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Sample records for cancer surgery wards

  1. [Oral anticoagulation control in a cardiac surgery ward].

    PubMed

    Melis Tormos, Eloida

    2008-09-01

    In patients who undergo cardiac surgery, particularly valvular surgery it is essential to carry out frequent anticoagulation controls during their hospital stay The author questions if it is viable to carry out these controls by means of a portable coagulation meter which, in principle, can provide advantages in patient care. To determine this viability the author evaluates the concordance between the measurements obtained with this device and measurements taken in a laboratory The author compared the INR (prothrombin time, Normalized International Ratio) in 106 pairs of simultaneous blood samples, from both veins and capillaries, taken from 60 patients receiving anticoagulation medicine hospitalized in the cardiac surgery ward at the La Fe Hospital after each underwent surgery The samples taken from veins were processed in a hemostasia laboratory while the capillary samples were processed with a portable coagulation meter, a Roche CoaguChek"S. The statistical analyses applied were Pearson coefficient, intraclass correlation coefficient (CCI) and the method for mean differences (MMD). Numbers for hemocytes and therapy combined with heparine were taken into account. The results showed, in the overall analysis of data, a very good degree of concordance, CCI = 0.939 (confidence interval, IC=95%, 0.902-0.961) and MMD numbers <10%. For hemocytes <32, the concordance decreases, CCI = 0.876 (IC 95% = 0.787-0.930). The author concludes that this coagulation meter is trustworthy therefore using it would improve care for a patient needing anti-coagulation treatment during his/her stay in the ward since using this meter helps to obtain immediate results and reduces the trauma when extracting blood samples, etc. Nonetheless, when dealing with patients having a low hemocyte level, it is more prudent to make use of laboratory results.

  2. Surgery for Bone Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... surgery, see Cancer Surgery . Written by References The American Cancer Society medical and editorial content team Our team is ... of use state fundraising notices Site Comments © 2017 American Cancer Society, Inc. All rights reserved. The American Cancer Society ...

  3. Surgery for pancreatic cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007649.htm Surgery for pancreatic cancer To use the sharing features on this page, ... surgery are used in the surgical treatment of pancreatic cancer. Whipple procedure: This is the most common surgery ...

  4. Training in General Surgery Ward Call: A Resident-Student Buddy System.

    PubMed

    Maurice, Andrew; Hann, Angus

    2015-01-01

    There is a paucity of literature regarding medical student experiences of after hours hospital ward call. It was observed at our institution that medical students had minimal experience in ward call, yet were required to undertake such shifts as interns after graduation. We implemented a buddy system in which a medical student shadowed a general surgery resident for a ward call shift. Final year medical students were recruited from the local university at a tertiary teaching hospital after institutional approval. Each student attended a 4 hour evening shift on a general surgery ward with a supervising resident. A survey detailing attitudes and expectations of ward call was completed before and after the experience. Nine students enrolled in the project. Familiarity of expectations of what is required of an intern on a ward call shift improved significantly after the experience (3.1/5 to 4.1/5, p = 0.002). After hours work experience was reported as useful both before and after the study (4.5/5 to 4.7/5, p = 0.47). Students and doctors involved unanimously felt the experience was worthwhile. After hours ward call experience is useful for a final year medical student. More studies are required to further define the role of after hours ward call experiences during medical training.

  5. Breast Cancer Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    FACTS FOR LIFE Breast Cancer Surgery The goal of breast cancer surgery is to remove the whole tumor from the breast. Some lymph nodes ... might still be in the body. Types of breast cancer surgery There are two types of breast cancer ...

  6. Cancer Surgery: Physically Removing Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... in cancer diagnosis, staging, treatment and symptom relief. Robotic surgery. In robotic surgery, the surgeon sits away from the operating ... to maneuver surgical tools to perform the operation. Robotic surgery helps the surgeon operate in hard-to- ...

  7. Surgery for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Oncology . 5th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Elsevier; 2014. Last Medical Review: June 1, 2016 Last Revised: August 18, 2016 Breast Cancer Treatment Surgery for Breast Cancer Radiation for Breast Cancer Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer Hormone ...

  8. Barriers to nurse-patient communication in cardiac surgery wards: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Shafipour, Vida; Mohammad, Eesa; Ahmadi, Fazlollah

    2014-08-15

    An appropriate and effective nurse-patient communication is of the most important aspect of caring. The formation and continuation of such a relationship depends on various factors such as the conditions and context of communication and a mutual understanding between the two. A review of the literature shows that little research is carried out on identification of such barriers in hospital wards between the patients and the healthcare staff. The present study was therefore conducted to explore the experiences of nurses and patients on communication barriers in hospital cardiac surgery wards. This qualitative research was carried out using a content analysis method (Graneheim & Lundman, 2004). The participants were selected by a purposeful sampling and consist of 10 nurses and 11 patients from the cardiac surgery wards of three teaching hospitals in Tehran, Iran. Data was gathered by unstructured interviews. All interviews were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. Findings were emerged in three main themes including job dissatisfaction (with the sub-themes of workload tension and decreased motivation), routine-centered care (with the sub-themes of habitual interventions, routinized and technical interventions, and objective supervision), and distrust in competency of nurses (with the sub-themes of cultural contrast, less responsible nurses, and their apathy towards the patients). Compared to other studies, our findings identified different types of communication barriers depending on the nursing settings. These findings can be used by the ward clinical nursing managers at cardiac surgery wards to improve the quality of nursing care.

  9. Surgery for Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... certain vaccines because the spleen will be removed. Palliative surgery If the cancer has spread too far ... removed completely, any surgery being considered would be palliative (intended to relieve or prevent symptoms). Because pancreatic ...

  10. The management pattern carried out in a cataract surgery day ward.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jing; Fang, Xiaoqun; Wu, Suhong

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate the management practice and process of a cataract surgery day ward. From January to December in 2012, a portion of the cataract patients were evaluated for the pattern of day ward management. Methods were as follows: 1) Establish the cataract day ward. 2) Enroll the patients who met the following criteria: voluntary, local residents or outsiders who stayed in a hotel near the hospital, accompanied by family, and who had simple senile cataract without any systemic major diseases. 3) Establish the hospitalization process. 4) Analyze the nursing process. After cataract day surgery, the patients were followed for 2 hours and completed a questionnaire about their needs and sentiments. A total of 3971 cases were observed in this study; 49 cases were switched to a normal pattern of hospitalization because of operative complications, 1 case had a strong desire to switch to a normal pattern of hospitalization because of ocular discomfort, 8 cases went back to the hospital for treatment because of ocular pain, and 52 cases called on the phone to seek help. Overall, 3820 cases(96.2%) returned on time the next day to visit the doctor. No patients showed severe postoperative complications and 98% expressed great satisfaction with the day ward process. Only 200 cases expressed great concern about not knowing how to deal with postoperative pain, the changes in condition outside the hospital, the therapeutic effects, and the problem of expense reimburse-ment. Day ward cataract surgery is an efficient and safe mode, and has the potential to relieve the demand for inpatient beds and to ensure timely treatment of the patients. In addition, it helps the patients enjoy health care at public expense, reserving reimbursement for those who need to be hospitalized. Nurses should pay more attention to systemic evaluation of the patients, health education, and psychological guidance, and keep in close communication with doctors, which is the key to ensure the safety of day ward

  11. Surgery for Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... but the goal is not to try to cure the cancer. Staging laparoscopy To determine which type of surgery ... the planned operation would be very unlikely to cure the cancer and could still lead to major side effects. ...

  12. Improving Intensive Care Unit and Ward Utilization by Adapting Master Surgery Schedules.

    PubMed

    Fügener, Andreas; Edenharter, Guenther Michael; Kiefer, Paskal; Mayr, Ulrike; Schiele, Julian; Steiner, Fabian; Kolisch, Rainer; Blobner, Manfred

    2016-03-15

    With increasing organizational and financial pressure on hospitals, each individual surgical treatment has to be reviewed and planned thoroughly. Apart from the expensive operating room facilities, proper staffing and planning of downstream units, like the wards or the intensive care units (ICUs), should be considered as well. In this article, we outline the relationship between a master surgery schedule (MSS), i.e., the assignment of surgical blocks to medical specialties, and the bed demand in the downstream units using an analytical model. By using historical data retrieved from the clinical information system and a patient flow model, we applied a recently developed algorithm for predicting bed demand based on the MSSs for patients of 3 surgical subspecialties of a hospital. Simulations with 3 different MSSs were performed. The impact on the required amount of beds in the downstream units was analyzed. We show the potential improvements of the current MSS considering 2 main goals: leveling workload among days and reduction of weekend utilization. We discuss 2 different MSSs, one decreasing the weekend ICU utilization by 20% and the other one reducing maximum ward bed demand by 7%. A test with 12 months of real-life data validates the results. The application of the algorithm provides detailed insights for the hospital into the impact of MSS designs on the bed demand in downstream units. It allowed creating MSSs that avoid peaks in bed demand and high weekend occupancy levels in the ICU and the ward.

  13. Safety and efficacy of continuous morphine infusions following pediatric cranial surgery in a surgical ward setting.

    PubMed

    Warren, Daniel T; Bowen-Roberts, Tim; Ou, Christine; Purdy, Robert; Steinbok, Paul

    2010-11-01

    Morphine is avoided by many neurosurgeons following cranial surgery. There exists a concern regarding the potential complications and a perception that cranial surgery is less painful than other surgical procedures. At British Columbia Children's Hospital continuous morphine infusions (CMI) have been used to control pain in pediatric neurosurgical patients. The purpose of this study was to compare the safety and efficacy of continuous intravenous morphine infusion to standard oral analgesics in a neurosurgical ward setting. A retrospective review of medical records for 71 children was completed. The patients underwent either cranial reconstruction (2002-2007) or craniotomies for intradural pathology (2005-2007) at British Columbia Children's Hospital. Outcome measures included pain control and adverse events. Comparison was made between patients receiving a CMI and patients receiving acetaminophen and codeine. Thirty-seven children received CMI on the ward (30 cranial reconstruction and 7 craniotomy), while 34 (10 cranial reconstruction and 24 craniotomy) received acetaminophen and codeine. There was no statistical difference in pain control. There was significantly more nausea on post-operative day one in the CMI group (p = 0.002). There were no other significant adverse events. These findings suggest that CMI is comparable to acetaminophen and codeine with respect to analgesia and serious side effects. We recommend the use of CMIs as an alternative when pain is poorly controlled in post-operative pediatric neurosurgical patients to prevent the potential adverse consequences of inadequate analgesia.

  14. Cancer in young people in the north of England, 1968-85: analysis by census wards.

    PubMed Central

    Craft, A W; Parker, L; Openshaw, S; Charlton, M; Newell, J; Birch, J M; Blair, V

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine whether the seeming excess of childhood leukaemia and lymphoma identified in Seascale, Cumbria, UK, remains unusual when put into a wider context. DESIGN--Analysis of cancer incidence by geographical area. SETTING--The north of England including the Northern and North Western Regional Health Authority regions and the Southport and South Sefton districts of the Mersey Regional Health Authority. SUBJECTS--Altogether 6686 cases of malignant disease in people under 25 years old. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS--Cases of cancer diagnosed before their 25th birthday between January 1968 and December 1985 identified from three regional cancer registries were allocated to a census ward on the basis of 'usual place of residence'. Population data were derived from the 1971 and 1981 censuses, and the cancer incidence was calculated for each ward. Of the 6686 cases, there were 1035 cases of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and 361 of non-Hodgkins lymphoma. Wards were ranked by cancer incidence and Poisson probability, using different population bases. Seascale ward is the most highly ranked ward for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia for the time periods 1968-85 or 1968-76. It is not the most highly ranked for non-Hodgkins lymphoma. However, combining acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and non-Hodgkins lymphoma incidence gives an even more extreme position for Seascale. The most extreme Poisson probability for any of the analyses was that for brain tumours in the electoral ward of Ashton St Michael, Tameside (p = 0.000009). CONCLUSION--The incidence of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and non-Hodgkins lymphoma in the Seascale ward remains high when put into a wider context. For other cancers there are wards with even more extreme Poisson probability values. PMID:8326267

  15. Global cancer surgery: delivering safe, affordable, and timely cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Richard; Alatise, Olusegun Isaac; Anderson, Benjamin O; Audisio, Riccardo; Autier, Philippe; Aggarwal, Ajay; Balch, Charles; Brennan, Murray F; Dare, Anna; D'Cruz, Anil; Eggermont, Alexander M M; Fleming, Kenneth; Gueye, Serigne Magueye; Hagander, Lars; Herrera, Cristian A; Holmer, Hampus; Ilbawi, André M; Jarnheimer, Anton; Ji, Jia-Fu; Kingham, T Peter; Liberman, Jonathan; Leather, Andrew J M; Meara, John G; Mukhopadhyay, Swagoto; Murthy, Shilpa S; Omar, Sherif; Parham, Groesbeck P; Pramesh, C S; Riviello, Robert; Rodin, Danielle; Santini, Luiz; Shrikhande, Shailesh V; Shrime, Mark; Thomas, Robert; Tsunoda, Audrey T; van de Velde, Cornelis; Veronesi, Umberto; Vijaykumar, Dehannathparambil Kottarathil; Watters, David; Wang, Shan; Wu, Yi-Long; Zeiton, Moez; Purushotham, Arnie

    2015-09-01

    Surgery is essential for global cancer care in all resource settings. Of the 15.2 million new cases of cancer in 2015, over 80% of cases will need surgery, some several times. By 2030, we estimate that annually 45 million surgical procedures will be needed worldwide. Yet, less than 25% of patients with cancer worldwide actually get safe, affordable, or timely surgery. This Commission on global cancer surgery, building on Global Surgery 2030, has examined the state of global cancer surgery through an analysis of the burden of surgical disease and breadth of cancer surgery, economics and financing, factors for strengthening surgical systems for cancer with multiple-country studies, the research agenda, and the political factors that frame policy making in this area. We found wide equity and economic gaps in global cancer surgery. Many patients throughout the world do not have access to cancer surgery, and the failure to train more cancer surgeons and strengthen systems could result in as much as US $6.2 trillion in lost cumulative gross domestic product by 2030. Many of the key adjunct treatment modalities for cancer surgery--e.g., pathology and imaging--are also inadequate. Our analysis identified substantial issues, but also highlights solutions and innovations. Issues of access, a paucity of investment in public surgical systems, low investment in research, and training and education gaps are remarkably widespread. Solutions include better regulated public systems, international partnerships, super-centralisation of surgical services, novel surgical clinical trials, and new approaches to improve quality and scale up cancer surgical systems through education and training. Our key messages are directed at many global stakeholders, but the central message is that to deliver safe, affordable, and timely cancer surgery to all, surgery must be at the heart of global and national cancer control planning. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Gallbladder Cancer: Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Gallbladder Cancer Chemotherapy for Gallbladder Cancer Palliative Therapy for Gallbladder Cancer Treatment Options Based on the Extent of Gallbladder Cancer ... Cancer Information Cancer Prevention & Detection Cancer Basics ...

  17. [The implementation of the week surgery in an orthopedic and urology ward and assessment of its impact].

    PubMed

    Mulloni, Giovanna; Petrucco, Stefania; De Marc, Raffaella; Nazzi, Cheti; Petri, Roberto; Guarrera, Giovanni Maria

    2015-01-01

    The implementation of the week surgery in an orthopedic and urology ward and the assessment of its impact. The week surgery (WS) is one of the models organized according the intensity of care that allows the improvement of the appropriateness of the hospital admissions. To describe the implementation and the impact of the WS on costs and levels of care. The WS was gradually implemented in an orthopedic and urology ward. The planning of the surgeries was modified, the wards where patients would have been transferred during the week-end where identified, the nurses were supported by expert nurses to learn new skills and clinical pathways were implemented. The periods January-June 2012 and 2013 were compared identifying a set of indicators according to the health technology assessment method. The nurses were able to take vacations according to schedule; the cost of outsourcing services were reduced (-4.953 Euros) as well as those of consumables. The nursing care could be guaranteed employing less (-5) full-time nurses; the global clinical performance of the ward did not vary. Unfortunately several urology patients could not be discharged during the week-ends. A good planning of the surgeries according to the patients' length of staying, together with interventions to increase the staff-skill mix, and the clinical pathways allowed an effective and efficient implementation of the WS model without jeopardizing patients' safety.

  18. Effects of a surgical ward care protocol following open colon surgery as part of an enhanced recovery after surgery programme.

    PubMed

    Kim, BoYeoul; Park, SungHee; Park, KyuJoo; Ryoo, SeungBum

    2016-12-16

    To investigate the effects of a standardised care protocol as part of an enhanced recovery after surgery programme on the management of patients who underwent open colon surgery at the University Hospital, South Korea. Patients who undergo open colon surgery often have concerns about their care as they prepare for hospitalisation. By shortening hospital stay lengths, enhanced recovery after surgery programmes could reduce the number of opportunities for patient education and communication with nurses. Therefore, our surgical team developed an enhanced recovery after surgery programme, applied using a care protocol for patients with colorectal cancer, that spans the entire recovery process. A retrospective, comparative study was conducted using a care protocol as part of an enhanced recovery after surgery programme. Comparisons were made before and after the implementation of an enhanced recovery after surgery programme with a care protocol. Records of 219 patients who underwent open colon surgery were retrospectively audited. The records were grouped according to the care protocol used (enhanced recovery after surgery programme with a care protocol or traditional care programme). The outcomes, including postoperative bowel function recovery, postoperative pain control, recovery time and postoperative complications, were compared between two categories. Patients who were managed using the programme with a care protocol had shorter hospital stays, fewer complications, such as postoperative ileus wound infections, and emergency room visits than those who were managed using the traditional care programme. The findings can be used to facilitate the implementation of an enhanced recovery after surgery programme with a care protocol following open colon surgery. We present a care protocol that enables effective management using consistent and standardised education providing bedside care for patients who undergo open colon surgery. This care protocol empowers long

  19. Rapid response team implementation on a burn surgery/acute care ward.

    PubMed

    Moroseos, Teresa; Bidwell, Karen; Rui, Lin; Fuhrman, Lawrence; Gibran, Nicole S; Honari, Shari; Pham, Tam N

    2014-01-01

    To date there is limited evidence of efficacy for rapid response teams (RRT) in burns despite widespread their implementation in U.S. hospitals. The burn surgery/acute care ward at the Harborview Medical Center, Seattle, Washington, primarily treats burns, acute wounds, and pediatric trauma patients, but also accepts overflow surgical and medical patients. The authors hypothesize that institutional RRT implementation in 2006 has reduced code blue activations, unplanned intensive care unit (ICU) transfers, and mortality on the acute care ward of this hospital. The authors retrospectively analyzed all patients treated in our acute care unit before (2000-2004) and after RRT implementation (2007-2011). Patient, injury, and treatment outcomes information were collected and analyzed. The authors specifically examined clinical signs that triggered RRT activation and processes of care after activation. They compared code blue activation rates, unplanned ICU transfers, and mortality between the two periods by Poisson regression. The acute care unit treated 7092 patients before and 9357 patients after RRT implementation. There were 409 RRT activations in 329 patients, 18 of whom ultimately died during hospitalization. Those who died had higher rates of stridor (P = .03), tachypnea (P = .001), and low oxygen saturations (P = .02) compared with survivors. Fewer burn and surgical patients died after implementation (seven patients; 22% of all deaths) compared with patients who died pre-RRT (27 patients; 53% of all deaths). After adjustment for case-mix index, age, and medical service differences between the two periods, code blue calls decreased from 1.4/1000 to 0.4/1000 admissions (P = .04), unplanned ICU transfer rates decreased from 65/1000 to 50/1000 admissions (P < .01), and hospital deaths decreased from 4.5/1000 to 3.3/1000 admissions (P = .11). Since its implementation, RRT activation has been frequently used in the acute care ward of this hospital. Respiratory symptoms

  20. [Surgery of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Villers, Arnauld; Rébillard, Xavier

    2003-12-31

    Radical prostatectomy is one of the standard treatment of localised prostate cancer. It is considered that cure is obtain if PSA value is undetectable (< 0,1 ng/mL) for at least 5 to 7 years post surgery. 8 to 9 men out of 10 are currently cured by prostatectomy if the cancer is detected at organ confined stage, with PSA < 10 ng/mL. Major technical progress related to patient setting, surgical approach, instrumentation, periprostatic fascial exposure and surgical strategy clearly decreased perioperative morbidity and late effects (erectile dysfunction and incontinence). Laparoscopic approach was described mainly by French teams since 1997 and represents a validated alternative to the gold standard suprapubic open approach.

  1. Surgery for Breast Cancer in Men

    MedlinePlus

    ... Men Treating Breast Cancer in Men Surgery for Breast Cancer in Men The thought of surgery can be ... Doctor About Breast Cancer in Men? More In Breast Cancer In Men About Breast Cancer in Men Causes, ...

  2. Over surgery in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    MacNeill, Fiona; Karakatsanis, Andreas

    2017-02-01

    Breast surgery remains the original and most effective 'targeted' therapy: excision of early cancer is curative and for more advanced disease surgery improves local disease control. However in well intentioned pursuit of cure and local disease control, some cancers are over-treated resulting in major physical and emotional morbidity. Less breast surgery is safe, as evidenced by steady reductions in mortality and local recurrence; earlier diagnosis and widespread use of systemic therapies and radiotherapy have allowed more conservative surgery. As tumour biology dictates cancer outcomes not surgery extent, surgery can safely be 'minimum required' rather than 'more is better' with the focus on removal of disease rather than healthy tissue. Surgeons can reduce the burden of surgery further but it is important that less surgery is not over-compensated by more radical or unnecessary systemic therapies and/or radiotherapy with their own toxicities and morbidity. We all need to be alert to the potential drivers of over treatment and over surgery such as failure to work within a multidisciplinary team, failure to design a multimodality treatment plan at diagnosis or overuse of novel assessment technologies of uncertain clinical utility. Pursuit of wide margins and the removal of the contra-lateral healthy breast for marginal risk-reduction gains are also to be discouraged as is routine local/regional surgery in stage 4 disease. The surgeon has a pivotal role in minimizing breast surgery to what is required to achieve the best oncological, functional and aesthetic outcomes.

  3. Robotic surgery for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Nozawa, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2017-09-26

    Laparoscopic surgery has gained acceptance as a less invasive approach in the treatment of colon cancer. However, laparoscopic surgery for rectal cancer, particularly cancer of the lower rectum, is still challenging because of limited accessibility. Robotic surgery overcomes the limitations of laparoscopy associated with anatomy and offers certain advantages, including 3-D imaging, dexterity and ambidextrous capability, lack of tremors, motion scaling, and a short learning curve. Robotic rectal surgery has been reported to reduce conversion rates, particularly in low anterior resection, but it is associated with longer operative times than the conventional laparoscopic approach. Postoperative morbidities are similar between the robotic and conventional laparoscopic approaches, and oncological outcomes such as the quality of the mesorectum and the status of resection margins are also equivalent. The possible superiority of robotic surgery in terms of the preservation of autonomic function has yet to be established in research based on larger numbers of patients. Although robotic rectal surgery is safe, feasible, and appears to overcome some of the technical limitations associated with conventional laparoscopic surgery, the advantages provided by this technical innovation are currently limited. To justify its expensive cost, robotic surgery is more suitable for select patients, such as obese patients, men, those with cancer of the lower rectum, and those receiving preoperative chemoradiotherapy. © 2017 Japan Society for Endoscopic Surgery, Asia Endosurgery Task Force and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  4. Utilization effect of integrating a chest radiography room into a thoracic surgery ward.

    PubMed

    Maehara, Cleo K; Jacobson, Francine; Andriole, Katherine P; Khorasani, Ramin

    2012-06-01

    Bedside chest radiography (CXR) represents a substantial fraction of the volume of medical imaging for inpatient health care facilities. However, its image quality is limited compared with posterior-anterior/lateral (PA/LAT) acquisitions taken in radiographic rooms. The aim of this study was to evaluate the utilization of bedside CXR and other chest imaging modalities before and after placing a radiography room within a thoracic surgical inpatient ward. All patient admissions (n = 3,852) to the thoracic surgical units between April 1, 2007, and December 31, 2010, were retrospectively identified. All chest imaging tests performed for these patients, including CT scans, MRI, ultrasound, and bedside and PA/LAT radiography, were counted. The primary outcome measure was chest imaging utilization, defined as the number of chest examinations per admission, before and after the establishment of the digital radiography room on January 10, 2010. Statistical analysis was performed using an independent-samples t test to evaluate changes in chest imaging utilization. A 2.61-fold increase in the number of PA/LAT CXR studies per admission (P < .01) and a 1.96-fold decrease in the number of bedside CXR studies per admission (P < .01) were observed after radiography room implementation. The number of chest CT, MRI, and ultrasound studies per admission did not change significantly. Establishing a radiography room physically within thoracic surgery units or in close proximity can significantly shift CXR utilization from bedside to PA/LAT acquisitions, which may enable opportunities for improvement in efficiency, quality, and safety in patient care. Copyright © 2012 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Robotic Surgery for Oropharyngeal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Shivani; Goldenberg, David

    2014-01-01

    Oropharyngeal cancer represents a growing proportion of head and neck malignancies. This has been associated with the increase in infection of the oropharynx by oncogenic strains of human papillomavirus (HPV). Transoral robotic surgery (TORS) has opened the door for minimally invasive surgery for HPV-related and non-HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer. Compared to traditional open surgical approaches, TORS has been shown to improve functional outcomes in speech and swallowing, while maintaining good oncologic outcomes. PMID:24808952

  6. Rate of contamination of hospital privacy curtains on a burns and plastic surgery ward: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Shek, K; Patidar, R; Kohja, Z; Liu, S; Gawaziuk, J P; Gawthrop, M; Kumar, A; Logsetty, S

    2017-05-01

    Surfaces in the patient environment may play a role in microbial transmission if they become colonized by bacteria. Patient privacy curtains are one such surface that may pose a high risk for transmission because they are high-contact surfaces, are infrequently cleaned, and healthcare workers are less likely to wash their hands after contacting inanimate objects such as curtains. To determine the amount and type of bacterial colonization of patient privacy curtains at a regional burns/plastic surgery unit. Privacy curtain contamination on the burns/plastic surgery ward was determined for two separate occasions six months apart: 23 curtains on August 2015 and 26 curtains on January 2016. Dey-Engley neutralizing agar (DENA) replicate organism detection and counting (RODAC) contact plates were used daily to sample curtains near the edge hem where they are most frequently touched. Microbial contamination was reported as cfu/cm(2) and the presence of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was determined. Swabs were also taken of any open wounds and from tracheostomy sites on the ward. Curtain contamination in August 2015 was 0.7-4.7 cfu/cm(2) with 22% testing positive for MRSA, whereas contamination on January 2016 was 0.6-13.3 cfu/cm(2) with 31% of curtains testing positive for MRSA. Curtains on the burns/plastic surgery ward become colonized with significant quantities of bacteria. Future studies will need to address the rate of colonization and the clinical impact of this colonization to better inform cleaning protocols. Copyright © 2017 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Caring for patients with cancer in non-specialist wards: the nurse experience.

    PubMed

    Mohan, S; Wilkes, L M; Ogunsiji, O; Walker, A

    2005-07-01

    This study aims to describe the experiences of nurses caring for cancer patients in non-specialist wards. The study was conducted in a large (420 beds) and small (32 beds) hospital in an area health service with urban and rural populations in the west of Sydney. A qualitative descriptive approach was utilized to collect data from the nurses. Data were collected using a survey and in-depth interviews of nurses working in non-specialist cancer wards. Transcribed data were managed with Nudist Vivo software and analysed for common themes using process of constant comparison and contrast. Twenty-five surveys were returned and five nurses volunteered to be interviewed. The six major themes that emerged from analysis of data were: emotional nature of care, lack of time, lack of knowledge of cancer treatment, family support, environment not conducive to proper care and dealing with patient's non-acceptance of cancer diagnosis. The nurses in this study wished to provide quality supportive care for cancer patients and their families but the inconducive environment and inadequate relevant training hindered the nurses' efforts. This then presents further need of relevant training for nurses in cancer care and time management, to meet up with these challenges.

  8. Surgery for Testicular Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... about this. Written by References The American Cancer Society medical and editorial content team Our team is ... 2015 Last Revised: February 12, 2016 American Cancer Society medical information is copyrighted material. For reprint requests, ...

  9. Surgery for Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... laparoscope, which makes it easier for the doctor. Robotic-assisted surgery: In this approach, the laparoscopy is done with special tools attached to robotic arms that are controlled by the doctor to ...

  10. [Surgery in complicated colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Kreisler, Esther; Biondo, Sebastiano; Martí-Ragué, Joan

    2006-07-01

    Colorectal cancer continues to have a serious social impact. A large proportion of patients are diagnosed at an advanced stage of the disease. Approximately one-third of patients with colorectal cancer will undergo emergency surgery for a complicated tumor, with a high risk of mortality and poorer long-term prognosis. The most frequent complications are obstruction and perforation, while massive hemorrhage is rare. The curative potential of surgery, whether urgent or elective, depends on how radical the resection is, among other factors. In the literature on the management of urgent colorectal disease, there are few references to the oncological criteria for resection. Uncertainly about the optimal treatment has led to wide variability in the treatment of this entity. The present article aims to provide a critical appraisal of the controversies surrounding the role of surgery and its impact on complicated colorectal cancer.

  11. Bacterial Epidemiology and Antimicrobial Resistance in the Surgery Wards of a Large Teaching Hospital in Southern Italy

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Silvano; Gioia, Renato; De Simone, Giuseppe; Noviello, Silvana; Lombardi, Domenico; Di Crescenzo, Vincenzo Giuseppe; Filippelli, Amelia; Rega, Maria Rosaria; Massari, Angelo; Elberti, Maria Giovanna; Grisi, Lucilla; Boccia, Giovanni; De Caro, Francesco; Leone, Sebastiano

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Surgical infections represent an increasingly important problem for the National Health System. In this study we retrospectively evaluated the bacterial epidemiology and antimicrobial susceptibility of the microorganisms concerned as well as the utilization of antibiotics in the General and Emergency Surgery wards of a large teaching hospital in southern Italy in the period 2011–2013. Methods Data concerning non-duplicate bacterial isolates and antimicrobial susceptibility were retrieved from the Vitek 2 database. The pharmacy provided data about the consumption of antibiotics in the above reported wards. Chi-square or Fisher’s exact test were used. Results In all, 94 Gram-negative were isolated in 2011, 77 in 2012, and 125 in 2013, Escherichia coli, Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa always being the most frequently isolated microorganisms. A. baumannii showed high rates of resistance to carbapenems (with values of 100% in 2011 and 2012) and low rates of resistance to tigecycline, colistin and amikacin. In the same years, there were respectively 105, 93, and 165 Gram-positive isolated. The rate of MRSA isolates ranged from 66% to 75% during the study period. Conclusions Our results show no significant increase in antimicrobial resistance over the period in question, and a higher rate of both MRSA isolates and resistance to carbapenems in A. baumannii compared with other European data. PMID:26075047

  12. Between-ward disparities in colorectal cancer incidence and screening in Washington DC.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sharmila; Chattopadhyay, Amit; Levine, Paul H

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to investigate the incidence and determinants of colorectal cancer (CRC) and its screening in District of Columbia (DC), and identify modifiable risk factors. Data (2000-2009) from the DC Cancer Registry, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS-DC) and Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) were used to estimate CRC incidence in eight DC Wards. Risk factors and CRC screening were analyzed using uni-, bi-, and multivariable statistical methods with survey procedures in SAS (version 9.2) including binary, unconditional multivariable logistic regression analysis. Factors measured included stage of diagnosis, age, gender, race/ethnicity, smoking, alcohol, exercise, body weight, health insurance, education, employment, and income. Over the study time, CRC screening increased from 48.4% to 68.6%. Mean age at diagnosis was 67 years. CRC incidence is high in DC. Furthermore, CRC incidence rates in DC below 50 years' age were higher than the SEER18 average. Disparities exist between CRC incidence and screening among DC Wards. Identified risk factors for CRC are smoking, obesity, and low physical activity; screening was less prevalent among the uninsured and low socio-economic group. Local variations in CRC occurrence exist and may vary from average national experiences. Identification of local regions which vary from national trends in disease occurrence is important for comprehensive understanding of the disease in the community.

  13. Chemo Before Surgery May Help Stomach Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Chemotherapy given before surgery for cancer of the lower esophagus and stomach increased the number of patients surviving for five years compared to surgery alone, according to findings presented at the 2007 ASCO meeting in Chicago.

  14. Robot-assisted surgery for gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Procopiuc, Livia; Tudor, Ştefan; Mănuc, Mircea; Diculescu, Mircea; Vasilescu, Cătălin

    2016-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery for gastric cancer is a relatively new research field, with convincing results mostly stemming from Asian countries. The use of the robotic surgery platform, thus far assessed as a safe procedure, which is also easier to learn, sets the background for a wider spread of minimally invasive technique in the treatment of gastric cancer. This review will cover the literature published so far, analyzing the pros and cons of robotic surgery and highlighting the remaining study questions. PMID:26798433

  15. Thermomagnetic surgery for renal cancer.

    PubMed

    Rand, R W; Snow, H D; Brown, W J

    1982-01-01

    Thermomagnetic surgery is a technique that uses hysteresis heating of ferromagnetic materials to produce focally controlled temperatures within solid organs or tumors to cause coagulation necrosis. The degree of heating of a neoplasm is controlled by manipulating the power of the electromagnetic coil system through temperature monitoring. This effectively limits the region of destruction to the disease process and thereby avoids damage to surrounding structures. If the ferromagnetic material is delivered by an arterial route to the tumor or organ additional beneficial effect of ischemic necrosis of tissue may be achieved. This new technique is applicable to selected cases of human cancer. Exposure in the electromagnetic fields or use of the ferromagnetic material in experimental animals has produced no ill effects.

  16. Cancer prevention behaviors among African-American adults: a survey of wards 7 and 8 in Washington, DC.

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, S.; Kofie, V. Y.; Helzlsouer, K.; Rivo, M. L.; Bonney, G.

    1995-01-01

    A telephone survey of knowledge, attitude, and health practices regarding cancer was undertaken in wards 7 and 8, Washington, DC in 1988. These wards have the highest cancer rates in the city and are predominantly African American. Of the 670 randomly selected persons over 18 years of age, 243 were males and 427 were females. Among females, 84% believed cigarette smoking causes cancer, and 48% thought alcohol causes cancer; 31% smoked cigarettes and 38% consumed alcoholic beverages. Among males, 91% and 52% thought cigarettes and alcohol causes cancer respectively; 41% smoked and 54% consumed alcoholic beverages. Only 6% of the males over age 40 practiced all eight recommended cancer prevention behaviors, while 2% of the females over age 40 practiced all preventive health behaviors. Cancer preventive behavior was examined in relation to socioeconomic status. This study indicates that preventive health behaviors were not associated with socioeconomic status. Data suggest that cancer prevention and control programs and services targeted to this Washington, DC population should be increased and intensified. PMID:7869405

  17. Minimally invasive surgery for stomach cancer.

    PubMed

    Nunobe, Souya; Kumagai, Koshi; Ida, Satoshi; Ohashi, Manabu; Hiki, Naoki

    2016-05-01

    Laparoscopic surgery for gastric cancer has become extremely widespread in recent years especially in Asian countries due to its low invasiveness. As to evidence of indication for laparoscopic surgery for gastric cancer, laparoscopic surgery for gastric cancer often appears to be indicated for early gastric cancer at many institutions, while evidence was considered to be insufficient to recommend laparoscopic surgery for gastric cancer at Stage II and above. There are also problems with indications for cases other than tumour factors. No meta-analyses and prospective studies have been reported, but outcomes of laparoscopic surgery for gastric cancer in gastric cancer patients with co-morbid and/or existing diseases have been reported in retrospective studies. Indications in the elderly appear to be favourable in terms of post-operative ambulation considering factors such as the degree of dissection in accordance with the status of the patient. Meta-analyses, randomized controlled trials and several retrospective studies have compared the short-term usefulness of laparoscopic surgery for gastric cancer with that of conventional gastrectomy. The superiority of laparoscopic surgery for gastric cancer has been reported in terms of the reduced amount of bleeding, a reduction in the administration frequency and period of analgesic doses, a reduction in the duration of fever, early recovery of intestinal movement and early return to oral intake. A small-scale randomized controlled trial and several retrospective studies have demonstrated no significant differences in survival rate, recurrence rate and type of recurrence between laparoscopic surgery for gastric cancer and conventional gastrectomy. The results of the aforementioned trials in early gastric cancer in Japan and Korea for which enrolment is complete remain to be published. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Factors Influencing Communication Between the Patients with Cancer and their Nurses in Oncology Wards

    PubMed Central

    Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Rassouli, Maryam; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Nikanfar, Alireza; Alavi-Majd, Hamid; Ghahramanian, Akram

    2014-01-01

    Aims: The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the factors influencing nurse-patient communication in cancer care in Iran. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted with a qualitative conventional content analysis approach in oncology wards of hospitals in Tabriz. Data was collected through purposive sampling by semi-structured deep interviews with nine patients, three family members and five nurses and analyzed simultaneously. Robustness of data analysis was evaluated by the participants and external control. Results: The main theme of the research emerged as “three-factor effects” that demonstrates all the factors related to the patient, nurse, and the organization and includes three categories of “Patient as the center of communication”, “Nurse as a human factor”, and “Organizational structures”. The first category consists of two sub-categories of “Imposed changes by the disease” and the “patient's particular characteristics”. The second category includes sub-categories of “sense of vulnerability” and “perception of professional self: Pre-requisite of patient-centered communication”. The third category consists of the sub-categories of “workload and time imbalance”, “lack of supervision”, and “impose duties in context of neglecting nurse and patient needs”. Characteristics of the patients, nurses, and care environment seemed to be the influential factors on the communication. Conclusions: In order to communicate with cancer patients effectively, changes in philosophy and culture of the care environment are essential. Nurses must receive proper trainings which meet their needs and which focus on holistic and patient-centered approach. PMID:24600177

  19. Prevalence of delirium among patients at a cancer ward: Clinical risk factors and prediction by bedside cognitive tests.

    PubMed

    Grandahl, Mia Gall; Nielsen, Svend Erik; Koerner, Ejnar Alex; Schultz, Helga Holm; Arnfred, Sidse Marie

    2016-08-01

    Background Delirium is a frequent psychiatric complication to cancer, but rarely recognized by oncologists. Aims 1. To estimate the prevalence of delirium among inpatients admitted at an oncological cancer ward 2. To investigate whether simple clinical factors predict delirium 3. To examine the value of cognitive testing in the assessment of delirium. Methods On five different days, we interviewed and assessed patients admitted to a Danish cancer ward. The World Health Organization International Classification of Diseases Version 10, WHO ICD-10 Diagnostic System and the Confusion Assessment Method (CAM) were used for diagnostic categorization. Clinical information was gathered from medical records and all patients were tested with Mini Cognitive Test, The Clock Drawing Test, and the Digit Span Test. Results 81 cancer patients were assessed and 33% were diagnosed with delirium. All delirious participants were CAM positive. Poor performance on the cognitive tests was associated with delirium. Medical records describing CNS metastases, benzodiazepine or morphine treatment were associated with delirium. Conclusions Delirium is prevalent among cancer inpatients. The Mini Cognitive Test, The Clock Drawing Test, and the Digit Span Test can be used as screening tools for delirium among inpatients with cancer, but even in synergy, they lack specificity. Combining cognitive testing and attention to nurses' records might improve detection, yet further studies are needed to create a more detailed patient profile for the detection of delirium.

  20. [Reconstructive surgery in larynx cancer].

    PubMed

    Szmeja, Z; Szyfter, W; Leszczyńska, M; Wierzbicka, M; Golusiński, W; Dabrowski, P; Karlik, M

    2000-01-01

    Subtotal laryngectomies with larynx reconstruction are an acceptable alternative to the total laryngectomy in T2, T3 larynx cancer treatment. One procedure resection and reconstruction allow for radical oncological treatment with simultaneous preservation of air passage continuity and the function of the neolarynx. In the years 1988-1997 in ENT Dept. of Karol Marcinkowski University of Medical Sciences 38 subtotal laryngectomies with larynx reconstruction were performed. They were: 34 supracricoid laryngectomies with cricohyoidopexy, 2 with epiglotohyoidopexy and 3 supraglotic laryngectomies with reconstruction. The basic criterion of the evaluation of such procedures effectiveness was their oncological radicality. The follow-up period ranged from 2 to 9 years. Local relapse was observed in none of the cases, nodal relapse was started in 2 patients. Another aspect taken into consideration was the function of the neolarynx. In 3 cases two or three laser procedures were performed because of neolarynx lumen structure which were followed by T-dren plasty. In 10 patients temporary swallowing difficulties, especially liquids, were observed in the first three month. Gastrostomy was performed in one case. The authors discuss indications to this type of surgery, operation technique, oncological and functional results. Spirometry results and voice analyses after larynx resection and reconstruction in these patients are presented.

  1. Does bariatric surgery decrease gastric cancer risk?

    PubMed

    Menéndez, Pablo; Padilla, David; Villarejo, Pedro; Menéndez, Jose M; Lora, David

    2012-01-01

    In the attempt to establish the different incidence between cancer in anatomically whole stomachs and cancer in patients who have undergone a surgical procedure for morbid obesity, a review on the epidemiology of bariatric surgery and stomach cancer and a correlation with the global incidence of stomach cancer (comparing it with the median age of patients who developed neoplasms after bariatric surgery) have been conducted. This was a descriptive study of the gastric neoplasms located at the gastric pouch, bypassed stomach or in the esophagogastric junction, following bariatric surgery described in the medical literature. Twenty-one cases of gastric neoplasm located at the gastric pouch, in the bypassed stomach or in the esophagogastric junction were described after bariatric surgery. Bariatric surgery seems to produce a decrease in the incidence of cancer when comparing obese patients who were operated and obese patients who have not, so additional studies are needed to compare the cancer incidence between the general population and patients undergoing bariatric surgery. New studies will determine if it is necessary to focus on the early detection of pathological processes at the excluded digestive tract.

  2. Worldwide practice in gastric cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Brenkman, Hylke JF; Haverkamp, Leonie; Ruurda, Jelle P; van Hillegersberg, Richard

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the current status of gastric cancer surgery worldwide. METHODS: An international cross-sectional survey on gastric cancer surgery was performed amongst international upper gastro-intestinal surgeons. All surgical members of the International Gastric Cancer Association were invited by e-mail to participate. An English web-based survey had to be filled in with regard to their surgical preferences. Questions asked included hospital volume, the use of neoadjuvant treatment, preferred surgical approach, extent of the lymphadenectomy and preferred anastomotic technique. The invitations were sent in September 2013 and the survey was closed in January 2014. RESULTS: The corresponding specific response rate was 227/615 (37%). The majority of respondents: originated from Asia (54%), performed > 21 gastrectomies per year (79%) and used neoadjuvant chemotherapy (73%). An open surgical procedure was performed by the majority of surgeons for distal gastrectomy for advanced cancer (91%) and total gastrectomy for both early and advanced cancer (52% and 94%). A minimally invasive procedure was preferred for distal gastrectomy for early cancer (65%). In Asia surgeons preferred a minimally invasive procedure for total gastrectomy for early cancer also (63%). A D1+ lymphadenectomy was preferred in early gastric cancer (52% for distal, 54% for total gastrectomy) and a D2 lymphadenectomy was preferred in advanced gastric cancer (93% for distal, 92% for total gastrectomy) CONCLUSION: Surgical preferences for gastric cancer surgery vary between surgeons worldwide. Although the majority of surgeons use neoadjuvant chemotherapy, minimally invasive techniques are still not widely adapted. PMID:27099448

  3. Improving the outcomes in gastric cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Tegels, Juul J W; De Maat, Michiel F G; Hulsewé, Karel W E; Hoofwijk, Anton G M; Stoot, Jan H M B

    2014-10-14

    Gastric cancer remains a significant health problem worldwide and surgery is currently the only potentially curative treatment option. Gastric cancer surgery is generally considered to be high risk surgery and five-year survival rates are poor, therefore a continuous strive to improve outcomes for these patients is warranted. Fortunately, in the last decades several potential advances have been introduced that intervene at various stages of the treatment process. This review provides an overview of methods implemented in pre-, intra- and postoperative stage of gastric cancer surgery to improve outcome. Better preoperative risk assessment using comorbidity index (e.g., Charlson comorbidity index), assessment of nutritional status (e.g., short nutritional assessment questionnaire, nutritional risk screening - 2002) and frailty assessment (Groningen frailty indicator, Edmonton frail scale, Hopkins frailty) was introduced. Also preoperative optimization of patients using prehabilitation has future potential. Implementation of fast-track or enhanced recovery after surgery programs is showing promising results, although future studies have to determine what the exact optimal strategy is. Introduction of laparoscopic surgery has shown improvement of results as well as optimization of lymph node dissection. Hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy has not shown to be beneficial in peritoneal metastatic disease thus far. Advances in postoperative care include optimal timing of oral diet, which has been shown to reduce hospital stay. In general, hospital volume, i.e., centralization, and clinical audits might further improve the outcome in gastric cancer surgery. In conclusion, progress has been made in improving the surgical treatment of gastric cancer. However, gastric cancer treatment is high risk surgery and many areas for future research remain.

  4. Improving the outcomes in gastric cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tegels, Juul JW; De Maat, Michiel FG; Hulsewé, Karel WE; Hoofwijk, Anton GM; Stoot, Jan HMB

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains a significant health problem worldwide and surgery is currently the only potentially curative treatment option. Gastric cancer surgery is generally considered to be high risk surgery and five-year survival rates are poor, therefore a continuous strive to improve outcomes for these patients is warranted. Fortunately, in the last decades several potential advances have been introduced that intervene at various stages of the treatment process. This review provides an overview of methods implemented in pre-, intra- and postoperative stage of gastric cancer surgery to improve outcome. Better preoperative risk assessment using comorbidity index (e.g., Charlson comorbidity index), assessment of nutritional status (e.g., short nutritional assessment questionnaire, nutritional risk screening - 2002) and frailty assessment (Groningen frailty indicator, Edmonton frail scale, Hopkins frailty) was introduced. Also preoperative optimization of patients using prehabilitation has future potential. Implementation of fast-track or enhanced recovery after surgery programs is showing promising results, although future studies have to determine what the exact optimal strategy is. Introduction of laparoscopic surgery has shown improvement of results as well as optimization of lymph node dissection. Hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy has not shown to be beneficial in peritoneal metastatic disease thus far. Advances in postoperative care include optimal timing of oral diet, which has been shown to reduce hospital stay. In general, hospital volume, i.e., centralization, and clinical audits might further improve the outcome in gastric cancer surgery. In conclusion, progress has been made in improving the surgical treatment of gastric cancer. However, gastric cancer treatment is high risk surgery and many areas for future research remain. PMID:25320507

  5. [Perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis in cancer surgery].

    PubMed

    Vilar-Compte, Diana; García-Pasquel, María José

    2011-01-01

    The effectiveness of perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis in reducing surgical site infections has been demonstrated. Its utility is recognized for clean-contaminated procedures and some clean surgeries. Prophylactic antibiotics are used as intended to cover the most common germs in the surgical site; first and second generation cephalosporins are the most used. For optimal prophylaxis, an antibiotic with a targeted spectrum should be administered at sufficiently high concentrations in serum, tissue, and the surgical wound during the time that the incision is open and risk of bacterial contamination. The infusion of the first dose of antimicrobial should begin within 60 min before surgical incision and should be discontinued within 24 h after the end of surgery The prolonged use of antibiotic prophylaxis leads to emergence of bacterial resistance and high costs. The principles of antimicrobial prophylaxis in cancer surgery are the same as those described for general surgery; it is recommended to follow and comply with the standard criteria. In mastectomies and clean head and neck surgery there are specific recommendations that differ from non-cancer surgery. In the case of very extensive surgeries, such as pelvic surgery or bone surgery with reconstruction, extension of antibiotics for 48-72 h should be considered.

  6. Anesthetic techniques and cancer recurrence after surgery.

    PubMed

    Fodale, Vincenzo; D'Arrigo, Maria G; Triolo, Stefania; Mondello, Stefania; La Torre, Domenico

    2014-01-01

    Many of the most common anesthetics are used in surgical oncology, yet effects on cancer cells are still not known. Anesthesia technique could differentially affect cancer recurrence in oncologic patients undergoing surgery, due to immunosuppression, stimulation of angiogenesis, and dissemination of residual cancer cells. Data support the use of intravenous anesthetics, such as propofol anesthesia, thanks to antitumoral protective effects inhibiting cyclooxygenase 2 and prostaglandins E2 in cancer cells, and stimulation of immunity response; a restriction in the use of volatile anesthetics; restriction in the use of opioids as they suppress humoral and cellular immunity, and their chronic use favors angiogenesis and development of metastases; use of locoregional anesthesia compared with general anesthesia, as locoregional appears to reduce cancer recurrence after surgery. However, these findings must be interpreted cautiously as there is no evidence that simple changes in the practice of anesthesia can have a positive impact on postsurgical survival of cancer patients.

  7. The Good Pain Management (GPM) Ward Program in China and its impact on Chinese cancer patients: the SYSUCC experience

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yun-Peng; Ma, Yu-Xiang; Huang, Yan; Zhao, Yuan-Yuan; Xu, Fei; Tian, Ying; Zou, Ben-Yan; Gao, Rui-Zhen; Zhang, Li

    2014-01-01

    To improve cancer pain management, the Medical Oncology Department of Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center (SYSUCC) launched the Good Pain Management (GPM) Ward Program, which has been recognized by the Chinese Ministry of Health and promoted throughout the nation. This retrospective case-control study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of the program. Patients diagnosed with malignant solid tumors with bone metastasis were eligible. Patients who were admitted 6 months before the initiation of the GPM program were used as the control group, and patients admitted 6 months after the initiation of the program were used as the GPM group. The pain-reporting rate and pain management index (PMI) were calculated. The pain levels before and after pain management were compared. A total of 475 patients (244 in the control group and 231 in the GPM group) were analyzed. The pain-reporting rate of the GPM group was significantly higher than that of the control group (62.8% vs. 37.7%, P < 0.001). The PMI of the GPM group was significantly higher than that of the control group (0.083 vs. -0.261, P < 0.001). Therefore, the GPM Ward Program improved the pain management of cancer patients and provided experience for improving cancer pain management in the future. PMID:24874643

  8. Robotic Surgery for Colon and Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun Jung; Baik, Seung Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    Robotic surgery, used generally for colorectal cancer, has the advantages of a three-dimensional surgical view, steadiness, and seven degrees of robotic arms. However, there are disadvantages, such as a decreased sense of touch, extra time needed to dock the robotic cart, and high cost. Robotic surgery is performed using various techniques, with or without laparoscopic surgery. Because the results of this approach are reported to be similar to or less favorable than those of laparoscopic surgery, the learning curve for robotic colorectal surgery remains controversial. However, according to short- and long-term oncologic outcomes, robotic colorectal surgery is feasible and safe compared with conventional surgery. Advanced technologies in robotic surgery have resulted in favorable intraoperative and perioperative clinical outcomes as well as functional outcomes. As the technical advances in robotic surgery improve surgical performance as well as outcomes, it increasingly is being regarded as a treatment option for colorectal surgery. However, a multicenter, randomized clinical trial is needed to validate this approach.

  9. Analysis of surgery for incurable gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Honguang; Chen, Wenhu; Lin, Yehua; Qin, Jiangfeng; Wang, Lifang

    2015-12-18

    It is important to evaluate the curability of and avoid unnecessary exploratory surgery for gastric cancer preoperatively. However, no related research has been reported until now. The aim of this study was to evaluate the factors influencing surgery for incurable gastric cancer. 310 cases of T3-4 gastric cancer patients were analyzed retrospectively, including 141 cases with radical surgery and 169 with surgery for incurable gastric cancer. The incurable factors were categorized as T status (unresectable T4 tumor), N status (unresectable lymph node), peritoneal metastasis, and distant metastasis. χ (2) test and logistic regression were performed to analyze the associations between curability, T status, N status, peritoneal metastasis, or distant metastasis and clinicopathological data. Esophageal involvement and T grade were associated with curability. Cardia involvement and Borrmann type were associated with T status. Esophageal involvement and T grade were associated with N status. Gastric body involvement, esophageal involvement, and T grade were associated with peritoneal metastasis. Gastric antrum involvement was associated with distant metastasis. The influencing factors of surgery for incurable gastric cancer should be analyzed preoperatively. Resectability should be evaluated according to these influencing factors combined with imaging analysis.

  10. Lung cancer surgery: an up to date

    PubMed Central

    Baltayiannis, Nikolaos; Chandrinos, Michail; Anagnostopoulos, Dimitrios; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Mpakas, Andreas; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Courcoutsakis, Nikolaos; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2013-01-01

    According to the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) GLOBOCAN World Cancer Report, lung cancer affects more than 1 million people a year worldwide. In Greece according to the 2008 GLOBOCAN report, there were 6,667 cases recorded, 18% of the total incidence of all cancers in the population. Furthermore, there were 6,402 deaths due to lung cancer, 23.5% of all deaths due to cancer. Therefore, in our country, lung cancer is the most common and deadly form of cancer for the male population. The most important prognostic indicator in lung cancer is the extent of disease. The Union Internationale Contre le Cancer (UICC) and the American Joint Committee for Cancer Staging (AJCC) developed the tumour, node, and metastases (TNM) staging system which attempts to define those patients who might be suitable for radical surgery or radical radiotherapy, from the majority, who will only be suitable for palliative measures. Surgery has an important part for the therapy of patients with lung cancer. “Lobectomy is the gold standard treatment”. This statement may be challenged in cases of stage Ia cancer or in patients with limited pulmonary function. In these cases an anatomical segmentectomy with lymph node dissection is an acceptable alternative. Chest wall invasion is not a contraindication to resection. En-bloc rib resection and reconstruction is the treatment of choice. N2 disease represents both a spectrum of disease and the interface between surgical and non-surgical treatment of lung cancer Evidence from trials suggests that multizone or unresectable N2 disease should be treated primarily by chemoradiotherapy. There may be a role for surgery if N2 is downstaged to N0 and lobectomy is possible, but pneumonectomy is avoidable. Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is considered a systemic disease at diagnosis, because the potential for hematogenous and lymphogenic metastases is very high. The efficacy of surgical intervention for SCLC is not clear. Lung cancer

  11. Laparoendoscopic single-site surgery and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liatsikos, Evangelos N.; Georgiopoulos, Ioannis; Kallidonis, Panagiotis; Stolzenburg, Jens-Uwe

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To perform a survey of the current state of laparoendoscopic single-site surgery (LESS) and its implementation in the treatment of malignant disease of the urinary tract. Although it is a recent development in the field of laparoscopic surgery with still unproven long-term results, LESS may prove to be more commonly performed in the coming years while managing urologic cancer patients. Materials and Methods: A PubMed search was conducted using the key words laparoendoscopic single-site surgery, LESS, urologic cancer. Relevant articles were reviewed for data on the management of urologic malignancy with LESS. Results: The first articles describing LESS for urologic cancers were published in 2007. Since then, published experience with this technique has increased. LESS has been implemented as an alternative to conventional laparoscopic surgery and open surgery for the treatment of major urologic cancers. The proposed advantages of LESS are the aesthetic benefit of a single incision and a quicker and less painful recovery. Disadvantages are the lack of instrument triangulation, instrument clashing and the steeper learning curve. As this is a fairly recent technical innovation, long-term functional and oncological results for LESS have not yet been published. Conclusions: LESS is a novel technical advance over conventional laparoscopic surgery, and it can be successfully used in the treatment of patients with urologic cancers. Published data support the feasibility and safety of LESS interventions for major urologic cancers, and newer data may assist in finding LESS's ultimate position among therapeutic options for patients with urologic malignancies. PMID:22557722

  12. [Resection margins in conservative breast cancer surgery].

    PubMed

    Medina Fernández, Francisco Javier; Ayllón Terán, María Dolores; Lombardo Galera, María Sagrario; Rioja Torres, Pilar; Bascuñana Estudillo, Guillermo; Rufián Peña, Sebastián

    2013-01-01

    Conservative breast cancer surgery is facing a new problem: the potential tumour involvement of resection margins. This eventuality has been closely and negatively associated with disease-free survival. Various factors may influence the likelihood of margins being affected, mostly related to the characteristics of the tumour, patient or surgical technique. In the last decade, many studies have attempted to find predictive factors for margin involvement. However, it is currently the new techniques used in the study of margins and tumour localisation that are significantly reducing reoperations in conservative breast cancer surgery. Copyright © 2012 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. New Technologies in Breast Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Thill, Marc; Baumann, Kristin

    2012-01-01

    Since breast-conserving surgery has become the gold standard for early breast cancer, the development of less radical or less burdensome technologies has been pressed for in order to preserve the patient from unnecessary harm through the operative procedure. Different technical approaches are under evaluation, and some of them are already being used in the clinical setting. The aim of this article is to present a perspective on future breast cancer surgery by shedding light on the current innovative and new techniques. PMID:24647775

  14. Combined cholecystectomy in gastric cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Lai, Shuo-Lun; Yang, Jyh-Chin; Wu, Jin-Ming; Lai, I-Rue; Chen, Chiung-Nien; Lin, Ming-Tsan; Lai, Hong-Shiee

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have described the risk factors of gallstone formation in gastric cancer patients after gastrectomy, but few studies focus on the management of asymptomatic gallstones. Our goal is to examine the rationale of simultaneous cholecystectomy during gastric cancer surgery, and influence of surgical mortality, morbidity and overall survival after combined cholecystectomy and gastrectomy. We retrospectively reviewed 445 gastric cancer patients and the gallbladders evaluated by abdominal ultrasound or computed tomography preoperatively and postoperatively. Clinicopathologic factors, including surgical morbidity, mortality and overall survival of combined surgery, were compared between patients receiving gastrectomy with simultaneous cholecystectomy and patients receiving gastrectomy only. We also evaluated the risk factors of gallstone formation after gastrectomy and the probability of subsequent cholecystectomy after gastrectomy in gastric cancer patients with or without asymptomatic gallstones. Of 445 gastric cancer patients, 52 (11.7%) patients had asymptomatic gallstones upon diagnosis of gastric cancer. Among patients with healthy gallbladders, 15.2% developed gallstones after gastrectomy. Men and older patients (age over 60) had significantly higher risk of gallstone formation. Rate of subsequent cholecystectomy in patients with and without preoperative asymptomatic gallstones was 30.8% and 4.5%, respectively (p = 0.005). The rates of mortality and morbidity were not significantly different between combined surgery (3.4%, 24.2%) and gastrectomy only (3.1%, 22%). There was also no significant difference in 5-year survival between combined surgery (61%) and gastrectomy only (63%) groups. Combined cholecystectomy for asymptomatic gallstone in gastric cancer surgery may be considered. It was not associated with increased surgical morbidity or mortality, and had no significant effect on overall survival. Copyright © 2013 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published

  15. Cancer stem cells in surgery

    PubMed Central

    D’ANDREA, V.; GUARINO, S.; DI MATTEO, F.M.; SACCÀ, M. MAUGERI; DE MARIA, R.

    2014-01-01

    The Cancer Stem Cells (CSC) hypothesis is based on three fundamental ideas: 1) the similarities in the mechanisms that regulate self-renewal of normal stem cells and cancer cells; 2) the possibility that tumour cells might arise from normal stem cells; 3) the notion that tumours might contain ‘cancer stem cells’ - rare cells with indefinite proliferative potential that drive the formation and growth of tumours. The roles for cancer stem cells have been demonstrated for some cancers, such as cancers of the hematopoietic system, breast, brain, prostate, pancreas and liver. The attractive idea about cancer stem cell hypothesis is that it could partially explain the concept of minimal residual disease. After surgical macroscopically zero residual (R0) resections, even the persistence of one single cell nestling in one of the so called “CSCs niches” could give rise to distant relapse. Furthermore the metastatic cells can remain in a “dormant status” and give rise to disease after long period of apparent disease free. These cells in many cases have acquired resistance traits to chemo and radiotherapy making adjuvant treatment vain. Clarifying the role of the cancer stem cells and their implications in the oncogenesis will play an important role in the management of cancer patient by identifying new prospective for drugs and specific markers to prevent and monitoring relapse and metastasis. The identification of the niche where the CSCs reside in a dormant status might represent a valid instrument to follow-up patients also after having obtained a R0 surgical resection. What we believe is that if new diagnostic instruments were developed specifically to identify the localization and status of activity of the CSCs during tumor dormancy, this would lead to impressive improvement in the early detection and management of relapse and metastasis. PMID:25644725

  16. Surgery for Cancer: A Trigger for Metastases.

    PubMed

    Tohme, Samer; Simmons, Richard L; Tsung, Allan

    2017-04-01

    Surgery is a crucial intervention and provides a chance of cure for patients with cancer. The perioperative period is characterized by an increased risk for accelerated growth of micrometastatic disease and increased formation of new metastatic foci. The true impact for cancer patients remains unclear. This review summarizes the often fragmentary clinical and experimental evidence supporting the role of surgery and inflammation as potential triggers for disease recurrence. Surgery induces increased shedding of cancer cells into the circulation, suppresses antitumor immunity allowing circulating cells to survive, upregulates adhesion molecules in target organs, recruits immune cells capable of entrapping tumor cells, and induces changes in the target tissue and in the cancer cells themselves to enhance migration and invasion to establish at the target site. Surgical trauma induces local and systemic inflammatory responses that can also contribute to the accelerated growth of residual and micrometastatic disease. Furthermore, we address the role of perioperative factors, including anesthesia, transfusions, hypothermia, and postoperative complications, as probable deleterious factors contributing to early recurrence. Through the admittedly limited understanding of these processes, we will attempt to provide suggestions for potential new therapeutic approaches to target the protumorigenic perioperative window and ultimately improve long-term oncological outcomes. Cancer Res; 77(7); 1548-52. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. Laparoscopic pelvic surgery for endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Tay, Eng-Hseon

    2009-02-01

    The traditional approach for the treatment of endometrial cancer by laparotomy is increasingly being replaced by laparoscopic surgery. The advantages of laparoscopy have been well-documented. Laparoscopy avoids the morbidity of a laparotomy, overcomes the limitations of vaginal hysterectomy, provides adequate pathological information for an accurate surgical staging and expedites the postoperative recovery of patients. This paper reports the outcome of a series of 50 consecutive cases of laparoscopic hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy for endometrial cancers that were performed by the author. The objective is to review the perioperative, postoperative experience and survival outcomes of patients with endometrial cancer managed by laparoscopic surgery performed by a single surgeon. The records of 50 consecutive patients with endometrial cancers from October 1995 to October 2007 treated by laparoscopic pelvic lymphadenectomy and laparoscopic hysterectomy (total and assisted) were retrospectively reviewed. Data on patients' attributes, endometrial cancers, surgical procedures, surgical complications and morbidity, perioperative experience, length of hospital stays and clinical outcome were analysed. Laparoscopic surgery was successful in all 50 patients and is clearly an option for the treatment of early endometrial cancer. Careful patient selection and surgical competency are instrumental in ensuring successful treatment.

  18. Gastric cancer following bariatric surgery: a review.

    PubMed

    Orlando, Giulio; Pilone, Vincenzo; Vitiello, Antonio; Gervasi, Rita; Lerose, Maria A; Silecchia, Gianfranco; Puzziello, Alessandro

    2014-10-01

    Bariatric procedures can induce a massive weight loss that lasts for >15 years after surgery; in addition, they achieve important metabolic effects including diabetes resolution in the majority of morbidly obese patients. However, some bariatric interventions may cause gastroesophageal reflux disease and other serious complications. The aim of our study is to evaluate the risk of cancer after bariatric surgery. We conducted a review of the literature about the cases of gastric cancer arising after any bariatric procedure, including a case of adenocarcinoma incidentally discovered by the authors 6 months after laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding. Globally, 17 case reports describing 18 patients were retrieved, including the case study by the authors. The diagnosis of tumor was at a mean of 8.6 years after bariatric surgery, 9.3 years after RYGB, and 8.1 years after restrictive procedures. The adenocarcinoma represented most cases (15 patients, 83%). In the patients with RYGB, the adenocarcinoma was localized in the excluded stomach in 5 patients (83%) and in the pouch in 1 patient (17%). After a restrictive procedure, the cancer was localized in the pouch in 5 patients (62.5%), in the pylorus in 2 patients (25%), and in lesser curvature only in 1 patient (12.5%). There is a lack of evidence about a connection between the late occurrence of gastric adenocarcinoma and the bariatric surgery. For this reason, although the preoperative upper endoscopy is still mandatory, there is no need for a regular endoscopic evaluation of patients after surgery.

  19. [Breast cancer surgery in the third millenium].

    PubMed

    Sierra García, Antonio

    2004-01-01

    Progress in health education and awareness by women of this disease, together with technical and diagnostic progresses, have contributed at the beginning of the third millenium to an earlier diagnosis and surgical treatment of breast cancer in women. In addition, a better understanding of the biology and development of this disease makes possible to achieve high cure rates with conservative surgery. This conservative surgery together wuth systematic analysis of sentinel adenopathy will allow cure in the future with only ample tumorectomies. For the few cases of advanced tumors, neoadjuvant therapies can be used; for multicentric cancers treated with total mastectomy, reconstructive surgery and prosthetic materials will be applied. Finally, progress in the understanding of genetics and advances in the field of tumor markers and receptors will help to establish indications for prophylactic syrgery in women considered at high risk for this disease.

  20. [Role of surgery in metastatic breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Medina-Franco, Heriberto; Suárez-Bobadilla, Yoli Lizbeth

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignant tumor in Mexican women and very often patients present with advanced stages. Patients with metastatic breast cancer have limited therapeutic options and the mainstay of treatment in this disease stage is systemic chemotherapy Traditionally, the role of surgery in this context is limited to symptom palliation. The increase in efficiency of chemotherapy drugs and the new endocrine and molecular targeted therapy has prolonged the life expectancy of this group of patients and has expanded surgical indications beyond palliation. Some recent institutional reports suggest increasing survival of patients who undergo resection of limited metastatic disease. On another hand, there are reports of survival benefit when the primary tumor is removed even in presence of metastatic disease. We conducted a systematic review of the literature with the objective to analyze the role of surgery in the multidisciplinary management of metastatic breast cancer in order to improve the prognosis of this increasing group of patients.

  1. Perceived uncertainty, social support and psychological adjustment in older patients with cancer being treated with surgery.

    PubMed

    Lien, Chin-Yen; Lin, Hung-Ru; Kuo, Ing-Tiau; Chen, Mei-Ling

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this longitudinal correlative study was to explore the degree, compare the differences and to detect the relationships of uncertainty, social support and psychological adjustment for older cancer patients who were undergoing surgery. While the number of the older cancer patients has been increasing, there has been little research exploring their needs with respect to psychological adjustment during cancer treatment. The study used a pre-/postdescriptive design. Purposive sampling was used to recruit 43 patients aged 65-84 from six surgery wards in a medical centre in northern Taiwan from January 2005-May 2005. Participants were interviewed one to two days prior to surgery and interviewed again one to two days before hospital discharge. Demographic data, Mishel's Uncertainty Illness Scale, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the Interpersonal Support Evaluation List were used to collect data. Uncertainty varied with cancer stage. At the time of surgery, the patients had moderate levels of uncertainty. There was a significant decrease in uncertainty at the second data collection period before hospital discharge. In these participants, anxiety was significantly associated with past medical history. The participants obtained social support from family members, physicians, nurses, relatives and other patients. Married patients had higher levels of social support than those without a spouse. Significant relationships were found among uncertainty and anxiety and depression. Interestingly, a positive relationship between anxiety and social support after surgery was also identified. Increasing levels of social support could ameliorate the degree of uncertainty, anxiety and depression in older cancer patients. Nurses should provide resources to establish an effective social network to older cancer patients who were being treated surgically. These findings can assist nurses in understanding the psychological adjustment needs among older cancer patients

  2. Surgery for advanced epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Neville F; Rao, Archana

    2017-05-01

    Cytoreductive surgery for patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer has been practised since the pioneering work of Tom Griffiths in 1975. Further research has demonstrated the prognostic significance of the extent of metastatic disease pre-operatively, and of complete cytoreduction post-operatively. Patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer should be referred to high volume cancer units, and managed by multidisciplinary teams. The role of thoracoscopy and resection of intrathoracic disease is presently investigational. In recent years, there has been increasing use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and interval cytoreductive surgery in patients with poor performance status, which is usually due to large volume ascites and/or large pleural effusions. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy reduces the post-operative morbidity, but if the tumour responds well to the chemotherapy, the inflammatory response makes the surgery more difficult. Post-operative morbidity is generally tolerable, but increases in older patients, and in those having multiple, aggressive surgical procedures, such as bowel resection or diaphragmatic stripping. Primary cytoreductive surgery should be regarded as the gold standard for most patients until a test is developed which would allow the prediction of platinum resistance pre-operatively. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Combined surgery and photodynamic therapy of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douplik, Alexandre

    According to the recent guidelines, the gold standard is resecting an extra 0.5-3 cm beyond the lesion margins that are visually detected and/or biopsy confirmed depending on type of malignancy and its localisation to avoid missing the residuals of the tumour. Often, such a large resection leads to dysfunctions of the organ or tissues, which underwent the surgery. In some cases, an extra tumour-free margin cannot be achieved because of tumour proximity to vital sites such as major vascular or nerve structures. Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) is an emerging clinical modality to locally destroy cancer lesions selectively. The limitation of photodynamic therapy is the curable depth of an order of one centimetre or less. A combination of cancer surgery following by PDT can bring a benefit to reduce the resection and minimise the impact on the organ or tissue functionality. Combination of cancer surgery and photodynamic therapy provides another opportunity-fluorescence image guidance of cancer removal. Most of the photosensitizers intensively fluoresce and hence facilitate a strong fluorescence contrast versus healthy adjacent tissues.

