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Sample records for cancer subset enriched

  1. Characterization of a naturally occurring breast cancer subset enriched in EMT and stem cell characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Hennessy, Bryan T.; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana-Maria; Stemke-Hale, Katherine; Gilcrease, Michael Z.; Krishnamurthy, Savitri; Lee, Ju-Seog; Fridlyand, Jane; Sahin, Aysegul; Agarwal, Roshan; Joy, Corwin; Liu, Wenbin; Stivers, David; Baggerly, Keith; Carey, Mark; Lluch, Ana; Monteagudo, Carlos; He, Xiaping; Weigman, Victor; Fan, Cheng; Palazzo, Juan; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Nolden, Laura K.; Wang, Nicholas J.; Valero, Vicente; Gray, Joe W.; Perou, Charles M.; Mills, Gordon B.

    2009-05-19

    Metaplastic breast cancers (MBC) are aggressive, chemoresistant tumors characterized by lineage plasticity. To advance understanding of their pathogenesis and relatedness to other breast cancer subtypes, 28 MBCs were compared with common breast cancers using comparative genomic hybridization, transcriptional profiling, and reverse-phase protein arrays and by sequencing for common breast cancer mutations. MBCs showed unique DNA copy number aberrations compared with common breast cancers. PIK3CA mutations were detected in 9 of 19 MBCs (47.4%) versus 80 of 232 hormone receptor-positive cancers (34.5%; P = 0.32), 17 of 75 HER-2-positive samples (22.7%; P = 0.04), 20 of 240 basal-like cancers (8.3%; P < 0.0001), and 0 of 14 claudin-low tumors (P = 0.004). Of 7 phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT pathway phosphorylation sites, 6 were more highly phosphorylated in MBCs than in other breast tumor subtypes. The majority of MBCs displayed mRNA profiles different from those of the most common, including basal-like cancers. By transcriptional profiling, MBCs and the recently identified claudin-low breast cancer subset constitute related receptor-negative subgroups characterized by low expression of GATA3-regulated genes and of genes responsible for cell-cell adhesion with enrichment for markers linked to stem cell function and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). In contrast to other breast cancers, claudin-low tumors and most MBCs showed a significant similarity to a 'tumorigenic' signature defined using CD44{sup +}/CD24{sup -} breast tumor-initiating stem cell-like cells. MBCs and claudin-low tumors are thus enriched in EMT and stem cell-like features, and may arise from an earlier, more chemoresistant breast epithelial precursor than basal-like or luminal cancers. PIK3CA mutations, EMT, and stem cell-like characteristics likely contribute to the poor outcomes of MBC and suggest novel therapeutic targets.

  2. Highly enriched CD133(+)CD44(+) stem-like cells with CD133(+)CD44(high) metastatic subset in HCT116 colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ke-li; Pan, Feng; Jiang, Heng; Chen, Jian-fang; Pei, Li; Xie, Fang-wei; Liang, Hou-jie

    2011-12-01

    Stem-like cancer cells (SLCCs) are distinct cellular subpopulation in colon cancer that is essential for tumor maintenance. Previous studies indicated that SLCCs accounted for only a minor subset in a given cancer model. However, we found that SLCCs frequency varied among a panel of colon cancer cell lines, with HCT116 cells composed mainly of SLCCs, as demonstrated by colonosphere forming capability and CD133 expression. Indeed, flow cytometric analysis revealed more than 60% HCT116 cells co-expressed the putative SLCCs markers CD133 and CD44. Compared with non-CD133(+)CD44(+) cells, FACS sorted CD133(+)CD44(+) cells were undifferentiated, endowed with extensive self-renewal and epithelial lineage differentiation capacity in vitro. CD133(+)CD44(+) exhibited enhanced tumorigeneicity in NOD/SCID mice. One thousand CD133(+)CD44(+) cells initiated xenograft tumors efficiently (3/6) while 1 × 10(5) non-CD133(+)CD44(+) cells could only form palpable nodule with much slower growth rate (1/6). More interestingly, long-term cultured self-renewing CD133(+)CD44(+) cells enriched CD133(+)CD44(high) subset, which expressed epithelial to mesenchymal transition marker, were more invasive in vitro and responsible solely for liver metastasis in vivo. In conclusion, these data demonstrated for the first time that CD133(+)CD44(+) SLCCs were highly enriched in HCT116 cells and that metastatic SLCCs resided exclusively in a CD133(+)CD44(high) subpopulation.

  3. Feature Subset Selection for Cancer Classification Using Weight Local Modularity

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guodong; Wu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Microarray is recently becoming an important tool for profiling the global gene expression patterns of tissues. Gene selection is a popular technology for cancer classification that aims to identify a small number of informative genes from thousands of genes that may contribute to the occurrence of cancers to obtain a high predictive accuracy. This technique has been extensively studied in recent years. This study develops a novel feature selection (FS) method for gene subset selection by utilizing the Weight Local Modularity (WLM) in a complex network, called the WLMGS. In the proposed method, the discriminative power of gene subset is evaluated by using the weight local modularity of a weighted sample graph in the gene subset where the intra-class distance is small and the inter-class distance is large. A higher local modularity of the gene subset corresponds to a greater discriminative of the gene subset. With the use of forward search strategy, a more informative gene subset as a group can be selected for the classification process. Computational experiments show that the proposed algorithm can select a small subset of the predictive gene as a group while preserving classification accuracy. PMID:27703256

  4. Feature Subset Selection for Cancer Classification Using Weight Local Modularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guodong; Wu, Yan

    2016-10-01

    Microarray is recently becoming an important tool for profiling the global gene expression patterns of tissues. Gene selection is a popular technology for cancer classification that aims to identify a small number of informative genes from thousands of genes that may contribute to the occurrence of cancers to obtain a high predictive accuracy. This technique has been extensively studied in recent years. This study develops a novel feature selection (FS) method for gene subset selection by utilizing the Weight Local Modularity (WLM) in a complex network, called the WLMGS. In the proposed method, the discriminative power of gene subset is evaluated by using the weight local modularity of a weighted sample graph in the gene subset where the intra-class distance is small and the inter-class distance is large. A higher local modularity of the gene subset corresponds to a greater discriminative of the gene subset. With the use of forward search strategy, a more informative gene subset as a group can be selected for the classification process. Computational experiments show that the proposed algorithm can select a small subset of the predictive gene as a group while preserving classification accuracy.

  5. Testing gene set enrichment for subset of genes: Sub-GSE.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiting; Sun, Fengzhu

    2008-09-02

    Many methods have been developed to test the enrichment of genes related to certain phenotypes or cell states in gene sets. These approaches usually combine gene expression data with functionally related gene sets as defined in databases such as GeneOntology (GO), KEGG, or BioCarta. The results based on gene set analysis are generally more biologically interpretable, accurate and robust than the results based on individual gene analysis. However, while most available methods for gene set enrichment analysis test the enrichment of the entire gene set, it is more likely that only a subset of the genes in the gene set may be related to the phenotypes of interest. In this paper, we develop a novel method, termed Sub-GSE, which measures the enrichment of a predefined gene set, or pathway, by testing its subsets. The application of Sub-GSE to two simulated and two real datasets shows Sub-GSE to be more sensitive than previous methods, such as GSEA, GSA, and SigPath, in detecting gene sets assiated with a phenotype of interest. This is particularly true for cases in which only a fraction of the genes in the gene set are associated with the phenotypes. Furthermore, the application of Sub-GSE to two real data sets demonstrates that it can detect more biologically meaningful gene sets than GSEA. We developed a new method to measure the gene set enrichment. Applications to two simulated datasets and two real datasets show that this method is sensitive to the associations between gene sets and phenotype. The program Sub-GSE can be downloaded from http://www-rcf.usc.edu/~fsun.

  6. A subset polynomial neural networks approach for breast cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, T J; Penm, Jack; Penm, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    Breast cancer is a very common and serious cancer for women that is diagnosed in one of every eight Australian women before the age of 85. The conventional method of breast cancer diagnosis is mammography. However, mammography has been reported to have poor diagnostic capability. In this paper we have used subset polynomial neural network techniques in conjunction with fine needle aspiration cytology to undertake this difficult task of predicting breast cancer. The successful findings indicate that adoption of NNs is likely to lead to increased survival of women with breast cancer, improved electronic healthcare, and enhanced quality of life.

  7. Bulk enrichment of transplantable hemopoietic stem cell subsets from lipopolysaccharide-stimulated murine spleen

    SciTech Connect

    Ploemacher, R.E.; Brons, R.H.; Leenen, P.J.

    1987-02-01

    Counterflow centrifugal elutriation (CCE) in combination with density flotation centrifugation and fluorescence-activated cell sorting on wheat-germ agglutinin-FITC(WGA)-binding cells within the light-scatter ''blast window'' were used consecutively to enrich pluripotent hemopoietic stem cells (HSC) in bulk from lipopolysaccharide-stimulated mouse spleen. The medium-to-strong WGA + ve fraction contained 3.10(6) cells isolated from 3-4 X 10(9) spleen cells, with an average of 126% day-12 CFU-S and 65% day-8 CFU-S as calculated on the basis of their seeding fraction, suggesting that virtually all cells represented in vivo macroscopic colony formers. In view of the large differences reported elsewhere between stem cell subsets differing in reconstitutive capacity and secondary stem cell generation ability, we also studied various isolated cell fractions with respect to spleen colony formation, radioprotective ability, and spleen- and marrow- repopulating ability. Day-8 and day-12 CFU-S copurified when isolated by CCE. Cells from a fraction with high affinity for WGA were most highly enriched for their radioprotective ability (RPA) and their ability to repopulate the cellularity of the spleen and femur of irradiated recipients. This fraction contained virtually pure day-12 CFU-S. However, the ability to generate secondary day-12 CFU-S and CFU-GM in irradiated organs was enriched most in the medium WGA + ve cell fraction. MRA and SRA, according to the latter criteria, could therefore be partly separated from day-12 CFU-S and RPA on the basis of affinity for WGA. The data strongly suggest that at least part of all day-12 CFU-S have a high potential to proliferate and differentiate into mature progeny, but a relatively low self-renewal ability, and may therefore not be representative of the genuine stem cell.

  8. Recursive fuzzy granulation for gene subsets extraction and cancer classification.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yuchun; Zhang, Yan-Qing; Huang, Zhen; Hu, Xiaohua; Zhao, Yichuan

    2008-11-01

    A typical microarray gene expression dataset is usually both extremely sparse and imbalanced. To select multiple highly informative gene subsets for cancer classification and diagnosis, a new Fuzzy Granular Support Vector Machine---Recursive Feature Elimination algorithm (FGSVM-RFE) is designed in this paper. As a hybrid algorithm of statistical learning, fuzzy clustering, and granular computing, the FGSVM-RFE separately eliminates irrelevant, redundant, or noisy genes in different granules at different stages and selects highly informative genes with potentially different biological functions in balance. Empirical studies on three public datasets demonstrate that the FGSVM-RFE outperforms state-of-the-art approaches. Moreover, the FGSVM-RFE can extract multiple gene subsets on each of which a classifier can be modeled with 100% accuracy. Specifically, the independent testing accuracy for the prostate cancer dataset is significantly improved. The previous best result is 86% with 16 genes and our best result is 100% with only eight genes. The identified genes are annotated by Onto-Express to be biologically meaningful.

  9. Refinement of breast cancer risk prediction with concordant leading edge subsets from prognostic gene signatures.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chi-Cheng; Tu, Shih-Hsin; Lien, Heng-Hui; Huang, Ching-Shui; Huang, Chi-Jung; Lai, Liang-Chuan; Tsai, Mon-Hsun; Chuang, Eric Y

    2014-09-01

    Several prognostic signatures have been identified for breast cancer. However, these signatures vary extensively in their gene compositions, and the poor concordance of the risk groups defined by the prognostic signatures hinders their clinical applicability. Breast cancer risk prediction was refined with a novel approach to finding concordant genes from leading edge analysis of prognostic signatures. Each signature was split into two gene sets, which contained either up-regulated or down-regulated genes, and leading edge analysis was performed within each array study for all up-/down-regulated gene sets of the same signature from all training datasets. Consensus of leading edge subsets among all training microarrays was used to synthesize a predictive model, which was then tested in independent studies by partial least squares regression. Only a small portion of six prognostic signatures (Amsterdam, Rotterdam, Genomic Grade Index, Recurrence Score, and Hu306 and PAM50 of intrinsic subtypes) was significantly enriched in the leading edge analysis in five training datasets (n = 2,380), and that the concordant leading edge subsets (43 genes) could identify the core signature genes that account for the enrichment signals providing prognostic power across all assayed samples. The proposed concordant leading edge algorithm was able to discriminate high-risk from low-risk patients in terms of relapse-free or distant metastasis-free survival in all training samples (hazard ratios: 1.84-2.20) and in three out of four independent studies (hazard ratios: 3.91-8.31). In some studies, the concordant leading edge subset remained a significant prognostic factor independent of clinical ER, HER2, and lymph node status. The present study provides a statistical framework for identifying core consensus across microarray studies with leading edge analysis, and a breast cancer risk predictive model was established.

  10. Building on Dendritic Cell Subsets to Improve Cancer Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Palucka, Karolina; Ueno, Hideki; Zurawski, Gerard; Fay, Joseph; Banchereau, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY T cells can reject established tumors when adoptively transferred into patients, thereby demonstrating that the immune system can be harnessed for cancer therapy. However, such passive immunotherapy is unlikely to maintain memory T cells that might control tumor outgrowth on the long term. Active immunotherapy with vaccines has the potential to induce tumor-specific effector and memory T cells. Vaccines act through dendritic cells (DCs) which induce, regulate and maintain T cell immunity. Clinical trials testing first generation DC vaccines pulsed with tumor antigens provided a proof-of-principle that therapeutic immunity can be elicited. The increased knowledge of the DC system, including the existence of distinct DC subsets is leading to new trials which aim at improved immune and clinical outcomes. PMID:20226644

  11. Characterization of tumor-associated B-cell subsets in patients with colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gryschok, Luise; Malcher, Joke; Wennhold, Kerstin; Garcia-Marquez, Maria; Herbold, Till; Neuhaus, Laura S.; Becker, Hans J.; Fiedler, Anne; Scherwitz, Pascal; Koslowsky, Thomas; Hake, Roland; Stippel, Dirk L.; Hölscher, Arnulf H.; Eidt, Sebastian; Hallek, Michael; Theurich, Sebastian; von Bergwelt-Baildon, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: A precise understanding of the mechanisms by which human immune cell subsets affect tumor biology will be critical for successful treatment of cancer using immunotherapeutic approaches. Recent evidence suggests that B cells can both promote and inhibit the development and progression of tumors. The aim of this study was to characterize the composition of the B-cell infiltrates in colorectal cancers (CRC) in order to gain further insight into the role of B cells in CRC. Experimental Design: In this study we characterized B-cell subsets in primary tumors (n=38), metastases (n=6) and blood (n=46) of 51 patients with a diagnosis of CRC and blood of 10 healthy controls. B-cell subsets were analyzed by flow cytometry or immunohistochemistry. Results: Peripheral blood of CRC patients contained a higher percentage of memory B cells than that of age-matched healthy controls. Furthermore, the percentage of B cells within tumors was higher than that in the peripheral blood of CRC patients while metastases were typically devoid of tumor-infiltrating B cells. Tumor-associated B cells were enriched for activated and terminally differentiated B cells. Relevant proportions of regulatory B cells could only be detected in advanced cancer and metastases. Conclusion: B cells constitute a significant proportion of the immune infiltrate in CRC. The B-cell infiltrate of primary CRC is characterized by an accumulation of terminally differentiated memory B cells or plasma cells suggestive of a specific immune response against the tumor. However advanced tumors and metastases are also infiltrated by a considerable number of regulatory B cells. PMID:25026291

  12. Human endotoxin tolerance is associated with enrichment of the CD14+ CD16+ monocyte subset.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Nieto, Aimée; Zentella, Alejandro; Moreno, José; Ventura, José L; Pedraza, Sigifredo; Velázquez, Juan R

    2015-01-01

    Prior exposure to lipopolysaccharides (LPS) induces a state of cell resistance to subsequent LPS restimulation, known as endotoxin tolerance, mainly by repressing the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. We established an endotoxin tolerance model in human monocytes Endotoxin-tolerant cells showed a decrease in IκBα degradation and diminished expression of Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) (both messenger RNA [mRNA] and protein content). The myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88)/MyD88 splice variant (MyD88s) ratio, an indirect way to test the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) MyD88-dependent signaling cascade, did not change in endotoxin-tolerant cells when compared to LPS-stimulated or -unstimulated ones. Remarkably, cell population analysis indicated a significant increase of the CD14+ CD16+ subset only under the endotoxin-tolerant condition. Furthermore, endotoxin-tolerant cells produced higher amounts of C-X-C motif chemokine 10 (CXCL10), a typical MyD88-independent cytokine.

  13. DDX5 regulates DNA replication and is required for cell proliferation in a subset of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Mazurek, Anthony; Luo, Weijun; Krasnitz, Alexander; Hicks, James; Powers, R Scott; Stillman, Bruce

    2012-09-01

    Understanding factors required for DNA replication will enrich our knowledge of this important process and potentially identify vulnerabilities that can be exploited in cancer therapy. We applied an assay that measures the stability of maintenance of an episomal plasmid in human tissue culture cells to screen for new DNA replication factors. We identify an important role for DDX5 in G(1)-S-phase progression where it directly regulates DNA replication factor expression by promoting the recruitment of RNA polymerase II to E2F-regulated gene promoters. We find that the DDX5 locus is frequently amplified in breast cancer and that breast cancer-derived cells with amplification of DDX5 are much more sensitive to its depletion than breast cancer cells and a breast epithelial cell line that lacks DDX5 amplification. Our results show a novel role for DDX5 in cancer cell proliferation and suggest DDX5 as a therapeutic target in breast cancer treatment. DDX5 is required for cell proliferation by controlling the transcription of genes expressing DNA replication proteins in cancer cells in which the DDX5 locus is amplified, and this has uncovered a dependence on DDX5 for cell proliferation. Given the high frequency of DDX5 amplification in breast cancer, our results highlight DDX5 as a promising candidate for targeted therapy of breast tumors with DDX5 amplification, and indeed we show that DDX5 inhibition sensitizes a subset of breast cancer cells to trastuzumab.

  14. Circulating and tumor-infiltrating myeloid cell subsets in patients with bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Eruslanov, Evgeniy; Neuberger, Molly; Daurkin, Irina; Perrin, George Q; Algood, Chester; Dahm, Philipp; Rosser, Charles; Vieweg, Johannes; Gilbert, Scott M; Kusmartsev, Sergei

    2012-03-01

    Both cancer-related inflammation and tumor-induced immune suppression are associated with expansion of myeloid cell subsets including myeloid-derived suppressor cells. However, little known regarding characteristics of myeloid cells in patients with bladder cancer. In this study, we analyzed myeloid cells from peripheral blood (PBMC) and tumor tissue that were collected from patients with superficial noninvasive and invasive urothelial carcinomas. Our results demonstrate that PBMC from bladder cancer patients contain two major CD11b myeloid cell subsets: granulocyte-type CD15(high) CD33(low) cells and monocyte-type CD15(low) CD33(high) cells. The number of circulating granulocytic but not monocytic myeloid cells in cancer patients was markedly increased when compared to healthy individuals. Both myeloid cell subsets from cancer patients were highly activated and produced substantial amounts of proinflammatory chemokines/cytokines including CCL2, CCL3, CCL4, G-CSF, IL-8 and IL-6. Granulocytic myeloid cells were able to inhibit in vitro T cell proliferation through induction of CD4(+) Foxp3(+) T regulatory cells. Analysis of bladder cancer tissues revealed that tumors were infiltrated with monocyte-macrophage CD11b(+) HLA-DR(+) and granulocytic CD11b(+) CD15(+) HLA-DR(-) myeloid cells. Collectively, this study identifies myeloid cell subsets in patients with bladder cancer. We demonstrate that these highly activated inflammatory myeloid cells represent a source of multiple chemokines/cytokines and may contribute to inflammation and immune dysfunction in bladder cancer.

  15. T Helper Lymphocyte Subsets and Plasticity in Autoimmunity and Cancer: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, Ekaterina A.; Orekhov, Alexander N.

    2015-01-01

    In response to cytokine signalling and other factors, CD4-positive T lymphocytes differentiate into distinct populations that are characterized by the production of certain cytokines and are controlled by different master transcription factors. The spectrum of such populations, which was initially limited to Th1 and Th2 subsets, is currently broadened to include Th17 and Treg subsets, as well as a number of less studied subtypes, such as Tfh, Th9, and Th22. Although these subsets appear to be relatively stable, certain plasticity exists that allows for transition between the subsets and formation of hybrid transition forms. This provides the immune system flexibility needed for adequate response to pathogens but, at the same time, can play a role in the pathogenic processes in cases of deregulation. In this review, we will discuss the properties of T lymphocyte subsets and their plasticity, as well as its implications for cancer and autoimmune diseases. PMID:26583100

  16. The beating heart of melanomas: a minor subset of cancer cells sustains tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Patrick; Abken, Hinrich

    2011-04-01

    The recent observation that targeted elimination of a minor subpopulation of melanoma cells can lastingly eradicate the tumor lesion provides strong evidence that an established melanoma lesion is hierarchically organized and maintained by definite subset of cells but not by every random cancer cell. This review discusses the concepts of discrete cancer stem cells and of a cellular hierarchy in melanomas, the rationale for shifting therapies from broad tumor cell cytotoxicity into selective cancer cell elimination strategies and the challenges for future therapeutic concepts.

  17. The isolation and characterization of CTC subsets related to breast cancer dormancy

    PubMed Central

    Vishnoi, Monika; Peddibhotla, Sirisha; Yin, Wei; T. Scamardo, Antonio; George, Goldy C.; Hong, David S.; Marchetti, Dario

    2015-01-01

    Uncovering CTCs phenotypes offer the promise to dissect their heterogeneity related to metastatic competence. CTC survival rates are highly variable and this can lead to many questions as yet unexplored properties of CTCs responsible for invasion and metastasis vs dormancy. We isolated CTC subsets from peripheral blood of patients diagnosed with or without breast cancer brain metastasis. CTC subsets were selected for EpCAM negativity but positivity for CD44+/CD24− stem cell signature; along with combinatorial expression of uPAR and int β1, two markers directly implicated in breast cancer dormancy mechanisms. CTC subsets were cultured in vitro generating 3D CTC tumorspheres which were interrogated for biomarker profiling and biological characteristics. We identified proliferative and invasive properties of 3D CTC tumorspheres distinctive upon uPAR/int β1 combinatorial expression. The molecular characterization of uPAR/int β1 CTC subsets may enhance abilities to prospectively identify patients who may be at high risk of developing BCBM. PMID:26631983

  18. Embryonic mammary signature subsets are activated in Brca1-/- and basal-like breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Cancer is often suggested to result from development gone awry. Links between normal embryonic development and cancer biology have been postulated, but no defined genetic basis has been established. We recently published the first transcriptomic analysis of embryonic mammary cell populations. Embryonic mammary epithelial cells are an immature progenitor cell population, lacking differentiation markers, which is reflected in their very distinct genetic profiles when compared with those of their postnatal descendents. Methods We defined an embryonic mammary epithelial signature that incorporates the most highly expressed genes from embryonic mammary epithelium when compared with the postnatal mammary epithelial cells. We looked for activation of the embryonic mammary epithelial signature in mouse mammary tumors that formed in mice in which Brca1 had been conditionally deleted from the mammary epithelium and in human breast cancers to determine whether any genetic links exist between embryonic mammary cells and breast cancers. Results Small subsets of the embryonic mammary epithelial signature were consistently activated in mouse Brca1-/- tumors and human basal-like breast cancers, which encoded predominantly transcriptional regulators, cell-cycle, and actin cytoskeleton components. Other embryonic gene subsets were found activated in non-basal-like tumor subtypes and repressed in basal-like tumors, including regulators of neuronal differentiation, transcription, and cell biosynthesis. Several embryonic genes showed significant upregulation in estrogen receptor (ER)-negative, progesterone receptor (PR)-negative, and/or grade 3 breast cancers. Among them, the transcription factor, SOX11, a progenitor cell and lineage regulator of nonmammary cell types, is found highly expressed in some Brca1-/- mammary tumors. By using RNA interference to silence SOX11 expression in breast cancer cells, we found evidence that SOX11 regulates breast cancer cell

  19. PD-1 expression on peripheral blood T-cell subsets correlates with prognosis in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Waki, Kayoko; Yamada, Teppei; Yoshiyama, Koichi; Terazaki, Yasuhiro; Sakamoto, Shinjiro; Matsueda, Satoko; Komatsu, Nobukazu; Sugawara, Shunichi; Takamori, Shinzo; Itoh, Kyogo; Yamada, Akira

    2014-01-01

    PD-1 expression in peripheral blood T-cells has been reported in several kinds of cancers, including lung cancer. However, the relationship between PD-1 expression in peripheral blood T-cells and prognosis after treatment with a cancer vaccine has not been reported. To elucidate this relationship, we analyzed PD-1 expression in the peripheral blood T-cells of patients with non-small cell lung cancer. The blood samples used in this study were obtained from patients enrolled in phase II clinical trials of a personalized peptide vaccine. Seventy-eight samples obtained before and after a single vaccination cycle (consisting of six or eight doses) were subjected to the analysis. PD-1 was expressed on lymphocytes in the majority of samples. The relative contents of PD1+CD4+ T-cells against total lymphocytes before and after the vaccination cycle correlated with overall survival (OS) with a high degree of statistical significance (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.0014). A decrease in PD-1+CD8+ T-cells after one cycle of vaccination also correlated with longer OS (P = 0.032). The IgG response to the non-vaccinated peptides suggested that the epitope spreading seemed to occur more frequently in high-PD-1+CD4+ T-cell groups. Enrichment of CD45RA−CCR7− effector-memory phenotype cells in PD-1+ T-cells in PBMCs was also shown. These results suggest that PD-1 expression on the peripheral blood T-cell subsets can become a new prognostic marker in non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with personalized peptide vaccination. PMID:25117757

  20. Distinct Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Subsets Mediate Anti-HER2 Drug Resistance in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Peter B; Chen, Rui; Gong, Chang; Yuan, Lifeng; Jasper, Jeff S; Ding, Yi; Markowitz, Geoffrey J; Yang, Pengyuan; Xu, Xin; McDonnell, Donald P; Song, Erwei; Wang, Xiao-Fan

    2017-01-13

    Targeted inhibitors of the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), such as trastuzumab and lapatinib, are among the first examples of molecularly targeted cancer therapy and have proven largely effective for the treatment of HER2-positive breast cancers. However, approximately half of those patients either do not respond to these therapies or develop secondary resistance. Although a few signaling pathways have been implicated, a comprehensive understanding of mechanisms underlying HER2 inhibitor drug resistance is still lacking. To address this critical question, we undertook a concerted approach using patient expression data sets, HER2-positive cell lines, and tumor samples biopsied both before and after trastuzumab treatment. Together, these methods revealed that high expression and activation of a specific subset of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) was strongly associated with poor clinical prognosis and the development of resistance. Mechanistically, these RTKs are capable of maintaining downstream signal transduction to promote tumor growth via the suppression of cellular senescence. Consequently, these findings provide the rationale for the design of therapeutic strategies for overcoming drug resistance in breast cancer via combinational inhibition of the limited number of targets from this specific subset of RTKs. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Microsatellite-stable diploid carcinoma: a biologically distinct and aggressive subset of sporadic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, N J; Tomlinson, I; Meagher, A; Ward, R L

    2001-01-01

    Chromosomal instability and microsatellite instability represent the major pathways for colorectal cancer (CRC) progression. However, a significant percentage of CRC shows neither pattern of instability, and thus represents a potentially distinctive form of the disease. Flow cytometry was used to determine the degree of DNA aneuploidy in 46 consecutive sporadic colorectal cancers. Microsatellite status was determined by PCR amplification using standard markers, while immunostaining was used to examine the expression of p53. K- ras status was determined by restriction-mediated PCR assay. Twenty-five (54%) tumours were aneuploid, 14 (30%) were diploid and microsatellite-stable and seven (15%) were diploid and microsatellite-unstable. Tumours with microsatellite instability were more likely to be right sided, to occur in women and to be associated with an improved survival. Aneuploid tumours were significantly more common in men and were likely to be left sided. The diploid microsatellite-stable (MSS) tumours did not show a sex or site predilection, but were strongly associated with the presence of metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis. Our data suggests that diploid, MSS tumours represent a biologically and phenotypically distinct subset of colorectal carcinoma, and one that is associated with the early development of metastases. We suggest that the genetic stability that characterizes these tumours may favour the maintenance of an invasive phenotype, and thus facilitate disease progression. These findings may have important implications for treatment options in this disease subset. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11161382

  2. TASK-1 Regulates Apoptosis and Proliferation in a Subset of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Leithner, Katharina; Hirschmugl, Birgit; Li, Yingji; Tang, Bi; Papp, Rita; Nagaraj, Chandran; Stacher, Elvira; Stiegler, Philipp; Lindenmann, Jörg; Olschewski, Andrea; Olschewski, Horst; Hrzenjak, Andelko

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide; survival times are poor despite therapy. The role of the two-pore domain K+ (K2P) channel TASK-1 (KCNK3) in lung cancer is at present unknown. We found that TASK-1 is expressed in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines at variable levels. In a highly TASK-1 expressing NSCLC cell line, A549, a characteristic pH- and hypoxia-sensitive non-inactivating K+ current was measured, indicating the presence of functional TASK-1 channels. Inhibition of TASK-1 led to significant depolarization in these cells. Knockdown of TASK-1 by siRNA significantly enhanced apoptosis and reduced proliferation in A549 cells, but not in weakly TASK-1 expressing NCI-H358 cells. Na+-coupled nutrient transport across the cell membrane is functionally coupled to the efflux of K+ via K+ channels, thus TASK-1 may potentially influence Na+-coupled nutrient transport. In contrast to TASK-1, which was not differentially expressed in lung cancer vs. normal lung tissue, we found the Na+-coupled nutrient transporters, SLC5A3, SLC5A6, and SLC38A1, transporters for myo-inositol, biotin and glutamine, respectively, to be significantly overexpressed in lung adenocarcinomas. In summary, we show for the first time that the TASK-1 channel regulates apoptosis and proliferation in a subset of NSCLC. PMID:27294516

  3. TASK-1 Regulates Apoptosis and Proliferation in a Subset of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers.

    PubMed

    Leithner, Katharina; Hirschmugl, Birgit; Li, Yingji; Tang, Bi; Papp, Rita; Nagaraj, Chandran; Stacher, Elvira; Stiegler, Philipp; Lindenmann, Jörg; Olschewski, Andrea; Olschewski, Horst; Hrzenjak, Andelko

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide; survival times are poor despite therapy. The role of the two-pore domain K+ (K2P) channel TASK-1 (KCNK3) in lung cancer is at present unknown. We found that TASK-1 is expressed in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines at variable levels. In a highly TASK-1 expressing NSCLC cell line, A549, a characteristic pH- and hypoxia-sensitive non-inactivating K+ current was measured, indicating the presence of functional TASK-1 channels. Inhibition of TASK-1 led to significant depolarization in these cells. Knockdown of TASK-1 by siRNA significantly enhanced apoptosis and reduced proliferation in A549 cells, but not in weakly TASK-1 expressing NCI-H358 cells. Na+-coupled nutrient transport across the cell membrane is functionally coupled to the efflux of K+ via K+ channels, thus TASK-1 may potentially influence Na+-coupled nutrient transport. In contrast to TASK-1, which was not differentially expressed in lung cancer vs. normal lung tissue, we found the Na+-coupled nutrient transporters, SLC5A3, SLC5A6, and SLC38A1, transporters for myo-inositol, biotin and glutamine, respectively, to be significantly overexpressed in lung adenocarcinomas. In summary, we show for the first time that the TASK-1 channel regulates apoptosis and proliferation in a subset of NSCLC.

  4. DENDRITIC CELL SUBSETS AS VECTORS AND TARGETS FOR IMPROVED CANCER THERAPY

    PubMed Central

    Palucka, Karolina; Ueno, Hideki; Roberts, Lee; Fay, Joseph; Banchereau, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Current active immunotherapy trials have shown durable tumor regressions in a fraction of patients. However, clinical efficacy of current vaccines is limited, possibly because tumors skew the immune system by means of myeloid-derived suppressor cells, inflammatory type 2 T cells and regulatory T cells (Tregs), all of which prevent the generation of effector cells. To improve the clinical efficacy of cancer vaccines in patients with metastatic disease, we need to design novel and improved strategies that can boost adaptive immunity to cancer, help overcome Tregs and allow the breakdown of the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. This can be achieved by exploiting the fast increasing knowledge about the dendritic cell (DC) system, including the existence of distinct DC subsets. Critical to the design of better vaccines is the concept of distinct DC subsets and distinct DC activation pathways, all contributing to the generation of unique adaptive immune responses. Such novel DC vaccines will be used as monotherapy in patients with resected disease and in combination with antibodies and/or drugs targeting suppressor pathways and modulation of the tumor environment in patients with metastatic disease. PMID:20490776

  5. MicroRNA-125b expands hematopoietic stem cells and enriches for the lymphoid-balanced and lymphoid-biased subsets

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, A. G. Lisa; Sahoo, Debashis; Adorno, Maddalena; Wang, Yulei; Weissman, Irving L.; Park, Christopher Y.

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs profoundly impact hematopoietic cells by regulating progenitor cell-fate decisions, as well as mature immune effector function. However to date, microRNAs that regulate hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) function have been less well characterized. Here we show that microRNA-125b (miR-125b) is highly expressed in HSCs and its expression decreases in committed progenitors. Overexpression of miR-125b in mouse HSC enhances their function, demonstrated through serial transplantation of highly purified HSC, and enriches for the previously described Slamf1loCD34− lymphoid-balanced and the Slamf1negCD34− lymphoid-biased cell subsets within the multipotent HSC (CD34-KLS) fraction. Mature peripheral blood cells derived from the miR-125b–overexpressing HSC are skewed toward the lymphoid lineage. Consistent with this observation, miR-125b overexpression significantly increases the number of early B-progenitor cells within the spleen and induces the expansion and enrichment of the lymphoid-balanced and lymphoid-biased HSC subset via an antiapoptotic mechanism, reducing the mRNA expression levels of two proapoptotic targets, Bmf and KLF13. The antiapoptotic effect of miR-125b is more pronounced in the lymphoid-biased HSC subset because of their intrinsic higher baseline levels of apoptosis. These effects of miR-125b are associated with the development of lymphoproliferative disease, marked by expansion of CD8+ T lymphocytes. Taken together, these data reveal that miR-125b regulates HSC survival and can promote lymphoid-fate decisions at the level of the HSC by preferentially expanding lymphoid-balanced and lymphoid-biased HSC. PMID:21118986

  6. MicroRNA-125b expands hematopoietic stem cells and enriches for the lymphoid-balanced and lymphoid-biased subsets.

    PubMed

    Ooi, A G Lisa; Sahoo, Debashis; Adorno, Maddalena; Wang, Yulei; Weissman, Irving L; Park, Christopher Y

    2010-12-14

    MicroRNAs profoundly impact hematopoietic cells by regulating progenitor cell-fate decisions, as well as mature immune effector function. However to date, microRNAs that regulate hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) function have been less well characterized. Here we show that microRNA-125b (miR-125b) is highly expressed in HSCs and its expression decreases in committed progenitors. Overexpression of miR-125b in mouse HSC enhances their function, demonstrated through serial transplantation of highly purified HSC, and enriches for the previously described Slamf1(lo)CD34(-) lymphoid-balanced and the Slamf1(neg)CD34(-) lymphoid-biased cell subsets within the multipotent HSC (CD34-KLS) fraction. Mature peripheral blood cells derived from the miR-125b-overexpressing HSC are skewed toward the lymphoid lineage. Consistent with this observation, miR-125b overexpression significantly increases the number of early B-progenitor cells within the spleen and induces the expansion and enrichment of the lymphoid-balanced and lymphoid-biased HSC subset via an antiapoptotic mechanism, reducing the mRNA expression levels of two proapoptotic targets, Bmf and KLF13. The antiapoptotic effect of miR-125b is more pronounced in the lymphoid-biased HSC subset because of their intrinsic higher baseline levels of apoptosis. These effects of miR-125b are associated with the development of lymphoproliferative disease, marked by expansion of CD8(+) T lymphocytes. Taken together, these data reveal that miR-125b regulates HSC survival and can promote lymphoid-fate decisions at the level of the HSC by preferentially expanding lymphoid-balanced and lymphoid-biased HSC.

  7. Telomere fusion threshold identifies a poor prognostic subset of breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Simpson, K; Jones, R E; Grimstead, J W; Hills, R; Pepper, C; Baird, D M

    2015-06-01

    Telomere dysfunction and fusion can drive genomic instability and clonal evolution in human tumours, including breast cancer. Telomere length is a critical determinant of telomere function and has been evaluated as a prognostic marker in several tumour types, but it has yet to be used in the clinical setting. Here we show that high-resolution telomere length analysis, together with a specific telomere fusion threshold, is highly prognostic for overall survival in a cohort of patients diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast (n = 120). The telomere fusion threshold defined a small subset of patients with an extremely poor clinical outcome, with a median survival of less than 12 months (HR = 21.4 (7.9-57.6), P < 0.0001). Furthermore, this telomere length threshold was independent of ER, PGR, HER2 status, NPI, or grade and was the dominant variable in multivariate analysis. We conclude that the fusogenic telomere length threshold provides a powerful, independent prognostic marker with clinical utility in breast cancer. Larger prospective studies are now required to determine the optimal way to incorporate high-resolution telomere length analysis into multivariate prognostic algorithms for patients diagnosed with breast cancer.

  8. p63 Expression Defines a Lethal Subset of Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Woonyoung; Shah, Jay B.; Tran, Mai; Svatek, Robert; Marquis, Lauren; Lee, I-Ling; Yu, Dasom; Adam, Liana; Wen, Sijin; Shen, Yu; Dinney, Colin; McConkey, David J.; Siefker-Radtke, Arlene

    2012-01-01

    Background p63 is a member of the p53 family that has been implicated in maintenance of epithelial stem cell compartments. Previous studies demonstrated that p63 is downregulated in muscle-invasive bladder cancers, but the relationship between p63 expression and survival is not clear. Methodology/Principal Findings We used real-time PCR to characterize p63 expression and several genes implicated in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in human bladder cancer cell lines (n = 15) and primary tumors (n = 101). We correlated tumor marker expression with stage, disease-specific (DSS), and overall survival (OS). Expression of E-cadherin and p63 correlated directly with one another and inversely with expression of the mesenchymal markers Zeb-1, Zeb-2, and vimentin. Non-muscle-invasive (Ta and T1) bladder cancers uniformly expressed high levels of E-cadherin and p63 and low levels of the mesenchymal markers. Interestingly, a subset of muscle-invasive (T2–T4) tumors maintained high levels of E-cadherin and p63 expression. As expected, there was a strongly significant correlation between EMT marker expression and muscle invasion (p<0.0001). However, OS was shorter in patients with muscle-invasive tumors that retained p63 (p = 0.007). Conclusions/Significance Our data confirm that molecular markers of EMT are elevated in muscle-invasive bladder cancers, but interestingly, retention of the “epithelial” marker p63 in muscle-invasive tumors is associated with a worse outcome. PMID:22253920

  9. CD1− and CD1+ porcine blood dendritic cells are enriched for the orthologues of the two major mammalian conventional subsets

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Jane C.; Everett, Helen E.; Pedrera, Miriam; Mokhtar, Helen; Marchi, Emanuele; Soldevila, Ferran; Kaveh, Daryan A.; Hogarth, Philip J.; Johns, Helen L.; Nunez-Garcia, Javier; Steinbach, Falko; Crooke, Helen R.; Graham, Simon P.

    2017-01-01

    Conventional dendritic cells (cDC) are professional antigen-presenting cells that induce immune activation or tolerance. Two functionally specialised populations, termed cDC1 and cDC2, have been described in humans, mice, ruminants and recently in pigs. Pigs are an important biomedical model species and a key source of animal protein; therefore further understanding of their immune system will help underpin the development of disease prevention strategies. To characterise cDC populations in porcine blood, DC were enriched from PBMC by CD14 depletion and CD172a enrichment then stained with lineage mAbs (Lin; CD3, CD8α, CD14 and CD21) and mAbs specific for CD172a, CD1 and CD4. Two distinct porcine cDC subpopulations were FACSorted CD1− cDC (Lin−CD172+ CD1−CD4−) and CD1+ cDC (Lin−CD172a+ CD1+ CD4−), and characterised by phenotypic and functional analyses. CD1+ cDC were distinct from CD1− cDC, expressing higher levels of CD172a, MHC class II and CD11b. Following TLR stimulation, CD1+ cDC produced IL-8 and IL-10 while CD1− cDC secreted IFN-α, IL-12 and TNF-α. CD1− cDC were superior in stimulating allogeneic T cell responses and in cross-presenting viral antigens to CD8 T cells. Comparison of transcriptional profiles further suggested that the CD1− and CD1+ populations were enriched for the orthologues of cDC1 and cDC2 subsets respectively. PMID:28106145

  10. A subset of myofibroblastic cancer-associated fibroblasts regulate collagen fiber elongation, which is prognostic in multiple cancers.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Christopher J; Noble, Fergus; Ward, Matthew; Bullock, Marc; Drifka, Cole; Mellone, Massimiliano; Manousopoulou, Antigoni; Johnston, Harvey E; Hayden, Annette; Thirdborough, Steve; Liu, Yuming; Smith, David M; Mellows, Toby; Kao, W John; Garbis, Spiros D; Mirnezami, Alex; Underwood, Tim J; Eliceiri, Kevin W; Thomas, Gareth J

    2016-02-02

    Collagen structure has been shown to influence tumor cell invasion, metastasis and clinical outcome in breast cancer. However, it remains unclear how it affects other solid cancers. Here we utilized multi-photon laser scanning microscopy and Second Harmonic Generation to identify alterations to collagen fiber structure within the tumor stroma of head & neck, esophageal and colorectal cancers. Image segmentation algorithms were then applied to quantitatively characterize these morphological changes, showing that elongated collagen fibers significantly correlated with poor clinical outcome (Log Rank p < 0.05). We used TGF-β treatment to model fibroblast conversion to smooth muscle actin SMA-positive cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and found that these cells induce the formation of elongated collagen fibers in vivo. However, proteomic/transcriptomic analysis of SMA-positive CAFs cultured ex-vivo showed significant heterogeneity in the expression of genes with collagen fibril organizing gene ontology. Notably, stratifying patients according to stromal SMA-positivity and collagen fiber elongation was found to provide a highly significant correlation with poor survival in all 3 cancer types (Log Rank p ≤ 0.003). In summary, we show that increased collagen fiber length correlates with poor patient survival in multiple tumor types and that only a sub-set of SMA-positive CAFs can mediate the formation of this collagen structure.

  11. A subset of myofibroblastic cancer-associated fibroblasts regulate collagen fiber elongation, which is prognostic in multiple cancers

    PubMed Central

    Hanley, Christopher J.; Noble, Fergus; Ward, Matthew; Bullock, Marc; Drifka, Cole; Mellone, Massimiliano; Manousopoulou, Antigoni; Johnston, Harvey E.; Hayden, Annette; Thirdborough, Steve; Liu, Yuming; Smith, David M.; Mellows, Toby; Kao, W. John; Garbis, Spiros D.; Mirnezami, Alex; Underwood, Tim J.

    2016-01-01

    Collagen structure has been shown to influence tumor cell invasion, metastasis and clinical outcome in breast cancer. However, it remains unclear how it affects other solid cancers. Here we utilized multi-photon laser scanning microscopy and Second Harmonic Generation to identify alterations to collagen fiber structure within the tumor stroma of head & neck, esophageal and colorectal cancers. Image segmentation algorithms were then applied to quantitatively characterize these morphological changes, showing that elongated collagen fibers significantly correlated with poor clinical outcome (Log Rank p < 0.05). We used TGF-β treatment to model fibroblast conversion to smooth muscle actin SMA-positive cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and found that these cells induce the formation of elongated collagen fibers in vivo. However, proteomic/transcriptomic analysis of SMA-positive CAFs cultured ex-vivo showed significant heterogeneity in the expression of genes with collagen fibril organizing gene ontology. Notably, stratifying patients according to stromal SMA-positivity and collagen fiber elongation was found to provide a highly significant correlation with poor survival in all 3 cancer types (Log Rank p ≤ 0.003). In summary, we show that increased collagen fiber length correlates with poor patient survival in multiple tumor types and that only a sub-set of SMA-positive CAFs can mediate the formation of this collagen structure. PMID:26716418

  12. CD4 T-LYMPHOCYTE SUBSETS IN WOMEN WITH INVASIVE CERVICAL CANCER IN KENYA.

    PubMed

    Gichangi, P; Gathece, L; Estambale, B; Temmerman, M

    2013-10-01

    Invasive cervical cancer (ICC) and HIV are common in sub-Sahara Africa. Both ICC and HIV are immunosuppressive, and are associated with decreased CD4 and CD8 profiles. In a group of women with ICC starting radiotherapy, we determined their CD4 profiles. A cross-sectional study. Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi, Kenya, radiotherapy unit. Women with invasive cervical cancer (344) seeking radiotherapy treatment for the first time between January 2000 and March 2003, had blood samples analyzed for CD4 and CD8 cell counts by flow cytometry. Haemoglobin, white cell count, lymphocyte and platelet counts were determined using coulter machine. All patients had received pre- and post HIV counseling. The mean age was 49+13 years. About 13.1% of the women with ICC were HIV positive. Overall, mean and median CD4 cell count was 829+355 cells/mm and 792 cells/mm3. Among HIV+ patients, mean and median CD4 cell counts were 451+288 cells/mm and 405 cells/mm respectively. The mean CD4 cell count for the HIV+ womenwas 886+329 cells/mm3 with median of 833 cells/mm3, range 147-2065 cells/mm3. Only nine (20%) of the 45 HIV+ women had CD4 cell count of 0-200. HIV+ women had lower CD4 percentage and cell count and higher CD8 percentage and cell count as compared to HIV negative women, p < 0.001. HIV infection was significantly and independently associated with high proportion of women who had CD4 cell count of less than 200 cells/mm3 or less than 350 cells/mm3, p < 0.0001. Women with ICC and concurrent HIV infection have decreased CD4 cell subset. These results suggest HIV infection may be associated with more severe CD4 depletion in women with ICC.

  13. SCA-1 Labels a Subset of Estrogen-Responsive Bipotential Repopulating Cells within the CD24(+) CD49f(hi) Mammary Stem Cell-Enriched Compartment.

    PubMed

    Dall, Genevieve V; Vieusseux, Jessica L; Korach, Kenneth S; Arao, Yukitomo; Hewitt, Sylvia C; Hamilton, Katherine J; Dzierzak, Elaine; Boon, Wah Chin; Simpson, Evan R; Ramsay, Robert G; Stein, Torsten; Morris, Joanne S; Anderson, Robin L; Risbridger, Gail P; Britt, Kara L

    2017-02-14

    Estrogen stimulates breast development during puberty and mammary tumors in adulthood through estrogen receptor-α (ERα). These effects are proposed to occur via ERα(+) luminal cells and not the mammary stem cells (MaSCs) that are ERα(neg). Since ERα(+) luminal cells express stem cell antigen-1 (SCA-1), we sought to determine if SCA-1 could define an ERα(+) subset of EpCAM(+)/CD24(+)/CD49f(hi) MaSCs. We show that the MaSC population has a distinct SCA-1(+) population that is abundant in pre-pubertal mammary glands. The SCA-1(+) MaSCs have less stem cell markers and less in vivo repopulating activity than their SCA-1(neg) counterparts. However, they express ERα and specifically enter the cell cycle at puberty. Using estrogen-deficient aromatase knockouts (ArKO), we showed that the SCA-1(+) MaSC could be directly modulated by estrogen supplementation. Thus, SCA-1 enriches for an ERα(+), estrogen-sensitive subpopulation within the CD24(+)/CD49f(hi) MaSC population that may be responsible for the hormonal sensitivity of the developing mammary gland.

  14. Circulating tumor cells in pancreatic cancer patients: Enrichment and cultivation

    PubMed Central

    Bobek, Vladimir; Gurlich, Robert; Eliasova, Petra; Kolostova, Katarina

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the feasibility of separation and cultivation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in pancreatic cancer (PaC) using a filtration device. METHODS: In total, 24 PaC patients who were candidates for surgical treatment were enrolled into the study. Peripheral blood samples were collected before an indicated surgery. For each patient, approximately 8 mL of venous blood was drawn from the antecubital veins. A new size-based separation MetaCell® technology was used for enrichment and cultivation of CTCs in vitro. (Separated CTCs were cultured on a membrane in FBS enriched RPMI media and observed by inverted microscope. The cultured cells were analyzed by means of histochemistry and immunohistochemistry using the specific antibodies to identify the cell origin. RESULTS: CTCs were detected in 16 patients (66.7%) of the 24 evaluable patients. The CTC positivity did not reflect the disease stage, tumor size, or lymph node involvement. The same percentage of CTC positivity was observed in the metastatic and non-metastatic patients (66.7% vs 66.7%). We report a successful isolation of CTCs in PaC patients capturing proliferating cells. The cells were captured by a capillary action driven size-based filtration approach that enabled cells cultures from the viable CTCs to be unaffected by any antibodies or lysing solutions. The captured cancer cells displayed plasticity which enabled some cells to invade the separating membrane. Further, the cancer cells in the “bottom fraction”, may represent a more invasive CTC-fraction. The CTCs were cultured in vitro for further downstream applications. CONCLUSION: The presented size-based filtration method enables culture of CTCs in vitro for possible downstream applications. PMID:25493031

  15. ENRICH Forum: Ethical aNd Regulatory Issues in Cancer ResearcH

    Cancer.gov

    ENRICH Forum: Ethical aNd Regulatory Issues in Cancer ResearcH, designed to stimulate dialogue on ethical and regulatory issues in cancer research and promote awareness of developing policies and best practices.

  16. Serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 (SPINK1) drives proliferation and anoikis resistance in a subset of ovarian cancers

    PubMed Central

    Mehner, Christine; Oberg, Ann L.; Kalli, Kimberly R.; Nassar, Aziza; Hockla, Alexandra; Pendlebury, Devon; Cichon, Magdalena A.; Goergen, Krista M.; Maurer, Matthew J.; Goode, Ellen L.; Keeney, Gary L.; Jatoi, Aminah; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós; Copland, John A.; Radisky, Derek C.; Radisky, Evette S.

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer represents the most lethal tumor type among malignancies of the female reproductive system. Overall survival rates remain low. In this study, we identify the serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 (SPINK1) as a potential therapeutic target for a subset of ovarian cancers. We show that SPINK1 drives ovarian cancer cell proliferation through activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling, and that SPINK1 promotes resistance to anoikis through a distinct mechanism involving protease inhibition. In analyses of ovarian tumor specimens from a Mayo Clinic cohort of 490 patients, we further find that SPINK1 immunostaining represents an independent prognostic factor for poor survival, with the strongest association in patients with nonserous histological tumor subtypes (endometrioid, clear cell, and mucinous). This study provides novel insight into the fundamental processes underlying ovarian cancer progression, and also suggests new avenues for development of molecularly targeted therapies. PMID:26437224

  17. Differential expression of CD44 and CD24 markers discriminates the epitheliod from the fibroblastoid subset in a sarcomatoid renal carcinoma cell line: evidence suggesting the existence of cancer stem cells in both subsets as studied with sorted cells.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chin-Hsuan; Hsiung, Shih-Chieh; Yeh, Chi-Tai; Yen, Chih-Feng; Chou, Yah-Huei Wu; Lei, Wei-Yi; Pang, See-Tong; Chuang, Cheng-Keng; Liao, Shuen-Kuei

    2017-02-28

    Epithelioid and fibroblastoid subsets coexist in the human sarcomatoid renal cell carcinoma (sRCC) cell line, RCC52, according to previous clonal studies. Herein, using monoclonal antibodies to CD44 and CD24 markers, we identified and isolated these two populations, and showed that CD44bright/CD24dim and CD44bright/CD24bright phenotypes correspond to epithelioid and fibroblastoid subsets, respectively. Both sorted subsets displayed different levels of tumorigenicity in xenotransplantation, indicating that each harbored its own cancer stem cells (CSCs). The CD44bright/CD24bright subset, associated with higher expression of MMP-7, -8 and TIMP-1 transcripts, showed greater migratory/invasive potential than the CD44bright/CD24dim subset, which was associated with higher expression of MMP-2, -9 and TIMP-2 transcripts. Both subsets differentially expressed stemness gene products c-Myc, Oct4A, Notch1, Notch2 and Notch3, and the RCC stem cell marker, CD105 in 4-5% of RCC52 cells. These results suggest the presence of CSCs in both sRCC subsets for the first time and should therefore be considered potential therapeutic targets for this aggressive malignancy.

  18. Combining FoxP3 and Helios with GARP/LAP markers can identify expanded Treg subsets in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Abd Al Samid, May; Chaudhary, Belal; Khaled, Yazan S; Ammori, Basil J; Elkord, Eyad

    2016-03-22

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) comprise numerous heterogeneous subsets with distinct phenotypic and functional features. Identifying Treg markers is critical to investigate the role and clinical impact of various Treg subsets in pathological settings, and also for developing more effective immunotherapies. We have recently shown that non-activated FoxP3-Helios+ and activated FoxP3+/-Helios+ CD4+ T cells express GARP/LAP immunosuppressive markers in healthy donors. In this study we report similar observations in the peripheral blood of patients with pancreatic cancer (PC) and liver metastases from colorectal cancer (LICRC). Comparing levels of different Treg subpopulations in cancer patients and controls, we report that in PC patients, and unlike LICRC patients, there was no increase in Treg levels as defined by FoxP3 and Helios. However, defining Tregs based on GARP/LAP expression showed that FoxP3-LAP+ Tregs in non-activated and activated settings, and FoxP3+Helios+GARP+LAP+ activated Tregs were significantly increased in both groups of patients, compared with controls. This work implies that a combination of Treg-specific markers could be used to more accurately determine expanded Treg subsets and to understand their contribution in cancer settings. Additionally, GARP-/+LAP+ CD4+ T cells made IL-10, and not IFN-γ, and levels of IL-10-secreting CD4+ T cells were elevated in LICRC patients, especially with higher tumor staging. Taken together, our results indicate that investigations of Treg levels in different cancers should consider diverse Treg-related markers such as GARP, LAP, Helios, and others and not only FoxP3 as a sole Treg-specific marker.

  19. Combining FoxP3 and Helios with GARP/LAP markers can identify expanded Treg subsets in cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Khaled, Yazan S.; Ammori, Basil J.; Elkord, Eyad

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) comprise numerous heterogeneous subsets with distinct phenotypic and functional features. Identifying Treg markers is critical to investigate the role and clinical impact of various Treg subsets in pathological settings, and also for developing more effective immunotherapies. We have recently shown that non-activated FoxP3−Helios+ and activated FoxP3+/–Helios+ CD4+ T cells express GARP/LAP immunosuppressive markers in healthy donors. In this study we report similar observations in the peripheral blood of patients with pancreatic cancer (PC) and liver metastases from colorectal cancer (LICRC). Comparing levels of different Treg subpopulations in cancer patients and controls, we report that in PC patients, and unlike LICRC patients, there was no increase in Treg levels as defined by FoxP3 and Helios. However, defining Tregs based on GARP/LAP expression showed that FoxP3−LAP+ Tregs in non-activated and activated settings, and FoxP3+Helios+GARP+LAP+ activated Tregs were significantly increased in both groups of patients, compared with controls. This work implies that a combination of Treg-specific markers could be used to more accurately determine expanded Treg subsets and to understand their contribution in cancer settings. Additionally, GARP−/+LAP+ CD4+ T cells made IL-10, and not IFN-γ, and levels of IL-10-secreting CD4+ T cells were elevated in LICRC patients, especially with higher tumor staging. Taken together, our results indicate that investigations of Treg levels in different cancers should consider diverse Treg-related markers such as GARP, LAP, Helios, and others and not only FoxP3 as a sole Treg-specific marker. PMID:26885615

  20. Association between Chemotherapy-Response Assays and Subsets of Tumor-Infiltrating Lymphocytes in Gastric Cancer: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jee Youn; Son, Taeil; Cheong, Jae-Ho; Hyung, Woo Jin; Noh, Sung Hoon; Kim, Choong-Bai; Park, Chung-Gyu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the association between adenosine triphosphate-based chemotherapy response assays (ATP-CRAs) and subsets of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in gastric cancer. Materials and Methods In total, 15 gastric cancer tissue samples were obtained from gastrectomies performed between February 2007 and January 2011. Chemotherapy response assays were performed on tumor cells from these samples using 11 chemotherapeutic agents, including etoposide, doxorubicin, epirubicin, mitomycin, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), oxaliplatin, irinotecan, docetaxel, paclitaxel, methotrexate, and cisplatin. TILs in the tissue samples were evaluated using antibodies specific for CD3, CD4, CD8, Foxp3, and Granzyme B. Results The highest cancer cell death rates were induced by etoposide (44.8%), 5-FU (43.1%), and mitomycin (39.9%). Samples from 10 patients who were treated with 5-FU were divided into 5-FU-sensitive and -insensitive groups according to median cell death rate. No difference was observed in survival between the two groups (P=0.216). Only two patients were treated with a chemotherapeutic agent determined by an ATP-CRA and there was no significant difference in overall survival compared with that of patients treated with their physician's choice of chemotherapeutic agent (P=0.105). However, a high number of CD3 TILs was a favorable prognostic factor (P=0.008). Pearson's correlation analyses showed no association between cancer cell death rates in response to chemotherapeutic agents and subsets of TILs. Conclusions Cancer cell death rates in response to specific chemotherapeutic agents were not significantly associated with the distribution of TIL subsets. PMID:26819801

  1. Progression of prostate cancer from a subset of p63-positive basal epithelial cells in FG/Tag transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Reiner, Teresita; de Las Pozas, Alicia; Parrondo, Ricardo; Perez-Stable, Carlos

    2007-11-01

    Transgenic mice that allow targeting of SV40 T antigen (Tag) to the prostate provide a unique model to identify cancer-initiating cells and follow their progression from a normal cell phenotype into prostate cancer cells. We have developed the FG/Tag transgenic mouse model of prostate cancer using the human fetal globin (FG) promoter linked to Tag. Immunohistochemistry results show that before the development of prostate intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), a subset of p63(+) basal epithelial cells expresses Tag. As in the case of human prostate cancer, there is a loss of p63(+) basal cells with neoplastic progression, and a long period of time is required for PIN lesions to develop into palpable prostate tumors. Other immunohistochemistry results show cellular heterogeneity in FG/Tag PIN lesions and primary tumors with neuroendocrine differentiation. Cell lines derived from primary prostate tumors showed characteristics of a neuroendocrine-epithelial intermediate cell type. The FG promoter has high transcriptional activity in intermediate (DU 145, PC-3) and p63(+) basal epithelial (LHSR-AR) prostate cancer cells. Therefore, the unexpected development of prostate cancer in the FG/Tag mice may be due to the presence of DNA elements in the FG promoter that can target Tag to specific basal or intermediate cells. We conclude that FG/Tag mouse is a unique model of prostate cancer because the initiating cells are a subset of p63(+) basal (possibly stem cells), which may be the true cells of origin for carcinogenesis in aggressive human prostate cancer.

  2. γKlotho is a novel marker and cell survival factor in a subset of triple negative breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Trošt, Nuša; Peña-Llopis, Samuel; Koirala, Sajjan; Stojan, Jurij; Potts, Patrick Ryan; Tacer, Klementina Fon; Martinez, Elisabeth D.

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, breast cancer mortality has declined. However, triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) remains a challenging problem mostly due to early recurrence and lack of molecularly driven treatments. There is a critical need to identify subgroups of TNBC with common molecular features that can be therapeutically targeted. Here we show that in contrast to Klotho and βKlotho, the third member of the Klotho protein family, γKlotho, is overexpressed in more than 60% of TNBCs and correlates with poorer disease progression. Furthermore, we find that γKlotho is expressed in a subset of TNBC cell lines promoting cell growth. Importantly, we demonstrate that in these cells γKlotho is necessary for cell survival and that its depletion leads to constitutive ERK activation, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Interestingly, we observe increased oxidative stress in γKlotho-depleted cells suggesting that γKlotho enables cancer cells to cope with an oxidative environment and that cells become dependent on its expression to maintain this survival advantage. These findings indicate that γKlotho might be a potential marker for patients that would benefit from treatments that alter oxidative stress and constitutes a novel drug target for a subset of TN breast cancers. PMID:26556877

  3. Alternative splicing enriched cDNA libraries identify breast cancer-associated transcripts

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Alternative splicing (AS) is a central mechanism in the generation of genomic complexity and is a major contributor to transcriptome and proteome diversity. Alterations of the splicing process can lead to deregulation of crucial cellular processes and have been associated with a large spectrum of human diseases. Cancer-associated transcripts are potential molecular markers and may contribute to the development of more accurate diagnostic and prognostic methods and also serve as therapeutic targets. Alternative splicing-enriched cDNA libraries have been used to explore the variability generated by alternative splicing. In this study, by combining the use of trapping heteroduplexes and RNA amplification, we developed a powerful approach that enables transcriptome-wide exploration of the AS repertoire for identifying AS variants associated with breast tumor cells modulated by ERBB2 (HER-2/neu) oncogene expression. Results The human breast cell line (C5.2) and a pool of 5 ERBB2 over-expressing breast tumor samples were used independently for the construction of two AS-enriched libraries. In total, 2,048 partial cDNA sequences were obtained, revealing 214 alternative splicing sequence-enriched tags (ASSETs). A subset with 79 multiple exon ASSETs was compared to public databases and reported 138 different AS events. A high success rate of RT-PCR validation (94.5%) was obtained, and 2 novel AS events were identified. The influence of ERBB2-mediated expression on AS regulation was evaluated by capillary electrophoresis and probe-ligation approaches in two mammary cell lines (Hb4a and C5.2) expressing different levels of ERBB2. The relative expression balance between AS variants from 3 genes was differentially modulated by ERBB2 in this model system. Conclusions In this study, we presented a method for exploring AS from any RNA source in a transcriptome-wide format, which can be directly easily adapted to next generation sequencers. We identified AS transcripts

  4. Prognostic value of circulating regulatory T cell subsets in untreated non-small cell lung cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Kotsakis, Athanasios; Koinis, Filippos; Katsarou, Afroditi; Gioulbasani, Marianthi; Aggouraki, Despoina; Kentepozidis, Nikolaos; Georgoulias, Vassilis; Vetsika, Eleni-Kyriaki

    2016-01-01

    The role of the different circulating regulatory T-cells (Treg) subsets, as well as their correlation with clinical outcome of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients is poorly understood. Peripheral blood from 156 stage III/IV chemotherapy-naive NSCLC patients and 31 healthy donors (HD) was analyzed with flow cytometry for the presence and functionality of CD4+ Treg subsets (naive, effector and terminal effector). Their frequencies were correlated with the clinical outcome. All CD4+ Treg subsets exhibited highly suppressive activity by TGF-β and IL-10 production. The percentages of naive Treg were found elevated in NSCLC patients compared to HD and were associated with poor clinical outcome, whereas the percentage of terminal effector Treg was lower compared to HD and higher levels were correlated with improved clinical response. At baseline, normal levels of naive and effector Treg were associated with longer overall survival (OS) compared to high levels, while the high frequency of the terminal effector Treg was correlated with longer Progression-Free Survival and OS. It is demonstrated, for first time, that particular CD4+ Treg subtypes are elevated in NSCLC patients and their levels are associated to the clinical outcome. The blocking of their migration to the tumor site may be an effective therapeutic strategy. PMID:27976733

  5. Tumor endothelial markers define novel subsets of cancer-specific circulating endothelial cells associated with antitumor efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Mehran, Reza; Nilsson, Monique; Khajavi, Mehrdad; Du, Zhiqiang; Cascone, Tina; Wu, Hua Kang; Cortes, Andrea; Xu, Li; Zurita, Amado; Schier, Robert; Riedel, Bernhard; El-Zein, Randa; Heymach, John V.

    2014-01-01

    Circulating endothelial cells (CEC) are derived from multiple sources including bone marrow (circulating endothelial progenitors [CEP]) and established vasculature (mature CEC). Although CEC have shown promise as a biomarker for cancer patients, their utility has been limited in part by the lack of specificity for tumor vasculature and the different non-malignant causes that can impact CEC. Tumor endothelial markers (TEM) are antigens enriched in tumor vs non-malignant endothelia. We hypothesized that TEMs may be detectable on CEC and that these circulating TEM+ endothelial cells (CTEC) may be a more specific marker for cancer and tumor response than standard CEC. We found that tumor-bearing mice had a relative increase in numbers of circulating CTEC, specifically with increased levels of TEM7 and TEM8 expression. Following treatment with various vascular targeting agents, we observed a decrease in CTEC that correlated with the reductions in tumor growth. We extended these findings to human clinical samples and observed that CTEC were present in esophageal cancer and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients (N=40) and their levels decreased after surgical resection. These results demonstrate that CTEC are detectable in preclinical cancer models and cancer patients. Further, they suggest that CTEC offer a novel cancer-associated marker that may be useful as a blood-based surrogate for assessing the presence of tumor vasculature and antiangiogenic drug activity. PMID:24626092

  6. DNA methylation outliers in normal breast tissue identify field defects that are enriched in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Teschendorff, Andrew E; Gao, Yang; Jones, Allison; Ruebner, Matthias; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Wachter, David L.; Fasching, Peter A.; Widschwendter, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Identifying molecular alterations in normal tissue adjacent to cancer is important for understanding cancer aetiology and designing preventive measures. Here we analyse the DNA methylome of 569 breast tissue samples, including 50 from cancer-free women and 84 from matched normal cancer pairs. We use statistical algorithms for dissecting intra- and inter-sample cellular heterogeneity and demonstrate that normal tissue adjacent to breast cancer is characterized by tens to thousands of epigenetic alterations. We show that their genomic distribution is non-random, being strongly enriched for binding sites of transcription factors specifying chromatin architecture. We validate the field defects in an independent cohort and demonstrate that over 30% of the alterations exhibit increased enrichment within matched cancer samples. Breast cancers highly enriched for epigenetic field defects, exhibit adverse clinical outcome. Our data support a model where clonal epigenetic reprogramming towards reduced differentiation in normal tissue is an important step in breast carcinogenesis. PMID:26823093

  7. DNA methylation outliers in normal breast tissue identify field defects that are enriched in cancer.

    PubMed

    Teschendorff, Andrew E; Gao, Yang; Jones, Allison; Ruebner, Matthias; Beckmann, Matthias W; Wachter, David L; Fasching, Peter A; Widschwendter, Martin

    2016-01-29

    Identifying molecular alterations in normal tissue adjacent to cancer is important for understanding cancer aetiology and designing preventive measures. Here we analyse the DNA methylome of 569 breast tissue samples, including 50 from cancer-free women and 84 from matched normal cancer pairs. We use statistical algorithms for dissecting intra- and inter-sample cellular heterogeneity and demonstrate that normal tissue adjacent to breast cancer is characterized by tens to thousands of epigenetic alterations. We show that their genomic distribution is non-random, being strongly enriched for binding sites of transcription factors specifying chromatin architecture. We validate the field defects in an independent cohort and demonstrate that over 30% of the alterations exhibit increased enrichment within matched cancer samples. Breast cancers highly enriched for epigenetic field defects, exhibit adverse clinical outcome. Our data support a model where clonal epigenetic reprogramming towards reduced differentiation in normal tissue is an important step in breast carcinogenesis.

  8. AGTR1 overexpression defines a subset of breast cancer and confers sensitivity to losartan, an AGTR1 antagonist.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Daniel R; Ateeq, Bushra; Cao, Qi; Tomlins, Scott A; Mehra, Rohit; Laxman, Bharathi; Kalyana-Sundaram, Shanker; Lonigro, Robert J; Helgeson, Beth E; Bhojani, Mahaveer S; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz; Kleer, Celina G; Hayes, Daniel F; Lucas, Peter C; Varambally, Sooryanarayana; Chinnaiyan, Arul M

    2009-06-23

    Breast cancer patients have benefited from the use of targeted therapies directed at specific molecular alterations. To identify additional opportunities for targeted therapy, we searched for genes with marked overexpression in subsets of tumors across a panel of breast cancer profiling studies comprising 3,200 microarray experiments. In addition to prioritizing ERBB2, we found AGTR1, the angiotensin II receptor type I, to be markedly overexpressed in 10-20% of breast cancer cases across multiple independent patient cohorts. Validation experiments confirmed that AGTR1 is highly overexpressed, in several cases more than 100-fold. AGTR1 overexpression was restricted to estrogen receptor-positive tumors and was mutually exclusive with ERBB2 overexpression across all samples. Ectopic overexpression of AGTR1 in primary mammary epithelial cells, combined with angiotensin II stimulation, led to a highly invasive phenotype that was attenuated by the AGTR1 antagonist losartan. Similarly, losartan reduced tumor growth by 30% in AGTR1-positive breast cancer xenografts. Taken together, these observations indicate that marked AGTR1 overexpression defines a subpopulation of ER-positive, ERBB2-negative breast cancer that may benefit from targeted therapy with AGTR1 antagonists, such as losartan.

  9. AGTR1 overexpression defines a subset of breast cancer and confers sensitivity to losartan, an AGTR1 antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Daniel R.; Ateeq, Bushra; Cao, Qi; Tomlins, Scott A.; Mehra, Rohit; Laxman, Bharathi; Kalyana-Sundaram, Shanker; Lonigro, Robert J.; Helgeson, Beth E.; Bhojani, Mahaveer S.; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz; Kleer, Celina G.; Hayes, Daniel F.; Lucas, Peter C.; Varambally, Sooryanarayana; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer patients have benefited from the use of targeted therapies directed at specific molecular alterations. To identify additional opportunities for targeted therapy, we searched for genes with marked overexpression in subsets of tumors across a panel of breast cancer profiling studies comprising 3,200 microarray experiments. In addition to prioritizing ERBB2, we found AGTR1, the angiotensin II receptor type I, to be markedly overexpressed in 10–20% of breast cancer cases across multiple independent patient cohorts. Validation experiments confirmed that AGTR1 is highly overexpressed, in several cases more than 100-fold. AGTR1 overexpression was restricted to estrogen receptor-positive tumors and was mutually exclusive with ERBB2 overexpression across all samples. Ectopic overexpression of AGTR1 in primary mammary epithelial cells, combined with angiotensin II stimulation, led to a highly invasive phenotype that was attenuated by the AGTR1 antagonist losartan. Similarly, losartan reduced tumor growth by 30% in AGTR1-positive breast cancer xenografts. Taken together, these observations indicate that marked AGTR1 overexpression defines a subpopulation of ER-positive, ERBB2-negative breast cancer that may benefit from targeted therapy with AGTR1 antagonists, such as losartan. PMID:19487683

  10. Activated FGFR2 as a Viable Therapeutic Target in a Subset of Ovarian Cancers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    endom etrioid ovarian 70 carcinomas [3], whereas PTEN, PIK3CA, and CTNNB-1 (β-catenin) mutations are more common 71 in low-grade endom etrioid ovarian...100 high-grade advanced stage serous ovarian tumors [16]. FGF9 has also been implicated as playing 101 a key role in ovarian endom etrioid ade...mutations in FGFR2 in endom etrial cancer, 111 predominantly in the endom etrioid histologic subtype [20, 21]. Interestin gly, ovarian cancer and 112

  11. The DNA aptamer binds stemness-enriched cancer cells in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon-Jin; Lee, Hee Seung; Jung, Dawoon E; Kim, Jeong Mi; Song, Si Young

    2017-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains one of the most common and lethal cancers. Most patients (80%) present with inoperable advanced pancreatic cancer at initial diagnosis, and their early diagnosis is a significant unmet challenge. Recent studies indicate that cancer, including pancreatic cancer, is initiated and propagated by cancer stem cells (CSCs). CSCs are responsible not only for the pathogenesis of cancer but also for the heterogeneity, malignant degree, anticancer therapy resistance, and recurrence of tumors. Therefore, the identification of CSCs may be a crucial stepping stone for overcoming this disastrous pancreatic cancer. Here, we investigated pancreatic CSC-associated aptamers as a novel tool for diagnosis and therapeutic agents. Aptamers that bind to stemness-enriched cancer cells in pancreatic cancer were developed by modified Cell-SELEX method. Positive selection was performed by the sphere cells generated by pancreatic cancer cell line, HPAC, and then the aptamer pool was negatively selected by pancreatic normal cell line, HPDE. Aptamers 1 and 146 showing high specificity upon the KD values with 22.18 and 22.62 nM were selected. These 2 aptamers were validated by binding to HPAC sphere cells and to HPDE cells, and both aptamers showed specificity to HPAC sphere cells only. Aptamer-positive cells showed high expression levels of CSC-associated genes compared with the aptamer-negative cells by FACS analysis. The colocalization of CD44, CD24, ESA, and CD133 was also observed in the aptamer-positive cells by confocal microscopy. In the present study, these 2 pancreatic CSC-associated aptamers may be potential candidates for novel diagnostic markers, CSC-targeting drug delivery, or circulating tumor cell detection.

  12. Defining glycoprotein cancer biomarkers by MS in conjunction with glycoprotein enrichment.

    PubMed

    Song, Ehwang; Mechref, Yehia

    2015-01-01

    Protein glycosylation is an important and common post-translational modification. More than 50% of human proteins are believed to be glycosylated to modulate the functionality of proteins. Aberrant glycosylation has been correlated to several diseases, such as inflammatory skin diseases, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disorders, rheumatoid arthritis, Alzheimer's and prion diseases, and cancer. Many approved cancer biomarkers are glycoproteins which are not highly abundant proteins. Therefore, effective qualitative and quantitative assessment of glycoproteins entails enrichment methods. This chapter summarizes glycoprotein enrichment methods, including lectin affinity, immunoaffinity, hydrazide chemistry, hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography, and click chemistry. The use of these enrichment approaches in assessing the qualitative and quantitative changes of glycoproteins in different types of cancers are presented and discussed. This chapter highlights the importance of glycoprotein enrichment techniques for the identification and characterization of new reliable cancer biomarkers.

  13. Notch reporter activity in breast cancer cell lines identifies a subset of cells with stem cell activity.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Rosemarie C; Ouzounova, Maria; Davis, April; Choi, Daejin; Tchuenkam, Stevie M; Kim, Gwangil; Luther, Tahra; Quraishi, Ahmed A; Senbabaoglu, Yasin; Conley, Sarah J; Clouthier, Shawn G; Hassan, Khaled A; Wicha, Max S; Korkaya, Hasan

    2015-03-01

    Developmental pathways such as Notch play a pivotal role in tissue-specific stem cell self-renewal as well as in tumor development. However, the role of Notch signaling in breast cancer stem cells (CSC) remains to be determined. We utilized a lentiviral Notch reporter system to identify a subset of cells with a higher Notch activity (Notch(+)) or reduced activity (Notch(-)) in multiple breast cancer cell lines. Using in vitro and mouse xenotransplantation assays, we investigated the role of the Notch pathway in breast CSC regulation. Breast cancer cells with increased Notch activity displayed increased sphere formation as well as expression of breast CSC markers. Interestingly Notch(+) cells displayed higher Notch4 expression in both basal and luminal breast cancer cell lines. Moreover, Notch(+) cells demonstrated tumor initiation capacity at serial dilutions in mouse xenografts, whereas Notch(-) cells failed to generate tumors. γ-Secretase inhibitor (GSI), a Notch blocker but not a chemotherapeutic agent, effectively targets these Notch(+) cells in vitro and in mouse xenografts. Furthermore, elevated Notch4 and Hey1 expression in primary patient samples correlated with poor patient survival. Our study revealed a molecular mechanism for the role of Notch-mediated regulation of breast CSCs and provided a compelling rationale for CSC-targeted therapeutics.

  14. Notch reporter activity in breast cancer cell lines identifies a subset of cells with stem cell activity

    PubMed Central

    Davis, April; Choi, Daejin; Tchuenkam, Stevie M.; Kim, Gwangil; Luther, Tahra; Quraishi, Ahmed A.; Senbabaoglu, Yasin; Conley, Sarah J.; Clouthier, Shawn G.; Hassan, Khaled A.; Wicha, Max S.; Korkaya, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Developmental pathways such as Notch play a pivotal role in tissue specific stem cell self-renewal as well as in tumor development. However, the role of Notch signaling in breast cancer stem cells (CSC) remains to be determined. We utilized a lentiviral Notch reporter system to identify a subset of cells with a higher Notch activity (Notch+) or reduced activity (Notch-) in multiple breast cancer cell lines. Using in vitro and mouse xenotransplantation assays we investigated the role of Notch pathway in breast CSC regulation. Breast cancer cells with increased Notch activity displayed increased sphere formation as well as expression of breast CSC markers. Interestingly Notch+ cells displayed higher Notch4 expression in both basal and luminal breast cancer cell lines. Moreover, Notch+ cells demonstrated tumor initiation capacity at serial dilutions in mouse xenografts while Notch- cells failed to generate tumors. Gamma-secretase inhibitor (GSI), a Notch blocker but not a chemotherapeutic agent effectively targets these Notch+ cells in vitro and in mouse xenografts. Furthermore, elevated Notch4 and Hey1 expression in primary patient samples correlated with poor patient survival. Our studies reveal molecular mechanism for the role of Notch mediated regulation of breast CSCs and provide a compelling rationale for CSC targeted therapeutics. PMID:25673823

  15. Enrichment and characterization of cancer stem-like cells from a cervical cancer cell line

    PubMed Central

    WANG, LI; GUO, HUIJIE; LIN, CAIYU; YANG, LIUQI; WANG, XIUJIE

    2014-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are proposed to be responsible for tumor recurrence, metastasis and the high mortality rate of cancer patients. Isolation and identification of CSCs is crucial for basic and preclinical studies. However, as there are currently no universal markers for the isolation and identification of CSCs in any type of cancer, the method for isolating CSCs from primary cancer tissues or cell lines is costly and ineffective. In order to establish a reliable model of cervical cancer stem cells for basic and preclinical studies, the present study was designed to enrich cervical cancer CSCs using a nonadhesive culture system and to characterize their partial stemness phenotypes. Human cervical cancer cells (HeLa) were cultured using a nonadhesive culture system to generate tumor spheres. Their stemness characteristics were investigated through colony formation, tumor sphere formation, self-renewal, toluidine blue staining, chemoresistance, invasion assays, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, immunofluorescence staining of putative stem cell markers, including octamer-binding transcription factor 4, SRY-box 2 and aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 family, member A1, and adipogenic differentiation induction. Typical tumor spheres were formed within 5–7 days under this nonadhesive culture system. Compared with the adherent parental HeLa cells, the colony formation capacity, self-renewal potential, light cell population, cell invasion, chemoresistance and expression of putative stem cell markers of the tumor sphere cells increased significantly, and a subpopulation of tumor sphere cells were induced into adipogenic differentiation. Using the nonadhesive culture system, a reliable model of cervical cancer stem cells was established, which is inexpensive, effective and simple compared with the ultra-low attachment serum free culture method. The stemness characteristics of the tumor sphere HeLa cells mirrored the CSC phenotypes. This CSC model may be useful

  16. Upregulation of glycans containing 3' fucose in a subset of pancreatic cancers uncovered using fusion-tagged lectins.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sudhir; Pal, Kuntal; Yadav, Jessica; Tang, Huiyuan; Partyka, Katie; Kletter, Doron; Hsueh, Peter; Ensink, Elliot; Kc, Birendra; Hostetter, Galen; Xu, H Eric; Bern, Marshall; Smith, David F; Mehta, Anand S; Brand, Randall; Melcher, Karsten; Haab, Brian B

    2015-06-05

    The fucose post-translational modification is frequently increased in pancreatic cancer, thus forming the basis for promising biomarkers, but a subset of pancreatic cancer patients does not elevate the known fucose-containing biomarkers. We hypothesized that such patients elevate glycan motifs with fucose in linkages and contexts different from the known fucose-containing biomarkers. We used a database of glycan array data to identify the lectins CCL2 to detect glycan motifs with fucose in a 3' linkage; CGL2 for motifs with fucose in a 2' linkage; and RSL for fucose in all linkages. We used several practical methods to test the lectins and determine the optimal mode of detection, and we then tested whether the lectins detected glycans in pancreatic cancer patients who did not elevate the sialyl-Lewis A glycan, which is upregulated in ∼75% of pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Patients who did not upregulate sialyl-Lewis A, which contains fucose in a 4' linkage, tended to upregulate fucose in a 3' linkage, as detected by CCL2, but they did not upregulate total fucose or fucose in a 2' linkage. CCL2 binding was high in cancerous epithelia from pancreatic tumors, including areas negative for sialyl-Lewis A and a related motif containing 3' fucose, sialyl-Lewis X. Thus, glycans containing 3' fucose may complement sialyl-Lewis A to contribute to improved detection of pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, the use of panels of recombinant lectins may uncover details about glycosylation that could be important for characterizing and detecting cancer.

