from 30 breast cancer patients who were selected randomly by adopting random number table, 10 in each experimental arm during evening at 18 hour; radioimmunoassay method was used to measure the level of serum cortisol before and after intervention. The intervention was given twice in a week for the duration of 30-45 minutes, in which early 20-30 minutes spares to express thoughts and feelings of the participants and subsequent 10-15 minutes for rendering informational support and later follow up session for the period of 1 month. Results: Emotional support was effective in reducing serum cortisol level among breast cancer patients. There was no statistically significant difference between arms on serum cortisol levels. Conclusions: Marginal differences were noted between posttest mean scores of serum cortisol among verbal, written and telephone arms. Further emotional support can be rendered according to the preference of the breast cancer patients. PMID:27162424

  5. Patients' satisfaction in early breast cancer treatment: Change in treatment over time and impact of HER2-targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Spano, Jean-Philippe; Azria, David; Gonçalves, Anthony

    2015-06-01

    Although breast cancer remains a major cause of cancer death, its related death rate has dropped in the last years through early tumor detection and better available treatments. With the development of innovative techniques and new molecules as well as new routes of administration, local treatment and adjuvant therapy of early breast cancer have evolved, from mutilating, time-consuming and/or painful procedures to breast-conservative ones, sparing healthy tissues, reducing the total dose of treatment and the treatment time which in turn reduce the occurrence and severity of toxicity. In parallel with these improvements leading to an increase in survival rate, patients' health-related quality of life has become a major concern. This review aims at describing the evolution of early breast cancer treatment, and its impact on patients' quality of life, convenience, and satisfaction, including a special insight into emerging human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-targeted therapy.

  6. Impact of colour blindness on recognition of haematuria in bladder cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Katmawi-Sabbagh, Samer; Haq, Ahsanul; Jain, Sunila; Subhas, Gokul; Turnham, Helen

    2009-01-01

    Colour blindness might lead to failure in recognizing frank haematuria. Our aim is to investigate as to whether colour-blind males who develop bladder cancer present later with less favourable histology. Two hundred male patients with bladder cancer were assessed using Ishihara plate test for colour deficiency. Degree of haematuria, method of presentation and initial histologic findings were also determined. Colour-blind patients who develop bladder cancer present with less favourable histology compared with non-colour-blind (p = 0.01). Colour blindness was associated with presentation with more advanced bladder tumours.

  7. Patient counselling on the risk of infertility and its impact on childhood cancer survivors: results from a national survey.

    PubMed

    Hohmann, Cynthia; Borgmann-Staudt, Anja; Rendtorff, Rosa; Reinmuth, Simone; Holzhausen, Steve; Willich, Stefan N; Henze, Guenter; Goldbeck, Lutz; Keil, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Fertility can be impaired by radiation and chemotherapy among childhood cancer survivors. Therefore, timely and adequate patient counselling about the risk of infertility and preservation methods is needed. The primary study objective was to assess remembered counselling among childhood cancer survivors. As a second objective, the impact of lacking patient counselling on offspring-related attitudes and behaviour was examined. Counselling regarding the late effects of gonadotoxicity that could be recalled by patients was assessed using a questionnaire sent by the German Childhood Cancer Registry. The questionnaire was answered by 2754 adult childhood cancer survivors (53.1% female, mean = 25.7 years). The proportion of patients who could not remember patient counselling about the late effects of chemo-/radiotherapy on fertility decreased significantly over time. In 1980 to 1984 67%, in 2000 to 2004 50% of the patients reported no memories of counselling (p < .001). Counselled patients feared significantly less that their children may have an increased cancer risk (4.4% vs. 6.7%, p = .03). They were also more likely to undergo fertility testing than patients who could not recall counselling (odds ratio = 2.91, 95% confidence interval [2.12, 3.99]). Patients reported an increased memory of patient counselling over the past 25 years. Still, a 50% rate of recalled counselling shows an ongoing need for adequate and especially sustainable counselling of paediatric cancer patients about infertility and other long-term adverse treatment effects. Those who reported a lack of counselling had offspring-related fears more frequently, which stopped them from having children.

  8. Impact of (18)F-Fluoride PET on Intended Management of Patients with Cancers Other Than Prostate Cancer: Results from the National Oncologic PET Registry.

    PubMed

    Hillner, Bruce E; Siegel, Barry A; Hanna, Lucy; Duan, Fenghai; Shields, Anthony F; Quinn, Bruce; Coleman, R Edward

    2014-07-01

    The National Oncologic PET Registry prospectively assessed the impact of PET with (18)F-sodium fluoride (NaF PET) on intended management of Medicare patients with suspected or known osseous metastasis. We report our findings for cancers other than prostate and make selected comparisons to our previously reported prostate cancer cohort. Data were collected from both referring and interpreting physicians before and after NaF PET in patients (age ≥ 65 y) stratified for initial staging (IS; n = 570), for suspected first osseous metastasis (FOM; n = 1,814; breast, 781 [43%]; lung, 380 [21%]; and all other cancers, 653 [36%]), and for suspected progression of osseous metastasis (POM; n = 435). The dominant indication was bone pain. If NaF PET were unavailable, conventional bone scintigraphy would have been ordered in 85% of patients. In IS, 28% of patients had suspected or confirmed nonosseous metastasis. If neither conventional bone scintigraphy nor NaF PET were available, referring physicians would have ordered other advanced imaging more than 70% of the time rather than initiate treatment for suspected FOM (11%-16%) or POM (18%-22%). When intended management was classified as either treatment or nontreatment, the intended management change for each cancer type was highest in POM, lower in IS, and lowest in FOM. For suspected FOM, intended management change was lower in breast (24%), lung (36%), or other cancers (31%), compared with prostate cancer (44%) (P < 0.0001), but the NaF PET finding (normal/benign/equivocal, probable, or definite metastases) frequencies were similar across cancer types. After normal/benign/equivocal PET results, 15% of breast, 30% lung, and 38% prostate cancer patients had treatment, likely reflecting differences in management of nonosseous disease. For patients with definite metastasis on NaF PET, nonprostate, compared with prostate, cancer patients had post-PET plans for more frequent biopsy, alternative imaging, chemotherapy, and

  9. Impact of COPD and emphysema on survival of patients with lung cancer: A meta-analysis of observational studies.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yong-Hua; Guan, Wei-Jie; Liu, Qi; Wang, Hua-Qi; Zhu, Ya-Nan; Chen, Rong-Chang; Zhang, Guo-Jun

    2016-02-01

    Both COPD and emphysema are associated with an increased incidence of lung cancer, but the impacts of these comorbidities on lung cancer prognosis are still unclear. Herein, we conducted a meta-analysis to clarify whether the presence of these comorbidities indicates poor survival in patients with lung cancer. A comprehensive search was conducted using PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, ASCO Abstracts and Cochrane library for articles published before 1 June 2015. Papers referenced by the obtained articles were also reviewed. Main outcomes were overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) in patients with lung cancer. Pooled hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using random-effects models. Subgroup and sensitivity analyses were also conducted. Of 58 full texts reviewed, 26 met our inclusion criteria that were derived from 21 and seven studies examining the impacts of COPD and emphysema on survival of lung cancer, respectively. Meta-analyses revealed that concomitant COPD was associated with poorer OS (HR, 1.17; 95% CI: 1.10-1.25, n = 20), which was independent of tumour staging, diagnostic criteria of COPD or location, and DFS (HR, 1.52; 95% CI: 1.04-2.23, n = 6) with high heterogeneity (I(2) = 78%). The presence of emphysema in patients with lung cancer predicted worse OS (HR, 1.66; 95% CI: 1.25-2.22, n = 7), but not poorer DFS. The presence of COPD and emphysema are robust predictors of poor survival in patients with lung cancer. Early detection of these diseases should be taken into account for lung cancer surveillance and management.

  10. Impact of the early detection of esophageal neoplasms in hypopharyngeal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shigenobu; Ogino, Ichiro; Inayama, Yoshiaki; Sugiura, Madoka; Sakuma, Yasunori; Kokawa, Atsushi; Kunisaki, Chikara; Inoue, Tomio

    2017-04-01

    We examined the risk factors and prognostic factors for synchronous esophageal neoplasia (SEN) by comparing the characteristics of hypopharyngeal cancer (HPC) patients with and without SEN. We examined 183 patients who were treated with definitive radiotherapy for HPC. Lugol chromoendoscopy screening of the esophagus was performed in all patients before chemoradiotherapy. Thirty-six patients had SEN, 49 patients died of HPC and two died of esophageal cancer. The patients with SEN exhibited significantly higher alcohol consumption than those without SEN (P = 0.018). The 5-year overall survival (OS) rate of the 36 patients with SEN was lower than that of the other patients (36.2% vs 63.4%, P = 0.006). The SEN patients exhibited significantly shorter HPC cause-specific survival than the other patients (P = 0.039). Both the OS (P = 0.005) and the HPC cause-specific survival (P = 0.026) of the patients with SEN were significantly shorter than those of the patients without SEN in multivariate analysis. Category 4/T1 stage esophageal cancer was treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT), endoscopic treatment or chemotherapy. The 5-year survival rates for esophageal cancer recurrence for CCRT, endoscopic treatment and chemotherapy were 71.5, 43.7 and 0%, respectively. The median (range) survival time (months) of CCRT, endoscopic treatment and chemotherapy was 22.7 (7.5-90.6), 46.44 (17.3-136.7) and 7.98 (3.72-22.8), respectively. Advanced HPC patients with SEN might have a poorer prognosis than those without SEN even when the esophageal cancer is detected early and managed appropriately. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. Taste and smell changes in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy: distress, impact on daily life, and self-care strategies.

    PubMed

    Bernhardson, Britt-Marie; Tishelman, Carol; Rutqvist, Lars Erik

    2009-01-01

    Few studies have described how patients receiving chemotherapy experience taste/smell changes (TSCs). Food and meal situations have important meaning beyond nutrition, so these common symptoms may affect daily lives. This study aims to investigate distress and impact on daily life from TSCs in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy, analyze reported levels of distress and impact on daily life from TSCs with regard to sociodemographic and clinical factors, and explore patients' reports of self-care strategies and communication with staff. The 340 patients reporting TSCs on a multicenter survey (n = 518) were grouped into subsets by level of TSC-related distress and impact on daily life, which served as the basis for statistical comparison. Written comments were analyzed inductively using content analysis. Nearly one-third of participating patients reported both high levels of distress and impact on daily life (high distress and high impact on daily life [HDHI]) from TSCs. The HDHI subset reported other symptoms more often than others did (P = .01) and also more often responded to open questions about distress, impact, and self-care strategies (P = .01). Taste/smell changes were not always reported to staff, even in the HDHI subset. The specific aspects of TSCs resulting in distress and impact on daily life varied greatly, affecting both psychological and somatic aspects, with little consensus and great individual differences described in self-care strategies. The variety of distress, impact, and strategies used to alleviate TSCs clarifies the importance of situational meaning.

  12. Does physician communication style impact patient report of decision quality for breast cancer treatment?

    PubMed

    Martinez, Kathryn A; Resnicow, Ken; Williams, Geoffrey C; Silva, Marlene; Abrahamse, Paul; Shumway, Dean A; Wallner, Lauren P; Katz, Steven J; Hawley, Sarah T

    2016-12-01

    Provider communication that supports patient autonomy has been associated with numerous positive patient outcomes. However, to date, no research has examined the relationship between perceived provider communication style and patient-assessed decision quality in breast cancer. Using a population-based sample of women with localized breast cancer, we assessed patient perceptions of autonomy-supportive communication from their surgeons and medical oncologists, as well as patient-reported decision quality. We used multivariable linear regression to examine the association between autonomy-supportive communication and subjective decision quality for surgery and chemotherapy decisions, controlling for sociodemographic and clinical factors, as well as patient-reported communication preference (non-directive or directive). Among the 1690 women included in the overall sample, patient-reported decision quality scores were positively associated with higher levels of perceived autonomy-supportive communication from surgeons (β=0.30; p<0.001) and medical oncologists (β=0.26; p<0.001). Patient communication style preference moderated the association between physician communication style received and perceived decision quality. Autonomy-supportive communication by physicians was associated with higher subjective decision quality among women with localized breast cancer. These results support future efforts to design interventions that enhance autonomy-supportive communication. Autonomy-supportive communication by cancer doctors can improve patients' perceived decision quality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Spiritual Well-being May Reduce the Negative Impacts of Cancer Symptoms on the Quality of Life and the Desire for Hastened Death in Terminally Ill Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yin-Chih; Lin, Chia-Chin

    2016-01-01

    Spirituality is a central component of the well-being of terminally ill cancer patients. The aim of this study was to examine the mediating or moderating role of spiritual well-being in reducing the impact of cancer-related symptoms on quality of life and the desire for hastened death in terminally ill cancer patients. Eighty-five terminally ill cancer patients were assessed using the Taiwanese version of the M. D. Anderson Symptom Inventory, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General, the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual Well-being, the Beck Hopelessness Scale, and the Schedule of Attitudes Toward Hastened Death. Spiritual well-being was significantly negatively correlated with symptom severity (r = -0.46, P < .01). Symptom severity negatively correlated with quality of life (r = -0.54) and positively correlated with hopelessness (r = 0.51, P < .01) and the desire for hastened death (r = 0.61, P < .01). Spiritual well-being was a partial mediator and moderator between symptom severity and quality of life. Spiritual well-being was a partial mediator between symptom severity and the desire for hastened death. The meaning subscale of spiritual well-being was a more significant predictor of the desire for hastened death and quality of life than the faith subscale was. Spiritual well-being may reduce the negative impacts of cancer on quality of life and the desire for hastened death. Appropriate spiritual care may reduce the negative impact of severe cancer symptoms on quality of life and the desire for hastened death in terminally ill cancer patients.

  14. Prospective multicenter study of the impact of oncotype DX colon cancer assay results on treatment recommendations in stage II colon cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Geetika; Renfro, Lindsay A; Behrens, Robert J; Lopatin, Margarita; Chao, Calvin; Soori, Gamini S; Dakhil, Shaker R; Mowat, Rex B; Kuebler, J Philip; Kim, George; Mazurczak, Miroslaw; Lee, Mark; Alberts, Steven R

    2014-05-01

    The Oncotype DX colon cancer assay is a clinically validated predictor of recurrence risk in stage II colon cancer patients. This prospective study evaluated the impact of recurrence score (RS) results on physician recommendations regarding adjuvant chemotherapy in T3, mismatch repair-proficient (MMR-P) stage II colon cancer patients. Patients and Methods. Stage IIA colon cancer patients were enrolled in 17 centers. Patient tumor specimens were assessed by the RS test (quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction) and mismatch repair (immunohistochemistry). For each patient, the physician's recommended postoperative treatment plan of observation, fluoropyrimidine monotherapy, or combination therapy with oxaliplatin was recorded before and after the RS and mismatch repair results were provided. Results. Of 221 enrolled patients, 141 patients had T3 MMR-P tumors and were eligible for the primary analysis. Treatment recommendations changed for 63 (45%; 95% confidence interval: 36%-53%) of these 141 T3 MMR-P patients, with intensity decreasing for 47 (33%) and increasing for 16 (11%). Recommendations for chemotherapy decreased from 73 patients (52%) to 42 (30%), following review of RS results by physician and patient. Increased treatment intensity was more often observed at higher RS values, and decreased intensity was observed at lower values (p = .011). Conclusion. Compared with traditional clinicopathological assessment, incorporation of the RS result into clinical decision making was associated with treatment recommendation changes for 45% of T3 MMR-P stage II colon cancer patients in this prospective multicenter study. Use of the RS assay may lead to overall reduction in adjuvant chemotherapy use in this subgroup of stage II colon cancer patients.

  15. Prospective Multicenter Study of the Impact of Oncotype DX Colon Cancer Assay Results on Treatment Recommendations in Stage II Colon Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Geetika; Renfro, Lindsay A.; Behrens, Robert J.; Lopatin, Margarita; Chao, Calvin; Soori, Gamini S.; Dakhil, Shaker R.; Mowat, Rex B.; Kuebler, J. Philip; Kim, George; Mazurczak, Miroslaw; Lee, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The Oncotype DX colon cancer assay is a clinically validated predictor of recurrence risk in stage II colon cancer patients. This prospective study evaluated the impact of recurrence score (RS) results on physician recommendations regarding adjuvant chemotherapy in T3, mismatch repair-proficient (MMR-P) stage II colon cancer patients. Patients and Methods. Stage IIA colon cancer patients were enrolled in 17 centers. Patient tumor specimens were assessed by the RS test (quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction) and mismatch repair (immunohistochemistry). For each patient, the physician’s recommended postoperative treatment plan of observation, fluoropyrimidine monotherapy, or combination therapy with oxaliplatin was recorded before and after the RS and mismatch repair results were provided. Results. Of 221 enrolled patients, 141 patients had T3 MMR-P tumors and were eligible for the primary analysis. Treatment recommendations changed for 63 (45%; 95% confidence interval: 36%–53%) of these 141 T3 MMR-P patients, with intensity decreasing for 47 (33%) and increasing for 16 (11%). Recommendations for chemotherapy decreased from 73 patients (52%) to 42 (30%), following review of RS results by physician and patient. Increased treatment intensity was more often observed at higher RS values, and decreased intensity was observed at lower values (p = .011). Conclusion. Compared with traditional clinicopathological assessment, incorporation of the RS result into clinical decision making was associated with treatment recommendation changes for 45% of T3 MMR-P stage II colon cancer patients in this prospective multicenter study. Use of the RS assay may lead to overall reduction in adjuvant chemotherapy use in this subgroup of stage II colon cancer patients. PMID:24710310

  16. Impact of non-axillary sentinel node biopsy on staging and treatment of breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Tanis, P J; Nieweg, O E; Valdés Olmos, R A; Peterse, J L; Rutgers, E J Th; Hoefnagel, C A; Kroon, B B R

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of lymphatic drainage to non-axillary sentinel nodes and to determine the implications of this phenomenon. A total of 549 breast cancer patients underwent lymphoscintigraphy after intratumoural injection of 99mTc-nanocolloid. The sentinel node was intraoperatively identified with the aid of intratumoural administered patent blue dye and a gamma-ray detection probe. Histopathological examination of sentinel nodes included step-sectioning at six levels and immunohistochemical staining. A sentinel node outside level I or II of the axilla was found in 149 patients (27%): internal mammary sentinel nodes in 86 patients, other non-axillary sentinel nodes in 44 and both internal mammary and other non-axillary sentinel nodes in nineteen patients. The intra-operative identification rate was 80%. Internal mammary metastases were found in seventeen patients and metastases in other non-axillary sentinel nodes in ten patients. Staging improved in 13% of patients with non-axillary sentinel lymph nodes and their treatment strategy was changed in 17%. A small proportion of clinically node negative breast cancer patients can be staged more precisely by biopsy of sentinel nodes outside level I and II of the axilla, resulting in additional decision criteria for postoperative regional or systemic therapy. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 87, 705–710. doi:10.1038/sj.bjc.6600359 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:12232750

  17. The impact of cancer treatment on the diets and food preferences of patients receiving outpatient treatment.

    PubMed

    Coa, Kisha I; Epstein, Joel B; Ettinger, David; Jatoi, Aminah; McManus, Kathy; Platek, Mary E; Price, Wendy; Stewart, Meghan; Teknos, Theodoros N; Moskowitz, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Patients undergoing cancer treatment experience a multitude of symptoms that can influence their ability to complete treatment as well as their quality of life during and after treatment. This cross-sectional study sought to describe the dietary changes experienced by cancer patients and to identify associations between these changes and common treatment symptoms. A convenience sample of 1199 cancer patients aged 18 yr and older undergoing active treatment were recruited from 7 cancer centers to complete a self-administered paper-and-pencil survey. Descriptive analyses were conducted to estimate prevalence of dietary changes and chi-squared tests were used to examine associations between dietary changes and health outcomes. Approximately 40% of patients reported a decreased appetite since beginning treatment, and 67.2% of patients reported at least 1 chemosensory alteration. Increased taste sensitivities were more common than decreased taste sensitivities, with increased sensitivity to metallic being the most common taste sensitivity (18.6%). Patients also had increased sensitivities to certain smells including cleaning solutions (23.4%), perfume (22.4%), and food cooking (11.4%). Patients reported a wide range of food preferences and aversions. Patients who had less energy or lost weight since beginning treatment were more likely than others to report treatment-related dietary changes.

  18. Factors that influence cancer patients' anxiety following a medical consultation: impact of a communication skills training programme for physicians.

    PubMed

    Liénard, A; Merckaert, I; Libert, Y; Delvaux, N; Marchal, S; Boniver, J; Etienne, A-M; Klastersky, J; Reynaert, C; Scalliet, P; Slachmuylder, J-L; Razavi, D

    2006-09-01

    No study has yet assessed the impact of physicians' skills acquisition after a communication skills training programme on the evolution of patients' anxiety following a medical consultation. This study aimed to compare the impact, on patients' anxiety, of a basic communication skills training programme (BT) and the same programme consolidated by consolidation workshops (CW), and to investigate physicians' communication variables associated with patients' anxiety. Physicians, after attending the BT, were randomly assigned to CW or to a waiting list. The control group was not a non-intervention group. Consultations with a cancer patient were recorded. Patients' anxiety was assessed with the State Trait Anxiety Inventory before and after a consultation. Communication skills were analysed according to the Cancer Research Campaign Workshop Evaluation Manual. No statistically significant change over time and between groups was observed. Mixed-effects modelling showed that a decrease in patients' anxiety was linked with screening questions (P = 0.045), physicians' satisfaction about support given (P = 0.004) and with patients' distress (P < 0.001). An increase in anxiety was linked with breaking bad news (P = 0.050) and with supportive skills (P = 0.013). No impact of the training programme was observed. This study shows the influence of some communication skills on the evolution of patients' anxiety. Physicians should be aware of these influences.

  19. The impact of physical activity on fatigue and quality of life in lung cancer patients: a randomised controlled trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background People with lung cancer have substantial symptom burden and more unmet needs than the general cancer population. Physical activity (PA) has been shown to positively influence quality of life (QOL), fatigue and daily functioning in the curative treatment of people with breast and colorectal cancers and lung diseases, as well as in palliative settings. A randomised controlled trial (RCT) is needed to determine if lung cancer patients benefit from structured PA intervention. The Physical Activity in Lung Cancer (PAL) trial is designed to evaluate the impact of a 2-month PA intervention on fatigue and QOL in patients with non-resectable lung cancer. Biological mechanisms will also be studied. Methods/design A multi-centre RCT with patients randomised to usual care or a 2-month PA programme, involving supervised PA sessions including a behavioural change component and home-based PA. QOL questionnaires, disease and functional status and body composition will be assessed at baseline, 2, 4 and 6 months follow-up. The primary endpoint is comparative levels of fatigue between the 2 arms. Secondary endpoints include: QOL, functional abilities and physical function. Exploratory endpoints include: anxiety, depression, distress, dyspnoea, PA behaviour, fitness, hospitalisations, survival, cytokines and insulin-like growth factor levels. Discussion This study will provide high-level evidence of the effect of PA programmes on cancer-related fatigue and QOL in patients with advanced lung cancer. If positive, the study has the potential to change care for people with cancer using a simple, inexpensive intervention to improve their QOL and help them maintain independent function for as long as possible. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry No. ACTRN12609000971235 PMID:23216897

  20. The impact of de novo liver metastasis on clinical outcome in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yu-Ping; Chen, Yu-Mu; Lai, Chien-Hao; Lin, Chiung-Yu; Fang, Wen-Feng; Huang, Cherng-Hua; Li, Shau-Hsuan; Chen, Hung-Chen; Lin, Meng-Chih

    2017-01-01

    Liver metastasis has been found to affect outcome in prostate cancer and colorectal cancer, but its role in lung cancer is unclear. The current study aimed to evaluate the impact of de novo liver metastasis (DLM) on stage IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) outcomes and to examine whether tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) reverse poor prognosis in patients with DLM and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mutant NSCLC. Among 1392 newly diagnosed NSCLC patients, 490 patients with stage IV disease treated between November 2010 and March 2014 at Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital were included. Patients were divided into two groups according to DLM status. There were 75 patients in the DLM group and 415 patients in the non-DLM group. The DLM group included more patients with bone metastasis, fewer patients with a lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio (LMR) > 3.1, and fewer patients with pleural metastasis. In the DLM group, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 3–4 and LMR ≦3.1 were associated with poor outcome. In patients without DLM, overall survival (OS) was longer in patients with EGFR-mutant NSCLC than in those without (20.2 vs. 7.3 months, p < 0.001). Among DLM patients, OS was similar between the EGFR-mutant and wild-type EGFR tumor subgroups (11.9 vs. 7.7 months, p = 0.155). We found that DLM was a significant poor prognostic factor in the EGFR-mutant patients treated with EGFR-TKIs, whereas DLM did not affect the prognosis of EGFR-wild-type patients. PMID:28591157

  1. Lymphoedema following treatment for head and neck cancer: impact on patients, and beliefs of health professionals.

    PubMed

    McGarvey, A C; Osmotherly, P G; Hoffman, G R; Chiarelli, P E

    2014-05-01

    Cervicofacial lymphoedema is a recognised side-effect that may result following treatment for head and neck cancer. This study aimed to investigate the perspectives of affected patients and the beliefs that treating health professionals hold about head and neck lymphoedema. Ten patients with head and neck lymphoedema and 10 health professionals experienced in the treatment of head and neck cancer patients agreed to participate in semi-structured face to face interviews. Interviews were recorded, audio files were transcribed and coded and then analysed for themes. Themes of experiences of patients with head and neck lymphoedema and the beliefs of health professionals largely overlapped. Given its visible deformity, the main effect of lymphoedema in head and neck cancer patients was on appearance. In some cases this lead to negative psychosocial sequelae such as reduced self-esteem, and poor socialisation. Clinicians need to be aware of those patients more likely to experience lymphoedema following treatment for head and neck cancer, and how they are affected. Understanding how patients with facial lymphoedema are affected psychologically and physically, and the importance of prompt referral for lymphoedema treatment, might ultimately improve outcomes and ensure optimal management.

  2. Impact of patient navigation in eliminating economic disparities in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Rodday, Angie Mae; Parsons, Susan K; Snyder, Frederick; Simon, Melissa A; Llanos, Adana A M; Warren-Mears, Victoria; Dudley, Donald; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Patierno, Steven R; Markossian, Talar W; Sanders, Mechelle; Whitley, Elizabeth M; Freund, Karen M

    2015-11-15

    Patient navigation may reduce cancer disparities associated with socioeconomic status (SES) and household factors. This study examined whether these factors were associated with delays in diagnostic resolution among patients with cancer screening abnormalities and whether patient navigation ameliorated these delays. This study analyzed data from 5 of 10 centers of the National Cancer Institute's Patient Navigation Research Program, which collected SES and household data on employment, income, education, housing, marital status, and household composition. The primary outcome was the time to diagnostic resolution after a cancer screening abnormality. Separate adjusted Cox proportional hazard models were fit for each SES and household factor, and an interaction between that factor and the intervention status was included. Among the 3777 participants (1968 in the control arm and 1809 in the navigation intervention arm), 91% were women, and the mean age was 44 years; 43% were Hispanic, 28% were white, and 27% were African American. Within the control arm, the unemployed experienced a longer time to resolution than those employed full-time (hazard ratio [HR], 0.85; P = .02). Renters (HR, 0.81; P = .02) and those with other (ie, unstable) housing (HR, 0.60; P < .001) had delays in comparison with homeowners. Never married (HR, 0.70; P < .001) and previously married participants (HR, 0.85; P = .03) had a longer time to care than married participants. There were no differences in the time to diagnostic resolution with any of these variables within the navigation intervention arm. Delays in diagnostic resolution exist by employment, housing type, and marital status. Patient navigation eliminated these disparities in the study sample. These findings demonstrate the value of providing patient navigation to patients at high risk for delays in cancer care. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  3. Impact of Soy Foods on the Development of Breast Cancer and the Prognosis of Breast Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Messina, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between soy food intake and breast cancer has been rigorously investigated for more than 25 years. The identification of isoflavones as possible chemopreventive agents helped fuel this line of investigation. These diphenolic compounds, which are found in uniquely-rich amounts in soy beans, possess both estrogen-dependent and -independent properties that potentially inhibit the development of breast cancer. Observational studies show that among Asian women higher soy consumption is associated with an approximate 30% reduction in risk of developing breast cancer. However, evidence suggests that for soy to reduce breast cancer risk consumption must occur early in life, that is during childhood and/or adolescence. Despite the interest in the role of soy in reducing breast cancer risk concerns have arisen that soy foods, because they contain isoflavones, may increase the likelihood of high-risk women developing breast cancer and worsen the prognosis of breast cancer patients. However, extensive clinical and epidemiologic data show these concerns to be unfounded. Clinical trials consistently show that isoflavone intake does not adversely affect markers of breast cancer risk, including mammographic density and cell proliferation. Furthermore, prospective epidemiologic studies involving over 11,000 women from the USA and China show that postdiagnosis soy intake statistically significantly reduces recurrence and improves survival. © 2016 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  4. [Tasty food for cancer patients: the impact of smell and taste alterations on eating behaviour].

    PubMed

    Postma, E M; de Vries, Y C; Boesveldt, S

    2017-01-01

    - This article provides an overview of smell and taste changes in cancer patients and the influence of these changes on eating behaviour and food preferences.- Taste changes seem to be more common than alterations in the sense of smell.- The changes in taste and smell are often temporary; smell and taste functions mostly return to their previous level after treatment cessation.- The type of cancer and its treatment influence changes in the sense of smell and taste, making it challenging to give general advice.- Changes in taste and smell - which can lead to modified food preferences and decreased appetite - should be taken into consideration during the treatment of cancer patients to improve the nutritional status and the effectiveness of the treatment.- This requires a personal approach, a multidisciplinary team and validated methods. Moreover, it is important to involve the environment of the patient.

  5. Long-term prevalence of oropharyngeal dysphagia in head and neck cancer patients: Impact on quality of life.

    PubMed

    García-Peris, P; Parón, L; Velasco, C; de la Cuerda, C; Camblor, M; Bretón, I; Herencia, H; Verdaguer, J; Navarro, C; Clave, P

    2007-12-01

    To determine the prevalence of dysphagia in head and neck cancer patients treated with surgery and radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. To study the impact of dysphagia on food habits, nutritional status, and quality of life. Retrospective cross-sectional study of 87 head and neck cancer patients treated with surgery and radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy from January 2000 through May 2005. Time since surgery was 28.5+/-17.8 months. A clinical test was used to detect dysphagia. A nutritional assessment was performed in all patients. A questionnaire was used to evaluate quality of life. Oropharyngeal dysphagia was present in 50.6% of patients, mostly to solid foods (72.4%). Patients with total glossectomy and chemoradiotherapy had the highest rate of dysphagia. Nutritional support was necessary in 57.1% of patients. Malnutrition was present in 20.3% of patients, mainly marasmus (81%). Fifty-one percent of patients reported a decrease in their quality of life due to dysphagia. We found a high prevalence of dysphagia in head and neck cancer patients treated with surgery and coadjuvant treatment. This problem negatively affects their quality of life. It is important that nutritional surveillance be provided to detect it and to prevent malnutrition.

  6. Interaction between smoking history and gene expression levels impacts survival of breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Andres, Sarah A; Bickett, Katie E; Alatoum, Mohammad A; Kalbfleisch, Theodore S; Brock, Guy N; Wittliff, James L

    2015-08-01

    In contrast to studies focused on cigarette smoking and risk of breast cancer occurrence, this study explored the influence of smoking on breast cancer recurrence and progression. The goal was to evaluate the interaction between smoking history and gene expression levels on recurrence and overall survival of breast cancer patients. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were fitted for 48 cigarette smokers, 50 non-smokers, and the total population separately to determine which gene expressions and gene expression/cigarette usage interaction terms were significant in predicting overall and disease-free survival in breast cancer patients. Using methods similar to Andres et al. (BMC Cancer 13:326, 2013a; Horm Cancer 4:208-221, 2013b), multivariable analyses revealed CENPN, CETN1, CYP1A1, IRF2, LECT2, and NCOA1 to be important predictors for both breast carcinoma recurrence and mortality among smokers. Additionally, COMT was important for recurrence, and NAT1 and RIPK1 were important for mortality. In contrast, only IRF2, CETN1, and CYP1A1 were significant for disease recurrence and mortality among non-smokers, with NAT2 additionally significant for survival. Analysis of interaction between smoking status and gene expression values using the combined samples revealed significant interactions between smoking status and CYP1A1, LECT2, and CETN1. Signatures consisting of 7-8 genes were highly predictive for breast cancer recurrence and overall survival among smokers, with median C-index values of 0.8 and 0.73 for overall survival and recurrence, respectively. In contrast, median C-index values for non-smokers was only 0.59. Hence, significant interactions between gene expression and smoking status can play a key role in predicting breast cancer patient outcomes.

  7. The impact of lymph vascular space invasion on recurrence and survival in patients with early stage endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Loizzi, V; Cormio, G; Lorusso, M; Latorre, D; Falagario, M; Demitri, P; Scardigno, D; Selvaggi, L E

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine impact of lymph vascular space involvement (LVSI) on recurrence and survival in early stage of endometrial cancer. From 1991 through 2010, all endometrial cancer patients at University Hospital of Bari, Italy were identified. The Log-rank test and Kaplan-Meyer methods were used for time-to-event analysis to evaluate the effects of on lymph vascular space involvement recurrence rate and survival time. Of the 560 endometrial cancer patients, 525 underwent primary surgery. Of those, 399 had early stage disease. Three hundred and forty women were not found to have LVSI, whereas 59 were found to have lymph vascular space involvement. Forty-nine (12%) patients developed a recurrence and 20 of them showed lymph vascular space involvement. The statistical analysis demonstrated that LVSI was strongly associated with a poor survival (P < 0.0001). Lymph vascular space involvement is associated with a high risk of recurrence and poor overall survival in early stage of endometrial cancer; therefore, the clinical decision to decide whether or not a patient with early stage endometrial cancer should receive adjuvant therapy should be included the evaluation of lymph vascular space involvement.

  8. Impact of a bronchial genomic classifier on clinical decision making in patients undergoing diagnostic evaluation for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, J Scott; Van Wert, Ryan; Choi, Yoonha; Rosenbluth, Michael J; Smith, Kate Porta; Huang, Jing; Spira, Avrum

    2016-05-17

    Bronchoscopy is frequently used for the evaluation of suspicious pulmonary lesions found on computed tomography, but its sensitivity for detecting lung cancer is limited. Recently, a bronchial genomic classifier was validated to improve the sensitivity of bronchoscopy for lung cancer detection, demonstrating a high sensitivity and negative predictive value among patients at intermediate risk (10-60 %) for lung cancer with an inconclusive bronchoscopy. Our objective for this study was to determine if a negative genomic classifier result that down-classifies a patient from intermediate risk to low risk (<10 %) for lung cancer would reduce the rate that physicians recommend more invasive testing among patients with an inconclusive bronchoscopy. We conducted a randomized, prospective, decision impact survey study assessing pulmonologist recommendations in patients undergoing workup for lung cancer who had an inconclusive bronchoscopy. Cases with an intermediate pretest risk for lung cancer were selected from the AEGIS trials and presented in a randomized fashion to pulmonologists either with or without the patient's bronchial genomic classifier result to determine how the classifier results impacted physician decisions. Two hundred two physicians provided 1523 case evaluations on 36 patients. Invasive procedure recommendations were reduced from 57 % without the classifier result to 18 % with a negative (low risk) classifier result (p < 0.001). Invasive procedure recommendations increased from 50 to 65 % with a positive (intermediate risk) classifier result (p < 0.001). When stratifying by ultimate disease diagnosis, there was an overall reduction in invasive procedure recommendations in patients with benign disease when classifier results were reported (54 to 41 %, p < 0.001). For patients ultimately diagnosed with malignant disease, there was an overall increase in invasive procedure recommendations when the classifier results were reported (50 to 64

  9. Impact of paroxetine on sleep problems in 426 cancer patients receiving chemotherapy: A trial from the University of Rochester Cancer Center Community Clinical Oncology Program

    PubMed Central

    Palesh, Oxana G.; Mustian, Karen M.; Peppone, Luke J.; Janelsins, Michelle; Sprod, Lisa K.; Kesler, Shelli; Innominato, Pasquale F.; Roth, Thomas; Manber, Rachel; Heckler, Charles; Fiscella, Kevin; Morrow, Gary R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Sleep problems are a frequent distressing symptom in cancer patients, yet little is known about their treatment. Sleep problems and depression frequently co-occur, leading healthcare professionals to treat depression with the expectation that sleep problems will also improve. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of paroxetine to placebo on sleep problems via a secondary data analysis of a RCT designed to compare the effects of paroxetine to placebo on fatigue in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. A previously published report found a significant effect of paroxetine on depression in this cohort. Methods A total of 426 patients were randomized following Cycle 2 of chemotherapy to receive either 20 mg of paroxetine or placebo. Sleep problems were assessed using questions from the Hamilton Depression Inventory three times during chemotherapy. Results A total of 217 patients received paroxetine and 209 received placebo. Significantly fewer patients taking paroxetine reported sleep problems compared to patients on placebo (Paroxetine 79% versus Placebo 88%; p < 0.05). These differences remained significant even after controlling for baseline sleep problems and depression (p < 0.05). Conclusion Paroxetine had a significant benefit on sleep problems in both depressed and non-depressed cancer patients. However, rates of sleep problems remained high even among those effectively treated for depression with paroxetine. There is a need to develop and deliver sleep-specific interventions to effectively treat sleep-related side effects of cancer treatments. These findings suggest that sleep problems and depression are prevalent and co-morbid. Cancer progression, its response to treatment, and overall patient survival are intricately linked to host factors, such as inflammatory response and circadian rhythms, including sleep/wake cycles. Sleep problems and depression are modifiable host factors that can influence inflammation and impact cancer

  10. [Palliative care in patients without cancer: Impact of the end-of-life care team].

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Mitsunori; Yokoe, Yuriko; Kubokawa, Naomi; Hukuda, Koji; Hattori, Hideyuki; Hong, Young-Jae; Miura, Hisayuki; Shibasaki, Masataka; Endo, Hidetoshi; Takeda, Jun; Odate, Mitsuru; Senda, Kazuyoshi; Nakashima, Kazumitsu

    2013-01-01

    Palliative care improves the quality of life of patients and their families facing problems associated with life-threatening illnesses by promoting the prevention and relief of suffering. Palliative care in Japan has been developed mainly for cancer patients. At the National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, an end-of-life care team (EOLCT) has been developed to promote palliative care for patients without cancer. In the first 6 months of its operation, 109 requests were received by the team, 40% of which were for patients without cancer or related disease, including dementia, frailty due to advanced age, chronic respiratory failure, chronic heart failure, and intractable neurologic diseases. The main purpose of the EOLCT is to alleviate suffering. The relevant activities of the team include the use of opioids, providing family care, and giving support in decision-making (advance care planning) regarding withholding; enforcement; and withdrawal of mechanical ventilators, gastric feeding tubes, and artificial alimentation. The EOLCT is also involved in ongoing discussions of ethical problems. The team is actively engaged in the activities of the Japanese Geriatric Society and contributes to the development of decision-making guidelines for end-of-life by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare. The EOLCT can be helpful in promoting palliative care for patients with diseases other than cancer. The team offers support during times of difficulty and decision-making.

  11. Evaluation of the Impact of Cancer Treatment on the Adoption and Consolidation of Pro-Health Attitudes in the Field of Cancer in Treated Patients with Colon Cancer.

    PubMed

    Adamowicz, Krzysztof; Zaucha, Renata

    2016-09-19

    Colorectal cancer is the second most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Although progress in the development of new drugs over the last two decades has expanded treatment options for this disease, many significant problems relating to their optimization remain to be solved. Data on the cancer knowledge and the healthy behavior and lifestyle in patients with colorectal cancer in Poland is missing. We analyzed the course and results of treatment of first-line chemotherapy in 165 patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer treated between May 2010 and December 2013. The respondent's knowledge in the field of cancer and their lifestyle before and after the treatment were rated. The results were compared with a control group. Mean age was 60.89 ± 8.69 years, median 59 years. The general knowledge about cancer and the level of healthy lifestyle before treatment were low. After treatment, both the knowledge about cancer and the level of healthy lifestyle increased compared to the control group. There was a clear relationship between the level of knowledge about cancer and the willingness to adopt attitudes and healthy behavior by patients. In our analysis, the overall quality of life in patients treated with first-line palliative chemotherapy of colorectal cancer did not change during treatment. Our results indicate the need to implement an educational program on cancer prevention in treated patients, and the analysis of quality of life and other factors than treatment effect remains controversial.

  12. A pilot study on the impact of known drug-drug interactions in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Ussai, Silvia; Petelin, Riccardo; Giordano, Antonio; Malinconico, Mario; Cirillo, Donatella; Pentimalli, Francesca

    2015-08-25

    When a patient concomitantly uses two or more drugs, a drug-drug interaction (DDI) can possibly occur, potentially leading to an increased or decreased clinical effect of a given treatment. Cancer patients are at high risk of such interactions because they commonly receive multiple medications. Moreover, most cancer patients are elderly and require additional medications for comorbidities. Aim of this preliminary observational study was to evaluate the incidence of well known and established DDIs in a cohort of cancer outpatients undergoing multiple treatments. Anamnestic and clinical data were collected for 64 adult patients in the ambulatory setting with malignant solid tumors who were receiving systemic anticancer treatment. Patients also declared all drugs prescribed by other specialists or self-taken in the previous 2 weeks. DDIs were divided into two different groups: 'neoplastic DDIs' (NDDIs), involving antitumoral drugs, and 'not neoplastic DDIs' (nDDIs), involving all other classes of drugs. The severity of DDIs was classified as major, moderate and minor, according to the 'Institute for Pharmacological Research Mario Negri' definition. About 34 % of cancer outpatients within our cohort were prescribed/assumed interacting drug combinations. The most frequent major NDDIs involved the anticoagulant warfarin (33 % of total NDDIs) that, in association with tamoxifen, or capecitabine and paclitaxel, increased the risk of haemorrhage. About 60 % of nDDIs involved acetylsalicylic acid. Overall, 16 % of DDIs were related to an A-level strength of recommendation to be avoided. The lack of effective communication among specialists and patients might have a role in determining therapeutic errors. Our pilot study, although limited by a small cohort size, highlights the urgent need of implementing the clinical management of cancer outpatients with new strategies to prevent or minimize potential harmful DDIs.

  13. The impact of mindfulness-based interventions on symptom burden, positive psychological outcomes, and biomarkers in cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Rouleau, Codie R; Garland, Sheila N; Carlson, Linda E

    2015-01-01

    Research on the use of mindfulness-based stress reduction and related mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) in cancer care has proliferated over the past decade. MBIs have aimed to facilitate physical and emotional adjustment to life with cancer through the cultivation and practice of mindfulness (ie, purposeful, nonjudgmental, moment-to-moment awareness). This descriptive review highlights three categories of outcomes that have been evaluated in MBI research with cancer patients – namely, symptom reduction, positive psychological growth, and biological outcomes. We also examine the clinical relevance of each targeted outcome, while describing recently published original studies to highlight novel applications of MBIs tailored to individuals with cancer. Accumulating evidence suggests that participation in a MBI contributes to reductions in psychological distress, sleep disturbance, and fatigue, and promotes personal growth in areas such as quality of life and spirituality. MBIs may also influence markers of immune function, hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis regulation, and autonomic nervous system activity, though it remains unclear whether these biological changes translate to clinically important health benefits. We conclude by discussing methodological limitations of the extant literature, and implications of matching MBIs to the needs and preferences of cancer patients. Overall, the growing popularity of MBIs in cancer care must be balanced against scientific evidence for their impact on specific clinical outcomes. PMID:26064068

  14. The impact of mindfulness-based interventions on symptom burden, positive psychological outcomes, and biomarkers in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Rouleau, Codie R; Garland, Sheila N; Carlson, Linda E

    2015-01-01

    Research on the use of mindfulness-based stress reduction and related mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) in cancer care has proliferated over the past decade. MBIs have aimed to facilitate physical and emotional adjustment to life with cancer through the cultivation and practice of mindfulness (ie, purposeful, nonjudgmental, moment-to-moment awareness). This descriptive review highlights three categories of outcomes that have been evaluated in MBI research with cancer patients - namely, symptom reduction, positive psychological growth, and biological outcomes. We also examine the clinical relevance of each targeted outcome, while describing recently published original studies to highlight novel applications of MBIs tailored to individuals with cancer. Accumulating evidence suggests that participation in a MBI contributes to reductions in psychological distress, sleep disturbance, and fatigue, and promotes personal growth in areas such as quality of life and spirituality. MBIs may also influence markers of immune function, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis regulation, and autonomic nervous system activity, though it remains unclear whether these biological changes translate to clinically important health benefits. We conclude by discussing methodological limitations of the extant literature, and implications of matching MBIs to the needs and preferences of cancer patients. Overall, the growing popularity of MBIs in cancer care must be balanced against scientific evidence for their impact on specific clinical outcomes.

  15. The impact of anti-inflammatory agents on the outcome of patients with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Park, J H; McMillan, D C; Horgan, P G; Roxburgh, C S

    2014-02-01

    Although there is increasing appreciation of the role of the host inflammatory response in determining outcome in patients in colorectal cancer, there has been little concerted effort to favourably manipulate cancer-associated inflammation, either alone or in combination with current oncological treatment. Epidemiological and cardiovascular disease studies have identified aspirin, other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and statins as potential chemotherapeutic agents which may manipulate the host inflammatory response to the benefit of the patient with cancer. Similarly, evidence of a chemotherapeutic effect of histamine-2 receptor antagonists, again mediated by an immunomodulatory effect, has previously led to increased interest in their use in gastrointestinal cancer. Extensive pre-clinical data and a limited number of clinical investigations have proposed a direct effect of these agents on tumour biology, with an anti-tumour effect on several of the hallmarks of cancer, including proliferative capacity, evasion from apoptosis and cell cycle regulation, and invasive capability of tumour cells. Furthermore, clinical evidence has suggested a pertinent role in down-regulating the systemic inflammatory response whilst favourably influencing the local inflammatory response within the tumour microenvironment. Despite such compelling results, the clinical applicability of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, statins and histamine-2 receptor antagonists has not been fully realised, particularly in patients identified at high risk on the basis of inflammatory parameters. In the present review, we examine the potential role that these agents may play in improving survival and reducing recurrence in patients with potentially curative colorectal cancer, and in particular focus on their effects on the local and systemic inflammatory response.

  16. Impact of FDG-PET findings on decisions regarding patient management strategies: a multicenter trial in patients with lung cancer and other types of cancer.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Kazuo; Matsuno, Shinsuke; Morioka, Nobuo; Adachi, Shuji; Koizumi, Mitsuru; Seto, Hikaru; Kojo, Motohisa; Nishioka, Satoshi; Nishimura, Michihiko; Yamamoto, Hiroshi

    2015-06-01

    To date, numerous studies have been conducted on the diagnostic capabilities of positron emission tomography using [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET). However, no studies designed to evaluate the influence of FDG-PET on the selection of patient management strategies within the Japanese healthcare system have been reported to date. The aim of the present study was to investigate prospectively the proportion of patients whose management strategies were modified based on FDG-PET findings (strategy modification rate). The strategy modification rate was calculated by comparing the patient management strategy (test and treatment plans) after FDG-PET with the strategy before FDG-PET for 560 cancer patients with nine types of cancer (lung cancer, breast cancer, colorectal cancer, head/neck cancer, brain tumor, pancreas cancer, malignant lymphoma, cancer of unknown origin, and melanoma). In addition, the details of the modifications to the patient management strategies were analyzed. The strategy modification rate for patients with lung cancer was 71.6% (149 of 208 patients, 95% confidence interval 65.0-77.7%), which was higher than previously reported strategy modification rates for lung cancer before and after FDG-PET (25.6%). The strategy modification rates for patients with cancers other than lung cancer were as follows: breast, 44.4% (56/126); colorectal, 75.6% (62/82); head and neck, 65.2% (15/23); malignant lymphoma, 70.0% (35/50); pancreas, 85.0% (17/20); and cancer of unknown origin, 78.0% (32/41). The mean modification rate (major and minor modifications) of the treatment plans after FDG-PET, relative to the plans before FDG-PET, was 55.4% (range 44.0-69.2%), with major modifications pertaining to the treatment plan made in 43.3-68.2% of the patients based on the objectives of the FDG-PET examination. The results from this study indicate that FDG-PET can contribute to the modification of management strategies (particularly treatment plans), especially for lung

  17. Pathophysiologic Impact of Doxorubicin and Radiation Therapy on the Heart of Patients Treated for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-07-01

    with < 1% of their LV within the RT field, no new defects were detected . Similarly, the SRS scores over time are shown. 100 5- With > 5%of LV Ted With... Radiaiton (RT)-induced Perfusion Changes in Patients with Left-Sided Breast Cancer. ASTRO 44 h Annual Meeting, New Orleans, Oct 2002. Abstract in press

  18. Impact of Triple-Negative Phenotype on Prognosis of Patients With Breast Cancer Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Zhiyuan; Schlesinger, David; Toulmin, Sushila; Rich, Tyvin; Sheehan, Jason

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To elucidate survival times and identify potential prognostic factors in patients with triple-negative (TN) phenotype who harbored brain metastases arising from breast cancer and who underwent stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: A total of 103 breast cancer patients with brain metastases were treated with SRS and then studied retrospectively. Twenty-four patients (23.3%) were TN. Survival times were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method, with a log-rank test computing the survival time difference between groups. Univariate and multivariate analyses to predict potential prognostic factors were performed using a Cox proportional hazard regression model. Results: The presence of TN phenotype was associated with worse survival times, including overall survival after the diagnosis of primary breast cancer (43 months vs. 82 months), neurologic survival after the diagnosis of intracranial metastases, and radiosurgical survival after SRS, with median survival times being 13 months vs. 25 months and 6 months vs. 16 months, respectively (p < 0.002 in all three comparisons). On multivariate analysis, radiosurgical survival benefit was associated with non-TN status and lower recursive partitioning analysis class at the initial SRS. Conclusion: The TN phenotype represents a significant adverse prognostic factor with respect to overall survival, neurologic survival, and radiosurgical survival in breast cancer patients with intracranial metastasis. Recursive partitioning analysis class also served as an important and independent prognostic factor.

  19. Postradiation trismus and its impact on quality of life in patients with head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Li-Yun; Chen, Shu-Ching; Chen, Wen-Cheng; Huang, Bing-Shen; Lin, Chien-Yu

    2015-02-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the following in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC): (1) factors related to trismus that predict the development of trismus, (2) factors affecting quality of life and measurements of these factors, and (3) comparison of these findings in patients with and without trismus to evaluate the effects of trismus on quality of life. This cross-sectional study included the questionnaires: the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) - Depression Subscale, the Chewing Function Questionnaire (CFQ), and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire - Head and Neck Cancer Module (EORTC QLQ-HN35). A scaled ruler was used to measure maximal intercisal opening (MIO). Of the 104 patients in the study, 8.7% had clinical depression. The average MIO was 35.81 mm, and 47.1% of patients had trismus. Moderate levels of chewing dysfunction with regard to different types of food were noted. Lower body mass index, chemoradiotherapy treatment, longer time since treatment completion, and higher radiation dose were significantly associated with trismus. Such patients had significantly lower head and neck-specific quality of life in terms of social contact, sexuality, teeth, mouth opening, dry mouth, feeling ill, nutritional supplement, and weight loss. Patients with trismus should be provided mouth opening exercises after treatment and programs to improve trismus and quality of life. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A retrospective cohort study of patients with stomach and liver cancers: the impact of comorbidity and ethnicity on cancer care and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Sarfati, Diana; Gurney, Jason; Stanley, James; Koea, Jonathan

    2014-11-07

    Comorbidity has an adverse impact on cancer survival partly through its negative impact on receipt of curative treatment. Comorbidity is unevenly distributed within populations, with some ethnic and socioeconomic groups having considerably higher burden. The aim of this study was to investigate the inter-relationships between comorbidity, ethnicity, receipt of treatment, and cancer survival among patients with stomach and liver cancer in New Zealand. Using the New Zealand Cancer Registry, Māori patients diagnosed with stomach and liver cancers were identified (n = 269), and compared with a randomly selected group of non-Māori patients (n = 255). Clinical and outcome data were collected from medical records, and the administrative hospitalisation and mortality databases. Logistic and Cox regression modelling with multivariable adjustment were used to examine the impacts of ethnicity and comorbidity on receipt of treatment, and the impact of these variables on all-cause and cancer specific survival. More than 70% of patients had died by two years post-diagnosis. As comorbidity burden increased among those with Stage I-III disease, the likelihood that the patient would receive curative surgery decreased (e.g. C3 Index score 6 vs 0, adjusted OR: 0.32, 95% CI 0.13-0.78) and risk of mortality increased (e.g. C3 Index score 6 vs 0, adjusted all-cause HR: 1.44, 95% CI 0.93-2.23). Receipt of curative surgery reduced this excess mortality, in some cases substantially; but the extent to which this occurred varied by level of comorbidity. Māori patients had somewhat higher levels of comorbidity (34% in highest comorbidity category compared with 23% for non-Māori) and poorer survival that was not explained by age, sex, site, stage, comorbidity or receipt of curative surgery (adjusted cancer-specific HR: 1.36, 95% CI 0.97-1.90; adjusted all-cause HR: 1.33, 95% CI 0.97-1.82). Access to healthcare factors accounted for 25-36% of this survival difference. Patients with

  1. The impact of hospice inpatient care on the quality of life of patients terminally ill with cancer.

    PubMed

    Yeung, E W; French, P; Leung, A O

    1999-10-01

    This study explored the expectations and experiences of patients with terminal cancer in a hospice inpatient environment in an attempt to evaluate their quality of life and the impact of the care and services provided. A total of 52 patients terminally ill with cancer from 11 hospice units in Hong Kong participated in the study. Data were collected from patients by devising a Hospice Care Performance Inventory (HCPI), which was an interview schedule consisting of 25 items. The HCPI was developed after a review of the literature on the quality of life experienced by patients with advanced cancer and the aims of hospice units in Hong Kong. Each item was rated by the patient on a Likert scale in terms of its importance and the perceived effectiveness of the care provided. The study identified six issues in which expectations did not seem to match effectiveness. These issues indicated areas in which improvement could be attempted to enhance the quality of life for the patients. The most important was maximizing self-care and mobility. Two issues were identified in which effectiveness was high and importance to the patient relatively low. One of these issues was pain management, and the other was spiritual care.