  4. Body image concerns after colorectal cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Claire

    Body image is understood to be a person's perception of his or her own physical appearance although, as this article highlights, it embraces a greater range of bodily attributes than is often appreciated. It can be significantly affected by a diagnosis of colorectal cancer and subsequent treatment, which may modify the way the body looks, feels and functions. One of the major aesthetic and functional consequences of colorectal cancer surgery is the possibility of stoma formation, which is of particular concern to many. However, the range of other bodily effects following surgery should not be overlooked, not least because of they may result in distress. While concerns about changes in body image generally decrease over time, people recovering from cancer treatment often feel their relationship with their body has been permanently altered. Specialist support is often required when adjusting to any changes in bodily appearance and function. Care outcomes can be improved by having a sound understanding of the body image concerns likely to arise following treatment, as well as the skills to identify and support patients at risk of altered body image. This article provides guidance to nurses caring for individuals who may be experiencing distress over how their body is now perceived by themselves and others following colorectal cancer surgery.

  5. Robotic Surgery for Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ambrogi, Marcello C; Fanucchi, Olivia; Melfi, Franco; Mussi, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    During the last decade the role of minimally invasive surgery has been increased, especially with the introduction of the robotic system in the surgical field. The most important advantages of robotic system are represented by the wristed instrumentation and the depth perception, which can overcome the limitation of traditional thoracoscopy. However, some data still exist in literature with regard to robotic lobectomy. The majority of papers are focused on its safety and feasibility, but further studies with long follow-ups are necessary in order to assess the oncologic outcomes. We reviewed the literature on robotic lobectomy, with the main aim to better define the role of robotic system in the clinical practice. PMID:25207216

  6. Minimally invasive surgery in cancer. Immunological response.

    PubMed

    Bobocea, A C; Trandafir, B; Bolca, C; Cordoş, I

    2012-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery produced major changes in treating abdominal malignancies and early stage lung cancer. Laparoscopy and thoracoscopy are less traumatic than open surgery: allow faster recovery, shorter hospital stay, better cosmesis. Although these clinical benefits are important, prolonged disease-free interval, long-term survival with improved quality of life are most important endpoints for oncologic surgery. Major surgery causes significant alteration of immunological response, of particular importance in oncologic patients, as postoperative immunosuppression has been related to septic complications, lower survival rate, tumor spread and metastases. Clinical studies have shown laparoscopic surgery preserves better the patient's immunological function. Postoperative plasma peak concentrations of IL-6, IL-10, C-reactive protein (CRP) and TNF-alpha were lower after laparoscopic colonic resection. Prospective thoracoscopic VATS lobectomy trials found better preservation of lymphocyte T-cell function and quicker return of proliferative responses to normal, lower levels of CRP, thromboxane and prostacyclin. Immune function is influenced by the extent of surgical trauma. Minimally invasive surgery show reduced acute-phase responses compared with open procedures and better preservation of cellular immune mechanisms.

  7. Organ preservation surgery for laryngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Sharad; Carney, Andrew Simon

    2009-01-01

    The principles of management of the laryngeal cancer have evolved over the recent past with emphasis on organ preservation. These developments have paralleled technological advancements as well as refinement in the surgical technique. The surgeons are able to maintain physiological functions of larynx namely speech, respiration and swallowing without compromising the loco-regional control of cancer in comparison to the more radical treatment modalities. A large number of organ preservation surgeries are available to the surgeon; however, careful assessment of the stage of the cancer and selection of the patient is paramount to a successful outcome. A comprehensive review of various organ preservation techniques in vogue for the management of laryngeal cancer is presented. PMID:19442314

  8. Transoral robotic surgery for larynx cancer.

    PubMed

    Smith, Richard V

    2014-06-01

    Transoral robotic surgery (TORS) has become increasingly used to manage laryngeal and pharyngeal cancers, although the published experience in the larynx is small. Although there is burgeoning use of TORS for primary pharyngeal cancer, its application in the larynx is currently more limited. Successful TORS of the larynx has been predominantly as supraglottic laryngectomy, although there is some experience in total laryngectomy and cordectomy. Limitations of TORS of the larynx are primarily those of access and instrumentation, with respect to both the surgical robot and the retractors used to access the larynx transorally. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Medicolegal aspects of esophageal cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    De Giorgio, Fabio

    2005-01-01

    Forensic implications of esophageal cancer surgery are varied and complex depending on the field of specialization involved i.e. civil law, criminal law, insurance or social security and for the distinct probative requirements related to each field. The aim of this article is to reconstruct the logical procedure of a forensic doctor who actually examines a practical case to establish the profiles of professional responsibility in particular in civil or criminal law.

  10. Minimally Invasive Colorectal Cancer Surgery in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Babaei, Masoud; Balavarca, Yesilda; Jansen, Lina; Gondos, Adam; Lemmens, Valery; Sjövall, Annika; B⊘rge Johannesen, Tom; Moreau, Michel; Gabriel, Liberale; Gonçalves, Ana Filipa; Bento, Maria José; van de Velde, Tony; Kempfer, Lana Raffaela; Becker, Nikolaus; Ulrich, Alexis; Ulrich, Cornelia M.; Schrotz-King, Petra; Brenner, Hermann

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) of colorectal cancer (CRC) was first introduced over 20 years ago and recently has gained increasing acceptance and usage beyond clinical trials. However, data on dissemination of the method across countries and on long-term outcomes are still sparse. In the context of a European collaborative study, a total of 112,023 CRC cases from 3 population-based (N = 109,695) and 4 institute-based clinical cancer registries (N = 2328) were studied and compared on the utilization of MIS versus open surgery. Cox regression models were applied to study associations between surgery type and survival of patients from the population-based registries. The study considered adjustment for potential confounders. The percentage of CRC patients undergoing MIS differed substantially between centers and generally increased over time. MIS was significantly less often used in stage II to IV colon cancer compared with stage I in most centers. MIS tended to be less often used in older (70+) than in younger colon cancer patients. MIS tended to be more often used in women than in men with rectal cancer. MIS was associated with significantly reduced mortality among colon cancer patients in the Netherlands (hazard ratio [HR] 0.66, 95% confidence interval [CI] (0.63–0.69), Sweden (HR 0.68, 95% CI 0.60–0.76), and Norway (HR 0.73, 95% CI 0.67–0.79). Likewise, MIS was associated with reduced mortality of rectal cancer patients in the Netherlands (HR 0.74, 95% CI 0.68–0.80) and Sweden (HR 0.77, 95% CI 0.66–0.90). Utilization of MIS in CRC resection is increasing, but large variation between European countries and clinical centers prevails. Our results support association of MIS with substantially enhanced survival among colon cancer patients. Further studies controlling for selection bias and residual confounding are needed to establish role of MIS in survival of patients. PMID:27258522

  11. Vitamin D deficiency in patients admitted to the general ward with breast, lung, and colorectal cancer in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Marina; Manzano, Natalia; Salas, Yésica; Angel, Martín; Díaz-Couselo, Fernando A; Zylberman, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    A high prevalence of hypovitaminosis D has been reported in cancer patients. Low levels of 25-(OH)-vitamin D were found in 158 of 162 (97.5%) inpatients with breast, lung, and colorectal cancer under active treatment, with severe deficiency (<20 ng/ml) in 77.2% and mild deficiency (20-30 ng/ml) in 20.4%. A high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency has been reported in cancer patients. Nevertheless, vitamin D serum levels have been checked in few patients. Information about the frequency of hypovitaminosis D in cancer patients in Argentina is unknown. The aim of the study was to assess the frequency of vitamin D deficiency in patients with breast, lung, and colorectal cancer. A prospective observational study was designed for cancer patients admitted to the general ward in 2014. The patients included had breast, lung, and colorectal cancer. All of them were under active treatment. The serum level of 25-(OH)-vitamin D [25-(OH)-D] was measured and categorized as sufficiency (>30 ng/ml), mild deficiency (20-30 ng/ml), and severe deficiency (<20 ng/ml). A total of 162 patients were included, 98.2% were in stages III-IV. Median level of 25-(OH)-D was 15.3 ng/ml (range 4.1-103.6 ng/ml). Serum levels <30 ng/ml were found in 158 (97.5%) patients, severe deficiency in 125 cases (77.2%) and mild deficiency in 33 cases (20.4%). In patients under chemo/hormone therapy, the median level was 15.3 ng/ml (range 4.1-103.6 ng/ml) and in those under concurrent therapy was 17.1 ng/ml (range 7.4-58.5 ng/ml); p = 0.1944. There were no statistical differences in severe or mild deficiency of vitamin D among breast, lung, and colorectal cancer patients. The study found a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in hospitalized cancer patients under active treatment. Many authors have recommended dosing vitamin D levels in this population; normalizing serum levels is difficult.

  12. Transanal endoscopic surgery in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Serra-Aracil, Xavier; Mora-Lopez, Laura; Alcantara-Moral, Manel; Caro-Tarrago, Aleidis; Gomez-Diaz, Carlos Javier; Navarro-Soto, Salvador

    2014-09-07

    Total mesorectal excision (TME) is the standard treatment for rectal cancer, but complications are frequent and rates of morbidity, mortality and genitourinary alterations are high. Transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) allows preservation of the anal sphincters and, via its vision system through a rectoscope, allows access to rectal tumors located as far as 20 cm from the anal verge. The capacity of local surgery to cure rectal cancer depends on the risk of lymph node invasion. This means that correct preoperative staging of the rectal tumor is necessary. Currently, local surgery is indicated for rectal adenomas and adenocarcinomas invading the submucosa, but not beyond (T1). Here we describe the standard technique for TEM, the different types of equipment used, and the technical limitations of this approach. TEM to remove rectal adenoma should be performed in the same way as if the lesion were an adenocarcinoma, due to the high percentage of infiltrating adenocarcinomas in these lesions. In spite of the generally good results with T1, some authors have published surprisingly high recurrence rates; this is due to the existence of two types of lesions, tumors with good and poor prognosis, divided according to histological and surgical factors. The standard treatment for rectal adenocarcinoma T2N0M0 is TME without adjuvant therapy. In this type of adenocarcinoma, local surgery obtains the best results when complete pathological response has been achieved with previous chemoradiotherapy. The results with chemoradiotherapy and TEM are encouraging, but the scientific evidence remains limited at present.

  13. Changing Trends in Gastric Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Özer, İlter; Bostancı, Erdal Birol; Ulaş, Murat; Özoğul, Yusuf; Akoğlu, Musa

    2017-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer-related death. It requires multimodal treatment and surgery is the most effective treatment modality. Radical surgery includes total or subtotal gastrectomy with lymph node dissection. The extent of lymphadenectomy still remains controversial. Eastern surgeons have performed D2 or more extended lymphadenectomy while their Western colleagues have performed more limited lymph node dissection. However, the trend has been changing in favour of D2 lymph node dissection in both hemispheres. Currently, D2 is the recommended type of lymphadenectomy in experienced centres in the west. In Japan, D2 lymph node dissection is the standard surgical approach. More extensive lymphadenectomy than D2 has not been found to be associated with improved survival and generally is not performed. Bursectomy and splenectomy are additional controversial issues in surgical performance, and trends regarding them will be discussed. The performance of bursectomy is controversial and there is no clear evidence of its clinical benefit. However, a trend toward better survival in patients with serosal invasion has been reported. Routine splenectomy as a part of lymph node dissection has largely been abandoned, although splenectomy is recommended in selected cases. Minimally invasive surgery has gained wide popularity and indications for minimally invasive procedures have been expanding due to increasing experience and improving technology. Neoadjuvant therapy has been shown to have beneficial effects and seems necessary to provide a survival benefit. Diagnostic laparoscopy should be kept in mind prior to treatment. PMID:28251018

  14. Surgery for lung cancer invading the mediastinum

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ayoubi, Adnan M.

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer infiltrating the mediastinum is a subset of locally advanced lung tumors for which surgery is not routinely offered. Radical operations that involve removal of adjacent mediastinal structures to obtain free margins may provide a realistic cure. Such extended resections are typically reserved to highly motivated patients seeking more aggressive management, and are only offered following complete evaluation on a case-by-case basis. Positive prognosis depends on complete R0 resection and lack of mediastinal nodal metastases. Careful and exhaustive preoperative planning as well as surgical expertise cannot be overemphasized for successful surgical outcomes. Here we provide a brief summary of the literature as well as our own experience managing these rare and sometimes challenging surgeries. PMID:27942411

  15. Improving patient education by an in-service communication training for health care providers at a cancer ward: communication climate, patient satisfaction and the need of lasting implementation.

    PubMed

    Visser, Adriaan; Wysmans, Michel

    2010-03-01

    To show the effects of an in-service communication training for health care providers at a cancer ward, to improve the quality and quantity of the patient education, and patient satisfaction with the care received. A 3-year in-service communication training was held at a cancer ward. Pre- and post-data were collected about the quality and quantity of the communication of nurses, physicians and other health care providers (HCPs) towards patients and colleagues (n=22) as well as the satisfaction of the patients with the quality of care (n=90). The communication training raised significantly the quality and quantity of the communication towards patients and with colleagues. Also patient satisfaction with the quality of care increased. However, the long-term implementation of the benefits was proved disappointing. In-service communication training is an important means for the long-term improvement of the quality of patient education at nursing departments in hospitals. Lasting implementation of the benefits however requires attention to organizational obstacles, budgetary conditions, leadership factors at the ward, and the application of an organizationally oriented theoretical framework. Improvement of patient education at nursing wards does not only require educational means, organizational facilities and professional training, but can be improved too by in-service communication training, which increases the quality of the patient-centered care. An organizational oriented change-strategy is needed to ensure the implementation produces lasting effects. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Design of patient rooms and automatic radioiodine-131 waste water management system for a thyroid cancer treatment ward: 'Suandok Model'.

    PubMed

    Vilasdechanon, N; Ua-Apisitwong, S; Chatnampet, K; Ekmahachai, M; Vilasdechanon, J

    2014-09-01

    The great benefit of (131)I radionuclide treatment for differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) was acknowledged by the long survival rate. The main requirements for (131)I therapy in hospital were treatment facilities and a radiation safety plan that assured radiation protection and safety to patient, hospital worker, public, and environment. To introduce the concepts and methods of radiation safety design for a patient's room in a (131)I treatment ward and a system of radioactive waste water management in hospital. The design was based on principles of external and internal radiation protection for unsealed source and radioactive waste management. Planning for treatment facilities was concluded from clinical evidence, physical and physiological information for (131)I, radiation safety criteria, hospital resources and budget. The three phases of the working process were: construction, software development, and radiation safety assessment. The (131)I treatment facility and automatic radioactive waste water management system was completely implemented in 2009. The radiation waste water management system known as the 'Suandok Model' was highly recommended by the national regulator to hospitals who desire to provide (131)I treatment for thyroid cancer. In 2011, the Nuclear Medicine Division, Chiang Mai University was rewarded by the national authority for a very good radiation practice in development of safe working conditions and environment. The Suandok Model was a facility design that fulfilled requirements for the safe use of high radiation (131)I doses for thyroid cancer treatment in hospital. The facility presented in this study may not be suitable for all hospitals but the design concepts could be applied according to an individual hospital context and resources. People who use or gain benefit from radiation applications have to emphasise the responsibility to control and monitor radiation effects on individuals, communities and the environment.

  17. Pancreatic cancer surgery: past, present, and future

    PubMed Central

    Poruk, Katherine E.

    2015-01-01

    The history of pancreatic cancer surgery, though fraught with failure and setbacks, is punctuated by periods of incremental progress dependent upon the state of the art and the mettle of the surgeons daring enough to attempt it. Surgical anesthesia and the aseptic techniques developed during the latter half of the 19th century were instrumental in establishing a viable setting for pancreatic surgery to develop. Together, they allowed for bolder interventions and improved survival through the post-operative period. Surgical management began with palliative procedures to address biliary obstruction in advanced disease. By the turn of the century, surgical pioneers such as Alessandro Codivilla and Walther Kausch were demonstrating the technical feasibility of pancreatic head resections and applying principles learned from palliation to perform complicated anatomical reconstructions. Allen O. Whipple, the namesake of the pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD), was the first to take a systematic approach to refining the procedure. Perhaps his greatest contribution was sparking a renewed interest in the surgical management of periampullary cancers and engendering a community of surgeons who advanced the field through their collective efforts. Though the work of Whipple and his contemporaries legitimized PD as an accepted surgical option, it was the establishment of high-volume centers of excellence and a multidisciplinary approach in the later decades of the 20th century that made it a viable surgical option. Today, pancreatic surgeons are experimenting with minimally invasive surgical techniques, expanding indications for resection, and investigating new methods for screening and early detection. In the future, the effective management of pancreatic cancer will depend upon our ability to reliably detect the earliest cancers and precursor lesions to allow for truly curative resections. PMID:26361403

  18. Delaying Chemo After Lung Cancer Surgery? Better Late Than Never

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_162926.html Delaying Chemo After Lung Cancer Surgery? Better Late Than Never Patient recovery may ... 6, 2017 FRIDAY, Jan. 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Lung cancer chemotherapy that's been delayed due to slow recovery ...

  19. Increased risk of colorectal cancer after obesity surgery.

    PubMed

    Derogar, Maryam; Hull, Mark A; Kant, Prashant; Östlund, Magdalena; Lu, Yunxia; Lagergren, Jesper

    2013-12-01

    The purpose was to determine whether obesity surgery is associated with a long-term increased risk of colorectal cancer. Long-term cancer risk after obesity surgery is not well characterized. Preliminary epidemiological observations and human tissue biomarker studies recently suggested an increased risk of colorectal cancer after obesity surgery. A nationwide retrospective register-based cohort study in Sweden was conducted in 1980-2009. The long-term risk of colorectal cancer in patients who underwent obesity surgery, and in an obese no surgery cohort, was compared with that of the age-, sex- and calendar year-matched general background population between 1980 and 2009. Obese individuals were stratified into an obesity surgery cohort and an obese no surgery cohort. The standardized incidence ratio (SIR), with 95% confidence interval (CI), was calculated. Of 77,111 obese patients, 15,095 constituted the obesity surgery cohort and 62,016 constituted the obese no surgery cohort. In the obesity surgery cohort, we observed 70 patients with colorectal cancer, rendering an overall SIR of 1.60 (95% CI 1.25-2.02). The SIR for colorectal cancer increased with length of time after surgery, with a SIR of 2.00 (95% CI 1.48-2.64) after 10 years or more. In contrast, the overall SIR in the obese no surgery cohort (containing 373 colorectal cancers) was 1.26 (95% CI 1.14-1.40) and remained stable with increasing follow-up time. Obesity surgery seems to be associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer over time. These findings would prompt evaluation of colonoscopy surveillance for the increasingly large population who undergo obesity surgery.

  20. The Thoracic Surgery Service at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

    PubMed

    Rusch, Valerie W

    2015-01-01

    The development of the Thoracic Surgery Service at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center paralleled the emergence of Thoracic Surgery as a specialty, but with the unique focus on oncology and multidisciplinary cancer care characteristic of the institution. From the early post-war years treating lung cancer with new surgical techniques, through early definitive work in malignant mesothelioma, to today's translational research in cancer biology, the Thoracic Surgery Service continues to be an international leader in educating surgeons in thoracic surgical oncology, conducting clinical trials, and developing innovative therapies to treat thoracic cancers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. [Volumes of lymphadenectomy in gastric cancer surgery].

    PubMed

    Cherniavskiĭ, A A; Lavrov, N A

    2015-01-01

    It is summarized an experience of 1528 resections for gastric cancer supplemented by D1-, D2-, D2,5- and D3-lymphadenectomy in 751, 241, 359 and 177 patients resrectively. Unconventional type D2.5 means D2-lymphodis section with additional lymphadenectomy along hepatoduodenal ligament and superior retropancreatic nodes as well as omental bursa removal with lymphodis section of esophageal opening crura. Analysis of immediate and remote results is presented. It is concluded that D3-lymphadenectomy is minimally preferred over D2.5-type in gastric cancer staging. D3-lymphodis section has the largest number of especially purulent and pancreatogenic postoperative complications. D2.5-lymphadenectomy significantly increases 5-year survival in comparison with D2-lymphodis section (from 51.2 ± 4.9 to 64.0 ± 4.1%; p<0.001) and may be chosen for any radical surgery for gastric cancer including early forms. Localized proximal tumors which are in distinctive for metastasis into hepatoduodenal ligament lymph nodes are exception. D3-lymphodis section did not impact on survival in comparison with D2,5-lymphadenectomy. Only patients with antral cancer after distal subtotal gastric resection had 5-year survival increasing on 8 % (from 60.6 ± 7.5 to 68.5 ± 6.3%).

  2. Probe-guided surgery for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lechner, P; Lind, P; Snyder, M; Haushofer, H

    2000-01-01

    Anti-CEA-scintigraphy turned out to be very reliable in detecting primary and recurrent colorectal cancer, its overall accuracy being more than 90%. The intraoperative application of this technology should provide similar results when focussing at extrahepatic tumor deposits, for example in lymph nodes, thus allowing accurate staging of the underlying disease. To test this hypothesis we launched the following feasibility study the results of which are compared to those reported in the recent literature. We investigated 20 patients, six with rectum and 14 with colon cancer. 24 hours before surgery they were intravenously given 1 ml of a fab'-fragment-antibody to CEA, labeled with 25 mCi of 99mTc (CEA-Scan). During surgery the radioactivity in lymph glands regional to the tumors was measured and compared to the much lower activity in healthy nodes. For this we used a scintillation probe (C-Trak, Care Wise, Inc., Morgan Hill, CA). All lymph nodes of interest were then excised and submitted to frozen section pathology. In 7 out of 20 cases scintimetry led to an up-staging of the disease. In addition we found metastatic spread to lymph nodes that were basically not regional to the primary tumor (retroperitoneum, renal hilum etc.). Scintimetry can precisely identify even very small tumor deposits. So it leads to accurate staging while surgery is still ongoing. In a further step the concept of sentinel node diagnosis, which is right now being clinically evaluated, may some day be applied in colorectal surgical oncology.

  3. Influence of obesity and bariatric surgery on gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dantas, Anna Carolina Batista; Santo, Marco Aurelio; de Cleva, Roberto; Sallum, Rubens Antônio Aissar; Cecconello, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal and gastric cancer (GC) are related to obesity and bariatric surgery. Risk factors, such as gastroesophageal reflux and Helicobacter pylori, must be investigated and treated in obese population. After surgery, GC reports are anecdotal and treatment is not standardized. This review aims to discuss GC related to obesity before and after bariatric surgery. PMID:27458534

  4. Influence of obesity and bariatric surgery on gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Dantas, Anna Carolina Batista; Santo, Marco Aurelio; de Cleva, Roberto; Sallum, Rubens Antônio Aissar; Cecconello, Ivan

    2016-06-01

    Esophageal and gastric cancer (GC) are related to obesity and bariatric surgery. Risk factors, such as gastroesophageal reflux and Helicobacter pylori, must be investigated and treated in obese population. After surgery, GC reports are anecdotal and treatment is not standardized. This review aims to discuss GC related to obesity before and after bariatric surgery.

  5. Nurses Exploring the Spirituality of Their Patients With Cancer: Participant Observation on a Medical Oncology Ward.

    PubMed

    van Meurs, Jacqueline; Smeets, Wim; Vissers, Kris C P; Groot, Marieke; Engels, Yvonne

    2017-07-19

    Attention for spirituality should be an integral part of professionals' caregiving. Particularly, nurses caring for patients with cancer might have opportunities to give attention to this dimension. The aim of this study was to gain insight in the way and extent to which nurses during daily caregiving observe and explore spiritual issues of hospitalized patients with cancer. We performed an ethnographic study with participant observation. Data were collected in 2015 during 4 shifts at the medical oncology department of a university hospital. The researcher, a spiritual care provider (chaplain) wearing the same kind of uniform as the nurses, observed the nurses, participated in their actions, and interviewed them after the shift. Although the patients did send many implicit and explicit messages concerning spiritual issues, the nurses did not explore them. If noticed, 3 barriers for exploring spiritual issues were mentioned by the nurses: lack of time, conflict with their mindset, and being reserved to talk about such issues. During their daily caregiving to patients with a life-threatening illness, nurses have many opportunities to explore spiritual issues, but they do not often recognize them. If they do, they tend not to explore the spiritual issues. Communication training for nurses is necessary to develop skills for exploring the spiritual dimension in patients with cancer. In such training, attention to the misconception that such a conversation requires a lot of time and for recognizing signals from patients inviting an exploration of their concerns is necessary.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.

  6. Thromboembolic events following surgery for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Van Hemelrijck, Mieke; Garmo, Hans; Holmberg, Lars; Bill-Axelson, Anna; Carlsson, Stefan; Akre, Olof; Stattin, Pär; Adolfsson, Jan

    2013-02-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) and surgery are both associated with increased risk of thromboembolic diseases (TED). We assessed risk of TED among men undergoing different types of urologic surgery. Using the Prostate Cancer Database Sweden (PCBaSe) Sweden, we identified all men (n=45 065) undergoing pelvic lymph node dissection (PLND), radical prostatectomy (RP) with or without PLND, orchiectomy due to PCa, or a transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). We identified a comparison cohort from the population. Main outcomes were deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) as primary diagnoses in the National Patient Register or Cause of Death Register (2002-2010). We calculated hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) using multivariable Cox proportional hazards models. All surgical procedures were associated with increased risk of TED; laparoscopic and open RP with a PLND were the most strongly associated with TED (HR for PE: 8.1 [95% CI, 2.9-23.0] and 7.8 [95% CI, 4.9-13], respectively). For surgery including a PLND, the risk increased during the second half of the first postoperative month. The HR for PE after TURP in men with PCa was 3.0 (95% CI, 1.8-5.1). Patients with a history of TED had a strongly increased risk of TED (HR for DVT: 4.5; 95% CI, 2.6-8.0). A limitation is lack of information on TED prophylaxis, but its use was standardized during the study period for RP and PLND. Other limitations are lack of information on extent of PLND and lifestyle factors. Surgeries for PCa, including TURP, are associated with hospitalization for TED. Patients with a history of TED and patients undergoing a PLND were at highest risk. The largest risk was observed from days 14 to 28 postoperatively. Thus, our results suggest that prophylactic measures may be beneficial during the first 4 wk in these patients. Copyright © 2012 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Recent advances in surgery for head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    de Bree, Remco; Leemans, Charles René

    2010-05-01

    This paper reviews the advances in surgery in head and neck cancer patients. Sentinel node biopsy is a promising diagnostic technique to detect occult lymph node metastases, especially in oral carcinomas. Fludeoxyglucose-PET seems to be useful in detecting recurrent (laryngeal) carcinoma after radiotherapy. The role of fludeoxyglucose-PET to detect residual disease in the neck after radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy is not yet clear. The armamentarium of reconstructive surgery is still expanding. Endonasal endoscopic, robotic surgery and image-guided surgery are used as minimal invasive surgery in selected patients. Other advances include photodynamic therapy, ultrasonic surgery and mechanical sutures. New diagnostic techniques are used to avoid futile extensive surgery. Technical improvements have been made to treat head and neck cancer patients with minimal invasive surgery. Large prospective trials are needed to determine the indications for each technique.

  8. Prevalence and treatment of cancer pain in Italian oncological wards centres: a cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Mercadante, Sebastiano; Roila, Fausto; Berretto, Oscar; Labianca, Roberto; Casilini, Stefania

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this national cross-sectional survey was to draw information on pain prevalence and intensity from a large sample of patients who were admitted to oncologic centres for different reasons and to evaluate the pain treatment and possible influencing factors. A total of 2,655 patients completed the study. Nine hundred and one patients (34%) reported pain. Higher pain levels were observed in inpatients, in the presence of bone metastases, and with low levels of Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group status. The number of patients receiving strong opioids increased with the highest levels of pain. However, a significant part of patients with moderate-severe pain were not receiving appropriate medication, patients being predominantly administered non-opioid drugs. General practitioners' attitudes did not negatively influence the opioid prescription. The results of this survey indicate a need for continuing educational and informative program in pain management for oncologists and more generally for any physician dealing with cancer patients.

  9. Port-site metastasis after laparoscopic surgery for gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Emoto, Shigenobu; Ishigami, Hironori; Yamaguchi, Hironori; Ishihara, Soichiro; Sunami, Eiji; Kitayama, Joji; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2017-03-01

    Although the incidence of port-site metastasis after laparoscopic surgery for colorectal cancer has markedly decreased since laparoscopic colectomy was first reported in 1991, it still has not reached zero. In colorectal cancer, the safety of laparoscopic surgery, including the low incidence of port-site metastasis, has been proven in large, randomized trials. In gastric cancer, reports of port-site metastasis are extremely rare, but we should await the results of ongoing trials. This brief review summarizes the current knowledge regarding port-site metastasis after laparoscopic surgery for colorectal and gastric cancer.

  10. Robotic surgery for gastric cancer: a technical review.

    PubMed

    Hyung, Woo Jin; Woo, Yanghee; Noh, Sung Hoon

    2011-12-01

    Minimally invasive gastric cancer surgery is gaining acceptance, especially in the treatment of patients with early gastric cancer. While offering patients the benefits of minimally invasive surgery, laparoscopic surgery is limited by several disadvantages such as altered operating view and lack of versatility in surgical instrumentation. Robotic surgery offers the surgeon the benefit of superior 3D visualization, the freedom of the EndoWrist function, and the tremble-filtered control of the four robotic arms. Due to the technical advantages of the robotic surgical system, robotic surgery may facilitate the expansion of minimally invasive surgery over laparoscopy. The application of robotic surgery for gastric cancer is increasing in experienced centers. Most reports of the robotic operating methods are only slightly modified from the laparoscopic technique. Robotic gastric cancer surgery including radical subtotal gastrectomy with D2 lymph node dissection is technically feasible and safe and results in similar short-term postoperative outcomes when compared to laparoscopic surgery. The role of robotic surgery in gastric cancer is promising but awaits further comparative studies of long-term results and cost-effectiveness.

  11. Recent advances in robotic surgery for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Soichiro; Otani, Kensuke; Yasuda, Koji; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Tanaka, Junichiro; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Hata, Keisuke; Kawai, Kazushige; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Kazama, Shinsuke; Yamaguchi, Hironori; Sunami, Eiji; Kitayama, Joji; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2015-08-01

    Robotic technology, which has recently been introduced to the field of surgery, is expected to be useful, particularly in treating rectal cancer where precise manipulation is necessary in the confined pelvic cavity. Robotic surgery overcomes the technical drawbacks inherent to laparoscopic surgery for rectal cancer through the use of multi-articulated flexible tools, three-dimensional stable camera platforms, tremor filtering and motion scaling functions, and greater ergonomic and intuitive device manipulation. Assessments of the feasibility and safety of robotic surgery for rectal cancer have reported similar operation times, blood loss during surgery, rates of postoperative morbidity, and circumferential resection margin involvement when compared with laparoscopic surgery. Furthermore, rates of conversion to open surgery are reportedly lower with increased urinary and male sexual functions in the early postoperative period compared with laparoscopic surgery, demonstrating the technical advantages of robotic surgery for rectal cancer. However, long-term outcomes and the cost-effectiveness of robotic surgery for rectal cancer have not been fully evaluated yet; therefore, large-scale clinical studies are required to evaluate the efficacy of this new technology.

  12. Penile rehabilitation after pelvic cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Aoun, Fouad; Peltier, Alexandre; van Velthoven, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction is the most common complication after pelvic radical surgery. Rehabilitation programs are increasingly being used in clinical practice but there is no high level of evidence supporting its efficacy. The principle of early penile rehabilitation stems from animal studies showing early histological and molecular changes associated with penile corporal hypoxia after cavernous nerve injury. The concept of early penile rehabilitation was developed in late nineties with a subsequent number of clinical studies supporting early pharmacologic penile rehabilitation. These studies included all available phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors, intracavernosal injection and intraurethral use of prostaglandin E1 and to lesser extent vacuum erectile devices. However, these studies are of small number, difficult to interpret, and often with no control group. Furthermore, no studies have proven an in vivo derangement of endothelial or smooth muscle cell metabolism secondary to a prolonged flaccid state. The purpose of the present report is a synthetic overview of the literature in order to analyze the concept and the rationale of rehabilitation program of erectile dysfunction following radical pelvic surgery and the evidence of such programs in clinical practice. Emphasis will be placed on penile rehabilitation programs after radical cystoprostatectomy, radical prostatectomy, and rectal cancer treatment. Future perspectives are also analyzed.

  13. The role of surgery in the treatment of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Marschke, P S

    2001-05-01

    To describe the role of surgery in the treatment of organ-confined prostate cancer and advanced prostate cancer. Journals, textbooks, and personal communication. Radical prostatectomy plays a possible role in curing those patients with disease confined to the prostate. Bilateral orchiectomy plays a palliative role for patients with advanced disease. This article provides nurses with the knowledge needed to teach patients about how the surgery is performed, the associated complications, and the likelihood of cancer control.

  14. [Optimal surgery for breast cancer elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Lin, Yan; Sun, Qiang; Guan, Heng; Zhou, Wei-xun; Xu, Ying; Wang, Bin

    2012-12-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of optimal surgery for breast cancer in elderly patients. The clinical data of 481 patients aged 70 years and above who were treated in our hospital from 1995 to 2009 were retrospectively analyzed. Based on their general conditions and clinical stages, 481 patients were divided into three groups to received different surgical procedures including modified radical mastectomy (MRM group, n=256), tumor extended resection (ER group, n=173), and simple mastectomy (SM group, n=52). The overall 5-and 10-year survival rates were 63.77%and 46.71%, respectively, and the 5-year (p=0.956) and 10-year (p=0.977) survival rates were not significantly among these three groups. However, patients in the ER group had significantly shorter hospital stay, smaller surgical wound, earlier recovery and less complications. It is feasible for female breast cancer patients over 70 years old choose the optimal surgical procedures according to their general conditions and clinical stages.

  15. Cosmetic surgery prior to diagnosis of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Panjari, M; Bell, R J; Fradkin, P; Davis, S R

    2012-04-01

    Cosmetic breast surgery is amongst the top five most commonly performed cosmetic surgical procedures. With breast cancer being the most common non-skin malignancy in women, the likelihood that a woman undergoing cosmetic breast surgery may have an occult breast cancer needs to be considered. Most of the available data pertaining to breast cancer diagnosis in the setting of cosmetic surgery are from studies of cosmetic breast surgery populations. We report on the prevalence of breast cancer as an incidental finding during cosmetic breast surgery in the context of women subsequently diagnosed with invasive breast cancer. The Bupa Health Foundation Health and Wellbeing after Breast Cancer Study is a prospective cohort study of 1684 women recruited within 12 months of their first diagnosis with invasive breast cancer. Participants completed an enrolment questionnaire and annual follow-up questionnaires for 5 years. At the second follow-up, 1.5% of women reported having undergone cosmetic breast surgery prior to being diagnosed with breast cancer, 16 had undergone breast reduction and seven had augmentations. Invasive breast cancer was diagnosed at the time of a cosmetic breast procedure in two women, in both an augmentation and a reduction procedure, which is 8.7% (95% confidence interval 23.5% to +20.9%) of the women in our study reporting a cosmetic breast procedure prior to diagnosis. Although prior cosmetic breast surgery was reported by few women, breast cancer was diagnosed in two women during the procedure. Surgeons performing elective breast surgery need to understand and apply consistent, reliable breast cancer screening practices.

  16. Role of surgery for colorectal cancer in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Biondi, Antonio; Vacante, Marco; Ambrosino, Immacolata; Cristaldi, Erika; Pietrapertosa, Giuseppe; Basile, Francesco

    2016-09-27

    The prevalence of subjects with colorectal cancer is expected to grow in the next future decades and surgery represents the most successful treatment modality for these patients. Anyway, currently elderly subjects undergo less elective surgical procedures than younger patients mainly due to the high rates of postoperative morbidity and mortality. Some authors suggest extensive surgery, including multistage procedures, as carried out in younger patients while others promote less aggressive surgery. In older patients, laparoscopic-assisted colectomy showed a number of advantages compared to conventional open surgery that include lower stress, higher rate of independency after surgery, quicker return to prior activities and a decrease in costs. The recent advances in chemotherapy and the introduction of new surgical procedures such as the endoluminal stenting, suggest the need for a revisitation of surgical practice patterns and the role of palliative surgery, mainly for patients with advanced disease. In this article, we discuss the current role of surgery for elderly patients with colorectal cancer.

  17. Aesthetic Surgery in Patients with Lung Cancer: A Paradigm Shift

    PubMed Central

    Baranski, Jan; Sinno, Sammy

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lung cancer is the most common cancer worldwide and the leading cause of cancer death. With the development of targeted therapy against causative driver mutations, some patients have experienced dramatic responses that have converted their disease into a chronic, stable form. Shifting concerns away from survival and back to quality-of-life issues has led some of these patients to seek aesthetic surgery. Methods: Three patient examples are presented to illustrate current lung cancer treatment modalities, disease responses, and subsequent experiences with aesthetic surgical procedures. Two patients presented for blepharoplasty and the third for revisional breast augmentation surgery. Results: Two patients were treated for lung cancer with targeted therapy and a third with more traditional chemotherapy before undergoing aesthetic surgery. All 3 patients experienced a normal recovery from surgery without any untoward results. Two remain free of disease and one has chronic stable disease. All have returned to normal, active lives. Conclusions: Recent developments in lung cancer treatment are transforming this entity into a less formidable diagnosis for some patients, much like breast cancer and prostate cancer. Plastic surgeons should be aware of this paradigm shift. Successfully treated patients should be considered as reasonable candidates for aesthetic surgery, particularly when they have the full support of their oncologist. Beyond the typical psychological benefits that plastic surgery can produce, it also provides affirmation in this patient population of a return to normalcy, thereby imparting hope and optimism for the future. PMID:27826480

  18. Scalping Surgery – Dermatologic Indications beyond Curative Primary Skin Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Wollina, Uwe; Langner, Dana; Hansel, Gesina; Koch, André; Tchernev, Georgi

    2017-01-01

    Skin tumours are among the most frequent tumour types of mankind. In the case of large tumours, field cancerization, or satellitosis scalping surgery is a possible option. The procedure can also be used in a palliative setting with tumour debulking. Less common indications are multiple benign tumours of the scalp and chronic inflammatory scalp dermatoses not responding to medical treatment. We present a case series and discuss surgical modalities beyond curative surgery of primary skin cancer. PMID:28785321

  19. Surgery for Bile Duct (Cholangiocarcinoma) Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... after surgery can include bile leakage into the abdomen, infections, and liver failure. Because most of the organs removed are involved in digestion, eating and nutrition problems can be side effects of surgery for ...

  20. [Quality standards in rectal cancer surgery].

    PubMed

    Pera, M; Pascual, M

    2005-01-01

    The results of surgery for rectal cancer have classically been measured through indicators such as morbidity, mortality, and length of hospital stay. In the last few years other parameters have been included that evaluate healthcare quality such as the functional results of the surgical technique employed and quality of life. Total resection of the mesorectum, performed by experienced surgeons, is the surgical technique of choice. Currently, the sphincter can be preserved in 70% of patients. Anastomotic dehiscence after anterior resection of the rectum is the most serious complication and the most important risk factor is the height of the anastomosis. The overall dehiscence rate should be less than 15% and operative mortality should be between 2% and 3%. The colonic reservoir improves functional outcome and consequently it is the procedure of choice to reconstruct transit after low anterior resection. Local recurrence should be less than 10% and 5-year survival should be between 70% and 80%. In general, quality of life is better after anterior resection of the rectum than after abdominoperineal amputation, despite the functional deterioration presented by some patients.

  1. The role of robotic surgery in endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, David M; Smith, Blair; Fowler, Jeffrey M

    2015-12-01

    Robotic surgery for endometrial cancer has less blood loss, shorter hospital stays, and less postoperative complications compared to laparotomies. Robotic technologic advantages over laparoscopic technique are most pronounced in obese patients. The shorter learning curve may explain the greater utilization of the robotic technique. Robotic surgery will continue as a mainstay in the treatment of uterine cancers as we become more efficient and cost conscious while maintaining the high quality outcomes that have been reported.

  2. The Role of Oncoplastic Breast Surgery in Breast Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Emiroğlu, Mustafa; Sert, İsmail; İnal, Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to discuss indications, advantages, disadvantages, oncologic and aesthetic results of Oncoplastic Surgery (OBS). Pubmed and Medline database were searched for articles published between 1998 and 2014 for keywords: oncoplastic breast surgery, therapeutic mammoplasty, oncoplastic breast reduction, synchrenous reconstructions. Role of OBS in breast cancer surgery, its aspects to be considered, its value and results have been interpreted. This technique has advantages by providing more extensive tumourectomy, yielding better aesthetic results compared with breast conserving surgery, allowing oncoplastic reduction in breast cancer patients with macromastia, with higher patient satisfaction and quality of life and by being inexpensive due to single session practice. As for its disadvantages are: re-excision is more difficult, risk for mastectomy is higher, it is depent on the Surgeron’s experience, it has a risk for delay in adjuvant therapies and its requirement for additional imaging studies during management. Main indications are patients with small tumour/breast volume, macromastia, multifocality, procedures which can disrupt breast cosmesis such as surgeries for upper inner breas tquadrient tumours. Contraindications are positive margin problems after wide excision, diffuse malign microcalsifications, inflammatory breast cancer, history of radiotherapy and patients’ preferences. Despite low evidence level, Oncoplastic Breast Surgery seems to be both reliable and acceptable in terms of oncologic and aesthetic aspects. Oncoplastic Breast Surgery increase the application rate of breast conserving surgery by obviating practical limitations and improve the results of breast conserving surgery. Correct patient and technique choice in OBS is vital for optimization of post surgical

  3. Role of robotic surgery in colorectal resections for cancer.

    PubMed

    Bertani, E; Chiappa, A; Ubiali, P; Fiore, B; Corbellini, C; Cossu, M L; Minicozzi, A; Andreoni, B

    2012-09-01

    In recent years, robotic surgery is becoming a valid alternative in colorectal diseases treatment to laparoscopic and traditional open surgery. The most relevant reported technical advantages of the robotic surgery are 3D-view, tremor-filtering, seven degree-free motion and a higher comfortable setting for the surgeon. Both case series and comparative studies available in Literature report only short and mid-term outcomes. These studies are able to demonstrate that robotic surgery is as safe and feasible as laparoscopic surgery regarding perioperative outcomes. Trials with long term follow up are needed to establish the real safety and effectiveness of the robotic surgery especially concerning resections for cancer. The robotic surgery could be considered a promising surgical field. The high costs represent one of the most relevant drawbacks.

  4. The state of academic cancer surgery in the UK.

    PubMed

    Eckhouse, S; Sullivan, R

    2008-10-01

    Despite media and public perception to the contrary cancer surgery is the most important modality for the control and cure of cancer. However, after years of underinvestment by research funders and increasing service delivery demands the academic cancer surgeon is an endangered species. In an effort to improve evidence-based policymaking in this critical domain of cancer research the ECRM has conducted a semi-quantitative assessment of the state of academic cancer surgery in the UK. We have found that the percentage of investment in cancer surgical technologies R&D is less than 1% and even when this is extended to other diseases then this figure is still less than 1%. A decline in the overall numbers of academic surgical staff is paralleled by our finding that over 50% of the academic cancer surgeons in this survey had insufficient time for research. With clinical trials and surgical technology development identified as key research domains the majority (60-80%) did not perceive any benefit for surgical research in these areas as a result of the creation of the UK National Cancer Research Institute. We also found high support for academic surgery from colleagues but medium-low support from many institutions. Key policy conclusions are: (1) greater hypothecated investment by research funders, particularly for the development of surgical technologies as well as clinical trials, and (2) the creation of cancer surgery centres of excellence which have sufficient staffing and institutional support to engendered a creative academic environment.

  5. An Investigation into Reliability of Knee Extension Muscle Strength Measurements, and into the Relationship between Muscle Strength and Means of Independent Mobility in the Ward: Examinations of Patients Who Underwent Femoral Neck Fracture Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Katoh, Munenori; Kaneko, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to investigate the reliability of isometric knee extension muscle strength measurement of patients who underwent femoral neck fracture surgery, as well as the relationship between independent mobility in the ward and knee muscle strength. [Subjects] The subjects were 75 patients who underwent femoral neck fracture surgery. [Methods] We used a hand-held dynamometer and a belt to measure isometric knee extension muscle strength three times, and used intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) to investigate the reliability of the measurements. We used a receiver operating characteristic curve to investigate the cutoff values for independent walking with walking sticks and non-independent mobility. [Results] ICCs (1, 1) were 0.9 or higher. The cutoff value for independent walking with walking sticks was 0.289 kgf/kg on the non-fractured side, 0.193 kgf/kg on the fractured side, and the average of both limbs was 0.238 kgf/kg. [Conclusion] We consider that the test-retest reliability of isometric knee extension muscle strength measurement of patients who have undergone femoral neck fracture surgery is high. We also consider that isometric knee extension muscle strength is useful for investigating means of independent mobility in the ward. PMID:24567667

  6. [Comparison of robotic surgery documentary in gynecological cancer].

    PubMed

    Vargas-Hernández, Víctor Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Robotic surgery is a surgical technique recently introduced, with major expansion and acceptance among the medical community is currently performed in over 1,000 hospitals around the world and in the management of gynecological cancer are being developed comprehensive programs for implementation. The objectives of this paper are to review the scientific literature on robotic surgery and its application in gynecological cancer to verify its safety, feasibility and efficacy when compared with laparoscopic surgery or surgery classical major surgical complications, infections are more common in traditional radical surgery compared with laparoscopic or robotic surgery and with these new techniques surgical and staying hospital are lesser than the former however, the disadvantages are the limited number of robot systems, their high cost and applies only in specialized centers that have with equipment and skilled surgeons. In conclusion robotic surgery represents a major scientific breakthrough and surgical management of gynecological cancer with better results to other types of conventional surgery and is likely in the coming years is become its worldwide.

  7. Image-guided cancer surgery using near-infrared fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Vahrmeijer, Alexander L.; Hutteman, Merlijn; van der Vorst, Joost R.; van de Velde, C.J.H.; Frangioni, John V.

    2013-01-01

    Paradigm shifts in surgery arise when surgeons are empowered to perform surgery faster, better, and/or less expensively. Optical imaging that exploits invisible near-infrared fluorescent light has the potential to improve cancer surgery outcomes while minimizing anesthesia time and lowering healthcare costs. Because of this, the last few years have witnessed an explosion of proof-of-concept clinical trials in the field. In this review, we introduce the concept of near-infrared fluorescence imaging for cancer surgery, review the clinical trial literature to date, outline the key issues pertaining to imaging system and contrast agent optimization, discuss limitations and leverage, and provide a framework for making the technology available for the routine care of cancer patients in the near future. PMID:23881033

  8. A ward without patients.

    PubMed

    1988-01-02

    Walk into Brooke ward and it doesn't feel like a ward at all. There are bright-coloured bedspreads, cuddly toys everywhere, a 1930s ball gown hangs above one of the lockers. And of course, there's Emma, the ward cat - continually fussed over by nurses and residents alike.

  9. Complications from Surgeries Related to Ovarian Cancer Screening

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Lauren A.; Pavlik, Edward J.; Ueland, Emma; Brown, Hannah E.; Ladd, Kelsey M.; Huang, Bin; DeSimone, Christopher P.; van Nagell, John R.; Ueland, Frederick R.; Miller, Rachel W.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate complications of surgical intervention for participants in the Kentucky Ovarian Cancer Screening Program and compare results to those of the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening trial. A retrospective database review included 657 patients who underwent surgery for a positive screen in the Kentucky Ovarian Cancer Screening Program from 1988–2014. Data were abstracted from operative reports, discharge summaries, and office notes for 406 patients. Another 142 patients with incomplete records were interviewed by phone. Complete information was available for 548 patients. Complications were graded using the Clavien–Dindo (C–D) Classification of Surgical Complications and considered minor if assigned Grade I (any deviation from normal course, minor medications) or Grade II (other pharmacological treatment, blood transfusion). C–D Grade III complications (those requiring surgical, endoscopic, or radiologic intervention) and C–D Grade IV complications (those which are life threatening) were considered “major”. Statistical analysis was performed using SAS 9.4 software. Complications were documented in 54/548 (10%) subjects. For women with malignancy, 17/90 (19%) had complications compared to 37/458 (8%) with benign pathology (p < 0.003). For non-cancer surgery, obesity was associated with increased complications (p = 0.0028). Fifty patients had minor complications classified as C–D Grade II or less. Three of 4 patients with Grade IV complications had malignancy (p < 0.0004). In the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening trial, 212 women had surgery for ovarian malignancy, and 95 had at least one complication (45%). Of the 1080 women with non-cancer surgery, 163 had at least one complication (15%). Compared to the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening trial, the Kentucky Ovarian Cancer Screening Program had significantly fewer complications from both cancer and non-cancer

  10. Complications from Surgeries Related to Ovarian Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Lauren A; Pavlik, Edward J; Ueland, Emma; Brown, Hannah E; Ladd, Kelsey M; Huang, Bin; DeSimone, Christopher P; van Nagell, John R; Ueland, Frederick R; Miller, Rachel W

    2017-03-08

    The aim of this study was to evaluate complications of surgical intervention for participants in the Kentucky Ovarian Cancer Screening Program and compare results to those of the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening trial. A retrospective database review included 657 patients who underwent surgery for a positive screen in the Kentucky Ovarian Cancer Screening Program from 1988-2014. Data were abstracted from operative reports, discharge summaries, and office notes for 406 patients. Another 142 patients with incomplete records were interviewed by phone. Complete information was available for 548 patients. Complications were graded using the Clavien-Dindo (C-D) Classification of Surgical Complications and considered minor if assigned Grade I (any deviation from normal course, minor medications) or Grade II (other pharmacological treatment, blood transfusion). C-D Grade III complications (those requiring surgical, endoscopic, or radiologic intervention) and C-D Grade IV complications (those which are life threatening) were considered "major". Statistical analysis was performed using SAS 9.4 software. Complications were documented in 54/548 (10%) subjects. For women with malignancy, 17/90 (19%) had complications compared to 37/458 (8%) with benign pathology (p < 0.003). For non-cancer surgery, obesity was associated with increased complications (p = 0.0028). Fifty patients had minor complications classified as C-D Grade II or less. Three of 4 patients with Grade IV complications had malignancy (p < 0.0004). In the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening trial, 212 women had surgery for ovarian malignancy, and 95 had at least one complication (45%). Of the 1080 women with non-cancer surgery, 163 had at least one complication (15%). Compared to the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening trial, the Kentucky Ovarian Cancer Screening Program had significantly fewer complications from both cancer and non-cancer surgery (p

  11. [Minimal-invasive surgery for lung cancer - strategies and limits].

    PubMed

    Schneiter, D; Weder, W

    2012-07-01

    Minimal invasive surgical procedures, also known as keyhole surgery, have gained in importance in the last years and have become the standard of care in experienced hands for most surgical procedures. Despite initial concerns with respect to the radicalness of the approach it is nowadays also established in oncologic surgery. Minimal invasive procedures aim at minimizing the operative trauma and associated inflammatory reactions to achieve faster convalescence after surgery. In addition to obvious cosmetic advantages minimal invasive surgery has been shown to be associated with fewer postoperative pain and shorter postoperative rehabilitation and faster reintegration into everyday as well as working life. With 15% of all cancer diagnoses and 29% of all cancer-associated causes of death, lung cancer is the most frequent malignancy in the general public and hence the treatment of lung cancer is a main focus of thoracic surgery. Within the scope of modern multimodal treatment concepts radical surgical resection of lung cancer is essential and the main pillar of curative treatment. In early stage lung cancer the current standard of care is a thoracoscopic lobectomy with mediastinal lymphadenectomy. The expertise of specialized centers allows for curative minimal-invasive treatment in a large number of patients, particularly of patients of advanced age or with limited pulmonary function.

  12. Randomized trial of subfascial infusion of ropivacaine for early recovery in laparoscopic colorectal cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Hyun; Kim, Go Eun; Kim, Hee Cheol; Jun, Joo Hyun; Lee, Jin Young; Shin, Byung-Seop; Yoo, Heejin; Jung, Sin-Ho; Kim, Joungyoun; Lee, Seung Hyeon; Yo, Deok Kyu; Na, Yu Ri

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a need for investigating the analgesic method as part of early recovery after surgery tailored for laparoscopic colorectal cancer (LCRC) surgery. In this randomized trial, we aimed to investigate the analgesic efficacy of an inverse ‘v’ shaped bilateral, subfascial ropivacaine continuous infusion in LCRC surgery. Methods Forty two patients undergoing elective LCRC surgery were randomly allocated to one of two groups to receive either 0.5% ropivacaine continuous infusion at the subfascial plane (n = 20, R group) or fentanyl intravenous patient controlled analgesia (IV PCA) (n = 22, F group) for postoperative 72 hours. The primary endpoint was the visual analogue scores (VAS) when coughing at postoperative 24 hours. Secondary end points were the VAS at 1, 6, 48, and 72 hours, time to first flatus, time to first rescue meperidine requirement, rescue meperidine consumption, length of hospital stay, postoperative nausea and vomiting, sedation, hypotension, dizziness, headache, and wound complications. Results The VAS at rest and when coughing were similar between the groups throughout the study. The time to first gas passage and time to first rescue meperidine at ward were significantly shorter in the R group compared to the F group (P = 0.010). Rescue meperidine was administered less in the R group; however, without statistical significance. Other study parameters were not different between the groups. Conclusions Ropivacaine continuous infusion with an inverse ‘v ’ shaped bilateral, subfascial catheter placement showed significantly enhanced bowel recovery and analgesic efficacy was not different from IV PCA in LCRC surgery. PMID:27924202

  13. Laparoscopic surgery versus open surgery for colon cancer: short-term outcomes of a randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Veldkamp, Ruben; Kuhry, Esther; Hop, Wim C J; Jeekel, J; Kazemier, G; Bonjer, H Jaap; Haglind, Eva; Påhlman, Lars; Cuesta, Miguel A; Msika, Simon; Morino, Mario; Lacy, Antonio M

    2005-07-01

    The safety and short-term benefits of laparoscopic colectomy for cancer remain debatable. The multicentre COLOR (COlon cancer Laparoscopic or Open Resection) trial was done to assess the safety and benefit of laparoscopic resection compared with open resection for curative treatment of patients with cancer of the right or left colon. 627 patients were randomly assigned to laparoscopic surgery and 621 patients to open surgery. The primary endpoint was cancer-free survival 3 years after surgery. Secondary outcomes were short-term morbidity and mortality, number of positive resection margins, local recurrence, port-site or wound-site recurrence, metastasis, overall survival, and blood loss during surgery. Analysis was by intention to treat. Here, clinical characteristics, operative findings, and postoperative outcome are reported. Patients assigned laparoscopic resection had less blood loss compared with those assigned open resection (median 100 mL [range 0-2700] vs 175 mL [0-2000], p<0.0001), although laparoscopic surgery lasted 30 min longer than did open surgery (p<0.0001). Conversion to open surgery was needed for 91 (17%) patients undergoing the laparoscopic procedure. Radicality of resection as assessed by number of removed lymph nodes and length of resected oral and aboral bowel did not differ between groups. Laparoscopic colectomy was associated with earlier recovery of bowel function (p<0.0001), need for fewer analgesics, and with a shorter hospital stay (p<0.0001) compared with open colectomy. Morbidity and mortality 28 days after colectomy did not differ between groups. Laparoscopic surgery can be used for safe and radical resection of cancer in the right, left, and sigmoid colon.

  14. Contract management of Ontario's cancer surgery wait times strategy.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Siu Mee; Irish, Jonathan C; Thompson, Leslee J

    2007-01-01

    The province of Ontario, as a result of the First Ministers' Meeting, was committed to addressing surgery wait times in Ontario. The Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care's response to this commitment was the Wait Times Strategy (WTS) initiative, which addressed access issues with the aim of positively impacting wait times in cancer surgery. Cancer Care Ontario (CCO) was tasked with managing the cancer surgery WTS. CCO engaged in accountability agreements with Ontario hospitals to provide incremental cancer surgery volumes, in return for one-time funding. Through the use of accountability agreements, CCO was able to tie service volume delivery, quality care initiatives and reporting requirements to funding. Other elements of the cancer surgery WTS implementation included the development of wait times definitions, guidelines and targets; the use of a performance management system; facilitation by existing regional cancer leads and continued development of regional cancer programs. Eight key lessons were learned: (1) baseline volume guarantees are critical to ensuring that wait times are positively impacted; (2) there is a need to create a balance between accountability and systems management; (3) clinical quality initiatives can be tied to funding initiatives; (4) allocations of services should be informed by many factors; (5) regional leadership is key to ensuring that local needs are met; (6) data are invaluable in improving performance; (7) there is regional disparity in service delivery, capacity and resources across the province; and (8) program sustainability is an underlying goal of the WTS for cancer surgery. The implication is that accountability agreements can be leveraged to create sustainable health management systems.

  15. Evidence and evidence gaps of laryngeal cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Wiegand, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Surgical treatment of laryngeal cancer has been established for decades. In addition to total laryngectomy, which was first performed in 1873, a large number or organ preservation surgical techniques, like open partial laryngectomy, transoral laser microsurgery, and transoral robotic surgery have been developed. Studies on laryngeal cancer surgery are mainly retrospective case series and cohort studies. The evolution of chemoradiation protocols and their analysis in prospective randomized trials have led to an increasing acceptance of non-surgical treatment procedures. In addition to an improvement of prognosis, in recent years the preservation of function and maintenance of life quality after primary therapy of laryngeal cancer has increasingly become the focus of therapy planning. Significant late toxicity after chemoradiation has been identified as an important issue. This leads to a reassessment of surgical concepts and initiation of studies on laryngeal cancer surgery which was additionally stimulated by the advent of transoral robotic surgery in the US. Improving the evidence base of laryngeal cancer surgery by successful establishment of surgical trials should be the future goal. PMID:28025603

  16. [Current status and future perspectives of robotic surgery and laparoscopic surgery for gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhi-wei; Li, Jie-shou

    2012-08-01

    Laparoscopic gastrectomy has not become a common procedure for gastric cancer due to the difficulties of performing D2 lymphadenectomy and reconstruction of digestive tract by the conventional laparoscopic instruments. The da Vinci system provides 3D visualization, enhanced magnification, and seven degrees of freedom of the instruments to suture and knot in the narrow surgical space, so it can perform totally robotic gastrectomy with D2 lymphadenectomy and robot-sewing anastomosis for reconstruction. Application of robotic system can expand the indications of minimally invasive surgery in treatment of gastric cancer. Combination fast-track surgery to optimize the perioperative management with the technique of minimally invasive surgery can enhance the recovery of surgical gastric cancer patients.

  17. Robotic surgery for oropharynx cancer: promise, challenges, and future directions.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, John R; Genden, Eric M

    2012-04-01

    Epidemiologic studies have shown a rise in the incidence of oropharyngeal cancer without a corresponding increase in oral cavity cancers. These diverging trends are explained by human papilloma virus, which preferentially affects the oropharynx. Cancers resulting from this viral infection bear a better prognosis than those that are smoking-related. Treatment of oropharyngeal cancers has typically involved the use of radiation and chemotherapy to avoid the morbidity of mandibular splitting surgery. The use of transoral robotic surgery (TORS) has obviated the need for large-scale open approaches but still provides the pathologic staging data that is unavailable from non-surgical approaches. Although TORS is in its infancy, early functional and oncologic outcome data are promising. The complex management of oropharyngeal cancers should utilize the available treatment modalities to optimize outcomes and stratify patients to different treatment based on risk status.

  18. Robot-assisted laparoscopic (RAL) surgery for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Alimoglu, Orhan; Atak, Ibrahim; Eren, Tunc

    2014-09-01

    This literature review focuses on the potential benefits and eventual limitations of robotic surgery with respect to the traditional minimally invasive laparoscopic surgical technique for gastric cancer. A literature survey was performed using specific search phrases in PubMed. Series including < 10 cases and series including only an 'open group' of patients in comparison with the 'robotic group' were excluded. Characteristics such as patient demographics, perioperative outcomes and oncological results were analysed. According to the analysis of 12 series, robotic gastric surgery has been shown to be a safe and feasible method. However, a considerable number of studies are composed of early-stage gastric cancer cases and there seems to be a lack of randomized controlled studies. Large prospective randomized studies are still required in order to demonstrate the exact benefits of robotic surgery and its effects on survival in gastric cancer. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Regionalization and Outcomes of Lung Cancer Surgery in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Bendzsak, Anna M; Baxter, Nancy N; Darling, Gail E; Austin, Peter C; Urbach, David R

    2017-08-20

    Purpose Regionalization of complex surgery to high-volume hospitals has been advocated based on cross-sectional volume-outcome studies. In April 2007, the agency overseeing cancer care in Ontario, Canada, implemented a policy to regionalize lung cancer surgery at 14 designated hospitals, enforced by economic incentives and penalties. We studied the effects of implementation of this policy. Methods Using administrative health data, we used interrupted time series models to analyze the immediate and delayed effects of implementation of the policy on the distribution of lung cancer surgery among hospitals, surgical outcomes, and health services use. Results From 2004 to 2012, 16,641 patients underwent surgery for lung cancer. The proportion of operations performed in designated hospitals increased from 71% to 89% after the policy was implemented. Although operative mortality decreased from 4.1% to 2.9% (adjusted odds ratio, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.58 to 0.81; P < .001), the reduction was due to a preexisting declining trend in mortality. In contrast, in the years after implementation of the policy, length of hospital stay decreased more than expected from the baseline trend by 7% per year (95% CI, 5% to 9%; P < .001), and the distance traveled by all patients to the hospital for surgery increased by 4% per year (95% CI, 0% to 8%; P = .03), neither of which were explained by preexisting trends. Analyses limited to patients ≥ 70 years of age demonstrated a reduction in operative mortality (odds ratio, 0.80 per year after regionalization; 95% CI, 0.67 to 0.95; P = .01). Conclusion A policy to regionalize lung cancer surgery in Ontario led to increased centralization of surgery services but was not independently associated with improvements in operative mortality. Improvements in length of stay and in operative mortality among elderly patients suggest areas where regionalization may be beneficial.

  20. [Robot-assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery for Lung Cancer].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hiroshige; Taniguchi, Yuji

    2016-07-01

    As surgical robots have widely spread, verification of their usefulness in the general thoracic surgery field is required. The most favorable advantage of robotic surgery is the markedly free movement of joint-equipped robotic forceps under three-dimensional high-vision. Accurate operation makes complex procedures straightforward and may overcome weak points of previous thoracoscopic surgery. Robotic surgery for lung cancer has been safely introduced and initial results have shown favorable. It is still at the stage of clinical research, but is expected to take its usefulness in the procedure of hilar exposure, lymph node dissection and the suturing of lung parenchyma or bronchus. The evidence is insufficient for robotic thoracic surgery, and also safety management, education and significant cost are larger problems. Now, urgent issues are to carry out clinical trial for advanced medical care and insurance acquisition.

  1. Probiotics reduce psychological stress in patients before laryngeal cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Zhao, Xiaoyun; Tang, Shan; Huang, Hua; Zhao, Xiulan; Ning, Zhuohui; Fu, Xiurong; Zhang, Caihong

    2016-03-01

    Laryngeal cancer is a common malignancy; surgery is the preferred treatment. Psychosocial stress is one of the negative impacts on patient recovery. This study aimed to elucidate the effect of probiotics on ameliorating anxiety, and on serum corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) in laryngeal cancer patients before surgery. A total 30 patients with laryngeal cancer and 20 healthy volunteers were recruited. During the 2 weeks before surgery, 20 patients were randomly allocated to receive probiotics or placebo twice a day. Heart rate was recorded daily. The degree of anxiety was assessed by the Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAMA). Serum CRF levels in laryngeal cancer patients increased significantly in approaching surgery. After ingestion of probiotics, serum levels of CRF and heart rate did not increase before surgery. In addition, taking probiotics relieved the degree of anxiety of the patients from HAMA 19.8 to 10.2. Probiotics can ameliorate the clinical anxiety and biochemical features of stress in patients scheduled for laryngectomy. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  2. Role of surgery for colorectal cancer in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Biondi, Antonio; Vacante, Marco; Ambrosino, Immacolata; Cristaldi, Erika; Pietrapertosa, Giuseppe; Basile, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of subjects with colorectal cancer is expected to grow in the next future decades and surgery represents the most successful treatment modality for these patients. Anyway, currently elderly subjects undergo less elective surgical procedures than younger patients mainly due to the high rates of postoperative morbidity and mortality. Some authors suggest extensive surgery, including multistage procedures, as carried out in younger patients while others promote less aggressive surgery. In older patients, laparoscopic-assisted colectomy showed a number of advantages compared to conventional open surgery that include lower stress, higher rate of independency after surgery, quicker return to prior activities and a decrease in costs. The recent advances in chemotherapy and the introduction of new surgical procedures such as the endoluminal stenting, suggest the need for a revisitation of surgical practice patterns and the role of palliative surgery, mainly for patients with advanced disease. In this article, we discuss the current role of surgery for elderly patients with colorectal cancer. PMID:27721923

  3. [Endoscopic surgery].

    PubMed

    Rushfeldt, Christian; Pham, Khanh Do-Cong; Aabakken, Lars

    2016-05-01

    Endoscopic surgery of the stomach/gastrointestinal tract was developed in the 1990s in Japan as a minimally invasive method of removing early-stage tumours, using a gastro-/coloscope instead of open or laparoscopic surgery. Its advantages are obvious, in that the patient is spared more major surgery, the hospital saves on resources as well as admission to a ward, and society is spared the costs of days of sickness absence. Endoscopic submucosal dissection is considered the most difficult technique, but it allows for the accurate dissection of large tumours. In 1999, Japanese surgeon Takuji Gotoda and his team were the first to perform these types of dissections of early cancers in the rectum using a diathermic needle and a flexible scope.

  4. Surgical Site Infection Complicating Breast Cancer Surgery in Kuwait

    PubMed Central

    Omar, Abeer A.; Al-Mousa, Haifaa H.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives. Surgical site infection (SSI) is the most common postoperative complication associated with breast cancer surgery. The present investigation aimed to determine the SSI rate after breast cancer surgeries and the causative microorganisms. Patients and Methods. All patients who underwent breast surgery in Kuwait Cancer Control Center as a treatment for breast cancer from January 2009–December 2010 were prospectively followed for the development of SSI. Indirect detection was used to identify SSIs through medical record to review and discussion with the treating surgeons. Results. The number of operations was 438. Females represented 434 (99.1%) cases while males constituted only 4 (0.9%) cases. SSIs were diagnosed after 10 operations, all for female cases. Most of the SSIs (8 cases; 80%) were detected after patients were discharged, during outpatient followup. Out of those 5/8; (62.5%) were readmitted for management of SSI. Nine patients (90%) received systemic antibiotic therapy for management of their wound infection. The SSI rate was 2.3%. The main causative organism was Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) which was responsible for 40% of infections. Gram negative bacteria were isolated from 40% of the cases. Conclusion. SSI is an important complication following breast cancer surgery. Microbiological diagnosis is an essential tool for proper management of such patients. PMID:24967132

  5. Laparoscopic gastric surgery for cancer: where do we stand?

    PubMed

    Antonakis, Pantelis T; Ashrafian, Hutan; Isla, Alberto Martinez

    2014-10-21

    Gastric cancer poses a significant public health problem, especially in the Far East, due to its high incidence in these areas. Surgical treatment and guidelines have been markedly different in the West, but nowadays this debate is apparently coming to an end. Laparoscopic surgery has been employed in the surgical treatment of gastric cancer for two decades now, but with controversies about the extent of resection and lymphadenectomy. Despite these difficulties, the apparent advantages of the laparoscopic approach helped its implementation in early stage and distal gastric cancer, with an increase on the uptake for distal gastrectomy for more advanced disease and total gastrectomy. Nevertheless, there is no conclusive evidence about the laparoscopic approach yet. In this review article we present and analyse the current status of laparoscopic surgery in the treatment of gastric cancer.

  6. Prevention of venous thromboembolism in the cancer surgery patient.

    PubMed

    Spyropoulos, Alex C; Brotman, Daniel J; Amin, Alpesh N; Deitelzweig, Steven B; Jaffer, Amir K; McKean, Sylvia C

    2008-04-01

    Cancer patients, especially those undergoing surgery for cancer, are at extremely high risk for developing venous thromboembolism (VTE), even with appropriate thromboprophylaxis. Anticoagulant prophylaxis in cancer surgery patients has reduced the incidence of VTE events by approximately one-half in placebo-controlled trials, and extended prophylaxis (for up to 1 month) has also significantly reduced out-of-hospital VTE events in clinical trials in this population. Clinical trials show no difference between low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) and unfractionated heparin in VTE prophylaxis efficacy or bleeding risk in this population, although the incidence of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia is lower with LMWH. The risk-benefit profile of low-dose anticoagulant prophylaxis appears to be favorable even in many cancer patients undergoing neurosurgery, for whom pharmacologic VTE prophylaxis has been controversial because of bleeding risks.