  17. Upregulation of Glycans Containing 3’ Fucose in a Subset of Pancreatic Cancers Uncovered Using Fusion-Tagged Lectins

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sudhir; Pal, Kuntal; Yadav, Jessica; Tang, Huiyuan; Partyka, Katie; Kletter, Doron; Hsueh, Peter; Ensink, Elliot; Birendra, KC; Hostetter, Galen; Xu, H. Eric; Bern, Marshall; Smith, David F.; Mehta, Anand S.; Brand, Randall; Melcher, Karsten; Haab, Brian B.

    2015-01-01

    The fucose post-translational modification is frequently increased in pancreatic cancer, thus forming the basis for promising biomarkers, but a subset of pancreatic cancer patients does not elevate the known fucose-containing biomarkers. We hypothesized that such patients elevate glycan motifs with fucose in linkages and contexts different from the known fucose-containing biomarkers. We used a database of glycan array data to identify the lectins CCL2 to detect glycan motifs with fucose in a 3’ linkage; CGL2 for motifs with fucose in a 2’ linkage; and RSL for fucose in all linkages. We used several practical methods to test the lectins and determine the optimal mode of detection, and we then tested whether the lectins detected glycans in pancreatic cancer patients who did not elevate the sialyl-Lewis A glycan, which is upregulated in ~75% of pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Patients who did not upregulate sialyl-Lewis A, which contains fucose in a 4’ linkage, tended to upregulate fucose in a 3’ linkage, as detected by CCL2, but they did not upregulate total fucose or fucose in a 2’ linkage. CCL2 binding was high in cancerous epithelia from pancreatic tumors, including areas negative for sialyl-Lewis A and a related motif containing 3’ fucose, sialyl-Lewis X. Thus glycans containing 3’ fucose may complement sialyl-Lewis A to contribute to improved detection of pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, the use of panels of recombinant lectins may uncover details about glycosylation that could be important for characterizing and detecting cancer. PMID:25938165

  18. Enrichment of cancer cells from whole blood using a microfabricated porous filter.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Hye; Lee, Jong Kil; Kim, Byung Chul; Rhim, Sung Han; Kim, Jhin Wook; Kim, Kyung Hee; Jung, Sung Mok; Park, Pyeong Soo; Park, Hee Chul; Lee, Jason; Jeon, Byung Hee

    2013-09-01

    Enrichment of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from whole blood is very challenging due to its rarity. We have developed a new CTC enrichment method using a microfabricated filter. The filter was designed to fractionate tumor cells by cell size and optimized to have high porosity and proper pore distribution. When cancer cells were spiked in whole blood, the average recovery rate was 82.0 to 86.7% and the limit of detection by filtration process was approximately 2 cancer cells in a testing volume of blood. The results indicate that the microfabricated filter-based enrichment would be useful to retrieve and analyze CTCs in practice.

  19. Phenotype and function of tumor-associated neutrophils and their subsets in early-stage human lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Eruslanov, Evgeniy B

    2017-03-10

    Neutrophils accumulate in many types of human and murine tumors and represent a significant portion of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells. Our current understanding of the role of neutrophils in tumor development has depended primarily on murine models of cancer. However, there are crucial species differences in the evolution of tumors, genetic diversity, immune and inflammatory responses, and intrinsic biology of neutrophils that might have a profound impact on the tumor development and function of neutrophils in mouse versus human tumors. To date, the majority of experimental approaches to study neutrophils in cancer patients have been limited to the examination of circulating blood neutrophils. The phenotype and function of tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs) in humans, particularly in the early stages of tumor development, have not been extensively investigated. Thus, the long-term goal of our work has been to characterize human TANs and determine their specific role in tumor development. Here, we summarize our findings on human TANs obtained from human early stage lung cancer patients. We will describe the phenotypes of different TAN subsets identified in early stage lung tumors, as well as their functional dialog with T cells.

  20. LKB1/KRAS mutant lung cancers constitute a genetic subset of NSCLC with increased sensitivity to MAPK and mTOR signalling inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, C L; Choudhury, B; Davies, H; Edkins, S; Greenman, C; Haaften, G van; Mironenko, T; Santarius, T; Stevens, C; Stratton, M R; Futreal, P A

    2009-01-01

    LKB1/STK11 is a multitasking tumour suppressor kinase. Germline inactivating mutations of the gene are responsible for the Peutz-Jeghers hereditary cancer syndrome. It is also somatically inactivated in approximately 30% of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Here, we report that LKB1/KRAS mutant NSCLC cell lines are sensitive to the MEK inhibitor CI-1040 shown by a dose-dependent reduction in proliferation rate, whereas LKB1 and KRAS mutations alone do not confer similar sensitivity. We show that this subset of NSCLC is also sensitised to the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin. Importantly, the data suggest that LKB1/KRAS mutant NSCLCs are a genetically and functionally distinct subset and further suggest that this subset of lung cancers might afford an opportunity for exploitation of anti-MAPK/mTOR-targeted therapies. PMID:19165201

  1. Elucidating high-dimensional cancer hallmark annotation via enriched ontology.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shankai; Wong, Ka-Chun

    2017-09-01

    Cancer hallmark annotation is a promising technique that could discover novel knowledge about cancer from the biomedical literature. The automated annotation of cancer hallmarks could reveal relevant cancer transformation processes in the literature or extract the articles that correspond to the cancer hallmark of interest. It acts as a complementary approach that can retrieve knowledge from massive text information, advancing numerous focused studies in cancer research. Nonetheless, the high-dimensional nature of cancer hallmark annotation imposes a unique challenge. To address the curse of dimensionality, we compared multiple cancer hallmark annotation methods on 1580 PubMed abstracts. Based on the insights, a novel approach, UDT-RF, which makes use of ontological features is proposed. It expands the feature space via the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) ontology graph and utilizes novel feature selections for elucidating the high-dimensional cancer hallmark annotation space. To demonstrate its effectiveness, state-of-the-art methods are compared and evaluated by a multitude of performance metrics, revealing the full performance spectrum on the full set of cancer hallmarks. Several case studies are conducted, demonstrating how the proposed approach could reveal novel insights into cancers. https://github.com/cskyan/chmannot. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The Role of Biomaterials on Cancer Stem Cell Enrichment and Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ordikhani, Faride; Kim, Yonghyun; Zustiak, Silviya P.

    2015-11-01

    The theory of cancer stem cells (CSCs) and their role in cancer metastasis, tumorigenicity and resistance to therapy is slowly shifting the emphasis on the search for cancer cure: more evidence is surfacing that a successful therapy should be geared against this rare cancer cell population. Unfortunately, CSCs are difficult to culture in vitro which severely limits the progress of CSC research. This review gives a brief overview of CSCs and their microenvironment, with particular focus on studies that used in vitro biomaterial-based models and biomaterial/CSC interfaces for the enrichment of CSCs. Biomaterial properties relevant to CSC behaviors are also addressed. While the discussed research field is still in its infancy, it appears that in vitro cancer models that include a biomaterial can support CSC enrichment and this has proved indispensable to the study of their biology as well as the development of novel cancer therapies.

  3. A subset of high Gleason grade prostate carcinomas contain a large burden of prostate cancer syndecan-1 positive stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Benjamin; Alghezi, Dhafer A; Cattermole, Claire; Beresford, Mark; Bowen, Rebecca; Mitchard, John; Chalmers, Andrew D

    2017-05-01

    There is a pressing need to identify prognostic and predictive biomarkers for prostate cancer to aid treatment decisions in both early and advanced disease settings. Syndecan-1, a heparan sulfate proteoglycan, has been previously identified as a potential prognostic biomarker by multiple studies at the tissue and serum level. However, other studies have questioned its utility. Anti-Syndecan-1 immunohistochemistry was carried out on 157 prostate tissue samples (including cancerous, adjacent normal tissue, and non-diseased prostate) from three independent cohorts of patients. A population of Syndecan-1 positive stromal cells was identified and the number and morphological parameters of these cells quantified. The identity of the Syndecan-1-positive stromal cells was assessed by multiplex immunofluorescence using a range of common cell lineage markers. Finally, the burden of Syndecan-1 positive stromal cells was tested for association with clinical parameters. We identified a previously unreported cell type which is marked by Syndecan-1 expression and is found in the stroma of prostate tumors and adjacent normal tissue but not in non-diseased prostate. We call these cells Prostate Cancer Syndecan-1 Positive (PCSP) cells. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that the PCSP cell population did not co-stain with markers of common prostate epithelial, stromal, or immune cell populations. However, morphological analysis revealed that PCSP cells are often elongated and displayed prominent lamellipodia, suggesting they are an unidentified migratory cell population. Analysis of clinical parameters showed that PCSP cells were found with a frequency of 20-35% of all tumors evaluated, but were not present in non-diseased normal tissue. Interestingly, a subset of primary Gleason 5 prostate tumors had a high burden of PCSP cells. The current study identifies PCSP cells as a novel, potentially migratory cell type, which is marked by Syndecan-1 expression and is found in the stroma

  4. Epithelial mesenchymal-like transition occurs in a subset of cells in castration resistant prostate cancer bone metastases.

    PubMed

    Haider, Maahum; Zhang, Xiaotun; Coleman, Ilsa; Ericson, Nolan; True, Lawrence D; Lam, Hung-Ming; Brown, Lisha G; Ketchanji, Melanie; Nghiem, Belinda; Lakely, Bryce; Coleman, Roger; Montgomery, Bruce; Lange, Paul H; Roudier, Martine; Higano, Celestia S; Bielas, Jason H; Nelson, Peter S; Vessella, Robert L; Morrissey, Colm

    2016-03-01

    TGFβ is a known driver of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) which is associated with tumor aggressiveness and metastasis. However, EMT has not been fully explored in clinical specimens of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) metastases. To assess EMT in CRPC, gene expression analysis was performed on 149 visceral and bone metastases from 62 CRPC patients and immunohistochemical analysis was performed on 185 CRPC bone and visceral metastases from 42 CRPC patients. In addition, to assess the potential of metastases to seed further metastases the mitochondrial genome was sequenced at different metastatic sites in one patient. TGFβ was increased in bone versus visceral metastases. While primarily cytoplasmic; nuclear and cytoplasmic Twist were significantly higher in bone than in visceral metastases. Slug and Zeb1 were unchanged, with the exception of nuclear Zeb1 being significantly higher in visceral metastases. Importantly, nuclear Twist, Slug, and Zeb1 were only present in a subset of epithelial cells that had an EMT-like phenotype. Underscoring the relevance of EMT-like cells, mitochondrial sequencing revealed that metastases could seed additional metastases in the same patient. In conclusion, while TGFβ expression and EMT-associated protein expression is present in a considerable number of CRPC visceral and bone metastases, nuclear Twist, Slug, and Zeb1 localization and an EMT-like phenotype (elongated nuclei and cytoplasmic compartment) was only present in a small subset of CRPC bone metastases. Mitochondrial sequencing from different metastases in a CRPC patient provided evidence for the seeding of metastases from previously established metastases, highlighting the biological relevance of EMT-like behavior in CRPC metastases.

  5. Xmrk, kras and myc transgenic zebrafish liver cancer models share molecular signatures with subsets of human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Weiling; Li, Zhen; Nguyen, Anh Tuan; Li, Caixia; Emelyanov, Alexander; Gong, Zhiyuan

    2014-01-01

    Previously three oncogene transgenic zebrafish lines with inducible expression of xmrk, kras or Myc in the liver have been generated and these transgenic lines develop oncogene-addicted liver tumors upon chemical induction. In the current study, comparative transcriptomic approaches were used to examine the correlation of the three induced transgenic liver cancers with human liver cancers. RNA profiles from the three zebrafish tumors indicated relatively small overlaps of significantly deregulated genes and biological pathways. Nevertheless, the three transgenic tumor signatures all showed significant correlation with advanced or very advanced human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Interestingly, molecular signature from each oncogene-induced zebrafish liver tumor correlated with only a small subset of human HCC samples (24-29%) and there were conserved up-regulated pathways between the zebrafish and correlated human HCC subgroup. The three zebrafish liver cancer models together represented nearly half (47.2%) of human HCCs while some human HCCs showed significant correlation with more than one signature defined from the three oncogene-addicted zebrafish tumors. In contrast, commonly deregulated genes (21 up and 16 down) in the three zebrafish tumor models generally showed accordant deregulation in the majority of human HCCs, suggesting that these genes might be more consistently deregulated in a broad range of human HCCs with different molecular mechanisms and thus serve as common diagnosis markers and therapeutic targets. Thus, these transgenic zebrafish models with well-defined oncogene-induced tumors are valuable tools for molecular classification of human HCCs and for understanding of molecular drivers in hepatocarcinogenesis in each human HCC subgroup.

  6. Xmrk, Kras and Myc Transgenic Zebrafish Liver Cancer Models Share Molecular Signatures with Subsets of Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Weiling; Li, Zhen; Nguyen, Anh Tuan; Li, Caixia; Emelyanov, Alexander; Gong, Zhiyuan

    2014-01-01

    Previously three oncogene transgenic zebrafish lines with inducible expression of xmrk, kras or Myc in the liver have been generated and these transgenic lines develop oncogene-addicted liver tumors upon chemical induction. In the current study, comparative transcriptomic approaches were used to examine the correlation of the three induced transgenic liver cancers with human liver cancers. RNA profiles from the three zebrafish tumors indicated relatively small overlaps of significantly deregulated genes and biological pathways. Nevertheless, the three transgenic tumor signatures all showed significant correlation with advanced or very advanced human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Interestingly, molecular signature from each oncogene-induced zebrafish liver tumor correlated with only a small subset of human HCC samples (24–29%) and there were conserved up-regulated pathways between the zebrafish and correlated human HCC subgroup. The three zebrafish liver cancer models together represented nearly half (47.2%) of human HCCs while some human HCCs showed significant correlation with more than one signature defined from the three oncogene-addicted zebrafish tumors. In contrast, commonly deregulated genes (21 up and 16 down) in the three zebrafish tumor models generally showed accordant deregulation in the majority of human HCCs, suggesting that these genes might be more consistently deregulated in a broad range of human HCCs with different molecular mechanisms and thus serve as common diagnosis markers and therapeutic targets. Thus, these transgenic zebrafish models with well-defined oncogene-induced tumors are valuable tools for molecular classification of human HCCs and for understanding of molecular drivers in hepatocarcinogenesis in each human HCC subgroup. PMID:24633177

  7. Circulating microRNA Profiling Identifies a Subset of Metastatic Prostate Cancer Patients with Evidence of Cancer-Associated Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Kroh, Evan M.; Dowell, Alexander E.; Chéry, Lisly; Siddiqui, Javed; Nelson, Peter S.; Vessella, Robert L.; Knudsen, Beatrice S.; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Morrissey, Colm; Tewari, Muneesh

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small (∼22 nucleotide) non-coding RNAs that regulate a myriad of biological processes and are frequently dysregulated in cancer. Cancer-associated microRNAs have been detected in serum and plasma and hold promise as minimally invasive cancer biomarkers, potentially for assessing disease characteristics in patients with metastatic disease that is difficult to biopsy. Here we used miRNA profiling to identify cancer-associated miRNAs that are differentially expressed in sera from patients with metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) as compared to healthy controls. Of 365 miRNAs profiled, we identified five serum miRNAs (miR-141, miR-200a, miR-200c, miR-210 and miR-375) that were elevated in cases compared to controls across two independent cohorts. One of these, miR-210, is a known transcriptional target of the hypoxia-responsive HIF-1α signaling pathway. Exposure of cultured prostate cancer cells to hypoxia led to induction of miR-210 and its release into the extracellular environment. Moreover, we found that serum miR-210 levels varied widely amongst mCRPC patients undergoing therapy, and correlated with treatment response as assessed by change in PSA. Our results suggest that (i) cancer-associated hypoxia is a frequent, previously under-appreciated characteristic of mCRPC, and (ii) serum miR-210 may be further developed as a predictive biomarker in patients with this distinct disease biology. PMID:23935962

  8. [Enrichment analysis of Fanconi anemia gene expression profiles in cancer related genesets].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Quan-quan; Wang, Xiao-juan; Zhu, Xiao-fan; Yuan, Wei-ping; Cheng, Tao

    2012-05-01

    To investigate the underlying tumor susceptibility mechanisms and reasons for the high risk of cancer in Fanconi anemia (FA). Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) was performed to compare gene expression profiles between 21 FA patients' bone marrow (BM) mononuclear cell (BMNC) and 11 normal controls in cancer related gene sets from NCBI GEO database, then core enriched genes were identified by further investigation. Through enrichment analyzing biological processes of gene ontology sets and structural genomic gene sets between FA expression profiles and control, more details related with its tumor susceptibility had been revealed. Compared with normal control, gene expression in FA group had significant been enriched in resistance to Bcl-2 inhibitor gene set, fibroblast growth factors signalling pathways, insulin and insulin-like growth factors (IGF) signalling pathways induced cancer genesis gene sets. The high level of D4S234E, SST, FGFs, IGFs, FGFRs and IGFBP expression provided an initiate environment for tumorgenesis and drug resistance. There were significant differences in biogenesis extracellular molecules and cytomembrane structure organizations between FA and control. Genes with promoter regions around transcription start sites containing either motif RRCAGGTGNCV or CCTNTMAGA were enriched and those former genes match annotation for tumorgenic transcription factor 3 (TCF3). The high tumor susceptibility of FA patients may be closely related with the dramatic changes in cancer related growth factors and hormones environment. This study provides new insights into tumor susceptibility mechanism in FA patients.

  9. ALCHEMIST: Adjuvant Lung Cancer Enrichment Marker Identification and Sequencing Trials

    Cancer.gov

    ALCHEMIST represents three integrated, precision medicine trials that are designed to identify people with early-stage lung cancer who have tumors that harbor certain uncommon genetic changes and evaluate whether drug treatments targeted against those mol

  10. ALCHEMIST: Adjuvant Lung Cancer Enrichment Marker Identification and Sequencing Trials

    Cancer.gov

    ALCHEMIST represents three integrated, precision medicine trials that are designed to identify people with early-stage lung cancer who have tumors that harbor certain uncommon genetic changes and evaluate whether drug treatments targeted against those mol

  11. Aptamer-based microfluidic device for enrichment, sorting, and detection of multiple cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ye; Phillips, Joseph A; Yan, Jilin; Li, Qingge; Fan, Z Hugh; Tan, Weihong

    2009-09-01

    The ability to diagnose cancer based on the detection of rare cancer cells in blood or other bodily fluids is a significant challenge. To address this challenge, we have developed a microfluidic device that can simultaneously sort, enrich, and then detect multiple types of cancer cells from a complex sample. The device, which is made from poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), implements cell-affinity chromatography based on the selective cell-capture of immobilized DNA-aptamers and yields a 135-fold enrichment of rare cells in a single run. This enrichment is achieved because the height of the channel is on the order of a cell diameter. The sorted cells grow at the comparable rate as cultured cells and are 96% pure based on flow cytometry determination. Thus, by using our aptamer based device, cell capture is achieved simply and inexpensively, with no sample pretreatment before cell analysis. Enrichment and detection of multiple rare cancer cells can be used to detect cancers at the early stages, diagnose metastatic relapse, stratify patients for therapeutic purposes, monitor response to drugs and therapies, track tumor progression, and gain a deeper understanding of the biology of circulating tumor cells (CTCs).

  12. Aptamer-based microfluidic device for enrichment, sorting, and detection of multiple cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ye; Phillips, Joseph A.; Yan, Jilin; Li, Qingge

    2011-01-01

    The ability to diagnose cancer based on the detection of rare cancer cells in blood or other bodily fluids is a significant challenge. To address this challenge, we have developed a microfluidic device that can simultaneously sort, enrich, and then detect multiple types of cancer cells from a complex sample. The device, which is made from poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), implements cell-affinity chromatography based on the selective cell-capture of immobilized DNA-aptamers and yields a 135-fold enrichment of rare cells in a single run. This enrichment is achieved because the height of the channel is on the order of a cell diameter. The sorted cells grow at the comparable rate as cultured cells and are 96% pure based on flow cytometry determination. Thus, by using our aptamer based device, cell capture is achieved simply and inexpensively, with no sample pretreatment before cell analysis. Enrichment and detection of multiple rare cancer cells can be used to detect cancers at the early stages, diagnose metastatic relapse, stratify patients for therapeutic purposes, monitor response to drugs and therapies, track tumor progression, and gain a deeper understanding of the biology of circulating tumor cells (CTCs). PMID:19715365

  13. Major infections, secondary cancers and autoimmune diseases occur in different clinical subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia patients.

    PubMed

    Visentin, Andrea; Imbergamo, Silvia; Gurrieri, Carmela; Frezzato, Federica; Trimarco, Valentina; Martini, Veronica; Severin, Filippo; Raggi, Flavia; Scomazzon, Edoardo; Facco, Monica; Piazza, Francesco; Semenzato, Gianpietro; Trentin, Livio

    2017-02-01

    Major infections (MIs), secondary cancers (SCs) and autoimmune diseases (ADs) are the most common and relevant complications in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia. We performed a single-centre retrospective study to investigate the prevalence of the above quoted complications, the association with most important prognostic markers and their impact on survival (n = 795). Almost one out of three patients experienced at least one complication and only 0.9% of the cohort developed all three complications. One hundred and twenty (20%) subjects developed SC, 98 MI (12%) and 80 AD (10%); these complications seem to occur in a mutually exclusive manner. By Kaplan-Meier analysis we estimated that after 20 years from the diagnosis SC, MI and AD occurred in 48%, 42% and 29% of patients, respectively. Furthermore, we showed that some clinical and biological markers are skewed among patients with different complications and that subjects with MI and SC had a worse prognosis than those with AD and all other patients (p < 0.0001). This study reveals the existence of different clinical subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia patients characterised by an increased and different risk for developing specifically MI, SC and AD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Key genes and pathways in thyroid cancer based on gene set enrichment analysis.

    PubMed

    He, Wenwu; Qi, Bin; Zhou, Qiuxi; Lu, Chuansen; Huang, Qi; Xian, Lei; Chen, Mingwu

    2013-09-01

    The incidence of thyroid cancer and its associated morbidity has shown the most rapid increase among all cancers since 1982, but the mechanisms involved in thyroid cancer, particularly significant key genes induced in thyroid cancer, remain undefined. In many studies, gene probes have been used to search for key genes involved in causing and facilitating thyroid cancer. As a result, many possible virulence genes and pathways have been identified. However, these studies lack a case contrast for selecting the most possible virulence genes and pathways, as well as conclusive results with which to clarify the mechanisms of cancer development. In the present study, we used gene set enrichment and meta-analysis to select key genes and pathways. Based on gene set enrichment, we identified 5 downregulated and 4 upregulated mixed pathways in 6 tissue datasets. Based on the meta-analysis, there were 17 common pathways in the tissue datasets. One pathway, the p53 signaling pathway, which includes 13 genes, was identified by both the gene set enrichment analysis and meta-analysis. Genes are important elements that form key pathways. These pathways can induce the development of thyroid cancer later in life. The key pathways and genes identified in the present study can be used in the next stage of research, which will involve gene elimination and other methods of experimentation.

  15. Sphere Culture of Murine Lung Cancer Cell Lines Are Enriched with Cancer Initiating Cells

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Brian J.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer initiating cells (CICs) represent a unique cell population essential for the maintenance and growth of tumors. Most in vivo studies of CICs utilize human tumor xenografts in immunodeficient mice. These models provide limited information on the interaction of CICs with the host immune system and are of limited value in assessing therapies targeting CICs, especially immune-based therapies. To assess this, a syngeneic cancer model is needed. We examined the sphere-forming capacity of thirteen murine lung cancer cell lines and identified TC-1 and a metastatic subclone of Lewis lung carcinoma (HM-LLC) as cell lines that readily formed and maintained spheres over multiple passages. TC-1 tumorspheres were not enriched for expression of CD133 or CD44, putative CIC markers, nor did they demonstrate Hoechst 33342 side population staining or Aldefluor activity compared to adherent TC-1 cells. However, in tumorsphere culture, these cells exhibited self-renewal and long-term symmetric division capacity and expressed more Oct-4 compared to adherent cells. HM-LLC sphere-derived cells exhibited increased Oct-4, CD133, and CD44 expression, demonstrated a Hoechst 33342 side population and Aldefluor activity compared to adherent cells or a low metastatic subclone of LLC (LM-LLC). In syngeneic mice, HM-LLC sphere-derived cells required fewer cells to initiate tumorigenesis compared to adherent or LM-LLC cells. Similarly TC-1 sphere-derived cells were more tumorigenic than adherent cells in syngeneic mice. In contrast, in immunocompromised mice, less than 500 sphere or adherent TC-1 cells and less than 1,000 sphere or adherent LLC cells were required to initiate a tumor. We suggest that no single phenotypic marker can identify CICs in murine lung cancer cell lines. Tumorsphere culture may provide an alternative approach to identify and enrich for murine lung CICs. Furthermore, we propose that assessing tumorigenicity of murine lung CICs in syngeneic mice better models the

  16. Potent HIV-specific responses are enriched in a unique subset of CD8+ T cells that coexpresses CD4 on its surface.

    PubMed

    Zloza, Andrew; Schenkel, Jason M; Tenorio, Allan R; Martinson, Jeffrey A; Jeziorczak, Paul M; Al-Harthi, Lena

    2009-10-29

    In humans, approximately 3% of peripheral CD8+ T cells coexpress CD4 dimly on their surface and hence are designated as CD4(dim)CD8(bright) T cells. We evaluated the contribution of this CD4(dim)CD8(bright) T-cell population to anti-HIV immunity. We demonstrate that CD4(dim)CD8(bright) T cells generate greater than 55% of CD8+ T-cell antigen recognition and effector response to HIV, as evaluated by multiple parameters for assessing T-cell antiviral immunity, including HIV tetramer recognition, cytokine production, and cytolytic potential. Inhibition of major histocompatibility class II (MHC-II) on target cells or CD4 on CD4(dim)CD8(bright) T cells diminishes their anti-HIV responses, suggesting that CD4 on effector cells and MHC-II on target cells provides an additional arm of contact between effector and target cells which is critical to CD4(dim)CD8(bright) T-cell function. CD4(dim)CD8(bright) T cells also exhibit features that are indicative of central memory T cells. Finally, CD4(dim)CD8(bright) T cells are elevated in blood of HIV+ long-term nonprogressors in comparison to HIV- donors. Collectively, our findings show that CD4(dim)CD8(bright) T cells designate an enriched antiviral subpopulation of CD8+ T cells that should be targeted for therapeutic intervention or evaluation of vaccine efficacy.

  17. Potent HIV-specific responses are enriched in a unique subset of CD8+ T cells that coexpresses CD4 on its surface

    PubMed Central

    Zloza, Andrew; Schenkel, Jason M.; Tenorio, Allan R.; Martinson, Jeffrey A.; Jeziorczak, Paul M.

    2009-01-01

    In humans, approximately 3% of peripheral CD8+ T cells coexpress CD4 dimly on their surface and hence are designated as CD4dimCD8bright T cells. We evaluated the contribution of this CD4dimCD8bright T-cell population to anti-HIV immunity. We demonstrate that CD4dimCD8bright T cells generate greater than 55% of CD8+ T-cell antigen recognition and effector response to HIV, as evaluated by multiple parameters for assessing T-cell antiviral immunity, including HIV tetramer recognition, cytokine production, and cytolytic potential. Inhibition of major histocompatibility class II (MHC-II) on target cells or CD4 on CD4dimCD8bright T cells diminishes their anti-HIV responses, suggesting that CD4 on effector cells and MHC-II on target cells provides an additional arm of contact between effector and target cells which is critical to CD4dimCD8bright T-cell function. CD4dimCD8bright T cells also exhibit features that are indicative of central memory T cells. Finally, CD4dimCD8bright T cells are elevated in blood of HIV+ long-term nonprogressors in comparison to HIV− donors. Collectively, our findings show that CD4dimCD8bright T cells designate an enriched antiviral subpopulation of CD8+ T cells that should be targeted for therapeutic intervention or evaluation of vaccine efficacy. PMID:19700667

  18. Analyses of 123 Peripheral Human Immune Cell Subsets: Defining Differences with Age and between Healthy Donors and Cancer Patients Not Detected in Analysis of Standard Immune Cell Types

    PubMed Central

    Lepone, Lauren M.; Donahue, Renee N.; Grenga, Italia; Metenou, Simon; Richards, Jacob; Heery, Christopher R.; Madan, Ravi A.; Gulley, James L.; Schlom, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in human immunology have led to the identification of novel immune cell subsets and the biological function of many of these subsets has now been identified. The recent US Food and Drug Administration approval of several immunotherapeutics for the treatment of a variety of cancer types and the results of ongoing immunotherapy clinical studies requires a more thorough interrogation of the immune system. We report here the use of flow cytometry-based analyses to identify 123 immune cell subsets of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The use of these panels defines multiple differences in younger (< 40 years) vs. older (≥ 40 years) individuals and between aged-matched apparently healthy individuals and metastatic cancer patients, aspects not seen in the analysis of the following standard immune cell types: CD8, CD4, natural killer, natural killer-T, regulatory T, myeloid derived suppressor cells, conventional dendritic cells (DCs), plasmacytoid DCs and B cells. The use of these panels identifying 123 immune cell subsets may aid in the identification of patients who may benefit from immunotherapy, either prior to therapy or early in the immunotherapeutic regimen, for the treatment of cancer or other chronic or infectious diseases.

  19. A Longitudinal Evaluation of the National Cancer Institute Science Enrichment Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, Colleen F.; Goodman, Irene F.

    This paper proposes the design and key methodological features of a longitudinal evaluation of the National Cancer Institute Science Enrichment Program (NCISEP). Goodman Research Group's (GRG) five-year longitudinal evaluation is designed as a randomized experiment with a control group and employs both quantitative and qualitative data collection…

  20. Immune modulation by a cellular network of mesenchymal stem cells and breast cancer cell subsets: Implication for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Eltoukhy, Hussam S; Sinha, Garima; Moore, Caitlyn A; Sandiford, Oleta A; Rameshwar, Pranela

    2017-08-01

    The immune modulatory properties of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are mostly controlled by the particular microenvironment. Cancer stem cells (CSCs), which can initiate a clinical tumor, have been the subject of intense research. This review article discusses investigative studies of the roles of MSCs on cancer biology including on CSCs, and the potential as drug delivery to tumors. An understanding of how MSCs behave in the tumor microenvironment to facilitate the survival of tumor cells would be crucial to identify drug targets. More importantly, since CSCs survive for decades in dormancy for later resurgence, studies are presented to show how MSCs could be involved in maintaining dormancy. Although the mechanism by which CSCs survive is complex, this article focus on the cellular involvement of MSCs with regard to immune responses. We discuss the immunomodulatory mechanisms of MSC-CSC interaction in the context of therapeutic outcomes in oncology. We also discuss immunotherapy as a potential to circumventing this immune modulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Cancer initiating-cells are enriched in the CA9 positive fraction of primary cervix cancer xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Marie-Egyptienne, Delphine Tamara; Chaudary, Naz; Kalliomäki, Tuula; Hedley, David William; Hill, Richard Peter

    2017-01-01

    Numerous studies have suggested that Cancer Initiating Cells (CIC) can be identified/enriched in cell populations obtained from solid tumors based on the expression of cell surface marker proteins. We used early passage primary cervix cancer xenografts to sort cells based on the expression of the intrinsic hypoxia marker Carbonic Anhydrase 9 (CA9) and tested their cancer initiation potential by limiting dilution assay. We demonstrated that CICs are significantly enriched in the CA9+ fraction in 5/6 models studied. Analyses of the expression of the stem cell markers Oct4, Notch1, Sca-1 & Bmi1 showed a trend toward an increase in the CA9+ populations, albeit not significant. We present evidence that enhanced autophagy does not play a role in the enhanced growth of the CA9+ cells. Our study suggests a direct in vivo functional link between hypoxic cells and CICs in primary cervix cancer xenografts. PMID:27901496

  2. The association between CD2+ peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets and the relapse of bladder cancer in prophylactically BCG-treated patients

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, E; Carballido, J; Manzano, L; Moltó, L; Olivier, C; Alvarez-Mon, M

    1999-01-01

    We investigated the potential existence of differences in the distribution of T-lymphocyte subsets and in the proliferative response of these CD2+ cells to polyclonal mitogens in patients with transitional cell bladder carcinoma (SBTCC) treated with prophylactic intracavitary instillations of bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) according to their clinical response to this treatment. Before BCG treatment, different subset distribution (CD8+ and CD3+ CD56+), activation antigen expression (CD3+ HLA– DR+) and proliferative response to mitogenic signals were found in CD2+ cells from SBTCC patients prophylactically treated with BCG who remained free of disease or those who had recurrence of tumour. Otherwise, the prophylactic intracavitary BCG instillations in SBTCC patients are associated with a transitory variation of T-lymphocyte subset distribution (CD4 and CD8) and activation antigens expression (CD25). © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10098752

  3. High casein kinase 1 epsilon levels are correlated with better prognosis in subsets of patients with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Guerra, Jose Luis; Verdugo-Sivianes, Eva M.; Otero-Albiol, Daniel; Vieites, Begoña; Ortiz-Gordillo, Maria J.; De León, Jose M.; Praena-Fernandez, Juan M.; Marin, Juan J.; Carnero, Amancio

    2015-01-01

    Reliable biological markers that predict breast cancer (BC) outcomes after multidisciplinary therapy have not been fully elucidated. We investigated the association between casein kinase 1 epsilon (CK1ε) and the risk of recurrence in patients with BC. Using 168 available tumor samples from patients with BC treated with surgery +/− chemo(radio)therapy, we scored the CK1ε expression as high (≥1.5) or low (<1.5) using an immunohistochemical method. Kaplan-Meier analysis was performed to assess the risk of relapse, and Cox proportional hazards analyses were utilized to evaluate the effect of CK1ε expression on this risk. The median age at diagnosis was 60 years (range 35-96). A total of 58% of the patients underwent breast conservation surgery, while 42% underwent mastectomy. Adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation therapy were administered in 101 (60%) and 137 cases (82%), respectively. Relapse was observed in 24 patients (14%). Multivariate analysis found high expression of CK1ε to be associated with a statistically significant higher disease-free survival (DFS) in BC patients with wild-type p53 (Hazard ratio [HR] = 0.33; 95% CI, 0.12-0.91; P = 0.018) or poor histological differentiation ([HR] = 0.34; 95% CI, 0.12-0.94; P = 0.039) or in those without adjuvant chemotherapy ([HR] = 0.11; 95% CI, 0.01-0.97; P = 0.006). Our data indicate that CK1ε expression is associated with DFS in BC patients with wild-type p53 or poor histological differentiation or in those without adjuvant chemotherapy and thus may serve as a predictor of recurrence in these subsets of patients. PMID:26327509

  4. The Culture of Cancer Cell Lines as Tumorspheres Does Not Systematically Result in Cancer Stem Cell Enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Calvet, Christophe Y.; André, Franck M.; Mir, Lluis M.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) have raised great excitement during the last decade and are promising targets for an efficient treatment of tumors without relapses and metastases. Among the various methods that enable to enrich cancer cell lines in CSC, tumorspheres culture has been predominantly used. In this report, we attempted to generate tumorspheres from several murine and human cancer cell lines: B16-F10, HT-29, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. Tumorspheres were obtained with variable efficiencies from all cell lines except from MDA-MB-231 cells. Then, we studied several CSC characteristics in both tumorspheres and adherent cultures of the B16-F10, HT-29 and MCF-7 cells. Unexpectedly, tumorspheres-forming cells were less clonogenic and, in the case of B16-F10, less proliferative than attached cells. In addition, we did not observe any enrichment in the population expressing CSC surface markers in tumorspheres from B16-F10 (CD133, CD44 and CD24 markers) or MCF-7 (CD44 and CD24 markers) cells. On the contrary, tumorspheres culture of HT-29 cells appeared to enrich in cells expressing colon CSC markers, i.e. CD133 and CD44 proteins. For the B16-F10 cell line, when 1 000 cells were injected in syngenic C57BL/6 mice, tumorspheres-forming cells displayed a significantly lower tumorigenic potential than adherent cells. Finally, tumorspheres culture of B16-F10 cells induced a down-regulation of vimentin which could explain, at least partially, the lower tumorigenicity of tumorspheres-forming cells. All these results, along with the literature, indicate that tumorspheres culture of cancer cell lines can induce an enrichment in CSC but in a cell line-dependent manner. In conclusion, extensive characterization of CSC properties in tumorspheres derived from any cancer cell line or cancer tissue must be performed in order to ensure that the generated tumorspheres are actually enriched in CSC. PMID:24586931

  5. Enriched transcription factor signatures in triple negative breast cancer indicates possible targeted therapies with existing drugs

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Scooter; De, Pradip; Dey, Nandini; Long, Bradley; Young, Brandon; Sparano, Joseph A.; Wang, Victoria; Davidson, Nancy E.; Leyland-Jones, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Triple negative (TN) breast cancers which lack expression of the estrogen (ER), progesterone (PR), and human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2) receptors convey a poor prognosis due in part to a lack of targeted therapies. Methods To identify viable targets for the treatment of TN disease, we have conducted a gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) on seven different breast cancer whole genome gene expression cohorts comparing TN vs. ER + HER2 − to identify consistently enriched genes that share a common promoter motif. The seven cohorts were profiled on three different genome expression platforms (Affymetrix, Illumina and RNAseq) consisting in total of 2088 samples with IHC metadata. Results GSEA identified enriched gene expression patterns in TN samples that share common promoter motifs associated with SOX9, E2F1, HIF1A, HMGA1, MYC BACH2, CEBPB, and GCNF/NR6A1. Unexpectedly, NR6A1 an orphan nuclear receptor normally expressed in germ cells of gonads is highly expressed in TN and ER + HER2 − samples making it an ideal drug target. Conclusion With the increasing number of large sample size breast cancer cohorts, an exploratory analysis of genes that are consistently enriched in TN sharing common promoter motifs allows for the identification of possible therapeutic targets with extensive validation in patient derived data sets. PMID:26005638

  6. CTMP, a predictive biomarker for trastuzumab resistance in HER2-enriched breast cancer patient

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Chia; Li, Hao-Yi; Liang, Jui-Lin; Ger, Luo-Ping; Chang, Hong-Tai; Hsiao, Michael; Calkins, Marcus J.; Cheng, Hui-Chuan; Chuang, Jiin-Haur; Lu, Pei-Jung

    2017-01-01

    Trastuzumab is regarded as the primary therapy for patients with HER2-enriched breast cancer, but the pathological complete response for advanced cases is less than 30%. The underlying mechanism of trastuzumab resistance remains unclear and there are currently no conclusive biomarkers for patient response to trastuzumab. Identifying predictive biomarkers for trastuzumab response may allow treatments to be individually tailored and optimized multi-target therapies may be developed. CTMP activates AKT signaling in breast cancer and over-activation of AKT has been reported to contribute to trastuzumab resistance. In this study, we examined samples from 369 patients to investigate the correlation between CTMP expression level and patient outcome. Elevated CTMP expression was correlated with adverse outcomes in HER2-enriched patients including overall and disease-free survival as well as trastuzumab resistance. Ectopic expression of varying levels of CTMP in SkBR3 cells dose-dependently attenuated trastuzumab-mediated growth inhibition through AKT activation. In addition, inhibition of AKT signaling by AKT inhibitor IV and Rapamycin reversed CTMP-mediated trastuzumab resistance. In clinical samples, the high expression of CTMP was showed in trastuzumab non-responders and positively correlated with AKT activity. Taken together, we demonstrated that CTMP promotes AKT activation resulting in trastuzumab resistance in patients with HER2-enriched breast cancer. High CTMP expression not only predicted poor prognosis, but may also predict resistance to trastuzumab in HER2-enriched patients. Therefore, CTMP expression may be considered as a prognostic biomarker in HER2-enriched breast cancer and high expression may indicate a utility for AKT-inhibition in these patients. PMID:27447863

  7. CXCR3 expression defines a novel subset of innate CD8+ T cells that enhance immunity against bacterial infection and cancer upon stimulation with IL-15

    PubMed Central

    Oghumu, Steve; Terrazas, Cesar A.; Varikuti, Sanjay; Kimble, Jennifer; Vadia, Stephen; Yu, Lianbo; Seveau, Stephanie; Satoskar, Abhay R.

    2015-01-01

    Innate CD8+ T cells are a heterogeneous population with developmental pathways distinct from conventional CD8+ T cells. However, their biology, classification, and functions remain incompletely understood. We recently demonstrated the existence of a novel population of chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 3 (CXCR3)-positive innate CD8+ T cells. Here, we investigated the functional properties of this subset and identified effector molecules and pathways which mediate their function. Adoptive transfer of IL-15 activated CXCR3+ innate CD8+ T cells conferred increased protection against Listeria monocytogenes infection in susceptible IFN-γ−/− mice compared with similarly activated CXCR3− subset. This was associated with enhanced proliferation and IFN-γ production in CXCR3+ cells. Further, CXCR3+ innate cells showed enhanced cytotoxicity against a tumor cell line in vitro. In depth analysis of the CXCR3+ subset showed increased gene expression of Ccl5, Klrc1, CtsW, GP49a, IL-2Rβ, Atp5e, and Ly6c but reduced IFN-γR2 and Art2b. Ingenuity pathway analysis revealed an up-regulation of genes associated with T-cell activation, proliferation, cytotoxicity, and translational initiation in CXCR3+ populations. Our results demonstrate that CXCR3 expression in innate CD8+ T cells defines a subset with enhanced cytotoxic potential and protective antibacterial immune functions. Immunotherapeutic approaches against infectious disease and cancer could utilize CXCR3+ innate CD8+ T-cell populations as novel clinical intervention strategies.—Oghumu, S., Terrazas, C. A., Varikuti, S., Kimble, J., Vadia, S., Yu, L., Seveau, S., Satoskar, A. R. CXCR3 expression defines a novel subset of innate CD8+ T cells that enhance immunity against bacterial infection and cancer upon stimulation with IL-15. PMID:25466888

  8. [Effect of Sijunzi Decoction and enteral nutrition on T-cell subsets and nutritional status in patients with gastric cancer after operation: a randomized controlled trial].

    PubMed

    Cai, Jun; Wang, Hua; Zhou, Sheng; Wu, Bin; Song, Hua-Rong; Xuan, Zheng-Rong

    2008-01-01

    To observe the effect of perioperative application of Sijunzi Decoction and enteral nutrition on T-cell subsets and nutritional status in patients with gastric cancer after operation. In this prospective, single-blinded, controlled clinical trial, fifty-nine patients with gastric cancer were randomly divided into three groups: control group (n=20) and two study groups (group A, n=21; group B, n=18). Sjunzi Decoction (100 ml) was administered via nasogastric tube to the patients in the study group B from the second postoperation day to the 9th postoperation day. Patients in the two study groups were given an isocaloric and isonitrogonous enteral diet, which was started on the second day after operation, and continued for eight days. Patients in the control group were given an isocaloric and isonitrogonous parenteral diet for 9 days. All variables of nutritional status such as serum albumin (ALB), prealbumin (PA), transferrin (TRF) and T-cell subsets were measured one day before operation, and one day and 10 days after operation. All the nutritional variables and the levels of CD3(+), CD4(+), CD4(+)/CD8(+) were decreased significantly after operation. Ten days after operation, T-cell subsets and nutritional variables in the two study groups were increased as compare with the control group. The levels of ALB, TRF and T-cell subsets in the study group B were increased significantly as compared with the study group A (P<0.05). Enteral nutrition assisted with Sijunzi Decoction can positively improve and optimize cellular immune function and nutritional status in the patients with gastric cancer after operation.

  9. Prostate Specific or Enriched Genes as Composite Biomarkers for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    plays important roles in endocytosis.7 DYF-2, the C . elegans orthologue of WDR19, is involved in intraciliary/intraflagellar transport. Loss of DYF-2...chemosensation in C . elegans (35). The mouse WDR19 was shown to localize to granule structures inside of the cell at the base of cilia in the ependymal...Prostate Specific or Enriched Genes as Composite Biomarkers for Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Biaoyang Lin, Ph.D

  10. CXCR3 expression defines a novel subset of innate CD8+ T cells that enhance immunity against bacterial infection and cancer upon stimulation with IL-15.

    PubMed

    Oghumu, Steve; Terrazas, Cesar A; Varikuti, Sanjay; Kimble, Jennifer; Vadia, Stephen; Yu, Lianbo; Seveau, Stephanie; Satoskar, Abhay R

    2015-03-01

    Innate CD8(+) T cells are a heterogeneous population with developmental pathways distinct from conventional CD8(+) T cells. However, their biology, classification, and functions remain incompletely understood. We recently demonstrated the existence of a novel population of chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 3 (CXCR3)-positive innate CD8(+) T cells. Here, we investigated the functional properties of this subset and identified effector molecules and pathways which mediate their function. Adoptive transfer of IL-15 activated CXCR3(+) innate CD8(+) T cells conferred increased protection against Listeria monocytogenes infection in susceptible IFN-γ(-/-) mice compared with similarly activated CXCR3(-) subset. This was associated with enhanced proliferation and IFN-γ production in CXCR3(+) cells. Further, CXCR3(+) innate cells showed enhanced cytotoxicity against a tumor cell line in vitro. In depth analysis of the CXCR3(+) subset showed increased gene expression of Ccl5, Klrc1, CtsW, GP49a, IL-2Rβ, Atp5e, and Ly6c but reduced IFN-γR2 and Art2b. Ingenuity pathway analysis revealed an up-regulation of genes associated with T-cell activation, proliferation, cytotoxicity, and translational initiation in CXCR3(+) populations. Our results demonstrate that CXCR3 expression in innate CD8(+) T cells defines a subset with enhanced cytotoxic potential and protective antibacterial immune functions. Immunotherapeutic approaches against infectious disease and cancer could utilize CXCR3(+) innate CD8(+) T-cell populations as novel clinical intervention strategies.

  11. Role of Anthocyanin-enriched Purple-fleshed Sweet Potato P40 in Colorectal Cancer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Soyoung; Xu, Jianteng; Kim, Jaeyong; Chen, Tzu-Yu; Su, Xiaoyu; Standard, Joseph; Carey, Edward; Griffin, Jason; Herndon, Betty; Katz, Benjamin; Tomich, John; Wang, Weiqun

    2013-01-01

    Scope Anthocyanins, the natural pigments in plant foods, have been associated with cancer prevention. However, the content of anthocyanins in staple foods is typically low and the mechanisms by which they exert anti-cancer activity is not yet fully defined. Methods and results We selected an anthocyanin-enriched purple-fleshed sweet potato clone, P40, and investigated its potential anti-cancer effect in both in vitro cell culture and in vivo animal model. In addition to a high level of total phenolics and antioxidant capacity, P40 possesses a high content of anthocyanins at 7.5 mg/g dry matter. Treatment of human colonic SW480 cancer cells with P40 anthocyanin extracts at 0–40 μM of peonidin-3-glucoside equivalent resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in cell number due to cytostatic arrest of cell cycle at G1 phase but not cytotoxicity. Furthermore, dietary P40 at 10–30% significantly suppressed azoxymethane-induced formation of aberrant crypt foci in the colons of CF-1 mice in conjunction with, at least in part, a lesser proliferative PCNA and a greater apoptotic caspase-3 expression in the colon mucosal epithelial cells. Conclusion These observations, coupled with both in vitro and in vivo studies reported here, suggest anthocyanin-enriched sweet potato P40 may protect against colorectal cancer by inducing cell cycle arrest, anti-proliferative and apoptotic mechanisms. PMID:23784800

  12. Effect of rosemary polyphenols on human colon cancer cells: transcriptomic profiling and functional enrichment analysis.

    PubMed

    Valdés, Alberto; García-Cañas, Virginia; Rocamora-Reverte, Lourdes; Gómez-Martínez, Angeles; Ferragut, José Antonio; Cifuentes, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the effect of rosemary extracts rich on polyphenols obtained using pressurized fluids was investigated on the gene expression of human SW480 and HT29 colon cancer cells. The application of transcriptomic profiling and functional enrichment analysis was done via two computational approaches, Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis. These two approaches were used for functional enrichment analysis as a previous step for a reliable interpretation of the data obtained from microarray analysis. Reverse transcription quantitative-PCR was used to confirm relative changes in mRNA levels of selected genes from microarrays. The selection of genes was based on their expression change, adjusted p value, and known biological function. According to genome-wide transcriptomics analysis, rosemary polyphenols altered the expression of ~4 % of the genes covered by the Affymetrix Human Gene 1.0ST chip in both colon cancer cells. However, only ~18 % of the differentially expressed genes were common to both cell lines, indicating markedly different expression profiles in response to the treatment. Differences in induction of G2/M arrest observed by rosemary polyphenols in the two colon adenocarcinoma cell lines suggest that the extract may be differentially effective against tumors with specific mutational pattern. From our results, it is also concluded that rosemary polyphenols induced a low degree of apoptosis indicating that other multiple signaling pathways may contribute to colon cancer cell death.

  13. Selenium enrichment of broccoli sprout extract increases chemosensitivity and apoptosis of LNCaP prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Broccoli is a Brassica vegetable that is believed to possess chemopreventive properties. Selenium also shows promise as an anticancer agent. Thus, selenium enrichment of broccoli has the potential to enhance the anticancer properties of broccoli sprouts. Method Selenium-enriched broccoli sprouts were prepared using a sodium selenite solution. Their anticancer properties were evaluated in human prostate cancer cell lines and compared with those of a control broccoli sprout extract. Results Selenium-enriched broccoli sprouts were superior to normal broccoli sprouts in inhibiting cell proliferation, decreasing prostate-specific antigen secretion, and inducing apoptosis of prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, selenium-enriched broccoli sprouts but, not normal broccoli sprouts, induced a downregulation of the survival Akt/mTOR pathway. Conclusion Our results suggest that selenium-enriched broccoli sprouts could potentially be used as an alternative selenium source for prostate cancer prevention and therapy. PMID:19943972

  14. Enriched environment housing enhances the sensitivity of mouse pancreatic cancer to chemotherapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yufeng; Gan, Yu; Yuan, Hui; Wang, Qing; Fan, Yingchao; Li, Guohua; Zhang, Jian; Yao, Ming; Gu, Jianren; Tu, Hong

    2016-04-29

    Living in an enriched housing environment is an established model of eustress and has been consistently shown to reduce the growth of transplanted tumors, including pancreatic cancer. Here, we further investigate the influence of an enriched environment (EE) on the efficacy of chemotherapy in pancreatic cancer. Male C57BL/6 mice were housed in EE or standard environment (SE) conditions and transplanted with syngeneic Panc02 pancreatic cancer cells. Tumor-bearing mice were treated with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) or gemcitabine (GEM) to examine their sensitivities to chemotherapy. The results showed that both 5-FU and GEM exerted the dose dependent inhibition of tumor growth. The tumor inhibition rates of low-dose 5-FU and GEM were improved from 17.7% and 23.6% to 46.3% and 49.9% by EE housing. Importantly, tumor cells isolated from the pancreatic cancer xenografts of EE mice had significantly enhanced sensitivities to both 5-FU and GEM (IC50 for 5-FU: 2.8 μM versus 27.3 μM; IC50 for GEM: 0.8 μM versus 5.0 μM). Furthermore, using microarray analyses, we identified the "ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter" that was overrepresented among EE-induced down-regulated genes in pancreatic cancer. Particularly, the tumoral expression of ABC transporter A8b (ABCA8b) was confirmed to be significantly decreased by EE. Over-expression of ABCA8b in mouse pancreatic cancer cells led to a marked decrease in the sensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs both in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, our data indicate that benign stressful stimulation can synergistically boost the efficiency of chemotherapeutics in pancreatic cancer, which suggests a novel strategy for adjuvant cancer therapy.

  15. Identification of CD166 as a Surface Marker for Enriching Prostate Stem/Progenitor and Cancer Initiating Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shunyou; Tran, Linh M.; Goldstein, Andrew S.; Lawson, Devon; Chen, Donghui; Li, Yunfeng; Guo, Changyong; Zhang, Baohui; Fazli, Ladan; Gleave, Martin; Witte, Owen N.; Garraway, Isla P.; Wu, Hong

    2012-01-01

    New therapies for late stage and castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) depend on defining unique properties and pathways of cell sub-populations capable of sustaining the net growth of the cancer. One of the best enrichment schemes for isolating the putative stem/progenitor cell from the murine prostate gland is Lin-;Sca1+;CD49fhi (LSChi), which results in a more than 10-fold enrichment for in vitro sphere-forming activity. We have shown previously that the LSChi subpopulation is both necessary and sufficient for cancer initiation in the Pten-null prostate cancer model. To further improve this enrichment scheme, we searched for cell surface molecules upregulated upon castration of murine prostate and identified CD166 as a candidate gene. CD166 encodes a cell surface molecule that can further enrich sphere-forming activity of WT LSChi and Pten null LSChi. Importantly, CD166 could enrich sphere-forming ability of benign primary human prostate cells in vitro and induce the formation of tubule-like structures in vivo. CD166 expression is upregulated in human prostate cancers, especially CRPC samples. Although genetic deletion of murine CD166 in the Pten null prostate cancer model does not interfere with sphere formation or block prostate cancer progression and CRPC development, the presence of CD166 on prostate stem/progenitors and castration resistant sub-populations suggest that it is a cell surface molecule with the potential for targeted delivery of human prostate cancer therapeutics. PMID:22880034

  16. Enrichment of cancer stem cell-like cells by culture in alginate gel beads.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao-xi; Liu, Chang; Liu, Yang; Yang, Li; Li, Nan; Guo, Xin; Sun, Guang-wei; Ma, Xiao-jun

    2014-05-10

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are most likely the reason of cancer reoccurrence and metastasis. For further elucidation of the mechanism underlying the characteristics of CSCs, it is necessary to develop efficient culture systems to culture and expand CSCs. In this study, a three-dimensional (3D) culture system based on alginate gel (ALG) beads was reported to enrich CSCs. Two cell lines derived from different histologic origins were encapsulated in ALG beads respectively and the expansion of CSCs was investigated. Compared with two-dimensional (2D) culture, the proportion of cells with CSC-like phenotypes was significantly increased in ALG beads. Expression levels of CSC-related genes were greater in ALG beads than in 2D culture. The increase of CSC proportion after being cultured within ALG beads was further confirmed by enhanced tumorigenicity in vivo. Moreover, increased metastasis ability and higher anti-cancer drug resistance were also observed in 3D-cultured cells. Furthermore, we found that it was hypoxia, through the upregulation of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) that occurred in ALG beads to induce the increasing of CSC proportion. Therefore, ALG bead was an efficient culture system for CSC enrichment, which might provide a useful platform for CSC research and promote the development of new anti-cancer therapies targeting CSCs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A Combined Negative and Positive Enrichment Assay for Cancer Cells Isolation and Purification.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Boran; Wang, Shuyi; Chen, Yuanyuan; Fang, Yuan; Chen, Fangfang; Wang, Zhenmeng; Xiong, Bin

    2016-02-01

    Cancer cells that detach from solid tumor and circulate in the peripheral blood (CTCs) have been considered as a new "biomarker" for the detection and characterization of cancers. However, isolating and detecting cancer cells from the cancer patient peripheral blood have been technically challenging, owing to the small sub-population of CTCs (a few to hundreds per milliliter). Here we demonstrate a simple and efficient cancer cells isolation and purification method. A biocompatible and surface roughness controllable TiO2 nanofilm was deposited onto a glass slide to achieve enhanced topographic interactions with nanoscale cellular surface components, again, anti-CD45 (a leukocyte common antigen) and anti-EpCAM (epithelial cell adhesion molecule) were then coated onto the surface of the nanofilm for advance depletion of white blood cells (WBCs) and specific isolation of CTCs, respectively. Comparing to the conventional positive enrichment technology, this method exhibited excellent biocompatibility and equally high capture efficiency. Moreover, the maximum number of background cells (WBCs) was removed, and viable and functional cancer cells were isolated with high purity. Utilizing the horizontally packed TiO2 nanofilm improved pure CTC-capture through combining cell-capture-agent and cancer cell-preferred nanoscale topography, which represented a new method capable of obtaining biologically functional CTCs for subsequent molecular analysis.

  18. Strategies for Isolating and Enriching Cancer Stem Cells: Well Begun Is Half Done

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Jiang-jie; Qiu, Wen; Xu, Sen-lin; Wang, Bin; Ye, Xian-zong; Ping, Yi-fang; Zhang, Xia

    2013-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) constitute a subpopulation of cancer cells that have the potential for self-renewal, multipotent differentiation, and tumorigenicity. Studies on CSC biology and CSC-targeted therapies depend on CSC isolation and/or enrichment methodologies. Scientists have conducted extensive research in this field since John Dick's group successfully isolated CSCs based on the expression of the CD34 and CD38 surface markers. Progress in CSC research has been greatly facilitated by the enrichment and isolation of these cells. In this review, we summarize the current strategies used in our and other laboratories for CSC isolation and enrichment, including methods based on stem cell surface markers, intracellular enzyme activity, the concentration of reactive oxygen species, the mitochondrial membrane potential, promoter-driven fluorescent protein expression, autofluorescence, suspension/adherent culture, cell division, the identification of side population cells, resistance to cytotoxic compounds or hypoxia, invasiveness/adhesion, immunoselection, and physical property. Although many challenges remain to be overcome, it is reasonable to believe that more reliable, efficient, and convenient methods will be developed in the near future. PMID:23540661

  19. Mechanistic-enriched models: integrating transcription factor networks and metabolic deregulation in cancer.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Lemus, Enrique; Siqueiros-García, J Mario

    2015-09-09

    In the present paper we will examine methodological frameworks to study complex genetic diseases (e.g. cancer) from the stand point of theoretical-computational biology combining both data-driven and hypothesis driven approaches. Our work focuses in the apparent counterpoint between two formal approaches to research in natural science: data- and hypothesis-driven inquiries. For a long time philosophers have recognized the mechanistic character of molecular biology explanations. On these grounds we suggest that hypothesis and data-driven approaches are not opposed to each other but that they may be integrated by the development of what we call enriched mechanistic models. We will elaborate around a case study from our laboratory that analyzed the relationship between transcriptional de-regulation of sets of genes that present both transcription factor and metabolic activity while at the same time have been associated with the presence of cancer. The way we do this is by analyzing structural, mechanistic and functional approaches to molecular level research in cancer biology. Emphasis will be given to data integration strategies to construct new explanations. Such analysis has led us to present a mechanistic-enriched model of the phenomenon. Such model pointed out to the way in which regulatory and thermodynamical behavior of gene regulation networks may be analyzed by means of gene expression data obtained from genome-wide analysis experiments in RNA from biopsy-captured tissue. The foundations of the model are given by the laws of thermodynamics and chemical physics and the approach is an enriched version of a mechanistic explanation. After analyzing the way we studied the coupling of metabolic and transcriptional deregulation in breast cancer, we have concluded that one plausible strategy to integrate data driven and hypothesis driven approaches is by means of resorting to fundamental and well established laws of physics and chemistry since these provide a solid

  20. Differential PI3Kδ signaling in CD4+ T cell subsets enables selective targeting of T regulatory cells to enhance cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Shamim; Abu-Eid, Rasha; Shrimali, Rajeev K; Webb, Mason; Verma, Vivek; Doroodchi, Atbin; Berrong, Zuzana; Samara, Raed N; Rodriguez, Paulo C; Mkrtichyan, Mikayel; Khleif, Samir N

    2017-01-20

    To modulate T cell function for cancer therapy one challenge is to selectively attenuate regulatory but not conventional CD4+ T cell subsets (Treg and Tconv). In this study we show how a functional dichotomy in Class IA PI3K isoforms in these two subsets of CD4+ T cells be exploited to target Treg while leaving Tconv intact. Studies employing isoform-specific PI3K inhibitors and a PI3Kδ-deficient mouse strain revealed that PI3Kα and PI3Kβ were functionally redundant with PI3Kδ in Tconv. Conversely, PI3Kδ was functionally critical in Treg, acting there to control TCR signaling, cell proliferation and survival. Notably, in a murine model of lung cancer, co-administration of a PI3Kδ-specific inhibitor with a tumor-specific vaccine decreased numbers of suppressive Treg and increased numbers of vaccine-induced CD8 T-cells within the tumor microenvironment, eliciting potent anti-tumor efficacy. Overall, our results offer a mechanistic rationale to employ PI3Kδ inhibitors to selectively target Treg and improve cancer immunotherapy.

  1. Alu and LINE-1 Hypomethylation Is Associated with HER2 Enriched Subtype of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hae Yoen; Gwak, Jae Moon; Jung, Namhee; Cho, Nam-Yun; Kang, Gyeong Hoon

    2014-01-01

    The changes in DNA methylation status in cancer cells are characterized by hypermethylation of promoter CpG islands and diffuse genomic hypomethylation. Alu and long interspersed nucleotide element-1 (LINE-1) are non-coding genomic repetitive sequences and methylation of these elements can be used as a surrogate marker for genome-wide methylation status. This study was designed to evaluate the changes of Alu and LINE-1 hypomethylation during breast cancer progression from normal to pre-invasive lesions and invasive breast cancer (IBC), and their relationship with characteristics of IBC. We analyzed the methylation status of Alu and LINE-1 in 145 cases of breast samples including normal breast tissue, atypical ductal hyperplasia/flat epithelial atypia (ADH/FEA), ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and IBC, and another set of 129 cases of IBC by pyrosequencing. Alu methylation showed no significant changes during multistep progression of breast cancer, although it tended to decrease during the transition from DCIS to IBC. In contrast, LINE-1 methylation significantly decreased from normal to ADH/FEA, while it was similar in ADH/FEA, DCIS and IBC. In IBC, Alu hypomethylation correlated with negative estrogen receptor (ER) status, and LINE-1 hypomethylation was associated with negative ER status, ERBB2 (HER2) amplification and p53 overexpression. Alu and LINE-1 methylation status was significantly different between breast cancer subtypes, and the HER2 enriched subtype had lowest methylation levels. In survival analyses, low Alu methylation status tended to be associated with poor disease-free survival of the patients. Our findings suggest that LINE-1 hypomethylation is an early event and Alu hypomethylation is probably a late event during breast cancer progression, and prominent hypomethylation of Alu and LINE-1 in HER2 enriched subtype may be related to chromosomal instability of this specific subtype. PMID:24971511

  2. Alu and LINE-1 hypomethylation is associated with HER2 enriched subtype of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Park, So Yeon; Seo, An Na; Jung, Hae Yoen; Gwak, Jae Moon; Jung, Namhee; Cho, Nam-Yun; Kang, Gyeong Hoon

    2014-01-01

    The changes in DNA methylation status in cancer cells are characterized by hypermethylation of promoter CpG islands and diffuse genomic hypomethylation. Alu and long interspersed nucleotide element-1 (LINE-1) are non-coding genomic repetitive sequences and methylation of these elements can be used as a surrogate marker for genome-wide methylation status. This study was designed to evaluate the changes of Alu and LINE-1 hypomethylation during breast cancer progression from normal to pre-invasive lesions and invasive breast cancer (IBC), and their relationship with characteristics of IBC. We analyzed the methylation status of Alu and LINE-1 in 145 cases of breast samples including normal breast tissue, atypical ductal hyperplasia/flat epithelial atypia (ADH/FEA), ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and IBC, and another set of 129 cases of IBC by pyrosequencing. Alu methylation showed no significant changes during multistep progression of breast cancer, although it tended to decrease during the transition from DCIS to IBC. In contrast, LINE-1 methylation significantly decreased from normal to ADH/FEA, while it was similar in ADH/FEA, DCIS and IBC. In IBC, Alu hypomethylation correlated with negative estrogen receptor (ER) status, and LINE-1 hypomethylation was associated with negative ER status, ERBB2 (HER2) amplification and p53 overexpression. Alu and LINE-1 methylation status was significantly different between breast cancer subtypes, and the HER2 enriched subtype had lowest methylation levels. In survival analyses, low Alu methylation status tended to be associated with poor disease-free survival of the patients. Our findings suggest that LINE-1 hypomethylation is an early event and Alu hypomethylation is probably a late event during breast cancer progression, and prominent hypomethylation of Alu and LINE-1 in HER2 enriched subtype may be related to chromosomal instability of this specific subtype.

  3. RICTOR Amplification Defines a Novel Subset of Patients with Lung Cancer Who May Benefit from Treatment with mTORC1/2 Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Haiying; Zou, Yiyu; Ross, Jeffrey S; Wang, Kai; Liu, Xuewen; Halmos, Balazs; Ali, Siraj M; Liu, Huijie; Verma, Amit; Montagna, Cristina; Chachoua, Abraham; Goel, Sanjay; Schwartz, Edward L; Zhu, Changcheng; Shan, Jidong; Yu, Yiting; Gritsman, Kira; Yelensky, Roman; Lipson, Doron; Otto, Geoff; Hawryluk, Matthew; Stephens, Philip J; Miller, Vincent A; Piperdi, Bilal; Perez-Soler, Roman

    2015-12-01

    We identified amplification of RICTOR, a key component of the mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2), as the sole actionable genomic alteration in an 18-year-old never-smoker with lung adenocarcinoma. Amplification of RICTOR occurs in 13% of lung cancers (1,016 cases) in The Cancer Genome Atlas and at a similar frequency in an independent cohort of 1,070 patients identified by genomic profiling. In the latter series, 11% of cases harbored RICTOR amplification as the only relevant genomic alteration. Its oncogenic roles were suggested by decreased lung cancer cell growth both in vitro and in vivo with RICTOR ablation, and the transforming capacity of RICTOR in a Ba/F3-cell system. The mTORC1/2 inhibitors were significantly more active against RICTOR-amplified lung cancer cells as compared with other agents targeting the PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway. Moreover, an association between RICTOR amplification and sensitivities to mTORC1/2 inhibitors was observed. The index patient has been treated with mTORC1/2 inhibitors that led to tumor stabilization for more than 18 months. RICTOR amplification may define a novel and unique molecular subset of patients with lung cancer who may benefit from treatment with mTORC1/2 inhibitors. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. Curcumin Promotes Autophagic Survival of a Sub-Set of Colon Cancer Stem Cells, which are Ablated by DCLK1-siRNA

    PubMed Central

    Kantara, Carla; O’Connell, Malaney; Sarkar, Shubhashish; Moya, Stephanie; Ullrich, Robert; Singh, Pomila

    2014-01-01

    Curcumin is known to induce apoptosis of cancer cells by different mechanisms, but its effects on cancer stem-like cells have been less investigated. Here we report that curcumin promotes the survival of DCLK1-positive colon cancer stem-like cells (CSC), potentially confounding application of its anticancer properties. At optimal concentrations, curcumin greatly reduced expression levels of stem cell markers (DCLK1/CD44/ALDHA1/Lgr5/Nanog) in 3D spheroid cultures and tumor xenografts derived from colon cancer cells. However, curcumin unexpectedly induced proliferation and autophagic survival of a subset of DCLK1-positive CSCs. Spheroid cultures were disintegrated by curcumin in vitro but re-grew within 30–40 days of treatment, suggesting a survival benefit from autophagy, permitting long-term persistence of CRC. Notably, RNAi-mediated silencing of DCLK1 triggered apoptotic cell death of colon cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, and abolished CRC survival in response to curcumin; combination of DCLK1-siRNA and curcumin dramatically reversed CSC phenotype, contributing to attenuation of the growth of spheroid cultures and tumor xenografts. Taken together, our findings confirm a role of DCLK1 in colon cancer stem cells and highlight DCLK1 as a target to enhance antitumor properties of curcumin. PMID:24626093

  5. Predictive Outcomes for HER2-enriched Cancer Using Growth and Metastasis Signatures Driven By SPARC.

    PubMed

    Güttlein, Leandro N; Benedetti, Lorena G; Fresno, Cristóbal; Spallanzani, Raúl G; Mansilla, Sabrina F; Rotondaro, Cecilia; Raffo Iraolagoitia, Ximena L; Salvatierra, Edgardo; Bravo, Alicia I; Fernández, Elmer A; Gottifredi, Vanesa; Zwirner, Norberto W; Llera, Andrea S; Podhajcer, Osvaldo L

    2017-03-01

    Understanding the mechanism of metastatic dissemination is crucial for the rational design of novel therapeutics. The secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) is a matricellular glycoprotein which has been extensively associated with human breast cancer aggressiveness although the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Here, shRNA-mediated SPARC knockdown greatly reduced primary tumor growth and completely abolished lung colonization of murine 4T1 and LM3 breast malignant cells implanted in syngeneic BALB/c mice. A comprehensive study including global transcriptomic analysis followed by biological validations confirmed that SPARC induces primary tumor growth by enhancing cell cycle and by promoting a COX-2-mediated expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC). The role of SPARC in metastasis involved a COX-2-independent enhancement of cell disengagement from the primary tumor and adherence to the lungs that fostered metastasis implantation. Interestingly, SPARC-driven gene expression signatures obtained from these murine models predicted the clinical outcome of patients with HER2-enriched breast cancer subtypes. In total, the results reveal that SPARC and its downstream effectors are attractive targets for antimetastatic therapies in breast cancer.Implications: These findings shed light on the prometastatic role of SPARC, a key protein expressed by breast cancer cells and surrounding stroma, with important consequences for disease outcome. Mol Cancer Res; 15(3); 304-16. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Enrichment of putative PAX8 target genes at serous epithelial ovarian cancer susceptibility loci.

    PubMed

    Kar, Siddhartha P; Adler, Emily; Tyrer, Jonathan; Hazelett, Dennis; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Bandera, Elisa V; Beckmann, Matthias W; Berchuck, Andrew; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brinton, Louise; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian; Carty, Karen; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Cook, Linda S; Cramer, Daniel W; Cunningham, Julie M; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Doherty, Jennifer Anne; Dörk, Thilo; Dürst, Matthias; Eccles, Diana; Fasching, Peter A; Flanagan, James; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Glasspool, Rosalind; Goode, Ellen L; Goodman, Marc T; Gronwald, Jacek; Heitz, Florian; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Høgdall, Estrid; Høgdall, Claus K; Huntsman, David G; Jensen, Allan; Karlan, Beth Y; Kelemen, Linda E; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Kjaer, Susanne K; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Lambrechts, Diether; Levine, Douglas A; Li, Qiyuan; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Karen H; Lubiński, Jan; Massuger, Leon F A G; McGuire, Valerie; McNeish, Iain; Menon, Usha; Modugno, Francesmary; Monteiro, Alvaro N; Moysich, Kirsten B; Ness, Roberta B; Nevanlinna, Heli; Paul, James; Pearce, Celeste L; Pejovic, Tanja; Permuth, Jennifer B; Phelan, Catherine; Pike, Malcolm C; Poole, Elizabeth M; Ramus, Susan J; Risch, Harvey A; Rossing, Mary Anne; Salvesen, Helga B; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Sellers, Thomas A; Sherman, Mark; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Sieh, Weiva; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa; Terry, Kathryn L; Tworoger, Shelley S; Walsh, Christine; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S; Wu, Anna H; Yang, Hannah; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Freedman, Matthew L; Gayther, Simon A; Pharoah, Paul D P; Lawrenson, Kate

    2017-02-14

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 18 loci associated with serous ovarian cancer (SOC) susceptibility but the biological mechanisms driving these findings remain poorly characterised. Germline cancer risk loci may be enriched for target genes of transcription factors (TFs) critical to somatic tumorigenesis. All 615 TF-target sets from the Molecular Signatures Database were evaluated using gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) and three GWAS for SOC risk: discovery (2196 cases/4396 controls), replication (7035 cases/21 693 controls; independent from discovery), and combined (9627 cases/30 845 controls; including additional individuals). The PAX8-target gene set was ranked 1/615 in the discovery (PGSEA<0.001; FDR=0.21), 7/615 in the replication (PGSEA=0.004; FDR=0.37), and 1/615 in the combined (PGSEA<0.001; FDR=0.21) studies. Adding other genes reported to interact with PAX8 in the literature to the PAX8-target set and applying an alternative to GSEA, interval enrichment, further confirmed this association (P=0.006). Fifteen of the 157 genes from this expanded PAX8 pathway were near eight loci associated with SOC risk at P<10(-5) (including six with P<5 × 10(-8)). The pathway was also associated with differential gene expression after shRNA-mediated silencing of PAX8 in HeyA8 (PGSEA=0.025) and IGROV1 (PGSEA=0.004) SOC cells and several PAX8 targets near SOC risk loci demonstrated in vitro transcriptomic perturbation. Putative PAX8 target genes are enriched for common SOC risk variants. This finding from our agnostic evaluation is of particular interest given that PAX8 is well-established as a specific marker for the cell of origin of SOC.

  7. Breast Cancer Stem Cell Culture and Enrichment Using Poly(ε-Caprolactone) Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Palomeras, Sònia; Rabionet, Marc; Ferrer, Inés; Sarrats, Ariadna; Garcia-Romeu, Maria Luisa; Puig, Teresa; Ciurana, Joaquim

    2016-04-23

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) population displays self-renewal capabilities, resistance to conventional therapies, and a tendency to post-treatment recurrence. Increasing knowledge about CSCs' phenotype and functions is needed to investigate new therapeutic strategies against the CSC population. Here, poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL), a biocompatible polymer free of toxic dye, has been used to fabricate scaffolds, solid structures suitable for 3D cancer cell culture. It has been reported that scaffold cell culture enhances the CSCs population. A RepRap BCN3D+ printer and 3 mm PCL wire were used to fabricate circular scaffolds. PCL design and fabrication parameters were first determined and then optimized considering several measurable variables of the resulting scaffolds. MCF7 breast carcinoma cell line was used to assess scaffolds adequacy for 3D cell culture. To evaluate CSC enrichment, the Mammosphere Forming Index (MFI) was performed in 2D and 3D MCF7 cultures. Results showed that the 60° scaffolds were more suitable for 3D culture than the 45° and 90° ones. Moreover, 3D culture experiments, in adherent and non-adherent conditions, showed a significant increase in MFI compared to 2D cultures (control). Thus, 3D cell culture with PCL scaffolds could be useful to improve cancer cell culture and enrich the CSCs population.

  8. Cardamonin reduces chemotherapy-enriched breast cancer stem-like cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Jia, Deyong; Tan, Yuan; Liu, Huijuan; Ooi, Sarah; Li, Li; Wright, Kathryn; Bennett, Steffany; Addison, Christina L; Wang, Lisheng

    2016-01-05

    The failure of cytotoxic chemotherapy in breast cancers has been closely associated with the presence of drug resistant cancer stem cells (CSCs). Thus, screening for small molecules that selectively inhibit growth of CSCs may offer great promise for cancer control, particularly in combination with chemotherapy. In this report, we provide the first demonstration that cardamonin, a small molecule, selectively inhibits breast CSCs that have been enriched by chemotherapeutic drugs. In addition, cardamonin also sufficiently prevents the enrichment of CSCs when simultaneously used with chemotherapeutic drugs. Specifically, cardamonin effectively abolishes chemotherapeutic drug-induced up-regulation of IL-6, IL-8 and MCP-1 and activation of NF-κB/IKBα and Stat3. Furthermore, in a xenograft mouse model, co-administration of cardamonin and the chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin significantly retards tumor growth and simultaneously decreases CSC pools in vivo. Since cardamonin has been found in some herbs, this work suggests a potential new approach for the effective treatment of breast CSCs by administration of cardamonin either concurrent with or after chemotherapeutic drugs.

  9. Remainder Subset Awareness for Feature Subset Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prat-Masramon, Gabriel; Belanche-Muñoz, Lluís A.

    Feature subset selection has become more and more a common topic of research. This popularity is partly due to the growth in the number of features and application domains. It is of the greatest importance to take themost of every evaluation of the inducer, which is normally the more costly part. In this paper, a technique is proposed that takes into account the inducer evaluation both in the current subset and in the remainder subset (its complementary set) and is applicable to any sequential subset selection algorithm at a reasonable overhead in cost. Its feasibility is demonstrated on a series of benchmark data sets.

  10. Pathologic complete response predicts recurrence-free survival more effectively by cancer subset: results from the I-SPY 1 TRIAL--CALGB 150007/150012, ACRIN 6657.