  2. Cancer-Related Fatigue in Patients With and Survivors of Hodgkin Lymphoma: The Impact on Treatment Outcome and Social Reintegration.

    PubMed

    Behringer, Karolin; Goergen, Helen; Müller, Horst; Thielen, Indra; Brillant, Corinne; Kreissl, Stefanie; Halbsguth, Teresa Veronika; Meissner, Julia; Greil, Richard; Moosmann, Peter; Shonukan, Oluwatoyin; Rueffer, Jens Ulrich; Flechtner, Hans-Henning; Fuchs, Michael; Diehl, Volker; Engert, Andreas; Borchmann, Peter

    2016-12-20

    Purpose Cancer-related fatigue occurs frequently in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and has a major impact on their quality of life. We hypothesized that severe fatigue (sFA) might have an impact on patients' treatment outcome and social reintegration. Methods Of 5,306 patients enrolled in the German Hodgkin Study Group's fifth generation of clinical trials in HL (HD13, HD14, and HD15; nonqualified and older [> 60 years] patients excluded), 4,529 provided data on health-related quality of life. We describe sFA (defined as a score ≥ 50 on the 0 to 100 scale from the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core 30) before and up to 9 years after therapy and analyze its impact on treatment outcome and social reintegration. Results The proportion of patients reporting sFA was 37% at baseline and ranged from 20% to 24% during follow-up. Baseline sFA was associated with significantly impaired progression-free survival and a trend to impaired overall survival, which can be overcome in patients receiving highly effective HL therapies as applied in our fifth-generation trials. Our analysis revealed a significant negative association of sFA and employment in survivors: 5 years after therapy, 51% and 63% of female and male survivors, respectively, with sFA were working or in professional education, compared with 78% and 90% without sFA, respectively ( P < .001 adjusted for age, sex, stage, baseline employment status, and treatment outcome). sFA was also associated with financial problems and the number of visits to a general practitioner and medical specialists. Conclusion sFA is an important factor preventing survivors from social reintegration during follow-up. This observation underscores the need to address fatigue as a significant diagnosis when treating patients with and survivors of cancer.

  3. Impact of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Among Patients with Pancreatic Fistula After Gastrectomy for Advanced Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Takashi; Akiyama, Hirotoshi; Makino, Hirochika; Kimura, Jun; Takagawa, Ryo; Ono, Hidetaka A; Kunisaki, Chikara; Endo, Itaru

    2016-04-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) has been widely adopted for patients with advanced gastric cancer; however, the safety of gastrectomy with D2 lymphadenectomy followed by NAC has not yet been evaluated. We retrospectively analyzed the influence of NAC on morbidity and mortality after gastrectomy in patients with advanced gastric cancer. A series of 364 patients with advanced gastric cancer who underwent gastrectomy without pancreatectomy between January 2008 and December 2010 at eight hospitals registered to the Yokohama Clinical Oncology Group were studied retrospectively. There were 330 patients who underwent surgical treatment immediately after diagnosis (surgery alone group) and 34 patients (NAC group) who first received NAC and then underwent surgical resection. Although there were no significant differences in the morbidity rate between the two groups, postoperative pancreatic fistula was more often observed in NAC patients than in patients of the group treated with surgery alone [5 cases (14.7%) vs. 11 cases (3.3%); p=0.011]. In the univariate analysis, NAC (p=0.029), bursectomy (p<0.001) and operative bleeding (≥300 ml, p=0.002), were significantly correlated with postoperative pancreatic fistula, and NAC [odds ratio (OR)=4.901, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.455-16.67; p=0.010] and bursectomy (OR=11.2, 95% CI=3.460-37.04; p<0.001) were independent risk factors for postoperative pancreatic fistula by multivariate analysis. The incidence of postoperative pancreatic fistula was 40.0% among patients who underwent gastrectomy with bursectomy followed by NAC. The incidence of pancreatic fistula in patients treated with NAC and bursectomy was significantly higher than that in other patients. Bursectomy may be discouraged for the prevention of pancreatic fistula from gastrectomy following NAC. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  4. Impact of chemoradiotherapy on vaginal and sexual function of patients with FIGO IIb cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Ljuca, Dženita; Marošević, Goran

    2011-02-01

    The opinion regarding sexual and vaginal function of patients with advanced cervical cancer treated primarily by chemoradiotherapy has still not been formed, mainly due to inappropriate methodology as the control group was comprised of healthy women. The aim of this study is to, by means of interview, evaluate vaginal and sexual function of patients with advanced cervical cancer before and after chemoradiotherapy and compare the results. A number of 35 patients were irradiated by teleradiotherapy dose of 45 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks to the pelvis and additional 20-24 Gy in 4-6 fractions were given by intracavitary HDR brachytherapy. Patients received 40 mg/m(2) of cisplatin once a week, which is a total of 4-6 cycles of cisplatin. Patients answered the questions in a form of a questionnaire specifically created for cervical cancer (EORTC-QLQ-Cx 24), for the period immediately before diagnosed cervical cancer (thus being a control group). They also answered the same questions for the period starting 12 months after the completion of concomitant chemoradiotherapy, and were an experimental group at the time. For the testing of statistical significance of differences among the examined groups parameter and non-parameter tests were used (the Wilcoxon signed ranks test and Student's t-test). The difference p<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Vaginal problems of patients after chemoradiotherapy were statistically reduced (44 versus 0; p<0.0001). There is no statistical significance in the vaginal function among the analyzed groups but weaker pain during intercourse was registered after chemoradiotherapy (p=0.009). After chemoradiotherapy, patients' vaginal function is extremely improved whereas there is no difference in the sexual function. Pain during intercourse is statistically reduced after chemoradiotherapy.

  5. The impact of patient navigation in eliminating economic disparities in cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Rodday, Angie Mae; Parsons, Susan K.; Snyder, Frederick; Simon, Melissa A.; Llanos, Adana A.M.; Warren-Mears, Victoria; Dudley, Donald; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Patierno, Steve R.; Markossian, Talar W.; Sanders, Mechelle; Whitley, Elizabeth; Freund, Karen M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Patient navigation may reduce cancer disparities associated with socioeconomic status (SES) and household factors. We examined whether these factors were associated with delays in diagnostic resolution among patients with cancer screening abnormalities and whether patient navigation ameliorated these delays. Methods We analyzed data from five of ten centers from the NCI Patient Navigation Research Program that collected SES and household data on employment, income, education, housing, marital status, and household composition. The primary outcome was time to diagnostic resolution following a cancer screening abnormality. We fit separate adjusted Cox proportional hazard models for each SES and household factor and included an interaction between that factor and intervention status. Results Among 3777 participants (n=1968 control, n=1809 navigation intervention), 91% were women, with a mean age of 44 years, and 43% were Hispanic, 28% White, and 27% African American. Within the control arm, the unemployed experienced longer time to resolution than the full-time employed (HR=0.85, p=0.02). Renters (HR=0.81, p=0.02) and those with other (i.e., unstable) housing (HR=0.60, p<0.001) had delays compared to homeowners. Never married (HR=0.70, p<0.001) and previously married participants (HR=0.85, p=0.03) had longer time to care than married participants. There were no differences in time to diagnostic resolution by any of these variables within the navigation intervention arm. Conclusions Delays in diagnostic resolution exist by employment, housing type, and marital status. Patient navigation eliminated these disparities in our study sample. Our findings demonstrate the value of providing patient navigation to patients at high risk for delays in cancer care. PMID:26348120

  6. Prognostic Impact of 21-Gene Recurrence Score in Patients With Stage IV Breast Cancer: TBCRC 013.

    PubMed

    King, Tari A; Lyman, Jaclyn P; Gonen, Mithat; Voci, Amy; De Brot, Marina; Boafo, Camilla; Sing, Amy Pratt; Hwang, E Shelley; Alvarado, Michael D; Liu, Minetta C; Boughey, Judy C; McGuire, Kandace P; Van Poznak, Catherine H; Jacobs, Lisa K; Meszoely, Ingrid M; Krontiras, Helen; Babiera, Gildy V; Norton, Larry; Morrow, Monica; Hudis, Clifford A

    2016-07-10

    The objective of this study was to determine whether the 21-gene Recurrence Score (RS) provides clinically meaningful information in patients with de novo stage IV breast cancer enrolled in the Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium (TBCRC) 013. TBCRC 013 was a multicenter prospective registry that evaluated the role of surgery of the primary tumor in patients with de novo stage IV breast cancer. From July 2009 to April 2012, 127 patients from 14 sites were enrolled; 109 (86%) patients had pretreatment primary tumor samples suitable for 21-gene RS analysis. Clinical variables, time to first progression (TTP), and 2-year overall survival (OS) were correlated with the 21-gene RS by using log-rank, Kaplan-Meier, and Cox regression. Median patient age was 52 years (21 to 79 years); the majority had hormone receptor-positive/human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative (72 [66%]) or hormone receptor-positive/HER2-positive (20 [18%]) breast cancer. At a median follow-up of 29 months, median TTP was 20 months (95% CI, 16 to 26 months), and median survival was 49 months (95% CI, 40 months to not reached). An RS was generated for 101 (93%) primary tumor samples: 22 (23%) low risk (< 18), 29 (28%) intermediate risk (18 to 30); and 50 (49%) high risk (≥ 31). For all patients, RS was associated with TTP (P = .01) and 2-year OS (P = .04). In multivariable Cox regression models among 69 patients with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive/HER2-negative cancer, RS was independently prognostic for TTP (hazard ratio, 1.40; 95% CI, 1.05 to 1.86; P = .02) and 2-year OS (hazard ratio, 1.83; 95% CI, 1.14 to 2.95; P = .013). The 21-gene RS is independently prognostic for both TTP and 2-year OS in ER-positive/HER2-negative de novo stage IV breast cancer. Prospective validation is needed to determine the potential role for this assay in the clinical management of this patient subset. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  7. Revisiting the impact of age and molecular subtype on overall survival after radiotherapy in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jian-Hua; Diest, Paul J van; Perez-Losada, Jesus; Snijders, Antoine M

    2017-10-03

    Adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) in breast cancer (BC) is often used to eradicate remaining tumor cells following surgery with the goal of maximizing local control and increasing overall survival. The current study investigated the impact of age and BC molecular subtype on overall survival after RT using a meta-analysis of the METABRIC and TCGA BC patient cohorts. We found that RT significantly prolonged survival across the whole BC patient population. The survival benefit of RT was predominantly observed in stage II BC patients treated with breast conserving surgery. Patients were then stratified by age and molecular subtype to investigate survival rate associated with RT. An increase in survival for the luminal-A and basal BC molecular subtypes was observed after RT. Stratifying patients based on age revealed that increased survival was restricted to younger patients (≤60 years of age at diagnosis). There was a significant survival benefit of radiotherapy for younger patients with tumors of the luminal A and basal molecular subtypes. Patients with other breast tumor subtypes or older breast cancer patients did not seem to benefit effects of RT. Therefore, alternate local treatment strategies should be considered for older, luminal B, and HER2 driven BC patients.

  8. Impact of the difference in surgical site on the physique in gastrointestinal tract cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Hara, Tsuyoshi; Kubo, Akira; Kogure, Eisuke; Ishii, Takaya

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to observe physical function, physique (only BMI), and nutrition status (evaluated by serum albumin levels) from before surgery to after discharge among perioperative patients with gastrointestinal tract cancer and to examine the effect of difference in surgical site (i.e., stomach, colon, and rectum) in these patients. [Subjects and Methods] The study subjects were 70 patients who underwent surgical treatment for gastrointestinal tract cancer [36 males and 34 females, aged 59.3 ± 11.4 years (mean ± SD)]. The subjects were classified into three levels according to surgical site (stomach, colon, and rectum). We evaluated patients' physical function, physique, and nutrition status in the three points: before surgery, after surgery, and after discharge. The 6-minute walk distance was measured for physical function. Body mass index was measured for physique. The serum albumin level was measured for nutrition status. [Results] Significant declines in 6-minute walk distance, body mass index, and serum albumin were observed after surgery among the study subjects. In addition, a significant decline in body mass index was observed after discharge compared with before surgery. Regarding body mass index, a significant interaction between surgical site and evaluation times was observed for ANOVA. [Conclusion] These results suggest that BMI after discharge is significantly less than that before surgery and that body mass index changes from before surgery to after surgery are efficacy the difference of surgical site in patients who undergo surgical treatment for gastrointestinal tract cancer.

  9. Negative impact of leukoaraiosis on the incidence of brain metastases in patients with lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Nakamasa; Mitsuya, Koichi; Nakasu, Yoko; Naito, Tateaki; Ohka, Fumiharu; Takahashi, Toshiaki

    2017-07-27

    The embolization of cancer cells to cerebral vessels occurs early in the multi-step metastatic process. We aimed to determine whether the presence of leukoaraiosis (LA) before treatment would predict the development of brain metastases (BM) in patients with lung cancer. Between January 2014 and June 2015, 1007 patients underwent initial (i.e., prior to any chemotherapy) or routine magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the brain and exhibited no evidence of BM. Of these, 189 underwent repeat MR imaging; 34 of 189 patients (18%) developed new BM, whereas 155 patients did not. LA was retrospectively evaluated according to Fazekas scale on the initial screening MR images of these 189 patients. The frequency of grade 0 periventricular hyperintensity (PVH) was greater among patients with BM, compared to those without BM (p = 0.001). In a multivariate analysis, patients with adenocarcinoma (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.8-171.8) and small cell carcinoma (95% CI 1.4-172.4) respectively developed BM at 9.3- and 8.8-fold higher rates than those with squamous cell carcinoma. Patients with grade 0 PVH developed BM at a rate 3.5-, 8.6-, and 3.6-fold higher rates than those with grade 1 (95% CI 1.4-9.0), 2 (95% CI 2.4-41.9), and 3 (95% CI 1.02-15.0), respectively. Lung cancer patients with grade 0 PVH on initial MR images have a high subsequent incidence of BM. PVH is a useful method for evaluating risk of BM.

  10. Impact on caregiver burden of a patient-focused palliative care intervention for patients with advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Ross E; Hull, Jay G; Lyons, Kathleen D; Bakitas, Marie; Hegel, Mark T; Li, Zhongze; Ahles, Tim A

    2010-12-01

    Caregivers of patients with advanced cancer experience physical and emotional strain that can raise their own risk for morbidity and mortality. This analysis was performed to determine whether ENABLE II, a patient-focused palliative care intervention that increased patients' quality of life, reduced symptom intensity, and lowered depressed mood compared to usual care, would affect caregiver burden. Caregivers of patients with advanced cancer from the parent study completed a caregiver burden scale and patients completed quality of life, symptom intensity, and depressed mood measures. Data were collected at baseline, 1 month, and every 3 months thereafter until patient death or the study ended. Decedents' caregivers were asked to complete an after-death interview regarding the quality of care that the patient received. There were no significant differences in caregiver burden between intervention and usual care conditions. Follow-up analyses showed that higher caregiver objective burden and stress burden were related to lower patient quality of life, higher symptom intensity, and higher depressed mood. Caregivers who perceived that patients had unmet needs at end of life reported higher objective burden, and those who perceived that patients were not treated with respect reported higher demand burden. The results indicate that a successful patient-focused intervention did not have a similar beneficial effect on caregiver burden. Future interventions should focus on caregivers as well as patients, with particular attention to caregivers' perceptions of patient care, and seek to change both negative and positive effects of informal caregiving.

  11. Impact of chemoradiotherapy on vaginal and sexual function of patients with FIGO IIb cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ljuca, Dženita; Marošević, Goran

    2011-01-01

    The opinion regarding sexual and vaginal function of patients with advanced cervical cancer treated primarily by chemoradiotherapy has still not been formed, mainly due to inappropriate methodology as the control group was comprised of healthy women. The aim of this study is to, by means of interview, evaluate vaginal and sexual function of patients with advanced cervical cancer before and after chemoradiotherapy and compare the results. A number of 35 patients were irradiated by teleradiotherapy dose of 45 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks to the pelvis and additional 20-24 Gy in 4-6 fractions were given by intracavitary HDR brachytherapy. Patients received 40 mg/m2 of cisplatin once a week, which is a total of 4-6 cycles of cisplatin. Patients answered the questions in a form of a questionnaire specifically created for cervical cancer (EORTC-QLQ-Cx 24), for the period immediately before diagnosed cervical cancer (thus being a control group). They also answered the same questions for the period starting 12 months after the completion of concomitant chemoradiotherapy, and were an experimental group at the time. For the testing of statistical significance of differences among the examined groups parameter and non-parameter tests were used (the Wilcoxon signed ranks test and Student’s t-test). The difference p<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Vaginal problems of patients after chemoradiotherapy were statistically reduced (44 versus 0; p<0.0001). There is no statistical significance in the vaginal function among the analyzed groups but weaker pain during intercourse was registered after chemoradiotherapy (p=0.009). After chemoradiotherapy, patients’ vaginal function is extremely improved whereas there is no difference in the sexual function. Pain during intercourse is statistically reduced after chemoradiotherapy. PMID:21342145

  12. Impact of socio-economic factors in delayed reporting and late-stage presentation among patients with cervix cancer in a major cancer hospital in South India.

    PubMed

    Kaku, Michelle; Mathew, Aleyamma; Rajan, B

    2008-01-01

    The impact of socio- economic and demographic status (SEDS) factors on the stage of cervical cancer rat diagnosis, symptom duration and delay-time from diagnosis to registration was determined by analysing data for the year 2006 from the Regional Cancer Centre (RCC), Trivandrum, Kerala, India. Patients (n=349) were included if they were from the states of Kerala or Tamil Nadu. SEDS factors included age, residing district, religion, marital status, income, education and occupation. Associations between SEDS factors by stage at diagnosis and symptom duration were tested using chi-square statistics with odds ratios (OR) estimated through logistic regression modeling. Elevated risks for late stage reporting among cervical cancer patients were observed for women who were widowed/divorced (OR=2.08; 95%CI: 1.24-3.50) and had a lower education (OR=2.62; 95%CI:1.29-5.31 for women with primary school education only). Patients who had symptoms of bleeding/bleeding with other symptoms (77%) were more likely to seek treatment within one month, compared to patients with other symptoms only (23%) (p=0.016). This analysis helped to identify populations at increased risk of diagnosis at later stages of cancer with the ultimate intent of providing health education and detecting cancer at earlier stages.

  13. Cancer-related direct-to-consumer advertising: awareness, perceptions, and reported impact among patients undergoing active cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Abel, Gregory A; Burstein, Harold J; Hevelone, Nathanael D; Weeks, Jane C

    2009-09-01

    Although cancer-related direct-to-consumer advertising (CR-DTCA) is prevalent, little is known about cancer patients' experiences with this controversial medium of medical communication. We administered a 41-item, mailed questionnaire to consecutive patients with breast and hematologic malignancies who were undergoing active treatment at our institution. We assessed awareness of CR-DTCA within the prior year, perceptions of CR-DTCA, and CR-DTCA-prompted patient and provider behaviors. We received 348 completed questionnaires (response rate, 75.0%). Overall, 86.2% reported being aware of CR-DTCA, most frequently from television (77.7%). Awareness did not vary with clinical or sociodemographic factors except that patients were more likely to be aware of CR-DTCA for products specific to their cancer types (P < .0001). A majority of those aware reported that CR-DTCA made them "aware of treatments they did not know about" (62.2%), provided information in "a balanced manner" (65.2%), and helped them to have "better discussions" with their provider (56.8%). These perceptions were significantly more favorable among those who had not graduated from college (P < .05 for each). Overall, 11.2% reported that CR-DTCA made them "less confident" in their providers' judgment. Of those aware, 17.3% reported talking to their provider about an advertised medication, although less than one fifth of those reported receiving a prescription for the advertised medication. The patients in our cohort were highly aware of CR-DTCA. CR-DTCA was found to be accessible and useful; however, it decreased some patients' confidence in their providers' judgment. CR-DTCA prompted a modest amount of patient-provider discussion but infrequent patient-reported changes in therapy.

  14. Cancer-Related Direct-to-Consumer Advertising: Awareness, Perceptions, and Reported Impact Among Patients Undergoing Active Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Abel, Gregory A.; Burstein, Harold J.; Hevelone, Nathanael D.; Weeks, Jane C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Although cancer-related direct-to-consumer advertising (CR-DTCA) is prevalent, little is known about cancer patients' experiences with this controversial medium of medical communication. Methods We administered a 41-item, mailed questionnaire to consecutive patients with breast and hematologic malignancies who were undergoing active treatment at our institution. We assessed awareness of CR-DTCA within the prior year, perceptions of CR-DTCA, and CR-DTCA–prompted patient and provider behaviors. Results We received 348 completed questionnaires (response rate, 75.0%). Overall, 86.2% reported being aware of CR-DTCA, most frequently from television (77.7%). Awareness did not vary with clinical or sociodemographic factors except that patients were more likely to be aware of CR-DTCA for products specific to their cancer types (P < .0001). A majority of those aware reported that CR-DTCA made them “aware of treatments they did not know about” (62.2%), provided information in “a balanced manner” (65.2%), and helped them to have “better discussions” with their provider (56.8%). These perceptions were significantly more favorable among those who had not graduated from college (P < .05 for each). Overall, 11.2% reported that CR-DTCA made them “less confident” in their providers' judgment. Of those aware, 17.3% reported talking to their provider about an advertised medication, although less than one fifth of those reported receiving a prescription for the advertised medication. Conclusion The patients in our cohort were highly aware of CR-DTCA. CR-DTCA was found to be accessible and useful; however, it decreased some patients' confidence in their providers' judgment. CR-DTCA prompted a modest amount of patient-provider discussion but infrequent patient-reported changes in therapy. PMID:19652071

  15. Crosstalk between the mitochondrial fission protein, Drp1, and the cell cycle is identified across various cancer types and can impact survival of epithelial ovarian cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Tanwar, Deepak Kumar; Parker, Danitra J.; Gupta, Priyanka; Spurlock, Brian; Alvarez, Ronald D.; Basu, Malay Kumar; Mitra, Kasturi

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial metabolic reprogramming is a hallmark of tumorigenesis. Although mitochondrial function can impact cell cycle regulation it has been an understudied area in cancer research. Our study highlights a specific involvement of mitochondria in cell cycle regulation across cancer types. The mitochondrial fission process, which is regulated at the core by Drp1, impacts various cellular functions. Drp1 has been implicated in various cancer types with no common mechanism reported. Our Drp1-directed large-scale analyses of the publically available cancer genomes reveal a robust correlation of Drp1 with cell-cycle genes in 29 of the 31 cancer types examined. Hypothesis driven investigation on epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) revealed that Drp1 co-expresses specifically with the cell-cycle module responsible for mitotic transition. Repression of Drp1 in EOC cells can specifically attenuate mitotic transition, establishing a potential casual role of Drp1 in mitotic transition. Interestingly, Drp1-Cell-Cycle co-expression module is specifically detected in primary epithelial ovarian tumors that robustly responded to chemotherapy, suggesting that Drp1 driven mitosis may underlie chemo-sensitivity of the primary tumors. Analyses of matched primary and relapsed EOC samples revealed a Drp1-based-gene-expression-signature that could identify patients with poor survival probabilities from their primary tumors. Our results imply that around 60% of platinum-sensitive EOC patients undergoing relapse show poor survival, potentially due to further activation of a mitochondria driven cell-cycle regime in their recurrent disease. We speculate that this patient group could possibly benefit from mitochondria directed therapies that are being currently evaluated at various levels, thus enabling targeted or personalized therapy based cancer management. PMID:27509055

  16. Crosstalk between the mitochondrial fission protein, Drp1, and the cell cycle is identified across various cancer types and can impact survival of epithelial ovarian cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Tanwar, Deepak Kumar; Parker, Danitra J; Gupta, Priyanka; Spurlock, Brian; Alvarez, Ronald D; Basu, Malay Kumar; Mitra, Kasturi

    2016-09-13

    Mitochondrial metabolic reprogramming is a hallmark of tumorigenesis. Although mitochondrial function can impact cell cycle regulation it has been an understudied area in cancer research. Our study highlights a specific involvement of mitochondria in cell cycle regulation across cancer types. The mitochondrial fission process, which is regulated at the core by Drp1, impacts various cellular functions. Drp1 has been implicated in various cancer types with no common mechanism reported. Our Drp1-directed large-scale analyses of the publically available cancer genomes reveal a robust correlation of Drp1 with cell-cycle genes in 29 of the 31 cancer types examined. Hypothesis driven investigation on epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) revealed that Drp1 co-expresses specifically with the cell-cycle module responsible for mitotic transition. Repression of Drp1 in EOC cells can specifically attenuate mitotic transition, establishing a potential casual role of Drp1 in mitotic transition. Interestingly, Drp1-Cell-Cycle co-expression module is specifically detected in primary epithelial ovarian tumors that robustly responded to chemotherapy, suggesting that Drp1 driven mitosis may underlie chemo-sensitivity of the primary tumors. Analyses of matched primary and relapsed EOC samples revealed a Drp1-based-gene-expression-signature that could identify patients with poor survival probabilities from their primary tumors. Our results imply that around 60% of platinum-sensitive EOC patients undergoing relapse show poor survival, potentially due to further activation of a mitochondria driven cell-cycle regime in their recurrent disease. We speculate that this patient group could possibly benefit from mitochondria directed therapies that are being currently evaluated at various levels, thus enabling targeted or personalized therapy based cancer management.

  17. Impact on Survival of Regular Postoperative Surveillance for Patients with Early Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Yun; Lim, Sung Hee; Lee, Min-Young; Kim, Haesu; Kim, Moonjin; Kim, Sungmin; Jung, Hyun Ae; Sohn, Insuk; Gil, Won Ho; Lee, Jeong Eon; Kim, Seok Won; Nam, Seok Jin; Ahn, Jin Seok; Im, Young-Hyuck; Park, Yeon Hee

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to evaluate the role of regular postoperative surveillance to improve the prognosis of patients with breast cancer after curative surgery. Materials and Methods We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of 4,119 patients who received curative surgery for breast cancer at Samsung Medical Center between January 2000 and September 2008. Patients were divided into two groups (group I, regular postoperative surveillance; group II, control group) according to their post-therapy follow-up status for the first 5 years after surgery. Results Among the 3,770 patients selected for inclusion, groups I and II contained 3,300 (87%) and 470 (13%) patients, respectively. The recurrence rates at 5 years for groups I and II were 10.6% and 16.4%, respectively (hazard ratio, 0.85; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.67 to 1.09; p=0.197). The 10-year mortality cumulative rates were 8.8% for group I and 25.4% for group II (hazard ratio, 0.28; 95% CI, 0.22 to 0.35; p < 0.001). In multivariate analysis for recurrence-free survival (RFS), age over 40 years (p < 0.001), histologic grade 1 (p < 0.001), and pathologic stage I (p < 0.001) were associated with longer RFS but not with follow-up status. Multivariate analysis for overall survival (OS) revealed that patients in group I showed significantly improved OS (hazard ratio, 0.29; 95% CI, 0.23 to 0.37; p < 0.001). Additionally, age over 40 years, histologic grade I, and pathologic stage I were independent prognostic factors for OS. Conclusion Regular follow-up for patients with breast cancer after primary surgery resulted in clinically significant improvements in patient OS. PMID:25622590

  18. Impact on Caregiver Burden of a Patient-Focused Palliative Care Intervention for Patients with Advanced Cancer

    PubMed Central

    O’Hara, Ross E.; Hull, Jay G.; Lyons, Kathleen D.; Bakitas, Marie; Hegel, Mark T.; Li, Zhongze; Ahles, Tim A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Caregivers of patients with advanced cancer experience physical and emotional strain that can raise their own risk for morbidity and mortality. This analysis was performed to determine whether ENABLE II, a patient-focused palliative care intervention that increased patients’ quality of life, reduced symptom intensity, and lowered depressed mood compared to usual care, would affect caregiver burden. Methods Caregivers of patients with advanced cancer from the parent study completed a caregiver burden scale and patients completed quality of life, symptom intensity, and depressed mood measures. Data were collected at baseline, 1 month, and every 3 months thereafter until patient death or the study ended. Decedents’ caregivers were asked to complete an after death interview regarding the quality of care that the patient received. Results There were no significant differences in caregiver burden between intervention and usual care conditions. Follow-up analyses showed that higher caregiver objective burden and stress burden were related to lower patient quality of life, higher symptom intensity, and higher depressed mood. Caregivers who perceived that patients had unmet needs at end-of-life reported higher objective burden, and those who perceived that patients were not treated with respect reported higher demand burden. Significance of results The results indicate that a successful patient-focused intervention did not have a similar beneficial effect on caregiver burden. Future interventions should focus on caregivers as well as patients, with particular attention to caregivers’ perceptions of patient care, and seek to change both negative and positive effects of informal caregiving. PMID:20875202

  19. Antimicrobial-resistant Gram-negative bacteria in febrile neutropenic patients with cancer: current epidemiology and clinical impact.

    PubMed

    Trecarichi, Enrico M; Tumbarello, Mario

    2014-04-01

    In the recent years, several studies involving cancer patients have demonstrated a clear trend in the epidemiology of bacterial infections showing a shift in the prevalence from Gram-positive to Gram-negative bacteria and the extensive emergence of antimicrobial-resistant strains among Gram-negatives isolated from the blood. The aim of this systematic review was to examine the recent trends in epidemiology and antimicrobial resistance in Gram-negatives recovered from neutropenic cancer patients, with particular emphasis on the impact of antimicrobial resistance on the clinical outcome of severe infections caused by such microorganisms. Overall, from 2007 to date, the rate of Gram-negative bacteria recovery ranged from 24.7 to 75.8% (mean 51.3%) in cancer patient cohorts. Escherichia coli represented the most common species (mean frequency of isolation 32.1%) among the Gram-negatives, followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (mean frequency of isolation 20.1%). An increasing frequency of Acinetobacter spp. and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia was also reported. Increased rates of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative strains have been highlighted among Enterobacteriaceae and nonfermenting Gram-negative rods, despite discontinuation of fluoroquinolone-based antibacterial prophylaxis for neutropenic patients. In addition, antimicrobial resistance and/or the inadequacy of empirical antibiotic treatment have been frequently linked to a worse outcome in cancer patients with bloodstream infections caused by Gram-negative isolates. Sound knowledge of the local distribution of pathogens and their susceptibility patterns and prompt initiation of effective antimicrobial treatment for severe infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria are essential in cancer patients.

  20. Impact of chemotherapy on telomere-length in sporadic and familial breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Benitez-Buelga, C.; Sanchez-Barroso, L.; Gallardo, M.; Apellániz-Ruiz, María; Inglada-Pérez, L.; Yanowski, K.; Carrillo, J.; Garcia-Estevez, L.; Calvo, I.; Perona, R.; Urioste, M.; Osorio, A.; Blasco, MA.; Rodriguez-Antona, C.; Benitez, J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Recently, we observed that telomeres of BRCA1/2 mutation carriers were shorter than those of controls or sporadic breast cancer patients, suggesting that mutations in these genes might be responsible for this event. Given the contradictory results reported in the literature, we tested whether other parameters, such as chemotherapy, could be modifying telomere-length. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study measuring leukocyte telomere-length of 266 sporadic breasts cancer patients treated with first-line chemotherapy, with a median follow up of 240 days. Additionally, we performed both cross-sectional and longitudinal studies in a series of 236 familial breast cancer patients that included affected and non-affected BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. We have measured in leukocytes from peripheral blood: The telomere-length, percentage of short telomeres (<3Kb), telomerase activity levels and the annual telomere shortening speed. Results In sporadic cases we found that chemotherapy exerts a transient telomere shortening effect (around 2 years) that varies depending on the drug combination. In familial cases, only patients receiving treatment were associated with telomere shortening but they recovered normal telomere-length after a period of two years. Conclusion Chemotherapy affects telomere-length and should be considered in the studies that correlate telomere-length with disease susceptibility. PMID:25528024

  1. Early-Stage Young Breast Cancer Patients: Impact of Local Treatment on Survival

    SciTech Connect

    Bantema-Joppe, Enja J.; Munck, Linda de; Willemse, Pax H.B.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Siesling, Sabine; Maduro, John H.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: In young women, breast-conserving therapy (BCT), i.e., lumpectomy followed by radiotherapy, has been associated with an increased risk of local recurrence. Still, there is insufficient evidence that BCT impairs survival. The aim of our study was to compare the effect of BCT with mastectomy on overall survival (OS) in young women with early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: From two Dutch regional population-based cancer registries (covering 6.2 million inhabitants) 1,453 women <40 years with pathologically T1N0-1M0 breast cancer were selected. Cox regression survival analysis was used to study the effect of local treatment (BCT vs. mastectomy) stratified for nodal stage on survival and corrected for tumor size, age, period of diagnosis, and use of adjuvant systemic therapy. Results: With a median follow-up of 9.6 years, 10-year OS was 83% after BCT and 78% after mastectomy, respectively (unadjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.37; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.09-1.72). In N0-patients, 10-year OS was 84% after BCT and 81% after mastectomy and local treatment was not associated with differences in OS (HR 1.19; 95% CI, 0.89-1.58; p = 0.25). Within the N1-patient group, OS was better after BCT compared with mastectomy, 79% vs. 71% at 10 years (HR 1.91; 95% CI, 1.28-2.84; p = 0.001) and in patients treated with adjuvant hormonal therapy (HR 0.34; 95% CI, 0.18-0.66; p = 0.001). Conclusions: In this large population-based cohort of early-stage young breast cancer patients, 10-year OS was not impaired after BCT compared with mastectomy. Patients with 1 to 3 positive lymph nodes had better prognosis after BCT than after mastectomy.

  2. Intravenous bisphosphonates for breast cancer: impact on patient outcomes and scientific concepts.

    PubMed

    Gnant, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Among women worldwide, breast cancer is the most common malignancy and a leading cause of death, accounting for approximately 6% of all cancer deaths globally. The predilection of breast cancer to metastasize to bone provides a strong rationale that antiresorptive agents such as bisphosphonates may have the potential to prevent disease recurrence. Bisphosphonates are established therapies for bone loss and for preventing skeletal-related events (SREs) from bone metastases. Moreover, intravenous nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates, such as zoledronic acid, have been shown to block multiple steps in tumor metastasis (e.g., angiogenesis, invasion, and adhesion). Recent clinical data from ABCSG-12, ZO-FAST, and AZURE demonstrate that zoledronic acid can significantly improve disease-free survival (DFS) in the adjuvant breast cancer setting in women who are naturally postmenopausal or have endocrine therapy-induced menopause. Furthermore, the ABCSG-12 trial showed durable disease-free survival benefits 2 years after completion of adjuvant therapy. These data suggest a potential role for zoledronic acid beyond bone health in breast cancer. Although it is too early to determine which patients are most likely to benefit from the anticancer potential of bisphosphonates, future research will help further guide therapy in this setting.

  3. Characteristics and Prognostic Impact of Pneumonitis during Systemic Anti-Cancer Therapy in Patients with Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, Daichi; Kato, Ryoji; Morimoto, Takeshi; Shimizu, Ryoko; Sato, Yuki; Kogo, Mariko; Ito, Jiro; Teraoka, Shunsuke; Nagata, Kazuma; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Otsuka, Kojiro; Tomii, Keisuke

    2016-01-01

    Background Data on characteristics, outcomes, and prognosis of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients who develop pneumonitis during systemic anti-cancer therapy (pneumonitis) are currently lacking. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 910 consecutive patients diagnosed with advanced NSCLC between January 2004 and January 2014. Of these, 140 patients were excluded because they did not receive systemic anti-cancer therapy at this hospital. Results A total of 770 patients were included in the study, of whom 44 (6%) were diagnosed with pneumonitis. The mortality rate of pneumonitis was 36%. The incidence of pneumonitis was independently associated with pre-existing ILD (adjusted odds ratio, 2.99, P = 0.008), and survivors were significantly associated with younger age (P = 0.003) and radiographic non-acute interstitial pneumonia pattern (P = 0.004). In all patients, pneumonitis was identified as an independent predictor of overall survival (OS) (adjusted hazard ratio 1.53, 95% CI, 1.09–2.09, P = 0.015). Performance status was poor in 82% of survivors of pneumonitis; in 62% of survivors, the PS worsened after the pneumonitis improved. Additionally, 54% of survivors received no further systemic anti-cancer therapy after pneumonitis. The median survival time of survivors after pneumonitis was 3.5 months (95% CI, 2.3–7.2 months). Conclusions Our study indicated that 6% of patients with advanced NSCLC developed pneumonitis during systemic anti-cancer therapy. The early mortality rate of pneumonitis is high, and the survival and PS after pneumonitis is extremely poor. Additionally, pneumonitis has an adverse impact on the survival of patients with advanced NSCLC. These data should be considered for the management of pneumonitis, and we recommend that future work focuses on pneumonitis particularly to improve the survival of patients with advanced NSCLC. PMID:28006019

  4. Impact of lymph node ratio on survival in patients with pancreatic and periampullary cancer.

    PubMed

    Tol, J A M G; Brosens, L A A; van Dieren, S; van Gulik, T M; Busch, O R C; Besselink, M G H; Gouma, D J

    2015-02-01

    According to some studies, the number of lymph nodes with metastases in relation to the total number of removed lymph nodes, the lymph node ratio (LNR), is one of the most powerful predictors of survival after resection in patients with pancreatic cancer. However, contradictory results have been reported, and small sample sizes of the cohorts and different definitions of a microscopic positive resection margin (R1) hamper the interpretation of data. The predictive value of LNR for 3-year survival was assessed using a Cox proportional hazards model. From 1992 to 2012, all patients with pancreatic and periampullary cancer operated on with pancreatoduodenectomy were selected from a database. Clinicopathological characteristics were analysed. Microscopic positive resection margin was defined as the microscopic presence of tumour cells within 1 mm of the margins. A nomogram was created. Some 760 patients were included. Predictive factors for death in 350 patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma included in the nomogram were: R1 resection (hazard ratio (HR) 1·55, 95 per cent c.i. 1·07 to 2·25), poor tumour differentiation (HR 2·78, 1·40 to 5·52), LNR above 0·18 (HR 1·75, 1·13 to 2·70) and no adjuvant therapy (HR 1·54, 1·01 to 2·34). The C statistic was 0·658 (0·632 to 0·698), and calibration was good (Hosmer-Lemeshow χ(2)  = 5·67, P =0·773). LNR and poor tumour differentiation (HR 4·51 and 3·30 respectively) were also predictive in patients with distal common bile duct (CBD) cancer. LNR, R1 resection and jaundice were predictors of death in patients with ampullary cancer (HR 7·82, 2·68 and 1·93 respectively). LNR is a common predictor of poor survival in pancreatic, distal CBD and ampullary cancer. © 2014 BJS Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. The impact of IGF-1R expression on the outcomes of patients with breast cancer: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Shunchao; Jiao, Xin; Li, Kai; Li, Wusheng; Zou, Huawei

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The value of insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) for predicting survival of patients with breast cancer remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to perform a meta-analysis of the published data to attempt to clarify the impact of IGF-1R. Methods Studies published between January 1, 1990 and October 1, 2014 were identified using an electronic search to aggregate the available survival results. Studies were included if they reported detecting IGF-1R expression in the primary breast cancer and analyzed patient survival data according to IGF-1R status. The principal outcome measures were hazard ratios (HRs) for survival of IGF-1R-positive patients. Combined HRs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using fixed- or random-effects models according to between-study heterogeneity. Results Ten studies, involving 5,406 patients, satisfied our inclusion criteria. Data from five studies provided the impact of IGF-1R on overall survival (OS), three studies the impact on breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS), and seven studies the impact on disease-free survival (DFS). The results of meta-analysis showed that for DFS, membranous IGF-1R positivity was not a significant predictor. The combined HR for OS/BCSS was 0.63 (95% CI: 0.42–0.95, P=0.03), indicating that membranous IGF-1R positivity was a significant predictor of better survival. IGF-1R cytoplasmic positivity was significantly associated with longer DFS and OS/BCSS (combined HR: 0.56, 95% CI: 0.35–0.89, P=0.01; combined HR: 0.55, 95% CI: 0.35–0.85, P=0.008, respectively). The results of subgroup analysis suggested that membranous IGF-1R positivity in hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer was correlated with favorable DFS (combined HR: 0.61, 95% CI: 0.41–0.92, P=0.02) and OS/BCSS (combined HR: 0.73, 95% CI: 0.57–0.93, P=0.01). Membranous IGF-1R positivity in triple-negative breast cancer predicted worse DFS (combined HR: 1.86, 95% CI: 1.03–3.34, P=0.04). Membranous

  6. [The impacts of the multidisciplinary team model on the length of stay and hospital expenses of patients with lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Zou, Jing; Xu, Xingxiang; Wang, Daxin; Xu, Jin; Gu, Wenju

    2015-05-01

    To explore the impacts of the multidisciplinary team model on the average length of stay and hospital expenses of patients with lung cancer. After the multidisciplinary team discussion, 97 patients with lung cancer were selected as the lung cancer group according to the enrollment and elimination criteria the control group was 97 patients with lung cancer managed without team discussion during the same period. All the patients were firstly diagnosed to have lung cancer from December 2011 to December 2013 in Subei People's Hospital. The length of stay, hospital expenses, stages of tumor, types of tumor, Zubrod-ECOG-WHO score, the form of payment, smoking history, sex and age of all the patients were collected. The difference in the average length of stay and hospital expenses between the 2 groups and the associated factors were analyzed by using χ² test, t test and multi-factor stepwise regression analysis. There were 68 males and 29 females with a mean age of (61 ± 9) years in the lung cancer group, while there were 73 males and 24 females with a mean age of (63 ± 10) years in the control group. There were no differences between the 2 groups in tumor staging, tumor types, Zubrod-ECOG-WHO score, the form of payment, smoking history, sex and age (χ² = 4.854, P = 0.563, χ² = 4.248, P = 0.097; χ² = 0.395, P = 0.821; χ² = 1.191, P = 0.554; χ² = 0.108, P = 0.977; χ² = 1.011, P = 0.389; χ² = 0.649, P = 0.519; P = 0.474, P = 0.845, respectively). The average hospital expenses (13 303 vs 16 553, Yuan) were lower and the length of stay (10.33 vs 12.49, days) was shorter in the lung cancer group as compared to the control group (t = 2.616, P = 0.010; t = 2.730, P = 0.007), especially so for the first clinical hospitalization (15 953 vs 19 485 yuan, t = 2.315, P = 0.022; 12.71 vs 14.75 days, t = 1.979, P = 0.049). The average length of stay and the tumor stages were the main factors associated with the average hospital expenses. Except for patients with the

  7. The Impact of Post-Mastectomy Radiation Therapy on Male Breast Cancer Patients-A Case Series

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Edward; Suzuki, Hiromichi; Younus, Jawaid; Elfiki, Tarek; Stitt, Larry; Yau, Gary; Vujovic, Olga; Perera, Francisco; Lock, Michael; Tai, Patricia

    2012-02-01

    Objective: To assess the impact of radiation management on male breast cancer (MBC) at London Regional Cancer Program (LRCP). Methods and Materials: Men with a diagnosis of breast cancer referred to LRCP were reviewed. The seventh American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system was used. Patients treated with and without post-mastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) were analyzed. Disease-free survival (DFS) was defined as time duration from diagnosis to first recurrence. Overall survival (OS) was defined as time duration from pathologic diagnosis to death or last follow-up with any death defined as an event. Survival estimates were obtained using Kaplan-Meier methodology. Results: From January 1977 to December 2006, 81 men had invasive ductal carcinoma. The median age was 65 (range, 35-87 years). There were 15 Stage I, 40 Stage II, 20 Stage III, and 6 Stage IV patients. Median follow-up time was 46 months (range, 1-225 months). Of the 75 patients treated with curative intent, 29 did not receive PMRT and 46 completed PMRT. Patients who received PMRT demonstrated no benefit in overall survival (p = 0.872) but significantly better local recurrence free survival (p < 0.001) compared with those who did not receive RT. There was trend toward improving locoregional recurrence with PMRT in patients with high-risk features (node-positive, advanced stage, and {<=}2 mm or unknown surgical margin). The median, 5-year, and 10-year disease-free survival and overall survival for the 75 patients were 77.7 months, 66.3%, 32.7%, and 91.2 months, 73.9%, and 36.6%, respectively. Conclusion: The experience at LRCP suggests that high-risk MBC patients should consider PMRT to improve their chance of local recurrence-free survival.

  8. The impact of body mass index dynamics on survival of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer receiving chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Choi, Younak; Kim, Tae-Yong; Lee, Kyung-hun; Han, Sae-Won; Oh, Do-Youn; Im, Seock-Ah; Kim, Tae-You; Bang, Yung-Jue

    2014-07-01

    High body mass index (BMI) is linked to an increased risk of developing pancreatic cancer (PC). However, in patients with advanced PC (APC), especially those receiving palliative chemotherapy, the impact of BMI on survival has not been investigated fully. To assess changes in BMI during the course of APC and their impact on patient survival, specifically for those receiving palliative chemotherapy. Consecutive patients with APC, all of whom were treated with palliative chemotherapy, were enrolled during 2003-2010. Clinical characteristics and prognoses were analyzed. A total of 425 patients participated (median age, 60.1 years). At diagnosis of APC, patients' BMI distribution of patients was as follow: <18.5 (45, 10.6%); 18.5-19.9 (67, 15.8%); 20.0-22.4 (156, 36.7%); 22.5-24.9 (107, 25.2%); 25.0-29.9 (49, 11.5%); and ≥ 30.0 (1, 0.2%). Median overall survival (OS) was 8.1 months (95% confidence interval 7.2, 9.1). Precancer BMI and baseline BMI (at diagnosis) had no impact on OS. Weight loss at diagnosis (precancer weight minus weight at diagnosis) and weight loss during first-line chemotherapy (both stipulated as BMI change ≥ 1) were associated with shortened OS (hazard ratio, 1.300; P = 0.012 and hazard ratio, 1.367; P = 0.010, respectively). In patients with APC undergoing palliative chemotherapy, decreases in BMI at APC diagnosis and during chemotherapy are more hazardous for OS than precancer BMI or baseline BMI (at diagnosis) as absolute values. Further studies are needed to validate this finding and investigate strategies to maintain BMI during chemotherapy in this setting. Copyright © 2014 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Impact of Response Shift on Time to Deterioration in Quality of Life Scores in Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hamidou, Zeinab; Dabakuyo-Yonli, Tienhan S.; Guillemin, Francis; Conroy, Thierry; Velten, Michel; Jolly, Damien; Causeret, Sylvain; Graesslin, Olivier; Gauthier, Mélanie; Mercier, Mariette; Bonnetain, Franck.

    2014-01-01

    Background This prospective multicenter study aimed to study the impact of the recalibration component of response-shift (RS) on time to deterioration (TTD) in health related quality of life (QoL) scores in breast cancer (BC) patients and the influence of baseline QoL expectations on TTD. Methods The EORTC-QLQ-C30 and BR-23 questionnaires were used to assess the QoL in a prospective multicenter study at inclusion (T0), at the end of the first hospitalization (T1) and, three (T2) and 6 months after the first hospitalization (T3). Recalibration was investigated by the then-test method. QoL expectancy was assessed at diagnosis. Deterioration was defined as a 5-point decrease in QoL scores, considered a minimal clinically important difference (MCID). TTD was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox regression analyses were used to identify factors influencing TTD. Results From February 2006 to February 2008, 381 women were included. Recalibration of breast cancer patients' internal standards in the assessment of their QoL had an impact on TTD. Median TTD were significantly shorter when recalibration was not taken into account than when recalibration was taken into account for global health, role-functioning, social-functioning, body-image and side effects of systemic therapy. Cox multivariate analyses showed that for body image, when recalibration was taken into account, radiotherapy was associated with a shorter TTD (HR: 0.60[0.38–0.94], whereas, no significant impact of surgery type on TTD was observed. For global health, cognitive and social functioning dimensions, patients expecting a deterioration in their QoL at baseline had a significantly shorter TTD. Conclusions Our results showed that RS and baseline QoL expectations were associated with time to deterioration in breast cancer patients. PMID:24828426

  10. Impact of Cosmetic Result on Selection of Surgical Treatment in Patients With Localized Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Salamanca, Juan Ignacio; Maestro, Mario Alvarez; Galarza, Ignacio Sola; Rodriguez, Joaquin Carballido

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To analyze the effect of cosmetic outcome as an isolated variable in patients undergoing surgical treatment based on the incision used in the 3 variants of radical prostatectomy: open (infraumbilical incision and Pfannestiel incision) and laparoscopic, or robotic (6 ports) surgery. Patients and methods: 612 male patients 40 to 70 years of age with a negative history of prostate disease were invited to participate. Each patient was evaluated by questionnaire accompanied by a set of 6 photographs showing the cosmetic appearance of the 3 approaches, with and without undergarments. Participants ranked the approaches according to preference, on the basis of cosmesis. We also recorded demographic variables: age, body mass index, marital status, education level, and physical activity. Results: Of the 577 patients who completed the questionnaries, the 6-port minimally invasive approach represents the option preferred by 52% of the participants, followed by the Pfannestiel incision (46%), and the infraumbilical incision (11%), respectively. The univariate and multivariate analyses did not show statistically significant differences when comparing the approach preferred by the patients and the sub-analyses for demographic variables, except for patients who exercised who preferred the Pfannestiel incision (58%) instead of minimally invasive approach (42%) with statistically significant differences. Conclusion: The minimally invasive approach was the approach of choice for the majority of patients in the treatment of prostate cancer. The Pfannestiel incision represents an acceptable alternative. More research and investment may be necesary to improve cosmetic outcomes. PMID:25516703

  11. Impact of local treatment on overall survival of patients with metastatic prostate cancer: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, Arie; Baccaglini, Willy; Glina, Felipe P.A.; Kayano, Paulo P.; Nunes, Victor M.; Smaletz, Oren; Bernardo, Wanderley Marques; de Carvalho, Icaro Thiago; Lemos, Gustavo Caserta

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Context Currently, standard treatment of metastatic prostatic cancer (MPCa) is androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT). Recent studies suggested that local treatment of MPCa is related to increase of survival of those patients, as observed in other tumors. Objective To evaluate the impact of local treatment on overall survival and cancer specific survival in 3 and 5 years in patients with MPCa. Materials and Methods Systematic review and meta-analysis of population studies published at PubMed, Scielo, Lilacs, Cochrane and EMBASE databases until June 2016. Several large cohorts and Post-Roc studies were included, that evaluated patients with MPCa submitted to local treatment (LT) using radiotherapy (RDT), surgery (RP) or brachytherapy (BCT) or not submitted to local treatment (NLT). Results 34.338 patients were analyzed in six included papers, 31.653 submitted to NLT and 2.685 to LT. Overall survival in three years was significantly higher in patients submitted to LT versus NLT (64.2% vs. 44.5%; RD 0.19, 95% CI, 0.17-0.21; p<0.00001; I2=0%), as well as in five years (51.9% vs. 23.6%; RD 0.30, 95% CI, 0.11-0.49; p<0.00001; I2=97%). Sensitive analysis according to type of local treatment showed that surgery (78.2% and 45.0%; RD 0.31, 95% CI, 0.26-0.35; p<0.00001; I2=50%) and radiotherapy (60.4% and 44.5%; RD 0.17, 95% CI, 0.12-0.22; p<0.00001; I2=67%) presented better outcomes. Conclusion LT using RDT, RP or BCT seems to significantly improve overall survival and cancer-specific survival of patients with metastatic prostatic cancer. Prospective and randomized studies must be performed in order to confirm our results. PMID:27802009

  12. Impact of subsequent metastases on costs and medical resource use for prostate cancer patients initially diagnosed with localized disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Tracy T; Shore, Neal D; Mehra, Maneesha; Todd, Mary B; Saadi, Ryan; Leblay, Gaetan; Aggarwal, Jyoti; Griffiths, Robert I

    2017-09-15

    The impact of subsequent metastases on costs and medical resource use (MRU) for prostate cancer (PC) patients initially diagnosed with localized disease was estimated. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data, linked to Medicare (1999-2012), were used to identify 7482 patients diagnosed with subsequent metastases 12 months or more after the initial diagnosis of localized PC (cases), and they were matched to 25,709 localized PC patients without subsequent metastases (controls). Patients were followed for costs and MRU from 12 months before their index date (subsequent metastases or a matched date for controls) up to 12 months after it. Costs and MRU were stratified by the setting/type of care/service. Multivariate mixed effects regression analyses were used to construct and compare longitudinal trajectories of marginal predicted costs and predicted probabilities of MRU between cases and controls. Among the controls, predicted monthly costs remained relatively stable throughout the entire observation period (weighted mean per patient per month, $2746; range during 24 months, $2603-2858). In contrast, among the cases, costs increased from $2622 (95% confidence interval [CI], $2525-2719) 12 months before the diagnosis of subsequent metastases to $4767 (95% CI, $4623-4910) 1 month before the diagnosis of subsequent metastases, peaked during the month of metastases at $13,291 (95% CI, $13,148-13,435), and remained significantly higher than costs for the controls thereafter (eg, $4677 at + 12 months; 95% CI, $4549-4805). Costs and MRU increased across a wide range of settings/types, including inpatient, outpatient, home health, and hospice settings. In PC patients initially diagnosed with localized disease, a diagnosis of subsequent metastases is associated with substantially increased costs and MRU. Cancer 2017;123:3591-601. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  13. The impact of poly implant prothèse fraud on breast cancer patients: a report by the institut curie.