  7. Antibiotic use in 530 French hospitals: results from a surveillance network at hospital and ward levels in 2007.

    PubMed

    Dumartin, Catherine; L'Hériteau, François; Péfau, Muriel; Bertrand, Xavier; Jarno, Pascal; Boussat, Sandrine; Angora, Pacôme; Lacavé, Ludivine; Saby, Karine; Savey, Anne; Nguyen, Florence; Carbonne, Anne; Rogues, Anne-Marie

    2010-09-01

    Antibiotic use in French hospitals is among the highest in Europe. A study was carried out to describe antibiotic consumption for inpatients at hospital and at ward levels. Data were voluntarily collected retrospectively by 530 hospitals accounting for approximately 40 million patient-days (PD) on the following: antibacterials for systemic use [J01 class of the WHO Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) classification, defined daily doses (DDD) system, 2007], rifampicin and oral imidazole derivatives, expressed in number of DDD and number of PD in 2007. Consumption was expressed in DDD/1000 PD. Median antibiotic use ranged from 60 DDD/1000 PD in long-term care (LTC) and psychiatric hospitals to 633 DDD/1000 PD in teaching hospitals. Penicillins and beta-lactamase inhibitors combinations were the most frequently used antibiotics, accounting for 26% of total use in cancer hospitals to 40% in LTC/psychiatric hospitals. Glycopeptides and carbapenems were mostly used in cancer and teaching hospitals. Level of consumption and pattern of use differed according to clinical ward from 60 DDD/1000 PD in psychiatric wards up to 1466 DDD/1000 PD in intensive care units (ICUs). In medicine, surgery, ICU and rehabilitation wards, fluoroquinolones accounted for 13%-19% of the total use. This multicentre survey provided detailed information on antibiotic use in a large sample of hospitals and wards, allowing relevant comparisons and benchmarking. Analysis of consumption at the ward level should help hospitals to target practice audits to improve antibiotic use.

  8. [Robotic surgery for colorectal cancer in elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Xu, Pingping; Wei, Ye; Xu, Jianmin

    2016-05-01

    The outstanding advantages of robotic surgery include the stable and three-dimension image and the convenience of surgery manipulation. The disadvantages include the lack of factile feedback, high cost and prolonged surgery time. It was reported that robotic surgery was associated with less trauma stress and faster recovery in elderly patients(≥75 years old) when compared with open surgery. Elderly people have a higher incidence of carcinogenesis and also have more comorbidities and reduced functional reserve. Clinical data of patients over 75 years old treated by robotic surgery in Zhongshan Hospital affiliated to Fudan University from March 2011 to October 2014 were analyzed retrospectively. A total of 24 consecutive patients were included with a median age of 77.8 years old. There were 18 male and 6 female patients. Among them, 14 patients were diagnosed with descending and sigmoid colon cancers while 10 with rectal cancers; 19 had tumor size larger than 5 cm; 16 were diagnosed with ulcerative adenocarcinoma. Fourteen patients were complicated with hypertension, 6 with cardiopulmonary diseases, 4 with diabetes mellitus and 3 with cerebrovascular diseases. Twenty-two patients underwent low anterior resection and 2 abdominoperineal resection. The estimated blood loss was 85 ml; the median operation time was (123.1±45.2) min; the median number of retrieved lymph node was 12.4. Postoperative pathologic results showed that 3 patients were stage I, 10 stage II, and 11 stage III. Postoperative complication was observed in 3 patients: urinary infection in 1 case, intraperitoneal infection in 1 case and atria fibrillation in 1 case, respectively. Median time to first postoperative flatus was 2.8 days. Our results indicated that robotic surgery is safe and feasible in the elderly patients. The next generation of robotic system may make up for these deficiencies through new technologies. With the advantage of more advanced surgical simulator, robotic surgery will play a

  9. Fertility sparing surgery in early stage epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Ditto, Antonino; Martinelli, Fabio; Lorusso, Domenica; Haeusler, Edward; Carcangiu, Marialuisa; Raspagliesi, Francesco

    2014-10-01

    Fertility sparing surgery (FSS) is a strategy often considered in young patients with early epithelial ovarian cancer. We investigated the role and the outcomes of FSS in eEOC patients who underwent comprehensive surgery. From January 2003 to January 2011, 24 patients underwent fertility sparing surgery. Eighteen were one-to-one matched and balanced for stage, histologic type and grading with a group of patients who underwent radical comprehensive staging (n=18). Demographics, surgical procedures, morbidities, pathologic findings, recurrence-rate, pregnancy-rate and correlations with disease-free survival were assessed. A total of 36 patients had a complete surgical staging including lymphadenectomy and were therefore analyzed. Seven patients experienced a recurrence: four (22%) in the fertility sparing surgery group and three (16%) in the control group (p=not significant). Sites of recurrence were: residual ovary (two), abdominal wall and peritoneal carcinomatosis in the fertility sparing surgery group; pelvic (two) and abdominal wall in the control group. Recurrences in the fertility sparing surgery group appeared earlier (mean, 10.3 months) than in radical comprehensive staging group (mean, 53.3 months) p<0.001. Disease-free survival were comparable between the two groups (p=0.422). No deaths were reported. All the patients in fertility sparing surgery group recovered a regular period. Thirteen out of 18 (72.2%) attempted to have a pregnancy. Five (38%) achieved a spontaneous pregnancy with a full term delivery. Fertility sparing surgery in early epithelial ovarian cancer submitted to a comprehensive surgical staging could be considered safe with oncological results comparable to radical surgery group.

  10. Impact of an enhanced recovery program on colorectal cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Lohsiriwat, Varut

    2014-01-01

    Surgical outcomes of colorectal cancer treatment depend not only on good surgery and tumor biology but also on an optimal perioperative care. The enhanced recovery program (ERP) - a multidisciplinary and multimodal approach, or so called 'fast-track surgery' - has been designed to minimize perioperative and intraoperative stress responses, and to support the recovery of organ function aiming to help patients getting better sooner after surgery. Compared with conventional postoperative care, the enhanced recovery program results in quicker patient recovery, shorter length of hospital stay, faster recovery of gastrointestinal function, and a lower incidence of postoperative complications. Although not firmly established as yet, the enhanced recovery program after surgery could be of oncological benefit in colorectal cancer patients because it can enhance recovery, maintain integrity of the postoperative immune system, increase feasibility of postoperative chemotherapy, and shorten the time interval from surgery to chemotherapy. This commentary summarizes short-term outcomes and potential long-term benefits of enhanced recovery programs in the treatment of colorectal cancer.

  11. Fluorescent imaging of cancerous tissues for targeted surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Lihong; Shen, Baozhong; Cheng, Zhen

    2014-01-01

    To maximize tumor excision and minimize collateral damage is the primary goal of cancer surgery. Emerging molecular imaging techniques have to “image-guided surgery” developing into “molecular imaging-guided surgery”, which is termed “targeted surgery” in this review. Consequently, the precision of surgery can be advanced from tissue-scale to molecule-scale, enabling “targeted surgery” to be a component of “targeted therapy”. Evidence from numerous experimental and clinical studies has demonstrated significant benefits of fluorescent imaging in targeted surgery with preoperative molecular diagnostic screening. Fluorescent imaging can help to improve intraoperative staging and enable more radical cytoreduction, detect obscure tumor lesions in special organs, highlight tumor margins, better map lymph node metastases, and identify important normal structures intraoperatively. Though limited tissue penetration of fluorescent imaging and tumor heterogeneity are two major hurdles for current targeted surgery, multimodality imaging and multiplex imaging may provide potential solutions to overcome these issues, respectively. Moreover, though many fluorescent imaging techniques and probes have been investigated, targeted surgery remains at a proof-of-principle stage. The impact of fluorescent imaging on cancer surgery will likely be realized through persistent interdisciplinary amalgamation of research in diverse fields. PMID:25064553

  12. Genetic surgery - a right strategy to attack cancer.

    PubMed

    Sverdlov, Eugene D

    2011-12-01

    The approaches now united under the term "gene therapy" can be divided into two broad strategies: (1) strategy using the ideology of molecular targeted therapy, but with genes in the role of agents targeted at certain molecular component(s) or pathways presumably crucial for cancer maintenance; (ii) strategy aimed at the destruction of tumors as a whole exploiting the features shared by all cancers, for example relatively fast mitotic cell division. While the first strategy is "true" gene therapy, the second one, as e.g. suicide gene therapy, is more like genetic surgery, when a surgeon just cuts off a tumor being not interested in subtle genetic mechanisms of cancer emergence and progression. This approach inherits the ideology of chemotherapy but escapes its severe toxic effects due to intracellular formation of toxic agents. Genetic surgery seems to be the most appropriate approach to combat cancer, and its simplicity is paradoxically adequate to the super-complexity of tumors. The review consists of three parts: (i) analysis of the reasons of tumor supercomplexity and fatally inevitable failure of molecular targeted therapy, (ii) general principles of the genetic surgery strategy, and (iii) examples of genetic surgery approaches with analysis of their drawbacks and the ways for their improvement.

  13. [Surgery for pancreatic cancer: Evidence-based surgical strategies].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Cabús, Santiago; Fernández-Cruz, Laureano

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer surgery represents a challenge for surgeons due to its technical complexity, the potential complications that may appear, and ultimately because of its poor survival. The aim of this article is to summarize the scientific evidence regarding the surgical treatment of pancreatic cancer in order to help surgeons in the decision making process in the management of these patients .Here we will review such fundamental issues as the need for a biopsy before surgery, the type of pancreatic anastomosis leading to better results, and the need for placement of drains after pancreatic surgery will be discussed. Copyright © 2014 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Surgery for invasive gynecologic cancer in the elderly female population.

    PubMed

    Lawton, F G; Hacker, N F

    1990-08-01

    Radical, curative surgery may not be considered in elderly patients with gynecologic cancer, yet the morbidity for this population from radiotherapy and cytotoxics may be high. This study compared the feasibility and outcome of such surgery in 226 consecutive patients, 72 women over 70 years old and 154 younger patients, in our institution over a 26-month period. Older patients presented with more advanced-stage cancers and, as a group, had significantly poorer presurgical performance status and more intercurrent medical problems. Nevertheless, the planned radical surgical procedure could be carried out in 90% of elderly patients, with a postoperative mortality of 1.5%. Minor postoperative complication rates were similar for the two groups and, except for vulvectomy patients, the mean inpatient stay was the same for both groups. Chronological age alone is a poor determinant of surgical risk, and elderly patients withstand radical surgery almost as well as their younger counterparts.

  15. 4. FIRE BREAK BETWEEN PSYCHIATRIC WARD AND NEXT WARD TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. FIRE BREAK BETWEEN PSYCHIATRIC WARD AND NEXT WARD TO THE SOUTH - Fort Randall, Neuro-Psychiatric Ward, Northeast of intersection of California Boulevard & Nurse Drive, Cold Bay, Aleutian Islands, AK

  16. Advanced cancer patients' self-assessed physical and emotional problems on admission and discharge from hospital general wards--a questionnaire study.

    PubMed

    Soelver, L; Oestergaard, B; Rydahl-Hansen, S; Wagner, L

    2012-09-01

    Most cancer patients receiving life-prolonging or palliative treatment are offered non-specialist palliative services. There is a lack of knowledge about their problem profile. The aim of this article is to describe the incidence of patient-reported physical and emotional problems on admission and discharge from general hospital wards and health staff's reported intervention. A prospective study was undertaken over 12 months, where advanced cancer patients completed a patient questionnaire, EORTC QLQ C15-PAL, on admission (n= 97) and discharge (n= 46). The incidences of the problems were dichotomised in intensity categories. The average number of 'clinically relevant problems' on admission was 5 (SD 2) and on discharge 4 (SD 2). A Wilcoxon signed rank test showed significant change in mean score for six out of nine problem areas, but the majority of the patients did not move to the lower intensity category. The highest concurrence was between patient-reported problems and reported intervention for physical function, pain, constipation and loss of appetite. Palliative cancer patients' self-reported problem profile on admission and discharge from hospital has not previously been described and the results indicate a need to focus on improvements to palliative services and for a special service for pain and constipation that could prevent some admissions. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Is laparoscopic colorectal cancer surgery equal to open surgery? An evidence based perspective

    PubMed Central

    Künzli, Beat M; Friess, Helmut; Shrikhande, Shailesh V

    2010-01-01

    Laparoscopic colorectal surgery (LCS) is an evolving subject. Recent studies show that LCS can not only offer safe surgery but evidence is growing that this new technique can be superior to classical open procedures. Fewer perioperative complications and faster postoperative recovery are regularly mentioned when studies of LCS are presented. Even though the learning curve of LCS is frequently debated when limitations of laparoscopic surgeries are reviewed, studies show that in experienced hands LCS can be a safe procedure for colorectal cancer treatment. The learning curve however, is associated with high conversion rates and economical aspects such as higher costs and prolonged hospital stay. Nevertheless, laparoscopic colorectal cancer surgery (LCCR) offers several advantages such as less co-morbidity and less postoperative pain in comparison with open procedures. Furthermore, the good exposure of the pelvic cavity by laparoscopy and the magnification of anatomical structures seem to facilitate pelvic dissection laparoscopically. Moreover, recent studies describe no difference in safety and oncological radicalness in LCCR compared to the open total mesorectal excision (TME). The oncological adequacy of LCCR still remains unproven today, because long-term results do not yet exist. To date, only a few studies have described the results of laparoscopic TME combined with preoperative adjuvant treatment for colorectal cancer. The aim of this review is to examine the various areas of development and controversy of LCCR in comparison to the conventional open approach. PMID:21160858

  18. Radiotherapy combined with surgery as treatment for advanced cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Perches, R D; Lobaton, A T; Garcia, M C

    1983-12-01

    Experience obtained in a group of 44 patients with advanced cervical cancer is reported here. In this study, patients with residual cancer underwent laparotomy eight weeks after one or two different radiotherapy protocols. Sixty-eight percent of patients underwent radical surgery, 85% of patients pelvic exenterations, and 15% radical hysterectomies. In 27% of patients, no evidence of residual cancer was found in surgical specimens. Radical surgery was well tolerated, and one-third of patients were free of disease for one year or more. Control of disease was obtained in 50% of pelvic exenterations and in 60% of radical hysterectomies, regardless of prognosis, clinical stage or radiotherapy scheme. Although results show an improvement of up to 22% when comparing this to other more conventional treatments, we have concluded that we must obtain a wider experience in order to support our findings.

  19. Economics and the laparoscopic surgery learning curve: comparison with open surgery for rectosigmoid cancer.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun-Seok; Kang, Sung-Bum; Kim, Sung-Wook; Cheon, Gui-Neum

    2007-09-01

    Wide-ranging costs of laparoscopic surgery (LAP) are associated with variations in the experience levels of surgeons. There is no available report on the changes of economic outcomes relative to the LAP learning curve in the treatment of colorectal cancer. In the present study, we have compared changes in economic outcomes according to the LAP learning curve with the economic outcomes of open surgery (OS) for rectosigmoid cancer. A total of 197 patients with rectosigmoid cancer were included in this analysis; 116 received LAP and 81 received OS. Scatter of operative times demonstrated an early learning period of 37 cases in LAP. The following outcomes were compared between LAP and OS during the early learning period and experienced periods; operating room (OR) costs, OR-related hospital profit, total hospital charge, and patient payment. During the median interval of two periods according to the laparoscopic surgery learning curve, there was an inflation rate of about 10% on the medical charges such as operation, radiology, laboratory, and admission fee. Operating room costs were significantly higher after LAP during the two periods, but the median difference between LAP and OS decreased during the experienced period ($3,055 to $1,850). With increasing operative experience in LAP, the OR-related hospital deficit improved (-$1,072 to-$840). Total hospital charges were significantly higher for LAP than for OS in the early learning period (p < 0.05), but they were similar in the experienced period ($7,983/patient versus $7,045/patient, p > 0.05). During the experienced period, patients paid a lower surcharge for LAP ($1,885-$1,118). Total hospital charges for laparoscopic surgery were substantially higher than those of open surgery during the early learning period, but become similar during the experienced period. The shortening of the learning period is a critical factor for achieving cost-effective laparoscopic surgery.

  20. Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer: surgery, surveillance and unanswered questions.

    PubMed

    Cisco, Robin M; Norton, Jeffrey A

    2008-08-01

    Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) is an inherited cancer-susceptibility syndrome characterized by autosomal dominance and high penetrance. In 30-50% of cases, a causative germline mutation in CDH1, the E-cadherin gene, may be identified. Female carriers of CDH1 mutations also have an increased (20-40%) risk of lobular breast cancer. Endoscopic surveillance of patients with CDH1 mutations is ineffective because early foci of HDGC are typically small and underlie normal mucosa. CDH1 mutation carriers are therefore offered the option of prophylactic gastrectomy, which commonly reveals early foci of invasive signet-ring cell cancer. We review recommendations for genetic testing, surveillance and prophylactic surgery in HDGC. Areas for future research are discussed, including development of new screening modalities, optimal timing of prophylactic gastrectomy, identification of additional causative mutations in HDGC, management of patients with CDH1 missense mutations and prevention/early detection of lobular breast cancer in CDH1 mutation carriers.

  1. Differences in immune response to anesthetics used for day surgery versus hospitalization surgery for breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ryungsa; Kawai, Ami; Wakisaka, Megumi; Funaoka, Yuri; Ohtani, Shoichiro; Ito, Mitsuya; Kadoya, Takayuki; Okada, Morihito

    2017-09-14

    Surgery/anesthetic technique-stimulated immunosuppression may be associated with outcome for cancer patients. Here, the immune responses of patients undergoing day surgery versus hospitalization surgery for breast cancer were compared in a prospective study. Between February 2012 and August 2014, 21 breast cancer patients underwent day surgery and 16 breast cancer patients underwent hospitalization surgery. The former group received lidocaine/propofol/pethidine, while propofol/systemic opioid- and sevoflurane/propofol/systemic opioid-based anesthesia were administered to the latter group. Surgical stress response was evaluated based on time of operation and amount of bleeding during operation. Immune function was assessed based on natural killer (NK) cell activity, CD4/8 T cell ratio, and cytokine levels of IL-6 and IL-10 that were detected before surgery, after surgery, and on the first postoperative day. Operation time did not differ between the two groups. Blood loss was significantly less for the hospitalization surgery group. No change in NK cell activity was observed for either group, although the CD4/8 T cell ratio increased transiently following day surgery. Levels of IL-6 increased significantly in both groups following surgery, and these levels tended to be higher in the hospitalization surgery group. One patient who underwent hospitalization surgery had higher levels of IL-10. There were few differences in immune response between the two groups, potentially since a majority of the hospitalization surgery patients received propofol-based anesthesia. We hypothesize that the use of volatile anesthetic/opioid analgesia in hospitalization surgery has a greater influence on immune function in breast cancer patients than local anesthetic/propofol-based anesthesia in day surgery.

  2. Practice patterns in breast cancer surgery: Canadian perspective.

    PubMed

    Porter, Geoffrey A; McMulkin-Tait, Heather

    2004-01-01

    Breast cancer is a common disease, and the surgical management is continually evolving. The objective of this study was to describe the current breast cancer practice patterns among Canadian surgeons. All active General Surgeons (n=1172), as accredited by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, were sent a 31-item questionnaire. Anonymous responses were collected and analyzed regarding surgeon demographics, practice, and perceptions regarding surgical care of breast cancer patients. Overall 640 active surgeons responded; of these, 519 (81%) treated breast cancer and formed the study cohort. Practice settings included community (55%), community with university affiliation (28%), and academic (17%). The majority of surgeons (76%) stated that <25% of their practice was devoted to breast disease, and 42% performed < or =2 breast cancer operations/month. Immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) was used by 57% of surgeons. On multivariate analysis, higher surgeon volume of breast cancer cases (p=0.0008), fellowship training in Surgical Oncology (p=0.009), community population (p=0.001), and academic practice setting (p<0.0001) were independently associated with the use of IBR. Of the 640 surgeons who responded, 79% stated that breast cancer surgery should be performed by "most general surgeons." In Canada, most breast cancer surgery was performed by general surgeons who did not appear to have an interest, as defined by training or clinical volume, in breast cancer. Although variability regarding specific surgical issues was found among subgroups of surgeons, the majority of respondents felt that most general surgeons should treat breast cancer.

  3. Robotic surgery for colorectal cancer: systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Papanikolaou, Ioannis G

    2014-12-01

    Surgical practice has been changed since the introduction of robotic techniques and robotic colorectal surgery is an emerging field. Innovative robotic technologies have helped surgeons overcome many technical difficulties of conventional laparoscopic surgery. Herein, we review the clinical studies regarding the application of surgical robots in resections for colorectal cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted for articles published up to September 9, 2012, using the MEDLINE database. The keywords that were used in various combinations were: "surgical robotics," "robotic surgery," "computer-assisted surgery," "colectomy," "sigmoid resection," "sigmoidectomy," and "rectal resection." Fifty-nine articles reporting on robot-assisted resections of colon and/or rectum were identified and 41 studies were finally included in the analysis. A total of 1635 colorectal procedures were performed: 254 right colectomies, 185 left colectomies/sigmoid resections, 969 anterior resections, 182 abdominoperineal or intersphincteric resections, 34 colectomies (without being specified as right or left), and 11 total/subtotal colectomies. In general, blood loss, conversion rates, and complications were low but the operative time was longer than the open procedures, whereas the duration of hospitalization was shorter. The number of harvested lymph nodes was also quite satisfactory. Robotic colorectal operations provide favorable results, with acceptable operative times and low conversion rates and morbidity. Surgical robots may provide additional benefits treating challenging pathologies, such as rectal cancer. Further clinical studies and long-term follow-up are required to better evaluate the outcomes of robotic colorectal surgery.

  4. The role of surgery in advanced epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Cameán, María; Delgado-Sánchez, Elsa; Piñera, Antonio; Diestro, Maria Dolores; De Santiago, Javier; Zapardiel, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, the standard management of advanced epithelial ovarian cancer is correct surgical staging and optimal tumour cytoreduction followed by platinum and taxane-based chemotherapy. Standard surgical staging consists of peritoneal washings, total hysterectomy, and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, inspection of all abdominal organs and the peritoneal surface, biopsies of suspicious areas or randomised biopsies if they are not present, omentectomy and para-aortic lymphadenectomy. After this complete surgical staging, the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) staging system for ovarian cancer is applied to determine the management and prognosis of the patient. Complete tumour cytoreduction has shown an improvement in survival. There are some criteria to predict cytoreduction outcomes based on serum biomarkers levels, preoperative imaging techniques, and laparoscopic-based scores. Optimised patient selection for primary cytoreduction would determine patients who could benefit from an optimal cytoreduction and might benefit from interval surgery. The administration of intraperitoneal chemotherapy after debulking surgery has shown an increase in progression-free survival and overall survival, especially in patients with no residual disease after surgery. It is considered that 3–17% of all epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC) occur in young women that have not fulfilled their reproductive desires. In these patients, fertility-sparing surgery is a worthy option in early ovarian cancer. PMID:27594911

  5. Critical appraisal of laparoscopic vs open rectal cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Winson Jianhong; Chew, Min Hoe; Dharmawan, Angela Renayanti; Singh, Manraj; Acharyya, Sanchalika; Loi, Carol Tien Tau; Tang, Choong Leong

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the long-term clinical and oncological outcomes of laparoscopic rectal resection (LRR) and the impact of conversion in patients with rectal cancer. METHODS: An analysis was performed on a prospective database of 633 consecutive patients with rectal cancer who underwent surgical resection. Patients were compared in three groups: Open surgery (OP), laparoscopic surgery, and converted laparoscopic surgery. Short-term outcomes, long-term outcomes, and survival analysis were compared. RESULTS: Among 633 patients studied, 200 patients had successful laparoscopic resections with a conversion rate of 11.1% (25 out of 225). Factors predictive of survival on univariate analysis include the laparoscopic approach (P = 0.016), together with factors such as age, ASA status, stage of disease, tumor grade, presence of perineural invasion and vascular emboli, circumferential resection margin < 2 mm, and postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy. The survival benefit of laparoscopic surgery was no longer significant on multivariate analysis (P = 0.148). Neither 5-year overall survival (70.5% vs 61.8%, P = 0.217) nor 5-year cancer free survival (64.3% vs 66.6%, P = 0.854) were significantly different between the laparoscopic group and the converted group. CONCLUSION: LRR has equivalent long-term oncologic outcomes when compared to OP. Laparoscopic conversion does not confer a worse prognosis. PMID:27358678

  6. National Practice in Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Breast Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Eroglu, Aydan; Karasoy, Durdu; Kurt, Halil; Baskan, Semih

    2014-01-01

    Background Although breast cancer surgery is regarded as a “clean” surgery, surgical site infection (SSI) rates are higher than expected. There is no consensus regarding the use of antibiotic prophylaxis in elective breast surgery. The nationwide survey was conducted to determine the trend of antibiotic prophylaxis in breast cancer among Turkish surgeons. Methods The survey was sent to surgeons who are member of Turkish Surgical Association (TSA) via e-mail from TSA web address. A 15 item web-based survey consisted of surgeon demographics and the use of prophylactic antibiotic in patients with risk factors related to SSI. Results The number of completed questionnaires was 245. The most common antibiotic used was first generation of cephalosporins. A majority of respondents indicated that prophylaxis was preferred in patients with high risk of SSI including preoperative chemotherapy or radiotherapy, older age, diabetes mellitus, immunodeficiency, immediate reconstruction (P < 0.05). However, the use of drain did not significantly influence antibiotic prophylaxis (P = 0.091). Conclusions The use of prophylactic antibiotic was strongly dependent on the presence of some risk factors; however, the variation in current practice regarding antibiotic prophylaxis demonstrated a lack of its effect on preventing SSI after breast cancer surgery. PMID:24400029

  7. Ultrasonic scalpel for gastric cancer surgery: a prospective randomized study.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Kentaro; Nakane, Yasushi; Michiura, Taku; Yamada, Masanori; Mukaide, Hiromi; Fukui, Junichi; Miki, Hirokazu; Ueyama, Yosuke; Nakatake, Richi; Tokuhara, Katsuji; Iwamoto, Shigeyoshi; Yanagimoto, Hiroaki; Toyokawa, Hideyoshi; Satoi, Sohei; Kwon, A-Hon

    2012-10-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the potential advantages of the ultrasonic scalpel compared with the conventional technique in gastric cancer surgery. Patients with resectable adenocarcinoma of the stomach were randomly assigned to ultrasonic scalpel or conventional technique. We used the HARMONIC FOCUS (Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.) as ultrasonic scalpel. Between February 2010 and December 2010, 60 patients with resectable gastric cancer were enrolled into the study. Operative time was significantly shorter with the ultrasonic arm than with the conventional arm (median 238.5 vs. 300.5 min; P = 0.0004). Blood loss was also significantly lower in the ultrasonic arm than in the conventional arm (median 351.0 vs. 569.5 ml; P = 0.016). Clavien-Dindo grades of postoperative complications were similar in the two groups. From a questionnaire survey of operators, the ultrasonic scalpel significantly reduced the stress of lymph node dissection (3.67 vs. 2.87; P = 0.0006). However, in assisting surgeons, the contributions to surgery, study, and technical improvement of the ultrasonic group were lower than in the conventional group. This study shows that the ultrasonic scalpel is a reliable and safe tool for open gastric cancer surgery.

  8. [Causes of local recurrence after curative surgery for rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Hôhn, József; Varga, László; Baradnay, Gellért; Simonka, Zsolt; Géczi, Tibor; Nagy, Ferenc; Molnár, Tamás; Maráz, Anikó; Kahán, Zsuzsa; Balogh, Adám

    2003-01-01

    The rate of local recurrence (LR) has been 20-40% after resective surgery for rectal cancer by the traditional - Miles or Dixon - operative technics. The authors performed curative resection in 358 patients with rectal cancer in a 10 year period (01.01.1990 - 31.12.2000) in the Surgical Department of Szeged University. Since 01.01.1996 the authors changed this type of surgery for the Heald technics (total mesorectal excision - TME - with sharp dissection, using the UltraCision device) for the surgical treatment of middle or lower third rectal cancer. To compare the results of the two procedures, the authors analysed their material in two periods: Period I: 01.01.1991 - 31.12.1992: 62 patients operated on with the traditional operative technics; LR 15% within 2 years after surgery. Period II: 01.01.1997 - 31.12.1998: 78 patients operated on with the Heald technics (TME with sharp dissection); LR 6.4% within 2 years after surgery. Based on their results, the authors found that the modern operative technics by Heald, used in the second period of the study, was a relevant factor decreasing LR from 15% to 6.4%, while the gender, age of the patients, ratio of the abdominoperineal extirpation versus anterior resection (APRE/AR) and the free margin of more than 3 cm proved to be irrelevant.

  9. The assessment and management of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting among cancer patients in a chemotherapy ward: a best practice implementation project.

    PubMed

    Gu, Lingli; Li, Jing

    2016-03-01

    Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) are considered to be two of the most distressing side-effects of chemotherapy. They have a negative impact on a patient's quality of life and can influence the continuance of treatment. Owing to the lack of effective management of CINV, regular assessment and management of CINV is recommended for patients undergoing chemotherapy. The aim of this project was to integrate the available evidence on the assessment and management of CINV into practice, and implement strategies to improve compliance with evidence-based practice. The project carried out a pre- and post-implementation audit procedure using the Joanna Briggs Institute Practical Application of Clinical Evidence System and Getting Research into Practice programs. Five audit criteria were established according to the best available evidence on the assessment and management of CINV. The program was divided into three phases and conducted over four months in the chemotherapy ward, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, China. Sixty patients and 14 oncology nurses were involved in this project. The results of the follow-up cycle showed that the compliance rates regarding patient education, risk factors evaluation and non-pharmacologic managements were 100%, 100% and 80%, respectively. The rate of validated tools being used by patients and nurses improved by 93% and 97%, respectively. This project demonstrated that the use of pre- and post-best practice audits is an effective method for incorporating evidence into practice in a chemotherapy ward. The practice of assessing and managing CINV was significantly improved. The next step is to develop strategies for sustaining the new procedures of CINV assessment and management.

  10. Being-in-the-Chemotherapy-Suite versus Being-in-the-Oncology-Ward: An Analytical View of Two Hospital Sites Occupied by People Experiencing Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Catherine; van Heugten, Kate; Keeling, Sally; Szekely, Francisc

    2017-01-01

    How do people with cancer occupy places within the health system during their journey through palliative care? The answer to this question was explored by the authors as part of a wider ethnographic study of eight people’s journeys from referral to palliative care services to the end of life. This article reports on findings that have emerged from ongoing analysis that has been completed in the years proceeding data collection. An ethnographic research design was used to collect data about the participants and their family members over a three-year period. Data was collected using participant observation and semi-structured interviews. Over 380 transcripts based on field note entries and taped interviews were produced during the 1121 h of contact with participants and family members that made up the research period. Analysis of these texts identified two focal sites within Christchurch Hospital that were occupied by the participants. These were the Chemotherapy Suite and the Oncology Ward. Drawing on literature concerning previous anthropological analysis, research was conducted to understand how places affect people and how people affect places. The researchers have used a model outlined by the American ethnographer Miles Richardson to analyse two distinct sites within one hospital. As explained in Richardson’s article, whose title is used to model the title of this article, a sense of place becomes apparent when comparing and contrasting two sites within the same location. Richardson’s article is highly interpretative and relies not only on pre-existing theoretical frameworks but also on personal interpretation. The same approach has been used in the current article. Here, ethnographic methods require the researcher’s interpretation of how participants occupied these sites. Following this approach, the Chemotherapy Suite is presented as a place where medicine dominates illness, and appears as distinct from the Oncology Ward, where disease predominates and

  11. Needlescopic surgery for left-sided colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Toshiki; Fukunaga, Yosuke; Ueno, Masashi; Nagayama, Satoshi; Fujimoto, Yoshiya; Konishi, Tsuyoshi; Akiyoshi, Takashi; Ono, Riki; Yamaguchi, Toshiharu

    2014-12-01

    Laparoscopic surgery has become the standard for colorectal cancers, but more minimally invasive surgery is continuously pursued. In June 2011, our institution started needlescopic surgery (NS). The aims of this study are to describe this technique and to investigate its feasibility for left-sided colorectal cancer surgery. From June 2011 to June 2013, 105 sigmoid colon and upper/middle rectal cancer patients underwent NS in our institution, involving one 5-mm port and three 3-mm ports, with the exception of an umbilical 12-mm port. A 10-mm scope is used through the umbilical 12-mm port, which will be extended to a small skin incision for specimen extraction. After dissection of the left colon, a 5-mm scope is inserted through the right lower 5-mm port and a linear stapler is inserted through the umbilical 12-mm port for rectal transection. The specimen is then extracted through umbilical incision, and the anastomosis is carried out by the double-staple technique. TNM staging is stage 0/I/II/III/IV = 0/31/32/31/11. Fifty-one patients underwent sigmoidectomy and 54 patients underwent anterior resection. There was no conversion to open surgery, but one patient required a change to a 5-mm port from one of the 3-mm ports. Mean operating time was 193 min and mean estimated blood loss was 12 ml. There were ten (9 %) postoperative complications: two anastomotic leaks requiring reoperation, two anastomotic hemorrhages, and one wound infection. There was no mortality. NS for left-sided colorectal cancer was a technically and oncologically feasible technique for selected patients.

  12. Gamma Knife Surgery for Metastatic Brain Tumors from Gynecologic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Shigeo; Shuto, Takashi; Sato, Mitsuru

    2016-05-01

    The incidences of metastatic brain tumors from gynecologic cancer have increased. The results of Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) for the treatment of patients with brain metastases from gynecologic cancer (ovarian, endometrial, and uterine cervical cancers) were retrospectively analyzed to identify the efficacy and prognostic factors for local tumor control and survival. The medical records were retrospectively reviewed of 70 patients with 306 tumors who underwent GKS for brain metastases from gynecologic cancer between January 1995 and December 2013 in our institution. The primary cancers were ovarian in 33 patients with 147 tumors and uterine in 37 patients with 159 tumors. Median tumor volume was 0.3 cm(3). Median marginal prescription dose was 20 Gy. The local tumor control rates were 96.4% at 6 months and 89.9% at 1 year. There was no statistically significant difference between ovarian and uterine cancers. Higher prescription dose and smaller tumor volume were significantly correlated with local tumor control. Median overall survival time was 8 months. Primary ovarian cancer, controlled extracranial metastases, and solitary brain metastasis were significantly correlated with satisfactory overall survival. Median activities of daily living (ADL) preservation survival time was 8 months. Primary ovarian cancer, controlled extracranial metastases, and higher Karnofsky Performance Status score were significantly correlated with better ADL preservation. GKS is effective for control of tumor progression in patients with brain metastases from gynecologic cancer, and may provide neurologic benefits and preservation of the quality of life. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Criteria of life quality after reconstructive breast cancer surgery].

    PubMed

    Strittmatter, H J; Neises, M; Blecken, S R

    2006-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of life of women after a breast cancer surgery. The question was if women which had reconstructive breast cancer surgery experience a higher quality of life than women who, for various distinct reasons, had not undergone reconstruction. The participants of this study were women who had either received a mastectomy or those who at the same time underwent a breast reconstruction using implants during the time period from 1/1/2000 until 31/10/2003 at the University Hospital for Women of Heidelberg and Mannheim. With the help of three standardised questionnaires, the women could describe their post-surgical physical and psychological condition as well as the perceived quality of life. The study included 33 patients who had received breast implants and 31 patients without reconstruction. Women who had breast cancer surgery with reconstruction through implants had less problems and restrictions concerning their physical condition as well as their functional status. Moreover, compared to those participants with no reconstruction, their cognitive and emotional burdens were not as pronounced and they also they were able to better cope with the disease. Thus, their overall quality of life was superior than that of the other women. Breast reconstruction after primary and secondary mastectomy is an important contribution in order to improve the self-esteem and quality of a patient's life. Furthermore, it plays an essential role in coping with the psychological effects of breast cancer.

  14. [Laparoscopic versus open surgery for colorectal cancer. A comparative study].

    PubMed

    Arribas-Martin, Antonio; Díaz-Pizarro-Graf, José Ignacio; Muñoz-Hinojosa, Jorge Demetrio; Valdés-Castañeda, Alberto; Cruz-Ramírez, Omar; Bertrand, Martin Marie

    2014-01-01

    Laparoscopic surgery for colorectal cancer is currently accepted and widespread worldwide. However, according tol the surgical experience on this approach, surgical and short-term oncologic results may vary. Studies comparing laparoscopic vs. open surgery in our population are scarce. To determine the superiority of the laparoscopic vs. open technique for colorectal cancer surgery. This retrospective and comparative study collected data from patients operated on for colorectal cancer between 1999 and 2011 at the Angeles Lomas Hospital, Mexico. A total of 82 patients were included in this study; 47 were operated through an open approach and 35 laparoscopically. Mean operative time was significantly lower in the open approach group (p= 0.008). There were no significant difference between both techniques for intraoperative bleeding (p= 0.3980), number of lymph nodes (p= 0.27), time to initiate oral feeding (p= 0.31), hospital stay (p= 0.12), and postoperative pain (p= 0.19). Procedure-related complications rate and type were not significantly different in both groups (p= 0.44). Patients operated laparoscopically required significantly less analgesic drugs (p= 0.04) and less need for epidural postoperative analgesia (p= 0.01). Laparoscopic approach is as safe as the traditional open approach for colorectal cancer. Early oncological and surgical results confirm its suitability according to this indication.

  15. The Liverpool Care Pathway for cancer patients dying in hospital medical wards: a before-after cluster phase II trial of outcomes reported by family members.

    PubMed

    Costantini, Massimo; Pellegrini, Fabio; Di Leo, Silvia; Beccaro, Monica; Rossi, Carla; Flego, Guia; Romoli, Vittoria; Giannotti, Michela; Morone, Paola; Ivaldi, Giovanni P; Cavallo, Laura; Fusco, Flavio; Higginson, Irene J

    2014-01-01

    Hospital is the most common place of cancer death but concerns regarding the quality of end-of-life care remain. Preliminary assessment of the effectiveness of the Liverpool Care Pathway on the quality of end-of-life care provided to adult cancer patients during their last week of life in hospital. Uncontrolled before-after intervention cluster trial. The trial was performed within four hospital wards participating in the pilot implementation of the Italian version of the Liverpool Care Pathway programme. All cancer patients who died in the hospital wards 2-4 months before and after the implementation of the Italian version of Liverpool Care Pathway were identified. A total of 2 months after the patient's death, bereaved family members were interviewed using the Toolkit After-Death Family Interview (seven 0-100 scales assessing the quality of end-of-life care) and the Italian version of the Views of Informal Carers - Evaluation of Services (VOICES) (three items assessing pain, breathlessness and nausea-vomiting). An interview was obtained for 79 family members, 46 (73.0%) before and 33 (68.8%) after implementation of the Italian version of Liverpool Care Pathway. Following Italian version of Liverpool Care Pathway implementation, there was a significant improvement in the mean scores of four Toolkit scales: respect, kindness and dignity (+16.8; 95% confidence interval = 3.6-30.0; p = 0.015); family emotional support (+20.9; 95% confidence interval = 9.6-32.3; p < 0.001); family self-efficacy (+14.3; 95% confidence interval = 0.3-28.2; p = 0.049) and coordination of care (+14.3; 95% confidence interval = 4.2-24.3; p = 0.007). No significant improvement in symptom' control was observed. These results provide the first robust data collected from family members of a preliminary clinically significant improvement, in some aspects, of quality of care after the implementation of the Italian version of Liverpool Care Pathway programme. The poor effect for symptom control

  16. Robotic surgery in supermorbidly obese patients with endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Jean-Marie; Goodheart, Michael J; McDonald, Megan; Hansen, Jean; Reyes, Henry D; Button, Anna; Bender, David

    2015-07-01

    Morbid obesity is a known risk factor for the development of endometrial cancer. Several studies have demonstrated the overall feasibility of robotic-assisted surgical staging for endometrial cancer as well as the benefits of robotics compared with laparotomy. However, there have been few reports that have evaluated robotic surgery for endometrial cancer in the supermorbidly obese population (body mass index [BMI], ≥50 kg/m(2)). We sought to evaluate safety, feasibility, and outcomes for supermorbidly obese patients who undergo robotic surgery for endometrial cancer, compared with patients with lower body mass indices. We performed a retrospective chart review of 168 patients with suspected early-stage endometrial adenocarcinoma who underwent robotic surgery for the management of their disease. Analysis of variance and univariate logistic regression were used to compare patient characteristics and surgical variables across all body weights. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to determine the impact of body weight on recurrence-free and overall survival. The mean BMI of our cohort was 40.9 kg/m(2). Median follow up was 31 months. Fifty-six patients, 30% of which had grade 2 or 3 tumors, were supermorbidly obese with a BMI of ≥50 kg/m(2) (mean, 56.3 kg/m(2)). A comparison between the supermorbidly obese and lower-weight patients demonstrated no differences in terms of length of hospital stay, blood loss, complication rates, numbers of pelvic and paraaortic lymph nodes retrieved, or recurrence and survival. There was a correlation between BMI and conversion to an open procedure, in which the odds of conversion increased with increasing BMI (P = .02). Offering robotic surgery to supermorbidly obese patients with endometrial cancer is a safe and feasible surgical management option. When compared with patients with a lower BMI, the supermorbidly obese patient had a similar outcome, length of hospital stay, blood loss, complications, and numbers of lymph

  17. [Advantages and disadvantages of minimally invasive surgery in colorectal cancer surgery].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Minhua; Ma, Junjun

    2017-06-25

    Since the emergence of minimally invasive technology twenty years ago, as a surgical concept and surgical technique for colorectal cancer surgery, its obvious advantages have been recognized. Laparoscopic technology, as one of the most important technology platform, has got a lot of evidence-based support for the oncological safety and effectiveness in colorectal cancer surgery Laparoscopic technique has advantages in terms of identification of anatomic plane and autonomic nerve, protection of pelvic structure, and fine dissection of vessels. But because of the limitation of laparoscopic technology there are still some deficiencies and shortcomings, including lack of touch and lack of stereo vision problems, in addition to the low rectal cancer, especially male, obese, narrow pelvis, larger tumors, it is difficult to get better view and manipulating triangle in laparoscopy. However, the emergence of a series of new minimally invasive technology platform is to make up for the defects and deficiencies. The robotic surgical system possesses advantages, such as stereo vision, higher magnification, manipulator wrist with high freedom degree, filtering of tremor and higher stability, but still has disadvantages, such as lack of haptic feedback, longer operation time, high operation cost and expensive price. 3D system of laparoscopic surgery has similar visual experience and feelings as robotic surgery in the 3D view, the same operating skills as 2D laparoscopy and a short learning curve. The price of 3D laparoscopy is also moderate, which makes the 3D laparoscopy more popular in China. Transanal total mesorectal excision (taTME) by changing the traditional laparoscopic pelvic surgery approach, may have certain advantages for male cases with narrow pelvic and patients with large tumor, and it is in accordance with the technical concept of natural orifice, with less minimally invasive and better cosmetics, which can be regarded as a supplemental technique of the

  18. [Kidney function and renal cancer surgery].

    PubMed

    Izzedine, Hassan; Méjean, Arnaud; Escudier, Bernard

    2014-02-01

    Although radical nephrectomy is still practiced in many patients with large renal tumors, oncology and nephrology arguments for kidney-sparing approach for small renal masses has taken over this first. Indeed, partial nephrectomy provides equivalent oncologic results while preserving renal function and thereby limit morbidity and cardiovascular mortality related to chronic kidney disease. In addition, patients who develop kidney cancer often have medical comorbidities that may affect renal function, such as diabetes and hypertension. Histological examination of renal tissue adjacent to the tumor showed significant pathological changes in the majority of patients. For elderly patients or patients with comorbidities, active surveillance allows kidney-sparing approach with extremely low rates of progression and metastasis of cancer disease. Despite these significant advances in understanding for the treatment of small renal masses, partial nephrectomy remains underused. Better management must take into account the preservation of renal function in order to increase overall survival. A strategy for the systematic evaluation of renal function in patients with CR, with multidisciplinary staff (nephrologist urologist and oncologist), is therefore highly desirable.

  19. Incidence of metachronous gastric cancer in the remnant stomach after synchronous multiple cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Isao; Hato, Shinji; Kobatake, Takaya; Ohta, Koji; Kubo, Yoshirou; Nishimura, Rieko; Kurita, Akira

    2014-01-01

    In the preoperative evaluation for gastric cancer, high-resolution endoscopic technologies allow us to detect small accessory lesions. However, it is not known if the gastric remnant after partial gastrectomy for synchronous multiple gastric cancers has a greater risk for metachronous cancer. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of metachronous cancer in this patient subset compared with that after solitary cancer surgery. Data on a consecutive series of 1,281 patients gastrectomized for early gastric cancer from 1991 to 2007 were analyzed retrospectively. The 715 gastric remnants after distal gastrectomy were periodically surveyed by endoscopic examination in Shikoku Cancer Center. Among those surveyed cases, 642 patients were pathologically diagnosed with solitary lesion (SO group) and 73 patients with synchronous multiple lesions (MU group) at the time of the initial surgery. In the follow-up period, 15 patients in the SO group and 3 patients in the MU group were diagnosed as having metachronous cancer in the gastric remnant. The cumulative 4-year incidence rate was 1.9 % in the SO group and 5.5 % in the MU group. The difference did not reach the significant level by the log-rank test. The incidence of metachronous cancer is higher after multiple cancer surgery; however, the difference is not statistically significant.

  20. [Perineal cutaneous metastases from adenocarcinoma after surgery for colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Placer, Carlos; Elósegui, José Luis; Irureta, Idoia; Mujika, José Andrés; Goena, Ignacio; Enríquez Navascués, José M

    2007-07-01

    The development of cutaneous metastases in the context of colorectal cancer is exceptional, especially in the absence of visceral lesions. We present the case of a 50-year-old woman who underwent surgery for a T3N0M0 tumor in the sigmoid colon, with resection of ovarian metastases at 12 months. Reoperation was performed 14 months later for local anastomotic recurrence. Four months after surgery, a nodular ulcerated lesion was observed in the perineum due to metastases from adenocarcinoma. Aggressive local surgery was performed and the patient has presented no recurrences after a 5-year follow-up. We discuss the need for correct management of the rectal or anal stump (through the use of iodine povidone wash solution) during instrumental anastomoses.

  1. [Robotic surgery -- the modern surgical treatment of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Szabó, Ferenc János; Alexander, de la Taille

    2014-09-01

    Minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery replaces many open surgery procedures in urology due to its advantages concerning post-operative morbidity. However, the technical challenges and need of learning have limited the application of this method to the work of highly qualified surgeons. The introduction of da Vinci surgical system has offered important technical advantages compared to the laparoscopic surgical procedure. Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy became a largely accepted procedure. It has paved the way for urologists to start other, more complex operations, decreasing this way the operative morbidity. The purpose of this article is to overview the history of robotic surgery, its current and future states in the treatment of the cancer. We present our robot-assisted radical prostatectomy and the results.

  2. Radioimmunoguided surgery in primary colon cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nieroda, C.A.; Mojzisik, C.; Sardi, A.; Ferrara, P.J.; Hinkle, G.; Thurston, M.O.; Martin, E.W. Jr. )

    1990-01-01

    Radioimmunoguided surgery (RIGS), the intraoperative use of a hand-held gamma detecting probe (GDP) to identify tissue containing radiolabeled monoclonal antibody (MAb), was performed upon 30 patients with primary colon carcinoma. Each patient received an intravenous injection of MAb B72.3 (1.0 to 0.25 mg) radiolabeled with {sup 125}I (5.0 to 1.0 mCi) 8 to 34 days before exploration. The GDP was used to measure radioactivity in colon tissue, tumor bed, nodal drainage areas, and areas of suspected metastases. Antibody localized to histologically documented tumor in 23 of 30 patients (77%). Tumor margins were more clearly defined in 20 of 30 patients (67%). GDP counts led to major alterations in surgical resection in five patients (17%) and changes in adjuvant therapy in four (14%). GDP counts identified occult liver metastases in two patients (7%) and correctly indicated the benign nature of liver masses in three (10%). In four patients (13%), occult nodal metastases were identified. RIGS can precisely delineate tumor margins, define the extent of nodal involvement, and localize occult tumor, providing a method of immediate intraoperative staging that may lessen recurrences and produce higher survival rates.

  3. Comparison of laparoscopic vs. open surgery for rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Zihai; Wang, Zheng; Huang, Shijie; Zhong, Shizhen; Lin, Jianhua

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the safety of laparoscopic radical resection for rectal cancer. A total of 64 cases of rectal cancer patients undergoing radical surgery between January, 1998 and March, 2010 were collected. The patients were divided into the laparoscopic rectal surgery group (LS group, n=31) and the open surgery group (OS group, n=33). Operation time, postoperative recovery, complications and tumor-free survival rate were compared between the two groups. The inclusion criteria were as follows: Standard Karnofsky score >70 prior to surgery, definitive pathological diagnosis and complete clinical data. The exclusion criteria were concomitant tumors affecting survival. With the Dixon operation, the LS group had a longer operation time compared with the OS group (271.2±56.2 vs. 216.0±62.7 min, respectively; P=0.036), and an earlier time of oral intake (3.0±0.9 vs. 4.7±1.0 days, respectively; P=0.000). There were no significant differences between the LS and OS groups in terms of intraoperative blood loss, number of lymph nodes retrieved, duration of postoperative hyperthermia and hospitalization time (P>0.05). With the Miles operation, there were no obvious differences between the LS and OS groups regarding operation time, intraoperative blood loss, number of lymph nodes retrieved, time of oral intake, duration of postoperative hyperthermia and hospitalization time (P>0.05). Furthermore, there were no significant differences between the LS and OS groups with the Dixon or Miles operation in terms of 3-year tumor-free survival rate (P>0.05). Thus, laparoscopic surgery appears to be a safe and feasible option for the treatment of rectal cancer. PMID:28357087

  4. Efficacy of Ramelteon for delirium after lung cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Ryo; Omasa, Mitsugu; Fujimoto, Ryo; Ishikawa, Hiroyuki; Aoki, Minoru

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the feasibility of Ramelteon for the prevention of delirium after lung cancer surgery in elderly patients. Medical records of patients over 70 years old, who underwent anatomical pulmonary resection for lung cancer at our institution from January 2013 to December 2015, were reviewed. Patients treated in 2013 and 2014 were used as a control group. Ramelteon was administered daily for 7 days after surgery. The incidence of delirium was determined based on the Intensive Care Delirium Screening Checklist (ICDSC). Scores of ≥4 and 1-3 points were used for the diagnoses of delirium and a pre-delirious state, respectively. There were 24 patients in the Ramelteon group and 58 patients in the control group. ICDSC scores of ≥4 points were found for no patients in the Ramelteon group and 5 (9%) in the control group, whereas 21 (88%) and 49 (85%) patients, in the respective groups, had ICDSC scores of 0 points. The average incidence of events, associated with delirium, showed a trend of being lower in the Ramelteon group (0.25 ± 0.74 vs 1.58 ± 4.93, P = 0.061), and all events in the Ramelteon group occurred on the day of surgery. Thus, only one day was required for complete recovery from delirium in the Ramelteon group, whereas 8 days were needed in the control group. The peak delirious state occurred after 5 days in the control group. Ramelteon is likely to reduce the incidence and intensity of delirium after surgery for lung cancer in elderly patients. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  5. A review of postoperative analgesia for breast cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Gloria S; Ilfeld, Brian M

    2016-11-01

    An online database search with subsequent article review was performed in order to review the various analgesic modalities for breast cancer surgery. Of 514 abstracts, 284 full-length manuscripts were reviewed. The effect of pharmacologic interventions is varied (NSAIDS, opioids, anticonvulsants, ketamine, lidocaine). Likewise, data from high-quality randomized, controlled studies on wound infiltration (including liposome encapsulated) and infusion of local anesthetic are minimal and conflicting. Conversely, abundant evidence demonstrates paravertebral blocks and thoracic epidural infusions provide effective analgesia and minimize opioid requirements, while decreasing opioid-related side effects in the immediate postoperative period. Other techniques with promising - but extremely limited - data include cervical epidural infusion, brachial plexus, interfascial plane and interpleural blocks. In conclusion, procedural interventions involving regional blocks are more conclusively effective than pharmacologic modalities in providing analgesia to patients following surgery for breast cancer.

  6. Thermo-magnetic surgery for experimental renal cancer.

    PubMed

    Rand, R W; Snow, H D; Elliott, D G; Bubbers, J E; Barbaric, Z L; Brown, W J

    1982-09-01

    Thermo-magnetic surgery is an innovative modality in the treatment of malignancies. This unique combination can produce selectively controlled destruction of deep tumors. Heating of the magnetic metallic compounds of ferrosilicone by hysteresis produces temperatures which are incompatible with cancer cell survival. The intense focal heating causes a coagulation necrosis. Damage to surrounding normal tissue can be avoided by careful temperature monitoring and power control of the magnetic field. Cell destruction in the target tissue has been demonstrated by light and electron microscopy. Reproducible and predictable VX2 renal carcinomas in rabbits have been produced and used as the tumor model in the initial experiments of this research project. A clinical trial with selected cancer patients, performed with this technique of thermo-magnetic surgery, is now a reasonable and feasible procedure.

  7. Gastric Cancer After Restrictive Bariatric Surgery: A Clinical Pitfall.

    PubMed

    Scozzari, Gitana; Balmativola, Davide; Trapani, Renza; Toppino, Mauro; Morino, Mario

    2014-08-01

    Although vertical banded gastroplasty is rarely performed at present, most bariatric surgery departments continue to follow up patients who underwent this procedure in the past few decades. In view of this, it is advisable for bariatric and general surgeons to know how to diagnose the very rare event of the development of a gastric cancer after this restrictive procedure. In this report, 2 cases of gastric cancer occurring years after vertical banded gastroplasty are presented, and clinical presentation and diagnostic difficulties are discussed. © The Author(s) 2013.

  8. Women's recovery experiences after breast cancer reconstruction surgery.

    PubMed

    Spector, Denise J; Mayer, Deborah K; Knafl, Kathleen; Pusic, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Many women with early-stage breast cancer choose breast reconstruction following mastectomy with the goal to improve physical and psychological quality of life. Breast reconstruction procedures vary in surgical complexity, types of postsurgical complications, and time to recovery, all of which can affect a women's well-being. Although there is a growing body of literature on the satisfaction with aesthetic outcomes following breast reconstruction, there is little research addressing the recovery process. This qualitative study explores woman's physical and emotional recovery experiences. Findings may be useful for improving educational and counseling services for women who undergo breast cancer reconstructive surgeries.

  9. Surgery for oligometastasis of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Fengchun; Poruk, Katherine E.

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) has steadily increased over the past several decades. The majority of PDAC patients will present with distant metastases, limiting surgical management in this population. Hepatectomy and pulmonary metastasectomy (PM) has been well established for colorectal cancer patients with isolated, resectable hepatic or pulmonary metastatic disease. Recent advancements in effective systemic therapy for PDAC have led to the selection of certain patients where metastectomy may be potentially indicated. However, the indication for resection of oligometastases in PDAC is not well defined. This review will discuss the current literature on the surgical management of metastatic disease for PDAC with a specific focus on surgical resection for isolated hepatic and pulmonary metastases. PMID:26361405

  10. Optical coherence tomography in guided surgery of GI cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagaynova, Elena V.; Abelevich, Alexander I.; Zagaynov, Vladimir E.; Gladkova, Natalia D.; Denisenko, Arkady N.; Feldchtein, Felix I.; Snopova, Ludmila B.; Kutis, Irina S.

    2005-04-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a new high spatial resolution, real-time optical imaging modality, known from prior pilot studies for its high sensitivity to invasive cancer. We reported our results in an OCT feasibility study for accurate determination of the proximal border for esophageal carcinoma and the distal border for rectal carcinoma. The OCT study enrolled 19 patients with rectal adenocarcinoma and 24 patients with distal esophageal carcinoma (14 squamous cell carcinomas, 10 adenocarcinomas). During pre-surgery planning endoscopy we performed in vivo OCT imaging of the tumor border at four dial clock axes (12, 3, 6 and 9 o"clock). The OCT border then was marked by an electrocoagulator, or by a methylene blue tattoo. A cold biopsy (from the esophagus) was performed at visual and OCT borders and compared with visual and OCT readings. 27 post-surgery excised specimens were analyzed. OCT borders matched the histopathology in 94% cases in the rectum and 83.3% in the esophagus. In the cases of a mismatch between the OCT and histology borders, a deep tumor invasion occurred in the muscle layer (esophagus, rectum). Because of its high sensitivity to mucosal cancer, OCT can be used for pre-surgery planning and surgery guidance of the proximal border for esophageal carcinoma and the distal border for rectal carcinoma. However, deep invasion in the rectum or esophageal wall has to be controlled by alternative diagnostic modalities.

  11. A systematic review of prehabilitation programs in abdominal cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Hijazi, Yasser; Gondal, Umair; Aziz, Omer

    2017-03-01

    Prehabilitation programs aim to optimise patients in order to enhance post-operative recovery. This study aims to review the composition of prehabilitation programs for patients undergoing major abdominal cancer surgery and define the outcome measures that are used to evaluate this intervention. A systematic literature review of all comparative studies on prehabilitation versus standard care in patients undergoing abdominal cancer surgery was performed in accordance with PRISMA guidelines. Literature search was performed using Medline, OVID, EMBASE, Google Scholar, and Cochrane databases. Outcomes of interest included prehabilitation program composition (exercise, nutritional, and psychological interventions), duration, mode of delivery, and outcome measures used to determine impact of prehabilitation versus standard care. 9 studies (7 randomised controlled and 2 prospective non-randomised trials) comprising of 549 patients (281 prehabilitation versus 268 standard care) were included in this review. 5 studies reported patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer, 2 for bladder tumours, 1 for liver resections, and 1 involving unspecified abdominal oncological operations. The 6 min walk test (6MWT) was used in 4 studies to measure functional capacity with a threshold of >20 m improvement at 4-8 weeks post-operatively deemed significant (distance range from 278 to 560 m). Changes in anaerobic threshold and VO2(max) with prehabilitation were evaluated in 5 studies (ml/kg/min). Health-related quality of life was evaluated using SF-36 system, anxiety assessed using hospital anxiety and depression score (HADS). Post-operative complications were classified according to the Clavien-Dindo classification with no significant difference between prehabilitation and standard care groups. Prehabilitation programs in patients undergoing abdominal cancer surgery remain heterogeneous in their composition, mode of administration, outcome measures of functional capacity that

  12. Epidemiological and Clinical Aspects and Therapy of Chronic Otitis Media in the “ENT” and Cervicofacial Surgery Ward in the University Hospital of Ouagadougou

    PubMed Central

    Gyebre, Y. M. C.; Ouedraogo, R. W.-L.; Elola, A.; Ouedraogo, B. P.; Sereme, M.; Ouattara, M.; Ouoba, K.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of this study was to analyze the epidemiological and clinical aspects of chronic otitis media and its therapeutic processes in our context. Patients and Methods. In a prospective study over a period of 1 year (March 2009–February 2010), 79 patients with chronic otitis media have been cared for in the otolaryngology ward of the University Hospital of Ouagadougou. Results. Chronic otitis media (COM) commonly occurs in the age group from 0 to 15 years (40.50%). Otorrhea was the main reason for consultation in 53 cases (67.10%); the most frequently encountered clinicopathological forms were simple COM (71%) followed by otitis media with effusion (24.30%). Intra-auricular instillations of traditional products (46.09%) were the dominant favoring factor. Treatment was essentially through medication in 59 cases with a stabilization of lesions. Endotemporal complications were noticed in 6 cases. Conclusion. The fight against chronic otitis media is carried out through preventive measures of education the of people. PMID:24066241

  13. [Intraoperative radiotherapy in abdominal-pelvic cancer surgery].

    PubMed

    Signor, M; Fongione, S

    1997-12-01

    Intraoperative radiotherapy consists in the irradiation of the affected area, exposed using anesthesiological and laparotomic procedures, following the removal of a neoplasia using palliative or macroscopically radical surgical. This increases local tumour control and augments the selectivity of treatment between healthy and neoplastic tissues, thus obtaining a marked improvement in survival or palliation. The authors analyse the data reported in international literature regarding the possible use of intraoperative radiotherapy in patients undergoing abdomino-pelvic oncological surgery. The aim of the study was to evaluate this method for use in selected and combined treatment in which surgery represents an obligatory step. Studies were carried out in a few highly specialised centres given that special technical, logistic and professional skills were required. The populations studied were often very small with a marked prevalence of feasibility studies compared to random studies. In spite of this intraoperative radiotherapy is undoubtedly indicated in locally advanced gastric, rectal and vesical neoplasia, it represents a valid palliative solution in pancreatic neoplasia and in pelvic recidivation, and an effective alternative solution to mutilating surgery in the initial stages of vesical cancer. Positive results are obtained in prostate and uterine cancer, but they are reported by non-conclusive studies. Toxicity is acceptable and non-limiting within a given range of doses and irradiated volume. The "repercussion" in terms of knowledge, experience, scientific integration between oncological surgeons and radiotherapists is basic, with a marked improved in the management of cancer treatment.

  14. Pathological Characterization of Ovarian Cancer Patients Who Underwent Debulking Surgery in Combination With Diaphragmatic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nagai, Takeshi; Oshiro, Hisashi; Sagawa, Yasukazu; Sakamaki, Kentaro; Terauchi, Fumitoshi; Nagao, Toshitaka

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Despite exhaustive efforts to detect early-stage ovarian cancers, greater than two-thirds of patients are diagnosed at an advanced stage. Although diaphragmatic metastasis is not rare in advanced ovarian cancer patients and often precludes optimal cytoreductive surgery, little is known about the mechanisms and predictive factors of metastasis to the diaphragm. Thus, as an initial step toward investigating such factors, the present study was conducted to characterize the pathological status of ovarian cancer patients who underwent debulking surgery in combination with diaphragmatic surgery. This is a retrospective and cross-sectional study of patients who underwent debulking surgery in combination with diaphragmatic surgery at our institution between January 2005 and July 2015. Clinicopathological data were reviewed by board-certified gynecologists, pathologists, and cytopathologists. The rates of various pathological findings were investigated and compared by Fisher exact test between 2 groups: 1 group that was pathologically positive for diaphragmatic metastasis (group A) and another group that was pathologically negative for diaphragmatic metastasis (group B). Forty-six patients were included: 41 patients pathologically positive and 5 pathologically negative for diaphragmatic metastasis. The rates of metastasis to the lymph node (95.8% vs 20%, P = 0.001) and metastasis to the peritoneum except for the diaphragm (97.6% vs 60.0%, P = 0.028) were significantly increased in group A compared with group B. However, no significant differences between the 2 groups were found for rates of histological subtypes (high-grade serous or non-high-grade serous), the presence of ascites, the presence of malignant ascites, exposure of cancer cells on the ovarian surface, blood vascular invasion in the primary lesion, and lymphovascular invasion in the primary lesion. Our study demonstrated that metastasis to the lymph node and nondiaphragmatic metastasis to the

  15. Oncoplastic surgery in the treatment of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rancati, Alberto; Gonzalez, Eduardo; Dorr, Julio; Angrigiani, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Advances in reconstructive breast surgery with new materials and techniques now allow us to offer our patients the best possible cosmetic results without the risks associated with oncological control of the disease. These advances, in both oncological and plastic surgery, have led to a new specialisation, namely oncoplastic breast surgery, which enables us to undertake large resections and, with advance planning, to prevent subsequent deformities. This is particularly important when more than 30% of the breast volume is removed, as it allows us to obtain precise information for conservative surgery according to the site of the lesion, and also allows us to set the boundary between conservative surgery and mastectomy. Given the existence of new alloplastic materials and new reconstructive techniques, it is essential for our patients that surgeons involved in breast cancer treatment are trained in both the oncological as well as the reconstructive and aesthetic fields, to enable them to provide the best loco-regional treatment with the best cosmetic results. PMID:23441139

  16. Glans-preserving surgery for superficial penile cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Pengchao; Song, Ninghong; Yin, Changjun; Zhang, Wei; Li, Jie; Hua, Lixin; Wang, Zengjun; Cheng, Gong

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the safety and feasibility of glans-preserving surgery for superficial penile squamous cell carcinoma. Young patients with penile primary tumors exhibiting favorable histologic features were best suited for organ-sparing procedures, enabling them to avoid sexual disturbances. The study included 12 patients, 38-53 years of age (median age 46 years), with superficial lesions involving the glans penis, coronary sulcus, or shaft skin. After clinical staging and grading, those patients were offered a glans-preserving procedure to preserve the normal appearance and functional integrity of the glans penis. Of the 12 patients referred, the tumors were TaG1 in 4 patients, TaG2 in 3, TisG1 in 1, TisG2 in 1, T1G1 in 2, and T1G2 in 1. All patients returned to normal sexual activity 1 month postoperatively. Sexual function and sexual satisfaction were well maintained after surgery. The cosmetic results were considered satisfying/very satisfying by 83% (10 of 12 patients). Follow-up data were available on 12 patients at a mean follow-up of 62.5 months. Only 1 patient had recurrence 6 months after surgery, which was managed by a second glans-preserving surgery without recurrence. With careful patient selection and vigilant follow-up, anatomically suitable superficial penile cancer can be offered this glans-preserving surgery, while preserving function of the penis wherever possible.

  17. The Role of Robotic Surgery for Rectal Cancer: Overcoming Technical Challenges in Laparoscopic Surgery by Advanced Techniques.

    PubMed

    Park, Seungwan; Kim, Nam Kyu

    2015-07-01

    The conventional laparoscopic approach to rectal surgery has several limitations, and therefore many colorectal surgeons have great expectations for the robotic surgical system as an alternative modality in overcoming challenges of laparoscopic surgery and thus enhancing oncologic and functional outcomes. This review explores the possibility of robotic surgery as an alternative approach in laparoscopic surgery for rectal cancer. The da Vinci® Surgical System was developed specifically to compensate for the technical limitations of laparoscopic instruments in rectal surgery. The robotic rectal surgery is associated with comparable or better oncologic and pathologic outcomes, as well as low morbidity and mortality. The robotic surgery is generally easier to learn than laparoscopic surgery, improving the probability of autonomic nerve preservation and genitourinary function recovery. Furthermore, in very complex procedures such as intersphincteric dissections and transabdominal transections of the levator muscle, the robotic approach is associated with increased performance and safety compared to laparoscopic surgery. The robotic surgery for rectal cancer is an advanced technique that may resolve the issues associated with laparoscopic surgery. However, high cost of robotic surgery must be addressed before it can become the new standard treatment.

  18. Male urinary and sexual function after robotic pelvic autonomic nerve-preserving surgery for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang; Wang, Zhiming; Jiang, Zhiwei; Liu, Jiang; Zhao, Jian; Li, Jieshou

    2017-03-01

    Urinary and sexual dysfunction is the potential complication of rectal cancer surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the urinary and sexual function in male patients with robotic surgery for rectal cancer. This prospective study included 137 of the 336 male patients who underwent surgery for rectal cancer. Urinary and male sexual function was studied by means of a questionnaire based on the International Prostatic Symptom Score and International Index of Erectile Function. All data were collected before surgery and 12 months after surgery. Patients who underwent robotic surgery had significantly decreased incidence of partial or complete erectile dysfunction and sexual dysfunction than patients with laparoscopic surgery. The pre- and post-operative total IPSS scores in patients with robotic surgery were significantly less than that with laparoscopic surgeries. Robotic surgery shows distinct advantages in protecting the pelvic autonomic nerves and relieving post-operative sexual dysfunction. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. [Lung cancer surgery in solid organ transplanted patients].

    PubMed

    Arame, A; Rivera, C; Borik, W; Mangiameli, G; Abdennahder, M; Pricopi, C; Bagan, P; Badia, A; Le Pimpec Barthes, F; Riquet, M

    2014-12-01

    The incidence of lung cancer is reputed to be higher and prognosis worse in solid organ transplant recipients than in the general population. Our purpose was to review the results of surgery in this group of patients. We retrospectively reviewed 49 male and 6 female patients; mean aged 60.6 years (38-85). Transplanted organ was heart (n = 37), kidney (n=12), liver (n = 5) and both-lungs (n = 1); 48 patients had smoking habits and 42 heavy comorbidities (76.4%). Lung cancer was diagnosed during surveillance (78.2%, n = 43) or because of symptoms (21.8%, n = 12). We reviewed TNM and other main characteristics, among them histology (squamous-cell-carcinoma n = 23, adenocarcinomas n = 24, others n = 8). Surgery consisted of: exploratory thoracotomy (n = 2), wedge resections (n = 6), segmentectomy (n = 1), lobectomy (n = 42), pneumonectomy (n = 4). Postoperative mortality was 7.4% (n = 4) and complication rate 34.5% (n = 19). Five-year survival rate was 46.4% (65.4% for stage I patients, n = 25). Among the 35 dead patients during follow-up, 14 died of their lung cancer (40%). Two had been re-operated from another lung cancer: one after 3 and 8 years who survived 16 years, and the other after 2 years who survived 70 months. Surgery results are good and postoperative events acceptable despite theoretically increased risks. This also supports performing a close follow-up of transplanted patients and particularly those with smoking history in view of detecting lung cancer appearing at an early stage. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Video-Assisted Thoracic Surgery Lobectomy: Results in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Loscertales, Jesús; Quero Valen zuela, Florencio; Congregado, Miguel; Jiménez Merchán, Rafael; Gallardo Varela, Gregorio; Trivino Ramírez, Ana; B. Moreno Merino, Sergio; Cózar Bernal, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Background The application of video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) in major pulmonary resections is still far from routine in most hospitals, even though the safety and technical feasibility of the procedure have by now been amply demonstrated. This paper reports on the surgical technique used by the authors for VATS lobectomy, on their experience of the procedure and on the results obtained. Methods A retrospective study was performed of all patients undergoing VATS lobectomy at the our Thoracic Surgery Department ,between 1993 and 2009.The clinical records of all patients were reviewed, and the following variables were noted for purposes of analysis: patient age and sex; clinical diagnosis; staging; date of surgery; type of surgery; conversion to conventional surgery and grounds for conversion; duration of surgery; intraoperative, postoperative and long-term complications; postoperative stay, final diagnosis and staging; and death rates. Results A total of 349 VATS lobectomies were performed over the study period (292 men, 57 women; mean age 59.7) The aetiology was non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) in 313 patients and benign processes in 26;four patients had carcinoid tumours, and a further six required lobectomy due to metastases. The overall conversion rate was 9.4%. Mean duration of lobectomy was 148 minutes, and median duration 92 minutes. Mean postoperative was 3.9 days. The morbidity rate was 12.89 %, mostly involving minor complications. Perioperative mortality was 1.43%. There were no intraoperative deaths. The overall five-year survival rate for patients with NSCLC was 80.1%. Conclusions VATS lobectomy is a safe and technically-viable procedure that meets oncological criteria for lung-cancer surgery. Major pulmonary resection using VATS should be considered the procedure of choice for a number of benign processes and for early-stage bronchogenic carcinoma (T1-T2 N0 M0). PMID:22263014

  1. Beyond precision surgery: Molecularly motivated precision care for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Choi, Y Y; Cheong, J-H

    2017-03-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Despite the high disease prevalence, gastric cancer research has not gained much attention. Recently, genome-scale technology has made it possible to explore the characteristics of gastric cancer at the molecular level. Accordingly, gastric cancer can be classified into molecular subtypes that convey more detailed information of tumor than histopathological characteristics, and these subtypes are associated with clinical outcomes. Furthermore, this molecular knowledge helps to identify new actionable targets and develop novel therapeutic strategies. To advance the concept of precision patient care in the clinic, patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models have recently been developed. PDX models not only represent histology and genomic features, but also predict responsiveness to investigational drugs in patient tumors. Molecularly curated PDX cohorts will be instrumental in hypothesis generation, biomarker discovery, and drug screening and testing in proof-of-concept preclinical trials for precision therapy. In the era of precision medicine, molecularly tailored therapeutic strategies should be individualized for cancer patients. To improve the overall clinical outcome, a multimodal approach is indispensable for advanced cancer patients. Careful, oncological principle-based surgery, combined with a molecularly guided multidisciplinary approach, will open new horizons in surgical oncology.