    PubMed

    Esserman, Laura J; Berry, Donald A; DeMichele, Angela; Carey, Lisa; Davis, Sarah E; Buxton, Meredith; Hudis, Cliff; Gray, Joe W; Perou, Charles; Yau, Christina; Livasy, Chad; Krontiras, Helen; Montgomery, Leslie; Tripathy, Debasish; Lehman, Constance; Liu, Minetta C; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Rugo, Hope S; Carpenter, John T; Dressler, Lynn; Chhieng, David; Singh, Baljit; Mies, Carolyn; Rabban, Joseph; Chen, Yunn-Yi; Giri, Dilip; van 't Veer, Laura; Hylton, Nola

    2012-09-10

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer provides critical information about tumor response; how best to leverage this for predicting recurrence-free survival (RFS) is not established. The I-SPY 1 TRIAL (Investigation of Serial Studies to Predict Your Therapeutic Response With Imaging and Molecular Analysis) was a multicenter breast cancer study integrating clinical, imaging, and genomic data to evaluate pathologic response, RFS, and their relationship and predictability based on tumor biomarkers. Eligible patients had tumors ≥ 3 cm and received neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We determined associations between pathologic complete response (pCR; defined as the absence of invasive cancer in breast and nodes) and RFS, overall and within receptor subsets. In 221 evaluable patients (median tumor size, 6.0 cm; median age, 49 years; 91% classified as poor risk on the basis of the 70-gene prognosis profile), 41% were hormone receptor (HR) negative, and 31% were human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) positive. For 190 patients treated without neoadjuvant trastuzumab, pCR was highest for HR-negative/HER2-positive patients (45%) and lowest for HR-positive/HER2-negative patients (9%). Achieving pCR predicted favorable RFS. For 172 patients treated without trastuzumab, the hazard ratio for RFS of pCR versus no pCR was 0.29 (95% CI, 0.07 to 0.82). pCR was more predictive of RFS by multivariate analysis when subtype was taken into account, and point estimates of hazard ratios within the HR-positive/HER2-negative (hazard ratio, 0.00; 95% CI, 0.00 to 0.93), HR-negative/HER2-negative (hazard ratio, 0.25; 95% CI, 0.04 to 0.97), and HER2-positive (hazard ratio, 0.14; 95% CI, 0.01 to 1.0) subtypes are lower. Ki67 further improved the prediction of pCR within subsets. In this biologically high-risk group, pCR differs by receptor subset. pCR is more highly predictive of RFS within every established receptor subset than overall, demonstrating that the extent of outcome advantage

  11. Pathologic Complete Response Predicts Recurrence-Free Survival More Effectively by Cancer Subset: Results From the I-SPY 1 TRIAL—CALGB 150007/150012, ACRIN 6657

    PubMed Central

    Esserman, Laura J.; Berry, Donald A.; DeMichele, Angela; Carey, Lisa; Davis, Sarah E.; Buxton, Meredith; Hudis, Cliff; Gray, Joe W.; Perou, Charles; Yau, Christina; Livasy, Chad; Krontiras, Helen; Montgomery, Leslie; Tripathy, Debasish; Lehman, Constance; Liu, Minetta C.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Rugo, Hope S.; Carpenter, John T.; Dressler, Lynn; Chhieng, David; Singh, Baljit; Mies, Carolyn; Rabban, Joseph; Chen, Yunn-Yi; Giri, Dilip; van 't Veer, Laura; Hylton, Nola

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer provides critical information about tumor response; how best to leverage this for predicting recurrence-free survival (RFS) is not established. The I-SPY 1 TRIAL (Investigation of Serial Studies to Predict Your Therapeutic Response With Imaging and Molecular Analysis) was a multicenter breast cancer study integrating clinical, imaging, and genomic data to evaluate pathologic response, RFS, and their relationship and predictability based on tumor biomarkers. Patients and Methods Eligible patients had tumors ≥ 3 cm and received neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We determined associations between pathologic complete response (pCR; defined as the absence of invasive cancer in breast and nodes) and RFS, overall and within receptor subsets. Results In 221 evaluable patients (median tumor size, 6.0 cm; median age, 49 years; 91% classified as poor risk on the basis of the 70-gene prognosis profile), 41% were hormone receptor (HR) negative, and 31% were human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) positive. For 190 patients treated without neoadjuvant trastuzumab, pCR was highest for HR-negative/HER2-positive patients (45%) and lowest for HR-positive/HER2-negative patients (9%). Achieving pCR predicted favorable RFS. For 172 patients treated without trastuzumab, the hazard ratio for RFS of pCR versus no pCR was 0.29 (95% CI, 0.07 to 0.82). pCR was more predictive of RFS by multivariate analysis when subtype was taken into account, and point estimates of hazard ratios within the HR-positive/HER2-negative (hazard ratio, 0.00; 95% CI, 0.00 to 0.93), HR-negative/HER2-negative (hazard ratio, 0.25; 95% CI, 0.04 to 0.97), and HER2-positive (hazard ratio, 0.14; 95% CI, 0.01 to 1.0) subtypes are lower. Ki67 further improved the prediction of pCR within subsets. Conclusion In this biologically high-risk group, pCR differs by receptor subset. pCR is more highly predictive of RFS within every established receptor subset than overall

  12. Ex-vivo characterization of circulating colon cancer cells distinguished in stem and differentiated subset provides useful biomarker for personalized metastatic risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Malara, Natalia; Trunzo, Valentina; Foresta, Umberto; Amodio, Nicola; De Vitis, Stefania; Roveda, Laura; Fava, Mariagiovanna; Coluccio, MariaLaura; Macrì, Roberta; Di Vito, Anna; Costa, Nicola; Mignogna, Chiara; Britti, Domenico; Palma, Ernesto; Mollace, Vincenzo

    2016-05-12

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) represent one of the most interesting target in improving diagnosis, prognosis and treatment. Herein we evaluate the possibility of using an emo-cytometric approach on the evaluation of the heterogeneous population of CTCs to improve personalized metastatic risk assessment. We benchmarked ex vivo behavior of distinct subsets of circulating colon tumor cells with correspondent clinical behavior of patients from which we isolated CTCs. Isolation and CTC expansion were performed by a gradient protocol. In vitro characterization was determined by flow cytometry, immunofluorescence, western blotting and proteomic profiling. Cell sorter was performed with immunomagnetic beads. Confocal microscopy was used to evaluate tissue sections. Kaplan Mayer curves was cared for through Medcalc program. We collected heterogeneous CTCs, derived from the whole blood of seven patients affected by colon cancer, expressing CD133(pos)CD45(neg) (5 ± 1) and (2 ± 1) and CK20(pos)CD45(neg) of (29 ± 3) (11 ± 1) cells/ml in Dukes D and A stage respectively. Proliferation rate of 57 ± 16 %, expression for CXCR4(pos) of 18 ± 7 % and detectable levels of IL-6, IL-8 and SDF-1 cytokines in conditioned culture medium characterized short-time expanded-CTCs (eCTCs). ECTCs organized in tumor sphere were CD45(neg)CD133(pos) while in adhesion were CXCR4(pos)CK20(pos). These two subsets were separately injected in mice. The first group of xenografts developed superficial lesions within 2 weeks. In the second group, in absence of growing tumour, the survival of injected eCTCs was monitored through SDF-1 serum levels detection. The detection of human cancer cells expressing CK20, in mice tissues sections, suggested a different biological behaviour of injected eCTC-subsets: tumorigenic for the first and disseminating for the second. The benchmarking of the experimental data with the clinical course highlights that patients with prevalence of circulating

  13. KIT Signaling Promotes Growth of Colon Xenograft Tumors in Mice and Is Up-Regulated in a Subset of Human Colon Cancers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Evan C; Karl, Taylor A; Kalisky, Tomer; Gupta, Santosh K; O'Brien, Catherine A; Longacre, Teri A; van de Rijn, Matt; Quake, Stephen R; Clarke, Michael F; Rothenberg, Michael E

    2015-09-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) inhibitors have advanced colon cancer treatment. We investigated the role of the RTK KIT in development of human colon cancer. An array of 137 patient-derived colon tumors and their associated xenografts were analyzed by immunohistochemistry to measure levels of KIT and its ligand KITLG. KIT and/or KITLG was stably knocked down by expression of small hairpin RNAs from lentiviral vectors in DLD1, HT29, LS174T, and COLO320 DM colon cancer cell lines, and in UM-COLON#8 and POP77 xenografts; cells transduced with only vector were used as controls. Cells were analyzed by real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, single-cell gene expression analysis, flow cytometry, and immunohistochemical, immunoblot, and functional assays. Xenograft tumors were grown from control and KIT-knockdown DLD1 and UM-COLON#8 cells in immunocompromised mice and compared. Some mice were given the RTK inhibitor imatinib after injection of cancer cells; tumor growth was measured based on bioluminescence. We assessed tumorigenicity using limiting dilution analysis. KIT and KITLG were expressed heterogeneously by a subset of human colon tumors. Knockdown of KIT decreased proliferation of colon cancer cell lines and growth of xenograft tumors in mice compared with control cells. KIT knockdown cells had increased expression of enterocyte markers, decreased expression of cycling genes, and, unexpectedly, increased expression of LGR5 associated genes. No activating mutations in KIT were detected in DLD1, POP77, or UM-COLON#8 cells. However, KITLG-knockdown DLD1 cells formed smaller xenograft tumors than control cells. Gene expression analysis of single CD44(+) cells indicated that KIT can promote growth via KITLG autocrine and/or paracrine signaling. Imatinib inhibited growth of KIT(+) colon cancer organoids in culture and growth of xenograft tumors in mice. Cancer cells with endogenous KIT expression were more tumorigenic in mice. KIT and

  14. Multi-cycle chemotherapy with the glycolipid-like polymeric micelles evade cancer stem cell enrichment in breast cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Tingting; Liu, Jingwen; Wen, Lijuan; Yuan, Ming; Cheng, Bolin; Hu, Yingwen; Zhu, Yun; Liu, Xuan; Yuan, Hong; Hu, Fuqiang

    2016-01-01

    Multi-cycle chemotherapy is commonly used in the clinic, while the phenomena of enrichment of cancer stem cells (CSCs) and enhanced multi-drug resistance (MDR) are commonly involved. This research was designed for evaluating this successive administration. Chitosan oligosaccharide-g-stearic acid (CSOSA) polymer was used as the drug delivery system (DDS) to perform tri-cycle chemotherapy on a new tumor model induced by mammosphere cells. In vitro, on CSCs enriched mammospheres model, the doxorubicin-loaded CSOSA (CSOSA/DOX) displayed an improved growth inhibition effect measured by acid phosphatase assay (APH). While in vivo, the CSOSA/DOX micelles blocked tumor progression and led to a marked decrease of CSCs proportion as well as MDR capacity. What's more, the CSOSA/DOX helped decay the microenvironment and attenuate systemic side effects. We concluded that the CSOSA polymer could be a potential DDS for long-term multi-cycle chemotherapy in antitumor research. PMID:27659522

  15. Importance of collection in gene set enrichment analysis of drug response in cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Bateman, Alain R.; El-Hachem, Nehme; Beck, Andrew H.; Aerts, Hugo J. W. L.; Haibe-Kains, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) associates gene sets and phenotypes, its use is predicated on the choice of a pre-defined collection of sets. The defacto standard implementation of GSEA provides seven collections yet there are no guidelines for the choice of collections and the impact of such choice, if any, is unknown. Here we compare each of the standard gene set collections in the context of a large dataset of drug response in human cancer cell lines. We define and test a new collection based on gene co-expression in cancer cell lines to compare the performance of the standard collections to an externally derived cell line based collection. The results show that GSEA findings vary significantly depending on the collection chosen for analysis. Henceforth, collections should be carefully selected and reported in studies that leverage GSEA. PMID:24522610

  16. An integrated microfluidic platform for negative selection and enrichment of cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Wen-Yi; Tsai, Sung-Chi; Hsieh, Kuangwen; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2015-08-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs), tumor cells that disseminate from primary tumors to the bloodstream, have recently emerged as promising indicators for cancer diagnosis and prognosis. However, the technical difficulties in isolating and detecting rare CTCs have limited the widespread applicability of this method to date. In this work, a new integrated microfluidic system integrating micromixers and micropumps capable of performing ‘negative selection and enrichment’ of CTCs was developed. By using anti-human CD45 antibodies-coated magnetic beads, leukocytes were effectively removed by applying an external magnetic force, leaving behind an enriched target cell population. The on-chip CTC recovery rate was experimentally found to be 70   ±   5% after a single round of negative selection and enrichment. Meanwhile, CD45 depletion efficiency was 83.99   ±   1.00% and could be improved to 99.84   ±   0.04% after three consecutive rounds of depletion. Notably, on-chip negative selection and enrichment was 58% faster and the repeated depletion could be processed automatically. These promising results suggested the developed microfluidic chip is potentiated for a standardized CTC isolation platform. Preliminary results of the current paper were presented at Micro TAS 2014, San Antonio, Texas, USA, October 26-30, 2014.

  17. [Efficacy evaluation of an oral powder supplement enriched with eicosapentaenoic acid in cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Candela, C; Villarino Sanz, M; Horrisberger, A; Loria Kohen, V; Bermejo, L M; Zamora Auñón, P

    2011-01-01

    The beneficial effect of eicosapentaenoic acid in cancer patients is widely described especially in relation to its role in tumour cachexia. The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of administration of a new oral powder supplement enriched with eicosapentaenoic acid compared to a standard liquid supplement in cancer patients. A total of 61 cancer patients, aged more than 18 years, were randomized to receive during a month a bonus of 600 kcal/ day to their regular diet with an oral powder supplement enriched with eicosapentaenoic acid (1.5 g) (RSI) or with a standard liquid supplement (RE). The following data were collected at baseline and after one month: the Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment (pg-SGA), anthropometric measurements (skin folds, circumferences and bioimpedance), dietary parameters (3-day food record), biochemical and inflammatory parameters (basic biochemistry, cytokines, prealbumin and Reactive C Protein). Quality of life was evaluated using the SF-36 questionnaire. At the end, scales were used to asses sensory perception, tolerance and satiety induced by the products and motivation to eat. 40 patients completed the study. After intervention, anthropometric parameters do not change and prealbumin values increased significantly in both groups (RSI 16.11 ± 5.66 mg/dl vs. 19.81 ± 6.75 mg/dl p < 0.05 and RE 6.13 ± 16.55 mg/dl vs. 19.03 ± 5.47 mg / dl p < 0.05). RSI group significantly decreased interferon gamma (INF-γ) values (0.99 ± 0.95 vs. 0.65 ± 0.92 pg/ml, p < 0.05). In contrast, RE group increased INF-γ after intervention (1.62 ± 1 27 vs. 2.2 ± 3.19 pg/ml, p < 0.05). There were no significant differences in hunger, appetite, satiety and intake capacity in both groups. The SF-36 scores improved in both groups. Supplementation based on an oral powder formula enriched with 1.5 g EPA during one month in cancer patients improved certain inflammatory parameters. This product may be a novel and valuable option to be added

  18. Concurrent nuclear ERG and MYC protein overexpression defines a subset of locally advanced prostate cancer: potential opportunities for synergistic targeted therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Udager, Aaron M.; De Marzo, Angelo M.; Shi, Yang; Hicks, Jessica L.; Cao, Xuhong; Siddiqui, Javed; Jiang, Hui; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Mehra, Rohit

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Recurrent ERG gene fusions, the most common genetic alterations in prostate cancer, drive overexpression of the nuclear transcription factor ERG and are early clonal events in prostate cancer progression. The nuclear transcription factor MYC is also frequently overexpressed in prostate cancer and may play a role in tumor initiation and/or progression. The relationship between nuclear ERG and MYC protein overexpression in prostate cancer, as well as the clinicopathologic characteristics and prognosis of ERG-positive/MYC high tumors, is not well understood. METHODS Immunohistochemistry (IHC) for ERG and MYC was performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue from prostate cancer tissue microarrays (TMAs), and nuclear staining was scored semi-quantitatively (IHC product score range = 0–300). Correlation between nuclear ERG and MYC protein expression and association with clinicopathologic parameters and biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy was assessed. RESULTS 29.1% of all tumor nodules showed concurrent nuclear ERG and MYC protein overexpression (i.e., ERG-positive/MYC high), including 35.0% of secondary nodules. Overall, there was weak positive correlation between ERG and MYC expression across all tumor nodules (rpb = 0.149, P = 0.045), although this correlation was strongest in secondary nodules (rpb = 0.520, P = 0.019). In radical prostatectomy specimens, ERG-positive/MYC high tumors were positively associated with the presence of extraprostatic extension (EPE), relative to all other ERG/MYC expression subgroups, however, there was no significant association between concurrent nuclear ERG and MYC protein overexpression and time to biochemical recurrence. CONCLUSIONS Concurrent nuclear ERG and MYC protein overexpression is common in prostate cancer and defines a subset of locally advanced tumors. Recent data indicates that BET bromodomain proteins regulate ERG gene fusion and MYC gene expression in prostate cancer, suggesting

  19. Expression of DNA ligase IV is linked to poor prognosis and characterizes a subset of prostate cancers harboring TMPRSS2:ERG fusion and PTEN deletion.

    PubMed

    Grupp, Katharina; Roettger, Laura; Kluth, Martina; Hube-Magg, Claudia; Simon, Ronald; Lebok, Patrick; Minner, Sarah; Tsourlakis, Maria Christina; Koop, Christina; Graefen, Markus; Adam, Meike; Haese, Alexander; Wittmer, Corinna; Sauter, Guido; Wilczak, Waldemar; Huland, Hartwig; Schlomm, Thorsten; Steurer, Stefan; Krech, Till

    2015-09-01

    DNA ligases are essential for the maintenance of genome integrity as they are indispensable for DNA replication, recombination and repair. The present study was undertaken to gain insights into the prevalence and clinical significance of ligase IV (LIG4) expression in prostate cancer. A total of 11,152 prostate cancer specimens were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for LIG4 expression. Results were compared to follow-up data, ERG status and deletions at PTEN, 3p13, 5q21 and 6q15. LIG4 expression was predominantly localized in the nucleus of the cells with increased intensities in malignant as compared to benign prostate epithelium. In prostate cancer, LIG4 expression was found in 91% of interpretable tumors, including 12% cancers with weak, 23% with moderate and 56% with strong LIG4 positivity. Strong LIG4 expression was tightly linked to advanced Gleason score (P<0.0001) and positive nodal involvement (P=0.03). There was a remarkable accumulation of strong LIG4 expression in tumors harboring TMPRSS2:ERG fusion and PTEN deletions (P<0.0001 each). High LIG4 expression was also tightly related to early biochemical recurrence when all tumors (P<0.0001) or the subsets of ERG-negative (P=0.0004) or ERG-positive prostate cancers (P=0.006) were analyzed. Multivariate analysis including parameters that are available before surgery demonstrated independent association with biochemical recurrence for advanced Gleason grade on biopsy, high preoperative PSA level, high clinical stage (P<0.0001 each) and for LIG4 immunostaining (P=0.03). Our study identifies LIG4 as a predictor of an increased risk for early PSA recurrence in prostate cancer. Moreover, the strong association with TMPRSS2:ERG fusion and PTEN deletions suggest important interactions between these pathways in prostate cancers.

  20. Predictors of Progression to Cancer in Barrett’s Esophagus: Baseline Histology and Flow Cytometry Identify Low- and High-Risk Patient Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Brian J.; Levine, Douglas S.; Longton, Gary; Blount, Patricia L.; Rabinovitch, Peter S.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Barrett’s esophagus develops in 5–20% of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease and predisposes to esophageal adenocarcinoma. The value of endoscopic biopsy surveillance is questioned because most patients do not develop cancer. Furthermore, observer variation in histological diagnosis makes validation of surveillance guidelines difficult because varying histological interpretations may lead to different estimated rates of progression. Thus, objective biomarkers need to be validated for use with histology to stratify patients according to their risk for progression to cancer. METHODS We prospectively evaluated patients using a systematic endoscopic biopsy protocol with baseline histological and flow cytometric abnormalities as predictors and cancer as the outcome. RESULTS Among patients with negative, indefinite, or low-grade dysplasia, those with neither aneuploidy nor increased 4N fractions had a 0% 5-yr cumulative cancer incidence compared with 28% for those with either aneuploidy or increased 4N. Patients with baseline increased 4N, aneuploidy, and high-grade dysplasia had 5-yr cancer incidences of 56%, 43%, and 59%, respectively. Aneuploidy, increased 4N, or HGD were detected at baseline in all 35 patients who developed cancer within 5 yr. CONCLUSIONS A systematic baseline endoscopic biopsy protocol using histology and flow cytometry identifies subsets of patients with Barrett’s esophagus at low and high risk for progression to cancer. Patients whose baseline biopsies are negative, indefinite, or low-grade displasia without increased 4N or aneuploidy may have surveillance deferred for up to 5 yr. Patients with cytometric abnormalities merit more frequent surveillance, and management of high-grade displasia can be individualized. PMID:10925966

  1. Inactivation of BRCA2 in human cancer cells identifies a subset of tumors with enhanced sensitivity towards death receptormediated apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    De Toni, Enrico N.; Ziesch, Andreas; Rizzani, Antonia; Török, Helga-Paula; Hocke, Sandra; Lü, Shuai; Wang, Shao-Chun; Hucl, Tomas; Göke, Burkhard; Bruns, Christiane; Gallmeier, Eike

    2016-01-01

    Purpose DNA repair defects due to detrimental BRCA2-mutations confer increased susceptibility towards DNA interstrand-crosslinking (ICL) agents and define patient subpopulations for individualized genotype-based cancer therapy. However, due to the side effects of these drugs, there is a need to identify additional agents, which could be used alone or in combination with ICL-agents. Therefore, we investigated whether BRCA2-mutations might also increase the sensitivity towards TRAIL-receptors (TRAIL-R)-targeting compounds. Experimental design Two independent model systems were applied: a BRCA2 gene knockout and a BRCA2 gene complementation model. The effects of TRAIL-R-targeting compounds and ICL-agents on cell viability, apoptosis and cell cycle distribution were compared in BRCA2-proficient versus-deficient cancer cells in vitro. In addition, the effects of the TRAIL-R2-targeting antibody LBY135 were assessed in vivo using a murine tumor xenograft model. Results BRCA2-deficient cancer cells displayed an increased sensitivity towards TRAIL-R-targeting agents. These effects exceeded and were mechanistically distinguishable from the well-established effects of ICL-agents. In vitro, ICL-agents expectedly induced an early cell cycle arrest followed by delayed apoptosis, whereas TRAIL-R-targeting compounds caused early apoptosis without prior cell cycle arrest. In vivo, treatment with LBY135 significantly reduced the tumor growth of BRCA2-deficient cancer cells in a xenograft model. Conclusions BRCA2 mutations strongly increase the in vitro- and in vivo-sensitivity of cancer cells towards TRAIL-R-mediated apoptosis. This effect is mechanistically distinguishable from the well-established ICL-hypersensitivity of BRCA2-deficient cells. Our study thus defines a new genetic subpopulation of cancers susceptible towards TRAIL-R-targeting compounds, which could facilitate novel therapeutic approaches for patients with BRCA2-deficient tumors. PMID:26843614

  2. Cell-type-specific enrichment of risk-associated regulatory elements at ovarian cancer susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Coetzee, Simon G.; Shen, Howard C.; Hazelett, Dennis J.; Lawrenson, Kate; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline; Tyrer, Jonathan; Rhie, Suhn K.; Levanon, Keren; Karst, Alison; Drapkin, Ronny; Ramus, Susan J.; Couch, Fergus J.; Offit, Kenneth; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Monteiro, Alvaro N.A.; Antoniou, Antonis; Freedman, Matthew; Coetzee, Gerhard A.; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Noushmehr, Houtan; Gayther, Simon A.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the regulatory landscape of the human genome is a central question in complex trait genetics. Most single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with cancer risk lie in non-protein-coding regions, implicating regulatory DNA elements as functional targets of susceptibility variants. Here, we describe genome-wide annotation of regions of open chromatin and histone modification in fallopian tube and ovarian surface epithelial cells (FTSECs, OSECs), the debated cellular origins of high-grade serous ovarian cancers (HGSOCs) and in endometriosis epithelial cells (EECs), the likely precursor of clear cell ovarian carcinomas (CCOCs). The regulatory architecture of these cell types was compared with normal human mammary epithelial cells and LNCaP prostate cancer cells. We observed similar positional patterns of global enhancer signatures across the three different ovarian cancer precursor cell types, and evidence of tissue-specific regulatory signatures compared to non-gynecological cell types. We found significant enrichment for risk-associated SNPs intersecting regulatory biofeatures at 17 known HGSOC susceptibility loci in FTSECs (P = 3.8 × 10−30), OSECs (P = 2.4 × 10−23) and HMECs (P = 6.7 × 10−15) but not for EECs (P = 0.45) or LNCaP cells (P = 0.88). Hierarchical clustering of risk SNPs conditioned on the six different cell types indicates FTSECs and OSECs are highly related (96% of samples using multi-scale bootstrapping) suggesting both cell types may be precursors of HGSOC. These data represent the first description of regulatory catalogues of normal precursor cells for different ovarian cancer subtypes, and provide unique insights into the tissue specific regulatory variation with respect to the likely functional targets of germline genetic susceptibility variants for ovarian cancer. PMID:25804953

  3. Cell-type-specific enrichment of risk-associated regulatory elements at ovarian cancer susceptibility loci.

    PubMed

    Coetzee, Simon G; Shen, Howard C; Hazelett, Dennis J; Lawrenson, Kate; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline; Tyrer, Jonathan; Rhie, Suhn K; Levanon, Keren; Karst, Alison; Drapkin, Ronny; Ramus, Susan J; Couch, Fergus J; Offit, Kenneth; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Monteiro, Alvaro N A; Antoniou, Antonis; Freedman, Matthew; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Pharoah, Paul D P; Noushmehr, Houtan; Gayther, Simon A

    2015-07-01

    Understanding the regulatory landscape of the human genome is a central question in complex trait genetics. Most single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with cancer risk lie in non-protein-coding regions, implicating regulatory DNA elements as functional targets of susceptibility variants. Here, we describe genome-wide annotation of regions of open chromatin and histone modification in fallopian tube and ovarian surface epithelial cells (FTSECs, OSECs), the debated cellular origins of high-grade serous ovarian cancers (HGSOCs) and in endometriosis epithelial cells (EECs), the likely precursor of clear cell ovarian carcinomas (CCOCs). The regulatory architecture of these cell types was compared with normal human mammary epithelial cells and LNCaP prostate cancer cells. We observed similar positional patterns of global enhancer signatures across the three different ovarian cancer precursor cell types, and evidence of tissue-specific regulatory signatures compared to non-gynecological cell types. We found significant enrichment for risk-associated SNPs intersecting regulatory biofeatures at 17 known HGSOC susceptibility loci in FTSECs (P = 3.8 × 10(-30)), OSECs (P = 2.4 × 10(-23)) and HMECs (P = 6.7 × 10(-15)) but not for EECs (P = 0.45) or LNCaP cells (P = 0.88). Hierarchical clustering of risk SNPs conditioned on the six different cell types indicates FTSECs and OSECs are highly related (96% of samples using multi-scale bootstrapping) suggesting both cell types may be precursors of HGSOC. These data represent the first description of regulatory catalogues of normal precursor cells for different ovarian cancer subtypes, and provide unique insights into the tissue specific regulatory variation with respect to the likely functional targets of germline genetic susceptibility variants for ovarian cancer. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Microfluidic, Label-Free Enrichment of Prostate Cancer Cells in Blood Based on Acoustophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Augustsson, Per; Magnusson, Cecilia; Nordin, Maria; Lilja, Hans; Laurell, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTC) are shed in peripheral blood at advanced metastatic stages of solid cancers. Surface-marker-based detection of CTC predicts recurrence and survival in colorectal, breast, and prostate cancer. However, scarcity and variation in size, morphology, expression profile, and antigen exposure impairs reliable detection and characterization of CTC. We have developed a non-contact, label-free microfluidic acoustophoresis method to separate prostate cancer cells from white blood cells (WBC) through forces generated by ultrasonic resonances in microfluidic channels. Implementation of cell pre-alignment in a temperature-stabilized (±0.5°C) acoustophoresis microchannel dramatically enhanced the discriminatory capacity and enabled the separation of 5-μm microspheres from 7-μm microspheres with 99% purity. Next, we determined the feasibility of employing label-free microfluidic acoustophoresis to discriminate and divert tumor cells from WBCs using erythrocyte-lysed blood from healthy volunteers spiked with tumor cells from three prostate cancer cell-lines (DU145, PC3, LNCaP). For cells fixed with paraformaldehyde, cancer cell recovery ranged from 93.6% to 97.9% with purity ranging from 97.4% to 98.4%. There was no detectable loss of cell viability or cell proliferation subsequent to the exposure of viable tumor cells to acoustophoresis. For non-fixed, viable cells, tumor cell recovery ranged from 72.5% to 93.9% with purity ranging from 79.6% to 99.7%. These data contribute proof-in-principle that label-free microfluidic acoustophoresis can be used to enrich both viable and fixed cancer cells from WBCs with very high recovery and purity. PMID:22897670

  5. A functional signal profiling test for identifying a subset of HER2-negative breast cancers with abnormally amplified HER2 signaling activity

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yao; Burns, David J; Rich, Benjamin E; MacNeil, Ian A; Dandapat, Abhijit; Soltani, Sajjad M.; Myhre, Samantha; Sullivan, Brian F; Furcht, Leo T; Lange, Carol A; Hurvitz, Sara A; Laing, Lance G

    2016-01-01

    The results of clinical trials evaluating the efficacy of HER2 inhibitors in patients with breast cancer indicate that the correlation between HER2 receptor levels and patient outcomes is as low as 50%. The relatively weak correlation between HER2 status and response to HER2-targeting drugs suggests that measurement of HER2 signaling activity, rather than absolute HER2 levels, may more accurately diagnose HER2-driven breast cancer. A new diagnostic test, the CELx HER2 Signaling Profile (CELx HSP) test, is demonstrated to measure real-time HER2 signaling function in live primary cells. In the present study, epithelial cells extracted fresh from breast cancer patient tumors classified as HER2 negative (HER2−, n = 34 of which 33 were estrogen receptor positive) and healthy subjects (n = 16) were evaluated along with reference breast cancer cell lines (n = 19). Live cell response to specific HER2 agonists (NRG1b and EGF) and antagonist (pertuzumab) was measured. Of the HER2− breast tumor cell samples tested, 7 of 34 patients (20.5%; 95% CI = 10%–37%) had HER2 signaling activity that was characterized as abnormally high. Amongst the tumor samples there was no correlation between HER2 protein status (by cell cytometry) and HER2 signaling activity (hyperactive or normal) (Regression analysis P = 0.144, R2 = 0.068). One conclusion is that measurement of HER2 signaling activity can identify a subset of breast cancers with normal HER2 receptor levels with abnormally high levels of HER2 signaling. This result constitutes a new subtype of breast cancer that should be considered for treatment with HER2 pathway inhibitors. PMID:27713176

  6. Enrichment and Molecular Analysis of Breast Cancer Disseminated Tumor Cells from Bone Marrow Using Microfiltration

    PubMed Central

    Siddappa, Chidananda M.; Adams, Daniel L.; Li, Shuhong; Makarova, Olga V.; Amstutz, Pete; Nunley, Ryan; Tang, Cha-Mei; Watson, Mark A.; Aft, Rebecca L.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Molecular characterization of disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) in the bone marrow (BM) of breast cancer (BC) patients has been hindered by their rarity. To enrich for these cells using an antigen-independent methodology, we have evaluated a size-based microfiltration device in combination with several downstream biomarker assays. Methods BM aspirates were collected from healthy volunteers or BC patients. Healthy BM was mixed with a specified number of BC cells to calculate recovery and fold enrichment by microfiltration. Specimens were pre-filtered using a 70 μm mesh sieve and the effluent filtered through CellSieve microfilters. Captured cells were analyzed by immunocytochemistry (ICC), FISH for HER-2/neu gene amplification status, and RNA in situ hybridization (RISH). Cells eluted from the filter were used for RNA isolation and subsequent qRT-PCR analysis for DTC biomarker gene expression. Results Filtering an average of 14×106 nucleated BM cells yielded approximately 17–21×103 residual BM cells. In the BC cell spiking experiments, an average of 87% (range 84–92%) of tumor cells were recovered with approximately 170- to 400-fold enrichment. Captured BC cells from patients co-stained for cytokeratin and EpCAM, but not CD45 by ICC. RNA yields from 4 ml of patient BM after filtration averaged 135ng per 10 million BM cells filtered with an average RNA Integrity Number (RIN) of 5.3. DTC-associated gene expression was detected by both qRT-PCR and RISH in filtered spiked or BC patient specimens but, not in control filtered normal BM. Conclusions We have tested a microfiltration technique for enrichment of BM DTCs. DTC capture efficiency was shown to range from 84.3% to 92.1% with up to 400-fold enrichment using model BC cell lines. In patients, recovered DTCs can be identified and distinguished from normal BM cells using multiple antibody-, DNA-, and RNA-based biomarker assays. PMID:28129357

  7. Use of Aleuria alantia Lectin Affinity Chromatography to Enrich Candidate Biomarkers from the Urine of Patients with Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ambrose, Sarah R.; Gordon, Naheema S.; Goldsmith, James C.; Wei, Wenbin; Zeegers, Maurice P.; James, Nicholas D.; Knowles, Margaret A.; Bryan, Richard T.; Ward, Douglas G.

    2015-01-01

    Developing a urine test to detect bladder tumours with high sensitivity and specificity is a key goal in bladder cancer research. We hypothesised that bladder cancer-specific glycoproteins might fulfill this role. Lectin-ELISAs were used to study the binding of 25 lectins to 10 bladder cell lines and serum and urine from bladder cancer patients and non-cancer controls. Selected lectins were then used to enrich glycoproteins from the urine of bladder cancer patients and control subjects for analysis by shotgun proteomics. None of the lectins showed a strong preference for bladder cancer cell lines over normal urothlelial cell lines or for urinary glycans from bladder cancer patients over those from non-cancer controls. However, several lectins showed a strong preference for bladder cell line glycans over serum glycans and are potentially useful for enriching glycoproteins originating from the urothelium in urine. Aleuria alantia lectin affinity chromatography and shotgun proteomics identified mucin-1 and golgi apparatus protein 1 as proteins warranting further investigation as urinary biomarkers for low-grade bladder cancer. Glycosylation changes in bladder cancer are not reliably detected by measuring lectin binding to unfractionated proteomes, but it is possible that more specific reagents and/or a focus on individual proteins may produce clinically useful biomarkers. PMID:28248271

  8. Repeated observation of immune gene sets enrichment in women with non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Jhajaira M.; Prado, Alexandra; Cardenas, Nadezhda K.; Zaharia, Mayer; Dyer, Richard; Doimi, Franco; Bravo, Leny; Pinillos, Luis; Morante, Zaida; Aguilar, Alfredo; Mas, Luis A.; Gomez, Henry L.; Vallejos, Carlos S.; Rolfo, Christian; Pinto, Joseph A.

    2016-01-01

    There are different biological and clinical patterns of lung cancer between genders indicating intrinsic differences leading to increased sensitivity to cigarette smoke-induced DNA damage, mutational patterns of KRAS and better clinical outcomes in women while differences between genders at gene-expression levels was not previously reported. Here we show an enrichment of immune genes in NSCLC in women compared to men. We found in a GSEA analysis (by biological processes annotated from Gene Ontology) of six public datasets a repeated observation of immune gene sets enrichment in women. “Immune system process”, “immune response”, “defense response”, “cellular defense response” and “regulation of immune system process” were the gene sets most over-represented while APOBEC3G, APOBEC3F, LAT, CD1D and CCL5 represented the top-five core genes. Characterization of immune cell composition with the platform CIBERSORT showed no differences between genders; however, there were differences when tumor tissues were compared to normal tissues. Our results suggest different immune responses in NSCLC between genders that could be related with the different clinical outcome. PMID:26958810

  9. Repeated observation of immune gene sets enrichment in women with non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Jhajaira M; Prado, Alexandra; Cardenas, Nadezhda K; Zaharia, Mayer; Dyer, Richard; Doimi, Franco; Bravo, Leny; Pinillos, Luis; Morante, Zaida; Aguilar, Alfredo; Mas, Luis A; Gomez, Henry L; Vallejos, Carlos S; Rolfo, Christian; Pinto, Joseph A

    2016-04-12

    There are different biological and clinical patterns of lung cancer between genders indicating intrinsic differences leading to increased sensitivity to cigarette smoke-induced DNA damage, mutational patterns of KRAS and better clinical outcomes in women while differences between genders at gene-expression levels was not previously reported. Here we show an enrichment of immune genes in NSCLC in women compared to men. We found in a GSEA analysis (by biological processes annotated from Gene Ontology) of six public datasets a repeated observation of immune gene sets enrichment in women. "Immune system process", "immune response", "defense response", "cellular defense response" and "regulation of immune system process" were the gene sets most over-represented while APOBEC3G, APOBEC3F, LAT, CD1D and CCL5 represented the top-five core genes. Characterization of immune cell composition with the platform CIBERSORT showed no differences between genders; however, there were differences when tumor tissues were compared to normal tissues. Our results suggest different immune responses in NSCLC between genders that could be related with the different clinical outcome.

  10. Effect of glutamine-enriched nutritional support on intestinal mucosal barrier function, MMP-2, MMP-9 and immune function in patients with advanced gastric cancer during perioperative chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Li, Yanfen; Qi, Yuanling

    2017-09-01

    We studied the effects of glutamine-enriched nutritional support on intestinal mucosal barrier, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-9 and immune function during perioperative chemotherapy in patients with advanced gastric cancer. The study was conducted on 94 patients with advanced gastric cancer admitted from April 2015 to March 2016. They were randomly divided into observation and control groups, n=47. Control group was given basic nutritional support whereas glutamine-enriched nutritional support was given to patients in observation group. High-performance liquid chromatography was used to measure lactulose and mannitol ratio in urine (L/M) and ELISA was used to measure D-lactate levels before chemotherapy and in the 1st, 2nd and 3rd cycle of chemotherapy. Immunoglobulin level was detected by immune turbidimetry assay, T lymphocyte subsets were determined by flow cytometry after 3 cycles of chemotherapy, MMP-2 and MMP-9 of patients were compared between the two groups. The serious adverse reactions incidence (grade and IV) of patients were observed. To evaluate the life quality of patients, QLQ-C30 was used after 6 months. The levels of L/M and D-lactate in both groups after the first cycle of chemotherapy were significantly higher than that before chemotherapy; they began to decline after the second or third cycle, but were still significantly higher than the levels before chemotherapy (p<0.05). On comparison, between the two groups after 1st, 2nd, 3rd cycle after chemotherapy, L/M and D-lactate levels of patients in the observation group were significantly lower than in the control group (p<0.05). Incidence of serious adverse reactions (grades III and IV) in observation group was significantly lower than control group (p<0.05). At follow-up of 6 months, living quality scores of patients in observation group were significantly higher than control group (p<0.05). Glutamine-enriched nutritional support can effectively protect the intestinal mucosal barrier

  11. Integrin-β4 identifies cancer stem cell-enriched populations of partially mesenchymal carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Bierie, Brian; Pierce, Sarah E.; Kroeger, Cornelia; Stover, Daniel G.; Pattabiraman, Diwakar R.; Thiru, Prathapan; Liu Donaher, Joana; Reinhardt, Ferenc; Chaffer, Christine L.; Keckesova, Zuzana; Weinberg, Robert A.

    2017-01-01

    Neoplastic cells within individual carcinomas often exhibit considerable phenotypic heterogeneity in their epithelial versus mesenchymal-like cell states. Because carcinoma cells with mesenchymal features are often more resistant to therapy and may serve as a source of relapse, we sought to determine whether such cells could be further stratified into functionally distinct subtypes. Indeed, we find that a basal epithelial marker, integrin-β4 (ITGB4), can be used to enable stratification of mesenchymal-like triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells that differ from one another in their relative tumorigenic abilities. Notably, we demonstrate that ITGB4+ cancer stem cell (CSC)-enriched mesenchymal cells reside in an intermediate epithelial/mesenchymal phenotypic state. Among patients with TNBC who received chemotherapy, elevated ITGB4 expression was associated with a worse 5-year probability of relapse-free survival. Mechanistically, we find that the ZEB1 (zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 1) transcription factor activity in highly mesenchymal SUM159 TNBC cells can repress expression of the epithelial transcription factor TAp63α (tumor protein 63 isoform 1), a protein that promotes ITGB4 expression. In addition, we demonstrate that ZEB1 and ITGB4 are important in modulating the histopathological phenotypes of tumors derived from mesenchymal TNBC cells. Hence, mesenchymal carcinoma cell populations are internally heterogeneous, and ITGB4 is a mechanistically driven prognostic biomarker that can be used to identify the more aggressive subtypes of mesenchymal carcinoma cells in TNBC. The ability to rapidly isolate and mechanistically interrogate the CSC-enriched, partially mesenchymal carcinoma cells should further enable identification of novel therapeutic opportunities to improve the prognosis for high-risk patients with TNBC. PMID:28270621

  12. Enriched inhibition of cancer and stem-like cancer cells via STAT-3 modulating niclocelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Santosh K.; Jensen, Tor W.; Pan, Dipanjan

    2015-04-01

    We describe for the first time a therapeutic strategy to target stem-like cancer cells via STAT-3 modulation using a nanomedicine approach. Niclocelle, a niclosamide loaded rigid core mixed micelle, was synthesized from a self-assembled well-defined amphiphilic diblock copolymer and an FDA-approved signal transducer and activator of transcription factor 3. Followed by a rigorous physico-chemical characterization, niclocelles were evaluated biologically for cytotoxicity and apoptosis in human melanoma (C32) and breast cancer (MDA-MB231 and MCF-7) cells. Niclocelles were found to selectively reduce the CD44+ stem cell population in C32 cells via STAT-3 modulation.We describe for the first time a therapeutic strategy to target stem-like cancer cells via STAT-3 modulation using a nanomedicine approach. Niclocelle, a niclosamide loaded rigid core mixed micelle, was synthesized from a self-assembled well-defined amphiphilic diblock copolymer and an FDA-approved signal transducer and activator of transcription factor 3. Followed by a rigorous physico-chemical characterization, niclocelles were evaluated biologically for cytotoxicity and apoptosis in human melanoma (C32) and breast cancer (MDA-MB231 and MCF-7) cells. Niclocelles were found to selectively reduce the CD44+ stem cell population in C32 cells via STAT-3 modulation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr00403a

  13. Concurrent nuclear ERG and MYC protein overexpression defines a subset of locally advanced prostate cancer: Potential opportunities for synergistic targeted therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Udager, Aaron M; DeMarzo, Angelo M; Shi, Yang; Hicks, Jessica L; Cao, Xuhong; Siddiqui, Javed; Jiang, Hui; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Mehra, Rohit

    2016-06-01

    Recurrent ERG gene fusions, the most common genetic alterations in prostate cancer, drive overexpression of the nuclear transcription factor ERG, and are early clonal events in prostate cancer progression. The nuclear transcription factor MYC is also frequently overexpressed in prostate cancer and may play a role in tumor initiation and/or progression. The relationship between nuclear ERG and MYC protein overexpression in prostate cancer, as well as the clinicopathologic characteristics and prognosis of ERG-positive/MYC high tumors, is not well understood. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) for ERG and MYC was performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue from prostate cancer tissue microarrays (TMAs), and nuclear staining was scored semi-quantitatively (IHC product score range = 0-300). Correlation between nuclear ERG and MYC protein expression and association with clinicopathologic parameters and biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy was assessed. 29.1% of all tumor nodules showed concurrent nuclear ERG and MYC protein overexpression (i.e., ERG-positive/MYC high), including 35.0% of secondary nodules. Overall, there was weak positive correlation between ERG and MYC expression across all tumor nodules (rpb  = 0.149, P = 0.045), although this correlation was strongest in secondary nodules (rpb  = 0.520, P = 0.019). In radical prostatectomy specimens, ERG-positive/MYC high tumors were positively associated with the presence of extraprostatic extension (EPE), relative to all other ERG/MYC expression subgroups, however, there was no significant association between concurrent nuclear ERG and MYC protein overexpression and time to biochemical recurrence. Concurrent nuclear ERG and MYC protein overexpression is common in prostate cancer and defines a subset of locally advanced tumors. Recent data indicates that BET bromodomain proteins regulate ERG gene fusion and MYC gene expression in prostate cancer, suggesting possible synergistic

  14. DDX3X promotes the biogenesis of a subset of miRNAs and the potential roles they played in cancer development

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Luqing; Mao, Yitao; Zhao, Yuelong; He, Yanong

    2016-01-01

    DDX3X, located on the X-chromosome, belongs to the DEAD-box RNA helicase family and acts as a key RNA-binding protein to exert its regulatory functions in various biological processes. In this paper, knock-down the expression of DDX3X can affect a subset of miRNA expression levels, especially for miR-1, miR-141, miR-145, miR-19b, miR-20a and miR-34a. Through adopting the immunoprecipitation (IP), RNA immunoprecipitation (RIP), dual luciferase reporter assays, we illustrate that DDX3X could interact with Drosha/DGCR8 complex, elevate the processing activity of Drosha/DGCR8 complex on pri-miRNAs, and increase mature miRNA expression levels. For the studies of potential roles and biological functions of DDX3X-dependent miRNAs and their downstream target genes in multiple cancers, we use the primary data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) and several miRNA target prediction databases, to systematically analyze the expression levels of DDX3X-dependent miRNAs in almost 14 kinds of cancers versus normal tissues, and the essential biological functions for their putative downstream target genes. All these findings will provide us novel insights and directions for thoroughly exploring the regulatory mechanisms of miRNA biogenesis, and shed light on effectively searching the clinical significances and biological roles of DDX3X-dependent miRNAs and their target genes in cancer development. PMID:27586307

  15. Identification of subsets of patients with favorable prognosis after recurrence in completely resected non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Sonobe, Makoto; Yamada, Tetsu; Sato, Masaaki; Menju, Toshi; Aoyama, Akihiro; Sato, Toshihiko; Chen, Fengshi; Omasa, Mitsugu; Bando, Toru; Date, Hiroshi

    2014-08-01

    This retrospective study aimed to determine prognostic factors associated with postrecurrence survival of completely resected non-small cell cancer patients with postoperative recurrence. Characteristics, treatment modality, and postrecurrence survival of 234 patients (157 males and 77 females, mean age at recurrence: 68.7 years, 152 adenocarcinomas and 82 non-adenocarcinomas), who underwent complete resection for non-small cell lung cancer between 2003 and 2009 at our hospital and experienced recurrence, were analyzed for prognostic factors. Cox proportional hazard model was applied for multivariate analysis. Among 234 patients, the median survival time after the diagnosis of recurrence was 21 months, and the 5-year postrecurrence survival rate was 19.9 %. Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Performance Status (ECOG PS) (hazard ratio [HR]: ECOG PS-0/PS-1/PS-2 = 1/3.313/7.622), time to recurrence after surgery (HR: >2 years/1-2 years/<1 year = 1/1.881/2.185), and number of initial recurrent organs (HR: 1 organ/2 organs/3 or more organs = 1/1.896/2.818) were independent prognostic factors. Patients who received resection or stereotactic irradiation for limited number of brain metastases or solitary extracranial metastasis, and those who received mediastinal radiation or chemoradiation for recurrence at regional lymph nodes and/or resected stump had better survival (median survival time after recurrence: 34, 64, and 25 months, respectively). Poor ECOG PS, shorter time from initial surgery to recurrence, and increasing number of initial recurrent regions are associated with poor prognosis after recurrence. When the number of recurrent lesions is limited, intensive local treatment with curative intent should be applied for achieving long-term postrecurrence survival.

  16. The cancer-testis antigen NY-ESO-1 is highly expressed in myxoid and round cell subset of liposarcomas.

    PubMed

    Hemminger, Jessica A; Ewart Toland, Amanda; Scharschmidt, Thomas J; Mayerson, Joel L; Kraybill, William G; Guttridge, Denis C; Iwenofu, O Hans

    2013-02-01

    Liposarcomas are a heterogenous group of fat-derived sarcomas, and surgery with or without chemoradiation therapy remains the main stay of treatment. NY-ESO-1 is a cancer-testis antigen expressed in various cancers where it can induce both cellular and humoral immunity. Immunotherapy has shown promise in clinical trials involving NY-ESO-1-expressing tumors. Gene expression studies have shown upregulation of the gene for NY-ESO-1, CTAG1B, in myxoid and round cell liposarcomas. Herein, we evaluated the expression of NY-ESO-1 among liposarcoma subtypes by quantitative real-time PCR, western blot analysis, and immunohistochemistry. Frozen tissue for quantitative real-time PCR and western blot analysis was obtained for the following liposarcoma subtypes (n=15): myxoid and round cell (n=8); well-differentiated (n=4), and dedifferentiated (n=3). Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded blocks were obtained for the following liposarcoma subtypes (n=44): myxoid and round cell (n=18); well-differentiated (n=10); dedifferentiated (n=10); and pleomorphic (n=6). Full sections were stained with monoclonal antibody NY-ESO-1, and staining was assessed for intensity (1-3+), percentage of tumor positivity, and location. In all, 7/8 (88%) and 16/18 (89%) myxoid and round cell expressed CTAG1B and NY-ESO-1 by quantitative real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Western blot correlated with mRNA expression levels. By immunohistochemistry, 94% (15/16) of positive cases stained homogenously with 2-3+ intensity. Also, 3/6 (50%) pleomorphic liposarcomas demonstrated a range of staining: 1+ intensity in 50% of cells; 2+ intensity in 5% of cells; and 3+ intensity in 90% of cells. One case of dedifferentiated liposarcoma showed strong, diffuse staining (3+ intensity in 75% of cells). Our study shows that both CTAG1B mRNA and protein are overexpressed with high frequency in myxoid and round cell liposarcoma, enabling the potential use of targeted immunotherapy in the treatment of this

  17. Model of fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinomas reveals striking enrichment in cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Oikawa, Tsunekazu; Wauthier, Eliane; Dinh, Timothy A.; Selitsky, Sara R.; Reyna-Neyra, Andrea; Carpino, Guido; Levine, Ronald; Cardinale, Vincenzo; Klimstra, David; Gaudio, Eugenio; Alvaro, Domenico; Carrasco, Nancy; Sethupathy, Praveen; Reid, Lola M.

    2015-01-01

    The aetiology of human fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinomas (hFL-HCCs), cancers occurring increasingly in children to young adults, is poorly understood. We present a transplantable tumour line, maintained in immune-compromised mice, and validate it as a bona fide model of hFL-HCCs by multiple methods. RNA-seq analysis confirms the presence of a fusion transcript (DNAJB1-PRKACA) characteristic of hFL-HCC tumours. The hFL-HCC tumour line is highly enriched for cancer stem cells as indicated by limited dilution tumourigenicity assays, spheroid formation and flow cytometry. Immunohistochemistry on the hFL-HCC model, with parallel studies on 27 primary hFL-HCC tumours, provides robust evidence for expression of endodermal stem cell traits. Transcriptomic analyses of the tumour line and of multiple, normal hepatic lineage stages reveal a gene signature for hFL-HCCs closely resembling that of biliary tree stem cells—newly discovered precursors for liver and pancreas. This model offers unprecedented opportunities to investigate mechanisms underlying hFL-HCCs pathogenesis and potential therapies. PMID:26437858

  18. Fractionation of polyphenol-enriched apple juice extracts to identify constituents with cancer chemopreventive potential.

    PubMed

    Zessner, Henriette; Pan, Lydia; Will, Frank; Klimo, Karin; Knauft, Jutta; Niewöhner, Regina; Hümmer, Wolfgang; Owen, Robert; Richling, Elke; Frank, Norbert; Schreier, Peter; Becker, Hans; Gerhauser, Clarissa

    2008-06-01

    Apples and apple juices are widely consumed and rich sources of phytochemicals. The aim of the present study was to determine which apple constituents contribute to potential chemopreventive activities, using a bioactivity-directed approach. A polyphenol-enriched apple juice extract was fractionated by various techniques. Extract and fractions were tested in a series of test systems indicative of cancer preventive potential. These test systems measured antioxidant effects, modulation of carcinogen metabolism, anti-inflammatory and antihormonal activities, and antiproliferative potential. Regression analyses indicated that 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging potential correlated with the sum of low molecular weight (LMW) antioxidants (including chlorogenic acid, flavan-3-ols, and flavonols) and procyanidins, whereas peroxyl radicals were more effectively scavenged by LMW compounds than by procyanidins. Quercetin aglycone was identified as a potent Cyp1A inhibitor, whereas phloretin and (-)-epicatechin were the most potent cyclooxygenase 1 (Cox-1) inhibitors. Aromatase and Cyp1A inhibitory potential and cytotoxicity toward HCT116 colon cancer cells increased with increasing content in procyanidins. Overall, apple juice constituents belonging to different structural classes have distinct profiles of biological activity in these in vitro test systems. Since carcinogenesis is a complex process, combination of compounds with complementary activities may lead to enhanced preventive effects.

  19. EPA-enriched phospholipids ameliorate cancer-associated cachexia mainly via inhibiting lipolysis.

    PubMed

    Du, Lei; Yang, Yu-Hong; Wang, Yu-Ming; Xue, Chang-Hu; Kurihara, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Koretaro

    2015-12-01

    Excessive loss of fat mass is considered as a key feature of body weight loss in cancer-associated cachexia (CAC). It affects the efficacy and tolerability of cancer therapy and reduces the quality and length of cancer patients' lives. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of EPA-enriched phospholipids (EPA-PL) derived from starfish Asterias amurensis on cachectic weight loss in mice bearing S180 ascitic tumor, and TNF-α-stimulated lipolysis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes and to elucidate the possible mechanisms involved. Our findings revealed that oral administration of EPA-PL at 100 mg per kg body weight (BW) per day for 14 days prevented body weight loss in CAC mice by preserving the white adipose tissue (WAT) mass. We found that serum levels of nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) and pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and interleukin (IL)-6 increased in CAC mice but decreased significantly after oral treatment of EPA-PL. In addition, EPA-PL treatment also suppressed the overexpression of several key lipolytic factors and raised the mRNA levels of some adipogenic factors in the WAT of CAC mice. Moreover, treatment of EPA-PL (200 and 400 μM) markedly inhibited TNF-α-stimulated lipolysis in adipocytes. Furthermore, the antilipolytic effects of EPA-PL were stimulated by the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK 1/2) inhibitor PD 98059 and blocked via the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) inhibitor compound C and the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY 294002. Taken together, these data suggest that the dietary EPA-PL ameliorates CAC mainly via inhibiting lipolysis and at least in part for recovering the function of adipogenesis.

  20. Enriched CD44(+)/CD24(-) population drives the aggressive phenotypes presented in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC).

    PubMed

    Ma, Fei; Li, Huihui; Wang, Haijuan; Shi, Xiuqing; Fan, Ying; Ding, Xiaoyan; Lin, Chen; Zhan, Qimin; Qian, Haili; Xu, Binghe

    2014-10-28

    The mechanism underlying the aggressive behaviors of triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is not well characterized yet. The association between cancer stem cell (CSC) population and the aggressive behaviors of TNBC has not been established. We found the CD44(+)/CD24(-) cell population was enriched in TNBC tissues and cell lines, with a higher capacity of proliferation, migration, invasion and tumorigenicity as well as lower adhesion ability. The CD44(+)/CD24(-) cell population with cancer stem cell-like properties may play an important role in the aggressive behaviors of TNBC. This discovery may lead to new therapeutic strategies targeting CD44(+)/CD24(-) cell population in TNBC.

  1. EpCAM-Independent Enrichment of Circulating Tumor Cells in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schneck, Helen; Gierke, Berthold; Uppenkamp, Frauke; Behrens, Bianca; Niederacher, Dieter; Stoecklein, Nikolas H.; Templin, Markus F.; Pawlak, Michael; Fehm, Tanja; Neubauer, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are the potential precursors of metastatic disease. Most assays established for the enumeration of CTCs so far–including the gold standard CellSearch—rely on the expression of the cell surface marker epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM). But, these approaches may not detect CTCs that express no/low levels of EpCAM, e.g. by undergoing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Here we present an enrichment strategy combining different antibodies specific for surface proteins and extracellular matrix (ECM) components to capture an EpCAMlow/neg cell line and EpCAMneg CTCs from blood samples of breast cancer patients depleted for EpCAM-positive cells. The expression of respective proteins (Trop2, CD49f, c-Met, CK8, CD44, ADAM8, CD146, TEM8, CD47) was verified by immunofluorescence on EpCAMpos (e.g. MCF7, SKBR3) and EpCAMlow/neg (MDA-MB-231) breast cancer cell lines. To test antibodies and ECM proteins (e.g. hyaluronic acid (HA), collagen I, laminin) for capturing EpCAMneg cells, the capture molecules were first spotted in a single- and multi-array format onto aldehyde-coated glass slides. Tumor cell adhesion of EpCAMpos/neg cell lines was then determined and visualized by Coomassie/MitoTracker staining. In consequence, marginal binding of EpCAMlow/neg MDA-MB-231 cells to EpCAM-antibodies could be observed. However, efficient adhesion/capturing of EpCAMlow/neg cells could be achieved via HA and immobilized antibodies against CD49f and Trop2. Optimal capture conditions were then applied to immunomagnetic beads to detect EpCAMneg CTCs from clinical samples. Captured CTCs were verified/quantified by immunofluorescence staining for anti-pan-Cytokeratin (CK)-FITC/anti-CD45 AF647/DAPI. In total, in 20 out of 29 EpCAM-depleted fractions (69%) from 25 metastatic breast cancer patients additional EpCAMneg CTCs could be identified [range of 1–24 CTCs per sample] applying Trop2, CD49f, c-Met, CK8 and/or HA magnetic enrichment. Ep

  2. Enriching and characterizing cancer stem cell sub-populations in the WM115 melanoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Siddarth; DeLouise, Lisa A

    2011-12-01

    Cutaneous melanoma is an increasingly common and potentially lethal malignancy of melanocytes, the melanin producing cells normally located in the basal layer of the skin epidermis. Despite major advances in cancer chemotherapeutics and immunotherapy, the success in treating metastatic melanoma remains poor. The notion that cancer stem cells (CSCs) play a key role in melanoma progression is well received. Therefore, isolating and characterizing CSCs is of critical importance for designing new therapeutic strategies that target this unique tumor initiating cell sub-population. In this work, we present a simple in vitro method, employing cell culture on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and transfer back onto standard tissue culture plate, to enrich a non-adherent spheroid (NA/S) forming and an adherent monolayer (AM) cell sub-populations from the tumorigenic WM115 melanoma cell line. The phenotypes of the morphologically distinct NA/S and AM sub-populations were further characterized by quantifying the expression of stem cell markers, CD20 and CD271. Flow cytometric analysis found 2.32% of the cells in the NA/S sub-population were CD20+ CD271+ whereas only 0.27% of the cells in the AM sub-population were CD20+ CD271+. When the NA/S sub-population was cultured back onto PDMS it resulted in the further enrichment of CD20+ CD271+ cells to 14.7%. We used microbubble arrays to quantify the in vitro clonogenic potential of the NA/S and AM cell sub-populations. Microbubbles are spherical cavities, ~160 μm in diameter with 60 μm circular openings, formed in PDMS using the gas expansion molding (GEM) process. Cells from each sub-population were seeded, under limiting dilution conditions, onto separate arrays containing 1215 microbubble wells. After five days in culture, wells seeded with 1, 2, 3 and >3 cells per microbubble well were inspected for cell proliferation. The Extreme Limiting Dilutions Analysis (ELDA) determined a ~58% clonal survival (1 in every 1.72 cells) for the

  3. Probabilistic Subset Conjunction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohli, Rajeev; Jedidi, Kamel

    2005-01-01

    The authors introduce subset conjunction as a classification rule by which an acceptable alternative must satisfy some minimum number of criteria. The rule subsumes conjunctive and disjunctive decision strategies as special cases. Subset conjunction can be represented in a binary-response model, for example, in a logistic regression, using only…

  4. The Prognostic Value of the 8th Edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) Staging System in HER2-Enriched Subtype Breast Cancer, a Retrospective Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bin; Xu, Ling; Ye, Jingming; Xin, Ling; Duan, Xuening; Liu, Yinhua

    2017-08-01

    The American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) released its 8th edition of tumor staging which is to be implemented in early 2018. The present study aimed to analyze the prognostic value of AJCC 8th edition Cancer Staging System in HER2-enriched breast cancer, on a retrospective cohort. This study was a retrospective single-center study of HER2-enriched breast cancer cases diagnosed from January 2008 to December 2014. Clinicopathological features and follow up data including disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were analyzed to explore prognostic factors for disease outcome. We restaged patients based on the 8th edition of the AJCC cancer staging system and analyzed prognostic value of the Anatomic Stage Group and the Prognostic Stage Group. The study enrolled 170 HER2-enriched subtype breast cancer patients with 5-year disease free survival (DFS) of 85.1% and 5-year overall survival (OS) of 86.8%. Prognostic stages of 117 cases (68.8%) changed compared with anatomic stages, with 116 upstaged cases and 1 downstaged case. The Anatomic Stage Groups had a significant prognostic impact on DFS (χ(2)=16.752, p<0.001) and OS (χ(2)=25.038, p<0.001). The Prognostic Staging Groups had a significant prognostic impact on DFS (χ(2)=6.577, p=0.037) and OS (χ(2)=21.762, p<0.001). In the multivariate analysis, both stage groups were independent predictors of OS. Both Anatomic and Prognostic Stage Groups in the 8th edition of the AJCC breast cancer staging system had prognostic value in HER2-enriched subtype breast cancer. The Prognostic Stage system was a breakthrough on the basis of anatomic staging system. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  5. Differential expression of immunohistochemical markers in primary lung and breast cancers enriched for triple-negative tumours.

    PubMed

    Provenzano, Elena; Byrne, David J; Russell, Prudence A; Wright, Gavin M; Generali, Daniele; Fox, Stephen B

    2016-02-01

    In breast cancer patients presenting with a lung lesion, the distinction between lung and breast origin is clinically important. Lung and breast cancers are both CK7(+) /CK20(-) , so additional immunohistochemical markers are needed. We examined the expression of oestrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1), gross cystic disease fluid protein-15 (GCDFP-15), p63 and Wilms' tumour 1 (WT1) in a series of tissue microarrays comprising 266 non-small-cell lung cancers and 837 primary breast cancers enriched for triple-negative tumours (TNBC). Staining for ER, PR, TTF-1 and GCDFP-15 was present in 63%, 49%, 0% and 25% of breast and 6%, 9%, 59% and 1% of lung cancers, respectively. Strong staining for p63 was present in 63 (97%) lung squamous cell carcinomas and only eight (9%) TNBC. WT1 nuclear staining was rare; however, cytoplasmic staining was identified in 49 (40%) TNBC and 10 (5%) lung cancers. Cluster analysis segregated TNBC from lung cancers with TTF-1 and/or p63 staining favouring lung origin, and GCDFP-15 or WT1 staining favouring breast origin. Cancers negative for all four markers (17%) were 60% breast and 40% lung origin. An immunohistochemical panel incorporating ER, TTF-1, GCDFP-15, p63 and WT1 can help to distinguish lung cancer from metastatic breast cancer, including TNBC. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Neuropilin-1 expression identifies a subset of regulatory T cells in human lymph nodes that is modulated by preoperative chemoradiation therapy in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Battaglia, Alessandra; Buzzonetti, Alexia; Monego, Giovanni; Peri, Laura; Ferrandina, Gabriella; Fanfani, Francesco; Scambia, Giovanni; Fattorossi, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    We examined the phenotype and function of CD4+ T cells expressing the semaphorin III receptor neuropilin-1 (Nrp1) in human lymph nodes and peripheral blood. In lymph nodes, Nrp1 identified a small regulatory CD4+ CD25(high) T-cell subpopulation (Nrp1+ Treg) that expressed higher levels of Forkhead box P3 (Foxp3) message and protein than Nrp1- Treg, and various molecular markers of activated Treg, i.e. CD45RO, human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DR and glucocorticoid-induced tumour necrosis factor receptor (GITR). Similarly to conventional Treg, Nrp1+ Treg proliferated poorly in vitro, and exerted contact-dependent in vitro suppression of T-cell proliferation and cytokine secretion. However, Nrp1+ Treg were more efficient than Nrp1- Treg at inducing suppression. Nrp1 was also expressed on a small subpopulation of CD25(int) and CD25- CD4+ T cells that expressed more Foxp3, CD45RO, HLA-DR and GITR than their Nrp1- counterparts. In contrast, in peripheral blood Nrp1 identified a minor CD4+ T-cell subset that did not display the phenotypic features of Treg lacking Foxp3 expression and marginally expressing CD25. Hence, the function of Nrp1+ CD4+ T cells seemingly depends on their anatomical location. In a previous report, we proposed that Treg may curb the anti-tumour T-cell response in cervical cancer. We show here that Treg and Nrp1+ Treg levels dropped in the tumour-draining lymph nodes of patients with cervical cancer following preoperative chemoradiotherapy in a direct relationship with the reduction of tumour mass, suggesting that suppressor cell elimination facilitated the generation of T cells mediating the destruction of the neoplastic cells left behind after cytotoxic therapy.

  7. Evidence that the familial adenomatous polyposis gene is involved in a subset of colon cancers with a complementable defect in c-myc regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Erisman, M.D.; Scott, J.K.; Astrin, S.M. )

    1989-06-01

    Human colorectal carcinomas frequently express elevated levels of c-myc mRNA in the absence of a gross genetic change at the c-myc locus. To test the hypothesis that these tumors are defective in a gene function necessary for the regulation of c-myc expression, the authors fused an osteosarcoma cell line that exhibits normal c-myc regulation with two colon carcinoma cell lines that express deregulated levels of c-myc mRNA. Since rates of c-myc mRNA turnover in the colon carcinoma cells were found to be comparable to those in normal cells, increased message stability cannot account for the increased steady-state levels of transcripts. These finding suggest that loss of function of a trans-acting regulator is responsible for the deregulation of c-myc expression in a major fraction of colorectal carcinomas. Analysis of restriction fragment length polymorphisms in tumor/normal tissue pairs from patients with primary colorectal lesions indicated that deregulation of c-myc expression in the tumors is correlated with frequent loss of alleles of syntenic markers on chromosome 5q. Chromosome 5q is the region known to contain the gene for familial adenomatous polyposis, an inherited predisposition to colon cancer. These findings, together with the arlier finding that the colonic distribution of tumors exhibiting deregulated c-myc expression is similar to that reported for familial polyposis, provide evidence that loss of function of the familial adenomatous polyposis gene is involved in a subset of colorectal cancers in which c-myc expression is deregulated.

  8. Gefitinib (IRESSA) in patients of Asian origin with refractory advanced non-small cell lung cancer: subset analysis from the ISEL study.

    PubMed

    Chang, Alex; Parikh, Purvish; Thongprasert, Sumitra; Tan, Eng Huat; Perng, Reury-Perng; Ganzon, Domingo; Yang, Chih-Hsin; Tsao, Chao-Jung; Watkins, Claire; Botwood, Nick; Thatcher, Nick

    2006-10-01

    The IRESSA Survival Evaluation in Lung Cancer (ISEL) phase III study compared the efficacy of gefitinib (IRESSA) versus placebo in patients with refractory advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Although a statistically significant difference in survival was not seen between gefitinib and placebo in the overall ISEL population, preplanned subset analyses demonstrated a significant survival benefit in patients who had never smoked and in patients of Asian origin. In ISEL, 1692 patients who were refractory to or intolerant of their latest chemotherapy were randomized to receive either gefitinib (250 mg/day) or placebo, plus best supportive care. Preplanned subgroup analyses included an assessment of patients who were of Asian origin (n = 342). Two hundred thirty-five patients of Asian origin received gefitinib, and 107 received placebo. In these patients, treatment with gefitinib significantly improved survival compared with placebo (hazard ratio [HR], 0.66; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.48, 0.91; p = 0.010; median survival, 9.5 versus 5.5 months). Patients of Asian origin also experienced statistically significant improvements in time to treatment failure with gefitinib compared with placebo (HR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.52, 0.91; p = 0.0084; 4.4 versus 2.2 months), and objective response rates were higher with gefitinib than with placebo (12 versus 2%). Gefitinib was generally well tolerated in patients of Asian origin, with rash and diarrhea being the most common adverse events. No unexpected adverse events were observed. Treatment with gefitinib was associated with a significant improvement in survival in a subgroup of patients of Asian origin with previously treated refractory advanced NSCLC.

  9. Prosurvival long noncoding RNA PINCR regulates a subset of p53 targets in human colorectal cancer cells by binding to Matrin 3

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Ritu; Gryder, Berkley; Woods, Wendy S; Subramanian, Murugan; Jones, Matthew F; Li, Xiao Ling; Jenkins, Lisa M; Shabalina, Svetlana A; Mo, Min; Dasso, Mary; Yang, Yuan; Wakefield, Lalage M; Zhu, Yuelin; Frier, Susan M; Moriarity, Branden S; Prasanth, Kannanganattu V; Perez-Pinera, Pablo; Lal, Ashish

    2017-01-01

    Thousands of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been discovered, yet the function of the vast majority remains unclear. Here, we show that a p53-regulated lncRNA which we named PINCR (p53-induced noncoding RNA), is induced ~100-fold after DNA damage and exerts a prosurvival function in human colorectal cancer cells (CRC) in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. Targeted deletion of PINCR in CRC cells significantly impaired G1 arrest and induced hypersensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs. PINCR regulates the induction of a subset of p53 targets involved in G1 arrest and apoptosis, including BTG2, RRM2B and GPX1. Using a novel RNA pulldown approach that utilized endogenous S1-tagged PINCR, we show that PINCR associates with the enhancer region of these genes by binding to RNA-binding protein Matrin 3 that, in turn, associates with p53. Our findings uncover a critical prosurvival function of a p53/PINCR/Matrin 3 axis in response to DNA damage in CRC cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.23244.001 PMID:28580901

  10. Prosurvival long noncoding RNA PINCR regulates a subset of p53 targets in human colorectal cancer cells by binding to Matrin 3.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Ritu; Gryder, Berkley; Woods, Wendy S; Subramanian, Murugan; Jones, Matthew F; Li, Xiao Ling; Jenkins, Lisa M; Shabalina, Svetlana A; Mo, Min; Dasso, Mary; Yang, Yuan; Wakefield, Lalage M; Zhu, Yuelin; Frier, Susan M; Moriarity, Branden S; Prasanth, Kannanganattu V; Perez-Pinera, Pablo; Lal, Ashish

    2017-06-05

    Thousands of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been discovered, yet the function of the vast majority remains unclear. Here, we show that a p53-regulated lncRNA which we named PINCR (p53-induced noncoding RNA), is induced ~100-fold after DNA damage and exerts a prosurvival function in human colorectal cancer cells (CRC) in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. Targeted deletion of PINCR in CRC cells significantly impaired G1 arrest and induced hypersensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs. PINCR regulates the induction of a subset of p53 targets involved in G1 arrest and apoptosis, including BTG2, RRM2B and GPX1. Using a novel RNA pulldown approach that utilized endogenous S1-tagged PINCR, we show that PINCR associates with the enhancer region of these genes by binding to RNA-binding protein Matrin 3 that, in turn, associates with p53. Our findings uncover a critical prosurvival function of a p53/PINCR/Matrin 3 axis in response to DNA damage in CRC cells.

  11. Combination Therapy Targeting BCL6 and Phospho-STAT3 Defeats Intratumor Heterogeneity in a Subset of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers. | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Oncogene-specific changes in cellular signaling have been widely observed in lung cancer. Here, we investigated how these alterations could affect signaling heterogeneity and suggest novel therapeutic strategies. We compared signaling changes across six human bronchial epithelial cell (HBEC) strains that were systematically transformed with various combinations of TP53, KRAS, and MYC-oncogenic alterations commonly found in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

  12. Long Term Consumption of Flaxseed Enriched Diet Decreased Ovarian Cancer Incidence and Prostaglandin E2 in Hens

    PubMed Central

    Eilati, Erfan; Bahr, Janice M.; Hales, Dale Buchanan

    2013-01-01

    Objective Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological malignancy. Prevention may be the best approach to reduce ovarian cancer. Flaxseed is the richest vegetable source of omega-3 fatty acids which may be effective in the prevention of ovarian cancer. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is the most proinflammatory ecoisanoid and one of the downstream products of two isoforms of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes: COX-1 and COX-2. Our objective was to determine if long-term consumption of a flaxseed enriched diet decreased ovarian cancer severity and incidence in the laying hen and to investigate its potential correlation with the expression of COX enzymes and PGE2 concentration. Methods White Leghorn hens were fed 10% flaxseed-enriched or standard diet for 4 years. The severity and incidence of ovarian cancer were determined by gross pathology and histology. COX-1 and COX-2 protein and mRNA expression and PGE2 concentrations in ovaries were measured by Western blot, quantitative real-time PCR and ELISA, respectively. Results The results demonstrated that there was a reduction in ovarian cancer severity and incidence in hens fed flaxseed diet. In correlation with decreased ovarian cancer severity and incidence, concentration of PGE2 and expression of COX-2 were diminished in ovaries of hens fed flaxseed. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the lower levels of COX-2 and PGE2 are the main contributing factors in the chemo-suppressive role of long-term flaxseed consumption in ovarian cancer in laying hens. These findings may provide the basis for clinical trials of dietary intervention targeting prostaglandin biosynthesis for the prevention and treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:23707669

  13. The anti-oncogenic influence of ellagic acid on colon cancer cells in leptin-enriched microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Yousef, Amany I; El-Masry, Omar S; Yassin, Eman H

    2016-10-01

    Ellagic acid (EA) has been proposed as a promising candidate for therapeutic use in colon cancer. Investigation of the effectiveness of EA in a leptin-enriched model might have been given a little interest. Here in, we investigated the anti-tumor effect of EA in the presence of leptin to reflect on therapeutic use of EA in obesity-linked colon cancer. Proven effective in leptin-enriched microenvironment, EA inhibited cell proliferation of HCT-116 and CaCo-2 cell lines, modulated cell cycle, translocated Bax to the mitochondrial fraction of cells, activated caspase-8, and reduced PCNA expression. The current study findings cast a beam of light on the potential therapeutic use of EA in obesity-related colon carcinogenesis.

  14. Role of Distinct Natural Killer Cell Subsets in Anticancer Response

    PubMed Central

    Stabile, Helena; Fionda, Cinzia; Gismondi, Angela; Santoni, Angela

    2017-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells, the prototypic member of innate lymphoid cells, are important effectors of anticancer immune response. These cells can survey and control tumor initiation due to their capability to recognize and kill malignant cells and to regulate the adaptive immune response via cytokines and chemokines release. However, several studies have shown that tumor-infiltrating NK cells associated with advanced disease can have profound functional defects and display protumor activity. This evidence indicates that NK cell behavior undergoes crucial alterations during cancer progression. Moreover, a further level of complexity is due to the extensive heterogeneity and plasticity of these lymphocytes, implying that different NK cell subsets, endowed with specific phenotypic and functional features, may be involved and play distinct roles in the tumor context. Accordingly, many studies reported the enrichment of selective NK cell subsets within tumor tissue, whereas the underlying mechanisms are not fully elucidated. A malignant microenvironment can significantly impact NK cell activity, by recruiting specific subpopulations and/or influencing their developmental programming or the acquisition of a mature phenotype; in particular, neoplastic, stroma and immune cells, or tumor-derived factors take part in these processes. In this review, we will summarize and discuss the recently acquired knowledge on the possible contribution of distinct NK cell subsets in the control and/or progression of solid and hematological malignancies. Moreover, we will address emerging evidence regarding the role of different components of tumor microenvironment on shaping NK cell response. PMID:28360915

  15. SINGLE-TUBE, HIGHLY PARALLEL MUTATION ENRICHMENT IN CANCER GENE PANELS USING TEMPERATURE-TOLERANT-COLD-PCR

    PubMed Central

    Castellanos-Rizaldos, E.; Richardson, K.; Lin, R.; Wu, G.; Makrigiorgos, G. M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Multiplexed detection of low-level mutations presents a technical challenge for many technologies, including cancer gene panels used for targeted-re-sequencing. Analysis of mutations below ~2–5% abundance in tumors with heterogeneity, samples with stromal contamination, or biofluids, is problematic due to increased ‘noise’ from sequencing errors. Technologies that reduce noise via deep-sequencing unavoidably reduce throughput and increase cost. Here we provide proof-of-principle that COLD-PCR technology enables multiplex low-level mutation detection in cancer gene panels while retaining throughput. METHODS We have developed a multiplex temperature-tolerant-COLD-PCR (fast-TT-COLD-PCR) approach that uses cancer gene panels developed for massively parallel sequencing. Following a multiplex pre-amplification from genomic DNA we attach tails to all amplicons and perform fast-TT-COLD-PCR. This approach gradually increases denaturation temperatures in a step-wise fashion, such that all possible denaturation temperatures are encompassed. By introducing modified nucleotides, fast-COLD-PCR is adapted to enrich for Tm-increasing as well as Tm-decreasing mutations over all amplicons, in a single tube. RESULTS Using custom-made and commercial gene panels containing 8, 50, 190 or 16,000 amplicons we demonstrate that fast-TT-COLD-PCR enriches mutations on all examined targets simultaneously. Incorporation of dITP/dDTP in place of dGTP/dATP enables enrichment of Tm-increasing mutations. Serial dilution experiments demonstrate a limit-of-detection of ~ 0.01–0.1% mutation abundance using Ion-Torrent and 0.1–0.3% using Sanger sequencing. CONCLUSIONS Fast-TT-COLD-PCR improves the limit of detection of cancer gene panels by enabling mutation enrichment in multiplex, single tube reactions. This novel adaptation of COLD-PCR converts subclonal mutations to clonal, thereby facilitating detection and subsequent mutation sequencing. PMID:25297854

  16. The effect of an oral nutritional supplement enriched with fish oil on weight-loss in patients with pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Barber, M D; Ross, J A; Voss, A C; Tisdale, M J; Fearon, K C

    1999-09-01

    Previous studies have suggested that administration of oral eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) will stabilize weight in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. The aim of the present study was to determine if a combination of EPA with a conventional oral nutritional supplement could produce weight gain in these patients. Twenty patients with unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma were asked to consume two cans of a fish oil-enriched nutritional supplement per day in addition to their normal food intake. Each can contained 310 kcal, 16.1 g protein and 1.09 g EPA. Patients were assessed for weight, body composition, dietary intake, resting energy expenditure (REE) and performance status. Patients consumed a median of 1.9 cans day(-1). All patients were losing weight at baseline at a median rate of 2.9 kg month(-1). After administration of the fish oil-enriched supplement, patients had significant weight-gain at both 3 (median 1 kg, P= 0.024) and 7 weeks (median 2 kg, P = 0.033). Dietary intake increased significantly by almost 400 kcal day(-1) (P = 0.002). REE per kg body weight and per kg lean body mass fell significantly. Performance status and appetite were significantly improved at 3 weeks. In contrast to previous studies of oral conventional nutritional supplements in weight-losing cancer patients, this study suggests that an EPA-enriched supplement may reverse cachexia in advanced pancreatic cancer.

  17. The enriched fraction of Elephantopus scaber Triggers apoptosis and inhibits multi-drug resistance transporters in human epithelial cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Beeran, Asmy Appadath; Maliyakkal, Naseer; Rao, Chamallamudi Mallikarjuna; Udupa, Nayanabhirama

    2015-01-01

    Background: Medicinal plants have played an important role in the development of clinically useful anticancer agents. Elephantopus scaber (Asteraceae) (ES) is widely used in Indian traditional system of medicine for the treatment of various ailments including cancer. Objective: To investigate anticancer effects of ES in human epithelial cancer cells. Materials and Methods: Cytotoxicity of ethanolic extract of ES (ES-ET) and its fractions, such as ES Petroleum ether fraction (ES-PET), ES Dichloromethane fraction (ES DCM), n Butyl alcohol fraction (ES-BT), and ES-Rest (ES-R) were assessed in human epithelial cancer cell lines using sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay. Acridine orange/ethidium bromide assay and Hoechst 33342 assays were used to gauge induction of apoptosis. Cell cycle analysis and micronuclei assay were used to assess cell cycle specific pharmacological effects and drug induced genotoxicty. Further, the ability of ES to inhibit multi drug resistant (MDR) transporters (ABC-B1 and ABC-G2) was determined by Rhodamine (Rho) and Mitoxantrone (MXR) efflux assays. Results: The enriched fraction of ES (ES DCM) possessed dose-dependent potent cytotoxicity in human epithelial cancer cells. Further, treatment of cancer cells (HeLa, A549, MCF-7, and Caco-2) with ES DCM showed hall mark properties of apoptosis (membrane blebbing, nuclear condensation etc.). Similarly, ES DCM caused enhanced sub G0 content and micronuclei formation indicating the induction of apoptosis and drug induced genotoxicity in cancer cells, respectively. Interestingly, ES DCM inhibited MDR transporters (ABC B1 and ABC G2) in cancer cells. Conclusion: The enriched fraction of ES imparted cytotoxic effects, triggered apoptosis, induced genotoxicity, and inhibited MDR transporters in human epithelial cancer cells. Thus, ES appears to be potential anticancer agent. PMID:25829763

  18. Cancer stem cells are enriched in Fanconi anemia head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    WU, JEAN; MU, QINGSHAN; THIVIYANATHAN, VARATHARASA; ANNAPRAGADA, ANANTH; VIGNESWARAN, NADARAJAH

    2014-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) patients have an increased risk of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) at a higher rate with no apparent risk factors. HNSCC of FA patients is an aggressive tumor characterized by multifocal origin, early metastases and frequent recurrences. Given that cancer stem cells (CSC) drive tumorigenesis, tumor recurrence and metastasis, in this study, we characterized the CSC population in FA and sporadic HNSCC. The Aldefluor assay was used to characterize and isolate CSC with high aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity (ALDHpos) in cell lines derived from FA and sporadic HNSCC. Isolated ALDHpos and ALDHneg cells were examined for the expression of stemness genes using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) array. Tumor cell-derived FA and sporadic HNSCC were examined for their ability to form tumorspheres in vitro. Stem-like cell population in FA and sporadic HNSCC in human and mouse xenograft tumors were evaluated using ALDH isoform 1 (ALDH1) immunohistochemistry. FA-HNSCC cell lines harbor a greater proportion of ALDHpos cells (15–31%) compared to sporadic HNSCC (10%). Expression of Nanog, Oct-3/4 and Stella, molecular markers of undifferentiated embryonic stem (ES) cells were detected in the ALDHpos FA-HNSCC cells and not in the ALDHneg cells. FA-HNSCC cell lines revealed enhanced in vitro tumorsphere formation compared to sporadic HNSCC cells. A higher percentage of ALDH1pos tumor cells are noted in the human and mouse xenograft tumors of FA-HNSCC compared to sporadic HNSCC tumors. FA-HNSCC are highly enriched for CSC and may serve as a model to develop CSC-targeted therapies for HNSCC. PMID:25340704

  19. Effect of a fish oil-enriched nutritional supplement on metabolic mediators in patients with pancreatic cancer cachexia.