    PubMed

    Reyal, Fabien; Feron, Jean-Guillaume; Leman Detour, Solene; Pourcelot, Anne Gaelle; Valentin, Morgane; Phillippe, Anne-Cecile; Levy-Zauberman, Yaelle; Agman, Antoine; Monier, Sindy; Blondel, Anne; Cothier-Savey, Isabelle; Guihard, Thierry; Le Masurier, Perig; Fitoussi, Alfred; Couturaud, Benoit

    2013-04-01

    In March of 2010, French authorities suspended the use of breast implants made by the company Poly Implant Prothèse. Institut Curie is a large cancer center, and Poly Implant Prothèse was one major silicone-filled breast implant brand used. This report describes the impact of the fraudulent implants worldwide and more specifically on patient care at the authors' unit. From 2002 to 2009, the median number of Poly Implant Prothèse implants removed per year was 32. Since the first alert in March of 2010, 252 of these breast implants were removed in 2010 and 2011. The breast implants removed were mainly reported as normal, with a rupture rate of less than 5 percent before 2008. However, the annual rupture rate has increased from 2008 to 2011 (8, 14, 20, and 23 percent, respectively). The Institut Curie, in conjunction with breast cancer patients, has organized a management plan to deal with this major industrial fraud. Its surveillance program of breast cancer patients facilitated the management of patients during this difficult time.

  14. Prognostic Impact of Residual Disease After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in 648 Patients with Triple-negative Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kern, Peter; Von Minckwitz, Gunter; Puetter, Carolin; Pavlidou, Sofia; Flach, Annika; Kimmig, Rainer; Rezai, Mahdi

    2015-10-01

    In order to establish a new risk categorization system for triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy, we analyzed a large database including more than 50% of all breast cancer cases nationwide. From a database of 39,570 primary breast cancer cases, 648 patients with TNBC were treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (2009-2011). The primary study end-point was the impact of residual tumor burden on survival. Pathological complete response (pCR) was achieved in 199 patients; 449 patients had a non-pCR (pCR rate=30.8%). Stage ypT1 did not differ prognostically from ypT2, and likewise ypT3 not from ypT4 (in patients with N0 and N1-3 disease). Combined analysis of ypT1/2 and ypT3/4 yielded highly significant differences (p=0.000145). A partial response still conveys a substantial survival benefit. There is no linear deterioration of prognosis according to residual tumor size. Post-neoadjuvant TNM stages ypT1 and ypT2, and ypT3 and ypT4 pairwise build uniform prognostic groups in TNBC, when there is no or low axillary lymph-node involvement. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  15. Development of Booklet on Male Sexual Dysfunction, its Measures and Assessing its Impact on Knowledge of Patients with Urological Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Chellayadhas, Jackson Yovin; Achrekar, Meera Sharad; Bakshi, Ganesh; Shetty, Rani; Carvalho, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Urological cancer and its surgeries have great impact on male sexuality which could have physical or emotional consequences. In India, speaking openly about the sexual matter is a taboo and an aspect considered forbidden. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to develop an information booklet about male sexual dysfunction and assess its impact on knowledge of patients with urological cancers. Methods: Information booklet was developed after literature review, and its content validity was established. Reliability of the questionnaire was 0.95. A randomized control trail using pre- and post-test design was used for 30 male urological cancer patients and was assigned to experimental group (15) who received information booklet and control group (15) who received standard treatment. Subjects in the experimental group were provided with opinionnaire during posttest. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Results: In experimental group, 40% of the subjects were ≤ 40 years, whereas 27% in the control group (P = 0.699). The pre- and post-mean difference score was significantly higher in experimental group (mean difference - 5) than control group (mean difference - 0.4). All subjects (100%) opined that the information booklet was useful, adequate, self-explanatory, sequential, and clear. Conclusions: Information in the booklet will help subjects to understand the common sexual problems after urological surgeries and help them to cope with the problems, thereby improving their quality of life. PMID:28083556

  16. The impact of tamoxifen brand switch on side effects and patient compliance in hormone receptor positive breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Zeidan, B; Anderson, K; Peiris, L; Rainsbury, D; Laws, S

    2016-10-01

    In 2006 Nolvadex was discontinued and replaced by a variety of alternative generic tamoxifen brands for the adjuvant treatment of breast cancer. Anecdotally, patients are switching brands and taking alternative medications to reduce treatment related symptoms. Nevertheless, more severe side effects may equate to better relapse prevention. This study evaluates generic tamoxifen adherence and its correlation with side effects and brand switch. Consecutive disease free ER positive patients (stage I-III) were invited to respond to a questionnaire. 165 of 327 questionnaires were returned (50% response). Pearson's Chi Square test was used for data analysis. 63 patients (38%) reported a switch between generic tamoxifen. 59% of all patients experienced side effects associated with tamoxifen treatment of which 53% were severe. Patients experiencing differential symptoms dependent on tamoxifen brand reported more severe side effects (p = 0.02). Non-prescribed supplements were taken by 42% of all patients with no significant improvement in climacteric symptoms (p = 0.05). The concomitant use of SSRIs appeared to have no effect on symptoms. A significant number of patients considered discontinuing tamoxifen because of the side effects (p = 0.001), yet this did not translate into discontinuation or non-adherence (p = 0.8 and 0.08 respectively). Severe tamoxifen side effects are commonly experienced by breast cancer patients and can be significantly altered by change in tamoxifen brand. Most patients will continue to take tamoxifen, despite side effects to avoid cancer relapse. Supplementation and antidepressants did not improve tamoxifen related side effects in our cohort. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Impact of sex on prognostic host factors in surgical patients with lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Wainer, Zoe; Wright, Gavin M; Gough, Karla; Daniels, Marissa G; Choong, Peter; Conron, Matthew; Russell, Prudence A; Alam, Naveed Z; Ball, David; Solomon, Benjamin

    2016-09-14

    Lung cancer has markedly poorer survival in men. Recognized important prognostic factors are divided into host, tumour and environmental factors. Traditional staging systems that use only tumour factors to predict prognosis are of limited accuracy. By examining sex-based patterns of disease-specific survival in non-small cell lung cancer patients, we determined the effect of sex on the prognostic value of additional host factors. Two cohorts of patients treated surgically with curative intent between 2000 and 2009 were utilized. The primary cohort was from Melbourne, Australia, with an independent validation set from the American Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database. Univariate and multivariate analyses of validated host-related prognostic factors were performed in both cohorts to investigate the differences in survival between men and women. The Melbourne cohort had 605 patients (61% men) and SEER cohort comprised 55 681 patients (51% men). Disease-specific 5-year survival showed men had statistically significant poorer survival in both cohorts (P < 0.001); Melbourne men at 53.2% compared with women at 68.3%, and SEER 53.3% men and 62.0% women were alive at 5 years. Being male was independently prognostic for disease-specific mortality in the Melbourne cohort after adjustment for ethnicity, smoking history, performance status, age, pathological stage and histology (hazard ratio = 1.54, 95% confidence interval: 1.10-2.16, P = 0.012). Sex differences in non-small cell lung cancer are important irrespective of age, ethnicity, smoking, performance status and tumour, node and metastasis stage. Epidemiological findings such as these should be translated into research and clinical paradigms to determine the factors that influence the survival disadvantage experienced by men. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  18. Survival impact of neoadjuvant therapy in resected pancreatic cancer: A Prospective Cohort Study involving 18,332 patients from the National Cancer Data Base.

    PubMed

    Mirkin, Katelin A; Hollenbeak, Christopher S; Wong, Joyce

    2016-10-01

    Pancreatic cancer carries a dismal prognosis, with surgical resection and adjuvant therapy offering the only hope for long-term survival. Recently, neoadjuvant therapy (NAT) has been employed to optimize outcomes. This study evaluates the impact of NAT in resected pancreatic cancer. Patients with clinically staged I-III resected carcinoma of the pancreas who underwent at least NAT or surgery first in the 2003-2011 National Cancer Data Base were included. Univariate statistics were used to compare characteristics between treatment groups. Kaplan-Meier and multivariate survival analyses using Cox proportional hazards models were also performed. 1736 patients who underwent NAT, 6706 patients who underwent surgical resection alone, and 9890 patients who underwent surgical resection followed by adjuvant therapy were studied. In patients with clinical stage I disease, adjuvant therapy was associated with similar median survival to NAT, which was greater than surgery alone (24.9, 24.8, and 18.3 months, respectively, p < 0.0001). However, in stage II, NAT offered improved median survival over adjuvant therapy, which was greater than surgery alone (21.78, 20.63, and 12.1 months, respectively, p < 0.0001). In stage III disease, NAT had better median survival relative to other groups (22.6, 14.6, and 8.7 months, respectively, p < 0.0001). In multivariate survival analysis, patients who received NAT had a 33% lower hazard of mortality up to 5 years as compared to surgical resection alone (p < 0.0001). Neoadjuvant therapy in advanced stage pancreatic cancer is associated with a survival benefit, perhaps related to a selection bias. In early stage pancreatic cancer, NAT is associated with similar survival. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Impact of cosmetic result on selection of surgical treatment in patients with localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Rojo, María Alejandra Egui; Martinez-Salamanca, Juan Ignacio; Maestro, Mario Alvarez; Galarza, Ignacio Sola; Rodriguez, Joaquin Carballido

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the effect of cosmetic outcome as an isolated variable in patients undergoing surgical treatment based on the incision used in the 3 variants of radical prostatectomy: open (infraumbilical incision and Pfannestiel incision) and laparoscopic, or robotic (6 ports) surgery. 612 male patients 40 to 70 years of age with a negative history of prostate disease were invited to participate. Each patient was evaluated by questionnaire accompanied by a set of 6 photographs showing the cosmetic appearance of the 3 approaches, with and without undergarments. Participants ranked the approaches according to preference, on the basis of cosmesis. We also recorded demographic variables: age, body mass index, marital status, education level, and physical activity. Of the 577 patients who completed the questionnaries, the 6-port minimally invasive approach represents the option preferred by 52% of the participants, followed by the Pfannestiel incision (46%), and the infraumbilical incision (11%), respectively. The univariate and multivariate analyses did not show statistically significant differences when comparing the approach preferred by the patients and the sub-analyses for demographic variables, except for patients who exercised who preferred the Pfannestiel incision (58%) instead of minimally invasive approach (42%) with statistically significant differences. The minimally invasive approach was the approach of choice for the majority of patients in the treatment of prostate cancer. The Pfannestiel incision represents an acceptable alternative. More research and investment may be necesary to improve cosmetic outcomes.

  20. Family history of colorectal cancer and its impact on survival in patients with resected stage III colon cancer: results from NCCTG Trial N0147 (Alliance)

    PubMed Central

    Jansson-Knodell, Claire L.; Foster, Nathan R.; Sargent, Daniel J.; Limburg, Paul J.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Smyrk, Thomas C.; Sinicrope, Frank A.; Jahagirdar, Balkrishna; Goldberg, Richard M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Family history of colon cancer often portends increased risk of disease development; however, the prognostic significance of family history related to disease and survival outcomes is unclear. Methods To investigate the relationship between family history of colorectal cancer and survival outcomes in stage III colon cancer patients, a prospective cohort of 1,935 patients with resected stage III colon cancer enrolled in a randomized controlled trial (N0147), comparing the standard of care FOLFOX to FOLFOX with cetuximab, was studied. Patients completed a baseline questionnaire on family history and were followed every 6 months until death or 5 years after randomization. Results We examined the endpoints of disease-free survival (DFS), time to recurrence (TTR) and overall survival (OS), comparing patients with a positive versus negative family history of colorectal cancer. The adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for patients with a positive family history were 0.95 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.78–1.16] for DFS, 0.94 (95% CI, 0.76–1.16) for TTR, and 0.92 (95% CI, 0.74–1.15) for OS (all adjusted P>0.47). A non-significant trend toward improved DFS (P=0.17; adjusted P=0.34) was observed when 2 or more relatives were affected as compared to 0 relatives (multivariate HR: 0.72; 95% CI, 0.45–1.15), whereas subjects with histories of 0 or 1 affected relatives had similar DFS (multivariate HR for 1 vs. 0: 1.00; 95% CI, 0.81–1.24). Interactions of the molecular factors KRAS, BRAF, and MMR with family history were also explored. The only significant interaction was for deficient MMR (dMMR) and first-degree relatives with a family history of colorectal cancer (0 vs. 1 vs. 2+ relatives) for a benefit on OS (univariate P=0.001), which remained significant after adjusting for other factors (P=0.029). Conclusions Among patients with stage III resected colon cancer treated with adjuvant FOLFOX, a family history of colorectal cancer did not significantly impact DFS

  1. Impact of radiofrequency energy on intraoperative outcomes of laparoscopic colectomy for cancer in obese patients.

    PubMed

    Cassini, Diletta; Miccini, Michelangelo; Gregori, Matteo; Manoochehri, Farshad; Baldazzi, Gianandrea

    2017-05-04

    Nowadays laparoscopic approach is accepted as a valid alternative to open surgery for the treatment of colorectal cancer. Several studies consider this approach to be safe and feasible also in obese patients, even if dissection in these patients may require a longer operative time and involve higher blood loss. To facilitate laparoscopic approach, more difficult in these patients, several energy sources for laparoscopic dissection and sealing, has been adopted recently. The aim of this study is to investigate the possible intraoperative advantages of radiofrequency energy in terms of blood loss and operative time in obese patients undergoing laparoscopic resection for cancer. All patients who underwent laparoscopic surgery for colorectal cancer from January 2010 to December 2015 were registered in a prospective database. Patients with a body mass index BMI (kg/m(2)) ≥30 were defined as obese, and patients with a BMI (kg/m(2)) <30 were defined as non-obese. All 136 obese patients observed were divided retrospectively into 2 groups according to the devices used for dissection: 83 patients (Historical group: B) on whom dissection and coagulation were performed using other energy sources (monopolar electrocautery scissors, bipolar electrical energy, ultrasonic coagulating shears) and 53 patients who were treated with electrothermal bipolar vessel sealing (Caiman group: A). In group A, the Laparoscopic Caiman 5 (Aesculap AG, Tuttlingen, Germany) was the only instrument employed in the whole procedure. The study examined only three types of operation: right colectomy (RC), left colectomy (LC), and anterior resection (AR). Preoperative data were similar for RC, LC, and AR in both groups (A and B). The mean operative time was statistically shorter in the Caiman group than in the Historical group [104 vs 124 min (p 0.004), 116 vs 140 min (p 0.004), and 125 vs 151 min (p 0.003) for RC, LC, and AR between group A and B, respectively]. Also intraoperative blood loss

  2. Impact of intra-abdominal fat on surgical outcome and overall survival of patients with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, J H; Chin, H M; Hwang, S S; Jun, K H

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of obesity on surgical outcome and prognosis in patients with gastric cancer. A total of 304 patients who underwent curative gastrectomy for gastric adenocarcinoma between January 2005 and March 2008were enrolled. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated before the operation and visceral fat area (VFA) was measured by abdominal computed tomography (CT). The patients were divided according to BMI class and VFA quartile. The influence of BMI and VFA on surgical outcome and survival was evaluated. The median BMI was 23.3 kg/m(2) and the median VFA was 103 cm(2). There was a significant positive correlation between BMI and VFA. According to BMI class and VFA quartile, there were no significant differences in patients' characteristics or surgical outcome, with the exception of a significantly longer operation time and fewer retrieved lymph nodes in patients with a high BMI and VFA. The unadjusted overall and disease free survival were not significantly different between BMI classes or VFA quartiles. Obesity, as represented by BMI and VFA, may not be a poor prognostic factor in patients with gastric cancer. Copyright © 2014 Surgical Associates Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The impact of the extent of surgical resection on survival of gastric cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Angelov, Kostadin Georgiev; Vasileva, Mariela Borisova; Grozdev, Konstantin Savov; Toshev, Svetoslav Yordanov; Sokolov, Manol Bonev; Todorov, Georgi Todorov

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the significance of the extent of gastric resection on the postoperative and overall gastric cancer survival. Resection with clean margins (4 cm or more) is widely accepted as the standard-ized goal for radical treatment of gastric cancer according to current guidelines, while the type of resection (subtotal or total) is still a matter of debate. The study included 155 patients diagnosed and treated in the Department of Surgery, Aleksandrovska University Hospital between January 2005 and December 2014. In order to determine the significance of the resection volume, we excluded from the study 54 patients receiving palliative intervention or staging exploratory laparoscopy. The remaining 101 patients were divided into two groups based on the volume of the performed gastric resection (total and subtotal) and compared based on overall survival and perioperative mortality. We also investigated the 3-year survival in the two groups as well as the overall survival only in the subgroup of patients with D2 lymphadenectomy. We could not determine any statistically significant difference in overall survival and 3-year survival (P=0.990) based on the extent of surgical resection (P=0.824) or perioperative mortality. The statistical analysis on patients with D2 lymph node dissection only did not show significance for overall survival. Our study shows no difference in safety and long-term survival rate of patients with gastric carcinoma based on the volume of stomach resection. Comparison with other studies also shows no difference in survival based on volume of the resection.

  4. Circulating CD105 shows significant impact in patients of oral cancer and promotes malignancy of cancer cells via CCL20.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chang-Han; Chuang, Hui-Ching; Lin, Yu-Tsai; Fang, Fu-Min; Huang, Chao-Cheng; Chen, Ching-Mei; Lu, Hui; Chien, Chih-Yen

    2016-02-01

    CD105 is rich in endothelium cells and is involved in angiogenesis. Higher microvascular density of tumor is also related to the prognosis in a variety of cancers. In this present study, patients with positive N classification, advanced T classification, advanced TNM stage, extracapsular spread of lymph nodes (ECS), and perineural invasion had significantly higher levels of peripheral vein (pCD105) and venous return from tumor (tCD105) in 71 patients with OSCC compared to 13 healthy volunteers. Those with higher pCD105 or tCD105 levels had significantly poorer 5-year disease-specific survival rate (DDS) and overall survival rate (OS). The tCD105 and pCD105 levels and ECS were the independent prognostic factors by the multivariate analysis according to the Cox regression model in 5-year DDS and OS rate. SAS and SCC4 cells treated with CD105 showed the increase in migration, invasion, and proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, CCL20 expression participated in CD105-elicited cell motility in oral cancer cells. In conclusion, higher level of circulating CD105 is related to adverse pathological features among patients with OSCC. It is also a useful marker for evaluating the prognosis and targeting therapeutics of OSCC.

  5. Impact of the obesity on lymph node status in operable breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Keskin, O; Aksoy, S; Babacan, T; Sarici, F; Kertmen, N; Solak, M; Turkoz, F P; Arik, Z; Esin, E; Petekkaya, I; Altundag, K

    2013-01-01

    Although many studies have shown association of obesity and tumor size, the association with the lymph node status is not clear. We examined the relationship of the lymph node status and obesity and other possible factors in early breast cancer patients. In this retrospective cohort study, 1295 breast cancer patients who had axillary dissection were included. Patients were grouped according to their body mass index (BMI) values at the time of diagnosis. We analyzed the relationship between BMI and patient and tumor characteristics, especially lymph node status. The median patient age was 48 years (range 20- 84). Of the patients 69.6% had modified radical mastectomy and the remaining 30.4% had breast-conserving surgery and axillary dissection. Median BMI of the patients was 27.2 kg/m(2) and 33.1% (N-429) of them had normal BMI, 36% (N-471) were overweight and 30.5% (N=395) were obese at the time of the diagnosis. Of the patients, 44.2% had N0 disease, and 55.8% had lymph node metastasis. N1 disease had 28.3% (N=367), 13.8% (N=179) had N2 and 13.7% (N=177) had N3 disease. When patients were classified as normal (≤24.9 kg/m(2)) and obese (>24.9 kg/m(2)) group, the total number of lymph nodes removed was higher in the obese group and this difference was statistically significant (18.12±10.48 and 20.36±11.37, respectively, p= 0.001). There was strong correlation between the number of the dissected lymph nodes and BMI (r=0.11; p<0.001). However, there was no statistically significant correlation between the number of metastatic lymph nodes and BMI. The mean number of the dissected and involved lymph nodes was higher in the HER2 positive group compared to the negative ones (21 vs 19, p=0.008; 6 vs 3, p<0.001; respectively) The number of the dissected lymph nodes was slightly higher in obese patients but there was no correlation between metastatic lymph node number and BMI. The number of the dissected and involved lymph nodes was higher in the HER2 positive group.

  6. Duration of symptoms: Impact on outcome of radiotherapy in glottic cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Olfred . E-mail: olfred@dadlnet.dk; Larsen, Susanne; Bastholt, Lars; Godballe, Christian; Jorgensen, Karsten Ejsing

    2005-03-01

    Purpose: To study the relationship between the durations of symptoms before the start of radiotherapy and treatment outcome in Stage I-III glottic cancer. Methods and materials: From 1965 to 1997, 611 glottic cancer patients from the Southern Region of Denmark were treated with primary radiotherapy. A total of 544 patients fulfilled the criteria for inclusion to the study (Stage I-III glottic cancer, a duration of symptoms less than or equal to 36 months, primary radiotherapy with at least 50 Gy and sufficient data for analysis). The total radiation dose ranged from 50.0 to 71.6 Gy in 22 to 42 fractions, and the median dose per fraction was 2.00 Gy (range, 1.56-2.29 Gy). All patients had 5 years of follow-up, and the 5-year recurrence-free survival rate was used as the primary endpoint. Results: The 5-year recurrence-free survival rate was 74%. In a multivariate Cox regression analysis, duration of symptoms was a significant factor (p < 0.0001) with a hazard ratio of 1.045 (95% CI 1.023, 1.069). Other significant factors included tumor stage and radiation dose, whereas duration of treatment time was borderline significant (p = 0.06). Conclusions: The duration of symptoms was statistically significantly related to a decrease in recurrence-free survival. One-month delay from onset of symptoms to start of radiotherapy was equivalent to a 4.5% decrease in recurrence-free survival.

  7. [Empathy in nursing care--its dimensions and impact on cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Badke, Volker

    2007-07-01

    As part of their professional activity nurses have to perform emotional and relationship-related work. Without doubt the ability to show empathy is a fundamental requirement to acting in a helpful way. Based on neuropsychological knowledge, in this article it is investigated to what extent it is possible for nurses to understand life of a cancer patient with the help of empathetic behaviour in order to honour it accordingly and influence it positively. Different forms of empathy are introduced, and they are discussed regarding their usefulness for development of empathetic competence in nursing.

  8. Impact of Home Hospice Care on Patients with Advanced Lung Cancer: A Longitudinal Population-Based Study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Jui-Kun; Kao, Yee-Hsin

    2016-04-01

    The effectiveness of home hospice care was helping patients to die at home, and reducing symptom burden. The study objective was to explore the impact of home hospice care on death at home, end-of-life (EOL) care, and health care costs among patients with advanced lung cancer in their last month of life. Using Taiwan's National Health Insurance Claims Database, we analyzed factors associated with home hospice care using logistic regression analysis. We enrolled 568 patients with advanced lung cancer under hospice care who died during 1997-2011, of which 238 (41.9%) received home hospice care. Compared with the inpatient hospice (IH) group, the home hospice (HH) group had a larger portion die at home (55.5% versus 22.1%, p < 0.001), but a smaller portion stayed in hospital more than 14 days in their last month of life (67.3% versus 40.8%, p < 0.001). The mean health care cost was less in the HH group than in the IH group (US $1,385.00 ± $1,370.00 and US $2,155.00 ± $1,739.00 [p < 0.001], respectively). Female patients' (p = 0.001) decreased hospital stay in the last month of life (p < 0.001) and longer hospice care duration (p = 0.003) were predictors of receiving home hospice care in advanced lung patients. Home hospice care enables patients with advanced lung cancer to increase the 33.4% chance of dying at home, to spend an average of eight-days less in hospital stay, and to save 35.7% health care costs in the last month of life, compared with their counterparts with only inpatient hospice care. Female patients' decreased hospital stay and longer hospice care duration were the predictors of receiving home hospice care.

  9. Economic Impact of Gene Expression Profiling in Patients with Early-Stage Breast Cancer in France

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Gregory; Romano, Olivier; Foa, Cyril; Vataire, Anne-Lise; Chantelard, Jean-Victor; Hervé, Robert; Barletta, Hugues; Durieux, Axel; Martin, Jean-Pierre; Salmon, Rémy

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims The heterogeneous nature of breast cancer can make decisions on adjuvant chemotherapy following surgical resection challenging. Oncotype DX is a validated gene expression profiling test that predicts the likelihood of adjuvant chemotherapy benefit in early-stage breast cancer. The aim of this study is to determine the costs of chemotherapy in private hospitals in France, and evaluate the cost-effectiveness of Oncotype DX from national insurance and societal perspectives. Methods A multicenter study was conducted in seven French private hospitals, capturing retrospective data from 106 patient files. Cost estimates were used in conjunction with a published Markov model to assess the cost-effectiveness of using Oncotype DX to inform chemotherapy decision making versus standard care. Sensitivity analyses were performed. Results The cost of adjuvant chemotherapy in private hospitals was estimated at EUR 8,218 per patient from a national insurance perspective and EUR 10,305 from a societal perspective. Cost-effectiveness analysis indicated that introducing Oncotype DX improved life expectancy (+0.18 years) and quality-adjusted life expectancy (+0.17 QALYs) versus standard care. Oncotype DX was found cost-effective from a national insurance perspective (EUR 2,134 per QALY gained) and cost saving from a societal perspective versus standard care. Inclusion of lost productivity costs in the modeling analysis meant that costs for eligible patients undergoing Oncotype DX testing were on average EUR 602 lower than costs for those receiving standard care. Conclusions As Oncotype DX was found both cost and life-saving from a societal perspective, the test was considered to be dominant to standard care. However, the delay in coverage has the potential to erode the quality of the French healthcare system, thus depriving patients of technologies that could improve clinical outcomes and allow healthcare professionals to better allocate hospital resources to

  10. A retrospective study of the impact of age on patterns of care for elderly patients with metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Kenji; Yonemori, Kan; Shimizu, Chikako; Hirakawa, Akihiro; Yamamoto, Harukaze; Ono, Makiko; Hirata, Taizo; Kouno, Tsutomu; Tamura, Kenji; Katsumata, Noriyuki; Ando, Masashi; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro

    2011-06-01

    This study aims at evaluating the impact of age on patterns of care in elderly patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC) and their outcome. We identified 177 patients aged ≥ 65 treated for MBC at the National Cancer Center Hospital in Japan from 1999 to 2007. We evaluated the impact of age on the selection of best supportive care (BSC) only, chemotherapy as first-line treatment, and chemotherapy after first-line endocrine therapy. Fisher's exact test and a multivariate logistic regression analysis with variables of age, performance status (PS), hormone receptor (HR) status, human epidermal growth factor-2 (HER2), and life-threatening disease (LTD) were used. The median age of patients was 72, and 60 patients (33.9%) were aged ≥ 75. HR-negative patients and those whose PS was ≥ 2, regardless of age, were more likely to choose BSC without chemotherapy. Multivariate analysis revealed age ≥ 75 (P = 0.018), positive-HR status (P < 0.001), and absence of LTD (P < 0.001) were significantly correlated to choose endocrine therapy rather than chemotherapy. In patients who had previous endocrine therapy, age (P = 0.008) and absence of HER2 (P = 0.018) were related not to choose chemotherapy. Not age but HR-negative status or PS ≥ 2 were related to the selection of BSC. In selecting endocrine therapy rather than chemotherapy, age (≥ 75), HR-positive, and absence of LTD were significant factors. In patients failed to endocrine therapy, age and HER2 status were correlated to decision-making to choose chemotherapy.

  11. Performance status in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma: determinants, prognostic impact, and ability to improve the Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer system.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chia-Yang; Lee, Yun-Hsuan; Hsia, Cheng-Yuan; Huang, Yi-Hsiang; Su, Chien-Wei; Lin, Han-Chieh; Lee, Rheun-Chuan; Chiou, Yi-You; Lee, Fa-Yauh; Huo, Teh-Ia

    2013-01-01

    Performance status is included in the Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) system for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Few studies specifically evaluated the role of performance status in patients with HCC. This study investigated its distribution, determinants, and prognostic impact, aiming to improve the performance of the BCLC system. A total of 2,381 HCC patients were enrolled. Performance status was determined according to the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group scale. The prognostic ability of the original and three modified BCLC systems in HCC patients was compared by the Akaike information criterion (AIC). There were 60, 17, 11, 8, and 4% of patients who were classified as performance status 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. A worse performance status significantly correlated with age, alcoholism, hypoalbuminemia, hyperbilirubinemia, renal insufficiency, hyponatremia, and prothrombin time prolongation (all P < 0.001). Larger tumor burden, poorer residual liver function, more frequent vascular invasion, and diabetes mellitus were also observed in patients with worse performance status (all P < 0.001). Patients with poorer performance status more often received best supportive care (P < 0.001). In the Cox proportional hazards model, performance status was an independent prognostic predictor and the long-term survival tended to be worse in patients with progressively poor performance status (all P < 0.05). Reassigning patients with performance status 0 or 1 to stage B provided the lowest AIC among the four BCLC-based staging systems. Performance status is strongly associated with both tumoral and cirrhotic factors and accurately predicts long-term survival in HCC patients. Modification of the BCLC system based on performance status may further enhance its prognostic ability in patients with early to advanced cancer stage. Copyright © 2012 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  12. Does Multimedia Education with 3D Animation Impact Quality and Duration of Urologists' Interactions with their Prostate Cancer Patients?

    PubMed

    Peltier, Alexandre; Aoun, Fouad; Ameye, Filip; Andrianne, Robert; De Meerleer, Gert; Denis, Louis; Joniau, Steven; Lambrecht, Antoon; Billiet, Ignace; Vanderdonck, Frank; Roumeguère, Thierry; Van Velthoven, Roland

    2015-09-01

    This large multicenter study aimed to assess the impact of the use of multimedia tools on the duration and the quality of the conversation between healthcare providers (urologists, radiotherapists and nurses) and their patients. 30 urological centers in Belgium used either videos or other instructive tools in their consultation with prostate cancer patients. Each consultation was evaluated for duration and quality using a visual analog scale. In total, 905 patient visits were evaluated: 447 without and 458 with video support. During consultations with video support, an average of 2.3 videos was shown. Video support was judged to be practical and to improve the quality of consultations, without loss of time, regardless of patient age or stage of disease management (p > 0.05). Healthcare providers indicate that the use of videos improved patient comprehension about prostate cancer, as well as the quality information exchange, without increasing consultation time. The use of video material was feasible in daily practice, and was easy to understand, relevant and culturally appropriate, even for the most elderly men. Multimedia education also helped to empower men to actively participate in their healthcare and treatment discussions. Ipsen NV.

  13. The impact of abdominal compression on outcome in patients treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy for primary lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mampuya, Wambaka Ange; Matsuo, Yukinori; Ueki, Nami; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Mukumoto, Nobutaka; Nakamura, Akira; Iizuka, Yusuke; Kishi, Takahiro; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of abdominal compression (AC) on outcome in patients treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for primary lung cancer. We retrospectively reviewed data for 47 patients with histologically proven non-small cell lung cancer and lung tumour motion ≥8 mm treated with SBRT. Setup error was corrected based on bony structure. The differences in overall survival (OS), local control (LC) and disease-free survival (DFS) were evaluated to compare patients treated with AC (n = 22) and without AC (n = 25). The median follow-up was 42.6 months (range, 1.4–94.6 months). The differences in the 3-year OS, LC and DFS rate between the two groups were not statistically significant (P = 0.909, 0.209 and 0.639, respectively). However, the largest difference was observed in the LC rate, which was 82.5% (95% CI, 54.9–94.0%) for patients treated without AC and 65.4% (95% CI, 40.2–82.0%) for those treated with AC. After stratifying the patients into prognostic groups based on sex and T-stage, the LC difference increased in the group with an unfavourable prognosis. The present study suggests that AC might be associated with a worse LC rate after SBRT using a bony-structure-based set-up. PMID:24801474

  14. Colony-stimulating factor use and impact on febrile neutropenia among patients with newly diagnosed breast, colorectal, or non-small cell lung cancer who were receiving chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    McCune, Jeannine S; Sullivan, Sean D; Blough, David K; Clarke, Lauren; McDermott, Cara; Malin, Jennifer; Ramsey, Scott

    2012-01-01

    To determine the impact of primary prophylactic colony-stimulating factor (CSF) use on febrile neutropenia in a large patient population receiving contemporary chemotherapy regimens to treat breast cancer, colorectal cancer, or non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Retrospective claims analysis. The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Puget Sound cancer registry and insurance claims records. A total of 2728 patients aged 25 years or older who received a diagnosis of breast cancer (998 patients), colorectal cancer (688 patients), or NSCLC (1042 patients) between January 1, 2002, and December 31, 2005, and received chemotherapy. Initial chemotherapy regimen, CSF use (filgrastim or pegfilgrastim), and febrile neutropenia events were evaluated after the first chemotherapy administration. Subsequently, febrile neutropenia rates in patients receiving primary prophylactic CSF were compared with febrile neutropenia rates in patients receiving CSF in settings other than primary prophylaxis or not at all. The impact of primary prophylactic CSF could not be assessed for patients with colorectal cancer or NSCLC because only 1 and 18 febrile neutropenia events, respectively, occurred in those receiving primary prophylactic CSF. Of the 998 patients with breast cancer, 72 (7.2%) experienced febrile neutropenia, 28 of whom received primary prophylactic CSF. In the patients with breast cancer, we observed that primary prophylactic CSF use was associated with reduced febrile neutropenia rates; however, the analysis may have been confounded by unmeasured factors associated with febrile neutropenia. The impact of primary prophylactic CSFs on febrile neutropenia rates could not be demonstrated. Given the substantive cost of CSFs to pharmacy budgets, there are numerous opportunities for pharmacists to optimize CSF use. Research studies are needed to evaluate if guideline-directed prescribing of primary prophylactic CSFs can improve clinical outcomes. © 2012

  15. Impact of Radiation-Induced Xerostomia on Quality of Life After Primary Radiotherapy Among Patients With Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jellema, Anke Petra Slotman, Ben J.; Doornaert, Patricia; Leemans, C. Rene M.D.

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of xerostomia on overall quality of life (QoL) outcome and related dimensions among head and neck cancer patients treated with primary radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 288 patients with Stage I-IV disease without distant metastases were included. Late xerostomia according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG-xerostomia) and QoL (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLC-C30) were assessed at baseline and every 6th month from 6 months to 24 months after radiotherapy. Results: A significant association was found between RTOG-xerostomia and overall QoL outcome (effect size [ES] 0.07, p < 0.001). A significant relationship with global QoL, all functioning scales, and fatigue and insomnia was observed. A significant interaction term was present between RTOG-xerostomia and gender and between RTOG-xerostomia and age. In terms of gender, RTOG-xerostomia had a larger impact on overall QoL outcome in women (ES 0.13 for women vs. 0.07 for men). Furthermore, in women ES on individual scales were larger, and a marked worsening was observed with increasing RTOG-xerostomia. No different ES according to age was seen (ES 0.10 for 18-65 years vs. 0.08 for >65 years). An analysis of the impact of RTOG-xerostomia on overall QoL outcome over time showed an increase from 0.09 at 6 months to 0.22 at 24 months. With elapsing time, a worsening was found for these individual scales with increasing RTOG-xerostomia. Conclusions: The results of this prospective study are the first to show a significant impact of radiation-induced xerostomia on QoL. Although the incidence of Grade {>=}2 RTOG-xerostomia decreases with time, its impact on QoL increases. This finding emphasizes the importance of prevention of xerostomia.

  16. The impact of music therapy versus music medicine on psychological outcomes and pain in cancer patients: a mixed methods study.

    PubMed

    Bradt, Joke; Potvin, Noah; Kesslick, Amy; Shim, Minjung; Radl, Donna; Schriver, Emily; Gracely, Edward J; Komarnicky-Kocher, Lydia T

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the impact of music therapy (MT) versus music medicine (MM) interventions on psychological outcomes and pain in cancer patients and to enhance understanding of patients' experiences of these two types of music interventions. This study employed a mixed methods intervention design in which qualitative data were embedded within a randomized cross-over trial. Thirty-one adult cancer patients participated in two sessions that involved interactive music making with a music therapist (MT) and two sessions in which they listened to pre-recorded music without the presence of a therapist (MM). Before and after each session, participants reported on their mood, anxiety, relaxation, and pain by means of visual analogue and numeric rating scales. Thirty participants completed an exit interview. The quantitative data suggest that both interventions were equally effective in enhancing target outcomes. However, 77.4 % of participants expressed a preference for MT sessions. The qualitative data indicate that music improves symptom management, embodies hope for survival, and helps connect to a pre-illness self, but may also access memories of loss and trauma. MT sessions helped participants tap into inner resources such as playfulness and creativity. Interactive music making also allowed for emotional expression. Some participants preferred the familiarity and predictability of listening to pre-recorded music. The findings of this study advocate for the use of music in cancer care. Treatment benefits may depend on patient characteristics such as outlook on life and readiness to explore emotions related to the cancer experience.

  17. Negative Impact of Skeletal Muscle Wasting After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Followed by Surgery on Survival for Patients with Thoracic Esophageal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Mayanagi, Shuhei; Tsubosa, Yasuhiro; Omae, Katsuhiro; Niihara, Masahiro; Uchida, Tsuneyuki; Tsushima, Takahiro; Yokota, Tomoya; Sato, Hiroshi; Naito, Tateaki; Yasui, Hirofumi

    2017-08-31

    Skeletal muscle wasting during curative treatment is an important issue faced by esophageal cancer patients. However, it has not been clarified whether skeletal muscle change during neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgery adversely affects prognosis. This study aimed to determine the relation between skeletal muscle change and survival for patients with advanced esophageal cancer who underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgery. This study retrospectively analyzed 66 patients with thoracic esophageal cancer who had undergone neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by esophagectomy. The study investigated the correlation between the change in the total muscle cross-sectional area at the third lumbar vertebra before and 4 months after surgery as well as the postoperative recurrence and overall survival (OS). Of the 66 patients, 39 (59%) showed a skeletal muscle decrease from baseline to 4 months after esophagectomy. The change in the skeletal muscle index from baseline to 4 months after surgery was -1.2 cm(2)/m(2). Multivariable analysis showed that nonsquamous cell carcinoma subtype (hazard ratio [HR] 2.57; p = 0.029), pathologic stage (HR 5.73; p < 0.01), and skeletal muscle wasting (HR per 1 unit decrease in skeletal muscle index, 1.16; p = 0.015) were the independent prognostic factors associated with worse OS. Additionally, pathologic stage (HR 6.03; p < 0.01) and skeletal muscle wasting (HR per 1 unit decrease in skeletal muscle index, 1.11; p = 0.048) also were found to be independent prognostic factors associated with worse recurrence-free survival. The study findings suggest that skeletal muscle wasting from baseline has a negative impact on cancer recurrence and survival.

  18. Impact of provider-patient communication on cancer screening adherence: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Emily B; Ostroff, Jamie S; DuHamel, Katherine N; D'Agostino, Thomas A; Hernandez, Marisol; Canzona, Mollie R; Bylund, Carma L

    2016-12-01

    Cancer screening is critical for early detection and a lack of screening is associated with late-stage diagnosis and lower survival rates. The goal of this review was to analyze studies that focused on the role of provider-patient communication in screening behavior for cervical, breast, and colorectal cancer. A comprehensive search was conducted in four online databases between 1992 and 2016. Studies were included when the provider being studied was a primary care provider and the communication was face-to-face. The search resulted in 3252 records for review and 35 articles were included in the review. Studies were divided into three categories: studies comparing recommendation status to screening compliance; studies examining the relationship between communication quality and screening behavior; and intervention studies that used provider communication to improve screening behavior. There is overwhelming evidence that provider recommendation significantly improves screening rates. Studies examining quality of communication are heterogeneous in method, operationalization and results, but suggest giving information and shared decision making had a significant relationship with screening behavior. Intervention studies were similarly heterogeneous and showed positive results of communication interventions on screening behavior. Overall, results suggest that provider recommendation is necessary but not sufficient for optimal adherence to cancer screening guidelines. Quality studies suggest that provider-patient communication is more nuanced than just a simple recommendation. Discussions surrounding the recommendation may have an important bearing on a person's decision to get screened. Research needs to move beyond studies examining recommendations and adherence and focus more on the relationship between communication quality and screening adherence.

  19. [To test the impact of hypnotherapy upon immunity and circadian rhythms among palliative cancer patients: a promising goal?].

    PubMed

    Kwiatkowski, F; Bignon, Y-J

    2007-01-01

    Epidemiological and clinical researches in the borderline domain between psychology and cancer have produced consequent results, despite the large variety of employed approaches and aimed goals: these results permit to define domains where new investigations still appear promising. If randomized prospective controlled trials that test the impact of psychosocial interventions, constitute to our mind a strategy that must not be bypassed, a special attention should be focussed on the following topics: 1) it seems necessary to add to standard goals (survival and quality of life) the evaluation of the impact on immunity and main biological rhythms (circadian and ultradian). Specific questionnaires should be included (pain, sleep, mood, self-esteem, life events...) and others may need to be developed or adapted (sexuality, spirituality, coping with death); 2) among types of psychosocial management, hypnosis and/or learning of self-hypnosis appears to be a modality of choice since some results have already been obtained on immune pathologies and also on cancer. Mixed to an approach of clinical psychology, such a management could arouse behavior changes toward pathology but also promote an improvement of biological rhythms (action on sleep...) and perhaps, by the way, an immune rebound; 3) on a methodological point of view, trials cannot be double-blind. The effort must then concern sample sizes, that were often insufficient in many trials, but also targeted populations: palliative cancer patients with a good performance status seem more relevant for this type of investigation, since psychosocial interventions usually improve quality of life.

  20. Integrated PET/CT in differentiated thyroid cancer: diagnostic accuracy and impact on patient management.

    PubMed

    Palmedo, Holger; Bucerius, Jan; Joe, Alexius; Strunk, Holger; Hortling, Niclas; Meyka, Susanne; Roedel, Roland; Wolff, Martin; Wardelmann, Eva; Biersack, Hans-Juergen; Jaeger, Ursula

    2006-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic accuracy and impact on patient management of the new integrated PET/CT modality in patients with suspected iodine-negative, differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC). Forty patients with DTC and a suggestion of iodine-negative tumor tissue underwent PET/CT examination (370 MBq (18)F-FDG, coregistered PET/CT whole-body images). As the first step of analysis, PET and CT images were scored blindly and independently by 2 nuclear medicine physicians and 2 radiologists. A 5-point scale was used. The second step consisted of a consensus reading, during which a virtual side-by-side fusion of PET and CT images was initially evaluated and afterward the "real" fusion (i.e., coregistered) PET/CT images were also scored with the same 5-point scale. The imaging results were compared with histopathologic findings and the course of disease during further follow-up examinations. One hundred twenty-seven lesions in 40 patients were evaluated. Diagnostic accuracy was 93% and 78% for PET/CT and PET, respectively (P = 0.049, per-patient analysis). In 17 (74%) of 23 patients with suspicious (18)F-FDG foci, integrated PET/CT added relevant information to the side-by-side interpretation of PET and CT images by precisely localizing the lesion(s). In tumor-positive PET patients, PET/CT fusion by coregistration led to a change of therapy in 10 (48%) patients. Futile surgery was prevented in an additional 3 patients. Integrated PET/CT is able to improve diagnostic accuracy in a therapeutically relevant way in patients with iodine-negative DTC. By precisely localizing tumor tissue, image fusion by integrated PET/CT is clearly superior to side-by-side interpretation of PET and CT images.

  1. Clinical impact of surveillance for head and neck cancer in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Hiroyuki; Yano, Tomonori; Yoda, Yusuke; Oono, Yasuhiro; Ikematsu, Hiroaki; Hayashi, Ryuichi; Ohtsu, Atsushi; Kaneko, Kazuhiro

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the clinical impact of surveillance for head and neck (HN) region with narrow band imaging (NBI) in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). METHODS Since 2006, we introduced the surveillance for HN region using NBI for all patients with ESCC before treatment, and each follow-up. The patients with newly diagnosed stage I to III ESCC were enrolled and classified into two groups as follows: Group A (no surveillance for HN region); between 1992 and 2000), and Group B (surveillance for HN region with NBI; between 2006 and 2008). We comparatively evaluated the detection rate of superficial head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), and the serious events due to metachronous advanced HNSCC during the follow-up. RESULTS A total 561 patients (group A: 254, group B: 307) were enrolled. Synchronous superficial HNSCC was detected in 1 patient (0.3%) in group A, and in 12 (3.9%) in group B (P = 0.008). During the follow up period, metachronous HNSCC were detected in 10 patients (3.9%) in group A and in 30 patients (9.8%) in group B (P = 0.008). All metachronous lesions in group B were early stage, and 26 patients underwent local resection, however, 6 of 10 patients (60%) in group A lost their laryngeal function and died with metachronous HNSCC. CONCLUSION Surveillance for the HN region by using NBI endoscopy increase the detection rate of early HNSCC in patients with ESCC, and led to decrease serious events related to advanced metachronous HNSCC. PMID:28246479

  2. Impact of molecular profiling on overall survival of patients with advanced ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Thomas J; Spetzler, David; Xiao, Nick; Burnett, Ken; Maney, Todd; Voss, Andreas; Reddy, Sandeep; Burger, Robert; Krivak, Thomas; Powell, Matthew; Friedlander, Michael; McGuire, William

    2016-04-12

    Patients with recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) have limited treatment options. Studies have reported that biomarker profiling may help predict patient response to available treatments. This study sought to determine the value of biomarker profiling in recurrent EOC. Patients in the Matched cohort had a median OS of 36 months compared to 27 months for patients in the Unmatched cohort (HR 0.62, 95% CI 0.41-0.96; p < 0.03). Individual biomarkers were analyzed, with TUBB3, and PGP prognostic for survival. Biomarker analysis also identified a molecular subtype (positive for at least two of the following markers: ERCC1, RRM1, TUBB3, PGP) with particularly poor overall survival. 224 patients from a commercial registry (NCT02678754) with stage IIIC/IV EOC at diagnosis, or restaged to IIIC/IV EOC at the time of molecular profiling, were retrospectively divided into two cohorts based on whether or not the drugs they received matched their profile recommendations. The Matched cohort received no drugs predicted to be lack-of-benefit while the Unmatched cohort received at least one drug predicted to be lack-of-benefit. Profile biomarker/drug associations were based on multiple test platforms including immunohistochemistry, fluorescent in situ hybridization and DNA sequencing. This report demonstrates the ability of multi-platform molecular profiling to identify EOC patients at risk of inferior survival. It also suggests a potential beneficial role of avoidance of lack-of-benefit therapies which, when administered, resulted in decreased survival relative to patients who received only therapies predicted to be of benefit.

  3. Impact of immunohistological subtypes on the long-term prognosis of patients with metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kokoro; Ito, Yoshinori; Matsuura, Masaaki; Fukada, Ippei; Horii, Rie; Takahashi, Shunji; Akiyama, Futoshi; Iwase, Takuji; Hozumi, Yasuo; Yasuda, Yoshikazu; Hatake, Kiyohiko

    2016-07-01

    Although improved long-term prognoses for patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC) have been demonstrated, few reports address overall survival (OS) with sufficient follow-up. Furthermore, the relevance of immunohistological subtypes to OS in MBC has not been clarified. We evaluated, retrospectively, the OS of patients who had been initiated on systemic therapy for MBC between 2000 and 2008. The subjects of this study were 527 patients with MBC treated by systemic therapy. The median survival time (MST) was 55.5 months. The MST for each immunohistological subtype was as follows: luminal, 59.9 months; luminal-HER2, not reached; triple-negative, 18.6 months; and HER2-enriched, 49.9 months. According to multivariate analysis, metastasis-free intervals of ≥2 years and treatment with anthracycline for MBC were predictive of better OS. The predictors of shorter OS included disease progression after first-line treatment for MBC, triple-negative, and all histological factors, except papillotubular carcinoma, with liver metastasis, and having three or more initial metastatic sites. The prognosis of the patients with MBC in this series was better than that reported before 2000, which is probably attributable to the use of novel, improved pharmacological agents. For example, luminal-HER2 tumors can be treated using both aromatase inhibitors and trastuzumab. Because of the lower toxicities, it is now possible to administer these agents for longer periods, resulting in better prognoses.

  4. FOXP3+ Tregs: heterogeneous phenotypes and conflicting impacts on survival outcomes in patients with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Changhua; Xu, Ye; Ying, Mingang; Li, Qingguo; Huang, Liyong; Li, Dawei; Cai, Sanjun; Li, Bin

    2015-03-01

    The tumor microenvironment composites a mixture of immune lymphoid cells, myeloid cells, stromal cells with complex cytokines, as well as numerous lymphovascular vessels. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a common malignancy and one of the leading causes of tumor-related death in the United States and worldwide. The immune status in the tumor microenvironment contributes to the survival of a patient with CRC. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are considered a key factor in immune escape and immunotherapy failure among cancer patients. The transcription factor forkhead box P3 (FOXP3) is a crucial intracellular marker and also a key developmental and functional factor for CD4+CD25+ Tregs. Tregs are correlated with survival in various human neoplasms, and elevated proportions of Tregs are usually associated with unfavorable clinical outcomes. However, the role of Tregs in CRC remains controversial. High densities of tumor-infiltrating Tregs in CRC patients are reported to be correlated with worse or better outcomes. And Tregs may not be predictive of prognosis after resection of the primary tumor. The exact explanations for these discordant results remain unclear. The heterogeneous instincts of cell phenotype, gene expression, and functional activities of Tregs may partly contribute this contrasting result. Furthermore, the lack of a robust marker for identifying Tregs or due to the different techniques applied is also account. The Treg-specific demethylated region (TSDR) was recently reported to be a specific epigenetic marker for natural Tregs (nTregs), which can stably express FOXP3. The FOXP3-TSDR demethylation assay may be an promising technique for CRC-related nTregs studies.

  5. Impact of guidelines implemented in a Paris university hospital: application to the use of antiemetics by cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Debrix, I; Flahault, A; Becker, A; Schwartz, L; Kanfer, A; Milleron, B

    1999-01-01

    Aims To assess the impact with time of guidelines on antiemetic use in an 850-bed Paris university hospital with a high proportion of cancer patients. Methods Guidelines on the use of antiemetics available in cancer chemotherapy were drafted according to the Delphi technique. Their implementation was based upon a patient-specific antiemetic prescription form. To assess the impact of guideline implementation over time, discrepancies between current practice and the guidelines were compared before guideline implementation (between March and August 1995) and after implementation (between March and August 1997, and March and August 1998). Results Before the Delphi panel’s guidelines were implemented, 5-HT3 antagonists were inappropriately administered in 70% of cases. After guideline implementation, this proportion dropped significantly (P <0.0001, Fisher’s exact test) to 22% between March and August 1997 and 28% between March and August 1998. Conclusions Implementation of guidelines seems to have resulted in significant changes with time, although a causal relationship has not been demonstrated. The development of guidelines by our hospital’s multidisciplinary working group helped the various consultants to adjust medical practices to take account of these changes. PMID:10583034

  6. Impact of Time from Completion of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy to Surgery on Survival Outcomes in Breast Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Rachel A; Lei, Xiudong; Barcenas, Carlos H; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A; Caudle, Abigail S; Valero, Vicente; Tripathy, Debu; Giordano, Sharon H; Chavez-MacGregor, Mariana

    2016-05-01

    No studies have examined the impact of the interval from conclusion of neoadjuvant chemotherapy to surgery in breast cancer patients. This study was undertaken to investigate the relationship between time interval from neoadjuvant chemotherapy to surgery and survival outcomes. Breast cancer patients diagnosed with stage I-III disease who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy June 1995 to April 2007 were identified. The effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy to surgery interval, defined as ≤4, 4-6, or >6 weeks, on survival outcomes was examined. Descriptive statistics and Cox proportional hazards models were used. A total of 1101 patients were identified. Median time to surgery was 33 (range 8-159) days; 335 patients (30.4 %) had surgery within 4 weeks of their last dose of neoadjuvant chemotherapy, 524 (47.6 %) within 4-6 weeks, and 242 (22.0 %) after more than 6 weeks. Median follow-up was 94 (range 3-178) months. The 5-year overall survival (OS) estimates were 79, 87, and 81 % in patients who underwent surgery ≤4, 4-6, and >6 weeks after neoadjuvant chemotherapy, respectively (p = 0.03). The three groups did not differ in 5-year recurrence-free survival (RFS) or locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRFS). In multivariable analysis, compared with an interval of ≤4 weeks, patients who underwent surgery at 4-6 or >6 weeks had equivalent OS, LRFS, and RFS; a sensitivity analysis suggested worse OS in patients who underwent surgery at >8 weeks. Patients with neoadjuvant chemotherapy to surgery intervals of up to 8 weeks had equivalent OS, RFS, and LRFS.