  2. Elective surgery for colorectal cancer in a defined Swedish population.

    PubMed

    Jestin, P; Heurgren, M; Påhlman, L; Glimelius, B; Gunnarsson, U

    2004-02-01

    The aim of this study was to describe variability in compliance to clinical guidelines in colorectal cancer surgery related to hospital structure. All patients registered in the databases of the Regional Oncologic Centre, operated upon electively for colon cancer between the start of the register in 1997 until 2000 (n=1771) and for rectal cancer between the start of the register in 1995 until 2000 (n=1841) were selected for analysis. There was no difference in 5-year survival rate between colon and rectal cancer (mean follow-up 2.6 and 3.0 years, respectively; p=0.22). There was a significant difference in frequency of preoperative liver scan depending on hospital category with an increase in colon cancer from 39 to 46% (p=0.02) and in rectal cancer from 42 to 64% (p<0.001). For colon cancer there was no difference, according to hospital category, in quotient sigmoid and high anterior resection to left-sided resection. Furthermore, high anterior resection was more common at university and general district hospitals (8%) compared with district hospitals (4%) (p=0.01). Sphincter-saving surgery was more common at university hospitals and district general hospitals than at district hospitals (low anterior/abdomino-perineal resection quotients 2.3, 2.4 and 1.6, respectively; p<0.001). Population-based audit forms an appropriate and valuable basis for quality assurance projects. In addition to describing compliance to guidelines and pointing to process steps that can be improved, such investigations may also indicate changes due to scientific development. Linked to case-costing data, such results may form an important basis for decisions about modifications in health care.

  3. Nosocomial candidemia in patients admitted to medicine wards compared to other wards: a multicentre study.

    PubMed

    Luzzati, Roberto; Merelli, Maria; Ansaldi, Filippo; Rosin, Chiara; Azzini, Annamaria; Cavinato, Silvia; Brugnaro, Pierluigi; Vedovelli, Claudio; Cattelan, Annamaria; Marina, Busetti; Gatti, Giuseppe; Concia, Ercole; Bassetti, Matteo

    2016-12-01

    Risk factors for nosocomial candidemia, severity of sepsis, treatment, and outcome were compared between patients admitted to medicine wards and those to surgical and intensive care units (ICUs). Data were retrospectively collected from patients belonging to six referral hospitals in Italy between January 2011 and December 2013. Risk factors for 30-day mortality were evaluated in the whole patient population. A total of 686 patients (mean age 70 ± 15 years) with candidemia were included. 367 (53.5 %) patients were in medicine wards, and 319 in surgery and ICUs. Host-related risk factors for candidemia were more common in medicine patients whereas healthcare-related factors in surgery/ICU patients. These patients showed severe sepsis and septic shock more commonly (71.7 %) than medicine patients (59.9 %) (p 0.003). The latter underwent central venous catheter (CVC) removal and adequate antifungal therapy less frequently than surgery/ICU patients. 149 (40.6 %) patients died with candidemia in medicine wards and 69 (21.6 %) in other wards (p < 0.001). Overall, the 30-day mortality was 36.3 %. At multivariate analysis, independent risk factors for death were aging, higher Charlson score, severe sepsis and septic shock, and no antifungal therapy, while major surgery and CVC removal were associated with higher probability of survival. The burden of risk factors for candidemia was different between medicine patients and those in other wards. Despite the lower severity of candidemia in medicine patients, their mortality turned out to be higher than in surgery or ICU patients. Awareness of the best management of candidemia should be pursued, especially in medicine wards.

  4. Lymphedema After Surgery in Patients With Endometrial Cancer, Cervical Cancer, or Vulvar Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-23

    Lymphedema; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IB Vulvar Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIB Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIC Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVB Vulvar Cancer

  5. Results of radical surgery for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Heald, R J; Karanjia, N D

    1992-01-01

    This paper examines the hypothesis that a reduction in the distal mural margin during anterior resection for sphincter conservation in rectal cancer excision is safe, provided total mesorectal excision is undertaken with wash-out of the clamped rectum. One hundred ninety-two patients underwent anterior resection and 21 (less than 10%) patients underwent abdomino-perineal excision (APE) by one surgeon (RJH). Anterior resections were classified as "curative" (79%) and "non-curative" (21%); in the "curative" sub-group less than 4% of patients developed local recurrence. The series was retrospectively analyzed for the effect of mural margins on local recurrence with 152 patients undergoing "curative" anterior resections and 40 patients undergoing "non-curative" resections. In the 152 specimens from curative resections, 110 had a resection margin greater than 1 cm and 42 had a resection margin less than 1 cm. Four patients developed local recurrence in the greater than 1 cm margin group (95% confidence interval: 0.8%-7.8%) and no patients developed local recurrence in the less than or equal to 1 cm margin group (95% confidence interval: 0%-5.9%). In each patient with local recurrence a cause for failure was apparent. There was no statistically significant difference in local recurrence rate between the less than or equal to 1 cm margin group and the greater than 1 cm margin group. A reduction in resection margin therefore did not compromise survival after anterior resection. The significance of lateral resection margins is discussed. The role of deep radiotherapy and cytotoxics are considered.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Body Image Screening for Cancer Patients Undergoing Reconstructive Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fingeret, Michelle Cororve; Nipomnick, Summer; Guindani, Michele; Baumann, Donald; Hanasono, Matthew; Crosby, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Body image is a critical issue for cancer patients undergoing reconstructive surgery, as they can experience disfigurement and functional impairment. Distress related to appearance changes can lead to various psychosocial difficulties, and patients are often reluctant to discuss these issues with their healthcare team. Our goals were to design and evaluate a screening tool to aid providers in identifying patients who may benefit from referral for specialized psychosocial care to treat body image concerns. Methods We designed a brief 4-item instrument and administered it at a single time point to cancer patients who were undergoing reconstructive treatment. We used simple and multinomial regression models to evaluate whether survey responses, demographic, or clinical variables predicted interest and enrollment in counseling. Results Over 95% of the sample (n = 248) endorsed some concerns, preoccupation, or avoidance due to appearance changes. Approximately one-third of patients were interested in obtaining counseling or additional information to assist with body image distress. Each survey item significantly predicted interest and enrollment in counseling. Concern about future appearance changes was the single best predictor of counseling enrollment. Sex, age, and cancer type were not predictive of counseling interest or enrollment. Conclusions We present initial data supporting use of the Body Image Screener for Cancer Reconstruction. Our findings suggest benefits of administering this tool to patients presenting for reconstructive surgery. It is argued that screening and treatment for body image distress should be provided to this patient population at the earliest possible time point. PMID:25066586

  7. Outcome of Gastric Cancer Surgery in Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Sung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Owing to increased life expectancy, the number of elderly patients with gastric cancer has increased. This study aimed to identify the outcomes of gastric cancer patients aged 80 years or older through comparison of their clinicopathological characteristics, surgical outcomes, and oncologic outcomes. Materials and Methods Between January 2006 and December 2013, the records of 478 patients who underwent surgery for gastric cancer were retrospectively evaluated. Patients were divided into two groups: patients <80 years old (n=446) and patients ≥80 years old (n=32). Results There were no significant differences in sex, body mass index, length of hospital stay, duration of surgery, depth of invasion, nodal metastasis, histologic type, or tumor size between the two groups. However, significant differences were found for the American Society of Anesthesiologist score and the serum albumin level between the two groups. Postoperative morbidity, mortality, disease-free survival, and recurrence rate did not differ between curatively resected patients in the two groups. Conclusions In elderly patients with gastric cancer, active treatment including radical gastrectomy is necessary. PMID:28053812

  8. Prior Bariatric Surgery Is Linked to Improved Colorectal Cancer Surgery Outcomes and Costs: A Propensity-Matched Analysis.

    PubMed

    Hussan, Hisham; Stanich, Peter P; Gray, Darrell M; Krishna, Somashekar G; Porter, Kyle; Conwell, Darwin L; Clinton, Steven K

    2017-04-01

    Morbid obesity is associated with worse colorectal cancer (CRC) perioperative outcomes. The impact of bariatric surgery on these outcomes is unknown. The National Inpatient Sample Database (2006-2012) was used to identify adults with prior bariatric surgery (divided into BMI ≤35 kg/m(2) and BMI >35 kg/m(2)) or morbid obesity that underwent CRC surgery. Main outcomes were mortality, surgical complications and health care utilization. There were 1813 patients with prior bariatric surgery and 22,552 morbidly obese patients that underwent CRC surgery between 2006 and 2012. Prior bariatric surgery patients were younger, with fewer comorbidities, and had less emergency CRC surgery admissions (p < 0.05). Multivariate analyses revealed no adverse association (OR 0.54, 95 % CI = 0.16 to 1.79) between prior bariatric surgery and CRC perioperative mortality. Notably, multivariate analysis revealed that bariatric surgery patients undergoing CRC surgery had fewer accidental surgical lacerations (OR 0.38, 95 % CI = 0.15 to 0.93), shorter hospitalizations (-1.85 days, 95 % CI = 2.03 to 1.67), decreased total hospital costs (US$-5374, 95 % CI = -5935 to -4813) and lower disposition to short-term rehabilitation facilities (OR 0.65, 95 % CI = -0.43 to 0.97). Propensity score matched analysis validated these reductions in surgical complications and health care utilization in bariatric surgery patients, which were further more pronounced when bariatric surgery patients were restricted to BMI ≤35 kg/m(2). Analysis of national-level data demonstrates that prior bariatric surgery is associated with fewer colorectal cancer surgical complications and improved health care resource utilization compared to morbidly obese patients. These findings emphasize and extend the therapeutic effect of bariatric surgery to the colorectal cancer perioperative setting.

  9. Stigma Perceived by Women Following Surgery for Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Lopamudra; Datta, Soumitra Shankar; Agrawal, Sanjit Kumar; Chatterjee, Sanjoy; Ahmed, Rosina

    2017-01-01

    Women undergoing treatment for breast cancer often have psychological morbidity and body image difficulties. The risk factors for increased levels of stigma in women with breast cancer have not been adequately studied. This study aimed at investigating the associations of high levels of stigma in women with breast cancer. This cross-sectional study was conducted in a comprehensive cancer center in India and recruited women (n = 134) undergoing surgical treatment for breast cancer. Body image difficulties, including stigma and affective symptoms, were quantified, alongside disease- and treatment-related variables using standardized questionnaires. Univariate analysis followed by multivariate logistic regression was performed to find the risk factors of high levels of stigma related to body image. In the univariate analysis, high levels of stigma were associated with lesser educational attainment (odds ratio [OR] =2.92, confidence interval [CI] 1.25-6.8, P = 0.01), breast conservation surgery (BCS) as opposed to mastectomy (OR = 4.78, CI 2.07-11.03, P < 0.001), having an anxiety disorder (OR = 2.4, CI 1.09-5.33, P = 0.03), and depression (OR = 3.08, CI 1.37-6.89, P < 0.01). On multivariate logistic regression, with stigma as the dependent variable, being less educated (adjusted OR [AOR] 3.08, CI 1.18-8.04, P = 0.02) and opting for BCS (AOR 6.12, CI 2.41-15.5, P < 0.001) were associated with higher stigma. Women with breast cancer should be screened for distress and stigma. Women opting for BCS may still have unmet emotional needs on completion of surgery and should have access to psychological interventions to address stigma, affective symptoms, and body image problems.

  10. Assessment of Risk Reduction for Lymphedema Following Sentinel Lymph Noded Guided Surgery for Primary Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    Lymphedema Following Sentinel Lymph Noded Guided Surgery for Primary Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Andrea L. Cheville, M.D...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Assessment of Risk Reduction for Lymphedema Following Sentinel Lymph Noded Guided Surgery for Primary Breast Cancer 5b...14. ABSTRACT Lymphedema is a common complication of primary breast cancer therapy. It is a chronic, insidiously progressive, and potentially

  11. Endoscopic Breast Surgery in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-05

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  12. Enhanced recovery after surgery protocol in oesophageal cancer surgery: Systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Major, Piotr; Wysocki, Michał; Budzyński, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    Background Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) protocol are well established in many surgical disciplines, leading to decrease in morbidity and length of hospital stay. These multi-modal protocols have been also introduced to oesophageal cancer surgery. This review aimed to evaluate current literature on ERAS in oesophageal cancer surgery and conduct a meta-analysis on primary and secondary outcomes. Methods MEDLINE, Embase, Scopus and Cochrane Library were searched for eligible studies. We analyzed data up to May 2016. Eligible studies had to contain four described ERAS protocol elements. The primary outcome was overall morbidity. Secondary outcomes included length of hospital stay, specific complications, mortality and readmissions. Random effect meta-analyses were undertaken. Results Initial search yielded 1,064 articles. Thorough evaluation resulted in 13 eligible articles which were analyzed. A total of 2,042 patients were included in the analysis (1,058 ERAS group and 984 treated with traditional protocols). Analysis of overall morbidity as well as complication rate did not show any significant reduction. Non-surgical complications and pulmonary complications were significantly lower in the ERAS group, RR = 0.71 95% CI 0.62–0.80, p < 0.00001 and RR = 0.75, 95% CI 0.60–0.94, p = 0.01, respectively. Meta-analysis on length of stay presented significant reduction Mean difference = -3.55, 95% CI -4.41 to -2.69, p for effect<0.00001. Conclusions This systematic review with a meta-analysis on ERAS in oesophageal surgery indicates a reduction of non-surgical complications and no negative influence on overall morbidity. Moreover, a reduction in the length of hospital stay was presented. PMID:28350805

  13. Surgical site infection in women undergoing surgery for gynecologic cancer.

    PubMed

    Mahdi, Haider; Gojayev, Anar; Buechel, Megan; Knight, Jason; SanMarco, Janice; Lockhart, David; Michener, Chad; Moslemi-Kebria, Mehdi

    2014-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to describe the rate and predictors of surgical site infection (SSI) after gynecologic cancer surgery and identify any association between SSI and postoperative outcome. Patients with endometrial, cervical, or ovarian cancers from 2005 to 2011 were identified from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program. The extent of surgical intervention was categorized into modified surgical complexity scoring (MSCS) system. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used. Odds ratios were adjusted for patient demographics, comorbidities, preoperative laboratory values, and operative factors. Of 6854 patients, 369 (5.4%) were diagnosed with SSI. Surgical site infection after laparotomy was 3.5 times higher compared with minimally invasive surgery (7% vs 2%; P < 0.001). Among laparotomy group, independent predictors of SSI included endometrial cancer diagnosis, obesity, ascites, preoperative anemia, American Society of Anesthesiologists class greater than or equal to 3, MSCS greater than or equal to 3, and perioperative blood transfusion. Among laparoscopic cases, independent predictors of SSI included only preoperative leukocytosis and overweight. For patients with deep or organ space SSI, significant predictors included hypoalbuminemia, preoperative weight loss, respiratory comorbidities, MSCS greater than 4, and perioperative blood transfusion for laparotomy and only preoperative leukocytosis for minimally invasive surgery. Surgical site infection was associated with longer mean hospital stay and higher rate of reoperation, sepsis, and wound dehiscence. Surgical site infection was not associated with increased risk of acute renal failure or 30-day mortality. These findings were consistent in subset of patients with deep or organ space SSI. Seven percent of patients undergoing laparotomy for gynecologic malignancy developed SSI. Surgical site infection is associated with longer hospital

  14. Longitudinal Perioperative Pain Assessment in Head and Neck Cancer Surgery.

    PubMed

    Buchakjian, Marisa R; Davis, Andrew B; Sciegienka, Sebastian J; Pagedar, Nitin A; Sperry, Steven M

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate perioperative pain in patients undergoing major head and neck cancer surgery and identify associations between preoperative and postoperative pain characteristics. Patients undergoing head and neck surgery with regional/free tissue transfer were enrolled. Preoperative pain and validated screens for symptoms (neuropathic pain, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia) were assessed. Postoperatively, patients completed a pain diary for 4 weeks. Twenty-seven patients were enrolled. Seventy-eight percent had pain prior to surgery, and for 38%, the pain had neuropathic characteristics. Thirteen patients (48%) completed at least 2 weeks of the postoperative pain diary. Patients with moderate/severe preoperative pain report significantly greater pain scores postoperatively, though daily pain decreased at a similar linear rate for all patients. Patients with more severe preoperative pain consumed greater amounts of opioids postoperatively, and this correlated with daily postoperative pain scores. Patients who screened positive for neuropathic pain also reported worse postoperative pain. Longitudinal perioperative pain assessment in head and neck patients undergoing surgery suggests that patients with worse preoperative pain continue to endorse worse pain postoperatively and require more narcotics. Patients with preoperative neuropathic pain also report poor pain control postoperatively, suggesting an opportunity to identify these patients and intervene with empiric neuropathic pain treatment.

  15. [Anteroaxillary thoracotomy for curative surgery in lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Nomori, H; Horio, H

    1996-10-01

    The method and results of anteroaxillary thoracotomy for curative surgery in lung cancer are reported. A 20 cm incision is made from the axilla past the nipple line. The serratus anterior muscle is divided, but the lattisimus dorsi muscle does not require division. For an upper lobectomy, the fourth intercostal space is divided, and for a lower lobectomy, the fifth intercostal space is divided. By spreading the thoracic opener, the anterior portion of the rib and costal cartilage are disconnected, and the thorax is opened sufficiently. In the posterior portion, the skin, including the lattisimus dorsi muscle is drawn posteriorly ising an "Octopus". By these techniques, the operative field is made large enough for lobectomy and lymph node dissection. Compared to posterolateral thoracotomy, chronic pain following surgery is dramatically reduced. By anteroaxillary thoracotomy we have satisfactorily performed lobectomy and lymph node dissection of 11 non-T 3 or T 4 lung cancers. In conclusion, anteroaxillary thoracotomy can be a useful approach for ordinal lobectomy and lymph node dissection in lung cancer.

  16. Robotic surgery: review of prostate and bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Sohn, William; Lee, Hak J; Ahlering, Thomas E

    2013-01-01

    Minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery has become to replace many of the open procedures in urology because of the obvious benefits in perioperative morbidity. However, because of the technical challenges and steep learning curve, the adoption of laparoscopy has been limited to only highly skilled laparoscopic surgeons. The introduction of the da Vinci surgical system (Intuitive Surgical Inc, Sunnyvale, Calif) has offered significant technical advantages over laparoscopic surgery. Because of the wide acceptance of robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy over the past decade, it has paved the way for urologists to tackle other complex operations, such as a radical cystectomy to decrease the morbidity of the operation. The goal of this article was to review the history and discuss the application and current status of the robot in both prostate and bladder cancer management. We present our technique of performing a robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy and the application of the robust prostate experience to robotic cystectomy.

  17. Short- and long-term outcomes of laparoscopic surgery vs open surgery for transverse colon cancer: a retrospective multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Wan; Kim, Jeong Yeon; Kang, Byung Mo; Lee, Bong Hwa; Kim, Byung Chun; Park, Jun Ho

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of the present study was to compare the perioperative and oncologic outcomes between laparoscopic surgery and open surgery for transverse colon cancer. Patients and methods We conducted a retrospective review of patients who underwent surgery for transverse colon cancer at six Hallym University-affiliated hospitals between January 2005 and June 2015. The perioperative outcomes and oncologic outcomes were compared between laparoscopic and open surgery. Results Of 226 patients with transverse colon cancer, 103 underwent laparoscopic surgery and 123 underwent open surgery. There were no differences in the patient characteristics between the two groups. Regarding perioperative outcomes, the operation time was significantly longer in the laparoscopic group than in the open group (267.3 vs 172.7 minutes, P<0.001), but the time to soft food intake (6.0 vs 6.6 days, P=0.036) and the postoperative hospital stay (13.7 vs 15.7 days, P=0.018) were shorter in the laparoscopic group. The number of harvested lymph nodes was lower in the laparoscopic group than in the open group (20.3 vs 24.3, P<0.001). The 5-year overall survival (90.8% vs 88.6%, P=0.540) and disease-free survival (86.1% vs 78.9%, P=0.201) rates were similar in both groups. Conclusion The present study showed that laparoscopic surgery is associated with several perioperative benefits and similar oncologic outcomes to open surgery for the resection of transverse colon cancer. Therefore, laparoscopic surgery offers a safe alternative to open surgery in patients with transverse colon cancer. PMID:27143915

  18. Delaying surgery after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy improves prognosis of rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mihmanlı, Mehmet; Kabul Gürbulak, Esin; Akgün, İsmail Ethem; Celayir, Mustafa Fevzi; Yazıcı, Pınar; Tunçel, Deniz; Bek, Tuba Tülin; Öz, Ayhan; Ömeroğlu, Sinan

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the prognostic effect of a delayed interval between neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and surgery in locally advanced rectal cancer. METHODS We evaluated 87 patients with locally advanced mid- or distal rectal cancer undergoing total mesorectal excision following an interval period after neoadjuvant CRT at Şişli Hamidiye Etfal Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul between January 2009 and January 2014. Patients were divided into two groups according to the interval before surgery: < 8 wk (group I) and ≥ 8 wk (group II). Data related to patients, cancer characteristics and pathological examination were collected and analyzed. RESULTS When the distribution of timing between group I (n = 45) and group II (n = 42) was viewed, comparison of interval periods (median ± SD) of groups showed a significant difference of as 5 ± 1.28 wk in group I and 10.1 ± 2.2 wk in group II (P < 0.001). The median follow-up period for all patients was 34.5 (9.9-81) mo. group II had significantly higher rates of pathological complete response (pCR) than group I had (19% vs 8.9%, P = 0.002). Rate of tumor regression grade (TRG) poor response was 44.4% in group I and 9.5% in group II (P < 0.002). A poor pathological response was associated with worse disease-free survival (P = 0.009). The interval time did not show any association with local recurrence (P = 0.79). CONCLUSION Delaying the neoadjuvant CRT-surgery interval may provide nodal down-staging, improve pCR rate, and decrease the rate of TRG poor response. PMID:27672428

  19. Patient factors may predict anastomotic complications after rectal cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hayden, Dana M.; Mora Pinzon, Maria C.; Francescatti, Amanda B.; Saclarides, Theodore J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Anastomotic complications following rectal cancer surgery occur with varying frequency. Preoperative radiation, BMI, and low anastomoses have been implicated as predictors in previous studies, but their definitive role is still under review. The objective of our study was to identify patient and operative factors that may be predictive of anastomotic complications. Methods A retrospective review was performed on patients who had sphincter-preservation surgery performed for rectal cancer at a tertiary medical center between 2005 and 2011. Results 123 patients were included in this study, mean age was 59 (26–86), 58% were male. There were 33 complications in 32 patients (27%). Stenosis was the most frequent complication (24 of 33). 11 patients required mechanical dilatation, and 4 had operative revision of the anastomosis. Leak or pelvic abscess were present in 9 patients (7.3%); 4 were explored, 2 were drained and 3 were managed conservatively. 4 patients had permanent colostomy created due to anastomotic complications. Laparoscopy approach, BMI, age, smoking and tumor distance from anal verge were not significantly associated with anastomotic complications. After a multivariate analysis chemoradiation was significantly associated with overall anastomotic complications (Wall = 0.35, p = 0.05), and hemoglobin levels were associated with anastomotic leak (Wald = 4.09, p = 0.04). Conclusion Our study identifies preoperative anemia as possible risk factor for anastomotic leak and neoadjuvant chemoradiation may lead to increased risk of complications overall. Further prospective studies will help to elucidate these findings as well as identify amenable factors that may decrease risk of anastomotic complications after rectal cancer surgery. PMID:25685338

  20. Lymphovascular space invasion in robotic surgery for endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Mark R; Richmond, Abby M; Cheng, Georgina; Davidson, Susan; Spillman, Monique A; Sheeder, Jeanelle; Post, Miriam D; Guntupalli, Saketh R

    2014-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery has become a standard treatment for endometrial cancer and offers significant benefits over abdominal approaches. There are discrepant data regarding lymphovascular space invasion (LVSI) and positive peritoneal cytology with the use of a uterine manipulator, with previous small-scale studies demonstrating an increased incidence of these prognostically important events. We sought to determine if there was a higher incidence of LVSI in patients who underwent robot-assisted surgery for endometrial cancer. We performed a single-institution review of medical records for patients who underwent open abdominal or robot-assisted hysterectomy for endometrial cancer over a 24-month period. The following data were abstracted: age, tumor grade and stage, size, depth of invasion, LVSI, and peritoneal cytology. For patients with LVSI, slides were reviewed by 2 pathologists for confirmation of LVSI. Of 104 patients identified, LVSI was reported in 39 (37.5%) and positive peritoneal cytology in 6 (4.8%). Rates of peritoneal cytology were not significantly different between the 2 groups (odds ratio, 0.55; 95% confidence interval, 0.10-3.17; P=.50). LVSI was reported in significantly fewer robot-assisted hysterectomies than open procedures (odds ratio, 0.39; 95% confidence interval, 0.17-0.92; P=.03). In subgroup analyses restricted to early-stage disease (stage≤II), there was no significant difference in LVSI between open and robot-assisted hysterectomies (odds ratio, 0.64; 95% confidence interval, 0.22-1.85; P=.43). In this retrospective study, we found that use of a uterine manipulator in robot-assisted surgery did not increase the incidence of LVSI.

  1. CURRENT CONCEPTS IN MANAGEMENT OF ORAL CANCERSURGERY

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Jatin P.; Gil, Ziv

    2014-01-01

    Oral cancer is the sixth most common cancer worldwide, with a high prevalence in South Asia. Tobacco and alcohol consumption remain the most dominant etiologic factors, however HPV has been recently implicated in oral cancer. Surgery is the most well established mode of initial definitive treatment for a majority of oral cancers. The factors that affect choice of treatment are related to the tumor and the patient. Primary site, location, size, proximity to bone, and depth of infiltration are factors which influence a particular surgical approach. Tumors that approach or involve the mandible require specific understanding of the mechanism of bone involvement. This facilitates the employment of mandible sparing approaches such as marginal mandibulectomy and mandibulotomy. Reconstruction of major surgical defects in the oral cavity requires use of a free flap. The radial forearm free flap provides excellent soft tissue and lining for soft tissue defects in the oral cavity. The fibula free flap remains the choice for mandibular reconstruction. Over the course of the past thirty years there has been improvement in the overall survival of patients with oral carcinoma largely due to the improved understanding of the biology of local progression, early identification and treatment of metastatic lymph nodes in the neck, and employment of adjuvant postoperative radiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy. The role of surgery in primary squamous cell carcinomas in other sites in the head and neck has evolved with integration of multidisciplinary treatment approaches employing chemotherapy and radiotherapy either sequentially or concurrently. Thus, larynx preservation with concurrent chemoradiotherapy has become the standard of care for locally advanced carcinomas of the larynx or pharynx requiring total laryngectomy. On the other hand, for early staged tumors of the larynx and pharynx, transoral laser microsurgery has become an effective means of local control of these lesions

  2. Detectability of Hygroscopic Clips Used in Breast Cancer Surgery.

    PubMed

    Carmon, Moshe; Olsha, Oded; Gekhtman, David; Nikitin, Irena; Cohen, Yamin; Messing, Michael; Lioubashevsky, Natali; Abu Dalo, Ribhi; Hadar, Tal; Golomb, Eliahu

    2017-02-01

    Sonographically detectable clips were introduced over the last decade. We retrospectively studied the rate and duration of sonographically detectable clip detectability in patients with breast cancer who had sonographically detectable clips inserted over a 2-year period. Nine of 26 patients had neoadjuvant chemotherapy, with all clips remaining detectable 140 to 187 days after insertion. Six of the 9 had intraoperative sonographic localization, with 1 reoperation (17%). Eleven additional patients with nonpalpable tumors and sonographically detectable clips had intraoperative sonographic localization with 1 reoperation (9%). In 1 patient, a sonographically detectable clip enabled intraoperative identification of a suspicious lymph node. There were no complications or clip migration. Sonographically detectable clips are helpful in breast cancer surgery with and without neoadjuvant chemotherapy, remaining detectable for many months and often averting preoperative localization and scheduling difficulties.

  3. Surreptitious surgery on Long Island Sound: The oral cancer surgeries of President Grover Cleveland.

    PubMed

    Maloney, William

    2010-01-01

    Grover Cleveland rose from being the mayor of Buffalo to the governor of New York to the president of the United States. At the start of Cleveland's second term as president, the nation was involved in a severe financial crisis, the extent of which was not known by the general public. President Cleveland was to make a strong appeal to Congress in the coming months to repeal the Sherman Silver Purchase Act of 1890. He thought this would set the nation on the road to fiscal recovery. However, his vice president, Adlai Stevenson, strongly opposed repeal of the Sherman Act. Prior to scheduling his appearance before Congress, President Cleveland noticed a rough spot on his palate. A biopsy confirmed that it was cancer, and it was determined that surgery was needed. Cleveland and his advisors thought the nation would be thrown into a panic if the President's health did not remain a secret. A surgical team, which included a dentist, performed the surgery in secrecy while traveling aboard a yacht. A prosthetic obturator was fabricated by a New York prosthodontist to close the surgical defect. Cleveland recovered well, made a forceful speech before Congress, had the Sherman Act repealed and lived without a recurrence of his oral cancer for the rest of his life. The public remained unaware, for the most part, of the gravity of President Cleveland's health for decades.

  4. Robotic Surgery in Women With Ovarian Cancer: Surgical Technique and Evidence of Clinical Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Minig, Lucas; Padilla Iserte, Pablo; Zorrero, Cristina; Zanagnolo, Vanna

    2016-01-01

    Robotic surgery is a new technology that has been progressively implemented to treat endometrial and cervical cancer. However, the use of robotic surgery for ovarian cancer is limited to a few series of cases and comparative studies with laparoscopy or laparotomy. The technical issues concerning robotic surgery, as well as clinical evidence, are described in this review. Robotic surgery in early stage, advanced stage, and relapsed ovarian cancer is discussed separately. In conclusion, evidence regarding the use of robotic-assisted surgical treatment for women with ovarian cancer is still scarce, but its use is progressively growing. Robotic-assisted staging in selected patients with early stage disease has an important role in referral institutions when well-trained gynecologists perform surgeries. However, minimally invasive surgery in patients with advanced stage or relapsed ovarian cancer requires further investigation, even in selected cases.

  5. Learning curve for robotic-assisted laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Rodríguez, Rosa M; Díaz-Pavón, José Manuel; de la Portilla de Juan, Fernando; Prendes-Sillero, Emilio; Dussort, Hisnard Cadet; Padillo, Javier

    2013-06-01

    One of the main uses of robotic assisted abdominal surgery is the mesorectal excision in patients with rectal cancer. The aim of the present study is to analyse the learning curve for robotic assisted laparoscopic resection of rectal cancer. We included in our study 43 consecutive rectal cancer resections (16 females and 27 males) performed from January 2008 through December 2010. Mean age of patients was 66 ± 9.0 years. Surgical procedures included both abdomino-perineal and anterior resections. We analysed the following parameters: demographic data of the patients included in the study, intra- and postoperative data, time taking to set up the robot for operations (set-up or docking time), operative time, intra- and postoperative complications, conversion rates and pathological specimen features. The learning curve was analysed using cumulative sum (CUSUM) methodology. The procedures understudied included seven abdomino-perineal resections and 36 anterior resections. In our series of patients, mean robotic set-up time was 62.9 ± 24.6 min, and the mean operative time was 197.4 ± 44.3 min. Once we applied CUSUM methodology, we obtained two graphs for CUSUM values (operating time and success), both of them showing three well-differentiated phases: phase 1 (the initial 9-11 cases), phase 2 (the middle 12 cases) and phase 3 (the remaining 20-22 cases). Phase 1 represents initial learning; phase 2 plateau represents increased competence in the use of the robotic system, and finally, phase 3 represents the period of highest skill or mastery with a reduction in docking time (p = 0.000), but a slight increase in operative time (p = 0.007). The CUSUM curve shows three phases in the learning and use of robotic assisted rectal cancer surgery which correspond to the phases of initial learning of the technique, consolidation and higher expertise or mastery. The data obtained suggest that the estimated learning curve for robotic assisted rectal cancer

  6. Depressive symptoms and one year mortality among elderly patients discharged from a rehabilitation ward after orthopaedic surgery of the lower limbs.

    PubMed

    Guerini, Fabio; Morghen, Sara; Lucchi, Elena; Bellelli, Giuseppe; Trabucchi, Marco

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the present prospective observational study is to evaluate the effect of depressive symptoms on 1-year mortality in a population of elderly patients discharged from a rehabilitation unit after orthopaedic surgery of the lower limbs. A total of 222 elderly inpatients were included, and stratified according to 12-months survival. 14 (6.3%) of the patients who were eligible for this study died during the 12-months period after discharge. As expected, patients who died were significantly older, lower cognitive performance, more depressive symptoms, poorer nutritional status and higher comorbidity in comparison to those who survived. Furthermore, they were generally more functionally dependent on admission to the Department, had worse functional recovery and were more disable at discharge, although a longer length of stay comparing to survived patients. In the adjusted logistic regression model, after adjustment for possible confounders and covariates, the presence of severe depressive symptoms significantly predicted a four-fold risk of death at 12 months. The only other factor associated poor 12-months survival was comorbidity, that predicted a 6-fold risk of death. In conclusions this study suggests that severe depressive symptoms on admission predicts 1-year mortality in elderly patients discharged from a post-acute care unit after orthopaedic rehabilitation.

  7. Surviving the wait: defining support while awaiting breast cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, Suzanne S; Alqaissi, Nesreen; Underhill, Meghan; Lally, Robin M

    2011-07-01

    This paper is a report of a descriptive study of the common meanings, shared experiences and practices of social support of women within the days between breast cancer diagnosis and treatment initiation. Support needs, types of social support and support outcomes during and after breast cancer treatment have been explored worldwide. However, to promote women's psychological wellbeing it is essential to understand how women define support in the highly stressful period initially following diagnosis. Secondary analysis of narrative texts using interpretive phenomenology from 18 women in the Midwestern United States newly diagnosed with breast cancer who were interviewed in 2005 for a study of women's pretreatment thought processes. 'Surviving the wait for surgery by balancing support needs to maintain a hopeful outlook' was the overarching pattern linking six other related themes: (1) controlling access to information for self and to others, (2) knowing which supportive network members to access, (3) controlling anxiety through distraction to maintain hope while waiting, (4) being in good hands and comfortable with decision (provider support), (5) protecting others through concealment and being strong to maintain hope and (6) accepting care from others vs. maintaining a nurturing role. Implications for nurses working with women in the days following breast cancer diagnosis include assessing women's definitions and availability of support; respecting varied needs for informational support; providing a supportive clinical environment; educating clinicians, family and friends regarding unsupportive responses within the cultural context and validating women's control and balancing of support needs. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Minimally invasive surgery for esophageal cancer – benefits and controversies

    PubMed Central

    Zgodziński, Witold; Masiak-Segit, Wioletta; Skoczylas, Tomasz; Dąbrowski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Open esophagectomy (OE) requires extensive surgery and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Furthermore, the long-term results of esophageal cancer surgery are not satisfactory; hence, the best surgical approach is constantly under debate. During the last twenty years, minimally invasive esophagectomy (MIE) employing laparoscopy and/or thoracoscopy has been introduced in a growing number of centers worldwide. To date, several studies have demonstrated that MIE has better outcomes than OE, as it results in shorter hospital stay and decreased overall morbidity. However, the length of operating time in MIE is increased in comparison to OE. The survival benefit has been demonstrated to be similar in OE and MIE. Highly advanced laparo-thoracoscopic skills are required to perform MIE; along with the relatively long learning curve, this makes MIE feasible only in high-volume, experienced university surgical centers. There is a need for further large-scale comparative studies to prove the superiority of MIE over open surgery. PMID:26336413

  9. Feasibility Evaluation of Radioimmunoguided Surgery of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, Ananth; Reilly, Raymond M.; Holloway, Claire M. B.; Caldwell, Curtis B.

    2012-01-01

    Breast-conserving surgery involves completely excising the tumour while limiting the amount of normal tissue removed, which is technically challenging to achieve, especially given the limited intraoperative guidance available to the surgeon. This study evaluates the feasibility of radioimmunoguided surgery (RIGS) to guide the detection and delineation of tumours intraoperatively. The 3D point-response function of a commercial gamma-ray-detecting probe (GDP) was determined as a function of radionuclide (131I, 111In, 99mTc), energy-window threshold, and collimator length (0.0–3.0-cm). This function was used to calculate the minimum detectable tumour volumes (MDTVs) and the minimum tumour-to-background activity concentration ratio (T:B) for effective delineation of a breast tumour model. The GDP had larger MDTVs and a higher minimum required T:B for tumour delineation with 131I than with 111In or 99mTc. It was shown that for 111In there was a benefit to using a collimator length of 0.5-cm. For the model used, the minimum required T:B required for effective tumour delineation was 5.2 ± 0.4. RIGS has the potential to significantly improve the accuracy of breast-conserving surgery; however, before these benefits can be realized, novel radiopharmaceuticals need to be developed that have a higher specificity for cancerous tissue in vivo than what is currently available. PMID:22518303

  10. Colorectal Cancer Prognosis Following Obesity Surgery in a Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Tao, Wenjing; Konings, Peter; Hull, Mark A; Adami, Hans-Olov; Mattsson, Fredrik; Lagergren, Jesper

    2017-05-01

    Obesity surgery involves mechanical and physiological changes of the gastrointestinal tract that might promote colorectal cancer progression. Thus, we hypothesised that obesity surgery is associated with poorer prognosis in patients with colorectal cancer. This nationwide population-based cohort study included all patients with an obesity diagnosis who subsequently developed colorectal cancer in Sweden from 1980 to 2012. The exposure was obesity surgery, and the main and secondary outcomes were disease-specific mortality and all-cause mortality, respectively. Cox proportional hazard survival models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), adjusted for sex, age, calendar year and education level. The exposed and unexposed cohort included 131 obesity surgery and 1332 non-obesity surgery patients with colorectal cancer. There was a statistically significant increased rate of colorectal cancer deaths following obesity surgery (disease-specific HR 1.50, 95% CI 1.00-2.19). When analysed separately, the mortality rate was more than threefold increased in rectal cancer patients with prior obesity surgery (disease-specific HR 3.70, 95% CI 2.00-6.90), while no increased mortality rate was found in colon cancer patients (disease-specific HR 1.10, 85% CI 0.67-1.70). This population-based study among obese individuals found a poorer prognosis in colorectal cancer following obesity surgery, which was primarily driven by the higher mortality rate in rectal cancer.

  11. Incontinence after prostatectomy: coping with incontinence after prostate cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Mary H; Fogarty, Linda A; Somerfield, Mark R; Powel, Lorrie L

    2003-01-01

    To describe the nature of postprostatectomy urinary incontinence, determine how men manage postsurgery urinary incontinence, identify men's perceptions of adequacy of preoperative counseling, and identify men's expectations regarding the probability of postsurgery incontinence. Survey. United States. Members of US TOO International, who experienced urinary incontinence after surgery. Copies of the survey (N = 370) were mailed to all chapters of US TOO International, a prostate cancer support group, for distribution to members. A letter of invitation also was posted on the US TOO International Web site and in the monthly newsletter. Men who desired to complete the survey (N = 130) called the researcher's office, and a copy of the survey and a stamped return envelope was mailed to them. Surveys returned to the researchers from June 1998 to January 1999 were included in the analyses. Urinary incontinence, management of urinary incontinence, and coping. 166 men returned surveys. The majority was Caucasian (95%) and married (83%). The median age was 67 years, 87% of the men rated their health as good or excellent, and 114 men (69%) reported becoming incontinent after surgery. Most men experienced stress incontinence symptoms. The majority (89 of 111 men) reported that they were told preoperatively that urinary incontinence was a possible complication. Overall, regardless of length of time since surgery, men (74%) thought that incontinence was an important problem to resolve. Men used containment devices such as pads, special undergarments, and even sanitary napkins as management strategies. The majority of men (54%) used pelvic muscle exercises, especially those who were fewer than two years postsurgery (72%). Urinary incontinence is a prevalent postoperative complication for men, even up to five years after surgery, and a source of great distress for some. Men reported stress and urge incontinence symptoms and used an array of strategies to contain their urine. Finding

  12. Systematic review of laparoscopic versus open surgery for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Reza, M M; Blasco, J A; Andradas, E; Cantero, R; Mayol, J

    2006-08-01

    This study compares the efficacy and safety of laparoscopic surgery (LS) and open surgery (OS) for colorectal cancer. An electronic search of the literature was undertaken to identify primary studies and systematic reviews. Information on the efficacy and safety of LS versus OS was analysed. A meta-analysis was conducted to examine long-term outcomes. A systematic review published in 2000 and 12 more recent randomized clinical trials were identified. Compared with OS, LS reduced blood loss and pain, and resulted in a faster return of bowel function and earlier resumption of normal diet. Hospital stay was up to 2 days shorter after LS. No significant differences between the techniques were noted in the incidence of complications or postoperative mortality. The time required to complete LS was significantly longer (0.5-1.0 h more). No significant differences were found between the two procedures in terms of overall mortality, cancer-related mortality or disease recurrence. LS takes longer than OS but offers several short-term benefits. However, complication rates are similar for both procedures and no differences were found in long-term outcomes.

  13. Gastric Cancer Surgery – A Balance of Risk and Radicality

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, Peter; Sivashanmugam, T; White, Martin; Irving, Mark; Wayman, John; Raimes, Simon

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The aim of this study was to determine whether tailoring the extent of resection would allow radical gastric cancer surgery to be performed safely in a UK population. PATIENTS AND METHODS A total of 180 consecutive patients (median age 70 years; male:female ratio 2:1) undergoing resection for gastric adenocarcinoma with curative intent were studied. Extent of lymphadenectomy was based upon pre-operative and intra-operative staging, and balanced against the patient's age and fitness. RESULTS In the study group, 83 patients underwent subtotal or distal partial gastrectomy and 97 patients underwent total or proximal partial gastrectomy. Operative procedures were: D1 lymphadenectomy (n = 62); modified (spleen and pancreas preserving) D2 lymphadenectomy (n = 73); D2 lymphadenectomy (n = 42); and extended resection (n = 3). TNM classification was: stage 1 (n = 45); stage 2 (n = 37); stage 3 (n = 61); and stage 4 (n = 37). Of the patients, 48 developed postoperative complications including 17 patients with a major surgical complication. The in-hospital mortality was 1.7% (3 of 180). Predicted mortality according to POSSUM and P-POSSUM was 21.4% and 7.8%, respectively. Disease-specific 5-year survival according to stage was 85.4%, 64.2%, 33.3%, and 6.9%. CONCLUSIONS By tailoring the extent of resection and balancing risk and radicality, gastric cancer surgery can be performed with low mortality in Western patients. PMID:18430340

  14. Gastric cancer surgery--a balance of risk and radicality.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Peter; Sivashanmugam, T; White, Martin; Irving, Mark; Wayman, John; Raimes, Simon

    2008-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether tailoring the extent of resection would allow radical gastric cancer surgery to be performed safely in a UK population. A total of 180 consecutive patients (median age 70 years; male:female ratio 2:1) undergoing resection for gastric adenocarcinoma with curative intent were studied. Extent of lymphadenectomy was based upon pre-operative and intra-operative staging, and balanced against the patient's age and fitness. In the study group, 83 patients underwent subtotal or distal partial gastrectomy and 97 patients underwent total or proximal partial gastrectomy. Operative procedures were: D1 lymphadenectomy (n = 62); modified (spleen and pancreas pre-serving) D2 lymphadenectomy (n = 73); D2 lymphadenectomy (n = 42); and extended resection (n = 3). TNM classification was: stage 1 (n = 45); stage 2 (n = 37); stage 3 (n = 61); and stage 4 (n = 37). Of the patients, 48 developed postoperative complications including 17 patients with a major surgical complication. The in-hospital mortality was 1.7% (3 of 180). Predicted mortality according to POSSUM and P-POSSUM was 21.4% and 7.8%, respectively. Disease-specific 5-year survival according to stage was 85.4%, 64.2%, 33.3%, and 6.9%. By tailoring the extent of resection and balancing risk and radicality, gastric cancer surgery can be performed with low mortality in Western patients.

  15. [Current status of robotic surgery for gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Suda, Koichi; Ishida, Yoshinori; Uyama, Ichiro

    2014-11-01

    Robotic surgery was launched in Japan in 2000.In particular, the development of the da Vinci S Surgical System was a major breakthrough. It was introduced in Japan for the first time through our hospital in January 2009. Since then, the number of surgical robots used has been dramatically increasing, with up to approximately 160 robots all over the country. To date, we have performed more than 500 robotic surgeries, including 180 gastrectomies, at our hospital. Our data suggest that compared with the conventional laparoscopic approach, the use of the da Vinci Surgical System in minimally invasive gastrectomy for gastric cancer might improve short-term outcomes, particularly in terms of preventing postoperative local complications. Thus, we believe that use of surgical robots become increasingly beneficial for more extensive resections and operations that require more advanced skills, even though a couple of issues remain to be solved, such as long operative time, high cost, and limited experience and evidence. In this article, the current status and future perspectives regarding robotic gastrectomy for gastric cancer are presented based on our experience and a review of the literature.

  16. Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancers: Surgery Alone Versus Surgery Plus Postoperative Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Gwak, Hee Keun; Kim, Woo Chul; Kim, Hun Jung; Park, Jeong Hoon

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to determine the role of radiotherapy after curative-intent surgery in the management of extrahepatic bile duct (EHBD) cancers. Methods and Materials: From 1997 through 2005, 78 patients with EHBD cancer were surgically staged. These patients were stratified by the absence of adjuvant radiation (n = 47, group I) versus radiation (n = 31, group II) after resection. Pathology examination showed 27 cases in group I and 20 cases in group II had microscopically positive resection margins. The patients in group II received 45 to 54 Gy of external beam radiotherapy. The primary endpoints of this study were overall survival, disease-free survival, and prognostic factors. Results: There were no differences between the 5-year overall survival rates for the two groups (11.6% in group I vs. 21% in group II). However, the patients with microscopically positive resection margins who received adjuvant radiation therapy had higher median disease-free survival rates than those who underwent surgery alone (21 months vs. 10 months, respectively, p = 0.042). Decreasing local failure was found in patients who received postoperative radiotherapy (61.7% in group I and 35.6% in group II, p = 0.02). Outcomes of the patients with a positive resection margin and lymph node metastasis who received postoperative radiation therapy were doubled compared to those of patients without adjuvant radiotherapy. Resection margin status, lymph node metastasis, and pathology differentiation were significant prognostic factors in disease-free survival. Conclusions: Adjuvant radiotherapy might be useful in patients with EHBD cancer, especially for those patients with microscopic residual tumors and positive lymph nodes after resection for increasing local control.

  17. Variation in Medicare Payments for Colorectal Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Abdelsattar, Zaid M.; Birkmeyer, John D.; Wong, Sandra L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most expensive cancer in the United States. Episode-based bundled payments may be a strategy to decrease costs. However, it is unknown how payments are distributed across hospitals and different perioperative services. Methods: We extracted actual Medicare payments for patients in the fee-for-service Medicare population who underwent CRC surgery between January 2004 and Decembe 2006 (N = 105,016 patients). Payments included all service types from the date of hospitalization up to 1 year later. Hospitals were ranked from least to most expensive and grouped into quintiles. Results were case-mix adjusted and price standardized using empirical Bayes methods. We assessed the contributions of index hospitalization, physician services, readmissions, and postacute care to the overall variation in payment. Results: There is wide variation in total payments for CRC care within the first year after CRC surgery. Actual Medicare payments were $51,345 per patient in the highest quintile and $26,441 per patient in the lowest quintile, representing a difference of Δ = $24,902. Differences were persistent after price standardization (Δ = $17,184 per patient) and case-mix adjustment (Δ = $4,790 per patient). Payments for the index surgical hospitalization accounted for the largest share (65%) of payments but only minimally varied (11.6%) across quintiles. However, readmissions and postacute care services accounted for substantial variations in total payments. Conclusion: Medicare spending in the first year after CRC surgery varies across hospitals even after case-mix adjustment and price standardization. Variation is largely driven by postacute care and not the index surgical hospitalization. This has significant implications for policy decisions on how to bundle payments and define episodes of surgical CRC care. PMID:26130817

  18. Trends in breast cancer surgery at Brazil's public health system.

    PubMed

    Freitas-Júnior, Ruffo; Gagliato, Debora Melo; Moura Filho, João Wesley Cabral; Gouveia, Pollyana Alves; Rahal, Rosemar Macedo Sousa; Paulinelli, Régis Resende; Oliveira, Luis Fernando Pádua; Freitas, Paola Ferreira; Martins, Edesio; Urban, Cicero; Lucena, Clécio Ênio Murta

    2017-04-01

    To analyze time trend patterns in Breast Cancer (BC) surgeries performed at Brazil's Public Health System, known as SUS from 2008 to 2014. Ecological study of time series, based on the database system from SUS. Information on surgical procedures performed for BC treatment was collected. Analysis of the absolute number of surgeries was performed using Poisson Regression through Jointpoint Regression, and the trends were calculated through the annual percentage change (APC), with a confidence interval (CI) of 95%, and statistical significance when P < 0.05. Data analysis from 193.596 breast surgeries revealed a reduced number of simple mastectomies (APC -4.4%; CI -7.4 to -1.4; P < 0.05); stable trends in radical mastectomy with lymphadenectomy (APC -1.0%; CI -2.4 to 0.5; P = 0.1) and breast conserving surgery (APC 0.4%; CI -1.6 to 2.4; P = 0.6). Also, we observed a reduced number of axillary lymphadenectomy dissection (APC -16.8%; CI -26.8 to -5.4; P < 0.05); increased trends in breast reconstruction with implants after 2011 (APC 9.1%; CI 0.1-18.8; P < 0.05) and with flaps after 2012 (APC 61.3%; CI 41.3-84.0; P < 0.05). The overall rate of patients with breast reconstruction increased from 15% in 2008 to 29.2% in 2014. We found a significant increase in breast reconstruction in public health system in Brazil, and also a reduction in simple mastectomy and axillary lymphadenectomy. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. [Post-treatment sequelae after breast cancer conservative surgery].

    PubMed

    Delay, E; Gosset, J; Toussoun, G; Delaporte, T; Delbaere, M

    2008-04-01

    Thanks to the earlier detection of breast cancer, the advent of neoadjuvant therapy and the development of more effective surgical procedures reducing treatment sequelae, conservative treatment has dramatically expanded over the past 15 years. Several factors have recognized negative aesthetic consequences for breast cancer patients: being overweight, having voluminous or on the contrary, very small breasts, having a tumor located in the lower quadrant, having high breast-tumor: breast-volume ratio. Tissue injuries induced by radiotherapy and chemotherapy, such as shrinking, fibrosis or induration, maximize the deleterious impact of surgery. The results of conservative treatment also deteriorate with time: weight gain is common and may result in increased breast asymmetry. Patients undergoing conservative treatment may experience sequelae including various degrees of the following dimorphisms, all possibly responsible for minor or even major breast deformity: breast asymmetry, loss of the nipple/areola complex, scar shrinkage and skin impairment, irregular shape and position of the nipple and areola. Various sensory symptoms have also been reported following conservative treatment, with patients complaining of hypo- or dysesthesia or even suffering actual pain. Breast lymphedema is also a common incapacitating after-effect that is believed to be largely underdiagnosed in clinical practice. Finally, like mastectomy, conservative breast surgery may induce serious psychological distress in patients who suffer the loss of physical integrity, womanhood or sexual arousal. Clinicians must be aware of the radiological changes indicative of late cancer recurrence. There are four types of modifications as follows: increased breast density, architectural distortion at the surgical site and formation of scar, mammary fat necrosis, and occurrence of microcalcifications. The management of sequelae of conservative breast treatment must therefore involve a multidisciplinary

  20. Transoral surgery for laryngo-pharyngeal cancer - The paradigm shift of the head and cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Tateya, Ichiro; Shiotani, Akihiro; Satou, Yasuo; Tomifuji, Masayuki; Morita, Shuko; Muto, Manabu; Ito, Juichi

    2016-02-01

    Transoral surgery is a less invasive treatment that is becoming a major strategy in the treatment of laryngo-pharyngeal cancer. It is a minimally invasive approach that has no skin incision and limits the extent of tissue dissection, disruption of speech and swallowing muscles, blood loss, damage to major neurovascular structures, and injury to normal tissue. Transoral approaches to the laryngo-pharynx, except for early glottis cancer, had been limited traditionally to tumors that can be observed directly and manipulated with standard instrumentation and lighting. Since the 1990s, transoral laser microsurgery (TLM) has been used as an organ preservation strategy with good oncological control and good functional results, although it has not been widely used because of its technical difficulty. Recently, transoral robotic surgery (TORS) is becoming popular as a new treatment modality for laryngo-pharyngeal cancer, and surgical robots are used widely in the world since United States FDA approval in 2009. In spite of the global spread of TORS, it has not been approved by the Japan FDA, which has led to the development of other low-cost transoral surgical techniques in Japan. Transoral videolaryngoscopic surgery (TOVS) was developed as a new transoral surgery system for laryngo-pharyngeal lesions to address the problems of TLM. In TOVS, a rigid endoscope is used to visualize the surgical field instead of a microscope and the advantages of TOVS include the wide operative field and working space achieved using the distending laryngoscope and videolaryngoscope. Also, with the spread of narrow band imaging (NBI), endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD), which are widely used for superficial cancers in the gastrointestinal tract, have been applied for the superficial laryngo-pharyngeal cancer. Both EMR and ESD are performed mainly by gastroenterologists with a sharp dissector and magnifying endoscopy (ME)-NBI with minimal surgical margin

  1. Patient surveillance after curative-intent surgery for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Frank E; Longo, Walter E; Ode, Kenichi; Shariff, Umar S; Papettas, Trifonas; McGarry, Alaine E; Gammon, Steven R; Lee, Paul A; Audisio, Riccardo A; Grossmann, Erik M; Virgo, Katherine S

    2005-09-01

    The follow-up of patients with rectal cancer after potentially curative resection has significant financial and clinical implications for patients and society. The ideal regimen for monitoring patients is unknown. We evaluated the self-reported practice patterns of a large, diverse group of experts. There is little information available describing the actual practice of clinicians who perform potentially curative surgery on rectal cancer patients and follow them after recovery. The 1795 members of the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons were asked, via a detailed questionnaire, how often they request 14 discrete follow-up modalities in their patients treated for cure with TNM stage I, II, or III rectal cancer over the first five post-treatment years. 566/1782 (32%) responded and 347 of the respondents (61%) provided evaluable data. Members of the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons typically follow their own patients postoperatively rather than sending them back to their referral source. Office visit and serum CEA level are the most frequently requested items for each of the first five postoperative years. Endoscopy and imaging tests are also used regularly. Considerable variation exists among these highly experienced, highly credentialed experts. The surveillance strategies reported here rely most heavily on relatively simple and inexpensive tests. Endoscopy is employed frequently; imaging tests are employed less often. The observed variation in the intensity of postoperative monitoring is of concern.

  2. Retrospective review of rectal cancer surgery in northern Alberta

    PubMed Central

    Pelletier, Jean-Sébastien; DeGara, Christopher; Porter, Geoff; Ghosh, Sunita; Schiller, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Previous studies, including research published more than 10 years ago in Northern Alberta, have demonstrated improved outcomes with increased surgical volume and subspecialisation in the treatment of rectal cancer. We sought to examine contemporary rectal cancer care in the same region to determine whether practice patterns have changed and whether outcomes have improved. Methods We reviewed the charts of all patients with rectal adenocarcinoma diagnosed between 1998 and 2003 who had a potentially curative resection. The main outcomes examined were 5-year local recurrence (LR) and disease-specific survival (DSS). Surgeons were classified into 3 groups according to training and volume, and we compared outcome measures among them. We also compared our results to those of the previous study from our region. Results We included 433 cases in the study. Subspecialty-trained colorectal surgeons performed 35% of all surgeries in our study compared to 16% in the previous study. The overall 5-year LR rate and DSS in our study were improved compared to the previous study. On multivariate analysis, the only factor associated with increased 5-year LR was presence of obstruction, and the factors associated with decreased 5-year DSS were high-volume noncolorectal surgeons, presence of obstruction and increased stage. Conclusion Over the past 10 years, the long-term outcomes of treatment for rectal cancer have improved. We found that surgical subspecialization was associated with improved DSS but not LR. Increased surgical volume was not associated with LR or DSS. PMID:23883504

  3. Retrospective review of rectal cancer surgery in northern Alberta.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, Jean-Sébastien; Degara, Christopher; Porter, Geoff; Ghosh, Sunita; Schiller, Dan

    2013-08-01

    Previous studies, including research published more than 10 years ago in Northern Alberta, have demonstrated improved outcomes with increased surgical volume and subspecialisation in the treatment of rectal cancer. We sought to examine contemporary rectal cancer care in the same region to determine whether practice patterns have changed and whether outcomes have improved. We reviewed the charts of all patients with rectal adenocarcinoma diagnosed between 1998 and 2003 who had a potentially curative resection. The main outcomes examined were 5-year local recurrence (LR) and disease-specific survival (DSS). Surgeons were classified into 3 groups according to training and volume, and we compared outcome measures among them. We also compared our results to those of the previous study from our region. We included 433 cases in the study. Subspecialty-trained colorectal surgeons performed 35% of all surgeries in our study compared to 16% in the previous study. The overall 5-year LR rate and DSS in our study were improved compared to the previous study. On multivariate analysis, the only factor associated with increased 5-year LR was presence of obstruction, and the factors associated with decreased 5-year DSS were high-volume noncolorectal surgeons, presence of obstruction and increased stage. Over the past 10 years, the long-term outcomes of treatment for rectal cancer have improved. We found that surgical subspecialization was associated with improved DSS but not LR. Increased surgical volume was not associated with LR or DSS.

  4. [Orbital tumors in material of Department of Head and Neck Surgery and Oncological Laryngology of Greater Poland Cancer Center 2007-2010].

    PubMed

    Pieńkowski, Piotr; Wieloch, Michał; Golusiński, Wojciech; Pazdrowski, Jakub; Luczewski, Lukasz

    2012-01-01

    Tumors of the orbit are diagnosed sporadically. Based on the tumor registry of the American Cancer Society the incidence of tumors of the orbit is assessed at fewer than 1 per 100 000 persons. Tumors of the orbit can be divided into three groups: primary tumors, tumors penetrating the orbit from neighboring structures, and tumors that are metastases of malignant cancers from distant organs. To present the results of treatment of patients with tumors of the orbit treated in the Head and Neck Surgery and Laryngological Oncology Ward of the Greater Poland Cancer Centre in Poznań during 2007-2010. The study group consisted of 26 patients surgically treated during 2007-2010 in the Head and Neck Surgery and Laryngological Oncology Ward of the Greater Poland Cancer Centre in Poznań. In the postoperative histopathological examination 18 patients (69%) were diagnosed with malignant tumors, 7 patients (27%) with non-malignant tumor and 1 patient (4%) with inflammatory lesion. Among malignant tumors the most frequent was basal cell carcinoma, diagnosed in 7 patients (27%). When removing the tumors of the orbit 4 types of operation were performed: lateral orbitotomy, superior orbitotomy, eye enucleation, and exenteration of the orbit. In 3 patients (12%) cancer recurrences occurred. All patients with recurrences underwent reoperation. In a patient with an extensive recurrence of squamous cell carcinoma the surgery was not radical and the patient died during palliative chemotherapy. Patients with tumors of the orbit should be treated operatively in appropriately prepared centers. In our material the confirmation of this thesis is the group of patients with recurrences of basal cell carcinoma, operated on many times in the past, who due to the extent of the cancerous process had to have the seeing eye removed. In the case of malignant cancers of the orbit an interdisciplinary approach to the problem and the assurance of psychological care for patients who have lost an orbit

  5. [Preoperative assessment of patient candidate to prostate cancer surgery].

    PubMed

    Beauval, J-B; Mazerolles, M; Salomon, L; Soulié, M

    2015-11-01

    To determine the tools of therapeutic decision that push towards surgical treatment in non metastatic prostate cancer eligible to local treatment. The optimized assessment of the disease and eventual comorbidities improves the selection of patients. Patient's files will be presented in the uro-oncological multidisciplinary discussions to validate the customized therapeutic approach proposed. Literature review using Medline (National library of medicine, Pubmed) and Med Science databases based on the scientific pertinence. Research was focused on the diagnosis of prostate cancer, the evaluation of the disease and patient's characteristics, and finally the elements that are with a surgical treatment (past medical history, past surgical history, functional status, patient's comorbidities, and life expectancy). The pretherapeutic oncologic evaluation allows to estimate the risks associated with prostate cancer; it is an essential aspect of therapeutic decision. Several clinical, biological, imaging and pathological criteria allow to guide decision-making according to tumor aggressiveness and risk of recurrence, estimating the results of the different treatments proposed. On the other hand, the evaluation of lower urinary tract symptoms, urinary continence and sexual function, the integration of anatomical data, past medical and past surgical history are all essential for the therapeutic decision, in addition to the comorbidities (Charlson, ASA, ICD). These elements should be taken all together in order to decide for a radical or conservative management of PCa, they guide decision-making in patients candidate for surgery. For example, age plays a key role in the choice of treatment, even in older men at risk of developing high-risk PCa that can affect overall survival. The combined evaluation of the patient and disease characteristics is of utmost importance in oncology, and especially in the treatment of non-metastatic PCa. The role of the anesthesiologist in the

  6. Core Outcomes for Colorectal Cancer Surgery: A Consensus Study

    PubMed Central

    Whistance, Robert N.; Forsythe, Rachael O.; Macefield, Rhiannon; Pullyblank, Anne M.; Avery, Kerry N. L.; Brookes, Sara T.; Thomas, Michael G.; Sylvester, Paul A.; Russell, Ann; Oliver, Alfred; Morton, Dion; Kennedy, Robin; Jayne, David G.; Huxtable, Richard; Hackett, Roland; Card, Mia; Brown, Julia; Blazeby, Jane M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of worldwide morbidity and mortality. Surgical treatment is common, and there is a great need to improve the delivery of such care. The gold standard for evaluating surgery is within well-designed randomized controlled trials (RCTs); however, the impact of RCTs is diminished by a lack of coordinated outcome measurement and reporting. A solution to these issues is to develop an agreed standard “core” set of outcomes to be measured in all trials to facilitate cross-study comparisons, meta-analysis, and minimize outcome reporting bias. This study defines a core outcome set for CRC surgery. Methods and Findings The scope of this COS includes clinical effectiveness trials of surgical interventions for colorectal cancer. Excluded were nonsurgical oncological interventions. Potential outcomes of importance to patients and professionals were identified through systematic literature reviews and patient interviews. All outcomes were transcribed verbatim and categorized into domains by two independent researchers. This informed a questionnaire survey that asked stakeholders (patients and professionals) from United Kingdom CRC centers to rate the importance of each domain. Respondents were resurveyed following group feedback (Delphi methods). Outcomes rated as less important were discarded after each survey round according to predefined criteria, and remaining outcomes were considered at three consensus meetings; two involving international professionals and a separate one with patients. A modified nominal group technique was used to gain the final consensus. Data sources identified 1,216 outcomes of CRC surgery that informed a 91 domain questionnaire. First round questionnaires were returned from 63 out of 81 (78%) centers, including 90 professionals, and 97 out of 267 (35%) patients. Second round response rates were high for all stakeholders (>80%). Analysis of responses lead to 45 and 23 outcome domains being retained

  7. Minimally Invasive Surgery for Early-Stage Lung Cancer: From Innovation to Standard of Care.

    PubMed

    White, Abby; Swanson, Scott J

    2016-11-15

    The era of minimally invasive surgery for lung cancer follows decades of research; the collection and interpretation of countless qualitative and quantitative data points; and tireless efforts by a few pioneering thoracic surgeons who believed they could deliver a safe and oncologically sound operation with less tissue trauma, an improved physiologic profile, and fewer complications than traditional open surgery. This review highlights those efforts and the role of minimally invasive surgery for early-stage lung cancer in light of evolving technology, the emerging understanding of the biology of early-stage lung cancer, and lung cancer screening.

  8. Technical feasibility of laparoscopic extended surgery beyond total mesorectal excision for primary or recurrent rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Akiyoshi, Takashi

    2016-01-14

    Relatively little is known about the oncologic safety of laparoscopic surgery for advanced rectal cancer. Recently, large randomized clinical trials showed that laparoscopic surgery was not inferior to open surgery, as evidenced by survival and local control rates. However, patients with T4 tumors were excluded from these trials. Technological advances in the instrumentation and techniques used by laparoscopic surgery have increased the use of laparoscopic surgery for advanced rectal cancer. High-definition, illuminated, and magnified images obtained by laparoscopy may enable more precise laparoscopic surgery than open techniques, even during extended surgery for T4 or locally recurrent rectal cancer. To date, the quality of evidence regarding the usefulness of laparoscopy for extended surgery beyond total mesorectal excision has been low because most studies have been uncontrolled series, with small sample sizes, and long-term data are lacking. Nevertheless, laparoscopic extended surgery for rectal cancer, when performed by specialized laparoscopic colorectal surgeons, has been reported safe in selected patients, with significant advantages, including a clear visual field and less blood loss. This review summarizes current knowledge on laparoscopic extended surgery beyond total mesorectal excision for primary or locally recurrent rectal cancer.

  9. The Cancer Ward: Scapegoating Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeargan, Linda D.; Nehemkis, Alexis M.

    1983-01-01

    Describes scapegoating encountered during the author's third-year experience as psychological consultant to the oncology unit of a large medical center. Therapeutic strategies for managing the crisis within the structure of an ongoing staff support group are discussed. A conceptual framework for understanding the scapegoating process is…

  10. Conservative treatment for breast cancer. Complications requiring reconstructive surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Bostwick, J. 3d.; Paletta, C.; Hartrampf, C.R.

    1986-05-01

    Women who select conservative treatment for carcinoma of the breast (tumor excision followed by supervoltage radiation therapy) place a premium on breast preservation and aesthetics. When local control fails and they require a mastectomy, or when the aesthetic appearance is unacceptable, they may request breast reconstruction. The goal of this study is to evaluate a series of 10 patients who required reconstructive breast surgery after complications of conservative treatment. Patient classification: I. Breast or chest wall necrosis (3). II. Breast fibrosis and gross asymmetry (3). III. Local recurrence of breast cancer (5). IV. Positive margins after the initial lumpectomy (1). The mean age was 34 years. Radiation dosage average was 5252 rads with two patients receiving iridium-192 implant boosts. The reconstructive management was complex and usually required a major musculocutaneous flap because of the radiation effects.

  11. Reconstructive surgery in young women with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Marín-Gutzke, Martina; Sánchez-Olaso, Alberto

    2010-09-01

    Recovery of body image after mastectomy is essential for physical and mental quality of life. Partial or total mastectomy deformities can be reversed by reconstructive surgical procedures. Young women with breast cancer have specific characteristics related to the age of onset of the disease, prognosis and reconstructive expectations. Patient individualization is the key to a successful breast reconstruction. Autologous and prosthetic reconstruction are the two main techniques used for breast reconstruction. Each reconstructive technique has its own indications, advantages and limitations. Timing of the surgery is primarily determined by the requirement for adjuvant radiotherapy, so an immediate or a delayed approach can be recommended. In patients in whom the need for adjuvant radiotherapy is in doubt, a delayed-immediate approach is the best to optimize aesthetic and oncologic outcomes. Prophylactic mastectomy is also being indicated in a growing number of patients. In these patients it is important to choose a similar reconstructive procedure on both sides to achieve breast symmetry.