    PubMed

    Barber, M D; Fearon, K C; Tisdale, M J; McMillan, D C; Ross, J A

    2001-01-01

    Weight loss in advanced cancer patients is refractory to conventional nutritional support. This may be due to metabolic changes mediated by proinflammatory cytokines, hormones, and tumor-derived products. We previously showed that a nutritional supplement enriched with fish oil will reverse weight loss in patients with pancreatic cancer cachexia. The present study examines the effect of this supplement on a number of mediators thought to play a role in cancer cachexia. Twenty weight-losing patients with pancreatic cancer were asked to consume a nutritional supplement providing 600 kcal and 2 g of eicosapentaenoic acid per day. At baseline and after 3 wk, patients were weighed and samples were collected to measure serum concentrations of interleukin (IL)-6 and its soluble receptor tumor necrosis factor receptors I and II, cortisol, insulin, and leptin, peripheral blood mononuclear cell production of IL-1 beta, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor, and urinary excretion of proteolysis inducing factor. After 3 wk of consumption of the fish oil-enriched nutritional supplement, there was a significant fall in production of IL-6 (from median 16.5 to 13.7 ng/ml, P = 0.015), a rise in serum insulin concentration (from 3.3 to 5.0 mU/l, P = 0.0064), a fall in the cortisol-to-insulin ratio (P = 0.0084), and a fall in the proportion of patients excreting proteolysis inducing factor (from 88% to 40%, P = 0.008). These changes occurred in association with weight gain (median 1 kg, P = 0.024). Various mediators of catabolism in cachexia are modulated by administration of a fish oil-enriched nutritional supplement in pancreatic cancer patients. This may account for the reversal of weight loss in patients consuming this supplement.

  20. Germline Heterozygous Variants in SEC23B Are Associated with Cowden Syndrome and Enriched in Apparently Sporadic Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yehia, Lamis; Niazi, Farshad; Ni, Ying; Ngeow, Joanne; Sankunny, Madhav; Liu, Zhigang; Wei, Wei; Mester, Jessica L.; Keri, Ruth A.; Zhang, Bin; Eng, Charis

    2015-01-01

    Cancer-predisposing genes associated with inherited cancer syndromes help explain mechanisms of sporadic carcinogenesis and often inform normal development. Cowden syndrome (CS) is an autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by high lifetime risks of epithelial cancers, such that ∼50% of affected individuals are wild-type for known cancer-predisposing genes. Using whole-exome and Sanger sequencing of a multi-generation CS family affected by thyroid and other cancers, we identified a pathogenic missense heterozygous SEC23B variant (c.1781T>G [p.Val594Gly]) that segregates with the phenotype. We also found germline heterozygous SEC23B variants in 3/96 (3%) unrelated mutation-negative CS probands with thyroid cancer and in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), representing apparently sporadic cancers. We note that the TCGA thyroid cancer dataset is enriched with unique germline deleterious SEC23B variants associated with a significantly younger age of onset. SEC23B encodes Sec23 homolog B (S. cerevisiae), a component of coat protein complex II (COPII), which transports proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi apparatus. Interestingly, germline homozygous or compound-heterozygous SEC23B mutations cause an unrelated disorder, congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II, and SEC23B-deficient mice suffer from secretory organ degeneration due to ER-stress-associated apoptosis. By characterizing the p.Val594Gly variant in a normal thyroid cell line, we show that it is a functional alteration that results in ER-stress-mediated cell-colony formation and survival, growth, and invasion, which reflect aspects of a cancer phenotype. Our findings suggest a different role for SEC23B, whereby germline heterozygous variants associate with cancer predisposition potentially mediated by ER stress “addiction.” PMID:26522472

  1. Long genes and genes with multiple splice variants are enriched in pathways linked to cancer and other multigenic diseases.

    PubMed

    Sahakyan, Aleksandr B; Balasubramanian, Shankar

    2016-03-12

    The role of random mutations and genetic errors in defining the etiology of cancer and other multigenic diseases has recently received much attention. With the view that complex genes should be particularly vulnerable to such events, here we explore the link between the simple properties of the human genes, such as transcript length, number of splice variants, exon/intron composition, and their involvement in the pathways linked to cancer and other multigenic diseases. We reveal a substantial enrichment of cancer pathways with long genes and genes that have multiple splice variants. Although the latter two factors are interdependent, we show that the overall gene length and splicing complexity increase in cancer pathways in a partially decoupled manner. Our systematic survey for the pathways enriched with top lengthy genes and with genes that have multiple splice variants reveal, along with cancer pathways, the pathways involved in various neuronal processes, cardiomyopathies and type II diabetes. We outline a correlation between the gene length and the number of somatic mutations. Our work is a step forward in the assessment of the role of simple gene characteristics in cancer and a wider range of multigenic diseases. We demonstrate a significant accumulation of long genes and genes with multiple splice variants in pathways of multigenic diseases that have already been associated with de novo mutations. Unlike the cancer pathways, we note that the pathways of neuronal processes, cardiomyopathies and type II diabetes contain genes long enough for topoisomerase-dependent gene expression to also be a potential contributing factor in the emergence of pathologies, should topoisomerases become impaired.

  2. The Enrichment of Survivin in Exosomes from Breast Cancer Cells Treated with Paclitaxel Promotes Cell Survival and Chemoresistance

    PubMed Central

    Kreger, Bridget T.; Johansen, Eric R.; Cerione, Richard A.; Antonyak, Marc A.

    2016-01-01

    The generation and release of membrane-enclosed packets from cancer cells, called extracellular vesicles (EVs), play important roles in propagating transformed phenotypes, including promoting cell survival. EVs mediate their effects by transferring their contents, which include specific proteins and nucleic acids, to target cells. However, how the cargo and function of EVs change in response to different stimuli remains unclear. Here, we discovered that treating highly aggressive MDAMB231 breast cancer cells with paclitaxel (PTX), a chemotherapy that stabilizes microtubules, causes them to generate a specific class of EV, namely exosomes, that are highly enriched with the cell survival protein and cancer marker, Survivin. Treating MDAMB231 cells with a variety of other chemotherapeutic agents, and inhibitors that block cell growth and survival, did not have the same effect as PTX, with the exception of nocodazole, another inhibitor of microtubule dynamics. Exosomes isolated from PTX-treated MDAMB231 cells strongly promoted the survival of serum-starved and PTX-treated fibroblasts and SKBR3 breast cancer cells, an effect that was ablated when Survivin was knocked-down from these vesicles using siRNA. These findings underscore how the enrichment of a specific cargo in exosomes promotes cell survival, as well as can potentially serve as a marker of PTX resistance. PMID:27941677

  3. Boron-enriched streptavidin potentially useful as a component of boron carriers for neutron capture therapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Sano, T

    1999-01-01

    A boron-enriched streptavidin has been prepared by chemical conjugation of a boron-rich compound, B(12)H(11)SH(2)(-) (BSH), to a genetically engineered streptavidin variant. The streptavidin variant used has 20 cysteine residues per molecule, derived from a C-terminal cysteine stretch consisting of five cysteine residues per subunit. Because natural streptavidin has no cysteine residues, the reactive sulfhydryl groups of the cysteine stretch serve as unique conjugation sites for sulfhydryl chemistry. BSH was conjugated irreversibly to the sulfhydryl groups of the streptavidin variant via a sulfhydryl-specific homobifunctional chemical cross-linker. Quantitative boron analysis indicates that the resulting streptavidin-BSH conjugate carries approximately 230 boron atoms/molecule. This indicates that the chemical conjugation of BSH to the streptavidin variant was highly specific and efficient because this method should allow the conjugation of a maximum of 240 boron atoms/streptavidin molecule. This boron-enriched streptavidin retained both full biotin-binding ability and tetrameric structure, suggesting that the conjugation of BSH has little, if any, effect on the fundamental properties of streptavidin. This boron-enriched streptavidin should be very useful as a component of targetable boron carriers for neutron capture therapy of cancer. For example, a monoclonal antibody against a tumor-associated antigen can be attached tightly to the boron-enriched streptavidin upon simple biotinylation, and the resulting conjugate could be used to target boron to tumor cells on which the tumor-associated antigen is overexpressed.

  4. Single-tube, highly parallel mutation enrichment in cancer gene panels by use of temperature-tolerant COLD-PCR.

    PubMed

    Castellanos-Rizaldos, Elena; Richardson, Katherine; Lin, Rui; Wu, Grant; Makrigiorgos, Mike G

    2015-01-01

    Multiplexed detection of low-level mutations presents a technical challenge for many technologies, including cancer gene panels used for targeted-resequencing. Analysis of mutations below approximately 2%-5% abundance in tumors with heterogeneity, samples with stromal contamination, or biofluids is problematic owing to increased noise from sequencing errors. Technologies that reduce noise via deep sequencing unavoidably reduce throughput and increase cost. Here we provide proof of principle that coamplification at lower denaturation temperature (COLD)-PCR technology enables multiplex low-level mutation detection in cancer gene panels while retaining throughput. We have developed a multiplex temperature-tolerant COLD-PCR (fast-TT-COLD-PCR) approach that uses cancer gene panels developed for massively parallel sequencing. After multiplex preamplification from genomic DNA, we attach tails to all amplicons and perform fast-TT-COLD-PCR. This approach gradually increases denaturation temperatures in a step-wise fashion, such that all possible denaturation temperatures are encompassed. By introducing modified nucleotides, fast-COLD-PCR is adapted to enrich for melting temperature (Tm)-increasing mutations over all amplicons, in a single tube. Therefore, in separate reactions, both Tm-decreasing and Tm-increasing mutations are enriched. Using custom-made and commercial gene panels containing 8, 50, 190, or 16 000 amplicons, we demonstrate that fast-TT-COLD-PCR enriches mutations on all examined targets simultaneously. Incorporation of deoxyinosine triphosphate (dITP)/2,6-diaminopurine triphosphate (dDTP) in place of deoxyguanosine triphosphate (dGTP)/deoxyadenosine triphosphate (dATP) enables enrichment of Tm-increasing mutations. Serial dilution experiments demonstrate a limit of detection of approximately 0.01%-0.1% mutation abundance by use of Ion-Torrent and 0.1%-0.3% by use of Sanger sequencing. Fast-TT-COLD-PCR improves the limit of detection of cancer gene panels by

  5. Genetic network and gene set enrichment analysis to identify biomarkers related to cigarette smoking and lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xiaocong; Netzer, Michael; Baumgartner, Christian; Bai, Chunxue; Wang, Xiangdong

    2013-02-01

    Cigarette smoking is the most demonstrated risk factor for the development of lung cancer, while the related genetic mechanisms are still unclear. The preprocessed microarray expression dataset was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus database. Samples were classified according to the disease state, stage and smoking state. A new computational strategy was applied for the identification and biological interpretation of new candidate genes in lung cancer and smoking by coupling a network-based approach with gene set enrichment analysis. Network analysis was performed by pair-wise comparison according to the disease states (tumor or normal), smoking states (current smokers or nonsmokers or former smokers), or the disease stage (stages I-IV). The most activated metabolic pathways were identified by gene set enrichment analysis. Panels of top ranked gene candidates in smoking or cancer development were identified, including genes involved in cell proliferation and drug metabolism like cytochrome P450 and WW domain containing transcription regulator 1. Semaphorin 5A and protein phosphatase 1F are the common genes represented as major hubs in both the smoking and cancer related network. Six pathways, e.g. cell cycle, DNA replication, RNA transport, protein processing in endoplasmic reticulum, vascular smooth muscle contraction and endocytosis were commonly involved in smoking and lung cancer when comparing the top ten selected pathways. New approach of bioinformatics for biomarker identification and validation can probe into deep genetic relationships between cigarette smoking and lung cancer. Our studies indicate that disease-specific network biomarkers, interaction between genes/proteins, or cross-talking of pathways provide more specific values for the development of precision therapies for lung. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. HPV-E6 protein enriches the CD55(+) population in cervical cancer cells promoting radio-resistance and cancer aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Leung, Thomas Ho-Yin; Tang, Hermit Wai-Man; Siu, Michelle Kwan-Yee; Chan, David Wai; Chan, Karen Kar-Loen; Cheung, Annie Nga-Yin; Ngan, Hextan Yuen-Sheung

    2017-09-25

    Accumulating evidence indicates that the human papilloma virus (HPV) E6 protein plays a crucial role in the development of cervical cancer. Sub-populations of cells that reside within tumors are responsible for tumor resistance to cancer therapy and recurrence. However, the identity of such cells residing in cervical cancer and their relationship with the HPV-E6 protein have not been identified. Here, we isolated sphere-forming cells, which exhibited self-renewal ability, from primary cervical tumors. Gene expression profiling revealed that CD55 was upregulated in primary cervical cancer sphere cells. Flow cytometric analysis detected abundant CD55(+) populations among a panel of HPV-positive cervical cancer cell lines, while only few CD55(+) cells were found in HPV-negative cervical cancer and normal cervical epithelial cell lines. The isolated CD55(+) sub-population from the C33A cell line exhibited significant sphere-forming ability and enhanced tumorigenicity, cell migration and radio-resistance. In contrast, the suppression of CD55 in HPV-positive CaSki cells inhibited tumorigenicity both in vitro and in vivo and sensitized cells to irradiation treatment. In addition, ectopic expression of HPV-E6 in HPV-negative cervical cancer cells dramatically enriched the CD55(+) sub-population. CRISPR/Cas9 knockout of the CD55 gene in an HPV-E6-overexpressing stable clone abolished the tumorigenic properties exerted by HPV-E6. Taken together, our data suggest that HPV-E6 protein expression enriches the CD55(+) population, which contributes to tumorigenicity and radio-resistance in cervical cancer cells. Targeting CD55 via CRISPR/Cas9 may represent a novel avenue for developing new strategies and effective therapies for the treatment of cervical cancer. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Mel-18 controls the enrichment of tumor-initiating cells in SP fraction in mouse breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Janakiraman, Harinarayanan; Nobukiyo, Asako; Inoue, Hiroko; Kanno, Masamoto

    2011-06-01

    Side population (SP) cell analysis has been used to identify and isolate a minor population of cells with stem cell properties in normal tissues and in many cancers including breast cancer cells. However, the molecular mechanisms that operate in tumor-initiating cells (TICs) in SP fraction remain unclear. The Polycomb group genes, including Bmi1 and Mel-18, have been implicated in the maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and suggested to be oncogenic and tumor suppressive, respectively, in breast cancer. In this study, we determined the critical role of Mel-18 in the enrichment mechanisms of TICs with the SP phenotype in a mouse breast cancer cell line, MMK3, that was established from a breast cancer developed spontaneously in Mel-18+/- mice. The Mel-18 protein expression level significantly correlates to the percentage of SP fraction in the mouse breast cancer cell line MMK3 series. The comparison between MMK3V3 (V3) cells containing one copy of the Mel-18 gene and MMK3S2 (S2) cells having twice the amount of Mel-18 expression clearly demonstrates the above relationship. Similar results obtained with the percentage of ALDH+ cells in V3 and S2 further confirmed the correlation between protein expression level of Mel-18 and the TICs. More importantly, transplantation of SP and non-SP cells of V3 and S2 cells into the NOD/SCID mice clearly showed that the heterozygous level of Mel-18 leads to the disappearance of enrichment of TICs into SP fraction in vivo. Stem cell pathway focused gene expression profiling of V3 and S2 cells revealed that the genes Abcg2, Aldh1a1 and Dhh were highly down-regulated in V3 compared to S2. These results indicate that the precise Mel-18 expression level controls TIC enrichment mechanisms through the regulation of channel molecule of Abcg2 and functional TIC marker of Aldhlal. In conclusion, our findings revealed the significance of fine-tuning mechanisms for Mel-18 protein expression level in the maintenance of TIC into SP

  8. Concurrent TMPRSS2-ERG and SLC45A3-ERG rearrangements plus PTEN loss are not found in low grade prostate cancer and define an aggressive tumor subset.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Silvia; Font-Tello, Alba; Juanpere, Núria; de Muga, Silvia; Lorenzo, Marta; Salido, Marta; Fumadó, Lluís; Serrano, Laia; Cecchini, Lluís; Serrano, Sergio; Lloreta, Josep

    2016-06-01

    SLC45A3 is the second most common ERG partner in prostate cancer (PrCa). Coexisting TMPRSS2 and SLC45A3 rearrangements are found in a subset of cases, but the meaning is still unknown. SLC45A3-ERG and TMPRSS2-ERG rearrangements and their association with ERG and PTEN expression and with clinical and pathological features have been analyzed in 80 PrCa (PSMAR-Biobank, Barcelona, Spain). ERG and PTEN mRNA were assessed by qRT-PCR; TMPRSS2-ERG and SLC45A3-ERG by RT-PCR, FISH, and direct sequencing; and ERG expression by IHC. The endpoints were Gleason score (GS), stage, and PSA progression-free survival. Single TMPRSS2-ERG was found in 51.6% GS ≤ 7 and 22.2% GS ≥ 8 tumors (P = 0.027). SLC45A3-ERG was found in 25 cases, 20 of them with concurrent TMPRSS2-ERG rearrangement: 11.5% GS = 6, 22.2% GS = 7, and 50% GS ≥ 8 tumors (P = 0.013). Double rearrangements were associated with higher levels of ERG mRNA (P = 0.04). Double rearrangement plus PTEN loss was detected in 0% GS = 6; 14.7% GS = 7, and 29.4% GS ≥ 8 tumors (P = 0.032). Furthermore, this triple change was present in 19.2% stage T3-4 but not in any of stage T2 tumors (P = 0.05). No relationship was found with PSA progression-free survival. Single TMPRSS2-ERG translocation is associated with low grade PrCa. Subsequent development of SLC45A3-ERG results in higher ERG expression. The combination of double rearrangement plus PTEN loss, according to our series, is never found in low grade, low stage tumors. These findings could be potentially useful in therapeutic decision making in PrCa. Tumors with combined TMPRSS2-ERG/SLC45A3-ERG fusions plus PTEN loss should be excluded from watchful waiting and are candidates for intensive therapy. Prostate 76:854-865, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Strigolactones: a novel class of phytohormones that inhibit the growth and survival of breast cancer cells and breast cancer stem-like enriched mammosphere cells.

    PubMed

    Pollock, C B; Koltai, H; Kapulnik, Y; Prandi, C; Yarden, R I

    2012-08-01

    Several naturally occurring phytohormones have shown enormous potential in the prevention and treatment of variety of different type of cancers. Strigolactones (SLs) are a novel class of plant hormones produced in roots and regulate new above ground shoot branching, by inhibiting self-renewal of undifferentiated meristem cells. Here, we study the effects of six synthetic SL analogs on breast cancer cell lines growth and survival. We show that SL analogs are able to inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis of breast cancer cells but to a much lesser extent "non-cancer" lines. Given the therapeutic problem of cancer recurrence which is hypothesized to be due to drug resistant cancer stem cells, we also tested the ability of SL analogs to inhibit the growth of mammosphere cultures that are typically enriched with cancer stem-like cells. We show that SLs are potent inhibitors of self-renewal and survival of breast cancer cell lines grown as mammospheres and even a short exposure leads to irreversible effects on mammosphere dissociation and cell death. Immunoblot analysis revealed that SLs analogs induce activation of the stress response mediated by both P38 and JNK1/2 MAPK modules and inhibits PI3K/AKT activation. Taken together this study indicates that SLs may be promising anticancer agents whose activities may be achieved through modulation of stress and survival signaling pathways.

  10. Chemopreventive effect of selenium-enriched Japanese radish sprout against breast cancer induced by 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene in rats.

    PubMed

    Yamanoshita, Osamu; Ichihara, Shu; Hama, Hidetoshi; Ichihara, Gaku; Chiba, Momoko; Kamijima, Michihiro; Takeda, Iwao; Nakajima, Tamie

    2007-06-01

    Breast cancer is one of the major cancers in women, and dietary intake must be controlled to prevent it. Selenium (Se), especially Se compound in vegetables, is thought to be a promising chemopreventive dietary ingredient for preventing breast cancer. In this study, we developed Se-enriched Japanese radish sprout using a special Se-additional fertilizer, and identified the Se chemical forms. The newly developed Se-enriched sprout is produced within a week by the tank forming method, and the major chemical form was identified as Se-methylselenocysteine (MeSeCys) (80%). Then, the chemopreventive effects of the Se-enriched sprout were investigated using Sprague-Dawley female rats with mammary cancer, induced by a single oral dose of 10 mg or 14 mg of 7, 12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA). Mammary tumors were found in 11, 16 and 2 rats treated with DMBA and thereafter fed the basal (n = 34), sprout-added basal (n = 30) and Se-enriched sprout-added test diets (n = 30), respectively. The incidence of mammary tumors was significantly lower in the Se-enriched sprout-added test diet group (7%) than in the basal diet group (32%) or sprout-added basal diet group (53%). In contrast, no significant difference was detected in the numbers and incidence of the tumor between the basal diet group and Se-enriched sprout-added test diet group before DMBA-dosing. These results suggest that the diet supplement of Se-enriched sprout after DMBA-dosing provides a significant chemoprevention against chemical-induced mammary cancer. Thus, Se-enriched sprout may be a useful dietary ingredient for preventing breast cancer.

  11. Enrichment of prostate cancer stem-like cells from human prostate cancer cell lines by culture in serum-free medium and chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Huang, Xing; Zheng, Xinmin; Wang, Xinghuan; Li, Shiwen; Zhang, Lin; Yang, Zhonghua; Xia, Zhiping

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of rare subpopulations of cancer stem cells (CSCs) has created a new focus in cancer research. As CSCs demonstrate resistance to chemoradiation therapy relative to other cancer cells, this allows the enrichment of CSC populations by killing apoptosis-susceptible cancer cells. In this study, three commonly used human prostate cancer (PCa) cell lines (DU145, PC-3 and LNCaP) were examined for their expression of the putative stem cell markers CD133 and CD44 via flow cytometric analysis. Under normal culture conditions, CD133(+)/CD44(+) cells were only present in the DU145 cell line, and comprised only a minor percentage (0.1% ± 0.01%) of the total population. However, the proportion of these CD133(+)/CD44(+) prostate CSCs could be increased in these cell lines via culture in serum-free medium (SFM), or through chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Indeed, after culture in SFM, the proportion of CD133(+)/CD44(+) cells in DU145 and PC-3 had increased to 10.3% and 3.0%, respectively. Moreover, the proportion had increased to 9.8% enriched by chemotherapy and 3.5% by radiotherapy in DU145. Colony-formation tests, cell invasion assays, and tumor xenografts in BALB/c nude mice were used to evaluate the stem cell properties of CD133(+)/CD44(+) PCa cells that were isolated via fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). CD133(+)/CD44(+) cells had an enhanced colony-formation capability and invasive ability in vitro, and displayed greater tumorigenic properties in vivo. These results demonstrate the presence of CD133(+)/CD44(+) prostate CSCs in established PCa cell lines and that populations of these cells can be enriched by culture in SFM or chemoradiotherapy. Finding novel therapies to override chemoradiation resistance in the prostate CSCs is the key to improve long-term results in PCa management.

  12. Krüppel-Like Factor 4 Acts as an Oncogene in Colon Cancer Stem Cell-Enriched Spheroid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Qinghua; Tan, Jun; Yue, Zhongyi; Chen, Jinhuang; Xi, Hailin; Li, Jie; Zheng, Hai

    2013-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), a rare population in any type of cancers, including colon cancer, are tumorigenic. It has been thought that CSCs are responsible for cancer recurrence, metastasis, and drug resistance. Isolating CSCs in colon cancers is challenging, and thus the molecular mechanism regulating the self-renewing and differentiation of CSCs remains unknown. We cultured DLD-1 cells, one of types of cells derived from colon cancers, in serum-free medium to obtain spheroid cells. These cells possessed the characteristics of CSCs, with the expression of CD133, CD166, Lgr5, and ALDH1, higher capacities of chemo-resistance, migration, invasion, and tumorigenicity in vitro and in vivo than the adherent DLD-1 cells. Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) is essential factor for maintaining self-renewal of adult and embryonic stem cells. It has been used to induce pluripotent stem cells (iPS) from somatic cells. Since KLF4 is expressed in colon cancer cells, we investigated its role in spheroid cells isolated from DLD-1 cells and found that KLF4 was overexpressed only in spheroid cells and reducing the expression of KLF4 by short-hairpin RNA significantly decreased the capacities of these cells to resist the chemicals, migrate, invade, and generate tumors in vitro and in vivo. The spheroid cells with reduced KLF4 expression also had decreased expression of CSCs markers and mesenchymal markers. Taken together, culturing DLD-1 cells in serum-free medium enriches CSCs and the expression of KLF4 is essential for the characteristics of CSCs in DLD-1; thus KLF4 can be a potential therapeutic target for treating colon cancer. PMID:23418515

  13. The Side Population in Human Lung Cancer Cell Line NCI-H460 Is Enriched in Stem-Like Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yang; Fu, Xuelian; Hua, Yong; Han, Yang; Lu, Ying; Wang, Junchen

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer is among the most lethal malignancies with a high metastasis and recurrence rate. Recent studies indicate that tumors contain a subset of stem-like cancer cells that possess certain stem cell properties. Herein, we used Hoechst 33342 dye efflux assay and flow cytometry to isolate and characterize the side population (SP) cells from human lung cancer cell line NCI-H460 (H460). We show that the H460 SP cells harbor stem-like cells as they can readily form anchorage-independent floating spheres, possess great proliferative potential, and exhibit enhanced tumorigenicity. Importantly, the H460 SP cells were able to self-renew both in vitro and in vivo. Finally, we show that the H460 SP cells preferentially express ABCG2 as well as SMO, a critical mediator of the Hedgehog (HH) signaling, which seems to play an important role in H460 lung cancer cells as its blockage using Cyclopamine greatly inhibits cell-cycle progression. Collectively, our results lend further support to the existence of lung cancer stem cells and also implicate HH signaling in regulating large-cell lung cancer (stem) cells. PMID:22428030

  14. The side population in human lung cancer cell line NCI-H460 is enriched in stem-like cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yang; Fu, Xuelian; Hua, Yong; Han, Yang; Lu, Ying; Wang, Junchen

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer is among the most lethal malignancies with a high metastasis and recurrence rate. Recent studies indicate that tumors contain a subset of stem-like cancer cells that possess certain stem cell properties. Herein, we used Hoechst 33342 dye efflux assay and flow cytometry to isolate and characterize the side population (SP) cells from human lung cancer cell line NCI-H460 (H460). We show that the H460 SP cells harbor stem-like cells as they can readily form anchorage-independent floating spheres, possess great proliferative potential, and exhibit enhanced tumorigenicity. Importantly, the H460 SP cells were able to self-renew both in vitro and in vivo. Finally, we show that the H460 SP cells preferentially express ABCG2 as well as SMO, a critical mediator of the Hedgehog (HH) signaling, which seems to play an important role in H460 lung cancer cells as its blockage using Cyclopamine greatly inhibits cell-cycle progression. Collectively, our results lend further support to the existence of lung cancer stem cells and also implicate HH signaling in regulating large-cell lung cancer (stem) cells.

  15. The mortality and cancer morbidity experience of workers at the Capenhurst uranium enrichment facility 1946-95.

    PubMed

    McGeoghegan, D; Binks, K

    2000-12-01

    The results presented here contain the follow-up of the cohort of workers ever employed at the Capenhurst site of British Nuclear Fuels plc or its predecessors between 1946 and 1995. The main activity of the plant is isotopic, 235U, enrichment of uranium. The study cohort consists of 12,540 employees and contains 334,473 person-years of follow up. This is a relatively mature cohort, with a mean follow-up period of 26.7 years, that has been exposed to low levels of radiation. The collective external radiation dose received by the 3244 radiation workers was 31.95 person-sieverts, with mean cumulative dose 9.85 mSv. To the end of 1995 there have been 3841 deaths recorded for this cohort, 585 of which were amongst radiation workers. The standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) for all causes were significantly low, 83 and 91 respectively, for radiation and non-radiation workers, indicating the usual 'healthy worker' effect. The cancer mortality was less than that expected, though not significantly so, with SMRs for all cancers of 88 and 97, for radiation and non-radiation workers respectively. The cancer registration rates were significantly low, with standardised registration ratios (SRRs) for all cancers of 82 and 88, for radiation and non-radiation workers respectively. An association between bladder cancer registrations and cumulative external radiation exposure was noted when the cumulative external dose was lagged by 20 years.

  16. Human dendritic cell subsets

    PubMed Central

    Collin, Matthew; McGovern, Naomi; Haniffa, Muzlifah

    2013-01-01

    Summary Dendritic cells are highly adapted to their role of presenting antigen and directing immune responses. Developmental studies indicate that DCs originate independently from monocytes and tissue macrophages. Emerging evidence also suggests that distinct subsets of DCs have intrinsic differences that lead to functional specialisation in the generation of immunity. Comparative studies are now allowing many of these properties to be more fully understood in the context of human immunology. PMID:23621371

  17. CALIPSO Search and Subset Tool

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2017-03-10

    Description:  Search and subset CALIPSO Level 1 and select Level 2 Lidar data Customization Options Search and subset by date, time, and geolocation Subset by parameter and ... 2 V4.10 datasets Details:  CALIPSO Search and Subset Tool Screenshot:  ...

  18. Enriched Environment Inhibits Mouse Pancreatic Cancer Growth and Down-regulates the Expression of Mitochondria-related Genes in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guohua; Gan, Yu; Fan, Yingchao; Wu, Yufeng; Lin, Hechun; Song, Yanfang; Cai, Xiaojin; Yu, Xiang; Pan, Weihong; Yao, Ming; Gu, Jianren; Tu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Psycho-social stress has been suggested to influence the development of cancer, but it remains poorly defined with regard to pancreatic cancer, a lethal malignancy with few effective treatment modalities. In this study, we sought to investigate the impacts of enriched environment (EE) housing, a rodent model of “eustress”, on the growth of mouse pancreatic cancer, and to explore the potential underlying mechanisms through gene expression profiling. The EE mice showed significantly reduced tumor weights in both subcutaneous (53%) and orthotopic (41%) models, while each single component of EE (inanimate stimulation, social stimulation or physical exercise) was not profound enough to achieve comparative anti-tumor effects as EE. The integrative transcriptomic and proteomic analysis revealed that in response to EE, a total of 129 genes in the tumors showed differential expression at both the mRNA and protein levels. The differentially expressed genes were mostly localized to the mitochondria and enriched in the citrate cycle and oxidative phosphorylation pathways. Interestingly, nearly all of the mitochondria-related genes were down-regulated by EE. Our data have provided experimental evidence in favor of the application of positive stress or of benign environmental stimulation in pancreatic cancer therapy. PMID:25598223

  19. Potential usefulness of an EPA-enriched nutritional supplement on chemotherapy tolerability in cancer patients without overt malnutrition.

    PubMed

    Trabal, Joan; Leyes, Pere; Forga, Maria; Maurel, Joan

    2010-01-01

    To assess the effect of an intervention with an Eicosapentaenoic Acid-enriched oral nutritional supplement on chemotherapy tolerability in patients with advanced colorectal cancer. Thirteen patients diagnosed with stage IV colorectal cancer were included. Patients in the experimental group received 2 packs of supplement per day during 12 weeks plus dietary counseling. The control group only received dietary counseling. Patients were assessed for nutritional status, dietary intake, health related quality of life (HRQOL) and chemotherapy compliance. Only patients in the supplemented group significantly increased their weight after the intervention. They also had better scores in important domains of HRQOL, compared to controls. Although not statistically significant, the supplemented group did not experience interruptions in their chemotherapy treatment compared to the control group, with more interruptions due to toxicity. The present study, although limited by sample size, points out towards a positive effect of the intervention on chemotherapy tolerability.

  20. Imputation and subset-based association analysis across different cancer types identifies multiple independent risk loci in the TERT-CLPTM1L region on chromosome 5p15.33.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaoming; Zhu, Bin; Zhang, Mingfeng; Parikh, Hemang; Jia, Jinping; Chung, Charles C; Sampson, Joshua N; Hoskins, Jason W; Hutchinson, Amy; Burdette, Laurie; Ibrahim, Abdisamad; Hautman, Christopher; Raj, Preethi S; Abnet, Christian C; Adjei, Andrew A; Ahlbom, Anders; Albanes, Demetrius; Allen, Naomi E; Ambrosone, Christine B; Aldrich, Melinda; Amiano, Pilar; Amos, Christopher; Andersson, Ulrika; Andriole, Gerald; Andrulis, Irene L; Arici, Cecilia; Arslan, Alan A; Austin, Melissa A; Baris, Dalsu; Barkauskas, Donald A; Bassig, Bryan A; Beane Freeman, Laura E; Berg, Christine D; Berndt, Sonja I; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Biritwum, Richard B; Black, Amanda; Blot, William; Boeing, Heiner; Boffetta, Paolo; Bolton, Kelly; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Bracci, Paige M; Brennan, Paul; Brinton, Louise A; Brotzman, Michelle; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Buring, Julie E; Butler, Mary Ann; Cai, Qiuyin; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Canzian, Federico; Cao, Guangwen; Caporaso, Neil E; Carrato, Alfredo; Carreon, Tania; Carta, Angela; Chang, Gee-Chen; Chang, I-Shou; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Che, Xu; Chen, Chien-Jen; Chen, Chih-Yi; Chen, Chung-Hsing; Chen, Constance; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Chen, Yuh-Min; Chokkalingam, Anand P; Chu, Lisa W; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Colditz, Graham A; Colt, Joanne S; Conti, David; Cook, Michael B; Cortessis, Victoria K; Crawford, E David; Cussenot, Olivier; Davis, Faith G; De Vivo, Immaculata; Deng, Xiang; Ding, Ti; Dinney, Colin P; Di Stefano, Anna Luisa; Diver, W Ryan; Duell, Eric J; Elena, Joanne W; Fan, Jin-Hu; Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Feychting, Maria; Figueroa, Jonine D; Flanagan, Adrienne M; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Freedman, Neal D; Fridley, Brooke L; Fuchs, Charles S; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Gallinger, Steven; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gapstur, Susan M; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Garcia-Closas, Reina; Gastier-Foster, Julie M; Gaziano, J Michael; Gerhard, Daniela S; Giffen, Carol A; Giles, Graham G; Gillanders, Elizabeth M; Giovannucci, Edward L; Goggins, Michael; Gokgoz, Nalan; Goldstein, Alisa M; Gonzalez, Carlos; Gorlick, Richard; Greene, Mark H; Gross, Myron; Grossman, H Barton; Grubb, Robert; Gu, Jian; Guan, Peng; Haiman, Christopher A; Hallmans, Goran; Hankinson, Susan E; Harris, Curtis C; Hartge, Patricia; Hattinger, Claudia; Hayes, Richard B; He, Qincheng; Helman, Lee; Henderson, Brian E; Henriksson, Roger; Hoffman-Bolton, Judith; Hohensee, Chancellor; Holly, Elizabeth A; Hong, Yun-Chul; Hoover, Robert N; Hosgood, H Dean; Hsiao, Chin-Fu; Hsing, Ann W; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Hu, Nan; Hu, Wei; Hu, Zhibin; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Hunter, David J; Inskip, Peter D; Ito, Hidemi; Jacobs, Eric J; Jacobs, Kevin B; Jenab, Mazda; Ji, Bu-Tian; Johansen, Christoffer; Johansson, Mattias; Johnson, Alison; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kamat, Ashish M; Kamineni, Aruna; Karagas, Margaret; Khanna, Chand; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Christopher; Kim, In-Sam; Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Yeul Hong; Kim, Young-Chul; Kim, Young Tae; Kang, Chang Hyun; Jung, Yoo Jin; Kitahara, Cari M; Klein, Alison P; Klein, Robert; Kogevinas, Manolis; Koh, Woon-Puay; Kohno, Takashi; Kolonel, Laurence N; Kooperberg, Charles; Kratz, Christian P; Krogh, Vittorio; Kunitoh, Hideo; Kurtz, Robert C; Kurucu, Nilgun; Lan, Qing; Lathrop, Mark; Lau, Ching C; Lecanda, Fernando; Lee, Kyoung-Mu; Lee, Maxwell P; Le Marchand, Loic; Lerner, Seth P; Li, Donghui; Liao, Linda M; Lim, Wei-Yen; Lin, Dongxin; Lin, Jie; Lindstrom, Sara; Linet, Martha S; Lissowska, Jolanta; Liu, Jianjun; Ljungberg, Börje; Lloreta, Josep; Lu, Daru; Ma, Jing; Malats, Nuria; Mannisto, Satu; Marina, Neyssa; Mastrangelo, Giuseppe; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGlynn, Katherine A; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; McNeill, Lorna H; McWilliams, Robert R; Melin, Beatrice S; Meltzer, Paul S; Mensah, James E; Miao, Xiaoping; Michaud, Dominique S; Mondul, Alison M; Moore, Lee E; Muir, Kenneth; Niwa, Shelley; Olson, Sara H; Orr, Nick; Panico, Salvatore; Park, Jae Yong; Patel, Alpa V; Patino-Garcia, Ana; Pavanello, Sofia; Peeters, Petra H M; Peplonska, Beata; Peters, Ulrike; Petersen, Gloria M; Picci, Piero; Pike, Malcolm C; Porru, Stefano; Prescott, Jennifer; Pu, Xia; Purdue, Mark P; Qiao, You-Lin; Rajaraman, Preetha; Riboli, Elio; Risch, Harvey A; Rodabough, Rebecca J; Rothman, Nathaniel; Ruder, Avima M; Ryu, Jeong-Seon; Sanson, Marc; Schned, Alan; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Schwartz, Ann G; Schwartz, Kendra L; Schwenn, Molly; Scotlandi, Katia; Seow, Adeline; Serra, Consol; Serra, Massimo; Sesso, Howard D; Severi, Gianluca; Shen, Hongbing; Shen, Min; Shete, Sanjay; Shiraishi, Kouya; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Siddiq, Afshan; Sierrasesumaga, Luis; Sierri, Sabina; Loon Sihoe, Alan Dart; Silverman, Debra T; Simon, Matthias; Southey, Melissa C; Spector, Logan; Spitz, Margaret; Stampfer, Meir; Stattin, Par; Stern, Mariana C; Stevens, Victoria L; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z; Stram, Daniel O; Strom, Sara S; Su, Wu-Chou; Sund, Malin; Sung, Sook Whan; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tan, Wen; Tanaka, Hideo; Tang, Wei; Tang, Ze-Zhang; Tardon, Adonina; Tay, Evelyn; Taylor, Philip R; Tettey, Yao; Thomas, David M; Tirabosco, Roberto; Tjonneland, Anne; Tobias, Geoffrey S; Toro, Jorge R; Travis, Ruth C; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Troisi, Rebecca; Truelove, Ann; Tsai, Ying-Huang; Tucker, Margaret A; Tumino, Rosario; Van Den Berg, David; Van Den Eeden, Stephen K; Vermeulen, Roel; Vineis, Paolo; Visvanathan, Kala; Vogel, Ulla; Wang, Chaoyu; Wang, Chengfeng; Wang, Junwen; Wang, Sophia S; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Wheeler, William; White, Emily; Wiencke, John K; Wolk, Alicja; Wolpin, Brian M; Wong, Maria Pik; Wrensch, Margaret; Wu, Chen; Wu, Tangchun; Wu, Xifeng; Wu, Yi-Long; Wunder, Jay S; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Xu, Jun; Yang, Hannah P; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Yatabe, Yasushi; Ye, Yuanqing; Yeboah, Edward D; Yin, Zhihua; Ying, Chen; Yu, Chong-Jen; Yu, Kai; Yuan, Jian-Min; Zanetti, Krista A; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zheng, Wei; Zhou, Baosen; Mirabello, Lisa; Savage, Sharon A; Kraft, Peter; Chanock, Stephen J; Yeager, Meredith; Landi, Maria Terese; Shi, Jianxin; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Amundadottir, Laufey T

    2014-12-15

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have mapped risk alleles for at least 10 distinct cancers to a small region of 63 000 bp on chromosome 5p15.33. This region harbors the TERT and CLPTM1L genes; the former encodes the catalytic subunit of telomerase reverse transcriptase and the latter may play a role in apoptosis. To investigate further the genetic architecture of common susceptibility alleles in this region, we conducted an agnostic subset-based meta-analysis (association analysis based on subsets) across six distinct cancers in 34 248 cases and 45 036 controls. Based on sequential conditional analysis, we identified as many as six independent risk loci marked by common single-nucleotide polymorphisms: five in the TERT gene (Region 1: rs7726159, P = 2.10 × 10(-39); Region 3: rs2853677, P = 3.30 × 10(-36) and PConditional = 2.36 × 10(-8); Region 4: rs2736098, P = 3.87 × 10(-12) and PConditional = 5.19 × 10(-6), Region 5: rs13172201, P = 0.041 and PConditional = 2.04 × 10(-6); and Region 6: rs10069690, P = 7.49 × 10(-15) and PConditional = 5.35 × 10(-7)) and one in the neighboring CLPTM1L gene (Region 2: rs451360; P = 1.90 × 10(-18) and PConditional = 7.06 × 10(-16)). Between three and five cancers mapped to each independent locus with both risk-enhancing and protective effects. Allele-specific effects on DNA methylation were seen for a subset of risk loci, indicating that methylation and subsequent effects on gene expression may contribute to the biology of risk variants on 5p15.33. Our results provide strong support for extensive pleiotropy across this region of 5p15.33, to an extent not previously observed in other cancer susceptibility loci.

  1. Investigation of Human Cancers for Retrovirus by Low-Stringency Target Enrichment and High-Throughput Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Vinner, Lasse; Mourier, Tobias; Friis-Nielsen, Jens; Gniadecki, Robert; Dybkaer, Karen; Rosenberg, Jacob; Langhoff, Jill Levin; Cruz, David Flores Santa; Fonager, Jannik; Izarzugaza, Jose M G; Gupta, Ramneek; Sicheritz-Ponten, Thomas; Brunak, Søren; Willerslev, Eske; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Hansen, Anders Johannes

    2015-08-19

    Although nearly one fifth of all human cancers have an infectious aetiology, the causes for the majority of cancers remain unexplained. Despite the enormous data output from high-throughput shotgun sequencing, viral DNA in a clinical sample typically constitutes a proportion of host DNA that is too small to be detected. Sequence variation among virus genomes complicates application of sequence-specific, and highly sensitive, PCR methods. Therefore, we aimed to develop and characterize a method that permits sensitive detection of sequences despite considerable variation. We demonstrate that our low-stringency in-solution hybridization method enables detection of <100 viral copies. Furthermore, distantly related proviral sequences may be enriched by orders of magnitude, enabling discovery of hitherto unknown viral sequences by high-throughput sequencing. The sensitivity was sufficient to detect retroviral sequences in clinical samples. We used this method to conduct an investigation for novel retrovirus in samples from three cancer types. In accordance with recent studies our investigation revealed no retroviral infections in human B-cell lymphoma cells, cutaneous T-cell lymphoma or colorectal cancer biopsies. Nonetheless, our generally applicable method makes sensitive detection possible and permits sequencing of distantly related sequences from complex material.

  2. Multifaceted enrichment analysis of RNA–RNA crosstalk reveals cooperating micro-societies in human colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mazza, Tommaso; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Fusilli, Caterina; Capocefalo, Daniele; Panza, Anna; Biagini, Tommaso; Castellana, Stefano; Gentile, Annamaria; De Cata, Angelo; Palumbo, Orazio; Stallone, Raffaella; Rubino, Rosa; Carella, Massimo; Piepoli, Ada

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in the balance of mRNA and microRNA (miRNA) expression profiles contribute to the onset and development of colorectal cancer. The regulatory functions of individual miRNA-gene pairs are widely acknowledged, but group effects are largely unexplored. We performed an integrative analysis of mRNA–miRNA and miRNA–miRNA interactions using high-throughput mRNA and miRNA expression profiles obtained from matched specimens of human colorectal cancer tissue and adjacent non-tumorous mucosa. This investigation resulted in a hypernetwork-based model, whose functional backbone was fulfilled by tight micro-societies of miRNAs. These proved to modulate several genes that are known to control a set of significantly enriched cancer-enhancer and cancer-protection biological processes, and that an array of upstream regulatory analyses demonstrated to be dependent on miR-145, a cell cycle and MAPK signaling cascade master regulator. In conclusion, we reveal miRNA-gene clusters and gene families with close functional relationships and highlight the role of miR-145 as potent upstream regulator of a complex RNA–RNA crosstalk, which mechanistically modulates several signaling pathways and regulatory circuits that when deranged are relevant to the changes occurring in colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:27067546

  3. Investigation of Human Cancers for Retrovirus by Low-Stringency Target Enrichment and High-Throughput Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Vinner, Lasse; Mourier, Tobias; Friis-Nielsen, Jens; Gniadecki, Robert; Dybkaer, Karen; Rosenberg, Jacob; Langhoff, Jill Levin; Cruz, David Flores Santa; Fonager, Jannik; Izarzugaza, Jose M. G.; Gupta, Ramneek; Sicheritz-Ponten, Thomas; Brunak, Søren; Willerslev, Eske; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Hansen, Anders Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Although nearly one fifth of all human cancers have an infectious aetiology, the causes for the majority of cancers remain unexplained. Despite the enormous data output from high-throughput shotgun sequencing, viral DNA in a clinical sample typically constitutes a proportion of host DNA that is too small to be detected. Sequence variation among virus genomes complicates application of sequence-specific, and highly sensitive, PCR methods. Therefore, we aimed to develop and characterize a method that permits sensitive detection of sequences despite considerable variation. We demonstrate that our low-stringency in-solution hybridization method enables detection of <100 viral copies. Furthermore, distantly related proviral sequences may be enriched by orders of magnitude, enabling discovery of hitherto unknown viral sequences by high-throughput sequencing. The sensitivity was sufficient to detect retroviral sequences in clinical samples. We used this method to conduct an investigation for novel retrovirus in samples from three cancer types. In accordance with recent studies our investigation revealed no retroviral infections in human B-cell lymphoma cells, cutaneous T-cell lymphoma or colorectal cancer biopsies. Nonetheless, our generally applicable method makes sensitive detection possible and permits sequencing of distantly related sequences from complex material. PMID:26285800

  4. Multifaceted enrichment analysis of RNA-RNA crosstalk reveals cooperating micro-societies in human colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Mazza, Tommaso; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Fusilli, Caterina; Capocefalo, Daniele; Panza, Anna; Biagini, Tommaso; Castellana, Stefano; Gentile, Annamaria; De Cata, Angelo; Palumbo, Orazio; Stallone, Raffaella; Rubino, Rosa; Carella, Massimo; Piepoli, Ada

    2016-05-19

    Alterations in the balance of mRNA and microRNA (miRNA) expression profiles contribute to the onset and development of colorectal cancer. The regulatory functions of individual miRNA-gene pairs are widely acknowledged, but group effects are largely unexplored. We performed an integrative analysis of mRNA-miRNA and miRNA-miRNA interactions using high-throughput mRNA and miRNA expression profiles obtained from matched specimens of human colorectal cancer tissue and adjacent non-tumorous mucosa. This investigation resulted in a hypernetwork-based model, whose functional backbone was fulfilled by tight micro-societies of miRNAs. These proved to modulate several genes that are known to control a set of significantly enriched cancer-enhancer and cancer-protection biological processes, and that an array of upstream regulatory analyses demonstrated to be dependent on miR-145, a cell cycle and MAPK signaling cascade master regulator. In conclusion, we reveal miRNA-gene clusters and gene families with close functional relationships and highlight the role of miR-145 as potent upstream regulator of a complex RNA-RNA crosstalk, which mechanistically modulates several signaling pathways and regulatory circuits that when deranged are relevant to the changes occurring in colorectal carcinogenesis.

  5. Isolation and enrichment of circulating biomarkers for cancer screening, detection, and diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Kyung-A; Kim, Junmoo; Gwak, Hogyeong; Jung, Hyo-Il

    2016-01-21

    Much research has been performed over the past several decades in an attempt to conquer cancer. Tissue biopsy is the conventional method for gathering biological materials to analyze cancer and has contributed greatly to the understanding of cancer. However, this method is limited because it is time-consuming (requires tissue sectioning, staining, and pathological analysis), costly, provides scarce starting materials for multiple tests, and is painful. A liquid biopsy, which analyzes cancer-derived materials from various body fluids using a minimally invasive procedure, is more practical for real-time monitoring of disease progression than tissue biopsy. Biomarkers analyzable through liquid biopsy include circulating tumor cells (CTCs), exosomes, circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA), miRNA, and proteins. Research on CTCs has been actively conducted because CTCs provide information on the whole cell, unlike the other biomarkers mentioned above. However, owing to the rarity and heterogeneity of CTCs, CTC research faces many critical concerns. Although exosomes and cfDNA have some technical challenges, they are being highlighted as new target materials. That is because they also have genetic information on cancers. Even though the number of exosomes and cfDNA from early stage cancer patients are similar to healthy individuals, they are present in high concentrations after metastasis. In this article, we review several technologies for material analyses of cancer, discuss the critical concerns based on hands-on experience, and describe future directions for cancer screening, detection, and diagnostics.

  6. Evaluation of sulfur isotopic enrichment of urine metabolites for the differentiation of healthy and prostate cancer mice after the administration of (34)S labelled yeast.

    PubMed

    Galilea San Blas, Oscar; Moreno Sanz, Fernando; Herrero Espílez, Pilar; Sainz Menéndez, Rosa María; Mayo Barallo, Juan Carlos; Marchante-Gayón, Juan Manuel; García Alonso, José Ignacio

    2017-01-01

    Sulfur isotopic enrichment of urine metabolites in healthy and prostate cancer mice using (34)S enriched yeast and High Performance Liquid Chromatography coupled to Multicollector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (HPLC-MC-ICP-MS) has been evaluated. A 30 weeks experiment (since the eleventh to the fortieth week of life) was carried out collecting the urine of three healthy mice and three transgenic mice with prostate cancer during 24h after a single oral administration of a (34)S enriched yeast slurry. The isotopic enrichment of different sulphur metabolites was monitored by coupling a C18 reverse phase HPLC column with a multicollector ICP-MS using a membrane desolvating system. Quantification of sulfur in the chromatographic peaks was carried out by post-column isotope dilution using a (33)S enriched spike. Differences between the (34)S enrichment in the urine metabolites of healthy and prostate cancer mice were found from the beginning of the disease. Both populations could be differentiated using a principal component analysis (PCA). Finally, 7 unknown mice were correctly classified in each population using a linear discriminant analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Natural and synthetic progestins enrich cancer stem cell-like cells in hormone-responsive human breast cancer cell populations in vitro.

    PubMed

    Goyette, Sandy; Liang, Yayun; Mafuvadze, Benford; Cook, Matthew T; Munir, Moiz; Hyder, Salman M

    2017-01-01

    Clinical trials and studies have shown that combination estrogen/progestin hormone replacement therapy, but not estrogen therapy alone or placebo, increases breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women. Using animal models, we have previously shown that both natural and synthetic progestins (including medroxyprogesterone acetate [MPA], a synthetic progestin used widely in the clinical setting) accelerate the development of breast tumors in vivo and increase their metastasis to lymph nodes. Based on these observations, we have hypothesized that progestin-induced breast cancer tumor growth and metastasis may be mediated by an enrichment of the cancer stem cell (CSC) pool. In this study, we used T47-D and BT-474 hormone-responsive human breast cancer cells to examine the effects of progestin on phenotypic and functional markers of CSCs in vitro. Both natural and synthetic progestins (10 nM) significantly increased protein expression of CD44, an important CSC marker in tumor cells. MPA increased the levels of both CD44 variants v3 and v6 associated with stem cell functions. This induction of CD44 was blocked by the antiprogestin RU-486, suggesting that this process is progesterone receptor (PR) dependent. CD44 induction was chiefly progestin dependent. Because RU-486 can bind other steroid receptors, we treated PR-negative T47-DCO-Y cells with MPA and found that MPA failed to induce CD44 protein expression, confirming that PR is essential for progestin-mediated CD44 induction in T47-D cells. Further, MPA treatment of T47-D cells significantly increased the activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), another CSC marker. Finally, two synthetic progestins, MPA and norethindrone, significantly increased the ability of T47-D cells to form mammospheres, suggesting that enrichment of the CD44(high), ALDH(bright) subpopulation of cancer cells induced by MPA exposure is of functional significance. Based on our observations, we contend that exposure of breast cancer cells to

  8. An enhancer from the 8q24 prostate cancer risk region is sufficient to direct reporter gene expression to a subset of prostate stem-like epithelial cells in transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Ting, Man-Chun; Liao, Chun-Peng; Yan, Chunli; Jia, Li; Groshen, Susan; Frenkel, Baruch; Roy-Burman, Pradip; Coetzee, Gerhard A.; Maxson, Robert

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Regions in the 8q24 gene desert contribute significantly to the risk of prostate cancer and other adult cancers. This region contains several DNA regions with enhancer activity in cultured cells. One such segment, histone acetylation peak 10 (AcP10), contains a risk single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) that is significantly associated with the pathogenesis of colorectal, prostate and other cancers. The mechanism by which AcP10 influences cancer risk remains unknown. Here we show that AcP10 contains a sequence that is highly conserved across terrestrial vertebrates and is capable in transgenic mice of directing reporter gene expression to a subset of prostate lumenal epithelial cells. These cells include a small population of Nkx3.1-positive cells that persist even after androgen ablation. Castration-resistant Nkx3.1-positive (CARN) cells were shown by others to function both as stem cells and cells of origin of prostate cancer. Our results thus provide a mechanism by which AcP10 could influence prostate cancer risk. PMID:22279083

  9. Prostate Specific or Enriched Genes as Composite Biomarkers for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    research: To evaluate prostate specific genes such as WDR19, NDRG1 , TAGLN2 as diagnosis and prognosis markers for prostate cancers. Major findings: (1) We...have determined that WDR19, NDRG1 are not as good a marker as PSA for prostate cancer stratification. (2) We developed a mouse antibody for a...optimize sandwich ELISA assays for WDR19, NDRG1 , or other novel prostate-specific biomarker candidates. During the past two years, we have evaluated the

  10. CERES Search and Subset Tool

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-06-24

    ... data granules using a high resolution spatial metadata database and directly accessing the archived data granules. Subset results are ... data granules using a high resolution spatial metadata database and directly accessing the archived data granules. Subset results are ...

  11. Development of a multiplexed assay for oral cancer candidate biomarkers using peptide immunoaffinity enrichment and targeted mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Yung-Chin; Chi, Lang-Ming; Chien, Kun-Yi; Chiang, Wei-Fan; Chen, Szu-Fan; Chuang, Yao-Ning; Lin, Shih-Yu; Wu, Chia-Chun; Chang, Ya-Ting; Chu, Lichieh Julie; Chen, Yi-Ting; Chia, Shu-Li; Chien, Chih-Yen; Chang, Kai-Ping; Chang, Yu-Sun; Yu, Jau-Song

    2017-08-18

    Oral cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide, and there are currently no biomarkers approved for aiding its management. Although many potential oral cancer biomarkers have been discovered, very few have been verified in body fluid specimens in parallel to evaluate their clinical utility. The lack of appropriate multiplexed assays for chosen targets represents one of the bottlenecks to achieving this goal. In the present study, we develop a peptide immunoaffinity enrichment-coupled multiple reaction monitoring-mass spectrometry (SISCAPA-MRM) assay for verifying multiple reported oral cancer biomarkers in saliva. We successfully produced 363 clones of mouse anti-peptide monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against 36 of 49 selected targets, and characterized useful mAbs against 24 targets in terms of their binding affinity for peptide antigens and immuno-capture ability. Comparative analyses revealed that an equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) cut-off value < 2.82 ´ 10-9 M could identify most clones with an immuno-capture recovery rate >5%. Using these mAbs, we assembled a 24-plex SISCAPA-MRM assay and optimized assay conditions in a 25-mg saliva matrix background. This multiplexed assay showed reasonable precision (median coefficient of variation, 7.16 to 32.09%), with lower limits of quantitation (LLOQ) of <10, 10–50, and >50 ng/ml for 14, 7 and 3 targets, respectively. When applied to a model saliva sample pooled from oral cancer patients, this assay could detect 19 targets at higher salivary levels than their LLOQs. Finally, we demonstrated the utility of this assay for quantification of multiple targets in individual saliva samples (20 healthy donors and 21 oral cancer patients), showing that levels of six targets were significantly altered in cancer compared with the control group. We propose that this assay could be used in future studies to compare the clinical utility of multiple oral cancer biomarker candidates in a

  12. Molecular Epidemiology of EGFR Mutations in Asian Patients with Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer of Adenocarcinoma Histology - Mainland China Subset Analysis of the PIONEER study.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yuankai; Li, Junling; Zhang, Shucai; Wang, Mengzhao; Yang, Shujun; Li, Ning; Wu, Gang; Liu, Wei; Liao, Guoqing; Cai, Kaican; Chen, Liang'an; Zheng, Meizhen; Yu, Ping; Wang, Xiuwen; Liu, Yunpeng; Guo, Qisen; Nie, Ligong; Liu, Jiwei; Han, Xiaohong

    2015-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations are the strongest response predictors to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) therapy, but knowledge of the EGFR mutation frequency on lung adenocarcinoma is still limited to retrospective studies. The PIONEER study (NCT01185314) is a prospective molecular epidemiology study in Asian patients with newly diagnosed advanced lung adenocarcinoma, aiming to prospectively analyze EGFR mutation status in IIIB/IV treatment-naïve lung adenocarcinomas in Asia. We report the mainland China subset results. Eligible patients (≥20 yrs old, IIIB/IV adenocarcinoma and treatment-naïve) were registered in 17 hospitals in mainland China. EGFR was tested for mutations by amplification refractory mutation system using biopsy samples. Demographic and clinical characteristics were collected for subgroup analyses. A total of 747 patients were registered. Successful EGFR mutation analysis was performed in 741, with an overall mutation rate of 50.2%. The EGFR active mutation rate is 48.0% (with 1.3% of combined active and resistance mutations). Tobacco use (>30 pack-year vs. 0-10 pack-year, OR 0.27, 95%CI: 0.17-0.42) and regional lymph nodes involvement (N3 vs. N0, OR 0.47, 95%CI: 0.29-0.76) were independent predictors of EGFR mutation in multivariate analysis. However, even in regular smokers, the EGFR mutation frequency was 35.3%. The EGFR mutation frequency was similar between diverse biopsy sites and techniques. The overall EGFR mutation frequency of the mainland China subset was 50.2%, independently associated with the intensity of tobacco use and regional lymph nodes involvement. The relatively high frequency of EGFR mutations in the mainland China subset suggest that any effort to obtain tissue sample for EGFR mutation testing should be encouraged.

  13. Enhanced enrichment of prostate cancer stem-like cells with miniaturized 3D culture in liquid core-hydrogel shell microcapsules

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jianhua; Lu, Xiongbin; Zynger, Debra L.; He, Xiaoming

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are rare subpopulations of cancer cells that are reported to be responsible for cancer resistance and metastasis associated with conventional cancer therapies. Therefore, effective enrichment/culture of CSCs is of importance to both the understanding and treatment of cancer. However, it usually takes approximately 10 days for the widely used conventional approach to enrich CSCs through the formation of CSC-containing aggregates. Here we report the time can be shortened to 2 days while obtaining prostate CSC-containing aggregates with better quality based on the expression of surface receptor markers, dye exclusion, gene and protein expression, and in vivo tumorigenicity. This is achieved by encapsulating and culturing human prostate cancer cells in the miniaturized 3D liquid core of microcapsules with an alginate hydrogel shell. The miniaturized 3D culture in core–shell microcapsules is an effective strategy for enriching/culturing CSCs in vitro to facilitate cancer research and therapy development. PMID:24952981

  14. [Analysis on clone in vitro and tumorigenic capacity in vivo of different subsets cells from the MCF-7 human breast cancer cell line].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi; Liu, Chun-ping; He, Yan-li; Tian, Yuan; Huang, Tao

    2008-07-01

    To investigate whether there are cancer stem cells in the MCF-7 human breast cancer cell line. Flow cytometry was applied to separate different subpopulation cells from MCF-7 cells, and their ability of clone in vitro and reconstruction tumor in vivo were determined. The ability of clone in vitro and reconstruction tumor in vivo were observed in some MCF-7 cells. Contrast with CD44+ CD24+ cells, the proportion of tumorigenic cancer cells in CD44+ CD24- cells is higher. Breast cancer stem cell exists in MCF-7 and it mainly locates the subpopulation of CD44+ CD24- cells, CD44+ CD24+ cell possibly is breast cancer progenitor cell.

  15. Exome enrichment and SOLiD sequencing of formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) prostate cancer tissue.

    PubMed

    Menon, Roopika; Deng, Mario; Boehm, Diana; Braun, Martin; Fend, Falko; Boehm, Detlef; Biskup, Saskia; Perner, Sven

    2012-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have revolutionized cancer research allowing the comprehensive study of cancer using high throughput deep sequencing methodologies. These methods detect genomic alterations, nucleotide substitutions, insertions, deletions and copy number alterations. SOLiD (Sequencing by Oligonucleotide Ligation and Detection, Life Technologies) is a promising technology generating billions of 50 bp sequencing reads. This robust technique, successfully applied in gene identification, might be helpful in detecting novel genes associated with cancer initiation and progression using formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissue. This study's aim was to compare the validity of whole exome sequencing of fresh-frozen vs. FFPE tumor tissue by normalization to normal prostatic FFPE tissue, obtained from the same patient. One primary fresh-frozen sample, corresponding FFPE prostate cancer sample and matched adjacent normal prostatic tissue was subjected to exome sequencing. The sequenced reads were mapped and compared. Our study was the first to show comparable exome sequencing results between FFPE and corresponding fresh-frozen cancer tissues using SOLiD sequencing. A prior study has been conducted comparing the validity of sequencing of FFPE vs. fresh frozen samples using other NGS platforms. Our validation further proves that FFPE material is a reliable source of material for whole exome sequencing.

  16. Exome Enrichment and SOLiD Sequencing of Formalin Fixed Paraffin Embedded (FFPE) Prostate Cancer Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Roopika; Deng, Mario; Boehm, Diana; Braun, Martin; Fend, Falko; Boehm, Detlef; Biskup, Saskia; Perner, Sven

    2012-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have revolutionized cancer research allowing the comprehensive study of cancer using high throughput deep sequencing methodologies. These methods detect genomic alterations, nucleotide substitutions, insertions, deletions and copy number alterations. SOLiD (Sequencing by Oligonucleotide Ligation and Detection, Life Technologies) is a promising technology generating billions of 50 bp sequencing reads. This robust technique, successfully applied in gene identification, might be helpful in detecting novel genes associated with cancer initiation and progression using formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissue. This study’s aim was to compare the validity of whole exome sequencing of fresh-frozen vs. FFPE tumor tissue by normalization to normal prostatic FFPE tissue, obtained from the same patient. One primary fresh-frozen sample, corresponding FFPE prostate cancer sample and matched adjacent normal prostatic tissue was subjected to exome sequencing. The sequenced reads were mapped and compared. Our study was the first to show comparable exome sequencing results between FFPE and corresponding fresh-frozen cancer tissues using SOLiD sequencing. A prior study has been conducted comparing the validity of sequencing of FFPE vs. fresh frozen samples using other NGS platforms. Our validation further proves that FFPE material is a reliable source of material for whole exome sequencing. PMID:22942743

  17. ENRICH: A promising oncology nurse training program to implement ASCO clinical practice guidelines on fertility for AYA cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Vadaparampil, Susan T; Gwede, Clement K; Meade, Cathy; Kelvin, Joanne; Reich, Richard R; Reinecke, Joyce; Bowman, Meghan; Sehovic, Ivana; Quinn, Gwendolyn P

    2016-11-01

    We describe the impact of ENRICH (Educating Nurses about Reproductive Issues in Cancer Healthcare), a web-based communication-skill-building curriculum for oncology nurses regarding AYA fertility and other reproductive health issues. Participants completed an 8-week course that incorporated didactic content, case studies, and interactive learning. Each learner completed a pre- and post-test assessing knowledge and a 6-month follow-up survey assessing learner behaviors and institutional changes. Out of 77 participants, the majority (72%) scored higher on the post-test. Fifty-four participants completed the follow-up survey: 41% reviewed current institutional practices, 20% formed a committee, and 37% gathered patient materials or financial resources (22%). Participants also reported new policies (30%), in-service education (37%), new patient education materials (26%), a patient navigator role (28%), and workplace collaborations with reproductive specialists (46%). ENRICH improved nurses' knowledge and involvement in activities addressing fertility needs of oncology patients. Our study provides a readily accessible model to prepare oncology nurses to integrate American Society of Clinical Oncology guidelines and improve Quality Oncology Practice Initiative measures related to fertility. Nurses will be better prepared to discuss important survivorship issues related to fertility and reproductive health, leading to improved quality of life outcomes for AYAs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A Walnut-Enriched Diet Reduces the Growth of LNCaP Human Prostate Cancer Xenografts in Nude Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Dun-Xian; Manchester, Lucien C.; Korkmaz, Ahmet; Fuentes-Broto, Lorena; Hardman, W. Elaine; Rosales-Corral, Sergio A.; Qi, Wenbo

    2013-01-01

    It was investigated whether a standard mouse diet (AIN-76A) supplemented with walnuts reduced the establishment and growth of LNCaP human prostate cancer cells in nude (nu/nu) mice. The walnut-enriched diet reduced the number of tumors and the growth of the LNCaP xenografts; 3 of 16 (18.7%) of the walnut-fed mice developed tumors; conversely, 14 of 32 mice (44.0%) of the control diet-fed animals developed tumors. Similarly, the xenografts in the walnut-fed animals grew more slowly than those in the control diet mice. The final average tumor size in the walnut-diet animals was roughly one-fourth the average size of the prostate tumors in the mice that ate the control diet. PMID:23758186

  19. Low adherent cancer cell subpopulations are enriched in tumorigenic and metastatic epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition-induced cancer stem-like cells.

    PubMed

    Morata-Tarifa, Cynthia; Jiménez, Gema; García, María A; Entrena, José M; Griñán-Lisón, Carmen; Aguilera, Margarita; Picon-Ruiz, Manuel; Marchal, Juan A

    2016-01-11

    Cancer stem cells are responsible for tumor progression, metastasis, therapy resistance and cancer recurrence, doing their identification and isolation of special relevance. Here we show that low adherent breast and colon cancer cells subpopulations have stem-like properties. Our results demonstrate that trypsin-sensitive (TS) breast and colon cancer cells subpopulations show increased ALDH activity, higher ability to exclude Hoechst 33342, enlarged proportion of cells with a cancer stem-like cell phenotype and are enriched in sphere- and colony-forming cells in vitro. Further studies in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells reveal that TS subpopulation expresses higher levels of SLUG, SNAIL, VIMENTIN and N-CADHERIN while show a lack of expression of E-CADHERIN and CLAUDIN, being this profile characteristic of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). The TS subpopulation shows CXCL10, BMI-1 and OCT4 upregulation, differing also in the expression of several miRNAs involved in EMT and/or cell self-renewal such as miR-34a-5p, miR-34c-5p, miR-21-5p, miR-93-5p and miR-100-5p. Furthermore, in vivo studies in immunocompromised mice demonstrate that MDA-MB-231 TS cells form more and bigger xenograft tumors with shorter latency and have higher metastatic potential. In conclusion, this work presents a new, non-aggressive, easy, inexpensive and reproducible methodology to isolate prospectively cancer stem-like cells for subsequent biological and preclinical studies.

  20. Low adherent cancer cell subpopulations are enriched in tumorigenic and metastatic epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition-induced cancer stem-like cells

    PubMed Central

    Morata-Tarifa, Cynthia; Jiménez, Gema; García, María A.; Entrena, José M.; Griñán-Lisón, Carmen; Aguilera, Margarita; Picon-Ruiz, Manuel; Marchal, Juan A.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells are responsible for tumor progression, metastasis, therapy resistance and cancer recurrence, doing their identification and isolation of special relevance. Here we show that low adherent breast and colon cancer cells subpopulations have stem-like properties. Our results demonstrate that trypsin-sensitive (TS) breast and colon cancer cells subpopulations show increased ALDH activity, higher ability to exclude Hoechst 33342, enlarged proportion of cells with a cancer stem-like cell phenotype and are enriched in sphere- and colony-forming cells in vitro. Further studies in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells reveal that TS subpopulation expresses higher levels of SLUG, SNAIL, VIMENTIN and N-CADHERIN while show a lack of expression of E-CADHERIN and CLAUDIN, being this profile characteristic of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). The TS subpopulation shows CXCL10, BMI-1 and OCT4 upregulation, differing also in the expression of several miRNAs involved in EMT and/or cell self-renewal such as miR-34a-5p, miR-34c-5p, miR-21-5p, miR-93-5p and miR-100-5p. Furthermore, in vivo studies in immunocompromised mice demonstrate that MDA-MB-231 TS cells form more and bigger xenograft tumors with shorter latency and have higher metastatic potential. In conclusion, this work presents a new, non-aggressive, easy, inexpensive and reproducible methodology to isolate prospectively cancer stem-like cells for subsequent biological and preclinical studies. PMID:26752044

  1. Ontological Enrichment of the Genes-to-Systems Breast Cancer Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viti, Federica; Mosca, Ettore; Merelli, Ivan; Calabria, Andrea; Alfieri, Roberta; Milanesi, Luciano

    Breast cancer research need the development of specific and suitable tools to appropriately manage biomolecular knowledge. The presented work deals with the integrative storage of breast cancer related biological data, in order to promote a system biology approach to this network disease. To increase data standardization and resource integration, annotations maintained in Genes-to-Systems Breast Cancer (G2SBC) database are associated to ontological terms, which provide a hierarchical structure to organize data enabling more effective queries, statistical analysis and semantic web searching. Exploited ontologies, which cover all levels of the molecular environment, from genes to systems, are among the most known and widely used bioinformatics resources. In G2SBC database ontology terms both provide a semantic layer to improve data storage, accessibility and analysis and represent a user friendly instrument to identify relations among biological components.

  2. Distinct transcriptional control in major immunogenetic subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukemia exhibiting subset-biased global DNA methylation profiles

    PubMed Central

    Kanduri, Meena; Marincevic, Millaray; Halldórsdóttir, Anna M.; Mansouri, Larry; Junevik, Katarina; Ntoufa, Stavroula; Kultima, Hanna Göransson; Isaksson, Anders; Juliusson, Gunnar; Andersson, Per-Ola; Ehrencrona, Hans; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Rosenquist, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) can be divided into prognostic subgroups based on the IGHV gene mutational status, and is further characterized by multiple subsets of cases with quasi-identical or stereotyped B cell receptors that also share clinical and biological features. We recently reported differential DNA methylation profiles in IGHV-mutated and IGHV-unmutated CLL subgroups. For the first time, we here explore the global methylation profiles of stereotyped subsets with different prognosis, by applying high-resolution methylation arrays on CLL samples from three major stereotyped subsets: the poor-prognostic subsets #1 (n = 15) and #2 (n = 9) and the favorable-prognostic subset #4 (n = 15). Overall, the three subsets exhibited significantly different methylation profiles, which only partially overlapped with those observed in our previous study according to IGHV gene mutational status. Specifically, gene ontology analysis of the differentially methylated genes revealed a clear enrichment of genes involved in immune response, such as B cell activation (e.g., CD80, CD86 and IL10), with higher methylation levels in subset #1 than subsets #2 and #4. Accordingly, higher expression of the co-stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 was demonstrated in subset #4 vs. subset #1, pointing to a key role for these molecules in the crosstalk of CLL subset #4 cells with the microenvironment. In summary, investigation of three prototypic, stereotyped CLL subsets revealed distinct DNA methylation profiles for each subset, which suggests subset-biased patterns of transcriptional control and highlights a key role for epigenetics during leukemogenesis. PMID:23154584

  3. Distinct transcriptional control in major immunogenetic subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukemia exhibiting subset-biased global DNA methylation profiles.

    PubMed

    Kanduri, Meena; Marincevic, Millaray; Halldórsdóttir, Anna M; Mansouri, Larry; Junevik, Katarina; Ntoufa, Stavroula; Kultima, Hanna Göransson; Isaksson, Anders; Juliusson, Gunnar; Andersson, Per-Ola; Ehrencrona, Hans; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Rosenquist, Richard

    2012-12-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) can be divided into prognostic subgroups based on the IGHV gene mutational status, and is further characterized by multiple subsets of cases with quasi-identical or stereotyped B cell receptors that also share clinical and biological features. We recently reported differential DNA methylation profiles in IGHV-mutated and IGHV-unmutated CLL subgroups. For the first time, we here explore the global methylation profiles of stereotyped subsets with different prognosis, by applying high-resolution methylation arrays on CLL samples from three major stereotyped subsets: the poor-prognostic subsets #1 (n = 15) and #2 (n = 9) and the favorable-prognostic subset #4 (n = 15). Overall, the three subsets exhibited significantly different methylation profiles, which only partially overlapped with those observed in our previous study according to IGHV gene mutational status. Specifically, gene ontology analysis of the differentially methylated genes revealed a clear enrichment of genes involved in immune response, such as B cell activation (e.g., CD80, CD86 and IL10), with higher methylation levels in subset #1 than subsets #2 and #4. Accordingly, higher expression of the co-stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 was demonstrated in subset #4 vs. subset #1, pointing to a key role for these molecules in the crosstalk of CLL subset #4 cells with the microenvironment. In summary, investigation of three prototypic, stereotyped CLL subsets revealed distinct DNA methylation profiles for each subset, which suggests subset-biased patterns of transcriptional control and highlights a key role for epigenetics during leukemogenesis.

  4. Exosomes enriched in stemness/metastatic-related mRNAS promote oncogenic potential in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Marta; Silva, Javier; Herrera, Alberto; Herrera, Mercedes; Peña, Cristina; Martín, Paloma; Gil-Calderón, Beatriz; Larriba, María Jesús; Coronado, M Josés; Soldevilla, Beatriz; Turrión, Víctor S; Provencio, Mariano; Sánchez, Antonio; Bonilla, Félix; García-Barberán, Vanesa

    2015-12-01

    Cancer cells efficiently transfer exosome contents (essentially mRNAs and microRNAs) to other cell types, modifying immune responses, cell growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. Here we analyzed the exosomes release by breast tumor cells with different capacities of stemness/metastasis based on CXCR4 expression, and evaluated their capacity to generate oncogenic features in recipient cells. Breast cancer cells overexpressing CXCR4 showed an increase in stemness-related markers, and in proliferation, migration and invasion capacities. Furthermore, recipient cells treated with exosomes from CXCR4-cells showed increased in the same abilities. Moreover, inoculation of CXCR4-cell-derived exosomes in immunocompromised mice stimulated primary tumor growth and metastatic potential. Comparison of nucleic acids contained into exosomes isolated from patients revealed a "stemness and metastatic" signature in exosomes of patients with worse prognosis. Finally, our data supported the view that cancer cells with stem-like properties show concomitant metastatic behavior, and their exosomes stimulate tumor progression and metastasis. Exosomes-derived nucleic acids from plasma of breast cancer patients are suitable markers in the prognosis of such patients.

  5. Induction of apoptosis by (-)-gossypol-enriched cottonseed oil in human breast cancer cells

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Induction of apoptosis is one of the mechanisms of chemotherapeutic agents against breast cancer. In addition, recent studies have shown that diets containing polyphenolic components possess anticancer activities either in vitro or in vivo by inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis. T...

  6. Exosomes enriched in stemness/metastatic-related mRNAS promote oncogenic potential in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Marta; Silva, Javier; Herrera, Alberto; Herrera, Mercedes; Peña, Cristina; Martín, Paloma; Gil-Calderón, Beatriz; Larriba, María Jesús; Coronado, Mª José; Soldevilla, Beatriz; Turrión, Víctor S.; Provencio, Mariano; Sánchez, Antonio; Bonilla, Félix; García-Barberán, Vanesa

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells efficiently transfer exosome contents (essentially mRNAs and microRNAs) to other cell types, modifying immune responses, cell growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. Here we analyzed the exosomes release by breast tumor cells with different capacities of stemness/metastasis based on CXCR4 expression, and evaluated their capacity to generate oncogenic features in recipient cells. Breast cancer cells overexpressing CXCR4 showed an increase in stemness-related markers, and in proliferation, migration and invasion capacities. Furthermore, recipient cells treated with exosomes from CXCR4-cells showed increased in the same abilities. Moreover, inoculation of CXCR4-cell-derived exosomes in immunocompromised mice stimulated primary tumor growth and metastatic potential. Comparison of nucleic acids contained into exosomes isolated from patients revealed a “stemness and metastatic” signature in exosomes of patients with worse prognosis. Finally, our data supported the view that cancer cells with stem-like properties show concomitant metastatic behavior, and their exosomes stimulate tumor progression and metastasis. Exosomes-derived nucleic acids from plasma of breast cancer patients are suitable markers in the prognosis of such patients. PMID:26528758

  7. Reactivity with A monoclonal antibody to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 1 defines a subset of aggressive breast cancers in the absence of the EBV genome.

    PubMed

    Murray, Paul G; Lissauer, David; Junying, Jia; Davies, Gillian; Moore, Sukhjinder; Bell, Andrew; Timms, Judith; Rowlands, David; McConkey, Christopher; Reynolds, Gary M; Ghataura, Suk; England, David; Caroll, Rebecca; Young, Lawrence S

    2003-05-01

    Previous studies have suggested that common breast cancers are associated with EBV. We used a highly sensitive quantitative real-time PCR method to screen whole tumor sections of breast cancers for the presence of the EBV genome. EBV DNA was detected in 19 of 92 (21%) tumors, but viral load was very low in positive samples (mean = 1.1 copy EBV/1000 cells, maximum = 7.1 copies EBV/1000 cells). Importantly, quantitative real-time PCR failed to detect the EBV genome in microdissected tumor cells from any case. Using a monoclonal antibody (2B4-1) reactive against the EBV nuclear antigen-1, we noted strong staining of tumor nuclei in a proportion of those breast cancers that had tested negative for the presence of the EBV genome. Because nuclear staining with the 2B4-1 antibody was previously observed more frequently in poor prognosis breast cancers, we examined a larger series of breast cancers with complete clinical follow-up. Strong punctate staining of tumor cell nuclei was observed in 47 of 153 (31%) breast cancers; 2B4-1-positive tumors were significantly more likely to be ER-negative (P < 0.0001), to be of higher grade (P = 0.001) and larger (P = 0.03), to involve more regional lymph nodes (P = 0.01), and to have higher Nottingham Prognostic Index scores (P = 0.0003). Conclusions are: (a) EBV can be regularly detected in whole sections of breast cancers but viral copy number is very low; (b) in these cases, tumor cells do not harbor virus; and (c) reactivity with the monoclonal antibody 2B4-1 is detectable in the absence of the EBV genome and is strongly associated with ER-negative breast tumors and with prognostically unfavorable disease. Additional studies should be directed to the identification of this protein and to elucidation of its role in breast cancer.

  8. Overexpression of enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) characterizes an aggressive subset of prostate cancers and predicts patient prognosis independently from pre- and postoperatively assessed clinicopathological parameters.