  7. Impact of Sulfatase-2 on cancer progression and prognosis in patients with renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Shin; Ishibashi, Kei; Kataoka, Masao; Oguro, Toshiki; Kiko, Yuichirou; Yanagida, Tomohiko; Aikawa, Ken; Kojima, Yoshiyuki

    2016-11-01

    Heparan sulfate-specific endosulfatase-2 (SULF-2) can modulate the signaling of heparan sulfate proteoglycan-binding proteins. The involvement of SULF-2 in cancer growth varies by cancer type. The roles of SULF-2 expression in the progression and prognosis of renal cell carcinomas (RCC) have not yet been fully clarified. In the present study, the expression levels of SULF-2 mRNA and protein in 49 clinical RCC samples were determined by RT-PCR and immunostaining. The existence of RCC with higher SULF-2 expression and lower SULF-2 expression compared to the adjacent normal kidney tissues was suggested. High SULF-2 expression was correlated with an early clinical stage and less invasive pathological factors. Low SULF-2 expression was correlated with an advanced stage and higher invasive factors. Three-year cancer-specific survival (CSS) for high SULF-2 RCC and low SULF-2 RCC were 100% and 71.4%, respectively (log-rank P = 0.0019), with a significantly shorter CSS observed in low SULF-2 RCC patients. The influence of SULF-2 expression level on Wnt/VEGF/FGF signaling, cell viability and invasive properties was examined in three RCC cell lines, Caki-2, ACHN and 786-O, using a SULF-2 suppression model involving siRNA or a SULF-2 overexpression model involving a plasmid vector. High SULF-2 expression enhanced Wnt signaling and Wnt-induced cell viability, but not cell invasion. In contrast, low levels of SULF-2 expression significantly enhanced both cell invasion and viability through the activation of VEGF/FGF pathways. RCC with lower SULF-2 expression might have a higher potential for cell invasion and proliferation, leading to a poorer prognosis via the activation of VEGF and/or FGF signaling.

  8. Impact of chemotherapy-induced alopecia distress on body image, psychosocial well-being, and depression in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Im-Ryung; Chang, Oliver; Kang, Danbee; Nam, Seok-Jin; Lee, Jeong Eon; Lee, Se Kyung; Im, Young-Hyuck; Park, Yeon Hee; Yang, Jung-Hyun; Cho, Juhee

    2014-10-01

    This study aims to evaluate the impact of chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA) distress on body image, psychosocial well-being, and depression among breast cancer patients. A cross-sectional survey was conducted at the breast cancer advocacy events held at 16 hospitals in Korea. Alopecia distress was assessed using the 'Chemotherapy-Induced Alopecia Distress Scale', body image and psychosocial well-being were measured by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core 30 and breast specific module (BR23), and depression was measured using the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale. Means of outcomes were compared between low and high CIA distress groups. Univariable and multivariable linear regression models were used to analyze the relationship between the CIA distress and body image, psychosocial well-being, and depression. One hundred sixty-eight breast cancer patients participated in the study; the mean age was 48.4 (SD = 8.4) years, and 55.3% of the patients experienced higher distress from alopecia. In fully adjusted models, the high distress group was more likely to have a poorer body image than the low distress group (35.2 vs. 62.0; p < 0.001). Distressed patients were also more likely to report lower emotional (55.3 vs. 76.9; p < 0.001), role (58.6 vs. 72.0; p < 0.001), and social functioning (51.3 vs. 70.9; p < 0.001). The high distress group was also more likely to have depression compared with the low distress group (19.6 vs. 14.8; p < 0.001). Chemotherapy-induced alopecia distress was negatively associated with body image, psychosocial well-being, and depression in women with breast cancer. It is necessary to develop specific interventions to minimize distress due to alopecia for women with breast cancer. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Impact of extraperitoneal lymphadenectomy on treatment and survival in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Gil-Moreno, Antonio; Díaz-Feijoo, Berta; Pérez-Benavente, Asumpció; del Campo, José M; Xercavins, Jordi; Martínez-Palones, José M

    2008-09-01

    During the last years, and coinciding with the beginning of the concomitant treatment with radio-chemotherapy, a better control of local cervical cancer has been reached, although failures in the systemic control of the illness have been more frequent. One of the main causes is not treating the illness at the level of the para-aortic lymph nodes, basically because their affectation is unknown and because imaging tests have a high percentage of false negative results. At this time, it is when laparoscopic para-aortic lymphadenectomy arises, in order to be able to know the extension of the illness better before treatment. A extraperitoneal laparoscopic approach is described in order to reduce complications derived from a possible extended irradiation. Between August 2001 and October 2007, a total of 69 patients with bulky and locally advanced cervical cancer (FIGO stages IB2, IIA > 4 cm and IIB-IVA) underwent extraperitoneal laparoscopic lymphadenectomy for surgical staging. Extraperitoneal aortic lymphadenectomy by laparoscopic approach is a technique with low morbidity. Special laparoscopic material is not required and if it is performed by a team trained in technical endoscopics it is not difficult. Radio-chemotherapy treatment began immediately after laparoscopy because of its minimal aggression.

  10. Impact of a modified Broviac maintenance care bundle on bloodstream infections in paediatric cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Furtwängler, Rhoikos; Laux, Carolin; Graf, Norbert; Simon, Arne

    2015-01-01

    Background: During intensive chemotherapy, bloodstream infection (BSI) represents an important complication in paediatric cancer patients. Most patients carry a long-term central venous access device (CVAD). Improved maintenance care of these vascular catheters may decrease the risk of BSI. Methods: Intervention study (adapted CVAD prevention protocol) with two observation periods (P1: 09-2009 until 05-2011; P2: 09-2011 until 05-2013); prospective surveillance of all laboratory confirmed BSIs. In P2, ready to use sterile NaCl 0.9% syringes were used for CVAD flushing and octenidine/isopropanol for the disinfection of catheter hubs and 3-way stopcocks. Results: During P1, 84 patients were included versus 81 patients during P2. There were no significant differences between the two patient populations in terms of median age, gender, underlying malignancy or disease status (first illness or relapse). Nearly all CVADs were Broviac catheters. The median duration from implantation to removal of the CVAD was 192 days (Inter-quartile-range (IQR); 110–288 days) in P1 and 191 days (IQR; 103–270 days) in P2. 28 BSI were diagnosed in 22 patients in P1 (26% of all patients experienced at least one BSI) and 15 BSI in 12 patients in P2 (15% of all patients). The corresponding results for incidence density (ID) were 0.44 (CI95 0.29–0.62) for P1 vs. 0.34 (0.19–0.53) BSI per 100 inpatient days for P2 and for incidence rate (IR) 7.76 (5.16–10.86) in P1 vs. 4.75 (2.66–7.43) BSI per 1,000 inpatient CVAD utilization days. In P1, 9 BSI were caused by CoNS vs. only 2 in P2 (IR 2.49; CI95 0.17–4.17 vs. 0.63; CI95 0.08–1.72). In P1 two BSI (7%) lead to early removal of the device. During P2 one CVAD was prematurely removed due to a Broviac-related BSI (6.7%). Conclusion: The preventive protocol investigated in this study led to a reduction of BSI in paediatric cancer patients. This result was clinically relevant but – due to insufficient power in a single centre observation

  11. Impact of lymphadenectomy on survival after recurrence in patients with advanced ovarian cancer without suspected lymph node metastasis.

    PubMed

    Paik, E Sun; Shim, Minhee; Choi, Hyun Jin; Lee, Yoo-Young; Kim, Tae-Joong; Lee, Jeong-Won; Kim, Byoung-Gie; Bae, Duk-Soo; Choi, Chel Hun

    2016-11-01

    To investigate the impact of pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy during primary debulking surgery (PDS) on recurrence pattern and survival after recurrence in patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) without suspected lymph node (LN) metastasis in preoperative imaging studies and intraoperative findings. A retrospective review of patients with FIGO stage III and IV EOC without suspected lymph node metastasis was performed. Patients with stage III EOC due to LN metastasis without peritoneal disease were excluded from this study. Survival comparisons for progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and survival after recurrence were performed between patients with or without lymphadenectomy. Of the 261 EOC patients fulfilling inclusion criteria, 194 (74.3%) experienced relapse and a further 132 (50.6%) died within a median follow-up period of 48months (range, 6-139months). Patterns of recurrence and CA-125 level at recurrence were not different between patients with lymphadenectomy and without lymphadenectomy; however, patients with lymphadenectomy showed longer survival after recurrence than those without lymphadenectomy (43 vs. 32months, p=0.013). This difference was pronounced in the group with residual tumor <1cm (48 vs. 30months, p=0.010). The survival advantage of lymphadenectomy after recurrence remained significant in multivariate analysis (HR 0.57, 95% CI 0.38-0.84, p=0.005). Lymphadenectomy during PDS was associated with longer survival, especially survival after recurrence. The underlying mechanism should be elucidated in future studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Impact of 5-fluorouracil metabolizing enzymes on chemotherapy in patients with resectable colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Takumi; Umeki, Masahiko; Miyake, Hiroshi; Iida, Tatsumi; Okumura, Minoru; Ohno, Kazuhide; Sakamoto, Masashi; Miyoshi, Nobukazu; Takahashi, Masahiko; Tsumura, Hidenori; Tokunaga, Yukihiko; Naitou, Haruhiko; Fukui, Takuji

    2014-09-01

    Although 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is an important drug for colorectal cancer (CRC) treatment, no useful biomarker is currently available to predict treatment response. Since 5-FU is converted into active or inactive forms by orotate phosphoribosyltransferase (OPRT) or dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD), a correlation between these enzymes and response to 5-FU has been suggested. However, such a correlation has not been investigated prospectively. Therefore, in the present study, we aimed to prospectively evaluate whether OPRT and DPD were predictive factors of the response to 5-FU treatment in patients with resectable CRC. The present investigation was designed as a multicenter prospective cohort study. OPRT and DPD activities were assessed in biopsy samples, obtained surgically from patients with resectable CRC. The OPRT/DPD ratio was calculated and the cut-off values for this ratio were determined for 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Patients were treated with 5-FU/leucovorin (LV) regimens and oral 5-FU. The endpoint of this study was the correlation between the OPRT/DPD ratio and 5-year DFS and OS. The cut-off value for the OPRT/DPD ratio was determined by using the maximum χ2 statistic method against 5-year DFS and OS. Sixty-eight patients were enrolled from July 2003 to May 2005. The median follow-up period was 1925 days. The OPRT/DPD ratio cut-off values for 5-year DFS and OS were 0.015 and 0.013, respectively. During the 5-year DFS and OS periods, patients with higher cut-off values had a better prognosis than those with lower ratios (P=0.03 and 0.02, respectively). In conclusion, our results suggest that the OPRT/DPD ratio could be a predictive factor for response to 5-FU/LV adjuvant chemotherapy.

  13. Impact of travel distance to the treatment facility on overall mortality in US patients with prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Vetterlein, Malte W; Löppenberg, Björn; Karabon, Patrick; Dalela, Deepansh; Jindal, Tarun; Sood, Akshay; Chun, Felix K-H; Trinh, Quoc-Dien; Menon, Mani; Abdollah, Firas

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of travel distance to the treating facility on the risk of overall mortality (OM) among US patients with prostate cancer (PCa). In total, 775,999 patients who had PCa in all stages and received treatment with different strategies (radical prostatectomy, radiation therapy, observation, androgen-deprivation therapy, multimodal treatment, and chemotherapy) were drawn from the National Cancer Data Base from 2004 through 2012. Independent predictors of travel distance (intermediate [12.5-49.9 miles] and long [49.9-249.9 miles] vs short[<12.5 miles]) and its effect on OM were calculated using multivariable regression analyses. Additional analyses evaluated the distance effect on OM in selected subgroups. In total, 54.5%, 33.4%, and 12.1% of patients traveled short, intermediate, and long distances, respectively. Residency in rural areas and the receipt of treatment at academic/high-volume centers independently predicted long travel distance. Non-Hispanic black men and Medicaid-insured men were less likely to travel long distances (all P < .001). Overall, traveling a long distance (hazard ratio, 0.87; 95% confidence interval, 0.83-0.92; P < .001) was associated with lower OM risk compared with traveling a short distance. This held true among non-Hispanic white men; privately insured and Medicare-insured men; those who underwent radical prostatectomy, received radiation therapy, and received multimodal strategies; and those who received treatment at academic/high-volume centers (P < .01), but not among non-Hispanic black men (P = .3). Long travel distance was associated with an increased OM in Medicaid-insured patients (P < .001). An OM benefit was observed among men who traveled long distances for PCa treatment, which is likely to be a reflection of centralization of care and more favorable patient-level characteristics in those travelers. Furthermore, the survival benefit mediated by long travel distances appears

  14. Impact of COPD in patients with lung cancer and advanced disease treated with chemotherapy and/or tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Izquierdo, José Luis; Resano, Pilar; El Hachem, Abdulkader; Graziani, Desiré; Almonacid, Carlos; Sánchez, Ignacio M

    2014-01-01

    While it is relatively well known that the prognosis of patients with lung cancer (LC) treated with surgery is worse in the presence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), it is unknown if this assessment can be extrapolated to patients with advanced disease treated with chemotherapy and/or tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The aim of our study is to analyze the clinical characteristics and survival rates in patients with LC and COPD, and to compare these to the patients without airflow obstruction. From 471 evaluable patients, 324 (69%) were not treated with surgery due to disseminated disease (stages 3B and 4). Of them, 47.7% also had COPD. All patients were treated at the moment of diagnosis according to National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines with platinum-based chemotherapy or tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Kaplan–Meier curves showed no significant differences in overall survival between COPD and non-COPD patients (log–rank P=0.65). In the multivariate Cox proportional hazard model adjusting for the most relevant variables, the adjusted hazard ratio (HRadj) was statistically significant for performance status (HRadj =1.33, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.11–1.59; P=0.002) and clinical stage (HRadj =0.67, 95% CI: 0.50–0.89; P=0.006), but not for COPD status (HRadj =1.20, 95% CI: 0.83–1.50; P=0.46). Our conclusion is that at present, when using standard care in advanced LC (stages 3B and 4), COPD does not have a significant deleterious impact on overall survival. PMID:25336937

  15. Impact of COPD in patients with lung cancer and advanced disease treated with chemotherapy and/or tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, José Luis; Resano, Pilar; El Hachem, Abdulkader; Graziani, Desiré; Almonacid, Carlos; Sánchez, Ignacio M

    2014-01-01

    While it is relatively well known that the prognosis of patients with lung cancer (LC) treated with surgery is worse in the presence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), it is unknown if this assessment can be extrapolated to patients with advanced disease treated with chemotherapy and/or tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The aim of our study is to analyze the clinical characteristics and survival rates in patients with LC and COPD, and to compare these to the patients without airflow obstruction. From 471 evaluable patients, 324 (69%) were not treated with surgery due to disseminated disease (stages 3B and 4). Of them, 47.7% also had COPD. All patients were treated at the moment of diagnosis according to National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines with platinum-based chemotherapy or tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Kaplan-Meier curves showed no significant differences in overall survival between COPD and non-COPD patients (log-rank P=0.65). In the multivariate Cox proportional hazard model adjusting for the most relevant variables, the adjusted hazard ratio (HRadj) was statistically significant for performance status (HRadj =1.33, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.11-1.59; P=0.002) and clinical stage (HRadj =0.67, 95% CI: 0.50-0.89; P=0.006), but not for COPD status (HRadj =1.20, 95% CI: 0.83-1.50; P=0.46). Our conclusion is that at present, when using standard care in advanced LC (stages 3B and 4), COPD does not have a significant deleterious impact on overall survival.

  16. Trends, predictors, and impact of systemic chemotherapy in small cell lung cancer patients between 1985 and 2005.

    PubMed

    Behera, Madhusmita; Ragin, Camille; Kim, Sungjin; Pillai, Rathi N; Chen, Zhengjia; Steuer, Conor E; Saba, Nabil F; Belani, Chandra P; Khuri, Fadlo R; Ramalingam, Suresh S; Owonikoko, Taofeek K

    2016-01-01

    The last 3 decades have witnessed limited therapeutic advances in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) management. This study evaluated real-world trends in the use of systemic therapies and the impact on patient outcomes in the United States. The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare database was used to find patients diagnosed with SCLC between 1985 and 2005. The 1985-1990 period served as the baseline for a temporal analysis conducted at 5-year intervals (1985-1990, 1991-1995, 1996-2000, and 2001-2005). Cox proportional models were used to estimate the effect of chemotherapy on survival. Results were validated with a propensity-matched analysis. There were 47,351 eligible patients: 52% were male; the median age was 71 years; and 87% were white, 7% were black, and 1.4% were Asian. The proportion of patients treated with chemotherapy was low but increased over time (38%, 55%, 50%, and 53%; P < .001). Race, diagnosis period, age, stage, and location of residence significantly predicted chemotherapy use. Females (51%), Asians (53%), and rural residents (60%) were more likely to receive chemotherapy. The median overall survival with and without chemotherapy was 9.6 and 3.6 months, respectively. Linear trend analyses showed a modest reduction in the impact of chemotherapy on survival for patients treated with chemotherapy versus untreated patients (hazard ratios [HRs], 0.59, 0.61, 0.64, and 0.62; P < .001) but an overall trend of improved survival for treated (HRs, 1.0, 1.03, 1.00, and 0.96; P = .005) and untreated patients (HRs, 1.0, 0.99, 0.94, and 0.92; P < .001). There was no survival difference between patients treated with carboplatin and patients treated with cisplatin (HR, 0.99; confidence interval [CI], 0.81-1.19; P = .875). Additional therapy beyond platinum-based chemotherapy was associated with a survival benefit (HR, 0.78; CI, 0.75-0.81; P < .001). Chemotherapy use was associated with a survival benefit in Medicare patients with SCLC treated in a

  17. The impact of patient navigation on the delivery of diagnostic breast cancer care in the National Patient Navigation Research Program: a prospective meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Battaglia, Tracy A; Darnell, Julie S; Ko, Naomi; Snyder, Fred; Paskett, Electra D; Wells, Kristen J; Whitley, Elizabeth M; Griggs, Jennifer J; Karnad, Anand; Young, Heather; Warren-Mears, Victoria; Simon, Melissa A; Calhoun, Elizabeth

    2016-08-01

    Patient navigation is emerging as a standard in breast cancer care delivery, yet multi-site data on the impact of navigation at reducing delays along the continuum of care are lacking. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of navigation on reaching diagnostic resolution at specific time points after an abnormal breast cancer screening test among a national sample. A prospective meta-analysis estimated the adjusted odds of achieving timely diagnostic resolution at 60, 180, and 365 days. Exploratory analyses were conducted on the pooled sample to identify which groups had the most benefit from navigation. Clinics from six medical centers serving vulnerable populations participated in the Patient Navigation Research Program. Women with an abnormal breast cancer screening test between 2007 and 2009 were included and received the patient navigation intervention or usual care. Patient navigators worked with patients and their care providers to address patient-specific barriers to care to prevent delays in diagnosis. A total of 4675 participants included predominantly racial/ethnic minorities (74 %) with public insurance (40 %) or no insurance (31 %). At 60 days and 180 days, there was no statistically significant effect of navigation on achieving timely diagnostic care, but a benefit of navigation was seen at 365 days (aOR 2.12, CI 1.36-3.29). We found an equal benefit of navigation across all groups, regardless of race/ethnicity, language, insurance status, and type of screening abnormality. Patient navigation resulted in more timely diagnostic resolution at 365 days among a diverse group of minority, low-income women with breast cancer screening abnormalities. Trial registrations clinicaltrials.gov Identifiers: NCT00613275, NCT00496678, NCT00375024, NCT01569672.

  18. The method of GFR determination impacts the estimation of cisplatin eligibility in patients with advanced urothelial cancer.

    PubMed

    Horn, Thomas; Ladwein, Barbara; Maurer, Tobias; Redlin, Jutta; Seitz, Anna Katharina; Gschwend, Jürgen E; Retz, Margitta; Kübler, Hubert R

    2014-04-01

    To determine GFR with different methods in patients with first-line chemotherapy for advanced urothelial cancer (UC) and to evaluate the impact of these methods on the estimation of cisplatin eligibility. A database was built retrospectively containing all patients receiving first-line chemotherapy for UC between 2001 and 2012 in one German high-volume center. GFR was calculated with the methods by Cockcroft-Gault (CG), MDRD and CKD-EPI. Measurements of creatinine clearance with timed urine collections were registered. A total of 166 patients were included. All methods of renal function determination yielded consistent results in terms of cisplatin eligibility for 134 patients (80.7 %) and disagreeing results for 32 patients (19.3 %). Twenty-two of these 32 patients with borderline GFR received cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Fifteen of these 22 patients completed at least three cycles. The mean GFR in the mentioned 32 patients was 51.3, 56.2 and 54.2 ml/min with the method by CG, MDRD and CKD-EPI. Three, ten and four patients were estimated cisplatin-eligible with either method. There was a good correlation between MDRD and CKD-EPI (r (2) = 0.92). CG tended to underestimate GFR compared to both MDRD and CKD-EPI. Measurements of creatinine clearance showed a wide distribution in comparison with MDRD (r (2) = 0.002). The method used to determine GFR influences the estimation of cisplatin eligibility in a subset of UC patients. MDRD and CKD-EPI formulas seem most valuable, while CG tends to underestimate renal function. Using a strict cutoff of 60 ml/min may unnecessarily preclude cisplatin in some patients.

  19. Impact of Radiotherapy Dose on Dentition Breakdown in Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Mary P.; Wichman, Brian; Cheng, An-Lin; Coster, James; Williams, Karen B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the severity of post-radiation dental lesions and possible correlation with radiation dose to the teeth in patients treated for head and neck cancers. Methods and Materials Data from 93 head and neck radiotherapy patients treated between 1997 and 2008 were analyzed retrospectively. The main effect, radiation dose to the individual teeth, was evaluated with covariates of elapsed time after radiation, xerostomia, topical fluoride use, and oral hygiene status included. Patients’ radiotherapy plans were used to calculate cumulative exposure for each tooth. Patients’ teeth were evaluated using a validated index and then categorized as having none/slight or moderate/severe post-radiation damage. Results Patients (31 females, 62 males) ranged in age from 18–82 yrs (mean=57). The number of teeth/patient ranged from 3–30 (mean=20) with a total of 1873 teeth evaluated. Overall, 51% of teeth had moderate/severe damage, with the remaining having little or none. Using odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals, the odds for moderate/severe damage were 2–3x greater for teeth exposed to between 30–60 Gy as compared to no radiation. However, for teeth exposed to ≥60 Gy as compared to no radiation the odds of moderate/severe tooth damage was greater by a magnitude of 10 times. Conclusions The results indicate that there is minimal tooth damage below 30 Gy (salivary gland threshold), a greater than 1:1 increased dose-response between 30–60y likely related to salivary gland damage, and a critical threshold of ≥60Gy which may be linked to direct effects of radiation on tooth structure. These findings suggest that care should be taken during the treatment planning process to limit tooth dose, and when clinically possible to limit tooth dose to less than 60 Gy. PMID:21857887

  20. Body fat composition impacts the hematologic toxicities and pharmacokinetics of doxorubicin in Asian breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Wong, A L; Seng, K Y; Ong, E M; Wang, L Z; Oscar, H; Cordero, M T; Copones, R; Fan, L; Tan, S H; Goh, B C; Lee, S C

    2014-02-01

    Body surface area (BSA)-based dosing leads to wide inter-individual variations in drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, whereas body composition has been shown to be a more robust determinant of efficacy and toxicity of certain chemotherapeutic agents. We correlated various parameters of body composition with doxorubicin pharmacokinetics and hematologic toxicities in Asian patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer. Our analysis included 84 patients from two studies who received pre- or post-operative single-agent doxorubicin; pharmacokinetic parameters were available for 44 patients. Body composition parameters were derived from CT cross-sectional images and population pharmacokinetic analysis was conducted using mixed-effects modeling. Higher intra-abdominal fat volume and fat ratio (intra-abdominal:total abdominal fat volume) correlated with greater incidence of grade 4 leukopenia on cycle 1 day 15 (mean intra-abdominal fat volume: 97.4 ± 46.5 cm(3) vs 63.4 ± 30.9 cm(3), p = 0.014; mean fat ratio: 0.43 ± 0.11 vs 0.33 ± 0.09, p = 0.012, grade 4 vs grade 0-3 leukopenia). On subset analysis, this relationship was maintained even in underweight patients. Concordantly, there were positive correlations between doxorubicin AUC and intra-abdominal fat volume as well as total abdominal fat volume (r (2) = 0.324 and 0.262, respectively, all p < 0.001). BSA and muscle volume did not predict for doxorubicin pharmacokinetics or toxicities. High-intra-abdominal fat volume but not BSA predicted for greater doxorubicin exposure and hematologic toxicities, suggesting that body composition is superior to BSA in determining doxorubicin pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Body composition has an emerging role in chemotherapy dose determination.

  1. Impact of Selenium Supplementation in Neutropenia and Immunoglobulin Production in Childhood Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Katya Cristina; Vieira, Maria Luiza Dos Santos; Beltrame, Registila Libania; Cartum, Jairo; Alves, Sarah Isabel P M do N; Azzalis, Ligia Ajaime; Junqueira, Virginia Berlanga Campos; Pereira, Edimar Cristiano; Fonseca, Fernando Luiz Affonso

    2016-06-01

    Essential to human health, selenium (Se) has enzymatic functions of fundamental importance to human biology due to its effects on DNA damage repair, its antioxidant properties, and cancer prevention. The best studied relationships between Se and the immune system is its role in the functions of neutrophils and of lymphocytes. Despite these observations, it is not yet clear by which mechanism Se is able to modify the immune status. This was a double-blind, crossover study: Group 1 received Se and Group 2 received placebo (30 days). After this, Group 1 received placebo and Group 2 received Se (30 days). Every 30 days, blood samples were collected for white blood cell count, red blood cell count, and Ig level measurement (IgA, IgG, IgE, IgM). Of the 36 patients, 17 were suffering from leukemia/lymphomas (LL) and 19 from solid tumors (ST). In the ST group's leukogram, a significant increase in neutrophils was observed after Se usage (P = .0192). During the analyzed period, Se minimized the triggering of neutropenia cases in both groups. IgA and IgG levels in ST patients were significantly higher than those identified in LL patients after Se usage (P = .0051 and P = .0055). For IgA, a significant increase in its production, after Se usage, was observed in the ST group when compared to the LL (P = .0011). The same did not occur to the IgM and IgE immunoglobulins. In our study, the supplementation with Se reduced the neutropenic cases (LL and ST patients) and reduced IgG and IgA levels in LL and increased in ST group.

  2. Impact of platelet to lymphocyte ratio and metabolic syndrome on the prognosis of colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    You, Jie; Zhang, Huxiang; Shen, Yanyan; Chen, Chuanzhi; Liu, Wenyue; Zheng, Minghua; Van Poucke, Sven; Guo, Guilong; Huang, Zonghai

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of both platelet to lymphocyte ratio (PLR) and metabolic syndrome (MetS) in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. We retrospectively enrolled 1,163 CRC patients. Preoperative values of PLR were stratified into three groups according to cut-off values of 120 and 220. The Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to calculate cumulative survival rate related to PLR and MetS. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to analyze potential risk factors and the prognosis associated with PLR and MetS in CRC patients. PLR was significantly higher in the MetS(+) group as compared to MetS(-) group (P=0.039). An elevated PLR was significantly associated with mortality (P=0.014), but not the existence of MetS (P=0.235). In multivariate regression analysis, PLR was an independent risk factor for overall survival (OS) (P=0.046). For the subgroup with a PLR >220, MetS was an independent predictor for both OS and disease-free survival (P=0.039 and P=0.047, respectively) by multivariate analysis adjusting for confounding covariates. In addition, the presence of MetS was associated with a 2-fold increased risk of mortality and tumor recurrences (hazard ratio [HR] =2.0 and HR =1.9, P<0.05, respectively). Preoperative PLR was associated with MetS in CRC patients. Testing for the combined presence of PLR and MetS could potentially improve the predictive accuracy of CRC prognosis.

  3. [Neurological complications in cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Hundsberger, Thomas; Roth, Patrick; Roelcke, Ulrich

    2014-08-20

    Neurological symptoms in cancer patients have a great impact on quality of life and need an interdisciplinary approach. They lead to significant impairment in activities of daily living (gait disorders, dizziness), a loss of patients independency (vegetative disturbances, wheel-chair dependency) and interfere with social activities (ban of driving in case of epilepsy). In this article we describe three main and serious neurological problems in the context of oncological patients. These are chemotherapy-induced polyneuropathy, malignant spinal cord compression and epileptic seizures. Our aim is to increase the awareness of neurological complications in cancer patients to improve patients care.

  4. The Impact of Music Therapy on Anxiety in Cancer Patients Undergoing Simulation for Radiation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Rossetti, Andrew; Chadha, Manjeet; Torres, B Nelson; Lee, Jae K; Hylton, Donald; Loewy, Joanne V; Harrison, Louis B

    2017-09-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is associated with high stress levels. The role of music therapy (MT) for patients receiving RT is not well described. This study evaluates the impact of MT on anxiety and distress during simulation in patients with newly diagnosed head and neck or breast cancer. This institutional review board-approved randomized trial of MT versus no MT at the time of simulation included the pre-State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-S Anxiety) questionnaire and Symptom Distress Thermometer (SDT). Patients randomized to MT received a consultation with a music therapist, during which music of the patients' choice to be played during simulation was selected. The no-MT patients did not receive the MT consultation, nor did they hear prerecorded music during simulation. Subsequent to the simulation, all patients repeated the STAI-S Anxiety questionnaire and the SDT. Of the 78 patients enrolled (39 in MT group and 39 in no-MT group), 38 had breast cancer and 40 had head and neck cancer. The male-female ratio was 27:51. The overall mean pre- and post-simulation STAI-S scores were 38.7 (range, 20-60) and 35.2 (range, 20-72), respectively. The overall mean pre- and post-simulation SDT scores were 3.2 (range, 0-10) and 2.5 (range, 0-10), respectively. The MT group had mean pre- and post-simulation STAI-S scores of 39.1 and 31.0, respectively (P<.0001), and the mean SDT scores before and after simulation were 3.2 and 1.7, respectively (P<.0001). The no-MT group's mean pre- and post-simulation STAI-S scores were 38.3 and 39.5, respectively (P=.46), and the mean SDT scores were 3 and 3.2, respectively (P=.51). MT significantly lowered patient anxiety and distress during the simulation procedure on the basis of the STAI-S questionnaire and SDT. Incorporating culturally centered individualized MT may be an effective intervention to reduce stressors. Continued research defining the role of MT intervention in improving the patient experience by reducing anxiety is

  5. Impact of ABO blood group on the prognosis of patients undergoing surgery for esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Lei; Wang, Zhiwei; Wei, Min; He, Qi; Ling, Tianlong; Cao, Ziang; Zhang, Yixin; Wang, Qiang; Shi, Minxin

    2015-09-29

    ABO blood type is an established prognostic factor in several malignancies, but its role in esophageal cancer (EC) is largely unknown. The aim of this study is to determine whether ABO blood group is associated with survival after esophagectomy for EC. A total of 406 patients who underwent surgery for EC were enrolled. The associations of ABO blood group with clinical and pathological variables were assessed using chi-square test. Associations of ABO blood group with the survival were estimated using univariable and multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models. The ABO blood group proportionally associated with the grade of EC tumor (P = 0.049). The ABO blood group status did not correlate with disease-free survival (DFS) in univariable analysis or multivariable analysis (P > 0.05). And there was no significant relationship between the ABO blood group and overall survival (OS) in univariable analysis or multivariable analysis (P > 0.05). Our results suggested that no association between ABO blood group and the survival was observed in patients undergoing surgery for EC.

  6. Different characteristics and prognostic impact of deep-vein thrombosis / pulmonary embolism and intraabdominal venous thrombosis in colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seyoun; Lee, Keun-Wook; Bang, Soo-Mee; Kim, Sujung; Lee, Jeong-Ok; Kim, Yu Jung; Kim, Jee Hyun; Park, Young Soo; Kim, Duck-Woo; Kang, Sung-Bum; Kim, Jae-Sung; Oh, Doyeun; Lee, Jong Seok

    2011-12-01

    This study was performed to determine the incidence, risk factors, and prognostic implications of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in Asian patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). Differences in clinical characteristics and prognostic impact between extremity venous thrombosis (or deep-vein thrombosis; DVT)/pulmonary embolism (PE) and intra-abdominal venous thrombosis (IVT) were also evaluated. For this study, consecutive CRC patients (N = 2,006) were enrolled and analyses were conducted retrospectively. VTEs were classified into two categories (DVT/PE and IVT). Significant predictors of developing VTEs were advanced stage and an increased number of co-morbidities. The two-year cumulative incidence of DVT/PE was 0.3%, 0.9% and 1.4% in stages 0~1, 2 and 3, respectively; this incidence range of DVT/PE in Asian patients with loco-regional CRC was lower than in Western patients. However, the two-year incidence (6.4%) of DVT/PE in Asian patients with distant metastases was not lower than in Western patients. Although 65.2% of patients with DVT/PE were symptomatic, only 15.7% of patients with IVT were symptomatic. During chemotherapy, DVT/PE developed more frequently than IVT. Only DVT/PE had a negative effect on survival; IVT had no prognostic significance. In conclusion, despite the low incidence of DVT/PE in Asian patients with loco-regional CRC, the protective effect of Asian ethnicity on VTE development disappears as tumour stage increases in patients with distant metastases. Considering different clinical characteristics and prognostic influences between DVT/PE and IVT, the treatment approach should be also different.

  7. Impact of time to surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy in operable breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Omarini, C; Guaitoli, G; Noventa, S; Andreotti, A; Gambini, A; Palma, E; Papi, S; Tazzioli, G; Balduzzi, S; Dominici, M; Cascinu, S; Piacentini, F

    2017-04-01

    The optimal time interval between the end of neoadjuvant systemic therapy (NST) and breast surgery is still unclear. It is not known if a delay in surgery might influence the benefit of primary chemotherapy. The aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship between time to surgery (TTS) and survival outcomes. According to TTS, women with diagnosis of BC treated with NST were divided into two cohorts: group A = 21 days or fewer and group B = longer than 21 days. OS and RFS were estimated and compared according to TTS and known prognostic factors. A total of 319 patients were included in the study: 61 in group A and 258 in group B. Median TTS was 34 days. No association between clinical stage, nuclear grade, type of chemotherapy, type of surgery and TTS was detected. OS and RFS were significantly worse for group B compared with group A, with a hazard ratio of 3.1 (95% CI, 1.1-8.6 p = 0.03) and 3.1 (95% CI, 1.3-7.1 p = 0.008) respectively. Multivariate analysis confirmed that TTS was an independent prognostic factor in term of OS (p = 0.03) and RFS (p = 0.01). Even in the subgroup of patients with pCR, TTS continued to be an independent prognostic factor for both OS and RFS (p = 0.05 and p = 0.03). TTS after NST seems to influence survival outcomes. BC patients underwent surgery within 21 days experienced maximal benefit from previous treatment: this advantage is consistent and maintained over time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ The Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  8. The Impact of Tumor Expression of Erythropoietin Receptors and Erythropoietin on Clinical Outcome of Esophageal Cancer Patients Treated With Chemoradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk Golke, Helmut; Schild, Steven E.; Kilic, Ergin

    2008-05-01

    Background: To investigate the impact of tumor erythropoietin receptors (Epo-R) and erythropoietin (Epo) expression in 64 patients with Stage III esophageal cancer receiving or not receiving erythropoietin during chemoradiation. Materials and Methods: The impact of tumor Epo-R expression, Epo expression, and 10 additional factors (age, Karnofsky-Performance-Score [KPS], tumor length, T and N stage, histology and grading, hemoglobin during radiotherapy, erythropoietin administration, surgery) on overall survival (OS) and locoregional control (LC) was evaluated. Results: Improved OS was associated with low ({<=}20%) Epo expression (p = 0.049), KPS >80 (p 0.008), T3 stage (p = 0.010), hemoglobin {>=}12 g/dL (p < 0.001), and surgery (p = 0.010). Erythropoietin receptor expression showed a trend (p = 0.09). Locoregional control was associated with T stage (p = 0.005) and hemoglobin (p < 0.001), almost with erythropoietin administration (p = 0.06). On multivariate analyses, OS was associated with KPS (p = 0.045) and hemoglobin (p = 0.032), LC with hemoglobin (p < 0.001). Patients having low expression of both Epo-R and Epo had better OS (p = 0.003) and LC (p = 0.043) than others. Two-year OS was nonsignificantly better (p = 0.25) in patients with low Epo-R expression receiving erythropoietin (50%) than in those with higher Epo-R expression receiving erythropoietin (21%), low Epo-R expression/no erythropoietin administration (29%), or higher Epo-R expression/no erythropoietin administration (18%). Two-year LC rates were, respectively, 65%, 31%, 26%, and 29% (p = 0.20). Results for Epo expression were similar. Conclusions: Higher Epo-R expression or Epo expression seemed to be associated with poorer outcomes. Patients with low expression levels receiving erythropoietin seemed to do better than patients with higher expression levels or not receiving erythropoietin. The data need to be confirmed in a larger series of patients.

  9. The Impact of Consumer-Directed Health Plans and Patient Socioeconomic Status on Physician Recommendations for Colorectal Cancer Screening

    PubMed Central

    Mallya, Giridhar; Polsky, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Background Consumer-directed health plans are increasingly common, yet little is known about their impact on physician decision-making and preventive service use. Objective To determine how patients’ deductible levels and socioeconomic status may affect primary care physicians’ recommendations for colorectal cancer screening. Design, Setting, and Participants Screening recommendations were elicited using hypothetical vignettes from a national sample of 1,500 primary care physicians. Physicians were randomized to one of four vignettes describing a patient with either low or high socioeconomic status (SES) and either low- or high-deductible plan. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to examine how recommendations varied as a function of SES and deductible. Outcome Measures Rates of recommendation for home fecal occult blood testing, sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy, and inappropriate screening, defined as no screening or office-based fecal occult blood testing. Results A total of 528 (49%) eligible physicians responded. Overall, 7.2% of physicians recommended inappropriate screening; 3.2% of patients with high SES in low-deductible plans received inappropriate screening recommendations and 11.4% of patients with low SES in high-deductible plans for an adjusted odds ratio of 0.22 (0.05–0.89). The odds of a colonoscopy recommendation were over ten times higher (AOR 11.46, 5.26–24.94) for patients with high SES in low-deductible plans compared to patients with low SES in high-deductible plans. Funds in medical savings accounts eliminated differences in inappropriate screening recommendations. Conclusions Patient SES and deductible-level affect physician recommendations for preventive care. Coverage of preventive services and funds in medical savings accounts may help to mitigate the impact of high-deductibles and SES on inappropriate recommendations. PMID:18629590

  10. Impact of intercostal paravertebral neurectomy on post thoracotomy pain syndrome after thoracotomy in lung cancer patients: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Althaus, Astrid; Poels, Marcel; Joppich, Robin; Lefering, Rolf; Wappler, Frank; Windisch, Wolfram; Ludwig, Corinna; Stoelben, Erich

    2016-01-01

    Background Thoracotomy leads to chronic neuropathic pain in up to 50% of patients and is responsible for an impaired quality of life. Intercostal nerve injury has been suggested to be responsible for this pain. In the present study the impact of paravertebral intercostal neurectomy on post thoracotomy pain was assessed. Methods In this single center parallel-group randomized controlled trial patients underwent muscle sparing anterolateral thoracotomy and anatomical lung resection for lung cancer. A subcostal approach was used for thoracotomy with single paravertebral neurectomy being performed at the beginning of the procedure at the level of the retracted intercostal space. For documentation of neuropathic pain the Leeds Assessment Score for Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs (LANSS) was used postoperatively. The primary endpoint was defined as LANSS ≥12 points on day 120. In addition, the numeric pain rating scale (NRS) was used to score pain intensity. Results Out of 172 patients initially randomized 161 patients were investigated following intraoperative and postoperative drop-out criteria. All patients required anatomical lung resection via thoracotomy. Five patients were lost for follow up. For the remaining 156 patients there was no difference between the two groups with regard to LANSS ≥12: 26.6% in patients with neurectomy and 28.8% in control-subjects (P=0.78). In addition, the NSR score at day 120 did not differ significantly at rest and during activity between the two groups (at rest: 21.7% vs. 15.8% P=0.439; activity: 24.5% vs. 21.9% P=0.735). Conclusions Neurectomy was not shown to reduce the post thoracotomy pain syndrome in patients with anatomical lung resection following anterolateral muscle sparing thoracotomy. PMID:27746994

  11. Impact of venous tumour thrombus consistency (solid vs friable) on cancer-specific survival in patients with renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bertini, Roberto; Roscigno, Marco; Freschi, Massimo; Strada, Elena; Angiolilli, Diego; Petralia, Giovanni; Matloob, Rayan; Sozzi, Francesco; Capitanio, Umberto; Da Pozzo, Luigi Filippo; Colombo, Renzo; Guazzoni, Giorgio; Cremonini, Anna; Montorsi, Francesco; Rigatti, Patrizio

    2011-08-01

    To our knowledge, the impact of venous tumour thrombus (VTT) consistency in patients affected by renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has never been addressed. To analyse the effect of VTT consistency on cancer-specific survival (CSS). We retrospectively analysed 174 consecutive patients with RCC and renal vein or inferior vena cava (IVC) VTT who underwent surgical treatment between 1989 and 2007 at our institute. All patients underwent radical nephrectomy and thrombectomy. Pathologic specimens were reviewed by a single uropathologist. In addition to traditional pathologic features, the morphologic aspect of the tumour thrombus was evaluated to distinguish solid from friable patterns. The prognostic role of thrombus consistency (solid vs friable) on CSS was assessed by means of Cox regression models. The VTT was solid in 107 patients (61.5%) and friable in 67 patients (38.5%). The presence of a friable VTT increased the risk of having synchronous nodal or distant metastases, higher tumour grade, higher pathologic stage, and simultaneous perinephric fat invasion (all p < 0.05). The median follow-up was 24 mo. The median CSS was 33 mo; the median CSS was 8 mo in patients with a friable VTT and 55 mo in patients with a solid VTT (p < 0.001). On multivariable analyses, the presence of a friable VTT was an independent predictor of CSS (p = 0.02). The power of our conclusion may be somewhat limited by the relatively small study population and the retrospective nature of the study. In patients with RCC and VTT, the presence of a friable thrombus is an independent predictor of CSS. If our finding is confirmed by further studies, the consistency of the tumour thrombus should be introduced into routine pathologic reports to provide better patient risk stratification. Copyright © 2011 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The impact of selected factors on early diagnosis of multiple primary cancers in patients with uveal melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Romanowska-Dixon, Bożena

    2013-01-01

    Aim of the study To find differences between a group of patients with intraocular melanoma and another primary cancer and a group of patients with no identifiable second primary cancer. Material and methods The analysis involved 240 participants, selected from patients who were treated for uveal melanoma at the Department of Ophthalmology and Ocular Oncology of the Jagiellonian University Medical College between the year 1998 and 2007. Among those patients 97 were diagnosed with one or more independent primary cancers. Those patients were subject to a comparative analysis with a second group of 143 patients who had uveal melanoma with no identifiable second primary cancer. Results Statistically significant differences between the group of patients with intraocular melanoma and another primary cancer, and the group of patients with uveal melanoma (but without another diagnosed primary neoplasm) were as follows: more common family history of cancer, better education, living in cities (especially with a population over 500 thousand), previous surgery except for uveal melanoma, and two or less than two pregnancies in the case of women. Conclusions This analysis revealed that more common family history of cancer, better education, living in cities (especially with a population over 500 thousand), previous surgery, except for uveal melanoma, and two or less than two pregnancies in the case of women, were associated with a higher rate of detection of multiple primary cancers. PMID:24592138

  13. The Comparative Impact of Mindfulness-Based Cancer Recovery (MBCR) and Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Insomnia (CBT-I) on Sleep and Mindfulness in Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Garland, Sheila N; Rouleau, Codie R; Campbell, Tavis; Samuels, Charles; Carlson, Linda E

    2015-01-01

    Insomnia is an important but often overlooked side effect of cancer. Dysfunctional sleep beliefs have been identified as an important perpetuating factor for insomnia. Mindfulness practice has been demonstrated to improve sleep quality but it is unknown whether these effects relate to changes in dysfunctional sleep beliefs. This study is a secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial comparing mindfulness-based cancer recovery (MBCR) to cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) in cancer patients with insomnia. This present analysis compares program impact on mindfulness, dysfunctional sleep beliefs, and insomnia severity clinical cutoffs. Patients (MBCR, n = 32; CBT-I, n = 40) were assessed at baseline, post-program, and 3-month follow-up. Across both groups, patients showed improvements over time in acting with awareness (P = .021) and not judging experiences (P = .023). Changes in dysfunctional sleep beliefs produced by the CBT-I group exceeded those produced by MBCR at post-program and follow-up (P < .001). Acting with awareness, non-judging, and non-reacting were the facets of mindfulness associated with an overall reduction in dysfunctional sleep beliefs. There were no significant differences between the MBCR and CBT-I groups in the percentage of patients exceeding insomnia severity clinical cutoffs at post-program or follow-up. This study supports the use of both CBT-I and MBCR to reduce insomnia severity and suggests the development of mindfulness facets as a method of reducing dysfunctional sleep beliefs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Impact of Body Mass Index and Weight Fluctuation on Lymphedema Risk in Patients Treated for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jammallo, Lauren S.; Miller, Cynthia L.; Singer, Marybeth; Horick, Nora K.; Skolny, Melissa N.; Specht, Michelle C.; O'Toole, Jean; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Identifying risk factors for lymphedema in patients treated for breast cancer has become increasingly important given the current lack of standardization surrounding diagnosis and treatment. Reports on the association of body mass index (BMI) and weight change with lymphedema risk are conflicting. We sought to examine the impact of pre-operative BMI and post-treatment weight change on the incidence of lymphedema. Methods From 2005-2011, 787 newly-diagnosed breast cancer patients underwent prospective arm volume measurements with a Perometer pre- and post-operatively. BMI was calculated from same-day weight and height measurements. Lymphedema was defined as a relative volume change (RVC) of ≥10%. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate the association between lymphedema risk and pre-operative BMI, weight change, and other demographic and treatment factors. Results By multivariate analysis, a pre-operative BMI ≥30 was significantly associated with an increased risk of lymphedema compared to a pre-operative BMI <25 and 25-<30 (p = 0.001 and p = 0.012, respectively). Patients with a pre-operative BMI 25-<30 were not at an increased risk of lymphedema compared to patients with a pre-operative BMI<25 (p= 0.409). Furthermore, large post-operative fluctuations in weight, regardless of whether they reflected weight gain or loss (i.e. 10 pounds gained/lost per month), resulted in a significantly increased risk of lymphedema (HR: 1.97, p = <0.0001). Conclusions Pre-operative BMI of ≥30 is an independent risk factor for lymphedema, whereas a BMI of 25-<30 is not. Large post-operative weight fluctuations also increase risk of lymphedema. Patients with a pre-operative BMI≥30 and those who experience large weight fluctuations during and after treatment for breast cancer should be considered at higher-risk for lymphedema. Close monitoring or early intervention to ensure optimal treatment of the condition may be

  15. Impact of morphine, fentanyl, oxycodone or codeine on patient consciousness, appetite and thirst when used to treat cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Wiffen, Philip J; Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew

    2014-05-29

    There is increasing focus on providing high quality care for people at the end of life, irrespective of disease or cause, and in all settings. In the last ten years the use of care pathways to aid those treating patients at the end of life has become common worldwide. The use of the Liverpool Care Pathway in the UK has been criticised. In England the LCP was the subject of an independent review, commissioned by a Health Minister. The Neuberger Review acknowledged that the LCP was based on the sound ethical principles that provide the basis of good quality care for patients and families when implemented properly. It also found that the LCP often was not implemented properly, and had instead become a barrier to good care; it made over 40 recommendations, including education and training, research and development, access to specialist palliative care services, and the need to ensure care and compassion for all dying patients. In July 2013, the Department of Health released a statement that stated the use of the LCP should be "phased out over the next 6-12 months and replaced with an individual approach to end of life care for each patient".The impact of opioids was a particular concern because of their potential influence on consciousness, appetite and thirst in people near the end of life. There was concern that impaired patient consciousness may lead to an earlier death, and that effects of opioids on appetite and thirst may result in unnecessary suffering. This rapid review, commissioned by the National Institute for Health Research, used standard Cochrane methodology to examine adverse effects of morphine, fentanyl, oxycodone, and codeine in cancer pain studies as a close approximation to possible effects in the dying patient. To determine the impact of opioid treatment on patient consciousness, appetite and thirst in randomised controlled trials of morphine, fentanyl, oxycodone or codeine for treating cancer pain. We assessed adverse event data reported in

  16. Impact of early prophylactic feeding on long term tube dependency outcomes in patients with head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Brown, Teresa; Banks, Merrilyn; Hughes, Brett G M; Lin, Charles; Kenny, Lizbeth M; Bauer, Judith D

    2017-09-01

    Prophylactic gastrostomy tube (PGT) is frequently used in patients with head and neck cancer (HNSCC). There are concerns this leads to tube dependency but this phenomena is not well defined. This study aimed to determine whether early feeding via PGT impacted on longer term tube feeding outcomes. Patients with HNSCC with PGT were observed monthly post-treatment regarding tube use and time to removal up to twelve months. Patients were from a randomised controlled trial comparing an early feeding intervention via the PGT (n=57) versus usual care which commenced feeding when clinically indicated (n=67). Patient characteristics; male (88%), mean age 60±10.1years, oropharyngeal tumours (76%), receiving chemoradiotherapy (82%). Tubes were used by 87% (108/124) on completion of treatment and 66% (83/124) one month post. No differences in tube use between groups at any time point or tube removal rates over 12months (p=0.181). In patients free of disease (n=99), the intervention had higher tube use at 4months (p=0.003) and slower removal rates (p=0.047). Overall ten patients had their tube in-situ at 12months (8%) but five were awaiting removal (4% true dependency rate). Of the five patients legitimately using the tube, only one (<1%) was from severe dysphagia post definitive chemoradiotherapy. PGT use is high in the acute phase post-treatment. Encouraging early use may prolong time to tube removal but it does not increase long term dependency rates beyond four months post treatment. Monitoring tube use is important to prevent over-estimation of dependency rates. This trial has been registered in the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials registry as ACTRN12612000579897. Available at http://www.anzctr.org.au. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Information Needs of Cancer Patients and Perception of Impact of the Disease, of Self-Efficacy, and Locus of Control.

    PubMed

    Keinki, C; Seilacher, E; Ebel, M; Ruetters, D; Kessler, I; Stellamanns, J; Rudolph, I; Huebner, J

    2016-09-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the relationship between information needs and cancer patients' perceptions of the impact of the disease, self-efficacy, and locus of control. Using a standardized questionnaire, we obtained data from patients who attended a series of lectures. The questionnaire included questions on their information needs, sources of information, satisfaction with information, and short questionnaires on self-efficacy, perception of the disease, and locus of control of reinforcement. Data was obtained from 185 patients. Our results showed that the sources of information that were most often used were physicians (84 %), print media (68 %), and the Internet (59 %); online fora (7.5 %), non-medical practitioners (9.7 %), and telephone-based counseling (8.6 %) were only used by a minority. Patients with a high perception of their own control over the disease more often used any source of information available to them and were more often interested in acquiring additional information. Higher self-efficacy was significantly associated with the need for information on all topics. Patients with a higher external locus of control significantly more often used sources of information and had significantly more need for additional information. By contrast, there were no associations with an internal locus of control. Neither external nor internal locus of control showed any associations with satisfaction with information. Information needs seem to be higher in patients with a high external locus of control and low self-efficacy. Physicians, other professionals, and institutions that provide information may take these relationships into consideration for tailoring their services to patients.

  18. Impact of disclosure of diagnosis and patient autonomy on quality of life and illness perceptions in Chinese patients with liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Jie, Bin; Qiu, Yan; Feng, Zheng-Zhi; Zhu, Shai-Nan

    2016-08-01

    This prospective cohort study explored the impact of disclosure of diagnosis and patient autonomy on the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and illness perceptions in Chinese patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Patients with HCC who were admitted for potentially curative treatments in a teaching hospital were recruited from August 2013 to July 2014. Patients were interviewed at admission regarding their HRQOL and their attitude towards disclosure of diagnosis. They were interviewed again regarding HRQOL and illness perceptions at discharge. There were 218 patients recruited; 57.8% of them were aware of their cancer diagnosis (disclosed group). For 63.8% of the participants, their desire for disclosure or nondisclosure was satisfied (autonomy-satisfied group). When comparing the patients in the disclosed group with the patients who were uninformed, the patients in the disclosed group had higher scores for global HRQOL at discharge (p = 0.013) and higher scores on understanding of their illness regarding illness perceptions (p = 0.022). When comparing the patients in the 'autonomy-satisfied' group with the patients whose desire for disclosure was not satisfied, the patients in the autonomy-satisfied group had better emotional functioning and better global HRQOL at discharge (p < 0.001 and p = 0.001, respectively). Additionally, the patients in the autonomy-satisfied group had higher scores for personal control (p = 0.009) and lower scores for emotional reaction (p = 0.007) regarding illness perceptions, even after controlling for other confounding factors. Our findings suggest that for patients with HCC who have undergone potentially curative treatment, physicians should satisfy patients' desires for autonomy regarding the disclosure of their diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Vulnerabilities in Older Patients when Cancer Treatment is Initiated: Does a Cognitive Impairment Impact the Two-Year Survival?