  12. Long-term outcomes of surgery alone versus surgery following preoperative chemoradiotherapy for early T3 rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Seung Hyun; Choi, Gyu-Seog; Kim, Gab Chul; Seo, An Na; Kim, Hye Jung; Kim, Won Hwa; Shin, Kyung-Min; Lee, So Mi; Ryeom, Hunkyu; Kim, See Hyung

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Recently, a few studies have raised the question of whether preoperative chemoradiotherapy (PCRT) is essential for all T3 rectal cancers. This case-matched study aimed to compare the long-term outcomes of surgery alone with those of PCRT + surgery for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-assessed T3ab (extramural depth of invasion ≤5 mm) and absent mesorectal fascia invasion (clear MRF) in mid/lower rectal cancer patients. From January 2006 to November 2012, 203 patients who underwent curative surgery alone (n = 118) or PCRT + surgery (n = 85) were enrolled in this retrospective study. A 1:1 propensity score-matched analysis was performed to eliminate the inherent bias. Case-matching covariates included age, sex, body mass index, histologic grade, carcinoembryonic antigen, operation method, follow-up period, tumor height, and status of lymph node metastasis. The end-points were the 5-year local recurrence (LR) rate and disease-free-survival (DFS). After propensity score matching, 140 patients in 70 pairs were included. Neither the 5-year LR rate nor the DFS was significantly different between the 2 groups (the 5-year LR rate, P = 0.93; the 5-year DFS, P = 0.94). The 5-year LR rate of the surgery alone was 2% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.2%–10.9%) versus 2% (95% CI 0.2%–10.1%) in the PCRT + surgery group. The 5-year DFS of the surgery alone was 87% (95% CI 74.6%–93.7%) versus 88% (95% CI 77.8%–93.9%) in the PCRT + surgery group. In patients with MRI-assessed T3ab and clear MRF mid/lower rectal cancer, the long-term outcomes of surgery alone were comparable with those of the PCRT + surgery. The suggested MRI-assessed T3ab and clear MRF can be used as a highly selective indication of surgery alone in mid/lower T3 rectal cancer. Additionally, in those patients, surgery alone can be tailored to the clinical situation. PMID:28328820

  13. Nutrition interventions in patients with gynecological cancers requiring surgery.

    PubMed

    Obermair, Andreas; Simunovic, Marko; Isenring, Liz; Janda, Monika

    2017-04-01

    Including developing countries, between 20 and 88% of gynecological oncology patients may present with at least mild malnutrition at diagnosis. Significant morbidity and mortality is attributed to malnutrition. Here we reviewed randomized clinical trials of nutritional interventions used to achieve early return to oral diet, enhance recovery from surgery and reduce adverse events in gynecological cancer patients undergoing surgery. Ebscohost (CINAHL+Medline+PsycINFO), Cochrane, Embase, PubMed and Scopus databases were searched for articles published from 2000 onwards. Potentially eligible articles were screened by two reviewers. Length of hospital stay (LOS), postoperative complications, recovery of intestinal function, quality of life (QOL), hematological and immunological parameters were outcome measures of the nutritional interventions. Seven randomized clinical trials were included in the review. Early clear liquid diet, semiliquid diet, regular diet or immune-enhanced enteral diets were all found to be safe as nutritional interventions. In five of the seven trials significantly better outcomes were observed in the intervention group compared to usual care for one of more of the outcomes intestinal recovery time, LOS, postoperative complications and immunological parameters. However, the nutritional interventions varied greatly between the trials, making it difficult to directly compare their findings. Trial quality was low to moderate. Recommended malnutrition screening and assessment tools and guidelines for treatment are reviewed. From the limited findings it would appear that nutritional interventions of early oral feeding and enteral feeding are safe. Receiving nutritional interventions seems to reduce LOS, intestinal recovery time and postoperative complications for some patients. Increasing use of neoadjuvant treatment may reduce the prevalence of patients presenting malnourished for surgery in the future. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier

  14. Transoral robotic surgery in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Hans, S; Delas, B; Gorphe, P; Ménard, M; Brasnu, D

    2012-02-01

    Robots have invaded industry and, more recently, the field of medicine. Following the development of various prototypes, Intuitive Surgical® has developed the Da Vinci surgical robot. This robot, designed for abdominal surgery, has been widely used in urology since 2000. The many advantages of this transoral robotic surgery (TORS) are described in this article. Its disadvantages are essentially its high cost and the absence of tactile feedback. The first feasibility studies in head and neck cancer, conducted in animals, dummies and cadavers, were performed in 2005, followed by the first publications in patients in 2006. The first series including more than 20 patients treated by TORS demonstrated the feasibility for the following sites: oropharynx, supraglottic larynx and hypopharynx. However, these studies did not validate the oncological results of the TORS technique. TORS decreases the number of tracheotomies, and allows more rapid swallowing rehabilitation and a shorter length of hospital stay. Technical improvements are expected. Smaller, more ergonomic, new generation robots, therefore more adapted to the head and neck, will probably be available in the future. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. [Recognition of postoperative complication after surgery for gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhouqiao; Li, Ziyu; Ji, Jiafu

    2017-02-25

    Complications significantly postpone postoperative recovery and increase mortality after gastric cancer surgery. However, varied complication rates have been reported in the literature as well as in our annual report of China Gastrointestinal Oncological Surgery League. It appears that there have been some misunderstandings regarding the diagnosis and interventions as well as the etiology of major complications. We should be aware of the fact that reaching worldwide consensus for the diagnostic criteria is a difficult task in most complications, which disabled the possibility of data comparison among different studies in most cases. Disagreements among the Chinese and western surgeons in the complication diagnosis should also be acknowledged when interpreting data from both ends. The western colleagues appreciate more latent manifestations of the complications, which eventually lead to earlier and more aggressive examinations and interventions. We, together with all Chinese centers, need to acknowledge the differences, ensure the integrity of our reported data while proposing respective countermeasures. Although the complication registration may continue to differ among centers, we can register complications with the intervention details so that the reported complications can be classified with the same standard (i.e. Clavien-Dindo scoring system). We should also encourage multi-center collaborations and trials, which facilitate the standardization of complication diagnosis and registration. Recognizing the difficulty and long-course nature of reaching national or even international consensus, we continue aiming at the ultimate goal with our best effort.

  16. Laparoscopic resection of colon Cancer: consensus of the European Association of Endoscopic Surgery (EAES).

    PubMed

    Veldkamp, R; Gholghesaei, M; Bonjer, H J; Meijer, D W; Buunen, M; Jeekel, J; Anderberg, B; Cuesta, M A; Cuschierl, A; Fingerhut, A; Fleshman, J W; Guillou, P J; Haglind, E; Himpens, J; Jacobi, C A; Jakimowicz, J J; Koeckerling, F; Lacy, A M; Lezoche, E; Monson, J R; Morino, M; Neugebauer, E; Wexner, S D; Whelan, R L

    2004-08-01

    The European Association of Endoscopic Surgery (EAES) initiated a consensus development conference on the laparoscopic resection of colon cancer during the annual congress in Lisbon, Portugal, in June 2002. A systematic review of the current literature was combined with the opinions, of experts in the field of colon cancer surgery to formulate evidence-based statements and recommendations on the laparoscopic resection of colon cancer. Advanced age, obesity, and previous abdominal operations are not considered absolute contraindications for laparoscopic colon cancer surgery. The most common cause for conversion is the presence of bulky or invasive tumors. Laparoscopic operation takes longer to perform than the open counterpart, but the outcome is similar in terms of specimen size and pathological examination. Immediate postoperative morbidity and mortality are comparable for laparoscopic and open colonic cancer surgery. The laparoscopically operated patients had less postoperative pain, better-preserved pulmonary function, earlier restoration of gastrointestinal function, and an earlier discharge from the hospital. The postoperative stress response is lower after laparoscopic colectomy. The incidence of port site metastases is <1%. Survival after laparoscopic resection of colon cancer appears to be at least equal to survival after open resection. The costs of laparoscopic surgery for colon cancer are higher than those for open surgery. Laparoscopic resection of colon cancer is a safe and feasible procedure that improves short-term outcome. Results regarding the long-term survival of patients enrolled in large multicenter trials will determine its role in general surgery.

  17. Minimally invasive surgery for gastric cancer: A comparison between robotic, laparoscopic and open surgery

    PubMed Central

    Parisi, Amilcare; Reim, Daniel; Borghi, Felice; Nguyen, Ninh T; Qi, Feng; Coratti, Andrea; Cianchi, Fabio; Cesari, Maurizio; Bazzocchi, Francesca; Alimoglu, Orhan; Gagnière, Johan; Pernazza, Graziano; D’Imporzano, Simone; Zhou, Yan-Bing; Azagra, Juan-Santiago; Facy, Olivier; Brower, Steven T; Jiang, Zhi-Wei; Zang, Lu; Isik, Arda; Gemini, Alessandro; Trastulli, Stefano; Novotny, Alexander; Marano, Alessandra; Liu, Tong; Annecchiarico, Mario; Badii, Benedetta; Arcuri, Giacomo; Avanzolini, Andrea; Leblebici, Metin; Pezet, Denis; Cao, Shou-Gen; Goergen, Martine; Zhang, Shu; Palazzini, Giorgio; D’Andrea, Vito; Desiderio, Jacopo

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the role of minimally invasive surgery for gastric cancer and determine surgical, clinical, and oncological outcomes. METHODS This is a propensity score-matched case-control study, comparing three treatment arms: robotic gastrectomy (RG), laparoscopic gastrectomy (LG), open gastrectomy (OG). Data collection started after sharing a specific study protocol. Data were recorded through a tailored and protected web-based system. Primary outcomes: harvested lymph nodes, estimated blood loss, hospital stay, complications rate. Among the secondary outcomes, there are: operative time, R0 resections, POD of mobilization, POD of starting liquid diet and soft solid diet. The analysis includes the evaluation of type and grade of postoperative complications. Detailed information of anastomotic leakages is also provided. RESULTS The present analysis was carried out of 1026 gastrectomies. To guarantee homogenous distribution of cases, patients in the RG, LG and OG groups were 1:1:2 matched using a propensity score analysis with a caliper = 0.2. The successful matching resulted in a total sample of 604 patients (RG = 151; LG = 151; OG = 302). The three groups showed no differences in all baseline patients characteristics, type of surgery (P = 0.42) and stage of the disease (P = 0.16). Intraoperative blood loss was significantly lower in the LG (95.93 ± 119.22) and RG (117.91 ± 68.11) groups compared to the OG (127.26 ± 79.50, P = 0.002). The mean number of retrieved lymph nodes was similar between the RG (27.78 ± 11.45), LG (24.58 ± 13.56) and OG (25.82 ± 12.07) approach. A benefit in favor of the minimally invasive approaches was found in the length of hospital stay (P < 0.0001). A similar complications rate was found (P = 0.13). The leakage rate was not different (P = 0.78) between groups. CONCLUSION Laparoscopic and robotic surgery can be safely performed and proposed as possible alternative to open surgery. The main highlighted benefit is a faster

  18. Recurrence of papillary thyroid cancer after optimized surgery.

    PubMed

    Grant, Clive S

    2015-02-01

    Recurrence of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) after optimized surgery requires a full understanding of the disease, especially as it has changed in the last 15 years, what comprises optimized surgery, and the different types and implications of disease relapse that can be encountered. PTC has evolved to tumors that are much smaller than previously seen, largely due to various high quality imaging studies obtained for different reasons, but serendipitously identifying thyroid nodules that prove to be papillary thyroid microcarcinomas (PTMC). With rare exception, these cancers are cured by conservative surgery without additional therapy, and seldom result in recurrent disease. PTC is highly curable in 85% of cases because of its rather innocent biologic behavior. Therefore, the shift in emphasis from disease survival to recurrence is appropriate. As a result of three technologic advances-high-resolution ultrasound (US), recombinant TSH, and highly sensitive thyroglobulin (Tg)-disease relapse can be discovered when it is subclinical. Endocrinologists who largely control administration of radioactive iodine have used it to ablate barely detectable or even biochemically apparent disease, hoping to reduce recurrence and perhaps improve survival. Surgeons, in response to this new intense postoperative surveillance that has uncovered very small volume disease, have responded by utilizing US preoperatively to image this disease, and incorporated varying degrees of lymphadenectomy into their initial treatment algorithm. Bilateral thyroid resection-either total or near-total thyroidectomy-remains the standard for PTC >1 cm, although recent data has re-emphasized the value of unilateral lobectomy in treating even some PTC measuring 1-4 cm. Therapeutic lymphadenectomy has universal approval, but when lymph nodes in the central neck are not worrisome to the surgeon's intraoperative assessment, although that judgment in incorrect up to 50%, whether they should be excised has

  19. Perioperative fasting time among cancer patients submitted to gastrointestinal surgeries.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Nayara de Castro; Turrini, Ruth Natalia Teresa; Poveda, Vanessa de Brito

    2017-05-25

    To identify the length of perioperative fasting among patients submitted to gastrointestinal cancer surgeries. Retrospective cohort study, developed by consulting the medical records of 128 patients submitted to gastrointestinal cancer surgeries. The mean of total length of fasting was 107.6 hours. The total length of fasting was significantly associated with the number of symptoms presented before (p=0.000) and after the surgery (p=0.007), the length of hospital stay (p=0.000), blood transfusion (p=0.013), nasogastric tube (p=0.001) and nasojejunal tube (p=0,003), postoperative admission at ICU (p=0.002), postoperative death (p=0.000) and length of preoperative fasting (p=0.000). The length of fasting is associated with complications that affect the quality of the patients' postoperative recovery and nurses' work. The nursing team should be alert to this aspect and being responsible for overseeing the patients' interest, should not permit the unnecessary extension of fasting. Identificar la duración del ayuno perioperatorio entre los pacientes sometidos a cirugías de cáncer gastrointestinal. Estudio de cohorte retrospectivo, por consulta de los registros médicos de 128 pacientes sometidos a cirugías de cáncer gastrointestinal. La media de la duración total del ayuno fue de 107,6 horas. La duración total del ayuno se asoció significativamente con el número de síntomas presentados antes (p=0,000) y después de la cirugía (p=0,007), la duración de la estancia hospitalaria (p=0,000), transfusión de sangre (p=0,013),tubo nasogástrico (P=0,003), ingreso postoperatorio en la UCI (p=0,002), muerte postoperatoria (p=0,000) y duración del ayuno preoperatorio (p=0,000). La duración del ayuno se asocia con complicaciones que afectan la calidad de la recuperación postoperatoria de los pacientes y el trabajo de enfermería. El equipo de enfermería debe estar alerta en relación a este aspecto y ser responsable de supervisar el interés de los pacientes, no

  20. Bariatric Surgery and Liver Cancer in a Consortium of Academic Medical Centers.

    PubMed

    Yang, Baiyu; Yang, Hannah P; Ward, Kristy K; Sahasrabuddhe, Vikrant V; McGlynn, Katherine A

    2016-03-01

    Obesity is implicated as an important factor in the rising incidence of liver cancer in the USA. Bariatric surgery is increasingly used for treating morbid obesity and comorbidities. Using administrative data from UHC, a consortium of academic medical centers in the USA, we compared the prevalence of liver cancer among admissions with and without a history of bariatric surgery within a 3-year period. Admissions with a history of bariatric surgery had a 61 % lower prevalence of liver cancer compared to those without a history of bariatric surgery (prevalence ratio 0.39, 95 % confidence interval 0.35-0.44), and these inverse associations persisted within strata of sex, race, and ethnicity. This hospital administrative record-based analysis suggests that bariatric surgery could play a role in liver cancer prevention.

  1. The role of antifibrinolytic agents in gynecologic cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Celebi, Nalan; Celebioglu, Bilge; Selcuk, Mehtap; Canbay, Ozgur; Karagoz, Ayse H; Aypar, Ulku

    2006-05-01

    To compare the effects of crystalloid and colloid solutions, tranexamic acid and epsilon-aminocaproic acid on the need for allogenic blood transfusion and on coagulation and fibrinolysis parameters. We conducted the study in the Anesthesiology and Reanimation Department of Hacettepe University Medical Faculty, Ankara, Turkey between March 2004 and April 2005. The study included 105 patients, classified by the American Society of Anesthesiology as physical status groups I-II, undergoing gynecologic cancer treatment. We divided them into 5 groups: group I (crystalloid) received crystalloid solutions, group II (colloid) received colloid solutions, group III (tranexamic acid) received 10 mg x kg(-1) tranexamic acid, and group 5 (epsilon-aminocaproic acid) received 100 mg x kg(-1) epsilon-aminocaproic acid. All patients bleeding amount was measured and recorded perioperatively, and at the 12th and 24th hours postoperatively. We then evaluated the patients' hemoglobin, hematocrit, activated thromboplastin time, international normalized ration, fibrinogen, and thrombocyte count and symptoms of pulmonary embolism. In comparing the amount of bleeding, the bleeding in the tranexamic acid group was 30.8% less than the crystalloid group (p<0.05), 33.3% less than the colloid group (p<0.05), and 23.9% less than the epsilon-aminocaproic acid group (p<0.05). When the negative effects of blood transfusions were considered, tranexamic acid administration can be recommended for decreasing the need for blood transfusion in gynecologic cancer surgery.

  2. The role of the robotic technique in minimally invasive surgery in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Paolo Pietro; Luca, Fabrizio; Petz, Wanda; Valvo, Manuela; Cenciarelli, Sabine; Zuccaro, Massimiliano; Biffi, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Laparoscopic rectal surgery is feasible, oncologically safe, and offers better short-term outcomes than traditional open procedures in terms of pain control, recovery of bowel function, length of hospital stay, and time until return to working activity. Nevertheless, laparoscopic techniques are not widely used in rectal surgery, mainly because they require a prolonged and demanding learning curve that is available only in high-volume and rectal cancer surgery centres experienced in minimally invasive surgery. Robotic surgery is a new technology that enables the surgeon to perform minimally invasive operations with better vision and more intuitive and precise control of the operating instruments, promising to overcome some of the technical difficulties associated with standard laparoscopy. The aim of this review is to summarise the current data on clinical and oncological outcomes of minimally invasive surgery in rectal cancer, focusing on robotic surgery, and providing original data from the authors’ centre. PMID:24101946

  3. Radiotherapy and chemoradiation after surgery for early cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Linda; Siu, Shing Shun N; Luesley, David; Bryant, Andrew; Dickinson, Heather O

    2014-01-01

    Background This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review first published in Issue 4, 2009. There is an ongoing debate about the indications for, and value of, adjuvant pelvic radiotherapy after radical surgery in women with early cervical cancer. Certain combinations of pathological risk factors are thought to represent sufficient risk for recurrence, that they justify the use of postoperative pelvic radiotherapy, though this has never been shown to improve overall survival, and use of more than one type of treatment (surgery and radiotherapy) increases the risks of side effects and complications. Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of adjuvant therapies (radiotherapy, chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy, chemoradiation) after radical hysterectomy for early-stage cervical cancer (FIGO stages IB1, IB2 or IIA). Search methods For the original review, we searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Issue 4, 2008. The Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Group Trials Register, MEDLINE (January 1950 to November 2008), EMBASE (1950 to November 2008). We also searched registers of clinical trials, abstracts of scientific meetings, reference lists of included studies and contacted experts in the field. For this update, we extended the database searches to September 2011 and searched the MetaRegister for ongoing trials. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared adjuvant therapies (radiotherapy, chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy, or chemoradiation) with no radiotherapy or chemoradiation, in women with a confirmed histological diagnosis of early cervical cancer who had undergone radical hysterectomy and dissection of the pelvic lymph nodes. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently abstracted data and assessed risk of bias. Information on grade 3 and 4 adverse events was collected from the trials. Results were pooled using random-effects meta-analyses. Main results Two RCTs

  4. Mohs micrographic surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Skin cancer - Mohs surgery; Basal cell skin cancer - Mohs surgery; Squamous cell skin cancer - Mohs surgery ... visits. During the procedure, the surgeon removes the cancer in layers until all the cancer has been ...

  5. Guided implant surgery on oral cancer patients: in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Paris, Marion; Chaux-Bodard, Anne-Gaëlle; Gourmet, René; Fortin, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Many oral cancer patients (OCPs) are unable to wear conventional prostheses due to the disease and treatment effects, so they are candidates for oral rehabilitation with osseointegrated implants. A guide suitable for OCPs was designed and tested. Image-guided systems based on a custom template for oral implant placement are now widespread among healthy patients, but this has not been extended to OCPs. The EasyGuideT system (Keystone Dental, Burlington, MA, USA) for template stabilization is used on healthy edentulous patients, achieved by bone screws, mini-implants or stereolithography with a bone support. All these systems are invasive and cannot be used in many oral cancer patients. We adapted the EasyGuideT to OCP rehabilitation. The first stage focused on developing a template-positioning system for use on edentulous mandibles that is non-invasive, repeatable, stable on the oral mucosa, consistent with the operating room asepsis, and comfortable for the patient. This repositioning system consists of a cube fiducial marker and an extra-oral support using a facial thermoplastic mask. The mask is linked to the surgical template through the cube. The second stage consisted of direct evaluation of the repositioning system reproducibility, performed on 5 adult cadaver skulls. The translation errors and rotation errors obtained using the modified EasyGuideT system were satisfactory in ex vivo experiments on cadaver skulls. A non-invasive repositioning system for image-guided implant surgery on oral cancer patients is clinically feasible using a cube fiducial marker and extra-oral support with a facial thermoplastic mask.

  6. How Mohs Surgery Transformed Into a First-Line Treatment of Skin Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bobotsis, Rob; Guenther, Lyn

    Mohs surgery is considered ideal treatment for many types of skin cancers. Developed by Dr Frederic Edward Mohs (1910-2002), Mohs surgery allows all surgical margins to be viewed microscopically, ensuring no cancer cells go unremoved, yet it failed to achieve immediate acceptance when first introduced in the 1940s. A catalyst to the widespread acceptance of Mohs surgery occurred with the work of dermatologic colleagues who reported excellent results without using the paste. It suggested the real innovation of Mohs surgery lay in its microscopic control and not the paste, the discontinuation of which removed all the problems associated with its use.

  7. Does bariatric surgery reduce cancer risk? A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Maestro, Alba; Rigla, Mercedes; Caixàs, Assumpta

    2015-03-01

    Bariatric surgery has been shown to provide sustained weight loss and to decrease obesity-related mortality in most patients with morbid obesity, but its effect on cancer risk is less clear. Our aim was to review the published studies on the association between bariatric surgery and cancer risk. A literature search for relevant articles published in English, with no limitation on the year of publication, was conducted using PubMed. Studies reporting data on preoperative cancer, case reports, and publications with no abstract available were excluded. Overall, the published literature suggests that bariatric surgery may decrease risk of cancer, although this effect appears to be limited to women. However, two recent studies contradict these findings and state that risk of cancer has not been actually shown to decrease after surgery, and an increased risk of colorectal cancer has even been seen. Although most studies report lower cancer risk after bariatric surgery, the main limitations include their designs, which do not achieve the highest levels of evidence. Moreover, several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the protective effect of surgery, but the exact mechanisms have not been elucidated yet, which suggests the need for further research. Bariatric surgery may have a protective effect from overall cancer risk, mainly in women, but additional research is needed. Further research is also required to better examine the relationship between bariatric surgery and risk of colorectal cancer before confirming or dismissing the above reported higher risk, as well as the risk of esophagogastric cancer, which has not been adequately studied to date. Copyright © 2014 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Surgery for limited-stage small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Hayley; See, Katharine; Barnett, Stephen; Manser, Renée

    2017-04-21

    Current treatment guidelines for limited-stage small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) recommend concomitant platinum-based chemo-radiotherapy plus prophylactic cranial irradiation, based on the premise that SCLC disseminates early, and is chemosensitive. However, although there is usually a favourable initial response, relapse is common and the cure rate for limited-stage SCLC remains relatively poor. Some recent clinical practice guidelines have recommended surgery for stage 1 (limited) SCLC followed by adjuvant chemotherapy, but this recommendation is largely based on the findings of observational studies. To determine whether, in patients with limited-stage SCLC, surgical resection of cancer improves overall survival and treatment-related deaths compared with radiotherapy or chemotherapy, or a combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy, or best supportive care. We performed searches on CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, and Web of Science up to 11 January 2017. We handsearched review articles, clinical trial registries, and reference lists of retrieved articles. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) with adults diagnosed with limited-stage SCLC, confirmed by cytology or histology, and radiological assessment, considered medically suitable for resection and radical radiotherapy, which randomised participants to surgery versus any other intervention. We imported studies identified by the search into a reference manager database. We retrieved the full-text version of relevant studies, and two review authors independently extracted data. The primary outcome measures were overall survival and treatment-related deaths; and secondary outcome measures included loco-regional progression, quality of life, and adverse events. We included three trials with 330 participants. We judged the quality of the evidence as very low for all the outcomes. The quality of the data was limited by the lack of complete outcome reporting, unclear risk of bias in the methods in which the

  9. Adopting ambulatory breast cancer surgery as the standard of care in an asian population.

    PubMed

    Ng, Yvonne Ying Ru; Chan, Patrick Mun Yew; Chen, Juliana Jia Chuan; Seah, Melanie Dee Wern; Teo, Christine; Tan, Ern Yu

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Ambulatory surgery is not commonly practiced in Asia. A 23-hour ambulatory (AS23) service was implemented at our institute in March 2004 to allow more surgeries to be performed as ambulatory procedures. In this study, we reviewed the impact of the AS23 service on breast cancer surgeries and reviewed surgical outcomes, including postoperative complications, length of stay, and 30-day readmission. Methods. Retrospective review was performed of 1742 patients who underwent definitive breast cancer surgery from 1 March 2004 to 31 December 2010. Results. By 2010, more than 70% of surgeries were being performed as ambulatory procedures. Younger women (P < 0.01), those undergoing wide local excision (P < 0.01) and those with ductal carcinoma-in situ or early stage breast cancer (P < 0.01), were more likely to undergo ambulatory surgery. Six percent of patients initially scheduled for ambulatory surgery were eventually managed as inpatients; a third of these were because of perioperative complications. Wound complications, 30-day readmission and reoperation rates were not more frequent with ambulatory surgery. Conclusion. Ambulatory breast cancer surgery is now the standard of care at our institute. An integrated workflow facilitating proper patient selection and structured postoperativee outpatient care have ensured minimal complications and high patient acceptance.

  10. [Current status and future prospects of robotic surgery for lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hiroshige; Taniguchi, Yuji; Miwa, Ken; Haruki, Tomohiro

    2014-11-01

    As the use of robotic surgery has widely spread, its usefulness in the field of general thoracic surgery needs to be verified. The biggest advantage of robotic surgery is the remarkably free movement of joint-equipped robotic forceps under 3-dimensional high vision. An accurate operation makes complex procedures straightforward and may overcome the disadvantages of previous thoracoscopic surgery. Robotic surgery for lung cancer has been safely introduced, and the initial results have been favorable. While still at the stage of clinical research, it is expected to be useful in hilar exposure, lymph node dissection, and suturing of lung parenchyma or bronchus. We considered robotic surgery for lung cancer surgery because of its ability to facilitate both thoracotomy and minimally invasive video-assisted thoracic surgery. Robotic thoracic surgery has not been sufficiently examined for its usefulness, and other major issues such as safety management, education, and significant cost need to be addressed. However, it may become an extension of thoracoscopic surgery, and studies showing its usefulness for primary lung cancer have been increasing. Two urgent issues are its use in advanced medical care and national heal th insurance coverage.

  11. Postoperative hormonal therapy prevents recovery of neurological damage after surgery in patients with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Sato, Chiho; Matsudaira, Izumi; Kotozaki, Yuka; Nouchi, Rui; Takeuchi, Hikaru; Kawai, Masaaki; Tada, Hiroshi; Ishida, Takanori; Taki, Yasuyuki; Ohuchi, Noriaki; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2016-01-01

    Cancer survivors are exposed to several risk factors for cognitive dysfunction, such as general anesthesia, surgical trauma, and adjuvant therapies. In our recent study we showed that thalamic volume reduction and attentional dysfunction occurred shortly after surgery. Here, we examined the 6-month prognosis of the 20 patients with breast cancer who underwent surgery. Seven patients did not receive any adjuvant therapy after the surgery and 13 patients received a hormonal therapy after the surgery. We assessed their attentional functions, and thalamic volumes shortly after and 6 months after surgery. We found a significant group x time interaction in the attentional functions (p = 0.033) and the right thalamus (p <  0.05, small volume correction), suggesting the thalamic volume reduction and attentional dysfunction recovered in patients without adjuvant therapy. Our findings provide a better understanding of the potential role of hormonal therapy in relation to the cognitive dysfunction of cancer survivors. PMID:27708377

  12. Dynamic Changes in Helicobacter pylori Status Following Gastric Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Kichul; Kim, Nayoung; Kim, Jaeyeon; Lee, Jung Won; Lee, Hye Seung; Lee, Jong-Chan; Yoon, Hyuk; Shin, Cheol Min; Park, Young Soo; Ahn, Sang-Hoon; Park, Do Joong; Kim, Hyung Ho; Lee, Yoon Jin; Lee, Kyoung-Ho; Kim, Young-Hoon; Lee, Dong Ho

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Helicobacter pylori eradication is recommended in patients with early gastric cancer. However, the possibility of spontaneous regression raises a question for clinicians about the need for “retesting” postoperative H. pylori status. Methods Patients who underwent curative gastrectomy at Seoul National University Bundang Hospital and had a positive H. pylori status without eradication therapy at the time of gastric cancer diagnosis were prospectively enrolled in this study. H. pylori status and atrophic gastritis (AG) and intestinal metaplasia (IM) histologic status were assessed pre- and postoperatively. Results One hundred forty patients (mean age, 59.0 years; 60.7% male) underwent subtotal gastrectomy with B-I (65.0%), B-II (27.1%), Roux-en-Y (4.3%), jejunal interposition (0.7%), or proximal gastrectomy (4.3%). Preoperative presence of AG (62.9%) and IM (72.9%) was confirmed. The mean period between surgery and the last endoscopic follow-up was 38.0±25.6 months. Of the 140 patients, 80 (57.1%) were found to be persistently positive for H. pylori, and 60 (42.9%) showed spontaneous negative conversion at least once during follow-up. Of these 60 patients, eight (13.3%) showed more complex postoperative dynamic changes between negative and positive results. The spontaneous negative conversion group showed a trend of having more postoperative IM compared to the persistent H. pylori group. Conclusions A high percentage of spontaneous regression and complex dynamic changes in H. pylori status were observed after partial gastrectomy, especially in individuals with postoperative histological IM. It is better to consider postoperative eradication therapy after retesting for H. pylori. PMID:27840366

  13. Pancreatic Cancer: 80 Years of Surgery-Percentage and Repetitions.

    PubMed

    Gudjonsson, Birgir

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The incidence of pancreatic cancer is estimated to be 48,960 in 2015 in the US and projected to become the second and third leading causes of cancer-related deaths by 2030. The mean costs in 2015 may be assumed to be $79,800 per patient and for each resection $164,100. Attempt is made to evaluate the results over the last 80 years, the number of survivors, and the overall survival percentage. Methods. Altogether 1230 papers have been found which deal with resections and reveal survival information. Only 621 of these report 5-year survivors. Reservation about surgery was first expressed in 1964 and five-year survival of nonresected survivors is well documented. Results. The survival percentage depends not only on the number of survivors but also on the subset from which it is calculated. Since the 1980s the papers have mainly reported the number of resections and survival as actuarial percentages, with or without the actual number of survivors being reported. The actuarial percentage is on average 2.75 higher. Detailed information on the original group (TN), number of resections, and actual number of survivors is reported in only 10.6% of the papers. Repetition occurs when the patients from a certain year are reported several times from the same institution or include survivors from many institutions or countries. Each 5-year survivor may be reported several times. Conclusion. Assuming a 10% resection rate and correcting for repetitions and the life table percentage the overall actual survival rate is hardly more than 0.3%.

  14. Oncoplastic Surgery for Upper/Upper Inner Quadrant Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Joseph; Chen, Dar-Ren; Wang, Yu-Fen; Lai, Hung-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Tumors located in the upper/upper inner quadrant of the breast warrant more attention. A small lesion relative to the size of breast in this location may be resolved by performing a level I oncoplastic technique. However, a wide excision may significantly reduce the overall quality of the breast shape by distorting the visible breast line. From June 2012 to April 2015, 36 patients with breast cancer located in the upper/upper inner quadrant underwent breast-conservation surgery with matrix rotation mammoplasty. According to the size and location of the tumor relative to the nipple-areola complex, 11 patients underwent matrix rotation with periareolar de-epithelialization (donut group) and the other 25 underwent matrix rotation only (non-donut group). The cosmetic results were self-assessed by questionnaires. The average weights of the excised breast lumps in the donut and non-donut groups were 104.1 and 84.5 g, respectively. During the 3-year follow-up period, local recurrence was observed in one case and was managed with nipple-sparing mastectomy followed by breast reconstruction with prosthetic implants. In total, 31 patients (88.6%) ranked their postoperative result as either acceptable or satisfactory. The treated breasts were also self-evaluated by 27 patients (77.1%) to be nearly identical to or just slightly different from the untreated side. Matrix rotation is an easy breast-preserving technique for treating breast cancer located in the upper/upper inner quadrant of the breast that requires a relatively wide excision. With this technique, a larger breast tumor could be removed without compromising the breast appearance. PMID:28030581

  15. A Brief History of Thoracic Surgery at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Garrett Lyndon; Mehran, Reza John

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the history of the creation of the Department of Thoracic Surgery at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Texas. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Observation as Good as Surgery for Some Men with Prostate Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Many men diagnosed with early-stage prostate cancer could forego radical prostatectomy and live as long as men who have immediate surgery, according to long-awaited results from a clinical trial published July 19, 2012, in NEJM.

  17. Observation as Good as Surgery for Some Men with Prostate Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Many men diagnosed with early-stage prostate cancer could forego radical prostatectomy and live as long as men who have immediate surgery, according to long-awaited results from a clinical trial published July 19, 2012, in NEJM.

  18. Teaching a 'good' ward round.

    PubMed

    Powell, Natalie; Bruce, Christopher G; Redfern, Oliver

    2015-04-01

    Ward rounds are a vital part of hospital medicine and junior doctors play a key role in their delivery. Despite the importance of ward rounds to patient care and experience, we believe that junior doctors may lack the training and skills to carry them out most effectively. We designed a simulation-based training session focusing on ward round skills themed to key patient safety issues and have delivered the training to over 100 learners (medical students and foundation year one doctors). Few learners had any prior training in ward rounds. The session was highly valued by all participants and surveys completed both before and after the session showed statistically significant improvements in confidence in leading and documenting ward rounds. In addition, 94% of final year medical students and 93% of doctors felt such training should be included in the undergraduate curriculum. We believe there is a current gap in training around ward round skills and would strongly encourage simulation-based ward round training to be developed for undergraduates. Further sessions following qualification may then consolidate and develop ward round skills adapted to the level of the doctor. © 2015 Royal College of Physicians.

  19. Factors that Affect Drain Indwelling Time after Breast Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Uslukaya, Ömer; Türkoğlu, Ahmet; Gümüş, Metehan; Bozdağ, Zübeyir; Yılmaz, Ahmet; Gümüş, Hatice; Kaya, Şeyhmus; Gül, Mesut

    2016-01-01

    Objective The most common procedure to prevent seroma formation, a common complication after breast and axillary surgery, is to use prophylactic surgical drains. Ongoing discussions continue regarding the ideal time for removing drains after surgical procedures. In this study, we aimed to investigate factors that affect drain indwelling time (DIT). Materials and Methods From 2014 to 2015, a total of 91 consecutive patients with breast cancer were included in the study. The demographic characteristics of the patients, treatment methods, histopathologic features of the tumor, size of removed breast tissue (BS), tumor size (TS), number of totally removed lymph nodes (TLN), and metastatic lymph nodes (MLN), whether they had neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and the DIT were retrospectively recorded from the hospital database. Results The mean age of the patients was 48.9 years, and the mean DIT was 4.8 days. The mean size of breast removed was 17.3 cm and tumor size was 4.7 cm, and the mean number of metastatic lymph nodes was 3.3, and mean total number of lymph nodes was 14.1. Patients who had neoadjuvant chemotherahpy had longer DIT. There was a positive correlation between the BS, TS, TLN, MLN, length of hospital stay, and DIT. Linear regresion analysis revealed that the BS, TLN, and history of neoadjuvant chemotherahpy were independent risk factors for DIT. Conclusion DIT primarily depends on BS, TLN, and history of neoadjuvant chemotherahpy. A policy for the management of removing drains to prevent seroma formation should thus be individualized.

  20. Conservative treatment for breast cancer. Complications requiring reconstructive surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Bostwick, J; Paletta, C; Hartrampf, C R

    1986-01-01

    Women who select conservative treatment for carcinoma of the breast (tumor excision followed by supervoltage radiation therapy) place a premium on breast preservation and aesthetics. When local control fails and they require a mastectomy, or when the aesthetic appearance is unacceptable, they may request breast reconstruction. The goal of this study is to evaluate a series of 10 patients who required reconstructive breast surgery after complications of conservative treatment. Patient classification: I. Breast or chest wall necrosis (3). II. Breast fibrosis and gross asymmetry (3). III. Local recurrence of breast cancer (5). IV. Positive margins after the initial lumpectomy (1). The mean age was 34 years. Radiation dosage average was 5252 rads with two patients receiving iridium-192 implant boosts. The reconstructive management was complex and usually required a major musculocutaneous flap because of the radiation effects. Images FIGS. 1A and B. FIGS. 2A-C. FIGS. 2A-C. FIG. 3. FIGS. 4A and B. FIGS. 5A-C. FIGS. 5A-C. FIG. 7. PMID:3010888

  1. [Treatment outcomes of colon cancer surgery combined with radical lymphadenectomy].

    PubMed

    Lipská, L; Visokai, V; Mrácek, M; Levý, M

    2008-05-01

    The authors analyzed a group of 1281 subjects with colorectal cancer operated and followed up in a single institution from I/1992 to VIII/2007. Colon carcinoma patients were assessed separately (C18). Patients with rectal and rectosigmoid tumors are not included in the presentation. A total of 846 patients were operated for colon carcinomas. In 546 subjects, radical R0 resections were achieved. In the R0 group, the male/female ratio is 315/231, age 29-94 years, the mean age of 69 years. The R0 group stratification by TNM classification was: I 17.8%, II 49.6%, III 24.0%, IV 8.1%, TNMx 0.5%. Irrespective of the TNM staging, three-year, five-year and ten-year survival rates were 80%, 71%, and 51%, resp. The median survival time was 9.85 years. Postoperative morality was 5.5%, morbidity 29.8%, anastomic leak occured in 5.7%. Systematic lymph node dissection up to the apical level, had been gradually introduced as an integral part of the R0 surgery. The aim of the study is to analyze outcomes of the colon carcinoma surgical management, combined with radical lymphadenectomy. Furthermore, effects of the extensive procedure on the postoperative morbidity and moratility rates are analyzed as well.

  2. Interval Between Surgery and Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy for Distal Rectal Cancer: Does Delayed Surgery Have an Impact on Outcome?

    SciTech Connect

    Habr-Gama, Angelita Perez, Rodrigo Oliva; Proscurshim, Igor; Nunes dos Santos, Rafael Miyashiro; Kiss, Desiderio; Gama-Rodrigues, Joaquim; Cecconello, Ivan

    2008-07-15

    Background: The optimal interval between neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) and surgery in the treatment of patients with distal rectal cancer is controversial. The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether this interval has an impact on survival. Methods and Materials: Patients who underwent surgery after CRT were retrospectively reviewed. Patients with a sustained complete clinical response (cCR) 1 year after CRT were excluded from this study. Clinical and pathologic characteristics and overall and disease-free survival were compared between patients undergoing surgery 12 weeks or less from CRT and patients undergoing surgery longer than 12 weeks from CRT completion and between patients with a surgery delay caused by a suspected cCR and those with a delay for other reasons. Results: Two hundred fifty patients underwent surgery, and 48.4% had CRT-to-surgery intervals of 12 weeks or less. There were no statistical differences in overall survival (86% vs. 81.6%) or disease-free survival rates (56.5% and 58.9%) between patients according to interval ({<=}12 vs. >12 weeks). Patients with intervals of 12 weeks or less had significantly higher rates of Stage III disease (34% vs. 20%; p = 0.009). The delay in surgery was caused by a suspected cCR in 23 patients (interval, 48 {+-} 10.3 weeks). Five-year overall and disease-free survival rates for this subset were 84.9% and 51.6%, not significantly different compared with the remaining group (84%; p = 0.96 and 57.8%; p = 0.76, respectively). Conclusions: Delay in surgery for the evaluation of tumor response after neoadjuvant CRT is safe and does not negatively affect survival. These results support the hypothesis that shorter intervals may interrupt ongoing tumor necrosis.

  3. [Treatment of thyroid cancer in our field: attitude regarding lymph node surgery].

    PubMed

    Campos Dana, J J; Faubel Serra, M; Artazkoz del Toro, J J; Vendrell Marqués, J B; Dalmau Galofre, J; Piñón Selles, F

    1990-01-01

    We comment our attitude in dealing with lymph nodes and thyroid gland surgery for thyroid cancer. This was based on our 10 years experience with such surgery, in which we have performed 350 chirurgic interventions. Of them, in 55 cases a thyroid carcinoma was detected (36 papilar, 13 follicular, 4 medular, 1 anaplasic and 1 metastasic clear-cell carcinoma).

  4. ONE WEEK VERSUS FOUR WEEK HEPARIN PROPHYLAXIS AFTER LAPAROSCOPIC SURGERY FOR COLORECTAL CANCER.

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-04-28

    The Primary Study Objective is to Assess the Efficacy and; Safety of Extended 4-week Heparin Prophylaxis Compared to; Prophylaxis Given for 8±2 Days After Planned Laparoscopic; Surgery for Colorectal Cancer.; The Clinical Benefit Will be Evaluated as the Difference in; the Incidence of VTE or VTE-related Death Occurring Within 30 Days; From Surgery in the Two Study Groups.

  5. Is there a role for locoregional surgery in stage IV breast cancer?

    PubMed

    Quinn, Edel M; Kealy, Rebecca; O'Meara, Siobhan; Whelan, Maria; Ennis, Rachel; Malone, Carmel; McLaughlin, Ray; Kerin, Michael J; Sweeney, Karl J

    2015-02-01

    Current guidelines do not recommend locoregional surgery for Stage IV breast cancer at presentation despite some studies suggesting a survival benefit. We aimed to assess outcomes in patients with Stage IV breast cancer who underwent surgery. In a cohort study of all Stage IV breast cancers diagnosed at our tertiary-referral specialist centre between 2006 and 2012, we assessed patient survival in the context of demographics, histopathology, metastatic burden, and type of surgery performed. One hundred and nine patients were included; 52 underwent surgery. Patients in the surgery group had longer 5-year-survival (p = 0.003). Survival was also significantly longer in those with just one site of metastatic disease (p < 0.001). Patients with axillary cytology positive for regional metastases were less likely to proceed to surgery. Locoregional surgery does confer a survival advantage in Stage IV breast cancer. Assessment of preoperative axillary cytology may preclude some patients from proceeding to potentially beneficial locoregional surgery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Predictors of loco-regional recurrence and cancer-related death after breast cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Rausei, Stefano; Rovera, Francesca; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Tornese, Deborah; Fachinetti, Anna; Boni, Luigi; Dionigi, Renzo

    2010-01-01

    To determine which tumor-related factors might predispose the patient to loco-regional recurrence or death and the impact of these factors on the different types of events. We retrospectively analyzed the data of 1991 women between January 1998 and March 2010 for a first primary nonmetastatic breast cancer and treated with surgery and neo-adjuvant/adjuvant therapy. The overall survival distribution was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. The prognostic impact of several factors on cumulative overall and loco-regional recurrence free survival was evaluated by univariate (log-rank test) and multivariate analysis (Cox regression). At log-rank test, pT, nodal status, histotype, grading, lymphangioinvasive growth, tumor diameter, estrogen receptors (ER) status, progesterone receptors (PR) status, expression of Ki67, and expression of Her2/neu had a prognostic value on loco-regional recurrence or overall survival. In the multivariate analysis grading remained the only independent predictor of loco-regional recurrences. With regard to overall survival, the Cox model selected grading along with nodal status and PR status. Loco-regional recurrences after breast cancer surgery are not frequent events. They are markers of tumor aggressiveness and predictor of an increased likelihood of cancer-related death. However, loco-regional recurrence and systemic tumor progression are partially independent events, since some prognostic factors differ.

  7. Morbidities of lung cancer surgery in obese patients.

    PubMed

    Dhakal, Binod; Eastwood, Daniel; Sukumaran, Sunitha; Hassler, George; Tisol, William; Gasparri, Mario; Choong, Nicholas; Santana-Davila, Rafael

    2013-08-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for increased perioperative morbidity and mortality in surgical patients. There have been limited studies to correlate the morbidity of lung cancer resection with obesity. We performed a retrospective study of patients who underwent surgical resection for lung cancer at the Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, from 2006 to 2010. Data on patient demographics, weight, pathological findings, and hospital course were abstracted after appropriate institutional review board approval. Perioperative morbidity was defined as atrial fibrillation, heart failure, respiratory failure, pulmonary embolism, or any medical complications arising within 30 days after surgery. The Fisher exact test was used to test the association between body mass index (BMI) and perioperative morbidities. Between 2006 and 2010, 320 lung resections were performed for lung cancer. The median age was 67 (interquartile range, 59-75) years, and 185 (57.8%) were females. A total of 121 (37.8%) of patients had a BMI lower than 25, and 199 (62.18%) patients had a BMI of 25 or higher. The 30-day mortality rate was 1.8% (n = 6) in the whole group; only 2 of these patients had a BMI of 25 or higher. Perioperative morbidity occurred in 28 (23.14%) of patients with a normal BMI and in 47 (23.61%) of patients with a BMI of 25 or higher (P = .54). Specific morbidities encountered by patients with normal versus BMI of 25 or higher were as follows: atrial fibrillation, 11 (9.09%) versus 24 (12.06%) (P = .46); pulmonary embolism, 1 (0.83%) versus 3 (1.51%) (P = 1.0); congestive heart failure, 2 (1.65%) versus 2 (1.01%) (P = .63); renal failure, 4 (3.3%) versus 2 (1.0%) (P = .29); respiratory failure, 12 (9.92%) versus 17 (8.54%) (P = .69); and acute respiratory distress syndrome, 2 (1.65%) versus 1 (0.50%) (P = .55). The median hospital stay was 5 days in the lower BMI group and 4 days in the BMI of 25 or higher group (P = .52). Overweight and normal weight patients do not differ

  8. Minimally invasive surgery in gastrointestinal cancer: benefits, challenges, and solutions for underutilization.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Osama H; Gusani, Niraj J; Kimchi, Eric T; Kavic, Stephen M

    2014-01-01

    After the widespread application of minimally invasive surgery for benign diseases and given its proven safety and efficacy, minimally invasive surgery for gastrointestinal cancer has gained substantial attention in the past several years. Despite the large number of publications on the topic and level I evidence to support its use in colon cancer, minimally invasive surgery for most gastrointestinal malignancies is still underused. We explore some of the challenges that face the fusion of minimally invasive surgery technology in the management of gastrointestinal malignancies and propose solutions that may help increase the utilization in the future. These solutions are based on extensive literature review, observation of current trends and practices in this field, and discussion made with experts in the field. We propose 4 different solutions to increase the use of minimally invasive surgery in the treatment of gastrointestinal malignancies: collaboration between surgical oncologists/hepatopancreatobiliary surgeons and minimally invasive surgeons at the same institution; a single surgeon performing 2 fellowships in surgical oncology/hepatopancreatobiliary surgery and minimally invasive surgery; establishing centers of excellence in minimally invasive gastrointestinal cancer management; and finally, using robotic technology to help with complex laparoscopic skills. Multiple studies have confirmed the utility of minimally invasive surgery techniques in dealing with patients with gastrointestinal malignancies. However, training continues to be the most important challenge that faces the use of minimally invasive surgery in the management of gastrointestinal malignancy; implementation of our proposed solutions may help increase the rate of adoption in the future.

  9. Could Adjuvant Chemotherapy after Surgery Benefit Elderly Patients with Advanced Gastric Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jin Woon; Kwon, In Gyu; Son, Young-Gil

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate tolerance to adjuvant chemotherapy, and to compare survival between treatments using only surgery and using surgery with adjuvant chemotherapy, in elderly patients with advanced gastric cancer who were ≥75 years of age. Materials and Methods Patients ≥75 years of age who were diagnosed with pathological stage II or III gastric cancer were identified retrospectively and categorized into the surgery only and surgery with adjuvant chemotherapy groups. Clinicopathological and survival data were compared between these two groups. Results Among the 130 patients studied, 67 patients underwent curative surgery only, and 63 patients received adjuvant chemotherapy after curative surgery. In the latter group, adverse events were reported in 24 patients (38.1%). The treatments were discontinued in 19 patients (30.2%) owing to any reason. The overall 5-year survival rates of the surgery only and the surgery with adjuvant chemotherapy groups did not differ significantly (44.1% vs. 30.7%, respectively; P=0.804). Among 90 death events, deaths from recurrences of gastric cancer occurred in 42 patients. Multivariate analyses revealed that the American Society of Anesthesiologists score and the depths of tumor invasions were related to survival, and the addition of adjuvant chemotherapy after surgery did not influence survival. Conclusions The decision for the addition of adjuvant chemotherapy for elderly patients should be taken after considering the condition of individual patients and their life expectancies. PMID:28053813

  10. Aggressive surgery for borderline resectable pancreatic cancer: evaluation of National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Suguru; Fujii, Tsutomu; Sugimoto, Hiroyuki; Nomoto, Shuji; Takeda, Shin; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Nakao, Akimasa

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the relevance of defining borderline resectable (BR) pancreatic cancer as a distinct entity in the treatment scheme of pancreatic cancer as proposed by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. Among 375 patients with pancreatic cancer, 137 patients were deemed to have resectable disease (R) by preoperative imaging studies, whereas 96 were found to have an unresectable disease during surgery. The remaining 142 patients fulfilled the definition of BR and were further classified into 3 subgroups based on the National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines: portal vein invasion (PV[+]), common hepatic artery invasion (CHA[+]), and superior mesenteric artery invasion (SMA[+]). PV(+) was subdivided into types B, C, and D according to the degree of portal vein invasion. Patients in the R group had significantly better survival than those in the PV(+) group (P = 0.0038), who in turn survived significantly longer than those classified as SMA(+) (P = 0.041). Type B patients survived significantly longer than did types C and D patients (P = 0.013 and P = 0.030, respectively). In PV(+) patients, compliance with postoperative chemotherapy at 3 and 6 months was 56.9% and 44.6%, respectively, substantially inferior to patients with resectable disease (72.6% and 54.7%, respectively). The optimal treatment strategy may differ among various subgroups within the BR category.

  11. [Outcome after surgery preserving pharynx and larynx for cervical esophageal cancer].

    PubMed

    Ma, Shao-hua; Qin, Bin; Shen, Lu-yan; Liang, Zhen; Kang, Xiao-zhen; Dai, Liang; Chen, Ke-neng

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the long-term survival of multidisciplinary treatment based on thoracic surgery for cervical esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. The clinical characters and follow-up data of forty-one cervical esophageal cancer patients who accepted multidisciplinary treatment based on surgery with preservation of pharynx and larynx were retrospectively reviewed, and the long-term survival was compared with 480 non-cervical esophageal cancers who accepted surgery in the same period done by the same surgical team. There were 28 males and 13 females with a mean age of 62 years old. In the cervical esophageal cancer group, 30 patients accepted neoadjuvant chemotherapy, 25 patients accepted adjuvant chemotherapy, and 21 patients accepted both. Six patients received postoperative radiation. Four patients underwent exploratory surgery alone, and 37 cases underwent radical surgery and cervical anastomosis. One case died during the perioperative period. The 1-, 3-, 5- and 8-year survival rates were 96.8%, 52.6%, 35.1%, and 35.1% in the 36 patients with cervical esophageal cancer who underwent radical surgery, and were 85.0%, 54.3%, 45.0%, and 36.7% respectively in the 457 non-cervical esophageal cancer patients. There was no significant difference between the cervical group and non-cervical group(P=0.91). Cervical esophageal cancer should be treated in a multidisciplinary approach to obtain satisfactory long-term outcomes.

  12. Early assessment of nutritional status in patients scheduled for colorectal cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Seija; Andersson, Liv; Berglund, Britta

    2009-01-01

    Nutritional support is important to optimize treatment outcomes in colorectal cancer surgery. Using retrospective review of patients' medical records, we sought to identify the kinds of nutritional problems patients with colorectal cancer reported on their first visit to the surgeon to support those at risk of malnutrition. After reviewing data from the Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment of Nutritional Status, patients had a supportive counseling meeting about nutrition with a nurse. Of the 153 patients, 65% were diagnosed with colon cancer and 35% with rectal cancer. Eighteen percent of those with colon cancer were overweight, and 12% were obese. Of those with rectal cancer, 10% were overweight, and 7% were obese. Weight loss was reported by 18% of the patients with colon cancer and by 12% of the patients with rectal cancer. To identify the patients who need nutritional support before colorectal cancer surgery, it is important to first identify the patients' nutritional status. When the focus is on surgery, it is possible that these problems are not mentioned if no questions are asked. Nutritional assessment at the outpatient department makes it possible to use the time lapse between examination and surgery to improve the nutritional status.

  13. Critical analysis of the literature investigating urogenital function preservation following robotic rectal cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Panteleimonitis, Sofoklis; Ahmed, Jamil; Harper, Mick; Parvaiz, Amjad

    2016-11-27

    To analyses the current literature regarding the urogenital functional outcomes of patients receiving robotic rectal cancer surgery. A comprehensive literature search of electronic databases was performed in October 2015. The following search terms were applied: "rectal cancer" or "colorectal cancer" and robot* or "da Vinci" and sexual or urolog* or urinary or erect* or ejaculat* or impot* or incontinence. All original studies examining the urological and/or sexual outcomes of male and/or female patients receiving robotic rectal cancer surgery were included. Reference lists of all retrieved articles were manually searched for further relevant articles. Abstracts were independently searched by two authors. Fifteen original studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. A total of 1338 patients were included; 818 received robotic, 498 laparoscopic and 22 open rectal cancer surgery. Only 726 (54%) patients had their urogenital function assessed via means of validated functional questionnaires. From the included studies, three found that robotic rectal cancer surgery leads to quicker recovery of male urological function and five of male sexual function as compared to laparoscopic surgery. It is unclear whether robotic surgery offers favourable urogenital outcomes in the long run for males. In female patients only two studies assessed urological and three sexual function independently to that of males. In these studies there was no difference identified between patients receiving robotic and laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery. However, in females the presented evidence was very limited making it impossible to draw any substantial conclusions. There seems to be a trend towards earlier recovery of male urogenital function following robotic surgery. To evaluate this further, larger well designed studies are required.

  14. Superiority of robotic surgery for cervical cancer in comparison with traditional approaches: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhongyu; Li, Xiuli; Tian, Shuang; Zhu, Tongyu; Yao, Yuanqing; Tao, Ye

    2017-04-01

    To review the safety and effectiveness of da Vinci robotic surgery for cervical cancer in comparison with the traditional open surgery and conventional laparoscopic operation. Based on Medline, the Cochrane library, Embase, and the Journal of Robotic Surgery prior to December 30st, 2015, we searched for controlled trials and observational studies. A systematic review with meta-analyses was conducted to compare the clinical efficacy between the da Vinci robotic surgery, open surgery, and laparoscopic surgery for cervical cancer. Data were pooled using the random effects meta-analysis. Compared with the open surgery, the robotic surgery for cervical cancer would be advantageous in terms of the length of hospital stay, incidence of complications, volume of blood loss and blood transfusion. The operative time of robotic surgery was longer than that of the open surgery, but the prediction intervals indicated that they could be shorter in future studies. Meanwhile, compared with conventional laparoscopic surgery, the robotic surgery could offer more benefits in terms of the length of hospital stay, while no difference was found in terms of the incidence of complications and the volume of blood loss. Compared to open surgery, the robotic surgery would be advantageous for cervical cancer patients in terms of the length of hospital stay, the incidence of complications, blood loss and blood transfusion. Compared with conventional laparoscopic surgery, the robotic surgery would result in longer OT, more BL and shorter LOS. The study quality was poor. Copyright © 2017 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A Clinical Outcome-Based Prospective Study on Venous Thromboembolism After Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Agnelli, Giancarlo; Bolis, Giorgio; Capussotti, Lorenzo; Scarpa, Roberto Mario; Tonelli, Francesco; Bonizzoni, Erminio; Moia, Marco; Parazzini, Fabio; Rossi, Romina; Sonaglia, Francesco; Valarani, Bettina; Bianchini, Carlo; Gussoni, Gualberto

    2006-01-01

    Summary Background Data: The epidemiology of venous thromboembolism (VTE) after cancer surgery is based on clinical trials on VTE prophylaxis that used venography to screen deep vein thrombosis (DVT). However, the clinical relevance of asymptomatic venography-detected DVT is unclear, and the population of these clinical trials is not necessarily representative of the overall cancer surgery population. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of clinically overt VTE in a wide spectrum of consecutive patients undergoing surgery for cancer and to identify risk factors for VTE. Methods: @RISTOS was a prospective observational study in patients undergoing general, urologic, or gynecologic surgery. Patients were assessed for clinically overt VTE occurring up to 30 ± 5 days after surgery or more if the hospital stay was longer than 35 days. All outcome events were evaluated by an independent Adjudication Committee. Results: A total of 2373 patients were included in the study: 1238 (52%) undergoing general, 685 (29%) urologic, and 450 (19%) gynecologic surgery. In-hospital prophylaxis was given in 81.6% and postdischarge prophylaxis in 30.7% of the patients. Fifty patients (2.1%) were adjudicated as affected by clinically overt VTE (DVT, 0.42%; nonfatal pulmonary embolism, 0.88%; death 0.80%). The incidence of VTE was 2.83% in general surgery, 2.0% in gynecologic surgery, and 0.87% in urologic surgery. Forty percent of the events occurred later than 21 days from surgery. The overall death rate was 1.72%; in 46.3% of the cases, death was caused by VTE. In a multivariable analysis, 5 risk factors were identified: age above 60 years (2.63, 95% confidence interval, 1.21–5.71), previous VTE (5.98, 2.13–16.80), advanced cancer (2.68, 1.37–5.24), anesthesia lasting more than 2 hours (4.50, 1.06–19.04), and bed rest longer than 3 days (4.37, 2.45–7.78). Conclusions: VTE remains a common complication of cancer surgery, with a remarkable proportion

  16. [Effects of oral health care for lung cancer patients with surgery--improvement of cough reflex].

    PubMed

    Yamada, Chiharu

    2012-10-01

    The number of lung cancer patients is increasing. One complication of particular concern after surgery for lung cancer is postoperative pneumonia. The present study examined the various effects of oral care cough reflexes (cough reflex test), oral health conditions (OAG and face scale), and immune function (NK cell activity) in patients who underwent surgery for lung cancer. Subjects included 60 patients aged 75 years old or younger who were scheduled to undergo surgery for stage I lung cancer. The average age was 65.3 +/- 6.0 years old. We randomly divided the subjects into an oral care group and a control group. In the oral care group, we observed a significant increase in the normal rate of cough reflex test postsurgery, relative to pre-surgery. In contrast, no significant change in the normal rate of cough reflex test was noted for patients in the control group. Oral health conditions showed similar results. While we observed no significant change in NK cell activity from between pre-surgery and post-surgery in the oral care group, we did note a significant decrease in the control group. Two cases of pneumonia after surgery were identified in the control group. The oral care group did not get postoperative pneumonia. Thus, it was shown that oral care is related to cough reflex, oral health conditions, and immune function.

  17. Postoperative sepsis prediction in patients undergoing major cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Sood, Akshay; Abdollah, Firas; Sammon, Jesse D; Arora, Nivedita; Weeks, Matthew; Peabody, James O; Menon, Mani; Trinh, Quoc-Dien

    2017-03-01

    Cancer patients are at increased risk for postoperative sepsis. However, studies addressing the issue are lacking. We sought to identify preoperative and intraoperative predictors of 30-d sepsis after major cancer surgery (MCS) and derive a postoperative sepsis risk stratification tool. Patients undergoing one of nine MCSs (gastrointestinal, urological, gynecologic, or pulmonary) were identified within the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (2005-2011, n = 69,169). Multivariable adjusted analyses (MVA) were performed to identify the predictors of postoperative sepsis. A composite sepsis risk score (CSRS) was constructed using the regression coefficients of predictors significant on MVA. The score was stratified into low, intermediate, and high risk, and its predictive accuracy for sepsis, septic shock, and mortality was assessed using the area under the curve analysis. Overall, 4.3% (n = 2954) of patients developed postoperative sepsis. In MVA, Black race (odds ratio [OR] = 1.30, P = 0.002), preoperative hematocrit <30 (OR = 1.40, P = 0.022), cardiopulmonary and cerebrovascular comorbidities (P < 0.010), American Society of Anesthesiologists score >3 (P < 0.05), operative time (OR = 1.002, P < 0.001), surgical approach (OR = 1.81, P < 0.001), and procedure type (P < 0.001) were significant predictors of postoperative sepsis. CSRS demonstrated favorable accuracy in predicting postoperative sepsis, septic shock, and mortality (area under the curve 0.72, 0.75, and 0.74, respectively). Furthermore, CSRS risk stratification demonstrated high concordance with sepsis rates, 1.3% in low-risk patients versus 9.7% in high-risk patients. Similarly, 30-d mortality rate varied from 0.5% to 5.5% (10-fold difference) in low-risk patients versus high-risk patients. Our study identifies the major risk factors for 30-d sepsis after MCS. These risk factors have been converted into a simple, accurate bedside sepsis risk

  18. [Feasibility and cosmetic outcome of oncoplastic surgery in breast cancer treatment].

    PubMed

    Sherwell-Cabello, Santiago; Maffuz-Aziz, Antonio; Villegas-Carlos, Felipe; Domínguez-Reyes, Carlos; Labastida-Almendaro, Sonia; Rodríguez-Cuevas, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the leading oncological cause of death in Mexican women over 25 years old. Given the need to improve postoperative cosmetic results in patients with breast cancer, oncoplastic surgery has been developed, which allows larger tumour resections and minor cosmetic alterations. To determine the oncological feasibility and cosmetic outcome of oncoplastic surgery at the Instituto de Enfermedades de la Mama, FUCAM, AC. A review was conducted from January 2010 to July 2013, which included patients with breast cancer diagnosis treated with conventional breast-conserving surgery or with oncoplastic surgery in the Institute of Diseases of the Breast, FUCAM AC. Clinical and histopathological parameters were compared between the two groups, and a questionnaire of cosmetic satisfaction and quality of life was applied. Of the 171 patients included, 95 of them were treated with conventional breast-conserving surgery and 76 with oncoplastic surgery. Pathological tumour size was significantly larger in patients treated with oncoplastic surgery (p = 0.002). There were no differences found between the groups as regards the number of patients with positive surgical margin, the rate of complications, and cosmetic satisfaction. This study demonstrates the oncological feasibility and high cosmetic satisfaction of oncoplastic surgery with minimal psycho-social impact on patients. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  19. Subtotal Colectomy for Colon Cancer Reduces the Need for Subsequent Surgery in Lynch Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Renkonen-Sinisalo, Laura; Seppälä, Toni T; Järvinen, Heikki J; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka

    2017-08-01

    The risk of metachronous colorectal cancer is high after surgical resection for first colon cancer in Lynch syndrome. This study aimed to examine whether extended surgery decreases the risk of subsequent colorectal cancer and improves long-term survival. This was a retrospective study. Data were collected from a nationwide registry. Two hundred forty-two Lynch syndrome pathogenic variant carriers who underwent surgery for a first colon cancer from 1984 to 2009 were included. Patients underwent standard segmental colectomy (n = 144) or extended colectomy (n = 98) for colon cancer. Patients were followed a median of 14.6 up to 25 years. Risk of subsequent colorectal cancer in either group, overall and disease-specific survival, and operative mortality were the primary outcomes measured. Subtotal colectomy decreased the risk of subsequent colorectal cancer (HR, 0.20; 95% CI, 0.08-0.52; p = 0.001), compared with segmental resection. Subsequent colorectal cancer decreased in MLH1 carriers. The MSH2 carriers showed no statistical difference, possibly because of their small number. Disease-specific and overall survival within 25 years did not differ between the standard and extended surgeries (82.7% vs 87.2%, p = 0.76 and 47.2% vs 41.4%, p = 0.83). The cumulative risk of subsequent colorectal cancer was 20% in 10 years and 47% within 25 years after standard resection and 4% and 9% after extended surgery. The cumulative risk of metachronous colorectal cancer was 7% within 25 years after subtotal colectomy with ileosigmoidal anastomosis. One patient died of postoperative septicemia within 30 days after segmental colectomy. Data on surgical procedures were primarily collected retrospectively. Lynch syndrome pathogenic variant carriers may undergo subtotal colectomy to manage first colon cancer and avoid repetitive abdominal surgery and to reduce the remaining bowel to facilitate easier endoscopic surveillance. It provides no survival benefit, compared with segmental colon

  20. Risk factors for positive margins in conservative surgery for breast cancer after neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bouzón, Alberto; Acea, Benigno; García, Alejandra; Iglesias, Ángela; Mosquera, Joaquín; Santiago, Paz; Seoane, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Breast conservative surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy intends to remove any residual tumor with negative margins. The purpose of this study was to analyze the preoperative clinical-pathological factors influencing the margin status after conservative surgery in breast cancer patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy. A retrospective study of 91 breast cancer patients undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy (92 breast lesions) during the period 2006 to 2013. A Cox regression analysis to identify baseline tumor characteristics associated with positive margins after breast conservative surgery was performed. Of all cases, 71 tumors were initially treated with conservative surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Pathologic exam revealed positive margins in 16 of the 71 cases (22.5%). The incidence of positive margins was significantly higher in cancers with initial size >5cm (P=.021), in cancers with low tumor grade (P=.031), and in patients with hormone receptor-positive cancer (P=.006). After a median follow-up of 45.2 months, 7 patients of the 71 treated with conservative surgery had disease recurrence (9.8%). There was no significant difference in terms of disease-free survival according to the margin status (P=.596). A baseline tumor size >5cm, low tumor grade and hormone receptor-positive status increase the risk for surgical margin involvement in breast conservative surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Copyright © 2016 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Chronic preoperative pain and psychological robustness predict acute postoperative pain outcomes after surgery for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, J; Thornton, A J; Scott, N W; Marfizo, S; Powell, R; Johnston, M; Wells, M; Heys, S D; Thompson, A M

    2012-01-01

    Background: Few epidemiological studies have prospectively investigated preoperative and surgical risk factors for acute postoperative pain after surgery for breast cancer. We investigated demographic, psychological, pain-related and surgical risk factors in women undergoing resectional surgery for breast cancer. Methods: Primary outcomes were pain severity, at rest (PAR) and movement-evoked pain (MEP), in the first postoperative week. Results: In 338 women undergoing surgery, those with chronic preoperative pain were three times more likely to report moderate to severe MEP after breast cancer surgery (OR 3.18, 95% CI 1.45–6.99). Increased psychological ‘robustness', a composite variable representing positive affect and dispositional optimism, was associated with lower intensity acute postoperative PAR (OR 0.63, 95% CI 0.48–0.82) and MEP (OR 0.71, 95% CI 0.54–0.93). Sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) and intraoperative nerve division were associated with reduced postoperative pain. No relationship was found between preoperative neuropathic pain and acute pain outcomes; altered sensations and numbness postoperatively were more common after axillary sample or clearance compared with SLNB. Conclusion: Chronic preoperative pain, axillary surgery and psychological robustness significantly predicted acute pain outcomes after surgery for breast cancer. Preoperative identification and targeted intervention of subgroups at risk could enhance the recovery trajectory in cancer survivors. PMID:22850552

  2. Secondary cytoreductive surgery in the patient with recurrent ovarian cancer is often beneficial.

    PubMed

    Selman, Alberto E; Copeland, Larry J

    2002-03-01

    The majority of women with ovarian cancer will present at an advanced stage and ultimately experience a recrudescence of tumor. Recent data indicates that secondary cytoreductive surgery is feasible, well tolerated and associated with significant prolongation of survival in selected patients with recurrent ovarian cancer.

  3. Current status of randomized controlled trials for laparoscopic gastric surgery for gastric cancer in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Guoxin; Hu, Yanfeng; Liu, Hao

    2015-08-01

    China alone accounts for nearly 42% of all new gastric cancer cases worldwide, and gastric cancer is the third leading cause of cancer deaths in China nowadays. Without mass screening programs, unfortunately over 80% of all Chinese patients have been diagnosed as advanced diseases. As in other Asian countries, especially Japan and Korea, laparoscopic gastrectomy for the treatment of gastric cancer has gained increasingly popularity in China during the past decade. Whether laparoscopic surgery can be safely and effectively performed in the treatment of gastric cancer remains controversial, particularly with regard to curative intent in advanced diseases. Given the high incidence of these cancers, and their advanced stage at diagnosis, China has a significant interest in determining the safety and effectiveness of laparoscopic gastrectomy. A well-designed randomized controlled trial (RCT) is considered the only feasible way to provide conclusive evidence. To date, China has not played a significant role in terms of conducting RCT concerning laparoscopic surgery for gastric cancer. However, an effort has been made by the Chinese researchers, with the great help from our colleagues in neighboring countries such as Korea and Japan, through the establishment of the Chinese Laparoscopic Gastrointestinal Surgery Study Group. In this review, we present the current status of RCT for laparoscopic gastric surgery for gastric cancer in China, including published and ongoing registered RCT.