    PubMed

    Melling, Nathaniel; Thomsen, Erik; Tsourlakis, Maria Christina; Kluth, Martina; Hube-Magg, Claudia; Minner, Sarah; Koop, Christina; Graefen, Markus; Heinzer, Hans; Wittmer, Corinna; Sauter, Guido; Wilczak, Waldemar; Huland, Hartwig; Simon, Ronald; Schlomm, Thorsten; Steurer, Stefan; Krech, Till

    2015-11-01

    Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) plays an important role in tumor development and progression by interacting with histone and nonhistone proteins. In the current study, we analyzed prevalence and prognostic impact of EZH2 in prostate cancer. EZH2 expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry on a tissue microarray containing more than 12400 prostate cancer specimens. Results were compared to tumor phenotype, biochemical recurrence and molecular subtypes defined by ERG status as well as genomic deletions of 3p, 5q, 6q and PTEN. EZH2 immunostaining was detectable in 56.6% of 10168 interpretable cancers and considered strong in 1.1%, moderate in 12.2% and weak in 43.3% of cases. High EZH2 expression was strongly associated with high Gleason grade (P < 0.0001), advanced pathological tumor stage (P < 0.0001), positive nodal status (P < 0.0001), elevated preoperative PSA level (P = 0.0066), early PSA recurrence (P < 0.0001) and increased cell proliferation P < 0.0001). High-level EZH2 staining was also associated with TMPRSS2:ERG rearrangement and ERG expression in prostate cancers (P < 0.0001) and was linked to deletions of PTEN, 6q15, 5q21 and 3p13 (P < 0.0001 each) particularly in ERG-negative cancers. The prognostic impact of EZH2 was independent of established pre- and postoperatively assessed clinicopathological parameters. EZH2 has strong prognostic impact in prostate cancer and might contribute to the development of a fraction of genetically instable and particularly aggressive prostate cancers. EZH2 analysis might therefore be of clinical value for risk stratification of prostate cancer. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Syngeneic murine ovarian cancer model reveals that ascites enriches for ovarian cancer stem-like cells expressing membrane GRP78

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Lihong; Bachelder, Robin E.; Kennedy, Margaret; Chen, Po-Han; Chi, Jen-Tsan; Berchuck, Andrew; Cianciolo, George; Pizzo, Salvatore V.

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer patients are generally diagnosed at FIGO (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics) stage III/IV, when ascites is common. The volume of ascites correlates positively with the extent of metastasis and negatively with prognosis. Membrane GRP78, a stress-inducible endoplasmic reticulum chaperone that is also expressed on the plasma membrane (memGRP78) of aggressive cancer cells, plays a crucial role in the embryonic stem cell maintenance. We studied ascites effects on ovarian cancer stem-like cells using a syngeneic mouse model. Our study demonstrates that ascites-derived tumor cells from mice injected intraperitoneally with murine ovarian cancer cells (ID8) express increased memGRP78 levels compared to ID8 cells from normal culture. We hypothesized that these ascites associated memGRP78+ cells are cancer stem-like cells (CSC). Supporting this hypothesis, we show that memGRP78+ cells isolated from murine ascites exhibit increased sphere forming and tumor initiating abilities compared to memGRP78− cells. When the tumor microenvironment is recapitulated by adding ascites fluid to cell culture, ID8 cells express more memGRP78 and increased self-renewing ability compared to those cultured in medium alone. Moreover, compared to their counterparts cultured in normal medium, ID8 cells cultured in ascites, or isolated from ascites, show increased stem cell marker expression. Antibodies directed against the carboxy-terminal domain of GRP78: 1) reduce self-renewing ability of murine and human ovarian cancer cells pre-incubated with ascites and 2) suppress a GSK3α-AKT/SNAI1 signaling axis in these cells. Based on these data, we suggest that memGRP78 is a logical therapeutic target for late stage ovarian cancer. PMID:25589495

  10. Intravenous infusion of phage-displayed antibody library in human cancer patients: enrichment and cancer-specificity of tumor-homing phage-antibodies.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Girja S; Krag, David N; Peletskaya, Elena N; Pero, Stephanie C; Sun, Yu-Jing; Carman, Chelsea L; McCahill, Laurence E; Roland, Thomas A

    2013-08-01

    Phage display is a powerful method for target discovery and selection of ligands for cancer treatment and diagnosis. Our goal was to select tumor-binding antibodies in cancer patients. Eligibility criteria included absence of preexisting anti-phage-antibodies and a Stage IV cancer status. All patients were intravenously administered 1 × 10(11) TUs/kg of an scFv library 1 to 4 h before surgical resection of their tumors. No significant adverse events related to the phage library infusion were observed. Phage were successfully recovered from all tumors. Individual clones from each patient were assessed for binding to the tumor from which clones were recovered. Multiple tumor-binding phage-antibodies were identified. Soluble scFv antibodies were produced from the phage clones showing higher tumor binding. The tumor-homing phage-antibodies and derived soluble scFvs were found to bind varying numbers (0-5) of 8 tested normal human tissues (breast, cervix, colon, kidney, liver, spleen, skin, and uterus). The clones that showed high tumor-specificity were found to bind corresponding tumors from other patients also. Clone enrichment was observed based on tumor binding and DNA sequence data. Clone sequences of multiple variable regions showed significant matches to certain cancer-related antibodies. One of the clones (07-2,355) that was found to share a 12-amino-acid-long motif with a reported IL-17A antibody was further studied for competitive binding for possible antigen target identification. We conclude that these outcomes support the safety and utility of phage display library panning in cancer patients for ligand selection and target discovery for cancer treatment and diagnosis.

  11. Imputation and subset-based association analysis across different cancer types identifies multiple independent risk loci in the TERT-CLPTM1L region on chromosome 5p15.33

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhaoming; Zhu, Bin; Zhang, Mingfeng; Parikh, Hemang; Jia, Jinping; Chung, Charles C.; Sampson, Joshua N.; Hoskins, Jason W.; Hutchinson, Amy; Burdette, Laurie; Ibrahim, Abdisamad; Hautman, Christopher; Raj, Preethi S.; Abnet, Christian C.; Adjei, Andrew A.; Ahlbom, Anders; Albanes, Demetrius; Allen, Naomi E.; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Aldrich, Melinda; Amiano, Pilar; Amos, Christopher; Andersson, Ulrika; Andriole, Gerald; Andrulis, Irene L.; Arici, Cecilia; Arslan, Alan A.; Austin, Melissa A.; Baris, Dalsu; Barkauskas, Donald A.; Bassig, Bryan A.; Beane Freeman, Laura E.; Berg, Christine D.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Biritwum, Richard B.; Black, Amanda; Blot, William; Boeing, Heiner; Boffetta, Paolo; Bolton, Kelly; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Bracci, Paige M.; Brennan, Paul; Brinton, Louise A.; Brotzman, Michelle; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Buring, Julie E.; Butler, Mary Ann; Cai, Qiuyin; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Canzian, Federico; Cao, Guangwen; Caporaso, Neil E.; Carrato, Alfredo; Carreon, Tania; Carta, Angela; Chang, Gee-Chen; Chang, I-Shou; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Che, Xu; Chen, Chien-Jen; Chen, Chih-Yi; Chen, Chung-Hsing; Chen, Constance; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Chen, Yuh-Min; Chokkalingam, Anand P.; Chu, Lisa W.; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Colditz, Graham A.; Colt, Joanne S.; Conti, David; Cook, Michael B.; Cortessis, Victoria K.; Crawford, E. David; Cussenot, Olivier; Davis, Faith G.; De Vivo, Immaculata; Deng, Xiang; Ding, Ti; Dinney, Colin P.; Di Stefano, Anna Luisa; Diver, W. Ryan; Duell, Eric J.; Elena, Joanne W.; Fan, Jin-Hu; Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Feychting, Maria; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Flanagan, Adrienne M.; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Freedman, Neal D.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Fuchs, Charles S.; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Gallinger, Steven; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gapstur, Susan M.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Garcia-Closas, Reina; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Gaziano, J. Michael; Gerhard, Daniela S.; Giffen, Carol A.; Giles, Graham G.; Gillanders, Elizabeth M.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Goggins, Michael; Gokgoz, Nalan; Goldstein, Alisa M.; Gonzalez, Carlos; Gorlick, Richard; Greene, Mark H.; Gross, Myron; Grossman, H. Barton; Grubb, Robert; Gu, Jian; Guan, Peng; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hallmans, Goran; Hankinson, Susan E.; Harris, Curtis C.; Hartge, Patricia; Hattinger, Claudia; Hayes, Richard B.; He, Qincheng; Helman, Lee; Henderson, Brian E.; Henriksson, Roger; Hoffman-Bolton, Judith; Hohensee, Chancellor; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Hong, Yun-Chul; Hoover, Robert N.; Hosgood, H. Dean; Hsiao, Chin-Fu; Hsing, Ann W.; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Hu, Nan; Hu, Wei; Hu, Zhibin; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Hunter, David J.; Inskip, Peter D.; Ito, Hidemi; Jacobs, Eric J.; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Jenab, Mazda; Ji, Bu-Tian; Johansen, Christoffer; Johansson, Mattias; Johnson, Alison; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kamat, Ashish M.; Kamineni, Aruna; Karagas, Margaret; Khanna, Chand; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Christopher; Kim, In-Sam; Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Yeul Hong; Kim, Young-Chul; Kim, Young Tae; Kang, Chang Hyun; Jung, Yoo Jin; Kitahara, Cari M.; Klein, Alison P.; Klein, Robert; Kogevinas, Manolis; Koh, Woon-Puay; Kohno, Takashi; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Kooperberg, Charles; Kratz, Christian P.; Krogh, Vittorio; Kunitoh, Hideo; Kurtz, Robert C.; Kurucu, Nilgun; Lan, Qing; Lathrop, Mark; Lau, Ching C.; Lecanda, Fernando; Lee, Kyoung-Mu; Lee, Maxwell P.; Le Marchand, Loic; Lerner, Seth P.; Li, Donghui; Liao, Linda M.; Lim, Wei-Yen; Lin, Dongxin; Lin, Jie; Lindstrom, Sara; Linet, Martha S.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Liu, Jianjun; Ljungberg, Börje; Lloreta, Josep; Lu, Daru; Ma, Jing; Malats, Nuria; Mannisto, Satu; Marina, Neyssa; Mastrangelo, Giuseppe; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGlynn, Katherine A.; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; McNeill, Lorna H.; McWilliams, Robert R.; Melin, Beatrice S.; Meltzer, Paul S.; Mensah, James E.; Miao, Xiaoping; Michaud, Dominique S.; Mondul, Alison M.; Moore, Lee E.; Muir, Kenneth; Niwa, Shelley; Olson, Sara H.; Orr, Nick; Panico, Salvatore; Park, Jae Yong; Patel, Alpa V.; Patino-Garcia, Ana; Pavanello, Sofia; Peeters, Petra H. M.; Peplonska, Beata; Peters, Ulrike; Petersen, Gloria M.; Picci, Piero; Pike, Malcolm C.; Porru, Stefano; Prescott, Jennifer; Pu, Xia; Purdue, Mark P.; Qiao, You-Lin; Rajaraman, Preetha; Riboli, Elio; Risch, Harvey A.; Rodabough, Rebecca J.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Ruder, Avima M.; Ryu, Jeong-Seon; Sanson, Marc; Schned, Alan; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Schwartz, Ann G.; Schwartz, Kendra L.; Schwenn, Molly; Scotlandi, Katia; Seow, Adeline; Serra, Consol; Serra, Massimo; Sesso, Howard D.; Severi, Gianluca; Shen, Hongbing; Shen, Min; Shete, Sanjay; Shiraishi, Kouya; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Siddiq, Afshan; Sierrasesumaga, Luis; Sierri, Sabina; Loon Sihoe, Alan Dart; Silverman, Debra T.; Simon, Matthias; Southey, Melissa C.; Spector, Logan; Spitz, Margaret; Stampfer, Meir; Stattin, Par; Stern, Mariana C.; Stevens, Victoria L.; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z.; Stram, Daniel O.; Strom, Sara S.; Su, Wu-Chou; Sund, Malin; Sung, Sook Whan; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tan, Wen; Tanaka, Hideo; Tang, Wei; Tang, Ze-Zhang; Tardon, Adonina; Tay, Evelyn; Taylor, Philip R.; Tettey, Yao; Thomas, David M.; Tirabosco, Roberto; Tjonneland, Anne; Tobias, Geoffrey S.; Toro, Jorge R.; Travis, Ruth C.; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Troisi, Rebecca; Truelove, Ann; Tsai, Ying-Huang; Tucker, Margaret A.; Tumino, Rosario; Van Den Berg, David; Van Den Eeden, Stephen K.; Vermeulen, Roel; Vineis, Paolo; Visvanathan, Kala; Vogel, Ulla; Wang, Chaoyu; Wang, Chengfeng; Wang, Junwen; Wang, Sophia S.; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Wheeler, William; White, Emily; Wiencke, John K.; Wolk, Alicja; Wolpin, Brian M.; Wong, Maria Pik; Wrensch, Margaret; Wu, Chen; Wu, Tangchun; Wu, Xifeng; Wu, Yi-Long; Wunder, Jay S.; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Xu, Jun; Yang, Hannah P.; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Yatabe, Yasushi; Ye, Yuanqing; Yeboah, Edward D.; Yin, Zhihua; Ying, Chen; Yu, Chong-Jen; Yu, Kai; Yuan, Jian-Min; Zanetti, Krista A.; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zheng, Wei; Zhou, Baosen; Mirabello, Lisa; Savage, Sharon A.; Kraft, Peter; Chanock, Stephen J.; Yeager, Meredith; Landi, Maria Terese; Shi, Jianxin; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Amundadottir, Laufey T.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have mapped risk alleles for at least 10 distinct cancers to a small region of 63 000 bp on chromosome 5p15.33. This region harbors the TERT and CLPTM1L genes; the former encodes the catalytic subunit of telomerase reverse transcriptase and the latter may play a role in apoptosis. To investigate further the genetic architecture of common susceptibility alleles in this region, we conducted an agnostic subset-based meta-analysis (association analysis based on subsets) across six distinct cancers in 34 248 cases and 45 036 controls. Based on sequential conditional analysis, we identified as many as six independent risk loci marked by common single-nucleotide polymorphisms: five in the TERT gene (Region 1: rs7726159, P = 2.10 × 10−39; Region 3: rs2853677, P = 3.30 × 10−36 and PConditional = 2.36 × 10−8; Region 4: rs2736098, P = 3.87 × 10−12 and PConditional = 5.19 × 10−6, Region 5: rs13172201, P = 0.041 and PConditional = 2.04 × 10−6; and Region 6: rs10069690, P = 7.49 × 10−15 and PConditional = 5.35 × 10−7) and one in the neighboring CLPTM1L gene (Region 2: rs451360; P = 1.90 × 10−18 and PConditional = 7.06 × 10−16). Between three and five cancers mapped to each independent locus with both risk-enhancing and protective effects. Allele-specific effects on DNA methylation were seen for a subset of risk loci, indicating that methylation and subsequent effects on gene expression may contribute to the biology of risk variants on 5p15.33. Our results provide strong support for extensive pleiotropy across this region of 5p15.33, to an extent not previously observed in other cancer susceptibility loci. PMID:25027329

  12. Induction of Vasculogenic Mimicry Overrides VEGF-A Silencing and Enriches Stem-like Cancer Cells in Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Schnegg, Caroline I; Yang, Moon Hee; Ghosh, Subrata K; Hsu, Mei-Yu

    2015-04-15

    The basis for resistance to VEGF inhibition is not fully understood despite its clinical importance. In this study, we examined the adaptive response to VEGF-A inhibition by a loss-of-function analysis using plasmid-based shRNA. Tumor xenografts that initially responded to VEGF-A inhibition underwent an adaptation in vivo, leading to acquired resistance. VEGF-A blockade in tumors was associated with HIF1α expression and an increase in CD144(+) vasculogenic mimicry (VM), leading to formation of channels displaying Tie-1 and MMP-2 upregulation. CD133(+) and CD271(+) melanoma stem-like cells (MSLC) accumulated in the perivascular niche. Tumor xenografts of melanoma cell populations that were intrinsically resistant to VEGF-A blockade did not exhibit any of these features, compared with nontarget control counterparts. Thus, melanomas that are initially sensitive to VEGF-A blockade acquire adaptive resistance by adopting VM as an alternate angiogenic strategy, thereby enriching for deposition of MSLC in the perivascular niche through an HIF1α-dependent process. Conversely, melanomas that are intrinsically resistant to VEGF-A blockade do not show any evidence of compensatory survival mechanisms that promote MSLC accumulation. Our work highlights the potential risk of anti-VEGF treatments owing to a selective pressure for an adaptive resistance mechanism that empowers the development of stem-like cancer cells, with implications for how to design combination therapies that can improve outcomes in patients. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Ovarian cancer stem cell like side populations are enriched following chemotherapy and overexpress EZH2

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, Siân; Hersey, Jenny M.; Mellor, Paul; Dai, Wei; Santos-Silva, Alessandra; Liber, Daniel; Luk, Louisa; Titley, Ian; Carden, Craig P; Box, Garry; Hudson, David L.; Kaye, Stanley B.; Brown, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Platinum-based chemotherapy, with cytoreductive surgery, is the cornerstone of treatment of advanced ovarian cancer, however acquired drug resistance is a major clinical obstacle. It has been proposed that subpopulations of tumour cells with stem-cell like properties, such as so-called side populations (SP) which over-express ABC drug-transporters, can sustain the growth of drug resistant tumour cells, leading to tumour recurrence following chemotherapy. The histone methyltransferase EZH2 is a key component of the Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) required for maintenance of a stem cell state and overexpression has been implicated in drug resistance and shorter survival of ovarian cancer patients. We observe higher percentage SP in ascites from patients that have relapsed following chemotherapy compared to chemonaive patients, consistent with selection for this subpopulation during platinum-based chemotherapy. Furthermore, ABCB1 (P-glycoprotein) and EZH2 are consistently over-expressed in SP compared to non-SP from patients’ tumour cells. SiRNA knockdown of EZH2 leads to loss of SP in ovarian tumour models, reduced anchorage-independent growth and reduced tumour growth in vivo. Together these data support a key role for EZH2 in the maintenance of a drug-resistant tumour-sustaining subpopulation of cells in ovarian cancers undergoing chemotherapy. As such, EZH2 is an important target for anticancer drug development. PMID:21216927

  14. Overexpression of the A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase ADAM15 is linked to a Small but Highly Aggressive Subset of Prostate Cancers.

    PubMed

    Burdelski, Christoph; Fitzner, Michael; Hube-Magg, Claudia; Kluth, Martina; Heumann, Asmus; Simon, Ronald; Krech, Till; Clauditz, Till; Büscheck, Franziska; Steurer, Stefan; Wittmer, Corinna; Hinsch, Andrea; Luebke, Andreas M; Jacobsen, Frank; Minner, Sarah; Tsourlakis, Maria Christina; Beyer, Burkhard; Steuber, Thomas; Thederan, Imke; Sauter, Guido; Izbicki, Jakob; Schlomm, Thorsten; Wilczak, Waldemar

    2017-04-01

    The A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase (ADAM) family of endopeptidases plays a role in many solid cancers and includes promising targets for anticancer therapies. Deregulation of ADAM15 has been linked to tumor aggressiveness and cell line studies suggest that ADAM15 overexpression may also be implicated in prostate cancer. To evaluate the impact of ADAM15 expression and its relationship with key genomic alterations, a tissue microarray containing 12,427 prostate cancers was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. ADAM15 expression was compared to phenotype, prognosis and molecular features including TMPRSS2:ERG fusion and frequent deletions involving PTEN, 3p, 5q and 6q. Normal prostate epithelium did not show ADAM15 staining. In prostate cancers, negative, weak, moderate, and strong ADAM15 staining was found in 87.7%, 3.7%, 5.6%, and 3.0% of 9826 interpretable tumors. Strong ADAM15 staining was linked to high Gleason grade, advanced pathological tumor stage, positive nodal stage and resection margin. ADAM15 overexpression was also associated with TMPRSS2:ERG fusions and PTEN deletions (P<.0001) but unrelated to deletions of 3p, 5q and 6q. In univariate analysis, high ADAM15 expression was strongly linked to PSA recurrence (P<.0001). However, in multivariate analyses this association was only maintained if the analysis was limited to preoperatively available parameters in ERG-negative cancers. The results of our study demonstrate that ADAM15 is strongly up regulated in a small but highly aggressive fraction of prostate cancers. In these tumors, ADAM15 may represent a suitable drug target. In a preoperative scenario, ADAM15 expression measurement may assist prognosis assessment, either alone or in combination with other markers.

  15. Method for Recovery and Immunoaffinity Enrichment of Membrane Proteins Illustrated with Metastatic Ovarian Cancer Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Luke V.; Likhte, Varsha; Wright, William H.; Chu, Frances; Cambron, Emma; Baldwin-Burnett, Anne; Krakow, Jessica; Smejkal, Gary B.

    2012-01-01

    Integral membrane proteins play key biological roles in cell signaling, transport, and pathogen invasion. However, quantitative clinical assays for this critical class of proteins remain elusive and are generally limited to serum-soluble extracellular fragments. Furthermore, classic proteomic approaches to membrane protein analysis typically involve proteolytic digestion of the soluble pieces, resulting in separation of intra- and extracellular segments and significant informational loss. In this paper, we describe the development of a new method for the quantitative extraction of intact integral membrane proteins (including GPCRs) from solid metastatic ovarian tumors using pressure cycling technology in combination with a new (ProteoSolve-TD) buffer system. This new extraction buffer is compatible with immunoaffinity methods (e.g., ELISA and immunoaffinity chromatography), as well as conventional proteomic techniques (e.g., 2D gels, western blots). We demonstrate near quantitative recovery of membrane proteins EDG2, EDG4, FASLG, KDR, and LAMP-3 by western blots. We have also adapted commercial ELISAs for serum-soluble membrane protein fragments (e.g., sVEGFR2) to measure the tissue titers of their transmembrane progenitors. Finally, we demonstrate the compatibility of the new buffers with immunoaffinity enrichment/mass spectrometric characterization of tissue proteins. PMID:22919487

  16. Top associated SNPs in prostate cancer are significantly enriched in cis-expression quantitative trait loci and at transcription factor binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Bairong; Zhao, Zhongming

    2014-01-01

    While genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have revealed thousands of disease risk single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), their functions remain largely unknown. Recent studies have suggested the regulatory roles of GWAS risk variants in several common diseases; however, the complex regulatory structure in prostate cancer is unclear. We investigated the potential regulatory roles of risk variants in two prostate cancer GWAS datasets by their interactions with expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) and/or transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) in three populations. Our results indicated that the moderately associated GWAS SNPs were significantly enriched with cis-eQTLs and TFBSs in Caucasians (CEU), but not in African Americans (AA) or Japanese (JPT); this was also observed in an independent pan-cancer related SNPs from the GWAS Catalog. We found that the eQTL enrichment in the CEU population was tissue-specific to eQTLs from CEU lymphoblastoid cell lines. Importantly, we pinpointed two SNPs, rs2861405 and rs4766642, by overlapping results from cis-eQTL and TFBS as applied to the CEU data. These results suggested that prostate cancer associated SNPs and pan-cancer associated SNPs are likely to play regulatory roles in CEU. However, the negative enrichment results in AA or JPT and the potential mechanisms remain to be elucidated in additional samples. PMID:25026280

  17. Subsets of ATP-sensitive potassium channel (KATP) inhibitors increase gap junctional intercellular communication in metastatic cancer cell lines independent of SUR expression

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) is a process whereby cells share molecules and nutrients with each other by physical contact through cell membrane pores. In tumor cells, GJIC is often altered, suggesting that this process may be important in the context of cancer. Certain ion chan...

  18. CHK1 Inhibition in Small-Cell Lung Cancer Produces Single-Agent Activity in Biomarker-Defined Disease Subsets and Combination Activity with Cisplatin or Olaparib.

    PubMed

    Sen, Triparna; Tong, Pan; Stewart, C Allison; Cristea, Sandra; Valliani, Aly; Shames, David S; Redwood, Abena B; Fan, You Hong; Li, Lerong; Glisson, Bonnie S; Minna, John D; Sage, Julien; Gibbons, Don L; Piwnica-Worms, Helen; Heymach, John V; Wang, Jing; Byers, Lauren Averett

    2017-07-15

    Effective targeted therapies for small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), the most aggressive form of lung cancer, remain urgently needed. Here we report evidence of preclinical efficacy evoked by targeting the overexpressed cell-cycle checkpoint kinase CHK1 in SCLC. Our studies employed RNAi-mediated attenuation or pharmacologic blockade with the novel second-generation CHK1 inhibitor prexasertib (LY2606368), currently in clinical trials. In SCLC models in vitro and in vivo, LY2606368 exhibited strong single-agent efficacy, augmented the effects of cisplatin or the PARP inhibitor olaparib, and improved the response of platinum-resistant models. Proteomic analysis identified CHK1 and MYC as top predictive biomarkers of LY2606368 sensitivity, suggesting that CHK1 inhibition may be especially effective in SCLC with MYC amplification or MYC protein overexpression. Our findings provide a preclinical proof of concept supporting the initiation of a clinical efficacy trial in patients with platinum-sensitive or platinum-resistant relapsed SCLC. Cancer Res; 77(14); 3870-84. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. Pathways enrichment analysis for differentially expressed genes in squamous lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Qian, Liqiang; Luo, Qingquan; Zhao, Xiaojing; Huang, Jia

    2014-01-01

    Squamous lung cancer (SQLC) is a common type of lung cancer, but its oncogenesis mechanism is not so clear. The aim of this study was to screen the potential pathways changed in SQLC and elucidate the mechanism of it. Published microarray data of GSE3268 series was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO). Significance analysis of microarrays was performed using software R, and differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were harvested. The functions and pathways of DEGs were mapped in Gene Otology and KEGG pathway database, respectively. A total of 2961 genes were filtered as DEGs between normal and SQLC cells. Cell cycle and metabolism were the mainly changed functions of SQLC cells. Meanwhile genes such as MCM, RFC, FEN1, and POLD may induce SQLC through DNA replication pathway, and genes such as PTTG1, CCNB1, CDC6, and PCNA may be involved in SQLC through cell cycle pathway. It is demonstrated that pathway analysis is useful in the identification of target genes in SQLC.

  20. Bacteria-human somatic cell lateral gene transfer is enriched in cancer samples.

    PubMed

    Riley, David R; Sieber, Karsten B; Robinson, Kelly M; White, James Robert; Ganesan, Ashwinkumar; Nourbakhsh, Syrus; Dunning Hotopp, Julie C

    2013-01-01

    There are 10× more bacterial cells in our bodies from the microbiome than human cells. Viral DNA is known to integrate in the human genome, but the integration of bacterial DNA has not been described. Using publicly available sequence data from the human genome project, the 1000 Genomes Project, and The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), we examined bacterial DNA integration into the human somatic genome. Here we present evidence that bacterial DNA integrates into the human somatic genome through an RNA intermediate, and that such integrations are detected more frequently in (a) tumors than normal samples, (b) RNA than DNA samples, and (c) the mitochondrial genome than the nuclear genome. Hundreds of thousands of paired reads support random integration of Acinetobacter-like DNA in the human mitochondrial genome in acute myeloid leukemia samples. Numerous read pairs across multiple stomach adenocarcinoma samples support specific integration of Pseudomonas-like DNA in the 5'-UTR and 3'-UTR of four proto-oncogenes that are up-regulated in their transcription, consistent with conversion to an oncogene. These data support our hypothesis that bacterial integrations occur in the human somatic genome and may play a role in carcinogenesis. We anticipate that the application of our approach to additional cancer genome projects will lead to the more frequent detection of bacterial DNA integrations in tumors that are in close proximity to the human microbiome.

  1. Radiation-enhanced therapeutic targeting of galectin-1 enriched malignant stroma in triple negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Upreti, Meenakshi; Jyoti, Amar; Johnson, Sara E.; Swindell, Elden P.; Napier, Dana; Sethi, Pallavi; Chan, Ryan; Feddock, Jonathan M.; Weiss, Heidi L.; O'Halloran, Thomas V.; Mark Evers, B.

    2016-01-01

    Currently there are no FDA approved targeted therapies for Triple Negative Breast Cancer (TNBC). Ongoing clinical trials for TNBC have focused primarily on targeting the epithelial cancer cells. However, targeted delivery of cytotoxic payloads to the non-transformed tumor associated-endothelium can prove to be an alternate approach that is currently unexplored. The present study is supported by recent findings on elevated expression of stromal galectin-1 in clinical samples of TNBC and our ongoing findings on stromal targeting of radiation induced galectin-1 by the anginex-conjugated arsenic-cisplatin loaded liposomes using a novel murine tumor model. We demonstrate inhibition of tumor growth and metastasis in response to the multimodal nanotherapeutic strategy using a TNBC model with orthotopic tumors originating from 3D tumor tissue analogs (TTA) comprised of tumor cells, endothelial cells and fibroblasts. The ‘rigorous’ combined treatment regimen of radiation and targeted liposomes is also shown to be well tolerated. More importantly, the results presented provide a means to exploit clinically relevant radiation dose for concurrent receptor mediated enhanced delivery of chemotherapy while limiting overall toxicity. The proposed study is significant as it falls in line with developing combinatorial therapeutic approaches for stroma-directed tumor targeting using tumor models that have an appropriate representation of the TNBC microenvironment. PMID:27223428

  2. Bacteria-Human Somatic Cell Lateral Gene Transfer Is Enriched in Cancer Samples

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Kelly M.; White, James Robert; Ganesan, Ashwinkumar; Nourbakhsh, Syrus; Dunning Hotopp, Julie C.

    2013-01-01

    There are 10× more bacterial cells in our bodies from the microbiome than human cells. Viral DNA is known to integrate in the human genome, but the integration of bacterial DNA has not been described. Using publicly available sequence data from the human genome project, the 1000 Genomes Project, and The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), we examined bacterial DNA integration into the human somatic genome. Here we present evidence that bacterial DNA integrates into the human somatic genome through an RNA intermediate, and that such integrations are detected more frequently in (a) tumors than normal samples, (b) RNA than DNA samples, and (c) the mitochondrial genome than the nuclear genome. Hundreds of thousands of paired reads support random integration of Acinetobacter-like DNA in the human mitochondrial genome in acute myeloid leukemia samples. Numerous read pairs across multiple stomach adenocarcinoma samples support specific integration of Pseudomonas-like DNA in the 5′-UTR and 3′-UTR of four proto-oncogenes that are up-regulated in their transcription, consistent with conversion to an oncogene. These data support our hypothesis that bacterial integrations occur in the human somatic genome and may play a role in carcinogenesis. We anticipate that the application of our approach to additional cancer genome projects will lead to the more frequent detection of bacterial DNA integrations in tumors that are in close proximity to the human microbiome. PMID:23840181

  3. Increased CD4 and CD8-positive T cell infiltrate signifies good prognosis in a subset of triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hirofumi; Thike, Aye Aye; Li, Huihua; Yeong, Joe; Koo, Si-Lin; Dent, Rebecca Alexandra; Tan, Puay Hoon; Iqbal, Jabed

    2016-04-01

    Tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) signify immune response to tumour in a variety of cancers including breast cancer. However, earlier studies examining the clinical significance of TILs in breast cancers have generated mixed results. There are only a few that address the relationship between TILs and clinical outcomes in triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC). The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical significance of TILs that express CD4 + and CD8 + , in TNBC. Immunohistochemical staining of CD4 and CD8 was performed on tissue microarrays of 164 cases of TNBC. TILs were counted separately as intratumoral when within the cancer cell nests (iTILs) and as stromal when within cancer stroma (sTILs). High CD8 + iTILs and sTILs, and CD4 + iTILs correlated with histologic grade. On Kaplan-Meier analysis, a significantly better survival rate was observed in high CD8 + iTIL (disease-free survival, DFS: P = 0.004, overall survival, OS: P = 0.02) and both high CD4 + iTILs (DFS: P = 0.025, OS: P = 0.023) and sTILs (DFS: P = 0.01, OS: P = 0.002). In multivariate analysis, CD8 + iTILs (DFS: P = 0.0095), CD4 + sTILs (DFS: P = 0.0084; OS: P = 0.0118), and CD4 (high) CD8 (high) CD8 iTILs (DFS: P = 0.0121; OS: P = 0.0329) and sTILs (DFS: P = 0.0295) showed significantly better survival outcomes. These results suggest that high levels of both CD8 + iTILs and CD4 + sTILs as well as CD4 (high) CD8 (high) iTILs and sTILs are independent prognostic factors in TNBC.

  4. Applications and perspectives of boron-enriched nanocomposites in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Yinghuai, Zhu; Hosmane, Narayan S

    2013-04-01

    Recently, boron compounds have attracted increasing attention both in academic laboratories and in the pharmaceutical industry. Boron, in particular the (10)B isotope, has the unique capability of absorbing a slow neutron to initiate a nuclear reaction with release of energetic particles such as α- and Li-particles, which is not observed in its carbon analogues. The nuclear capture reaction concept has been adopted in radiation therapy and used in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). BNCT is a potentially promising treatment for malignant brain tumors as well as other cancers, despite the limitation of a scarcity of neutron sources. There is the need in advanced research centers to construct high boron-containing composites as BNCT agents and develop more efficient drug carriers. This review discusses recent works on the development of boron-based therapeutic nanomaterials as BNCT agents.

  5. Combination Therapy Targeting BCL6 and Phospho-STAT3 Defeats Intratumor Heterogeneity in a Subset of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers.

    PubMed

    Deb, Dhruba; Rajaram, Satwik; Larsen, Jill E; Dospoy, Patrick D; Marullo, Rossella; Li, Long Shan; Avila, Kimberley; Xue, Fengtian; Cerchietti, Leandro; Minna, John D; Altschuler, Steven J; Wu, Lani F

    2017-06-01

    Oncogene-specific changes in cellular signaling have been widely observed in lung cancer. Here, we investigated how these alterations could affect signaling heterogeneity and suggest novel therapeutic strategies. We compared signaling changes across six human bronchial epithelial cell (HBEC) strains that were systematically transformed with various combinations of TP53, KRAS, and MYC-oncogenic alterations commonly found in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We interrogated at single-cell resolution how these alterations could affect classic readouts (β-CATENIN, SMAD2/3, phospho-STAT3, P65, FOXO1, and phospho-ERK1/2) of key pathways commonly affected in NSCLC. All three oncogenic alterations were required concurrently to observe significant signaling changes, and significant heterogeneity arose in this condition. Unexpectedly, we found two mutually exclusive altered subpopulations: one with STAT3 upregulation and another with SMAD2/3 downregulation. Treatment with a STAT3 inhibitor eliminated the upregulated STAT3 subpopulation, but left a large surviving subpopulation with downregulated SMAD2/3. A bioinformatics search identified BCL6, a gene downstream of SMAD2/3, as a novel pharmacologically accessible target of our transformed HBECs. Combination treatment with STAT3 and BCL6 inhibitors across a panel of NSCLC cell lines and in xenografted tumors significantly reduced tumor cell growth. We conclude that BCL6 is a new therapeutic target in NSCLC and combination therapy that targets multiple vulnerabilities (STAT3 and BCL6) downstream of common oncogenes, and tumor suppressors may provide a potent way to defeat intratumor heterogeneity. Cancer Res; 77(11); 3070-81. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. New 3-alkylpyridine marine alkaloid analogues as promising antitumor agents against the CD44(+/high) /CD24(-/low) subset of triple-negative breast cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    de Lima, Aline Brito; Barbosa, Camila de Souza; Gonçalves, Alessandra Mirtes Marques Neves; Santos, Fabio Vieira Dos; Viana, Gustavo Henrique Ribeiro; Varotti, Fernando de Pilla; Silva, Luciana Maria

    2016-12-19

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is one of the most aggressive cancers in women. Additionally, presence of residual cancer stem cells (CSC) in TNBC has challenged the efficacy of chemotherapy. Thus, the development of new molecules with potential action against CSC is fundamental. In this study, six synthetic analogues of theonelladin C, a 3-alkylpyridine marine alkaloid, were tested for cytotoxic activity against human TNBC cell line (BT-549) and tumorspheres derived from BT-549. Cytotoxicity assay was performed by sulforhodamine B (SRB). BT-549 and tumorspheres were examined for CD44(+/high) /CD24(-/low) markers, indicative of CSC profile, by flow cytometry. Clonogenic assay was performed to verify inhibiting growth of tumorspheres by the synthetic analogues. Cell death by apoptosis was investigated employing annexin V assay. SRB assay on BT-549 cells revealed that compounds 1c and 2c were the most active of the series, with IC50 values of 18.66 and 9.8 μm, respectively. Compounds 1c and 2c were able to reduce both CSC-like population (CD44(+/high) /CD24(-/low) ) and non-CSC population (CD44(+/high) /CD24(+/high) ) in tumorsphere model. Clonogenic and annexin V assays confirmed the ability of 1c and 2c to induce growth inhibition and apoptosis in BT-549 cells and tumorspheres. These preliminary data indicate that these compounds are a promising class for development of anticancer agents.

  7. MOPITT Search and Subset Tool

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2017-05-11

    ... and improved version of the ASDC MOPITT Search and Subset Web Application has been released. New features include: Versions 6 and 7 ... and improved version of the ASDC MOPITT Search and Subset Web Application has been released. New features include: Versions 6 and 7 ...

  8. Identification of novel dendritic cell subset markers in human blood.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Fabian; Hackstein, Holger

    2014-01-10

    Human dendritic cells (DC) are key regulators of innate and adaptive immunity that can be divided in at least three major subpopulations: plasmacytoid DC (pDC), myeloid type 1 DC (mDC1) and myeloid type 2 DC (mDC2) exhibiting different functions. However, research, diagnostic and cell therapeutic studies on human DC subsets are limited because only few DC subset markers have been identified so far. Especially mDC2 representing the rarest blood DC subset are difficult to be separated from mDC1 and pDC due to a paucity of mDC2 markers. We have combined multiparameter flow cytometry analysis of human blood DC subsets with systematic expression analysis of 332 surface antigens in magnetic bead-enriched blood DC samples. The initial analysis revealed eight novel putative DC subset markers CD26, CD85a, CD109, CD172a, CD200, CD200R, CD275 and CD301 that were subsequently tested in bulk peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) samples from healthy blood donors. Secondary analysis of PBMC samples confirmed three novel DC subset markers CD26 (dipeptidyl peptidase IV), CD85a (Leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor B3) and CD275 (inducible costimulator ligand). CD85a is specifically expressed in mDC1 and CD26 and CD275 represent novel mDC2 markers. These markers will facilitate human DC subset discrimination and additionally provide insight into potentially novel DC subset-specific functions.

  9. A convenient and effective strategy for the enrichment of tumor-initiating cell properties in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiming; Huang, Yiqiang; Jin, Zhong; Li, Xiezhao; Li, Bingkun; Xu, Peng; Huang, Peng; Liu, Chunxiao

    2016-09-01

    Stem-like prostate cancer (PrCa) cells, also called PrCa stem cells (PrCSCs) or PrCa tumor-initiating cells (PrTICs), are considered to be involved in the mediation of tumor metastasis and may be responsible for the poor prognosis of PrCa patients. Currently, the methods for PrTIC sorting are mainly based on cell surface marker or side population (SP). However, the rarity of these sorted cells limits the investigation of the molecular mechanisms and therapeutic strategies targeting PrTICs. For PrTIC enrichment, we induced cancer stem cell (CSC) properties in PrCa cells by transducing three defined factors (OCT3/4, SOX2, and KLF4), followed by culture with conventional serum-containing medium. The CSC properties in the transduced cells were evaluated by proliferation, cell cycle, SP assay, drug sensitivity technology, in vivo tumorigenicity, and molecular marker analysis of PrCSCs compared with parental cells and spheroids. After culture with serum-containing medium for 8 days, the PrCa cells transduced with the three factors showed significantly enhanced CSC properties in terms of marker gene expression, sphere formation, chemoresistance to docetaxel, and tumorigenicity. The percentage of CD133(+)/CD44(+) cells was ninefold higher in the transduced cell population than in the adherent PC3 cell population (2.25 ± 0.62 vs. 0.25 ± 0.12 %, respectively), and the SP increased to 1.22 ± 0.18 % in the transduced cell population, but was undetectable in the adherent population. This method can be used to obtain abundant PrTIC material and enables a complete understanding of PrTIC biology and development of novel therapeutic agents targeting PrTICs.

  10. Detection of Circulating Tumor Cells Using Negative Enrichment Immunofluorescence and an In Situ Hybridization System in Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yu; Qin, Tai; Li, Jing; Wang, Xiuchao; Gao, Chuntao; Xu, Chao; Hao, Jihui; Liu, Jingcheng; Gao, Song; Ren, He

    2017-03-23

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is the most lethal type of gastrointestinal cancer, and early detection and monitoring is an urgent problem. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are emerging as a non-invasive biomarker for tumor detection. However, the low sensitivity is a main problem in the traditional CellSearch System for detecting CTCs, especially in patients with PC. In this study, we used negative enrichment (NE), immunofluorescence and in situ hybridization (FISH) of chromosome 8 (NE-iFISH) to capture and identify CTCs in PC patients. We showed that the NE-iFISH system exhibited a dramatically high detection rate of CTCs in PC patients (90%). The diagnostic rate of PC reached 97.5% when combining CTCs ≥ 2 and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) > 37 µmol/L. The 1-year survival in the group of CTCs < 3 was significantly higher than that of CTCs ≥ 3 (p = 0.043). In addition, we analyzed the role of chromosomal instability in CTCs detection. The group of triploid (three hybridization signals of chromosome 8) CTCs ≥ 3 showed a shorter 1-year survival (p = 0.0279) and overall survival (p = 0.0188) than the group with triploid CTCs < 3. Importantly, the triploid CTC number but not the overall CTC counts could be a predictor of chemo-sensitivity. Moreover, circulating tumor microembolus (CTMs) were found in stage IV patients, and were positively related to the poor response to chemotherapy. In conclusion, the NE-iFISH system significantly improved the positive detection rate of CTCs and triploid CTC could be used to predict prognosis or the response to the chemotherapy of PC patients. CTM is a potential indicator of the chemotherapeutic effect in advanced PC patients.

  11. Induction of vasculogenic mimicry overrides VEGF-A silencing and enriches stem-like cancer cells in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Schnegg, Caroline I.; Yang, Moon Hee; Ghosh, Subrata K.; Hsu, Mei-Yu

    2015-01-01

    The basis for resistance to VEGF inhibition is not fully understood despite its clinical importance. In this study, we examined the adaptive response to VEGF-A inhibition by a loss-of-function analysis using plasmid-based shRNA. Tumor xenografts that initially responded to VEGF-A inhibition underwent an adaptation in vivo leading to acquired resistance. VEGF-A blockade in tumors was associated with HIF-1α expression and an increase in CD144+ vasculogenic mimicry (VM), leading to formation of channels displaying Tie-1 and MMP-2 upregulation. CD133+ and CD271+ melanoma stem-like cells (MSLC) accumulated in the perivascular niche. Tumor xenografts of melanoma cell populations that were intrinsically resistant to VEGF-A blockade did not exhibit any of these features, compared to non-target control counterparts. Thus, melanomas which are initially sensitive to VEGF-A blockade acquire adaptive resistance by adopting VM as an alternate angiogenic strategy, thereby enriching for deposition of MSLC in the perivascular niche through a HIF-1α-dependent process. Conversely, melanomas which are intrinsically resistant to VEGF-A blockade do not show any evidence of compensatory survival mechanisms that promote MSLC accumulation. Our work highlights the potential risk of anti-VEGF treatments owing to a selective pressure for an adaptive resistance mechanism that empowers the development of stem-like cancer cells, with implications for how to design combination therapies that can improve outcomes in patients. PMID:25769726

  12. CHK1 Inhibition in Small-Cell Lung Cancer Produces Single-Agent Activity in Biomarker-Defined Disease Subsets and Combination Activity with Cisplatin or Olaparib

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Triparna; Tong, Pan; Stewart, C. Allison; Cristea, Sandra; Valliani, Aly; Shames, David S.; Redwood, Abena B.; Fan, You Hong; Li, Lerong; Glisson, Bonnie S.; Minna, John D.; Sage, Julien; Gibbons, Don L.; Piwnica-Worms, Helen; Heymach, John V.; Wang, Jing; Byers, Lauren Averett

    2017-01-01

    Effective targeted therapies for small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), the most aggressive form of lung cancer, remain urgently needed. Here we report evidence of preclinical efficacy evoked by targeting the overexpressed cell-cycle checkpoint kinase CHK1 in SCLC. Our studies employed RNAi-mediated attenuation or pharmacologic blockade with the novel second-generation CHK1 inhibitor prexasertib (LY2606368), currently in clinical trials. In SCLC models in vitro and in vivo, LY2606368 exhibited strong single-agent efficacy, augmented the effects of cisplatin or the PARP inhibitor olaparib, and improved the response of platinum-resistant models. Proteomic analysis identified CHK1 and MYC as top predictive biomarkers of LY2606368 sensitivity, suggesting that CHK1 inhibition may be especially effective in SCLC with MYC amplification or MYC protein overexpression. Our findings provide a preclinical proof of concept supporting the initiation of a clinical efficacy trial in patients with platinum-sensitive or platinum-resistant relapsed SCLC. PMID:28490518

  13. IDH1 and IDH2 Gene Mutations Identify Novel Molecular Subsets Within De Novo Cytogenetically Normal Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Cancer and Leukemia Group B Study

    PubMed Central

    Marcucci, Guido; Maharry, Kati; Wu, Yue-Zhong; Radmacher, Michael D.; Mrózek, Krzysztof; Margeson, Dean; Holland, Kelsi B.; Whitman, Susan P.; Becker, Heiko; Schwind, Sebastian; Metzeler, Klaus H.; Powell, Bayard L.; Carter, Thomas H.; Kolitz, Jonathan E.; Wetzler, Meir; Carroll, Andrew J.; Baer, Maria R.; Caligiuri, Michael A.; Larson, Richard A.; Bloomfield, Clara D.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To analyze the frequency and associations with prognostic markers and outcome of mutations in IDH genes encoding isocitrate dehydrogenases in adult de novo cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML). Patients and Methods Diagnostic bone marrow or blood samples from 358 patients were analyzed for IDH1 and IDH2 mutations by DNA polymerase chain reaction amplification/sequencing. FLT3, NPM1, CEBPA, WT1, and MLL mutational analyses and gene- and microRNA-expression profiling were performed centrally. Results IDH mutations were found in 33% of the patients. IDH1 mutations were detected in 49 patients (14%; 47 with R132). IDH2 mutations, previously unreported in AML, were detected in 69 patients (19%; 13 with R172 and 56 with R140). R172 IDH2 mutations were mutually exclusive with all other prognostic mutations analyzed. Younger age (< 60 years), molecular low-risk (NPM1-mutated/FLT3-internal tandem duplication–negative) IDH1-mutated patients had shorter disease-free survival than molecular low-risk IDH1/IDH2-wild-type (wt) patients (P = .046). R172 IDH2-mutated patients had lower complete remission rates than IDH1/IDH2wt patients (P = .007). Distinctive microarray gene- and microRNA-expression profiles accurately predicted R172 IDH2 mutations. The highest expressed gene and microRNAs in R172 IDH2-mutated patients compared with the IDH1/IDH2wt patients were APP (previously associated with complex karyotype AML) and miR-1 and miR-133 (involved in embryonal stem-cell differentiation), respectively. Conclusion IDH1 and IDH2 mutations are recurrent in CN-AML and have an unfavorable impact on outcome. The R172 IDH2 mutations, previously unreported in AML, characterize a novel subset of CN-AML patients lacking other prognostic mutations and associate with unique gene- and microRNA-expression profiles that may lead to the discovery of novel, therapeutically targetable leukemogenic mechanisms. PMID:20368543

  14. CERES Search and Subset Application

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-02-18

    ... locating and subsetting CERES Level 2 SSF and FLASHFlux data granules using a high resolution spatial metadata database and directly accessing the archived data granules for the following select products:   SSF Edition 3A: ...

  15. Anti-protozoal and anti-bacterial antibiotics that inhibit protein synthesis kill cancer subtypes enriched for stem cell-like properties

    PubMed Central

    Cuyàs, Elisabet; Martin-Castillo, Begoña; Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Massaguer, Anna; Bosch-Barrera, Joaquim; Menendez, Javier A

    2015-01-01

    Key players in translational regulation such as ribosomes might represent powerful, but hitherto largely unexplored, targets to eliminate drug-refractory cancer stem cells (CSCs). A recent study by the Lisanti group has documented how puromycin, an old antibiotic derived from Streptomyces alboniger that inhibits ribosomal protein translation, can efficiently suppress CSC states in tumorspheres and monolayer cultures. We have used a closely related approach based on Biolog Phenotype Microarrays (PM), which contain tens of lyophilized antimicrobial drugs, to assess the chemosensitivity profiles of breast cancer cell lines enriched for stem cell-like properties. Antibiotics directly targeting active sites of the ribosome including emetine, puromycin and cycloheximide, inhibitors of ribosome biogenesis such as dactinomycin, ribotoxic stress agents such as daunorubicin, and indirect inhibitors of protein synthesis such as acriflavine, had the largest cytotoxic impact against claudin-low and basal-like breast cancer cells. Thus, biologically aggressive, treatment-resistant breast cancer subtypes enriched for stem cell-like properties exhibit exacerbated chemosensitivities to anti-protozoal and anti-bacterial antibiotics targeting protein synthesis. These results suggest that old/existing microbicides might be repurposed not only as new cancer therapeutics, but also might provide the tools and molecular understanding needed to develop second-generation inhibitors of ribosomal translation to eradicate CSC traits in tumor tissues. PMID:25970790

  16. Anti-protozoal and anti-bacterial antibiotics that inhibit protein synthesis kill cancer subtypes enriched for stem cell-like properties.

    PubMed

    Cuyàs, Elisabet; Martin-Castillo, Begoña; Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Massaguer, Anna; Bosch-Barrera, Joaquim; Menendez, Javier A

    2015-01-01

    Key players in translational regulation such as ribosomes might represent powerful, but hitherto largely unexplored, targets to eliminate drug-refractory cancer stem cells (CSCs). A recent study by the Lisanti group has documented how puromycin, an old antibiotic derived from Streptomyces alboniger that inhibits ribosomal protein translation, can efficiently suppress CSC states in tumorspheres and monolayer cultures. We have used a closely related approach based on Biolog Phenotype Microarrays (PM), which contain tens of lyophilized antimicrobial drugs, to assess the chemosensitivity profiles of breast cancer cell lines enriched for stem cell-like properties. Antibiotics directly targeting active sites of the ribosome including emetine, puromycin and cycloheximide, inhibitors of ribosome biogenesis such as dactinomycin, ribotoxic stress agents such as daunorubicin, and indirect inhibitors of protein synthesis such as acriflavine, had the largest cytotoxic impact against claudin-low and basal-like breast cancer cells. Thus, biologically aggressive, treatment-resistant breast cancer subtypes enriched for stem cell-like properties exhibit exacerbated chemosensitivities to anti-protozoal and anti-bacterial antibiotics targeting protein synthesis. These results suggest that old/existing microbicides might be repurposed not only as new cancer therapeutics, but also might provide the tools and molecular understanding needed to develop second-generation inhibitors of ribosomal translation to eradicate CSC traits in tumor tissues.

  17. Fish oil-enriched nutritional supplement attenuates progression of the acute-phase response in weight-losing patients with advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Barber, M D; Ross, J A; Preston, T; Shenkin, A; Fearon, K C

    1999-06-01

    The presence of an acute-phase protein response (APPR) has been suggested to shorten survival and contribute to weight loss in patients with pancreatic cancer. Fatty acids derived from fish oil have been shown to alter proinflammatory cytokine production and acute-phase protein synthesis in vitro. The present study was designed to determine the effects of a fish oil-enriched nutritional supplement on the concentrations of a range of individual acute-phase proteins (APP) in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. In a sequential series, 18 patients with pancreatic cancer received the supplement (providing 2 g eicosapentaenoic acid and 1 g docosahexaenoic acid/d) for 3 wk while another 18 received full supportive care alone. Six healthy subjects served as additional controls. Acute-phase proteins were measured before and after the 3-wk intervention period in cancer patients. At baseline, albumin, transferrin and pre-albumin were significantly reduced and fibrinogen, haptoglobin, alpha-1-acid glycoprotein, alpha-1-antitrypsin, ceruloplasmin and C-reactive protein (CRP) were significantly elevated in the cancer patients compared with healthy controls, reflecting their roles as negative and positive acute phase proteins, respectively. In the supplemented cancer group, the only significant change in APP concentrations over the 4-wk study period was an increase in transferrin. In the control cancer group there were further significant reductions in albumin, transferrin and pre-albumin, and a significant increase in CRP concentration. These results suggest that many positive and negative APP are altered in advanced pancreatic cancer. The APPR tends to progress in untreated patients but may be stabilized by the administration of a fish oil-enriched nutritional supplement. This may have implications for reducing wasting in such patients.

  18. Efficacy and safety of capecitabine plus cisplatin in Japanese patients with advanced or metastatic gastric cancer: subset analyses of the AVAGAST study and the ToGA study.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Kensei; Sawaki, Akira; Doi, Toshihiko; Satoh, Taroh; Yamada, Yasuhide; Omuro, Yasushi; Nishina, Tomohiro; Boku, Narikazu; Chin, Keisho; Hamamoto, Yasuo; Takiuchi, Hiroya; Komatsu, Yoshito; Saji, Shigehira; Koizumi, Wasaburo; Miyata, Yoshinori; Sato, Atsushi; Baba, Eishi; Tamura, Takao; Abe, Takashi; Ohtsu, Atsushi

    2013-04-01

    Capecitabine plus cisplatin (XP) is recognized as one of the global standard first-line chemotherapy regimens for patients with metastatic gastric cancer (mGC). Recent multinational phase III trials in mGC have been conducted with XP as the control arm, although no data on XP in Japanese patients with mGC have been published to date. The AVAGAST (XP ± bevacizumab in mGC) and ToGA (XP ± trastuzumab in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 [HER2]-positive mGC) studies were the first two global studies including Japanese mGC patients. The aim of this analysis was to investigate the efficacy and safety of XP in Japanese mGC patients, using AVAGAST and ToGA subgroup data. Efficacy and safety analyses were carried out in Japanese patients with mGC receiving XP alone, based on results from the AVAGAST and ToGA studies. There were differences in the target populations between the two studies; for example, the ToGA study limited patients to those with HER2-positive tumors; therefore, efficacy was evaluated separately. Ninety-four Japanese patients in the AVAGAST study and 50 in the ToGA study received XP alone. Median overall and progression-free survivals were 14.2 and 5.7 months, respectively, in the AVAGAST study, and 17.7 and 5.6 months, respectively, in the ToGA study. Overall response rates were 49.2 % in the AVAGAST and 58.5 % in the ToGA study. Adverse events were generally mild; the most common grade 3/4 events were neutropenia, anemia, anorexia, and nausea. XP is effective and well tolerated in Japanese patients with mGC, and could be one of the standard regimens for the first-line treatment in this cohort.

  19. Optimization of an Enrichment process for Circulating tumor cells from the blood of Head and Neck Cancer patients through depletion of normal cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liying; Lang, James C.; Balasubramanian, Priya; Jatana, Kris R.; Schuller, David; Agrawal, Amit; Zborowski, Maciej; Chalmers, Jeffrey J.

    2014-01-01

    The optimization of a purely negative depletion, enrichment process for circulating tumor cells, CTC's, in the peripheral blood of Head and Neck cancer patients is presented. The enrichment process uses a red cell lysis step followed by immunomagnetic labeling, and subsequent depletion, of CD45 positive cells. A number of relevant variables are quantified, or attempted to be quantified, which control the performance of the enrichment process. Six different immunomagnetic labeling combinations were evaluated as well as the significant difference in performance with respect to the blood source: buffy coats purchased from the Red Cross, fresh, peripheral blood from normal donors, and fresh peripheral blood from human cancer patients. After optimization, the process is able to reduce the number of normal blood cells in a cancer patient's blood from 4.05 × 109 to 8.04 × 103 cells/ml and still recover, on average, 2.32 CTC per ml of blood. For all of the cancer patient blood samples tested in which CTC were detected (20 out of 26 patients) the average recovery of CTCs was 21.7 per ml of blood, with a range of 282 to 0.53 CTC per ml of blood. Unlike a majority of other published studies, this study focused on quantifying as many factors as possible to facilitate both the optimization of the process as well as provide information for future performance comparisons. The authors are not aware any other reported study which has achieved the performance reported here (a 5.76 log10) in a purely negative enrichment mode of operation. Such a mode of operation of an enrichment process provides significant flexibility in that it has no bias with respect to what attributes define a CTC; thereby allowing the researcher or clinician to use any maker they choose to define whether the final, enrich product contains CTC's or other cell type relevant to the specific question (i.e. does the CTC have predominately epithelia or mesenchymal characteristics?). PMID:18726961

  20. Effects of Enriched Environment on COX-2, Leptin and Eicosanoids in a Mouse Model of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nachat-Kappes, Rachida; Pinel, Alexandre; Combe, Kristell; Lamas, Bruno; Farges, Marie-Chantal; Rossary, Adrien; Goncalves-Mendes, Nicolas; Caldefie-Chezet, Florence; Vasson, Marie-Paule; Basu, Samar

    2012-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and adipokines have been implicated in breast cancer. This study investigated a possible link between COX-2 and adipokines in the development of mammary tumors. A model of environmental enrichment (EE), known to reduce tumor growth was used for a syngeneic murine model of mammary carcinoma. 3-week-old, female C57BL/6 mice were housed in standard environment (SE) or EE cages for 9 weeks and transplanted orthotopically with syngeneic EO771 adenocarcinoma cells into the right inguinal mammary fat pad. EE housing influenced mammary gland development with a decrease in COX-2 expressing cells and enhanced side-branching and advanced development of alveolar structures of the mammary gland. Tumor volume and weight were decreased in EE housed mice and were associated with a reduction in COX-2 and Ki67 levels, and an increase in caspase-3 levels. In tumors of SE mice, high COX-2 expression correlated with enhanced leptin detection. Non-tumor-bearing EE mice showed a significant increase in adiponectin levels but no change in those of leptin, F2-isoprostanes, PGF2α, IL-6, TNF-α, PAI-1, and MCP-1 levels. Both tumor-bearing groups (SE and EE housing) had increased resistin, IL-6, TNF-α, PAI-1 and MCP-1 levels irrespective of the different housing environment demonstrating higher inflammatory response due to the presence of the tumor. This study demonstrates that EE housing influenced normal mammary gland development and inhibited mammary tumor growth resulting in a marked decrease in intratumoral COX-2 activity and an increase in the plasma ratio of adiponectin/leptin levels. PMID:23272114

  1. Colorectal cancer cell-derived microvesicles are enriched in cell cycle-related mRNAs that promote proliferation of endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hong, Bok Sil; Cho, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Hyunjung; Choi, Eun-Jeong; Rho, Sangchul; Kim, Jongmin; Kim, Ji Hyun; Choi, Dong-Sic; Kim, Yoon-Keun; Hwang, Daehee; Gho, Yong Song

    2009-11-25

    Various cancer cells, including those of colorectal cancer (CRC), release microvesicles (exosomes) into surrounding tissues and peripheral circulation. These microvesicles can mediate communication between cells and affect various tumor-related processes in their target cells. We present potential roles of CRC cell-derived microvesicles in tumor progression via a global comparative microvesicular and cellular transcriptomic analysis of human SW480 CRC cells. We first identified 11,327 microvesicular mRNAs involved in tumorigenesis-related processes that reflect the physiology of donor CRC cells. We then found 241 mRNAs enriched in the microvesicles above donor cell levels, of which 27 were involved in cell cycle-related processes. Network analysis revealed that most of the cell cycle-related microvesicle-enriched mRNAs were associated with M-phase activities. The integration of two mRNA datasets showed that these M-phase-related mRNAs were differentially regulated across CRC patients, suggesting their potential roles in tumor progression. Finally, we experimentally verified the network-driven hypothesis by showing a significant increase in proliferation of endothelial cells treated with the microvesicles. Our study demonstrates that CRC cell-derived microvesicles are enriched in cell cycle-related mRNAs that promote proliferation of endothelial cells, suggesting that microvesicles of cancer cells can be involved in tumor growth and metastasis by facilitating angiogenesis-related processes. This information will help elucidate the pathophysiological functions of tumor-derived microvesicles, and aid in the development of cancer diagnostics, including colorectal cancer.

  2. Selenium nanoparticle-enriched Lactobacillus brevis causes more efficient immune responses in vivo and reduces the liver metastasis in metastatic form of mouse breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and the purpose of the study Selenium enriched Lactobacillus has been reported as an immunostimulatory agent which can be used to increase the life span of cancer bearing animals. Lactic acid bacteria can reduce selenium ions to elemental selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs) and deposit them in intracellular spaces. In this strategy two known immunostimulators, lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and SeNPs, are concomitantly administered for enhancing of immune responses in cancer bearing mice. Methods Forty five female inbred BALB/c mice were divided into three groups of tests and control, each containing 15 mice. Test mice were orally administered with SeNP-enriched Lactobacillus brevis or Lactobacillus brevis alone for 3 weeks before tumor induction. After that the administration was followed in three cycles of seven days on/three days off. Control group received phosphate buffer saline (PBS) at same condition. During the study the tumor growth was monitored using caliper method. At the end of study the spleen cell culture was carried out for both NK cytotoxicity assay and cytokines measurement. Delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses were also assayed after 72h of tumor antigen recall. Serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) levels were measured, the livers of mice were removed and prepared for histopathological analysis. Results High level of IFN-γ and IL-17 besides the significant raised in NK cytotoxicity and DTH responses were observed in SeNP-enriched L. brevis administered mice and the extended life span and decrease in the tumor metastasis to liver were also recorded in this group compared to the control mice or L.brevis alone administered mice. Conclusion Our results suggested that the better prognosis could be achieved by oral administration of SeNP-enriched L. brevis in highly metastatic breast cancer mice model. PMID:23631392

  3. Loss of post-transcriptional regulation of DNMT3b by microRNAs: a possible molecular mechanism for the hypermethylation defect observed in a subset of breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Rupninder; Rivenbark, Ashley G; Coleman, William B

    2012-08-01

    A hypermethylation defect associated with DNMT hyperactivity and DNMT3b overexpression characterizes a subset of breast cancers and breast cancer cell lines. We analyzed breast cancer cell lines for differential expression of regulatory miRs to determine if loss of miR-mediated post-transcriptional regulation of DNMT3b represents the molecular mechanism that governs the overexpression of DNMT3b that drives the hypermethylation defect in breast cancer. MicroRNAs (miRs) that regulate (miR-29a, miR-29b, miR-29c, miR-148a, miR-148b) or are predicted (miR-26a, miR-26b, miR-203, miR-222) to regulate DNMT3b were examined among 10 hypermethylator and 6 non-hypermethylator breast cancer cell lines. Hypermethylator cell lines express diminished levels of miR-29c, miR-148a, miR-148b, miR-26a, miR-26b, and miR-203 compared to non-hypermethylator cell lines. miR expression patterns correlate inversely with methylation-sensitive gene expression (r=-0.66, p=0.0056) and directly with the methylation status of these genes (r=0.72, p=0.002). To determine the mechanistic role of specific miRs in the dysregulation of DNMT3b among breast cancer cell lines, miR levels were modulated by transfection of pre-miR precursors for miR-148b, miR-26b, and miR-29c into hypermethylator cell lines (Hs578T, HCC1937, SUM185) and transfection of antagomirs directed against miR-148b, miR-26b, and miR-29c into non-hypermethylator cell lines (BT20, MDA-MB-415, MDA-MB-468). Antagomir-mediated knock-down of miR-148b, miR-29c, and miR-26b significantly increased DNMT3b mRNA in non-hypermethylator cell lines, and re-expression of miR-148b, miR-29c, and miR-26b following transfection of pre-miR precursors significantly reduced DNMT3b mRNA in hypermethylator cell lines. These findings strongly suggest that: i) post-transcriptional regulation of DNMT3b is combinatorial, ii) diminished expression of regulatory miRs contributes to DNMT3b overexpression, iii) re-expression of regulatory miRs reduces DNMT3b m

  4. Impact of Upfront Cellular Enrichment by Laser Capture Microdissection on Protein and Phosphoprotein Drug Target Signaling Activation Measurements in Human Lung Cancer: Implications for Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Elisa, Baldelli; B., Haura Eric; Lucio, Crinò; Douglas, Cress W.; Vienna, Ludovini; B., Schabath Matthew; A., Liotta Lance; F., Petricoin Emanuel; Mariaelena, Pierobon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate whether upfront cellular enrichment via laser capture microdissection is necessary for accurately quantifying predictive biomarkers in non-small cell lung cancer tumors. Experimental design Fifteen snap frozen surgical biopsies were analyzed. Whole tissue lysate and matched highly enriched tumor epithelium via laser capture microdissection (LCM) were obtained for each patient. The expression and activation/phosphorylation levels of 26 proteins were measured by reverse phase protein microarray. Differences in signaling architecture of dissected and undissected matched pairs were visualized using unsupervised clustering analysis, bar graphs, and scatter plots. Results Overall patient matched LCM and undissected material displayed very distinct and differing signaling architectures with 93% of the matched pairs clustering separately. These differences were seen regardless of the amount of starting tumor epithelial content present in the specimen. Conclusions and clinical relevance These results indicate that LCM driven upfront cellular enrichment is necessary to accurately determine the expression/activation levels of predictive protein signaling markers although results should be evaluated in larger clinical settings. Upfront cellular enrichment of the target cell appears to be an important part of the workflow needed for the accurate quantification of predictive protein signaling biomarkers. Larger independent studies are warranted. PMID:25676683

  5. Circulating tumour cells: the evolving concept and the inadequacy of their enrichment by EpCAM-based methodology for basic and clinical cancer research.

    PubMed

    Grover, P K; Cummins, A G; Price, T J; Roberts-Thomson, I C; Hardingham, J E

    2014-08-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that circulating tumour cells (CTCs) are responsible for metastatic relapse and this has fuelled interest in their detection and quantification. Although numerous methods have been developed for the enrichment and detection of CTCs, none has yet reached the 'gold' standard. Since epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM)-based enrichment of CTCs offers several advantages, it is one of the most commonly used and has been adapted for high-throughput technology. However, emerging evidence suggests that CTCs are highly heterogeneous: they consist of epithelial tumour cells, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) cells, hybrid (epithelial/EMT(+)) tumour cells, irreversible EMT(+) tumour cells, and circulating tumour stem cells (CTSCs). The EpCAM-based approach does not detect CTCs expressing low levels of EpCAM and non-epithelial phenotypes such as CTSCs and those that have undergone EMT and no longer express EpCAM. Thus, the approach may lead to underestimation of the significance of CTCs, in general, and CTSCs and EMT(+) tumour cells, in particular, in cancer dissemination. Here, we provide a critical review of research literature on the evolving concept of CTCs and the inadequacy of their enrichment by EpCAM-based technology for basic and clinical cancer research. The review also outlines future perspectives in the field. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Effect of Nutritional Supplementation Enriched with Eicosapentaenoic Acid on Inflammatory Profile of Patients With Oral Cavity Cancer in Antineoplastic Pretreatment: A Controlled and Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Thayana C; Cruz, Bruna C S; Viana, Monica S; Martucci, Renata B; Saraiva, Danúbia C A; Reis, Patrícia F

    2017-04-01

    The objective of the study is to investigate the effect of nutritional supplementation with eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA)-enriched formula on the inflammatory profile of patients with oral cavity cancer. The study was conducted with 53 patients with oral cavity cancer in antineoplastic pretreatment who were randomized into two groups: the control group received a powdered supplement without EPA during 4 wk and the intervention group received a liquid supplement enriched with EPA (2 g/day) during the same period. In the baseline and after 4 wk of supplementation, serum concentrations of albumin, prealbumin, C-reactive protein (CRP), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were measured. Values of CRP and of CRP/albumin ratio were lower in the intervention group than those in the control group. However, when the two groups were compared to each other after intervention, any significant difference was not observed. There was a significant negative correlation between levels of CRP and albumin, and IL-6 and albumin, both in the control and in the intervention groups. In both groups, a positive correlation between concentrations of IL-6 and CRP was observed. No significant difference was encountered in the assessed parameters between the group that received standard supplement and the group that received EPA-enriched supplement.

  7. Enrichment of the Cancer Stem Phenotype in Sphere Cultures of Prostate Cancer Cell Lines Occurs through Activation of Developmental Pathways Mediated by the Transcriptional Regulator ΔNp63α

    PubMed Central

    Portillo-Lara, Roberto; Alvarez, Mario Moisés

    2015-01-01

    Background Cancer stem cells (CSC) drive prostate cancer tumor survival and metastasis. Nevertheless, the development of specific therapies against CSCs is hindered by the scarcity of these cells in prostate tissues. Suspension culture systems have been reported to enrich CSCs in primary cultures and cell lines. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon have not been fully explored. Methodology/Principal Findings We describe a prostasphere assay for the enrichment of CD133+ CSCs in four commercial PCa cell lines: 22Rv1, DU145, LNCaP, and PC3. Overexpression of CD133, as determined by flow cytometric analysis, correlated with an increased clonogenic, chemoresistant, and invasive potential in vitro. This phenotype is concordant to that of CSCs in vivo. Gene expression profiling was then carried out using the Cancer Reference panel and the nCounter system from NanoString Technologies. This analysis revealed several upregulated transcripts that can be further explored as potential diagnostic markers or therapeutic targets. Furthermore, functional annotation analysis suggests that ΔNp63α modulates the activation of developmental pathways responsible for the increased stem identity of cells growing in suspension cultures. Conclusions/Significance We conclude that profiling the genetic mechanisms involved in CSC enrichment will help us to better understand the molecular pathways that underlie CSC pathophysiology. This platform can be readily adapted to enrich and assay actual patient samples, in order to design patient-specific therapies that are aimed particularly against CSCs. PMID:26110651

  8. Enrichment of the Cancer Stem Phenotype in Sphere Cultures of Prostate Cancer Cell Lines Occurs through Activation of Developmental Pathways Mediated by the Transcriptional Regulator ΔNp63α.

    PubMed

    Portillo-Lara, Roberto; Alvarez, Mario Moisés

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) drive prostate cancer tumor survival and metastasis. Nevertheless, the development of specific therapies against CSCs is hindered by the scarcity of these cells in prostate tissues. Suspension culture systems have been reported to enrich CSCs in primary cultures and cell lines. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon have not been fully explored. We describe a prostasphere assay for the enrichment of CD133+ CSCs in four commercial PCa cell lines: 22Rv1, DU145, LNCaP, and PC3. Overexpression of CD133, as determined by flow cytometric analysis, correlated with an increased clonogenic, chemoresistant, and invasive potential in vitro. This phenotype is concordant to that of CSCs in vivo. Gene expression profiling was then carried out using the Cancer Reference panel and the nCounter system from NanoString Technologies. This analysis revealed several upregulated transcripts that can be further explored as potential diagnostic markers or therapeutic targets. Furthermore, functional annotation analysis suggests that ΔNp63α modulates the activation of developmental pathways responsible for the increased stem identity of cells growing in suspension cultures. We conclude that profiling the genetic mechanisms involved in CSC enrichment will help us to better understand the molecular pathways that underlie CSC pathophysiology. This platform can be readily adapted to enrich and assay actual patient samples, in order to design patient-specific therapies that are aimed particularly against CSCs.

  9. Dose-dense adjuvant chemotherapy for node-positive breast cancer in women 60 years and older: feasibility and tolerability in a subset of patients in a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Kümmel, Sherko; Krocker, Jutta; Kohls, Andreas; Breitbach, Georg-Peter; Morack, Günther; Budner, Marek; Blohmer, Jens-Uwe; Lichtenegger, Werner; Elling, Dirk

    2006-05-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and tolerability of dose-dense adjuvant chemotherapy for older patients with node-positive breast cancer, a retrospective subset analysis compared dose delays and dose reductions for women aged > or = 60 years with those of younger women. Patients were randomized to a dose-dense (DD, 14-day cycle) or conventional-schedule (CS, 21-day cycle) regimen. DD patients (n = 104; 25 aged > or = 60 years) received epirubicin 90 mg/m2 plus paclitaxel 175 mg/m2 (four cycles), then cyclophosphamide 600 mg/m2, methotrexate 40 mg/m2 and fluorouracil 600 mg/m2 (CMF 600/40/600) (three cycles), plus filgrastim 5 microg/kg per day in every cycle. CS patients (n = 107; 27 aged > or = 60 years) received epirubicin 90 mg/m2 plus cyclophosphamide 600 mg/m2 (four cycles), then CMF 600/40/600 (three cycles), plus filgrastim if required. Delays were more common in older patients in both the DD and CS groups (DD, 17% versus 6%; CS, 11% versus 6%), as were Grades 3-4 leukopenia (26% versus 12%) and neutropenia (33% versus 25%). All older DD and 89% of older CS patients received all seven chemotherapy cycles, with 99% of cycles at full dose. This study demonstrates that a dose-dense regimen combining epirubicin and paclitaxel can be administered to patients > or = 60 years of age with a tolerable safety profile.

  10. Multivoxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy identifies enriched foci of cancer stem-like cells in high-grade gliomas

    PubMed Central

    He, Tao; Qiu, Tianming; Wang, Xiaodong; Gui, Hongxing; Wang, Xilong; Hu, Qikuan; Xia, Hechun; Qi, Gaoyang; Wu, Jinsong; Ma, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study investigated the correlation between choline/creatine (Cho/Cr) ratios determined by multivoxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) and the distribution of cancer stem-like cells (CSLCs) in high-grade gliomas. Patients and methods Sixteen patients with high-grade gliomas were recruited and underwent 1H-MRS examination before surgery to identify distinct tumor regions with variable Cho/Cr ratios. Using intraoperative neuronavigation, tumor tissues were accurately sampled from regions with high and low Cho/Cr ratios within each tumor. The distribution of CSLCs in samples from glioma tissue regions with different Cho/Cr ratios was quantified by neurosphere culture, immunohistochemistry, and Western blot. Results The mean neurosphere formation rate in tissues with high Cho/Cr ratios was significantly increased compared with that in low Cho/Cr ratio tissues (13.94±5.94 per 100 cells vs 8.04±3.99 per 100 cells, P<0.001). Immunohistochemistry indicated that tissues with high Cho/Cr ratios had elevated expression of CD133, nestin, and CD15, relative to low Cho/Cr ratio tissue samples (23.6%±3.8% vs 18.3%±3.3%, 25.2%±4.5% vs 19.8%±2.8%, 24.5%±3.8% vs 17.8%±2.2%, respectively; all P<0.001). Western blot demonstrated that relative CD133 and nestin protein expression in high Cho/Cr ratio regions was significantly higher than that in low Cho/Cr ratio tissue samples (0.50±0.17 vs 0.30±0.08, 0.45±0.13 vs 0.27±0.07, respectively; both P<0.001). The protein expression levels of CD133 and nestin were highly correlated with Cho/Cr ratios (r=0.897 and r=0.861, respectively). Conclusion Cho/Cr ratios correlate with the distribution of CSLCs in high-grade gliomas, and this may assist in identifying foci enriched with CSLCs and thus improve the management of high-grade gliomas. PMID:28115854

  11. Comprehensive Proteomic Study of the Antiproliferative Activity of a Polyphenol-Enriched Rosemary Extract on Colon Cancer Cells Using Nanoliquid Chromatography-Orbitrap MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Valdés, Alberto; Artemenko, Konstantin A; Bergquist, Jonas; García-Cañas, Virginia; Cifuentes, Alejandro

    2016-06-03

    In this work, a proteomics strategy based on nanoliquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (nano-LC-MS/MS) using an Orbitrap high-resolution mass spectrometer together with stable isotope dimethyl labeling (DML) is applied to quantitatively examine relative changes in the protein fraction of HT-29 human colon cancer cells treated with different concentrations of a polyphenol-enriched rosemary extract over the time. The major objective of this study was to gain insights into the antiproliferative mechanisms induced by rosemary polyphenols. Using this methodology, 1909 and 698 proteins were identified and quantified in cell extracts. The polyphenol-enriched rosemary extract treatment changed the expression of several proteins in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Most of the altered proteins are implicated in the activation of Nrf2 transcription factor and the unfolded protein response. In conclusion, rosemary polyphenols induced proteomic changes that were related to the attenuation of aggresome formation and activation of autophagy to alleviate cellular stress.

  12. Clinical significance of detecting circulating tumor cells in colorectal cancer using subtraction enrichment and immunostaining-fluorescence in situ hybridization (SE-iFISH)

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zhen; Jing, Yan; Lu, Haibo; Li, Heng; Yang, Xiaoye; Cui, Xiangbin; Li, Yuqing; Lou, Zheng; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Cun; Zhang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTC) are useful in early detection of colorectal cancer. This study described a newly developed platform, integrated subtraction enrichment and immunostaining-fluorescence in situ hybridization (SE-iFISH), to assess CTCs in colorectal cancer. CTCs were detected by SE-iFISH in 40 of 44 preoperative colorectal cancer patients, and yielded a sensitivity of 90.9%, which was significantly higher than CellSearch system (90.9% vs. 43.2%, P=0.033). No significant association was found between tumor stage, survival and preoperative CTC number. CTCs were detected in 10 colorectal cancer patients one week after surgery; seven patients with decreased CTC numbers (compared with preoperative CTC number) were free of recurrence; whereas two of the three patients with increased CTC numbers had tumor recurrence. Moreover, CTCs were detected in 34 colorectal cancer patients three months after surgery; patients with CTC<2 at three months after surgery had significantly longer Progression Free Survival than those with CTC>=2 (P=0.019); patients with decreased CTC number (compared with preoperative CTC number) had significantly longer Progression Free Survival than those with increased CTC number (P=0.003). In conclusion, CTCs could be detected in various stages of colorectal cancer using SE-iFISH. Dynamic monitoring of CTC numbers could predict recurrence and prognosis. PMID:28423493

  13. Mitosis Phase Enrichment with Identification of Mitotic Centromere-Associated Kinesin As a Therapeutic Target in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sircar, Kanishka; Huang, Heng; Hu, Limei; Liu, Yuexin; Dhillon, Jasreman; Cogdell, David; Aprikian, Armen; Efstathiou, Eleni; Navone, Nora; Troncoso, Patricia; Zhang, Wei

    2012-01-01

    The recently described transcriptomic switch to a mitosis program in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) suggests that mitotic proteins may be rationally targeted at this lethal stage of the disease. In this study, we showed upregulation of the mitosis-phase at the protein level in our cohort of 51 clinical CRPC cases and found centrosomal aberrations to also occur preferentially in CRPC compared with untreated, high Gleason–grade hormone-sensitive prostate cancer (P<0.0001). Expression profiling of chemotherapy-resistant CRPC samples (n = 25) was performed, and the results were compared with data from primary chemotherapy-naïve CRPC (n = 10) and hormone-sensitive prostate cancer cases (n = 108). Our results showed enrichment of mitosis-phase genes and pathways, with progression to both castration-resistant and chemotherapy-resistant disease. The mitotic centromere-associated kinesin (MCAK) was identified as a novel mitosis-phase target in prostate cancer that was overexpressed in multiple CRPC gene-expression datasets. We found concordant gene expression of MCAK between our parent and murine CRPC xenograft pairs and increased MCAK protein expression with clinical progression of prostate cancer to a castration-resistant disease stage. Knockdown of MCAK arrested the growth of prostate cancer cells suggesting its utility as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:22363599

  14. eEF1A1 binds and enriches protoporphyrin IX in cancer cells in 5-aminolevulinic acid based photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Zhichao; Cui, Xiaojun; Wei, Dan; Liu, Wei; Li, Buhong; He, Hao; Ye, Huamao; Zhu, Naishuo; Wei, Xunbin

    2016-05-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) with protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), which is endogenously derived from 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) or its derivatives, is a promising modality for the treatment of both pre-malignant and malignant lesions. However, the mechanisms of how ALA-induced PpIX selectively accumulated in the tumors are not fully elucidated. Here we discovered that eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1 alpha 1 (eEF1A1) interacted with PpIX (with an affinity constant of 2.96 × 106 M‑1). Microscopy imaging showed that ALA-induced PpIX was co-localized with eEF1A1 in cancer cells. eEF1A1 was found to enrich ALA-induced PpIX in cells by competitively blocking the downstream bioavailability of PpIX. Taken together, our study discovered eEF1A1 as a novel photosensitizer binding protein, which may play an essential role in the enrichment of ALA-induced PpIX in cancer cells during PDT. These suggested eEF1A1 as a molecular marker to predict the selectivity and efficiency of 5-ALA based PDT in cancer therapy.