    PubMed Central

    Borghgraef, Cindy; Etienne, Anne-Marie; Merckaert, Isabelle; Paesmans, Marianne; Reynaert, Christine; Roos, Myriam; Slachmuylder, Jean-Louis; Vandenbossche, Sandrine; Bron, Dominique; Razavi, Darius

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Dementia is a known predictor of shorter survival times in older cancer patients. However, no empirical evidence is available to determine how much a cognitive impairment shortens survival in older patients when cancer treatment is initiated. Purpose To longitudinally investigate how much a cognitive impairment detected at the initiation of cancer treatment influences survival of older patients during a two-year follow-up duration and to compare the predictive value of a cognitive impairment on patients survival with the predictive value of other vulnerabilities associated with older age. Methods Three hundred and fifty-seven consecutive patients (≥65 years old) admitted for breast, prostate, or colorectal cancer surgeries were prospectively recruited. A cognitive impairment was assessed with the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA<26). Socio-demographic, disease-related, and geriatric vulnerabilities were assessed using validated tools. Univariate and subsequent multivariate Cox proportional hazards models stratified for diagnosis (breast/prostate cancer versus colorectal cancer) and disease status (metastatic versus non-metastatic) were used. Results A cognitive impairment was detected in 46% (n = 163) of patients. Survival was significantly influenced by a cognitive impairment (HR = 6.13; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.07–18.09; p = 0.001), a loss in instrumental autonomy (IADL ≤7) (HR = 3.06; 95% CI = 1.31–7.11; p = 0.009) and fatigue (Mob-T<5) (HR = 5.98; 95% CI = 2.47–14.44; p <0.001). Conclusions During the two years following cancer treatment initiation, older patients with a cognitive impairment were up to six times more likely to die than patients without. Older patients should be screened for cognitive impairments at cancer treatment initiation to enable interventions to reduce morbidity and mortality. Further studies should address processes underlying the relationship between cognitive impairments and an increased risk of dying

  20. Impact of Patient Factors on Recurrence Risk and Time Dependency of Oxaliplatin Benefit in Patients With Colon Cancer: Analysis From Modern-Era Adjuvant Studies in the Adjuvant Colon Cancer End Points (ACCENT) Database

    PubMed Central

    Renfro, Lindsay A.; Allegra, Carmen J.; André, Thierry; de Gramont, Aimery; Schmoll, Hans-Joachim; Haller, Daniel G.; Alberts, Steven R.; Yothers, Greg; Sargent, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Fluorouracil plus leucovorin (FU + LV) adjuvant chemotherapy reduced the risk of recurrence and death across all time points in a pooled analysis of 20,898 patients with colon cancer from 18 randomized studies. The impact of oxaliplatin added to FU + LV on the time course of recurrence and survival remains unknown. Patients and Methods A total of 12,233 patients enrolled to the randomized trials C-07, C-08, N0147, MOSAIC (Adjuvant Treatment of Colon Cancer), and XELOXA (Adjuvant XELOX) were pooled to examine the impact of oxaliplatin and tumor-specific factors on the time course of recurrence and death. For each end point, continuous-time risk was modeled over 6 years post treatment in all oxaliplatin-treated patients and patients concurrently randomized to FU + LV with or without oxaliplatin; the latter analyses supported time-dependent treatment comparisons. Results Addition of oxaliplatin significantly reduced the risk of recurrence within the first 14 months post treatment for patients with stage II disease and within the first 4 years for patients with stage III disease. Oxaliplatin also significantly reduced risk of death from 2 to 6 years post treatment for patients with stage III disease, with no differences in timing of outcomes between treatment groups (ie, oxaliplatin did not simply postpone recurrence or death compared with FU + LV alone). Patients with stage II disease receiving oxaliplatin did not exhibit a significant reduction in risk of death in the first 6 years post treatment. Recurrence risk peaked near 14 months for both treatments, and risk of recurrence and death increased with increased tumor and nodal burden. Conclusions These analyses support the addition of oxaliplatin to fluoropyrimidine-based adjuvant therapy in patients with stage III disease and underscore the need for adequate surveillance of patients with colon cancer during the first 3 years after adjuvant therapy. PMID:26811529

  1. Daily Pomegranate Intake Has No Impact on PSA Levels in Patients with Advanced Prostate Cancer - Results of a Phase IIb Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Stenner-Liewen, Frank; Liewen, Heike; Cathomas, Richard; Renner, Christoph; Petrausch, Ulf; Sulser, Tullio; Spanaus, Katharina; Seifert, Hans Helge; Strebel, Räto Thomas; Knuth, Alexander; Samaras, Panagiotis; Müntener, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Pomegranate has been shown to prolong PSA doubling time in early prostate cancer, but no data from a placebo controlled trial has been published yet. The objective of this study was to prospectively evaluate the impact of pomegranate juice in patients with prostate cancer. We conducted a phase IIb, double blinded, randomized placebo controlled trial in patients with histologically confirmed prostate cancer. Only patients with a PSA value ≥ 5ng/ml were included. The subjects consumed 500 ml of pomegranate juice or 500 ml of placebo beverage every day for a 4 week period. Thereafter, all patients received 250 ml of the pomegranate juice daily for another 4 weeks. PSA values were taken at baseline, day 14, 28 and on day 56. The primary endpoint was the detection of a significant difference in PSA serum levels between the groups after one month of treatment. Pain scores and adherence to intervention were recorded using patient diaries. 102 patients were enrolled. The majority of patients had castration resistant prostate cancer (68%). 98 received either pomegranate juice or placebo between October 2008 and May 2011. Adherence to protocol was good, with 94 patients (96%) completing the first period and 87 patients (89%) completing both periods. No grade 3 or higher toxicities occurred within the study. No differences were detected between the two groups with regard to PSA kinetics and pain scores. Consumption of pomegranate juice as an adjunct intervention in men with advanced prostate cancer does not result in significant PSA declines compared to placebo. PMID:24069070

  2. Daily Pomegranate Intake Has No Impact on PSA Levels in Patients with Advanced Prostate Cancer - Results of a Phase IIb Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Stenner-Liewen, Frank; Liewen, Heike; Cathomas, Richard; Renner, Christoph; Petrausch, Ulf; Sulser, Tullio; Spanaus, Katharina; Seifert, Hans Helge; Strebel, Räto Thomas; Knuth, Alexander; Samaras, Panagiotis; Müntener, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Pomegranate has been shown to prolong PSA doubling time in early prostate cancer, but no data from a placebo controlled trial has been published yet. The objective of this study was to prospectively evaluate the impact of pomegranate juice in patients with prostate cancer. We conducted a phase IIb, double blinded, randomized placebo controlled trial in patients with histologically confirmed prostate cancer. Only patients with a PSA value ≥ 5ng/ml were included. The subjects consumed 500 ml of pomegranate juice or 500 ml of placebo beverage every day for a 4 week period. Thereafter, all patients received 250 ml of the pomegranate juice daily for another 4 weeks. PSA values were taken at baseline, day 14, 28 and on day 56. The primary endpoint was the detection of a significant difference in PSA serum levels between the groups after one month of treatment. Pain scores and adherence to intervention were recorded using patient diaries. 102 patients were enrolled. The majority of patients had castration resistant prostate cancer (68%). 98 received either pomegranate juice or placebo between October 2008 and May 2011. Adherence to protocol was good, with 94 patients (96%) completing the first period and 87 patients (89%) completing both periods. No grade 3 or higher toxicities occurred within the study. No differences were detected between the two groups with regard to PSA kinetics and pain scores. Consumption of pomegranate juice as an adjunct intervention in men with advanced prostate cancer does not result in significant PSA declines compared to placebo.

  3. Long Term Toxicity of Cancer Treatment in Older Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shahrokni, Armin; Wu, Abraham; Carter, Jeanne; Lichtman, Stuart M.

    2016-01-01

    Synopsis With earlier cancer diagnosis among older cancer patients, the possibility of curing cancer increases. However, cancer treatment may have long lasting impact on older cancer survivors. It is vital to screen, diagnose and properly manage the long term toxicities of cancer treatment, in order to maintain quality of life of older cancer survivors PMID:26614861

  4. Long-term Toxicity of Cancer Treatment in Older Patients.

    PubMed

    Shahrokni, Armin; Wu, Abraham J; Carter, Jeanne; Lichtman, Stuart M

    2016-02-01

    With earlier cancer diagnosis among older patients with cancer, the possibility of curing cancer increases. However, cancer treatment may have a long-lasting impact on older cancer survivors. It is vital to screen, diagnose, and properly manage the long-term toxicities of cancer treatment in order to maintain the quality of life of older cancer survivors.

  5. Dosimetric impact of setup errors in head and neck cancer patients treated by image-guided radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Inderjit; Rawat, Sheh; Ahlawat, Parveen; Kakria, Anjali; Gupta, Gourav; Saxena, Upasna; Mishra, Manindra Bhushan

    2016-01-01

    To assess and analyze the impact of setup uncertainties on target volume coverage and doses to organs at risk (OAR) in head and neck cancer (HNC) patients treated by image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Translational setup errors in 25 HNC patients were observed by kilovoltage cone beam computed tomography (kV CBCT). Two plans were generated. Plan one – the original plan which was the initially optimized and approved plan of the patient. All patients were treated according to their respective approved plans at a defined isocenter. Plan two – the plan sum which was the sum of all plans recalculated at a different isocenter according to setup errors in x, y, and z-direction. Plan sum was created to evaluate doses that would have been received by planning target volume (PTV) and OARs if setup errors were not corrected. These 2 plans were analyzed and compared in terms of target volume coverage and doses to OARs. A total 503 kV CBCT images were acquired for evaluation of setup errors in 25 HNC patients. The systematic (mean) and random errors (standard deviation) combined for 25 patients in x, y, and z directions were 0.15 cm, 0.21 cm, and 0.19 cm and 0.09 cm, 0.12 cm, and 0.09 cm, respectively. The study showed that there was a significant difference in PTV coverage between 2 plans. The doses to various OARs showed a nonsignificant increase in the plan sum. The correction of translational setup errors is essential for IGRT treatment in terms of delivery of planned optimal doses to target volume. PMID:27217627

  6. Early gastric cancer: diagnosis, staging, and clinical impact. Evaluation of 530 patients. New elements for an updated definition and classification.

    PubMed

    Saragoni, Luca; Morgagni, Paolo; Gardini, Andrea; Marfisi, Caterina; Vittimberga, Giovanni; Garcea, Domenico; Scarpi, Emanuela

    2013-10-01

    The prevention and early diagnosis of gastric cancer permit clinicians to discover the tumor in the initial phase, during which time it can be completely eradicated, endoscopically or surgically. Since Murakami gave the definition of early gastric cancer (EGC) in 1971, many authors have identified various subtypes of EGC with different morphological characteristics and clinical behaviour. We evaluated retrospectively 530 patients: the median follow-up time was 10.4 months (range 0.3-29.2). All tumors were classified according to the macroscopic and microscopic criteria proposed by the Japanese Society of Gastroenterology and Endoscopy and Lauren, respectively. The infiltrative growth pattern was evaluated according to Kodama's classification. Only tumor-related death was considered as an endpoint of interest for the survival analysis. The overall survival rates of our patients were 94 % (95 % CI, 92-96) and 90 % (95 % CI, 87-93) at 5 and 10 years, respectively. Only 44 patients (8.3 %) died of the disease. Kodama's type (p < 0.0001), lymph node status, both for number and pathological stage according to the 7th Edition of TNM (p < 0.0001), and depth of infiltration (p = 0.0006) were significant prognostic factors in univariate analysis. The multivariate analysis identified Kodama's PENA type (HR, 3.91; 95 % CI, 2.08-7.33; p < 0.0001) and lymph node status for more than three positive nodes versus negative nodes (HR, 12.78; 95 % CI, 5.37-30.43; p < 0.0001) as the only independent prognostic factors in our series. Lymph node status, especially when more than three lymph nodes are involved, is the most important prognostic factor in EGC. However, it is also important to evaluate the infiltrative growth pattern of the cancers in their early phase according to Kodama's classification, considering PEN A type lesions to be more aggressive than the other EGC types. Then, we propose new elements for an updated definition and classification of EGC, with an important clinical

  7. Prognostic impact of ΔTAp73 isoform levels and their target genes in colon cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Soldevilla, Beatriz; Díaz, Raquel; Silva, Javier; Campos-Martín, Yolanda; Muñoz, Concepción; García, Vanesa; García, José M; Peña, Cristina; Herrera, Mercedes; Rodriguez, Marta; Gómez, Irene; Mohamed, Nagat; Marques, Margarita M; Bonilla, Félix; Domínguez, Gemma

    2011-09-15

    Cumulative data support the role of ΔTAp73 variants in tumorigenic processes such as drug resistance. We evaluate the impact of TP73 isoforms and their putative target genes ABCB1, HMGB1, and CASP1 on the survival of colon cancer patients and the correlation between their expressions. We determined in 77 colon cancer patients the expression of ΔEx2p73, ΔEx2/3p73, ΔNp73, TAp73, ABCB1, HMGB1, and CASP1 by quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR. Tumor characteristics, disease-free survival, and overall survival (OS) were examined in each patient. Functional experiments were carried out to check whether ectopic expression of ΔNp73 modifies the proliferation, drug resistance, migration, and invasion properties of colon tumor cells and the expression of ABCB1, HMGB1, and CASP1. Positive correlations were observed between the expression levels of ΔTAp73 variants and HMGB1. Furthermore, a trend was observed for ABCB1. Overexpression of ΔEx2/3p73 and ΔNp73 isoforms was significantly associated with advanced stages (P = 0.04 and P = 0.03, respectively) and predicted shortened OS (P = 0.04 and P = 0.05, respectively). High levels of ABCB1 and HMGB1 were associated with shorter OS (P = 0.04 and P = 0.05, respectively). Multivariate analysis showed that, in addition to the tumor stage, ABCB1 and HMGB1 had independent relationships with OS (P = 0.008). Ectopic expression of ΔNp73 was associated with an increase in proliferation and drug resistance. The positive correlation between ΔTAp73 variants and HMGB1 and ABCB1 expression supports them as TP73 targets. The fact that upregulation of ΔTAp73 isoforms was associated with shortened OS, increase in proliferation, and drug resistance confirms their oncogenic role and plausible value as prognostic markers. ABCB1 and HMGB1, putative ΔTAp73 target genes, strongly predict OS in an independent manner, making clear the importance of studying downstream TP73 targets that could predict the outcome of colon cancer

  8. The impact of physical activity on health-related fitness and quality of life for patients with head and neck cancer: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Capozzi, Lauren C; Nishimura, Kathryn C; McNeely, Margaret L; Lau, Harold; Culos-Reed, S Nicole

    2016-03-01

    Patients with head and neck cancer often face a plethora of cancer and treatment-related side effects, negatively impacting their lean body mass, physical functioning, quality of life and fatigue management. Physical activity is a potential mediator of many of these side effects. This is the first systematic review reporting on head and neck cancer and physical activity literature. A literature search was conducted up to January 2015. Two reviewers independently identified articles using the outlined inclusion criteria, assessing the study methodology, risk of bias and extracting the necessary data from studies evaluating the impact of full-body physical activity on patients with head and neck cancer. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Statement was used to guide this review. We identified 16 articles published from 2003 to 2014, the majority of which were published within the past 5 years. Physical activity interventions were feasible, safe and beneficial in mediating cancer and treatment-related side effects. Specifically, patients experienced improvements in lean body mass, muscular strength, physical functioning, quality of life and fatigue management. Owing to significant study heterogeneity, data were not pooled. Reflecting the early state of the literature, included studies were found to vary greatly in design, quality and reporting characteristics. There is early evidence that supports the benefit of physical activity interventions for patients with head and neck cancer, both during and following treatment. Future research is necessary to determine the benefits of different physical activity interventions, and their impact on patients with different head and neck cancers. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  9. Impact of Parental Cancer on Children.

    PubMed

    Shah, Binay K; Armaly, Jeffery; Swieter, Erin

    2017-08-01

    The majority of cancers affect the elderly, but 22.4% of all cases occur in the ages of 21-55. This age range represents common childbearing and child-rearing years, which imply that many of these patients have minor children. Approximately 2.85 million children under 18 live with a parent affected by cancer. The Pubmed and Google Scholar were searched to identify literature on impact of parental cancer on children and potential interventions to support parents and children. We reviewed impact of parental cancer on daily routine, role changes, emotional problems and social functioning of children. We also discuss interventions that may be useful for parents and children. It is essential that we learn more about the impact of parental cancer on children and ways to support the families using evidence-based interventions. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  10. Impact of Weight Change During the Course of Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy on Outcomes in Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients: Retrospective Analysis of 425 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Topkan, Erkan; Parlak, Cem; Selek, Ugur

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: We retrospectively investigated the impact of weight change (WC) during concurrent chemoradiation therapy (C-CRT) on clinical outcomes of stage 3B non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 425 patients treated with C-CRT were included. All patients received 60 to 66 Gy of thoracic radiation therapy concurrently with 1 to 3 cycles of platinum-based chemotherapy. Pre- and posttreatment weight measurements on first and last days of C-CRT were used for WC. Patients were divided into 2 groups: group 1 = weight loss (WL); group 2 = weight preservation/gain (WP) for comparative analyses. Results: Following C-CRT, 252 patients (59.3%) experienced WL, while 89 patients (20.9%) and 84 patients (19.8%) showed WP or WG. At median 24.2 months of follow-up, 142 patients (33.4%) were alive (84 WP [48.6%] and 58 WL [23.0%]), and 58 (13.6%) of them were free of disease progression (41 [23.7%] for WP and 17 [6.7%] for WL). Median overall survival (OS), locoregional progression-free survival (LRPFS), progression-free survival (PFS), and distant metastases-free survival (DMFS) for the entire population were 22.8, 14.4, 10.6, and 11.7 months, respectively. Intergroup comparisons between WP and WL cohorts revealed significantly superior OS, LRPFS, PFS, and DMFS in WP patients (P<.05 for each). On multivariate analyses, only WL and advanced T stage were associated with poor prognosis (P<.05). Conclusions: Present results in 425 stage 3B NSCLC patients demonstrated that WL during C-CRT is strongly associated with inferior survival outcomes compared to WP. This emerging finding might be useful by forming an encouraging basis for future investigations in facilitating a way to improve the outcomes of these patients experiencing WL during C-CRT.

  11. Examining Margin Reduction and Its Impact on Dose Distribution for Prostate Cancer Patients Undergoing Daily Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Hammoud, Rabih Patel, Samir H.; Pradhan, Deepak; Kim, Jinkoo; Guan, Harrison; Li Shidong; Movsas, Benjamin

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: To examine the dosimetric impact of margin reduction and quantify residual error after three-dimensional (3D) image registration using daily cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) for prostate cancer patients. Methods and Materials: One hundred forty CBCTs from 5 prostate cancer patients were examined. Two intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans were generated on CT simulation on the basis of two planning target volume (PTV) margins: 10 mm all around the prostate and seminal vesicles except 6 mm posteriorly (10/6) and 5 mm all around except 3 mm posteriorly (5/3). Daily CBCT using the Varian On-Board Imaging System was acquired. The 10/6 and 5/3 simulation plans were overlaid onto each CBCT, and each CBCT plan was calculated. To examine residual error, PlanCT/CBCT intensity-based 3D image registration was performed for prostate localization using center of mass and maximal border displacement. Results: Prostate coverage was within 2% between the 10/6 and 5/3 plans. Seminal vesicle coverage was reduced with the 5/3 plan compared with the 10/6 plan, with coverage difference within 7%. The 5/3 plan allowed 30-50% sparing of bladder and rectal high-dose regions. For residual error quantification, center of mass data show that 99%, 93%, and 96% of observations fall within 3 mm in the left-right, anterior-posterior, and superior-inferior directions, respectively. Maximal border displacement observations range from 79% to 99%, within 5 mm for all directions. Conclusion: Cone-beam CT dosimetrically validated a 10/6 margin when soft-tissue localization is not used. Intensity-based 3D image registration has the potential to improve target localization and to provide guidelines for margin definition.

  12. Factors that influence cancer patients' and relatives' anxiety following a three-person medical consultation: impact of a communication skills training program for physicians.

    PubMed

    Lienard, Aurore; Merckaert, Isabelle; Libert, Yves; Delvaux, Nicole; Marchal, Serge; Boniver, Jacques; Etienne, Anne-Marie; Klastersky, Jean; Reynaert, Christine; Scalliet, Pierre; Slachmuylder, Jean-Louis; Razavi, Darius

    2008-05-01

    No study has yet assessed the impact of physicians' skills acquisition after a communication skills training program on changes in patients' and relatives' anxiety following a three-person medical consultation. This study aimed at comparing, in a randomized study, the impact, on patients' and relatives' anxiety, of a basic communication skills training program and the same program consolidated by consolidation workshops and at investigating physicians' communication variables associated with patients' and relatives' anxiety. Consultations with a cancer patient and a relative were recorded and analyzed by the Cancer Research Campaign Workshop Evaluation Manual. Patients' and relatives' anxiety were assessed with the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory-State. No statistically significant change over time and between groups was observed. Mixed-effects modeling of changes in patients' and relatives' anxiety showed that decreases in both patients' and relatives' anxiety were linked with patients' and relatives' self-reported distress (p = 0.031 and 0.005), and that increases in both patients' and relatives' anxiety were linked with physicians' breaking bad news (p = 0.028 and 0.005). No impact of the training program was observed. Results indicate the need to further study communication skills which may help reduce patients' and relatives' anxiety especially when breaking bad news.

  13. Pathophysiologic Impact of Doxorubicin and Radiation Therapy on the Heart of Patients Treated for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-07-01

    asserting the restriction is notified of such release, disclosure or use. This legend, together with the indications of the portions of this data which...patients developed transient pericarditis . No events of myocardial infarction (MI) or congestive heart failure (CHF) have occurred. Conclusions: RT causes...CHF. Two of 33 patients have suffered from transient pericarditis . Both of these patients received Dox-based chemotherapy. One patient has had a

  14. Preventing Infections in Cancer Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... Caregivers Flu Treatment for Cancer Patients and Survivors Flu Publications Stay Informed Cancer Home Information for Patients and Caregivers Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Cancer patients ...

  15. The Impact of Delayed Chemotherapy on Its Completion and Survival Outcomes in Stage II Colon Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Fang; Rimm, Alfred A.; Fu, Pingfu; Krishnamurthi, Smitha S.; Cooper, Gregory S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Delayed chemotherapy is associated with inferior survival in stage III colon and stage II/III rectal cancer patients, but similar studies have not been performed in stage II colon cancer patients. We investigate the association between delayed and incomplete chemotherapy, and the association of delayed chemotherapy with survival in stage II colon cancer patients. Patients and Methods Patients (age ≥66) diagnosed as stage II colon cancer and received chemotherapy from 1992 to 2005 were identified from the linked SEER–Medicare database. The association between delayed and incomplete chemotherapy was assessed using unconditional and conditional logistic regressions. Survival outcomes were assessed using stratified Cox regression based on propensity score matched samples. Results 4,209 stage II colon cancer patients were included, of whom 73.0% had chemotherapy initiated timely (≤2 months after surgery), 14.7% had chemotherapy initiated with moderate delay (2–3 months), and 12.3% had delayed chemotherapy (≥3 months). Delayed chemotherapy was associated with not completing chemotherapy (adjusted odds ratio (OR): 1.33 (95% confidence interval: 1.11, 1.59) for moderately delayed group, adjusted OR: 2.60 (2.09, 3.24) for delayed group). Delayed chemotherapy was associated with worse survival outcomes (hazard ratio (HR): 1.75 (1.29, 2.37) for overall survival; HR: 4.23 (2.19, 8.20) for cancer-specific survival). Conclusion Although the benefit of chemotherapy is unclear in stage II colon cancer patients, delay in initiation of chemotherapy is associated with an incomplete chemotherapy course and poorer survival, especially cancer-specific survival. Causal inference in the association between delayed initiation of chemotherapy and inferior survival requires further investigation. PMID:25238395

  16. Impact of new generation hormone-therapy on cognitive function in elderly patients treated for a metastatic prostate cancer: Cog-Pro trial protocol.

    PubMed

    Lange, Marie; Laviec, Heidi; Castel, Hélène; Heutte, Natacha; Leconte, Alexandra; Léger, Isabelle; Giffard, Bénédicte; Capel, Aurélie; Dubois, Martine; Clarisse, Bénédicte; Coquan, Elodie; Di Fiore, Frédéric; Gouérant, Sophie; Bartélémy, Philippe; Pierard, Laure; Fizazi, Karim; Joly, Florence

    2017-08-16

    New generation hormone-therapies (NGHT) targeting the androgen signalling pathway are nowadays proposed to elderly patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPCa). The impact of these treatments on cognitive function has never been evaluated whereas cognitive impairment may have an impact on the autonomy and the treatment adherence. The aim of this study is to prospectively assess the incidence of cognitive impairment in elderly men after treatment by NGHT for a metastatic CRPCa. The Cog-Pro study is a multicentre longitudinal study including CRPCa patients ≥70 years old treated with NGHT (n = 134), control metastatic prostate cancer patients without castration resistance treated with first generation androgen deprivation therapy (n = 55), and healthy participants (n = 33), matched on age and education. Cognitive, geriatric and quality of life assessment and biological tests will be performed at baseline, 3, 6 and 12 months after start of the treatment (inclusion time). The primary endpoint is the proportion of elderly patients receiving a NGHT who will experience a decline in cognitive performances within 3 months after study enrollment. Secondary endpoints concern: autonomy, quality of life, anxiety, depression, cognitive reserve, adherence to hormone-therapy, comparison of the cognitive impact of 2 different NGHT (abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide), impact of co-morbidities and biological assessments. Evaluating, understanding and analyzing the incidence, severity of cognitive impairments and their impact on quality of life, autonomy and adherence in this group of patients with advanced disease is a challenge. This study should help to improve cancer care of elderly patients and secure the use of oral treatments as the risk of non-observance does exist. Our results will provide up-to date information for patients and caregivers on impact of these treatments on cognitive function in order to help the physicians in the choice of

  17. Impact of home enteral nutrition in malnourished patients with upper gastrointestinal cancer: A multicentre randomised clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Gavazzi, Cecilia; Colatruglio, Silvia; Valoriani, Filippo; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo; Sabbatini, Annarita; Biffi, Roberto; Mariani, Luigi; Miceli, Rosalba

    2016-09-01

    Weight loss is frequent in patients with gastrointestinal (GI) cancer. Nutritional status deteriorates throughout anti-cancer treatment, mostly after major surgery, increasing complications, reducing tolerance and worsening the final prognosis. Enteral nutrition is safe and effective in malnourished patients undergoing major GI surgery. Randomised trials aimed at investigating the effects of home enteral nutrition (HEN) in post-surgical patients with GI cancer are lacking. This study compares HEN and counselling in limiting weight loss during oncologic treatment. Patients with upper GI cancer and candidate to major surgery were included in the protocol when the nutritional risk screening (NRS 2002) score was ≥3. All patients were supported with enteral nutrition through a jejunostomy after surgery and randomly assigned to continue enteral nutrition or receiving nutritional counselling after discharge. Nutritional and performance status, quality of life (QoL) and tolerance to cancer treatment have been evaluated at 2 and 6 months after discharge. Seventy-nine patients were randomised; 38 continued enteral nutrition at home and 41 patients received nutritional counselling only. After 2 months, patients on HEN maintained their mean body weight, while patients in the nutritional counselling group showed a weight loss of 3.6 kg. Patients supported on HEN had a higher chance to complete chemotherapy as planned (48% versus 34%). QoL was not worsened by HEN. No complications were reported. HEN is a simple and feasible treatment to support malnourished patients with upper GI cancer after major surgery and during chemotherapy in order to limit further weight loss. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. The impact of statin use on the efficacy of abiraterone acetate in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Harshman, Lauren C; Werner, Lillian; Tripathi, Abhishek; Wang, Xiaodong; Maughan, Benjamin L; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S; Nakabayashi, Mari; McKay, Rana; Pomerantz, Mark; Mucci, Lorelei A; Taplin, Mary-Ellen; Sweeney, Christopher J; Lee, Gwo-Shu Mary; Kantoff, Philip W

    2017-05-01

    Statins compete with DHEAS for influx through the SLCO2B1 transporter, which may prolong time to progression (TTP) on androgen deprivation therapy. Abiraterone acetate (AA) may also undergo SLCO-mediated transport. Based on preclinical findings showing antagonism, we hypothesized that statins may compete with AA for influx via SLCO2B1 and could negatively impact drug efficacy. We queried two institutional clinical databases (Dana-Farber Cancer Institute [DFCI], Johns Hopkins University [JHU]) for CRPC patients treated with AA. Treatment duration was a surrogate for TTP. Associations between statin use and AA duration were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Multivariable Cox regression modeling adjusted for known prognostic factors. Of the 224 DFCI and 270 JHU patients included, the majority (96%) had metastatic disease. Nearly half (41% and 45%) were statin users. In the DFCI cohort, there was a trend toward longer AA duration in statin users: 14.2 versus 9.2 months (HR 0.79, 95%CI: 0.57-1.09, P = 0.14). There was no association between statin use and AA duration in the JHU cohort: 8.3 versus 8.0 months (HR 0.89, 95%CI: 0.69-1.16, P = 0.38) in the statin users versus non-users, except for a trend in patients that had not previously received docetaxel or enzalutamide (HR 0.79; 95%CI: 0.57-1.10). Contrary to our initial hypothesis, there was a trend toward longer (rather than shorter) AA duration in statin users in the entire DFCI cohort and in the enzalutamide- and docetaxel-naïve JHU patients. Together, these results do not support the hypothesis that statins interfere with AA efficacy. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Impact of age-adjusted Charlson comorbidity score on outcomes for patients with early-stage endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Jared R; Gayar, Omar H; Zaki, Mark; Mahan, Meredith; Buekers, Thomas; Elshaikh, Mohamed A

    2013-12-01

    To determine the impact of Age-Adjusted Charlson Comorbidity (AAC) index score on survival outcomes for patients with early stage endometrial cancer. After IRB-approval, AAC score at time of hysterectomy was retrospectively tabulated by physician chart review for 671 patients with 2009 FIGO stage I-II endometrioid adenocarcinoma. Patients were grouped based on their AAC scores as follows: 0-1 (n=204), 2-3 (n=293) and >3 (n=174). Kaplan-Meier and log-rank test methods and univariate and multivariate modeling with Cox regression analysis was used to determine significant predictors of each survival endpoint. After a median follow-up of 85 months, 225 deaths were recorded (34 from EC and 191 from other causes) with a 7-year Overall (OS) and Disease-specific survival (DSS) of 77.6% and 94.0%, respectively. Based on AAC grouping, the 7-year OS, DSS, and Recurrence-free survival (RFS) were: 92.9%, 96.8%, and 94.9% for AAC 0-1; 81.7%, 95.3%, and 89.8% for AAC 2-3: and 56%, 88.2%, and 84.9% for AAC>3 (p<0.0001, p=0.005 and p=0.013, respectively). On multivariate analyses, higher AAC score, tumor grade, lower uterine segment involvement, and lymphovascular space invasion were significantly independent predictors for shorter OS, while for DSS and RFS, higher tumor grade and lymphovascular space invasion were significant predictors of worse outcome, but higher AAC score was not. Comorbidity score is as important as pathological features for predicting overall survival outcomes in patients with early-stage endometrioid endometrial carcinoma. Higher AAC scores accurately predicted for worse OS. Comorbidity score should be considered in prospective clinical trials of endometrial carcinoma. © 2013.

  20. A randomized, blinded study of the impact of intercessory prayer on spiritual well-being in patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Olver, Ian N; Dutney, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Cochrane reviews have analyzed multiple studies on intercessory prayer that treatment teams had added to health interventions; however, the reviewers could draw no conclusions about the efficacy of prayer because the studies showed either positive or no effects and used different endpoints and methodologies. The study intended to determine whether researchers could measure the impact of intercessory prayer on spiritual well-being. The research team conducted a randomized blinded trial of intercessory prayer added to normal cancer treatment with participants agreeing to complete quality of life (QOL) and spiritual well-being scales at baseline and 6 months later. The research team had shown previously that spiritual well-being is an important, unique domain in the assessment of QOL. Participants remained blinded to the randomization. Based on a previous study, the research team determined that the study required a sample of 1000 participants to detect small differences (P = .05, 2-tailed, 80% power). SETTING The research team performed this research at the Royal Adelaide Hospital Cancer Centre, South Australia, Australia. Participants were patients at the cancer center between June 2003 and May 2008. Of 999 participants with mixed diagnoses who completed the baseline questionnaires, 66.6% provided follow-up. The average age was 61 years, and most participants were married/de facto (living with partners), were Australians or New Zealanders living in Australia, and were Christian. Intervention The research team asked an external group offering Christian intercessory prayer to add the study's participants to their usual prayer lists. They received details about the participants, but this information was not sufficient to identify them. Outcome Measures The research team used the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual Well-being questionnaire to assess spiritual wellbeing and QOL. Results The intervention group showed significantly greater

  1. Impact of Preexisting Mental Illness on All-Cause and Breast Cancer-Specific Mortality in Elderly Patients With Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Iglay, Kristy; Santorelli, Melissa L; Hirshfield, Kim M; Williams, Jill M; Rhoads, George G; Lin, Yong; Demissie, Kitaw

    2017-09-21

    Purpose Limited data are available on the survival of patients with breast cancer with preexisting mental illness, and elderly women are of special interest because they experience the highest incidence of breast cancer. Therefore, we compared all-cause and breast cancer-specific mortality for elderly patients with breast cancer with and without mental illness. Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted by using SEER-Medicare data, including 19,028 women ≥ 68 years of age who were diagnosed with stage I to IIIa breast cancer in the United States from 2005 to 2007. Patients were classified as having severe mental illness if an International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Edition, Clinical Modification code for bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, or other psychotic disorder was recorded on at least one inpatient or two outpatient claims during the 3 years before breast cancer diagnosis. Patients were followed for up to 5 years after breast cancer diagnosis to assess survival outcomes, which were then compared with those of patients without mental illness. Results Nearly 3% of patients had preexisting severe mental illness. We observed a two-fold increase in the all-cause mortality hazard between patients with severe mental illness compared with those without mental illness after adjusting for age, income, race, ethnicity, geographic location, and marital status (adjusted hazard ratio, 2.19; 95% CI, 1.84 to 2.60). A 20% increase in breast cancer-specific mortality hazard was observed, but the association was not significant (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.20; 95% CI, 0.82 to 1.74). Patients with severe mental illness were more likely to be diagnosed with advanced breast cancer and aggressive tumor characteristics. They also had increased tobacco use and more comorbidities. Conclusion Patients with severe mental illness may need assistance with coordinating medical services.

  2. Impact of tissue-based genomic profiling on clinical decision making in the management of patients with metastatic breast cancer at academic centers.

    PubMed

    Santa-Maria, Cesar A; Kruse, Megan; Raska, Paola; Weiss, Mia; Swoboda, April; Mutonga, Martin B; Abraham, Jame; Jain, Sarika; Nanda, Rita; Montero, Alberto J

    2017-07-27

    Genomic profiling can identify targetable mutations; however, the impact of tissue-based genomic profiling on clinical decision making for patients with metastatic breast cancer has not been well characterized. Patients with stage IV breast cancer who had undergone genomic profiling between 7/2013 and 3/2015 were identified at three academic cancer centers. Genomic analysis was determined to have impacted clinical decision if (A) a patient was enrolled onto a genotype-matched clinical trial or (B) prescribed off-label an FDA-approved therapy targeting an identified mutation. The frequency of mutated genes was determined. A total of 117 patients with stage IV breast cancer were identified. Median age was 46 (25-75). Fifty-three patients (45%) had ER-positive/HER2-negative disease, 50 (43%) had ER-negative/HER2-negative disease, and 14 (12%) had ER-any/HER2-positive disease. Median number of previous therapies received prior to genomic profiling was 2 (range 0-15), and median follow-up after testing was obtained after 5.8 months (range 0-24.4 months). Commercial reports indicated that 85 (73%) patients had at least one mutation targetable by an FDA-approved medication, and 112 (96%) patients had at least one clinical trial available; however, clinical management was only affected in 11 patients (9%). The most frequent mutations observed were those in TP53, FGF, PI3KCA, MYC, ZNF, FGFR, CCND, ARID1A, GATA3, and MAP; frequencies of these mutations varied by clinical subtype. Tumor genomic profiling affected clinical management in a minority of patients with metastatic breast cancer, thus these data do not support the routine use of genomic profiling outside of a clinical trial.

  3. Biopsy confirmation of metastatic sites in breast cancer patients: clinical impact and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Determination of hormone receptor (estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 status in the primary tumor is clinically relevant to define breast cancer subtypes, clinical outcome, and the choice of therapy. Retrospective and prospective studies suggest that there is substantial discordance in receptor status between primary and recurrent breast cancer. Despite this evidence and current recommendations, the acquisition of tissue from metastatic deposits is not routine practice. As a consequence, therapeutic decisions for treatment in the metastatic setting are based on the features of the primary tumor. Reasons for this attitude include the invasiveness of the procedure and the unreliable outcome of biopsy, in particular for biopsies of lesions at complex visceral sites. Improvements in interventional radiology techniques mean that most metastatic sites are now accessible by minimally invasive methods, including surgery. In our opinion, since biopsies are diagnostic and changes in biological features between the primary and secondary tumors can occur, the routine biopsy of metastatic disease needs to be performed. In this review, we discuss the rationale for biopsy of suspected breast cancer metastases, review issues and caveats surrounding discordance of biomarker status between primary and metastatic tumors, and provide insights for deciding when to perform biopsy of suspected metastases and which one (s) to biopsy. We also speculate on the future translational implications for biopsy of suspected metastatic lesions in the context of clinical trials and the establishment of bio-banks of biopsy material taken from metastatic sites. We believe that such bio-banks will be important for exploring mechanisms of metastasis. In the future, advances in targeted therapy will depend on the availability of metastatic tissue. PMID:25032257

  4. Emerging issues on the impact of smoking on health-related quality of life in patients with lung cancer and their families.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, Karen Kane; Bullock, Linda F C; Hollen, Patricia J; Heath, Janie; Kozower, Benjamin D

    2014-04-01

    Compelling evidence exists that continued smoking after a diagnosis of lung cancer adversely affects treatment effectiveness, survival, risk of recurrence, second malignancy, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL). The importance of HRQOL to patients with cancer and their families has been well documented. Because of increasing evidence of the benefits of smoking cessation, more research has focused on the impact of smoking on HRQOL. Smoking is a behavior that clusters in families; patients who smoke are likely to have family members who smoke, and together they experience impaired HRQOL. This article describes the evidence regarding HRQOL measurement in individuals diagnosed with lung cancer and their family members who smoke and explores the implications for nursing practice. Oncology nurses are in a critical position to advocate for the integration of HRQOL assessment into clinical settings, monitor patient and family member smoking status and environmental tobacco smoke exposure, and support development of smoking cessation interventions to enhance HRQOL.

  5. Impact of prediagnosis smoking, alcohol, obesity, and insulin resistance on survival in male cancer patients: National Health Insurance Corporation Study.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang Min; Lim, Min Kyung; Shin, Soon Ae; Yun, Young Ho

    2006-11-01

    Although many studies have demonstrated that smoking, alcohol, obesity, and insulin resistance are risk factors for cancer, the role of those factors on cancer survival has been less studied. The study participants were 14,578 men with a first cancer derived from a cohort of 901,979 male government employees and teachers who participated in a national health examination program in 1996. We obtained mortality data for those years from the Korean Statistical Office. We used a standard Poisson regression model to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) for survival in relation to smoking, alcohol, obesity, and insulin resistance before diagnosis. Poor survival of all cancer combined (HR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.16 to 1.33), cancer of the lung (HR, 1.45; 95% CI, 1.15 to 1.82), and cancer of the liver (HR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.21 to 1.53) were significantly associated with smoking. Compared with the nondrinker, heavy drinkers had worse outcomes for head and neck (HR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.23 to 2.79) and liver (HR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.11 to 1.41) cancer, with dose-dependent relationships. Patients with a fasting serum glucose level above 126 mg/dL had a higher mortality rate for stomach (HR, 1.52; 95% CI, 1.25 to 1.84) and lung (HR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.18 to 1.87) cancer. Higher body mass index was significantly associated with longer survival in head and neck (HR, 0.54; 95% CI, 0.39 to 0.74) and esophagus (HR, 0.44; 95% CI, 0.28 to 0.68) cancer. Prediagnosis risk factors for cancer development (smoking, alcohol consumption, obesity, and insulin resistance) had a statistically significant effect on survival among male cancer patients.

  6. Stents in patients with esophageal cancer before chemoradiotherapy: high risk of complications and no impact on the nutritional status.

    PubMed

    Mão-de-Ferro, S; Serrano, M; Ferreira, S; Rosa, I; Lage, P; Alexandre, D P; Freire, J; Mirones, L; Casaca, R; Bettencourt, A; Pereira, A D

    2016-03-01

    Preoperative chemoradiotherapy is the standard of care for locally advanced esophageal cancer, causing persistent deterioration in the nutritional status. We performed a prospective study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of esophageal double-covered self-expandable metal stents in patients with esophageal cancer before chemoradiotherapy. The nutritional status and dysphagia were prospectively recorded. Eleven patients were included: eight were moderate and three were severely malnourished. After stent placement, dysphagia improved in all patients. With regard to complications, one patient developed an esophageal perforation that required urgent esophagectomy. Four patients presented stent migration. Three of these patients required enteral nutrition and none was submitted to surgery because of poor nutritional status. Of the other six patients, only four were operated upon. Stent placement presented a high complication rate and did not prevent weight loss or malnutrition. Other alternatives, including naso-gastric tube placement or endoscopic percutaneous gastrostomy or jejunostomy, should be considered.

  7. Impact of Obesity on Sentinel Lymph Node Mapping in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Uterine Cancer Undergoing Robotic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Ane Gerda Zahl; Montovano, Margaret; Beavis, Anna; Soslow, Robert A; Zhou, Qin; Abu-Rustum, Nadeem R; Gardner, Ginger J; Zivanovic, Oliver; Barakat, Richard R; Brown, Carol L; Levine, Douglas A; Sonoda, Yukio; Leitao, Mario M; Jewell, Elizabeth L

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the impact of obesity on the rate of successful sentinel lymph node (SLN) mapping in patients with uterine cancer undergoing robotic surgery, and compare SLN detection rates using indocyanine green (ICG) versus blue dye. We reviewed robotic cases undergoing SLN mapping with a cervical injection from January 2011 to December 2013 using either blue dye or ICG with near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging. Data were stratified by body mass index (BMI) and the dye used. Appropriate statistical tests were applied. Overall, 472 cases were identified. Bilateral mapping was successful in 352 cases (75 %), and unilateral mapping was successful in 73 cases (15 %). Bilateral mapping was achieved in 266 (85 %) of 312 ICG cases compared with 86 (54 %) of 160 blue-dye cases (p < 0.001). Cases with successful bilateral mapping had a median BMI of 29.8 kg/m(2) (range 16.3-65.3 kg/m(2)); cases with no mapping had a median BMI of 34.7 kg/m(2) (range 21.4-60.4 kg/m(2)) (p = 0.001). With increasing BMI, there was a significant decrease in successful bilateral mapping rates for both the ICG (p < 0.001) and blue-dye groups (p = 0.041); however, the use of ICG resulted in better bilateral (p = 0.002) and overall (p = 0.011) mapping rates compared with the use of blue dye in all BMI groups. ICG results in a higher overall and bilateral SLN detection than blue dye in women with uterine cancer. Successful mapping decreases with increasing BMI irrespective of the dye used; however, it is significantly improved with the use of ICG and NIR fluorescence imaging compared with blue dye.

  8. Impacts of physically active and under-active on clinical outcomes of esophageal cancer patients undergoing esophagectomy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lu; Wang, Cong; Guan, Shanghui; Cheng, Yufeng

    2016-01-01

    Physical activity has been reported to positively influence quality of life and survival in certain cancers. However, the associations between them in esophageal cancer are previously undefined. The aims of this study are to investigate whether physically active esophageal cancer patients have improved quality of life and lower risk of recurrence as well as death compared with physically inactive patients. We evaluated the relationships between postoperative leisure time physical activity and quality of life and recurrence and death among patients diagnosed with esophageal cancer. We respectively used generalized estimating equations and Cox proportional regression to analysis quality of life and survival, adjusting for known potential confounding factors. Comparing esophageal cancer patients reporting more than 9 MET hours per week of postoperative leisure time physical activity with those reporting less, we found improved quality of life. Additionally, we also found that postoperative leisure time physical activity ≥9 MET hours per week, compared with less, was associated with a 23% lower risk of all-cause mortality (HR, 0.666; 95% CI, 0.481-0.921; P=0.014) and a 53% lower risk of recurrence (HR, 0.306; 95% CI 0.218-0.429; P<0.001). Leisure time physical activity was significantly associated with quality of life and risk of recurrence and death of esophageal cancer patients. Clinicians should consider increasing physical activity, regardless of previous behaviors, as a part of primary cancer treatment. The ultimate goal is to improve quality of life and prolong survival of cancer survivors. PMID:27508099

  9. Impact of enzalutamide on patient-related outcomes in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jia; Graff, Julie N

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer claims the lives of more than 25,000 men in the United States yearly, most from metastatic disease. In the past decade, several new medications have been approved for the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer including the antiandrogen enzalutamide. In addition, there has been mounting interest in evaluating health-related quality of life (QoL) in patients with cancer including new more detailed recommendations released by the Prostate Cancer Working Group 3 on how to evaluate patient-related outcomes in clinical trials. A total of four randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trials have evaluated patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) randomized to receive enzalutamide vs control or bicalutamide. Each study used validated health-related QoL and pain surveys to evaluate patient-related outcomes. The studies suggest that patients with mCRPC, including those aged 75 years and older, have favorable overall QoL scores taking enzalutamide compared to standard of care. There was short-term improved pain control in patients taking enzalutamide compared to those in the placebo group. Some commonly reported adverse effects included fatigue, back pain, and hot flashes. These studies were limited in their patient attrition in filling out surveys as well as difficulty in comparing them to each other. Future studies examining patients with mCRPC taking enzalutamide will have to rigorously standardize ways patient-reported outcomes are collected and evaluate patients in a more diversified real-world population. PMID:27942507

  10. Patient preference and the impact of decision-making aids on prostate cancer treatment choices and post-intervention regret

    PubMed Central

    Aning, J.J.; Wassersug, R.J.; Goldenberg, S.L.

    2012-01-01

    The number of prostate cancer survivors is rapidly growing in the Western world. As a result of better oncologic outcomes, more patients are living longer with the adverse effects of treatment, which can be both functional and psychological. Clinicians, in an era of shared decision-making, must not only cure the cancer, but also ensure that, after treatment, their patients experience the best quality of life and minimal post-treatment decisional regret. To participate in the decision-making process, men and their involved partners and family need to fully understand the relative benefits and harms of prostate cancer treatments. Patient preference studies indicate that men with prostate cancer are not well informed. Decision-making aids are a positive treatment adjunct both to convey information and to allow patients to explore their own beliefs and values during the decision-making process. The evidence suggests that decision-making aids better prepare patients for involvement in treatment decisions, but further studies are required to investigate the relationship between the use of decision-making aids and post-treatment decisional regret in prostate cancer. PMID:23355792

  11. Impact of Pretreatment Body Mass Index on Patients With Head-and-Neck Cancer Treated With Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Pai, Ping-Ching; Chuang, Chi-Cheng; Tseng, Chen-Kan; Tsang, Ngan-Ming; Chang, Kai-Ping; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Liao, Chun-Ta; Hong, Ji-Hong; Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate the association of pretreatment body mass index (preT BMI) with outcomes of head-and-neck cancer in patients treated with radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: All 1,562 patients diagnosed with head-and-neck cancer and treated with curative-intent RT to a dose of 60 Gy or higher were retrospectively studied. Body weight was measured both at entry and at the end of RT. Cancer-specific survival (CSS), overall survival (OS), locoregional control (LRC), and distant metastasis (DM) were analyzed by preT BMI (<25 kg/m{sup 2} vs. {>=}25 kg/m{sup 2}). The median follow-up was 8.6 years. Results: Patients with lower preT BMI were statistically significantly associated with poorer CSS and OS than those with higher preT BMI. There was no significant difference between preT BMI groups in terms of LRC and DM. Body weight loss (BWL) during radiation did not influence survival outcomes. However, in the group with higher preT BMI, CSS, OS, and DM-free survival of patients with less BWL during radiation were statistically longer when compared with greater BWL. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that higher preT BMI positively influenced survival outcomes for patients with head-and-neck cancer. Patients with higher preT BMI who were able to maintain their weight during radiation had significantly better survival than patients with greater BWL.

  12. Impact of tumour bed boost integration on acute and late toxicity in patients with breast cancer: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Daniel George; Bale, Rebecca; Jones, Claire; Fitzgerald, Emma; Khor, Richard; Knight, Kellie; Wasiak, Jason

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to summarise the evidence from studies investigating the integration of tumour bed boosts into whole breast irradiation for patients with Stage 0-III breast cancer, with a focus on its impact on acute and late toxicities. A comprehensive systematic electronic search through the Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE and PubMed databases from January 2000 to January 2015 was conducted. Studies were considered eligible if they investigated the efficacy of hypo- or normofractionated whole breast irradiation with the inclusion of a daily concurrent boost. The primary outcomes of interest were the degree of observed acute and late toxicity following radiotherapy treatment. Methodological quality assessment was performed on all included studies using either the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale or a previously published investigator-derived quality instrument. The search identified 35 articles, of which 17 satisfied our eligibility criteria. Thirteen and eleven studies reported on acute and late toxicities respectively. Grade 3 acute skin toxicity ranged from 1 to 7% whilst moderate to severe fibrosis and telangiectasia were both limited to 9%. Reported toxicity profiles were comparable to historical data at similar time-points. Studies investigating the delivery of concurrent boosts with whole breast radiotherapy courses report safe short to medium-term toxicity profiles and cosmesis rates. Whilst the quality of evidence and length of follow-up supporting these findings is low, sufficient evidence has been generated to consider concurrent boost techniques as an alternative to conventional sequential techniques.

  13. Symptom Clusters in Advanced Cancer Patients: An Empirical Comparison of Statistical Methods and the Impact on Quality of Life.

    PubMed

    Dong, Skye T; Costa, Daniel S J; Butow, Phyllis N; Lovell, Melanie R; Agar, Meera; Velikova, Galina; Teckle, Paulos; Tong, Allison; Tebbutt, Niall C; Clarke, Stephen J; van der Hoek, Kim; King, Madeleine T; Fayers, Peter M

    2016-01-01

    Symptom clusters in advanced cancer can influence patient outcomes. There is large heterogeneity in the methods used to identify symptom clusters. To investigate the consistency of symptom cluster composition in advanced cancer patients using different statistical methodologies for all patients across five primary cancer sites, and to examine which clusters predict functional status, a global assessment of health and global quality of life. Principal component analysis and exploratory factor analysis (with different rotation and factor selection methods) and hierarchical cluster analysis (with different linkage and similarity measures) were used on a data set of 1562 advanced cancer patients who completed the European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 30. Four clusters consistently formed for many of the methods and cancer sites: tense-worry-irritable-depressed (emotional cluster), fatigue-pain, nausea-vomiting, and concentration-memory (cognitive cluster). The emotional cluster was a stronger predictor of overall quality of life than the other clusters. Fatigue-pain was a stronger predictor of overall health than the other clusters. The cognitive cluster and fatigue-pain predicted physical functioning, role functioning, and social functioning. The four identified symptom clusters were consistent across statistical methods and cancer types, although there were some noteworthy differences. Statistical derivation of symptom clusters is in need of greater methodological guidance. A psychosocial pathway in the management of symptom clusters may improve quality of life. Biological mechanisms underpinning symptom clusters need to be delineated by future research. A framework for evidence-based screening, assessment, treatment, and follow-up of symptom clusters in advanced cancer is essential. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Pathophysiologic Impact of Doxorubicin and Radiation Therapy on the Heart of Patients Treated for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-07-01

    Accomplishments: "* We have established the first dose - response curve for RT-induced perfusion defects in the heart. "* We have defined the time-dependence of these... response curve (DRC) is shown. 4 7G 6G 5O 40 0 30 ee 2& 0 0 10 0 1𔃺 2o 3o 4o 5O 6o Regional Dose @y) Similar data were generated for each patient at...axial SPECT image is shown. There is a clear reduction in perfusion within the RT field on the post-RT image. The associated patient-specific dose

  15. Prospective assessment of oral mucositis and its impact on quality of life and patient-reported outcomes during radiotherapy for head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Franco, Pierfrancesco; Martini, Stefania; Di Muzio, Jacopo; Cavallin, Chiara; Arcadipane, Francesca; Rampino, Monica; Ostellino, Oliviero; Pecorari, Giancarlo; Garzino Demo, Paolo; Fasolis, Massimo; Airoldi, Mario; Ricardi, Umberto

    2017-05-01

    Oral mucositis (OM) is a common acute side effect during radiotherapy treatments for head and neck cancer (HNC), with a potential impact on patient's compliance to therapy, quality of life (QoL) and clinical outcomes. Its timely and appropriate management is of paramount importance. Several quantitative scoring scales are available to properly assess OM and its influence on patient-reported outcomes (PROs) and QoL. We prospectively assessed OM in a cohort of HNC patients submitted to radiation using the Oral Mucositis Assessment Scale (OMAS), while its impact on PROs and QoL was evaluated employing the Oral Mucositis Weekly Questionnaire-Head and Neck Cancer (OMWQ-HN) and the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Head and Neck Cancer (FACT-HN). Evaluation of OMAS scores highlighted a progressive increase in OM during treatment and a partial recovery after the end of radiation. These trends were correlated to PROs and QoL as evaluated with OMWQ-HN and FACT-HN questionnaires. In the present study, we provided a quantitative assessment of OM, PROs and QoL in HNC patient undergoing radiotherapy, potentially useful for future comparison.