  4. [Multivariate analysis of pharyngo cutaneou fistulas after larynx cancer and lower pharynx cancer surgery].

    PubMed

    Su, Jiakun; Zhao, Feng; Wei, Xiaolin; Su, Jiping

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the relative factors of pharyngo cutaneou fistulas after larynx cancer and lower pharynx cancer surgery. The clinical datas of 87 larynx cancer patients and lower pharynx cancer patients admitted were retrospectively analyzed. According to the type of postoperative complications all cases could be divided into pharyngo cutaneou fistulas group and no pharyngo cutaneou fistulas group. Thirty-eight kinds of factors,including age, clinical stage, plasma electrolytes level and type of procedure are in the multivariate analysis, and the variability indicators are in binary-regression analysis. Eleven patients had pharyngo cutaneou fistulas (12.64%). Univariate analysis indicated that BMI, pre-operative serum potassium, operation time, cervical lymph dissection, post-operative prealbumin, post-operative hemoglobin, infection and delayed union of incision were the risk factors of pharyngo cutaneou fistulas (P < 0.05). Logistic stepwise regression analysis indicated that post-operative prealbumin and operation time were the independent risk factors. To avoid pharyngo cutaneou fistulam, it is very necessary to correct electrolyte disorder and negative nitrogen balance. To shorten the operation time, to avoid incision infection and delayed union were helpfulness, too.

  5. MINIMALLY INVASIVE SURGERY FOR GASTRIC CANCER: TIME TO CHANGE THE PARADIGM

    PubMed Central

    BARCHI, Leandro Cardoso; JACOB, Carlos Eduardos; BRESCIANI, Cláudio José Caldas; YAGI, Osmar Kenji; MUCERINO, Donato Roberto; LOPASSO, Fábio Pinatel; MESTER, Marcelo; RIBEIRO-JÚNIOR, Ulysses; DIAS, André Roncon; RAMOS, Marcus Fernando Kodama Pertille; CECCONELLO, Ivan; ZILBERSTEIN, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Minimally invasive surgery widely used to treat benign disorders of the digestive system, has become the focus of intense study in recent years in the field of surgical oncology. Since then, the experience with this kind of approach has grown, aiming to provide the same oncological outcomes and survival to conventional surgery. Regarding gastric cancer, surgery is still considered the only curative treatment, considering the extent of resection and lymphadenectomy performed. Conventional surgery remains the main modality performed worldwide. Notwithstanding, the role of the minimally invasive access is yet to be clarified. Objective: To evaluate and summarize the current status of minimally invasive resection of gastric cancer. Methods: A literature review was performed using Medline/PubMed, Cochrane Library and SciELO with the following headings: gastric cancer, minimally invasive surgery, robotic gastrectomy, laparoscopic gastrectomy, stomach cancer. The language used for the research was English. Results: 28 articles were considered, including randomized controlled trials, meta-analyzes, prospective and retrospective cohort studies. Conclusion: Minimally invasive gastrectomy may be considered as a technical option in the treatment of early gastric cancer. As for advanced cancer, recent studies have demonstrated the safety and feasibility of the laparoscopic approach. Robotic gastrectomy will probably improve outcomes obtained with laparoscopy. However, high cost is still a barrier to its use on a large scale. PMID:27438040

  6. Depressive Symptoms and Cortisol Variability Prior to Surgery for Suspected Endometrial Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sannes, Timothy S.; Jensen, Sally E.; Dodd, Stacy M.; Kneipp, Shawn M.; Garey, Stephanie L.; Patidar, Seema M.; Marsiske, Michael M.; Lutgendorf, Susan M.; Morgan, Linda S.; Pereira, Deidre B.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Endometrial cancer (EC) is the most common type of gynecologic cancer affecting women; however, very little research has examined relationships between psychological factors and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis dysregulation in this population. The current study examined relations between depressive/anxious symptoms and salivary cortisol diurnal rhythm and variability in women undergoing surgery for suspected endometrial cancer. Depressive and anxious symptoms were measured prior to surgery using the Structured Interview Guide for the Hamilton Depression Inventory (SIGH-AD). Saliva was collected four times a day for the three days prior to surgery and then assayed by ELISA to obtain cortisol concentrations. Cortisol slopes and intraindividual variability were then calculated across subjects. Relations between depressive/anxious symptoms and cortisol indices were examined using multilevel modeling and linear regression analyses. Participants were 82 women with nonmetastatic endometrial cancer. Anxious symptoms were not associated with either cortisol slope or intraindividual variability, and depressive symptoms were unrelated to cortisol slope. However, after controlling for presence of poorer prognosis cancer subtypes, greater depressive symptoms (excluding symptoms possibly/definitely due to health/treatment factors) in the week preceding surgery were significantly related to greater cortisol intraindividual variability (β=.214; p<.05). These results suggest that depressive symptoms prior to surgery for suspected endometrial cancer are related to greater cortisol intraindividual variability, which is suggestive of more erratic HPA axis arousal. Future research should examine whether mood symptoms may be associated with compromised health outcomes via erratic HPA axis arousal in this population. PMID:22762895

  7. All-Cause Mortality After Fertility-Sparing Surgery for Stage I Epithelial Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Melamed, Alexander; Rizzo, Anthony E; Nitecki, Roni; Gockley, Allison A; Bregar, Amy J; Schorge, John O; Del Carmen, Marcela G; Rauh-Hain, J Alejandro

    2017-07-01

    To compare all-cause mortality between women who underwent fertility-sparing surgery with those who underwent conventional surgery for stage I ovarian cancer. In a cohort study using the National Cancer Database, we identified women younger than 40 years diagnosed with stage IA and unilateral IC epithelial ovarian cancer between 2004 and 2012. Fertility-sparing surgery was defined as conservation of one ovary and the uterus. The primary outcome was time from diagnosis to death. We used propensity score methods to assemble a cohort of women who underwent fertility-sparing or conventional surgery but were otherwise similar on observed covariates and conducted survival analyses using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazard models. We identified 1,726 women with stage IA and unilateral IC epithelial ovarian cancer of whom 825 (47.8%) underwent fertility-sparing surgery. Fertility-sparing surgery was associated with younger age, residence in the northeastern and western United States, and serous or mucinous histology (P<.05 for all). Propensity score matching yielded a cohort of 904 women who were balanced on observed covariates. We observed 30 deaths among women who underwent fertility-sparing surgery and 37 deaths among propensity-matched women who underwent conventional surgery after a median follow-up of 63 months. Fertility-sparing surgery was not associated with hazard of death (hazard ratio 0.80, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.49-1.29, P=.36). The probability of survival 10 years after diagnosis was 88.5% (95% CI 82.4-92.6) in the fertility-sparing group and 88.9% (95% CI 84.9-92.0) in the conventional surgery group. In patients with high-risk features such as clear cell histology, grade 3, or stage IC, 10-year survival was 80.5% (95% CI 68.5-88.3) among women who underwent fertility-sparing surgery and 83.4% (95% 76.0-88.7) among those who had conventional surgery (hazard ratio 0.86, 95% CI 0.49-1.53, P=.61). Compared with conventional surgery

  8. Current status and future perspectives of fluorescence-guided surgery for cancer

    PubMed Central

    DeLong, Jonathan; Hoffman, Robert M.; Bouvet, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Summary Curative cancer surgery is dependent on the removal of all tumor and metastatic cancer cells. Preoperative imaging, intraoperative inspection and palpation, and pathological margin confirmation aid the surgeon, but these methods are lacking in sensitivity and can be highly subjective. Techniques in fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS) are emerging that selectively illuminate cancer cells, enhancing the distinction between tumors and surrounding tissues with the potential for single-cell sensitivity. FGS enhances tumor detection, surgical navigation, margin confirmation, and in some cases can be combined with therapeutic techniques to eliminate microscopic disease. In this review, we describe the preclinical developments and currently used techniques for FGS. PMID:26567611

  9. Anesthetic technique and cancer recurrence in oncologic surgery: unraveling the puzzle.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ryungsa

    2017-03-01

    Surgery/anesthetic technique-stimulated immunosuppression in the perioperative period might cause an increase in cancer-related mortality. Whether anesthetic technique can affect the outcomes of cancer patients remains inconclusive. This review discusses data from the available literature on anesthetic techniques applied in oncologic surgery, the long-term outcomes of anesthetic technique, and their relation to survival and cancer recurrence. Searches of the PubMed database up to June 30, 2016, were conducted to identify publications with the terms "anesthetic technique and cancer recurrence," "regional anesthesia and cancer recurrence," "local anesthesia and cancer recurrence," "anesthetic technique and immunosuppression," and "anesthetic technique and oncologic surgery." Surgery/anesthesia-stimulated activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) provides immunosuppression through several soluble factors. Volatile anesthetics and opioids suppress cell-mediated immunity (CMI) and promote the proliferation of cancer cells and angiogenesis, whereas propofol does not suppress CMI and inhibits tumor angiogenesis. Regional anesthesia (RA) protects CMI and diminishes the surgical neuroendocrine stress response by blocking afferent neural transmission that stimulates the HPA axis and SNS, decreasing the requirement for opioids and volatile anesthetics and thereby decreasing cancer recurrence. Preclinical and retrospective studies highlight a potential benefit of anesthetic technique in reducing cancer-related mortality and recurrence by attenuating immunosuppression following surgical treatment in patients with specific types of cancer. Several well-planned, prospective, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are underway that may provide more conclusive and definitive results regarding the benefits of anesthetic technique on survival in oncologic surgery.

  10. Surgery for Localized Pancreatic Cancer: The Trend Is Not Improving.

    PubMed

    Strohl, Madeleine P; Raigani, Siavash; Ammori, John B; Hardacre, Jeffrey M; Kim, Julian A

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the trend in the use of surgery for localized pancreatic adenocarcinoma for the past 2 decades using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database. We identified a cohort of patients who received a diagnosis of localized pancreatic adenocarcinoma between 1988 and 2010 in the United States. Univariate and multivariate methods were used to determine factors associated with not receiving surgery. Cox proportional hazards regression modeling was used to determine factors associated with survival. Of 6742 patients with a diagnosis of localized pancreatic adenocarcinoma, 1715 patients (25.4%) underwent surgery. There was no significant change in use of surgery over time. Patients were less likely to undergo surgery if they were older than 50 years, black, unmarried, and located outside the East and had pancreatic head or body lesions, higher tumor grades, or tumor size greater than 2 cm (P < 0.0001). Receiving surgery had the most significant impact on the hazard of disease-specific death (hazards ratio, 1.41; 95% confidence interval, 1.29-1.53; P < 0.0001). In contrast to recent studies that suggest an increasing use of surgery, the present study demonstrates that there has been no change in the rate of use of surgery in patients with localized pancreatic disease.

  11. Progress of the Productive Ward.

    PubMed

    Robert, Glenn

    The progress of the Productive Ward programme has been variable. This article outlines a study that investigated the experience of implementing the programme in different hospitals and the lessons that can be learnt.

  12. Aggressive Surgery in Palliative Setting of Lung Cancer: Is it Helpful?

    PubMed Central

    Byregowda, Suman; Prabhash, Kumar; Puri, Ajay; Joshi, Amit; Noronha, Vanita; Patil, Vijay M; Panda, Pankaj Kumar; Gulia, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    With increase in survival and progression-free survival in the advanced metastatic cancers, the expectation of quality of life (QOL) has increased dramatically. Palliative care plays a vital role in the management of these advanced cancer patients. At present scenario, palliative care in advanced cancer has seen a completely different approach. Aggressive surgical procedures have been performed to improve the QOL in the advanced cancer patients. We report a case of advanced lung cancer with pathological femur fracture, treated with extensive total femur replacement surgery to provide better QOL. PMID:27803575

  13. Is there any evidence of a “July effect” in patients undergoing major cancer surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, Praful; Trinh, Vincent Q.; Sun, Maxine; Sammon, Jesse; Sukumar, Shyam; Gervais, Mai-Kim; Shariat, Shahrokh F.; Kim, Simon P.; Kowalczyk, Keith J.; Hu, Jim C.; Menon, Mani; Karakiewicz, Pierre I.; Trinh, Quoc-Dien

    2014-01-01

    Background The “July effect” refers to the phenomenon of adverse impacts on patient care arising from the changeover in medical staff that takes place during this month at academic medical centres in North America. There has been some evidence supporting the presence of the July effect, including data from surgical specialties. Uniformity of care, regardless of time of year, is required for patients undergoing major cancer surgery. We therefore sought to perform a population-level assessment for the presence of a July effect in this field. Methods We used the Nationwide Inpatient Sample to abstract data on patients undergoing 1 of 8 major cancer surgeries at academic medical centres between Jan. 1, 1999, and Dec. 30, 2009. The primary outcomes examined were postoperative complications and in-hospital mortality. Univariate analyses and subsequently multivariate analyses, controlling for patient and hospital characteristics, were performed to identify whether the time of surgery was an independent predictor of outcome after major cancer surgery. Results On univariate analysis, the overall postoperative complication rate, as well as genitourinary and hematologic complications specifically, was higher in July than the rest of the year. However, on multivariate analysis, only hematologic complications were significantly higher in July, with no difference in overall postoperative complication rate or in-hospital mortality for all 8 surgeries considered separately or together. Conclusion On the whole, the data confirm an absence of a July effect in patients undergoing major cancer surgery. PMID:24666444

  14. Incidence of myofascial pain syndrome in breast cancer surgery: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Torres Lacomba, María; Mayoral del Moral, Orlando; Coperias Zazo, José Luís; Gerwin, Robert D; Goñí, Alvaro Zapico

    2010-05-01

    Pain after breast cancer therapy is a recognized complication found to have an adverse impact on patient's quality of life, increasing psychosocial distress. In recent years, case reports about myofascial pain syndrome are emerging in thoracic surgery as a cause of postsurgery pain. Myofascial pain syndrome is a regional pain syndrome characterized by myofascial trigger points in palpable taut bands of skeletal muscle that refers pain a distance, and that can cause distant motor and autonomic effects. The objective of this study was to assess the incidence of myofascial pain syndrome prospectively 12 months after breast cancer surgery. Each participant was assessed preoperatively, postoperatively between day 3 and day 5, and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery. A physical therapist, expert in the diagnosis of myofascial pain syndrome, performed follow-up assessments. Pain descriptions by the patients and pain pattern drawings in body forms guided the physical examination. The patients were not given any information concerning myofascial pain or other muscle pain syndromes. One year follow-up was completed by 116 women. Of these, 52 women developed myofascial pain syndrome (44.8%, 95% confidence interval: 35.6, 54.3). Myofascial pain syndrome is a common source of pain in women undergoing breast cancer surgery that includes axillary lymph node dissection at least during the first year after surgery. Myofascial pain syndrome is one potential cause of chronic pain in breast cancer survivors who have undergone this kind of surgery.

  15. Impact of hospital volume on quality indicators for rectal cancer surgery in British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    McColl, Ryan J; McGahan, Colleen E; Cai, Eric; Olson, Rob; Cheung, Winson Y; Raval, Manoj J; Phang, Paul Terry; Karimuddin, Ahmer A; Brown, Carl J

    2017-02-01

    The relationship between hospital volume and patient outcomes remains controversial for rectal cancer. This is a population-based database study. Patients treated with surgery for a stage I to III rectal adenocarcinoma from 2003 to 2009 were identified. High-volume hospitals (HVH) were those centers performing 20 surgeries or more per year. Primary outcomes were operative and perioperative factors that have proven influence on patient outcomes. In all, 2,081 patients had surgery for rectal cancer. Of these, 1,690 patients had surgery in an HVH and 391 had surgery in a low-volume hospital. On multivariate analysis, patients who had surgery in an HVH were more likely to have sphincter-preserving surgery, 12 or more lymph nodes removed with the tumor, neoadjuvant radiation therapy, and receive pre-operative or postoperative chemotherapy. For rectal cancer patients in British Columbia, Canada, being treated at an HVH is associated with several quality indicators linked to better patient outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Critical analysis of the literature investigating urogenital function preservation following robotic rectal cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Panteleimonitis, Sofoklis; Ahmed, Jamil; Harper, Mick; Parvaiz, Amjad

    2016-01-01

    AIM To analyses the current literature regarding the urogenital functional outcomes of patients receiving robotic rectal cancer surgery. METHODS A comprehensive literature search of electronic databases was performed in October 2015. The following search terms were applied: “rectal cancer” or “colorectal cancer” and robot* or “da Vinci” and sexual or urolog* or urinary or erect* or ejaculat* or impot* or incontinence. All original studies examining the urological and/or sexual outcomes of male and/or female patients receiving robotic rectal cancer surgery were included. Reference lists of all retrieved articles were manually searched for further relevant articles. Abstracts were independently searched by two authors. RESULTS Fifteen original studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. A total of 1338 patients were included; 818 received robotic, 498 laparoscopic and 22 open rectal cancer surgery. Only 726 (54%) patients had their urogenital function assessed via means of validated functional questionnaires. From the included studies, three found that robotic rectal cancer surgery leads to quicker recovery of male urological function and five of male sexual function as compared to laparoscopic surgery. It is unclear whether robotic surgery offers favourable urogenital outcomes in the long run for males. In female patients only two studies assessed urological and three sexual function independently to that of males. In these studies there was no difference identified between patients receiving robotic and laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery. However, in females the presented evidence was very limited making it impossible to draw any substantial conclusions. CONCLUSION There seems to be a trend towards earlier recovery of male urogenital function following robotic surgery. To evaluate this further, larger well designed studies are required. PMID:27933136

  17. Comparative effectiveness of surgery and radiosurgery for stage I non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, James B; Soulos, Pamela R; Cramer, Laura D; Decker, Roy H; Kim, Anthony W; Gross, Cary P

    2015-07-15

    Although surgery is the standard treatment for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has been disseminated as an alternative therapy. The comparative mortalities and toxicities of these treatments for patients of different life expectancies are unknown. The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare linked database was used to identify patients who were 67 years old or older and underwent SBRT or surgery for stage I NSCLC from 2007 to 2009. Matched patients were stratified into short life expectancies (<5 years) and long life expectancies (≥5 years). Mortality and complication rates were compared with Poisson regression. Overall, 367 SBRT patients and 711 surgery patients were matched. Acute toxicity (0-1 month) was lower from SBRT versus surgery (7.9% vs 54.9%, P < .001). At 24 months after treatment, there was no difference (69.7% vs 73.9%, P = .31). The incidence rate ratio (IRR) for toxicity from SBRT versus surgery was 0.74 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.64-0.87). Overall mortality was lower with SBRT versus surgery at 3 months (2.2% vs 6.1%, P = .005), but by 24 months, overall mortality was higher with SBRT (40.1% vs 22.3%, P < .001). For patients with short life expectancies, there was no difference in lung cancer mortality (IRR, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.40-2.56). However, for patients with long life expectancies, there was greater overall mortality (IRR, 1.49; 95% CI, 1.11-2.01) as well as a trend toward greater lung cancer mortality (IRR, 1.63; 95% CI, 0.95-2.79) with SBRT versus surgery. SBRT was associated with lower immediate mortality and toxicity in comparison with surgery. However, for patients with long life expectancies, there appears to be a relative benefit from surgery versus SBRT. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  18. Network meta-analysis of protocol-driven care and laparoscopic surgery for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Currie, A C; Malietzis, G; Jenkins, J T; Yamada, T; Ashrafian, H; Athanasiou, T; Okabayashi, K; Kennedy, R H

    2016-12-01

    Laparoscopic approaches and standardized recovery protocols have reduced morbidity following colorectal cancer surgery. As the optimal regimen remains inconclusive, a network meta-analysis was undertaken of treatments for the development of postoperative complications and mortality. MEDLINE, Embase, trial registries and related reviews were searched for randomized trials comparing laparoscopic and open surgery within protocol-driven or conventional perioperative care for colorectal cancer resection, with complications as a defined endpoint. Relative odds ratios (ORs) for postoperative complications and mortality were estimated for aggregated data. Forty trials reporting on 11 516 randomized patients were included with the network. Open surgery within conventional perioperative care was the index for comparison. The OR relating to complications was 0·77 (95 per cent c.i. 0·65 to 0·91) for laparoscopic surgery within conventional care, 0·69 (0·48 to 0·99) for open surgery within protocol-driven care, and 0·43 (0·28 to 0·67) for laparoscopic surgery within protocol-driven care. Sensitivity analyses excluding trials of low rectal cancer and those with a high risk of bias did not affect the treatment estimates. Meta-analyses demonstrated that mortality risk was unaffected by perioperative strategy. Laparoscopic surgery combined with protocol-driven care reduces colorectal cancer surgery complications, but not mortality. The reduction in complications with protocol-driven care is greater for open surgery than for laparoscopic approaches. Registration number: CRD42015017850 (https://www.crd.york.ac.uk/PROSPERO). © 2016 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Presence of early stage cancer does not impair the early protein metabolic response to major surgery.

    PubMed

    Engelen, Mariëlle P K J; Klimberg, V Suzanne; Allasia, Arianna; Deutz, Nicolaas Ep

    2017-06-01

    Combined bilateral mastectomy and reconstruction is a common major surgical procedure in women with breast cancer and in those with a family history of breast cancer. As this large surgical procedure induces muscle protein loss, a preserved anabolic response to nutrition is warranted for optimal recovery. It is unclear whether the presence of early stage cancer negatively affects the protein metabolic response to major surgery as this would mandate perioperative nutritional support. In nine women with early stage (Stage II) breast malignancy and nine healthy women with a genetic predisposition to breast cancer undergoing the same large surgical procedure, we examined whether surgery influences the catabolic response to overnight fasting and the anabolic response to nutrition differently. Prior to and within 24 h after combined bilateral mastectomy and reconstruction surgery, whole body protein synthesis and breakdown rates were assessed after overnight fasting and after meal intake by stable isotope methodology to enable the calculation of net protein catabolism in the post-absorptive state and net protein anabolic response to a meal. Major surgery resulted in an up-regulation of post-absorptive protein synthesis and breakdown rates (P < 0.001) and lower net protein catabolism (P < 0.05) and was associated with insulin resistance and increased systemic inflammation (P < 0.01). Net anabolic response to the meal was reduced after surgery (P < 0.05) but higher in cancer (P < 0.05) indicative of a more preserved meal efficiency. The significant relationship between net protein anabolism and the amount of amino acids available in the circulation (R(2)  = 0.85, P < 0.001) was independent of the presence of non-cachectic early stage breast cancer or surgery. The presence of early stage breast cancer does not enhance the normal catabolic response to major surgery or further attenuates the anabolic response to meal intake within 24 h after

  20. Timing of Breast Cancer Surgery-How Much Does It Matter?

    PubMed

    Mansfield, Sara A; Abdel-Rasoul, Mahmoud; Terando, Alicia M; Agnese, Doreen M

    2017-01-24

    Timing of surgical resection after breast cancer diagnosis is dependent on a variety of factors. Lengthy delays may lead to progression; however, the impact of modest delays is less clear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of surgical timing on outcomes, including disease-free survival (DFS) and nodal status (NS). The cancer registry from one academic cancer hospital was retrospectively reviewed. Time from initial biopsy to surgical resection was calculated for patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and stage 1 and 2 invasive carcinomas. Early (0-21 days), intermediate (22-42 days), and late (43-63 days) surgery groups were evaluated for differences in NS and DFS for each cancer stage separately. A total of 3,932 patients were identified for analysis. There were no differences in DFS noted for DCIS. For stage 1, early surgery (ES) was associated with worse DFS compared to intermediate surgery (IS) (p = 0.025). There were no significant differences between ES and late surgery (LS) (p = 0.700) or IS and LS (p = 0.065). In stage II cancers, there was a significant difference in DFS in ES compared to IS (p < 0.001) and LS (p = 0.009). There was no significant difference between IS and LS (p = 0.478). Patients were more likely to undergo immediate reconstruction (p < 0.0001 for all stages) in later time-to-surgery groups, while patients in earlier groups were more likely to undergo breast conserving surgery. There was also no significant difference in NS at time of surgery in clinical stage 1 (p = 0.321) or stage 2 disease (p = 0.571). Delays of up to 60 days were not associated with worse outcomes. This study should reassure patients and surgeons that modest delays do not adversely affect breast cancer outcomes. This allows patients time to consider treatment and reconstruction options.

  1. Outcomes of cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy for colorectal cancer with peritoneal metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, En-Kwang; Hsieh, Mao-Chih; Chen, Chien-Hsin; Lu, Yen-Jung; Wu, Szu-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In Taiwan, colorectal cancer with peritoneal carcinomatosis is considered a terminal condition. We examined the clinical outcomes of cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) treatment for colorectal cancer with peritoneal carcinomatosis in Taiwan. We enrolled patients with colorectal cancer and peritoneal metastasis from Taipei Medical University, Wanfang Hospital between January 1999 and December 2014. Of the enrolled patients, 3 had mucinous-type tumors. In total, we enrolled 31 patients who underwent a total of 33 procedures. Of the 31 patients, 2 received the HIPEC procedure twice. Cytoreductive surgery was performed followed by HIPEC. The hazard ratios of death following cytoreductive surgery and HIPEC were calculated using the Cox proportional hazards model. The 2- and 5-year overall survival rates of these patients following cytoreductive surgery and HIPEC were 57% and 38%, respectively. The completeness of cytoreduction (CC) scores were CC-0, CC-1, CC-2, and CC-3 in 18 (54.5%), 3 (9%), 7 (21.2%), and 5 (15.2%) patients, respectively. The mean peritoneal cancer index (PCI) was 16.20, and the mean postoperative PCI (PPCI) was 4.6. The major risk factors for death in these patients were a total PCI score > 20, total PPCI score > 0, and CC score ≥ 2 (P = 0.022, 0.031, and 0.0001, respectively; log-rank test). Multivariate analysis revealed that the total PPCI score was the strongest predictor of death following cytoreductive surgery and HIPEC in these patients. In Taiwan, performing cytoreductive surgery and administering HIPEC for treating colorectal cancer with peritoneal metastasis are feasible and resulted in long-term survival. In addition, the total PPCI score was related to poor prognosis following cytoreductive surgery and HIPEC in patients with colorectal cancer and peritoneal metastasis. PMID:28033247

  2. Surgery to Reduce the Risk of Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... outcomes: the NSABP Study of Tamoxifen and Raloxifene (STAR) P–2 trial. JAMA 2006; 295(23):2727– ... and Bowel Project Study of Tamoxifen and Raloxifene (STAR) P-2 Trial: Preventing breast cancer. Cancer Prevention ...

  3. Quality of Online Information to Support Patient Decision-Making in Breast Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Jordan G.; Tucholka, Jennifer L.; Steffens, Nicole M.; Neuman, Heather B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Breast cancer patients commonly use the internet as an information resource. Our objective was to evaluate the quality of online information available to support patients facing a decision for breast surgery. Methods Breast cancer surgery-related queries were performed (Google and Bing), and reviewed for content pertinent to breast cancer surgery. The DISCERN instrument was used to evaluate websites’ structural components that influence publication reliability and ability of information to support treatment decision-making. Scores of 4/5 were considered “good”. Results 45 unique websites were identified. Websites satisfied a median 5/9 content questions. Commonly omitted topics included: having a choice between breast conservation and mastectomy (67%) and potential for 2nd surgery to obtain negative margins after breast conservation (60%). Websites had a median DISCERN score of 2.9 (range 2.0–4.5). Websites achieved higher scores on structural criteria (median 3.6 [2.1–4.7]), with 24% rated as “good”. Scores on supporting decision-making questions were lower (2.6 [1.3–4.4]), with only 7% scoring “good”. Conclusion Although numerous breast cancer-related websites exist, most do a poor job providing women with essential information necessary to actively participate in decision-making for breast cancer surgery. Providing easily-accessible, high-quality online information has the potential to significantly improve patients’ experiences with decision-making. PMID:26417898

  4. Quality of online information to support patient decision-making in breast cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Jordan G; Tucholka, Jennifer L; Steffens, Nicole M; Neuman, Heather B

    2015-11-01

    Breast cancer patients commonly use the internet as an information resource. Our objective was to evaluate the quality of online information available to support patients facing a decision for breast surgery. Breast cancer surgery-related queries were performed (Google and Bing), and reviewed for content pertinent to breast cancer surgery. The DISCERN instrument was used to evaluate websites' structural components that influence publication reliability and ability of information to support treatment decision-making. Scores of 4/5 were considered "good." 45 unique websites were identified. Websites satisfied a median 5/9 content questions. Commonly omitted topics included: having a choice between breast conservation and mastectomy (67%) and potential for 2nd surgery to obtain negative margins after breast conservation (60%). Websites had a median DISCERN score of 2.9 (range 2.0-4.5). Websites achieved higher scores on structural criteria (median 3.6 [2.1-4.7]), with 24% rated as "good." Scores on supporting decision-making questions were lower (2.6 [1.3-4.4]), with only 7% scoring "good." Although numerous breast cancer-related websites exist, most do a poor job providing women with essential information necessary to actively participate in decision-making for breast cancer surgery. Providing easily- accessible, high-quality online information has the potential to significantly improve patients' experiences with decision-making. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Extended venous thromboembolism prophylaxis after colorectal cancer surgery: the current state of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Sammour, Tarik; Chandra, Raaj; Moore, James W

    2016-07-01

    There is level one evidence to support combined mechanical and chemical thromboprophylaxis for 7-10 days after colorectal cancer surgery, but there remains a paucity of data to support extended prophylaxis after discharge. The aim of this clinical review is to summarise the currently available evidence for extended venous thromboprophylaxis after elective colorectal cancer surgery. Clinical review of the major clinical guidelines and published clinical data evaluating extended venous thromboprophylaxis after elective colorectal cancer surgery. Five major guideline recommendations are outlined, and the results of the five published randomised controlled trials are summarised and reviewed with a specific focus on the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of extended heparin prophylaxis to prevent clinically relevant post-operative venous thromboembolism (VTE) after colorectal cancer surgery. Extended VTE prophylaxis after colorectal cancer surgery reduces the incidence of asymptomatic screen detected deep venous thrombosis (DVT) only, with no demonstrable reduction in symptomatic DVT, symptomatic PE, or VTE related death. Evidence for cost-effectiveness is limited. As the incidence of clinical VTE is very low in this patient subgroup overall, future research should be focused on higher risk patient subgroups in whom a reduction in VTE may be both more demonstrable and clinically relevant.

  6. [The perioperative period in cancer surgery: a critical moment! Is there a role for regional anesthesia in preventing cancer recurrence?].

    PubMed

    Beloeil, H; Nouette-Gaulain, K

    2012-06-01

    Surgical treatment of cancer is usually necessary but it can paradoxically aggravate the patient outcome by increasing the risk of recurrence. Many perioperative factors have been shown to contribute to the dissemination of the tumor: surgery itself, stress, inflammation, pain, anaesthetic drugs, blood transfusion, etc. The type of anaesthesia chosen in the cancer patient could then be crucial and influence the evolution of the disease. Experimental, preclinical and retrospective studies have suggested that a regional anesthesia associated or not with a general anesthesia for carcinologic surgery might reduce the risk of cancer recurrence. This text reviews the factors promoting the recurrence of tumors after carcinologic surgery and the potential possibilities of protection associated with the type of anaesthesia chosen.

  7. Comparative analysis of late functional outcome following preoperative radiation therapy or chemoradiotherapy and surgery or surgery alone in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Contin, Pietro; Kulu, Yakup; Bruckner, Thomas; Sturm, Martin; Welsch, Thilo; Müller-Stich, Beat P; Huber, Johannes; Büchler, Markus W; Ulrich, Alexis

    2014-02-01

    This study evaluates the anorectal and genitourinary function of patients treated by preoperative short-term radiotherapy (RT) or chemoradiotherapy (CRT) followed by surgery and surgery alone for rectal cancer. For this study, a total of 613 patients, who were identified from a prospective rectal cancer database, underwent anterior resection of the rectum between October 2001 and December 2007. Standardized questionnaires were used to determine fecal incontinence, urinary, and sexual function. Relevant clinical variables were evaluated using univariate and multivariate analyses. Independent predictors of functional outcome were identified by a binary logistic regression analysis. The data of 263 (43 %) patients were available for analysis. On multivariate analysis, neoadjuvant RT (P < 0.01) and low anterior resection (LAR) (P = 0.049) were associated with fecal incontinence. In univariate analysis, fecal incontinence was linked to preoperative neoadjuvant treatment (RT and/or CRT vs. LAR) (P < 0.01). The hazard ratio for developing fecal incontinence was 3.3 (1.6-6.8) for patients who received RT. One hundred twenty-five patients (51.2 %) experienced urinary incontinence following surgery, the majority of whom were female (P < 0.01). On univariate analysis, male sexual function was associated with age (P < 0.01), ASA class (P = 0.01) and LAR (P = 0.01). Multimodal therapy of low rectal cancer increases the incidence of fecal incontinence and negatively affects sexual function. The potential benefits of RT or CRT need to be balanced against the risk of increased bowel dysfunction when determining the appropriate treatment for individual patients with rectal cancer.

  8. Gastric cancer after mini-gastric bypass surgery: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chun-Chi; Lee, Wei-Jei; Ser, Kong-Han; Chen, Jung-Chien; Tsou, Jun-Juin; Chen, Shu-Chun; Kuan, Wai-Sang

    2013-11-01

    Gastric cancer in the stomach after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass or mini-gastric bypass is rare, but a few cases have been reported since 1991, when the first case emerged. According to the literature, the interval between bypass surgery and the diagnosis of cancer ranged from 1 to 22 years. Given the difficulty of monitoring a bypassed stomach, the potential for gastric cancer must be considered, especially in countries with high incidence of this cancer. The literature reported the first case in the Asia-Pacific region - a woman developed advanced gastric cancer in her stomach 9 years after laparoscopic mini-gastric bypass for morbid obesity. © 2013 Japan Society for Endoscopic Surgery, Asia Endosurgery Task Force and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. Surgery Choices for Women with DCIS or Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... a tattoo that looks like the areola (the dark area around your nipple). There are two main ... feeling in your breast, nipple, and areola (the dark area around your nipple). Maybe. After surgery, the ...

  10. Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... pleasing to the person than it was originally. Anesthesia Because surgery is typically painful, it is almost ... three types of anesthesia: Local Regional General Local anesthesia and regional anesthesia These types of anesthesia consist ...

  11. Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... pulmonary disease (COPD) includes two separate lung problems, emphysema and chronic bronchitis. Some people with COPD have ... improve breathing. The surgery takes care of the emphysema component of COPD. Not everyone is a candidate ...

  12. Non-grasping en bloc mediastinal lymph node dissection through uniportal video-assisted thoracic surgery for lung cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chengwu; Ma, Lin; Guo, Chenglin

    2016-01-01

    Uniportal video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) has been demonstrated to be feasible, safe, and effective for lung cancer surgery compared with traditional multi-portal VATS. However, complete mediastinal lymph node dissection (MLND) through uniportal VATS is still a difficult work due to more limited access, and most thoracic surgeons use strategies of grasping, accompanied with which are complicated instrumentation and mutual interference among them. To simplify the instrumentation and make MLND more comfortable, we developed the method of “non-grasping en bloc MLND” and applied it during uniportal VATS lung cancer surgery. Two main instruments (suction and energy devices) were developed with diversified use. And only the two instruments were used during MLND following the strategy of “non-grasping”. This technique incorporates with several advantages, such as: simplified instrumentation, decreased risk of damages to lymph nodes, and en bloc dissection. Considering the limited access, this technique fits well with the uniportal procedure and truly interprets the concept of “less is more” during uniportal VATS MLND. PMID:27867574

  13. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery for lung cancer in patients on hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Katsunari; Kuroda, Ayumi; Kang, Angyoung; Imanishi, Naoko; Nagai, Shinjiro; Ueda, Mitsuhiro; Miyamoto, Yoshihiro

    2013-01-01

    Surgical treatment of lung cancer in patients receiving hemodialysis carries a high risk because of poor cardiac function and a fragile electrolyte balance. Because the number of patients receiving hemodialysis has increased, the proportion of such patients with lung cancer is expected to rise. However, few studies have examined the results of surgery for lung cancer in hemodialysis patients, especially by video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). We conducted a retrospective analysis of 5 hemodialysis patients who underwent VATS for lung cancer. All patients were men, and the mean age was 70.4 years. The operative procedure was lobectomy in 4 patients and segmentectomy in 1. During the perioperative period, none required urgent hemodialysis. There were no critical complications and in-hospital deaths. Three of the 5 patients are currently alive and recurrence-free. One patient died of recurrence at 4 month after surgery, and the other patient died at 17 months after surgery without cancer recurrence. VATS appears to be a safe procedure for hemodialysis patients with lung cancer, and the long-term outcome is satisfactory.

  14. Treatment of Early Stage Endometrial Cancer by Transumbilical Laparoendoscopic Single-Site Surgery Versus Traditional Laparoscopic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Hui-hua; Liu, Mu-biao; He, Yuan-li

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To compare the outcomes of transumbilical laparoendoscopic single-site surgery (TU-LESS) versus traditional laparoscopic surgery (TLS) for early stage endometrial cancer (EC). We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients with early stage EC who were surgically treated by TU-LESS or TLS between 2011 and 2014 in a tertiary care teaching hospital. We identified 18 EC patients who underwent TU-LESS. Propensity score matching was used to match this group with 18 EC patients who underwent TLS. All patients underwent laparoscopic-assisted vaginal hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, and systematic pelvic lymphadenectomy by TU-LESS or TLS without conversion to laparoscopy or laparotomy. Number of pelvic lymph nodes retrieved, operative time and estimated blood loss were comparable between 2 groups. Satisfaction values of the cosmetic outcome evaluated by the patient at day 30 after surgery were significantly higher in TU-LESS group than that in TLS group (9.6 ± 0.8 vs 7.5 ± 0.7, P < 0.001), while there was no statistical difference in postoperative complications within 30 days after surgery, postoperative hospital stay, and hospital cost. For the surgical management of early stage EC, TU-LESS may be a feasible alternative approach to TLS, with comparable short-term surgical outcomes and superior cosmetic outcome. Future large-scale prospective studies are needed to identify these benefits. PMID:27057851

  15. Does Bariatric Surgery Affect the Incidence of Breast Cancer Development? A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Winder, Alec A; Kularatna, Malsha; MacCormick, Andrew D

    2017-08-24

    We reviewed the evidence for bariatric surgery reducing the risk of breast cancer. Data was extracted from multiple libraries, including PubMed, EMBASE, and Medline, to perform a systematic review. Abstracts were reviewed by two independent reviewers. Thirty-eight full-text articles were identified from 1171 abstracts. Four studies were included for meta-analysis; 114 of 10,533 (1.1%) patients receiving bariatric surgery versus 516 of 20,130 (2.6%) controls developed breast cancer, odds ratio 0.564 (95% CI 0.453 to 0.702) using a fixed effects model (P < 0.001) and odds ratio 0.585 (95% CI 0.247 to 1.386) using a random effects model (P 0.223). Bariatric surgery may reduce the risk of breast cancer. More research is required due to heterogeneity of studies, difficulty in identifying accurate controls, and limited follow-up.

  16. Tracking Nonpalpable Breast Cancer for Breast-conserving Surgery With Carbon Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yanyan; Lin, Nan; Huang, Sheng; Lin, Chongping; Jin, Na; Zhang, Zaizhong; Ke, Jun; Yu, Yinghao; Zhu, Jianping; Wang, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To examine the feasibility of using carbon nanoparticles to track nonpalpable breast cancer for breast-conserving surgery. During breast-conserving surgery, it is often very challenging to determine the boundary of tumor and identify involved lymph nodes. Currently used methods are useful in identifying tumor location, but do not provide direct visual guidance for resection margin during surgery. The study was approved by the Institutional Review Board of the Fuzhou General Hospital (Fuzhou, China). The current retrospective analysis included 16 patients with nonpalpable breast cancer receiving breast-conserving surgery under the guidance of preoperative marking using a carbon nanoparticle, as well as 3 patients receiving carbon nanoparticle marking followed by neoadjuvant treatment and then breast-conserving surgery. The Tumor Node Metastasis stage in the 16 cases included: T1N0M0 in 7, T1N1M0 in 2, T2N0M0 in 4, and T2N1M0 in the remaining 3 cases. The nanoparticle was injected at 12 sites at 0.5 cm away from the apparent edge under colored ultrasonography along 6 tracks separated by 60 degrees (2 sites every track). Lymph node status was also examined. The resection edge was free from cancer cells in all 16 cases (and the 3 cases with neoadjuvant treatment). Cancer cells were identified in majority of stained lymph nodes, but not in any of the unstained lymph nodes. No recurrence or metastasis was noticed after the surgery (2 to 22-month follow-up; median: 6 months). Tracking nonpalpable breast cancer with carbon nanoparticle could guide breast-conserving surgery. PMID:25761181

  17. The changes of blood platelet activation in breast cancer patients before surgery, after surgery, and in various phases of the chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kedzierska, Magdalena; Czernek, Urszula; Szydłowska-Pazera, Katarzyna; Potemski, Piotr; Piekarski, Janusz; Jeziorski, Arkadiusz; Olas, Beata

    2013-01-01

    Blood platelets from patients with cancer (before or after the surgery) exhibit a variety of qualitative abnormalities. Different anti-cancer drugs may also induce the oxidative/nitrative stress in blood platelets and change their hemostatic properties. The aim of our study was to explain the effect of superoxide anion radicals ([Formula: see text]) production on hemostatic properties of blood platelets (activated by a strong physiological agonist - thrombin) from breast cancer patients before the surgery, after the surgery, and after various phases (I-IV) of chemotherapy (doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide). Patients were hospitalized in the Department of Oncological Surgery and at the Department of Chemotherapy, Medical University of Lodz, Poland. We measured the platelet aggregation as the marker of hemostatic activity of blood platelets. We observed an increase of [Formula: see text] in thrombin-activated blood platelets from patients with breast cancer (before or after the surgery and after various phases of the chemotherapy) compared to the healthy group. Our other experiments demonstrated that aggregation (induced by thrombin) of blood platelets from patients with breast cancer before the surgery, after the surgery, and after various phases of the chemotherapy differs from aggregation of platelets obtained from healthy volunteers. Moreover, our results showed the correlation between the [Formula: see text] generation and changes of platelet aggregation in breast cancer patients before the surgery, after the surgery, and after the chemotherapy (I and IV phases). Considering the data presented in this study, we suggest that the production of [Formula: see text] in blood platelets (activated by thrombin) obtained from breast cancer patients may induce the changes of platelet aggregation, which may contribute in thrombosis in these patients.

  18. The Comparative Effectiveness of Surgery and Radiosurgery for Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, James B.; Soulos, Pamela R.; Cramer, Laura D.; Decker, Roy H.; Kim, Anthony W.; Gross, Cary P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although surgery is the standard treatment for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has disseminated as an alternative therapy. The comparative mortality and toxicity of these treatments for patients of different life expectancies (LE) are unknown. Methods Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results–Medicare linked database, we identified patients age ≥67 who underwent SBRT or surgery for stage I NSCLC from 2007–2009. Matched patients were stratified into short (<5 years) and long (≥5 years) LE. Mortality and complication rates were compared using Poisson regression. Findings Overall, 367 SBRT and 711 surgery patients were matched. Acute toxicity (0–1-month) from SBRT was lower than surgery (7.9% vs. 54.9%, p<.001). At 24-months post-treatment, there was no difference (69.7% vs. 73.9%, p=.31). The incidence rate ratio (IRR) for toxicity for SBRT vs. surgery was 0.74 [95%CI 0.64–0.87]. Overall mortality was lower for SBRT than surgery at 3-months (2.2% vs. 6.1%; p=.005), but by 24-months, overall mortality was higher for SBRT (40.1% vs. 22.3% p<.001). For patients with short LE there was no difference in lung cancer mortality (IRR 1.01 [95% CI 0.40–2.56]). However for patients with long LE, there was greater overall mortality (IRR 1.49 [95% CI 1.11–2.01]) and a trend towards greater lung cancer mortality (IRR 1.63 [95% CI 0.95–2.79]) for SBRT vs. surgery. Conclusions SBRT was associated with lower immediate mortality and toxicity compared to surgery. However, for patients with long LE, there appears to be a relative benefit for surgery compared to SBRT. PMID:25847699

  19. Neoadjuvant Long-Course Chemoradiotherapy for Rectal Cancer: Does Time to Surgery Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Panagiotopoulou, Ioanna G.; Parashar, Deepak; Qasem, Eyas; Mezher-Sikafi, Rasha; Parmar, Jitesh; Wells, Alan D.; Bajwa, Farrukh M.; Menon, Madhav; Jephcott, Catherine R.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to evaluate whether delaying surgery following long-course chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer correlates with pathologic complete response. Pre-operative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is standard practice in the UK for the management of locally advanced rectal cancer. Optimal timing of surgery following CRT is still not clearly defined. All patients with a diagnosis of rectal cancer who had undergone long-course CRT prior to surgery between January 2008 and December 2011 were included. Statistical analysis was performed using Stata 11. Fifty-nine patients received long-course CRT prior to surgery in the selected period. Twenty-seven percent (16/59) of patients showed a complete histopathologic response and 59.3% (35/59) of patients had tumor down-staging from radiologically-assessed node positive to histologically-proven node negative disease. There was no statistically significant delay to surgery after completion of CRT in the 16 patients with complete response (CR) compared with the rest of the group [IR: incomplete response; CR group median: 74.5 days (IQR: 70–87.5) and IR group median: 72 days (IQR: 57–83), P = 0.470]. Although no statistically significant predictors of either complete response or tumor nodal status down-staging were identified in logistic regression analyses, a trend toward complete response was seen with longer delay to surgery following completion of long-course CRT. PMID:26414816

  20. Neoadjuvant Long-Course Chemoradiotherapy for Rectal Cancer: Does Time to Surgery Matter?

    PubMed

    Panagiotopoulou, Ioanna G; Parashar, Deepak; Qasem, Eyas; Mezher-Sikafi, Rasha; Parmar, Jitesh; Wells, Alan D; Bajwa, Farrukh M; Menon, Madhav; Jephcott, Catherine R

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this paper was to evaluate whether delaying surgery following long-course chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer correlates with pathologic complete response. Pre-operative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is standard practice in the UK for the management of locally advanced rectal cancer. Optimal timing of surgery following CRT is still not clearly defined. All patients with a diagnosis of rectal cancer who had undergone long-course CRT prior to surgery between January 2008 and December 2011 were included. Statistical analysis was performed using Stata 11. Fifty-nine patients received long-course CRT prior to surgery in the selected period. Twenty-seven percent (16/59) of patients showed a complete histopathologic response and 59.3% (35/59) of patients had tumor down-staging from radiologically-assessed node positive to histologically-proven node negative disease. There was no statistically significant delay to surgery after completion of CRT in the 16 patients with complete response (CR) compared with the rest of the group [IR: incomplete response; CR group median: 74.5 days (IQR: 70-87.5) and IR group median: 72 days (IQR: 57-83), P = 0.470]. Although no statistically significant predictors of either complete response or tumor nodal status down-staging were identified in logistic regression analyses, a trend toward complete response was seen with longer delay to surgery following completion of long-course CRT.

  1. Learning curve in robotic rectal cancer surgery: current state of affairs.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Rodríguez, Rosa M; Rubio-Dorado-Manzanares, Mercedes; Díaz-Pavón, José Manuel; Reyes-Díaz, M Luisa; Vazquez-Monchul, Jorge Manuel; Garcia-Cabrera, Ana M; Padillo, Javier; De la Portilla, Fernando

    2016-12-01

    Robotic-assisted rectal cancer surgery offers multiple advantages for surgeons, and it seems to yield the same clinical outcomes as regards the short-time follow-up of patients compared to conventional laparoscopy. This surgical approach emerges as a technique aiming at overcoming the limitations posed by rectal cancer and other surgical fields of difficult access, in order to obtain better outcomes and a shorter learning curve. A systematic review of the literature of robot-assisted rectal surgery was carried out according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement. The search was conducted in October 2015 in PubMed, MEDLINE and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, for articles published in the last 10 years and pertaining the learning curve of robotic surgery for colorectal cancer. It consisted of the following key words: "rectal cancer/learning curve/robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgery". A total of 34 references were identified, but only 9 full texts specifically addressed the analysis of the learning curve in robot-assisted rectal cancer surgery, 7 were case series and 2 were non-randomised case-comparison series. Eight papers used the cumulative sum (CUSUM) method, and only one author divided the series into two groups to compare both. The mean number of cases for phase I of the learning curve was calculated to be 29.7 patients; phase II corresponds to a mean number 37.4 patients. The mean number of cases required for the surgeon to be classed as an expert in robotic surgery was calculated to be 39 patients. Robotic advantages could have an impact on learning curve for rectal cancer and lower the number of cases that are necessary for rectal resections.

  2. The effect of low molecular weight heparin thromboprophylaxis on bleeding complications after gastric cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Oh; Ryu, Seong Yeop; Park, Young Kyu; Kim, Young Jin

    2010-09-01

    Low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) has been widely used to prevent venous thromboembolism in cancer surgical patients. However, relatively few studies have examined the safety aspects related to the use of LMWH after abdominal cancer surgery. This study was designed to investigate the relationship between bleeding complications and LMWH thromboprophylaxis after gastric cancer surgery. From March to July in 2009, 179 consecutive patients who underwent gastric cancer surgery at our institution were administered LMWH (3200 U once daily from 2 to 6 h before surgery until discharge) perioperatively. A total of 182 patients consecutively treated before the introduction of LMWH prophylaxis were selected as controls. There were 234 men and 127 women (mean age, 60 +/- 12 years). No significant intergroup differences were observed with respect to clinicopathological features and operative procedures. No patient in the LMWH or control group developed symptomatic venous thromboembolism postoperatively. However, the LMWH group had a significantly higher surgical complication rate (27.4 versus 15.4%, P = 0.005). Among the surgical complications, postoperative bleeding and wound complications were significantly higher in the LMWH group, whereas other complications were similar in the two study groups. Multivariate analysis showed that LMWH administration was an independent risk factor (odds ratio, 2.83; 95% confidence interval, 1.28-6.23, P = 0.009) of postoperative bleeding. LMWH thromboprophylaxis was found to increase significantly the risk of bleeding complications after gastric cancer surgery. Optimal LMWH prophylaxis regimens, including the dosage and timing of treatment commencement, for gastric cancer surgery should be determined in further clinical trials.

  3. Randomized trials and quality assurance in gastric cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Dikken, Johan L; Cats, Annemieke; Verheij, Marcel; van de Velde, Cornelis J H

    2013-03-01

    A D2 lymphadenectomy can be considered standard of surgical care for advanced resectable gastric cancer. Currently, several multimodality strategies are used, including postoperative monochemotherapy in Asia, postoperative chemoradiotherapy in the United States, and perioperative chemotherapy in Europe. As the majority of gastric cancer patients are treated outside the framework of clinical trials, quality assurance programs, including referral to high-volume centers and clinical auditing are needed to improve gastric cancer care on a nationwide level. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. [The role of surgery in the treatment of small cell lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Puma, F; Urbani, M; Santoprete, S; Ricci, F; Sanguinetti, A; Vinci, D; Ottavi, P; Porcaro, G; Daddi, G

    2001-12-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a biologically aggressive tumor with a low long-term survival rate. SCLC is highly responsive to chemotherapy and surgery has a very limited role in its treatment because the disease is usually widely disseminated at the diagnosis. Good results from surgery have been reported in the small subgroup of T1-2 N0 M0 patients. In N1 peripheral SCLC, surgery in combination with other treatments, can obtain fair results. Surgical treatment does not influence the prognosis in SCLC as stage III and IV.

  5. Robotic surgery and cancer: the present state, problems and future vision.

    PubMed

    Hashizume, Makoto; Tsugawa, Kouji

    2004-05-01

    In the 1990s, laparoscopic surgery entirely changed the traditional style of surgical operations. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy has spread rapidly and is now established as the standard treatment. However, besides cholecystectomy, endoscopic procedures are still not applied so widely to a variety of surgical operations. This is because laparoscopic techniques, such as suturing or ligation, make it difficult for surgeons to perform other kinds of operations and thus greatly increase their mental and physical stress. It is necessary to introduce various advanced technologies such as: surgical robots, three dimensional (3D) images, computer graphics (CG), computer simulation technology and others. Surgical robots, including the AESOP, da Vinci and ZEUS systems, provide surgeons with technologically advanced vision and hand skills. As a result, such systems are expected to revolutionize the field of surgery. However, there have so far been few studies which discuss the indications of robotic surgery for tumors/cancer. Therefore, herein we review various studies published in English to focus on the application of robotic surgery to tumors/cancer. We point out that there are several problems to be solved for robot surgery: i) price of surgical robots, ii) training systems for surgeon, iii) coverage by medical insurance, iv) downsizing and v) navigation system. In conclusion, we believe that, in the near future as robotic technology continues to develop, almost all kinds of endoscopic surgery will be performed by this technology. It will replace traditional surgery not only in the treatment of benign diseases but also in malignant illnesses.

  6. Second-look surgery following Hartmann's procedure for obstructive left-sided colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Beppu, Naohito; Kimura, Fumihiko; Matsubara, Nagahide; Noda, Masashi; Tomita, Naohiro; Yanagi, Hidenori; Yamanaka, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the short- and long-term outcomes of patients undergoing second-look surgery following Hartmann's procedure for obstructive left-sided colorectal cancer (LSCC). All patients included in the present study had undergone radical surgery with Hartmann's procedure for obstructive LSCC. Adjuvant chemotherapy was recommended for all patients, and patients with no signs of recurrence following six months of surveillance were planned to undergo second-look surgery. The aim of second-look surgery was early detection of local recurrence and determination of the efficacy of laparoscopic Hartmann procedure reversal. A total of 15 patients with locally advanced colorectal cancer were included in the study. Three patients exhibited peritoneal dissemination at the time of laparoscopic Hartmann procedure reversal and underwent partial peritonectomy. Following adjuvant chemotherapy treatment, laparoscopic Hartmann procedure reversal was performed in all patients. However, two patients underwent colo-anal anastomosis, and two patients underwent right-sided colon or ileum reconstruction. Regarding the oncological outcomes, two of three patients in whom peritoneal dissemination was identified during laparoscopic Hartmann procedure reversal were eventually in remission following the initial surgery and the second-look surgery with partial peritonectomy. Favorable long-term outcomes were observed in 12/15 patients due to no recurrence, which may be due to the surgical techniques used and the timing of the second-look surgery following Hartmann's procedure for the treatment of obstructive LSCC. PMID:27900043

  7. Experience with perioperative pirfenidone for lung cancer surgery in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Takekazu; Yoshida, Shigetoshi; Nagato, Kaoru; Nakajima, Takahiro; Suzuki, Hidemi; Tagawa, Tetsuzo; Mizobuchi, Teruaki; Ota, Satoshi; Nakatani, Yukio; Yoshino, Ichiro

    2015-10-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive diffuse lung disease associated with an increased risk of lung cancer. Patients with IPF sometimes develop a life-threatening acute exacerbation of IPF (AE-IPF) after lung cancer surgery. In this retrospective study, pirfenidone, an antifibrotic agent, was perioperatively administered to IPF patients with lung cancer with the aim of preventing postoperative AE-IPF, and the feasibility and clinical outcomes were investigated. Twelve IPF patients with concomitant lung cancer who received perioperative pirfenidone treatment (PPT) for lung cancer surgery were retrospectively investigated. Sixteen IPF patients undergoing lung cancer surgery without PPT were analyzed as historical controls. Compared to the controls, the PPT patients had a more severely impaired preoperative pulmonary function and a larger number of limited pulmonary resections. There was a significant preoperative decrease in the serum KL-6 levels of the PPT patients. No severe pirfenidone-related complications or IPF-related events occurred in the PPT patients, while six control patients developed AE-IPF (P = 0.0167). A quantitative histopathological evaluation of resected lung specimens found that tissue changes associated with IPF were significantly fewer in the PPT patients (P = 0.021). PPT is a feasible perioperative treatment for IPF patients with lung cancer. Its effectiveness in preventing postoperative AE-IPF thus warrants prospective verification.

  8. Outcome after emergency surgery in patients with a free perforation caused by gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, Hironori; Hiraki, Shuichi; Sakamoto, Naoko; Yaguchi, Yoshihisa; Horio, Takuya; Kumano, Isao; Akase, Takayoshi; Sugasawa, Hidekazu; Aiko, Satoshi; Ono, Satoshi; Ichikura, Takashi; Kazuo, Hase

    2010-01-01

    Perforation of gastric cancer is rare and it accounts for less than 1% of the incidences of an acute abdomen. In this study, we reviewed cases of benign or malignant gastric perforation in terms of the accuracy of diagnosis and investigated the clinical outcome after emergency surgery in patients with a free perforation caused by gastric cancer. On the basis of pathological examination, gastric cancer was diagnosed in 8 patients and benign ulcer perforation in 32 patients. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of intraoperative diagnosis by pathological examination were 50, 93.8 and 85%, respectively. Except for age, there were no differences in the other demographic characteristics between patients with gastric cancer and benign ulcer perforation. The median survival time of patients with perforated gastric cancer was 195 days after surgery. Patients with gastric cancer perforation had a poorer overall survival rate than those who had T3 tumors without perforation. In addition, in patients with perforation, recurrence of peritoneum occurred more frequently. In conclusion, to improve the survival rate of patients with perforated gastric cancer and to improve the accuracy of intraoperative diagnosis, endoscopic examination and/or pathological examination of the frozen section should be performed, if possible. A balanced surgical strategy using laparoscopic local repair as the first-step of surgery, followed by radical open gastrectomy with lymphadenectomy may be considered.

  9. Outcome after emergency surgery in patients with a free perforation caused by gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    TSUJIMOTO, HIRONORI; HIRAKI, SHUICHI; SAKAMOTO, NAOKO; YAGUCHI, YOSHIHISA; HORIO, TAKUYA; KUMANO, ISAO; AKASE, TAKAYOSHI; SUGASAWA, HIDEKAZU; AIKO, SATOSHI; ONO, SATOSHI; ICHIKURA, TAKASHI; KAZUO, HASE

    2010-01-01

    Perforation of gastric cancer is rare and it accounts for less than 1% of the incidences of an acute abdomen. In this study, we reviewed cases of benign or malignant gastric perforation in terms of the accuracy of diagnosis and investigated the clinical outcome after emergency surgery in patients with a free perforation caused by gastric cancer. On the basis of pathological examination, gastric cancer was diagnosed in 8 patients and benign ulcer perforation in 32 patients. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of intraoperative diagnosis by pathological examination were 50, 93.8 and 85%, respectively. Except for age, there were no differences in the other demographic characteristics between patients with gastric cancer and benign ulcer perforation. The median survival time of patients with perforated gastric cancer was 195 days after surgery. Patients with gastric cancer perforation had a poorer overall survival rate than those who had T3 tumors without perforation. In addition, in patients with perforation, recurrence of peritoneum occurred more frequently. In conclusion, to improve the survival rate of patients with perforated gastric cancer and to improve the accuracy of intraoperative diagnosis, endoscopic examination and/or pathological examination of the frozen section should be performed, if possible. A balanced surgical strategy using laparoscopic local repair as the first-step of surgery, followed by radical open gastrectomy with lymphadenectomy may be considered. PMID:23136615

  10. The influence of complications on the costs of complex cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Short, Marah N; Aloia, Thomas A; Ho, Vivian

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND It is widely known that outcomes after cancer surgery vary widely, depending on interactions between patient, tumor, neoadjuvant therapy, and provider factors. Within this complex milieu, the influence of complications on the cost of surgical oncology care remains unknown. The authors examined rates of Patient Safety Indicator (PSI) occurrence for 6 cancer operations and their association with costs of care. METHODS The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) PSI definitions were used to identify patient safety-related complications in Medicare claims data. Hospital and inpatient physician claims for the years 2005 through 2009 were analyzed for 6 cancer resections: colectomy, rectal resection, pulmonary lobectomy, pneumonectomy, esophagectomy, and pancreatic resection. Risk-adjusted regression analyses were used to measure the association between each PSI and hospitalization costs. RESULTS Overall PSI rates ranged from a low of 0.01% for postoperative hip fracture to a high of 2.58% for respiratory failure. Death among inpatients with serious treatable complications, postoperative respiratory failure, postoperative thromboembolism, and accidental puncture/laceration were >1% for all 6 cancer operations. Several PSIs—including decubitus ulcer, death among surgical inpatients with serious treatable complications, and postoperative thromboembolism—raised hospitalization costs by ≥20% for most cancer surgery types. Postoperative respiratory failure resulted in a cost increase >50% for all cancer resections. CONCLUSIONS The consistently higher costs associated with cancer surgery PSIs indicate that substantial health care savings could be achieved by targeting these indicators for quality improvement. PMID:24382697

  11. Predictors of functional shoulder recovery at 1 and 12 months after breast cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Levy, Ellen W; Pfalzer, Lucinda A; Danoff, Jerome; Springer, Barbara A; McGarvey, Charles; Shieh, Ching-yi; Morehead-Gee, Alicia; Gerber, Lynn H; Stout, Nicole L

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this study are (1) to determine if upper extremity function, as represented by shoulder ROM, self-reported symptoms and upper extremity functional limitations in activities of daily living could be predictively related to demographic and cancer characteristics post-surgery for breast cancer. And (2) to examine if variables related to early onset impairment contribute to late onset impairments in women after breast cancer surgery. Subjects were assessed preoperatively and 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12+ months post breast cancer surgery for impairments and symptoms and at 12+ months for shoulder functional limitations using a physical therapy surveillance model. Body weight, shoulder ROM, manual muscle testing, and upper limb volume were recorded. At 12+ months, the Harvard Alumni Health Study Physical Activity Questionnaire, and an Upper Limb Disability Questionnaire were administered. Symptoms and ROM impairments were compared by functional limitations. Characteristics significantly associated with early ROM impairment (but not later impairment) were axillary lymph node dissection, removal of ≥15 nodes, mastectomy surgery and stage II breast cancer. Positive nodes, older age, and BMI≥25 were significantly associated with reduced shoulder ROM at 12+ months. At 12+ months, only 10 % of the patients experienced ROM impairments while rates of self-reported symptoms in the affected upper extremity at 12+ months were as follows: pain-49%, weakness-47.1%, numbness-55.9%, feeling tired-42.5%. The majority of patients used the affected upper extremity for reaching without limitation, but ≥35% reported limitation with household chores, carrying and lifting. Difficulty carrying and lifting could be predicted by BMI≥25 and use of the dominant affected upper limb. Different factors are associated with early versus later ROM loss. Symptoms reported by breast cancer survivors are frequently associated with functional limitations in upper extremity tasks and warrant

  12. [The surgery after. . . retroperitoneal lymph node dissection and surgery of the residual masses after chemotherapy for advanced testicular cancer].

    PubMed

    Guillemin, François; Belinga, Jean-François Betala; Marchal, Frédéric; Rauch, Philippe; Verhaeghe, Jean-Luc

    2011-01-01

    Thirty-six cases of retroperitoneal lymph node dissections for residual mass after chemotherapy for testicular cancer are reported. In a reference center, the recruitment is modified by the severity of the situations related to very big masses, tumors of poor prognosis and resistant tumors. Lymph node dissection is often atypical and surgery of metastatic residual masses is frequent (13 operations). The 8-year global survival remains stable, over 90%. The 5-year cumulated risk of recurrence is 20%, but these situations can be overtaken.

  13. Atrial fibrillation after lung cancer surgery: incidence, severity, and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Muranishi, Yusuke; Sonobe, Makoto; Menju, Toshi; Aoyama, Akihiro; Chen-Yoshikawa, Toyohumi F; Sato, Toshihiko; Date, Hiroshi

    2017-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation (Af) is a common post-operative cardiac complication after lung cancer surgery; however, the type of lung cancer surgery being performed has evolved, remarkably, into minimally invasive surgical procedures. The purpose of this study was to quantify the incidence and severity of post-operative Af and to identify the risk factors for Af, using a recent cohort of lung cancer surgery patients. We reviewed, retrospectively, the medical records of 593 patients, who underwent lung cancer surgery between 2011 and 2013, for the development of post-operative Af. The overall incidence of post-operative Af in our study was 6.4 % (38/593). Three (8 %) of these 38 patients, subsequently, suffered brain infarction. Multivariate analysis revealed that mediastinal lymph node dissection (OR ND-2/ND-0-1 = 3.06; 95 % CI 1.06-10.9) was associated with the development of post-operative Af. Omission of mediastinal lymph dissection for patients with early stage lung cancer and a high risk of Af should be considered to prevent post-operative Af.

  14. A Validation Study of Administrative Claims Data to Measure Ovarian Cancer Recurrence and Secondary Debulking Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Livaudais-Toman, Jennifer; Egorova, Natalia; Franco, Rebeca; Prasad-Hayes, Monica; Howell, Elizabeth A.; Wisnivesky, Juan; Bickell, Nina A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Administrative claims data offer an alternative to chart abstraction to assess ovarian cancer recurrence, treatment and outcomes. Such analyses have been hindered by lack of valid recurrence and treatment algorithms. In this study, we sought to develop claims-based algorithms to identify ovarian cancer recurrence and secondary debulking surgery, and to validate them against the gold-standard of chart abstraction. Methods: We conducted chart validation studies; 2 recurrence algorithms and 1 secondary surgery among 94 ovarian cancer patients treated at one hospital between 2003–2009. A new recurrence algorithm was based on treatment timing (≥6 months after primary treatment) and a previously validated algorithm was based on secondary malignancy codes. A secondary debulking surgery algorithm was based on surgical billing codes. Results: The new recurrence algorithm had: sensitivity=100% (95% confidence interval [CI]=87%-=100%), specificity=89% (95%CI=78%–95%), kappa=84% (SE=10%) while the secondary-malignancy-=code recurrence algorithm had: sensitivity=84% (95%CI=66%–94%), specificity=44% (95%CI=31%-=57%), kappa=23% (SE=8%). The secondary surgery algorithm had: sensitivity=77% (95%CI=50%–92%), = specificity= 92% (95%CI=83%–97%), kappa=66% (SE=10%).= Conclusions: A recurrence algorithm based on treatment timing accurately identified ovarian cancer =recurrence. If validated in other populations, such an algorithm can provide a tool to compare effectiveness of recurrent ovarian cancer treatments. PMID:27891525

  15. A review on robotic surgery in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Mohd Azman, Zairul Azwan; Kim, Seon-Hahn

    2016-01-01

    Robotic surgery has the upper hand when compared to the laparoscopic approach in terms of superior visualisation, flexibility in movement, steadiness and accessibility to confined anatomical spaces. Nevertheless, limitations still exist with regards to cost, reduced tactile sensation, time-consuming setup and a significant learning curve to achieve. Although studies have shown better or at least comparable outcomes between the robotic and laparoscopic approach, the limitations mentioned result in poor penetrance among centres and surgeons. Advancements in robotic surgery technology and attaining the acquired skillset will translate into better clinical outcomes for patients.

  16. A review on robotic surgery in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mohd Azman, Zairul Azwan

    2016-01-01

    Robotic surgery has the upper hand when compared to the laparoscopic approach in terms of superior visualisation, flexibility in movement, steadiness and accessibility to confined anatomical spaces. Nevertheless, limitations still exist with regards to cost, reduced tactile sensation, time-consuming setup and a significant learning curve to achieve. Although studies have shown better or at least comparable outcomes between the robotic and laparoscopic approach, the limitations mentioned result in poor penetrance among centres and surgeons. Advancements in robotic surgery technology and attaining the acquired skillset will translate into better clinical outcomes for patients. PMID:28138573

  17. Study examines outcomes from surgery to prevent ovarian cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A new study looked at women at high risk of ovarian cancer who had no clinical signs of the disease and who underwent risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy (RRSO). The study results showed cancer in the removed tissues of 2.6 percent (25 of 966) of the par

  18. [A Case of Advanced Esophageal Cancer and Tongue Cancer Treated with Induction DCF Chemotherapy Followed by Radical Surgery].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Motomu; Koyanagi, Kazuo; Sugiura, Hitoshi; Kakefuda, Toshihiro

    2015-11-01

    A man in his 60s was admitted for the treatment of advanced cervical esophageal cancer with metastasis to the lymph nodes and advanced tongue cancer with metastasis to the lymph nodes. Esophageal cancer was suspected to have invaded the trachea. The tongue cancer was located on the left side and had invaded beyond the median line of the tongue. Both cancers were pathologically diagnosed as squamous cell carcinomas. Therefore, it was determined that pharyngo-laryngo- esophagectomy and total glossectomy were required prior to the treatment. However, after 2 courses of docetaxel/cisplatin/ 5-FU combined induction chemotherapy, both cancers remarkably decreased; consequently, an esophagectomy to preserve laryngeal function and partial glossectomy could be performed simultaneously. The patient is well without recurrence 1 year post-surgery.