  15. eEF1A1 binds and enriches protoporphyrin IX in cancer cells in 5-aminolevulinic acid based photodynamic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Zhichao; Cui, Xiaojun; Wei, Dan; Liu, Wei; Li, Buhong; He, Hao; Ye, Huamao; Zhu, Naishuo; Wei, Xunbin

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) with protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), which is endogenously derived from 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) or its derivatives, is a promising modality for the treatment of both pre-malignant and malignant lesions. However, the mechanisms of how ALA-induced PpIX selectively accumulated in the tumors are not fully elucidated. Here we discovered that eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1 alpha 1 (eEF1A1) interacted with PpIX (with an affinity constant of 2.96 × 106 M−1). Microscopy imaging showed that ALA-induced PpIX was co-localized with eEF1A1 in cancer cells. eEF1A1 was found to enrich ALA-induced PpIX in cells by competitively blocking the downstream bioavailability of PpIX. Taken together, our study discovered eEF1A1 as a novel photosensitizer binding protein, which may play an essential role in the enrichment of ALA-induced PpIX in cancer cells during PDT. These suggested eEF1A1 as a molecular marker to predict the selectivity and efficiency of 5-ALA based PDT in cancer therapy. PMID:27150264

  16. Rapid detection of germline mutations for hereditary gastrointestinal polyposis/cancers using HaloPlex target enrichment and high-throughput sequencing technologies.

    PubMed

    Kohda, Masakazu; Kumamoto, Kensuke; Eguchi, Hidetaka; Hirata, Tomoko; Tada, Yuhki; Tanakaya, Kohji; Akagi, Kiwamu; Takenoshita, Seiichi; Iwama, Takeo; Ishida, Hideyuki; Okazaki, Yasushi

    2016-10-01

    Genetic testing for hereditary colorectal polyposis/cancers has become increasingly important. Therefore, the development of a timesaving diagnostic platform is indispensable for clinical practice. We designed and validated target enrichment sequencing for 20 genes implicated in familial gastrointestinal polyposis/cancers in 32 cases with previously confirmed mutations using the HaloPlex enrichment system and MiSeq. We demonstrated that HaloPlex captured the targeted regions with a high efficiency (99.66 % for covered target regions, and 99.998 % for breadth of coverage), and MiSeq achieved a high sequencing accuracy (98.6 % for the concordant rate with SNP arrays). Using this approach, we correctly identified 33/33 (100 %) confirmed alterations including SNV, small INDELs and large deletions, and insertions in APC, BMPR1A, EPCAM, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, PMS2, and SKT11. Our approach yielded the sequences of 20 target genes in a single experiment, and correctly identified all previously known mutations. Our results indicate that our approach successfully detected a wide range of genetic variations in a short turnaround time and with a small sample size for the rapid screening of known causative gene mutations of inherited colon cancer, such as familial adenomatous polyposis, Lynch syndrome, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, and Juvenile polyposis syndrome.

  17. Social cognitive theory mediators of physical activity in a lifestyle program for cancer survivors and carers: findings from the ENRICH randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Stacey, F G; James, E L; Chapman, K; Lubans, D R

    2016-04-14

    Despite increasing numbers of cancer survivors and evidence that diet and physical activity improves the health of cancer survivors, most do not meet guidelines. Some social cognitive theory (SCT)-based interventions have increased physical activity behavior, however few have used objective physical activity measures. The Exercise and Nutrition Routine Improving Cancer Health (ENRICH) randomized controlled trial reported a significant intervention effect for the primary outcome of pedometer-assessed step counts at post-test (8-weeks) and follow-up (20-weeks). The aim of this study was to test whether the SCT constructs operationalized in the ENRICH intervention were mediators of physical activity behavior change. Randomized controlled trial with 174 cancer survivors and carers assessed at baseline, post-test (8-weeks), and follow-up (20-weeks). Participants were randomized to the ENRICH six session face-to-face healthy lifestyle program, or to a wait-list control. Hypothesized SCT mediators of physical activity behavior change (self-efficacy, behavioral goal, outcome expectations, impediments, and social expectations) were assessed using valid and reliable scales. Mediation was assessed using the Preacher and Hayes SPSS INDIRECT macro. At eight weeks, there was a significant intervention effect on behavioral goal (A = 9.12, p = 0.031) and outcome expectations (A = 0.25, p = 0.042). At 20 weeks, the intervention had a significant effect on self-efficacy (A = 0.31, p = 0.049) and behavioral goal (A = 13.15, p = 0.011). Only changes in social support were significantly associated with changes in step counts at eight weeks (B = 633.81, p = 0.023). Behavioral goal was the only SCT construct that had a significant mediating effect on step counts, and explained 22 % of the intervention effect at 20 weeks (AB = 397.9, 95 % CI 81.5-1025.5). SCT constructs had limited impact on objectively-assessed step counts in a multiple health

  18. Bulk production and evaluation of high specific activity 186g Re for cancer therapy using enriched 186 WO 3 targets in a proton beam

    DOE PAGES

    Mastren, Tara; Radchenko, Valery; Bach, Hong T.; ...

    2017-06-01

    Rhenium-186 g (t1/2 = 3.72 d) is a β– emitting isotope suitable for theranostic applications. Current production methods rely on reactor production by way of the reaction 185Re(n,γ)186gRe, which results in low specific activities limiting its use for cancer therapy. Production via charged particle activation of enriched 186W results in a 186gRe product with a much specific activity, allowing it to be used more broadly for targeted radiotherapy applications. Furthermore, this targets the unmet clinical need for more efficient radiotherapeutics.

  19. Bulk production and evaluation of high specific activity 186gRe for cancer therapy using enriched 186WO3 targets in a proton beam

    DOE PAGES

    Mastren, Tara; Radchenko, Valery; Bach, Hong Thu; ...

    2017-03-03

    Rhenium-186 g (t1/2 = 3.72 d) is a β– emitting isotope suitable for theranostic applications. Current production methods rely on reactor production by way of the reaction 185Re(n,γ)186gRe, which results in low specific activities limiting its use for cancer therapy. Production via charged particle activation of enriched 186W results in a 186gRe product with a much specific activity, allowing it to be used more broadly for targeted radiotherapy applications. Furthermore, this targets the unmet clinical need for more efficient radiotherapeutics.

  20. Selenium-Containing Polysaccharide-Protein Complex in Se-Enriched Ulva fasciata Induces Mitochondria-Mediated Apoptosis in A549 Human Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xian; Zhong, Yu; Luo, Hongtian; Yang, Yufeng

    2017-07-16

    The role of selenium (Se) and Ulva fasciata as potent cancer chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agents has been supported by epidemiological, preclinical, and clinical studies. In this study, Se-containing polysaccharide-protein complex (Se-PPC), a novel organoselenium compound, a Se-containing polysaccharide-protein complex in Se-enriched Ulva fasciata, is a potent anti-proliferative agent against human lung cancer A549 cells. Se-PPC markedly inhibited the growth of cancer cells via induction of apoptosis which was accompanied by the formation of apoptotic bodies, an increase in the population of apoptotic sub-G1 phase cells, upregulation of p53, and activation of caspase-3 in A549 cells. Further investigation on intracellular mechanisms indicated that cytochrome C was released from mitochondria into cytosol in A549 cells after Se-PPC treatment. Se-PPC induced depletion of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) in A549 cells through regulating the expression of anti-apoptotic (Bcl-2, Bcl-XL) and pro-apoptotic (Bax, Bid) proteins, resulting in disruption of the activation of caspase-9. This is the first report to demonstrate the cytotoxic effect of Se-PPC on human cancer cells and to provide a possible mechanism for this activity. Thus, Se-PPC is a promising novel organoselenium compound with potential to treat human cancers.

  1. B Cell Subsets in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Heather M.; Bender, Timothy P.; McNamara, Coleen A.

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of heart attacks and strokes, is a chronic inflammatory disease of the artery wall. Immune cells, including lymphocytes modulate atherosclerotic lesion development through interconnected mechanisms. Elegant studies over the past decades have begun to unravel a role for B cells in atherosclerosis. Recent findings provide evidence that B cell effects on atherosclerosis may be subset-dependent. B-1a B cells have been reported to protect from atherosclerosis by secretion of natural IgM antibodies. Conventional B-2 B cells can promote atherosclerosis through less clearly defined mechanism that may involve CD4 T cells. Yet, there may be other populations of B cells within these subsets with different phenotypes altering their impact on atherosclerosis. Additionally, the role of B cell subsets in atherosclerosis may depend on their environmental niche and/or the stage of atherogenesis. This review will highlight key findings in the evolving field of B cells and atherosclerosis and touch on the potential and importance of translating these findings to human disease. PMID:23248624

  2. Lower bounds for identifying subset members with subset queries

    SciTech Connect

    Knill, E.

    1994-04-01

    An instance of a group testing problem is a set of objects {Omicron}and an unknown subset P of {Omicron}.The task is to determine P by using queries of the type ``does P intersect ``Q``, where Q is a subset of {Omicron}. This problem occurs in areas such as fault detection, multiaccess communications, optimal search, blood testing and chromosome mapping. Consider the two stage algorithm for solving a group testing problem where in the first stage, a predetermined set of queries, are asked in parallel, and in the second stage, P is determined by testing individual objects. Let n = {vert_bar}{Omicron}{vert_bar}. Suppose that P is generated by independently adding each {chi} {element_of}{Omicron} to P with probability p/n. Let q{sub 1} (q{sub 2}) be the number of queries asked in the first (second) stage of this algorithm. We show that if q{sub 1} = o(log(n) log(n)/log log(n)), then Exp(q{sub 2}) = n{sup l{minus}0(1)}, while there exist algorithms with q{sub 1} = O(log(n)log(n)/loglog(n)) and Exp(q{sub 2}) = o(l). The proof involves a relaxation technique which can be used with arbitrary distributions. The best previously known bound is q{sub 1} + Exp(q{sub 2}) = {Omega}(p log(n)). For general group testing algorithms, our results imply that if the average number of queries over the course of n{sup {gamma}} ({gamma} > 0) independent experiments is O n{sup l{minus}{element_of}}, then with high probability {Omega}(log(n)log(n)/loglog(n)) non-singleton subsets are queried. This settles a conjecture of Bill Bruno and David Torney and has important consequences for the use of group testing in screening DNA libraries and other applications where its is more cost effective to use non-adaptive algorithms and/or expensive to prepare a subset Q for its first test.

  3. CD4+ T Cells Expressing Latency-Associated Peptide and Foxp3 Are an Activated Subgroup of Regulatory T Cells Enriched in Patients with Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mahalingam, Jayashri; Lin, Chun-Yen; Chiang, Jy-Ming; Su, Po-Jung; Chu, Yu-Yi; Lai, Hsin-Yi; Fang, Jian-He; Huang, Ching-Tai; Lin, Yung-Chang

    2014-01-01

    Latency-associated peptide (LAP) - expressing regulatory T cells (Tregs) are important for immunological self-tolerance and immune homeostasis. In order to investigate the role of LAP in human CD4+Foxp3+ Tregs, we designed a cross-sectional study that involved 42 colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. The phenotypes, cytokine-release patterns, and suppressive ability of Tregs isolated from peripheral blood and tumor tissues were analyzed. We found that the population of LAP-positive CD4+Foxp3+ Tregs significantly increased in peripheral blood and cancer tissues of CRC patients as compared to that in the peripheral blood and tissues of healthy subjects. Both LAP+ and LAP− Tregs had a similar effector/memory phenotype. However, LAP+ Tregs expressed more effector molecules, including tumor necrosis factor receptor II, granzyme B, perforin, Ki67, and CCR5, than their LAP− negative counterparts. The in vitro immunosuppressive activity of LAP+ Tregs, exerted via a transforming growth factor-β–mediated mechanism, was more potent than that of LAP− Tregs. Furthermore, the enrichment of LAP+ Treg population in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of CRC patients correlated with cancer metastases. In conclusion, we found that LAP+ Foxp3+ CD4+ Treg cells represented an activated subgroup of Tregs having more potent regulatory activity in CRC patients. The increased frequency of LAP+ Tregs in PBMCs of CRC patients suggests their potential role in controlling immune response to cancer and presents LAP as a marker of tumor-specific Tregs in CRC patients. PMID:25268580

  4. Domino: Extracting, Comparing, and Manipulating Subsets across Multiple Tabular Datasets

    PubMed Central

    Gratzl, Samuel; Gehlenborg, Nils; Lex, Alexander; Pfister, Hanspeter; Streit, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Answering questions about complex issues often requires analysts to take into account information contained in multiple interconnected datasets. A common strategy in analyzing and visualizing large and heterogeneous data is dividing it into meaningful subsets. Interesting subsets can then be selected and the associated data and the relationships between the subsets visualized. However, neither the extraction and manipulation nor the comparison of subsets is well supported by state-of-the-art techniques. In this paper we present Domino, a novel multiform visualization technique for effectively representing subsets and the relationships between them. By providing comprehensive tools to arrange, combine, and extract subsets, Domino allows users to create both common visualization techniques and advanced visualizations tailored to specific use cases. In addition to the novel technique, we present an implementation that enables analysts to manage the wide range of options that our approach offers. Innovative interactive features such as placeholders and live previews support rapid creation of complex analysis setups. We introduce the technique and the implementation using a simple example and demonstrate scalability and effectiveness in a use case from the field of cancer genomics. PMID:26356916

  5. Nicotine Promotes Apoptosis Resistance of Breast Cancer Cells and Enrichment of Side Population Cells with Cancer Stem Cell Like Properties via a Signaling Cascade Involving Galectin-3, α9 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor and STAT3

    PubMed Central

    Guha, Prasun; Bandyopadhyaya, Gargi; Polumuri, Swamy K.; Chumsri, Saranya; Gade, Padmaja; Kalvakolanu, Dhananjaya V.; Ahmed, Hafiz

    2014-01-01

    Nicotine, a main addictive compound in tobacco smoke, has been linked to promotion and progression of lung, head and neck, pancreatic, and breast cancers, but the detailed mechanisms of cancer progression remain elusive. Here we show that nicotine induces the expression of galectin-3 (an anti-apoptotic β-galactoside-binding lectin) in breast cancer cell line and in primary tumors from breast cancer patients. Nicotine-induced up regulation of galectin-3 is due to an increased expression of α9 isoform of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α9nAChR), which activates transcription factor STAT3 that in turn, physically binds to galectin-3 (LGALS3) promoter and induces transcription of galectin-3. Intracellular galectin-3 increased mitochondrial integrity and suppressed chemotherapeutic-induced apoptosis of breast cancer cell. Moreover, nicotine induced enrichment of side population cells with cancer stem cell-like properties was modulated by galectin-3 expression and could be significantly reduced by transient knock down of LGALS3 and its upstream signaling molecules STAT3 and α9nAChR. Thus, galectin-3 or its upstream signaling molecule STAT3 or α9nAChR could be a potential target to prevent nicotine-induced chemoresistance in breast cancer. PMID:24668500

  6. Project ENRICH.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gwaley, Elizabeth; And Others

    Project ENRICH was conceived in Beaver County, Pennsylvania, to: (1) identify preschool children with learning disabilities, and (2) to develop a program geared to the remediation of the learning disabilities within a school year, while allowing the child to be enrolled in a regular class situation for the following school year. Through…

  7. Job Enrichment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Rick

    1970-01-01

    Job enrichment means giving people more decision-making power, more responsibility, more grasp of the totality of the job, and a sense of their own importance in the company. This article presents evidence of the successful working of this approach (Donnelly Mirrors), and the lack of success with an opposing approach (General Motors). (NL)

  8. Targeting Colorectal Cancer Proliferation, Stemness and Metastatic Potential Using Brassicaceae Extracts Enriched in Isothiocyanates: A 3D Cell Model-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Lucília P.; Silva, Patrícia; Duarte, Marlene; Rodrigues, Liliana; Duarte, Catarina M. M.; Albuquerque, Cristina; Serra, Ana Teresa

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) recurrence is often attributable to circulating tumor cells and/or cancer stem cells (CSCs) that resist to conventional therapies and foster tumor progression. Isothiocyanates (ITCs) derived from Brassicaceae vegetables have demonstrated anticancer effects in CRC, however little is known about their effect in CSCs and tumor initiation properties. Here we examined the effect of ITCs-enriched Brassicaceae extracts derived from watercress and broccoli in cell proliferation, CSC phenotype and metastasis using a previously developed three-dimensional HT29 cell model with CSC-like traits. Both extracts were phytochemically characterized and their antiproliferative effect in HT29 monolayers was explored. Next, we performed cell proliferation assays and flow cytometry analysis in HT29 spheroids treated with watercress and broccoli extracts and respective main ITCs, phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC) and sulforaphane (SFN). Soft agar assays and relative quantitative expression analysis of stemness markers and Wnt/β-catenin signaling players were performed to evaluate the effect of these phytochemicals in stemness and metastasis. Our results showed that both Brassicaceae extracts and ITCs exert antiproliferative effects in HT29 spheroids, arresting cell cycle at G2/M, possibly due to ITC-induced DNA damage. Colony formation and expression of LGR5 and CD133 cancer stemness markers were significantly reduced. Only watercress extract and PEITC decreased ALDH1 activity in a dose-dependent manner, as well as β-catenin expression. Our research provides new insights on CRC therapy using ITC-enriched Brassicaceae extracts, specially watercress extract, to target CSCs and circulating tumor cells by impairing cell proliferation, ALDH1-mediated chemo-resistance, anoikis evasion, self-renewal and metastatic potential. PMID:28394276

  9. Targeting Colorectal Cancer Proliferation, Stemness and Metastatic Potential Using Brassicaceae Extracts Enriched in Isothiocyanates: A 3D Cell Model-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Lucília P; Silva, Patrícia; Duarte, Marlene; Rodrigues, Liliana; Duarte, Catarina M M; Albuquerque, Cristina; Serra, Ana Teresa

    2017-04-10

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) recurrence is often attributable to circulating tumor cells and/or cancer stem cells (CSCs) that resist to conventional therapies and foster tumor progression. Isothiocyanates (ITCs) derived from Brassicaceae vegetables have demonstrated anticancer effects in CRC, however little is known about their effect in CSCs and tumor initiation properties. Here we examined the effect of ITCs-enriched Brassicaceae extracts derived from watercress and broccoli in cell proliferation, CSC phenotype and metastasis using a previously developed three-dimensional HT29 cell model with CSC-like traits. Both extracts were phytochemically characterized and their antiproliferative effect in HT29 monolayers was explored. Next, we performed cell proliferation assays and flow cytometry analysis in HT29 spheroids treated with watercress and broccoli extracts and respective main ITCs, phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC) and sulforaphane (SFN). Soft agar assays and relative quantitative expression analysis of stemness markers and Wnt/β-catenin signaling players were performed to evaluate the effect of these phytochemicals in stemness and metastasis. Our results showed that both Brassicaceae extracts and ITCs exert antiproliferative effects in HT29 spheroids, arresting cell cycle at G₂/M, possibly due to ITC-induced DNA damage. Colony formation and expression of LGR5 and CD133 cancer stemness markers were significantly reduced. Only watercress extract and PEITC decreased ALDH1 activity in a dose-dependent manner, as well as β-catenin expression. Our research provides new insights on CRC therapy using ITC-enriched Brassicaceae extracts, specially watercress extract, to target CSCs and circulating tumor cells by impairing cell proliferation, ALDH1-mediated chemo-resistance, anoikis evasion, self-renewal and metastatic potential.

  10. SOX2 expression is an early event in a murine model of EGFR mutant lung cancer and promotes proliferation of a subset of EGFR mutant lung adenocarcinoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Dogan, Irem; Kawabata, Shigeru; Bergbower, Emily; Gills, Joell J.; Ekmekci, Abdullah; Wilson, Willie; Rudin, Charles M.; Dennis, Phillip A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Primary and acquired resistance to EGFR TKIs in EGFR mutant lung cancer occurs primarily through secondary mutations in EGFR or Met amplification. Drug resistance can also be mediated by expression of pluripotency transcription factors, such as OCT4, SOX2 and NANOG that decrease terminal differentiation. In this study, we investigated the expression and role of SOX2 in model systems of EGFR mutant tumors. Materials and Methods Immunoblotting or immunohistochemistry was used to assess expression of pluripotency transcription factors in lungs of transgenic mice or in human NSCLC cell lines. Expression of SOX2 was reduced by shRNA knockdown, and response to erlotinib and cellular proliferation were assessed. Results and Conclusion Induction of mutant EGFR in transgenic CCSP-rtTA/TetO-EGFRL858R/T790M mice correlated with increased OCT4 and SOX2 expression in lung tissue prior to tumor development. Established lung tumors retained SOX2 expression. To assess a role for SOX2 in tumorigenesis, a panel of NSCLC cell lines with activating EGFR mutations was assessed for SOX2 expression. Two of six cell lines with mutant EGFR showed detectable SOX2 levels, suggesting SOX2 expression did not correlate with EGFR mutation status. To assess the role of SOX2 in these cell lines, HCC827 and H1975 cells were infected with lentivirus containing SOX2 shRNA. Knockdown of SOX2 decreased proliferation in both cell lines and increased sensitivity to erlotinib in HCC827 cells. Because constitutive activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway is associated with EGFR TKI resistance, cells were treated with PI3K/AKT inhibitors and expression of SOX2 was examined. PI3K/Akt inhibitors decreased SOX2 expression in a time-dependent manner. These data suggest targeting SOX2 may provide therapeutic benefit in the subset of EGFR-mutant tumors with high constitutive levels of SOX2, and that until more direct means of inhibiting SOX2 are developed, PI3K/Akt inhibitors might be useful to inhibit SOX2

  11. New TES Search and Subset Application

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2017-08-23

    ... The Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC) at NASA Langley Research Center in collaboration with the Tropospheric Emission ... Search and Subset Web Application URL: https://subset.larc.nasa.gov/tes/login.php   Read more ...

  12. A Tumor initiating cell-enriched prognostic signature for HER2+:ERα- breast cancer; rationale, new features, controversies and future directions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jeff C; Egan, Sean E; Zacksenhaus, Eldad

    2013-08-01

    The high intra- and inter-tumor heterogeneity of many types of cancers, including breast cancer (BC), poses great challenge to development of subtype-specific prognosis. In BC, the classification of tumors as either ERα+ (Luminal A and Luminal B), HER2+ (ERα+ or ERα-) or triple-negative (TNBC)(Basal-like, claudin-low) guides both prognostication and therapy. Indeed, prognostic signatures for ERα+ BC are being incorporated into clinical use. However, these signatures distinguish between luminal A (low risk) and Luminal B (high risk) BC; signatures that identify low/high risk patients with luminal B BC are yet to be developed. Likewise, no signature is in clinical use for HER2+ or TNBC. The major obstacles to development of robust signatures stem from diversity of BC, clonal evolution and heterogeneity within each subtype. We have recently generated a prognostic signature for HER2+:ERα- BC based on the identification of genes that were differentially expressed in a tumor-initiating cell (TIC)-enriched fraction versus non-TIC fraction from a mouse model of HER2+ BC (MMTV-Hers/Neu). Here we describe the rationale behind development of this prognosticator, and present new features of the signature, including elevated PI3K pathway activity and low TNFalpha and IFNgamma signaling in high-risk tumors. In addition, we address controversies in the field such as whether random gene expression signatures significantly associate with cancer outcome. Finally, we suggest a guideline for development of prognostic signatures and discuss future directions.

  13. Flaxseed enriched diet-mediated reduction in ovarian cancer severity is correlated to the reduction of prostaglandin E(2) in laying hen ovaries.

    PubMed

    Eilati, Erfan; Hales, Karen; Zhuge, Yan; Ansenberger Fricano, Kristine; Yu, Rui; van Breemen, Richard B; Hales, Dale Buchanan

    2013-09-01

    Prevention of ovarian cancer is the best approach for reducing the impact of this deadly disease. The laying hen is a robust model of spontaneous ovarian cancer that recapitulates the human disease. Dietary intervention with flaxseed, the richest vegetable source of omega-3 fatty acids (OM-3FAs) and phytoestrogen lignans, demonstrate the potential for effective prevention and amelioration of ovarian cancer by targeting inflammatory prostaglandin pathways. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is the most pro-inflammatory ecoisanoid and one of the downstream products of two isoforms of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes: COX-1 and COX-2. Our objective was to investigate the effect of flaxseed supplementation for one year on ovarian cancer and correlate its effects to expression of COX enzymes and concentrations of prostaglandins. White Leghorn hens were fed 10% flaxseed-enriched or standard diet for one year. The severity of ovarian cancer was determined by gross pathology and histology. COX-1 and COX-2 localization and protein and mRNA expression and PGE2 and PGE3 concentrations in ovaries were measured by IHC, western blot, quantitative real-time PCR and LC-MS-MS, respectively. The results demonstrated a significant reduction in late stage ovarian tumors in the flaxseed-fed hens compared with the control diet-fed hens. In correlation with decreased ovarian cancer severity, concentrations of PGE2 and expression of COX-2 were diminished in ovaries of flaxseed-fed hens. PGE3 concentrations were below the level of detection. The results demonstrated that in normal ovaries, COX-1 was localized to the granulosa cell layer surrounding the follicles and ovarian surface epithelium (OSE) whereas COX-2 protein was localized to the granulosa cell layer in the follicle. Extensive COX-1 and COX-2 protein expression was found throughout the ovarian carcinoma. Our findings suggest that the flaxseed-mediated reduction in the severity of ovarian cancer in hens is correlated to the reduction in PGE2 in

  14. Personalized ex vivo multiple peptide enrichment and detection of T cells reactive to multiple tumor-associated antigens in prostate cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Taborska, Pavla; Stakheev, Dmitry; Strizova, Zuzana; Vavrova, Katerina; Podrazil, Michal; Bartunkova, Jirina; Smrz, Daniel

    2017-09-02

    Personalized peptide vaccination is a promising immunotherapeutic approach in prostate cancer (PCa). We therefore examined whether an approach, utilizing personalized multiple peptide-mediated ex vivo enrichment with effector T cells reactive to multiple tumor-associated antigens (TAAs), could be employed as a basis for the development of T cell immunotherapy of PCa. In this study, we used the non-adherent fraction (lymphocytes) of cryopreserved peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a leukapheretic product of biochemically recurrent (BR, n = 14) and metastatic hormone-refractory (HR, n = 12) PCa patients. The lymphocytes were primed with a pool of mixed overlapping peptides derived from 6 PCa TAAs-PSA, PAP, NY-ESO-1, MAGE-A1, MAGE-A3 and MAGE-A4. After 2 weeks of culture, the cells were stimulated with the peptides and T cell reactivity determined by externalization of CD107a. No TAAs-reactive effector T cells were detected in the patient's lymphocytes after their reconstitution. However, following their priming with the TAAs-derived peptides and 2-week culturing, the lymphocytes became enriched with polyclonal TAAs-reactive effector CD8(+) T cells in 8 out of 14 BR and 5 out of 12 HR patients. No such reactive CD8(+) T cells were detected in cultured lymphocytes without the peptide priming. Stimulation of the responding cultures with peptides derived from individual TAAs revealed a unique repertoire of the reactive CD8(+) T cells. Our strategy revealed that the personalized multiple peptide-mediated ex vivo enrichment with multiple TAAs-reactive T cells in the PCa patient's lymphocytes is a viable approach for development of T cell immunotherapy of PCa.

  15. Detection of EGFR somatic mutations in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) using a novel mutant-enriched liquidchip (MEL) technology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Yang, Huiyi; Zhao, Yanwei; Liu, Wenchao; Wu, Shiyang; He, Jiaying; Luo, Xiaodi; Zhu, Zeyao; Xu, Jiasen; Zhou, Qinghua; Ren-Heidenreich, Lifen

    2012-09-01

    We have developed and standardized a novel technology, mutant-enriched liquidchip (MEL), for clinical detection of EGFR mutations. The MEL integrates a mutant-enriched PCR procedure with liquidchip technology for detections of EGFR exon 19 deletions and L858R mutation on both formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) slides and plasma samples from patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The detection sensitivity was 0.1% of mutant DNA in the presence of its wild-type DNA. The cross-reaction rate was lower than 5%. To evaluate the MEL platform, the EGFR mutation status of 59 patients with advanced NSCLC treated with EGFRTKIs (Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors) were tested on their FFPE samples. EGFR exon 19 deletions and L858R were detected in 21 patients (21/59) and 76.2% (16/21) of them had partial response to the EGFR-TKIs, while by sequencing method, only 4 (4/59) mutations were detected. Plasma samples from 627 patients with various stages of NSCLC were examined with the MEL and 22% of EGFR exon 19 deletions and L858R were detected. Furthermore, in patients with advanced disease there are more mutations detected in plasma samples than in patients with less advanced disease. In conclusion, the MEL is a sensitive, stable, and robust technology for detecting EGFR DNA mutations from both FFPE and plasma samples from patients with NSCLC and is now routinely used for clinical diagnosis.

  16. Liver natural killer cells: subsets and roles in liver immunity

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hui; Wisse, Eddie; Tian, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    The liver represents a frontline immune organ that is constantly exposed to a variety of gut-derived antigens as a result of its unique location and blood supply. With a predominant role in innate immunity, the liver is enriched with various innate immune cells, among which natural killer (NK) cells play important roles in host defense and in maintaining immune balance. Hepatic NK cells were first described as ‘pit cells' in the rat liver in the 1970s. Recent studies of NK cells in mouse and human livers have shown that two distinct NK cell subsets, liver-resident NK cells and conventional NK (cNK) cells, are present in this organ. Here, we review liver NK cell subsets in different species, revisiting rat hepatic pit cells and highlighting recent progress related to resident NK cells in mouse and human livers, and also discuss the dual roles of NK cells in liver immunity. PMID:26639736

  17. Liver natural killer cells: subsets and roles in liver immunity.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hui; Wisse, Eddie; Tian, Zhigang

    2016-05-01

    The liver represents a frontline immune organ that is constantly exposed to a variety of gut-derived antigens as a result of its unique location and blood supply. With a predominant role in innate immunity, the liver is enriched with various innate immune cells, among which natural killer (NK) cells play important roles in host defense and in maintaining immune balance. Hepatic NK cells were first described as 'pit cells' in the rat liver in the 1970s. Recent studies of NK cells in mouse and human livers have shown that two distinct NK cell subsets, liver-resident NK cells and conventional NK (cNK) cells, are present in this organ. Here, we review liver NK cell subsets in different species, revisiting rat hepatic pit cells and highlighting recent progress related to resident NK cells in mouse and human livers, and also discuss the dual roles of NK cells in liver immunity.

  18. In vitro antiproliferative/cytotoxic activity on cancer cell lines of a cardanol and a cardol enriched from Thai Apis mellifera propolis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Propolis is a complex resinous honeybee product. It is reported to display diverse bioactivities, such as antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor properties, which are mainly due to phenolic compounds, and especially flavonoids. The diversity of bioactive compounds depends on the geography and climate, since these factors affect the floral diversity. Here, Apis mellifera propolis from Nan province, Thailand, was evaluated for potential anti-cancer activity. Methods Propolis was sequentially extracted with methanol, dichloromethane and hexane and the cytotoxic activity of each crude extract was assayed for antiproliferative/cytotoxic activity in vitro against five human cell lines derived from duet carcinoma (BT474), undifferentiated lung (Chaco), liver hepatoblastoma (Hep-G2), gastric carcinoma (KATO-III) and colon adenocarcinoma (SW620) cancers. The human foreskin fibroblast cell line (Hs27) was used as a non-transformed control. Those crude extracts that displayed antiproliferative/cytotoxic activity were then further fractionated by column chromatography using TLC-pattern and MTT-cytotoxicity bioassay guided selection of the fractions. The chemical structure of each enriched bioactive compound was analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectroscopy. Results The crude hexane and dichloromethane extracts of propolis displayed antiproliferative/cytotoxic activities with IC50 values across the five cancer cell lines ranging from 41.3 to 52.4 μg/ml and from 43.8 to 53.5 μg/ml, respectively. Two main bioactive components were isolated, one cardanol and one cardol, with broadly similar in vitro antiproliferation/cytotoxicity IC50 values across the five cancer cell lines and the control Hs27 cell line, ranging from 10.8 to 29.3 μg/ml for the cardanol and < 3.13 to 5.97 μg/ml (6.82 - 13.0 μM) for the cardol. Moreover, both compounds induced cytotoxicity and cell death without DNA fragmentation in the cancer cells, but only an

  19. Selenium-enriched polysaccharides from Pyracantha fortuneana (Se-PFPs) inhibit the growth and invasive potential of ovarian cancer cells through inhibiting β-catenin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Changdong; Sheng, Deqiao; Li, Zhihong; Huang, Debin; Yuan, Chengfu

    2016-01-01

    Polysaccharides from medicinal plants exert antitumor activity in many cancers. Our previous study demonstrated that polysaccharides extracted from the selenium-enriched Pyracantha fortuneana (Se-PFPs) showed antiproliferative effect in breast cancer cell line. This study aimed to investigate the antitumor effect of Se-PFPs in ovarian cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Se-PFPs could decrease cell viability, induce apoptosis, and inhibit migratory and invasive potentials in HEY and SKOV3 cells. These findings are supported by reduced expression of cyclin D1, Bcl-2 and MMP-9, enhanced cleavage of PARP and caspase-3, elevated activity of caspase-3 and caspase-9, and EMT (epithelial to mesenchymal transition) inhibition (elevated expression of E-cadherin and cytokeratin 19, and reduced expression of N-cadherin, vimentin, ZEB1 and ZEB2). Moreover, Se-PFPs inhibited xenografted tumor growth through inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing cell apoptosis. More importantly, Se-PFPs significantly reduced cytoplasmic β-catenin particularly nuclear β-catenin expression but increased β-catenin phosphorylation in a GSK-3β-dependent mechanism. Furthermore, β-catenin knockdown exerted similar effects on cell proliferation and invasion as seen in Se-PFPs-treated cells, while β-catenin overexpression neutralized the inhibitory effects of Se-PFPs on cell proliferation and invasion. Take together,Se-PFPs exert antitumor activity through inhibiting cell proliferation, migration, invasion and EMT, and inducing cell apoptosis. These effects are achieved by the inhibition of β-catenin signaling. Thus Se-PFPs can be used as potential therapeutic agents in the prevention and treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:27058760

  20. Selenium-enriched polysaccharides from Pyracantha fortuneana (Se-PFPs) inhibit the growth and invasive potential of ovarian cancer cells through inhibiting β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qianling; Dong, Mengmeng; Wang, Zhihui; Wang, Changdong; Sheng, Deqiao; Li, Zhihong; Huang, Debin; Yuan, Chengfu

    2016-05-10

    Polysaccharides from medicinal plants exert antitumor activity in many cancers. Our previous study demonstrated that polysaccharides extracted from the selenium-enriched Pyracantha fortuneana (Se-PFPs) showed antiproliferative effect in breast cancer cell line. This study aimed to investigate the antitumor effect of Se-PFPs in ovarian cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Se-PFPs could decrease cell viability, induce apoptosis, and inhibit migratory and invasive potentials in HEY and SKOV3 cells. These findings are supported by reduced expression of cyclin D1, Bcl-2 and MMP-9, enhanced cleavage of PARP and caspase-3, elevated activity of caspase-3 and caspase-9, and EMT (epithelial to mesenchymal transition) inhibition (elevated expression of E-cadherin and cytokeratin 19, and reduced expression of N-cadherin, vimentin, ZEB1 and ZEB2). Moreover, Se-PFPs inhibited xenografted tumor growth through inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing cell apoptosis. More importantly, Se-PFPs significantly reduced cytoplasmic β-catenin particularly nuclear β-catenin expression but increased β-catenin phosphorylation in a GSK-3β-dependent mechanism. Furthermore, β-catenin knockdown exerted similar effects on cell proliferation and invasion as seen in Se-PFPs-treated cells, while β-catenin overexpression neutralized the inhibitory effects of Se-PFPs on cell proliferation and invasion. Take together,Se-PFPs exert antitumor activity through inhibiting cell proliferation, migration, invasion and EMT, and inducing cell apoptosis. These effects are achieved by the inhibition of β-catenin signaling. Thus Se-PFPs can be used as potential therapeutic agents in the prevention and treatment of ovarian cancer.

  1. Modulation of multidrug resistance gene expression in human breast cancer cells by (-)-gossypol-enriched cottonseed oil.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    P-glycoprotein, the product of the multidrug resistance 1 gene, acts as an efflux pump and prevents sufficient intracellular accumulation of several anticancer agents. Thus, it plays a major role in multidrug cancer resistance. Using the non-radioactive cell proliferation MTS assay, none of three ...

  2. Small RNA deep sequencing discriminates subsets of extracellular vesicles released by melanoma cells – Evidence of unique microRNA cargos

    PubMed Central

    Lunavat, Taral R; Cheng, Lesley; Kim, Dae-Kyum; Bhadury, Joydeep; Jang, Su Chul; Lässer, Cecilia; Sharples, Robyn A; López, Marcela Dávila; Nilsson, Jonas; Gho, Yong Song; Hill, Andrew F; Lötvall, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Melanoma cells release different types of extracellular vesicles (EVs) into the extracellular milieu that are involved with communication and signaling in the tumor microenvironment. Subsets of EVs include exosomes, microvesicles, and apoptotic bodies that carry protein and genetic (RNA) cargos. To define the contribution of the RNA cargo of melanoma cell derived EVs we performed small RNA sequencing to identify different small RNAs in the EV subsets. Using validated centrifugation protocols, we separated these EV subsets released by the melanoma cell line MML-1, and performed RNA sequencing with the Ion Torrent platform. Various, but different, non-coding RNAs were detected in the EV subsets, including microRNA, mitochondrial associated tRNA, small nucleolar RNA, small nuclear RNA, Ro associated Y-RNA, vault RNA and Y-RNA. We identified in total 1041 miRNAs in cells and EV subsets. Hierarchical clustering showed enrichment of specific miRNAs in exosomes, including hsa-miR-214-3p, hsa-miR-199a-3p and hsa-miR-155-5p, all being associated with melanoma progression. Comparison of exosomal miRNAs with miRNAs in clinical melanoma samples indicate that multiple miRNAs in exosomes also are expressed specifically in melanoma tissues, but not in benign naevi. This study shows for the first time the presence of distinct small RNAs in subsets of EVs released by melanoma cells, with significant similarities to clinical melanoma tissue, and provides unique insights into the contribution of EV associated extracellular RNA in cancer. PMID:26176991

  3. Enrichment map profiling of the cancer invasion front suggests regulation of colorectal cancer progression by the bone morphogenetic protein antagonist, gremlin-1.

    PubMed

    Karagiannis, George S; Berk, Aaron; Dimitromanolakis, Apostolos; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2013-08-01

    The cancer invasion front (CIF), a spatially-recognized area due to the frequent presence of peritumoral desmoplastic reaction, represents a cancer site where many hallmarks of cancer metastasis occur. It is now strongly suggested that the desmoplastic microenvironment holds crucial information for determining tumor development and progression. Despite extensive research on tumor-host cell interactions at CIFs, the exact paracrine molecular network that is hardwired into the proteome of the stromal and cancer subpopulations remains partially understood. Here, we interrogated the signaling pathways and the molecular functional signatures across the proteome of a desmoplastic coculture model system of colorectal cancer progression. We discovered a group of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) antagonists that coordinates major biological programs in CIFs, including cell proliferation, invasion, migration and differentiation processes. Using a mathematical model of cancer cell progression, coupled to in vitro cell migration assays, we demonstrated that the prominent BMP antagonist gremlin-1 (GREM1) may trigger motility of cancer cell cohorts. Our data collectively demonstrate that the desmoplastic CIFs deploy a microenvironmental signature, based on BMP antagonism, in order to regulate the motogenic fates of cancer cell cohorts invading the adjacent stroma. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. All rights reserved.

  4. EMT-like circulating tumor cells in ovarian cancer patients are enriched by platinum-based chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Chebouti, Issam; Kasimir-Bauer, Sabine; Buderath, Paul; Wimberger, Pauline; Hauch, Siegfried; Kimmig, Rainer; Kuhlmann, Jan Dominik

    2017-07-25

    Assuming that tumor cell dissemination requires a shift to a mesenchymal phenotype, we analyzed the incidence of epithelial-to-mesenchymal-transition (EMT)-like circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in ovarian cancer patients and inquired, how their molecular phenotypes respond to platinum-based chemotherapy and influence outcome. Before surgery, overall detection rate for epithelial CTCs was 18%. EMT-like CTCs were more frequently observed (30%) and were mutually exclusive to epithelial CTCs in the majority of patients (82%). After chemotherapy, EMT-like CTCs increased up to 52%, accompanied by the "de novo" emergence of PI3Kα+/Twist+ EMT-like CTCs. Before surgery, PI3K+ EMT-like CTCs in combination with epithelial CTCs indicated decreased OS (p = 0.02) and FIGO I-III patients with residual tumor burden after surgery were more likely to be positive for EMT-like CTCs after chemotherapy (p = 0.02). In the latter group, epithelial CTCs alone significantly correlated with decreased PFS and OS (p = 0.02, p = 0.002), supported by an additional inclusion of PI3K+ CTCs (OS, p = 0.001). Blood samples of 91 ovarian cancer patients before surgery and 31 matched samples after adjuvant chemotherapy were evaluated for CTCs with the AdnaTest ovarian cancer and EMT-1, analyzing the epithelial-associated transcripts EpCAM, Muc-1 and CA125 and the EMT-associated transcripts PI3Kα, Akt-2 and Twist. Platinum-based chemotherapy seems to select for EMT-like CTCs in ovarian cancer patients and provokes a shift towards PI3Kα and Twist expressing CTCs, which may reflect clonal tumor evolution towards therapy resistance. It has to be determined, whether this CTC subgroup may serve as a biomarker to identify patients at high risk.

  5. MicroRNA-296 is enriched in cancer cells and downregulates p21WAF1 mRNA expression via interaction with its 3' untranslated region.

    PubMed

    Yoon, A-rum; Gao, Ran; Kaul, Zeenia; Choi, Il-Kyu; Ryu, Jihoon; Noble, Jane R; Kato, Yoshio; Saito, Soichiro; Hirano, Takashi; Ishii, Tetsuro; Reddel, Roger R; Yun, Chae-Ok; Kaul, Sunil C; Wadhwa, Renu

    2011-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of noncoding small RNAs that act as negative regulators of gene expression. To identify miRNAs that may regulate human cell immortalization and carcinogenesis, we performed comparative miRNA array profiling of human normal and SV40-T antigen immortalized cells. We found that miR-296 was upregulated in immortalized cells that also had activation of telomerase. By an independent experiment on genomic analysis of cancer cells we found that chromosome region (20q13.32), where miR-296 is located, was amplified in 28/36 cell lines, and most of these showed enriched miR-296 expression. Overexpression of miR-296 in human cancer cells, with and without telomerase activity, had no effect on their telomerase function. Instead, it suppressed p53 function that is frequently downregulated during human cell immortalization and carcinogenesis. By monitoring the activity of a luciferase reporter connected to p53 and p21(WAF1) (p21) untranslated regions (UTRs), we demonstrate that miR-296 interacts with the p21-3'UTR, and the Hu binding site of p21-3'UTR was identified as a potential miR-296 target site. We demonstrate for the first time that miR-296 is frequently upregulated during immortalization of human cells and contributes to carcinogenesis by downregulation of p53-p21(WAF1) pathway.

  6. Fatty Acids of CLA-Enriched Egg Yolks Can Induce Transcriptional Activation of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors in MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Banks, Paula; Master, Adam; Domagała, Dominik; Piasna-Słupecka, Ewelina; Drozdowska, Mariola; Sikora, Elżbieta; Laidler, Piotr

    2017-01-01

    In our previous study, we showed that fatty acids from CLA-enriched egg yolks (EFA-CLA) reduced the proliferation of breast cancer cells; however, the molecular mechanisms of their action remain unknown. In the current study, we used MCF-7 breast cancer cell line to determine the effect of EFA-CLA, as potential ligands for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), on identified in silico PPAR-responsive genes: BCAR3, TCF20, WT1, ZNF621, and THRB (transcript TRβ2). Our results showed that EFA-CLA act as PPAR ligands with agonistic activity for all PPAR isoforms, with the highest specificity towards PPARγ. In conclusion, we propose that EFA-CLA-mediated regulation of PPAR-responsive genes is most likely facilitated by cis9,trans11CLA isomer incorporated in egg yolk. Notably, EFA-CLA activated PPAR more efficiently than nonenriched FA as well as synthetic CLA isomers. We also propose that this regulation, at least in part, can be responsible for the observed reduction in the proliferation of MCF-7 cells treated with EFA-CLA. PMID:28458685

  7. Fatty Acids of CLA-Enriched Egg Yolks Can Induce Transcriptional Activation of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors in MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Koronowicz, Aneta A; Banks, Paula; Master, Adam; Domagała, Dominik; Piasna-Słupecka, Ewelina; Drozdowska, Mariola; Sikora, Elżbieta; Laidler, Piotr

    2017-01-01

    In our previous study, we showed that fatty acids from CLA-enriched egg yolks (EFA-CLA) reduced the proliferation of breast cancer cells; however, the molecular mechanisms of their action remain unknown. In the current study, we used MCF-7 breast cancer cell line to determine the effect of EFA-CLA, as potential ligands for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), on identified in silico PPAR-responsive genes: BCAR3, TCF20, WT1, ZNF621, and THRB (transcript TRβ2). Our results showed that EFA-CLA act as PPAR ligands with agonistic activity for all PPAR isoforms, with the highest specificity towards PPARγ. In conclusion, we propose that EFA-CLA-mediated regulation of PPAR-responsive genes is most likely facilitated by cis9,trans11CLA isomer incorporated in egg yolk. Notably, EFA-CLA activated PPAR more efficiently than nonenriched FA as well as synthetic CLA isomers. We also propose that this regulation, at least in part, can be responsible for the observed reduction in the proliferation of MCF-7 cells treated with EFA-CLA.

  8. CUDA Enabled Graph Subset Examiner

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, Jeremy T.

    2016-12-22

    Finding Godsil-McKay switching sets in graphs is one way to demonstrate that a specific graph is not determined by its spectrum--the eigenvalues of its adjacency matrix. An important area of active research in pure mathematics is determining which graphs are determined by their spectra, i.e. when the spectrum of the adjacency matrix uniquely determines the underlying graph. We are interested in exploring the spectra of graphs in the Johnson scheme and specifically seek to determine which of these graphs are determined by their spectra. Given a graph G, a Godsil-McKay switching set is an induced subgraph H on 2k vertices with the following properties: I) H is regular, ii) every vertex in G/H is adjacent to either 0, k, or 2k vertices of H, and iii) at least one vertex in G/H is adjacent to k vertices in H. The software package examines each subset of a user specified size to determine whether or not it satisfies those 3 conditions. The software makes use of the massive parallel processing power of CUDA enabled GPUs. It also exploits the vertex transitivity of graphs in the Johnson scheme by reasoning that if G has a Godsil-McKay switching set, then it has a switching set which includes vertex 1. While the code (in its current state) is tuned to this specific problem, the method of examining each induced subgraph of G can be easily re-written to check for any user specified conditions on the subgraphs and can therefore be used much more broadly.

  9. Enrichment of putative prostate cancer stem cells after androgen deprivation: upregulation of pluripotency transactivators concurs with resistance to androgen deprivation in LNCaP cell lines.

    PubMed

    Seiler, Daniel; Zheng, Junying; Liu, Gentao; Wang, Shunyou; Yamashiro, Joyce; Reiter, Robert E; Huang, Jiaoti; Zeng, Gang

    2013-09-01

    Prostate cancer stem cells (PCSC) offer theoretical explanations to many clinical and biological behaviors of the disease in human. In contrast to approaches of using side populations and cell-surface markers to isolate and characterize the putative PCSC, we hypothesize that androgen deprivation leads to functional enrichment of putative PCSC. Human prostate cancer lines LNCaP, LAPC4 and LAPC9 were depleted of androgen in cell cultures and in castrated SCID mice. The resultant androgen deprivation-resistant or castration-resistant populations, in particular in LNCaP and its derivative cell lines, displayed increased expression of pluripotency transactivators and significantly higher tumorigenicity. Individual tumor cell clones were isolated from castration-resistant bulk cultures of LNCaP (CR-LNCaP) and tested for tumorigenicity in male SCID mice under limiting dilution conditions. As few as 200 cells were able to form spheres in vitro, and generate tumors with similar growth kinetics as 10(6) LNCaP or 10(4) CR-LNCaP cells in vivo. These putative PCSC were CD44(+) /CD24(-) and lack the expression of prostate lineage proteins. When transplanted into the prostate of an intact male SCID mouse, these putative PCSC seemed to show limited differentiation into Ck5(+) , Ck8(+) , Ck5(+) /Ck8(+) , and AR(+) cells. On the other hand, stable transduction of LNCaP with retrovirus encoding Sox2 led to androgen-deprivation resistant growth and down-regulation of major prostate lineage gene products in vitro. Concurrence of overexpression of pluripotency transactivators and resistance to androgen deprivation supported the role of putative PCSC in the emergence of prostate cancer resistant to androgen deprivation. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. A two-stage, single-arm, phase II study of EGCG-enriched green tea drink as a maintenance therapy in women with advanced stage ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Trudel, Dominique; Labbé, David P; Araya-Farias, Monica; Doyen, Alain; Bazinet, Laurent; Duchesne, Thierry; Plante, Marie; Grégoire, Jean; Renaud, Marie-Claude; Bachvarov, Dimcho; Têtu, Bernard; Bairati, Isabelle

    2013-11-01

    A two-stage, single-arm, phase II study was conducted to assess the effectiveness and safety of an epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG)-enriched tea drink, the double-brewed green tea (DBGT), as a maintenance treatment in women with advanced stage serous or endometrioid ovarian cancer (clinicaltrials.gov, NCT00721890). Eligible women had FIGO stage III-IV serous or endometrioid ovarian cancer. They had to undergo complete response after debulking surgery followed by 6 to 8 cycles of platinum/taxane chemotherapy at the Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Québec. They all had to drink the DBGT, 500 mL daily until recurrence or during a follow-up of 18 months. The primary endpoint was the absence of recurrence at 18 months. Statistical analyses were done according to the principle of intention to treat. Using a two-stage design, the first stage consisted of 16 enrolled patients. At the end of the follow-up, if 7 or fewer patients were free of recurrence, the trial stopped. Otherwise, accrual would continue to a total of 46 patients. During the first stage of the study, only 5 of the 16 women remained free of recurrence 18 months after complete response. Accordingly, the clinical trial was terminated. Women's adherence to DBGT was high (median daily intake during intervention, 98.1%, interquartile range: 89.7-100%), but 6 women discontinued the intervention before the end of their follow-up. No severe toxicity was reported. DBGT supplementation does not appear to be a promising maintenance intervention in women with advanced stage ovarian cancer after standard treatment. © 2013.

  11. [Preventive effects of 4 Se-enriched plants on rat stomach cancer induced by MNNG--1. inhibitary effects of different selenium resources on rat aneuploid cell incidence in mucosal epithelium of gastric antrum].

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenjie; Li, Weidong; Chen, Jing; Chen, Xiaobin

    2007-09-01

    To obtain new Se resources with high healthy value (both high activity and low toxicity), the preventive efficacies of three Se-enriched higher plants on stomach cancer were compared with selenite and Se-enriched garlic. Ninety weanling male Wistar rats were fed the basal diet for a week, divided equally into nine groups, control, MNNG,Se 75 and 150 microg/kg bw of selenite, Se 150 and 300 microg/kg bw of Se-enriched garlic, Se 150 microg/kg bw of Se-enriched broccoli, Se 300 microg/kg bw of Se-enriched red kales and green kales group. Rats in MNNG and Se supplementation groups were daily given 15 mg/kg bw of MNNG (solved in 1 ml distilled water) and the rats of control group were given 1 ml distilled water by gavage for ten days. Meanwhile, the rats of the control and MNNG group were daily given 1 ml distilled water and the rats of other groups were given 1 ml water suspension of Se-enriched garlic, red kavas, green kavas, broccoli or 1 ml solution of sodium selenite by gavage for seventeen weeks. All rats were freely fed the basal diet and water during the period of the experiment. At the end of 18th week, the rats were sacrificed, the incidence of aneuploid cells (IAC) in mucosal epithelium of the gastric antrum was detected, and the IAC data were analyzed by SPSS 12.0. The results showed that the IACs were 25% and 30%, respectively, in the Se 150 microg/kg bw of Se-enriched garlic and -broccoli group, and were in turn 22%, 50% and 30% in the 300 microg/kg bw of Se-enriched garlic, -red kale and -green kale. No significant differences of IACs were found in the same level of Se supplementation groups by Se-enriched plants. The data showed that Se-enriched broccoli, red kale and green kale had high activities similar to Se-enriched garlic in stomach cancer prevention and lower toxicity than selenite.

  12. Bulk production and evaluation of high specific activity (186g)Re for cancer therapy using enriched (186)WO3 targets in a proton beam.

    PubMed

    Mastren, Tara; Radchenko, Valery; Bach, Hong T; Balkin, Ethan R; Birnbaum, Eva R; Brugh, Mark; Engle, Jonathan W; Gott, Matthew D; Guthrie, James; Hennkens, Heather M; John, Kevin D; Ketring, Alan R; Kuchuk, Marina; Maassen, Joel R; Naranjo, Cleo M; Nortier, F Meiring; Phelps, Tim E; Jurisson, Silvia S; Wilbur, D Scott; Fassbender, Michael E

    2017-06-01

    Rhenium-186g (t1/2 = 3.72 d) is a β(-) emitting isotope suitable for theranostic applications. Current production methods rely on reactor production by way of the reaction (185)Re(n,γ)(186g)Re, which results in low specific activities limiting its use for cancer therapy. Production via charged particle activation of enriched (186)W results in a (186g)Re product with a higher specific activity, allowing it to be used more broadly for targeted radiotherapy applications. This targets the unmet clinical need for more efficient radiotherapeutics. A target consisting of highly enriched, pressed (186)WO3 was irradiated with protons at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Isotope Production Facility (LANL-IPF) to evaluate (186g)Re product yield and quality. LANL-IPF was operated in a dedicated nominal 40 MeV mode. Alkaline dissolution followed by anion exchange chromatography was used to isolate (186g)Re from the target material. Phantom and radiolabeling studies were conducted with the produced (186g)Re activity. A (186g)Re batch yield of 1.38 ± 0.09 MBq/μAh or 384.9 ± 27.3 MBq/C was obtained after 16.5 h in a 205 μA average/230μA maximum current proton beam. The chemical recovery yield was 93% and radiolabeling was achieved with efficiencies ranging from 60-80%. True specific activity of (186g)Re at EOB was determined via ICP-AES and amounted to 0.788 ± 0.089 GBq/μg (0.146 ± 0.017 GBq/nmol), which is approximately seven times higher than the product obtained from neutron capture in a reactor. Phantom studies show similar imaging quality to the gold standard (99m)Tc. We report a preliminary study of the large-scale production and novel anion exchange based chemical recovery of high specific activity (186g)Re from enriched (186)WO3 targets in a high-intensity proton beam with exceptional chemical recovery and radiochemical purity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Quantitative analysis of aberrant protein glycosylation in liver cancer plasma by AAL-enrichment and MRM mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yeong Hee; Shin, Park Min; Kim, Yong-Sam; Oh, Na Ree; Ji, Eun Sun; Kim, Kwang Hoe; Lee, Yeon Jung; Kim, Sung Ho; Yoo, Jong Shin

    2013-11-07

    A lectin-coupled mass spectrometry (MS) approach was employed to quantitatively monitor aberrant protein glycosylation in liver cancer plasma. To do this, we compared the difference in the total protein abundance of a target glycoprotein between hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) plasmas and hepatitis B virus (HBV) plasmas, as well as the difference in lectin-specific protein glycoform abundance of the target glycoprotein. Capturing the lectin-specific protein glycoforms from a plasma sample was accomplished by using a fucose-specific aleuria aurantia lectin (AAL) immobilized onto magnetic beads via a biotin-streptavidin conjugate. Following tryptic digestion of both the total plasma and its AAL-captured fraction of each HCC and HBV sample, targeted proteomic mass spectrometry was conducted quantitatively by a multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) technique. From the MRM-based analysis of the total plasmas and AAL-captured fractions, differences between HCC and HBV plasma groups in fucosylated glycoform levels of target glycoproteins were confirmed to arise from both the change in the total protein abundance of the target proteins and the change incurred by aberrant fucosylation on target glycoproteins in HCC plasma, even when no significant change occurs in the total protein abundance level. Combining the MRM-based analysis method with the lectin-capturing technique proved to be a successful means of quantitatively investigating aberrant protein glycosylation in cancer plasma samples. Additionally, it was elucidated that the differences between HCC and control groups in fucosylated biomarker candidates A1AT and FETUA mainly originated from an increase in fucosylation levels on these target glycoproteins, rather than an increase in the total protein abundance of the target glycoproteins.

  14. Visualization and enrichment of live putative cancer stem cell populations following p53 inactivation or Bax deletion using non-toxic fluorescent dyes

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Joshua E.; Hart, Lori S.; Dicker, David T.; Wang, Wenge; El-Deiry, Wafik S.

    2010-01-01

    Putative cancer stem cell (CSC) populations efflux dyes such as Hoechst 33342 giving rise to side populations (SP) that can be analyzed or isolated by flow cytometry. However, Hoechst 33342 is highly toxic, more so to non-SP cells, and thus presents difficulties in interpreting in vivo studies where non-SP cells appear less tumorigenic than SP cells in immunodeficient mice. We searched for non-toxic dyes to circumvent this problem as well as to image these putative CSCs. We found that the fluorescent dye calcein, a product of intracellular Calcein AM cleavage, is effluxed by a small subpopulation, calcein low population (CloP). This population overlaps with SP and demonstrated long term cell viability, lack of cell stress and proliferation in several cancer cell lines when stained whereas Hoechst 33342 staining caused substantial apoptosis and ablated proliferation. We also found that the effluxed dye D-luciferin exhibits strong UV-fluorescence that can be imaged at cellular resolution and spatially overlaps with Calcein AM. In order to evaluate the hypothesis that p53 loss promotes enrichment of putative CSC populations we used Calcein AM, D-luciferin and Mitotracker Red FM as a counterstain to visualize dye-effluxing cells. Using fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry we observed increased dye-effluxing populations in DLD-1 colon tumor cells with mutant p53 versus wild-type (WT) p53-expressing HCT116 cells. Deletion of the wild-type p53 or pro-apoptotic Bax genes induced the putative CSC populations in the HCT116 background to significant levels. Restoration of WT p53 in HCT116 p53−/− cells by an adenovirus vector eliminated the putative CSC populations whereas a control adenovirus vector, Ad-LacZ, maintained the putative CSC population. Our results suggest it is possible to image and quantitatively analyze putative CSC populations within the tumor microenvironment and that loss of pro-apoptotic and tumor suppressing genes such as Bax or p53 enrich such

  15. Circulating Tumor Cells Enriched by the Depletion of Leukocytes with Bi-Antibodies in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Potential Clinical Application

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Guangfu; Ma, Hongxia; Dai, Juncheng; Chen, Jiaping; Jiang, Yue; Wang, Hui; Liu, Zhian; Hu, Zhibin; Shen, Hongbing

    2015-01-01

    Background It has been considered that the detection methods for circulating tumor cells (CTCs) based on epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) underestimate the number of CTCs and may miss a metastatic subpopulation with cancer stem cell (CSC) properties. Therefore, we investigated EpCAM-positive and -negative CTCs in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients at different stages, assessed the clinical value of these CTCs and explored their capacity in the following CSC model. Methods CTCs were enriched by the depletion of leukocytes with bi-antibodies using a magnetic bead separation technique and then identified by the expression of EpCAM and cytokeratin 7 and 8 using multi-parameter flow cytometry. We determined the distribution of CTCs classified by the expression of EpCAM in 46 NSCLC patients with stages I to IV, assessed the diagnostic value of these CTCs by longitudinal monitoring in 4 index patients during adjuvant therapy and characterized the stemness of these CTCs by the expression of CXCR4 and CD133 in 10 patients. Results EpCAM-negative (E-) CTCs were detected to be significantly higher than EpCAM-positive (E+) CTCs in stage IV (p = 0.003). The patients with the percentage of E-CTCs more than 95% (r > 95%) were detected to be significantly increased from 13.3% in stage I-II to 61.1% in stage IV (p = 0.006). Kaplan–Meier analysis indicated that the patients with r > 95% had significantly shorter survival time than those with r ≤ 0.95 (p = 0.041). Longitudinal monitoring of CTCs indicated that the patients with a high percentage of E-CTCs in the blood were not responsive to either chemotherapy or targeted therapy. Further characterization of CTCs revealed that a stem-like subpopulation of CXCR4+CD133+ CTCs were detected to be significantly more prevalent in E-CTCs than that in E+CTCs (p = 0.005). Conclusions The enrichment of CTCs by the depletion of leukocytes with bi-antibodies is a valuable method for estimating the number of CTCs, which can

  16. Perineural Mast Cells Are Specifically Enriched in Pancreatic Neuritis and Neuropathic Pain in Pancreatic Cancer and Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kun; Kehl, Timo; Giese, Nathalia A.; Algül, Hana; Friess, Helmut; Ceyhan, Güralp O.

    2013-01-01

    Background Pancreatic neuritis is a histopathological hallmark of pancreatic neuropathy and correlates to abdominal neuropathic pain sensation in pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PCa) and chronic pancreatitis (CP). However, inflammatory cell subtypes that compose pancreatic neuritis and their correlation to the neuropathic pain syndrome in PCa and CP are yet unknown. Methods Inflammatory cells within pancreatic neuritis lesions of patients with PCa (n = 20) and CP (n = 20) were immunolabeled and colorimetrically quantified with the pan-leukocyte marker CD45, with CD68 (macrophages), CD8 (cytotoxic T-lymphocytes), CD4 (T-helper cells), CD20 (B-lymphocytes), NCL-PC (plasma cells), neutrophil elastase, PRG2 (eosinophils), anti-mast cell (MC) tryptase and correlated to pain sensation. Perineural mast cell subtypes were analyzed by double immunolabeling with MC chymase. Expression and neural immunoreactivity of protease-activated receptor type 1 (PAR-1) and type 2 (PAR-2) were analyzed in PCa and CP and correlated to pain status of the patients. Results In PCa and CP, nerves were predominantly infiltrated by cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (PCa: 35% of all perineural inflammatory cells, CP: 33%), macrophages (PCa: 39%, CP: 33%) and MC (PCa: 21%, CP: 27%). In both entities, neuropathic pain sensation was associated with a specific increase of perineural MC (PCa without pain: 14% vs. PCa with pain: 31%; CP without pain: 19% vs. CP with pain: 34%), not affecting the frequency of other inflammatory cell subtypes. The vast majority of these MC contained MC chymase. PAR-1 and PAR-2 expression did not correlate to the pain sensation of PCa and CP patients. Conclusion Pancreatic neuritis in PC and CP is composed of cytotoxic T-lymphocytes, macrophages and MC. The specific enrichment of MC around intrapancreatic nerves in neuropathic pain due to PCa and CP suggests the presence of MC-induced visceral hypersensitivity in the pancreas. Therefore, pancreatic and enteric neuropathies seem

  17. Digital Image Correlation with Dynamic Subset Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Ghulam Mubashar; MacNish, Cara; Dyskin, Arcady; Shufrin, Igor

    2016-09-01

    The quality of the surface pattern and selection of subset size play a critical role in achieving high accuracy in Digital Image Correlation (DIC). The subset size in DIC is normally selected by testing different subset sizes across the entire image, which is a laborious procedure. This also leads to the problem that the worst region of the surface pattern influences the performance of DIC across the entire image. In order to avoid these limitations, a Dynamic Subset Selection (DSS) algorithm is proposed in this paper to optimize the subset size for each point in an image before optimizing the correlation parameters. The proposed DSS algorithm uses the local pattern around the point of interest to calculate a parameter called the Intensity Variation Ratio (Λ), which is used to optimize the subset size. The performance of the DSS algorithm is analyzed using numerically generated images and is compared with the results of traditional DIC. Images obtained from laboratory experiments are also used to demonstrate the utility of the DSS algorithm. Results illustrate that the DSS algorithm provides a better alternative to subset size "guessing" and finds an appropriate subset size for each point of interest according to the local pattern.

  18. Active Learning With Optimal Instance Subset Selection.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yifan; Zhu, Xingquan; Elmagarmid, A K

    2013-04-01

    Active learning (AL) traditionally relies on some instance-based utility measures (such as uncertainty) to assess individual instances and label the ones with the maximum values for training. In this paper, we argue that such approaches cannot produce good labeling subsets mainly because instances are evaluated independently without considering their interactions, and individuals with maximal ability do not necessarily form an optimal instance subset for learning. Alternatively, we propose to achieve AL with optimal subset selection (ALOSS), where the key is to find an instance subset with a maximum utility value. To achieve the goal, ALOSS simultaneously considers the following: 1) the importance of individual instances and 2) the disparity between instances, to build an instance-correlation matrix. As a result, AL is transformed to a semidefinite programming problem to select a k-instance subset with a maximum utility value. Experimental results demonstrate that ALOSS outperforms state-of-the-art approaches for AL.

  19. Magnetic Enrichment of Dendritic Cell Vaccine in Lymph Node with Fluorescent-Magnetic Nanoparticles Enhanced Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Honglin; Qian, Yuan; Dai, Yanfeng; Qiao, Sha; Huang, Chuan; Lu, Lisen; Luo, Qingming; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Zhihong

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) migration to the lymph node is a key component of DC-based immunotherapy. However, the DC homing rate to the lymphoid tissues is poor, thus hindering the DC-mediated activation of antigen-specific T cells. Here, we developed a system using fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles (α-AP-fmNPs; loaded with antigen peptide, iron oxide nanoparticles, and indocyanine green) in combination with magnetic pull force (MPF) to successfully manipulate DC migration in vitro and in vivo. α-AP-fmNPs endowed DCs with MPF-responsiveness, antigen presentation, and simultaneous optical and magnetic resonance imaging detectability. We showed for the first time that α-AP-fmNP-loaded DCs were sensitive to MPF, and their migration efficiency could be dramatically improved both in vitro and in vivo through MPF treatment. Due to the enhanced migration of DCs, MPF treatment significantly augmented antitumor efficacy of the nanoparticle-loaded DCs. Therefore, we have developed a biocompatible approach with which to improve the homing efficiency of DCs and subsequent anti-tumor efficacy, and track their migration by multi-modality imaging, with great potential applications for DC-based cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27698936

  20. Flavonoid-enriched apple fraction AF4 induces cell cycle arrest, DNA topoisomerase II inhibition, and apoptosis in human liver cancer HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Sudan, Sudhanshu; Rupasinghe, H P Vasantha

    2014-01-01

    Apples are a major source of dietary phytochemicals such as flavonoids in the Western diet. Here we report anticancer properties and possible mechanism of action of apple flavonoid-enriched fraction (AF4) isolated from the peels of Northern Spy apples in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells, HepG2. Treatment with AF4 induced cell growth inhibition in HepG2 cells in time- and dose-dependent manner. Concentration of 50 μg/ml (50 μg total monomeric polyphenols/ml) AF4 was sufficient to induce a significant reduction in cell viability within 6 h of treatment (92%, P < 0.05) but had very low toxicity (minimum 4% to maximum 16%) on primary liver and lung cells, which was significantly lower than currently prescribed chemotherapy drug Sorafenib (minimum 29% to maximum 49%, P < 0.05). AF4 induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells within 6 h of treatment via activation of caspase-3. Cell cycle analysis via flow-cytometer showed that AF4 induced G2/M phase arrest. Further, results showed that AF4 acts as a strong DNA topoisomerase II catalytic inhibitor, which may be a plausible reason to drive the cells to apoptosis. Overall, our data suggests that AF4 possesses a significantly stronger antiproliferative and specific action than Sorafenib in vitro and is a potential natural chemotherapy agent for treatment of liver cancer.

  1. Growth inhibition and antioxidative status induced by selenium-enriched broccoli extract and selenocompounds in DNA mismatch repair-deficient human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Cheng-Fang; Ou, Bor-Rung; Liang, Yu-Chuan; Yeh, Jan-Ying

    2013-08-15

    The effects of enzymatic-digested Se-enriched broccoli extracts (SeB) and selenocompounds on growth and antioxidative status in human colon cancer cells was investigated in this study. HCT116 and HCT116+Chr.3 cells were treated with selenocompounds (sodium selenite, sodium selenate, Se-Met, MeSeCys) or SeB [high-Se (H-SeB) or low-Se (L-SeB)]. The cytotoxicity induced by selenocompounds in HCT116 cells was not associated with cellular H2O2 level, while the differential cytotoxicity observed by sodium selenite between HCT116 and HCT116+Chr.3 cell lines was related to cellular H2O2 production with the change in antioxidative enzyme activity, and the restoration of chromosome 3. H-SeB was found to reduce the cellular H2O2 content in HCT116+Chr.3 cells. The results in this study indicate that regardless of Se content, the cytotoxicity in HCT116 cells of both SeB forms appeared to be H2O2-independent, whereas the cytotoxicity in HCT116+Chr.3 of either SeB form appeared to be H2O2-dependent with an increase in antioxidative ability for H-SeB.

  2. Minimum Bayesian error probability-based gene subset selection.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Yu, Tian; Wei, Jin-Mao

    2015-01-01

    Sifting functional genes is crucial to the new strategies for drug discovery and prospective patient-tailored therapy. Generally, simply generating gene subset by selecting the top k individually superior genes may obtain an inferior gene combination, for some selected genes may be redundant with respect to some others. In this paper, we propose to select gene subset based on the criterion of minimum Bayesian error probability. The method dynamically evaluates all available genes and sifts only one gene at a time. A gene is selected if its combination with the other selected genes can gain better classification information. Within the generated gene subset, each individual gene is the most discriminative one in comparison with those that classify cancers in the same way as this gene does and different genes are more discriminative in combination than in individual. The genes selected in this way are likely to be functional ones from the system biology perspective, for genes tend to co-regulate rather than regulate individually. Experimental results show that the classifiers induced based on this method are capable of classifying cancers with high accuracy, while only a small number of genes are involved.

  3. Consumption of soy isoflavone enriched bread in men with prostate cancer is associated with reduced proinflammatory cytokines and immunosuppressive cells.

    PubMed

    Lesinski, Gregory B; Reville, Patrick K; Mace, Thomas A; Young, Gregory S; Ahn-Jarvis, Jennifer; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer; Vodovotz, Yael; Ameen, Zeenath; Grainger, Elizabeth; Riedl, Kenneth; Schwartz, Steven; Clinton, Steven K

    2015-11-01

    We hypothesized that soy phytochemicals may have immunomodulatory properties that may affect prostate carcinogenesis and progression. A randomized, phase II trial was conducted in 32 patients with prostate cancer with asymptomatic biochemical recurrence but no measurable disease on standard staging studies. Patients were randomized to two slices of soy bread (34 mg isoflavones/slice) or soy bread containing almond powder daily as a source of β-glucosidase. Flow cytometry and bioplex assays were used to measure cytokines or immune cell phenotype in blood at baseline (day 0) and following intervention (day 56). Adequate blood samples were available at enrollment and day 56 and evaluated. Multiple plasma cytokines and chemokines were significantly decreased on day 56 versus baseline. Subgroup analysis indicated reduced TH1 (P = 0.028) and myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC)-associated cytokines (P = 0.035). TH2 and TH17 cytokines were not significantly altered. Phenotypic analysis revealed no change in CD8(+) or CD4(+) T cells but showed increased CD56(+) natural killer (NK) cells (P = 0.038). The percentage of cells with a T regulatory cell phenotype (CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+)) was significantly decreased after 56 days of soy bread (P = 0.0136). Significantly decreased monocytic (CD33(+)HLADR(neg)CD14(+)) MDSC were observed in patients consuming soy bread (P = 0.0056). These data suggest that soy bread modulates systemic soluble and cellular biomarkers consistent with limiting inflammation and suppression of MDSCs. Additional studies to elucidate impact on the carcinogenic process or as a complement to immune-based therapy are required.

  4. Identification of a SOX2-dependent subset of tumor- and sphere-forming glioblastoma cells with a distinct tyrosine kinase inhibitor sensitivity profile.

    PubMed

    Hägerstrand, Daniel; He, Xiaobing; Bradic Lindh, Maja; Hoefs, Saskia; Hesselager, Göran; Ostman, Arne; Nistér, Monica

    2011-11-01

    Putative cancer stem cells have been identified in glioblastomas and are associated with radio- and chemo-resistance. Further knowledge about these cells is thus highly warranted for the development of better glioblastoma therapies. Gene expression analyses of 11 high-grade glioma cultures identified 2 subsets, designated type A and type B cultures. The type A cultures displayed high expression of CXCR4, SOX2, EAAT1, and GFAP and low expression of CNP, PDGFRB, CXCL12, and extracellular matrix proteins. Clinical significance of the 2 types was indicated by the expression of type A- and type B-defining genes in different clinical glioblastoma samples. Classification of glioblastomas with type A- and type B-defining genes generated 2 groups of tumors composed predominantly of the classical, neural, and/or proneural subsets and the mesenchymal subset, respectively. Furthermore, tumors with EGFR mutations were enriched in the group of type A samples. Type A cultures possessed a higher capacity to form xenograft tumors and neurospheres and displayed low or no sensitivity to monotreatment with PDGF- and IGF-1-receptor inhibitors but were efficiently growth inhibited by combination treatment with low doses of these 2 inhibitors. Furthermore, siRNA-induced downregulation of SOX2 reduced sphere formation of type A cultures, decreased expression of type A-defining genes, and conferred sensitivity to monotreatment with PDGF- and IGF-1-receptor inhibitors. The present study thus describes a tumor- and neurosphere-forming SOX2-dependent subset of glioblastoma cultures characterized by a gene expression signature similar to that of the recently described classical, proneural, and/or neural subsets of glioblastoma. The findings that resistance to PDGF- and IGF-1-receptor inhibitors is related to SOX2 expression and can be overcome by combination treatment should be considered in ongoing efforts to develop novel stem cell-targeting therapies.

  5. What makes a blood cell based miRNA expression pattern disease specific? - A miRNome analysis of blood cell subsets in lung cancer patients and healthy controls

    PubMed Central

    Dahmke, Indra N.; Galata, Valentina; Huwer, Hanno; Stehle, Ingo; Bals, Robert; Keller, Andreas; Meese, Eckart

    2014-01-01

    There is evidence of blood-borne miRNA signatures for various human diseases. To dissect the origin of disease-specific miRNA expression in human blood, we separately analyzed the miRNome of different immune cell subtypes, each in lung cancer patients and healthy individuals. Each immune cell type revealed a specific miRNA expression pattern also dependinging on the cell origin, line of defense, and function. The overall expression pattern of each leukocyte subtype showed great similarities between patients and controls. However, for each cell subtype we identified miRNAs that were deregulated in lung cancer patients including hsa-miR-21, a well-known oncomiR associated with poor lung cancer prognosis that was up-regulated in all leukocyte subtype comparisons of cancer versus controls. While the miRNome of cells of the adaptive immune system allowed only a weak separation between patients and controls, cells of the innate immune system allowed perfect or nearly perfect classification. Leukocytes of lung cancer patients show a cancer-specific miRNA expression profile. Our data also show that cancer specific miRNA expression pattern of whole blood samples are not determined by a single cell type. The data indicate that additional blood components, like erythrocytes, platelets, or exosomes might contribute to the disease specificity of a miRNA signature. PMID:25344866

  6. Subset selection circumvents the square root law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craver, Scott; Yu, Jun

    2010-01-01

    The square root law holds that acceptable embedding rate is sublinear in the cover size, specifically O(square root of n), in order to prevent detection as the warden's data and thus detector power increases. One way to transcend this law, at least in the i.i.d.case, is to restrict the cover to a chosen subset whose distribution is close to that of altered data. Embedding is then performed on this subset; this replaces the problem of finding a small enough subset to evade detection with the problem of finding a large enough subset that possesses a desired type distribution. We show that one can find such a subset of size asymptotically proportional to n rather than the square root of n. This works in the case of both replacement and tampering: Even if the distribution of tampered data depends on the distribution of cover data, one can find a fixed point in the probability simplex such that cover data of that distribution yields stego data of the same distribution. While the transmission of a subset is not allowed, this is no impediment: wet paper codes can be used, else in the worst case a maximal desirable subset can be computed from the cover by both sender and receiver without communication of side information.

  7. Redefining Myeloid Cell Subsets in Murine Spleen.

    PubMed

    Hey, Ying-Ying; Tan, Jonathan K H; O'Neill, Helen C

    2015-01-01

    Spleen is known to contain multiple dendritic and myeloid cell subsets, distinguishable on the basis of phenotype, function and anatomical location. As a result of recent intensive flow cytometric analyses, splenic dendritic cell (DC) subsets are now better characterized than other myeloid subsets. In order to identify and fully characterize a novel splenic subset termed "L-DC" in relation to other myeloid cells, it was necessary to investigate myeloid subsets in more detail. In terms of cell surface phenotype, L-DC were initially characterized as a CD11b(hi)CD11c(lo)MHCII(-)Ly6C(-)Ly6G(-) subset in murine spleen. Their expression of CD43, lack of MHCII, and a low level of CD11c was shown to best differentiate L-DC by phenotype from conventional DC subsets. A complete analysis of all subsets in spleen led to the classification of CD11b(hi)CD11c(lo)MHCII(-)Ly6C(lo)Ly6G(-) cells as monocytes expressing CX3CR1, CD43 and CD115. Siglec-F expression was used to identify a specific eosinophil population, distinguishable from both Ly6C(lo) and Ly6C(hi) monocytes, and other DC subsets. L-DC were characterized as a clear subset of CD11b(hi)CD11c(lo)MHCII(-)Ly6C(-)Ly6G(-) cells, which are CD43(+), Siglec-F(-) and CD115(-). Changes in the prevalence of L-DC compared to other subsets in spleens of mutant mice confirmed the phenotypic distinction between L-DC, cDC and monocyte subsets. L-DC development in vivo was shown to occur independently of the BATF3 transcription factor that regulates cDC development, and also independently of the FLT3L and GM-CSF growth factors which drive cDC and monocyte development, so distinguishing L-DC from these commonly defined cell types.

  8. How do I subset MISR data?

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-12-08

    ... of the swath that cover their region of interest. The MISR Order and Customization Tool enables users to order and customize data in a single interface. Customization options are subsetting by ...

  9. Eradication of melanomas by targeted elimination of a minor subset of tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Patrick; Kopecky, Caroline; Hombach, Andreas; Zigrino, Paola; Mauch, Cornelia; Abken, Hinrich

    2011-02-08

    Proceeding on the assumption that all cancer cells have equal malignant capacities, current regimens in cancer therapy attempt to eradicate all malignant cells of a tumor lesion. Using in vivo targeting of tumor cell subsets, we demonstrate that selective elimination of a definite, minor tumor cell subpopulation is particularly effective in eradicating established melanoma lesions irrespective of the bulk of cancer cells. Tumor cell subsets were specifically eliminated in a tumor lesion by adoptive transfer of engineered cytotoxic T cells redirected in an antigen-restricted manner via a chimeric antigen receptor. Targeted elimination of less than 2% of the tumor cells that coexpress high molecular weight melanoma-associated antigen (HMW-MAA) (melanoma-associated chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan, MCSP) and CD20 lastingly eradicated melanoma lesions, whereas targeting of any random 10% tumor cell subset was not effective. Our data challenge the biological therapy and current drug development paradigms in the treatment of cancer.