  16. Art therapy among palliative cancer patients: Aesthetic dimensions and impacts on symptoms.

    PubMed

    Lefèvre, Cédric; Ledoux, Mathilde; Filbet, Marilène

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to explore whether aesthetic beauty and the pleasure that results from artistic activity can contribute to a reduction in the symptoms experienced by palliative care patients, and to improve the effectiveness of art therapy sessions. A self-assessment of six symptoms (pain, anxiety, ill-being, tiredness, sadness, and depression) adapted from the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS) was completed by patients before and after a one-hour art therapy session. This assessment was completed after the session with a self-assessment of aesthetic feeling. A correlation analysis was then performed. From July of 2012 to December of 2013, 28 patients took part in 63 art therapy sessions. On the whole, these sessions reduced the global distress of patients by 47% (p < 0.0001). There was a significant reduction in all the symptoms studied; pain (p = 0.003), anxiety (p < 0.0001), ill-being (p < 0.0001), tiredness (p < 0.0001), sadness (p < 0.0001), and depression (p < 0.0001). A study of the significant correlations (0.35 < rs < 0.52, p < 0.05) indicated that technical satisfaction, aesthetic beauty, and pleasure are all involved to varying degrees in reduction of symptoms. Our findings confirm the benefits of art therapy in reducing distress within the palliative context. We also make suggestions for the future direction and improvement of these sessions.

  17. Racial and ethnic differences in advance care planning among patients with cancer: impact of terminal illness acknowledgment, religiousness, and treatment preferences.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alexander K; McCarthy, Ellen P; Paulk, Elizabeth; Balboni, Tracy A; Maciejewski, Paul K; Block, Susan D; Prigerson, Holly G

    2008-09-01

    Despite well-documented racial and ethnic differences in advance care planning (ACP), we know little about why these differences exist. This study tested proposed mediators of racial/ethnic differences in ACP. We studied 312 non-Hispanic white, 83 non-Hispanic black, and 73 Hispanic patients with advanced cancer in the Coping with Cancer study, a federally funded multisite prospective cohort study designed to examine racial/ethnic disparities in ACP and end-of-life care. We assessed the impact of terminal illness acknowledgment, religiousness, and treatment preferences on racial/ethnic differences in ACP. Compared with white patients, black and Hispanic patients were less likely to have an ACP (white patients, 80%; black patients, 47%; Hispanic patients, 47%) and more likely to want life-prolonging care even if he or she had only a few days left to live (white patients, 14%; black patients, 45%; Hispanic patients, 34%) and to consider religion very important (white patients, 44%; black patients, 88%; Hispanic patients, 73%; all P < .001, comparison of black or Hispanic patients with white patients). Hispanic patients were less likely and black patients marginally less likely to acknowledge their terminally ill status (white patients, 39% v Hispanic patients, 11%; P < .001; white v black patients, 27%; P = .05). Racial/ethnic differences in ACP persisted after adjustment for clinical and demographic factors, terminal illness acknowledgment, religiousness, and treatment preferences (has ACP, black v white patients, adjusted relative risk, 0.64 [95% CI, 0.49 to 0.83]; Hispanic v white patients, 0.65 [95% CI, 0.47 to 0.89]). Although black and Hispanic patients are less likely to consider themselves terminally ill and more likely to want intensive treatment, these factors did not explain observed disparities in ACP.

  18. Does Cytoreductive Prostatectomy Really Have an Impact on Prognosis in Prostate Cancer Patients with Low-volume Bone Metastasis? Results from a Prospective Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Steuber, Thomas; Berg, Kasper D; Røder, Martin A; Brasso, Klaus; Iversen, Peter; Huland, Hartwig; Tiebel, Anne; Schlomm, Thorsten; Haese, Alexander; Salomon, Georg; Budäus, Lars; Tilki, Derya; Heinzer, Hans; Graefen, Markus; Mandel, Philipp

    2017-07-08

    The impact of cytoreductive radical prostatectomy (CRP) on oncological outcomes in patients with prostate cancer (PCa) and distant metastases has been demonstrated by retrospective data with their potential selection bias. Using prospective institutional data, we compared the outcomes between 43 PCa patients with low-volume bone metastases (1-3 lesions) undergoing CRP (median follow-up 32.7 mo) and 40 patients receiving best systemic therapy (BST; median follow-up 82.2 mo). The inclusion criteria for both cohorts were identical. So far, no significant difference in castration resistant-free survival (p=0.92) or overall survival (p=0.25) has been detected. Compared to recent reports, the outcomes for our control group are more favorable, indicating a potential selection bias in the previous retrospective studies. Therefore, the unclear oncological effect has to be weighed against the potential risks of CRP. However, patients benefit from a significant reduction in locoregional complications (7.0% vs 35%; p<0.01) when undergoing CRP. In this study we analyzed the impact of surgery in patients with prostate cancer and bone metastases. Using prospective data, we could not show a significant benefit of surgery on survival, but the rate of locoregional complications was lower. Therefore, patients should be treated within prospective trials evaluating the role of cytoreductive prostatectomy in low-volume, bone metastatic prostate cancer. Copyright © 2017 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The Possible Impact of Obesity on Androgen, Progesterone and Estrogen Receptors (ERα and ERβ) Gene Expression in Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Esfahlan, R. Jahanban; Zarghami, N.; Esfahlan, A. Jahanban; Mollazadeh, M.; Nejati, K.; Nasiri, M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Obesity has been associated with increased mortality from hormone dependant cancers such as breast cancer which is the most prevalent cancer in women. The link between obesity and breast cancer can be attributed to excess estrogen produced through aromatization in adipose tissue. The role of steroid hormone receptors in breast cancer development is well studied but how obesity can affect the expression pattern of steroid hormones in patients with different grades of breast cancer was the aim of this study. Methods In this case-control study, 70 women with breast cancer participated with different grades of obesity (36 none obese, BMI < 25 kg/m2 and 34 obese, BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2). The mean age of participants was 44.53 ± 1.79 yr (21–70 yr). The serum level of estrogen, progesterone and androgen determined by ELISA. Following quantitative expression of steroid hormone receptors mRNA in tumor tissues evaluated by Real-time PCR. Patients with previous history of radiotherapy or chemotherapy were excluded. SPSS 16 was used for data analysis and P < 0.05 considered statistically significant. Results The difference in ERα, ERβ and PR mRNA level between normal and obese patients was significant (P < 0.001). In addition, the expression of AR mRNA was found to be higher than other steroid receptors. There was no significant relation between ERβ gene expression in two groups (P = 0.68). We observed a significant relationship between ERα and AR mRNA with tumor stage and tumor grade, respectively (P = 0.023, P = 0.015). Conclusion According to the obtained results, it is speculated that obesity could paly a significant role in estrogen receptors gene expression and also could affect progression and proliferation of breast cancer cells. PMID:22174584

  20. Comparing the dosimetric impact of interfractional anatomical changes in photon, proton and carbon ion radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Houweling, Antonetta C; Crama, Koen; Visser, Jorrit; Fukata, Kyohei; Rasch, Coen R N; Ohno, Tatsuya; Bel, Arjan; van der Horst, Astrid

    2017-04-21

    Radiotherapy using charged particles is characterized by a low dose to the surrounding healthy organs, while delivering a high dose to the tumor. However, interfractional anatomical changes can greatly affect the robustness of particle therapy. Therefore, we compared the dosimetric impact of interfractional anatomical changes (i.e. body contour differences and gastrointestinal gas volume changes) in photon, proton and carbon ion therapy for pancreatic cancer patients. In this retrospective planning study, photon, proton and carbon ion treatment plans were created for 9 patients. Fraction dose calculations were performed using daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) images. To this end, the planning CT was deformably registered to each CBCT; gastrointestinal gas volumes were delineated on the CBCTs and copied to the deformed CT. Fraction doses were accumulated rigidly. To compare planned and accumulated dose, dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters of the planned and accumulated dose of the different radiotherapy modalities were determined for the internal gross tumor volume, internal clinical target volume (iCTV) and organs-at-risk (OARs; duodenum, stomach, kidneys, liver and spinal cord). Photon plans were highly robust against interfractional anatomical changes. The difference between the planned and accumulated DVH parameters for the photon plans was less than 0.5% for the target and OARs. In both proton and carbon ion therapy, however, coverage of the iCTV was considerably reduced for the accumulated dose compared with the planned dose. The near-minimum dose ([Formula: see text]) of the iCTV reduced with 8% for proton therapy and with 10% for carbon ion therapy. The DVH parameters of the OARs differed less than 3% for both particle modalities. Fractionated radiotherapy using photons is highly robust against interfractional anatomical changes. In proton and carbon ion therapy, such changes can severely reduce the dose coverage of the target.

  1. Comparing the dosimetric impact of interfractional anatomical changes in photon, proton and carbon ion radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houweling, Antonetta C.; Crama, Koen; Visser, Jorrit; Fukata, Kyohei; Rasch, Coen R. N.; Ohno, Tatsuya; Bel, Arjan; van der Horst, Astrid

    2017-04-01

    Radiotherapy using charged particles is characterized by a low dose to the surrounding healthy organs, while delivering a high dose to the tumor. However, interfractional anatomical changes can greatly affect the robustness of particle therapy. Therefore, we compared the dosimetric impact of interfractional anatomical changes (i.e. body contour differences and gastrointestinal gas volume changes) in photon, proton and carbon ion therapy for pancreatic cancer patients. In this retrospective planning study, photon, proton and carbon ion treatment plans were created for 9 patients. Fraction dose calculations were performed using daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) images. To this end, the planning CT was deformably registered to each CBCT; gastrointestinal gas volumes were delineated on the CBCTs and copied to the deformed CT. Fraction doses were accumulated rigidly. To compare planned and accumulated dose, dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters of the planned and accumulated dose of the different radiotherapy modalities were determined for the internal gross tumor volume, internal clinical target volume (iCTV) and organs-at-risk (OARs; duodenum, stomach, kidneys, liver and spinal cord). Photon plans were highly robust against interfractional anatomical changes. The difference between the planned and accumulated DVH parameters for the photon plans was less than 0.5% for the target and OARs. In both proton and carbon ion therapy, however, coverage of the iCTV was considerably reduced for the accumulated dose compared with the planned dose. The near-minimum dose ({{D}98 % } ) of the iCTV reduced with 8% for proton therapy and with 10% for carbon ion therapy. The DVH parameters of the OARs differed less than 3% for both particle modalities. Fractionated radiotherapy using photons is highly robust against interfractional anatomical changes. In proton and carbon ion therapy, such changes can severely reduce the dose coverage of the target.

  2. Mitochondrial DNA content in breast cancer: Impact on in vitro and in vivo phenotype and patient prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Weerts, Marjolein J.A.; Sieuwerts, Anieta M.; Smid, Marcel; Look, Maxime P.; Foekens, John A.; Sleijfer, Stefan; Martens, John W.M.

    2016-01-01

    Reduced mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content in breast cancer cell lines has been associated with transition towards a mesenchymal phenotype, but its clinical consequences concerning breast cancer dissemination remain unidentified. Here, we aimed to clarify the link between mtDNA content and a mesenchymal phenotype and its relation to prognosis of breast cancer patients. We analyzed mtDNA content in 42 breast cancer cell lines and 207 primary breast tumor specimens using a combination of quantitative PCR and array-based copy number analysis. By associating mtDNA content with expression levels of genes involved in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and with the intrinsic breast cancer subtypes, we could not identify a relation between low mtDNA content and mesenchymal properties in the breast cancer cell lines or in the primary breast tumors. In addition, we explored the relation between mtDNA content and prognosis in our cohort of primary breast tumor specimens that originated from patients with lymph node-negative disease who did not receive any (neo)adjuvant systemic therapy. When patients were divided based on the tumor quartile levels of mtDNA content, those in the lowest quarter (≤ 350 mtDNA molecules per cell) showed a poorer 10-year distant metastasis-free survival than patients with > 350 mtDNA molecules per cell (HR 0.50 [95% CI 0.29–0.87], P = 0.015). The poor prognosis was independent of established clinicopathological markers (HR 0.54 [95% CI 0.30–0.97], P = 0.038). We conclude that, despite a lack of evidence between mtDNA content and EMT, low mtDNA content might provide meaningful prognostic value for distant metastasis in breast cancer. PMID:27081694

  3. Impact of scalp cooling on chemotherapy-induced alopecia, wig use and hair growth of patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    van den Hurk, C J G; van den Akker-van Marle, M E; Breed, W P M; van de Poll-Franse, L V; Nortier, J W R; Coebergh, J W W

    2013-10-01

    Cytotoxic therapy for patients with cancer frequently induces reversible, but long-lasting alopecia which might be prevented by scalp cooling. This study evaluates the effectiveness of scalp cooling with respect to the severity of chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA) and the purchase and use of wigs and head covers. In this observational study, scalp-cooled patients (n = 160) were compared with non scalp-cooled patients (n = 86) with several types of cancer. Patients were enrolled in 15, mostly general hospitals prior to taxane and/or anthracycline-based chemotherapy. Patients completed four questionnaires between the start and one year after the last chemotherapy. Severity of CIA, and purchasing and actually wearing wigs and head covers were significantly lower among scalp-cooled than non scalp-cooled patients. Overall, scalp cooling reduced the use of wigs and head covers by 40%. Among 84 scalp-cooled patients who purchased a wig (53%), only 52 patients actually wore it (62%), and they just wore it intensively (86% daily) for less than six months (80%). Especially young patients camouflaged CIA with a head cover instead of a wig. The relatively long duration of CIA, the wish of many patients to camouflage or rather prevent it and the 40% reduction for head covering by scalp cooling, makes it a worthwhile supportive intervention. However, (cost-) effectiveness can be improved. Many scalp-cooled patients purchased a wig unnecessarily. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The Good Pain Management (GPM) Ward Program in China and its impact on Chinese cancer patients: the SYSUCC experience

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yun-Peng; Ma, Yu-Xiang; Huang, Yan; Zhao, Yuan-Yuan; Xu, Fei; Tian, Ying; Zou, Ben-Yan; Gao, Rui-Zhen; Zhang, Li

    2014-01-01

    To improve cancer pain management, the Medical Oncology Department of Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center (SYSUCC) launched the Good Pain Management (GPM) Ward Program, which has been recognized by the Chinese Ministry of Health and promoted throughout the nation. This retrospective case-control study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of the program. Patients diagnosed with malignant solid tumors with bone metastasis were eligible. Patients who were admitted 6 months before the initiation of the GPM program were used as the control group, and patients admitted 6 months after the initiation of the program were used as the GPM group. The pain-reporting rate and pain management index (PMI) were calculated. The pain levels before and after pain management were compared. A total of 475 patients (244 in the control group and 231 in the GPM group) were analyzed. The pain-reporting rate of the GPM group was significantly higher than that of the control group (62.8% vs. 37.7%, P < 0.001). The PMI of the GPM group was significantly higher than that of the control group (0.083 vs. -0.261, P < 0.001). Therefore, the GPM Ward Program improved the pain management of cancer patients and provided experience for improving cancer pain management in the future. PMID:24874643

  5. Metabolic and protein interaction sub-networks controlling the proliferation rate of cancer cells and their impact on patient survival

    PubMed Central

    Feizi, Amir; Bordel, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Cancer cells can have a broad scope of proliferation rates. Here we aim to identify the molecular mechanisms that allow some cancer cell lines to grow up to 4 times faster than other cell lines. The correlation of gene expression profiles with the growth rate in 60 different cell lines has been analyzed using several genome-scale biological networks and new algorithms. New possible regulatory feedback loops have been suggested and the known roles of several cell cycle related transcription factors have been confirmed. Over 100 growth-correlated metabolic sub-networks have been identified, suggesting a key role of simultaneous lipid synthesis and degradation in the energy supply of the cancer cells growth. Many metabolic sub-networks involved in cell line proliferation appeared also to correlate negatively with the survival expectancy of colon cancer patients. PMID:24154670

  6. Metabolic and protein interaction sub-networks controlling the proliferation rate of cancer cells and their impact on patient survival.

    PubMed

    Feizi, Amir; Bordel, Sergio

    2013-10-24

    Cancer cells can have a broad scope of proliferation rates. Here we aim to identify the molecular mechanisms that allow some cancer cell lines to grow up to 4 times faster than other cell lines. The correlation of gene expression profiles with the growth rate in 60 different cell lines has been analyzed using several genome-scale biological networks and new algorithms. New possible regulatory feedback loops have been suggested and the known roles of several cell cycle related transcription factors have been confirmed. Over 100 growth-correlated metabolic sub-networks have been identified, suggesting a key role of simultaneous lipid synthesis and degradation in the energy supply of the cancer cells growth. Many metabolic sub-networks involved in cell line proliferation appeared also to correlate negatively with the survival expectancy of colon cancer patients.

  7. Impact of nutritional status on the quality of life of advanced cancer patients in hospice home care.

    PubMed

    Shahmoradi, Negar; Kandiah, Mirnalini; Peng, Loh Su

    2009-01-01

    Cancer patients frequently experience malnutrition and this is an important factor in impaired quality of life. This cross-sectional study examined the association between global quality of life and its various subscales with nutritional status among 61 (33 females and 28 males) advanced cancer patients cared for by selected hospices in peninsular Malaysia. The Patient Generated-Subjective Global Assessment (PG-SGA) and the Hospice Quality of Life Index (HQLI) were used to assess nutritional status and quality of life, respectively. Nine (14.7%) patients were well-nourished, 32 (52.5%) were moderately or suspected of being malnourished while 20 (32.8%) of them were severely malnourished. The total HQLI mean score for these patients was 189.9-/+51.7, with possible scores ranging from 0 to 280. The most problem areas in these patients were in the domain of functional well-being and the least problems were found in the social/spiritual domain. PG-SGA scores significantly correlated with total quality of life scores (r2= 0.38, p<0.05), psychophysiological well-being (r2= 0.37, p<0.05), functional well-being (r2= 0.42, p<0.05) and social/ spiritual well-being (r2= 0.07, p<0.05). Thus, patients with a higher PG-SGA score or poorer nutritional status exhibited a lower quality of life. Advanced cancer patients with poor nutritional status have a diminished quality of life. These findings suggest that there is a need for a comprehensive nutritional intervention for improving nutritional status and quality of life in terminally ill cancer patients under hospice care.

  8. Fostering hope in the patient with cancer.

    PubMed

    Lichwala, Rebecca

    2014-06-01

    When a patient is diagnosed with cancer, feelings such as fear, anxiety, and hopelessness can negatively affect a person's frame of mind. Hope can help a patient decrease anxiety and increase quality of life. Nurses should assess hope, provide interventions, be empathetic, listen, and treat patients with dignity to help improve hope and quality of life. This article features how hope can have a positive impact and provides specific information about how nurses can promote and foster hope in patients with cancer.

  9. Baroreceptor reflex failure: Review of the literature and the potential impact on patients with head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Shah-Becker, Shivani; Pennock, Michael; Sinoway, Lawrence; Goldenberg, David; Goyal, Neerav

    2017-10-01

    Baroreceptor dysfunction and reflex failure may occur after surgery affecting the carotid artery. The implications for patients undergoing treatment for head and neck cancer are not well described. A literature search of PubMed was performed between March 2016 and May 2016. Search terms used individually and in combination included: "baroreflex failure," "carotid sinus sensitivity," "carotid endarterectomy," "carotid body tumor," and "head and neck cancer." Bibliographies of included articles were also reviewed for additional pertinent articles. There is evidence of baroreceptor failure in certain patients after interventions associated with the carotid artery, including carotid endarterectomy and carotid body tumor excision. Few studies have been performed investigating the potential effect of head and neck surgery treatment, including surgery and/or radiation, on baroreflex function. Head and neck cancer treatment has the potential to cause baroreflex failure, and this is likely an underrecognized and underdiagnosed condition. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Impact of socio-economic class on colorectal cancer patient outcomes in Kuala Lumpur and Kuching, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Kong, Chee-Kwan; Roslani, April Camilla; Law, Chee-Wei; Law, Suk-Chin Diana; Arumugam, Kulenthran

    2010-01-01

    Research over the past several decades has indicated that low socioeconomic class has a direct effect on health outcomes. In Malaysia, class distribution may differ with the region. The objective of this study was to compare the presentation and survival of colorectal cancer patients in two dissimilar cities, Kuala Lumpur and Kuching, Sarawak. All patients diagnosed with a malignancy of the colon or rectum in Sarawak General Hospital and University of Malaya Medical Center from 1st Jan 2000-31st Dec 2006 were recruited. Data on presentation, socio-economic class and survival were obtained. The survival duration was categorized into more than three years or three years and less. Testing for significance was performed using the chi-square test, with p values less than 0.05 considered statistically significant. A total of 565 patients in UMMC and 642 patients in SGH had a new diagnosis of colorectal carcinoma. Patients in Kuching had a longer duration of symptoms and more advanced stage at presentation, but this was not statistically significant. Lower socio-economic class was a significant factor for late and more advanced stage at diagnosis, as well as poorer three and five year survival rates. However, survival was lower for patients in Kuching compared to Kuala Lumpur, even after matching for socio-economic class. There is near-zero awareness of colorectal cancer screening in Malaysia. These findings support reaching out to communities of lower socioeconomic backgrounds to improve the colorectal cancer survival rates.

  11. Impact of young age on local control after partial breast irradiation in Japanese patients with early stage breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kazuhiko; Mizuno, Yoshio; Fuchikami, Hiromi; Kato, Masahiro; Shimo, Takahiro; Kubota, Jun; Takeda, Naoko; Inoue, Yuko; Seto, Hiroshi; Okawa, Tomohiko

    2017-01-01

    Partial breast irradiation (PBI) is an alternative to whole breast irradiation (WBI) for breast-conserving therapy (BCT). A randomised phase 3 trial demonstrated that PBI using multicatheter brachytherapy had an equivalent rate of local recurrence, disease-free survival, and overall survival as compared to WBI. However, limited data are available on PBI efficacy for young patients with breast cancer. We evaluated consecutive patients with Tis-2 (≤ 3 cm) N0-1 breast cancer who underwent BCT. For PBI, patients received radiotherapy using multicatheter brachytherapy in an accelerated manner with a dose of 32 Gy in eight fractions over 5-6 days. For WBI, patients received an external beam radiation therapy that was applied to the entire breast with a total dose of 50 Gy in fractions of 2 Gy for 5 weeks. Two hundred seventy-four patients with 278 lesions received PBI; 190 patients with 193 lesions received WBI. Patients aged <50 years including 98 women with 99 lesions receiving PBI and 85 women with 85 lesions receiving WBI were selected. Ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence rate was 3.0 and 2.4 % by PBI and WBI, respectively (P = 0.99). There was no significant difference in 4-year probability of disease-free survival (97.6 and 91.4 % for PBI and WBI, respectively; P = 0.87). This is the first report of PBI efficacy in young patients in Asia. Although it is a nonrandomized retrospective chart review of a small cohort of patients with a relatively short follow-up period, PBI may be a better option than WBI following BCS in some young patients with breast cancer.

  12. Impact of a pharmacist-led oral chemotherapy-monitoring program in patients with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jay M; Holle, Lisa M; Clement, Jessica M; Bunz, Thomas; Niemann, Christopher; Chamberlin, Kevin W

    2016-12-01

    With the introduction of oral chemotherapy, the paradigm for cancer treatment is shifting. Use of oral chemotherapy agents offers a non-invasive option for patients with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer. However, these medications are not without challenges including strict adherence for optimal effects, novel toxicity profiles, frequent lab parameter monitoring, high cost, and proper handling and disposal methods. Pharmacists are positioned to play a key role in providing patients with the education required to assure an optimal treatment course is carried out. Two cohorts of patients receiving abiraterone, bicalutamide, or enzalutamide for metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer seen in our outpatient cancer center 21 months before and 24 months after the implementation of a pharmacist-led oral chemotherapy-monitoring program in December of 2012 were retrospectively compared. Patients were evaluated for number of interventions, adherence to lab parameter monitoring, and overall time on each therapy. Of the 64 patients identified, 31 patients fulfilled inclusion criteria. A significant increase in the average number of interventions per patient (6.9 vs. 2.6; P = 0.004) and adherence to lab parameter monitoring (10 vs. 3; P = 0.04) in the post-program implementation cohort was found. However, no significant difference in overall time on therapy (10.3 vs. 8.1; P = 0.341) between the two groups was observed. These results suggest a potential opportunity exists to maximize oral chemotherapy treatment outcomes with the addition of a formalized monitoring program directed by an oncology pharmacist. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Impact of ascites on the perioperative course of patients with advanced ovarian cancer undergoing extensive cytoreduction: results of a study on 119 patients.

    PubMed

    Feldheiser, Aarne; Braicu, Elena-Ioana; Bonomo, Tommaso; Walther, Anne; Kaufner, Lutz; Pietzner, Klaus; Spies, Claudia; Sehouli, Jalid; Fotopoulou, Christina

    2014-03-01

    Cytoreductive surgery for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the cornerstone of multimodal therapy and considered as a high-risk surgery because of extensive multivisceral procedures. In most patients, ascites is present, but its impact on the surgical and clinical outcomes is unclear. One hundred nineteen patients undergoing surgical cytoreduction because of EOC between 2005 and 2008 were included. All surgical data and the individual tumor pattern were collected systematically based on a validated documentation tool (intraoperative mapping of ovarian cancer) during primary surgery. The amount of ascites was determined at the time of surgery, and 3 groups were classified (no ascites [NOA, n = 56], low amount of ascites [< 500 mL, n = 42], and high amount of ascites [HAS > 500 mL, n = 21]). Group NOA compared with HAS showed less transfusions of packed red blood cells (median [quartiles], 0 [0-2] vs 0 [0-2] vs 3 [1-4] U; P < 0.001) and fresh frozen plasma (median [quartiles], 0 [0-2] vs 0 [0-4] vs 2 [2-6] U; P < 0.001). In addition, in patients with ascites, noradrenaline was administered more frequently and in higher doses. The postoperative length of stay in the intensive care unit was significantly shorter in the NOA versus the group with low amount of ascites and HAS (median [quartiles], 1 [0-1] vs 1 [0-2] vs 2 [1-5] days; P < 0.001). The hospital length of stay is extended in HAS compared with that in NOA (median [quartiles], 16 [13-20] vs 17 [14-22] vs 21 [17-41] days; P = 0.004). Postoperative complications were increased in patients with ascites at the time of surgery (P = 0.007). The presence of a high amount of ascites at cytoreductive surgery because of EOC is associated with higher amounts of blood transfusions, whereas the length of hospital stay and the postoperative intensive care unit treatment are significantly prolonged compared with those of patients without ascites.

  14. [Malnutrition in cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Antoun, Sami; Merad, Mansouriah; Raynard, Bruno; Ruffié, Pierre

    2006-11-30

    Malnutrition is common in cancer patients. Many factors contribute to weight loss: some of them can be related to diminished dietary intake, while others are more associated with metabolic changes induced by systemic inflammatory responses. This is why at a specific phase during the course of development, some cancers will benefit from nutritional support, while in theory, and others will benefit from anti-inflammatory treatment. Parenteral nutrition is indicated for severe malnourished surgical patients and for allogenic stem cell transplant patients. Tube feeding (enteral nutrition) should be considered for patients with a functional gut who are unable to ingest sufficient nutrients orally, for example head and neck cancer patients. The value of dietary counselling and oral nutritional support has not been proven in patients undergoing chemotherapy, which is why it is so difficult to propose recommendations. Some arguments seem to favour parenteral nutrition for patients with bowel obstruction suffering from advanced-stage incurable cancer. As the results of studies following omega-3 fatty acid-enriched oral nutritional support in palliative care patients are inconsistent, these products cannot be recommended.

  15. Multicenter, cross-sectional observational study of the impact of neuropathic pain on quality of life in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Oh, So Yeon; Shin, Sang Won; Koh, Su-Jin; Bae, Sang Byung; Chang, Hyun; Kim, Jung Han; Kim, Hyo Jung; Hong, Young Seon; Park, Keon Uk; Park, Jeanno; Lee, Kyung Hee; Lee, Na Ri; Lee, Jung Lim; Jang, Joung Soon; Hong, Dae Sik; Lee, Seung-Sei; Baek, Sun Kyung; Choi, Dae Ro; Chung, Jooseop; Oh, Sang Cheul; Han, Hye Sook; Yun, Hwan Jung; Sym, Sun Jin; Yoon, So Young; Choi, In Sil; Shim, Byoung Yong; Kang, Seok Yun; Kim, Sung Rok; Kim, Hyun Joo

    2017-07-08

    Neuropathic cancer pain (NCP) is a common and potentially debilitating symptom in cancer patients. We investigated the prevalence of NCP, as well as its management and association with QOL. Cancer patients with pain ≥1 on the visual analogue scale (VAS) were surveyed with the Douleur Neuropathique (DN4) questionnaire, the Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form (BPI-SF), and the EuroQOL five dimensions (EQ-5D) questionnaire. The associations between NCP and pain severity or NCP and QOL, while controlling for variables relevant to QOL, were then analyzed. A total of 2003 patients were enrolled in this survey; the prevalence of NCP was 36.0% (n = 722, 95% CI, 32.5-39.5). We found that NCP in cancer patients was closely correlated to a higher pain severity (BPI-SF; 4.96 ± 1.94 versus 4.24 ± 2.02, p < 0.001), and in patients with NCP, pain more severely interfered with daily living, as compared to those without NCP (BPI-SF; 4.86 ± 2.71 versus 4.41 ± 2.87, p < 0.001). Patients with NCP also had worse QOL than those without NCP, as measured by EQ-5D index score (0.47 ± 0.30 vs. 0.51 ± 0.30, p = 0.005), and this was confirmed using multivariate analysis (p < 0.001), even after controlling for other variables such as age, sex, disease stage, cancer duration, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and comorbidities. Importantly, adjuvant analgesics were used in less than half of patients with NCP (n = 358, 46.4%). We found that NCP in cancer patients was significantly associated with a worsened QOL, and current management is inadequate. Therefore, future research aimed at developing improved strategies for management of NCP is required.

  16. Palliative stenting for relief of dysphagia in patients with inoperable esophageal cancer: impact on quality of life.

    PubMed

    Madhusudhan, Chinthakandhi; Saluja, Sundeep S; Pal, Sujoy; Ahuja, Vineet; Saran, Pratap; Dash, Nihar R; Sahni, Peush; Chattopadhyay, Tushar K

    2009-01-01

    The aim of palliation in patients with inoperable esophageal cancer is to relieve dysphagia with minimal morbidity and mortality, and thus improve quality of life (QOL). The use of a self-expanding metal stent (SEMS) is a well-established modality for palliation of dysphagia in such patients. We assessed the QOL after palliative stenting in patients with inoperable esophageal cancer. Thirty-three patients with dysphagia due to inoperable esophageal cancer underwent SEMS insertion between October 2004 and December 2006. All patients had grade III/IV dysphagia and locally advanced unresectable cancer (n = 13), distant metastasis (n = 14), or comorbid conditions/poor general health status precluding a major surgical procedure (n = 6). Patients with grade I/II dysphagia and those with carcinoma of the cervical esophagus were excluded. The QOL was assessed using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30 (version 3) and EORTC QLQ-Esophagus (OES) 18 questionnaire (a QOL scale specifically designed for esophageal diseases) before and at 1, 4, and 8 weeks after placement of the stent. The mean age of the patients was 56 (range 34-78) years, and 22 were men. A covered SEMS was used in all patients. The most common site of malignancy was the lower third of the esophagus (n = 18, 55%). In 23 (77%) patients, the stent crossed the gastroesophageal junction. Seven patients required a reintervention for stent block (n = 5) and stent migration (n = 2). Dysphagia improved significantly immediately after stenting, and this improvement persisted until 8 weeks (16.5 vs. 90.6; P < 0.01). The global health status (5.8 vs. 71.7; P < 0.01) and all functional scores improved significantly after stenting from baseline until 8 weeks. Except pain (14.1 vs. 17.7; P = 0.67), there was significant improvement in deglutition (22.7 vs. 2.0; P < 0.01), eating (48 vs. 12.6; P < 0.01), and other symptom scales (19.7 vs. 12.1; P = 0.04) following stenting. The

  17. The impact of obesity on the use of a totally laparoscopic distal gastrectomy in patients with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Oki, Eiji; Sakaguchi, Yoshihisa; Ohgaki, Kippei; Saeki, Hiroshi; Chinen, Yoshiki; Minami, Kazuhito; Sakamoto, Yasuo; Toh, Yasushi; Kusumoto, Testuya; Okamura, Takeshi; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2012-06-01

    Since a patient's obesity can affect the mortality and morbidity of the surgery, less drastic surgeries may have a major benefit for obese individuals. This study evaluated the feasibility of performing a totally laparoscopic distal gastrectomy, with intracorporeal anastomosis, in obese patients suffering from gastric cancer. This was a retrospective analysis of the 138 patients, who underwent a totally laparoscopic distal gastrectomy from April 2005 to March 2009, at the National Kyushu Cancer Center. The body mass index of 20 patients was ≥25, and in 118 patients, it was <25 kg/m(2). The mean values of body mass index in the 2 groups were 27.3±2.2 and 21.4±2.3. Hypertension was significantly more frequent in the obese patients than in the non-obese patients. The intraoperative blood loss, duration of surgery, post-operative complication rate, post-operative hospital stay, and a number of retrieved lymph nodes were not significantly different between the two groups. Intracorporeal anastomosis seemed to have a benefit for obese individuals. Totally laparoscopic gastrectomy is, therefore, considered to be a safe and an effective modality for obese patients.

  18. Impact of regular aspirin use on overall and cancer-specific survival in patients with colorectal cancer harboring a PIK3CA mutation

    PubMed Central

    KOTHARI, NISHI; KIM, RICHARD; JORISSEN, ROBERT N.; DESAI, JAYESH; TIE, JEANNE; WONG, HUI-LI; FARRAGHER, IAN; JONES, IAN; DAY, FIONA L.; LI, SHAN; SAKTHINANDESWAREN, ANURATHA; PALMIERI, MICHELLE; LIPTON, LARA; SCHELL, MICHAEL; TEER, JAMIE K.; SHIBATA, DAVID; YEATMAN, TIMOTHY; SIEBER, OLIVER M.; GIBBS, PETER; TRAN, BEN

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent data have suggested that regular aspirin use improves overall and cancer-specific survival in the subset of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients harboring PIK3CA mutations. However, the number of PIK3CA-mutated CRC patients examined in these studies was modest. Our collaborative study aims to validate the association between regular aspirin use and survival in patients with PIK3CA-mutated CRC. Patients and methods Patients with PIK3CA-mutated CRC were identified at Moffitt Cancer Center (MCC) in the United States and Royal Melbourne Hospital (RMH) in Australia. Prospective clinicopathological data and survival data were available. At MCC, PIK3CA mutations were identified by targeted exome sequencing using the Illumina GAIIx Next Generation Sequencing platform. At RMH, Sanger sequencing was utilized. Multivariate survival analyses were conducted using Cox logistic regression. Results From a cohort of 1487 CRC patients, 185 patients harbored a PIK3CA mutation. Median age of patients with PIK3CA-mutated tumors was 72 years (range: 34 – 92) and median follow up was 54 months. Forty-nine (26%) patients used aspirin regularly. Regular aspirin use was not associated with improved overall survival (multivariate HR 0.96, p = 0.86). There was a trend towards improved cancer-specific survival (multivariate HR 0.60, p = 0.14), but this was not significant. Conclusions Despite examining a large number of patients, we did not confirm that regular aspirin use was associated with statistically significant improvements in survival in PIK3CA-mutated CRC patients. Prospective evaluation of this relationship is warranted. PMID:25549537

  19. Eribulin in heavily pretreated metastatic breast cancer patients and clinical/biological feature correlations: impact on the practice.

    PubMed

    Fabi, Alessandra; Moscetti, Luca; Ciccarese, Mariangela; Caramanti, Miriam; Salesi, Nello; La Verde, Nicla; Russillo, Michelangelo; Generali, Daniele; Scandurra, Giuseppina; Vari, Sabrina; Pacetti, Umberto; Cognetti, Francesco; Giannarelli, Diana

    2015-01-01

    This multicenter study describes the effectiveness of eribulin in current practice. In total, 78 patients with advanced metastatic breast cancer, previously treated with two or more chemotherapy lines were enrolled. The median duration of response and disease stability were 7.5 (5.4-9.5) and 8.9 (6.2-11.6) months, respectively, with a clinical benefit (CB) at 6 months in 41% of patients. CB in visceral and nonvisceral metastases were 72.7 and 88.9%, respectively. Eribulin was active also in brain metastases, with 47% CB. The activity was shown in all biological subtypes. Toxicities were manageable. Our study confirms the effectiveness of eribulin mesylate in the treatment of patients with metastatic breast cancer and two or more lines of chemotherapy, in particular in the good disease control at the different metastatic sites.

  20. The impact of active breathing control on internal mammary lymph node coverage and normal tissue exposure in breast cancer patients planned for left-sided postmastectomy radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Barry, Aisling; Rock, Kathy; Sole, Claudio; Rahman, Mohammad; Pintilie, Melania; Lee, Grace; Fyles, Anthony; Koch, C Anne

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of the active breathing control (ABC) technique on IMN coverage and organs at risk in patients planned for postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT), with the inclusion of the internal mammary lymph nodes (IMNs). The effect of body mass index (BMI) on recorded dosimetric parameters was examined in the same patient cohort. Fifty left-sided postmastectomy patients with breast cancer who underwent free-breathing (FB) and ABC-Elekta CT simulation scans were selected at random from an institutional breast cancer database between 2008 and 2014. The ABC plans were directly compared with FB plans from the same patient. The IMN planning target volume coverage met dosimetric criteria for coverage of receiving more than 90% of the prescribed dose (V90) >90%, although it decreased with ABC compared with FB (94.5% vs 98%, P < .001). Overall, ABC significantly reduced doses to all measured heart and left anterior descending coronary artery parameters, ipsilateral lung V20, and mean lung dose compared with FB (P < .001). There was no difference seen between the ABC and FB plans with respect to the dose to contralateral lung or contralateral breast. There was no correlation identified between BMI and any of the dosimetric parameters recorded from the ABC and FB plans. Our results suggest that ABC reduces IMN coverage in left-sided breast cancer patients planned for PMRT; however, dosimetric criteria for IMN coverage were still met, suggesting that this is not likely to be clinically significant. ABC led to significant sparing of organs at risk compared with FB conditions and was not affected by BMI. Collectively, the results support the use of ABC for breast cancer patients undergoing left-sided PMRT requiring regional nodal irradiation that includes the IMNs. Further prospective clinical studies are required to determine the impact of these results on late normal tissue effects. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc

  1. What Impact Do Chaplains Have? A Pilot Study of Spiritual AIM for Advanced Cancer Patients in Outpatient Palliative Care.

    PubMed

    Kestenbaum, Allison; Shields, Michele; James, Jennifer; Hocker, Will; Morgan, Stefana; Karve, Shweta; Rabow, Michael W; Dunn, Laura B

    2017-07-20

    Spiritual care is integral to quality palliative care. Although chaplains are uniquely trained to provide spiritual care, studies evaluating chaplains' work in palliative care are scarce. The goals of this pre-post study, conducted among patients with advanced cancer receiving outpatient palliative care, were to evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of chaplain-delivered spiritual care, utilizing the Spiritual Assessment and Intervention Model ("Spiritual AIM"); and to gather pilot data on Spiritual AIM's effects on spiritual well-being, religious and cancer-specific coping, and physical and psychological symptoms. Patients with advanced cancer (n=31) who were receiving outpatient palliative care were assigned based on chaplains' and patients' outpatient schedules, to one of three professional chaplains for three individual Spiritual AIM sessions, conducted over the course of approximately six to eight weeks. Patients completed the following measures at baseline and post-intervention: Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS), Steinhauser spirituality, Brief Religious Coping (Brief RCOPE), Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual (FACIT-Sp-12), Mini-Mental Adjustment to Cancer (Mini-MAC), Patient Dignity Inventory, Center for Epidemiological Studies - Depression (CES-D, 10-item), and Spielberger State Anxiety Inventory (STAI-S). From baseline to post-Spiritual AIM, significant increases were found on the FACIT-Sp-12 Faith subscale, the Mini-MAC Fighting Spirit subscale, and Mini-MAC Adaptive Coping factor. Two trends were observed, i.e., an increase in Positive religious coping and an increase in Fatalism (a subscale of the Mini-MAC). Spiritual AIM, a brief chaplain-led intervention, holds potential to address spiritual needs, as well as religious and general coping in patients with serious illnesses. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Prognostic impact of progesterone receptor status combined with body mass index in breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant aromatase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Ohara, Masahiro; Akimoto, Etsushi; Noma, Midori; Matsuura, Kazuo; Doi, Mihoko; Kagawa, Naoki; Itamoto, Toshiyuki

    2015-11-01

    Aromatase inhibitors have played a central role in endocrine therapy for the treatment of estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer in postmenopausal patients. However, prognostic factors for recurrence following such treatment have not been identified. The current study aimed to validate the prognostic value of endocrine-related progesterone receptor (PgR) status combined with body mass index (BMI). Among 659 consecutive patients with primary breast cancer who underwent curative surgery between 2002 and 2012, 184 postmenopausal patients with ER-positive (ER+) and human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2-negative (HER2-) breast cancer who were treated with adjuvant aromatase inhibitor therapy were assessed. The patients were assigned to groups based on BMI, according to the WHO cut-off value: ≥25 kg/m(2) (high, H) or <25 kg/m(2) (low, L). Positive nodal status, negative PgR status, BMI-H and a high Ki-67 labeling index (≥20%) were found to be significantly associated with a short recurrence-free interval (RFI) upon univariate analysis (P=0.048, 0.007, 0.027, and 0.012, respectively). The patients were further grouped based on their combined PgR/BMI status. The RFI was significantly shorter in the PgR- and/or BMI-H group compared with that of the PgR+/BMI-L group (P=0.012). Multivariate analysis revealed PgR- tumors and/or BMI-H and positive nodal status to be independent prognostic factors (P=0.012 and 0.020, respectively). The present findings indicate that PgR/BMI status may serve as a practical tool in the management of ER+ and HER2- breast cancer in patients treated with adjuvant aromatase inhibitors.

  3. Impact of Clinical Pharmacy Services on KAP and QOL in Cancer Patients: A Single-Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Wu, Huimin; Xu, Feng

    2015-01-01

    This study was to evaluate the efficacy of pharmaceutical intervention (PI) on chemotherapy knowledge-attitude-practice (KAP) and quality of life (QOL) in cancer patients. A prospective, randomized, controlled study was carried out at Oncology Ward in a tertiary hospital affiliated to Southern Medical University, China. Eligible patient was randomly assigned to pharmaceutical intervention (PI) group or control group. Each patient in PI group was given information booklets and was given 30 min face-to-face medication education and psychological counseling by clinical pharmacists, 2 sessions per week for 2 months. Patients in control group only received conventional treatment. All participants were asked to complete a structured Chemotherapy KAP Questionnaire and QOL Questionnaire at pre- and poststudy time. A total of 149 cancer patients (77 in PI group and 72 in control group) completed the study. The baseline scores of KAP and QOL in 2 groups were similar. At the end of study, only knowledge score was significantly increased; meanwhile no difference existed for attitude, practice, and QOL scores in control group; both KAP scores and QOL score were significantly increased in PI group. As for the between-group comparison, both KAP scores and QOL score in PI group were significantly higher than those in control group. In conclusion, pharmaceutical intervention has a positive role in increasing chemotherapy-related knowledge, improving patients' positive emotions, dealing with chemotherapy adverse reactions, and improving the quality of life of patients. PMID:26697487

  4. The impact of metabolic syndrome on outcome and response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation in locally advanced rectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Brandon J; Wahlquist, Amy E; Hill, Elizabeth G; Marshall, David T; Kimchi, Eric T; Staveley O'Carroll, Kevin F; Camp, E Ramsay

    2016-09-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a constellation of cardiovascular risk factors shown to increase the risk of developing various malignancies, as well as diminish tumor response to conventional therapies. The effects of MetS and its individual components on therapeutic response and treatment-related outcomes were examined in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Data was retrospectively collected on LARC patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation (nCRT) and surgery. Medical records were reviewed for patient characteristics, staging, treatment plan, and outcomes. One hundred two patients were included in the study. Patients with HTN had a significantly decreased nCRT response and were four times more likely to experience a poor response to treatment compared to patients without HTN. Additionally, HTN was found to significantly increase the rate of surgical complications. Neither DM nor obesity exhibited any significant effect on therapeutic response or complication rates, either individually or in combination with another risk factor. This study demonstrates the importance of considering underlying MetS risk factors, especially HTN, when predicting tumor response in LARC patients undergoing nCRT followed by radical surgery. The results provide support for an increased focus on pre-treatment risk factor control to optimize cancer therapy outcomes. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Prognostic impact of circulating tumor cells assessed with the CellSearch System™ and AdnaTest Breast™ in metastatic breast cancer patients: the DETECT study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction There is a multitude of assays for the detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) but a very limited number of studies comparing the clinical relevance of results obtained with different test methods. The DETECT trial for metastatic breast cancer patients was designed to directly compare the prognostic impact of two commercially available CTC assays that are prominent representatives of immunocytochemical and RT-PCR based technologies. Methods In total, 254 metastatic breast cancer patients were enrolled in this prospective multicenter trial. CTCs were assessed using both the AdnaTest Breast Cancer and the CellSearch system according to the manufacturers' instructions. Results With the CellSearch system, 116 of 221 (50%) evaluable patients were CTC-positive based on a cut-off level at 5 or more CTCs. The median overall survival (OS) was 18.1 months in CTC-positive patients. (95%-CI: 15.1-22.1 months) compared to 27 months in CTC-negative patients (23.5-30.7 months; p<0.001). This prognostic impact for OS was also significant in the subgroups of patients with triple negative, HER2-positive and hormone receptor-positive/HER2-negative primary tumors. The progression free survival (PFS) was not correlated with CTC status in our cohort receiving different types and lines of systemic treatment (p = 0.197). In multivariate analysis, the presence of CTCs was an independent predictor for OS (HR: 2.7, 95%-CI: 1.6-4.2). When the AdnaTest Breast was performed, 88 of 221 (40%) patients were CTC-positive. CTC-positivity assessed by the AdnaTest Breast had no association with PFS or OS. Conclusions The prognostic relevance of CTC detection in metastatic breast cancer patients depends on the test method. The present results indicate that the CellSearch system is superior to the AdnaTest Breast Cancer in predicting clinical outcome in advanced breast cancer. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials Registry number ISRCTN59722891. PMID:22894854

  6. Impact of concomitant chemoradiation on survival for patients with T1-2N1 head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Zumsteg, Zachary S; Kim, Sungjin; David, John M; Yoshida, Emi J; Tighiouart, Mourad; Shiao, Stephen L; Scher, Kevin; Mita, Alain; Sherman, Eric J; Lee, Nancy Y; Ho, Allen S

    2017-05-01

    Single-modality radiotherapy is considered a standard-of-care option for certain stage III, T1-2N1 head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs). The role of concomitant chemoradiation is not well established because there have been no studies comparing chemoradiation with radiation alone in this population. This study analyzed patients in the National Cancer Data Base with cT1-2N1M0 invasive squamous cell carcinomas of the oropharynx, larynx, and hypopharynx who were diagnosed between 2004 and 2012 and were undergoing definitive radiation. Patients who were undergoing surgery before radiation with unknown follow-up or for whom either the receipt or timing of chemotherapy was unknown were excluded. In all, 5030 patients with T1-2N1 oropharyngeal, laryngeal, or hypopharyngeal cancer were included. The median follow-up was 56.8 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 55.7-58.6 months). Overall, 68% of the patients received concomitant chemoradiation (CCRT). The use of CCRT significantly increased during the time period of this study from 53% in 2004 to 78% in 2012 (P < .001). CCRT was associated with improved overall survival (OS) in comparison with radiation alone in a multivariate analysis (hazard ratio [HR], 0.80; 95% CI, 0.72-0.88; P < .001). In propensity score-adjusted analyses, CCRT remained significantly associated with improved OS, with 5-year OS rates of 63.5% (95% CI, 60.7%-66.2%) and 55.6% (95% CI, 52.7%-58.4%; P < .001) with CCRT and radiation alone, respectively. Subgroup analyses showed a benefit across the majority of subgroups, including patients with oropharyngeal cancer (HR, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.65-0.85; P < .001). Concomitant chemoradiation is associated with improved survival for patients with T1-2N1 HNSCC. Prospective trials in this population should be pursued. Cancer 2017;123:1555-1565. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  7. Impact of transcutaneous neuromuscular electrical stimulation on dysphagia in patients with head and neck cancer treated with definitive chemoradiation.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Aashish D; Goodwin, Nicole; Cash, Elizabeth; Bhatt, Geetika; Silverman, Craig L; Spanos, William J; Bumpous, Jeffrey M; Potts, Kevin; Redman, Rebecca; Allison, Wes A; Dunlap, Neal E

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of transcutaneous neuromuscular electrical stimulation (TNMES) therapy in maintaining swallowing function during chemoradiation for locally advanced head and neck cancer. We retrospectively compared 43 consecutive patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer treated with TNMES (treatment group) to 55 control patients. Validated swallowing scale scores were assigned. All patients' swallowing scores declined post-chemoradiotherapy. A difference in mean decline in scores for the control group versus the treatment group using the Functional Oral Intake Scale (FOIS) was seen, favoring TNMES intervention (23% vs 7%; p = .015). Age, race, >10 pack-years smoking, diabetes, stage, nodal disease, accelerated fractionation, weight loss, dietary modification, no TNMES, and radiotherapy dose were all significant for poorer scores on the swallowing scales. TNMES should be considered an adjunct to dysphagia reduction and possible prevention in patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer. Further studies should be conducted to define the benefit of TNMES intervention. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. The Pearl of FDG PET/CT in Preoperative Assessment of Patients with Potentially Operable Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer and its Clinical Impact

    PubMed Central

    Kung, Boom Ting; Yong, Ting Kun Au; Tong, Cheuk Man

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study is to evaluate the clinical impact and efficacy of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography–computed tomography (PET/CT) on management decisions for patients suffering from clinically operable non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A retrospective review of 186 potentially operable NSCLC patients who underwent whole-body PET/CT examination in 2012 was performed. The patients were further analyzed via the electronic patient record (ePR) system for relevant findings. Overall change in management was assigned if a patient avoided unnecessary surgery due to disease upstaging or if a patient underwent further neoadjuvant treatment or investigation before the curative surgery. Of all 186 subjects, 65 (34.9%) became inoperable after PET/CT due to disease upstaging. The remaining 121 (65.1%) of patients remained operable after PET/CT examination. Nineteen out of 121 potentially operable patients did not receive curative surgery eventually, as 11 patients had poor clinical condition and 8 patients refused surgery. One hundred two out of 186 (54.8%) patients received curative operation following PET/CT. Among these 102 individuals, 97 patients (95%) proceeded to surgery without further neoadjuvant treatment or other investigatory procedures. Of the remaining 5 patients, 4 (3.9%) received neoadjuvant treatment and 1 (1.0%) had further investigation after PET/CT. Seventy of the 186 (37.6%) patients underwent changes in management plans after PET/CT study. Out of the 186 individuals, a subgroup of 141 (75.8%) patients underwent dedicated CT thorax before PET/CT examination. Forty-seven (33.3%) patients had avoided futile surgery due to disease upstaging. Fifty-one of the 141 (36.2%) patients underwent changes in management plans after PET/CT. PET/CT had great clinical impact, with significant reduction of futile curative surgery. PMID:28217015

  9. The Pearl of FDG PET/CT in Preoperative Assessment of Patients with Potentially Operable Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer and its Clinical Impact.