  19. Ultrasound screening of contralateral breast after surgery for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung Ja; Chung, Se-Yeong; Chang, Jung Min; Cho, Nariya; Han, Wonshik; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether supplemental screening ultrasound (US) to mammography could improve cancer detection rate of the contralateral breast in patients with a personal history of breast cancer and dense breasts. During a one-year study period, 1314 screening patients with a personal history of breast cancer and dense breasts simultaneously underwent mammography and breast US. BI-RADS categories were given for mammography or US-detected lesions in the contralateral breast. The reference standard was histology and/or 1-year imaging follow-up, and the cancer rate according to BI-RADS categories and cancer detection rate and positive biopsy rate according to detection modality were analyzed. Of 1314 patients, 84 patients (6.4%) were categorized as category 3 with one interval cancer and one cancer which was upgraded to category 4A after 6-month follow-up US (2.5% cancer rate, 95% CIs 1.5-9.1%). Fifteen patients (1.1%) had category 4A or 4B lesions in the contralateral breast. Four lesions were detected on mammography (two lesions were also visible on US) and 11 lesions were detected on US and 5 cancers were confirmed (33.3%, 95% CIs 15.0-58.5%). Six patients (0.5%) had category 4C lesions, 2 detected on mammography and 4 on US and 4 cancers were confirmed (66.7%, 95% CIs 29.6-90.8%). No lesions were categorized as category 5 in the contralateral breast. Cancer detection rate by mammography was 3.3 per 1000 patients and that by US was 5.0 per 1000 patients, therefore overall cancer detection rate by mammography plus US was 8.3 per 1000 patients. Positive biopsy rate of mammography-detected lesions was 66.7% (4 of 6) and that of US-detected lesions was 40.0% (6 of 15). US can be helpful to detect mammographically occult breast cancer in the contralateral breast with high positive biopsy rate and low category 3 rate in patients with a previous history of breast cancer and dense breasts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Development of the American Society of Colon & Rectal Surgeons (ASCRS) Rectal Cancer Surgery Checklist

    PubMed Central

    Glasgow, Sean C.; Morris, Arden M.; Baxter, Nancy N.; Fleshman, James W.; Alavi, Karim S.; Luchtefeld, Martin A.; Monson, John R. T.; Chang, George J.; Temple, Larissa K.

    2016-01-01

    Background There is excellent evidence that surgical safety checklists contribute to decreased morbidity and mortality. Objective To develop a surgical checklist comprising the key phases of care for rectal cancer patients. Design Consensus-oriented decision-making model involving iterative input from subject matter experts under the auspices of the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons. Results The process generated a 25-item checklist covering the spectrum of care for rectal cancer patients undergoing surgery. Limitations Lack of prospective validation. Conclusions The American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons Rectal Cancer Surgery checklist comprises the essential elements of pre-, intra- and postoperative care that must be addressed during the surgical treatment of patients with rectal cancer. PMID:27270511

  1. Can We Be Less Radical with Surgery for Early Cervical Cancer?

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Madeleine C; Tidy, John A

    2016-03-01

    Although a rare cancer in the developed world due to the success of cervical screening programmes, cervical cancer remains one of the most common cancers diagnosed in women under the age of 35 years old. Radical hysterectomy and more recently radical trachelectomy have been highly effective in curing the majority of women with early stage disease. Many, however, are left with long-term 'survivorship' issues including bowel, bladder and sexual dysfunction. In view of these chronic co-morbidities, many clinicians now consider whether a less radical approach to surgery may be an option for some women. This review focuses on the current evidence for the safety of conservative surgery for early stage cervical cancer with regard to cure rates in comparison to standard management, as well as any improvement in short and long-term morbidity associated with a more conservative approach.

  2. Determining the use of prophylactic antibiotics in breast cancer surgeries: a survey of practice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Prophylactic antibiotics (PAs) are beneficial to breast cancer patients undergoing surgery because they prevent surgical site infection (SSI), but limited information regarding their use has been published. This study aims to determine the use of PAs prior to breast cancer surgery amongst breast surgeons in Colombia. Methods An online survey was distributed amongst the breast surgeon members of the Colombian Association of Mastology, the only breast surgery society of Colombia. The scope of the questions included demographics, clinical practice characteristics, PA prescription characteristics, and the use of PAs in common breast surgical procedures. Results The survey was distributed amongst eighty-eight breast surgeons of whom forty-seven responded (response rate: 53.4%). Forty surgeons (85.1%) reported using PAs prior to surgery of which >60% used PAs during mastectomy, axillary lymph node dissection, and/or breast reconstruction. Surgeons reported they targeted the use of PAs in cases in which patients had any of the following SSI risk factors: diabetes mellitus, drains in situ, obesity, and neoadjuvant therapy. The distribution of the self-reported PA dosing regimens was as follows: single pre-operative fixed-dose (27.7%), single preoperative dose followed by a second dose if the surgery was prolonged (44.7%), single preoperative dose followed by one or more postoperative doses for >24 hours (10.6%), and single preoperative weight-adjusted dose (2.1%). Conclusion Although this group of breast surgeons is aware of the importance of PAs in breast cancer surgery there is a discrepancy in how they use it, specifically with regards to prescription and timeliness of drug administration. Our findings call for targeted quality-improvement initiatives, such as standardized national guidelines, which can provide sufficient evidence for all stakeholders and therefore facilitate best practice medicine for breast cancer surgery. PMID:22937833

  3. Evaluation of Tumor Response after Short-Course Radiotherapy and Delayed Surgery for Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rega, Daniela; Pecori, Biagio; Scala, Dario; Avallone, Antonio; Pace, Ugo; Petrillo, Antonella; Aloj, Luigi; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Delrio, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Neoadjuvant therapy is able to reduce local recurrence in rectal cancer. Immediate surgery after short course radiotherapy allows only for minimal downstaging. We investigated the effect of delayed surgery after short-course radiotherapy at different time intervals before surgery, in patients affected by rectal cancer. Methods From January 2003 to December 2013 sixty-seven patients with the following characteristics have been selected: clinical (c) stage T3N0 ≤ 12 cm from the anal verge and with circumferential resection margin > 5 mm (by magnetic resonance imaging); cT2, any N, < 5 cm from anal verge; and patients facing tumors with enlarged nodes and/or CRM+ve who resulted unfit for chemo-radiation, were also included. Patients underwent preoperative short-course radiotherapy with different interval to surgery were divided in three groups: A (within 6 weeks), B (between 6 and 8 weeks) and C (after more than 8 weeks). Hystopatolgical response to radiotherapy was measured by Mandard’s modified tumor regression grade (TRG). Results All patients completed the scheduled treatment. Sixty-six patients underwent surgery. Fifty-three of which (80.3%) received a sphincter saving procedure. Downstaging occurred in 41 cases (62.1%). The analysis of subgroups showed an increasing prevalence of TRG 1–2 prolonging the interval to surgery (group A—16.7%, group B—36.8% and 54.3% in group C; p value 0.023). Conclusions Preoperative short-course radiotherapy is able to downstage rectal cancer if surgery is delayed. A higher rate of TRG 1–2 can be obtained if interval to surgery is prolonged to more than 8 weeks. PMID:27548058

  4. Surgery and Chemotherapy With or Without Chemotherapy After Surgery in Treating Patients With Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, Uterine, or Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-18

    Recurrent Uterine Corpus Cancer; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Cancer; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer

  5. [Oral cancer surgery and oral cutaneous fistulas: risk factors].

    PubMed

    Ramos, Gyl Henrique A; Crivelaro, André Luiz Soares; de Oliveira, Benedito Valdecir; Pedruzzi, Paola Andrea G; de Freitas, Rosyane Rena

    2010-04-01

    To quantify the oral cutaneous fistulae after surgery and to identify possible risk factors. A retrospective study, interesting patients that were submitted to surgery, with a two years minimum post-operative follow up. The considered variables were: sex, concomitant diseases, tabacco and alcohol use, the anesthesic and pulmonary risks, clinical stage, cervical linphadenectomy, pre or postoperative radiotherapy, accidents during the surgery, wound infection and or hematoma, pulmonary infection, surgery and reconstruction extension. In 159 patients, oral cutaneous fistulae occurred in 48 patients (30,3%): Patients stage T1 in 26,6 %,T2 in 1,8 %,T3 in 16%, and T4 in 40,3% (p=0,0138). The cases N+ developed fistulae in 22.9%, (N2c with 42,8%, (p=0,0136), those with preoperative radiotherapy in 63,6% (p=0,0346) Those with wound infection in 47,3% (p=0,0146), and those with wound deiscense in 53,7 % (p=0,0030). The fistulae rate was of 60% in the regional mucocutaneous flaps reconstruction cases, 39,2% in the myocutaneous ones and 12,5% of microsurgery ones (p=0,0286). The general rate of oral cutaneous fistulae was 30,3%. The significant factors were: T stage, cervical linphadenectomy, pre or postoperative radiotherapy, wound infection and deiscense, and the use of flaps.

  6. MBCP - Approach - Advanced Surgery | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Advanced Surgery We have the expertise to do complex reconstructive procedures with robotic assistance. This results in: smaller incisions, less blood loss, and shorter stays in the hospital In the most challenging of cases of radical cystectomy, we remove the bladder and replace it with a bladder that we construct from bowel tissue. This is standard-of-care for advanced cases.

  7. Biological research in the evolution of cancer surgery: a personal perspective.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Bernard

    2008-12-15

    During the 19th, and for most of the 20th century, malignant tumors were removed by mutilating radical anatomic dissection. Advances such as anesthesia, asepsis, and blood transfusion made possible increasingly more radical operations. There was no scientific rationale for the operations being performed. Surgery in the 20th century was dominated by the principles of William S. Halsted, who contended that the bloodstream was of little significance as a route of tumor cell dissemination; a tumor was autonomous of its host; and cancer was a local-regional disease that spread in an orderly fashion based on mechanical considerations. Halsted believed that both the extent and nuances of an operation influenced patient outcome and that inadequate surgical skill was responsible for the failure to cure. A new surgical era arose in 1957, when cancer surgery began to be influenced by laboratory and clinical research, with results contrary to Halstedian principles. A new hypothesis resulted in a scientific basis for cancer surgery. Clinical trials supported the thesis that operable cancer is a systemic disease and that variations in local-regional therapy are unlikely to substantially affect survival. Complex host-tumor relationships were shown to affect every aspect of cancer and, contrary to Halsted's thesis, the bloodstream is of considerable importance in tumor dissemination. Clinical trials also have shown that less radical surgery is justified. Studies have shown that improved survival can be achieved with systemic therapy after surgery. Such therapy can reduce both the incidence of distant disease and the tumor recurrence at the tumor site after minimal surgery. The use of systemic therapy in patients who have no identifiable metastatic disease is a drastic departure from previous strategies. New technological innovations resulting from engineering research have improved the quality of life of patients by eliminating the need for some surgical procedures. Because cancer

  8. [3rd Hungarian Breast Cancer Consensus Conference - Surgery Guidelines].

    PubMed

    Lázár, György; Bursics, Attila; Farsang, Zoltán; Harsányi, László; Kósa, Csaba; Maráz, Róbert; Mátrai, Zoltán; Paszt, Attila; Pavlovics, Gábor; Tamás, Róbert

    2016-09-01

    Therapy for breast cancer today is characterised by ever more precise diagnostic methods and ever more effective oncological treatments, a trend which will certainly continue in the future. Breast preservation and the application of oncoplastic principles are increasingly popular. A sentinel lymph node biopsy in the surgical treatment of the axilla is primary, with the indication for axillary block dissection (ABD) narrowing and radiation therapy becoming an alternative to ABD in certain cases. This publication summarises our recommendations on the surgical treatment of breast cancer based on the content of the 2nd Breast Cancer Consensus Conference and considering the latest international studies and professional recommendations.

  9. Gastrointestinal Endoscopy-Assisted Minimally Invasive Surgery for Superficial Cancer of the Uvula.

    PubMed

    Odagiri, Hiroyuki; Iizuka, Toshiro; Kikuchi, Daisuke; Kaise, Mitsuru; Takeda, Hidehiko; Ohashi, Kenichi; Yasunaga, Hideo

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies reported that endoscopic resection is effective for the treatment of superficial pharyngeal cancers, as for digestive tract cancers. However, the optimal treatment for superficial cancer of the uvula has not been established because of the rarity of this condition. We present two male patients in their 70s with superficial cancer of the uvula, detected with upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Both patients underwent surgical resection of the uvula under general anesthesia. The extent of the lesions was determined by means of gastrointestinal endoscopy by using magnifying observation with narrow-band imaging, enabling the performance of minimally invasive surgery. Endoscopic submucosal dissection was performed to achieve en bloc resection of the intramucosal carcinoma that had infiltrated the area adjacent to the uvula. Gastrointestinal endoscopists should carefully examine the laryngopharynx to avoid missing superficial cancers. Our minimally invasive treatment for superficial cancer of the uvula had favorable postoperative outcomes, and prevented postoperative loss of breathing, swallowing, and articulation functions.

  10. Surgery for Locally Recurrent Rectal Cancer: Tips, Tricks, and Pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Warrier, Satish K.; Heriot, Alexander G.; Lynch, Andrew Craig

    2016-01-01

    Rectal cancer can recur locally in up to 10% of the patients who undergo definitive resection for their primary cancer. Surgical salvage is considered appropriate in the curative setting as well as select cases with palliative intent. Disease-free survival following salvage resection is dependent upon achieving an R0 resection margin. A clear understanding of applied surgical anatomy, appropriate preoperative planning, and a multidisciplinary approach to aggressive soft tissue, bony, and vascular resection with appropriate reconstruction is necessary. Technical tips, tricks, and pitfalls that may assist in managing these cancers are discussed and the roles of additional boost radiation and intraoperative radiation therapy in the management of such cancers are also discussed. PMID:27247536

  11. Surgery for Locally Recurrent Rectal Cancer: Tips, Tricks, and Pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Warrier, Satish K; Heriot, Alexander G; Lynch, Andrew Craig

    2016-06-01

    Rectal cancer can recur locally in up to 10% of the patients who undergo definitive resection for their primary cancer. Surgical salvage is considered appropriate in the curative setting as well as select cases with palliative intent. Disease-free survival following salvage resection is dependent upon achieving an R0 resection margin. A clear understanding of applied surgical anatomy, appropriate preoperative planning, and a multidisciplinary approach to aggressive soft tissue, bony, and vascular resection with appropriate reconstruction is necessary. Technical tips, tricks, and pitfalls that may assist in managing these cancers are discussed and the roles of additional boost radiation and intraoperative radiation therapy in the management of such cancers are also discussed.

  12. Prescription of extended-duration thromboprophylaxis after high-risk, abdominopelvic cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Wright, Jason D; Chen, Ling; Jorge, Soledad; Burke, William M; Tergas, Ana I; Hou, June Y; Hu, Jim C; Neugut, Alfred I; Ananth, Cande V; Hershman, Dawn L

    2016-06-01

    Extended-duration thromboprophylaxis for 4weeks after discharge has been demonstrated to reduce venous thromboembolic events (VTE) in cancer patients undergoing abdominopelvic surgery and is recommended in national guidelines. We examined the utilization and effectiveness of extended-duration low molecular weight heparin prophylaxis in high-risk cancer patients. We analyzed patients with colon, ovarian, and uterine cancer who underwent surgery from 2009 to 2013 and who were recorded in the MarketScan database. Multivariable models and propensity score analysis with inverse probability of treatment weight were developed to examine uptake and predictors of use of post-discharge low molecular weight heparin (LMWH), as well as associated adverse events (transfusion, and hemorrhage). A total of 63,280 patients were identified. Use of extended-duration prophylaxis increased from 2009 to 2013 from 1.4% to 1.7% (P=0.67) for colectomy, 5.9% to 18.3% for ovarian cancer surgery (P<0.001), and 6.3% to 12.2% (P<0.001) for hysterectomy for endometrial cancer. There was no association between use of extended-duration prophylaxis and reductions in VTE for any of the procedures: colectomy (2.4% with extended-duration prophylaxis vs. 2.9% without prophylaxis, OR=0.84; 95% CI, 0.54-1.31), ovarian cancer-directed surgery (3.7% vs. 3.6%, OR=1.01; 95% CI, 0.76-1.33), hysterectomy (2.1% vs. 2.1%; OR=0.96; 95% CI, 0.67-1.38). Extended-duration prophylaxis was associated with an increased risk of adverse postoperative events: 2.20 (95% CI, 1.51-3.19) after colectomy, 1.24 (95% CI, 0.92-1.68) following ovarian cancer-directed surgery and 0.99 (95% CI, 0.66-1.48) for hysterectomy for endometrial cancer. Use of extended-duration thromboprophylaxis is low among high-risk cancer patients undergoing surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Three United Laparoscopic Surgery for the Treatment of Gastric Cardia Cancer-A Comparative Study with Laparotomy and Laparoscopy-Assisted Surgery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhanxue; Sun, Shuyuan; Qi, Jinchun; Qiu, Shaofan; Wang, Haijun; Ru, Lina; Lin, Lin; Li, Zhong; Zhao, Zongmao

    2017-02-01

    Gastric cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. We have invented a novel hand-assist device that allows the placement of surgical instruments and the maneuvering of the surgeon's hand, and we have established a new hand-assisted laparoscopic technique called Three United Laparoscopic Surgery (TULS) for laparoscopic dissection of advanced gastric cancer. The present study aimed at exploring the usefulness of TULS in the treatment of advanced gastric cardia cancer. A retrospective study on 100 patients with advanced gastric cardia cancer admitted from January 2014 to June 2015 was done. There were 38 cases of TULS, 30 cases of laparotomy, and 32 cases of laparoscopy-assisted surgery. Statistical comparisons between three treatment groups in operative time, incision length, amount of bleeding, number of lymph nodes dissected, time to flatus after surgery, rate of postoperative complications, hospital stay, and expense were done. For lymph node dissection, there were no significant differences between TULS, laparotomy, and laparoscopy-assisted surgery. However, compared with conventional laparotomy, TULS and laparoscopy-assisted surgery were found to be able to minimize incision length, reduce blood loss during surgery, lower postoperative complication rate, and shorten time to flatus and hospital stay. The differences were statistically significant (P < .05). The operative time of TULS was significantly shorter than that of the laparoscopy-assisted surgery (P < .05), and it was comparable to that of laparotomy. TULS is as efficient as laparotomy in lymph node dissection, and it shows the advantages of minimally invasive surgery. It can be considered a novel and promising surgical intervention for treatment of advanced gastric cancer.

  14. Robotic surgery for rectal cancer: current immediate clinical and oncological outcomes.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Sergio Eduardo Alonso; Seid, Victor Edmond; Klajner, Sidney

    2014-10-21

    Laparoscopic rectal surgery continues to be a challenging operation associated to a steep learning curve. Robotic surgical systems have dramatically changed minimally invasive surgery. Three-dimensional, magnified and stable view, articulated instruments, and reduction of physiologic tremors leading to superior dexterity and ergonomics. Therefore, robotic platforms could potentially address limitations of laparoscopic rectal surgery. It was aimed at reviewing current literature on short-term clinical and oncological (pathological) outcomes after robotic rectal cancer surgery in comparison with laparoscopic surgery. A systematic review was performed for the period 2002 to 2014. A total of 1776 patients with rectal cancer underwent minimally invasive robotic treatment in 32 studies. After robotic and laparoscopic approach to oncologic rectal surgery, respectively, mean operating time varied from 192-385 min, and from 158-297 min; mean estimated blood loss was between 33 and 283 mL, and between 127 and 300 mL; mean length of stay varied from 4-10 d; and from 6-15 d. Conversion after robotic rectal surgery varied from 0% to 9.4%, and from 0 to 22% after laparoscopy. There was no difference between robotic (0%-41.3%) and laparoscopic (5.5%-29.3%) surgery regarding morbidity and anastomotic complications (respectively, 0%-13.5%, and 0%-11.1%). Regarding immediate oncologic outcomes, respectively among robotic and laparoscopic cases, positive circumferential margins varied from 0% to 7.5%, and from 0% to 8.8%; the mean number of retrieved lymph nodes was between 10 and 20, and between 11 and 21; and the mean distal resection margin was from 0.8 to 4.7 cm, and from 1.9 to 4.5 cm. Robotic rectal cancer surgery is being undertaken by experienced surgeons. However, the quality of the assembled evidence does not support definite conclusions about most studies variables. Robotic rectal cancer surgery is associated to increased costs and operating time. It also seems to be

  15. Robotic surgery for rectal cancer: Current immediate clinical and oncological outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Sergio Eduardo Alonso; Seid, Victor Edmond; Klajner, Sidney

    2014-01-01

    Laparoscopic rectal surgery continues to be a challenging operation associated to a steep learning curve. Robotic surgical systems have dramatically changed minimally invasive surgery. Three-dimensional, magnified and stable view, articulated instruments, and reduction of physiologic tremors leading to superior dexterity and ergonomics. Therefore, robotic platforms could potentially address limitations of laparoscopic rectal surgery. It was aimed at reviewing current literature on short-term clinical and oncological (pathological) outcomes after robotic rectal cancer surgery in comparison with laparoscopic surgery. A systematic review was performed for the period 2002 to 2014. A total of 1776 patients with rectal cancer underwent minimally invasive robotic treatment in 32 studies. After robotic and laparoscopic approach to oncologic rectal surgery, respectively, mean operating time varied from 192-385 min, and from 158-297 min; mean estimated blood loss was between 33 and 283 mL, and between 127 and 300 mL; mean length of stay varied from 4-10 d; and from 6-15 d. Conversion after robotic rectal surgery varied from 0% to 9.4%, and from 0 to 22% after laparoscopy. There was no difference between robotic (0%-41.3%) and laparoscopic (5.5%-29.3%) surgery regarding morbidity and anastomotic complications (respectively, 0%-13.5%, and 0%-11.1%). Regarding immediate oncologic outcomes, respectively among robotic and laparoscopic cases, positive circumferential margins varied from 0% to 7.5%, and from 0% to 8.8%; the mean number of retrieved lymph nodes was between 10 and 20, and between 11 and 21; and the mean distal resection margin was from 0.8 to 4.7 cm, and from 1.9 to 4.5 cm. Robotic rectal cancer surgery is being undertaken by experienced surgeons. However, the quality of the assembled evidence does not support definite conclusions about most studies variables. Robotic rectal cancer surgery is associated to increased costs and operating time. It also seems to be

  16. Learning curve for robotic-assisted surgery for rectal cancer: use of the cumulative sum method.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Tomohiro; Kinugasa, Yusuke; Shiomi, Akio; Sato, Sumito; Yamakawa, Yushi; Kagawa, Hiroyasu; Tomioka, Hiroyuki; Mori, Keita

    2015-07-01

    Few data are available to assess the learning curve for robotic-assisted surgery for rectal cancer. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the learning curve for robotic-assisted surgery for rectal cancer by a surgeon at a single institute. From December 2011 to August 2013, a total of 80 consecutive patients who underwent robotic-assisted surgery for rectal cancer performed by the same surgeon were included in this study. The learning curve was analyzed using the cumulative sum method. This method was used for all 80 cases, taking into account operative time. Operative procedures included anterior resections in 6 patients, low anterior resections in 46 patients, intersphincteric resections in 22 patients, and abdominoperineal resections in 6 patients. Lateral lymph node dissection was performed in 28 patients. Median operative time was 280 min (range 135-683 min), and median blood loss was 17 mL (range 0-690 mL). No postoperative complications of Clavien-Dindo classification Grade III or IV were encountered. We arranged operative times and calculated cumulative sum values, allowing differentiation of three phases: phase I, Cases 1-25; phase II, Cases 26-50; and phase III, Cases 51-80. Our data suggested three phases of the learning curve in robotic-assisted surgery for rectal cancer. The first 25 cases formed the learning phase.

  17. Decision-Making in Breast Cancer Surgery: Where Do Patients Go for Information?

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Hank; Cohen, Almog; Mandeli, John; Weltz, Christina; Port, Elisa R

    2016-05-01

    Patient decision-making regarding breast cancer surgery is multifactorial, and patients derive information on surgical treatment options from a variety of sources which may have an impact on choice of surgery. We investigated the role of different information sources in patient decision-making regarding breast cancer surgery. Two hundred and sixty-eight patients with breast cancer, eligible for breast-conserving therapy were surveyed in the immediate preoperative period, and clinical data were also collected. This survey evaluated the scope and features of patient-driven research regarding their ultimate choice of surgical treatment. The two most common sources of information used by patients were written material from surgeons (199/268-74%) and the Internet (184/268-69%). There was a trend for women who chose bilateral mastectomy to use the Internet more frequently than those choosing unilateral mastectomy (P = 0.056). Number of surgeons consulted, genetic testing, and MRI were significant predictors of patient choice of mastectomy over breast-conserving therapy. Multivariate analysis showed that the number of surgeons consulted (P < 0.001) and genetic testing (P < 0.001) were independent predictors of choosing mastectomy, whereas MRI was not. In conclusions, understanding factors driving patient decision-making may promote more effective education for patients requiring breast cancer surgery.

  18. What is the problem in clinical application of sentinel node concept to gastric cancer surgery?

    PubMed

    Miyashiro, Isao

    2012-03-01

    More than ten years have passed since the sentinel node (SN) concept for gastric cancer surgery was first discussed. Less invasive modified surgical approaches based on the SN concept have already been put into practice for malignant melanoma and breast cancer, however the SN concept is not yet placed in a standard position in gastric cancer surgery even after two multi-institutional prospective clinical trials, the Japan Clinical Oncology Group trial (JCOG0302) and the Japanese Society for Sentinel Node Navigation Surgery (SNNS) trial. What is the problem in the clinical application of the SN concept to gastric cancer surgery? There is no doubt that we need reliable indicator(s) to determine with certainty the absence of metastasis in the lymph nodes in order to avoid unnecessary lymphadenectomy. There are several matters of debate in performing the actual procedure, such as the type of tracer, the site of injection, how to detect and harvest, how to detect metastases of SNs, and learning period. These issues have to be addressed further to establish the most suitable procedure. Novel technologies such as indocyanine green (ICG) fluorescence imaging and one-step nucleic acid amplification (OSNA) may overcome the current difficulties. Once we know what the problems are and how to tackle them, we can pursue the goal.

  19. American Thyroid Association Statement on Preoperative Imaging for Thyroid Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Andrew J.; Bernet, Victor A.; Ferris, Robert L.; Loevner, Laurie A.; Mandel, Susan J.; Orloff, Lisa A.; Randolph, Gregory W.; Steward, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The success of surgery for thyroid cancer hinges on thorough and accurate preoperative imaging, which enables complete clearance of the primary tumor and affected lymph node compartments. This working group was charged by the Surgical Affairs Committee of the American Thyroid Association to examine the available literature and to review the most appropriate imaging studies for the planning of initial and revision surgery for thyroid cancer. Summary: Ultrasound remains the most important imaging modality in the evaluation of thyroid cancer, and should be used routinely to assess both the primary tumor and all associated cervical lymph node basins preoperatively. Positive lymph nodes may be distinguished from normal nodes based upon size, shape, echogenicity, hypervascularity, loss of hilar architecture, and the presence of calcifications. Ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration of suspicious lymph nodes may be useful in guiding the extent of surgery. Cross-sectional imaging (computed tomography with contrast or magnetic resonance imaging) may be considered in select circumstances to better characterize tumor invasion and bulky, inferiorly located, or posteriorly located lymph nodes, or when ultrasound expertise is not available. The above recommendations are applicable to both initial and revision surgery. Functional imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) or PET-CT may be helpful in cases of recurrent cancer with positive tumor markers and negative anatomic imaging. PMID:25188202

  20. Combination of surgery and radiation in the treatment of cancer. A review

    SciTech Connect

    McLeod, D.A.; Thrall, D.E.

    1989-01-01

    Although radiation and surgery have been combined for the treatment of cancer in humans and animals since the 1920s, little has been written about the methods of combining radiation and surgery and the efficacy of this combination for the treatment of animal tumors. This article reviews the rationale for combining radiation and surgery for the treatment of cancer and the ways in which these two modalities can be combined with emphasis placed on the advantages and disadvantages of preoperative and postoperative radiotherapy. The role of preoperative and postoperative irradiation for the treatment of various animal tumors is discussed. Directions for future clinical trials are pointed out. Finally, the importance of surgeons and radiation oncologists communicating with each other and participating in cooperative treatment methods is stressed. 36 references.

  1. Video-assisted thoracic surgery for cancer after thoracic aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Lauren J; Adesoye, Taiwo; Maloney, James D

    2016-02-01

    Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery is increasingly accepted as an alternative to open thoracotomy and has established efficacy in the management of non-small-cell lung cancer, but the presence of extensive intrapleural adhesions has been considered a deterrent to a minimally invasive approach. We report the successful use of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery in 3 patients with history of open thoracic aortic aneurysm repair who presented with left lower lobe stage I non-small-cell lung cancer. While this approach is feasible, it is technically demanding and thus, at the present time, we recommend that its use be limited to high-volume video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery centers. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Characterization of a phantom setup for breast conserving cancer surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwell, Jacob T.; Conley, Rebekah H.; Collins, Jarrod A.; Meszoely, Ingrid M.; Miga, Michael I.

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop an anatomically and mechanically representative breast phantom for the validation of breast conserving surgical therapies, specifically, in this case, image guided surgeries. Using three patients scheduled for lumpectomy and four healthy volunteers in mock surgical presentations, the magnitude, direction, and location of breast deformations was analyzed. A phantom setup was then designed to approximate such deformations in a mock surgical environment. Specifically, commercially available and custom-built polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) phantoms were used to mimic breast tissue during surgery. A custom designed deformation apparatus was then created to reproduce deformations seen in typical clinical setups of the pre- and intra-operative breast geometry. Quantitative analysis of the human subjects yielded a positive correlation between breast volume and amount of breast deformation. Phantom results reflected similar behavior with the custom-built PVA phantom outperforming the commercial phantom.

  3. Minimally Invasive Surgery for the Treatment of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Karcz, W. Konrad; von Braun, William

    2016-01-01

    Background Reduction in operative trauma along with an improvement in endoscopic access has undoubtedly occupied surgical minds for at least the past 3 decades. It is not at all surprising that minimally invasive colon surgery has come a long way since the first laparoscopic appendectomy by Semm in 1981. It is common knowledge that the recent developments in video and robotic technologies have significantly furthered advancements in laparoscopic and minimally invasive surgery. This has led to the overall acceptance of the treatment of benign colorectal pathology via the endoscopic route. Malignant disease, however, is still primarily treated by conventional approaches. Methods and Results This review article is based on a literature search pertaining to advances in minimally invasive colorectal surgery for the treatment of malignant pathology, as well as on personal experience in the field over the same period of time. Our search was limited to level I and II clinical papers only, according to the evidence-based medicine guidelines. We attempted to present our unbiased view on the subject relying only on the evidence available. Conclusion Focusing on advances in colorectal minimally invasive surgery, it has to be stated that there are still a number of unanswered questions regarding the surgical management of malignant diseases with this approach. These questions do not only relate to the area of boundaries set for the use of minimally invasive techniques in this field but also to the exact modality best suited to the treatment of every particular case whilst maintaining state-of-the-art oncological principles. PMID:27493947

  4. Reconstructive Surgery for Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hanasono, Matthew M.

    2014-01-01

    The field of head and neck surgery has gone through numerous changes in the past two decades. Microvascular free flap reconstructions largely replaced other techniques. More importantly, there has been a paradigm shift toward seeking not only to achieve reliable wound closure to protect vital structures, but also to reestablish normal function and appearance. The present paper will present an algorithmic approach to head and neck reconstruction of various subsites, using an evidence-based approach wherever possible. PMID:26556426

  5. [Surgery of the thymus gland, normal, atrophied or cancerous].

    PubMed

    Limet, R; Rogister, B

    2000-10-01

    Thymoma is the most frequently resected mediastinal tumor. Its malignancy is related more to macroscopical findings than to microscopical analysis. All thymomas should be resected, in order to prevent malignant degeneration. Furthermore, for the treatment of myasthenia, several centers recommend resection of the thymus, either tumoral (thymoma) or atrophied. Although the role of surgery in this regard is controversial, all authors unanimously stress that complete resection of all thymic remnants is essential to achieve adequate results.

  6. Thyroid cancer in Graves' disease: is surgery the best treatment for Graves' disease?

    PubMed

    Tamatea, Jade A U; Tu'akoi, Kelson; Conaglen, John V; Elston, Marianne S; Meyer-Rochow, Goswin Y

    2014-04-01

    Graves' disease is a common cause of thyrotoxicosis. Treatment options include anti-thyroid medications or definitive therapy: thyroidectomy or radioactive iodine (I(131) ). Traditionally, I(131) has been the preferred definitive treatment for Graves' disease in New Zealand. Reports of concomitant thyroid cancer occurring in up to 17% of Graves' patients suggest surgery, if performed with low morbidity, may be the preferred option. The aim of this study was to determine the rate of thyroid cancer and surgical outcomes in a New Zealand cohort of patients undergoing thyroidectomy for Graves' disease. This study is a retrospective review of Waikato region patients undergoing thyroid surgery for Graves' disease during the 10-year period prior to 1 December 2011. A total of 833 patients underwent thyroid surgery. Of these, 117 were for Graves' disease. Total thyroidectomy was performed in 82, near-total in 33 and subtotal in 2 patients. Recurrent thyrotoxicosis developed in one subtotal patient requiring I(131) therapy. There were two cases of permanent hypoparathyroidism and one of permanent recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy. Eight patients (6.8%) had thyroid cancer detected, none of whom had overt nodal disease. Five were papillary microcarcinomas (one of which was multifocal), two were papillary carcinomas (11 mm and 15 mm) and one was a minimally invasive follicular carcinoma. Thyroid cancer was identified in approximately 7% of patients undergoing surgery for Graves' disease. A low complication rate (<2%) of permanent hypoparathyroidism and nerve injury (<1%) supports surgery being a safe alternative to I(131) especially for patients with young children, ophthalmopathy or compressive symptoms. © 2012 The Authors. ANZ Journal of Surgery © 2012 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  7. [Interrelations of Objective Conditions on Psychiatric Wards and Ward Climate Characteristics].

    PubMed

    Schalast, Norbert; Sieß, Julia

    2017-04-03

    Objective Investigate inter-relations of objective conditions and a ward's social climate. Method Staff and patients on 104 wards filled in the short Essen Climate Evaluation Schema (EssenCES). Assessments were related to setting variables (like open vs. closed wards, forensic vs. general psychiatric wards, ward size, staffing). Results Setting variables and climate characteristics are strongly associated. Conclusions The EssenCES, originally catered for forensic settings, proved to be useful to characterize general psychiatric wards. A number of suggestions regarding relevant setting conditions are clearly confirmed (like staffing level; open vs. closed wards). Remarkably, staff experience a higher level of Safety on forensic than on general psychiatric wards. Patients' Cohesion and Therapeutic Hold are rated higher on general psychiatric wards. Heterogeneity of patients (vs. specialization of wards) is not positively related to climate characteristics; staff experiences less Safety on non-specialized wards.

  8. N2-IIIA non-small cell lung cancer: a plea for surgery!

    PubMed Central

    Renaud, Stéphane; Reeb, Jérémie; Santelmo, Nicola; Olland, Anne; Falcoz, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Management of stage IIIA-N2 non-small cell lung cancer is still matter of ongoing controversy. The debate is flawed by the heterogeneity of this group of patients, lack of strong evidence from controlled trials, diverging treatment strategies, and hesitating estimation of prognosis. Surgery is credited a survival advantage in a trimodality setting. For many teams, N2 is by principle managed with induction chemotherapy, followed by surgery if the patient is down-staged. However, surgery remains a suitable option even in case of persistent N2. On the other hand, outcomes are comparable, regardless whether chemotherapy has been given as induction or adjuvant treatment. Hence, upfront surgery without invasive staging, followed by adjuvant therapies, appears reasonable in resectable single station N2 disease, simplifying patient care and reducing cost. We expect that molecular biomarkers will improve estimation of prognosis and patient selection in the future. PMID:27942406

  9. The changing role of surgery in the treatment of primary liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Tang, Z Y; Yu, Y Q; Zhou, X D

    1986-01-01

    For decades, the role of surgery in the treatment of primary liver cancer (PLC) was important but limited. However, a comparison of pathologically proven PLC during the three periods 1958-1966, 1967-1975, and 1976-1984 revealed that as a result of alpha fetoprotein (AFP) serosurvey, changing concepts in surgical oncology, and introduction of new surgical modalities, the role of surgery has become greater. The increasing proportion of subclinical PLC (0, 7.2, and 21.2%) has favored the increasing series resection rate (16.1, 34.7, and 39.6%) and palliative surgery (13.7, 17.0, and 29.8%). The results indicated that early resection, reoperation for subclinical recurrence, resection of huge PLC in stages, and combination of palliative surgery other than resection might be responsible for the increasing 5-year survival rate (1.7, 7.1, and 19.5%) in the entire series.

  10. 17-Week Delay Surgery after Chemoradiation in Rectal Cancer with Complete Pathological Response

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Marisa D.; Gomes, Manuel T.; Moreno, Filipa; Rocha, Anabela; Lopes, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiation (CRT) followed by curative surgery still remains the standard of care for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). The main purpose of this multimodal treatment is to achieve a complete pathological tumor response (ypCR), with better survival. The surgery delay after CRT completion seems to increase tumor response and ypCR rate. Usually, time intervals range from 8 to 12 weeks, but the maximum tumor regression may not be seen in rectal adenocarcinomas until several months after CRT. About this issue, we report a case of a 52-year-old man with LARC treated with neoadjuvant CRT who developed, one month after RT completion, an acute myocardial infarction. The need to increase the interval between CRT and surgery for 17 weeks allowed a curative surgery without morbidity and an unexpected complete tumor response in the resected specimen (given the parameters presented in pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed 11 weeks after radiotherapy completion). PMID:26579325

  11. Comparison of neoadjuvant versus a surgery first approach for gastric and esophagogastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Russell, Maria C

    2016-09-01

    Gastric cancer remains a significant worldwide health concern. While surgery is required for cure, all but the earliest of cancers will require multimodality therapy. Chemotherapy and chemoradiation in the neoadjuvant and adjuvant settings have shown to improve overall survival, but the sequencing of treatment is controversial. As healthcare expenses surge, it is increasingly important to impart value to these treatments. This review will look at the intersection of effective treatment and costs for gastric cancer. J. Surg. Oncol. 2016;114:296-303. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Video-assisted thoracic surgery lobectomy for lung cancer: the point at issue.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Yoshinori; Harada, Hiroaki; Misumi, Keizo

    2011-03-01

    Among the four subjects addressed in this article, the definition of video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) lobectomy is fundamentally the point at issue, which leads to various obstacles for upcoming clinical trials. It is strongly expected that VATS lobectomy will be identified as a standard operation for primary lung cancer with confirmed clinical evidence. Standard surgical procedure with a certain oncological validity for lung cancer should be minimally invasive, safe, and technically simple for general thoracic surgeons. In conclusion, most patients with resectable lung cancer will be able to benefit from a validated painless VATS lobectomy in the near future.

  13. Efficacy of Surgery and Adjuvant Therapy in Older Patients With Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lie; Ma, Qin; Yu, Yong-Yang; Wang, Cun; Meng, Wen-Jian; Adell, Gunnar; Albertsson, Maria; Arbman, Gunnar; Jarlsfelt, Ingvar; Peng, Zhi-Hai; Li, Yuan; Zhou, Zong-Guang; Sun, Xiao-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The present study aimed to assess the efficacy of surgery and adjuvant therapy in older patients (age ≥70 years) with colorectal cancer (CRC). Older CRC patients are under-represented in available clinical trials, and therefore their outcomes after receiving surgery and adjuvant therapy are unclear. From two prospective Swedish databases, we assessed a cohort of 1021 patients who underwent curative surgery for stage I, II, or III primary CRC, with or without adjuvant chemotherapy/radiotherapy. Of the patients with colon cancer (n = 467), 182 (39%) were aged <70 years, 162 (35%) aged 70 to 80 years, and 123 (26%) were aged ≥80 years. Of rectal cancer patients (n = 554), 264 (48%) were aged <70 years, 234 (42%) aged 70 to 80 years, and 56 (10%) aged ≥80 years. Older patients with either colon or rectal cancer had higher comorbidity than did younger patients. Older patients with colon cancer had equivalent postoperative morbidity and 30-day mortality to younger patients. Rectal cancer patients aged ≥80 years had a higher 30-day mortality than younger patients (odds ratio [OR], 2.37; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.6–4.55; P = 0.03). For either colon or rectal cancer, adjuvant chemotherapy compromised the 5-year overall survival (OS) of older patients with stage II disease and had no effect on those with stage III disease. Receiving adjuvant chemotherapy was a poor factor of OS for older patients with either colon (HR 1.88, 95% CI: 1.20–4.35, P = 0.03) or rectal cancer (HR 1.72, 95% CI: 1.05–2.26, P = 0.004). Preoperative short-course radiotherapy improved both OS and local control for older patients with stage III rectal cancer and had no effect on those with stage II disease. Radiotherapy was a favorable factor for the OS of the older patients with rectal cancer (HR 0.42, 95% CI: 0.21–3.57, P = 0.01). In conclusion, Older CRC patients had equal safety of surgery as younger patients, except rectal cancer patients aged

  14. Long-term survival after endoscopic resection for early gastric cancer in the remnant stomach: comparison with radical surgery

    PubMed Central

    Yamashina, Takeshi; Uedo, Noriya; Dainaka, Katsuyuki; Aoi, Kenji; Matsuura, Noriko; Ito, Takashi; Fujii, Mototsugu; Kanesaka, Takashi; Yamamoto, Sachiko; Akasaka, Tomofumi; Hanaoka, Noboru; Takeuchi, Yoji; Higashino, Koji; Ishihara, Ryu; Kishi, Kentaro; Fujiwara, Yoshiyuki; Iishi, Hiroyasu

    2015-01-01

    Background Endoscopic resection (ER) has recently become standard treatment, even for early gastric cancer (EGC) in the remnant stomach. We aimed to compare long-term survival after ER versus radical surgery for EGC in the remnant stomach. Methods We retrospectively compared overall and cause-specific survival of patients who had undergone ER or radical surgery for EGC in the remnant stomach from 1998 to 2012. Results During the study period, 32 patients with intramucosal (M), two with shallow submucosal (SM1) and eight with deep submucosal (SM2) cancers had undergone ER (ER group) whereas six with M and seven with SM2 cancers had undergone surgery (surgery group). All patients were followed up for a median of 60 months; during follow up, 15 patients died, including three in the ER group with SM2 cancer who died of gastric cancer. The overall 5-year survival rates of M-SM1 and SM2 cancer patients in the ER and surgery groups were 89%, 48%, 80%, and 67%, respectively (P=0.079). The disease-specific 5-year survival rates of M-SM1 and SM2 cancer patients in the ER and surgery groups were 100%, 48%, 100%, and 100%, respectively (P=0.000). Operation time and hospital stay were significantly shorter in the ER than the surgery group (P<0.001). Grade 2 perforation occurred in two patients in the ER group and Grade 3 anastomotic leakage in two patients in the surgery group. Conclusion ER provides excellent outcomes, comparable with those of radical surgery, in patients with M-SM1 gastric cancer in the remnant stomach; however, patients with SM2 cancer require radical surgery. PMID:25608929

  15. A Preoperative Personalized Risk Assessment Calculator for Elderly Ovarian Cancer Patients undergoing Primary Cytoreductive Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Emma L; Rutstein, Sarah; Miller, William C; Gehrig, Paola A

    2015-01-01

    Objective Cytoreductive surgery for ovarian cancer has higher rates of postoperative complication than neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgery. If patients at high risk of postoperative complication were identified preoperatively, primary therapy could be tailored. Our objective was to develop a predictive model to estimate the risk of major postoperative complication after primary cytoreductive surgery among elderly ovarian cancer patients. Methods Patients who underwent primary surgery for ovarian cancer between 2005-2013 were identified from the National Surgical Quality Improvement Project. Patients were selected using primary procedure CPT codes. Major complications were defined as grade 3 or higher complications on the validated Claviden-Dindo scale. Using logistic regression, we identified demographic and clinical characteristics predictive of postoperative complication. Results We identified 2,101 ovarian cancer patients of whom 35.9% were older than 65. Among women older than 65, the rate of major postoperative complication was 16.4%. Complications were directly associated with preoperative laboratory values (serum creatinine, platelets, white blood cell count, hematocrit), ascites, white race, and smoking status, and indirectly associated with albumin. Our predictive model had an area under receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.725. In order to not deny patients necessary surgery, we chose a 50% population rate of postoperative complication which produced model sensitivity of 9.8% and specificity of 98%. Discussion Our predictive model uses easily and routinely obtained objective preoperative factors to estimate the risk of postoperative complication among elderly ovarian cancer patients. This information can be used to assess risk, manage postoperative expectations, and make decisions regarding initial treatment. PMID:26432038

  16. Impact of Recurrence and Salvage Surgery on Survival After Multidisciplinary Treatment of Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ikoma, Naruhiko; You, Y Nancy; Bednarski, Brian K; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A; Eng, Cathy; Das, Prajnan; Kopetz, Scott; Messick, Craig; Skibber, John M; Chang, George J

    2017-08-10

    Purpose After preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by total mesorectal excision for locally advanced rectal cancer, patients who experience local or systemic relapse of disease may be eligible for curative salvage surgery, but the benefit of this surgery has not been fully investigated. The purpose of this study was to characterize recurrence patterns and investigate the impact of salvage surgery on survival in patients with rectal cancer after receiving multidisciplinary treatment. Patients and Methods Patients with locally advanced (cT3-4 or cN+) rectal cancer who were treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by total mesorectal excision at our institution during 1993 to 2008 were identified. We examined patterns of recurrence location, time to recurrence, treatment factors, and survival. Results A total of 735 patients were included. Tumors were mostly midrectal to lower rectal cancer, with a median distance from the anal verge of 5.0 cm. The most common recurrence site was the lung followed by the liver. Median time to recurrence was shorter in liver-only recurrence (11.2 months) than in lung-only recurrence (18.2 months) or locoregional-only recurrence (24.7 months; P = .001). Salvage surgery was performed in 57% of patients with single-site recurrence and was associated with longer survival after recurrence in patients with lung-only and liver-only recurrence ( P < .001) but not in those with locoregional-only recurrence ( P = .353). Conclusion We found a predilection for lung recurrence in patients with rectal cancer after multidisciplinary treatment. Salvage surgery was associated with prolonged survival in patients with lung-only and liver-only recurrence, but not in those with locoregional recurrence, which demonstrates a need for careful consideration of the indications for resection.

  17. Cost-effectiveness of risk-reducing surgeries in preventing hereditary breast and ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Schrauder, Michael G; Brunel-Geuder, Lisa; Häberle, Lothar; Wunderle, Marius; Hoyer, Juliane; Reis, André; Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger; Beckmann, Matthias W; Lux, Michael P

    2017-04-01

    Risk-reducing surgeries are a feasible option for mitigating the risk in individuals with inherited susceptibility to cancer, but are the procedures cost-effective in the current health-care system in Germany? This study compared the health-care costs for bilateral risk-reducing mastectomy (BRRM) and risk-reducing (bilateral) salpingo-oophorectomy (RRSO) with cancer treatment costs that could potentially be prevented. The analysis is based on interdisciplinary consultations with individuals with a high familial risk for breast and ovarian cancer at the University Breast Center for Franconia (Germany) between 2009 and 2013 (370 consultations; 44 patients with BRCA1 mutations and 26 with BRCA2 mutations). Health-care costs for risk-reducing surgeries in BRCA mutation carriers were calculated as reimbursements in the German diagnosis-related groups (DRG) hospital pricing system. These costs for the health-care system were compared with the potential cancer treatment costs that could possibly be prevented by risk-reducing surgeries. Long-term health-care costs can be reduced by risk-reducing surgeries after genetic testing in BRCA mutation carriers. The health-care system in Germany would have saved € 136,295 if BRRM had been performed and € 791,653 if RRSO had been performed before the development of cancer in only 50% of the 70 mutation carriers seen in our center. Moreover, in patients with combined RRSO and BRRM (without breast reconstruction), one further life-year for a 40-year-old BRCA mutation carrier would cost € 2,183. Intensive care, including risk-reducing surgeries in BRCA mutation carriers, is cost-effective from the point of view of the health-care system in Germany. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Changes in Symptom Occurrence and Severity Before and After Lung Cancer Surgery.

    PubMed

    Oksholm, Trine; Miaskowski, Christine; Solberg, Steinar; Lie, Irene; Cooper, Bruce; Paul, Steven M; Kongerud, Johny Steinar; Rustoen, Tone

    2015-01-01

    Patients need information about the course of recovery after surgery for lung cancer, but knowledge about symptoms in this period is limited. The purpose of this study was to assess for changes in symptom occurrence rates and severity scores from the preoperative period to 1 month after surgery. Patients (n = 228) completed questionnaires before and at 1 month after surgery. McNemar tests were used to evaluate for changes over time in symptom occurrence rates and paired t tests for changes in symptom severity scores. General linear model was used to determine if select demographic and clinical characteristics were associated with the number of symptoms after surgery. The total number of symptoms increased significantly from the preoperative (mean, 9.4) to the postoperative (mean, 13.1) assessment. Of the 11 symptoms that occurred in 50% or more of the patients 1 month after surgery, 8 increased significantly in both occurrence and severity. Four symptoms were experienced by more than 80% of the patients 1 month after surgery: shortness of breath (85.5%), lack of energy (83.8%), pain (83.8%), and feeling drowsy (82.5%). Patients experienced a high number of symptoms after lung cancer surgery. The only characteristic that was associated with a higher number of symptoms 1 month after surgery was the number of symptoms reported preoperatively. These findings can be used to educate patients about the normal course of postoperative recovery. Clinicians need to assess for these symptoms and develop effective interventions to improve symptom management for these patients.

  19. Enhanced identification and functional protective role of carbon nanoparticles on parathyroid in thyroid cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Chenlei; Tian, Bo; Li, Shengze; Shi, Tiefeng; Qin, Huadong; Liu, Shaoyan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to determine the effects of nanocarbon particles in combination with meticulous capsular dissection on enhancing the identification and protecting the function of parathyroid glands in thyroid cancer surgery. The data of 97 patients with papillary thyroid tumors diagnosed and treated at the Second Affiliated Hospital, Harbin Medical University between January 2014 and February 2015 were reviewed. Data regarding the sex, age, calcium and parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels, tumor size, multifocality, T stage, and extrathyroid invasion were collected. The incidence of surgeries in which the parathyroid glands were cut mistakenly, the concentration of serum calcium and parathyroid hormone before surgery (baseline) and after surgery on days 1, 3, and 7, and 1 and 6 months in the patients of the two groups (the nanocarbon and control groups) were analyzed. Fifty-two patients underwent meticulous capsular dissection combined with nanocarbon treatment (nanocarbon group), and 45 underwent meticulous capsular dissection alone (control group). The nanocarbon group showed a significantly higher total and average number of revealed parathyroid glands (average number is the mean for different individuals have different number) and a lower incidence of the parathyroid glands being mistakenly cut, in addition to a lower level of hypoparathyroidism than control group following surgery (P < 0.05). Serum calcium and PTH levels were significantly lower in patients from both groups after surgery on days 1, 3, and 7 and after 1 month, compared with the preoperative levels (P < 0.05). Compared with the control group, the serum calcium and PTH levels were significantly higher in the nanocarbon group after surgery on days 1, 3, 7, than in the control group. Treatment with nanocarbon in combination with meticulous capsular dissection can significantly facilitate the identification of the parathyroid in thyroid cancer surgery, reduce the risk of

  20. Patient experiences and outcomes following facial skin cancer surgery: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Erica H; Klassen, Anne F; Lawson, Jessica L; Cano, Stefan J; Scott, Amie M; Pusic, Andrea L

    2016-08-01

    Early melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer of the facial area are primarily treated with surgery. Little is known about the outcomes of treatment for facial skin cancer patients. The objective of the study was to identify concerns about aesthetics, procedures and health from the patients' perspective after facial skin surgery. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with 15 participants. Line-by-line coding was used to establish categories and develop themes. We identified five major themes on the impact of skin cancer surgery: appearance-related concerns; psychological (e.g., fear of new cancers or recurrence); social (e.g. impact on social activities and interaction); physical (e.g. pain and swelling) concerns and satisfaction with the experience of care (e.g., satisfaction with surgeon). The priority of participants was the removal of the facial skin cancer, as this reduced their overall worry. The aesthetic outcome was secondary but important, as it had important implications on the participants' social and psychological functioning. The participants' experience with the care provided by the surgeon and staff also contributed to their satisfaction with their treatment. This conceptual framework provides the basis for the development of a new patient-reported outcome instrument. © 2015 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  1. Breast cancer surgery: an historical narrative. Part I. From prehistoric times to Renaissance.

    PubMed

    Sakorafas, George H; Safioleas, Michael

    2009-11-01

    Cancer was known as a disease since prehistoric times. Management of breast cancer evolved slowly through centuries in the ancient world up to the Renaissance. This period is marked by the absence of any scientifically verifiable understanding of the true nature of cancer and its natural history and consequently by a lack of effective treatment. Breast has been considered as a symbol of femininity, fertility and beauty. Hippocrates proposed that breast cancer, among other neoplasms, was a 'systemic disease' caused by an excess of black bile. The humoral theory was further supported by Galen and dominated for centuries in medicine. Fulguration and breast amputation by using various instruments to achieve a rapid operation were widely used up to the 18th century. The Renaissance was a revolutionary period, since it stimulated medical practice; at that time physicians started to scientifically study medicine. Vesalius greatly contributed in the advancement of surgery, and he vigorously opposed Galen's doctrines. Many great surgeons of that time (including Paré, Cabrol, Servetto, Scultetus, Tulp, Fabry von Hilded, etc.) advanced the science of surgery. Interestingly, Bartoleny Gabrol (1590) in Montpellier advocated radical mastectomy, which was popularised by Halsted, 300 years later. However, the lack of anaesthesia and the problem of wound infections (due to the lack of the aseptic techniques) generated significance and often problems for the surgeons of that time. Surgery was often 'heroic' but primitive and even inhumane by current standards. Therapeutic nihilism was the prevailing altitude regarding breast cancer, at least among the vast majority of surgeons.

  2. Pleural Photodynamic Therapy and Surgery in Lung Cancer and Thymoma Patients with Pleural Spread.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ke-Cheng; Hsieh, Yi-Shan; Tseng, Ying-Fan; Shieh, Ming-Jium; Chen, Jin-Shing; Lai, Hong-Shiee; Lee, Jang-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Pleural spread is difficult to treat in malignancies, especially in lung cancer and thymoma. Monotherapy with surgery fails to have a better survival benefit than palliative chemotherapy, the currently accepted treatment. Photodynamic therapy utilizes a photosensitizer to target the tumor site, and the tumor is exposed to light after performing a pleurectomy and tumor resection. However, the benefits of this procedure to lung cancer or thymoma patients are unknown. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes of patients with lung cancer or thymoma with pleural seeding who underwent pleural photodynamic therapy and surgery between 2005 and 2013. Eighteen patients enrolled in this study. The mean patient age was 52.9 ± 12.2 years. Lung cancer was the inciting cancer of pleural dissemination in 10 patients (55.6%), and thymoma in 8 (44.4%). There was no procedure-related mortality. Using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, the 3-year survival rate and the 5-year survival rate were 68.9% and 57.4%, respectively. We compared the PDT lung cancer patients with those receiving chemotherapy or target therapy (n = 51) and found that the PDT group had better survival than non-PDT patients (mean survival time: 39.0 versus 17.6 months; P = .047). With proper patient selection, radical surgical resection combined with intrapleural photodynamic therapy for pleural spread in patients with non-small cell lung cancer or thymoma is feasible and may provide a survival benefit.

  3. Surgery for esophageal cancer: goals of resection and optimizing outcomes.

    PubMed

    Rizk, Nabil

    2013-11-01

    Determining what defines an adequate esophageal resection to optimize long-term outcomes in esophageal cancer is an elusive goal. The primary reason for this ambiguousness is the almost total lack of good quality prospective randomized surgical trials that examine this question adequately. Most available data are derived from small retrospective series typically representing single institution series and their treatment biases. The intent of this article is to identify the goals of an appropriate esophagectomy for cancer, essentially defining the targets that should be achieved from an operation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Reviving post-take surgical ward round teaching.

    PubMed

    Force, Jade; Thomas, Ian; Buckley, Frances

    2014-04-01

    Learning in the clinical environment is an important feature of medical education. Ward-round teaching leads to relevant, applied and lasting learning of knowledge, skills and attitudes; however, on fast-paced ward rounds in specialties such as general surgery, the student experience is often suboptimal, and teaching can be overlooked. Clinical teaching fellows (CTFs) are postgraduate doctors ranging from foundation year-2 (FY2) level through to specialty trainees, who have elected to spend up to 2 years out of the programme to teach medical undergraduates. This article explores whether CTFs can successfully support the regular delivery of undergraduate medical teaching on the busy post-take surgical ward round (PTSWR). The CTFs at Raigmore Hospital, Inverness, planned and facilitated weekly, structured teaching sessions to accompany the PTSWR. This educational intervention was evaluated using pre- and post-intervention student questionnaires. The questionnaires focused on student enjoyment and depth of learning using Likert scales and free-text components. Students were also asked about barriers to learning on typical PTSWRs. The consultant surgeons leading on these rounds were issued separate questionnaires, to gauge their evaluation of CTF support. The main barrier to effective undergraduate ward round teaching was a lack of time on the part of clinical staff. Ward rounds accompanied by CTF support significantly increased student enjoyment (p < 0.0001) and perceived learning (p < 0.0001). Consultant surgeons were supportive of the teaching initiative. Support from CTFs on busy PTSWRs optimised student satisfaction, and was welcomed by clinical staff. CTF support could be widened to other busy ward rounds, e.g. acute medical takes, to enhance student learning and reduce the teaching burden on clinical faculty staff. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Indications for surgery and significance of unrecognized cancer in endemic multinodular goiter.

    PubMed

    Lasithiotakis, Konstantinos; Grisbolaki, Evangelia; Koutsomanolis, Dimosthenis; Venianaki, Maria; Petrakis, Ioannis; Vrachassotakis, Nikolaos; Chrysos, Emanuel; Zoras, Odysseas; Chalkiadakis, George

    2012-06-01

    The exclusion of cancer in endemic goiter is often difficult mainly because of the high number of nodules and the as-yet unclear natural history of diagnosed cancer in endemic goiter patients. In a large number of consecutive patients who were to undergo total thyroidectomy for endemic multinodular goiter, we assessed indications for surgery and thyroid cancer outcome. All patients who were to undergo total thyroidectomy for diffuse multinodular goiter on histological examination between January 1990 and October 2008 were evaluated. Of the 1,161 patients included in the study, 252 were cases of thyroid cancer (21.7%). Sensitivity of thyroid ultrasound (US) and fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) for cancer detection was 30.3 and 64.1%, respectively. Differentiated thyroid carcinoma accounted for most of the tumors (96%), with 54.8% of them being papillary microcarcinomas, while bilateral-multicentric cancer occurred in 20.3%. In multivariate analysis, younger age (p = 0.06), sonographic findings (p = 0.03), and presence of histological thyroiditis (p = 0.09) were independently associated with the occurrence of tumors with diameter greater than 2 cm. The percentage of transient and permanent postoperative complications were approximately 25 and below 2%, respectively. After a median follow-up time of 78.5 months, overall recurrence rate was 6.7% and disease-specific mortality was 1.2%. As US and FNAC did not consistently detect cancer in patients with diffuse multinodular goiter in our endemic area, evidence-based indications for surgery in this group of patients is needed, although radical surgery and favorable tumor histology offer favorable outcomes in commonly diagnosed thyroid cancer after total thyroidectomy for endemic multinodular goiter.

  6. Postoperative complications after thoracic surgery for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Maugeri, Laura; Corbo, Giuseppe Maria; Valente, Salvatore

    2004-01-01

    Postoperative complications and related risk factors after lung reduction surgery are analyzed based on a review of the literature. In particular the pathogenesis of some of postoperative respiratory disorders is carefully assessed. Most commonly cardiac arrhythmias, respiratory failure, bronchopleural fistula are observed. Main risk factors for postoperative complications are old age, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, coronary disease, poor nutritional state, neoadjuvant therapy. Attention should be paid to all these factors, both in preoperative assessment and postoperative care, to prevent and promptly treat postoperative complications.

  7. What is the future of axillary surgery for breast cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, M; Douek, M

    2013-01-01

    The Z11 trial demonstrated a subgroup of patients with low axillary burden who do not benefit from axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) at short-term follow-up when treated with adjuvant whole-breast radiotherapy and systemic therapy. We consider the role of sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) and look at and beyond the Z11 trial to consider further imaging studies, which may offer truly minimally invasive management of the axilla and relegate SLNB to the realms of history. Regional lymph node status provides information regarding staging, local control, and prognostic outcomes in all cancers. This information was provided in breast cancer by axillary lymph node dissection (ALND). This changed with the development of sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) [1, 2]. Sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) are defined as the first lymph nodes receiving lymphatic drainage from the primary tumour and therefore the most likely to harbour metastatic cancer via lymphatic spread. SLNB is now the standard of care in patients with a clinically and radiologically clear axilla in early-stage breast cancer. PMID:23717340

  8. Rates of breast cancer surgery in Canada from 2007/08 to 2009/10: retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Wagar, Brandon; Bryant, Heather; Hewitt, Maria; Wai, Elaine; Dabbs, Kelly; McFarlane, Anne; Rahal, Rami

    2014-01-01

    Background Surgery is a common and important component of breast cancer treatment. We assessed the rates of breast cancer surgery across Canada from 2007/08 to 2009/10. Methods We used hospital and day surgery data from the Canadian Institute for Health Information to assemble a cohort of women who had undergone breast cancer surgery. We identified the index surgical procedure and subsequent surgical procedures performed within 1 year for each woman included in the analysis. We calculated the crude mastectomy rate for each province, and we calculated the adjusted mastectomy rate for select jurisdictions using a logistic regression model fitted using age, neighbourhood income quintile and travel time. Results In total, 57 840 women underwent breast cancer surgery during the study period. Among women with unilateral invasive breast cancer, the crude mastectomy rate was 39%. Adjusted rates for mastectomy varied widely by province (26%–69%). The rate of re-excision within 1 year for women who had breast-conserving surgery as their index procedure was 23% and varied by province in terms of frequency and type (mastectomy or repeat breast-conserving surgery). Among women who underwent mastectomy for unilateral invasive breast cancer, 6% also underwent contralateral prophylactic mastectomy, and 7% had immediate breast reconstruction following surgery. Of mastectomy procedures, 20% were performed as day surgery; for breast-conserving surgery, 70% were performed as day surgery. Interpretation There is substantial interprovincial variation in surgical care for breast cancer in Canada. Further research is needed to better understand such variation, and continued monitoring should be the focus of quality initiatives. PMID:25077125

  9. Rates of breast cancer surgery in Canada from 2007/08 to 2009/10: retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Porter, Geoff; Wagar, Brandon; Bryant, Heather; Hewitt, Maria; Wai, Elaine; Dabbs, Kelly; McFarlane, Anne; Rahal, Rami

    2014-04-01

    Surgery is a common and important component of breast cancer treatment. We assessed the rates of breast cancer surgery across Canada from 2007/08 to 2009/10. We used hospital and day surgery data from the Canadian Institute for Health Information to assemble a cohort of women who had undergone breast cancer surgery. We identified the index surgical procedure and subsequent surgical procedures performed within 1 year for each woman included in the analysis. We calculated the crude mastectomy rate for each province, and we calculated the adjusted mastectomy rate for select jurisdictions using a logistic regression model fitted using age, neighbourhood income quintile and travel time. In total, 57 840 women underwent breast cancer surgery during the study period. Among women with unilateral invasive breast cancer, the crude mastectomy rate was 39%. Adjusted rates for mastectomy varied widely by province (26%-69%). The rate of re-excision within 1 year for women who had breast-conserving surgery as their index procedure was 23% and varied by province in terms of frequency and type (mastectomy or repeat breast-conserving surgery). Among women who underwent mastectomy for unilateral invasive breast cancer, 6% also underwent contralateral prophylactic mastectomy, and 7% had immediate breast reconstruction following surgery. Of mastectomy procedures, 20% were performed as day surgery; for breast-conserving surgery, 70% were performed as day surgery. There is substantial interprovincial variation in surgical care for breast cancer in Canada. Further research is needed to better understand such variation, and continued monitoring should be the focus of quality initiatives.

  10. Improving outcomes for operable pancreatic cancer: is access to safer surgery the problem?

    PubMed

    Chang, David K; Merrett, Neil D; Biankin, Andrew V

    2008-07-01

    Despite advances in the understanding and treatment of pancreatic cancer in the last two decades, there is a persisting nihilistic attitude among clinicians. An alarmingly high rate of under-utilization of surgical management for operable pancreatic cancer was recently reported in the USA, where more than half of patients with stage 1 operable disease and no other contraindications were not offered surgery as therapy, denying this group of patients a 20% chance of long-term survival. These data indicate that a nihilistic attitude among clinicians may be a significant and reversible cause of the persisting high mortality of patients with pancreatic cancer. This article examines the modern management of pancreatic cancer, in particular, the advances in surgical care that have reduced the mortality of pancreatectomy to almost that of colonic resection, and outlines a strategy for improving outcomes for patients with pancreatic cancer now and in the future.

  11. Cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy for treatment of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Polom, Karol; Roviello, Giandomenico; Generali, Daniele; Marano, Luigi; Petrioli, Roberto; Marsili, Stefania; Caputo, Edda; Marrelli, Daniele; Roviello, Franco

    2016-05-01

    Hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC), a strategy combining maximal cytoreductive surgery and maximal regional chemotherapy, has been applied to treat ovarian cancer resulting in long-term survival rates in selected patients. However, the status of HIPEC in ovarian cancer remains an experimental procedure, given the many variables among the data and trials reviewed, to enable us to derive strong conclusions about its role from this overview. In this review we discuss treatment with HIPEC in patients with ovarian cancer and future prospective of its use in clinical setting. HIPEC is an effective tool in the treatment of selected patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis from ovarian cancer. Unfortunately, due to the lack of randomised trials, the evidence of HIPEC is very limited. Future randomised studies are awaited to define the role and clinical impact of HIPEC in ovarian cancer.

  12. 34 CFR 97.409 - Wards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Secretary, Department of Education PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Additional ED Protections for Children Who Are Subjects in Research § 97.409 Wards. (a) Children who are wards of the State or any other agency..., or similar settings in which the majority of children involved as subjects are not wards. (b)...

  13. 45 CFR 46.409 - Wards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Protections for Children Involved as Subjects in Research § 46.409 Wards. (a) Children who are wards of the..., camps, hospitals, institutions, or similar settings in which the majority of children involved as... require appointment of an advocate for each child who is a ward, in addition to any other...

  14. 45 CFR 46.409 - Wards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Protections for Children Involved as Subjects in Research § 46.409 Wards. (a) Children who are wards of the..., camps, hospitals, institutions, or similar settings in which the majority of children involved as... require appointment of an advocate for each child who is a ward, in addition to any other...

  15. 34 CFR 97.409 - Wards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Wards. 97.409 Section 97.409 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Additional ED Protections for Children Who Are Subjects in Research § 97.409 Wards. (a) Children who are wards of the State or any other...

  16. 34 CFR 97.409 - Wards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Wards. 97.409 Section 97.409 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Additional ED Protections for Children Who Are Subjects in Research § 97.409 Wards. (a) Children who are wards of the State or any other...

  17. 34 CFR 97.409 - Wards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Wards. 97.409 Section 97.409 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Additional ED Protections for Children Who Are Subjects in Research § 97.409 Wards. (a) Children who are wards of the State or any other...

  18. 21 CFR 50.56 - Wards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... act in, the best interest of the child for the duration of the child's participation in the clinical... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Wards. 50.56 Section 50.56 Food and Drugs FOOD AND... Additional Safeguards for Children in Clinical Investigations § 50.56 Wards. (a) Children who are wards...

  19. 45 CFR 46.409 - Wards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Protections for Children Involved as Subjects in Research § 46.409 Wards. (a) Children who are wards of the state or any other agency, institution, or entity can be included in research approved under § 46.406 or § 46.407 only if such research is: (1) Related to their status as wards; or (2) Conducted in schools...

  20. 45 CFR 46.409 - Wards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Protections for Children Involved as Subjects in Research § 46.409 Wards. (a) Children who are wards of the state or any other agency, institution, or entity can be included in research approved under § 46.406 or § 46.407 only if such research is: (1) Related to their status as wards; or (2) Conducted in schools...

  1. 45 CFR 46.409 - Wards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Protections for Children Involved as Subjects in Research § 46.409 Wards. (a) Children who are wards of the state or any other agency, institution, or entity can be included in research approved under § 46.406 or § 46.407 only if such research is: (1) Related to their status as wards; or (2) Conducted in schools...

  2. 34 CFR 97.409 - Wards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Wards. 97.409 Section 97.409 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Additional ED Protections for Children Who Are Subjects in Research § 97.409 Wards. (a) Children who are wards of the State or any other agency...

  3. 21 CFR 50.56 - Wards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Wards. 50.56 Section 50.56 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Additional Safeguards for Children in Clinical Investigations § 50.56 Wards. (a) Children who are wards of...

  4. 21 CFR 50.56 - Wards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Wards. 50.56 Section 50.56 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Additional Safeguards for Children in Clinical Investigations § 50.56 Wards. (a) Children who are wards of...

  5. 21 CFR 50.56 - Wards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Wards. 50.56 Section 50.56 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Additional Safeguards for Children in Clinical Investigations § 50.56 Wards. (a) Children who are wards of...