  10. Long Non-Coding RNA HOTAIR Regulates the Proliferation, Self-Renewal Capacity, Tumor Formation and Migration of the Cancer Stem-Like Cell (CSC) Subpopulation Enriched from Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Rong; An, Ning; Wang, Xiaoshan; Liu, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) play important roles in the malignant behavior of cancer. HOTAIR, a well-studied lncRNA, contributes to breast cancer development, and overexpression of HOTAIR predicts a poor prognosis. However, the regulatory role of HOTAIR in the cancer stem-like cell (CSC) subpopulation remains largely unknown. Our goal was to determine the regulatory functions of HOTAIR in the processes of self-renewal capacity, tumor formation and proliferation of CSCs derived from breast cancer. Methods We first enriched and incubated the CSC population derived from breast cancer cell line MCF7 (CSC-MCF7) or MDA-MB-231 (MB231, CSC-MB231). Self-renewal capacity and tumor formation were assessed in vitro and in vivo to determine the stemness of CSCs. We assessed the impact on ectopically upregulated or downregulated expression of HOTAIR in CSCs by soft agar, self-renewal capacity and CCK-8 assays. The functional domain of HOTAIR was determined by truncation. RT-qPCR and semiquantitative Western blotting were performed to detect the expression levels of genes of interest. Chromatin IP (ChIP) was employed to detect the transcriptional regulatory activity of p53 on its target gene. Results After the identification of CSC properties, RT-qPCR analysis revealed that HOTAIR, but not other cancer-associated lncRNAs, is highly upregulated in both CSC-MCF7 and CSC-MB231 populations compared with MCF7 and MB231 populations. By modulating the level of HOTAIR expression, we showed that HOTAIR tightly regulates the proliferation, colony formation, migration and self-renewal capacity of CSCs. Moreover, full-length HOTAIR transcriptionally inhibits miR-34a specifically, leading to upregulation of Sox2, which is targeted by miR-34a. Ectopic introduction of miR-34a mimics reverses the effects of HOTAIR on the physiological processes of CSCs, indicating that HOTAIR affects these processes, including self-renewal capacity; these effects are dependent on the regulation of Sox

  11. PD-L1 protein expression in breast cancer is rare, enriched in basal-like tumours and associated with infiltrating lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Ali, H R; Glont, S-E; Blows, F M; Provenzano, E; Dawson, S-J; Liu, B; Hiller, L; Dunn, J; Poole, C J; Bowden, S; Earl, H M; Pharoah, P D P; Caldas, C

    2015-07-01

    Expression of programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) in solid tumours has been shown to predict whether patients are likely to respond to anti-PD-L1 therapies. To estimate the therapeutic potential of PD-L1 inhibition in breast cancer, we evaluated the prevalence and significance of PD-L1 protein expression in a large collection of breast tumours. Correlations between CD274 (PD-L1) copy number, transcript and protein levels were evaluated in tumours from 418 patients recruited to the METABRIC genomic study. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect PD-L1 protein in breast tumours in tissue microarrays from 5763 patients recruited to the SEARCH population-based study (N = 4079) and the NEAT randomised, controlled trial (N = 1684). PD-L1 protein data was available for 3916 of the possible 5763 tumours from the SEARCH and NEAT studies. PD-L1 expression by immune cells was observed in 6% (235/3916) of tumours and expression by tumour cells was observed in just 1.7% (66/3916). PD-L1 was most frequently expressed in basal-like tumours. This was observed both where tumours were subtyped by combined copy number and expression profiling [39% (17/44) of IntClust 10 i.e. basal-like tumours were PD-L1 immune cell positive; P < 0.001] and where a surrogate IHC-based classifier was used [19% (56/302) of basal-like tumours were PD-L1 immune cell positive; P < 0.001]. Moreover, CD274 (PD-L1) amplification was observed in five tumours of which four were IntClust 10. Expression of PD-L1 by either tumour cells or infiltrating immune cells was positively correlated with infiltration by both cytotoxic and regulatory T cells (P < 0.001). There was a nominally significant association between PD-L1 and improved disease-specific survival (hazard ratio 0.53, 95% confidence interval 0.26-1.07; P = 0.08) in ER-negative disease. Expression of PD-L1 is rare in breast cancer, markedly enriched in basal-like tumours and is correlated with infiltrating lymphocytes. PD-L1 inhibition may benefit the 19% of

  12. Carcinogenic risk associated with radon-enriched well water

    SciTech Connect

    Mose, D.G.; Mushrush, G.W.

    1997-08-01

    A comparison has been made between radon in drinking water and the incidence of cancer using a set of home occupants in Virginia and Maryland. In a subset of people who drink radon-free but chlorinated drinking water from a reservoir, about 3% develop some type of cancer. In a subset of people who drink low-radon water from private water wells, about 3% develop cancer. In a subset who drink high-radon well water, about 6% develop cancer. A comparison with Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) estimates of cancer related to airborne radon indicates that for the general population, the incidence of radon-related cancer from drinking water is similar to the incidence of cancer from inhaled radon. For the 10% of the population that consumes well water and, in particular, for the 5% of the population that consumes high-radon well water, the drinking water carries a considerably higher cancer risk than inhaling airborne radon.

  13. T-cell subsets in the germinal center.

    PubMed

    Ramiscal, Roybel R; Vinuesa, Carola G

    2013-03-01

    T cells are known to migrate to B-cell-enriched follicles and germinal centers within secondary lymphoid organs to provide help to B cells. Cognate T:B interactions that take place at the T:B border and subsequently within germinal centers are essential for B-cell priming, differentiation into germinal center B cells, and selection of mutated cells into memory B cells or memory plasma cells. In recent years, different stages of maturation within B-cell helper T cells, collectively known as B-follicular helper T (Tfh) cells, as well as heterogeneity amid germinal center T cells are becoming clear. Indeed, germinal centers support not only bona fide Tfh cells but also CD4(+) and CD8(+) follicular regulatory T (Tfr) cells that act to suppress germinal center responses and B-cell helper natural killer T cells. There is a growing need for more precise phenotypic and functional distinction of these specialized T-cell subsets. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on the ontogeny, molecular identity, and functional relevance of the various subsets of germinal center T cells.

  14. Different spectra of recurrent gene mutations in subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukemia harboring stereotyped B-cell receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Lesley-Ann; Young, Emma; Baliakas, Panagiotis; Hadzidimitriou, Anastasia; Moysiadis, Theodoros; Plevova, Karla; Rossi, Davide; Kminkova, Jana; Stalika, Evangelia; Pedersen, Lone Bredo; Malcikova, Jitka; Agathangelidis, Andreas; Davis, Zadie; Mansouri, Larry; Scarfò, Lydia; Boudjoghra, Myriam; Navarro, Alba; Muggen, Alice F.; Yan, Xiao-Jie; Nguyen-Khac, Florence; Larrayoz, Marta; Panagiotidis, Panagiotis; Chiorazzi, Nicholas; Niemann, Carsten Utoft; Belessi, Chrysoula; Campo, Elias; Strefford, Jonathan C.; Langerak, Anton W.; Oscier, David; Gaidano, Gianluca; Pospisilova, Sarka; Davi, Frederic; Ghia, Paolo; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Rosenquist, Richard

    2016-01-01

    We report on markedly different frequencies of genetic lesions within subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients carrying mutated or unmutated stereotyped B-cell receptor immunoglobulins in the largest cohort (n=565) studied for this purpose. By combining data on recurrent gene mutations (BIRC3, MYD88, NOTCH1, SF3B1 and TP53) and cytogenetic aberrations, we reveal a subset-biased acquisition of gene mutations. More specifically, the frequency of NOTCH1 mutations was found to be enriched in subsets expressing unmutated immunoglobulin genes, i.e. #1, #6, #8 and #59 (22–34%), often in association with trisomy 12, and was significantly different (P<0.001) to the frequency observed in subset #2 (4%, aggressive disease, variable somatic hypermutation status) and subset #4 (1%, indolent disease, mutated immunoglobulin genes). Interestingly, subsets harboring a high frequency of NOTCH1 mutations were found to carry few (if any) SF3B1 mutations. This starkly contrasts with subsets #2 and #3 where, despite their immunogenetic differences, SF3B1 mutations occurred in 45% and 46% of cases, respectively. In addition, mutations within TP53, whilst enriched in subset #1 (16%), were rare in subsets #2 and #8 (both 2%), despite all being clinically aggressive. All subsets were negative for MYD88 mutations, whereas BIRC3 mutations were infrequent. Collectively, this striking bias and skewed distribution of mutations and cytogenetic aberrations within specific chronic lymphocytic leukemia subsets implies that the mechanisms underlying clinical aggressiveness are not uniform, but rather support the existence of distinct genetic pathways of clonal evolution governed by a particular stereotyped B-cell receptor selecting a certain molecular lesion(s). PMID:27198719

  15. IL-1β, IL-8, and Matrix Metalloproteinases-1, -2, and -10 Are Enriched upon Monocyte-Breast Cancer Cell Cocultivation in a Matrigel-Based Three-Dimensional System.

    PubMed

    Espinoza-Sánchez, Nancy Adriana; Chimal-Ramírez, Gloria Karina; Mantilla, Alejandra; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel Moisés

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer remains the first cancer-related cause of death in women worldwide, particularly in developing countries in which most cases are diagnosed in late stages. Although most cancer studies are based in the genetic or epigenetic changes of the tumor cells, immune cells within the tumor stroma often cooperate with cancer progression. Particularly, monocytes are attracted to the tumor primary site in which they are differentiated into tumor-associated macrophages that facilitate tumor cell invasion and metastasis. In this study, we used three-dimensional cultures to form acini-like structures to analyze the inflammatory secretion profile of tumor cells individually or in co-culture with monocytes. Breast cancer cell lines and primary isolates from eight Mexican patients with breast cancer were used. We found high levels of RANTES/CCL5, MCP-1/CCL2, and G-CSF in the breast cancer individual cultures, supporting an important recruitment capacity of monocytes, but also of neutrophils. The co-cultures of the tumor cells and monocytes were significantly enriched with the potent pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-8, known to support malignant progression. We also found that the interaction of tumor cells with monocytes promoted high levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-1, MMP-2, and MMP-10. Our study supports that a key event for malignant progression is the recruitment of different immune cell populations, which help to sustain and enhance a chronic inflammatory microenvironment that highly favors tumor malignancy.

  16. IL-1β, IL-8, and Matrix Metalloproteinases-1, -2, and -10 Are Enriched upon Monocyte–Breast Cancer Cell Cocultivation in a Matrigel-Based Three-Dimensional System

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza-Sánchez, Nancy Adriana; Chimal-Ramírez, Gloria Karina; Mantilla, Alejandra; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel Moisés

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer remains the first cancer-related cause of death in women worldwide, particularly in developing countries in which most cases are diagnosed in late stages. Although most cancer studies are based in the genetic or epigenetic changes of the tumor cells, immune cells within the tumor stroma often cooperate with cancer progression. Particularly, monocytes are attracted to the tumor primary site in which they are differentiated into tumor-associated macrophages that facilitate tumor cell invasion and metastasis. In this study, we used three-dimensional cultures to form acini-like structures to analyze the inflammatory secretion profile of tumor cells individually or in co-culture with monocytes. Breast cancer cell lines and primary isolates from eight Mexican patients with breast cancer were used. We found high levels of RANTES/CCL5, MCP-1/CCL2, and G-CSF in the breast cancer individual cultures, supporting an important recruitment capacity of monocytes, but also of neutrophils. The co-cultures of the tumor cells and monocytes were significantly enriched with the potent pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-8, known to support malignant progression. We also found that the interaction of tumor cells with monocytes promoted high levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-1, MMP-2, and MMP-10. Our study supports that a key event for malignant progression is the recruitment of different immune cell populations, which help to sustain and enhance a chronic inflammatory microenvironment that highly favors tumor malignancy. PMID:28337194

  17. Plasticity of Human CD4 T Cell Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Geginat, Jens; Paroni, Moira; Maglie, Stefano; Alfen, Johanna Sophie; Kastirr, Ilko; Gruarin, Paola; De Simone, Marco; Pagani, Massimiliano; Abrignani, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Human beings are exposed to a variety of different pathogens, which induce tailored immune responses and consequently generate highly diverse populations of pathogen-specific T cells. CD4+ T cells have a central role in adaptive immunity, since they provide essential help for both cytotoxic T cell- and antibody-mediated responses. In addition, CD4+ regulatory T cells are required to maintain self-tolerance and to inhibit immune responses that could damage the host. Initially, two subsets of CD4+ helper T cells were identified that secrete characteristic effector cytokines and mediate responses against different types of pathogens, i.e., IFN-γ secreting Th1 cells that fight intracellular pathogens, and IL-4 producing Th2 cells that target extracellular parasites. It is now well established that this dichotomy is insufficient to describe the complexity of CD4+ T cell differentiation, and in particular the human CD4 compartment contains a myriad of T cell subsets with characteristic capacities to produce cytokines and to home to involved tissues. Moreover, it has become increasingly clear that these T cell subsets are not all terminally differentiated cells, but that the majority is plastic and that in particular central memory T cells can acquire different properties and functions in secondary immune responses. In addition, there is compelling evidence that helper T cells can acquire regulatory functions upon chronic stimulation in inflamed tissues. The plasticity of antigen-experienced human T cell subsets is highly relevant for translational medicine, since it opens new perspectives for immune-modulatory therapies for chronic infections, autoimmune diseases, and cancer. PMID:25566245

  18. Randomized phase III trial of APF530 versus palonosetron in the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in a subset of patients with breast cancer receiving moderately or highly emetogenic chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Boccia, Ralph; O'Boyle, Erin; Cooper, William

    2016-02-26

    APF530 provides controlled, sustained-release granisetron for preventing acute (0-24 h) and delayed (24-120 h) chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). In a phase III trial, APF530 was noninferior to palonosetron in preventing acute CINV following single-dose moderately (MEC) or highly emetogenic chemotherapy (HEC) and delayed CINV in MEC (MEC and HEC defined by Hesketh criteria). This exploratory subanalysis was conducted in the breast cancer subpopulation. Patients were randomized to subcutaneous APF530 250 or 500 mg (granisetron 5 or 10 mg) or intravenous palonosetron 0.25 mg during cycle 1. Palonosetron patients were randomized to APF530 for cycles 2 to 4. The primary efficacy end point was complete response (CR, no emesis or rescue medication) in cycle 1. Among breast cancer patients (n = 423 MEC, n = 185 HEC), > 70 % received anthracycline-containing regimens in each emetogenicity subgroup. There were no significant between-group differences in CRs in cycle 1 for acute (APF530 250 mg: MEC 71 %, HEC 77 %; 500 mg: MEC 73 %, HEC 73 %; palonosetron: MEC 68 %, HEC 66 %) and delayed (APF530 250 mg: MEC 46 %, HEC 58 %; 500 mg: MEC 48 %, HEC 63 %; palonosetron: MEC 52 %, HEC 52 %) CINV. There were no significant differences in within-cycle CRs between APF530 doses for acute and delayed CINV in MEC or HEC in cycles 2 to 4; CRs trended higher in later cycles, with no notable differences in adverse events between breast cancer and overall populations. APF530 effectively prevented acute and delayed CINV over 4 chemotherapy cycles in breast cancer patients receiving MEC or HEC. Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00343460 (June 22, 2006).

  19. Loss of CD28 within CD4(+) T cell subsets from cervical cancer patients is accompanied by the acquisition of intracellular perforin, and is further enhanced by NKG2D expression.

    PubMed

    Escarra-Senmarti, Marta; Bueno-Topete, Miriam Ruth; Jave-Suarez, Luis Felipe; Gomez-Bañuelos, Eduardo; Gutierrez-Franco, Jorge; Vega-Magaña, Natali; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana; Pereira-Suarez, Ana Laura; Haramati, Jesse; Del Toro-Arreola, Susana

    2017-02-01

    CD28 is well characterized as an essential co-stimulatory receptor critical for activation, proliferation and survival processes in CD4(+) T cells. Populations of CD4(+)CD28(null) T cells, with apparently contradictory physiological roles, have recently been reported, along with the co-expression of the NK activating receptor NKG2D, in autoimmune diseases and chronic viral inflammation. Paradoxically, studies in cancer suggest that an expanded CD4(+)NKG2D(+) population may be armed with immunosuppressive properties. We have recently reported the existence of two separate CD4(+)NKG2D(+) T cell populations, which were defined by the presence or absence of the co-stimulatory molecule CD28, with the CD4(+)CD28(null)NKG2D(+) population more frequently observed in women with cervical cancer. This has led to the present effort to further characterize this population and to determine if the loss of CD28 influences the acquisition of cytotoxic or regulatory markers. In the present work, a multicolor flow cytometry protocol was used to analyze the expression of cytotoxic and immunoregulatory markers on circulating CD4(+) T cells characterized by the presence or absence of CD28 and NKG2D in patients with invasive cervical carcinoma and age/gender-matched healthy controls. A noticeable expansion of CD4(+)CD28(null) cells, many of them NKG2D(+), were observed in selected cervical cancer samples. This CD4(+)CD28(null) T cell population was characterized by a lack of immunoregulatory markers, as well as very low basal levels of intracellular IFN-γ, TNF-α, TGF-β, and IL-10. Intracellular perforin, however, was found to be significantly increased in this CD4(+)CD28(null) population, and increases in the mean fluorescence intensity of perforin were found to be enhanced by the presence of NKG2D. In conclusion, our data provide the first evidence of a strict link between the absence of CD28 and the expression of perforin, which is likewise enhanced by the expression of NKG2D

  20. Beyond Job Enrichment to Employment Enrichment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Werther, William B., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Employment enrichment views the total work environment confronting employees as a system consisting of two overlapping areas: worker-job and worker-organization subsystems. Job enrichment has improved the worker-job subsystem. The focus of this article is on methods of improving the worker-organization relationship. (Author/JB)

  1. Interlesional diversity of T cell receptors in melanoma with immune checkpoints enriched in tissue-resident memory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Boddupalli, Chandra Sekhar; Bar, Noffar; Kadaveru, Krishna; Krauthammer, Michael; Pornputtapong, Natopol; Ariyan, Stephan; Narayan, Deepak; Kluger, Harriet; Deng, Yanhong; Verma, Rakesh; Das, Rituparna; Bacchiocchi, Antonella; Halaban, Ruth; Sznol, Mario; Dhodapkar, Madhav V.; Dhodapkar, Kavita M.

    2016-01-01

    Heterogeneity of tumor cells and their microenvironment can affect outcome in cancer. Blockade of immune checkpoints (ICPs) expressed only on a subset of immune cells leads to durable responses in advanced melanoma. Tissue-resident memory T (TRM) cells have recently emerged as a distinct subset of memory T cells in nonlymphoid tissues. Here, we show that functional properties and expression of ICPs within tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) differ from those of blood T cells. TILs secrete less IL-2, IFN-γ, and TNF-α compared with circulating counterparts, and expression of VEGF correlated with reduced TIL infiltration. Within tumors, ICPs are particularly enriched within T cells with phenotype and genomic features of TRM cells and the CD16+ subset of myeloid cells. Concurrent T cell receptor (TCR) and tumor exome sequencing of individual metastases in the same patient revealed that interlesional diversity of TCRs exceeded differences in mutation/neoantigen load in tumor cells. These findings suggest that the TRM subset of TILs may be the major target of ICP blockade and illustrate interlesional diversity of tissue-resident TCRs within individual metastases, which did not equilibrate between metastases and may differentially affect the outcome of immune therapy at each site. PMID:28018970

  2. Feature subset selection based on relevance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Bell, David; Murtagh, Fionn

    In this paper an axiomatic characterisation of feature subset selection is presented. Two axioms are presented: sufficiency axiom—preservation of learning information, and necessity axiom—minimising encoding length. The sufficiency axiom concerns the existing dataset and is derived based on the following understanding: any selected feature subset should be able to describe the training dataset without losing information, i.e. it is consistent with the training dataset. The necessity axiom concerns the predictability and is derived from Occam's razor, which states that the simplest among different alternatives is preferred for prediction. The two axioms are then restated in terms of relevance in a concise form: maximising both the r( X; Y) and r( Y; X) relevance. Based on the relevance characterisation, four feature subset selection algorithms are presented and analysed: one is exhaustive and the remaining three are heuristic. Experimentation is also presented and the results are encouraging. Comparison is also made with some well-known feature subset selection algorithms, in particular, with the built-in feature selection mechanism in C4.5.

  3. Is there a subset of patients with recurrent cancer in the vagina who are not candidates for interstitial brachytherapy that can be treated with multichannel vaginal brachytherapy using graphic optimization?

    PubMed

    Singh, Deepinder P; Bylund, Kevin C; Matloubieh, Ahmad; Mazloom, Ali; Gray, Alexander; Sidhu, Ravinder; Barrette, Lucille; Chen, Yuhchyau

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate recurrent vaginal cancer treated with vaginal brachytherapy (VBT) using graphic optimization in patients not amenable to surgery and interstitial brachytherapy (ISBT). We retrospectively reviewed the records of 5 patients with recurrent cancer in the vagina that were deemed not to be good candidates for ISBT implant because of medical reasons. All patients received computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (CT/MRI) based evaluation in addition to a detailed clinical examination, and were noted to have recurrent nodules in the vagina with size ranging from 10-25 mm. Four of the 5 patients had recurrent disease in the vaginal apex, whereas one patient had recurrence in the lateral vaginal wall. Subsequently, all patients were treated with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) followed by multichannel vaginal cylinder (MVC)-based VBT using graphic optimization for shaping the isodose to improve the clinical target volume (CTV) coverage, as well as to spare the organs at risk (OAR). The dose to the bladder and rectum with regard to 0.1 cc, 1 cc, and 2 cc were recorded. Median age of the patients was 78 years (range 58-86 years). Thickness of the lesions before VBT ranged from 6-15 mm. All patients were followed up with MRI at 3 months. All patients but one demonstrated complete clinical/ radiological response of the tumor. No patient had any grade III/IV toxicity at 24 months. MVC-based VBT using graphic optimization is safe and yields favorable results if used judiciously.

  4. Role of tumour-free margin distance for loco-regional control in vulvar cancer-a subset analysis of the Arbeitsgemeinschaft Gynäkologische Onkologie CaRE-1 multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Woelber, Linn; Griebel, Lis-Femke; Eulenburg, Christine; Sehouli, Jalid; Jueckstock, Julia; Hilpert, Felix; de Gregorio, Nikolaus; Hasenburg, Annette; Ignatov, Atanas; Hillemanns, Peter; Fuerst, Sophie; Strauss, Hans-Georg; Baumann, Klaus H; Thiel, Falk C; Mustea, Alexander; Meier, Werner; Harter, Philipp; Wimberger, Pauline; Hanker, Lars Christian; Schmalfeldt, Barbara; Canzler, Ulrich; Fehm, Tanja; Luyten, Alexander; Hellriegel, Martin; Kosse, Jens; Heiss, Christoph; Hantschmann, Peer; Mallmann, Peter; Tanner, Berno; Pfisterer, Jacobus; Richter, Barbara; Neuser, Petra; Mahner, Sven

    2016-12-01

    A tumour-free pathological resection margin of ≥8 mm is considered state-of-the-art. Available evidence is based on heterogeneous cohorts. This study was designed to clarify the relevance of the resection margin for loco-regional control in vulvar cancer. AGO-CaRE-1 is a large retrospective study. Patients (n = 1618) with vulvar cancer ≥ FIGO stage IB treated at 29 German gynecologic-cancer-centres 1998-2008 were included. This subgroup analysis focuses on solely surgically treated node-negative patients with complete tumour resection (n = 289). Of the 289 analysed patients, 141 (48.8%) had pT1b, 140 (48.4%) pT2 and 8 (2.8%) pT3 tumours. One hundred twenty-five (43.3%) underwent complete vulvectomy, 127 (43.9%) partial vulvectomy and 37 (12.8%) radical local excision. The median minimal resection margin was 5 mm (1 mm-33 mm); all patients received groin staging, in 86.5% with full dissection. Median follow-up was 35.1 months. 46 (15.9%) patients developed recurrence, thereof 34 (11.8%) at the vulva, after a median of 18.3 months. Vulvar recurrence rates were 12.6% in patients with a margin <8 mm and 10.2% in patients with a margin ≥8 mm. When analysed as a continuous variable, the margin distance had no statistically significant impact on local recurrence (HR per mm increase: 0.930, 95% CI: 0.849-1.020; p = 0.125). Multivariate analyses did also not reveal a significant association between the margin and local recurrence neither when analysed as continuous variable nor categorically based on the 8 mm cutoff. Results were consistent when looking at disease-free-survival and time-to-recurrence at any site (HR per mm increase: 0.949, 95% CI: 0.864-1.041; p = 0.267). The need for a minimal margin of 8 mm could not be confirmed in the large and homogeneous node-negative cohort of the AGO-CaRE database. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Is there a subset of patients with recurrent cancer in the vagina who are not candidates for interstitial brachytherapy that can be treated with multichannel vaginal brachytherapy using graphic optimization?

    PubMed Central

    Bylund, Kevin C.; Matloubieh, Ahmad; Mazloom, Ali; Gray, Alexander; Sidhu, Ravinder; Barrette, Lucille; Chen, Yuhchyau

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate recurrent vaginal cancer treated with vaginal brachytherapy (VBT) using graphic optimization in patients not amenable to surgery and interstitial brachytherapy (ISBT). Material and methods We retrospectively reviewed the records of 5 patients with recurrent cancer in the vagina that were deemed not to be good candidates for ISBT implant because of medical reasons. All patients received computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (CT/MRI) based evaluation in addition to a detailed clinical examination, and were noted to have recurrent nodules in the vagina with size ranging from 10-25 mm. Four of the 5 patients had recurrent disease in the vaginal apex, whereas one patient had recurrence in the lateral vaginal wall. Subsequently, all patients were treated with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) followed by multichannel vaginal cylinder (MVC)-based VBT using graphic optimization for shaping the isodose to improve the clinical target volume (CTV) coverage, as well as to spare the organs at risk (OAR). The dose to the bladder and rectum with regard to 0.1 cc, 1 cc, and 2 cc were recorded. Results Median age of the patients was 78 years (range 58-86 years). Thickness of the lesions before VBT ranged from 6-15 mm. All patients were followed up with MRI at 3 months. All patients but one demonstrated complete clinical/ radiological response of the tumor. No patient had any grade III/IV toxicity at 24 months. Conclusions MVC-based VBT using graphic optimization is safe and yields favorable results if used judiciously. PMID:26034494

  6. Heteroclitic XBP1 peptides evoke tumor-specific memory cytotoxic T lymphocytes against breast cancer, colon cancer, and pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jooeun; Samur, Mehmet; Munshi, Aditya; Hideshima, Teru; Keskin, Derin; Kimmelman, Alec; Lee, Ann-Hwee; Dranoff, Glen; Anderson, Kenneth C; Munshi, Nikhil C

    2015-01-01

    XBP1 is a critical transcriptional activator of the unfolded protein response (UPR), which increases tumor cell survival under prolonged endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and hypoxic conditions.This study was designed to evaluate the immunogenicity of heteroclitic XBP1 unspliced (US)184–192 (YISPWILAV) and heteroclictic XBP1 spliced (SP)367–375 (YLFPQLISV) HLA-A2 peptides, and to characterize the specific activities of XBP1 peptides-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (XBP1-CTL) against breast cancer, colon cancer, and pancreatic cancer cells.The XBP1-CTL had upregulated expression of critical T cell markers and displayed HLA-A2-restricted and antigen-specific activities against breast cancer, colon cancer and pancreatic cancer cells. XBP1-CTL were enriched withCD45RO+ memory CTL, which showed high expression of critical T cell markers (CD28, ICOS, CD69, CD40L), cell proliferation and antitumor activities as compared to CD45RO− non-memory CTL. The effector memory (EM: CD45RO+CCR7−) subset had the highest level of cell proliferation while the central memory (CM: CD45RO+CCR7+) subset demonstrated enhanced functional activities (CD107a degranulation, IFNγ/IL-2 production) upon recognition of the respective tumor cells. Furthermore, both the EM and CM XBP1-CTL subsets expressed high levels of Th1 transcription regulators Tbet and Eomes. The highest frequencies of IFNγ or granzyme B producing cells were detected within CM XBP1-CTL subset that were either Tbet+ or Eomes+ in responding to the tumor cells.These results demonstrate the immunotherapeutic potential of a cocktail of immunogenic HLA-A2 specific heteroclitic XBP1 US184–192 and heteroclictic XBP1 SP367–375 peptides to induce CD3+CD8+ CTL enriched for CM and EM cells with specific antitumor activities against a variety of solid tumors. PMID:25941601

  7. B7-H1-expressing antigen-presenting cells mediate polarization of protumorigenic Th22 subsets.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Dong-Ming; Xiao, Xiao; Zhao, Qiyi; Chen, Min-Min; Li, Xue-Feng; Liu, Rui-Xian; Wei, Yuan; Ouyang, Fang-Zhu; Chen, Dong-Ping; Wu, Yan; Lao, Xiang-Ming; Deng, Hong; Zheng, Limin

    2014-10-01

    Classical IL-22-producing T helper cells (Th22 cells) mediate inflammatory responses independently of IFN-γ and IL-17; however, nonclassical Th22 cells have been recently identified and coexpress IFN-γ and/or IL-17 along with IL-22. Little is known about how classical and nonclassical Th22 subsets in human diseases are regulated. Here, we used samples of human blood, normal and peritumoral liver, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) to delineate the phenotype, distribution, generation, and functional relevance of various Th22 subsets. Three nonclassical Th22 subsets constituted the majority of all Th22 cells in human liver and HCC tissues, although the classical Th22 subset was predominant in blood. Monocytes activated by TLR2 and TLR4 agonists served as the antigen-presenting cells (APCs) that most efficiently triggered the expansion of nonclassical Th22 subsets from memory T cells and classical Th22 subsets from naive T cells. Moreover, B7-H1-expressing monocytes skewed Th22 polarization away from IFN-γ and toward IL-17 through interaction with programmed death 1 (PD-1), an effect that can create favorable conditions for in vivo aggressive cancer growth and angiogenesis. Our results provide insight into the selective modulation of Th22 subsets and suggest that strategies to influence functional activities of inflammatory cells may benefit anticancer therapy.

  8. Derived enriched uranium market

    SciTech Connect

    Rutkowski, E.

    1996-12-01

    The potential impact on the uranium market of highly enriched uranium from nuclear weapons dismantling in the Russian Federation and the USA is analyzed. Uranium supply, conversion, and enrichment factors are outlined for each country; inventories are also listed. The enrichment component and conversion components are expected to cause little disruption to uranium markets. The uranium component of Russian derived enriched uranium hexafluoride is unresolved; US legislation places constraints on its introduction into the US market.

  9. Identifying subset errors in multiple sequence alignments.

    PubMed

    Roy, Aparna; Taddese, Bruck; Vohra, Shabana; Thimmaraju, Phani K; Illingworth, Christopher J R; Simpson, Lisa M; Mukherjee, Keya; Reynolds, Christopher A; Chintapalli, Sree V

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sequence alignment (MSA) accuracy is important, but there is no widely accepted method of judging the accuracy that different alignment algorithms give. We present a simple approach to detecting two types of error, namely block shifts and the misplacement of residues within a gap. Given a MSA, subsets of very similar sequences are generated through the use of a redundancy filter, typically using a 70-90% sequence identity cut-off. Subsets thus produced are typically small and degenerate, and errors can be easily detected even by manual examination. The errors, albeit minor, are inevitably associated with gaps in the alignment, and so the procedure is particularly relevant to homology modelling of protein loop regions. The usefulness of the approach is illustrated in the context of the universal but little known [K/R]KLH motif that occurs in intracellular loop 1 of G protein coupled receptors (GPCR); other issues relevant to GPCR modelling are also discussed.

  10. Nonequivalent periodic subsets of the lattice.

    PubMed

    Cocke, W

    2013-07-01

    The use of Pólya's theorem in crystallography and other applications has greatly simplified many counting and coloring problems. Given a group of equivalences acting on a set, Pólya's theorem equates the number of unique subsets with the orbits of the group action. For a lattice and a given group of periodic equivalences, the number of nonequivalent subsets of the lattice can be solved using Pólya's counting on the group of relevant symmetries acting on the lattice. When equivalence is defined via a sublattice, the use of Pólya's theorem is equivalent to knowing the cycle index of the action of the group elements on a related finite group structure. A simple algebraic method is presented to determine the cycle index for a group element acting on a lattice subject to certain periodicity arguments.

  11. Ultrametric subsets with large Hausdorff dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendel, Manor; Naor, Assaf

    2013-04-01

    It is shown that for every $\\e\\in (0,1)$, every compact metric space $(X,d)$ has a compact subset $S\\subseteq X$ that embeds into an ultrametric space with distortion $O(1/\\e)$, and $$\\dim_H(S)\\ge (1-\\e)\\dim_H(X),$$ where $\\dim_H(\\cdot)$ denotes Hausdorff dimension. The above $O(1/\\e)$ distortion estimate is shown to be sharp via a construction based on sequences of expander graphs.

  12. Fizzy. Feature subset selection for metagenomics

    SciTech Connect

    Ditzler, Gregory; Morrison, J. Calvin; Lan, Yemin; Rosen, Gail L.

    2015-11-04

    Background: Some of the current software tools for comparative metagenomics provide ecologists with the ability to investigate and explore bacterial communities using α– & β–diversity. Feature subset selection – a sub-field of machine learning – can also provide a unique insight into the differences between metagenomic or 16S phenotypes. In particular, feature subset selection methods can obtain the operational taxonomic units (OTUs), or functional features, that have a high-level of influence on the condition being studied. For example, in a previous study we have used information-theoretic feature selection to understand the differences between protein family abundances that best discriminate between age groups in the human gut microbiome. Results: We have developed a new Python command line tool, which is compatible with the widely adopted BIOM format, for microbial ecologists that implements information-theoretic subset selection methods for biological data formats. We demonstrate the software tools capabilities on publicly available datasets. Conclusions: We have made the software implementation of Fizzy available to the public under the GNU GPL license. The standalone implementation can be found at http://github.com/EESI/Fizzy.

  13. Fizzy. Feature subset selection for metagenomics

    DOE PAGES

    Ditzler, Gregory; Morrison, J. Calvin; Lan, Yemin; ...

    2015-11-04

    Background: Some of the current software tools for comparative metagenomics provide ecologists with the ability to investigate and explore bacterial communities using α– & β–diversity. Feature subset selection – a sub-field of machine learning – can also provide a unique insight into the differences between metagenomic or 16S phenotypes. In particular, feature subset selection methods can obtain the operational taxonomic units (OTUs), or functional features, that have a high-level of influence on the condition being studied. For example, in a previous study we have used information-theoretic feature selection to understand the differences between protein family abundances that best discriminate betweenmore » age groups in the human gut microbiome. Results: We have developed a new Python command line tool, which is compatible with the widely adopted BIOM format, for microbial ecologists that implements information-theoretic subset selection methods for biological data formats. We demonstrate the software tools capabilities on publicly available datasets. Conclusions: We have made the software implementation of Fizzy available to the public under the GNU GPL license. The standalone implementation can be found at http://github.com/EESI/Fizzy.« less

  14. Fizzy: feature subset selection for metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Ditzler, Gregory; Morrison, J Calvin; Lan, Yemin; Rosen, Gail L

    2015-11-04

    Some of the current software tools for comparative metagenomics provide ecologists with the ability to investigate and explore bacterial communities using α- & β-diversity. Feature subset selection--a sub-field of machine learning--can also provide a unique insight into the differences between metagenomic or 16S phenotypes. In particular, feature subset selection methods can obtain the operational taxonomic units (OTUs), or functional features, that have a high-level of influence on the condition being studied. For example, in a previous study we have used information-theoretic feature selection to understand the differences between protein family abundances that best discriminate between age groups in the human gut microbiome. We have developed a new Python command line tool, which is compatible with the widely adopted BIOM format, for microbial ecologists that implements information-theoretic subset selection methods for biological data formats. We demonstrate the software tools capabilities on publicly available datasets. We have made the software implementation of Fizzy available to the public under the GNU GPL license. The standalone implementation can be found at http://github.com/EESI/Fizzy.

  15. Database of Ligand-Receptor Partners, a DIP subset

    DOE Data Explorer

    Graeber, Thomas G.; Eisenberg, David

    The Database of Ligand-Receptor Partners (DLRP) is a subset of DIP (Database of Interacting Proteins). The DLRP is a database of protein ligand and protein receptor pairs that are known to interact with each other. By interact we mean that the ligand and receptor are members of a ligand-receptor complex and, unless otherwise noted, transduce a signal. In some instances the ligand and/or receptor may form a heterocomplex with other ligands/receptors in order to be functional. We have entered the majority of interactions in DLRP as full DIP entries, with links to references and additional information (see the DIP User's Guide). DLRP is a web supplement for: Thomas G. Graeber and David Eisenberg. Bioinformatic identification of potential autocrine signaling loops in cancers from gene expression profiles. Nature Genetics, 29(3):295-300 (November 2001). [Quoted from the DLRP homepage at http://dip.doe-mbi.ucla.edu/dip/DLRP.cgi] Also available from this page is the DLRP chemokine subset.

  16. A Patient-Derived, Pan-Cancer EMT Signature Identifies Global Molecular Alterations and Immune Target Enrichment Following Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition.

    PubMed

    Mak, Milena P; Tong, Pan; Diao, Lixia; Cardnell, Robert J; Gibbons, Don L; William, William N; Skoulidis, Ferdinandos; Parra, Edwin R; Rodriguez-Canales, Jaime; Wistuba, Ignacio I; Heymach, John V; Weinstein, John N; Coombes, Kevin R; Wang, Jing; Byers, Lauren Averett

    2016-02-01

    We previously demonstrated the association between epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and drug response in lung cancer using an EMT signature derived in cancer cell lines. Given the contribution of tumor microenvironments to EMT, we extended our investigation of EMT to patient tumors from 11 cancer types to develop a pan-cancer EMT signature. Using the pan-cancer EMT signature, we conducted an integrated, global analysis of genomic and proteomic profiles associated with EMT across 1,934 tumors including breast, lung, colon, ovarian, and bladder cancers. Differences in outcome and in vitro drug response corresponding to expression of the pan-cancer EMT signature were also investigated. Compared with the lung cancer EMT signature, the patient-derived, pan-cancer EMT signature encompasses a set of core EMT genes that correlate even more strongly with known EMT markers across diverse tumor types and identifies differences in drug sensitivity and global molecular alterations at the DNA, RNA, and protein levels. Among those changes associated with EMT, pathway analysis revealed a strong correlation between EMT and immune activation. Further supervised analysis demonstrated high expression of immune checkpoints and other druggable immune targets, such as PD1, PD-L1, CTLA4, OX40L, and PD-L2, in tumors with the most mesenchymal EMT scores. Elevated PD-L1 protein expression in mesenchymal tumors was confirmed by IHC in an independent lung cancer cohort. This new signature provides a novel, patient-based, histology-independent tool for the investigation of EMT and offers insights into potential novel therapeutic targets for mesenchymal tumors, independent of cancer type, including immune checkpoints. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. Designing vaccines based on biology of human dendritic cell subsets

    PubMed Central

    Palucka, Karolina; Banchereau, Jacques; Mellman, Ira

    2010-01-01

    The effective vaccines developed against a variety of infectious agents, including polio, measles and Hepatitis B, represent major achievements in medicine. These vaccines, usually composed of microbial antigens, are often associated with an adjuvant that activates dendritic cells (DCs). Many infectious diseases are still in need of an effective vaccine including HIV, malaria, hepatitis C and tuberculosis. In some cases, the induction of cellular rather than humoral responses may be more important as the goal is to control and eliminate the existing infection rather than to prevent it. Our increased understanding of the mechanisms of antigen presentation, particularly with the description of DC subsets with distinct functions, as well as their plasticity in responding to extrinsic signals, represent opportunities to develop novel vaccines. In addition, we foresee that this increased knowledge will permit us to design vaccines that will reprogram the immune system to intervene therapeutically in cancer, allergy and autoimmunity. PMID:21029958

  18. Brain Tumor Cells in Circulation are Enriched for Mesenchymal Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, James P.; Nahed, Brian V.; Madden, Marissa W.; Oliveira, Samantha M.; Springer, Simeon; Bhere, Deepak; Chi, Andrew S.; Wakimoto, Hiroaki; Rothenberg, S. Michael; Sequist, Lecia V.; Kapur, Ravi; Shah, Khalid; Iafrate, A. John; Curry, William T.; Loeffler, Jay S.; Batchelor, Tracy T.; Louis, David N.; Toner, Mehmet; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Haber, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a highly aggressive brain cancer characterized by local invasion and angiogenic recruitment, yet metastatic dissemination is extremely rare. Here, we adapted a microfluidic device to deplete hematopoietic cells from blood specimens of patients with GBM, uncovering evidence of circulating brain tumor cells (CTCs). Staining and scoring criteria for GBM CTCs were first established using orthotopic patient-derived xenografts (PDX), and then applied clinically: CTCs were identified in at least one blood specimen from 13/33 patients (39%; 26/87 samples). Single GBM CTCs isolated from both patients and mouse PDX models demonstrated enrichment for mesenchymal over neural differentiation markers, compared with primary GBMs. Within primary GBMs, RNA-in-situ hybridization identifies a subpopulation of highly migratory mesenchymal tumor cells, and in a rare patient with disseminated GBM, systemic lesions were exclusively mesenchymal. Thus, a mesenchymal subset of GBM cells invades into the vasculature, and may proliferate outside the brain. PMID:25139148

  19. A patient-derived, pan-cancer EMT signature identifies global molecular alterations and immune target enrichment following epithelial to mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Milena P.; Tong, Pan; Diao, Lixia; Cardnell, Robert J.; Gibbons, Don L.; William, William N.; Skoulidis, Ferdinandos; Parra, Edwin R.; Rodriguez-Canales, Jaime; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Heymach, John V.; Weinstein, John N.; Coombes, Kevin R.; Wang, Jing; Byers, Lauren Averett

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We previously demonstrated the association between epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and drug response in lung cancer using an EMT signature derived in cancer cell lines. Given the contribution of tumor microenvironments to EMT, we extended our investigation of EMT to patient tumors from 11 cancer types to develop a pan-cancer EMT signature. Experimental Design Using the pan-cancer EMT signature, we conducted an integrated, global analysis of genomic and proteomic profiles associated with EMT across 1,934 tumors including breast, lung, colon, ovarian, and bladder cancers. Differences in outcome and in vitro drug response corresponding to expression of the pan-cancer EMT signature were also investigated. Results Compared to the lung cancer EMT signature, the patient-derived, pan-cancer EMT signature encompasses a set of core EMT genes that correlate even more strongly with known EMT markers across diverse tumor types and identifies differences in drug sensitivity and global molecular alterations at the DNA, RNA, and protein levels. Among those changes associated with EMT, pathway analysis revealed a strong correlation between EMT and immune activation. Further supervised analysis demonstrated high expression of immune checkpoints and other druggable immune targets such as PD1, PD-L1, CTLA4, OX40L, and PDL2, in tumors with the most mesenchymal EMT scores. Elevated PD-L1 protein expression in mesenchymal tumors was confirmed by immunohistochemistry in an independent lung cancer cohort. Conclusions This new signature provides a novel, patient-based, histology-independent tool for the investigation of EMT and offers insights into potential novel therapeutic targets for mesenchymal tumors, independent of cancer type, including immune checkpoints. PMID:26420858

  20. Toward a Refined Definition of Monocyte Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler-Heitbrock, Loems; Hofer, Thomas P. J.

    2013-01-01

    In a nomenclature proposal published in 2010 monocytes were subdivided into classical and non-classical cells and in addition an intermediate monocyte subset was proposed. Over the last couple of years many studies have analyzed these intermediate cells, their characteristics have been described, and their expansion has been documented in many clinical settings. While these cells appear to be in transition from classical to non-classical monocytes and hence may not form a distinct cell population in a strict sense, their separate analysis and enumeration is warranted in health and disease. PMID:23382732

  1. Adaptive enrichment designs for clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Simon, Noah; Simon, Richard

    2013-09-01

    Modern medicine has graduated from broad spectrum treatments to targeted therapeutics. New drugs recognize the recently discovered heterogeneity of many diseases previously considered to be fairly homogeneous. These treatments attack specific genetic pathways which are only dysregulated in some smaller subset of patients with the disease. Often this subset is only rudimentarily understood until well into large-scale clinical trials. As such, standard practice has been to enroll a broad range of patients and run post hoc subset analysis to determine those who may particularly benefit. This unnecessarily exposes many patients to hazardous side effects, and may vastly decrease the efficiency of the trial (especially if only a small subset of patients benefit). In this manuscript, we propose a class of adaptive enrichment designs that allow the eligibility criteria of a trial to be adaptively updated during the trial, restricting entry to patients likely to benefit from the new treatment. We show that our designs both preserve the type 1 error, and in a variety of cases provide a substantial increase in power.

  2. Re-purposing of curcumin as an anti-metastatic agent for the treatment of epithelial ovarian cancer: in vitro model using cancer stem cell enriched ovarian cancer spheroids

    PubMed Central

    He, Misi; Wang, Dong; Zou, Dongling; Wang, Chen; Lopes-Bastos, Bruno; Jiang, Wen G.; Chester, John; Zhou, Qi; Cai, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Malignant epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) spheroids high frequently are detected in the malignant ascites of the patients with the extensive peritoneal metastasis of ovarian cancer, which represent a significant obstacle to efficacious treatment. Clinical data also suggested that EOC spheroids play a putative role in the development of chemoresistance. Since standard surgery and conventional chemotherapy is the only available treatment, there is an urgent need to identify a more effective therapeutic strategy. Recent studies demonstrated that curcumin exerts an anticancer effect in a variety of human cancers including ovarian cancer. This study evaluates anti-peritoneal metastasis and chemoresistance of curcumin related to the EOC spheroids. In this study, we confirm that the high invasive EOC cells forming the spheroids express a high level of a cancer stem cell (CSC) marker, aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 family member A1 (ALDH1A1), which was significantly down-regulated by curcumin treatment. Curcumin treatment markedly enhances the sensitivity of EOC spheroids to cisplatin in a dose-dependent manner. Our experiments provided evidence that curcumin could abolish the sphere-forming capacity of EOC cells in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, curcumin substantially suppressed the growth of the pre-existed EOC spheroids, inhibited the adhesion of EOC spheroids to ECM as well as the invasion of EOC spheroids to the mesothelial monolayers. We propose to re-purpose curcumin as anti-metastatic and chemoresistant agent for EOC management in combination with conventional regimen. Further preclinical studies are necessary to validate the anti-cancer effect of curcumin in patients with EOC. PMID:27863439

  3. Greedy Hypervolume Subset Selection in Low Dimensions.

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, Andreia P; Fonseca, Carlos M; Paquete, Luís

    2016-01-01

    Given a nondominated point set [Formula: see text] of size [Formula: see text] and a suitable reference point [Formula: see text], the Hypervolume Subset Selection Problem (HSSP) consists of finding a subset of size [Formula: see text] that maximizes the hypervolume indicator. It arises in connection with multiobjective selection and archiving strategies, as well as Pareto-front approximation postprocessing for visualization and/or interaction with a decision maker. Efficient algorithms to solve the HSSP are available only for the 2-dimensional case, achieving a time complexity of [Formula: see text]. In contrast, the best upper bound available for [Formula: see text] is [Formula: see text]. Since the hypervolume indicator is a monotone submodular function, the HSSP can be approximated to a factor of [Formula: see text] using a greedy strategy. In this article, greedy [Formula: see text]-time algorithms for the HSSP in 2 and 3 dimensions are proposed, matching the complexity of current exact algorithms for the 2-dimensional case, and considerably improving upon recent complexity results for this approximation problem.

  4. Monocyte subsets in myocardial infarction: A review.

    PubMed

    Arfvidsson, John; Ahlin, Fredrik; Vargas, Kris G; Thaler, Barbara; Wojta, Johann; Huber, Kurt

    2017-03-15

    Monocytes form an important part of the human innate immune system by taking part in inflammatory reactions. With time, monocytes have gained interest in the role they may play during the event of myocardial infarction (MI). The current paradigm suggests that monocytes consist of three subdivisions which differ in phenotypic and dynamic patterns after an MI. In the inflammation that ensues, the different subsets have been shown to have an impact on reparative processes and patient recovery. We searched Medline and Embase until April 5, 2016, for observational studies or clinical trials regarding monocyte functions and dynamics in MI. Apart from studies in humans, extensive work has been done in mice in an effort to understand the complex nature of monocyte dynamics. Animal models might add useful information on mapping these processes. The question still remains whether animal data can, to a certain degree, be extrapolated to monocyte functions during human MI. This review aims to summarize current available evidence on both mice and men with particular focus on the understanding of monocyte subsets dynamics and effects in human MI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. NK cell subsets in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cai; Tian, Zhigang

    2017-03-09

    Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes of the innate immune system. They not only exert cell-mediated cytotoxicity against tumor cells or infected cells, but also play regulatory role through promoting or suppressing functions of other immune cells by secretion of cytokines and chemokines. However, overactivation or dysfunction of NK cells may be associated with pathogenesis of some diseases. NK cells are found to act as a two edged weapon and play opposite roles with both regulatory and inducer activity in autoimmune diseases. Though the precise mechanisms for the opposite effects of NK cells has not been fully elucidated, the importance of NK cells in autoimmune diseases might be associated with different NK cell subsets, different tissue microenvironment and different stages of corresponding diseases. The local tissue microenvironment, unique cellular interactions and different stages of corresponding diseases shape the properties and function of NK cells. In this review, we focus on recent research on the features and function of different NK cell subsets, particularly tissue-resident NK cells in different tissues, and their potential role in autoimmune diseases.

  6. Pathophysiological relevance of macrophage subsets in atherogenesis.

    PubMed

    Liberale, Luca; Dallegri, Franco; Montecucco, Fabrizio; Carbone, Federico

    2017-01-05

    Macrophages are highly heterogeneous and plastic cells. They were shown to play a critical role in all stages of atherogenesis, from the initiation to the necrotic core formation and plaque rupture. Lesional macrophages primarily derive from blood monocyte, but local macrophage proliferation as well as differentiation from smooth muscle cells have also been described. Within atherosclerotic plaques, macrophages rapidly respond to changes in the microenvironment, shifting between pro- (M1) or anti-inflammatory (M2) functional phenotypes. Furthermore, different stimuli have been associated with differentiation of newly discovered M2 subtypes: IL-4/IL-13 (M2a), immune-complex (M2b), IL-10/glucocorticoids (M2c), and adenosine receptor agonist (M2d). More recently, additional intraplaque macrophage phenotypes were also recognized in response to CXCL4 (M4), oxidized phospholipids (Mox), haemoglobin/haptoglobin complexes (HA-mac/M(Hb)), and heme (Mhem). Such macrophage polarization was described as a progression among multiple phenotypes, which reflect the activity of different transcriptional factors and the cross-talk between intracellular signalling. Finally, the distribution of macrophage subsets within different plaque areas was markedly associated with cardiovascular (CV) vulnerability. The aim of this review is to update the current knowledge on the role of macrophage subsets in atherogenesis. In addition, the molecular mechanisms underlying macrophage phenotypic shift will be summarised and discussed. Finally, the role of intraplaque macrophages as predictors of CV events and the therapeutic potential of these cells will be discussed.

  7. The frequency of naïve and early-activated hapten-specific B cell subsets dictates the efficacy of a therapeutic vaccine against prescription opioid abuse

    PubMed Central

    Laudenbach, Megan; Baruffaldi, Federico; Vervacke, Jeffrey S; Distefano, Mark D; Titcombe, Philip J; Mueller, Daniel L; Tubo, Noah J; Griffith, Thomas S; Pravetoni, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Translation of therapeutic vaccines for addiction, cancer or other chronic non-communicable diseases has been slow because only a small subset of immunized subjects achieved effective antibody levels. We hypothesize that individual variability in the number of naïve and early-activated hapten-specific B cells determines post-vaccination serum antibody levels and vaccine efficacy. Using a model vaccine against the highly abused prescription opioid oxycodone, the polyclonal B cell population specific for an oxycodone-based hapten (6OXY) was analyzed by flow cytometry paired with antigen-based magnetic enrichment. A higher frequency of 6OXY-specific B cells in either spleen biopsies or blood, before and after immunization, correlated to subsequent greater oxycodone-specific serum antibody titers and their efficacy in blocking oxycodone distribution to the brain and oxycodone-induced behavior in mice. The magnitude of 6OXY-specific B cell activation and vaccine efficacy was tightly correlated to the size of the CD4+ T cell population. The frequency of enriched 6OXY-specific B cells was consistent across various mouse tissues. These data provide novel evidence that variations in the frequency of naïve or early-activated vaccine-specific B and T cells can account for individual responses to vaccines and may predict the clinical efficacy of a therapeutic vaccine. PMID:25972483

  8. Effect of a protein and energy dense n-3 fatty acid enriched oral supplement on loss of weight and lean tissue in cancer cachexia: a randomised double blind trial

    PubMed Central

    Fearon, K C H; von Meyenfeldt, M F; Moses, A G W; van Geenen, R; Roy, A; Gouma, D J; Giacosa, A; Van Gossum, A; Bauer, J; Barber, M D; Aaronson, N K; Voss, A C; Tisdale, M J

    2003-01-01

    Aim: N-3 fatty acids, especially eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), may possess anticachectic properties. This trial compared a protein and energy dense supplement enriched with n-3 fatty acids and antioxidants (experimental: E) with an isocaloric isonitrogenous control supplement (C) for their effects on weight, lean body mass (LBM), dietary intake, and quality of life in cachectic patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods: A total of 200 patients (95 E; 105 C) were randomised to consume two cans/day of the E or C supplement (480 ml, 620 kcal, 32 g protein ± 2.2 g EPA) for eight weeks in a multicentre, randomised, double blind trial. Results: At enrolment, patients’ mean rate of weight loss was 3.3 kg/month. Intake of the supplements (E or C) was below the recommended dose (2 cans/day) and averaged 1.4 cans/day. Over eight weeks, patients in both groups stopped losing weight (Δ weight E: −0.25 kg/month versus C: −0.37 kg/month; p = 0.74) and LBM (Δ LBM E: +0.27 kg/month versus C: +0.12 kg/month; p = 0.88) to an equal degree (change from baseline E and C, p<0.001). In view of evident non-compliance in both E and C groups, correlation analyses were undertaken to examine for potential dose-response relationships. E patients demonstrated significant correlations between their supplement intake and weight gain (r = 0.50, p<0.001) and increase in LBM (r = 0.33, p = 0.036). Such correlations were not statistically significant in C patients. The relationship of supplement intake with change in LBM was significantly different between E and C patients (p = 0.043). Increased plasma EPA levels in the E group were associated with weight and LBM gain (r = 0.50, p<0.001; r = 0.51, p = 0.001). Weight gain was associated with improved quality of life (p<0.01) only in the E group. Conclusion: Intention to treat group comparisons indicated that at the mean dose taken, enrichment with n-3 fatty acids did not provide a therapeutic advantage and that both supplements were

  9. Comprehensive tissue-specific gene set enrichment analysis and transcription factor analysis of breast cancer by integrating 14 gene expression datasets

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Shao-Xing; Li, Gong-Hua; Lv, Wen-Wen; Guo, Yi-Cheng; An, San-Qi; Wu, Guo-Ying; Liu, Dahai; Huang, Jing-Fei

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed malignancy in women. Several key genes and pathways have been proven to correlate with breast cancer pathology. This study sought to explore the differences in key transcription factors (TFs), transcriptional regulation networks and dysregulated pathways in different tissues in breast cancer. We employed 14 breast cancer datasets from NCBI-GEO and performed an integrated analysis in three different tissues including breast, blood and saliva. The results showed that there were eight genes (CEBPD, EGR1, EGR2, EGR3, FOS, FOSB, ID1 and NFIL3) down-regulated in breast tissue but up-regulated in blood tissue. Furthermore, we identified several unreported tissue-specific TFs that may contribute to breast cancer, including ATOH8, DMRT2, TBX15 and ZNF367. The dysregulation of these TFs damaged lipid metabolism, development, cell adhesion, proliferation, differentiation and metastasis processes. Among these pathways, the breast tissue showed the most serious impairment and the blood tissue showed a relatively moderate damage, whereas the saliva tissue was almost unaffected. This study could be helpful for future biomarker discovery, drug design, and therapeutic and predictive applications in breast cancers. PMID:28036274

  10. Comprehensive tissue-specific gene set enrichment analysis and transcription factor analysis of breast cancer by integrating 14 gene expression datasets.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Xing; He, Kan; Tang, Ling; Dai, Shao-Xing; Li, Gong-Hua; Lv, Wen-Wen; Guo, Yi-Cheng; An, San-Qi; Wu, Guo-Ying; Liu, Dahai; Huang, Jing-Fei

    2017-01-24

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed malignancy in women. Several key genes and pathways have been proven to correlate with breast cancer pathology. This study sought to explore the differences in key transcription factors (TFs), transcriptional regulation networks and dysregulated pathways in different tissues in breast cancer. We employed 14 breast cancer datasets from NCBI-GEO and performed an integrated analysis in three different tissues including breast, blood and saliva. The results showed that there were eight genes (CEBPD, EGR1, EGR2, EGR3, FOS, FOSB, ID1 and NFIL3) down-regulated in breast tissue but up-regulated in blood tissue. Furthermore, we identified several unreported tissue-specific TFs that may contribute to breast cancer, including ATOH8, DMRT2, TBX15 and ZNF367. The dysregulation of these TFs damaged lipid metabolism, development, cell adhesion, proliferation, differentiation and metastasis processes. Among these pathways, the breast tissue showed the most serious impairment and the blood tissue showed a relatively moderate damage, whereas the saliva tissue was almost unaffected. This study could be helpful for future biomarker discovery, drug design, and therapeutic and predictive applications in breast cancers.

  11. Targeted depletion of a MDSC subset unmasks pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma to adaptive immunity

    PubMed Central

    Stromnes, Ingunn M.; Brockenbrough, Scott; Izeradjene, Kamel; Carlson, Markus A.; Cuevas, Carlos; Simmons, Randi M.; Greenberg, Philip D.; Hingorani, Sunil R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is characterized by a robust desmoplasia, including the notable accumulation of immunosuppressive cells that shield neoplastic cells from immune detection. Immune evasion may be further enhanced if the malignant cells fail to express high levels of antigens that are sufficiently immunogenic to engender an effector T cell response. In this report, we investigate the predominant subsets of immunosuppressive cancer-conditioned myeloid cells that chronicle and shape pancreas cancer progression. We show that selective depletion of one subset of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) in an autochthonous, genetically engineered mouse model (GEMM) of PDA unmasks the ability of the adaptive immune response to engage and target tumor epithelial cells. Methods A combination of in vivo and in vitro studies were performed employing a GEMM that faithfully recapitulates the cardinal features of human PDA. The predominant cancer-conditioned myeloid cell subpopulation was specifically targeted in vivo and the biological outcomes determined. Results PDA orchestrates the induction of distinct subsets of cancer-associated myeloid cells through the production of factors known to influence myelopoeisis. These immature myeloid cells inhibit the proliferation and induce apoptosis of activated T cells. Targeted depletion of granulocytic MDSC (Gr-MDSC) in autochthonous PDA increases the intratumoral accumulation of activated CD8 T cells and apoptosis of tumor epithelial cells, and also remodels the tumor stroma. Conclusions Neoplastic ductal cells of the pancreas induce distinct myeloid cell subsets that promote tumor cell survival and accumulation. Targeted depletion of a single myeloid subset, the Gr-MDSC, can unmask an endogenous T cell response, revealing an unexpected latent immunity and invoking targeting of Gr-MDSC as a potential strategy to exploit for treating this highly lethal disease. PMID:24555999

  12. Enrichment through Creative Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krause, Claire S.

    The CREST (Creative Resources Enriching Student Talents) Project, an enrichment approach for elementary gifted, talented, and creative students, is described. The project is explained to incorporate an interdisciplinary approach to instruction in art and science using resources within the community. Chapter 1 outlines the project philosophy,…

  13. ABC transporters and NR4A1 identify a quiescent subset of tissue-resident memory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Boddupalli, Chandra Sekhar; Nair, Shiny; Gray, Simon M.; Nowyhed, Heba N.; Verma, Rakesh; Gibson, Joanna A.; Abraham, Clara; Narayan, Deepak; Vasquez, Juan; Hedrick, Catherine C.; Dhodapkar, Kavita M.; Kaech, Susan M.; Dhodapkar, Madhav V.

    2016-01-01

    Immune surveillance in tissues is mediated by a long-lived subset of tissue-resident memory T cells (Trm cells). A putative subset of tissue-resident long-lived stem cells is characterized by the ability to efflux Hoechst dyes and is referred to as side population (SP) cells. Here, we have characterized a subset of SP T cells (Tsp cells) that exhibit a quiescent (G0) phenotype in humans and mice. Human Trm cells in the gut and BM were enriched in Tsp cells that were predominantly in the G0 stage of the cell cycle. Moreover, in histone 2B-GFP mice, the 2B-GFP label was retained in Tsp cells, indicative of a slow-cycling phenotype. Human Tsp cells displayed a distinct gene-expression profile that was enriched for genes overexpressed in Trm cells. In mice, proteins encoded by Tsp signature genes, including nuclear receptor subfamily 4 group A member 1 (NR4A1) and ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, influenced the function and differentiation of Trm cells. Responses to adoptive transfer of human Tsp cells into immune-deficient mice and plerixafor therapy suggested that human Tsp cell mobilization could be manipulated as a potential cellular therapy. These data identify a distinct subset of human T cells with a quiescent/slow-cycling phenotype, propensity for tissue enrichment, and potential to mobilize into circulation, which may be harnessed for adoptive cellular therapy. PMID:27617863

  14. Tumor engraftment in nude mice and enrichment in stroma- related gene pathways predict poor survival and resistance to gemcitabine in patients with pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Garrido-Laguna, Ignacio; Uson, Maria; Rajeshkumar, N V; Tan, Aik Choon; de Oliveira, Elizabeth; Karikari, Collins; Villaroel, Maria C; Salomon, Ana; Taylor, Gretchen; Sharma, Rajni; Hruban, Ralph H; Maitra, Anirban; Laheru, Daniel; Rubio-Viqueira, Belén; Jimeno, Antonio; Hidalgo, Manuel

    2011-09-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate prospectively the engraftment rate, factors influencing engraftment, and predictability of clinical outcome of low-passage xenografts from patients with resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) and to establish a bank of PDA xenografts. Patients with resectable PDA scheduled for resection at the Johns Hopkins Hospital were eligible. Representative pieces of tumor were implanted in nude mice. The status of the SMAD4 gene and content of tumor-generating cells were determined by immunohistochemistry. Gene expression was carried out by using a U133 Plus 2.0 array. Patients were followed for progression and survival. A total of 94 patients with PDA were resected, 69 tumors implanted in nude mice, and 42 (61%) engrafted. Engrafted carcinomas were more often SMAD4 mutant, and had a metastatic gene expression signature and worse prognosis. Tumors from patients resistant to gemcitabine were enriched in stroma-related gene pathways. Tumors sensitive to gemcitabine were enriched in cell cycle and pyrimidine gene pathways. The time to progression for patients who received treatment with gemcitabine for metastatic disease (n = 7) was double in patients with xenografts sensitive to gemcitabine. A successful xenograft was generated in 61% of patients attempted, generating a pool of 42 PDA xenografts with significant biological information and annotated clinical data. Patients with PDA and SMAD4 inactivation have a better engraftment rate. Engraftment is a poor prognosis factor, and engrafted tumors have a metastatic gene expression signature. Tumors from gemcitabine-resistant patients were enriched in stromal pathways. ©2011 AACR.

  15. Harnessing Human Dendritic Cell Subsets for Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Hideki; Schmitt, Nathalie; Klechevsky, Eynav; Pedroza-Gonzales, Alexander; Matsui, Toshimichi; Zurawski, Gerard; Oh, SangKon; Fay, Joseph; Pascual, Virginia; Banchereau, Jacques; Palucka, Karolina

    2010-01-01

    Summary Immunity results from a complex interplay between the antigen-nonspecific innate immune system and the antigen-specific adaptive immune system. The cells and molecules of the innate system employ non-clonal recognition receptors including lectins, Toll-like receptors, NOD-like receptors and helicases. B and T lymphocytes of the adaptive immune system employ clonal receptors recognizing antigens or their derived peptides in a highly specific manner. An essential link between innate and adaptive immunity is provided by dendritic cells (DCs). DCs can induce such contrasting states as immunity and tolerance. The recent years have brought a wealth of information on the biology of DCs revealing the complexity of this cell system. Indeed, DC plasticity and subsets are prominent determinants of the type and quality of elicited immune responses. Here we summarize our recent studies aimed at a better understanding of the DC system to unravel the pathophysiology of human diseases and design novel human vaccines. PMID:20193020

  16. The expanding universe of regulatory T cell subsets in cancer.

    PubMed

    Gajewski, Thomas F

    2007-08-01

    Evidence has indicated that failed antitumor immunity is dominated by immunosuppressive mechanisms within the tumor microenvironment. In this issue of Immunity, Peng et al. (2007) add to this list by describing tumor-infiltrating gammadelta T cells that have regulatory function.

  17. Hierarchical modeling for rare event detection and cell subset alignment across flow cytometry samples.

    PubMed

    Cron, Andrew; Gouttefangeas, Cécile; Frelinger, Jacob; Lin, Lin; Singh, Satwinder K; Britten, Cedrik M; Welters, Marij J P; van der Burg, Sjoerd H; West, Mike; Chan, Cliburn

    2013-01-01

    Flow cytometry is the prototypical assay for multi-parameter single cell analysis, and is essential in vaccine and biomarker research for the enumeration of antigen-specific lymphocytes that are often found in extremely low frequencies (0.1% or less). Standard analysis of flow cytometry data relies on visual identification of cell subsets by experts, a process that is subjective and often difficult to reproduce. An alternative and more objective approach is the use of statistical models to identify cell subsets of interest in an automated fashion. Two specific challenges for automated analysis are to detect extremely low frequency event subsets without biasing the estimate by pre-processing enrichment, and the ability to align cell subsets across multiple data samples for comparative analysis. In this manuscript, we develop hierarchical modeling extensions to the Dirichlet Process Gaussian Mixture Model (DPGMM) approach we have previously described for cell subset identification, and show that the hierarchical DPGMM (HDPGMM) naturally generates an aligned data model that captures both commonalities and variations across multiple samples. HDPGMM also increases the sensitivity to extremely low frequency events by sharing information across multiple samples analyzed simultaneously. We validate the accuracy and reproducibility of HDPGMM estimates of antigen-specific T cells on clinically relevant reference peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) samples with known frequencies of antigen-specific T cells. These cell samples take advantage of retrovirally TCR-transduced T cells spiked into autologous PBMC samples to give a defined number of antigen-specific T cells detectable by HLA-peptide multimer binding. We provide open source software that can take advantage of both multiple processors and GPU-acceleration to perform the numerically-demanding computations. We show that hierarchical modeling is a useful probabilistic approach that can provide a consistent labeling

  18. Hierarchical Modeling for Rare Event Detection and Cell Subset Alignment across Flow Cytometry Samples

    PubMed Central

    Cron, Andrew; Gouttefangeas, Cécile; Frelinger, Jacob; Lin, Lin; Singh, Satwinder K.; Britten, Cedrik M.; Welters, Marij J. P.; van der Burg, Sjoerd H.; West, Mike; Chan, Cliburn

    2013-01-01

    Flow cytometry is the prototypical assay for multi-parameter single cell analysis, and is essential in vaccine and biomarker research for the enumeration of antigen-specific lymphocytes that are often found in extremely low frequencies (0.1% or less). Standard analysis of flow cytometry data relies on visual identification of cell subsets by experts, a process that is subjective and often difficult to reproduce. An alternative and more objective approach is the use of statistical models to identify cell subsets of interest in an automated fashion. Two specific challenges for automated analysis are to detect extremely low frequency event subsets without biasing the estimate by pre-processing enrichment, and the ability to align cell subsets across multiple data samples for comparative analysis. In this manuscript, we develop hierarchical modeling extensions to the Dirichlet Process Gaussian Mixture Model (DPGMM) approach we have previously described for cell subset identification, and show that the hierarchical DPGMM (HDPGMM) naturally generates an aligned data model that captures both commonalities and variations across multiple samples. HDPGMM also increases the sensitivity to extremely low frequency events by sharing information across multiple samples analyzed simultaneously. We validate the accuracy and reproducibility of HDPGMM estimates of antigen-specific T cells on clinically relevant reference peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) samples with known frequencies of antigen-specific T cells. These cell samples take advantage of retrovirally TCR-transduced T cells spiked into autologous PBMC samples to give a defined number of antigen-specific T cells detectable by HLA-peptide multimer binding. We provide open source software that can take advantage of both multiple processors and GPU-acceleration to perform the numerically-demanding computations. We show that hierarchical modeling is a useful probabilistic approach that can provide a consistent labeling

  19. Macrophage subsets and microglia in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bogie, Jeroen F J; Stinissen, Piet; Hendriks, Jerome J A

    2014-08-01

    Along with microglia and monocyte-derived macrophages, macrophages in the perivascular space, choroid plexus, and meninges are the principal effector cells in neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative disorders. These phagocytes are highly heterogeneous cells displaying spatial- and temporal-dependent identities in the healthy, injured, and inflamed CNS. In the last decade, researchers have debated on whether phagocytes subtypes and phenotypes are pathogenic or protective in CNS pathologies. In the context of this dichotomy, we summarize and discuss the current knowledge on the spatiotemporal physiology of macrophage subsets and microglia in the healthy and diseased CNS, and elaborate on factors regulating their behavior. In addition, the impact of macrophages present in lymphoid organs on CNS pathologies is defined. The prime focus of this review is on multiple sclerosis (MS), which is characterized by inflammation, demyelination, neurodegeneration, and CNS repair, and in which microglia and macrophages have been extensively scrutinized. On one hand, microglia and macrophages promote neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative events in MS by releasing inflammatory mediators and stimulating leukocyte activity and infiltration into the CNS. On the other hand, microglia and macrophages assist in CNS repair through the production of neurotrophic factors and clearance of inhibitory myelin debris. Finally, we define how microglia and macrophage physiology can be harnessed for new therapeutics aimed at suppressing neuroinflammatory and cytodegenerative events, as well as promoting CNS repair. We conclude that microglia and macrophages are highly dynamic cells displaying disease stage and location-specific fates in neurological disorders. Changing the physiology of divergent phagocyte subsets at particular disease stages holds promise for future therapeutics for CNS pathologies.

  20. Dissimilarity-Based Sparse Subset Selection.

    PubMed

    Elhamifar, Ehsan; Sapiro, Guillermo; Sastry, S Shankar

    2016-11-01

    Finding an informative subset of a large collection of data points or models is at the center of many problems in computer vision, recommender systems, bio/health informatics as well as image and natural language processing. Given pairwise dissimilarities between the elements of a 'source set' and a 'target set,' we consider the problem of finding a subset of the source set, called representatives or exemplars, that can efficiently describe the target set. We formulate the problem as a row-sparsity regularized trace minimization problem. Since the proposed formulation is, in general, NP-hard, we consider a convex relaxation. The solution of our optimization finds representatives and the assignment of each element of the target set to each representative, hence, obtaining a clustering. We analyze the solution of our proposed optimization as a function of the regularization parameter. We show that when the two sets jointly partition into multiple groups, our algorithm finds representatives from all groups and reveals clustering of the sets. In addition, we show that the proposed framework can effectively deal with outliers. Our algorithm works with arbitrary dissimilarities, which can be asymmetric or violate the triangle inequality. To efficiently implement our algorithm, we consider an Alternating Direction Method of Multipliers (ADMM) framework, which results in quadratic complexity in the problem size. We show that the ADMM implementation allows to parallelize the algorithm, hence further reducing the computational time. Finally, by experiments on real-world datasets, we show that our proposed algorithm improves the state of the art on the two problems of scene categorization using representative images and time-series modeling and segmentation using representative models.

  1. Dissimilarity-based Sparse Subset Selection.

    PubMed

    Elhamifar, Ehsan; Sapiro, Guillermo; Sastry, Shankar

    2015-12-23

    Finding an informative subset of a large collection of data points or models is at the center of many problems in computer vision, recommender systems, bio/health informatics as well as image and natural language processing. Given pairwise dissimilarities between the elements of a 'source set' and a 'target set,' we consider the problem of finding a subset of the source set, called representatives or exemplars, that can efficiently describe the target set. We formulate the problem as a row-sparsity regularized trace minimization problem. Since the proposed formulation is, in general, NP-hard, we consider a convex relaxation. The solution of our optimization finds representatives and the assignment of each element of the target set to each representative, hence, obtaining a clustering. We analyze the solution of our proposed optimization as a function of the regularization parameter. We show that when the two sets jointly partition into multiple groups, our algorithm finds representatives from all groups and reveals clustering of the sets. In addition, we show that the proposed framework can effectively deal with outliers. Our algorithm works with arbitrary dissimilarities, which can be asymmetric or violate the triangle inequality. To efficiently implement our algorithm, we consider an Alternating Direction Method of Multipliers (ADMM) framework, which results in quadratic complexity in the problem size. We show that the ADMM implementation allows to parallelize the algorithm, hence further reducing the computational time. Finally, by experiments on real-world datasets, we show that our proposed algorithm improves the state of the art on the two problems of scene categorization using representative images and time-series modeling and segmentation using representative models.

  2. A Novel Workflow to Enrich and Isolate Patient-Matched EpCAM(high) and EpCAM(low/negative) CTCs Enables the Comparative Characterization of the PIK3CA Status in Metastatic Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lampignano, Rita; Yang, Liwen; Neumann, Martin H D; Franken, André; Fehm, Tanja; Niederacher, Dieter; Neubauer, Hans

    2017-08-31

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs), potential precursors of most epithelial solid tumors, are mainly enriched by epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM)-dependent technologies. Hence, these approaches may overlook mesenchymal CTCs, considered highly malignant. Our aim was to establish a workflow to enrich and isolate patient-matched EpCAM(high) and EpCAM(low/negative) CTCs within the same blood samples, and to investigate the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase catalytic subunit alpha (PIK3CA) mutational status within single CTCs. We sequentially processed metastatic breast cancer (MBC) blood samples via CellSearch(®) (EpCAM-based) and via Parsortix™ (size-based) systems. After enrichment, cells captured in Parsortix™ cassettes were stained in situ for nuclei, cytokeratins, EpCAM and CD45. Afterwards, sorted cells were isolated via CellCelector™ micromanipulator and their genomes were amplified. Lastly, PIK3CA mutational status was analyzed by combining an amplicon-based approach with Sanger sequencing. In 54% of patients' blood samples both EpCAM(high) and EpCAM(low/negative) cells were identified and successfully isolated. High genomic integrity was observed in 8% of amplified genomes of EpCAM(low/negative) cells vs. 28% of EpCAM(high) cells suggesting an increased apoptosis in the first CTC-subpopulation. Furthermore, PIK3CA hotspot mutations were detected in both EpCAM(high) and EpCAM(low/negative) CTCs. Our workflow is suitable for single CTC analysis, permitting-for the first time-assessment of the heterogeneity of PIK3CA mutational status within patient-matched EpCAM(high) and EpCAM(low/negative) CTCs.

  3. SuperSAGE evidence for CD14++CD16+ monocytes as a third monocyte subset.

    PubMed

    Zawada, Adam M; Rogacev, Kyrill S; Rotter, Björn; Winter, Peter; Marell, Rolf-R; Fliser, Danilo; Heine, Gunnar H

    2011-09-22

    Monocytes are a heterogeneous cell population with subset-specific functions and phenotypes. The differential expression of CD14 and CD16 distinguishes classical CD14(++)CD16(-), intermediate CD14(++)CD16(+), and nonclassical CD14(+)CD16(++) monocytes. Current knowledge on human monocyte heterogeneity is still incomplete: while it is increasingly acknowledged that CD14(++)CD16(+) monocytes are of outstanding significance in 2 global health issues, namely HIV-1 infection and atherosclerosis, CD14(++)CD16(+) monocytes remain the most poorly characterized subset so far. We therefore developed a method to purify the 3 monocyte subsets from human blood and analyzed their transcriptomes using SuperSAGE in combination with high-throughput sequencing. Analysis of 5 487 603 tags revealed unique identifiers of CD14(++)CD16(+) monocytes, delineating these cells from the 2 other monocyte subsets. Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis suggests diverse immunologic functions, linking CD14(++)CD16(+) monocytes to Ag processing and presentation (eg, CD74, HLA-DR, IFI30, CTSB), to inflammation and monocyte activation (eg, TGFB1, AIF1, PTPN6), and to angiogenesis (eg, TIE2, CD105). In conclusion, we provide genetic evidence for a distinct role of CD14(++)CD16(+) monocytes in human immunity. After CD14(++)CD16(+) monocytes have earlier been discussed as a potential therapeutic target in inflammatory diseases, we are hopeful that our data will spur further research in the field of monocyte heterogeneity.