    PubMed

    Kung, Boom Ting; Yong, Ting Kun Au; Tong, Cheuk Man

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study is to evaluate the clinical impact and efficacy of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) on management decisions for patients suffering from clinically operable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A retrospective review of 186 potentially operable NSCLC patients who underwent whole-body PET/CT examination in 2012 was performed. The patients were further analyzed via the electronic patient record (ePR) system for relevant findings. Overall change in management was assigned if a patient avoided unnecessary surgery due to disease upstaging or if a patient underwent further neoadjuvant treatment or investigation before the curative surgery. Of all 186 subjects, 65 (34.9%) became inoperable after PET/CT due to disease upstaging. The remaining 121 (65.1%) of patients remained operable after PET/CT examination. Nineteen out of 121 potentially operable patients did not receive curative surgery eventually, as 11 patients had poor clinical condition and 8 patients refused surgery. One hundred two out of 186 (54.8%) patients received curative operation following PET/CT. Among these 102 individuals, 97 patients (95%) proceeded to surgery without further neoadjuvant treatment or other investigatory procedures. Of the remaining 5 patients, 4 (3.9%) received neoadjuvant treatment and 1 (1.0%) had further investigation after PET/CT. Seventy of the 186 (37.6%) patients underwent changes in management plans after PET/CT study. Out of the 186 individuals, a subgroup of 141 (75.8%) patients underwent dedicated CT thorax before PET/CT examination. Forty-seven (33.3%) patients had avoided futile surgery due to disease upstaging. Fifty-one of the 141 (36.2%) patients underwent changes in management plans after PET/CT. PET/CT had great clinical impact, with significant reduction of futile curative surgery.

  10. Impact of Glucose-Lowering Agents on the Risk of Cancer in Type 2 Diabetic Patients. The Barcelona Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Simó, Rafael; Plana-Ripoll, Oleguer; Puente, Diana; Morros, Rosa; Mundet, Xavier; Vilca, Luz M.; Hernández, Cristina; Fuentes, Inmaculada; Procupet, Adriana; Tabernero, Josep M.; Violán, Concepción

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study is to evaluate the impact of glucose-lowering agents in the risk of cancer in a large type 2 diabetic population. Methods A nested case-control study was conducted within a defined cohort (275,164 type 2 diabetic patients attending 16 Primary Health Care Centers of Barcelona). Cases (n = 1,040) comprised those subjects with any cancer diagnosed between 2008 and 2010, registered at the Cancer Registry of Hospital Vall d'Hebron (Barcelona). Three control subjects for each case (n = 3,120) were matched by age, sex, diabetes duration, and geographical area. The treatments analyzed (within 3 years prior to cancer diagnosis) were: insulin glargine, insulin detemir, human insulin, fast-acting insulin and analogues, metformin, sulfonylureas, repaglinide, thiazolidinediones, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors, and alpha glucosidase inhibitors. Conditional logistic regressions were used to calculate the risk of cancer associated with the use of each drug adjusted by age, BMI, dose and duration of treatment, alcohol use, smoking habit, and diabetes duration. Results No differences were observed between case and control subjects for the proportion, dose or duration of exposure to each treatment. None of the types of insulin and oral agents analyzed showed a significant increase in the risk of cancer. Moreover, no cancer risk was observed when glargine was used alone or in combination with metformin. Conclusions Our results suggest that diabetes treatment does not influence the risk of cancer associated with type 2 diabetes. Therefore, an eventual increase of cancer should not be a reason for biasing the selection of any glucose-lowering treatment in type 2 diabetic population. PMID:24278227

  11. DISTRIBUTION OF CCK-B RECEPTOR GENOTYPE BETWEEN PANCREATIC CANCER PATIENTS AND CONTROLS AND ITS IMPACT ON SURVIVAL

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jill P.; Whitcomb, David C.; Matters, Gail L.; Brand, Randall E.; Liao, Jiangang; Huang, Yu-Jing; Frazier, Marsha L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cholecystokinin (CCK) and gastrin stimulate growth of pancreatic cancer through the CCK-B receptor (CCK-BR). A splice variant of the CCK-BR that results from a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) has been identified. Since the splice variant receptor has an extended 3rd intracellular loop, an area involved in cell signaling and growth, we hypothesized that this genetic variant could contribute to the poor prognosis and short survival of this malignancy. Methods DNA from 931 patients with pancreatic cancer was evaluated for the SNP (C >A; rs1800843) in the CCK-BR gene. For statistical analysis, the Fisher’s exact test was used to compare the genotype and allele frequency between the cancer cohort and normal controls and the dependence of genotype on factors, such as stage of disease and age, was analyzed using Cox’s proportional hazard models. Results Compared to the normal cohort, the frequency of the A-allele in pancreatic cancer subjects was increased (p=0.01123; OR=2.283). Even after adjustment for stage of disease, survival of subjects with the minor allele was significantly shorter than those with the wild-genotype (HR=1.83; p =3.11×10−11). Conclusion The CCK-BR SNP predicts survival and should be studied as a candidate genetic biomarker for those at risk for pancreatic cancer. PMID:25469546

  12. Impact of being overweight on the surgical outcomes of patients with gastric cancer: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiang-Song; Wu, Wen-Guang; Li, Mao-Lan; Yang, Jia-Hua; Ding, Qi-Chen; Zhang, Lin; Mu, Jia-Sheng; Gu, Jun; Dong, Ping; Lu, Jian-Hua; Liu, Ying-Bin

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of being overweight on the surgical results of patients with gastric cancer. METHODS: Comprehensive electronic searches of the PubMed, Web of Science, and Cochrane Library databases were conducted. Studies were identified that included patients with surgical complications from gastric cancer who were classified as normal weight [body mass index (BMI) < 25 kg/m2] or overweight (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2). The operative time, retrieved lymph nodes, blood loss, and long-term survival were analyzed. A subgroup analysis was conducted based on whether patients received laparoscopic or open gastrectomy procedures. All statistical tests were performed using ReviewerManager 5.1.2 software. RESULTS: This meta-analysis included 23 studies with 20678 patients (15781 with BMI < 25 kg/m2; 4897 with BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2). Overweight patients had significantly increased operation times [MD: -29.14; 95%CI: -38.14-(-20.21); P < 0.00001], blood loss [MD: -194.58; 95%CI: -314.21-(-74.95); P = 0.001], complications (RR: 0.75; 95%CI: 0.66-0.85; P < 0.00001), anastomosis leakages (RR: 0.59; 95%CI: 0.42-0.82; P = 0.002), and pancreatic fistulas (RR: 0.486; 95%CI: 0.34-0.63; P < 0.00001), whereas lymph node retrieval was decreased significantly in the overweight group (MD: 1.69; 95%CI: 0.75-2.62; P < 0.0001). In addition, overweight patients had poorer long-term survival (RR: 1.14; 95%CI: 1.07-1.20; P < 0.0001). No significant difference was detected for the mortality and length of hospital stay. CONCLUSION: This meta-analysis demonstrates that a high BMI not only increases the surgical difficulty and complications but also impairs the long-term survival of patients with gastric cancer. PMID:23901238

  13. Impact of Scrambler Therapy on Pain Management and Quality of Life in Cancer Patients: A Study of Twenty Cases

    PubMed Central

    Kashyap, Komal; Joshi, Saurabh; Vig, Saurabh; Singh, Vishwajeet; Bhatnagar, Sushma

    2017-01-01

    Aim of the Study: To study the effect of scrambler therapy on patients with chronic cancer pain. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective, observational study conducted on patients with chronic pain due to malignancy which is not responding to oral analgesics. A total of twenty patients were included in the study (ten males, ten females) with a visual analog scale score of >4 on oral analgesics. Patients aged 18–70 years with a life expectancy of >3 months having bony, neuropathic, or mixed type of pain were included in the study. A total of 12 sessions of scrambler therapy were planned, ten sessions on consecutive days and one session each on two follow-up visits after 1 week each. Each session lasted for 40 min. Pain relief and quality of life according to the World Health Organization Quality of Life were recorded as primary outcome variables. Results: All patients had good pain relief and improvement in all four domains of quality of life. Pain scores decreased significantly (P < 0.01) after each session and at each follow-up. Patients showed significant improvement in physical, psychological, social, and environmental health (P < 0.01) after the therapy. Conclusion: Scrambler therapy offers a promising role in the pain physician's armamentarium as an adjunct to pharmacological therapy for the treatment of chronic drug-resistant cancer pain; it may bring down analgesic drug requirements significantly and improve quality of life in cancer patients. Larger prospective, randomized multicenter studies are needed to validate the findings of the small pilot studies published in literature so far. PMID:28216858

  14. Impact of computer-assisted data collection, evaluation and management on the cancer genetic counselor's time providing patient care.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Stephanie A; McIlvried, Dawn E

    2011-06-01

    Cancer genetic counseling sessions traditionally encompass collecting medical and family history information, evaluating that information for the likelihood of a genetic predisposition for a hereditary cancer syndrome, conveying that information to the patient, offering genetic testing when appropriate, obtaining consent and subsequently documenting the encounter with a clinic note and pedigree. Software programs exist to collect family and medical history information electronically, intending to improve efficiency and simplicity of collecting, managing and storing this data. This study compares the genetic counselor's time spent in cancer genetic counseling tasks in a traditional model and one using computer-assisted data collection, which is then used to generate a pedigree, risk assessment and consult note. Genetic counselor time spent collecting family and medical history and providing face-to-face counseling for a new patient session decreased from an average of 85-69 min when using the computer-assisted data collection. However, there was no statistically significant change in overall genetic counselor time on all aspects of the genetic counseling process, due to an increased amount of time spent generating an electronic pedigree and consult note. Improvements in the computer program's technical design would potentially minimize data manipulation. Certain aspects of this program, such as electronic collection of family history and risk assessment, appear effective in improving cancer genetic counseling efficiency while others, such as generating an electronic pedigree and consult note, do not.

  15. Estimation of Nickel in Different Smokeless Tobacco Products and Their Impact on Human Health of Oral Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Arain, Sadaf S; Kazi, Tasneem G; Afridi, Hassan I; Talpur, Farah N; Kazi, Atif G; Brahman, Kapil D; Naeemullah; Arain, Mariam S; Sahito, Oan M

    2015-01-01

    It has been extensively investigated that the chewing of smokeless tobacco (SLT) products may enhance the inflammation of the oral cavity. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the relationship between nickel (Ni) exposure via different SLT products with oral cancer (different sites) incidence in the population of Sindh, Pakistan. The different brands of SLT products (mainpuri, gutkha, and moist snuff) commonly consumed by the studied population were analyzed for Ni contents. The biological samples of oral cancer patients and noncancerous control subjects of both genders, who have or have not consumed SLT products, were collected. The concentration of Ni in biological samples and SLT products were measured by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometer after microwave-assisted acid digestion. The validity and accuracy of the methodology were checked by using certified reference materials. The results of this study showed that the Ni level was significantly higher in scalp hair and blood samples of oral cancer patients compared to controls (P < 0.01). The study suggested that exposure of Ni as a result of chewing different SLT products may be synergistic with risk factors associated with oral cancer.

  16. [Physiotherapy of cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Gomez, Izabella; Szekanecz, Éva; Szekanecz, Zoltán; Bender, Tamás

    2016-07-01

    Physiotherapy of cancer patients is one of the most controversial issues in our country. Malignant diseases are firstly mentioned as a contraindication of physiotherapy. Until now, physiotherapy was not suggested (or only in limited accessibility) for those patients who had malignant disease in medical history. International medical practice was less restrictive in managing this topic. The development of imaging techniques put this question in a new light. On the basis of evidence, the majority of articles have reported beneficial effects of physiotherapy in cancer patients, and only few articles mentioned it as harmful. Of course, each patient requires an individual assessment, however, if we exclude the possibility of tumor recurrence and metastasis, most of physiotherapy procedures can be used safely. One of the aims of this review is to support the physicians' decisions when to prescribe treatments, in such a way, that more patients could receive physiotherapy. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(31), 1224-1231.

  17. Impact of the pretreatment Glasgow prognostic score on treatment tolerance, toxicities, and survival in patients with advanced head and neck cancer undergoing concurrent chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Chang, Pei-Hung; Yeh, Kun-Yun; Wang, Cheng-Hsu; Chen, Eric Yen-Chao; Yang, Shih-Wei; Huang, Jen-Seng; Chou, Wen-Chi; Hsieh, Jason Chia-Hsun

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of the pretreatment Glasgow prognostic score on treatment-related toxicities, tolerance, and survival in patients with advanced head and neck cancers undergoing concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT). We retrospectively analyzed and compared the clinical characteristics, toxicities, and survival of 143 patients with stages III, IVA, and IVB head and neck cancer treated with concurrent CRT according to their Glasgow prognostic score between 2007 and 2010. The Glasgow prognostic score was correlated with advanced tumor stage and T/N classification. Patients with a higher Glasgow prognostic score were less likely to tolerate concurrent CRT, experienced more weight loss, required tube feeding support more frequently, and had higher percentage of grade ≥3 hematological toxicities, sepsis, and toxic death. Patients with a Glasgow prognostic score of 0 had better overall and recurrence-free survival than those with a Glasgow prognostic score of 1 or 2. Pretreatment Glasgow prognostic score predicts treatment tolerance, toxicity, and survival in patients with advanced head and neck cancer undergoing concurrent CRT. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. A literature review on the mutual impact of the spousal caregiver-cancer patients dyads: 'communication', 'reciprocal influence', and 'caregiver-patient congruence'.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiuping; Loke, Alice Yuen

    2014-02-01

    A diagnosis of cancer is the start of a journey of distress and adjustment for both the patient and his/her spouse. However, the dyadic phenomena are less conceptualised and related research is in the early stages. This review explores concepts of mutuality among spousal caregiver-cancer patient dyads and identifies directions for future research. A systematic search, including trawling through six electronic databases, a manual search, and an author search, was conducted to identity articles that had been published in English and Chinese from January 2000 to March 2013, using key terms related to caregiver-patients dyads in cancer care. An inductive content analysis approach was adopted to analyse and synthesise the concepts of spousal caregiver-cancer patient dyads. Thirty-one articles were identified. The findings are described according to Fletcher et al.'s proposals for conceptualising spousal caregiver-patient dyads. The proposed concepts of 'communication', 'reciprocal influence', and 'caregiver-patient congruence' have been found to be interrelated, and to contribute to the spousal caregiver-patient dyads' mutual appraisal of caregiving and role adjustment through the cancer trajectory. The findings highlight the importance of a perspective that focuses on the nature of the relationship between couples coping with cancer and the quality of their communication with each other. It is recognised that communication may act as a fundamental element of the abovementioned three concepts. Better communication between couples would probably facilitate reciprocal influence and caregiver-patient congruence, which in turn would have a positive effect on intimacy between the couple and improve the caregiving outcomes. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. [Impact of stages of axillary lymph nodes and pathological response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy on the survival of breast cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenyan; Zhang, Bailin; Xu, Xiaozhou; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Pin; Wang, Xiang

    2015-03-01

    To analyze the relevance between lymph node status and pathological response after neoadjuvant chemotherapy and survival in breast cancer patients. The clinicopathological data of 653 needle biopsy proved breast cancer patients, who underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy and surgery in our hospital from July 1998 to April 2012, were retrospective analyzed. The median follow up time was 59.3 months. The 653 cases were classified into ypN0 (242 cases), ypN1 (182 cases), ypN2 (135 cases), and ypN3 (94 cases) stages, and the 5-year overall survival rates in the four groups were 93.4%, 93.4%, 87.4%, and 83.0%, respectively. The Log rank test showed a significant difference in the overall survival rates between the ypN0, ypN1, ypN2 stages and ypN3 stage (P=0.046). No significant differences were observed between the disease free survival (DFS) rates in the four groups (P>0.05). Multivariate analysis indicated that the postoperative pathological response of metastatic lymph nodes was a major prognostic factor affecting the overall survival and disease-free survival (RR=1.051, P=0.007; RR=1.028, P=0.028). The stage and pathological response of axillary lymph nodes after neoadjuvant chemotherapy are effective indicators for predicting the OS and DFS in breast cancer patients.

  20. Impact of immunohistochemistry-based molecular subtype on chemosensitivity and survival in Hispanic breast cancer patients following neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Rodolfo; Ossa, Carlos Andrés; Montoya, María Elvira; Echeverri, Carolina; Ángel, Gonzalo; Ascuntar, Johana; Borrero, Mauricio; Gil, Mónica; Herrera, Sabrina; Gutiérrez, Eduardo; Herazo, Fernando; Jiménez, Alejo; Madrid, Jorge; Reyes, Pedro Alejandro; Zuluaga, Lina; García, Héctor

    2015-01-01

    Background Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) is the standard treatment for patients with locally advanced breast cancer, showing improvement in disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) rates in patients achieving pathological complete response (pCR). The relationship between immunohistochemistry-based molecular subtyping (IMS), chemo sensitivity and survival is currently a matter of interest. We explore this relationship in a Hispanic cohort of breast cancer patients treated with NAC. Methods A retrospective survival analysis was performed on Colombian females with breast cancer treated at Instituto de Cancerología-Clinica Las Américas between January 2009 and December 2011. Patients were classified according to immunohistochemistry-based subtyping into the following five groups: Luminal A, Luminal B, Luminal B/HER 2+, HER2-enriched, and triple-negative breast cancer. Demographic characteristics, recurrence pattern, and survival rate were reviewed by bivariate and multivariate analysis. Results A total of 328 patients fulfilled the study’s inclusion parameters and the distribution of subtypes were as follows: Luminal A: 73 (22.3%), Luminal B/HER2−: 110 (33.5%), Luminal B/HER2+: 75 (22.9%), HER2-enriched: 30 (9.1%), and triple-negative: 40 (12.2%). The median follow-up was 41 months (interquartile range: 31–52). Pathological response to NAC was as follows: complete pathological response (pCR) in 28 (8.5%) patients, partial 247 (75.3%); stable disease 47 (14.3%), and progression 6 (1.8%) patients. The presence of pCR had a significant DFS and OS in the entire group (p = 0.01) but subtypes had different DFS in Luminal B (p = 0.01) and triple negative (p = 0.02) and also OS in Luminal B (p = 0.01) and triple negative (p = 0.01). Conclusions pCR is associated with an improved overall survival and disease-free survival rates in this group of Hispanics patients. Advanced stages, Luminal B subtypes, triple-negative tumours and non-pCR showed lower DFS

  1. Dissociative symptomatology in cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Civilotti, Cristina; Castelli, Lorys; Binaschi, Luca; Cussino, Martina; Tesio, Valentina; Di Fini, Giulia; Veglia, Fabio; Torta, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The utilization of the post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) diagnostic spectrum is currently being debated to categorize psychological adjustment in cancer patients. The aims of this study were to: (1) evaluate the presence of cancer-related traumatic dissociative symptomatology in a sample of cancer patients; (2) examine the correlation of cancer-related dissociation and sociodemographic and medical variables, anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress symptomatology; (3) investigate the predictors of cancer-related dissociation. Methods: Ninety-two mixed cancer patients (mean age: 58.94, ds = 10.13) recruited from two hospitals in northern Italy were administered a questionnaire on sociodemographic and medical characteristics, the Karnofsky Scale to measure the level of patient activity and medical care requirements, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) to evaluate the presence of anxiety and depression, the Impact of Event Scale Revised (IES-R) to assess the severity of intrusion, avoidance, and hypervigilance, and the Peritraumatic Dissociative Experiences Questionnaire (PDEQ) to quantify the traumatic dissociative symptomatology. Results: 31.5% of participants report a PDEQ score above the cutoff. The results indicated that dissociative symptomatology was positively correlated with HADS scores (HADS-Anxiety: r = 0.476, p < 0.001; HADS-Depression: r = 0.364, p < 0.001) and with IES-R scores (IES-R-Intrusion: r = 0.698, p < 0.001; IES-R-Avoidance: r = 0.619, p < 0.001; IES-R- Hypervigilance: r = 0.681, p < 0.001). A stepwise regression analysis was performed in order to find the predictors of cancer-related traumatic dissociative symptomatology. The results converged on a three predictor model revealing that IES-R-Intrusion, IES-R-Avoidance, and IES-R-Hyperarousal accounted for 53.9% of the explained variance. Conclusion: These findings allow us to hypothesize a specific psychological reaction which may be ascribed to the traumatic

  2. Significant impact of biochemical recurrence on overall mortality in patients with high-risk prostate cancer after carbon-ion radiotherapy combined with androgen deprivation therapy.

    PubMed

    Kasuya, Goro; Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Nomiya, Takuma; Makishima, Hirokazu; Kamada, Tadashi; Akakura, Koichiro; Suzuki, Hiroyoshi; Shimazaki, Jun; Haruyama, Yasuo; Kobashi, Gen; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2016-10-15

    Whether biochemical recurrence (BR) is a significant predictive factor of mortality after definitive radiation therapy for prostate cancer remains unknown. The aim of the current study was to investigate the relation between BR and overall mortality (OAM) in high-risk prostate cancer patients who were treated with carbon-ion radiotherapy (CIRT) and had long-term follow-up in 2 prospective trials. In the 2 phase 2 clinical trials, which involved 466 prostate cancer patients who received 63.0 to 66.0 Gy of CIRT (relative biological effect) in 20 fractions between 2000 and 2007, 324 patients who were deemed to be at high risk on the basis of the modified D'Amico classification criteria and received CIRT along with androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) were examined. The OAM rate was adjusted for the ADT duration, and multivariate analyses using a Cox proportional hazards model were performed for OAM with BR as a time-dependent covariate. The median follow-up period was 107.4 months, and the 5- and 10-year OAM rates after adjustments for the ADT duration were 7.0% (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.0%-9.4%) and 23.9% (95% CI, 16.4%-26.2%), respectively. A multivariate analysis revealed that the presence of BR (hazard ratio, 2.82; 95% Cl, 1.57-5.08; P = .001) was one of the predictive factors for OAM. On the other hand, the duration of ADT had no impact on OAM. BR after CIRT combined with ADT is an independent predictive factor for OAM in high-risk prostate cancer patients. The results of this study could be applied to other high-dose radiation therapies. Cancer 2016;122:3225-31. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Cancer Society. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made. © 2016 The

  3. PREDOMOS study, impact of a social intervention program for socially isolated elderly cancer patients: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Crétel-Durand, Elodie; Nouguerède, Emilie; Le Caer, Hervé; Rousseau, Frédérique; Retornaz, Frédérique; Guillem, Olivier; Couderc, Anne-Laure; Greillier, Laurent; Norguet, Emmanuelle; Cécile, Maud; Boulahssass, Rabia; Le Caer, Francoise; Tournier, Sandrine; Butaud, Chantal; Guillet, Pierre; Nahon, Sophie; Poudens, Laure; Kirscher, Sylvie; Loubière, Sandrine; Diaz, Nadine; Dhorne, Jean; Auquier, Pascal; Baumstarck, Karine

    2017-04-12

    Cancer incidence and social isolation increase along with advanced age, and social isolation potentiates the relative risk of death by cancer. Once spotted, social isolation can be averted with the intervention of a multidisciplinary team. Techniques of automation and remote assistance have already demonstrated their positive impact on falls prevention and quality of life (QoL), though little is known about their impact on socially isolated elderly patients supported for cancer. The primary objective of the PREDOMOS study is to evaluate the impact of establishing a Program of Social intervention associated with techniques of Domotic and Remote assistance (PS-DR) on the improvement of QoL of elderly isolated patients, treated for locally advanced or metastatic cancer. The secondary objectives include treatment failure, tolerance, survival, and autonomy. This trial is a multicenter, prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, open-label, two-parallel group study. The setting is 10 French oncogeriatric centers. Inclusion criteria are patients aged at least 70 years with a social isolation risk and a histological diagnosis of cancer, locally advanced or metastatic disease. The groups are (1) the control group, receiving usual care; (2) the experimental group, receiving usual care associating with monthly social assistance, domotic, and remote assistance. Participants are randomized in a 1:1 allocation ratio. Evaluation times involve inclusion (randomization) and follow-up (12 months). The primary endpoint is QoL at 3 months (via European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ C30); secondary endpoints are social isolation, time to treatment failure, toxicity, dose response-intensity, survival, autonomy, and QoL at 6 months. For the sample size, 320 individuals are required to obtain 90% power to detect a 10-point difference (standard deviation 25) in QoL score between the two groups (20% loss to follow-up patients expected). The randomized

  4. Impact of Increasing Age on Cause-Specific Mortality and Morbidity in Patients With Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Competing Risks Analysis.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, Takashi; Bains, Sarina; Lee, Ming-Ching; Tan, Kay See; Hristov, Boris; Buitrago, Daniel H; Bains, Manjit S; Downey, Robert J; Huang, James; Isbell, James M; Park, Bernard J; Rusch, Valerie W; Jones, David R; Adusumilli, Prasad S

    2017-01-20

    Purpose To perform competing risks analysis and determine short- and long-term cancer- and noncancer-specific mortality and morbidity in patients who had undergone resection for stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods Of 5,371 consecutive patients who had undergone curative-intent resection of primary lung cancer at our institution (2000 to 2011), 2,186 with pathologic stage I NSCLC were included in the analysis. All preoperative clinical variables known to affect outcomes were included in the analysis, specifically, Charlson comorbidity index, predicted postoperative (ppo) diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide, and ppo forced expiratory volume in 1 second. Cause-specific mortality analysis was performed with competing risks analysis. Results Of 2,186 patients, 1,532 (70.1%) were ≥ 65 years of age, including 638 (29.2%) ≥ 75 years of age. In patients < 65, 65 to 74, and ≥ 75 years of age, 5-year lung cancer-specific cumulative incidence of death (CID) was 7.5%, 10.7%, and 13.2%, respectively (overall, 10.4%); noncancer-specific CID was 1.8%, 4.9%, and 9.0%, respectively (overall, 5.3%). In patients ≥ 65 years of age, for up to 2.5 years after resection, noncancer-specific CID was higher than lung cancer-specific CID; the higher noncancer-specific, early-phase mortality was enhanced in patients ≥ 75 years of age than in those 65 to 74 years of age. Multivariable analysis showed that low ppo diffusing capacity of lung for carbon monoxide was an independent predictor of severe morbidity ( P < .001), 1-year mortality ( P < .001), and noncancer-specific mortality ( P < .001), whereas low ppo forced expiratory volume in 1 second was an independent predictor of lung cancer-specific mortality ( P = .002). Conclusion In patients who undergo curative-intent resection of stage I NSCLC, noncancer-specific mortality is a significant competing event, with an increasing impact as patient age increases.

  5. Early impact of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act on insurance among young adults with cancer: Analysis of the dependent insurance provision.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Helen M; Schmidt, Susanne; Tenner, Laura L; Bang, Heejung; Keegan, Theresa H M

    2016-06-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) included provisions to extend dependent health care coverage up to the age of 26 years in 2010. The authors examined the early impact of the ACA (before the implementation of insurance exchanges in 2014) on insurance rates in young adults with cancer, a historically underinsured group. Using National Cancer Institute Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data for 18 cancer registries, the authors examined insurance rates before (pre) (January 2007-September 2010) versus after (post) (October 2010-December 2012) dependent insurance provisions among young adults aged 18 to 29 years when diagnosed with cancer during 2007 through 2012. Using multivariate generalized mixed effect models, the authors conducted difference-in-differences analysis to examine changes in overall and Medicaid insurance after the ACA among young adults who were eligible (those aged 18-25 years) and ineligible (those aged 26-29 years) for policy changes. Among 39,632 young adult cancer survivors, the authors found an increase in overall insurance rates in those aged 18 to 25 years after the dependent provisions (83.5% for pre-ACA vs 85.4% for post-ACA; P<.01), but not among individuals aged 26 to 29 years (83.4% for pre-ACA vs 82.9% for post-ACA; P = .38). After adjusting for patient sociodemographics and cancer characteristics, the authors found that those aged 18 to 25 years had a 3.1% increase in being insured compared with individuals aged 26 to 29 years (P<.01); however, there were no significant changes noted in Medicaid enrollment (P = .17). The findings of the current study identify an increase in insurance rates for young adults aged 18 to 25 years compared with those aged 26 to 29 years (1.9% vs -0.5%) that was not due to increases in Medicaid enrollment, thereby demonstrating a positive impact of the ACA dependent care provisions on insurance rates in this population. Cancer 2016;122:1766-73. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  6. Benefit of Adjuvant Brachytherapy Versus External Beam Radiation for Early Breast Cancer: Impact of Patient Stratification on Breast Preservation

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Grace L.; Jiang, Jing; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Xu, Ying; Hoffman, Karen E.; Giordano, Sharon H.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Smith, Benjamin D.

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: Brachytherapy after lumpectomy is an increasingly popular breast cancer treatment, but data concerning its effectiveness are conflicting. Recently proposed “suitability” criteria guiding patient selection for brachytherapy have never been empirically validated. Methods: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results–Medicare linked database, we compared women aged 66 years or older with invasive breast cancer (n=28,718) or ductal carcinoma in situ (n=7229) diagnosed from 2002 to 2007, treated with lumpectomy alone, brachytherapy, or external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). The likelihood of breast preservation, measured by subsequent mastectomy risk, was compared by use of multivariate proportional hazards, further stratified by American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) brachytherapy suitability groups. We compared 1-year postoperative complications using the χ{sup 2} test and 5-year local toxicities using the log-rank test. Results: For patients with invasive cancer, the 5-year subsequent mastectomy risk was 4.7% after lumpectomy alone (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.1%-5.4%), 2.8% after brachytherapy (95% CI, 1.8%-4.3%), and 1.3% after EBRT (95% CI, 1.1%-1.5%) (P<.001). Compared with lumpectomy alone, brachytherapy achieved a more modest reduction in adjusted risk (hazard ratio [HR], 0.61; 95% CI, 0.40-0.94) than achieved with EBRT (HR, 0.22; 95% CI, 0.18-0.28). Relative risks did not differ when stratified by ASTRO suitability group (P=.84 for interaction), although ASTRO “suitable” patients did show a low absolute subsequent mastectomy risk, with a minimal absolute difference in risk after brachytherapy (1.6%; 95% CI, 0.7%-3.5%) versus EBRT (0.8%; 95% CI, 0.6%-1.1%). For patients with ductal carcinoma in situ, EBRT maintained a reduced risk of subsequent mastectomy (HR, 0.40; 95% CI, 0.28-0.55; P<.001), whereas the small number of patients treated with brachytherapy (n=179) precluded definitive comparison with lumpectomy alone

  7. Prognostic impact of Ki-67 in patients with gastric cancer-the importance of depth of invasion and histologic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ko, Gyung Hyuck; Go, Se-Il; Lee, Won Sup; Lee, Jeong-Hee; Jeong, Sang-Ho; Lee, Young-Joon; Hong, Soon Chan; Ha, Woo Song

    2017-06-01

    Ki-67 protein is a cellular marker for proliferation. The role of Ki-67 as a prognostic biomarker has not been established in gastric cancer. The present study was performed to investigate the significance of Ki-67 expression as a biomarker in early gastric cancer (EGC).With tissue microarray for 320 patients with gastric cancer, we performed immunohistochemical staining for Ki-67. Its clinical significance was analyzed with adjustment via the propensity score-matching. For validation, we performed bootstrap resampling.The median follow-up duration was 72 months (range: 3-120 months). Ki-67-high group showed worse prognosis than Ki-67-low group in EGC (5-YSR, 78.9% vs 92.0%, P  =  .018), but not in advanced gastric cancer (AGC) (5-YSR, 58.5% vs 59.2%, P  =  .951). Interestingly, in the patients with well-differentiated histology, prognosis for Ki-67-high group was considerably worse than that for Ki-67-low group (5-YSR, 67.0% vs 94.4%, P  =  .012), but not in those with moderately differentiated (P  =  .504) and poorly differentiated histology (P  =  .905). In this cohort, there was a strong correlation between the proportion of EGC and well-differentiated histology (r  =  0.215, P  =  .002). Multivariate analysis also revealed that the high-Ki-67 expression serves as a poor prognostic factor in EGC (HR 4.346, 95% CI 1.397-13.515, P  =  .011), especially in the well-differentiated histology, but not in all the patients (P  =  .171). Bootstrap resampling internally validated this result (P  =  .011).This study suggests that Ki-67 expression may be a good biomarker for prognosis prediction for EGC with well-differentiated histologic type.

  8. An Observational Research Study to Evaluate the Impact of Breakthrough Cancer Pain on the Daily Lives and Functional Status of Patients.

    PubMed

    Twomey, F; O'Brien, T; O'Reilly, M; Bogan, C; Fleming, J

    2015-06-01

    Breakthrough cancer pain (BTcP) is common, resulting in significant physical and psychosocial morbidity. We assessed the impact of BTcP on 81 cancer patients attending Irish specialist palliative care services. BTcP occurred up to twice daily in 24 (30%) and 3-4 times daily in 57 (70%) of cases. Median scores for the 'worst' and 'least' pains in the previous 24 hours were 7 and 2/10 respectively. Pain lasted < 15 minutes in 19 (23.5%), 15-30 minutes in 25 (30.8%), 30-60 minutes in 18 (22.2%) and > 60 minutes in 19 (23.5%) of patients. BTcP had a negative impact on general activity, mood, walking ability, work, relations with others, sleep and overall enjoyment of life. BTcP increased anxiety, depression, anger, isolation, financial difficulties and an inability to undergo cancer treatments. Systematic assessment of BTcP should form an integral part of every oncology/palliative medicine assessment. Once identified, BTcP should be managed assiduously.

  9. Malnutrition in Patients With Cancer.

    PubMed

    Gyan, Emmanuel; Raynard, Bruno; Durand, Jean-Philippe; Lacau Saint Guily, Jean; Gouy, Sébastien; Movschin, Marie Lespiau; Khemissa, Faiza; Flori, Nicolas; Oziel-Taieb, Sandrine; Bannier Braticevic, Cécile; Zeanandin, Gilbert; Hebert, Christophe; Savinelli, Francesco; Goldwasser, François; Hébuterne, Xavier

    2017-01-01

    Malnutrition is a critical predictor of toxicity and outcome in patients with cancer and may be perceived differently by patients, relatives, and physicians. To assess the prevalence of malnutrition in oncology departments and to compare it with the perceptions of nutrition status by patients themselves, their closest relatives, and attending physicians. A 1-day multicentric cross-sectional survey on the prevalence of malnutrition was conducted in different oncology departments using patient-, relative-, and physician-specific questionnaires. Malnutrition was defined by a weight loss ≥5% within 1 month or ≥10% within 6 months, a body mass index ≤18.5 kg/m(2) in patients aged <70 years or ≤21 kg/m(2) in patients aged ≥70 years, and/or albuminemia <35 g/L. Questionnaires for assessing medical condition, knowledge of nutrition status, and perceptions of the impact of malnutrition on daily life were distributed to consenting patients, attending physicians, and closest relatives. A total of 2197 patients were included, and 2071 and 976 questionnaires were collected from patients and relatives, respectively. Prevalence of malnutrition was 39%. Physicians overestimated malnutrition (44%), whereas patients and relatives underestimated it (22% and 23%, respectively, P < .001). Conversely, malnutrition-associated symptoms were underestimated by physicians compared with patients and relatives. We found a prevalence of malnutrition of 39%: it was underestimated by patients and relatives and overestimated by physicians.

  10. Impact of RASSF1A gene methylation on the metastatic axillary nodal status in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Jezkova, Eva; Zubor, Pavol; Kajo, Karol; Grendar, Marian; Dokus, Karol; Adamkov, Marian; Lasabova, Zora; Plank, Lukas; Danko, Jan

    2017-07-01

    Hypermethylation of CpG islands is a hallmark of cancer and occurs at an early stage in breast tumorigenesis. To gain insight into the epigenetic switches that may promote and/or contribute to the initial neoplastic events during breast carcinogenesis, the present study focused on the DNA methylation profile of invasive breast carcinoma. The aim of the study was to evaluate the prognostic significance of Ras association domain family 1 isoform A (RASSF1A) promoter methylation status in operable breast cancer, and to analyze the utility of this biomarker regarding its association with metastatic and nonmetastatic axillary nodal status. For this purpose, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue specimens from 116 breast cancer patients with known axillary nodal status were subjected to assessment of RASSF1A promoter methylation status by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP) and methylation-sensitive high-resolution melting assay, and the results were subsequently validated by bisulfite sequencing. A multinomial logistic regression model was used to model the dependence of distinct levels of methylation status of the RASSF1A promoter on the nodal status. Promoter region CpG hypermethylation was identified by MSP in 97 (83.6%) of 116 primary breast tumors, while hypermethylation of RASSF1A was confirmed by MS-HRM in 107 (92.2%) of 116 cases of breast cancer. Based on the results of the multinomial logistic regression model, there was no significant difference between the frequency of RASSF1A promoter methylation and axillary lymph node status of patients in general. However, upon adjustment of pN stage, an association was identified between pN0 lymph node-negative status (without axillary metastases) and percentage of RASSF1A methylation in two groups of heterogeneous methylated alleles with ≤50% methylated (P<0.05) and >50% methylated alleles (P<0.0001). If a patients' nodal status changes from pN- to pN+ then the risk of having >50% methylated

  11. Impact of RASSF1A gene methylation on the metastatic axillary nodal status in breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Jezkova, Eva; Zubor, Pavol; Kajo, Karol; Grendar, Marian; Dokus, Karol; Adamkov, Marian; Lasabova, Zora; Plank, Lukas; Danko, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Hypermethylation of CpG islands is a hallmark of cancer and occurs at an early stage in breast tumorigenesis. To gain insight into the epigenetic switches that may promote and/or contribute to the initial neoplastic events during breast carcinogenesis, the present study focused on the DNA methylation profile of invasive breast carcinoma. The aim of the study was to evaluate the prognostic significance of Ras association domain family 1 isoform A (RASSF1A) promoter methylation status in operable breast cancer, and to analyze the utility of this biomarker regarding its association with metastatic and nonmetastatic axillary nodal status. For this purpose, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue specimens from 116 breast cancer patients with known axillary nodal status were subjected to assessment of RASSF1A promoter methylation status by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP) and methylation-sensitive high-resolution melting assay, and the results were subsequently validated by bisulfite sequencing. A multinomial logistic regression model was used to model the dependence of distinct levels of methylation status of the RASSF1A promoter on the nodal status. Promoter region CpG hypermethylation was identified by MSP in 97 (83.6%) of 116 primary breast tumors, while hypermethylation of RASSF1A was confirmed by MS-HRM in 107 (92.2%) of 116 cases of breast cancer. Based on the results of the multinomial logistic regression model, there was no significant difference between the frequency of RASSF1A promoter methylation and axillary lymph node status of patients in general. However, upon adjustment of pN stage, an association was identified between pN0 lymph node-negative status (without axillary metastases) and percentage of RASSF1A methylation in two groups of heterogeneous methylated alleles with ≤50% methylated (P<0.05) and >50% methylated alleles (P<0.0001). If a patients' nodal status changes from pN- to pN+ then the risk of having >50% methylated

  12. Prognostic impact of education level of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer enrolled in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Di Maio, Massimo; Signoriello, Simona; Morabito, Alessandro; Rossi, Antonio; Maione, Paolo; Piantedosi, Francovito; Bilancia, Domenico; Cigolari, Silvio; Barbera, Santi; Gebbia, Vittorio; Daniele, Bruno; Robbiati, Sergio Federico; Illiano, Alfonso; Ceribelli, Anna; Carrozza, Francesco; Favaretto, Adolfo; Piazza, Elena; Piccirillo, Maria Carmela; Daniele, Gennaro; Giordano, Pasqualina; Costanzo, Raffaele; Sandomenico, Claudia; Rocco, Gaetano; Gallo, Ciro; Perrone, Francesco; Gridelli, Cesare

    2012-06-01

    Socioeconomic status can potentially affect prognosis of cancer patients. Our aim was to describe potential differences in demographic and clinical characteristics, treatment, and survival by education level in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) enrolled in clinical trials of first-line treatment. Individual data of Italian patients with advanced NSCLC (stage IV, or IIIB with supraclavicular nodes or malignant pleural effusion), ECOG performance status (PS) 0-2, enrolled in four phase III randomized trials conducted between 1996 and 2005 were pooled. Information about education was available for 1680 of 1709 patients (98.3%). Patients were divided in two groups according to education level: high (patients with at least high school diploma) or low (those with less than high school diploma). Survival analyses were stratified by treatment arm within trial. There were 312 (19%) and 1368 (81%) patients with high and low education, respectively. Education level was significantly different among birth cohorts, with a time-trend toward higher education level. Patients with high education were significantly younger (median age 65 vs. 70), were less frequently unfit at diagnosis (ECOG PS2 5% vs. 16%), and their tumor type was more frequently adenocarcinoma (47% vs. 37%). Number of treatment cycles received was not significantly different between education groups. Median survival was 9.4 and 7.6 months in high and low education, respectively (p=0.012). At multivariable analysis, female sex, better PS and high education level (Hazard Ratio 0.85, 95%CI 0.73-0.99, p=0.03) were independently associated with longer survival. In Italian patients enrolled in four randomized trials of first-line chemotherapy for advanced NSCLC, high education was significantly more frequent among younger patients, and was associated with lower proportion of PS2 patients. Education level did not significantly affect number of chemotherapy cycles received. Overall survival was

  13. The impact of perceived stage of cancer on carers' anxiety and depression during the patients' final year of life.

    PubMed

    Burridge, Letitia H; Barnett, Adrian G; Clavarino, Alexandra M

    2009-06-01

    This paper explores the effects of perceived stage of cancer (PSOC) on carers' anxiety and depression during the patients' final year. A consecutive sample of patients and carers (N=98) were surveyed at regular intervals regarding PSOC, and anxiety and depression using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Means were compared by gender using the Mann-Whitney U-test. The chi-square was used to analyse categorical data. Agreement between carers' and patients' PSOC was estimated using kappa statistics. Correlations between carers' PSOC and their anxiety and depression were calculated using the Spearman's rank correlation. Over time, an increasing proportion of carers reported that the cancer was advanced, culminating at 43% near death. Agreement regarding PSOC was fair (kappa=0.29-0.34) until near death (kappa=0.21). Carers' anxiety increased over the year; depression increased in the final 6 months. Females were more anxious (p=0.049, 6 months; p=0.009, 3 months) than males, and more depressed until 1 month to death. The proportion of carers reporting moderate-severe anxiety almost doubled over the year to 27%, with more females in this category at 6 months (p=0.05). Carers with moderate-severe depression increased from 6 to 15% over the year. Increased PSOC was weakly correlated with increased anxiety and depression. Carers' anxiety exceeded depression in severity during advanced cancer. Females generally experienced greater anxiety and depression. Carers were more realistic than patients regarding the ultimate outcome, which was reflected in their declining mental health, particularly near the end.

  14. The impact of FDG-PET/CT in the management of patients with vulvar and vaginal cancer.

    PubMed

    Robertson, N L; Hricak, H; Sonoda, Y; Sosa, R E; Benz, M; Lyons, G; Abu-Rustum, N R; Sala, E; Vargas, H A

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the changes in prognostic impression and patient management following PET/CT in patients with vulvar and vaginal carcinoma; and to compare PET/CT findings with those of conventional imaging modalities. We summarized prospectively and retrospectively collected data for 50 consecutive patients from our institution that enrolled in the National Oncologic PET Registry and underwent FDG-PET/CT for a suspected or known primary or recurrent vulvar/vaginal cancer. 54/83 (65%) studies included had a diagnosis of vulvar cancer, and the remaining 29/83 (35%), a diagnosis of vaginal cancer. Following FDG-PET/CT, the physician's prognostic impression changed in 51% of cases. A change in patient management, defined as a change to/from a non-interventional strategy (observation or additional imaging), to/from an interventional strategy (biopsy or treatment), was documented in 36% of studies. The electronic records demonstrated that 95% of the management strategies recorded in the physician questionnaires were implemented as planned. MRI and/or CT were performed within one month of the FDG-PET/CT in 20/83 (24%) and 28/83 (34%) cases, respectively. FDG-PET/CT detected nodes suspicious for metastases on 29/83 (35%) studies performed. MRI and CT detected positive nodes on 6 and 11 studies respectively. Distant metastases were identified in 10 cases imaged with FDG-PET and 5 cases that had additional conventional CT imaging. All suspicious lesions seen on CT were positively identified on PET/CT. In 4 cases, an abnormality identified on PET/CT, was not seen on diagnostic CT. FDG-PET/CT may play an important role in the management of vulvar and vaginal carcinoma. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The incidence of trismus and long-term impact on health-related quality of life in patients with head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Pauli, Nina; Johnson, Joakim; Finizia, Caterina; Andréll, Paulin

    2013-08-01

    Trismus is a common symptom related to the treatment of head and neck (H&N) cancer. To date there are few prospective studies regarding the incidence of trismus and the patients' experience of trismus in daily life activities. The aim of the study was to assess the incidence of trismus in H&N cancer patients and the impact on health-related quality of life (HRQL), by evaluating the patients before and after oncological treatment. We used the criteria for trismus of maximum interincisal opening (MIO) ≤ 35 mm and measured the patients at several occasions before and after treatment during one year. The patients answered the HRQL questionnaires EORTC QLQ C30, EORTC QLQ H&N 35, Gothenburg Trismus Questionnaire (GTQ) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). The incidence of trismus was 9% pre-treatment and 28% at the one-year follow-up post-treatment. The highest incidence, 38%, was found six months post-treatment. Patients with tumours of the tonsils were most prone to develop trismus. Patients with trismus reported greater HRQL impairments with regard to the GTQ domains; mouth opening (p < 0.001), jaw-related problems (p < 0.05), eating limitations (p < 0.05) and muscular tension (p < 0.001) six months post-treatment. EORTC QLQ H&N 35 scores indicated clinically significantly more problems with dry mouth, swallowing and pain for patients with trismus, 6-12 months post-treatment. Furthermore, all patients reported pain, anxiety and depression pre- and post-treatment. The incidence of trismus in patients with H&N cancer is non-negligible. Trismus severely impairs HRQL and negatively affects daily life activities in patients with H&N cancer. Further studies regarding symptomatic treatment of patients with trismus are highly warranted. The symptom-specific questionnaire GTQ is useful to identify the problems in this group of patients given it is responsive to showing change over time.

  16. Impact of the Cancer Risk Intake System on Patient-Clinician Discussions of Tamoxifen, Genetic Counseling, and Colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sugg Skinner, Celette; Rawl, Susan M; Moser, Barry K; Buchanan, Adam H; Scott, Linda L; Champion, Victoria L; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Parmigiani, Giovanni; Clark, Shelly; Lobach, David F; Bastian, Lori A

    2005-01-01

    The Cancer Risk Intake System (CRIS), a computerized program that “matches” objective cancer risks to appropriate risk management recommendations, was designed to facilitate patient-clinician discussion. We evaluated CRIS in primary care settings via a single-group, self-report, pretest-posttest design. Participants completed baseline telephone surveys, used CRIS during clinic visits, and completed follow-up surveys 1 to 2 months postvisit. Compared with proportions reporting having had discussions at baseline, significantly greater proportions of participants reported having discussed tamoxifen, genetic counseling, and colonoscopy, as appropriate, after using CRIS. Most (79%) reported CRIS had “caused” their discussion. CRIS is an easily used, disseminable program that showed promising results in primary care settings. PMID:15857495

  17. Acute impact of home parenteral nutrition in patients with late-stage cancer on family caregivers: preliminary data.

    PubMed

    Santarpia, Lidia; Bozzetti, Federico

    2017-09-18

    Since there is no information regarding quality of life of caregivers assisting patients with advanced malignancy on home parenteral nutrition, herewith we report a preliminary series of 19 patients who received total parenteral nutrition at home under the strict supervision of their relatives. The relatives of 19 incurable patients with cancer-related cachexia, discharged from the hospital with a home parenteral nutrition program, were prospectively studied. They filled out a validated questionnaire, the Family Strain Questionnaire Short Form, prior to patient discharge and after 2 weeks of home care. The questionnaire included 30 items, which explored different domains regarding the superimposed burden on caregivers in relation to the assistance given to their relatives. Our findings show that the basal level of strain was relatively high (about three quarters of positive answers) but did not increase after 2 weeks of home care. Similarly, there was no difference in the nutritional status and quality of life of the patients. Eight patients and their relatives could be also analyzed after 2 months and the results maintained unchanged. This preliminary investigation shows that home parenteral nutrition does not exacerbate the level of strain on caregivers involved in surveillance of such a supportive intervention. It is possible that the perception of an active contribution to the benefit of patients, who maintained unchanged their nutritional status and quality of life, could gratify caregivers despite the objective burden in the constant supervision of administering Parenteral Nutrition.

  18. Impact of Glycemic Control and Metformin Use on the Recurrence and Progression of Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the potential relationships of glycemic control and use of metformin with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer characteristics. We reviewed data from 645 patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer between January 2004 and May 2015. We analyzed the association of pre and post-operative glycemic control and use of metformin with clinical characteristics of bladder tumors. We also analyzed the association of glycemic control and use of metformin with recurrence-free and progression-free survivals. Diabetes mellitus patients showed decreased recurrence-free survival (hazard ratio 1.42; 95% confidence interval 1.1–1.9; P = 0.021) and progression-free survival (hazard ratio 1.79; 95% confidence interval 1.1–2.8; P = 0.013). Diabetes mellitus patients with a HbA1c ≥ 7.0% demonstrated a higher rate of progression (P = 0.026). Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that progression-free survival rate was associated with poor baseline glycemic control (P = 0.026) and post-operative glycemic control (P = 0.025). However, use of metformin had no impact on the recurrence (P = 1.00) and progression (P = 0.282). In conclusion, poor baseline and post-operative glycemic control was related with shorter progression-free survival of patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer. Use of metformin had no impact on the recurrence and progression. Therefore, tight glycemic control and close follow-up for bladder tumor may be beneficial in patients with poor glycemic control. PMID:27510392

  19. Spatial organization of dendritic cells within tumor draining lymph nodes impacts clinical outcome in breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dendritic cells (DCs) are important mediators of anti-tumor immune responses. We hypothesized that an in-depth analysis of dendritic cells and their spatial relationships to each other as well as to other immune cells within tumor draining lymph nodes (TDLNs) could provide a better understanding of immune function and dysregulation in cancer. Methods We analyzed immune cells within TDLNs from 59 breast cancer patients with at least 5 years of clinical follow-up using immunohistochemical staining with a novel quantitative image analysis system. We developed algorithms to analyze spatial distribution patterns of immune cells in cancer versus healthy intra-mammary lymph nodes (HLNs) to derive information about possible mechanisms underlying immune-dysregulation in breast cancer. We used the non-parametric Mann–Whitney test for inter-group comparisons, Wilcoxon Matched-Pairs Signed Ranks test for intra-group comparisons and log-rank (Mantel-Cox) test for Kaplan Maier analyses. Results Degree of clustering of DCs (in terms of spatial proximity of the cells to each other) was reduced in TDLNs compared to HLNs. While there were more numerous DC clusters in TDLNs compared to HLNs,DC clusters within TDLNs tended to have fewer member DCs and also consisted of fewer cells displaying the DC maturity marker CD83. The average number of T cells within a standardized radius of a clustered DC was increased compared to that of an unclustered DC, suggesting that DC clustering was associated with T cell interaction. Furthermore, the number of T cells within the radius of a clustered DC was reduced in tumor-positive TDLNs compared to HLNs. Importantly, clinical outcome analysis revealed that DC clustering in tumor-positive TDLNs correlated with the duration of disease-free survival in breast cancer patients. Conclusions These findings are the first to describe the spatial organization of DCs within TDLNs and their association with survival outcome. In addition, we

  20. The impact of language barriers and immigration status on the care experience for Spanish-speaking caregivers of patients with pediatric cancer.

    PubMed

    Zamora, Eduardo R; Kaul, Sapna; Kirchhoff, Anne C; Gwilliam, Vannina; Jimenez, Ornella A; Morreall, Deborah K; Montenegro, Roberto E; Kinney, Anita Y; Fluchel, Mark N

    2016-12-01

    An increasing proportion of pediatric cancer patients in the United States are Latino and many have Spanish-speaking immigrant parents with limited English proficiency (LEP). Little is known about how language or undocumented immigration status impacts their care experience. A cross-sectional survey was administered to English (N = 310) and Spanish-speaking LEP (N = 56) caregivers of pediatric cancer patients. To assess differences in healthcare experiences between the language groups, t-tests and chi-square statistics were used. Multivariable logistic regression evaluated associations between primary language and knowledge of clinical trial status. Spanish-speaking caregivers were more likely to report higher rates of quitting or changing jobs as a direct result of their child's cancer, and their children were more likely to experience a delay in education. Although Spanish-speaking caregivers reported higher satisfaction with care, 32% reported feeling that their child would have received better care if English was their primary language. Spanish-speaking caregivers were more likely to incorrectly identify whether their child was on a clinical trial compared with English-speaking caregivers. The majority of Spanish-speaking caregivers reported at least one undocumented caregiver in the household and 11% of them avoided or delayed medical care for their child due to concerns over their undocumented immigration status. Language barriers and undocumented immigration status may negatively impact the quality of informed decision-making and the care experience for Spanish-speaking LEP caregivers of pediatric cancer patients. These families may benefit from culturally appropriate Spanish language resources to improve communication and open a dialogue regarding undocumented immigration status. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. A prospective longitudinal study comparing the impact of external radiation therapy with radical prostatectomy on health related quality of life (HRQOL) in prostate cancer patients.