  6. Endoscopic laser scalpel for head and neck cancer surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Snehal; Rajadhyaksha, Milind; Kirov, Stefan; Li, Yongbiao; Toledo-Crow, Ricardo

    2012-02-01

    Minimally invasive surgical (MIS) techniques, such as laparoscopic surgery and endoscopy, provide reliable disease control with reduced impact on the function of the diseased organ. Surgical lasers can ablate, cut and excise tissue while sealing small blood vessels minimizing bleeding and risk of lymphatic metastases from tumors. Lasers with wavelengths in the IR are readily absorbed by water causing minimal thermal damage to adjacent tissue, ideal for surgery near critical anatomical structures. MIS techniques have largely been unable to adopt the use of lasers partly due to the difficulty in bringing the laser into the endoscopic cavity. Hollow waveguide fibers have been adapted to bring surgical lasers to endoscopy. However, they deliver a beam that diverges rapidly and requires careful manipulation of the fiber tip relative to the target. Thus, the principal obstacle for surgical lasers in MIS procedures has been a lack of effective control instruments to manipulate the laser in the body cavity and accurately deliver it to the targeted tissue. To overcome this limitation, we have designed and built an endoscopic laser system that incorporates a miniature dual wedge beam steering device, a video camera, and the control system for remote and /or robotic operation. The dual wedge Risley device offers the smallest profile possible for endoscopic use. Clinical specifications and design considerations will be presented together with descriptions of the device and the development of its control system.

  7. The relationship between body image, age, and distress in women facing breast cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Miller, Sarah J; Schnur, Julie B; Weinberger-Litman, Sarah L; Montgomery, Guy H

    2014-10-01

    Research suggests that the strength of the relationship between body image and emotional distress decreases with age. Past research has focused on expected aging-related body changes, and has not yet examined unexpected body changes (e.g., breast cancer surgery). The present post-hoc study assessed relationships between age, body image, and emotional distress in women facing breast cancer surgery. Older (≥ 65 years, n = 40) and younger (<65 years, n = 40) women were matched on race/ethnicity, marital status, and surgery type. Within one week prior to surgery, participants completed measures of demographics, aspects of body image, and emotional distress (general and surgery-specific). Results indicated that: (1) body image did not differ by age (p > 0.999); (2) older women reported less pre-surgical emotional distress than younger women (p's < 0.01); and, (3) age moderated the relationship between body image and emotional distress (p's < 0.06). The results suggest that younger women, particularly those with poor body image, are at an increased risk for pre-surgical emotional distress. These women may benefit from pre-surgical interventions designed to improve body image or to reduce pre-surgical emotional distress.

  8. [Usefulness of reductive surgery for elderly advanced breast cancer with bone metastases - a case report].

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Kenichi; Fujisaki, Shigeru; Nagashima, Saki; Maeda, Tetsuyo; Tomita, Ryouichi; Suzuki, Shuhei; Hara, Yukiko; Hirano, Tomohiro; Enomoto, Katsuhisa; Amano, Sadao

    2014-11-01

    We report the case of an elderly, advanced breast cancer patient with multiple bone metastases. Breast reduction surgery was useful for this patient. The patient was an 81-year-old woman who had a breast lump. A core needle biopsy for breast cancer led to a diagnosis of invasive ductal carcinoma. The mucinous carcinoma was estrogen receptor (ER) nd progesterone receptor (PgR) positive and HER2/neu negative. Due to patient complications, it was not possible to treat with chemotherapy. The patient was administrated aromatase inhibitors (AI) and zoledronic acid hydrate. However, the AI treatment was not effective, and so she was administered toremifene. Toremifene treatment was effective for 6 months, after which she received fulvestrant. Fulvestrant treatment maintained stable disease (SD)for 14 months. After 14 months of fulvestrant treatment, serum concentrations of the tumor markers CA15-3, CEA, and BCA225 increased. We therefore decided to perform surgical breast reduction surgery. The pathological diagnosis from the surgically resected specimen was mucinous carcinoma, positive for ER and HER2, and negative for PgR. After surgery, serum concentrations of the tumor markers decreased. Following surgery, the patient was administrated lapatinib plus denosumab plus fulvestrant. The patient remains well, without bone metastases, 2 years and 6 months after surgery.

  9. The impact of adhesions on operations and postoperative recovery in colon cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Amri, Ramzi; den Boon, Hannah C; Bordeianou, Liliana G; Sylla, Patricia; Berger, David L

    2013-08-01

    Many surgeons assume that adhesions encountered during surgery negatively influence surgical outcomes. This article attempts to assess the role adhesions have on outcomes of colon cancer surgery. Records of 1,071 consecutive patients operated for colonic adenocarcinoma (2004-2011) were reviewed. Patients were assigned to 3 groups: no adhesions, any adhesions, or dense adhesions. Multivariate regression assessed the association between adhesions and the duration of surgery and stay as well as laparoscopic conversion and complication rates. Adhesions were encountered in 329 (30.7%) patients; 138 (12.8%) had dense adhesions. After correction for age and comorbidities, having adhesions was associated with longer surgeries (P < .001), longer hospital stays (P = .029), a borderline significantly higher conversion rate (P = .058), and a delayed return of bowel function (P = .037). Dense adhesions had stronger associations with surgical duration (P < .001), stay duration (P < .001), and conversion (P < .001). Abdominal adhesions independently put patients at risk for a longer and more complicated perioperative stay after colon cancer surgery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Single-site robotic surgery in gynecologic cancer: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Ha-Na; Lee, Yoo-Young; Choi, Chel Hun; Lee, Jeong-Won; Bae, Duk-Soo; Kim, Byoung-Gie

    2015-01-01

    Objective To discuss the feasibility of single-site robotic surgery for benign gynecologic tumors and early stage gynecologic cancers. Methods In this single institution, prospective analysis, we analyzed six patients who had undergone single-site robotic surgery between December 2013 and August 2014. Surgery was performed using the da Vinci Si Surgical System. Patient characteristics and surgical outcomes were analyzed. Results Single-site robotic surgery was performed successfully in all six cases. The median patient age was 48 years, and the median body mass index was 25.5 kg/m2 (range, 22 to 33 kg/m2). The median total operative time was 211 minutes, and the median duration of intracorporeal vaginal cuff suturing was 32 minutes (range, 22 to 47 minutes). The median duration of pelvic lymph node dissection was 31 minutes on one side and 27 minutes on the other side. Patients' postoperative courses were uneventful. The median postoperative hospital stay was 4 days. No postoperative complications occurred. Conclusion When used to treat benign gynecologic tumors and early stage gynecologic cancers, the single-site da Vinci robotic surgery is feasible, safe, and produces favorable surgical outcomes. PMID:25609162

  11. Treatment strategies in elderly breast cancer patients: Is there a need for surgery?

    PubMed

    Sierink, J C; de Castro, S M M; Russell, N S; Geenen, M M; Steller, E Ph; Vrouenraets, B C

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the role of surgery in elderly patients with breast cancer. Between 1999 and 2009, 153 consecutive women, ≥80 years old with breast cancer were treated at our hospital. Surgically and non-surgically treated patients were compared with respect to characteristics and survival. Treatment was surgical in 102 patients (67%). The non-surgically treated patients were older than surgically treated patients, had more co-morbidity and were more often diagnosed with a clinically T3/T4 tumour and distant metastasis. Patients not receiving surgery, had an 11% overall survival rate at 5-year versus 48% in surgically treated patients (P < 0.001). Independent factors for survival were clinical N0 status, M0 status at presentation and surgery. One in three patients of 80 years and older did not have surgical treatment for breast cancer. Patient not treated surgically are older, have more severe co-morbidity and are diagnosed with more advanced disease than patients who underwent surgery.The selection of patients, who have a poor prognosis, is made on clinical grounds not measurable with a common co-morbidity survey. Better and evidence-based selection criteria for surgical and non-surgical treatment in these patients are needed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Presurgical symptom profiles predict quality of life 2 years after surgery in women with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei-Ling; Liu, Li-Ni; Miaskowski, Christine; Chen, Shin-Cheh; Lin, Yung-Chang; Wang, Jong-Shyan

    2016-01-01

    Higher symptom burden in oncology patients is associated with poorer quality of life (QOL). However, the long-term predictive relationship between pre-treatment symptom profiles and QOL is unknown. The aim of this study was to identify subgroups of breast cancer patients based on their presurgical symptom profiles and to examine the predictive effect of group membership on QOL 2 years after surgery. Data were analyzed from a longitudinal study of women's (N = 198) symptoms after breast cancer surgery. Patient subgroups were identified by latent class analysis based on presurgical severity of five symptoms (i.e., attentional and physical fatigue, sleep disturbance, depression, and anxiety). Among these 198 women, quality of life 2 years after surgery was available for 97. Group differences in QOL were examined by general linear models. We identified four distinct patient groups. Group A (All Low) had low levels of all symptoms. Group B (Low Fatigue and Moderate Mood) was characterized by low attentional and physical fatigue but moderate sleep disturbance, depression, and anxiety. Group C (All Moderate) was characterized by moderate levels of all five symptoms. Group D was characterized by moderate attentional and physical fatigue and severe sleep disturbance, depression, and anxiety (Moderate Fatigue and High Mood). Group D had significantly lower overall QOL scores 2 years after surgery than Group A (p = 0.002). Breast cancer patients' presurgical symptom profile had a long-term predictive effect on QOL. Routine assessment of patients' pre-treatment symptom is suggested to identify high risk group.

  13. The use of the LigaSure Vessel Sealing System in esophageal cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Eroglu, Atilla; Turkyilmaz, Atila; Aydin, Yener; Erdem, Ali Fuat; Tokur, Mahmut; Karaoglanoglu, Nurettin

    2007-12-01

    In this clinical study we investigated the use and results of the LigaSure Vessel Sealing Sytem (LVSS) (Valleylab, Boulder, CO) compared with conventional surgery in esophageal cancer resection. The LVSS (Valleylab) is a device with a hemostatic design frequently used in abdominal surgery. Sixty patients (n = 30 in each group) with esophageal cancer from a single center were evaluated to undergo esophagectomy using either the LVSS or conventional clamping methods. The main outcome measures (ie, operating time, intraoperative blood loss, and postoperative course) were then compared. In resections performed using the LVSS, operation duration (307 +/- 35 minutes vs 260 +/- 35 minutes; p = 0.000), intraoperative blood loss (average 533 +/- 211 mL vs 390 +/- 256 mL; p = 0.022), and postoperative drainage volumes (abdomen, 70 +/- 86 mL vs 40 +/- 61 mL; p = 0.122; thorax, 690 +/- 646 mL vs 540 +/- 359 mL; p = 0.271) all decreased. The LVSS is easy to use and a reliable method in esophageal cancer surgery. Compared with conventional hemostatic techniques a reduction in intraoperative and postoperative blood loss, and a shortening of operation duration were determined. We believe that the use of the LVSS in esophageal surgery will become even more widespread in the future.

  14. The Association Between Pain and Quality of Life for Patients With Cancer in an Outpatient Clinic, an Inpatient Oncology Ward, and Inpatient Palliative Care Units.

    PubMed

    Mikan, Fukiko; Wada, Makoto; Yamada, Michiko; Takahashi, Ayaka; Onishi, Hideki; Ishida, Mayumi; Sato, Kazuki; Shimizu, Sachiko; Matoba, Motohiro; Miyashita, Mitsunori

    2016-09-01

    This study was designed to clarify the association between pain and quality of life (QOL) of Japanese patients with cancer using a cancer-specific QOL scale (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer [EORTC] QLQ-C15-PAL) in 3 care settings (outpatient, inpatient, and palliative care units [PCUs]). We examined the above-mentioned purpose for the total of 404 patients. In outpatients, physical, emotional functioning (EF), and global health status/QOL (QL item) were significantly correlated with average pain, and their correlation coefficients were -0.37 to -0.46 (P < .0001). In inpatients, they were -0.33 (P = .006), -0.26 (P = .030), and -0.31 (P = .012). In the PCU patients, they were -0.12 (P = .316), -0.30 (P = .009), and -0.28 (P = .015). Patients' pain had an association with physical and emotional QOL, and the association was smaller in the PCU patients than the others. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. A Prospective Study of Nausea and Vomiting After Breast Cancer Surgery.

    PubMed

    Wesmiller, Susan W; Bender, Catherine M; Conley, Yvette P; Bovbjerg, Dana H; Ahrendt, Gretchen; Bonaventura, Marguerite; Sereika, Susan M

    2017-06-01

    Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) and post-discharge nausea and vomiting (PDNV) continue to be common and disturbing complications experienced after surgery, particularly in women and especially in women undergoing breast cancer surgery. The purpose of this study was to assess the incidence and risk factors associated with PONV and PDNV from preoperative to 48 hours postoperatively in 97 women scheduled for breast cancer surgery. Prospective, comparative design. After informed consent was obtained, women scheduled for breast cancer surgery were evaluated for incidence of vomiting, as well as the presence and severity of nausea from the preoperative holding area for 48 hours following surgery. Vomiting was assessed as both a nominally scaled, binary variable (Yes/No) and as a continuous variable to measure separate emetic events. Nausea was measured on an 11point verbal numeric scale with 0 being the absence of nausea and 10 representing the highest level of nausea ever experienced. Twenty-nine (29.8%) women experienced nausea, and nine (9%) women experienced nausea and vomiting while in the post-anesthesia care unit despite close attention to the need for prophylactic antiemetic medications. Women who experienced PONV had higher levels of pain and received more opioids than those women who did not experience PONV. Women who received intravenous acetaminophen did not experience less PONV in this study. PDNV occurred more frequently than PONV, with 34 women (35%) reporting occurrence after discharge. About 13 women who did not experience PONV while in the PACU subsequently experienced PDNV after leaving the hospital, evidence for the importance of patient discharge teaching regarding these symptoms. Although clinical guidelines are necessary, our observation is that nurses in the PACU setting continuously challenge themselves to individualize the combination of medications and activities for each patient to reduce PONV after surgery. Copyright © 2016 American

  16. Urogenital function in robotic vs laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Panteleimonitis, Sofoklis; Ahmed, Jamil; Ramachandra, Meghana; Farooq, Muhammad; Harper, Mick; Parvaiz, Amjad

    2017-02-01

    Urological and sexual dysfunction are recognised risks of rectal cancer surgery; however, there is limited evidence regarding urogenital function comparing robotic to laparoscopic techniques. The aim of this study was to assess the urogenital functional outcomes of patients undergoing laparoscopic and robotic rectal cancer surgery. Urological and sexual functions were assessed using gender-specific validated standardised questionnaires. Questionnaires were sent a minimum of 6 months after surgery, and patients were asked to report their urogenital function pre- and post-operatively, allowing changes in urogenital function to be identified. Questionnaires were sent to 158 patients (89 laparoscopy, 69 robotic) of whom 126 (80 %) responded. Seventy-eight (49 male, 29 female) of the responders underwent laparoscopic and 48 (35 male, 13 female) robotic surgery. Male patients in the robotic group deteriorated less across all components of sexual function and in five components of urological function. Composite male urological and sexual function score changes from baseline were better in the robotic cohort (p < 0.001). In females, there was no difference between the two groups in any of the components of urological or sexual function. However, composite female urological function score change from baseline was better in the robotic group (p = 0.003). Robotic rectal cancer surgery might offer better post-operative urological and sexual outcomes compared to laparoscopic surgery in male patients and better urological outcomes in females. Larger scale, prospective randomised control studies including urodynamic assessment of urogenital function are required to validate these results.

  17. Outcomes and cost comparisons after introducing a robotics program for endometrial cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Lau, Susie; Vaknin, Zvi; Ramana-Kumar, Agnihotram V; Halliday, Darron; Franco, Eduardo L; Gotlieb, Walter H

    2012-04-01

    To evaluate the effect of introducing a robotic program on cost and patient outcome. This was a prospective evaluation of clinical outcome and cost after introducing a robotics program for the treatment of endometrial cancer and a retrospective comparison to the entire historical cohort. Consecutive patients with endometrial cancer who underwent robotic surgery (n=143) were compared with all consecutive patients who underwent surgery (n=160) before robotics. The rate of minimally invasive surgery increased from 17% performed by laparoscopy to 98% performed by robotics in 2 years. The patient characteristics were comparable in both eras, except for a higher body mass index in the robotics era (median 29.8 compared with 27.6; P<.005). Patients undergoing robotics had longer operating times (233 compared with 206 minutes), but fewer adverse events (13% compared with 42%; P<.001), lower estimated median blood loss (50 compared with 200 mL; P<.001), and shorter median hospital stay (1 compared with 5 days; P<.001). The overall hospital costs were significantly lower for robotics compared with the historical group (Can$7,644 compared with Can$10,368 [Canadian dollars]; P<.001) even when acquisition and maintenance cost were included (Can$8,370 compared with Can$10,368; P=.001). Within 2 years after surgery, the short-term recurrence rate appeared lower in the robotics group compared with the historic cohort (11 recurrences compared with 19 recurrences; P<.001). Introduction of robotics for endometrial cancer surgery increased the proportion of patients benefitting from minimally invasive surgery, improved short-term outcomes, and resulted in lower hospital costs. II.

  18. Ovarian vein thrombosis after debulking surgery for ovarian cancer: epidemiology and clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Mantha, Simon; Sarasohn, Debra; Ma, Weining; Devlin, Sean M; Chi, Dennis S; Roche, Kara Long; Suidan, Rudy S; Woo, Kaitlin; Soff, Gerald A

    2015-08-01

    Ovarian vein thrombosis is associated with pregnancy and pelvic surgery. Postpartum ovarian vein thrombosis is associated with infection and a high morbidity rate and is treated with anticoagulant and intravenous antibiotic therapy. The natural history of such thrombotic events after debulking surgery for ovarian cancer has not been well described. Our objective was to characterize the presentation and outcomes for patients with this condition at our institution. We conducted a retrospective study of patients who underwent surgical debulking for ovarian cancer at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center between the years 2001 and 2010. Patients were included if contrast computed tomography scans of both the abdomen and pelvis were performed within 12 weeks before and 12 weeks after the surgery. The images were reviewed to assess for the presence and extent of a new postoperative ovarian vein thrombosis. When available, subsequent studies were assessed for thrombus progression. Medical records were reviewed to determine whether anticoagulation was used for treatment of the thrombotic episode and to record the occurrence of any new significant venous thromboembolic event in the next year. One hundred fifty-nine patients had satisfactory imaging. New ovarian vein thrombosis was a common complication of debulking surgery, as found in 41 of patients (25.8%). Only 5 women with ovarian vein thrombosis were started on anticoagulation, of which 2 individuals had an independent venous thromboembolic event as indication for treatment. Only 2 of the ovarian vein thromboses (4.9%) progressed to the inferior vena cava or left renal vein on subsequent scan. The estimated cumulative incidence of venous thromboembolism 1 year after the first postoperative scan was 17.1% for patients in the new ovarian vein thrombosis group vs 15.3% of individuals for the group without a postoperative ovarian vein thrombosis (P = .78). Ovarian vein thrombosis is commonly encountered after debulking

  19. Predicting inpatient stay lasting 2 midnights or longer after robotic surgery for endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Liang, Margaret I; Rosen, Maggie A; Rath, Kellie S; Hade, Erinn M; Clements, Aine E; Backes, Floor J; Eisenhauer, Eric L; Salani, Ritu; O'Malley, David M; Fowler, Jeffrey M; Cohn, David E

    2015-01-01

    To estimate the rate of inpatient stay and the factors predicting inpatient status after robotic surgery for endometrial cancer following the change in the Medicare definition of "inpatient" to include hospitalization spanning 2 midnights. Retrospective chart review (Canadian Task Force classification II-1). Academic hospital. All patients (n = 395) with endometrial cancer who underwent robotic surgical management between 2006 and 2010. The outpatient stay group with hospitalization spanning 1 midnight was compared with the inpatient stay group with hospitalization spanning 2 midnights or longer through estimation of the adjusted relative risk (aRR) for various characteristics of interest. Ninety-six of 395 patients (24.3%) stayed at least 2 midnights and thus were deemed inpatients. Clinical factors associated with inpatient stay were increasing age, history of myocardial infarction (aRR, 2.0; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.0-3.7), surgery start time at or after 12 noon (aRR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.2-2.4), perioperative blood transfusion (aRR, 3.2; 95% CI, 2.3-4.5), and surgery performed in the year 2010 (aRR, 0.5; 95% CI, 0.3-0.7). Age ≥ 60 years was associated with at least a 2-fold adjusted risk of prolonged hospitalization. Body mass index, other medical comorbidities, operative duration, estimated blood loss, and performance of lymphadenectomy or additional surgical procedures were not identified as significant risk factors. Approximately 75% of the patients undergoing robotic surgery for endometrial cancer were discharged as outpatients. Recognition of factors predicting inpatient stay can improve hospital resource allocation and throughput in women undergoing robotic surgery for endometrial cancer. Copyright © 2015 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Influence of recent immobilization or surgery on mortality in cancer patients with venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Trujillo-Santos, Javier; Gussoni, Gualberto; Gadelha, Telma; Sänchez Muñoz-Torrero, Juan Francisco; Barron, Manuel; Lopez, Luciano; Ruiz-Ruiz, Justo; Fernandez-Capitan, Carmen; Lorente, Manuel; Monreal, Manuel

    2014-05-01

    The influence of recent immobilization or surgery on mortality in cancer patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE) has not been thoroughly studied. We used the RIETE Registry data to compare the 3-month mortality rate in cancer patients with VTE, with patients categorized according to the presence of recent immobilization, surgery or neither. The major outcomes were fatal pulmonary embolism (PE) and fatal bleeding within the first 3 months. Of 6,746 patients with active cancer and acute VTE, 1,224 (18%) had recent immobilization, 1,055 (16%) recent surgery, and 4,467 (66%) had neither. The all-cause mortality was 23.4% (95% CI: 22.4-24.5), and the PE-related mortality: 2.5% (95% CI: 2.1-2.9). Four in every ten patients dying of PE had recent immobilization (37%) or surgery (5.4%). Only 28% of patients with immobilization had received prophylaxis, as compared with 67% of the surgical. Fatal PE was more common in patients with recent immobilization (5.0%; 95% CI: 3.9-6.3) than in those with surgery (0.8%; 95% CI: 0.4-1.6) or neither (2.2%; 95% CI: 1.8-2.6). On multivariate analysis, patients with immobilization were at an increased risk for fatal PE (odds ratio: 1.8; 95% CI: 1.2-2.5). One in every three cancer patients dying of PE had recent immobilization for ≥ 4 days. Many of these deaths could have been prevented with adequate thromboprophylaxis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The role of cytoreductive surgery in nongenital cancers metastatic to the ovaries.

    PubMed

    Ayhan, A; Guvenal, T; Salman, M C; Ozyuncu, O; Sakinci, M; Basaran, M

    2005-08-01

    To investigate the role of cytoreductive surgery in patients with nongenital cancers metastatic to the ovaries. One hundred and fifty-four patients with nongenital cancers metastatic to the ovaries treated in Hacettepe University Hospital, Gynecologic Oncology Unit between 1982 and 2004 years were retrospectively evaluated. Data were obtained from patients' records and pathology reports. Demographic characteristics, prognostic factors, 5-year and median survivals were analyzed in all patients. During study period, nongenital cancers metastatic to the ovaries constituted 9% of all malignant ovarian neoplasms. Primary cancers were breast (35), stomach (35) and colorectal (33) cancers, lymphoma (17), undetermined origin (16), appendix (7), ileum (4), pancreas (3), gallbladder cancer (2) and mesothelioma (2). Of patients, 67% were premenopausal and 33% were postmenopausal. Although most common presenting symptoms were abdominal distension with dyspeptic complaints in 46%, abdominal mass in 22%, and pressure symptoms in 8.4%, 15 patients (10%) were asymptomatic and were diagnosed in routine control examinations. Total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (TAH + BSO), omentectomy, and bilateral pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy (BP-PALND) with cytoreduction were performed in 102 patients (66%), TAH + BSO + omentectomy in 21 patients (14%), TAH + BSO in 23 patients (15%), minimal surgical effort including BSO or biopsy in 8 patients (5%). Eighty-four percent of patients received adjuvant treatment according to the primary origins. Mean follow-up was 47.3 +/- 5.9 months. Overall, 5-year survival was 36% and median survival was 42 months. Comparison of median survival times for the primary sites showed a significant overall differences (P = 0.0001) and were as follows: breast 54 months, stomach 18 months, colorectal 48 months, lymphoma 181 months, unknown primary 16 months, appendix 18 months, ileum 40 months, pancreas 3 months, gallbladder 8

  2. Laparoscopic surgery of pancreatic cancer: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Croce, Enrico; Olmi, Stefano; Bertolini, Aimone; Magnone, Stefano

    2005-01-01

    The use of laparoscopy in pancreatic cancer offers a significant contribution to the diagnosis and treatment of this disease. Both laparoscopic staging and treatment of pancreatic cancer have proved feasible and effective. This paper reviews the literature on this topic, by a Medline search using the words laparoscopy and pancreas. Various aspects are considered: staging, treatment and palliation. Cross-references from the articles retrieved were reviewed. The efficacy and safety of diagnostic laparoscopy and ultrasonography, lowering the rate of useless laparotomies, is evident in most studies. Moreover laparoscopic resection of the body and tail of the pancreas, as well as palliation of digestive obstruction has been demonstrated as feasible. Controversy exists on feasibility of pancreatoduodenectomy. Laparoscopic gastric outlet obstruction bypass and laparoscopic biliary decompression have been reported with good results compared to open surgical procedures. Randomized controlled trials are required to validate promising results coming from the reported series, mainly retrospective.

  3. A Subacute Care Intervention for Short Stay Cancer Surgery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-01

    entry into the formal health care system for adjuvant therapy . Data were collected by a one hour telephone interview with the participant which was...women were using complementary therapies in addition to customary medical care . We realize that CT use is becoming more common practice among cancer...their care with CTs since they had the highest proportion using one or more therapies . This higher use may be an attempt to supplement conventional

  4. Risk Factors for Gallstone Formation after Surgery for Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Park, Dong Jin; Kim, Ki Hyun; Park, Young Suk; Ahn, Sang-Hoon; Park, Do Joong; Kim, Hyung-Ho

    2016-06-01

    The incidence of gallstones after gastrectomy for gastric cancer is higher than in the general population. However, the causes and mechanisms of post-gastrectomy gallstones are unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of gallstone formation and the risk factors for their development after gastrectomy for gastric cancer. Of 1,744 gastric cancer patients who underwent gastrectomy at Seoul National University Bundang Hospital between January 2010 and December 2012, 1,284 were included in this study and retrospectively reviewed. Patients' age, sex, body mass index (BMI), tumor location, stage, type of gastrectomy, type of reconstruction, and extent of node dissection were evaluated. The incidence of gallstones after gastrectomy for gastric cancer was significantly higher in men than in women (P=0.019). Exclusion of the duodenum during reconstruction was associated with a significantly higher incidence of gallstones (P=0.003). Overweight and obese patients with BMI ≥23 kg/m(2) had significantly higher incidence of gallstones than those with a lower BMI (P=0.006). Multivariate analysis showed that obesity (hazard ratio, HR=1.614; 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.135~2.296; P=0.008), male sex (HR=1.515, 95% CI: 1.029~2.231, P=0.033), and exclusion of the duodenum (HR=1.648, 95% CI: 1.192~2.280, P=0.003) were significant, independent risk factors for gallstones after gastrectomy. The cumulative incidence of gallstones for 5 years after gastrectomy was 15.3%. Male sex, obesity, and exclusion of the duodenum were risk factors for gallstone formation after gastrectomy. Careful surveillance will be required for these patient groups after gastrectomy.

  5. Robotic surgery compared with laparotomy for high-grade endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Pant, Alok; Schink, Julian; Lurain, John

    2014-06-01

    High-grade endometrial cancer often presents with occult metastatic disease and this presentation pattern can be considered a contraindication to minimally invasive surgery. We sought to compare the surgical and oncologic outcomes of patients with high-grade endometrial cancer who underwent surgical management/staging via the robotic approach versus the traditional open approach. A retrospective analysis was performed of patients with high-grade endometrial cancer who were treated at a single institution from January 2008 through December 2011. High-grade endometrial histology was defined as FIGO grade 2 or 3 endometrioid, serous, clear cell or uterine carcinosarcoma. Pre-operatively, all patients had clinical stage I disease based on a combination of physical examination and imaging studies. Baseline patient demographics, operative results, complications and oncologic outcomes were analyzed. Eighty consecutive patients were included. Forty-seven patients underwent surgical management using the robotic approach and 33 patients underwent a traditional operation via laparotomy. The groups were well matched in terms of age, body mass index, medical co-morbidities, stage and histology. The average hospital stay for patients who underwent open surgery was significantly longer than for those who underwent a robotic approach [5.6 versus 1.4 days (p = 0.0001)]. Of the patients who underwent robotic surgery, 7/47 (15 %) experienced an operative complication versus 18/33 (55 %) in the open surgery cohort (p = 0.002). The average number of pelvic lymph nodes retrieved in each cohort was 12. The average number of para-aortic lymph nodes retrieved in each group was 4. On final pathologic analysis, 20 patients in the robotic surgery arm were found to have disease that had spread beyond the uterus (43 %), compared to 14 in the traditional surgery group (42 %). There were 11/47 (23 %) recurrences in the robotic surgery group during the study period, compared to 8/33 (24

  6. [Predictive factors for locally recurrent rectal cancer after primary curative surgery].

    PubMed

    Gao, Haoji; Zhang, Tao; Zhao, Ren

    2015-11-01

    Local recurrence is a major clinical challenge after primary rectal cancer surgery. Although there is a possibility that R0 resection can be achieved, the outcome is still not favorable due to the low R0 resection rate and complexity of the surgery. Therefore prevention has a higher priority over treatment afterwards. As TME principle is accepted worldwide, the local recurrence rate has been reduced dramatically. And there are other factors associated with local recurrence including CRM, operation type, staging and PNI. Proper chemoradiotherapy may reduce the risk, however benefit always comes with side effect, therefore risk stratification is important.

  7. Failure to rescue patients from early critical complications of oesophagogastric cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Weledji, Elroy P.; Verla, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    ‘Failure to rescue’ is a significant cause of mortality in gastrointestinal surgery. Differences in mortality between high and low-volume hospitals are not associated with large difference in complication rates but to the ability of the hospital to effectively rescue patients from the complications. We reviewed the critical complications following surgery for oesophageal and gastric cancer, their prevention and reasons for failure to rescue. Strategies focussing on perioperative optimization, the timely recognition and management of complications may be essential to improving outcome in low-volume hospitals. PMID:27054032

  8. On a prolonged interval between rectal cancer (chemo)radiotherapy and surgery.

    PubMed

    Glimelius, Bengt

    2017-03-01

    Preoperative radiotherapy (RT) or chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is often required before rectal cancer surgery to obtain low local recurrence rates or, in locally advanced tumours, to radically remove the tumour. RT/CRT in tumours responding completely can allow an organ-preserving strategy. The time from the end of the RT/CRT to surgery or to the decision not to operate has been prolonged during recent years. After a brief review of the literature, the relevance of the time interval to surgery is discussed depending upon the indication for RT/CRT. In intermediate rectal cancers, where the aim is to decrease local recurrence rates without any need for down-sizing/-staging, short-course RT with immediate surgery is appropriate. In elderly patients at risk for surgical complications, surgery could be delayed 5-8 weeks. If CRT is used, surgery should be performed when the acute radiation reaction has subsided or after 5-6 weeks. In locally advanced tumours, where CRT is indicated, the optimal delay is 6-8 weeks. In patients not tolerating CRT, short-course RT with a 6-8-week delay is an alternative. If organ preservation is a goal, a first evaluation should preferably be carried out after about 6 weeks, with planned surgery for week 8 if the response is inadequate. In case the response is good, a new evaluation should be carried out after about 12 weeks, with a decision to start a 'watch-and-wait' programme or operate. Chemotherapy in the waiting period is an interesting option, and has been the subject of recent trials with promising results.

  9. On a prolonged interval between rectal cancer (chemo)radiotherapy and surgery

    PubMed Central

    Glimelius, Bengt

    2017-01-01

    Preoperative radiotherapy (RT) or chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is often required before rectal cancer surgery to obtain low local recurrence rates or, in locally advanced tumours, to radically remove the tumour. RT/CRT in tumours responding completely can allow an organ-preserving strategy. The time from the end of the RT/CRT to surgery or to the decision not to operate has been prolonged during recent years. After a brief review of the literature, the relevance of the time interval to surgery is discussed depending upon the indication for RT/CRT. In intermediate rectal cancers, where the aim is to decrease local recurrence rates without any need for down-sizing/-staging, short-course RT with immediate surgery is appropriate. In elderly patients at risk for surgical complications, surgery could be delayed 5–8 weeks. If CRT is used, surgery should be performed when the acute radiation reaction has subsided or after 5–6 weeks. In locally advanced tumours, where CRT is indicated, the optimal delay is 6–8 weeks. In patients not tolerating CRT, short-course RT with a 6–8-week delay is an alternative. If organ preservation is a goal, a first evaluation should preferably be carried out after about 6 weeks, with planned surgery for week 8 if the response is inadequate. In case the response is good, a new evaluation should be carried out after about 12 weeks, with a decision to start a ‘watch-and-wait’ programme or operate. Chemotherapy in the waiting period is an interesting option, and has been the subject of recent trials with promising results. PMID:28256956

  10. Response to treatment and interval to surgery after preoperative short-course radiotherapy in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    García-Cabezas, Sonia; Rodríguez-Liñán, Milagrosa; Otero-Romero, Ana M; Bueno-Serrano, Carmen M; Gómez-Barbadillo, José; Palacios-Eito, Amalia

    2016-10-01

    Preoperative short-course radiotherapy with immediate surgery improves local control in patients with rectal cancer. Tumor responses are smaller than those described with radiochemotherapy. Preliminary data associate this lower response to the short period until surgery. The aim of this study is to analyze the response to preoperative short-course radiotherapy and its correlation with the interval to surgery especially analyzing patients with mesorectal fascia involvement. A total of 155 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer treated with preoperative radiotherapy (5×5Gy) were retrospectively analyzed. Tumor response in terms of rates of complete pathological response, downstaging, tumor regression grading and status of the circumferential resection margin were quantified. The mean interval from radiotherapy to surgery was 23 days. The rate of complete pathological response was 2.2% and 28% experienced downstaging (stage decreased). No differences between these rates and interval to surgery were detected. Eighty-eight patients had magnetic resonance imaging for staging (in 31 patients the mesorectal fascia was involved).The mean time to surgery in patients with involvement of the fascia and R0 surgery was 27 days and 16 days if R1 (P=.016). The cutoff of 20 days reached the highest probability of achieving a free circumferential resection margin between patients with mesorectal fascia involvement, with no statistically significant differences: RR 3.036 95% CI=(0.691-13.328), P=.06. After preoperative short-course radiotherapy, an interval>20 days enhances the likelihood of achieving a free circumferential resection margin in patients with mesorectal fascia involvement. Copyright © 2016 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Graves' Disease that Developed Shortly after Surgery for Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hea Min; Park, Soon Hyun; Lee, Jae Min; Park, Kang Seo

    2013-09-01

    Graves' disease is an autoimmune disorder that may present with various clinical manifestations of hyperthyroidism. Patients with Graves' disease have a greater number of thyroid nodules and a higher incidence of thyroid cancer compared with patients with normal thyroid activity. However, cases in which patients are diagnosed with recurrence of Graves' disease shortly after partial thyroidectomy for thyroid cancer are very rare. Here we report a case of hyperthyroid Graves' disease that occurred after partial thyroidectomy for papillary thyroid cancer. In this case, the patient developed hyperthyroidism 9 months after right hemithyroidectomy, and antithyroglobulin autoantibody and thyroid stimulating hormone receptor stimulating autoantibody were positive. Therefore, we diagnosed Graves' disease on the basis of the laboratory test results and thyroid ultrasonography findings. The patient was treated with and maintained on antithyroid drugs. The mechanism of the recurrence of Graves' disease in this patient is still unclear. The mechanism may have been the improper response of the immune system after partial thyroidectomy. To precisely determine the mechanisms in Graves' disease after partial thyroidectomy, further studies based on a greater number of cases are needed.

  12. Digital technologies and quality improvement in cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Mutter, D; Bouras, G; Marescaux, J

    2005-08-01

    Telecommunications, multimedia and computer technologies will introduce marked changes in the management of cancer. New modalities in the representation of patient's medical records using computer technology products and services allow unlimited cross-sharing of information. Education taught through multimedia methods, and through the Internet, is available anywhere and any time just like surgical simulation, robotics and virtual reality. Thanks to computer and IT technologies, surgeons will be able to acquire, assess and validate new surgical procedures or concepts from any geographical location. Live demonstrations shared via videoconferencing facilitate mental development through the acquisition of the cognitive aspects of surgical procedures. Virtual reality is a major improvement in the processing of medical imaging. As a result, the interpretation and the simulation of therapeutic approaches to patients with cancer are facilitated through transparency, navigation and manipulation. The Internet eventually offers uninterrupted communication links between healthcare providers (teaching, training or multidisciplinary telementoring included). Computer and IT technologies will undoubtedly contribute to standardized cancer treatment modalities and determined guidelines for good clinical practice worldwide.

  13. Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer: implications of genetic testing for screening and prophylactic surgery.

    PubMed

    Cisco, Robin M; Ford, James M; Norton, Jeffrey A

    2008-10-01

    Approximately 10% of patients with gastric cancer show familial clustering, and 3% show autosomal dominance and high penetrance. Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) is an autosomal-dominant, inherited cancer syndrome in which affected individuals develop diffuse-type gastric cancer at a young age. Inactivating mutations in the E-cadherin gene CDH1 have been identified in 30% to 50% of patients. CDH1 mutation carriers have an approximately 70% lifetime risk of developing DGC, and affected women carry an additional 20% to 40% risk of developing lobular breast cancer. Because endoscopic surveillance is ineffective in identifying early HDGC, gene-directed prophylactic total gastrectomy currently is offered for CDH1 mutation carriers. In series of asymptomatic individuals undergoing total gastrectomy for CDH1 mutations, the removed stomachs usually contain small foci of early DGC, making surgery not prophylactic but curative. The authors of this review recommend consideration of total gastrectomy in CDH1 mutation carriers at an age 5 years younger than the youngest family member who developed gastric cancer. Individuals who choose not to undergo prophylactic gastrectomy should be followed with biannual chromoendoscopy, and women with CDH1 mutations also should undergo regular surveillance with magnetic resonance imaging studies of the breast. Because of the emergence of gene-directed gastrectomy for HDGC, today, a previously lethal disease is detected by molecular techniques, allowing curative surgery at an early stage.

  14. Airway Management of Patients Undergoing Oral Cancer Surgery: A Retrospective Analysis of 156 Patients.

    PubMed

    Nikhar, Sapna Annaji; Sharma, Ashima; Ramdaspally, Mahesh; Gopinath, Ramachandran

    2017-04-01

    Oral cancer patients have a potentially difficult airway, but if managed properly during the perioperative period, morbidity and mortality can be reduced or avoided. The medical records of 156 patients who were operated for oral cancers were reviewed for airway management during the perioperative period. The surgical procedures ranged from excisions, wide local excisions with split skin graftings, hemiglossectomies and radical neck nodes dissections to pectoralis major myocutaneous or free fibular flaps. Intubation was assessed as difficult in 14.7% of patients because of tumour- or radiation fibrosis-related trismus, restricted neck mobility and prior similar surgeries. Twenty patients had undergone surgery for oral cancer previously and were scheduled for flap reconstruction. Nasotracheal intubation was a preferred route, and 62.8% of patients could be intubated nasotracheally after neuromuscular blockade. Tracheostomy (elective or existing) was utilised for airway control in 19.2% cases. Patients who had undergone prior radiotherapy were more likely to be tracheostomised. McCoy laryngoscopes (13.4%), gum elastic bougies (23.6%), Airtraq devices (0.006%) and fibreoptic bronchoscopes (FOBs) (0.03%) were the additional airway techniques employed. In total, 64 patients (50.7%) could be extubated immediately after surgery. Proper preoperative evaluation and planning help manage difficult airways effectively with minimal need of advanced airway gadgets. Gum elastic bougies and Magill forceps are very useful in airway management and decrease the need of elective tracheostomy in oral cancer patients.

  15. [Two cases of bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) induced radiotherapy after surgery of breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Hojo, Shigeyuki; Yoshioka, Setsuko; Toyoda, Yasuhiro; Shimizu, Kaori; Yoshioka, Akiko; Fujie, Yujiro; Fukunaga, Hiroki; Ota, Hirofumi; Endo, Wakio; Maeura, Yoshiichi

    2010-11-01

    We report two cases of bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) induced radiotherapy after surgery of breast cancer. One of the patients was a 58-year-old woman. She underwent a conserving surgery for bilateral breast cancers, and received radiation therapy to the remaining part of bilateral breasts. Two months after the termination of irradiation, cough, fever and general fatigue developed. We clinically diagnosed this case as BOOP after radiation therapy. After initiation of oral steroid therapy, the clinical symptoms and radiographic findings disappeared. Another patient was a 57-year-old woman. She underwent radical mastectomy for right breast cancer. A month after the operation, she suffered from local recurrence, so radiation therapy to the thoracic wall was performed. After irradiation, resection of the thoracic wall lesion was performed because of malignancy from local skin biopsy specimen. Two months after the termination of irradiation, cough, dyspnea and fever developed. We clinically diagnosed this case as radiation-induced BOOP by BAL and TBLB findings. After an initiation of steroid therapy, the clinical symptoms and radiographic findings disappeared. It is important to be aware of BOOP as a complication in the patient who was given radiation after surgery of breast cancer.

  16. Psychosocial Adaptationand Cellular Immunity in Breast Cancer Patients in the Weeks After Surgery: An Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Blomberg, Bonnie B.; Alvarez, Juan P.; Diaz, Alain; Romero, Maria G.; Lechner, Suzanne; Carver, Charles S.; Holly, Heather; Antoni, Michael H.

    2009-01-01

    Background The period just after surgery for breast cancer requires psychosocial adaptation and is associated with elevated distress. Distress states have been associated with decreased cellular immune functioning in this population, which could have negative effects on physical recovery. However little is known about relations between psychological status (negative and positive mood states and overall quality of life) and cellular signaling cytokines that could account for these associations in women undergoing treatment for breast cancer. Methods The present study examined associations between psychological adaptation indicators (mood, quality of life) and T-helper cell-type 1 (Th1) cytokine production from stimulated peripheral mononuclear cells in women who had recently undergone surgery for early-stage breast cancer but had not yet begun adjuvant therapy. These associations were evaluated while controlling for relevant disease/treatment, sociodemographic and health behavior covariates. Results Lower anxiety related to greater production of the Th1 cytokine interleukin-2 (IL-2) while greater positive mood (affection) related to greater production of the Th1 cytokines IL-12 and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ). Better quality of life (QOL) related to greater production of the Th1 cytokine, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). Conclusion Individual differences in psychosocial adaptation in women with breast cancer during the period after surgery relate to biological parameters that may be relevant for health and well-being as they move through treatment. PMID:19837199

  17. Framework for hyperspectral image processing and quantification for cancer detection during animal tumor surgery.

    PubMed

    Lu, Guolan; Wang, Dongsheng; Qin, Xulei; Halig, Luma; Muller, Susan; Zhang, Hongzheng; Chen, Amy; Pogue, Brian W; Chen, Zhuo Georgia; Fei, Baowei

    2015-01-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is an imaging modality that holds strong potential for rapid cancer detection during image-guided surgery. But the data from HSI often needs to be processed appropriately in order to extract the maximum useful information that differentiates cancer from normal tissue. We proposed a framework for hyperspectral image processing and quantification, which includes a set of steps including image preprocessing, glare removal, feature extraction, and ultimately image classification. The framework has been tested on images from mice with head and neck cancer, using spectra from 450- to 900-nm wavelength. The image analysis computed Fourier coefficients, normalized reflectance, mean, and spectral derivatives for improved accuracy. The experimental results demonstrated the feasibility of the hyperspectral image processing and quantification framework for cancer detection during animal tumor surgery, in a challenging setting where sensitivity can be low due to a modest number of features present, but potential for fast image classification can be high. This HSI approach may have potential application in tumor margin assessment during image-guided surgery, where speed of assessment may be the dominant factor.

  18. Perceived utility of an integrated psychological intervention for gynaecological cancer patients admitted for surgery: preliminary data

    PubMed Central

    Arnaboldi, Paola; Oliveri, Serena; Vadilonga, Valeria; Santoro, Luigi; Maggioni, Angelo; Pravettoni, Gabriella

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate patients’ satisfaction and perceived utility for psychological consultations delivered by clinical psychologists in a sample of gynaecological cancer patients hospitalised for surgery. Methods A total of 51 gynaecological cancer patients who scored higher than four on the distress thermometer (DT) were proposed and received a psychological consultation during hospitalisation for surgery. After six months from discharge, patients were asked, during a telephone interview, to rate their level of distress post-treatment, their perceived satisfaction, and usefulness of the psychological intervention received. Results At the time of the telephone interview, the distress levels stated by patients tended to be lower than those at hospital admission, and around 61% of the patients expressed maximum satisfaction with psychological intervention. Among these, 60.8% rated the psychological consultation useful for dealing with the hospitalisation itself, 45.1% useful for dealing with personal issues and 58.8% for dealing with issues related to returning home. People who were at their first diagnosis and those who had no other reason to be distressed beyond their cancer found psychological support significantly more useful for facing up to personal issues. Conclusions Patients are highly satisfied with integrative psychological interventions delivered by clinical psychologists in a medical setting such as that of gynaecological cancer surgery and from the six-month follow-up, it emerged that such interventions help in promoting patients’ adjustment to the phase of hospitalisation and post-hospital discharge. PMID:28275391

  19. Framework for hyperspectral image processing and quantification for cancer detection during animal tumor surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Guolan; Wang, Dongsheng; Qin, Xulei; Halig, Luma; Muller, Susan; Zhang, Hongzheng; Chen, Amy; Pogue, Brian W.; Chen, Zhuo Georgia; Fei, Baowei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is an imaging modality that holds strong potential for rapid cancer detection during image-guided surgery. But the data from HSI often needs to be processed appropriately in order to extract the maximum useful information that differentiates cancer from normal tissue. We proposed a framework for hyperspectral image processing and quantification, which includes a set of steps including image preprocessing, glare removal, feature extraction, and ultimately image classification. The framework has been tested on images from mice with head and neck cancer, using spectra from 450- to 900-nm wavelength. The image analysis computed Fourier coefficients, normalized reflectance, mean, and spectral derivatives for improved accuracy. The experimental results demonstrated the feasibility of the hyperspectral image processing and quantification framework for cancer detection during animal tumor surgery, in a challenging setting where sensitivity can be low due to a modest number of features present, but potential for fast image classification can be high. This HSI approach may have potential application in tumor margin assessment during image-guided surgery, where speed of assessment may be the dominant factor. PMID:26720879

  20. Framework for hyperspectral image processing and quantification for cancer detection during animal tumor surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Guolan; Wang, Dongsheng; Qin, Xulei; Halig, Luma; Muller, Susan; Zhang, Hongzheng; Chen, Amy; Pogue, Brian W.; Chen, Zhuo Georgia; Fei, Baowei

    2015-12-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is an imaging modality that holds strong potential for rapid cancer detection during image-guided surgery. But the data from HSI often needs to be processed appropriately in order to extract the maximum useful information that differentiates cancer from normal tissue. We proposed a framework for hyperspectral image processing and quantification, which includes a set of steps including image preprocessing, glare removal, feature extraction, and ultimately image classification. The framework has been tested on images from mice with head and neck cancer, using spectra from 450- to 900-nm wavelength. The image analysis computed Fourier coefficients, normalized reflectance, mean, and spectral derivatives for improved accuracy. The experimental results demonstrated the feasibility of the hyperspectral image processing and quantification framework for cancer detection during animal tumor surgery, in a challenging setting where sensitivity can be low due to a modest number of features present, but potential for fast image classification can be high. This HSI approach may have potential application in tumor margin assessment during image-guided surgery, where speed of assessment may be the dominant factor.

  1. Local recurrence following lung cancer surgery: incidence, risk factors, and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Fedor, David; Johnson, W Rainey; Singhal, Sunil

    2013-09-01

    To date, few large-scale original studies have focused specifically on local recurrence following curative lung cancer surgery. This review seeks to consolidate and analyze data from these studies regarding local recurrence incidence, risk factors, salvage treatments, and outcomes to increase awareness in the Oncology community and to spark new research in this area. PubMed literature was searched for large-scale cohort studies involving recurrence following lung cancer surgery. Studies with a primary focus on local recurrence and studies that examined overall recurrence but provided relevant numerical data on local recurrence were included. Each chosen study's methods were critically analyzed to reconcile as best as possible large differences in reported results across the studies. Up to 24% of patients recur locally following lung cancer surgery. Risk of local recurrence increases with the stage of the primary cancer, but even stage I patients experience local recurrence up to 19% of the time. Overall survival time following local recurrence varies widely across studies, from 7 to 26 months, and may be related to frequency of follow-up visits. Salvage therapy appears to increase survival time. However, estimates of this increase vary widely, and measurements of benefits of the various salvage options are confounded by lack of control of subjects' condition at the time of salvage therapy administration. Local recurrence following lung cancer surgery is a significant problem warranting additional research. At present, data on this topic is scarce. We recommend initiation of additional large-scale studies to clearly define the parameters of local recurrence in order to provide useful guidance to clinicians. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Local recurrence following lung cancer surgery: Incidence, risk factors, and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Fedor, David; Johnson, W. Rainey; Singhal, Sunil

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To date, few large-scale original studies have focused specifically on local recurrence following curative lung cancer surgery. This review seeks to consolidate and analyze data from these studies regarding local recurrence incidence, risk factors, salvage treatments, and outcomes to increase awareness in the Oncology community and to spark new research in this area. Methods PubMed literature was searched for large-scale cohort studies involving recurrence following lung cancer surgery. Studies with a primary focus on local recurrence and studies that examined overall recurrence but provided relevant numerical data on local recurrence were included. Each chosen study’s methods were critically analyzed to reconcile as best as possible large differences in reported results across the studies. Results Up to 24% of patients recur locally following lung cancer surgery. Risk of local recurrence increases with the stage of the primary cancer, but even stage I patients experience local recurrence up to 19% of the time. Overall survival time following local recurrence varies widely across studies, from 7 to 26 months, and may be related to frequency of follow-up visits. Salvage therapy appears to increase survival time. However, estimates of this increase vary widely, and measurements of benefits of the various salvage options are confounded by lack of control of subjects’ condition at the time of salvage therapy administration. Conclusions Local recurrence following lung cancer surgery is a significant problem warranting additional research. At present, data on this topic is scarce. We recommend initiation of additional large-scale studies to clearly define the parameters of local recurrence in order to provide useful guidance to clinicians. PMID:23702313

  3. Variation in rates of breast cancer surgery: A national analysis based on French Hospital Episode Statistics.

    PubMed

    Rococo, E; Mazouni, C; Or, Z; Mobillion, V; Koon Sun Pat, M; Bonastre, J

    2016-01-01

    Minimum volume thresholds were introduced in France in 2008 to improve the quality of cancer care. We investigated whether/how the quality of treatment decisions in breast cancer surgery had evolved before and after this policy was implemented. We used Hospital Episode Statistics for all women having undergone breast conserving surgery (BCS) or mastectomy in France in 2005 and 2012. Three surgical procedures considered as better treatment options were analyzed: BCS, immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) and sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB). We studied the mean rates and variation according to the hospital profile and volume. Between 2005 and 2012, the volume of breast cancer surgery increased by 11% whereas one third of the hospitals no longer performed this type of surgery. In 2012, the mean rate of BCS was 74% and similar in all hospitals whatever the volume. Conversely, IBR and SLNB rates were much higher in cancer centers (CC) and regional teaching hospitals (RTH) [IBR: 19% and 14% versus 8% on average; SLNB: 61% and 47% versus 39% on average]; the greater the hospital volume, the higher the IBR and SLNB rates (p < 0.0001). Overall, whatever the surgical procedure considered, inter-hospital variation in rates declined substantially in CC and RTH. We identified considerable variation in IBR and SLNB rates between French hospitals. Although more complex and less standardized than BCS, most clinical guidelines recommended these procedures. This apparent heterogeneity suggests unequal access to high-quality procedures for women with breast cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Postoperative care fragmentation and thirty-day unplanned readmissions after head and neck cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Graboyes, Evan M; Kallogjeri, Dorina; Saeed, Mohammed J; Olsen, Margaret A; Nussenbaum, Brian

    2017-04-01

    Postdischarge care fragmentation, readmission to a hospital other than the one performing the surgery, has not been described in head and neck cancer patients. We sought to determine the frequency, risk factors, and outcomes for head and neck cancer patients experiencing postdischarge care fragmentation. Retrospective cohort study. We analyzed patients in the 2008 to 2010 California State Inpatient Database with a 30-day unplanned readmission following head and neck cancer surgery. The frequency of postdischarge care fragmentation, patient- and hospital-level risk factors for care fragmentation, readmission diagnosis, and readmission outcomes were determined. Of 561 patients with a 30-day unplanned readmission, 210 (37.4%) were readmitted to a hospital other than the one performing the surgery. Surgical hospitalization length of stay ≥15 days (odds ratio [OR]: 1.87, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.13-3.10) and discharge to a care facility (OR: 2.85, 95% CI: 1.77-4.58) were associated with care fragmentation. Overall, 39.8% of unplanned 30-day readmissions (223/561) were treatment complications, and 30.9% of treatment complication readmissions (69/223) occurred at a nonindex hospital. Patients with postdischarge care fragmentation had a 2.1-fold increased risk of in-hospital mortality within 30 days of readmission compared to patients readmitted to the index hospital (95% CI: 1.04-4.26). Postdischarge care fragmentation following head an neck cancer surgery is common, as 37% of readmitted patients and 31% of patients readmitted with a treatment complication are readmitted to a hospital other than the surgical hospital. Head and neck cancer patients experiencing care fragmentation are at increased risk of in-hospital mortality within 30 days of readmission. 4. Laryngoscope, 127:868-874, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  5. Surgery Branch recruiting patients to study new treatment for cancers with RAS mutations | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    RAS is a family of proteins that send signals to genes involved in cell growth and is mutated in approximately a quarter of all human cancers. James Yang, M.D., of the Surgery Branch is leading a team of investigators who have generated a special T-cell receptor from mouse cells that can recognize a mutation of RAS that is found in many human cancer cells. The goal is to determine if a new therapy is safe and can help shrink tumors that have the G12V RAS mutation. Read more...

  6. The American Association for Thoracic Surgery guidelines for lung cancer screening using low-dose computed tomography scans for lung cancer survivors and other high-risk groups.

    PubMed

    Jaklitsch, Michael T; Jacobson, Francine L; Austin, John H M; Field, John K; Jett, James R; Keshavjee, Shaf; MacMahon, Heber; Mulshine, James L; Munden, Reginald F; Salgia, Ravi; Strauss, Gary M; Swanson, Scott J; Travis, William D; Sugarbaker, David J

    2012-07-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in North America. Low-dose computed tomography screening can reduce lung cancer-specific mortality by 20%. The American Association for Thoracic Surgery created a multispecialty task force to create screening guidelines for groups at high risk of developing lung cancer and survivors of previous lung cancer. The American Association for Thoracic Surgery guidelines call for annual lung cancer screening with low-dose computed tomography screening for North Americans from age 55 to 79 years with a 30 pack-year history of smoking. Long-term lung cancer survivors should have annual low-dose computed tomography to detect second primary lung cancer until the age of 79 years. Annual low-dose computed tomography lung cancer screening should be offered starting at age 50 years with a 20 pack-year history if there is an additional cumulative risk of developing lung cancer of 5% or greater over the following 5 years. Lung cancer screening requires participation by a subspecialty-qualified team. The American Association for Thoracic Surgery will continue engagement with other specialty societies to refine future screening guidelines. The American Association for Thoracic Surgery provides specific guidelines for lung cancer screening in North America. Copyright © 2012. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  7. The Role of Non-Curative Surgery in Incurable, Asymptomatic Advanced Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi-qiang; Luo, Hui-yan; Jin, Ying; Wei, Xiao-li; Xu, Rui-hua

    2013-01-01

    Background Although general agreement exists on palliative surgery with intent of symptom palliation in advanced gastric cancer (AGC), the role of non-curative surgery for incurable, asymptomatic AGC is hotly debated. We aim to clarify the role of non-curative surgery in patients with incurable, asymptomatic AGC under the first-line chemotherapy. Methods A total of 737 patients with incurable, asymptomatic advanced gastric adenocarcinoma between January 2008 and May 2012 at the Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center were retrospectively analyzed, comprising 414 patients with non-curative surgery plus first-line chemotherapy, and 323 patients with first-line chemotherapy only. The clinicopathologic data, survival, and prognosis were evaluated, with propensity score adjustment for selection bias. Results The median overall survival (OS) outcomes significantly favored non-curative surgery group over first-line chemotherapy only group in entire population (28.00 versus 10.37 months, P = 0.000), stage 4 patients (23.87 versus 10.37 months, P = 0.000), young patients (28.70 versus 10.37 months, P = 0.000) and elderly patients (23.07 versus 10.27 months, P = 0.031). The median OS advantages of non-curative surgery over first-line chemotherapy only were also maintained when the analyses were restricted to single organ metastasis (P = 0.001), distant lymph node metastasis (P = 0.002), peritoneal metastasis (P = 0.000), and multi-organ metastasis (P = 0.010). Significant OS advantages of non-curative surgery over chemotherapy only were confirmed solid by multivariate analyses before and after adjustment on propensity score (P = 0.000). Small subsets of patients with surgery of single metastatic lesion after previous curative gastrectomy, and with surgery of both primary and single metastatic sites showed sound median OS. Conclusions There is a role for non-curative surgery plus first-line chemotherapy for incurable, asymptomatic AGC, in

  8. sEphB4-HSA Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Bladder Cancer, Prostate Cancer, or Kidney Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-06-02

    Infiltrating Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Stage I Prostate Cancer; Stage I Renal Cell Cancer; Stage II Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage II Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIA Prostate Cancer; Stage IIB Prostate Cancer; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer

  9. Allocating operating room resources to an acute care surgery service does not affect wait-times for elective cancer surgeries: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Anantha, Ram Venkatesh; Paskar, Dave; Vogt, Kelly; Crawford, Silvie; Parry, Neil; Leslie, Ken

    2014-03-27

    Acute care surgical services provide timely comprehensive emergency general surgical care while optimizing the use of limited resources. At our institution, 50% of the daily dedicated operating room (OR) time allocated to the Acute Care Emergency Surgery Service (ACCESS) came from previous elective general surgery OR time. We assessed the impact of this change in resource allocation on wait-times for elective general surgery cancer cases. We retrospectively reviewed adult patients who underwent elective cancer surgeries in the pre-ACCESS (September 2009 to June 2010) and post-ACCESS (September 2010 to June 2011) eras. Wait-times, calculated as the time between booking and actual dates of surgery, were compared within assigned priority classifications. Categorical and continuous variables were compared using chi-square and Mann-Whitney U tests respectively. A total of 732 cases (367 pre-ACCESS and 365 post-ACCESS) were identified, with no difference in median wait-times (25 versus 23 days) between the eras. However, significantly fewer cases exceeded wait-time targets in the post-ACCESS era (p <0.0001). There was a significant change (p = 0.027) in the composition of cancer cases, with fewer breast cancer operations (22% versus 28%), and more colorectal (41% versus 32%) and hepatobiliary cancer cases (5% versus 2%) in the post-ACCESS era. These results suggest that shifting OR resources towards emergency surgery does not affect the timeliness of surgical cancer care. This study may encourage more centres to adopt acute care surgical services alongside their elective or subspecialty practices.

  10. [Role of surgery for lung cancer in elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Benko, István; Horváth, Ors Péter; Nagy, Klára; Sárosi, Veronika; Balikó, Zoltán; Potó, László; Molnár, F Tamás

    2008-02-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cause of death in the civilised world. Surgical resection, which play a crucial role in the complex oncological treatment, has to be offered in older ages than it was done before, due to an ageing population. Results of surgical treatment of patients older than 75 years are investigated retrospectively in the present paper. A retrospectively analysis was carried out of 54 from a total of 884 lung resections for primary lung cancer performed for patients older than 75 years between 1995-2005. Twelve of these patients were above 80 years. Kaplan-Meier analysis was performed to calculate survival and multifactor analysis for the risk factors. Average age was 77.5 years (75-85). Two pneumonectomies, two bilobectomies, 41 lobectomies, seven sublobar resections and two lobectomies with chest wall resections were performed. The average hospital stay was 11.4 days (8-36). Mortality: 7.4% (n = 4), morbidity: 52% (n = 28) including: sputum retention: 43%, arrhythmia 33%, atelectasia: 15%. There were two bronchial stump insufficiencies (4%) and three reoperations were performed (5%). The average follow up was: 32 months and the five year survival 33.7% (median 43 months). Multifactorial analysis show that extended resection, male gender, age above 80 years are risk factors for adverse outcome. Female gender, stage Ia and lobectomy are considered as predictive factors for long survival. We conclude, that with proper patient selection (below ASA3, early stage) and with carefully conducted postoperative care (physiotherapy, monitoring) surgical resection should be offered to elderly lung cancer patients as well.

  11. Burden of Geriatric Events Among Older Adults Undergoing Major Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Saliba, Debra; Kwan, Lorna; Moore, Alison A.; Litwin, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Most malignancies are diagnosed in older adults who are potentially susceptible to aging-related health conditions; however, the manifestation of geriatric syndromes during surgical cancer treatment is not well quantified. Accordingly, we sought to assess the prevalence and ramifications of geriatric events during major surgery for cancer. Patients and Methods Using Nationwide Inpatient Sample data from 2009 to 2011, we examined hospital admissions for major cancer surgery among elderly patients (ie, age ≥ 65 years) and a referent group age 55 to 64 years. From these observations, we identified geriatric events that included delirium, dehydration, falls and fractures, failure to thrive, and pressure ulcers. We then estimated the collective prevalence of these events according to age, comorbidity, and cancer site and further explored their relationship with other hospital-based outcomes. Results Within a weighted sample of 939,150 patients, we identified at least one event in 9.2% of patients. Geriatric events were most common among patients age ≥ 75 years, with a Charlson comorbidity score ≥ 2, and who were undergoing surgery for cancer of the bladder, ovary, colon and/or rectum, pancreas, or stomach (P < .001). Adjusting for patient and hospital characteristics, those patients who experienced a geriatric event had a greater likelihood of concurrent complications (odds ratio [OR], 3.73; 95% CI, 3.55 to 3.92), prolonged hospitalization (OR, 5.47; 95% CI, 5.16 to 5.80), incurring high cost (OR, 4.97; 95% CI, 4.58 to 5.39), inpatient mortality (OR, 3.22; 95% CI, 2.94 to 3.53), and a discharge disposition other than home (OR, 3.64; 95% CI, 3.46 to 3.84). Conclusion Many older patients who receive cancer-directed surgery experience a geriatric event, particularly those who undergo major abdominal surgery. These events are linked to operative morbidity, prolonged hospitalization, and more expensive health care. As our population ages, efforts focused on

  12. Characterizing biased cancer-related cognitive processing: relationships with BRCA1/2 genetic mutation status, personal cancer history, age, and prophylactic surgery.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Kristen M; Eisenberg, Stacy; Weltfreid, Sharone; Low, Carissa A; Beran, Tammy; Stanton, Annette L

    2014-09-01

    This study evaluated associations of cancer-related cognitive processing with BRCA1/2 mutation carrier status, personal cancer history, age, and election of prophylactic surgery in women at high risk for breast cancer. In a 2 (BRCA1/2 mutation carrier status) × 2 (personal cancer history) matched-control design, with age as an additional predictor, participants (N = 115) completed a computerized cancer Stroop task. Dependent variables were response latency to cancer-related stimuli (reaction time [RT]) and cancer-related cognitive interference (cancer RT minus neutral RT). RT and interference were tested as predictors of prophylactic surgery in the subsequent four years. RT for cancer-related words was significantly slower than other word groups, indicating biased processing specific to cancer-related stimuli. Participants with a cancer history evidenced longer RT to cancer-related words than those without a history; moreover, a significant Cancer History × Age interaction indicated that, among participants with a cancer history, the typical advantage associated with younger age on Stroop tasks was absent. BRCA mutation carriers demonstrated more cancer-related cognitive interference than noncarriers. Again, the typical Stroop age advantage was absent among carriers. Exploratory analyses indicated that BRCA+ status and greater cognitive interference predicted greater likelihood of undergoing prophylactic surgery. Post hoc tests suggest that cancer-related distress does not account for these relationships. In the genetic testing context, younger women with a personal cancer history or who are BRCA1/2 mutation carriers might be particularly vulnerable to biases in cancer-related cognitive processing. Biased processing was associated marginally with greater likelihood of prophylactic surgery. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Financial comparative analysis of minimally invasive surgery to open surgery for localized prostate cancer: a single-institution experience.

    PubMed

    Mouraviev, Vladimir; Nosnik, Israel; Sun, Leon; Robertson, Cary N; Walther, Philip; Albala, David; Moul, Judd W; Polascik, Thomas J

    2007-02-01

    To evaluate the financial implications of how the costs of new minimally invasive surgery such as laparoscopic robotic prostatectomy (LRP) and cryosurgical ablation of the prostate (CAP) technologies compare with those of conventional surgery. From January 2002 to July 2005, 452 consecutive patients underwent surgical treatment for clinically localized (Stage T1-T2) prostate cancer. The distribution of patients among the surgical procedures was as follows: group 1, radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) (n = 197); group 2, radical perineal prostatectomy (RPP) (n = 60); group 3, LRP (n = 137); and group 4, CAP (n = 58). The total direct hospital costs and grand total hospital costs were analyzed for each type of surgery. The mean length of stay in the CAP group was significantly lower (0.16 +/- 0.14 days) than that for RRP (2.79 +/- 1.46 days), RPP (2.87 +/- 1.43 days), and LRP (2.15 +/- 1.48 days; P <0.0005). The direct surgical costs were less for the RRP (2471 dollars +/- 636 dollars) and RPP (2788 dollars +/- 762 dollars) groups than for the technology-dependent procedures: LRP (3441 dollars +/- 545 dollars) and CAP (5702 dollars +/- 1606 dollars; P <0.0005). The total hospital cost differences, including pathologic assessment costs, were less for LRP (10,047 dollars +/- 107 dollars, median 9343 dollars) and CAP (9195 dollars +/- 1511 dollars, median 8796 dollars) than for RRP (10,704 dollars +/- 3468 dollars, median 9724 dollars) or RPP (10,536 dollars +/- 3088 dollars, median 9251 dollars), with significant differences (P <0.05) between the minimally invasive technique and open surgery groups. In our study, despite the relatively increased surgical expense of CAP compared with conventional surgical prostatectomy (RRP or RPP) and LRP, the overall direct costs were offset by the significantly lower nonoperative hospital costs. The cost advantages associated with CAP included a shorter length of stay in the hospital and the absence of pathologic costs and the

  14. Patient expectations of functional outcomes after rectal cancer surgery: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Park, Jason; Neuman, Heather B; Bennett, Antonia V; Polskin, Lily; Phang, P Terry; Wong, W Douglas; Temple, Larissa K

    2014-02-01

    Rectal cancer patients' expectations of health and function may affect their disease- and treatment-related experience, but how patients form expectations of postsurgery function has received little study. We used a qualitative approach to explore patient expectations of outcomes related to bowel function after sphincter-preserving surgery for rectal cancer. This was a cohort study of patients who were about to undergo sphincter-preserving surgery for rectal cancer. The study was conducted through individual telephone interviews with participants. Twenty-six patients (14 men and 12 women) with clinical TNM stage I to III disease were enrolled. The semistructured interview script contained open-ended questions on patient expectations of postoperative bowel function and its perceived impact on daily function and life. Two researchers analyzed the interview transcripts for emergent themes using a grounded theory approach. Participant expectations of bowel function reflected 3 major themes: 1) information sources, 2) personal attitudes, and 3) expected outcomes. The expected outcomes theme contained references to specific symptoms and participants' descriptions of the certainty, importance, and imminence of expected outcomes. Despite multiple information sources and attempts at maintaining a positive personal attitude, participants expressed much uncertainty about their long-term bowel function. They were more focused on what they considered more important and imminent concerns about being cancer free and getting through surgery. This study was limited by context in terms of the timing of interviews (relative to the treatment course). The transferability to other contexts requires further study. Patient expectations of long-term functional outcomes cannot be considered outside of the overall context of the cancer experience and the relative importance and imminence of cancer- and treatment-related events. Recognizing the complexities of the expectation formation

  15. Predictors of readmissions after head and neck cancer surgery: A national perspective.

    PubMed

    Chen, Michelle M; Orosco, Ryan K; Harris, Jeremy P; Porter, Julie B; Rosenthal, Eben L; Hara, Wendy; Divi, Vasu

    2017-08-01

    Surgical oncology patients have multiple comorbidities and are at high risk of readmission. Prior studies are limited in their ability to capture readmissions outside of the index hospital that performed the surgery. Our goal is to evaluate risk factors for readmission for head and neck cancer patients on a national scale. A retrospective cohort study of head and neck cancer patients in the Nationwide Readmissions Database (2013). Our main outcome was 30-day readmission. Statistical analysis included 2-sided t tests, χ(2), and multivariate logistic regression analysis. Within 30days, 16.1% of 11,832 patients were readmitted and 20% of readmissions were at non-index hospitals, costing $31million. Hypopharyngeal cancer patients had the highest readmission rate (29.6%), followed by laryngeal (21.8%), oropharyngeal (18.2%), and oral cavity (11.6%) cancers (P<0.001). Half of readmissions occurred within 10days and were often associated with infections (27%) or wound complications (12%). Patients from lower household income areas were more likely to be readmitted (odds ratio [OR], 1.54; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.16-2.05). Patients with valvular disease (OR, 2.07; 95% CI, 1.16-3.69), rheumatoid arthritis/collagen vascular disease (OR, 2.05; 95