  4. Molecular Subtyping of Serous Ovarian Tumors Reveals Multiple Connections to Intrinsic Breast Cancer Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Jönsson, Jenny-Maria; Johansson, Ida; Dominguez-Valentin, Mev; Kimbung, Siker; Jönsson, Mats; Bonde, Jesper Hansen; Kannisto, Päivi; Måsbäck, Anna; Malander, Susanne; Nilbert, Mef; Hedenfalk, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    Objective Transcriptional profiling of epithelial ovarian cancer has revealed molecular subtypes correlating to biological and clinical features. We aimed to determine gene expression differences between malignant, benign and borderline serous ovarian tumors, and investigate similarities with the well-established intrinsic molecular subtypes of breast cancer. Methods Global gene expression profiling using Illumina's HT12 Bead Arrays was applied to 59 fresh-frozen serous ovarian malignant, benign and borderline tumors. Nearest centroid classification was performed applying previously published gene profiles for the ovarian and breast cancer subtypes. Correlations to gene expression modules representing key biological breast cancer features were also sought. Validation was performed using an independent, publicly available dataset. Results 5,944 genes were significantly differentially expressed between benign and malignant serous ovarian tumors, with cell cycle processes enriched in the malignant subgroup. Borderline tumors were split between the two clusters. Significant correlations between the malignant serous tumors and the highly aggressive ovarian cancer signatures, and the basal-like breast cancer subtype were found. The benign and borderline serous tumors together were significantly correlated to the normal-like breast cancer subtype and the ovarian cancer signature derived from borderline tumors. The borderline tumors in the study dataset, in addition, also correlated significantly to the luminal A breast cancer subtype. These findings remained when analyzed in an independent dataset, supporting links between the molecular subtypes of ovarian cancer and breast cancer beyond those recently acknowledged. Conclusions These data link the transcriptional profiles of serous ovarian cancer to the intrinsic molecular subtypes of breast cancer, in line with the shared clinical and molecular features between high-grade serous ovarian cancer and basal-like breast

  5. Molecular subtyping of serous ovarian tumors reveals multiple connections to intrinsic breast cancer subtypes.

    PubMed

    Jönsson, Jenny-Maria; Johansson, Ida; Dominguez-Valentin, Mev; Kimbung, Siker; Jönsson, Mats; Bonde, Jesper Hansen; Kannisto, Päivi; Måsbäck, Anna; Malander, Susanne; Nilbert, Mef; Hedenfalk, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    Transcriptional profiling of epithelial ovarian cancer has revealed molecular subtypes correlating to biological and clinical features. We aimed to determine gene expression differences between malignant, benign and borderline serous ovarian tumors, and investigate similarities with the well-established intrinsic molecular subtypes of breast cancer. Global gene expression profiling using Illumina's HT12 Bead Arrays was applied to 59 fresh-frozen serous ovarian malignant, benign and borderline tumors. Nearest centroid classification was performed applying previously published gene profiles for the ovarian and breast cancer subtypes. Correlations to gene expression modules representing key biological breast cancer features were also sought. Validation was performed using an independent, publicly available dataset. 5,944 genes were significantly differentially expressed between benign and malignant serous ovarian tumors, with cell cycle processes enriched in the malignant subgroup. Borderline tumors were split between the two clusters. Significant correlations between the malignant serous tumors and the highly aggressive ovarian cancer signatures, and the basal-like breast cancer subtype were found. The benign and borderline serous tumors together were significantly correlated to the normal-like breast cancer subtype and the ovarian cancer signature derived from borderline tumors. The borderline tumors in the study dataset, in addition, also correlated significantly to the luminal A breast cancer subtype. These findings remained when analyzed in an independent dataset, supporting links between the molecular subtypes of ovarian cancer and breast cancer beyond those recently acknowledged. These data link the transcriptional profiles of serous ovarian cancer to the intrinsic molecular subtypes of breast cancer, in line with the shared clinical and molecular features between high-grade serous ovarian cancer and basal-like breast cancer, and suggest that biomarkers and

  6. Immune regulation by low doses of the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-azacitidine in common human epithelial cancers

    PubMed Central

    Easwaran, Hariharan; Yen, Ray-Whay Chiu; Vatapalli, Rajita; Topper, Michael J.; Luo, Jianjun; Connolly, Roisin M.; Azad, Nilofer S.; Stearns, Vered; Pardoll, Drew M.; Davidson, Nancy; Jones, Peter A.; Slamon, Dennis J.; Baylin, Stephen B.; Zahnow, Cynthia A.; Ahuja, Nita

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic therapy is emerging as a potential therapy for solid tumors. To investigate its mechanism of action, we performed integrative expression and methylation analysis of 63 cancer cell lines (breast, colorectal, and ovarian) after treatment with the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-azacitidine (AZA). Gene Set Enrichment Analysis demonstrated significant enrichment for immunomodulatory pathways in all three cancers (14.4-31.3%) including interferon signaling, antigen processing and presentation, and cytokines/chemokines. Strong upregulation of cancer testis antigens was also observed. An AZA IMmune gene set (AIMs) derived from the union of these immunomodulatory pathway genes classified primary tumors from all three types into “high” and “low” AIM gene expression subsets in tumor expression data from both TCGA and GEO. Samples from selected patient biopsies showed upregulation of AIM genes after treatment with epigenetic therapy. These results point to a broad immune stimulatory role for DNA demethylating drugs in multiple cancers. PMID:24583822

  7. Cancer stem cells, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and drug resistance in high-grade ovarian serous carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoxiang; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Zhihong; Li, Hongxia; Cheng, Wenjun; Liu, Jinsong

    2013-11-01

    Although epithelial ovarian cancer cells are eliminated by debulking surgery and chemotherapy during initial treatment, it is believed that only a subset of cancer cells, that is, cancer stem cells, may be an important source of tumor recurrence and drug resistance. This review highlights our current understanding of high-grade serous carcinoma, ovarian cancer stem cells, common methods for enrichment of ovarian cancer stem cells, mechanisms involved in drug resistance, and potential strategies for overcoming drug resistance, with associated potential controversies and pitfalls. We also review the potential relationship between epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and cancer stem cells and how we can induce cancer cells to differentiate into benign stromal fibroblasts in response to certain chemotherapy drugs.

  8. Characterization of the myeloid-derived suppressor cell subset regulated by NK cells in malignant lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yusuke; Shimizu, Kanako; Shinga, Jun; Hidaka, Michihiro; Kawano, Fumio; Kakimi, Kazuhiro; Yamasaki, Satoru; Asakura, Miki; Fujii, Shin-Ichiro

    2015-03-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a heterogeneous population with the ability to suppress immune responses and are currently classified into three distinct MDSC subsets: monocytic, granulocytic and non-monocytic, and non-granulocytic MDSCs. Although NK cells provide an important first-line defense against newly transformed cancer cells, it is unknown whether NK cells can regulate MDSC populations in the context of cancer. In this study, we initially found that the frequency of MDSCs in non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) patients was increased and inversely correlated with that of NK cells, but not that of T cells. To investigate the regulation of MDSC subsets by NK cells, we used an EL4 murine lymphoma model and found the non-monocytic and non-granulocytic MDSC subset, i.e., Gr1(+)CD11b(+)Ly6G(med)Ly6C(med) MDSC, is increased after NK cell depletion. The MDSC population that expresses MHC class II, CD80, CD124, and CCR2 is regulated mainly by CD27(+)CD11b(+)NK cells. In addition, this MDSC subset produces some immunosuppressive cytokines, including IL-10 but not nitric oxide (NO) or arginase. We also examined two subsets of MDSCs (CD14(+)HLA-DR(-) and CD14(-) HLA-DR(-) MDSC) in NHL patients and found that higher IL-10-producing CD14(+)HLA-DR(-)MDSC subset can be seen in lymphoma patients with reduced NK cell frequency in peripheral blood. Our analyses of MDSCs in this study may enable a better understanding of how MDSCs manipulate the tumor microenvironment and are regulated by NK cells in patients with lymphoma.

  9. Characterization of the myeloid-derived suppressor cell subset regulated by NK cells in malignant lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Yusuke; Shimizu, Kanako; Shinga, Jun; Hidaka, Michihiro; Kawano, Fumio; Kakimi, Kazuhiro; Yamasaki, Satoru; Asakura, Miki; Fujii, Shin-ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a heterogeneous population with the ability to suppress immune responses and are currently classified into three distinct MDSC subsets: monocytic, granulocytic and non-monocytic, and non-granulocytic MDSCs. Although NK cells provide an important first-line defense against newly transformed cancer cells, it is unknown whether NK cells can regulate MDSC populations in the context of cancer. In this study, we initially found that the frequency of MDSCs in non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) patients was increased and inversely correlated with that of NK cells, but not that of T cells. To investigate the regulation of MDSC subsets by NK cells, we used an EL4 murine lymphoma model and found the non-monocytic and non-granulocytic MDSC subset, i.e., Gr1+CD11b+Ly6GmedLy6Cmed MDSC, is increased after NK cell depletion. The MDSC population that expresses MHC class II, CD80, CD124, and CCR2 is regulated mainly by CD27+CD11b+NK cells. In addition, this MDSC subset produces some immunosuppressive cytokines, including IL-10 but not nitric oxide (NO) or arginase. We also examined two subsets of MDSCs (CD14+HLA-DR− and CD14− HLA-DR− MDSC) in NHL patients and found that higher IL-10-producing CD14+HLA-DR−MDSC subset can be seen in lymphoma patients with reduced NK cell frequency in peripheral blood. Our analyses of MDSCs in this study may enable a better understanding of how MDSCs manipulate the tumor microenvironment and are regulated by NK cells in patients with lymphoma. PMID:25949922

  10. CD133 is a temporary marker of cancer stem cells in small cell lung cancer, but not in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Cui, Fei; Wang, Jian; Chen, Duan; Chen, Yi-Jiang

    2011-03-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Current investigations in the field of cancer research have intensively focused on the 'cancer stem cell' or 'tumor-initiating cell'. While CD133 was initially considered as a stem cell marker only in the hematopoietic system and the nervous system, the membrane antigen also identifies tumorigenic cells in certain solid tumors. In this study, we investigated the human lung cancer cell lines A549, H157, H226, Calu-1, H292 and H446. The results of real-time PCR analysis after chemotherapy drug selection and the fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis showed that CD133 only functioned as a marker in the small cell lung cancer line H446. The sorted CD133+ subset presented stem cell-like features, including self-renewal, differentiation, proliferation and tumorigenic capacity in subsequent assays. Furthermore, a proportion of the CD133+ cells had a tendency to remain stable, which may explain the controversies arising from previous studies. Therefore, the CD133+ subset should provide an enriched source of tumor-initiating cells among H446 cells. Moreover, the antigen could be used as an investigative marker of the tumorigenic process and an effective treatment for small cell lung cancer.

  11. "Cancer Cell Biology:" A Student-Centered Instructional Module Exploring the Use of Multimedia to Enrich Interactive, Constructivist Learning of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bockholt, Susanne M.; West, J. Paige; Bollenbacher, Walter E.

    2003-01-01

    Multimedia has the potential of providing bioscience education novel learning environments and pedagogy applications to foster student interest, involve students in the research process, advance critical thinking/problem-solving skills, and develop conceptual understanding of biological topics. "Cancer Cell Biology," an interactive, multimedia,…

  12. "Cancer Cell Biology:" A Student-Centered Instructional Module Exploring the Use of Multimedia to Enrich Interactive, Constructivist Learning of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bockholt, Susanne M.; West, J. Paige; Bollenbacher, Walter E.

    2003-01-01

    Multimedia has the potential of providing bioscience education novel learning environments and pedagogy applications to foster student interest, involve students in the research process, advance critical thinking/problem-solving skills, and develop conceptual understanding of biological topics. "Cancer Cell Biology," an interactive, multimedia,…

  13. TU-F-BRE-07: In Vivo Neutron Detection in Patients Undergoing Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) for Primary Kidney Cancer Using 6Li and 7Li Enriched TLD Pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Lonski, P; Kron, T; Franich, R; Keehan, S; Siva, S; Taylor, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for primary kidney cancer often involves the use of high-energy photons combined with a large number of monitor units. While important for risk assessment, the additional neutron dose to untargeted healthy tissue is not accounted for in treatment planning. This work aims to detect out-of-field neutrons in vivo for patients undergoing SABR with high-energy (>10 MV) photons and provides preliminary estimates of neutron effective dose. Methods: 3 variations of high-sensitivity LiF:Mg,Cu,P thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) material, each with varying {sup 6}Li / {sup 7}Li concentrations, were used in custom-made Perspex holders for in vivo measurements. The variation in cross section for thermal neutrons between Li isotopes was exploited to distinguish neutron from photon signal. Measurements were made out-of-field for 7 patients, each undergoing 3D-conformal SABR treatment for primary kidney cancer on a Varian 21iX linear accelerator. Results: In vivo measurements show increased signal for the {sup 6}Li enriched material for patients treated with 18 MV photons. Measurements on one SABR patient treated using only 6 MV showed no difference between the 3 TLD materials. The out-of-field photon signal decreased exponentially with distance from the treatment field. The neutron signal, taken as the difference between {sup 6}Li enriched and {sup 7}Li enriched TLD response, remains almost constant up to 50 cm from the beam central axis. Estimates of neutron effective dose from preliminary TLD calibration suggest between 10 and 30 mSv per 1000 MU delivered at 18 MV for the 7 patients. Conclusion: TLD was proven to be a useful tool for the purpose of in vivo neutron detection at out-of-field locations. Further work is required to understand the relationship between TL signal and neutron dose. Dose estimates based on preliminary TLD calibration in a neutron beam suggest the additional neutron dose was <30 mSv per 1000 MU at 18 MV.

  14. Type I IFN-mediated synergistic activation of mouse and human DC subsets by TLR agonists.

    PubMed

    Kreutz, Martin; Bakdash, Ghaith; Dolen, Yusuf; Sköld, Annette E; van Hout-Kuijer, Maaike A; de Vries, I Jolanda M; Figdor, Carl G

    2015-10-01

    Novel approaches of dendritic cell (DC) based cancer immunotherapy aim at harnessing the unique attributes of different DC subsets. Classical monocyte-derived DC vaccines are currently being replaced by either applying primary DCs or specifically targeting antigens and adjuvants to these subsets in vivo. Appropriate DC activation in both strategies is essential for optimal effect. For this purpose TLR agonists are favorable adjuvant choices, with TLR7 triggering being essential for inducing strong Th1 responses. However, mouse CD8α(+) DCs, considered to be the major cross-presenting subset, lack TLR7 expression. Interestingly, this DC subset can respond to TLR7 ligand upon concurrent TLR3 triggering. Nevertheless, the mechanism underlying this synergy remains obscure. We now show that TLR3 ligation results in the production of IFN-α, which rapidly induces the expression of TLR7, resulting in synergistic activation. Moreover, we demonstrate that this mechanism conversely holds for plasmacytoid DCs that respond to TLR3 ligation when TLR7 pathway is mobilized. We further demonstrate that this mechanism of sharpening DC senses is also conserved in human BDCA1(+) DCs and plasmacytoid DCs. These findings have important implications for future clinical trials as it suggests that combinations of TLR ligands should be applied irrespective of initial TLR expression profiles on natural DC subsets for optimal stimulation.

  15. Generalized Subset Designs in Analytical Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Surowiec, Izabella; Vikström, Ludvig; Hector, Gustaf; Johansson, Erik; Vikström, Conny; Trygg, Johan

    2017-06-20

    Design of experiments (DOE) is an established methodology in research, development, manufacturing, and production for screening, optimization, and robustness testing. Two-level fractional factorial designs remain the preferred approach due to high information content while keeping the number of experiments low. These types of designs, however, have never been extended to a generalized multilevel reduced design type that would be capable to include both qualitative and quantitative factors. In this Article we describe a novel generalized fractional factorial design. In addition, it also provides complementary and balanced subdesigns analogous to a fold-over in two-level reduced factorial designs. We demonstrate how this design type can be applied with good results in three different applications in analytical chemistry including (a) multivariate calibration using microwave resonance spectroscopy for the determination of water in tablets, (b) stability study in drug product development, and (c) representative sample selection in clinical studies. This demonstrates the potential of generalized fractional factorial designs to be applied in many other areas of analytical chemistry where representative, balanced, and complementary subsets are required, especially when a combination of quantitative and qualitative factors at multiple levels exists.

  16. Targeting macrophage subsets for infarct repair.

    PubMed

    Ben-Mordechai, Tamar; Palevski, Dahlia; Glucksam-Galnoy, Yifat; Elron-Gross, Inbar; Margalit, Rimona; Leor, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are involved in every cardiovascular disease and are an attractive therapeutic target. Macrophage activation is complex and can be either beneficial or deleterious, depending upon its mode of action, its timing, and its duration. An important macrophage characteristic is its plasticity, which enables it to switch from one subset to another. Macrophages, which regulate healing and repair after myocardial infarction, have become a major target for both treatment and diagnosis (theranostic). The aim of the present review is to describe the recent discoveries related to targeting and modulating of macrophage function to improve infarct repair. We will briefly review macrophage polarization, plasticity, heterogeneity, their role in infarct repair, regeneration, and cross talk with mesenchymal cells. Particularly, we will focus on the potential of macrophage targeting in situ by liposomes. The ability to modulate macrophage function could delineate pathways to reactivate the endogenous programs of myocardial regeneration. This will eventually lead to development of small molecules or biologics to enhance the endogenous programs of regeneration and repair. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. Heterogeneity of gangliosides among T cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Inokuchi, Jin-ichi; Nagafuku, Masakazu; Ohno, Isao; Suzuki, Akemi

    2013-09-01

    Gangliosides are major components of highly organized membrane microdomains or rafts, yet little is known about the role of gangliosides in raft organization. This is also the case of gangliosides in TCR-mediated activation. Comprehensive structural analysis of gangliosides in the primary thymocytes and CD4(+) T and CD8(+) T cells was not achieved due to technical difficulties. We have found that CD8(+) T cells express very high levels of o-series gangliosides, but on the other hand, CD4(+) T cells preferably express a-series gangliosides. In the TCR-dependent activation, CD4(+) T cells selectively require a-series gangliosides, but CD8(+) T cells do require only o-series gangliosides but not a-series gangliosides. Ganglioside GM3 synthase-deficient mice lacking a-series gangliosides neither exhibited the TCR-dependent activation of CD4(+) T nor developed ovalbumin-induced allergic airway inflammation. These findings imply that the distinct expression pattern of ganglioside species in CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells define the immune function of each T cell subset.

  18. Identification of polarized macrophage subsets in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen-Chi, Mai; Laplace-Builhe, Béryl; Travnickova, Jana; Luz-Crawford, Patricia; Tejedor, Gautier; Phan, Quang Tien; Duroux-Richard, Isabelle; Levraud, Jean-Pierre; Kissa, Karima; Lutfalla, Georges

    2015-01-01

    While the mammalian macrophage phenotypes have been intensively studied in vitro, the dynamic of their phenotypic polarization has never been investigated in live vertebrates. We used the zebrafish as a live model to identify and trail macrophage subtypes. We generated a transgenic line whose macrophages expressing tumour necrosis factor alpha (tnfa), a key feature of classically activated (M1) macrophages, express fluorescent proteins Tg(mpeg1:mCherryF/tnfa:eGFP-F). Using 4D-confocal microscopy, we showed that both aseptic wounding and Escherichia coli inoculation triggered macrophage recruitment, some of which started to express tnfa. RT-qPCR on Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS)-sorted tnfa+ and tnfa− macrophages showed that they, respectively, expressed M1 and alternatively activated (M2) mammalian markers. Fate tracing of tnfa+ macrophages during the time-course of inflammation demonstrated that pro-inflammatory macrophages converted into M2-like phenotype during the resolution step. Our results reveal the diversity and plasticity of zebrafish macrophage subsets and underline the similarities with mammalian macrophages proposing a new system to study macrophage functional dynamic. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07288.001 PMID:26154973

  19. Identification of polarized macrophage subsets in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Chi, Mai; Laplace-Builhe, Béryl; Travnickova, Jana; Luz-Crawford, Patricia; Tejedor, Gautier; Phan, Quang Tien; Duroux-Richard, Isabelle; Levraud, Jean-Pierre; Kissa, Karima; Lutfalla, Georges; Jorgensen, Christian; Djouad, Farida

    2015-07-08

    While the mammalian macrophage phenotypes have been intensively studied in vitro, the dynamic of their phenotypic polarization has never been investigated in live vertebrates. We used the zebrafish as a live model to identify and trail macrophage subtypes. We generated a transgenic line whose macrophages expressing tumour necrosis factor alpha (tnfa), a key feature of classically activated (M1) macrophages, express fluorescent proteins Tg(mpeg1:mCherryF/tnfa:eGFP-F). Using 4D-confocal microscopy, we showed that both aseptic wounding and Escherichia coli inoculation triggered macrophage recruitment, some of which started to express tnfa. RT-qPCR on Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS)-sorted tnfa(+) and tnfa(-) macrophages showed that they, respectively, expressed M1 and alternatively activated (M2) mammalian markers. Fate tracing of tnfa(+) macrophages during the time-course of inflammation demonstrated that pro-inflammatory macrophages converted into M2-like phenotype during the resolution step. Our results reveal the diversity and plasticity of zebrafish macrophage subsets and underline the similarities with mammalian macrophages proposing a new system to study macrophage functional dynamic.

  20. Enrichment Activities for Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Usiskin, Zalman

    1983-01-01

    Enrichment activities that teach about geometry as they instruct in geometry are given for some significant topics. The facets of geometry included are tessellations, round robin tournaments, geometric theorems on triangles, and connections between geometry and complex numbers. (MNS)

  1. Mortality among uranium enrichment workers

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.P.; Bloom, T.

    1987-01-01

    A retrospective cohort mortality study was conducted on workers at the Portsmouth Uranium Enrichment facility in Pike County, Ohio, in response to a request from the Oil, Chemical and Atomic Workers International Local 3-689 for information on long-term health effects. Primary hazards included inhalation exposure to uranyl fluoride containing uranium-235 and uranium-234, technetium-99 compounds, and hydrogen-fluoride. Uranium-238 presented a nephrotoxic hazard. Statistically significant mortality deficits based on U.S. death rates were found for all causes, accidents, violence, and diseases of nervous, circulatory, respiratory, and digestive systems. Standardized mortality rates were 85 and 54 for all malignant neoplasms and for other genitourinary diseases, respectively. Deaths from stomach cancer and lymphatic/hematopoietic cancers were insignificantly increased. A subcohort selected for greatest potential uranium exposure has reduced deaths from these malignancies. Insignificantly increased stomach cancer mortality was found after 15 years employment and after 15 years latency. Routine urinalysis data suggested low internal uranium exposures.

  2. Selenium enrichment of table eggs.

    PubMed

    Bennett, D C; Cheng, K M

    2010-10-01

    Selenium is an essential trace element with a recommended dietary allowance for human adults of 55 μg/d. However, there is evidence that greater dietary intakes may have possible health benefits, including a reduction in the risk of cancer. Several studies have shown the feasibility of enriching eggs using organic Se and that Se-enriched eggs are an effective way to supplement human diets. However, few studies have examined the response of egg Se concentration to high (>1 μg/g) dietary organic Se intake by the laying hens. The objective of the current study is to examine the effect of higher dietary organic Se levels on production, egg mass, and egg Se levels. These were assessed by feeding 3 breeds of laying hens (Barred Plymouth Rock, Lohmann Brown, Lohmann White) a basal diet containing 0.3 μg of Se/g of diet as Na2SeO3. Into this diet, Se yeast (SelenoSource AF 600), an organic source of Se, was added at 1.0, 2.4, or 5.1 μg of Se/g of diet for 4 wk. Feed consumption, egg production, and egg mass were not affected by the dietary Se concentration in all 3 breeds. Within the range of Se levels employed in the laying hens' diet, egg Se content increased linearly as dietary levels of Se increased. The results of this study indicate that feeding up to 5.1 µg/g of Se will not affect egg production and the welfare of the laying hen and is a practical way of producing Se-enriched eggs for the consumers.

  3. Algorithm For Solution Of Subset-Regression Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verhaegen, Michel

    1991-01-01

    Reliable and flexible algorithm for solution of subset-regression problem performs QR decomposition with new column-pivoting strategy, enables selection of subset directly from originally defined regression parameters. This feature, in combination with number of extensions, makes algorithm very flexible for use in analysis of subset-regression problems in which parameters have physical meanings. Also extended to enable joint processing of columns contaminated by noise with those free of noise, without using scaling techniques.

  4. Distribution of B lymphocyte subsets in normal lymphoid tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, L J; Swerdlow, S H; Habeshaw, J A

    1984-01-01

    Using the ABC avidin-biotin peroxidase techniques and a series of monoclonal antibodies against B cell associated antigens, the anatomical distribution of B lymphocyte subsets was studied in reactive lymph node, tonsil and spleen. Evidence is presented for at least five major phenotypically distinct B cell subsets, each localized to specific compartments of peripheral lymphoid tissue. The possible relationship of these subsets of B lymphocytes to activation, maturation and function in the B cell lineage is discussed. Images Fig. 2 PMID:6375918

  5. Human NK Cell Subsets in Pregnancy and Disease: Toward a New Biological Complexity.

    PubMed

    Cristiani, Costanza Maria; Palella, Eleonora; Sottile, Rosa; Tallerico, Rossana; Garofalo, Cinzia; Carbone, Ennio

    2016-01-01

    In humans, NK cells are mainly identified by the surface expression levels of CD56 and CD16, which differentiate between five functionally different NK cell subsets. However, nowadays NK cells are considered as a more heterogeneous population formed by various subsets differing in function, surface phenotype, and anatomic localization. In human CMV- and hantaviruses-infected subjects, an increased frequency of a NKG2A(-)CD57(+)NKG2C(+) NK cell subset has been observed, while the phenotype of the NK cell subpopulation associated with cancer may vary according to the specific kind of tumor and its anatomical location. The healthy human lymph nodes contain mainly the CD56(bright) NK cell subset while in melanoma metastatic lymph nodes the CD56(dim)CD57(+)KIR(+)CCR7(+) NK cell subpopulation prevails. The five NK cell subpopulations are found in breast cancer patients, where they differ for expression pattern of chemokine receptors, maturation stage, functional capabilities. In pregnancy, uterine NK cells show a prevalence of the CD56(bright)CD16(-) NK cell compartment, whose activity is influenced by KIRs repertoire. This NK cell subset's super specialization could be explained by (i) the expansion of single mature CD56(dim) clones, (ii) the recruitment and maturation of CD56(bright) NK cells through specific stimuli, and (iii) the in situ development of tumor-resident NK cells from tissue-resident CD56(bright) NK cells independently of the circulating NK cell compartment. This new and unexpected biological feature of the NK cell compartment could be an important source of new biomarkers to improve patients' diagnosis.

  6. B7-H1–expressing antigen-presenting cells mediate polarization of protumorigenic Th22 subsets

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Dong-Ming; Xiao, Xiao; Zhao, Qiyi; Chen, Min-Min; Li, Xue-Feng; Liu, Rui-Xian; Wei, Yuan; Ouyang, Fang-Zhu; Chen, Dong-Ping; Wu, Yan; Lao, Xiang-Ming; Deng, Hong; Zheng, Limin

    2014-01-01

    Classical IL-22–producing T helper cells (Th22 cells) mediate inflammatory responses independently of IFN-γ and IL-17; however, nonclassical Th22 cells have been recently identified and coexpress IFN-γ and/or IL-17 along with IL-22. Little is known about how classical and nonclassical Th22 subsets in human diseases are regulated. Here, we used samples of human blood, normal and peritumoral liver, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) to delineate the phenotype, distribution, generation, and functional relevance of various Th22 subsets. Three nonclassical Th22 subsets constituted the majority of all Th22 cells in human liver and HCC tissues, although the classical Th22 subset was predominant in blood. Monocytes activated by TLR2 and TLR4 agonists served as the antigen-presenting cells (APCs) that most efficiently triggered the expansion of nonclassical Th22 subsets from memory T cells and classical Th22 subsets from naive T cells. Moreover, B7-H1–expressing monocytes skewed Th22 polarization away from IFN-γ and toward IL-17 through interaction with programmed death 1 (PD-1), an effect that can create favorable conditions for in vivo aggressive cancer growth and angiogenesis. Our results provide insight into the selective modulation of Th22 subsets and suggest that strategies to influence functional activities of inflammatory cells may benefit anticancer therapy. PMID:25244097

  7. Laser and gas centrifuge enrichment

    SciTech Connect

    Heinonen, Olli

    2014-05-09

    Principles of uranium isotope enrichment using various laser and gas centrifuge techniques are briefly discussed. Examples on production of high enriched uranium are given. Concerns regarding the possibility of using low end technologies to produce weapons grade uranium are explained. Based on current assessments commercial enrichment services are able to cover the global needs of enriched uranium in the foreseeable future.

  8. Laser and gas centrifuge enrichment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinonen, Olli

    2014-05-01

    Principles of uranium isotope enrichment using various laser and gas centrifuge techniques are briefly discussed. Examples on production of high enriched uranium are given. Concerns regarding the possibility of using low end technologies to produce weapons grade uranium are explained. Based on current assessments commercial enrichment services are able to cover the global needs of enriched uranium in the foreseeable future.

  9. Cancer Cell Biology: A Student-Centered Instructional Module Exploring the Use of Multimedia to Enrich Interactive, Constructivist Learning of Science

    PubMed Central

    Bockholt, Susanne M.; West, J. Paige; Bollenbacher, Walter E.

    2003-01-01

    Multimedia has the potential of providing bioscience education novel learning environments and pedagogy applications to foster student interest, involve students in the research process, advance critical thinking/problem-solving skills, and develop conceptual understanding of biological topics. Cancer Cell Biology, an interactive, multimedia, problem-based module, focuses on how mutations in protooncogenes and tumor suppressor genes can lead to uncontrolled cell proliferation by engaging students as research scientists/physicians with the task of diagnosing the molecular basis of tumor growth for a group of patients. The process of constructing the module, which was guided by scientist and student feedback/responses, is described. The completed module and insights gained from its development are presented as a potential “multimedia pedagogy” for the development of other multimedia science learning environments. PMID:12822037

  10. Use of the Total Cancer Care System to Enrich Screening for CD30-Positive Solid Tumors for Patient Enrollment Into a Brentuximab Vedotin Clinical Trial: A Pilot Study to Evaluate Feasibility

    PubMed Central

    Eschrich, Steven A; Berglund, Anders; Mitchell, Melissa; Fenstermacher, David; Danaee, Hadi; Dai, Hongyue; Sullivan, Daniel; Trepicchio, William L; Dalton, William S

    2017-01-01

    Background One approach to identify patients who meet specific eligibility criteria for target-based clinical trials is to use patient and tumor registries to prescreen patient populations. Objective Here we demonstrate that the Total Cancer Care (TCC) Protocol, an ongoing, observational study, may provide a solution for rapidly identifying patients with CD30-positive tumors eligible for CD30-targeted therapies such as brentuximab vedotin. Methods The TCC patient gene expression profiling database was retrospectively screened for CD30 gene expression determined using HuRSTA-2a520709 Affymetrix arrays (GPL15048). Banked tumor tissue samples were used to determine CD30 protein expression by semiquantitative immunohistochemistry. Statistical comparisons of Z- and H-scores were performed using R statistical software (The R Foundation), and the predictive value, accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of CD30 gene expression versus protein expression was estimated. Results As of March 2015, 120,887 patients have consented to the institutional review board–approved TCC Protocol. A total of 39,157 fresh frozen tumor specimens have been collected, from which over 14,000 samples have gene expression data available. CD30 RNA was expressed in a number of solid tumors; the highest median CD30 RNA expression was observed in primary tumors from lymph node, soft tissue (many sarcomas), lung, skin, and esophagus (median Z-scores 1.011, 0.399, 0.202, 0.152, and 1.011, respectively). High level CD30 gene expression significantly enriches for CD30-positive protein expression in breast, lung, skin, and ovarian cancer; accuracy ranged from 72% to 79%, sensitivity from 75% to 100%, specificity from 70% to 76%, positive predictive value from 20% to 40%, and negative predictive value from 95% to 100%. Conclusions The TCC gene expression profiling database guided tissue selection that enriched for CD30 protein expression in a number of solid tumor types. Such an approach may improve

  11. CD133+CD24lo defines a 5-Fluorouracil-resistant colon cancer stem cell-like phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Paschall, Amy V.; Yang, Dafeng; Lu, Chunwan; Redd, Priscilla S.; Choi, Jeong-Hyeon; Heaton, Christopher M.; Lee, Jeffrey R.; Nayak-Kapoor, Asha; Liu, Kebin

    2016-01-01

    The chemotherapeutic agent 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is the most commonly used drug for patients with advanced colon cancer. However, development of resistance to 5-FU is inevitable in almost all patients. The mechanism by which colon cancer develops 5-FU resistance is still unclear. One recently proposed theory is that cancer stem-like cells underlie colon cancer 5-FU resistance, but the phenotypes of 5-FU-resistant colon cancer stem cells are still controversial. We report here that 5-FU treatment selectively enriches a subset of CD133+ colon cancer cells in vitro. 5-FU chemotherapy also increases CD133+ tumor cells in human colon cancer patients. However, sorted CD133+ colon cancer cells exhibit no increased resistance to 5-FU, and CD133 levels exhibit no correlation with colon cancer patient survival or cancer recurrence. Genome-wide analysis of gene expression between sorted CD133+ colon cancer cells and 5-FU-selected colon cancer cells identifies 207 differentially expressed genes. CD24 is one of the genes whose expression level is lower in the CD133+ and 5-FU-resistant colon cancer cells as compared to CD133+ and 5-FU-sensitive colon cancer cells. Consequently, CD133+CD24lo cells exhibit decreased sensitivity to 5-FU. Therefore, we determine that CD133+CD24lo phenotype defines 5-FU-resistant human colon cancer stem cell-like cells. PMID:27659530

  12. Dendritic cell subsets digested: RNA sensing makes the difference!

    PubMed

    Buschow, Sonja I; Figdor, Carl G

    2010-02-26

    In this issue of Immunity, Luber et al. (2010) report a comprehensive quantitative proteome of in vivo mouse spleen dendritic cell (DC) subsets: a data set of encyclopedic value already revealing that DC subsets exploit different RNA sensors for virus recognition. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. ';Best' Practices for Aggregating Subset Results from Archived Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskin, W. E.; Perez, J.

    2013-12-01

    In response to the exponential growth in science data analysis and visualization capabilities Data Centers have been developing new delivery mechanisms to package and deliver large volumes of aggregated subsets of archived data. New standards are evolving to help data providers and application programmers deal with growing needs of the science community. These standards evolve from the best practices gleaned from new products and capabilities. The NASA Atmospheric Sciences Data Center (ASDC) has developed and deployed production provider-specific search and subset web applications for the CALIPSO, CERES, TES, and MOPITT missions. This presentation explores several use cases that leverage aggregated subset results and examines the standards and formats ASDC developers applied to the delivered files as well as the implementation strategies for subsetting and processing the aggregated products. The following topics will be addressed: - Applications of NetCDF CF conventions to aggregated level 2 satellite subsets - Data-Provider-Specific format requirements vs. generalized standards - Organization of the file structure of aggregated NetCDF subset output - Global Attributes of individual subsetted files vs. aggregated results - Specific applications and framework used for subsetting and delivering derivative data files

  14. Indirect Positive Evidence in the Acquisition of a Subset Grammar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Misha; Goad, Heather

    2017-01-01

    This article proposes that second language learners can use indirect positive evidence (IPE) to acquire a phonological grammar that is a subset of their L1 grammar. IPE is evidence from errors in the learner's L1 made by native speakers of the learner's L2. It has been assumed that subset grammars may be acquired using direct or indirect negative…

  15. Science Student Enrichment Opportunities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento.

    This document was developed with the intention of increasing California public school students' awareness of and participation in science-related enrichment activities. Some of the activities are intended for participation by individuals, while others are meant for teams of students. These annual events are listed in chronological order for a…

  16. Enriching the Catalog

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennant, Roy

    2004-01-01

    After decades of costly and time-consuming effort, nearly all libraries have completed the retrospective conversion of their card catalogs to electronic form. However, bibliographic systems still are really not much more than card catalogs on wheels. Enriched content that Amazon.com takes for granted--such as digitized tables of contents, cover…

  17. Backward Mathematics for Enrichment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westcott, Alvin M.; Shuler, Nancy L.

    1982-01-01

    The use of backward mathematics is promoted as an enrichment strategy which gives pupils the opportunity to generate creative responses that explore many possibilities. It is felt that teachers will find the instructional method a worthwhile innovation, and a technique useful in any curricular area. (MP)

  18. Designing job enrichment projects.

    PubMed

    Clakeley, G L

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes a management strategy for a job satisfaction program utilized in a large occupational therapy department. The goal of the program is to retain satisfied, productive employees and reduce attrition of therapists and assistants. The use of job enrichment projects for occupational therapy assistants will be presented with brief descriptions of two projects.

  19. Job Enrichment in Extension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fourman, Louis S.; Jones, Jo

    1997-01-01

    Interviews with 10 participants in Ohio State University's job enrichment program for midcareer extension agents found that 5 returned to their same jobs after the experience but only 2 felt challenged/renewed. Part-time participation while working made it difficult to balance responsibilities. More information and a structured orientation were…

  20. ENRICHMENT--CLASSROOM CHALLENGE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GIBBONY, HAZEL L.

    THIS MANUAL CONTAINS SUGGESTIONS FOR ENRICHMENT IN LANGUAGE ARTS, SOCIAL STUDIES, SCIENCE, ARITHMETIC, FOREIGN LANGUAGES, ART, AND MUSIC AT THE ELEMENTARY LEVEL AND IN ENGLISH, SOCIAL STUDIES, SCIENCE, MATHEMATICS, MODERN LANGUAGES AND LATIN, ART, AND MUSIC AT THE SECONDARY LEVEL. ADDITIONAL SECTIONS INCLUDE INFORMATION ON THE USE OF COMMUNITY…

  1. Enriching the Catalog

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennant, Roy

    2004-01-01

    After decades of costly and time-consuming effort, nearly all libraries have completed the retrospective conversion of their card catalogs to electronic form. However, bibliographic systems still are really not much more than card catalogs on wheels. Enriched content that Amazon.com takes for granted--such as digitized tables of contents, cover…

  2. Modulation of postoperative immune response by enteral nutrition with a diet enriched with arginine, RNA, and omega-3 fatty acids in patients with upper gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Senkal, M; Kemen, M; Homann, H H; Eickhoff, U; Baier, J; Zumtobel, V

    1995-02-01

    To find out whether an enteral diet supplemented with arginine, RNA, and omega-3 fatty acids modulated the production of interleukin-1 (IL-1), interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-2 receptor, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) after operations for upper gastrointestinal cancer. Prospective double blind clinical study. University hospital, Germany. 42 patients randomised into two groups (n = 21 each), one of which was given an isocaloric and isonitrogenous placebo diet and one of which was fed the same diet supplemented with arginine, RNA, and omega-3 fatty acids. The cytokines were measured before operation and on postoperative days 1, 3, 7, 10, and 16. Comparison of concentrations of cytokines in the two groups. Among those receiving the placebo diet (after spontaneous stimulation) IL-6 concentrations were significantly higher on days 3 and 7 (p < 0.05) and TNF-alpha concentrations on day 7. In contrast (after stimulation with phytohaemagglutinin) mean concentrations of IL-2 receptor were significantly higher on days 3 and 7, and of IL-1 beta and IL-2 on day 16 (p < 0.05) in the group receiving the supplemented diet. Supplementation of an enteral diet with arginine, RNA and omega-3 fatty acids can modulate the acute phase reaction as indicated by the reduction in concentrations of TNF-alpha and IL-6 in the group fed the supplemented diet. Patients receiving the supplemented diet also showed accelerated recovery in the concentrations of IL-1 beta and IL-2 receptor.

  3. Prostate Cancer Heterogeneous High-Metastatic Multi-Organ-Colonizing Chemo-Resistant Variants Selected by Serial Metastatic Passage in Nude Mice Are Highly Enriched for Multinucleate Giant Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Wu, Chengyu; Hoffman, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    In order to further understand the role of tumor heterogeneity in metastasis and chemo-resistance, high metastatic PC-3 human prostate cancer variants were selected by injecting parental PC-3 cells, expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the footpad of nude mice, which then metastasize to inguinal lymph nodes. The PC-3-GFP cells which metastasized to the inguinal lymph nodes were collected and were re-injected to the footpad. After 6 such cycles, the PC-3-GFP cells collected from inguinal lymph nodes (PC-3-GFP-LN) were again injected to the footpad. PC-3-GFP-LN showed 100% metastasis to major lymph nodes (popliteal, inguinal, axillary, and cervical), and 100% metastasis to bone and lung. The percent of giant cell variants was enriched in PC-3-GFP-LN-6 compared to parental cells and increased with each cycle of selection, which in turn had increased metastasis. PC-3-GFP-LN-6 cells were resistant to 5-fluorouracil, doxorubicin and cisplatinum, compared to parental PC-3. However, PC-3-GFP-LN-6 was sensitive to the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) herbal mixture LQ, similar to the parental cells. These results suggest that PC-3 tumors are heterogenous and that subpopulations of highly metastatic, drug-resistant cells can be step-wise selected using a mouse model of tumor progression.

  4. Brain tumor cells in circulation are enriched for mesenchymal gene expression.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, James P; Nahed, Brian V; Madden, Marissa W; Oliveira, Samantha M; Springer, Simeon; Bhere, Deepak; Chi, Andrew S; Wakimoto, Hiroaki; Rothenberg, S Michael; Sequist, Lecia V; Kapur, Ravi; Shah, Khalid; Iafrate, A John; Curry, William T; Loeffler, Jay S; Batchelor, Tracy T; Louis, David N; Toner, Mehmet; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Haber, Daniel A

    2014-11-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a highly aggressive brain cancer characterized by local invasion and angiogenic recruitment, yet metastatic dissemination is extremely rare. Here, we adapted a microfluidic device to deplete hematopoietic cells from blood specimens of patients with GBM, uncovering evidence of circulating brain tumor cells (CTC). Staining and scoring criteria for GBM CTCs were first established using orthotopic patient-derived xenografts (PDX), and then applied clinically: CTCs were identified in at least one blood specimen from 13 of 33 patients (39%; 26 of 87 samples). Single GBM CTCs isolated from both patients and mouse PDX models demonstrated enrichment for mesenchymal over neural differentiation markers compared with primary GBMs. Within primary GBMs, RNA in situ hybridization identified a subpopulation of highly migratory mesenchymal tumor cells, and in a rare patient with disseminated GBM, systemic lesions were exclusively mesenchymal. Thus, a mesenchymal subset of GBM cells invades the vasculature and may proliferate outside the brain. GBMs are locally invasive within the brain but rarely metastasize to distant organs, exemplifying the debate over "seed" versus "soil." We demonstrate that GBMs shed CTCs with invasive mesenchymal characteristics into the circulation. Rare metastatic GBM lesions are primarily mesenchymal and show additional mutations absent in the primary tumor. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Consumption of soy isoflavone enriched bread in men with prostate cancer is associated with reduced pro-inflammatory cytokines and immune suppressive cells

    PubMed Central

    Lesinski, Gregory B.; Reville, Patrick K.; Mace, Thomas A.; Young, Gregory S.; Ahn-Jarvis, Jennifer; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer; Vodovotz, Yael; Ameen, Zeenath; Grainger, Elizabeth; Riedl, Kenneth; Schwartz, Steven; Clinton, Steven K.

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized that soy phytochemicals may have immunomodulatory properties that may impact prostate carcinogenesis and progression. A randomized, phase II trial was conducted in 32 prostate cancer patients with asymptomatic biochemical recurrence but no measurable disease on standard staging studies. Patients were randomized to 2 slices of soy bread (34 mg isoflavones/slice) or soy bread containing almond powder daily as a source of β-glucosidase. Flow cytometry and bioplex assays were used to measure cytokines or immune cell phenotype in blood at baseline (day 0) and following intervention (day 56). Adequate blood samples were available at enrollment and day 56 and evaluated. Multiple plasma cytokines and chemokines were significantly decreased on Day 56 versus baseline. Subgroup analysis indicated reduced Th1 (p=0.028) and MDSC-associated cytokines (p=0.035). Th2 and Th17 cytokines were not significantly altered. Phenotypic analysis revealed no change in CD8+ or CD4+ T cells, but showed increased CD56+ NK cells (p=0.038). The percentage of cells with a T regulatory cell phenotype (CD4+CD25+FoxP3+) were significantly decreased after 56 days of soy bread (p=0.0136). Significantly decreased monocytic (CD33+HLADRnegCD14+) MDSC were observed in patients consuming soy bread (p=0.0056). These data suggest that soy bread modulates systemic soluble and cellular biomarkers consistent with limiting inflammation and suppression of MDSCs. Additional studies to elucidate impact on the carcinogenic process or as a complement to immune-based therapy are required. PMID:26276751

  6. A feasibility study for enrichment of highly-aggressive cancer subpopulations by their biophysical properties via dielectrophoresis enhanced with synergistic fluid flow.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Temple Anne; Cemazar, Jaka; Balani, Nikita; Sweeney, Daniel C; Schmelz, Eva M; Davalos, Rafael V

    2017-03-25

    A common problem with cancer treatment is the development of treatment resistance and tumor recurrence that result from treatments that kill most tumor cells yet leave behind aggressive cells to repopulate. Presented here is a microfluidic device that can be used to isolate tumor subpopulations to optimize treatment selection. Dielectrophoresis (DEP) is a phenomenon where particles are polarized by an electric field and move along the electric field gradient. Different cell subpopulations have different DEP responses depending on their bioelectrical phenotype, which, we hypothesize, correlate with aggressiveness. We have designed a microfluidic device in which a region containing posts locally distorts channel of the electric field created by an AC voltage across a microfluidic channel and which forces cells toward the posts through DEP. This force is balanced with a simultaneous drag force from fluid motion that pulls cells away from the posts. We have shown that by adjusting the drag force, cells with aggressive phenotypes are influenced more by the DEP force and trap on posts while others flow through the chip unaffected. Utilizing single-cell trapping on cell-sized posts by a drag-DEP force balance, we show that separation of very similar cell subpopulations may be achieved, a result that was previously impossible with DEP alone. Separated subpopulations maintain high viability downstream, and remain in a native state, without fluorescent labeling. These cells can then be cultured to help select a therapy that kills aggressive subpopulations equally or better than the bulk of the tumor, mitigating resistance and recurrence. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Progressive Enrichment of Stemness Features and Tumor Stromal Alterations in Multistep Hepatocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jeong Eun; Kim, Young-Joo; Rhee, Hyungjin; Kim, Haeryoung; Ahn, Ei Yong; Choi, Jin Sub; Roncalli, Massimo; Park, Young Nyun

    2017-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), a subset of tumor cells, contribute to an aggressive biological behavior, which is also affected by the tumor stroma. Despite the role of CSCs and the tumor stroma in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), features of stemness have not yet been studied in relation to tumor stromal alterations in multistep hepatocarcinogenesis. We investigated the expression status of stemness markers and tumor stromal changes in B viral carcinogenesis, which is the main etiology of HCC in Asia. Stemness features of tumoral hepatocytes (EpCAM, K19, Oct3/4, c-KIT, c-MET, and CD133), and tumor stromal cells expressing α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), CD68, CD163, and IL-6 were analyzed in 36 low grade dysplastic nodules (DNs), 48 high grade DNs, 30 early HCCs (eHCCs), and 51 progressed HCCs (pHCCs) by immunohistochemistry or real-time PCR. Stemness features (EpCAM and K19 in particular) were progressively acquired during hepatocarcinogenesis in combination with enrichment of stromal cells (CAFs, TAMs, IL-6+ cells). Stemness features were seen sporadically in DNs, more consistent in eHCCs, and peaked in pHCCs. Likewise, stromal cells were discernable in DNs, showed up as consistent cell densities in eHCCs and peaked in pHCCs. The stemness features and tumor stromal alterations also peaked in less differentiated or larger HCCs. In conclusion, progression of B viral multistep hepatocarcinogenesis is characterized by an enrichment of stemness features of neoplastic hepatocytes and a parallel alteration of the tumor stroma. The modulation of neoplastic hepatocytes and stromal cells was at low levels in precancerous lesions (DNs), consistently increased in incipient cancer (eHCCs) and peaked in pHCCs. Thus, in B viral hepatocarcinogenesis, interactions between CSCs and the tumor stroma, although starting early, seem to play a major role in tumor progression.

  8. Progressive Enrichment of Stemness Features and Tumor Stromal Alterations in Multistep Hepatocarcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Hyungjin; Kim, Haeryoung; Ahn, Ei Yong; Choi, Jin Sub; Roncalli, Massimo; Park, Young Nyun

    2017-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), a subset of tumor cells, contribute to an aggressive biological behavior, which is also affected by the tumor stroma. Despite the role of CSCs and the tumor stroma in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), features of stemness have not yet been studied in relation to tumor stromal alterations in multistep hepatocarcinogenesis. We investigated the expression status of stemness markers and tumor stromal changes in B viral carcinogenesis, which is the main etiology of HCC in Asia. Stemness features of tumoral hepatocytes (EpCAM, K19, Oct3/4, c-KIT, c-MET, and CD133), and tumor stromal cells expressing α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), CD68, CD163, and IL-6 were analyzed in 36 low grade dysplastic nodules (DNs), 48 high grade DNs, 30 early HCCs (eHCCs), and 51 progressed HCCs (pHCCs) by immunohistochemistry or real-time PCR. Stemness features (EpCAM and K19 in particular) were progressively acquired during hepatocarcinogenesis in combination with enrichment of stromal cells (CAFs, TAMs, IL-6+ cells). Stemness features were seen sporadically in DNs, more consistent in eHCCs, and peaked in pHCCs. Likewise, stromal cells were discernable in DNs, showed up as consistent cell densities in eHCCs and peaked in pHCCs. The stemness features and tumor stromal alterations also peaked in less differentiated or larger HCCs. In conclusion, progression of B viral multistep hepatocarcinogenesis is characterized by an enrichment of stemness features of neoplastic hepatocytes and a parallel alteration of the tumor stroma. The modulation of neoplastic hepatocytes and stromal cells was at low levels in precancerous lesions (DNs), consistently increased in incipient cancer (eHCCs) and peaked in pHCCs. Thus, in B viral hepatocarcinogenesis, interactions between CSCs and the tumor stroma, although starting early, seem to play a major role in tumor progression. PMID:28114366

  9. Role of memory T cell subsets for adoptive immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Busch, Dirk H; Fräßle, Simon P; Sommermeyer, Daniel; Buchholz, Veit R; Riddell, Stanley R

    2016-02-01

    Adoptive transfer of primary (unmodified) or genetically engineered antigen-specific T cells has demonstrated astonishing clinical results in the treatment of infections and some malignancies. Besides the definition of optimal targets and antigen receptors, the differentiation status of transferred T cells is emerging as a crucial parameter for generating cell products with optimal efficacy and safety profiles. Long-living memory T cells subdivide into phenotypically as well as functionally different subsets (e.g. central memory, effector memory, tissue-resident memory T cells). This diversification process is crucial for effective immune protection, with probably distinct dependencies on the presence of individual subsets dependent on the disease to which the immune response is directed as well as its organ location. Adoptive T cell therapy intends to therapeutically transfer defined T cell immunity into patients. Efficacy of this approach often requires long-term maintenance of transferred cells, which depends on the presence and persistence of memory T cells. However, engraftment and survival of highly differentiated memory T cell subsets upon adoptive transfer is still difficult to achieve. Therefore, the recent observation that a distinct subset of weakly differentiated memory T cells shows all characteristics of adult tissue stem cells and can reconstitute all types of effector and memory T cell subsets, became highly relevant. We here review our current understanding of memory subset formation and T cell subset purification, and its implications for adoptive immunotherapy.

  10. Phenotypic Characterization of Five Dendritic Cell Subsets in Human Tonsils

    PubMed Central

    Summers, Kelly L.; Hock, Barry D.; McKenzie, Judith L.; Hart, Derek N. J.

    2001-01-01

    Heterogeneous expression of several antigens on the three currently defined tonsil dendritic cell (DC) subsets encouraged us to re-examine tonsil DCs using a new method that minimized DC differentiation and activation during their preparation. Three-color flow cytometry and dual-color immunohistology was used in conjunction with an extensive panel of antibodies to relevant DC-related antigens to analyze lin− HLA-DR+ tonsil DCs. Here we identify, quantify, and locate five tonsil DC subsets based on their relative expression of the HLA-DR, CD11c, CD13, and CD123 antigens. In situ localization identified four of these DC subsets as distinct interdigitating DC populations. These included three new interdigitating DC subsets defined as HLA-DRhi CD11c+ DCs, HLA-DRmod CD11c+ CD13+ DCs, and HLA-DRmod CD11c− CD123− DCs, as well as the plasmacytoid DCs (HLA-DRmod CD11c− CD123+). These subsets differed in their expression of DC-associated differentiation/activation antigens and co-stimulator molecules including CD83, CMRF-44, CMRF-56, 2-7, CD86, and 4-1BB ligand. The fifth HLA-DRmod CD11c+ DC subset was identified as germinal center DCs, but contrary to previous reports they are redefined as lacking the CD13 antigen. The definition and extensive phenotypic analysis of these five DC subsets in human tonsil extends our understanding of the complexity of DC biology. PMID:11438475

  11. Motif enrichment tool.

    PubMed

    Blatti, Charles; Sinha, Saurabh

    2014-07-01

    The Motif Enrichment Tool (MET) provides an online interface that enables users to find major transcriptional regulators of their gene sets of interest. MET searches the appropriate regulatory region around each gene and identifies which transcription factor DNA-binding specificities (motifs) are statistically overrepresented. Motif enrichment analysis is currently available for many metazoan species including human, mouse, fruit fly, planaria and flowering plants. MET also leverages high-throughput experimental data such as ChIP-seq and DNase-seq from ENCODE and ModENCODE to identify the regulatory targets of a transcription factor with greater precision. The results from MET are produced in real time and are linked to a genome browser for easy follow-up analysis. Use of the web tool is free and open to all, and there is no login requirement. ADDRESS: http://veda.cs.uiuc.edu/MET/.

  12. Enriching Nanoparticles via Acoustofluidics.

    PubMed

    Mao, Zhangming; Li, Peng; Wu, Mengxi; Bachman, Hunter; Mesyngier, Nicolas; Guo, Xiasheng; Liu, Sheng; Costanzo, Francesco; Huang, Tony Jun

    2017-01-24

    Focusing and enriching submicrometer and nanometer scale objects is of great importance for many applications in biology, chemistry, engineering, and medicine. Here, we present an acoustofluidic chip that can generate single vortex acoustic streaming inside a glass capillary through using low-power acoustic waves (only 5 V is required). The single vortex acoustic streaming that is generated, in conjunction with the acoustic radiation force, is able to enrich submicrometer- and nanometer-sized particles in a small volume. Numerical simulations were used to elucidate the mechanism of the single vortex formation and were verified experimentally, demonstrating the focusing of silica and polystyrene particles ranging in diameter from 80 to 500 nm. Moreover, the acoustofluidic chip was used to conduct an immunoassay in which nanoparticles that captured fluorescently labeled biomarkers were concentrated to enhance the emitted signal. With its advantages in simplicity, functionality, and power consumption, the acoustofluidic chip we present here is promising for many point-of-care applications.

  13. Chromatin enrichment for proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Kustatscher, Georg; Wills, Karen L. H.; Furlan, Cristina; Rappsilber, Juri

    2015-01-01

    During interphase, chromatin hosts fundamental cellular processes, such as gene expression, DNA replication and DNA damage repair. To analyze chromatin on a proteomic scale, we have developed chromatin enrichment for proteomics (ChEP), which is a simple biochemical procedure that enriches interphase chromatin in all its complexity. It enables researchers to take a ‘snapshot’ of chromatin and to isolate and identify even transiently bound factors. In ChEP, cells are fixed with formaldehyde; subsequently, DNA together with all cross-linked proteins is isolated by centrifugation under denaturing conditions. This approach enables the analysis of global chromatin composition and its changes, which is in contrast with existing chromatin enrichment procedures, which either focus on specific chromatin loci (e.g., affinity purification) or are limited in specificity, such as the analysis of the chromatin pellet (i.e., analysis of all insoluble nuclear material). ChEP takes half a day to complete and requires no specialized laboratory skills or equipment. ChEP enables the characterization of chromatin response to drug treatment or physiological processes. Beyond proteomics, ChEP may preclear chromatin for chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analyses. PMID:25101823

  14. Human NK Cell Subsets in Pregnancy and Disease: Toward a New Biological Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Cristiani, Costanza Maria; Palella, Eleonora; Sottile, Rosa; Tallerico, Rossana; Garofalo, Cinzia; Carbone, Ennio

    2016-01-01

    In humans, NK cells are mainly identified by the surface expression levels of CD56 and CD16, which differentiate between five functionally different NK cell subsets. However, nowadays NK cells are considered as a more heterogeneous population formed by various subsets differing in function, surface phenotype, and anatomic localization. In human CMV- and hantaviruses-infected subjects, an increased frequency of a NKG2A−CD57+NKG2C+ NK cell subset has been observed, while the phenotype of the NK cell subpopulation associated with cancer may vary according to the specific kind of tumor and its anatomical location. The healthy human lymph nodes contain mainly the CD56bright NK cell subset while in melanoma metastatic lymph nodes the CD56dimCD57+KIR+CCR7+ NK cell subpopulation prevails. The five NK cell subpopulations are found in breast cancer patients, where they differ for expression pattern of chemokine receptors, maturation stage, functional capabilities. In pregnancy, uterine NK cells show a prevalence of the CD56brightCD16− NK cell compartment, whose activity is influenced by KIRs repertoire. This NK cell subset’s super specialization could be explained by (i) the expansion of single mature CD56dim clones, (ii) the recruitment and maturation of CD56bright NK cells through specific stimuli, and (iii) the in situ development of tumor-resident NK cells from tissue-resident CD56bright NK cells independently of the circulating NK cell compartment. This new and unexpected biological feature of the NK cell compartment could be an important source of new biomarkers to improve patients’ diagnosis. PMID:28082990

  15. Regulation of Human Helper T Cell Subset Differentiation by Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Nathalie; Ueno, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery of Th1 and Th2 cells in the late 80’s, the family of effector CD4+ helper T (Th) cell subsets has expanded. The differentiation of naïve CD4+ T cells is largely determined when they interact with dendritic cells in lymphoid organs, and cytokines play a major role in the regulation of Th differentiation in the early stages. Recent studies show that the developmental mechanism of certain Th subsets is not fully shared between mice and humans. Here we will review recent discoveries on the roles of cytokines in the regulation of Th differentiation in humans, and discuss the differences between mice and humans in the developmental mechanisms of several Th subsets, including Th17 cells and T follicular helper (Tfh) cells. We propose that the differentiation of human Th subsets is largely regulated by the three cytokines, IL-12, IL-23, and TGF-β. PMID:25879814

  16. Glycoprotein enrichment through lectin affinity techniques.

    PubMed

    Mechref, Yehia; Madera, Milan; Novotny, Milos V

    2008-01-01

    Posttranslational modifications (PTM) of proteins are among the key biological regulators of function, activity, localization, and interaction. The fact that no more than 30,000-50,000 proteins are encoded by the human genome underlines the importance of posttranslational modifications in modulating the activities and functions of proteins in health and disease. With approximately 50% of all proteins now considered to be glycosylated, its physiological importance in mammalian systems is imperative. Aberrant glycosylation has now been recognized as an attribute of many mammalian diseases, including hereditary disorders, immune deficiencies, neurodegenerative diseases, cardiovascular conditions, and cancer. As many potential disease biomarkers may be glycoproteins present in only minute quantities in tissue extracts and physiological fluids, glycoprotein isolation and enrichment may be critical in a search for such biomarkers. For decades, efforts have been focused on the development of glycoprotein enrichment from complex biological samples. Logically, the great majority of these enrichment methodologies rely on the use of immobilized lectins, which permit selective enrichment of the pools of glycoproteins for proteomic/glycomic studies. In this chapter, lectin affinity chromatography in different formats are described, including tubes; packed columns, and microfluidic channels.

  17. Stochastic subset selection for learning with kernel machines.

    PubMed

    Rhinelander, Jason; Liu, Xiaoping P

    2012-06-01

    Kernel machines have gained much popularity in applications of machine learning. Support vector machines (SVMs) are a subset of kernel machines and generalize well for classification, regression, and anomaly detection tasks. The training procedure for traditional SVMs involves solving a quadratic programming (QP) problem. The QP problem scales super linearly in computational effort with the number of training samples and is often used for the offline batch processing of data. Kernel machines operate by retaining a subset of observed data during training. The data vectors contained within this subset are referred to as support vectors (SVs). The work presented in this paper introduces a subset selection method for the use of kernel machines in online, changing environments. Our algorithm works by using a stochastic indexing technique when selecting a subset of SVs when computing the kernel expansion. The work described here is novel because it separates the selection of kernel basis functions from the training algorithm used. The subset selection algorithm presented here can be used in conjunction with any online training technique. It is important for online kernel machines to be computationally efficient due to the real-time requirements of online environments. Our algorithm is an important contribution because it scales linearly with the number of training samples and is compatible with current training techniques. Our algorithm outperforms standard techniques in terms of computational efficiency and provides increased recognition accuracy in our experiments. We provide results from experiments using both simulated and real-world data sets to verify our algorithm.

  18. Heterogeneous in vivo behavior of monocyte subsets in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Swirski, Filip K; Weissleder, Ralph; Pittet, Mikael J

    2009-10-01

    Monocytes and macrophages play active roles in atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammatory disease that is a leading cause of death in the developed world. The prevailing paradigm states that, during human atherogenesis, monocytes accumulate in the arterial intima and differentiate into macrophages, which then ingest oxidized lipoproteins, secrete a diverse array of proinflammatory mediators, and eventually become foam cells, the key constituents of a vulnerable plaque. Yet monocytes are heterogeneous. In the mouse, one subset (Ly-6C(hi)) promotes inflammation, expands in hypercholesterolemic conditions, and selectively gives rise to macrophages in atheromata. A different subset (Ly-6C(lo)) attenuates inflammation and promotes angiogenesis and granulation tissue formation in models of tissue injury, but its role in atherosclerosis is largely unknown. In the human, monocyte heterogeneity is preserved but it is still unresolved how subsets correspond functionally. The contradistinctive properties of these cells suggest commitment for specific function before infiltrating tissue. Such commitment argues for discriminate targeting of deleterious subsets while sparing host defense and repair mechanisms. In addition to advancing our understanding of atherosclerosis, the ability to target and image monocyte subsets would allow us to evaluate drugs designed to selectively inhibit monocyte subset recruitment or function, and to stratify patients at risk for developing complications such as myocardial infarction or stroke. In this review we summarize recent advances of our understanding of the behavioral heterogeneity of monocytes during disease progression and outline emerging molecular imaging approaches to address key questions in the field.

  19. CXCR6 marks a novel subset of T-bet(lo)Eomes(hi) natural killer cells residing in human liver.

    PubMed

    Stegmann, Kerstin A; Robertson, Francis; Hansi, Navjyot; Gill, Upkar; Pallant, Celeste; Christophides, Theodoros; Pallett, Laura J; Peppa, Dimitra; Dunn, Claire; Fusai, Giuseppe; Male, Victoria; Davidson, Brian R; Kennedy, Patrick; Maini, Mala K

    2016-05-23

    Natural killer cells (NK) are highly enriched in the human liver, where they can regulate immunity and immunopathology. We probed them for a liver-resident subset, distinct from conventional bone-marrow-derived NK. CXCR6+ NK were strikingly enriched in healthy and diseased liver compared to blood (p < 0.0001). Human hepatic CXCR6+ NK had an immature phenotype (predominantly CD56(bright)CD16-CD57-), and expressed the tissue-residency marker CD69. CXCR6+ NK produced fewer cytotoxic mediators and pro-inflammatory cytokines than the non-liver-specific CXCR6- fraction. Instead CXCR6+ NK could upregulate TRAIL, a key death ligand in hepatitis pathogenesis. CXCR6 demarcated liver NK into two transcriptionally distinct populations: T-bet(hi)Eomes(lo)(CXCR6-) and T-bet(lo)Eomes(hi)(CXCR6+); the latter was virtually absent in the periphery. The small circulating CXCR6+ subset was predominantly T-bet(hi)Eomes(lo), suggesting its lineage was closer to CXCR6- peripheral than CXCR6+ liver NK. These data reveal a large subset of human liver-resident T-bet(lo)Eomes(hi) NK, distinguished by their surface expression of CXCR6, adapted for hepatic tolerance and inducible anti-viral immunity.

  20. Inhibition of AR-mediated Transcription by Binding of Oct1 to a Motif enriched in AR-Occupied Regions

    PubMed Central

    Jariwala, Unnati; Cogan, Jon P.; Jia, Li; Frenkel, Baruch; Coetzee, Gerhard A.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The androgen receptor (AR) plays roles in prostate development and cancer (PCa). In response to androgens, the AR binds to androgen-response elements (AREs) to modulate gene transcription. The responses of such genes are dependent on the cellular milieu and on sequences around the AREs, which attract other transcription factors. Previously, bioinformatic analysis of 62 AR-occupied regions (ARORs) in PCa cells revealed enrichment for both AREs and a TTGGCAAATA-like motif. We undertook the present study to investigate the significance of the TTGGCAAATA-like motif. Methods: Prostate cancer cell lines, LNCaP and C4-2B, were analyzed by transient transfections of wild type and mutant reporter constructs, electro-mobility shift assays (EMSAs), and RT-qPCR analysis of endogenous genes. Results: In two of six tested ARORs, point mutations in the TTGGCAAATA-like motif resulted in inhibition of DHT-mediated enhancer activity. EMSA revealed that Oct1 bound the motif, and that the mutations that abolished DHT responsiveness in the transfection assays augmented Oct1 binding. These results suggest a role for Oct1 as a context-dependent negative coregulator of AR. Consistent with this, siRNA knockdown of Oct1 increased the DHT-mediated enhancer activity of transfected reporters as well as an endogenous AR target gene, transglutaminase 2. Conclusions: Oct1 negatively regulates DHT-mediated enhancer activity in a subset of ARORs. The enrichment of ARORs for the Oct-binding, TTGGCAAATA-like motif may reflect a mechanism that utilizes Oct1 to keep AR activity in check at some ARORs, while augmenting AR activity in other ARORs. Therefore, Oct1 may have regulatory functions in prostate development and cancer progression. PMID:19058140

  1. Multiparametric profiling of non–small-cell lung cancers reveals distinct immunophenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Lizotte, Patrick H.; Ivanova, Elena V.; Awad, Mark M.; Jones, Robert E.; Keogh, Lauren; Liu, Hongye; Dries, Ruben; Herter-Sprie, Grit S.; Santos, Abigail; Feeney, Nora B.; Paweletz, Cloud P.; Kulkarni, Meghana M.; Bass, Adam J.; Rustgi, Anil K.; Yuan, Guo-Cheng; Kufe, Donald W.; Jänne, Pasi A.; Hammerman, Peter S.; Sholl, Lynette M.; Hodi, F. Stephen; Richards, William G.; Bueno, Raphael; English, Jessie M.; Bittinger, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Immune checkpoint blockade improves survival in a subset of patients with non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), but robust biomarkers that predict response to PD-1 pathway inhibitors are lacking. Furthermore, our understanding of the diversity of the NSCLC tumor immune microenvironment remains limited. METHODS. We performed comprehensive flow cytometric immunoprofiling on both tumor and immune cells from 51 NSCLCs and integrated this analysis with clinical and histopathologic characteristics, next-generation sequencing, mRNA expression, and PD-L1 immunohistochemistry (IHC). RESULTS. Cytometric profiling identified an immunologically “hot” cluster with abundant CD8+ T cells expressing high levels of PD-1 and TIM-3 and an immunologically “cold” cluster with lower relative abundance of CD8+ T cells and expression of inhibitory markers. The “hot” cluster was highly enriched for expression of genes associated with T cell trafficking and cytotoxic function and high PD-L1 expression by IHC. There was no correlation between immunophenotype and KRAS or EGFR mutation, or patient smoking history, but we did observe an enrichment of squamous subtype and tumors with higher mutation burden in the “hot” cluster. Additionally, approximately 20% of cases had high B cell infiltrates with a subset producing IL-10. CONCLUSIONS. Our results support the use of immune-based metrics to study response and resistance to immunotherapy in lung cancer. FUNDING. The Robert A. and Renée E. Belfer Family Foundation, Expect Miracles Foundation, Starr Cancer Consortium, Stand Up to Cancer Foundation, Conquer Cancer Foundation, International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, National Cancer Institute (R01 CA205150), and the Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation. PMID:27699239

  2. Multiparametric profiling of non-small-cell lung cancers reveals distinct immunophenotypes.

    PubMed

    Lizotte, Patrick H; Ivanova, Elena V; Awad, Mark M; Jones, Robert E; Keogh, Lauren; Liu, Hongye; Dries, Ruben; Almonte, Christina; Herter-Sprie, Grit S; Santos, Abigail; Feeney, Nora B; Paweletz, Cloud P; Kulkarni, Meghana M; Bass, Adam J; Rustgi, Anil K; Yuan, Guo-Cheng; Kufe, Donald W; Jänne, Pasi A; Hammerman, Peter S; Sholl, Lynette M; Hodi, F Stephen; Richards, William G; Bueno, Raphael; English, Jessie M; Bittinger, Mark A; Wong, Kwok-Kin

    2016-09-08

    BACKGROUND. Immune checkpoint blockade improves survival in a subset of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), but robust biomarkers that predict response to PD-1 pathway inhibitors are lacking. Furthermore, our understanding of the diversity of the NSCLC tumor immune microenvironment remains limited. METHODS. We performed comprehensive flow cytometric immunoprofiling on both tumor and immune cells from 51 NSCLCs and integrated this analysis with clinical and histopathologic characteristics, next-generation sequencing, mRNA expression, and PD-L1 immunohistochemistry (IHC). RESULTS. Cytometric profiling identified an immunologically "hot" cluster with abundant CD8(+) T cells expressing high levels of PD-1 and TIM-3 and an immunologically "cold" cluster with lower relative abundance of CD8(+) T cells and expression of inhibitory markers. The "hot" cluster was highly enriched for expression of genes associated with T cell trafficking and cytotoxic function and high PD-L1 expression by IHC. There was no correlation between immunophenotype and KRAS or EGFR mutation, or patient smoking history, but we did observe an enrichment of squamous subtype and tumors with higher mutation burden in the "hot" cluster. Additionally, approximately 20% of cases had high B cell infiltrates with a subset producing IL-10. CONCLUSIONS. Our results support the use of immune-based metrics to study response and resistance to immunotherapy in lung cancer. FUNDING. The Robert A. and Renée E. Belfer Family Foundation, Expect Miracles Foundation, Starr Cancer Consortium, Stand Up to Cancer Foundation, Conquer Cancer Foundation, International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, National Cancer Institute (R01 CA205150), and the Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation.

  3. Recirculation of lymphocyte subsets (CD5+, CD4+, CD8+, T19+ and B cells) through fetal lymph nodes.

    PubMed Central

    Kimpton, W G; Washington, E A; Cahill, R N

    1989-01-01

    The experiments reported in this paper examine the cell-surface phenotype (CD5, CD4, CD8, T19, MHC class II and sIg) and cell output of lymphocyte subsets circulating through a subcutaneous lymph node in the sheep fetus, in an environment unaffected by foreign antigen and circulating immunoglobulins. CD4+ lymphocytes were the major T-cell subset in fetal lymph and were clearly enriched in lymph compared with blood, whereas T19+, CD8+ and B lymphocytes were not. It seems likely that in the fetus CD4+ lymphocytes are extracted from the blood at a faster rate than are other T-cell subsets and B cells. There was a much higher percentage of CD8+ and T null cells and a lower percentage of MHC class II+ and B cells circulating in the fetal lymph than in adult lymph, while the percentage of T19+ lymphocytes in fetal blood was twice that in the adult. Although the hourly cell output from an adult prescapular lymph node was far higher than that from a fetal lymph node, the circulation of lymphocytes through fetal lymph nodes was much greater per gram lymph node weight than that through adult lymph nodes. The wholesale recirculation in the fetus of all the major T-cell subsets found in the adult is paradoxical because it is not known what function they serve in the fetus in the absence of antigen and ongoing immune responses, although clearly they are not memory cells. PMID:2481644

  4. Different tumor microenvironments contain functionally distinct subsets of macrophages derived from Ly6C(high) monocytes.

    PubMed

    Movahedi, Kiavash; Laoui, Damya; Gysemans, Conny; Baeten, Martijn; Stangé, Geert; Van den Bossche, Jan; Mack, Matthias; Pipeleers, Daniel; In't Veld, Peter; De Baetselier, Patrick; Van Ginderachter, Jo A

    2010-07-15

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) form a major component of the tumor stroma. However, important concepts such as TAM heterogeneity and the nature of the monocytic TAM precursors remain speculative. Here, we show for the first time that mouse mammary tumors contained functionally distinct subsets of TAMs and provide markers for their identification. Furthermore, in search of the TAM progenitors, we show that the tumor-monocyte pool almost exclusively consisted of Ly6C(hi)CX(3)CR1(low) monocytes, which continuously seeded tumors and renewed all nonproliferating TAM subsets. Interestingly, gene and protein profiling indicated that distinct TAM populations differed at the molecular level and could be classified based on the classic (M1) versus alternative (M2) macrophage activation paradigm. Importantly, the more M2-like TAMs were enriched in hypoxic tumor areas, had a superior proangiogenic activity in vivo, and increased in numbers as tumors progressed. Finally, it was shown that the TAM subsets were poor antigen presenters, but could suppress T-cell activation, albeit by using different suppressive mechanisms. Together, our data help to unravel the complexities of the tumor-infiltrating myeloid cell compartment and provide a rationale for targeting specialized TAM subsets, thereby optimally "re-educating" the TAM compartment. (c)2010 AACR.

  5. Expression of CD8alpha identifies a distinct subset of effector memory CD4+ T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Macchia, Iole; Gauduin, Marie-Claire; Kaur, Amitinder; Johnson, R Paul

    2006-10-01

    Circulating CD4+ CD8+ T lymphocytes have been described in the peripheral blood of humans and several animal species. However, the origin and functional properties of these cells remain poorly understood. In the present study, we evaluated the frequency, phenotype and function of peripheral CD4+ CD8+ T cells in rhesus macaques. Two distinct populations of CD4+ CD8+ T cells were identified: the dominant one was CD4hi CD8lo and expressed the CD8alphaalpha homodimer, while the minor population was CD4lo CD8hi and expressed the CD8alphabeta heterodimer. The majority of CD4hi CD8alphalo T cells exhibited an activated effector/memory phenotype (CCR5lo CD7- CD28- HLA-DR+) and expressed relatively high levels of granzyme B. Intracellular cytokine staining assays demonstrated that the frequency of cytomegalovirus-specific T cells was enriched five-fold in CD4hi CD8alphalo T cells compared to single-positive CD4+ T cells, whereas no consistent enrichment was observed for simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-specific T cells. Cross-sectional studies of SIV-infected animals demonstrated that the frequency of CD4hi CD8alphalo T cells was lower in wild-type SIV-infected animals compared to uninfected controls, although prospective studies of SIV-infected animals demonstrated depletion of CD4hi CD8alphalo lymphocytes only in a subset of animals. Taken together, these data suggest that CD4+ T cells expressing CD8alpha represent an effector/memory subset of CD4+ T cells and that this cell population can be depleted during the course of SIV infection.

  6. Improving the characterization of endothelial progenitor cell subsets by an optimized FACS protocol.

    PubMed

    Huizer, Karin; Mustafa, Dana A M; Spelt, J Clarissa; Kros, Johan M; Sacchetti, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    The characterization of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) is fundamental to any study related to angiogenesis. Unfortunately, current literature lacks consistency in the definition of EPC subsets due to variations in isolation strategies and inconsistencies in the use of lineage markers. Here we address critical points in the identification of hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs), circulating endothelial cells (CECs), and culture-generated outgrowth endothelial cells (OECs) from blood samples of healthy adults (AB) and umbilical cord (UCB). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were enriched using a Ficoll-based gradient followed by an optimized staining and gating strategy to enrich for the target cells. Sorted EPC populations were subjected to RT-PCR for tracing the expression of markers beyond the limits of cell surface-based immunophenotyping. Using CD34, CD133 and c-kit staining, combined with FSC and SSC, we succeeded in the accurate and reproducible identification of four HPC subgroups and found significant differences in the respective populations in AB vs. UCB. Co-expression analysis of endothelial markers on HPCs revealed a complex pattern characterized by various subpopulations. CECs were identified by using CD34, KDR, CD45, and additional endothelial markers, and were subdivided according to their apoptotic state and expression of c-kit. Comparison of UCB-CECs vs. AB-CECs revealed significant differences in CD34 and KDR levels. OECs were grown from PBMC-fractions We found that viable c-kit+ CECs are a candidate circulating precursor for CECs. RT-PCR to angiogenic factors and receptors revealed that all EPC subsets expressed angiogenesis-related molecules. Taken together, the improvements in immunophenotyping and gating strategies resulted in accurate identification and comparison of better defined cell populations in a single procedure.

  7. A computational approach to identifying gene-microRNA modules in cancer.

    PubMed

    Jin, Daeyong; Lee, Hyunju

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play key roles in the initiation and progression of various cancers by regulating genes. Regulatory interactions between genes and miRNAs are complex, as multiple miRNAs can regulate multiple genes. In addtion, these interactions vary from patient to patient and even among patients with the same cancer type, as cancer development is a heterogeneous process. These relationships are more complicated because transcription factors and other regulatory molecules can also regulate miRNAs and genes. Hence, it is important to identify the complex relationships between genes and miRNAs in cancer. In this study, we propose a computational approach to constructing modules that represent these relationships by integrating the expression data of genes and miRNAs with gene-gene interaction data. First, we used a biclustering algorithm to construct modules consisting of a subset of genes and a subset of samples to incorporate the heterogeneity of cancer cells. Second, we combined gene-gene interactions to include genes that play important roles in cancer-related pathways. Then, we selected miRNAs that are closely associated with genes in the modules based on a Gaussian Bayesian network and Bayesian Information Criteria. When we applied our approach to ovarian cancer and glioblastoma (GBM) data sets, 33 and 54 modules were constructed, respectively. In these modules, 91% and 94% of ovarian cancer and GBM modules, respectively, were explained either by direct regulation between genes and miRNAs or by indirect relationships via transcription factors. In addition, 48.4% and 74.0% of modules from ovarian cancer and GBM, respectively, were enriched with cancer-related pathways, and 51.7% and 71.7% of miRNAs in modules were ovarian cancer-related miRNAs and GBM-related miRNAs, respectively. Finally, we extensively analyzed significant modules and showed that most genes in these modules were related to ovarian cancer and GBM.

  8. T-cell subsets in peripheral blood and tumors of patients treated with oncolytic adenoviruses.

    PubMed

    Kristian, Taipale; Ilkka, Liikanen; Juuso, Juhila; Aila, Karioja-Kallio; Minna, Oksanen; Riku, Turkki; Nina, Linder; Johan, Lundin; Ari, Ristimäki; Anna, Kanerva; Anniina, Koski; Timo, Joensuu; Markus, Vähä-Koskela; Akseli, Hemminki

    2015-05-01

    The quality of the antitumor immune response is decisive when developing new immunotherapies for cancer. Oncolytic adenoviruses cause a potent immunogenic stimulus and arming them with costimulatory molecules reshapes the immune response further. We evaluated peripheral blood T-cell subsets of 50 patients with refractory solid tumors undergoing treatment with oncolytic adenovirus. These data were compared to changes in antiviral and antitumor T cells, treatment efficacy, overall survival, and T-cell subsets in pre- and post-treatment tumor biopsies. Treatment caused a significant (P < 0.0001) shift in T-cell subsets in blood, characterized by a proportional increase of CD8(+) cells, and decrease of CD4(+) cells. Concomitant treatment with cyclophosphamide and temozolomide resulted in less CD4(+) decrease (P = 0.041) than cyclophosphamide only. Interestingly, we saw a correlation between T-cell changes in peripheral blood and the tumor site. This correlation was positive for CD8(+) and inverse for CD4(+) cells. These findings give insight to the interconnections between peripheral blood and tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL) populations regarding oncolytic virotherapy. In particular, our data suggest that induction of T-cell response is not sufficient for clinical response in the context of immunosuppressive tumors, and that peripheral blood T cells have a complicated and potentially misleading relationship with TILs.

  9. Multi-lingual search engine to access PubMed monolingual subsets: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Darmoni, Stéfan J; Soualmia, Lina F; Griffon, Nicolas; Grosjean, Julien; Kerdelhué, Gaétan; Kergourlay, Ivan; Dahamna, Badisse

    2013-01-01

    PubMed contains many articles in languages other than English but it is difficult to find them using the English version of the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) Thesaurus. The aim of this work is to propose a tool allowing access to a PubMed subset in one language, and to evaluate its performance. Translations of MeSH were enriched and gathered in the information system. PubMed subsets in main European languages were also added in our database, using a dedicated parser. The CISMeF generic semantic search engine was evaluated on the response time for simple queries. MeSH descriptors are currently available in 11 languages in the information system. All the 654,000 PubMed citations in French were integrated into CISMeF database. None of the response times exceed the threshold defined for usability (2 seconds). It is now possible to freely access biomedical literature in French using a tool in French; health professionals and lay people with a low English language may find it useful. It will be expended to several European languages: German, Spanish, Norwegian and Portuguese.

  10. IL-10-producing NKT10 cells are a distinct regulatory invariant NKT cell subset.

    PubMed

    Sag, Duygu; Krause, Petra; Hedrick, Catherine C; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Wingender, Gerhard

    2014-09-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells rapidly produce copious amounts of multiple cytokines after activation, thereby impacting a wide variety of different immune reactions. However, strong activation of iNKT cells with α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer) reportedly induces a hyporeactive state that resembles anergy. In contrast, we determined here that iNKT cells from mice pretreated with αGalCer retain cytotoxic activity and maintain the ability to respond to TCR-dependent as well as TCR-independent cytokine-mediated stimulation. Additionally, αGalCer-pretreated iNKT cells acquired characteristics of regulatory cells, including production and secretion of the immunomodulatory cytokine IL-10. Through the production of IL-10, αGalCer-pretreated iNKT cells impaired antitumor responses and reduced disease in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, a mouse model of autoimmune disease. Furthermore, a subset of iNKT cells with a similar inhibitory phenotype and function were present in mice not exposed to αGalCer and were enriched in mouse adipose tissue and detectable in human PBMCs. These data demonstrate that IL-10-producing iNKT cells with regulatory potential (NKT10 cells) represent a distinct iNKT cell