    PubMed

    van Andel, G; Visser, A P; Zwinderman, A H; Hulshof, M C C M; Horenblas, S; Kurth, K H

    2004-03-01

    The objective of the present study is to compare the impact on the general and disease-specific health related quality of life (HRQOL) of external radiation therapy (ERT) with radical prostatectomy (RP) in patients with localized prostate cancer, and to explore which factors, and to what extent, contribute to the assessed changes in HRQOL. One hundred and thirty eight patients participated in this prospective longitudinal study. They completed before treatment (T0) and after 12 months (T1) a questionnaire constructed of validated instruments, measuring HRQOL and several psychosocial factors (PF). Among other things, multiple regression analyses including all baseline characteristics, HRQOL and PF were executed in order to meet the objectives. RP patients showed significantly more improvement in their emotional function, while they reported more incontinence and a worse sexual function. There was significantly more improvement in the overall HRQOL of ERT patients, while the changes in the gastrointestinal function of these patients were significantly worse. Only the differences with respect to incontinence can be attributed to the treatment itself. Almost all HRQOL change scores are primarily influenced by their own baseline score. The influence of other factors, like age, socioeconomic status, and several PF, is limited. The impact on HRQOL of ERT is similar to that of RP, except for incontinence. RP patients suffer more from incontinence than ERT patients. Changes in the assessed HRQOL are mainly influenced by the pre-treatment HRQOL scores. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Rehabilitation of cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Pandey, M; Thomas, B C

    2001-01-01

    With the developments in cancer treatment, more and more patients are surviving their disease. However, very little emphasis is being placed to rehabilitate these cancer survivors. Ignorance, social structure, stigma attached in seeking psychological help, and poor communication skills of oncology staff all contribute to poor rehabilitative efforts. The priority of governmental agencies and health efforts to fight rampant communicable diseases, malnutrition, maternal health, and the frequent natural calamities, puts rehabilitation movements in the back seat. Treatment and prevention of disability and its rehabilitation requires comprehensive and multidisciplinary approach. There is an urgent need to promote physical and psychological rehabilitation.

  3. Impact of Symptom Clusters on Quality of Life Outcomes in Patients from Japan with Advanced Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Hamada, Tamami; Komatsu, Hiroko; Rosenzweig, Margaret Quinn; Chohnabayashi, Naohiko; Nishimura, Naoki; Oizumi, Satoshi; Ren, Dianxu

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Identify symptom clusters based on symptoms experienced by patients with advanced nonsmall cell lung cancers (NSCLCs), and examine the relationship between the symptom clusters and impairment in everyday life and quality of life (QOL). Methods: Using the M.D. Anderson Symptom Inventory, 9 symptom items and the QOL Questionnaire (QLQ-C-30) evaluation apparatus from the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, we evaluated symptom severity, interference in daily life, and QOL. Factor analysis and multiple regression analysis techniques were used. Results: Sixty patients with advanced NSCLCs seen in pulmonary medicine departments were included in the study. The average age of patients was 64.33 (standard deviation = 11.40). Thirty-six were male and 24 were female. Three symptom clusters were identified as fatigue/anorexia cluster (dry mouth, altered the sense of taste, drowsiness, fatigue/tiredness, and lack of appetite), pain cluster (anxiety, sadness, and pain), numbness cluster (numbness, leg weakness, and distress). The pain cluster had the strongest influence (adjusted R2 = 0.355) on daily life (emotions) while the numbness cluster most strongly affected walking. The fatigue/anorexia cluster explained 22.7% of role function variance. This symptom clustering may be unique among patients with advanced NSCLCs. Conclusions: Each of these clusters affected QOL and everyday life with varying degrees of influence. In clinical screening assessments, focusing on symptom clusters could provide tailored management strategies for patients with advanced NSCLCs. These care strategies may improve outcomes specifically for advanced NSCLCs patients. PMID:28083555

  4. Impact of pulmonary rehabilitation on postoperative complications in patients with lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Saito, Hajime; Hatakeyama, Kazutoshi; Konno, Hayato; Matsunaga, Toshiki; Shimada, Yoichi; Minamiya, Yoshihiro

    2017-09-01

    Given the extent of the surgical indications for pulmonary lobectomy in breathless patients, preoperative care and evaluation of pulmonary function are increasingly necessary. The aim of this study was to assess the contribution of preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) for reducing the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The records of 116 patients with COPD, including 51 patients who received PR, were retrospectively analyzed. Pulmonary function testing, including slow vital capacity (VC) and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1 ), was obtained preoperatively, after PR, and at one and six months postoperatively. The recovery rate of postoperative pulmonary function was standardized for functional loss associated with the different resected lung volumes. Propensity score analysis generated matched pairs of 31 patients divided into PR and non-PR groups. The PR period was 18.7 ± 12.7 days in COPD patients. Preoperative pulmonary function was significantly improved after PR (VC 5.3%, FEV1 5.5%; P < 0.05). The FEV1 recovery rate one month after surgery was significantly better in the PR (101.6%; P < 0.001) than in the non-PR group (93.9%). In logistic regression analysis, predicted postoperative FEV1 , predicted postoperative %FEV1 , and PR were independent factors related to postoperative pulmonary complications after pulmonary lobectomy (odds ratio 18.9, 16.1, and 13.9, respectively; P < 0.05). PR improved the recovery rate of pulmonary function after lobectomy in the early period, and may decrease postoperative pulmonary complications. © 2017 The Authors. Thoracic Cancer published by China Lung Oncology Group and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  5. What is the impact of cervical invasion on lymph node metastasis in patients with stage IIIC endometrial cancer?

    PubMed

    Turan, Taner; Hızlı, Deniz; Yılmaz, Saynur Sarici; Gundogdu, Burcu; Boran, Nurettin; Tulunay, Gokhan; Ozfuttu, Ahmet; Faruk Kose, M

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the presence of cervical invasion has altered the site of lymph node (LN) metastasis in stage IIIC endometrial cancer (EC) patients. Fourty-six patients who had systematic pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy surgery for EC and staged as IIIC were included in the study. Patients with cervical invasion were defined as Group A and patients without cervical invasion were defined as Group B. The groups were compared according to surgical-pathologic characteristics. Chi-square and Annova table test were used to examine the effect of cervical invasion on LN metastasis. The mean age of patients was 59 years (range 38-81) and tumor size was 47 mm (range 10-80). Twenty-three patients had cervical involvement (Group A) and 23 had no cervical metastasis (Group B). Groups were not different with regard to cell type, grade, depth of myometrial invasion, tumor size, adnexal involvement, peritoneal metastasis and lymphovascular space invasion. Among 46 patients obturator LN was the most involved site of LN metastasis, however, when there is cervical metastasis external iliac LN was found to be the most involved LN site. Patients without cervical invasion had 21.7% of external iliac LN metastasis while patients with cervical invasion had 60.9% of external iliac LN metastasis. Also, cervical invasion has increased the risk of pelvic LN and obturator LN involvement from 82.6 to 95.7% and 39.1 to 52.2%, respectively. Cervical invasion may have an effect on lymphatic spread and change the site of metastatic LNs. Large prospective studies are needed to clarify the alteration of LN metastasis in cervix invaded EC patients.

  6. [Fever in Cancer Patients].

    PubMed

    Cornely, Oliver Andreas; Mellinghoff, Sibylle Christiane

    2017-07-01

    Fever in cancer patients is a medical emergency until a severe infection has been ruled out. In case of neutropenia prompt diagnostic work-up should be paralleled by empiric antibiotic treatment. Underlying malignancy as well as treatments may impair immune response and thus pave the way for less virulent pathogens. So the spectrum of infections comprises both pathogens that cause disease in immunocompetent patients and a variety of rarer organisms. After collecting two pairs of blood cultures, broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment should commence within one to two hours. Depending on the individual patient's risk antimicrobial prophylaxis should be considered. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. The Impact of Quality Variations on Patients Undergoing Surgery for Renal Cell Carcinoma: A National Cancer Database Study.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Keith A; Saarela, Olli; Abouassaly, Robert; Kim, Simon P; Breau, Rodney H; Finelli, Antonio

    2017-09-01

    Despite efforts to define metrics assessing hospital-level quality for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) surgical care there remains a paucity of real-world data validating their ability to benchmark performance. Consequently, whether poor performance on hospital-level quality indicators is associated with inferior patient outcomes remains unknown. To determine hospital-level variations in RCC surgical quality after adjusting for differences in patient- and tumor-specific factors. Further, to determine associations between hospital-level quality performance and surgical volume, academic affiliation, and patient mortality. RCC patients undergoing surgery in the USA and Puerto Rico (2004-2014) were identified from the National Cancer Database. Hospital-level quality of care was assessed according to disease-specific process and outcome quality indicators. Case-mix adjusted hospital benchmarking was performed using indirect standardization methodology and multivariable regression models. A composite measure of quality, the Renal Cancer Quality Score (RC-QS), was subsequently derived and associations between RC-QS and surgical volume, academic affiliation, and patient mortality were determined. Over 1100 hospitals were benchmarked for quality, with 10-31% identified as providing poor care for a given quality indicator. Lower RC-QS hospitals had smaller referral volumes and were less academic compared with higher RC-QS hospitals (p<0.001). Higher RC-QS was independently associated with lower 30-d, 90-d, and overall mortality (adjusted odds ratio [confidence interval]: 0.92 [0.90-0.95], odds ratio: 0.94 [0.91-0.96], hazard ratio: 0.97 [0.96-0.98] per unit increase, respectively). These data are retrospective and it is unknown whether improvement in the RC-QS improves outcomes. Widespread hospital-level variations in RCC surgical quality exist, as captured by the RC-QS. Superior quality is associated with improved patient outcomes, including mortality benefit. The RC-QS serves

  8. Positive vascular wall margins have minimal impact on cancer outcomes in patients with non-metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with tumour thrombus.

    PubMed

    Abel, E Jason; Carrasco, Alonso; Karam, Jose; Tamboli, Pheroze; Delacroix, Scott; Vaporciyan, Ara A; Wood, Christopher G

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate the impact of microscopically positive vascular margins on recurrence and cancer-specific survival (CSS) in patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with venous thrombus We reviewed the records from the period 1993 to 2009 of consecutive patients treated surgically for RCC with venous tumour thrombus at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Patients with metastatic disease, positive soft tissue margins or gross residual disease at time of thrombectomy were excluded. The primary outcome measures were local or systemic disease recurrence, and CSS. Univariate and multivariate analysis were used to evaluate whether microscopically positive vascular margins were associated with RCC recurrence or CSS after nephrectomy with thrombectomy. A total of 256 patients with RCC were identified with a median (interquartile range) follow-up of 36.7 (18.4-63.5) months. Microscopic tumour was present at the margin of resection in 47 patients (18.4%). The median recurrence-free interval was significantly shorter in patients with positive vascular margins: 22.1 vs 70.2 months (P = 0.009). The rate of local recurrence was higher in patients with positive vein margins: 12.8 vs 4.3% (P < 0.01). Local recurrence without concomitant systemic recurrence was identified in only two of 256 (0.8%) patients. Patients with positive vascular margins had significantly worse CSS times compared with patients with negative vascular margins: 37.7 vs 93.0 months (P = 0.004). In multivariable analysis, positive vascular margins were found to be independently predictive of local recurrence but not of systemic recurrence or CSS. Complete surgical excision should always be attempted because positive vascular wall margins increase local recurrence rates. Invasion of RCC into the vein wall at the resection margin is associated with aggressive tumour biology, and the majority of patients with positive vascular wall margins experience systemic recurrence. © 2013 The Authors. BJU

  9. Impact of low-level laser therapy on hyposalivation, salivary pH, and quality of life in head and neck cancer patients post-radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Palma, Luiz Felipe; Gonnelli, Fernanda Aurora Stabile; Marcucci, Marcelo; Dias, Rodrigo Souza; Giordani, Adelmo José; Segreto, Roberto Araújo; Segreto, Helena Regina Comodo

    2017-03-03

    Late effects of radiotherapy for head and neck cancer treatment have been increasingly investigated due to its impact on patients' quality of life. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of low-level laser therapy on hyposalivation, low salivary pH, and quality of life in head and neck cancer patients post-radiotherapy. Twenty-nine patients with radiation-induced xerostomia received laser sessions twice a week, during 3 months (24 sessions). For this, a continuous wave Indium-Gallium-Aluminium-Phosphorus diode laser device was used punctually on the major salivary glands (808 nm, 0.75 W/cm(2), 30 mW, illuminated area 0.04 cm(2), 7.5 J/cm(2), 10 s, 0.3 J). Six extraoral points were illuminated on each parotid gland and three on each submandibular gland, as well as two intraoral points on each sublingual gland. Stimulated and unstimulated salivary flow rate, pH (two scales with different gradations), and quality of life (University Of Washington Quality of Life Questionnaire for Patients with Head and Neck Cancer) were assessed at baseline and at the end of the treatment. There were significant increases in both mean salivary flow rates (unstimulated: p = 0.0012; stimulated: p < 0.0001), mean pH values (p = 0.0002 and p = 0.0004), and mean score from the quality of life questionnaire (p < 0.0001). Low-level laser therapy seems to be effective to mitigate salivary hypofunction and increase salivary pH of patients submitted to radiotherapy for head and neck cancer, thereby leading to an improvement in quality of life.

  10. Impact of pre-operative body mass index in head and neck cancer patients undergoing microvascular reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hyun, D-J; Joo, Y-H; Kim, M-S

    2017-10-02

    To analyse the relationship of pre-operative body mass index with surgical complications and oncological outcomes in patients undergoing microvascular reconstruction for head and neck squamous cell cancer. A retrospective review was conducted of 259 patients who underwent microvascular free flap reconstruction after head and neck ablative surgery. Mean body mass index was 22.48 kg/m2. There were no correlations between body mass index and: flap failure (p = 0.739), flap ischaemia (p = 0.644), pharyngocutaneous fistula (p = 0.141) or wound infection (p = 0.224). The five-year disease-specific survival rate was 63 per cent. On univariate analysis, the five-year disease-specific survival rate was significantly correlated with pre-operative body mass index, based on Kaplan-Meier survival curves (p = 0.028). The five-year disease-specific survival rates in underweight, normal weight, overweight and obese groups were 47 per cent, 55 per cent, 65 per cent and 80 per cent, respectively. Pre-operative body mass index was a useful predictor for recurrence and survival in patients who underwent microvascular reconstruction for head and neck squamous cell cancer.

  11. Impact of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease on postoperative recurrence in patients with resected non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Qiang, Guangliang; Liang, Chaoyang; Xiao, Fei; Yu, Qiduo; Wen, Huanshun; Song, Zhiyi; Tian, Yanchu; Shi, Bin; Guo, Yongqing; Liu, Deruo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to determine whether the severity of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) affects recurrence-free survival in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients after surgical resection. Patients and methods A retrospective study was performed on 421 consecutive patients who had undergone lobectomy for NSCLC from January 2008 to June 2011. Classification of COPD severity was based on guidelines of the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD). Characteristics among the three subgroups were compared and recurrence-free survivals were analyzed. Results A total of 172 patients were diagnosed with COPD (124 as GOLD-1, 46 as GOLD-2, and two as GOLD-3). The frequencies of recurrence were significantly higher in patients with higher COPD grades (P<0.001). Recurrence-free survival at 5 years was 78.1%, 70.4%, and 46.4% in non-COPD, mild COPD, and moderate/severe COPD groups, respectively (P<0.001). By univariate analysis, the age, sex, smoking history, COPD severity, tumor size, histology, and pathological stage were associated with recurrence-free survival. Multivariate analysis showed that older age, male, moderate/severe COPD, and advanced stage were independent risk factors associated with recurrence-free survival. Conclusion NSCLC patients with COPD are at high risk for postoperative recurrence, and moderate/severe COPD is an independent unfavorable prognostic factor. PMID:26766906

  12. Impact of fish oil and melatonin on cachexia in patients with advanced gastrointestinal cancer: a randomized pilot study.

    PubMed

    Persson, Christina; Glimelius, Bengt; Rönnelid, Johan; Nygren, Peter

    2005-02-01

    The effect of fish oil (FO), melatonin (MLT), or their combination and dietary advice on cachexia and biochemistry variables reflecting cachexia were investigated in patients with advanced gastrointestinal cancer. Twenty-four patients not amenable to standard anticancer treatment and with documented weight loss and/or decreased serum albumin were included. They were randomized to 30 mL/d of FO, which provided 4.9 g of eicosapentaenoic acid and 3.2 g of docosahexanoic acid, or 18 mg/d of MLT for 4 wk. During the next 4 wk, all patients had FO and MLT. Serum or plasma was analyzed for tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1beta, soluble interleukin-2 receptor, interleukin-6, and interleukin-8 and the fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid, docosahexanoic acid, arachidonic acid, and linoleic acid. Serum levels of eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexanoic acid increased as expected with FO. No major changes in biochemical variables and cytokines were observed with any intervention. In the FO group, 5 of 13 patients (38%) showed weight stabilization or gain compared with 3 of 11 patients (27%) in the MLT group. After combining interventions, approximately 63% of patients showed such responses. FO, MLT, or their combination did not induce major biochemical changes indicative of a strong anticachectic effect. Nonetheless, the interventions used may have produced a weight-stabilizing effect.

  13. Impact of age and comorbidity on survival in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    van Eeghen, Elmer E.; Bakker, Sandra D.; van Bochove, Aart

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with colorectal cancer are often excluded from clinical trials based on age or a poor performance score. However, 70% of colorectal cancer is diagnosed in patients over 65. Evaluation on the influence of age and comorbidity on survival and cause of death in a non-selected population. Methods Included were 621 consecutive patients with colorectal cancer. An extensive chart review was performed for 392 patients with colon cancer and 143 patients with rectal cancer. Analyses were performed separately for both groups. Results Median survival of colon cancer patients was 5.13 years, 131 patients (34.3%) died from tumour progression. Age and comorbidity were significant predictors for overall survival (P<0.001). Age was also a significant predictor of cause of death (P=0.001). In rectal cancer patients median survival was 4.67 years, 51 (35.7%) of patients died from tumour progression. Neither age nor comorbidity was significant predictors of survival. Age was a significant predictor of cause of death (P<0.001). Conclusions In colon cancer patient age and comorbidity predict survival. This represents possible bias or a reduced survival benefit of treatment, and is an indication that colon cancer is not the prognosis defining illness in the majority of patients. In rectal cancer patients neither age or comorbidity significantly impacted survival. PMID:26697191

  14. Impact of facility volume on outcomes in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal: Analysis of the National Cancer Data Base.

    PubMed

    Amini, Arya; Jones, Bernard L; Ghosh, Debashis; Schefter, Tracey E; Goodman, Karyn A

    2017-01-01

    Given the rarity of anal cancer and the technical aspects involved in radiation (RT) planning, the authors conducted a population-based analysis evaluating the impact of radiation oncology facility volume on overall survival (OS) in patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the anal canal. The National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) was queried for patients with SCC of the anal canal who underwent RT. All patients were coded as having received their entire course of RT at the NCDB reporting facility. Facility volume was categorized into tertiles (low, intermediate, and high) and was based on the number of times a facility's unique identification code appeared. In total, 13,550 patients were identified. Patients who received treatment at higher volume radiation oncology facilities had longer OS based on multivariate analysis (MVA) (hazard ratio, 0.81; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.73-0.90; P < .001) and propensity score matching analysis (hazard ratio, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.69-0.91; P < .001). For patients who received treatment at low-volume, intermediate-volume, and high-volume centers, the 5-year OS rate was 70%, 72.2%, and 75.4%, respectively (P < .001). Compared with low/intermediate-volume radiation oncology centers, high-volume centers were more likely to treat patients with concurrent chemotherapy (odds ratio, 1.27; 95% CI, 1.07-1.51; P = .006) and less likely to have treatment delays leading to an RT duration of >45 days (odds ratio, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.69-0.80; P < .001). Treatment at higher volume radiation oncology centers appears to be associated with improved OS in patients with SCC of the anal canal. These results likely reflect the relation between physician experience and delivery of high-quality RT, which perhaps is best evident in rare tumors such as anal SCC. Cancer 2017;123:228-236. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  15. The Impact of the Expression Level of Intratumoral Dihydropyrimidine Dehydrogenase on Chemotherapy Sensitivity and Survival of Patients in Gastric Cancer: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cong; Liu, Hongpeng; Ma, Bin; Song, Yongxi; Gao, Peng; Xu, Yingying; Yu, Dehao

    2017-01-01

    The potential impact that the intratumoral expression level of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) has on chemotherapy sensitivity and long-term survival for gastric cancer (GC) patients remains controversial; therefore, this study seeks to clarify this issue. Our meta-analysis was performed using Review Manager (RevMan) 5.3 software. In vitro drug sensitivity tests, correlation coefficients between sensitivity to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and expression levels of intratumoral DPD were used as effective indexes to analyse. Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were used as endpoints for patient outcome, and hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were noted as measures of effect. There were 15 eligible studies including 1805 patients for the final analysis. The analysis revealed a statistically significant difference between the expression level of intratumoral DPD activity, DPD mRNA levels, and sensitivity to 5-FU in GC patients, with high expression levels of intratumoral DPD resulting in low sensitivity to 5-FU. However, no matter what therapeutic regimens were used, there was no significant difference for patient outcomes between high and low DPD expression groups, either in OS or in PFS. In conclusion, high levels of intratumoral DPD expression have a negative impact on sensitivity to 5-FU in GC patients, but no prognostic value for long-term survival was uncovered. PMID:28255193

  16. A prospective evaluation of the impact of 18-F-fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography staging on survival for patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Blackstock, A. William . E-mail: ablackst@wfubmc.edu; Farmer, Michael R.; Lovato, James; Mishra, Girish; Melin, Susan A.; Oaks, Timothy; Aklilu, Mabea; Clark, Paige B.; Levine, Edward A.

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the impact of 18-F-fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in the staging and prognosis of patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer (LAEC). Methods and Materials: Between January 2000 and October 2004, all patients with LAEC evaluated in the Department of Radiation Oncology were considered for enrollment into a Phase II trial of preoperative chemoradiation. Entry required a staging whole-body FDG-PET scan. Results: One hundred ten consecutive patients were evaluated; 38 were ineligible for reasons including treatment elsewhere, prior malignancy, or refusal of treatment. After conventional staging (clinical examination, endoscopic ultrasound, and chest/abdominal computerized tomography), 33 patients were ineligible because of metastatic disease or poor performance status. Of the remaining 39 patients, 23 were confirmed to have LAEC after FDG-PET staging and were treated in the Phase II trial (Cohort I). Sixteen patients, however, had FDG-PET findings consistent with occult metastatic disease and were deemed ineligible for the trial but were treated with curative intent (Cohort II). The 2-year survival rate for the 23 patients in Cohort I was 64%, compared with 17% (p = 0.003) for patients in Cohort II (FDG-PET positive). Conclusions: More than one-third of patients determined to have LAEC with conventional staging were upstaged with the use of FDG-PET. Despite comparable therapy, upstaging with FDG-PET predicts poor 2-year survival.

  17. Impact of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease on postoperative recurrence in patients with resected non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Guangliang; Liang, Chaoyang; Xiao, Fei; Yu, Qiduo; Wen, Huanshun; Song, Zhiyi; Tian, Yanchu; Shi, Bin; Guo, Yongqing; Liu, Deruo

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine whether the severity of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) affects recurrence-free survival in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients after surgical resection. A retrospective study was performed on 421 consecutive patients who had undergone lobectomy for NSCLC from January 2008 to June 2011. Classification of COPD severity was based on guidelines of the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD). Characteristics among the three subgroups were compared and recurrence-free survivals were analyzed. A total of 172 patients were diagnosed with COPD (124 as GOLD-1, 46 as GOLD-2, and two as GOLD-3). The frequencies of recurrence were significantly higher in patients with higher COPD grades (P<0.001). Recurrence-free survival at 5 years was 78.1%, 70.4%, and 46.4% in non-COPD, mild COPD, and moderate/severe COPD groups, respectively (P<0.001). By univariate analysis, the age, sex, smoking history, COPD severity, tumor size, histology, and pathological stage were associated with recurrence-free survival. Multivariate analysis showed that older age, male, moderate/severe COPD, and advanced stage were independent risk factors associated with recurrence-free survival. NSCLC patients with COPD are at high risk for postoperative recurrence, and moderate/severe COPD is an independent unfavorable prognostic factor.

  18. Clinical Impact of 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT in a Patient With Biochemical Recurrence of Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Marcelo A; Viana, Publio; Santos, Allan; Bastos, Diogo; Etchebehere, Elba; Cerri, Giovanni

    2016-09-01

    A 64-year-old man with history of prostate adenocarcinoma underwent radical prostatectomy in 2003. He remained with undetectable prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels until 2014, when he then presented rising serum PSA levels and performed a Tc-MDP bone scan that was negative for metastases. In August 2015, his PSA was 4.89 ng/dL, and restaging images with pelvic MR and F-FDG PET/CT were both negative. Therefore, the patient underwent a Ga-PSMA PET/CT that showed marked tracer uptake in a single mediastinal lymph node. Histopathology demonstrated metastatic adenocarcinoma secondary to prostate cancer, altering patient management to hormone therapy instead of pelvic radiotherapy.

  19. The Impact of the Duration of Adjuvant Chemotherapy on Survival in Patients with Epithelial Ovarian Cancer – A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Seebacher, Veronika; Reinthaller, Alexander; Koelbl, Heinz; Concin, Nicole; Nehoda, Regina; Polterauer, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to investigate the prognostic role of the duration of adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube and primary peritoneal cancer (EOC). Materials and Methods Within the present study we retrospectively evaluated the data of 165 consecutive patients with EOC treated with primary surgery followed by six completed cycles of platinum-taxan based intravenous adjuvant chemotherapy. Medians of total duration of chemotherapy were compared with clinical-pathological parameters. Patients were stratified into four risk groups according to the delay in days of total duration of chemotherapy, and univariate and multivariable survival analyses were performed. Results The median duration of six completed cycles of chemotherapy comprised 113 days (IQR 107–124 days). Uni- and multivariable survival analyses revealed a delay of total duration of chemotherapy of at least 9 days to be associated with progression-free (PFS), cancer-specific (CSS) and overall survival (OS). Hazard ratios (HR), confidence intervals (95% CI) and p-values for PFS, CSS and OS due to delay of chemo-duration were 2.9 (1.6–5.4; p = 0.001), 2.9 (1.3–6.2; p = 0.008) and 2.6 (1.3–5.4; p = 0.008), respectively. Prolonged total chemo-duration was associated with the amount of postoperative residual disease (p = 0.001) and the patients’ age (p = 0.03). Conclusion The present study suggests a prolonged duration of adjuvant chemotherapy after primary surgery to adversely affect PFS, CSS and OS in patients with EOC. Yet larger studies are required to validate our results. PMID:28060918

  20. The impact of yoga on quality of life and psychological distress in caregivers for patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Martin, Andi Céline; Keats, Melanie R

    2014-05-01

    To assess the effects of a six-week Vinyasa yoga (VY) intervention on caregivers' overall quality of life (QOL) and psychological distress. A single-group, pre- and post-test pilot study. University public recreational facility. 12 informal caregivers for patients with cancer. Caregivers participated in a six-week VY intervention and completed measures of QOL and psychological distress pre- and postintervention. Program satisfaction was measured with open-ended survey questions. QOL, psychological distress, and program satisfaction. Significant improvements were found in the mental component score of overall QOL and in overall psychological distress. Several subdomains of QOL and psychological distress were also improved significantly. Open-ended survey question responses revealed participants perceived physical and mental benefit from the intervention, highlighting improvements in flexibility, core and upper-body strength, balance, breathing, and energy. Informal caregivers may benefit mentally and physically from participating in VY. Caregivers of patients with cancer characterize a group worthy of attention, research, and interventions focusing on their healthcare needs.

  1. Routine contrast esophagram has minimal impact on the postoperative management of patients undergoing esophagectomy for esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Cools-Lartigue, Jonathan; Andalib, Amin; Abo-Alsaud, Ali; Gowing, Stephen; Nguyen, Maxime; Mulder, David; Ferri, Lorenzo

    2014-08-01

    Routine contrast esophagram is frequently performed after esophagectomy in order to detect occult anastomotic leak (AL). This modality has a low sensitivity, and its routine use has been called into question. Accordingly, we sought to demonstrate the clinical impact of routine contrast esophagography in the management of patients undergoing esophagectomy for malignant disease. All patients undergoing esophagectomy from 2005 to 2011 for malignancy at a North American University hospital were identified from a prospectively collected database. Barium esophagram (BE) was performed within the first week postoperatively. Patients were dichotomized according to whether they had an AL, and the sensitivity and specificity of BE was determined. The clinical impact of the BE result, defined as cessation of enteral feeding, additional interventions, or delay in discharge, was determined. Overall, 221 patients underwent esophagectomy. Thirty (13.6 %) developed an AL, of which 10 (30 %) had a positive BE, 12 (40 %) had a negative BE, and 8 (26.7 %) had no BE and were diagnosed clinically (1/8), by computed tomography (CT) (3/8), endoscopically (3/8), or at reoperation (1/7). AL in patients with a negative BE was confirmed clinically (4/12), by CT (6/12), endoscopically (1/12), or at reoperation (1/12). The sensitivity and specificity of BE was 45.5 and 97.8 %, respectively. BE altered postoperative management in 8/221 (3.6 %) patients, with 5/221 (2.3 %) undergoing therapeutic intervention. Conversely, 3/221 (1.4 %) patients demonstrated clinically insignificant AL, delaying discharge and feeding without intervention. Contrast esophagram is not an effective screening modality for AL when employed routinely following esophagectomy.

  2. Impact of Intraoperative Re-resection to Achieve R0 Status on Survival in Patients With Pancreatic Cancer: A Single-center Experience With 483 Patients.

    PubMed

    Nitschke, Philipp; Volk, Andreas; Welsch, Thilo; Hackl, Jonas; Reissfelder, Christoph; Rahbari, Mohammad; Distler, Marius; Saeger, Hans-Detlev; Weitz, Jürgen; Rahbari, Nuh N

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that intraoperative frozen section (FS) and re-resection results to achieve R0 status are associated with different long-term outcomes in pancreatic cancer patients. Recent data have challenged the survival benefit of additional resection in patients with pancreatic cancer in case of positive FS to achieve clear pathological section (PS). Patients who underwent surgery for exocrine pancreatic malignancy with curative intent were identified from a prospective database. Data were stratified by resection margin (group I: FS-R0 → PS-R0; group II: FS-R1 → PS-R0; group III: FS-R1 → PS-R1). Associations with survival were analyzed by univariate and multivariate analyses. A total of 483 patients met the inclusion criteria. Of these, 61 patients were excluded due to R2 or Rx status. Three hundred seventeen (75%) patients were allocated to margin group I, 32 (8%) to group II, and 73 (17%) to group III. Median overall survival in group I, II, and III was 29, 36, and 12 months (P < 0.001). There was no significant difference in survival between patients in Group I and II (P = 0.849), whereas patients in group III had significantly poorer outcome than group I (P < 0.001) and II (P = 0.039). The prognostic value of margin group status was confirmed on multivariate analysis (hazard ratio = 1.694, 95% confidence interval 1.175-2.442). FS analysis with intraoperative re-resection should be performed routinely in patients undergoing pancreatic cancer surgery with the aim to achieve a R0 resection.

  3. The impact of pre- and post-operative weight loss and body mass index on prognosis in patients with oesophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Hynes, O; Anandavadivelan, P; Gossage, J; Johar, A M; Lagergren, J; Lagergren, P

    2017-08-01

    Weight loss is a cardinal symptom of oesophageal cancer and is often continued after surgery. High body mass index (BMI) is a strong risk factor for oesophageal adenocarcinoma. This study aimed to assess the impact of pre- and post-operative weight loss and BMI on long-term mortality after resection for oesophageal cancer. This prospective and nationwide cohort study included 390 patients, operated on for oesophageal cancer in Sweden in 2001-2005 with follow-up until 2016, who responded to a questionnaire on weight history 6 months after surgery. Multivariable Cox proportional hazard models provided hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) of mortality while adjusting for several prognostic factors, including tumour stage. Compared to weight stable patients, pre-surgery weight loss indicated increased HRs of overall all-cause mortality (HR = 1.32, 95% CI 0.94-1.86) and disease-specific mortality (HR = 1.36, 95% CI 0.93-1.98). Patients with >20% weight loss post-surgery had worse overall all-cause mortality (HR = 1.71, 95% CI 1.01-2.88) and disease-specific mortality (HR = 2.20, 95% CI 1.24-3.89). Compared to patients with normal BMI, decreased HRs were indicated for patients who were obese at the time of surgery (overall all-cause mortality HR 0.87 95% CI, 0.58-1.31 and disease-specific mortality HR = 0.89, 95% CI 0.57-1.40), while patients with BMI ≤19.9 at 6 months post-surgery had increased all-cause mortality (HR = 1.41, 95% CI 1.03-1.95) and disease-specific mortality (HR = 1.55, 95% CI 1.09-2.21). Post-operative weight loss and low BMI at 6 months post-surgery are independent markers of poor prognosis in patients who undergo surgery for oesophageal cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ The Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  4. Impact of Preexisting Interstitial Lung Disease on Acute, Extensive Radiation Pneumonitis: Retrospective Analysis of Patients with Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ozawa, Yuichi; Abe, Takefumi; Omae, Minako; Matsui, Takashi; Kato, Masato; Hasegawa, Hirotsugu; Enomoto, Yasunori; Ishihara, Takeaki; Inui, Naoki; Yamada, Kazunari; Yokomura, Koshi; Suda, Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction This study investigated the clinical characteristics and predictive factors for developing acute extended radiation pneumonitis with a focus on the presence and radiological characteristics of preexisting interstitial lung disease. Methods Of 1429 irradiations for lung cancer from May 2006 to August 2013, we reviewed 651 irradiations involving the lung field. The presence, compatibility with usual interstitial pneumonia, and occupying area of preexisting interstitial lung disease were retrospectively evaluated by pretreatment computed tomography. Cases of non-infectious, non-cardiogenic, acute respiratory failure with an extended bilateral shadow developing within 30 days after the last irradiation were defined as acute extended radiation pneumonitis. Results Nine (1.4%) patients developed acute extended radiation pneumonitis a mean of 6.7 days after the last irradiation. Although preexisting interstitial lung disease was found in 13% of patients (84 patients), 78% of patients (7 patients) with acute extended radiation pneumonitis cases had preexisting interstitial lung disease, which resulted in incidences of acute extended radiation pneumonitis of 0.35 and 8.3% in patients without and with preexisting interstitial lung disease, respectively. Multivariate logistic analysis indicated that the presence of preexisting interstitial lung disease (odds ratio = 22.6; 95% confidence interval = 5.29–155; p < 0.001) and performance status (≥2; odds ratio = 4.22; 95% confidence interval = 1.06–20.8; p = 0.049) were significant predictive factors. Further analysis of the 84 patients with preexisting interstitial lung disease revealed that involvement of more than 10% of the lung field was the only independent predictive factor associated with the risk of acute extended radiation pneumonitis (odds ratio = 6.14; 95% confidence interval = 1.0–37.4); p = 0.038). Conclusions Pretreatment computed tomography evaluations of the presence of and area size occupied

  5. Impact of income and education on drug purchasing decisions in Hong Kong Chinese cancer patients: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Chan, W M; Mak, J; Epstein, R J

    2011-01-01

    The affordability of diagnostic, preventive and therapeutic interventions is a global concern, particularly in the developing world. To clarify the educational and financial factors that influence purchasing decisions, we conducted a survey of Hong Kong cancer patients across a broad social spectrum. A questionnaire was designed to assess the effect of costs on purchasing decisions relating to six drug-related variables: efficacy, tolerability, convenience, safety, peer pressure, and uncertainty. Validation of the original 31-part survey resulted in a final set of 22 core questions that was administered to 51 consecutive oncology patients who were characterized in terms of varying household income and educational level. Most respondents (87.6%) were Hong Kong-born or mainland Chinese. There was a strong correlation between household income and education. Demand for drug tolerability and safety was high and cost-inelastic across all educational and income groups. An unexpected finding was that patients from low-income/education households were keen to purchase costly medications (whether Western, or Chinese herbs) of reputed high efficacy, whereas patients from middle-income/-education backgrounds were more negatively influenced by considerations of cost. Only the most affluent and well-educated patients valued overall survival above disease-free survival when making drug purchasing decisions; this cohort was also the least influenced by peer pressure, and the most willing to pay extra for drugs offering more convenience alone. Low-income/education Asian patients had paradoxically high expectations of costly drug interventions. Although larger studies addressing this issue are needed to confirm these conclusions, public education initiatives aimed at protecting low-income/education patients from exploitation or disappointment may be desirable.

  6. Reduction in patient-reported acute morbidity in prostate cancer patients treated with 81-Gy Intensity-modulated radiotherapy using reduced planning target volume margins and electromagnetic tracking: assessing the impact of margin reduction study.

    PubMed

    Sandler, Howard M; Liu, Ping-Yu; Dunn, Rodney L; Khan, David C; Tropper, Scott E; Sanda, Martin G; Mantz, Constantine A

    2010-05-01

    To investigate whether patient-reported quality of life after high-dose external beam intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer can be improved by decreasing planning target volume margins while using real-time tumor tracking. Study patients underwent radiotherapy with nominal 3-mm margins and electromagnetic real-time tracking. Morbidity was assessed before and at the end of radiotherapy using Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC) questionnaires. Changes in scores were compared between the Assessing Impact of Margin Reduction (AIM) study cohort and the comparator Prostate Cancer Outcomes and Satisfaction with Treatment Quality Assessment (PROST-QA) cohort, treated with conventional margins. The 64 patients in the prospective AIM study had generally less favorable clinical characteristics than the 153 comparator patients. Study patients had similar or slightly poorer pretreatment EPIC scores than comparator patients in bowel, urinary, and sexual domains. AIM patients receiving radiotherapy had less bowel morbidity than the comparator group as measured by changes in mean bowel and/or rectal domain EPIC scores from pretreatment to 2 months after start of treatment (-1.5 vs -16.0, P = .001). Using a change in EPIC score >0.5 baseline standard deviation as the measure of clinical relevance, AIM study patients experienced meaningful decline in only 1 health-related quality of life domain (urinary) whereas decline in 3 health-related quality of life domains (urinary, sexual, and bowel/rectal) was observed in the PROST-QA comparator cohort. Prostate cancer patients treated with reduced margins and tumor tracking had less radiotherapy-related morbidity than their counterparts treated with conventional margins. Highly contoured intensity-modulated radiotherapy shows promise as a successful strategy for reducing morbidity in prostate cancer treatment. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Impact of axillary lymph node dissection on breast cancer outcome in clinically node negative patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Sanghani, Mona; Balk, Ethan M; Cady, Blake

    2009-04-15

    The regional lymph node control and survival impact of axillary dissection in breast cancer has been the subject of multiple randomized trials, with various results. This study reviews and conducts a meta-analysis of contemporary trials of axillary dissection in patients with early stage breast cancer. A systematic MEDLINE review identified 3 randomized trials published between January 2000 and January 2007 of axillary dissection versus no dissection in clinically lymph node negative early stage breast cancer patients. A fourth trial of axillary radiotherapy versus no axillary treatment was also identified and included in this review. Meta-analyses were performed for survival, axillary recurrence, metastatic disease, and ipsilateral breast recurrence. All trials reported a higher rate of axillary recurrence (1.5%-3%, median follow-up 5-15 years) in the absence of axillary dissection or radiotherapy. Overall survival was similar with and without definitive axillary treatment in 3 of the 4 trials, with an increased rate of nonbreast cancer-related death in the observation arm of the fourth trial. Meta-analyses found no significant difference in overall survival (odds ratio [OR] 1.55; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.74-3.24), metastases (OR 0.91; 95% CI, 0.65-1.29), or ipsilateral breast recurrence (OR 1.11; 95% CI, 0.68-1.83) associated with axillary treatment. A significantly lower rate of axillary recurrence was seen after lymphadenectomy (OR 0.28; 95% CI, 0.11-0.73, P<.01). Axillary dissection does not confer a survival benefit in the setting of early stage clinically lymph node negative breast cancer. Although the rate of axillary failure was increased in the absence of dissection, the absolute risk was found to be extremely low.

  8. Impact of Molecular Predictors on the Response Rates in Head and Neck Cancer Patients - an Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Sathyamurthy, Arvind; Koushik, A S Kirthi; Gowri, Mangala; Janaki, M G; Kilara, Nalini; Ponni, T R Arul; Alva, Ram Charith; Kumar, S Mohan; Kannan, Ram Abhinav; Harjani, Ritika

    2016-12-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck region account for more than 25 % of male and more than 10 % of female cancers in India (1). Head and neck cancer treatment includes a multidisciplinary approach involving all specialties. Concurrent chemo-radiation is the standard of care in most of the subsites (2). Inspite of the multi-disciplinary approach, a plateau has been reached in terms of results with 5 year survival of locally advanced disease of around 30 % (3). In order to improve outcomes, there has been considerable interest in molecular profiling of head and neck cancers 4-10. However there is still significant paucity in terms of Indian data, hence the need for the study. The objectives are to assess the HPV-p16, EGFR and p53 status, to correlate HPV-p16, EGFR and p53 status with the response rates, to correlate HPV-p16,EGFR and p53 status with other factors like age, sex, tobacco use. Twenty five consecutive cases of histopathologically proven head and neck cancers were accrued. All patients were treated with external radiation to a dose of 66Gy in 33 fractions along with concurrent weekly cisplatin chemotherapy at a dose of 40mg/sqm. HPV-p16, EGFR and p53 mutation analysis was done on paraffin embedded histopathological blocks. PCR technique used for HPV-p16, EGFR and p53 status detection. Response assessment was done based on RECIST criteria. Correlation of HPV, EGFR and p53 status on response was done. The EGFR positivity rate was 84 %, the p53 positivity rate was 76 % and the HPV p-16 positivity rate was 28 %. Out of 25 patients, 13(52%) had complete response, 7(28 %) had partial response, 3(12 %) had stable disease and 2(8 %) had progressive disease. On correlation of molecular profile with response, there was no statistical significance between EGFR status and response (p 0.5) or HPV-p16 and response (p 0.8). However, p53 positivity was approaching significance with respect to good response (p 0.07).

  9. Impact on the quality of remaining life of treatment with self-expandable metal prostheses in patients with inoperable esophago-cardial cancer. Results of a study of 107 consecutive patients treated with Ultraflex-type prostheses.

    PubMed

    De Palma, G D; Siciliano, S; Sivero, L; Galloro, G; Donisi, M; Catanzano, C

    1999-06-01

    Self-expanding metal stents are a new alternative for palliation of esophagocardial malignancies. We evaluated the impact of these stents on the quality of remaining life in patients affected by inoperable esophago-cardial cancer. Between September 1992 and September 1997, 102 patients underwent implantation of self expanding metal stents for palliation of dysphagia due to esophagene or cardial cancer (76 patients), or for locally recurrent carcinoma after surgery (14 patients), lasertherapy (13 patients) or radiotherapy (5 patients). Stents were implanted under radiological and endoscopic control in patients under mild sedation. Successful stent implantation was achieved in 102/107 patients (95.3%). Early complications were observed in 4.9% and per-operative mortality was 1.96%. After stent implantation the dysphagia score improved from 3.0, on average, to 0.5, on average. Late complications were evidenced in 25.5%. Weight gain was evidenced in 24.5% and the performance status improved in 14.3%. The mean survival time was 6.9 months. Self expanding metal stents are an effective alternative for palliation of malignant dysphagia due to esophageal and cardial cancers.

  10. The impact of decision models on self-perceived quality of life: a study on brain cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Lucchiari, C; Botturi, A; Pravettoni, G

    2010-01-01

    Quality of life (QoL) is an increasingly important outcome measure in medicine. Health, in fact, is not only based on functional status but also on psychological and social well being. Since QoL is related to the patient's perception of their position in life in relation to their goals, expectations, standards and concerns, the way in which the medical context is experienced may be critical. We then hypothesised that self-perceived QoL may be linked to unmet needs in information management and decision involvement. To analyse this hypothesis, we conducted a quantitative study on 84 consecutive patients with a diagnosis of primary high-grade glioma. The functional assessment of cancer therapy-Brain (FACT-Br) scales, the hospital anxiety and depression (HAD) scale and the need evaluation questionnaire (NEQ) questionnaire were used, in order to measure quality-of-life dimension, mood and unmet needs. Patients were classified as having no need (cluster 1), a moderate need (cluster 2) or a high need (cluster 3) to be more involved in the clinical process.Our data confirmed previous studies in other clinical areas, showing that shared decision might contribute to a better adaptation process to the illness [1]. In fact, patients in cluster 1 showed a significant better self-perceived QoL, despite the lack of clinical differences between clusters. The study showed that patients satisfied with respect to decisional involvement seem to be able to better cope with their disease. Finally, the study suggests the need for a more attuned decision-making process in approaching clinical decisions. Physicians need to better understand patient preferences related to information and decision sharing.

  11. Impact of Adherence to Quality Measures for Localized Prostate Cancer on Patient-reported Health-related Quality of Life Outcomes, Patient Satisfaction, and Treatment-related Complications.

    PubMed

    Sohn, William; Resnick, Matthew J; Greenfield, Sheldon; Kaplan, Sherrie H; Phillips, Sharon; Koyama, Tatsuki; Goodman, Michael; Hamilton, Ann S; Hashibe, Mia; Hoffman, Karen E; Paddock, Lisa E; Stroup, Antoinette M; Wu, Xiao-Cheng; Penson, David F; Barocas, Daniel A

    2016-08-01

    Quality measures used in pay-for-performance systems are intended to address specific quality goals, such as safety, efficiency, effectiveness, timeliness, equity, and patient-centeredness. Given the small number of narrowly focused measures in prostate cancer care, we sought to determine whether adherence to any of the available payer-driven quality measures influences patient-centered outcomes, including health-related quality of life (HRQOL), patient satisfaction, and treatment-related complications. The Comparative Effectiveness Analysis of Surgery and Radiation study is a population-based, prospective cohort study that enrolled 3708 men with clinically localized prostate cancer during 2011 and 2012, of whom 2601 completed the 1-year survey and underwent complete chart abstraction. Compliance with 6 quality indicators endorsed by national consortia was assessed. Multivariable regression was used to determine the relationship between indicator compliance and Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC-26) instrument summary scores, satisfaction scale scores (service satisfaction scale for cancer care), and treatment-related complications. Overall rates of compliance with these quality measures ranged between 64% and 88%. Three of the 6 measures were weakly associated with 1-year sexual function and bowel function scores (β=-4.6, 1.69, and 2.93, respectively; P≤0.05), whereas the remaining measures had no significant relationship with patient-reported HRQOL outcomes. Satisfaction scores and treatment-related complications were not associated with quality measure compliance. Compliance with available nationally endorsed quality indicators, which were designed to incentivize effective and efficient care, was not associated with clinically important changes in patient-centered outcomes (HRQOL, satisfaction, or complications) within 1-year.

  12. Impact of Hyperglycemia on Survival and Infection-Related Adverse Events in Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Who Were Receiving Palliative Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yong Joo; Han, Hye-Suk; Jeong, Yusook; Jeong, Jiwon; Lim, Sung-Nam; Choi, Hyung Jin; Jeon, Hyun-Jung; Oh, Tae-Keun; Lee, Sang-Jeon; Lee, Ki Hyeong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Non-metastatic colorectal cancer patients with diabetes have poor overall survival than those without diabetes. However, the effect of hyperglycemia on survival after diagnosis of metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) has not been assessed. Therefore, we assessed the impact of hyperglycemia on the survival and infection-related adverse events (AEs) in patients with metastatic CRC. Materials and Methods We reviewed the records of 206 patients with newly diagnosed metastatic CRC who were treated with palliative chemotherapy from March 2000 to December 2012 at Chungbuk National University Hospital. The mean glucose level of each patient was calculated using all available glucose results. Results The mean glucose levels ranged between 76.8 and 303.5 mg/dL, and patients were categorized into quartiles in accordance to their mean glucose level: group 1 (< 106.7 mg/dL), group 2 (106.7-117.2 mg/dL), group 3 (117.3-142.6 mg/dL), and group 4 (> 142.6 mg/dL). The median overall survival for patients in groups 1, 2, 3, and 4 were 22.6, 20.1, 18.9, and 17.9 months, respectively; however, this difference was not statistically significant (p=0.643). Compared with patients in group 1, those in groups 2, 3, and 4 were at a higher risk of infection-related AEs, according to a multivariate analysis (p=0.002). Conclusion Hyperglycemia was not associated with shorter survival; however, it was associated with infection-related AEs in patients with newly diagnosed metastatic CRC receiving palliative chemotherapy. PMID:25038764

  13. The impact of lymph node dissection and adjuvant chemotherapy on survival: A nationwide cohort study of patients with clinical early-stage ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Kleppe, Marjolein; van der Aa, Maaike A; Van Gorp, Toon; Slangen, Brigitte F M; Kruitwagen, Roy F P M

    2016-10-01

    To establish the impact of lymph node dissection and chemotherapy on survival in patients with early-stage epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). All Dutch patients with International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage I-IIA and IIIA1 EOC between 2000 and 2012 were included. Data concerning age, stage, tumour grade, histological subtype, hospital type, lymph node dissection, adjuvant chemotherapy and survival were extracted from the Netherlands Cancer Registry. Of 3658 patients included, 1813 (49.6%) had lymph nodes removed. Relative survival of patients with lymph node dissection (including those with lymph node metastases) was significantly better than that of patients without, also after correcting for stage, tumour grade, histology and age (89% and 82%, respectively; relative excess risk [RER], 0.64; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.52-0.78). There was a positive correlation between the number of removed lymph nodes and overall survival (after excluding patients with lymph node metastases). Of patients with stage I-IIA EOC who had ≥10 lymph nodes removed, there was no difference in relative survival between those who received chemotherapy and those who did not (RER, 0.51; 95% CI: 0.15-1.64). This was also true for a subgroup of patients with high-risk features (stage IC and IIA and/or tumour grade 3 and/or clear cell histology [RER, 0.90; 95% CI: 0.46-1.99]). Adequate dissection of at least 10 but preferably ≥20 lymph nodes should be standard procedure for the staging of early-stage EOC. Adjuvant chemotherapy after an adequate lymph node dissection does not seem to contribute to a better relative survival. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Impact of COX2 genotype, ER status and body constitution on risk of early events in different treatment groups of breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Markkula, Andrea; Simonsson, Maria; Rosendahl, Ann H; Gaber, Alexander; Ingvar, Christian; Rose, Carsten; Jernström, Helena

    2014-10-15

    The COX2 rs5277 (306G>C) polymorphism has been associated with inflammation-associated cancers. In breast cancer, tumor COX-2 expression has been associated with increased estrogen levels in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive and activated Akt-pathway in ER-negative tumors. Our study investigated the impact of COX2 genotypes on early breast cancer events and treatment response in relation to tumor ER status and body constitution. In Sweden, between 2002 and 2008, 634 primary breast cancer patients, aged 25-99 years, were included. Disease-free survival was assessed for 570 rs5277-genotyped patients. Body measurements and questionnaires were obtained preoperatively. Clinical data, patient- and tumor-characteristics were obtained from questionnaires, patients' charts, population registries and pathology reports. Minor allele(C) frequency was 16.1%. Genotype was not linked to COX-2 tumor expression. Median follow-up was 5.1 years. G/G genotype was not associated with early events in patients with ER-positive tumors, adjusted HR 0.77 (0.46-1.29), but conferred an over 4-fold increased risk in patients with ER-negative tumors, adjusted HR 4.41 (1.21-16.02)(p(interaction) = 0.015). Chemotherapy-treated G/G-carriers with a breast volume ≥ 850 ml had an increased risk of early events irrespective of ER status, adjusted HR 8.99 (1.14-70.89). Endocrine-treated C-allele carriers with ER-positive tumors and a breast volume ≥ 850 ml had increased risk of early events, adjusted HR 2.30 (1.12-4.75). COX2 genotype, body constitution and ER status had a combined effect on the risk of early events and treatment response. The high risk for early events in certain subgroups of patients suggests that COX2 genotype in combination with body measurements may identify patients in need of more personalized treatment.

  15. Impact of Time Factors on Outcome in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer Treated with Definitive Radio(Chemo)Therapy.

    PubMed

    Dahlke, Sören; Steinmann, Diana; Christiansen, Hans; Durisin, Martin; Eckardt, Andre; Wegener, Gerd; Bremer, Michael; Meyer, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate treatment-related factors such as overall treatment time (OTT) and radiation treatment time (RTT) in head-and-neck cancer. A total of 216 patients with locoregionally advanced inoperable head and neck cancer were treated with definitive radio(chemo)therapy. Mean follow-up was 37 months. Median time from diagnosis to start of radiotherapy (total waiting time) was 34 days, and comprised of referral waiting time and time for preparatory work. Median RTT was 40 days, and median OTT was 91 days. At 6, 12 and 24 months local recurrence-free survival (LRFS) was 75%, 65% and 60%; metastasis-free survival (MFS) was 84%, 77% and 70%; overall survival (OS) was 72%, 58% and 40%. Tumor stage, boost and chemotherapy were significant for OS, waiting time for preparatory work and RTT were significant for MFS, and referral waiting time and total radiotherapy dose for LRFS. RTT ≤40 days was a prognostic factor for better MFS. Prolonged waiting time had a converse effect for radiotherapy with better outcome on MFS and LRFS. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  16. Impact of CYP2C19 polymorphism on the pharmacokinetics of nelfinavir in patients with pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kattel, Krishna; Evande, Ruby; Tan, Chalet; Mondal, Goutam; Grem, Jean L; Mahato, Ram I

    2015-01-01

    Aim This study evaluated the influence of CYP2C19 polymorphisms on the pharmacokinetics of nelfinavir and its metabolite M8 in patients with pancreatic cancer. Methods Nelfinavir was administered orally to patients for o